USF Libraries
USF Digital Collections

Lake stage fluctuation study in West-Central Florida using multiple regression models

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Lake stage fluctuation study in West-Central Florida using multiple regression models
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Gao, Jie, 1967-
Publisher:
University of South Florida
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
SWFWMD
USGS
basin characteristics
minimum lake level
Polk county
Pasco county
Highlands county
Hillsborough county
Dissertations, Academic -- Civil Engineering -- Masters -- USF
Genre:
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Summary:
ABSTRACT: Multiple linear regression models were developed to calculate lake fluctuation that occurs between 10 percent, 50 percent, and 90 percent of the time lake surface elevation is exceeded. A total of 48 lakes were selected from Hillsborough, Pasco, Highlands and Polk counties, which were identified as natural lakes through the study the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) conducted in 1999 and 2002 to develop the models. "Natural lake" refers to lakes that were not impacted by ground water pumping. Among these 48 lakes, 22 lakes from Hillsborough and Pasco counties sit in the coastal lowlands area. 26 lakes from Highlands and Polk counties are located in the Upland and Highlands Ridge area. In developing multiple regression models, the 48 lakes were divided into two groups, the same group of lakes that SWFWMD used to develop the Reference Lake Water Regime, the method that is used to set the minimum lake levels in the region.Further, these two groups of data were subdivided into four categories based on their physical characteristics. 22 lakes were divided into surface water flow through lakes (SWF) and surface water drainage lakes (SWD). 26 lakes used their county line as the divider to separate them into Highlands County lakes and Polk County lakes. A total of six sets of multiple regression models were developed to predict the lake stage fluctuation for lakes that have no or limited lake stage data. The Polk County date set provides the best model with R2 at 0.9. However, due to the lack of available information on lake basin characteristics, the models that were developed for Hillsborough and Pasco counties do not provide a good prediction.
Thesis:
Thesis (M.S.C.E.)--University of South Florida, 2004.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
System Details:
System requirements: World Wide Web browser and PDF reader.
System Details:
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Jie Gao.
General Note:
Title from PDF of title page.
General Note:
Document formatted into pages; contains 92 pages.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001498264
oclc - 57710784
notis - AJU6869
usfldc doi - E14-SFE0000502
usfldc handle - e14.502
System ID:
SFS0025193:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Lake Stage Fluctuation Study in West-Central Florida Using Multiple Regression Models by Jie Gao A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Civil Engineering Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering College of Engineering University of South Florida Major Professor: Mahmood Nachabe, Ph.D. Mark Ross, Ph.D. A.N.V. Rao, Ph.D. Date of Approval: November 10, 2004 Keywords: Hillsborough County, Highla nds County, Pasco County, Polk County, Minimum Lake Level, Basin Characteristics, USGS, SWFWMD Copyright 2004, Jie Gao

PAGE 2

DEDICATION This work is dedicated to my pare nts, Gao Shu Zhong, Shi Chang Xu, my husband, Edward, my son, Calvin, and my moth er-in-law, Katie for their unconditional love, support, patience, and inspirat ion during my academic pursuits.

PAGE 3

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank USGS and SWFWMD for the oppor tunity to conduct this study. Thanks to Kathi Hammett for her gui dance and knowledge in making this project possible. Thanks to Dr. Mark Ross and Dr. A.N.V. Rao for taking their time to provide me with valuable technical advice. Thanks to Dr. Mahmood Nachabe for his constant guidance, patience, and commitment to qual ity research. Thanks to Dawn Renee for editing my paper. Finally, special thanks goes to Laura Sacks for her assistance in leading me in the compilation of lake data a nd her expertise in technical discussions. Her energy and efforts were instrumental for the completion of this project.

PAGE 4

i TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES.............................................................................................................iii LIST OF FIGURES...........................................................................................................iv ABSTRACT......................................................................................................................v ii CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................1 1.1 Background...............................................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Scope....................................................................................................2 1.3 Description of Study Area........................................................................................3 1.4 Lake Selection...........................................................................................................6 CHAPTER 2. DATA COLLECITON AND METHODOLOGY....................................11 2.1 Data Base................................................................................................................11 2.2 Basin Characteristics...............................................................................................13 2.3 Statistics Analysis of Lake Stage Data...................................................................14 2.4 Methodology...........................................................................................................18 CHAPTER 3. MULTIPLE REGRESSION MODELS....................................................21 3.1 Multiple Regression Analysis.................................................................................21 3.2 Model Results.........................................................................................................22 3.2.1 Regression Equations for 26 Lakes in Highlands and Polk Counties:.............22 3.2.2 Regression Equations for Highlands County Lakes:.......................................23 3.2.3 Regression Equations for Polk County Lakes:................................................23 3.2.4 Regression Equations for 22 Lakes in Hillsborough and Pasco Counties:......24 3.2.5 Regression Equations for SWF and SWD Lakes:............................................24 3.3 Example of Model Application...............................................................................25 CHAPTER 4. CONCLUSIONS.......................................................................................26 4.1 Limitation of the Multiple Regression Models.......................................................26 4.2 Summary and Conclusions.....................................................................................26

PAGE 5

ii REFERENCES.................................................................................................................28 APPENDICES..................................................................................................................30 Appendix A: Visual Basic Code for Data Cleaning.....................................................31 Appendix B: Definition of Explanatory Variables.......................................................32 Appendix C: Study Lakes’ Data and Their Hydrographs.............................................34

PAGE 6

iii LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Location and Size of Study Lakes........................................................................8 Table 2. 11 SWF Lakes in Hillsborough and Pasco Counties..........................................16 Table 3. 8 SWD Lakes in Hillsborough and Pasco Counties...........................................16 Table 4. 14 Lakes in Highlands County............................................................................17 Table 5. 12 Lakes in Polk County.....................................................................................17 Table 6. Explanatory Variables and Definition................................................................32

PAGE 7

iv LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Location of Study Lakes Map............................................................................4 Figure 2. Generalized Hydrogeologic Section Through a Cent ral Florida Lake (from Tihansky and Sacks, 1997).................................................................................5 Figure 3. Study Lakes in Hillsborough and Pasco Counties..............................................9 Figure 4. Study Lakes in Highlands and Polk Counties..................................................10 Figure 5. Illustration of P10, P50, a nd P90 on Moon Lake (Pasco County)...................12 Figure 6. Lake Cooper.....................................................................................................34 Figure 7. Lake Ellen.........................................................................................................3 5 Figure 8. Lake Hanna.......................................................................................................36 Figure 9. Lake Hobbs.......................................................................................................37 Figure 10. Lake Platt.........................................................................................................3 8 Figure 11. Lake Stemper...................................................................................................39 Figure 12. Bell Lake.........................................................................................................40 Figure 13. Big Lake Vienna..............................................................................................41 Figure 14. Bird Lake.........................................................................................................42 Figure 15. Cow (East) Lake..............................................................................................43 Figure 16. Curve Lake......................................................................................................44 Figure 17. Geneva (Mud) Lake.........................................................................................45

PAGE 8

v Figure 18. Gooseneck Lake..............................................................................................46 Figure 19. King Lake at Drexel........................................................................................47 Figure 20. Lake Minniola.................................................................................................48 Figure 21. Moon Lake.......................................................................................................49 Figure 22. Lake Padgett....................................................................................................50 Figure 23. Lake Parker (Ann)...........................................................................................51 Figure 24. Saxon Lake......................................................................................................52 Figure 25. Lake Seminole.................................................................................................53 Figure 26. Tampa Lake.....................................................................................................54 Figure 27. Lake Thomas...................................................................................................55 Figure 28. Lake Annie......................................................................................................56 Figure 29. Lake Clay.........................................................................................................57 Figure 30. Lake Francis....................................................................................................58 Figure 31. Lake Huntley...................................................................................................59 Figure 32. Lake Jackson...................................................................................................60 Figure 33. Lake Josephine................................................................................................61 Figure 34. Lake June-in-Winter........................................................................................62 Figure 35. Lake Letta........................................................................................................63 Figure 36. Lake Lotella.....................................................................................................64 Figure 37. Lake McCoy....................................................................................................65 Figure 38. Lake Mirror.....................................................................................................66 Figure 39. Lake Pearl........................................................................................................67 Figure 40. Lake Placid......................................................................................................68

PAGE 9

vi Figure 41. Lake Sirena......................................................................................................69 Figure 42. Lake Clinch.....................................................................................................70 Figure 43. Lake Crooked..................................................................................................71 Figure 44. Lake Deer........................................................................................................72 Figure 45. Lake Hamilton.................................................................................................73 Figure 46. Lake Hancock..................................................................................................74 Figure 47. Lake Howard...................................................................................................75 Figure 48. Lake Mariana...................................................................................................76 Figure 49. Lake Otis.........................................................................................................77 Figure 50. Lake Parker......................................................................................................78 Figure 51. Lake Reedy......................................................................................................79 Figure 52. Lake Rochelle..................................................................................................80 Figure 53. Lake Scott........................................................................................................81

PAGE 10

vii LAKE STAGE FLUCTUATION STUDY IN WEST-CENTRAL FLORIDA USING MULTIPLE REGRESSION MODELS Jie Gao ABSTRACT Multiple linear regression models were developed to calculate lake fluctuation that occurs between 10 percent, 50 percen t, and 90 percent of the time lake surface elevation is exceeded. A total of 48 la kes were selected from Hillsborough, Pasco, Highlands and Polk counties, which were iden tified as natural lakes through the study the Southwest Florida Water Management Di strict (SWFWMD) conducted in 1999 and 2002 to develop the models. “Natural lake” refers to lakes that were not impacted by ground water pumping. Among these 48 lakes, 22 lakes from Hillsborough and Pasco counties sit in the coastal lowlands area. 26 lakes from Highl ands and Polk counties are located in the Upland and Highlands Ridge area. In developing multiple regression models, the 48 lakes were divided into two groups, the sa me group of lakes that SWFWMD used to develop the Reference Lake Water Regime, th e method that is used to set the minimum lake levels in the region. Further, these tw o groups of data were subdivided into four categories based on their physical characterist ics. 22 lakes were divided into surface water flow through lakes (SWF) and surface wate r drainage lakes (SWD). 26 lakes used

PAGE 11

viii their county line as the divider to separate them into Highlands County lakes and Polk County lakes. A total of six sets of multiple regression models were developed to predict the lake stage fluctuation for lakes that have no or limited lake stage data. The Polk County date set provides th e best model with R2 at 0.9. However, due to the lack of available information on lake basin characteristics, the models that were developed for Hillsborough and Pasco counties do not provide a good prediction.

PAGE 12

1 CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background Lakes, as a natural earth resource, have played an important role in human lives since the beginning of time. Not only are lake s used for recreational purposes, but they are also used for flood control, water suppl y, and irrigation. There are approximately 7,800 lakes located in Florida th at having surface areas greate r than one acre (Schiffer, 1998). The United States Geological Survey (USGS) established lake level data collection on a limited number of lakes starti ng back in the 1930s. Withdrawal of lake water for various purposes increases as Flor ida’s population rapidly grows. This causes lake stages to change drastically, especially during drought years. The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) established a method to define initial minimum levels fo r certain lakes in the specific geographical areas (Rules of the Southwes t Florida Water Management District – Chapter 40D-8, 7/23/98). This method is called the Reference Lake Water Regime, through which SWFWMD has identif ied 48 lakes that have lake stag e records that predate the ground water pumping impact and calculates their stag e level at 10 percent, 50 percent, and 90 percent of the time that lake surface eleva tion is exceeded. Then, it determines the median value between P10 and P50 (P10 – P50), and P10 and P90 (P10 – P90) as the reference lake stage fluctuati on value. However, this method has a high percentage of

PAGE 13

2 error in setting up the minimum level for lakes. Therefore, water ma nagers are interested in developing a new process that can be appl ied to lakes in a broader region using a valid scientific technique. In finding a new mathematical and statisti cal method that could be used to define minimum levels on lakes throughout west-centr al Florida, multiple regression models were proposed and used to pred ict lake stage fluctuation fo r lakes without data. These models were developed based on the avai lable historic water-level data, basin characteristics, anthropogenic effects and climatic data. 1.2 Purpose and Scope The purpose of this study is to devel op multiple regression models that can represent lake stage fluctuation between 10 and 50 percent of time (P10 – P50), and between 10 and 90 percent of time (P10 – P90) that lake surface elevation is exceeded during a natural period using available lake basin characteristics. These regression models could then evaluate lakes that have no or limited lake stage data but have similar geological setting and morphom etric characteristics. Results of this study offer water mana gers an alternate method to set up a minimum lake level in the region. Multiple re gression models provide a better lake stage fluctuation estimation than the other method, the Reference Lake Water Regime, used by SWFWMD. The scope of this work consists of four chapters. Chapter 1 is the introduction, stating the need for a lake stage fluctuation study. Chapter 2 descri bes the data collection

PAGE 14

3 and methodology used in this work. Chapte r 3 explains the models’ development and shows an example of model application. Fi nally, chapter 4 discusses the limitation of model performance and the conclusion of research. 1.3 Description of Study Area The lakes studied are located in the Cent ral Lake District and the Ocala Uplift District physiographic divisi ons of Florida (Brook, 1981) which spread through four counties: Hillsborough, Highla nds, Pasco, and Polk. Geomorphic divisions (figure 1) were described by White (1970), with the Northwest portion of this study considered in the Tampa Plain area, a lowlands area with karst features and thick silty sand overlying the limestone. The remaining study lakes are located in the Lakeland Ridge and Lake Wales Ridge areas, which consists of sand hill formations, and are dominated by karst featur es. Most of the la kes in Florida are considered sinkhole lakes, which are formed by the solution process. This is a chemical reaction causing limestone and dolomite rocks, the two main mineral compositions of the Florida peninsula, to dissolve due to their interaction with water. This process increases the hydraulic connectivity between the surficial aquifer, the intermediate, and Floridan aquifers–the main potable drinking wa ter sources of Florida (figure 2).

PAGE 15

4 HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY POLK COUNTY HIGHLANDS COUNTYPASCO COUNTY PINELLAS COUNTYMANATEE COUNTY HARDEE COUNTY OSCEOLA DESOTO COUNTY Gulf of Mexico 08162432 4 Miles County lines Study lakes Wellfields Ridges Lowlands and Plains Intraridge Valley AREA SHOWN ABOVE Figure 1. Location of Study Lakes Map

PAGE 16

5 Figure 2. Generalized Hydrogeologic Section Through a Cent ral Florida Lake (from Tihansky and Sacks, 1997). The elevation of lakes is quite different between the coastal lowlands, uplands and ridge areas. Generally, lowl and lakes have elevations of less than 100 feet according to the National Geodetic Vertical Datu m (NGVD) of 1929. However, the central highlands region has lake el evations ranging from 40 to 325 feet above sea level (Schiffer, 1998). All the study lakes are c onsidered recharge lakes, in which the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer sy stem is lower than the water table level. Normally, lake water levels fluctuate more in recharge areas than in discharge areas (Hughes, 1974). The climate of the study area is subtropical in nature and has warm, wet summers and dry winters with lake s averaging around 52 in/yr a nnual rainfall and 56 in/yr

PAGE 17

6 evapotranspiration (Swancar and others, 2000). Approximately 60% of precipitation occurs June through September, characterized by high intensity, shor t duration, localized afternoon showers or thundersto rms. From October to May, the rainfall generally lasts for longer periods with less intensity. 1.4 Lake Selection The 48 lakes were selected after review ing reports that SWFWMD produced for establishing lake minimum levels using re ference lakes (SWFWMD, 1999, 2002). These 48 study lakes are of various sizes, lake de pths, and basin topographies which populate the database variety. All lakes are located within jurisdiction boundaries of SWFWMD, whose observation data represents the natural or historical period, meaning the lakes have no or very limited pumping impact. La kes in Hillsborough and Pasco counties are relatively small, and range from 13 to 200 acres, compared to lakes in Highlands and Polk counties, which range from 56 to 5500 acr es. Even though lake sizes are highly variable, median values of P10 – P50 are calculated at approximately 1 foot. This indicates that lake surface area has no significant influence on lake stage fluctuation. Establishment of pumping well fields be gan in the early 1930’s and presented a challenge in selecting those reference la kes representing a natural period. SWFWMD examined the lake stage records of 88 lakes from the costal lowla nds area and over 200 lakes in the upland and ridge regions. Am ong the 88 lakes in the lakes region, 22 lakes were identified as reference lakes meeting the fo llowing two criteria: one is that the lake has sufficient records pre-dating ground pumpi ng withdrawal, And the other is that the

PAGE 18

7 lake is located far enough away from pump ing fields that no trend of a ground pumping withdrawal effect is shown. For the upla nd and ridge regions, 26 lakes were found that have observation data before the groundwat er pumping withdrawal influence began. Table 1 shows the location and size of the 48 st udy lakes, while Figure 2 and 3 illustrate their physical location.

PAGE 19

8 Table 1. Location and Size of Study Lakes No. Lake Name Section Township (South) Range (East) P.O.R. Quadrangle Map Lake Surface Area (acres) Number of Years Record Hillsborough County lakes in coastal lowlands: 1 Cooper 11 27 18 1946-1956Lutz 82 10 2 Ellen 10 28 18 1946-1956Sulphur Springs 53 10 3 Hanna 18 27 19 1946-1956Lutz 34 10 4 Hobbs 1 27 18 1946-1962Lutz 67 16 5 Platt 35 27 18 1946-1956Sulphur Springs 63 10 6 Stemper 13 27 18 1946-1962Lutz 117 16 Pasco County lakes in coastal lowlands: 7 Bell 13 26 18 1977-2003Lutz 80 26 8 Big Lake Vienna 23 26 18 1986-2003Lutz 36 17 9 Bird 36 26 18 1978-2003Lutz 150 25 10 Cow (East) 19 26 19 1976-2003Lutz 98 27 11 Curve 1 26 18 1976-2003Ehren 24 27 12 Geneva (Mud) 26 26 17 1981-2003Odessa 13 22 13 Gooseneck 29 26 19 1978-2003Lutz 27 25 14 King @ Drexel 7 26 19 1976-2003Lutz 122 27 15 Minniola 35 26 17 1981-1997Odessa 30 16 16 Moon 28 25 17 1965-2003Fivay 99 38 17 Padgett 24 26 18 1965-2002Lutz 200 37 18 Parker (Ann) 35 26 17 1969-2003Odessa 93 34 19 Saxon 30 26 19 1983-2003Lutz 81 20 20 Seminole 35 26 17 1969-2003Odessa 14 34 21 Tampa 32 26 19 1978-2003Lutz 65 25 22 Thomas 11 26 18 1968-2000Lutz 164 32 Highlands County lakes in central highlands: 23 Annie 6 38 30 1951-1965Childs 86 14 24 Clay 29 36 30 1951-1963Lake Placid 367 12 25 Francis 22 36 29 1954-1965June-in-Winter 539 11 26 Huntley 5 37 30 1951-1963Lake Placid 680 12 27 Jackson 30 34 29 1945-1965Sebring 3412 20 28 Josephine 32 35 29 1946-1965Sebring 1236 19 29 June in Winter 34 36 29 1945-1965June-in-Winter 3504 20 30 Letta 31 33 29 1951-1965Lake Arbuckle SW478 14 31 Lotela 26 33 28 1950-1965Lake Arbuckle SW802 15 32 McCoy 6 37 30 1951-1965Lake Placid 56 14 33 Mirror 7 37 30 1951-1959Lake Placid 97 8 34 Pearl 6 37 30 1951-1965Lake Placid 66 14 35 Placid 30 37 30 1931-1965Lake Placid 3320 34 36 Sirena 1 37 29 1951-1965Lake Placid 153 14 Polk County lakes in central highlands: 37 Clinch 31 31 28 1947-1965Frostproof 1207 18 38 Crooked (both) 1 31 27 1945-1965Babson Park 5538 20 39 Deer 25 28 25 1946-1965Auburndale 125 19 40 Hamilton 18 28 27 1945-1965Winter Haven 2162 20 41 Hancock 8 29 25 1958-1965Bartow 4519 7 42 Howard 30 28 26 1946-1965Winter Haven 628 19 43 Mariana 1 28 25 1946-1965Auburndale 503 19 44 Otis 28 28 26 1954-1965Winter Haven 143 11 45 Parker 8 28 24 1949-1965Lakeland 2272 16 46 Reedy 35 31 28 1947-1965Babson Park 3486 18 47 Rochelle 4 28 26 1946-1965Winter Haven 578 19 48 Scott 18 29 24 1953-1965Mulberry 285 12

PAGE 20

9 HILLSBOROUGH COUNTYLake SeminolePASCO COUNTYSTARKEY CYPRESS CREEK CROSS BAR RANCH COSME ELDRIDGE WILDE SECTION 21 SOUTH PASCO HILLSBOROUGH RIVER Lake Stemper Platt Lake Cooper Lake Lake Ellen Hanna Lake Lake Padgett King Lake Lake Thomas Moon Lake Bell Lake Bird Lake Saxon Lake East Lake (Cow) Lake Ann (Parker) Big Lake Vienna Tampa Lake Curve Lake Lake Minniola Gooseneck Lake Lake Geneva Hobbs Lake 02468 1 Miles Study lakes Wellfields Ridges Lowlands and Plains Figure 3. Study Lakes in Hillsborough and Pasco Counties

PAGE 21

10 POLK COUNTY HIGHLANDS COUNTY HARDEE COUNTY OSCEOLA COUNTY DESOTO COUNTYLake Placid Lake Jackson Lake June in Winter Lake Josephine Lake Lotela Lake Huntley Lake Letta Lake Francis Lake Clay Mirror Lake Lake Annie Crooked Lake Lake Hancock Reedy Lake Lake Parker Lake Hamilton Lake Clinch Lake Howard Lake Rochelle Lake Mariana Scott Lake Lake Oits 06121824 3 Miles County lines Study lakes Wellfields Ridges Lowlands and Plains Intraridge Valley Figure 4. Study Lakes in Hi ghlands and Polk Counties

PAGE 22

11 CHAPTER 2. DATA COLLECIT ON AND METHODOLOGY 2.1 Data Base Data used to develop the regression models consisted of 48 lakes stage data and basin characteristics. Among the 48 lakes, 16 lakes are located in Pasco County, 14 lakes are in Highlands County, 12 lakes are in Polk County, and 6 lakes are in Hillsborough County. The lake stage periods of record are between 8 to 38 years. All of the study lakes have had records kept for more than 10 years, with the exception of Lake Mirror and Lake Hancock (located in Polk County) wh ere, due to pumping impact, the lake stage period of record can only be used prior to 1965. The lake stage observation data was collected by USGS, SWFWMD, and local agencies. Available lake stage records vary in length and frequency, such as daily, weekly, or monthly readings. Certain lakes have intermittent periods of record. Because of differences in frequency of lake stage reco rds, a consistent set of lake stage records was needed to conduct the study. This serv ed to normalize the data set giving equal weight to all observations. The longest sampling interval, found to be the monthly observation, was picked as the base for obtaining a long-term stage data set. To determine which set of the monthly data should be used to form the study data, an evaluation was conducted. Three different da ta sets were complied by either selecting the first data of the month, the last data of the month, or ra ndomly picked data during the

PAGE 23

12 month. Then, the lake stage data set statis tics were calculated and compared. This comparison involved evaluating the tenth percen tile (P10), the fiftieth percentile (P50), the ninetieth percentil e (P90), along with their descriptiv e statistics (such as median, maximum, and minimum) for each set of the stage records. Figure 5 shows the P10, P50, and P90 of Lake Moon as an illustration. Th is verification was pe rformed on numerous lakes. Results indicated diffe rences between the three calcula tions were minimal if lake stage records were kept ten or more years, which implied that no matter how lake stage data was picked during a month-long peri od, the P10, P50, and P90 percentiles would have the same values. However, lakes with fi ve or less years of records yield varied results. For the purpose of this study, a visual ba sic code was written for cleaning the data set (Appendix A). This program searches for the last data of each month in the entire lake stage data of a lake to create the final lake stage study data. Moon Lake33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 Dec-62Dec-67Dec-72Dec-77Dec-82Dec-87Dec-92Dec-97Dec-02Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) Figure 5. Illustration of P10, P50, and P90 on Moon Lake (Pasco County) P10 P50 P90

PAGE 24

13 2.2 Basin Characteristics Regression models were developed to es timate lake stage fluctuations between P10 – P50, and P10 – P90 for lakes that do not have historical da ta by using available basin characteristics that were compiled th rough published reports, the USGS database, and the SWFWMD/GIS databases. Basin charac teristics having a stat istically significant contribution to regression models in this study include lake basin drainage area, lake maximum depth, hydraulic gradients, and slope A detailed explanation of significant basin characteristics and thei r calculated values is define d in the following section. Entire basin characteristics compiled for th is study are listed in Appendix B. 2.2.1 Definition of Explanatory Variables P10 – P50: Fluctuation depth (ft) between the 10 percent of ti me and 50 percent of time that lake surface elevation is exceeded. P10 – P90: Fluctuation depth (ft) between the 10 percent of ti me and 90 percent of time that lake surface elevation is exceeded. SF_AREA: Lake surface area (acres) (obtai ned directly from SWFWMD lake data sheet or Florida Lakes Pa rt III Gazetteer 1969). BAS_AREA: Topo lake basin area (sq. miles) (obtained directly from SWFWMD lake data sheet). SHORE_PE: Lake perimeter (f t) (lu99 GIS coverage). BAS_LK_A: Ratio of basi n / lake area (unitless). LK_A_P: Lake surface area / perimeter (ft).

PAGE 25

14 LK_DEP: Lake depth (ft) (obtained from Polk County Lake Atlas website or calculated from bathymetric map through the Lakewatch website. Lake depth equals deepest point of the lake that is shown on the lake bathymetric map). HD_GRAD: Vertical head gradient betw een lake-UFA (Upper Floridan Aquifer) calculated from AVE_DIFF / (AVE_STG – ELEV_UFA). AVE_DIFF: Average value of difference between lake surface elevation and UFA (potentiometric head) in May and September 1999 (ft). AVE_STG: Average lake surface elevation of May and September 1999 (ft). ELEV_UFA: Obtained from Buono and Rutle dge, 1978 (Configuration of the top of Floridan aquifer, USGS WRI open file report 78-34), extrapolated from contours and rounded to nearest 10 ft (ft). P10 – INVEL: Difference between 10 percent of time that lake surface elevation is exceeded and invert elevation of the lake outlet (ft). SLOPE: Average level difference of 4 compa ss directions of the lake basin/average distance of 4 compass directions of lake edge to basin boundary. 2.3 Statistics Analysis of Lake Stage Data Two multiple regression models were ran first, based on the two-group data that SWFWMD summarized in their minimum leve l study to determine if best-fit models could be developed. After examining physical characteristics of all 48 lakes, it was reasonable to further divide them into four subsets of data.

PAGE 26

15 For lakes in Hillsborough and Pasco Coun ties, the lakes were divided into two different categories: surface flow lakes with inflow and outflow (SWF) and lakes with outflow only, which are called surface drainage lakes (SWD) (table 2, 3). The median of P10–P50 for SWF and SWD lakes is almost identical. However, the median of P10 – P90 for SWD lakes is higher than the SWF lakes. Smaller P10 – P90 indicates lakes have constant surface flux in and out of the lakes during the rainy season, while drainage lakes retain water. The highest lake stage fluctuation in this regi on is Gooseneck Lake of Pasco County, with P10 – P50 at 2.13 feet and with P10 – P90 at 4.63 feet. Cow Lake has the lowest lake stage fluctuation with P10 – P 50 at 0.45 feet and P10 – P90 at 1.26 feet. A note of interest is that these two lakes ar e both SWD lakes. After reviewing drainage control structures and invert elevations, any relationship that causes one lake to fluctuate more than the other cannot be identified. However, information on when the control structures were installed and how they were operated is very limited, as indicated in the SWFWMD report. Due to the Upper Floridan Aquifer (UFA ) running deeper from north to south of the Central Lake District, lake fluctuations reflect on lake basin characteristics differently. Therefore, it is necessary to se parate lakes in Highlands and Polk counties into two different categories due to geographical location. Table 4 and 5 describes lake statistics of Highlands and Polk counties.

PAGE 27

16 Table 2. 11 SWF Lakes in Hillsborough and Pasco Counties Lake Name County P.O.R. P90 P50 P10 P10-P50 P10-P90 Max Min Cooper Hillsborough 1946-1956 60.11 61.02 61.63 0.61 1.53 3.50 Ellen Hillsborough 1946-1956 38.86 39.93 40.71 0.78 1.85 3.91 Platt Hillsborough 1946-1956 47.70 48.89 49.94 1.05 2.24 4.40 Bell Pasco 1977-2003 69.24 70.44 71.59 1.15 2.35 7.02 Bird Pasco 1978-2003 64.30 65.48 66.80 1.32 2.50 5.60 Minniola Pasco 1981-1997 48.30 49.28 49.81 0.54 1.51 3.24 Padgett Pasco 1965-2002 68.22 69.44 70.52 1.08 2.30 4.92 Parker (Ann) Pasco 1969-2003 45.23 46.76 48.01 1.25 2.78 5.57 Saxon Pasco 1983-2003 68.18 69.50 70.49 0.99 2.31 5.40 Seminole Pasco 1969-2003 45.64 46.81 48.09 1.28 2.45 5.22 Tampa Pasco 1978-2003 60.52 63.00 64.94 1.94 4.42 7.98 Average 1.09 2.39 5.16 Max 1.94 4.42 7.98 Min 0.54 1.51 3.24 Variance 0.15 0.61 2.05 Stdev 0.39 0.78 1.43 Median 1.08 2.31 5.22 Table 3. 8 SWD Lakes in Hillsborough and Pasco Counties Lake Name County P.O.R. P90 P50 P10 P10-P50 P10-P90 Max Min Hobbs Hillsborough 1946-1962 63.86 65.81 66.94 1.13 3.07 6.20 Big Lake Vienna Pasco 1986-2003 66.09 67.58 68.84 1.26 2.76 6.85 Cow (East) Pasco 1976-2003 76.78 77.59 78.04 0.45 1.26 2.80 Geneva (Mud) Pasco 1981-2003 47.78 49.13 49.80 0.67 2.02 4.56 Gooseneck Pasco 1978-2003 68.48 70.98 73.11 2.13 4.63 7.52 King @ Drexel Pasco 1976-2003 69.76 71.61 72.66 1.05 2.90 6.77 Moon Pasco 1965-2003 36.27 38.38 39.92 1.54 3.65 7.20 Thomas Pasco 1968-2000 72.31 73.49 74.52 1.03 2.21 4.00 Average 1.16 2.81 5.74 Max 2.13 4.63 7.52 Min 0.45 1.26 2.80 Variance 0.27 1.07 2.98 Stdev 0.52 1.03 1.73 Median 1.09 2.83 6.48

PAGE 28

17 Table 4. 14 Lakes in Highlands County Lake Name County P.O.R. P90 P50 P10 P10-P50 P10-P90 Max Min Annie Highlands 1951-1965 110.52 111.00 111.65 0.65 1.13 2.22 Clay Highlands 1951-1963 77.11 78.03 78.80 0.77 1.69 3.81 Francis Highlands 1954-1965 67.78 68.99 70.36 1.37 2.58 4.35 Huntley Highlands 1951-1963 82.13 82.62 83.18 0.56 1.05 2.29 Jackson Highlands 1945-1965 101.11 102.03 102.59 0.56 1.48 3.87 Josephine Highlands 1946-1965 69.89 70.97 72.19 1.22 2.30 5.76 June in Winter Highlands 1945-1965 72.90 74.01 74.92 0.91 2.02 4.85 Letta Highlands 1951-1965 97.78 99.03 99.96 0.93 2.18 5.15 Lotela Highlands 1950-1965 104.66 106.92 107.80 0.88 3.14 5.92 McCoy Highlands 1951-1965 84.18 85.47 86.67 1.20 2.49 5.66 Mirror Highlands 1951-1959 88.78 91.91 93.30 1.39 4.52 6.58 Pearl Highlands 1951-1965 84.72 85.98 87.29 1.31 2.57 5.02 Placid Highlands 1931-1965 91.30 93.19 94.29 1.10 3.00 5.46 Sirena Highlands 1951-1965 83.22 85.13 86.81 1.68 3.59 6.00 Average 1.04 2.41 4.78 Max 1.68 4.52 6.58 Min 0.56 1.05 2.22 Variance 0.12 0.91 1.78 Stdev 0.34 0.95 1.33 Median 1.02 2.40 5.09 Table 5. 12 Lakes in Polk County Lake Name County P.O.R. P90 P50 P10 P10-P50 P10-P90 Max Min Clinch Polk 1947-1965 103.23 104.59 107.00 2.41 3.77 7.97 Crooked (both) Polk 1945-1965 117.25 119.07 122.05 2.98 4.80 7.19 Deer Polk 1946-1965 139.01 139.68 140.27 0.59 1.26 3.82 Hamilton Polk 1945-1965 118.64 120.69 122.53 1.84 3.89 7.23 Hancock Polk 1958-1965 96.69 97.48 98.50 1.02 1.80 4.52 Howard Polk 1946-1965 129.81 131.40 131.89 0.49 2.08 4.33 Mariana Polk 1946-1965 134.70 136.20 137.08 0.88 2.38 3.72 Otis Polk 1954-1965 124.74 126.22 128.30 2.08 3.56 5.65 Parker Polk 1949-1965 128.89 129.62 130.59 0.97 1.70 3.54 Reedy Polk 1947-1965 77.65 78.22 79.03 0.81 1.38 3.23 Rochelle Polk 1946-1965 126.20 128.50 129.16 0.66 2.96 4.60 Scott Polk 1953-1965 165.20 166.79 168.06 1.27 2.86 4.94 Average 1.33 2.70 5.06 Max 2.98 4.80 7.97 Min 0.49 1.26 3.23 Variance 0.65 1.27 2.55 Stdev 0.81 1.12 1.60 Median 0.99 2.62 4.56

PAGE 29

18 2.4 Methodology An early approach to this study used lake storage volume as the dependent variable. This was reasonable, as lake vol ume fluctuation was more stable than lake stage. The smaller lake had higher fluctuati on than the bigger lake if both received the same amount of water. With lake volume, changes between the smaller lake and bigger lake were small. Using lake volume normaliz ed the dataset more effectively than using lake stage data. Storage volume between lake stage P10 – P50 and P10 – P90 needed to be calculated. Lake storage volume estimated us ed the approach described by Shih (1982), which used the average area between stages multiplied by stage difference. Vs+1 = Vs + h [(As + As+1)/2] where Vs+1 = lake storage volume at la ke stage s + 1 in acre-ft; Vs = lake storage volume at lake stage s, in acre-ft; As+1 = lake surface area at lake stage s + 1 in acres; As = lake surface area at lake stage s in acres; h = the range between lake stages. Because the initial lake volume at s=1 is unknown, V1 = C is used, where C is a constant. For this study, only the change volume part of this equation was adopted. This equation required calculation of lake area at stage P10, P50, and P90. Calculating lake area required the availability of a lake bathymetric map. For lakes that had a bathymetric map, area of P10, P50, and P90 was measured using Planimeter. Lake stage was calibrated to match lake elevation as the date the bathymetric map was taken. Once accomplished, these three stage areas can be interpolated or extrapolated through

PAGE 30

19 stage/area curves. For lakes that did not have the available bathymetric map, areas were estimated through interpolation and extrapolat ion of stage/area curves measured from topographic maps by using the best availabl e data. Lake storage volumes were computed for the 26 lakes of Hi ghlands and Polk Counties. Multiple regression models were regresse d on lake basin characteristics. Without subdividing the 26 lakes into any small subset preliminary models were first developed using all 26 lakes as one data se t. Model results indicated that lake surface area, vertical hydraulic gradient, and lake shape factor (l ake surface area/lake perimeter) were the significant explanatory variables. The coefficient of determinant R2 for the models is in between 0.7 to 0.8. Examining significant explanatory variables fo r the models, there is a problem with the results. One of the explanatory variables is the surface area. This surface area was obtained through published records. The dependent variable of lake storage volume was calculated using stage surface area measured through the Planimeter. Note that when models were performed the variance inflati on factor (VIF) was ch ecked and the surface area variable was not collinear with the dependent variable. Therefore, using these models would constitute a problem because of volume needing to be calculated back to lake stage by dividing lake surface area. This causes a huge discrepancy in obtaining lake stage fluctuation. Thus, converting to lake volume does not describe lake stage fluctuation accurately. Because water managers are more interested in finding lake fluctuation between P10 – P50 and P10 – P90, the dependent variables were changed from lake storage volume to lake stage fluctuation. After evaluating P10 – P50 for all 26 lakes, lake

PAGE 31

20 fluctuation was between 0.5 and 2.9 feet, with variance at 0.37 f eet and median at 1 foot. This lake fluctuation between P10 and P50 could be used directly as the dependent variable for multiple regression models.

PAGE 32

21 CHAPTER 3. MULTIPLE REGRESSION MODELS 3.1 Multiple Regression Analysis Multiple linear regression models were used to predict lake stage fluctuation of P10 – P50 and P10 – P90. For this study, the multiple regression model having the following form was applied (Helsel and Hirsch, 1992). x .... x x Yk k 2 2 1 1 0 + + + + + = where Y is the explanatory variable; 0 is the intercept; 1 is the slope coefficient for the first explanatory variable; 2 is the slope coefficient for the second explanatory variable; k is the slope coefficient for the kth explanatory variable; and is the remaining unexplained noi se in the data (the error). Stepwise regression analysis was then applied for developing multiple regression equations. The variance inflation factor (V IF) was checked for all final models to limit problems with multi-colinearity between explanat ory variables. Absolute values of VIF are all under 1.5. The best-fit equations were verified using the Mallow Cp value: the best model has the lowest Mallow Cp (Helsel and Hirsch, 1992).

PAGE 33

22 3.2 Model Results It is reasonable to find that lake mor phological characteristics make a significant contribution to lake stage fluctuation. Explanatory variables having statistically significance (p<0.05) are basin drainage area, lake depth, vertical hydraulic gradients, and lake area/perimeter. Obviously, a larger lake drainage area and depth of lake have a positive relationship with lake stage fluctuation. Listed below are the best-f it regression models for the six categories along with their coefficient of determination R2 and the average percentage of estimate error. This average percentage of estimate error was cal culated by taking the average of percentage error of modeled lakes, determined by using absolute difference of actual observed lake stage fluctuation and estimated value using the regression model divided by the observed value times 100. 3.2.1 Regression Equations for 26 Lake s in Highlands and Polk Counties: P10 – P50 = 1.1009 + 0.00002(SHORE_PE) – 0.0004(LK_A-P) R2 = 0.35 Average error = 38.8 percent (explanatory variables with p<0.05) P10 P90 = 2.6819 + 0.00002(SHORE_PE) – 0.0006(LK_A-P) R2 = 0.18 Average error = 35.8 percent (explanatory variables with p<0.05) The equation for P10 – P50 shows a slight ly better model result than the model for P10 – P90 with R2 equals 0.35.

PAGE 34

23 3.2.2 Regression Equations fo r Highlands County Lakes: P10 – P50 = 1.004 + 0.0122 (LK_DEP)– 9.72 (HD_GRAD) R2 = 0.53 Average error = 22 percent (explanatory variab les with p<0.05) P10 – P90 = 2.1315 + 0.0255 (LK_DEP)– 14.832 (HD_GRAD) R2 = 0.22 Average error = 32.3 percen t (explanatory variables with p>0.05) The equation for P10 – P50 presents a better model than the model for P10 – P90. Not only is the R2 higher, but also all explanatory variables ha ve p values under 0.05, which means all variables are st atistically significant to the equations in explaining lake stage fluctuation between P10 – P50. 3.2.3 Regression Equations for Polk County Lakes: P10 – P50 = -2.06 +0.0902 (LK_DEP) + 79.49 (SLOPE) +0.00002 (SHORE_PE) + 0.166 (P10-INVEL) R2 = 0.90 Average error = 24 percent (e xplanatory variab les with p<0.05) P10 – P90 = -1.48 + 0.086 (LK_DEP)+0.00002 (SHORE_PE) + 202.36 (SLOPE) R2 = 0.84 Average error = 23 percent (e xplanatory variab les with p<0.05) These two equations were actually run on 11 Polk county lakes because Lake Otis had no lake depth value available. Thes e two equations are considered the best regression models among the six categor ies. Both equations have high R2 values with all explanatory variables p value less than 0.05.

PAGE 35

24 3.2.4 Regression Equations for 22 Lake s in Hillsborough and Pasco Counties: P10 – P50 = 0.707 + 0.0126 (UFA_HEAD) – 0.00003(SHORE_PE) R2 = 0.11 Average error = 44 percent (e xplanatory variab les with p>0.05) P10 P90 = 1.929 + 0.0235 (UFA_HEAD) – 0.000066(SHORE_PE) R2 = 0.12 Average error = 41 percent (e xplanatory variab les with p>0.05) 3.2.5 Regression Equations for SWF and SWD Lakes: P10 – P50 (SWF lakes) = 0.903 -0.0056 SF_AREA +0.14 BAS_AREA 0.018 BAS_LK_A + 0.0016 LK_A_P R2 = 0.2 Average error = 29 percent (e xplanatory variab les with p>0.05) P10 – P90 (SWF lakes) = 2.152 -0.0128 SF_AREA +0.308 BAS_AREA 0.038 BAS_LK_A + 0.0032 LK_A_P R2 = 0.19 Average error = 22 percent (e xplanatory variab les with p>0.05) P10 – P50 (SWD lakes) = 2.61 0.0118 SF_AREA + 0.539 BAS_AREA 0.126 BAS_LK_A R2 = 0.41 Average error = 34.9 percent (explanatory variables with p>0.05) P10 – P90 (SWD lakes) = 5.58 -0.026 SF_AREA + 1.44 BAS_AREA 0.241 BAS_LK_A R2 = 0.38 Average error = 27.3 percent (explanatory variables with p>0.05) These six equations developed fo r Hillsborough and Pasco counties are considered extremely poor models. Explanator y variables are not st atistically significant (p>0.05). These models were regressed on lim ited explanatory variab les due to lack of available basin characteristics One of the variables show ed statistical significant

PAGE 36

25 correlation in explaining lake stage fluctuati on is the lake depth when the model was run on lakes having lake depth information. Howeve r, lake depth information is not available for most of the Pasco County lakes. It is ev ident that these four models can be improved significantly if more lake basin characteristics fo r these 22 lakes should become available. 3.3 Example of Model Application Lake Smart was selected as an example illustrating how a multiple regression models can be applied to lakes having no or lim ited stage records. Lake Smart is located in Polk County and was not used in the model development data set. It has a lake depth of 16 feet, with 0.011 slopes, 4,044 feet of shore perimeter, and 1.2 feet difference between P10 and invert elevation of flow outle t. Substituting these values into the Polk county P10 – P50 equation obtains 0.54 feet fluc tuation for Lake Smart. Compared with actual observation 0.66 feet, estimate error is 0.12 feet, which gives an 18.9 percent error. When the P10 – P90 model was evaluated usi ng the above values, the model obtained 2.2 feet. Compared with actual observation of 1.72 feet, estimate d error is 0.48 feet, giving a 28 percent error.

PAGE 37

26 CHAPTER 4. CONCLUSIONS 4.1 Limitation of the Multiple Regression Models There are some limitations on applying these multiple regression models. Each model was developed using a relatively small se t of data. The smallest data set had only 8 observation data with 4 degrees of freedom for the model. The largest data set had 26 lake stage data that produced a regression m odel with 2 explanatory variables, increasing the degree of freedom for the model to 23. Because there is very limited lake stag e data that can be used to represent the natural period (which is cons idered as the predate of gr oundwater pumping withdrawal), the challenge is to develop a multiple regres sion model explaining lake stage fluctuation using available lake basin characteristics. After examining lake stage data and physical characteristics, each lake shows its uniqueness. Therefore, these multiple regression models need to be applied with caution. 4.2 Summary and Conclusions The 48 lakes stage data and their ba sin characteristics from Hillsborough, Highlands, Pasco, and Polk counties were collected and used to develop multiple regression models. The entire data set was examined and divided into two groups of

PAGE 38

27 data, further subdivided into four more categories according to their physical and hydrologic settings. One group of lakes locate d in the Lake Distri ct region was divided into two categories using their county line as the separation boundary. The other group of lakes, located in the coastal lowlands area of Hillsborough and Pasco Counties, were separated into surface flow lakes (SWF) and surface drainage lakes (SWD). The mathematical techniques used to pred ict lake stage fluctu ation between P10 – P50 and P10 – P90 are of interest to wate r managers, who may use this method to set minimum levels for lakes having no or limited historical data. This technique provides an improved method for predicting lake stage fluctuation over the Reference Lake Water Regime developed by SWFWMD. It gives a minimal error for the estimation. Developed regression equations have R2 ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 with Polk County having the best estimate model and Hillsborough and Pasco counties having the worst results. This is due to lakes from Highl ands and Polk Counties having more available lake basin characteristics th an the lakes in Hillsborough a nd Pasco Counties. The model result of Highlands and Polk Counties indi cates that there is a potential for model improvement in Hillsborough and Pasco Countie s when lake basin characteristics are available.

PAGE 39

28 REFERENCES Brook, H.K. (1981). Guide to the physiographi c divisions of Florida. Gainesville, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institut e of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, p. 11. Helsel, D.R., and Hirsch, R.M. (1992). Statistical methods in water resources. Amsterdam: Elsevier, p. 522. Hughes, G.H. (1974). Water-level fluctuations of lakes in Florida. Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series 62. Sacks, L.A. (2002). Estimating ground-water inflow to lakes in Central Florida using the isotope mass-balance approach. U.S. Geological Surv ey Water – Resources Investigations Report 02-4192, p. 55. Schiffer, D.M. (1998). Hydrology of central Fl orida lakes – a primer. U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1137, p. 38. Swancar, Amy, Lee, T.M., and O’Hare, T.M., (2000), Hydrogeologic setting, water budget, and preliminary analysis of gr ound-water exchange at Lake Starr, a seepage lake in Polk County, Florida. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 00-4030, p.1. Southwest Florida Water Management District, (1999), Establishment of minimum levels for category 1 and category 2 lakes. Southwest Florida Water Management District Report. Southwest Florida Water Management District, (2002), Establishment of a reference lake water regime for the Highlands ridge area of Polk and Highlands counties. Southwest Florida Water Management District Report. Tihansky, A.B., and Sacks, L.A., (1997), Evaluation of nitrate s ources using nitrogen isotrope techniques in shallow ground wa ter within selected lake basins in the Central Lakes District, Polk and Highlands Counties, Florida. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 97-4207, p.28.

PAGE 40

29 White, W.A. (1970). The geomorphology of the Florida peninsula. Tallahassee, Florida Geological Survey Bulletin 51, p. 164.

PAGE 41

30 APPENDICES

PAGE 42

31 Appendix A: Visual Basic Code for Data Cleaning Private Sub CmdRun_Click() Dim i As Integer Dim counterinsert As Integer Dim first As Date Dim firstday As Integer, firstmonth As Integer, firstyear As Integer Dim second As Date Dim secondday As Integer, secondmonth As Integer, secondyear As Integer counterinsert = 2 For i = 3 To 10000 first = Sheet1.Cells(i, "A") firstday = DatePart("d", first) firstmonth = DatePart("m", first) firstyear = DatePart("yyyy", first) second = Sheet1.Cells(i + 1, "A") secondday = DatePart("d", second) secondmonth = DatePart("m", second) secondyear = DatePart("yyyy", second) If (secondmonth > firstmont h) And (secondyear = firstyear) Then Sheet1.Cells(counterinsert, "E") = Sheet1.Cells(i, "A") Sheet1.Cells(counterinsert, "F") = Sheet1.Cells(i, "B") counterinsert = counterinsert + 1 End If If (secondyear > firstyear) Then Sheet1.Cells(counterinsert, "E") = Sheet1.Cells(i, "A") Sheet1.Cells(counterinsert, "F") = Sheet1.Cells(i, "B") counterinsert = counterinsert + 1 End If If i = 2575 Then Sheet1.Cells(counterinsert, "E") = Sheet1.Cells(i, "A") Sheet1.Cells(counterinsert, "F") = Sheet1.Cells(i, "B") End If Next i End End Sub

PAGE 43

32 Appendix B: Definition of Explanatory Variables Table 6. Explanatory Va riables and Definition Variable names Explanation P.O.R. Period of Record P10-P50 Fluctuation depth between the 10 percent of time and 50 percent of time that lake surface elevation is being exceeded. (feet) P10-P90 Fluctuation depth between the 10 percent of time and 90 percent of time that lake surface elevation is being exceeded. (feet) MAX-MIN The lake stage depth different between the maximum and minimum of lake surface elevation for the ent ire period of record. (feet) P10-INVEL The different between the 10 percent of ti me that lake surface elevation is being exceeded and the invert elevat ion of the lake outlet. (feet) WETINDEX El_Nino and La_Nina wetness index from NOAA weather center (http://www.srh.noaa.gov/tbw/information/nino.htm) QD_STG Lake stage on the curr ent quadrangle map. (feet) IVT_ELEV Lake outlet invert elevation (feet) MAY_LK_STG Lake surface elev ation in May of 1999 (feet) SEPT_LK_STG Lake surface elevatio n in September of 1999 (feet) A VE_STG A verage lake surface elevation of May and September 1999 (feet) UFA_MAY Obtained from May potentiometric map created by USGS in 1999 (feet) UFA_SEPT Obtained from September potentiome tric map created by USGS in 1999 (feet) A VE_UFA A verage value of May and September potentiometric map of 1999 (feet) CHG_UFA Different between May and Septem ber potentiometric map of 1999 (feet) LK_UFA_M Different between lake surfac e elevation and UFA in May 1999 (feet) LK_UFA_S Different between lake surface el evation and UFA in September 1999 (feet) A VE_DIFF A verage value of the LK_UFA_M and LK_UFA_S (feet) ICU_THK The thickness of the intermediate confin ing unit. Obtained from Buono et al., 1979 (Generalized thickness of the confin ing bed overlying the Floridan aquifer, USGS WRI open file report 79-1171), extrapolated from contours on map and rounded to nearest 10 ft (except in Hills. a nd Pasco Co., there if < 25 ft, set to 20 ft; >25 set to 30; >50 set to 55) (feet) ELEV_UFA Obtained from Buono and Rutledge, 19 78 (Configuration of the top of the Floridan aquifer, USGS WRI open file re port 78-34), extrapolated from contours and rounded to nearest 10 ft (feet) ELEV_ICU Calculated from 2 Buono maps (ICU_THK + ELEV_UFA) (feet) SAS_TK_B A VE_STG ELEV_ICU (feet) ICU+SAS Mantle thickness (Inte rmediate Confining Unit + Surf icial Aquifer System) (feet) HD_GRAD Vertical head gradient between Lake -UFA (Upper Floridan Aquifer) (Calculated from AVE_DIFF/(AVE_STG ELEV_UFA) UFA_DEP Depth to UFA (Upper Floridan Aquifer) (P50 ELEV_UFA) (feet) SF_AREA Lake Surface Area (Obtained directly fr om SWFWMD Lake data sheet or Florida Lakes Part III Gazetteer 1969) (acres) SHORE_PE Lake shore perimeter (feet) (Lu99 GIS coverage) BAS_AREA Topo basin area (GIS coverage) (sq. miles) LK_A_P Lake surface area/perimeter (feet) BAS_LK_A Ratio basin/lake area (unitless)

PAGE 44

33 Appendix B (Continued) Variable names Explanation LK_DEP Lake depth (obtained from Polk County Lake Atlas website or calculated from bathymetric map through lakewatch webs ite. Lake depth equals the deepest point of the lake that is shown on the lake bathymetric map) (feet) REL_DEP Calculated value using the square root of the lake surface area divided by Lake depth LK_A_DPT Ratio lake surface area/depth (feet) S_DIS Shortest distance between lake and topo divide (feet) L_DIS Longest distance between lake and topo divide (feet) RT_L_S Ratio long/short distance to topo divide SLOPE The average level different of 4 direction of the lake basin / average distance of 4 direction of the lake edge to the basin boundary WET_B % basin "palustrine" wetland w/lake. Calculated from GIS land use coverage UPLD_B % basin "upland" w/lake. Calculated from GIS land use coverage WET_100 % basin "palustrine" without lake. Calculated from GIS land use coverage UPLD_100 % basin "upland" without lake. Calculated from GIS land use coverage GW_I_FLOW Ground water inflow (%). (Using the equation from Laura Sacks' report:” Estimating Ground-Water Inflow to Lakes in Central Florida Using the Isotope Mass-Balance Approach.")

PAGE 45

34 Appendix C: Study Lakes’ Da ta and Their Hydrographs No. 1 Lake name: Lake Cooper COUNTY Hillsborough UFA_SEPT 49.00 Ft LK_A_P 474.06 P.O.R. 1946-1956 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 13.27 P10-P50 0.61Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP 25.00Ft P10-P90 1.53Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP 75.60 MAX-MIN 3.50Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT 142877.36Ft P90 60.11Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 61.02Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 61.63Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 82.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE7534.80Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA1.70 Sq. miles Lake Cooper58 59 60 61 62 63 Dec-45Jan-48Feb-50Mar-52Apr-54May-56 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 6. Lake Cooper

PAGE 46

35 Appendix C (Continued) No. 2 Lake name: Lake Ellen COUNTY Hillsborough UFA_SEPT 25.00 Ft LK_A_P 381.67 P.O.R. 1946-1956 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 50.48 P10-P50 0.78Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP 22.00Ft P10-P90 1.85Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP 69.07 MAX-MIN 3.91Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT 104940.41Ft P90 38.86Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 39.93Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 40.71Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 53.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE6048.87Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA4.18 Sq. miles Lake Ellen37 38 39 40 41 42 Mar-45Apr-47May-49Jun-51Jun-53Jul-55Aug-57 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 7. Lake Ellen

PAGE 47

36 Appendix C (Continued) No. 3 Lake name: Lake Hanna COUNTY Hillsborough UFA_SEPT 47.00 Ft LK_A_P 222.27 P.O.R. 1946-1956 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 3.35 P10-P50 0.50FtCHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP 22.00Ft P10-P90 1.98FtLK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP 55.32 MAX-MIN 4.75FtLK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT 67320.26Ft P90 59.80FtAVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 61.28FtICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 61.78FtELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL FtELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_BFt WET_B QD_STG FtICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV FtHD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG FtUFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG FtSF_AREA 34.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG FtSHORE-PE6663.33Ft UFA_MAY FtBAS_AREA0.18 Sq. miles Lake Hanna57 58 59 60 61 62 63 Dec-45Jan-48Feb-50Mar-52Apr-54May-56 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 8. Lake Hanna

PAGE 48

37 Appendix C (Continued) No. 4 Lake name: Lake Hobbs COUNTY Hillsborough UFA_SEPT 52.00 Ft LK_A_P 389.29 P.O.R. 1946-1962 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 8.79 P10-P50 1.13FtCHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP 22.00Ft P10-P90 3.07FtLK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP 77.65 MAX-MIN 6.20FtLK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT 132660.52Ft P90 63.86FtAVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 65.81FtICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 66.94FtELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL FtELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_BFt WET_B QD_STG FtICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV FtHD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG FtUFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG FtSF_AREA 67.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG FtSHORE-PE7497.16Ft UFA_MAY FtBAS_AREA0.92 Sq. miles Lake Hobbs61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 Mar-45Mar-48Mar-51Mar-54Mar-57Feb-60Feb-63 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 9. Lake Hobbs

PAGE 49

38 Appendix C (Continued) No. 5 Lake name: Lake Platt COUNTY Hillsborough UFA_SEPT 35.00 Ft LK_A_P 425.37 P.O.R. 1946-1956 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 93.46 P10-P50 1.05Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP 16.00Ft P10-P90 2.24Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP 103.54 MAX-MIN 4.40Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT 171518.17Ft P90 47.70Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 48.89Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 49.94Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 63.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE6451.55Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA9.20 Sq. miles Lake Platt46 47 48 49 50 51 52 Mar-45Apr-47May-49Jun-51Jun-53Jul-55Aug-57 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 10. Lake Platt

PAGE 50

39 Appendix C (Continued) No. 6 Lake name: Lake Stemper: COUNTY Hillsborough UFA_SEPT 45.00 Ft LK_A_P 492.77 P.O.R. 1946-1962 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 4.81 P10-P50 0.45Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP 18.00Ft P10-P90 2.02Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP 125.42 MAX-MIN 4.30Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT 283141.11Ft P90 59.47Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 61.04Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 61.49Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 117.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE10342.64Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA0.88 Sq. miles Lake Stemper57 58 59 60 61 62 63 Mar-45Apr-47May-49Jun-51Jun-53Jul-55Aug-57Sep-59Oct-61Nov-63 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 11. Lake Stemper

PAGE 51

40 Appendix C (Continued) No. 7 Lake name: Bell Lake COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT60.00Ft LK_A_P 397.23 P.O.R. 1977-2003 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 50.40 P10-P50 1.15Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 2.35Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 7.02Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 69.24Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 70.44Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 71.59Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 80.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE8772.86Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA6.30Sq. Miles Bell Lake66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 Aug-76Aug-80Aug-84Aug-88Aug-92Aug-96Aug-00Aug-04Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl) P10 P50 P90 Figure 12. Bell Lake

PAGE 52

41 Appendix C (Continued) No. 8 Lake name: Big Lake Vienna COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT57.00Ft LK_A_P 328.27 P.O.R. 1986-2003 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 8.36 P10-P50 1.26Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 2.76Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 6.85Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 66.09Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 67.58Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 68.84Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 36.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE4777.08Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA0.47Sq. Miles Big Lake Vienna62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 Nov-84Nov-87Nov-90Nov-93Nov-96Nov-99Nov-02 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 13. Big Lake Vienna

PAGE 53

42 Appendix C (Continued) No. 9 Lake name: Bird Lake COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT55.00Ft LK_A_P 752.60 P.O.R. 1978-2003 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 2.54 P10-P50 1.32Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 2.50Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 5.60Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 64.30Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 65.48Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 66.80Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 150.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE8681.93Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA0.60Sq. Miles Bird Lake62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 Aug-76Aug-80Aug-84Aug-88Aug-92Aug-96Aug-00Aug-04 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 14. Bird Lake

PAGE 54

43 Appendix C (Continued) No. 10 Lake name: Cow (East) Lake COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT58.00 Ft LK_A_P 383.47 P.O.R. 1976-2003 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 3.92 P10-P50 0.45Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP 10.00Ft P10-P90 1.26Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP 206.61 MAX-MIN 2.80Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT 426889.67Ft P90 76.78Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 77.59Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 78.04Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 98.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE11132.34Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA0.60 Sq. Miles Cow (East) Lake76 76 77 77 78 78 79 79 Jul-75Jul-79Jul-83Jul-87Jul-91Jul-95Jul-99Jul-03Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 15. Cow (East) Lake

PAGE 55

44 Appendix C (Continued) No. 11 Lake name: Curve Lake COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT68.00 Ft LK_A_P 247.63 P.O.R. 1976-2003 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 2.55 P10-P50 1.49Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 3.36Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 7.02Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 73.42Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 75.28Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 76.78Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 24.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE4221.86Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA0.10 Sq. Miles Curve Lake70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 Jul-75Jul-79Jul-83Jul-87Jul-91Jul-95Jul-99Jul-03 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 16. Curve Lake

PAGE 56

45 Appendix C (Continued) No. 12 Lake name: Geneva (Mud) Lake COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT40.00 Ft LK_A_P 198.29 P.O.R. 1981-2003 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 15.26 P10-P50 0.67Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 2.02Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 4.56Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 47.78Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 49.13Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 49.80Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 13.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE2855.90Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA0.31 Sq. Miles Geneva (Mud) Lake45 46 47 48 49 50 51 May-79May-83May-87May-91May-95May-99May-03 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 17. Geneva (Mud) Lake

PAGE 57

46 Appendix C (Continued) No. 13 Lake name: Gooseneck Lake COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT55.00 Ft LK_A_P 209.03 P.O.R. 1978-2003 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 6.40 P10-P50 2.13Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 4.63Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 7.52Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 68.48Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 70.98Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 73.11Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 27.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE5626.71Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA0.27 Sq. Miles Gooseneck Lake66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 Aug-76Aug-80Aug-84Aug-88Aug-92Aug-96Aug-00Aug-04 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 18. Gooseneck Lake

PAGE 58

47 Appendix C (Continued) No. 14 Lake name: King Lake at Drexel COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT63.00 Ft LK_A_P 539.02 P.O.R. 1976-2003 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 8.92 P10-P50 1.05Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 2.90Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 6.77Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 69.76Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 71.61Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 72.66Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 122.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE9859.18Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA1.70 Sq. Miles King Lake at Drexel66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 Dec-73Dec-77Nov-81Nov-85Nov-89Nov-93Nov-97Nov-01Nov-05 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 19. King Lake at Drexel

PAGE 59

48 Appendix C (Continued) No. 15 Lake name: Lake Minniola COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT40.00 Ft LK_A_P 261.10 P.O.R. 1981-1997 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 6.61 P10-P50 0.54Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 1.51Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 3.24Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 48.30Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 49.28Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 49.81Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 30.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE5004.95Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA0.31 Sq. Miles Lake Minniola47 48 49 50 51 May-79May-82May-85May-88May-91May-94May-97 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 20. Lake Minniola

PAGE 60

49 Appendix C (Continued) No. 16 Lake name: Moon Lake COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT35.00 Ft LK_A_P 533.42 P.O.R. 1965-2003 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 2.39 P10-P50 1.54Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 3.65Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 7.20Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 36.27Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 38.38Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 39.92Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 99.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE8084.59Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA0.37 Sq. Miles Moon Lake33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 Dec-62Dec-67Dec-72Dec-77Dec-82Dec-87Dec-92Dec-97Dec-02 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 21. Moon Lake

PAGE 61

50 Appendix C (Continued) No. 17 Lake name: Lake Padgett COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT57.00 Ft LK_A_P 470.33 P.O.R. 1965-2002 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 21.12 P10-P50 1.08Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP 14.00Ft P10-P90 2.30Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP 210.83 MAX-MIN 4.92Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT 622288.14Ft P90 68.22Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 69.44Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 70.52Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 200.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE18523.08Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA6.60 Sq. Miles Lake Padgett66 67 68 69 70 71 72 Jan-64Jan-69Jan-74Jan-79Jan-84Jan-89Jan-94Jan-99Jan-04 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 22. Lake Padgett

PAGE 62

51 Appendix C (Continued) No. 18 Lake name: Lake Parker (Ann) COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT38.00 Ft LK_A_P 443.16 P.O.R. 1969-2003 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 21.26 P10-P50 1.25Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 2.78Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 5.57Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 45.23Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 46.76Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 48.01Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 93.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE9141.33Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA3.09 Sq. Miles Lake Parker (Ann)43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 Jun-68Jun-72Jun-76Jun-80Jun-84Jun-88Jun-92Jun-96Jun-00Jun-04 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 23. Lake Parker (Ann)

PAGE 63

52 Appendix C (Continued) No. 19 Lake name: Saxon Lake COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT57.00 Ft LK_A_P 201.81 P.O.R. 1983-2003 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 5.16 P10-P50 0.99Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 2.31Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 5.40Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 68.18Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 69.50Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 70.49Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 81.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE17483.93Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA0.65 Sq. Miles Saxon Lake65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 Feb-82Feb-85Feb-88Feb-91Feb-94Feb-97Feb-00Feb-03 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 24. Saxon Lake

PAGE 64

53 Appendix C (Continued) No. 20 Lake name: Lake Seminole COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT40.00 Ft LK_A_P 166.83 P.O.R. 1969-2003 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 4.57 P10-P50 1.28Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 2.45Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 5.22Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 45.64Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 46.81Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 48.09Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 14.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE3655.50Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA0.10 Sq. Miles Lake Seminole43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 Jun-68Jun-72Jun-76Jun-80Jun-84Jun-88Jun-92Jun-96Jun-00Jun-04 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 25. Lake Seminole

PAGE 65

54 Appendix C (Continued) No. 21 Lake name: Tampa Lake COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT51.00 Ft LK_A_P 497.51 P.O.R. 1978-2003 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 2.46 P10-P50 1.94Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 4.42Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 7.98Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 60.52Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 63.00Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 64.94Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 65.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE5691.17Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA0.25 Sq. Miles Tampa Lake58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 Aug-76Aug-80Aug-84Aug-88Aug-92Aug-96Aug-00Aug-04 Time (Date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 26. Tampa Lake

PAGE 66

55 Appendix C (Continued) No. 22 Lake name: Lake Thomas COUNTY Pasco UFA_SEPT63.00 Ft LK_A_P 552.70 P.O.R. 1968-2000 AVE_ UFA Ft BAS_LK_A 3.90 P10-P50 1.03Ft CHG_UFA Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 2.21Ft LK-UFA_M Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 4.00Ft LK_UFA_S Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 72.31Ft AVE_DIFF Ft S_DIS P50 73.49Ft ICU_THK Ft L_DIS P10 74.52Ft ELEV_UFAFt RT_L_S P10 INVEL Ft ELEV_ICU Ft SLOPE WETINDEX SAS_TK_B Ft WET_B QD_STG Ft ICU+SAS Ft UPLD_B IVT_ELEV Ft HD_GRAD WET_100 MAY_LK_STG Ft UFA_DEP Ft UPLD_100 SEPT_LK_STG Ft SF_AREA 164.00Acres GW_I_FLW AVE_STG Ft SHORE-PE12925.40Ft UFA_MAY Ft BAS_AREA1.00 Sq. Miles Lake Thomas70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 Nov-67Nov-71Nov-75Nov-79Nov-83Nov-87Nov-91Nov-95Nov-99 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 27. Lake Thomas

PAGE 67

56 Appendix C (Continued) No. 23 Lake name: Lake Annie COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 50.00 Ft LK_A_P 510.71 P.O.R. 1951-1965 AVE_UF A 48.00Ft BAS_LK_A 42.42 P10-P50 0.65Ft CHG_UFA 4.00Ft LK_DEP 63.00Ft P10-P90 1.13Ft LK-UFA_M 64.15Ft REL_DEP 30.72 MAX-MIN 2.22Ft LK_UFA_S 61.17Ft LK_A_DPT 59463.09Ft P90 110.52Ft AVE_DIFF 62.66Ft S_DIS 185.93 P50 111.00Ft ICU_THK 265.00Ft L_DIS 14247.77 P10 111.65Ft ELEV_UFA -461.00Ft RT_L_S 76.63 P10 INVEL 1.65Ft ELEV_ICU -196.00Ft SLOPE 0.02 WETINDEX 7.20 SAS_TK_B 306.66Ft WET_B 0.02 QD_STG 111.00Ft ICU+SAS 571.66Ft UPLD_B 0.96 IVT_ELEV 110.00Ft HD_GRAD 0.11 WET_100 0.02 MAY_LK_STG 110.15Ft UFA_ DEP 572.00Ft UPLD_100 0.98 SEPT_LK_STG 111.17Ft SF_AREA 86.00Acres GW_I_FLW 1.09 AVE_STG 110.66Ft SHORE-PE 7335.20Ft UFA_MAY 46.00 Ft BAS_AREA 5.70 Sq. Miles Lake Annie109 110 111 112 113 Aug-50Sep-52Oct-54Nov-56Dec-58Jan-61Feb-63Mar-65 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 28. Lake Annie

PAGE 68

57 Appendix C (Continued) No. 24 Lake name: Lake Clay COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 73.00 Ft LK_A_P 894.01 P.O.R. 1951-1963 AVE_UF A 70.50Ft BAS_LK_A 20.40 P10-P50 0.77Ft CHG_UFA 5.00Ft LK_DEP 21.00Ft P10-P90 1.69Ft LK-UFA_M 8.44Ft REL_DEP 190.40 MAX-MIN 3.81Ft LK_UFA_S 5.16Ft LK_A_DPT 761265.83Ft P90 77.11Ft AVE_DIFF 6.80Ft S_DIS 586.75 P50 78.03Ft ICU_THK 240.00Ft L_DIS 3936.45 P10 78.80Ft ELEV_UFA -410.00Ft RT_L_S 6.71 P10 INVEL 1.70Ft ELEV_ICU -170.00Ft SLOPE 0.02 WETINDEX 6.52 SAS_TK_B 247.30Ft WET_B 0.02 QD_STG 78.00Ft ICU+SAS 487.30Ft UPLD_B 0.71 IVT_ELEV 77.10Ft HD_GRAD 0.01 WET_100 0.02 MAY_LK_STG 76.44Ft UFA_ DEP 488.03Ft UPLD_100 0.98 SEPT_LK_STG 78.16Ft SF_AREA 367.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.76 AVE_STG 77.30Ft SHORE-PE 17881.79Ft UFA_MAY 68.00 Ft BAS_AREA 11.70 Sq. Miles Lake Clay75 76 77 78 79 80 Jun-51Jul-53Aug-55Sep-57Oct-59Nov-61Dec-63 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 29. Lake Clay

PAGE 69

58 Appendix C (Continued) No. 25 Lake name: Lake Francis COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 69.00 Ft LK_A_P 1315.73 P.O.R. 1954-1965 AVE_UF A 64.50Ft BAS_LK_A 58.30 P10-P50 1.37Ft CHG_UFA 9.00Ft LK_DEP 19.00Ft P10-P90 2.58Ft LK-UFA_M 9.20Ft REL_DEP 255.03 MAX-MIN 4.35Ft LK_UFA_S 0.40Ft LK_A_DPT 1235733.24Ft P90 67.78Ft AVE_DIFF 4.80Ft S_DIS 110.04 P50 68.99Ft ICU_THK 195.00Ft L_DIS 12853.28 P10 70.36Ft ELEV_UFA -395.00Ft RT_L_S 116.81 P10 INVEL 1.86Ft ELEV_ICU -200.00Ft SLOPE 0.01 WETINDEX 7.55 SAS_TK_B 269.30Ft WET_B 0.05 QD_STG 70.00Ft ICU+SAS 464.30Ft UPLD_B 0.65 IVT_ELEV 68.50Ft HD_GRAD 0.01 WET_100 0.09 MAY_LK_STG 69.20Ft UFA_ DEP 463.99Ft UPLD_100 0.91 SEPT_LK_STG 69.40Ft SF_AREA 539.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.90 AVE_STG 69.30Ft SHORE-PE 17844.79Ft UFA_MAY 60.00 Ft BAS_AREA 49.10 Sq. Miles Lake Francis66 67 68 69 70 71 72 Mar-54Apr-56May-58Jun-60Jul-62Aug-64 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 30. Lake Francis

PAGE 70

59 Appendix C (Continued) No. 26 Lake name: Lake Huntley COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 72.00 Ft LK_A_P 961.65 P.O.R. 1951-1963 AVE_UF A 68.00Ft BAS_LK_A 3.25 P10-P50 0.56Ft CHG_UFA 8.00Ft LK_DEP 10.83Ft P10-P90 1.05Ft LK-UFA_M 17.78Ft REL_DEP 502.69 MAX-MIN 2.29Ft LK_UFA_S 10.74Ft LK_A_DPT 2735895.39Ft P90 82.13Ft AVE_DIFF 14.26Ft S_DIS 320.11 P50 82.62Ft ICU_THK 240.00Ft L_DIS 4094.98 P10 83.18Ft ELEV_UFA -440.00Ft RT_L_S 12.79 P10 INVEL 0.85Ft ELEV_ICU -200.00Ft SLOPE 0.01 WETINDEX 6.41 SAS_TK_B 282.26Ft WET_B 0.07 QD_STG 83.00Ft ICU+SAS 522.26Ft UPLD_B 0.63 IVT_ELEV 82.33Ft HD_GRAD 0.03 WET_100 0.10 MAY_LK_STG 81.78Ft UFA_ DEP 522.62Ft UPLD_100 0.90 SEPT_LK_STG 82.74Ft SF_AREA 680.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.34 AVE_STG 82.26Ft SHORE-PE 30802.23Ft UFA_MAY 64.00 Ft BAS_AREA 3.46 Sq. Miles Lake Huntley81 82 83 84 85 Jun-51Jul-53Aug-55Sep-57Oct-59Nov-61Dec-63 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 31. Lake Huntley

PAGE 71

60 Appendix C (Continued) No. 27 Lake name: Lake Jackson COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 81.00 Ft LK_A_P 2929.58 P.O.R. 1945-1965 AVE_UF A 77.50Ft BAS_LK_A 2.63 P10-P50 0.56Ft CHG_UFA 7.00Ft LK_DEP 17.39Ft P10-P90 1.48Ft LK-UFA_M 26.58Ft REL_DEP 701.11 MAX-MIN 3.87Ft LK_UFA_S 21.76Ft LK_A_DPT 8547471.62Ft P90 101.11Ft AVE_DIFF 24.17Ft S_DIS 767.26 P50 102.03Ft ICU_THK 300.00Ft L_DIS 17501.84 P10 102.59Ft ELEV_UFA -369.00Ft RT_L_S 22.81 P10 INVEL -0.11Ft ELEV_ICU -69.00Ft SLOPE 0.01 WETINDEX 7.19 SAS_TK_B 170.67Ft WET_B 0.06 QD_STG 102.00Ft ICU+SAS 470.67Ft UPLD_B 0.71 IVT_ELEV 102.70Ft HD_GRAD 0.05 WET_100 0.08 MAY_LK_STG 100.58Ft UFA_ DEP 471.03Ft UPLD_100 0.92 SEPT_LK_STG 102.76Ft SF_AREA 3412.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.33 AVE_STG 101.67Ft SHORE-PE 50733.39Ft UFA_MAY 74.00 Ft BAS_AREA 14.00 Sq. Miles Lake Jackson100 101 102 103 104 Apr-49Jan-52Oct-54Jun-57Mar-60Dec-62Sep-65 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 32. Lake Jackson

PAGE 72

61 Appendix C (Continued) No. 28 Lake name: Lake Josephine COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 70.00 Ft LK_A_P 1096.37 P.O.R. 1946-1965 AVE_UF A 67.50Ft BAS_LK_A 23.97 P10-P50 1.22Ft CHG_UFA 5.00Ft LK_DEP 7.00Ft P10-P90 2.30Ft LK-UFA_M 6.16Ft REL_DEP 1048.23 MAX-MIN 5.76Ft LK_UFA_S 1.82Ft LK_A_DPT 7691481.45Ft P90 69.89Ft AVE_DIFF 3.99Ft S_DIS 151.25 P50 70.97Ft ICU_THK 180.00Ft L_DIS 17611.22 P10 72.19Ft ELEV_UFA -375.00Ft RT_L_S 116.44 P10 INVEL 0.86Ft ELEV_ICU -195.00Ft SLOPE 0.00 WETINDEX 6.84 SAS_TK_B 266.49Ft WET_B 0.10 QD_STG 71.00Ft ICU+SAS 446.49Ft UPLD_B 0.83 IVT_ELEV 71.33Ft HD_GRAD 0.01 WET_100 0.11 MAY_LK_STG 71.16Ft UFA_ DEP 445.97Ft UPLD_100 0.89 SEPT_LK_STG 71.82Ft SF_AREA 1236.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.67 AVE_STG 71.49Ft SHORE-PE 49107.70Ft UFA_MAY 65.00 Ft BAS_AREA 46.30 Sq. Miles Lake Josephine68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 Apr-49May-51Jun-53Jul-55Aug-57Sep-59Oct-61Nov-63 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 33. Lake Josephine

PAGE 73

62 Appendix C (Continued) No. 29 Lake name: Lake June-in-Winter COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 67.00 Ft LK_A_P 2142.55 P.O.R. 1945-1965 AVE_UF A 61.00Ft BAS_LK_A 8.04 P10-P50 0.91Ft CHG_UFA 12.00Ft LK_DEP 33.00Ft P10-P90 2.02Ft LK-UFA_M 18.47Ft REL_DEP 374.38 MAX-MIN 4.85Ft LK_UFA_S 7.67Ft LK_A_DPT 4625298.05Ft P90 72.90Ft AVE_DIFF 13.07Ft S_DIS 256.53 P50 74.01Ft ICU_THK 200.00Ft L_DIS 17956.14 P10 74.92Ft ELEV_UFA -420.00Ft RT_L_S 70.00 P10 INVEL 9.55Ft ELEV_ICU -220.00Ft SLOPE 0.01 WETINDEX 8.05 SAS_TK_B 294.07Ft WET_B 0.04 QD_STG 73.00Ft ICU+SAS 494.07Ft UPLD_B 0.69 IVT_ELEV 65.37Ft HD_GRAD 0.03 WET_100 0.06 MAY_LK_STG 73.47Ft UFA_ DEP 494.01Ft UPLD_100 0.94 SEPT_LK_STG 74.67Ft SF_AREA 3504.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.62 AVE_STG 74.07Ft SHORE-PE 71239.72Ft UFA_MAY 55.00 Ft BAS_AREA 44.00 Sq. Miles Lake June-in-winter71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 Apr-49May-51Jun-53Jul-55Aug-57Sep-59Oct-61Nov-63Dec-65 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 34. Lake June-in-Winter

PAGE 74

63 Appendix C (Continued) No. 30 Lake name: Lake Letta COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 83.00 Ft LK_A_P 1249.26 P.O.R. 1951-1965 AVE_UF A 81.50Ft BAS_LK_A 20.89 P10-P50 0.93Ft CHG_UFA 3.00Ft LK_DEP 2.95Ft P10-P90 2.18Ft LK-UFA_M 15.88Ft REL_DEP 1545.37 MAX-MIN 5.15Ft LK_UFA_S 13.96Ft LK_A_DPT 7051636.25Ft P90 97.78Ft AVE_DIFF 14.92Ft S_DIS 202.76 P50 99.03Ft ICU_THK 200.00Ft L_DIS 6533.17 P10 99.96Ft ELEV_UFA -333.00Ft RT_L_S 32.22 P10 INVEL 2.06Ft ELEV_ICU -133.00Ft SLOPE 0.01 WETINDEX 7.69 SAS_TK_B 229.42Ft WET_B 0.02 QD_STG 99.00Ft ICU+SAS 429.42Ft UPLD_B 0.74 IVT_ELEV 97.90Ft HD_GRAD 0.03 WET_100 0.03 MAY_LK_STG 95.88Ft UFA_ DEP 432.03Ft UPLD_100 0.97 SEPT_LK_STG 96.96Ft SF_AREA 478.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.67 AVE_STG 96.42Ft SHORE-PE 16667.25Ft UFA_MAY 80.00 Ft BAS_AREA 15.60 Sq. Miles Lake Letta96 97 98 99 100 101 102 Mar-51Dec-53Sep-56May-59Feb-62Nov-64 Time (date)Lake Stage (Fee,msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 35. Lake Letta

PAGE 75

64 Appendix C (Continued) No. 31 Lake name: Lake Lotela COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 85.00 Ft LK_A_P 1371.31 P.O.R. 1950-1965 AVE_UF A 82.50Ft BAS_LK_A 9.74 P10-P50 0.88Ft CHG_UFA 5.00Ft LK_DEP 38.00Ft P10-P90 3.14Ft LK-UFA_M 24.78Ft REL_DEP 155.54 MAX-MIN 5.92Ft LK_UFA_S 19.86Ft LK_A_DPT 919348.85Ft P90 104.66Ft AVE_DIFF 22.32Ft S_DIS 62.86 P50 106.92Ft ICU_THK 240.00Ft L_DIS 16798.29 P10 107.80Ft ELEV_UFA -310.00Ft RT_L_S 267.23 P10 INVEL 2.32Ft ELEV_ICU -70.00Ft SLOPE 0.03 WETINDEX 7.69 SAS_TK_B 174.82Ft WET_B 0.03 QD_STG 106.00Ft ICU+SAS 414.82Ft UPLD_B 0.80 IVT_ELEV 105.48Ft HD_GRAD 0.05 WET_100 0.03 MAY_LK_STG 104.78Ft UFA_ DEP 416.92Ft UPLD_100 0.97 SEPT_LK_STG 104.86Ft SF_AREA 802.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.68 AVE_STG 104.82Ft SHORE-PE 25475.91Ft UFA_MAY 80.00 Ft BAS_AREA 12.20 Sq. Miles Lake Lotella103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 Apr-49Jan-52Oct-54Jun-57Mar-60Dec-62Sep-65 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 36. Lake Lotella

PAGE 76

65 Appendix C (Continued) No. 32 Lake name: Lake McCoy COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 72.00 Ft LK_A_P 437.24 P.O.R. 1951-1965 AVE_UF A 68.50Ft BAS_LK_A 3.43 P10-P50 1.20Ft CHG_UFA 7.00Ft LK_DEP 61.00Ft P10-P90 2.49Ft LK-UFA_M 18.18Ft REL_DEP 25.60 MAX-MIN 5.66Ft LK_UFA_S 12.70Ft LK_A_DPT 39989.66Ft P90 84.18Ft AVE_DIFF 15.44Ft S_DIS 149.34 P50 85.47Ft ICU_THK 240.00Ft L_DIS 2092.72 P10 86.67Ft ELEV_UFA -440.00Ft RT_L_S 14.01 P10 INVEL -0.63Ft ELEV_ICU -200.00Ft SLOPE 0.04 WETINDEX 8.34 SAS_TK_B 283.94Ft WET_B 0.00 QD_STG 86.00Ft ICU+SAS 523.94Ft UPLD_B 0.72 IVT_ELEV 87.30Ft HD_GRAD 0.03 WET_100 0.00 MAY_LK_STG 83.18Ft UFA_ DEP 525.47Ft UPLD_100 1.00 SEPT_LK_STG 84.70Ft SF_AREA 56.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.62 AVE_STG 83.94Ft SHORE-PE 5579.01Ft UFA_MAY 65.00 Ft BAS_AREA 0.30 Sq. Miles Lake McCoy82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 Mar-51Dec-53Sep-56May-59Feb-62Nov-64 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 37. Lake McCoy

PAGE 77

66 Appendix C (Continued) No. 33 Lake name: Lake Mirror COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 70.00 Ft LK_A_P 499.22 P.O.R. 1951-1959 AVE_UF A 66.50Ft BAS_LK_A 3.96 P10-P50 1.39Ft CHG_UFA 7.00Ft LK_DEP 41.00Ft P10-P90 4.52Ft LK-UFA_M 25.16Ft REL_DEP 50.14 MAX-MIN 6.58Ft LK_UFA_S 22.48Ft LK_A_DPT 103056.99Ft P90 88.78Ft AVE_DIFF 23.82Ft S_DIS 207.32 P50 91.91Ft ICU_THK 264.00Ft L_DIS 3780.77 P10 93.30Ft ELEV_UFA -445.00Ft RT_L_S 18.24 P10 INVEL -1.70Ft ELEV_ICU -181.00Ft SLOPE 0.02 WETINDEX 6.78 SAS_TK_B 271.32Ft WET_B 0.01 QD_STG 92.00Ft ICU+SAS 535.32Ft UPLD_B 0.72 IVT_ELEV 95.00Ft HD_GRAD 0.04 WET_100 0.02 MAY_LK_STG 88.16Ft UFA_ DEP 536.91Ft UPLD_100 0.98 SEPT_LK_STG 92.48Ft SF_AREA 97.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.56 AVE_STG 90.32Ft SHORE-PE 8463.88Ft UFA_MAY 63.00 Ft BAS_AREA 0.60 Sq. Miles Lake Mirror87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95Jun-51Jun-52Jun-53Jun-54Jun-55Jun-56Jun-57Jun-58Jun-59Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 38. Lake Mirror

PAGE 78

67 Appendix C (Continued) No. 34 Lake name: Lake Pearl COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 70.00 Ft LK_A_P 467.04 P.O.R. 1951-1965 AVE_UF A 67.50Ft BAS_LK_A 3.30 P10-P50 1.31Ft CHG_UFA 5.00Ft LK_DEP 47.00Ft P10-P90 2.57Ft LK-UFA_M 18.24Ft REL_DEP 36.08 MAX-MIN 5.02Ft LK_UFA_S 14.64Ft LK_A_DPT 61169.60Ft P90 84.72Ft AVE_DIFF 16.44Ft S_DIS 195.80 P50 85.98Ft ICU_THK 240.00Ft L_DIS 2426.80 P10 87.29Ft ELEV_UFA -440.00Ft RT_L_S 12.39 P10 INVEL 2.67Ft ELEV_ICU -200.00Ft SLOPE 0.05 WETINDEX 8.34 SAS_TK_B 283.94Ft WET_B 0.01 QD_STG 86.00Ft ICU+SAS 523.94Ft UPLD_B 0.62 IVT_ELEV 84.62Ft HD_GRAD 0.03 WET_100 0.02 MAY_LK_STG 83.24Ft UFA_ DEP 525.98Ft UPLD_100 0.98 SEPT_LK_STG 84.64Ft SF_AREA 66.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.55 AVE_STG 83.94Ft SHORE-PE 6155.68Ft UFA_MAY 65.00 Ft BAS_AREA 0.34 Sq. Miles Lake Pearl82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 Jun-51Mar-54Dec-56Sep-59Jun-62Feb-65 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 39. Lake Pearl

PAGE 79

68 Appendix C (Continued) No. 35 Lake name: Lake Placid COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 60.00 Ft LK_A_P 2514.22 P.O.R. 1931-1965 AVE_UF A 57.50Ft BAS_LK_A 3.89 P10-P50 1.10Ft CHG_UFA 5.00Ft LK_DEP 45.00Ft P10-P90 3.00Ft LK-UFA_M 36.68Ft REL_DEP 267.24 MAX-MIN 5.46Ft LK_UFA_S 33.38Ft LK_A_DPT 3213772.54Ft P90 91.30Ft AVE_DIFF 35.03Ft S_DIS 259.38 P50 93.19Ft ICU_THK 265.00Ft L_DIS 15141.11 P10 94.29Ft ELEV_UFA -461.00Ft RT_L_S 58.37 P10 INVEL 1.29Ft ELEV_ICU -196.00Ft SLOPE 0.01 WETINDEX 8.05 SAS_TK_B 288.53Ft WET_B 0.07 QD_STG 92.00Ft ICU+SAS 553.53Ft UPLD_B 0.54 IVT_ELEV 93.00Ft HD_GRAD 0.06 WET_100 0.11 MAY_LK_STG 91.68Ft UFA_ DEP 554.19Ft UPLD_100 0.89 SEPT_LK_STG 93.38Ft SF_AREA 3320.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.53 AVE_STG 92.53Ft SHORE-PE 57520.71Ft UFA_MAY 55.00 Ft BAS_AREA 20.20 Sq. Miles Lake Placid88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 Apr-49Jan-52Oct-54Jun-57Mar-60Dec-62Sep-65 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 40. Lake Placid

PAGE 80

69 Appendix C (Continued) No. 36 Lake name: Lake Sirena COUNTY Highlands UFA_SEPT 70.00 Ft LK_A_P 699.73 P.O.R. 1951-1965 AVE_UF A 67.50Ft BAS_LK_A 2.55 P10-P50 1.68Ft CHG_UFA 5.00Ft LK_DEP 58.00Ft P10-P90 3.59Ft LK-UFA_M 18.08Ft REL_DEP 44.51 MAX-MIN 6.00Ft LK_UFA_S 13.38Ft LK_A_DPT 114908.72Ft P90 83.22Ft AVE_DIFF 15.73Ft S_DIS 194.98 P50 85.13Ft ICU_THK 240.00Ft L_DIS 5120.11 P10 86.81Ft ELEV_UFA -440.00Ft RT_L_S 26.26 P10 INVEL 2.19Ft ELEV_ICU -200.00Ft SLOPE 0.01 WETINDEX 4.36 SAS_TK_B 283.23Ft WET_B 0.03 QD_STG 86.00Ft ICU+SAS 523.23Ft UPLD_B 0.83 IVT_ELEV 84.62Ft HD_GRAD 0.03 WET_100 0.03 MAY_LK_STG 83.08Ft UFA_ DEP 525.13Ft UPLD_100 0.97 SEPT_LK_STG 83.38Ft SF_AREA 153.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.54 AVE_STG 83.23Ft SHORE-PE 9524.65Ft UFA_MAY 65.00 Ft BAS_AREA 0.61 Sq. Miles Lake Sirena81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 Jun-51Mar-54Dec-56Sep-59Jun-62Feb-65 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 41. Lake Sirena

PAGE 81

70 Appendix C (Continued) No. 37 Lake name: Lake Clinch COUNTY Polk UFA_SEPT 85.00 Ft LK_A_P 1742.97 P.O.R. 1947-1965 AVE_UF A 79.00Ft BAS_LK_A 22.27 P10-P50 2.41Ft CHG_UFA 12.00Ft LK_DEP 31.82Ft P10-P90 3.77Ft LK-UFA_M 30.10Ft REL_DEP 227.85 MAX-MIN 7.97Ft LK_UFA_S 19.46Ft LK_A_DPT 1652114.15Ft P90 103.23Ft AVE_DIFF 24.78Ft S_DIS 77.89 P50 104.59Ft ICU_THK 190.00Ft L_DIS 13596.92 P10 107.00Ft ELEV_UFA -200.00Ft RT_L_S 174.57 P10 INVEL 1.76Ft ELEV_ICU -10.00Ft SLOPE 0.01 WETINDEX 8.05 SAS_TK_B 113.78Ft WET_B 0.07 QD_STG 103.00Ft ICU+SAS 303.78Ft UPLD_B 0.77 IVT_ELEV 105.24Ft HD_GRAD 0.08 WET_100 0.08 MAY_LK_STG 103.10Ft UFA_ DEP 304.59Ft UPLD_100 0.92 SEPT_LK_STG 104.46Ft SF_AREA 1207.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.75 AVE_STG 103.78Ft SHORE-PE 30165.27Ft UFA_MAY 73.00 Ft BAS_AREA 42.00 Sq. Miles Lake Clinch101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 Jul-46Aug-48Sep-50Oct-52Nov-54Dec-56Jan-59Feb-61Mar-63Apr-65 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 42. Lake Clinch

PAGE 82

71 Appendix C (Continued) No. 38 Lake name: Lake Crooked COUNTY Polk UFA_SEPT88.00Ft LK_A_P 1852.38 P.O.R. 1945-1965 AVE_UF A 82.25Ft BAS_LK_A 3.62 P10-P50 2.98Ft CHG_UFA 11.50Ft LK_DEP 9.00Ft P10-P90 4.80Ft LK-UFA_M 39.87Ft REL_DEP 1725.75 MAX-MIN 7.19Ft LK_UFA_S30. 05Ft LK_A_DPT 26804024.61Ft P90 117.25Ft AVE_DIFF 34.96Ft S_DIS 784.68 P50 119.07Ft ICU_THK 130.00Ft L_DIS 17545.64 P10 122.05Ft ELEV_UFA-90.00Ft RT_L_S 22.36 P10 INVEL 2.05Ft ELEV_ICU 40.00Ft SLOPE 0.01 WETINDEX 8.05 SAS_TK_B77.21Ft WET_B 0.18 QD_STG 118.00Ft ICU+SAS 207.21Ft UPLD_B 0.60 IVT_ELEV 120.00Ft HD_GRAD 0.17 WET_100 0.23 MAY_LK_STG 116.37Ft UFA_ DEP 209.07Ft UPLD_100 0.77 SEPT_LK_STG 118.05Ft SF_AR EA 5538.00AcresGW_I_FLW 0.21 AVE_STG 117.21Ft SHORE-PE130230.53Ft UFA_MAY 76.50 Ft BAS_AREA31.30Sq. Miles Lake Crooked115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 Oct-43Oct-46Oct-49Oct-52Oct-55Oct-58Oct-61Oct-64Oct-67 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 43. Lake Crooked

PAGE 83

72 Appendix C (Continued) No. 39 Lake name: Lake Deer COUNTY Polk UFA_SEPT 112.00 Ft LK_A_P 649.49 P.O.R. 1946-1965 AVE_UF A 112.00Ft BAS_LK_A 3.94 P10-P50 0.59Ft CHG_UFA 0.00Ft LK_DEP 17.59Ft P10-P90 1.26Ft LK-UFA_M 26.01Ft REL_DEP 132.69 MAX-MIN 3.82Ft LK_UFA_S 27.10Ft LK_A_DPT 309634.78Ft P90 139.01Ft AVE_DIFF 26.56Ft S_DIS 279.72 P50 139.68Ft ICU_THK 120.00Ft L_DIS 5779.10 P10 140.27Ft ELEV_UFA -30.00Ft RT_L_S 20.66 P10 INVEL 1.20Ft ELEV_ICU 90.00Ft SLOPE 0.01 WETINDEX 6.13 SAS_TK_B 48.56Ft WET_B 0.02 QD_STG 139.00Ft ICU+SAS 168.56Ft UPLD_B 0.82 IVT_ELEV 139.07Ft HD_GRAD 0.16 WET_100 0.03 MAY_LK_STG 138.01Ft UFA_ DEP 169.68Ft UPLD_100 0.97 SEPT_LK_STG 139.10Ft SF_AREA 125.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.34 AVE_STG 138.56Ft SHORE-PE 8383.51Ft UFA_MAY 112.00 Ft BAS_AREA 0.77 Sq. Miles Lake Deer137 138 139 140 141 142 143 Mar-45Mar-48Mar-51Mar-54Mar-57Feb-60Feb-63Feb-66 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 44. Lake Deer

PAGE 84

73 Appendix C (Continued) No. 40 Lake name: Lake Hamilton COUNTY Polk UFA_SEPT110.00 Ft LK_A_P 1905.76 P.O.R. 1945-1965 AVE_UF A 110.00Ft BAS_LK_A 6.07 P10-P50 1.84 Ft CHG_UFA 0.00Ft LK_DEP 5.91Ft P10-P90 3.89 Ft LK-UFA_M 9.52Ft REL_DEP 1643.29 MAX-MIN 7.23 Ft LK_UFA_S 10.34Ft LK_A_DPT 15947319.65Ft P90 118.64 Ft AVE_DIFF 9.93Ft S_DIS 234.94 P50 120.69 Ft ICU_THK 100.00Ft L_DIS 13176.74 P10 122.53 Ft ELEV_UFA17.00Ft RT_L_S 56.09 P10 INVEL 3.53 Ft ELEV_ICU 117.00Ft SLOPE 0.02 WETINDEX 8.05 SAS_TK_B 2.93Ft WET_B 0.04 QD_STG 120.00 Ft ICU+SAS 102.93Ft UPLD_B 0.51 IVT_ELEV 119.00 Ft HD_GRAD 0.10 WET_100 0.08 MAY_LK_STG 119.52 Ft UFA_DEP 103.69Ft UPLD_100 0.92 SEPT_LK_STG 120.34 Ft SF_AREA 2162.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.30 AVE_STG 119.93 Ft SHORE-PE49417.15Ft UFA_MAY 110.00 Ft BAS_AREA20.50 Sq. Miles Lake Hamilton116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 Mar-45Mar-48Mar-51Mar-54Mar-57Feb-60Feb-63Feb-66 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 45. Lake Hamilton

PAGE 85

74 Appendix C (Continued) No. 41 Lake name: Lake Hancock COUNTY Polk UFA_SEPT90.00 Ft LK_A_P 3402.59 P.O.R. 1958-1965 AVE_UF A 87.50Ft BAS_LK_A 18.55 P10-P50 1.02Ft CHG_UFA 5.00Ft LK_DEP 3.61Ft P10-P90 1.80Ft LK-UFA_M 12.12Ft REL_DEP 3887.66 MAX-MIN 4.52Ft LK_UFA_S 8.06Ft LK_A_DPT 54544902.64Ft P90 96.69Ft AVE_DIFF 10.09Ft S_DIS 44.91 P50 97.48Ft ICU_THK 135.00Ft L_DIS 40038.32 P10 98.50Ft ELEV_UFA-23.00Ft RT_L_S 891.43 P10 INVEL 6.80Ft ELEV_ICU 112.00Ft SLOPE 0.00 WETINDEX 9.82 SAS_TK_B -14.41Ft WET_B 0.23 QD_STG 97.00Ft ICU+SAS 120.59Ft UPLD_B 0.57 IVT_ELEV 91.70Ft HD_GRAD 0.08 WET_100 0.29 MAY_LK_STG 97.12Ft UFA_ DEP 120.48Ft UPLD_100 0.71 SEPT_LK_STG 98.06Ft SF_AREA 4519.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.40 AVE_STG 97.59Ft SHORE-PE57852.47Ft UFA_MAY 85.00 Ft BAS_AREA131.00 Sq. Miles Lake Hancock95 96 97 98 99 100 101 Jun-57Jun-58Jun-59Jun-60Jun-61Jun-62Jun-63Jun-64Jun-65Jun-66Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 46. Lake Hancock

PAGE 86

75 Appendix C (Continued) No. 42 Lake name: Lake Howard COUNTY Polk UFA_SEPT113.00 Ft LK_A_P 1390.53 P.O.R. 1946-1965 AVE_UF A 112.50Ft BAS_LK_A 13.04 P10-P50 0.49Ft CHG_UFA 1.00Ft LK_DEP 14.00Ft P10-P90 2.08Ft LK-UFA_M 18.29Ft REL_DEP 373.59 MAX-MIN 4.33Ft LK_UFA_S 17.80Ft LK_A_DPT 1953984.77Ft P90 129.81Ft AVE_DIFF 18.05Ft S_DIS 40.19 P50 131.40Ft ICU_THK 100.00Ft L_DIS 6508.89 P10 131.89Ft ELEV_UFA-35.00Ft RT_L_S 161.95 P10 INVEL 0.59Ft ELEV_ICU 65.00Ft SLOPE 0.01 WETINDEX 8.05 SAS_TK_B 65.55Ft WET_B 0.02 QD_STG 131.00Ft ICU+SAS 165.55Ft UPLD_B 0.58 IVT_ELEV 131.30Ft HD_GRAD 0.11 WET_100 0.04 MAY_LK_STG 130.29Ft UFA_ DEP 166.40Ft UPLD_100 0.96 SEPT_LK_STG 130.80Ft SF_AREA 628.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.54 AVE_STG 130.55Ft SHORE-PE19672.86Ft UFA_MAY 112.00 Ft BAS_AREA12.80 Sq. Miles Lake Howard127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 Mar-45Mar-48Mar-51Mar-54Mar-57Feb-60Feb-63Feb-66 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 47. Lake Howard

PAGE 87

76 Appendix C (Continued) No. 43 Lake name: Lake Mariana COUNTY Polk UFA_SEPT120.00 Ft LK_A_P 1040.30 P.O.R. 1946-1965 AVE_UF A 118.50Ft BAS_LK_A 3.56 P10-P50 0.88Ft CHG_UFA 3.00Ft LK_DEP 17.00Ft P10-P90 2.38Ft LK-UFA_M 18.46Ft REL_DEP 275.35 MAX-MIN 3.72Ft LK_UFA_S 16.14Ft LK_A_DPT 1288868.56Ft P90 134.70Ft AVE_DIFF 17.30Ft S_DIS 114.80 P50 136.20Ft ICU_THK 100.00Ft L_DIS 8231.50 P10 137.08Ft ELEV_UFA8.00Ft RT_L_S 71.71 P10 INVEL 0.84Ft ELEV_ICU 108.00Ft SLOPE 0.01 WETINDEX 8.05 SAS_TK_B 27.80Ft WET_B 0.03 QD_STG 136.00Ft ICU+SAS 127.80Ft UPLD_B 0.71 IVT_ELEV 136.24Ft HD_GRAD 0.14 WET_100 0.04 MAY_LK_STG 135.46Ft UFA_ DEP 128.20Ft UPLD_100 0.96 SEPT_LK_STG 136.14Ft SF_AREA 503.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.29 AVE_STG 135.80Ft SHORE-PE21061.94Ft UFA_MAY 117.00 Ft BAS_AREA2.80 Sq. Miles Lake Mariana133 134 135 136 137 138 Mar-45Mar-48Mar-51Mar-54Mar-57Feb-60Feb-63Feb-66 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl) P10 P50 P90 Figure 48. Lake Mariana

PAGE 88

77 Appendix C (Continued) No. 44 Lake name: Lake Otis COUNTY Polk UFA_SEPT110.00 Ft LK_A_P 442.35 P.O.R. 1954-1965 AVE_UF A 111.00Ft BAS_LK_A 4.48 P10-P50 2.08Ft CHG_UFA -2.00Ft LK_DEP Ft P10-P90 3.56Ft LK-UFA_M 11.90Ft REL_DEP MAX-MIN 5.65Ft LK_UFA_S 15.18Ft LK_A_DPT Ft P90 124.74Ft AVE_DIFF 13.54Ft S_DIS 61.48 P50 126.22Ft ICU_THK 100.00Ft L_DIS 3096.26 P10 128.30Ft ELEV_UFA-38.00Ft RT_L_S 50.36 P10 INVEL 3.69Ft ELEV_ICU 62.00Ft SLOPE 0.04 WETINDEX 6.91 SAS_TK_B 62.54Ft WET_B 0.01 QD_STG 128.00Ft ICU+SAS 162.54Ft UPLD_B 0.76 IVT_ELEV 124.61Ft HD_GRAD 0.08 WET_100 0.02 MAY_LK_STG 123.90Ft UFA_ DEP 164.22Ft UPLD_100 0.98 SEPT_LK_STG 125.18Ft SF_AREA 143.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.29 AVE_STG 124.54Ft SHORE-PE14081.96Ft UFA_MAY 112.00 Ft BAS_AREA1.00 Sq. Miles Lake Otis123 124 125 126 127 128 129 May-53Jun-55Jul-57Aug-59Sep-61Oct-63Nov-65 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 49. Lake Otis

PAGE 89

78 Appendix C (Continued) No. 45 Lake name: Lake Parker COUNTY Polk UFA_SEPT105.00 Ft LK_A_P 1897.56 P.O.R. 1949-1965 AVE_UF A 100.00Ft BAS_LK_A 6.65 P10-P50 0.97Ft CHG_UFA 10.00Ft LK_DEP 10.00Ft P10-P90 1.70Ft LK-UFA_M 34.32Ft REL_DEP 994.83 MAX-MIN 3.54Ft LK_UFA_S 25.54Ft LK_A_DPT 9896870.62Ft P90 128.89Ft AVE_DIFF 29.93Ft S_DIS 98.65 P50 129.62Ft ICU_THK 100.00Ft L_DIS 12655.84 P10 130.59Ft ELEV_UFA50.00Ft RT_L_S 128.28 P10 INVEL 1.44Ft ELEV_ICU 150.00Ft SLOPE 0.00 WETINDEX 8.05 SAS_TK_B -20.07Ft WET_B 0.07 QD_STG 130.00Ft ICU+SAS 79.93Ft UPLD_B 0.64 IVT_ELEV 129.15Ft HD_GRAD 0.37 WET_100 0.09 MAY_LK_STG 129.32Ft UFA_ DEP 79.62Ft UPLD_100 0.91 SEPT_LK_STG 130.54Ft SF_AREA 2272.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.30 AVE_STG 129.93Ft SHORE-PE52155.72Ft UFA_MAY 95.00 Ft BAS_AREA23.60 Sq. Miles Lake Parker127 128 129 130 131 132 Sep-48Sep-51Sep-54Sep-57Sep-60Sep-63Sep-66 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 50. Lake Parker

PAGE 90

79 Appendix C (Continued) No. 46 Lake name: Lake Reedy COUNTY Polk UFA_SEPT88.00 Ft LK_A_P 2856.22 P.O.R. 1947-1965 AVE_UF A 81.50Ft BAS_LK_A 11.18 P10-P50 0.81Ft CHG_UFA 13.00Ft LK_DEP 14.00Ft P10-P90 1.38Ft LK-UFA_M 2.50Ft REL_DEP 880.20 MAX-MIN 3.23Ft LK_UFA_S -9.18Ft LK_A_DPT 10846482.33Ft P90 77.65Ft AVE_DIFF -3.34Ft S_DIS 173.39 P50 78.22Ft ICU_THK 208.00Ft L_DIS 20485.47 P10 79.03Ft ELEV_UFA-250.00Ft RT_L_S 118.15 P10 INVEL 2.07Ft ELEV_ICU -42.00Ft SLOPE 0.00 WETINDEX 5.83 SAS_TK_B 120.16Ft WET_B 0.15 QD_STG 78.00Ft ICU+SAS 328.16Ft UPLD_B 0.60 IVT_ELEV 76.96Ft HD_GRAD -0.01 WET_100 0.20 MAY_LK_STG 77.50Ft UFA_ DEP 328.22Ft UPLD_100 0.80 SEPT_LK_STG 78.82Ft SF_AREA 3486.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.49 AVE_STG 78.16Ft SHORE-PE53164.94Ft UFA_MAY 75.00 Ft BAS_AREA60.90 Sq. Miles Lake Reedy76 77 78 79 80 81 Mar-45Mar-48Mar-51Mar-54Mar-57Feb-60Feb-63Feb-66 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl) P10 P50 P90 Figure 51. Lake Reedy

PAGE 91

80 Appendix C (Continued) No. 47 Lake name: Lake Rochelle COUNTY Polk UFA_SEPT120.00 Ft LK_A_P 1218.41 P.O.R. 1946-1965 AVE_UF A 119.00Ft BAS_LK_A 17.16 P10-P50 0.66Ft CHG_UFA 2.00Ft LK_DEP 14.00Ft P10-P90 2.96Ft LK-UFA_M 9.30Ft REL_DEP 358.41 MAX-MIN 4.60Ft LK_UFA_S 7.60Ft LK_A_DPT 1798412.73Ft P90 126.20Ft AVE_DIFF 8.45Ft S_DIS 387.53 P50 128.50Ft ICU_THK 100.00Ft L_DIS 6584.45 P10 129.16Ft ELEV_UFA3.00Ft RT_L_S 16.99 P10 INVEL 1.96Ft ELEV_ICU 103.00Ft SLOPE 0.01 WETINDEX 0.02 SAS_TK_B 24.45Ft WET_B 0.26 QD_STG 128.00Ft ICU+SAS 124.45Ft UPLD_B 0.47 IVT_ELEV 127.20Ft HD_GRAD 0.07 WET_100 0.35 MAY_LK_STG 127.30Ft UFA_ DEP 125.50Ft UPLD_100 0.65 SEPT_LK_STG 127.60Ft SF_AREA 578.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.41 AVE_STG 127.45Ft SHORE-PE20664.45Ft UFA_MAY 118.00 Ft BAS_AREA15.50 Sq. Miles Lake Rochelle124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 Mar-45Mar-48Mar-51Mar-54Mar-57Feb-60Feb-63Feb-66 Time (date)Stage, in ft msl P10 P50 P90 Figure 52. Lake Rochelle

PAGE 92

81 Appendix C (Continued) No. 48 Lake name: Lake Scott COUNTY Polk UFA_SEPT75.00 Ft LK_A_P 744.03 P.O.R. 1953-1965 AVE_UF A 70.00Ft BAS_LK_A 4.74 P10-P50 1.27Ft CHG_UFA 10.00Ft LK_DEP 9.19Ft P10-P90 2.86Ft LK-UFA_M 102.14Ft REL_DEP 383.55 MAX-MIN 4.94Ft LK_UFA_S 92.18Ft LK_A_DPT 1351423.12Ft P90 165.20Ft AVE_DIFF 97.16Ft S_DIS 1154.10 P50 166.79Ft ICU_THK 130.00Ft L_DIS 21278.61 P10 168.06Ft ELEV_UFA-22.00Ft RT_L_S 18.44 P10 INVEL 5.49Ft ELEV_ICU 108.00Ft SLOPE 0.02 WETINDEX 7.72 SAS_TK_B 59.16Ft WET_B 0.11 QD_STG 168.00Ft ICU+SAS 189.16Ft UPLD_B 0.83 IVT_ELEV 162.57Ft HD_GRAD 0.51 WET_100 0.12 MAY_LK_STG 167.14Ft UFA_ DEP 188.79Ft UPLD_100 0.88 SEPT_LK_STG 167.18Ft SF_AREA 285.00Acres GW_I_FLW 0.30 AVE_STG 167.16Ft SHORE-PE16685.64Ft UFA_MAY 65.00 Ft BAS_AREA2.11 Sq. Miles Lake Scott163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 Jan-52Feb-54Mar-56Apr-58May-60Jun-62Jul-64Aug-66 Time (date)Lake Stage (Feet, msl ) P10 P50 P90 Figure 53. Lake Scott


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
record xmlns http:www.loc.govMARC21slim xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.loc.govstandardsmarcxmlschemaMARC21slim.xsd
leader nam Ka
controlfield tag 001 001498264
003 fts
006 m||||e|||d||||||||
007 cr mnu|||uuuuu
008 041209s2004 flua sbm s000|0 eng d
datafield ind1 8 ind2 024
subfield code a E14-SFE0000502
035
(OCoLC)57710784
9
AJU6869
b SE
SFE0000502
040
FHM
c FHM
090
TA145 (ONLINE)
1 100
Gao, Jie,
d 1967-
0 245
Lake stage fluctuation study in West-Central Florida using multiple regression models
h [electronic resource] /
by Jie Gao.
260
[Tampa, Fla.] :
University of South Florida,
2004.
502
Thesis (M.S.C.E.)--University of South Florida, 2004.
504
Includes bibliographical references.
516
Text (Electronic thesis) in PDF format.
538
System requirements: World Wide Web browser and PDF reader.
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
500
Title from PDF of title page.
Document formatted into pages; contains 92 pages.
520
ABSTRACT: Multiple linear regression models were developed to calculate lake fluctuation that occurs between 10 percent, 50 percent, and 90 percent of the time lake surface elevation is exceeded. A total of 48 lakes were selected from Hillsborough, Pasco, Highlands and Polk counties, which were identified as natural lakes through the study the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) conducted in 1999 and 2002 to develop the models. "Natural lake" refers to lakes that were not impacted by ground water pumping. Among these 48 lakes, 22 lakes from Hillsborough and Pasco counties sit in the coastal lowlands area. 26 lakes from Highlands and Polk counties are located in the Upland and Highlands Ridge area. In developing multiple regression models, the 48 lakes were divided into two groups, the same group of lakes that SWFWMD used to develop the Reference Lake Water Regime, the method that is used to set the minimum lake levels in the region.Further, these two groups of data were subdivided into four categories based on their physical characteristics. 22 lakes were divided into surface water flow through lakes (SWF) and surface water drainage lakes (SWD). 26 lakes used their county line as the divider to separate them into Highlands County lakes and Polk County lakes. A total of six sets of multiple regression models were developed to predict the lake stage fluctuation for lakes that have no or limited lake stage data. The Polk County date set provides the best model with R2 at 0.9. However, due to the lack of available information on lake basin characteristics, the models that were developed for Hillsborough and Pasco counties do not provide a good prediction.
590
Adviser: Nachabe, Mahmood.
653
SWFWMD.
USGS.
basin characteristics.
minimum lake level.
Polk county.
Pasco county.
Highlands county.
Hillsborough county.
690
Dissertations, Academic
z USF
x Civil Engineering
Masters.
773
t USF Electronic Theses and Dissertations.
4 856
u http://digital.lib.usf.edu/?e14.502