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Material Information

Title:
Metro-Dade Transit Agency Metrobus availability and the Transit Operating System : final report
Portion of title:
Metrobus availability and the Transit Operating System
Physical Description:
1 online resource (various pagings). : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
Metropolitan Dade County Transit Agency
University of South Florida -- Center for Urban Transportation Research
Publisher:
University of South Florida, Center for Urban Transportation Research
Place of Publication:
Tampa
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Transport Operating System (Computer file)   ( lcsh )
Local transit -- Management -- Florida -- Miami-Dade County   ( lcsh )
Bus lines -- Management -- Florida -- Miami-Dade County   ( lcsh )
Bus lines -- Data processing -- Florida -- Miami-Dade County   ( lcsh )
Production scheduling   ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
prepared for Metro-Dade Transit Agency ; prepared by Center for Urban Transportation Research.
General Note:
"April 1996."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029078435
oclc - 748860361
usfldc doi - C01-00031
usfldc handle - c1.31
System ID:
SFS0032154:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


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PAGE 1

METRO-DADE TRANSIT AGENCY Metrobus Availability and the Transit Operating System FINAL REPORT Prepared for Metro Dade Transit Agency M E T R 0 D A D E I R \ \ S I T Prepared by Center for Urban Transportation Research College of Engineering, University of South Florida Tampa, Florida CUTR Aprll1996

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Executive Summary I n any transit agency, the relationship between the operations and maintenance divis ions is subject to stresses caused by differing objectives. While not exclusive, one of the operation division's primary functions is placing buses into service, while one of the maintenance division's primary ro les is to ensure that buses are fit for service. Inev itab ly conflicts will arise when specific objectives of these two divisions clash. Improving communications between the two divisions can potentially minimize these conflicts and increase the level of bus availability to meet vehicle requirements. Improving coordination between bus operations and bus maintenance will help ensure that the req uire d number of vehicles are in service at any one time which. in tum, will increase overall rider confidence in the dependability of Metrobus service. As part of the interlocal agreement between the University of South Florida (USF) and Metropo lit an Dade County, the Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR) conducted a study to examine and evaluate the interface between bus operations and bus maintenance at Metro-Dade Transit Agency (MOTA), with specific focus given to increasing the level of bus availability. Currently, MOTA uses a Transit Operating System (TO$) computer software program to tracl: bus availability and assignments. TOS is one of the major communications tools between MDT A's bus operations and bus maintenance divisions, but its effectiveness in terms of assisting these divisions to ensure sufficient availability of vehicles has been questioned by staff from both divis ions In order to assist MOTA achieve it goal of 100 percent daily bus pullout requirements, three tasks were specified, including: iii

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an assessmen t of the number of t ate and missed bus pullouts by bus facility during a continuous s i x-month period in 1995 to identify the extent of the bus avai l ability problem at each facility; an examination of the current TOS and manual processes used by s taff for the placemtont of buses into service; and an investigation of the effectiveness of TOS from the perspectives of MDT A's bus operatoons, bus maintenance, and MIS d i v i sions via personal interviews and CUTR staff observations during the morning and afternoon peaks Based on the findings in each of these research tasks, imp r ovements were recommended to increase the leve l of bus availabil ity us ing TOS and other procedures The recommendations were as follows : The operations and maintenance divisions should establish a lia i son to worl< with the existing TOS coord i nator to assist staff from both d i vis i ons regarding TOS training refr esher courses etc.; Update the ex i sting TOS manual ; Conduct refresher training courses with all bus operations and maintenance staff that worl< c l ose l y with TOS; Remove redundant paperwork/effort from the operat i on of TOS (bus ass i g n ment) such as faxing and telephoning ; Revisit the specific assignment of buses to designated parking spaces at each of MOTA s bus facil i ties; Purchase new computer hardware that Will a ll ow TOS to operate as a stand-a l o n e system or i mprove the processing power of the central VAX system i n order to i ncrease TOS' p rocessing speed to give bus operat i ons and ma i ntenance the ability to update the system in r eal time and make the system more user-friendly to dispatchers ; Enhance the exist i ng batch reade r i n VMS to improve and speed up the opera t or check in process in conj uncti on with using an external operato r ident i fication swi pe-ca r d devi ce and printer t o provide the operators with informat i on about the loca t ion of thei r bus on the lot, run n umber etc.; Continue the recent l y-implemented bus maintenance rad i o supervisor located at the Colnty s Gover n ment Center to coo r dinate road ca ll s ; F o nnally define in w ri ting what const i tu t es an alive and a "dead bus ; iv

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Impleme nt a monitor display system that Is interfaced with TOS located in both the bus operations and maintenance divis i ons at each facility to keep staff apprised of the status (i.e., alive" or dead") of buses in real t ime; Investigate the possibility of having bus maintenance be responsible for assigning buses to operators rather than the current method of having bus operations assign buses to operators; and The assignment of buses to specific runs and/or i nd i vidual pieces of work shou ld be by bus type (i.e. articulated and/or handicap accessible) and not by specific bus number Lastly the study makes it clear that improving certain elements of TOS such as the speed with which it processes information will improve bus availability only to a certain degree, but w i ll certainty not solve the problem entirely. Moreover, the report points out that implementat ion of the automated bus operator check-in system should provide MOTA with the opportunity to redeploy one dispatcher supervisory position per shi ft per facility to other high priority assignments. Cocpled with improving TOS, the report recommends that MOTA needs to address labor shortages in maintenance while creating new and refining existing procedures related to the p lacement of buses i nto service every day v

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Contents Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii Tables ............... ................ .... .......... .............. ........... t x Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x i Preface ......... ......... . ..... .. ...... ... .... ... ............... ........ .... 1 Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 I. INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE OF STUDY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 II. TASK 1: REVIEW OF RECENT DATA ON BUS AVAILABILITY . .. . .. . . .. .. . 6 Summary of Bus Availability Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Ill. TASK 2: EXAMINATION OF CURRENT PROCESSES RELATED TO THE PLACEMENT OF BUSES I NTO SERVICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 B u s Maintenance Radio Supervisor at Communications Central Command . . . . . 20 N. TASK 3: EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTNENESS OF TOS......... .............. 21 I nterviews wijh Key MOTA Person n el . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Summary of Interviews wtth MOTA Staff . .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. . .. . .. .. . 27 Transit Property Site V i sits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 V. TASK 4: RECOMMENDED IMPROVEMENTS TO INCREASE BUS AVAILABILITY APPENDICES: APPENDIX A: Dai ly MOTA Bus Avai l abilily . ............. .. .. ................... APPENDIX B: Sample Bus Availabilily Sheet ... ... .... ........ .................... APPENDIXC: AM and PM Late and M i ssed T ripper s and Runs by Fac i lity by Day of Week .. ....... ......... .... ... .... .... ... ....... vii 34 A-1 B1 C-1

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Table 1 Table2 T able 3 Ta ble 4 Tab le 5 Table6 Table 7 Table 8 Table 9 Tab les AM Bus Avai l abi l ity by Day of Week ...... . .......... ..................... PM Bus Availability by Day of Week ...................................... . Cumulalive Tota l Bus Availability by Day of Week .... ....... .... ...... Days of AM Serv i ce with La te and M i ssed Trippers a n d Runs by Facil ity .. ...... . Days of PM Serv i ce w ith Late and M i ssed T rippers and Runs by F acility ... .... .. AM MOTA Bus Avai l ability by Fac i li ty .. .. ... . . ........ ................ PM MOTA Bus Availab il ity by Fac i lity . ........ ....................... ... Monday AM Service with Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Faci lity ........... Monday PM Service with Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Facility ..... ... . 9 1 1 12 13 14 A-3 A-17 C-3 C-4 Table 1 0 Tuesday AM Service with Late and Missed Trippers and R uns by Facility . . . . . C-5 Tabl e 1 1 Tuesday PM Service with Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Faci l ity . . . . . C-{1 Table 12 Wednesday AM Service with Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Faci l ity . . . . C-7 Tab l e 13 Wednesda y PM Service La te and M i ssed Trippers and Runs by Fac i lity..... .... C-8 Table 14 Thursday AM Service with Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Facility Table 1 5 Thu rs day PM Service with Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Faci l ity C-9 C-10 Ta b le 1 6 Friday AM Service with Late an d Missed Trippers a nd Runs by Facility . . . . . . C-11 T able 1 7 F r iday PM Service with Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Facility . . . . . C-12 Tab l e 18 Saturday AM Service with Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Facility . . . . C-13 Ta b le 19 Saturday PM Service with Late and Missed Trippers a nd Runs by Facility . . . . C-14 Table 20 Sunday AM Service Late and Missed Tri ppers and Runs by F aci lity . . . . . C-15 Table 21 Sunday PM Service wrth Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Facility . . . . C-16 ix

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F i gures Ftgure 1 Example of Automatic Checl<-ln Receipt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 xi

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Preface As part of the interlocal agreement between the Universrty of South Florida (USF) and Metropolitan Dade County, the Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR) at USF is under contract to examine and evaluate the interface between bus operations and bus maintenance at Metro-Dade Transit Agency (MOTA) with specific focus given to placing buses into service every day. Four tasks were specified to comp lete this research project. The first task consisted of a review of recent data on bus availability by MOTA bus facility. This review in cluded examining late and missed pullouts to iden tity the extent of the bus availability problem. The second task involved examining current processes related to placing buses into service. Also, the second task included interviews with key MOTA operations and maintenance personnel. The third task involved evaluating the effectiveness of the Transrt Operating System (TOS) program. In this task, elements of the TOS program were evaluated from the perspectives of the bus operations, bus maintenance, and Management Information Systems (MIS) divisions. The final task involved recommending improvements to increase bus availability, based on the previous three tasks. Center for Urban Transportation Research Universrty of South Florida College of Engineering, ENB 118 4202 East Fowler Avenue Tampa. Florida 33620 Phone (813) 974-3120 SunCom 574-3120 FAX (813) 974-5168 Electronic Mail: hineba ug@cutr.eng.usf.edu CUTR URL: http://www.cutr.eng.usf.edu/CUTR/cutrhome.htm t CUTR Project Team: Gary Brosch, Joel Volinski, Deputy for Transit Dennis Hinebaugh, Transit Planning Program Manager Michael R. Baltes, Research Associate Joel R. Rey, Research Associate 1

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Acknowledgments CUTR extends sincere gratitude to all of the MOTA staff who helped to accomplish this project. CUTR also wishes to sincerely thank the staff at Suburban Mobility Area Regiona l Transit (SMART) in Detroit, Michigan, and Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA) in Columbus, Ohio for sharing their experiences and knowledge relate d to t h eir computerized transit operating system software provided to them by TeleRide Sage. 3

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Moltobus Availability and the Tronsit Operating System Program I. INTROD UCTIO N AND PURPOSE OF STUDY The purpose of this study was to examine and evaluate the interface between bus operations and bus maintenance at MOTA, specifically in tenns of placing buses into serv ice every day Communication between these two divisions is vital to ensure that a sufficient number of buses are availab le and assigned to service MOTA uses a Trans it Operating System (TOS) computer software program to track bus availability, assignments, and maintenance. TOS is one of the major communicat i o ns tools between bus operations and bus maintenance. but Hs effectiveness in tnnns of assisting these divisions to ensure sufficient availab ility of vehicles has been questioned. Metrobus riders depend on Metrobus schedules for everything from getting to work on time to traveling for medical-related appointments. shopping, and personal business. Reliability is a key element in attracting and retaining ridership. Improving coordination between bus operations and bus maintenance will help ensure that the required num ber of vehicles are in service which, in tum. will i ncrease overall rider confidence in the dependab i lity of Metrob us service. In an y transit agency, the relationship between the operations and maintenance divisions is subject to stresses caused by differing objectives The operation division's primary concern is placing buse s into service, while the maintenance division's role is to ensure that buses are fit for service. lnevHably. conflicts will arise when specific objectives of these two divisions clash. Improving communications b etween the two div i sions can minimize these conflicts and potentially inc rease levels of b us availability. In order to meet the objectives of this research study. four tasks were specified. The first task consisted of a review of recent data on bus availabilrty. This review included examin ing the number of late and missed bus pullouts during a six-month period to id entify the extent of the bus 5

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Metrobus Availability and the Tnmsit Operating System Program availability problem. The second task invo lved examining current processes related to placing buses int o service. This included interviews with key MOTA operations and maintenance personnel. The third task involved evaluating the effec tivenes s of the TOS System. In this task, elements of t he TOS system were evaluated from the perspectives of bus operations bus maintenance, and M IS divisions via personal interviews. The fourth and final task invo lved recommending improvements to increase bus availability using TOS and other p roced ures based on the previous three tasks. The accumulation of information fro m t hese tasks greatly aided the research team in gaining a greater understanding of t he many issues surrounding the question of coordination be tween MOTA's b us operations and maintenance divisions. The methodology and findings from each of these tasks, as well as the conclusions drawn from them, are detailed in the followin g sections of t his report. II. TASK 1: REVIEW OF RECENT DATA ON BUS AVAILABILITY The purpose of this tas k was to review recent data on bus ava i lability with specific attention given to late and missed trippers and runs. MOTA's established service goal is to make 100 percent bus pu llout. Inc lude d in t his task is a review of the net numbe r of pullouts that were late and missed to ide ntify the extent of the bus availability problem. Specifically, data on pullouts by bus facility were examined over a six-month period to determine whether there are differences in bus availability by individua l bus facility. Currently, MOTA operates three bus facilities: Coral Way Central, and Northeast. Bus availability information was obtained and reviewed for each facility fo r the six-month time frame (182 tota l service days) includ ing and between the months of June and November 1995. 6

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MtHtobus end the Tran$it Operating System Program 1 through 3 show summarized aggregate data by day of week for each facility perta in ing to the availability of buses for the AM PM, and a comb inat ion of the AM and PM service periods for the 182-day t ime frame, including average weekday (Monday-Friday) a nd weekly bus availabi lity measurements Specifically, the data contained in these tables represent an aggregat i on of the 182-day period under analysis To explain the data contained in Tables 1 through 3, the column labeled "Monday in Table 1 for the Coral Way facility, for example, relates that for all of the Mondays during the 182-day t im e frame. there was an aggregate surplus of 38 buses available for service at the 4:00AM time point at this particular bus fac ili ty. In addition to the aggregate bus availability data shown in Tables 1 through 3, Table 4 and Table 5 also show summarized aggregate bus availability data for the six-month time frame. These particular data denote the total number of days during both the AM and PM service periods with late and missed trippers and runs by facility. Again, the data presented pertain to the perfonnance of each ind ividual facility for the 182-day time frame To clarify the data contained in Tables 4 and 5 the column labe le d o Trippers Late in Table 4 for the Coral Way facility, for example, relates that there were a total of 154 days of service in whi ch "ze ro" trippers were late at this particular facility Finally, Tables 8 through 21, in Appendix C, contain bus availability data by individual day of the week for bot h the AM and PM serv i ce periods. The data included in these tables represent a day-to-day recounting of bus availability by facility during the lime frame under scrutiny F i nally Tables 6 and 7 in Appendix A, show the day-to-day ava ilabi lity of buses for the AM and PM service periods by facility for each of the 182 days during the six-month examination period. The data used in this task to determine whether differences exist in bus availability between MOTA's three bus facilities were provided to CUTR by MOTA from their Metrobus Daily Service Reports Since the data are secondary in nat u re and were provided by an external source to 7

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MetfObus Availability and the Transit Operating System Program CUTR the integrity and accuracy of the data used in this task could not be verified. Therefore ca re should be used when interpreting and drawing Inferences from the findings as they relate to differences in bus availability between MOTA's three bus facilities. In addition, the 4:00AM, 7:30 AM, noon, and 4 :30 PM time points are not necessarily reflective of the actual number of buses available to meet service requ i rements after all buses have been assigned. This is due to operations completing the Daily Service Report several hours prior to the actua l time point (in some instances this time d ifference is up to three hours prior to the time point). During these three hUrs, for example, in most cases, enough buses are provided to operations by maintenance to meet service requirements at a pa rt icular time point. As of March 1995, the reporting of bus availability information during these four time points has been removed from the Daily Service Report due to their inaccuracy However, H was communicated by MOTA staff that the information related to late and missed trippers and runs are accurate. Neverthe l ess, these data do provide some genera l gui dance when determining the overall temporal trend(s) with regard to each facility's level of bus availability to meet daily service requirements. With regard to each facility's AM bus availabiiHy (encompassing both the 4:00AM and 7:30AM time points) the data contained i n Table 1 show that the Central faciiHy had the most trippers (164) and runs late (415) and the Northeast facility had the most trippers and runs missed 33 and two, respectively. Over the 182-days the Coral Way facility performed the best during the AM with a total of only 40 t rippe rs and 36 runs late and eight trippers and zero runs missed. When AM bus availability at the 4:00AM time point for each facility is examined using information in the co lumn labe led "M-F Average," the data show that all three facilities experienced a negative average number of buses available for pullout at this time period. Moreover, when the 4:00 AM time point data for each faciiHy for weekdays (Monday Friday) were examined more closely both the Central and Northeast facilities had a significantly greater number of buses unavailable for service than the 8

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Metrobus Availability and tho Transit Operating System Program T able 1 AM B u s Availability by Day of Week COQIWy .. ,.,.., T ues.Hy \'lo4no$CII)' _, Fridrt Sabsda.)' """"'' Moi'A-.gl Wllfdy AY .... _'I 04:00AM .., .6() ,. .. I U S = .. ., 1412 -01:30AM .. ., .. ,., t,6t9 2.2S S S.S7 0 0 0.3t OJ> Tnl)f>ft1 M ined 5 0 0 2 0 0 o .ro ... Aun slob)> 0 0,27 0 .20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .00 000 C.ncrl """'' ,..,..., -.. ... """'" F rilf s.-, ---O
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Metrobus A vel/ability and the Tmnsil Operating System Progmm When the data were examined across all performance categories contained in Table 1 the performance of the Coral Way facility exceeded that of the other two facilities in terms of overall bus availability. The aggregate data for the AM service peri o d relate that a total of 311 trippers were late, 50 tri ppers were missed, 669 runs were late, and two runs were missed by all facilities duri n g the 182-d ays With regard to each facility's M-F Average" number of buses available for PM service the data contained in this column in Table 2 show that all three facilities experienced problems meetino bus availability requirements at the noon t ime point. This poi nt is evidenced by the fact that each facility had a negative average number of buses available during each weekday to meet pullout at this particular time. Interestingly, despite its superior performance during the AM service period, the Coral Way facility missed the greatest number of t rippers (29) during the PM service period. No apparent explanation for this anomaly could be readily discerned. The Central facility had the greatest number of trippers late (137) and the Northeast facility had the greatest number of runs late (34) during the PM service period. Unlike each facility's performance during the AM service period in which a total of only two runs were missed no runs were missed by each facility during the PM service period. Overall, aggregate data for the PM service period relate that a total of 271 trippers were late 59 trippers were m i s sed, 49 runs were late (compared to 669 late runs in the AM), and, as mentioned, no runs were missed by each. Lastly, Table 3 contains a summation of data for the AM and PM service periods. Tab le 4 and Table 5 contain bus availability data by day of week for both the AM and PM se!'Vice periods by facility for the time frame under examination. Specifically, these particular tables contain data for both the AM and PM service periods that show the total number of days wit h late and missed trippers and runs. 10

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Metn::>bus AvailsbiUty and the Transit Operating System Program Table 2 PM Bus Availability by Day of We e k .,.,._ """'' ,...,... .._._ F""r .., ... .,...., M.f' Avwao Weekly 12.00 NoM 3 1 4 .. .. .. .,., .,., .., V24 \.&4 ... 1 6:30 PM .. ., .. t,18a 1 ,640 '-" t1 IG 1 3 0 0 0 0 22 1 0 ' 0 0 0 o.n 0 .16 t.e 0 2 3 0 0 0 .06 oos 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 000 000 c. ..... ......, --Tllursdr l $allltdl)' """'' MFA' w.Hlr ..... ,.o-12.00Noon .. .... .,., 20< " 11.$7 .. 1&3()P I.I 11 ... ... ,,. .... 047 36 .. ,. .. 0 ,., 0 .1$ Tt'PS)e!a M iaMCI 0 0 0 007 0. 06 Rvtll Ul ' 0 0 I ' 0 002 000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .00 0 .00 -......,, .. Tlul
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Metrobus Availability and the Transit Operating System Program late run (49 of t he d ays expe r ience d 4 or more la te runs} Ove r the 182 days, during the AM service period, t he Coral Way facility consistently out-performed the othe r two bus facilities with r egard t o lat e and mi ssed trip pers and runs a s Tab l e 4 shows. T ab le 3 Cumulative Total Bus Availability by Day of Week Cot ... Wiy """"' ToAW)' Thi.lrterly FriNy .. ......, """'" M Av..-.g w..kly A"tfl8t """ "' -11 3 .. .... ..,, .... .190 f .11 0 ...... $1.38 ,. o 8 0 0 0 $2 031 2 o 2 2 0 0 028 0 .20 " 7 0 0 35 0 25 RunsMssM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ... 0 00 Otmra l MOI'II:b'f ...... / _.. ... Tlv$dl)' F ti(Jay -"""' MF I W..kl)' A .... AN. PM .... .... 13 2 .... 5 1 3 '""' "' -2169 i ... T f'Wtr.t..-" .. .. 3 '" 1.76 Tf'4IPOI'I 3 2 0 0 0 0" 0.1 0 Auns Llll 76 10 "' 2 0 ,., 2 3 1 -s:tvns t,(jswj 0 0 0 000 0. 00 Nontl .. lt M f ....... .._._ Ttusdll)' ''''" -...... MF Awonttt .. AM PM .... .... -_.., .... 1.'1128 ,...., 2:US 7 1 5 73 27 23 ' 1 .41 .... Mifd 7 7 0 0 0 .42 030 Ru.'lllA!t "' 27 .. 2 ,. 1.74 ... Al.nS MiSMO: 0 0 0 0 0 0 .02 O.ot ,, .... Motlllll)' Tuotdoy ---,_ -......., '"""" -I' ""' ..... 1.37) 1 ,103 - 1,3.43 1,800 .., n. m ..... 62.57 Tr..,.,.,. Urlt ... .. ,., .. '"' .. ,, O 0 0 0 .8< .. R11n ,. 02 7 7 .. M ... MiUed 0 0 0 0 0 002 0 01 Concern i ng each facility's tota l number of days with lale and missed trippers and runs during the PM service period the data contained i n Table 5 relate that no o bvi ous trend existed duri n g the PM service per iod across a ll performance categorie s. The bus availa b ility data fo r the PM service perio d sh ow considerable va r i at io n among each facility rega r ding the number of days w i th late and 12

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Metrobvs Availability Bnd the Tmnsit OpettJling Sy$tem Program missed trippers and runs When scrutinizing all of the performance categories contained in the table, the data indicate that the Central facility experienced the most days with late trippers (39) the Coral Way facility experienced the most days with missed trippers (11), and the Northeast facility experienced the most days with late runs (18) As was pointed out earlier in the report, none of the facilities experienced days with missed runs dur in g the PM service period CotI'V'Wf Con1r011 ......... T..., ,...., CotaiWJt c ...... """'"'' To111 F"'llity C cwtlV11y Too" Fillly CorI\'R'f c ...... NOo1,.._,, T ... o Table 4 Days of AM Service with Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Facility o.tr of AM: s.rnu will\-or,.._....,., 2-l TlfpJNn L ... 4-S '" " 0 ... " s ... l ,,. .. o.y. of AM Setvk wtff Mined MIMed 4-SlrfltpMI MIIMCII ,. s ,. 1 0 7 '" 0.,01 o1 AM $otfltb ...,.__ 0 Rl.oftl ...... 1 ftl.ln 1..111 1 3 fb.II\IUM ... Rom ...... "' "' 0 ... ,. .. .. o2< 22 "' 73 .. ,, 0.,. of AM S.I"'ICt with. -Mihe4 t Rui\Mitlld 44R...,aMii
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Metrobus Availability and the Transit Operating System Program there were a total of 26 days for each representative day of the week (i.e 26 Mondays 26 Tuesdays and so forth). The ensuing brief paragraph discusses t he findings from t he analysis of t he data contained i n these tables. ... .., Clf't11 1 NON!$NI ,.., F.ICIII'Y C oral\'lfy c"""' "''" hdii'Y --centre NQnfltii::SI ,,.., CWW.y c ...... """'"'" TOIII Table 5 Days of PM Service with Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Facility Op o r PM S.WC. wllt'l,,. 0 r,;pp.,. Uta 1 Trll'f*'Utol 2-3Ttl...,.l..let 4-5 TtlpPif'l LMI ... 1<'1 10 1 $< ... 32 D.y1 oiPM 0 MinH t Tripp Ml-...d U TriPfll,. MO...\t 171 0 "' 3 3 0 .,. 2 1 "' 1 0 1 0 1 o.y. of ,... l
PAGE 27

Melrobus Availability and tM Transit Operating System Program service during the weekends the issue of late and missed t r ippers and runs was not an However, as was shown by the bus availability data contained in the previous five tables the data in these tables reiterate that the Central and Northeast facilrties experienced the most extensive p r ob lems meeting their service requirements during both the AM and PM service periods during the 1 B2 days. In addition. the data illustrate that the problem of late and missed trippers and runs was the most profound at each facility during the AM service per iod Summary of Bus Availability Data Overall, the extensive assortment of data contained in Tables 1 through 21 show that d i fferences exist between the facilities wit h regard to bus availability particularly during the AM service pc;riod. In almost a ll instances, the Coral Way facilrty consistently met the AM and PM bus availability requirements of their peak AM and PM pullouts. Contrarily, the Central and Northeast facilities experienced the most problems related to l ate and missed trippers and l ate runs during the AM service period and, to a lesser extent, during the PM service period Interestingly, only the Northeast facilrty experienced missed runs (2) in the AM service period Overall, the data shows that the Central and Northeast faci lities appear to have the most extensive problem with bus availability and the Coral Way facility seems to sutter from this problem much less than the other two facilities. However, the data also indicates that none of the facilities are totally immune from this problem, particularly du ring the AM service period. The data show that each facility sutlers from the b us availability problem, but to vary ing degrees. Not surprising the problem of bus availability is greater during the weekdays (Monday Friday) than du r ing the weekends due to higher lev els of on-street service. No explicit trend appeared in the data with regard to a parti o :ular weekday being worse than another weekday regarding b us availabilrty. lastly, one significa nt difference between the performance of the AM and PM service periods was in the performance category of "late runs." The aggregate data for the AM service period shows that a total of 669 late 15

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Metrobus Availability and the Transit Operating Sy$tem Program runs were experienced by all facilijies during this time period as compared to only 49 late runs in the PM service period by all facil i t ies ; a measured difference of 620 late runs Ill. TASK 2: EXAMINATION OF CURRENT PROCESSES RELATED TO THE PLACEMENT OF BUSES INTO SERVICE Task 2 focused o n the examination of current processes pertaining to the availability of buses for serv i ce and the related assignment of buses to operators Specifically, this task provides a general written description of the flow of bus availabilijy in format i on us ing TOS and other procedures utili zed in the assignment of buses to operators at MOTA. Interviews with key MOTA personnel were conducted to obtain a clear understanding of how the current bus assignment process works utilizing TOS and other procedures The key personnel induded staff from the bus operations and bus maintenance divisions. During the interviews, as mentioned, particular focus was placed on obtaining the specific proced ures related to p lacing buses into service using TOS. Briefly TOS is a computer software p rogram that operates on MOTA's in-house central VAX (mainframe) computer system TOS was installed on the Metropolitan-Dade County Government mainframe in 1989 The specific software was developed for MOTA by TeleRide Sage of Ontario, Canada. TOS was originally designed as a tool to assist bus operations in the areas of dispatching, time keeping, absenteeism control operator scheduling and a variety of other information such as payroll. However, as TOS evolved within MOTA. the bus maintenance division began using TOS for bus availab ility information and vehicle status ( dead,' alive or in for preventative maintenance) In addition to TOS. the bus maintenance division also uti lizes a computer software program entitled Equipment Management System (EMS) to functions specific to maintenance such as preventive maintenance scneoules and parts inventory These two computer software programs (TOS and EMS) operate independently of one another and, therefore do not share information. 16

PAGE 29

Metrobus Avai'labifity and the Transit Operating Sy.stem Program The three written steps below outline both the manual procedures and automated TOS procedures followed by MOTA's bus operations and bus maintenance divisions at each facility when assigning buses to operators. The same basic process for assigning buses to operators is followed at all three of MOTA's bus facilities. In addition t o t he written steps that outline both the manual procedures and automated TOS procedures, a section has been provided that out li nes a recently implemented process that has changed the method of communicating roadcalls (as of 1992 based on FTA's National Transit Database reporting requirements, roadca lls are now referred to as revenue service interruptions') received from bus operators in the field This new method consists of placing a bus maintenance supervisor at the Communications Central Command (CCC) at the County's Government Center (5 t h floor) to monitor receive and determine the status of roadca lls that are received from bus operators In the field. A full description of this process is provided immediately after the section that outlines the manual and automated TOS procedures. The manual and automated TOS procedures followed by MOTA's bus operations and bus maintenance divisions at each when assigning buses to ope rators is as follows: STEP 1: During the PM maintenance shift, maintenance staff removes buses from the next day's AM service using TOS screen U62 (veh icle availability information). The U62 screen allows for the adding, changing, or deleting of vehicle availability records. Buses are removed from service by maintenance staff for various reasons such as scheduled preventative maintenance and for unscheduled repairs. At approximately midnight, maintenance staff invento ries the buses on the lot and the board" to determine which buses are 'dead." Briefly, the "board' is defined 17

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Metrobus Availability and the Transit Operating System Program as an inventory of all buses that are currently not fit for service for a variety of reasons and a "d ead bus is a bus that is not fit for service, hence. the boa rd" contains an in ven tory of dead" buses. Using the in f ormat ion o btained from these two sources maintenance then manually generates what is termed as a bus availability sheet. The bus availability sheet i s a log of all the buses by bus number t hat are available ("alive") for use by operations. For re ference a copy of an actual bus availability sheet is contained in Appendix B. The bus availability sheet is then either faxed or hand carried from maintenance to dispatch by no later than 1 :00 AM o r 2 :00 AM. During the in terviews with MOTA staff, it was indicated that the bus availability sheet generally contains 5 to 15 fewer buses than are needed to meet the AM peak period pullout. The shortage of buses is attributed to variable charter service requirements unscheduled maintenance, and to the fat: that a number of buses are being repaired between midnight and 4:00 AM and have not yet bee n entered into TOS as being available for AM service. STEP 2 : Once the bus availability sheet is received by the AM operation's dispatchers from the maintenance division, the dispatchers then generate a bus availability report using TOS screen R61B. An R61B report produces a list of vehicles and thei r subsequent availability. Bus data shown on t he R61B report are vehicle number, vehicle type, status, symptom code, and assignment status. Usually before 3 : 00AM, dispatch nuns a U42 (days work assignment) to obtain an R41B report to coordinate the assignment of bus es by type and by run to operators. The data contained on the R41B report are cross-referenced with the bus availability sheet and the F.61B report. To determine which buses are available for service and their respective p(eces of work the dispatcher simply crosses off the runs and bus numbers on the R41 B after cross-referencing the bus availability sheet and the R61 B report. In assigning a bus to an operator, the dispatcher relies on the bus availability informat ion generated by the R61 B query and t he bus availability sheet. As 18

PAGE 31

Metrobus Availability and the Transit Operating System Program buses return to the facility for vari ous reasons (for example completion of a run o r a roadcall) throughout the morn ing, dispatch inquires about the status of the buses f r om each returning operator. Once the status of each bus has been determined, d i spatch will then e i ther reassign the bus to an appropriate piece of work or r oute it to maintenance if it has been determined that some type of mechanical prob lem ex i sts with the bus. Using the process described i n Steps 1 and 2 above buses are continuous l y assigned to oper' d tors by dispatch until approximately noon. A t th i s t ime, ma i ntenance manua ll y generates a new bus availability sheet to replace the one generated in the early morn i ng. Again. the bus availabi l ity sheet is a log of all the buses by bus number that are available ( alive") for use by bus operations. Thi s process is described in Step 3. STEP 3: At approximately noon, ma i ntenance staff once again inventories the buses on the lot and consults the "board' to determ i ne which buses are "dead. After consulting the boa r d another manually-generated bus availability sheet is created by maintenance showing the alive buses to be used by operations when assign i ng buses to operators in the PM. As was the case in the AM, the bus availab i lity sheet is then either faxed or hand-carried from maintenance to operaoJons (di spatch) Once the bus availabi lity sheet has been received by dispatch, the process described in Steps 1 and 2 above i s repeated until the end of service for a given day. The entire bus assignment process starts over again beginning at approximately midnight by repeating Steps 1 through 3 described above Bus Maintenance Radio Supervisor at Communications Central Control MOTA has recently changed its methods of communicating roadcalls received from bus operators i n the field. T his new method cons i sts of placing a bus maintenance supervisor at the CCC at the 19

PAGE 32

Metrobvs Availabifity attd the Transit Operating System Program County's Government Center (5th floor) to monitor, receive. and determine the status of roadcalls received from bus operators in the field. This process entails all of the roadcalls that are received by bus operations supervisors at the CCC being immediately forwarded to the bus mainten >lnce supervisor. also located at the CCC This maintenance supervisor listens to all of the information provided by the operations supervisor or road truck mechanic and attempts to assist the bus operator the problem. Every attempt is made to keep the bus in service. If it has been determined that the bus it to be kept in service, no inf ormation is entered into the TOS system (TOS screen U62). If it has been determined that the bus must be sent back to its facility of origin for repairs. the bus maintenance supervisor calls the maintenance division at this particular facility to alert them of the returning bus. Once the call has been placed to the maintenance facility of origin to alert them of the returning bus, the maintenance superv iso r manually rec ords the status of the bus condition on a "Fields' Dispatched" form. The maintenance supervisor puts a "dead stamp" o r 'work required indicator on the form and then faxes thi s form to the bus' maintenance of orig in. The maintenance supervisor then enters the known information about the bus' into TOS (again information is only entered in to TOS if the bus is being sent back to its facility of origin for repairs) Once the bus has been repaired and is deemed fit for service by the maintenance facility, the maintenance supervisor located at the CCC is notified by the bus maintenance that the bus i s ready for service. This maintenance supervisor then records the "alive status of the repaired bus on the "Fie lds Units Dispatched" form and then gives the f orm to the bus operations supervisor also located at the CCC who then enters this information into TOS. To compliment this newly-implemented process of keeping track of buses that have been brought back to a facility for a roadcall, MOTA has added another step that assists with the tracking of these 20

PAGE 33

Mefrolw.s Availability snd the Transit Operating System Program buses at the Central facility. At the Central facility, a maintenance instructor has been positioned in the yard to check each bus that is sent in for a roadcall by the bus maintenance supervisor located downtown at the CCC. This maintenance ins tructor checks the problem(s) as noted by the bus operator. If the problem(s) in question cannot be confirmed. the instructor makes the bus available for immediate retum to service. The instructor then in forms bus operations managers that a particular bus has been brought in for no apparent reason. I nterestingly although no disciplinary act ions have been taken against bus operators who have brought a bus in for a roadcall without an apparent problem(s) this process has resutted in a nearly 50 percent decrease in the number of buses brought in for roadcalls. Evidently i f a bus operator knows that the roadcall in question might be challenged by the maintenance instructor and, in addition that he/she might face possible disciplinary actions if the roadcall has been determined to be erroneous in nature, it appears that the operator is less likely to falsify a roadca ll. If the instructor confirms the problem(s) w ith the bus as reported by the bus operator the instructor records the problem(s) and gives this in formation to the maintenance supervisor at the Central facilily. The maintenance supervisor then gives the bus priority status in the repair queue Unfortunately due to budgetary constraints this particular process has only been implemented at the Central facility. MOTA i s trying to find a way to implement this additional process at the other two bus facilities (Coral Way and Northeast). IV. TASK 3 : EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TOS Task 3 invo l ved an evaluation from the perspective of bus operations, bus maintenance. and MIS divisions regarding TOS. The objective of this evaluation was to determine how TOS assists in ensur ing t hat buses are available for service, how effective individual elements are in TOS, and how outputs from TOS are used by both the bus maintenance and bus operations d i visions In addition to the conduct of personal in terviews CUTR staff two transit properties that operate 2 1

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Mstrobus Availability and the Transit Operating System Progfl!Jm software similar to TOS that was also developed by TeleRide Sage. The are summarized at the end of this section. Interviews with Key MOTA Personnel The following section details the i nterviews conducted by CUTR wijh key MOTA personnel that have a worl
PAGE 35

Metrobus Availability and the Transit Opera6ng System Program operators. Once the moming and evening peak slows down, the dispatchers input the infonnation from the manually-generated hard-copy records of bus assignments into the TOS system. There was some TOS procedures train i ng for operations' personnel, but Mr. Clarke believes that the training was not as useful as could or should have been because of the continuous changes that were being made to TOS during the training period. Also Mr. Clarke commented that the current TOS manual is outdated. He furthe r stated that MOTA s MIS division is generally responsive when operations has questions regarding TOS allhough they have not created a new, updated TOS manual that covers all of the p rocedures that a dispatcher nee ds to know when assigning buses to operators using TOS. Lastly, Mr. Clarke remarked that TOS is very slow due nunning on the central VAX system. He also commented that there are power outages as well as slowdowns in the central VAX system for other r easons that make TOS unreliable for dispatchers. Mr. Clarke commented that he not believe that payroll uses current TOS rep orts He made it clear during the interview that he understands the va l ue of a system like TOS, but is generally not supportive of it in its curren t state. He would lik e to see TOS removed from the central VAX system and operating on stand-alone personal computers in a M icrosoft Windows environment. Mr. Bill Imhof-Assistant General Superintendent, Bus Maintenance Mr. Imhof began the i nterview by stating that TOS is a program for bus operations, and not one for maintenance. For instance, the operators' line -up is done in TOS, whil e the maintenance lire-up is perfonned using a software program called Equipment Management System (EMS). 23

PAGE 36

Metrobus Availability and the Transit Operating System Program Mr. Im ho f remarked during the intervi ew that the biggest drawback to TOS is that it does not track in-service bus breakdowns He commented that dispatchers are not inputting this information in real-time He continued by stating that, although they might keep manual reco rds of current bus breakdowns, they in put the information into TOS too l ate which makes the information unusable. Another apparent problem with TOS, according to Mr. Imhof, is that the Communications Division of MOTA is responsible for repairing fareboxes, which requires an in-service bus to be brought back to the appropriate facility to make the necessary repairs This procedure adds confusion to the process of keeping track of the status of buses ( 'alive or dead') and disposition of roadcalls. As an aside, Mr. Imhof remarked that hostlers are frustrated about not being able to fi nd buses since operators do not always p ark their buses in their assigned lots at each facility. There have been committee meetings regarding TOS and roadcalls in the past but no resolution has ever been rea ched Everyone would like a real-time system to t rack the status of buses as related to road calls EMS has an area to capture roadcalls, but that portion of EMS is not connected to TOS on the central VAX system. Consequently, maintenance relies on EMS and keeps a separate work station for TOS in the supervisors room. Maintenance can input into the TOS system that a bus has been repaired and is ready for service. Mr. Imhof concluded the interview by noting t h at the programs (TOS and EMS) do not work well w i t h each other and more coordination is needed. Specifically there is not a method to link roadcalls to repair orders and that roadcalls are not kept track of on a real-time basis Bill BrownSpecial Transportation Services (former Assistant General Superintendent of Operations) During the interview, Mr. Brown commented that he thinks thai all modules in TOS have been corrected by MIS and are functioning as they should He regards TOS as an effective 24

PAGE 37

Metrobus Avanabllity and the Tronsit 01)4Jrating Systom Program management tool but not very userfriendly. He believes that dispatchers who utilize it daily can use i s effectively, but those dispatchers that use it infrequently want to do away with it. Mr. Brown continued by stating that the data and reports generated by TOS can be very useful. However, TOS is very slow. He commented that changing a bus or a driver assignment can take up to three or four minutes per change. He suggested removing TOS from the cent ral VAX system and p lacing it on separate computer hardware. In addition to th is recommendation, Mr. Brown also suggested that TOS' file management needs to be improved as well. He believes it should run on stand-alone personal computers that create files that could be uploaded to the central VAX system during the night. Mr. Brown commented that he likes the TOS system because it allows MOTA to manage within the constraints of Florida Statute 1490 (safety regulations} and because i t has good report generat ion capabilities. While the present system works off of keystrokes, he thinks a system similar to TOS is available in a Microsoft Windows version from TeleRide Sage that works with a mouse and/or simple keystrokes Even though the present system is not very use r-fri endly he believes His worth working with the system He commented that maintenance now has computer-literate managers that can p rovide input and that a person should be dedicated by MIS to work exc!usjyetv with the TOS system. Mr. Brown concluded the interview by stating that part of t he problem with TOS is when telephone lines go down or power outages occur the TOS system is virtually useless. He believes that if the TOS system were decentra lize d, this would minimize the chances of TOS being inoperable. Odilia Bercande-Management Information Systems Division Ms. Bercande started the interview by commenting that MOTA currently owns the COBOL sc.urce 25

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Metn>bus Aveilebilily eiKithe Transit Opera#ng S ystem Program code for TOS. She believes that M I S has been very responsive to operations whenever they 11ave had a problem with TOS or needed customization of TOS. The CPUs that TOS runs on are currently at 200 percent capacity A l ong the other in terviewees, she acknowledges t h e need for TOSto run on a separate system independent of the central VA:X system. She estimated that if TOS were to run on separate computer hardware it may run as much as 1 0-times faster. She is aware that operations wants to run TOS in a M i crosoft Windows environment. but commented that TeleRide Sage in formally advised her that this transition could take up to three years and requ ire a lot of additional funds. The trans ition would be a major task since the current TOS program has over 600 indiv id ual modu l es or programs to h andle such tasks as customer information services ; employee information; trip information; vehicle assignmen ts, repairs, and scheduling; and operator absenteeism, d iscipline, and evaluat i ons Ms. Bercande also noted that a great dea l of customization would be needed to accommodate the parameters of the ;abo r agreement. She commented t hat M I S has worked with operations in the past regarding the issue of bus assignments MIS was asked to modify TOS to make sure maintenance clerks could clea r out a vehicle when it was ready for service and that operations could not assign a bus that was not ready for service. H owever, in itia l tests did not go well due to the i nability to capture correct informat ion Lastly, she thinks there probab ly is a need for a separation between EMS and TOS. She commented that EMS is a huge p r ogram, it runs on an IBM system, and presents challenges in communicating with the central VA:X system Currently Ms. Bercande is the MIS representative assigned to work with bus maintenance and bus operations regar ding the TOS system. 26

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Metrobus Availability and ths Transit Operating System Program Luis Rivas -Management lnfonnatlon Systems Division Mr. Rivas began the interview by commenting that he was involved with the innial inslallalion of the TOS system. Like othe r interviewees he also realizes a need to speed up TOS He believes that removing TOS from the central VAX system and placing it on a sepa r ate fi l e server is a good i dea and that this will speed up the TOS system He is aware that TeleRide Sage is currently offering a vers i on of the TOS system that operates wi t hin the Microsoft Windows env i ronment but notes that it has not been proven. He bel i eves that the r e are technical constraints in switch in g to such a system The current TOS system operates through user-driven menus that are relative l y easy to use. In addition, he also commented that because of state regulation 1490 it wou!d be inappropriate for each bus facility to work strictly with thei r own un l inked computers. Mr. Rivas continued by commenting that going to personal computers is not a good option at this time due to the i r prohib i t ive cost If personal computers were purchased, they would have to be linked to the central VAX system. He noted that doing this just puts one back into the multiprocessor and shared-data environment that TOS currently operates in He commented that operations has a need for a dedicated person to work with TOS and MIS and that there is always a need for training of dispatchers since operations supervisors can readily choose new ass i gnments (moving in to and out of dispatch). Consequently, a person is needed who can provide refresher courses and assistance at all times. He commented that, from an organizational standpoint this person should report to MIS Summary of Interviews All of the MOTA personnel i nterv i ewed agree that the present TOS system does not function as well as it should as a dispatch system or as a communications tool between bus operations and 27

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Metrobus Availability and the Ttansit Operating System Program bus maintenance. There is also a consensus on the part of the in tervie w subjects that the speed at which TOS processes info rmat ion must be impr oved However, there were conflicting suggestions as to how this should be accomplished. Several suggestions for increasing the speed at which TOS processes information were recommended by interviewees. Some of the interviewees commented that the most feasible and pragmatic solution is to remove TOS from the central VAX system to a separate, stand-alone computer such as an Alpha server. According to the se interv iewees this would greatly imp rove t he speed at which TOS processes informat i on. Other interviewees suggested that, ins tea d of removing TOS from t he centra l VAX system attogether. the processing power of the central VAX machine should be improved. Nevertheless, even if TOS' operating speed i s imp roved utilizing one of the two methods suggested, interviewees related that problems may still exist between bus operations and bus maintenance regardi n g t he availability of buses that goes well beyond t he TOS system Transit Property Site Visits In itially, CUTR contacted TeleRide Sage to obtain a l ist of peer transit systems using similar software to the TOS system used by MDT A. This produced a list of two possible peer transit systems for visitation by CUTR staff. The two systems that were identified as using software similar to TOS were Suburban Mobility Area Regional Transi t (SMART) located in Detroit Michigan, and New Jersey Transit (NJT) located in Newark, New Jersey. Telephone contact was made with a representative from each of these transit systems knowledgeable about the TeleRide Sage software to determine the feasibility of visiting each system. Discussions with the manager of bus service planning at NJT revealed that while they utilize most of the components of the Tel eRide Sage software they do not use the software for bus assignment. Currently NJT utilizes a manual system as the communications medium between bus 28

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Metrobus AvailabiOty and the Transit Operating System Program maintenance and bus operations when assigning buses to operators. Therefore due to NJT not utilizing the specific component of the TeleRide Sage software under ana l ys is in this research study as well as the complexities involved with ana lyz ing t he coordination between bus maintenance and bus operations at a transit system as large as NJT, it was determined t hat a visit to NJT would not be beneficial to the stated objective of this research study. As a result, NJT was dropped as a candidate for a visit by CUTR staff. With the exception of operating fewer total buses than MOTA, contact a rep resen tat ive from SMART in Michigan reve aled that they utilize the TeleRide Sage software for the assignment of buses to operators in much the same manner as MOTA and in add:tion. experienced similar problems as MO TA's with their TOS system. Based on the information gathered from the telephone conversation, a site was arranged with an appropriate representative from SMART knowledgeable of their T eleRide Sage software. The site visit by CUTR staff to SMART took place in October 1g95 SMART operates fixed-route service out of three that house approximately 1 00 buses per facility. All buses are parked in-doors at the three facilities. Specifically, CUTR staff only the Oakland located north of the City of Detroit In addition to a complete tour of the Oakland facility during the visi t to SMART, the director of p l anning and dispatchers were interviewed regarding the use of the Tel eRide Sage software. Real-time observation ol the TeleRide Sage software along with the discussions SMART personnel revealed that the software used by SMART is virtually identical to the TOS system used by MOTA The site to SMART uncovered many of the s ame problems with the TeleRi de Sage software experienced by MOTA including: 29

PAGE 42

Metrobus Availability and the Transit OperaHng System Program a breakdown of communication between maintenance and operations related to roadcalls; lack of speed when processing information in the TOS system ; and the need to manually communicate v ia telephone with maintenance collaterally using the TOS system. The site visit to SMART did not reveal any information that would be useful to improvinr the coordination between bus operations and bus maintenance utilizing the TOS system at MOTA. However, as a result of the site visit to SMART, the research team was put in contact with a representa tive from the Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA), located in Columbus Ohio After an initial telephone conversation with a representative from COTA the research team conc luded that a site visit to this system would be appropriate to learn more about how their bus operations and bus maintenance divisions communicate and coordinate bus assignments us ing the software developed by TeleRide Sage. CUTR's resear ch team initially visited COTA in November 1995. COTA operates fixed-route service out of two facilities (McKinley and Fields) that house approximately 150 buses per fal)ility. All buses are parked in-doors at the two facilit i es During the ini tial to COTA CUTR staff interviewed the directo r of transportation the division superintendent of operations and several div i sion supervisors (dispatchers) at the McKinley facility regarding the use of the TeleRide Sage software (kn own as the Transit Operating Management Information System or TOMIS) at COTA. An extensive tour of both the operations and maintenance divisions at the McKinley was also conducted. In addition to conducting personal interviews COTA dispatchers, CUTR staff also observed t he dispatching function for both the AM and PM peak periods using TOMIS. 30

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MetroOus Availability and the Transi t Operating System Program The initial site visit to COTA was extremely enlightening and beneficial to this project s objectives. Not only does COTA operate an efficient dispatch and bus assignment procedure utilizinu the TOMIS system. but the actual bus facility is very neat, orderly, and clean. In addition to the facility i tself, the morale of and cooperation between facility personnel includ ing bus opera:ors dispatchers, maintenance staff, etc .. appeared to be very high among those persons that are involved w ith the day-to-day operat i on of the facility. All persons encountered at this facility appeared to take tremendous pride in provid i ng a valuable service to the ci tizens of Columbus, Ohio. Similar to the experience at SMART CUTR staff observation of the TOM IS system in conjunction with the discussions with COTA personnel revealed that the TOMIS system used by COTA is virtually identical to the TOS system utilized by MOTA. However. one significant enhancement of the TOMIS system by COTA was the addition of a peripheral swipe card and printing device. The periphera l device is known at COTA as the automatic check -in system. The hardware for the peripheral device was developed in-house by COTA staff, and the COBOL programming code needed to interface with TOMIS was also written in-house. The COBOL programming was performed by COT A's MIS div i sion. Specifically, the automatic check-in device provides a receipt to the bus operator after the operator has swiped his/her magnetically-encoded employee identification swipe card through the system. This receipt contains information including the exact time and date; f acility name; operator name and employee number; run and block numbers (work assignment); parked location of the bus with in the facility; a SO-day countdown of the expirat i on of the operator's commercial driver's licunse (COL); an d space for a written note (i e., see supervisor). An example of an actual rece ipt is contained in Figure 1 31

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Metrobus Availability an
PAGE 45

Metrobus Avsilsbility snd tM Transit Operating Systsm Program After the bus has been made ready for service this maintenance person reassigns the bus to a row by type and by handicap accessibility. The bus is now ready to be received by an operator for service. Unlike the procedure follo wed at MOTA, COT A's maintenance division controls and is totally responsible for a bus until the ass i gned operator accepts ij for service. This has greatly reduced confusion as to whether a specific bus is available for immediate service Based on the inform ation gathered from the initial visit to COTA, the research team thought. that it would be very beneficia l for MOTA personnel to visit COTA in person to interact with its staff to discuss the details of TOMIS and the cooperative interaction between its operations and maintenance divisions. They could also discuss the possibility of acquiring the automatic check-in device and the COBOL programming code needed to integrate and interface the device with the TOS system used by MOTA. On January 18 and 19 1996, Mr. Vernon Clarke, Superintendent, Bus Operations, ano Ms. Mariaelena Salazar Manager Management Information Systems (MIS). visited the COTA system to meet with representatives from COT A. Mr. Clarke and Ms. Salazar were accompanied by two representatives from CUTR. During the visit, an extensive tour of the McKinley facility's operations and maintenance divisions were conducted as well as a truncated tour of the Fie ld' s fac ility. Specific activities of this site visit inc luded lengthy discussions with dispatchers observations of the dispatch function during the AM and PM peak periods. discussions with the director of COT A's MIS division, and the manager of service scheduling to discuss TOM IS and the automatic check-in system and associated COBOL programming code. Lastly, a discussion related to the acquisition of the Trapeze scheduling software for future use by MOTA also occurred during the meeting with COT A's service scheduling division. 33

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Metrobus Availabifily and the Transit Operating System Program From these was agreed that COTA would coord i nate personnel from MOTA's MIS and bus operations divisions to transfer the techno logy for the automatic check -in device over to MOTA. In addition, COTA also supplied copies of their contract between COTA and the local chapter of the Tran sport Workers Union of America and the Policy Manual for Represented Employees. A debriefing of the two MOTA staff and CUTR personnel that attended the second site visit to COTA confirmed that the visit was very beneficial and that MOTA's MIS div i sion will maintain contact COTA to secure the hardware and software for implementation of the automatic check in device. It was also discussed that it may be beneficial for other MOTA staff to visit COTA in t he futu re. V. TASK 4: CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS The purpose of this study was to examine and evaluate the interface between bus operations and bus maint enance at MOTA, specifically in terms of placing buses into service every day. Communication between these two divisions is vital to ensure that a sufficient number of buses are ava il able to be assigned to service every day. To assist with this task, MOTA uses TOSto track bus availability, assignments. and maintenance. TOS is one of the major communications tools between bus operations and bus maintenance, however, it is only one of several components necessary for the placement of buses int o service. Imp roving certain elements of the TOS system such as the speed with which it processes information will improve bus only to a certain degree, but certa in ly not solve the problem entirely. Coupled with improving the TOS system, MOTA needs to solve labor shortages in maintenance and create new and refin e existing procedures related t o the placement of bus es into service every day. 34

PAGE 47

Metrobus Avat 1 ability and tM Transit Operat ing System Program Based on the three previous tasks and a workshop attended by staff from MOTA s operat i ons, maintenance and MIS divis i ons, the follOWing 12 recommendation were formulated to improve the bus availability problem : 1. The operations and maintenance divisions at each facility shou l d establ i sh a liaison to work with the existing TOS coordinator. It is envisioned that the ex isti ng TOS coord i nator will field questions from the liaisons and coo r dinate with the MIS divis i on's TOS representat ive regarding the TOS matters (training refresher courses, etc.) on an as needed bas i s Initially, MIS should meet with dispatchers and the TOS liaisons to coordinate individual updates or changes to certain TOS screens t o allow d i spatchers more speedy input and access to i nformation. Th i s cou l d inc lu de the use of "macros to all ow a dispatcher to easi l y go back and forth between the most used TOS screens. Also the layout of individual TOS screens could be updated so that they could contain more info r mation 2. Revise the existing TOS manual to i nclude updates to th e system completed s i nce its i mplementati on in 1 gag This will i nclude any changes to the system based on the outcome(s) of recommendation number one above. 3. Conduct refresher tra i ning courses for a ll bus operations and bus maintenance personnel that work close l y with TOS after the manual has been updated. These courses cou l d be taught by the new l y established TOS lia i sons along with MIS staff proposed in recommendat i on number one above 4 After refresher training has been completed, bus operations and bus maintena n ce should attempt to r emove redundant effort/paperwork (fax ing, telephoning, etc. } over a s i x-month 35

PAGE 48

Metrobus Availability and the Transit Operating System Program period from the operation ofTOS. The intent ofthis is to specifically allow bus operations and bus maintenance staff to utilize the full capabil ities of the TOS system through the removal of the redundant faxing and telephoning between the bus operations and maintenance divisions regarding bus availability. The current manual back-up syste m for the assignment of buses should be kept in place in the event of power failures, natural disasters etc. 5 Revisit the specific assignment of buses to designated parking spaces at each facility. This activity may have to be facility-specific due to t he diffe rent physical configurations of each facility 6 Purchase new computer hardware that will allow TOS to operate as a stand-alone system or i ncrease the information processing capability of the existing central VIV< system Either of these options will increase TOS' ability to assimilate information and, t herefore allow for quicker input and retrieval of TOS-related in forma tion. 7. Enhance the existing batch reader i n VMS to emulate the automatic check-in device used by COTA (previously referenced i n this report). COTA has agreed to transfer both the hardware specifications and software programming language (COBOL) necessary to implement this system at MOTA. After a trial period of six months using the automatic check-in device, MOTA should reexamine the role of dispatchers and person power requirements in this area. 8 Continue to utilize the recently-implemented bus maintenance radio supervisor located at the CCC at the County's Government Center (5th floor) for the hand ling of roadcalls. This may require the hiring of additional maintenance personnel to handle this function due to the fact that, initially, th is process was to be only temporary in nature and that it required the 36

PAGE 49

Metrobus Availab ility and the Transit Operating System Program reallocation of maintenance personnel to the CCC It has been shown that this new process has improved the accuracy of the track i ng of buses that have been se n t back to a particular for repa i rs and/or to track the use of "plug" buses used to replace the buses that have been sent back to a particular facility. 9. Formally state, in writing, a set of procedures that define exactly what an alive" bus is and what a "dead" bus is, and who will be responsible for the dead i ng of buses (dispatcher, maintenance supervisor, etc.) in a variety of situations (ale broken. etc.). For example a bus is alive" only when it is ready for an operator to use in-service i.e. after all repairs have been made to the bus and it has been fueled and cleaned by the bus maintenance division And, a "dead" bus, for example, is a bus that is not frt for service This should in conjunction with the other recommendations contained in this report, remove some of the surround i ng a bus' immediate availability. Consideration should a l so be g i ven to defining a bus that is in transition from "dead" to "alive,' i.e., all of the maintenance work has been completed but the bus has not been returned to its assigned parking location or a bus is out of service and a mechanic is in route to the bus to determine if it will be taken out of service. 10. I mplement an interactive real-time display monitor system (OMS) that shows the status of buses i e .. a l ive" or dead.' The purpose of the OMS wou l d be to keep bus and bus maintenance apprised of the status of buses ( a l ive or "dead ) i n real-time This could be accomplished with a color coding system on the OMS that denotes the bus number of "dead" buses in red and the bus number of alive buses in green for example. The OMS hardware (d i splay monitor) wou l d be independent of the TOS system's, but the OMS would need to be interfaced with TOS in order for it to report the real-time status of buses It is env i sioned that the OMS hardware could consist of an external computer (preferably 37

PAGE 50

Metrobus Availability and the Transit Operati ng System Program a very large color monitor) or some other type of display system t hat is strategically placed in both the operations and maintenance facilities to allow for ease of reference by staff members of both divisions. In addition, the OMS should show a running tota l in real time of the number of buses that are alive and dead." 11. Similar to the method used at COTA, it is recommended that bus maintenance should be responsible for assigning buses to operators Unlike at MOTA where bus operations is resp onsible for assigning buses to operators COTA's maintenance division is totally respons ible for a bus until the assigned operator accepts for service. The use of this procedure at COTA has greatly reduced confusion as to whether a specific bus is available for immediate service and greatly improved coordination between their maintenance and operations divisions. 12. The assignment of buses to specific runs and/or individua l pieces or work should be by bus type" (i e., articulated and/or handicap accessible) and not by specific bus "number ." Consideration may have to be given to the assignment of certain buses that have full advertising (full wraps) to specific runs and/or individual pieces or work to uphold contra::tual obligations associated the advertising. In order to successfully implement the above recommendations, it will be necessary for bus operations and bus maintenance personnel to follow the established procedures specified in the updated TOS Procedures Manual. In addition, a monttoring process should be developed and implemented to verify the accuracy of the information that is input in to and output from the TOS system, and to determine the overall success of the process. 38

PAGE 51

APPENDIX A Daily MOTA Bus Availability A-1

PAGE 52

This is a blank page A 2

PAGE 53

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PAGE 54

"""" ,., ... 0 0 0 0 F rRr L.4' 0 ., .. 0 0 $\MIC!oll)' ,, 72 0 T able 6 (continued ) AM M O T A Bus A vail ability b y F acility rrld3y ""'"'' .. ,. ..,... "'' ".; r. H . ... . 1"-" <11:1 .,,_,._ ... -- '. 1. .... ,. .... 5 2 0 > l212l o l 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Sunday 0612<,. .. I 0 0 0 0 0 0 R>.ltiJ Mitd () 0 0 0 0 0 'h t !l_ .. C.nnl .. ., ,.... .. .,. ( lit,!;}w .-... .-. ,..\_,.. : 04:00AM 1 6 1 8 -8 I 13 13 27 27 0 7 0 0 .. 3 23 Trlppots Lar.JO 2 2 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 t.IW:ry ....... , 0 0 0 ... 0 0 0 0612119$ -, ..... I"(' ... 0 0 0 .. 0 R vn4 MiUfd 0 0 0 NOf1tlut Df'l!$f01\ ""'V"" 0 0 0 0 0 ..,. d" .... ... .... . ... .. 29 I o I n I ., I I o I 0 0 0 10 0 Tft, 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o I o o I o 1 I o ..,.,, .. 0 0 0 0 .. 0 0 0 '"'"'""" .. 27 0 0 . .. ... f, -r:., <-::111 2<' ;_-!;::.' ;/.:;"';f """;. ,j _, t; : :} -i: .-.. :rl'.'. .. .,.-; ...... _..,, ; '... "hX . I . , .. ... 1ll\1Ji "' ... ..... .i 04. 00AM .. u; I 106 I m I -29 I .)() 2 1 31 -35 se 1 , .. ... 011ttlAM 2 o I ,. I ,., I .1 I 2 1 I "' I 11 t 2 2 2 0 6 I e 3 2 I 1 o I o 0 Tt\ppf!l M$s.ocl 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 I I 0 0 0 I I 0 I 0 I 0 I 0 l 0 I I 1 I 0 I 0 _....) A-4

PAGE 55

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PAGE 56

f i . .. 0 0 0 0 0 ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 . .. ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o o o o.l o o o ., 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N 0 0 N 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 0 ... $..' 0
PAGE 57

]:;> u .. ... .., ;:. "c = :;.c C,!! 0 .... ..... > ..,co: 1-c( b 2 :1! c( g m o o o o , .. ::: o o o o : o o o o o o o o I : -:: 1 -o o o o o o I; o o ., o ;' '' '': o o o o ') ., o o o "no ft o .... < ,, 0 0 0 0 !fil 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1:{1 :: 0 0 0 0 f:j J . ,, I I! 0 0 0 0 1 II R 0 0 0 0 B ll 0 0 0 0 .l ; !! 0 0 0 0 ; g o o o o o o o o o o o o ; o o o o l i

PAGE 58

Tabl e 6 (continued) A M M OTA B u s Availa bility by Facility TW&da r Ft.,_t 5111\lt city Sl.nday T uosdey TW$4ty F'rid:J)' Monc:'$)' 1\l$sda/ DIYition Neme 08110195 0&1119S 08.' 12195 O!JI3196 0011419S 08115.'9$ 0811619$ 08117J9S Oett8i'95 ()81191'95 te.'lOo'OS 08J21195 08122196 <181W95 ; N. ' ''' ... -l.,f' ;.-'., ) -'" '-';>'> -eon.w-oM ... I\ ... . :.' :-;," -o::"':.fl 'I' ....-. -;:;}:..,. . .. -;_. .. -:-:+c .. __ .... -, 1 ,';Ci_l' _, I _,' ..... . ...... c" ,,. '" .... <" .. 1 Qo&;OOAM --8 -4 39 0 .$ 8 t -4 "' 44 7 1 1 t __ __ 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 o 0 1 0 2 TriPPf!'t MiS&&d 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Runtlete 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 o 0 0 0 o o o Ftuuf.lissocl 0 0 0 0 0 -o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 c .., u .. .... . ; : t . . 04 00 AM 1 l3 3i u 16 1 0 13 ll XI 1 2 I OT:30AAI 5 0 26 30 ..4 0 o3 1 2 16 15 .7 2 ""' Tr"*-L-. 2 0 0 0 12 0 4 2 0 0 0 1 0 4 T rippersMissod 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o A._lotc-S 0 0 0 0 0 9 o 0 1 0 6 1 s Alsosi6Md 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 o """"""' ... ... .. , ,.,., ,., z ,, -"' .># ,.,;,;,, .. li" ... "'rl'" '"," -.. " HOI'!bMstDMslon '. '.'.: ::;;:.!:. :, i 0400 AU 32 <33 .. l!t -25 ..3Q -33 -30 -31 15 31 ll 30 $ I 07 ;3QN4 0 0 1 )6 <6 1 9 ... .13 t 3 1 1 0 0 1 l(()l)t ftl..,. 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 5 0 0 3 0 0 l f'iWettMi*SfiS 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 5 0 0 1 0 0 R.l.nsla'A 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 2 1 2 J 1 0 0 0 RunsMiod 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 o 0 o Tou.lt tor AM .;.. l ':::.,.,. ;..-; .. i. n n 4 n o n , N > Tippors l.,. 2 o o o 20 o 4 e s o o 6 o & 0 0 () 0 .. Z 0 2
PAGE 59

Table 6 (continued) AM MOTA Bus Availability by Facility Ttusday ftid;,.y. T ._,.,dtly \Vf4ne&dtly JliiA(Itly S.)u( toWs fo r AM :;.: d'!> 'r,. ; )J'::';ih..l .<;.. ; "' -..: /-"' -= .. ,. AM 0 43 1$' .U 39 34 -29 1 0 1 123 15e 6 -3 1 01 .30AM -& 0 38 t27 2 -4 1 2 4 412 112 IU 1 0 TtCIPtrtltlt ......... 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 Q 1 o 0 0 1 t o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 $ l S I 0 0 0 2 2 2 0 Aoos Mi sWd 0 0 (I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 A 9

PAGE 60

u .. IL _,.. 'i"' c:= .. o= .. -> <.O<> !,'ooo<>o .. !l'!><>o<> 2 I> 0 ., 0 il 0 ., ., ., ., ., ., ., 0 0 ., ., 2!1' .. '! ., ., 0 ., I i 0 0 0 0 0 l) ., 0 0 !! 0 0 0 0 .. N 0 0 . f ,,,,: ., 0 0 0 0 0 :; 0 0 N Q Ill &! ., 0 0 0 g 0 ., N ., /,; ;!; 0 0 0 ., 0 0 0 n 0 ., 0 0 0 0 ., .. 0 0 ., ., ; .. N 0 ., -., 0 0 0 -' N 0 !" ., . -0 ., 0 .,JijJ '1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -0 0 ., 0 :<: i I 0 j ] i ! f i i I % '

PAGE 61

_,., ., ... G>]:o -== ;;.Q c .. o= u .. -> c<>< ., .. 1-ol( .... c :i lE C( 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 l 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 :; 0 0 0 0 ' 0 -,; 0 !''"; 1.:,:. 0 0 l 0 0 0 7 n o -"I o o o o :; o o o o o e ., --+-+-1--+-+-1 i o o o 1 m 2 o -I i :; 0 N 0 0 0 l' 0 0 0 = ie 0 0 0 "o! o o o o b ; o ; o o l:r: 1 o o o I o o o o o o o o o l
PAGE 62

" .. ... '. 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 lc' .: .. "o o o o 2 o-o o r, n o o o o I : ,. o o o o I'" = o o o h .;&r <": 0 0 0 0 ;; j? 0 0 N 0

PAGE 63

1 : .. 0 0 0 0 olti 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 :; 0 0 o J . "0 0 0 0 0 I : o l o o l I o o o ., ! ..... . t .. I I ll 1 ; j J

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c:; {! _,. ..., ... "'Z:. c= ;:;.o c .. o= u '"> -... < ., ., '""< 5 :E :E < lil 0 0 0 0 O I L .,. N 0 o o o N o o o l\l o o o o "I V o o o J k 0 0 0 0 Fi, :! 0 -0 J';: l! 0 0 0 0 0 N 0 0 i 0 0 0 01,: 0 0 0 0 !! 0 0 N 0 2 :II 0 0 N 0 g ., ., ., ., ., ., ., jl g ., ., ., .,H p ., ., ., ., l c i 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 $ 0 0 <: 0 0 0 o o o !1 l! o o o ), i I j : e i I :
PAGE 65

Cor,. Wlfl 04:00.AM 0130'-M TtO Rvtlt lllf.e 11117195 . 1 ,. "'' {.Y .. ,, 2 I o \ 0 0 0 0 0 0 '""'" 70 4S lG 0 0 0 0 0 0 Table 6 (continued) AM MOTA Bus Availability by Facility 11/2!0.195 I 0 0 0 11121195 ; 1.'1 }P.': !.t 4 0 0 0 .. 0 0 0 0 -., 0 0 0 f r id;y IU2....S 0 0 0 1112519S .. .. ,. 0 0 o I o I o """' """''' .. 1 0 0 0 0 0 11/2&195 .JJ. ............. ,., .... . --;'! 3 2 0 0 0 :<1 "ii ,.. 6 0 0 0 0 Rl.nJM i nocl 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ... ..... ... -"-=t w -... -c .... -:;. !:.\J {r . 04:00AM 4 4 0 4 4 4 4 0 6 l , 12 12 S 3 o 4 2 2 I 4 0 l6 .. 0 I 0 o l o l o l o l o l o o o o o o o I o 0 0 I 0 0 0 0 0 2 -0 0 0 0 I I 0 I 0 I I I 0 I 0 I I I I I I 0 I I I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NottiMUI OMsiOI\ :t; ;P-. o:ff.tt)}. .!/!:.'! 41 M o 2 1 ... 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 63 0 0 '22 Runttfllt 01111 0 o 2 o o o o : o o o 0 I 0 0 I) 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 I I R ....... Mi.* I 0 0 0 0 () 0 0 o I o I o o I o J. .. "' .. ; "'"m '" .. '..;;, ... ""' lo4a1Sf01'AIII .. 07 : JOJ\M N IM '1"1 .. 1'1' 0 (I 0 Q Q I 0 0 0 0 l$iolol:l: . ' ' . --""tt-:t.t, ..;.;.;: . ., 178 101 0 0 o I o 0 I .. 0 0 -.. 0 0 L._ """".!!!!!. _o_ I o I o I o o 1 2... o_L..-2. 0 0 A 15 .;: .. -;.'' ... 110 I .us 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 0 0 .,. I 0 0 19 0 0 0 0 0 . .:J ... 0 0 0 I 0

PAGE 66

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PAGE 67

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PAGE 68

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PAGE 69

u .. ... 0 0 0 0 0 fj ., ., 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ;l:,\ ., ., 0 0 0 I -,_ '., ; o o o o :j o o o o o -M o .; -0 1:; 0 0 0 0 lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -2 0 0 0 R o o o o o o o :!! o o o o o o o o o o i ll i i i l i 0 I i g a i

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u .. IL

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PAGE 72

u IL .... c: ;S> c .. o= u .. > ..... .!!!': S>ID f! g ::E ::E a. I I I I I I f 2 i I I I I I I 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ::; J!! 0 0 0 0 :ll 0 0 0 0 .. 0 0 0 0 ;Stoooo' 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 '"" 0 4 0 0 0 0 "':' 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I,., :; 1 o o o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ji:OOOOO:<.. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 i> ; 0 .. 0 0 s:;qooo ; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 :--0 0 ::; Q 0 0 0 o 0 0 0 0 ;:1 0 0 0 0 :: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ; 0 0 0 0

PAGE 73

" .. ... ..... :J.:t: c:= :;:.t:o c: .. o= .. -> ,..<( .... >-ct: ::E ... ooooo ,<;ooo oo l'! o !;I '<' o '<> o ; o o o o :; o o ; "' 0 0 0 . :}"'"0000 : I ': 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ol!?l " 0 0 0 0 ::!' 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 e 0 0 0 r r l 0 0 0 \,; 0 0 0 k '!! o o o 0 :; '!' o o o o o o o o o k 1 <:; o o o o f" 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 :; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I:; o o o .. *soooJ ii"Eooo 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ol I X :; 0 0 0 0 0 ; " 0 0 I I <:; 0 0 0 0 I ., 0 0 0 :i ; ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ... 0

PAGE 74

u .. ... _,... ...... .. ,... c::: ;SJ c .. o:=: u .. -> r-.
PAGE 75

c::; (:. ., ..... """ c= ;:.c c .. o= .. -> .... <( .. .. -" 1-<( ::; :Iii II. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 0 l 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ; 0 N 0 0 0 0 0 0 -0 0 -! 7 ,., , i "' 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 j) :; 0 0 0 0 0 i j o o o o i o o o o o o l .-; o o o o iS o o o o 0 0 0 J 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 :; 0 0 0 0 . :' 1: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ::; 0 0 0 0 0 -1" i ; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 , :: 0 0 0 0 0 . l
PAGE 76

! I f I 0 0 0 0 , "" 0 0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 ., 0 0 . .. ..; :; o o o o o f f or o o o o o ..i 0 0 0 oooor. .,. ., 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 :-; 0 0 0 0 0 0 .,. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 rt: 0 0 0 0 .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 :ooooa 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o J; o o o o j. 0 0 0 0 ';: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 '{ 'i'\ '? 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .. 0 l -,, ;;l, 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .. ... 0 0 0 fa 0 0 0 0 0 0 I -t-!--I-+-1H-++-t: 4: -!--l-+-1 f-+-t.' I'J,_ -1--1-H-+++-H-1--+-t,... 1.. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Z-. :; ":" 0 0 0 0 .. "' 0 0 r'

PAGE 77

f 1 -. f I -0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ; 0 0 0 0 ll $; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ,, 0 t:: ., 0 -. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 , .... oooo ; 0 0 0 0 0 :; 0 0 0 0 0 G $ o o o o 0 0 0 0 .. ; 0 0 0 0 00000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .-. "' 0 0 0 0 ;; 0 0 0 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 s:l 0 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 0 0 0 oooooo .. -1: -;.: ...... 000 ,.. ' .. , 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 !" Q 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ... ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 I'J' 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .._;,.c 0 0 0 0 0 'J _., I

PAGE 78

:i! ., 0 0 0 0 I ,., 0 o 0 o :a 2 0 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

PAGE 79

APPENDIX B Sample Bus Availability Sheet B-1

PAGE 80

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Centnll 0 &I Bus Avallabll i ty Sheet Date: Supervisor: Total: It :'3.o v,., 1073 7008 8044 9007 9319 4026 1000 0001 9008 9338 4027 8002 8046 9009 9339 4028 8003 8047 9010 9341 4029 1088 8004 8048 9012 9342 4030 8005 8049 9013 9343 4031 1090 8006 8050 9014 9344 4032 8007 8051 9015 9345 4 0 33 8008 8052 9016 -<@"?-4034 8009 8053 9017 9347 4035 8010 8054 9348 4036 8055 9349 4037 8012 8056 9350 4038 8013 8057 9351 4039 8014 8058 9352 4 040 8015 8059 9153 .A 8016 8060 9024 9354 II'? ... -7 8017 8061 9025 9355 5001 114'8 8018 8062 9026 9356 5002 1150 8019 8063 9357 1155 8020 8064 9358 8021 8065 9029 93&9 5005 8022 8066 9053 9370 5006 ltS l 1 1 58 8023 8067 9060 9371 5007 I '-j I 9372 5008 .,...-r. 1068 1 162 8025 8069 9088 9373 500 9 1163 8026 8070 9089 5010 1164 8027 8071 9090 9411 5011 1169 8028 eon 9091 9420 8029 8073 9421 r 8030 90!3 9422 8031 9094 9C23 11115 11032 I 1m 9414 8033 8077 9201 9425 803-1 8078 9202 9 426 1259 8035 8079 9203 9427 8036 8080 9204 9428 0037 8081 9205 9430 8038 8032 9207 8039 8040 1 8041 . 8042 8086 3043 8087 B-3

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APPENDIXC AM and PM Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Facility by Day of Week C

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Cetal\'hy ctntia1 N0f1h005! TotO! FKW!y Com"' -T.,.l ,-c:lllty Con11I\'Wiy Ctl'lttal Ncwt,_.t TQ\111 F.c.lllcy CotaiVIay c- ........ Ta b le 8 M o n d ay AM S ervice with Late and Miss e d Trippers and Runs by Facil ity Pq1 of AM htvlce wleh .. t T""* Lee. ,"'",. bl 4-S Let 0 1 0 5 I 1$ I 2 1 2 3 ... 1 TnoP"!' Mi...S 24 Trippe,. M'-4 2 I 0 n 0 3 0 2 1 0 I D y of AM s.n>lc;e wilt! ... ORunt Ute t Run u"' 24 R\11'11 Ut. C.fftu n Lm , 3 0 5 18 I 3 l 1 0 o..y. of AM &.Nice ._..II,, 0 Runs Miuecl 1RunMiued l-31Wn s lllilhtd .. N ,. 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 '' 0 0 0 0 C 3 6\ppen! LAte 0 3 3 ... .. ed 0 0 0 5 3 t M!tMCI 0 0 0 0

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Cota!Way c"""' Nertl'lo4tsl r'"" Faeili'ly C orttw-, c ..... ,. TOIOl Corltt.ol NOt'lhel r.., C0t$1V/8y c ...... NOI'ff>c_,l T1tl Table 9 Monday PM Service with Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Facility O.y. of wlll'l 1 Tr!p,...LM Llt>t 44 t.ett ,, ' I 17 I I Q .. 3 O.rt of PM 0 Tl'lppwt Mihtd 2 3 Mlu.cl 4 4 Tl1pp.rt MO..st d 23 Q 0 2 \ 2 Q ,. Q I I .. 2 1 I Dyt of PM SentiCt wlch .. 1 R!,ol'llAtt 24 Runt L.-. 44RuntUe. "' Q 0 2S I Q -"' I I 71 s I I Day. of "' s.Mct """" OAu ,IIM'*-" 1 Ruft Mlaa.d 2-3 fb.IM Mluecl RvntMI--..d ,. Q Q Q "' Q Q Q "' 0 ,. 0 C-4 6 0 I ' 4 T 6ppers Ml t.MCI 3 Au'" u.t. Q Q 0

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-COffiW.y c .... -'"" C IM'il Nortl\01$! '""' Fk""Y """'""' Cootro> NOnrltl$1 '""' - .. .. 1 0.,.111 AM I 1 TtlH"W .,.._. 24 Tri....-Ml...cJ I 0 0 ,. 0 ,. 0 0 Or of AM s.Mct wlltl ,,. 0 Jb.lr\11 Lilli 1 Runut. 241tuM LAlli I.MI 2 1 > 2 o s O.y-. Of AM S.Mce wlltl ... ORuMMiaMCI 1 2:4 Rolmo Mined 44 Mlauod ,. 0 ,. 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 C-5 ,. TrlppeA l.t14 0 4 Tripper. Mi11td 0 0 I+ Runt LAII 0 s 2 1 f+AuntMioue4 0 0

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'"'"" """'-..... ._.. Tot al CoraiWllly c ..... ,.,., ,tleillty C.IWtll .._,. Fec ll:t)t Calwty CO!'!II.al N'CWIIW I I.t T01a1 Table 11 T uesday PM Serv i ce with Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Facility O.ya ot PM s.tvsc with-OTllpP4ft WI 1 4.6 Tripp.,_ Uk 2 2 0 2 ,. 2 o.y. of PM Service wlct! 0 Tri.,.,. Mk!Md :l.-3 T...,_ MlaNCI 4.$ T !'Sppt,. Mmt\1 20 2 0 '' 0 0 I I 0 .. J 0 0.,.. of PM hrvin wilh, .. 0 RIMII t Run LM 2.JRuMIAII R11t11 I.AM ,. I 0 0 ,. I 0 0 ,. I 0 0 ,. J 0 0 Oeya Of PM s.rriu .wtn. .. 0 Rul'l l M !Moed t lib.l1t MIINCI l 2-' RloiM MI....:! Alin a Ml...cl ,. 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 C-S $+ TIIPP"'* LAtl 0 2 2 i Tri"""* Mi....t 0 0 0 0 $4 JWMI.MI 0 I 0 0 0 $+ AUI'II Ml...cl 0 0 0 0

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F.cMily Ccnl'WI'/ c ...... """""' TOIAI ConiW.y c ...... """""' Total Facility eon.ow., Cet11taf ...... '"'" facility Corll\'n)' "'" Table 12 Wednesday AM Service with Late and M issed Trippe"' and Runs by facility 0.,.. of AM s-ICJe wteh... 0 Tfifll!*' \.aile t u tr'lppen.l.* ,, 0 O 1t ? 1 63 8 0.)'1 oiA.IIII ... 0 T"991',. 1 TriP$*' Mi...cl Mi...cl ,. 0 0 ,. ' 0 2l 1 T3 2 ' 0.,. of AM hf'llcl 0 Rt.WII Lat. 'fbi" .... 2YRuna&At. .sRunUo 0 .. 0.,.. of AM a.Mc:. ..,_ ORunalu.d t Run Ml-..cl 241tun Mi-.d 44 Run MloHecf ,. ,. 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 0 0 0 C-7 0 0 0 ... ,. ... 0 0 0 0 $+ RI.Wia 0 7 ... Aia'IIMillt>d 0 0 0

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F1c.lllty Coral c .... -TOIII FM:oil!()' toreiV4y c- ""'""'" ro:el COfiiYh)' c..-. ..,_ TO .. o.,.. ot ... s.ntoe Mil\ ... 0 TrlppeN MOI.Md 1 ltipP"r MIIHd 1-3 Tnpp.o-. Mlu.d 2$ 0 0 .. 0 0 0 .. 0 0 0 0 0 0..,. ol 11''-' S.rvle wilt! ... ORun.L.-. 1 RI.WI LA'* 2.3 Rlltl l Ullt 4..$RunaUte .. 0 0 0 "' 0 0 0 .. 2 0 1 2 0 0.,0. of .. s.tvlc.l with ... 0 R\1,... Ml...cl 1 lb.u! Mh:Met 24RunlftfHd W R11111 Mi--.d "' 0 0 0 "' 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 .. 0 0 0 C-8 .. 0 0 \ I I tlriPI*"IIIIi .. M 0 0 Ruftl LAc. 0 0 I l 6 0 0 0

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Coralvv.t c... ... T<>
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F.cl llry CoP"tiVIey N001"-SI r .... Fdlty C.nl.ltl ......... "'" C:ota i VIay C t l'(re l HMN0$1 T"" -"""'""' Ctfllltl ......... TOI&I Table 1 5 Thursday P M S e rvice with Late and Missed Tri ppers an d R uns by Facility Day of ... OTri.....-&,..t. I Ttlp.-rU .. 2..) Tri;IJN" Yilt 4.$Ttlp ...... L 24 0 .. 2 22 0 2 2 4 Oeye of PM .. 2-3 Tlippt,. MiohN 4$ Trip'""' Mi .. td .. 0 0 ,. 0 0 ,. 0 I ' 0 ,. 1 I 2 j 0 o..y. of PM &.nile with ORune.._, 1 Run LaW 2..) R u n Ut. 44 fb,lM ,, 2 0 0 26 0 0 0 22 0 12 s 0 Deyt. of Pfll ........ with ... 0 2.S Ml-..d 4.$ R\lnt Ml-..d ,. 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 ,. a 0 0 C -10 0 0 4 T n,pp.,. Mi-...4 0 0 0 0 .. RuM LAt. 0 0 0 0 .. R1.111tMI11ed 0 0 0 0

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F.ellif)' c.tllfal -T""1 Faelllf)' Coni! Ill r..,, Ffltlllty Cott. IW.f c.mnoo Tott.l -Corti w ., ........ Tota l Table 16 Friday AM Service with L ate a nd Mlssod Trippers and Runs by FacUlty Cit wld'l OT,.._.L 1-3 Ttll)llolrt 21 2 3 0 0 1 0 58 o.y. Of A M $r.ri.U t W f..,.,. M I&Md 2 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 1 2 3 OR\11\&Lit. tllui'ILite 2..3 Rlll'lt. "'" ... >o 0 7 .. 2 ,, Dey-. of A M s.mu wtltl,., 0 Aiw"l MIIIMCJ W Ar.m. Ml-..d "4Rvt' Miu.cl ,. I 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 2$ 1 0 0 71 0 0 C-11 1+ TI'IPPtft LAI 0 0 e.o t,.,.....M_II 0 0 0 0 Rl.l,. '"""' t+R\IniM IIIIMd 0 0 0

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-.... ....... ""''-" ... Corlll Wrt C ntr l Hol'lltll! ,.., ...... e...-..... ... ,_. hc.III'V Coro i W.y c- ........ '''" Table 17 Friday PM Serv ic e with Late and Missed Trippers and Runs by Facility 0.,. .. ,... ...,.,_,. ....._ I I 1l ..... U.. 1 .-IT ...... Uie UT,._.L* 2$ 0 0 0 ' 0 0 .. 2 0 Oty of,.. 6wriot """''" 0 frippw. MIIHd 1 TI'IH I 0 ,. 0 0 20 2 0 .. 0 Dtt1 flf,. ....... ... 0 AIIM MINH t libJA Ml1-.d 4 .. Aunt MIMoM "' 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 "' 0 0 0 0 0 0 C-12 I T".,...,. L* 0 2 tTri!II*IMitHd 0 0 0 0 ...... 0 0 0 0 .. RIMII MIIMCI 0 0 0 0

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FaciiMy """'-e.tllllll ......... tot<1f Facility Cor.,v.'ay Ctntrtl ........ local F.clllcy Ccn!W8y c ..... New!hMst TOIIII Facll icy COttiWty -TOitl T a bt e 18 Satu rda y A M S ervice with Late and Missed Trippers and R uns by Facility o.y. of A M $ tNic;t wll'lt.,. 1 4-$ Tripp4o111 ._., "' 25 ,. 0 0 0 0.,.. o t A M $eN!e. wilt! ... 0 Tl1pptr. Mlaed 1 Tl1pp MhHd l 2..3 ntppe,. M iNecl 4-5 TriP9tf'ti M'-<1 "' 0 0 0 0 0 "' 0 0 0 0 0 0.,. of AM Setvl c t .... 1111 Oftlll'ltl.aW t 1\u nUte l-3 Rut! t 4-$Rw.tUt. 0 0 0 .. \ ' CMr of AM a.t"vlc:. '<01Ch. 0 Rlantllintd t Rlu1t Mlued 24 Run s W.IMCI URU!ItMan.d ,. 0 0 ,. 0 0 18 0 0 C-13 0 0 0 0 l Tl1ppen ... d 0 0 t R""tl..et 0 0 I 0 .. 0 0 \ I 0

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ftc'iJity """"'" NMPI .. Sl T OIPI eon.wo, c...,., T0\11 ,_., CO
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CortlwtY C$111.rlll ...,_, FK.., CorotW t c ....- HO"'I>4onl To1a1 Flltillty ""'c ..... ..._, T""' F11Giilty CoroiMy Otnlfll ......... T.,.l Table 20 Sunday AM Service with L ate and M issed Trippers and R u ns by Facility tMo,, df "5t>fflc; a oollltl . OTriP,.,.I.Mt 1 T!'$119tt U.e NTriP$*nl..W u """"lit. ,. 0 0 0 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 Deye of AM 1 tri,._, MIHM :ll T/felpel'l .. laud 4-5 Tripp.rt. Ml...cl ,. 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 D lyt o t AM """"' witt! t..11 1 I S Rut11 L.Ma ,, 0 0 ,. .. 1 0 Day. of AM a. .... ia -.4th... 0 1 R:unMIIMd 2-)fbln -,. 0 0 0 0 0 ,. 0 ,. 0 0 0 C-15 .. Trippn,U.1 0 0 0 0 ,. ,....,.. ....... 111 0 0 0 0 lt\ltll '-t. 0 0 0 0 ... R-MI....-1 0 0 0

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Ftldllty Conlro l NotlhoO!ll '""' f'ltllily c-w., Con1r1 1 Nclrthooll! To 1o1 Fac:ll!ry COtt! IW.y Cti'(I'&J NCMeMI '""' Facili t)" Corol\'hy CCH'If1ol HOtlhoa$1 '""' Table 21 Sunday PM Service with Late and Missed T rippers and Runs by Facility Dey of PM with... 1 Tripp lAW Z-3 TriPfN'I"' Ut. I 4.6 Ttl.,.,..-. ,. 0 0 l 0 ,. 0 0 I 0 ,. 0 0 0 0 O.y1 c:lf PM s.Mc:. with. .. 0 Trf9peft Mi...c:l 1 TliPPtt MIM< I 2-3 T rt.,.,.,_ M"'-d 44 Milltd ,. 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 ,. 0 0 0 D.ty1 of PM leNICI With... ORsilnLM 1 AI.WI LnJ 2-3 RI.WII Lat. ._5Run