USF Libraries
USF Digital Collections

Timicuan Indians, of Pre-Columbus days, left clan symbols

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Timicuan Indians, of Pre-Columbus days, left clan symbols
Physical Description:
1 online resource (2 p.) : ill. ;
Language:
English
Creator:
Dunn, Hampton
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Ethnological museums and collections -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Totem poles -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Abstract:
Typescript of Photouring Florida column that describes Timucuan totem poles at the Florida State Museum in Gainesville.
General Note:
Title from caption on PDF of p.1 (viewed July 8, 2010).
General Note:
At head of title: Photouring Florida.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002220690
oclc - 646276855
usfldc doi - D33-0015
usfldc handle - d33.15
System ID:
SFS0000396:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

-b14TIMICUAN INDIANS, OF PRE-COLUMBUS DAYS, LEFT CLAN SYMBOLS GAINESVILLE --Way back yonder B.C., Florida was occupied by the Indians. And for some time before Columbus discovered America, they were scattered in all sections of the state. From the Tampa Bay northward, the Timucuan Indians resided. They were a more docile people than their neighbors to the south, the Caloosas. The Timucuans offered very little resistance to the conquistadors and, indeed, even welcomed missionaries as friends. In the Florida State Museum in the Seagle Building in downtown Gainesville are a couple of outstanding mementoes of the Timicuans. Near the entrance is the horned owl totem pole which was made by these tribes about 1350 A.D. It was found and dredged from the St. Johns River near DeLand by Victor Roepke in 1955. The 10-Foot figure was carved from a single piece of pine. It probably served as a symbol or totem for a village or a family group (clan). It is explained at the Museum that there were many such poles in preColumbian times in the Southeastern U.S., but except for minor fragments, the only two known examples are the horned owl totem and the eagle totem, which also is on display here. The interesting eagle totem was donated to the Museum by N. F. Norton. Indians in the Southeast U.S. also used other kinds of poles in connection with special ceremonies and ball games.

PAGE 2

-b14


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
record xmlns http:www.loc.govMARC21slim xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.loc.govstandardsmarcxmlschemaMARC21slim.xsd
leader nam 2200337Ia 4500
controlfield tag 001 002220690
005 20100708093347.0
006 m d
007 cr bn|||||||||
008 100708s196u flua s 000 0 eng d
datafield ind1 8 ind2 024
subfield code a D33-0015
040
FHM
c FHM
043
n-us-fl
035
(OCoLC)646276855
049
FHmm
090
F306 (ONLINE)
1 100
Dunn, Hampton.
0 245
Timicuan Indians, of Pre-Columbus days, left clan symbols
h [electronic resource] / by Hampton Dunn.
260
196-?
300
1 online resource (2 p.) :
b ill.
500
Title from caption on PDF of p.1 (viewed July 8, 2010).
At head of title: Photouring Florida.
520
Typescript of Photouring Florida column that describes Timucuan totem poles at the Florida State Museum in Gainesville.
2 610
Florida State Museum.
650
Ethnological museums and collections
z Florida
Gainesville.
Totem poles
Florida
Gainesville.
651
Gainesville (Fla.)
x Description and travel.
773
t Hampton Dunn Photouring Florida collection.
w (OCoLC)645457977
4 856
u http://digital.lib.usf.edu/?d33.15