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Do you have a permit for that? exposing the pseudo-public space and exploring alternative means of urban occupation

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Title:
Do you have a permit for that? exposing the pseudo-public space and exploring alternative means of urban occupation
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Barbosa, Adam
Publisher:
University of South Florida
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Private
Architecture
City
Simulacra
Street Art
Urban Intervention
Dissertations, Academic -- School of Architecture and Community Design -- Masters -- USF   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Abstract:
ABSTRACT: In his 1964 work "One Dimensional Man" Herbert Marcuse describes what he believes to be the de-evolution of industrialized society into the single minded pursuit of commerce. Decades later his hypothesis seems even closer to the truth, as much of our social interaction is now based in spaces that are designed to promote consumption. These spaces are in fact privately owned lots masquerading as public space so as to satiate the populace's desire for "public" interaction without sacrificing their effectiveness as places of commerce. The migration of social interaction into these pseudo-public spaces has also further marginalized the city's remaining public space. In his essay "Spaces of Uncertainty" Ken Cupers asks "is it only the sterile places with clearly defined use that we can enjoy today? Is it the designer shops, the fancy cafes, or the commercial promenades that provide our satisfaction? What about the young, the restless, the old, the poor, and the ones having been excluded from contemporary public space and therefore removed from society?" Options for inhabiting public space are limited for those who choose to forgo the theater of commercial space (and those who are forced to avoid it). However there is hope in the margins of our cities. The in-between and left behind spaces hold untold potential as spaces for interaction and expression. The struggle against the pseudo-public space utilizes a three-faceted approach with urban interventions inspired by the Situationists and modern street artists. Each of the interventions will be designed to either, inform, identify, or occupy. First, the city's inhabitants must be made aware of the nature of the pseudo-public space, its effects on our culture and their underlying mechanisms of control. Second, a network of marginalized spaces will be created as alternative spaces for occupation and interaction. Finally an intervention will be organized to occupy space outside the realm of the pseudo-public in a manner that could inspire other such occupations, or at the very least raise awareness as to the potential for non-commercial human interaction in the public sphere.
Thesis:
Thesis (M.Arch.)--University of South Florida, 2010.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
System Details:
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
System Details:
System requirements: World Wide Web browser and PDF reader.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Adam Barbosa.
General Note:
Title from PDF of title page.
General Note:
Document formatted into pages; contains X pages.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
usfldc doi - E14-SFE0003394
usfldc handle - e14.3394
System ID:
SFS0027709:00001


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ABSTRACT: In his 1964 work "One Dimensional Man" Herbert Marcuse describes what he believes to be the de-evolution of industrialized society into the single minded pursuit of commerce. Decades later his hypothesis seems even closer to the truth, as much of our social interaction is now based in spaces that are designed to promote consumption. These spaces are in fact privately owned lots masquerading as public space so as to satiate the populace's desire for "public" interaction without sacrificing their effectiveness as places of commerce. The migration of social interaction into these pseudo-public spaces has also further marginalized the city's remaining public space. In his essay "Spaces of Uncertainty" Ken Cupers asks "is it only the sterile places with clearly defined use that we can enjoy today? Is it the designer shops, the fancy cafes, or the commercial promenades that provide our satisfaction? What about the young, the restless, the old, the poor, and the ones having been excluded from contemporary public space and therefore removed from society?" Options for inhabiting public space are limited for those who choose to forgo the theater of commercial space (and those who are forced to avoid it). However there is hope in the margins of our cities. The in-between and left behind spaces hold untold potential as spaces for interaction and expression. The struggle against the pseudo-public space utilizes a three-faceted approach with urban interventions inspired by the Situationists and modern street artists. Each of the interventions will be designed to either, inform, identify, or occupy. First, the city's inhabitants must be made aware of the nature of the pseudo-public space, its effects on our culture and their underlying mechanisms of control. Second, a network of marginalized spaces will be created as alternative spaces for occupation and interaction. Finally an intervention will be organized to occupy space outside the realm of the pseudo-public in a manner that could inspire other such occupations, or at the very least raise awareness as to the potential for non-commercial human interaction in the public sphere.
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Do You Have A Permit For That? Exposing the Pseudo-Public Space and Exploring Alternative Means of Urban Occupation by Adam Barbosa of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture School of Architecture and Community Design College of the Arts University of South Florida Major Professor: Mark Weston, M. Arch. Gregory Green, MFA Stephen Szutenbach, M. Arch. Date of Approval: April 2, 2010 Keywords: Private, Intervention, Architecture, City, Simulacra Copyright 2010, Adam Barbosa

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List of Figures Abstract Introduction The Encroachment on Public Space: The In-Between: Seeking Out New Public Space The Art of War: Strategy and Tactics in Urbanism Tactical Performance: Action as Architecture Tactical Intervention: Temporary Architecture Case Studies Phase 1: Modifying the Visual Code Simulacra and You: Art, Architecture, and Our Distorted Reality Case Study 1-1: Barbara Kruger Case Study 1-2: Brad Downey Case Study 1-3: Permanent Breakfast Site Selection Phase 1: The Battlegrounds Interventions Phase 1: Unmasking the Pseudo-Public Space. Intervention 1-1: The Centro Ybor Brochure Hack Intervention 1-2: The Channelside Brochure Hack Brochure Hack Follow Up: Centro Ybor and Channelside Table of Contents iii ix 1 1 11 13 14 17 22 22 25 30 32 34 36 36 36 46 54 i

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Intervention 1-3: The Muvico Coupon Hack Intervention 1-4: The Centro Sign Project Intervention 1-5: The Ybor Planter Project Site Selection Phase 2: Existing in the Margins Case Studies Phase 2: Inform, Identify, Occupy Case Study 2-1: The Temporary Art Installation Case Study 2-2: The Transportable Object Case Study 2-3: The Built Intervention Interventions Phase 2: Exploring Alternative Spaces and Methods of Occupying Urban Space Intervention 2-1: The Punctuation Invasion Intervention 2-2.1: SMS Text Srver Intervention 2-2.2: Question Mark SMS Hybrid Intervention 2-2.3: Subvertisements Program Manifesto: A Guide to Urban Intervention Closing Comments Literature Cited Bibliography 55 65 72 83 119 120 128 132 136 136 139 152 168 175 188 200 204 206 208 ii

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Figure 1. Herald Square Gates, NY. (Photo by Mauro e Ornella via Panoramio) 3 Figure 2. Herald Square, NY. 3 Figure 3. Protesters at Baywalk, St Pete FL. (Photo by Anthony Allred) 4 Figure 4. Sidewalk in Question at Baywalk, St Pete, FL. 4 Figure 5. Sidewalk at Baywalk, St Pete, FL. (Photo Courtesy of City of St. Pete) 5 Figure 7. Channelside Street View 6 Figure 6. Channelside Street View 6 Figure 8. Centro Ybor Plaza (Photo by Virtual Tourist) 7 Figure 9. Marginalized Space in Tampa Re-purposed by Local Skaters 12 Figure 10. Easter Parade in NY in the Early 1890s (Painting by Once a Week Publishing in 1891) 15 Figure 11. Easter Parade NY (Photo by Getty Images) 15 Figure 12. Easter Parade NY (Photo by Stephen Chernin/Getty Images) 16 Figure 13. Easter Parade NY (Photo by Michael Arnella) 16 Figure 14. Brad Downey, The Madonna and Child (Photo by Braddowney.com) 18 Figure 15. Hover (Photo by Hyarchitecture.com) 19 List of Figures iii

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(Photo by RebarGroup.org) 20 Figure 17. Simulacrum Example 1 Media Induced False Reality 23 Figure 18. Simulacrum Example 2 Media Induced False Reality 23 Figure 19. Barbara Krugers Buy me...Ill Change Your Life 26 Figure 20. Barbara Krugers You Are Not Yourself 27 Figure 21. Barbara Krugers I Shop Therefore I Am 28 Figure 22. Barbara Kruger at Selfridges 29 Figure 23. Brad Downeys Whats Up (Photo by Braddowney.com) 31 Figure 24. Brad Downeys Wild at Heart (Photo by Braddowney.com) 31 Figure 25. Permanent Breakfast Example 1 (Photo by PermanentBreakfast.org 33 Figure 26. Permanent Breakfast Example 2 (Photo by PermanentBreakfast.org) 33 Figure 27. Centro Ybor, Security Asking Man to Leave 37 Figure 28. Centro Ybor Security Cameras 37 Figure 29. Centro Ybor Original Brochure 38 Figure 30. Centro Ybor Hacked Brochure 39 Figure 31. Location of Brochure Drop, Centro Ybor Visitors Center 40 Figure 32. Centro Ybor Brochure Hack Front and Back Covers 41 Figure 33. Centro Ybor Brochure Interior 42 Figure 34. Centro Ybor First Print Run 43 Figure 35. Centro Brochure In the Visitors Center 44 Figure 36. Centro Brochure In the Visitors Center Entrance and Exterior Light Up Photo 82 Figure 64. Psychogeographic Map of Downtown Tampa and the Potential Sites 86 Figure 65. Downtown Sites A & B 87 iv

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Figure 66. Downtown Sites C & D 88 Figure 67. Downtown Sites E & F 89 Figure 68. Downtown Sites G & H 90 Figure 69. Downtown Sites I & J 91 Figure 70. Downtown Sites K & L 92 Figure 71. Downtown Sites M & N 93 Figure 72. Downtown Sites O & P 94 Figure 73. Downtown Sites Q & R 95 Figure 74. Ybor Psychogeographical Map and Potential Discovered Sites 96 Figure 75. Ybor Sites A & B 97 Figure 76. Ybor Sites C & D 98 Figure 77. Ybor Sites E & F 99 Figure 78. Ybor Sites G & H 100 Figure 79. Ybor Sites I & J 101 Figure 80. Ybor Sites K & L 102 Figure 81. Ybor Sites M & N 103 Figure 82. Ybor Sites O & P 104 Figure 83. Ybor Sites Q & R 105 Figure 84. Ybor Site S 106 Figure 85. Ybor Site A Analysis 107 Figure 86. Ybor Site D Analysis 108 Figure 87. Ybor Site F Analysis 109 Figure 88. Ybor Site H Analysis 110 Figure 89. Ybor Site K Analysis 111 Figure 90. Ybor Site Q Analysis 112 Figure 91. Ybor Site R Analysis 113 Figure 92. Downtown Site B Analysis 114 Figure 93. Downtown Site J Analysis 115 Figure 94. Downtown Site K Analysis 116 Figure 95. Downtown Site L Analysis 117 Figure 96. Downtown Site O Analysis 118 Figure 97. Train of Thought (Photo by Laura OBrien) 121 Figure 98. Train of Thought (Photo by Laura OBrien) 122 Figure 99. Parking Day Site Map 123 Figure 100. Parking Day Sites 124 v

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Figure 101. Parking Day Sites 125 Figure 102. Parking Day Sites 126 Figure 103. Parking Day Sites 127 RebarGroup.org) 129 RebarGroup.org) 129 Figure 106. Hover (Photo by Hyarchitecture.com) 130 Figure 107. Hover (Photo by Hyarchitecture.com) 130 Figure 108. Break Block (Photo by Allan Chawner) 131 Figure 109. Break Block (Photo by Allan Chawner) 131 Figure 110. Sunday Adventure Club (Photo by Playscapes020 via Flickr.com) 133 Figure 111. Sunday Adventure Club (Photo by Playscapes020 via Flickr.com) 133 Figure 112. Marking Time (Photo by Florian Bolk) 134 Figure 113. Marking Time (Models by Hermann Scheidt) 134 Figure 114. Burnside Before Skatepark (Image by Burnsideproject.blogspot) 135 Figure 115. Burnside Before Skatepark (Image by Burnsideproject.blogspot) 135 Figure 116. Question Mark Construction 141 Figure 117. Question Mark Construction 142 Figure 118. Question Mark Construction 143 Figure 119. Question Mark Construction 144 Figure 120. Question Mark Site Pics 145 Figure 121. Question Mark Site Pics 146 Figure 122. Question Mark Site Pics 147 Figure 123. Question Mark Site Pics 148 Figure 124. Question Mark Site Pics 149 Figure 125. Question Mark Site Location Map 150 Figure 126. QR Codes for Question Marks 151 vi

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Figure 127. SMS Server Build Parts 154 Figure 128. SMS Server Build Parts 155 Figure 129. SMS Sticker Locations 156 Figure 130. SMS Sticker Campaign Locations 157 Figure 131. SMS Sticker Campaign Locations 158 Figure 132. SMS Sticker Campaign Locations 159 Figure 133. SMS Sticker Campaign Locations 160 Figure 134. SMS Sticker Campaign Locations 161 Figure 135. SMS Sticker Campaign Locations 162 Figure 136. SMS Sticker Campaign Locations 163 Figure 137. SMS Sticker Campaign Locations 164 Figure 138. SMS Sticker Campaign Locations 165 Figure 139. SMS Server Propaganda Projected in Centro 166 Figure 140. SMS Server Propaganda Projected in Centro 167 Figure 141. SMS Question Mark Locations 169 Figure 142. SMS Question Mark Paint 170 Figure 143. SMS Question Mark Location 1 171 Figure 144. SMS Question Mark Location 2 172 Figure 145. SMS Question Mark Location 3 173 Figure 146. SMS Question Mark Location 4 174 Figure 148. Poster Location Map 178 Figure 149. Poster 1 Code 179 Figure 150. Poster 1 Code Location 180 Figure 151. Poster 1 Code Location 181 Figure 152. Poster 2 Control 182 Figure 153. Poster 2 Control Location 183 Figure 154. Poster 2 Control Location 184 Figure 155. Poster 3 Patrol 185 Figure 156. Poster 3 Patrol Location 186 Figure 157. Poster 3 Patrol Location 187 Figure 161. Practice Set Up at Home and USF 193 vii

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viii

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ix Do You Have a Permit For That? : Exposing the Pseudo-Public Space and Exploring Alternative Means of Urban Occupation Adam Barbosa ABSTRACT In his 1964 work One Dimensional Man Herbert Marcuse describes what he believes to be the deevolution of industrialized society into the single minded pursuit of commerce. Decades later his hypothesis seems even closer to the truth, as much of our social interaction is now based in spaces that are designed to promote consumption. These spaces are in fact pri vately owned lots masquerading as public space so as to satiate the populaces desire for public interaction merce. The migration of social interaction into these pseudo-public spaces has also further marginalized the citys remaining public space. In his essay Spaces of Uncertainty Ken Cupers asks, is it only the sterile Is it the designer shops, the fancy cafes, or the commercial promenades that provide our satisfaction? What about the young, the restless, the old, the poor, and the ones having been excluded from contemporary public space and therefore removed from society? Options for inhabiting public space are limited for those who choose to forgo the theater of commercial space (and those

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who are forced to avoid it). However there is hope in the margins of our cities. The in-between and left behind spaces hold untold potential as spaces for interaction and expression. The struggle against the pseudo-public space utilizes a three-faceted approach with urban interven tions inspired by the Situationists and modern street art ists. Each of the interventions will be designed to either, inform, identify, or occupy. First, the citys inhabitants must be made aware of the nature of the pseudo-public space, its effects on our culture and their underlying mechanisms of control. Second, a network of marginal ized spaces will be created as alternative spaces for occupation and interaction. Finally an intervention will be organized to occupy space outside the realm of the pseudo-public in a manner that could inspire other such occupations, or at the very least raise awareness as to the potential for non-commercial human interaction in the public sphere. x

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1 Introduction

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1. Accessible to All

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2. Urban Recycling 3. My Space. Your Space. Our Space. 4. No Peeking.

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5.Types of Use Will Not be Limited. 6. Bring People to the Streets 7. Public Laboratory. 8. Stimulate Public Interaction 9. Have Fun 10. No Purchase Necassary