Changes in altitudinal distribution of hummingbird diversity between forest and pasture habitats


previous item | next item

Citation
Changes in altitudinal distribution of hummingbird diversity between forest and pasture habitats

Material Information

Title:
Changes in altitudinal distribution of hummingbird diversity between forest and pasture habitats
Translated Title:
Cambios en la distribución altitudinal de la diversidad del colibrí entre el bosque y los hábitats en los potreros
Creator:
Chute, Jessica
Publication Date:
Language:
Text in English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Hummingbirds ( lcsh )
Colibríes ( lcsh )
Climatic changes ( lcsh )
Cambios climáticos ( lcsh )
Costa Rica--Puntarenas--Monteverde Zone
Costa Rica--Puntarenas--Zona de Monteverde
CIEE Spring 2009
CIEE Primavera 2009
Genre:
Reports

Notes

Abstract:
Climate change has affected the composition of bird communities elevationally in Monteverde, Costa Rica (Pounds et al. 1999). In addition, habitat transformation from forest to pasture has favored weedy species there (Feinsinger 1988). This study sought to combine hummingbird distributions across both habitat type and elevation, as the interaction of habitat disturbance and climate change is not well understood. Past studies have shown changes in hummingbird communities for either climate or habitat changes (Oliver 1993; Donnelly 1998; Smith 2000; Lynn 2001; Winchell 2001; Spear 2004). In order to observe these changes, I hung hummingbird feeders in different elevational zones in both forest and pasture. I found that Purple-throated Mountain Gems (Lampornis calolaemus) have shifted upward in elevation, and Violet Sabrewings (Campylopterus hemileucurus) and Green-crowned Brilliants (Heliodoxa jacula) show trends towards upward movement as well. Also, I observed that the communities of both fields and forest habitats have been altered. I saw no open-area specialist species, very low numbers of any species in pasture sites, and I did not observe some common forest species. My data suggest possible changes in the composition of the hummingbird communities of Monteverde. ( , )
Abstract:
El cambio climático ha afectado la composición de las comunidades de aves en Monteverde, Costa Rica en términos de elevación (Pounds et al. 1999). Además la transformación del hábitat de bosques a potreros a favorecido ciertas especies de malas hierbas allí (Feinsinger 1988). Este estudio trato de combinar la distribucion del colibrí en función del tipo de hábitat y la elevación, debido a que no se ha entendido muy bien la interacción de la perturbación del hábitat y el cambio climático.
Biographical:
Student Affiliation: Department of Biology, Northeastern University
General Note:
Born Digital

Record Information

Source Institution:
|Monteverde Institute
Holding Location:
|Monteverde Institute
Rights Management:
This item is licensed with the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivative License. This license allows others to download this work and share them with others as long as they mention the author and link back to the author, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.
Resource Identifier:
M39-00100 ( USFLDC DOI )
m39.100 ( USFLDC Handle )

Postcard Information

Format:
Book

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Changes in Altitudinal Distribution of Hummingbird Diversity between Forest and Pasture Habitats Jessica Chute Department of Biology, Northeastern University ABSTRACT Climate change has affected the composition of bird communities elevationally in Monteverde, Costa Rica Pounds et al. 1999. In addition, habitat transformation from forest to pasture has favored weedy species there Feinsinger 1988. This study sought to combine hummingbird distributions across both habitat type and elevation, as the interaction of habitat disturbance and climate change is not well understood. Past studies have shown changes in hummingbird communities for either climate or habitat changed Oliver 1993; Donnelly 1998; Smith 2000; Lynn 2001; Winchell 2001; Spear 2004. In order to observe these changes, I hung hummingbird feeders in different elevational zones in both forest and pasture. I found that Purple throated Mountain Gems Lampornis calolaemus have shifted upward in elevation, and Violet Sabrewings Cam pylopterus hemileucurus and Green crowned Brilliants Heliodoxa jacula show trends towards upward movement as well. Also, I observed that the communities of both fields and forest habitats have been altered. I saw no open area specialist species, very low numbers of any species in pasture sites, and I did not observe some common forest species. My data suggest possible changes in the composition of the hummingbird communities of Monteverde. RESUMEN El cambio climático ha afectado la composición de las comunidades en Monteverde, Costa Rica en términos de elevación. Además la transformación del hábitat de bosques a potreros a favorecido ciertas especies. Este estudio busca estudiar la interacción entre la elevación y el tipo de hábitat, debido a que e sto no ha sido estudiado. Estudios en el pasado han demostrado los cambios de las comunidades en diferentes elevaciones y en diferentes hábitats. Utilizando comederos artificiales en potreros y bosque a diferentes alturas estudie estos cambios. Encontré qu e Lampornis calolaemos ha subido en elevación y existe una tendencia a que Campylopterus hemileucurus y Heliodoxa jacula muestran una tendencia a subir en su rango altitudinal. Además observe que las comunidades de potrero y bosque también han sido altera das. No observe especialistas en áreas abiertas, poca abundancia de especies en general y no observe algunas especies comunes de bosque. Estos datos sugieren cambios en la composición de las comunidades de colibríes en la comunidad de Monteverde.. INTRO DUCTION Climate change has been a problem since the Industrial Revolution, and has skyrocketed since the 1970s McCarty 2001. In addition, human impacts on the environment have become more and more apparent IPCC 2007, with heavier repercussions on spe cies that are more habitat specific Iverson and Prasad 1998. The tropics are among the most affected of all ecosystems because of the high biodiversity they contain Wright 2005. Climate change has hit Monteverde of the Tilarán Mountains particularly hard; as the area has a large number of habitat types and transitions in comparison to the area it encompasses Pounds et al. 1999. In Monteverde, a 0.5 o C global change in temperature has a huge impact on biological communities where the temperature dif ference between one altitudinal community and another may differ very little, and where temperature plays such an important role in the climates that define each community. Holdridge Life Zones based on elevation, mean annual temperature and rainfall, cla ssify these

PAGE 2

habitats and provide scientists with a basis for identifying species ranges Haber 2000. In Monteverde an overall change of 0.5 o C in temperature results in an expected 100 meter upward climb in elevational range Pounds et al. 1999. Birds are good indicators of climate and human impacts as they respond quickly to changes because of their high mobility Walther et al. 2002. Indeed, birds in Monteverde appear to be moving up altitudinally Pounds et al. 1999. The hummingbird species that are typically found in Monteverde have known altitudinal distributions Feinsinger 1977; Fogden 1993; Young et al. 1998. Initial comparisons of studies already show upward movement in some forest species such as Green crowned Brilliants Heliodoxa jacula . Fogden 1993; Lynn 2001. Other forest species simply show lower than expected frequency of observance Lynn 2001, Winchell 2001. Many species also have specific habitat preferences, with some favoring forest habitats and others forest edges or clea rings Feinsinger 1977; Stiles and Skutch, 1987 the bird book; Fogden 1993. As forest was transformed to pasture in Monteverde, the abundances of these species have shifted. Comparisons of hummingbird habitat studies show changes in abundances of specie s as a result of habitat disturbance Oliver 1993; Stiles and Skutch 1999; Smith 2000; Winchell 2001; Spear 2004. My goal was to track changes in species diversity and abundance along an altitudinal gradient as well as between habitat types. I predicte d that species in the forest would show greater upward movement than pasture species. Pasture species have a greater ability to disperse over area and altitude because of their more general requirements. This is because disturbances in habitats clearing s, fields, etc. €loosen species interactions and allow other species to move in that are more adapted for these less specific habitats. Hummingbird species in disturbed sites visit flowers in a more haphazardly and opportunistically than species in undi sturbed sites, and so open habitats favor different species than undisturbed forest Feinsinger et al. 1988. Hummingbirds circulate freely among bean fields, scrub, and other open areas, which also share many plant species and so, whether spatially adjac ent or not, the plants in all three habitats are linked through their common set of pollinators Feinsinger 1978. Therefore, pasture species were not expected to move as much elevationally, because their habitat is not subject to the interaction dynamics found in natural forest habitats Terborgh 1971. METHODS Eight sites were chosen at four elevations that each fell into different Holdridge Life Zones as defined by Fogden 1993 Tables 1&2. At each elevation, four hummingbird feeders were hung from trees by yellow rope, two in a pasture or field clearing, and two in forest. The first set of sites at the lowest elevation was located at the Ecolodge in San Luis. The forest site was in the secondary forest patch ten meters off El Zapote Trail and had an elevation of 1185 meters. The field site was located in the middle of the horse pasture directly in front of the building complex and had an elevation of 1135 meters. The second set of sites was in the Bajo del Tigre area. The forest site was in the reserve ten meters off the Sendero de los Monos at marker 20 with an elevation of 1340 meters. The field site was in the lowest horse pasture owned by Elias Newswanger at 1385 meters. The third set of sites was at the Villa. The field site was in t he front yard at 1510 meters. The forest site was in the secondary forest patch behind the house at 1540 meters. The last sites were along the TV tower road at 1650 meters. The field site was in a

PAGE 3

clearing along the road created by the construction of t elephone wires. The forest site was approximately 30 meters into the forest from the field site. TABLE 1 Description of Fogden Zones used in finding study site elevations for hummingbird feeders. Zone Altitude Range Locati ons 1 700m 1300m San Luis to cliff edge of SW Monteverde 2 1300m 1500m Santa Elena and Monteverde 3 1500m 1600m Upper Monteverde and lower levels of Monteverde Cloud Forest Preserve 4 1600m+ Pac. Upper levels of Monteverde Cloud Forest Preserve Table 2 Description of the Holdridge Life Zones of Monteverde on the Pacific slope. Life Zones were used in conjunction with Fogden Zones 1 through 4 to determine elevations for hummingbird feeders. Zones in grey were not used. Life Zone Elevation m Mean Annual Rainfall mm Mean Annual Temp ‚C Dry Season Duration months Canopy m Premontane moist forest 700 1000 1200 2200 17 24 3.5 5 25 Premontane moist wet forest transition 1000 1200 Premontane wet forest 800 1450 2000 4000 17 24 0 5 30 40 Lower montane wet forest 1450 1600 1850 4000 12 17 0 3 25 35 Lower montane rain forest 1550 1850 3600 8000 12 17 0 3 20 30 The feeders had red bases with white flowers and perches, and were filled with a 20% sugar solution. The feeders were left for a week before commencing data collection to allow the hummingbird community composition to reach equilibrium. Each site was observed every other day over a period of ten days. Observation times were rotated to allow for variance s in feeding behavior during different times of the day. During observation periods, each species that visited the feeders was recorded, as well as the number of individual visits of each species. Pseudo replication was limited as much as possible by not re recording individuals that made obvious repeat visits. A one way ANOVA was used to test differences in the distribution of hummingbird species across elevations. Multinomial tests were used to find deviations of observed elevational distributions f rom both even distributions and expected distributions from Fogden 1993 within each species. A ðc 2 test for independence was used to test differences in habitat distribution between species. RESULTS Four of Monteverdeƒs reported hummingbird species were observed: the Violet Sabrewing Campylopterus hemileucurus , Stripe tailed Hummingbird Eupherusa eximia , Purple throated Mountain Gem Lampornis calolaemus , and Green crowned Brilliant. Of the total number of individuals observed, 25% were found i n field habitats and 75% in forest habitats. Elevational distribution of both habitats was grouped into Fogden Zones 1, 2, 3 & 4. Individuals in Zone 1

PAGE 4

accounted for 14.6% of total, Zone 2 had 16.7% of all individuals, in Zone 3 there were 47.9% of total individuals and 20.8% were in Zone 4. Of the observed species, only Violet Sabrewings were in both habitats in all three zones they were expected at. Stripe tailed hummingbirds were the only other species seen in a field site, and only in Zone 3, but were found in the three other zones in forest habitats. Green crowned Brilliants and Purple throated Mountain Gems were only found in forest sites in Zones 3 and 4. FIGURE 1 Distribution in elevation Fogden zones and habitat field or forest of observed hummingbird species in Monteverde, Costa Rica. Habitat There was a significant difference in the distribution of species across the two habitat types studied with a combined total of 12 individuals from two species found in field sites and 36 individuals from all four species found in forest sites ðc 2 = 7.8195, d.f. = 3, p = 0.049892. Very few individuals were observed at most field sites, with no visits recorded at all for the field site at the lowest elevation 1135 me ters. In addition none of the expected field specialists Rufous tailed Hummingbird, Steely vented Hummingbird were observed, and no visits were recorded for other expected species, like the Green Hermit and Green Violet ear.

PAGE 5

Elevation There was a significant difference in elevational distribution between the species I observed F = 10.5030, d.f. = 3, p < 0.0001. There were two results for the multinomial tests, one for even distribution across all four zones, while the other was weighted for ex pected distribution according to Fogdenƒs Annotated Checklist 1993. Significant differences from even distribution were found for Purple throated Mountain Gems, which were observed eight times in Zone 3, twice in Zone 4 and never in Zones 1 and 2 ðc 2 = 17.2000, d.f. = 3, p = 0.0006; and Green crowned Brilliants, which were only observed in Zones 3, and 4 with four and two individuals respectively ðc 2 = 8.6, d.f. = 3, p = 0.0351. No significant difference for observed data was found for even distributi on of Violet Sabrewings for which three, five and six individuals were observed in Zones 2, 3 and 4 ðc 2 = 6.0, d.f. = 3, p = 0.1116; and Stripe tailed Hummingbirds observed in all four Zones with seven, five, six and one individuals observed in Zones 1 th rough 4 ðc 2 = 4.3684, d.f. = 3, p = 0.2243. In the comparison to expected distribution, which was derived from ranking Fogdenƒs expected observance rates of Common ranked 4, Fairly Common 3, Uncommon 2 and Rare 1, two species show significant m ovement. Stripe tailed Hummingbirds were expected to be uncommon in Zone 1, fairly common in Zone 2, and common in Zones 3 and 4, but my observations indicate they have moved down from their expected distribution as there were higher abundances in Zones 1 through 3 seven, five and six individuals respectively than in Zone 4 one individual ðc 2 = 9.7939, d.f. = 3, p = 0.0204. Purple throated Mountain Gems show upward movement from Fogdenƒs expected distribution of fairly common in Zone 2, and common in Zones 3 and 4, with eight individuals observed in Zone 3, and one individual in Zone 4 ðc 2 = 8.7001, d.f. = 2, p = 0.0129. Two species show no significant difference between expected and observed distribution: Green crowned Brilliants were observed four times in Zone 3 and once in Zone 4, and were expected to be common in both Zones they were observed in ðc 2 = 1.8000, d.f. = 1, p = 0.1797. Violet Sabrewing observations of three, five and six individuals in Zones 2 through 4 also did not show significan t differences from the expected distribution of common throughout the Zones they were observed in ðc 2 = 1.0, d.f. = 2, p = 0.6065, though from visual comparison of the graphs Violet Sabrewings show a slight trend of upward movement. While there is no uni form trend of upward movement between all species, there are significant changes in their elevational distributions.

PAGE 6

FIGURE 2 Frequency rank is assigned on a scale from 1 to 4 based on Michael Fogdenƒs expected observance frequencies of Common 4, Fairly Common 3, Uncommon 2 and Rare 1 in each zone. FIGURE 3 Abundance of species across habitats was combined for each zone to show total number of individuals found in each zone per species. DISCUSSION The distribution of species across both elevations and habitats has changed. Chiefly, there were significant differences between observed elevational distributions and Fogdenƒs expected

PAGE 7

distributions, but they did not uniformly show upward or no movement. The one outlier from this prediction in these results was the Stripe tailed Hummingbird, which exhibited downward movement instead of up. However, according to the field guide The Birds of Costa Rica , Stripe tailed Hummingbirds are found at middle eleva tions from 800 2000 meters with some seasonal altitudinal movements up to 500 meters higher or lower than their normal range Garrigues & Dean, 2007. Seasonal movement occurs from March to June Fogden 1993, a time period in which the complete duration of my study fell into. In addition, according to a compilation of bird species abundance data Young et al. 1998, Stripe tailed Hummingbirds are abundant at much lower altitudes than reported by Fogden with 77.28% of the captured sample found between 100 0 and 1450 meters, 17.15% between 1400 and 1550 meters, and 5.56% 1500 „ 1700 meters. These data imply that the abundance of Stripe tailed Hummingbirds along the altitudinal gradient of their range may vary from year to year, which would place my data wit hin the overall normal range and abundance of Stripe tailed Hummingbirds, and follow that they have not actually moved down. Beyond the behavior of Stripe tailed Hummingbirds, there are overall trends of upward or no movement for the hummingbird species observed in my data analysis. This is also shown to be true through comparisons between Fogdenƒs 1993 expected distributions, Young et al.ƒs 1998 data, and my data; Green crowned Brilliants are the only species that do not show trends of upward movem ent. Their natural range is for the most part located at higher elevations than human disturbances occur. As a result, Green crowned Brilliants may be more resilient than the other species observed in this study, as they are subjected to only one type of pressure, climate change, to a great degree and not to a combination of two pressures. The absence of expected species in this study could be a result of climate change and habitat transformation affecting their individual habitats, causing those speci es to decrease in abundance in my study area. Green Hermits are found in wet mountain forest edges, understory, and second growth from 1650 „ 2600 meters Stiles and Skutch 1989. As a result, they may be sensitive to climate change, since their preferre d habitats of edges and second growth may not be as abundant at higher elevations in Monteverde due to a lower frequency of disturbance. This would result in a decrease in abundance of this species. Also, my study ended at 1650 meters, which is the report ed beginning of their range. I may not have seen this species because their range has moved further up the mountain and out of my study area. Rufous tailed Hummingbirds were also not observed in this study. This species prefers non forest habitats such as open scrub, secondary growth, thickety edges, semi open areas, coffee, and gardens, and inhabit all elevations up to 1850 m Stiles and Skutch 1989. However, many hummingbird studies conducted by other students also reported no Rufous tailed hummingb irds. These studies as well as mine had no observations of this species even at sites that would seem ideal, such as a pasture in Zone 1. The apparent disappearance of Rufous tailed hummingbirds may be because climate change has shifted their preferred e levations up the mountain, but since their preferred habitat, pasture, is quite scarce at higher elevations in Monteverde; their abundance may have drastically decreased instead. This showed that my prediction of greater resistance to climate change by f ield specialist species was false. My data does not show that €weedier hummingbird species with broader habitat

PAGE 8

requirements are more resistant to climate change. Instead these species may be suffering more than forest species, as their preferred habita ts are not present at the higher altitudes all species are being forced into, and may be undergoing local disappearances as a result. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Thank you first and foremost to Alan Masters for all his support on this project from conception to cu lmination. Thank you also to Yi men Araya and Anjali Kumar for helping me with an exhaustive amount of statistics, and to Pablo Allen and Moncho Calderon for helping with whatever I asked of them. I would also like to thank the Monteverde Conservation Le ague, the Tropical Science Center, the University of Georgia Ecolodge, and all the Monteverde residents who allowed me to conduct my research on their property. Lastly, thank you to my family and friends for supporting me throughout. LITERATURE CITED Bornstein et al. 2007. Climate Change 2007: Synthesis Report. IPCC. Donnelly, E. 1998. Changes in Bird Species Composition in Four Habitat Zones in Monteverde, Costa Rica. CIEE Spring 1998. Feinsinger, P. 1977. €Notes on the Hummingbirds of Monteverde, Cordillera de Tilar…n, Costa Rica. The Wilson Bulletin, Vol. 89, No. 1 March 1977, pp 159 164. Feinsinger, P. 1978. €Ecological Interactions between Plants and Hummingbirds in a Successional Tropical Community: Ecological Monogra phs, Vol. 43, No. 3, pp. 268 287. Feinsinger, P. et al. 1988. €Mixed Support for Spatial Heterogeneity in Species Interactions: Hummingbirds in a Tropical Disturbance Mosaic: The American Naturalist, Vol. 131, No. 1, pp. 35 57. Fogden, M. 1993. An Annotated Checklist of the Birds of Monteverde and Peñas Blancas . San Jose, Costa Rica. Garrigues, R. and R. Dean. 2007. The Birds of Costa Rica: A Field Guide . Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York. Haber, W. A. 2000. €Plants and Vege tation. In Monteverde: Ecology and Conservation of a Tropical Cloud Forest , p. 43 eds. Nalini M. Nadkarni and Nathaniel T. Wheelwright. New York, NY, Oxford University Press. Iverson, L.R. and A.M. Prasad. 1998. €Predicting Abundance of 80 Tree Sp ecies Following Climate Change in the Eastern united States: Ecological Monographs, Vol. 68, No4, pp. 465 485. Lynn, A. 2001. €Altitudinal Effects on Cloud forest Hummingbird Communities. CIEE Spring 2001. Monteverde, Costa Rica. McCarty, J.P . 2001. €Ecological Consequences of Recent Climate Change: Conservation Biology, Vol. 15, No. 2, pp. 320 331. Blackwell Publishing for Society for Conservation Biology. Oliver, M. 1993. Frequency of Hummingbird Activity in Forest and Pasture of Monteverde, Costa Rica. CIEE Summer 1993.

PAGE 9

Pounds, J.A. et al. 2006. €Widespread amphibian extinctions from epidemic disease driven by global warming. Nature, Vol. 439, pp. 161 167. Pounds, J.A., M.P.L. Fogden and J.H. Campbell. 1999. €Biolog ical response to climate change on a tropical mountain: Nature, Vol. 398, pp. 611 615. Smith, S. 2000. Changes in Hummingbird Species Richness and Abundance in a Forest Fragment and Agricultural Ecotones. CIEE Fall 2000. Spear, E. 2004. Edge Effect and Hummingbird Specialization. CIEE Spring 2004. Stiles, F.G., and A.F. Skutch. 1989. A Guide to the Birds of Costa Rica . Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York. Terborgh, J. 1971. €Distribution on environmental gradients: theory an d preliminary interpretation of distributional patterns in the avifauna of Cordillera Vilcabamba, Peru: Ecology, Vol. 52, pp. 22 40. Walther, G.R. et al. 2002. €Ecological Responses to Recent Climate Change: Nature, Vol. 416, pp. 389 395. Winche ll, M.M. 2001. €Responses of Canopy and Understory Hummingbird Communities to Habitat Disturbance. CIEE Spring 2001. Monteverde, Costa Rica. Wright, J. 2005. €Tropical Forests in a Changing Environment: TRENDS in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 20, No. 10, pp. 553 560. Young, B.E. et al. 1998. €Diversity and Conservation of Understory Birds in the Tilar…n Mountains, Costa Rica. The Auk, Vol. 115, No. 4, pp. 998 1016. University of California Press on behalf of the American Ornithologists' U nion.

PAGE 10

FIGURE 4 Average elevations of species for individuals combined from both field and forest habitats. FIGURE 5 Abundance of Violet Sabrewing VS, Stripe tailed Hummingbirds STH, Purple throated Mountain Gem PTMG, and Green crowned Brilliant GCB in field and forest habitats distributed across elevational zones. 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 5 0 0 0 0 3 2 6 0 0 8 0 4 2 4 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Number of Individuals 1 2 3 4 Fogden Zones Species Abudance in Zones and Habitats VS in field VS in forest STH in field STH in forest PTMG in field PTMG in forest GCB in field GCB in forest


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
record xmlns http:www.loc.govMARC21slim xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
leader 00000nas 2200000Ka 4500
controlfield tag 008 000000c19749999pautr p s 0 0eng d
datafield ind1 8 ind2 024
subfield code a M39-00100
040
FHM
0 041
eng
049
FHmm
1 100
Chute, Jessica
242
Cambios en la distribucin altitudinal de la diversidad del colibr entre el bosque y los hbitats en los potreros
245
Changes in altitudinal distribution of hummingbird diversity between forest and pasture habitats
260
c 2009-05
500
Born Digital
3 520
Climate change has affected the composition of bird communities elevationally in Monteverde, Costa Rica (Pounds et al. 1999). In addition, habitat transformation from forest to pasture has favored weedy species there (Feinsinger 1988). This study sought to combine hummingbird distributions across both habitat type and elevation, as the
interaction of habitat disturbance and climate change is not well understood. Past studies have shown changes in hummingbird communities for either climate or habitat changes (Oliver 1993; Donnelly 1998; Smith 2000; Lynn 2001; Winchell 2001; Spear 2004). In order to observe these changes, I hung hummingbird feeders in different elevational zones in both forest and pasture. I found that Purple-throated Mountain Gems (Lampornis calolaemus) have shifted upward in elevation, and Violet Sabrewings (Campylopterus hemileucurus) and Green-crowned Brilliants (Heliodoxa jacula) show trends towards upward movement as well. Also, I observed that the communities of both fields and forest habitats have been altered. I saw no open-area specialist species, very low numbers of any species in pasture sites, and I did not observe some common forest species. My data suggest possible changes in the composition of the hummingbird communities of Monteverde.
El cambio climtico ha afectado la composicin de las comunidades de aves en Monteverde, Costa Rica en trminos de elevacin (Pounds et al. 1999). Adems la transformacin del hbitat de bosques a potreros a favorecido ciertas especies de malas hierbas all (Feinsinger 1988). Este estudio trato de combinar la distribucion del colibr en funcin del tipo de hbitat y la elevacin, debido a que no se ha entendido muy bien la interaccin de la perturbacin del hbitat y el cambio climtico.
546
Text in English.
650
Hummingbirds--Costa Rica--Puntarenas--Monteverde Zone
Hummingbirds--Variation--Puntarenas--Monteverde Zone
Hummingbirds--Biogeography
4
Colibres--Costa Rica--Puntarenas--Zona de Monteverde
Colibres--Variacin--Costa Rica--Puntarenas--Zona de Monteverde
Colibres--Biografa
653
Tropical Ecology 2009
Altitudinal distribution
Pasture habitats
Forest habitats
Ecologa Tropical 2009
Distribucin altitudinal
Hbitats del potrero
Hbitats del bosque
655
Reports
720
CIEE
773
t Monteverde Institute : Tropical Ecology
856
u http://digital.lib.usf.edu/?m39.100


printinsert_linkshareget_appmore_horiz

Download Options [CUSTOM IMAGE]

close
Choose Size
Choose file type

Cite this item close

APA

Cras ut cursus ante, a fringilla nunc. Mauris lorem nunc, cursus sit amet enim ac, vehicula vestibulum mi. Mauris viverra nisl vel enim faucibus porta. Praesent sit amet ornare diam, non finibus nulla.

MLA

Cras efficitur magna et sapien varius, luctus ullamcorper dolor convallis. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Fusce sit amet justo ut erat laoreet congue sed a ante.

CHICAGO

Phasellus ornare in augue eu imperdiet. Donec malesuada sapien ante, at vehicula orci tempor molestie. Proin vitae urna elit. Pellentesque vitae nisi et diam euismod malesuada aliquet non erat.

WIKIPEDIA

Nunc fringilla dolor ut dictum placerat. Proin ac neque rutrum, consectetur ligula id, laoreet ligula. Nulla lorem massa, consectetur vitae consequat in, lobortis at dolor. Nunc sed leo odio.