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Tyndall target

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Title:
Tyndall target
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Tyndall Air Force Base (Fla.)
Publisher:
Public Relations Office, Air Corps Gunnery School
Place of Publication:
Tyndall Field, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Tyndall Field

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Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 24602432
usfldc doi - T34-00115
usfldc handle - t34.115
System ID:
SFS0024307:00115


This item is only available as the following downloads:


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PAGE 1

BILL OF RIGHTS TO PROVIDE MANY BENEFITS Here, in a is what may derive from the $6,000,000,000 GI Bill of Rigr .ts, whi ch was enacted into law last week. 1. A maximum of 52 weeks unemployment compensation at tl-.e rate or $20 a week. 2. A government guarantee of 50 percent (although no t more than $2,000) on loans ror the purchase of farms, small businesses and homes. These loans will bear the low rate of four percent interest. 3. A maximum or rour years' educational aid for servicemen who joined the armed forces before they were 25 years old. Five hundred dollars yearly will be provided for tuition, plus subsistence allowances or $50 a month fJ r .single and $75 a month for married veterans. 4. A veterans placement service to assist reiurning servicemen and women in ob taining civilian jobs througb the u.s. Employment Service. 5. Hospitalization, which is obtainable through the veter ans Administration. STUDENT SCRIBES VIE FOR WEEKEND PASSES VIA TARGET A recent competition instigated to promote interest and pride throughout the units of section I has been announced by Capt. Robeson carter, section commander. Weekend passes will be awarded to the unit reporter and his four assistants who submit the best column ror publication in the TYndall Target. The contest 'will be a weekly affair, under the supervision or Lt. K.D. Downer, section Plans and Training officer, with the starr of the Target as judges. rnis weeks contest ended in a tie, with I-1 and I-7 submitting copy or equal caliber and the scribes and assistants of both units will be awarded passes. Future heroes of the air gaze at honor 1 ist of those who wer,t before. LAUNDRY OFFICER EXCHANGES VIEWS WITH s.s. REPRESENTATIVES AT WEEKLY MEET Captain J.J. Fornal, post laundry officer, addressed the members of the Special services council last Wednesday, exchanging views and receiving suggestions and ionstructi ve criticism from the members on T/F laundry problems. Captain Fornal's presence at the meeting was in keeping with the r ecently inaugurated policy or the Special Services Office to have at least one officer or a key department closely related to the welfare of the enlisted men address the weekly council meetings. In discussing long delays in returning finished laundry the captain explained that hls chief problem has been that of personnel and their transportation to and from work. However, he expressed the belief that for the present the per-sonnel problem has improved and pe promised a maximum or six-day service under existing condl tlons. The captain concluded hls session with the GI representatlves by extending a personal lnvltatlon to them to visit the laundry and watch the huge plant I n operation. Other matters up for discussion at the meeting were mostly or an athletic nature, with the water sports carnival to be held tomorrow heading the list. The council members also took up plans !or a ten nis tournament In the near future for students and permanent party personnel. A beer hall ror students and the comIng track meet were also topIcs of discussion, as was the war Bond Golf Tournament to be staged at the Panama country Club tomorrow. T/F WAt SOFTBALLERS FACE WAVE TEAM HERE THIS AFTERNOON WAC softball team this afternoon will have an opportunity to avenge its 12-2 defeat at the hands or the WAVES or the Naval Air Sta tion a.Qninis tered at Pensacola two weeks ago. The game wl'll be played on PT Area 2 an' d is scheduled to begin at 2 P.M. Ensign Marie Oehler,or New York, is expected to start 'on the mound for the visitors wh 1le ream Manager Pvt. Flo rence Rice will twirl for the Tyndall squad. The WAVES are expected to arrive here by plane and elaborate plans have been made for their entertainment during their weekend stay here by the Wacs, in return for the generous hospitality displayed by the WAVES when the Tyndall team played at Pensacola. 18-YEAR-OLD STUDENT, IN UNIFORM FIVE MONTHS, CHOSEN GUNNER OF CLASS Before adj ournlng, the coun cil -voted to amend the present softball rules regarding basestealing. The ruling for T/F softball competltlon now per mits base runners to leave any base except third as soon as the. ball leaves the pitcher. Previously the rules prohibit ed a runner from leaving a base until the ball had reached the batter. Pvt. P.1ce announced that ller st.arting line-up would include Phyllis Martin at the backstop position, Wanda Karp on first, Jeannette Gogan on second, Rachel Whiting at third, Dot Smith at short, Marjorie coburn in left, Laura Phipps ln right, Mara Hessee in cent.er and Albina Kurlinski in $hart field. one of the youngest Tyndall gunnery students to be selected as "Gunner or the Class Is 18-year-old Pvt. Ralph o. Barr, top man or class. 44-28. Barr halls from Jamaica, N.Y., and enlisted In October, 1943. However, he was permitted to finish hls high school education at Forest Hills High before donning OD's In March, 1944. Inducted at FOrt Dix, Barr was sent to Greensboro for hls basic training There he was notified that because or a physical defect he was disqualified ror flight training and Ins te!ld was trans re rred to TYndall t'' take up aer 1 al gun nery. He names his hours in the air as the most Interesting phase 9! his training here and wants to go on record as sayIn g that sleeping is his fa vorite method or relaxation. When the war Is over, Barr plans to go to college with a B.A. degree as his goal. PVT. RALPH 0. BARR Here are his gunnery schoo l marks: Cal. 50 .... 94 ... 89 Turrets .... 98 Tower Range ... 83 Sighting ... 97 Moving Target15.8 The contest will mark the second or the year ror the WAC team. TYNDALL nBIG GAME HUNTERS" BAG WILD HOG, or, NOTHING SOARING ABOUT THIS A wild boar wei ghlng nearly 600 pounds, which !or the past two months has been damaging targe-ts on the small arms range, was killed there early last Sunday morning by three enlisted men who laid In walt !or the big-tusked animal. Armed with two submachine guns and a carbine, the three men opened !Ire on three or or the wild hogs, killing one ahd wounding one The other escaped unscathed. The hogs apparently have been attracted to the targets by the flour and water paste whtch Is used on them. Attempts to lure the hogs into . a pl t trap by using the paste as bait, however, were unsuccess ful. The three hunters were S/ Sgt. Sherwin Morris, Pfc. James MUlligan and Pvt. O.G. Morrow. They laid in walt for the animals after obtaining permission to shoot them If possible. The hogs were among those which were !reed !rom farms on the site when the govern took over the Tyndall Field reservation. COL. PERSONS' ADDRESS HIGHLIGHTS JULY ijTH CEREMONY The 4th or July was commemorated 11ere by the dedication or a huge honor scroll, bearing the names of more than 500 graduates of TYndall Field who have been decorated for valor in every theater or war. Colonel John w. Persons, post commander, addressing a crowd of several hundred gunnery students and permanent party personnel, dedicated the scroll to the hundreds of brave American youths who have gone forth to fight the enemy with honor and valor." It is fitting that we $e lect 'the celebration of the Declaration of Independence as the time to unveil this scroll of honor," Col. Persons said, for these men have carried the attack to a ruthless enemy to help safeguard the very principles of American democracy. "I am confident that this scroll will serve as a permanent inspiration to all gunners graduating from Tyndall Field. There are places reserved for many names, and they will be added, for the history of heroic deeds accomplished by aerial gunners is not yet finished." The ceremony was brief, but impressive. As soon as the dedication had been made, the gunnery students continued on their way to their afternoon classes. The program was held during the noon hour so that valuable time would not be lost from the fast-moving training program of this station. The 20-foot square scroll carries the names of TYndall graduates who hav.e been decorated with one or more of the following awards: Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal, Distinguished Flyibg and the Purple Heart. The scroll was prepared and erected by 2nd Lt. Vincent J. MUrphy, Jr., war room officer, and his staff. The nanes or the decorated alumni of Tyn dall were obtained from of ficial war DePartment files. CAPTAIN RETURNS McCLELLAN FOR VISIT Capt. Ammon McClellan, for mer public relations officer here, returned to Tyndall for a brief visit wlth old friends tliis week. The captain, who was public relations officer here during 1942, left for overseas duty early ln 1943 and sweated out three major engagements or operations or the war: the defeat or the Axis in North Afi'ic a, the invasion of Italy and the invasion or France. For a time Capt. McClellan was on duty in North Africa, then Italy and later was gunnery officer of a squadron of A-20 medium bombers of the 9th Air Force operating from Eng land. A graduate or the gunnery school here, the captain Is officially credited with 14 missions against the enemy and wears the Air Medal and one oak Lear Cluster. He is now en route to Laredo, Texas, for further training.

PAGE 2

P.age 2 PUBLISHED ON SATURDAYS BY THE SPECIAL SERVICE FOR PERSONNEL OF THE ARMY AIR FORCES FLEXIBLE GUNNERY SCHOOL, TYNDALL FIELD, PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA. Copy Prep a red u.nder Supervision of Relations Officer. Printing and Photography by Base graphic & Reproduction Sect ion: Art work by Department of Tra1n1ng i ng Department. Publ i c PhotoDraft-The Tyndall Target receiYes aterio.l sup plied by Caap Plewspo.per Service, liar Dept., 2011 42nd St., PI ew York City. Jl&teri al to CHS aay PlOT be republished with out prior neraission fro CHS. DON'T "TAKE IT EASY" Now that the invasion of France has been launched, you have often heard the warning voiced that we must buckle down and w ork all the harder. That word o f advice, we believe, bears repetition. On the morning of June 6, various remarks were heard uuiversally, such as: "What a relief!""Now we're over the hump!" But how ab out the men who sto rmed the beaches and dropped from airplanes in enemy-2uarded territory? Don't you imagine-that one of their first thoughts was: "Will reinforcements and supplies reach u s in tin:e?" After the tensio n of waiting for D day, it was only natural for some of us to relax, breathe a sigh of relief, and hore for the best. And that inclination--to "take it easy"-i s what we in this country must now c ombat. As Lt. Gen. S omervell, commanding general o f the Army Service Forces, recently pointed out, the invasio n means that now we shall need increased supplies, larger numbers o f replacements, more of everythiLg. Then, as General Uhl, Fourth 2ervice Command, declared: "We cannot, o f c ourse, match the sacrifices of our men in the froLt lines. But we can-and we must--make certain that we drive ahead at full speed to give them all the suprlies, equirment and weapons they need. Unless we do drive ahead at full speed, we are not worthy to be classed as teammates of ou r fighting men." So think it over, Mac and Wac, before you let yourself; intentionally o r unintentionGlly, adopt the attitude that this is the end of tb e war in Europe. If you d o feel obU gat i o n +,o those men who led the assault, who faced the of machine guns, who braved the land and sea mines, who lest their eyes o r arms o r legs--or, if you feel you owe a debt t o t h ose who gave their l 1 vee in order t o invade Hitler's fort ress .... then d o n o t relax, Buddy, and just watch the fight, and "take it easy. WHAT'S YOUR PROBLEH? What's your problem, soldier? If you are puzzled by regulations on Family allotrr.er.ts, GI insurance, furlough time or any other matters of personal importance to you, look for the answers in Yank, the Army Weekly. Yank's 'What's Your Problem' column gives authoritative ans11 ers to every kind of question asked by servicemen. Don't miss a single issue of Yank. It's easy to get--just Five cents at the PX. There's a new issue every Friday, TYNDALL TARGET FLYING CADETS ll'e1ve seen them come, eager and true, ll'e1ve seen them go out into the Some were jriends--and all were mer... The y went as we, we know not when. But when we go, as soon we must-fhere is a God in !JJhom we trust. And though !l!e fight and die in a lie know we have not fought in vain. for there are those to come behind, Strong of heart and and mind. take and win their betsThey are as we were, cadets. --Cpl. Geore H. DouAlss Clsss.44-25 KNow YouR PLANE SHORT "STIRLING" TYPE: f our-engined long-range heavy bor.iber. WING: all-metal mid-wing monoplane, dihedrallP.d and equally swept-back and tapered, raked ying tips. FUSELAGE: Rectangular-shaped with round corLers, all-metal construction. TAIL mn':': fully cantilever tail assembly, single rudder swept-back and tapered with round tip, ta.il plane is swept-back and slightly tapered, round tips. LANDING GEAR: Main wheels retract into the inner engiLe nacelles, retractable double tail wheels, undercarriage can be retracted by hand operation. POWER PLANT: four 1,600 hp Bristo l "Hercules" 14-cylinder sleeve-valve or four 1,f0 2 hp Wright "Cyclone" doublerow radial air-cooled engir,es, threebladed De Haviland hydromatic constant speed full-feathering propellers, self sealing fuel tanks. SPAN: 99 feet 1 inch. LENGTH: 87 feet 3 inches. ARMAMEl'T: three power-operated gun turrets, one in the nose, one amidship, and one ir, the tc.i), t o tal of eight cal. 3J machine guns, maximum bomb load io 18,000 pou!lds. BUY MORE THAN BEFORE SUPPORT THE FIFTH WAR LOAN DR/ VEl July 8, J94q THE 71 [no) f 7/llcJ.-.. ,.-COLUMN YUUR MOTHER'S PRAYING A priest once met an old Spanish mother who asked him to pray for her bullfighter son. And when the priest met the bullfighter himself, leaning against a tree, dressed in silver and black, smoking his cigaret, the priest wondered and asked him if he were not excited, were he not afraid about the morrow and the bull. "Why, no," said the bullfighter. "Why should I be afraid?" "But the bull might gore you. That should s-.dr. e you enough. "Oh, no!" said the bullfighter. He stamped out his cigaret and grinned, "Amigo. Padre, my friend. That bull, he has no motl:er to pray for him, yes?" HORSE SENSE A horse can't pun tdlne kicking. This fact I mention. And he can.tt kick whne puLling, ll'hich is 111y chief con tent ion. Let's imitate the good horse And a that's fitting; Just an honest and then be no time for kicking. CHAPEL SERVICES PROTESTANT Sunday Sunday School, Post Chapel 9 A.M. \rlorsnip, Colored Rec Hall 9 A.M. worship, Post Chapel 10 A.M. worship, Trigger Town 10 A.M. worship, Post Chapel 7:30 P.M. Tueday Fellowship MeP.ting, .............. 7:30P.M. Christian service B P.M. Wedne11day Choir Rehearsal 7:30 P.M. CATHOLIC Sunday Mass, Post Chapel 8 A.M. Mass, Post Theater;................. 10 A.M. Mass, Post c.;napel ................. 11:15 A.M Mass, Post Chapel 6:30 Daily Mass................................ 5:.30 A.M. Monday Novena 7 P.M. Choir Rehearsal 8 P.M. Saturday Confessions 7 P.M. (and any time Chaplain is in his JEWISH Friday worship Service 7:30 P.M. .... ; . I The best I can make out of it is, "You are now entering Los Angeles." -American Legion 1\lagazlne

PAGE 3

July THE' TYNDALL TARGET VOTING REGULATIONS IN FIVE STATES AND TWO TERRITORIES Eorliot D111t o State o r NAME OF STATE O R TURITO IY DAT AND KIND Of EU:CTION HOW T O A l' r l'l' FOit STATE OR TERRITORY A I UNTH U.lLOf T .. ritory W lll lt.c.o i .... lo11ot Ea rli o l D to Stoloot y.,, ;,_.., W iiiS.nd lallo t t o Appli(ont fil\col Dote E a o c w ttod lcrllot Mw11 l oloclr To a. Eli g ible To lo Co"'niM SI' I CIAl StAU OR TIIIITOIIAL r R OVIS I O N S CotORAoo g Sept. Primary, a ) I n accordance with Colorado law, 21 Aug. 23 Aug. 12 S ept. or bl B y sendin g the W D o r USWB C p os t c ard t('l the Secretary o f Stat e, D e n ver, C o l o LOUISIANA 2 Prima r ies: 1 2 S e p t. (fl.rstl and 17 Oct. csecondl a) I n acco rdance wi th Louisiana l nw o Any time for both 1 3 Aug tflrstl 11 Sept. lfir stJ 1 6 Oct. 22 Aug. ($('(."00d) Not e that South Ca r oli n a changed its electio n laws since y ,,,..K announced that 'oldlers co u l d vo t e o n ly in p el "SOO. 22 Aug. Csecond) 2 4 June !second) 24 June < s e-condJ Note !hat 'soldiers m u s t been e nrolled prio r t o 2 7 June with a local part y c lu b In orde r to reques t a ballo!. ar.d th'l l tho!te w i ng WD o r USWBC post cards sho\1ld write on b ot h s1de s CJf t he card the na m e 01nd addr ess or the club or county sec r e t a r y county secreta r y by the so ldier or a r e la.tivtlfOr friend acting in h is behalf It ca n b e made with the W D o r USW BC post card, o n w hich he has writte n on both si d es th e name and addreSs of the app r o p riate club or county secretary. ALASKA Territ orial El e ction, 1 2 S e pt. a ) In accordance with Alask a law, or 3 A u g 3 A ug 9 Sept. Note that this is t he Terr i t o ria l e1e tl1 .1.1n N o e l C('tion will be held in November b ) B y send i n g the W D o r U S W BC pos t c a r d t o the S e cretary o f t he Terr i t o r y Juneau, A laska. }fA WAll T errito rial Primary El e c ti on 7 Oct. S o ldiers voti n g In Hawaii c a n vote o n ly b y appearl n J 1r. person I n t h ei r home p reci nct or at a polli n e p l ac e within the T e rritNy. designated by the Cover no r ---. .. This table, distributed through Camp Newspaper Service by YANK, the Army Weekly, explains the voting rules in five states and the territories of Alaska and Hawaii, which are holding primary or .general elections in July, August, September and October. All these states and Alaska permit serviCemen to apply for ballots by using either the old WD post card (WD AGO Form 560) or the new United States War Ballot Commission card (US WBC Form No. 1 ). You may also apply by a letter that contains the text of the USWBC post card but if you use the letter, or the old AGO Form 560, be sure it is distinctly marked as ballot material and that it bears the appropriate air-mail markings. In addition to signing the application, you s hould print your name and serial number and if you're applying for a primary btJIIot be sure to state your party affiliation To be eligi ble to vote in some states and territories, soldiers have to fulfill some other requirements so if you re not sure about your eligibility, write to the Secretary of State of your home state and get the full particulars from him. TELEVISION FOLDER AVAILABLE TO GI'S .Anyone who wants to know more about postwar employment prospects 1n the television industry will helptul in!qrmation 1n a s1x-page on "Occupations in Television" by John E. craw ford of the Raaio corporation or America, just published by oc cupational Index, InG., New York University, New York 3, N.Y. Single copies are 25 cents, cash w1 th order. In brier, readable style the author discusses postwar pros pects, training required, methods or entrance and advancement, range or salari.es, advantages and disadvantages or television as a career. For those who want more detailed data three sources or -rurther information are 11sted, and the five best books are recommended !rom a collection or 21 publications examfned 1n preparing the !older. He may just be curious as to Where his War Bond money Goes But, he may be a spy. Don't drink more than you can hold In the presence of Strangers If they ask you suspicious quest I on s TELL INTELLIGENCE Phone Ex. 3101l-ONE MAN'S OPINION What's Yours? It'-s like this. I don t mind which is just about as rar as he work--provldin' it keeps got, because I was g radually get table hours. BUt the !irst day I tlng madder and madder. 1.And," nit TYn: hl.ll Field, before I even he says, come back in about get a t>lace to 1'\leep, I round mytwo hours. so without further selr in th<> office or the TYndall words, !or rear or being busted, Targe-t. 1 wss needed,. it seems, or losing my rurlough, whi:t:h is to rolJ r.ewspapers.It was coming up sOd tact, 1n add! tion to my regular ror tl:ree hours I folded, until army duty at the range, and my I got pretty good at it. The honor bound duty, as the sereditor even remarked that I'd geant says it, I .am one or the m ake my mark in newspaper foldravored rew who are allowed to ing, I round out what he meant set pins 1n the evenings at the very soon. The very next Satur-!ield bowling, alley--but that s a day, after having worked on de-separate story in itself. tail !or three. days in a row on I will admit that I wasn't the range where I am an instruc-alone in the paper-folding busitor, I was given some time orr by ness. With me were three men on the range orr1cer as a reward weekend passes, a man o n a threefor showing initiative on the day pass, a man who had just come detail. 0 rr night K.P., and several Well, anyway, I was l ying others who were, like myself, peacefully on my bunk when a resting after several days or flunky announced himself by arduous labor. knocking on the soles or my reet What we want to Know is, just and yeliing, 1Yer wanted, Doug-when i s a man Who has been glven las!. Then he proceeded to e:x.-time orr going to be permitted to plain how badly I was needed on a stay in his own barracks without big production job, an d when he ltidtng and trembling in rear or tole: m e how I'd been recommended being considered worthy or foldbecause or previous experience, ing newspapers? As ror my worth, I began to see the light or day, you could convince me or it much as they say. easier by putting this in your so, in a little while, I was paper. than br allowing me the not surprised to find myself race honor or assisting men on threeto race with the Target editor. da y passes to put the Target to After ravoring him witt a sample gether. --CPL. DOUGLAS. or choice. invective which means that I called him things I C2111 t rep eat here I asked when I could g e t started in order that I might be able to return to my bunk ror a little sack time before going back to work. "Well," he says, we re not Quite ready yet, you see n EDITOR'S MJTE: 'If hi 1 e far from sanctioninA the practice of recruitinA men who are on pass to help fold the TarAet, we hope you are convinced of your 'llfOrth. If there were no TarAets to fold, your Jetter 'llfOuld never have Aot ten into print. B y COE and RUTSTEIN Q UESTION: 0o YOU BELIEVE YOUR ARMY CAREER WILL MAK E YOU A BETTER CIVILIAN ? PVT. FRED JOHNSON, H artford, Conn.: yes, I believe the Army has helpe d me a lot. It has taught me s el!-disc i pline and h o w to g e t along with other men. PVT. JOHN McCLENTION Nultville, Tenn.: yes, r t hink my Army caree r will make me a better CiVilian than I was when I en tered the service last year. PFC. JACK H STIFFLER, Muncie, Ind.: so far, no! PIC. V.H. McCANTY Vinton, Va.: "Idon1tthi n k A rm y 1 i f e h a s helped m e a t all to b eco m e a better c i t1z.en. PVT. MiaiAEL TERPLAK I s l IUid City, N.Y.: yes, I believe that Army 11 fe has helped me a lot. Ithas taught m e discipline and how to get along w i th others, so when I returned to civilian-lifer will to undergo much adjusting at any job that I may get, a>L. W BATES, New Jer .. .,: yes, it's taught me discipline and has made me realize that t here is nothing lik e belng a civilian."

PAGE 4

TYNDALL TARGET All Material Supplied By The Camp Newspaper Service Clio Sheet USAFI Extends Courses Sept. 15 Oct. 15 Set To Cover U. S. Internees as Christmas Mail Month Washington (CNS)-U. S. military and naval person_nel who a::e prisoners of war or mtemees m neutral countries now may use the educational facilities of .the U S. Armed Forces Institute, the War Department has disclosed. The shipment and distribution of this material is being handled by the War Prisoners Aid of the YMCA a member agency of the Nation;u War Fund, the WD said. An Education Center is being established at Geneva, Switzer land, where the program will be carried out. Under this plan, thousands of standard and special textbooks and courses already are being shipped abroad. Later they will be d istributed among prisoners of war and internees and lessons will be graded and returned and examinations will be conducted. The Institute now offers more than 70 high school, vocational and college courses, a number that soon will be increased to 200 All of these courses will be made available to prisoners under the new plan. Washington (C:"JS>-The Army Postal Senice has issul' d a call to G I s overseas, urgmg them t o t e ll the folks back home to post GI Chri stmas mail from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. During this p eriod. which w ill b e known as .. Christmas Mail :\1onth.. for soldiers. Christmas packages may be mai. l e d overseas without the presentation of a reques t from the soldier. Gift pack ages will be accepted for mailing onl v within the present limita tions of weight and size-fiv e pounds in weight and 36 i nches i n length and girth combinedand only one such package will be accepted from the same person to the same addressee during any one week. 17 Year-olds Eligible For AAF Training Again Washington (CNS)The AAF Tieserve Corps i s accepting enlist m ents once again, the W a r D e partment has disclose d. Eligible are youths 17 years old who may volunteer for future training as combat crew members. Top Yank Airman Takes No Chances With Foe, He Says When Maj. Richard Bong shot down his 27th Jap plane, thereby passing Capt. Eddie Rickenbacke r s World War I total of enemy aircraft destroyed in the air, Ricken backer announced that he was sendi11g the new champion a case of Scotch. .. I'm delighte d, the old titleh olde r remarked. "I hope he gets 27 more. Earlier, Rickenbacker had predicte d that his record of 26 planes downed over Germany would be treble d by some U S flier in this war. 'Before the war is over, one of our fliers--if not five or six of them -will down 50 to 75 planes," he said. Although Rickenbacker's 26 was the top score compiled by any U S. flier during the last war, his record wasn't even close to that of Maj. Edward Mannock, of the RAF, whose World War I score was 73, one more than that of Capt. Billy Bishop, the famed Canadian ace. Ace of aces in the last war was Germany's Baron Manfred von Richtofen, who downed 81 Allied planes before he was shot down by a Canadian rookie flying in his first combat forma tion. In this war, two Jap-killing Marines, Maj. Joe Foss and Maj. Greg Boyington, tied Rickenbacker's American record before Bong broke it. Top Yank in the ETO is AAF Capt. Don Gentile, whose bag totaled 30, including 23 destroyed in the air and seven on the ground. The RAF's Wing Cmdr. Paddy Finucane had 32 enemy planes t o his credit the day he radioed, "This is it, chaps," as his plane dived into the English channel and Russian Maj. Alexander Pokryshkin has 59 and is still active. Nazi propagandists insist that a Luftwaffe colonel named Wilke had bagged 151 Allied planes before he was shot down in a r ecent -dog fight. Previous Nazi high claim was 115 for Col. Werner Molders, who was killed in 1941. Some commanders, notably Maj. Gen. Claire L. Chennault, chief of the 14th AAF, don't publicize their pilot's combat totals. Others refuse to count planes destroyed on the ground. Bong's 27 kills, for instance, all were made in the air. Bong, who says he takes no unnecessary chances in the air because he "wants to get back alive," holds 20 decorations topped by the Distinguished Service Incidentally, Bong never did receive that case of Scotch from Rickenbacker. Fact is, he doesn't drink. So Rickenbacker sent him a case of cokes instead. "Copyrighted Material Syndicated Content Available from Commercial News Providers" Comin' Up! This is Janice Hansen, 17, of Union City, N J who recently won $1,000 in War Bonds for having the most beautiful legs in New Jersey. She' s going to show them to sol diers in camps a.JI over the U. S. in a forthcoming coast-to-coast tour. Yank Marks 2d Birthday, Still Of, By and For Cis New York (CNS)-YANK, the Army Weekl y, will mar k the completion of its second y ear as the official voice of the enlisted m a n in the U S. armed forces with a special anniversa r y issue on June 30, available at domestic PX ne,vsstands June 23. Since its inception two years ago, YANK has expanded from one edition p rinte d i n New York to 14 editions printed in 11 locations, ten of the m overseas, and it has remained a strictly GI publica tion, with all its m aterial prepare d and edite d by enlisted m e n

PAGE 5

July 8, WEEK ENDING JULY 7 It was in Munich at a Nazi party rally 1n 1939. Adolf Hitler rose and screBI1!ed to the world, 'On the day the British decl a red war, I commanded Goer inA to make all preparations for a five-year war, not because I believe this war will last five years but because we will never capitulate in five years,' Today we lack but a bit over a month to. com plete the five years Hitler allotted to his war. ITA Ll AN FRONT The Germans Flee In Italy, the Germans were withdrawing a._ s fast as their resources would allow. Pausing only for limited and sporadic rearguard actions, they abandoned vast amounts of irreplaceable materiel in the path of the victorious Allies, who have advanced some 300 miles since May 11, when Cassino fell. What is the outlook The Allies have broken through the Atlantic Wall, have captured Cherbourg. the third port It appears that the German High Com mand is stilly undecided as to whether it should defend the "Gothic Line," based on Pis a, Florence and Rimini, or whether it should retire to the Po River or even to the Alps. Observers feel that of France, and are turning their strength inland. In the ea:st the Red Army has swept across the Berezina and captured Minsk; iike a hungry bear the Russians pursue their quarry Warsaw, driving ahead at a fa:ster pace an. d on a wide er front than the German Army was able to accomplish in the darkest days of the early 40s. In the south the Wehrmacht is in hasty retreat, ita forces disorgan ized, its equipment scattered, before the advance of the 5th and 8th Armies up the Italian peninaula. The underground armies of suppressed countries are becoming active; scenes such as the Copenhagen garrison battle, the revolt at Tours are but weather vanes pointing toward things to come. 'theytime for a decision is running short, especially ifjthe High Command should make its stand on the Gothic Line. Thus indications point toward a German retreat beyond the Gothic Line and a sterid in the Po Valley. Such a retreat would give the Allies a number of air bases whence British and American planes can bomb Bavaria, in the heart of Germany, with ease. RUSSIAN FRONT A Symbolical March Fifteen days ago the Germans were entrenched along the "Fatherland Line," a seemingly formidable chain of bastions based on the fortresses of Vitebsk, Orsha, Mogilev, Minsk and Polotsk. To day every one of thes. e fortresses. has fallen, the Russians have rolled beyond Minsk to the broad plains that border East Prussia. Farthest Russian spearhead is now 110 miles from the breeding place of the Junker generals. The Red Army is pounding along the age-old invasion route used by Ghengis Khan in the days before Christ. This victorious march is symbolical, for here the Army of Napoleon met aisastrous defeat, marking the downfall of the French em p ire which had set out to conquer the. world. Other Russian offensives speared tow ard Iassi, aimed at splitting Hungary and Romania. The second is smashing through Kowol, in an effort to hit War and split Poland. Another is spear ing from the ;northeast to tear apart Latvia and Lithuania, and in the far north another spearhead is developing which will attempt to cut off Estonia. A glance at a map of the Russian front will reveal a most significant development to even the untrained eye. Another thorn in Hitler's side is the Finnish situation. The Russians have extended gains beyond Viipuri and are relentlessly driving toward Helsinki. Prompt action must be expected from Hitler. Already German troqps have been dispatched to Finland in an effort to maintain some semblance of German security. INVASION FRONT Preparation The destruction of Cherbourg has been but Allied engineers are confident that operations can be restored in a matter of days. Even at this reading, supplies are most probably streaming in to the marching armies through the third greatest port of France. The comparative quiet on the invasion front is not due to a lack of action; rather this action has transformed, momentarily, from one of action to one of preparation. Local actions include the capture of La Haye du Pui ts on the northern rim of the shattered German west defense canadian who captured the Capriquet airport have been driven back from that airport to the village itself and are standing firm against vicious counter-attack. British around Caen, on the Canadian flank, are locked in a deadly battle with German armor, and the "issue is still in doubt." PACIFIC BATTLE A Va i n Ge s t u r e The J aps are backed into a corner f o r a Saipan showdown. The Nips, squeezed into a north end corner of the Island, are making a final but vain gesture f o r their emperor. Loss of Saipan Island will be a serious blow to the entire structure of the Japanese military machine, as Saipan is the door to the Marianas. Meanwhile American naval task f orces have been busy hammering Bonin Island, 600 miles from Tokyo. Qur airforce has continued its bombings with unabated fury, knocking 55 enemy planes from the sky :while attacking Iwo Island in the Kazan group, 755 miles from Tokyo. In Burma, Stilwell pressed his cam p aign in tn.e north, capturing Moguang a n d c ompletely s urrounding Myitkyina However, in China the J a p s closed in o n Hengyang and c u t the Canton -Hankow rail way. The 1 uestion mark of this week's war i s whether the unaided Chinese ce.n stop this .Ja panese d!'iVe a imed at cutting China in two. TIHE TRENDS ONE YEAR AGO RAF bombs Cologne, Hamburg. SiciliC!n bombings continued. On June 30, while Churchill in London pledged Jap defeat, U .S. Marines occupied Rendova Island. TWO YEARS AGO Gen. "Tooey" Spaatz appointed USAF European commander. Sevastopol falls on July I after historic sIege. Germans reach El Alemein on same day. Bremen, K i ska THREE YEARS AGO Germany attacks Russia without warning (June 21). Lithuania, Poland and most of Latvia fall. Fighting around Minsk, Byalistok severe. Italians in Ethiopia surrender. U.S. occupies Iceland. Nightmare for Luftwaffe The Army's new "Stratosphere Gun" is one of the most powerful of American weapons. This bl g 120 mm. antl-ai rcraft blaster is capableoffirlng a projectile 20,000 feet higher than any other gun of Its type.

PAGE 7

July 8, I . ONE WEEK OF THE WAR. It was in Munich at a Nazi party rally 11n 1939. .Adolf Hitler rose and screamed to the world, 'On the day the British decla-red war, I commanded Goeringto make all preparations for a five-year war, not because I believe this war will last five years but because we will never capitulate in five years,' Today we lack. but a bi t over a month to com plete-the five years Hitler allotted to his war. What is the outlook now? The .Allies have broken throuAh the .Atlantic Wall, have captured Cherbour&, the third port of France, and are turning their strenAth inland' In the east the Red Army has swept the Berezina and captured Minsk: fike a hunAry bear the Russians pursue their quarry tf)ward Warsaw, driving ahead at a Easter and on a wide fran t than the German .Army was able to accompliah in the darkest days of the early 40s, In the-south the Wehrmacht is in hasty retreat, its forces disorgan ized, ita equipment.scattered, 'before the advance of the. 5th and 8th .Armies up the Italian peninsula. The under ground armies of suppressed countries are becoming active; scenes such as the CopenhaAen garrison. battle, the revolt at Tours are but weather vanes pointinA toward thinAs to RUSSIAN FRONT A Symbolical March Fifteen days ago the Germans were entrenched along the "Fatherland Line," a seemingly formidable chain of bastions _based on the fortresses of Vitebsk, ')rsha, Mogilev, Minsk and Polotsk. To day every one of these fortresses has fallen, the Russians have rolled beyond Minsk to the broad. plains that border East Prussia. Farthest Russian spear head is now 110 miles from the breeding place of the Junker gener a.l s. The Red Army i a pounding along the age-old invasion route used by Ghengis Khan in the days before Christ. This victorious march is symbolical,. f or here the Army of Napoleon met disastrous defeat, marking the downfall of the French empire which had set out to the world. Other Russian offensives speared tow-I WEEK ENDING JULY 7 I TALI .AN-FRONT The Germans Flee In Italy, the Germans were withdrawing a._ a fast as their resources would allow. Pausing only for limited and sporadic rearguard actions, they abandoned vast amounts of irreplaceable materiel in the path of the victorious Allies, who have advanced some 300 miles since May 11, when Cassino fell. It appears that the German High Com mand is stilly undecided as to whether it -should defend the "Gothic Line," based on Pisa., Florence a.nd Rimini, or whether it should retire to the Po River or even to the Alps. Observers feel that theytime for a decision is running short, especially if ythe High Command should make its stand on the Gothic Line. Thus indications point toward a German retreat beyond the Gothic Line and a. stand in the Po Valley. Such a retreat would give the Allies a number of air bases whence British and American planes can bomb Bavaria, in the heart of Germany, with ease. INVASION FRONT Preparation The destruction of Cherbourg has been but Allied engineers are confident that operations can be restored in a. matter of days. Even at this reading, supplies are most probably streaming in to the marching armies through the third greatest port of France. The comparative on the invasion front is not due to a lack of action; rather this action has transformed, momentarily, from one of action to one of prep a.ra.tion. Local actions include the capture of La Haye du Pui ts on the northern rim of the shattered German west de fense anchor. Canadian troops who cap tured the airport have been driven back from that airport to the village itself and are standing firm against vicious counter-attack. British troops around Caen, on the Canadian flank, are locked in a deadly battle with German armor, and the "issue is still in doubt. 11 ard Iassi, aimed a.t sp-litting Hungary and Romania.. The second is smashing through Kowol, in an effort to hit Wa.r'l.'!aw and split Poland. Another is spear"ing from the ;northeas t to tea r apart Latvia and Lithuania, and in the far north another spearhead is developing which will attempt to cut off Estonia. A glance at a. map of the Russian front will reveal a. most significant development to even the untrained eye. PACIFIC BATTLE A V a i n Ge s t u r e The J aps are backed into a corner for a Saip an showdown. The Nips, squeezed into a north end corner of the Island, are making a final but vain gesture f o r their emperor. Loss of Saipan Island will be a serious blow to the entire structure of the Japanese roili tary ma chine, as Saipan is the door to the Marianas.Meanwhile American naval task forces Another thorn in HitLer's side is the Finnish situation. The Russians. have extended gains beyond Viipuri and a.re relentlessly driving toward Helsinki. Prompt action must be expected from Hitler. Already German troqps have been dispatched to Finland in an effort to maintain some semblance of German security. have been busy hammering Bonin Island, 600 miles from Tokyo. Our airforce-has continued its bombings with unabated fury, knocking 55 enemy planes from the sky .while attacking Iwo Island in the Ka21an group, 755 miles from Tokyo. In Burma, Stilwell pressed his cam p aign in tne north, capturing Mogua.ng a n d completely s urrounding Myitkyina. However, in China the J a p s closed in o n Hen.g.yang and c u t the Canton-Hankow rail way. The 1uestion mark of this week's war i s whether the unaided c&n stop this .Japanese d.:ive aimed at c utting China in tw o T I H E T R E N D S OH E YEAR AGO RAF bombs Cologne, Hamburg. Sici I i-an bombings continued. On June 30, while Churchill in London pledged Jap defeat, Marines occupied Rendova Island. TWO YEARS AGO Gen. "Tooey" Spaatz appointed USAF European commander. Sevastopol falls on July 1 after historic siege. Germans reach El AI eme in on same day. Bremen K i ska bolllbed. THREE YEARS .&;GO Germany attacksRussiawithout warning (June 21). Lithuania, Poland and most of Latvia fall. Fighting around Minsk, Byalistok severe. Italians in Ethiopia surrender. U.S. occupies Iceland. Nightmare for Luftwaffe The Army's new "Stratosphe re Gun" is one of the most powerful of weapons. This bl g 120 m. antl-ai rcraft blaster is capableoffiring a projectile 20,000 feet higher than any other gun of its type.

PAGE 8

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PAGE 9

July 8, TYHDALL TARGET NEWS FROM THE SECTION I-8 IMPROVEMENTS UNDER WAY AT TRIGGER TOWN Lt. BUford, c.o. of Section I-8, is endeavoring to make the shipPing section of Tr1ggertown a ore pleasant place for you fu / ture graduates to come to. He i s having grass sodded around the orderly room and more and more tents are being razed. Tl;e o l d tents are being torn down and huts are replacing them. T he mall clerks, in both your old sub-section and in sub-section I 8, are working very hard to get your mall to you as soon as possibl e The usual mixing up of the mall does not prevai l much anymore one or the occupants of section I-8, while sweating out a chow line, was interviewed and asked what he thought shoul d be the next improveJTlen t in tf!e section. His answer was very definite: think of my girl with the longing that is transJTlitted to 1my fingertips, so I would like /to write a lo!1g letter t o her, but I am handicapped through the ulck or electricity. uo J9JS91 .JJJ!Y SJ9'1s!lqnd ''OJ poaw 'ppoa . 'pooJq Jado4 51auod puc U!:f a16u!5 o puc 5d!' papunoJ ay, !0'5a6pa al!l!"" Jo1n6 soy auoldi!D' paJado, a41 '5dH pa -uopaJ 5! 56U!M ay' !O UO!Pa5 Ja' -punoJ o, 5a6pa 4'oq uo Jade' puc -ua:> a41 az!u6o:>aJ o, A5oa auo1d UO!Pa5 Ja,ua:> >P!l!' o aAoy 56U!M 5!4' a>jDW auoldl!o' !IDl! ay' puc ayl au!6Ua o, a:>UDJoaddo aua:>ou U!qo:> ay, Aq pa:>UDioq a6ol daap o 5aA!6 a5ou ay' Mo1aq doo:>s -asnt Ja,ua:> :HO a41 auo1d ID=>!J,aw J!D a6ny 'V' 'JaqwoqaA!P puc -WA5D ay, aq o, u6!5ap a16u!s '6u!M-MOI o ,,'uooyd..<.l, 1Dn5nun to d!ys-,oa5 o 'Ltl 'Ag ay, s ,,, "ON .JD .JON uowJan ay' 5 ,,, ; 1 oN .JD aJ!:I we, the occupants o r section I-8, welcome you, our buddies or Class 44-28 to the shipping section of Field. There are a lot of morale builders posted around the section. A varied assortment of these are in the mailroom. Be sure to take a gander at them when you call for your mall. we hope that you will enjoy your short stay here. W e lcom e back Sgt. Pollard! How was the furlough? Did the b u ggy manage to make the round trip, maybe it should be turned in for salvage? I understand that some of the boys like our new deta1l The beach i s fine this time of the year. SECTION I-2 -1JlJ-31J BOASTS MANY COMBAT VETERANS Many of us have come from all parts of t h e States; many, too, have ::.erved overseas, some -in combat zones and others i n all Pheaters on the globe. Many who make up the newly formed class have seen a good number of years go by in the Army, also some are still very ne w to Army life. BUt after all, we have all come here for one purpose: to get thi"s gunnery course under our belts and the n to be assigned to a combat c rew, where each of us )Tligl1 t then g 1 ve our all in helping the fellows who have g one before us. The great day has arrived now. that we are here assigned to our new quarters for the next seven weeks. we were greeted with a great let-down, as we were put in the well known desolated place (otherwise known as Triggertown) from which w e were all a bunch of smiles when we packed our bags and headed toward Section I-2. After all the commotion having been stirred up by our coming here to start, we have all now settled back ready to dig in and prove to unc l e sam and t o Tyndall F ield that all their time with us has no t been spent in vain. This is Class 44-34 now signing orr for now, but you will hear from u s later. Section I-7 Boys Comb Trigger Town Out Of Their Hair; Get Set For Nomenclature And Deflections Greetings from Section I 7 In case yo u don't know just who that is, we are the GI' s most recen tly combing Trlggertown out of ou r hair. In sp1 te of all that has been drilled into us the past week o n nomenclature, deflections and the rest of i t most of the boys have retained their sense of humor. For instance, there is the story that Sgt. Bobby Pope recently returned veteran or the south Pacific Theater of Opera t 1 on s, tells o f the Liberator waist gunner whose g un jammed w hile the formation was being attacked by a flock of Nips. It seems the gun n er, .l<..now1ng it is suicide to let a Jap know you're unarmed, grabbed a flare pistol and cut l oose with it whenever a Jap made a pass at him Ev1-den tly the NiP pilots thought 1 t a new 11secret weapon and decided they had enough flying for one day NOW I can t guarantee that all th 1 s really happened Even Sgt. pope can' t, but who knows, stranger things have happened They ve even de vel oped a nickname for Pvt. R i chard c Hall. :he reason for it is selfexplanatory. Thename? ol1yes, it's sacktime. n Cpl. K l einfelter is groo min g Sgt. Karsmi szk1 for Gunn.er of t he Class. He says the bracelet would be too heavy to wear but he'd like to t h e three-day pass that goes with i t As far as scholasti c achievements are concerned, most or the boys are there with the best or them. For instance Pfc. Kenneth Faulkner accomplished field stripping blindfolded w1 th heavy gloves on in one and a half minutes the first try. And that is good time for anyone. Pvt Bobbie Freeman did 1 t in two minutes flat wr, i ch 1sn t bad either. The &ong bird of t he outfit is Pvt. William Hayes. His voice can be heard above all or Flight 1, which I think you'll agree i s pretty loud. I understand M/Sgt. Hall and SjSgt. "Red" Gibson give their lungs a good exercising every morning around 5 a m Doc tor s orders, no doubt. one thing the fellow s are not hap py about though are the lines around here. Now some lines are to be expected but when a guy can read a 300-page book and smoke three packs of c1garets sweating out lines in one day well! --CPL. JAMES B. LE ROY sect1on I-1 Left Over Meatbal I Starts Controversy A shy h ello !rom your rookie reporter of the latest class to enter this battle or the silver wings and w1 th an alarmingly loud gulp, here goes nothing I n wanderlng around and st1ck-1ngmy nose where I hadn 1 t oughta yours trul y these ingredients for his literary stew whi ch I ll serv e to all who like to read the educational that make s the A i r Forc e what it is. Who ever thought the lowly meatball could be of such importance as it was in a certain case this week? I t seems Pvt. Rov1nell1 had part of one left ove r when h i s hunger was quenched but the mess sergeant thought he needed the vitamins left i n the meat. And after a discussion on nutrition, our own Pvt. Rov1nell1 wound up in t he kitchen helping-makin g more meatballs! N o information was available as t o how much this improved the dish. The splendid tenor voice heard echoing from the barracks 436 shower room bel ongs to Pvt. H. c. Pa e 7 SECTION I-6 GUNNER OF THE CLASS TITLE SPURS STUDENTS On Saturday, June 10, in the year or our Lor d Nineteen Hundred and FortyFour 2 60 brave young soldiers struggled up the r oad from the renowned Trlggertown to make themselves a name 1n TYn dall's Hall or Fame. With each individual was t he small voice saying you too may become the Gunner or the Class. Life was pleasant i n Triggertow n ror there was no pressure chamber first aid lessons, Articles or war, and other such minor details. Yes, it seemed thae our llfe or ease had come to an end ror the time being. During the pre-school week w e didn't have too much time to hit the sack an d lick our wounds. Lt. Blanding (incidently we round him to be a very efficient as well as likeable orr1cer) round a way to keep our days fUll or classes and drill. w e saw a rew or our buddies left by the wayside, victims or the pressure chamber, etc., but as a whole the class did very well pre-school S lowly but surely our dreams or being the GUnne r o! the Class are fad in g o u r steps are beginning to !alter. Between Sighting and weapons we are losing our contempt ror instructors and in its place we have the certain respectful that they so rightly deserve Each day the sick call line grows in magnitude and the result is that there are quite a few vacancies in the ranks when P. T. time rolls around in the after noon. Yes, the fellows pick up the 11 ttle tricks in a hurry. The second week and the light i s beginning to dawn on some rew or u s Thi s Sighting isn't nearly as bad as it seemed to be. The depressing thing is that now we !lnd the 50 call ber machine gun (or which we have profound respect) is nothing more than one big lot or malfunctions. Each part can have at least one thousand things wrong with it at one t ime The result or these l!la1runctions were naturally drastic sin. ce each and every one or them means the gun won t shoot. wurthman, but dont get him to singing those Irish ditties or you'll never love the Irish a ga 1n-Pvt. Earl Jones is taking a ribbing from his shipmates because or the way he wears his earphones during !light. (On his kne e or lap.) Who sal d drilling couldn t be run? Watch Cpl. Majzels 1r you don t believe it. Even a column left is a show rrom the spectators point or v1ew our two FUller brothers who got together here seem headed ror different ways. Wendell got the Emerson Nose TUrret while Nelson took over the Mar tin upper or course all we he-men have tans but Pvt. vanns1c1si almost makes m e self-conscious with the one the sun painted on him. And now before my new boss puts me back to sweeping the floor, I 111 close wl th this thought: Every sergeant has his place but some or them just been dug yet. I think confUcius said that but don t quote me.

PAGE 10

Page 8 TYH DALL TARGET The Girl "Back Home" Nine out of ten Gls have one--and for the tenth lonely Gl who doesn't have a girl back home, we Twentieth Century Fox's Jeanne Crain in "Home in Indiana." A comparative newcoMer to the screen, Jeanne turns In a top-notcll perfon11ance in this homey film story .;,ich Is scheduled for the Post Theaters to1110rrow and You probably won't recognize Jeanne in "Home in Indiana as being the same girl In the above photo, but regardless of the role she plays, she can be the leading lady In our photo album on Sunday, Monday and a 1 ways. SECTION I-3 YOU SHOULD HEAR JONES' STORIES ABOUT HAWAII; LANDOLINA WAS PRO BOXfR Did you know that S/Sgt. Jones Incidentally the last group or spent eight hears in Hawaii? (You cadets that we sang our special ought to hear some or his stor-song to, Junior Birdmen, ap ies!) .One or our boys, Pvt. preciated it so much that they Landolina, was a professional star ted to throw coins at us, boxer and really was he ad in g which we so easily appropriated. toward the big time before he got (What ever did happen to that his greetings we are consid-s urn or 8 cents?) ered the best sub-section on the Weapons, sighting, turrets, field ror policlng the airdrome. drill, moving base range, moving All they have to do now is ask us target range and all the others-once more and the boys will be just think how much we are going asking for a phase check on poto miss all these formations licing the area with blindfold It certainly showed on everyand gloves... body's race when the dirrerent Thoug)1t: wonde r when 'Pappy will count the same cadence that he starts out with? The boys are suet. a fine crew that they change steD wltt.out being told. But, that's all right, PaDPY, we love you just tt, e same P.oom 7 was so glad to get bac k from APalachicola that they all t hrew a big blast Saturday night on milk and crackers. P.S. They had : o ny the next moming. !lights began to ny. or course there were the rew that liked it so much that they stayed !or more. We'll be waiting !or you fellows, cater. upl Will ya, huh ? or course the most prominent part or the sub-section, lstjSgt. Nelson, will be missed when we leave. you did a rlne job with us boys, Sgt. so don t mind the little griping(?) that we did. --CPL. LOUIS GOLDBERG Two Meals on T omado Diet Ruined by Overdose of '' Liquid Sunshine'' Heavy formations of Florida dew interrupted the Tornadoes two offensive thrusts at highly strategic moments during the past seven days. Last saturday, at Whiting Field, Pensacola, behind the spectacular pitching of DThunderball" Frank usonyi, the Tyndall nine piled up an 8-0 lead in the first inning when buckets run or dampness caused the game to be halted. Again, on Wednesday, up at the Marianna Army Air Base, the Tornadoes were trailing 1-o when they barely made the third out in the top or the fourth to complete four and a half innings of play and have .the game registered as official. A sudden outburst or exceedingly heavy mist sent both teams to the dugout and eventually the players were forced to wade to a more permanent shelter. In Sa turday s con against Whiting Field, uzonyi earned his newest nickname of Tbunderball when a resounding clap or thunder greeted his first pitch. UP at Marianna or. Wednesday, Dale Livingston was on the mound for Tyndall and during his !our-inning stint on the mound gave up one hit. The Flyers scoredttheir run in the second inning when Shortstop Gunkel llfted a ny to right Paul Brown got set ror the. catch but a burst or wind gave the ball wings and Brown was barely able to touch tne ball when it finally descended and Gun kel was safe on third, Center!ielder Dawkins then drove Gunkel home with a single to center for the only score of the day. TYn dall's two hits were accourt ted for by Patterson, who singled in the first, and George Mitro, new T/F third baseman, who to center in the fourth. This afternoon on the Post Diamond, the TOrnadoes will meet the Moody Field nine from Valdosta, Ga. The game will start at 4 P.M. In their only previous meeting, the Tornadoes clubbed out a 15-9 win over the Georgia team. The Tornadoes are scheduled to meet the Moody baseballers again in a night game at Valdosta on Tuesday. The members of the Tyndall Field skeet team pause for a moment of refreshment between events at the AAF. gunnery competition staged at Las Vegas, Nevada, June 2q_25. AI so entered In the meet was a team of Tyndall gunnery students which placed second in the student competitions. The Tyndall Field Instructors who the skeet team pictured above are, left to right,. T/Sgt. R. G. Henderson, Sgt. E.J. D'Ambrosio, Pfc. E.A. Cusick, T/Sgt. Paul A. Brown and Sgt. E.H. Miller. Henderson smashed 50 straight pigeons for a perfect score I n the f i rst event of the meet. INTERSECTION SPORTS RESULTS AND STANDINGS SOFTBALL Tea W L Teaa W B2 ......... 7 1 B6 ......... 4 E1 ......... 6 1 Flnance .... 3 1!2. 6 1 A2.,,., , 3 cs . 11 3 c6 ......... 2 Cll II 3 C2 2 A3 3 2 C9 2 B4 II 4 C4 2 A1 ......... 4 3 B3 1 photo 4 3 Bl ........ 1 C7 ......... 1 RESULTS L 4 3 3 4 II II 6 4 II 6 Cll 8, C3 2; B6 II, C6 6; C7 10, B4 3; B2 9, E1 0 (forfeit); B6 9, C4 0 (forfeit) B4 2, Cll 1. OUTSTAKDIKG GAMF. OF TRF. WEEK: 84's 2-t victory over C6 the 2-hit hurling ofWagner. Saa Knepper, the losing twirler, was nicked for four hits. Neither teaa coaaitted any errors. ca scored its lone run in the fourth inntng, while 84 pushed across one run in the second and another in the seYenth. BASEBALL Teaa W L Teaa WW 1 Cll ......... 4 0 C6 ......... 2 E1. ........ 3 0 Al ......... l 3 E2 2 1 B6 ,., 1 4 A2 3 2 C7 1 4 RESULTS A2 12, C7 3; E2 II, Et II (gaa .. called on account or darkness.) VOLLEYBALL Teaa. 11 Bt. ........ 4 photo 3 A 1. 2 C6 2 L Tea a W 0 B6 2 1 B2 2 1 Finance 1 1 E2 ......... o E1 ......... o RESULTS L 2 2 3 3 3 B6 111-111, El o-o (forfeit); B2 16-16, E2 0 .-0 (forfeit); Fi nance 16-13-0, Photo 6-16-16; Bl 16-16, A 1 ],2,. 10.

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BOATI NEW T/F 'DRY DOCK' READY FOR USE BY CRASH BOATS TYH DALL TARGET PHASE CHECK-"Checkers1 Softbal lers Arouse Enthusiasm \HCTIV I TIE: S-Rhowdi Takes Over Where Sad Sack Left Off Fntliuslasm in the Ptase Cl'leck -"'inc e y e olde Sad E'ac left cr. The dock space arollnd is ing DepartnenL ls ruining service there has fairly cluttered with tired over the softt-all team, no Wactivit:es but now Howch i is looking patrol boats. These which, despite tl" e fact it has taking over and all shall be :e shabby ladies have come from all lost three out of six g a!l'e s ported. over tlJe east GUlf area to have looks like one of tf.e besL tea,.. s We often wonder w hy D i cky sin gs their faces lifted on the new in the lec.gue Playing Mana ger such sad songs wllile she ls lr-onmariEerallwa;y.Capt..F'.V.TttomaJlnBk ft j 11th ing. Wehaveahunct:that.gig son of the F'ourth Service corr: mand 0 1 a_ er, a er u g g ne:, e under Col. Bozardt supervised the llnet:p for the last few gaJlles, she got in basic is still haunt.completion of this dock andrel ;as a COJ;Jbination whict, t e ll!ainingherand her lh:teners L .ooks tains will winnir: g ball the as if Diers, Beeney and McGee cently hauled the first boat out remainder of n.e .c.eo."son. h 11 1 d d i -'lligh and dry. In case you are ave a an e a Jllan ap ece. In a closely played grune Monda} Wonrler if Beeney is selling her wondering wbat a Jllarine rallwa;, n1ght tt.e Phase Check P.egulars man bonds'? And speaking of sell is, it is not a branch of the defeated an all-star te8Jll of 111aring war bor.ds, Cage l seemed to be great Bay Line, but an inclined ried men from the department by maki n g every effort to build up a railway that carries a platfOrJT: a 5-3 score. Sgt. Ja.rne s Hayes sales tc.lk in her sleep the other down into the water. Any boat turned in a creditable. mound per-night. to be hauled is maneuvered over fornance for the mar;ied men by The Wacs like tc play softball this platform and secured and, lioldir:g tlle t :ard-hittlng regulc.rs with B-1 as everyone flatters presto, tl::e cradle is pulled orto seven t:lt.s. them except that Goodman rellc.w the ralls and the boat is ready The Phase Check volleyball team is a fly-hawk as well as beir,l' a to be overhauled. The prime purpaced by Sgt. Lee Al tenderfP.r has very fancy pen pt;sl:er. Any secpose is to service and repair Air two wins ln four matches, but is tion wishing to play our softball Force P.escue Boats in the Glllt practicir,g nightly and expects to team, just call 3254 for an ap-area. show a big in the pointJllent. (adv.) It is a knowr, fact that u,e near future. Welcome home, Gersho;,, we miss-little mess hall is witness to we welcOT:-,e to our fcld S gt. ed your llumor (????) around the some of the best Jlleals laid out Dale Livingston and CPl. Jar1es company area. we trusL you had on the field. "Just like upWilson. a delightful furlough. Schiele, iown!" tl1.e boys say. He notice increased enthusiasm too, ls bact and her inimitable Pride of the Boat Dock baseball on t.l:'te part of our Sgts. 'Finley, (is tha:t the right word) style of team is Cpl. Joseph Forbes who, J-ielton and Radio s. Edwards who making the piano keys talk is ,.in his own quiet way, fanned 18 recently acquired what ls known again floating from the dayroom. out of 21 in a 7-inning gaF.e and as "A Better Half." congratula-Never too much music, Schiele. the next day dropped 13 more into tions, fellas' VirGinia Duncan is doing a fine the bag. Forbes Played seJlli-pro Pfc. F.oberts, a newcoJTler to the job in U t e mess hall. We are all once, but has logged a lot of department, hasn t wasted any pulling for you, so don't let us desk time since, wt,ich aln' t s q time getting acquainted with our down. Page 9 (wHAT's DOING NEXT WEEK f SUNDAY 7 P.M. --BinAo at TriAAertown MONDAY 7 F. !1.. -/rl o vies, H o s pi t a 1 8 :30 P.M.--Movies, Receiving Section TUESDAY 7 P.M.--Entertainment in Hospital Wards 8 P.M.--Dance, USO 8 P.M. --Bingo, Rec Hall 8 P.M. --Movies, Colored Rec Hall WEDNESDAY 12:30 P.M.-Special Servi'ce Non-Com Meeting, Library 7 P.M. --Weekly Variety Shqw at ReceivinA Section 8 P.M.-GI Dance, Rec Hall, Permanent party only THURSDAY 7 P.M. --Movies, Hospital 8 P.M.--GI Dance, Rec Hall, Students only 8 P.M. --Dance, Colored Rec Hall 8 :30 P.M.--Movies, RecevinA Section FRIDAY 7 P.M.--Triggertown Talent Review 8 P.M. --Movies, Colored Rec Hall SATURDAY 7 P.M.--Movies, Hospital 8:30P.M. --Movies, TriggerTown good for a barefooted Mississippi charming wac, Cpl. Hilton. It is Mall clerY., beauty operator, lad. said they're making good use of rr.essenger, PX operator, un-doer BOXING SAILJER OF THE WEEK: OUr Jllan on the Florida moon. "Just talking cf all odd jobs, for crying out Tuesday, 8 P.M. -Weekly the dock interview this weer. things over, says Robert.s. loud Dively what IS your MOS? at Post Gym Area caught T/Sgt. Thoe s. Shaw someplace close to Akron, Ohio. boats and has a Master rating. a long, easy-going GI. got a w1ie "811 stands for "Smokey," who is F"our .1ears ago tt.e Air Force res-and a little baby, and has been Regular Arnr and at this writing cue boats were in their infancy, heard to say, with a far away aboard the P-253. His Arny car-but Shaw says they put him in a look in his eyes, that being a 30 eer is unique in 1tbat he has Quarternas.ter Corps boat that year man would not be so bad . Emerson tl Harlow back after E. long strE:tct. of D S He' s one of the pioneers of tti s place, and ace draftsman, sail or. carr-en r.er and --S AILJ E R JAC!\. spent a-'-1 four years on crE.sh was old enough to vote." P.e is All hands are glad to see Cpl. CAHERA STOPS BALL AS FORHER A.L. BATTING CHAMP GETS SET FOR SWING Ted Williams, "Mr. Boston" himself, is caught by the cameraman as he prepares to pounce on one of Dale Livingston's pitches in the fourth inning of the T/F Bronson Field game here t\\Q weeks ago. In this unusual shot, the ball has been stopped in rr.id-ai r, half-way between the pitcher's box and home Livingston has completed his follow throuyh, is set for a slam, and Catcher Busby crouches low and waits, while Umpire Russ Cannon also bends low to get a better view of the horsehide and call the pitch. The former American League batting champ caught the ball inside and slammed it through First baseman Bob Patterson (waiting in the background) for a single. Bronson 1\Qn the game 2-0, thereby halting the Tornadoes' winning streak at 7 straight. Cpl. Bill James of the Post Photo Section was the boy with the quick finger on the shutter in this

PAGE 12

July 8, t()VIE FARE FOR THE WEEK POST Saturday, 'ROGER TOUHY, GANGS TER,' P. Foster, V. McLaglen. Sun. -Mon. 'HOME IN INDIANA, Walter Brennan, Jeanne Crain. Tuesday, 'SECRETS OF SCOTLAND YARD,' Lionel Atwill, C. Aubrey Smith; Also, 'SOUTH OF DIXIE,' Anne Gwynne, David B rue e. Wed.-Thurs., 'MARINE RAIDERS,' Pat O'Brien, Ruth Hussey. Friday, 'TAKE IT BIG,' Jack Haley, Arline Judge. RITZ Sun. -Mon. 'TENDER CCNRADE, Ginger Rogers. Tues. thru Fri. 'PIN-UP GIRL Betty Grable. Saturday, 'BENEATH WESTERN SKIES.' PANAMA Sun. -Mon. 'BEST FOOT FOR WARD,' Lucille Ball. Tuesday, 'FIVE GRAVES TO CAIRO, Von Stroheim, F. Tone. Wednesday, 'DR. GILLESPIE'S NEW ASSISTANT,' L. Barrymore. Thursday, 'THREE HEARTS FOR SYLVIA.' Fri .-Sat. 'ARIZONA WHIRLWIND.' BAY Sunday, 'NINE GIRLS, Harding, Keyes. Mon.-Tues., 'CRIME SCHOOL,' Humphrey Bogart. Wednesday. 'TOP MAN,' R. O' Connor. Thursday, 'WINTER CARNIVAL,' Anne Sheridan. Fri. -Sat., 'GUN SMOKE MESA.' & 'CITY THAT STOPPED HITLER.' TYNDALL TARGET SPORTS BULLETIN This afternoon, on the Post Diamond, the Tornadoes face the Moody Field Flyers; the game is scheduled to start at 4 p.m. On Tuesday ne T/F nine will travel to valdosta to play the Moody team ln a game under the arc lights. Next weekend the Tyndall squad will play at Pensacola with B ronson Field as the opposi tlon on Saturday and Fort Barrancas on sunday. Tomorrow afternoon on the enlisted men's beach the raindelayed water sports carnival will be held with the final heats in all events expected to begin at 2 p.m. The War Bond Golf Tourna ment, to which all T/F golfers are invited, will be staged at the Panama country Club ln L y nn Haven tomorrow with the first flight tee-off set for 8:30a.m. Also on tomorrow's bt:sY schedule is the former Instructors Club beach party and dinner. GI transportation for all guests will leave from Section B headquarters and from the Department of Train ing headquarters at 10 a.m. Capt; o.o. Freeman, services Officer, announced at noon today that through the cooperation of the local usa, 50 cadets will be selected each week as guests on a Sunday f1 shin g trip an in vita t i an similar to that now offered to 50 enlisted men who are third week students. The -rirst group of cadets to enjoy the invitation wlll leave from the usa to morrow mornin g LECTURE Page 10


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