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Florida Sentinel Bulletin

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Material Information

Title:
Florida Sentinel Bulletin
Physical Description:
Serial
Publisher:
Florida sentinel Pub. Co., Inc.
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
semiweekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers   ( lcsh )
African Americans   ( lcsh )
Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
usfldc doi - F19-00078
usfldc handle - f19.78
System ID:
SFS0024310:00076


This item is only available as the following downloads:


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Florida Sentinel Bulletin.
n Vol. 64, no. 49 (February 3, 2009)
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February 3, 2009
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Tampa (Fla.)
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PAGE 1

Celebrating 64 Years In The Tampa Bay Area Fight B Girls, Ends With Stabbing SEE STORY ON PAGE 16 CLUB 44 HOSTS OBAMA AFTER PARTY A group of ladies who worked diligently in the campaign to el ect S e nator B a r a ck Obama to the presidency of the United States hosted an elegant affair after the Inauguration to celebration his election. The event was held at the Hilton Tampa Airport Westshore Hotel on Saturday, January 24, 2009. The ladies who make up Club 44 (named for the 44th President of the United States) are: seated, left to right, Barbara Jackson, Grace Jones and Bessie Brown. Standing left to right, Bernadette Vee Jean Collins, Ruby Brown, Sonja Garcia, Holly Otoya, Pearlyne Wilson, Patricia Miles, Frances Sykes, Lorraine Livingston, Evelyn Bethune, Verneka Rhodes, Ollie Hunter and Ellie Gilder. Not pic tured Sandra Helen Wilson Hannah and Ruth Duncan Bell. Photo ra h b Brunson IAACP Celebrates Its 100111 Anniversary SEE PAGE 3 Stage Play Targets Decisions About Crime SEE PAGE 7 Former Police Olfi Dies Alter llln-SEE PAGE 6 Jazz Singer To Appear At Library SEE PAGE 3

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0) Features M > a: Communitv Event For National Black HIV/AIDS AWareness oav Tampa-Hills borough W Action Plan, Inc. (THAP) is u. > collaborating with The a: w > w c w l: (J) ::::; m ::> a. z t= w ..J ..J ::> m I ..J w z t= z w (J) c( c a: 0 ..J u. LOLITA EMMANUELBROWN ... Director, Case Management Services ing The HW /AIDS Crisis In The AfricanAmerican Community: Fact, Fiction and Policy," Black communities are in a public health state of emergency as a result of the devastating impact of HIVIAIDS. To effectively address this public health crisis, THAP continues its focus on Prevention Services and Case Management to meet the needs of those in our communities living with and at risk for HIV I AIDS The Program Director of Case Management Services is Ms. Lolita Emmanuel-COREfHA LARKINS .. Director, Preventiom Services Brown. Her job is targeting families infected and affect ed by HIV I AIDS and providing a multitude of linkage services to individuals recently rel eased from incarceration. THAP's Prevention Service is comprised of 7 programs, which 'pro\/ide effective outreach. The idea is providing community level interventions to reduc and eliminate HIV-/ AIDS The ,Director of Prevention Services is Ms. Coreatha B. Larkins. If you would like more .information on the many programs administered by THAP, including how to r e ceiv e FREE on-site tests for 1-IIV (re sults can be given in 20 minutes), STI, or pregnancy, ple a s e call the Prevention Office at 813-226-2141 or the Case M anage m ent Office at 813933-0407. Tampa Hillsborough Action Plan Inc. is a 501(c)3 Community Based Organi-zation (CBO) whose mission is to provide meaningful programs that meet of inner city residents who have historically felt powerless in accessing the mainstream social, economic and educational systems in order to gain self sufficiency, dignity, pride and self respect Tampa Man Develops Hip Hop. Clot.hinu line MARK ULEE-Mark alorig-With-Ciie Dance, a who've joined him, are-devel oping a hip hop::cli>!ftfng hqe called "Fa t To Def;" _--uThe hip hop \w.rld is a multi-billion aollar.:inaustry and I feel it's our fu-m:.to get:& piece of the pie, Sa.id YUlee. W I've admiredthe.bf --; world for the ears l've eyen a ttempt to fulfill.lll.._ dream with their hip tiop aspi-rations." _J __ Yulee said he. local artists in the hfp hop community th-at we r e <>;Qe jump from success. but would not take the leap .... .. ...._ "That's when I decided to launch a logo for clotliing appare 'Fat-To Qef.' r came up with .the concept when a couple of friends were discussing slang terms that were popular back in the day. While having the discussion, I -:: ..::mainstormed and realized he : a.w some marketing potential : =aebind the slogan 'Fat To Def.' -It is a term used when a person :: : a young lady, car, or = :: it se the top of the line, bad to the bone. Yulee said he's seen how the world of Def has made SoSo Def, Def Comedy Jam and other Fortune soo companies reach the hip bop community. "I want to incorporate this slogan and put it on denim jeans, valor jogging suits, shorts, and other women's appareL Yulee said be wants his apparel to give women that added sense of self-esteem with good taste. "Right now, I'm trying to build a coalition of inveStorS. and entrepreneurs to launch this ideal I'm loek:ing for web designers, marketing special ists, photographers, and models." Mark Yulee can be reached at yulee22lycos.com Reporter Leon B. Crews can be reached at 248-0724 or e-mailed at lcrews@flsentinel.com. ""'""" 1r .... : ... . ..,.,,, Hono r Roll Ads Will Be Published ridaoy, A ea 1ne .o nn11 n u dJ' February 1 1, 2009 /.fl Each 1 / Student s Name:. _________ Grade: Schooi::------Honor: P rincipal's Honor Roll, Hi gh Hono r RQII Honor Roll, Cit ize nsh i p P erfec t A tte ndanc e Hobbi es: __________________ rch: Telep h o ne:------------------(Not For Publication) For More Information Contact Iris At 3) 248-1921

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Features ': .. m en c NUCP Its Centennial Anniversarv: "TT m ID :u BY IRIS B. HOLTON Sentinel City Editor On February 12, 1909, a group of community activists formed the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in New York New York. Today, members of the organization a re preparing to celebrate the 10oth anniversary of the CURTIS STOKFS national organizati,on . -:-:_-: . ... President; Hillsborough The Hillsborough CouR'ty :.::.Comity Chapter4ofthe Chapter of the organizatiQD .. : : . was one of three chapters : ib:::= foiindea1riii19!7.::-: .. :: the state w. E: B. DuBois, -Curtis Stokes, presi-one of the founders of the national organiza,tion, County Chapter ?f the W.E.B. DuBOIS ... Founder of Tampa Chapter of NAACP NAACP said, "We're excited about the opportunity for us to come together with differ ent events some of which are Jazz Singer To Appear At College Hilllibrarv BY IRIS B. HOLTON Sentinel City Editor On Wednesday, February 10th, Ms. Rose Bilal will be at the College Hill Library, 2607 E. M. L. King, Jr., Blvd., from 10 a. m. until 6 p m. Her visit is in conjunction with National Black History Month The event is free and open to the public. Ms. Bilal will be at the library from 10 a.m. until 6 p m. Ms. Bilal who is a jazz vocalist, has toured nationally and internationally with world renowned musicians including John Lamb, the bass player for the Duke Ellington Band, and Kenny Drew, Jr., a world renowned pianist She is also well known in the Tampa Bay area. Ms. Bilal was born in Atlanta and moved to Newark, New Jersey with her mother as an infant. After reaching adulthood, she moved to Philadelphia, where she began singing R & B an opening act for such groups as Gladys Knight and Pips and the O'Jays. But, while her career was on track, her personal life was not She recalls that she was in an abusive relation ship and knew that she had to get out of it. "I had relatives in Florida that he didn t know about, so I moved here and worked for the phone company for about 17years." After leaving her job, Ms. Bilal said she didn' t have any other skills to support herself, so she fell back on her talents as a singer. "I am doing things that I MS. ROSE BllAL ... To visit College Hill Public Ubrary never thought I would. I never liked jazz, but I didn't like the R & B songs being sung in 1989. Now, jazz is all I want to sing," she said Ms. Bilal said she also began sharing her story with teenage girls who were in abusive relationships and that led her to attending seminars on public speaking. It was at one of these events that she met Dr. Tina DuPree of Miami, who encouraged her to write a book about her experiences. "She told me that no one can tell my story better than me and to just write the book th e editors would take care of the rest. I wrote the book three years ago because I realized that I h ad some thing to offer to help oth ers." Ms. Bilal will p e rform a f e w jazz numbers and will also read from h er a utobiog r ap hy, "Don't Blame the Road." "I'm looking forward to the event because I love meeting and talking with people, that is always a plea sure I think it will be a nice, social event." Ms. Bilal will also answer questions from the audience about her life and work as a musician, visual artist, actor and writer. The program is sponsored by the Ada T. Payne Friends of the Urban Libraries For more infor mation about this and other programs call (813) 273-3652 or visit Suppport The Florida Sentinel Advertisers fundraisers and others designed to raise awareness. Stokes said he joined the NAACP. after relocating to Tampa, but credits Dr. Sam Horton and the late Rev. Paul Matthews with encouraging him to seek an office in the organization. "They are reason why I got involved at this level. They told me that they needed younger people to get involved. Now, my job is to get younger people involved." The local chapter has a calendar of events that offi cially kicks off the monthlong celebration. On Saturday, February 7th, the organization will host a WIN Breakfast, from 7 a. m. until 9 a. m., a Health Fair from 7 a. m. until 2 p. m., and a Legal Redress Forum from 10 a. m. until 2 p. m. All of these events Will take place at the Mount Pleasant Missionary Baptist Church in the Burney-Mitchell Fellowship Center, located at the corner of Rome Avenue and Spruce Street. On Sunday, the organization will host a Gospel Extravaganza at the Mount Calvary Seventh Day Church, corner of N. 40t Street and E Osborne Avenue, beginning atsp. m. :u Other events planned for -< throughout the month include the NAACP Birthday Party, Educational Forum, Golf Tournament, and Rededication Ceremony, ainong other events. Some of the presidents who served the organization were Matthew Gregory, Bob Gilder, Henry Carley, and Dr. Sam Horton. Mrs. Ellen Green was the first woman to serve as president pf the organization. Other women included Mrs. Helen Saunders, and Mrs. Ann Porter, who became the first president after the Tampa Chapter and Plant City Chapter merged in 1996. The National NAACP was created to address the civil rights of Blacks and other minorities in America. Initially referred to as the National Negro Committee, the founding members were: Ida Wells-Barnett, W. E. B. DuBois, Henry Moscowitz, Mary. White Ovington, Garrison Villiard, and William Englisn Walling. "TT r-0 :u 6 )It en m z z m .r;-m c: rr-z v-c: ID r-u; % m c m < m ... c: m en c )It z c "TT :u 6 Referral Service (813) 495-3702 1-866-352-4200 C) m w

PAGE 4

en Editorials & Columns C") > a: < :::> a: m w LL > < c CIJ w :::> .... FLORIDA SENTINEL BULLETIN (USPS 202-140) 2207 21st Avenue Tampa Florida 33605 (813) 248-1921 Published Every Tuesday and Friday By FLORIDA SENTINEL BULLETIN PUBLISHING Co Member of National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) and Amalgamated Publishers, Inc., New York 1990-94 CP Timelnternational POSTMASTER : Send Address Change To : Florida Sentinel Bulletin, P.O Box 3363 Tampa, FL 33601 Periodical Postage Paid At Tampa, FL W.W. Andrews 1874-1931 (1919) C. Blythe Andrews 1901n (1945) Founders C. BLYTHE ANDREWS, JR., CHAIRMAN S KAY ANDREWS, PUBLISHER C. BLYTHE ANDREWS Ill, PRESIDENT/CONTROLLER GWEN HAYES, EDITOR IRIS HOLTON, CITY EDITOR BETTY DAWKINS, ADVERTISING DIRECTOR KEITH GEORGE, CIRCULATION AND PRESS DIRECTOR Subscriptions-$44 00-6 Months Both Editions : $87.0Q-Per Year Both Editions Opinions expressed on edUorial pages ol this newspapar by Column ists or Guest Writer s do not necessarily rellect the editorial siance of The Florida Sentinel Bulletin or the Publish er What We Must Never Forget C ertain people ask, "Why should Black newspapers continue to exist in this world of diversity and advancing integration? The answer is simple. Black newspapers continue to be able to say what many non-Black newspapers would not C dare think, let alone print. Take for instance, the followa: ing set of ideas. LL 0 It's a belief passed down from one generation to anoth-Z er. It says, "Our struggle is not simply to prove we are < equal. Our struggle is to prove we are human." In the past two weeks, President Barack Obama and staff have C done more to heal an ailing America, than his predecesfn sor had done in eight years. Barack's face has been seen :::> on Middle Eastern television. His presence has been felt in the midst of a seemingly ceaseless Palestinian-Israeli a: family feud, and even more importantly, the Obama message ha' s knocked boldly on the door of an w intractable, but off-balance Republican Senate. In other C words, he has reached across all lines and done what Lincoln, FDR, JFK and even Ronald Reagan hgve all CJJ done. He has, thus far, led with the hand of a true :J Commander-in-Chiefl m :::> However, when the day is done, and his cabinet and ll. staff members go home, do they say they have served an Z able statesman, or does the fact he's a Black man cross their minds? In other words, to what extent is America ::j willing to see Barack Obama as a man and not a Black :::> man? m I ..J w z w CIJ < c a: 0 ..J LL Convenience Stares: I Change Is Needed Could it be that the City of St. Petersburg is on to something worth considering by all local cities and counties? Following a recent rash of robberies and shootings in the city's convenience store industry (six in the past eight weeks), police officials a .re advising store owners to install surveillance cameras and recording systems. Additionally, law enforcement is advising store owners to rem.ove posters, displays. or any equipment that blocks cl!!ar view of the cash register . Finally, store owners have been admonished to increase exterior lighting and to install electronic door looks to increase visibility and to control who enters the stores. In an allout war against convenience-store crime, St. Pete's City Council is considering an ordinance or changes to state law. _While 'certain changes St. Pete is considering are eostly and could cause certain store owners to go out of busi. ness, other changes make sense and are ."no-brainers" as a means of deterring deadly crime. Sadly, some of our staff have commented on how wary they are of visiting certain Tampa convenience stores at especially if there are few cars in the parking lot, or af store _windows are completely covered by posters, ATM machmes, crates and cases of sodas or Lotto equipW ment. In addition, job-seekers have shied away from (!) convenience store employment because of the growing if danger. Super BliWIIHerlllath Now, the Super Bowl XLIII is over and those of us who served as the "host city," can reflect on the positives and negatives. Of course; faw enforcement was kept busy trying to protect our out-of town guests. The idea is to keep the visi tors healthy and happy in a safe environment. Otherwise, they won't come back --. and we need those tourist dollars, especially in this economy. According to statistics from the Tampa -Police Department, several people were given a free ride to jail over the past weekend. The good news is, if there is such a thing when -it comes to people being arrested; they were from all over. ft would be a bad tbing if everyone were from Tampa But; it seems that suclt events I sat there Scrolling through some of the 67,000 names in the slave trade database, I wondered if my ancestors were among the names of slav.es brought to Maryland and Virginia, on the slave ship Speedwell, years ago. I'm referring to the Voya&es: The TrapsAtlantic Slave -Trade 1>atabase that '-all ofyou, who are blessed to have acceSs to computers, can a t www. s lay'eyoy-. a&es.ol'&. You see, last a gi:oup ;of internatiort'al schol llrs gathered at a conference held at I!mory University to launch a free and interactive database that documents the an4 19t $tH} a the data.base. \vas begun in 1999. .. the marked the bicentennial of the end of the trans r Atlantic slave trade in 1808 . Pointing out the fact that "the database establishes links betwe e n America and breed their own brand of craftsmen who just travel from place to place!' The police were expecting the counterfeifers tobein rare form and they weten't disappointed : 'A special law enforcement task force was formed for juSt si.ich an occasion. Nine people were arrested for selling counterfeit Super Bowl tickets, with the highest priced at $2,500. In fa-ct, the arrests raitged-ftoni setling the eounterfeit tiCkets to sell ing counterfeit merchandise, to selling counterfeit a-eden-. In all, a total of 12 peciple were arrested for felonies ' and another 14 were charged With misdemeanor offenses. Pdlice also ejecte