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When myth and nomos meet

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Material Information

Title:
When myth and nomos meet the use of midrashic sources in halachic literature of the Middle Ages
Physical Description:
1 streaming video file (ca. 24 min.) : digital, MPEG4, sd., col. ;
Language:
English
Creator:
Adelman, Rachel
University of South Florida -- Tampa Library. -- Special Collections Dept
Conference:
Sacred Leaves Graduate Symposium, 2008
Publisher:
University of South Florida Tampa Library, Special Collections Dept.
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish law   ( lcsh )
Aggada   ( lcsh )
Sacred books -- History and criticism   ( lcsh )
Genre:
Streaming videos   ( lcsh )
Online video   ( local )
Streaming videos.
Online video   ( local )
video recording   ( marcgt )

Notes

Abstract:
The classic Jewish sources have traditionally been marked by a sharp distinction between narrative and legal discourse, between Midrash and Mishnah, between creative exegesis on the Hebrew Bible and the codification of law. Similarly, the Talmud is deemed to include two separate genres of discourse: Aggadah (story telling) and Halacha (legal discussion). However, these distinctions are not characteristic of the Hebrew Bible or the early medieval period. Why was the distinction so adamantly asserted by the sages of the classic rabbinic period (2nd-5th century C.E.) and why does it breakdown in the 8th century and onward? This presentation traces the midrashic antecedents to the blurring between halachic (legal) and aggadic (narrative) discourse in the medieval works of R. Elazar of Worms (1160-1230 C.E., known as the Rokeah), and Isaac ben Moses of Vienna (circa 1200-70 C.E., known for his legal work Or zaruʻa). Adelman claims that a movement existed to provide a biblical basis as mythic narrative to legal discourse particularly in the area of ritual and liturgy beginning with the 8th century.
Venue:
Paper presented Feb. 22, 2008 during the Annual Sacred Leaves Graduate Symposium, held at the University of South Florida and organized by the Special Collections Dept. of the USF Tampa Library.
System Details:
System requirements: Quicktime software.
System Details:
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
General Note:
Title from Symposium home page (viewed Feb. 13, 2009).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029446191
oclc - 304563955
usfldc doi - S65-00006
usfldc handle - s65.6
System ID:
SFS0022422:00001

Full Text
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