Harritos: Tampa, Fla.; a cigar of Samuel Davis and Company.

Citation
Harritos: Tampa, Fla.; a cigar of Samuel Davis and Company.

Material Information

Title:
Harritos: Tampa, Fla.; a cigar of Samuel Davis and Company.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Tampa (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Hillsborough County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Label ( Documentary Artifact, Communication Artifact )
Samuel I. Davis & Co. (900 N. Howard Avenue)
Cigar labels--Harritos
Cigar industry
Genre:
Cigar label ( local )
Cigar label ( local )

Notes

Summary:
Much of this label is filled with gold inlay. Around the turn of the 20th century, cigars were advertised and sold mainly by the colourful, intricate labels that adorned the boxes. Intense competition encouraged manufacturers to see who could create the most beautiful, eye-catching labels. A different stone was required to print each colour. It was not unusual for as many as 20 stones to be used to create a single label. The register for each printing had to be perfect.The process became known as STONE LITHOGRAPHY or CHROMOLITHOGRAPHY.Once this exacting printing process was completed, the labels were then gilded with hand-applied gold leaf. Finally, the labels were embossed using huge 30-ton presses. According to Joe Davidson, the eminent American art dealer and collector, the "Golden Era" of cigar labels is associated with the introduction of gilding and embossing in the 1890's up to the late 1920's when the less attractive full-colour or photo-mechanical labels began to appear. Genuine gold leaf was used primarily by German and Cuban printers and "bronzing" in which bronze powder was mixed with lacquer or sizing, applied like ink, then burnished with brushes or polished rollers to make them gleam like gold. These particular labels were produced by the German factory, Gerhard Meinesz in Bentheim, near the Dutch border, and closed in 1932. The labels were used during the 1920's.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
C24-05406 ( USFLDC DOI )
c24.5406 ( USFLDC Handle )

Postcard Information

Format:
Artifact

Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
record xmlns http:www.loc.govMARC21slim xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.loc.govstandardsmarcxmlschemaMARC21slim.xsd
leader am 3u
datafield ind1 ind2 tag 042
subfield code a dc
2 720
Samuel David and Company
260
c 1906
520
Much of this label is filled with gold inlay.
Around the turn of the 20th century, cigars were advertised and sold mainly by the colourful, intricate labels that adorned the boxes. Intense competition encouraged manufacturers to see who could create the most beautiful, eye-catching labels.
A different stone was required to print each colour. It was not unusual for as many as 20 stones to be used to create a single label. The register for each printing had to be perfect.The process became known as STONE LITHOGRAPHY or CHROMOLITHOGRAPHY.Once this exacting printing process was completed, the labels were then gilded with hand-applied gold leaf. Finally, the labels were embossed using huge 30-ton presses.
According to Joe Davidson, the eminent American art dealer and collector, the "Golden Era" of cigar labels is associated with the introduction of gilding and embossing in the 1890's up to the late 1920's when the less attractive full-colour or photo-mechanical labels began to appear.
Genuine gold leaf was used primarily by German and Cuban printers and "bronzing" in which bronze powder was mixed with lacquer or sizing, applied like ink, then burnished with brushes or polished rollers to make them gleam like gold.
These particular labels were produced by the German factory, Gerhard Meinesz in Bentheim, near the Dutch border, and closed in 1932. The labels were used during the 1920's.
8 024
C24-05406
540
Internet distribution rights are extended by the owner of the original to PALMM for use in the Ephemeral Cities project. This image may not be commercially reproduced without permission.
653
Label ( Documentary Artifact, Communication Artifact )
Samuel I. Davis & Co. (900 N. Howard Avenue)
Cigar labels--Harritos
Cigar industry
0 245
[Harritos: Tampa, Fla.; a cigar of Samuel Davis and Company.]
7 655
Cigar label
local
651
Tampa (Fla.)
Hillsborough County (Fla.)
773
t Tampa Cigar Industry and Art Collection
4 856
u http://digital.lib.usf.edu/?c24.5406


printinsert_linkshareget_appmore_horiz

Download Options

close
Choose Size
Choose file type
Cite this item close

APA

Cras ut cursus ante, a fringilla nunc. Mauris lorem nunc, cursus sit amet enim ac, vehicula vestibulum mi. Mauris viverra nisl vel enim faucibus porta. Praesent sit amet ornare diam, non finibus nulla.

MLA

Cras efficitur magna et sapien varius, luctus ullamcorper dolor convallis. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Fusce sit amet justo ut erat laoreet congue sed a ante.

CHICAGO

Phasellus ornare in augue eu imperdiet. Donec malesuada sapien ante, at vehicula orci tempor molestie. Proin vitae urna elit. Pellentesque vitae nisi et diam euismod malesuada aliquet non erat.

WIKIPEDIA

Nunc fringilla dolor ut dictum placerat. Proin ac neque rutrum, consectetur ligula id, laoreet ligula. Nulla lorem massa, consectetur vitae consequat in, lobortis at dolor. Nunc sed leo odio.