Patch fidelity behavior in coexisting damselflies: Hetaerina cruentata (Odonata: Calopterygidae) and Argia extranea (Odonata: Coenagrionidae)


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Patch fidelity behavior in coexisting damselflies: Hetaerina cruentata (Odonata: Calopterygidae) and Argia extranea (Odonata: Coenagrionidae)

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Title:
Patch fidelity behavior in coexisting damselflies: Hetaerina cruentata (Odonata: Calopterygidae) and Argia extranea (Odonata: Coenagrionidae)
Translated Title:
Comportamiento de fidelidad de parches en libélulas coexistentes: Hetaerina cruentata (Odonata: Calopterygidae) y Argia extranea (Odonata: Coenagrionidae)
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Peterson, Anna C
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Text in English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Damselflies ( lcsh )
Libélulas ( lcsh )
Insects--Behavior ( lcsh )
Insectos--Comportamiento ( lcsh )
Costa Rica--Puntarenas--Monteverde Zone--San Luis
Costa Rica--Puntarenas--Zona de Monteverde--San Luis
CIEE Fall 2006
CIEE Otoño 2006
Genre:
Reports

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Abstract:
Patch fidelity in coexisting territorial damselfly species, Hetaerina cruentata and Argia extranea was studied to determine if these species displayed differing territorial behavior, which may be one mechanism for niche differentiation of these species. Data such as light amount and proximity to water of the patch sites were gathered to provide information about territorial preferences of these two species. No significant relationships between patch fidelity and patch characteristics were found. A significant difference was seen between the patch fidelity of the two species, implicating territory as a possible niche differentiating mechanism. Possible explanations for the variation in patch fidelity behavior between the species include: genetic differences between the two species, differences in learning abilities in relation to life span, and differing impacts of population dynamics on H. cruentata and A. extranea. ( ,, )
Abstract:
Fidelidad a pequeños parches entre dos especies de libélulas de la familia Odonata, Hetaerina cruentata y Argia extranea, fue investigado para determinar si hay una diferencia en la conducta territorial de las especies.
Biographical:
Student affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado at Boulder
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Born Digital

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Monteverde Institute
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Monteverde Institute
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This item is licensed with the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivative License. This license allows others to download this work and share them with others as long as they mention the author and link back to the author, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.
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M39-00172 ( USFLDC DOI )
m39.172 ( USFLDC Handle )

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Comportamiento de fidelidad de parches en liblulas coexistentes: Hetaerina cruentata (Odonata: Calopterygidae) y Argia extranea (Odonata: Coenagrionidae)
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Patch fidelity behavior in coexisting damselflies: Hetaerina cruentata (Odonata: Calopterygidae) and Argia extranea (Odonata: Coenagrionidae)
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c 2006-12
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Patch fidelity in coexisting territorial damselfly species, Hetaerina cruentata and Argia extranea was studied to determine if these species displayed differing territorial behavior, which may be one mechanism for niche differentiation of these species. Data such as light amount and proximity to water of the patch sites were gathered to provide information about territorial preferences of these two species. No significant relationships between patch fidelity and patch characteristics were found. A significant difference was seen between the patch fidelity of the two species, implicating territory as a possible niche differentiating mechanism. Possible explanations for the variation in patch fidelity behavior between the species include: genetic differences between the two species, differences in learning abilities in relation to life span, and differing impacts of population dynamics on H. cruentata and A. extranea.
Fidelidad a pequeos parches entre dos especies de liblulas de la familia Odonata, Hetaerina cruentata y Argia extranea, fue investigado para determinar si hay una diferencia en la conducta territorial de las especies.
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Text in English.
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Damselflies--Costa Rica--Puntarenas--San Luis
Insects--Behavior
4
Liblulas--Costa Rica--Puntarenas--San Luis
Insectos--Comportamiento
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Tropical Ecology 2006
Patch fidelity
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Fidelidad de parches
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Reports
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t Monteverde Institute : Tropical Ecology
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u http://digital.lib.usf.edu/?m39.172



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1 Patch fidelity behavior in coexisting damselflies: Hetaerina cruentata Odonata: Calopterygidae and Argia extranea Odonata: Coenagrionidae Anna C. Peterson Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado at Boulder Abstract Patch fidelity in coexisting territorial damselfly species, Hetaerina cruentata and Argia extranea was studied to determine if these species displayed differing territorial behavior, which may be one mechanism for niche differentiation of these species. Da ta such as light amount and proximity to water of the patch sites were gathered to provide information about territorial preferences of these two species. No significant relationships between patch fidelity and patch characteristics were found. A significa nt difference was seen between the patch fidelity of the two species, implicating territory as a possible niche differentiating mechanism. Possible explanations for the variation in patch fidelity behavior between the species include: genetic differences b etween the two species, differences in learning abilities in relation to life span, and differing impacts of population dynamics on H. cruentata and A. extranea . Resumen Fidelidad a pequeños parches entre dos especies de la familia Odonata, Hetaerina cr uentata y Argia extranea, fue investigado para determinar si hay una diferencia en la conducta territorial de las especies. Esta conducta es un mecanismo posible de diferenciación de estas especies. Datos como la cantidad de luz y la proximidad al río de l o s pequeños parch e s, fuer on colectados para determinar l a s preferencias territoriales de las especies. No hubo relaciones significativas entre la fidelidad a los parches y las características de los parches. Hubo una diferencia significativa entre la fide lidad a los parches entre las dos especies, implicando las diferencias territoriales como un mecanismo de posible diferencia. Explicaciones posibles para la diferencia en la conducta de l a s especies incluyen las diferencias genéticas, las diferencias en la habilidad a aprender conductas, y los im pactos diferentes de dinámica poblacional en H. cruentata y A. extranea. Introduction Territories of the family Odonata are defined as €any defended area. Nobel 1939. Males aggressively defend areas near ov iposition sites where females arrive searching for copulation Cordoba Aguilar 1994. Territories are maintained because they are beneficial to the fitness of Odonata species. When returning to a familiar site, a species will already be aware of potential dangers such as spider webs or other dangers. Territories also allow individuals to spend less time looking for potential oviposition sites and instead spend time on more productive activities such as hunting or mating Grether and Switzer 2000. A defende d area will sometimes contain individuals of multiple species Huffaker and Gutierrez 1999. Adults of the Odanata subfamily Zygoptera are predacious, feeding on small flying

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2 insects found in riparian areas Romoser and Stoffolano 1998. Like all insects , they are ectothermic, with most of their heat provided by solar radiation and metabolic heat Romoser and Stoffolano 1998. The two species studied in this experiment, Hetaerina cruentata and Argia extranea are both predacious, ectothermic and also both display territorial behavior. A. extranea and H. cruentata are found living in coexistence along the Rio Alóndra in San Luis, Costa Rica. Due to their shared habitat, similar prey choice and physiological needs, it appears that H. cruentata and A. extran ea exhibit a potential for niche overlap. The Lotka Voltera Principle of Competitive Exclusion states that no two coexisting species can occupy the same niche at the same time Begon et. al. 1990. What, then, is the mechanism that differentiates the nich es of these species? Studies have shown that local behavioral interactions between individuals can be important mechanisms for explaining coexistence Mikami et. al. 2004. Therefore territoriality may be a possible mechanism for differentiating the niche s of H. cruentata and A. extranea . Territoriality is known to be an important process in the distribution of individuals over a habitat Bothe and Visser 2003. Differences in the territorial behavior may differentiate H. cruentata and A. extranea in spa ce. For example one species may keep loose territories while another keeps more consistently visited or defined territories. Studies have already shown that H. cruentata moves infrequently from its territorial sites, even after multiple days Cordoba Aguil ar 1994. My study aimed to explore the territorial behavior of H. cruentata further and compare its behavior to that of A. extranea in order to determine if these species display differences in their patch fidelity. This study also considered if patches w ith high numbers of faithful individuals had particular characteristics, which would provide information on territorial preferences of damselfly species in general. It was hypothesized that there would be a difference between the patch fidelity of the tw o species. It was predicted that the largest individuals would return to patches most often because they would be best able to defend their chosen habitat. It was also predicted that the larger H. cruentata would show more patch fidelity because its larger size would make it a better inter specific competitor. Materials and Methods Study Site This study was conducted along a 1 km stretch of the Rio Alóndra about 2 km south east of the Ecolodge in San Luis for a 3 week period during October and November between the hours of 8 a.m. and 2 p.m. This area is typified by open fields visited by few cattle, and grades into more closed secondary forest moving upstream. The fifteen study sites used varied in their substrate and included patches of bare rock, open pasture grass and leafy vines, lianas and other vegetation.

PAGE 3

3 Study subject Two species within the subfamily Zygoptera: Hetaerina cruentata Calopterygidae and Argia extranea Coenagronidae were studied in this experiment. H. cruentata is the larger o f the species, averaging 4.70 cm in length. It is dark black to brown in coloration. Males of this species have bright red spots on the base of their wings, giving them their common name €ruby spot. Females of the species H. cruentata are often more brown in color than males, and lack the red spot on their wings. A. extranea is smaller averaging 3.65 cm in length and displays strong sexual dimorphism in color; males are bright blue with black rings and females are tan with black rings. Both species are c ommon and fairly widespread in Costa Rica, and usually found below 600 m Haber personal communication. These species are considered beneficial to humans because larvae of Odonata are aquatic and often feed on mosquito larvae Romoser and Stoffolano 1998 . Methodology I chose fifteen 2 m 2 patches for use in this study. I designated this size for each patch after observing the behavior of H. cruentata and A. extranea . This size was also the patch size used by Cordoba Aguilar 1994 in his study of H. cr uentata . A patch represents the area of potentially defended territory. These patches were marked off at various intervals along the riverbank with flagging tape. I captured all members of H. cruentata and A. extranea within each patch and marked each indi vidual with a unique pattern of dots using paint pens and acrylic paints, and then measured their size. I observed patches over the course of 3 weeks and made records of any individual found returning to a patch. For each patch I measured the size, distanc e from water, distance from other patches, slope of patch estimated in degrees, substrate, and amount of sun. I used an Extech EasyView Light Meter to take the light data, which I measured over two different clear days between the hours of 11 a.m. and 1 p. m. I collected data on patch characteristics such as in order to determine if persistently visited patches had particular characteristics, thus providing more information on territorial preferences of damselfly species in general. I spent five minutes at e ach perch recording the aggressive behavior. I defined an aggressive behavior as any behavior in which two male damselflies engaged in chasing or physical contact. If I observed this behavior between a male and female I did not count it, as it may have bee n a mating behavior. I recorded numbers of aggressive behaviors in order to determine if persistently visited patches also had higher levels of aggression. Results In total 71 individuals were captured, 36 individuals of H. cruentata and 35 individuals of A. extranea . Individuals of H. cruentata were recaptured in their original patch after at least one or more subsequent days with a rate of 80.6% ðC 2 = 7.557, DF = 1, P < 0.01, Figure 1. Individuals of A. extranea were recaptured in their original patch with a rate of 17.1% ðC 2 = 7.557, DF = 1, P < 0.01, Figure 1. There was no significant relationship

PAGE 4

4 between patch angle and recapture R 2 = 0.251, P = 0.056, n = 28, between patch distance from water and recapture R 2 = 0.183, P = 0.1119, n = 28, or be tween light amount and recapture R 2 = 0.1138, P = 0.2188, n = 28, Figure 2. A correlation between aggressive behavior and patch fidelity also was found to be non significant P = 1.000. There was no significant difference between sizes of H. cruentata individuals recaptured in their original patch and individuals not recaptured T= 0.074364 DF = 12, P=0.941946, n = 36, Figure 3 or size of A. extranea individuals recaptured in comparison to those not recaptured T = 0.211604, DF = 5, P = 0.840771, n = 35, Figure 4 . 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Hetaerina cruentata Argia extranea Species Number Recaptured FIGURE 1. Recaptures in original patch of H. cruentata and A. extranea . Recaptures between two damselfly species Hetaerina cruentata and Argia extranea differ significantly from each other. H. cruentata was foun d to return to a patch significantly more often than A. extranea Chi Square, ðC 2 = 7.557, DF = 1, P < 0.01.

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5 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Sun Amount Klux Total Recaptures FIGURE 2. Total recaptures in relation so sun amount. No relationship between recaptures and amount of sun, measured in Klux. Klux data measured with a light meter. Slight trend shows higher levels of recaptures with greater amount of sun. Linear regression showed no significant relationship R 2 = 0.1138, P = 0.2188, n = 28. €Std. Dev. €Std. Err. Mean size cm 4,54 4,60 4,66 4,72 4,78 4,84 4,90 No recapture Yes recapture FIGURE 3. H. cru entata size by recapture. No significant difference between sizes of H. cruentata individuals recaptured in original patch and size of individuals not recaptured. T test for dependent samples, T= 0.074364 DF = 12, P=0.941946, n = 36 .

PAGE 6

6 €Std. Dev. €Std. Err. Mean size cm 3,4 3,5 3,6 3,7 3,8 3,9 No recapture Yes recapture FIGURE 4. A. extranea size by recapture. No significant difference between sizes of A. extranea individuals recaptured in original patch and size of individual not recaptured T test for dependent samples T = 0.211604, DF = 5, P = 0.840771 , n = 35. Discussion Individuals of H. cruentata returned to the same patch of habitat more often than individuals of A. extranea X 2 = 7.557, DF = 1, P<1. This supports the original hypothesis that there would be a difference between the patch fidel ity of the two species. The difference in the territorial behavior of the two species is a plausible mechanism for differentiating the distributions of H. cruentata and A. extranea . Territoriality may be the agent responsible for spatially distributing the se species, leading to differentiation in other areas of their niche Both and Visser 2003. A possible explanation for the lack of relationship between sun amount R 2 = 0.1138, P = 0.2188, n = 28, angle R 2 = 0.251, P = 0.056, n = 28, distance from wate r R 2 = 0.183, P = 0.1119, n = 28 and patch fidelity is that there may be factors more important to H. cruentata and A. extranea in determining territorial sites. Gibbons and Pain 1992 found that female Caloptyryx damselflies prefer to oviposit in patch es of aquatic vegetation found in fast water. This study suggests that faster water may increase oxygen to the eggs, or may reduce parasitism on the eggs. A possible future study could determine if H. cruentata and A. extranea also display this behavior, a nd prefer sites better equipped to ensure the survival of their offspring. Adult males of the species H. cruentata have been shown to move infrequently once a territory is established Cordoba Aguilar 1994. In his study Cordoba Aguilar 1994 recaught 64. 8% of the H. cruentata originally captured in his study. The return rate in this study was even higher, with 80.6% of H. cruentata individuals recaptured in the same patch, therefore supporting Cordoba Aguilar‚s findings. Furthermore this study shows that not only do H. cruentata move infrequently from patch areas, but they return to a patch significantly more often than members of the species A. extranea. Only 17.1% of A. extranea individuals were recaptured in the same patch on subsequent days. No signifi cant correlation between the size of individuals and their tendency to return to a particular patch area was found; suggesting that the relationship isn‚t as simple as the

PAGE 7

7 bigger damselfly wins the territory most often. What then, could explain the differ ence between the patch fidelity of H. cruentata and A. extranea ? Females entering a territory are recognized as females through the use of sight Romoster and Stoffolano 1998. Occasionally males will not recognize the sex of an individual, and will attem pt to enter the tandem position that precedes copulation with a male rather than female Johnson 1963. Males may attempt to avoid this behavior by spreading out into territories. It has been suggested that sexual encounters between males preceded the evol ution of territorial behavior Romoser and Stoffolano 1998. It is possible that this same behavior is present in the species observed in this study. A. extranea displays a high level of sexual dimorphism. H. cruentata displays less obvious sexual dimorph ism with so it is possible that H. cruentata has a harder time recognizing females of its species, and consequently has evolved a stronger sense of territoriality in order to avoid negative male male mating behavior. Studies have shown that a high percen tage of adults die shortly after reaching maturity Johnson 1962. Thus it is thought that species species behaviors, such as territoriality, are genetically controlled because members of Odonata simply don‚t spend enough time as adults to learn this behav ior Johnson 1962. Cordoba Aguilar 1994 found that the survival rate of H. cruentata might be as high as 44.9 days, which is the highest rate within the suborder, and perhaps for all odonates in general. This longer lifetime may provide H. cruentata the opportunity to €learn territorial behaviors that A. extranea is unable to. H. cruentata may then possess not only genetically embedded knowledge, but also may possess some learned knowledge as well, which may allow this species to have more developed ter ritorial behavior than A. extranea . A final possibility for the difference in perch fidelity between A. extranea and H. cruentata may have nothing to do with learned or genetic behaviors, but rather could be a function of population dynamics. At low densi ties, populations are better able to establish territories. At higher densities the costs of defending territories increases, so territories can shrink or behaviors can change Both and Visser 2003. It is possible that the A. extranea and H. cruentata pop ulations differed at the time of this study; or that these species differ in their response to changing population densities. No population data were collected for either species so it is unknown if the populations of the species differed. A possible study for the future could take into account population data for these two species to determine if they do respond differently to changes in population density. It would also be interesting to look closer at other possible differentiating mechanisms, such as fo od choice or reproduction, to determine to what extent these two species are differentiated in other areas. A. extranea and H. cruentata are species known to defend territories. This study has shown that these species differ significantly in their territo rial behavior, suggesting differences in these species‚ utilization of space. The cause of this difference is not known. It may be a genetically programmed response, with each species evolving different territorial behaviors based on male male copulation a voidance, or that H. cruentata , with its longer life span is able to €learn territorial behavior and gain and advantage over A. extranea. The difference in behavior of these two species may also be a reflection of the population dynamics present at the ti me of the study. Whatever the reason, it is important to increase knowledge of species interactions because interactions are important to how species utilize space Both and Visser 2003. This knowledge

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8 becomes increasingly important as human beings change and destroy this space at incredible rates. Acknowledgments First off I‚d like to thank Bill Haber for his help in identifying my damselfly species and Tania for her advising and making the trip all the way to San Luis. Cam, that cake that one nightƒaw esome. In general I‚d like to thank the worlds best TA‚s for all their help in editing, preparing snacks, and Tom for getting us lost. Karen and Alan, thanks for a good time. And mostly I‚d like to thank all my fellow students for your help and humor, and for making even the tough days fun. Except for Lili. Thanks for nothing. Works Cited Begon, M. et. al. 1990. Ecology: Individuals, Populations and Communities. Blackwell Scientific Publications, Boston. Borrar, D.J. and D.M. DeLong. 1971. An Introduction to The Study of Insects, Third Edition. Holt, Rinehart and Winston. New York. Both, C. and M.E. Visser. 2003. Density dependence, territoriality, and divisibility of resources: From optimality models to population processes. The American Naturalist 1612 : 326 337. Cordoba Aguilar, A. 1994. Adult Survival and Movement in Males of the Damselfly Hetaerina cruentata Odonata: Calopterydigdae. Florida Entomologist 772: 256 264. Grether, G. F. and Switzer, P.V. 2000. Mechanisms for the formation and mainten ance of traditional night roost aggregations in a territorial damselfly. Animal Behavior 60 : 569 579. Huffaker, C.B. and Gutierrez, A.P. 1999. Ecological Entomology, Second Edition. John Wiley and Sons, New York. Johnson, C. 1964. The Evolution of Territor iality in the Odonata. Evolution 18 : 89 92. Mikami, O.K. et. al. 2004. A new hypothesis for species coexistence: male male repulsion promotes coexistence of competing species. Population Ecology 46 : 213 217. Nobel, G. K. 1939. The role of dominance in the life of birds. In Johnson, C. 1964. The Evolution of Territoriality in the Odonata. Evolution 18 : 89 92. Romoser, W.S. and J.G. Stoffolano. 1998. The Science of Entomology. McGraw Hill, Boston, MA. Wingfield, G. D. and D. Pain. 1992. The influence of rive r flow rates on the breeding behavior of Calopteryx damselflies. Journal of Animal Ecology 61 : 283 289.


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