USF Libraries
USF Digital Collections

Meta-analysis of single-case data :

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Meta-analysis of single-case data : a monte carlo investigation of a three level model
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Owens, Corina M
Publisher:
University of South Florida
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Meta-analysis
Multilevel Modeling
Simulation
Single-case
Dissertations, Academic -- Educational evaluation Statistics -- Doctoral -- USF   ( lcsh )
Genre:
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Abstract:
ABSTRACT: Numerous ways to meta-analyze single-case data have been proposed in the literature, however, consensus on the most appropriate method has not been reached. One method that has been proposed involves multilevel modeling. This study used Monte Carlo methods to examine the appropriateness of Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data multilevel modeling approach to the meta-analysis of single-case data. Specifically, the study examined the fixed effects (i.e., the overall average baseline level and the overall average treatment effect) and the variance components (e.g., the between person within study variance in the average baseline level, the between study variance in the overall average baseline level, the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect) in a three level multilevel model (repeated observations nested within individuals nested within studies). More specifically, bias of point estimates, confidence interval coverage rates, and interval widths were examined as a function of specific design and data factors. Factors investigated included (a) number of primary studies per meta-analysis, (b) modal number of participants per primary study, (c) modal series length per primary study, (d) level of autocorrelation, and (3) variances of the error terms. The results of this study suggest that the degree to which the findings of this study are supportive of using Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data multilevel modeling approach to meta-analyzing single-case data depends on the particular effect of interest. Estimates of the fixed effects tended to be unbiased and produced confidence intervals that tended to overcover but came close to the nominal level as level-3 sample size increased. Conversely, estimates of the variance components tended to be biased and the confidence intervals for those estimates were inaccurate.
Thesis:
Disseration (Ph.D.)--University of South Florida, 2011.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
System Details:
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
System Details:
System requirements: World Wide Web browser and PDF reader.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Corina M. Owens.
General Note:
Title from PDF of title page.
General Note:
Document formatted into pages; contains 219 pages.
General Note:
Includes vita.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
usfldc doi - E14-SFE0004953
usfldc handle - e14.4953
System ID:
SFS0028191:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
record xmlns http:www.loc.govMARC21slim xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.loc.govstandardsmarcxmlschemaMARC21slim.xsd
leader nam 22 Ka 4500
controlfield tag 007 cr-bnu---uuuuu
008 s2011 flu ob 000 0 eng d
datafield ind1 8 ind2 024
subfield code a E14-SFE0004953
035
(OCoLC)
040
FHM
c FHM
049
FHMM
090
XX9999 (Online)
1 100
Owens, Corina M.
0 245
Meta-analysis of single-case data :
h [electronic resource] /
b a monte carlo investigation of a three level model
by Corina M. Owens.
260
[Tampa, Fla] :
University of South Florida,
2011.
500
Title from PDF of title page.
Document formatted into pages; contains 219 pages.
Includes vita.
502
Disseration
(Ph.D.)--University of South Florida, 2011.
504
Includes bibliographical references.
516
Text (Electronic dissertation) in PDF format.
3 520
ABSTRACT: Numerous ways to meta-analyze single-case data have been proposed in the literature, however, consensus on the most appropriate method has not been reached. One method that has been proposed involves multilevel modeling. This study used Monte Carlo methods to examine the appropriateness of Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data multilevel modeling approach to the meta-analysis of single-case data. Specifically, the study examined the fixed effects (i.e., the overall average baseline level and the overall average treatment effect) and the variance components (e.g., the between person within study variance in the average baseline level, the between study variance in the overall average baseline level, the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect) in a three level multilevel model (repeated observations nested within individuals nested within studies). More specifically, bias of point estimates, confidence interval coverage rates, and interval widths were examined as a function of specific design and data factors. Factors investigated included (a) number of primary studies per meta-analysis, (b) modal number of participants per primary study, (c) modal series length per primary study, (d) level of autocorrelation, and (3) variances of the error terms. The results of this study suggest that the degree to which the findings of this study are supportive of using Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data multilevel modeling approach to meta-analyzing single-case data depends on the particular effect of interest. Estimates of the fixed effects tended to be unbiased and produced confidence intervals that tended to overcover but came close to the nominal level as level-3 sample size increased. Conversely, estimates of the variance components tended to be biased and the confidence intervals for those estimates were inaccurate.
538
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
System requirements: World Wide Web browser and PDF reader.
590
Advisor:
Ferron, John M
653
Meta-analysis
Multilevel Modeling
Simulation
Single-case
690
Dissertations, Academic
z USF
x Educational evaluation Statistics
Doctoral.
773
t USF Electronic Theses and Dissertations.
4 856
u http://digital.lib.usf.edu/?e14.4953



PAGE 1

! ! Meta Analysis of Single Case Data: A Monte Carlo Investigation of a Three Level Model by Corina M. Owens A d issertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Department of Educational Meas urement and Research College of Education University of South Florida Major Professor: John M. Ferron, Ph.D Robert F. Dedrick, Ph.D. Liliana Rodriguez Campos, Ph.D. Julia Ogg, Ph.D. Date of Approval: March 28, 2011 Keywords: single subject, resear ch synthesis, multilevel modeling, hierarchical linear modeling, simulation ! Copyright 2011, Corina M. Owens

PAGE 2

! DEDICATION I dedicate this dissertation to my grandparents whose belief in me could quite pos sibly have exceeded my belief in myself. Your u nwavering love and support motivated me to work hard and succeed. To my Oma and Opa, may you rest in peace and as you look down on me I hope I have made you proud. To my Grandma and Grandfather, your constant encouragement has helped propel me through my studies. I want to thank my parents, Karen and John, for their unconditional love and support. I am forever grateful to you both for pushing me beyond what I thought was possible. I would also like to thank my partner, Ashley, who came in during that f inal stretch to stand beside me and remind me anything is possible. Thank you all for always believing in me!

PAGE 3

! ACKNOWDLEGEMENTS My journey through doctoral studies could not have been successful without the helpful hands of so many professors and co lleagues. First, I would like to thank my major professor, Dr. John M. Ferron, without whose constant guidance and patience I would not have made it this far. He is an outstanding professor and mentor who has helped me realize my own potential. Second, I would like to thank the other members of my doctoral committee, Dr. Robert F. Dedrick who pushed me to think outside of my comfort zone, Dr. Liliana Rodriguez Campos whose belief in me allowed me to believe in myself, and Dr. Julia Ogg whose kindness hel ped me push through this challenging dissertation process. Third, in addition to my doctoral committee the whole Department of Educational Measurement and Research has impacted my journey through doctoral studies from our office manager, Jody Duke, to the rest of the faculty members within our department (Jeff Kromrey, Constance Hines and Yi Hsin Chen). Finally, several students and graduates have played a major role in my doctoral journey. Specifically, Adrienne Cadle, Bethany Bell, Heather Scott, Jenni e Farmer, and Aarti Bellara. They were all an inspiration and without their guidance and support I could not have made it through.

PAGE 4

! TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... v LIST OF FIGURES ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... viii ABSTRACT ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... xi ii CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION ................................ ................................ .................. 1 Problem St atement ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 4 Purpose of the Study ................................ ................................ ................................ 5 Research Questions ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 5 Overview of Study ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 7 Limitations ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 9 Definitions of Terms ................................ ................................ ................................ 9 CHAPTER TWO: LITERATURE REVIEW ................................ ................................ .... 12 Single Case Research ................................ ................................ ............................ 12 Methodological Issues ................................ ................................ ............... 13 Design Types ................................ ................................ ............................. 14 Analysis Options ................................ ................................ ........................ 21 Visual ana lysis ................................ ................................ ............... 21 Descriptive statistics ................................ ................................ ...... 22 Inferential statistics ................................ ................................ ........ 24 Randomization tests ................................ ........................... 24 Regression analysis ................................ ............................ 26 Autocorrelation ................................ ................................ .. 26 Multilevel modeling ................................ ........................... 27 Meta Analysis ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 34 Individual Participant Data versus Aggregate Data ................................ ... 35 Procedures ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 37 Analysis Considerations and Methods ................................ ....................... 39 IPD meta analysis ................................ ................................ .......... 39 AD meta analysis ................................ ................................ ........... 39 Weights ................................ ................................ .............. 40 Calculating the effect size mean and distribution .............. 41 Meta analysis models ................................ ........................ 41 Threats to Validity ................................ ................................ ..................... 42 Single Case Meta Analysis ................................ ................................ .................... 43

PAGE 5

! "" Analysi s Options ................................ ................................ ........................ 44 Summary measures ................................ ................................ ........ 45 Inferential statistics ................................ ................................ ........ 47 Applications of Single Case Meta Analysis ................................ .............. 53 Summary ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 55 CHAPTER THREE: METHODOLOGY ................................ ................................ .......... 58 Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 58 Research Questions ................................ ................................ ................................ 58 Design ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 60 Sample ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 61 Conditions Sampled ................................ ................................ ................... 62 Number of prima ry studies within the meta analysis .................... 62 Modal number of participants per primary study .......................... 62 Modal series length per primary study ................................ .......... 63 Level of autocorrelation ................................ ................................ 63 Variances of the error terms ................................ ........................... 64 Data Generation ................................ ................................ ......................... 64 Analysis of Each Simulated Meta Analytic Data Set ................................ ............ 66 Analysis to Estimate Bias of the Point Estimates, Confidence Interval Coverage, and Confidence Interval Width ................................ ...................... 67 Analyses to Examine Relationships Between Design Factors and Bias of the Point Estimates, Confidence Interval Coverage, and Confidence Interval Width ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 68 Research Question One ................................ ................................ .............. 69 Research Question Two ................................ ................................ ............. 69 Research Question Three ................................ ................................ ........... 70 Research Question Four ................................ ................................ ............. 71 Research Question Five ................................ ................................ ............. 72 Research Question Six ................................ ................................ ............... 72 CHAPTER FOUR: RESULTS ................................ ................................ .......................... 74 Fixed Effects ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 77 Bias ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 78 Confidence Interval Coverage ................................ ................................ ... 78 Overall average baseline level ................................ ....................... 79 Overall average treatment effect ................................ .................... 82 Confidence Interval Width ................................ ................................ ......... 85 Overall average baseline level ................................ ....................... 86 Overall average treatment effect ................................ .................... 88 Variance Components ................................ ................................ ............................ 90 Bias ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 91 Bet ween study variance in the overall average baseline level ................................ ................................ .......................... 94 Between study variance in the overall average treatment effect ................................ ................................ ........................ 96

PAGE 6

! """ Between person within study variance in the average baseline level ................................ ................................ ............ 98 Between person w ithin study variance in the average treatment effect ................................ ................................ ...... 100 Within person residual variance ................................ .................. 102 Relative Bias ................................ ................................ ............................ 104 Between study variance in the overall average baseline level ................................ ................................ ........................ 106 Between study variance in the overall average treat ment effect ................................ ................................ ...................... 110 Between person within study variance in the average baseline level ................................ ................................ .......... 114 Between person within study variance in the average treatment effect ................................ ................................ ...... 118 Confidence Interval Coverage ................................ ................................ 122 Between study variance in the overall average baseline level ................................ ................................ ........................ 125 Between study variance in the overall average treatment effect ................................ ................................ ...................... 128 Between person within study variance in the average baseline level ................................ ................................ .......... 131 Between person within study variance i n the average treatment effect ................................ ................................ ...... 135 Within person residual variance ................................ .................. 137 Confidence Interval Width ................................ ................................ ....... 139 Within person residual variance ................................ .................. 141 Amount of estimated autocorrelation ................................ .......... 145 Relationships Among Dependent Variables ................................ ........................ 147 Fixed Effec ts ................................ ................................ ............................ 147 Overall average baseline level ................................ ..................... 147 Overall average treatment effect ................................ .................. 148 Variance Components ................................ ................................ .............. 149 Between study variance in the overall average baseline level ................................ ................................ ........................ 149 Between study variance in the overall average treatment effect ................................ ................................ ...................... 150 Betw een person within study variance in the average baseline level ................................ ................................ .......... 151 Between person within study variance in the average treatment effect ................................ ................................ ...... 152 Within person residual variance ................................ .................. 153 Amount of estimated autocorrelation ................................ .......... 153 Summary ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 154 Fixed Effects ................................ ................................ ............................ 15 7

PAGE 7

! "# Variance Components ................................ ................................ .............. 158 CHAPTER FIVE: DISCUSSION ................................ ................................ .................... 162 Summary of the Study ................................ ................................ ......................... 162 Research Questions ................................ ................................ .............................. 166 Discussion of Study Results ................................ ................................ ................ 167 Fixed Effects ................................ ................................ ............................ 167 Variance Components ................................ ................................ .............. 170 Limitations of the Study ................................ ................................ ...................... 176 Implications ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 177 Implications for Researchers Conducting Single Case Meta Analyses ................................ ................................ ............................. 178 Implications for Researchers Conducting Single Case Studies ............... 179 Implications for Methodologists ................................ .............................. 180 REFERENCES ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 182 APPENDICES ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 192 Appendix A: SAS Programming Code ................................ ................................ 193

PAGE 8

! # LIST OF TABLES Table 1: Study Design ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 8 Table 2: Benefits of Individual Participant Data and Aggregated Data Meta Analysis ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 37 Table 3: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Overall Average Baseline Lev el ............... 81 Table 4: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Overall Average Treatment Effect ............ 84 Table 5: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Width of the Overall Average Baseline Level .................... 87 Table 6: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Width of the Overall Average Treatment Effect ................. 89 Table 7: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Bias o f the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Baseline Level .................. 95 Table 8: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Bias of the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Treatment Effect ............... 97 Table 9: Eta squared Values ( ) for As sociation of Design Factors with Bias of the Between Person Within Study Varianc e in the Average Baseline Level ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 99 Table 10: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Bias of the Between Person Within Study Variance in the Average Tre atment Effect ................................ ................................ ................................ ................. 101 Table 11: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Bias of the Within Person Residual Variance ................................ ............................... 103

PAGE 9

! #" Table 12: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Relative Bias of the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Baseline Level ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 107 Table 13: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Relative Bias of the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Treatment Effect ................................ ................................ ............................... 111 Table 14: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Desi gn Factors with Relative Bias of the Between Person Within Study Variance in the Average Baseline Level ................................ ................................ .................... 115 Table 15: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Relative Bias of the Between Person Within Study Variance in the Average Tre atment Effect ................................ ................................ ................. 119 Table 16: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Baseline Level ................................ ................................ ....... 126 Table 17: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factor s with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Treatment Effect ................................ ................................ .... 129 Table 18: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Between Person Within Study Variance i n the Average Baseline Level ................................ ........................... 132 Table 19: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Between Person Within Study Variance in the Average Treatment Effect ................................ ....................... 136 Table 20: Eta squared Values ( ) for Assoc iation of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Within Person Residual Variance .......... 138 Table 21: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Width of the Within Person Residual Variance ............... 142 Table 22: Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Width of the Amount of Estimated Autocorrelation ........ 145 Table 23: Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Overall Average Baseline Level Dependent Variables ................................ .... 148

PAGE 10

! #"" Table 24: Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Overall Average Treatment Effect Dependent Variables ................................ 148 Table 25: Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average B aseline Level Dependent Variables ................................ ................................ ......................... 150 Table 26: Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Treatment Effect Dependent Variables ................................ ................................ ......................... 151 Table 27: Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard De viations for the Between Person Within Study in the Overall Average Baseline Level Dependent Variables ................................ ................................ ......................... 152 Table 28: Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Between Person Within Study in the Overall Average Treatment Effect Depende nt Variables ................................ ................................ ......................... 153 Table 29: Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Within Person Residual Variance Dependent Variables ................................ .. 153 Table 30: Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Amount of Estimated Autocorrelation Dependent Variables ........................... 154 Table 31: Results Summary ................................ ................................ .............................. 155

PAGE 11

! #""" LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1: Graphical display of interrupted time series design ................................ ............ 15 Figure 2: Graphical display of ABA reversal design ................................ .......................... 17 Figure 3: Graphical display of ABAB reversal design ................................ ....................... 18 Fi gure 4: Graphical display of multiple baseline design ................................ .................... 20 Figure 5: Example randomization scheme assigning phase shift from baseline to treatment ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 25 Figure 6: Box plots showing the distribution of bias estimates for each fixed effect in the three level model ................................ ................................ ....................... 78 Figure 7: Box plots showing the distribution of confidence interval coverage rates for each fixed effect in the three level model ................................ ..................... 79 Figure 8: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the overall average baseline level as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ................................ ................................ .................... 82 Figure 9: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the overall average treatment effect as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ................................ ................................ ....... 85 Fi gure 10: Box plots showing the distribution of confidence interval width estimates for each fixed effect in the three level model ................................ .... 86 Figure 11: Line graph showing the confidence interval width estimates for the overall average baseline level as a functio n of the variances of the error terms for each level of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ......... 88 Figure 12: Line graph showing the confidence interval width estimates for the overall average treatment effect as a function of the variances of the error terms for each level of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 90

PAGE 12

! "$ Figure 13: Box plots showing the distribution of bias estimates for each level 3 variance component in the three level model ................................ .................... 92 Figure 14: Box plots showing the distribution o f bias estimates for each level 2 variance component in the three level model ................................ .................... 93 Figure 15: Box plots showing the distribution of bias estimates for the within person residual variance and amount of estimated autocorrelation in the three level model ................................ ................................ ............................... 94 Fi gure 16: Line graph showing the bias estimates for the between study variance in the overall average baseline level as a function of the variances of the error terms ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 96 Figure 17: Line graph showing the bias estimates for the between study variance in the o verall average treatment effect as a function of the variances of the error terms ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 98 Figure 18: Line graph showing the bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the variances of the error ter ms ................................ ................................ ............. 100 Figure 19: Line graph showing the bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as a function of the variances of the error terms ................................ ................................ ............. 102 Figure 20: Line graph showing the bias estimates for the within perso n residual variance as a function of the level of autocorrelation ................................ ..... 103 Figure 21: Box plots showing the distribution of the relative bias estimates for each level 3 variance component in the three level model ............................. 104 Figure 22: Box plots showing the distributio n of the relative bias estimates for each level 2 variance component in the three level model ............................. 105 Figure 23: Box plots showing the distribution of the relative bias estimates for the amount of estimated autocorrelation in the three level model ........................ 106 Figure 24: Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between study variance in the overall average baseline level as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ................................ .................. 108 Figure 25: Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the be tween study variance in the overall average baseline level as a function of the modal number of participants per primary study ................................ ....................... 109

PAGE 13

! $ Figure 26: Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between study variance in the overall average baseline leve l as a function of the variances of the error terms ................................ ................................ ............. 110 Figure 27: Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ................................ .................. 112 F igure 28: Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect as a function of the modal number of participants per primary study ................................ ............ 113 Figure 29: Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect as a function of the variances of the error terms ................................ ................................ ............. 114 Figure 30: Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average baseline lev el as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ................................ .................. 116 Figure 31: Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the modal number of participants p er primary study ................................ ............ 117 Figure 32: Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the variances of the error terms ................................ ................................ ............. 118 Figure 33: Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ................................ ............ 120 Figure 34: Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between person within study varian ce in the average treatment effect as a function of the modal number of participants per primary study ................................ ...... 121 Figure 35: Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as a function of the variances of the error terms ................................ ................................ ....... 122 Figure 36: Box plots showing the distribution of confidence interval coverage rates of the level 3 variance components in the three level model .......................... 123 Figure 37: Box plots showing the distribution of confidence interval coverage rates of the level 2 variance components in the three level model .......................... 124

PAGE 14

! $" Figure 38: Box plots showing the distribution of confidence interval coverage rates of the within person residual variance and amount of autocorrelation in the three level mode l ................................ ................................ ....................... 125 Figure 39: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the between study variance in the overall average baseline level as a function of the three way interaction between number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, and variances of the error terms ................................ ............................ 128 Figure 40: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect as a function of the three way interaction between number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, and variances of the error terms ................................ ............................ 131 Figure 41: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ......... 133 Figure 42: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the between person within study variance in the aver age baseline level as a function of the modal number of participants ................................ 134 Figure 43: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the variance s of the error terms ................................ ..... 135 Figure 44: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as a function of the variances of the error terms for each level of the num ber of primary studies per meta analysis ................................ ............ 137 Figure 45: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the within person residual variance as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ................................ ................................ ... 139 Figure 46: Line graph s howing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the within person residual variance as a function of the level of autocorrelation ................................ ................................ ................................ 139 Figure 47: Box plots showing the distribution of confidence interval width estimates for the within person res idual variance and the amount of estimated autocorrelation in the three level model ................................ .......... 141

PAGE 15

! $"" Figure 48: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval widths for the within person residual variance as a function of the number of primary studies per meta a nalysis ................................ ................................ ................. 143 Figure 49: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval widths for the within person residual variance as a function of the modal series length per primary study ................................ ................................ ............................ 144 Figure 50: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval width s for the within person residual variance as a function of the level of autocorrelation ................................ ................................ ................................ 144 Figure 51: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval widths for the amount of autocorrelation as a function of the number of primary studies per meta ana lysis ................................ ................................ ................. 146 Figure 52: Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval widths for the amount of autocorrelation as a function of the modal series length per primary study ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 147

PAGE 16

! $""" ABSTRACT Numerous ways to meta analyze single case data have been p roposed in the literature, however, consensus on the most appropriate method has not been reached. One method that has been proposed involves multilevel modeling This study used Monte Carlo methods to examine the appropriateness of Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data multilevel modeling approach to the meta analysis of single case data. Specifica lly, the st udy examine d the fixed effects (i.e., the overall average baseline level and the overall average treatment effect) and the variance compon ents (e.g., the between person within study variance in the average baseline level, the between study variance in the overall average baseline level, the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect) in a three level multilevel mode l (repeated observations nested within individuals nested within studies). More specifically, bias of point estimates, confidence interval coverage rates, and interval widths were examined as a function of specific design and data factors. Factors invest igated included (a) number of primary studies per meta analysis, (b) modal number of participants per primary study, (c) modal series length per primary study, (d) level of autocorrelation, and (3) variances of the error terms. The results of this study s uggest that the degree to which the findings of this study are supportive of using Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data multilevel modeling approach to meta analyzing single case data depends on the particular effect of interest. Estimates of t he fixed effects tended to be unbiased and produced confidence

PAGE 17

! $ "# intervals that tended to overcover but came close to the nominal level as level 3 sample size increased. Conversely, estimates of the variance components tended to be biased and the confidence intervals for those estimates were inaccurate.

PAGE 18

! 1 ! CHAPTER ONE: INTRODU CTION Single case research has grown in popularity over the past decade and is being conducted in a variety of settings such as school psychology (Skinner, 2004), special education (A lgozzine, Browder, & Karvonen, 2001), teacher education (Hsieh, Hemmeter, McCollum, & Ostrosky, 2009), and behavioral intervention research (Filter & Horner, 2009). This type of research allows for the repeated measurement of one case over a certain perio d of time to assess a treatment's effect on an individual case Typically, data are collected during a baseline phase (prior to treatment) and then during or after the implementation of the treatment or intervention. This is the most basic design; addition al design types include the removal of the intervention, reintroduction of the intervention, and maintenance of the intervention. In addition, several cases or settings can be studied at the same time in a multiple baseline design. Across single case stud ies there have been numerous ways to analyze this type of data, such as visual analysis, computing descriptive summaries, randomization tests, regression analysis, and multilevel modeling. In addition to a variety of analysis options, a variety of effect size estimates have been proposed for use in single case research, such as percentage of non overlapping d ata (PND, Scruggs, Mastropieri, & Castro, 1987), a form of standardized mean difference (Busk & Serlin, 1992), change in values (Center, Skiba, & Cas ey, 1985 1986; Kromrey & Foster Johnson, 1996; Beretvas &

PAGE 19

! 2 Chung, 2008a), and the use of standardized regression coefficients in multilevel models (Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003a, 2007, 2008). Quantitative integration of study results, termed meta ana lysis, involves the combining of data across multiple studies to evaluate and summarize research findings. The term meta analysis was first coined by Glass (1976) and was defined as "the statistical analysis of a large collection of analysis results from i ndividual studies for the purpose of integrating the findings" (p.3). Meta analysis has been used to synthesize results from a wide variety of studies, both non experimental (e.g., gender differences) and experimental (e.g., intervention effectiveness). This type of research is necessary to determine relationships among variables and the effectiveness of interventions across studies It also allow s researchers to integrate study findings with the goal of generalization. Quantitative integration of study findings should cross research domains and i nclude all types of quantitative research, including single case research. Meta analysis of single case research has resulted in much disagreement in the field. In a study synthesizing single case meta analyse s conducted between 1985 and 2005, the majority of meta analyses were simply reporting mean effect sizes across studies (Beretvas & Chung, 2008b). However, another possible option for combining effect sizes across studies is the use of multilevel modeling Multilevel modeling has been proposed for use with single case data by many researchers because of its flexibility in handling nesting of observations within people (Nugent, 1996; Shadish & Rindskopf, 2007; Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003b). One spec ific example is Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) application of multilevel modeling to the meta analysis of single case data. Their study proposed the use of a multilevel model to meta analyze

PAGE 20

! 3 single case data. Equations 1 5 represent their propose d individual level raw data model. Equation 1 represents an outcome ( y ) that is modeled on measurement occasion i for participant j of study k ( ) as a linear function of a single predictor, phase: (1) where phase is a dichotomous variable indicating wh ether a measurement occasion or observation occurred during baseline or treatment phase. is the level of the outcome during baseline for participant j from study k is the treatment effect for participant j from study k and is within phase error ( re presents the variance of % At the second level, the variation across participants is modeled in the following equation s : (2) and (3) where the fixed effects are the average baseline level for study k and the average treatment effect for stud y k and the error terms are and allow ing variation in both baseline levels and treatment effects among participants ( represents the variance of and represents the variance of % At the third level, the variation across studies is modeled in the following equations: (4) and (5)

PAGE 21

! 4 where the fixed effects are the overall average baseline level, and the overall average treatment effect, and the error terms are and which allow variation in both the average baseline levels and average treatment effects among studies ( represents the variance of and represents the variance of ) It should be noted that in multilevel modeling analysis errors on all levels are typically assumed to be normally distributed and have a mean of zer o. Proble m Statement Although the use of single case designs has grown over the past decades, the majority of literature on meta analysis focuses on group comparison studies and leaves out single case research (Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2008). This lack of lite rature related to single case designs is often why these designs are excluded from meta analyses. This exclusion of single case designs is concerning when one considers the plethora of information single case research can add to the literature. Single ca se designs not only provide information related to average treatment effects but also offer information related to how that treatment effect is related to specific cases. Meta analyses of single case designs offer the ability to summarize and evaluate the overall effect without the loss of that specific case information. In addition, the meta analysis of single case data increases the generalizabilty of research findings. Researchers have proposed a variety of methods to meta analyze single case data. Va n den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) proposed method of using multilevel modeling to meta analyze single case data offers many advantages. The use of multilevel modeling provides the flexibility of appropriately modeling the autocorrelational nature of si ngle case data, can take into consideration multiple effect sizes per study, and can

PAGE 22

! 5 apply appropriate meta analytic models, such as fixed or random effects models. Although the use of multilevel modeling offers advantages in the analysis of single case da ta, there are still concerns as to whether the use of multilevel modeling is appropriate for single case data. Specifically, multilevel modeling is based on large sample theory, which is not representative of single case data. Therefore, it is necessary to further investigate the utility of inferences made from multilevel modeling when applied to single case data. Purpose of the Study The purpose of this study was to examine the appropriateness of Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data multileve l modeling approach to the meta analysis of single case data. Specifica lly, the st udy examine d the fixed effects (i.e., the overall average baseline level and the overall average treatment effect) and the variance components (e.g., the between person with in study variance in the average baseline level, the between study variance in the overall average baseline level, the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect) in a three level multilevel model. More specifically, bias of poin t estimates, confidence interval coverage rates, and interval widths were examined as a function of specific design and data factors. The following research questions are of interest: Research Questions 1. To what extent are the fixed effect estimates from a three level meta analytic single case model biased as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary

PAGE 23

! 6 study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )? 2. To what extent does the confidence interval coverage of the fixed effect estimates from a three level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )? 3. To what extent does the confidence interval width of the fixed effect estimates from a t hree level meta ana lytic single case model vary as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )? 4. To what extent are the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model biased as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )? 5. To what extent does the confidence interval coverage of the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )?

PAGE 24

! 7 6. To what extent does the confidence interval width of the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, le vel of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )? Overview of Study Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to examine the appropriateness of the multilevel modeling inferences. The use of simulation methods allowed for the control and manipulat ion of specific design and data factors. The Monte Carlo study included five factors in the design (see Table 1). These factors were (a) number of primary studies per meta analysis (10, 30, and 80); (b) modal number of participants per primary study ( sma ll [mode = 4] and large [mode = 8]); (c) modal series length per primary study ( small [mode = 10] medium [mode = 20] and large [mode = 30]); (d) level of autocorrelation (0, .2, and .4); and (e) variances of the error terms ( most of the variance at level 1 [ = 1, = .2, and = .05] and most of the variance at level 2 [ = 1, = 2, and = .5]). The appropriateness of the inferences made from the estimates was evaluated in terms of coverage and width of 95% confidence intervals as well as bias of point esti mates.

PAGE 25

! Table 1 Study Design Error Variances Number of Primary Studies per Meta Analysis Modal number of Participants per Primary Study Modal Series Length per Primary Study level 1 = 1; level 2 = .2; level 3 = .05 level 1 = 1; level 2 = 2; level 3 = .5 Level of Autocorrelation 0 .2 .4 0 .2 .4 Small (mode = 10) Medium (mode = 20) Small (mode = 4) Large (mode = 30) Small (mode = 10) Medium (mode = 20) 10 Large (mode = 8) Large (mode = 30) Small (mode = 10) Medium (mode = 20) Small (mode = 4) Large (mode = 30) Small (mode = 10) Medium (mode = 20) 30 Large (mode = 8) Large (mode = 30) Small (mode = 10) Medium (mod e = 20) Small (mode = 4) Large (mode = 30) Small (mode = 10) Medium (mode = 20) 80 Large (mode = 8) Large (mode = 30)

PAGE 26

! 9 Limitations The data in this study were simulated based on specific conditions. Those conditions were chosen base d on a review of single case literature and meta analyses of single case data. The specific conditions chosen for this study are only some of the possible options. Therefore, the results of this study can only be generalized to studies with similar condi tions. Any conclusions beyond the observed conditions should be interpreted with caution. Definitions of Terms Autocorrelation The degree to which errors from repeated observations are correlated with each other. Bias The average difference between a known parameter estimate and an estimated parameter estimate. Confidence interval c overage The proportion of 95% confidence intervals that contain the estimated parameter. Confidence i nterval w idth The average difference between the upper and lower limit s of the 95% confidence intervals for the estimated parameter. Effect size A measure of the magnitude of the relationship between two variables. Fixed e ffects Parameter estimates of the coefficients represented in the multilevel model (e.g., overall aver age baseline level, overall average treatment effect). Kenward Roger degrees of freedom method A method for estimating degrees of freedom that approximates the degrees of freedom and was developed to be used with unbalanced designs and complex covariance structures. This method is an extension of

PAGE 27

! 10 the Satterthwaite method; it adjusts for small sample size bias in the estimation of variances. Meta analysis The q uantitative integration of study results that involves the combining of effects sizes across mul tiple studies to evaluate and summarize research findings Multilevel m odeling A statistical model used to account for hierarchical or nested data, also known as hierarchical linear modeling. "A hierarchical linear model consists of one or more regression equations at each level in which the characteristics of the units from that level are used as predictors in describing the coefficients of the equation(s) of the level just below" (Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003a, p. 329). Primary s tudies The original studies that comprise the sample for the meta analysis. Satterthwaite degrees of freedom method. A method that approximates the degrees of freedom, and was developed to be used with unbalanced designs and complex covariance structures. Series l ength The level 1 sample size in the multilevel model, or the number of times a participant is observed. Single case r esearch T he study of a single participant or a group (e.g. a classroom) measured at multiple points in time to determine the effectiveness of on e or more interventions or treatments. Treatment e ffect The change in a dependent variable that is attributable to a specific treatment.

PAGE 28

! 11 Variance c omponent s Parameters that estimate variation within person, between persons within studies, and between s tudies.

PAGE 29

! 12 CHAPTER TWO : LITERATURE REVIEW This literature review will be divided into three parts. First si ngle case research is described. Second, a brief overvie w of meta analysis is described and f inally, the meta analysis of single case research wil l be discussed. Single Case Research Single case research like case studies, can be defined as the stu dy of a single participant or group (e.g. a classroom) However, unlike case study research which gathers in depth narrative or anecdotal information o n a single case, single case research systematically measures a single case at multiple points in time to determine the effectiveness of one or more interventions or treatments (Kazdin, 2011) Single case research designs have taken on a variety of differ ent names such as single case, single subject, N=1, and intra subject. Regardless of the name identified by the researcher the focus of this type of rese arch is on the single case and its growth over time. This type of research allows the researcher to focus on individual variations in the treatment effect which have a tendency to be lost in group comparison designs where the focus is the average treatment effect (Barlow, Nock, & Hersen, 2009) In addition to individual variation, this type of design also allows the individual to be measured at various points in time thereby allowing the treatment effect to be evaluated with more than a single observation, which allows researchers to see how the treatment effect will change over time. Single case research also allows practitioners to implement research in their own

PAGE 30

! 13 setting therefore reducing the gap between research and practice (Morga n & Morgan, 2001). Finally due to the fact that only a small sample size is needed researchers are able to study populations of people that have a low prevalence rate (e.g., children with autism, the homeless) (Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003a). Metho dological Issues Single case research offers many advantages to researchers. However, as with any type of research, with those advantages come certain methodological concerns. One such concern comes in the form of generality of findings. This concern s tems from the fact that when studying a single case it is difficult to know if results from that particular case will be applicable to other cases (Barlow, Nock, & Hersen, 2009). Although generality of findings can be a concern in single case research spe cific replication strategies can be implemented to improve generalizations. Another important methodological concern centers on a key feature of single case research, repeated measurement. Barlow, Nock, and Hersen (2009) suggest that repeated measuremen ts need to be "specific, observable, and replicable" (p. 62). A repeated measurement is (a) specific when it is obvious that a behavior has or has not occurred; (b) observable when multiple observers can measure it without difficulty; and (c) replicable w hen the methods used to observe the behaviors can be duplicated on several occasions (Barlow, Nock, & Hersen, 2009). In addition, it is important to take into consideration the frequency of measurements. Specifically, one should balance the importance of having enough data with which to evaluate change with the importance of not causing fatigue on the part of the subject.

PAGE 31

! 14 Another issue to consider when using repeated measurements is the use of self report data. Often in research it is necessary to mea sure a participant's perceptions of a particular behavior (e.g. feelings of depression, anxiety, or happiness, level of control over life choices), however, attempting to measure self report data is not without limitations. One possible limitation is the role social desirability (Crowne & Marlowe, 1960) can play on self report data. It is possible that a true behavior change is not occurring and instead the participant is reporting what they think is socially desirable. Single case researchers should be aware of these methodological issues and design their studies to minimize these concerns. Design Types All studies are based on specific types of research designs and w ithin a single case framework there are multiple research designs that can be i mplemented. Baseline logic is a set of guidelines that can be used to organize the experimental design process (Riley Tillman & Burns, 2009). Baseline logic is comprised of four steps, (1) prediction, (2) affirmation of the consequent, (3) verification, a nd (4) replication by affirmation of the consequent (Riley Tillman & Burns, 2009). The first step, prediction, is used to determine what the behavior looks like prior to the intervention and is typically termed baseline or A phase. This stage is necessa ry to illustrate what level the behavior is occurring at and how stable and/or variable the behavior is prior to the intervention (Riley Tillman & Burns, 2009). By examining these things researchers are able to predict what the behavior would look like if no intervention were implemented. The second step of baseline logic, affirmation of the consequent, allows the researcher to first test whether the intervention had some impact on the participant's behavior and is

PAGE 32

! 15 typically termed treatment or B phase. In this phase the intervention has been implemented and the behavior is being measured to determine if there is a predictable change in the data (Riley Tillman & Burns, 2009). Thus far in the steps of baseline logic the most basic single case design type has been described, an AB or interrupted time series design (see Figure 1). This type of design consists of observations of the dependent variable both before and after an intervention. The observations that occur before an intervention are considered part of the baseline (A) phase and the observations that occur after the intervention are considered part of the treatment (B) phase. Figure 1. Graphical d isplay of interrupted time series design This basic AB design type is not without criticism. For example when using this type of design it is difficult to attribute a change in the data to the treatment and not to some other event which could have occurred at the same time. Another plausible explanation for a shift in data could be developmental milestones or a change in instrumentation ( Ferron & Rendina Gobioff, 2005 ). These limitations can be addressed Baseline (A) Treatment (B)

PAGE 33

! 16 by utilizing more complex study designs, such as a reversal or multiple baseline design which will also address the final two steps of baselin e logic. The third step of baseline logic is verification. This step is used to verify what was observed in the original baseline phase by removing the intervention and returning to a second baseline or A phase. This step allows one to gain increased con fidence in what was originally seen in the first baseline as well as attributing the changes observed in the treatment phase to the introduction of the intervention rather than some extraneous variable (Riley Tillman & Burns, 2009). This stage of baseline logic is clearly illustrated with the use of the most simplistic reversal design, an ABA design. Reversal or withdrawal designs are extension s of the basic AB design. Although the terms reversal and withdrawal are often used interchangeably in the l iterature there is a slight distinction (Barlow, Nock, & Hersen, 2009). Reversal designs refer to situations when the intervention is reversed and applied to an incompatible behavior, whereas withdrawal designs refer to situations where the intervention is simply withdrawn and returned to the A phase (Barlow, Nock, & Hersen, 2009; Rusch& Kazdin, 1981). Nonetheless, t he most simplistic reversal or withdrawal design is removal of the treatment from participants (ABA; see Figure 2). This design consists of o bservations during an initial baseline (A) phase, then observations during a treatment (B) phase, followed by observations in a second baseline (A) phase. The implementation of a second baseline phase allows the researchers to observe if the behavior reve rts back to the original baseline levels. If this occurs then it is easier to attribute the changes observed to the treatment and other alternative explanations become less plausible. One major

PAGE 34

! 17 limitation of this design is that in certain settings it may not be legal or ethical to remove treatment from a participant. Figure 2. Graphical display of ABA reversal design The final step of baseline logic, replication by affirmation of the consequent, is an attempt to strengthen what was observed in the i nitial treatment phase by reintroducing the intervention and creating an opportunity to observe the behavior change once again (Riley Tillman & Burns, 2009). This replication increases our confidence in the likelihood of a relationship existing between t he participant's behavior and the implementation of the intervention. This replication can also be accomplished in other ways when the removal and reintroduction of the intervention is not feasible or is unethical. An extension of the most simplistic rev ersal design (ABA) is the reintroduction of a treatment phase in an ABAB design (see Figure 3). This design consists of observations in an initial baseline (A) phase, then observations in an initial treatment (B) phase, followed by observations in a secon d baseline phase (A), and ending with Basel ine (A) Treatment (B) Baseline (A)

PAGE 35

! 18 observations in a final treatment (B) phase. The inclusion of a final treatment phase provides the opportunity for replication of the initial treatment phase in which the observed behavior should revert back to the ch ange seen in the initial treatment phase. Figure 3. Graphical display of ABAB reversal design One major limitation of single case designs is their lack of generalization beyond the one case that is being studied. The ability to generalize can b e accomplished through replication Barlow, Nock, and Hersen (2009 ) state that there are at least three types of generalization in behavior change research: (1) generality of findings across participants, (2) generality of findings across behaviors, and ( 3) generality of findings across settings. One natural way of achieving these various types of generalizations is through replication. T here are various ways to replicate single case experiments such as replication of the baseline and treatment phase, a s discussed previously in baseline logic, or simultaneous replication built into the study design ( Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2007 ). A multiple baseline design allows fo r this simultaneous replication and can often Baseline (A) Baseline (A) Treatment (B) Treatment (B)

PAGE 36

! 19 be used when the removal and reintrodu ction of the intervention is not feasible or is unethical. A multiple baseline design is another type of extension of the traditional AB design (see Figure 4). This extension of the AB design simply establishes a baseline and treatment phase for multiple participants, behaviors, or settings. The initiation of the treatment phase is staggered across time creating different baseline lengths for different participants, behaviors, or settings. By staggering the length of the baseline phases it is more plau sible to attribute a change in the data to the treatment as we would not expect changes in history or maturation to stagger themselves across time ( Ferron & Rendina Gobioff, 2005 ). While this type of design does have many advantages it does still have a few limitations. For example when there is a lack of independence between baselines or when treatment effects vary across participants, behaviors, or settings it is more difficult to accurately attribute changes in the data to the tr eatment.

PAGE 37

! 20 Figure 4. Graphical display of multiple baseline design Baseline (A) Treatment (B) Person 1 Person 2 Person 3

PAGE 38

! 21 Analysis Options Single case research has been wrought with disagreement on the most appropriate method to analyze data. These analysis options can be grouped into three broad categories: (1) visual analysis, (2) descriptive statistics, and (3) inferential statistics. Visual analysis Historically, visual analysis of data has been the preferred analysis option ( Kazdin, 2011 ; Parsonson & Baer, 1992 ). "The underlying rationale is to encour age investigators to focus on interventions that produce potent effects and effects that would be obvious from merely inspecting the data" (Kazdin, 2011, p.286). Proponents of visual analysis have argued that researchers who primarily rely on visual analys es of their graphed data are more likely to commit Type II (miss) errors than those who primarily rely on statistical analyses (Kazdin, 2011) ,i n essence stating that visual analysts tend to be more conservative when evaluating the effectiveness of a partic ular treatment and therefore visual analysts commit fewer Type I (false a larm ) errors (Parsonson & Baer, 1986). However, despite these claims there have been several criticisms of visual analysis (DeProspero & Cohen, 1979; Jones, Weinrott, & Vaught, 1978 ; Matyas & Greenwood, 1990; Wampold & Furlong, 1981). Matyas and Greenwood (1990) argued that visual analysts were not as conservative as previously claimed committing Type II errors 0% to 22% of the time and Type I errors 16% to 84% of the time. Additi onally, Jones, Weinrott, and Vaught (1978) examined conclusions made from visual analysis as compared to statistical analysis and found that there was little agreement between the two. Also, Jones et al. (1978) and DeProspero and Cohen (1979) examined int er rater agreement among judges and found that reliability was low. These conclusions support the assertion that visual analysis is not as consistently reliable and

PAGE 39

! 22 conservative as once purported. Th erefore, single case researchers can supplement visual analysis with varying statistical analysis options. Descriptive statistics. One such statistical analysis option is computing descriptive statistics or summary measures. These descriptive statistics include within phase measures (i.e. means, medians, s tandard deviations, root mea n square error, and trend lines) and between phases measures (i.e. varying types of effect sizes). Just as there is contention in the literature as to how to analyze single case data there is also disagreement over ho w to summ arize these effects. Effect sizes can be broken down into three overarching categories: (1) standardized mean difference, (2) regression based, and (3) non regression based. One approach is the standardized mean difference ( Busk & Serlin, 1992 ), where t he difference in baseline and intervention means is divided by the baseline standard deviation ( ) or by the pooled standard deviation ( ). More formally, (6) and (7) where is the mean of the treatment phase, is the mean of the baselin e phase, is the standard deviation of baseline phase, and is the pooled standard deviation across baseline and treatment phases. Busk and Serlin (1992) recommend using the difference in baseline and treatment means divided by the baseline standard devia tion (see Equation 6) when normality of the population distribution and equality of

PAGE 40

! 23 the variances cannot be assumed. Otherwise, if the assumptions of normality and equality of variances or at least the assumption of equality of the variances are met then it is suggested to pool the variances and calculate a standardized mean difference based on the formula in Equation 7 (Busk & Serlin, 1992). Another category of approaches for effect size calculations is regression based. These types of effect sizes are able to account for trends in data. One variation of this approach includes the difference between the treatment trend line and the extension of the baseline trend line at the first point in treatment or at the last point in the treatment ( Allison & Gorma n, 1993 ). Other variations include computation of an value representing a change in values corresponding to a change in level and a change in slope ( Kromrey & Foster Johnson, 1996) and standardizing regression coefficients that correspond to a shift in l evel and a shift in slope ( Van den Noort g a te & Onghena, 2003 ). A final category is non regression based effect sizes. There are several possible options in this category. One possible option is the percentage of non overlapping data (PND ; Scruggs, Mastr opieri, & Castro, 1987). The PND is calculated by identifying the highest or lowest point (depending upon which direction the data is expected to move) in the baseline phase and then finding the percent of treatment phase data points that exceed it. Othe r possible options have been created as alternatives to the PND, such as (a) the percentage of data points exceeding the median (PEM; Ma, 2006), which is calculated by finding the percentage of treatment data points above the median level of baseline data points, (b) the mean baseline reduction (MBLR; Lundervold & Bourland, 1988), which is the difference between baseline and treatment phase means divided by the baseline mean and then multiplied by 100, and (c) the percentage of all non overlapping data (PAN D;

PAGE 41

! 24 Parker, Hagan Burke, & Vannest, 2007) which is the percentage of data points whose removal from either phase would eliminate all data overlap between phases Inferential statistics. Another possible statistical analysis option is inferential tests. T here are a plethora of options available ; however one of the most often emplo yed and well researched options are randomization tests. Randomization tests. Randomization tests make no assumptions about the distribution of the data and only use informati on obtained from the sample to evaluate the null hypothesis. However, these tests do assume random assignment of the data points or measurement occasions to either baseline or treatment phase. By randomly assigning measurement occasions to baseline or tre atment the study design can be classified as an experimental one ( Onghena & Edgington, 2005). The use of an experimental design minimizes threats to internal validity by accounting for extraneous variables in both baseline and treatment phases. The rando m assignment of measurement occasions can be thought of in two schemes. The first assumes the intervention can be alternated at any given measurement occasion. For example, let's assume a researcher wants to gather 12 observations on a single individual w ith 6 observations in baseline and 6 observations in treatment. The researcher could randomly assign the 12 observations to either baseline or treatment. The second is utilized when alternating the intervention at any given measurement occasion is not fea sible. This randomization scheme assigns the timing of the phase change from baseline to intervention (Barlow, Nock, & Hersen, 2009). Specifically, the measurement occasions are assigned to a specific phase shift. For example, let's assume we have a basic AB design with 27 total measurement occasions and each phase must have a

PAGE 42

! 25 minimum of four observations each. The start of the intervention phase could occur on one of 20 possible occasions (see Figure 5) The logic behind randomization tests is that if the treatment has no impact on the dependent variable then what is observed will not be affected by the independent variable (treatment assignment); the order of the assignment of the independent variable should not matter (Barlow, Nock, & Hersen, 2009). This null hypothesis is tested by comparing an obtained test statistic to a randomization distribution that is formed by calculating a test statistic for all possible permutations of the data. Figure 5. Example randomization scheme assigning phase shif t from baseline to t reatment A limitation of this method is that it only allows inference of the presence of a treatment effect and not of the type of effect (i.e. change in level and change in slope) or how big that effect is (Morgan & Morgan, 2001; On ghena & Edgington, 2005) In

PAGE 43

! 26 addition, randomization tests are unable to provide interval estimates of the treatment effect (Ferron, Farmer, & Owens, 2010) It is also difficult to estimate power for this type of test since it depends on many factors, su ch as effect size, design, series length, and form of randomization to name a few (Ferron & Onghena, 1996; Onghena & Edgington, 2005) Regression analysis. Regression methods have also been proposed in the literature as a possible analysis option for sin gle case data ( Huitema & McKean, 1998). A regression analysis can be performed to compare the treatment phase mean to the baseline phase mean for a specific individual using the following model: (8 ) where is the observed value at i th point in time, p hase is a dummy coded variable ( 0 = baseline and 1= treatment), is the baseline mean, is the difference in means between the baseline and the treatment phases, and is the error term at the i th point in time. A treatment effect can be determined by tes ting the regression coefficient to determine stati stical significance. Equation 8 is the most basic model and can be further extended to include terms to evaluate trends in the phases ( Center, Skiba, & Casey, 1985 1986; Huitema & McKean, 2000). Although the use of ordinary least squares (OLS) has been suggested for use with single case data (Huitema & McKean, 1998; Shine & Bower, 1971) specifically multiple baseline designs, a major limitation of this model is that it does not tak e into consideration the dependency of the errors and it assumes the errors modeled are independent. Autocorrelation. Due to the fact that single case research is based on the premise that a single case is being measured repeatedly across time many have argued that the

PAGE 44

! 27 errors produced by these repeated measurements will be more similar when they are close to each other in time and therefore positively autocorrelated ( Kratochwill, Alden, Demuth, Dawson, Panicucci, & Arnston 1974; Matyas & Greenwood, 1997). Research has shown that positive autocorrelation can impact statistical inferences by increasing Type I error rates (finding a treatment effect when a treatment effect does not exist) ( Matyas & Greenwood, 1990; Toothaker, Banz, Noble, Camp, & Davis, 1983) Although there is agreement on the negative effects of autocorrelation there has been debate on the extent to which single case data are likely to illustrate autocorrelation ( Busk & Marascuilo, 1988; Huitema, 1985; Huitema & McKean, 1998; Matyas & Greenwood, 1997; Suen & Ary, 1987). According to Kazdin (2011), "The current verdict after several studies is that serial dependence is likely to be present and ought to be taken into account in evaluation of the data" (p.409). Multilevel modeling. As an alternative to the si mple OLS regression model, the use of multilevel models has been suggested for analyzing single case data ( Ferron, Bell, Hess, Rendina Gobioff, & Hibbard, 2009; Jenson, Clark, Kircher, & Kristjansson, 2007; Nugent, 1996; Shadish & Rindskopf, 2007; Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003a, 2003b). Multilevel models al low for the analysis of hierarchical data that are organized into two or more levels (Raudenbush & Bryk, 2002). For example, in educational research when the focus is on the effectiveness of a new c urriculum students are assigned to the treatment (receive the new curriculum) or control group by classroom. The students (level one) in each of the classrooms are therefore nested w ithin classrooms (level two). Another example is when repeated measure ments are gathered over time on a set of p articipants. The measurements (level one) are therefore nested within the

PAGE 45

! 28 participants (level two). This type of data structure is representative of single case data and for the purposes of this study the focus w as on this second example. To examine single case data within a study, a two level model can be used. The first level of the multilevel model is based on a simple linear regression model (9 ) where is the observed score at measurement occasion i for par ticipant j is a dichotomous variable indicating whether a measurement occasion or observation occurred during baseline or treatment, is the baseline mean for participant j is the treatment effect for participant j (i.e. the difference in means betw een baseline and treatment phases for participant j ), and is the error at measurement occasion i for participant j which accounts for within phase error variance. The errors for participant j are typically assumed to be independent with a variance of ( ). However, this assumption of independence could be violated due to autocorrelation ( Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003a). Therefore, it is possible with the use of multilevel modeling to assume a more complex covariance structure such as a first order autoregressive structure, which would account for possible autocorrelation ( Ferron, Farmer, & Owens, 2010 ; Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003b). It should also be noted that just as in OLS regression the first level of the multilevel model could be expand ed to account for trends in the data ( Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003b). The second level of the multilevel model allows for variation across participants in both their baseline levels and their treatment effects. (10 ) and

PAGE 46

! 29 (11 ) where is the average b aseline, is the average treatment effect, is an error term that indicates how far participant j 's baseline mean is from the average baseline mean with a variance of and is an error term that indicates the difference between participant j 's treatment effect and the average treatment effect with a variance of The error terms are assumed to be normally distributed and have a mean of zero. Multilevel modeling provides three different types of parameter estimates: (1) variance components, (2) fixed e ffects, and (3) individual estimates. The variance components of a two level model are the variance between participants' baseline means (i.e. ) and the variance between participants' treatment effects (i.e. ). The fixed effects are the average baselin e means across participants (i.e. ) and the average treatment effect across participants (i.e. ). Finally the individual estimates for each participant are the baseline mean for participant j (i.e. ) and the treatment effect for participant j (i.e. ) A major advantage of multilevel modeling over other statistical analysis options, such as OLS regression, is its flexibility in handling serial dependency or autocorrelation. As discussed previously, the nature of single case data lends itself to seria l dependency. Some researchers have argued that autocorrelation does not exist in single case data and therefore an OLS piecewise regression technique is an appropriate analysis option (Center, Skiba, & Casey, 1985 1986 ) and still others have debated the use of interrupted time series analysis because the influence of autocorrelation is removed prior to analysis of the data (Crosbie, 1993 ). Although the interrupted time series method has the ability

PAGE 47

! 30 to account for the influence of autocorrelation it req uires a large number of data points to adequately implement the procedure ( Busse, Kratochwill, & Elliott, 1995; Crosbie, 1993). Multilevel modeling provides a n alternative solution to handling serial dependency by having the flexibility to model a more co mplex covariance structure such as a first order autoregressive structure (Raudenbush & Bryk, 2002). According to Van de Noortgate and Onghena (2003a), several other advantages of the use of multilevel modeling exist as well. On e advantage of multilevel modeling is the flexibility of the model to handle heterogeneous varianc es and moderating variables. Another advantage of the use of multilevel models is that the individual parameter estimates are based on data from all the cases and therefore can still be relatively reliable even with a small number of observations per case. Lastly, software for estimating the parameters has become readily accessible. Although several advantages exist some limitations or concerns also exist. One concern focuses on sample size. Multilevel models are typically estimated using restricted maximum likelihood methods. Those methods were developed under a large sample theory and most recommendations specify the use of at least 30 units at the upper level ( Hox, 1998 ). P revious research has indicated that regardless of sample size, fixed effect parameter estimates are unbiased b ut variance components may be biased ( Ferron, Bell, Hess, Rendina Gobioff, & Hibbard, 2009; Maas & Hox, 2004; Mok, 1995 ;Raudenbush & Bryk, 2002). F erron, Bell, Hess, Rendina Gobioff, and Hibbard (2009) investigated the quality of inferences from multilevel modeling of multiple ba seline data. Specifically, the authors examined for the models in Equations 9 11, the interval estimates of the

PAGE 48

! 31 average treatment effect. Ferron et al (2009) used Monte Carlo simulation methods to examine multiple baseline studies having four, six, or eight participants (level 2 sample size) and series lengths of 10, 20, or 30 (level 1 sample sizes) for each participant. Their results indicated the fixed effect estimate of the average treatment effect was unbiased regardless of sample size. In addition to relative bias, confidence interval estimates were also examined and as long as the Kenward Roger or Satterthwaite d egrees of freedom methods were used accurate confidence interval estimates could be obtained. Specifically, the coverage estimates were close to the nominal .95 value, ranging from .965 to .935, when autocorrelation was modeled. However, the results of F erron et al (2009) also indicated that estimates of the variance components tended to be biased. Although the average relative bias estimates of the variance of the treatment effect did decrease as sample size got larger, ranging from 34% when the sample size was four to 21% when the sample size was eight a 21% upperward bias for a sample size of eight sti ll represents substantial bias. These results were similar to previous research on two level organizational models, where Maas and Hox (2004 ) indicate d a 25% upperward bias in the level 2 variance components with a level 2 sample size of 10 and a level 1 sample size of 5. Ferron, Owens, and Bell (2010) in an extension of past research to include more complex treatment effects and a larger number of p articipants, found results similar to Ferron et al. (2009). Equations 12 16 contain the model that was under investigation. Equation 12 represents the first level of the multilevel model where the outcome ( ) was modeled as a function of time (centered so 0 represents the first point in treatment), a

PAGE 49

! 32 dichotomous variable (0 = baseline, 1 = intervention), and the interaction between time and phase (12) where is the predicted value of the baseline trajectory for participant j when time = 0 or the firs t point in treatment is the baseline slope for participant j is the treatment effect for participant j (i.e. the difference in predicted values between baseline and treatment trajectories for participant j ) at the first point in treatment is the c hange in slope from baseline to treatment for participant j and is the error at measurement occasion i for participant j which accounts for the within phase error variance. At level 2 each of the level 1 coefficients was allowed to vary across particip ants, (13) (14) (15) and (16) Results from Ferron, Owens et al. (2010) indicated that f ixed effects coverage estimates for both the average treatment effect and average change in slope ranged from .917 to .962 and .908 to .963, respectively, w hen the Kenward Roger degrees of freedom method was used. In addition, as participants increased from three to 32 the average fixed effects confidence interval coverage for the Kenward Roger method increased.

PAGE 50

! 33 Ferron, Farmer, and Owens ( 2010 ) continued to research the statistical functioning of multilevel modeling Ferron, Farmer et al. (2010) moved beyond average treatment effects and their variance components to examining the accuracy of individual treatment effects and their confidence intervals (model given in Equations 9 11) The researchers conducted a Monte Carlo simulation study that examined multiple baselines of four, six, or eight ; series lengths of 10,20, or 30 observations ; and autocorrelation values of 0, .1, .2, .3, or .4. The confidence intervals of the empirical Bayes estimates of the individual treatment effects (i.e., from Equation 9) using the Kenward Roger method, provided accurate confidence intervals across all design factors studied. The precision of the confidence interval wi dth was widest utilizing the Kenward Roger method but rapidly decrea sed as series length increased. In addition, the confidence interval coverage showed variation across study conditions when the OLS method of estimation was used. The confidence interval was accurate when no autocorrelation was simulated and tended to undercover when positive autocorrelation was simulated. This finding was not too surprising given previous research that examined the utility of OLS methods in the presence of autocorrelati on ( Matyas & Greenwood, 1990; Toothaker, Banz, Noble, Camp, & Davis, 1983 ). In conclusion, the research examining the use of multilevel modeling (specifically two level models) to analyze single case data has been promising. The degree to which multileve l modeling is functioning properly, under small sample sizes, depends on the type of parameter being estimated (Ferron et al., 2009). If the focus is on the variance components and sample sizes are small then the estimates will not be very accurate. How ever, if the focus is on the fixed effects the parameter estimates are often accurate,

PAGE 51

! 34 as long as the error structure is correctly specified and the Kenward Roger degrees of freedom method is used. Meta Analysis The quantitative integration of findings is a necessary component of all types of research. The ability to integrate findings across studies allows researchers to make statements about the relationships between variables and the effectiveness of interventions across varying study characteristics. The idea of research synthesis and moving beyond statistical significance has been around since the early 1900s but was not termed meta analysis until 1976 by Gene Glass (Cooper & Hedges, 2009). Glass (1976) defines meta analysis as "the analysis of ana lysesthe statistical analysis of a large collection of analysis results from individual studies for the purpose of integrating the findings" (p.3). Although Glass (1976) was technically the first to coin the term "meta analysis" other researchers have b een involved in expanding the analysis options available in terms of meta analysis methods (Glass, McGaw, & Smith, 1981; Hedges & Olkin, 1985 ; Hunter, Schmidt, & Jackson, 1982; Rosenthal & Rubin, 1986). Meta analysis provides many advantages when summarizi ng results across research studies. One advantage of meta analysis is that it is a structured and systematic research technique that is open to replication. The steps involved in conducting a meta analysis are required to be well documented and therefore open to replication. "By making the research summarizing process explicit and systematic, the consumer can assess the author's assumptions, procedures, evidence, and conclusions rather than take on faith that the conclusions are valid" ( Lipsey & Wilson, 2001, p. 6). In addition, the analysis is more sophisticated than traditional review processes such as "vote counting"

PAGE 52

! 35 Vote counting is simply the process of taking all the studies measuring the relationship of interest and counting the number of statis tically significant results and the number of non statistically significant results. The category with the most counts wins, so if numerous non significant studies are found then the conclusion may be reached that there was not a relationship or effect. This method becomes problematic because statistical significance is dependent on sample size so studies with small samples may find effects that are meaningful but may not find statistically significant results due to low power ( Lipsey & Wilson, 2001; Sch midt, 1996). Another major advantage of meta analysis is its ability to move beyond a qualitative review of study findings and into a more detailed analysis of the relationships between the study characteristics and the study findings. This analysis of t he relationships between study characteristics and study findings is typically called a moderator analysis and provides a means of explaining possible variation in effect sizes (Lipsey & Wilson, 2001) A final advantage of meta analysis is its ability to handle a large number of studies. The procedures involved in a meta analysis allow researchers to systematically keep track of study details without losing information. Lipsey and Wilson (2001) did append this advantage by stating, M eta analysis does no t require large numbers of studies and, in some circumstances, can be usefully applied to as few as two or three study findings" (p.7). Individual Participant Data Versus Aggregate Data There are two forms of meta analysis : aggregate data meta analysis an d individual participant data meta analysis. In an aggregate data (AD) meta analysis the statistical synthesis is conducted by utilizing summary statistics from published and/ or unpublished studies to calculate effect sizes and then statistically combinin g these effect

PAGE 53

! 36 sizes in order to obtain an average effect size across studies as well as an associated confidence interval In contrast, an individual participant data (IPD; Cooper & Patall, 2009 ) meta analysis "involves the central collection, checking, and re analysis of the raw data from each study in order to obtain combined results" (p.166). After the raw data is collected from each study and if the outcomes across studies have been measured the same then the data is pooled and re analyzed using tra ditional inferential statistics (Cooper & Patall, 2009). Although IPD meta analyses are rare in large group social science literature they have been extensively investigated in the medical literature. Table 2 provides a listing of the relative benefits o f both the IPD and AD meta analysis. According to Cooper and Patall (2009) two major benefits of AD meta analysis are that the meta analysis can be done relatively quickly and with relatively low cost incurred to the meta analyst, as compared to the IPD meta analysis T wo bene fits of the IPD meta analysis are (a) the ability to perform subgroup analyses that were not performed by the original researchers ; and (b) the ability to check the data for possible errors. While it is evident that both have benefi ts over the other it is obvious that when availability of the dat a is not an issue the benefits o f IPD meta analysis outweigh those of AD meta analysis ( Cooper & Patall, 2009). However, ob taining individual data from large group studies is highly unlikel y and the use of AD meta analysis will continue until such "data sharing" becomes available. It is however commonplace to include individual level data in studies utilizing a single case design. This notion of having access to the individual participan t data is certainly an advantage for single case meta analysts. Nevertheless, AD meta analysis has historically been the focus of meta analysis literature.

PAGE 54

! 37 Table 2 Benefits of Individual Participant Data and Aggregate Data Meta Analysis Individual Parti cipant D ata (IPD) Meta Analysis S ubgroup analyses that were not originally conducted can be performed Data from the original studies can be checked Ability to ensure that the original analyses were conducted prope rly, as well as standardization analyses across studies C omplex analyses can be performed more easily N ew information can be added to the data sets Moderator analyses can be conducted with greater power, assuming all individual participant data sets are available B etween s tudy and within stu dy moderator analyses can be performed Aggregate Data (AD) Meta Analysis C ost, in both money and time is less Time to complete analysis is faster Ability to include group level statistics for which individual participant data are not available Bias c ould be decreased if study results are associated with availability of individual participant data Power could be increased to detect effects if many studies are available without individual participant data Note: F rom "The Relative Benefits of Meta Anal ysis Conducted With Individual Participant Data Versus Aggregated Data," by H. Cooper and E.A. Patall, 2009 Psychological Methods 14 p. 172. Copyright 2009 by the American Psychological Association. Adapted with permission. Procedures A meta analysis or research synthesis moves beyond the traditional literature search and combines data into a quantitative analysis. However, prior to and after the analysis stage of the meta analysis process there are several steps that also need to be considered. Co oper (2007) outlines six stages of research synthesis. The first stage is to define the problem. This stage consists of identifying and defining variables and the relationships among those variables in order to identify the research studies that will be relevant to the problem of interest. One characteristic of a good meta analysis is an explicit statement about inclusion and exclusion criteria ( Lipsey & Wilson, 2001). This allows the readers of the meta analysis to determine the specific research domai n and the

PAGE 55

! 38 criteria for why a study was included or not. The second stage is to collect the research evidence. Specifically, identify sources ( e.g., databases, journals, conference proceedings) and key terms needed to identify relevant studies. During thi s stage meta analysts attempt to identify and locate every study defined within the specified research domain that meets the eligibility requirements. The third stage is to evaluate the data. Once the relevant studies have been collected specific inform ation or data must be extracted from the studies in order to best synthesize the information to address the problem of interest. Specifically, this stage involves the coding of data. "The coding procedures for meta analysis revolve around a coding protoc ol that specifies the information to be extracted from each eligible study"( Lipsey & Wilson, 2001, p.73). The fourth stage consists of data analysis. This stage involves the identification and application of specific statistical procedures to quantitativ ely integrate the data from each individual study In an AD meta analysis, the distribution of effect sizes are analyzed to examine the variability and obtain an estimate of the average effect size and its corresponding confidence interval, as well as tes ting for differences among effect sizes. In an IPD meta analysis, raw data are obtained from all studies and if the outcomes were measured the same across the studies then the data are pooled together and re analyzed using "traditional inferential statist ics or more sophisticated techniques" (Cooper & Patall, 2009, p. 166). The fifth stage involves the interpretation of the analysis results. Meta analysis methods allow researchers to make inferences about specific relationships and the average magnitude o f effects sizes across studies. The sixth and final stage is presenting the meta analysis results. This stage involves making judgments about what to report and how to disseminate findings to a broader audience.

PAGE 56

! 39 Analysis Considerations and Methods Alth ough there are many steps involved in the meta analysis process a major component and arguably the most defining feature is the analysis or quantitative integration of data across studies. IPD meta analysis. In an IPD meta analysis raw data or individua l participant data are obtained from each study and then each participant's data are incorporated into an analysis option that is appropriate for the research questions. The use of IPD meta analysis allows for many possible analysis options including MANO VA, multiple regression, structural equation modeling (SEM), or multilevel modeling. However a recent review of IPD meta analyses indicated that the most common analysis option used was a two stage process that consisted of obtaining the raw data in each study converting to a standardized effect size and then combining the effect sizes across studies. This process parallels the processes involved in an AD meta analysis (Simmonds et al., 2005). AD meta analysis. In order to quantitatively integrate fin dings a n AD meta analyst needs an effect size from each included study. "An effect size is a number that reflects the magnitude of the relationship between two variables" (Borenstein, 2009, p. 220). Specifically, an effect size represents the strength a nd direction of an effect. There are various types of effect sizes and their applicability is specific to the research problem. For example, an effect size could represent how much a treatment (independent variable) impacted social skills (dependent var iable) as compared to no treatment or an effect size could represent an index of the relationship between two variables such as depression and alcoholism. These effect sizes are then combined and compared in a meta analysis.

PAGE 57

! 40 Effect sizes provide stan dardized estimates, which allow us to combine them across studies. If all studies investigated exactly the same constructs and used the same sample sizes and instruments then combining effect sizes would be easy; all studies would be exact replicates of each other. However, this is rarely -if ever -the case and meta analysts must make certain decisions to determine how to combine studies that differ in many methodological and substantive ways ( Shadish & Haddock, 2009). Therefore, Hershberger, Wallace, Green, and Marquis (1999) suggested that the method chosen for combining effect sizes across studies "must be able to provide overall estimates of treatment effectiveness and the precision of those estimates as well as assessments of the magnitude and dire ction of effects of other variables or factors on treatment effectiveness" (p.119). Weights. As illustrated earlier, not all studies are exact replicates of each other and therefore it has been suggested in the literature to account for varying study c haracteristics by weighting each effect size Shadish and Haddock (2009) suggest that weighting schemes rest on three assumptions. First, studies with certain characteristics are less biased, with regard to inferences, than studies with other characteris tics. Second, prior to combing effect sizes the bias of those characteristics can be estimated. Third, in order to compensate for the bias suitable weights can be calculated and are defensible. Several weighting schemes have been proposed in the litera ture and adequately address all three of the assumptions outlined previously ( Hedges & Olkin, 1985; Hunter & Schmidt, 2004 ). However, most of the literature relating to the weighting of effec t sizes focuses on large group studies. The type s of weights pr oposed for large group studies, such as the inverse of the variance or the within study sample size, would not be

PAGE 58

! 41 appropriate for use with single case data due to the relatively small sample sizes used in these types of designs. Therefore, some singe case researchers have suggested weighting each effect size by the number of observations in the series (Shadish & Rindskopf, 2007; Faith Allison & Gorman, 1996). Calculating the effect size mean and distribution After gathering effect sizes from each study and choosing an appropriate weighting scheme, the effect sizes are statistically combined to describe the distribution of the effect sizes. Specifically, means and confidence intervals are calculated. The mean effect size represents a point estimate of t he population effect size and the confidence interval indicates a range of possible values in which the population effect size is likely to be. The confidence interval provides a degree of precision around the mean effect size and can also be used to det ermine statistical significance in relation to the null hypothesis that there is no effect in the population (Lipsey & Wilson, 2001). Meta analysis models Beyond calculating mean effect sizes and confidence intervals lies another important component of meta analysis : homogeneity of the effect size distribution. Meta analysts must decide if the effect sizes included in their estimate of the mean effect size are all estimating a single population effect size or are from a distribution of population effect sizes. This decision leads meta analysts to choose between two types of statistical models, fixed or random effects. A fixed effects model assumes a common effect size across all studies ( ) ( Shadish & Haddock, 2009). In other words, in a fixed effect s model it is assumed that one true effect size exists in the population with variability being only due to sampling error. In contrast, under a random effects model one would

PAGE 59

! 42 not assume that one population effect size exists but rather a distribution of population effect sizes exists. Therefore differences in effect sizes are based on underlying population differences and are not just due to sampling error. The decision whether to use a fixed or random effects model does not have one single correct answ er. Some would argue that conceptually the random effects model makes the most sens e due to the fact that it reduces to the fixed effects model when the variance component is zero or when no random variation exists ( Shadish & Haddock, 2009). Others would encourage the use of a homogeneity test statistic, such as the Q statistic ( Hedges & Olkin, 1985). This test allows the homogeneity of variance to be tested statistically indicating that rejection of homogeneity implies that it is tenable to assume that the variability among effects sizes is greater than what could have occurred due to sampling error alone (Lipsey & Wilson, 2001 ). However, the Q statistic has low power with small sample sizes and therefore may fail to reject homogeneity when in fact the re is variability among the effect sizes that is due to more than just sampling error. S till othe rs would argue that the choice of models depends on the inferences the researcher hopes to make ( Hedges & Vevea, 1998). Threats to Validity Researchers have d iscussed several potential threats to the validity of inferences made from meta analysis ( Matt & Cook, 2009). Some threats relate specifically to inferences about the association between an independent and a dependent variable, such as an intervention eff ect on an outcome variable. These possible threats are (a) unrel iability in primary studies, (b) restriction of range, (c) missing effect sizes, (d) unreliab ility of meta analytic codings, (e) increased Type I error rates, (f) sampling bias,

PAGE 60

! 43 (g) dependent effect sizes, (h) failu re to use weighted effect sizes, (i) inappropriate meta analysis mod el selection, and (j) lack of statistical power (Matt & Cook, 2009). Although a single study's deficiencies will not likely threaten the inferences made from a meta analysis the occurrence of a deficiency across multiple, included studies can lead to increased Type I or T ype II errors (Matt & Cook, 2009). Another often and most persistent criticism of meta analysis is the notion of apples and oranges (Lipsey & Wilso n, 2001). The apples and oranges issue deals with the inclusion of studies that deal with a wide variety of different constructs and/or utilize different instruments to measure variables. This becomes an issue when combining effect sizes across studies a nd calculating a grand mean effect size. However, at the heart of meta analysis is the examination of the distribution of effect sizes and often of primary interest to the meta analyst is the identification of sources of variability that are due to study differences (Lipsey & Wilson, 2001). Single Case Meta Analysis Although the use of single case designs to evaluate interventions has grown in popularity over the last decade their inclusion in meta analyses and the methodological research encouraging their inclusion has been limited (Busk & Serlin, 1992; Busse, Kratochwill, & Elliott, 1995; Jenson, Clark, Kircher, & Kristjansson, 2007; Shadish & Rindskopf, 2007; Shadish, Rindskopf, & Hedges, 2008; Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003b ). Most research inv olving meta analysis has focused on large group studies (Glass, 1976; Hedges & Olkin, 1985; Hunter & Schmidt, 1990; Rosenthal & Rubin 1 986 ) and while these methods have worked well with results from large group comparison studies there is still disagreeme nt o ver the best way to meta analyze results from single

PAGE 61

! 44 case studies ( Beretvas & Chung, 2008 ). Nevertheless, the inclusion of results from single case studies in meta analyses is necessary for many reasons. The inclusion of single case studies in meta a nalysis allows for information about the overall treatment effect without losing information about the individual cases. A single case study involves the repeated measurement of one or a few cases over time offering information on the variability in the treatment effect of individual cases. When several single case studies are aggregated together the overall treatment effect can be estimated as well as the effects for individual cases (Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003a). In addition, the aggregation of several single case studies increases the generalizabilty of the findings. A major criticism of single case designs is their lack of generalizabilty and by combining several single case studies together it becomes tenable to assume greater generalizabi lty of the results. Analysis Options The earliest proposal for meta analyzing single case data dates back to 1984, where Gingerich proposed the use of meta analysis methods developed by Smith, Glass, and Miller (1980) Specifically, Gingerich (1984) pr oposed calculating a standardized mean difference between post test and pre test scores with the standard deviation of the pre test scores serving as the standardizing unit. Although his idea for synthesizing single case data across studies was well inten ded h is suggestion for using Glassian meta analytic methods does not take into account the serial dependence among single case data. His argument in favor of this method is actually more of an argument against the notion that serial dependency or autocor relatio n is a characteristic of single case data, a questionable argument given the nature of the data.

PAGE 62

! 45 Summary measures. Following Gingerich's (1984) proposal, a non parametric or non regression based method was proposed. Scruggs, Mastropieri, and Cas tro (1987) suggested an approach to calculate the percentage of non overlapping data (PND) between treatment and baseline phases. The PND is calculated by identifying the number of data points in treatment that exceed the highest data point in baseline di vided by the total number of data points in treatment and then multiplied by 100. "When computation is completed, these outcome measures can be combined across studies to determine relative effectiveness of particular treatments" (Scruggs, Mastropieri, & Castro, 1987, p.27). Although relatively easy to compute, the use of PND as a meta analy tic approach has several limitations (Allison & Gorman, 1993). Allison and Gorman (1993) point out that the PND has the potential to misrepresent treatment effects wh en there is a trend in the data, outliers are present in the treatment phase, and the treatment has had a negative effect on the outcome. In addition, this proposed single case meta analytic approach does not take into consideration specific meta analysis considerations such as the weighting of effect sizes or the use of appropriate meta analytic models (i.e. fixed or random effects). Busk and Serlin (1992) suggest that the most appropriate effect size measure for both between and within subject experim ents, given the assumptions of equality of variance and compound symmetry, is the standardized mean difference effect size where the denominator is the square root of the mean square error in the design. The authors describe four advantages for this type of effect size. First, one single definition holds for all experimental designs. Second, because the distribution of the effect size measure is known, one can test the effect size

PAGE 63

! 46 directly and build a confidence interval for it. Third, Hedges and Olkin 's meta analytic techniques can be used, because they are based on large sample, normal approximations to the noncentral t distribution. And fourth, it is straightforward to convert individual t s to effect sizes (Busk & Serlin, 1992, p. 195) However, if t he assumptions needed to pool the within phase variances are not met then other methods are need ed to calculate and test the effect size measure. Busk and Serlin (1992) present three approaches to obtain the effect size estimate. The three approaches dif fer in the assumptions concerning the population distribution form and equality of variances. The first approach the Glassian original effect size estimate makes no assumptions and the standardized mean difference score is calculated by taking the diffe rence between the baseline and treatment phase means and dividing by the baseline standard deviation. The second approach assumes equality of variances across the baseline and treatment phases but still makes no assumption about the population distributio n form. In this approach the within phase variances are pooled to obtain better estimates of the effect size. In the third approach, assumptions are made about the population distribution as well as about equality of variances across baseline and treatme nt phase. Calculation of the effect size measure doesn't change ; however by making the assumption that the phase scores are from a normal distribution and that the within phase variances are equal the distribution of the effect size is considered to fol low a noncentral t distribution and confidence intervals can be constructed for the individual effect estimates. In addition, with the assumption of a normal distribution large group meta analytic methods can be used to synthesize effects across studies.

PAGE 64

! 47 The third approach is most in line with what meta analysts are hoping to do ; however most single case data do not adhere to these strict assumptions of equality of variances, compound symmetry, and normality of the distribution across baseline and treatm ent phases. Therefore, the use of confidence intervals and meta analytic procedures that allow for the testing of specific hypotheses becomes inappropriate and limits the amount of information available to the meta analysts. In addition, the formula sugg ested by Busk and Serlin (1992) when no assumptions can be made yields a numerator and denominator that are not independent of each other and can no longer be used in large group meta analytic methods for combining effect sizes across studies. Inferential statistics. Beyond the proposal of specific summary measures other researchers have suggested the use of various inferential tests to meta analyze single case data (Allison & Gorman, 1993; Center, Skiba, & Casey, 1985 1986; Onghena & Edgington, 2005; Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003a, 2003b, 2007, 2008). Onghena and Edgington (2005) propose the use of p value combining, based on the use of randomization tests, as a method to meta analyze single case data. The authors demonstrate that if the single case experiments used in a meta analysis provide independent tests of the same null hypothesis then the p values can be combined by summing the p values across studies and comparing the sum to all other possible sums that could have occurred. The proportion o f summed p values that is as small or smaller than the observed summed p value is then calculated to determine if the overall treatment effect is significant. Although the use of randomization tests does provide a meta analyst with information related to whether there was or was not a treatment effect it does not provide an estimate of the size of that treatment effect or the ability to test the impact of

PAGE 65

! 48 other variables on the treatment effect. In addition, it has been well documented that p values are influenced by the size of the treatment effect as well as the number of observations included in the analysis (Onghena & Edgington, 2005). A series of regression methods have also been suggested for use in meta analyzing single case dat a. Center, Skiba, a nd Casey (1985 19 8 6) proposed the use of a piece wise regression technique that utilized raw data from individual single case studies. The technique used the following model: (17 ) where represents the number of points in baseline, is a term for change in level, is a term for the baseline trend, and is an interaction term to measure the change in slope due to the treatment. This technique produces two separate effect sizes ( ), which can make interpretation more complicated. However, based on what we know about single case data attempting to represent treatment effectiveness with an effect size that only illustrates a change in level would not adequately account for changes in slope or the combined effects of level and slope changes. Center, Skiba, and Casey (1985 1986) also proposed computing one effect size by calculating a difference in values between the full model (given in Equation 17) and a model without each of the parameters ( ), and t hen converting that difference in values into an F sta tistic, which can be converted to an often recognized and easily interpretable d effect size. By allowing investigation of changes in both slope and level this model proved to be a significant improvement over what was available at the time. Nevertheless this technique did not take into account the autocorrelational nature of single case data and assumed that errors of successive observations were independent. In

PAGE 66

! 49 addition, none of the methods up to this point acknowledged crucial meta analytical issues such as the use of fixed or random effects models, the weighting of effect sizes, or the use of multiple effect sizes per study. Allison and Gorman (1993) modified the method proposed by Center, Skiba, and Casey (1985 1986) to address concerns inherent in the model. Three specific problems were discussed and the model was improved upon to rectify these problems. The first problem was that under certain conditions the model could overestimate the effects of trend and thereby underestimate the overall effec t size. Allison and Gorman (1993) corrected for this by computing trend on the baseline data only instead of across both phases. The second problem was that due to the nature of how the effect size is calculated the effect can never go below zero. This is problematic because it is not consistent with the notion that sometimes treatments can have a negative impact and worse results can be produced. This problem was corrected for by recommending the application of the appropriate sign as indicated by the regression coefficient. The third problem was that the effect could be overestimated due to an increase in predictability of the dependent variable regardless of whether or not the change was in the intended direction or not ( Alison & Gorman, 1993). In order to address the third problem, the authors recommend that if the zero order correlations have different signs simply estimate the change in level because the change in slope will automatically attenuate its effect (Allison & Gorman, 1993). This mod el was again a significant improvement over the previous models but still did not take into account autocorrelation or key meta analytic issues, such as weighting of effect sizes, independence of effect sizes, and meta analytic model selection.

PAGE 67

! 50 Although e ach of these models provided advances on their predecessors, they still leav e much to be desired in the form of meta analyzing single case data. Specifically, a method needs to be able to address the issue of autocorrelation, the standardization of effect sizes for combination across studies, and the use of a meta analytical method that allows the further investigation of variability in e ffect sizes. The use of multil evel modeling provides the tools to be able to accomplish all of these goals. Van den Noortgate and Onghena (2003a, 2003b, 2007, 2008) proposed the use of multi level modeling to aggregate single case data for the purposes of meta analysi s. The authors have suggested aggregating single case data in three different ways. The first option in cludes individual level raw data from each primary study in the meta analysis and makes the assumption that all dependent variables across studies are measured the same way. Van den Noortgate and Onghena (2008) illustrated this first option in a series of models provided in Equations 18 through 22. Equation 18 represents within person variation, which can be modeled with a basic regression equation. Specifically, an outcome ( y ) is modeled on measurement occasion i for participant j in study k ( ) as a lin ear function of a single predictor, phase : (18 ) where phase represents a dummy coded variable indicating whether measurement occasion i took place during the baseline (0) or treatment (1) phase. is the level of the outcome during baseline for participa nt j from study k is the treatment effect for participant j from study k and is within phase error variance.

PAGE 68

! 51 At the second level, the variation across participants is modeled in the following equatio ns : (19 ) and (20 ) where the fixed effects are ,the average baseline level for study k and ,the average treatment effect for study k and the error terms are and that allow variation in both baseline levels and treatment effects among participants within study k At the third level, the vari ation across studies is modeled in the following equations: (21 ) and (2 2 ) where the fixed effects are ,the overall average baseline level, and the overall average treatment effect, and the error terms are and which allow variation in both the average baseline levels and average treatment effects among studies. It should be noted that errors on all levels were assumed to be independently normally distributed and have a mean of zero. However, multilevel models are quite flexible and the use of a complex covariance structure, such as a first order auto regressive structure, is possible to account for dependent errors. Van de Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) second option assumes the dependent variable is measured differently across studies and t herefore scores from individuals need to be standardized before combining them into one analysis First, the individual level

PAGE 69

! 52 raw data are standardized by performing an OLS regression for each participant separately and dividing their scores by each resul ting root mean squared error and then combining the data into the models defined in Equations 18 through 22 (Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2008). T he third option proposed by Van den Noortgate and Onghena (2008) does not include individual leve l data from each study in the meta analysis. Instead, standardized regression coefficients are calculated for each study and included in the meta analysis as effect sizes representing a standardized change in level and change in slope. In this option, Equation 18 n eeds slight modifications to appropriately meta analyze single case data. The first level of the model is adapted to model the effect sizes or standardized regression coefficients from each study rather than the individual level data: ! 0 j k = 0 j k + e j k (23) with ! 0 j k representing the observed effect size for participant j in study k modeled as the true effects size ( ) for participant j in study k plus some random variation or error ( ), where the level 1 error variance matrix is assumed known. The second and third level equations (see Equations 19 22) describing variation across participants and between studies remain the same. Multilevel modeling estimates (co) variance at each level but typically only estimates fixed effect parameters at the highest level. Therefore, variance and covariance estimates across all levels and fixed effects at the third level, the average baseline across studies and the average treatment effect across studie s can be reported. These types of parameter estimates offer the ability not only to provide information on the overall treatment effect but also information related to the variability of that overall average

PAGE 70

! 53 treatment effect. In addition, predictors can be added to the model to account for that variability. Van den Noortgate and Onghena (2008) argue that single case study conclusions are restricted to the participants which were investigated but multilevel modeling provides the ability to combine result s from multiple participants and studies to gain inf ormation about not only the average treatment effect but also if and how the treatment effect varies across participants and studies. Another advantage of multilevel modeling is that it can be used to ag gregate data from single case studies that include multiple participants. This use of multiple data sources or effect sizes from the same study is typically problematic and has not been addressed by other proposed single case meta analytic methods. Multi level modeling is structured to account for that "nesting" of data within studies by allowing variation within participants, between participants of the same study, and between studies (Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2008). Although all of the previous si mulation research on multilevel modeling of single case data (Ferron et al., 2009; Ferron, Farmer et al., 2010; Ferron, Owens et al., 2010) has focused on two level models and the use of a three level model has only been applied to a real world data set (V an den Noortgate & Onghena, 2008) the results have been encouraging. These findings provide motivation in the pursuit of empirically evaluating the utility of inferences made from a three level model to meta analyze single case data. Applications of Si ngle Case Meta Analysis Beretvas and Chung (2008a) conducted a narrative review of single case meta analyses that took place between 1985 and 2005; 24 articles were identified. Their results indicated that the most commonly used metric to summarize study results was the

PAGE 71

! 54 PND, and it was most commonly used in combination with percent zero data (PZD). The next most popular effect size utilized was the standardized mean difference in various forms. Also, a form of time series analysis was used by a small per centage of studies, as well as the use of piecewise regression, which was incorrectly specified both times it was reported. Although most of the meta analyses reviewed by Beretvas and Chung (2008a) focused on studies using more complex designs (e.g., mul tiple baseline, reversal, alternating treatment) than a simple AB design, the most common metric used to summarize results only focused on the comparison of an intervention phase to a baseline phase. This focus can lead to a dependence of outcomes yielded by the same metric (Beretvas & Chung, 2008a). The results of Beretvas and Chung's (2008a) review indicated that the majority of meta analyses reviewed did not clearly state how this dependence was handled. When analyzing multiple treatments per study, t he most common method reported was to average the indices together. Further, when addressing the use of multiple measures per study, the majority of studies analyzed results separately for each measure and when multiple participants per study were involve d, most of the meta analyses ignored the dependence and treated each effect size as independent (Beretvas & Chung, 2008a). In terms of analyses conducted, the majority of meta analyses simply averaged the effect sizes together. In addition, a few studies performed moderator analyses to explore variability in the effect sizes. Farmer, Owens, Ferron and Allsopp (2010a) also conducted a review of single case meta analyses. Farmer et al. (2010a) searched for single case meta analyses that were conducted fro m 1999 2009. Their search yielded 39 articles for inclusion. Most of

PAGE 72

! 55 the meta analyses were related to education, with the majority in special education. The majority of meta analyses provided clear search procedures but did not tend to include detailed information about the primary study characteristics (Farmer et al., 2010a). However, when primary study information was provided, the meta analyses reported the use of studies that included more complex designs and tended to exclude simple AB designs and those studies with less than three points per phase. Similar to Beretvas and Chung (2008), the most common metric reported was the PND, and the majority of studies computed averages of the effect sizes. The meta analytic review also noted that limited i nformation was provided regarding effect size calculation, meta analytic method used, and any further analyses (e.g., moderator analyses) that were conducted. Farmer et al. (2010a) cautioned single case meta analysts on the dangers of not providing enough information to their readers and concluded with a suggestion that a table be included in future single case meta analyses identifying the types of single case designs used, the phases used in the calculation of the effect sizes, and the number of effect s izes used from each study. Summary Single case designs provide the ability to intensively study the effect of a treatment on a single case over time. The popularity of these designs has grown rapidly over the past decades to include research in school ps ychology (Skinner, 2004), special education (Algozzine, Browder, Karvonen, Test, & Wood, 2001), teacher education (Hsieh, Hemmeter, McCollum, & Ostrosky, 2009), and behavioral intervention research (Filter & Horner, 2009). However, the integration of sing le case designs in meta analytic research has been far less frequent (Busk & Serlin, 1992; Busse, Kratochwill, & Elliott,

PAGE 73

! 56 1995; Jenson, Clark, Kircher, & Kristjansson, 2007; Shadish & Rindskopf, 2007; Shadish, Rindskopf, & Hedges, 2008; Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003b). This infrequency may be due to the lack of methodological consensus on how to best synthesize single case results across studies. Several methods have been proposed, such as the combining of the PND across studies (Scruggs, Mastropieri, & Castro 1987), the calculation of a standardized mean difference and use of traditional large group meta analytic methods (Busk & Serlin, 1992), the combining of p values through the use of r andomization tests ( Onghena & Edgington 2005), several regress i on based methods that account for changes in level and slope (Casey, Center, & Skiba, 1985 1986; Allison & Gorman, 1993), and the use of multilevel modeling (Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003a, 2003b, 2007, 2008). Among these methods, multilevel modeling has been recommended for use with single case meta analytic data due to features of the model that can handle characteristics of the data that are often problemati c for other analysis options. However, further investigation into the utility of the inferen ces made from multilevel modeling is necessary to provide guidance to future single case meta analysts. Furthermore, the empirical evaluation of a three level single case meta analytic model under conditions that are similar to the field of social science is needed. Therefore, this study examine d the utility of Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data multilevel modeling approach to the meta analysis of single case data. Specifically, the quality of the fixed effects (i.e. the overall average bas eline level and the overall average treatment effect) and the variance components ( e. g., the between person within study variance in the average baseline level, the between study variance in the overall average baseline level, the between person within stu dy variance in the average treatment effect)

PAGE 74

! 57 in a three level multilevel model were examined More specifically, it investigated confidence interval coverage rates, confidence interval widths, and bias of the point estimates as a function of specific desi gn and data factors. The raw data option was the most fitting method to first evaluate, as it is the most basic model of Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) three proposed options.

PAGE 75

! 58 CHAPTER THREE: METHOD This chapter outlines the methods for this study, including the purpose, research questions, sample, and design. Purpose The purpose of this study wa s to examine the appropriateness of Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data multilevel modeling approach to the meta analysis of single c ase d ata. Specifically, the study examine d the fixed effects (i.e., the overall average baseline level and the overall average treatment effect) and the variance compo n ents ( e. g., the between person within study variance in the average baseline level, the between study variance in the overall average baseline level, the between person within study va riance in the average treatment effect) in a three level multilevel model. More specifically, it investigated bias of the point estimates, confidence interval coverage, and confidence interval width as a function of specific design and data factors, such as the number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelat ion, and variances of the error terms Research Questions 1. To what extent are the fixed effect estimates from a three level meta analytic single case model biased as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal n umber of participants per primary

PAGE 76

! 59 study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )? 2. To what extent does the confidence interval coverage of the fixed effect estimates from a three level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error term s )? 3. To what extent does the confidence interval width of the fixed effect estimates from a t hree level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms)? 4. To what extent are the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model biased as a function of specific design fa ctors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )? 5. To what extent does the confidence interval coverage of the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )?

PAGE 77

! 60 6. To what extent does the confidence interval width of the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific design factors (number of primary s tudies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )? Design This study utilized a 3 X 2 X 3 X 3 X 2 factorial design. The factorial des ign included five independent variables: (1) number of primary studies per meta analysis (10, 30, and 80); (2) modal number of participants per primary study ( small [mode = 4] and large [mode = 8] ); (3) modal series length per primary study ( small [mode = 10] medium [mode = 20] and large [mode = 30] ); (4) level of autocorrelation (0, .2, and .4); and (5) variances of the error terms ( most of the variance at level 1 [ = 1, = .2, and = .05] and most of the variance at level 2 [ = 1, = 2, and = .5]). Fo r each of the 108 conditions, 5,000 data sets were simulated using SAS IML (SAS Institute Inc., 2008). The dependent variables were bias, the average difference between the known parameter value and the parameter estimate for both the fixed effects ( and ) and the variance components ( , , and ! ), confidence interval coverage, the proportion of 95% confidence intervals that contain both the fixed effects estimates and the variance components, and confidence interval w idth, the average difference between the upper and lower limits of the 95% confidence intervals for both the fixed effects and the variance components.

PAGE 78

! 61 Five experimental variables were examined: (1) number of primary studies per meta analysis, (2) modal n umber of participants per primary study, (3) modal series length per primary study, (4) level of autocorrelation, and (5) variances of the error terms. Of these variables, (1), (2), and (3) represent aspects of the meta analysis, (4) represents aspects of the primary studies within the meta analysis, and (5) represents aspects of both the meta analysis and the primary study data. Sample Crossing the two variance levels of the error terms with the three levels of autocorrelation, a total of six data condit ions were examined for each of 18 combinations of number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, and modal series length per primary study. For each of the 108 conditions (6*18), 5,000 data sets will be simula ted using SAS IML (SAS Institute Inc., 2008). The use of 5,000 replications leads to a standard error of .003 when coverage is .95, which is an adequate level of precision when estimating coverage. The sample for this study was generated through Monte Ca rlo simulation methods. The sample generation consisted of two aspects: (1) primary study characteristics and (2) meta analytic characteristics. The primary study characteristics were based on specific values of the following factors: level of autocorrel ation, and variances of the level 2 error terms. The number of primary studies included in each meta analysis, the modal number of participants per primary study, the modal series length per primary study, and the variances of the level 3 error terms addr ess characteristics of the meta analysis. The factors used to define the simulated data are further defined below.

PAGE 79

! 62 Conditions Sampled Number of primary studies per meta a nalysis The number of primary studies in each meta analysis had three levels (10, 30 or 80). These values were chosen based on a review that was conducted by Farmer, Owens, Ferron, and Allsopp (2010b) on 39 single case meta analyses in social science between the years of 1999 and 2009. Farmer et al. (2010b) found that the number of prim ary studies included in the meta analyses ranged from 3 to 117, with 60% of the meta analyses including less than 30 primary studies. Modal number of p articipants per primary study. The modal number of participants per primary study had two levels (small and large). The small category contain ed 70% of primary studies with four participants, 20% of primary studies with six participants, and 10% of primary st udies with eight participants in each meta analysis, indicating a mode of 4 and an average of 4.7 p articipants per primary study. The large category contain ed 70% of primary studies with eight participants, 20% with six participants, and 10% with four participants in each meta analysis, indicating a mode of 8 and an average of 7.2 participants per prim ary study These categories we re defined based on findings fr om Farmer et al. (2010b ) where the average number of participants per study ranged from 1.4 to 30.67 with 93% of those values falling at or below seven and Ferron Farmer et al ( 2010 ) who fo und in multiple baselines designs the number of participants ranged from 3 to 10 with a median of 4 In addition, these levels were chosen based on recommendations of a minimum of four baselines and upwards of eight or nine to show treatment effects acro ss behaviors, persons, or settings (Kazdin, 2011 ).

PAGE 80

! 63 Modal series length per primary study. The modal series length per primary study had three levels (small, medium, and large). The small level contain ed 70% of primary studies with series lengths of 10, 2 0% of primary studies with series lengths of 20, and 10% of primary studies with series lengths of 30 in each meta analysis, indicating a mode of 10 and an average series length of 14 per primary study The medium level contain ed 70% of primary studies wi th series lengths of 20, 20% of primary studies with series lengths of 10, and 10% of primary studies with series lengths of 30 in each meta analysis, indicating a mode of 20 and an average series length of 19 per primary study The large level contain ed 70% of primary studies with series lengths of 30, 20% with series lengths of 10, and 10% with series lengths of 20 in each meta analysis, indicating a mode of 30 and an average series length of 25 per primary study These categories were chosen to represe nt a range of possible va lues in single case meta analyse s. These levels were chosen based on the consistency with previous simulation studies investigating the use of multilevel modeling as a method of analyzing single case data where series length of 10 20, and 30 were modeled (Ferron et al., 2009; Ferron, Farmer et al., 2010b; Ferron, Owens et al., 2010a) In addition, Ferron, Farmer et al. (2010) conducted a survey of multiple baseline studies published in 2008 and found that average series lengths ra nged from seven to 58 with a median of 24. Level of a utocorrelation The level of autocorrelation in the primary studies was 0, .2, or .4. These values cover the range of possible autocorrelation values typically found in behavioral studies (Busk & Mara scuilo, 1988; Huitema, 1985; Matyas & Greenwood, 1996 ). In addition, these values were consistent with past simulation studies

PAGE 81

! 64 that investigated the utility of multilevel modeling ( Ferron et al., 2009; Ferron Farmer et al., 2010; Ferron, Owens et al., 20 10). Variances of the error t erms. The variances of the error terms were comprised of two categories. The first category modeled the data to have most of the variance at level 1 or within person, with values of 1 for the level 1 error term, .2 for the l evel 2 error terms, and .05 for the level 3 error terms. The second category modeled the data to have most of the variance at level 2, with values of 1 for the level 1 error variance, 2 for the level 2 error variances, and .5 for the level 3 error varianc es. These values covered a range of possible values, such as those presented in Van den Noortgate and Onghena (2008) and previous simulation research (Ferron et al., 2009). In addition, the variance in t he average baseline levels equal ed the variance in the average treatment effects. Constraining the level 2 variances to be equal was consistent with previous simulation research (Ferron et al., 2009; Ferron, Farmer et al. 2010; Ferron, Owens et al., 2010). Data Generation Data was generated based on Van d en Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data, three level single case meta analytic model shown in Equati ons 24 through 28 The raw data method was chosen as it is the most basic model and therefore was the most logical model to first evaluate. At the firs t level, an outcome ( y ) wa s modeled on measurement occasion i for participant j of study k ( ) as a linear function of a single predictor, phase: ( 24 ) where phase wa s a dichotomous variable indicating whether a measurement occasion or observation occurre d during baseline or treatment phase wa s the level of the outcome

PAGE 82

! 65 during baseline for participant j from study k wa s the treatment effect for participant j from study k and was within phase error variance. This within phase participant model was c onsistent with the multilevel modeling application presented by Van den Noortgate and Onghena (2008). In addition, it was the most basic interrupted time series model (e.g., no trends or changes in trends); therefore it was the most logical model for an i nitial study into the three level meta analytic modeling of single case data. If estimation problems occurred in the simplest model one would suspect that those same problems would likely occur in any further complex model. Errors for the within particip ant model ( ) were generated using the ARMASIM function in SAS version 9.2 (SAS Institute, 2008) with a variance of ( ) of 1.0 and autocorrelation values of 0, .2, or .4, as previously discussed. At the second level, the variation across participant s was m odeled using the following equation s : (25 ) and (26 ) where the fixed effects were the average baseline level for study k and the average treatment effect for study k and the error terms are and that allow ed variation in both baseline levels and treatment effects among participants. Level 2 errors were generated from a normal distribution using the RANNOR random number generator in SAS version 9.2 (SAS Institute Inc., 2008). The variance of the level 2 errors were defined based on the previous ly discussed levels of .2 or 2 and the covariance between

PAGE 83

! 66 and was set to 0 The covariance between the level 2 errors was set to zero which was consistent with past simulation research (Ferron et al., 2009; Ferron, Farmer et al. 2010; Ferron, Owens et al., 2010), as well as Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2003a, 2007) application of multilevel modeling to single case data. At the third level, the variation across studies was modeled using the following equations: (27 ) and (28 ) where the fixed effects were the overall average baseline level, and the overall average treatment effect, and the error terms are and which allow ed variation in both the overall average baseline level and overall average treatment effect among studies Leve l 3 errors were generated from a normal distribution using the RANNOR random number generator in SAS version 9.2 (SAS Institute Inc., 2008). The fixed effects ( and ) were set to 1.0. The variance of the level 3 errors were defined based on the previou sly discussed levels of .05 or .5 and the covariance between and was set to 0. The covariance between the level 3 errors was set to zero which was consistent with past simulation research (Ferron et al., 2009; Ferron, Farmer et al. 2010; Ferron, Owens et al., 2010), as well as Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2003a, 2007) application of multilevel modeling to single case data. Analysis of Each Simulated Meta Analytic Data Set Each data set was analyzed using the same model that was used for data gene ration (see Equations 24 28). The three level model was estimated using restricted

PAGE 84

! 67 maximum likelihood (REML) via PROC MIXED with the Kenward Roger degrees of freedom method in SAS version 9.2 (SAS Institute Inc., 2008). In addition, a first order auto regressive model for the level 1 errors was specified. Based on the current model, the treatment effect was modeled as a change in level, and estimates were obtained for autocorrelation, variance within participants, variance in baseline levels across par ticipants and studies, and variance in treatment effects across participants and studies. The estimated models were checked for consistency with data generation. Several checks were used to verify the accuracy of the simulation program by running the pr ogram for a small number of replications. The vectors created during data generation were examined for consistency with data specifications, output data sets from the PROC MIXED statements were created to ensure the intended models were being analyzed and the summary statistics from those data sets were compared to the output data sets for accuracy. Analysis to Estimate Bias of the Point Estimates, Confidence Interval Coverage and Confidence Interval Width For each of the 108 combinations of the five ind ependent variables, bias of the fixed effects ( and ) and the variance components ( , , and ! ) and confidence interval coverage and width of the fixed effects and variance components were the dependent variables. Bias was calculated as the average difference between the known parameter value and the estimated parameter value. More formally, bi as = k = 1 5000 1 h # 1 h ( ) 5000 (29)

PAGE 85

! 68 where ! 1 h was the estimated parameter from the h t h simulated meta analysis and was the simulated parameter value from the h th simulated meta analysis. Relative bias was also calculated for those parameters whose known value was anything other than 1.0 so that bias could be represented as a percentage of the known parameter va lue. More formally, bi as = k = 1 5000 1 h # 1 h 1 h $ % & ( ) 5000 (30) where ! 1 h was the estimated parameter from the h th simulated meta analysis, and was the simulated parameter value from the h th simulated meta analysis Coverage was calculated as the proportion of the 95% confidence interval that contained the parameter value, and width was calculated as the average difference between the upper and lower limits of the 95% confidence intervals. Bias, coverage, and widt h estimates were calculated based on values that were summarized across all 5,000 replications. Analyses to Examine Relationships Between Design Factors and Bias of the Point Estimates, Confidence Interval Coverage, and Confidence Interval Width Research Question One Research Question One, evaluation of the bias of the fixed effect estimates from the three level meta analytic single case model were addressed by examining box and whisker plots to illustrate the distribution of the bias estimates of the fix ed effects. In addition, generalized linear modeling (GLM) was used to examine v ariability of each of the bias estimates of the fixed effects as a function of the independent variables. Models were built with the purpose of finding effects whose eta squa red values .06 or greater.

PAGE 86

! 69 The effects size, eta squared ( ), was calculated to determine the proportion of variability associated with each effect. Those values were compared to Cohen's (1988) standards for interpreting eta squared values with a small ef fect size having an = .01, .a medium effect size having an = .06, and a large effect size having an = .14 or greater. Each model was first created as a main effects only model. If this model explained 94% of the total variability then no further compl ex models were investigated. However, if less than 94% of the total variability was explained then interactions were included in the model. Two way interactions were added to the model first followed by three way and then four way interactions until at l east 94% of the variability was explained. Finally, line graphs were created to show bias estimates of the fixed effects as a function of the independent variables (both main effects and interactions) that had eta squared values of .06 or higher. Researc h Question Two Research Question Two, evaluation of the confidence interval coverage of the fixed effect estimates from a three level meta analytic single case model, were addressed by examining box and whisker plots to illustrate the distribution of the c onfidence interval coverage estimates of the fixed effects. In addition, GLM was used to examine v ariability of each of the confidence interval coverage estimates of the fixed effects as a function of the independent variables. Models were built with the purpose of finding effects whose eta squared values .06 or greater. The effects size, eta squared ( ), was calculated to determine the proportion of variability associated with each effect. Those values were compared to Cohen's (1988) standards for inter preting eta squared values with a small effect size having an = .01, .a medium effect size having an = .06, and

PAGE 87

! 70 a large effect size having an = .14 or greater. Each model was first created as a main effects only model. If this model explained 94% of t he total variability then no further complex models were investigated. However, if less than 94% of the total variability was explained then interactions were included in the model. Two way interactions were added to the model first followed by three way and then four way interactions until at least 94% of the variability was explained. Finally, line graphs were created to show confidence interval coverage estimates of the fixed effects as a function of the independent variables (both main effects and in teractions) that had eta squared values of .06 or higher. Research Question Three Research Question Three, evaluation of the confidence interval width of the fixed effect estimates from a three level meta analytic single case model, were addressed by exam ining box and whisker plots to illustrate the distribution of the confidence interval width estimates of the fixed effects. In addition, GLM was used to examine v ariability of each of the confidence interval precision estimates of the fixed effects as a f unction of the independent variables. Models were built with the purpose of finding effects whose eta squared values .06 or greater. The effects size, eta squared ( ), was calculated to determine the proportion of variability associated with each effect. Those values were compared to Cohen's (1988) standards for interpreting eta squared values with a small effect size having an = .01, .a medium effect size having an = .06, and a large effect size having an = .14 or greater. Each model was first create d as a main effects only model. If this model explained 94% of the total variability then no further complex models were investigated. However, if less than 94% of the total variability was

PAGE 88

! 71 explained then interactions were included in the model. Two way interactions were added to the model first followed by three way and then four way interactions until at least 94% of the variability was explained. Finally, line graphs were created to show confidence interval width estimates of the fixed effects as a f unction of the independent variables (both main effects and interactions) that had eta squared values of .06 or higher. Research Question Four Research Question Four, evaluation of the bias of the variance components from a three level meta analytic singl e case model, were addressed by examining box and whisker plots to illustrate the distribution of the bias estimates of the variance components. In addition, GLM was used to examine v ariability of each of the bias estimates of the variance components as a function of the independent variables. Models were built with the purpose of finding effects whose eta squared values .06 or greater. The effects size, eta squared ( ), was calculated to determine the proportion of variability associated with each effect Those values were compared to Cohen's (1988) standards for interpreting eta squared values with a small effect size having an = .01, .a medium effect size having an = .06, and a large effect size having an = .14 or greater. Each model was first crea ted as a main effects only model. If this model explained 94% of the total variability then no further complex models were investigated. However, if less than 94% of the total variability was explained then interactions were included in the model. Two w ay interactions were added to the model first followed by three way and then four way interactions until at least 94% of the variability was explained. Finally, line graphs were created to show bias estimates of the variance

PAGE 89

! 72 components as a function of th e independent variables (both main effects and interactions) that had eta squared values of .06 or higher. Research Question Five Research Question Five, evaluation of the confidence interval coverage of the variance components from a three level meta ana lytic single case model, was addressed by examining box and whisker plots to illustrate the distribution of the confidence interval coverage estimates of the variance components. In addition, GLM was used to examine v ariability of each of the confidence i nterval coverage estimates of the variance components as a a function of the independent variables. Models were built with the purpose of finding effects whose eta squared values .06 or greater. The effects size, eta squared ( ), was calculated to determi ne the proportion of variability associated with each effect. Those values were compared to Cohen's (1988) standards for interpreting eta squared values with a small effect size having an = .01, .a medium effect size having an = .06, and a large effect s ize having an = .14 or greater. Each model was first created as a main effects only model. If this model explained 94% of the total variability then no further complex models were investigated. However, if less than 94% of the total variability was ex plained then interactions were included in the model. Two way interactions were added to the model first followed by three way and then four way interactions until at least 94% of the variability was explained. Finally, line graphs were created to show c onfidence interval coverage estimates of the variance components as a function of the independent variables (both main effects and interactions) that had eta squared values of .06 or higher.

PAGE 90

! 73 Research Question Six Research Question Six, evaluation of th e confidence interval width of the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model, was addressed by examining box and whisker plots to illustrate the distribution of the confidence interval width estimates of the variance components In addition, GLM was used to examine v ariability of each of the confidence interval width estimates of the variance components as a a function of the independent variables. Models were built with the purpose of finding effects whose eta squared values .06 or greater. The effects size, eta squared ( ), was calculated to determine the proportion of variability associated with each effect. Those values were compared to Cohen's (1988) standards for interpreting eta squared values with a small effect size h aving an = .01, .a medium effect size having an = .06, and a large effect size having an = .14 or greater. Each model was first created as a main effects only model. If this model explained 94% of the total variability then no further complex models w ere investigated. However, if less than 94% of the total variability was explained then interactions were included in the model. Two way interactions were added to the model first followed by three way and then four way interactions until at least 94% of the variability was explained. Finally, line graphs were created to show confidence interval width estimates of the variance components as a function of the independent variables (both main effects and interactions) that had eta squared values of .06 or higher.

PAGE 91

! 74 CHAPTER FOUR: RESULTS This chapter presents the results organized in the order of the research questions. This chapter begins by describing how the results were examined and then presents the results in two sections, the fixed effects an d the variance components. Each section presents each outcome measure (bias of the point estimate, confidence interval coverage, and confidence interval width) with the first section comprising the first three research questions and the second section com prising the last three research questions. The following research questions were addressed: 1. To what extent are the fixed effect estimates from a three level meta analytic single case model biased as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )? 2. To what extent does the confidence interval coverage of the fixed effect estimat es from a three level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelati on, and variances of the error terms )? 3. To what extent does the confidence interval width of the fixed effect estimates from a t hree level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific

PAGE 92

! 75 design factors (number of primary studies per meta ana lysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms)? 4. To what extent are the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model biased as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )? 5. To what extent does the confidence interval coverage of the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study moda l series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )? 6. To what extent does the confidence interval width of the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific d esign factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms )? There were 108 conditions simulated using the f ive factors of this Monte Carlo study. The five factors were the number of primary studies per meta analysis (10, 30, and 80), modal number of participants per primary study (small [mode = 4] and large [mode = 8]), modal series length per primary study (sm all [mode = 10], medium [mode = 20], and large [mode = 30]), level of autocorrelation (0, .2, and .4), and variances of the error

PAGE 93

! 76 terms ( most of the variance at level 1 [ = 1, = .2, and = .05] and most of the variance at level 2 [ = 1, = 2, and = .5]). This yielded 3 (number of primary studies per meta analysis) X 2 (modal number of participants per primary study) X 3 (modal series length per primary study) X 3 (level of autocorrelation) X 2 (variances of the error terms) = 108 conditions. First, th e dependent variables, bias of the point estimates, confidence interval coverage, and confidence interval width were evaluated for both the fixed effects and the variance components. In addition, an index of relative bias was calculated for all parameter estimates whose known value was anything other than a value of 1.0. This was accomplished by creating box plots, across all conditions, for each dependent variable. Then, the results of the simulation were analyzed using PROC GLM in SAS for both the fixe d effects and the variance components such that the dependent variables were bias, relative bias (where appropriate), confidence interval coverage, and confidence interval width and the independent variables were the five factors. Models were built with t he purpose of finding effects whose eta squared values were .06 or greater. The effect size, eta squared ( ), was calculated to measure the degree of association between the independent variables main effects and the dependent variables along with the two way, three way, and four way interaction effects between independent variables and the dependent variables. Eta squared is the proportion of variability in each of the outcome measures associated with each effect in this simulation study. It is calculat ed as the ratio of the effect variance (SS effect ) to the total variance (SS total ). (30)

PAGE 94

! 77 The calculated eta squared values were compared to Cohen's (1988) standards for interpreting eta squared values with a small effect size having an = .01, .a medium ef fect size having an = .06, and a large effect size having an = .14 or greater. Each model was first created as a main effects only model. If this model explained 94% of the total variability then no further complex models were investigated. However, if less than 94% of the total variability was explained then interactions were included in the model. Two way interactions were added to the model first followed by three way and then four way interactions until at least 94% of the variability was explain ed. Finally, line graphs were created to show bias and/or relative bias of the point estimates, confidence interval coverage, and confidence interval width estimates of the fixed effects and variance components as a function of the independent variables ( both main effects and interactions) that had eta squared values of .06 or higher. Fixed Effects The fixed effects are comprised of the overall average baseline level, and the overall average treatment effect. The first research question involves t he extent to which the fixed effects are biased as a function of the five factors used in this simulation study. The second research question involves the extent to which the confidence interval coverage of the fixed effects varied as a function of the fi ve factors used in this simulation study. The third research question involves the extent to which the confidence interval width of the fixed effects varied as function of the five factors used in this simulation study.

PAGE 95

! 78 Bias The distribution of bias val ues for each fixed effect is illustrated in box plots in Figure 6. The overall average baseline level ( ) had bias values close to zero with an average bias value of 0.000 ( SD = 0.002) and a range of values from 0.005 to 0.005. In addition, the overall average treatment effect ( ) had bias values close to zero with a mean of 0.000 ( SD = 0.001) and values ranging from 0.003 to 0.009. As indicated by the results, there was limited variation in both of the fixed effects and none of the bias estimates exc eeded 1% of the known parameter values (recall that all known fixed effect parameter values were set to 1.0). Therefore, any further exploration was unwarranted. Figure 6. Box plots showing the distribution of bias estimates for each fixed effect in t he three level model Confidence Interval Coverage The distribution of confidence interval coverage rates for each fixed effect is illustrated in box plots in Figure 7. The overall average baseline level ( ) had confidence interval coverage rates that t ended to slightly overcover with values that ranged from a high of .973 to a low of .951, with a mean of .961 ( SD = 0.005). Similarly,

PAGE 96

! 79 the overall average treatment effect ( ) had confidence interval coverage rates that ranged from a high of .971 to a low of .951, with a mean of .960 ( SD = 0.005). Figure 7. Box plots showing the distribution of confidence interval coverage rates for each fixed effect in the three level model Overall average baseline level. Variation in confidence interval coverage r ates of the overall average baseline level was explored by modeling confidence interval coverage with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms), all possible two way interactions involving the number of primary studies per meta analysis, all possible three way interactions involving the number of primary studies per meta analysis and thr ee four way interactions. One of the four way interactions involved the number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, and level of autocorrelation. The next four way in teraction involved the number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms, and the final

PAGE 97

! 80 four way interaction involved the number of primary studies per me ta analysis, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms. This model explained 96% of the variability in the confidence interval coverage rates of the overall average baseline level. Eta squared ( ) v alues for each of the main effects and interactions are in Table 3.

PAGE 98

! 81 Table 3 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Overall Average Baseline Level Number of Primary Studies 762 Modal Number of Participants .005 Modal Series Length .001 Autocorrelation .012 Variances of the Error Terms .004 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Number of Participants .000 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Series Length .013 Number of Primar y Studies*Autocorrelation .005 Number of Primary Studies*Variances of the Error Terms .001 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Series Length*Autocorrelation .026 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Series Length*Variances of the Error Terms .005 Number of Prim ary Studies*Modal Series Length*Modal Number of Participants .012 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Number of Participants*Autocorrelation .008 Number of Primary Studies*Autocorrelation*Variances of the Error Terms .028 Number of Primary Studies*Variances of the Error Terms*Modal Number of Participants .000 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Number of Participants*Modal Series Length*Autocorrelation .036 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Number of Participants* Autocorrelation Variances of the Error Terms 014 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Series Length*Autocorrelation Variances of the Error Terms .027 Total Explained .959

PAGE 99

! 82 In order to explore these effects further line graphs were created for those main effects and/or interactions whose eta squared v alues exceeded the pre established standard of Cohen's (1988) medium effect size criteria of or greater. Therefore, the only effect that met this standard was the main effect of the number of primary studies per meta analysis with an = .76. The 95% con fidence interval coverage rates of the overall average baseline level as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis (see Figure 8) illustrated that as the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased from 10 to 30 to 80 the clos er the coverage rates came to .95, with means of .968 ( SD = 0.002), .960 ( SD = 0.003), and .956 ( SD = 0.003), respectively. Figure 8. Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the overall average baseline level as a functio n of the number of primary studies per meta analysis. Overall average treatment effect Variation in confidence interval coverage rates of the overall average treatment effect was explored by modeling confidence interval coverage with the five main effec ts (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per

PAGE 100

! 83 primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms), all possible two way interactions involving the number of p rimary studies per meta analysis, all possible three way interactions involving the number of primary studies per meta analysis and three four way interactions. One of the four way interactions involved the number of primary studies per meta analysis, mod al number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, and level of autocorrelation. The next four way interaction involved the number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and the variances of the error terms, and the final four way interaction included the number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms. This model explained 97% of the variability in the confidence interval coverage rates of the overall average treatment effect. Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects and interactions are in Table 4.

PAGE 101

! 84 Table 4 Eta squared Values ( ) for As sociation of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Overall Average Treatment Effect Number of Primary Studies .701 Modal Number of Participants .009 Modal Series Length .013 Autocorrelation .000 Variances of the Error Terms .0 00 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Number of Participants .001 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Series Length .008 Number of Primary Studies*Autocorrelation .015 Number of Primary Studies*Variances of the Error Terms .018 Number of Primary Studies*Mo dal Series Length*Autocorrelation .044 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Series Length*Variances of the Error Terms .022 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Series Length*Modal Number of Participants .009 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Number of Participants *Autocorrelation .009 Number of Primary Studies*Autocorrelation*Variances of the Error Terms .024 Number of Primary Studies*Variances of the Error Terms*Modal Number of Participants .003 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Number of Participants*Modal Serie s Length*Autocorrelation .041 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Number of Participants*Autocorrelation*Variances of the Error Terms .030 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Series Length*Autocorrelation*Variances of the Error Terms .021 Total Explained .968

PAGE 102

! 85 Similar to the results for the overall average baseline level, the only effect that met the standard of a medium effect size or greater was the main effect of the number of primary studies per meta analysis with an = .70. The 95% confidence interval cov erage rates of the overall average treatment effect as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis (see Figure 9) illustrated that as the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased the closer the confidence interval coverage ra tes came to .95 with means of .966 ( SD = 0.002), .960 ( SD = .003), and .956 ( SD = .002), respectively. Figure 9. Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the overall average treatment effect as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis. Confidence Interval Width The box plot illustrating the distribution of the confidence interval width estimates for each fixed effect is presented in Figure 10. The confidence interval width estimates for the overall average baseline level ( ) ranged from a low of 0.099 to a high of 1.132, with a mean of 0.428 ( SD = 0.291). Similarly, the confidence interval

PAGE 103

! 86 width estimates for the overall average treatment effect ( ) ranged from a low of 0.114 to a high of 1.174, wit h a mean of 0.459 ( SD = 0.293). Figure 10. Box plots showing the distribution of confidence interval width estimates for each fixed effect in the three level model Overall average baseline level. Variation in confidence interval width estimates of the overall average baseline level was explored by modeling confidence interval width with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of a utocorrelation, and variances of the error terms) and a two way interaction involving the number of primary studies per meta analysis and the variances of the error terms. This model explained 99% of the variability in the confidence interval width estima tes of the overall average baseline level. Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects and interaction are in Table 5.

PAGE 104

! 87 Table 5 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Width of the Overall Average Basel ine Level Number of Primary Studies .472 Modal Number of Participants .023 Modal Series Length .000 Autocorrelation .001 Variances of the Error Terms .402 Number of Participants Variances of the Error Terms .089 Total Explained .987 To fur ther examine these effects a line graph was created for those effects whose eta squared values exceeded the pre established standard of a medium effect size or greater. Therefore, confidence interval width was modeled as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ( = .47), variances of the error terms ( = .40), and their interaction ( = .09). This model explained 96% of the variance in confidence interval width estimates of the overall average baseline level. As the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased from 10 to 30 to 80 the confidence interval width decreased, with means of 0.696 ( SD = 0.316), 0.368 ( SD = 0.165), and 0.220 ( SD = 0.098), respectively. Conversely, as the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 (or less variance at level 2 and level 3) to most of the variance at level 2 the confidence interval widths increased, with means of 0.244 ( SD = 0.119) and 0.612 ( SD = 0.297), respectively. The graph (see Figure 11) indicates t hat when the number of primary studies per meta analysis was 30 or 80 the confidence interval widths slightly increased when the variance of the error terms shifted from most of the variance

PAGE 105

! 88 at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2. However, when the number of primary studies was 10 there was a greater increase of the estimated confidence interval widths when the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 ( M = 0.396, SD = 0.053) to most of the variance at level 2 ( M = 0. 997, SD = 0.107). In addition, confidence interval widths were smallest when the number of primary studies per meta analysis was 80 and most of the variance of the error terms was at level 1 (or less variance at level 2 and level 3). Figure 11. L ine gr aph showing the confidence interval width estimates of the overall average baseline level as a function of the variance s of the error terms for each level of the number of primary studies per meta analysis Overall average treatment effect. Variation in confidence interval width estimates of the overall average treatment effect was explored by modeling confidence interval width with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal s eries length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms) and a two way interaction involving the number of primary studies per meta analysis and the variances of the error terms. This model explained 99% of the variabili ty in the confidence interval width

PAGE 106

! 89 estimates of the overall average treatment effect. Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects and interaction are in Table 6. Table 6 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Int erval Width of the Overall Average Treatment Effect Number of Primary Studies .534 Modal Number of Participants .029 Modal Series Length .002 Autocorrelation .003 Variances of the Error Terms .350 Number of Participants Variances of the Error Terms .078 Total Explained .996 To explore the variation between confidence interval width estimates of the overall average treatment effect a line graph was created that modeled confidence interval width as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ( = .53), variances of the error terms ( = .35), and their interaction ( = .08). This model explained 96% of the variance in confidence interval width estimates of the overall average treatment effect. Similar to the confidence inte rval width estimates of the overall average baseline level, the results indicated that as the number of primary studies increased from 10 to 30 to 80, the average width decreased from 0.746 ( SD = 0.299) to 0.236 ( SD = 0.093), respectively. Conversely, as the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 (or less variance at level 2 and level 3) to most of the variance at level 2 the confidence interval widths increased, with means of 0.287 ( SD = 0.140) and 0.632 ( SD = 0.306), re spectively. The graph (see Figure 12) indicates that

PAGE 107

! 90 when the number of primary studies per meta analysis was 30 or 80 the confidence interval widths slightly increased when the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2. However, when the number of primary studies was 10 there was a greater increase of the estimated confidence interval widths when the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 ( M = 0.465, SD = 0.063) to most of the variance at level 2 ( M = 1.028, SD = 0.109). In addition, confidence interval widths were smallest when the number of primary studies per meta analysis was 80 and most of the variance of the error terms was at level 1 (or less vari ance at level 2 and level 3). Figure 12. Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval width of the overall average treatment effect as a function of the variance s of the error terms for each level of the number of primary studies per meta analys is Variance Components The variance components are comprised of between study variance in the overall average baseline level, between study variance in the overall average treatment effect, between person within study variance in the average ba seline level,

PAGE 108

! 91 between person within study variance in the average treatment effect, within person residual variance, and amount of estimated autocorrelation. The fourth research question involves the extent to which the variance components are biased as a function of the five factors used in this simulation study. The fifth research question involves the extent to which the confidence interval coverage of the variance components varied as a function of the five factors u sed in this simulation study. The sixth and final research question involves the extent to which the confidence interval width of the variance components varied as function of the five factors used in this simulation study. Bias The distribution of bias values for each variance component is illustrated in box plots in Figure s 13 15 Both l evel 3 variance components ( and ) tended to be underestimated (see Figure 13). Between study variance in the overall average baseline level ( ) was biased with ne gative bias values ranging from 0.477 to 0.031 and a mean of 0.241 ( SD = 0.201) In addition, between study variance in the overall average treatment effect ( ) was biased with negative bias values ranging from 0.474 to 0.024 and a mean of 0.237 ( SD = 0.201)

PAGE 109

! 92 Figure 13. Box plots showing the distribution of bias estimates for each level 3 variance component in the three level model Conversely, the level 2 variance components ( and ) both tended to be overestimated (see Figure 14). Between person within study variance in the average baseline level ( ) was biased with positive bias values ranging fro m 0.033 to 0.479 and an average bias value of 0.243 ( SD = 0.202). Similarly, between person within study variance in the average treatment effe ct ( ) had positive bias values with a mean of 0.238 ( SD = 0.201) and values ranging from 0.027 to 0.476.

PAGE 110

! 93 Figure 14. Box plots showing the distribution of bias estimates for each level 2 variance component in the three level model The within perso n residual variance ( ) also tended to be slightly overestimated with an average bias value of 0.078 ( SD = 0.082) and values ranging from 0.001 to 0.194. Recall that the population value for the within person residual variance was 1.0, thus an average bi as estimate of 0.078 represents 8% of the average parameter value. The amount of estimated autocorrelation ( ) had bias values close to zero with a mean of 0 ( SD = 0.001) and values ranging from 0.002 to 0.001. Figure 15 illust rates the distribution of bias values for the residual variance and the amount of estimated autocorrelation. As indicated by the results, there was limited variation in the amount of estimated autocorrelation and the bias estimate did not exceed 1% of the known parameter value (see Relative Bias results section) Therefore, any further exploration of the amount of estimated autocorrelation was unwarranted.

PAGE 111

! 94 Figure 15. Box plots showing the distribution of bias estimates for the within person residual va riance and amount of estimated autocorrelation in the three level model Between study variance in the overall average baseline level. Variation in the bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average baseline level was explored by m odeling bias with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms). This model explained 99% of the variability in the bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average baseline level. Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects are in Table 7

PAGE 112

! 95 Table 7 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors wi th Bias of the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Baseline Level Number of Primary Studies .005 Modal Number of Participants .001 Modal Series Length .000 Autocorrelation .000 Variances of the Error Terms .989 Total Explained .995 In order to further explore these effects a line graph was created for the main effect of variances in the error terms ( = .99), as it was the only effect that met the pre established standard of a medium effect size or greater. The bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average baseline level as a function of the variances of the error terms (see Figur e 16) illustrated that as the var iances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at lev el 2 the parameter estimates decreased to become increasingly underestimated and progressively more biased with mean bias estimates of 0.042 ( SD = 0.004) to 0.440 ( SD = 0.030), respectively

PAGE 113

! 96 Figure 16. Line graph showing the bias estimates for the be tween study variance in the overall average baseline level as a function of the variances of the error terms. Level 1 = most of the variance at level 1; Level 2 = most of the variance at level 2. Between study variance in the overall average treatment ef fect. Variation in the bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect was explored by modeling bias with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary stu dy, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms). This model explained 99% of the variability in the bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects are in Table 8

PAGE 114

! 97 Table 8 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Bias of the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Treatment Effect Number of Primary Studies .006 Modal Number o f Participants .001 Modal Series Length .000 Autocorrelation .000 Variances of the Error Terms .988 Total Explained .995 Similar to the bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average baseline level, between study variance in th e overall average treatment effect was further explored with a line graph for the main effect of variances in the error terms ( = .99). The bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect as a function of the variances o f the error terms (see Figure 17) illustrated that as the var iances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at le vel 2 the parameter estimates decreased to become increasingly underestimated and progressive ly more biased with mean bias estimates of 0.039 ( SD = 0.006) to 0.436 ( SD = 0.031), respectively

PAGE 115

! 98 Figure 17 Line graph showing the bias estimates for the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect as a function of the variances of the error terms. Level 1 = most of the variance at level 1; Level 2 = most of the variance at level 2. Between person within study variance in the average baseline level. Variation in the bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level was explored by modeling bias with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variance s of the error terms). This model explained 99% of the variability in the bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level. Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects are in Table 9

PAGE 116

! 99 Table 9 Eta squa red Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Bias of the Between Person Within Study Variance in the Average Baseline Level Number of Primary Studies .004 Modal Number of Participants .001 Modal Series Length .000 Autocorrelation .000 Variances of the Error Terms .991 Total Explained .996 To further explore these effects a line graph was created for the main effect variances of the error terms ( = .99). The bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the average ba seline level as a function of the variances o f the error terms (see Figure 18) illustrated that as the variances of the error terms shifts from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2 the parameter estima tes increased to become p rogressively over estimated and more biased with mean bias estimates of 0.042 ( SD = 0.004) to 0.444 ( SD = 0.026), respectively

PAGE 117

! 100 Figure 18 Line graph showing the bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average baseline level a s a function of the variances of the error terms. Level 1 = most of the variance at level 1; Level 2 = most of the variance at level 2. Between person within study variance in the average treatment effect. Variation in the bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect was explored by modeling bias with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms). This model explained 99% of the variability in the bias estimates of the between person within study varian ce in the average treatment effect Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects are in Table 10

PAGE 118

! 101 Table 10 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Bias of the Between Person Within Study Variance in the Average Treatment Effect Number of Primary Studies .006 Modal Number of Participants .001 Modal Seri es Length .000 Autocorrelation .000 Variances of the Error Terms .989 Total Explained .995 Similar to the bias results for the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect, the only effect that met the pre established standar d of a medium effect size or greater was the variances of the error terms ( = .99). The bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as a function of the variances o f the error terms (see Figure 19) illustrate d that as the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2 the parameter estima tes increased to become progressively over estimated and more biased with mean bias estimates of 0.039 ( SD = 0.005 ) to 0.438 ( SD = 0.029), respectively.

PAGE 119

! 102 Figure 19 Line graph showing the bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as a function of the variances of the error terms. Level 1 = most of the variance at lev el 1; Level 2 = most of the variance at level 2. Within person residual variance Variation in the bias estimates of the within person residual variance was explored by modeling bias with the five main effects (number or primary studies per meta analysi s, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms). This model explained 99% of the variability in the bias estimates of the within person residual variance Eta squared ( ) values for e ach of the main effects are in Table 11

PAGE 120

! 103 Tabl e 11 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Bias of the Within Person Residual Variance Number of Primary Studies .000 Modal Number of Particip ants .000 Modal Series Length .000 Autocorrelation .999 Variances of the Error Terms .000 Total Explained .999 In order to explore these effects further a line graph was created for the main effect of level of autocorrelation ( = .99). The bias es timates of the within person residual variance as a function of the level of autocorrelation (see Figure 20) illustrated that as the level of autocorrelation increased from 0 to .200 to .400 so did the amount of bias, with values from 0.000 ( SD = 0.001) to 0.042 ( SD = 0.001) to 0.191 ( SD = 0.001), respectively Figure 20 Line graph showing the bias estimates for the within person residual variance as a function of the level of autocorrelation

PAGE 121

! 104 Relative Bias The distribution of relative bias estimates is illustrated in box plots (see Figure 21 23) for all variance components with the exception of the within person residual variance parameter as its' known parameter value was set to 1.0. The level 3 variance components ( and ) were the most biased o f all the variance components and tended to be underestimated (see Figure 21). The relative bias estimates for the between study variance in the overall average baseline level ( ) had values ranging from .954 to .624 with a mean of .858 ( SD = 0.077). This average relative bias estimate represented an absolute value of 86% of the average parameter value, which is substantial. Similarly, the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect ( ) had relative bias estimates that ranged from .948 to .474 with an average of .822 ( SD = 0.106). This average relative bias estimate represented an absolute value of 82% of the average parameter value, which is also substantial. Figure 21 Box plots showing the distribution of relative bias es timates for each level 3 variance component in the three level model

PAGE 122

! 105 The level 2 variance components ( and ) were also biased but instead tended to be overestimated (see Figure 22) with the between person within study variance in the average baseline l evel ( ) having relative bias values ranging from .166 to .240 with a mean of .217 ( SD = 0.016). This average relative bias estimate represented an absolute value of 22% of the average parameter value, which is substantial. The between person within stud y variance in the average treatment effect ( ) had relative bias values ranging from .136 to .238 with an average of .208 ( SD = 0.023). This average relative bias estimate represented an absolute value of 21% of the average parameter value, which is also substantial. Figure 22 Box plots showing the distribution of relative bias estimates for each level 2 variance component in the three level model The amount of estimated autocorrelation ( ) had relative bias values close to zero (see Figure 23) with a mean of .001 ( SD = 0.002) and values ranging from .007 to .002. As indicated by the results, there was limited variation in the amount of estimated autocorrelation and the relative bias estimate did not exceed 1% of the know n parameter value. Therefore, any further exploration was unwarranted.

PAGE 123

! 106 Figure 23 Box plots showing the distribution of relative bias estimates for amount of estimated autocorrelation in the three level model Between study variance in the overall av erage baseline level. Variation in the relative bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average baseline level was explored by modeling relative bias with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms) and a two way interaction involving the number of primary studies per meta analysis and the variances of the error terms This model explained 94 % of the variability in the relative bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average baseline level. Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects and interaction are in Table 12

PAGE 124

! 107 Table 12 Eta square d Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Relative Bias of the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Baseline Level Number of Primary Studies .664 Modal Number of Participants .156 Modal Series Length .003 Autocorrelation .012 Variances of the Error Terms .084 Number of Primary Studies Variances of the Error Terms .019 Total Explained .938 In order to further explore these effects line graphs were created for the main effects of number of primary studies per meta analysis ( = .66), modal number of participants ( = .16), and variances in the error terms ( = .08). This model explained 90% of the variance in relative bias of the between study overall average baseline level. T hese main effects were chosen as they were the on ly effects that met the pre established standard of a medium effect size or greater. The relative bias estimates of the variance in the overall average baseline level as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis (see Figure 24) illustr ated that as the number of primary studies p er meta analysis increased from 10 to 30 to 80 t he parameter estimates became increasingly underestimated and progressi vely more biased moving from an average relative bias estimate of .77 4 ( SD = 0.067) to .87 6 ( SD = 0.035) to .92 5 ( SD = 0.021) respectively.

PAGE 125

! 108 Figure 24. Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between study variance in the overall average baseline level as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysi s. The r elative bias estimates of the variance in the overall average baseline level as a function of modal number of participants per primary study (see Figure 25 ) illustrates that as the modal number of participants per primary study increased from small, with a mode of 4, to large, with a mode of 8, t he parameter estimates became increasingly underestimated and progressivel y more biased moving from an average relative bias estimate of .828 ( SD = 0.085) to .889 ( SD = 0.054) respectively.

PAGE 126

! 109 Figure 25 Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between study variance in the overall average baseline level as a function of the modal number of participants per primary study The relative bias estimates of the variance in the overall average baselin e level as a function of the variances of the error terms (see Figure 26) illustrated that as the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2 t he average parameter became increasingly underes timated and progressivel y more biased with the relative bias estimate moving from 0.836 ( SD = 0.086) to 0.881 ( SD = 0.060) respectively.

PAGE 127

! 110 Figure 26 Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between study variance in the overall avera ge baseline level as a function of the variances of the error terms Level 1 = most of the variance at level 1; Level 2 = most of the variance at level 2. Between study v ariance in the overall average treatment effect. Variation in the relative bias est imates of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect was explored by modeling relative bias with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms) and a two way interaction between the number of primary studies per meta analysis and the variances of the error terms. This model explained 94 % of the variability in the rela tive bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects are in Table 13

PAGE 128

! 111 Table 13 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Relative Bias of the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Treatment Effect Number of Primary Studies .538 Modal Number of Participants .108 Modal Series Length 006 Autocorrelation .018 Variances of the Error Terms .228 Number of Primary Studies Varianc es of the Error Terms .046 Total Explained 944 Similar to the relative bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average baseline level, these effects were further explored with line graphs for the main effects of number of primary st udies per meta analysis ( = .54), modal number of participants ( = .11), and variances in the error terms ( = .23). This model explained 87% of the variability in the relative bias of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect. The relative bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis (see Figure 27) illustrated that as the number of primary stu dies per meta analysis increased fr om 10 to 30 to 80 the average parameter became increasingly underestimated and progressivel y more biased with the relative bias estimate moving from .719 ( SD = 0.106) to .843 ( SD = 0.058) to 904 ( SD = 0.035) respectively.

PAGE 129

! 112 Figure 27 Line graph s howing the relative bias estimates for the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysi s. The relative bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average t reatment effect as a function of the modal number of participants per primary study (see Figure 28) illustrated that as the modal number of participants per primary study increased from small, with a mode of 4, to large, with a mode of 8, t he average param eter became increasingly underestimated and progressivel y more biased with the relative bias estimate moving from .788 ( SD = 0.118) to .857 ( SD = 0.081) respectively.

PAGE 130

! 113 Figure 28 Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between study v ariance in the overall average treatment effect as a function of the modal number of participants per primary study The relative bias estimates of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect as a function of the variances of the e rror terms (see Figure 29 ) illustrates that as the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2 t he average parameter estimate became increasingly underestimated and progressivel y more biased with the relative bias estimate moving from .772 ( SD = 0.117) to .872 ( SD = 0.062) respectively.

PAGE 131

! 114 Figure 29. Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect as a function of the v ariances of the error terms. Level 1 = most of the variance at level 1; Level 2 = most of the variance at level 2. Between person within study v ariance in the average baseline level. Variation in the relative bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level was explored by modeling relative bias with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of au tocorrelation, and variances of the error terms), all possible two way interactions involving the number of primary studies per meta analysis, and a ll possible two way interaction s involving the modal number of participants pe r primary study This model e xplained 94% of the variability in the relative bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level. Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects are in Table 14

PAGE 132

! 115 Table 14 Eta squared Values ( ) for Associat ion of Design Factors with Relative Bias of the Between Person Within Study Variance in the Average Baseline Level Number of Primary Studies .590 Modal Number of Participants .166 Modal Series Length .007 Autocorrelation .021 Variances of the E rror Terms .094 Number of Primary Studies Modal Number of Participants .024 Number of Primary Studies Modal Series Length .005 Number of Primary Studies Autocorrelation .006 Number of Primary Studies Variances of the Error Terms .018 Modal Num ber of Participants Modal Series Length .005 Modal Number of Participants Autocorrelation .001 Modal Number of Participants Variances of the Error Terms .002 Total Explained .939 To further explore these effects line graphs were created for the main effects of number of primary studies per meta analysis ( = .59), modal number of participants per primary study ( = .17), and variances of the error terms ( = .09). This model explained 85% of the variability in the relative bias estimates of the be tween person within study variance in the average baseline level T he relative bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the number of primary studies per meta anal ysis (see Figure 30) illust rated that as the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased from 10 to 20 to 30 the parameter estimates increased to become progressively overestimated and slightly more biased, with

PAGE 133

! 116 mean relative bias estimates of .200 ( SD = 0.015) to .220 ( SD = 0.009) to .230 ( SD = 0.005) respectively. Figure 30. Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis. The re lative bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the modal number of participants per primary studies (see Figure 31 ) illustrates that as the modal number of participants per primary study inc reased from small, with a mode of 4, to large, with a mode of 8, the parameter estimates increased to become progressively overestimated and slightly more biased with mean relative bias estimates of .210 ( SD = 0.018) to .223 ( SD = 0.012) respectively.

PAGE 134

! 117 Figure 31 Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the modal number of participants per primary study The relative bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the variances of the error terms (see Figure 32) illustrated that as the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2 the p arameter estimates increased to become progressively overestimated and slightly more biased with mean relative bias estimates of .212 ( SD = 0.018) to .222 ( SD = 0.013) respectively.

PAGE 135

! 118 Figure 32 Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the b etween person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the variances of the error terms. Level 1 = most of the variance at level 1; Level 2 = most of the variance at level 2. Between person within study v ariance in the average treatment effect. Variation in the relative bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect was explored by modeling relative bias with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal n umber of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms), a two way interaction between the number of primary studies per meta analysis and the modal number of participants per primary study, and a two way interaction between the number of primary studies per meta analysis and the variances of the error terms. This model explained 94% of the variability in the relative bias estimates of the between person within study varian ce in the average treatment effect. Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects are in Table 15.

PAGE 136

! 119 Table 15 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Relative Bias of the Between Person Within Study Variance in the Average Trea tment Effect Number of Primary Studies .537 Modal Number of Participants .100 Modal Series Length .005 Autocorrelation .019 Variances of the Error Terms .237 Number of Primary Studies Modal Number of Participants .034 Number of Primary Stu dies Variances of the Error Terms .013 Total Explained .945 Similar to the relative bias results for the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect the main effects that met the pre established standard of a medium effect s ize or greater were the number of primary studies per meta analysis ( = .54), modal number of participants ( = .10), and variances of the error terms ( = .24) This model explained 88% of the variability in the between person within study variance of the average treatment effect. The relative bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis (see Figure 33) illu strated that as the number of primary s tu dies per meta analysis increased from 10 to 30 to 80 the parameter estimates increased to become progressively overestimated and slightly more biased with mean relative bias estimates of .185 ( SD = 0.022) to .211 ( SD = 0.015) to .226 ( SD = 0.008) respec tively.

PAGE 137

! 120 Figure 33 Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis. The relative bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as a function of the modal number of participants per primary study (see Figure 34) illustrated that as the modal number of participants per primary study increased from small, with a mode of 4, to large, with a mode of 8, the parameter estimates increased to become progressively overestimated and slightly more biased with mean relative bias estimates of .2 00 ( SD = 0.025) to .2 15 ( SD = 0.019) respectively.

PAGE 138

! 12 1 Figure 34 Line graph showing the r elative bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as a function of the modal number of participants per primary study The relative bias estimates of the between person within study variance in the averag e treatment effect as a function of the variances of the error terms (see Figure 35) illustrated that as the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2 the parameter estimates increased to b ecome progressively overestimated and slightly more biased with mean relative bias estimates of .196 ( SD = 0.025) to 219 ( SD = 0.015) respectively.

PAGE 139

! 122 Figure 35. Line graph showing the relative bias estimates for the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as a function of the variances of the error terms. Level 1 = most of the variance at level 1; Level 2 = most of the variance at level 2. Confidence Interval Coverage The distribution of confidence interval coverage rates for each variance component is illustrated in b ox plots in Figures 36 38. The level 3 variance components ( and ) tended to overcover (see Figure 36). The between study variance in the overall average baseline level ( ) had confidence interval covera ge rates with values that ranged from a high of 1.000 to a low of .978, with a mean of .998 ( SD = 0.004). Similarly, the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect ( ) had confidence interval coverage rates that ranged from a high of 1 .000 to a low of .934, with a mean of .995 ( SD = 0.012).

PAGE 140

! 123 Figure 36. Box plots showing the distribution of confidence interval coverage rates for the level 3 variance components in the three level model The level 2 variance components ( and ) tende d to undercover (see Figure 37). The between person within study variance in the average baseline level ( ) had confidence interval coverage rates with values that ranged from a high of .895 to a low of .083 with an average coverage rate of .612 ( SD = 0.2 41). Likewise, the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect ( ) had confidence interval coverage rates with values ranging from a high of .892 to a low of .109 with a mean of .675 ( SD = 0.222).

PAGE 141

! 124 Figure 37. Box plots showing the distribution of confidence interval coverage rates for the level 2 variance components in the three level model The within person residual variance ( ) tended to undercover with values of confidence interval coverage rates ranging from a low of 0 t o a high of .958 and a mean of .550 ( SD = 0.398). Conversely, the amount of estimated autocorrelation ( ) had confidence interval coverage rates that came close to the .95 coverage rate corresponding to a nominal level of .05 wit h values ranging from a low of .943 to a high of .956 and an average confidence interval coverage rate of .950 ( SD = 0.003). Figure 38 illustrates the box plots of confidence interval coverage rates for both the within person residual variance and the amo unt of estimated autocorrelation. As indicated by the results, there was limited variation in the confidence interval coverage rates when estimating the amount of estimated autocorrelation and the 95% confidence interval coverage rates were on average clo se to the .95 coverage rate. Therefore, any further exploration of confidence interval coverage rates for the amount of estimated autocorrelation is unwarranted.

PAGE 142

! 125 Figure 38. Box plots showing the distribution of confidence interval coverage rates for th e within person residual variance and amount of estimated autocorrelation in the three level model Between study v ariance in the overall average baseline level. Variation in confidence interval coverage rates of the between study variance in the overa ll average baseline level was explored by modeling confidence interval coverage with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocor relation, and variances of the error terms), all possible two way interactions involving the number of primary studies per meta analysis, all possible two way interactions involving modal number of participants per primary study all possible two way inte ractions involvin g variances of the error terms a three way interaction involving the number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study and variances of the error terms and one four way interaction involving the number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms. This model explained 96 % of the variability in the confidence interval coverage rates of the between s tudy variance in the

PAGE 143

! 126 overall average baseline level. Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects and inte ractions are in Table 16 Table 16 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Between S tudy Variance in the Overall Average Baseline Level Number of Primary Studies 244 Modal Number of Participants 088 Modal Series Length 005 Autocorrelation 013 Variances of the Error Terms 081 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Number of Part icipants 156 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Series Length 007 Number of Primary Studies*Autocorrelation 025 Number of Primary Studies*Variances of the Error Terms 140 Modal Number of Participants Variances of the Error Terms .046 Modal Number of Participants Modal Series Length .003 Modal Number of Participants Autocorrelation .001 Variances of the Error Terms Modal Series Length .003 Variances of the Error Terms Autocorrelation .018 Number of Primary Studies Modal Number of Part icipants Variances of the Error Terms .079 Number of Primary Studies Modal Number of Participants Autocorrelation Variances of the Error Terms .046 Total Explained .955 In order to explore these effects further line graphs were created for thos e main effects and interactions whose eta squared values exceeded the pre established standard of a medium effect size or greater. Therefore, the effects that met this standard were the

PAGE 144

! 127 main effects of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ( = 24), modal number of participants per primary study ( = .09), variances of the error terms ( = .08), the two way interaction of number of primary studies per meta analysis with modal number of participants per primary study ( = .16), the two way interactio n of number of primary studies per meta analysis with variances of the error terms ( = .14), and the three way interaction involving number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants, and variances of the error terms ( = .08). This exp lained 79% o f the variability of the confidence interval coverage rates for the between study variance in the overall average baseline level. As the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased from 10 to 30 to 80 the confidence interval cove rage rates increased, with means of .996 ( SD = 0.006), .999 ( SD = 0.000) and 1.000 ( SD = 0.000) respectively. Also, as the modal number of participants increased from small with a mode of 4 to large with a mode of 8 the confidence interv al coverage rates increased from an average of .997 ( SD = 0.005) to 1 ( SD = 0.001) respectively. Likewise, as the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2 the confidence interval coverage rates incr eased, with means of .997 ( SD = 0.005) and 1 ( SD = 0.001) respectively. T he graph (see Figure 39) indicates that when the number of primary studies per meta analysis was 10, the modal number of participants per primary study was small and most of the va riance in the error terms was at level 1 the confidence interval coverage rates were closest to the nominal level with a mean of .986 ( SD = 0.005) In addition, all confidence interval coverage rates of the between study variance in the overall average ba seline level increased when the variance of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2. However,

PAGE 145

! 128 when the number of primary studies was greater than 10 and/or the modal number of participants was large the increase in confidence interval coverage rates of the between study variance in the overall average baseline level was less noticeable. Figure 39. Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the between study variance i n the overall average baseline level as a function of the three way interaction between number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study and the variances of the error terms. Between study v ariance in the overa ll average treatment effect Variation in confidence interval coverage rates of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect was explored by modeling confidence interval coverage with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms), all possible two way interactions involving the number of primary studies per meta analys is, all possible two way interactions involving modal number of participants per primary study all possible two way interactions involvin g variances of the error terms a three way interaction involving the number of primary studies per meta analysis, mo dal number of participants per primary study and variances

PAGE 146

! 129 of the error terms and a four way interaction involving the number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms This model explained 98 % of the variability in the confidence interval coverage rates of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects and interactions are in Table 17 Table 17 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Treatment Effect Number of Primary Studies 250 Modal Number of Participants 063 Modal Series Length 00 7 Autocorrelation .025 Variances of the Error Terms .132 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Number of Participants .082 Number of Primary Studies*Modal Series Length .012 Number of Primary Studies*Autocorrelation .032 Number of Primary Studies*Varianc es of the Error Terms .195 Modal Number of Participants Variances of the Error Terms .047 Modal Number of Participants Modal Series Length .001 Modal Number of Participants Autocorrelation .006 Variances of the Error Terms Modal Series Length 006 Variances of the Error Terms Autocorrelation .023 Number of Primary Studies Modal Number of Participants Variances of the Error Terms .058 Number of Primary Studies Modal Number of Participants Autocorrelation Variances of the Error Term s .042 Total Explained .975

PAGE 147

! 130 Similar to the results for the between study variance in the overall average baseline level, a line graph was created for the number of primary studies per meta analysis ( = 25 ), modal number of participants per primary stud y ( = .06 ), variances of the error terms ( = .13 ), the two way interaction of number of primary studies per meta analysis with modal number of participants per primary study ( = .08 ), the two way interaction of number of primary studies per meta analysis w ith variances of the error terms ( = .19), and the three way interaction involving number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants, and variances of the error terms ( = .06). This model explained 7 7% of the variability in the con fidence interval coverage of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect As the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased from 10 to 30 to 80 the confidence interval coverage rate s of the between study variance of the o verall average treatment effect increased, with means of .986 ( SD = 0.018), .999 ( SD = 0.003) and 1.000 ( SD = 0.000) respectively. Also, as the modal number of participants increased from small with a mode of 4 to large with a mode of 8 the confiden ce interval coverage rates of the between study variance of the overall average treatment effect increased with an average of .992 ( SD = 0.016) to .998 ( SD = 0.005) respectively. Likewise, as the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the vari ance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2 the confidence interval coverage rates of the between study variance of the overall average treatment effect increased, with means of .991 ( SD = 0.016) and .999 ( SD = 0.001) respectively. The graph (see Figure 40 ) indicates that when the number of primary studies per meta analysis was 10, the modal number of participants per primary study was small and most of the variance of the error terms was at level 1 the confidence

PAGE 148

! 131 interval coverage rates of the be tween study variance of the overall average treatment effect were closest to the nominal level with a mean of .9 6 0 ( SD = 0.016) In addition, all confidence interval coverage rates of the between study variance of the overall average treatment effect incr eased when the variance of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2. However, when the number of primary studies was 10 and the modal number of participants was small the increase in confidence interv al coverage rates of the between study variance of the overall average treatment effect was the most noticeable. Figure 40. Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the between study variance in the overall average treatme nt effect as a function of the three way interaction between number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, and the variances of the error terms. Between person within study variance in the average baseline l evel. Variation in the confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level was explored by modeling confidence interval coverage with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analys is, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of

PAGE 149

! 132 autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms) and a two way interaction involving number of primary studies per meta analysis and variances of the erro r terms. This model explained 97 % of the variability in the confidence interval coverage of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level Eta squared ( ) values for each of t he main effects and interaction are in Table 18 Table 18 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Between Person Within Study Variance in the Average Baseline Level Number of Primary Studies 736 Modal Number of Participants 055 Modal Series L ength 006 Autocorrelation 011 Variances of the Error Terms 119 Number of Primary Studies Variances of the Error Terms 041 Total Explained .968 To further explore these effects line graphs were created for the main effects of number of primary studies per meta analysis ( = .74), modal number of participants per primary study ( = .06), and variances of the error terms ( = 12). The confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a f unction of the number of primary studies per meta analysis (see Figure 41) illustrated that as the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased from 10 to 30 to 80 confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in t he average baseline level decreased with means of .840 ( SD = 0.036) to .656 ( SD = 0.112) to .340 ( SD = 0.182), respectively.

PAGE 150

! 133 Figure 41. Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the number of pr imary studies per meta analysis The confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the modal number of participan ts per primary study (see Figure 42) illustrated that as modal number of participants per primary study increased from small, with a mode of 4, to large, with a mode of 8, the confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance i n the average baseline level decreased with means of .668 ( SD = 0.208) to .556 ( SD = 0.261), respectively.

PAGE 151

! 134 Figure 42 Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the between person within study variance in the average basel ine level as a function of the modal number of participants per primary study The confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the variances of the error terms (see Figure 43) illustrated that as variances in the error terms shifted from most of the variance in level 1 to most of the variance in level 2 the confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level decreased with means of .695 ( SD = 0.178) to .529 ( SD = 0.267), respectively.

PAGE 152

! 135 Figure 43. Line grap h showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates for the between person within study variance in the average baseline level as a function of the variance s of the error terms Between person within study variance in the average treatment effect. Variation in the confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect was explored by modeling confiden ce interval coverage with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms) and a two way i nteraction involving number of primary studies per meta analysis and variances of the error terms. This model explained 97 % of the variability in the confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average treatment e ffect Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effect s and interaction are in Table 19

PAGE 153

! 136 Table 19 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Between Person Within Study Variance in the Average Treatment Effect Number of Primary Studies 554 Modal Number of Participants 038 Modal Series Length 004 Autocorrelation 008 Variances of the Error Terms 248 Number of Primary Studies Variances of the Error Terms 120 Total Explained .97 2 To further explore these effects a line graph was created that modeled the confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ( = .55), variances of the error terms ( = .25) and their interaction ( = .12) and thus explaining 92% of the variability in the confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect. As the number o f primary studies per meta analysis increased from 10 to 30 to 80 the confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect decreased, with means of .854 ( SD = 0.030), .715 ( SD = 0.116), and .457 ( SD = 0.230), respectively. Likewise, as the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2 the confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average treatm ent effect decreased, with means of .785 ( SD = 0.103) and .565 ( SD = 0.254), respectively. In addition, the graph (see Figure 44) indicates that when the number of primary studies per

PAGE 154

! 137 meta analysis was 10 and most of the variance was at level 1 the confid ence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect were closest to the nominal level with a mean of .876 ( SD = 0.010). The graph also illustrates a steep decline in confidence interval coverage rates o f the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased and when most of the variance in the error terms was at level 2 with the worst coverage rates occurring when the number of primary studies per meta analysis was 80 ( M = .248, SD = 0.960). Figure 44. Line graph showing the estimated coverage rates for the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect as a function of the variance of the error terms for each level of the number of primary studies per meta analysis Within person residual variance. Variation of the confidence interval coverage rates of the within person residual variance was explored by modeling confidence interval coverage with th e five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms) and a two way interaction involving the num ber of primary studies per meta analysis and the level of autocorrelation. This model

PAGE 155

! 138 explained 98 % of the variability in the confidence interval coverage rates of the within person residual variance Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects a nd interactions are in Table 20 Table 20 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Coverage of the Within Person Residual Variance Number of Primary Studies 055 Modal Number of Participants 003 Modal Serie s Length 008 Autocorrelation 863 Variances of the Error Terms 000 Number of Primary Studies Level of Autocorrelation 052 Total Explained .981 To further explore these effects line graphs were created that modeled the confidence interval covera ge rates of the within person residual variance as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ( = .06), and the level of autocorrelation ( = .86). The graph (see Figure 45) illustrates that as the number of primary studies per meta anal ysis increased from 10 to 30 to 80 the confidence interval coverage rates of the within person residual variance decreased, with means of .665 ( SD = 0.356), .547 ( SD = 0.407), and .437 ( SD = 0.406), respectively. In addition, as the level of autocorrelati on increased from 0 to .200 to .400 the confidence interval coverage rates of the within person residual variance decreased with means of .951 ( SD = 0.003), .636 ( SD = 0.233), and .062 ( SD = 0.109), respectively (see Figure 46).

PAGE 156

! 139 Figure 45. Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval coverage rates of the within person residual variance as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis Figure 46. Line graph showing the estimated confidence coverage rates of the within perso n residual variance as a function of the level of autocorrelation Confidence Interval Width Interval widths were so large for the level 3 ( and ) and level 2 ( and ) variance components that they provided no information. Specifically, the confidence interval width estimates of between study variance in the overall average

PAGE 157

! 140 baseline level ( ) ranged from a low of 3.890 X 10 269 to a high of 3.197 X 10 286 with a mean of 1.568 X 10 285 The confidence interval width estimates for the between study varian ce in the overall average treatment effect ( ) ranged from a low of 4.136 X 10 269 to a high of 5.919 X 10 286 with a mean of 2.449 X 10 285 In addition, the confidence interval width estimates of the between person within study variance in the average bas eline level ( ) ranged from a low of 0.077 to a high of 5.429 X 10 282 with a mean of 5.027 X 10 280 The confidence interval width estimates for the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect ( ) ranged from a low of 0.103 to a h igh of 9.691 X 10 286 with a mean of 9.419 X 10 282 As illustrated by the results, the confidence interval widths were so large for the level 3 and level 2 variance components that further investigation was unwarranted. The within person residual varianc e ( ) had an average confidence interval width estimate of 0.146 ( SD = 0.075) and values ranging from 0.047 to 0.368. The amount of estimated autocorrelation ( ) had a mean confidence interval width estimate of 0.090 ( SD = 0.041) and values ranging from 0.034 to 0.177. Figure 47 illustrates the distribution of confidence interval width estimates for the within person residual variance and the amount of estimated autocorrelation.

PAGE 158

! 141 Figure 47. Box plots showing the distribution of confidence interval width estimates for the within person residual variance and the amount of estimated autocorrelation in the three level model Within person residual variance. Variation of the confidence interval widths in the within person residual variance was explored by modeling confidence interval width with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and varia nces of the error terms) and a two way interaction involving the number of primary studies per meta analysis and the level of autocorrelation. This model explained 97 % of the variability in the confidence interval width estimates of the within person resi dual variance Eta squared ( ) values for each of the main effects and interactions are in Table 21

PAGE 159

! 142 Table 21 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Interval Width of the Within Person Residual Variance Number of Primary Studies 674 Modal Number of Participants 026 Modal Series Length 078 Autocorrelation 160 Variances of the Error Terms 000 Number of Primary Studies Level of Autocorrelation 029 Total Explained .967 To further explore these effect s line graphs were created that modeled the confidence interval width estimates as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ( = .67), modal series length per primary study ( = .08), and the level of autocorrelation ( = .16) as they wer e the only effects that met the pre established standard of a medium effect size or greater. The confidence interval width estimates of the within person residual variance as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis (see Figure 48) il lustrated that as the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased from 10 to 30 to 80 confidence interval width estimates decreased with means of .227 ( SD = 0.062) to .130 ( SD = 0.035) to .080 ( SD = 0.022), respectively.

PAGE 160

! 143 Figure 48. L ine graph showing the estimated confidence interval widths for the within person residual variance as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis The confidence interval width estimates of the within person residual variance as a function of th e modal series length per primary study (see Figure 49 ) illustrates that as the modal series length increased from small, with a mode of 10, to medium, with a mode of 20, to large, with a mode of 30, the confidence interval width estimates of the within pe rson residual variance decreased with means of .172 ( SD = 0.084) to .143 ( SD = 0.070) to .122 ( SD = 0.061), respectively.

PAGE 161

! 144 Figure 49. Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval widths for the with person residual variance as a function of the modal series length per primary study The confidence interval width estimates of the within person residual variance as a function of the level of autocorrelation (see Figure 50) illustrated that as the level of autocorrelation increased from 0 to .200 to .400 the confidence interval width estimates of the within person residual variance increased with means of .117 ( SD = 0.053) to .134 ( SD = 0.062) to .186 ( SD = 0.087), respectively. Figure 50. Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval w idths for the within person residual variance as a function of the level of autocorrelation

PAGE 162

! 145 Amount of estimated autocorrelation. Variation in the confidence interval width estimates of the amount of autocorrelation was explored by modeling confidence i nterval width with the five main effects (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms) This model explained 97 % of the variability in the confidence interval width estimates of the amount of autocorrelation. Eta squared ( ) values for each of th e main effects are in Table 22 Table 22 Eta squared Values ( ) for Association of Design Factors with Confidence Int erval Width of the Amount of Estimated Autocorrelation Number of Primary Studies 827 Modal Number of Participants 031 Modal Series Length 107 Autocorrelation 000 Variances of the Error Terms 002 Total Explained .967 To further explore th ese effects line graphs were created that modeled the confidence interval width estimates as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis ( = .83), and modal series length per primary study ( = .11). The confidence interval width estimate s of the amount of estimated autocorrelation as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis (see Figure 51) illustrate that as the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased from 10 to 30 to 80 confidence interval width estimat es of the amount of estimated autocorrelation decreased with means of .139 ( SD = 0.025) to .080 ( SD = 0.014) to .050 ( SD = 0.009), respectively.

PAGE 163

! 146 Figure 51. Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval widths for the amount of estimated autocorre lation as a function of the number of primary studies per meta analysis The confidence interval width estimates of the amount of estimated autocorrelation as a function of the modal series length per primary study (see Figure 52) illustrated that as the modal series length increased from small, with a mode of 10, to medium, with a mode of 20, to large, with a mode of 30, the confidence interval width estimates of the amount of estimated autocorrelation decreased with means of .107 ( SD = 0.045) to .088 ( S D = 0.038) to .074 ( SD = 0.033), respectively.

PAGE 164

! 147 Figure 52. Line graph showing the estimated confidence interval widths for the amount of estimated autocorrelation as a function of the modal series length per primary study Relationships Among Depende nt Variables One may have anticipated that relationships existed between certain dependent variables for example confidence interval coverage and confidence interval width. In addition, when reviewing the results of this study it became apparent that rela tionships existed among the dependent variables per estimated effect. Therefore, correlations among the dependent variables were examined for each fixed effect and variance component. Correlation coefficients were compared to Cohen's (1988) standards for interpreting correlation coefficients with a weak relationship having an r = .1, a moderate relationship having an r = .3, and a strong relationship having an r = .5. Fixed Effects Overall average baseline level. The relationships among the overall avera ge baseline level dependent variables are summarized in Table 23. A perusal of Table 23 indicates a strong and positive relationship between confidence interval coverage and width of the overall average baseline level with a correlation of .671. Specific ally, as

PAGE 165

! 148 confidence interval coverage of the overall average baseline level increased so did the width of the overall average baseline level. In addition, the relationships between bias and confidence interval coverage and width of the overall average bas eline level were weak. Table 23 Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Overall Average Baseline Level Dependent Variables Dependent Variable 1 2 3 1. Bias .063 .056 2. Confidence Interval Coverage .671 3. Confidence Int erval Width Mean 0.000 .961 0.427 Standard Deviation 0.002 0.005 0.291 Note. Values in the table are based on 108 conditions in the simulation Overall average treatment effect. Similar to the correlation results for the overall average baseline l evel, a strong and positive relationship existed between confidence interval coverage and width of the overall average treatment effect with a correlation of .612. Specifically, as confidence interval coverage of the overall average treatment effect incre ased so did the confidence interval width of the overall average treatment effect. However, relationships involving the bias estimates of the overall average treatment effect were weak. Relationships among the overall average treatment effect dependent v ariables are summarized in Table 24. Table 24 Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Overall Average Treatment Effect Dependent Variables Dependent Variable 1 2 3 1. Bias .149 .012 2. Confidence Interval Coverage .612 3 Confidence Interval Width Mean 0.000 .960 0.459 Standard Deviation 0.001 0.005 0.293 Note. Values in the table are based on 108 conditions in the simulation

PAGE 166

! 149 Variance Components Between study variance in the overall average baseline level. The re lationships among the between study variance in the overall average baseline level dependent variables are summarized in Table 25. It should be noted that due to extremely large confidence interval width estimates of the between study variance in the over all average baseline level correlations between the confidence interval widths and the other dependent variables was not calculated. An examination of Table 25 indicates several noteworthy relationships among the between study variance in the overall aver age baseline level dependent variables. Specifically, the relationship between relative bias and confidence interval coverage of the between study variance in the overall average baseline level is strong and negative with a correlation of .781. This rel ationship indicates that as relative bias increased confidence interval coverage decreased. A moderate, positive relationship existed between bias and relative bias of the between study variance in the overall average baseline level ( r = .357) indicating that as bias increased so did relative bias. Conversely, a moderate, negative relationship existed between bias and confidence interval coverage of the between study variance in the overall average baseline level ( r = .306) indicating that as bias increa sed confidence interval coverage decreased.

PAGE 167

! 150 Table 25 Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Baseline Level Dependent Variables Dependent Variable 1 2 3 1. Bias .357 .306 2. R elative Bias .781 3. Confidence Interval Coverage Mean 0.241 .858 .999 Standard Deviation 0.201 0.078 0.004 Note. Values in the table are based on 108 conditions in the simulation Between study variance in the overall average treatment effe ct. It should be noted that due to extremely large confidence interval width estimates of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect correlations between the confidence interval widths and the other dependent variables was unwarran ted. Similar to the correlation results for the between study variance in the overall average baseline level, several noteworthy relationships among the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect dependent variables existed. Specifica lly, the relationship between relative bias and confidence interval coverage of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect is strong and negative with a correlation of .850. This relationship indicates that as relative bias increa sed confidence interval coverage decreased. A strong, positive relationship existed between bias and relative bias of the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect ( r = .536) indicating that as bias increased so did relative bias. Co nversely, a moderate, negative relationship existed between bias and confidence interval coverage of the between study variance in the overall average baseline level ( r = .384) indicating that as bias increased confidence interval coverage decreased. Rel ationships among the dependent variables are summarized in Table 26.

PAGE 168

! 151 Table 26 Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Treatment Effect Dependent Variables Dependent Variable 1 2 3 1. Bias .536 .384 2. Relative Bias .851 3. Confidence Interval Coverage Mean 0.237 .822 .995 Standard Deviation 0.201 0.106 0.012 Note. Values in the table are based on 108 conditions in the simulation Between person within study variance in the average baseline level. The relationships among the between person within study variance in the average baseline level dependent variables are summarized in Table 27. It should be noted that due to extremely large confidence interval width estima tes of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level correlations between the confidence interval widths and the other dependent variables was unwarranted. A perusal of Table 27 indicates several notable relationships among the be tween person within study variance in the average baseline level dependent variables. Specifically, the relationship between relative bias and confidence interval coverage of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level was stron g and negative with a correlation of .802. This relationship indicates that as relative bias increased confidence interval coverage decreased. A moderate, positive relationship existed between bias and relative bias of the between person within study va riance in the average baseline level ( r = .364) indicating that as bias increased so did relative bias. Conversely, a moderate, negative relationship existed between bias and confidence interval coverage of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level ( r = .409) indicating that as bias increased confidence interval coverage decreased.

PAGE 169

! 152 Table 27 Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Between Person Within Study Variance in the Average Baseline Level Depende nt Variables Dependent Variable 1 2 3 1. Bias .364 .409 2. Relative Bias .802 3. Confidence Interval Coverage Mean 0.243 .217 .612 Standard Deviation 0.202 0.017 0.241 Note. Values in the table are based on 108 conditions in the simulatio n Between person within study variance in the average treatment effect. It should be noted that due to extremely large confidence interval width estimates of the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect correlations between t he confidence interval widths and the other dependent variables was unwarranted. Similar to the correlation results for the between participants within study variance in the average baseline level, several notable relationships among the between person wi thin study variance in the average treatment effect dependent variables existed. Specifically, the relationship between relative bias and confidence interval coverage of the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect was strong a nd negative with a correlation of .760. This relationship indicated that as relative bias increased confidence interval coverage decreased. A strong, positive relationship existed between bias and relative bias of the between person within study varianc e in the average treatment effect ( r = .542) indicating that as bias increased so did relative bias. Conversely, a moderate, negative relationship existed between bias and confidence interval coverage of the between person within study variance in the ave rage treatment effect ( r = .573) indicating that as bias increased confidence interval coverage decreased. Relationships among the dependent variables are summarized in Table 28.

PAGE 170

! 153 Table 28 Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Between Participant Within Study Variance in the Average Treatment Effect Dependent Variables Dependent Variable 1 2 3 1. Bias .542 .573 2. Relative Bias .760 3. Confidence Interval Coverage Mean 0.238 .208 .675 Standard Deviation 0.201 0. 023 0.222 Note. Values in the table are based on 108 conditions in the simulation Within person residual variance. The relationships among the within person residual variance dependent variables are summarized in Table 29. A perusal of Table 29 indica tes a strong and negative relationship between bias and confidence interval coverage of the within person residual variance with a correlation of .919. Specifically, as bias of the within person residual variance increased so did the confidence interval coverage. In addition, a moderate, positive relationship existed between bias and confidence interval width of the within person residual variance with a correlation of .402. Conversely, the relationship between confidence interval coverage and width of the within person residual variance were weak. Table 29 Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Within Person Residual Variance Dependent Variables Dependent Variable 1 2 3 1. Bias .919 .402 2. Confidence Interval Coverage .133 3. Confidence Interval Width Mean 0.078 .550 0.146 Standard Deviation 0.082 0.398 0.075 Note. Values in the table are based on 108 conditions in the simulation Amount of estimated autocorrelation. The relationships among the amount of e stimated autocorrelation dependent variables are summarized in Table 30. A perusal of

PAGE 171

! 154 Table 30 indicates several notable relationships among the amount of estimated autocorrelation dependent variables. Specifically, the relationship between bias and relat ive bias of the estimated autocorrelation was strong and positive with a correlation of .931. This relationship indicated that as bias increased so did relative bias. A strong, negative relationship existed between relative bias and confidence interval w idth of the amount of estimated autocorrelation ( r = .625) indicating that as relative bias increased confidence interval width decreased. Similarly, a moderate, negative relationship existed between bias and confidence interval width ( r = .444) of the amount of estimated autocorrelation indicating that as bias increased confidence interval width decreased. Table 30 Summary of Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for the Amount of Estimated Autocorrelation Dependent Variables Dependent Variable 1 2 3 4 1. Bias .931 .100 .444 2. Relative Bias .164 .615 3. Confidence Interval Coverage .146 4. Confidence Interval Width Mean 0.000 .001 .950 0.090 Standard Deviation 0.000 0.002 0.003 0.042 Note. Values in the table are based on 108 conditions in the simulation Summary Please see Table 31 for a summary of the results. The table is comprised of a column for each dependent variable (i.e., bias and/or relative bias of the point estimates, confidence interval coverage, and confi dence interval width) and a row for each effect (i.e., fixed effects and variance components) with a brief summary provided in each cell.

PAGE 172

! 155 Table 3 1 Summa ry of Results Parameter Estimate Bias Relative Bias Confidence Interval Coverage Confidence Interval Wi dth Fixed Effects Overall Average Baseline Level Unbiased ( M = 0.00) N/A Tended to overcover ( M = .961) Came close to nominal level as l e v e l 3 sample size increased Relatively small ( M = 0.428) Intervals smallest when l e v e l 3 sample size wa s largest and less variance was at l e v e l 2 and l e v e l 3 Overall Average Treatment Effect Unbiased ( M = 0.00) N/A Tended to overcover ( M = .960) Came close to nominal level as l e v e l 3 sample size increased Relatively small ( M = 0.459) Intervals smal lest when l e v e l 3 sample size was largest and less variance was at l e v e l 2 and l e v e l 3 Variance Components Level 3 Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Baseline Level Biased ( M = 0.241) Tended to be underestimated Less biased w hen most of the variances in the error terms was at l e v e l 1 Biased ( M = .858) Less biased as l e v e l 3, l e v e l 2 sample sizes decreased and when most of the variances in the error terms was at l e v e l 1 Tended to overcover ( M = .998) Moved towards the n ominal level when the l e v e l 3 and l e v e l 2 sample sizes were smallest and most of the variances in the error terms was at l e v e l 1 Too large to provide any information ( M = 1.568 X 10 285 ) Between Study Variance in the Overall Average Treatment Effect B iased ( M = 0.237) Tended to be underestimated Less biased when most of the variances in the error terms was at l e v e l 1 Biased ( M = .822) Less biased as l e v e l 3, l e v e l 2 sample sizes decreased and when most of the variances in the error terms was at l e v e l 1 Tended to overcover ( M = .995) Moved towards the nominal level when the l e v e l 3 and l e v e l 2 sample sizes were smallest and most of the variance in the error terms was at l e v e l 1 Too large to provide any information ( M = 2.449 X 10 285 )

PAGE 173

! 156 Ta ble 31 ( Continued ) Parameter Bias Relative Bias Confidence Interval Coverage Confidence Interval Width Level 2 Between Person Within Study Variance in the Average Baseline Level Biased ( M = 0.243) Tended to be overestimated Less biased when m ost of the variance in the error terms was at l e v e l 1 Biased ( M = .217) Less biased as l e v e l 3, l e v e l 2 sample sizes decreased and when most of the variance was at l e v e l 1 Tended to undercover ( M = .612) Moved towards the nominal level when the l e v e l 3 and l e v e l 2 sample sizes were smallest and when most of the variance was at l e v e l 1 Too large to provide any information ( M = 5.027 X 10 280 ) Between Person Within Study Variance in the Average Treatment Effect Biased ( M = 0.238) Tended to be over estimated Less biased when most of the variance in the error terms was at l e v e l 1 Biased ( M = .208) Less biased as l e v e l 3, l e v e l 2 sample sizes decreased and when most of the variance in the error terms was at l e v e l 1 Tended to undercover ( M = .67 5) Moved towards the nominal level when the l e v e l 3 sample size was smallest and when most of the variance in the error terms was at l e v e l 1 Too large to provide any information ( M = 9.419 X 10 282 ) Level 1 Within Person Residual Variance Biased ( M = 0.078) Tended to be slightly overestimated Least biased when autocorrelation was 0 N/A Tended to undercover ( M = .550) Close to the nominal level when autocorrelation was 0 Relatively small intervals ( M = 0.146) Smallest intervals when l e v e l 3 and l e v el 1 sample sizes were largest and level of autocorrelation was 0 Amount of Estimated Autocorrelation Unbiased ( M = 0.001) Unbiased ( M = .001) Close to the nominal level, regardless of condition ( M = .950) Relatively small interval s ( M = 0.090) Smallest intervals when l e v e l 3 and l e v e l 1 sample sizes were larg est

PAGE 174

! 157 Fixed Effects Results indicated that the fixed effects, both the overall average baseline level ( ) and the overall average treatment effect ( ), were unbiased r egardless of condition, with average bias values of zero. However, confidence interval coverage rates of the fixed effects tended to overcover. Variation in the confidence interval coverage rates of the overall average baseline level was explored by exam ining the only factor with a medium or larger effect size, the number of primary studies per meta analysis (level 3 sample size). Further examination of this effect illustrated that as the level 3 sample size became larger the closer the confidence interv al coverage rates came to a .95 coverage rate representing an alpha level of .05. Likewise, the number of primary studies per meta analysis had the same impact on the confidence interval coverage of the overall average treatment effect indicating that as the level 3 sample size increased the closer the confidence interval coverage rates came to a .95 coverage rate. Confidence interval widths of both fixed effects, the overall average baseline level and the overall treatment effect, were relatively small. To gain a better understanding for widths of this size, it is helpful to recall that the level 1 variance was set to 1.0 and both fixed effects were set to 1.0. Therefore, average confidence interval widths of 0.459 for the overall average treatment eff ect would produce an overall average treatment effect interval that ranged from around 0.770 to 1.230. Variation in the confidence interval width estimates of the overall average baseline level were explored by creating a line graph showing the confidence interval width estimates as a function of the interaction between the number of primary studies per meta analysis and the variances of the error terms. The results indicated that confidence interval widths were smallest when the

PAGE 175

! 158 number of primary studies per meta analysis was 80 and most of the variance was at level 1 or less variance was at level 2 and level 3. Similar results were found for the overall average treatment effect. Variance Components Level 3 and level 2 variance components tended to be bi ased, with level 3 variance components tending to be underestimated and level 2 variance components tending to be overestimated. Parameter estimates of the between study variance in the overall average baseline level ( ) and the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect ( ) tended to become increasingly underestimated and progressively more biased when the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2. Parameter estimates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level ( ) and in the average treatment effect ( ) tended to become increasingly overestimated and progressively more biased when the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the v ariance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2. The within person residual variance ( ) was also biased with an average bias value being slightly above zero. Parameter estimates of the within person residual variance tended to become increasingly overestimated and slightly more biased when the level of autocorrelation increased. However, the amount of estimated autocorrelation ( ! ) in the three level model was on average unbiased with the bias estimate not exceeding 1% of the known parameter value. Relative bias was also evaluated for any parameter whose known value was different from one. Results indicated that the parameter estimates of the level 3 variance components (between study variance in the overall average base line level and between

PAGE 176

! 159 study variance in the overall average treatment effect) tended to be underestimated and became progressively more underestimated and biased when the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased, the modal number of participa nts per primary study increased, and the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2. In addition, the parameter estimates of the level 2 variance components (between person within study var iance in the average baseline level and between person within study variance in the average treatment effect) tended to be overestimated and became progressively more overestimated and biased when the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased, the modal number of participants per primary study increased, and the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2. Confidence intervals of the level 3 variance components tended to overcove r but were closest to a .95 coverage rate when the number of primary studies per meta analysis was 10, the modal number of participants per primary study was small, and most of the variance was at level 1. In addition, as the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2 confidence interval coverage rates for the level 3 variance components increased regardless of the number of primary studies per meta analysis or modal number of participants p er primary study. Confidence intervals of the level 2 variance components and the residual variance tended to undercover. The confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level tended to decrease when the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased, the modal number or participants per primary study increased and the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1

PAGE 177

! 160 to most of the variance at level 2. The confiden ce interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect tended to decrease as the number of primary studies per meta analysis increased and the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2. In addition, the confidence interval coverage rates of the within person residual variance decreased as the number of primary studies per meta analysis and the level of autocorrelation increased. Conversely, t he confidence interval coverage rates of the amount of estimated autocorrelation were close to a .95 coverage rate regardless of condition. Confidence interval widths were so large for the level 3 and level 2 variance components that they provided no infor mation. However, the confidence interval width estimates for the within person residual variance produced relatively small intervals ( M = 0.146) and tended to decrease as the number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal series length per primary stu dy, and the level of autocorrelation increased. For example, consider the fact that the within person residual variance was set to 1.0 therefore a small series length, with a mode of 10, would yield a confidence interval from about .914 to 1.086, but a me dium series length, with a mode of 20, would produce a confidence interval from .929 to 1.072, and a large series length, with a mode of 30, would provide an even tighter confidence interval from .939 to 1.061. Similarly, the confidence interval width est imates for the amount of estimated autocorrelation were also relatively small ( M = 0.090) and tended to decrease as the number of primary studies per meta analysis and series length per primary study increased. Therefore, based on the results of the confi dence interval widths of the amount of estimated autocorrelation, when the amount

PAGE 178

! 161 of estimated autocorrelation was set to 0 a level 3 sample size of 10 primary studies would produce a confidence interval from about .070 to .070, but a level 3 sample size of 30 primary studies would lead to a confidence interval from around .040 to .040, and a level 3 sample size of 80 would yield even greater precision with a confidence interval from about .025 to .025.

PAGE 179

! 162 CHAPTER FIVE: DISCUSSION This chapter outlines a summary of the study and results, along with a discussion of the findings, limitations of the study, and implications. Summary of the Study Quantitative integration of study results, termed meta analysis, involves the combining of data across multiple st udies to evaluate and summarize research findings. The term meta analysis was first coined by Glass (1976) and was defined as "the statistical analysis of a large collection of analysis results from individual studies for the purpose of integrating the fi ndings" (p.3). This type of research is an important way to determine relationships among variables and the effectiveness of interventions across studies. It also allows researchers to integrate study findings with the goal of generalization. Quantitati ve integration of study findings should cross research domains and include all types of quantitative research, including single case research. However, m eta analysis of single case research has resulted in much disagreement in the field. Although the u se of single case designs has grown over the past decades, the majority of literature on meta analysis focuses on group comparison studies and leaves out single case research (Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2008). This lack of literature related to single c ase designs is often why these designs are excluded from meta analyses. This exclusion of single case designs is concerning when one considers the plethora of information single case research can add to the literature. Single case designs

PAGE 180

! 163 not only provid e information related to average treatment effects but also offer s information related to how that treatment effect is related to specific cases. Meta analyses of single case designs offer the ability to summarize and evaluate the overall effect without t he loss of that specific case information. In addition, the meta analysis of single case data increases the generalizabilty of research findings. Researchers have proposed a variety of methods to meta analyze single case data. Van den Noortgate and Onghe na's (2008) proposed method of using multilevel modeling to meta analyze single case data offers many advantages. The use of multilevel modeling provides the flexibility of appropriately modeling the autocorrelational nature of single case data, can take into consideration multiple effect sizes per study, and can apply appropriate meta analytic models, such as fixed or random effects models. Although the use of multilevel modeling offers advantages in the analysis of single case data, there is still concer n as to whether the use of multilevel modeling i s appropriate for single case data. Specifically, multilevel modeling is based on large sample theory, which is not representative of si ngle case data. Therefore, it wa s necessary to further investigate the appropriateness of inferences made from multilevel modeling when applied to single case data. The purpose of this study was to examine the appropriateness of Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data multilevel modeling approach to the meta analysi s of single case data. Specifically, the study examined the fixed effects (i.e., the overall average baseline level and the overall average treatment effect) and the variance components (e.g., the between person within study variance in the average baseli ne level, the between study variance in the overall average baseline level, the between person

PAGE 181

! 164 within study variance in the average treatment effect) in a three level multilevel model. More specifically, bias of point estimates, confidence interval covera ge rates, and confidence interval widths were examined as a function of specific design and data factors. Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to examine the appropriateness of multilevel modeling inferences. The use of simulation methods allowed for the control and manipulation of specific design and data factors. The Monte Carlo study included five fac tors in the design These factors were (a) number of primary studies per meta analysis (10, 30, and 80); (b) modal number of participants per primary study (small [mode = 4] and large [mode = 8]); (c) modal series length per primary study (small [mode = 10], medium [mode = 20], and large [mode = 30]); (d) level of autocorrelation (0, .2, and .4); and (e) variances of the error terms ( most of the varian ce at level 1 [ = 1, = .2, and = .05] and most of the variance at level 2 [ = 1, = 2, and = .5]). The values chosen for each of these factors were based on previous simulation research and observed factors of actual single case meta analyses. The data for this study were generated based on Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data, three level meta analytic single case model shown in Equations 24 through 28. Each data set was analyzed using the same model that was used for data generation (see E quations 24 28). The three level model was estimated using restricted maximum likelihood (REML) via PROC MIXED with the Kenward Roger degrees of freedom method in SAS version 9.2 (SAS Institute Inc., 2008). In addition, a first order auto regressive mo del for the level 1 errors was specified. Based

PAGE 182

! 165 on the current model, the treatment effect was modeled as a change in level, and estimates were obtained for autocorrelation, variance within participants, variance in baseline levels across participants and studies, and variance in treatment effects across participants and studies. T he appropriateness of Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data multilevel modeling approach to the meta analysis of single case data was evaluated by examining bias and/or relative bias of the point estimates, confidence interval coverage, and confidence interval width of both the fixed effects and the variance components. This was accomplished by creating box plots, across all conditions, for each dependent variable. The n, the results of the simulation were analyzed using PROC GLM in SAS 9.2 for both the fixed effects and the variance components such that the dependent variables were bias, relative bias (where appropriate), confidence interval coverage, and confidence int erval width and the independent variables were the five factors. Models were built with the purpose of finding effects whose eta squared values were .06 or greater. The effects size, eta squared ( ), was calculated to determine the proportion of variabil ity associated with each effect. Those values were compared to Cohen's (1988) standards for interpreting eta squared values with a small effect size having an = .01, .a medium effect size having an = .06, and a large effect size having an = .14 or grea ter. Each model was first created as a main effects only model. If this model explained 94% of the total variability then no further complex models were investigated. However, if less than 94% of the total variability was explained then interactions wer e included in the model. Two way interactions were added to the model first followed by three way and then four way interactions until at least 94% of the variability was explained.

PAGE 183

! 166 Research Questions 1. To what extent are the fixed effect estimates from a t hree level meta analytic single case model biased as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and va riances of the error terms)? 2. To what extent does the confidence interval coverage of the fixed effect estimates from a three level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms)? 3. To what extent does the confidence interval width of the fixed effect estimates from a three level meta anal ytic single case model vary as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms)? 4. To what extent are the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model biased as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal serie s length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms)? 5. To what extent does the confidence interval coverage of the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific

PAGE 184

! 167 desig n factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms)? 6. To what extent does the confidence interval width o f the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model vary as a function of specific design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, level of autocorrelation, and variances of the error terms)? Discussion of Study Results Fixed Effects The extent to which the fixed effects from a three level meta analytic single case model were biased, as a function of the specific design factors, was evaluated by the average amount that the estimated parameter differed from the known parameter. The results indicated that regardless of condition the fixed effects were unbiased with average bias values of zero. The unbiased fixed effect estimates revea led in this research are consistent with previous research regarding the utility of the inferences made from fixed effects in two level models (Ferron et al., 2009; Raudenbush & Bryk, 2002). Therefore, the use of fixed effects from a three level meta anal ytic single case model are likely to provide unbiased estimates of the average baseline level and average treatment effect across studies if the model is correctly specified. The proportion of the 95% confidence intervals that contained the parameter valu e estimated the confidence interval coverage of the fixed effects from a three level meta analytic single case model. The confidence interval coverage rates of the fixed

PAGE 185

! 168 effects, both the overall average baseline level and the overall average treatment ef fect, tended to overcover with means of .961 and .960, respectively. Further examination of the extent to which the fixed effects varied as a function of the specific design factors illustrated that the 95% confidence interval coverage rates of the fixed effects came close to a .95 coverage rate as the level 3 sample size increased. These findings suggest that whenever possible researchers should increase the level 3 sample size or number of primary studies included in the meta analysis. In addition, the se findings validate previous literature related to two level models for single case data that states larger upper level units lead to gr e ater accuracy and precision (Ferron et al., 2009). These findings are also consistent with general methodological rese arch on more traditional designs of repeated measurements using multilevel models and the Kenward Roger degrees of freedom ( Fouladi & Shieh, 2004; Gomez, Schaalje, & Fellingham, 2005; Kenward & Roger, 1997; Kowalchuk, Keselman, Algina, & Wolfinger, 2004; S chaalje, McBride, &Fellingham, 2001). These previous simulation studies have indicated that across a variety of conditions and sample sizes Type I error rates have been close to the nominal alpha level but variability in performance was noted. For exampl e, Gomez, Schaalje, and Fellingham (2005) examined a three group design with three participants per group and each participant measured at three points in time and they found that Type I error control varied based on the type of covariance structure. In p articular, results indicated that when the data were generated and analyzed assuming compound symmetry the estimated Type I error rate was .052 ( = .05). However, when the data were generated and analyzed assuming a 1 st order autoregressive with random e ffects model the estimated Type I error rate was .1165 ( = .05).

PAGE 186

! 169 The average difference between the upper and lower limits of the 95% confidence intervals defined the confidence interval widths of the fixed effects from a three level meta analytic single case model. The confidence interval widths of the fixed effects, both the overall average baseline level and the overall average treatment were relatively small with average confidence interval width estimates of 0.428 and 0.459, respectively. To gain a better understanding for widths of this size, it is helpful to recall that the level 1 variance was set to 1.0 and both fixed effects were set to 1.0. Therefore, average confidence interval widths of 0.459 for the overall average treatment effect would p roduce interval estimates that ranged from around 0.770 to 1.230. Further examination of the extent to which the confidence interval widths of the fixed effects varied as a function of the specific design factors indicated that the interaction between the level 3 sample size and the variances of the error terms impacted the variability in confidence interval widths of the fixed effects. Specifically, confidence interval widths of the fixed effects were smallest when the level 3 sample sizes were largest ( mode = 80) and most of the variance in the error terms was at level 1 or less variance at level 2 and level 3. Similar to previous research examining two level models for single case data (Ferron et al., 2009; Ferron et al., 2010), which found that confid ence interval widths of the treatment effect decreased with more participants, more observations per participant, and smaller variance components, this study's results would suggest that a larger number of upper level units and less variability between per sons and studies would produce more precise confidence intervals of the fixed effects.

PAGE 187

! 170 Variance Components The extent to which the variance components from a three level single case meta analytic model were biased, as a function of the specific design f actors, was evaluated by the average amount that the estimated parameter differed from the known parameter. As expected, the level 3 and level 2 variance components tended to be biased. Specifically, the level 3 variance components, both in the between s tudy variance in the overall average baseline level and the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect, tended to be underestimated with means of 0.241 and 0.237, respectively. The level 2 variance components, both the between person within study variance in the average baseline level and the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect, tended to be overestimated with means of 0.243 and 0.238, respectively. These findings are not too surprising given other re search from a broader methodological perspective. Previous Monte Carlo research on growth curve models with studies having as few as 30 participants and series lengths of 4 or 8 (Kwok, West, & Green, 2007) and series length of 5 or 8 (Murphy & Pituch, 200 9) have all reported substantial bias in the variance components when the model was correctly specified and the number of participants was small ( N = 30). In the present study, bias in the level 3 variance components was mainly impacted by one factor, the variances of the error terms. As the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2, the level 3 variance components tended to become increasingly underestimated and progressively more biased. Conversely, the level 2 variance components became increasingly overestimated and progressively more biased as the

PAGE 188

! 171 variances in the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2. Similar to previous research on two levels models with single case data (Ferron et al., 2009), level 1 variance or within person residual variance was slightly biased but differing from previous research the bias in the estimates of within person residual variance remained constant at around 8% regardless of level 3 or level 2 sample size. However, results from this study did reveal the within person residual variance of the three level model became increasingly biased as the level of autocorrelation increased. This finding is not su rprising given the notion that as autocorrelation increases the errors between observations within a person become more similar and therefore make it difficult to produce unbiased within person variability estimates. However, the amount of estimated autoc orrelation in the three level meta analytic single case model was on average unbiased. Both the within person residual variance and amount of estimated autocorrelation bias results were not consistent with previous literature on two level models that foun d both parameters to be substantially biased (Ferron et al, 2009). However, this current study did focus on a three level model as opposed to the previously investigated two level model and therefore more information was ultimately available in the estima tion of those parameters. The extent to which the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model were biased, based on specific design factors, were also evaluated by examining relative bias for any parameter whose known value was d ifferent from one so as to gain an index of bias in relation to the known parameter value. As was expected, based on previous literature (Ferron et al., 2009; Raudenbush & Bryk, 2002), the variance

PAGE 189

! 172 components were biased; however, the trend in bias of the variance components was not expected. Previous Monte Carlo research on two level models for singe case data has shown biased variance components at both level 2 and level 1 but with a decrease in bias of the point estimates as the upper level units incre ased (Ferron et al., 2009). In this study when the level 3 and level 2 sample size increased and the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2 the level 3 and level 2 variance components became increasing more b iased, albei t in opposing directions. Specifically, the level 3 variance components became increasingly underestimated and the level 2 variance components became increasingly overestimated. However, the level 3 sample size only we nt as high as 80 and the level 2 sample size only went as high as 8 therefore there is no way of knowing if and when the variance compo nents would have begun showing less bias with larger sample sizes Another interesting findin g of the present study that was contradictory to previous literature examining two level models for single case data (Ferron et al., 2009), which found that the amount of autocorrelation tended to be biased and underestimated, was that on average the amount of estimated autocorrelat ion was unbiased with relative bias estimates not exceeding 1% of the known parameter value. This finding suggests that it is tenable to assume that estimates of the amount of estimated autocorrelation fr om this three level meta analytic single case model under the se specific design conditions, a re unbiased if the model is correctly specified. The extent to which the confidence interval coverage estimates of the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model produced accurate conf idence intervals, as a function of specific design factors, was estimated by the

PAGE 190

! 173 proportion of the 95% confidence intervals that contained the parameter value. The level 3 variance components, both in the between study variance in the overall average base line level and the between study variance in the overall average treatment effect, tended to overcover with means of .998 and .995, respectively. Further examination of these effects indicated that the main factors that influenced the variability in confi dence interval coverage rates of the level 3 variance components were the level 3 sample size, level 2 sample size, and the variances of the error terms. Specifically, confidence interval coverage rates of the level 3 variance components were closest to a .95 coverage rate when the level 3 sample size was smallest (10 primary studies), level 2 sample size was smallest (mode = 10), and most of the variance in the error terms was at level 1. Recall that bias of the level 3 variance components was smallest w hen the level 3 sample size was smallest, level 2 sample size was smallest, and most of the variance in the error terms was at level 1. Therefore, given the relative bias results, it was not surprising that the confidence interval coverage was problematic for the level 3 variance components. Similar results were found for the level 2 variance components and the within person residual variance. The level 2 variance components, both the between person within study variance in the average baseline level an d the between person within study variance in the average treatment effect, tended to undercover with means of .612 and .675, respectively. Several design factors were found to have impacted the variability in the confidence interval coverage rates of the level 2 variance components. The confidence interval coverage rates of the between person within study variance in the average baseline level tended to decrease and move farther away from a .95 coverage rate when the level 3 sample size increased, the le vel 2 sample size increased, and the

PAGE 191

! 174 variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2. In addition, the confidence interval coverage rates of the other level 2 variance component, the between per son within study variance in the average treatment effect, tended to decrease and move farther away from a .95 coverage rate as the level 3 sample size increased and the variances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of t he variance at level 2. Recall that relative bias results of the level 2 variance components indicated that estimates of the level 2 variance components became more biased as the level 3 sample size increased, the level 2 sample size increased, and the va riances of the error terms shifted from most of the variance at level 1 to most of the variance at level 2. Therefore, it was not surprising that confidence interval coverage of the level 2 variance components was troublesome. Additionally, these results are consistent with previous findings (Maas & Hox, 2004) from a broader methodological perspective on two level organizational models, which found that coverage rates of the level 2 variance components tended to undercover with small sample sizes ( N = 30) Confidence interval coverage rates were the most problematic for the within person residual variance with average confidence interval coverage rates well below the nominal level ( M = .550). However, confidence interval coverage rates of the within pers on residual variance were close to a .95 coverage rate when autocorrelation was zero. This finding was consistent given the bias results for the within person residual variance. Conversely, confidence interval coverage rates for the amount of estimated a utocorrelation were close to a .95 coverage rate ( M = .950), regardless of condition, which is not surprising given the bias results for the amount of estimated autocorrelation.

PAGE 192

! 175 The average difference between the upper and lower limits of the 95% confide nce intervals defined the confidence interval widths of the variance components from a three level meta analytic single case model. Confidence interval widths for the level 3 and level 2 variance components were so large that they provided no information. These findings are not surprising given previous research on two level models for single case data (Ferron et al., 2009) where the results indicated that the confidence interval widths for the level 2 variance components were so large that they provided no information. However, the confidence interval width estimates for the within person residual variance produced relatively small interval widths ( M = 0.146) which tended to become even smaller as the level 3 and level 1 sample size, and level of autoco rrelation increased. For example, consider the fact that the within person residual variance was set to 1.0 therefore a small series length, with a mode of 10, would yield a confidence interval from about .914 to 1.086, but a medium series length, with a mode of 20, would produce a confidence interval from .929 to 1.072, and a large series length, with a mode of 30, would provide an even tighter confidence interval from .939 to 1.061. These results are not too surprising considering the confidence interval coverage estimates for the within person residual variance tended to undercover. Likewise, the confidence interval width estimates for the amount of estimated autocorrelation were small ( M = 0.090) and tended to decrease as the level 3 and level 1 sample size increased. Therefore, based on the results of the confidence interval widths of the amount of estimated autocorrelation, when the level of autocorrelation was set to 0 a level 3 sample size of 10 primary studies would produce a confidence interval wi th from about .070 to .070, but a level 3 sample size of 30 primary studies would lead to a

PAGE 193

! 176 confidence interval from around .040 to .040, and a level 3 sample size of 80 would yield even greater precision with a confidence interval from about .025 to .0 25. These findings suggest that it is tenable to assume as the level 3 and level 1 sample sizes increase the more precise the estimates of amount of estimated autocorrelation become, if t he model is correctly specified. Limitations of the Study Based on t he design of this study, there are generalizabilty limitations to consider with regard to this research study. The Monte Carlo method used in this study provided control of specific factors to investigate the appropriateness of inferences made from a thre e level meta analytic single case model in specific situations. While this is a benefit of simulation studies it also limits the generalizabilty of the study findings. Therefore, the five design factors (number of primary studies per meta analysis, modal number of participants per primary study, modal series length per primary study, variances of the error terms, and level of autocorrelation) determine the types of single case meta analyses to which the study's findings can be generalized. In addition, a nother generalizabilty limitation of this study is the levels of the specific design factors. These levels were chosen to represent a range of possible values seen in single case meta analyses as well as previous simulation work. However, they are not ex haustive of all possible values for each design factor. Another limitation to consider relates to the model under investigation. The specific model (see Equations 24 28) chosen for investigation in this research study makes several assumptions. First Van den Noortgate and Onghena's (2008) raw data three level meta analytic single case model assumes that all dependent variables were

PAGE 194

! 177 measured the same across primary studies included in the meta analysis. Second, the model chosen for analysis was the m ost basic interrupted time series model (e.g. no trends or changes in trends). The benefit of choosing this model is that it is the most basic model and therefore the most logical for an initial study into the three level meta analytic modeling of single case data. In addition, model and data generation assumed normality of the level 1 errors, multivariate normality of the level 2 errors, multivariate normality of the level 3 errors, and homoscedasticity of the errors at all levels. If the within person variance varied across the participants within studies or across studies, the autocorrelation varied, or a more complex time series model (e.g. 2 nd order of higher) was needed then the model would be misspecified. The results don't allow for generalizatio ns to performance when there is some degree of misspecification or there is use for more complex model specifications. Implications Researchers have suggested that use of multilevel modeling in meta analyzing single case data provides many advantages (Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2003a, 2007, 2008). Specifically, multilevel modeling provides the ability to combine the results from multiple participants and studies to gain information about not only the overall treatment effect but also if and how the treat ment effect varies across participants and studies (Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2008). Another advantage of multilevel modeling is that it can be used to aggregate data from single case studies that include multiple participants. This use of multiple da ta sources or effect sizes from the same study is typically problematic and has not been addressed by other proposed single case meta analytic methods. Multilevel modeling is structured to account for that "nesting" of data within

PAGE 195

! 178 studies by allowing vari ation within participants, between participants of the same study and between studies (Van den Noortgate & Onghena, 2008). The results of this study suggest that the degree to which the findings of this study are supportive of using Van den Noortgate and O nghena's (2008) raw data multilevel modeling approach to meta analyzing single case data depends on the particular effect of interest. This in turn leads to specific implications for those who conduct meta analyses of single case studies, single case rese archers, and methodologists. Implications for Researchers Conducting Single Case Meta Analyses For researchers interested in the overall average baseline level and overall average treatment effect across studies, the results of this research study are enco uraging. If researchers conducting single case meta analyses have data that conform to the assumptions of the model examined they should feel comfortable interpreting the overall average baseline levels and overall average treatment effects across studies Still, researchers should be advised to increase the level 3 sample size or number of primary studies per meta analysis whenever possible. With larger level 3 sample sizes, greater accuracy and precision could be gained in estimating the overall averag e baseline levels and treatment effects across studies. While single case meta analysts are constrained by the availability of primary studies they could adjust their methods for searching (e.g., expanding their search terms) whenever possible, but are li mited by what the field has generated. On the other hand statements about the variation in treatment effects across studies, which are also valued by meta analysts and single case researchers, should be viewed cautiously. Even assuming the model was corr ectly specified, the variance

PAGE 196

! 179 components at all levels were biased and confidence intervals for those estimates were inaccurate. Specifically, the level 3 (between study) variance components tended to overcover and the level 2 (between person within study ) variance components and the within person residual variance both tended to undercover and did not show signs of improvement with larger level 3 sample sizes. Implications for Researchers Conducting Single Case Studies For researchers conducting single c ase studies, the results of this study provide a few recommendations. The results of this study indicated that fixed effects were more precise any time the amount of variability in the model was smaller. Specifically, this study examined shifts in variab ility at level 2 and level 3 but one may anticipate that paying close attention to ways of reducing variability overall would produce greater precision when estimating the overall average baseline levels and treatment effects across studies. For example, s ingle case researchers should pay attention to baseline variability or stability in effort to decrease variability at level 1. Specifically, single case researchers should consider increasing the number of data points in baseline to correctly specify the model in an effort to decrease the amount of variability at level 1. Single case researchers should also pay attention to the extent to which the intervention is delivered as intended often termed treatment fidelity or integrity (Kazdin, 2011). For exam ple, if a treatment or intervention was administered exactly like it was intended to be administered the associated treatment effect would be different than a treatment effect associated with a treatment or intervention administered differently than intend ed. This modification in implementation or lack of treatment integrity could cause

PAGE 197

! 180 increases in between person variability and ultimately decrease precision in the overall average baseline levels and treatment effects across studies. Measurement error can also impact variability and finding ways to decrease that measurement error could ultimately decrease variability overall. For example, single case researchers should be consistent in their methods of measurement in an effort to decrease between person w ithin study and between study variability. Therefore, single case researchers should make every effort to measure outcomes at the same time of day and for the same amount of time across participants and even across studies assessing similar types of inter ventions. A final recommendation to single case researchers is to consider previous single case research that has focused in their particular area of interest when determining the most appropriate outcome measure. Specifically, if single case researcher s from similar areas of interest (e.g., reading, math) measured their outcomes variables the same across studies then single case meta analysts would have a larger number of primary studies to include in this specific meta analytic model and could feel mor e confident in their interpretation of overall average baseline levels and treatment effects across studies. Implications for Methodologists For methodologists studying the use of multilevel modeling to meta analyze single case data more research needs to be conducted on more complex treatment effects, such as delayed changes in level, trends in the data that change linearly or nonlinearly with time, and transitory effects. Furthermore, violations of assumptions (e.g., nonnormality of the level 1, level 2 or level 3 errors, heteroscedasticity of errors at all levels) and various level 1 error models (e.g., high order autoregressive or moving

PAGE 198

! 181 average models) needed to be investigated as well. Investigation of these more complex models would allow for a be tter understanding of the applicability of the models to a variety of conditions. Future research on other approaches to estimating variance components would also be of interest. Clearly, the results of this study have indicated that the variance compone nts at all levels are biased and provide inaccurate confidence intervals. Therefore, it would be interesting to investigate alternative methods for estimating variance such as the Bayesian approach. Finally, this study focused on the use of a three lev el model to meta analyze only single case data. It would be interesting to investigate ways to meta analyze single case and large group design data together. This would allow meta analysts the ability to synthesize research across a variety of research d esigns.

PAGE 199

! 182 REFERENCES Algozzine, B., Browder, D., Karvonen, M., Test, D. W., & Wood, W. M. (2001). Effects of interventions to promote self determination for individuals with disabilities. Review of Educational Research, 71 (2), 219 277. Allison, D. B., & Gorman, B. S. (1993). Calculating effect sizes for meta analysis: The case of the single case. Behavior, Research, and Therapy, 31 621 631. Barlow, D. H., Nock, M. K., & Hersen, M. (2009). Single Case Experimental Designs: Strategies for Studying Behavio r Change (3rd ed.) Boston, MA: Pearson. Beretvas, S. N., & Chung, H. (2008a). A review of meta analyses of single subject experimental designs: Methodological issues and practice. Evidence based Communication Assessment and Intervention, 2 129 141. Beret vas, S. N., & Chung, H. (2008b). An evaluation of modified R2 change effect size indices for single subject experimental designs. Evidence based Communication Assessment and Intervention, 2 (3), 120 128. Borenstein M (2009). Effect sizes for continuous da ta. In H. Cooper, L.V. Hedges, and J.C. Valentine (Eds.), The handbook of research synthesis and meta analysis (2nded., pp.221 236). New York: Russell Sage Foundation. Busk, P. L., & Marascuilo, L. A. (1988). Autocorrelation in single subject research: A counterargument to the myth of no autocorrelation. Behavioral Assessment, 10 229 242.

PAGE 200

! 183 Busk, P. L., & Serlin, R. C. (1992). Meta analysis for single case research. In T. R. Kratochwill & J. R. Levin (Eds.), Single case research design and analysis: New dir ections for psychology and education (pp. 187 212). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Busse, R. T., Kratochwill, T. R., & Elliott, S. N. (1995). Meta analysis for single case consultation outcomes: Applications to research and practice. Journal o f School Psychology, 33 269 285. Center, B. A., Skiba, R. J., & Casey, A. (1985 1986). A methodology for the quantitative synthesis of intrasubject design research. Journal of Special Education, 19 387 400. Cohen, J. (1988). Statistical power analysis fo r the behavioral sciences. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Cooper, H. (2007). Evaluating and Interpreting Research Synthesis in Adult Learning and Literacy. Boston, MA: National College Transition Network, New England Literacy Resource Center/ World Education Inc. Cooper, H., & Hedges, L. V. (2009). Research synthesis as a scientific process. In H. Cooper, L. V. Hedges & J. C. Valentine (Eds.), The Handbook of Research Synthesis and Meta Analysis (2nd ed., pp. 3 16). New York: Russell Sage Foundation Cooper, H., & Patall, E. A. (2009). The relative benefits of meta analysis conducted with individual participant data versus aggregated data. Psychological Methods, 14 165 176.

PAGE 201

! 184 Crosbie, J. (1993). Interrupted time series analysis with brief single subje ct data. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 61 966 974. Crowne, D.P. & Marlowe, D. (1960). A new scale of social desirability independent of psychopathology. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 24 349 354. DeProspero, A., & Cohen, S. (1979). In consistent visual analysis of intrasubject data. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 12 573 579. Faith, M. S., Allison, D. B., & Gorman, B. S. (1996). Meta analysis of single case research. In R. D. Franklin, D. B. Allison & B. S. Gorman (Eds.), Design and analysis of single case research (pp. 245 277). Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Far mer, J. L., Owens, C. M., Ferron, J. M., & Allsopp, D. H. (2010a, April). A methodological review of single case meta analyses Paper presented at the Am erican Educational Research Association. Denver, CO. Farmer, J., Owens, C.M., Ferron, J ., & Allsopp, D. (2010b ). A r eview of social science single case m eta a nalyses Manuscript in preparation. Ferron, J. M., Bell, B. A., Hess, M. R., Rendina Gobioff, G., & Hibbard, S. T. (2009). Making treatment effect inferences from multiple baseline data: The utility of multilevel modeling approaches. Behavior Research Methods, 41 (2), 372 384. Ferron, J. & Onghena, P. (1996). The power of randomization tests for single case phase designs. Journal of Experimental Education, 64 231 239. Ferron, J. M., Farmer, J., & Owens, C. M. (2010). Estimating individual treatment effects from multiple baseline data: A Monte Carlo study. Behavior Research Methods, 42, 930 943.

PAGE 202

! 185 Ferro n, J., Owens, C. M., & Bell, B. A. (2010, April ). Multilevel models for combining s i ngle case data: A Monte Carlo examination of treatment effect estimates and i nferences. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Associati on. Denver, CO. Ferron, J. & Rendina Gobioff, G. (2005). Interrupted time series design. In B. Everitt & D. Howell (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Behavioral Statistics (Vol. 2, pp. 941 945). West Sussex, UK: Wiley & Sons Ltd. Fouladi, R.T. &Shieh, Y. (2004). A co mparison of two general approaches to mixed model longitudinal analyses under small sample size conditions. Communications in Statistics: Simulation and Computation, 33 807 824. Filter, K. J., & Horner, R. H. (2009). Function based academic interventions for problem behavior. Education and Treatment of Children, 32 (1), 1 19. Gingerich, W. J. (1984). Meta analysis of applied time series data. Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 20 71 79. Glass, G. V. (1976). Primary, secondary, and meta analysis of rese arch. Educational Researcher, 5 3 8. Glass, G. V., McGaw, B., & Smith, M. L. (1981). Meta analysis in social research Beverly Hills, CA: Sage. Gomez, E., Schaalje, G. B., &Fellingham, G. W. (2005). Performance of the Kenward Roger method when the covaria nce structure is selected using AIC and BIC. Communication in Statistics: Simulation and Computation, 34 377 392. Hedges, L. V., & Olkin, I. (1985). Statistical methods for meta analysis Orlando, FL: Academic Press.

PAGE 203

! 186 Hedges L.V. & Vevea J.L. (1998). Fi xed and random effects models in meta analysis. Psychological Methods, 4 486 504. Hershberger, S.L., Wallace, D.D., Green, S.B., & Marquis J.G (1999). Meta analysis of single case deigns. In R.H. Hoyle (Ed.), Statistical strategies for small sample res earch (pp. 107 132). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Hox, J. (1998). Multilevel modeling: When and why? In I. Balderjahn, R. Mathar & M. Schader (Eds.), Classification, data analysis, and data highways (pp. 147 154). New York: Springer. Hsieh, W., Hemmeter, M. L. McCollum, J. A., & Ostrokosky, M. M. (2009). Using coaching to increase preschool teachers' use of emergent literacy teaching strategies. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 17 (4), 197 212. Huitema, B. E. (1985). Autocorrelation in applied be havior analysis: A myth. Behavioral Assessment, 7 107 118. Huitema, B. E., & McKean, J. W. (1998). Irrelevant autocorrelation in least squares intervention models. Psychological Methods, 3 104 116. Huitema, B. E., & McKean, J. W. (2000). Design specifica tion issues in time series intervention models. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 60 (1), 38 58. Hunter, J. E., & Schmidt, F. L. (2004). Methods of meta analysis: Correcting error and bias in research findings (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Hu nter, J. E., Schmidt, F. L., & Jackson, G. B. (1982). Meta analysis: Cumulating research findings across studies Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.

PAGE 204

! 187 Jenson, W. R., Clark, E., Kircher, J. C., & Kristjansson, S. D. (2007). Statistical reform: Evidence based practice, meta analyses, and single subject designs. Psychology in the Schools, 44 (5), 483 493. Jones, R. R., Weinrott, M. R., & Vaught, R. S. (1978). Effects of serial dependency on the agreement between visual and statistical inference. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 11 277 283. Kazdin, A. E. (2011). Single Case Research Designs: Methods for Clinical and Applied Settings (2nd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. Kenward, M. G. & Roger, J. H. (1997). Small sample inference for fixed effects from restrict ed maximum likelihood. Biometrics, 53 983 997. Kowalchuk, R. K., Keselman, H. J., Algina, J., &Wolfinger, R. D. (2004). The analysis of repeated measurements with mixed model adjusted F tests. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 64 224 242. Kr atochwill, T., Alden, K., Demuth, D., Dawson, D., Panicucci, C., Arnston, P., et al. (1974). A further consideration in the application of an analysis of variance model for the intrasubject replication design. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 7 629 6 33. Kromrey, J. D., & Foster Johnson, L. (1996). Determining the efficacy of intervention: The use of effect sizes for data analysis in single subject research. Journal of Experimental Education, 65 (1), 73 93. Lipsey M.W. & Wilson D.B (2001). Practical m eta analysis. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

PAGE 205

! 188 Lundervold, D., & Bourland, G. (1988). Quantitative analysis of treatment of aggression, self injury, and property destruction. Behavior Modification, 12 590 617. Ma, H. H. (2006). An alternative method for quantitat ive synthesis of single subject research: Percentage of data points exceeding the median. Behavior Modification, 30 598 617. Maas, C. J. M., & Hox, J. J. (2004). Robustness issues in multilevel regression analysis. Statistica Neerlandica, 58 127 137. Mat t G.E. & Cook T.D. (2009). Threats to the validity of generalized inferences. In H. Cooper, L. Hedges, & J.C. Valentine (Eds.), The handbook of research synthesis and meta analysis (2 nd ed. pp.537 560). New York: Russell Sage Foundation. Matyas, T. A., & Greenwood, K. M. (1990). Visual analysis of single case time series: Effects of variability, serial dependence, and magnitude of intervention effects. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 23 341 351. Matyas, T. A., & Greenwood, K. M. (1997). Serial depe ndency in single case time series. In D. Franklin, D. B. Allison & B. S. Gorman (Eds.), Design and analysis of single case research (pp. 215 243). Mahwah, N.Y.: Lawrence Erlbaum. Mok M. (1995). Sample size requirements for 2 level designs in educational r esearch Unpublished manuscript, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. Morgan, D.L. & Morgan, R.K. (2001). Single participant research design: Bringing science to managed care. American Psychologist, 56, 119 127. Nugent, W. (1996). Integrating single case and group comparison designs for evaluation research. Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 32 209 226.

PAGE 206

! 189 Onghena, P., & Edgington, E. S. (2005). Customization of pain treatments: Single case design and analysis. The Clinical Journal of Pain, 21 56 6 8. Parker, R. I., Hagan Burke, S., & Vannest, K. (2007). Percentage of all non overlapping data (PAND): An alternative to PND. Journal of Special Education, 40 194 204. Parsonson, B. S.,& Baer, D. M. (1986). The graphic analysis of data. In A. Poling & W. R. Fuqua (Eds.), Research methods in applied behavior analysis: Issues and advances (pp. 157 186). New York: Plenum Press. Parsonson, B. S., & Baer, D. M. (1992). The visual analysis of data, and current research into the stimuli controlling it. In T. R. Kratochwill & J. R. Levin (Eds.), Single case research design and analysis: New directions for psychology and education Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Raudenbush S.W. & Bryk A.S (2002). Hierarchical linear models: Applications and data anal ysis methods (2 nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Riley Tillman, T.C. & Burns, M.K. (2009). Evaluating educational interventions: Single case design for measuring response to intervention. New York, NY: The Guilford Press. Rosenthal, R., & Rubin, D. B. (19 86). Meta analytic procedures for combining studies with multiple effect sizes. Psychological Bulletin, 99 400 406. Rusch, F. R. & Kazdin, A.E. (1981). Toward a methodology of withdrawal designs for the assessment of response maintenance. Journal of Appli ed Behavioral Analysis, 14, 131 140. Schaalje, G. B., McBride, J. B., &Fellingham, G. W. (2001). Approximations of distributions of test statistics in complex mixed linear models using SAS Proc

PAGE 207

! 190 MIXED. In Proceedings of the SAS Users Group International 26 t h Annual Conference (Paper 262 26).Available at support.sas.com/events/sasglobalforum/previous/index.html. Schmidt, F. (1996). Statistical significance testing and cumulative knowledge in psychology: Implications for training of researchers. Psychologica l Methods, 1 115 129. Scruggs, T. E., Mastropieri, M. A., & Castro, G. (1987). The quantitative synthesis of single subject research: Methodology and validation. Remedial and Special Education, 8 24 33. Shadish, W. R. & Haddock, C. K. (2009). Combining e stimates of effect sizes. In H. Cooper, L. Hedges, & J.C. Valentine (Eds.), The handbook of research synthesis and meta analysis (2nd ed., pp.557 578). New York: Russell Sage Foundation. Shadish, W. R., & Rindskopf, D. M. (2007). Methods for evidence base d practice: Quantitative synthesis of single subject designs. New Directions for Evaluation, 113 95 109. Shadish, W.R., Rindskopf, D. M., & Hedges, L.V. (2008). The state of science in the meta analysis of single case experimental designs. Evidence Based Communication Assessment and Intervention, 3 188 196. Shine, L.C., & Bower, S.M. (1971). A one way analysis of variance for single subject designs. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 31, 105 113. Simmonds, M.C., Higgins, J.P.T., Stewart, L.A., Tie rney, J.F., Clarke, M.J., & Thompson, S.G. (2005). Meta analysis of individual participant data from

PAGE 208

! 191 randomized trials: A review of methods used in practice. Clinical Trials, 2 209 217. Skinner, C. H. (2004). Single subject designs: Procedures that allow school psychologists to contribute to the intervention evaluation and validation process. Journal of Applied School Psychology, 20 1 10. Suen, H. S., & Ary, D. (1987). Application of statistical power in assessing autocorrelation. Behavioral Assessment, 9 125 130. Toothaker, L. E., Banz, M., Noble, C., Camp, J., & Davis, D. (1983). N=1 designs: The failure of ANOVA based tests. Journal of Educational Statistics, 8 289 309. Van den Noortgate, W. & Onghena, P. (2003a). Combining single case experimental da ta using hierarchical linear models. School Psychology Quarterly, 18 (3), 325 346. Van den Noortgate, W. & Onghena, P. (2003b). Hierarchical linear models for the quantitative integration of effects sizes in single case research. Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers, 35 (1), 1 10. Van den Noortgate, W. & Onghena, P. (2007). The aggregation of single case results using hierarchical linear models. The Behavior Analyst Today, 8 (2), 196 209. Van den Noortgate, W. & Onghena, P. (2008). A multilevel meta analysis of single subject experimental design studies. Evidence Based Communication Assessment and Intervention, 3 142 151. Wampold, B. E., & Furlong, M. J. (1981). The heuristics of visual inference. Behavioral Assessment, 3 71 92.

PAGE 209

! 192 APPENDICES

PAGE 210

! 193 Appendix A : SAS Programming Code procprintto log =junk; procprintto print = junk2; data j0; input Estimate Lower Upper; datalines ; . . . ; data j00; input Estimate Lower Upper; datalines ; . . . . . . . . . ; %global _prin t_; %let _print_ = off; *++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ input for the macro are: n = 5000 (number of samples to generate) n3= 10,30,80 avgseries = 0, 1, or 2 (0 = small, 1 = medium, 2 = large) avgpart= 0 or 1 (0 = sma ll and 1 = large) varerror= 0 or 1 (0= most of the error at level 1 and 1= most of the error at level 2) gamma = 1 (fixed effects intercept [gamma000], effect [gamma100]) phi = 0, .2,or .4 (produces positive autocorrelation) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ; %macro hlmsim (n, n3, avgseries, avgpart, varerror, gamma, phi); %do i= 1 %to &n; prociml; *++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ This part of the program creates the initial data set,which con tains the following variables: n1: 10, 20, or 30 (number of time points or level 1 units) n2: 4, 6, or 8 (nuumber of participant or level 2 units) tau0 = .2 or .05 (level 2 variance in the intercept and treatment effect) tau1 = 2 or .5 (level 3 variance i n the intercept and treatment effect) IDlevel3: level 3 ID IDlevel2: level 2 ID time: potential level 1 predictor

PAGE 211

! 194 phase: dichotomous level 1 p redictor (0=baseline, 1=treatme nt) y: outcome +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++; create j1 var{IDlevel3 IDlevel2 time phase y tau0 tau1}; do ID3= 1 to &n3; n1= 0 ; n2= 0 ; if&n3= 10 then do; if&avgpart = 0 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 ) then n2 = 4 ; if&avgpart = 0 & (ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 ) then n2 = 6 ; if &avgpart = 0 & (ID3 = 10 ) then n2 = 8 ; if&avgpart = 1 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 ) then n2 = 8 ; if&avgpart = 1 & (ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 ) then n2 = 6 ; if&avgpart = 1 & (ID3 = 10 ) then n2 = 4 ; if&avgseries = 0 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 ) then n1 = 10 ; if&avgseries = 0 & (ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 ) then n1 = 20 ; if&avgseries = 0 & (ID3 = 10 ) then n1 = 30 ; if&avgseries = 1 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 ) then n1 = 20 ; if&avgseries = 1 & (ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 ) then n1 = 10 ; if&avgseries = 1 & (ID3 = 10 ) then n1 = 30 ; if&avgseries = 2 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 ) then n1 = 30 ; if&avgseries = 2 & (ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 ) then n1 = 10 ; if&avgseries = 2 & (ID3 = 10 ) then n1 = 20 ; end; if&n3= 30 then do; if&avgpart = 0 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 | ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 | ID3 = 10 | ID3 = 11 | ID3 = 12 | ID3 = 13 | ID3 = 14 | ID3 = 15 | ID3 = 16 | ID3 = 17 | ID3 = 18 | ID3 = 19 | ID3 = 20 | ID3 = 21 ) then n2 = 4 ; if&avgpart = 0 & (ID3 = 22 | ID3 = 23 | ID3 = 24 | ID3 = 25 | ID3 = 26 | ID3 = 27 )then n2 = 6 ; if&avgpart = 0 & (ID3 = 28 | ID3 = 29 | ID3 = 30 ) then n2 = 8 ; if&avgpart = 1 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 | ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 | ID3 = 10 | ID3 = 11 | ID3 = 12 | ID3 = 13 | ID3 = 14 | ID3 = 15 | ID3 = 16 | ID3 = 17 | ID3 = 18 | ID3 = 19 | ID3 = 20 | ID3 = 21 ) then n2 = 8 ; if&avgpart = 1 & (ID3 = 22 | ID3 = 23 | ID3 = 24 | ID3 = 25 | ID3 = 26 | ID3 = 27 )then n2 = 6 ; if&avgpart = 1 & (ID3 = 28 | ID3 = 29 | ID3 = 30 ) then n2 = 4 ; if&avgseries = 0 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 | ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 | ID3 = 10 | ID3 = 11 | ID3 = 12 | ID3 = 13 | ID3 = 14 | ID3 = 15 | ID3 = 16 | ID3 = 17 | ID3 = 18 | ID3 = 19 | ID3 = 20 | ID3 = 21 ) then n1 = 10 ; if&avgseries = 0 & (ID3 = 22 | ID3 = 23 | ID3 = 24 | ID3 = 25 | ID3 = 26 | ID3 = 27 )then n1 = 20 ; if&avgseries = 0 & (ID3 = 28 | ID3 = 29 | ID3 = 30 ) then n1 = 30 ; if&avgseries = 1 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 | ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 | ID3 = 10 | ID3 = 11 | ID3 = 12

PAGE 212

! 195 | ID3 = 13 | ID3 = 14 | ID3 = 15 | ID3 = 16 | ID3 = 17 | ID3 = 18 | ID3 = 19 | ID3 = 20 | I D3 = 21 ) then n1 = 20 ; if&avgseries = 1 & (ID3 = 22 | ID3 = 23 | ID3 = 24 | ID3 = 25 | ID3 = 26 | ID3 = 27 )then n1 = 10 ; if&avgseries = 1 & (ID3 = 28 | ID3 = 29 | ID3 = 30 ) then n1 = 30 ; if&avgseries = 2 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID 3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 | ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 | ID3 = 10 | ID3 = 11 | ID3 = 12 | ID3 = 13 | ID3 = 14 | ID3 = 15 | ID3 = 16 | ID3 = 17 | ID3 = 18 | ID3 = 19 | ID3 = 20 | ID3 = 21 ) then n1 = 30 ; if&avgseries = 2 & (ID3 = 22 | ID3 = 23 | ID3 = 24 | ID3 = 25 | ID3 = 26 | ID3 = 27 )then n1 = 10 ; if&avgseries = 2 & (ID3 = 28 | ID3 = 29 | ID3 = 30 ) then n1 = 20 ; end; if&n3= 80 then do; if&avgpart = 0 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 | ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 | ID3 = 10 | ID3 = 11 | ID3 = 12 | ID3 = 13 | ID3 = 14 | ID3 = 15 | ID3 = 16 | ID3 = 17 | ID3 = 18 | ID3 = 19 | ID3 = 20 | ID3 = 21 | ID3 = 22 | ID3 = 23 | ID3 = 24 | ID3 = 25 | ID3 = 26 | ID3 = 27 | ID3 = 28 | ID3 = 29 | ID3 = 30 | ID3 = 31 | ID3 = 32 | ID3 = 33 | ID3 = 34 | ID3 = 35 | ID3 = 36 | ID3 = 37 | ID3 = 38 | ID3 = 39 | ID3 = 40 | ID3 = 41 | ID3 = 42 | ID3 = 43 | ID3 = 44 | ID3 = 45 | ID3 = 46 | ID3 = 47 | ID3 = 48 | ID3 = 49 | ID3 = 50 | ID3 = 51 | ID3 = 52 | ID3 = 53 | ID3 = 54 | ID3 = 55 | ID3 = 56 ) then n2 = 4 ; if&avgpart = 0 & (ID 3 = 57 | ID3 = 58 | ID3 = 59 | ID3 = 60 | ID3 = 61 | ID3 = 62 | ID3 = 63 | ID3 = 64 | ID3 = 65 | ID3 = 66 | ID3 = 67 | ID3 = 68 | ID3 = 70 | ID3 = 71 | ID3 = 72 ) then n2 = 6 ; if&avgpart = 0 & (ID3 = 73 | ID3 = 74 | ID3 = 75 | ID3 = 76 | ID3 = 77 | ID3 = 78 | ID3 = 79 | ID3 = 80 ) then n2 = 8 ; if&avgpart = 1 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 | ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 | ID3 = 10 | ID3 = 11 | ID3 = 12 | ID3 = 13 | ID3 = 14 | ID3 = 15 | ID3 = 16 | ID3 = 17 | ID3 = 18 | ID3 = 19 | ID3 = 20 | ID3 = 21 | ID3 = 22 | ID3 = 23 | ID3 = 24 | ID3 = 25 | ID3 = 26 | ID3 = 27 | ID3 = 28 | ID3 = 29 | ID3 = 30 | ID3 = 31 | ID3 = 32 | ID3 = 33 | ID3 = 34 | ID3 = 35 | ID3 = 36 | ID3 = 37 | ID3 = 38 | ID3 = 39 | ID3 = 40 | ID3 = 41 | ID3 = 42 | ID3 = 43 | ID3 = 44 | ID3 = 45 | ID3 = 46 | ID3 = 47 | ID3 = 48 | ID3 = 49 | ID3 = 50 | ID3 = 51 | ID3 = 52 | ID3 = 53 | ID3 = 54 | ID3 = 55 | ID3 = 56 ) then n2 = 8 ; if&avgpart = 1 & (ID3 = 57 | ID3 = 58 | ID3 = 59 | ID3 = 60 | ID3 = 61 | ID3 = 62 | ID3 = 63 | ID 3 = 64 | ID3 = 65 | ID3 = 66 | ID3 = 67 | ID3 = 68 | ID3 = 70 | ID3 = 71 | ID3 = 72 ) then n2 = 6 ; if&avgpart = 1 & (ID3 = 73 | ID3 = 74 | ID3 = 75 | ID3 = 76 | ID3 = 77 | ID3 = 78 | ID3 = 79 | ID3 = 80 ) then n2 = 4 ; if&avgseries = 0 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | I D3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 | ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 | ID3 = 10 | ID3 = 11 | ID3 = 12 | ID3 = 13 | ID3 = 14 | ID3 = 15 | ID3 = 16 | ID3 = 17 | ID3 = 18 | ID3 = 19 | ID3 = 20 | ID3 = 21 | ID3 = 22 | ID3 = 23 | ID3 = 24 | ID3 = 25 | ID3 = 26 | ID3 = 27 | ID3 = 28 | ID3 = 29 | ID3 = 30 | ID3 = 31 | ID3 = 32 | ID3 = 33 | ID3 = 34 | ID3 = 35 | ID3 = 36 | ID3 = 37 | ID3 = 38 | ID3 = 39 | ID3 = 40 | ID3 = 41 | ID3 = 42 | ID3 = 43 |

PAGE 213

! 196 ID3 = 44 | ID3 = 45 | ID3 = 46 | ID3 = 47 | ID3 = 48 | ID3 = 49 | ID3 = 50 | ID3 = 51 | ID3 = 52 | ID3 = 53 | ID3 = 54 | ID3 = 55 | ID3 = 56 ) then n1 = 10 ; if&avgseries = 0 & (ID3 = 57 | ID3 = 58 | ID3 = 59 | ID3 = 60 | ID3 = 61 | ID3 = 62 | ID3 = 63 | ID3 = 64 | ID3 = 65 | ID3 = 66 | ID3 = 67 | ID3 = 68 | ID3 = 70 | ID3 = 7 1 | ID3 = 72 ) then n1 = 20 ; if&avgseries = 0 & (ID3 = 73 | ID3 = 74 | ID3 = 75 | ID3 = 76 | ID3 = 77 | ID3 = 78 | ID3 = 79 | ID3 = 80 ) then n1 = 30 ; if&avgseries = 1 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 | ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 | ID3 = 10 | ID3 = 11 | ID3 = 12 | ID3 = 13 | ID3 = 14 | ID3 = 15 | ID3 = 16 | ID3 = 17 | ID3 = 18 | ID3 = 19 | ID3 = 20 | ID3 = 21 | ID3 = 22 | ID3 = 23 | ID3 = 24 | ID3 = 25 | ID3 = 26 | ID3 = 27 | ID3 = 28 | ID3 = 29 | ID3 = 30 | ID3 = 31 | ID3 = 32 | ID 3 = 33 | ID3 = 34 | ID3 = 35 | ID3 = 36 | ID3 = 37 | ID3 = 38 | ID3 = 39 | ID3 = 40 | ID3 = 41 | ID3 = 42 | ID3 = 43 | ID3 = 44 | ID3 = 45 | ID3 = 46 | ID3 = 47 | ID3 = 48 | ID3 = 49 | ID3 = 50 | ID3 = 51 | ID3 = 52 | ID3 = 53 | ID3 = 54 | ID3 = 55 | ID3 = 56 ) then n1 = 20 ; if&avgseries = 1 & (ID3 = 57 | ID3 = 58 | ID3 = 59 | ID3 = 60 | ID3 = 61 | ID3 = 62 | ID3 = 63 | ID3 = 64 | ID3 = 65 | ID3 = 66 | ID3 = 67 | ID3 = 68 | ID3 = 70 | ID3 = 71 | ID3 = 72 ) then n1 = 10 ; if&avgseries = 1 & (ID3 = 73 | ID3 = 74 | ID3 = 75 | ID3 = 76 | ID3 = 77 | ID3 = 78 | ID3 = 79 | ID3 = 80 ) then n1 = 30 ; if&avgseries = 2 & (ID3 = 1 | ID3 = 2 | ID3 = 3 | ID3 = 4 | ID3 = 5 | ID3 = 6 | ID3 = 7 | ID3 = 8 | ID3 = 9 | ID3 = 10 | ID3 = 11 | ID3 = 12 | ID3 = 13 | ID3 = 14 | ID3 = 15 | I D3 = 16 | ID3 = 17 | ID3 = 18 | ID3 = 19 | ID3 = 20 | ID3 = 21 | ID3 = 22 | ID3 = 23 | ID3 = 24 | ID3 = 25 | ID3 = 26 | ID3 = 27 | ID3 = 28 | ID3 = 29 | ID3 = 30 | ID3 = 31 | ID3 = 32 | ID3 = 33 | ID3 = 34 | ID3 = 35 | ID3 = 36 | ID3 = 37 | ID3 = 38 | ID3 = 39 | ID3 = 40 | ID3 = 41 | ID3 = 42 | ID3 = 43 | ID3 = 44 | ID3 = 45 | ID3 = 46 | ID3 = 47 | ID3 = 48 | ID3 = 49 | ID3 = 50 | ID3 = 51 | ID3 = 52 | ID3 = 53 | ID3 = 54 | ID3 = 55 | ID3 = 56 ) then n1 = 30 ; if&avgseries = 2 & (ID3 = 57 | ID3 = 58 | ID3 = 59 | ID3 = 60 | ID3 = 61 | ID3 = 62 | ID3 = 63 | ID3 = 64 | ID3 = 65 | ID3 = 66 | ID3 = 67 | ID3 = 68 | ID3 = 70 | ID3 = 71 | ID3 = 72 ) then n1 = 10 ; if&avgseries = 2 & (ID3 = 73 | ID3 = 74 | ID3 = 75 | ID3 = 76 | ID3 = 77 | ID3 = 78 | ID3 = 79 | ID3 = 80 ) th en n1 = 20 ; end; do ID2= 1 to n2; cut= 0 ; if n2= 4 then do; if n1= 10 then cut = 2 + ID2; if n1= 20 then cut = 5 + ID2* 2 ; if n1= 30 then cut = 7 + ID2* 3 ; end; if n2= 6 then do; if n1= 10 then cut = 1 + ID2; if n1= 20 then cut = 3 + ID2* 2 ; if n1= 30 then cut = 5 + I D2* 3 ; end; if n2= 8 then do; if n1= 10 then cut = 0 + ID2; if n1= 20 then cut = 1 + ID2* 2 ;

PAGE 214

! 197 if n1= 30 then cut = 3 + ID2* 3 ; end; if&varerror= 0 then tau0 = .2 ; if&varerror= 0 then tau1 = .05 ; if&varerror= 1 then tau0 = 2 ; if&varerror= 1 then tau1 = .5 ; IDl evel3=j(n1, 1 ,ID3); IDlevel2=j(n1, 1 ,ID2); time=j(n1, 1 0 ); phase=j(n1, 1 0 ); do ii= 1 to n1; time[ii, 1 ]=(ii) 1 ; if ii > cut then phase[ii, 1 ]= 1 ; end; rr=armasim({ 1 ,&phi}, 0 0 1 ,n1, 0 ); b= 1 ; c= 0 ; d= 0 ; *b=.90475830311225; *c=.14721081863342; *d=.02386092280190; a = 1 *c; r=a+b#rr+c#rr## 2 +d#rr## 3 ; u0=repeat(rannor( 0 )*sqrt(tau0),n1); *error at level 2 intercept; u1=repeat(rannor( 0 )*sqrt(tau0),n1); *error at level 2 treatment effect; u2=repeat(rannor( 0 )*sqrt(tau1),n1); *error at level 3 intercept; u3=repeat(rannor( 0 )*s qrt(tau1),n1); *error at level 3 treatment effect; gamma000=γ gamma100=γ intercep=gamma000+u0+u2; effect=gamma100+u1+u3; y=intercep+(effect#phase)+r; append; end; end; close j1; *+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++ The following set of commands used PROC MIXED to estimate the multilevel model. This is done to create confidence inter vals for the fixed effects and variance components. For each run, the point e stimate, upper limit, and lower limit for the fixed effect s and the variance components, are written into an output data sets. ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++; *set t ing the data sets that will contain the tabl es for the fixed effects and variance components*; data j2; set j0; data j3; set j00;

PAGE 215

! 198 *model commands and data set creation; proc mixed data =j1 covtestcl; class idlevel2 idlevel3; model y = phase / s cl alpha = .05 ddfm = kenwardroger; randomint phase / sub = idlevel3; randomint phase / sub = idlevel2 (idlevel3); repeated / type = AR( 1 ) sub = idlevel2 (idlevel3) ; ods output solutionF=j2 (keep = estimate lower upper); ods output covparms=j3 (keep = estimate lower upper); data j4; set j2; w = estimate; output; w = lower; output; w = upper; output; drop estimate lower upper; proc transpose data = j4 out = j6 (rename = (col1=est_int col2=low_int col3=up_int col4=est_pha col5=low_pha col6=up_pha)); data j5; set j3; w = estimate; output; w = lower; output; w = upper; output; drop es timate lower upper; proc transpose data = j5 out = j7 (rename = (col1=est_vc_int_lvl3 col2=low_vc_int_lvl3 col3=up_vc_int_lvl3 col4=est_vc_pha_lvl3 col5=low_vc_pha_lvl3 col6=up_vc_pha_lvl3 col7=est_vc_int_lvl2 col8=low_vc_int_lvl2 col9=up_vc_int_lvl2 col 10=est_vc_pha_lvl2 col11=low_vc_pha_lvl2 col12=up_vc_pha_lvl2 col13=est_vc_ar col14=low_vc_ar col15=up_vc_ar col16=est_vc_r col17=low_vc_r col18=up_vc_r)); *++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ The following statements me rge the output da ta sets resulting with one row of data containing the point estimates, lower limit, upper limit, for each fixed effect and variance component. The data set is then appended with a new row for each simulated data set. +++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ; data j8; merge j6 j7; data j9; set j8;

PAGE 216

! 199 counter = &i; %if &i = 1 %then%do ; data j10; set j9; %end ; %else%do ; data j10; merge j10 j9; by counter; %end ; *DM 'LOG;*CLEAR'; *DM 'LISTING;*CLE AR'; %end ; *+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ The following set of commands creates a series of indicator variables based on whether the fixed effect param eter and the variance component parameter falls between the low er and upper limit. It then computes the width of the confidence interval. +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ; data j11; set j10; if&varerror= 0 then tau0 = .2 ; if&varerror= 0 then tau1 = .05 ; if&varerror= 1 then t au0 = 2 ; if&varerror= 1 then tau1 = .5 ; cov_int= 0 ; if (low_int<= &gamma) & (&gamma <= up_int) then cov_int= 1 ; iflow_int= thencov_int= ; cov_pha= 0 ; if (low_pha<= &gamma) & (&gamma <= up_pha) then cov_pha= 1 ; iflow_pha= thencov_pha= ; cov_vc_int_lvl2= 0 ; i f (low_vc_int_lvl2 <= tau0) & (tau0 <= up_vc_int_lvl2) then cov_vc_int_lvl2= 1 ; if low_vc_int_lvl2= then cov_vc_int_lvl2= ; cov_vc_pha_lvl2= 0 ; if (low_vc_pha_lvl2 <= tau0) & (tau0 <= up_vc_pha_lvl2) then cov_vc_pha_lvl2= 1 ; if low_vc_pha_lvl2= then cov_vc_p ha_lvl2= ; cov_vc_int_lvl3= 0 ; if (low_vc_int_lvl3 <= tau1) & (tau1 <= up_vc_int_lvl3) then cov_vc_int_lvl3= 1 ; if low_vc_int_lvl3= then cov_vc_int_lvl3= ;

PAGE 217

! 200 cov_vc_pha_lvl3= 0 ; if (low_vc_pha_lvl3 <= tau1) & (tau1 <= up_vc_pha_lvl3) then cov_vc_pha_lvl3= 1 ; i f low_vc_pha_lvl3= then cov_vc_pha_lvl3= ; cov_vc_ar= 0 ; if (low_vc_ar<= 1 *&phi) & ( 1 *&phi <= up_vc_ar) then cov_vc_ar= 1 ; iflow_vc_ar= thencov_vc_ar= ; cov_vc_r= 0 ; if (low_vc_r<= 1 ) & ( 1 <= up_vc_r) then cov_vc_r= 1 ; wid_int=up_int low_int; wid_pha=up_p ha low_pha; wid_vc_int_lvl2=up_vc_int_lvl2 low_vc_int_lvl2; wid_vc_pha_lvl2=up_vc_pha_lvl2 low_vc_pha_lvl2; wid_vc_int_lvl3=up_vc_int_lvl3 low_vc_int_lvl3; wid_vc_pha_lvl3=up_vc_pha_lvl3 low_vc_pha_lvl3; wid_vc_ar=up_vc_ar low_vc_ar; wid_vc_r=up_vc_r low_vc_r; *++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++ Means are then calculated, giving estimates of bias in the fixed and variance component effect estimates, the coverage pr obabilities for each effect, and the average CI w idth. +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++ ; proc means noprint data = j11; varest_int cov_int wid_int est_pha cov_pha wid_pha est_vc_int_lvl2 cov_vc_int_lvl2 wid_vc_int_lvl2 est_vc_pha_lvl2 cov_vc_pha_lvl2 wid_vc_ph a_lvl2 est_vc_int_lvl3 cov_vc_int_lvl3 wid_vc_int_lvl3 est_vc_pha_lvl3

PAGE 218

! 201 cov_vc_pha_lvl3 wid_vc_pha_lvl3 est_vc_ar cov_vc_ar wid_vc_ar est_vc_r cov_vc_r wid_vc_r; output out=j12 mean = est_int cov_int wid_int est_pha cov_pha wid_pha est_vc_int _lvl2 cov_vc_int_lvl2 wid_vc_int_lvl2 est_vc_pha_lvl2 cov_vc_pha_lvl2 wid_vc_pha_lvl2 est_vc_int_lvl3 cov_vc_int_lvl3 wid_vc_int_lvl3 est_vc_pha_lvl3 cov_vc_pha_lvl3 wid_vc_pha_lvl3 est_vc_ar cov_vc_ar wid_vc_ar est_vc_r cov_vc_r wid_vc_r n = n_sims; ods listing; %global _print_; %let _print_ = on; data j13; set j12; reps=&n; Average_Series=&avgseries; Average_Part=&avgpart; Error_Variance=&varerror;

PAGE 219

! 202 fixed=γ phi=φ conv=n_sims/reps; data j14; set j13; file print; file 'Y: \ D ocuments \ Dissertation \ Results \ DISS.txt' mod lrecl= 400 ; put @ 1 (Average_Series)( 1.0 ) @ 3 (Average_Part)( 1.0 ) @ 5 (Error_Variance)( 1.0 ) @ 7 (fixed)( 2.0 ) @ 10 (phi)( 4.1 ) @ 15 (conv)( 6.4 ) @ 22 (est_intcov_intwid_int est_phacov_phawid_pha est_vc_int_lvl2 cov_vc_int_lvl2 wid_vc_int_lvl2 est_vc_pha_lvl2 cov_vc_pha_lvl2 wid_vc_pha_lvl2 est_vc_int_lvl3 cov_vc_int_lvl3 wid_vc_int_lvl3 est_vc_pha_lvl3 cov_vc_pha_lvl3 wid_vc_pha_lvl3 est_vc_arcov_vc_arwid_vc_ar est_vc_rcov_vc_rwid_vc_r reps) ( 10.4 ); run; %mend ; *++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ input for the macro are: n = 5000 (number of samples to generate) n3= 10,30,or 80 avgseries = 0, 1, or 2 (0 = small, 1 = medium, 2 = large) avgpart= 0 or 1 (0 = small and 1 = large) varerror= 0 or 1 (0= most of the error at level 1 and 1= most of the error at level 2) gamma = 1 (fixed effects intercept [gamma000], effect [gamma100]) phi = 0, .2,or .4 (produces positive autocorrelation) +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ; % hlmsim ( 5000 10 0 0 0 1 .2 ); run ;