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Curse of Coronation Gulf, or, The outlaws of Blue Waters

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Title:
Curse of Coronation Gulf, or, The outlaws of Blue Waters
Series Title:
American Indian weekly.
Physical Description:
1 online resource (29 p.) 28 cm. : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
Dair, Spencer
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Cleveland A. Westbrook, c1911
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Detectives -- Fiction   ( lcsh )
Outlaws -- Fiction   ( lcsh )
Western stories   ( lcsh )
Dime novels   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
usfldc doi - D14-00526
usfldc handle - d14.526
System ID:
SFS0000001:00027


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Detectives
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EVERY 'fBOY SCOUT'' SHOULD READ.'JHIS ..

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I .. BY'COLONEL SPENCER I I J T!K ARfHOI WESTBiooi COIPAIY, CLBYIWD, 01111, U. S. l. N0.27 Published By Subscription, $ 2. 50 per year; $ 1. 25 for 6 months. .,..Copyright, l911, b y The Arthur Westbrook.Compan;y. ,. J .The-Curse ofCOrortition.Gulf, : I : "") ' . or The OUtlaWs. of BlUe' Waters , By Col. Spencer Dair 1 PRINCIPA L CHARACTERS IN THIS STORY. Mo n rER WrrcH: OF T H E S E RPENT -The age d tune -tell e r wh ose early life began in affl u e nc e and lu x u r y a n d ye t wh o e nd e d h e r r o m a nti c ca r eer -J?y a pi s t o l s h o t f r o m th e h a nd s of an o u t l a w For m a n y ye a r s s h e l iv e d . in St. L o u is, M i ssouri, wh e r e s h e pra cti c ed h e r pro f es s i oll f o r the puip os e o f gaitiing m o n ey t o aiel h e r in t h e s u p p ort of a chil d s h e h a d s t o l e n in infancy The .. df o l d M eg t o u c h es up o n th e n arro w l in e whi c h th e outl aw f r o m th e h o n es t m a H ANDERSON F J sH-He ..is a n w h o 'was a s .ex; ecuto r o f the es t a te o f Fr'l-'n!t l in Thomas, a St. L o u i s banke r w h o had left m a ny m i!l.i o n s o f d ollars The o n l y -daughte r o f th e b a nker h a d b ee n s t o l e n in infancy a nd wh e n t h y w ill o f th e .'c hild's fath e r was o p e n e d i t was d i sco v e r ecl th a t o n e -hal f o f t h e m o n ey was t o be d e vo t e d t o t h e findin g of t h e m i ssing h eiress The l a w ye r / fo und h im se l f t o rn with c,anflic t jn g e m o ti o n s w h e n a b eautiful g i rl c l aims t h e f ortu n e and wh ose c a r eei hinge d up o n t h a t o f o ld 1-,'[eg th e f o r tun e-telle r. H o w M r. F i s h fu lfille d hi s trust i s a t h rillin g narrative . THOii!ASA n un fortt in a t e g irl w h o made a r u n a wa y m arri age with Rudo lph t h e L o n g K n i fe a n o u t l a w well kn o wn o n th e s h o r es o f Co r o n a t io)l G ul f w h e r e h e m ade a w id e ca r ee r a s l ea d e r o f a band kn o wn as the O u tl a w s o f B lu e vVate r s I t 'mus t n o t b e f o r gotte n h o w eve r that th e r e w as awinn e r cord w h i c h bo u nd th e l i fe of thi s g irl wit h that o f o le\ Meg th e fortu n e-telle r. I n fact, Eth e l Tho m as a nd o l d Meg we r e one. CI-iAPTER I. A PLOT FOR A FORTUNE. IVIothe r JVIeg-h issed with rage as s he turne d h e r ey e l,lj)011 h e r c aller! A se rpe'rit t w in e d aro uncl the b o d y o f aged ha.g, HDE-0nce m o r e th e f a m o u s g un-m a n and fo r m e r o utl a w lead e r i n hi s offic i a l pos iti o n as a detec tiv e i n th e e m p l oy o f t h e Western and S outhwestern B anke r s G uil d i s up o n t o exer c i s e hi s t a l ent in running d ow n a band o f fam o u s o utla ws w h o h av e l oo t e d th e b ank in the 'littl e h a mlet o f Ce m e t e r y H ill, M i sso uri. Maxwell Hyd e r ose to tl}_e occas i o n and m ee t s with a se ries o f e x c itin g adventitres, ba r e l y es c a pin g wi t h hi s l i fe,. b u t finding a fortune a wa iting him a t th e e n d o f h i s d as l 1ing c a r ee r so f a r a s t h i s cas e i s c o ncerne d. E DNA T HOMASA be autiful g irl w h o f o r many yea r s w as s uv._gosed t o b e the daughte r o f o ld Meg, the \ill itch o f the S e rp e nt. A f a m o u s band of outlaws in loot i n g the Ce met e u y H ill B a n k which h e r father .own e d di scove r e d tha t s h e w as a l o n g -mi ss in g h e ir ess fo many millions o f d olla r s In their attempts t o abduct h e r, the g irl suf fered m a n y and dan ge rs, b u t finally co m es t o h e r o wn a f te r a se ri es o f ep i sodes \v.hic h a lm os t borde r on t h e marve l o us / .-DOCTOR MASON vVHEELOCKA brave man who kneW h o w t o u se a gu'!l whe n outlaws attem p t t o l oo t a stor e in a q u ie t M i ssouri h a ml et. RUDOLPH OF THE LONG KNIFE A n outLaw wh o co n ceived a p lot o f r e v e nge wh i c h e n ded in th e ahd u c ti o n of the o nl y dau ghte r of Fran k l in Thomas, the mj,lli o n a ir e S t. L ou i s r a i s ed its head, a n d ) 111 exact imitatio n of t h e cro n e, hi ss ed at the -snee ri n g f ace of a yo t in g m a n w h o sat e a s i l v in a chair and vi ew ed the ang r y woman and her n : o a n g r y pet witli : qui e t inte n sity. Outs ide t raffic o n O li, ; e Stree t St. L ouis, made a strident com-

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2 THE AMERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. pelling note to remjnd the figure s in thi s drama of Ne\e r mii1c L I see that you a r e a clever woman. Where the heart that there \\er e other things in this w o rld y o u have gotten your information I dQ. not know. but than th e point they were delating. y o u haYe describe d an event that happened within the Hut in t h e p en up rage that urgecj in the woman's twenty -four hours and I am willing to say to you breast, there seemed to be n o room for outs i de influ-that t was this event that caused me t o call upon e nc es She was in deadly earnes t a nd the b r oadyou. chnu! lend, athleti c m an fac i n g h e r, w hose sharp eyes It was the stranger 's turn to be puzzled. He had narr wed w ith hi i Qten c gaze upo n the faclecl ones of knovvn from certain knowledge that he hac! received, th e cilcl w oman . aw that hi s missi o n was near the fai l-that O ld Meg the fortun e-teller, was in touch with the ure po in t Meg did n o t propose t o giH. him c rim inal \ oriel. The intangible underground current' inf(;rm'ati o n i f s h e c o uld help it. t hat lik e a n e lectri c wire fl<.tshes from o ne criminal band ''?\ow. f o he;: Meg," cri e d t he man. hi s browJ l eyes t o another i 1formation o f the acts of the respective shiftily away from t h e woman, w hile the parties, had i n so m e way been crossed so that this n a k the hag's wai s t lullecl itself bac k to it s o ld woman ha d been able to clescrib.e an event that had inte rrupted slumbe r at the t o u c h of her witberecl happene d in the life of the strange caller n o t twentyb a nd .. I d r J n't want you to get angry. four h ours b efo re. Yet after all the strange r knew that .. J 'm n o t a n g ry/' the hag repl ied 'But you t o uch hi s identit y had b ee n heralclecl wide-cast in variou s m e n early with your q uesti oi1s. I do n o t know you through out the country, and he was not bnt J ca n imag in e your mi s i o n .'' ure but that the fortune-teller knew him from this The m a n hi s s h oulders and. with a half-reason. I she did he also tmew that she would have s mile, gazed into th e woman's face not o uble in imagining the scene had ''You are shrewd," he replied '1 I am willin g t o pay t o hi s mind. H i s caree r of crime h a d cut a wide swathe for a h y informati o n y u may g i ve me. hro u g h the great' Southwest. So for the purpose of Go ld cQ)u!cl n o t buy my knowledge--" extracting 11o re knowledge .of the woman's methods, Uut h w abq u u tt;aclincr a ecret forr a secret ? P the hanger in hi s mind decided to cross-examine the M the r gave her calle r a S\.V ift glamce. \ V h ,at f 9rtune-teller. did h e m ea n ? lj:l a d h e informatio n of which she was .. It m s t Q me, h e said "that you are groping in n ( t in p s. c i o n ? Co uld he hav e reached the1 clark Js t here a n ything that you can tell me fur by a n the r path the secret that she had l o n g concealed? ther that would lead me to bejj eve that you know me profes i c m o f made I er obsenmnt a nd the object of my mission?" o f intonat i o J q o f voice and she had the fortune-tellers O l d 1\'Leg-laughed s hrilly. S h e sat up in her chair, craft in being a l l e ti rans l ate expressi o n s. This man trance lik e attitude and turned h e r shrewd !;,h e did not B e hac! ca ll ed upo n her a nd g iven eye u pon the speaker h e r )1.er c ustomar y fee for l o q kin.g into the future. I clo' n o t propose t o speak your name. But I wi!J Should s h e r a i e the veil f o r him? A t l east so Iar as write it. te llin g him e n o u g h to w h e t hi s cuJ;iosjty? o r s h ou!Cl The woman p i chd up a pad and pencil and rapidly :: 1 lead him o n b y hints and all u s ion s t o the wrote Uj)O)\ it. h e extended her hand bearing the ecret that h e ha<;l !Duriecl in h e r heart f o r years? paper to the ranger, ?.nd allowed him to read what As th e hag t h o ught s h e g l a n ced around th e room s he ha<;l written. a nd re.sortecl to t h e art of her pro fessio n. O ld Meg con" T hafs my name.' murmured the man. "I see you ortecl h e r face ) writhed amd apparently fell in a trance. have me right. I L elieve in you, and I am going t o tell 1 1 h e a,lc] in a aint \ W ice I se e into the f uyou the truth." ure 1 o k retch o f desolate countcy. T e ll me the truth!" repeated the hag-1 not ow n a \ v inclin g road I see three h o r s e m e n riding. O n e you ca n tell the trut 1 But I am vvlll)ng t o 111d n itJ t)1e ba1 cl i s tall, c l ean-shaven l athletic. Ris listen to you." o mpani Ort i s young-er and wear s a mus .tache--" \ i V hen we robbed that bank this morning, as you 'll h e calle r era e a tart. Hi hand l ywg upo n )11s have described,' the man said in a sneering voice "we k n ees s udhrp u g h her veiled eyes, s a w t h e gestur ''Of a c ertain g irl_," cri ed Meo with a mocking laugh. 1 a n l h e r cunning tol d he-r that s h e h a d truc k o u l eannecl froq1 those papers that twenty years ago tJ1 e r i g h t co r d. o h e c ontinue d. t h e inant c hi)<;! of banker Tho ma whose milli ons wert: 'The m n 1 have b ee n t e lli ng you of," she murnJad e in St. Louis, was s t 0 l e n b y its nurs e, who had mttrcd i n a s mall Y Q ioe, 'ar e t war d a lit t l e take n it out into Fores t Park in this city for an airing, hamle;t. can ee the !';treet of th,at little town a h)ws t a nd fr o m that clay to this no trace of the ch ild has clesertecl ancl l n e l y 'l'he men have entered the Yileve r b ee n f ound. Into the vi sta o f nowhere the nurse !age. T he y a r e from the ir h o r ses. I see and hilcl disappeared together. During the of tl;e 1\' rll : I in go! I "fhe leader o f the h e 1at1h e r _of the c hi kl, tho u sands upon thousands of littl e p a rty has a revol ve r in hi s band. He entering clo]Ja r s wer e in a vain endeavo r t d secure some the bank. 1 1 i s com p a ni o n s tand guarding the in f rmatio n th, ;lt mi ght lead t the recover y of the r h e;u :. a h o t--" baby. \/\Then banker Franklin Thomas died and hi s O ld i\feg ga'\ r e a. tiRed hrie k wilf \Nas admitted to probate in the. St. Louis Courts, it "l\furde r,' ,;h e aiel) "Murder!" v'va s cli scove n:.d that o n e-half of hi s vast fortune. T h e calle r jumped hl s feet. H,is face was white amo unting t o m a n y milli o n s of dollars, had been set with a emoti o n. aside t{\) devot ed t o findin g the mis s in g h eiress. That St01 s t e p, he murmured. 'You a re describing-g irl t o -clay i s twenty years' of age. The papers con-

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r .. THE AMERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. 3 t a in ecl t h e re p o rts of m a n y detecti ve agen c i es a n d a ll the facts n a r r owed d o w n t o o n e p o in t O ld Meg the f ortune-te ller! S h e a l o n e knows t h e secret and a s soon a s you d iscover ed f r o m the p a p e r s this fa c t y o u ca m e to m e Man, d o n o t try to f oo l me. I k now w h y you a r e h ere. Drop tha t gun. Y o u ca nn o t intimida t e m e The str a nger tre mbled w i t h eagern ess His fa.ce was white w i t h suppres s e d e moti o n. H i s e y e s s n a p pe d with anxie t y . I see y o u k n o w eve r ything h e s a i d I d on't know w h e r e you got your in f o rmati o n a n d I d o n t care \,Yhat unde rstanding c a n I c o m e t o w i t h yo' u ? You have t h e in formatio n that I mu s t get bec a u s e I se e n o ' t hat a n e a s y for t un e awaits m e i f I can di s cover the wherea b o u t s of the missin g g i rl. Now I oo k h e r e o ld vvom a n I di clti t co m e h e r e f o r m y health, and I'm out for the l o n g g r ee n. O ld man T h o mas left a fortune o f t e n milli o n d ollars That m ea n s tha t fiv e milli o n s d o llars h a s b e en d evo t e d t o the findin g o f this missin g g irl. Think o f it you o ld foo l Fiv e milli o n d ollars T h e executo r of the e s t ate of Banke r Tho mas i s li v in g t o-clay in S t. L o ui s If we get tha t g irl and d e li ver h e r to the executo r Gf the es t a t e, w e can m a k e ours elves ri c h f o r life. ) am w illin g t o go into a d ea l with you. You can' t pul! this thing off a l o ne. You knO\v me and ,\rh o stands with m e in this affair. I kno w y o u I know tha t y ou w o uld sell you r h ope o f immortality f o r c o l d cash Suppose tha t w e hitch u p together. You d eliver the g ir l t o u s a n d w e w ill clean up the rewar d. I will guarantee t o you the l o n g end o f the stick. V v e w ill s t i c k up the e xecuto r s o f the e s t a t e fo r the entire five milli o n d ollars The n it w ill be a case o f additio n divi s i o n and sile J ) c e 'Old M eg's lip s p arte d in a t o o thl e s s g rin. She s a w tha t she h a d n ette d h e r fis h In golden dream tha t came t o her c all e r he had dropped hi s subterfuge. The v en eer of ci v ili zatio n and good manne r s had b e e n dropped a s a chi l d thrO)S away the mummer's mask The man s t oo d reve aled in hi s natura l guis e of a b lackma i ler. B rag i s a good <;log/ s hril l e d the o ld woman, "but H o ld f a s t i s a b e tter o n e You co m e t o me a s kin g me t o g i v e you a sec r e t which I already have. A ll the in fo r m atio n tha t you have I have k nown s ince the time tha t you wer e a todd l in g child. If you want t o d o b u s ines s w i t h m e come o v er! As s h e s p o k e Meg ex t ende d her s kinny hantl as i f r e cei v in g m o ney. \ The strange r a r os e and ith head bowed p a c e d t h o u ghtf ull v b ac k and f orth in the n arrow r oo m The coile d O ld Meg's' b o d y stirred its s lim y f o l d s and hissed f e eb l y and the n contented l y bowed i t s h ead in the woman's, n ec k and went t o s l ee p again B i r d s o f rare plumage flitted thr o u g h the r oo m The h e a vily 'draped w indow curtain stirre d with the fain t air of the June breez e Still the str a nger pa ce d bac k and f orth in hi s in. Make y ourse lf scarc e R eturn h e r e t e n t o ni g h t By -tha t time I w ill hav e m y plans b e tter l a id. \i\lith a n od the m a n l ef t t h e h o u se, leavin u O l d Meg t o f urther c o m plete h e r arra ngem ents "' I t n ee d n o t b e s a id that t h e stran g e r w h o h a d been hid in g i n t h e c l oset ' 'as Maxwell H y de i n t h e e m p loy o f t h e \i\T e s t e rn a n d S o u t hwes t e rn Bank e r s G uil d. N o b-ette r gun man liv ed than ::\-Iaxvvell Hyde. He had s w o rn t o capture the g a n g one o f w hose m em be r s ha d jus t b rib ed o ld Meg. a n d i t was w ith great g lee t h a t h e v i ewe
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4 AMERICAN INDIAN W EEKLY. going to accomplish the 1111 ion t o which he had devot e d his li fe. Old ieg arose f r o m her chair, untwined the serpent from around wai t and put the slimy thing ip. a large box. She then fastened the b o x, hurried t o the door of the room and d ouble-locked it, and then caJnJ..ly too k from her head a wig o stringy gray hair. Her hand quickly rubbed out the lines upor1 her face. She removed from her teeth several bits of c ourt plaster which revealed them in their pearly whiteness, and, as a glove i s removed from o ne's band, in a few m oments had removed all traces of the old hag Meg! \ Vith a tinkling laugh the girl l ooked in the glass. She saw revealed the contour of a beautiful girl. Old Meg, the fortune-teller hag, was the missiug heiress! .... f CHAPTER IL THE GANG MEET. The outlaw, filled with pleasure at the easy deal he had made with o ld Meg the f ortune t e ller, hurried dowL], Olive Street, darted thro u g h several cross streets into J effe rson Avenue, the n a t his bes t s pe e d whirled across to the Nat ural B ridge Road and walked alOJlg until. in a quiet co rn e r of the city, h e met a man standing by the s id e of two h o rses. The anirnal s wer e Kentucky tho r oughbreds. Each horse b 0 r e a Mexican saddle. F r o m the h olster o f eacb, saddl e p eeped revol vers. The m a n s t anding by one of the h o rse carried a rifl e sll111g upo n his s h oulder. \i\!ith tlt a word the two men vaulted upon the backs of the animals, and se11t the h o rses f orward at a smart gallop. man s p oke until they were beyond 1/landy s t.ati o n. T h e n the man who had m e t Mother Meg's caller ptdled his h 0 rse out o f hi s stride into a; walk. H i s companio n imitated him. \ i\!e ll, C l e l Miller," asked' the man who had met Moth e r M eg's calle r "An y lu o k?" Good lucl<, J es e James," replied the man. got the s mpri s e of li fe w h e n rr had a talk with o ld' Meg." Y o u d i d replied Jesse, w h o thus stood revealed as h e L1ead of the n o t o ri o u s band of bank robber s which in the year 1 had been devas tatjng; the south western honti e r of t h e United States ''You had better t ell m e all about i t." "That o l d hag knew ail a l ? Out the bank robbery we p ulled of this 11prning," replied C l e l M ill e r, in hims elf famc.n1 a a bank r o l i e2r a11c1 bandit. , asked J e se, with a t Qne of in hi VOICe. "Th a f rig-ht, Jesse! S h e was w ise t o t h e fac t that we h e l d u p t h e l;>ank. h e knew that we' d g-o t t o the box the in forma t i o n f the mi s ing; h eiress. S h e m a d e no b o n es o f b e ingthe vvo-ma\1 that I was after. N o t 1ly did s h e kuq w about a ll we've d o n e, but the o l d h e lli o n !'h e cli amOlHi!. n e rve t o write my name upo n a ca rd a n d $ h e w it t o m e I t 1 hi astoH i s hment. James pulled hard on the crue l pani s h bit in hi s h o r s s m outh, and the animal danced in fea r and rag-e. "You needn't pull the h ea d off that h o r s e in your amaze m ent1 Jesse" said Cl el. "But till I don't blame you a t that. I n e y e r had anything h ande d to m e so qnick in a ll my life. I felt exactly a s i f I had walked out of a bank we had just robbed: a.rr.d had a man pull down a d .J O.Ll me. \il/hat kind of a loobng woman was s he?'' asked J esse. '' She look e d to m e as if s he. was about. four hundred year s o ld. She had a big; snake arou11d her waist tha t made m e feel like t1'le morning after, btit she was right there with the g ; o ods, and. I came into a deal with her and I had to stak e her t o fifty tho u sand. dollars . "That's a good deal of JJ.'loney, C lel. " I know it i s, but I fig:ure.O.. it this way.. That money cathe easy t o u s \71/ e cleaned. up a hundre d tho u sand d ollars on that round-up, to say n othing about getting next to a secret that if we w .ork it out, will.give u s fifty t lillettsand d ollars. Now I l oo k it this way. It was, dea. I mll her into confidence.:" / Yes," replied Jesse, ' I see. that much." Ttn n m y plan i s t o go back t o -nig-ht as I have arram .ged to. T h e o ld b:as in me. 110 \ W S.he \vo n t qbject t o yon and Frank g-oingback with me. As l o n g as s h e plays fai(, ,..;e will play fair. I i>.t 'l-0ok ; s t o u s as if s h e w ,a& g,'ivingu s the double cross, it o nl y takes abo utf two se c onds and a half t o stick a knife in h e r and we caN g-et back that m oney am.yb0w If s h e plays fair, what's fifty tho u sand d o llars yoH re talking-about. getting; milli ons? 'A 1)-a-leful light came into Jesse Jamess e y es. Co l d erne! and merce n a r y b y n ature., yet p o s sessed o f acute iinttelli.gence, h e immed iatel y b.eg;an to find how h e c o uld n o t o nl y get posses io n of the milli o n s but o f the fifty t:hou s a1id d olla1:s al read)'r invesfecl "in the ente r P'ris
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.. T H E AMERICAN INDIAN vVEEKLY. 5 Jesse s neer e d "Th e o n l y t hing t hat I k ick about i s t hat the G o ve r n o r has o ffered twentyfive t housand d o llars' reward f o r eac h o n e of u s It s eem s t o me t hat as I p ] a n most o f t h e depredations of our c r owd, t h a t I o u ght t o b e wor t h a few dollars m o r e, dead o r alive, t h a n you fe ll o ws I s uppo:e we a r e like so man y b un c h es of radi s h es Y o u get three bunc h es for te n ce n t s o r o n e bunc h for fiv e T h e o nl y thing t hat I'm af r a i d of i s tha t some of t h e co un t r y ) ) um p kin s around h e r e carrie d awa y w ith the hope of a b i g rewar d f o r our lives o r arres t, vvill hustl e into S t. L o u is a n d g i v e the auth orities the t i p." ' D01i t you worry about t h a t. The h o u s e that I t o ld Frank t o go t o has a r eputati o n of bein g h aunte d, a nd a n y c ountry yokel that comes this way, and s h ould s ee .Jights about t h e o ld h o use, would swear that the p l ace was inhabited b y g h os t s B e s id es, n o one c a n be s tlr e tl}_at Jesse James a n d hi s gan g w ill 'be _caught. I u s uall y go bac k an d h ave a littl e person a l inte r view with a n il'fforme r afte r th@ informe r has t o ld hi s little s t o r y "._ "An d a s a. tJs u a thing t h e i nformer do n t in form any more." '' D ea d i11e n t e ll n o tales, replied Jes se. \Vithout furthe r argument, the two men .hurried away. After h a lf a n h our of .har d ridin g, they arrived at t h e h aunte d h o u se. The h o use w a s a o n e -stor y log c a bin. I t w a s tumb l e down, a p ortio n of the r oo f havin g caved in and was situated in the mids t of a cl tunp o f chestnut tre e s. Thro u g h the trees fr o m a r oadway, a faint light c ould b e seen issuin g fr o m the windows of the cabin. The scene w a s a desol ate o n e The h o u se itself s t oo d upo n a littl e hill and w a s the m os t p r ominent objec t t o be s ee n in mil es A r ound it stretched a bleak prairie. No other h o u s e c ould be s e e n f r o m it, and there was s omething s ini s'te r and g loom y, stealthy with the fla vor o f o ld c r ime, that made it in its elf a shuddering o b j ec t t o any eyes that mi ght h av e rested upo n it. The h o u s e was well kno\v n in the country s ide as hav in g bee n the s cen e o f a particula rl y h orrible murde r years ago. The t aint o f the deed seemed t o 1av e imparte d itsel f t o the ve r y building a n d so awesome w a s the fee l in g in the mind of peop l e d w ellin g in that vicinity regarding the structure, tha t J esse James with hi s acute mind co uld hav e t aken n o better s h elter f o r h im s elf and hi s g an g than the one h e had selecte d Even C lel l 'vliller ; stee p e d in crim e a s he w a s, felt a little tin g le o f dread run up hi s b a c k b one as he gazed at the solitary h o u se. "Hol y Smoke, Jesse!" C l e l murmured "That's a p retty bum l ooking j oint you v e s el ected Jesse l a u g h e d pull e d u p hi s h o r se, d i s m ounted and t h e n gave the iaint and gurg lin g cry o f a n owl. Hoo! Hoo! I{oo! h e shrilled. Thrice ca m e t h e same answerin g ca ll fr o m the s in ister h o use. Al l ri g ht," s a i d Jesse t o A n d leading hi s h o rse. f ollow e d by hi s co mpani o n he wen ded his w a y up a r oad a l o n g w hi c h weeds g rew clank, a n d amid t he furt i v e twitte rin g o f b ir d s w hi c h see m e d t o be a larm ed at the in t ru s i o n o f m an in this solit u de, hurr ied to t h e h o u s e w h e r e F r an k Jam es, p ullin g at hi s t aw n y mustache, s t o o d in doo rway o f t h e cabin awai t in g the m I I'm glad to s ee yon fell o w s Fran k muttered. Of all the G o d f o r saken s p o t s o n t h e face of the earth, t hi s p lace i s the limit a n d t hen some mor e." v v hat's t h e matter?" snapped J esse. 'Have you got to t h<::. po in t w here y ou re afraid t o be al one? If y o u h a ve the so o ne r y o u trade your r e v o lver for a h o e t h e longer you 'll li v e "That's all r i g h t ," returned F r a n k, "the r e s mor e n o i s e s i n t hi s o l d p lace tha n t h e r e i s a nytl i in g else, a n d I counte d over a m illi o n of. em, it seems to me,.in a httl e m o r e t h a n a n h o u r. "The n y o u wouldn't r ec ommend t hi s spot as a n ic e q uiet h o m e for a gentleman in s ea r c h of a c ount r y re s i de nce?" said C l el. O h go a drink. p u t in J esse impatiently This game we' r e o n n ee d s m e n without nerves. " I d o n t n eed a n y fa lse j oy, J esse r e pli e d Frank. "Tell me what you f ellows diet. In a few b r i e f word s T esse outlined all that had bee n acco mpli s hed so far. He t o l d hi s companio n s that w hil e their. plans wer e n o t as ye t comple t e, he felt that h e h a d taken a l o n g s t ep towar d the acco m pl i shm ent o f the ques t fo r milli o n s upon which they had embarked. Yet at the sam e t im e h e / did n o t d i s g ui s e the fact tha t much r emained t o b e do n e "This gam e i s a little bi t out of our line i s n t it, J e s s e?" a s k e d Frank. I don t objec t t o walking into a bank and putting a gun t o a ca shier's nose and r eques tin g him t o h and m e all the m oney he's got in the pl a ce but thi s confounded dipl omatic kind of crim e n eve r did app eal t o m e. In all our f ormer little e pi sodes, w e've been d o in g the t a lkin g, and w h e n w e three
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,. 6 THE AMERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. cou_ntry around for any spy that might investigate the1r occupancy of the place, while Frank and J esse James lay down on the bare and d irty floo r to get some rest. ,; T h e on l y thing that I can t s i ze u p," sai d J esse, b efore he went t o s l eep, i s t h e pos ition that Maxwell Hyde i s goingto tak e 1 n t h is m atter. He mus t have known long b efore this, t hat we h av e l oo t ed that b a n k We have fo u g h t so m e shar p battles too-ethe r somehow b y din t of g reat l uck, we have 111 esc a p ing the wiles of t h a t inferna l clog. But I m u s t say that I woul d fee l better off i f MaX\ve ll Hyde w a s e l imi nated from our pla ns-" From o u r pl o t," s n ee r ed Fran k. I n eve r c o uld, un de rstand J ess e w h y you do n t kill that fellow. "I've got a r easo n 1 r e pli e d Jesse. "You always have a 1ieaso n f o r eve r ythino-" r e pli ed F I b "'' r a n (, u t s0m e how o r othe r you a lways keep your r easo n s to yourse lf ." D o n t b othe r m e s l ee pil y a nswer ed Jesse I'll l(Jll Maxwell Hyd e w h e n I think it i s the p r oper time." T h e two o utlaws then went t o s l ee v a s c a lml y as i f t hey wer e child r e n altho u g h t he y s h o ul d hav e been h a unted in t\leir dreams b y th e t errible c riminal deeds t h e s h?wn in t h e r eco rd s of the p o a uthont1 es o f the worl d would have b orn wit ness. CHAPT E R III. ., TElE EXECUTOR IS SURPRISED. The im pos in g and offices o f Anderso n F i s h w i .th clerks o n the sam e aft e rn oo n t h a t Jesse James and Iu s brother Frank g u a r de d b y Clel M iller lay h idde n in t h e h aunt e'd cabin o n the Natural Road in S t. L o ui s. A nde:son F i s h a tall , .flo r id fa c e d with g:ray stele wh1s k!!r s and a droopmg gray mustache, sat io. hi s private o ffice e ngaged in o pening-la.is personal mail. As h e sa t at hi s d es k ; the doo r o p(;!necl, and o n e o f hi s cl e rk s entere d JJearinga neatl y eQgrave d c a rd MR. llf A XWJ1Jf.L Anderson F i s h gasped as h e read t h e f o regoin g name. Go d b less m y soul," h e said t o hims el ( '.'what d oes this mea n ? l T u rningto hi s cle rk h e o(d ered the in stant admit tance of the m a n w h o$e n a m e was e n graved upo n the car d W i t h a n easy air of assura nc e tha t marked hi s acqu ainta n ce w ith a polite worl d, M axweU Hyde e n tered. A nders o n F i s h ..;r iewed his c alle r with s h arp curiosity. He. knew of Maxwell Hyde b y reputa tio n In th e cteadl y aren a w h e r e all _p.rgument was punctu a t e d by the r evo lver's r in g in g s h o t Maxw ell Hyde was. k nown I n hi s ea rl y Maxw ell Hyde ltad lived t h e life of an o utlaw' O n the fr ontie r s of the U n ited S t a t es hi s name was e n g raved f o r y ears with t h ose of J esse J a m es, F rank J a m es and C lel M ill e r but as t h e clays of t h e g un m a n wan e d as the ti d e o f c i v i l ization roll ed o nwar d to t h e b o r de r a nd imme rsed w i t hi n it w hat had been t h e bo rder Maxwell Hyde w a s shrewd eno u g h to see t h a t t h e forces t h a t go t o m a k e u p civ ilization were str o nger t h a n those s upporting the o u t l aws. Having b ee n a n o u t l aw, h e b eca m e an o u t law catcher. He kn ew th e ways o f the m(;!n of blood; h e knew: the trend o f t h eir minds, and when 111 t h e terri b l e clays t h a t followed t h e o n s lau g hts of the J esse J a m es gan g, he h a d been offered the re s ponsible p ositio n of det e cti v e b y the Western and Southw e stern Bankers G uild he hai:I accepted .the offer mad e him and s lowl y but urel y had swept from the earth all o f the le sse r criminals that were making the southwest un ,safe f o r h o ne s t men, until n .ow littl e w a s l ef t a b ove earth of a ll the o utlav vs that had been so nume r o u s, save jesse J ames and hi s c ompanions, Ande rson F i s h was the general c ouns e l for the 'vVe stern and Southwes t ern Bankers G uild. I;Ii s amaze m e n t and surprise upon seein g the card of M a xwell Hyde h a d be e n due t o hi s knowledge o f the work of. this famo u s thie f catche r and outlaw s layer although he h a d never p e r soi 1 a ll y met him It w a s this reason tha t cause d the start of ar n az ement tha t the lawyer h a d e v iden,ced ,>,hen he h a d first re ceived the card. In s ilence the two men gazed at each other. This s ilence w a s first broken b y Anderson Fish. I suppose you came t o see me ," M r. Fis h said1 "on a c c o m i t of that robbery." You m ea n the r obbe r y of the bank at Cemetery Hill this m orn. in g by the James men?" remarked Max-w ell Hyde with a smil e "Ye s, of cour'se you hav e recei ved information of the robbery." "Yes I hav e recei ve d such informatio n, but it i s not upp n that questio n that I have called. "Indeed," returned the lawyer in surprise. "Then I suppose your mission i s t o g i v e me iRformation re gard.ing some ot t h e oth,er d epredations o f itl fam o u s James band." 1 No," a n swere d M axwell Hyde no.t t o take up y p u r valu a ble titne, l am h e t ; e t o g i v e y;0 u i n fo r mation' but not upo n t he s ubj ec t you have broache d. I am her e t { p o n ,the matter concerning the' e state of the late Franklin Th9 mas; the 111illi o n aire banker o f this eity w h o died a numbe r of year s ago." Had Maxwe ll H y de l a id upo n the de s k Qf Ander son Fish a b omb warranted t o blow him into king d o t c o me hi s surprise could,. n o t 11av e been greater. But hi s legal mind allo'wed him t o keep fr o m hi s face aU tra ce s o f hi s e m o ti o n. He did. H O t Betray h i s great surp ri se, and simpl y hi s eyeb1:ows in interrogati o n "vVill you please p roce ed?" he said . I thin!< that I C
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THE AMERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. 7 ' the banker's organization which you represent as coun-he knew they were pretty shifty propb s iti ons. They sel, I have learned that in the bank looted to-day by lived upon chicanery and their stock in trade consi sted Jesse James and his gang was a tin box containing all of the gullibility of their victims. In his career as a of the information kn'own about this missing girl. T\le detect'ive, J \lfaxwell Hyde had met old Meg about five Jesse James gang have this inform-ation. They are years before and he had some professional dealings using this information to get the millions. My duty with her apd she had ass .isted him greatly. But in all is to round up that gang and as a side issue to that of the past dealings there had never been the golden duty, I am willing to admit I have no objection touch. \1\That some people would do for money he to gaining some of that reward.' This is a position' had only to turn to criminal records to find out, aside whel:e duty and go J1ancl in hand." from his own experiei1ce. Was old Meg tellit:J.g the "I see that I am dealing with a remarkable man. As truth? Vo/ as she n 1erely a cheap tr-ickster who had a lawyer, I do not think that ever before ,have I met gained possession of the story of the missing heire s s, a man who did not forget his duty when it came to his which at the time of the abduction had been stre\n in_clinatio ,n." broadcast in'' the newspapers, and had "she u sed this "Thank you. But I did not come -here to bandy information in attempting to force U'POn him and upon compliments. I came here to ask you to give me' such :rvir. F:ish a spprious heiress? "' information as I may need to possess that will allow In his own 1u1ind, Maxwell Hyde could not but feel me t0 delve further into this mystery. First, let us that he -had baffled by the purely leg-a1 attitude assume 'that we are on thct right track and that the taken by Mr .,Fish. Yet he respected Mr. Fis h for that girl of whom I have knowledge is the missing heir" very attitude. Maxwell Hyde sa w at once that. Mr. ess. Then what?" . Fish was a man of honor and standing in the commun" You can readily' understand, Mr. Maxwell Hyde, ity and that he was willing t b aid in the return of the that first assuming that you. are on the right track, heiress, but that he had thrown the burden. of proof we would have to have absolute proof of the identity directly upon l\Iaxwell Hyde' s shoulders. The detecof the gjrJ. She was an infant when she was abducted, tive himself was willingto accept the responsibility, and now she mttst be. about twenty years of age, and' b1;1t he had no great faith in the outcome. VI ith thes e you will admit, I. think, there is a difference be-ideas in his mind, Maxwell Hyde resumed the con a.n infant of two months old and a girl of twenty versation. years o age. ,Therefore in your quest-you have got "I do not know exactly vvhat I ought to say to to set back the dock' years, lacking a few you, Mr. Fish," Maxwell ",I. am not .a months, and have got to prove to the of l:j.wyer but I believe that I ve got mformatwn that IS a court of law tll.at the girl yo11 have in fmind is really valuable I do not come here to dictate terms to you. the infant that was abducted. You can teadil'y see that I have falll!n into this matter tht:ough my life-long there must' be' a chai:n of strong proof that will estab-attempt at tht:. extermination of the Jesse James gang. !ish beyond the shaqbw of a doubt the identity of this You know my reputation and I know yours. Man to , man, what shall I do?" ,"My d ,ear Mr. Fish, you will at least ,give t h e the Had Maxwell Hyde known it, he could not hav e credit of possessing intelligence. I have gone through taken a more' direct and convincirig line tha' u he had tathe chain of evidence) and am convinced that I am ken in this last remark. Up to this time, Mr. Fish, with ahle to gie you the necessar.)'i informgtion. T}1e girl the suspicion of the average lawyer had hardl:r achas never been of the p,assession of the. nurse who cepted Maxwell Hyde or his story. He now belteved figured-.;.in the abduction. The evidence of that nurse that Maxwell Hyde, right or wrong believed that he would be conclusiv,e ; would it not?" was right. "I B J ld 1 "'I'I1'ere t's 011ly one tht'n!! for vo't1 to do," said Mt:. n a measure. t 1e courts wou. reqmre t 1at .. J the of the nurse is substantiated by the' Fish. Get that girl and bring her here to me. If testimqny of others. Having got thus far, 'the reis really the missing heiress, Edna Thomas. I thmk mainder of }'our mission would not seem to be hard. that right and justice .will be able I will say t<;> you however, frankly, that you are stand-to prove. it If she IS merely a tnckster 111 ing on ticklish g:ro,und ... The courts of Missouri have with other tricksters, we will at least have the satts heen flooded for years with actions .growing out pf faction olputting her in jail where she belongs, along claims to large estates 011 the part of persons who with the rest. of her gang. Do you neep any money?" have neve r be en able to c 'on_clusively nrove their id e n"No . The only thing that I wishfrom you, Mr. tity. I know you t o be an honest an. d I believe Fish. is advice." 1 that you are,here from best motives in the wodd, ." "Fhere .it is, then . 'the/-w e will hut, I wish to call atten-tion to the that in Missouri 'eltmmate her. from the proposttwn, and w tll you we have go,.t to1 be shown." 1 . : tell n\e quickly what you think the .Jesse James_ gang' to do?" M ,axwell Hyde folded his and s ,tudying : Get the girl." , over the words of Mr. Fish. He could see' that as "Th.at's bad. If ,she is reall-y the heiress, it .would exec-utor of the great Thom,as estate' he was 'acting_ 1 that we would have to pay a remorse es s clearly wjthin his rights. lVIaxwell Hyde himself, lik e of. criminals a tremendous sum for her liberation." J ess e James and his gan!!, was groping: for a jighUn Exactly." the clark. N either.side to this excittng episode were in of all the facts surrounding the mystery. "It means that we must go upo n the hypothesis that They both were intergependent in having: as a basis this girl i s the heiress We mus t therefore take for their Ciuests the ,word of o ld Meg. So far as Max-to protect her from the Jesse James gang." well Hyde was concerned,.he had no actmtl knowledge "Yes." as to the of the fortune-teller. As a rule "Do you vvisli me to call in the local authorities?" I

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8 THE AMERICAN WEEKLY. Heaven forb id! If there's a nything in the world that I w i s h to eliminate from this ca se it i s the average broad-s h oe d detecti ve 1\e got .enough trou ble as it i s_. w ith out having to ''"ard off the bunglin g attempts ot a man w h o doe s n t know the detective game. T h e n my id ea would be to take t hi s matter up alone, and if I s ucc eed t o a lso figure in the reward. I am going back t o the sources o f my ii1formatio n and alone and unaided, secure this g irl if I ca n and at the sam e time round up the gang I have been so m any year s search-ing for." M r Fis h n o dded. He saw the f o r ce of Maxwell Hyde's remark. ''You ca n c ount u po n me t o assi s t you, he said lVIy advice i s f o r you t o continue o n your missi o n and con sult with me as often as circumstances war rant. I a m willing t o say to you that i f you d o s ucceed in this missi o n J as executor o f this estate, will see that any arrangem ent y o u may make i s h o n ored and that you will r ece ive a substantial reward in case you are s uccessful. Having made thi s arrangemei;Jt, 1vJ axwell Hyde left Mr. Fish and returned t o hi s h o tel for the purpos e o f studying out hi s next s tep. He well knew that he was facing a tremendo u s ly danger o u s condition. Maxwell Hyde did n o t underrate the Jess e James gang; and he knew that w h e n he returned that night to the home of old Meg the f ortune-teller, he was placing hi s life upo n a hazard o u s chance. CHAPTER IV. OU1,'LA WS ?.JAKE A SIDE MOVE. A s soon as night had fallen and the around the haunted cabin was blurred and indistinct, Jesse James Clel l\t[iller, and Frank James mounted their h o rses again and started out f o r the purpose of ac complishing another deed o f viole,nce. In talking over their plots, Jesse had happened to think that as they were not due at the home of Old Meg until midnight, it might be as well to see if they co uld n o t clean up what he called easy m oney before keeping the engagement. "It's this way, boys," s aid Jesse James. "We got fifty tho u sand dollars and a little over along with those paper Now we've had to give 'up fifty thousand to get Mother Meg t o go in with u s In cas e she throws u s clown, we will have only a few hundred dol lars l e ft. It see m s t o me that we better kill two birds with 011e t one. TheJe's a little s ix by four bank in a ji g-water t ow n near here that ought to be pretty good !?ickin g fo r u s Our h orses are fresh and we're feelin::; pretty goo d, so what's the matter .with our goin g ove r there and ti cking up that bank?" ''You get n e where I live, laughed Frank. I m all right in the bank r obbing bus ine ss, and as our bal'lk-r oll i s getting pretty thin. let's we three walk over t h e re and d o up that bank. I hate t o put my hand in my p cket and find o nl y a few hundred dollars ther e." "That' right." s i g h e d C l e l i V Ii,ller. "Vlhat in thun de r ca n a fellow do with a few hundred According l y l ed by Jesse James, a t the end o f an h our the p arty h ad n egotiated ten mile s of country and h alted their l1orses o n the outskirts o f a tiny ,town which tragg l ed m.-er the l a nd scape at the bottom o f a steep hill. The three outlaws halted their h o rses l o n g enough: t o c over their face s with bl ack masks and then draw ing their reYolve r s, they s tarted into the town at a rattling pace, sc r ea min g at the t o p o f tl'ieir vo ice s a nd punctuating the atmosphere with bullets. It was in this deadly fashion that the three men u s ually opened their campa i g n of b a nk l oo ting. In the darkness of the ni ght, the startled inhabi tants of the town were petrified with fright. The tramping o f hors es h oo f s and the wild shrieks and oath s o f the outlaws the deto nati o n s o f their weapons. and the whistling of numero u s bullets made the-scene a terrifying o n e J\llen and women d odge d bac k into their h o uses and closed the d oo r s in deadl y fear. Childre n sc r ea m e d and cried in fright, but the outlaw s with the ir campaign clear in their minds in a m oment h a d reached the bank, which was in a tiny stone buildin g in the center of the town. Jess e James swun g from hi s h o rse, f ollowe\ 1 by Frank, throwing the rein s o f their r espective animals. to Clel :Miller, w h o was assigned t o act the part o f out s id e guard and who steadily fired his weapons right and left thus keeping the vicinity clear of all interlop e r s Jesse James rushed t o the bank do o r and thundered upo n it with the butt of his revo lver. Frank s t oo d ri!4ht behind him. \1\fithin the bank an aged night watchman, half deaf, who had not heard. the s h o t s and sc r eams of the approaching outlaws, gingerly opened the door. In a trice, Jesse-James's sinewy brown hands clo sed around his throat. The fortunate watchma n who w a s dragged out of the bank d oo r mucll as tJ10ugh he had been a stray cat who. had b ee n dragged out of an a s h barrel "by an angry do g, v.Tas trussed up, gagged and in a moment. "Oh, Clel," bawled Jesse, "watch tbis fellow! If he moves, kill him! Jesse James then strode into the bank. He held his heavy revolvers, one in each hand, and remorselessly as fate clicked acros s the marble flooring of the bank and swept a ound behind, a counter an elderly man .sat at a desk with amazement on his face. Hands up!" hissed Jesse. If you dare to move. I'll kill you The frightened bank o fficial \tarted involuntarily to put his hands toward a revo l ve r that lay on tl e desk befo re him, but one1 glance at the evil eyes of the out law peering through the slits in hi s mask told him that an acti o n of thi s k'ind would be the last one he' d take in this world. with a choking cry, the bank official held up his hands., '' Give me the combination to the safe sneered Jesse. "The safe i s open," cried the banker, his face dis t orted {IVith fear. T esse started t owards the safe Just then he saw a dart behind him toward the door of the bank. It was that of the bank messen?'er, a young man, about twenty -five -years o f age. Jesse raised hi s rev olver with the me action pull in g the trigger. As the d ead ly weapon belched f orth the s h o t the unfortunate m esse nger crumpled up like a dry le af and s taggered again t th e bank railing and then fell in a heap with hi s s h oulder broken b y the bullet. "You lie o r I'll kill you!" muttered J esse, his face di s t orte d w ith wrath. Now a n entire mast e r of the s i tuatio n Jesse dashed I

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THE AMERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. 9 t o the s a f e a great stee l vault in the rear o f t he bank, white Frank James t oo d with hi s two r e v o)vers trained upo n the bank of-ficial and the w ounded mes senger. In a s ec ond Jesse came out o f the bank vault with hispockets filled w !th m o ne y, and bearing in hi s ri ght hand a sack filled with g o ld. The two outlaws the n with flyin g steps hurried out o f the building, mounted their h o r s e s and still carrying their p1under, dashe d into the darkness and di sap peared. The t own awoke with a r o ar. lVIen came running from every c orner o f the tiny t own and s o o n willing; hands had rai s ed the bank messenger, while a phys i cian leaned over him and staunched hi s w ound. The citizens hurriedly organized a posse and rushed away after the bandits, but Jess e a 'nd hi s band had made their escape, and s oo n the bank o fficials who had hurriedly rushed t o the beleaguered in stitution. gave up the pursuit and another bank r obbery had be e n added t o the crim' e s o f M issouri. Highly at their s ucce ss, the three outlaws rode speedily toward St. L o ui s "\iVell we turned that trick," said Jesse. "I g o t t\1at bank messenge r all ri ght.'' -"\\That's the matter with y our gun?" a s k e d Frank James Y o u g o t that f ell o w in the s h o ulder. " My gun carried t o the left," replied Jesse. I didn't s ee that fellow until h e ran crosswise fr o m m e and I didn' t get a g o od s h o t at him. I suppose it's jus t a s well that I didn' t kill him under the circumstances "It i s only one m ore deed charged up t o oar ac coun,t. ventured Clel. H o w n1uch d o y o u think we got?" "I don't think there was more thai1 ten or fifteen thousand doiJars in that bank." replied Jesse. I took eve-ry cent I c ouLd find and didn't leave anything but the books. The trio of outlaws theq ht!rried back t o the haunted cabin where Jesse plac e d th e m o ne y in a h o le he dug .in the hard earth floor. "Why d on't y o u carry the m o ne y with you?" a sked. C lel. I don't want t o have any m o ney f ound o n me in cas e I am arrested when we g o t o o ld Meg's h o u se to-night. Y o u see I'm n o t 1dead sure that thi s thing i s n t a plant. If the old w oman i s giving u s a fal s e steer, must be dealt with, but if we are trappe d t o-night. it' s a pretty sure thing that one o f u s will get a\-vay. \ N h oever kno w s o f us, kno w s that we u s uall y carry the plunder that \ e secure ab out u s. In thi s -cas e, I'm g oing t o f oo l em r o w this i s the under standing, b o ys. \iVhicheYer of u s g e t s away, in case o f a plant, must hurry b a ck here, dig up this ca s h and hustle back h o me. : M y plan i s t o have all three g o t o u l c h Meg' s h o use. She i s our next live wire. If we' r e surprised the o nl y thing t o d o i s t o fight our way out, if we can, and the survi,o r mus t get back here t o the cash. That is the quickes t way out f o r u1s all. C o me o n now The three outlaws then hurrie d b a ck t o the h ome o f the o ld f ortune-teller. There they f o!c1nd oiCJ Meg awa iting; the1i1. she hav in g re sumed h e r make-up. and the three outlaws filed into h 'er r oo m and sat clo wn. Jess e J a me s peering a t t h e w o m a n with hi s co ld fis h y eyes. O ld Meg S mil e d a t the m and the n r e s um ed the r o l e o f a 3rnd be g a n q u es ti o nin g the three men. "So y o u bro u ght your friend s with you did you?" she s aid turning' t o C l el. Yes that outlaw replied. V'l ell said th e hag, I'm ready t o d o bus iness with y o u I have managed t o arrang e with y o u so far a s the ca s h end i s c oncerned. Now it's up t o m e t o deliver the girl. "That's about the s ize of it," r eplied Jesse. Where is the girl? a sked Clel. She i s not far a way," replied Meg. "No, I d o n t think she i s put in Jess e with a cyn ical g rin. A s he s p oke the outlaw aros e fr o m hi s seat and ap proached the f ortune-teller. His l ong arm reached forth and g-rasped the woman b y the throat. Frank James, seeing the actio n o f hi s brother, rushed t o his side and caught Meg by the arm. C lel stoo d in open m outhed amazen1ent. Quick a s tho ug-ht Jesse thrus t a gag; in the m outh of Meg, put hi s arm around her wais t, plucked he.r fr o m her feet a s if s he had been a feather, and throwing; her over hi s 'Sh oulder; ru shed out of the room, followed b y hi s two c ompanions The thre e men hurrie d t o their h o r s e s which were hitched t o a p os t in fr ont o f the h o u s e jus t a s the f o rm o f H y de was s een approaching. In a m oment Maxwell H yde s en sed the situatio n. His revol ver tipped his hand in a second and with a l oud shout he da shed at the three outlaws, firin g hi s revolver a s he ran. The semi-darkness only lighted up by the fitful gle'am fr o m a lamp-pos t near at hand di s c oncerted hi s aim . and a s he hurrie d he did n o t s ee th.at Frank James had stepped to the g-utter and was await in g hi s' approach. Instead o f s h ooting him, Frank Tame s bro ug ht the butt of hi s revo l ver clown upo n the head o f i'daxwell H y de As the s k y and the earth cla shed t ogether, H y d e fell pro ne up<_)n hi s face a s en seless ma ss, while with a wild hurrah, the three outlaws bearing t11e f orm of o ld Meg in their arms, m ounted their h o r s e s and darted up the solitary silent stree t a t t o p spee d. \ Vhat in thunder did you d o that f o r Jesse? askec i' Frank, a s they sped al o n g. \iVhat d o you want that old hag f o r ? "' "Shut up.!" rej o ined Jesse. "Do n t you s ee I have n o hag? This thing i s a plant. This girl in stead o f being o ld Meg;. the f ortune-telle r, i s the miss ing; heir ess. The are in our g ra sp!" CHAPTER V. l\'{ AXWELL HYDE AWAKES. F o r sev e ral m oments after the terrible bl o w that had b e en dealt him b y the outlaw F ran'k James, Max well H y d e lay a s one d e ad. Then s l owlv c o n scio u s ness returned. F o r a m oment h e la y staring vague l y up at the c l o ud s which were charg in o in the skv above him, and then struggled t o a sitting p os iti oi1. The detectiv e put hand t o hi s he a d. His finger s were c overe d with his bl oo d. He f ee hl v mana g e d t o crawl up the steps S o sudden .and crasli:ing had bee n the o n s l a u ght up o n him that hi s eyes re f u s ed t o b elie ve what they h a d s e e n and h e was c o nfid ent in hi s own min( tha t h e had n o t w i t n e s s ed the f o r c ibl e abductio n o f the but

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lO THE AMERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. that all t h e w hirlin g facts that r u shed upo n him were revealingherse lf to the execqtor of her father's es: t h e result of an u g l y drea)1J. tate, although s he had know n for some years that she B u t when h e weakl y t ottered into the fortune-teller's was the heiress to hi s millions. home, h e hegan to piece out the st:,or y that the mute v Vhen Jesse James tried to a s k the g-irl the reasons ev id e n ce s o f upturned furniture t o ld him. f o r her disgui se, she firml y refuse d to answer. In-.. They have captured o ld Me!!,'" he muttered, in dire stead, she sat and stared at the, outlaw, her face d i smay. S omebody hit me on the head!" s howin g white beneath the paint with which it was Max wel l Hyde put hi s hand to the d eep scalp wound e nvel o ped. he bore, and lau g h e d bitterly t o him se l f at his remark. '\Nell, IJl Y g irl, laughed Jesse, "welcome to our. \Vhen a ma. n has got a h o l e in hi s head," he mur-h o me. It i s a temporary home, and we are not in posmurecl that made him see all the star s in the firma-sessi o n of much antique furniture in it, but if you don' t for him t o say that somebody hit him is a trifle mind, I will ask yo u a feyv questions." funny.'' ''Ask them," replied the girl. I do not agre<: to Maxwell By de had been a bit late in keeping his a nswer them." appointment w i t h ole! unfortunate l y If he had "vVh y did you di .sguise yourself as o ld Meg, the not been l ate, the scheme of the James brothers would fortune-teller?" not have been acco mpli shed. Jesse James, without That i s my secr:e t,'' the g-irl replied. "You may co n sultati o n with hi s companio n s, had deftly made up kill me, but 1 will n o t explain to you." hi s mind that Meg, the f ortune-teller, was really the "You are 'bright en ough to know that we will not heiress in di s g ui se. Be h ad n o t known absolutely that harm you," Jesse laug-h ed. You ar,e worth too n1uch thi s was so until he had entered the fortune-teller's m oney t o u s a s you stand. If you will remain here h ome. Then his k ee n eyes had searched the woman's and n o t try to make trouble by screaming, cryin.g and face, penetrated her di s g ui se, and he had quickly un-wailing, we will guarantee you safety at leas t for the de r s t o o d that h e cou ld only win the campaign upon present. \ V ill you tell me whether you are Edna w hi c h h e had embarked b y abducting the girl. Thomas, the heiress?': d id not know w h y the heiress to so many million s had I am," the g-irl repli ed. thus disguis ed h e r elf, and this mooted nothing to J ess. e lau ghed and winked at his companio ns. him. He mad e up hi s mind quickly t o capture the Didn' t I tell you so, boys?" he said. "This mat-g irl a nd thus p l ace within hi s own hands the power ter now requires quick action on our part. I am go t o ex tort fro m her dead father's estate every dollar ing t o write a n ote t o Anderson Fish, whom i[ happen that h e cou l d for her return. to know i s the executor of the Thomas estate. In it The appearan ce of Maxwell Hyde upo n the scene I am goin g t o tell th. e lawyer that the heiress is our had Jesse. T he quick action of Frank captive and I am going t o tell him liow he can make James w hich had extri ca t ed the gan g ffom a perilous terms with u s. If he puts UJ? three million dollars cash, p o s i tio n1 ha d g reatl y pleased him. he can have this girl." "ffhat g-ood work F rarrk ," he said t o his Frank James drew hi s brother aside and engaged in brother. But then y,ou always were tbere with the a whispered conversatio n with him go o d s when an e mergenc y arose." I 'll take that' note a!) he saiu, "Lut sup" T never s.aw a man get his nicer o r neater than did pose Fish won't come ove r with the cas h What are Maxwell J-lyde, c him ed in C lel. '' l you killed we going to do then?" him.' "The o n l y thing for u s t o do then will be to take "Jf e s t o thick-headed for that," laughed J esse. that g irl over t o the river, tie a couple of big stones frank, y o u u s ed t h e w r o n g end of your revolver. a b out her waist and drop h e r in. If Fish won't 'vV h y lidn t y o u s h o ot!" u s the m oney, the girl i s n o good to' us. \lVe might as "J was afl"aid of m a kingt oo much n o ise. It s e emed well kill her and at least get revenge o u t of this whole t o me t hat the q ui c kest way out of it was t o hit that affair. fello w a be l t o ve r t h e h,ead. Like everyt11ing else in "I you r e right," replied Frank. "You scrib thi s world i{ I was g o in g to do it again, I would do ble that note fast as you can, and I wiii take it to the i t differe11b. A nyway, I knooked the detective out, and lawyer. Jn the meantime, it seems to me that yoti and we h a\'C the h e iress if what Jesse says i s str a i ght." Clel had b etter remain here and guard the girl. This S h e's a pretty b um l ook in g h iress a t that! cried i s the safes t place there i s about Here. is n o l e i who wa: aa 'rrying the form of the girl o n the danger in any way o f that d etective findin g where we p ommel of hi s addl e are. "Anyway, we've g t her," rejoined J esse. Jesse James n odc!e d and then has til y scribbling a A nd the p a r t y t h en proce e d ed at the best s p ee d note t Q Anderso n Fish, handed it to Jesse, who rapidly p ossibl e un ler the circumstances, to the haunted cabin. disappeared in the directio n o f St. L o ui s, spurring his A s s o o n a s they r ea,checl t h e deserted spot the girl h o r se' t o hi s utmos t endeavor. was r e l eased ;from her bond and the gag was taken \\1hile thi s little drama was b e in g enacted, Maxwell fr o m h e r m outh. The s i ght o f a revolver g-leaming in Hyde had b ound up hi s )le ad, hurried t o the nearest the h a nd s o f J e sse was enou g h to intimidate the girl, telephone a nd had called a cab which he had entered had h e w i s h ed to o r cry{or assistance. a nd h a d ordered the driver to hurry to the home of But t h e heiress wa') too frig-htened and bruised by Fish. 1\llaxwe ll Hyde had immediately decided in his her terribJe ride t o d o more than utter a faint pro-own min d that the James gan g having abducted Edna test. Her mind wa in a w hirl of excitement. There Thomas the heiress, their ne x t step woul d be to' inJorm had been ce r tai n r easons which s h e would n o t comAnde r so n Fish o f the capture of the g irl and thus municate to any o ne at present w h y s h e had disguised pave the way f o r the be g innin g of negotiations that her s elf The e reasons had much to do with her n o t might e nd in the payment of a reward for the return

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,. J THE AMERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. 11 of the heiress. It was pas t midnight when Maxwell Hyde arrived at .the beautifUl! home oi Mr. Fish. It repeated ringing of the bell at the residence before_ any one but when a sleepy butler ,had been mduced to take a message to his employer by Maxwell Hyde, Mr. Fish immediate ly ordered that the detective be brought to his room: The lawyer gave a cry of astonishment when he saw the white face of the with his head bound up in a bloody bandage; and when he had learned of the abduction of the heire s s his astonishmeBt knew no bounds. "_Y o u must let me telephone f o r thepolice, Fis h advtsed. "Not much!" cried the ind omitable detectiv e "I s till in s i s t upon o n this matte r alone. My idea is that y ou will recei v e from the James brothers. shor.tly some inf ormation a s t o where the girl is When you get. this informatio n, I feel sure that we can dev ise a plan that we can carry o n much better withGut p o lice interference. Hav e you g o t a g o od fas t horse in your stable?" S o me of the be s t in the c ountry," replied the lawyer, who was a lo ver o f good h o r s e s and had hi s stable filled with them. "Ord'er me one quick, saddled and bridled," snapped Maxwell Hyde. W,ithin a few rpoments, upon the c ommand of the lawyer, a horse was led t o a s ide entrance to his house, and Maxwell .Hyde mounted the animal. J UE't a s h e was rusl1in g away, he was stopped by tqe voice of th(! lawyer. "A mess a g e has jus t been handed in at the fr ont door, the lawyer cried. W ai t J In wonder the detectiv e s t o pped. He did not kno w that Frank James had craftil y ridden to the end of the street and had walked t o the fr ont door, slipped the note which Jesse James had scribbled in the haunted cabin under the door o f the banker's hous e, rang the door bell and rushed away Mr. Fish ran out of the h o u s e a nd handed the n ote to M 'axwell Hyde. By the faint radiance from a gas jet near at h lnd, the detec ti v e read the note. "Tt s ays that the outlaws are willin g ,to give up the g irl f o r three million dollars I think--" As he spoke Maxwell H y d e happened, to look ac 'ross the stree t and cau ght s i ght o f a man hurry in g alon g in the' shacto w of a sto n e fence whiel1 Sllrround e d the g r ounds t o the Fis h e s t ate. Maxwell H y d e in a moment made up his mind that the furtiv e form was that of a mess en ger fr o m the J a mes's den. Drawing his re vo l ver, he le a ped fr o m hi s h o r s e and silently stalked after the fly in g fig ure. A m ome!:Lt later, a s the man he was purs uin g turned so that the light f ell upon his face. M a x w ell H y de saw that he was upon the ri ght track and that the figure w a s that o f Frank James. 1 Looking o n all side s a s he pro c ee ded the keen g lance s o f Frank James did n o t s ee the f 6llowing detectiv e Belie v in g that he had been entirely secret in his mi ss i o n Frank James m ounted hi s h o r se, and w i s hin g to spare the beas t o n hi s r eturn j ourney, pro c e eded d own the street not knowing that in the shadm:V that lay at hi s ri ght, in the depths of the mi sty da'l'k nes s, he was being stalked b y the detective. So the chas e swept on. Utterly unco n s ciou s that he was being purs ued J a m es pro ceeded a l o n g until he had turned into the Natural Bridge R o ad Then he spurred hi s h o r se t o a fa ster pace and vani shed into the darkness, w hile Maxwell Hyde retraced hi s step s to Lawyer h o me, which he again entered f o 1 a further conversatio n with t 11e lawyer. Y o u remind me of a vanis hin g lady show," cried the lawyer merrily when he s a w the dete ctive. "What o n earth did y o u tt(n a w a y so quickl y f or?" I was after the man who had' deli.vered that messag e." I s a w n o man. "But I di'd. "Wh o was he? " Frank James ; \ Vhat, Frank James, the outlaw? " That was the man." Did he bear that n ote t o me?" "He did." \ V h y didn t y o u arres t him ? "vVhat g oo d w o uld tha t d o m e} "You w o uld hav e had a t lea s t one of the outlaws in your gras p ." I have been l oo kin g f o r outlaws for years. My p oint o f v iew has chang ed. A t present I am en gaged in l ooking f o r an heiress Had I arrested Frank James the secret o f where the mi ssing g irl i s to be .found we never c o uld hav e e x t orted from him. Where ver she i s, she i s in the p oss e ss i b n of Jess e James, and that thug w o uld immedia tel y have spirited her away. I took care not t o let Frank James s ee me. I f ollowed him as far a s the Natural Bridg e R oad arid I figure in m y own mind that the girl has been hidden b y the outlaw s in s o me unfrequented s p o t some where al o n g that thoro u g hfare. My plan i s t o mount that hors e of yours and hurry out al o n g the r oad which Frank James has t aken. o r other a few mile s from St. L o ui s, I feel c onfident tha:t I can find the mi ss in g gi.rl. When I d o I may have t o call in the of the l o cal p o lice but U\!til I find her and the place o f her c oncealment, it i s better f o r me t o work alone If I should call upo n the p o lic e here in St. L o ui s and a s k them t o go out o f the t own in search o f the outlaws, they would laugh at me, belie ving that there were n o outlaws fo b e purs ued. They w ould turn me over to the c ounty authorities, and b y the time the county autho riti es in whose jurisdictio n the bandits now are had taken acti o n the outlaws would b e hundreds o f mile s away fr o m here. Grea t b o dies m ov e s l o wl y and county o fficial s are too great a body t o move s wiftl y. Anderso n Fis h saw the f o rce o f Maxw ell H y d e' s a r gument. \iVhile he felt that it was a dangerous mi ss i o n that the, detec ti ve had planned f o r him se lf he c o uld n o t but think that the campaig n of the detectiv e was shrew dl y laid and so he ac q uie s c e d in what w a s s aid with a n od. In spite o f the pain of hi s wound, Maxwell H yde m ounte d the s t aunch tho r o u ghbred furni s h e d t o him bv Ande r so n Fis h an d soo n f ound hin s elf o n the' Natural Bridge Road h eading n the same directi o n that Frank James had taken hardly al) h our b e f o re. I mus t approa ch this situatio n ," murmured M ax well H y de t o hlim s elf "by a pro cess o f eliminati o n. The J a m es b oys, I figure would n o t dare c ome into tl i e o p e n a nd g o to an y farmho u s e with Edna Tho ma s They have gon e t o som e unus ual pla c e I work e d over this r oute three years ago in searc h of a band o f c ounterfeite r s and it s eem s t o me that I

PAGE 14

12 THE AMERICAN INDIAN )YEEKLY . remember a stor y of a haunted h o use that w a s s itu ated I've go t him!, h ow le d a voice. somewher e in this Yicinity. I belie\e in my h eart t hat The d oo r openeJ witl1 a cra::h and out streamed the. the James b o y s have taken that g irl to that h o u se. two outlaws, J esse and F r ank James. I wonder i f 1 can find it?" ?lhxwell ,Hyde saw that he was a captive in the For the purpose of keeping his h o r s e fresh, Maxhat1d s of Clel l\Iiller. He gfive himse lf up for lost. He well Hyde did n o t hurry in hi s outward j ourney. He felt himself grasped by all the outlaws and roughly had kept t o him self o n e part of the n ote recei ved from hurled into the cab in The was shut with a bang the James gan g by Anderso n F i s h and thi s part was and ,\,ithout ceremo n y Maxwell Hyde was bound and of the g re a te:t importance. lt had briefly in structed gagged. Anderson Fish t o depos it a n o te in the United States The detecti\ e s saw t he grinnin g countenances o the m ail address ed to Thomas James. The note was three bandits turned upon him. t o b ear fu r t h e r t he s impl e S t . L o ui s, and I was out t here on watch," Clel Miller explained, thus, Hyde knew, would go into the general "and I saw thi s fellow c o m e stealing across the deliver y of the post-office of that city, and he felt and peep into the window. I jus t natttrally got besure that, eventually. o n e of the gan g would call at hind him threw m y anns around him. took his rethe post-office and get the n ote. lt was :Maxwell volver, and yelled t o you fellows insidt" Hyde's plan t o answer the missiv e of the James boys -'' Ba, ha! l a u ghed Jesse James "Was there ever with one that would -acquiesce apparently in / their such luck ? l'Ye bee11 waating t o get that fellow Maxplans and would offer a milli o n d o llar s for the return well Hyde in m y clLitches f o r some time. Now I've of the girl. lJut pending the sendin g of this n ote, Max-got him a nd L've got the girl. too! If we can't clean well Hyde had decide d that h e w o uld find the hiding something out of this s ituation, I'm a Dutchman!" place of tlae gan g if pos!"ible. Be then planned in hi s C lel Miller drew his re vo lver from hi s belt and own mincl t o arres t the messenger jus t as he turne d with a fiemli s h expression o n hi s face, stepped over away fr om the ge. neral delivery window in the St. toward the detective . Louis p os to ffice fo r h e would then have upo n hi s "You h ound pup,' l he shrieked. "I'v.e g-ot an o ld perso n the incriminating letter that Maxwell Hyde pro-scor e t'o p ay off o n y o u myself! You pul a bullet in posed writing to him and at the same time, he de-my arm hack there at this g-irl' s h o use,,and I'll get s i gned, i h e coa)d g-ain the i nf ormatio n t o r ound up even with you b y bulle t through yotir head!" the member s o f the gan g and the missin g girl at the "1\'one o' that!: put in Jesse James, a's he caught same time. This woul d in sure a l ongterm of impriso n-Miller Lv the ann. Don't make a fool of yourself. ment fo r Frank James and C lel M iller for the abduc-There's j)Ie rit y of time t o kill this fellow. I can make tion, w hil e Jesse James co uld he tried and executed him u sef ul in this r o un d -u p." f o r the many murders h e had been knov;r n t o have co m" I don't see h o w you can!" hissed Clel. mitted. "Yo.u don t, Thi s fellow is employed by .the "It n ow se em s t o me, said Maxwell Hyde t o him\i\!estern and Southwestern Bankers' Guild, and Anself, ''that my objective poin t at present should be cler so n F i sl1 i s the law yer for that org-anization, and the h aunted h o use wher e the g-ang if I know anything he also i s the executo r of. the Thomas e state. I guess about bandit natuH, i s probably 11idd e n ." I. can get the Bankers' Guild t o put up a bundle of Keepin g a s ha:rp wat c h over the s urroundingcoun-c o ld cash for their de tective's \vorthless life. If I try, the intrepid detective at len gth manag-ed to get can't, I can kill him a week fro m now just as easy t o a p oint w h e re hi s recollection o f the coun-as I ca n n o w try t o ld hi111 the he was in search of could _be "That's right!, put in Frank J cfmes \!\That's the found He s t opped h1s hGJr s e at U1e t op of a s h ort nse use o f killino thi s fellow C l e l when ,e have him in of gro un 1 a nd peered and thither _around the_., our power?' Don' t f oo l o f yourself. Jus hang murky l a ndsCcap_e. A Cr): escaped .hun wh_en he onto this fellow f o r a fe, v days and let u s see where saw fa r t o the n ght. shmmg hnghtly, a hg-ht whtch he we're at. He can't get away a n y more than the g-irl felt co nfid ent, ca m e fr o m th e window of a h o u se Max' ca n. well Hyde ti e d hi s s t eed t o a tree and softly hurried C lel Miller hated t q be d issuaded from hi s purpose.' thro ugh the g-l oo m up to the s id e of a h o use through .but he saw the f o rce of the argument presented by which he h ad s.,ee n the lig-ht strea min g. \:Vith infinit e hi s lea de r. Jesse James. ca uti o n h e rai s ed himself o n hi s tiptoes and l ooked "All right. just a s you fellows say," h e growled. "nto the ca bin. \ N ithin the hous e he s a w the f o rm s "The o nl v thing I want you t o do i s t o promise me of the two o ntla ws f o r w h o m h e was searching while that if it aoes c o me t o a killing, that I may be sein the fitful ljght h e d i.-cernecl the .-white face of the lected t o fire the sj10t tha t s nuff s thi s fellow's candle missin g gi rl. 1 out t CH VI. GAUGH\(. Maxwell F l y de fell t o t h e g r ouncl a n d began spe' ed ing backward toward the s l i e lt e r of a che stnut tree. He had not pro ceeded but a few fee t when he felt himself g rasped b y a g ig-anti c h and. H e wormed hill) self around and made a g ra>b @ r a ht1ge shape that stood over him. l Te Jnissed g-r a p in g the man by the throat who was h o ldin g him and in the next sec o nd fe l t himself pini o n e d by the arms while hi s iev o lver was t o rn fr o m hi s grasp. "I'll agree t o that, o l d fell o w r ep lied J ames Now the best thing for u s t o d o i s t o stand these p eopie up in line and talk tLirk ey t o them. You go out, Frank. and get some dry w oo d. 'vVe can' build a nice little fire in the center of this cabit'l, and I 'll put that detective in the middle of the fire, and after h e's been scorched som e I gue,ss h e will tal, k. You go t oo, C l e l a nd h e lp F r ank bringin some wood." But the o utlaws had n o t counted upo n the dauntl ess courage within the h ea r t p f Maxwell Hyde, \'Vhile the o utl a w s had b ee h d e batingwhat t o db with hinl, and J esse had b ee n calming hi s inhtr-

PAGE 15

' ,. .. \ \ THE AMERICAN IND1AN WEEKLY. 13 i atecl associrite l\Iaxwell Hyde had been sec retl y str a ining at t h e n e w rope w ith which hi s h a nds had bee n confi n ed and h;:td wrenched himself l oose \ Vith the boun d of a t iger he flas h ed clown u po n J esse J a m es H i s great fist shot o u t and caught the o utl a \'v di rectly u po n t h e p o in t of h i s jaw. was o u t in a m o m ent. Jil i s head str uck the g r o u n d som e seconds be f o r e h i s h ee l s a n d he lay in se n sib le ; as clea n ly knocked out as i f t h e b low had' been dealt by a p u g ili st. Ma:'\well Byde w h o had l)een deprind o f h is arms w h en th e James boys captu red h i m l oo k ed aro un d the rcom and see! n g a butcher knife raving o n the s heetiron stove. gra:::pe d i t and w ith swift b l ows severed b o nds that b o u n d the.. girl Edna T h o m as. Maxwell Hyde, in t h e o f t h e cab in s u p posed that h e vvas rescuing o l d M e g, the fortune-teller. He gathered the gi rl u p i n h i s stalwar t a r;ns, and with .flee t s t eps. darte d the doorway and i n a brea th h a d buried him se l f 'beneath t h e s h a d e of the chestnut t r e es that s un: o unded the solitary cabin. "Cr o u c h clown. i\J eg!" he murmured I 'Hide behind t h e r oo t s o f tha t bi g t r ee Utt e r l y bewi lder e d at the s uddenness of h e r Tes cu e Edna in s ti nctiYe l y f o l l owed t his advi ce M axwe ll Hyde C J:ept f orward un til he cou'lcl see o Y e r the timbers and n o t i c ed that the two o u t laws Frank James and C l e l M ill e r were approac hing the cabin with their arms filled w i t h b i t s o f dry wood w hi c h they had gathered for the p urpos e of t orturin t h e d e t ective. .. Maxwell H yde sto l e b a c k to the s ide o f Edna a n d m otio n e d her t o f ollo w h im Edna obey ed a n d t h e c oupl e secre t ing t h e m s elves as well a s t hey c o u l d i n t h e high g : r a ss and w e ed s r a n a t fheir u t m os t s p eed t owar d t h e lVIi ss issippi River w hi c h c o ul d be s e e n w i nding a l o n g a b out h a lf a mi l e d i stant under the s t a r s w h i c h clotted the h o r i zo n ' \Ve w ill h a ve t o hurry," sa i ,cl M axwell H yde t o the g irl. "There w ill b e lhings d o i n g in that cabi n i11 a m oment o r two The d e tectiv e s p o k e trul y S h outs and 0at h s ran g the atmosp h e r e a nd t o l d the 1detec t iv e t hat C l e l 'l\ 1 i11er a n d Frank James h a d fm111c1 Jess e l y in g insens ib l e u p o n the floo r and h a d immediatel y under_ tood h o w the detec t i ve h a d effecte d hi s e scape. The n o i s e m a d e b y the o u t l aws i n their m a d p u r ; uit of the flee in g c o upl e in d i cated to the detective th e f ac t tha t the t h r e e bandits h a d seoarated a n d w e r e threshi n g the bus h es eac h f o r hims elf at d i vergen t points T hat's r ight s a i d Maxwel l Hyde. "vVa ste y o u r t ime a r o u nd the c a bin and pos:::i b l y w e m a y escape! ' ,How a r e y o u g o in g c r oss. the ri ver?" a s k ed the g i r l in a l o w ton e As s h e s p o k e she tu rn e d h a lf away 1 f r o m t h e detective so that he c o u l d n o t se e her fa ce There was something in her t o n e a n d attitude t h a t puzz l ed Maxwell Hyde The voi c e i n w hi c h the g i r l s p o ke, although her t o nes wer e l o w was n o t ,that o f a querul o u s o ld hag who spok e il1 t h e s hrill t o n e o f a g e, but was a f ull r ound voi c e tha t :'illlack e d o f you t h I s t hi s o l d I vieg ? 'murnnred tl1e detective to hims elf. \ N h o in t h e w o r l d have I res c u ed? I s t h e r e so m e decepti ori' here? v Vhat d oes t h i s mea n ? \ N h o is thi s g i r l ? But t h e t h o u g hts o f' the detecti ve wer e turned i n a n o t h e r d irecti o n immediate l y b y t h e s o un d made b y an m a li. Maxwell Hyde a n d Edn a r a n a t rig h t angles to the sound, t l1e detectiye's eager e y e s searching the rjver ban k in t h e h opes of fin ding a boat. I r e member readin g o n ce abou t a n E n g li s h K in g w ho was w i lling t o g ive h i s crown f o r a horse," murmur e d :.Jaxwell Hyd e t o h imself," but I:c l g i v e a good s h a r e of t h e fortune I h ope to win fo r a f o rty-cent du g out!" 1 l nclee d the detective' s plig h t ,\las o n e t h a t would stir t h e most phlegmatic h ea r t. He was una rmed, havin g i n custody a woman w hci w a s distrau ght w i t h fear, and he vvas fa r fr o m St. L o ui s ii1 a countr y of hi ch h e knew little, and "as bein g p u rsqecl b y foes w h o iver e p ledged t o murde r him \ V h e rever t h e r e i s life t h e r e must b e so1 ; 1 e hope l e ft ," l a u g h e d t h e in d o m itabl e det ective I am n o t going to g iv e up yet! : \ s h e s p oke these words, upo n a littl e b l uff a bove hi m s i lh o u ette d up o n 'th e b ackgro und o f the ni ght s k y, appeared the f orm o f a man who m1\1axwell H yde saw at o n c e was Jesse J a m es :.Iax w ell Hyd e g aYe o n e desp airi n g g lance a r ound. \:\1 hat co u l d h e d o now? H e unarmed and Jesse as a r m ed! He was e n cumber e d w ith a w oman he was 19otmd t o pro t ect and save, and J ess e was al one and thir sting f o r hi s blood. Times like thes e m ake men in w h os e vein s run good r ed bl oo d t h ink qui ckl y I J1e detect i v e s h ed hi s coa t a nd ki cked hi m s elf out o f his b oo t s almos t with the same m o t i on Graspin g Edna T h o mas b y the a r m, h e w hi sper ed t o the g i r l. Can you swim ? h e s a i d ' A little," r eplied Edn a. T h e M issi ssippi R iver i s nearl y a mil e wide her e It l o o k s t o m e a s if I 'll haYe t o s wim f o r both o f u s Come o n Edn a b o l d l y waded in t o the "ater until i t reached abo v e her 'wais t T h e un p l ea s a n t sen sati o n seemed t o make her h eart s t o p bea tin g She made one scrainbl e f o r land, b u t w ith t h e l ea st' cerem o n y m the w o rl d Maxwell Hyde p u s h e d her ahead o f him in t o dee p wate r The current o f t h e s luggi s l 1 a n d mudd y n ver <;au ght her frail f orm in a trice, and s h e was w hirl e d o u t beyo nd h e r depth. Edna trie d to s w i m b u t she di scov e r ed t hat th e c u rren t s ee med t o t u g a n d p ull at h e r w i t h s uc h migh t y stren gth t h a t s h e c o ul d n o t b r east i t. T h e g-i rl murm u r e d a prayer
PAGE 16

THE AMERIC.t\N INDif\N WEEKL. but tha t she was darting through the waves at a For the second time in his life, Maxwell Hyde again speed that s he never > vo uld have believed p os sible, \.Vas introduced to a feeling of surprise. He stuttered had she not experience d the sensatio n. Edna and stammered, his e y e s resembling the ha;rvest moon, breathed a sigh o f relief w hich was not h owever, while his wide-open r).1outh and utter bewilderment echoed by Maxwe ll Hyde. It i s no easy matter to s o appealed to Edna that, s he again burst into a merry carry a hundre d and t hirty-five p ound girl across a laugh. . rapidly flow in g 1iver, know in g at the same time that Yes," she repeated/ I am Edna Thomas, the missan outlaw o n e of the deadlie s t s h o t s in the world, ing heires s But dol}' t you think you had better go is s t a ndin g o n the ri ver bank awaiting an opportun-up and find out who occupies the house in, which we ity t o l o d g e a bullet in o ne's back. S o M axwell Hyde see a r light? And by the way, if you ca11 get a pair put as great d i stance between him and Jesse James as o f curling irons and a powder puff, I shall be obliged he p oss ibl y c o uld His eff orts soo n got them to the to y o u. middle o f the ri ver, and the n he all owed the current Maxwell Hyde. dumbJor shook his head, looked at to carry' him. d own stre am he merely swimming the girl, s1niled qnd hurrie' dly walked toward the light, -enough t o ke e p them b oth afl oat, and at the same time leaving Edna standing alone i the shadow.. to all o w him t o fill hi s lungs with air. had not The detectiV@looked into the house through a the slightes t idea in the w o rld where he was, but he window and saw that it was an old frame shack, oc
PAGE 17

fj THE AMERICAN .INDIAN WEEKLY. 15 and Frank James, followed by Jesse ran from the cabLn and began beating the immediate vicinity in every direction. The outlaws spread out like a fan and they expected that they would immediately find the couple they were pursuing. But fate was against them. No trace could be found of :Maxwe ll Hyde or Edna Thomas. They had vanishec;l completely. With angry oaths, Jesse instructed hi s companions to hurry to the 'river b eca u se in hi s mind he figured that this would be the objective point of the detecti ve. Jesse surmised that Max well Hyde would n o t take to the hi gh-road; knowing that the outlaws had horses with which to pursue him. It la cked o nly a few h ours fo morning, and Jesse knew that if Hyde remained in the vicinity, in a country prairie-like in its character, that when the morning broke, he w o uld be irnm e diatel v discovered. The only bit of woods t within many' surrounded i:,he haunted cabin from which Maxwell -Hyde had escaped. It was therefore a safe to assume that' the detective would hurry to the river. In his wish to recapture the detective and the heiress, Jesse his companions i n the race and reached the river bank far. in advance of them. His sharp eyes, ho'wever, did n b t see the detective and the heiress struggling in the middle o f the ri v er, 110r did see the gallant landing made 01'1 the opposite shore. "Tricked! hissed Jesse, with 'lnany fierce oaths. "Where in the worl d could that couple have gone to? They certainl y escaped me this time!" Jesse remained for nearly an h our, h oping against hope that some hidden no o k he could see the two beleaguered people is s ue. .But hi s h o pes met with disappointment, and he retrace d hi s steps and re j o ined his companions ,;h o had been equally as un-successful as he: r )laven t seen a s ingle trace o f them!" growled Clel Miller. "Nor I!" snapped Frank James. "It look s to me as if they had gotten clean o ft.: ' Jesse said not h ing, but w ith his head bowed walked g l oomi l y back to the cabin. He immediately d u g up the money obtained ; in the l oo t of the bank, and which 1 he-had buried, and concealed it in his m oney belt. Frank James watched him with curious eyes. "Well, that cfetective put o ne over o n us that time, clidn't he. Jesse?" cried Frank. "He. did!" vindktively repljed J e"se, a s he felt of his sore and swollen jaw. Maxwell Hyde has got the punch all right! "\Veil what are we a o ino to' do now?" asked Frank b I hel ples s l y _. '"Oh-" snarl ed Jesse,'' we're going t o do the we can. Clel, run out anp get the h o rse s ready. 'V\Te've got t Q dust out o f here in a hurry!" "It's all right to du s t out of here," sarca s t i cally re-joined Frank, "but where are you going t o dust to?" "To St. Louis." "What for?" "I'm going back t o old house." "You've got a butto n l oose somewhe r e I'm n o t as crazy as I look." \ Vhy aren't you?" ou. d o n t suppose that I'm going t o allow one rebuff t 6 daunt 1::e1 d o you?" When everybo d y i s kill ed and ,wounded more or le ss, what are you going t o do?" "I don't see any killed and wounded around here. r ca n d o some s h ooting yet i f my jaw i s sore!" Of course you can, Jesse but d o n't you see that your plan i s a: foelhardy one?" ''Why?" "That detective w ill beat us into St. Louis, and when we get there h e will h ave stirred up the_ pea l authorities so that we will be in the position .of the small boy who poked hi s finger into a hornet's ne st. ' 'That's all very well, but we can ;:;ting ome our: sel ves." ''That's true, but how many men do you suppose three meL1 can sting?" "Jus t as many as we have s hots in our revol ve rs." Yes, but d o n't you see, Jesse, i\Iaxwell Hyde will raise a hue and cry against u s and we will have to a of forty o r fifty _men? How long do you thmk wed las t under those Circumstances?" I don't care. I'm going back t o St: L o ui s, -and I'm _gom g to go back to o ld Meg's house! I'm going to get t o the b otto m o f tl11s mystery if I die with my boots on. No twent,y year o ld girl and a bum detectiv.e can euchre me out of those millions." "Oh, very well, I'm ready t o start any time you are." The three outlaws accordingly started back over the Natural Bridge Road to St. Louis. By the time they reached that. city, it was broad daylight. In sr)ite of that fact, Wtth a de speratio n born of the s ituatio n the th'ree men went directly to the h o me of old Merr: Leaving their horses 'in the street, Jess e who usual, planned the campaigns of the gang, in structed Clel Miller to remain with the ani1 ; 1al s and rruard them. Frank James was t old t o stand o n the of o ld l\tieg's home and bar the progress of any one who might try to go out of o r into the h o u se and] esse hims elf took up, the danger o u s mission of entering the room from which he had abducted the he iress now no l onger his prisoner. 'With hi s eyes blazing with wrath, Jesse James gave a 1 :esounding rap up o n the d oo r o'f o l d Meg's house. Enter! sounded a voice in a cracked treble. Jesse tore open the door and stalked in and then he staggered back in utter amazement. Seated o n a .chair in the. of the r oom, wearing a long r ed r
PAGE 18

/ 16 T H E A MERICAN INDIAN WEEK]",. Y. face and dre\v the bl o od in a moment. The horrible serpent twined about the woman 's wai s t awok e, and with hining eyes began his 1ngv i o lently. Fearless as he was, Jesse staggered back utterly astopi s h ed. He threw hi s hands back t o grasp his revol ve r wJ1e11 into the r oo m t here rang t he s ound of a,. c o l d, deadl y voi ce 'Hands up!" came the swift command. '\Vith the words, J e se fe lt the co l d p ressur e of a revol ve r barrel upo n the back o f hi s head. He knew in a m oment that he was a pri He daredn o t make a g rab fo r hi s revolver, fo r out of the corner of hi s eye h e saw gazing at him the mocking face o f Max well Hyde. 1 ''Put up your hands qu i ck added Hyde. "You are m y priso ner. Jesse James \iVith the swagger of the born outl aw, Jesse thrust' his I ands higl1 in the air. There was a start lin g click, and his wrists wer e dec orated with han d cuffs ).row utterl y unable t o m ove, Jesse felt : Max wel l Hyde r elieve him o f hi revolvers, and be knew that the fate he had so l ong dreaded had overtaken him. Fam o u s bandit as he was. he had fa ll en a prey to t h e pl o t of Maxwell Hyde, t h e detective, and was his pri soner! Jesse l ooked around with a sneer on h is face a n d saw that the r oo m was fill i n g u p w i t h a rmed i11en. But he breathed a sigh of relid w h e n h e heard the clatter of h o rse s h oo f s in t h e str ee t a n d knew t h a t C l e l :Miller a n d Frank J a'm es h ad escaped, ev idently havin g gained knowledge of the clrea9 elrama that had been e nacted in the si lent room. Jesse l ooked at Maxwell Hyde a n d g rowled o n e request. You've got me righ t ," he scoffed, "and I suppose I'll have t o take my med i cine, b u t w ill you tell me who thi s o l d witch is?" "Certainly;" rep l ied Maxwell Hyde. "J don't k now w h a t he r real nam e is, bpt in t h e fortune -tell e r's p r o fess i o n, v Jhere s he is m o re o r l ess k nown s h e i s called O l d Meg, t h e \i\Titch of the SerP.ent.'" "But i s n t she E d n a T h o m as, t h e c ri e d Jesse james. .. I s n't s he d isgu i sed as an o l d woman?" A g l eam of mer r iment s howed in t h e of Maxwel l Hyde. 'Dreams J es:::e James," he remark ed, "dreams! J would aclvi e you to change your b r a n d of liquor. The o n l y disguise that o l d Meg bears i s t h a t of o J d age. I rep eat, Jesse James, don' t d ream!" CHAPTER VIII. ' the \Vitch of the Serpent. in some unknown way, had lured Jesse James .to her r o om, and that s h e had thtrs al l owed a posse. of detec ti ves, headed by 'i\Ia...'n.Yell Hyde, to arrest the cl"esperado. )'i'axwell Hyde had spent so me t ime at t h e p i1e r on the :\I issi ss ippi River where he had la s t see n Ecll;a. Tho m as, in a Yain search fo r her. v\'he n h e found tha t s h e had utterl y disappear ed, he reverted to hi s old outlaw clays, walked clow n t h e thoroughfare toward St. L o u i s until h e came to a farmer's house, 1)r o k e into a barn, sec urttd a farm h o r se. and made the astonished beas t travel t o St . L o ui s at a pace he had not take n since h i s co l t days. Hyde hurri ed to police headquarten, explained the fact that J esse James ,,o u ld soon ,be a calle r on the old f ortune-teller, had s ec m'ed a posse of fifty dete cti v es a n d p l ain clothes men, h ad hurried back t o the f ortu ne -tel ler s h o me and with g r ea t adr oitt1ess had s u cce e ded in arres tingc hi ef o f ,the ,desperad0 gang. 'while h e vvas over j oye d at t h e arr es t of J esse, t h e r e was a fly i n t h e de tective's honeypot. He co ul d n o t reconcile t h e s i t uati o n with wbat he k new of t h e fac t s. He was par t i ally in the dark regar d ing tbe d isguise assumed by Edn a T h omas, b u t he h ad made u p hi s m in d af ter t hinkin g ove r all t h e circums t a n ces i n hi s possessi o n t ha.t "for so m e reason h e co ul d not fatho m t h e g irl had d isgui sed h e r se l f as o ld Meg-, but h e w a s utte rl y a t a l o_?s to underst a n d w h y s h e had t a k e n this course. A ft e r t h e arres t o f J e sse, h e had c losel y c rossq u es ti o n e d o l d Meg, and s h e had deni ed a n y complicity in the disguise. Her stor y, briefly t o ld -was tha t o n the clay that C l e l M ill e r h a d c alled at her. h 0 m e, s h e was v i s i t in g a frie n d, a nother fortune-telle r in a d istant p art of the ci.ty . O l d Meg sai d s h e hac!' l ef t the h o u se earl y i n the m orni_n g, a n d had not returned to i t until l a t e at nigl;tt. \i\Th e n h a d r e t umed, s h e 7 a id tha t s h e was utterl y a mazed to fin d the h o use u ptur' n ed, "sh o w i n g s i g n s of a struggl e a n d s h e t h ot!ght unt1l Maxwell Hyde h a d called upon her two h ours l:iefoie-t h e arrival of J esse Jam es, tha t h o m e h a d b ee n v i s itei:l by s n ea k thieves. 0 1d M e g d eni e d absolute l y k nowin g anything about the 1 n issin g lqeir ess, Edn a T h o mas, and her s in cerity s ee m e d to-be so appar e n t t h a t i n spite of himself Max>vell Hyde a lmost believed vVh e n h e had v i s ited .the fortuFJe telle r with whom o ld 1vieg cla imed. s h e h a d passed the fatal clay h e was greatl y sttrp rised to le arn that o l d Megs stor y was entire l y s ubst antiated. G r op ing in the.dark. a n d try in g t o pi e c e <;mt fac t a n d s uspi c i o n Maxwell Hyde saw o n e cle a r lig h_t. He IN JAIL. k new tha t J esse J a m es h a d a b d u c t ed the h e iress fr o m o l d Meg_'s r oo m I The fate o f Jesse Jam es ca n ea s j l y be imagin ed. Bound a nd ma1 acled and p l aced in t h e center of a g u a r d o f men with drawn rev o l ve r s, all k nowin g h i s desperate character, Jesse was m a r c h ed t o t h e jail where he was rece i ved \ V it h g reat p l eas u re I-li s b onds were removed a n d h e was tak en to a steel cell in t h e upper t i e r of cells of the innermt>st pri son. The newspapers issu ed extras a t li g h t nin g s peed, detailin g t h e stor y of hi s cap ture, b u t Maxwell Hyde carefull y e liminate(! f r o m t h e s t o r y of t h e cap ture, whic h h e gave to Hle host of r e p orters w h o he i egecl t h e jail, a n y informati o n of the a ppe.:"lr a n c e andd isappearan ce of Edn a T h o m as t h e h e iress. T h e reporters, therefore, o nl y knew that o ld Meg, He furt h e r knew tha t h e h a d r es cu e d the h eiress and a t im m in e n t d sk h a d negoti a t ed the danger o u s NI,ississi pp i River h a d talk ed w i t h the g irl w h o h a d ad211it ted her id entity, a nd w h o h ad t h e n d i s a ppear e d. Yet h e r e be f ore him was what appea r e d t o be a c o m p lete c h a in of ev id evce in d i ca tin g that the missing h ad n eve r b ee n in o l d Meg-'s h o u s e ' \i\T h a tever i s b ehind a]J t hi s mystery," a r g u e d Maxwell Hyd e to himself I a m left w h o lly in the bag so f a r as the h e ir ess i s c o nc e rn e d. I've got Jesse James a ll ri ght, but I m n o nea r e r the f ortune and the heir ess tha n I w a s w h e n I started It s eem s t o me, fioweve r tha t the o nl y thing l e ft f o r me t o d o i s t o try ..

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I THE AMERIC AN I NDIAN W:EEK LY. 17 somewh e r e else to finu a way out of t h i s h e lay in the &hadovv. His nervous smewy finger I' do n ot. think t hat C l e l and James w ill grasped t h e b i t of steel and he i n erted it within the dar e to remain l o nger in t hi v i cinity. Bol d and des locl5 of the door. His joy was boundles when he d i pe rate as they a re, t h e two men a r e not goin g to t ry' covered t hat he was confined in a steel cell which had to r esc u e J esse, and from m y standpoint, i t looks to bee i;t. locked separately from the other ce ll the jai l me as i f Jes e J ,ames was i n ,ai l to stay. I think I'll at t hat t ime not having been fitted out with the new g 0 t o m y h o t e l and get some re s t. T-o-mOITOw morni ntei ;clepende n t l ock ing system whereby t h e action of ing 1'11 go a n d see Ander o n F i s h, tell hi m all I've openin g o n e cell door will open al l the other cells i n eli covered, and get hi s advice as to what co urse I had a t i e r of steel str'uctures, and thu in the Yery act of better purs u e.' ope nin g, a l a r m t h e prison o-uards. }[eanwhil e J esse Ja111es sat in his cell, torn by angry Jesse felt with great care the s ide of the lock e mo ti o n s. He knew t hat he wa. in a s ituation that with hi s steel saw, unti l he reached the little wheel require d a ll hi s ab ility' to extricate h imsylf f r om, but whi c h moves the J ock backwar d and forward. He. ftom t h e momen t of h is arrest, he began t o p lot how p ressed hi s steel saw firmly upo n thi s wheel to the. to .free himse lf f r o m thi s di lemma. A man not of the ri ght a nd to his g reat p leasure, saw t h e bolt noise crimi na! w o r ld would h ave thou ght it impossibl e for l ess l y s hoot b a c kward. He knew that the steel door J esse J a m es t o .escape frbm bi s cell. IIe was i n t he to hi s cell was now open, and that i t needed but o n e st' r o ngcst cfll of a str o rJig j ail, wellg u a r tl.e d b y many slight pu s h to a llow him egress t o t h e c orridor w here brave m e n. .Not a s in g l e opportunity see m e d appar-sat the ent t h a.t wou l d l ea d t o hi s escape. I n f r o n t of hi s c ell Jesse' s next s t e p was to c rouch low and 'slowl y doo r s t oo d a11 armed g uard He h ad n o and up t o the ce ll 'doo r T h e g u a rd had r e lapse d he h a d n o f 1 : i e n d w h o co ul d o n e i n t o into slumbe r .and fo r him, had t aken Xeve rtheless, h e d i d n o t despair, b u t h e waited until a l onge r time than u s u a l for h i s excurs i o n i i 1t o drean 1 ni g h t befo re P,Uttin g into exec uti o n a p l a n that his l a n d This w a s J esse James's o pportuni t y b r a in h a d <>on<>e i v ed. H e s t e pped n o i s e l essl y into the c orrido r. v Vith a \ Vhen t he-. jail had s u n k t o !=ilumber and there was b ound h e stood over t h e s le ep in g guard. H i s hands o nl y t o be heard t h e soft breathi n g ai 1 d i n a r t iculate clos ed a r ound the man's n e ck and with the strength m 'nrmnrs o i t h e prisorJers w i t h in its co nfi n e s Jesse o f de sperati o n h e pulled the guar d back b o d i l y S o b e g a n to tak e acti o n He watc hed h i s guard sudden was the attack that the guar d cli d n o t make a a n d saw that the man had s ecured a n iro n c h ai1' in s in g l e s o u nd. J e sse carri ed h i m into 'the cell, gagged w hich h e had seated hims elf. Occa s i o n ally J e ss e no: and b o u n d him, laid h im o n the c o t p lucked h i s r e ti cecf t hat the g uard w o u l d dro p i n t o a n uneasy v o l ver fr o m its h o l ster, searched the man' s p o ckets s lumber, b u t w o ul d qui ck l y awa k e n hi m se lf'an d w o u l d u n ti l h e f o un d the key. t o the ce ll c1. oo r and t hen again peer into th e ce!J fr o m w h e r e he s a t, and upo n s eein g he s t epped o u t into the c orrido r a n d l o cked the door the f o r m o f Jesse l ying upo n a c o t withi n t h et ce ll a s he did so. T h e outl a w pi cked up the guard's cap w o ul d dro p off t o slumber a g ain and p l aced i t o n his bead. Fortunatel y f o r J ess e the T h i s gave J esse afi iC!ea l-Te stealth i l y arranged the g u a rd was n o t i n a unifo r m but wore a dark suit of cl othi n g o n t h e c o t s o t h a t i t assumed t h e fur n \ o f a cl othes, and a s Jesse a l so wor e cla rk clo t hing and he man. It requir ed intens e deftness t o a c c o m p li s h this and the g uard were about o f the same height and purpose. T h e ac t i o n h ad t o b e take n i n t h e few sec-build, T esse fel t that i n the h alf-darkness o f the COJ;o nd s o f s lu mb e r w hi c h the guard permitted hi m s elf r i d o r l;e m i g h t escape. and b y great Jesse p l aced a b un d l e o f clothin g :Jesse started dow n the c orricldr tow.ar d the main o n t h e c o t and d o dged b ac k out o f t h e line of v i s i o n door at it s e xtreme end, and jus t a s he did s-e, h e o f t h e g u ard, during o ne o f tl1e l a p ses o f his n1omen-:saw. a man c o m ipg him Her e was a s i t t .Iat i o n tary s l un1ber that the outlaw had n o t barg ain e d for. He knew that Jesse hardly da r e d breath when h e had acc omplis h e d t h e o nc o m i n g figure was that of the g u ard \ v h o was t o t h e p r elimi nary step i n hi s pl o t. H e watched t h e relieve t h e o n e h e had cap tured. v Vhat was b e s t t o g u a ru narrow l y f r o m a r ound a c orner o f t h e c o t an d b e clo ne? Shoul d h e attack the g uard? If j1e d i d so, saw that t h e offici a I h ac! n o t di scov e r e d t h e trans p os iw d ul d the re not be a n alarm g i ven? J es s e stoo d-ir t i o n 1 r esolute a n d then Dame F ortune c o ncluded t o s mil e F i v e'ten fifteen mi nutes pass ed a n d s till Jesse l a y u p o n hi m. co i l e d lik e a g reat s n ake, awaiting hi s opportu n i t y t o I s Jesse J a a s l ee p?" murmured the o n c oming take o ne m o re step t o ,var d hi s l i be rati o n. g t )ard. "Oh i f I had a oun '' h e m u rm u red f o "Sur e whispered Jesse \i\That made y o u so ,., 1 ? " J u s t q n e s h o t woul d do m e a l o t o f g o od just n o w. o n g 1 d I overs lept. I wasn't due until t hree o'clo ck and T esse l ooked w 1 t h l o n g m g e v e s at a S I ver mou n te 1 t t ft 1 whic h dan g led t h e guar d's bel t, a n d h e 11t sk_o n Y b e nt?n ,;mu e s a e r t 1ree n o w vVhat you I 'f GC m o a o u vowed t o hi m s elf that' h e w o uld get t 1at J "' h e ever c;u c ceeclecl i n b r eaki no o u t o f h i s c e ll. ' Q h, n othmg. I guess I'll turn in a n d get som e :-, t" A d i stan t clo c k outs i de the j a il b oo med t h e h o u r res . . . o f thre e befo r e Jesse t oo k furt h e r steps T h e n h e T h e g uard g lanced m t o the ce ll and seemg careful1y wrenched t h e h ee l o f hi s r i g h t boot off. I n a figure lymg on t h e cot, fel t St)r e 1t was of Jess e a littl e h ollowed out space w i t hin t h e b i t o f l eathe r James. Jesse walk e d s l o w l y d own the c
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THE AMERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. Jesse to proceed on his way. Jesse found himsel in a room which was untenanted. At one end of the room he saw narrow staircases and he boldly walked down the stair s and found him self on the main floor of the j a il. At this point, another dilemma confro nted hih1. l:..Ie did not know whether the guard of the jail slept within i t or not, but he made u p his mind that in all probabili ty, the guards when off duty, left the bui ldin g, so Jesse calmly walked forward un til he had reached .the main doo r fron tin g the street. He saw a man sitting in a c h a i r by this door, h o ldin g in his hand a large key w hi ch Jesse knew at once was the key to the door itself, and as Jesse turned around, he saw that t);le rf1an was looking at him and to his horror discovered that the g u ard was a youn g man from Jesse's own Jackson County, in M issouri. "That fellow knows me all ri ght," Jess e muttered to himself, but there was no opporttmity for him t 0 hesitate. Hesitation would mean instant discovery. Discovery would mean hi s return t o his cell, so Jesse s louched along, keeping in the .shadow as well as he could and h oping that the si n g le gas jet which' light ed up the dismal place would n o t betray him t o the T h e guard looked at Jesse, and seeing the prison offic ial cap up o n hi s head, thought at first that Jesse was the guard o n hi s way out of the prison to hi s home. T hi s allowed Jesse to get within a few fee t of the guard, hut this ac ti o n brought Jesse's face into the reli ef o f the li ght, and the optlaw saw from the express ion the other man's face that hi s iaentity had been discovered. "Jesse James murmured the g uide Jesse hurled him se lf upon hi s OP,ponent, grasped him by the throat and bore him backward. The action made a tremenclot1s n o ise in the narrow space, and Jesse felt the man's form under bin) begin to writh as he. t ried to e_cape the encirclin g hand about his throat. The outlaw's bl oo d was up, however, and awaiting a n opportunity he brought his fist clown upon the guard's fa<>e with all his force. The biow was s uffici e nt. The guard stretched out insensible. Jesse 1 :obbed him of his key, in a trice opened the l;>ig door to the jail stepped out i'l1to the free air of the street, and rapidly, yet not at top speed, was lost in tfie g l oo m of the early m orning. ) esse plunged into a network of street s at the left, and a s he did so, he heard 'the jail the sce n e of a wonderful turmoil. A s hot or two rang out. He heard wild cries and the booming of a deep-toned qell. Jesse James laughed to himself in sard onic fasl1ion as he plunged deeper .and deeper. into the city's str. eets. Maxwell Hy9e's, p risoner had "br bke n jail." CHAPTER lX. \ OLD MEG AND THE HEIRESS. Edna Thomas, the heiress, when she was le f t a1one o n the pier by h e r gallant resc u er, Maxwell Hyde, had not melted into obscurity without having a reason for s uch strange action .ltho ugl1 Maxwell Hyde did not know it, as soon as he had left h er, s h e had htU'riecl to the main road, and had walked back to St. Louis until she reached a 1ine of street cars, and had then gone to the Union s tatiofl vvhere s h e passed an hour or tw() walking up -and n. Her brisk walk had somewhat dried her wet clothing, but there were many ctuious g lances directed to'.vard her as she entered the station, but no o n e spoke to her. She availed herse lf of the fa cilities in stati o n to make h e rself presentable, and as soon as daylight broke, she left the Union station and weat to a restanrant and got sonjething to eat. After a s ubstantial breakfas t s h e called a cab and hurried to a dry good s store. There she purchased a trunk and a quantity of clothing 'and ordered the cabman to place the trunk up on the box of the cab and to return to U:ni o n statio n. The g irl then sent her trunk to the baggage room and re-entered the station and remained another hour dismissing h e r cab mean wh1le. She ca ll eq another cab,' ; Securecl her_ trunk anci drove at o nce t o the Planters' Hotel, where s he en gaged a room, sending her 'card t o the' clerk at the desk, which bore the name, Miss Edna Thon1as, St. Louis." The gi rl we'nt once t o her 'a!];>aitn1en\:' and 'then sat clown to think over her situation. The heiress had a well defined plan i n mind as t o her future a c tions. She had learned through a newspape{ extra ediyon which she had purchased, of the arrest of Jesse James and of 'the fact that Frank James a 'ncl C l e l 1vliller had es caped. She read with some amuse men t the accounts w[1ich in no way implis:ated her, and she was highly amused .at the <;J.Stuteness of Maxwell Hyde. Then a note to old Meg, which she inailed as soon as $he left Hie h o tel, about an hour later, and then after a short walk she r-eturned to the h o tel a nd waited until her watch told her that it was eleven o' cioc k. The g irl called a cab and ordered the driver to go to the o ffice o f Anderson Fish, whom she \ veil knew was the executor o'f her fathet's estate. S h e vvas told that :Mr. Fish was in hi s office, but that he was very busy. Edna l o0ked at the clerk who spoke t o he.r fished a five-dollar gold piece from her pocket-boQk and handed il; to the clerk with a dazzling sm ile. "Telt Mr. Fish," the girl said, "that a lady; has called upon ,him fot: th,e pu,rpose of giving him inq tna ti o n regalding m atters concerning the estate of the late J Rr:anklin ,Thomas." ., 'The clerk was at the n;te'ssa 'g'e, bttt, the five-dollar gold piece and his o wn curiosity caused him t o take the message t o hi s employer., Mr. Fish was seated in hi s office, and when Edna entered, he arose from his chair looked at her in open-mou'tb.ed amazement. He recognized in a moment the likeness t!1e girl bore t o the dead her father. He' cli'cl not know how to act. He felt that he was in the presence of a woman was goin g t o g ive him some astounding information and Eclna1 seeing the, expvessiof1 o n lawyer ' face, plunged immediately into h e r subject. . think,' fro m your expression, that you know me, she said. "No, I do n o t know yqu," the lav'\ryer replied, "but I ca n fancy w h o yo u are o r who you claim to be." "'I am Edna Thomas," the g irl sai<'i. Lawyer Fish l ooked incred.ibl e "If you are Edna Thomas, why do you .come t o m e in this myst e ri o u s fashion?" '"I can o nl y g ive you the usual woman's reasonBecause!" smiled the girl. "That i s aot a reason. It's a phantom." It i s o nl y r easo n I will g i ve at present." If you are Miss Thomas, the h eiress to the milyoos .,, J

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THE AMERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. 19 left by; Franklin Thomas, you doubtless can tell me some method that you have outlined which will fully convince me of your identity." "I did not come to-clay to make any claims upon my fatloler's estate. I understand that you are attorney for the Western and Southwestern Bankers' Guild and that you know Maxwell Hyde." The 'lawyer nodded. I d'o not know whether you know or not, but, Mr. Hyde rescued me last night from the Jesse James gang by whom I had been abducted." ''I did not know of that fact " I think that I am not yet safe from furtl{er at tempts abduct me although I have es<;aped this t ime, arid my visit to you has more to do with the Jesse James gang than it has with the question of obtaining my father's estate. Before w e discuss the qu. estion of your protection, I would like to ask yot1 a few questions. " Ask all you wish." Do you intend filing a claim ior the estate?" "I don't know." You don't knqw " Exactly. I don't know." That is a straNge answer." Edna did not reply for a few moments. She did not wish at the present time to do more than declare her identity to the lawyer. Her course of action was due to a secret which she wished to keep within her own possession for the present. She k11ew that if she told the lq.wyer just why she was in the frame of mi11d that made her weigh a claim to millions, he would with h i s natural sl;lrewdness pick her mind of her secret. This she did not propose to have happen at present. "You may think it strange, Mr. Fish," the girl con t inued, for me to sit here and calmly tell you that I do not know whether t want my father's millions or not. With your materialistic mind you probably: do not know that there are other things in this world l ,)esides mere ll).Oney." "Yes," d ri ly repl ied. the attorney, I have a lways found that th lack of money is sometimes harder to bear than its possession." "That is the answer that I would have sup osed yo u would giveme. I want to say t 9 you h0wever, that I am not averse to regaining possession of m y father's millions if I can do so along a line that I have marked out for myself. All m:r life I have had suffic ient. sufficient money is better than too much. Jf I should my father's money,_ I may have to change my standard of living, and I may have to take up a -phase that I do not like. I am going to tell you, 1 1owever, that I know all the circumstances surroundmy abduction when I was an infant. I know who stole me, and why. The people who stole me 11ave all their lives cared for me If I were to claim my for;tune, can law who stole me away from m:r father m my mfancy? L;Lwyer Fish was surprised at the words o the git:l. 1n his mind he saw why she was hesitating. l but he d1cl 110t betray this knowledge upon hi s face. "As a lawyer," he replied, "I do not think that there woulq be any attending t:he. person who $to l e yolf in infancy at this late clay, in case you were able to substantiate your claim. The o nl y person w ho would be liable to take legal action, would be ,yourse lf. From what you have told me I do not think that you feel like taking such action "No, I do n o t, murmured the girl. "Then the reason why you do not claim your father's estate is because of the fear' you have that the law might s tep in and touch those who abducted you in fancy and who since then have cared for you, educated you, and, while they may have done you a wrong by taking you from your natural environment, appear t o have succeeded in producing quite as charming a young woman, and I may say as ingenuous a o ne, as your dead father could have done. But whatever pain he may have suffered in the year s that have gone by, are buried with him in his !!rave. My t o you, young l ady, i s to resume the natural pos1t10n which your fortune gives you and to immediately employ an attorney t o substantiate your claim in the courts of Missouri. " Thank you," replied Edna. I will think over your advice and will give you my answer later. In the meantime I want yo u to consider what I have you to be a professional communication. vV e both know what that means to a good lawyer.'' "I see, young lady, that you are somewhat versed in the law. The communications of a client to a law ye r, those made to a reli g ious adviser, or to a phys ician may not be revealed unl ess with the c0nsent of the person interested I will respect your astonishing communications to me, but my advice to you is-Get a good lawyer and get o ne quickly! "We will now take up the question of Jesse J ames, if you do not mind," the girl said. Very good," replied the law yer. ''Of cdurse -we both know," the girl went on, "that when Jesse James robbed the bank at Cemetery Hill, Missouri, he learned the fact that I was heiress to my father's estate. Coul'd you tell me how it was that all the acts were in a tin box in s ide the vault of the robbed institution?" ''My dear young lady, i:licl you not know that your .father owned the Cemetery Hill when he was alive and that the major portion of the stock in the Bank is now a portion of your fatl;J.er's estate?" I did not know it. "It i s so, nevertheless. Nearly all of your father's personal papers have been stored ince his death in the vaults of the Cemetery Hill institution. It was .,an unlucky moment that turned the attention of Jesse James tb that bank. But if I were you, I would not mourn over the lo ss of the papers in the tin box which Jesse James has, for after all, they consist of merely reports of detective agencies, all of which showed that old Meg, the \!\fitch of tlie Serpent, could, if sh e chose, .tell where you were to be found Now tell me, p l ease, what i s the inner cord that binds you and that fortune-teller. together." "No, no, no!" rejoined Edna, "I will not tell you. "Why not?" I have reasons which I propose t Q keep to myself. If at any 'time that I can unseal my lips and tell you w hat:{ those reason' s are, I assure you that I will do so. At present, my lip s must be sealed. vVhat I want you to do i s to take s9me step to protect me from Jesse James. I have passed one night as his prisoner and I assure you that the night was not happily spent. I do. not to be captured again by him. And therefore I ask ,YOU what to do."

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2 0 THE A M ERICAN INDIAN W EEKLY. :-Tr. F i s h turne d t o a b ell o n h i s desk a n d r a n g it s h arpl y \\'h e n a n office t h e room, t h e l awye r instruct e d h i m t o g o Jmmeci Jately_ to the hotel o f :\l ax\v ell Hvde and in struct that detecti ve t o hasten withn u t clc l a v t o hi s office I 1 T h e r e iso nl y o n e ma n 1\'ho ca n say e you t hat. I know of. f r o m Jeo:se J a m es a11cl h i s gang," the lawyer s aid. ''Tha t -M1an i s ':\lax\\ell H yde. Go back t o t h e Planter s Hut el. w here] t h i nk y o u sai d yon wer e sto p p i n g a nd a :- raxwel l c o m es t o t hi s office 1 w ill se n d h 1 m t b vou 'Yo u may have eYe r y c onfide n ce in h i s di s c reti o n a n d a bility to a id y o n. a r ound hi m al i \e wi t h hi s e nemies h e knew thai a ny thi n o i n hi s attir e tha t exc ited critic i s m o r l a ughter "' w o uld e n d i n h i s iden t ificati o n. Jesse h owe:ver was a m a n of rbou r ces, a n d h e w aite d unt i l h e h a d ridden about a furth-er and the n a young man w i th a broad w hi te fel t hat o n hi s head coming clo \ vn the d ese rted street, Jess e rode ove r t o the m a n l eane}l d o w n p lu c k ed th e hat fro m the stranger's and plac 'ecl_ i t on h is own f o re head. .. How da r e you cri e d the stranger. \ N h o a r e y o u a nyway?,. f esse d r e w a f i \e -c!olla r gold pi e ce f ro m the pock e t an'd d r opi)ed i t a t t h e feet of t h e strang e r. The r e i s money t o b u y you a new hat,'' th e outlaw CHAPTER X l a u g h e d. .. Y o u g o h ome and t ell y o u r w i f e that -' Jesse James h o n ght you a hat in exchange for your old THE. JAMES G A N G ; \ T P.!I,Y. Jesse James hurried awa y after hi s escape f r om_ j ai l Leaving the w hite face d a n d astoni s h ed un t i l h e r ea ched a ; s a l o o n i n th e l o Jvest quarter ot St. s t a nd i n p aghas t o n t h e s idewalk J e ss e spurred h 1 s L o uis. h o r s e a gallo p a n d laim c h ed off d o w n t h e s t r ee t W h e n h e e 1ite r ecl t h e sal o o n it was Y acant save for a t a speed tha t d efied purs u i t. a n o ld c o lored w o m a 1 r w h o sa t b e hi n d t h e bar awaitin g In turnin g all th e e vi l s o f hi s posi ti o n over in hi s c u stom e rs. The wom a n wa:'i a.n e x t remel y fat n e -mind, Jess e d e cid e d tha t h e p r obabl y w o u l d be abl e g r e s about sjxt y year s of age. Jesse Jam e s a s h e t o rej o i n hi s c o mpani o n s -som ew here near the Natural e n te r ed look ed a t t h e o l d woman narrowl y to b e B ridge Road. At the e n d of a n hour s r i d ing, h e saw sure h e k n e w h e r aml w h e n h e had id e n tified her t h e f orms of two m e n m o u nted o n h o r s e s coming a l o n g in hi s mi n d h e w a lked u p t o the bar. t h e t horo u g h fare a n d when t h e h o r semen h a d ap. H ello, 1\'fammy S ue!" p r oach ed nearer to h i s i nten s e joy the men p roved' "Ef it a in t Jes:se James t h e i 1eg r ess ? a i el. "Ho w 1 to be hi s brother F r a n k a n d C l e l M ill e r. in the w o r l' d i d y o u b r e ak j ail?:. Jesse wav ed his stol e n h a t ancl Frank J a m es gave a "Never mi nd. \ N hat I w a n t t o g-e t i s a h o r se. I l o u d s h out w h e n h e saw hi s b r other, a n d i n a fe v v w ant a rroo d o u e a n d P m willi n g t o pay fo r it. m o m ents m o r e, t h e t hree outlaws were again togeth e -r. T h e e x p l aine d t h a t the r e was a horse _in the Jesse explained q ui ck l y how h e had escaped f r o m jail. s t a b l e s tha t s h e h a d b o u g h t o f a negr o h o r s e th1ef f o r a n d the pleasu re o f t h e o u tlaws over the e scape o f the i r o n e hund r e d d ollars She offe r e d t o s ell t h e h o r s e a .nd leader \ vas inte n s e : a saddl e a n d b ri d l e t o Jesse f o r two hund r ed a n d fift y I figure d they w o u ldn't k ee p you in jail l o n g d olla r s T h e o u t law embr a ce d t h e opportunity w i t h J e ss e, said F rank a l acri t y a n d as soo n a s t h e w oman had gone to th_e "Th e o nl y way t o k e ep Jesse in a cell," l a u g hed stabl e1 saddled a n d bridl ed t h e h ? r s e and b r o u ght 1t C l e l M ill e r "woul d be t o p u t him in a ce ll after h e was aro un d t o t h e f r ont street upo n whH;:h t h e saloon s tood; d ead." Jesse c o un t e d o u t the m o n ey into avari c i o u s palm "I' m n o t so sure I \iVOUlcll1' t _get up t h eri and ge:: o f t h e sal oo n k ee pe r and m o un ted h1s h o r se. out, 1;emarke d J esse I a m put, but by this time. It w a s ''vit h a fe elin g o f j o y t h a t h e found h e was t h e r e mus t b : e a n y number of p osses sear c hin g t h e rid i n g a K entu c k y n k n e w t hat t h e a nim a l h a d b e e n bred i n the fa m o u s blue have b e e n c h a s ed before A g ood many me n w h o g r ass regi o n o f XZe ntucky . c h a s ed u s aren t c hasing a nyb-od y : ; m y m o re If I were "It cloe: a man a l o t o f g oo d to throw h1s leg over in y o u r p l ace J e ss e, I d h ik e f o r old-Jac kson C ounty a aoocl h o r s e Jesse to h i mself : I ca n T hose fello w s w o n t cla r e t o follow u s ther e and I oet avvav fr o m every m a n w oman and child in S t t h ink it's g ettin g p retty danger o u s to be laying-t o ni s with t hi s beas t If I k new w h e r e F r a nk a n d a r ound h e r e Let's s t a r t f o r h o m e C l e l M ill e r w e r e I c o ul d j o i n t h e m and we in "No t muc h ," sai d Jesse.' 'I'm goin g t o g-et t hat s p i te o f t h e tro u b l es t h a t been thro u g h ml g h t g irl yet and ge' t t h a t m o ney! Don' t you think tha t get our haNd s o n t h e milli o n s after a ll. ] m g o in g to l e t t h e fac t t hat the r e' s t w o hund r e d m e n J e. s e r o e l e thro ug-h t h e s t r eets o f St. L o ui s w i t h m o r e or J ess, after m e sto p me in this clas h for mil-a puzzl e d mind. H e d id n o t k n o w 1t woul d l i o n s b e wi s e f o r h im t o r e tqrn t o the V l CI11Jty of the Natural B ri drre R o ad. o r t o b r a n c h o u t in a di ffe ren,t "It s e e m s t o m e, Jesse t hat we\ e goin g too fa r in "' 1 this thing, r e m arke d C l e l M ill er. \A.T e have ma<;le direc t i o n H e kne \ v that h i s e cape f r o m t 1 e Jal ll1 1 1 som e m o ney out of t hi s t ri p \i\ h a t s the m a tter w1t 1 St. L o u i s was b y t hi s t i me a m a tter o f comm on, propd f 'cl Jk _drawineout o f this gam e lettinga ll this hue a n c r y e r t y. I n fact, a news boy d a rted out .r o m a s ewa f a n d tri ed t o s ell him a paper. Jesse s t o pped Iu s h o r s e di e away, a n d c o min g bac k a nd gettingthe gJrl a t er-1 1 1 wards? a n d batwht t h e p a pe r and saw t 1e g reat stanng 1 eac lin e s otbl oc k t'y p e whi c h a n n ounce d Jesse J a mes "Yon like a c razy m an!" r ep lied Jesse B r ea k s J a il! "Maxwell Hyd e, b y the t im e we could get b a ck, Jess e n o ti ce d tha t t h e newsboy -st a r e d at him_ c ; it--vvo uld h a v e got to that g i r l turne d h e r over t o t hat ica ll y a n d then h e r e membered tha t he w a s n d m g lawyer who's running h e r fathe r's e state, and woul d t h r o u g h t h e s t r ee t s w i t h out a h a t. )Nith the town have cl eane d u p the rewar d If we're goin g t o ge t

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I< THE AMERlCAN INDIAN \VEEKL Y. 21 her at all, we've got t o get that h eire s s now. Tomorrow will be t oo l a te, perhaps.. Don' t yo, u see that the only chance we have t o get a piece of that fortune i s l;>y capturing the girl again and then reopening negotiations wit!} the executo r of the es t ate he will b e willing t o pay u s m o n ey for the return of the heiress?" : Dnt don't you see ," expostulated Frank, "that when :Maxwell Hyde t oo k the g irl away from u s, he figured o n d oing jus t what we propose t o do? How do you knr,>w but that by this time Maxwell Hyde has n o t escorted the girl t o the o ffice of Anderso n F i s h revealed the id entity of 'the g irl t o the lawyer and clea_ned up' that reward?" I know b etter than that," said Jesse "How do you know?" interrogated Frank. '' Because I b ought an extra edition of the news paper, issu e d n o t an h our ago, and while I find plenty of news about the escape of Jesse J a me s, n o t o ne word d o I fmd r e l ating t o the r eturn of .Edna Tho mas. If the girl h a d b ee n returned t o Ai1de rson F i s h, it would have been s uch an astounding piece o f news that the papers. would be filled with it. J esse i s rig-ht, remark; ed Clel. Dut w h a t d o you propo. e t o do?" l m goin g t o strike across country," said Jesse, until I can ge t around S t. L o ui s and come into town by a n othe r r oute. \ IVe can t t o get back again as we are n ow. My pla n i s t o r a id so me farmer' s h o use and get some d iffer ent cl othing, and when w e are able t o disguise ourselve s make a circuit of the town cross the river far above S t. L o uis and get into the city by an enti r e l y different route." "But, Jesse, won't the autho riti es be w -atching for you that way?.!: ''No," answered Jesse firml y. \ V h y not?" a s ked F rank. I fixe d all that," said J esse How? asked Frank. When I pin ched the hat off that fell o w I t o ld him to go h o me and tell hi s wife that-Jess e James did it. "vVhat a c onfounded fool tric k that was!" Frank. "You have bro ng ht d o w n the police upo n u s bv that act." '''Not much I have n t r e j o ined Je. sse. "That f oo l stranger has t o ld by this time at l eas t a hundred men that Jesse James t oo k hi s h a t. A t l eas t seventy five o f thosehundred m e n have sent this word t o the po li ce. Every --polic eman in town will hurry out here. expecti11g to capture m e here i t 1 this vicinity. "They'lL d o it all right," 'vhispered Clel. "No, they won't!" "\Vhy not?" a sked Frank. Because I don't pro p o s e t o -rema in here t o be captured. I'm goitw t o find h o w fast thi s h o rse that I have bouo-ht can"'carr y me in a few h ours Y our fel lows turn "'my h o rse l oose The police w ill find the ani mal o-razin o alono the and after they h av e 'got it htheir fool noddle s that it i s Jesse .T h o r s e w ill s p end val u a ble time in hunting for T es se, which will give said J es s e plenty of time t o ar' rive h e n ce. Come on, boys! Jesse put spurs to hi s h o r se, a t:d the p art? wer e s oo n m a n y miles f r o m the sce ne wht c h the p o h ce, sever a l h ours l a t e r as Jesse had predicte d se le c t ed as the Y e r y spot in which they would the o utlaw. T h e r e was much beating of bus h e s nclmgs t o and fro o n the part of the police, and finally they came across Jesse James' s h o r s e which one membe r Qf the posse pro n ounced after an examination, t o be one of the fa\ orite s teeds of the infamo u s outlaw. This identifica tio n whetted the curiosity of the authorities, and they beca'me sure in the ir own minds that Jesse was secreted somewhere in the vicinity. They soo n learned, h ow e ve r that while they had arrested Jesse James' s h o r se, th.ey had n o t arrested the animal's outlaw ri der, and cres tfallen they returned t o the jail in St. Louis and admitted t o a h orde o f waiting reporters, that they did n o t hav e the slightes t id e a as t o where J es s e James c o uld be found. By thi s time, Jesse and hi s two c ompanio n s were within twenty mile s of St. L o ui s, riding along a country r o ad. It was three o 'clo ck in the afternoo n o f an extremely h o t day .. Better ride around that v illage ahead of u s, cau-tioned Frank James. I think n o t ," replied J esse. "Any o f you fellows know the name o f v illage'?" I d o n t kno w its name, but it l oo k s like a tank t'own, replied Frank. . . <.I d o n t think anybody around here t s !table t o kno w u s, said Jesse. "Let' s u s ride ri ght into the town, g o up to a s t o re, walk in, h o ld up the s tore proprieto r and 'get some foo d. I'm h ollo w down t o mv bootheels. 'It was a n o ticeable fact about Jesse James that n o matter how much m o ne y he had, n o r h o w muc h h e secured in hi s law l e s s career, he hac! made up hi s mind never t o part with a cent for the o f anything if there was a fair chance of gettmg tt b y some deed o f crime. Jesse James ought t o hav e known better than t o engage in the petty r obbery of a c ountry s t o r e when his eas ie s t way would have b ee n t o have oone t o the s t ore and f o r a few dollars, made all the necessar y purchas e s 1 So the entire .party started clow n the m a m street o f th i s nnJm own t o them, c ontented 'little o ld v illa o e. in a quiet part o f the country where n o one for m oment drea m e d tha t the quiet r iders ent e rin g their peac e ful v ill ag e were the bandits of the blood'' band of Jackso n C ounty. At the s tore, Jesse swun g off h i s h o r se and >valkecl within it with hi s revolver in hi s -hand. The outlaw ordered a gray bearded half-farm e r h alfm erchant who s t oo d at a desk in the s t o re. to hustle out some food for him. C lel Miller and Frank Jaine s remained o n their h o r ses o u t s ide of the s t o r e in. the street, awaiting the r eturn of their fellow de spera d o. By one of those intang ible fla shes that s eem somehow i n quiet c ommttnities t o communicate fr o m m a n t o man, citi ze n s in the town became cognizant o f the fac t that Jesse and Frank James and C lel Miller were figuring in a h o ld-up at the o nl y large s t ore in the v il!ao-e. were seen running across the fie ld s bearing rifles, and soon a fringe o f fire began creeping the underbrus h as citizen s unde r cover commenced s h o o tin g at the outla\v s D o c t o r Man so n \.Vh eel o ck a phys ician in the t o wn . who was across the ; street in a n upstairs r o o m fired a r e vo lver at Frank J a mes's h o r s e hitting it in th e neck. F r ank J a m es returned the fir e with lig h t nin g rapidity. s ma shing the windo w s all about the d octo r and J e s se .who the s h o t s ru s h ed o u t o f the

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22 THE INDIAN WEEKLY. store, not stopping to get 'the bundle the. storekeeper had put up for him. As soo n as Jesse reached the street, he q1t loose with hi s revol ver. A young nian who r esided in the town fired at Jesse J a mes. The outlaw's hat went sp innin g away with the shot, and Jesse returned the .fire, shooting the youn g man thro ugh the lungs. The youn g man staggered a few feet and fe ll o n his face, but as he did so fir ed two rapid shots at Clel Miller. One of t]:le bullets struck C lel in the wri st, breaking it. By this time, Jesse had remounted his hors e and ordered a n instant retreat. C l e l M iller shifted hi s revol ve r to hi s left hand, and as the three outlaws spurred their horses to their utmost endeavor in a mad effo r t to get back into the country, a fired from a d o rway at C lel. \iVith quick fla s h Clel returned the s h o t hi s bullet cutting a furrow thro u g h the neg ro's cheek, but n o t killin g him. The outlaws, however, had had enough. 'I'hey retreated rapic)l y, and were soon out in the country again, a dilapidated trio. They had been caught almost for the fir s t time, but it was possible that sv ift and sharp punishment woul d be out to them at any moment The outlaws knew that they would be pursued, and w hile C lel Mi ller bound up hi s arm as well as he cou ld the. entire party scampe r ed away wi1h s uch speed tha t they sqo n their pur;mers. After a fift ee n mile ride, they fou 'nd themselves in of the suburbs of St. Loui&1 but o n the opposite side of the riv e r to the city. Here they turned thei}; horses lo ose in a l one l y field t q graze, hiding their saddles and bridles in the underbrush which skirted the field, and Jesse James led the way to the riyer where after some difficulty they secured a boat. lt was decided on the way over that Clel Miller, w h o was not known at all in that vicinity, better return at once to .Jackso n County by rail as far as he copld go. All a ound the h o me section of the J esse J a mes gang, they had many friends and, admirers. Jesse examined Clel M iller's wound, but he did n o t think that it was se rious. The bullet had broken one of the small bone"' in the outlaw's right wrist, but it lay so near the. surface that Jesse picked it out with hi s penknife. He roughly bandaged up the injury, and, as soon a s t he party had reached the St. Loui s s h ore, Clel Miller stole away in the darkness of the early evening intending t o board a late train ou t of the town for Jackso n County. Frank a nd Jesse James were therefore le f t .alone, _and in spite of the fact that t he y had not secured' a suitable dis g ui se, as they had planned, decided t o immediately r e-enter the c1ty, ai1d trust to )uck . This lu ck came t o them in an astonishing fas hi o n. A trifle cowed by hi s J asti attempt which ,oordered upo n the realms of petty thievery,' Jesse and Frank entered a c l othing store .a n d although a clerk in the store was so filled with the story of the escape of Jesse James from the jail that he could hardly have time to negotiate a saJ e of goods, the two outlaws purch ased two suits of cl othing entirel y different from the ones they were wearin g. They also bought two derby hats, and as they a lways wore the western. style of wide felt hat, this in itse lf changed their appearanc e materially. T he two outlaws c h a n ged their clothes in the store, and after the clerk had bundled u p the clothing they wore into the place, me ek ly pai d for the articles and left. Jesse rapidly retraced his steps to the riy.er, and after he had well weighted .his and his clothin g with heavy stones, dropped the respect1ve bundles beneath the water into which. they di 'sappeared forever. J esse could not help but laugh at Frank as he saw him in hi s new neat gray suit and black derby hat.'-" You l oo k like a whiskey' salesman," Jesse laughed. You l oo k like a psalm ,parson," replied Frank. "At all events," returned ']esse, "I 'we are effectuallv disgui sed. I think we are safe to go 'any, where in 'town we may feel like going to." T h e two outlaws had no trouble from this time on, at least for the in question, in roaming about St. Louis unobserved. Everywhere they found the town ringing w 'ith their story. They drifted from saloon to saloon, from dance hall to dance hall from theater to t h eater, walked about hotel as free as any citizen in St. Louis. There is more in this disguise business than ,people think for," murmured Jesse to Frank, as they turned into Vine Street, and saw knots ot excited citizens standing on street corners discussing their deeds of blood . ._ Wh t are you going, 1o do next?" asked Fr
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THE AMERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. 2 3 \tV here did she come from? 1 Heavens o nl y knows " Did she have a big snake with h e r ? " Did -she have wha t ? What d o y o u mean b y that?" "Did he signs o f l1av in g b ee n in the ri ver?" Snakes! River! Wha,t in the w o rld are you talk-. about? Who s aid an ything ab oHt ? n ake s or rivers? I Ji.ls t t o ld you that Edna Thomas h a d been here. M a x well Hyde grinne d s h e epi shly In his amazem ent at the a s t o ni s hin g news imparted t o him, he h a d f o rgotte n that Anderson F i s h knew n othing o' the f act that the heiress had disgui s ed herself a s o l d M e g the f ortune-telle r, had vioun d a hid eo u s s n ake around her w ai s t, and had f oo l e d him as w ell as Cl e l M ill e r. Nor did h e kno w that possibl y M r. F i s h w a s h o ldin g back the informa ti o n regardin g b o ld deed in res c uin g the h eiress "lt s e e m s t o me that theJ 'e i s n t very much m ore f0 r m e t o d o, Maxwell H y de remarked. You h av e gotten in t ouch with M iss Tho m as, now, and d o ubt less s h e i s ready t o throw off h e r d isguises and claim her f athe r's fortune. v Vhat els e i s there f o r me t o d o e x c ept to try t o recapture J ess e J ames." "There's a good d e al m o r e for you t o d o than you thi11k there i s,' returned M r. F i s h. M iss Thomas i s a t the Plante rs' 'II o t el. S h e i s reg i s t e r e d there in her own name, o r at leas t in the n ame that she s ays i s her own. She wants someone -to her a gains t any future attempts of the Jesse James gang t o abduct her: I hav e tol d her that if you w o uld c o nsent to take the questio n o f h e r protectio n upo n your s h oulders /tha t she co uld depend upo n your fidelit y and dis c retio n "That's all right, M r. F i s h I am willin g to d o a ll can t o aid you and t o a id M iss T h01nas in any p os sibl e w a y. I am w illin g t o t?-k e m y chances at getting killed by taking Jesse James o r any -member of his band, but I d o n t want t o act as fighting attendant to any woman o n earth, i f I c a n possibl y e scape it. I'v e had 'much experience in this world, and t ll t ake m y chances }ith any gun' man o n earth. I know pretty near what a gun m a n will clo. I c a n watch out f o r an y o f his tricks but I'm n o t smart enough t o figure w h a t Miss Tho mas w ill d o next. If_ you don't mind, and you can get somebody else to act as her squire, I would prefer t o hav e you do i t but don' t s t a ck me u p again s t a p y m a id e n w h o one m oment rece ive s me as an o ld fortune-telle r and the nex t m o makes me fis h her out of the ri ver a the imminent peril o f m y life That young l a dy's entil,"el y t oo swift f o r a p oo r d etectiv e like myself." Anderson Fis h lau g h e d l o udl y and long at the rem a rk o f Maxwell H y de. H e s a w in a m oment that H_ de was i n d e ad l y earnes t and did n o t relish t h e j o b o further protecting M iss Tho mas. But after a deal o f a r gument a 'nd mu c h p e r s uasi o n the tective a c cepte d the duty thrus t upon him, and M a x w e ll immedia t e l y repaire d t o the Plantets' H o t e l where h e sent hi s card t o M i ss Thomas The young lad y rece ived him i ; the public parlo r of the h o t e l and immedia,t e l y began thanking him f o r s a v in g h e r life D o n t m entio n it! stammered the d etective. ".I k now tha t it was a littl e thing," the g irl r e j oined "but I t pink I m goin g t o a s k a greater servi ce o f you altho u g h I 1 s ee t hat y o u l i ghtl y vcrl u e m y l i f e which, while it may n o t b e particularly valuable to yotl, I assure y o u i s n e c essary t o m y c ontinu e d ex i st-ence 1 ow I want t o tell you some thing that w ill surprise you " w h a t i s it? '1 ask e d the d e t ective, n o n p lussed at t h e t o n e of r a ill e r y ad opte d by the g iFl. I am informe d b y the c l erk at the h o t e l, that two men clad in g ray suits of c l othes and wea rin g eleroy hats, hav e b een a s kin g a fter me a t the h o tel de sk." Maxwell Hyd e fla s h e d a g l a n ce at the g irl's face. "Wh a t kind o f l oo kin g m e n were they? Did the clerk d escribe them t o you?" I sent f o r the cle rk myself ," replie d Edna, "and g ai n ed f r o m an ac c urat e desc ripti d n of the two 1ne n ." D e scribe them. " One man i s sai d t o have b ee n t a n broad s h o ul d ered, with brown h air and eyes. "Ah!" breathed thedetectiv e The s ec ond m a n i s s ai d t o be a little s h orter than hi s c ompanion with li ght h air and blue e y e s H e wore a tawn y musta.che. " Oh! " D o you know," c ontinue d Edna, "that I belie v e those two men were Frank an d Jesse Jam e s Maxwell H y de n o dd e d "'The y certainl y in some w a y s fit the d escriptions o f the two o u -tlaws the detec ti v e s aid. "But I have yet t o J ess e James and Frank J a me'S dressed in the mai1ner describe d b y the clerk. D o y o u know any youn g men that would answer the de scriptio n o f thes e two callers ? " I d o n o t,?' Edna. I d o n o t believ e that I know a d o z e n young men in the wor l d My life has always been a s h elte r e d o ne, and I am c o nfi dent tha t t here i s no one w h o would know me who w ould in a n y w a y answer the de s cri p ti o n o f those two callers.' : Maxwell H y d e paced back and f orth in the wide parlo r imnfersed in tho u ght. He had n o t rec ei ved the s li ghtes t atom o f inform a ti o n a s t o the whereabouts o f the James brothe r s since he had arrested Jesse James at o ld Meg's h o me, and at w h ich time Frank James and C l e l Mill e r had escaped upo n their horses. In the last an a lysi s of a ll the fact s surrounding this mysterio u s case, Maxwell H yde feli: c onfident that E dna Thomas had n o t seen the la s t o f the J ames boys. M axwell Hyde b e lieved that the stupendo u s amount of m o ney involved woul d lead the outlaws t o take the most de s petat e steps to r ecapture the g irl. She w a s the crux o f their c a mpai g n. v Vithout her, t h ere was n o possi b le ch a n ce o f their getting at b anke r's m oney M axwell Hyde bel ie ved tL1at in hi s effort t o protec t Edna T h o 1ij1as, he w o u l d once more have t o try conclH s i o n s w i t h t b e James boys. He felt sure that he w a s c orrec t in assuming tha t the call e r s wer e F r ank and Jesse James He communicate d this co ncl u s i o n to Edna. The g irl's f a ce turne d white, but after all sh e knew t h a t Maxwe ll H y d e h a d o nl y voic e d h e r own o pinion. She gave the _detectiv e an appealin g glance. \ i Vhat s t e p had I o u ght t o t ake f o r you t o p r otec t m e fr o m the James boys?" she a sked. I went t o the t h ea t e r t h e oth e r ni ght," r e p l i e d the detec t i ve, and I saw a five-act play. A ft e r twenty five word s h a d b ee n s p o k e n b y the actors o n the stag e had one man b e en posse ss ed o f the s impl es t common sen se, the play c o uld have cl ose d there without the other fom ac t s. But n o n e of the character s appeared

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' 24 THE AMERICAN 'INDIAN )VEEKL Y. to have the necessar y c,ommo n sense t o end the eli-think that either Frank o r Jesse James would dare to lemma and the play went on to the end." attempt to attack you here--" I see your applicat,ion. You mean. that If I had As the detective spbke, o n the mar.ble c ot'ridor out-a little common se n se, this play, a s -you call it, which s ide of the r oo m he heard the click of bootheels. There may end in a tragedy, for me, might be et).ded before wa: something omino u s and sinister iti the ootfalls. the othe r four acts are finished?" Maxwell Hvde jdmped t o hi s feet just as a crimson silk 'Exactly!" replied the detective. portiere wh-ich hung in the door of the room. in which I will admit that / I haven't much c ommo n sense, he and Edna Thomas were seated, parted, and there, and I must ask you to furnis h me with some." framed in the backgrouncJ of the blood-red curtain, 'Ver y well! I will try to d o that very thing. All s tood a man with a revolver in hi s hand. \ iVith a cry, ( you have got t o do, l\1iss is t o send f o r the Maxwell Hyde darted at tKe figure. chief of police of this town, and he w1ll guard you It's Jesse James!" he s h outed. safel y against all o f the Jesse James gang." v:_ "Nonsense! replied the girl. "Do you mean to CHAPTER XII. tell me that r am safe when guarded by the police, .... ___.... A LAST FIGHT FOR .THE FORTUNE. w h o did. n o t seem t o be able t o guard Jesse James when yoH delivered him over into their hands?" Edna Thomas gave a wild shriek. ... "Don't knock the police, please. It is the fashion She saw the dilemma in which she and the detective just now t o criticize policemen, but in 1this particular were placed in a secontl. The outlaw, in some tm case, the escape of Jesse James was. due to the jail k-;1 0w11 way, ,had di scovere d that she and Maxwell a u t horitie s and n o t t o the police. H vde were together in the public parlor, and he had Silenced, although not convinced, Edna waited, a few caimly walked up the maTble staircase leading to the moments before reply in g fir s t flo o r o f tbe Planters' Hotel, and had entered the Perhaps after all there I s a good deal of. truth in r -Q6m with the determination in his mind t o kill the. what you say. But I have a personal reason for keepdetective, and again make the girl a prisoner. ing to myself, and f rom the public, at leas t for the The quickness of mind of Maxwell Hyde' had r1.1ade present, a ll knowledge as to m y identity." him see in stantaneo usl y that the figure in doorway "You mean to say, therefore, that you do n o t wish \ vas that of the outlaw. Although no man li ved .at to t a k e the commo n sense plan that I hav-e presented 1 that, time who vyas qmick'er with his revolver than to you?" 1 Jes5e James, the detective with hi 9 vast experience in "I do." 1 man t o man fights, had embraced the only chance th-at \i\Tould you mind telling me w hy?" life held for him. \t\fith the speed of thought, he Tell you w hy? You are worse than Anderson j nmpecl over the intervening space hims elf I i sh! He d id n othing but ask me why. can you and the outlaw and grasped the revolver far back hom men do nothing but a s k question 'S? I s there no other the muzzle, and wi-th a _quick wret. 1ch threw it upwards word in the English lan guage save why' ? You in the air. may think me a very foolish g irl but I tell you at the Crash! The weapon exploded with a deafening re present time it is r1s imi:)Qs ibl e for me to appeal to port. Exerting all hi s strength, the detective pulled the St. Louis police for p r otectio n a s it is for me t o the revolver out of Jesse's grasp. Jesse caught the t e ll you why I am not willing to .reveal m y identity, detective by the arm and b y the throat wit!IJ. the same o r for the present to my claim t o my motio n and a titan tic strug ; g le began. The two. m ,en father's fortune in the c ourts as Anderson F i s h proover .the r oo m upsetting urpiture, while po!::ed to me." Edr1a shrieke'cl ?t the top of her voice rhus'hoping to.. "Then there is nothing more fo.r me to do, except bring immediate assistance. Maxwell Hyde, in his personally to try t o pro tect you as well as I can. to get the revolver away from Jesse, had n o t Having told you that I think you are a ver y foolish time t o draw hi s own. ;weapo,n until it was too late. girl f o r the attitude yciu are I am willing t o In fact, in the fierce situatio n that confronted him. h e take o n the difficult propositi o n of again saYing your had not jor a m oment tli o u ght of drawing his weap_on. life." \1\fhen he-clicl think of this action, Jesse had him b y the Do you think I am safe in this h otel?" throat and b y the arm. makiti.g it impossible for him I do n o t." t o get at his weapon. which was in hip pocket. In "What s hall I do?" their struggles, the two men fell over a chair and came I don' t know." dpwn with a cras!a, Jess e Jame, s on top ..... ate you tot'trg t,..,. do?. AI 1 1 I I E I Tl d vv v t 1 0Hg 1 extreme y exc1tec, _c na 1 omas acte I don't know." with rare discreti011. On a mante l o f reddish t 'narble "You are the most exasperating n'tan I 'have ever in the room s tood a gilt clock. :.-T he g irl rushed to the 11,1et." clock . picked it UJ) dashed back t o the struggling ''Not t o be impolite, I mus t say that you are the forms o n the ftoo r. an( rai s ingthe clock in her white most exasperating ,\oman l have ever met. Now, my hands, bro u ght it clown with h e r strength upo n the dear youn g lady, d o y o u not see that it is 1impossible back of Jesse James s head. It was fortunate f o r the -for t o d o anythitig? If anything i s goin g t o be outlaw that the clock was of flimsy material. Had done, it w ill be done by Jesse James's band. \"le have i t been the average bronze c lock ,Jesse James's hea-d got to r emain quiet a n d act upon the defensjve. They w o uld have been split open b y the f o r ce of the g-irl's a re the fly in g artille r y of this campaign. vVhen they blow, and h e w ould have been immediate l y killed. start anything, we've got t o he ready t o meet it. So f\s it was, the 1blow covered his head with and far a you are c oncerned. I think you had better r ein hi s fie r ce rage, h e turned t o grappl e with the girl. l'na m in this hoteL lt i a public place. and I do n o t At this c riti ca l moment. men came running into the

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) THE AMERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. 25 r oo m 11ea d ec.l by t h e cle rk of t h e h o t e l w h o, a s soon as h e saw tJ1e strugglin g men on the ftoo r began "\vilclly firin g a r e\'o lver a t t h e m. Edn a T h o mas w a s immine n t d a nger of killed by a stray bull e t, but she had prese nc e o f mmd e n o u g h t o f all t o the floo r and the missiles harmless l y \;vhistl ecl over h e r h e ad Detective Maxwell la y o n hi s b ac k c h oke d a l most into c omple t e in s en s ibilit y Foll o win g the h o t e l clerk, came a h orde o f men, all s h o u t in g and gesticul a ting, and when Jesse J a m es s a w th em, without at tempting further attack upo n Edna o r upo n the_ d e t e c tive, he rushed t o an open window at one end o f the r ob m and vaulted out into the ni ght. The de sperado kne w that directly b e n eath the wi;1do w .,va s a l o n g, l o w building only o ne s t o r y in h eight, aU'd he clashed al o n g the ro o f o f thi s buiWin g let hinise lf clown b y hi s hands f m m its eaves ailcl dr' o ppecl into the street, min g led with the cr6wcl hurry in g backwards and f o r wards, and di sappeared. B y this tinie; detectiv e Maxwell Hyde had regained possessi o n o f hi s faculties and he ran t o the window jus t a s Jesse James dropped into the street bel o w Edna Thomas f ollowed him quickly, and her de taining hand s t opped the d etec ti v e fr o m vaulting thro u g h the_ window after the fly in g outlaw. "He ha. s e s c aped y o u, the girl murmured. D o n o t try t o f o llow him! Stayh ere and get me O t\t o f this room a s quickly a s y o u can. ' Y o u re right," cried the dete ctive. "It i s my duty to remain here. Come this way! Rapidly threading the crowd o f men who gazed a t her curiously but who did n o t dare a s k the detective in whose h imd was a revolver what the trouble was M a K well Hyde atid Edna managed t o e scape from the r oo m and get into the c orrido r o f the h o tel'. Y o u 're n o t s afe here," s aid the detective. That's evident." "J\.re you hurt?" a sked the girl. "The only thing that's hurt a b out il1e." the detecsaid-; is my feeling s lVIy throat i s a little bit sore and I am slightly -bruis ed but the 011ly thing f o r u s to do is to get away from this h otel jus t as qpickly a s w e can. Never mind my injuries \iVhen Max well H y de and Edna reached the lower ftoor o f the hotel, .the y f ound it crowded with men which a squad o f policemen were trying t o beat ]jlack itJt o SOI'\le semblance o f order. A p o lice captain saw Maxwell Hyde and ,ru shed up t o him. 'What's the trouble, Maxw ell? Do you kno w?" asked the police captain. "I d o n t kno w. calmly an swered M axwell H y de. There seemed to be so me kind of a d o me s tic di s turbance up stairs there somewhere. I heard' s ome s h o t s, but I didn't g e up t o s ee w -hat it was abou' t. It wasn't any o f m y bus ine ss you kno w. " I _guess you re ri ght," rej o ined the p o lice captain. It's better f o r an outsider n o t t o mix in any s h oot in g scrapes iii which he's n o t p e r so n a llv c oncerned. Maxwell, what are you d oing here?" "I'm e s c oTting this youn g la dy, who i s a f ri end of the fai11ily o f JV[r. Anderso11 F i s h. I am a n x i o u s to get a c ab C aptain. Can you send o n e o f the boys out to get o n e f o r me? "Cert ainl y replied the captain. I know M r. F i s h very. well ind e ed. and, I w o uld be g l a d _!o assi s t an y fri end o f his J n a f e w m o m ents Maxw e ll Hyde and Edv a were p l aced in a cab by t h e captain, and at the reques t of t h e detec t ive, a p l a in clothes police man was placed o n t h e box of t he cab a n d a uniformed office r gor in with t h e c o u p l e an d th e dri ve r was instruct ed to h urry to the res i de n ce of A n de r s o n F i s h. "You see, M iss T h o m as, ' w hisper e d Maxwell Hyae to the gi;;l, "that jti s pes i b l e t o p lace you u ncler po li c e pro t ectio n without r evea lin g the sec r e t that you a r e so carefull y c o n cea lin g The g irl s mil e d. \IV hat i s your id ea," s h e s ai d, in takin g _me to An-de r so n F i s h?" I haven t any idea, he sai d, in that. It i s certainly impossibl e f o r you t o s tay in tha t h o t e l now tha t w e knb w Jesse J a m es i s aft e r you : The o nly pl ac e o f refuge that I c a n think o f i s in the h ome of 1Ir. Fis h "Very well," repli e d E dn a I suppose it i s a mat t e r that in a good many w ays i s 01.1t o f o .ur h a n ds. l suppos e that you kno w I c alle d o n M r. F i s h?" Y es. " And o f c ours e y o u know what I said t o him. U n de r the circumstances d o you think that he would recei v e me?" I think that he would." Edna s aid no m o re, and the cab soo n s t opped at the h o me o f Anderso n F i s h. l\Ia x w e ll Hyde briefl y relat ed the circumstances surrounding the renewed at tac k on 'the part of the James bat1d upo n the girl, and Mr. Fis h in a t o ne o.f surpris e a sked many ques ti o ns. In spite o f hims elf M r. Fis h felt that Edna Thomas was telling. the truth. H i s _mind was in a chaotic state becaus e w hile he did n o t think it possible f o r the gi d t o produce the necessar y le g al proof that she w a s the daughter o f Franklin Thomas, yet at the same M r Fis h felt in his innermost heart that the girl w a s t e llin g the truth. Under the circumstances he decid _ed that after all it w o u H:I be b es t t o receive Edna and, a s Mrs. Fis h was o f the same o pini o n a s her husband, the beautiful girl became a member->o hi s h o u s eh o l d temporarily: Maxwell H y de, t o who m had been a ssigned the f orm and plain clothes p o licemen, ordered the two 'Offi c e r s t o maintain a close watch b y patro llingaround the outs ide o f the Fish residence, and then Maxwell r e s i gned. hi s active participatio n in the protectio n of Edna t o thes e officer s artd afte r a few w ords with M r. Fis h started away t o continue activ e search Jor the James boys Jesse James, 1i1eanwhile had been hurrying away fr o m the scene of his la s t attack upo n Edna Thomas. The outlaw reproached him s elf f o r having all owed hims elf t o be.._ betray ed into the pos iti otY o f attacking the'girl in a public place. As a matter o f fact, he had n o t intended t o make the attack. He was s p y in g ab out at the h otel in an eff ort t o get the lay o f the land, and hi s sudden c o min g upon Maxwell H y d e an d had caus ed him t o l os e hi s hair-trigge r t emper. Jesse had m a d e hi s es c a pe fr o m the h o tel without d iffi-' cnlty and a fter he had s e a r c hed tl1r o u g h the crowd a h out him. r e j o in e d hi s broth e r Frank, a n d t h e t w o outlaws walk e d hastily aw a y t ogethe r "You ce r t ainl y got into t r o ubl e that tri p, Jesse' sai d F r ank i n a l a u g hin g ton e of voi ce "I c ertainly did ," repli ed J esse. T know i t was a foolis h thing f o r m e t o do, but w h e n I saw. t hat in f e r n a l detecti ve, I lost m y head completel y

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THE AMERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. t' \"-T ell, it's the firs t time on record. " \ V h y d idn't yo u u se your gun?" "I d i d n t ha ve time T hat fellow H y de go t me qui c ker than a flas h a n d t h e n that g irl dropped a clock o n to p of m y h ea d and i t w a s all Q rff with me." < tIt's a wonder s h e d idn't kill you!" S h e would if the cloc k h a d b ee;.1 h eav i e r As it was, I am prett y well cut u p o n the t o of m y head. D o you kn ow, Frank, that g irl's got a n awful tempe_r!" "I d on't know much .about her t emper, but if s h e fire s cl ocks lik e that very o ft e n s he d n e ed t o get her fathe r's for tune t o pay up the girl who fir es a forty -d ollar clo.ck at a man w ill eat up a l o t of furniture a t the end o f a year. But l oo k here, J e s s e, w h a t are w e g oing to do?" I m goi n g back to s e e o ld Meg, that f ortune-teller." \ V h y, you re crazy I'll b e t you that fortune-teller's j oint i s alive with p o li c e men. " I d o n t so T h os e p olicemer1. ne ver w o uld s u s p ect tha t w e d have the nerve t o go back to se!'! old M e g, a n d I'll b e t you 1 s e v en d o llar s that we will find her unprotecte d. If we d o, I'll warrant it'll be a bad five minutes f o r h e r " What are you g o in g t o d o with her?" I'm ashame d t o tell you. I'm goig to make her t ell me fir s t what charm s h e u s e s t o rnake her appear a s an old w oma one m oment, and a pretty young g irl t h e n e xt. When I get that out o f her, F m going t o m a k e h e r c o u g h up the f a cts a b out that mi s sing h eiress. If she cl0n't tell m e wher!'! I can find that p eo ple will be waljd G o d Jess e, what did 0U do that for!", &"a sped .Frank. ' "There w a s no u s e f oo lin g with that old hag," I mured Jesse. You hurry up and search this room ,n the' mystery. Foile d! hi ss ed Jes se with a bl oo d curdling oath. Frank, it' s no u se. The jig is up! All St. Louis i s up a g ain s t u s All Mis so uri i s aflame with the de s ire t o u s It' s back t o o ld Jackso n Country for ours I d o n t knovy whether we' ll get there or not." I d o n t much care. < Her e's the bigge.st scheme we, w e r e e ver in ending in n othing. Was there e ver s uch h ard lu c k

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, THE AMERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. 27 "Let's dust out of here quick," said Frank. "Some body may have heara your shot." The outlaws quickly left the house, paying no attention to the silent form lying face downward on a rug. Je-sse J a had secured his revenge and cared nothing for the life that he had 'taken. As the two men issued from the fortune-teller's home, Jesse grasped Frank by the arm. There comes Ma well Hyde! snapped Jesse. At the same moment, the two men saw coming from an opposite direction a squad of blue-coated p o lice-men. .1 axwell Hyde saw the outlaws almost at the same' instant that Jesse discovered him. In a n1oment Max: well Hyde let fly with hjs revolver, just as Jesse raised his pistol to shoot. The bullet from Hyde's revolver struck the weapon of Jesse, but did n o t harm the outJaw. But the shot tore Jessel s gun from his grasp, and the impact of the shot caused the outlaw to stagger backwards, while his revolver rang upon the stone pavement, and again exploded, the shot, however, harmlessly burying itself in a tree. frank a flying shot at' Maxwell Hyde, but missed. The posse of policemen rushed forward as they heard the shbts and a fus "Hade of bullets ca\ne tea(ng tG>, w.al'ds the outlaws. b.ack (" howled Frank. "Into the 'house, quick! Jesse did not stop' to pick up hi s revolver, but disap peared with Frank again into the fortune-teller's home. The outlaws. ran through the house, )eaped into an area or courtyar'd in the rear of the dwelling, scaled a fenc-e wit!} agility, and di sappeared down the street as the howling mob of p o lice headed by Maxwell Hyde dashed through the fron t door in pur-suit. The policemen commanded by Maxwell Hyde, every nook and cranny in the building and made a house to house canvass in a gallant effort to round up the !=JUtlaws. They were unsuccessful. Maxwell Hyde, baffied again, felt that the two outlaws had made their escape, and although he did not tell his companions so, felt sure that they haC! made off and he surmised tl)at the outla ws had gi;ven up their too dan.gerous plot and had returned to Jackson County, where the detective knew that they were perfectly safe, surrounded as they would be there by a multitude of friends and confederates. But Maxwell Hyde's indomitable perseverance made him once more swear to himself that come what might, he would catch the outlaws, and with bowed head and in no amiable frame of mind, he retLtrned to the home of Anderson Fish to acquaint him and Edna Thomas with the terrible story of the death of old Meg,' the fortune-teller, and the es. cape of her murderers. CHAPTER XIII: EDNA THOMAS REVEALS HER SECRET. On the same evening of the day in which old Meg had been so foully assassinated, Anderson Fish, Edna Thomas, and Maxwell Hyde sat in the library of Mr. Fish's home listening to the story of the death of the fortune-teller. Edna's face was white with suppressed emotion, and it was with difficulty that she restrained her tears. Neither Maxwell Hyde nor Anderson Fish, under the circumstances, felt like pressing Edna f b r the explanation that they felt was their due as to her strange con duct in not on ly refusing to claim the fortune which awaited her, but in her association with the fortuneteller. Edna, however, felt that the time for concealment on her part had ended. Her heart was torn with sorrow over the death of old Meg, and in a faltering voice I she told Mr. Anderson that the death of old Meg had removed from her the seal of secrecy which would have bound them not to answer any questions as long as the old woman was alive. I do not "know how to begin my recital," Edna fal tered. Perhaps it would be better for me to ask you ques tions, rejoined Mr. Fish. For S0111,e reason or other, i believe that we can more quickly at a solution of the mystery in this manner than by asking you to tell the story, Vljhich I doubt in your nervous and grief-stricken state yo.u could easily do." "Thank, you, Edna replied. I will answer your questions a s well as I can." Maxwel L Hyde folded his arms and stared into the flickering flame of iamp that stood on a table. Mr. Fish folded his arms also and began paciug up and down as' if he had been in a court-room examining a witness, while Edna sat in a chair in the center of the room, her white face turned in appeal to the lawyer. First, Miss Thom s," asked Mr. Fish, "who was old Meg?" was my father's only sister," replied the girl. Anderson Fis h wheeled around and at the girl with amazement on his face "\.Vhat!" he said, "are you mad? The only sister of Franklin Tl16mas died many ye11rs ago. I know this to be true because Mr. Thomas told me so." I know that my father did not know that his sister was not dead. Mr. Fish, a:s you are conversant ';y;ith all my de .ad father's affairs, you know how fond he was of hunting wild game, and hO\v, every summer, he u s ed to go on hunting expeditions to the shores of Coronation Gulf far away out in the remote frontier of British North America. "Yes, yes, I know that," answered the lawyer I

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28 THE A1.fERICAN INDIAN WEEKLY. ,./ "V cry often my father's s i ier Ethel Thomas accompanied h e r brother to those inaccessible wild s as s h e was eq u ally as f o n d o f an out-door lif e as he." I clid not U now that," the lawyer returned. "On one of the summer t ri ps, m y aunt m e t o n the bores o f Cor o n a ti o n Gulf, a youn? man with whom she fell in love. T hi s youn g m a n Rudolph o f the L ongKnife, as h e was called, was a member of the band known as the Outlaws o f Blue Waters. The hand was not much better than that n o w surrounding Jesse James. Of cour e m y f ather, as soon ,as h e heard of the foolis h love escapade of hi s s i s t e r, attempte d t o break up the friendship. Possibl y, if m y fath e r had been a little wiser h e would not have com hatted the friendship quite so str enuo u s l y Resistance o n the part o f the family o f a g-ir1 t o the m a n s h e s h e s in love w ith u s uall y makes the g irl stick to the man s h e has selected. My father tried every means possible to break up the marriage ,that he saw foreshadowed, but he was unsuccessful. His only. s i s ter e l oped and married the outlaw, and my father never communicated with I-ie r o r had anything to/ do w i t h her after the marriage. T hi s treatment rankled in the mind of Rudolph of the Long Knife, who was a t h oroughly bad man, and on. e night he c0nceived the p l a n f: s tealing me> wl1o was then a n infant. I \vas born some time after the marriage of my father's sister t o the outlaw Rudolph, and Rudolph thought that hi s reve nge upo n mY' father would be complete by stealing me Old Meg was not ole! Meg then, al}cl I am :::orry to say she assisted in the plot o f her lni s as s h e was bitterly angry at her brother for not h e r husband, anc l for casting her off 'and leavin g h e r out of hi s will, a s she well knew that he done." Ande r $ O n F i s h was uttedy dumbfounded by the revelatio n s o f t h e girl) but he felt sure fr o m some facts that h e kne w that Edna was telling the truth. He listene d intently while Edna cont,inuec L Aft e r m y abduction," the girl continued, I was taken charge o f by old l VIeg and for several years lived with h e r o n the s h ores of Cor onatio n G ulf. Of c ourse my (reatn1ent was o f the best. O ld did all in the world that any o n e c ould do for a child. After the death o f h e r husband, w h o was s h o t when .I was fiv e years ld in a hatti e with revenue o fficer s, who wi s h e d t o arrest him as a smuggl e r, o ld Meg came t o St. Louis." .. D id bring y u with her?" a sked the lawyer. \ i V hat did s h e d o w i t h you next?" q nesti oned the attorney. S h e e ducated m e h e r e in t. L o ui s. In my younger days she main ta in e d 11e a t a co nvent, and as the m o ney she had bro u g-ht w i t h h e r soon <;lwindl ecl, she resorted t o the o1-cupat i o n o f a f ortune-hunter t o gain e n ough m oney fo r onr support." "Ol d Meg revealed a ll these circumstances 'to you, did she n ot?" a sked t h e lawyer: S h e did, as soon as I was old enough to understand the m. Vv e talked t h e mattet; over tho r o u g hly, and 0 lcl J\'[eg, m y aunt, often assured m e tha t she bitterly regretted h e r part o f stealin g me from m y father. So far as I was COIJCerned, m y father was m ore a visio n to m e than an actu ality. I had never seen him, m y m othe r died at my birth, and of course, I had never seen her. t h a d always been reared with m ore o r less luxury, and I did not care f o r my father's mil li o n s. You can see how, t orn b y conflicting feelings, it would he impossible f o r me to claim1 my father's fortune. If I had made this claim, I would have to ten the s t o r y of how my own aunt abducted me, of how she had m a d e _an marriage, and I p_referred t o allow the skeleto n in ottr fcimily closet t o remain closely locked in rather than t o unleas h it and allow it, t o dance in the sight of all mankind." \ll.l ell," replied Anderson Fish, it was very loyal in you, of c ours e, but at the same time, U top ian "ill'.! O f c ours e, you do n o t see the sentimental standp oint vvith which I v 'iew this circumstance," the girl replied. II/J en and women do not look upon problems o f this kind from the same angle. I felt that it my duty n o t to cove r o ld Meg, who had sheltered, feel and educated me, with the mant,Ie of her crime merely to gain possession of m oney tf1at I did not need, and which I _am 1 io t S\.tre that I want now.'' 11 Your ieelings were laudable, at least," said the lawyer, "but when did you finally decide t o make the claim up'on your father's millions?" Not until I read in the newspapers of raiding of the bank at Cemetery Hill by Jesse James and his companions. Then o ld Meg, my q.unt, told !11e that my father's private papers were there. I then knew that it was time for me to take--actio n. I suspected that Jesse James would secure the documentswhich w ,ould l ea d him to make a das h for the Thomas niillions and I assumed a disg-uise that made me lo o k like my aunt o n the day that Clel Miller called .in the hopes that I could throw the outlaws off the scent, and could pro-. teet my arunt and myself from their dastardly attempts to blackmail you, Mr. Fish, a s executo r of the into paying them a tremendous reward to reveal my identity and m y whereabouts. But the further I got in this plot, the m ore mixed it beca m e ?ITaxwe ll Hyde le aned f orward earnestly as the girl fini s h e d speaking. "Did o ld Meg kno w o f your disguise, M iss T h omas ? Jaxwell Hyde a sked. "Sh e did not. She t o ld the truth when s h e said that s h e was away f r o m h e r h ome that clay, visiting a nother fri end who was a lso a fortune-telle r. She did n o t lie to you M r. Hyde, when she made that statement. She [ ..

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: .r THE AMERICAN I NDIAN WEEKLY. 29 kne w noth i n g at all o f m r attempts t o save h e r from t h e conseq u e n c es o f her own m i s deed s " I s uppose of cours e t hat y o u h a ve records that w ill prove the truth of your s t o ry?" said the materi a l i s t ic lawyer. have, repli e d the g irl. "My aunt, o ld Meg, has a safe i1 a S afe D e posit Co m pany's vault here in St. L o ui s, a n d a ll the facts tha t I've rel a t e d t o yon can be substantiated by those r eco rd s Ande rson F is11 studied ove r the w o rd s o f the g irl f o r some,.time He kne w in h is ow n mind that s h e s p oke the truth. H e h a d a cc epte d h e r s t ory a s being tnie, but h e felt that afte r all the an g ui s h and p ain she had s uffer e d that he w o uld like if possi b le t o rein s t ate .her in the possessi o n o f her fathe t"'s milli o n s without in the slightes t de g r ee s h e ddin g upo n the t errible s t o r y the fierce li g h t o f publicity. "It w o u ld seem. t o m e tha t t h e be s t thing fo r u s t o d o now," the l a w yer sai d will b e for M iss T h o m as t o go q.uie tl y awa y fro m S t. L o ni'S without making a n y cla im a t present upo n h e r fathe r 's e state I think s h e h a d 1 ) etter g o t o N" ew Y o rk and a ft e r severa l months; w h e n the e s c ape o f J es s e James fr o m jail, hi s flight a n d his return t b hi s home in Jacks o n County .:h a ve b eco m e mere memo ri e s in the public mind, the n M iss Thoma s c a n m a k e a c l a im u po n es t a t e This .:Sh e can do thro u g h co unsel t o w h o m I will sen d h e r in New York, and it n ee d n o t b e k n o wn in a n y w a y that I as executor of the es tate of F ranklin T h o ma s h ad .an y .kno wl e dge of the h ei r ess p r i o r t o t h e time that t he New York atto rn e y s make the c l a im u p o n t he e s t t ate. I am in your h ands o f c o u r s e i\Ir. F i s h t h e r e pli ed And possibl y the p r o p os iti o n that y o u have m a d e i s the b es t one f.or us a ll. 'Have you a sked t h e l a wyer. I have fift y tho u sand d olla r s replied the girl w i t h a g l ea m of a mu s em ent in h e r eyes 'It was p ai d t o .ine by C lel Miller as w ha t y o u er-la wyers sayw ell, a r etaining f ee, s o as t o speak." And lik e all good I a wyer s ,' answered Mr. F i sh, _yon h av e retained fee. ' "Hut I s u spec t, t he g:i'rl. H t hat t h i s m o ney w a s part of the l o o t t a k e n f r o m the Cemeter y H ill Bank Ri ghtfully, o f c ours e the m o ney s houl d .be r eturned t o the bank "As your father's e state h o l d s all o f t h e sto ck i n t h e Ce m e t e r y H ill Ban k with th e excepti o n o f a f e w s h a r es h e l d b y dummy d irecto r i t wou ld avpe a r t o me, as a lawyer tha t J e ss e James, v ; h e n h e r o b b e d t h e Ce meter y H ill Bank, r o bb e d yo u o f fifty tho u sand d oll a rs." A n d w h e n h e r e t a ined m e w i t h that fi.fty tl _10u s a n d d olla r s h e was s im p l y paying me back m y own r e mark e d the g irl. Do y o u k n o w w h a t I a m g o in g t o d o with tha t m o n ey, if you think l may a s well Tet::tin i t ? .. J pa i d oYei a fe w yea r s ago f r om y our fath e r the s u m o f fifty d ollars i n a draf t made payabl e t o t h e pt : e s icle n t o f the Ce metery H ill Bank t o r eimburs e dep o s i t o r s f o r the m o ney o f t h e ir s s t o l e n b y J ess e J a m es and hi s gan g I think the n y q u ca n reta in the fift y t h o u s a n d d olla r s g iven t o y o u by C l e l :Mill e r a s a f ee, without t a xin g y our c o n s ci e nce very nHich. " The re n o w remains littl e f o r m e t o do except t o see tha t the p oo r i s rewarded " Are you m ea n do you n o t ? t h e J lawyer. : "No, I mean is reward e d ," lau ghed the g irJ. "'I' m goin g t o g ive that 111o n ey to M axwell Hyd e f o r bra e r y i n protecting me f r o m the Jesse J a m es g : a n g, and a l so fo r s a v in g m y li fe, w hi c h, b etwe en u s, I d o not think i s worth fift y t h o usand d olla r s ...... "You probably woul d n p t sell it fo r fift y t h o u sand dollars, would you?" a s k ed the law y e t O f c ours e n o t ," an s v veted t h g g irl. A ncle 1 :son Fis h turned tmYatcl the ch air in the sl1ado w where M axwell Hyd e s h o uld have been seate d H e g a ve a gasp o f asloni shment when h e found the chair tenflntless \ V h e r e i s M axwe ll Hyde?,. the lawyer i n ast o n i s h m ent. "He certa in l y i s n o t s i t tlt ig' i n tha t c haif \Vhe re h e w a s fiv e minute s ag-o and I d o n o t remember see i n g him s t ea l out of the r o o m ," Edn a T h o ma s r eplied T here's so m e thi11g white in tha t c h a ir s a iu the lawyer It l o o k s like a card." Edn a ran t o the chair a nd pic k e d u p a card. S h e c arrie d it t o the l a mpli ght a ,ncJ r ea d it a l o u d t o A nder s o n F i s h. "'I ca n d o n o m o r e g oo d hete, 1 have g o n e t o fin d J esse J ames-'-l\Jax w ell Hycfe ,.,. These the t hat Edn a r h o ma s read: l\1axwell Hyde i s a remarkabl e t :nant m u r mu r e d Edna A la s, hi s mi s s i o n i s a da n !te r o u s o i1c t ,, ,..yr-THE i.>. '>11:-: ., .. ':..... The n ex t i ss u e will b e American f11dian Wrrk l j Y o 28, E ntitl ed 1'B :E DOOI H Tl-IE D A?\DIT BROTHERs; o r .

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THE THREE OLD WrTCHES, DREAM BOOK Lat es t editi o n C ompletel y revise d Man y n e w f eatJre s added. This i s the o ri g inal, w o r l d r e n ow n e d B O O K OF FATE, t h a t f o r o n e hundre d y ears h a s i!' h e ld intelligeJ;Jt p eo pl e spell b o u n d Its c o r rect interpre t a tio n o f dre a m s h a s a m a z e d those f ortuna t e e n o u g h ,-= a copy which t h e y coosu lt.The a ccurac y of the aceornpanying numb e r s h a s made it i n v a lu a b l e t o a ll p o licy p laye r s. N APOLEON'S O R A CULUM Which it c onta i n s a nd which i s printe d c o m p l e t e, is an abso l u t ely true c o p y of t h a t str a n g e anti wierd d ocument f ound within secre t c a bin e t o f N apol e o n Bona p arte's T h e f a c t t h a t d oze n s of wort h l ess and unre liable imi t a t io n s h a ve b ee n p l ac e d on t h e marke t d e m onstra tes it t o b e a f act th a t THE O L D THREE W ITCH E S D R,EAM BOOK s t ands t o d a y as a l w a y s the origin a l and onl y r e li a bl e Dream Boo k publis h e d it is for s a l e by a ll newsdeal e rs, or it w ill be s erft postage p a id upo n r ecei p t of t e n c ents. THE A -RTHUR WESTBiROGK COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A. NEW AND MAXIMS ALSO A FEW PROVERBS If you want the bes t book of TOASTS that has eve r b een pu b l i s h ed; if yo'! want new Toasts to s p ring upon your fri ends in s tead of the hoary' w i t h age m oss g rown assortm ents p u b l i s h e d i n the so calle d Toast Books" o f othe r publis h ers bu y t h is book o f NEW TOA S T S w hich has j u s t b e e n publ i s l1ed i n our MAMMOTH SER I E S It i s n o t onl y t he b es t book but the largest book e ve r sold for t e n c ents For sal e by a ll n e w sdeal e r s o r s ent post pa id u po n receipt o f t e n c ents. THE ARTHUR WESTBROOK COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio, U S A \ The New and Complete LETTER WRITER The latest book. The most comp l ete and b est book e.ve r pub l ishe d upon the important subject of THE ART OF LETTER WRITING. It is the l a rgest book ever off e r ed for the m o ney. It c ontai n s all the modern form s o f correspondence and g i ve s a ll the i n forma t io n n eede d b y those d es ir in g to write Love L ette r s o r L ette r s FRIENDSHIP, LOVE AND COURTSHIP In all its p hases up to m arriage are c a r e f u lly provid e d fo r by l e tters coverin g every p oss i ble subj ect tha t mi ght a ri se ; and b y u si n g thi s book as a g ui de it i s impo ssi bl e to g o astray. THE BUS INESS LETTERS C ontain e d i n t hi s b o o k a r e in valua bl e to those engaged i n m ercanti l e p u r s uits. THE NEW AND COMPLETE LETTER W R ITER is f o r s a l e b y a ll n e w s d ea l e r s o r i t will be sent postage p ai d to a n y a ddress upon rec e i p t of ten cents. THE ARTHUR WESTBRO_OK COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio,' u S. A. Riddles and Conundrums Hard Nuts to Crack All New and Up.:.to-Date One tho u sand brand n e w upto-date R I DDLES A N D CONUNDRUMS tha t y o u have nev e r heard befor e, ias t ead of the o ld ch estnuts tha t m ake yom: v ictim s wan t to hit you on the h ea d with a sar i d bag whe n y o u ge t them off. This i s the bes t Ri d d l e Book and collection of C o nundrums eve r p ubli s h e d and the biggest one ev e r sold for t e n c e n t s For s a l e by a ll newsdealers or s ent postage paid by the publ ishers upon the receipt of ten cents. THE ARTHUR WESTBROG>K COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A.

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::rHE ADVENTURE.SERIES Stories of Adventure and the Far W e s t e v e r Pub l ished. The Absolutely True and Authentic History of the Lives and Exploi t s of America's Famous Bandits ALL PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED --No. 2. The James Boys o f Old Missouri The Only True Account Ever Publishe:l of the Most Desperate Bandits of All Time. This thrilling story o f the Outlaw Kings wh o terrorized the .\lidd l e and Far West, i s prof usely illustrated. It i s based on facts related by eye witnesses of the awful deeds. lt breath es of ter rible revenge. It pulses with intense excitement. For the fint t i m e the real hi story o f the assassi na tio.l o f JESS E JAMES i s set forth. Price, by mai! postpaid, 20c Per copy. No. 6 The Younger Brothers. The start1ing a nd nigh ir.cr edible exploits o f these four b ro thers w h o terrorized a dozen States a re wr itten from the account of th e ir deeds given by Cole and B ob. 'Driven from their homes by fh e persecutions o f the Federal troops during the Civil \ Var, one a fter anoth er o f them en li sted under the ".Black Flag" of the Guer rill a Chieftain, Ouantrell, and fin aJiy joined the notorious James Boys as membeis of t h e ir gang. Price, by mail postpaid, 20c per copy. No. 8 Rube Burrow A Known in A labama throu g hOut the adJacent as the '';princ e of Train R obl>ers," Rube Burrow h e l d up t h e railroad flyers and loote d the safes in the express cars four. years e r e he was fina ll y kill ed Hundreds of detectives were sent out to capture him, but his arrest was actua11y accomplis hed by a huge negro. Even after h e was in j a i l by "' clever ruse, he made hi s captors prisoners. ; P r ice, by mail postpaid, 20c per copy. No. 11. Jesse James' Midnight Raid. This story describes the desc ent of the notorious outlaw and hi s men u po n a "boom'' mining town of Nevada. As they are in. a canyon they are startl ed by a cry J An mveS:ttgatwn leads t o an encounter with several f erocious m o untain li o n s and the finding Of a woman 's corpse. J:?roceedii1g t o the town, tHe b and its arrive just in time to prevent the l ynching of th e husband o f the woman, who, it is learned, fled fro m her home with h e r baby to escape the advances o f the boss o f the town, a gambler. decides t o unmask the. valain, and in doin g so mel"ts with a s eries of adventures t h a t are thrillin g fin aHy es caping f rom a snake-infested cave by making: a human b ritlg e P rice, by mail, post paid per copy. $20, 000 Reward-D ead or Alive ! Read -about i t in the great. book, "JESSE J A :'.IES, MY FATHER," written by his son, Jesse James Jr., the onl y true o f the l ife of the famous outla-w. Read how t h 1 s bandit kept an army of d e tectives, s hefiffs a n d Un iteU States mars h a l s s c o u r ing the c ountry and wa s shot i n t_he back by a t r aitorou s pal. R e ad a I;> out the fatahty attached to the name o f Jesse );ame s : h ow the of the law trie d t o vi sit the sins o f the o n the head o f the son. R ea d about the persecution and the har rowing a n g ui s h o f Jbsse J ames' fami l y in the graphic w ords o f his son a n d h eir. Read tJ.1ese f acts. Every bod y s houl d know t h e m There i s nothing to pervert the young, there i s no"t hing to repel the o l d. Look, at the reprodu.ctions of the p 1 c_tur es o f Jess e James, h i s moth er and hts son m ex1stence, except t h ose owned by hi s f a mil y. Price, by m ail, po stpaid 25c per copy. No. 4 Harry Tracy. T h e Death Dealing Ore gon Outlaw. The trail o f blood l ef t by this t e rrible bandit from one s ide of the State t o th e other i s set forth wit h a ll its fraphic detai l s in this boo k. \tVith the narra ti o n o th e gruesom e crimes there is the story o f thC overwhelming love o f this reckless desperado, a love which lured h im to hi s death. a death well fitting his wil d lawless life ;\I ore than fifty illus t ra tion s. Pric e, by mail, postpai d, 20 c per copy. No. 7 D alton Gang. These bandits o f the Far \Vest were the most desperate tr ain robber s that ever In this book is g iven th e fir s t t rue history of the raids and robberie s in cluding an account of the most daring dee d in the annal s o f crime the robbing o f two ban k s at th e sam e time, i n broad daylight, and the o utlaws' b att l e with twenty armed men,, as told by the U n i t ed States Deputy Marshal. Price, by mail, post paid, 20c per copy. No. 9 Jes se James' Dash fo r Fortune. \Vit h a handful o f men, the t errible desperado sets out to s teal th e gatemoney at t h e f air iti Kansas City. H e a nd hi s pa l s have a series o f adventures, discovering the dead body o f a young girl, running the m urderer to earth at the danger of cap ture d themselves hy d etctives, finaJly arrivmg at the fair grounds w here Jesse seizes the ca s h bo.x f ro m two men, esc aping w ith more than $10,000 i n booty. Pric e, b y mail, postpaid 20c per copy. No. 12. Jesse James' Greates t Haul. ;r'he threat o f the Red Death having been declared agains t some friends o f the dcspera does by a band of n i ght riders, Jesse and his men set out to exterminate the gang. The pursU it of this purpose c a rrie s the' m o n a raid into K entuck y marked by a t rail of bhod and a rson and terrible deeds which culminate in the robbery of the bank i n Russel v ille in broad daylight in th e presence o f scores of citizens and a successful escape deSp it e the Unexpected arr iv a l of a posse o f detectives. Pri c e, b y mail, postpaid, 2 0c copy. Truth Stranger Than Fict ion. The most m a rveLou s and extraordinary book ever written. "TH,E 'MAN COULD NOT HANG." Absolutel y t rue. The astounding history o f John Lee. Three times p l aced upon the scaffo l d and the t rap sprung! Yet to-day h e walks the streets a free man!!! I11ust.ra t ed from photograp hs. 'Do not fai l to read this, the most r emarkable book of the century. For s a l e everywh e r e, or sent, postpaid upon rece i p t of 1 5 cents. T ile Man THEY -COULDN OTffANG The Above Books are For Sale by All Booksellers and Newsdealers or They will be sen t Post Paid upon Receipt C?f Price by the Publishers TH. E ARTHUR WESTBROOK co. CLEVEC .AND, 0. u.s. A..

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T H E G REATEST OF ALL BY T HE GREATEST OF ALL DETECTIVE WRITERS OLD SLEUTH .-WEEKLY ., -.----------Thes e stories, issued every Friday, are the gr e a test det e c tiv e stori es ever writ ten. No has t.ver lived in thi s c p untry or any other whose ta1es are so t hrilling, so eptrancing, w h ich so teem with excitement and desperate situa t iOns as thos e of "OLD SLEUTIL" The stories are twic e as long as those i n any other library, eac h story having the enormous total of 50,000 words. Nothing like it ever b e fore attempted. THE FOLLOWING NUMBERS ARE NOW OUT: 1 The of O l d Sleuth, the Detective; or The Great Pbiladel p,_hia 71. The Omnipresent Avenger; being the c o ntinuation o f "On Thei r 2 ..XI y stery. Track." le o f the Missing Millions; or Tracked by a Great 79 Tragedy a n d Strategy; being t h e concl )ls ion orl T h e Omnipresent Detective. t 11e Avenger." :B. IIhe of Haunted House; or The Great Detective's Tragic 7 3. The Gypsy D e t e ctive's G reatest Case; o r ,Ph_il Tremain e t o the Fmd. Rescue. 1 4 .Iqng o f all Det;ctivcs; o r Young Jack Sleuth on t h e Trail. 74. The Shadows of New York; or T h e American Monte-Cristo's Winnin g 15. 1he Gti!nt DetectJve s Last Sl1adow; A Tale of Heiculcan Detective Han d \ ll> Tl ASdventure. 7 5. Th<; Old Weird Legacy; A Tal e of Marvelous Happening s ):! 1e Ten-or; A Narrative o G enuine Detective Strategy. m I nd1a. V e1led llequty; or The Mpycry of the Cal ifornia Heiress 76. A Mysterious Disappearance; A Singul arlly Strange 8. 1 he :Myste!'y of tne Spaniards Vend etta; or A Great Detective's 77. T h e Red Detective; A Great Tal e o f Mystery. Marvelous Stmtcgy. $ : The .'.Neird Warnings o f Fate; or E beon's S trange Case. !l The Great ,Bond Robbei'Y; 01 Tracked by a Femal e Detective. 1 9 T h e Treasure o f the.Rockics; A T a l e of Strange Adventures. 10. !1Id Greatest Case; or C a u g h t by the King of a ll Detec t ives. 80. Bonanza Bardie's W innin g S trike; bei n g tire sequel to" The Treasur e 1 he Bay Rtdge_ Mystery; or Old Sleuth's Winning Hand. of the Rcc k ies." :;1;;. to h;s Doom, ; or F oiled bv the Yankee D etective. 8 1 Lon g Shadow. the Detective; A Tal e o f In-di a n S trategy .,. TTraP.pmg the Cou,nterfette s; o The L ightning .on the Trail, T h e f0l\ 1ma. !f}c D isguise Detec t ive; T h e \ \ ierd Adventures cf a Trans" .. rail ed _by the ,Street D etect1v e ; or Badger's i\i idmght Ouest. "-v fhe lns h Detecttves Great e s t Case; or TJ>e Stategy o O'Nei l 83; A Young Detective's Great Shadow; A N...-rative of Extraordinary l\fcDarrag h ( 1 Detective Devices. 'lG. } h e G ,rea te s t l\lystery o f the Agr!: or S aved b y the Gipsy Detective. 84. Stealth y Brock. the Detective; or Trailed to their Doom. / .'J.1, Trapr,ng the i\loonshiners; or Strange Adventures of a Go\ernment 85. Old S leuth t o the Rescue; Startling Narrative o f Hidden Treasure. Dctecth e in the Tennessee Mountains: SU. Old Sl euth. t h e Aveftger; being the sequ e l t o "Ol d Sletttht o the 18. The Giant Det ective Among the Cowboys ; or The \Veird ,Narrative-of Rescne." -a f.oca utiful B!.;rckmail e.-. / Jfl7. l.arclemore. t he Dete c t iv e : or the King o f the "Shadowers." :11 Sleuth's Tiiumrh: or The-Tironx M v ,te-v. JO,q. The F a ta l C h a ir; b e i r.g t h e .y a {;ovemmentt J lO. The T w i tecl Trail: l)e ing the sec ucl to the Mas k o f Mystery. Spy. ]11. B ooth B r ll : or The Prince of Detectives Among the Indians. 40. T emp ted b y n \Voman; or The French D e tcct iTe,.s Narrow Escape.. 112. The Re"'ntif u i being th e c onti n u at i on of Rooth B e l l. 41. The D o llar ., .. Olcl SJetrth I<> tll<' R eoct r e. 11 3 Booth B e ll's Twisted Trail; being t h e sequel t o T h e Beautif u l 42 i\cc.,,cd from the Coffin; o r The Frut,ation uf a lhot Caket. Tracke r bv the ).T "" o f i\1 v
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Standing Alone at the Head of Its Class The Indian Weekly PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY This grea t weekly i s a r adica l departure f rom all o th e r five cent we e k lies t h a t are now being publ i s h ed It ha s the greates t s t o rie s o f fro n t i e r l i fe, o f Indians and g f the f a r Wes t that have ever been i ss u e d The sto ri es are l o ng e r than th ose pu blis hed in an y o th e r five ce nt l ibrary, e x cept th e c e lebrat e d OLD SLEUTH WEEKL Y They are all e dited b y Co l o n e l Sp. e n ce r D air, th e mo?t c e l ebrate d I n d i an S co ut, Ba n dit Tracker and G un F i g ht e r o f m o d ei"l1 fic ti o n 1\. 'he w numb e r i s i ss u e d eve r y Thursday. LIST OF TITLES No. 1. THE OUTLAW'S PLEDGE ........ ................ : .... .... or The Raid o n tli e O l d Stoc k a d e No. 2. T R A CKED T O HIS LAIR ....... ........................ o r The P ur suit o f t h e M i dn i ght R aider No. 3. THE BLACK DEATH .... . . .................... ..... ..... o r The o f t h e Nava j o Witc h No. 4 THE SQUAW MAN' S REVENGE ............ . . . . ............. o r K idn a p pe d b y th e P i u tes No. 5. TRAPPED BY THE CREES ...... .... . . .... ............... o r Tric k e d by a R e negad e Sc o ut No. 6. BETRAYED BY A MOCCASIN ........ ............ o r T h e R o und-Up of th e India n Smuggl e r s No. 7 FLYING CLOUD'S LAST STA T D ....... . .............. o r T h e Ba ttl e o f D ead Ma n's C a n yo n To. 8. A D A S H F O R LIFE .......................... . .................. o r Tric k e d b y T i mb e r W o lves No. 9. T H E DECOY MESSAGE .................... ................ or T h e R u se o f th e B o rde r Jumpers No. 10. THE MIDNIGH T A LARM ........ . ..................... o r The R aid o n th e P ay m as t e r's C a mp .,No 11. THE MA SKED R IDERS" ...... .. ....... ....... . . . .... ... o r The M y s t e r y o f Grizz l y Gulc h No. 12. LURED BY OUTLAWS ........... . .. ............. ... o r The Mounte d Ra nger's Rid e No. 13. S TAGE COACH l;liLL' S L AST RID E ... . : ............... o r The B.il'ndits of Great B ea r Lake To. 14. THE TRAGEDY OF HANGMAN' S GULC H .... ....... ..... o r The Ghost o f H o rn M o untain s No. 15. THE T REASURES O F MAcKENZIE ISLES .. . ................... or.,...T h e Outlaw's DragIet No. 16. HELD UP AT SNAKE BASI N ........................... ........ o r T h e R e n ega d e's D eath-Vo t e No 17. THE MA I L RIDER'S D A S H WITH DEAT H ............... .... o r T h e D espe r a d o o f P o k e r F l a t o 18. T H E RED MASSACRE .. .................... ... : ...... or. T h e Hold-Up Me n o f Barre n L a nd s No. 19. THE MYSTERY OF THE A RCTIC CIRCLE .................. . .... o r The R o bb e r s R o undU p No. 2 0 H OUNDED BY RED MEN ............ . ..... . . . ..... o r The Road Agents o f P o rcupin e River No. 21. T H E FUR TRADER'S DISCOVE R Y ... ......................... or The Brotherhood o f Thie v es Nq. 22. THE SMUGGLERS OF LITTLE SLAVE LAKE ...... . ..... . . o r The Tra pp e r's Venge anc e No. 23. NIGHT RIDERS OF THE N O R TH-l i VEST . ................. . .... o r The V i g i lantes Re v enge No. 24. 'TH E SPECTRE OF THUNDERBO L T CAVERN .......... o r Tricke d by Midni ght Ass a ss i n s No. 25. RED HAND O F T I -IE NORTH-WEST ..... ..... ........... o r The Pirates of Hornaday Riv e r TO BE PUBLISHED ON THURSDAY Ma y 25No. 26. THE HER MIT BANDIT'S REVENGE .. : ...... .... o r The League of th e Fur-Ste a lers June 1-No. 27. THE CURS E O F C ORONATION GULF .............. o r The Outl a w s o f B l u e Wat e r s June 8-No. 28. THE DOOM OF THE BAND E D BROTHE R S .............. or The D e m o n R e negade s June 15-No. 29. THE W ITCH OF DEVI L WHIRL POOL ......... ..... o r T h e Gun Me n o f Split Lake J u n e 22-No. 3 0 -TORNAD O BESS THE KIDNAPP E R ............. . o r The Outlaws o f R abbit I s l and June 29-No. 31. THE WRECKERS O F CARIBOU REEF .......... .......... o r Bord e r B andits a t B a y July 6-To. 32. THE PLAGU E SPREA D ERS O F H U NGRY TRAIL. .. .'o r T h e R o bb e r s o f Littl e T h e AMERICAN I NDIAN WEEKLY i s fo r s al e b y all n ews de a l e r s a nd bo o k s elle rs o r i t v v ill be sent t o a n y address p os tp a i d b y the publ i shers up o n r ece ipt o f 6c per c o p y 10 c o pi es f o r 5 0c. All1Jac k numb e r s a l ways in s t ock. THE ARTHUR WESTBROOK COMPANY CLEVELAND, OHIO, U S A