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Acoustic and perceptual comparisons of imitative prosody in kingergartners with and without speech disorders

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Material Information

Title:
Acoustic and perceptual comparisons of imitative prosody in kingergartners with and without speech disorders
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Rodriguez, Robin Harwell
Publisher:
University of South Florida
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Versification   ( lcsh )
prosody
Dissertations, Academic -- Speech-Language Pathology -- Masters -- USF   ( lcsh )
Genre:
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Summary:
ABSTRACT: This study investigated the affiliation of prosody with childhood articulation disorders. The Tennessee Test of Rhythm and Intonation Patterns, T-TRIP (Koike & Asp, 1981), was used to determine if kindergartners with linguistic (i.e. phonological) speech disorders, oral-motor speech disorders, or normal speech performed differently on imitative prosody tasks. Performance was assessed perceptually with T-TRIP overall and subtest scores, and acoustically with measurements of individual prosodic variables (amplitude, duration, and fundamental frequency) on selected items from the rhythm and intonation subtests. Perceptual and acoustic data were examined for characteristic patterns of performance by individual subjects and by groups. A Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA of the perceptual scores revealed that the three groups performed differently on the T-TRIP rhythm, and intonation subtests, and on the total score. Specifically, the oral-motor group had the lowest range of scores and was clearly separated from the other two groups. No group cut-off scores were established since the linguistic group's scores slightly overlapped the control groups' range of scores. Acoustic results generally supported the findings of earlier studies of stress and intonation. Correct responses contained a wide selection of acoustic patterns, while incorrect responses consisted of error patterns resembling those of younger children. Subjects with speech disorders demonstrated several characteristic error patterns: linguistic subjects tended to add syllables and to lexicalize items, while oral-motor subjects tended to delete syllables and to convert iambic stress into trochaic. Overall, whether T-TRIP responses were examined by perceptual or acoustic methods, the oral-motor group's imitative prosody ability was significantly different than the other groups' performance. The clinical implications of this finding are that the T-TRIP has the potential to be used as a screening tool to identify subjects whose difficulties with imitative prosody are consistent with oral-motor speech disorders, specifically DVD.
Thesis:
Thesis (M.S.)--University of South Florida, 2001.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
System Details:
System requirements: World Wide Web browser and PDF reader.
System Details:
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Robin Harwell Rodriguez.
General Note:
Title from PDF of title page.
General Note:
Document formatted into pages; contains 174 pages.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001432569
notis - AJL6116
usfldc doi - E14-SFE0000002
usfldc handle - e14.2
System ID:
SFS0024693:00001


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Acoustic and perceptual comparisons of imitative prosody in kingergartners with and without speech disorders
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ABSTRACT: This study investigated the affiliation of prosody with childhood articulation disorders. The Tennessee Test of Rhythm and Intonation Patterns, T-TRIP (Koike & Asp, 1981), was used to determine if kindergartners with linguistic (i.e. phonological) speech disorders, oral-motor speech disorders, or normal speech performed differently on imitative prosody tasks. Performance was assessed perceptually with T-TRIP overall and subtest scores, and acoustically with measurements of individual prosodic variables (amplitude, duration, and fundamental frequency) on selected items from the rhythm and intonation subtests. Perceptual and acoustic data were examined for characteristic patterns of performance by individual subjects and by groups. A Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA of the perceptual scores revealed that the three groups performed differently on the T-TRIP rhythm, and intonation subtests, and on the total score. Specifically, the oral-motor group had the lowest range of scores and was clearly separated from the other two groups. No group cut-off scores were established since the linguistic group's scores slightly overlapped the control groups' range of scores. Acoustic results generally supported the findings of earlier studies of stress and intonation. Correct responses contained a wide selection of acoustic patterns, while incorrect responses consisted of error patterns resembling those of younger children. Subjects with speech disorders demonstrated several characteristic error patterns: linguistic subjects tended to add syllables and to lexicalize items, while oral-motor subjects tended to delete syllables and to convert iambic stress into trochaic. Overall, whether T-TRIP responses were examined by perceptual or acoustic methods, the oral-motor group's imitative prosody ability was significantly different than the other groups' performance. The clinical implications of this finding are that the T-TRIP has the potential to be used as a screening tool to identify subjects whose difficulties with imitative prosody are consistent with oral-motor speech disorders, specifically DVD.
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Title page for ETD etd-07172001-123635 Type of Document Master's Thesis Author Rodriquez, Robin Harwell URN etd-07172001-123635 Title Acoustic and Perceptual Comparisons of Imitative Prosody in Kingergartners With and Without Speech Disorders Degree Master of Science Department Communication Sciences and Disorders Advisory Committee Advisor Name Title Caroyln Ford Committee Co-Chair Ruth Bahr Committee Co-Chair Winifred Strange Committee Member Keywords l prosody Date of Defense 1998-05-01 Availability unrestricted Abstract This study investigated the affiliation of prosody with childhood articulation disorders. The Tennessee Test of Rhythm and Intonation Patterns, T-TRIP (Koike & Asp, 1981), was used to determine if kindergartners with linguistic (i.e. phonological) speech disorders, oral-motor speech disorders, or normal speech performed differently on imitative prosody tasks. Performance was assessed perceptually with T-TRIP overall and subtest scores, and acoustically with measurements of individual prosodic variables (amplitude, duration, and fundamental frequency) on selected items from the rhythm and intonation subtests. Perceptual and acoustic data were examined for characteristic patterns of

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performance by individual subjects and by groups. A Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA of the perceptual scores revealed that the three groups performed differently on the T-TRIP rhythm, and intonation subtests, and on the total score. Specifically, the oral-motor group had the lowest range of scores and was clearly separated from the other two groups. No group cut-off scores were established since the linguistic group's scores slightly overlapped the control groups' range of scores. Acoustic results generally supported the findings of earlier studies of stress and intonation. Correct responses contained a wide selection of acoustic patterns, while incorrect responses consisted of error patterns resembling those of younger children. Subjects with speech disorders demonstrated several characteristic error patterns: linguistic subjects tended to add syllables and to lexicalize items, while oral-motor subjects tended to delete syllables and to convert iambic stress into trochaic. Overall, whether T-TRIP responses were examined by perceptual or acoustic methods, the oral-motor group's imitative prosody ability was significantly different than the other groups' performance. The clinical implications of this finding are that the T-TRIP has the potential to be used as a screening tool to identify subjects whose difficulties with imitative prosody are consistent with oralmotor speech disorders, specifically DVD. Files Filename Size Approximate Download Time (Hours:Minutes:Seconds) 28.8 Modem 56K Modem ISDN (64 Kb) ISDN (128 Kb) Higherspeed Access ch1.pdf 98.97 Kb 00:00:27 00:00:14 00:00:12 00:00:06 < 00:00:01 ch2.pdf 42.44 Kb 00:00:11 00:00:06 00:00:05 00:00:02 < 00:00:01 ch3.pdf 61.05 Kb 00:00:16 00:00:08 00:00:07 00:00:03 < 00:00:01 ch4.pdf 48.46 Kb 00:00:13 00:00:06 00:00:06 00:00:03 < 00:00:01

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charts.pdf 19.47 Kb 00:00:05 00:00:02 00:00:02 00:00:01 < 00:00:01 etd.pdf 305.17 Kb 00:01:24 00:00:43 00:00:38 00:00:19 00:00:01 refs.pdf 15.99 Kb 00:00:04 00:00:02 00:00:01 < 00:00:01 < 00:00:01