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Final report on ADA impacts on Florida's TD programs

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Title:
Final report on ADA impacts on Florida's TD programs
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Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Rahimi, Rebecca
Maas, Steven E
Hardin, Jennifer
Gribbon, Benjamin R
Jones, Ron F
Webb, Floyd G. III
Holman, Louis
Brosch, Gary L
Transporation Disadvantaged Commission
University of South Florida. Center for Urban Transportation Research
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Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR)
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla
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People with disabilities -- Transportation -- Law and legislation -- United States   ( lcsh )
People with disabilities--Florida--Transportation   ( lcsh )
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letter   ( marcgt )

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usfldc handle - c1.65
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Final Report on Impacts OJ) December 1993 Revised July 1994 Prepared for The F l orida Commission for the Transporta tion Disadvantaged By CUTR Center for Urban Transportation Resear ch Un iversity of South Florida, Tampa

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Transportation Disadvantag e d Commission 605 Suwannee Street, MS-49 Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0450 (904) 488-6036 Executive Director : Project Managers: Jo Ann Hutchinson Floyd G Webb, lli Louis Holman Center for Urbao Transportation Research University of South Florida 4202 E. Fowler Ave nu e, ENB 118 Tampa, Flor i da 33620 (813) 974-3120 Director: Project Director : Project Manager : Project Staff : II Gary L. Brosch F Ron Jones R. Benjamin Gribbon Steven E Maas Jennifer Hardin Rebe<:ca Rahimi

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Table of Contents List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I The Florida Coordinated Transportation Disadvantaged System . . I Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1 973 . . . . . . . 2 The Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 . . . . . . . . 2 ADA Complementary Paratransit . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Project Scope and Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Impacts on Community Transportation Coordinators . . . . . . I I Prior to ADA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II Operational Arrangements for ADA Comp le mentary Paratransit Serv ic e Provision . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Implementation of ADA Complementary Paratransi t Service . . 12 Effects of ADA Paratransit Service Criteria . . . . . . . . 1 3 Other Effects of ADA Paratransit on Coordinated TD Transp orta tion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Impacts on De mand and Funding . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Eligibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Sponsorship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Ridership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Funding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Appendix: System-by-System Summary . . . . . . . . . A-I Florida Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6 lll

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List o f Tab l es Table I T ransportation D i sadvantaged Populations . . . . . . . . 1 Table 2 Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 .... ............. 3 Table 3 ADA Paratransit Eligibility ...................... ..... 5 Table 4 Service Criteria for ADA Complementary Paratransit .. .... ... 6 Table 5 Counties With ADA Complementary Paratransit . . . . . . 9 Table 6 Provision of ADA Paratransit Service . . . . . . . . . 12 Table AI Data In System-by-System Summaries . . . . . . . . A-2 Syste m -by-System Numerical Data . . . . . . . . . . A-7 A-41 iv

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Preface The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 brought profound changes to services and facilities available to the public, especially public transportation Among these changes is a requirement for fixed-route public transit systems to provide complementary paratransit service for individuals who cannot use the fixed-route system due to a disability The requirement may have significant impacts on the Florida Coordinated Transportation System already in place to coordinate transportation services for Florida's transportation disadvantaged population The Florida Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged contracted with the Center for Urban Transportation Research in the Fall of I993 to examine the initial impacts of ADA complementary paratransit service on the Florida Coordinated Transportation System This report documents these findings The Center for Urban Transportation Research and the Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged acknowledge with appreciation the organizations that shared their plans and experiences for this study. Big Bend Transit, Inc. Broward Transit Division COMSJS Corporation (Duval County) COMSIS Corporation (Escambia Counf)l) Coordinated Transportation System, Inc. East Volusia Transit Authority Escambia County Transit System Good Wheels, Inc. Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority Hillsborough County Board of County Commissioners Jacksonville Transportation Authori/)1 Key West Transit Authority Lakeland Area Mass Transit District Lee County Transit Lynx v Manatee County Area Transit Metro Dade Transit Agency Palm Beach Coun/)1 ,\dPO Palm Beach County Transportation Authority Pinellas County ,\dPO Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authori/)1 Polk County Board of County Commissioners Regional Transit System Sarasota County Area Transit Senior Friendship Centers, Inc. Space Coast Area Transit Suwannee Valley Transit Authori/)1 Tallahassee Transit Authority Volusia County Council on Aging Inc.

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Executive Summary The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) requires public transit systems to provide paratransit service as a complement to their fixed-route transit service for individuals w i th disabilities who are unable to use the fix ed-route system. This ADA paratransit service affects, directly or indirectly, sixteen (25 percent of) community transportation coordinators (CTCs) in Florida. The Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR) conducted a short study of these impacts in late 1993 at the request of the Florida Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged (CTD). CUTR examined 1993 ADA paratransit plans and interviewed officials at CTCs and transit systems. The results are summarized below. Prior to ADA many transit systems were already involved in paratransit at some level, and already coordinated with CTCs or served as the CTC themselves. Since ADA the involvement of transit systems in paratransit has increased dramatically. Of the sixteen CTCs affected, thirteen (81 percent) are directly involved in providing or coordinating some or all ADA paratransit service. Requirements for ADA paratransit have had some impact on specific CTC service parameters. Many CTCs are altering reservation hours to accommodate ADA requirements. The TD and ADA fares paid by passengers are changing affecting demand and causing some confusion among riders. ADA paratransit is also providing some additional evening and weekend service. Transit systems are required (by 1997) to provide ADA paratransit without capacity constraints. ADA paratransit is therefore a rapidly growing program, and is contributing to the rapid growth of CTC trip volume. Some trends that are not specific to ADA requirements have also emerged. The level of communication and coordination between transit systems and CTCs has increased substantially. Both transit systems and CTCs are trying to identify TD riders who could use fixed-route services, and reserve demand-responsive paratransit for those who cannot. Some CTCs have upgraded computer equipment or made other improvements because other changes were being made to accommodate ADA at the same time ADA paratransit eligibility is limited to a subset of the TD eligible population that cannot use the fixed-route transit system because of their disability. Those who are ADA eligibility are frequently eligible for other programs with overlapping eligibility criteria; how each trip is assigned to a sponsor varies among CTCs. Riders sometimes do not know which program they are riding under for a given trip. Most ADA paratransit riders were already registered under the TD non -sponso red VII

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Executive Summary program, some are new paratransit users. Fewer were previously relying on an agency program. In 1992 and 1993, ADA paratransit represented nineteen and seventeen percent respectively of all coordinated paratransit trips in Florida, and both increased dramatically. ADA increased from 1.6 to an estimated 2.1 million, and total coordinated trips increased from 8.5 to 12.4 million. Transit systems expect ADA paratransit ridership of 3.8 million in 1997, which would meet approximately 26 percent of the estimated unmet demand for general TO trips in 1 997. Generally, transit systems are paying for all ADA paratransit trips out of existing budgets, without any separately identified funding source, but are very uncertain about future funding, especially as ridership and capacity grow. The total operating cost to F lorida transit systems for ADA paratransit was approximately $21 million in 1 992 and estimated to be $28 million in 1993. By 1997, annual operating costs are expected to exceed $55 million. As ADA paratransit becomes an increasin gly important part of the transportation in Florida for those who are transportation disadvantaged, the CTD should continue to monitor the implementatio n of ADA. More importantly, the future role of the CTD in ADA implementation, and the future role of ADA paratransit in the Florida Coordinated TD System should be carefully considered. VIII

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Background Tbe Florida Coordinated Transportation Disadvantaged System Florida has sought to coordinate transportation for those who are transportation disadvantaged since the enactment of Chapter 427 of the Florida Statotes in 1979 Today there exists an independent commission, the Florida Commission for the T ransportation Disadvantaged (CTD), reporting directly to the Legislature. The CTD oversees the Florida Coordinated Transportation Disadvantaged System. In this system, the CTO contracts with an entity in each county or designated service area to coordinate transportation disadvantaged (TD) transportation services as the designated community transportation coordinator (CTC) The CTC coordinates trips that are sponsored by social service programs and trips that are otherwise non-sponsored up to the limits of its resources The service includes both trips for specific social service programs and additional general trips. The CTC holds purchase-of-service contracts with organizations and agencies that require TO transportation services and may directly provide these trips or broker some or all trips to contracted transportation operators. The TO population served by the coordinated system can be classified into two categories, shown in Table I. The TO population incl ud es those that are eligible for ADA complementary paratransit service, which is discussed later in this document. TO Category I TO Category II ADA Eligibility TABLE 1 > Transportation Dliladvantaged Populations D i sabled, elderly, and low-income persons, and "high-risk". or "at risk" children, who may be eligibl e to receive governmental or social service agency subsidies for program and general trips. A subset of Category I, Those perso ns who are transportation disadvantaged according to the eligibility guidel i nes of Chapter 427 and are eligible to receive TO Trust Fund monies for general trips. Transit systems must provide complementary paratransit serv i ce to those who are unable to ride the fixed-route service due to a disability. Thi s eligibility is further exPlained later i n this section

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Background Section 504 of tbe Rehabilitation At Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in any program that r eceives federal financial assistance. In its implementing rule, the Urban Mass Transportation Administration (now the Federal Transit Administration FT A) allowed urban transit systems to meet the requirement by providing either a special service for individuals with disabilities or by making the regular fixed-route service accessible, or by some combination of the two. Nonurban transit systems needed only to certify that special efforts were being made to serve individuals with disabilities. Private non-profit organizations were not required to submit any special certification. Section 504 still requires that entities must not discriminate against individuals with disabilities if they are to be eligible for federal funding, but now references the ADA for compliance criteria. The Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 The Americans with Disabi.lities Act (ADA), a civil rights bill, was passed by Congress and signed into law on July 26, 1990. It lays out national goals for ending discrimination against individuals with disabilities. These goals include assuring that indiv i dual s with disabilities have equality of opportunity, a chance to fully participate in society, are able to live independently, and can be economically self-sufficient. The Act is organized into five titles, which are summarized in Table 2. Most important to transportation are Titles II and m which address public and private services and facilities.' T he ADA requirements for transportation are impleme nted by the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOD in the "Transportation for Individuals with Disabilities; Final Rule" published September 6, 1991.' The transportation regulations establish a variety of requirements i n cludi ng: Thatcher, Russell H. andGaffitey, John K. The ADA Paratransit HandbOtJk: lmplemenl ing /he Complemenlary Pararramlt Requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, U.S. Department of Transportation. September 1991. 2 U.S. Department of Transportation. 49 CFR Parts 27, 27, and 38. "Trans.pQrtation for Individuals. wilh Disabilities; Final Rule," Federal Register, September 6, 1991. 2

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' . '. . Title I Title II Tille Ill Title IV Tille V Background General requirements regarding non-discrimination and definitions; Explanatory discussion on i nterpretat ion and construction of the r egulat ions ; Rules outlining which requirements apply to what types of organizations; Accessibility requirements for transportation facilities; Rules on acquisition of accessible vehicles by public entities; Rules on acquisition of accessible vehicles by private entities; Rules for the provision of transportation service; Specific physical and operational accessibility requirements for varying types of vehic le s; and Requirements for paratransit as a complement to fixed-route transit. TABLE2 .., Employment. Prohibits discrimination against qualified i ndiv id uals with disabilities, In all aspects of employment. Businesses must also make reasonable accommodations for qualified applicants or employees. Public Services. Prohibits discrimination against persons wijh d i sabilit i es i n all services programs, or activities provided by public entities. Private Sector. Provides for the full and equal enjoyment of public accommodations, goods, and services offered by private entities Discrimination by private entities is prohibited In the prov isio n of services, the setting of policies or other advantages. privileges, and accommodations provided to the pub l ic. Telecommunications Access Requires telephone companies to offer relay services for individuals with hearing or speech impairments. Administrative. This t itle provides for administration and implemen t ation of the Act. Varying federal departments are respo nsib l e for enforcing ADA. Each of these requirements has some effect on Florida's Coordinated Transportation Disadvantaged System, especially the requirement for transit systems to provide paratransit as a complement to fixed-route service. This requirement incl udes extremely specific criteria for eligibility and service characteristics. This report examines the impacts of implementing complementary paratransit service on Florida's designated community transportation coordinators and the coordinated TO program.

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Background ADA Comp le m entary Paratransit USDOT's ''Transportation for Individuals with Disabilities; Final Rule" contains many requirements that app l y to transportation programs; however, complementary paratransit requirements apply only to public entities operating fixed-route transit systems. The comp l ementary paratransit requirements still apply if another organization provides this service for the transit system. Throughout this document, the phrase "ADA paratransit" is used to mean the "ADA complementary paratransil" required of public transit systems Requirements vary for other types of specialized transportation. Complementary paratransit service must be provided to ADA paratransit eligible individuals, which includes those persons who are unable to get to or use the fixed route service due to a permanent or temporary disability. Because eligibility is functional, based on inability to use fixed-route service, a person may be eligible for some trips but not for others. Public entities (i.e., the transit systems or the entity that provides the complementary paratransit service) may provide service for persons other than ADA paratransit eligible individuals, but must apply "ADA eligibility" strictly, counting additional service separately The ADA regulations contain very specific definitions of disability and eligibility, and contain equally detailed certification procedures that must be implemented. This is required in order to track ADA costs and ensure compliance, and so that ADA eligibility criteria are applied uniformly. The ADA eligibility requirements are detailed in Table 3. The regulations also contain very specific service criteria for complementary paratransit to make it comparable to fixed-route service Service criteria are defined for six aspects of service: service area, response time, fares, trip purpose restrictions, hours and days of service, and capacity constraints. These requirements are summarized in Table 4. It should be noted that the transit system can charge users (i.e., riders) no more than twice the applicable fixed-route fare for ADA paratransit trips, but can charge higher rates to agencies for agency trips. Agency trips are those trips guaranteed to an agency, paid for by an agency, or offered as a special service in addition to what ADA paratransit would offer to eligible individuals. This means that the transit system is responsible for a large portion of the cost of each ADA paratransit trip, but can charge higher rates, including the full cost of the trip, to agencies for agency trips. 4

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Background TABLE3 .. :"-: ,;:;. t' '.>' ,.' Eligibility i s based on a functional inability to use fixed-route transportation; indilliduals may therefore be eligible only for certain trips. The transit system must strictly limit ADA paratransit eligibility to the criteria summarized below, although service to others may also be provided. Category 1 Any individual with a disability who is unable, as a result ol an impairment. to board, ride, or disembark from any accessib l e vehicle on the fixed-route system wilhout the assistance of another pe rson (except the operator). Category 2 Any individual with a disability who is only able to board, r i de, or disembar k from access ible vehicles, when an accessible vehicl e is not availabl e on the route and at the time the individual wants to traveL Category 3 Any individual a disabi lity who has a specific impairment-related condition that prevents him or her from travelling to or from a boarding l ocation o n t he fixed-route system. Others Visiti n g individua l s with disabilities must be presumed eligibl e for 21 days Up to one persona l care attendant and one companion must be provided service if they are travelling with an ADA paratransit eligible individuaL Additional companions must be provided servi ce onl y on a space-available basis. It should also b e noted that the term complementary refers to paratransit that complements the fixed-route transit service, and does not mean "free" transportation. The rules outline specific requirements for transit systems in planning for complementary paratransil Each transit system was required to develop a complemenrary paratransit plan, with specific contents. Th e original plans were submitted to the FT A in January 1992. FTA reviewed these plans, requested additional information and changes as necessary, and approved the plans when they addressed all the requirements Transit systems were required to begin to implement complementary paratransit in January 1992, but do not need to be in full compliance until January 1997 Annual plan updates and progress reports, therefore, must be submitted to FTA every January for approvaL These plans and plan updates were used by CUTR staff for this project. The planning process also requires extensive public participation. Transit systems are required each year to conduct outreach to make people aware that the plan is being developed or modified consult with individuals with disabilities, make the draft plan available in accessible formats, provide an opportunity for public comment, hold a public hearing, and establish and maintain an ongoing mechanism for public input. These require ments are especially significant Summarized from 49 CFR Part 37 123.

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Background because they should heighten awareness of passenger rights and the availability of TD transportation in urban communities. Service Area Response Time Fares Trip Purpose Hours & Days Capacity TABLE4 Origins and destinations within Y. mile of fixed routes and within the core service area. Reservations must be acoepted during nonnat busi ness hours for service the next day or up to 14 days in advance. The negotiated pickup time must be within an hour of the individual's desired departure time. The fare charged to the user shall not exceed twice the fixed-route fare for a comparable trip, including transfers. The transit system may charge a higher fare to an agency for agency trips. No restrictions or priorities based on trip purpose can be imposed. Must be available during the same days and hours as the fixed-route service. This can vary by route. Availability cannot be by restrictions on the number of trips that will be provided, by lists, or by any operational pattern or practice that significantly limtts the availability of service to ADA paratranstt eligible persons. Project Scope and Methods This document evaluates the impacts of ADA complementary paratransit services on local CTC systems. Specifically it attempts to describe the general extent to which local CTCs and TD Trust Fund monies are involved in the provision of ADA complementary paratransit services and the general impact that ADA complementary paratransit is having on the operation of and the demand for regular TO paratransit services. Supporting research included the following tasks: CUTR staff collected ADA complementary paratransit plans and 1993 plan updates from Florida's fixed-route public transit systems. Draft 1994 updates were requested but were not Summarized from 49 CFR Pan 37 .131. These service criteria apply specitica11y to ADA complementary paratransit service.., but not to other or additional paratransil service. 6

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Background yet available. Each ADA plan and plan update was reviewed for information about funding and the operational relationship between ADA and TD paratransit services. CUTR staff interviewed by telephone CTCs and transit systems in the affected urban areas to obtain additional information on local experience coordinating AD A and TO transportation services with regard to both operations and funding. These interviews were conducted during N ovember and December I 993. Known and estimated ADA demand, expenses, and revenue figures were compiled for each urban area, using the knowledge gained from review of ADA plans, updates, and interv i ews The ADA figures were examined in comparison to known and estimated TO demand, expenses, and revenue. CUTR staff analyzed the collected information to determine the impact complementary paratransit is having on the TO program. A draft report was submitted to CTD staff followed by a presentation of preliminary findings to the CTD. This final report documents the research described above. This final report presents : The extent to which TO Trust Fund monies are used for the provision of ADA paratransit services, based on knowledge gained from review of ADA plans and updates and telephone interviews. The general extent to which local CTCs are involved in the provision of ADA paratransit services, based on the plan reviews and interviews. T he relationship between ADA and TO eligibility, demand, expenses, and revenues. Based on the above tasks, this final report documents, to the extent possible the impact ADA is having on demand for regular TO paratransit services, and estimates, to the extent pos s ible, future impacts on regular TD transportation funding T his final report also documents the impact ADA complementary paratransit is having on the operation of other TO transportation services identify i ng trends in Florida, unique 7

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Background arrangements, and any difficulties that are Wlique to coordinating ADA complementary paratransit service with other TD services. Impacts There are 17 public entities in Florida that operate fixed-route systems and, therefore, have moved to implement ADA (comp lementary ) paratransit service. The ADA paratransit service affects a CTC in each of these locations, except Monroe County, which did not have a CTC. These 16 CTCs serve 19 counties. The transit systems, CTCs, and counties studied are summarized in Table 5. Changes in coordinated TD transportation are discussed in the following section 8

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County Alachua Brevard' Broward' Dade' Duval Escambia Hillsborough Lee Leon Manatee Monroe Orange, Osceola Seminole' Palm Beach Pinellas Polk Sarasota Vol usia Transit System Regional Transit System Space Coast Area Transit Broward Transit Division TABLE 5 Metro-Dade Transit Agency Jacksonville Transportation Authority Escambia County Transit System Hil l sborough Area Regional Transit Authority Lee County T ransit Ta llahassee Transit Authority Manatee County Area Transit Key West Transit Authority Lynx Palm Beach County Transportation Authority Pinellas Suncoast Tra nsit Authority Lakeland Area Mass Transit District Sarasota County Area Transtt East Volusia Transit Authority The transit system is also the CTC. Background --h .. CTC Coordinated Transportation System, Inc Space Coast Area Transit Broward Transit Division Soc. Serv. Transp. Section Met ro-Dade Transit Agency COMSIS Corporation COMSIS Corporation Hillsborough County Board of County Commissioners Good Wheels, In c Big Bend Transit, Inc Manatee County Area Trans i t No 1992 or 1993 CTC Lynx Palm Beach County MPO Pinellas County MPO Polk County Board of County C
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Impacts on Community Transportation Coordinators Prior to ADA Because of Section 504 requirements, most of Florida's transit systems offered some sort of door-to-door demand-response paratransit service before ADA was passed in 1990. This service generally was provided for disabled persons in the transit system's service area who were unable to use fixed-route service. ln this respect, eligibility for these services was similar to ADA eligibility. Certification for eligibility was not especially stringent in most cases. Because federal requirements were not very specific, the availability of this service varied from system to system. Because community transportation coordinators were at the same time attempting to coordinate TD transportation a variety of coordination arrangements existed. Some transit systems contracted with CTCs to coordinate and provide paratransit service while other transit systems served as transportation operators for the ere. ln some cases the transit system and the ere operated separate services with some minima l coordination. Several transit system s served as the CTC. Because Section 504 allowed transit systems the alternative of making their fixed route service accessible some transit systems in Florida had no involvement in the coordinated TD program or paratransit services. Operational Arrangements for ADA Complementary Paratransit Service Provision The passage and implemen tation of ADA did not necessarily force a change in the general arrangement between the transit systems and CTCs Which organizations sponsor coordinate, and provide service remained the same in many counties. For example, in six co unties the transit system was already the eTe, so no new relationships were necessary in order to impl emen t and coordinate ADA paratransit. The trans i t systems that were e T Cs prior to ADA remain CTCs. Transi t systems that provided some paratransit service under contract or coordination agreement with the eTC, continue to do so. Transit systems that previously purchased servic e from their local ere have altered agreements to purchase service that meets ADA paratransit criteria. II

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Impacts on Coordinators Two trans i t systems that were not previously involved in paratransit, have b e come involved. In several counties where the transit syste m served only as an operator for the ere, the transit system became respo n sible for ADA paratransit.' In all cases, the level of communication and coo rdination between transit s y s tems and CTCs has increased. In most areas, ADA paratransit service is being coordinated o r prov ided by the ere, as summarized in Table 6:6 TABL E 6 l i ... . ; . . . . ) . < Provision of ADA Paratransit Se..Vlce .. . . . . . . N umber o f ADA Paratransit Pr ovid e r Co u n tie s Urban Areas 11 CTC coordinates all of the ADA par a t rans i t. Brevard, Broward, Dade, Many are transi t systems. D uval, Escambla, H illsborough Lee Manatee Orange/Osceo l a/Semino l e, Sarasota, Volusia 2 CTC coo r dinates some of the ADA paratransit. Alachua, Leon 4 Non-CTC coordi nates all o f t he ADA paratransrt. Monroe, Palm Beach, Pinellas, Po l k In three counties (Alachua, Brevard, and Broward ) the ere will be involved in ADA paratransit, but ADA paratransit service is just being implemented. In Monroe County, where ADA paratransit service a lso is just starting up, the ADA plan does no t cal l for ere involvement.' Imp l ementation of ADA Complementary Paratraosit Servic e The ADA not only requires that transit systems must provide (for) complementary paratransit service, i t specifically expresses the ways in which that service must be comparable ADA paratransit is used throughout this document to mean ADA c omplemenuuy paratransit, i.e paratransit as a complement to fixed-route transit service, as required by the Transportation for Individuals with Disabilit i es Final Rule (49 CFR Part 37 Subpart F). 4 The many responsibilities of service provision are actually coordinated slightly differently in each area. as detailed in the Appendix. 7 Monroe County does not yet have a CTC, but is likely to within the next year. 12

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Impacts on Coordinators to fixed-route transit. Where ADA paratransit service is coordinated or provided by the CTC changes to some of the coordinated service hav e been required. The steps taken and specific operational changes made to paratransit service in each urban area are described i n the Appendix, in the system-by-system summaries. The most common changes that occurred in implementing ADA paratransit in Florida are described below. The transit systems are changing the service requirements for the paratransit service with which they are involved. For all transit systems, the paratransit they spo n sored or provided exceeded the ADA paratransit minimum requirements in some ways and did not meet them in others. Generally, the trans it systems are tightening the criteria for the service they will sponsor or provide in order to match the ADA requirements. The primary reason for tightening service parameters (such as decreasing service area, restricting eligibility, and raising fares) is to more closely relate ADA paratransit to fixed-route service and to ensure that sufficient capacity will exist to meet all ADA demand. Effects of ADA Paratrans it Service Criteria In most arrangements the CTC is coordinating ADA paratransit service and is working with the transit systems, through agreements or contracts, to modify paratransit service to comp ly with ADA service criteria (see Table 4). In some cases the service changes are being applied to both TO and ADA service, while in others ADA paratransit service is provided with a set of service parameters that are different from T O service. The changes in service parameters are discussed below. Service Area. Most CTCs have been providing paratransit to entire counties, exceeding the service area required of ADA paratransit. In some cases, the transit system also sponsored paratransit service throughout a county. More often, tbe transit sys t ems have concentrated sponsorship and service provision in their fixed-route service area. Typically these service areas are slightly larger than the service area required by ADA (i.e., 3/4 mile around fixed routes). The transit systems are now focusing their paratransit invo lve ment on their ADA senlice area. In these cases TO service is sponsoring trips for people who are transportation disadvantaged, and ADA eligib le for some trips, when they are travelling outside of the ADA service area.

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Impacts on Coordinators Response Time. Most CTCs are having to adjust the hours during which reservations are accepted in order to meet ADA paratransit requirements for "next day" reservations. In such cases the CTC is now accepting trips until the end of the business day and having to broker and/or schedule trips later in the day than previously. In some cases this improved reservation schedule is being offered to all riders, in other cases just for ADA paratransit. In the cases where the transit system is one of the operators, the transit system is accepting brokered trips later In at least one case, the transit system is taking trips later but beginning to refuse same-day "add ons". A few CTCs and their operators previously had a several-day to one-week response time, and are having to take next-day reservations for the first time, which is a significant change for them. CTCs are also having to establish a mechanism for accepting trip requests on the weekends for Monday service; this is new for many of them. Saturday dispatchers are in some cases able to take reservation requests for Monday service. In other cases CTCs are able to help meet the weekend reservation requirement with an answering machine. In general, the weekend reservation service is a slight additional cost but is not yet being widely used by riders. The requirement for ADA paratransit reservations to be taken up to at least 14 days in advance is having little effect on CTCs as most previously accepted reservations farther in advance than 14 days. ADA paratransit requirements to schedule paratransit trips for within one hour of the eligib l e individual's desired departure time has been more difficult to meet because of limited peak capacity. This problem, more than the requirement, is of ongoing concern for most transit systems and CTCs, although the requirement may now be used as the benchmark for transit systems seeking to resolve peak capacity problems. Fares. The requirement for ADA paratransit fares to be no more than twice the applicable fixed-route fare has caused some of the most interest ing changes in coordinated transportation. The transit systems are modifying their fare structure to meet ADA exactly, e ither to come into compliance or to take advantage of the highest passenger fare allowed (still significantly below the actual cost of providing the trip). Fares for transit-sponsored paratransit trips varied greatly before ADA so they are now lowering fares, revising zone-based fares, or The tenn "fares" refers to the share of a trip's cost paid by the passenger. diS1inguished from the trip eost o r rates charged to sponsoring ageneie<. Rates are developed based on criteria estab lished by tile CTD. 14

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Impacts on Coordinator s raising fares to equal twice the fiXed-route fare. The crcs have revised fares also, in most cases setting the fare for non-sponsored TD trips above the ADA fare, although there are also areas where TO non-sponsored trips are still free to the passenger. In a few cities, fares paid by the rider are now the same for g e neral T D trips and ADA paratransit. The difference between the rider's fare and the actual cost of providing the ADA trip i s paid for by the transit system in almost all cases. Who pays for ADA trips is discussed further in the next section, Impacts on Demand and Funding. The fare issue relates d i rectly to ridership. Where the ADA fare is lower than the TD fare, demand for ADA paratransit eligibility is higher Likewise, where the ADA fare is higher than the fare for TD service the demand for ADA paratransit eligibility is only great where the ere has limited availability due to capacity trip purpose restrictions, or service times. In many cases, the changes in fare are a form of demand management, an attempt to encourage ridership on one program or another. The changes in fare structure have created some confusion among passengers. For C T Cs with very highly coordinated service in which the CTC determines the most appropriate funding source for each trip a rider's fare may vary greatly from trip to trip if the programs have different fare requirements. In some counties, for example, a rider may be eligible for Medicaid for one trip (riding for free), for ADA the next trip (paying twice the fixed route rate) and only for non-sponsored TO for the ne x t tr i p (paying a different fare). In some cases this is especially confusing for the riders, who may not understand who their sponsor is for each trip. A few CTCs are working with transit systems to equalize fares, which would minim iz e confusion and allow demand to be influenced more by service parameters. Many CTCs are finding the collection of A D A paratransit fares to be problematic The ADA paratransit fare does not consider ability to pay or trip purpose, which some users are not used to. Many CTCs have been striving to help users with all transportation needs, but A D A paratransit service is g e nerally offered only to passengers who pay the fare themselves, rather than for trips sponsored by agencies. In problem situations, some C T Cs are co v ering the rider's fare with TD or other funds. Another issue of concern for CTCs that previously did not charge fares to TD passengers but who now as part of their contract with the local trans i t agency, must collect fares from ADA passenger s is the presence of cash on the vehicles. In some cases fare boxes will have to be

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Impacts on Coordinators added to the vehicles and security and safety procedures will have to be established for handling and accounting for the money. In other cases passes and script are being considered as measures of avoiding dealing with cash. Days and Hours of Service. In many cases, the CTC provided very little service during evening and weekends. In order to provide ADA paratransit service during the same days and hours as fixed-route transit, many CTCs have had to arrange to provide more evening and weekend service. In many cases ADA paratransit is handling riders that need to travel in the evenings or on weekends, but the actual demand for evening and weekend service has been less than expected. A number of CTCs have bad to expand service to start earlier in the morning. For many areas expanded hours of service was applied only to ADA paratransit, but those that expanded service for both ADA and TD service are already realizing some early morning demand. The amount of additional service, additional hours of dispatch time, and any associated costs vary widely. Capacity. Because transit systems have to provide for ADA paratransit service without capacity constraints by 1997, ADA paratransit is a rapidly growing program in most locales. Although the ADA paratransit trips are mostly subsidized by the transit systems, CTCs are having to expand their capacity to process or carry these new trips CTCs that provide some or all of the service directly are finding it necessary to expand capacity, although this expansion is not entirely attributable to ADA paratransit. Nearly all CTCs have generally found it necessary to expand capacity to take more reservations, schedule more trips, and process more billing; again, some but not all of this expanded capacity is attributable to ADA paratransit. As an additional source of funding, however, ADA paratransit has expanded the total amount of transportation coordinated by the CTCs. To a large extent, the growth pains experienced by CTCs seem to be considered part of the normal process of change and growth, even where the change is difficult. Other impacts related to capacity are discussed in the later section, Impacts on Demand and Funding. Other Effects of ADA Paratransit on Coordinated TD Transportation Naturally, the implementation of ADA paratransit has affected coordination in the local arenas in ways other than the six service criteria specific to ADA paratransil Other major impacts are described below. IIi

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Impacts on Coordinators Communication. One of the most positive effects in Florida has been greatly increased communication and cooperation between CTCs and transit systems. In some cases, the transit system has been able to provide new resources. In one county (Hillsborough) the transit system was able to arrange for the purchase of a new fleet of accessible vans and new computer software and hardware with the CTC providing only 20 percent of the cost. In some cities, the extensive public participation process required for ADA paratransit planning is establishing better communications with the community as well. Some transit systems and CTCs n ow provide both ADA and TD applications to individuals seeking eligibility. Use of Fixed-Route Transit. Both transit systems and CTCs are interested in l imi t ing paratransit transportation to those who are unable to reasonably travel by other means CTCs i n part icular are faced with having to provide as much service as needed and possible with limited funds and capacities. Meanwhile, the transit systems are in terested in increasing fixed-route revenue. With the implementation of paratransit that is designed to shadow the fixed-route service, the relationship between paratransit and fixed-route is becoming more pronounced. In more and more cities, transit systems and CTCs are making available free monthly transit passes for both TO and ADA riders who will switch to fixed-route services, freeing paratransit capacity for other TD and ADA eligible persons who cannot. ln the case of TO transportation, CTCs usually purchase these passes from the transit system. Also because CTCs coordinating ADA paratransit must determine whether or not each trip could be taken on fixed route (even if trip-by trip eligibility is not used, the ADA trip must match the service area and days and hours of service), the CTCs are now better equipped to determine which non-ADA riders migh t be able to willingly shift to fixed-route usage, which is less expensive to the sponsor and taxpayers. Computers. In a number of areas, CTCs have upgraded computer software and/o r hardware to handl e the additional numbers of trips and/or to handle the specific service requirements of ADA paratransit service. Several, for example, have incorporated fixed-route service information into other computer programs. The organization paying for these improvements varies. Other Improvements. In some cities, ADA has prompted the CTC to make improvements to service in general only because other changes were necessary at this time to meet ADA. Examples include providing 1D cards, upgrading schedul ing capabilities and improving training. Effects on eligibility, demand, and funding are discussed in the next sect ion ,..,

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Impacts on Demand and Funding Eligibility ADA complementary paratransi t is designed for individuals with disabilities who are unable to use fixed-route services because of that disability. The eligibility criteria are based sim ultan eously on the abilities of the individual, the accessibility of the fixed-route system, the nature of specific trips, the env i ronment, and the cause and effects of the individual's limitations. In practice, most transit systems are app lying strict eligibility to individuals but are not strictly enforcing the eligibility of each trip. A number of transit systems have had similar criteria in the past, but in most cases eligibility is now being more carefully controlled. ADA paratransit eligibility does not necessarily include all of the persons who are eligible for TD service.9 Elderly and low-income persons and children who are "high-risk" or "at -risk are not specifically included in the ADA eligibility criteria. In fact, persons who do not meet ADA eligibility cannot be considered "ADA paratransit eligible," although the transit systems are pennitted to also make paratransit available to non-ADA eligible persons provided there is sufficient capacity for ADA eligible individuals. Many elderly and low income persons or "at risk" or "high risk" children of course may have disabilities that prevent their use of fixed-route transit, which would qualify them as ADA elig ible. ADA eligibility applies to a subset of disabled persons: those disabled persons who are unable to used fixed-route due to their disability ADA eligibility can therefore be considered a subset of the population eligible for TD transportation. Persons with disabilities make up a signifi cant portion (approximately one-third) of the TO-eligible popu lation. Each person who would not be able to use the fixed-route service for his or her trips is potentially ADA eligible. ADA paratransit eligibility is determined on a case by-case basis, however, and in order to be considered, an eligible individual needs to apply for certification. The number in each city that are actually applying for eligibility and becoming certified depends on several factors. ADA poratronsir is used throughout this document to mean ADA complemenl()l')' porarransit, i.e., par.atransir as a complement t o fixed-route tran-sit service as required by the Transportation for 1ndividua1s with Disabilities Final Rule (49 CFR Part 37 Subpart f). 10

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Impacts on Demand and Funding Knowledge of ADA paratransit service is needed before individuals will apply for the service. In most cases, it is the existence of the service itself that creates the most awareness, so the transit systems with paratransit programs newly created to meet ADA requirements are experiencing slower enrollment than expected. Riders that use paratransit services already sponsored or provided by the transit system are most likely to be aware of, and apply for the new ADA paratransit eligibility. The portion that are actually being found eligible depends on how carefully previous eligibility criteria were enforced. The most influential factor affecting ADA paratransit registrants is the availability of other transportat i on services. The greatest growth in ADA paratransit is occurring where TD availability is limited. In particular, where the funding for non-sponsored trips is insufficient to meet demand, applications for ADA eligibility are much higher. Much of the shift i n eligibility to ADA is related to the service parameters. Where service parameters, fares, and capacity for service are the same for ADA and TD service, there remains little demand for ADA paratransit. Disabled individuals who need evening or weekend transportation while fixed-route transit is operating but general TD service is not, find ADA paratransit an alternative. The differences in response time between ADA and TD service do not seem to be as important, except in those areas with very long advance-notice requirements. Fare differences have the potential to have a great impact on registrations but they have not been the primary factor yet. This is in part due to the recency of fare changes, and in part because the availability of service is far more important. CTCs with insufficient funding necessarily have trip prioritization strategies. Those individuals who find their trips to be low or no priority are those already applying for and taking advantage of ADA paratransit which cannot limit trips based on trip purpose. Certification In nearly all cases, completed applications for ADA paratransit eligibility are returned to the transit systems for assessment. While doctors' notes or additional assessments are sometimes required, Florida's transit systems are usually able to make a determination based upon information in the application and knowledge of the fixed routes, stops, and service area. Thi s arrangement is common so that the transit systems can ensure that eligibility standards are strictly enforced (to limit the financial impact) and because the certification process itself has a number of specific federal requirements that must be met Most commonly, the transit system then provides the individual with documentation of eligibility (a letter or an ID card), often further explaining the conditions under which they are ?0

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Impacts on Demand and Funding eligible. Some provide the rider with an ID number that will indica te to the CTC that they are ADA eligible. Rosters are then provided to the CTC so that eligible individuals can be provided ADA paratransit service when they call the CTC for reservations. The exception to this, of course, is where the transit system provides the ADA paratransit service. T he CTC generally maintains a client file also Dep ending on the service arrangements, ADA eligibility may entitle c lients to different service from other TD clients. Transit systems providing service tend to assign ADA paratransit trips a higher priority Sponsorship An ADA paratransit eligible individual will usually not be eligible for ADA paratransit service for all trips he or she may want. Technically, ADA paratransit is not to be used for trips when the individual is ahle to use the fixed-route service. In Florida, this is largely self monitored More important in actuality is whether or not the trip request fits into the service area and days and hours of service outlined for ADA paratransit service. In some cases, whether or not a trip is accepted as an ADA paratransit trip also depends on the amount of funding allocated for that time period for ADA paratransit trips. Transit systems are increas ing budgets annually, but the budget i s sometimes fixed per-day or per-month for now. Because ADA eligibility is a subset of TD eligibility, overlaps with certain program eligibility criteria, and may not meet all trip needs, persons who are ADA paratransit eligible may also be registered for other programs. How a trip request gets to be considered an ADA paratransit trip varies by system. In some cases the individuals need specifically to ask for an ADA trip or offer their ADA eligibility number when placing the reservation. For some CTCs riders und erstand enough about their funding sourc e s to request trips un der particular programs (including TD and ADA), although their eligibility has to be confirmed by the CTC. In other cases, particularly the more coordinated CTCs, the rider may have been certified for several programs and funding sources and the CTC assigns the most appropriate funding source to each trip. In the se cases, the CTC tends to assign the trip to a specific program if the trip meets that program's criteria (such as Medicaid for e ligible medical trips). The seeond choice is generally ADA service, followed by TD Trust Fund-sponsored service if the trip is ne i ther programnor ADA-eligible. Because the TD Trust Fund is the most flexible funding source and is applied last, CTCs are becoming better abl e to meet most requests for service up to the lim its of funding. The availability of ADA paratransit for eligible individuals without limitations by trip purpose or destination (within the service area) has allowed CTCs to shift some rider s hip between 11

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Impacts on Demand and Funding ADA and TO, and is giving the CTCs greater flexibility to match the most appropriate sponsor to the trip. Although demand still consumes all availab le resources, TO Trust Fund monies are being used to sponsor needed trips thaC would otherwise be unfunded. Rldel'$bip The implementation of ADA paratransit is generating and meeting some new demand and is causing some shift in demand. Transit systems and CTC s indicate that many of the ADA paratransit eligib le passengers are new, not coming from any other programs. ADA paratransit seems to be capturing many of the eligible individuals with disabilities who are only now seeking paratransit service. A sligl\tly larger portion of the ADA registrants were also registered under the TO program. The smallest portion of ADA registrants and trips seem to have been previously sponsored by an agency program. In some cases, agencies are seeking to take advantage of the low fares and unrestrained capacity required of ADA paratransit service. Transit systems are not required to guarantee any service to a particular agency but do have to provide ADA paratransit for individuals regardless of their trip purpose, so whether or not a trip can be shifted from a program to ADA paratransit depends upon the level of service and control desired by the agency and the individual. The extent to which each trip is sponsored by the most appropriate program (an agency ADA, or TD) varies, depending upon the vigilance of the CTC. Because the service criteria sometimes vary for ADA and TO service, and because CTCs often establish trip priorities for applying TD Trust Fund monies, ADA ridership in each community tends to capture more of some types of trips than others. I n many locales, ADA paratransit serv ice is carrying more employmen t, rec rea tion, evening, and weekend service. The TO programs are now carrying a greater portion of trips outside of the transit service area, creating some longer average trip l engths, wllich can increase the CTCs trip costs. In 1992 and 1993, ADA paratransit represented nineteen and seventeen percent respectively, of all coordinated trips in Florida, and both in creased dramatically. ADA increased from 1.6 to an estimated 2.1 million and total coordinated trips increased from 8.5 to 12.4 million 22

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Impacts on Demand and Funding Demand Ridership continues to increase for both TD and ADA paratransit service. Based on the estimates by transit systems for ADA paratransit, this i ncre ase will continue. The tota l demand for ADA paratransit trips, however, is less than the total estimated demand for general TD trips. Actual ADA paratransit ridership has grown more slowly in some cases than projected, and in some cases much faster. ADA paratransit service does not seem to be generating a lo t of new demand (need for paratransit trips), but is experiencing some of the demand that could not previously be met. If the predicted ridership for ADA of3.8 million trips is realized in 1997, approximately 26 percent of the 1997 estimated unmet demand for general trips should be met by ADA paratransit alone. The influ ence of the Americans with Disabilities Act itself reducing discrimination and inc reasing accessibil i ty in public places should generate some new demand in the long term However this potential increase in demand for paratransit is likely to be offset by the increasing accessibility and acceptability of fixed-route transit. Funding The ADA regulations require transit systems to develop and submit annual plans for implementing ADA paratransit and require transit systems to provide such a service, but do not specifically require the transit systems to pay for paratransit serv ice. Pro vi ded that the transit system can ensure that all ADA service criteria will be met, ADA paratransit is allowed to be provided through another program. In nearly every case (95 percent), however, the transit systems have assumed full responsibility for ADA paratransit and are providing the funding necessary for the service. For now, the ADA paratransit required of transit syst ems has proven to be an additional sponsored program. With some exception s the transit systems have been able to s upport this servic e out of their regular operating budgets with few cuts to fixed-route services. Over the next few years, however, as capacity for ADA paratransit increases (and it must), the transit systems are uncertain about its funding. USDOT is not at this time, expected to provide any additional operating assistance for the provision of ADA paratransit services. In at least one area, where ADA ridership will be low ADA paratransit will be provided as part of the previously-existing coordinated service s using TO Trust Fund grants. Although .,,

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Impacts on Demand and Funding uncommon, neither ADA nor TD regulations seem to prevent this arrange ment, provided that TD Trust Fund allocations do not supplant or replace any financial contributions of the transit systems to TD service So far ADA paratransit has not significantly reduced the demand for TD tranSportation. As capacity grows, it is expected that demand will also grow because of the more far-reaching requirements of ADA for non-diScrimination and accessibility. Current funding levels will continue to be far short of what is needed to meet the demand for TO services, even if ADA paratransit is fully funded for eligible trips. 24

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Recommendations As ADA paratransi t becomes an increasingly important part of the transportat io n in Florida for those who are transportat i on disadvantaged, the CTD should c ontinue to m o n ito r the implementation of ADA. More im p ortantly, the future ro l e of the CTD in ADA implementation, a nd the future role of ADA paratransit in the Florida Coordinat ed TO Sys tem should be carefully considered. In support of these important directions, several recommendatio n s are offe red This report was based on ADA paratransit plan updates avai la ble i n la te 199 3. This information s h ould be updated in the sp ring of 199 5, afte r Jan uary 1995 update s are available These updates will provide actual and projected ADA ridership, registration, and costs The CTD should con si der the possibility of specifically i dentifyi ng ADA paratransit inform ation i n uniform d a ta collection efforts ( e .g., ann ual operating reports and man ag ement informatio n systems). The CTD should cont i nue to work clo se ly with organizations responsible for ADA and transportation, suc h as transit systems FOOT, and state civil rights offices The impact and ro l e of ADA, if any in ex i sting CTD activities such as t rai ning, q ua lity assurance, informa tion sharing, technical assistance, standards de ve lopme n t, an d reporting should be carefully considered. T h e future ro l e of the Florida Coordinated TO p r ogram in ADA t ranspo rtation and its relationship with the transit systems responsible for ADA paratransit should be considered as should the roles ofCTCs, designa ted official p lann i ng ag encies (DO PAs) and local coordinating b oards (LCBs). Reli abl e te chnical assistance on ADA requirement s and im p lementa t ion should b e made available to organizations within the Florida Coord i na ted T O System

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APPENDIX

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Appendix System-by-System Summary This appendix presents a two page summary for each county in F l orida with fixed-route transit. The left page describes how ADA paratransit affects the coordinator The right page presents numerical data for the reader's perusal comparing ADA and CTC demand, rider s hip, and budgets. T hese summaries are organized alphabetically by county. The descriptive information is based on interviews conducted by CUTR staff with each transit system and CTC. The top of the page lists basic information on the transit system and CTC, including: Name of the organization Service area Type of organization Contact used for interview Which organization provides the A DA paratransit service The rest of the page describes for each county: Before ADA: The r ela tio n ship between the CTC and transit system before ADA paratransit was implemented and any service information needed to understand the changes br o ught about by ADA paratransit; Implementing ADA Paratransit: What changes occurred as a resu l t of implementing ADA paratransit; Eligibility and Coordination: How ADA paratransit eligibility is coordinat e d and who does what; and Demand and Funding: Known effects of ADA paratransit on demand and fund ing. A I

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System-by-System Summary The numerical data shown on the right hand page supports the described effects of ADA on demand and funding. A significant amount of data is also provided as additional information for the reader who wishes to examine the effects of ADA on a particular county in more detail. Information on populations, ridership, budgets, and other statistics are presented on the ere and transit system. Similar information is provided for the CTC and the transit system so comparisons may be drawn. The numerical data is compiled f rom three sources: Statewide Operations Report (SOR) (CTC operating data for F to 1993); Section 15 Reports (transit system data reported for 1991 and 1992); and ADA Complementary Paratransit Plan Updates submitted to the Federal Transit Administration by each transit system in January 1993 (estimates for 1992 to 1997). These sources were the most recent available at the time this report was prepared, and do not in all cases provide information for the same years. Researchers should also note that fiscal years vary between CTCs and some transit sys t ems. A list of the data presented, its source, and a descriptio n with additional i nformatio n is provided in Table A-1. Data Population County(ies) Population .... Fixed Route Service Area Pop. TO Category I TO Category II TABLE A-1 Source SOR Description Total population living in the county or counlies t h at the transit system serves. Section 15 Population estimated to live wilhin 114 mile of a transit route SOR SOR Population estimated to be disabled, elderly, low i ncome, or children at risk, who are eligible to receive government and social service agency subsidies for program and general trips. Population estimated to be t ransportation disadvantaged according to the eligibility guidelines In Chapter 427 (i.e unable to transport themselves or purchase transportation). A 2

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System-by-System Summary TABLEAl . ' : .. Source' :., Desc ffptlon > : ,,,,. -;, CTC Passenger Trips Demand for General Trips F i xed-Route (Section 9 & 18) Paratransit School Bus All D i sabled All Non-Disab l ed Total Trips .CTC Budget Revenue and Expenses SOR SOR SOR SOR SOR Updated estimate of demand for trips by individuals to destinations of t he i r choice, not associated with any agency program, based on t he es ti mated TO Category II popu l at i on. A subset of these trips wou l d b e ADA e l ig ib le. Actua l coordi n ated trips by mode, r epo rte d by CTCs i n ann u al operating repo rts. If the CTC p rovi des ADA paratrans", then a subset of the paratransit trips reported would be ADA paratransit trips Subtota l s of coord i nated trips by ride r characteristics. All disab l ed i n c l udes all riders that have disabil iti es i ncluding any elderly poor and children with disabilities. as reported by CTCs i n ann u al operating reports A subset of all disabled trips would be potent i al ADA paratrans it trips All coordi n ated trips repo rted by CTCs i n a nn ual operating reports. The total is equal to the su m (fixed route + + school bus trips ) and/or the sum (all disabled + all non-d i sabled). All CTC t rip informat ion is reported for the July-June fisca l year This tota l i ncludes ADA trips provided/coordinated by CTCs Actual administrative and operating figures for the total coordinated system reported by CTCs i n annua l operating reports, according to t he Mode l Uniform Accounting System for R u ral and Spec i alized Transportatio n Prov i ders Th ese figures do not include capital expenses or cap i ta l reven u es other tha n that portio n covered by depreciation. All CTC budget info r mation i s reported for t he July-June fiscal year.

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System-by-System Summary Transit System Passenger Trips ADA Paratransit T r ips ADA Trips Denied Total Paratransit Trips Total Transit Trips Transit System Budget PJJACapttal Expenses ADA Operating Expenses Total Paratransit Capital Expenses Total Paratransit Operat i ng Expens. Total System Capital Expenses Total System Operating Expenses Total System Revenue TABLEA-1 ADA Plan Updates ADA Plan Updates ADA Plan Updates Section 15 ADA Plan Updates ADA Plan Updates ADA P l an Updates ADA Plan Updates Number of one-way ADA paratranslt trips actually provided i n 1992, estimated for 1993, and projected tor years 1994 through 1997 (when ADA complementary paratransit must be fully implemented). Th i s information is compiled from ADA paratransit plan updates submitted by each transtt system in January 1993 Actual estimated and projected requests for ADA paratransit service that were eligible but could not be provided. Th i s information assumes capacity constraints, and will not be reported in 1994 paratransit plan updates, per FTA instructions. The total number of one way paratransit trips provided/sponsored by the transit system including ADA and non-ADA paratransit trips, as reported and estimated by transit systems in ADA plan updates Total trips provided or sponsored by the transit system ( i ncluding all fixed-route ridersh ip) from available Section 15 reports. Actual 1992, estimated 1993 and projected 1994 1997 expenses reported by transit systems for ADA paratransit only. These should only include expenses that are related to the provis i on of ADA paratransit. Expenses tor all paratransit sponsored or provided by the transit system including both ADA paratransit and any non-ADA paratransit. Reporting years are the same as for ADA expenses above. Total expenses for the transit system includ i ng all modes as reported in ADA plan updates, for the same reporting years as paratransit above. The expenses tor future years are i ntended to be realistic projections Total revenue for the transit system including grants and farebox revenue, though transit systems varied in sources included. Projected revenue for 1994-1997 is very uncertain. A-4

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System by-System Summary T ABLEA-1 < i' :Data -<_ ,., .. < .. .-oata fr:: 1 : ct ''''" : ; : . -. Statistics Ratio ADA : CTC Total Trips Ca l cu l ated Ca l c u la t ed from comp i l e d data : ADA Pa r a t ransit Trips divided by CTC Total T ri ps. T his numbe r estimates the perce nt of coord i na t ed t rips that are ADA paratransit trips o n l y i n count ies where the CTC coord i nates ADA t ri ps: where t h e CTC i s not i nvo l ved in ADA parat r ans it t h i s number i s a ratio of ADA to CTC trips Some differe nces in fisca l years l imit the accuracy o f t h is estimate ADA % of Demand for Genera l Ca l cu l ated cal cu l ated from comp i led data: ADA Para t ransit Trips Trips from ADA p l an updates d i v i ded by the esti mated Dema n d for Ge n era l T rips (x 10 0), r efle c t ing th e portio n o f dema n d for gen e r a l trips that is being met t hroug h ADA paratrans i t services. ADA % of Tota l Transit Expe n ses Calcu l ated Combi n ed ADA Capita l a n d Operati ng Expenses divi ded by comb i ned Capi t a l a n d Opera t i n g T o t al System Expenses est i mating the portion of tra n s i t b u dgets to be spent on ADA paratransit. Notes Various Footnotes as needed t o c l arify variatio n s i n availab l e data for each county Graph Calculated Shows t ho u sands of one-way paratransit trips, showing actua l ere-coordinated t rips f o r 1991 1993 a n d actual and projec t ed ADA para t rans i t trips for 1991-1997, based o n data i n table. ADA trips are zero for 1 991 reflecting t h e i mplemen-tation of ADA paratransit requ i r e m e nts, whi c h went i n to effect January 26, 1992 . SOR a Statewide Operations Report Secti on 15 z Secti on 15 Reports (transrt system data reported f or 199 1 and 1992) AOA Plan Updates =ADA Compl ementary P l an Upda tes submiited to the Fedor al Tran s i t Adm i nistratio n by each transft system i n January 1993 (estimates f or 1 992 t o 1997) The following pages provide wrille n descriptions and numerica l data summarizing the impacts of ADA paratransit on CTCs in each county, preceded by to ta l fig u res for Florida. A 5

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System-by-System Summary Florida Total The table opposite compares total CTC and ADA numerical data for Florida, compiled from the system-bysystem summaries that follow. A-6

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CTC Passeng., Trips Demand for Generel Trips FO ADA T r ips A-7 4.0% 4.1 %

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System-by-System Summary Alachua County Transit System: Regional Transit System Service Area: City of Gainesville Type: City Government Contact: Mr. George Boyle Community Transportation Coordinator: Coordinated Transportation System Inc. Service Area: Alachua County Type: Private Non-Profit, Complete Brokerage Contact: Ms. Marion Marks ADA Paratransit Providers: Transit System and CTC Before ADA: The transit system provided door-to-
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System-by-System Summary 184 621 187 ,697 190,82 1 Service Area Pop. 163.no 182 ,940 I 69,633 70,794 72.251 I I 8.6n 8 ,821 9,005 104,124 105,852 108 ,420 89, 146 0 0 85,261 186, 531 206,869 0 3 ,914 6 ,486 Disabled 135 ,327 45,805 116,632 Non-Di sabled 39,100 114 ,640 9 4,525 Tota l Tr ips 174 ,427 190,445 213,357 $ 1,393,035 $1,341,707 $1,7n,480 $ 1,344, 176 $1, 315,209 $1, 801,086 17,000 1 8,000 1 9,000 20.000 20,000 Tr ips Denied 0 0 0 0 0 Tr ips 85,000 90.000 95,000 100,000 100,000 2.569.5!10 2 569,58) TOlal so $100,000 $85,000 $100,000 $200,000 Total $51 1,816 $611 192 $641. 752 $673,840 $707,532 T otal System Expenses $ 1, 637,000 52.852 000 $2, 994.600 $3, 144,330 $3,301 547 To tal System Operating Expe n ses $4,645,043 $5,219 660 $5,480,643 $5, 682,675 $5,966.809 T otal System Rewnu e $6, 462,043 $6,07 1 ,660 $6,475 .243 $8,827 ,005 $ 9,288,356 : CTC Total T r ips 0 .09 0.08 %of Demand for GenBfal Trips 16. 1 % 16.6% %of Total Expenses NA NA NA NA NA population />DA expenses are i ncorpo..ated I n t otals in ADA plan Trips 220 200 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 2gl 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Year o Cooidinated Trips <> ADA Trips A-9 20,000 0

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System-by-System Summary Brevard County Transit System: Space Coast Area Transit Service Area: Brevard County Type: County Government Contact: Mr. Jim Lies enfelt ADA Paratransit Provider: Transit System/CTC Community Transportation Coordin2tor: Space Coast Area Transit Service Area: Brevard County Type: Public Transit, Partial Brokerage Contact: Mr. Jim Liesenfelt Before ADA: The transit system and the CTC are the same agency The transit/CTC operates fix ed-route service and subscription van pool service, and brokern TO service, including Medicaid service to a private company. Management of the vanpool service is also brokered to a private company. Implementing ADA Paratransit: The transit/CTC has not yet begun ADA service, but expects to begin service in February 1994 and have full service operating by April 1994 The transit/eTC will operate its own ADA service and TO service using the same vehicles and personnel for both services. (TO service is currently brokered but will be taken over by the transit/CTC, except for Medicaid services. Medicaid service will remain brokered.) The transit/CTC expects to carry ADA clients and other TO clients at the same time on the same vehicles. The maximum fare for TO service is currently $2.00, but a half fare of $1.00 is the actual fare paid by TO pernons. The ADA fare may be $2.00 or may be $1.00. If the ADA fare is $2.00 the transit/CTC expects confusion among disabled clients due to difference in fares. The transit/CTC does not expect ADA service to have a significant impact on the level of other TO service, but does foresee possible capacity constraints in the future if sufficient funding is not available. Eligibility and Coordination: The transit/CTC will determine ADA eligibility, and expects that the majority of ADA clients will be current clients of the other TO services. The transit/eTC will coordinate ADA service, and does not expect coordination to cause any difficulties. Demand and Funding: The transii/CTC forecasts that I 0 percent of the paratransit service provided by the transit/CTC will be ADA service. (This estimate does not include Medicaid service, which is currently 50 percent of all paratransit service). The transit/CTC expects some client shedding by social service agencies onto ADA service, and expects that much of the ADA service will be new service because the TO service currently provided is primarily medical and employment trips. The transit/CTC e xpects that ADA service will include many social, recreational, and shopping trips. The transiiiCTC received paratransit funding from the county this year, but does not know if this funding will continue. No dedicated ADA funding is currently available. A-10

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System-by-System Summary Brevard 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Pol!!!lation Coumy( i es) Population 409,971 421,268 432,660 --Fb-" 400 .... 3:!!: 300 ,o .,..:: 200 r::l::. 0 100 0 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Year o Coordinated Trip s o ADA Trips A-1 1

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System-by-System Summary Broward County Transit System: Broward Transit Division Service Area: Broward County Type: County Government Contact: Mr. Jim Siwek ADA Paratraasit Provider: Transit System/CTC Community Traasportation Coordinator: Broward Transit Division, Soc. Serv. Transp Sect. Service Area; Broward County Type: Public Transit, Complete Brokerage Contact: Mr. Jim Siwek Before ADA: The transit system and the CTC are the same agency. The transit system is a division of Broward County government, and the CTC is a section of the transit system. The transit/eTC does not operate paratransit service, all TO paratransit service is brokered out. Implemeotiog ADA Paratraasit: ADA service will be implemented at the end of January 1994. The transit/CTC will broker ADA service to a private operator. Some fi>
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Broward Population County(ies) Population Fixed Roo1e Service Area Pop. 10 Cat egory I 10 Category II lxe< 1 School Bus All D isabled All NOn-Disabled Total T r ips CTC Budge1 Revenue Expenses Transit Passen9!!r Trill!! ADA Paratransit Trips PJJA Trips Denied Total Paratransit T r ips Total T r ansil Trips Transit System Budget PJJA Capita l EXpenses PJJA Operating EXpenses Tota l Expenses Total OpeADA Trips A -13 1 .6% 2 1 %

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System-by-System Summary Dade County Transit System: Me. tro-Dade Transit Agency Service Area: Dade County Type: County Government Conlact: Ms. Christina Sizemore ADA Paratranslt Provider: Transit System/CTC Community Traasportalion Coordinator: Metro-Dade TI1Uisit Agency Service Area: Dade County Type: Public Transit, Partial Brokerage Contact: Ms. Shiela Winitzer Before ADA: The transit system and the CTC are the same agency. The transit/CTC operated some paratransit service and brokered some service to private operators, and the transit/CTC coordinated paratransit service This arrangement continues lroplemenling ADA Paratransit: The transit/CTC brokers ADA service to a private operator The operator already provided some of the 1D service for the transit/CTC and no changes were necessary to the service to meet ADA requirements. The client pays a $2.00 fare for ADA service or TD service. The transit/CTC is currently in the process of working out an agreement with Broward County on the fare to be charged for inter-county trips. Eliglbitity and Coordination: The transit/CTC certifies ADA eligibility, and issues an ID card to ADA clients The client cajls the transiVCTC when a trip is desired The transiVCTC informs the operator, who is also responsible for arranging the scheduling and dispatching of the trip. The transit/CTC will be implementing a new brokerage system in January 1994, and the current arrangement may change as a result. Demand aad Fundiag: The demand for ADA service has been about what the transit/CTC expected The demand for both ADA service and 1D service is extensive. The transit/CTC offers a travel train i ng prog ram to encourage persons who are able to use fixed-route service to use the fixed-route service, and provides free monthly fixed-route passes to low-income ADA-eligible persons who use ftxed-route serv i ce. The extent of the demand for both ADA and 1D services presents funding difficulties. The transit/CTC does not have a dedicated ADA funding source, but uses its general revenue to fund the service. Much of this revenue is supplied by the county government. A-14

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System-by-System Summary Dade 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Pgpula tion County(itt) Popul t;tion 1,965,538 1 ,994, 401 2 023.6'19 ---Fil(ed Rout e Service Area Pop 1,961,690 1,735,000 ---TD Category t 7 4 2,817 753,72 6 763.010 ----TD Category tt 112.227 1 13 ,875 1 1 5 ,133 ----CTC P a eae!!Sier Trie s D emand fOC" Genera l Trips 1 .346.724 1 ,366,500 1,381.596 -Fixed Route (Soetlon 9 & 1 8) 1 .2 1 2. 197 1. 182,677 2 400.366 --Paut.ttan$i t 831,386 9 6 4 ,515 1, 396,172 -Schoof Bus 0 4,930 8 .100 --A ll D i sab l ed NA N A 697, 4$3 ---All Non D isabled NA NA 3,1 0 7 185 --Tota l Tr ips 2.043,583 2 152,122 3 ,804,638 ---CTC Budgt:J Rtvenue $14,937,34 8 $16,064.898 $18,035,7 5 8 -Exp.nses $14,937,346 $ 1 6 ,064,898 $18,035 ,758 --Tr aotlt Paaunger Tries ADA Paratransi t Ttips 1,016,000 1,224,000 1 ,448,000 1.822,000 1,971,000 2 1 17,000 ADA T r ips 0 0 0 0 0 Total Paratran i t Trips 1 ,016,000 1.224.000 1. 448,000 1.822.000 1, 971 ,000 2 ,117,000 Total T ransit T r ips 73, 4 15,300 72,376,590 ---)'r.ntll ,xstom ADA Capital Ex p enses $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 ADA 0p91'ating ExptnMt $ 15,80 0 000 $20,600,000 $ 25,00 0,000 $30, 700 ,000 $33,400,000 $35,700,000 T oteJ Paratransit Capital Expen &es $0 $0 $ 0 $0 $0 $0 Total Paratranslt Opatlng Expens. St5,800,000 $20.600,000 $25,000,000 $30.700,000 $33.400, 000 $35,700,000 Total Syst e m Capital Expenses $ 1 0 5,000, 000 $11 1 ,000,000 $124,000,000 $158,000,000 $378,000,000 $416,000,000 Total S ystem Operating Expenses $ 172,000.000 $2&8.000 ,000 $.326,0 00 ,000 $381 ,000,000 $61 8 ,000,000 $658,000,000 Total SyS1em Revenu e $271,00 0 ,000 $ 277,000.000 $273,000,000 $305,000,000 $482,000, 0 0 0 $811,000, 000 Stll.J!9;! Ra.tio ADA: ere Tota l Trip s 0.47 0 .32 -ADA" of Demand for General Trip f 74.4% --of Total T ransit Expenses 5.7% 5.2% 5 .6% 5.7% 3.4% 3.3% No t a t Graph Trips 4 .. 3 >.C 2 ::: .. 1 / c 0 0 1991 1992 1 993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Year I 0 Coordinated Trips o ADA Trips

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System-by-System Summary Duval County Tr.lnsit System: Jaoksonville Transportation Authority Service Area: City of Jacksonville Type: Authority Contact: Mr. Joe Mistrot ADA Par.ltraosit Provider: CTC Community Tr.lnsportallon Coordinator: COMSIS Corporation Service Area: Duval County Type: Private For-Profit, Complete Brokerage Contact: Mr. Andrew DeCandis Before ADA: Just before the startup of ADA service, the transit s ystem began to contract with the CTC for the CTC to provide paratransit service for the transit system. The service was limited to work and school trips. The CTC does not directly operate the service, but brokers the service to privat e operators. Implementing ADA Par.ltransil: The CTC now provides brokered ADA service as well as TD service for the transit system Few changes were required to the TD service previously provided to accommodate ADA requirements; however, service hours were increased slightly Eligibility and Coordination: The CTC certifies ADA eligibility, coordinates ADA and TD service, and provides the service (through private operators). The CTC assigns funding responsibility for each trip to Medicaid, ADA, or TD non-sponsored (in that order of preference) depending on the service for which the client is eligible. The CTC bills the transit system for the ADA service provided up to a pre-set daily limit. Demand and Funding: Demand for ADA service is somewhat less than the transit system expected. The transit system expects demand for ADA serv i ce to increase greatly over the next few years. The transit system estimates that' client shedding by social service agencies has been the source of half of the ADA service currently provided. The transit system has a line item budget for ADA service. No dedicated funding source is available for ADA service, so the transit system funds the service out of its general revenue. Recently additional funding has been available through toll collections and a new sales tax, but this is expected to be a temporary source of funding and the transit system expects funding to remain a problem. A-1 {,

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Systemby-System Summary D uva l 1991 1 992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Popu auon COunty(les) Populatio n e81 776 690,701 699,731 ---F'D ,._c: ., .. 200 1 0 .,..: c:!::. 100 0 0 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Year CJ Coordina1ed Tr ips <>ADA Trips A-17

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System-by-System Summary Escambia County Transit System: Escambia County Transit System Service Area: Escambia County Type: County Government Contact: Mr. Kenneth Westbrook ADA Paratl'Snsit Provider: CTC Community Transportation Coordinator: COMSIS Corporation Service Area : Escambia County Type: Private For-Profit, Complete Brokerage Contact: Ms. Patricia Warner Before ADA: The CTC was already providing all of the paratransit service for the transit system before ADA. This arrangement cont inues. Implementing ADA Paratransit: The fare for ADA service i s $2.00, the fare for other TO service is $1.00. The fare differential between ADA service and 1D service has not caused any confusion among clients. ADA requirements led to the pur chase of some new lift-equipped vehicles. No other significant changes to the service were required. Elimination by the transit system of some fixed route service bas left some clients that would have been eligible for ADA service now eligible only for trips sponsored by the 1D Trust Fund. Eligibility and Coordination: The transit system certifies eligibility and issues ID cards to ADA clients, and the clients then call t h e CTC for service. The transit system forecasts that there will be I ,050 clients certified eligible by 1997. When an uncertified person requests service from the CTC, the CTC refers the person to the transit system for certification. The transit system reviews the application and, if the person is eligible, sends a fax certifying eligibility to the CTC (if immediate service is requested) and issues an ID card to the client The CTC coordinates ADA service with the TD service that it provides. This coordination has not created any problems for tile CTC The CTC uses a GIS system to determine if a particular trip request is eligible, and schedules, dispatches, and provides the trip. Demand and Funding: Demand for ADA service has been slightly greater than the transit system anticipated. Most ADA clients were already clients of the CTC's TO service, but many of the ADA trip s are additional trips that the client would not have made before ADA. The CTC estimates that 25 percent of the paratransit service it prov ides is ADA service. The largest percentage of ADA trips is for medical purposes, the next largest percentage is for employment purposes, and the third largest percentage is for educational purposes. The CTC has been successful in attempts to discourage agencies from shedding clients, atid demand for TO service has not decreased. The ADA service is causing minor capacity co nstraints for the CTC. The transit system has a line item in its budget for ADA. The transit system has no dedicated funding source for ADA, but funds the service out of its general revenue. The TO Trust fund is not funding ADA service.

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265,059 Area P o p 265, 120 94, 145 1 4,147 169,784 0 129 ,638 0 53,152 76,486 129 ,638 $1,303,758 $ 1 ,303,714 1 112,980 Expenses Expens. 8cpenses Expen ses 267 ,339 200.000 94,955 1 4 .269 171,228 0 180 971 0 74. 198 106.n3 1 80,97 1 $1 ,554, 041 $1 ,554,803 8 ,326 0 1 0 ,070 1 ,116 ,600 $0 $ 1 01,000 $0 $121,000 $ 1, 1 69,000 $3, 3 5 1,000 0 .05 4 .9% 2 .2% 269,638 95, 9 2 8 14,425 173 ,100 0 318,33ti 0 58,905 259.43 1 316,338 $ 1,762, e35 $ 1,729,576 14,500 0 20,000 $0 $ 142, 000 $0 $ 147, 000 $1, 1 0 1 ,000 $3,695,000 0 .05 8 .4% 3.0% Systemby-System Summary 1 6,000 16,200 1 8,400 1 6 ,600 0 0 0 0 21,000 21 ,200 2 1,400 21 ,600 $0 $0 $ 0 $0 $ 150,000 $ 157,000 $184, 000 $171,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $ 155.000 $ 162,000 $169 ,000 $ 1 76,000 $63,000 $663,000 $97,000 $675,000 $3, 926.000 $4, 170 ,000 $4,430 ,000 $ 4,695 ,000 3 7l(. 3 1 % 3 .6% System Revenue 'N3S not reported in comparabl e form. Par atransit Trips 350 0 300 I 250 200 I / 150 100 50 1 9 9 1 1992 1993 1994 1 995 1 996 1997 Year o Coordinated Trips <> ADA Trips A-19

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System-by-System Summary Hillsborough County Transit System: Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Service Area; Hillsborough County Type: Authority Contact: Ms. Roseanne Sullivan ADA Paratransil Provider: CTC Commnolty Tran.tportatioo Coordinator: Hillsborough Co. Board of County Commissioners Service Area: Hillsborough County Type: County Government, Partial Brokerage Contact: Ms. Sidney Moss Before ADA: The transit system did not provide or operate paratransit service The CTC operated some of the TD service in the county, and contracted with private operators for some of the service. This arrangement continues. Implementing ADA Paratransil! The CTC coordinates and provides the ADA service. Currently, the CTC is operating all of the ADA service and some of the TD service, and is brokering some of the TD service. Some changes were required to the paratransit service operated by the CTC to meet ADA requirements. Hours for both ADA and TD service were expanded to include weekend service and to run from 6:00 a.m. to 7:00p.m. on weekdays. Reservation time for both ADA and TD service was changed to next day. Eligibility and Coordination: The transit system certifies ADA eligibility, and provides clients with an 10 number and an explanation of what ADA trips they are eligible for. The transit system provides eligibility infonnation to the CTC. The CTC coordinates both ADA and TO service, and detennines the funding responsibility for each trip. Currently, th e ADA service is providing some TD trips that otherwise could not be provided due to limitations in the funding available for TD service. Demand and Funding: The demand for ADA service has been about what the transit system and the CTC expected. Most of the ADA service being provided is new service The demand existed before ADA b u t the service was not available. Neither agency believes that client s hedding by social service agencies bas been a problem. Both the transit system and the CTC are working to encourage persons who are able to use fixed-route service to use the frxed-route service. The transit system bas no dedicated ADA funding available, and is funding ADA service out of its general revenue. Some of this funding ha s been provided by delaying capital projects. A-70

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en: BydQoc .... 400 o-, o 300 .,.t: cC 200 0 100 0 1991 1992 1 993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Year o Coordinated Trips <> ADA Tr ips A-21

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System-by-System Summary Lee County Transit System: Lee County Transit Service Area: City of Fon Myers Type: County Government Contact: Mr. Jim Fetzer ADA Paratranslt Provider: CTC Community Transportation Coordinator: Good Wheels, Inc. Service Area: Glades, Heruy, and Lee Counties Type: Private Non-Profit. Panial Brokerage Contact: Ms. Deloris Sheridan Before ADA: The transit system provided its own paratransit service, not coordinated with the crc. All eligible persons in the transit system's service area could reserve the transi t system's paratransit service 24 hours in advance for allowable trip purposes. The fare paid by the client was $1.75. Paratransit service was available during the same days and hours as fixedroute service, and service could be reserved 14 days in advance. Just prior to ADA, the transit system contracted with the CTC for the CTC to provide some of the transit system's paratransit service Implementing ADA Paratransit: The transit system contracts with the CTC for the CTC to coordinate and provide all ADA service for the transit system. The transit system leased six vehicles for the CTC to use to provide ADA service. The CTC made some service changes to its ADA service, but not to its TO service For ADA service, longer advance reservation time is allowed, t here are no restrictions on trip purpose, and the fare is reduced from $1.75 (for TO service) to $1.50 (for ADA service). Eligibility and Coordination: The transit system certifies ADA eligibility. The transit system keeps a record of ADA-eligible clients and sends an updated computer file to the CTC on a monthly basis. The CTC coordinates both ADA service and TO service. When a client calls the CTC for service, the client is asked who his or her sponsor i s. The CTC then determines funding responsibility for the trip and bills the appropriate agency. Demand and Funding: There has been more demand for ADA service than the transit system expected, and demand for both ADA and TO service is growing. All requests for ADA service are currently being accommodated. ADA currently accounts for just five percent of the paratransit serv ice provided. There has been some shift in demand from TD service to ADA service, but the majority of ADA se rvice is new service. Both the transit system and the CTC encourage the use of fixed-route services through travel training and bus passes; however, the transit system is not yet fully accessible. The transit syste m has funded ADA serv ice out of its general revenue; however the Board of County Commissioners has recently allocated 112 cent of the gas tax to fund ADA service. TO Trust Fund monies arc sometimes used to pay the ADA service fare for low-income ADA-eligible persons A-22

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Lee Pop. C T C Budgat Rewnua Expenses Expenses Tota l Paratransit Operating Expens Tota l System C a pita l Expenses Tota l System OperaW!g Expenses Total System Rewnue Statistics Ratio ADA : CTCTotaiTrips %of D eman d tor G ener al Trips %of Total Transit Expenses Notes NR = N o t reported. System-by-System Summary 380, 452 392,8 1 9 405,sn 344, 000 331,340 162,917 168,234 172,152 31, 293 32, 294 33,008 385,291 397,510 406,202 0 0 0 132,090 1 39,017 2 1 3 ,800 0 0 0 NA 91,177 n ,052 NA 47,840 136, 748 132,090 139 ,017 2 1 3 ,800 $789,505 $931 ,862 $1, 543 ,87 8 $991,337 $914,996 $1.517 868 4,211 1 1,74 1 12 ,081 1 2,431 1 2 792 0 0 0 0 0 139,017 143, 182 148, 128 1 52,569 157, 148 1 ,352, 410 1,451 870 NR so $627,000 52.200, 000 $3,080, 000 $41 ,344 $ 1 89,000 $ 195,145 5200, 793 5206, 842 N R so $627 000 52.200 000 $3,080 000 $41 ,344 $ 1 89,000 $ 195,145 5200, 793 $208,842 $99,2 4 9 $37 ,000 $ 1, 507,964 52.300 000 $3, 180, 000 -$3,158, 9 1 5 $3,492, 228 $3, 631,9 17 $3,7n, 194 $3,928.28 1 $3,737 906 $3,523 ,826 $5, 616 ,22 1 $4,976,104 $5, 1 98,830 0 .03 0 .05 1 1 % 2.9% 1.3% 5.4% 16.0% 39. 5% 48.2% Paratra n sit Trips 220 200 ., 180 .g.,; 160 ';_-g .... :;: !!1 100 o eo 60 0 40 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1 997 Year o Coordinated Trips <> ADA T r ips A -23 13, 163 0

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System-by-System Summary Leon County Transit System: Tallahassee Transit Authority Service Area: City of Tallahassee Type: City Government Contact: Mr. John Smith Community Transportation Coordinator: Big Bend Transit, Inc. Service Area: Gads Jeff Leon, Madison, Taylor Type : Private Non-Profit, Partial Brokerage Contact: Mr. Ted Waters ADA Paratranslt Providers: Transit System and CTC Before ADA: The CTC had no relationship with the transit system prior to ADA. Prior to ADA, the uansit system operated paratransit service in the city of Tallahassee and the CTC operated paratransit service in the rest of Leon County. Implementing ADA Paratransit: The transit system operates its own ADA service during weekday business hours. The ADA service on weekends and after 6:00p.m. on weekdays i s brokered to the CTC, which operates the service. Changes were made to the transit system's paratransit service to meet ADA requirements, but the changes were not a big problem for the transit system. Prior to ADA the transit system required reservation one week in advance of a trip. Reservation time is currently three day s, and will soon be 24 hours. Fare w ent from $1.00 before ADA to $1.50 currently. Four additional vehicles were purchased to meet additional service needs These changes apply to all of the paratransit service operated by the transit system. No changes were necessary to the paratransit service operated by the CTC, except that the fare for ADA service is $1.50 and the fare for TO service is $2.00. The ADA service is simply filling up some of the excess capacity that the CTC already h ad available. Eligibility and Coordination: The transit system detennines ADA eligibility, but does not currently issue ID cards. The transit system refers eligible trips to th e CTC, usually two or three days in advance of the trip. The CTC schedules and dispatches ADA trips. Providing ADA service has allowed the CTC to better coordinate its paratransit service by filling up some of its excess capacity. Most of the CTC's ADA service is provided to clients that are n ew to the CTC, because the clients are residents of Ta llahassee who had previously ridden on the transit system's paratransit service rather than the CTC's service. Demand and Funding: Demand for the service operated by the transit system has been about as expected. The number of parauansit trips provided by the transit system o n a busy day has increased from about 250 to approximately 300 trips. The purposes of ADA trips provided by the transit system are approximately equally divided between medical, sheltered workshop, other employment, and soci aVrecreational purposes. Approximately 55 percent of the transit system's paratransit ridership is ADA service. Demand for ADA service operated by the CTC has been much less than expected, and is not increasing. Most of the ADA service is new service for the CTC. Since the ADA service provided by the CTC is after-hours and on weekends, most trips are for sociaVrecreational and employment purposes. Less than one percent of the CTC's Leon County service is ADA service. The transit system has no dedicated ADA funding. The CTC reports ADA funding as contracted transportation revenue received from the transit system

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To1al Total Paratransit To1al System To1al System T ola l System (1) Statistics Aalio ADA : C T C Tala! Trips % o f Demand fo r General T 1 ip5 %of To1al Expen ses 282.611 196 .270 97,932 21 192 283,969 0 302,909 0 NA NA 302,909 $1,556 .923 $ 1 ,601 ,438 3 ,453,080 -266,720 129.260 99,255 21.407 286,673 0 363,628 0 9 1 801 271 ,627 363,628 $2,139, 992 $2, 139 992 31 .090 268 53,605 3,626.890 $356,000 $647,000 $ 866,000 $8, 881 ,000 $3, 587,000 0 .09 10. 8% 4.7% 290,S94 100,876 21,692 290,196 0 4 1 0,742 0 1 1 3 ,675 297,067 4 10,742 $2, 343,985 $2,343,965 33,578 289 57,893 $485,000 $836,000 $7,602,000 $7,643,000 $8, 578,000 0 .08 11.6% 3 .2% System-by-System Summary 38,140 42,524 54,866 312 2 1 2 164 62,524 67,527 84,409 $336, 000 $150,000 $167,000 $536, 000 $581 ,000 $768,000 $1 $551,000 $238,000 $257,000 $878,000 $922,000 $1,213,000 $ 1 $1,600 ,000 $4,241 ,000 $ 1 2 844.000 $8,025,000 $8,426 ,000 $8,847,000 $7,24 9 ,000 $7,217,000 $16,082,000 9.1 % 5.8% 4.4% sllows no capilal "' .g..;; ,_., >-" .... ,o .,.c c:t:. 0 Paratransit Trips soor--------------------------, 400 300 200 1991 1992 1993 1994 1 995 1 996 1997 Year o Coordinated T rips ADA T r ips A -25 1

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System-by-System Summary Manatee County Transit System: Manatee County Area Transit Se!Vice Area: Urban Manatee County Type: County Government Contact: Ms. Mary Constiner ADA Paratransit Provider: Transit System/CTC Community Transportation Coordinator. Manatee County Area Transit Service Area: Manatee County Type: Public Transit, Sole Source Contact: Ms. Mary Constiner Before ADA: The transit system and the CTC are the same agency. The transit/CTC operated all of its own paratransit service This arrangement continues. Implementing ADA Paratransit: The transit/CTC provides its own ADA and TD service. Some changes wete required to the paratransit service that was previously operated in order to meet ADA requirements. Hours for ADA service were expanded to include Saturday service, and hours were expanded from 7:30a.m. to 4:00p.m. prior to ADA to 6:00a.m. to 7:00p.m. after ADA. Hours for TD service remain unchanged. Next day service is available for ADA service, but not for TD service. A new reservation system was installed to take ADA service requests on Sundays A change made to all service was the r emoval of cut-off times for will-call return trips The fare paid by the client for either ADA service or TD service is $1.00. Eligibility and Coordination: The transit/CTC certifies ADA eligibility and issues an lD card to eligible persons. The transit/CTC also coordinates and operates both ADA and TD service. ADA trips are given a priority over TD trips. Demand and Funding: The demand for ADA service has been greater than expected. The transit/CTC believes that there has been some shedding of clients onto ADA service by social service agencies. Weekday ADA service is mostly for medical purposes, while weekend ADA service is primarily for shopping or recreational trips. The transit/CTC encourages the use of fixed-route services where possible No dedicated ADA funding is available, so ADA service is funded out of the transit system's general revenue. A-26

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Pol!enQer Trips Demand for General Trips FIXed Roulll (Section 9 & 16) Paratr.enait Sel1ool8us All Disabled Non -Disabled Tr ips Tctal Tctal TOial System T ctal System Total System System-by-System Summary 217,284 215,130 100,976 1 8,057 216, 664 0 86,918 0 22,599 64,319 86,918 223.007 215,000 1 03 ,G31l 18,532 222.384 0 115,841 0 29.828 85.813 115,841 228,859 104,500 18.706 224,472 0 130,151 20,619 120,504 00,266 150,no $707 ,303 s1.1:le.eos S1,382,67o $823,941 s 1 13e,eos S1,382,670 638,720 0 0 114,500 843,170 $33,000 so $33,000 $1,050,000 $33,000 $1 050,000 $478,000 0 .00 0 .0% 3 .0% 3 ,588 0 115.000 so $35,000 so $1,125,000 $0 $1,125 ,000 $500,000 0 .02 1.6% 3 1% 4 ,632 0 116.000 $35, 000 $46,000 $35,000 $1, $35,000 $535,000 6.8% Paralranstt Trips 5,790 0 117,000 $35,000 $60,000 $35,000 $1, 204,000 $35,000 $1 204,000 $537,000 7 .7% 7 .238 0 118,000 8 .7% 100r--------------------------, .. ,!:-o ,._c:: .... !i:!l I o ,..c:: c::t::. 0 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Year o Coordinated Trips o I>DA Trips A-21

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System-by-System Summary Monroe County Transit System: Key West Transit Authority Service Area: Key West and Stock Island Type: City Government Contact: Mr. Ben Gibson Community Transportation Coordinator: NoCTC Service Atea: n/a Type: n/a Contact: n/a ADA Paratransil Provid ers: Tran sit System and Other Before ADA: The transit system does not currently operate paratransit service. Monroe County does not currently have a CTC. Monroe County Social Services (MCSS) operates paratransit service throughout the county. Implementing ADA Paratran.sit: ADA service will be implemented by June or July 1994. MCSS operates paratransit service during weekday business hours, and will provide ADA service also during those hours. MCSS will not charge ADA clients any fare. MCSS service already meets ADA requirements so no changes to service are anticipated. The transit system will purchase one van and contract with a private o p erator to operate the van and provide ADA service on weekends and beforeand after-hours on weekdays The transit system will charge ADA clients a fare of $1 50. The transit system may take over daytime ADA service at some time in the future, because MCSS eligibility guidelines are broader than required by A DA. Eligibility and Coordination: The transit system will certify ADA eligibility for the weekend and beforeand after-hours service. The transit system does not anticipate that coordination of this service will be a problem because the private contractor will schedule the trip. The transit system will not coordinate the service provided by MCSS. Demand and Funding: The transit system expects that most ADA demand will be for weekend service The transit system will fund the service out of its general revenue because no dedicated ADA funding is available The transit sys tem does not anticipate the use of TD Trust Fund monies to fund ADA service.

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System-by-System Summary 79 278 80,551 81,843 Pop. 29, 230 32,470 I 28, 220 28,672 26, 795 II 7 966 8,095 6,159 114,710 116,558 117,490 18) 0 NA NA 46, 000 NA NA 0 NA NA D isabled NA NA NA Non-Disabled NA NA NA Trips 46, 000 NA NA $343,629 NA NA $343,629 NA NA 0 0 1 ,990 2 652 2 705 2.759 Den ied 0 0 10 1 3 14 14 Total Paratransit Trips 0 0 0 199 2,652 2,705 2 759 Total Transit Trips 242,580 227 590 $0 $0 $25,000 $0 $0 $0 $3,000 $5, 000 $50 000 $ 120. 000 $ 122. 000 $124,000 $0 $0 $25,000 $0 $0 $0 $3,000 $5,000 $80,000 $120,000 $122,000 $124, 000 $4,000 $1,229,000 $2,546,000 $80, 000 $64, 000 $671 000 $704,000 $519 000 $659, 000 $901 000 $274 000 $1 459 000 $2, 916,000 $480, 000 $505,000 CTC Total Trips NA NA %of Demand fo r General T r iP< 0.0% 0 0% % of T oml T ranstt Expenses 0.4% 0.3% 3.1 % 12.6% 1 2.4% Notes Paratransit Trips 50 40 "' a...... -"' 30 ,:.., ,._c .... 20 1 0 .,.c c!:. 10 0 l. 0 199 1 1 992 1993 1994 1995 1996 199 7 Year 0 Coordinated Trips o ADA Trips A -29

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System-by-System Summary Orange, Osceola, and Seminole Counties System: Lynx Service Area; Orange, Osceola, Seminole Type: Authority Contact: Mr Bill Morris ADA Provider: Transit System/CTC Community Coordinator: Lynx Service Area: Orange, Osceola, Seminole Type: Public Transit, Complete Brokerage Contact: Mr. Bill Morris Before ADA : The transit system and the CTC are the same agency. The transit/CTC brokered its paratransit service to a private operator. This arrangement continues. Implementing ADA Pan1tn1nsit : The transit/CTC already had well-developed brokered paratransit services. The ADA service is also brokered Minor changes were required to the paratransit service to meet ADA requirements, but these changes were not a big problem. The changes were made to all paratransit services. The fare for ADA service is $1.50, and for TD service the fare varies depending on length of trip (the average fare for a TD trip is $1.87). The fare differential is sometimes an issue the first time a client encounters it. Overall, ADA has led to improved service for all clients, even those who are not eligible for ADA service Eligibility and Coordination: The transit/ CTC certifies eligibility for ADA service The transit/CTC has distributed approximately 20,000 copies of a brochure explaining the ADA service, and has been adding an average of 20 new clients per week. The transit/CTC informs the ADA operator of trip requests, the operator schedules and dispatches the trips This procedure is the same as before ADA Demand and Funding: Demand has been about what the transit/CTC expected. Many of the trips are new trips that would not have been provided prior to ADA. Data on the trip purposes of ADA service are not available Demand for TD service is stable, and client shedding by social service agencies has not been a problem. ADA service is about 15 percent of total paratransit ridership. The transit/CTC has good relationships with agencies and their clientele. Growth in service has not created problems, because t h e growth is anticipated and planned for The TD Trust Fund does not provide funds for ADA service. County governments contribute funding for ADA service in proportion to the percent of Lynx paratransit service in each of the three counties. The transit/CTC has a specific line it em in its budget for ADA servi ce. A-30

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System -bySystem Summary Orange, Osceola, Seminole 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 IPopu ation County(ies} Population 1 106.910 1 142, 195 1,178,570 ---FIXed Route SeNice Area Pop. 1 '113, 700 7(!8 ,430 -10 Catego-C: 0 6 0.5 ::. 0.4 .. -0.3 --'> c: 0 0.2 0 1 0 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1 997 Year o Coordinated Trips o ADA Trips A-31

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System-by-System Summary Palm Beach County Transit System: Palm Beach County Transportation Authority Service Area: Palm Beach County Type: County Government Contact: Ms. Kathy Giffm ADA Paratransit Provider: Other Commaaity Traasportation Coordinator: Palm Beach County MPO Service Area: Palm Beach County Type: Government, Complete Brokerage ContAct: Mr. Randy Whitfield Before ADA: Neither the transit system nor the CTC directly operated paratransit service. The transit system and the CTC contracted before ADA; the transit system provided some paratransit service for the CTC using a private operator. This arrangement continues. lmplementiog ADA Paratransit: The transit s ystem contracts directly with a privat e operator to provide ADA service. This private operator also provides TO service for the transit system. The private operator had to purchase some additional lift-equipped vehicles to provide the ADA service. No other significant changes were required to the previously-existing service to meet ADA Eligibility aod Coordination: The transit system detennines eligibility for ADA service. The CTC is unsure if most ADA clients are new or existing clients because the TD service provided by the transit system staned up about the same t ime as the ADA service staned The CTC contracts with the transit system for the transit system to schedule all of the ADA and TO service provided. A private operator actually prov ides the trips. l>emand and Funding: The transit system reports ADA demand about as expected. The CTC has not tracked demand for ADA services; ADA service and TO service are not separately ident ified. Demand is growing for both ADA service and TD service. No client shedding is yet apparent. The transit system plans an expansion of fiXed-route service in the near futur
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SeNice Area Pop. I I I : CTC Total T r ips of Demand fo r General Trips %of Tota l T r ansit Expenses System by-System Summary 888,660 914,947 941,747 683 ,040 775 340 369,210 380,047 386,666 67,055 69,023 70,141 804,660 828,2 7 6 841 ,692 NA 0 0 NA 299,593 638,475 NA 516 0 NA 148,705 151,394 NA 1 51 ,404 487, 081 NA 300, 109 638,475 NA $2, 107,101 $4,155 .873 NA $2, 107 ,101 $3,999, 165 165 ,000 360,000 390,000 4 1 0 ,000 430,000 NA NA 0 0 0 430,000 630,000 900,000 1,000 .000 1 ,()(X),OOO 2,71 2 ,8EI) 2,712 ,8EI) 369,000 $317,000 $202,000 $22 1,000 $247,000 -s1.2n. ooo $1, 444,000 $1,805 ,000 $2,000,000 $2,221 ,000 $160,000 $733,000 $465.000 $510.000 $570.000 $2,950 ,000 $3, 335,000 $4,170, 000 $ 4,820,000 $5, 130,000 $1, 253,000 $7, 500,000 $7,920 ,000 $3,650,000 $1,325,000 $8,558 ,000 $9.696,000 s1o.on.ooo $ 1 0 ,841 ,000 $11,382,000 $9, 8 11,000 $17, 196,000 $17,997,000 $14,491,000 $12,707,000 0.82 0.56 22.3% 42 8% 13.7% 1 0 2% 1 1 .2% 15.3% 1 9.4% Parat r ans i t Tr ips 700r--------------------------, 600 500 400 300 200 100 1991 1992 1993 1994 1 995 1996 1 997 Year o Coordinated Trips o ADA Trips A -33 21.

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System-by-System Summary Pinellas County Transit System: Pinellas Suncoast Tran sit Authority Service Area: Pinellas County Type: Authority Contact: Mr. Bill Steele ADA Paratransit Provider: Transit System Community TransJI()rtation Coordinator: Pinellas County MPO Service Area: Pinellas County Type: Government, Complete Brokerage Contact: Mr. Richard Stiles Before ADA: The transit system already operated paratransit service. The CTC contracted with the transit system for the transit system to operate some TD service for the CTC. This arrangement continues Implementing ADA Paratransit: The transit system provides its own paratransit service. The transit system operates some of the ADA service itself and brokers some to private operators. Some changes were required to the paratransit service operated by the transit system in order to meet ADA requirements. Days and hours of service were expanded, eligibility requirements were revised, next-day scheduling was begun, scheduling windows were tightened, zone-based fares were abolished in favor of a standard $2.00 fare, th.e fare for attendants was eliminated, and new staff training programs were initiated. These changes have benefited both ADA and TD clients To increase the funding available for ADA service, the transit system no longer subsidizes the trips that it provides for social service agencies Eligibility and Coordination: The transit system certifies eligibility for ADA services, and coordinates, schedules, dispatches and provides the ADA service. Revisions to this system are currently under consideration, and the ADA service may be prov ided through the CTC in the future. Demand and Funding: Demand for both ADA and TD service is quite large. The transit system's paratransit ridership has doubled since ADA. To meet the demand for ADA service, the transit system has tightened its paratransit eligibility criteria TI10s, many clients that previously were eligible for the transit system's paratransit service are now turning to the CTC for service. The transit system is working to prevent client shedding by social service agencies. The transit system has no dedicated ADA funding, so ADA service is funded out of the system's general revenue.

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CTC Budget Revenue Expenses Cepi1al Expenses Total Operating Expens. Tota l System capital Expenses Total System Opera tin g Expenses Tota l System Revenue : CTC Total Trips %of D emand for General T r ips %or Demand for General T r i ps Notes System-by-System Summary e62,639 873.760 884, 988 855,760 438 ,870 372, 496 3n,299 378,225 67,939 68,815 68,94 7 815,268 825,780 827,364 NA 0 0 NA 1 057,436 1,381, 665 NA 0 200 NA 732,537 881,408 NA 324,899 480 457 NA 1, 057,436 1 351 ,8615 NA $4,047,516 $8,794,030 NA $4,047,516 $8,794 030 1 11,647 134,875 142 ,800 149,940 157.437 1 0 0 0 0 0 96,889 125.528 135 ,000 142,800 149,940 157,437 10 805,160 9.413,740 $0 $0 $31 2 ,000 $312,000 $0 $0 $1.471 000 $1,855 .000 $2,032,000 $2,201 ,000 $2,363,000 $2, 539,000 $0 $0 $312,000 $31 2 ,000 $0 $0 $1,662 ,000 $1,871 ,000 $2, 032,000 $2,2 01 ,000 $2,363 ,000 $2, 539,000 $2,888 ,000 $8,537,000 $5,461 ,000 $3,485,000 $8,281 ,000 $4, 163,000 $22,613,000 $25, 497,000 $26,271,000 $27, 1 68,000 $28, 049,000 $28, 965.000 $26, 5 1 4,000 $34, 034,000 $31, 732,000 $80,653 ,000 $36,330 ,000 $33, 128,000 0.11 13.5% 5 .8% 0 10 16.3% 5.5% 7 .4% Paratransit Trips 8 .2% 1993 1994 1995 1996 1 997 Year o Coordinated Trips <> ADA Trips A-35 8.5%

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System-by-System Summary Polk County Transit System: Lakeland Area Mass Transit District Service Area: City of Lakeland Type: Authority Contact: Mr. Steve Githens ADA Paratraosit Provider: Transit System Community Transportation Coordinator: Polk County Board of County Commissioners Service Area: Polk County Type: Government, Partial Brokerage Contact: Mr. Roger Eckert &fore ADA: The transit system and the ere both operated paratransit service The transit system operated some paratransit service for the ere. Implementing ADA Paratransit: The transit system prov i des its own ADA service along with the other paratransit serv ice operated by the transit system. No significant changes w ere required to the service, which is less restrictive than required by ADA. The fare for ADA service is $1.00 (less than the allowable twice the $0.75 fare for fixed-route service). The ADA service is provided on the same vehicl es at the same time as the TD service. As a small operator, the transit system finds the extra administrative wori< required to be the biggest burden. ADA paratransit requirements have not directly affected the eTC. Eligibility and Coordination: The transit system currently allows all persons who cannot use fixed-route service to use ADA service, and does not have an ID system in place. However the transit system intends to implement an lD system in the future so that residents of the transit system's service area who visit other cities can use the ADA service in those other cities. The transit system coordinates the ADA service with the TO service, and has not experienced any problems resulting form this coordination. The ADA service clients are primarily the same persons as the TO service clients. The ADA trips provided are mostly trips that would have been provided even without ADA. Demand and Funding: Demand is about as expected. Client shedding by social service agencies has not been an issue so far, but the transit system expects i t to be a problem in the future. Approxima tely 60 percent of the paratransit service provided is ADA service. ADA service is funded from the transit system's general revenue; no dedicated ADA funding is available.

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System-by-Sy stem Summary 4 1 2 ,958 420,676 4 2 8 496 Pop. 414 ,700 1 10,000 161,17 4 164, 166 164,857 27,308 27,819 27,822 C TC Passenoe r Trii;!:S Demand lor General Trips 327,696 333,828 333,864 FIXed Route (Seetion 9 & 18) 0 0 40,570 Para transit 50,708 53,390 2 00,823 0 0 1 5 6 .960 6.592 6 .941 6 ,851 44,11 6 46,449 33,719 Tota l Trips 50,708 53.390 398.353 CTC Bud!l ADA T r i p s A -37

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System-by-System Summary Sarasota County Tl'llnsit System: Sarasota County Area Transit Service Area: Sarasota County Type: County Government Contact: Mr. Jay Goodwill ADA Paratransit Provider: CTC Community TraD.Sportation Coordinator: Senior Friendship Centers, Inc. Service Area: Sarasota County Type: Private Non-Profit, Sole Source Contact: Ms. Sue Berger Before ADA: The CTC already provided all of the demand-responsive service for the transit system, and the two agencies had a very good relationship. This arrangement continues. Implementing ADA Paratl'llD.Sil: The CTC operates the ADA service for the transit system. Saturday service was implemented to meet ADA requirements, and fares were lowered from $1.50 to $1.00. The fare is collected by the CTC and sent to the trans it system, which then pays th e CTC for the trip. Thes e changes apply to both ADA service and TD service. Eligibility and Coordination: Eligibility for ADA service is certified by the trans i t system, wh i ch issues 1D cards to eligible clients. Most of the ADA clients are also clients of the TD service. Tite CTC coordinates and operates the service. Demand and Funding: Demand for ADA service is extensive, and is currently increasing by 30 percent annually. The transit system attributes the high demand to several factors. These factors include new clients, expanded service. and client shedding by social serv ice agencies. Approximately 40 percent of all paratransit service provided is ADA service The transit system does not have dedicated funding for ADA service, and is funding the service out of its general revenue.

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Pop CTC Budaet Revenu e Expenses Total Expenses Total Parattansit Operating Expens. T otal System Capita l Expenses Tota l System Operating Expenses Total System R-c ADA Trips A-39 0 43,000 $0 $484 000 $484 000

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System-by-System Summary Volusia County Transit System: East Volusia Transit Authority Service Area: Volusia County Type : County Government Conrac .t: Mr. David Hope ADA Paratransit Provider: Other Community TI'IIMpor1ation Coordinator: East Volusia Transit Authority Service Area: Volusia County Type: Public Transit, Complete Brokerage Contact: Mr. David Hope Before ADA: The transit system and the CTC are the same agency. The transit/CTC does not operate paratransit service. The ADA operator already operated some paratransit service for the transit system before ADA. lmplemeotlog ADA Paratransit: ADA service is brokered to a private operator. The ADA operator was also the CTC until the transit system recently assumed the role of CTC. The operator provides ADA service using the transit/CTC's "Handiwheels" vehicles. The ADA operator also provides TD service for the transit system. The operator provides some of this TO service directly and contracts with other operators for the rest. Some ADA trips are provided using TD service vehicles rather than Handiwheels vehicles. (Medicaid service is not provided through the ADA operator but through a different private operator.) The ADA operator's paratransit service already met ADA requirements, so no changes were necessary to the service However, changes may be required in the future because the service currently provided is appro>
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System-by-System S u mmary Vol usia 1991 1992 1900 1994 1995 1996 1997 Population Counly{ i es) Populatioo 361 143 391 ,U8 402 ,894 --Fbood Route Se!vioe Atea Pop. 376,700 1 96,320 ---TO category 1 162,740 167,320 1 7 1,534 ---Til Category II 28. 133 28,925 29, 639 ---ere PassenQ!!r Demand 101 General Trips 337,596 347,100 355,668 -FIXed Route (Sect ion 9 & 1 8) 0 0 0 ---Paratransit 1 2 0,903 187,722 284 .069 ---School Bu s 0 0 0 ---A l l Disabled NA 35,796 28.502 ---A l l NonDisabled NA 150 ,924 255 .567 ---TOialT rips 1 2 0 ,903 187, 722 284,069 ---$8:!8 400 $851 484 $ 2,261 ,683 -$8:!6 ,600 $875 ,741 $2, 387,734 -Transit SX!;tem P a ssen9!r Tri.Q! ADA Paratransit Trips -35,714 37,000 48.000 47 ,640 49, 255 50, 174 ADA Trips Oenioo 9,610 1 1 ,110 7 ,221 4 293 2 ,335 0 Total Parat ransil Trips 96,714 37,000 46,000 47,640 49, 255 50, 1 7 4 Total T ransit Trips 3.001,650 3 ,025,300 ----Transit SYStem Budget ADA Capital Expenses $55,000 $0 50 $305 ,000 $ 1 65,000 $0 ADA Oper atilg Expenses $233 000 $250 ,000 $305,000 $316 ,000 $327,000 $333,000 Tota l P 818 t ransit Capital Expenses $55,000 $0 50 $305,000 $165,000 50 Tota l Operatilg E'xpens. $233 ,000 $250,000 $305 ,000 $31 6,000 $327,000 $333 ,000 Tota l System C apital Expenses $ 183, 000 $462 ,000 $ 1,45 9 ,000 $1,685 ,000 $ 1,305,000 $2, 1 57,000 Total System Operatilg Expenses $3,970,000 $4,272.000 $4,660,000 $4,794,000 $5, 130,000 $5, 468 ,000 Tota l System Ae..,nue $4, 153. 000 $4,734.000 $6,119 ,000 $6,479 .000 $6, 435 .000 $7,646.000 Statistics Ratio ADA; CTC Total Trips 0 .20 0.13 --ADA% of Demand for General Trips 1 0.6% 1 0.4% ---ADA% of Total Expenses 6 .9% 5 .9% 5 .0% 9 .6% 7 .6% 4 4 % Notes jGraph Paratr a nsit Trips 300 250 200 n..-. C/) f-'0 ,.c: 150 .... 100. 10 .,.c c:t:. 0 50 0 _/' 1 9 9 1 1992 1993 1994 1 9 9 5 1996 1997 Year o C oordinated Trips o ADA Trips A-41