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Florida Sentinel Bulletin

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Title:
Florida Sentinel Bulletin
Physical Description:
Serial
Publisher:
Florida sentinel Pub. Co., Inc.
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
semiweekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers   ( lcsh )
African Americans   ( lcsh )
Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )

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University of South Florida Library
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University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
usfldc doi - F19-00103
usfldc handle - f19.103
System ID:
SFS0024310:00101


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Florida Sentinel Bulletin.
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May 1, 2009
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Tampa (Fla.)
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PAGE 1

Celebrating 64 Years In The Tampa Bay Area rian I -----' ........ ,., ... a ar's -' SEE STORY ON PAGE 1 0-A ' -_ -' ' NEW CITY OF TAMPA BLACK HISTORY COMMITTEE OFFICERS The City Of Tampa Black History Committee, Inc. held its Committee Mixer and Installation Ceremony on Tuesday, April 28, 2009 in the Mascotte Room of the Old City Hall. With the recent retirement of Bettye Greene Johnson, a new president and other officers were elected. City Councilwoman Gwen Miller conducted the installation ceremony. From left to right are: Assistant Fire Chief Tom Forward, Parliamentarian; Tonja Brickhouse, Department of Solid Waste and Environmental Program Management, Advisor; Lenoir Russell, Housing and Community Development Division, Vice President; Frank J. Crum, Office of Cable Communication, President; City Councilwoman Miller; Linda C. Williams, Wastewater Department, Secretary; Gregory Hart, Minority Business Development Office, Treasurer; and Debbie Mercer, Office of the City Clerk, Assistant Treasurer. (Photography By Brunson) Printers Celebrate 10 Years Of Senice SEE PAGE 2-A -Annual Scholarship Program -Underway SEE PAGE 2-A Readers Talk About President's '1 00 Days' SEE PAGE 1-B Man Shot During Home Invasion SEE PAGE 22-A

PAGE 2

0'1 Features :E > < Father And Son Team Celebrate 10 Years Of Service C More than a decade ago a a: Tampa businessman found u. himself at a crossroads of his life He had to decide if he would remain with a comp any on the verge of a merger or venture into business on his own. After much thought, Sol Davis, Sr., decided to enter the business arena and opened the doors of Sol Davis Printing o n May 1, 1999. His son, Sol Davis, Jr., had already been introduced to' the business, as the child of a single parent, he spent many hours beside his father. "I thought about graduat ing and starting a career of my own. But I realized that my father was building a legacy and I had to take advan tage of it and do my due diligence to be a role model for other young Black men. "I want to say 'thank you' C to my dad because a lot of a: other African American males LL don't even know who their dad is. I also want to thank < c (/) w :;:) .... > a: w > w c w :t: (/) ::i m :;:) ll. z i= w ...J ...J :;:) m I ...J w z i= z w (/) <( c a: 0 ...J LL <( I N w (.!) my grandmother, Mrs. Willie Mae Lane, for s up porting us and teaching both me and my dad the values of hard work, dedication deter mination and honesty," Sol Davis, Jr., said. Sol Davis, Sr., graduat ed from Tampa Bay Technical High hoolj n 1977 with printing as an elective. It was also during his senior year in high school that h e became a father. His owrl father died when Sol Davis, Sr., and Sol Davis, Jr., place special emphasis on.providing a service that people will remember. he was 7 and his mother raised 8 children. He knew by her example that his role as a parent dictated that he find employment. ment. The company's motto is to provide the service to the customer and deliver it on time at a competitive rate. Davis said that philosophy will never change. They also realize that in order to remain on the cut ting edge, they must continue to have up-to-date equipment and be able to provide the services that th e ir c u stomers want. The business h as a 5color press for l arge printing jobs and other presses to han dle smaller jobs. He r e mains in his original 11,000 square foot office a t 5205 Lois Avenue. The compan y has_ a.staff of 13. Davis, Sr., said the future of the company does not focus on the number of offices available throughout the city, but the service the business provides. Being a full service busi ness, Davis said not only can his company provide the usual printed materials, but they also have the capacity to prepare books for self distrib ution. "If a person brings us his book, we can format it and produce it for them to distrib ute Davis said. Other orga nizations operating over the Internet are loc a t e d in ot her s t a t es do not offer that per sonal i zed attent ion. Davis, Sr., said, I am very thankful to our customers, who without their support, we wouldn't h ave reached this landmark. We want to l e t them know that 'we are grateful for their sup port." After opening the business ten years ago, Davis placed a photograph of a man reach ing down to help another up in his office. He has passed that philosophy on to his son . Sol Davis, Jr., said something he read sums up his idea of giving back, "It does no good to ride the elevator of success, if you don't send it back down for someone else." Davis' first job was with Dupree Printing Company. He left there and worked at Semco Company and was later hired b y Consolidated Press. From Con so lidated h e partnered with a co-worker to ope n Corporate Printing After years, there he stepped out alone. Bucitied Dream Seeker Program For 2009 UnderwaY "I was thoroughly tniihed in the printing aspect ol'the busi ness But, I had to lea rn the financial aspect of operating a business. I learned through trial and error," Davis, S r saicf : From the first day of busi ness Sol Davis Printing has been a full service establish-Created in honor of his moth er, Emma Lee, Alfred "Bucified Bert" Owens started the Dream Seeker Scholarship Program three years ago. Las t year, five lu cky stur,;.eceived scholarships thtQtigfi. Dream Seeker on th e Day event. Owens said his Day scholarship ":mij>wnt, Philida Darns, 2009 Mistress of eeremony. "She is very ready for the challenge The speaker will be Gary Baldassari. He worked on 18 Super and was a udio director of the pre-game, nationa l anthem, and the post game for 10 straight years before moving on. For the Super Bowl in Tampa, he recorded and mixed live the Whitney Houston National Anthem, which is now double pl atinum." .Others expected to appear at this year's event are B. K. Jackson, Marcus Borders, Militant Military, and others Owens said he understands that the economy is bad, but his mother taught him how to say no to any bad habits. AI "Bucified Bert" Owens and musician, B. K.Jackson. "Her legacy is very important to me, no matter if I have to get some new sponsors I'll do whatever it takes Failure is not an option. I have to honor my qtothet i ti : 2009. After all, I about being nomin a i&i the South Tanijra l CHamber of Commerce's 2tilJ9 V.o'Il.fnteer of the y e a r .., -1 A. "If my mom were still alive today, she's be grateful of this honor. She'dthin k it ; wonderful wha t I'm trying to do for our children Owens said kids go through so much today, and there are so many distractions in .. their lives. That's why it's so important to acknow l edge their ach i evements." This y e ar's event will be held at Channel 8 Studios on Parker Street. Scholarship recipients, the dance group, and a few others will b e picked up in limousines, cour tesy of Skyline Limousines. Reporter Leon B. Crews can be reached at (813) 2 48-0724, or e-mailed at lcrews@jlsentinel.com.

PAGE 3

Features East Tampa Proiect Unites Men With Vision ..... When Jean Loiseau met Terrance Bradford, it seemed like fate Both men had a vision for East Tampa and the youth of Tampa. Both men wanted to make a differ e nce in the lives of a lot of people and both are humble. When Mr. Loiseau and his wife, Margareth, purchased land on the corner of 22nd Street and Giddens Avenue some years ago, they didn't have immediate plans for the site. "We bought the land before the area where the Ross Store was developed. We saw things happening in the area that caused us to reject offers to sell the land to others." Mr. Loiseau said he and his wife, who founded Zagora International, had checked several properties in Tampa before settling on the site that will become the Zagora Retail Center. The center will contain a Quiznos franchise, a Caribbean Bistro, Ice Cream TERRANCE BRADFORD Shoppe, and a clothing store. Mr. Loiseau said he will also have an office at the cen ter. ""While in Tampa, my wife and I were looking at differ ent businesses and did some market surveys," said Mr. Loiseau. "We found that spot because we got the property at a good price and it fit into what we were trying to do We wanted that area because Organization Brings lite To Tampa Bav's Black Historv The Tampa Bay Chapter of the Association for the Study of African-American Life and History, Inc. (ASALH) brings local Black History alive with two major activities this year. "We are one of the nation's newest chapters," said President Fred Hearns, "but we're also one of the most active." The group is a member of the international ASALH organization founded in 1915 by the recognized "Father of Black History," Carter G. Woodson. The local chapter has two major upcoming activities: May 2oth, 5-8 p. m. Florida Emancipation Day Celebration, in partnership with the Tampa Bay History Center (TBHC) at the TBHC's new buildin; g Old Water St. in and the 2009 Bus Tour July 1st to Selma and Tuskegee, Alabama. The deadline for registering for the Alabama Civil Rights Tour is May 30th (see ad in this issue) The May 2oth Florida Emancipation Day Celebration includes a reading of the document signed by President Abraham Lincoln that recognizes that date in 1895 when Florida s slaves were set free Dr. Sydel LeGrande will be the guest speaker for the free event. The Mistress of Ceremonies, Dr. Cheryl Rodriguez, Director of the University of South Florida's Institute on Black Life and am DR. SYDEL LEGRANDE ASALH member, will be joined by several other distin guished participants. Among proclamation readers will be: Tampa City Council Chairman, Thomas Scott, Hillsborough County Commissioner Chair, Ken J:Iagan, Hillsborough County School Superintendent, MaryEllen Elia, Woods and Wanton Chapter of the Buffalo Soldiers' Frank Bell and. Tampa Bay Hi story Center Board of Trustees Chairman, Atty. George Howell. The program will be capped with a panel discussion and questi on and answer sessi o n : led by moderator, Atty. Warren Hope Dawson, titled, "55 Years After The Brown vs. Board of Education Decision -Where Are We Now?" Members of the George Edgecomb Bar Association and the Fred Minnis Bar Association will join School Board Member Doretha Edgecomb on this panel. Admission to the History Center's galleries will be offered at half price to all May 20th program visitors. This is an artist's rendering of the Zagora Retail Center. it is a mixed co mmunity and there were other projects going on in -the area: We also thought the vitality in the area was great. When we saw the Walgreen's Store nearby, we knew it was a great plan." Mr. Loiseau said the plan is to open the retail center and Quiznos in October and the others stores in December of this year "We're happy to have an African American contractor on the project, and he's a great man. I'm very pleased with him and his work. Everyone we've worked with have been great people." Bradford, CEO of ProFit Developers, grew up in West Tampa, and said it was through faith and believing in God, he was a b le to get this project. ; 'When I met Mr. Loiseau, I found him to be a very organized and detailed man. I attribute that to his military background. I had to make sure I earned his trust." "I think we're the right peo ple for the job. Integrity says a lot about how successful you are I visit the site daily to see what's going on." "I also have a project underway on Taliaferro just off Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard. J'm, building a professional office center that will also house my office. I also have other projects underway, including some new home construction and consulting. I also serve on the mayor's Energy Task Force. Right now, my life is just a dream." I\) Both men said they hav e a o 0 vision for young peop l e in the (0 area. Mr. Loiseau said w h at h e h as in mind is to get young people involved in various projects in the area, as well as offering them more opportu nities. I plan to visit area schools to get our youth invo l ve d locally and internationa ll y Through different ventures, I've been doing this for 28 years. As a youth, Bradford said he envisioned having a future where he could make a difference. "My first passion was to become an architect. I love designing things and conceiv ing something from start to finish." Bradford said the Zagora project is right on schedule "'T'' and his goal, along with that 5 of Mr. Loiseau, is to do more in the community and 0 continue to work with youth l> and community groups "Mr. Loiseau and I have Z plans to work together in the ::::! z future on projects that won t m necessarily have anything to ':"" do with construction or m c: development." r-Both men said they are also (:;; '' excited about how many jobs ::::! will be generated from this Z project ., c: m r-(i) ::t m 0 m < m c: m en 0 l> z c "'T'' ::c 0 (813) 495-3702 1-866-352-4200 C) m w I l>

PAGE 4

0') Editorials & Columns FLORIDA SENTINEL BULLETIN (USPS 202 140) 2207 2 1 s t Avenue T a mpa F lor ida 3360 5 (813) 248 -1921 Publi s hed E very T uesday and Friday By FLORIDA SENTINEL BULLETIN PUBLISHING Co., M em ber of Na t ional Newspaper P ublishers Associa t ion ( N N PA) an d Amalgamated P ublishers, I nc., New Y ork. 1990 -94 CP T ime lnterna t iona l POSTMASTER: Sen d Address Change T o : Florida Sentinel Bulle t in P.O. Bo x 3363 Tampa, FL 33601 P e riodical Pos t age Paid A t Tampa, FL W.W. Andrews 1874-1931 ( 1919) C Bly1he Andrews 1901-1977 (1945) Founders C. BLYTHE ANDREWS JR., CHAIRMAN S KAY ANDREWS, PUBLISHER C BLYTHE ANDREWS Ill, PRESIDENT/CONTROLLER GWEN HAYES, EDITOR IRIS HOLTON, CITY EDITOR BETTY DAWKINS, ADVERTISING DIRECTOR KEITH GEORGE, CIRCULATION AND PRESS DIRECTOR Subscriptions-$44.00-6 Months Both Editions : $87.00-Per Year Both Editions Opinions expressed on editorial pages of this new s paper by Columnists or Guest Writers do not necessarily reflect the editorial stance o f The Florida Sentinel Bulletin or the Publi s her The Greatest One Hundred oavs! D o not condemn us for having nothing more to talk about. For, if you did so, the condemnation would be untrue. Thousands of stories catch our C And countless issues arrest our ff: minds. But what kind of journal would we c be, if we did not scramble at least to be in Z the middle of a line of well-wishers that
PAGE 5

Columns President Barack Obama: The Bold And The Gifted F uture historians may call him reckless. He has a hankering to see the Washington Wizards play the Chicago Bulls. So, he over rules his Secret Service advi sors and President. Barack Obama the most powerlul man in the history of the world lopes into the midst of thousands of unsuspecting fans, plops down on an unadorned bench and watches the game, smacking chew ing gum like anybody else. John F. Kennedy would have done that. Both Teddy Roosevelt and even Franklin Delano Roosevelt; on his good days, would have done that, too. It's called the reassurance and brashness of youth, for a nation who has all-but-stopped believing in its purity, vigor and innocence. To see a president become once more a man of the people is thrilling. But it is also unnerving. Neither can it be doubted, nor ignored. President Barack Obama, his wife, Michelle, their daughters, their pooch and the great diversity and drive of the Obama1 administration has brought the water of hope to a thirsty society. And by doing so, this long, lanky Black man with a John Shaft stroll and a Michael Jordan jumpshot, has begun dreaming of Camelot, once again. Have you noticed? People are dar ing to smile, once more! ., Interestingly enough, a CNN correspondent quizzed a political observer who gets paid for being skeptical -about the possible mixed messages of President Obama's undeniable popularity. I forget what the observer answered. But what I did not .was the fact that be> en m z m aJ c: r rm ::! z "tJ c: aJ r-Cii ::1: m c What's The lrause Of All This Violenceil -.. m < m :0 -< -f c: m en c C orrimunity groups and activists in Hillsborough and Pinellas Counties have engineered marches and other gatherings to speak out against the rising violence involving our young people. Speeches are made, promises are given, but the vio lence continues. I've often asked young peo ple why they are so angry all the time? They can't give me an answer, because they don't know why What they do know is the only way to settle a dispute is with violence, and if it means an 8-year-old innocent child has to die, then it just has to be that way. material rewards they gain. Nothing is worth the lives of our young people. To stop this violence, it will take the fathers, mothers, aunt_ s, )> z c You'd think after a child was murdered as she slept inside her home the violence would stop. The recent shooting of a teenager at a community park is proof that nothing seems to phase these gun toting young adults. ., uncles, siblings, and other rei-:0 atives of the perpetrators to 6 take control of their family members and turn them around. If that doesn't happen, the war will continue and the vic I've often wondered what tims will be innocent children happened that made African or other young men and Americans the biggest killer women who are attracted to of -, .tl .. : How can we continue to d t I d I've heard some say there es roy our own peop e an k fi continued from page 4-A h t ? are no qmc xes or answers 10r w a l!alll. t th" bl nh ...... .. o -rspro em' .,_ ere:m:tte At the ro,pt of all th1s v1o-. 1 t" "f th' 'i 1 Egyptian pharaoh. Ironically, images depicting her as a queen were untouched. Some sources believe Thutmose's actions were driven by Hatshepsut's rule as the original "wicked stepmother." Eve-n though Hatshepsut ruled for 21 years, she fought off several attempts to dethrone her, including attempts by Thutmose III. During Hatshepsut's rule, Egypt became one of the most prosperous of all king-' 1 doms. Moreover, Hatshepsut was well known for promoting trade, industry and agriculture, as well as, for her role as a great builder, educator and philosopher. With the help of Semult, a great Egyptian architect, Hatshepsut built thousands of temples, monuments, obelisks and statues along the Nile River from Sinai to Nubia. One of the temples she built is displayed in the Egyptian Room of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, today. Indeed, quotes from Hatshepsut are engraved on the walls of temples, which still stand. Described as "more beautiful than anything or anyone," wanted to be remembered as a great ruler. Today, her mummy is on dis play, at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo Egypt So, now, you know a little bit more about who you are. Harambee! 1 -J( -so u Ions 1 e peop e are ence 1s a value system that "ll" many young adults feel has W1 mg. I ft th "th. _. h b t I hope the people walkmg e em WI no c mce u t tu t 1 around w1th guns ready to o rn o VIO ence. F t ft "d hurt someone read th1s and 1rs a er you ve pal your . debt to society and return, . then hves home, you're denied a chance somethmg, and so do Jo earn a living because you the hves o_f the they have a criminal httle regard for. you're cast out into the streets There s too much blood on to fend for yourself, because our streets riow, and some families don t have the will be more if we don't take resources to take care of you. action ourselves This is not a Making matters even worse law enforcement problem. G') are the older adults who con:. THIS IS A COMMUNITY m the acts because of the PROBLEM!

PAGE 6

O'l 0 0 C\1 c a: LL. c z <( c CJ) w :::> 1-> a: w > w c w ::r: CJ) :J ID :::> Q. z ti ...J ...J :::> ID I ...J w z i= z w CJ) <( c a: 0 ...J LL. Practicing Law In: Crim inal Defe n se Family Law P e rson a l Injury Atrornev & Counsel or A.t Law ( \-p re ss Point Of fice Park 10014 N. Dale Mabry, Suite 101 Tampa, Aoricb 33Cil8 (813 )2 69-9706 Fax:(813)960-06 41 n1e tunng o f 1:\,\ye r IS an