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Elevating communication

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Title:
Elevating communication
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Nguyen, Thao
Publisher:
University of South Florida
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Architecture
Art
Film
Cinema
Photography
Dissertations, Academic -- School of Architecture and Community Design -- Masters -- USF   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Abstract:
ABSTRACT: The products of vehicular transportation have led the modern traveler into a crisis of place. The modern journey that is held within ceaseless flux, confine movement to edges facilitating prompt passage yet negating active participation. These edges govern movement, highlighting points of destination while simultaneously obscuring our journey in between travels. The limited participation and extended observation of one's place within the concurring boundaries renders the senses dormant, causing passivity and reluctance to participate or communicate with the city. These lines of movement, demanding our attention toward beginning and end but omitting the middle, transforms the city, home, and place into the background at which movement seizes the foreground. If stability and opportunities for interruption is not made attainable to the modern traveler, one's sense of place will become blurred much like the perceived image of place occurring behind the window of our automobile. There must be a juxtaposition of the mechanical and instinctual experience in the modern travel with qualities that entice all human sensibilities. Elevating these grounded qualities of place into the traveled path will elevate the character of place against the pressure of movement, preserving the memory of place against the terror of forgetting. Qualities of architecture and urban conditions have collapsed against the swift forces of modern travel. Contextual information must arise above the ferocity of the travelers movement to supply the traveling perceiver with opportunities of interruption and introspection on place. Inscribing contextual information into the modern journey will awaken the senses, reaffi rming memory of place in order that the essence of place can be reestablished within its cultural and physical context. These interjected moments of knowing will reposition the perceiving traveler within the mental as well as bodily context of the city, home, and overall environment.
Thesis:
Thesis (M.Arch.)--University of South Florida, 2010.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
System Details:
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
System Details:
System requirements: World Wide Web browser and PDF reader.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Thao Nguyen.
General Note:
Title from PDF of title page.
General Note:
Document formatted into pages; contains X pages.

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University of South Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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usfldc doi - E14-SFE0003459
usfldc handle - e14.3459
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SFS0027774:00001


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ABSTRACT: The products of vehicular transportation have led the modern traveler into a crisis of place. The modern journey that is held within ceaseless flux, confine movement to edges facilitating prompt passage yet negating active participation. These edges govern movement, highlighting points of destination while simultaneously obscuring our journey in between travels. The limited participation and extended observation of one's place within the concurring boundaries renders the senses dormant, causing passivity and reluctance to participate or communicate with the city. These lines of movement, demanding our attention toward beginning and end but omitting the middle, transforms the city, home, and place into the background at which movement seizes the foreground. If stability and opportunities for interruption is not made attainable to the modern traveler, one's sense of place will become blurred much like the perceived image of place occurring behind the window of our automobile. There must be a juxtaposition of the mechanical and instinctual experience in the modern travel with qualities that entice all human sensibilities. Elevating these grounded qualities of place into the traveled path will elevate the character of place against the pressure of movement, preserving the memory of place against the terror of forgetting. Qualities of architecture and urban conditions have collapsed against the swift forces of modern travel. Contextual information must arise above the ferocity of the travelers movement to supply the traveling perceiver with opportunities of interruption and introspection on place. Inscribing contextual information into the modern journey will awaken the senses, reaffi rming memory of place in order that the essence of place can be reestablished within its cultural and physical context. These interjected moments of knowing will reposition the perceiving traveler within the mental as well as bodily context of the city, home, and overall environment.
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Elevating Communication by Thao Thanh Nguyen A thesis submitted in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture School of Architecture and Community Design College of the Arts University of South Florida Major Professor: Mark Weston, Stephen Szutenbach, M. Arch. Wendy Babcox, M.F.A. Date of Approval: April 16, 2010 Keywords: architecture, art, cinema, lm, photography Copyright 2010 Thao Thanh Nguyen

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Dedication The culmination of my studies as re ected in the document and my educational success would not be without the support and inspiration of the faculty and classmates. I owe my complete knowledge of architecture to everyone around me who have helped to foster the appropriate condition for learning through sharing of their own expertise and experience. Above all, I dedicate my success, both educationally and career-wise to my family, who have been the binding force of everything I have done. Through my success, failures, and endeavors, I am constantly able to be grounded by the constant encouragement and emotional support that my parents and brothers continue to extend my way. Lastly, the backbone of my success and reason for where I am today, I dedicate all that I am and have become to P.b. And though my involvement in my work have displaced us at opposite ends of the world, you continue to be on my mind and I am forever grateful for all that you have done for me, and so above all, I dedicate this to you.

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Acknowledgement I would like to acknowledge my thesis chair, Mark Weston for the freedom and opportunity to explore the thesis without boundaries. Such exploration has resulted in a rather episodic thesis but has nevertheless allowed me to arise above what I assumed to be my limits, exposing underlying skills and interest while mastering existing skills that blended various multidisciplinary approaches. Conversely, I would like to acknowledge Stephen Szutenbach for the boundaries that were set when my studies went astray. My ability to grasp and construct architectural theories and concepts would have not been as successful without the boundless knowledge which you possess and shared on a weekly basis. Your ability to understand and craft students ideas has allowed me to exceed intellectually in a manner I could never conceive of on my own. And nally, my ability to creatively stitch all these ideas and concepts together in the manner of lm and photography is the result of Wendy Babcox whom has allowed me to look outside the realm of architecture to perceive architecture everywhere and anywhere. Through your work and the work you have exposed me to, I was able to grasp and interject ideas of various disciplinary studies into my work. You have set me on a pursuit of creativity which has no limits and through your direction, I am able to conceptualize design in a unique manner that was before unknown to me.

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Table of Contents List of Tables ii Abstract v Chapter I: Introduction 1 Case Study One: Olafur Eliasson 4 Case Study Two: Louvre Museum 6 Case Study Three: Tower of Wind 7 Chapter II: The Problem 8 Chapter III: Travel, a Communicative Affair 11 Chapter IV: An Allegory for the Modern Traveler 16 Chapter V: The Experience of Driving 27 Chapter VI: Solution: Poetically Condensing (Film) 28 Chapter VII: Solution: Poetically Condensing Place 30 Chapter VIII: Preserving Memory of Place 31 Design Criteria: Concept Solution 32 Conclusion 36 References 37 Bibliography 38 i

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iiList of Figures Figure 1. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 11 Figure 2. Repetitive Experience for the Modern Traveler 13 Figure 3. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 13 Figure 4. Photographic Frame 15 Figure 5. Barriers 15 Figure 6. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 15 Figure 7. Road Decor 17 Figure 8. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 17 Figure 9. The Weather Project by Olafur Eliasson, Take Your Time: Olafur Eliasson 19 Figure 10. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 19 Figure 11. The Weather Project by Olafur Eliasson, Take Your Time: Olafur Eliasson 21 Figure 12. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 21 Figure 13. Louvre Museum by Jean Nouvel, http://www.eikongraphia.com/?p=1334 23 Figure 14. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 23 Figure 15. Tower of Wind by Toyo Ito, Toyo Ito 25 Figure 16. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 25 Figure 17. Physical and Visual Edges 27 Figure 18. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 27 Figure 19. Traveled Isolation 29 Figure 20. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 29 Figure 21. Modern Travel and Bounding Edges 31 Figure 22. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 31 Figure 23. East of Tampa Bay 33 Figure 24. West of Tampa Bay is the physical edge of Pinellas County. 33 Figure 25. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 33 Figure 26. Sequence as Crossing the Howard Franklin Bridge (towards St. Petersburg) 35 Figure 27. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 35 Figure 28. Visual Points 37 Figure 29. Contextual Information 37 Figure 30. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 37

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Figure 31. Analysis of the Site as Exiting and Entering Hillsborough County 39 Figure 32. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 39 Figure 33. Analysis of the Site as Exiting and Entering Pinellas County 41 Figure 34. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 41 Figure 35. Elevating Communication (Part 1: The Problem) 43 Figure 36. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 43 Figure 37. Storyboard 1 45 Figure 38. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 45 Figure 39. Storyboard 2 47 Figure 40. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 47 Figure 41. Storyboard 3 49 Figure 42. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 49 Figure 43. Storyboard 4 51 Figure 44. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 51 Figure 45. Storyboard 5 53 Figure 46. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 53 Figure 47. Storyboard 6 55 Figure 48. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 55 Figure 49. Storyboard 7 57 Figure 50. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 57 Figure 51. Storyboard 8 59 Figure 52. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 59 Figure 53. Storyboard 8 61 Figure 54. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 61 Figure 55. Storyboard 11 63 Figure 56. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 63 Figure 57. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 65 Figure 58. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 67 Figure 59. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 69 Figure 60. Formal study #1 71 Figure 61. Formal study #2 71 Figure 62. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 71 Figure 63. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 73 Figure 64. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 75 Figure 65. Diagram #1: Organizing Points of Reference 77 Figure 66. Construct #1: Organizing Points of Reference 77 iii

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Figure 67. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 77 Figure 68. Diagram #2: Punctuating and De ning Movement 79 Figure 69. Construct #2: Punctuating and De ning Movement 79 Figure 70. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 79 Figure 71. Diagram #3: Embracing the Isolation 81 Figure 72. Construct #3: Embracing the Isolation 81 Figure 73. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 81 Figure 74. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) 83 iv

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The products of vehicular transportation have led the modern traveler into a crisis of place. The modern journey that is held within ceaseless ux, con ne movement to edges facilitating prompt passage yet negating active participation. These edges govern movement, highlighting points of destination while simultaneously obscuring our journey in between travels. The limited participation and extended observation of one’s place within the concurring boundaries renders the senses dormant, causing passivity and reluctance to participate or communicate with the city. These lines of movement, demanding our attention toward beginning and end but omitting the middle, transforms the city, home, and place into the background at which movement seizes the foreground. If stability and opportunities for interruption is not made attainable to the modern traveler, one’s sense of place will become blurred much like the perceived image of place occurring behind the window of our automobile. There must be a juxtaposition of the mechanical and instinctual experience in the modern travel with qualities that entice all human sensibilities. Elevating these grounded qualities of place into the traveled path will elevate the character of place against the pressure of movement, preserving the memory of place against the terror of forgetting. Qualities of architecture and urban conditions have collapsed against the swift forces of modern travel. Contextual information must arise above the ferocity of the travelers movement to supply the traveling perceiver with opportunities of interruption and introspection on place. Inscribing contextual information into the modern journey will awaken the senses, reaf rming memory of place in order that the essence of place can be reestablished within its cultural and physical context. These interjected moments of knowing will reposition the perceiving traveler within the mental as well as bodily context of the city, home, and overall environment. vFigure 75. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication SequenceELEVATING COMMUNICATION THAO THANH NGUYEN ABSTRACT

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CHAPTER I Introduction Film and architecture centered the general scope of the thesis, however the intention of the study precedes general analysis and correlations of the two disciplines. The intention of the thesis is to explore the interaction of traveler and place within the context of the modern journey, that the scope of lm and architecture may assist to reinforce the overall critique. Uncovering these speci c experiences, the study began as a collection of photographic experiments that sought to frame, capture, and suspend spatial instances within the traveling environment. These are the speci c instances within the traveling experience that is otherwise lost because of the repetitive nature of how they are perceived. A photographic journal revisited how one perceives their place within a different aperture. The images isolate, crop, and reveal known yet desolate spatial moments within a new frame, releasing new meanings and relationships that these instances may have to the city. Progression of these studies, tightened the scope of photographed moments to objects and infrastructures of the driving experience. The compiled images of street objects mostly photographed at static composition outside the automobile prompted a study to understand these objects as they are also in ux, of which the driving experi-Figure 76. The repetitive nature of the road, offers a challenge to drivers to differentiate these various street objects as single part within a collective whole, instead the individual quality of these objects are lost at the uid imagery of driving. The individuality of each light post is only realized at the pause of the vehicle when the driver’s intent is to notice them. 1 Figure 77. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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ence was the catalyst. What was than revealed was the relationship of lm in the mode of driving. The automobile frames the driver into a speci c position and architecture and the urban environment is revealed in linear narratives. Presented to the driver is a narrative which is perceived collectively by others. The correlation is similar between a theatergoer experiencing a lm within the framed projection screen to a driver within the framed enclosure of a automobile, of which both experiences produce a collective perception. Contradicting however to one’s sense of place is the essence of experiences that exist at the grounds of cities and place, as these experiences are not narrowed down to singular lines of narrative but rather punctuated with moments of spontaneity and uctuation. Driving thus reduces movement and experiences to a emotional and perceptual singularity. Sense of place becomes devoid of certain characteristics and distinctions. The true essence of place cannot be known without knowing those moments that are tangible, heard, or smell. These events however requires the traveler to intercept these moving images, to allow them to become still and brought into dimension for the traveler to exploit all qualities of their existence. The presence of architecture and urban design become absent to the vehicular movement which positions the car between the person and the architecture and the person and place. Qualities to which buildings and place resonates with people dwindle against the accelerated linear perception of movement. To penetrate one’s consciousness, the architecture and contextual information must survive the forces that are brought against the pressure of these vehicular infrastructures and bleed into Figure 78. Through the frame, each photograph reveals instances within the urban environment, instances that are often lost within the monotony of the road. In such case, the ground, sky, and horizon is revealed. Figure 79. The hostile barriers which acts as landings for several vehicular infrastructures also acts to elevate the traveler from the grounds of his city.2 Figure 80. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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one’s perceptual mode of travel long enough so that spatial distinction mitigates the crisis of place. In the scope of lm and architecture, lm is the process of understanding speci c experiences where the architectural concept will arise as the mitigating force against the experientially hollow and singular moments of driving. The extent of the research and analysis covered within the thesis is not meant to make constant correlations with the general theme of lm. Rather these themes only act to critique the problem while conceptually supplying a solution. Film as a exploratory and representational tool is directly pursued and explored towards the second half of the thesis to examine more closely the problem and proposed solution. Figure 81. Trees become an attempt to humanize these otherwise mechanical experience of driving. Though perhaps more tacky than effective, they sometimes allow for illusory effect to occur rather through the interaction of light, a softening of the edge, or for providing formal transitions.3 Figure 82. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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Through conception of aesthetics, articulating elements that are sociable and community oriented, may derive an experience which will “inscribe a sense of community,” within place.1 As a condition that represents relational aesthetics, the intervention must be conceived through the process of discovering what is socially relatable and understood by the subject, in order that conscious intent may emerge.2 By referencing the idea of relational aesthetics that is exhibited within artwork of Olafur Eliasson, one will be able to abstract a moment that will represent, produce, or prompt interpersonal relations within the experiencing self and speci cally, the traveler that is in the mode of moving through.3 Modern travel allows for an opportunity of collective perception where the traveler is able to perceive the same thing within the realm of others. The collective perception may assist in the opportunity where elevated human qualities of place can mediate the disconnect between self and place; grounding the experiencing self back into the same physical plane of others. The modern architectural environment 1 Olafur Eliasson, Madeleine Grynsztejn, and Mieke Bal. Take Your Time: Olafur Eliasson (San Francisco: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 2007) 133. 2 Olafur Eliasson, Madeleine Grynsztejn, and Mieke Bal. Take Your Time: Olafur Eliasson (San Francisco: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 2007) 133. 3 Olafur Eliasson, Madeleine Grynsztejn, and Mieke Bal. Take Your Time: Olafur Eliasson (San Francisco: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 2007) 134.CASE STUDY ONE Olafur Eliasson Figure 83. The Weather Project by Olafur Eliasson offers one the opportunity to enter into a collective perception in which the act of gathering and perceiving occurs within the realm of others. 4 Figure 84. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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caters to the eyes, often only penetrating within the visual senses, leaving the other senses disengaged.4 If there is not an opportunity to connect the tangible qualities to the visual imageries, then the product of one’s experience becomes solely super cial. The Weather Project by Olafur Eliasson positions the physical self within the realm of others and presents to them an object of central hierarchy, the sun. Within the collective mode of perceiving the sun, one becomes aware of themselves amongst the realm of others and in such cases, a sense of community, place and self is exhibited. Collective experiences and activities will bring to order the disjointed sensorial experiences that lends to an overall crisis of place. In the overall understanding of self, and self within the realm of others, one would be able to form as Olafur Eliasson states “him or herself through engagement with the environment” and in turn, engagement within the realm of collective perception. 4 Yi-fu Tuan Space and Place: The Perspective of Experience (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1977) 11. Figure 85. The Weather Project is a simple composition of habitable space and an object which acts as the main hierarchy. The striking quality of the sun causes one to collectively position their sight towards a focal point and as a result a sociable moment occurs in which a collective many is brought into a similar realm offering a sense of community.5 Figure 86. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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The opposite forces acting upon each other within the building’s two main formal components allows for a unique spatial condition. These conditions establishes an experiential enclosure separate from site context. Cohesion of dome and exhibition spaces are done not within the typical formal understanding but rather metaphorically, by the layers of penetrating lights that cast and masks the museum interiors, blending any formal variety into one visual uniformity. As individuals are pulled completely from the site, the experiencing self is immersed completely and fully within the sensorial realm of the architecture. All formal characteristics are blanketed into one collective perception. The minimal gesture of the dome, encompassing the museum, aids in the experiential uidity and the effects becomes one that pulls the fragmented thoughts of those experiencing the space into one collective understanding. CASE STUDY TWO Jean Nouvel: Louvre Museum Figure 87. The dome of the Louvre Museum by Jean Nouvel creates for an illusory effect in which great details and differences within each space is blurred to the perceiver by the scattered light which lters through the dome.6 Figure 88. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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Various climatic condition and interaction at the grounds is transformed by the Tower of Wind into information that is visible to the perceiver. Situated in the streets of Yokohama, the tower acts to awaken the detaching senses that are often neglected within the monotony of everyday transactions. The uninhabitable structure that masks the exterior of a existing ventilation tower is dressed with hundreds of miniature lamps that illuminate in correspondence to the ow of air, wind, and sounds.1 In turn, a uctuating event unfolds to the presence of “invisible nature” and than transforms it into aesthetic information through modern technology.2 The very act of awakening the senses to these invisible qualities, awakens one’s understanding of the moment of experience that is before them. Within the moment of realization, past and future is what Irmtraud Schaarschmidt considers to be “wiped out by the present.” Schaarschmidt follows by stating that since a moment can never be static, constant transformation must and is occurring. The tower in this sense acts as the object of the kind of aesthetics that represents man’s constant transformation and through such representation, brings about a collective understanding of moment and self within the context of place and time. 1 Charles Jencks and Irmtraud Schaarschmidt-Richter, Toyo Ito (Weinheim: Ernst, 1995) 16. 2 Charles Jencks and Irmtraud Schaarschmidt-Richter, Toyo Ito (Weinheim: Ernst, 1995) 16.CASE STUDY THREE Toyo Ito: Tower of Wind Figure 89. Toyo Ito, Tower of Wind re ects the condition of the wind, sound, and noise. These qualities of the space aesthetically impacts the appearance of the tower, changing as the condition of the tower changes.7 Figure 90. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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The existence of the automobile carved, arranged, and segregated the urban landscapes into episodic moments of experiences. The corporeal being once held at the immediate tangible grounds of the city is now transposed behind the framed enclosure of the vehicle. No longer is the pedestrian positioned in front of his city and architecture but rather in his seat, within his vehicle, and through the frames by which captures place. Moments of tangible interaction that once might have occurred are now compressed into momentary visuals placed either at a distance or within close enough proximity to become a visual blur by the swift movement of the vehicle. The moving perspective translates into edge conditions separating the person from grasping the true essence of place which, by nature, does not move with him but instead fades into the distance. Though the experience of perceiving architecture and urban landscape is brought into a unique viewpoint, such experiences are not meant to linger long enough to arouse one’s senses and distill one’s memory. Vehicular accessibility has shaped the “physique and perception of contemporary cities,” allowing the act of driving to pull experiences through but not permitting movement to uctuate beyond the determined line of passage.1 Important 1 Mitchell Schwarzer, Zoomscape: Architecture in Mo-CHAPTER II The Problem F i gure 91. T h e p h otograp h re ects t h e many an d var i ous p hysical and visual edges that keeps the traveler from perceiving p l ace. 8 Figure 92. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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contextual information is omitted while what is attained is generalized into transformative visuals which suppresses the distinctiveness and character of place. Experiences becomes singular within the scope of sensorial engagement and its accountability for one’s sense of place, makes such experience liable for the overall crisis of place. With the distinctiveness of place becoming transient against the stillness of the automobile frame and dashboard, one becomes disengaged from the instability of passing environments that only occasionally takes form at the pause of the vehicle.2 Experiences cornered into an unchanging state of uniformity stage the perceptual visuals to that which is dictated by necessity for prompt passage rather than ful lling experiences. A design intervention must string together these contextual information in order to become elevated so that the latent character of place is brought to a fullexposing the unique possibilities and exploiting contrasts in function, scale, and character.3 The culminated journey is punctuated with holes, missing parts, and an unknowing of the true essence which derives from place. In such experience, the surface of place is slightly scratched but never peeled to uncover the generator from which building and place breathes of personality. What is attained at the beginning of the journey remains unchanged at the conclusion, as the journey never breaks the various layers to one’s consciousness. An experience which may embrace all senses is replaced with an instinctual mode of perceiving and tion and Media (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2004) 108. 2 Mitchell Schwarzer, Zoomscape: Architecture in Motion and Media (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2004) 108. 3 Michael Terence Gage and Maritz Vandenberg Hard Landscape in Concrete (London: Architectural Press, 1975) 8. Figure 93. Isolation is brought to the traveler when his experience is con ned within the road. What occurs within surrounding environment becomes desolated because these urban interventions do not possess the human sensibilities to entice and encourage active participation. 9 Figure 94. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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understanding. And though one’s instinct may contribute to one’s experience, these instincts never rely on the external and internal stimuli to engage the environment but instead relay necessary actions to ful ll the foregoing task.4 Driving becomes that task and under the environment of the road, one is never encouraged to break outside those intended tasks. Distance seems to run in nitely, so rather than being in complete awareness, one only reacts if the moment deems it necessary. Thus, what occurs in the process of driving causes the senses to become dulled by the lack of diversity. Whatever detail may exist, distance tends to blur. As the perceiver is separated visually from the details of afar, he or she is than forced to rely on what is immediate and visually clear in front of them; the lack of variety in turn distills a rather homogenized image of place. Sense of place is thus put in crisis, as place within the perceived experience, becomes accepted as a conglomerated thing rather than something consisting of many parts, characteristics, and experiences, and what is lost is the many opportunities to know place; to intercept place. 4 James Drever, Instinct in Man: a Contribution to the Psychology of Education (Gardners Books, 2007) 17.10 Figure 95. Modern travel consists of bounding edges that con nes the traveler to singular experiences. Unable to become interrupted, sense of place attached to one’s journey becomes composed of super cial imageries that is left to be perceived but never registered as known tangible experiences. Figure 96. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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The traveler’s journey and the grounds on which the journey occurs presents an elaborate system of communication. The communicator is place, the communication is the journey that occurs from one place to the other, and the information communicated is the traveler. Understanding travel as a system of communication and the role that modern intervention ful ll within this abstracted notion of travel will reveal the problem and conceptualize a solution necessary to accommodate for one’s crisis of place. To present the components of communication, a site speci c location is selected and each roles and components of communication is assigned to the site and context of the site. A bridge connecting two land mass will allegorically present the concept for communication, of which the Howard Frankland Bridge is the analogy. The Howard Frankland Bridge is vacant of the architectural mass and urban scenes which often surrounds bridges. Instead the traveler who communicates across is extended and brought into a physical and visual isolation. Within the experience, the bridge (one of many) stretches as a vehicular infrastructure, merging the gap that separates Pinellas and Hillsborough County meanwhile crossing Tampa Bay. As the landmass is notched out by the bay, these various strings of bridges stretch across to mend the distance, embedding those who choose CHAPTER III Travel, a Communicative Affair11 Figure 97. East of Tampa Bay is the physical edge of Hillsborough County. Where the traveler departs from Tampa, the traveler is brought onto the Howard Frankland Bridge or oppositely, the traveler is brought from the bridge and into Hillsborough County. Figure 98. West of Tampa Bay is the physical edge of Pinellas County. Figure 99. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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to embark across, a sense of between-ness prior to entering place. Within the knowing of one’s position as being between, one is able to account for the experience of not being here or there but being of neither physical location. In such case, the experience of entering and exiting place is elevated and made known to the traveler. These landmasses perceived through isolation allows contextual information to be presented and communicated to the modern traveler. As the condition of the bridge prompts the traveler’s momentary isolation, the physical closeness of the man made objects distance themselves from one’s visual sight. Only occasionally and depending on the orientation of the body, do these objects fall in and out the travelers line of vision. Never do these objects seem to situate themselves. The only thing to accompany us is the neighboring driver that passes by or lingers behind, of which never situating long enough to elude to their presence. Their similar experience of the bridge shrouds them in their own isolation and when the traveler is not seeking them out, they themselves are confronted by similar isolated feelings. Places of rest, pause, detour, or exit are absent within the bridge, causing one to become visually aligned to the path. Only when the visually absent is again populated with objects, does the attention of the perceiver become aware of these gures from the distance, assigning these formal gestures with identity. The rigid conglomeration of forms and clusters are associated with identity, place is imprinted within the mind of the traveler and offered a physical characteristic to be adhered to a name. In the mode of association, the driver is able to interject identity into his travel; identify12 Figure 100. Sequential sequence as one crosses the Howard Franklin Bridge (towards St. Petersburg) and over the county border. In such case the county line is understood as the imagined edge of place where as the physical and visual edge which is physically known and visualize at the beginning and end of place is seen once entering and exiting the body of land. The visual and physical isolation that is further pronounced by the body of water further offers a literal sense of entry and exit of place, in such case, one becomes aware of place as contextual information is elevated for the perceiver to be aware. Figure 101. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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ing place and journey which is held between those place. Furthermore distance is calculated, space is punctuated, and the physical position of the body can be estimated within the distance of these identi ed places. The traveler sense of orientation is realigned and one’s sense of place is derived from the experiential isolation of experiences. 13 Figure 102. As one crosses the bridge, various visual points are accentuated and elevated against the spatially void and vacant site. Visually hierarchical points are concentrated towards downtown areas, iconic architecture, or points that contrasts the mechanical experience of driving. Figure 103. Contextual information is released and accentuated according to the drama of the road; the road curvature, visually framed images, or speed differentiations may offer opportunities in which the revealing of place may be choreographed and enhanced for the perceiver. Figure 104. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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14 Figure 105. Analysis of the site as exiting and entering Hillsborough County in terms of what is visually perceived by the trav eler. Various points in which the environment is introduced and reintroduced to the traveler occurs either with introduction or disap pearance of land mass or objects that are visually obstructive to the perceiver at rst then begins to act to reintroduce the environment. For example, highway overpass which con nes the visual and then reveals the environment once the traveler passes under and through. Figure 106. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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15 Figure 107. Analysis of the site as exiting and entering Pinellas County in terms of what is visually perceived by the traveler Figure 108. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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Elevating Communication is an allegorical critique about the modern traveler and his passage through the urban built environment. By using telephone lines as a physical re ection of communication between communicators, a story of the traveling perceiver communicating through place is presented. The antagonist is modern technology which looks to render communication invisible by translating the physical communication into frequency. As communication loses its physical form, one is not able to visualize the communicated and the communicator, causing communication to never become intercepted. The modern journey is thus void of the appropriate participation with place. Modern technology is in this case, vehicular infrastructure which is overlaid over the pre-existing urban fabric, resulting in the traveler and concurring journey to be elevated from the immediate tangible grounds of place. Not able to visualize these intersections of communication, the traveler is left unable to become interrupted, unable to route himself back to the communicator. The result is one’s crisis of place which may be mediated if primitive communication is allowed to elevate, to be made visible for the modern traveler.CHAPTER IV An Allegory for the Modern Traveler16 Figure 109. Elevating Communication (Part 1: The Problem) Sequences from rst exploration into lm in which the traveled experience is portrayed as an isolated experience. Part 1 presents the traveler as isolated from place when traveling through place, and thus never grasping a true essence of place. Figure 110. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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17 Figure 111. Storyboard 1: Allegorically re ecting the components of communication (the communicators, the communication, and the message), the rst scene establishes the rst communicator (the place of departure) in which the message (the traveler) originates from. Departure of the traveler presents a message attempting to be sent and communicated to, for the opposite communicator to be received. Place of departure may be of various locations; cities, home, public and non public space... etc. Figure 112. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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18 Figure 113. Storyboard 2: The rst phase of communication is primitive communication. Primitive communication is essentially the beginning forms of communicating and is tangible, seen, and heard by the communicators and because such communication is sensible and able to be attained physically and visually, the traveler is able to intercept and participate with communicators because the traveler is perceiving the communicated. Interception of communication and participation with communicators develops a more hol istic sense of place. A holistic understanding in the sense that the participation extends beyond the perceived experience and is attached with the tangible qualities of place. Primitive communication is human interaction and within the urban built environment, such communication occurs spontaneously at street corners, paths, courtyard, etc... These are the spatial urban opportunities for commu nication to be interrupted, intercepted, and participated with on a spontaneous level Figure 114. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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19 Figure 115. Storyboard 3: The second phase of communication is the introduction of modern communication. Modern communication is advance, economical, and ef cient yet obscures the tangible, sensible means of interaction and transaction of communication. Such communication renders the physical communication into invisible communication. The inability to perceive communication causes the message (the traveler) to become lost, not able to develop a sense of knowing for those things communicated. Such cl ouded notion of communication does not allow the message (the traveler) to grasp a true vivid capture of place, thus never understand ing place on a tangible level. Furthermore one is not able to position oneself within the physical and corporal realm of place. Mod ern communication is an allegory for the modern urban intervention such as highway infrastructure which detaches the traveler, elevati ng the traveler from the immediate tangible grounds of place. In such cases the traveler’s place is obscured of the tangible qualities of place, causing the vivid qualities of place to become de-saturated and replace with a super cial impression of place. The result is that one’s experience of place only scratches the surface of an experience yet never penetrating the core quality of place. Figure 116. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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20 Figure 117. Storyboard 4: Modern communication replaces primitive communication. The message (traveler) is synchronized into new modes of movement. Distance and layers separates the message into order and inclusive paths that does not encourage interce ption or interruptions but instead a straight shot to the communicator. Modern communication or highway infrastructures are ef ciently routing the traveler through lines of communication without encouraging the traveler to pause. These infrastructural edges enco urages singular movement/travel and the traveler is left to follow these lines of movement unaware of the various other lines of commu nication buried and existing below the traveler. Highway infrastructure con nes the person within his vehicle and various boundaries are created between the person and the vehicle, the person and the infrastructure, and the person and place. Primitive communicatio n is accessible but the traveler must penetrate and break these various layers before reaching the core of place. Figure 118. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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21 Figure 119. Storyboard 5: As primitive communication transitions into new forms of communication, what is not immediately known, perceived, seen, or heard, as the message (the traveler) crosses these primitive communication causes the communication to become buried and forgotten. As the primitive fabric of communication (the urban fabric) is buried, the traveler becomes unawar e of how cities, place, and space is connecting and communicating and thus becomes unaware of how himself is connected back to place Figure 120. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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22 Figure 121. Storyboard 6: Primitive communication is overlaid and buried under modern communication. The message (traveler) is sent over modern communication yet never intersecting the primitive. Fabric of existing urban communication prior to modern communication is lost and obscured from the traveler. What is perceived is perceived from the distance onto which the modern co mmunication occurs, the message (traveler) is never able to become interrupted and thus not allowing the message to be intercept ed with spontaneity. Experiences within the sense of modern communication is thus hollow and void of experiences that invites the possi bilities for disruption. Figure 122. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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23 Figure 123. Storyboard 7: As the message (traveler) is processed through modern communication (modern travel), primitive communication is no longer immediately accessible through one’s perceptive experience. Primitive communication (existing urban fa bric) is buried by one’s lack of knowledge to their presence. The modern travel and experience through place is diluted by what is on ly immediately seen and thus what is not perceived is forgotten under the weight of modern urban intervention. Figure 124. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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24 Figure 125. Storyboard 8: Primitive communication only occasionally emerges but only when the grounded quality of place is ab le to be elevated against the pressure of ef ciency occurring at the level of modern communication. Figure 126. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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25 Figure 127. Storyboard 8: The grounded qualities inscribed into place through time becomes qualities which is socially attain able by the perceiver and thus entices the human sensibilities that occurs at the level of primitive communication but is often forgott en within the con nes of modern communication. Figure 128. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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26 Figure 129. Storyboard 11: Elevating the physical quality of communication to a level of perceiving will engage the perceptual experience of modern communication and connect these perceptions to the tangible quality of place, connecting the traveling per ceiver back into place. Figure 130. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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Under the in uence of the road, driving triggers a speci c experience and of these experiences, two arises according to the condition of the driver and environment. The experiences in uences the traveler in matters that determines how the traveler is to discern his or her environment. Experience, as one which is the very process of living, is instinctively provoked by natural procedures of acting, seeing, and knowing.1 Submitting oneself to these natural procedures prompts an experience to become instinctual. Along these lines however sometimes comes a moment of interruption, a moment which resuscitate unconscious thought into consciousness. These moments penetrates the scope of knowing to solidify our sense of place, our sense of self, and our senses as they exist for us to be aware of the delicacy of experiences. These experiences are what we consider an experience one of extraneous interruptions or of inner lethargy, which punctuates our everyday procedures with identity.2 The product of modern urban intervention have obscured the details, transcending the speci cs of knowing place beyond the discernible qualities and into the generalization of place. Elevating urban communication is an effort against the prospect of submitting oneself completely to the experience of 1 John Dewey Art As Experience (New York: Minton, Balch & Company, 1934) 36. 2 John Dewey Art As Experience (New York: Minton, Balch & Company, 1934) 36.CHAPTER V The Experience of Drivinginstinct so that one becomes interjected with emotion, ideas, to which conscious intent may arise.3 If one is able to become confronted with options rather then constricted to a de ned path, then the opportunity to make choices will inscribe the maps of one’s movement through place; de ning edges, calculating distance, and declaring place and space to be distinct. In turn, these qualities which arises through conscious intent will assign history to one’s journey, each with a plot, an inception and movement towards a close; each with a non repeated quality pervading throughout.4 This occurs when the repetitive nature of driving is intercepted and disrupted by the grounded qualities of place. 3 John Dewey Art As Experience (New York: Minton, Balch & Company, 1934) 36. 4 John Dewey Art As Experience (New York: Minton, Balch & Company, 1934) 37.27 Figure 131. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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Film consist of parts ltered through various levels of edits; of scenes, of people, of the acts that the people carry through and the place those acts consummate. De nition is kept to a minimal or exposed to the fullestto a level of suggesting or to a point of exploitation. What is conveyed is explored within the scope of frames, movement, or narrative which unfolds within the key element of cinema. The experience sets the act of watching cinema to be linear, yet what derives engages the mind in ways that is far from being experientially singular. These moments of non-singularity occur when the perceiver strings together various facets of his or her own experience, history or life to paint the emotions of the lm in complete vividness. A piece of cinema is most potent when others are able to attach the emotion of cinema to their own. The goal is to create a piece of work which does not become emotionally void, but to entice the perceiver to join in an emotional dialogue; to furnish these lmic imageries with history, meanings, and values, and thus to ll the void up to its rim with information conjured up from the act of seeing lm. Cinema de nes the dimension and essence of existential space, which depicts experiential scenes of everyday life.1 As the perceiver is exclusively set to particular narratives, there exists 1 Juhani Pallasmaa. The Architecture of Image: Existential Space in Cinema (Helsinki: Rakennustieto, 2001), 13.CHAPTER VI Solution: Poetically Condensing (Film)the visible as that which is literally presented to the viewer, and the imagined, the things which are aroused thereafter or during, by the absence of details on the screen. The interplay of those things which are visible and imagined to us, produces a secondary layer of experience which is not possessed in the lm exclusively, but instead, emanates from the immediate grounds by which cinematic image meets the conscious mind. The product of the emanating moment is the result of poetically condensing experiences into a visual that is relatable and provokes many thoughts; in the case of cinema, the scenes which is able to spur various other images from one’s own experience and memory.2 Rainer Maria Rilke speaks to the act of poetically condensing these things to provoke the various other thoughts: ‘For the verses are not, as people imagine, simply feelings...they are experi2 Juhani Pallasmaa. The Architecture of Image: Existential Space in Cinema (Helsinki: Rakennustieto, 2001), 9.28 Figure 132. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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ences. For the sake of a single verse, one must see many cities, men and things, one must know the animals, one must feel how the birds y and know the gesture with which the little owers open in the morning.’3 Furthermore these poetic condensing of things will open up streams of association and affect, strengthening our existential sense and sensitizing the boundary between ourselves and the world; while emancipating the human imagination.4 Memory, by way of lling the missing information, entices the imagination, which then causes the audience to insert details of their own inherent images. For instance, imagine a scenario of two characters, one positioned within a clearly visible space in front of a door and the other only merely suggested through the power of cinema, to be opposite of the door. With the proper play of cinematic techniques, the perceiver begins to imagine the person on the exterior space without having literally seen the character in such a space. Furthermore, to mentally position the second character, the viewer is required to envision the back of the door at which the character is facing, perhaps the frame on which the door hinges, the wall on which the frame lays at to, and to the wall, the various other elements that con nes the space: the oor, ceiling, and other oppositely bounding walls. Though perhaps the details is not meant to recognize the speci c parts but instead pieces which conveys the larger idea, the spatial consideration is required to be understood for a space to naturally ow within the lm. These various elements which are borrowed from one’s repository of experiences and understanding of space, lls the holes and gaps 3 Juhani Pallasmaa. The Architecture of Image: Existential Space in Cinema (Helsinki: Rakennustieto, 2001), 9. 4 Juhani Pallasmaa. The Architecture of Image: Existential Space in Cinema (Helsinki: Rakennustieto, 2001), 9.29 Figure 133. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequencealong the sequences of the lm and thus helps to ground the spatial characteristic of the scene. Juhani Pallasmaa terms the moment of conceptualizing space though re ecting of the inherent ephemeral architecture of the mind, thought and emotion, as “mind-spaces.”5 The moments in which poetic images construct space in the mind does not occur solely within the viewing of lm but is confronted by the many images discovered in place, space, and within the overall experiences of living. These moments occur when seeing, hearing, touching, or smelling triggers images of the past. The goal is to understand the possible application of such instances as occurring in lm, to occur within the realm of architecture and more speci cally, within the traveled experience. Poetically condensing, as occurring in images may be related to the urban intervention to incite memory in the traveler. If the product of modern inventions have positioned the viewer outside the frame that displays the speci c quality of space, perhaps from this physical separation there must exist a point to incite memory of place, so that one may be positioned back into the frame at which place is remembered as a tangible affair. 5 Juhani Pallasmaa. The Architecture of Image: Existential Space in Cinema (Helsinki: Rakennustieto, 2001), 9.

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CHAPTER VII Solution: Poetically Condensing Place Driving displays the context of a site through a frame, causing vast contextual information to be dismissed. The experience of the traveler is left with slight impressions of a site, with only the surface of place imprinted onto the consciousness. What is not immediately seen outside the frame of a vehicle is left unexplored and assumed. Conceptualizing and understanding the space and place which is not immediately visible to the traveler, one is left to substitute the missing information with information which is assumed. One’s sense of place is substituted with assumptions because one’s path is not placed within the tangible grounds; unable to become interrupted by qualities of distinctiveness. The road structures the narrative of one’s perceptual experience, keeping the narrative in sync with the path, embracing movement yet removing the opportunity to situate. Those distinct qualities grounded in place, must condense and elevate themselves against the pressure of movement. What needs to occur is not for these various characteristics to be displayed completely but rather to become poetically condensed in a manner of being able to open up streams of association and affect. If the overall contextual information of the site is understood and allowed to concentrate into focal points to incite memory, than what have become physical distance may be mended by visceral closeness. 30 Figure 134. Formal study #1 attempting to construct and utilize contextual information to generate form. Figure 135. Formal study #1 attempting to construct and utilize contextual information to generate form. Figure 136. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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If the traveler is to grasp a sense of place, it would be place that must conform to the modern urban intervention. These edge conditions that con nes the traveler must be alleviated to allow for the sociable qualities of place to be elevated. Condensing and elevating contextual information as gurative gestures of expressionism will transcend qualities of place to a level of visibility and incite memory of place. The layer of information that the architecture functions to preserve, defends against the crisis of forgetting, at which the culmination of modern urban intervention looks to bury; along with our memory of place. Preservation within the terms of the architectural intervention is not a means to preserve particular parts of urban production, but rather to concentrate this information to produce open associations while offering protection against those forces that looks to eradicate our sense of memory to place. Not merely yesterday did the presence of vehicular infrastructures began to split the urban fabric. These were the gradual rami cation of insuf cient design and lack of accountability. What must occur to counter similar issues in the near future must not break the fabric by which these modern urban interventions has been inscribed into our daily ritual and life. Instead the act of architecture will bridge these moments to establish points of reference, punctuate space, and isolate one’s sense of knowing, with an overall emphasis on poetically condensing the information to relatable gures for identity.CHAPTER VIII Preserving Memory of Place31 Figure 137. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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The stigma attach to vehicular infrastructures is that they disconnect landscapes, constricting sight and movement while, simultaneously and paradoxically exist for movement. The architectural implication should not omit the subconscious understanding attached to these infrastructures, instead a sensible implementation should run along the grains of what is socially accepted to formulate a proper solution. As these infrastructure coincides with the notion of movement and connectivity, then such concepts of movement and connectivity should aid the design; in fact, these must be the concept for design. The challenge is to bring stability of place into the experience of moving. Positioning the design within the foundation of preexisting beliefs will furthermore allow for such a design to read into the landscape without becoming an intrusive object that is instead alienated into disregarded existence. In realizing a proper spatial intervention that will bring clarity to the scenes that de ne our mental image of place, the elicited experiential sense produced by the proposed design will arise from the experiences made to exist by the presence of vehicular infrastructure. The condition of experiencing space as a linear sequential revelation of landscape and architecture will act as the existing mode of experience to give cause to the formal and spatial quality of the proposed design. Within PROGRAM Design Criteria: Concept Solution32 Figure 138. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequencethe mechanical experience of driving, what the architecture will attempt to do is interject a piece of humanity against the hollow mechanical experience induced by driving. The moment of perceptual juxtaposition will act as the window through which place is de ned; reintroducing place as something to be distinguished, to be explored on a tangible level in order that the quality of movement may be punctuated and de ne. Thus the design looks to create a phenomenal interruption between speci c points of movement, in order to realign the senses of the experiencing self back to the physical plane. In order to provide for a experiential awakening, the position for the architecture within the existing road experience will achieve the following objectives; organize points of reference, punctuate movement and travel, and embrace the isolation of traveling.

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(1) Design Objective One: Organizing Points for Reference As the current traveled environment does no t lend itself to a clear means of differentiating space, the experience must rely on other factors of orientation such as movement and active visual perception. In movement, the road generates the motion of the person. Drama is released at sharp turns, kinks, or sudden sheering off.1 Of the visual perception, a play with scale and distance within the length of the road may act to help the person negotiate the position of him or herself within the traveled distance. Organization may be issued with points of reference in which progress and distance may become measurable to the perceiver. Consistently planting these points of reference within the traveled road will differentiate the path, adding successive parts of distinction in which a sense of moving forward and journey transgressed is made recognizable to the person experiencing the space.2 During which, the self may be able to orient themselves within the given environment, visually scanning and locating the space’s principle feature and discovering their own position in relation to them.3 Also including are the opportunity of placing important landmarks of which comes into conjunction, to give a powerful sense of being “on line.”4 These land1 Donald Appleyard, Kevin Lynch, and John Randolph Myer, The View from the Road (Cambridge: Published for the Joint Center for Urban Studies of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University by the M.I.T. Press, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1964) 10. 2 Donald Appleyard, Kevin Lynch, and John Randolph Myer, The View from the Road (Cambridge: Published for the Joint Center for Urban Studies of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University by the M.I.T. Press, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1964) 8. 3 Donald Appleyard, Kevin Lynch, and John Randolph Myer, The View from the Road (Cambridge: Published for the Joint Center for Urban Studies of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University by the M.I.T. Press, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1964) 16. 4 Donald Appleyard, Kevin Lynch, and John Randolph 33 Figure 139. Diagram #1: Organizing Points of Reference Figure 140. Construct #1: Organizing Points of Reference Figure 141. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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marks will furthermore offer a sense of goal while allowing one’s journey to become measurable. (2) Design Objective Two: Punctuating and De ning Movement Points of reference may begin to offer opportunities in which the traveled path is punctuated, further de ning one’s traveled experience to be of distinctive parts. The gradual pace of one’s travel however offers little for one’s orientation, causing the experience to sometimes become further obscured. As a result, the architecture aims to intervene in a manner of exposing these underlying edge and border conditions that have been established through time or since existence, to allow them to be read quantitatively, so as to reinsert distinctive qualities back into the driving experience. The architecture should act as a readable platform in the landscape, transcribing the qualities of the old grounds and emerging them as new information.5 These layers, identi ed as what Edward White calls portals, will create apertures that may channel our vision into urban place, orchestrating the unfolding of our view, and of which place, we determine our next move.6 The layer of information overlaid over existing site context will allow one to read and identify place, in turn enriching one’s overall sense of place. Design Objective Three: Embracing the Isolation, Myer, The View from the Road (Cambridge: Published for the Joint Center for Urban Studies of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University by the M.I.T. Press, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1964) 15. 5 Manuel Gausa The Metapolis Dictionary of Advanced Architecture: City, Technology and Society in the Information Age (Barcelona: Actar, 2003) gure out page. 6 Edward T White, Path, Portal, Place: Appreciating Public Space in Urban Environments (Tallahassee, Fla: Architectural Media, 1999) 188.34 F igu r e 142 D iag r a m # 2 : P u n ctuati n g a n d D e n i n g M ove m e n t F i gure 143. Construct #2: Punctuat i ng an d De n i ng Movement Figure 144. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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Creating a Network of Knowing Momentary isolation allows one to break from intent, emotion, and ideas, directing and often enhancing one’s knowledge of place when the sense’s are once again awakened. In such cases, an experience absent of the essential human qualities creates an impulse to search these qualities out. The spatial voids within isolation will allow for moments in which physical networks of seeing, knowing, searching, and understanding occurs. As one is brought into a new aperture of seeing, objects in the distance are met with new meanings, of which cities seen as clusters of orthogonal forms, becomes symbolic references. 35 F igu r e 14 5. D iag r a m #3: Em b r aci n g the I solatio n F i gure 146. Construct #3: Em b rac i ng t h e Iso l at i on Figure 147. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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CONCLUSION The product of the year long study have resulted in a critique about the urban built environment and the resulting crisis of place that arises. Though a solution of architectural intervention has been hinted though allegory and concepts and organized through a design criteria, the thesis is intentionally aiming to trigger dialogue rather then literally supplying answers. The goal realized more towards the end of the study was to elevate and bring these idea through various multi-disciplinary elds while primarily suggesting architectural intervention. The blending of these disciplinary elds allow for an abstracted exploration, representation, and understanding of placelessness within the modern day traveler. Often, one’s architectural study may nd itself con ned and only engaged to those with similar interest and knowledge. The overall goal may then be to expose these mutual relationship art and architecture may have and foster creative understanding for those outside the eld. What essentially re ected in the thesis exposed the relationship of lm and architecture. Though perhaps the thesis could have emphasized the relationship much more literally where lm may have been utilized to conceptualize architectural solution. What I have discovered is the initial steps in what could possibly be a fruitful process 36 in using both formats to discuss and explore lm and architecture. Though I am more eager to push forward into different topics, the thesis has exposed and left me with an ability to see how speci c tools of lming may be substituted into conceptualizing architectural design and I can only foresee great possibilities in what will mature from this point on. Figure 148. Elevating Communication (Part 3: The Traveling Perceiver) Primitive Communication Sequence

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REFERENCES Appleyard, Donald, Kevin Lynch, and John Randolph Myer. The View from the Road. Cambridge: Published for the Joint Center for Urban Studies of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University by the M.I.T. Press, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1964. Charles Jencks and Irmtraud Schaarschmidt-Richter, Toyo Ito. Weinheim: Ernst, 1995. Dewey, John. Art As Experience. New York: Minton, Balch & Company, 1934. Drever, James. Instinct in Man: a Contribution to the Psychology of Education. Gardners Books, 2007. Edward T White, Path, Portal, Place: Appreciating Public Space in Urban Environments. Tallahassee, Fla: Architectural Media, 1999. Gage, Michael Terence, and Maritz Vandenberg. Hard Landscape in Concrete. London: Architectural Press 1975. Gausa, Manuel. The Metapolis Dictionary of Advanced Architecture: City, Technology and Society in the Information Age. Barcelona: Actar, 2003. Olafur Eliasson, Madeleine Grynsztejn, and Mieke Bal. Take Your Time: Olafur Eliasson. San Francisco: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 2007. Pallasmaa, Juhani. The Architecture of Image: Existential Space in Cinema. Helsinki: Rakennustieto, 2001. Schwarzer, Mitchell. Zoomscape: Architecture in Motion and Media. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2004. Tuan, Yi-fu. Space and Place: The Perspective of Experience. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1977. 37

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BIBLIOGRAPHY Barbara, Anna, and Anthony Perliss. Invisible Architecture: Experiencing Places Through the Sense of Smell. Milano: Skira, 2006. Benjamin, Andrew E., Miriam Kelly, and Dagmar Richter. Armed Surfaces: Dagmar Richter. DR D. Serial books, 5. London: Black Dog Pub, 2004. Boissi re, Olivier, and Jean Nouvel. Jean Nouvel. Studio paperback. Basel: Birkh user, 1996. It Toyoo, and Ron Witte. CASE--Toyo Ito, Sendai Mediatheque. Munich: Prestel, 2002. Langer, Monika M., and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception: A Guide and Commentary. Tallahassee: Florida State University Press, 1989. Mitnick, Keith. Arti cial Light: A Narrative Inquiry into the Nature of Abstraction, Immediacy, and Other Architectural Fictions. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2008. Moon, Karen. Modeling Messages: The Architect and the Model. New York: Monacelli Press, 2005. Olafur Eliasson, and Matthew Drutt. Olafur Eliasson: Photographs. Houston, Tex: Menil Foundation, 2004. Pope, Albert. Ladders. Houston, Tex: Rice School of Architecture, 1996. Rappolt, Mark. Greg Lynn FORM. New York: Rizzoli, 2008. Schaik, Martin van, and Otakar M el. Exit Utopia: Architectural Provocations, 1956-76. Munich: Prestel, 2005. Shon eld, Katherine. Walls Have Feelings: Architecture, Film, and the City. London: Routledge, 2000. 38

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Steeves, James B. Imagining Bodies: Merleau-Ponty’s Philosophy of Imagination. Pittsburgh, Pa: Duquesne University Press, 2004. 39