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Creating healing spaces, the process of designing holistically a battered women shelter

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Title:
Creating healing spaces, the process of designing holistically a battered women shelter
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Menéndez, Lilian
Publisher:
University of South Florida
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Women's shelters -- Designs and plans   ( lcsh )
Women's shelters -- Puerto Rico   ( lcsh )
domestic violence
architecture
art
space
women
Dissertations, Academic -- Architecture -- Masters -- USF   ( lcsh )
Genre:
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Summary:
ABSTRACT: My interest in the environment has led me to study the effects of space on people, both natural and man-made. This project explores how architects and designers can design spaces conducive to the healing process. The emphasis of this thesis is on my design methodology, with the hope that this project will help other designers in their struggle to create spaces that heal the body, soul and spirit. To develop this project, I chose a shelter for battered women as the building type. This shelter is theoretically located in Bayamón, Puerto Rico. Its main goal is to create an environment in which battered women can recuperate physically, emotionally and spiritually. In order to accomplish this, I first studied my personal responses to a variety of built, as well as, natural spaces. I used two types of case studies, one looking at spaces and the other looking at the building type. Besides utilizing traditional building analysis, I also used literature to study space, since it allows me to study human's reaction to space.These helped to shed light on why or why not certain spaces fulfill the building's purpose. Later, through a series of art workshops with women at a local shelter, I was able to better understand the user. These workshops culminated in a collaborative art installation in which their reality and mine were combined. In addition, I researched other fields that are also trying to understand why we respond to space the way we do. Some of these fields are environmental psychology, sociology, behavioral studies, and art. Their findings led me to design flexible spaces that allow each woman to shape their own space, and spaces that appeal to all six senses. Following this exploration, I developed a program to meet the user's requirements. This program described a prototypical facility that embodies ideal conditions. I then explored this program and its spatial requirements through physical models. A series of models interacting with the site gave birth to three design concepts. From these various schemes, a final design was selected and brought to the design development phase.
Thesis:
Thesis (M. Arch)--University of South Florida, 2001.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
System Details:
System requirements: World Wide Web browser and PDF reader.
System Details:
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Lilian Menéndez.
General Note:
Original thesis submitted in HTML and can be accessed at http://www.lib.usf.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-07252001-113744/unrestricted/default.htm
General Note:
Title from PDF of title page.
General Note:
Document formatted into pages; contains 103 pages.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
notis - AJL6118
usfldc doi - E14-SFE0000018
usfldc handle - e14.18
System ID:
SFS0024709:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


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ABSTRACT: My interest in the environment has led me to study the effects of space on people, both natural and man-made. This project explores how architects and designers can design spaces conducive to the healing process. The emphasis of this thesis is on my design methodology, with the hope that this project will help other designers in their struggle to create spaces that heal the body, soul and spirit. To develop this project, I chose a shelter for battered women as the building type. This shelter is theoretically located in Bayamn, Puerto Rico. Its main goal is to create an environment in which battered women can recuperate physically, emotionally and spiritually. In order to accomplish this, I first studied my personal responses to a variety of built, as well as, natural spaces. I used two types of case studies, one looking at spaces and the other looking at the building type. Besides utilizing traditional building analysis, I also used literature to study space, since it allows me to study human's reaction to space.These helped to shed light on why or why not certain spaces fulfill the building's purpose. Later, through a series of art workshops with women at a local shelter, I was able to better understand the user. These workshops culminated in a collaborative art installation in which their reality and mine were combined. In addition, I researched other fields that are also trying to understand why we respond to space the way we do. Some of these fields are environmental psychology, sociology, behavioral studies, and art. Their findings led me to design flexible spaces that allow each woman to shape their own space, and spaces that appeal to all six senses. Following this exploration, I developed a program to meet the user's requirements. This program described a prototypical facility that embodies ideal conditions. I then explored this program and its spatial requirements through physical models. A series of models interacting with the site gave birth to three design concepts. From these various schemes, a final design was selected and brought to the design development phase.
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PAGE 1

Home Thesis l Certificate of Approval l Title Page l Dedication l Acknowledgments l Abstract l Abstract in Spanish l Introduction l Chapter 1 l Chapter 2 l Chapter 3 l Chapter 4 l Chapter 5 l Chapter 6 l Chapter 7 l Conclusion l References l Bibliography l Appendices Resume DMI Website Better Viewed with Internet Explorer 5 or Netscape 6 or any of their latest version Architecture in the Making ...in the thinking Can I, as architect and artist, create art that touches our souls? By merging art and architecture in a collaborative effort to create meaningful spaces, I hope to create something more than a shelter. Fundamentally I strive to create art that touch the soul every day that is encounter. Lilian Menndez

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Architecture in the Making ...in the thinking Can I, as architect and artist, create art that touches our souls? By merging art and architecture in a collaborative effort to create meaningful spaces, I hope to create something more than a shelter. Fundamentally I strive to create art that touch the soul every day that is encounter.

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Architecture in the Making ...in the experimenting I have taken on an experiment this year. Trying to understand space in order to make it meaningful to us. The following document explains my exploration and my findings.

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Office of Graduate Studies University of South Florida Tampa, Florida CERTIFICATE OF APPROVAL __________________ Masters Thesis __________________ This is to certify that the Masters Thesis of LILIAN MENNDEZ with a major in Architecture has been approved for the thesis requirement on April 4, 2000 for the Master of Architecture degree. Examining Committee: _________________________________________________ Co-Major Profesor: Steve Cooke, M. Arch.

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_________________________________________________ Co-Major Profesor: P. Knight Martorell, M. Arch. _________________________________________________ Member: Vivian Salaga, M. Arch.

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CREATING HEALING SPACES, THE PROCESS OF DESIGNING HOLISTICALLY A BATTERED WOMEN SHELTER by LILIAN MENNDEZ A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture School of Architecture and Community Design College of Graduate Studies University of South Florida May 2001 Co-Major Professor: Steve Cooke, Co-Major Professor: P. Night Martorell,

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Dedication This work is dedicated first to God, who provided the strength to carry on during this last four years. Secondly, to my parents, who with their love and support have encouraged me throughout my graduate studies.

PAGE 8

Acknowledgments No work is ever the making of one single person. For that reason, I will like to thank all of those who helped me put it all together. First, I would like to acknowledge the various women at the Sprint of Tampa Bay, Inc. who taught me the importance of communication among women. I not only learned how to create healing spaces for women, but I learned so much about myself. In addition, I would like to acknowledge my committee members for their guidance throughout this year. Finally, but not least, I would like to acknowledge my dear husband for his insight and encouragement.

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CREATING HEALING SPACES, THE PROCESS OF DESIGNING HOLISTICALLY A BATTERED WOMEN SHELTER by LILIAN MENNDEZ An Abstract of a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture School of Architecture and Community Design College of Graduate Studies University of South Florida May 2001 Co-Major Professor: Steve Cooke, Co-Major Professor: P. Knight Martorell,

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My interest in the environment has led me to study the effects of space on people, both natural and man-made. This project explores how architects and designers can design spaces conducive to the healing process. The emphasis of this thesis is on my design methodology, with the hope that this project will help other designers in their struggle to create spaces that heal the body, soul and spirit. To develop this project, I chose a shelter for battered women as the building type. This shelter is theoretically located in Bayamn, Puerto Rico. Its main goal is to create an environment in which battered women can recuperate physically, emotionally and spiritually. In order to accomplish this, I first studied my personal responses to a variety of built, as well as, natural spaces. I used two types of case studies, one looking at spaces and the other looking at the building type. Besides utilizing traditional building analysis, I also used literature to study space, since it allows me to study humans reaction to space.These helped to shed light on why or why not certain spaces fulfill the buildings purpose. Later, through a series of art workshops with women at a local shelter, I was able to better understand the user. These workshops culminated in a collaborative art installation in which their reality and mine were combined. In addition, I researched other fields that are also trying to understand why we respond to space the way we do. Some of these fields are environmental psychology, sociology, behavioral studies, and art. Their findings led me to design flexible spaces that allow each woman to shape their own space, and spaces that appeal to all six senses. Following this exploration, I developed a program to meet the users requirements. This program described a prototypical facility that embodies ideal conditions. I then explored this program and its spatial requirements

PAGE 11

through physical models. A series of models interacting with the site gave birth to three design concepts. From these various schemes, a final design was selected and brought to the design development phase.

PAGE 12

CREANDO ESPACIOS CURATIVOS, EL PROCESO DE DISEAR TOTALMENTE UN ALBERGUE PARA MUJERES MALTRATADAS por LILIAN MENNDEZ Un abstracto de la tesis sometida como cumplimiento parcial de los requisitos necesarios par el grado de Maestra en Arquitectura Escuela de Arquitectura y Diseo de la Comunidad Colegio de Estudios Graduados Universidad de la Florida Mayo 2001 Profesor Co-Mayor: Steve Cooke, Profesor Co-Mayor: P. Knight Martorell,

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Mi inters en el medio ambiente me llev a estudiar los efectos del espacio, naturales o artificiales, en los seres humanos. Este proyecto explora como arquitectos y diseadores pueden disear espacios que ayudan en el proceso curativo. La tesis enfatiza en mi metodologa, con la esperanza de que el mismo ayude a otros diseadores concernidos en la creacin de espacios que ayudan a curar el cuerpo, alma y espritu. Para desarrollar ste proyecto, escog un albergue para mujeres maltratadas como el edificio en que explorara mis ideas. El albergue estara localizado teoreticamente en Bayamn Puerto Rico. La meta principal del albergue es la creacin de un ambiente propicio para que mujer han sufrido de violencia domestica pueda recuperarse fsica, emocional y espiritualmente. En orden de lograr esta meta, primeramente estudi mis propias respuestas a distintos espacios, naturales o hechos por el hombre. Para esto utilic dos tipos de estudios, uno que estudia espacios y el otro que estudia edificios similares. Adems de utilizar los mtodos tradicionales para analizar un edificio, tambin utilic la literatura, ya que este tipo de anlisis me deja ver la reaccin humana al ambiente construido. El estudio me ilumin en el porqu ciertos espacios cumplen el propsito para el cual fueron diseados. Luego, a travs de una serie de talleres de arte con mujeres en un albergue local, fui capaz de entender al usuario de ste tipo de edificio. Los talleres culminaron con una instalacin de arte, en la cual las realidades de estas mujeres y la ma fueron combinadas. Tambin estudi otros campos que estn tratando de entender porqu respondemos al espacio de la manera en que lo hacemos. Algunos de esos campos son la psicologa ambiental, sociologa, estudios del comportamiento humano y arte. Alguno de esos hallazgos me llevaron a disear espacios flexibles el cual permita a cada mujer transformar su propio espacio, que a la vez afecten todos los

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sentidos. Despus de sta exploracin, desarroll un programa que cumpliera con los requisitos del usuario. Este programa describe una facilidad prototpica basada en condiciones ideales. Luego explor el programa y sus requisitos espaciales a travs de maquetas. Una serie de maquetas que interactuaban con el solar dieron origen a tres conceptos de diseo. De estos esquemas, el diseo final fue seleccionado y llevado hasta la fase de diseo desarrollado.

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Introduction In 1992, in the last few days of a trip to Venezuela, I visited the capital of Caracas. The day I went to visit the area known as Bellas Artes, the citys arts district, I was feeling very tired but decided to visit the city with my friends. A few minutes after we left the metro station, we found the Main Theater. It was a big complex with multiple theater halls. We walked outside the complex and discovered an outdoor plaza with wellintegrated sculptures. The space was so fascinating and well integrated with the building and the outdoors sculpture garden that immediately I started feeling better. It was an intriguing and relaxing space. Today I am not completely certain what made me feel better. It might have been a combination of things, which now have faded from my memory. Nevertheless, that event changed my attitude toward architecture. In that moment, I knew that architecture could be more than just ugly or beautiful buildings. It could offer the relaxing experience I had so often found in the natural landscape. That powerful experience not only changed my perspective about architecture, it also changed my career. I am not the only one to have perceived such a revelation. Many have observed the powerful experience that the man-made environment can provoke. Certainly, the built environment has been creating powerful experiences as well. Although in our cities, they are not always so pleasant. We are accustomed to look for these pleasures in the green outdoors where, to be sure, they are present in their purest and most immediate form; but the need for a satisfying sensory experience is with us no matter where we are, and nowhere is that experience more intense (though not always more agreeable) than in the modern city. (Jackson 1970)

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Despite the chaos of our postmodern cities, architecture has the power to create meaningful spaces. In past centuries, churches and cathedrals have embodied a sense of majesty, solemnity, serenity, and peacefulness. Royal palaces and courthouses have instilled the sense of power that they meant to symbolize. These carefully designed spaces were created to induce certain feelings and emotions. As in past architecture, we can still create powerful experiences that help the human soul to look beyond its limitations. A powerful architecture experience silences all external noise; it focuses our attention on our very existence, and as with all art, it makes us aware of our fundamental solitude. (Pallasmaa 1996) Similar responses like the one quoted above are frequently experienced in the natural environment. Many love the mountains, beaches, rivers and waterfalls. I asked myself, what is it there that causes such emotion? Can I, as architect and artist, create art that touches our souls in that same manner? We may not be able to create the same feelings we get from nature but we can certainly create positive ones. By merging art and architecture in a collaborative effort to create meaningful spaces, I hope to create something more than a shelter. I would like to design spaces that have such an impact on people that it leads them to a healing state. Here I talk about a holistic healing, one that comprehends the spirit, soul, and body of the person. I think real healing can only occur inside people, either in their bodies, souls (mind, emotions, etc.) and spirit. Thus, architecture can only hope to create spaces conducive to healing. Therefore, a healing space is a space conducive to real healing.

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In order to create healing spaces, we need to experience them and try to comprehend how and why they affect us. We also need to ask others how they feel and interact with spaces. In the course of this project, I will gather information from multiple sources to create a document that can help our profession design healing spaces. In my thesis, I will use a battered womens shelter as a place for exploration. I will explore different building components to determine which design elements can be enhanced to create healing environments. These discoveries may serve to inform others dealing with healing-driven building types, such as hospitals, clinics, jails, and orphanages, among others. I hope to create meaningful spaces that help us gain healing and find hope for the future, so we can look beyond the difficulties we may face. Fundamentally, I strive to create art that touches the soul every day that it is encountered.

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References 1. Alexander, Christopher. A Pattern Language. New York: Oxford University Press. 1977 2. Ferrer, Diana Valle. Validating Coping Strategies and Empowering Latino Battered Women in Puerto Rio. In: Battered Women and Their Families, Intervention Strategies and Treatment Programs. Ed. Albert R. Roberts, PhD. 2nd Edition; Springer Publishing Company. 1988. 3. Hall, Edward T. The Hidden Dimension. New York: Anchor Books Doubleday & Company, Inc. 1966; reprint: New York: Anchor Books Doubleday & Company, Inc. 1969. 4. Henze, Anton. La Tourette, the Le Corbusier Monastery. Translated [from German] by Janet Seligman. London: Lund Humphries. 1966. 5. Jackson, J. B. Landscapes, Selected Writings of J. B. Jackson. Massachusetts: The University of Massachusetts Press. 1970. 6. Kelly, Jeff. The Body Politics of Suzanne Lacy. In: But it is art?. Ed. Nina Felshin. Seattle: Bay Press. 1995. 7. Lazy, Suzzane. Whisper, The Waves, The Wind La Jolla, California, 1984. Available http://users.lanminds.com/~slacy/projects/whisper.html 8. Le Corbusier. Les tendance de larchitecture rationaliste en relation avec la peinture et la sculpture. 1936 In The Chapel at Ronchamp. Photograph by Ezra Stoller; introduction by Eugenia Bell. New York: Princeton Architectural Press. 1999. 9. Pallasmaa, Juhani. The Eyes of the Skin, Architecture of the

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Senses. London. Academy Group Ltd. 1996

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Chapter 1: Case Studies Looking at Space The best way to understand space is by studying it. There are three ways to do so. First, direct experience where one analyzes empirical data and draws conclusions from it. Second, through the observations and experiences of others. I can achieve this experience through words, by either direct conversation or from their writings. Third, one can study buildings similar to the type being designed. By these methods, I have studied space both, in the natural and built environment, to determine the best spatial qualities for a shelter that provides the emotive responses that a healing environment should evoke. Analysis of Natural Space The Outlook. The first thing I did in my quest to understand space was to analyze those spaces that I enjoy. One of these spaces is the top of a mountain. So I ask myself, what is it there that I enjoy so much? What sensory input do I receive that generates joy, peacefulness, and a sense of accomplishment? Figure 1 View from Albert Mountain, North Carolina I selected a recent experience in the mountains to study what qualities created these positive experiences. The space selected was located on Albert Mountain, in North Carolina (figure 1). After a bumpy ride uphill and a walk of 10 minutes to the top, my companion and I arrived at the tower of a rocky hilltop. The following are my findings concerning this space.

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Figure 2 Serenity The sense of scale on mountains offers a perspective seldom achieved in other spaces. It offers the opportunity to see a lot without overloading our senses. This is the greatest gift of mountains. The fusion of elements at the distance creates continuity and harmony Figure 3 Belonging When looking out at a great landscape one notices that everything fits together. No pieces are juxtaposed. This brings the realization that we too, are part of that landscape. This togetherness reminds us that we belong here; it gives us a sense of value. Figure 4 Diversity Colors, shapes and forms fill the space, creating a rich environment. Diversity in the space provides joy to the eye and beauty to the soul. Diversity without confusion is the key to bring tranquility to a space.

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Figure 5 The Immaterial When analyzing a space we must include all of our senses. Besides vision, we use all the other senses to perceive a space. These are hearing, smelling, and touching. I have not included the sense of taste for this particular description. l Sound: I hear the wind, whispering to my ear new verses. In the distance, birds join the chorus with a sweet melody. Then some coyotes join the orchestra for a crescendo that screamed life. l Smell: Fresh air rushes through my nose and with it brings me the essence of the earth. Flowers, grass, trees, leaves, dirt, dead and live animals also provide a variety of smells that find their way through the air and come to me in a slow dance. l Touch: The air caresses my face, transporting me to my dreams, and the rocks under my feet remind me that it is not a dream. I am alive and part of a bigger scheme. Figure 6 Sound The hard and soft properties of the mountain produce an echo that brings back attenuated sounds, which makes the experience richer. Figure 7 Smell Different kinds of flowers, plants, and animals provide a range of aromas, fragrances and odors. Each area has its own smell to mark the ascension.

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Figure 8 Touch One can feel the air moving and the natural forces of gravity make the terrain more tangible. The soil differences and the change in topography make the procession to the top a complete sensory experience. Water & Space. It is interesting to note how popular waterfalls and other water features are. They usually are the central gathering area in squares and parks. The qualities of running water are very appealing to most people. Our physical and psychological dependency on this resource may help explain why we feel so comfortable with this element. Christopher Alexander, a California architect who has written several books on the quality of spaces, makes the case as to how our modern deprivation of water, as a city element, deteriorates our lives. "We came from the water; our bodies are largely water; and water plays a fundamental role in our psychology. We need constant access to water, all around us; and we cannot have it without reverence for water in all its forms. But everywhere in cities water is out of reach." (Alexander 1977, 323) On my last visit to North Carolina, I went to one of their most popular waterfalls (figure 9). It was full of people who walked in and out. The possibility of walking underneath the falls, makes this place one of the most popular in the area. I think that not just water, but how we access it, can make or break a pleasing experience. Therefore, interaction, along with other characteristics, makes this space very special. As designers, we need to learn from our natural environment and provide places that invite people to be themselves, and explore the world around them and their own thoughts, their inner world.

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Figure 9 Side View of Dry Falls, North Carolina. Figure 10 Interaction This waterfall offers a wide range of amenities: full interaction, playground, space to walk around and get wet, or just contemplate. Figure 11 Refreshing Everyone can argue that on a warm day a waterfall can be very refreshing. What about that feeling of refreshment that we get even in cold weather? A waterfall provides cool fresh air. This creates a healthy environment in which our brain receives fresh air, allowing it to think clearly. It allows us to relax from physical and mental stress.

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Figure 12 Transparency How do you make a solid transparent? New perspectives and images are formed through the transparent liquid veil. The clear properties of the water plus the rushing nature of the falls creates a new vision. This may be one of the properties that makes people stare at waterfalls. Through them we discover new things, new reflections and in the process we may discover a new self. Figure 13 Sound The hard surface behind the falls increases the noise level produced by the falls. The constant rush of water creates a soothing effect, even right behind the falls, where the noise level is higher. Figure 14 Plan View of Bouncing Sound The noises bouncing back and forth from the rock creates white noise. The final effect is a soothing environment.

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Analysis of Built Space La Tourette. Le Corbusier designed a monastery for the Dominican Order of Lyon, France. Here, I have specifically looked at the small altar area known as the Lower Church (figure 15). Next is my analysis of this place according to Corbusiers writings, as well as other peoples comments on this space. Figure 15 View of Altar at the Lower Church in LaTourette Figure 16 Light and Shadow Light is redirected and diffused through a series of cylinders in the roof. These cylinders redirect the light and create soft spots of light, which highlight different areas of the space. By creating these light pools, high contrast is achieved among the different surfaces. Drama is created through light and shadow.

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Figure 17 Focus The spots of light focus our attention toward God, while the altars bring us toward Christ on earth and the consequence of His coming. The horizontal and vertical movement of ones eye reorients our attention and makes us reflect on the death of Jesus Christ. In this space, our experience is directed to communion with God. The shape, form, light and all the other elements help create an adequate space for individual Mass. Therefore, the space helps create the intended experience. Figure 18 Space as Metaphor "The Christian sees the altar as the high place where the earth arches up towards heaven. Christ in the sacrament descends on the altar. We have seen no altar in contemporary architecture in which this inner image is so simply, exactly and grandly embodied as it is in the altars of La Tourette. They are the high places of the drama of Golgotha." (Henze, Anton 1996) Figure 19 Level Change The change in level creates individual spaces in a communal setting. The altars imply intimacy between the individual and God. Locating each altar at different levels creates intimacy.

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Ronchamp. Le Corbusier also designed this pilgrim chapel located on the outskirts of Lyon, France. This church is a good example of the use of light (figure 20). This helps to create the right atmosphere. It also helps to emphasize the journey of the pilgrim. A light that seems to come from above directs each step. Figure 20 Interior View of Ronchamp Chapel Figure 21 Playfulness This chapel plays with light and shadows in a magical way. Le Corbusier combines different light sources to create an interesting space. The light in the space also emphasizes the different elements such as the rows of pews, the triangular walls next to the pews, the curved roof, and the curvilinear nature of the wall across from the pews. Figure 22 Ethereal Light Wall thickness and window shape diffuse the light by reflecting it a few times inside the window opening. This creates ethereal light, which appears to be everywhere.

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Figure 23 Poetic Journey "Inside: we enter, we walk around, we look at things while walking around and the forms take on meaning; they expand, they combine with one another." (Le Corbusier 1936, 7) Figure 24 Outside ...we approach, we see, our interest is roused, we stop, we appreciate, we turn around, we discover. We receive a series of sensory shocks, one after the other, varying in emotion; the jeu comes to play. We walk, we turn, we never stop moving or turning towards things. Note the tools we use to perceive architecture the architectural sensations we experience stems from hundreds of different perceptions. It is the promenade, the movements we make that act as the motor for architectural events." (Le Corbusier 1975, 8)

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Looking at the Building Type The third way of studying space is through analysis of the specific building type. In fact, one of the first things I did early in the project was to visit different shelters for battered women. I visited two shelters in Puerto Rico, and one in Tampa, Florida. The fourth shelter mentioned in this analysis is a fictional one, created by Hispanic writer Marcela Serrano. Casa Protegida Julia de Burgos This shelter, located in San Juan, Puerto Rico, is the first shelter of this type on the island. It was established in 1974 as a non-profit institution by concerned women worried about the growing number of abused women on the island. The shelter is located in Santurce, a densely populated urban community in San Juan. I visited the shelter and conducted an interview with the director in May 23, 2000 (Appendix A) Figure 25 Program and Active Community Areas Here we find the utilitarian and service areas located on the ground floor, with a progression from the public to private in a vertical fashion. There are gathering spaces at each level but only the internal areas are utilized more often.

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Figure 26 Circulation and Security Circulation In this shelter, most circulation happens internally for two reasons: m Building form: mid-rise m Site Context: high urban density There is one staircase and one elevator connecting all five floors. Security Points There are two main entry points to the site. The first is located in the front at the public street. The second is toward the back; a gate allows entry to the parking lot, which is accessible from an alley. A back door allows entry from the parking lot. Figure 27 Perceived Volumetric Study This diagram shows how closed or open I perceived the space to be during my visit. Darker areas represent confined spaces and lighter hatch represents a more open space. Hogar Nueva Mujer This shelter is located in the mountainous town of Cayey, Puerto Rico. A Christian womens group from Caguas established the shelter out of a deep concern for the problem of domestic violence. It was established in 1990 and started offering services to women and their children in 1992. There are a few differences with the shelter mentioned above. On May 26, 2000, I conducted an interview with Rosael Jaimn, the director of the shelter (Appendix B) It is interesting to note that the size of the shelter and the building type, a typical house with extra rooms, created a familiar atmosphere. The size also helped increase the contact between staff and residence. Although this is very positive, it limits the services the

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shelter can offer. In this case, scarce financial resources are the major obstacles to the growth of the facility. The Catholic Church sponsors this facility, whereas Casa Julia the Burgos has no religious affiliation. According to the director, this relationship does not hinder their services but helps in providing spiritual support. Figure 28 Program And Community Areas In this two-story shelter, we found that the community and service areas are on the ground floor with direct access to the main entrance. The private (living) areas and the childrens area are located toward the back. Figure 29 Circulation In this case study, the limited means has forced circulation to the outside. The tropical climate of the area allows the external circulation. I think this has been a good solution since it encourages interaction with the site.

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Figure 30 Security Points There is one major security point, right at the main entrance. Each exterior door also works as a secondary security area. Figure 31 Perceived Volumetric Study This diagram shows how closed or open I perceived the space during my visit. Figure 32 Active Community Areas and Views I have identified community areas as: adult community areas and childrens play areas. Note that the best view is located opposite the adultgathering area and toward the child-play area. Adult Play & Gathering Space Childrens Play Area The Spring of Tampa Bay This shelter is located in Tampa, Florida, and was founded in 1980. It was included in the study because it offered the opportunity to study the users in depth and for a longer period. Chapter 4 gives details of this particular study. During the course of the users study, I gathered information about their perception of the space and the real problems they face every day. It is interesting to note that smell became as important as wall color in their evaluation of the space. Although one female resident described the building and the color as being less like a hospital, most women found it very depressing. Some even wrote poems about this issue.

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Figure 33 Program And Active Community Areas In this example, areas related to the women receiving services are on one side, while administrative, office and childcare facilities are located across the street. Figure 34 Circulation Circulation within the shelter and the administrative area occurs mainly in the interior. Figure 35 Security Points

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Figure 36 Perceived Volumetric Study Figure 37 Active Community Areas and Views In this shelter, there are no major vistas or interesting views. The only contemplative view is a narrow one towards a palm tree at the end of a long space limited by two walls of 20 ft or higher. One of the walls has a faded mural. Adult Play & Gathering Space Children Play Area El Albergue de las Mujeres Tristes Marcela Serrano created this imaginary shelter in her book El albergue de las mujeres tristes (The Sad Womens Shelter). This magnificent book tells the story of a woman who goes to a shelter for sad women. This shelter was not intended for battered women, but rather for women that are sad because of unresolved and troubled relationships with men. The main purpose of the book is to explore how men and women relate. I have chosen this book as a case study because it illustrates how the characters felt in the natural and built spaces. Through the eyes of the main characters, and the imagination of the author, I could see and understand how space could influence the feelings of the women living in that place. Figure 38 The Setting This fictional shelter is located in a coastal small town in south Chile. The shelter is situated on a hilltop. To one edge, we find the small town and toward the other side of the hill, we find the ocean. This location had a great impact on the characters. Some of these are: l Sense of Arrival l Ascension to the Healing Place l Accessible to Multiple Environments l Vista: Sense of Control l Height: Sense of Power

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Figure 39 Program This shelter has a big house where most communal activities take place. This area also holds the administrative and services activities. The private areas are located in the back in four cabins that hold 20 women. Figure 40 Private Areas One of the most important arrangements of this shelter is the organization of the private areas. Its most important characteristics are the following: l 4 women per cabin: these women also have similar interests. l 2 women per bathroom: this allows a certain level of intimacy that encourages friendship. l Simple and austere atmosphere: discourages women from spending too much time alone in their rooms. It was an efficient way to make them spend their free time in the living room of the big house.

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Figure 41 Daily Activities The daily activities are a combination of group activities and household chores, mostly accomplished at the big house. For spiritual fulfillment, there was a required daily group walk through the woods. Figure 42 Perceived Volumetric Study

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Appendices Appendix A: Interview with Director of Casa Protegida Julia de Burgos Interviewee: Evanglica Coln, Director Date: May 23, 2000 Time: 2:00 pm Place: Parada 18, Calle Palma, Santurce, Puerto Rico What is the main goal of the shelter? l Bring hope to women and their children that live in an abusive situation. l To provide a shelter, protection, love, and respect. l The program geared to return to the battered women their self-esteem. l Give the victim opportunities to remake their lives. What is the purpose of the shelter? l Provide emergency shelter to women whose lives are in danger. l Provide shelter for a maximum of 3 months until they are capable of being on their own. l The center provides a link with different agencies, public and private; to facilitate the services needed in order to make these women self-sufficient. l Work and study opportunities.

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l Housing away from the aggressor. l Provide daycare facilities for the kids, so mothers can go to work, study, receive legal counseling, or court hearings. l Shelter provides social workers and psychological help. l Shelter coordinates help with other agencies to provide financial aid. How many women receive service at this shelter? The shelter has a capacity of 16 women with their children. What is the profile of women who typically receive service at the shelter? The problem of family violence can happen at any social or economic level. But in terms of the percentage that use the shelters facilities, there is a specific group that could be defined as follows: l Young women: 20-30 years old l Have Children ages: 3-4 years old l Education: l 30% with an associate degree l Great percentage with high school diploma l Great percentage are low income house wives What would be the ideal conditions for this shelter? A place where the environment, built and natural, helps the internal healing of these women.

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Appendix B: Interview with Director of Hogar Nueva Mujer Santa Mara de la Merced, Inc. Interviewee: Rosael Jaimn, Director Date: May 26, 2000 Time: 10:00 am Place: Cayey, Puerto Rico What were the ideas behind the establishment of the House? To fight a social problem from a feminist stand point but with Christian values. What is the purpose of the Shelter? l Provide emergency shelter to women whose lives are on danger. l Provide shelter for a maximum of 3 month. l The center provides a link with different agencies, publics & privates, to facilitate the services needed in order to make these women self-sufficient. m Work and study opportunities. m Housing away from the aggressor. m Provide daycare facilities for the kids, so mothers can go to work, study, to receive legal counseling, or court hearings. m Shelter provides social workers and psychological help. m Shelter coordinates help with other agencies to provide financial aid. l Help these women to be emotionally stable. l Provide a familiar environment How many women receive service at this shelter?

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The Shelter has a capacity of 6 women with their children. What is the profile of women that typically receive service at the Shelter? The problem of family violence can happen in any social or economic. But in terms of percentages that use the shelters facilities there is a specific group that could be defines as follows: l Young women: 20-30 years old l Have Children ages: 3-4 year old l Education: low education l Kids that come from the interior of the island are much more attached to their parents. How and why was the center established in Cayey? Four young women from Caguas originated this project. One of them was my daughter. They needed a director and she begged me to be one at least for a few months while they found a permanent person. I retired from many years of working as a director of one of the social work agency of Caguas. Hence they though I was ideal for the position. Since I knew the system they though I could get more help for these women. Originally, it was going to be established in Caguas but it worked out better in Cayey. The Church and the local government were more willing to help in Cayey. So in 1990 we established the House and in 1992 we started offering services. I started directing the house in 1993. A year later, we bought this house with 5 rooms. Why involving the church with the House? Most of these women lack a religious experience, which this center tries to offer. The Catholic Church has helped us in many ways, financially and with human resources. I dont think that the traditional views of the church hindered our services of hope to these women.

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Appendix C: Essay about Art Workshops So, what about that unspoken reality? That which everyone knows and no one tells. What about that silent dialogue among genders? You and I know there is so much we dont tell. There, in the silence of our words, the real story is written. Is this their story, or it is mine? I will say its our story. For about 4 months, I made visits to a local shelter. There I saw women and children living in a small environment. It felt a bit confined. They thought it was depressing. No one will argue that point. It was true. Regardless of their environment, they fought for their rights. They kept on living for their children. They were there and they didnt care. They were determined to improve their lives. What a spirit I thought! Then it was I, once again, lost in the alleys of my mind. Why is it that we carry so much pain? Yet, pain is not gender specific. It is common to every living thing. One thing is true, female pain is different from male pain. Somehow, it seems to us that there is dignity in carrying our own pain. We may feel like martyrs or these heroic figures that fight for everyones well-being. Only when a loved one bears our pain, it becomes impossible to carry. There, at the shelter, I shared what I knew about art. They shared what they knew about life. One time one lady told me how bad her dad treated her mom. He hit her anytime, anywhere, with no compassion at all. She was strong and took it all. Only when B told her mom how her father was sexually abusing her, then her mom divorced Bs father. That was too much, that was the limit. Something is true; there are limits to things. But who is to decide? Is it our parents, our loved ones, society, or us? For many centuries, women have sacrificed themselves for the

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community, the greater good. That has been a political slogan for a long time. What if I want these politicians to sacrifice themselves for me? As I shared with them many nights, drawing under a dim light, I learned a lot about them, me, and us. I discovered that almost all of them were good people, humble in spirit, concerned for others well-being. Some of them even were still hoping to find good men that really loved them. There must be good people in the world. I was thinking how it is that some women can manipulate men so easily. These are the so called bad women. They are out there, not many but they exist. How do they do it? Well, I have watched it myself. They pretend to give what men want, and before they giving it all, they decline. They make them their slaves before they are enslaved. Nevertheless, thats not what we want. That is not what they want either. In the mean time, they were determined to make new lives for themselves and their babies. They needed to keep fighting for their lives. Even though suicide has been an option for every one of us at some point, we have all chosen to live. Why let them ruin our lives, our fun? There is still so much to do. It was clear for them, they need it to gain respect once again. So there is our reality. One in which we all lack respect for one another. One in which we think less of one another. Men look down on women just as the rich look down on the poor. Wouldnt it be great if there was no more looking down, just looking straight ahead at a road yet unpaved. Appendix D: Art Installation

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Instruction to view appendix D: First, click on the file named: install.avi to use with Windows Media Player or install.mov to be view with Quick Time. If your computer does not have Windows Media Player or Quick Time Player, please download the program from the following links: For Windows Media Player: http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windowsmedia/en/download/default.asp For Quick Time Player: http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/ Video Collaborators: Poem wrote by: Belinda Taylor; October 23, 2000 Voice by: Janet Terrel; April 22, 2001 Words on white fabric: journal that I wrote during my visits to the Spring of Tampa Bay, Inc. September through November Sculpture: I did this piece with the technical assistance of Irineo U. Cabreros, Jr. and the guidance of Rozalinda Bocila, both from the Art Department at the University of South Florida. Ideas behind the installation: The words floating above the sculpture are literary the generating force of the piece. Without the interaction with the women at the shelter nothing could have been done. The heavy piece under the fabric strip is a representation of the condition of women in a battered situation. While the women is represented by heavy column, which represent their strength to cope with the battering situation, the wood frame and

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the curtains represents the means which some of this women use to cover the real problem. Appendix E: Final Presentation Instruction to view appendix E: First, click on the file named: presen.avi to use with Windows Media Player or presen.mov to be view with Quick Time If your computer does not have Windows Media Player or Quick Time Player, please download the program from the following link: For Windows Media Player: http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windowsmedia/en/download/default.asp For Quick Time Player: http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/ Video Collaborators: First poem wrote by: women from the Spring of Tampa Bay whose identity could not be disclosed Voice by: Bamistka L. Rodrguez; April 24, 2001 Second poem was wrote by: Towanda Thomson, October 30, 2000 Voice by Josie Hyde; April 24, 2001

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Chapter 2: Behavioral Science Early in the 1970s, many architects, psychologists and sociologists were interested in the effects of the environment on human behavior. During these years, much research was done and books written in an effort to determine how the new scale of housing and the environment in many residential areas contributed to bad behavior. All this research suggested that architecture could influence people either positively or negatively. Other researchers also shed some light on how we perceive space. The anthropologist Edward T. Hall examined how culture filters the way we perceive space. He sees communication as the core of culture and life itself. Different cultures communicate differently and absorb new information through different senses. people from different cultures not only speak different languages but, what is possibly more important, inhabit different sensory worlds. (Hall 1969) This difference must be taken in consideration when designing. That is why preliminary research is so important. It is important to note that a difference in gender may be treated as a different culture. Men and women are not only physiologically different, but psychologically as well. These differences do not imply that one gender is better than the other; they just tell us that men and women perceive the world in different ways. When designing spaces specifically for one gender we must understand this difference. In order to understand differences in culture or gender we may need assistance from other fields. John Zeisel in his book Inquire by Design: Tools for Environment-Behavior Research makes the case that architects and designers in general could benefit by working with environmental-behavior researchers. In other cases, we need to do our own research. In this book, Zeisel stresses the inclusion of case studies, surveys, and experiments in the preliminary research for design projects. His book helps designers to establish a research method effective for their design expertise.

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Chapter 3: The User To really design spaces that touch people we must understand the user of that space. This understanding will help us provide a space and a building that satisfies its intended purpose. I asked myself, who are these people and what do they need. The relationship among all users and their needs is also very important. This relationship is explored through the diagram in figure 43. Although I have acknowledged the need to understand all possible users, in my design I have put emphasis on the primary user of my project, the battered women. Art as link to their reality Generally, when architects think about users and their needs, they just explore the obvious facts age, status, what they will be doing in the building and so forth. For that type of analysis, diagrams such as the one mentioned above are very helpful. Nonetheless, these diagrams are not enough to understand how people feel in certain circumstances or spaces. I have always believed that architecture is an art form. So I thought, why not use one field to inform the other? I decided that to really understand the women that use this type of shelter, I needed to be in contact with them. I used techniques similar to those pioneered by Suzzane Lacy and other public artists from the 1970s. These artists, mostly women trained in art, psychology and sociology, usually worked directly with the subject of their projects. They saw the entire process as art, not just the final piece. Usually they used installation or happenings as representations of their art. These artists and feminists utilized their female aesthetic with their experience as women to create new art. experiences that some of them and especially Lacyextended as art works on a social scale in the forms of visual images, press releases, community meetings, letters to police chiefs, ritual performances, self-defense classes for women, public spectacles, media events, videotapes, networking among socialservice agencies, and as curricula for inner-city teenagers on how to critically evaluate the mass media. (Kelly 1995)

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Figure 1 Users Diagram This type of art was quite unusual at the time. Those were the times of Pop Art, and figures like Andy Warhol and Marcel Duchamp. Where the art produced was more neutral and detached. On the other hand, these women were using art as activism. This in turn became not only an art for women but also the art of women. Its form was often borrowed from the healing rituals of communal feminism. For centuries, women have lived in a communal setting, where conversations were part of their life as women. Somehow, in the 20th century, women have been deprived of this type of sharing. Bringing back this tradition and other womens activities in art serve as a way to express to the rest of the world the real nature of womanhood. An example of this can be seen in Whisper, the Waves, the Wind (Lacy 1984) a performance that included 154 elderly women. More importantly, this type of art serves as a healing process for the entire community. Susan Lacy and other artist like Allan Kaprow (inventor of Happenings in the 1950s) believe in art making as a healing process. I think this type of art is a better guide to design healing space than traditional arts, mainly because this type of art is experiential. Architecture as well, must be understood in an experiential manner. Since my training is in fine arts, I decided to go beyond traditional art methods to

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explore this idea of people and space. I volunteered to host art workshops at The Spring of Tampa Bay. I held workshops for 3 months and the experience proved invaluable. I was able not only to hear firsthand what their needs were, but also to hear of their painful past and their dreams for the future. Through a friendly dialog, I learned their true self and reality. I saw women of different backgrounds, sheltered together and trying to fight for their rights. As we shared weeks working on charcoal drawings, I was able to establish a level of trust with these talented ladies. After two months, someone suggested doing poetry and I gave them a little project, a banner with their own poems and drawings. They loved the idea and decided the final piece should be on display at the shelter for new women that will come seeking refuge. From this effort emerged a collaborative art installation and an essay (Appendix C). Through the art installation (see figure 44 and Appendix D ), I presented their own work and my interpretation of their reality. Through this artwork (meaning the workshops and the installation), I realized a few things. The most important one for my project was communication. Either verbal or written, communication is extremely important for women. The process of sharing meaningful conversations through art projects, a non-threatening way to learn from a foreign group, helped me learn that communication is a vital tool for womens health and psychological well-being.

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Figure 2 Second Installation Work The Battered Women in Puerto Rico In addition, to working with battered women in Tampa, Florida, I researched the reality of battered women in Puerto Rico, my final users. I did this through interviews with professionals and reading books and essays. According to Diana Valle Ferrer, in a direct study of battered women in Puerto Rico, women in abusive situations are in no way passive or masochist. She points out that women in this situation are active in finding a solution.

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We have to view the women victims/survivors of battering as actively coping in the battering situation; appraising harm, threat, and control of the battering situation; drawing strength from their past history and their present immediate situation; drawing strength from their past history and their present resources; and evaluating the constraints in the environment. (Ferrer 1988) If we understand that women in these situations are active, strong and brave persons that have been successful at escaping life-threatening situations, then we can provide programs that reinforce their positive attitudes. In her study, Valle Ferrer points out six direct implications for centers that render direct services to these women. These are: validating womens experiences; understanding womens feelings toward the abuse and the abuser; supporting and advocating self-protection and safety planning; sharing educational material about violence and abuse; recognizing and building on womens history, experiences, coping strategies and strengths; and understanding that violence against women is rooted in the hierarchical structure of power relations in the family and in society. The Children This type of facility cannot avoid dealing with children. Mothers in any situation will put their life at risk for their childs safety. Women in this situation are not an exception. In most cases, their children are the reason they fight and survive. The reason women endure the worst cases of battering is often because they think it is best for their children. Similarly, if they leave the abusive situation it is because they are convinced it is the best for their children. For that reason a center that seeks the welfare of these women must offer services to their children. Childcare and grade school education are very important to offer continuity to the childrens education and provide some free time for the mothers. If the facilities can afford it, units that have separated rooms for kids and mothers are the ideal situation. In general, these centers must provided facilities and activities for the needs of the kids. The Staff It is important to talk about what the staffs needs are in this type of facility. Counselors, social workers, and psychologists are among the staff who endure the most stress and direct

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contact with the battered women. Therefore, special attention to their needs must be given. Besides the adequate space to work, we need to consider the working conditions. Natural light, appropriate artificial light, ventilation and flexibility in the working area are some desirable qualities of the space. In addition, it is important to remember that there will be staff 24 hours a day, therefore facilities such as showers and lockers must also be provided. It is important to provide for their special needs while integrating their facilities with the areas for the women. Increasing contact through a thoughtful layout is important to build relationships among staff and the primary users.

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Chapter 4: Building Program Before establishing the program, we must ask ourselves what is the building purpose. What are the goals of the building program? By establishing what we are trying to achieve, we can determine the spaces needed in the building. First, a building programs main purpose is to establish the areas needed for the facility. We can achieve this purpose by meeting the programs goals. In this project, I have established four goals: Holistic healing: provide programs that address the womens physical, spiritual and emotional needs Integration of spaces to create a familiar environment Establish an adequate population number Encourage socialization through connections The Shelter Founders The Christian Church Disciples of Christ of Puerto Rico will theoretically sponsor this shelter. There are three main reasons for this selection. First, this denomination has strong ties with Bayamns community. The founding church of this denomination was established in Bayamn. Seven of the 100 churches on the island are in Bayamn as well. Second, besides its widespread outreach, this church has different ministries to help the community. They also help other social programs outside the church, such as rehabilitation centers for drug and alcohol abuse. Third, this church is very proactive in women rights. They allow women in ministry positions and at all levels of the church government.

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Shelters Leadership Goals The church has two principal goals for this facility. The first goal is to provide refuge for victims of domestic violence. The second goal is to offer a balanced program that helps other women affected by domestic violence and their families to put their lives back in order, to regain hope and learn the necessary skills to live free of violence. These goals will be accomplished through a variety of different programs. The Short Stay A short stay will run for an average of 3 months. Women looking for refuge will be encouraged to stay at least 3 months. In this way, the staff can have time to help them heal physically, emotionally, and spiritually. In addition, in this period the center will help individuals identify and utilize diverse governmental assistance available for their particular situation. The Long Stay A longer program will run between 4 to 6 months. In addition to the above, this program will help the staff in establishing meaningful relationships with the women and their children, and it will allow the women to acquire the necessary skills they need to return to society on their own. Square Footage Through my case studies and general school guidelines, I established a building program and assigned a reasonable square footage. As the design developed, I altered the program to better serve the purpose of each space. In fact, the building program expanded and contracted as the design took its final shape. I believe that the spaces designated here are the ones necessary to meet all the needs of the battered women. Not all are essential for a shelter, but they are important

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when seek for a positive impact and transformation. I established the population of the facility at 24 women and their children, an average of three per mother. The maximum population for this design was calculated at 72. I thought this number was small enough to keep a familiar environment but big enough to make economic sense for such a large complex. The following table represents the final programmed square footages. Table 1 Square Footage Name of Area Criteria Sq. Ft. Quantity Total Sq.Ft. Private Areas End Units 1 per level 285 4 8 Living Units 386 24 600 Kitchenette 1 per level 135 4 540 Subtotal 10,944 Counseling Areas Conference Room Capacity: 8 persons 387 1 387 Small Meeting Room A Capacity: 6 persons 250 1 250 Small Meeting Room B Capacity: 4 persons 170 2 170 Counselors Office 1 per 4 Women 160 6 960 Psychologists Offices 100 2 200 Social Worker Offices 100 2 200 Copy Room 98 1 96 Restroom + Shower ADA 80 2 160 Subtotal 2,420 Administrative Area Executive Director Office 140 1 140 Director Assistant Office 132 1 132 Secretary Area 169 1 169 Reception Area 350 1 350 Accounting Office 143 1 143

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Accounting Assist. Office 133 1 133 Event Coordinators Office 140 1 140 Computer System Manager 169 1 169 Restroom + Shower ADA 115 1 115 Break Room 230 1 23 Copy/Fax/Printer Room 89 1 89 Small Conference Room Capacity: 10 persons 310 1 31 Storage Room 50 1 50 Subtotal 2,285 Internal Service Area Day Care & Classroom Area Nursery 18 Infants @ 36 sq.ft. /child 355 2 710 Toddler Room 18 Todd. @ 36 sqft. /child 344 2 688 Primary Classroom 18 Kids @ 32 sqft. /child 576 1 576 Intermediate classroom 18 Kids @ 32 sq.ft. /child 609 1 609 Restroom (1-3) Todd 2 per 15 kids 15 4 60 Restroom Female 18 Kids @ 15 sq.ft. /child 284 1 284 Restroom Male 12Kids @ 15 sq.ft. /child 184 1 184 Small Storage 125 1 125 Staff Office 90 2 190 Subtotal 3,728 Health Care Area Nurse Station 486 1 486 Subtotal 486 Adult Classroom Computer Room 480 1 480 Classroom 12/room @ 30 sq.ft. /person 350 2 700 Art Workshop 12/room @ 42 sq.ft. /person 488 2 976 Library/Resource Room 519 1 519 Workshop Tech. Office 100 1 100

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Subtotal 2,775 Dinning Area Dinning Room/Multipurpose Rm. Capacity: 100 persons 1,426 1 1,426 Kitchen & Service Area 928 1 928 Kitchen Dry Storage 317 1 317 Kitchen Non-Food Storage 115 1 115 Subtotal 2,786 Community Areas Chapel Capacity 50 persons 1,865 1 1,865 Kids Play Area 1,563 1 1,563 TV Lounge Area 337 1 337 Exercising Room 240 1 240 Contemplative space: Viewing Tower Capacity: 2 persons 250 1 250 Patio Area 6,983 1 6,983 Subtotal 11,238 Parking Area Parking 54 spaces @ 350 sq.ft. /car 18,900 1 18,900 Subtotal 18,900 Support Areas Electrical Room 306 1 306 Mechanical Room 1,384 1 1,384 Grounds & Maintenance Room 625 1 625 Laundry 283 1 283 Subtotal 2,598

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Summary of Square Footage Total Area Private Areas Subtotal 10,944 Counseling Areas Subtotal 2,420 Administration Area Subtotal 2,285 Internal Service Area Subtotal 9,473 Community Areas Subtotal 11,238 Parking Subtotal 18,900 Support Areas Subtotal 2598 Subtotal 57,858 Circulation 10 % of Subtotal Area Subtotal 579 Grand Total Total 58,437

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Chapter 5: The Site Site Criteria The criteria for site selection was established according to the goals and purpose of the shelter. As I mentioned before, the main purpose of the shelter is to provide holistic healing of the residents. For that reason, connection with nature is at the top of the criteria list. I think nature can be brought into the built environment in creative ways whenever the site does not provide natural features. Nevertheless, when the city provides good sites or site selection is flexible, a site that can satisfy the programmatic requirements and the spiritual needs of the user is always the best choice. Following spiritual needs are the programmatic or logistic needs. This type of shelter usually works as an emergency refuge for women and children whose lives are in danger. Therefore, security is an important issue. In Puerto Rico, most of the shelters provide a link to municipal and state aid to help victims of domestic violence find housing and work so they can avoid returning to their abusive partners. For that reason being close to different services is very important. Sites Selection On my second visit to Puerto Rico, I selected three possible sites for a battered womens shelter. All three sites were located in the metropolitan area. Currently there are only two shelters located in the metropolitan area, one of which I included as a case study. The need for more shelters is great, given the population size, an estimated 1 million inhabitants in the metropolitan area (according to Census 2000), and the limited number of women that can receive attention at these shelters. One of the largest shelters in Puerto Rico (Casa Protegida Julia de Burgos) only offers service to 16 women and their children younger than 13 years of age. Two sites are located in Bayamn, and the third one in Guaynabo. Site Number 1 The first site is located on road # 2 in Bayamn, Puerto Rico. This site is located north of one of the main arteries of Bayamn. This avenue connects downtown Bayamn with San Juan. The current site is still undeveloped, but new construction is approaching from the East. The greatest assets of this site are its proximity to diverse public transit systems, such as a light-rail train station. The total square footage of the site is 123,000 ft.

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Figure 1 Aerial Picture Figure 2 Location Map

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Figure 3 Surrounding Elements Figure 4 Travel Distance 1.25 miles to downtown5 miles 1.0 mile to closest train station 2 miles 0.75 miles to commercial center 3 min 0.40 miles to social agencies15 min 2.00 miles to nearest hospital 15 min

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2.00 miles to local college 20 min Figure 5 Figure Ground

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Figure 6 Topographic Map Figure 7 Circulation Node

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Figure 8 Activity Node Figure 9 Vehicular Traffic

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Figure 10 Pedestrian Traffic Figure 11 Existing Commercial Use

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Figure 12 Institutional Use Figure 13 Residential Use

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Figure 14 Protected Urban Land and Parks Site Number 2 The second site is located on road # 833 in Guaynabo, PR. Located at the northwest border of Guaynabo, this site belongs to a semi-rural residential area. This location can serve both cities. The total square footage of the site is 81,000 square feet.

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Figure 15 Aerial Picture Figure 16 Location Map

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Figure 17 Surrounding Elements > Figure 18 Travel Distances 2.75 miles to downtown Bayamn 20 min. 3.5 miles to downtown Guaynabo 30 min. 1.5 miles to train station 3 min 3 major shopping center 15 min 2.5 miles to nearest hospital 15 min 2 miles to local university 20 min.

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Figure 19 Topographic Map

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Figure 20 Circulation Node

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Figure 21 Activity Node

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Figure 22 Vehicular Traffic

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Figure 23 Pedestrian Traffic

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Figure 24 Commercial Use

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Figure 25 Institutional Use

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Figure 26 Residential Use

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Figure 27Urban and River Land Site Number 3 Road # 840 in Bayamn, PR. This site, located south of the city, is in a mountainous rural area. Although the farthest site from downtown, it is close to other services such as public schools, universities, and commercial areas. Its greatest asset is its view of the city and the ocean. The total square footage of the site is 135,000 ft.

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Figure 28 Aerial Picture

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Figure 29 Location Map Figure 30 Surrounding Elements

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Figure 31 Travel Distances 1.25 miles to downtown 5 min. 1 miles to closest train station 2 min. .75 miles to commercial center 3 min .4 miles to social agencies 15 min 2 miles to nearest hospital 15 min 2 miles to local university CUTB 20 min Figure 32 Figure Ground

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Figure 33 Topographic Map Figure 34 Circulation Node

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Figure 35 Activity Node Figure 36 Vehicular Traffic

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Figure 37 Pedestrian Traffic Figure 38 Commercial Use

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Figure 39 Institutional Use Figure 40 Residential Use

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Figure 41 Park and Cemetery Site Selected After doing a site analysis for all three sites and looking at the established criteria, I found two sites were the best options (Table 2). These were site number one, located north from road #2, and site number three, located east on road #840. Site number one fulfill most of the logistic needs while site number three fulfills all the spiritual needs. Since I am trying to create a facility that goes beyond what a traditional battered women shelter can offer, I selected site number three as my final site. The site is located on a mountain at 300 feet above see level. It offers a view of the entire city of Bayamn, and most of the metropolitan area (figure 87). On a clear day you can see the ocean towards the north. Besides an incredible view, the site is still entirely covered with natural vegetation (figure 88). This site feature, if utilized efficiently, can help provide an inconspicuous facility. It also provides me with the opportunity to use nature as a healing agent. This lot is very steep, having a level change of 100 feet. I think this challenging site could help create a very exciting place. In addition, this site gives me the opportunity to build on a common site in Puerto Rico, the hill. This place has the advantage of being located near many services, such as schools, an university, and different business that can provided job opportunities to the women at the shelter.

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Table 1 Site Selection Criteria. Legend: Excellent; Good/Acceptable; Poor Selection Criteria Site 1 Site 2 Site 3 Connection with Nature 1 2 1 Outlook Opportunities 2 3 1 Inconspicuous Area 2 3 1 Provides Shelter in Metropolitan Area 1 1 1 Proximity to Municipal & State Services 1 2 3 Proximity to Hospital, Schools, Work 1 2 1 Public Transportation 1 3 2 Figure 42 View of the City

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Figure 43 Sites North View

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Chapter 6: Preliminary ConceptsPutting the Information Together After analyzing the design problem, the programmatic requirements and the site information, I developed three schemes. First, I started by writing my ideas on what this place needed to accomplish in its architecture. Then, I created concept models based on the program. These models were completely alienated from the site so I could think of proximities without settling on a particular form. They were very helpful because it gave me the opportunity to find different arrangements for each scheme by simply turning the model up and down. Later I made a series of plaster models so I could freely explore, carve or modify my site any way I saw fit. These plaster models were a great tool to work on a difficult site. Radial Scheme Figure 1 Spatial Adjacency Model

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Figure 2 Sense of Control The overlook and the Overlap A sense of control may be achieved by placing the client in prominent areas. Views can reinforce this idea Figure 3 Private Areas Figure 4 Site Plan Figure 5 Section

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Figure 6 Perspective Figure 7 Zones Figure 8 Circulation

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Figure 9 Volumetric Study Figure 10 Model Advantages: l Multiplicity of Views l Opportunity for interesting circulation Disadvantages: l Private Rooms have view to cemetery l Kitchen location has little opportunity for natural ventilation

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Spine Scheme Figure 11 Spatial Adjacency Model Figure 12 Physical Analogy Figure 13 Procession

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Figure 14 First Impression: l Spiritual Space l Interaction of Spaces in a linear movement helps orient the user to the main goal. Figure 15 Site Plan Figure 16 Perspective

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Figure 17 Zones Figure 18 Circulation

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Figure 19 Volumetric Study Figure 20 Model Advantages: l Opportunity for framed views. l Parking is mostly concealed from view. l Raised building allows breeze to cool the building from beneath. Disadvantages: l Only a few areas have a great view. l Part of the building stops the breeze to penetrating the building fully.

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Cloister Scheme Figure 21 Spatial Adjacency Model Figure 22 Interlacing People Creating Bonds that build strong people: --Space can be arranged to encourage people to talk, to share their lives, loves, and ideas Figure 23 Sense of Community Connection that ties: l Family l Friends l Relationships

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Figure 24 Plan Figure 25 Section Figure 26 Perspective

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Figure 27 Zones Figure 28 Circulation

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Figure 29 Model Advantages: l Most areas have great views. l Courtyard offers protection and views. Disadvantages: l Administrative areas have view to parking. l Kitchen location creates difficulties for a loading dock.

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Chapter 7: Final Design The final design solution was developed by joining ideas from two schemes. These were the cloister and the radial scheme. I utilized the programmatic relationship of the radial scheme. I thought this scheme was more successful in the movement from one area to another. In this scheme, the visitor will approach the facility from the top of the site and keep a descending movement towards the rest of the facility. This downward movement allowed me to create vistas and point of interest along the path and have a clear movement from public to private. Using the organization principle from the cloister scheme, I was able to provided an intimate environment while providing glimpses to the city. Next I created a few massing models that helped me deal with the site. Two of these models are illustrated in figure 117 and 118. These massing models helped me find the best relationship of the main areas of the facility according to the program and the goals of the place. Along with these models were a series of plans, sections and perspectives that lead me to develop a coherent design. Figure 1 Sketch model Figure 2 Massing Model

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Designing Space I think models are the best tools of an architect. If done at the right scale, they help us to test our spatial ideas. The second best tools are perspectives, especially interior perspectives. They help us imagine our way into the space and help us imagine the character of the space. There are some things that plans, sections, and elevations cannot convey. Trying to design a three-dimensional object in two-dimensions is a recipe for failure. Through this project, I found out that models and perspectives were my best tools to put all the research and information I gathered into practice. After organizing all the necessary parts for this type of facility, I developed four of its major areas. These were the entry, the counseling area, the residential area, and the chapel. The Entry The major idea for this area was to create a sense of welcome and relaxation right at the door. I achieved this by using an outside courtyard-garden as the entry point. Angled walls conceal the lobby. It is not until you walk next to the door and turn to the left that you encounter the majesty of the view. The visitor first feels the gardens warmth and then experiences the energy of the lobby. The sensorial experience increases through a change in the floors materiality. Figure 3 View of the Entry Area Counseling Area The main goal of this area is to create a space for mental and emotional healing. The counseling area is located at the west side of the plaza. The offices have been organized along a spine. A pulling and pushing of the roof system transforms the simple rectangular spaces. This allows natural light to come from different places creating a comfortable working environment. The counseling rooms, the most important in this building, utilize water and nature to create a calming environment conducive to

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sharing deep feelings. Outside each of the counseling rooms next to the plaza, water falls on the face of the window. This feature creates a white noise that helps buffer the noise from kids playing in the plaza. It also fragments the light coming through the window creating interesting patterns inside the room. Counseling rooms, both on the east and west side, are divided into a working area and a sharing area. This latter space is one step lower from the working area and has wood flooring to create a more intimate space. The counseling rooms on the west side have a direct view to the landscape. In these rooms, light is brought in through the tilting of the roof in different directions. Light and visual contact with nature help achieve the calm environment necessary for a counseling room. Figure 4 Top view of Counseling Area Sketch Model Figure 5 North-east View of the Counseling Area Sketch Model Residential Area There were two goals with this space. To create a relaxing space in which to rest the body and to provided spaces in which these women can meet and have fellowship in addition to fulfilling those emotional needs of company. I started by designing a prototype of two units that will serve as a guide in laying out the multiple units necessary to accommodate 24 women and their children. Each unit is composed of a porch, a big room for the children, a bathroom, a private room for the mothers, and a balcony that is accessible from the mothers room. This narrow and tall space tries to focus the attention to the exterior. The light that enters from the side at the top edge of the wall helps to visually push the roof up, in that way the small space does not feel confining.

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Figure 6 Top View of Sketch Model of Two Residential Units Figure 7 Front View of Sketch Model of Two Residential Units The Chapel The chapel acts as the axis of the entire facility. The chapel is the communal area for spiritual renewal. Its main goal is to provide a place of meditation. The change in level at that point allowed me to increase its volume and create a second level for individual meditation, while in the first level the larger meetings could take place. I pulled the second level away from the walls to bring diffused light into the first level. I also played with the idea of water as metaphor for old and new life. The entire facility was designed to collect water from the roofs and bring it to a centralized location. Since the chapel was located at my lowest elevation point, I decided to use it as my cistern and filtration system. Most of the water is received from the plaza level through a water channel, it then spirals down through the walls. We can perceive the water channel from inside the chapel through a strip of glass interrupted only for structural members or wall openings. Water comes down from the residential area along the outside stair the chapel through a channel along the circumference of the chapel and then filters down directly into the cistern. The interior walls of the chapel are white concrete. The walls color facilitates the exterior views being brought inside and refracted with the water filter. The result is a dance of light and color that helps create a joyful environment. I think a place for meditation should be a place where hope, joy and peace are found. Through the manipulation of light and color I hope to make the chapel a place were battered women can look past their circumstances into a brighter future.

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Figure 8 Top View of the Chapels Sketch model Figure 9 Sketch Model of the Chapels Second Floor Putting the Pieces Together After studying in detail the major areas of this facility I organized them into a coherent design where all the parts speak to each other. At this point, I had a good idea of what healing spaces are for this type of facility. Then I developed the floor plans, major elevations, and sections. Later on, I concentrated on the development of two areas: the residential units and the chapel. In the final presentation, I emphasized the relationship of poetry with the final design. Since female poetry help me achieve my final design, I thought it important to represent them in the final presentation. For a view of this presentation, please refer to Appendix E What is a Healing Space? Working directly with battered women and trying to understand their primary problem helped me reach certain conclusion as to what a healing space for these women could be. I think that a center like this one, or any other that deals with people with broken spirits, needs to provide a space that allows for human communication at two different levels.

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First, it must allow for introspectioncommunication of one self. Second, it must facilitated and promote communication with others. I think if a space can encourage people to communicate at these two levels then it is acting as a healing agent. Throughout my design, I provided the battered women a place to communicate with themselves and with others. The following images will walk you through these healing spaces. Figure 10 The Lobby A place to open communication

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Figure 11 The Viewing Tower A place for introspection Figure 12 The Counseling Area

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A place to share experiences Figure 13 The Chapel

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A place to communicate with God Figure 14 The Residential

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A place to communicate with others Site PlanTouching the Ground

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Figure 15 Zones

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Figure 16 Site Plan Floor PlansLooking Beyond the Physical The following are the final floor plans presented before my committee members for my final presentation. I have organized them in the same order you will encounter them on the site, from the highest elevation downward.

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Figure 17 Levels 7, 6 and 5

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Figure 18 Levels 4 and 3 Figure 19 Levels 2 and 1

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Figure 20 Arriving at the Shelter Figure 21 View Inside the Lobby Figure 22 View of the

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Courtyard Figure 23 Outside View of the Counseling Rooms Figure 24 Night view of the

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chapels roof ResidentialA Place to Communicate with New Friends Figure 25 Cutaway Exploded Axonometric

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Figure 26 Cross Section Figure 27 Longitudinal Section

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Figure 28 Approaching the 3rd Level of Residential Area Figure 29 Interior View of Kitchenette at the Residential Wing Figure 30 Interior View of the Mothers Sleeping Room

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Figure 31 View of the City from Balcony at the End of Residential Floor The ChapelA Place for Spiritual Communication

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Figure 32 Enlarged Floor Plans

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Figure 33 Section 1 Figure 34 Section 2 Figure 35 Section 3

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Figure 36 View from East Stair Way Towards Chapel Figure 37 View Towards Main Altar Figure 38 View Towards Altar Under Stair

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Figure 39 View Towards Main Water System Figure 40 View From First Floor Towards Second Level Elevations, Sections and Model

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Figure 41 West Elevation Figure 42 North Elevation Figure 43 Section A

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Figure 44 Section B Figure 45 Overview of the Final Model Figure 46 View of the Entry

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Figure 47 Looking Down Towards Plaza Figure 48 East View of Viewing Tower Figure 49 East View of Plaza and Counseling Area

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Figure 50 North West View of Counseling Area and Chapel Figure 51 South View of Plaza and Classrooms Figure 52 View Toward Residential, Chapel and Kitchen Figure 53 North View of Residential Area

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Conclusion This project began with a desire to learn how to make spaces that can positively influence people. The techniques may need to vary depending on the type of emotions we want people to experience. Therefore, my emphasis was on the development of a design methodology that could help me create form and spaces that inspire peoples lives. I think these types of places are needed everywhere, but even more in buildings where the goal is to heal people. Regardless of what type of healing is needed, physical, spiritual or emotional, buildings or places that are designated for this task need to pay special attention to the qualities of the space. They also need to keep a holistic view when talking about healing. For example, in a hospital, where physical healing is the primary goal, providing features in the building program or design, that help address the emotional or spiritual needs of patients and families can have a positive impact on their physical health. With this in mind, a thesis that emphasizes not only the result but also how I got to it was more important to my learning process than just designing a building. In general, the goal of this thesis was to find the best approach for designing healing spaces. One of the first things that I established early in my research was the building type I was going to use to explore my ideas of healing spaces. I decided to design a shelter for battered women because it allowed me to explore the idea of healing, while avoiding the intensive programmatic requirements of a hospital. In addition, this building type provided me with the opportunity to deal with issues that affect my own gender. I decided to locate the building in a real context so I could explore the relationships of the site and the building. I select three sites in the Metropolitan Area of Puerto Rico, were there is a great need for this type of facility. Later on, I did a site analysis independently of the rest of my

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research. I postponed the final site selection until my research of space was more fully developed. Having an idea of what space qualities were necessary for this facility helped me later on to determine the right site. This final site met all the criteria that contributed to the creation of spaces conducive to healing. While I worked on the site analysis, I started an independent study on what is space and what makes good spaces. First, I asked myself what spaces do I enjoy the most and why? Nature has always captured my attention and certain places, like the mountains, the sea and waterfalls, have always given me a sense of peace and meaning. So I went up to the mountain and took notes along the way. With that experience, I created my first two case studies. Later I expanded the study and included other peoples opinions of good built spaces. I also analyzed existing shelters for battered women. Two of those shelters were located in Puerto Rico, while another was located in Tampa, Florida. I added to the study of this building type, an analysis of space based on a novel. Marcela Serranos books titled El albergue de las mujeres tristes (The Sad Womens Shelter) narrates the story of a women that visit a shelter for women that had problem with the opposite sex. The women in this shelter were not battered, but women emotionally hurt by a relationship with a man. This last analysis was very revealing because it let me understand space through someone elses eyes. Another method utilized in my thesis to understand the problem of healing space was by using art. There is so much that art can teach architects if we only allow ourselves to experiment with different mediums. I realized that in order to influence people and help them find healing, I needed to know them. Understanding the building user goes beyond knowing who they are or what they will be doing in the building. We need to understand how they see life, what are their real needs. Using the methods of social artists from the 1970s I became involved in the lives of

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these women. I started a series of art workshops at The Spring, a shelter for battered women in Tampa, Florida. These women taught me how important communication is for their emotional healing. They also showed me how the written word can reveal so much of their feelings. The work at the shelter culminated with an art installation that included their words, my reaction to their reality, and a banner with their poems and drawings. Once I understood that what these women needed was a place where they could communicate, I concluded that a healing space for these women was a space conducive to communication. This needs to occur at two levels. First, communication needs to be internal, a personal introspection. Second, there needs to be external communication, which happens when people interact and share common experiences. With these ideas in mind, I designed a facility that provided for all their physical needs and that allowed them to communicate at these two levels. I played with the ideas of light, color, texture, and volume to create spaces that encourage them to communicate. In order to do this I used sketch models and perspectives to explore the qualities of space. In conclusion, I think that in order to create healing spaces, we must first fully understand the user the best we can. For this purpose, there are alternative methods, such as art, that can help us to know them in a non-threatening and creative way. Once we understand what type of space will bring healing to their lives, we need to imagine our way into this space. I think that models, either physical or computer generated, and perspectives, help us in this task. Models that are big enough that we can look inside give us the opportunity to test different architectural ideas. The second tool, perspectives, let us explore the character of the space. I will never know if the final design is in fact a place for healing. In order to test my ideas I will have to build the facility and comeback a few

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years later and ask the women living there and the staff if these are the best spaces to communicate. Despite my inability to fully test these ideas, I think this thesis has been successful in identifying what is the best method to find out what type of healing needs to occur and how to create spaces that tries to fulfill those needs.

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Bibliography 1. Ando, Tadao. Tadao Ando, Complete Works. London: English Edition Phaidon Press Limited. 1995, reprint 1996. 2. Barreneche, Raul A. House South Architecture. February 2000, 128-135. 3. Beth Sipe, Evelyn J. Hall. I Am Not Your Victim, Anatomy of Domestic Violence. California: Sage Publications. 1996. 4. Birren, Faber. Light, Color & Environment: Presenting a Wealth of Data on the Biological and Psychological Effects of Color, with Detailed Recommendations for Practical Color Use, Special Attention to Computer Facilities, and a Historic Review of Period Styles. 2nd Revised Edition. West Chester, PA: Schiffer Pub., 1988 5. Bonilla Silva, Ruth M., et al. Hay amores que matan: la violencia contra las mujeres en la vida conyugal. Ro Piedras, Puerto Rico: Ediciones el Huracn. 1990. 6. Bttiker, Urs. Louis I. Kahn, Light and Space. New York: Whitney Library of Design, Watson-Guptill Publications. 1994. 7. Fampton, Kenneth; Futagawa, Global Architecture. Ed: Yukio. 1975. 8. Gardens in Healthcare Facilities. Architecture. January 1997,111. 9. Hogrefe, Jeffrey. In Pursuit of Gods Light. Metropolis. August/September 2000, 80-85. 10. Holl, Steven. Phenomenon and Idea. Steve Holl Writings. Available

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http://www.stevenholl.com/writings/phenomena.html 11. Jackson, Nicky Ali; Casanova Oates, Gisel. Violence in Intimate Relationships examining Sociological and Psychological Issues. Boston: Butterworth-Heinemann. 1998. 12. Lin, Maya Ying. Maya Lin, Boundaries. New York: Simon & Schuster. 2000 13. LeCorbusier Millowners Association Building, Ahmendabad, India, 1954; Carpenter Center for Visual Arts, Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A. 1961-64; Tokyo: A.D.A. EDITA. 14. Zelanski, Paul, et all. Color. Prentice Hall. 1989. 15. Zeisel, John. Inquire by Design: Tools for Environment-Behavior Research. Monterey California: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company. 1981.

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LILIAN MENNDEZ SHERRARD 7812 Buryl Court Tampa, Florida 33637 (813)984-6694 lmenende@tampabay.rr.com EMPLOYMENT OBJECTIVE Obtain a position as an intern architect with a firm committed to design excellence, sustainability, and the creation of spaces for the soul. QUALIFICATIONS Excellent in synthesizing ideas into a coherent design Highly skilled in graphic design, presentations & model construction Computer skills including: 3-DMAX 3D Studio VIZ R2; AutoCAD R14 & R2000; Adobe Photoshop 4.0 & 5.0; Adobe Illustrator 7 & 8; MS Word Photography skills including B&W film development Strong interpersonal and problem solving skills Good time management Fully bilingual in Spanish and English EDUCATION 2001 Masters Degree in Architecture; University of South Florida, School of Architecture and Community Design; 1995 Bachelors Degree in Arts; University of Puerto Rico,

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Rio Piedras; Major in Fine Arts; Magna Cum Laude LEADERSHIP 1999 Board Member of AIAS, Tampa Chapter 1998 Member of Association of Students of School of Architecture and Community Design, University of South Florida 1995 Organized and led committee of Youth Christian Alliance, Bayamn, Puerto Rico 1994 Board Member of the Art Students Association, University of Puerto Rico. 1992 Head of Advertising Committee for Anniversary of Elim Chorus, Bayamn, PR WORK HISTORY 2000-01 University of South Florida Health Science Center Planning & Construction, 12901 N. Bruce B. Downs Blvd. MDC 63, Tampa, FL 32612 1999-00 Atelier AEC Inc., 1607 N. Franklin Street, Tampa, FL 33602 1998 Alfonso Architects, 1705 N. 16th St. Tampa, FL 33605 1992-98 Sears Roebuck, Inc., Tampa, FL; Orlando, FL; Hato Rey, PR REFERENCES & PORTFOLIO Available upon request.