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Osceola's enemies acknowledged his virtues

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Material Information

Title:
Osceola's enemies acknowledged his virtues
Physical Description:
1 online resource (2 p.) : ill. ;
Language:
English
Creator:
Dunn, Hampton
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Statues -- Florida -- Silver Springs   ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Silver Springs (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Abstract:
Typescript of Photouring Florida column that describes the statue of Osceola in Silver Springs.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Hampton Dunn.
General Note:
Title from caption on PDF of p.1 (viewed July 15, 2010).
General Note:
At head of title: Photouring Florida.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002221085
oclc - 647959448
usfldc doi - D33-0051
usfldc handle - d33.51
System ID:
SFS0000432:00001


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Full Text

PAGE 1

-e02OSCEOLA'S ENEMIES ACKNOWLEDGED HIS VIRTUES By HAMPTON DUNN SILVER SPRINGS -An angry young man of his times was the handsome and virile Indian warrior, Osceola. A native of Hamilton County, Osceola moved to the Ocala area where he grew up and where he achieved fame in the Indian war to prevent shipment of the Reds to the West by the U. S. Givernment. There's a glistening white statue on the edge of sparkling Silver Springs that depicts Osceola in his most famous pose. It shows the irate young sub-chief displaying his emotions by stabbing a treaty which allegedly had been signed by fellow tribesmen with the whites. 'The only treaty I will execute is with this," growled Osceola slashing the piece of paper with a great knife. "This is my mark I will make no other." His inflammatory oration at Silver Springs on that memorable day, Oct. 23, 1834, fired up his race and ignited the Seven Years War. As a strapping youth wise to the words of "Ocali country," Osceola served as a guide and scout for Territorial Gov. William P. DuVal. Later he was friendly with the Indian agent, Gen. Wiley Thompson. This friendship severed when Thompson ordered the capture of the chief's lovely wife, Morning Dew, because she was supposed to be the daughter of a runaway slave. The mighty chief swore vengeance. He became an important Indian military genius and a noted strategist in American history. Even his enemies lauded him as a "Patriot and Warrior." Osceola was treacheroulsy captured under a flag of truce.

PAGE 2

-e02


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