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Aldo De Tomasi oral history interview

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Material Information

Title:
Aldo De Tomasi oral history interview
Series Title:
Concentration camp liberators oral history project
Uniform Title:
Holocaust & genocide studies oral history projects
Physical Description:
1 sound file (18 min.) : digital, MPEG4 file + ;
Language:
English
Creator:
De Tomasi, Aldo, 1925-
Hirsh, Michael, 1943-
University of South Florida Libraries -- Holocaust & Genocide Studies Center
University of South Florida -- Library. -- Special & Digital Collections. -- Oral History Program
Publisher:
University of South Florida Tampa Library
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Concentration camps -- History -- Germany   ( lcsh )
World War, 1939-1945 -- Concentration camps -- Germany   ( lcsh )
World War, 1939-1945 -- Concentration camps -- Liberation   ( lcsh )
World War, 1939-1945 -- Atrocities   ( lcsh )
World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, American   ( lcsh )
World War, 1939-1945 -- Veterans -- United States   ( lcsh )
Veterans -- Interviews -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genocide   ( lcsh )
Crimes against humanity   ( lcsh )
Genre:
Oral history   ( local )
Online audio   ( local )
Oral history.   ( local )
Online audio.   ( local )
interview   ( marcgt )

Notes

Summary:
This is an oral history interview with Holocaust concentration camp liberator Aldo De Tomasi. De Tomasi was a member of the 104th Infantry Division, which liberated Nordhausen, part of the Dora-Mittelbau complex of camps, on April 11, 1945. He joined the division during the Battle of the Bulge, which was his first combat action. After the Bulge, while proceeding through Germany, the division came to a fork in the road; most of the division took the left fork, but De Tomasi's unit took the other, which led them to Nordhausen. They were the first unit to arrive at the camp, and were followed by the rest of the division and the medics. In this interview, De Tomasi describes finding the camp and seeing the prisoners there.
Venue:
Interview conducted June 30, 2008.
Preferred Citation:
The Liberators: America's Witnesses to the Holocaust (New York: Bantam Books, 2010) and Concentration Camp Liberators Oral History Project, University of South Florida Libraries, ©2010 Michael Hirsh.
Statement of Responsibility:
interviewed by Michael Hirsh.
General Note:
This interview was conducted as research for The Liberators: America's Witnesses to the Holocaust / Michael Hirsch (New York: Bantam Books, 2010).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 021797023
oclc - 587063284
usfldc doi - C65-00027
usfldc handle - c65.27
System ID:
SFS0022083:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
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This is an oral history interview with Holocaust concentration camp liberator Aldo De Tomasi. De Tomasi was a member of the 104th Infantry Division, which liberated Nordhausen, part of the Dora-Mittelbau complex of camps, on April 11, 1945. He joined the division during the Battle of the Bulge, which was his first combat action. After the Bulge, while proceeding through Germany, the division came to a fork in the road; most of the division took the left fork, but De Tomasi's unit took the other, which led them to Nordhausen. They were the first unit to arrive at the camp, and were followed by the rest of the division and the medics. In this interview, De Tomasi describes finding the camp and seeing the prisoners there.
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The Liberators: America's Witnesses to the Holocaust (New York: Bantam Books, 2010) and Concentration Camp Liberators Oral History Project, University of South Florida Libraries, 2010 Michael Hirsh.
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xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 transcript
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text Michael Hirsh: Okay. Could you just spell your name for me, please?
1
00:00:4.8
Aldo De Tomasi: Yeah, its D-e capital T-o-m-a-s-i.
2
00:00:9.7
MH: Is it capital D?
3
00:00:11.3
AD: Capital D-e capital T-o-m-a-s-i.
4
00:00:15.3
MH: A-s-i.
5
00:00:16.5
AD: Its two words.
6
00:00:17.2
MH: And your first name is Aldo, A-l-d-o.
7
00:00:18.9
AD: Right.
8
00:00:20.6
MH: And you live at
9
00:00:21.4
AD: Right. Now, they got the whole thing about me on the Internet, you know.
10
00:00:26.3
MH: Uh, Ill look for it.
11
00:00:28.7
AD: The whole story on the Internet. Go ahead; I was just telling youlook it up on the Internet later on, too.
12
00:00:35.3
MH: Let me just put your phone number in; itsWhats your date of birth?
13
00:00:38.4
AD: 7-21-25 [July 21, 1925].
14
00:00:40.3
MH: When did you go into the Army?
15
00:00:43.8
AD: Into Nordhausen?
16
00:00:45.4
MH: No, into the Army.
17
00:00:46.5
AD: Nineteen forty-four.
18
00:00:48.4
MH: Forty-four [1944]. And you were how old at that time?
19
00:00:52.0
AD: Eighteen.
20
00:00:53.3
MH: Eighteen. So you were right out of high school?
21
00:00:55.6
AD: Right out of high school, right.
22
00:00:57.2
MH: Were you drafted or enlisted?
23
00:00:59.0
AD: I was drafted.
24
00:01:0.0
MH: Whered they send you?
25
00:01:3.2
AD: They sent me to Fort Ord, and I was only there a couple ofthen I went to Camp Hood for two weeks. And I went to Newport News, and I got on a ship and they sent me over to Africa. From there I went to repo depot in Italy, and from there I joined the Timberwolves at the Bulge.
26
00:01:27.5
MH: You joined the Timberwolves. Did you see action in North Africa?
27
00:01:31.2
AD: No, not at all. We were only there for about a week.
28
00:01:34.6
MH: What was the first action you saw?
29
00:01:37.4
AD: As soon as I hit my outfit at the Bulge.
30
00:01:41.5
MH: And what was your outfit?
31
00:01:43.5
AD: 104th Infantry Division.
32
00:01:45.3
MH: And the regiment?
33
00:01:50.1
AD: It was the 104th Infantry Division, 415th [Infantry] C Company.
34
00:01:55.0
MH: Okay. So what was your rank by that time?
35
00:02:0.0
AD: At that time, private.
36
00:02:1.8
MH: Private. What was your first combat experience?
37
00:02:5.0
AD: My first, sittin in a foxhole, and it was rainin like hell. You got there at nightmy buddy and I, we got there at night. It was raining and they were fighting, and they threw us in a foxhole. And the next day, we just joined the group, and we kept going.
38
00:02:25.7
MH: How did you react to the combat experience?
39
00:02:27.4
AD: Well, right now its one of the best experiences Ive ever had. At that time, who knows? Kind of scary.
40
00:02:36.7
MH: Im curious why you say it was one of the best experiences you had.
41
00:02:41.1
AD: Well, I got to see all of Europe, and I got to see Germany, and I gotafter the war was over, I stayed over there as occupation. I just had a real good deal, you know. I wouldnt trade that experience, cause Im alive. It was a hell of an experience.
42
00:03:7.9
MH: I have to tell you, I have the exact same reaction to Vietnam.
43
00:03:11.1
AD: Yeah. You do, yeah.
44
00:03:13.5
MH: So, I understand exactly what youre saying.
45
00:03:15.9
AD: You come out alive.
46
00:03:19.0
MH: Yeah, if you come out alive and okay
47
00:03:20.9
AD: Whats that?
48
00:03:22.1
MH: I said, if you come out alive and okay, its an experience that
49
00:03:26.7
AD: Youll never have another one like it.
50
00:03:28.2
MH: Right. And I wouldnt want to do it again.
51
00:03:30.3
AD: Oh, no, not me either. Well, Im too old now.
52
00:03:33.3
MH: So, what was going on as you guys approached Nordhausen?
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00:03:39.2
AD: Well, what happened is, we were moving pretty fast. We were walking and riding fast and movin. We were going right through Italy, you know, right through Germany, right through Germany there; we were moving [through] Halle, and all that there. How it happened was we were on a truck, ten of us, and the truck had a flat tire. So, they got out, fixed the flat tire, and our division kept going and went down maybe five, ten miles, whatever. There was a fork in the road, and the division took a left turn going to a town, I guess, to liberate it. The lieutenant we had, we called him Yard Block. He made a right turn and we went right into Nordhausen. So, we were the first ones there, ten of us.
54
00:04:31.2
MH: And when you say Nordhausen, you mean the death camp or the slave labor camp?
55
00:04:36.6
AD: The labor camp, and then right after the labor camp was the town. So, we went right into the labor camp first.
56
00:04:44.5
MH: So was that Dora?
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00:04:45.6
AD: Who?
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00:04:46.7
MH: Was that Dora-Mittelbau?
59
00:04:48.3
AD: What, the town?
60
00:04:50.0
MH: The camp, the first camp you got to.
61
00:04:51.8
AD: Nordhausen; they called it Nordhausen.
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00:04:53.2
MH: It was Nordhausen. So, what did you see?
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00:04:56.2
AD: I sawI didnt want to go inside too much. We saw all the prisoners in theyou know, in their uniforms, like the striped stuff, and saw a little bit of the bodies on the ground, and that was about it. I didnt want to go in and see all of that garbage.
64
00:05:15.5
MH: Were the gates still shut when you got there?
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00:05:17.5
AD: Oh, we opened them.
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00:05:18.6
MH: Howd you do that?
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00:05:19.5
AD: We just walked in They hadthere was a few SSers there. You know what an SS is?
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00:05:27.2
MH: Yeah, I know what they are. Whatd you do with them?
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00:05:28.8
AD: I didnt stick around to find out what happened to em. We just went to the outskirt of town and there were Germans there, and we waited for our group to catch up to us.
70
00:05:40.4
MH: Was there a firefight at the camp?
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00:05:42.3
AD: No, no fighting at all.
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00:05:43.8
MH: So, what did the SSers do, they just give up?
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AD: Well, I guess they took off, I dont know. You know, I didnt bother to find out.
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00:05:51.2
MH: But you did go inside the fence?
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00:05:55.0
AD: No, I stayed outside by the fence, never did exactly go in; I was right outside the fence. I saw all that stuff, and that was enough for me.
76
00:06:3.9
MH: Had you ever seen anything like that before?
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00:06:6.5
AD: Nope.
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00:06:8.8
MH: You ever see anything like it after that?
79
00:06:9.9
AD: Nope.
80
00:06:10.9
MH: So, there were ten or eleven guys on the truck.
81
00:06:14.5
AD: Ten of us, yes.
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00:06:15.9
MH: Ten. What did the other guys do; did they go in?
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00:06:18.3
AD: Some of them did, I guess. See, I was there with the guy I went to school withwe were together all the timemy buddy. And we just went to town. A lot of them went to town, and we just split up, you know: a couple of us go in one house; a couple of the other one go in another house. And we just stayed there and we waited for our group to catch up to us. There were Germans there in that town, though.
84
00:06:41.1
MH: Was there any fighting in the town?
85
00:06:44.2
AD: A little bit, not that much, cause we were movingthey, at that time, they were kind of retreating, you know.
86
00:06:51.0
MH: Can youwhat kind of a day was it? Rainy? Sunny?
87
00:06:55.7
AD: I guess normalI guess.
88
00:06:58.5
MH: Okay
89
00:07:1.6
AD: I know it wasnt raining, so it had to be a normal day.
90
00:07:4.6
MH: So, I imagine whats it likeI mean, whats it like? Youre in what, a deuce-and-a-half truck?
91
00:07:10.7
AD: Whats that?
92
00:07:11.2
MH: Youre in a deuce-and-a-half, a two-and-a-half-ton truck?
93
00:07:13.4
AD: It was one of those bigyeah, one of the big ones. A big truck, you know. I dont know, two and a half ton, I guess.
94
00:07:21.5
MH: Was the canvas up or down?
95
00:07:22.8
AD: What?
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00:07:23.7
MH: Was the canvas on top of the
97
00:07:25.2
AD: Everything was down.
98
00:07:26.1
MH: Everythings down.
99
00:07:26.8
AD: We were sitting out in the open.
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00:07:27.8
MH: So, who saw the camp first?
101
00:07:29.6
AD: Who saw it? We did.
102
00:07:31.9
MH: I mean, you all were looking out the front, and you see this camp?
103
00:07:34.8
AD: Well, we drove up to it. We all got off the truck and went in and looked at it.
104
00:07:38.0
MH: Did the prisoners try and talk to you?
105
00:07:41.3
AD: A few of them hollered, some hollered. I think there was a mixture of Polish, Italians and Jewish in there. To my memory, I heard a couple of them talk Italian, cause Im Italian, Italian or something. But we didnt have that much to do with it. We just wanted to get out of there. We wanted to get to town. Under cover, more or less.
106
00:08:4.0
MH: You had no orders to keep them in or let em out or anything?
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00:08:7.2
AD: No, no.
108
00:08:8.4
MH: Did they start pouring out after you opened the gate?
109
00:08:10.1
AD: Well, they come runnin out to us, and we moved inour outfit came in right after us, and they kind of went for em, more or less. Then the medics got in there after we did.
110
00:08:22.2
MH: How do you react to seeing something like that?
111
00:08:30.9
AD: At that time, it wasnt very nice to see. We were so busy moving and everything, it didnt, you know, hit me until I got home, and because when I heard about the Holocaust and all of that there, I went, Wow, there was more prison camps and everything else. And then you see all this stuff in the movies and all thatwhich they claim it wasnt true, but it was, I guarantee you. They say it never happened, but it did. I dont know how the Nordhausen people didnt smell the burning bodies and all that stuff. See, Nordhausen, was there by a big mountain, so they were making these big, big bombs in there, inside the mountain. They had it all dug out, and they had a factory, like, and they were making bombs.
112
00:09:23.4
MH: So, these were slave laborers.
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00:09:24.5
AD: Definitely, yeah. Slave laborers is what they were. Well, they were prisoners, but slave laborers.
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00:09:31.0
MH: Did you guys go into the tunnels in the mountains?
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00:09:33.8
AD: No, I didnt. I saw part of it. See, I went back there again, maybe ten years ago; we went through everywhere we were during the war. But I still didnt go into that hill.
116
00:09:48.1
MH: What was it like going back there ten years ago?
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00:09:50.5
AD: Like I said, Im glad I went. We went to Brusselsand then, see, before I got there, our outfit liberated Holland. And we went all through Holland, all through Germany, up to Berlin. Then we went through the fields we were in and saw a lot of the stuff, a lot of the places we were. And it brought back memories, but it was nice. It was a great trip.
118
00:10:23.0
MH: Yeah.
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00:10:23.9
AD: Thats another trip I wouldnt trade for nothing.
120
00:10:26.8
MH: Did you go back to where Nordhausen was?
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00:10:29.2
AD: Yeah, we went there. We went there.
122
00:10:32.4
MH: So what was still there when you went there?
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00:10:33.7
AD: There was nothing there, really. Nothing.
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00:10:36.3
MH: What kind of emotions go through you when you go to a place like that?
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00:10:41.2
AD: Well, at that time, you know, were all together and we looked at a few of the things. But I justreally, I cant explain it. I really cant. I cant explain it. Because you know with the German people and all thatits just hard to explain. You know, we fought them and were over there, and then were talking to em like nothing happened and everything. We went through that whole area that we went through during the war, the 104th Infantry Division. We went through everything.
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00:11:21.2
MH: How did you deal with Germans saying during the war, We didnt know about this, we didnt know what was going on, when?
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00:11:29.7
AD: Well, I didnt hear that until I got home. Its a bunch of baloney They keep saying there wasnt no such thing, but it was there. I saw it with my own eyes.
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00:11:39.5
MH: Right, but I mean, even Germans who lived next to the camps said, Oh, we never saw. We never knew.
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AD: I didnt talk to em, so I dont know.
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00:11:46.3
MH: Oh, okay.
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00:11:46.8
AD: We never talked to them, because when we got there, there were a few soldiers there and we captured them, and then the German people who lived there got in the houses and we never saw em. We just kept moving, you know, cause we were moving pretty good at that time. It was in forty-four [1944], and we were moving pretty good.
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00:12:10.6
MH: This was already April of forty-five [1945]. This is just a few weeks before V-E Day.
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00:12:16.2
AD: No, lets see. Well, yeah; this was after I got in. Yeah. From there, we went through, and then we went toI forgot the name of the town. Then we had to sit outside of Berlin for two weeks and wait for the Russians to get there
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00:12:32.3
MH: Oh, because they wouldnt let the Americans take Berlin.
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00:12:35.7
AD: The Russians had to take Berlin. We couldnt take it. So, we were out there comparing weapons and everything else, and theyd get mad because our weapons were more superior than theirs. Theyre really mean, them Russiansat that time. They had a lot of women soldiers, and they were mean.
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00:12:57.1
MH: Well, the German people were running like hell from the Russians. They were trying
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AD: Well, they were scared of them; they were mean. The Russians were really mean. Boy, they didnt fool around.
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00:13:5.1
MH: I was told by some of the guys Ive interviewed that after they saw the concentration camps, they didnt take very many prisoners, especially among the SS.
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AD: You mean the Russians?
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00:13:17.0
MH: No, the Americans.
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00:13:18.1
AD: Well, we didnt take that many, either, because we were moving. We took a few, but not that many. We didnt get too many prisoners, cause we kept going. Whenever we got an SSerwe had a German in our outfit. He got killed, the poor guy. He used to interrogating the SSers. They had to warn them, though, because every time he took them in a room to interrogate them, hed come out, the guy was dead. Hed kill em, he hated them so much. But he got killed anyway. I forgot his name. The guy got shot in the neck.
142
00:14:4.0
MH: Nobody was particularly concerned that he was killing the SS guys?
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00:14:7.2
AD: No, but the officers got on him for doing that. The SSers were mean. You know what they were, dont you?
144
00:14:14.2
MH: I know exactly who they were, yeah.
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00:14:15.4
AD: They were stormtroopers. They were Hitlers Jugend, they called em: Hitlers children. We got in one townIm not sure, I think it was Hallewhere Hitler had a place there for soldiers to come in and have a week or two off with German women, and theyd have kids. And if they were a girl, theyd kill it. If it were a boy, they kept it and sent it to this Hitler Jugend school down in the southern part of Germany. Them SSers, they were all just kids.
146
00:14:52.9
MH: Did you get married and have children?
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00:14:57.2
AD: Yeah, I got two.
148
00:14:58.3
MH: You have two. Did you tell your kids about the war?
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00:15:1.2
AD: Oh, yeah. Well, see, I got[Steven] Spielberg called me up, the guy from Hollywood. He heard about me through the people here in San Francisco, the Jewish outfit in San Francisco. So, he called me up and said hed like to interview me; took about maybe six, eight months. They sent two people up here from L.A., with the cameras and all, and they interviewed me, and they interviewed my son also. They knew all about it, my kids did. They had sealed the whole block; nobody can come up the block or nothin. But then, according to them, Im supposed to have a tape in all of the museums.
This is part of Spielbergs Survivors of the Shoah project.
150
00:15:52.2
MH: Where on the Internet is your story?
151
00:15:55.2
AD: Its onI dont know, a friend of mine brought it up and showed me. Its under my name, Aldo De Tomasi. If you want, I can call him and find out.
152
00:16:5.5
MH: If you couldcause Im looking at it. Im trying to find it right now, and Im not finding it.
153
00:16:9.6
AD: Youre not finding it? Can you hold a minute and call me back in five minutes?
154
00:16:13.7
MH: Sure. Ill call you back.
155
00:16:14.6
AD: Okay. Let me call him now and see if I can find out.
156
00:16:17.6
MH: Okay. Ill call you back.
157
00:16:37.2
AD: Hello?
158
00:16:38.1
MH: Hi, its Mike Hirsh.
159
00:16:38.9
AD: Okay, I got it here for you. Its www.google.com. And he said all you got to do is put in Nordhausen and my name, and they got the whole thing that I gave the Chicago newspaper and all the newspapers here, the write up they got. If you want to know anything, just call me anytime you want.
160
00:17:7.6
MH: Do you know any of the other guys who were with you who are still around?
161
00:17:11.8
AD: Yeah, theres Mangini, my buddy.
162
00:17:14.0
MH: He was also
163
00:17:15.7
AD: Hell tell you the same story, though.
164
00:17:18.1
MH: He was at Nordhausen, too?
165
00:17:19.2
AD: Yeah, we were together all through that.
166
00:17:21.2
MH: Can you give me his phone number and name?
167
00:17:22.7
AD: I dont know it. He lives up on the other side of Sacramento. Hell give you the same story.
168
00:17:29.0
MH: Whats his name?
169
00:17:30.3
AD: Al Mangini.
170
00:17:31.7
MH: How do you spell Mangini?
171
00:17:33.8
AD: M-a-n-g-i-n-i. There might beyeah, his name will be underneath my thing, cause we were together all that time.
172
00:17:44.0
MH: Okay.
173
00:17:44.9
AD: Okay?
174
00:17:45.7
MH: Terrific. Thank you very much, sir. I appreciate it.
175
00:17:47.2
AD: Youre quite welcome. Bye-bye.
176
00:17:48.3
MH: Bye-bye.



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