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Title:
Ex libris journal of the USF Library Associates
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Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
USF Library Associates
Publisher:
USF Library Associates.
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla
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non-fiction   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
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University of South Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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usfldc doi - E09-00015-156
usfldc handle - e9.15-156
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SFS0024293:00015


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This publication is dedicated to Mr. Leland W. Hawes as a token of appreciation for his support and encouragement through the years. Cover: Designed by Hassan High. Adapted from a bord er used by William Morris at the Kelmscott Press. Programs, activities, and services of the Universit y of South Florida are available to all on a non-discriminatory basis, without regard to ra ce, color, creed, religion, sex, age, national origin, or handicap. The University is an affirmative action Equal Opportunity Employer. Ex Libris Vol. 7, No. 1 Ex Libris is published by the USF Library Associates, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. Please address suggestions and comments to J. B. Do bkin, Executive Secretary, USF Library Associates, USF Library, Tampa, Fla. 33620. Compiled and edited by Barbara A. Bishop and J. B. Dobkin. Not printed at State expense. Except as noted, illustrations in Ex Libris are reproduced from works in the Special Collections Department of the University of South F lorida Library. Photography is by the photography department of USF's Division of Educati onal Resources.

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SPECIAL Collections at the University of South Flor ida naturally reflects the individuals who have guided its growth since the in ception of the department in 1962. More particularly, it shows the serendipitous natur e of growth when allocated funds are unavailable for planned and rational development. As the various collections described in this guide have been acquired, our flexibility has gradually diminished. With limited resources it has been obvious that a high degree of concentration of effort would be needed to assur e that the growth of various subject areas would result in valuable research tools for f aculty and student use. The general rare book collection and manuscript col lections almost entirely reflect gifts from various sources and thus lack the great subject depth that would support advanced research. Perhaps, as other collecting are as come closer to completion, our resources can be reallocated to achieve a more impr essive level of coverage. We hope that momentum gained in our years at U.S.F. can be maintained in the future insuring the development of collections of maximum utility to the academic community. Our successes thus far have been, in large part, du e to the generosity of our many friends, who through the years have supported our e fforts. In acknowledging this help, two names cannot be omitted. Harry Hudson, both dur ing his lifetime and in his provisions for the disposition of his estate, has b een the most influential single individual in determining our direction. Of primary importance in helping us in a myriad of ways and always giving unflagging support to our efforts has been Leland W. Hawes. Without his constant support our work would have been much less interesting, gratifying and effective. HISTORY OF THE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DEPARTMENT The Special Collections Department at the Universit y of South Florida opened for service on February 1, 1962 and has been serving th e research community in a variety of ways ever since. Begun primarily as a depository of Florida historical material, the department has grown and diversified in the years f ollowing its inception. In the more than twenty-five years of the departmen t's existence, there have been only three department heads. The first Special Collectio ns Librarian was Margaret Chapman. Miss Chapman served as the department head from 196 2 to 1971. During her tenure at U.S.F. she developed the university's Florida Colle ction (now called the Regional History Collection) along with creating strong ties with th e Florida Historical Society, which maintains offices in U.S.F.'s Special Collections D epartment. After Miss Chapman's resignation in 1971, the depar tment was briefly directed by Mary Jane Kuhl. Mrs. Kuhl continued developing the department's resources until her retirement in 1973. January of 1974 saw the arrival of J.B. Dobkin, who has managed the growth of the department's collections to their present status. W ith Mr. Dobkin's arrival at U.S.F. the focus of the department broadened to include a vari ety of specialized research collections. Some of these collections are consider ed as being the best of their kind in the nation. GENERAL INFORMATION The Special Collections Department is located on th e fourth floor of the main library building on the U.S.F. Tampa Campus. It is open for service from eight a.m. to five p.m.

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Monday through Friday, and is closed on weekends an d holidays. Off-campus researchers are encouraged to make advance arrangem ents when planning visits to Special Collections. The resources in the departmen t are available for use by any qualified researcher. The materials may not be remo ved from the department's Grace Allen Reading Room and are not available for circul ation or inter-library loan. Photocopy and photographic services are available, and items may be reproduced at the discretion of the Special Collections Librarian. Photographs of i tems from the collection used for publication must be credited to Special Collections University of South Florida Library. Exhibits of rare and unusual items from the departm ent's collections are displayed in the Library on a continuing basis. Display areas ar e located in the Library's first floor lobby, in the fourth floor lobby and in the Grace A llen Reading Room. In addition to regularly scheduled displays, exhibits on special t hemes are mounted periodically on a short-term basis. The Special Collections staff offers guided tours o f the non-public areas of the department to individuals and groups. Arrangements for tours may be made by calling (813) 974-2731 during the department's service hour s. The Special Collections librarians are also available to examine and give professional opinions as to the rarity or monetary value of books brought to the department by individ uals. Individuals taking advantage of this service should note that the librarian offers an OPINION ONLY and this opinion cannot be used in place of a bonafide appraisal offere d by a certified appraiser. Appointments are advised for persons wishing to tak e advantage of this service. Hours of Operation Monday-Friday 8 a.m. 5 p.m. University of South Florida Library, Special Collec tions Tampa, Florida 33620 (813) 974-2731 Nineteenth Century American Literature This is an in-depth collection of fiction, poetry a nd other literary works by American writers whose major periods of creativity fell with in the period from 1801 to 1900. Although as a general policy only materials publish ed before 1901 are collected, an attempt has been made to build comprehensive collec tions of works by selected authors (such as, for instance, Richard Harding Davis) whos e careers reached into the twentieth century. In developing the collection, a systematic effort has been made to acquire works appearing in Lyle Wright's bibliography of nineteenth century American fiction. Emphasis in collecting has been placed primarily on popular fiction, though the giants of the nineteenth century American literary scene have by no means been neglected. The collection includes, for instance, first editions of most of Mark Twain's works, including firsts of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. Overall, the Cover of the 1854 first edition of the temperance classic TEN NIGHTS IN A BAR ROOM.

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Nineteenth Century American Literature Collection t otals nearly 15,000 volumes. Certain writers from the period of 1801 to 1900 hav e also been selected for special attention. The works of American temperance writer and editor Timothy Shay Arthur (1809-1885) as an example, are a prime area of coll ecting interest. Best known for his anti-drink classic Ten Nights in a Barroom (1854), Arthur wrote more than 250 individual publications and edited several popular periodicals. The U.S.F. collection currently includes well over half of Arthur's known titles, many in multiple editions and states as well as runs of journals which he edited, notably Arthur's Home Magazine and The Children's Hour. Among the most interesting aspects of the nineteent h century American literature collection are the large number of dedication and a ssociation copies of these works that are held. Numerous volumes of such authors as Kate Douglas Wiggin (who seems to have been most generous with her inscriptions) and ranging to a copy of the novel Gabriel Conroy by Bret Harte. This particular book is a presentati on copy from Mark Twain (the publisher) to Eugene Field, the American poet, and is signed on the title page by both Field and Harte. A note on the final free e ndpaper signed by Eugene Field, Jr. and dated September 2, 1923 attests to the fact tha t the book came from the library of the senior Field. Bookplates of various famous former owners and coll ectors as well as their notations add a sense of intimacy to many of these volumes. T he range of bookplates runs from a Ku Klux Klan library to the ownership tags of Clift on W. Barrett and Jean Hersholt. The condition of most of these nineteenth century b ooks is excellent and enables the interested researcher to survey the entire range of binding styles used by American literary publishers in their infinite variety. Nineteenth Century Juvenile Literature Over one-third of the U.S.F. nineteenth century America literature collection consists of children' s publications of the period. Virtually every major A merican writer of juvenile books of the 1800s is at least r epresented in the collection, with many being held in consider able depth. From the late 1820s with the voluminous writ ings of Jacob Abbott and Samuel Griswold Goodrich, the foun ders of a "truly American" form of literature for youth, through the more realistic publications at the end of the c entury this collection is highlighted by nearly complete holdin gs of many major authors. Amongst them are such writers a s Oliver Optic (W.T. Adams), James Otis (J.O. Kaler), Edward S. Ellis, and Horatio Alger (though not all are present in the first edition). The collection inclu des, for example, over 600 books by "rags-to-riches" author Horatio Alger, representing in multiple editions th e bulk of his titles. Of particular interest to Floridians is the volumin ous collection of the works of Mrs. G.R. Alden, better known as Pansy. Mrs. Alden came to Winter Park, Florida wher e her Even today there are numerous collectors of the best-selling adventures for boys that swept 19th century America. W.T. Adams, writing as OLIVER OPTIC, was a dominant force in the era.

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husband was a Presbyterian clergyman. Mrs. Alden's son was in the first class at Rollins College in Winter Park, and for several years that was the family home. Over fifty volumes of Pansy's work, in addition to the serial publications she edited, are already held. The famous, and now much coveted, illustrated books for children that were produced throughout the century are present in multitudes, f rom the woodcuts of Alexander Anderson to the more sophisticated works of Maud Hu mphrey, A.B. Frost, and Thomas Nast. Story Papers and Juvenile Magazines In addition to monographic juvenile books, the collection also contains extensive runs of story pa pers and other periodical publications, some of which we re issued for young people while others were of a fami lyoriented nature. From a literary standpoint much im portance can be attached to these periodicals since th e work of many of the leading authors of the period appear ed in this format. Of special importance and interest to the collector of story papers are the extensive holding of the giant s in the field such as Golden Days, Golden Hours, Happy Days, Harper's Young People, and literally dozens of others. In excess of one thousand issues of some of these titl es are now held. The illustrations of many of the story pa pers reflect in detail the life-styles and aspirations o f nineteenth century American youth. Such fads as the bic ycle craze of the 1890s are documented both in story and advertisement in these often lurid pages. Represented in U.S.F. collections are examples that vary greatly in content, style and format. The Child at Home published by the American Tract Society had a religious orientation while such journals as Merry's Museum, the Peter Parley Magazine, edited by S.G. Goodrich, and Oliver Optic's Magazine were more on the entertaining and informative side. U.S.F. has copies of the first Southern journal designed for young readers, The Southern Rosebud, published in Charleston, South Carolina during 1833-34 as well as The Hive, a New England juvenile published in the 1820s at Salem, Massachusetts. Though some of the works serialized in these journals were later issued in book form, many were not and so are available only in the pages of these rare weekly and monthly periodicals. The often spectacular engravin gs and other illustrations that Frontispiece fr om Charles Sanders’ FIRST READER (c. 1845). The two classic toybooks at right illustrate the early American tendency to “borrow” from popular English editions, even down to the cover illustrations. At left is a similar American toybook telling the rather grim original version of “Little Red Riding Hood.”

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embellished the juvenile and adult story papers are an added dimension that gives the collection much graphic interest. Publications of Religious Bodies In nineteenth century America, the leading publishers of juvenile books and pamphlets during the first sixty years of the era were various religious bodies. While the American Tract Society and the American Sunday School Union were the leaders in this movement, many other religious organizations w ere active publishers. The Special Collections has over two thousand such items representing more than thirty publishers, and active collecting continues. American Chapbooks and Toybooks Complementary to the nineteenth century juvenile li terature is a collection of early American chapbooks and toybooks. Containing close t o 500 examples, U.S.F.'s collection includes items from such famed titles as Little Red Riding Hood to less well-known items like The History of Jacky Idle and Dicky Diligent (ca 1800). These small, usually fragile works, are often illustrated with charming cuts, wh ich are sometimes hand-colored. Most are between 2x3 and 4x7 inches in size, although af ter the mid-nineteenth century many tended to be produced in a larger format. Though is sued by the thousands in their day, these items are becoming scarce because of their gr eat vulnerability to destruction and their interest to collectors. While there were numerous publishers of toybooks throughout the northeastern states, a few names, we ll represented in our collections, stand out in import ance in the first half of the 1800s. Among these are Sidney Babcock of New Haven, Connecticut (over 25 examples ), Kiggins and Kellogg of New York (over 35 examples), and Rufus Merrill of Concord, New Hampshire (in excess of 50 examples). The contents of a large percentage of these toys we re lifted from English publications. Credit was given to the original authors or publishers only in some few ins tances; usually when that information was likely to increas e sales. The promotional toybook given away by manufacturers and retailers is graphically interesting and increa singly collectable today. Many of these slight but attract ive pamphlets are in our collection. Though the collect ion is relatively small, it provides a wide selection of d idactic works, moral tales, and other "improving" reading material s for young Americans of the nineteenth century. Of particular interest to researchers will be U.S.F .'s large History text from the USF Collection. Representative example of publications of American religious bodies. These organizations were responsible for thousands of juvenile books and pamphlets in pre-civil war Ame rica.

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group of McLoughlin Brothers' publications. This New York publishing firm was without a doubt the leading American publisher of toybooks in the nineteenth century. The company, established in 1828, assumed the McLoughlin name around 1860 and published well into the twentieth cen-tury. McLoughlin claimed to be "... the first American publisher to issue children's books illustrated in color". Its many chromolithographed toybooks made the latter half of the 1800s a blaze of color for generations of children. Among the artists employed by McLoughlin were such greats as Thomas Nast, Howard Pyle, and Palmer Cox, although the artwork in nearly all the books produced by the firm was unsigned. U.S.F. Special Collections Department currently hol ds over 1,200 examples of nineteenth century American textbooks. The paramete rs of the collection include those texts published before 1865 and used as school mate rials in educational institutions in the United States. Texts written by non-natives are inc luded if the books are American editions used in United States schools. Readers, spellers, arithmetics, history texts, and natural science texts are represented, among others. Many w orks, such as Lindley Murray's English Reader, Charles Davies' algebra textbooks, and Swinton's geography books, a re preserved in multiple editions. In addition to the actual books themselves, a facto r that adds immediacy, as well as charm, to the collection are the many inscriptions penciled in, or inked onto, the b ooks by the former owners. It seems that then, as well as n ow, graffiti was a form of expression to the youth of t he period. These schoolbooks often formed the only reading material, other than Bibles and hymn-books, that wa s available to many communities in the largely rural America of the 1800-1860 era. The readers used in that peri od give us particular insight into the values instilled in these students of a by-gone day. Through a perusal of the se moralistic and patriotic works, we can better see w hat formed the American character and aspirations. American Giftbooks and Annuals A view of the popular literary tastes of antebellum America is provided by nearly 500 American giftbooks and annuals published between th e years 1825 and 1865. These heavily illustrated and lavishly bound volumes of p oetry, fiction and essays provided the first appearance of many of the works of nineteenth century authors, such as Edgar Allan Poe, John Greenleaf Whittier, and Washington Irving Both general literary works such as The Token And Atlantic Souvenir and Rose of Sharon as well as more specialized titles such as The Odd Fellows Annual, Sons of Temperance Annual and the Know Nothing are Many of the reading books housed in the USF collection were used in early American schools like this one, pictured in Lyman Cobb’s NEW JUVENILE READER NO. 1, New York: Collins, 1847. Typical elaborate cover from a 19th century American gift book.

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included in the collection. In addition to its value as a resource for the stud y of American literature and popular culture, the collec tion is rich in illustrated works, providing research mater ial for the study of American book illustration. Leading illustrators of the day were paid to give these pub lications a degree of elegance seldom found in American books of the era. Particularly interesting are the many spec imens of early chromolithography, some dating from the 18 40s, soon after the introduction of this medium to the U nited States. The bindings are tremendously varied and represent the full range of the binders' art at the opening o f the Victorian period in the United States. Many colors of leather were both stamped and tooled with onlays, inlays, a nd decorations of many types. Sumptuous examples have hand-painted scenes with mother-of-pearl decoration ; the more modest versions are in simple cloth bindings. A few examples even appear with glazed paper covered boar ds. Any student of American binding should be intrigued by this collection. American Almanacs Almanacs were often the only other literature besid es the Bible found in many American homes of the nineteenth century. Because of the agricultural adv ice and chronological information, combined with wit, m oral pieces, and practical advice, these compendiums pla yed a major role in the rural life of 1800s America. Ther e were two major types of almanacs produced in the ninetee nth century, the agricultural almanac and the patent me dicine almanac. The agricultural almanac was sold and was designed to be used by farmers and gardeners as an informational source in regards to their crops. `Th e patent medicine almanacs arrived on the scene in the 1840s and in many cases replaced the agricultural almanac. Th ey were give-aways and used as an advertising tool by those companies who paid for the printing of them Though U.S.F.'s earliest almanac is Samuel Clough's Kalendarium Nov-Anglicanum (Boston, 1705), the majority of the works in the collection date from the ninete enth century. About one hundred titles are represented w ith extensive runs of Dudley Leavitt's Farmer's Almanac (18231926) and Thomas' Farmer's Almanac (1808-1977) among others. Added interest in the Leavitt almanacs is f ound in the fact that U.S.F. has some years of Dudley Leavi tt's An example of the “patent medicine almanac” distributed by commercial firms for promotional purposes. Interspersed with the traditional almanac fare were fulsome eulogies of the company’s nostrums. This specimen is typical of the early “farmer’s” almanac that provided weather, crop and astronomical data to rural America in the 18 th and early 19th centuries. Garnished with plithy sayings and witty stories, these almanacs were very often the only books other than the Bible to be found in many early American homes.

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manuscript computations for this early nineteenth century almanac. Nearly one thousand individual almanacs have thus far been acquired. Dime Novels The U.S.F. Dime Novel collection consists of nearly 7,000 American dime novels and nickel libraries. Though first viewed as "... a devil trap to captivate the child . ." this genre is now being seen by literary historians such as Ralph D. Gardner as ". . our first genuinely native form of literature." Cultural insight of the period can be gained through the study of the characterization of different ethnic minorities. The collection contains many examples of the "class ic" Beadle dime novel though the majority of the items are in the later "nickel library" format. The 1860 Malaeska, the Indian Wife of the White Hunter, the first dime novel is present in the collection as well as runs of Brave and Bold, Tip Top Weekly (the Frank Merriwell stories), Boys of Liberty, Nick Carter, and Frank Reade, the science fiction series that provided the inspiration for Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. While we hope to add to the pre-1880 section of the Dime Novel Collection (that is those items on relat ively durable paper), we regretfully are avoiding acquisi tion of the terribly fragile nickel library items published after this date. George Alfred Henty Collection One of the non-American literary collections held b y U.S.F. is that of the works of George Alfred Henty (18321902). The collecting of this British boys' book au thor began in 1961 when Vernon Herndon of Chicago donate d James Baird Herndon's (his brother's) collection of Henty books to U.S.F. The Herndon gift consisted primarily of first American and British editions of most of Henty's boys' books. Later, William B. Poage, who helped U. S.F. obtain the Herndon collection, donated his library of Henty works too. The combine d materials of Herndon and Poage virtually completed U.S.F.'s holdings in published Henty works. Not only does the collection contain Henty's juvenile novels, it also has four out of the five adult tripleBoy inventor Frank Reade’s adventures appeared in dime novels and nickel libraries from 1876 to 1904. Jules Verne himself “borrowed” ideas from Frank’s futuristic inventions. George Alfred Henty 1832-1902 For nearly 20 years, TIP TOP WEEKLY chronicled the exploits of Frank Merriwell, pattern for the image of the “All-American Boy.”

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decker novels Henty wrote, along with journals edit ed by Henty or in which Henty stories appeared. Through the generosity of the late Arline King, an endowment has been established to enhance our Henty holdings. Ms. King has also provided a small number of Henty manuscript letters which we hope to build on. An adjunct to the Henty Collection is an in-depth collection of authors who followed in the Henty sty le of British adventure juveniles. These authors include W.H. Kingston, R.H. Ballantyne, and Gordon Stables among others. Additions to these writers of the Henty sch ool are planned to give an exhaustive gathering of the titl es produced. We do not, however, envision a collection of first editions of these authors. Acting Editions of American Plays Almost 1,000 acting editions of plays performed in the theatres of nineteenth century America make up this collection. Most of the melodramas, tragedies, farces and dramas such as Black-Eyed Susan, or, All in the Downs or Catch an Heiress among other contemporary popular works that are now forgotten provide a view of American tastes in visual entertainment of the nineteenth century. The core collection was originally owned by George B.F. Maxwell (1848-1915) who had a nineteenth century dramatic career. Many of the plays contain written stage directions and alterati ons by Mr. Maxwell or other players allowing us a glimpse of nineteenth century stage technique. The increasing rarity and value of these fragile publications makes it unlikely that we will be able to purchase major additions to this body of material. We encourage donors who hold such items to consider U. S.F. as a possible home for them. Of course, the greater the depth of the collection the more utility it would h ave for research. These plays, in conjunction with the Library's Dion Boucicault manuscript collection form an important resource for the study of American drama. Anti-Catholic Literature This collection of monographic publications and pamphlets documents anti-Catholic sentiment in nine teenth Decorative covers like these add a touch of graphic interest to many 19th Century playscripts. R.M. Ballantyne was one of the major followers of the Henty school of British historical adventure books for boys. A stock character in American anti-Catholic literature was the lustful priest. The alleged sexual excesses of priests and nuns exercised a continuing fascination for Nativists, who viewed convents as “houses of assignation.”

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century America. Included are polemical tracts such as A Master Key to Popery (1833) as well as anti-Catholic fiction represented by The Fallen Priest (1883) and numerous other titles. The majority of the works comprising the co llection were published between 1830 and 1900, though some items were produced prior to and after these dates. The c ollection illustrates the depths of anti-Catholic sentiment i n nineteenth century American society through the use of such lu rid tales as Trials and Persecutions o f Miss Edith O'Gorman, an 1871 fictional tale based on convent life, and The Burning of the Convent, based on an actual event in 1834 Boston. While no concerted effort has been made to acquire items of the nineteenth century that reflect anti-Mormon, antiQuaker, and anti-Semitic sentiments, a growing numb er of these items lends needed balance to the anti-Cathol ic works. Mosher Press This press was founded by Thomas Bird Mosher (18521923) in 1891 and remained in operation into the 19 30s, surviving Mosher's death in 1923. A contemporary of Wi lliam Morris, Mosher published the first American edition of George Merideth's Modern Love the same year Morris launched Kelmscott Press with The Glittering Plain. While Mosher did not print the publications that appeared bearing the Mosher Press name, he exercised complete creative control over the design and editing of all the works bearing his name. Unless one examines closely the sad state into which most book design had fallen by 1891, it is difficult to com-prehend the vitality and innovative nature of his creations. Mosher's influence on American commercial publishing certainly deserves lasting recognition. Mosher did much to popularize modern British writing in America, though he devoted little effort to native authors. There were many printings of Yeats, Wilde, Swinburne, Andrew Lang, and many others of the Brit ish pantheon. At present U.S.F. holds over 600 of the more than 700 editions of 300 titles that the press published during his lifetime. U.S.F. also contains examples of many of the other premier private presses ranging from Thomas Bird Mosher 1852-1923 Launching his Mosher Press in 1891, Mosher was, in the words of celebrated bookman Norman Strouse, “…the first American to publish books of distinction in limited editions.” This title page illustrates the simple elegance typical of Mosher Press books, contrasting strongly with the highly ornamented Kelmscott style. THE STORY OF THE GLITTERING PLAIN by the Kelmscott Press, illustrating the design of William Morris, 1894.

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Doves and Kelmscott to Black Sparrow and Gehen-na. Additionally, a vast archive of the Hobby Printers Association works beginning in the mid-nineteenth century exists here. The subjects range from original literary works to neighborhood newspapers produced by juveniles. The David O. True Collection on Early American Exploration On long-term loan by Marjorie Stoneman Douglas, the True Collection consists of the personal library of the late David O. True. Mr. Tru e, best remembered for his theory that explorer John Cabot discovered America three months before Columbus, was a nationally recognized authority on the discovery and exploration of North America. The True Collection consists of about fifty running feet of manuscripts and maps. Another fifty feet contains books and other materials about the early voyages to North America. Much material relating to the discovery of Florida is present. The collection also includes Mr. True's correspondence and working pape rs along with original and facsimile maps of early Nor th America. Of particular importance in the True Collection are his voluminous notebooks in which he annotated every known map of exploration to the "Ne w World". These annotations give not only the history and background of the maps, but also vast amounts of da ta on the cartographers and explorers. The body of material on John Cabot is of the greatest volume an d completeness. This collection provides invaluable research opportunities for scholars in a variety of fields. Rare Maps and Charts In addition to the David O. True Collection, U.S.F. maintains a collection of rare maps and charts. Dea ling primarily with the American Southeast, the main foc us is on the Tampa Bay region and the state of Florida. O ver 500 original maps, and an equal number in facsimile (in addition to the many maps contained in books) are h eld ranging in date from the sixteenth century to 1901 The earliest map depicting Florida is dated 1508 in cluded in a Ptolemy atlas. Our wide holdings of navigation charts of the Flori da Coast, which date largely from the second half of the nineteenth century, provides much information to historians, geographers, and others interested in changing shor elines and the nature of our region before the impact of dredge and fill operations. While our holdings for nineteenth century maps are excellent, we are seeking detailed The Tampa Bay area was virtually uninhabited during the period of British rule in Florida (1763 -1783). This is a 1777 chart of the Bay by British cartographer Thomas Jefferys. Francis Johnson (1792 -1844) was America’s first published Black composer. His COLLECTION OF NEW COTILLIONS was published in 1818. A master of the violin, bugle and trumpet, in 1838 he toured Europe and played for Queen Victoria.

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maps of our region during the first Spanish period (1565-1736) to bolster research capabilities. The Papers of Miles Lawrence Hanley The Hanley papers were placed on indefinite loan at U.S.F. by Dr. H.M. Truby of Miami, Florida. Dr. Hanley (1893-1954) was regarded as an authority on English usage and phonetics, particularly pronunciation. During h is career, Dr. Hanley served as associate director in preparing the Linguistic Atlas o f New England (1939-1934), and creating the Linguistic Atlas o f the United States and Canada (1939-1940). He worked on the Thorndike-Century Dictionaries from 1936 to 1946 and was an editor for the American College Dictionary. The Hanley Papers consist of six running feet of co rrespondence and working papers along with seventy 8" x 5" card files containing no tes relating to the history of American and English pronunciation from the year 1500. All i n all, the papers provide an important resource for scholars in the field of linguistics a nd English. The NCNB Black Musical Heritage Collection In 1986 U.S.F. acquired in excess of 5,000 items of sheet music written or inspired by Black Americans as well as song books, scripts, dialogues original nineteenth century minstrel posters and music that featured Black performers. Beginning in 1818 with the first published work by a Black composer in America, Francis Johnson's "A Collec-tion of New Cotillions", the collection chronicles the evolution of Black and Black-inspired music with lullabies, mammy-songs, cakewalks, minstrel songs, rags, two-steps, and jazz. Highlights of the collec tion include pieces by Blind Tom and the team of Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake. For some years U.S.F. has been gathering sheet music of Black interest and this collection supplements the thousands of similar, but not identical items, in the NCNB Collection. Other interesting groups of music material include sheet music with a Florida locale (which is said to be the largest gathering of this genre available), and nineteenth century American songsters in a collection of over one hundred examples. Additional music resources are available to the interested patron. Cigar Industry Art The combined holdings of the Kane-Greenberg and Turn-of-the-century cigar box label featuring the famous Tampa Bay horel. CUBAN, a favorite theme of clear Havana cigar manufacturers, gives a panorama of the Cuban countryside surrounding a distinguished Don, perhaps a wealthy landowner or cigar manufacturer. It was not uncommon to portray members of their families, their mistresses or friends in cigar labels.

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Bautz Collections, together with material from a nu mber of other sources (of labels and lithographic proof boo ks), which number in excess of 10,000 items gives U.S.F. one of the best collections of this kind anywhere. Cons olidated Lithography of New York (the Kane-Greenberg donatio n) along with their predecessors produced the majority of labels made in America. Not only does the collection allow the researcher a view of the cigar advertising industry through thou sands of cigar box labels, and cigar bands, it also allows a look at the chromolithographic process through 1,000 "progressives". Objects, such as pipes and tobacco industry paraphernalia, round out the collection by adding d epth and color. Of decided interest to U.S.F. from a local history perspective are the items showing the Tampa cigar industry. Cultural insight is added by the ephemera present in the collection dealing with the once thriving Tampa cigar business. Research capabilities are increased with the nearly complete run of the n ewspaper Tobacco Leaf. Produced by the national organization of tobacco manufacturers, this newspaper began in 1865 and continued until well into the twentieth century. Al so, lengthy holdings of the U.S. Tobacco Journal from the nineteenth century add to our research cap ability. Chromolithography At present, U.S.F. maintains a collection of over o ne thousand examples of nineteenth century chromolithographed greeting and advertising cards. The bulk of the collection was produced during the 1870s and the 1880s. These decades were the years in which the cards were at the height of their popularity. Many fine examples by leading artists and lithographers are represented. Chromolithography in early childrens' books, dime novels, and American gift books extends the range of this graphically exciting collection. Rare Books Along with the specialized subject collections, U.S.F. holds many examples of rare and unusual books. Though the collection has no unifying theme save the rarity of the individual items, several subject strengths do appear. Many rare botany A selection of 19 th century chromolithographed Christmas cards. A page from a 1610 Frankfurt edition of the First Century A.D. botanical works of Pedianos Dioscorides. The Ivory-billed Woodpecker from Mark Catesby’s NATURAL HISTORY OF CAROLINA, FLORIDA, AND THE BAHAMA ISLANDS. From the revised edition published in London by Catesby’s friend George Edwards in 1754.

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and natural history books are present including the Audubon elephant folios in facsimile, an original Catesby Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands, as well as many other fine examples of eighteenth and nineteenth century works. The many costume books help complement our collection of plays. Photographica such as the University of Pennsylvania's locomotion studies and a complete collection of Stieglitz's photographic periodical, Camera Work are present. Another area held in some depth by U.S.F. are miniatures. These charming and many times whimsical volumes wer e designed, for the most part, to appeal in size and format to children. Over six hun dred of these less than 5 inch tall volumes are on our shelves. The Hudson Collections These collections began in 1978 with the purchase o f over 4,000 items of American juvenile literature belonging to Harry K. Hudson. M r. Hudson, known primarily as a boy's juvenile series book collector, published the definitive bibliography on this subject in two editions entitled Bibliography o f Hard-Cover Boys Series Books (this book has been revised once again and published by t he U.S.F. library in 1987). Though composed of both nineteenth and twentieth century juvenile material, the majority of the items are twentieth century juvenile series books. The collection, upon arrival at U.S.F., was divided into three main subdivisions with the subsequent addition of a fourth. The core of the Hudson library is retained in the Boy's Series Books and the Girl's Series Books collections. Together, they now contain over 6,000 volumes of such well known series as "The Hardy Boys", "Tom Swift", and "Nancy Drew", as well as lesser known though important series such as "Conquest of the U.S." and "The Moving Picture Girls". The third primary unit of the collection is a gathering of many non-series books written by series authors. Also included are other examples of important authors of juvenile works (both American and non-American), sometimes in multiple editions, such as Lewis ALICE IN WONDERLAND in an 1899 London edition gave the binder, Root, a chance to display a fanciful Alice with pig as a spine decoration. Publishers of boys’ series often issued complementary series for girls. An in-depth collection of girls’ series books is being developed to accompany the boys’ books that form the core of the Hudson Collection. Two of the 6,000 boys’ series books comprising USF’ s Hudson Collection of boys’ books. Particularly nota ble are the fragile original dust jackets, often much r arer than the books themselves.

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Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. Only pre-1950 imprints are held in this area. The fourth element of the Hudson collection, which grew out of the Girl's Series Book Collection, is t he Anthropomorphic Animal Series Books. These delightful animal tales include such well known characters as "Billy Whiskers" and "Uncle Wiggily" (a bibliography based on this collection has been published by the U.S.F. li brary). The Regional History Collection The Regional History Collection is actually a combination of several collections that include boo ks, maps, manuscripts, and images dealing with the cult ural, financial, political, and historical aspects of the Tampa Bay region. Though the primary focus of the collection is the city of Tampa, and Hillsborough County, general Flo rida history is also included though to a lesser extent. The Pizzo Collection, which includes anything relat ed to Tampa, Ybor City, and its inhabitants, is the core around which the rest was built. Tony Pizzo, an Ybor City native and local historian, had acquired thousands of item s before transferring the collection to U.S.F. Because of it s breadth, U.S.F. was able to build on the collection by conta cting local professional and cultural organizations and asking them to place their archiv al papers with the university. Every major women's organization belonging to the Hillsbo rough Federation of Women's Clubs is represented as a result of this policy. Local et hnic organizations, such as the Italian Club and Marti-Maceo, the Black-Cuban Club, are als o represented. Local historical archives such as the Avellanal family papers typify t he manuscripts complementing the collection. The single most important addition to the collection was the Hampton Dunn donation which expanded the non-Tampa material. Dunn, author of Yesterday's Tampa and other Florida history books, contributed greatly to the images held by U.S.F. With the items in his donation, there are over 100,000 photographic images ranging in date from the late 1880s to the p resent including both Tampa and nonTampa views. The collection's holdings of post card views from around the state number over 25,000. Extensive holdings of political manuscripts are pre sent among the department's Still a center of Tampa ItalianAmerican life, the headquarters of Tampa’s Societa Unione I taliana looks today much as it did in this 1922 view. In its library was preserved a unique collection of rare ItalianAmerican pamphlets, now in the Special Collections section of the USF Library. Postcard view of Tampa’s Ybor City, postmarked Octo ber 22 1908.

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resources. The papers of former Speakers of the State House of Representatives Lee Moffitt and Terrell Sessums are housed here. Also here are a portion of Louis De La Parte's papers. De La Parte is a former president of the Florida Senate. The most extensive and significant of the political papers housed in Special Collections are those of former Florida Governor LeRoy Collins and Representative Sam Gibbons (Rep. Gibbons' papers are presently under seal until the year 2000 and may be used only with his authorization). University Archives The Special Collections Department of U.S.F. mainta ins the university's archives. Primarily used as a historical source, the archives contains official papers, publications and artifacts, as well as such diverse items as the official ground-breaking shovel and copies of the student newspaper. The laws of the State of Florida establish the Stat e Division of Archives and History as the owners and ultimate repository of all archiv al material other than official publications of the university. Therefore, only tho se items, plus material deemed necessary for on-site referral, are maintained in o ur collection. Marjorie Holmes at a picnic with her parents. The photograph is captioned OLD SCHOOL HOUSE, 1896, MOHAWK, FLORIDA.”

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INDEX HISTORY OF THE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DEPARTMENT ..... ................................................... .1 GENERAL INFORMATION ............................... ................................................... .................................1 Hours of Operation................................. ................................................... ................................................2 Nineteenth Century American Literature ............ ................................................... ...................................2 Nineteenth Century Juvenile Literature ............ ................................................... .....................................3 Story Paper and Juvenile Magazines ................ ................................................... .....................................4 Publications of Religious Bodies .................. ................................................... .........................................4 American Chapbooks and Toybooks.................... ................................................... ..................................5 Early American Schoolbooks ........................ ................................................... ........................................6 American Giftbooks and Annuals .................... ................................................... ......................................7 American Almanacs.................................. ................................................... ..............................................8 Dime Novels........................................ ................................................... ................................................... 9 George Alfred Henty Collection .................... ................................................... ......................................10 Acting Editions of American Plays ................. ................................................... .....................................11 Anti-Catholic Literature .......................... ................................................... .............................................12 Mosher Press....................................... ................................................... ..................................................1 3 The David O. True Collection on Early American Expl oration ........................................... ..................13 Rare Maps and Charts............................... ................................................... ............................................14 The Papers of Miles Lawrence Hanley ............... ................................................... .................................14 The NCNB Black Musical Heritage Collection ........ ................................................... ...........................15 Cigar Industry Art ................................ ................................................... ................................................15 Chromolithography ................................. ................................................... .............................................16 Rare Books ........................................ ................................................... ................................................... 16 The Hudson Collections............................. ................................................... ...........................................17 The Regional History Collection ................... ................................................... ......................................18 University Archives................................ ................................................... ..............................................20