USF Libraries
USF Digital Collections

Brevard County 1998-2002 transit development plan and transportation disadvantaged service plan ; final report

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Brevard County 1998-2002 transit development plan and transportation disadvantaged service plan ; final report
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida. Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged
University of South Florida. Center for Urban Transportation Research
Publisher:
Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR)
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Aged--Florida--Transportation   ( lcsh )
People with disabilities--Florida--Transportation   ( lcsh )
Urban transportation--Florida--Planning   ( lcsh )
Genre:
letter   ( marcgt )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
usfldc doi - C01-00074
usfldc handle - c1.74
System ID:
SFS0032192:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
record xmlns http:www.loc.govMARC21slim xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.loc.govstandardsmarcxmlschemaMARC21slim.xsd
leader ntm 22 Ka 4500
controlfield tag 008 s flunnn| ||||ineng
datafield ind1 8 ind2 024
subfield code a C01-00074
040
FHM
049
FHmm
2 110
Florida. Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged.
0 245
Brevard County 1998-2002 transit development plan and transportation disadvantaged service plan ; final report
260
Tampa, Fla
b Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR)
c 1997 September
650
Aged--Florida--Transportation
People with disabilities--Florida--Transportation
Urban transportation--Florida--Planning
710
University of South Florida. Center for Urban Transportation Research.
1 773
t Center for Urban Transportation Research Publications [USF].
4 856
u http://digital.lib.usf.edu/?c1.74



PAGE 1

BREVARD COUNTY 1998-2002 TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN AND TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED SERVICE PLAN Final Report Prepared for: Space Coast Area Transit Cocoa, Florida By: Center for Urban Transportation Research College of Engi neering University of South F lorida September 1997

PAGE 2

Space Coast Area Transit 401 South Varr Avenue Cocoa F lorida 32922 (407) 635-7815 Fax (407) 633-1905 Project Manager: James Liesenfelt Director: Center for Urban Transportation Research University of South Florida College of Engineering 4202 E Fowle r Avenue, CUT 100 Tampa, Florida 33620-5375 (813) 974-3120 Suncom 574-3120 Fax (8 1 3) 974-5168 Gary L. Brosch Project Managers : Laura C. Lachance Jennifer A. Hardin R osemary G. Mathias Dennis Hinebaugh Dan Rudge Project Staff : Steven Maas Marti n Catala Chris Billingsley Kelly Hammett

PAGE 3

TABLE OF CONTENTS List of Tables ......... .... . .... .............. ................... . ... vii List of Figures ....... . . .... .... ..... ...... .... .......... ............ ... x Preface .. ........ .... . .... ....... ....... .... ....... ........ . . ...... xv Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii Chapter One: Demograph i c Data, Interviews, Focus Groups, and D i scussion Group ... 1 In t rod uct ion .............. ... .. .. .. .. ....... ............ . ........ 1 Consistency Rev ie w o f Plans .. .. .............. ..... ...... . ....... 1 Lo cal Government Comprehensive Plans ...... ................. .......... 2 Transit Development Plan ...... ... .... .... .... .................. . . 2 Commission fo r the Transportation Disadvanta ged 5/20 Year Plan ... ......... 2 MPO Long Range Transportation Plan .................... .............. 2 Brevard County MPO Transportat ion Im provement Program ... ................ 3 Study Area Setting ....................................... .... ...... .. 3 Brevard County Demographics . .............. .............. . . ... ... 4 Population and Population Dens ity . .... . ............. .... .... . .... 4 P opul ation Age Characteristics ................. . ....... ... .. ..... 5 Transportation Disadvantage d Popula tion ......... . ....... .... .. .. .. 19 Income Characteristics ..... .... .... .... ... .. ............ ..... 20 Vehicle Availability ...... ...... .... ....... .... .... ... ..... ... 21 Employment Characteristics ........ .... ... . .... ... . . ..... .... 31 Travel to Work ............... .......... ... .... .............. 31 Trave l Time to Work ..... ......... . ............................ 32 Means of Trave l to Work ....... . .... ....... ..... .... .. ... ... ...... 33 Brevard County CTC Major Trip Generators and Attractors ... ... ............ 4 7 Interviews with Local Officials ................. .......................... . 53 Perceptions ........ ......... ...... ........ ...... ........ .... 53 Suggestions and Options ..... ... .... ........ ... ..... . .......... 55 Policy Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ...... 56 Focus Group Report ....... .... ... .. ....................... ...... . 57 In troduction ...... . . . ............. .. ................ .. . ... 57 Focus Grou p #1: Pa lm Bay High School . ... .. ......................... 57 Focus G ro up #2: Melbourne H igh School . ........ . .............. 58 Brevard County Transit Dtwelopment Plan iii

PAGE 4

Focus G r o u p #3: Cental Jun ior High Schoo l ..... ... ....... ..... ........ 58 Focus G r oup #4: Coco a Beach Jun i or / Senio r H igh School .... . . ......... 59 Find i ngs ........................... .... .... .... ......... ... .. .... 60 Summary ....................................... .... ..... ..... .... 70 Discussion Grou p Summary (South Main l and Transportat i on Needs} ........ .. .... 71 I nt r oduction ................................................. ........ 71 Participant Ch a racteristics ................. .. ..... ... ......... ... 71 Percept i ons of T ransportation Needs/Wants . .... .......... ... ........ ... 72 Perceptions of and Experiences with SCAT Public Tra n sportation .... ... ...... 7 4 Potentia l So l utions to Mob il ity P r oblems .... ......................... .... 75 Chapter Two: Inventory of Providers and Description and Evaluation of Existing Public Transportation Services . . . ..... 77 iv Introduction ... .................................. ....... ... ... .. .... 77 Pub l ic T ransportation Providers in Brevard County ... .... ......... ......... 77 History of Public T r ansportation i n Brevard County ...... . .... .... ......... 79 Descript i on of SCAT Fixed-Route Services ... ... . ........... .......... ... .. 80 Evaluation of SCAT Fixed-Route Services ......... ..... ...................... 87 The Purpose of Performance Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 87 Performance Review Data .... ....... .. .... ....... ............ 89 FixedRoute Trend Ana l ysis . ..................... ..... ......... 90 Fixed-Route Peer Review Analysis .... . ....... . . .... ............. 111 Description and History of C T C Coo r dinated Services ....... ...... ............. 136 Flor ida Coordinated Transportation System .................. ... .... ... .. 136 History of the Brevard Coun t y Transportation Disad v antaged Program ........ . 137 Description of Brevard County CTC Coord i nated Serv i ces . . . . . . . . . . 141 Brevard County CTC Paratranslt Eligibility Requirements . .... ............... 148 T ransportatio n Operators Coordinated Services .. ............ .... ...... 150 CTC Vehicle Inventory ....... . ........ .... ... ...... ............ 151 System Safety Program Plan Certification . ............... ............ 151 I n tercounty Services ...... ....... ... . .......... . . . ............ 151 Natural Disaster/Emergency Preparedness ............. ... ........ 152 Ma r ket i n g ........ .... .... ... ............. ....... ........... . 152 Accepta bl e Alternatives .......................... .. ... .............. 153 Performance Eva lu ation of CTC Coo rd ina t ed Services ... . ... ... ... . . 1 54 Performance Rev i ew Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Brevard County CTC T r end Analysis . .......... .................. ...... 154 CTC Peer Group Analys i s ............................................. 169 Description of the Brevard County Commute r Assistance Program ....... ..... . 183 Vanpool Services ......... .... . . .... .... ....... ........... . ... .. 184 Brevard County Transit Dev e lopment Plan

PAGE 5

Other Commuter Ass is ta nce Pro gram E ff orts .... . ............... .... 185 Vanpool Trend Ana ly sis ........................................... .. 186 Vanpool Performance Measures . .... . .. ......... ....... . 1 86 Vanpoo l Effectiveness Measures .... .... ... ..... ... ........ .... 187 Vanpool Efficiency Measures ...... .. ............... ....... 188 Chapter Three: Goals and Objectives .... ... ... ...... .... .... . . . . 191 Introduction ........ ... .. .. .. ........ .... .... ...... .......... 191 TOP Proposed Goals and Objectives ... .... ................ ....... ... 191 Draft Loca l Coordinat in g Board Goals for 1997 ......... .... ............ 194 Trans it-Re lated Goa ls In Other Sources .. .. .. .............................. 196 Brevard County Comprehensive Plan: M ass Transi t Element ..... ... .. ... ... 196 Brev ard 2020 Long Range Transportation Plan ....... ......... .. ... ... . 202 Public Comments from The B r evard County TOP Publ i c Meet ing ....... .... ..... 202 Chapter Four: Estimates of Demand and Assessment of Needs ...... . ..... . 203 Introduction ... ... ................ . .............. .... .... .... ... ... 203 Estimates of Demand .... .... ... ... .... .... ....................... ... 203 Interview Focus Group Discussion Group and P ublic Meeting Results .......... 203 F ixedR o ute Dem a nd Est imates .. ........................... ...... .... 204 Americans wnh Disabilities Act (ADA) Ridership Demand Estimates . . . . . . 215 Tran spo rtati on Disadvantaged Demand Estimates . . . . . . . . . . . 223 B ar ri ers to Coordination of TO Services ...... .. .. ... .... ............. 236 Vanpool Demand Estimates ....... .. .. .. .. .. ..... ............ . . . 238 Other T r ansportation Demand Mana gemen t Options ... .... ..... ... .. .. 2 4 2 Assessment of Needs ... .... ......................... ....... ....... 249 Pu b lic Meeting ................. .. ............. ..... ........ 249 Service Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 2 50 Summary ...... .. ... .... .... .... . . ....... ................ ..... ... 256 Chapter Five: Public Transportation Alternatives and Recommendations . ... .. .. 257 Introduction ... ...... .. .. ............................ ... ............ 257 Public Transporta t ion Alternatives ........ ....... ......... ... ...... 257 Actions on Past Recommendation s ...... . .... . . . ...... .... . .... 258 Recommendations ......................... ............... .... . ... 262 Actions To Be In itia ted Imm ediately . . ......... ........ ... .... ..... 262 Actions To Be Initiated Over the Next One to Three Years ......... ......... 266 Actions To Be Ini tiated Over t he Next Fou r to Fiv e Years .. ........ ......... 272 Fiv e-Year Transit Developm ent P l a n: Financia l Plan ............ .... ..... .... 273 Brevard County Transit Development Plan v

PAGE 6

APPENDICES Append i x A: Appen di x B: Append i x C: Interview Guide . . .... .... . . ...... ................ A-1 Inventory of P u blic Transportat ion P r ov i ders ....... .. .. ... . . . B 1 Definitions of Performance Measures ... ......... ... ........ . . C-1 Appendix D : F i xe d Route Peer Analys i s ............... ... .... .... . . D-1 Appendix E : ADA Comp l ementary Paratrans i t Applicati on ............... .... E-1 Appendix F: CTC Current Veh i cle Inventory ....... .... ..... .... ... ... .... F-1 Appen dix G : System Sa f ety Program Plan ...... .......... ..... ...... . . G-1 Append i x H : CTC P eer Ana l ys i s ........... ..... .. . ............ . . H-1 Appendix 1: Public Comments ........ ...... .... .......... . ... .. . 1-1 Appendix J: Census Block G r oup Ana l ysis ......... .... ......... .. J 1 Appendix K: Route Analysis . . . . . ... ...... ... ........ . ... K-1 Appendix L : Loca l Coordi n ating Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L-1 vi Brevard C ounty TraMI I Dav eloptn$nl Plan

PAGE 7

Table ES-1 Table ES-2 Tabl e ES-3 Tabl e ES-4 Table ES-5 Table 1-1 Table 1-2 Table 1 3 Table 1-4 Table 1-5 Table 1 -6 Table 1-7 Table 1-8 Table 1-9 Table 110 Table 11 1 Table 1-12 Table 1-13 Table 1 -14 Table 1-15 Table 1-16 T able 1-17 Table 2-1 Table 2-2 Table 2-3 Table 2-4 Table 2-5 Table 2-6 Table 2-7 Table 2 8 Table 2-9 Tabl e 2-10 Ta ble 2-11 Table 2-12 Table 2-13 Table 2-14 Table 2-15 Table 2-16 LIST OF TABLES Status of Recommendations . ............ ... .... .............. xxxiii Estimated Cost of Unfunded Recommendations . . . . . . . . . xxxv Projected Base Five-Year Budget for SCAT .............. , . xxxvi Projected SCAT Budget Plus Unfunded Recommendations . . . . . xxxvii Expenses and Revenues ResuHing from Unfunded Recommendations ... xxxviii Population and Population Density .................... ... ... ........ 5 Population and Population Density: B r evard County ............. .... 5 Population Age Distribution ........................ ............... 6 Population Age Characteristics: Brevard County ......... ........... . 6 1997 Transportat ion Disadvantaged Population by Group ... ... ...... . 19 Household Income Distribution ........ .. ....... , .... .... . . 20 Household Income Characteristics: Brevard County ........ ............ 21 Household Vehicle Availability ............ . ....... ...... ..... . 21 Households wijh Zero Vehicles Available: Brevard County ...... ..... ... 22 Employment Characteristics .... .................. ... ....... ..... 31 Work Commuting Patterns .... .... .... ... ... ................ 31 Work Commuting Patterns: Brevard County . ........ .......... 32 Travel Time to Work ............ ...... . . ......... 32 Travel Time to Work : Brevard County ..... . ... . . ........... 33 Means of Travel to Work ....... .... .... .................. 33 Means of Travel to Work: Brevard County .................. . ..... 34 Brevard County CTC Ma j o r Trip Attractors . ...... . ...... ...... 48 Inventory of Public Transportation Providers: Brevard County ..... ... .... 78 Description of Current Fixed Routes ........... .. ....... . ......... 80 Factors Affecting Public Transportation Performance ........ . ...... 89 Performance Review Measures : Fixed-Route Analysis ... ........ . ... 90 Fi xed-Route Trend Analysis Ridership and Leve l of Service ... ........ 91 F ixed -Route Trend Analysis Expenses and Revenues .................. 93 F ixed-Route Trend AnalysisEmployees and Vehicles ... .............. 95 Fixed-Route Trend Analysis Service Supply and Service Consumption .... 97 Fixed-Route Trend Analysis Quality of Service .................. ... 100 Fixed-Route Trend Analysis Cost Effici ency ........ . ...... .. ... 103 Fixed-Route Trend Analysis Labor Productivijy ..... ... . ........... 106 Fixed-Route Trend Analysis Vehicle Utilization ... ...... ... ...... ... 108 Fixed-Route Trend Analysis-Farebox Recovery and Fare ...... ...... 110 Fixed-Route Performance Strengths and Weaknesses. Trend Analysis ... 110 SCAT's Peer Systems .................................. .. ...... 112 Fixed-Route Peer Analysis-Ridership and Level of Service FY 1995 .. ... 113 Brevard County Transit Development Plan vii

PAGE 8

Table 2-17 Fixed-Route Peer Analysis Expenses and Revenues, FY 1995 .......... 116 Table 2-18 Fixed-Route Peer Analysis-Employees and Vehicles, FY 1995 ..... ..... 118 Table 2-19 Fixed-Route Peer Analysis Service Supp l y and Serv i ce Consumption, FY 1995 . ... ..... ... ... 120 Tab l e 2-20 Fixed-Route Peer AnalysisQua lrt y of Serv i ce, FY 1995 ............... 123 Tab le 2-21 Fixed-Route Peer Analysis-Cost Efficiency, FY 1995 . ....... . ...... 126 Tab l e 2-22 Fixed-Route Peer Analysis Labor Productivrty, FY 1995 .............. 129 Table 2-23 Fixed-Route Peer Analysis Vehicle Utilization, FY 1 995 ......... ..... 131 Tab l e 2-24 Fi xed Route Peer Analysis Farebox Recovery and Fare, F Y 1995 ... ... 133 Table 2-25 Fixed-Route Performance Strengths and Weaknesses Table 2-26 Table 2-27 T able 2 28 Table 2-29 Tab l e 2-30 Table 2-31 Table 2 -32 Table 2-33 Tab le 2-34 Tab l e 2 Tab l e 2-36 Tab l e 2-37 Tab l e 2 Table 2-39 Tab le 2-40 Table 2-41 Table 4-1 Table 4-2 Table 4 3 Tabl e 4-4 Table 4-5 Table 4-6 Table 4-7 Table 4-8 T ab l e 4-9 Table 4-10 viii Peer Review Analys i s . .. . .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. . .. 135 Su bscri pt i on Bus Route Program Participants . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 SCAT Agency Sponsored Vanpool Prog r am Participants ...... ...... 146 Performance Review Measures: Paratransit Analys i s .......... ..... 154 CTC Trend Analysis Performance Measures .......... .... ..... 155 CTC Trend Analysis-Effectiveness Measures ............... ... .. 160 CTC Trend Analysis Efficiency Measu r es .............. ............ 165 CTC P erformance Strengths and Weaknesses, Trend Analysis ..... ... . 168 Brevard County CTC System Peers ................................ 170 CTC Peer Analysis Performance Measu r es . . . . . . . . 171 CTC Peer Analysis Effectiveness Measures . . ............... . 175 CTC Peer Analysis Efficiency Measures . . . . . . . . . .. . . . 180 CTC Performance Strengths and Weaknesses, Peer Review .... . ...... 1 83 Commuter Assistance Program Activities . .... .... ...... .. ..... 185 Va n pool Performance Measures ...................... ... ... 187 Va npo ol Effectiveness Measures .. ...... ...... ............ ... 188 Vanpool Efficiency Measu r es . .... ....... ...... ............ 189 Projected Fi xed-Route R i dership for SCAT .... ....... ............. 206 Im pacts of Fa r e and Service Scenarios . ....... .............. . . . 207 Base and E nhanced Fixed -Route Ridership Project i o ns for SCAT ... .... 209 Transrt-Dependen t Census B l ock Groups Not Served by . ...... 210 B r evard County ADA Popu l at i on and Low Ridership Demand Estimates ... 218 B r evard County ADA Popul ation and High Ridership Demand Estimates ... 221 Forecast of Brevard County Potential Transportation Disadvantaged Population ................................................... 228 Fo r ecast of Brevard County Transportation Disadvantaged Popu lat ion . . 232 Forecasts of Brevard County Potential TD Pop u lat ion and Program Trip Demand and Supply . . ........... ...... ..... .... 233 Forecasts of Brevard County TD Popu l ation and Genera l Trip Demand and Supply . .... ............. ... .......... 234 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 9

Table 4-11 Vanpool Ridersh i p Project i ons for SCAT .... ... ...... . ....... 239 Table 4-12 Potent ia l Brevard County Vanpool Market. 7 Passengers Per Van Average ..... .. ................... ....... 240 Table 4 13 Potential Breva r d Co unty Vanpoo l Market. 10 Passengers Per Van Average ............ .......... . .... .... 240 T ab le 4-14 Potential Breva r d County Vanpool Market, Tab l e 4-15 Tab l e 5-1 Table 5-2 Table 5-3 Tab le 5-4 Table 5 Table 5-6 12 Passengers Pe r Van Average .. ........................ .... . 241 Potential B r evard County Vanpoo l Market, 15 Passengers Per Van Average ......................... ......... 241 Summary of Actions on Past Recommendations .......... ..... ... 259 Status of Recommendations ........ .... ........... .... ...... 275 Estimated Cost of Unfunded Recommendations ............. .... ... 277 Projected Base Five-Year Budget for SCAT ... ..... .............. 278 Projected SCAT Budget Plus Unfunded Recommendat i ons ... .... . . . 279 E xpenses and Revenues Resulting from Unfunded Recommendations ..... 280 Brevani County Trsnsit Devofopm
PAGE 10

Figure 1-1a Figure 1 1b Figure 1 -2a Figure 1-2b F igure 1-3a Figure 1-3a Figure 1-4a Figure 1-4b Figure 1 -Sa Figure 1-Sb Figu r e 1-6a Figu r e 1-6b F i gure 1 -7 a F i gure 1-7b F i gure 1-8a F i gure 1-8b F i gure 1 -9a Figure 1-9b Figure 2 1a Figure 2 -1 b F igure 2-2 Figure 2-3 Figure 2-4 Figure 2-5 Figure 2-6 Figure 2-7 Figu r e 2-8 Figure 2 9 Figure 2 10 Figure 2 -1 1 F i gure 2-12 Figu r e 2-1 3 F igure 2 14 Figu r e 2-15 LIST OF FIGURES Populat ion Density, North Brevard County .......... .... .... ..... 7 Populat i o n Density South Brevard Coun t y .... ... ... . . ...... .. ... 9 Persons Under Age 18 North Brevard County ....... .... ... ....... 1 1 Persons Under Age 18 South B r evard County ...... .... . .... . ... 13 Perso n s Over Age 60, North Brevard County .... . . .... . .... .... 15 Persons Over Age 60, South Brevard County ....... ................ 17 Households with Annual I ncome Under $ 1 0,000, North Brevard County .... 23 Households with Annual I ncome Under $10,000 South Brevard County ..... 25 Perce n t of Occupied Housing Units w i th Zero Veh i cles Available, North Brevard County ............ ... ... . ... ........... .. .. .. 27 Percent of Occupied Housing Units with Zero Veh i cles Avai lab le, South Brevard County ...... ...... ... ........ ... .......... .. ... 29 Percent of L abor Force with Over 30 M i nutes Trave l Time to Wo r k North Brevard County .... ....... ....... .... ... ........ .. .. .. .. 35 Percent of Labor Force with Over 30 M i nutes Travel Time to Work, South Brevard County .......... ...... .................... ..... 37 Percent of Labor Fo r ce Us i ng Carpools North Brevard County ..... .. ... 39 Percent of Labor Fo r ce Us i ng Carpools South B r evard Coun t y .. ......... 41 Percent of Labor Fo r ce Us i ng Public Transportat i on, North Breva r d County .. 43 Percent of Labor Fo r ce Us i ng Public Transportation, South Brevard County 45 North Brevard County C T C Major Trip Attractors ... ... ............ .. .. 49 South Brevard County C T C Major T ri p Attractors . . ........ . .... 51 SCAT F ixed Routes, North Brevard County .... .... . . .... . ..... 83 SCAT Fixed Routes South Brevard County ...... ... .... .. ... ... 85 Passenger Tri ps (Fixed-Route Trend Ana l ysis) .......... ... .... 92 Revenue Miles (F i xed-Route Trend Analysis) .... ...... ..... . . 92 Revenue Hours (Fixed-Route Trend Analysis) ... ...... ... ... ....... 92 Tot al Operat ing Expense (Fixed Route Trend Ana l ysis) ... ... ... ....... 94 Total Maintenance Expense (Fixed-Route Trend Analysis) .............. 94 Emp l oyees (FTEs) (Fixed-Route T rend Analysis) . ... ............ . . 96 Vehicles in Max i mum Service ( Fi xed-Route T rend Analysis) ... ... . ..... 96 Vehicle Miles per Capita ( F ixed Route Trend Analys i s) ........ .. ...... 98 Passenger Trips per Capita (Fixed Route Trend Analysis) ........ . .... 98 Passenger T ri ps per Revenue Mile (Fixed-Route Trend Analysis) ... . .... 99 Pa s senger Trips per Revenue Hour (Fixed-Route Trend Analys is) . . .... 99 Average Speed (RMIRH) (Fixed-Route Trend Analysis) ... ....... ...... 101 Ave rage Age of F l eet ( Fixed-Route Trend Analysis) .................. 101 Number of Incidents ( Fixed-Route Trend Analys i s) . ... ........ .. .. ... 102 Brovard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 11

Figure 2-16 Figure 2-17 Figure 2-18 Figure 2-19 Figure 2-20 Figure 2-21 Figure 2-22 Figure 2-23 Figure 2-24 Figure 2-25 Figure 2-26 Figure 2-27 Figure 2-28 Figure 2-29 F igure 2-30 Figure 2-31 Figure 2-32 Figure 2-33 Figure 2-34 Figure 2-35 Figure 2-36 Figure 2-37 Figure 2-38 Figure 2-39 Figure 2-40 Figu re 2-41 Figure 2-42 Figure 2-43 Figure 2-44 Figure 2-45 Figure 2-46 Figure 2-47 Figure 2-48 Figure 2-49 Figure 2-50 F igure 2-51 Figure 2 -52 Figure 2-53 Revenue Service Interruptions (Fixed-Route Trend Analysis} ....... .... 102 Operating Expense per Capita (Fixed-Route Trend Analysis) .... ........ 104 Operating Expense per Passenger Trip (Fixed-Route Trend Analysis) .... 104 Operating Expense per Revenue Mile (Fixed-Route Trend Analys is ) ....... 105 Operating Expense per Revenue Hour (Fixed-Route Trend Analysis) ..... 105 Revenue Hours per FTE (Fixed-Route Trend Analysis) .............. .. 107 Passenger Trips per FTE (Fixed-Route Trend Analysis) ................ 107 Revenue Mites per T otal Vehicles (Fixed-Route Trend Analysis) ......... 109 Revenue Hours per Total Vehicles (Fixed-Route Trend Analysis) . .... . 109 Service Area Population (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) . . . . . . . . . 114 Passenger Trips (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ................ ...... 114 Revenue Miles (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ...... .... ... . . . . 115 Revenue Hours (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ............ ...... ...... 115 Total Operating Expense (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) . .............. 117 Total Maintenance Expense (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ............ : 117 Passenger Fare Revenue (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ................. 117 T otal Employ ees, FTE (Fixed-R oute Peer Analysis) ................... 119 Vehicles Available for Maximum Service (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) .... . 119 Vehicles Operated in Maximum Service (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ..... 1 19 Vehicle Miles per Capita (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) . . . ........ ... 121 Passenger Trips per Capita (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ...... .... . . 121 Passenger Trips per Revenue Mile (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) .... . .... 122 Passenger Trips per Revenue Hour (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ... . . . 122 Average Speed (RM/RH) (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ...... ... ... 124 Average Age of Fleet (Years) (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ........ ... ... 124 Revenue Miles Between Incidents (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) .. .. .. 125 Revenue Miles Between Interruptions (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ... . 125 Operating Expense per Cap"a (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) .. ........... 127 Operating Expense per Passenger Trip (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) . .... 127 Operating Expense per Revenue Mile (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ....... 128 Operating Expense per Revenue Hour (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ....... 128 Revenue Hours per Emp loyee (F ixed -Route Peer Analysis) .......... . 130 Passenger Trips per Employee (Fixed Route Peer Analysis) ...... ...... 130 Revenue Miles per Total Vehicles (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) . . ..... . 132 Revenue Hours per Total Vehicles (Fixed-Route Peer Analysis) ... ....... 132 Fareb ox Recovery Ratio (Fixed -Route Peer Analysis) ............ ..... 134 Average Fare (F ix ed-Route Peer Analysis) ....... . ............. 134 Florida's Transp ortat i o n Disadvantaged Program: Organizational Chart ............. ............... ............. . 13g Figure 2-54 Passenger Trips (CTC Trend Analysis) ..... .... ..... ...... ... 157 Brevard County Transit Development Plan xi

PAGE 12

Figure 2-55 Figure 2-56 Figu r e 2 -57 Figure 2-58 Figure 2-59 Figure 2-60 Figure 2-61 F i gure 2-62 F igure 2-63 F igure 2-64 F igure 2-65 Figu r e 2-66 Figure 2-67 Figure 2-68 Figure 2-69 Figure 2-70 Figure 2-71 Figure 2-72 Figure 2-73 Figure 2-74 Figure 2-75 Figure 2-76 Figure 2-77 Figure 2-78 Figure 2-79 Figure 2-80 Figure 2-81 Figure 2-82 Figure 2-83 Figure 2-84 Figure 2-85 Figure 2-86 F igure 2-87 Figure 2-88 Figure 2-89 Figure 2-90 Figure 2 -91 F igure 2-92 Figure 2-93 Figure 2-94 xli Para transit Passenger Trips (CTC Trend Analysis) ...... .... ...... 157 Vehicle Miles (CTC Trend Analysis) .............. . . ... . ... .. 158 Revenue Miles (CTC Trend Analys is) .... . ....... ...... . . . 158 Operating Expenses {CTC Trend Analysis) .................. ..... 159 Operating Revenues (CTC Trend Analysis) .. ... .... .......... 159 Total Fleet (CTC Trend Analysis) ........ .... ..... . .... .... ..... 159 Vehicle Miles per TO (CTC Trend Analysis) ............... ... .. 162 Vehicle Miles per Passenger Trip (CTC Trend Analysis) ........ ... .... 162 Vehicle Miles per Passenger Trip (CTC Trend Analys is) . .... 162 Passenger Trips per TO Capita (CTC Trend Analysis) ... ...... ..... .... 163 Paratransit Passenger Trips per TD Capita (CTC Trend Ana l ysis) . . .... 163 Passenger T rips per Vehicle Mile (CTC Trend Analysis) ........... ..... 163 Paratransit Passenger Trips per Vehicle Mile (CTC Trend Analysis) ....... 164 Acc i dents per 100 ,000 Vehicle Miles (CTC Tren d Analysis) ......... .. ... 164 Operating Expense per Passenger Trip {CTC Trend Analysis) .... ... ... 166 Operating Expense per Paratransit Passenger Trip {CTC Trend Analysis) . 166 Operating Expense per Veh i cle Mile {CTC Trend Analysis) ...... .. .. ... 166 Farebox Ratio (CTC Trend Analys is) ............ ................. 167 Loca l Government Revenue Ratio (CTC Trend Analysis) ..... ...... 167 Population {CTC Peer Analysis) .......... . .... ...... ... . .... 172 Potential TO Population (CTC Peer Ana l ysis) ........... .... .. .. 172 Passenger Trips (CTC Peer Analysis) ....................... .. ..... 172 Paratransit Passenger Trips (CTC Peer Analysis) ... .......... ... 173 Total Vehicle Miles (CTC Peer Analysis) ................... . . . 173 Total Revenue Miles (CTC Peer Analysis) .. ... ................. . . 173 Operating Expense {CTC Peer Analysis) .............. ..... ........ 17 4 Operating Revenues (CTC Peer Analysis) ..... .......... . . . . 174 Total Fleet (C T C Pee r Analysis) ....................... .......... .. 174 Vehicle Mil es per TO CapHa (CTC Peer Analysis) ... ... .............. 177 Vehicle Miles per Passenger Trip (CTC Pee r Analysis) .... ...... ...... 177 Passenger Trips per TO (CTC Peer Analysis) . ... ............ 177 Paratransit Passenger Trips per TO Capita (CTC Peer Ana ly sis) ......... 178 Passenger Trips per Vehicle Mil e {CTC Peer Analysis) .... ........ .... 178 Paratransit Passenger Trips per Vehicle Mile (CTC Peer Analysis) . . .... 178 Average Age of Fleet (Years) (CTC Peer Analysis) ................... 179 Accidents per 100,000 Vehicle Miles (CTC Peer Ana l ys is) ...... ... ... 179 Vehicle M i les Between Roadcalls (CTC Peer Analysis) ..... . ... ..... .. 179 Operating Expense per Passenger Trip (CTC Peer Analysis ) . ... .. .. ... 181 Operating Expense per Paratransit Passenger Trip (CTC Peer Analysis) . 181 Operating Expense per Vehicle Mile (CTC Peer Analys i s) ......... ...... 181 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 13

F i gure 2-gs Figure 2 96 Figure 4-1a Figure 4-1b Figure 4-2 Figure 4-3 Figure 4-4 Farebox Ratio (CTC Peer Analysis) ....................... .... . 182 Local Government Revenue Ratio (CTC Peer Analysis) ....... ....... 182 North Brevard County: Transit Dependent Census Block G r oups .... ... 211 South Brevard County: Transit Dependent-Census B lock Groups ......... 213 B r evard County Three-Quarter Mile Buffer ......................... .. 21g Over l ap Among Persons Who Are Disabled, Elderly and Low-Income . . 227 Process to Estimate the Low-Income Transportation Disadvantaged Population . . .......... ... .. .... 230 Brevard County Transit Development Plan xiii

PAGE 14

x lv Bt&vard County Ttllns/1 DovoloprrHJnt Plan

PAGE 15

PREFACE Space Coast Area Transit (SCAD has contracte
PAGE 16

KVi Brevard County TtaMit Dvek>pment Plan

PAGE 17

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY INTRODUCTION Space Coast Area Transit (SCAT) has contracted with the Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR) to produce a major update of its five-year Transit Development Plan (TOP) and a Transportation Disadvantaged Service Plan (TOSP) for Brevard County. Each transit property in Florida that receives State Transit B l ock Grant fund ing is required by the F l orida Department of Transportat i on (FOOT), to prepare a TOP This requirement is intended to ensure that the provision of public transportation service is consistent with the travel needs and mobility goals of the community. I n establishing a strategic context for transit planning, the TOP can serve as a guide in the development of a transit system. The TDSP represents a merger of the Coord i nated Transportation Deve l opment Plan (CTDP) and the Community Transportation Coordinator's Service P l an. The TOSP is an annually updated tactical p l an for the loca l TO program that included a Service Plan, Development Plan Quality Assurance components and Cost/Revenue Allocation and Fare Structure Justificat i on Brevard County has a long history of public transportation. Starting in 1g74, the Brevard T ransportat i on Authority (BTA) was established to provide fixed-route bus service, and the Consolidated Agencies Transportation System (CATS) was started as a subscription service funded by various non-profrt agencies in the County. When Chapter 427, F S., created the Florida Transportation Disadvantaged Program in 1979, CATS became the Coordinated Community Transportat i on Provider for Brevard County. On October 1, 1985, the two systems were merged to form Space Coast Area Transit (SCAT) as the County's pub lic transportation provider and coordinator. At the time of the formation of SCAT, the merged systems swi t ched to an exclusively demand-responsive service for those individuals who needed it most (elderly persons economically disadvantaged persons, and persons with disabilities. SCAT cont i nued to operate as the County's Coo r dinated Community Transportation Provider and later was named the community transportation coordinator for the County. It was not unt i l October 1991 that SCAT reestablished fixed routes served by conventiona l transit buses on a fixed schedule Currently SCAT provides and coord i nates many different transportation services including fixed route, subscription service for various social service agencies demand responsive and vanpoo l. The fixed-route service consists of 18 routes that generally operate Monday through Friday during non-peak hours of the day. SCAT, as Brevard County s CTC, coordinates several types of Brevard County Transit Development Plan xvii

PAGE 18

transportation services, including ambulatory, door-to-door paratransit services, agency and general public vanpool service as well as subscriptionand fixed-route transit service. SCAT, also operates the designated local commuter assistance program office. While SCAT provides assistance in carpool formation. aHemative worl< hour program development, marketing of alternative transportation and employer outreach and education, the focus of the program has been on vanpool formation. SCAT has developed a unique program that utilizes a third party provider, Vanpool Service, Inc (VPSI), for the vanpoo l program. Currently, SCAT an d VPSI operate 95 vans of which 52 are used as commuter vans and remainder are lease d to local human service agencies. DOCUMENT OVERVIEW CUTR directed and undertook several actions in the course of preparing this TOP Demographic and economic data were gathered using 1990 U.S. Census data and other sources Attitudes and opinions on public transportation were sought from key loca l officials, Bay Town Troll ey passengers, Bay Coordinated Transportation passengers and the general public. Existing trend s in ridersh ip and service for fixed-route, CTC, and vanpool services were reviewed, and performance measures for these systems were also compared to those for similar systems in Florida and the Southeast United States. Public transportation goals and objectives were established. Es t imates of fixed-route, CTC, and van pool demand were developed using several techniques. Unmet needs were assessed, and recommendations to meet these needs were prepared. A total of fiVe chapters were prepared that contain the results of this TOP. The first chapter examines the distribution of relevant demographic and economic characteristics of Brevard County such as population, population density, age, income, vehicle ava il ability, employment, and work travel behavior. I n general Brevard County is predominantly low-density and suburban in character, with income and vehicle ownership l evels above statewide averages but there are areas of the county that are exceptions to this general trend. Find ings from interviews with local officials are also summarized in Chapter One. Most of the local officials stated that there is limited support for public transportation in Brevard County. The perception is that support is localized to people who do not have travel alternatives to public t ransportation such as seniors, persons with disabilities, and young people. Interviewees suggested that SCAT should raise citizens' awareness about public transportation opinions. Other suggestions inc luded expansion of services to meet additional needs In addition, Chapter One contains r eports on the focus groups that were conducted with young people and the discussion group with citizens of South Mainland. Both sections report that these groups have many public transportation needs that are not being met by SCAT. xviii Brevard County Transit Developm9nt Plan

PAGE 19

Chapter Two focuses on an inventory, descri ption and evaluation of the Brevard s existing public transportation services. An inventory of all public transportation providers in Brevard County is compiled in Appendix C of the TOP. In multi-year trend analyses were conducted for the fixed-route, CTC and vanpool services and peer review analyses were conducted for the fixed route and CTC services. The specification of goals and objectives is a major element of the TOP Chapter Three develops system goal s based on input from the TOP review committee SCAT staff, i nterviews local officials and public meetings with the general public. The main areas addressed by the goals are examining and/or addressing unmet demand, expanding and reinforcing transportation coordination opportunities expanding and refining SCAT's marketing efforts, pursuing transit-friendly land-use and regulations, and improving SCAT's role in emergency evacuation. Chapter Three also contains the Local Coordinating Board Goals for 1997. The fourth chapter discusses needs within Brevard County and prov i des several estimates of current and future public transportation demand. Methods of estimated fixedrout e demand include a trend analysis fare and service elast i c ities, resu lts of interv iew s, public meetings, and surveys, and a analysis. Demand for complementary trips was also projected according to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements F ina lly, demand under the CTC system was projected using estimates of the Potential Transportation D i sadvantaged Populat io n and the Transportation Disadvantaged Population in Brevard County Also in Chapter Four. several mob i lity needs are addressed These needs, which are for all of the services p r ovided by SCAT, are listed in Chapter Four and were used t o develop the recommendations contained in Chapter Five. The final chapter, Chapter Five looks forward over the next five years to the future direction of public transportation i n Brevard County. This chapter is a culm i nat ion of all previous chapters and contains detai l ed recommendat io ns to help the system achieve its goals. (The recommendations are i nc l uded in the following sect i on of this executive summary.) Following these recommendations, this chapter also contains a five year financial plan. RECOMMENDATIONS Recommendations are prioritized by t i me frame for imp leme ntation : immediately, over the next one to three years and over the next four to five years. Most of the recommendations fall into the near tenm time frames, and it is expected that the transit development plan will be updated annually to account for changing condit ions in Brevard County and to track the progress in accomplishing these recommendations Within each time frame the related actions are grouped as appropriate but are not li sted in priority order. Brevaro County Transit Development Plan xix

PAGE 20

Actions To Be Initiated Immediately 1. Continue the public input process. As indicated by the outstanding turnout for the two public meetings conducted for the Transn Development Plan there is a strong interest in p ublic transportation in Brevard County SCAT has a good record in the a r ea of sponsoring public hearings and meetings in an attempt to keep the community informed and rece i ve i nput. This process should continue. 2 Continue the employee Input process. SCAT's employees ga i n important information about the operation of the service through input from the public as well as their own insights. This valuable resource should be tapped whenever possible SCAT makes a t remendous effort to Involve vehicle operators I n procurement and service decisions through in-service meetings SCAT should cont i nue efforts at u sing employee-based teams to determine solu ti ons to problems and increase SCAT's productivity As indicated from comments at the public meetings, these efforts should be continued 3. Establish new members on the Local Coordinating Board (LCB) representing the riders of SCAT's services. These new members can serve as an effective conduit i n commun i cations between the LCB, SCAT, and the general publ i c 4. Improve coordination with cities in the county. As a county agency. SCAT should continue to keep the cities informed wnh regard to transit issues, and to enlist their cooperation in matters such as for installing signage and benches, and perhaps securing funding for the transit system general operations 5 Complete installation of bus stop signs. SCAT should continue to coord i nate wit h app r opriate state county, and municipal governments in placing signs at bus stops. 6. Establish superstop/transfer centers at major locations where bus routes intersect. SCAT is currently considering estab l ishment of the first of these centers at the Government Center Once estab l ished, these centers shou l d be the first to receive new signage; informat i on disp l ays on SCAT routes should also be provided at these locat i ons. 7 Install bus shelters and benches at appropriate locations. The busiest bus stops should have bus shelters to protect waiting passengers from inclemen t weat h er, unless there is a sheHered area nearby (e.g., shopping centers) where passengers can see an approaching b us. Be n ches should, also, be provided at these stops, as well as at less busy stops XX 81evsro County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 21

8. Expand the use of illustrated buses on SCAT's fixed-route system. Specially painted ''supergraphic' buses at SCAT and around the state have proven to be extremely popular and can be a major source of revenue to the transit system. These types of buses can liven up' the streets and get the transit system noticed. Similar advertising is used on buses in Orlando Tampa, and Fort Myers. SCAT would benefit from continuing to look for more creative ways to market its services. Therefore. expanding the current illustrated bus program should be considered SCAT should, however, take care to ensure a consistent visual identificat ion on all of its buses. 9. Optimize the size of buses in SCAT's fleet to match ridership patterns. SCAT should when replacing vehicles, purchase buses that match the ridership patterns on specific routes The traditiona140-foot buses are not necessary on all of the fixed-routes. Optimizing the size of the buses will conserve capital expenses. 10. Formaltze internal performance measures to help measure the success of individual routes. SCAT keeps track of ridership and system performance of the fixed-route system on an ongoing basis. This informat ion should be used as one way of measuring the success of individual fixed-routes. The tables in Appendix l contain indiv idual route operation data for FY 1995 and FY 1996 From this information six scoring indicators were developed: riders/m ile riders/hour, revenue/mile, revenue/hour, operating ratio, and cosUrider Scores were then developed for each route based on these six i ndicators. A route's score for a part icular measure is based on a comparison of the measure as a percentage of the system average for that particu la r measu re These individual measure scores are added together and divided by six to get a final aggregate score. This final score is an indicat ion of a route s performance for the six measures when compared to the system average for those measures. A higher score represe nts better overall performance when compared to other routes. The final column rank-orders the routes based on their agg regate score. As previously stated, this informatio n helps to measure the success of individual fixed routes However, the results of this analysis should not be the only factor used to determine the success of a route. The results of this analysis should trigger further review of routes that are performing below the average of the system. 11. Conduct an in-depth study of the new fixed routes implemented in October 1996 Performa nce measures developed in Recommendation #9 should be used to study the success of new fixed routes. Results should be used to determine if a djustments in these routes are necessary. Brevard County Transit DeveiQPment Plan xx;

PAGE 22

12 Conduct a full on-board survey of fixed-route service, including on-off counts by bus stop. This survey will prov ide valuable information regarding origins a nd destinations of current riders as well as in-depth information about the demographic characteristics of SCATs passengers. The survey will also collect data related to customer satisfaction of the system and its operators. T he data gathered will be useful in determining future changes in service. 13. Review the route numbering scheme used for bus routes. There may be a more logical scheme which makes it easier for potential riders to identify where a bus goes (e.g., routes starting with a certa in number serve a particular part of the county numbers ending in zero connect different parts of the county). 14. Continue to ensure that the fixed-route service is in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Besides providing lift-equipped fixed-route service, SCAT is requ ired to provide other amenities for passengers with disabilities, such as announcing major stops and transfer points along routes, and making schedule info rmat ion available in alternative formats. In addition, SCAT must continue to repl ace all vehicles with fully accessible buses. 15. Establish ADA complementary paratransit certificate of eligibility (i.e., 10 Card). Currently only a small n umber of persons have applied for and have been certified as eligible for ADA complementary para transi t service. However the issue of transferability of ADA eligibility certification has been raised severa l times at LCB meetings. Indiv iduals who are certified as ADA-eligible in Brevard County may also use ADA complementary paratransit services i n other localities. A more active approach needs to be taken to ensure that ADA eligible individuals are able to obtain cert ification of eligibility. 16. Work with the Local Coordinating Board to review, discuss, and begin to establish a TO Eligibility Process. Currently, SCAT u ses self-certification to determine eligibility for TD non-sponsored trips. The Florida Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged has set forth criteria for l ocal programs to use to determine e l igibility for trips subsidized by TD Trust Fund monies (i.e., general purpose tri ps). The eligibility e lem ents set forth by the FCTD inclu de criteria that must be implemented by all local TD programs, as well as eleme nts that may be customized by each local program to reflect the unique situation in that locality. Although the eligibi lity criteria set forth by the FCTD will be phased into the Florida TD program, SCAT should beg i n working with the LCB to establish eligibi lity criteria that reflect the un i que situation in Brevard County. In addition, SCAT and the LCB should consider a coordinated one-step process for all eligibility certifications incl udin g TD non-sponsored trips, xxii Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 23

ADA services, and Medicaid services. Administrative costs could be minimized if all cert ifi cat i ons were performed together. 17. Determine the future method of service delivery for Medicaid non-emergency transportation. The current Medicaid transportation contract expires May 1998. SCAT, as the CTC needs to determine the most cost-efficient and effective method to serve Medicaid transportation needs SCAT will n eed to seek input from the Agency for Health Care Administration the Loca l Coordinat ing Board and the Brevard County Board of County Commissioners while developing the request for proposals. 18. Implement Eligibility Process for Medicaid Non-Emergency Transportation. SCAT identified an eligibility process to use i n the Medicaid non-emergency transportation program. The purpose of this eligibility process is to determine the mode of transportation service needed to meet the transportation needs of each Medicaid client. The eligibility p r o cess adopted by SCAT i s designed to consider all modes of transportation available including family and friends, fixed-route services and the more costly service This process should be implemented so that SCAT can ident ify Medicaid cli ents who are able to use fixed route bus service to meet their transportation needs. This would help to incr ease capacity on vehicles, reduce costs and prov i d e increased mobility to Medicaid clients. 19. Begin Medicaid bus pass program. SCAT and the Agency for Health Care Administration should develop a bus pass program for Medicaid clients determined to be able to use fixed route bus service for their Medicaid-reimbursable medical trips (see recommendation 17). These persons should be issued monthly bus passes good for any number of trip s on the fixed-route bus service in place of paratransit eligibility. This program may resutt in improved overall cost effectiveness and free up capacity on the paratransH system In addHion, the bus pass program could prov i de greater mobiiHy and independence by providing more t ransit options 20. Coordinate public transportation services with Indian River County and expand service for residents and veterans of the South Mainland area of Brevard County. Residents of South Mainland who use public transportation for shopping and medica l trips currently must t ravel to Palm Bay for these services. It was suggested by participants i n the discuss ion group and citizens attending the public meetings that additional transit service should be prov ided by SCAT to Sebastian in I ndian R iver County SCAT should continue to work with local offi cia l s, representatives, and private businesses from In dian River County to identify possible transportation coordination opportunities and determine cost sharing options with Indian River businesses. Brevard County Transit Development Plan xxiii

PAGE 24

21. Continue the park-and-ride lot program. The County's first park-and-ride lot opened at Eau Gallie and 1-95 in July 1996 SCAT should develop a list of potential locations for additional park-and-ride lots and work towards developing these sites for the park-and-ride program. This lot is currently used by participants in the vanpool program Ultimately, such lo ts could be a central point for TO shuttles operating to and from the passenger's home, and passengers who were able could transfer to fixed-route service. In addrtion, SCAT should investigate public/private partnerships (joint ventures) for park-and-ride lots and "mini" park and-ride lots. 22 Continue to support the van pool program. The vanpool program housed at Space Coast Area Transit is viewed as a model for other Florida vanpool programs to emulate. Locally, the program continues to provide a vital service to an important niche market that would otherwise go unserved. Support for efforts in this area should be an inte gral part of the Space Coast Area Transit service delivery program. Actions To Be Initiated Over The Next One To Three Years 23. Address changing public transportation needs for the planned VA Clinic. The planned Veterans Administration 0/A) Clinic, in Viera, is expected to be a major trip generator for TO eligible and ADA-eligible persons. SCAT will need to review service parameters to ensure that these persons are well served. In addition, the VA clinic will need to b e considered as a destination on future fixed-routes. 24. Consider extending weekday hours of service in the morning and evening on fixed routes. At present, many ofthe 18 fixed-routes that SCAT operate do not offer service eariy in the morning and late in the afternoon. Expanding service hours in bo th the morning and afternoon would open up new markets for SCAT including providing trips for young people and workers. Expanding the h ours of service was suggested in the Goals and Objectives the publi c meetings, the focus groups and discussion group, and by key local officials. Suggested routes for expansion includ e Routes 6, 7, 8, 26, 23, 27 24 and 28. 25. Consider expanding days of service to Saturday on selected routes. Saturday service on Route 21 in Melbourne has been successful. This service should be tested o n other routes Routes oriented toward shopping and social trips are the best inrtial candidates for Saturday serv i ce Weekend service would meet some of the needs of persons who do not work a standard Monday through Friday schedule as well as meeting the recreation and shopping needs of current riders and potential new riders such as young people. The need for weekend service was expressed in the Goals and Objectives, the public meetings, and xxiv Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 25

the focus groups. Suggested routes for Saturday service, in order of priority, include Routes 9, 26, 7, 23 .. 8, 27, 6, 24, and 28. 26. Consider increasing frequency of service on selected routes. More frequent serv i ce in areas where demand is heaviest will enable transit-dependent passengers to trave l more easily and will attract choice r iders. Increasing the frequency to every 30 minutes on Route 21 proved to be very popular to riders This improvement in frequency should be tested on one or two other routes. Inc reased frequency was suggested by citizens attending the public meetings and participants In the focus and discussion groups. Suggested routes for incr eased frequency of service inc lude Routes 6, 26, 23, 27 and 25. 27 Conduct an operations analysis of SCAT's fixed-route service. A comprehensive operations analysis examines the entire network as well as underserved areas of the County, and recomm ends specific changes at the route level. 28. Examine the feas ibility of connecting the two beach fixed routes. Currently Route 9 (serving Cocoa Beach) and Route 26 (serving the South Beaches) do not connect. SCAT should investigate the cost of connecting these two routes and providing North-South service without increasing headways on these routes. 29. .Examine the feasibility of operating a beach trolley along A1A, possibly connecting with other SCAT services. Other systems in Florida have had success wijh rubber-tired beach trolleys Service Is provided free or at a reduced fare, with the private sector and / or the localities contributing to the operating cost. A beach trolley could make it easier for tourists to get around without requir ing automobi l es. 30. Consider implementing a travel training program to assist seniors with the utilization of the fixed-route bus system. The ADA requirement that transit agencies provide complementary paratransrt servioe for ADA-eligible individuals who cannot access the fixed route system could have a significant impact on the demand for all paratransit services in Brevard County. However, many indiv idua ls can use the fixed-route system if they are assisted with learning to do so. SCAT should consider implementing a travel train ing program that focuses on how to access SCAT buses, use and understand route maps and route schedules, and how to transfer from one bus to another. This type of training will make it p ossi b le to move ind i viduals from the more costly paratransrt service to the less expensive fixed-route bus service. Travel training will also help to make seniors feel more comfortable while using the fixed-route bus system. Brevard County Transit Development Plan XXV

PAGE 26

31. Consider the expansion of the agency-sponsored vanpool program in Brevard County so that more agencies are able to take advantage of this alternative to door-to-door transportation. The vanpool program that SCAT coordinates has proven to be an extremely successful transportation alternative that should be expanded to inc lude more agency programs. The vanpool trips are much less expensive than trips. In addition, vanpool services may also be a viable option for providing work transportation to former welfare recipients 32. Consider the expansion of vanpool program partnerships between SCAT and local communities to meet the needs of remote areas of Brevard County. The vanpool partnership between Barefoot Bay and SCAT has proven to be very successful. This partnership should be duplicated for other remote areas of Brevard County These needs cannot currently be met by fixed -r oute serv ice due to the limited nature of the system 33. Explore the possibility of an expanded role for the Commuter Assistance Program (CAP). While the vanpool program is exemplary, other transportation demand management services could be added or enhanced. The ri se of telecommuting other flexible work arrangements, a guaranteed ride home program, and preferential parking at the worksite could lead to an expanded technical assistance role for CAP staff. County officials should approach Florida Department of Transportation staff for funding to expand the program. Any funding increases require a 50 percent local match 34. Expand CAP Program marketing efforts. While the CAP program has a modest marketing budget, funds allocated to the p rog ram do not meet needs. Because the CAP is housed in the transit is possible to combine fixed route service promotion CAP promotion under a approach. Such an approach wo u ld be managed by the community out r each coordinator as part of their overall marketing duties. In any event, the first two steps in changing drive a l one commuters to ridesharing arrangements involves strong marketing and outreach efforts. Neither of these efforts can be effectively done under existing funding conditions. 35 Consider alternate methods to fund transit capital needs. SCAT's public transportation fleet will become eligible for replacement in the next several years In addition with Federal operating cuts, SCAT will need to optimize available capital funding. New federal funding programs allow transit agenc ies to lease capital equipment. SCAT should investigate alternative methods for funding the purchase of vanpool vehicles, such as leasing the vans rather than purchasing. xxvi Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 27

36. Consider the expansion of Volunteers In Motion (VIM) program through partnerships with other Brevard County volunteer programs. The V I M program currently helps to meet the specialized needs of transportation disadvantaged persons in Brevard County. In addition to providing transportation, this program addresses the specific needs of fra i l elderly per sons The VIM program uses volunteers in all aspects of the program including as dispatchers. schedulers, drivers, and escorts. The VIM program provides another low-cost alternative to traditiona l door-to-door paratransit serv i ce and expansion of this prog r am would result in addit i ona l transportation needs be i ng met in Brevard County I n addition to providing transportation resources the expansion of the VIM program cou l d result in freeing up capacity in t he non-sponsored paratransit programs. As with many volunteer based programs, the VIM program must have vo l unteers to provide trips. There are other Brevard County vol unteer programs, as addressed by participants in the South Mainland discussion group. Partnerships with these groups cou l d result in a larger volunteer-base for the VIM p r ogram. SCAT should actively pursue partnerships with these groups to enable VIM to provide additional mobility to residents in remote areas of Brevard County 37 Investigate hiring of a full-time c:ommunity outreach c:oordlnator. A community outreach coordinator would coordinate all marketing pub li c involvement, and public information/education efforts for all services provided by SCAT. such as publ i c presentations, liaison with local public officials, resolution of ongoing service issues coordination of ag r eements other agencies provision of information and design and conduct of marketing campaigns would be included in the j ob description for this position. The person in this posit i on wou l d be responsible for tak i ng action on many o f the recommendations contained in this document i ncluding Recommendations 1 4 12 23, 29, 30 31, 32 33, 34, 36, 38, 39, 40, 46 48. In addition this employee would coo r dinate all public i npuVeducation in rega r ds to planned and imp l emented changes of service. A full-time coordinator would more effectively gather useful informat i on from the pub lic that could be used for futu r e planning efforts. The best-run, most efficient pub lic transportation system still needs someone to spread the news among potential riders Other sma ll transit systems in Florida have attributed ridership growth to innovative marketing act i vities. Such a person can also free up existing staff time spent on similar activities, and i ncrease productivity and mora l e throughout the agency. 38. Examine SCAT's current marketing program. The current SCAT contract with its marketing firm expires in 1998 SCAT will need to examine the best method to continue its marketing program before i ssuing a new marketing RFP 8revarrl County Transit Development Plan XKVii

PAGE 28

39. Clarify SCAT s role in emergency evacuation. SCAT is an important r esou r ce for many residents of Brevard County in the event of an emergency evacuation SCAT shou l d work to educate the genera l public about the agency s role in emergency evacuation . 40. Increase education about the half-price bus pass program. SCAT currently offers half price ($14.00) fixed-route monthly bus passes to seniors, persons with disabil i ties and youth in Brevard County. It appears that few governmental and social service agenc i es in Brevard County a r e taki ng advantage of th i s program The existence of the ha l f-p r ice buss pass program needs to be advertised to the genera l public and agencies. 41 Consider alternative fare structure on the fixed-route system to promote increased ridership. Many transit agencies across the country and F l orida have successfully increased ridership by lowering o r eliminating fares on their fixed-route service. SCAT should cons ider temporary or permanent changes in Its fare structure to promote the fixed-route service. 42. Provide more multi-leg paratransit trips. An issue mentioned at the d i scussion group in South Mai nla n d and public meetings as well as by SCAT staff is the p r ov i sion of multileg paratransit trips to enable ind i viduals returni n g from doctor visits to pick-up prescript ion medicine at local pharmacies Individuals who require transportation assistance for med i cal trips often also need he l p getting to pharmacies. Rather than providing two. separate rou nd trips, passengers already on SCAT vehicles could be transported to a nearby pharmacy to pick-up prescriptions on the i r r eturn trip home SCAT should work with the schedules to allow for the provision of paratransit trips. 43. Investigate the ability of SCAT to provide additional standing orders on paratransit services to medical services for individuals with regular, recurring medical needs, such as dialysis. Standing orders for paratransit service to medica l services allow individua l s with regular recurring med i cal needs, such as dia l ys is. to receive these trips without having to call to request a ride for each individual trip. Currently SCAT cannot accept any additional medica l standing orders due to the ma i ntenance of trip priorities set by the TD L ocal Coordinating Board. Addit i o n al standing orders are neede d to serve transportation disadvantaged indiv i duals receiving radiation therapy. SCAT should work to increase cap a city on the paratransit system to allow fo r addit i onal standing orders. However stand i ng orders should not fill the system to capacity. Several of the recommendations a l ready presented, if implemented cou l d result I n add i tiona l ca p acity on the paratrans i t system. 44. Reduce the number of paratransit cancellations and no-shows. Pa r atransit trip cancellat i ons and no-shows hamper system efficiency and overall productivity by preventing x.xviii Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 29

full utilization of vehicle capacities. Currently, cancellations and no-shows at SCAT account for approximately 15 percent of total paratransit trips. Although no statewide cancellation standard currently ex i sts nationally accepted industry norms suggest that a combined cancellation and no-show rate should not exceed 10 percent of total trips on average. Therefore, it is recommended that SCAT consider establishing a stricter cancellation and no show policy with a goal of achieving a combined no-show and cancellation rate that does not exceed 10 percent of total trips. 45. Continue coordination with WAGES (Welfare to Work) to provide transportation for work trips. Many of the recommendations address the current needs of work transportation; however, this need will continue to increase in the future given the recent welfare to work" initiatives (access to jobs). Work transportation for former welfare recipients is essential to ensure the success of the WAGES program. SCA T has been successful in working wrth companies such as Excell Corporation to provide transportation for employees. SCAT should pursue additional coordination efforts with potential employers throughout the County. SCAT should a lso periodically examine the public transportation needs of working people in the community through community outreach. 46. Continue coordination with the Brevard MPO and local governments to consider transit opportunities in conjunction with corridor or area transportation studies and follow-up on transit-related recommendations resulting from corridor or area transportation studies. SCAT has worked with the Brevard MPO in studies of State Road 3, State Road 513, Northwest Palm Bay, and Palm Bay Road. Additional studies are planned in the MPO work program. SCAT should also consider, where feasible, implemen tation of transit-related recommendations resulting from these studies 47. Consider Incorporating Intelligent Transportation Systems Technologies (ITS). SCAT should consider equipping all of its buses and paratransit vehicles with automatic vehicle location (AVL) units to facilitate dispatch ing and scheduling and to improve accountability. If feasible, SCAT should acquire the hardware and software needed to link the AVL system to its paratransit scheduling program (PASS) to take advantage of potential productivity improvements gained by linking data collection with scheduling and dispatching. Further, the use of electronic fare collection and documentation would facilitate agency billing and reduce cash handl ing. In addition, SCAT, in coordination w ith local municipalities should examine the feasibility of coordinating traffic control systems and private gated-entryways with pub lic transportation. 48. Develop an incentive program for developers to promote public transportation and ridesharlng. SCAT should work with the County and municipalities to develop incentives for Brevard County Transit Development Plan xxix

PAGE 30

developers to provide transit-friendly infrastructure Examples include crediting developers for parking spaces provided in park-and-ride lots transit amenHies in lieu of parking or landscaping and impact fee credHs for transH amenities 49. Enhance paratransit telephone reservation system. Several comments were received throughout the public meetings focus groups, and discussion group regarding difficulties encountered when attempting to make a reservation for a paratransit trip. The comments indicated that customers have a hard time reaching a reservationist during peak hours of service. either because ali lines are busy or they are kept on hold for quite some time SCAT shou l d attempt to enhance the telephone r eservation system by increasing the number of telephone lines and staff dedicated to the paratransit reservation system Enhancing the tel ephone reservation system will resuH in improved customer satisfaction. Actions To Be Initiated Over The Next Four To Five Years 50. Examine the potential coordination of taxis in Brevard County with SCAT's services (e.g., taxi trips to bus stops, using taxis to expand door-to-door paratransit). Private taxi services in Brevard County could be a valuable resource for meeting unmet demand for persons who can not travel to the fixed-route bus stops or who can not travel on the fixed route buses 51. Examine the feasibility of implementing an intracounty express bus service. SCAT should examine the feasibi l ity of establishing an express bus service for trips within the county. Express buses could operate i n conjunction with park-and-ride lots to serve longer distance tr i ps within the county 52. Examine the expansion of park-and-ride services to coordinate with other public transportation services (e.g., transit routes, express routes, and Lynx). The park-and ride lots in Brevard County are currently used by participants i n SCAT's vanpool program. These lots should be coordinated with the local transit routes as well. In addition, in the event of the establishment of express routes in Brevard County park-and ride l ots should be used. 53. Examine the feasibility of coordinating express bus service with neighboring counties (e.g., Orange and Volusia) for work trips. Citizens attending the publ i c meetings suggested that express service should be coordinated with other counties' public transportation networks in order to transport worke r s SCAT should examine the potential demand and feasibility of this service. XXX Brevard County Transit Dovelopment Plan

PAGE 31

FIVE-YEAR TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN: FINANCIAL PLAN Up to this point, the TOP process has not been constrained by fiscal considerations in accordance with "s strategic intent. Demographics, community input in various forms and peer and trend analyses have all been used to assess the demand for public transportation services and to identify mobility needs in Brevard County. The recommendations presented above have been based on previous findings and future direct i ons. The final step in the transit development plan process is to estimate the unfunded costs for these recommendations by comparing them against current and anticipated financial resources. Table ES-1 contains the status of all of the recommendations. This step is necessary to determine which recommendat ions could be accomplished within the current budget and/or current staffing and which would require additiona l funding The next step in developing a financia l plan is to determine the costs associated with the recommendations that are unfunded in the current budget. These r ecommendations and their antic i pated date of action are contained in Table ES-2 For Recommendations 24, 25, and 26, annual operating costs and revenues, in Table ES-2, are given for expansion of service on one route. The planned expansion year by year (for muHi ple routes) is contained In Table ES-5 and i s explained below. Table ES-3 contains budgeted capital and operating expenses and revenues projected through the end of the five-year planning period. Table ES-4 contains the expenses and revenues associated the unfunded recommendations added to the expenses and revenues contained in the current budget (Table ES-3). The bottom row of this table contains the net additiona l funding required if action was taken on all of the recommendations. Table ES-5 contains the year by year additional expenses and revenues associated with each of the unfunded recommendations The assumptions for the costs and revenues associated with these unfunded recommendations are also listed bel ow. Starting i n FY 1999, weekday service hours would be extended (Recommendation #24) on one route each year. Therefore by FY 2002 four routes would have additional weekday hours of service. Start ing in F Y 1998 Saturday service (Recommendation #25) would be added to one route each year. Therefore, by FY 2002 Saturday service would be on five additional routes In FY 2000, one route s frequency would be doub l ed (Recommendation #26) Brevard County T ransit Developm<>nt Plan xxxi

PAGE 32

xxxii In FY 2 002, a sec ond route's frequency would be doubled (Recommendation #26) A community outreach coordinator would be hired i n FY 1999 (Recommendation #37). In FY 1999 fixed-route fares would be decreased by 25 percent (Recommendation #41). One express bus route the County would be started in FY 2002 (Recommendation #51) One express bus route that coordinates with other counties wo uld be started in FY 2002 (Recommendation #53) Brevard County Trensit Development Plan

PAGE 33

Table ES-1 Status of Recommendations Recommendation Status 1. Continue publ ic input proces:s Ongoing -no additional cost 2. Continue emplOyee inpu t pcoceu Ongoing no additio n a l cost 3 New membet$ on LCB Can be accomplished with exi:sting staff n o additional cost 4. Improve coordination with cities Ongoing no add iti onal cost 5 Bus stop signs Funded in current 5-yea r b u dget 6 SuperstopltraMf6r centers Funded In current 5-year budget 1. BU$ sheltel'$ Funded in current Syear budget 8 E xpand Illustrated buses Funded In current 5-year budget 9. Opt i mize size of buses Ongoing no additional cost 10. Interna l perform a nce measures Can be acoompllshed with ex isting staff n o additional cost 1 1 Study of new fixed routes Can be accomplished with exist i ng staff-no a d d iti o n a l cos t 12. On-board survey Can be accomplished with ell:ist ing staff no add i tional cost 13. Review route numbering Can be aocomplished with exi sting start no add itional cost 14 Ensure comp Uanee with ADA Ongoing -no addrtional cost 15 AIJA cert ifi cate of elig i b il ity Can be acco m p li shed with existing s taffn o additional CO$t 1 6. TO e ligi b ility process Unfundedrefer to Table ES-2 17. Futu r e set'll'i ce delivery of Med icaid Can be accomplished with existing staff-no additional cost transportation 18. Eligibili t y prooess for Medicaid transportat i on Can be aooomplished with existing staffno additional cost 19. Medicaid bus pass p rogram be aooomplished with existing staff no additiona l oost 20. Coordi nat i n g service with Ind i a n River Cou nty Ca n be fun ded in c u rre n t 5-year budg.et, if imp leme nted 2 1 Park-and-ride kit Unfunded refer to Tab l e ES-2 2 2 Conti n ue to support vanpool program can be accompli5hed with existi n g staffno additional eos 1 23 Address n eeds of p l a n ned VA tlinic C0$1 o f program covered by #37 -community outreaCh coor d i nator 24 Exten d weekday hours of serv i ce Unfunded refe r to Table ES-2 25 Satur'day servioe Unfunded refer to Tab l e ES-2 26. lnaease frequency of seMoe I Unfundedrefer to Tab!& ES-2 27. Comprehensi ve operation$ ana l ysis I Funded In current 5-year budget 28. Feasib ility of connecting beac h fixed r outes Can be accomplished with existing staff no additional cost 29. Feasib i l ity of operating beach trolley Cost o f prog ram covered by m-COtl"'munlty outreach eoordlnalor (Trolley bus would be p urchased within planned replacement bus budget) 30. Trave l tra ining program i Cost of program covered by 1137 community out r each ooord i nato r 31. E xpa n sion of ag encysponsored vanpoots I Cost of program covered by 1i37 community outreach coordinator -32. E xpa n sion of vanpooJ partnetShips Cost of program oovered by 1137 community outreJCh coordinaiDl Brevard County Transit Development Plan XJ(Xfil

PAGE 34

Reco m mendation Status 33 Expanded ro l e for CAP. F unded in c u rrent 5-year budget 34. Expand CAP progra m m ar1
PAGE 35

Table ES-2 Estimated Costs of Unfunded Recommendations Annua l Annua l Capital F iscal Action Unit Coat 11 of Untta Ope-rating Revenue C<>St Yearw Cost Affected 16. TO eligibili ty S12 885 (for 0 5 FTE O .SFTE $1 2,885 1998-200 2 proceu o f a D is patcher) (20 hrsfweek) -2 1 Con tin ue p ark-I $3,500 per space 1 tOO spaces and-ride. -$350,000 1999 24. Extend weekday $2. 31/ rev mile 21, 700 rev m'des per $50,127 $2, 016 1998-2002 hours of seNice route(4 hrslctay) (1 route ) {1 route } 2 5 Saturday serv ice $2. 31/rev m ile 7.899 rev mile$ per $18,246 $734 1998-2002 route (7 tusldJy) (1 route) (1 route ) -zs l nccea.se $2,31/rev m il e 43,400 rev miles per $ 1 00,254 $4,033 $200,000 2000.2002 frequency o f HJVice route (1 r oute) (1 rou te) ( 1 vehicle) 37 H i re oo m m u n ity i $27,100plus 40% 1 FTE 1999-2002 outreac h coocdi nator fringe -41. Attemat lve fare 25% deetease in tare Structu r e ($13 352 ) 1999 51. Express Bus $2.31/rev m ile 45, 000 Service { within 6 daily trips of 30 rev m i les $103,950 $4,182 -2002 County) mile& 53. Express bus $2.31/fev m iie 45,000 $200,000 urvioe (coord inat e 6 daily trips of 30 $103,950 $4,182 2002 with o ther counties} m iles rev m ile s (1 Yol>i ele) ThiS COS-t assumes a park a nd-ride Sot. The cost space ooukl be iess 1f a s h a red lot was used -Brsvard Coun t y Transit Development Plan XI()(V

PAGE 36

l: :s. !l' ili a j g l?
PAGE 37

a !!, li' < :;, Tab l e E S 4 Proj ecte d SCAT Budge t Pl u s Un fund ed R ecom m e n d ati o ns Item FY 1998 I FY 199 9 FY20 0 0 O c igin al Operatin g E xpenses $6 947,882 $6, 640,000 $6 790,0 0 0 -Operating Expenses Resul ting fiom Unfu nded R e oommendations $31,131 $ 137,444 $306,071 Revised Operating Expenses 1-$6 97 9,0t3 $ 6 777,4 4 4 $7,096, 071 Orig inal Capital Ex p enses $ 3 123, 1 21 $2,057 ,000 $2,057,000 C apital Expenses R esulting f rom $0 $350 000 $200 .000 Unfunded Recommendations --Revised Capital Expenses $3 12 3,121 $2,4 0 7 000 $ 2,257 0 0 0 -----TOTA L EXPE NSES $10,1 02 134 $9, 18 4 ,444 $ 9 3 53,07 1 Orig i n a l Operat i n g Revenue $6 94 7,882 $6.640 000 I $6,790 ,000 Increase t n O peratmg Revenue Resul t ng from Unfunded Recommendations $ 734 $3,484 $ 1 0 ,267 ---Decrease i n Operating Revenue R esulting from Unfun ded R ecommendations 1 $0 ($ 1 3 352 ) ($ 1 3 ,352 ) Revised Oper ating Revenue $6,948 ,616 $ 6 6 30,13 2 $6 7 86,9 1 5 .. -Revenue $3, 1 23 ,121 $ 2,057, 000 $ 2 057,000 TO TAL REVE NUE $10,071,003 $8,667 132 $ 8, 843, 915 A D DITIONAL FUNDING REQUIRE D I ( $ 31,131) ($497,312) ($50 9 1$6) Table 5 6 contains detailed information regard ing the unfunded recommendations. F Y 2001 I FY 200 2 s6.82o ooo 1 $6 ,860, 000 $374 ,444 $750 9 7 1 $ 7,194 444 $ 7 6 1 0,97 1 $2 ,057 ,000 $2,057,000 $0 $400 ,000 $2 ,0 57,000 $2,457 ,000 -$ 9,251 ,444 $10,0 67 971 $6,8 2 0,000 $6,8 60 ,00 0 I -. $13,017 $ 28.1 64 ($ 1 3 352 ) ($13,352) -$ 6 8 1 9, 66 5 $6 ,874, 8 1 2 $2 ,057,000 $ 2 057, 000 .. $ 8,876,665 $ 6,931 8 1 2 ($3 7 4 779) ($ 1 136, 159)

PAGE 38

l: --iii a j 'if rdlnator $0 $37, 940 $37, 940 $37 940 $37, 940 51. Express bus service (within counM I $0 r $0 r $0 r $0 I $103, 950 53. Express bus service (coord inate with other coun1ies) I $0 I $0 I $0 I $0 I $103. 950 Tota l Additional Operating ExpenSft I $31,131 I $137,444 1 $308,0711 $374,444 1 $750,971 Capita l Expenses Resulting from Unfunded 1 1 1 21. Pailt-and-ride lot so I $350 000 I so so I so 26. Increase frequency of seJVice so I so I s2oo.ooo I so I s2oo .ooo I 53. Express bus service (coordinate with other count i es) L. $0 I $0 J $0 I $0 j $200, 000 I Total Additional Capital Expenses I $0 $350,000 I $200,000 $0 $400,000 Increase in Operating Revenue Resutting from Unfunded Recommendations 24. Extend weekday hours of service 25. Saturday service 1-26 Increase frequency of service 52. ExPfess bus service (within county) 53. Express bus service (coordinate with other counties) Total Additional Operating Revenues Decrease in Operating Revenue Resulting from Unfunded Recommendations 41. Alternative fare structure 1 $0 $734 $0 $0 $0 $734 $0 $2,018 $1,488 $0 $0 $0 $3,484 $4,032 $2,202 $4,033 -$0 $0 $10,267 ($13,352)1 ($13,352) $8,048 $2, 936 $4, 033 -$0 $0 $13,017 ($13,352) $8, 084 $3,670 $8,066 --$4, 182 $4, 182 $28,164 ($13,352)

PAGE 39

CHAPTER ONE DEMOGRAPHIC DATA, INTERVIEWS FOCUS GROUPS, AND DISCUSSION GROUP INTRODUCTION To better plan for the continuing development Imp rovement, or expansion of a public transportation system, it is necessary to gain an understanding of the environment which the system operates. To achieve this end, Chapter One analyzes the demographic and economic of Brevard County and population using 1990 U.S Census Bureau data as well as information collected from interviews with key loca l officia ls, as well as results from focus groups and a discussion group. The first section of this chapter analyzes information available from the 1990 Census. The data used for this report is analyzed on a census block group level. The second and third sections of this chapter are in terviews with local officials and foc us group analyses. The section pertaining to interviews with local officials contains a synopsis of interviews with ten local officials in Brevard County. The final section o f this chapter contains analyses of two sets of foc us groups that were conducted in Brevard County. The firs t an alysis is of focus groups with high school and junior high school students in Brevard County. The second analysis is of a discussion group that was conducted with residents of the South Mainland area of Brevard County. The purpose of the focus groups and discussion group was to gain informa tion regarding the perceptions held by specific market segments pertaining to current and future public t ransportation options in Brevard County. Although the informa t ion obtained th rough focus groups and discussion groups is not inte nded to provide a statistically valid sample the data are excellent for revealing attitudes held by particular groups. CONSISTENCY REVIEW OF PLANS This Transit Development Plan (TOP) and Transportation Disadvantaged Service P lan (TDSP) has been developed as a collaborative process that has involved members of the Brevard County Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) local government officials, members of the Brevard County L oca l Coordinating Board (LCB) Florida Department of Tran sportation (FOOT) r epresen t at ion staff from Space Coast Area Transit (SCAT), and citizens. The collaborative process was used to ensure thai the TDPffDSP is consistent with locally adopted comprehensive and transportation plans. Several plans were rev iewed in the course of developing the TDPffDSP to ensure that the TDPffDSP is consistent with other transportation and t ransportation-re la ted plans adopted in Brevard County A description of each plan reviewed has been included below. Brevard County Transit Development Plan 1

PAGE 40

Local Government Comprehensive Plans A review of comprehensive plans for Brevard County the City of Melbourne, and the City of Palm Bay revea ls a strong commitment to the provision of public transportation in Brevard County, including all modes. All of the plans include objectives and policies which support public transit for the general public, visitors, and people who are transportation disadvantaged in Brevard County Transit-related goals and policies included in the Brevard County Comprehensive Plan have been inc lud ed in Chapter Three of this document. In addition, the Mass Transit elements of both the Melbourne Comprehensive Plan and the Palm Bay Comprehensive plan contain goals and policies that support the provision of publ i c transit and transportation disadvantaged services in Brevard County. For example, the following goal is inc lud ed in the Palm Bay Comprehensive Plan Provision of adequate mass transit seNices and paratransit service for the transportation disadvantaged. Transit Development Plan This document will serve as both the Transit Development Plan (TOP) and the Transportation Disadvantaged Service Plan (TDSP). It Is, therefore, consistent with the TDP for Space Coast Area Similar to the TDSP, the TOP sets a five-year strategy for implementing community trans i t goals, along an assessment of t ransi t needs in the service area Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged 5120 Year Plan This document sets forth the goals objectives, and a plan of action for the Florida Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged (FCTD) The plan presents forecasts of demand for transportation disadvantaged services, the costs of meeting that demand, and forecasts future funding for transportation disadvantaged services This TOPITDSP is consistent the Florida Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged 5120 Year Plan. MPO Long Range Transportation Plan The Brevard 2020 Long Range Transportation Plan presents a long range v1s1on of how transportation needs will be met in Brevard County in such a way as to improve the mobiley of residents and and support economic development in the community. The devel opment of the plan included extensive public involvement and coordination with other transporta t ion represent at ives including SCAT and the LCB for Brevard County. Goals and policies from the 2 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 41

Brevard 2020 Long Range Transportation Plan that support transit and services for persons who are transportation disadvantaged in Brevard County have been included in Chapter Three of this document. Brevard County MPO Transportation Improvement Program The Brevard County MPO Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) is an annua lly updated document that contains Trans portation Disadvantaged a nd Public Transit elements, as required by the Fl orida Department of Transportation. Each year SCAT and the Brevard County MPO work together to coordinate the TD and public transit projects ident ified for implementation over a five year period. Each of the recommendations contained in the TDPITDSP have been scrutinized for consistency with the MPO's TIP. STUDY AREA SETTING Brevard County is unique in tenns of geographic setting and demographic profile The county encompasses seve r al major bodies of water: the Banana River, the Ind ian River, and the St. Johns River in addition to its Atlantic coast boundary The length of the county is extensive; from north to south is approximately 70 miles long and only 20 miles wide. This distinctive geography is one factor that has influenced the uneven growth pattern in the county. Most of th e population is scat1ered throughout the county except for several dense pockets that exist in the northern, central, and southern areas. These major population and growth centers include Titusville located at the far north end, Cocoa and Cocoa Beach in the central area, and Melbourne and Palm Bay at the southern end of the county. Brevard County experienced a 46 percentage increase from its 1980 population of 272,959 to a total population of 398,978 in 1990. H owever there are only two municipalities with populations more than 50,000 The southern cities of Palm Bay and Melbourne had 1990 populations of 62,543 and 60,034, respectively. This distribution of population reflects the low density of the county. In contrast the major employment centers in Brevard County are highly concentrated. The three major employment centers (the Space Center, Patrick Air Fo rce Base, and Melbourne/Palm Bay) have contributed to the une ven growth experienced during the past decade. Most of the residential and employment growt h continues to occur in the south as a result of the rapid expansion of the electronics market. Meanwhile the other areas of the county have experienced a slower rate of growth since 1990. Aside from its pennanent population, Brevard County has a significant tourist indus try that should not be overlooked when examining trans it service. According to the Brevard County Tourist Development Council, a total of 1 .2 million tourists visited the county in 1993. Brevard County Transit Development Plan 3

PAGE 42

This unique set of condrtions in Brevard County : the unusual geography, the low population densrty, the high employment concentration and the considerable distance between urban centers, has contributed to a development pattern which in essence divides the county into three distinct regions. As previously referenced, they are in general terms: the northern region ; the central region which includes the mainland, Merritt Island, and the central beaches; and the southern region. These factors along wrth the rapid southern growth and a significant tourist industry present an exceptional challenge in the delivery of transit services. The following section highlights population cha r acteristics of the county as a means of analyzing the transportation condrtions and needs within the county. BREVARD COUNTY DEMOGRAPHICS This section summarizes demographic and economic data for Brevard County Specific demographic characteristics related to potential transit use are presented. All data were obtained from the 1990 and 1980 Census of Population and Hous ing. Population and Population Density Table 1 1 displays population population growth, and population density for Florida and Brevard County. Brevard County's average population densrty is slightly higher than Florida's overall density. Table 1-2 shows population and population density for the ten most populous census block groups In Brevard County. The population densities for the county by census block group can be seen i n Figures 1-1a and 1-1b with the darkest shades showing the densest block groups. The densest block group is numbe r 641.221 wrth 6,631 persons per square mile, located in Melbourne. Most of the county has fewer than 2,500 persons per square mile However, along the Indian River in the southern portion of the county, the densrty increases. Specifically, in the three cities of Melbourne, Titusville and Cocoa Beach the densities are the highest wrthin the county. Generally, high population density is more conducive to transit use. Population growth for the county from 1980 to 1990 was almost 50 percent, or an increase of 126,019 people. Because new census block groups were added in the 1990 Census, it is not possible to provide growth data for all census block groups in the county. 4 Bnwanl Coun!Y Transit Development Plan

PAGE 43

Tab l e 1 Popu lation an d Pop u lation De nsity I I Population I Population Growth (1990) ( 1 980-19901 F lorida 12 937 926 32.8% B revard County 398,978 46.2% Table 1 2 Popu l ation and Population Density (1990} Breva r d Coun ty Census Bloc k Grou p Population 652.32 1 South Brevard I 6 321 621.014 Port St. Jolln 4869 641 .011 Me l bourne 4,454 621.012 Port St. John 4154 713.312 West Mel b ourne 4001 602.002 Titusville 3987 668.001 Sa t ellite B each 3969 631.002 Suntree 3859 641.2 1 1 Mel b o urne 3,659 l 713.231 Palm Bay I 3,550 Population Age Charact eristi c s Density (1990) (persons per sauare mile I 2 4 0 392 Density (peraons per sauare mile) 346 656 451 2098 2005 830 1 023 1 057 1 264 854 Tab l e 1-3 sh ows age group percentages f o r the c o unty and Florida. Brevard County is with in+/1 0 per cent o f the State figures except for the age category of 60 years and o lder. In t his category it i s 1.3 percent less t han the St a te pe r centage. Table 1-4 s h ows the block groups that have greater than 40 percen t concentrations of the age group 0 -17 years Table 1-5 shows b l ock groups that have greater t han 60 percent of the age g roup 60 years and older. Age g r oups on both ends of the scale are of significan t interest in regard to transit use because the young and t he elderly often do not have adequate access to automobiles and therefore re l y more on publi c tran s por1at i on. B tevat'd County Transit Development Plan 5

PAGE 44

Block group 612 006 with 100 0 percent of the population younger than 18 years of age, has the highest proportion of persons in this age category in the county. Shown in Figures 1-2a and 1-2b are the percentages of persons younger than 18 years of age with the highest concentrations in the darker shades Block groups 667. 002, 713.234, and 661.021 have t he highest proportion of persons age 60 and older (100.0 percent). These census block groups are located in Satellite Beach, South of Palm Bay, and the South beaches, respectively. Figures 1-3a and 1 -3b show the percentages of persons over age 60 by census block group. Block groups with high concentrations of elderly are shown in the darker shades. Brevar d Cou nty Florida Census Blotk Group 612.006 T i tusville 652.323 South Brevard 713.236 Palm Bal 7 1 3.235 Pal'!' Bay 648.002 Melbourne 668.001 Satellite Beach 607.001 Titusv ill e 626.004 CQCOa 626.002 Cocoa 713.32 3 P alm Bav I 6 Table 1-3 Population Age Distribution ( 1990 ) 0 -17 25-44 45-54 55-59 years years years years years 21. 9% 8 6% 31.5% 10.4% 22 1% 9.2% 30.5% 10. 1 % I Table 1-4 Population Age Characteristics (1990) Brevard County 5.4% 4.5% 60 years & over 22.3% 23. 6% Percentage Under Age 18 Census Bloek Group 100 .0% 667.002 Satellite Beach 55.5% 713.234 Palm Bav 48.2% 661.021 South Beaches 46.9% 694.001 Merritt Island 43.7% 647.003 Melboume 42 .7% 651.013 Melbourne 42.1% 713.215 Melboome 41.2% 651. 233 Melbourne I 40. 6% 652.321 Soutll Brevard 40.2o/. 64 7.004 Me lbourne 650.231 Melbourne 608.002 T itusville Percentage Age60and Over 100.0% 100.0% 1 00.0% 96.7% 94.6% 82.3% 78.9% 76.2% 75. 0% 73 0% 66.2% 60.3% Brevard County Transil Development Plan

PAGE 45

' ... Figure 1-1a Population Density North Brevard County 2 .210 to 6 640 860 1 0 2 .210 290to 860 l1il o to 290

PAGE 46

8 Bfftvatd County Transit Deve lopm
PAGE 47

Figure 1-1b Population Density South Brevard County Perrons per Square Mile 2.2101oM t o 2.210 29Qto a> IE Oto 290

PAGE 48

10 Brevard County Ttansft Development Plan

PAGE 49

. .. .... Figure 1-2a Persons Age 0-17 North Brevard County P e rcent of Population AgeQ-17 Over 15%1 026';', E!l Undor 15';',

PAGE 50

12 Brevard County Tramlt Development Plan

PAGE 51

Figure 1-2b Persons Age 0 South Brevard County Percent o f Popu lation Age0-1 7 o,.,, 35% 25%1035% f.i1l U nder 1511>

PAGE 52

14 Brevard County Tnmsit Development Plan

PAGE 53

. .... Figure 1-3a Person Age 60 and Older North Brevard County Percent of Popu la tio n Age 60 and Older 0YG<35% 25% to 35% l'fl Under 1 5%

PAGE 54

16 Brevan:l Counly Transit Development Plan

PAGE 55

Figure 1-3b Person Age 60 and Older South Brevard County Percen t of Population Age 60 a n d Olde r OV<>r35% 1:\l Under

PAGE 56

18 8trJvarr1 County Transit Development Pian

PAGE 57

T ransportation Disadvantage d Population Chapter 427 of the Flori d a Statues defines trans p orta t ion d i sadvantaged (TD) per so n s as: .. those persons whO because of physical or mental disability, income status, or age are unable to transport themselves or to purct>ase transportation and are, therefore dependent upon others to obtain access to health care, employment education, s hopping, social activities, or children who a re handicapped or high-risk or at risk a s defined ins. 411.202. The Florida Coordinated Transportation System (FCTS) serv e s two population groups The first group referred to in this rep o rt as the Potentia l TD P o pu l at i on (formerly TD Category 1), includes disabl e d, eld erly, an d lo w in co me persons. as well a s children who are "highr isk" o r "at-ris k ." These persons are elig i ble for trips tha t are subsid i zed b y s o cial serv i ce or o ther g o vernmen t al agenc i es. The sec o nd p opula t ion group. referred to as the TO Popul at ion (formerly TO Cat egory II), includes tho s e persons who are transportation disadvantaged according to the d e fin it ion in Chapte r 427 (i e they are unable to transport them s elves or t o purchase transportation). Members o f this population. a subse t of the Potentia l TD Popula t ion a r e elig i ble to receive the same su b sidies as Potenti a l TD persons plus t hey are eligible to receive TD Trus t Fund monies for tri p s that are not su b sid i zed by a social service or othe r governmenta l agency. Table 15 p resents informatio n on the TO popu l ation f or the coun t y an d sh ows the number of persons a n d the percentage of t o ta l county popu l at io n i n b oth ca t egories. TD da t a are 1997 esti mates derive d f rom th e CU T R pub li cation Florida Statewide Transporta t ion Disadvantaged Plan : Population and Demand Forecasts 19962015, July 1996. Table 1997 Transportation Disadvantaged P o p u lation b y Group Pob!ntial TO Potentia l TO TO Popu l a t ion P o t e n t ial T O Pot ential TD Popula t ion Pop ulati o n (Call!gory II) A
PAGE 58

Income Characteristics Table 1 -6 shows the d i stribution of household income i n the county and in Florida. B r evard County has a lower percentage of households income less than $20 000 compared to the state percentages Also, Brevard County has a h igher percentage of households with income h igher than $40,000, compared to the Sta t e Table 1-7 p r ovides informat ion on the census block g r oups w ith concentrations of 40 percent or more households with incomes less than $10, 000. Income i s an i mportant factor in determin i ng usage of conventional pub lic transit systems. In general l ow income persons rely more on the public system for mobility and access to jobs health care shopping, and entertainment. In Breva r d County there are only 10 census b l ock groups where 40 percen t of the households have an annual income less than $10,000 as shown In Table 1 -7. These block groups are predominantly l ocated along the Indian River in the three major cities i n the county. Median i ncome for the county is $30,534. Figu r es 1-4a and 1 -4b show the percentage of households with annual i ncome less than $10 000. Block groups with a high concentration of low-income households are shown in the darker shades. Table 1-6 Household Income Distribution (1990) $0-$9 ,999 $10,000$20 ,000-1 $30,000$40,000-OVer $19,999 $29,999 $39,999 $49,999 $50,000 Brevard Coun1y 1 1.8% 18. 4% 1 8.9% 15.7% 1 2 .0% 23.3% Florida 15.1% 20.1% 18.8% 14 .8% 10.4% 20. 8% 20 Brovard County Transi t Developtn6nt Plan

PAGE 59

Vehicle Availability Table 1-7 Household Income Characteristics (1990) B"'vard County Percent with Census Block Group Income Under $10 000 626.004 Cocoa 61.4% 648.003 Melbourne 55 8% 626.002 Cocoa 51.9% 649.021 Melbourne 50.7% 607.002 Trtusville 48.6% 608 .002 Trtusville I 48.5% 649.022 Melbourne 48. 4% 623.002 Cocoa 44.0% 663.011 Melbourne 43 .7% 626.001 Cocoa 41 .5% Table 1-8 presents the distribution of vehicle availability among households in Brevard County and Florida. Table 1-9 includes census block groups where at least 30 percent of households do not have a vehicle available. In Brevard County o nly 5 percent of households do not own a vehicle. This is much less than the Florid a average (9 percent). Figures 1-Sa and 1-Sb shows concentrations of households with no vehides available by census block g roup. The three major c i t ies have census block groups where there are concentrations of households with no vehicle available, but the suburban populat ion generally has access to automobiles. The census b loc k groups where no vehicle is available are generally in areas wilh concentrations of low-income households. Table 1-8 Household Vehicle Availability (1990) Number of Vehicles Available 0 1 2 3+ Brevard I 5% 38% 41% 15% Co unty Florida 9% 41% I 37% 13% BrevarrJ County Transit Development Plan 21

PAGE 60

22 Tab l e 1-9 H ouseholds wHh Z e r o Vehic les Available (199 0 ) Brevard County Census Block Group Percent with Zero Vehicles Available 694.001 Merritt l&land 66 2% 626 .004 Cocoa 55.9% 608.002 Tftusville I 51.3% I 649.02 1 Me l boume 45.1% 623.002 Coooa 37.2% 648.003 Melboume 36 .5% 626.001 Cocoa 36 .2% 627.002 Coooa 33.4% 651 231 Pa l m Bay 32.7% Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 61

() l Figure 1-4a Households with Annual Income Less Than $10,000 North Brevard County Percent of Households w tt h Income less t h a n $10,000 OV$r 35% 20%1034% 10%1019% C2J Under I 0%

PAGE 62

24 &uvatd County Ttansit Development Plan

PAGE 63

Figure 1-4b Households with Annual Income Less Than $10,000 South Brevard County Percent of Households w tth Income Less than $10 000 Ovot35% 20%1o3d% 10% toll> t:il Undor l 0%

PAGE 64

26 Brovaro County Transit Deve/optrH>nt Plan

PAGE 65

Figure 1-5a Percent of Occupied Hous ing Units with Zero Vehicles Available North Brevard County Pe rcent of Households wnh Zero Vehicles Avoiloble Over2:l% l!JI\ 1 0 19% 5'11\t o 9% !31 U n der S%

PAGE 66

28 Brovard County Transjf Development Plan

PAGE 67

Figure 1-Sb Percent of Occupied Housing Un i ts with Zero Vehicles Available South Breva r d County Percent of Households with Zero Vehicles AvoHoble Over2()% 10% t o 19'); S
PAGE 68

30 Brevard CoWlty Tf8nsit O.vetopment Plan

PAGE 69

Employment Characteristics Table 1-10 displays the percentage of the population 16 years and older i n the l abor force and the percentage of the labor force who are empl oyed (non-military) The percentage of Brevard County workers in the labor f orce (62 percent) is slightly higher than the State percentage (61 percent). Brevard County Florida Travel to Work Tab l e 1-10 Employment Characteristics (1990) Percentage in Percentage of Labor Labor force Force Emolovod 61.9% 94 .3% 60.4% 94 .2% Table 1-11 shows worl< loca tions and the ex1ent of intercounty commuting fo r Brevard County Tab l e 1 -12 shows census tracts within the county where greater than 50 percent of the labo r force wo r ked with i n the centra l c ity The majority of the labor force (53 percent) worl
PAGE 70

647 649. 02 642 645 648 643.01 649.01 644 650. 2 1 643.02 7 13.ot 641 .21 Travel Time to Work Table 1-12 Work Commuting Patt ems (1990) B revar d County Census Tract I Percent Working I n Central Cities Melboume 66.1% MelboJL me I 63. 2% Melboume 57.3% Me lbourne 56.6% MelbOtlme 55. 3 % Melbourne 55.2% Melbourne 55.1% Melbourne I 54.2% West Melbourne 54.2% Me1boume 51.3% Wesl of Palm Bav I CouniY) 51.0% Wast of Melbourne (County) I 50.1% -Table 1-13 presents the distribution of travel time to worll for Brevard County and Florida. The majo r ity of Brevard County residents have work trip commutes of less than 20 mi n utes Only 25 percent of Brevard County residents have worll trips of 30 minutes o r m o re compared to 30 percent of Fl orida residents Table 1-14 shows all census block groups with concentrations of 50 percent or more worllers trave ling greater than 30 minutes to worll. F i gures 1-6a and 1 -6b show the concentration of persons who travel more than 30 m i nutes to worll. Table 1 13 Travel Time to Work (1990) Travel T i me In Minutes I I 0 m i n min 20 29 min 30..39 min 40+ min _!lrevar d Countv 17% 35% 23% 15% 10% F l o r i da 16% 33% 21% I 17% I 13% 32 Brevard County Tnms;t Development Plan

PAGE 71

Table 1 1 4 Travel Time to Work (1990) Brevard County Census Block Group P ercentage with Travel Time Over 30 minutes 713 235 Pa l m Bav 100.0% 627.003 C o coa 100.0% 601.003 Titusville 59.2% 661 .025 South Beaches 57.1% 651. 234 Pa l m Bav I 55 8% 621.03 1 Cocoa 55.1% 601.006 Tijusvi lle I 54.5% 683.00 1 Cocoa Beach I 53 9% 711.001 North-West Brevard 51.6% 712 001 Centra l West Brevard i 51.4% Means of Travel t o Work Tab l e 1-15 shows workers' means of transportation to work. Use of publ i c transportation for the j oumey to work i s very low in Brevard County The overwhelming major i ty of workers are dri ving alone. Table 1 16 shows carpooling/vanpooling and pub li c transportation use in Brevard Coun t y Figu r es 1 -7a an d 1 7b show percen t ages o f workers using carpoo l s/vanpoo l s with h i gh concentrations disp l ayed i n darker shades. The census block group wi th the highest per c entage of carpoo l ers (100 percent) is l ocated in Sou t h o f Palm B a y. F i gures 1-Ba and 1-Bb s how percentages of workers using public t ransportat i on with h igh conc e ntrat i ons sho wn in d ar k er shades. Census block g roup 626.001 has the highest p e r c e nt a g e o f public trans i t use (10 1 percent). Th i s b l ock group is l ocated in Cocoa Table 1-15 M eans o f Trave l to Work ( 1990) I Other Walked or Drive Carpoo l / Public Worked at Alon e Vanpool i Trans Means home Brevard 80.6% 13 0% 0.3% 2.1% 4. 0% r-County I F l orida I 77. 1% 14.1% 2.0% 2 .0% 4 .8% Brevard County Transit Development Plan 33

PAGE 72

Census Stock G rou p 713.235 Palm BM f.. 651.234 Me l bourn e 604.001 Tijusville 603 002 Tijusville 601.006 T i tusville 651.232 Melbourno 607 005 Tijusville 661.003 Cocoa Beach 651.23 1 Me l bourne 604 003 Tijusville 712.002 Centrai West 651.012 34 Ta ble 1-16 Means of Travel to Work (1990) Brevard County Percentag41: Uslng Census Block Group Caroools 100.0% 626 001 Cocoa 45. 3% 648.002 Me lbourn e 42.5 % 627 002 Cocoa 37.1% 626 004 Cocoa 34 2% 696 001 Merrill Island 34.2 % 608 002 Titusville 34.1% 642 004 Melbourne 32.9% 643 02 Melbourne 32.2% 627 .001 Cocoa 32.2 % 31.1% 30.2% Percentag e Using Pub1ic: Transoortation 10.1% 9 .3% 6.3% 5.4% 5 .3% 4 .5% 4.2% 4 .2% 4.1% Brevard County Transi t Development Plan

PAGE 73

Figure 1-6a Percent of Labor Force with Over 30 M inutes Trave l Time to Work, North Brevard County Perc en t of T ime Greate< t han 30 M inutes Over40% 30%:o39% 20%:om IE Undor 2Q'll;

PAGE 74

3B Brevard County Transit O.wlopment Ptan

PAGE 75

Figure 1-6b Percen t of Labor Force with Over 30 Minutes Travel Time to Work South Brevard County P e rcent of Workers with Commute Time Greoter thon 30 Mi nute s 3091. to 39% 209!.tom {Q]

PAGE 76

38 Bl&vard County Transit Dovolopment Plan

PAGE 77

Figure 1-7a Percent of Workers Using Carpools, North Brevard County Percent of Workers Using Carpools Over 20\1\ 5% to 9% !lll U nder 5%

PAGE 78

40 BfflvarrJ County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 79

Figure 1-7b Percent of Workers Using Carpools South Brevard County Percent of Workers Usin g Carpools Over20% 10911 t o 19% 5%! 0 9% Undar5%

PAGE 80

42 Brevard County Transit O.W!Iopmenl Plan

PAGE 81

Figure 1 -8a Percent of Workers Using Public Transit, North Brevard County Pe rcent o f Workethon l \1\

PAGE 82

44 lln>vatd County Transit Develop,..nt Ptan

PAGE 83

Figure 1-Sb Percent of Workers Using Public Transit, South Brevard County Percef'\t of WOfkels Usif'\g Public Traf'\Sn 6'1> to 10% 2'1\to 4% I% to 2% lliJ LOSS than 1%

PAGE 84

46 &evalll Counzy Tranlt Devo/oproont Plan

PAGE 85

BREVARD COUNTY CTC MAJOR TRIP GENERATORS AND ATTRACTORS The Brevard County CTC currently operates under a system of tr i p priorities for non-sponsored paratransit trips provided with i n the coordinated system. Under the current syste m of trip priorit i es the majority of doortodoor paratransit trips are for medical/dialysis purposes (55 percent), followed by emp l oyment (20 percent) social and recreational (20 perce n t). and food shopping (5 percent). Most agen c y sponsored program trips are prov i ded through SCAT's agency sponsored subscription bus routes and agency-sponsored vanpool program, rather than through door-to-door paratransit service. An exception is Medicaid non emergency door-to doo r paratransit service, which is provided entirely by Coastal Health Services, Inc., under contract to the CTC. The C T C also prov i des a small number of doorto-door ADA comp l ementary paratransit trips for SCAT In order to determine the distribution of major trip generato r s and attractors in B r evard County, data tor door-to-door paratransit trips provided by the coordinator during May 1997 F i gures 1 9a and 1-9b and Table 1 show the locations of current trip attractors based on pa r atransit trips prov ided by the CTC during May 1g97. As outlined i n the trip priorit i es adopted by the LCB in Brevard County, the majority of trips were for med i ca l purposes ( i ncluding d i alysis). followed by employment t rips, social/recreation trips educat ion and tra i ning and trips made to attend a public meeting Des t inations were spread throughout both North and South Brevard County with the majority of trips attractors falling within areas of dense population pockets, includ i ng Melbourne and Palm Bay i n the southern portion of the county and Titusville which is located at the far north end of the county It is important to note that the trip attractors contained in Figures 1 9a and 1b and Table 1-17 do not include some of the sites tradit i onally associated with TO door to-door transportation, such as nutrition s i tes and aduH day care programs. The absence of these facilities from the figures and tables is not intended to suggest that TO clients are not being transported to these i mportant programs Rather, a majo r ity of these trips are being provided throug h SCATs agency-sponsored subscript i on bus service and agency-sponsored vanpool program. T he names and locations of the agencies participating in these programs are contained in Tables 2-26 and 2-27 which can be found i n Chapter Two of this document. Paratrans i t trip generators are typically viewed as traveler's residence as most paratransit trips are round trips. For that reason the residence of each active TO c l ient in the C T C's database was p l otted on a GIS map to detenn ine if clients are concentrated i n specific areas of the county. The result of this exercise showed that, like paratransit trip attractors in Brevard County TO clients are distributed throughout the county with the greatest density of TD populat i ons resid i ng in the population centers of Titusvi l le, Cocoa and Cocoa B each, Melbourne, Palm Bay as well as in the un i ncorporated areas i n the southern -most portion of the county, commonly referred to as South Ma i nland. Bmvard County Transit Development Plan 47

PAGE 86

Table 1-17 Brevard County CTC Major Trip Attrac:tors DESTINATION I ADDRESS ' ;, ; DialysJs & M;iilca F :" ; ... '''i' .. . < ..:\ ;< Melbourne Kidney Center 1 400 South Apollo Boulevard, Me lbourne MIMA 200 Sheridan Road, Melbourne Palm Bay Dialys is 220 N .E. Medplex Parkway Palm Bay Merritt I sland Kidney Center 375 s Courtenay Parkway Merritt Island North Brevard Kldney Center 830 Century Medical Drive, Titusville Parrish Rehabilitation 941 N Washi ngton Avenue Titusville Palm Bay Cancer Center 1 1081 N .E. Port Malabar Boulevard Palm Bay Cancer Care Center 1 1430 Pine Street, Melbourne ,:, . ;.;': ;; :, ';,z:'l;; Cape Canavera l 1638 Centra l Control Road, Cape Canaveral Dictaphone 3900 Sarno Road, Melbourne Goodwill Indu stries 795 Babcock Street Melbourne Association for Retarded Citizens 1110 Hickory Street, Melbourne Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB) 92 S Patrick Drive, Patrick Air Force Base 'h .its. -A Mer ri tt Island Baptist Church 140 Magnolia Avenue Merritt Island Indian River City Methodisl Churc h 1355 Cheney Highway, Titusville Indian Harbo r Beach 2289 A1A Highway, In dian Harbor Beach 2080 N. Atlantic Avenue Cocoa Beach -,,;;:.'' ;. .. ., 1 ; ' .;,. ..... . Meadowlane School 1 2255 Meadowlane-Avenue, W Melbourne Blind Associa ti on 67 4 S. Patrick Streel Satellite Beach Brevard Achievement Center (BAC) 1845 Cogswell Street Rockledge ' U' c7i .. ;:;P1bJfClMeetlng "' :' ..... Government Center (Viera) 2725 Judge Fran Jamieson Way, Me l bourne SO
PAGE 87

Figure 1-9a North Brevard County CTC Major Trip Attractors N Education 1 Training Medical Public Meeting SociaVRecreallon Work P lace

PAGE 88

50 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 89

N 0 2 Miles Figure 1-9b South Brevard County CTC Major Trip Anractors 4 Education I Training Medical Public Meeting T Social/Recreation Work Place

PAGE 90

52 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 91

INTERVIEWS WITH LOCAL OFFICIALS An important element in the preparation of a TOP is the ident ification of opinions and perceptions of loca l officials and community leaders because such persons usually have input to, or are respons ible for, po licy fonnulation and allocation of funding. A community's belief concerning the viability of public transportation in the a r ea is essential to understand. Also, the way in which public transportation is viewed can significantly influence the priority that is given to and other related t ransportat ion issues SCAT compiled a list of key officials representing Brevard County. From this list, CUTR interviewed 10 individuals either in perso n or over the phone during February and March 1997. These officials represented Brevard County ; municipalities from the northern, central, and southern parts of the county; the area business community; and residential i nterest s This section summarizes the results of the interviews during which the officials' impressions of the current transit system as well as thoughts about the system's future were discussed. The synopsis i s organized under th ree topics: perceptions, suggestions and options, and policy issues An outline of the questions that were used for these interviews is contained in Appendix A. Perceptions When asked about the level of interest and support there is in Brevard County for public transportation, most interviewees stated that there is limited support. The perception is that support is l oca lized to people who do not have travel alternatives to public transportation. Groups that were ident ified as having the most inte rest in pub lic transportation were senior citizens and persons with disabilities These groups are dependent on public transportation to provide transportation for shopping and doctors' appointments. Many interv iewees stated that of Brevard County who have a choice will in most cases, choose to drive personal vehicles. There is no motivation to take because of the unusual geography of the county and t he limited schedule of the fixed-route system. The 70-mile length of the county makes it difficult for people to effectively use public transportation because most of the routes are centralized in the northern, central, or southern parts of the county. One interviewee stated that development in Brevard County needs to be similar to the Orlando area for to be successful. Further, the limited hours of service and frequency of the fixed-route service make it imposs ib le for most people to use transit for work trips. One interviewee suggested that county officials have a low interest in public transportation and are not willing to spend additional money on any improvements Brevard County Transit Development Plan 53

PAGE 92

Even though interest is low for public transportation, the service that Space Coast Area Transit provides in the community is well-perceived. The consensus is that SCAT does a quality job with limited resou rces. Most interv iewees also believed that the perception and awareness of SCAT has improved i n recent years due to increased bus stop signs along the fixed-routes increased information, and illustrated buses making the system more visible. Others reco gnized that the fixed-route is s till in its infancy stage and therefore, is doing a good job considering its age. In addition, the vehicle operators were given high marks on their friendliness and helpfuln ess. Negative perceptions of SCAT's service inc luded routes that are too long and not frequent enough, no t enough information available about the system, and confusion about the schedules. One interviewee commented that people are afraid to use the system because they don't know if they will be able to get back from where they want to go given the limited schedule and frequency of the bus system. Interviewees were also asked what they thought the role of public transportation should be in the community and whether SCAT was fulfilling that role All respondents commented that the major role of SCAT is to provide transportation to the transit dependent; i.e., those persons who do not have any other aHematives. They further stated that the transit dependent include senior citizens, persons with disabilities, and pecple from households with low incomes. When asked whether SCAT should be filling additional roles in the community, most interviewees stated that SCAT should focus its l imited resources on the transit dependent. The choice rider or commuter to work will never have an incentive to use public transportation. However focusing on transportation for children was mentioned by a few interviewees as a potential future role for SCAT. Teenagers who are not old enough to drive need transportation for after-school, weekend, and summer activities. Teenagers ne ed to travel to places such as recreational activities, part-time jobs, shops, f riends' homes, the beach, etc. (This issue is discussed in greater detail in the focus group report which follows this summary.) Another group of citizens mentioned by interviewees as needing additional transportation were persons from low income households who cannot afford to own and/or maintain a personal vehicle This group r equires transportation to work, shopping, and recreational activities Several in terviewees mentioned that SCAT does a good job of providing work transportation on the fixed route system to county employees who live in Titusville and work at the County Center in Viera. According to the interv iewees, no other group of citizens uses the fixed-route system for work transportation. Reasons offered as to why workers do not use the fixed-route system included cheap and plentiful parking, limited congestion, and sprawling development. Overall parking is free and plentiful 54 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 93

throughout all parts of Brevard County. Parking is only an issue in the central cores of Melbourne and Cocoa. Parking can also be a problem in some areas of the beaches at p eak periods Traffic congestion in Brevard County is perceived to be troublesome only at certain times and in certain places. One interviewee stated that the most congested intersection in the county is at SR 520 and US 1. Others indicated that there is limited congestion during peak hours in the core areas of Cocoa, Melbourne and on the beaches. Future growth in Brevard County is going to be centralized in the western portion of the county (west of 1-95), according to the interviewees. The biggest res identia l growth will take p lac e in Viera, where 40,000 additional single-family homes are p l anned. Other growth areas include Palm Bay, where vast amounts of land are already platted; Suntree; and areas around Me lb ourne A redevelopment project in Cocoa was also mentioned as a future project in Brevard County. The plan for Cocoa would be a "facelift" for areas along the waterfront. Plans include resident ial redevelopment areas, parks waterfront recreational facilities and new lan dscaping Another in terviewee described a pot ential theme park called "Space Station One," which is planned for the Titusville area. This project, if built, could increased congestion on roadways in the northern part of the county Suggestions and Options All of the interviewees had suggestions regarding how to make SCAT more responsive to the needs of the citizens of Brevard County. Many of these suggestions centered around raising citizens awareness about public transportation options Methods suggested to raise awareness included more advertising, presentations at different organizations, and distribution of information to municipalities One interviewee suggested that SCAT could trade in-kind services for advert ising in loc a l magazines and newspapers. Sponsoring traffic reports on radio stations was suggested by another interviewee. Another suggestion was to include SCAT information in "welcome" packages distributed to new cit i zens of Brevard County. Several interviewees suggested that SCAT should give presentations at selected group meetings. Possible groups included home owner's associations and service groups, such as the Lion's Club. One interviewee went further with this idea by suggesting that SCAT should take groups on fi xed routes to demonstrate the serv i ce. This interviewee commented that many people are afraid to take the first t rip on the bus system but, after being shown the system would fee l more comfortable about taking it in the future. Brevard County Transit Development Plan 55

PAGE 94

It was also suggested that the municipalities need to be more invo lve d in disseminating information about public transportation. Fo r example, the Titusville City Council provides service organizations five minutes to present information at its meetings. These meetings are also broadcast on public access television. Other suggestions by interv iewees focused on service issues. Some respondents thought that SCAT's fixed-route service should be expanded to meet addijional needs. Suggestions for expansion incl uded additional evening hours to accommodate trips for teenagers, more park and ride services and increased frequency of routes. Changes to service were also suggested. Two interviewees suggested converting routes in high density corridors to express routes Route deviation along some of the routes was a lso suggested. Route deviation would accommodate persons who can use the fixed-route system but not cann ot walk the distance to the nearest bus stop. Additional North-South routes were suggested as a need to interconnect the communities. Many of the suggestions, however, centered on the issue of money. Many stated that SCAT would require additional resources to make many of these improvements. Policy Issues SCAT cu rrent ly receives funding from many different local government sources. And, given the recognition that additional services requ ire additional funding sources, interviewees were asked to comment on future funding sources to help support the transit system All of the repre sen ta tives from munic ipali ties recog nized the value of public transportation but offered t hat their respective municipalities were not currently w illing to contribute additional funds to public t ransporta t ion Many of the municipalities in Brevard County are small in population and have difficulty keep i ng up wijh essential services such as highways and storm water drainage Other municipalities do not have the funding sources available to pay for additional services. For example the city charter of West Melbo urn e prohibits the Institut io n of a city property tax. One interv iewee stated that prov id ing additional funding for public t ransportation is the responsibility of t he County Commission, which is not willing to increase f unding at this time. This in terv iewee further suggested that the leaders of the community view B rev ard County in the same light as before rapid increases in population were experienced Thus, the y are using old solutions for new problems 56 Brevard County Tmnsit Development Plan

PAGE 95

FOCUS GROUP REPORT Introduction As part of the TOP process CUTR conducted four focus groups with young people age 14 through 18 in Brevard County The purpose of the focus groups was to gain infonna t ion regarding young people s perceptions and awareness of the pub l ic transportation services available i n Brevard County. In the focus groups were designed to el i cit information that will help SCAT to market current and future services more effect i vely to this untapped market segment. SCAT r epresentatives recruited focus group participants at four schools located throughout Brevard County The four schoo l s that participated in the study were Palm Bay High School, Melboume High School Central Jun i o r High School, and Cocoa Beach High School. Each of the focus groups was he l d at the school sponsoring the event. Descriptive lnfonnation pertain i ng to the part i cipants of each of the four groups i s provided below. Focus Group #1: Palm Bay H i gh School The first focus group was held studen t s at Palm Bay High School. The students that partic i pated in the focus group were in either 1Oth, 11th or 1 2th grade. A tot a l of 11 persons participated in the focus group meeting. Seven of the partic i pants were female and four were ma le. The participants r anged from 15 to 1 8 years old, with a median age of 17 years. Seven of the focus group participants reported that they drive personal automobiles, while the remaining four participant reported that they are not abl e to drive However, all participants listed the personal automobile as the type of tran sport ation that they most often use Eight of the focus group partic i pants reported household ownersh i p of three or more personal automobiles Participants reported living in Breva r d County between 8 and 18 years Participant Characteristics All of the focus group partici p ants at Palm Bay High School were members o f the student council. In addrtion, all participants reported participating in many extracurricula r activities includ ing the school band sports (including swimming, softball, roller-b ladi ng, soccer, tennis, and basketball). dance, singing, playing with computers membership in various c l ubs and organ i zations Including the honor soc i ety. Three focus participants also i ndicated that they work after school. Although a majority of the focus group part i cipants reported that they currently drive their own persona l automob il e all of the participants indicated that the i r primary mode of transportat ion is the personal automobile. Those participants who do not currently drive Brev arrl County Transit Development Pl a n 57

PAGE 96

reported that they rely on parents siblings and/or friends for transporta tion The participants that reported driv ing their own automobile also indicated that they often transport friends and/or sib lings around Brevard County Focus Group #2: Melbourne High School The second focus group was held with students at Melbourne High School. The students who participated in the focus group were in the 10th grade Thirteen students participated in th is focus group meeting. Eleven of the participants were female and two were male. The participants ranged from 15 to 17 years old, with a median age of 15 years. Four of the focus group participants reported that they drive personal vehicles, while the remaining nine participants reported that they are not able to drive. Although all participants listed the personal automobile as their primary mode of transportation, two participants also listed the bus as a transportation mode sometimes utilized. Eight of t he focus group participants reported household ownership of three or more personal automobiles. All of the focus group participants reported living in Brevard County for more than five years; however, all but two participants indicated that they have lived in Florida for most .of their lives or all of t heir lives. Parti cipant Characteristics All of the focus group participants at Melboume High School were members of the student council. In addition all participants reported participating in many extracurricular activities including the school band, sports {including wrestling, swimming, football, volleyball, crew, soccer, surfing, and basketball), dance, and membership in various clubs and service organizations, inc luding the ho nor society Tw o f ocus participants also indicated that they work after school. A majority of the focus group participants reported that they do not currently have drive r licenses However, all of the participants indicated that their primary mode of transportation is the personal automobile. Those participants who do not currently drive reported t hat they re ly on parents siblings, and/or friends for transportation. The participants who reported driving their own automobile also ind icated that they often transport f riends and/or siblings around Brevard County. Focus Group #3: Central Junior High School The third SCAT focus group was held with students at Central Juni o r High School, which is located in West Melbourne. The students who participated in the focus group were in the 8th and 9th grades. Nine students part icipated in this focus group meeting. 58 Brevard County Transit Devalopmont Plan

PAGE 97

Five of the focus group participants were female and four were male. The participants ranged from 15 to 17 years old, with a median age of 15 years. Two of the focus group participants reported that they drive personal vehicles, while the remaining seven participants reported that they are not yet able to drive. All of the focus group participants listed the personal automobile as their primary mode of transportation. All but one focus group part icipant reported household ownership of two or more personal automobiles. Three f o cus group participants reported that they are not Florida natives. These part i c ipants moved to Florida from New York, Toronto, and Massachusens. Participant Characteristics All of the focus group participants at Central Junior High School were also members of a public service class offere d at the school. In addition, all participants reported that they enjoy participa t ing in extracurricular activities such as ta lking on the phone, going to the beach shopping, and participating in sports, such as basketball, surfing, baseball and boxing. Two focus participants also indicated t hat they work after sch o o l A majority of the focus group participants reported that they do not currently have driver licenses. However, all of the participants indicated that t hei r primary mode of transportat ion is the personal automobile. Those participants who do not currently drive reported that they must rely on parents. siblings, andlor friends for transportation The participants that reported driving their own automobile a lso ind icated that they often transport friends and/or siblings around Brevard County Focus Group #4: Cocoa Beach Junior/Senior High School The final focus group was held at Cocoa Beach Junior/Senior High School. The students who participated in the focus group were in grades 8 through 12 and represented every grade taught at the school. Eight students part i cip a ted in this focus group meeting. Four of the participants were female and four were male. The part i cipants ranged from 15 to 18 years old, with a median age of 15 years. Only one of the focus group participants indicated the ability to drive a personal vehicle, while the remaining seven participants reported that they are not able to drive. All of participants listed the personal automobile as their primary mode of transportation. In addition, t hree participants a ls o listed the school bus a primary mode of transportation Only two of the focus g roup participants reported household ownership of more than one personal vehicle. A majority of the participants in this focus group reported that they have lived i n Flor ida for less than two years. This may be a result of the influence that Patrick Air Force Base has on the population in this area of Brevard County. Only two participants indica ted that they have lived in Florida for their entire lives. Brevard County Trsnsit Development Plan 59

PAGE 98

Participant Characterist ics All of the focus group participants at Melbourne Cocoa Beach Junior/Senior High School reported participating in many extracurricular activities inc luding the school band, various school clubs, and sports (including track, football baseball, and basketball). One focus participant also reported having an after school job. All but one of the focus group participants reported that they do not currently have driver licenses In addition, all of the participants indicated that their primary mode of transportation is the personal automobile. Those participants who do not currently drive reported that they must rely on parents siblings and/or friends for transportation. The one participant who does drive a personal car also indicated that she often transports friends and/or siblings around Brevard County. Findings Current Mobilitv Options Most of the focus group participants do not yet have driver licenses. Most of the focus group parti c i pants also participate in many extracurricu lar activities, both school-related programs a nd outside activities. However, transportation to and from these activities can pose quite a problem for these young people because most reported that they must rely on rides from parents, siblings, and friends. 'You have to scrounge a ride from everyone and you feel bad if you don't have a car. "Me and my friends and a lot of people in the boxing club, we're always trying to get rides for something. That's the main reason I got a motorcycle. Focus g r oup participants with work in g parents are especially vulnerable to transportation problems, as they are limited in tenns of ride availability by their parents' work schedules 'I'm pretty much on my own for transportation and in between cars and crashes I have to bum rides off of friends or walk Although a number of participants mentioned walking as a possible tra nspo rtation alternative, the participants also reported that walking in Brevard County is difficult because of the lack of sidewalks throughout the county, as well as the low population and commercial densities characteristic of Brevard County. The problem, according to part i cipants, is compounded by motorists who have no reg ard for pedestrians 60 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 99

'We're like trapped in the size of this city (Melbourne). Because it's not big enough to have public transportation lines, and it's not small enough where you can walk to everywhere you want to go. Like if it were really tiny a rural community, and you could just go and walk there in ten minutes ... Expe riences with Public Transportation Elsewhere Some knowledge of public transportation systems elsewhere in the United States and other countries was expressed by approximately one-third of focus group participants. Reports of usage of these public transportation systems ranges from one time to nearly every day. All of the partic ip ants who reported using public transportation elsewhere indicated that the public transportation systems had been easy to use and "got you where you needed to go." Also mentioned was the fac t that route and schedule information was very accessible for these systems so that it was relatively easy to figure out how to get from point A to point B. "When I go to Boston in the summers you've got the bus system, you've got the subway, and it's like if you want to go somewhere, you just hop on. "It was great. Every like 15 minutes they'll have a bus that comes by for all the college students and they'll take you anywhere. When questioned about reasons that participants might want o r need to use public tra nspo rtation now or in the future, most participants indica ted that they could see themselves using public transportation at some point in their lives. One part i cipant expanded on this idea by stating that at some point, your car will probably break down and transit would become a travel option. In addition, one participant who currently has a personal vehicle reported that he might decide to use the public bus system if it cost less than the amount required to fill his vehicle gas. "Because I have a motorcycle and I get there faster, I donY have to wony about bus stops. But if it was cheaper, I could see like, if it cost less than gas for me going just to the rec center, maybe, but other than that, no. Overall a majority of focus group participants suggested that public transportation would only be a chosen t ransportation option among teenagers if they do not have driver lic enses and/or access to personal vehicles. Public Transp ortation jn Brevard County Focus group participants were questioned about the public transportation services that exist in Brevard County. Several partic i pants mentioned taxis as a form of public t rans portation available in Brevard County. However, many participants indicated that the services provided by taxis are too expensive lor young people to afford. Bmvard County Transit Development Plan 61

PAGE 100

Nearly all of the focus group participants were aware that Space Coast Area Transit operates some public transportation in the county However, the perception among participants was that SCAT's service h as been designed to serve only seniors in Breva r d County. As a resuH, most participants reported that SCAT buses only travel to places that seniors want to go, such as assisted living centers (e g., T rinity Towers), doctors' offices, shopping centers, chu r ches and the local malls. It should be noted however that participants cited many of the same destinations (shopping centers, malls, etc.) when questioned about the places that young people like to go. Most of the focus group participants reported learning about SCAT bus service simply by seeing the buses (especially SCAT illustrated buses) traveling on Brevard County streets and stopped at malls and stores throughout the community A ma j o r ity of the partic i pants in each of the focus groups revealed a high level of awareness of the beach bus," which operates during summer months to transport people from Palm Bay to Indialantic. However some amount of dissatisfaction was voiced concerning the fact that this bus can only be accessed in Palm Bay and that this route only operates during the summer. Interestingly one participant made a point to emphasize that unlike other SCAT bus routes, the "beach bus primarily transports young people, rather than elderly persons. Some amount of misinformation among focus group participants was revealed during the discussions For example, one focus group participant stated that SCAT bus service i s ... so expensive, they charge you so much money fo r one bus ride." This participant did not appear to be aware of the reduced fare (50 cents) available to students in Brevard County Limited knowledge of the extent of SCAT bus service in Brevard County was also evident. Several participants sta t ed that SCAT buses do not serve the Palm Bay residential area. One participant added that she has never seen a bus i n the residential areas of Palm Bay during the frve years that she has lived in the community. In addition, a number of participants stated that there is no bus service south of Pa l m Bay in Brevard County. Most partic i pants feH strongly that there is little awareness about the bus service in Brevard County, beyond the fact that it exists Participants reported that they do not know where they can travel to on a bus, when the buses run, and/or how much bus service costs. Although almost all of the focus g r oup participants were aware that SCAT does provide some bus service in Brevard County, most stated that there is very little knowledge among young people regarding where and when SCAT buses are available. Participants stated that the service is not advertised at all. However many participants did note that there is a telephone number you can call to get information, but they felt that this methods of information dissemination actually makes information less accessible. 62 Brovani County Tmnsit Development Plan

PAGE 101

"I know they're out there. Like when we say there is no transportation I know it's out there, it just doesn't seem like it' s it's constantly running bu t it doesnt seem like it accessible totally to kids "A lot of my friends don1 know where the bus goes. Like certain places. All my friends if they go somewhere they don't know if the bus is going to take them there or not so they don1 even check. Sever a l focus group partic i pants a lso state d that they have seen very few bus stop signs throughout the county and ther efore would not know where to catch a bus Very few of the focus g r oup part i c i pants had any d i rect experie n ce usi ng SCAT bus service Those who have used SCAT buses bef o r e reported trave l ing t o the beach on t he "beach bus t raveling to local malls and traveling a grandparent to a shopping center Severa l participants who r eported usi ng SCAT bus serv ice a lso emphasized that the bus serv ice is primari l y for seniors All of the young peopl e who have ridden on SCAT buses commented that the trips are "too l ong because the bus has to make too many s t ops Many part i cipants suggested that they do not use the bus because i t is tor old people" and does not go t o p l aces that young people want to go. However participant comments also revealed very l itt l e know l edge regarding where, besides Publix mall s and Trini t y Towers, SCAT buses travel to i n Breva r d Cou nty. I n d eed, most of the focus group part i cipants indicated that the r e is not enoug h informat ion about SCAT bus routes and schedu les availab l e in the community. React jon to SCAT Marketing Effo rt s Focus group participants were asked to share thei r percepti ons of and react ions to current and future SCAT mar keting efforts. Specifically part i cipant were p ro be d c oncerning how these efforts woul d be r ece ived by y o ung peopl e in Brevard County Market ing concep t s t hat wer e discussed incl uded the SCATman masc o t and SCAT ill ustrated buses Al l of the part i c i pants i nd i cated that the SCATman mascot devel oped for the t r ansit system woul d not appeal to teenagers However, the focu s group part i cipants a lso stated that the mascot w o u l d probab l y be very app ealing to chi ldren 10 year o f age or less. Inter esting ly, partic ipant in one of the focus groups felt str ong l y that having a masco t for the t r a ns it sys tem i s ir r elevant. Accord ing to these participants their mai n concern is how to get around Breva r d C o unty w i thout a car. "There s such a problem with getti ng places anyway th a t if you hand out flyers telling you this stop will take you here and here and here and all these places, you re going to look anyway i f you need a ride So you really don't need a mascot or anything like th a t Brevard County Transit Development Plan 63

PAGE 102

The focus group partic i pants were very familiar SCAT's illustrated buses and reacted very enthusiastically to the concept of illustrated buses. Among the comments received by participants descr i bing SCAT illustrated buses were "attractive ," cool," "good for advertising,' ... make the county look more responsible for the peop l e that they are t ransporting ." Participants stated that the i llustrated buses "catch your eye : "seems like would be fun to ride,' and "when you l ook at them you try to look at all of the different stuff on them ." One participant stated that the illustrated buses "make you want to look inside to see if there is anything going on because you cannot see into the bus from the outside. Several participants suggested that illustrated buses are a good way to target young people becau se they stand out more than the other SCAT buses and the illustrated buses make the bus system much more visible i n the communey. However, severa l participants also noted SCAT bus service would probably be more appea ling to young people if some of the illustrated buses had advertisements that young people could relate to, rather than only targeting older people in Brevard County One suggestion offered by focus group participants was to advertise a radio station In Brevard County that appeals to teenagers (e.g., 101, 102 107) rather than 95.1, which is perceived as a rad i o stat i on for seniors. II shoul d also be noted that some participants again expressed the sentiment that if someone really needs a ride it won t matter what the buses look like. "I really care {what the buses look like) as long as they get you where you're going. "If you don't have a ride, that's the only way you can get there. Suggestions: Serv i ce Enhancements and Marteting to Attract Young People In addition to gaining i nfonnation about how young people currently feel about SCAT bus service focus group participants also offered many suggestions regarding steps that can be taken to make SCAT bus service more attractive to young people in Brevard County. Suggestions were offered regarding specific service enhancements a imed at making the bus service more responsive to the needs of young people and potentia l marketing activit i es geared toward teenagers in Brevard County. Service Enhancements: Destinations When asked about destinations that would appeal to young people in Brevard County participants indicated that SCAT buses should go to more places that young people frequent such as the beach, movie theaters the Palm Bay Recreat i on Center, bowl ing alleys and the mall. 64 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 103

"I think it would be neat to have a bus system like in the big cities where you can take a bus and go wherever you want to go and you dont have to go like all the way to Palm Bay just to go to the beach. A common suggestion offered during all of the focus groups with young people was to design routes that access different residential areas throughout the county. The focus group participants indicated that many young people spend much of their free time "hanging out" with each other, but it is often hard to get to and from each other's houses if you do not have a driver license and/or you r parents are not available to give you a ride I think tha t it's good to have them go to public places and stuff, but sometimes you need to get to somebody's house, and if they could drop you off, if there was a cerlain general comer in a residential area They could have one stop in a neighborhood. ... (my friend) lives in Melbourne and /live in Palm Bay and our moms don't like to go back and forlh. so we dont gal to go to each other's house a tot and we can't walk from Melbourne to Palm Bay. One residential area that was specifica ll y mentioned as currently underserved by SCAT buses is Patrick Air Force Base. Participants suggested that SCAT buses serve Patrick Air Force Base so that all of the young people living on the base have more mobilny. "Yeah, I have a lot of friends that live on Patrick And if your parents are usually at work you have no way of getting there unless a friend has a car. Focus g roup participants a l so spoke at length about the value of having SCAT buses that s top at or near local schools so that students can use pub lic buses to get to and f rom sch o ol, r ather than having to ride school buses or find someone to drive them. The participants also ind i cated that SCAT buses could a l so be used to get home from after-school activities such as band practice o r club meetings. Currently students must "bum rides back and forth and this can be d i fficult both for the students and thei r parents. "I have practice till 4:30 everyday, and then I have a game at 6:30, so it would be really nice to have a bus take me home and back to school for the game. But it doesnt do that. See my mom hales running back and forlh from Melbourne to Palm Bay to pick me up and drop me off at a game, this meeting here, and she hates it. And she cannot wait, three months and I'll get my license We're counting down the days. Two months and 16 days I know this because we're waiting." I think it would be convenient if they could have some way to provide transporlation from the school back to kids' houses because I know there's a lot of kids here that have extracurricular activities after school and it's hard to gat a ride home sometime Brevan:l County Transit Development Plan 65

PAGE 104

"Sometimes I have to stay all day because I can1 get a ride back and forth So I just stay and get a ride home after that." "I think it would still be convenient if they could set up some sort of bus stop down by the school here to provide some sort of transportation afterwards Focus group participants also suggested that SCAT make sure that b us routes are designed so that major centers and busy intersections are well served by the bus system so that young peop l e could walk from the bus stop to several d i fferent locations Some parti ci pants c o mmented that there are many students in the county who currently walk and could potentially be serve d by the bus system. "If there is one bus that went up and down 192, they would make so much money. You see so many kids, like all thos e FAA [Florida Air Academy) kids, there's like a hundred kids at any given moment, walking in some part of the county. Service Enhancements: Hours and Days of Service Focus group participants provided information regard ing the days and hours of service that would appeal to young people in Brevard County First and foremost, part icipants emphasized tha t in order for the bus system t o be useful to young people, SCAT buses nee d to operate on fixed-routes during the hours that young people are not in school. Many participants ind i cated that the only t i me that they see SCAT buses opera t ing is during the hours that they normally spen d in school. These p articipants stated that as long as SCAT buses only operate during hours that young people are in school bus service will not be o f any use to young peo p l e in Brevard County. "The buses are running during the day but it's not doing us any good when we're in school." Hours of operation suggested by focus group participants included having bus service available during earl y morning hours so tha t studen t s are able t o ride SCAT buses to sch o ol, as well as operating service after school until at l eas t 8:00 p.m. Students expres sed much disdai n for the public scho o l bus system and stated that they would much rather ride on a public bus th a n a sch o o l bus. I would ride that bus over a cheese wagon (school bus) any day. Focus g roup p art i cipants a l so stated tha t bus service should be avai l able o n weekends to be useful for young people because this is the p art o f the week that teenagers have the most f ree time 66 Bt9van1 County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 105

Service Enhancement: Route and Stop Information The final area of SCAT service enhancements suggested by focus group participants pertains to the availabil ity of route and bus stop information. A common theme evident throughout all of the focus groups was a Jack of know1edge concerning where and when SCAT buses travel. The focus group p articipa n ts suggested th at the entire community would benefit from having route maps and schedules posted at public places t hroughout Brevard County In addition, participants recommended tha t this information be clea rly p osted at bus stops so riders are able to imme diately determine where they can travel and when the next bus will arrive at each stop This appears to be particularly important to teenagers because you feel dumb if you go on the bus and you end up somewhere you don't want to be, like, you're going to Palm Bay and you end up somewhere in Eau Gallie. The issue of SCAT bus stops was also a concern of focus group participants. Many participants stated that t here are too few bus stops dispersed throughout t he county, making i t difficult to determine the path of a particular bus route. Other comments suggested that the bus stop signs currently being used by SCAT tend to blend in with the signage in the surrounding area. A suggestion was made to make SCAT bus stop signs more vi sib le by using a multi->lored design similar to the bus stop signs in Orlando. Participants also suggested clearly indicating on the bus stop signs which SCAT routes serve each stop. Finally, a suggestion was made to clearly mark on the f ront back, and side of a ll buses route and destination information so that passengers know where each bus is traveling. Marketing to Yoyng PeQple By far, the most common suggestions regarding how SCAT could attract more teenagers to the bus system revolved around issues of SCAT's image an d advertising SCAT's services First and foremost, a common perception among focus group participants was that SCAT bus service has been designed for and is u sed by elderly persons in Brevard County. Participan ts seemed skeptical that the SCAT bus system could be used for their t r avel purposes. Focus group parti cipants stated that it i s very importan t that SCAT work to eliminate the image of th e bus system as only being for elderly persons if SCAT wants to appeal to young people i n Brevard County. "I think that if they lost the old person stereotype and, most importantly, if they go places that I want to go (I would use the bus). I'm not going to get on it and go to Publix because I just don't want to be at Publix. In order t o help change the image of the bus system in Brevard County, participants felt strongly that SCAT must advertise its services more to entice young people to use it. Participants stated Brevard Co(Jnty Transit Development Plan 67

PAGE 106

that they could not use the service now even if they wanted to because they don't know where buses go or when they are available. 'I might have ridden a bus when I didnY have a car, but I just never knew they came all the way down out where liNe. Every focus group participant stated that SCAT needs to advertise the bus system more and get more information out to the community. Advertising should include the times that bus service is available and the places that you can go by riding the bus. Fare information also should be made available. Participants suggested making easy to understand route maps and schedules that are widely available in the communrty so that young people know where the buses go and when they are available. The young people who participated in the focus groups acknowledged the role adults can play in making sure that information regarding available bus service is available to young people in Brevard County. Participants indicated that it is important to make sure that route and schedule infonnation reaches parents, as well as kids, so that they can encourage their children to use the bus service. The participants also suggested that SCAT supply loca l junior and senior high schools with flyers that include schedule infonnatlon so that teachers can distribute this information to students. "The faculty here could distribute some of the schedule if they could just provide it to them. They could distribute it to us. A suggestion was also made to use SCAT illustrated buses to attract more young people by advertising services that are more appealing to younger generations. One suggestion made was to advertise a radio station that caters to young people, rather than 95.1 which is perceived to be a radio station for the senior population in Brevard County Focus group participants also made several suggestions regarding specific advertising mediums to employ in order to get bus service infonnation out to the B r evard County communrty. Participants suggested advertising SCAT services through local newspapers (Florida Today, Cocoa Beach Press), radio announcements and television commercials. Several participants also suggested mailing flyers and/or bus schedules directly to residents' houses. Suggestions regarding places to advertise SCAT services to specifically target teenagers were in the Weekend comic, and/or movie sections of the newspaper Focus group participants also suggested that SCAT widely advertise the bus service on radio and 1V to let young people know that the service is available, where it goes and when it is available. The focus group participants felt strongly that SCAT should definitely advertise available services 68 Brevard County TransU Development Plan

PAGE 107

on the radio stations in Brevard County that young people listen to Including the following FM stations : 101, 102, 104, and 107 Although the focus group participants stated that SCAT should definitely advertise available services on the radio stations in Brevard County that young people listen to, the participants also felt strongly that there is no s ingl e type of music tha t will appeal to all teenagers. Rather participants emphasized that a great deal of diversity exists their age group and SCAT commercials should recognize this diversity In order to address this diversity, one participant suggested that SCAT develop an original "jingle' instead of trying to find a type of music that would have wide appeal. 'II would probably be best to create something original, like a jingle or something to go along with the commercial. Not something that's already been heard." Fi nally the focus group participants made many suggestions regarding potential SCAT television commercials that target young people. Participants suggested that SCAT use MlV, Fox, and l ocal televisio n stations to reach young people. Participants at the Melbourne High School f o cus group also suggested airing SCAT commercials aimed at young people on public television (channel 14) during the time slot that Melbourne High School's Bulldog Report airs on Wednesday nights. In terms of content, SCAT television com mercials aimed at teenagers should include teenagers the audience can relate to or a popular figure among teenagers The commercials intended for a teenage audience a lso should include scenes showing kids going to place s that young people want to go, such as the mall, friends houses, after-school or the beach Participants also suggested that SCAT commercials use humor because humor appeals to most people. However. participants warned that SCAT should use caution and develop a commerc ia l that does n ot rely on stupidity in order to be funny. Examp les of commercials that are "intelligent funny provided by participants include Mentos and M&M commercials. One participants even suggested creat ing a SCAT commercial that features a cartoon version of the SCAT man to catch the attention o f young people in Brevard County. Brevaft'l County Transit Dsvolopmont Plan 69

PAGE 108

Summary Participants in the focus groups with young people in Brevard County were candid in their opinions o f SCAT bus service and their suggestions for enticing more young people to use the SCAT bus system. The problems that they cited as affecting current use and awareness of the bus system among teenagers included: SCAT bus system is perceived to be designed for seniors; limited information available regarding the extent of existing SCAT bus service; hours and days of operation not responsive to the travel needs of young people; and lack of marketing directed toward young people in Brevard County. The focus group participants also recommended many service enhancements intended to make SCAT bus service more responsive to the needs of young p e ople. The suggestions inclu ded : travel to destinations frequented by young people, such as movie theaters, recreation centers, malls, and bowling alleys; develop routes that access residential areas throughout the county; have buses stop at or near loca l schools to pick up and drop off students; operate fixed-routes during the hours and days that students are not in school; develop and distribute route maps and schedules that are easy to understand; increase the number of bus stops signs; and make bus stops more visible by installing bus stop signs with multi-colored designs Finally the participants suggested specific marketing activities intended to target young people in Brevard County The suggestions included: eliminate the image of the bus system as being only for seniors; advertise SCAT bus service in mediums and places familiar to young people (movie section of the newspaper schools, parents, radio stations, and television); develop original jingle for SCAT bus service in place of music; include te. enagers or role models in SCAT television commercials; show teenagers in television commercials using the bus system to g o places that young people frequent; and use humor in advertisements to appeal to young people. 70 Brevard County Trensit Development Plan

PAGE 109

DISCUSS ION GROUP SUM M ARY (South Mai n l an d Transportatio n Needs) Introduction As part of the TDP process, CUTR conducted one discussion group with res i dents in the southern portion of Brevard County, which is wide l y referred to as "South Mainland. South Mainland i s actually composed of several communities, including Micco Snug Harbor, Barefoot Bay, Grant and Valkaria. The area is primari l y rura l in nature and has a large population of seniors, many of whom have retired t o Florida For some time residen t s from several communities in South Main l and have publicly expressed concern about a perceived lack of regard on the part of SCAT for the extensive transportation nee d s that residents f ace in this part of the county. The purpose of the discussion group was to el i cit addrrional information regarding the current transportation needs of the residen t s in South Mainland The discussion group was also deve l oped i n order to provide a forum from which potential solu t ions cou l d emerge regarding current mob il i t y problems. SCAT representatives invited each homeowner s association in South Mainland to send a representat i ve(s) t o the discuss i on group In addition, representatives f rom local hea lth care organ i zations a l so participa ted i n the discussion The discussion was held at the Barefoot Bay Voluntee r Fi r e Station. The discussion group was well attended and a great deal of valuable informat ion was obtained from the partic i pants. A summary o f the major find i ngs and suggestions offere d by the partici p ants is provide d below. Participant Cha r acteristics Eleven per.lons attended the South Mainland discussion. F ive of the p art icipa nts were female and six were male. Nine partic i pants reported being marr i ed All 11 di scussion g roup participants indicated that they drive per.lonal vehicles and no participants re p orted any drivin g rest r ictions One partici p ant reported hav i ng a mob i lity i mpairment. One discussion group participant reported a t o tal h o useho l d income of between $5,000 and $14,999. Six participants indicated that they have a total househo l d income between $25,000 and $4 9 0 00. Four participants indicated that the i r total househo l d incom e i s $50,000 or more Only one discussion group participant r eporte d liv i ng in Brevar d County for her entire life. The remainder of participants have lived i n Brevard County from 3 to 18 years Brevard County Tf8nsit Development Plan 71

PAGE 110

Perceptions of Transportation Needs/Wants All of the discussion group participants stated that they are very concerned about the perceived lack of consideration on the part of SCAT regarding the transportation needs in South Mainland. The discussion group participants were candid about the population groups in South Mainland that have the greatest transportation needs. Most of the participants stated that there are many elderly persons who reside in South Mainland are unable to get to doctors' appointments or go grocery shopping because they lack transportation. The group suggested that many senior residents in South Mainland probably should not be driving an au tomob ile because of declining heaHh related to aging, but drive anyway because they have no other way to meet their daily Jiving needs. Participants were also concerned abou t their own transportation in the future and acknowledged that the day will come for each of them when they will no longer be able to drive a personal automobile. "We've got our population hef9 that are primarily older people. We have people in the little Hollywood section of Micco that have been housebound for years, because they can't go anywhere. If you were visiting /hef9 you'd know what I'm talking about. I mean years' If you can imagine somebody being stuck in a house in a small community, whef9 they cant even gel out to go shopping because there's no transportation And because of our unique situation down here, that I think makes it even more imperative that we make or come up with some kind of a solution. And I'm sure there are people in Barefoot Bay, Snug Harbor, all around here, who because of these irregular routes or these set routes, might as we// be housebound for years because they're not going anywhere. The participants were also concerned about the young people who reside in South Mainland It was consistently noted that young people need to be able to participate in after-school go to the movies and malls, and go to the beach. Many participants suggested that this is the key to keeping rates of juvenile delinquency In South Mainland low "So what do they do? They hang around the park. The next thing you know; you read in the papar, uh huh, a couple of them got into a little bit of trouble, there was a burglary, maybe in Snug Harbor, or Barefoot Bay. They got nothing to do. They have no way to get in and out of the community. Participants reported that the current bus system is inadequate to meet the travel needs of teenagers in South Mainland For example, participants reported that the SCAT bus that takes young people to the beach is too infreq u e nt to be very useful. 72 "This summer a route was put on that allowed the kids in this area to get up to the beach with their surfboards and their whatever. The ones that weren1 old enough, junior high, they weren't old enough to drive yet. Well that had been going on for some summers out in Palm Bay. The only problem with the service that we have Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 111

at this end of the county is by the lime they get the kids to the beach, they have two hours, I believe, or two-and-a-half. and they report back to the bus to come back home. There's not anothe r bus, they don't have a choice of leaving early in the morning and coming back mid-afternoon, or leaving later, that's it." Participants indicated that they feel like the "stepchildren" of Brevard County because fixed-route bus service in the southern port ion of Brevard Co unty is very lim ited. "Seemingly the county doesn1 give a dam about us. And we're tax payers the same as everybody else in the county, and I feel that we're looked on as stepchildren, and it's about lime it changed." The discussion group participants also discussed that the transportation situation in South Mainland i s a particularly d ifficul t one due to the rural and undeveloped nature of the area. Participants explained that there are very fe w places in their part of the county to go grocery shopping, visit physicians, or even participate in recreational activities. Rather, if one wishes to see a doctor or go grocery shopp ing in Brevard County, one must travel north approximately 25 miles to the Me lbourne area. As an aHemative, residen ts i n South Mainland may travel four to six miles south into Indian River County to have access to shopping, medical services, and other activities that improve quality of lif e. "Shopping, because we're the forgotten population down here, a lot of the shopping is done in Sebastian. A lot of the economy and money will go into Sebastian because of the fact that if's such an ordeal to get up into town. And the transportation going across town and connecting is a problem. So I know that there's not a law saying the county bus can't cross the county line, I believe, so I think it would be great for the elderly, the children. "I guess the other thing about what she's saying about going south anyway, the other reason for them going is for miles. And we're talking about four to six miles to go to your grocery store, why go 25 minutes the other direction just to stay in Brevard county. Even my doctors, our biggest population are going south, and you can't get there either. The discussion group participants immed ia tely acknowledged that the i ssue of in tercounty bus service might be a controversial one for SCAT because it would involve the use of Brevard County tax dollars to transport c ounty resi dents to another county in order to purchase services at Indian River County bus inesses and facilities. However, the partic ipants also felt strongly that transporting South Mainland residents 25 or 30 miles to the nearest services and/o r facilities in Brevard County also constitutes inefficient use of county tax dollars. Several participants stated that is important for SCAT to consider expanding and enhancing the bus service currently available to South Mainland residents, rather than only exploring the possibility of bu s service from South Mainland into Indian River County. These participants Brevan:J County Transit Development Plan 73

PAGE 112

discussed the needs of young people to participate in after-school activities, seniors who need access to the doctors and medical facilities in Melbourne and working residents who need transportation to jobs in Brevard County. "Well I don1 think exclusively Indian River. That's where most of the people want to go because ft's the most convenient location. But to gal to certain types of stores, the mall for instance, you have to go up to Melbourne. So we do have, ft's not as popular, and you don1 have that many people, but there still Is a need to get to Melbourne, or shopping or entertainment and things like that. And people who can't drive still need to have a quality fife and be able to do some of these other things too. Finally, several participants reported that South Mainland residents would like to be able to attend public meetings related to land use, zoning, and other issues of public concem. However currently these meetings are only held in Viera, which is approximately forty miles away. For many residents of South Mainland the long distance prohibits their involveme nt in issues of public concem. "And you know there have been a couple of Issues going around in the aree of South Brevard that many people would like to attend the planning and zoning meetings, the commissioners meetings, and the only way that they are going to get up there, because the meetings carry over until after dark and as you said, many of our residents don1/ike to drive in the dark. So they just don1 go, unless the specific homeowner's association hires buses to take them there There should be a way that if they leave here in the afternoon to get to site X, they should have a way to get from there back without having to worry about driving in the dark." Perceptions of and Experiences with SCAT Public Transportation There was consensus among participants that the fixed-route bus service that operates in South Main land currently is inadequate and inconvenient. Specifically, participants stated that the buses are too infrequent and limited in scope to make intracounty travel feasible especially for seniors who have limited mobility In addition, participants reported that the b us service that is currently available in South Mainland only provides service to Melbourne and travels through South Mainland only a couple t imes per day. Participants reported that the average trip from South Mainland to a grocery store in Melbourne can easily take six or more hours. Many participants also stated that transferring between buses is a major problem, particularly for seniors. 74 "The bus schedule is my major problem with using your mass transit for getting, I say patients but residents to Brevard County doctors (in the Melbourne area) is where I and up (sending them). If I put them on your mass transit, even if they can gat on the regular one, if lakes them, my bigger problem is they're feeble or frail, elderly people, to figure out a schedule. I've tried to get a couple of them to do it that were sort of healthy just to try it, and they run into the same problem of transfers. But it is a six hour wait of one sort or another. And they canY get exactly where they need to go. BrevoffJ County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 113

The existing bus service i n South Mainland does not provide d irect service to many locations in the Melbourne area. Rather passengers must either transfer to another bus once they reach Melbourne or walk from the bus stop to their ultimate destination. Most participants reported that even very healthy res i den t s would have a difficult time "figuring out" t he SCAT bus schedules and route maps. The participants also reported that the limited frequency of SCAT buses makes it extremely unlikely that South Mai nland residents would be able to use the service to travel to and f rom doctor appointments during regular office hours. The discussion group participants also expressed concern about the d istance from residential areas to SCAT bus stops in South Mainland. The participants reported that it is very difficult for senior resi d ents to travel the one to three miles from their homes to reach a bus stop. "You cant expec t some of these elderly people to walk three miles to get on that bus to go to Melbourne. In addition to which it's a lengthy commute. But that's one of the problems that we have hera." The same concerns were expressed in terms of children and/or teenagers who want to use the SCAT buses. The participants stated that the rural nature of South Mainland makes it more difficult to reach a bus stop. In addition, participants suggested that t he bus stops in South Mainland should have benches and shelters so that people could wait comfortably and also be sheltered from the inclement weather that is so common in Florida. Several discussion group participants also mentioned the paratransit service offered by SCAT through the Brevard County TO Program. These participants recounted negative experiences related to trying to secure a reservation on the paratransit system. The health services representatives also suggested that many of their clien ts do not want to use the paratransit service because they believe they will have to wait several hours for dialysis patients who are receiving transportation home f rom medical treatments. Potential Solutions to Mobility Problems The South Mainland discussion group part ici pan t s made many suggestions regard ing possible solutions to the mobility problems that exist in their communities. 1. By far, the most common suggestion was for SCAT to work with Indian River County to provide intercounty bus service from South Mainland to services and facilities in Sebastian. Participants fe lt strongly that some of the tax money tha t they contribute to Brevard County should be used to help meet their mobility needs and the discussion group participants stated that their most immediate needs could be best met by accessing the nearest services and facilities which are in Indian River County. Brevard County Transit DevsiDpment Plan 75

PAGE 114

2. Participants suggested expanding the SCAT Volunteers in Motion transportation program to provide additional transportation services in South Mainland. One participant, a representative from the Helping Hands volunteer program, stated that the program she represents has a surplus of potential volunteers The suggestion was made to use those volunteers in the Volunteers in Motion program specifically for transportation in the southern portion of Brevard County Participants also suggested that volunteers from South Mainland cou l d operate SCAT Volunteers in Motion vehicte(s) traveling from South Mainland into Sebastian in Indian River County. 3 Another suggestion involved expans ion of the vanpool program to allow for more arrangements similar to the one with Barefoot Bay Currently, the Barefoot Bay community leases a van from VPSI. This van is used to provide transportation to the Senior Aid Program (SNAP) program. In exchange for providing this transportation, SCAT pays the Ba r efoot Bay community $500 per month, which almost covers the entire cost of the VPSI lease. In addition to SNAP trips, trips are provided to Barefoot Bay residents to grocery stores and malls. Passengers pay a minimal fare for these trips and the fares pay for the remainder of the lea se and operation costs. The discussion g ro up participants suggested that VPSI could provide vans to the other communities in South Mainland and SCAT could partially or fully subsidize the cost for the lease. 4. Many of the participants also suggested that SCAT increase the frequency of service and the number of stops on the route that travels on US 1 through South Mainland The participants feH that if this service was available more frequently, many more residents would use the bus service The participants stated that there are many areas along US 1 that people would like to access, but the amount of time that is required for travel currently makes the route extremely inconvenie nt. The participants also stated t ha t If this service was enhanced and available more frequently, it might be possible to convince community members to use the service by providing some sort of feeder service, either volunteer based or provided by SCAT, to help residents get from the ir homes to bus stops and back to t heir homes aga in. 5 Finally, th e discussion group participants stated that additional public education is needed to teach residents about the bus service and to make bus service more familiar in Brevard County. The participants recommended that SCAT continue to conduct outreach with the residents of Brevard County. One participant stated that they have seen a SCAT presentation once at a public meeting in Brevard County and it was a "wonderful p r esentation." The participants stated that these efforts should be continued and expanded. Additionally, easy to understand b us schedules and route maps should be developed and widely distributed throughout Brevard County. 76 81'9vard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 115

CHAPTER TWO INVENTORY OF PROVIDERS AND DESCRIPTION AND EVALUATION OF PUBUC TRANSPORTATION SERVICES INTRODUCTION This chapter describes the h i story of public transportation in Brevard County inventories the pub lic transportation services that are currently available in Brevard County and assesses the performances of those services provided by Space Coast Area The i nventory of p u blic transportation providers contains information on public transportation services currently provided i n Brevard County inc l uding SCA T vanpoo l services. social serv i ce agencies. and taxi companies. The eva l uat i on sect i ons focus on the perfo r mance of SCAT's CTC coordinated and vanpool services. PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION PROVIDERS IN BREVARD COUNTY Th i s section provides a description of the various transportation services currently offered in B r evard County This inventory includes all providers coordinated under the transportation disadvantaged coordinated system as well as agencies/companies that are not coordinated but either provide public transportation services for the general public, thei r own cl i ents or specific program clients This i nventory was developed to serve as the basis for the later demand estimates and needs assessment The inventory consists of informat ion on service prov i ders. types of service use r s of the service. service areas. hours and days of service, ridership, ve hi cle fleet, fare st r ucture. and serv i ce agreements/contracts. Appendix B contains detailed information for each of these providers Table 2 contains selected information for each of the transportation p r oviders I n the services provided or coordinated by Space Coast Area Transit are highlighted in the following sections of I his chapter Brevard County Trans# Dtwelopment Plan 77

PAGE 116

78 Table 21 I nven tory o f Pub lic Transportatio n Provi ders B r evard Co unty Names of Provide"' S J!!oe Coast Area Transit JBL Shuttle Coastal Health Svstems Johns_ton Transoortation Service A -Cab leisure Shuttl e and Taxi AAA Yellow Cab of Trt u sville I nc. Leonard Wilkins Shullle & Taxi A l wavs Readv Cab & Shullle Mark 's Tax i Atlantic Star Melbourne A irport Shuttle1 Taxi. and limo B& DCoaches Paramount Cab Inc. B revard Yellow Cab Trust Patricia G Casev Taxi Brown Shuttle Service Raoid Cab Buov Traveler Tranooor1atlon SCL Taxi Inc. Canave r a l Cab Co Seaview Shuttl e and Taxi Servioe C he cker Tax i I Beach Yellow Cab SnaoovCab Citv Shuttle and Taxi Soace Coast Taxi _Clark's Scace Coast limo Cocoa Beach Cab Co. Summer Wind Limousine Service Comfort Travel Tax i Dave Cote s T axi B i b l ia Creative Care Ce n ter Crew TransJl
PAGE 117

HISTORY OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION IN BREVARD COUNTY In 1974 several communities in Brevard County organized to start the Brevard Transportation Authority (BTA) as the transit provider for the county. At that time it was envis i oned that the BTA would operate transit ser.tices in the county under an intenocal agreement among lhe county local governments, and the Florida Department of Transportation As ij tumed out, the Brevard County Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) and the municipalities in the central and northern areas of the county declined to participate in the interfocal agreement that set up the BT A While lhe BTA was viewed as the transij provider for the county, ijs ser.tice area included only approximately one third of the county's population, mainly in the southern portion in and around Melbourne. As the county's only transij provider, BTA operated a traditional fixed-route system. Its ridership consisted mainly of senior citizens and lower income residents in the City of Melbourne. At the same time the BTA was being formed, the Brevard County Board of County Commissioners participated in the formation of a separate transportation system for senior citizens and persons with disabilities. Prior to 197 4 there were several not-for-profrt agencies that provided transportation services to their clients. These agencies, with the assistance of the BOCC, merged their services to start the Consolidated Agencies Transportation System (CATS). CATS was charged w i th providing service to senior citizens for medical, shopping and congregated meals. CATS also prov ided transportation service to developmentally and other disabled patrons for transportation to training centers and sheltered workshops and to the economically disadvantaged for medical and child care services. CATS operated as a subscription service (standing order) and was free to users. Funding for the service was derived from various non-profit agencies and the County A significant part of BTA's ridership market consisted of senior citizens who were qualified to ride the CATS system. In 1983, BTA urged local officials to provide some delineation of the service areas for both public transportation systems, both to preserve market equity and to alleviate associated conflicts. On October 1 19S5 the two systems were merged to form Space Coast Area Transit (SCAT) as the county's public transportation provider. At the time of the formation of SCAT, the merged systems switched to an exclusively demand responsive focus for service. The concept guiding this decision was to provide public transportation service to those who needed it most, primarily sen i ors, those with low incomes and persons with disabilities. Service was oriented toward social programs such as congregate meal sites and training workshops It was not until October 1991 that SCAT reestab lished fixed routes served by conventional transit buses on a fixed schedule. Brevard Courtly Ttans;t Development Plsn 79

PAGE 118

SCAT is a Brevard County depanment repon ing to the Community Services Administrator. SCAT provides and coordinates many different transporta t ion services including fixed-route, subscription service for various social service agencies, demand responsive and vanpool. (The next section contains detailed descriptions of the services provided by SCAT ) In addilion. SCAT was designated by the Florida Commission for the Transponation D is advantaged as the community transponation coordinato r for Brevard County in 1979. DESCRIP T ION OF SCAT FIXED-ROUTE SERVICES SCAT currently operates fiXed-route bu s service on 18 routes Monday through Frida y, with most routes operating during non -pea k (midday) h o u rs of the d a y The vehicles used for fixedroute transponation are a lso used f or subscription service during the peak hours of the day. In SCAT has two routes that operate only during the summer months (Routes 33 and 34) Most of the routes center in the northern central or southern portions of the county with a few routes connecting the different service areas. Contained in Figures 2-1 a and 2-1 b are graphical p resentations of these routes. In addition, Table 2-2 contains a description of the where each route goes Table 2-2 Description of Current Fixed Routes II ROUTE NAME I SERVING Cuyler Pari<. B.C C (US 111), Parrish Hospital, T i tusville Ht.Rise, Hea lth Dept. (Sandrift) St. Johns Plaza (Publix). Service Complex. Barna & Harrison, Palm 2 Titusville House Apts. (Court St.). Imperia l Towers (US 1) Miracle City Mall (S. Mall Ent./Betks). Seamown (N. Entrance), HRS (Olmstead), Royal Oaks Plaza (Pub l ix), Ind ian River Plaza (KMart) WaiMart Whispering Pines (S.R. 50) 5 North Connector North Gov't Center Complex Port St. John Plaza. Byrd Plaza. Center, Monroe Center, Health Dept (Rock) I B.C. C. (Student Center), Hawthorne Apts, Asbury Arms, Byrd Plaza (Mall Area) Sunrise Vlllage (Ent) Aur ora & Jackson, Transit Center, Monroe Center, Cocoa/Rock l edge/Merrl Barton/Fiske. Dept (Cedar) Barton Commons (K-mart), Rockledge Square 6 (Pub l ix/Walma rt) W\lesthoff (Or ang e Ave). Fla Ave. & Ra i der Rd .. tt Island Rockledge Courthouse (Fia Ave), Brevard & Oak (Traffic C ircle) Cocoa Post Office (Orange/Fia) Merritt Square, Cocoa Library (Forrest/Mullberry), Job Senrice5 (Forrest Av) l Central Service Complex Ke lly Pari< (N. Banana Rv. Or.). E RiveraiN. Banana Rv. Dr., AuduboniN. Banana Rv. Or . N Banana Rv. Dr./Pelican Dr . Co--op Apts 7 Me rritt !stand West {Offioe), Super Walmart. Merritt Square. K-matt, M&rritt AveJ1st Street. Baxley I Loo p Manor Manor House (Skylar1< Ave. ) Country Club Apls, T ropica l Manor Woody I Simpson Par1<. Victoria Square (Winn-Oixie Food Store), Target Store (Crockett Rd.), M.l. Post Office, Merritt Crossing (Publlx Food Store) 80 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 119

# ROUTE NAME 8 Merritt Island East Loop I Cocoa Beach/Cape 9 CanaverafiMerri tt 10 1 1 1 I sland AM Cocoa Beach E>rUs Cental Conne<::tor SERVING Central Se
PAGE 120

# ROUTE NAME \ S ERVIN G I Melbourne Shopping Cente r (Publix), G rant St Commun i ty Cen te r Jun i or Hi gh School Florida Ave./Monroe St., Conl an B l v d/Commerce Drive, Palm Bay I 1 RoadttJ.S. 1 Port Malabar P l aza (Winn Dixie) Palm Bay Community Cen t e r 27 E ast Pa l m Bay Good i ngs Ho l iday Pari< (C l ub House), Shoppes of Pal m Bay(Publix), Pa l m Bay Community Hospita l Good ing' s K -M a rt (Pal m Bay Road), South L ake Towers, I Pal m Bay Rd/U pscomb C rown Heights Wai -Mart (Babeock ), University Blvd/Babcock (Fil) Mel bourne Square M a ll (Morriso n 's), Wickham Rd/Nas a B l vd Choctaw/ R oy All e n Ave, Fatz ler Rd/Croton Rd, Sarno Plaza (Publi x ), Cro t on Rd/Eau Gallie Blvd 28 N o rt h Sadler Ln/Ho lland St Leewood B l vd/Croton Rd, Au rora Rd/Mosswood Dr, Stewart M e l b oume/B C C Rd/Palmwood D r Blvd, L ak e Washinglon Rd/Croton Rd, Brevard Commun i ty College Lake Wash i nglo n Rd/Wickham R d (Pub l ix) No rt h Gate Plaza (Win n Dixie), Wal Mart K-Mart Mel bourne Shopping Cente r (Pub l ix) Mel b ourne Courthouse, U .S. 29 South Connector 1/Ballard Royal Palm!Th omas Barbou r Thomas Barbour/U.S. 1 RamshurTowers, Auro r a/H i gh land, S outh l and/Masterson Masterson/P i neapple, U S 1 / P ost Rd., B C C . Suntree. Brevar d Zoo, Government Ce nte r SCA T Melbo urne Termina l, Grant S t o re-U S 1 Snug Harbor EntranceU S 1 Riverview M o bile Homes US #1, Baptis t ChurchLittle Hollywood, Sand P o i nt 3 2 South M a i n land M a ri n a -Little Hollywood, Barefoot Bay Shop p ing Cen ter (Post Bar efoot Bay C o mmun i ty Cente r Barefoot Bay Blvd & S nug Harbor L akes H ibiscus and Hidcory (Hospital) M e l bourne Shopping Cente r Melbourne S quar e Mall -SCAT T ennina l Mel bourne Square Mall (Morrison s), Melbourne S h oppi n g Cent e r (Publix), Trinity Towers Wesl Trinity TOW81S East Ave & A 1AIndialantic, A 1A & O cean Avo Melbou rne Beach, Spessard Holland North Breake r s Me l bourne I Beach Mobil e H ome P ark, Outdoor Resorts, 1l\e Hampton&, Riverwoods & A 1 A 35 South Bea ch es Beachwoods, Coconut Point Pari<, Driftwood P l aza (Pub lixSouth Entrance), Oceanway Or. & A1ASouth Shores Spoon b ill & A1ACrysta l Lakes, Cardina l & A 1 A Melbourne Shores, Steri ing House, Fl olida n a Beach -B l inker Light Cami no P l ace (Wood land E s ta t es). Baveriy Ct. & A 1A Sunny l an d B e ach Aquarina Golf Cl u b Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 121

' , > Figure 2-1a SCAT Fixed Rou tes North Brevard County Aoul& 11 l=loute 12 Rout Aout&21 Rovte 2-3 RQI/19 24 RO\Jie 26 Aoull& 27 Rovte 29 Rwte 32 -Aout& S ---Routo6 ......... Aol.lt& 7 -RoutoB Rollt$ 9

PAGE 122

84 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 123

Figure 2-1b SCAT Fixed Routes South Brevard County Brtv&rd County Bu$ AoUIGS Aovt9 1 1 12 Routo2 Route 21 Aoule23 Rou1e26 Roule27 Route28 Rou"' 29 Rou,.32 ROU1935 --RoiAeS ---:Route6 --Route7 -- RouteS Routes

PAGE 124

86 Brevard County Transit Developm ent Plan

PAGE 125

EVALUATION OF SCAT FIXED-ROUTE SERVICES The following section evaluates the performance of the fixed-route service provided by Space Coast Area Transit. These analyses are useful in determining the strenglhs and weaknesses of this system The Purpose of Performance Review Because a performance evaluation is only one method of evaluating the performance of a given public transportation system, and is limited to only those aspects included in the analysis, the reader should exercise considerable caution in i nterpreting the results. These analyses are particularly strong in reviewing cost effectiveness and efficiency; however, they do not relay the extent to which other objectives of the public transportation system are being achieved. For example, the performance evaluation will not directly measure severa l relevant considerations such as passenger satisfaction with regard to levels of service taxpayer and public attitudes toward the agency, empl oyee morale, success in attaining minority hiring or contracting goals, quality of planning, contributions to community economic development, air quality imp r ovements, or other goals that may be important to the public transportation system and t h e community. In add i tion, several aspects of qua lity of service are not measured in a performance eva luation. These include vehicle cleanliness and comfort operator courtesy on-time performance quality of marl
PAGE 126

effective service over such a large service area. There is however, a sensitivity concerning equal treatment for each part of the county. Limited service on fixed routes. SCAT operates its fixed-route service primarily during non-peak (midday) hours, us ing its bus es to provide subscription bus service for the TO populat ion during peak hours. The result is that the average vehicle is on a fixed-route less than five hours per day. This is very atypical of conventional transit systems, which orient a considerable portion of their service to the peak morning and afternoon commuting time periods. Because the commute trip cannot be accommodated the majority of the trips provided on the fixed-route system are shopping and medical trips. Low population density within the county. Fixed-route transit works best high residential and employment densities. While other Florida systems also face this dilemma, the unusually large service area in Brevard County presents a special problem for SCAT. The absence of a strong central city with extensive employment. Many older transit systems developed around a focused central business district, and continue to provide service to downtown areas. While "Ma i n streets' have declined all over Florida in the post war era, t here is often a concentration of public employment sites remaining in downtowns. Brevard County is obviously different. In addition, its major employment sites (Kennedy Space Center and Harris Corporation) are located at the far ends of the county Incidentally t his is one reason why vanpooling is very appropriate and very successful in Brevard County. The relatively recent origin of fixed-route service in Brevard County. Fixed-route service in Brevard County was reestablished in late 1991. Consequently, there is no base of ridership which has been built up over decades of operation, as is typically found even in systems in small cities. Performance reviews are a useful and important tool in monitoring and improving public transportation system perfonnance. However it should be recognized t hat the resuHs of trend and peer analyses are only a starting point for gaining a full and complete understanding of the performance of transit systems. The issues identified as a result of the evaluation contained within provide the basis for a series of questions that can lead to an enhanced unde rstandin g of the "hows" and ''w hys" of syste m perfonnance. 88 Brevard County Tronsit Development Pian

PAGE 127

Table 2-3 Factors Affecting Public Transportation Performance I Local Policy Decisions I Operating Environm&nt Skills and eXPerieftee Land u$4 [ Densities Training Urban design panems Leadership Pari
PAGE 128

Perfonnanct Measures Servtee Area Populatton Passenger Trips Revenue Miles, Revenue Hours Tot81 Expense Total Main tenance Expense Passenger Fare Revenue Total Employees, FTEs Veh icles Available in Max Service Vehicle& Operated in Max SeMoe Table 2-4 Performance Rev iew Measures Fixed-Route Analysis E,.etlvenM:a Measures Service Supply Vehicle Miles per Capita service Consumption Passenger Trips pet capita Passenger Trips per Revenue Mile Pnsenger Trips per Revenue Ho u r Quality of Service Average Age o f Fleet ( in years) Average Speed (R.M.IR.H ) N umber o f Incidents Revenue Service lntenul)tlons Revenue M iles Between Incidents Revenue M iles Between Interruptions Efficiency MeaS.UI"8$ Cost Efficiency Operating Expense per Capita Operating Expense per Pass. Trip Operating Exp. Pflr Revenue Mite Operatk'lg Exp. per Revenue Hou r Opt-rating Ratios F arebox Reoovery Ratio Labor Produetivfty Revenue Hours per Employee FTE Passenger Trips per Employee FTE Utill:z.ation Revenue M i les per Total Vehicle Revenu e Hours per Tota l Vehicle Fare Average Fare Source: 1994 Performance of Florida s Tfan-s.it Systems, Part t; Trend A.nalys.ts. CUTR. Tampa. M arc h 1996. Fixed-Route Trend Analysis A trend analysi s for the fisca l years 1992 through 1996 was conducted to recount SCAT's fixed route performance overtime (1992 was the first year that SCAT offe red fixed-route service). The tables and figures provided throughout the trend analysis present the performance, effectiveness and efficiency measures that are availab le from SCAT's reports to the National Transit Database. Results from the trend analysis are provided in the following paragraphs. 90 Brevard County TI'Bnsit Development Plan

PAGE 129

Performance Measures R i d e rship and Leve l of Service Shown i n Tabl e 2-5 a re three perfonna nce measures fo r SCAT's fixed-route service Passenger t r ip s increased consis tent l y ove r the five-y e ar peri o d w i th a n over all gro wt h of 5 7 7 percent fro m FY 1992 t o FY 1996. as ill ustrated in F i gure 2 2 During this same t ime period, revenue miles and revenue hours also increased. As shown in Table 2-5 and F i gure 2-3, revenue mi les i nc reased by 30.7 percent. In addition revenue hours increased by 68.1 percent, as illustrated in Tabl e 2 -5 and Figure 2-4 R e v enue hours, during this time period, i ncreased at a faster r ate tha n r even ue mile s because in December 1993, SCAT c h anged t h e focus of its fixed-route service. Bef o re D ecember 1993, SCAT operated the fixed-rout e service as trun k r outes w i th th e deman d r esp onsi ve serv ices feeding into the fixed routes T he refore, t h e fixed ro utes focused o n t he main, h igh speed corridors such as 1-95 and US 1 After, December 1993 the fixed r outes were changed to serve more neighborhood roads. The result is that revenue hours i ncreased mor e b ecause the vehic le speeds d e creased. The performance measures shown i n Tabl e 2-5 illust rate the improvements that have occurred with SCAT's fixedrout e system since its ince p ti o n i n 1992. Table 2 Fix ed Route T ren d A n a l y s is Ridership an d Lev el of Servic e Percent M e asure FY1992 FY1993 FY1994 FY 1 995 FY1995 Chan g e j (1992996) 57.7% Passenger Trips I 123.211 13 1 ,996 142,893 1 68, 750 194,262 Reve n u e M i les 400,2 1 0 418 ,370 3 7 6.365 502,755 523.039 30.7% Reven u e Hours 14 ,300 1 5,304 17 ,369 23,590 I 2 4 ,042 6 8 1 % Brevard County Transit Development Plan 91

PAGE 130

92 100,000 so.ooo 0 1tt2 Figure 2-2 Passenger Trips 1193 uu 1115 Figure 2-3 Revenue Miles 800,000 .----.--,---,---, 500,000 +--+ +----: oo,ooo 300,000 200,000 100,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 1192 0 1112 1113 1914 1995 Figure 2-4 Revenue Hours 1193 1114 1995 1U6 1916 Bmvard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 131

Eerformance Measures -Exoenses and Revenues Pertormance measures re lated t o expenses and revenues are shown i n Table 2-6. Correspond ing wi t h the expansion of service over t h e time p eri o d, as indicated in Tab l e 2 -6, e xpenses have also increase d In FY 1992, total operating expense for t he fixed-rout e service was $916, 04 1 In 1996 total operating exp e nse was $1,207 730 a 31.8 pe r cent increase ov e r the analys i s p e r iod, a s shown in Figure 2-5 Ove rall.. total ma intenance expense als o increased over the fivey ear perio d (17. 5 perc e nt), but at a slower rate than total oper a ting expenses. However in FY 1994, tota l maintenance expense decreased and then i ncreased agai n in FY 1995 Thi s decrease in the trend is related to t h e way in which SCAT reports this informat i on The reporting of ma intenance expense is d ivided between fixed route and subscription serv ices b ased on vehicle miles. The distribution of miles b etween fixed-route and sub scr iption was different in FY 1994 than in FY 1993 and FY 1995. Mainten ance expense is d isplayed in F igure 2 6 Passenger fare revenue also is inc luded in Table 2 6 ; however, fro m FY 1992 t o FY 1 994 th is revenue was not reported by SCAT. From FY 1995t o FY 1996, passenger fare revenue increased by 1 5 7 percent. Table 2 -6 Fi x ed-Route Tre n d A nalysi s -Expen$eS and Rev e nues l i Percent M tasure FY1992 FY1993 FY1994 FY19 9 5 I FY19K Change (1992-1996) T o tal Operating EXJ>eh&e $916,041 $944,398 $939 567 $ 1 1 50,1 5 9 $1 207 .730 31.8% To(3/ Mainleoaooe SZ4,.348 $Z81,094 $!95,333 $279 ,410 $283 511 17.5% Fare Revenue nla nla nla 569 ,020 $79,836 nla n la=not Brevard County Transit Development Plan 93

PAGE 132

94 Figure 2-5 Total Operating Expense S1,200,000 + ---f---f--S1,000,000 + -f----+: $800,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000 so 1912 ttt3 1194 1985 1896 Figure 2-6 Total Maintenance Expense $300,000 $250,000 S200,000 $150,000 $100,000 $50,000 so 1812 1tts '\tt6 Brevard County Transit Development Pl a n

PAGE 133

eerforroance Measures Employees and Vehicles As shown in Tab l e 2-7, the total number of SCAT employe e s fluctuated from FY 1992 to FY 1996, from a high of 23.5 full-t i me equiva l ent (FTE) employees in FY 1993, to a low of 15.8 FTE emp loyees in FY 1992. Between FY 1992 and FY 1996, t otal employment increased by 24.7 percent. However. as shown in Figu r e 2-7, a ll of the growth in employment has been for transportat i on operat i ons, which inc r eased from 13.5 FTE employees in FY 1992 to 17. 6 FTE em p loyees i n FY 1996. During this same t i me per iod, the number of administrative employees decreased from 2 3 to 2 1 FTE empl o yees. A l s o sh o wn in Table 2 7 a r e measure for veh i cles available for max i mum service and vehicles operate d in maximum service Veh i c les availab l e f o r maximum s e rvice i nc l ude all vehicles owned by SCAT that a r e availa b l e fo r fixed roule service. Vehicles o perated in maximum service are defined as the largest number of veh i cles required to provide service during peak service hours According to Table 2-7 and Figure 2-8, vehicles available for maximum service remained fairly stable over the five-year period w it h a drop to 27 vehicles from 29 vehic l es in FY 1992. Also sh o wn in Table 2 7 and Figure 2-8, vehicles ope r ated in max i mum serv i ce increa s ed by 27 3 percen l o ver the ana l ysis perio d SCAT currently operates 14 vehicles i n max i mum serv i ce. The difference between these two measures is large because SCAT uses the same vehicles for fixed route and demand responsive services T able 2-7 F i xed-Route Trend Analysis -Employees and V ehicl es Percent Measure FY1992 FY 1993 FY1994 FY1995 FY1996 Change (1992-1996) ' TOial EmplOyees ( FTEs) 15 8 23.$ 19 3 19 2 19.7 24.7% Ve h i c l&$ Availabl e for 29 28 28 2 7 27 6 .9% Maximum Service Vehicles Ope rated i n I " 14 14 14 27.3% Maximum Setvice Brevard County Transit DBvelopment Plan 95

PAGE 134

96 15.0 0.0 5.0 0 0 1992 Figure 2-7 Employeee (FTEs) 11&3 1114 19t5 Figure 2-8 1tt& Vehicles In Maximum Service 25 20 15 10 5 0 1992 1995 191& BtevarrJ County Trans i t De v eloproonl Plan

PAGE 135

Effectiveness Measures Service Suppl y and Service Consumotjoo Service supply. as measured by vehicle miles per capita, increased by 18.7 percent over t h e t rend analysis time period as shown i n T abl e 2-8 and Figure 2 9. This measure indicates that SCAT has consistently offered more and more service to the residents of Brevard County. Also shown i n Table 2-8, passenger trips per capfta i ncreased by 47. 5 per cent over the five-year period. T his measure of service consumption reflects the increased use of the fixed-route serv ice as i t has developed fro m fts start in FY 1992 Th is i nformation is a lso shown graphically in F igure 2-10 T wo other measures of service consumption are passenger trips per re v enue mile and passenger trips per revenue hour. These measures are influenced both by the supply and demand of transit service. As ill u strated i n T a b le 2-8 and Figures 2-11 and 2-12 passenger trips per revenue m i le increased by 20. 6 percent over the trend period, and passenger trips per revenue h ou r decreased by 6 2 percent over the same time period. Tabl e 2-8 Fixed-Route Trend Analysis -Service Supply and Serv i ce Consumption P e rcent Measure FY1992 FY1993 FY1994 FY1995 FY1995 Change (1992-1995) Veh.icle Miles per Capita 1.11 1 .14 0 .97 1.27 1.32 18.7% P assenge r Tri;:ls per Capita 0.30 0.32 0 .33 0. 3 9 0.44 47 5 % Passenger Trips per 0 31 0.32 0.38 0.34 0.37 20.6% Revenue Mile Passen ger Trips per 8 .62 8 6 2 8.23 7. 1 5 8.08 -6.2% Revenu& H our Brevard County Ttans;t Development Plan 97

PAGE 136

98 1 .40 1.20 1.00 0.80 0.60 0.40 0.20 0.00 Figure 2-9 Vehicle Miles per Capita 1992 19ts 1994 1996 1996 Figure 2-10 Passenger Trips per Capita 0.30 0.20 0.10 0.00 1tt2 1tt3 1994 1995 1996 Brevan1 County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 137

0.30 0 .20 0.10 Figure 2-11 Passenger Trips per Rev Mile o .oo 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Figure 2-12 Passenger Trips per Rev Hour 10.00 ,----,---....,---....,-----, a.oo 6.00 4.00 2.00 0.00 1992 Btevaro County Transit Development Plan 1993 1995 1996 99

PAGE 138

Effect i veness Mea s ures Quality of Service Four effect iveness measures were included in Table 2-9 to represent SCAT's quality of service over the analysi s period. Average speed (revenue miles divided by revenue hours) decre ased b y 22 percent, as illustrated in Figure 2-13 There could be many factors contributing to the decrease i n t h i s measure i ncluding increased ove r all traffic congestion change in routes to more congested areas and increased usage slowing down the routes. As mentioned previously, over this t ime period revenue hours Incr eased more than revenue miles due to the c hange in routes t o c over more neighborhoods. The result is a decrease i n average system speed The average age of the fleet, anothe r mea s u r e of the q uality o f serv ice, i n cr eased by 76 pe r cent over t he five-year time period, as shown in Tabl e 2-9. In FY 1992 the aver a g e age was 4 8 years and in FY 1996 the average age was 8 .44 years with a steady increase i n age in between, as illustrated in F igure 2-14 SCAT is scheduled to receive t hree new fixed-route replacement vehicles this ye ar. The r esult w ill be a drast i c decrease in t he average age of their fleet of vehicles The last two qual i ty of service measures presented in Tabl e 2-9 are the number of annual incidents and the annua l revenue service interruptions for SCAT's fixed-rou t e service An incident i s defined as an unforeseen occurrence resul t ing in casualty, collision or property damage in excess of $1, 000 Ove r the frve-year period, as shown in Table 2-9, SCAT's annual number of i ncidents have fluctuated from a high of 1 4 in FY 1994 to a l o w of 3 in FY 1993. Therefore, there i s no consi stent tren d. Re venue service interrupt ions, defined as a failure of some mechanical element of the revenue vehicle, have had a more consistent trend over the five-year period With the except ion of FY 1993, revenue service interruptions have increased each year T hese measures are also illustra t ed in Figures 21 5 and 2-16. T ab l e 2 9 F i xed-Route Trend Analysis -Quality of Service I PercEJnt Measure FY1992 FY1993 FY19N FY1995 FY1996 Change (1992) Ave rage S p eed (RM IRH) l 2 7 .99 I 27 .34 21.67 21. 31 2 1 .76 22.3% Age o f Fleet {years) 4 .79 5 .79 6 .79 7 44 8.44 76.2% Number of Inc idents 7 I 3 14 7 1 0 42.9% Revenue Setvice .. I 30 15 2 3 30 I 41 36.7% lnterruptions 100 Brovartl County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 139

Figure 2-13 Average Speed (RM/RH) 25.00 20.00 15.00 10.00 6.00 0.00 1992 4.00 2.00 o .oo 1992 Brevard County Transit Development Plan 1993 1tU 1995 Figure 2-14 Average Age of Fleet 1993 1&94 1995 1998 1994 101

PAGE 140

102 Figure 2-16 Number of Incidents 1.------,------.------.------. u + +--1o+---+e + +-s z 0 1992 1993 1994 1U5 Figure 2-16 Revenue Service Interruptions zo 10 0 1t92 ,., 1995 1996 Bmva.rd County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 141

M e asures Cost E ffic i ency As s t a t ed p rev i ous l y e ffic i ency measures r e v iew the level of re s ources require d to achieve a g i ven leve l of output. The resource being measured b y t he i n fo rmation c o nt a ine d in T ab l e 210 i s opera t ing expense Operating expense, in this tab l e is compared a g ainst popula t ion, passenger t rips revenue mi l es, and revenue hours. Operating expense per cap ita increased by 23.3 per cent o ve r the ftve ye a r peri o d reflecting the overall increase i n tot a l operating expense over t h i s period. This i nformat i on is also represented grap h ica ll y in Figure 21 7 An i mportant measure operating e x pense per passenger t rip, decreased by 16.4 percent fro m FY 1992 to FY 1996 as shown in Figure 2 18 Thi s trend indicates that r i d ership over the time period increased faster than total opera t ing expense, t herefore spreading the cos t more effici e ntly. Operating expense per revenue mile increased slightly over the analys i s p e riod. H o w ever, operating expense per revenue hour decrea s ed by 21.6 percent duri ng t his same time peri od These data are a ls o conta in ed in F i gures 2-19 and 2-20 Ta ble 21 0 Fixe d-Route T rend Analysis -Cost Efficiency Percent Measuro FY1992 FY1993 FY1994 FY1995 FY1996 Change (1992 -19 96) Operating Expense per $2.:14 $2.26 $2. 15 $2.63 I $2.76 23. 3% Capita -' I Operating EXPense per I $7.43 $7. 15 $6. 5 8 $8.82 $8.22 -16 .4% Passenger Trip I Oper a ting Expen se per I I I I $2.29 $2.26 $2.50 $2.29 $2. 3 1 0 .9% Reve n ue Mile Operal i n g expense pe-.t $84.06 I $61.71 $54.09 548 .76 $50. 2 3 -21.6% Revenue Hou r BrBvard County Transit Development Plan 103

PAGE 142

104 Figure 2-17 Operating Exp per Capita u.oo su o+--+--+---: $2.00 $1.00 $1.00 10.50 so.oo 1992 19t3 1994 1995 1996 Figure 2-18 Operating Exp per Pasa Trip Sl.OO -.----,-----,---,----. $7.00 u.oo ..... $3.00 $2.00 $1.00 &0.00 1992 U93 1995 1996 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 143

Figure 2-19 Operating Exp per Rev Mile $2.00 $1.50 $1 .00 JO .SO so.ao 1992 1tt3 19t4 Figure 2-20 1t9S 1896 Operating Exp per Rev Hour uo.oo .,-----,----,.----,----, uo.oo sso.oo uo.oo $30.00 S20.00 Uo.oo $0.00 1992 Brevard C<>unty Transit Development Plan 1993 1994 US$ 105

PAGE 144

Efficiency Measures Labor Produc!jyity Labor productivity, as presented in Table 2-11, is measured by revenue hours per FTE employee and passenger trips per FTE empl oyee As shown in Figures 2-21 and 2-22, revenue hours per FTE increased by 34.8 percent and passenger trips per FTE increased by 26. 5 percent over the five-year perio d indicating that the labor employed at SCAT has become more p r oductive g i ven the service p r ovided Tab l e 2 -11 Fixed-Route Trend Analysis -Labor Productivity P ercent M-easure FYHI92 FY1993 FY19M FY19V5 FY1tK Change (1992 996) Revenue Hours per FTE 90S 651 900 1.229 1 ,220 34.8% Passenget Ttips pet FTE 7 ,798 5,617 7 ,4()4 8,789 9 861 26 5% 106 Bfflvard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 145

Figure 2-21 Revenue Hours per FTE oo ,---.---,---,---., 1,200 +---+---1---: 1,000 +---+---1-100 &00 oo 200 0 tt92 1tt S ,.,.. 11tS Figure 2-22 Passenger Trips per FTE &,000 4 ,000 2 ,000 0 1992 BnJvatd County Transit Dove/opmeflt Plan Uts Ull 1116 1996 107

PAGE 146

Efficiency Measyres Vehicle Util i zatjon Two measures of vehicle utilizati o n are presented in Table 2-12 The numbers of revenue miles and revenue hours per total vehic les (vehicles available for maximum service) are measures that d emons trat e how efficiently a system util i zes the vehicles in its fleet. Both of these measures show a consistent improvement i n SCAT's vehic l e u t ilization over the five-year period. Revenue miles per total vehic les i ncreased from 13,800 revenue mil es in FY 1992, to 19,372 in FY 1996. Revenue hours per total vehicles increased from 493 revenue hours to 890 revenue hours in the five year period These measures are also shown i n Figures 2-23 and 2-24 Table 21 2 Fixed-Route Trend Analysis Vehlcl& Utilization Pere.nt Measure FY1992 FY1993 FY1994 FY1996 FY1996 Change 11992-1996) Revenue M ii M pe-r T ota1 13,800 1.(,94 2 1 3 .&42 1 8 621 19 372 40.4% Vehicles Revenue Hours per TOial 493 547 620 874 890 80.6% Ve h ides 108 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 147

Figure 2-23 Revenue Miles per Total Vehicle 20,000 .,.-----.----.--= 10,000 6,000 0 1992 1S03 1994 1995 Figure 2-24 Revenue Hours per Total Vehicle 1,000 .----,,-----.---.-----. 400 200 0 1992 Brevan:J County T ransit Development Plan 1&93 1994 1995 1998 109

PAGE 148

Efficiency Measures Earebox Recovery and Fare The farebox r ecovery ratio, as shown in Table 2-13 measures the ratio of passenger fare revenues to total opera t ing expenses. SCAT did not report passenger fare revenues from FY 1992 to FY 1994; however in FY 1995 the farebox recovery ratio was 6 0 per cent. This ra tio increased to 6.6 percent i n EY 1996 The average fare, as shown i n Table 2-13 was not calculated for FY 1992 through FY 1994. In FY 1995 and FY 1996 the average fare was $0.41 The average fare is a measure of tota l passenger fare revenues divi ded by the tota l number of passenger tri ps Therefore, even though the base fare for SCAT is $1.00 the fact that SCAT offers free service on some routes and half fares to many of Its riders brings down the average fare. Tab l e 21 3 Fixed-Route Trend Analysis Farebox Recovery and Fare Pereent Measure FY1992 FY1993 FY1994 FY1195 FY1998 Chang (1992-1996) Farebox Recovery Ratio nla n l a nla 6 .0% 6 .6% nla Avetage Fare nla nla nla I $0.4 1 $0. 41 n l a nlan o t ava11.able Conclusjons A summary of SCAT's fixed-route performance strengths and weaknesses based on the t rend anal ysis of effectiveness and efficiency measures is provided in Table 2-14. The intent of this table is not to su g gest the extent of the strength or weakness but to identify those performance areas where the trend has improved or worsened from FY 1992 to FY 1996. A performance strength is defined as any performance area that improved or was mai ntained over the trend analysis time period. A performance weakness is defined as a trend that declined over the trend analysis time period Table 2-14 SCAT Fixed-Route Perfonnance Strengths and Weaknesses, Trend Analysis Performanee Strengths Performlnee Wt.akntS$M Pas.sengM T -rips per Capita Average Age of Fleet Oper ating Expense Pet Passenger Trip 710 Brevard County Transn Davelopment Plan

PAGE 149

As shown in Table 2-14 according t o the methodology, SCAT has only one performance weakness, average age of fleet wh ich has increased consistently over the fi ve-year trend period. Also in Table 2-14, SCAT has two performance strengths, passenger trips per capita which has increased consistently over the analysis period and operating expense per passenger trip which has decreased over the time period. It should be noted that there were many other meas u res in the trend analysis that did not have a consistent trend either up or down over the five-year period. Fixed-Route Peer Review Analysis CUTR conducted a fixed-route peer review analysis to compare SCAT's performance with other s imi la r fixed-route systems in Florida and the Un ited States. The procedure to choose peer systems was based on both demog r aphic and operating characteristics. There are no perfect peers for any fixed-route system, the goal is to match as closely as possible and meet FOOT's peer selection re quirements All of the peers were selected from the southeastern United States because transit systems that operate in a similar geographic area are typically subjected to many of the same exogenous factors such as weather, labor cost, h istor ical trans it ridership trends, and population density. Peers were also selected from those transit systems that operate between 9 and 20 fixed-route vehicles in maximum service. The standard peer group for SCAT i n the Florida Department of Transportation's Annual Performance Evaluation of Florida's Transit Systems would be systems operating 10 to 49 vehicles in maximum service. However, SCAT operates 14 vehicles {near the bottom of this peer group} and does not operate those vehicles on fixed-route service for a full day (the vehicles are spirt between subscription and fixed-route service}. Therefore, the pool of peers, for this analysis, was shifted to those transit agencies that operate 9 to 25 vehicles in maximum service. The procedure to choose the peers from this subgroup of transit systems that operate 9 to 25 vehicles was i d ent ical to the methodology used by the Florida Department of Transportation in choosing peers for the annual performance evaluation of Florida's transit systems. The demographic factors that were compared for each system include service area population and population density. For operating characteristics, passenger t r ips revenue miles, revenue hours, average speed, and operating expense were compared. The final peer group contained eight transrt systems, including SCAT. These systems are listed in Table 2-15 Three ofthe systems are located in Florida. The remaining four systems in the peer Brevard County Transit Development Plan 111

PAGE 150

group are located in other states of the southeastern States. Of the systems selected fixed-route service is the major focus of service provided by all of these agencies It should be noted that fixed-route service is the smallest segment of service provided by SCAT Of the peer group, SCAT operates the l argest demand responsive system, in addition, only one other agency operates a vanpool program In the following tables and ftgures, FY 1995 National Transi t Databases in formation for the selected peers was compared against SCATs informa tion for the same year The peer review ana l ysis includes selected performance measures and effectiveness and efficiency measures, as shown in Table 2-4. Results from the fiXed-route peer review analysis are also contained in Appendix D. F1orida Peer Syatems Lakeland Area Mass Transil District Manatee County Aree Transit Saruota County Area 112 Table 2 SCAT's Peer Systems Non-Florida Peer Systems Asheville (North Carorina} Transit Authority Athens (Georgia) Tran$1t System WaJ (Texas) Transit System. I n c Wilmington (North Carolina) Transit Authority Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 151

l"erformanc.!l Measures Pooulation. Ridership and Level of Service As shown i n Table 2-16 and Figure 2-25, SCAT's service area population is the largest of the peer group and 163.7 percent higher than the peer mean. SCAT's service area includes the entire county population because the transit system covers the northern, central, and southern parts of the county and, as shown in Table 2-16 is 120.8 percent larger than the peer mean. Conversely, SCAT's passenger trips, as shown in Table 2-16 and Figure 2-26, for FY 19g5 were 82.0 percent below the peer mean. This reflects the relative infancy of SCAT's fixed-route service when comparing its service to other systems in the peer group. The last two penormance measures in Tab le 2-16, revenue miles and revenue hours, reflect the amount of service that a transit agency is providing in i ts service area. As shown in Figures 2-27 and 2-28, SCAT is providing 24.2 percent less annual revenue miles and 47. 1 percent less revenue hours than the peer group average. Low revenue miles indicates the lower frequency of service that SCAT maintains compared to its peers. Low revenue hours illustrates the fact that SCAT splits the service of its larger buses between fixed-route service and subscription service with the average fixed-route operating less than five hours per day. Table 2-16 Fixed-Route Peer Analys is -Population, Ridershi p and Level of Service, FY 1995 Measure SCAT PMrGroup PMrGroup Peer Group SCAT: Minimum Maximum Mea.n %From Mean Service Area Population 437,740 55. 530 437 740 1 65,990 163.7% Service Area (sq miles) 427 31 747 193 120 .&% Passenger Trips 1&&,750 168. 750 I ,61&,861 I 938,575 -&2.0% -' Revenue M IJes 502,755 423,609 1,342,899 663 149 .2% Revenue Hours 23, 590 23,590 90,461 44,60& -47.1% BrevaTd County Transit Development Plan 113

PAGE 152

114 Figure 2-25 Service Area Popul ation (000) Brevo s..,aao Mln.-t. La k eto nj .. nd Wac A tho Al:hevl W ilmingt 0 : 2 I 0 1 00 200 300 -500 I [ Fi gure 2 i!ii r c : 2 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 &evard Counly Tnmsit Devo,_,l Pl n

PAGE 153

Figure 2-27 Revenue M iles (000) Sarasota Lakeland -Athena Manatee Ashevill Brevard Waco Wilmi ngton 0 Waco llanaW. c : :IE aoo Figure 2-28 1 ,200 15 100 115

PAGE 154

Performance Measures Expenses and Revenues Table 2-17 and Figures 2-29 through 2-31 contain peer review information for selected expense and revenue performance measures. For total operating expense, SCAT fell below the mean by 33.5 percent. In addition, SCAT was below the mean by 8.7 percent for total maintenance expense Also contained i n Tabl e 2-17, passenger fare revenue for SCAT in FY 1 995 was $69 020, which was the lowest in the peer group and 79.8 percent below the mean. Table 217 Fixed-Route Peer Analysis -Expenses and Revenues, FY 1995 Measure SCAT Peer Group Peer Group Peer Group SCAT: M inimum Maximum Mean %From Mean Total Operating $1,150.159 $1,150,159 $3,339,218 $1,729,356 .5% Total Maintenance Expense $279,410 $171 688 $441,292 I $306,195 .7% Passenger Fare Revenue $69 020 $69,020 $$69,546 I $343,913 -79 .9% 116 Brevard County Transit Davafopmant Plan

PAGE 155

Figura 2 29 Total Manatee $0 $1,000 $2,000 $3,000 Figura 2-30 Total Maintenance lakeland Waco Manatee Waco I so $100 $200 $300 $(00 $500 Figura 2-31 Fare Revenue so $100 $200 $300 $400 $500 $&00 Btovard County Ttansil Development 1'1811 117

PAGE 156

Pertormance Measures Employees and Vehicles In FY 1995 SCAT had 19.2 FTE employees as illustrated in Table 2-18 and Figure 2-32 which was 47 5 percent below the peer mean Also shown in Table 21 8 SCAT had 27 vehicles availabl e for maximum service, and operated 1 4 of those vehi cles in maximum service For vehicles availabl e for maximum service, SCAT was 19.3 percent h igher t han the peer mean, as shown in Figure 2 33 However, SCAT was below the mean by 5.1 percent, in regar d to veh icles operated in maximum service. It s hould be no t ed that SCAT's fleet i s des i gned to operate in many modes, many of SCAT's vehicles operate in demand responsive service as well as fixed-route service. Table 2 -18 Fixed Route Peer A n alysis Employees and Vehicles, FY 1995 Measure SCAT I Peer Group Peer G r oup SCAT: MJnimum Maximum ..... %From MNn Total Employees. FTE 19.2 1 9 2 73. 4 I I 36. 6 -47.5% Vehicle$ Av ailable for 27 1 4 I 40 23 19 3% Maximum Service I Vehlel6s Operat e d in 14 9 25 1 5 .1 % Maximum Service 118 BrovarrJ County Transit Development P l an

PAGE 157

Figure 2-32 Total 0.0 20.0 40.0 60. 0 80.0 Figure 2-33 Vehic les Available for Max Service 0 10 20 30 Figure 2-34 Vehicles Operated in Max Service Sarasota Lakeland Athena I Brevard .. WacoAshevUJ Wilmington Manatee 0 c ::E s 10 15 20 40 25 119

PAGE 158

Effectiveness Measures Service Supply and Service Consumptjoo Effectiveness measures for service supply and service consumpt i o n for SCAT and its peer are shown in Table 2-19 and Figures 2-35 through 2-38. Vehicle miles per capita for SCAT were much less (1.27) tha n any of its peers. SCAT was 77.7 percent below the mean for this measure. As mentioned previously, this reflects the relative infre quency of service on SCAT's routes in comparison to its peers and reflects the large service area that SCAT attempts to cover. Another effectiveness measure, passenger t r ips per capita, illustrates the level of consumption by residents in the service area As shown in Table 2-19, SCAT's measure is far below the peer average, 96.0 percent. Again, this is indicative of the i nfancy of SCAT's fixed-route program. Passenger trips per revenue mile and passenger trips per revenue hour also measure service consumption. SCAT is also below the means for the se two measures at 77.4 percent and 66.1 percent below the mean for passenger trips per revenue mile and passenger trips per revenue hour, respecti v ely. Tabl e 2-19 Fixed-Route Peer Analysis Service Supply and Service Consumption, FY 1995 Measure SCAT PMrGroup Peer Group PMt'Group SCAT: Minimum Maximum Mean %From Mean Vehic le M i les per Capita 1,27 1 27 8.60 5.70 -77.7% Passenger Trips per Capita 0.39 0 .39 21.72 9.58 -96.0% Pas-senger per 0.34 0 .34 2.85 1.49 .4% Revenue M i l e Passenger Trips per Revenue Hour 7.15 7.15 35.96 21.12 120 Brt!vord County Transit Development Pian

PAGE 159

Figure 2-35 Vehicle Miles Manatee 0.00 2.00 4.00 6.00 8.00 10.00 I Figure 2-36 nps per-Waco J l : Manatee,-8 W' 0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00 25.00 Brevard County Transit Development Plan 121

PAGE 160

Figure 2-37 0.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 Figure 2-38 Manatee Wac o 0.00 10.00 20.00 30.00 40.00 122 Brevatd County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 161

Effectiveness Measures Qyality of Service The firs t measure in Table 2-20, average speed i s a r atio of r evenue m il es to reve nue hou rs SCAT has the hi g h est average s peed of its peers (21. 31} w h ich i s 40. 2 perc ent h i gher than the me an. This could be due to many factors including th e long dista n ces that SCAT travels on some r o u tes b e tween h i ghly urbanized are a s and the l ack of t raffic con g estion in many parts of Brevard County Thi s info rm a t i on i s als o di sp l ay e d graphically in Figu r e 2 39 The average age of the fleet, anothe r qua lity of serv i ce measu r e as illus t rated in Tabl e 2-20 and Figure 2-40 shows t ha t SCAT's fleet of vehic l es i s approximately 1 2 6 percent younge r than the average fleet in the peer group. SCAT's perfo rmance fo r revenue mi l es betw een i nci dent s and rev e nue mil es between interru p t i ons was spli t in FY 1995. As sh o wn in Table 2-20 a nd Figure s 2-41 and 2-42, SCAT was below the mea n by 65. 9 percen t forreve nue mile s between i nci d ents and 109.8 percent high e r t han the mean f o r r evenue m i les between i nterrupt i ons. T a b le 2-20 Fixe d -Route Pee r A n al y s is-Quality o f S ervice, FY 1995 M easure SCAT Poer Group I PHr Group Peer G roup S C A T: Minimum Maximu m u ... Yo From Mean Average Speed (RMIRH} 21 3 1 12.63 2 1. 3 1 1 5 .20 4 0.2% Average Age o f F leet 7.44 3 .38 20.SO 8 5 1 1 2 6% R evenue M iles Between 71 ,822 70.679 540 5 7 6 210 ,746 -65 9% Incident$ ------! Revenue M i l es B etween 16.759 2 597 16 759 7, 987 109 $ % lnterrup1i o n s I Brevard C ounty Transit Development Plan 123

PAGE 162

Figur e 2 -39 0.00 5 .00 10.00 16.00 20.00 25.00 Figure 2-40 0.00 5 00 10.00 15. 00 20 00 25.00 124

PAGE 163

Figure 2-41 Revenue Incidents (000) Manatu.., Athena I Ashevlll Lakeland Waco WiJmlngton : j Saraoota 0 0 Btevoltl C4cm(y Transit Development PWI 200 Figure 2-42 5 c :l 10 600 15 20 125

PAGE 164

Efficiency Measures Cost Efficiency The purpose of efficiency measures is to measure the amount of a particular resource i t takes to accomplish a particular output. I n Table 2-21 t he resource measured is cost, and it is measured against population, passenger trips revenue miles, and revenue hours The first measure, as shown i n F i gu r e 2-43, illustrates that SCAT spends less per capita than any of its peers (82 .6 percent below the mean). This illustrates the limited service that SCAT is offering in compar i son t o Brevard County's population. Operating expense per passenger tri p measu r es how efficiently the transit system is offering service in comparison to its service consumption. For this measu re, SCAT is below the mean by 179 1 percent, as illustrated in Figure 2-44. This illustrates the importance of moving as many paratransit riders to fixed routes in order to lower operating expenses per pas senge r trip. As shown in Figure 2-45 for the amount of service SCAT is offering, as measured by operating expense per revenue mile, SCAT prov ided it for 1 4.5 percent less than the peer mean. However, for operating expense per r evenue hour, shown in F i gure 2-46, SCAT's result was 21.2 percent higher than the mean. Table 2-21 Fixed-Route Peer Analysis-Cost Efficiency, FY 1995 Measure SCAT Peer Group Peer Group P...-Group SCAT: Minimum Maximum Mean %FromMNn Operating Expense per Capita $2.63 $2.63 $25.74 $ 15.14 .S2 6% Ope rating Expense pe r Passenger Trip $6.82 $1.08 $6.82 $2.44 179.1% Operating Ex pen s e per $2.29 $2.29 $3.20 $2 .67 14,5% Revenue Mile Operating Expense Pet $48 .76 $33.86 $49.13 $40.22 21.2% Revenu e Hour 126 Brovard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 165

Figure 2-43 $ 0.00 $10. 00 $20 .00 $ 30.00 Figure 2-44 $0 .00 $2 00 $4.00 $&.00 $11.00 127

PAGE 166

128 Figure 2-45 Operating Exp per Revenue Mile Brevard Lak e lan d Saraaota Athens I Waco-M a .nat&e Wllmlngt Asheville c : ::; $0.00 $1.00 $2.00 $3.00 $4.00 $0.00 Figure 2-46 Revenue Hour $20.00 c ::; $40.00 $6().00 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 167

Effic i ency Measures Labor Product i vity The measures in Tabl e 2-22 illustrate the labor productivity of SCAT and its peers. In the Iii'$! measure revenue hours per emp l oyee, SCAT is slightly higher than the mean ( 1.0 percent) This measure shows that SCAT is efficiently using its employees given the revenue hours it annually p rovides. Thi s info rmat i on i s also shown graphi c ally in Figu r e 2-47. The other measure in Table 2-22 passen ger trips per employee, again illustrates the lower demand for SCAT's service Figure 2-48 illus t rates that SCAT was 66.1 per cent below the mean for this measure in FY 1995 Table 2-22 Fixed-Route Peer Analysis Labor Productivity FY 1995 Measure SCAT Peer Group I Poor Group I PMrGroup SCAT: M inimu m Maximum M oan %From M ean Reven u e Hours per 1 229 1 ,110 1 ,310 1,217 1 .0% E mployee Passe n ger Trips 8 ,789 8 789 46. 2 1 5 25.918 EmplOyee Brevard Counly Tr8nsit Development Plan 129

PAGE 168

Figure 247 0 Figure 2""8 0 ,0, 000 %0, 000 30 000 40,000 50,000 130 Bn2vatd Coollly Tml>$it Devolopm
PAGE 169

Efficiency Measures Vehicle Utilization Two measures of vehicle utilization are presented in Table 2-23 and Figure 2-49 and 2-50. The nu mbers of revenue miles and revenue ho urs per total vehicles (vehicles available for maximum service) are measures that demonstrate how efficiently a system utilizes the vehicles in its fleet. As shown in Table 2-23, SCAT represents the peer group minimum for both of these measures. For revenue miles per to tal vehicle, SCAT was 37.4 percent below the mean, and for revenue hours per total vehic le, SCAT was 56.5 percen t below the mean. As stated previous ly, SCAT's flee t is designed to operate in many modes. The result is that many of the vehicles available for maximum serv ice operate in demand responsive service for part of the day, and, therefore, are not availab le for fixed-route serv ic e Table 2-23 Fixed-Route Peer AnalysisVeh i cle Utilization, FY 1995 I Meuure SCAT Peer Group Peer Group I Peer Group SCAT: Mini m um Maxlmum I Mtan %From Mean Re..,enve Mile s per Total 18.621 18,621 44,807 2 9,735 A% VehW;Ie Revenue Hour$ per Tot31 874 874 3,003 2.009 -56.5% Vehicle I Brevard County Tr8nsit Development Plan 131

PAGE 170

132 Figure 2-49 Miles per Total Vehicle Sarasota Waco 0 20,000 Figure 2-50 Revenue Hours e :l< 2,000 olll,OOO 3,000 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 171

Efficiency M e asures Earebox Recovery and Fare Table 2 -24 conta ins the final two efficien c y mea sures that were examin e d for SCAT and its peer grou p E a rebox r e covery ratio as shown i n F i gure 2-51, is th e r atio of f a rebox revenue and oper a t ing expense SC A T I s fa r below the peer m e an (71.5 p e r ce nt). This can be attribute d t o the fact that many of S CAT's riders quali f y for halff a r es and that two routes ope ra t e w ith no fares. The other measure, average fare, i ll u s t rates th a t SCAT is slight l y above the peer mea n (5.1 percent). The minimum average fare for th i s peer group was $0.18 and the maximum $0.48 Thi s i nformation i s a l so disp layed graphically in f i gure 2-52 T able 2 -24 Fixed Route P eer Analysis-Farebox Recov ery and Fare, FY 1995 Peer Group -Group Peer Group SCAT : M e asu,.. SCAT Minjmum M u:lmum %From Mtan Farebox R e cowry Ratio 8.0% 6.0% 38. '" 21.1Y. -71.4" Average Fare so . $0. 18 $0.48 $0.3$ 5.1" Brevarrl County Transit D&velopmont Plan 13J

PAGE 172

134 Figure 2-51 Farebox Rec overy R a t i o A t he n W11mln gt o Ashcvll L.akel a n n I d Waco Manatee Sarasota Brev a rd I ;;::: I 1 I "' 0.0 % 1 0.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% W a c o Lak .. and Manatee Figure 2 -52 Fare $0.00 $0.10 $ 0.20 $0.30 $0 .40 $ 0.50 B revald County Transit De v alopmsnt Plan

PAGE 173

A summary of the performance strengths and weaknesses based on the peer review analysis for fixed-route service of effectiveness and efficiency measures is provided in Table 2-25. A performance strength is defined as a performance area that is more than ten perce nt bette r than the peer group average. while a performance weakness is defined as a performance a r ea that is more than ten percent worse than the peer group average. Table 2-25 SCAT Fixed-Route Perfonnance Sltengths and Peer Review Analysis Porformaneo Strengths Performat\ce Woaknes-ses Ave-nige Age of Fleet Vehicle Miles per capita Revenue Miles lnterrvprions Pa.s.senget Trips per Capita Expense per Capita Passenger Trips per Revenue Mi l e Operating Expen:se Per Revenue M ile Passenger Trii)S per Revenue Hour Revenue Mile$ betWeen Incidents Operating Expense per Passenger Trip Operating Expense per Revenue Hour Passen!l"r Trips per Employee Fare-box Recovery Ratio All of SCAT's fixed-route performance weaknesses, as shown in Table 2-25, are related t o the amount of service that SCAT provided in FY 19 95. In comparison to its peers SCAT provides a lower amount of serv ice witll the same number of vehicles. This is due to the fact that SCAT splits these vehicles between fi xed-route service and subscription service. Brevard County Tronsil Development Pian 135

PAGE 174

DESCRIPTION AND HISTORY OF CTC COORDINATED SERVICES This section provides an introduction to SCAT's role as the community transportation coo rdinat or (CTC) for the Brevard County TO program. The history of Brevard County's TO program Is also provided Finally, this section summarizes the results of the performance evaluation of SCAT's paralransit system. The perfonnance evaluation was conducted in two parts : a CTC trend analysis and a CTC peer review analysis. The CTC trend analysis was completed to compare the performance of the Brevard County CTC over time. A CTC peer review analysis was also conducted t o compare the perfonnance of the Brevard County CTC to other peer CTCs within F lorida. Florida Coordinated Transportation System The Florida Coordinated Transportation System (FCTS) was created in 1979 with the enactment of Chapter 427, F.S. Chapter 427 defines transportation disadvantaged as: ... those persons who because of physical or mental disability, income status, or age are unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation and are, therefore, dependent upon others to obtain access to health care, employment, education, shopping, social activities, or children who are handicapped or high-risk or at-risk as defined in Section 411 202, Florida Statutes. The s ta tewide TO program was developed in order to better coordinate existing transportation disadvantaged services sponsored by social and human service agencies. The purpose of coordination is to reduce duplication of services and maximize the use of existing resources. The 1979 legislation created the Coordinating Council for the Transporta t ion Disadvantaged in the Department of T ransportation and the to coordinate TO transportation services throug h o ut the state. Legislative revisions to Chapter 427 in 1989 created the Aorida Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged (FCTD) (originally the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission) to accomplish the coordination of transportation services provided to the transportation disadvantaged in the State of Florida. The FCTO is an independent state-level commission reporting directly to the Governor and the legislature. The 1989 revisions also assigned the Commission to the Florida Department of Transportation for administrative and fiscal purposes. The legislation also established the TO Trust Fund, which provided a dedicated funding source, and gave the Commission authority to allocate monies from the Trust Fund. The 1989 revisions to Chapter 427 also established community transportation coordinators (CTCs) and lo ca l coordinating board (LCBs) to adm inister and monitor t he TO program at the local leve l in place of the Coordinated Community T ransportat ion Provider and the Coordinated Community Transportation Provider Council p rovid ed for in the initial19791egislation. Figure 2-53 contains an organ ization chart which 136 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 175

identifies part i es involved in the provision of TO transportation services in Florida There are an estimated 5.4 m i llion transportat ion disadvantaged ind ividuals residing in Florida. Florida's TO prog r am serves two populations groups: Potential Transportation D isa dvantaged (also referred to as "TD Category I" ) and the Transportation Disadvantaged (also referred to as "TO Category II"} The P otential TD Population i ncludes persons who are eligible for agency-sponsored tri ps. The TD Popu la tion group i s a subset of the Potential TO Population group Although the individuals in this population group are el igible to receive agency-sponso r ed trips through the Florida coordinated system they are also eligible to receive trips subsidized by the TD Trust Fund monies allocated to local community transportation coordinators by the Commission. History of the Brevard County Transportation Disadvantaged Program The Brevard County Board of County Commissioners has recognized the need to coordinate transportation services provided to transportation disadvantaged persons since 1973. At tha t time. a steering committee was formed to assess the transportation needs that existed i n the community and to oversee coord i nation of the t r ansportation service. In January 1974. the Community Services Council of Brevard County began coordinating transportation for the transportation disadvantaged in the county During October of that same year, the new transit system became a department under the Brevard County Board of County Commissioners This department was named Consolidated Agenc ie s Transportation System (CATS) CATS consisted of several not-for-profrt agencies, which provided transportation services to their clients. CATS was charged with providing service to senior citizens for medical shopping. and congregate meals. CATS also provided transportation service to training centers and sheltered wor1
PAGE 176

Provider for Brevard County. It was no t until October 1991 that SCAT reestablished fixed routes served by conventional transit buses on a fixed schedule With the establishment of Community Transportation Coordinators in place of Coordinated Community Transportation Providers, the Brevard County Board of County Commissioners dfb/a SCAT was recommended by the Brevard County Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) and approved by the FCTO as the CTC for Brevard County (The Local Coordinating Board for Brevard County is included in Appendix L .) Local CTCs are charged with the task of ensuring t he delivery of transportation services to the transportation disadvantaged in their service areas. CTCs must also strive to del iver the t ransporta tion services in the most cost-effective, unduplica ted, and unfragmented manner possible. Specifically, CTCs are responsib le for short-range operational planning, administration, monitoring, coordination, arrangement, and delivery of transportation disadvantaged services that originate within their service areas. The 199 7 Potential TO Population in Brevard County is estimated to be 160,441, or approximately 35 percent of the total county population (463,533). The 1997 TO Population in Brevard County is estimated to be 29 588 representing more than 6 percent of the total county population. As discussed above, SCAT has been coordinating transportation disadvantaged services in Brevard County since its inception in 1985 At that time, SCAT provided the majority of TO and Medicaid trips. A small number of overflow trips were provided by a private provider under contract to SCAT. In March 1991, Coastal Health Services, a not-for-profit agency, was chosen through a request for proposals (RFP) to provide all Med ica i d and m non-sponso red trips for SCAT. This change in service provision occurred as SCAT began preparations for introduction of fixed-route transit service i n Brevard County Under contract to the CTC, Coastal provided door-to-door paratransit service for TO non-sponsored client s and Medicaid clients requiring non-emergency transportation. In 1994, Coastal Health Services notified SCAT that it no longer wished to provide m non-sponsored transportation service. As a result SCAT acquired additional vehicles and staff, and gradually began to move the operation of TO transporta t ion services in-house The transition from Coastal to SCAT too k place from April 1994 through December 1994. Therefore the transition actually spanned two fiscal years-FY 1994 and FY 1995. Currently SCAT directly operates fixed-route t ransit, subscription routes and d o or-to-doo r paratransit service. Coastal has cont in ued to provide all Medicaid non-emergency transportation. 138 Brevard County Trensl t Development Plan

PAGE 177

Figure 2-53 Florida's Transportation Disadvantaged Program: Organizational Chart STATE LEVEL Commission for the State4ee l pollOf boatd for the coordination of trtnsJ)OI't.Otion (:l7 .......... ) Purehasina Asenc ios: surta f!lltndes inVOlved In or fundi ng tt1nspMatlon sefVIces lor their dietlts. .... Opetatol$ can bHI directly '-..... Tr ansportation Qis.advanlag&d Pei'$Ons: Persons ..mo beeause or disability age, or income s.Wu$ are Ul"tfbiO: to transport them$t l'lt$ Brsvard C ou nty Transit Develop(I'J(Int Plan LOCAL LEVEL Official Planning Aaency : Meti'OPOfitan Ptanring Organization Other Desigl\ltecl P lanning Agency l9CII Coordjwtjoa Board; Meml>ot$tlip P'I'IIIOil Commi$Sin: identifies '*1 ttMce nMCIS J)t0vktesgui4anoe for c::ootdillatiOn Ol &ei'Viee$, Commun!tv Tra n soortatio n Coordinator: EMit)' t'Q90n$ible for COOC'dinating seMoes ""''*' a &eMcearea 13 9

PAGE 178

140 Brevard County Trans i t D&velopment Plan

PAGE 179

Description of Brevard County CTC Coordinated Services The Brevard County CTC coordinates several types of transportation services, includ ing ambulatory and non-ambulatory, door-to-door paratransit services, agency and general public vanpool service, as well as subscriplionand fixed-route transtt service. The CTC coordinates and prov i des indivi dual, group, and subscription (standing order) transportation services A group trip is defined as one where individuals are picked up at their homes or at a common origin and dropped off at a common destination. Subscription, or standing order, trips are made to the same dest ination three or more times per week (e.g. dialysis). Because of the unique nature of SCAT's service design, all modes of public transportation in Brevard County explicitly serve the transportation disadvantaged population. Specifically, seven types of public transportation services are offered to meet the mobility needs of the Potential TO Population, TO Population and the ADA eligible population in Brevard County. These services include : (1) TO non-sponsored paratrans it, (2) Medicaid non-emergency transportation (3) ADA complementary paratransit (4) agency sponsored subscription routes, (5) agency-sponsored vanpool transportation (6) Volunteers in Motion, and (7) t radtt ionat fixed-route transit. The following section will provide general information about the umbrella of coordinated transportation services currently available through the Brevard County TO program TO Non-sponsored Paratransjt SeCices SCAT began to provide as well as coordinate, TO non-sponsored trips again in FY 1994 For three years prior to that time, this service was coordinated through SCAT, but provided by Coastal Health Services under contract to the CTC. Currently, SCAT provides all TO non-sponsored trips in Brevard County. TO non-sponsored trips are general purpose trips that are not subsidized by a governmental or social service agency. Individuals must be certified as TO-eligible to receive these trips Thus, the service is available to persons who, because of physical or mental disability, income status. age, or for other reasons, are unable to transport themselves or purchase transport ation. TO-eligible ind iv iduals whose trips are not subsidized by an agency or another fund ing source must request door-to-door paratransit service at least 24 hours in advance by calling SCAT at (407) 6331878 (North Brevard County) or (407) 952-4672 (South Brevard County) between the hours of 8:00 a.m and 5 :00p.m. TO transportation is generally provided Monday through Friday from 6:00a.m. to 6:00 p.m. However some group work trips are provided on a regular basis after hours to specific employment sites. In addition at least one SCAT lead operator is on-call each night to provide after hour trips, as needed. SCAT lea d operators and Coastal Health Services provide back-up and/or overflow services, whenever necessary Brevard County Transit Development Plan 141

PAGE 180

Non-sponsored trips are subsidized by the State of Florida TO Trust Fund. TO clients pay $2.00 per one-way trip ($1.00 for senior citizens and persons with disabilities). The remainder of the trip costs are paid by the TO Trust Fund (TOTF) according to a base plus mileage formula. Because the demand for TO non-sponsored, general purpose transportation service is greater than the funds available, a set of trip priorities has been established. The current trip priorities for TO non sponsored trips are as follows : Medical appointments 55 percent of trips Food shopping 5 percent of trips Employment 20 percent of trips Other 20 percent of trips TO trip cancellations may be made by calling the same telephone number that was used to make a trip reservation (listed above). Cancellations are handled by SCAT reservationists during normal office hours. TO customers may provide notice of a cancellation after hours by leaving a recorded telephone message for SCAT staff. Cancellations received at least 24 hours before the scheduled pick-up time are reflected on the TO customer's service record as a cancellation: however, the accumulation of cancellations does not result in the suspension of service. A TO customer's request for cancellation of a scheduled trip is considered a passenger no-show if the cancellation is not received at least 24 hours before the scheduled pick-up time. SCAT has established and implemented a no-show policy for TO transportation. TO customers who accumulate more than three no-shows in six months may have their paratransit privileges suspended, at the sole discretion of the CTC. As outlined in the Brevard County Local Coordinating Board for Transportation Disadvantaged (T.D ) Services Cancellation and No-Show Policy, the following steps are taken by the CTC and/or contract operators in response to passenger no-shows: One (1) No-Show: Attach door hanger, stating missed ride appointment to trip recipient's door. Mail out policy reminder form to TO Client. Two (2) No-Shows: Attach door hanger stating missed ride appointment to trip recipient's door. Mail out policy reminder form to TO client. The transportation operator may follow-up with phone call four (4) days after mail-out. The purpose of the call would be to discuss r eason(s) for no-show and poss i ble preventative act i ons Notify Medicaid when Medicaid cli ents accumulate two (2) no-shows Three (3) No-Shows: Attach door hanger stating missed ride appointment to trip recipient's front door. Mail out policy reminder form to TO client. The transportat i on operator must follow -up with a phone call four (4) days after ma i l out to discuss reason(s) for no-show and possible preventative actions The transportation operator must notify the CTC of the third no show The CTC may direct further action such as: 142 Brevard County Transit Development Pian

PAGE 181

1 Referral to sponsoring agency or Family & Children Services for review. 2. Suspension of paratransit privileges for one (1) to thirty (30) days. 3. Further action as determined appropriate by the CTC including permanent suspension of paratransit privileges. TD customers who are utiliZing paratransit service for life -susta ining medical purposes w ill not be suspended for passenge r no-shows, as the loss of transportation could be life-t h r eatening. However, SCAT will wor1< closely with these individuals to reduce the number of cancellations and no-shows. Medicaid Non-eroergi!OCY Medical Transportation Two forms of transportation are provided to Medicaid clients requiring transportat ion to Medicaid approved medical appointments. Whenever possible, Me dicaid clients are required to use the fixed-route system in Brevard County to travel to and from Medicaid-approved medical appointments. However, the fixed routes in Brevard County are very l imited. For that reason, many Medicaid clients who are not a b le to meet their own transportation needs through family friends or othe r co mmunity resources are transported to Medicaid-approved appointments by Coastal Health Services under contract to SCAT. Coastal provides door-to-doo r paratransit services to these i ndividuals and is reimbursed by Medicaid for the cost of these trips based on negotiated rates Medicaid non -e mergency transportat i on is provided as required, Monday through Saturday. Clients must call Coastal Health Services directly at (407} 632-7030 at least three days in advance of their des ired trip to obtain a trip reservation. The advance reservation requirement was increased from 24 hours notice t o three days n otice as part of the CTC s plan to reduce Medicaid in order to stay within the target provided by the Agency for Healthcare Administration (AHCA) Medicaid clients pay a $1.00 copay. Aml!ricans with Disabiliti es Act CADAl Compleml!ntarv P arat ransit Service The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) requires that complementary paratransit services be provided by agencies that provide fixed-route bus service. The paratransit service must "shadow" the fixed-route service area and a comparable level of service must be provided for pe rsons who cannot use the fixed-route service CurrenUy SCAT is responsib le for prov i ding ADA complementary services to persons who are ADA-eligible. Complementary paratransit serv ice in Brevard County is prov ided for trips within 3/4-mile of a bus route during the same days and hours that fixed-route service is available. ADA-eligible persons must request door-to-door ADA complementary service at l east 24 hours in advance by calling SCAT at (407) 6331878 (North Brevard County) or (407) 952-4672 Trip reservations are accepted Monday through Friday during SCAT office hours 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m ADA-eligible pass engers receive doo r -to-Brevard County Transit Development Plan 143

PAGE 182

door t ransporta t ion and pay a fare of $2.00 per one-way trip. Because SCArs fixed-route service is limited in terms of hours of availability and because several other types of transportation service are available to persons with disabilities within the county, the demand for ADA complementary paratransit has been minimal. Agency-sponsored Subscription Bus Routes Subscription service is contracted by an agency in order to transport agency clients who are making a common trip on a regular basis When not being used for fixed-route bus service, SCAT buses prov id e subscription bus service for persons traveling to training centers sheltered workshops congregate meal sites, and similar destinations. C u rrently, several agencies in Brevard County have a contract with SCAT for the provision of subscription route transportation to a variety of social service programs including the Brevard Achievement Center (BAC) Brevard ARC, Easter Seals of East Central Fl orida and the Senior Nut ritio nal Aid program. Table 2-26 contains the names and addresses of the agencies that sponsor subscription bus routes in Brevard County. Any group sponsored (and paid for) by the County, a municipality, school board, senior citizen group, or social service agency may subscr ib e for service. The agency-sponsored subscription routes in Brevard County operate between the hours of 6:30a.m. and 6:00p.m., Monday through Friday. The typical service day consists of picking up passengers at their homes and transporting them to the agency facilities between 6:30a.m. and 9:00a.m. In the afternoon, the bus reverses the route returning clients to their homes, generally between 3:00p.m. and 6:00p.m. Some buses also provide trips to meal sites from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The current average cost for this service is approximately $1.65 per vehicle mile, which is billed to the sponsoring agency. Other residents of the county may use this service on a seat-available basis for $1.00 per one-way trip; seniors and persons with disabilities are charged 50 cents. SCAT Agency-sponsored Yanpool The county vanpool program is another transportation service option available for human service agencies. Agencies may lease vans through the vanpool program to transport their clients. Thirty n ine vans are currently used in this capacity. The agencies that currently participate in SCAT's agency vanpool program are listed in Table 2-27. The vanpool program serves as an alternative to agency-sponsored subscription route bus service. The advantage to a vanpoo l program is that fewer people a re needed to fill the vehicle (8-15 passengers), and stops to pick-up and discharge passengers tend to be more conveniently located. The vans are leased to human service agencies for $575 per month, wh ich includes maintenance insurance, and administration 144 Brevarrl County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 183

Table 2-26 SCAT Subscription Bus Route Program Participants Agency Address Trip Purpose Brevard Ach i evement Center (SAC) 1845 Cogswell Street Cli ent transportation Rockledge, FL 32955 Easter Seal s Cen t e r, I nc.. 3661 S Babcock Street Client transportation Melbourne FL 32901 1-. North Train ing Center 835 Sycamore Street T itusville. F L 32780 Client tra n sportation Central Training Center 1 694 Cedar Street Client transportation Rockledge FL 32955 1110 Hickoty Street South Train i ng Cen ter j Client transportation Melboume, FL 3290 1 -Seni or Nutritional Aid Program 405 Indian River Avenue Nutrition s ite T ;tusville Center T itusville, F L 32796 Senio r Nutritional Aid Program 471 Canaveral Groves Btvd. Nutri ti o n site Sharpes Center Canavera l Groves, FL 32926 Se n ior N u t rit i onal Aid Program 1053 Fern Avenue Nu1rition site Fern Street Center Cocoa, F L 32922 -Senior Nutri ti ona l Aid Program 230 Burnett Avenue Nutrition s ite Cocoa West Senior Center Wes t Cocoa. FL 32926 Senior Nl.ltrit i ona l Aid Program 6 1 5 Kurek Coull Nutrition site Bax.ley Manor Center Merritt I slan d FL 32952 Senior Nutrit i ona J Aid Program 4000 N Riverside Drive Nutrition site Gar den Apartments Center Melbourne, FL 32937 Seni or Nutritional Aid Program 610 Young Street N utri tion site Eau Galli e Ce n ter Eau Gallie, FL 32935 Senio r N utritional Ai d Program Wes t Melbourne Cent e r 1 2150 S. Dairy Road West Melbourne FL 32904 Nut rition si t e Senior Nutritiona l Aid Program 1 300 Bianca Drive N E Nutrition site Palm Bay Center Pal m Bay FL 32905 Bmvard County Transit Development Plan 145

PAGE 184

Table 2-27 SCAT Agency-Sponsored Van pool Program Participants Agency Address Trip Purpose B revard ARC I 1694 Cedar Street Resident transportation and work Roct
PAGE 185

VoLunteers ;n Motion P rog ram In 1995, SCAT created the Volunteers in Motion (VIM) program to meet the specialized needs of Community Care for the Elder ly (CCE) clients. Recently, the program expanded int o serving other TO-eligible persons as well. The volunteer program provides more than just transportation. The program also add resses the specific needs of frail elderly persons. For example, the Volunteers in Motion program not only provides transportation to and from grocery stores but also assists the passengers with shopping and unpacking groceries in their home. The Volunteers in Motion program uses volunteer assistance in all aspects of the program including as dispatchers, schedulers, drivers, and escorts. The coordinator of the program is a full-time paid SCAT staff member Public Transit Utilization Persons who are transportation disadvantaged also may use the fixed routes operated by SCAT. Currently 18 routes are operating throughout the county and provide county-wide coverage. In general, the fixed-route service focuses on the urbanized areas East of 1-95 in the county. The fixed routes in Brevard County operate Monday through Friday from 6:00a.m. to 6:45p.m. The full fare for fixed-route bus service is $1.00 (50 cents for seniors, disabled and youth) SCAT also offers half-price ($14.00} monthly bus passes to seniors, persons with and youth Individuals may contact SCAT at (40 7) 633-1878 to request specific route and schedule information. Although use of the fiXed-route is always encouraged among the TO Population in Brevard County, the days and hours of service, as well as limited geographic coverage. extensive use of the fixed-route system for many TO trips However, SCAT is considering establishment of a Medicaid bus pass program for clients detennined to be able to use fixed-route bus service for their Medicaid -reim bursable medical trips. Monthly bus passes good for any number of trips on the fixed-route bus system would be issued In addition to result ing in cost savings for the TO program, bus passes could provide greater mobility to Medicaid clients. School Bus Utilization In addition to the transportation options described above, the Brevard County CTC coordinates the utilization of school bus services through a joint use agreement with the Brevard County School District SCAT and the Brevard County School District work together to coordinate and provide group trips for youth activities sponsored by the Brevard County Parks and Recreation Department during the summer months. Btevard County Transit Development Plan 147

PAGE 186

Brevard County CTC Paratransit Eligibility Requirements SCAT paratransit services are avai l able to persons who have been certified as eligible to r ece i ve ADA complementary paralransit service because they are unable to use SCA T' s fixed route bus service Paratransit services are also available for individuals classified as transportation disadvantaged because they are unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation due to physical o r mental disability, age, income status or because they are children at-risk. Finally door-to-door paratransit service i s provided to Med i caid c li ents for non-emergency medical purposes The processes used to determine elig i bility for each of the programs are discussed below. ADA Complementary Paratransit Serv i ce Persons with disabilities in Brevard County may be elig i ble to receive ADA complementary paratrans i t service fo r origins and desti n ations that fall within the 3/4 mile ADA corr idor that exists on eithe r side of the SCAT fixed-route bus system. These individuals must be certified as ADA e li g i ble in order to receive paratransit service. Eligibility is conferred to perso n s with disabilities who are able to demonstrate that they are unable to use SCAT fiXedroutes due to the nature and extent of their d i sability or because the fixed-route bus service i s not fully accessible ADA complementary paratransit serv i ces are onl y provided during the fixedr oute days and hours of serv i ce. Currently, individuals who would l ike to become certified as eligible to receive ADA complementary paratransit service must first contact SCAT. The i nitial telephone contact is han dled by SCAT customer service personnel. A detailed application is sent to each i nterested indi vidual along with a description of ADA eligibility and services Every applicant is required to provide along wit h the ADA applicat i on, permission for SCAT to contact a qualified professional famil i ar with the applicant s disability SCAT personne l then review each applicat i on to determine if the individuals should be certified as ADA-eligible because the nature or extent of their disability prevents them from using SCAT fixed route bus serv i ce Each applicant is notified in writing within three weeks of the receipt of the i r application regarding the outcome of the eligibility determination process All persons who are den i ed ADA-eligibility have the right to appeal the decision and are provided with information regarding SCAT s ADA eligibility appeal process SCAT repeats the certification process every three years A copy of the applicat i on used by SCAT to determ i ne eligibility for ADA comp l ementary paratransit is inc l uded in Appendix E. TO Non-sponsored Paratransit Service The issue of eligibility to receive pa r atrans i t trips funded th r ough TO non-sponsored funds has been a topic of much discussion In Brevard County since 1991. The catalyst for these discussions has been the acknowledgment that the demand for T O service exceeds the available supply and/or fund i ng for non-sponso r ed TO trips In June 1992 in an effort to help control the demand for T O 148 BrevarrJ County Trans;t Development Plan

PAGE 187

non-sponsored paratransit serv ice, the local coordinating board for Brevard County and the Brevard County Board of County Commissioners adopted a Passenger Management System (PMS) to set trip purpose priorities for TO non-sponsored trips. Along with the trip purpose priorities established through the PMS, TO eligibility was established through customer self-certification. The question of whether to establish a formal eligibility determination process for TO non sponsored trips was addressed again in April1995. At that time, CUTR, under contract to SCAT, conducted a Trip Priorities and Eligibility Workshop for the Brevard County LCB. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an interactive forum for LCB members to discuss trip priority and eligib i lity issues with the goa l of deciding whether to recommend that SCAT implement more formal cl i ent eligibility and priority-setting procedures. At the conclusion of the day-long workshop the LCB voted to mai ntain the PMS in its current form. With respect to elig ibili ty, the LCB voted not to Impose a formal eligibility certification process at that t im e ; however, SCAT was instructed to begin collecting additional information pertaining to passengers' ages disab iliti es, and income levels as part of the normal telephone reservation process SCAT was also instructed to continue accepting customer self-certification of eligibility. Currently, SCAT continues to accept self -certificat ion for TD non-sponsored trip eligibility determination. However, the Florida Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged (FCTO) has recently adopted criteria designed for CTC use to determine eligibility for non-sponsored trips subsidized with TD Trust Fund dollars. The eight criteria that have been set forth by the FC TD include the following: No other funding available. No other means of transportation Is available. (As specified by the LCB and CTC.) Public transit cannot be used Physical or mental disability. Age. (As specified by the LCB and CTC.) Individual and househol d income status is a specified percent of the poverty level. (As specified by the LCB and CTC.) No self-declarations allowed. Ability to pay. (As specified by the LCB and CTC.) Although SCAT currently accepts self-declaration f or TO non-sponsored trip eligibility, the CTC will be working closely with the LCB in the near future to establish and im plement a TD eligibility process, as requ i red by the FCTO Brevard Co(Jn/y Transjt DQvslopment Plan 149

PAGE 188

Medicaid Non-Emergency Medical Transportation Medicaid-sponsored transportation is offered to clients only when they are an eligible recipient, the t rip is medically necessary and reas o nable, and they are traveling to locations to receive Medicaid covered service. Currently, Medicaid c lie nts who would like to request transportation to medical appointments contact Coastal Health Services directly. As part of the CTC's plan to reduce Medicaid transportation Coastal, as the contract Medicaid provider, verifies that the client i s requesting transportation for a Medicaid-eligible medical appointment and that the client cannot utilize SCArs fixed-route bus system to complete the trip. Those persons who are unable to access SCAT fixed-route bus service due to to the route, availability of service, or because of a physical or mental disability that prevents the use of fixed-route are provided paratransit service SCAT, as the CTC for Brevard County, has been work ing to develop a formal process for determining for Medicaid non-emergency paratransit service. The process under consideration will evaluate whether the Medicaid recipient has any other transportation resources available the trip that the recipient would like to make i s for a Medicaid-eligible purpose, and w hether the fixed-route bus system can be utilized to complete the trip. However, the current contract with Coastal Health Services expires in May 1998. Therefore, SCAT does not have plans to implement the Medicaid eligibility process until the RFP process to select an operator of Medicaid non-emergency transportation has been completed. Transportation Operators Coordinated Services SCAT utilizes several transportation operators in order to p r ovide a variety of transportation services for the transportation disadvantaged in Brevar d County In march of 1987, SCAT entered into a public-private partnership with VPSI, Inc to operate the Brevard County Vanpool Program. As part of this program, the Brevard County Board of County Commissioners has purchased 95 vans Federal and State public transportation grants. The vans are leased to VPSI. Subsequently, VPSI has subleased the vans to commuters and human service agencies. Commuter groups pay VPSI $400 per month for use of the van(s) and human service agencies pay $575 per month. This fee covers the cost of insurance, vehicle maintenance, repair, and a variety of additional customer services. The V PSI contact persons is George Gaudy, Brevard County Manager Gaudy can be reached at 460 South Harbor City Boulevard, Melbourne, Florida 32901; (407) 952-4562. Coastal Health Services is the operator for Medicaid non-emergency transporta t ion services. Coastal is a not-for-profit 'agency owned jointly by Wuestoff Heallh Systems and Cape Canaveral Coastal's Medicaid reimbursable rates we re established through a negotiation proc ess between Coastal and the Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA). The contract between 150 Brevani County Trans# Development Plan

PAGE 189

Brevard County and Coastal began on April 1, 1991, and will expire May 1998. Coastal's headquarters are in Rockledge, Florida. All of Coastal's dispatch ing and administrative are performed at the Rockledge headquarters. Coastal Heatth Services can be reached at (407) 632-7030. With the Brevard County Board of County Commissioners' approval SCAT has coordinated the use of school bus services through a joint use agreement. The contact person for the Brevard County School District is Charles Long. Long can be reached at 2091 West King Street Cocoa, Florida 32926; (407) 633-3681. CTC Vehicle Inventory The fleel of vehicles used to serve the transportation disadvantaged in Brevard County consists of regular and lift-equipped vans, regular and lift-quipped transit buses and school buses provided by the Brevard County School District. The CTC's current vehicle inventory has been included in Appendix F in the Public Transportation Management System (PTMS) format. The inventory i nclude s information on vehicle type and ma ke the number of seats and tie-down for wheelchairs, current mileage age of vehicle, and the anticipated replacement date. System Safety Program Plan Certlflcation SCAT has an approved System Safety Program Plan (SSPP) and is in compliance with adopted safety standards in accordance with Rule 14-90. SCAT's SSPP certification is included in Appendix G. Intercounty Services Currently SCAT does not have any formal agreements other CTCs to provide intercounty TD transportation services. However SCAT is working with the Indian River County CTC and other local officials to examine the possibility of establishing transportation service from the South Mainland area of Brevard County into the northern portion of Indian River County. The need for this type of transportation arrangement was discussed, at length, in the d iscussio n group held with residents of South Mai nland. SCAT will also be exam i ning the feasibility of coordinating express bus service with neighboring counties in order to provide additional work trips for residents of Brevard County. The counties under consideration for express intercounty bus service include Orange County (Orlando area) and Volusia County {Daytona area). Brevard County Transit Dtwelopment Plan 151

PAGE 190

Natural Disaster/Emergency Preparedness I n addition to coordinating public transportation in Brevard County SCAT is the designated coord inator of Emergency Service Function (ESF) #1. This role encompasses the coordination of all phases of emergency preparedness transportation. SCAT has developed a coordination manual that details steps to be taken during a ll phases of a natural disaster and/or emergency. In the role of coordinator of ESF #1, SCAT works closely with the following agencies to accomplish safe and efficient evacuation services: Space Coast Area Harbor City Volunteer Ambulance Squad, Inc. Coastal Health Systems of Brevard Inc. Brevard County Fire/Rescue, and Brevard County School District Inc. Space Coast Area also has a detailed plan in place for hurricanes, disasters, and other incidents This plan has successfully been used to carry out evacuations during Hurricane Erin and Hurricane Bertha. Marketing SCAT has been actively marketing public transportation in Brevard County for several years. For the past two years, a private agency has been awarded a contract to develop and implement a marketing plan for Space Coast Area Transit. As a result SCAT has successfull y completed a number of media and public relations campaigns designed to increase awareness and use of public transportat ion available in Brevard County (including fixed-route bus, and vanpool). A majority of the marketing campaigns have focused on educat i ng the public about fixed-route bus service in Brevard County and providing enticements to encourage use of SCAT buses. Marketing at SCAT has concentrated on fixed-route bus service in order to facilitate the transition of persons from doorto-door paratransit services to the less expensive bus service available in the county By moving people to fixed-route bus service SCAT hopes to Increase capacity on the paratransit system for peop le who are unable to use fiXed-route bus service and provide greater for a ll persons in Brevard County. One very popu lar, ongoing, campaign begun in 1996 is the use of a third-party endorsement to enhance awareness of SCAT. SCAT secured the services of an Andy Rooney impersonator who agreed to repre sent SCAT in radi o and cable TV commercial s as a public service. These commercials present information regarding the social, environmental, and economic benefits of using public transportation, as well as education about how to use SCAT's services The commercials were designed to target specific popu lations in Brevard County that could benern from additional mobility options inc ludi ng seniors and school aged young people One often cited barrier to using public transportation is the lack of user-friendly, easily understood, standardized schedules. SCAT along w ith the Florida Today ne wspaper, has been working to develop a master book of standardized maps and routes. The book was completed and produced during 1997. SCAT is now in the process of distributing the master map/schedule books 152 B10vard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 191

throughout Brevard County. The schedule and route books provide detai led i nformation about each SCAT fixed-route bus route fare in fo rmation, transferring from route to route and a system overview which provides infor mation about each of the services offered by SCAT. SCAT also makes numerous public presentations each year to educate the public about the services offered by SCAT. Standardized speakers bureau presentation materials have been developed to fac i litate presentations to the public. These materials inc lude a short video describing SCAT's umbrella of public transportation services, a script for presenters, and promotional materials for audience members (fans, cups, etc .). SCAT also regularly submits press releases to local newspapers to notify the public of service changes and enhancements, as well as public meetings concerning public transportation. Acceptable Alternatives Any agency that purchases o r provides transportation for persons who are transportation disadvantaged with transportation disadvantaged funds is to do so through a contractual arrangement the Community Transportation Coordinator. Exempt from this requirement are p rivately-owned vehicles of an agency volunteer or employee; state-owned vehicles; privately owned vehicles of a family member or custodian; common carriers, such as commercial airlines or bus; emergency medical vehicles; and in instances where the CTC determines that it is unable to provide or arrange the req ui red service. At the current time, the agency-sponsored vanpool program at SCAT has been very successful providing a low cost, efficient transportation option to agencies that do not have transportation needs that can be easily met within the TO transportation program in Brevard County. A list of these agencies was provided i n Table 2-26, earlier in this chapter The Child Care Association of Brevard, Inc. (CCA) provides Head Start transportation in Brevard County. The CTC has met with CCA to discuss bringing Head Start transportation into the coordinated system However, the number of trips and level of service required by CCA cannot currently be accommodated by the CTC. Therefore. the transportation provided by CCA represents an acceptable alternative to the coord inate d system in Brevard County. Brevard County Transit D9ve/opment Pl an 153

PAGE 192

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF CTC COORDINATED SERVICES Performance Review Data The substantial amounl of data availal* from the annual operating reports (AORs} provide an opportunity to develop a large assortment of measures lor CTC service. Sets of performance effectiveness and efficiency measures have been selected that are known to provide a good representation of overall CTC system performance. Table 2-28 lists the measures used in this section. Perfonnanc. Measures Co u nty Populatio n Potent i al TO Population Pasienger lrjps Paratransil I:Jass Trips. Revenue Mit.es Operating Total Rev e nue T otal Fleet Table 2 Performance Review Meas ures ParatTansit Analysis Et'leetivenHS Measures Effleiency Mt.aS-Uf$1 Vehicle Miles per TD Capita Operating Expense per Passenge r Trip Passenger T l ips per TO Capita Ope-rating Exp per Paratta ns it Pass T rip Paratrans\\ Pass. Trips per TO Cap"a ODeratlng Expense per Ve-hicle Mfle Passenger Trip$ per Veh icle M ile t Fatebox Ratio Average A91' Qt F l eet {in years) LOQI Government Revenue Ratio AccicH!nts per 100. 000 Vehicle Miles Vehicle Miles Between Roade:alb In order to completely understand the data used in a performance evaluation of this type, it is i mportant to have an understanding of the definilions of the terms. In many instances, these definitions differ from initial perceptions and, therefore may be contingent upon subjective interpretation. Appendix C provides a detailed l ist of definitions for the terms used in the trend and peer analyses these definitions and continuous efforts t o refine them, some discrepancies rema i n as to how terms are defined and how informati on is collected. Consequently some caution shoul d be exercised when interpreting lhe findings, espec iall y for those variables tha t are more likely to be subject to varia lion in definition. Brevard County CTC Trend Analysis CUTR conducted a trend analysis fo r FY 1 992 through FY 1996 to compare the performance of SCAT over t ime The trend analysis includes the period duri ng which the provision of TO non sponsored trips was transferred from Coastal Health Services back to SCAT (FY 1994-1995). Thi s trend analys i s represents a combined set of statistics for all TO transportation services coordinated th r ough the CTC includ ing TO and Medicaid paratransit, fixed-route (unless otherwise specified}, agency vanpool, and subscription service The t ables and figures provided throughout the trend 154 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 193

analysis present selected performance effectiveness and efficiency measures that are available fro m SCAT's AORs. These figures may be o verstated or understated due to various accounting practices at SCAT. Results f rom the trend analysis a r e provided i n the follow ing paragraphs Performa n ce Measures Shown in Tab le 2 2 9 and Figures 2-54 through 2-60 are s i x performance measu re s for SCAT in its capacity of CTC for Brevard County. Total passenger trips for the CTC experienced an overa ll growth of 0.2 percent o ver the fove-year period. Total passenger trips steadily increased from FY 199 1 through FY 1994. However, a decline in total passenger trips Is evident in the data for FY 1995 and FY 1996. This data may be misleading however, as the decline actually represents the result of mod i fications to the reporting process for TO trips As a result of these changes, SCAT now i ncludes far fewer fixed-route trips in TO statistics than the CTC reported in the past. Tota l paratransit trips experience d an overa ll increase of 2.0 percent during the five-year period. The d e cline i n tota l paratransit trips evident fro m FY 1995 and FY 1996 may be the result of the reduction in Medicaid non-emergency t r ansportation recently mandated by the Agency for Healthcare Administration Table 2 CTC T ren d Analysts Performa nce Measures Percent Measure FY1992 FY1!193 FY1994 FY19H FY1996 Chango (1991-1996) Passenger Trips 704 050 745,440 764,449 7 1 9,875 705,795 0 .2% Paratransit PHs Trips 587.309 587,00 3 584,133 616 450 598.961 2.0% Vehk:l e Miles 3.645,298 3 ,996.91!4 4 026 901 4.274,7 17 4,17 5,065 1 4 .5% Revenue Miles 3 141,363 3,611,663 3 733 965 3.762 195 3 675 324 16.9% Operating ElCpentes $2,725,945 $2, 864 211 $3,929,546 $4 ,938,246 $4.289 166 56.6% Operating Revenues $2,686, 118 $3, 270 293 $4, 393 265 $4,938 ,246 $4,449.308 65.6% Total Flee-t 132 141 161 171 I 177 34. 1 % Souroe: SCAT Annual Operating Reports. fiscal years 1992-t996. During the five-year period covere d by the trend analysis the CTC has i ncreased total vehicle miles by 14 5 percent and tota l revenue miles by 16 9 percent. It shou l d be noted, however that both of t hese performa nce meas u r es declined between FY 1995 and FY 1996 Aga in, this decline wou l d be expec ted w ith the mandated re duction in Med i caid non -e mergency trips. Brovald County Transit Developm;lnt Plan 155

PAGE 194

CTC operating expenses increased by 56.6 percent over the five-year period. A significant portion of th i s incr ease occurred between FY 1993 and FY 1995. The trend analys i s also reveals similar increases in total operating revenues and fleet size during these fiscal years. Two significant and related changes in the CTC operations may account for much of the increase in the three performance measures. First, Coastal Health Services and AHCA negotiated a significant increase in Medicaid reimbursable rates for non-emergency transportation As a of the rate increase, the CTC's cost for purchased transportation increased dramatically, as well as total revenues At the same time, the amount oftotal paratransit trips delivered did not significantly increase. Second, during the same time TO non-sponsored t rips were transferred from Coastal to SCAT. SCAT operating expenses increased as a result of the transition because of the need for additional staff to operate the additional vehicles required for the TD service and to complete necessary sched ul i ng activities. 156 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 195

600,000 400,000 200,000 0 1tt2 Figure 2 -54 Passenger Trips 111S 1114 ttll Figure 2 -55 Paratranslt Passenger Trips 800,000 .,----.,----.,---.----, 100,000 400,000 200,000 0 1tt2 1114 1tl5 1991 1 5 7

PAGE 196

158 3,000.000 2,000,000 1 000 000 0 Figure 2-66 Vehicle Miles 1992 1tt3 1tt4 1995 199S 3,000,000 2,000,000 1,000,000 0 Figure 2-57 Revenue Miles 1992 1993 ,,,. 1995 1996 Brevaf'd County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 197

$2,000,000 $1,000,000 $0 Figure 2 -58 Operating Expenses 1112 111S 1tU 1te5 illS $3,000,000 $2,000,000 S1,ooo,ooo $ 0 Figure 2 -59 Operating Revenues 1 .. 2 1tts 1tU 1U5 1991 100 50 0 1tt2 Figure 2-80 Total Fleet 1U5 ,,, 159

PAGE 198

Effect i veness Measures Table 2-30 and F igures through contain trend in f ormation for seven effectiveness measures ca l culated for the Breva r d County CTC. The data shows growth over the five-year perio d (7. 3 per cent) for the average number of miles traveled per potential TO customer. However, the numbe r of total passenger trips per potential TO customers decli ned during this perio d by 6.1 perc ent, and the number o f trips per potential TO customers also declined by 4.4 per cent. B o th total passenger trips per vehicle mile and total paratransit passenger trips per vehicle mile have declined over the five-year period (12 5 percent and 11. 0 percent, respectively} The declines exper i enced in these meaSUre$ have been rather minimal and may be attributed i n part to growth in the average length of passenge r tri p s in Brevard County This is also suggested by the measures related to vehicle miles per tota l passenger trip and vehicle miles p e r par atransi t passenger t rip Both of these effectiveness measures increa s ed over the five-year period (14 2 percent and 12.3 percent respectively). Tab l e 2-30 CT C Tren d A n a l ys i s Effectiveness M easures FY19U I Porum Meaau .. FY1992 FY1994 FY1 9 9 5 FY1996 Change (1992-1996) Veh ide Mijes per TO 24 .87 26.29 26.63 28 02 28 .69 7 3% Veh icle Mi)es per 5 1 8 5.36 5 27 5 94 5 .92 14 .2% Passenger Trip Veh ide Miles pe r 6 .21 6 81 6.89 6 .93 6 .97 1 2 .3% Par a t r a nsit Passe n ger Trip Passenger Tr ips per TO cap f ta 4 .80 4 .90 5 .06 4 .72 4.51 -6. 1% PMSenger 4.01 I $.86 3 .66 4 04 3 .63 -4.4% Trips per T O Clpita I PasHng & r Trips per 0 19 0 19 0 .19 0 17 0 17 -12 .5% Veh ic.\e M\\8 Paratran sit Passenger 0 .16 0 15 0 1 5 0 1 4 0 14 -11.0% Trips per Vehic le M ile -Ac:Cidenlt per 100, 000 Vehicl e Miles 0.90 0 22 I 0 .37 0 .79 .6% Vehicle Mile$ between 43, 396 90,841 nla l 28,123 26,763 .. 38. 3% Roadcalls Source: SCAT Annua\ Operating Reports, f)SC.al years '992. 160 BmvarrJ County Transi t Development Plan

PAGE 199

The average number of vehicle miles traveled between roadca lls decreased by 38.3 percent over the five-year period This measure may suggest the need for further analysis to determine the cause(s) for the decline. However the CTC has also accomplished a significant decline of 12.2 percent in the number of accidents per 100 000 vehicle miles traveled between FY 1993 and FY 1996 (d ata were not available for this measure in FY 1992) This accomplishment is commendable and suggests a high level of system safety. Brevard County TratJsit Development Plan 161

PAGE 200

1 62 Figure 2-61 Vehicle Miles per TO Capita 25.00 20.00 15.00 10.00 s .oo 0 .00 1992 1883 1884 Uti 1888 Figure 2-62 Vehicle Miles per Pass Trip 5.00 ... 00 3.00 2 .00 1 .00 0.00 1992 1t93 1994 Figure 2 -63 1995 1111 Veh. Miles/ Paratransit Pass Trip 8.00 .....---..... ---,-----,----, s.oo 4.00 2.00 o.oo 1892 1993 1915 1998 Brevard County Trans i t Developmen t Plan

PAGE 201

Figure 2 -64 Passenger Trips per TO Capita 1 .00 ,----,----,--.----, 1 .00 4 .00 s .oo 2 .00 1 .00 0 .00 1992 11U uu uu: "" Figure 2 -65 Paratransit Pass Trips/TO Capita 1 .00 ,--,--,---,---, 4 .00 s.oo 2 .00 1.00 0 .00 1112 uu ,,. ,,, Figure 2-66 Passenger Trips per Veh Mile o.u 0 .10 o .os o.oo 19U Brevatd County Transit Deve lopment Pfan un 1tt' 1111 Uti 163

PAGE 202

164 Figure 2-67 Paratranalt Paaa TrlpaNeh Mile 0.11 0.12 0.08 0.04 o.oo 1tt2 1113 11t4 1815 1818 Figure 2-68 Accident& per 100,000 Veh Miles 1.00 0.80 0 .1 0 0 .40 0.20 0 .0 0 1993 1tt5 1998 Brevard County Tnmsi t Development Plan

PAGE 203

Efficjency Measures The final area examined in the trend ana lys is for the Brevard County CTC is the area of system efficiency. The measures include d in Table 2-31 and i ll ustrated graphically in Figures 2-sg through 2-73 are intended to provide a picture of how efficiently SCAT. in role as CTC, is providing service to the TD population in Brevard County. All of the efficiency measures rel ated t o operating expenses show a significant increase during the analysis period. Operating expenses per total p assenger trips r ose by 56.2 percent during the five-year period. Although data pertaining to operating expense per paratransit passenger trip were not available for FY 1g92 and FY 1993, t his measure shows an in crease of 38. 7 percent from FY 1994 to FY 1996 Finally oper at ing expense per ve h ic le mile traveled rose 36. 7 percent over the five-year period covered by the trend analysis. All of these increases may be the result of the increased cost of Med ica i d transportation in Brevard County and the additional SCAT staff required to provide TD non-sponsored trips. Tab le 2-31 CTC Trend Analysis -Efficiency Measures I Perent Mta sure FY1992 I FY1983 FY19i4 FY1995 FY1996 Change (1992) Operating Expense per $3.87 $3.64 $5. 14 $6.86 $6.05 56.2% Passenger Trip 0!)6rating per nla n/a $4.85 $7.52 $6.73 n la Paralransrt Passenger Trip Operat ing expense per VehiCle Mite $0.75 $0.72 $0.98 $1.16 $1.02 35.7% Farebox Ratio 6.6% 4.5% 6 0% 4 .1% 1 .4% 9 .1% Loca l Government 23.5% 26.6% 26.9% 21.(),<, 16. 5% 5% Revenue Ra t io Souroe: SCAT Annu al Operating Reports. fis.cal years 1992t 996 The final two efficiency measures farebox recovery ratio and local revenue ratio have declined over the past five fiscal years Revenues collected through the collection of fares have decreased by 79. 1 percent. However, this decline actually is the result of SCAT separating fares collected from fixed-route services from those collected from paratransit services. FY 1996 was the first fiscal year that this separation was accomplished. Revenues collected from local government contributions to the system have also decreased by 29. 5 percent. This decrease is an area for potential concern because this data may be viewed as a lack of local financial commitment to services. This decrease should be studied further to determine the potential reasons for the decline and possible long-term effects. Brevard County Transit Development Plan 165

PAGE 204

166 Figure 2-69 Operating Exp per Pass Trip $4.00 $2.00 $0.00 1992 1tU 1114 1985 Figure 2-70 Op Exp per Para Pass Trip $4.00 $2.00 $0.00 ... 1US Figure 2-71 Op Exp per Vehicle Mile suo $0.00 1912 1993 1995 tU6 1991 Brevald County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 205

6.0% 4.0% 2.0" 0.0% 1512 Figure 2 72 Farebox Ratio ttl4 UIS Figure 2 73 Local Gov't Revenue Ratio 20.0% 1 0.0% 0 .0" uu Brevard Counly Tren$it Development Plan 1114 uu Ut& 199& 167

PAGE 206

Conclusjons This con cluding section summarizes the resuHs of the CTC trend analysis for SCAT. A summary of SCAT's performance strengths and weaknesses based on effectiveness and efficiency measures is prov ided in Table 2-32. The in tent of showing this information is not to suggest the extent of the strength or weakness but to identity those performance areas where SCAT's performance has improved or declined from 1992 to 1996. With regard to the trend analysis a performance strength is defined as any performance area that improved or was maintained over the trend analysis t ime period and a performance weakness is defined as a trend that declined over t he trend analysis time period. Table 2-32 SCAT Performance Strengths and Weaknesses, Trend Analysis Performance Strengths Perfonnanee Weaknet:t" Vehicle Miles per TO Capita Passenger trips per TO Capi t a Accidents per 100,000 Vehicle Miles Paratranslt Passenger Trip$ per TO Cas>ita Pas.unger Trips per Ve hicle Mile Patatranslt Passenger Trips per VehiCle Mile Vehicle M iles between Road/s Operating Expense per Passenger Trip Operating Expense per Paratransit Pass. Trip Opera ting Expense per V&hide Mile Farebox Ratio Local Government Revenue Ratio As illustrated in Table 2-32 SCAT has experienced significant declines in most effectiveness and efficiency measures ana lyzed for the five-year period. However, it is important that t hese declines are only considered along with the major operational and accounting changes that took place at the CTC throughout the five-year trend analysis period, as well as an increase in average trip length, which decreases productivity. As discussed previously, SCAT's contract provider of Medicaid non-emergency transportation negotiated a very large increase in Medicaid reimbursable rates for non-emergency transportation during FY 1994. This ra te increase also raised the CTC's cost for purchased transportation. Also contributing to the rise in operating expenses during the trend analysis period was the transition of the provision of TD n on-sponsored trips from Coastal Health Services to SCAT. This t ran sition required additional staff to operate additional vehicles and complete scheduling activities. 168 Brevalfl County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 207

This section has presented a trend analysis of the B r evard County CTC covering fiscal years 1992 1993, 1994, 1995, and 1996. A CTC peer gro u p anal ysis was also comp l eted as part of the performance evaluation of the Brevard County CTC in order to compare SCAT's performance with the perfonnances of similar CTCs throughout the state. The CTC peer group analysis is presented in the follow i ng section. CTC Peer Group Analysis A peer group analysis serves two functions: first ij pro vides a comparison of how well SCAT is performing re l ative to s i milar CTC systems within the state of Florida and, second i t hel ps to establish realistic performance standar d s for the evaluation p rocess A paratransij service peer review analysis for FY 1996 was conducted to compare the performance o f SCAT against that of similar paratransit systems in Florida. The six Flor ida peer CTCs i ncluded in the analysis are shown in Table 2-33 These six systems were chosen because they a r e s o mewhat s i m il a r to SCAT i n terms of the follow i ng five key elements: demographic characteristics system s ize (measured in tenns of annua l TO ridership) operating environment (urban or ru r al service area d esignation), organization type (transit agency, government private non-profit or private for-profit) and network type (sole provider partial provider or complete brokerage). The graphs presented in this section summarize selected perfonnance measures, effectiveness measures, and effic i ency measures for the various CTCs considered for th i s review. Each perfonnance measure i s depicted in a bar chart which also indicates the peer group mean (a vertical bar in each chart) to enhance the overall comparison. Deta i led infonnation for each of the peer CTCs is included in Appendix H. All performance statistics for the CTC peer group systems were obtained from the FCTD s 1996 Annual Perfonnance Report which conta ins a compilati o n of the Annua l Operat i ng Reports submitted t o the FCTD for FY 1996 by each local CTC. According to the Evaluation Worl
PAGE 208

Table 2-33 Brevard County CTC System Peers Service Area Community TransportaUon Coordinator Duval County COMSIS Mobility Setvices Inc. Escambia County I COMSIS Mobility Servioes, Inc. Lee County COMSIS Mobiliey Servioes. I n c Pa500 County Pasco County Public Transportation Polk County Polk County Board of County Commissioners Volusla County VOTRAN Performaoce Measures Table 2-34 and Figures 2-74 through 2-82 present information pertaining to nine performance measures for SCAT and its CTC peers. As discussed previously, performance measures provide general information related to overall system performance. When compared to ijs CTC peers, SCAT is slightly above the peer group mean for total service area population. However, SCAT falls just below the peer group mean of 166,409 Potential TO Population Overall SCAT compared quite favorably to peer group in the remainder of the performance measure categories. SCAT provided 27. 5 percent more total passenger trips (705,795) during FY 1996 than the peer group mean (553,533) as illustrated in Figure 2-76. Figure 2-77 shows that the Brevard County CTC also provided 35.6 percent more paratransit passenger trips than the peer group mean Indeed, SCAT reported the second highest number of paratransit trips in the peer group. In terms of total vehicle miles and total revenue miles traveled, SCAT performed quite well in comparison toils peer group. SCAT traveled 23.5 percent more vehicle miles and 29.5 percent more revenue miles than the peer group average. In addition to traveling more total miles than the peer group average, a larger percent of these miles were revenue generat ing miles. This data is presented in Figures 2 -78 and 2-79. 170 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 209

Table 2-34 CTC Peer Anal y s is -Performance M &asures Measure SCAT Peer Group I Peer Group Peer Group SCAT: Mini mum Maximum Man % F rom M oan Service A t ea Pl)f)ulation -456.735 28&.277 726 783 i 433.701 5 .3% Poten! i al TO Po pvlation 1 56, 444 103 2 1 4 229 648 I 1 66,409 Pa-ssenger Trip$ 705 795 19-4, 660 950,380 553,533 27.5% Paratnmslt Passenge-r Trips 598.9e 1 194,832 74$, 114 441 777 35.6% Vehic l e Mi le-s 4,175,065 1 ,3&1,706 6.529.630 3 ,379.798 23.5% Re..,e-nue Miles 3 675 324 1,273,9Q2 6,202,9e4 2.838 ,.007 29. 5% Operat ing Expenses $4, 269 166 $2, 193, 217 $9, 115 ,542 I $4,333 954 1.5% Operatmg Reve n ue-s $2,193,217 $9,389, 931 $4, 397.299 1 2 % Tota l Fleet 177 57 235 133 32. 7% Data r elated to operating expenses operating revenues and fleet size are shown Figures 2-80 thro ugh 2 82 The s e d ata reveal that even the sharp i ncrease in operating expenses discusse
PAGE 210

172 Figure 2-74 0 200 400 600 Polk Lee Figure 2-75 Potential TO Pop ,1-..._. c :::; 0 Polk DuvaiBrevard Volus i a Eaeambia Pas co Lee 0 100 160 200 Figure 2-76 Passenger Trips (000) I iii -' 200 600 800 Brevard County Trensi t Oevelopmenl Plan

PAGE 211

Figur e 2-n Pa ratranslt Lee 0 200 400 600 Figure 2-78 Total Vehicle Miles (000) Duval Polk Brevard Vol: usia Escambia LAe Pasco Duva l LAe Pasco 0 Figure 2-79 Total Revenue Miles iiipi1 c .. :s 0 2,000 4,000 BI8VBII1 County Transit Development Plan e,ooo 173

PAGE 212

174 Figure 2-80 Operating Expense (000) Duval Polk Brevard e .. ::; Lee1--' Duval Vol usia Polk Brevard Eacambta Pasco $0 $4,000 $8,000 Figure 2-81 Operating Revenue (000) c ::; $0 $4,000 $8,000 Duval 0 Figure 2-82 Total Fleet 100 200 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 213

Effect iveness Measures Effectiveness measures for FY 1996 were calculated for SCAT and each of its peer CTCs and are shown in Tab l e 2-35 and Figures 2-83 through 2-91 On average SCAT trave ls many more veh ic le miles p e r potential TO customer than its peers as shown in Figure 2-83. Specifically SCAT traveled 35.6 percent more vehicles miles per TO capita than the peer group mean of 19.69 miles. The average l ength of SCAT's tota l passenger trips was slightly shorter (5. 92 miles) t han the pee r g roup mean (6.25 miles). Table 2-35 CTC Peer A n alysis -Effective ness Measures Mea&-ure SCAT P"rGroup Peer Group PQrGroup SCAT: Minimum M aximum Moan %From M ean Vehicle M i le s per TO Capita 26.69 8 43 28. 43 1 9.69 3s.6% Vehicle Miles pee Passenger Trip 5 9 2 3 68 8 66 6 25 .3% Passenger Trips per TO Capita 4 5 1 1 19 5 .5 1 I 3 40 32.8% Paratransil Passenger Trips per TO 3.83 1 19 3.83 2 69 42.4% Capita I Passe n g e r Tcips per Vehicle Mile 0.17 0.12 0.27 I 0.17 0.0% Paratransl1 Passenger Trips per 0.14 0. 1 1 0.22 0 .14 0.0% VehiCle Mile Average Age of Fieet (years) 4. 1 3 .6 7.4 5.2 -2 0 .5% Accidents pet 1 00 000 Vehicle Miles 0 .79 0.42 1 .62 1 1 2 9 .2% Vehlde M fJes between Roadcalls 26, 7 63 7 043 64, 643 31,514 15 1 % SCAT prov i ded m o re total passenge r trips per TO cap i ta and more paratransit trips per TO capita than the peer group aver age. In FY 1996 SCAT provided 4.51 passenger trips per potentia l TO customer compared to the pee r group mean of 3.40 passenger trips per potential TO customer. Likewise SCAT prov i ded 3 .83 paralransit passenger trips per potential TO customer compared to an average of 2 .69 paralransil trips for the peer group In the areas of passenger t rips per vehic le mile and paratransil passe nger trips per vehicle mile, SCAT's data was equal to the means reported for the peer group, 0.17 and 0.14 trips, respectively The relati o nship of SCA T to its peers for these two effectiveness measures is illustrated in F i gures 2-87 and 2-88 The fi nal three effectiveness measu res compare SCAT to its peer CTCs in terms of system safety and serv i ce qua lity, as shown in Figures 2 through 2-91. The average age of SCAT's vehicle fleet (4.1 years) falls well below (20.5 percent) the peer group mean of 5.2 yea rs. Sim i larly, SCAT Brevard CQunty Transit Development Plan 175

PAGE 214

reports far fewer accidents pe r 100,000 vehicle miles than the mean for the CTC peer group, 0. 79 as compared to the peer group average of 1.12. One possible area of concern apparent in peer group a n alys i s of effectiveness measures pertains to the number of vehicle miles between roadcalls. SCAT reported 15.1 percent fewer miles traveled between roadcalls than the peer group average of 31,514. Given the relatively young age of the vehicle fleet, this is one area that may merit further analysis. 176 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 215

F igure 2-83 TO ...,. .. .. li 0 .00 10 .00 20.00 F igure 2-84 Vehicle Miles 30.00 0.00 2 .00 4 .00 1.00 1 00 10.00 0 .00 2 00 Btevanf County T"'nsil Developmenl Plan c li 4 .00 6.00 177

PAGE 216

178 Figure 2-86 Paratransit Pass Trips per TO Capita Bn!van:t Eecambla .. Polk Ouvai Voluala Pasco Lee 0.00 1.00 2.00 Figure 2-87 c .. .. :s 3.00 4.00 Passenger Trips per Vehicle Mile Eacambia PoiJ( Brevard Puco Voluaia Lee Duval c :s 0.00 o.os 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 Figure 2-88 Paratransit Pass LM 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 217

Figure 2 -89 Average Age of Fleet (Years ) Lee Duva l BteVard I VoJusia Po l k Pasco 0.0 2.0 4 0 8.0 Figure 2-90 8 0 Accidents Vehicle Miles L .. 0.00 0.50 1 .00 Figure 2-91 e : 2 1.50 2 .00 Vehicle Miles Between Roadcalls flilliii I Pas eo Vol usia Polk Brevard ...... Ouva.l Eseambia-= 0 20,000 40 000 80,000 Bte v ard C<>ooly T rsn&t Plan

PAGE 218

Efficiency Measures The final area addressed in the CTC peer analysis is the area of system efficiency Table 2-36 and Figures 2 -92 through 2-96 contain the data collected In order to compare SCAT's system efficiency with its peer CTCs. Table 2-36 CTC Peer Analysis Efficiency Measures MN&\mt SCAT Peer Group Peer Group Peer Group SCAT: Minimum Maximum Mean o/. From Mun Operating ExjM!Inse per PassengerTri $6.05 $5.00 $12.09 $8.42 -28.2% Operating Expense Pet Paratranslt $6 73 S$.01 $13. 09 $9. 28.9% Pauengt'r Trip Operating Expense per Vehicle Mile $1.02 $0.99 $1. 6 1 $1.35 24.1% Farebox Ratio 1.4% 0.9% 4.0% 2.5% -<5. 1% Loe&\ Government Revenue Ratio 16 .5-Yo D.5% 23 .0% 1 0 .8% 53.2% Efficiency measures relat ing to operating expenses per passenger trip were calculated for paratransit trips, specifically, as well as total paratransit trips (includes fixed-route and vanpooltrips. where appli cab le). Figure 2-92 and 2-93 show that, with respect to operating expense per passenger trip and per paratranslt passenge r trip, SCAT falls well below the peer group mean for these measures. Specifically, SCAT operating expense per passenger trip in FY 1996 was 26.2 percent l ower than the average for the CTC peer group ($6.05 compared to $8.42). Similarly, SCAT's operating expense per paralransit passenger trip was $6.73 which is 26.9 percent l ower than the peer group mean of $9.47 per paratransittrip. SCAT's operating expense per vehicle mile was also 24.1 percent lower at $1. 02, than the peer group mean of $1.35 per vehicle mile. The amo unt of revenue collected during FY 1996 from SCAT fareboxes was significantly less than the peer group mean. 1.4 percent versus 2 5 percent. However, SCAT ranked third among its CTC peers in terms of the ratio of total revenue contributed by the l ocal government. It is very interesting to note that although the amount of revenue contributed by the loca l government has declined over the past five years (as discussed in the trend analysis previously), the amou nt of revenue contributed by the lo ca l government in Brevard County was 53.2 percent higher than t he peer group mean This relat i onship is illustrated in Figure 2-96. 180 Brevatd C<>unty Transit Development Plan

PAGE 219

- Figura 2-92 EIICI ,nbla .-fl-t-.... c : "' t s o .oo $4 00 $8.00 Figure 2 93 Tnp --,-$ 12.00 Op Exp per Paratranslt Pass Tri' I I .... so.oo $4 00 $8.00 $12.00 Figure 2 -94 Expense per Vehi cle Mile Polk so.oo $0.50 $ 1.00 suo $2.00 Brevartl C<>unry Tronslt Development Plan 181

PAGE 220

182 0.0% Figure 2-95 Farebox Ratio I 1.0 % 2.0% Figure 2 96 3.0% 4 .0% Local Government Revenue Ratio Voluai a Pasco Brevard Polk Lee Duval Escambla < :i 0 0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% BrtJvarrJ County Transit Development Pla n

PAGE 221

Conclusjom; This concluding section summarizes the resu lt s of the CTC peer review analysis for SCAT. For the CTC peer review analysis, a performance strength is defined as a performance area that is more than 10 percent better than the peer group average while a performance weakness is defined as a performance area that is more t h a n 10 percent worse than the peer group average. Overall, as shown in Table 2-37, the CTC peer comparison reveals that SCAT is perf orming very well in comparison to its CTC peer group.. Even when t he weaknesses revealed in the trend analysis above are considered, the CTC for Brevard County is perform ing very well. The only areas that appear to need improvement are vehicle miles between roadcalls and farebox recovery ratio. However, a l though all of the comparisons p r esented in this secti o n do p rovi de in sight into how we ll the CTC for Brevard County appears to be performing statistically, they should not be used as the sole measures to make inferences about the quality of SCAT's TO services. Table 2-37 SCAT CTC Performance Strengths and Weaknesses, Peer Review Performanc. Strengths Perfonnance Weaknesses VehiCle Mile$ pet TO Capita Vehicle between Roadcalls Passengef Trips per TO Capita Farebox Ratio Paratransit Passenger Trips per TO Capita Average Age o f Fleet Operating Expense pet Passenger Trip Operating Expense per Patatransit PaM Tlip Operating Expense per Vehjcle Mile Loc. l Government Revenue Ratio Accidents per 100.000 Vehicle M iles Brevard County Transit Development Pl an 183

PAGE 222

DESCRIPTION OF THE BREVARD COUNTY COMMUTER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Space Coast Area Transit, also, operates the designated local commuter assistance program office. The commuter assistance program is administered by the FOOT and was developed to assist local residents and businesses in the establishment and use of alternative transportation modes and other transportation demand management strategies. Although Space Coast Area Transit provides assistance in carpool formation alternative work hour program development, marketing of alternative transportation, and employer outreach and education, the focus of the program has bee n on vanpool formation. Vanpool Services In 1982, the Brevard Transportation Authority received a federal demonstration grant to promote rideshaling as an alternative to traditional public transit service. BTA ope rated the service with its own staff until 1985, when it was put out for competitive bid. The vanpool program still serves as an alternative to subscription bus service. The advantage to a vanpool program is that fewer people are needed to fill the vehicle (8-15 passengers), and stops to pick-up and discharge passengers tend to be more conveniently located (usually at the rider's front door). Other advantages include the potential for passenger travel time savings the ability to serve low density areas, and employer-recognized benefits of reduced absenteeism tardiness and commute stress. The disadvantages of vanpooling include the perceived higher costs of participation, concerns over administration, and coordination services. To address these disadvantages, Space Coast Area rransit has developed a unique program that utilizes a third-party provider, Vanpool Services, Inc. (VPSI). Under this arrangement, the van purchases are subsidized by Brevard County utilizing funds provided by the federal, state, and county government for the express purchase of transit capital purchases. Once the purchases are made, Space Coast Area Transit leases the vans over to VPSI which sub-leases the vehicles to each vanpool group. Under the lease, VPSI provides all maintenance, insurance, and administration, and provides back-up vehicles in the event of unforeseen mechanical problems. This type of arrangement is beneficial for all three parties. First, Space Coast Area Transit, through the purchase of the vans is allowed to include the vanpool operation as part of their public transportation system for all statistical reporting requirements. In addition, the capital costs of van purchase can be at least partially recovered when the vans are resold. (Vans are replaced after a set time period, four years or after a certain predetermined mileage figure Is reached 100,000 miles ) The vanpool users realize cost savings over other vanpools because much of the capital purchase expense is removed from the monthly lease fee. This resuKs in a cost savings of roughly $300 to $500 per month for each vanpool ($400 vs. $700 to $900). Finally, VPSI benefits from 184 Bmvard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 223

having an expanded market with which to operate since the perceived prohibitive costs are greatly reduced This allows vanpools to form before every seat is filled. In fact, many vans are operating without the full complement of passengers because ex i sting r iders buy-up the extra seats so that they have more room i n the van. This increases their monthly cost by only about $5.00 per month per person Currently, Space Coast Area and VPSI operate 95 vans of wh i ch 52 are used as commuter vans The rest are l ocal human serv i ce agency vans l eased to the agenc i es for $575 per month to provide transportat ion services to t r ansportation disadvantaged individuals. F i sca l Year 1996 ridership for vanpools was 256 836 passenger trips or 32 percent of the total publ i c transportation system ridership VPS I projects a 5 percent growth rate per year for the van pool p r ogram based on the current levels of dedication and use. At present, 90 percent of all vans in the purchase cycle (already purchased or under purchase agreement) are dedicated to identified markets Thi s compares favorably to national vanpoo l figures in which 80 percent of vans in the purchase cycle are dedicated and to Florida vanpool statistics i n which 60 percent of vans are dedicated. Overall, the Space Coast Area T r ansit vanpool program is one of the top vanpool programs i n the country and the leading vanpool program In F lorida. In the United States, only five vanpool programs located in much larger areas have b i gger fleets. Other Commuter Assistance Program Efforts While the vanpoo l program has received the most attention, othe r commuter assistance program act i vities have been undertaken Unfortunately, statistical informat ion on these programs is not collected Tab l e 2-38 summarizes the commuter assistance program activities for Space Coast Area Transit, and lists some of the services typically offered by other transportation demand management (TOM) programs housed wnhin a transit agency. SCAT's commuter programs staff have dedicated a great deal of time to employer outreach Thi s effort has led to the promot ion of other TOM strategies, such as alternative work hour arrangements and te l ecommuting. However, a system of measuring the results of this outreach is not in place. Therefore the effectiveness of these outreach efforts cannot be measured. According to national research, emp l oyer outreach i s an important first step i n the p r ocess of converting drive alone commuters into users of alternative forms of transportation. It should also be noted that the employer outreach efforts of Space Coast, when compared to other programs in Florida is above average. The commuter programs staff identified a lack of adequate funding for promotional efforts. While market ing and promotion of TOM efforts has long been considered a key element to TOM program success a r ecent report from the Federal Highway Administration Implementing Effective Travel Brevarrl County Transit Development Plan 185

PAGE 224

Demand Management Measures i ndicates the marketing and support is one of the least considered measures i n developing a successful TOM program. Importance should be placed on increasing public awareness of TOM with spec i al emphas i s on educating decisi o n makers and transportation professionals. Table 2-38 Commuter A ssistance Program Activiti es SeNie& Offered Throuah SCA T Ridest\arina oromotion at emolover site& Yes however extremel v limited _oeve1o12 and ... P.rocess Yes verv limited ETC training No Trip reduction p l an p r eparation No. !not r'!!juired i n B r eva r d Counlyl Advocacy: No Periodica lslori nted materials Yes ComQuterized ridematd'\in g Yes Persona l ized ridematchlnQ No Guaranteed ride home No Van!jor vanJ;!oolina I Yes Thi r doartv vanoools Yes Van12ool formation assistance Yes Vaneool driver training Yes Vanpool financial incentives Yes Transi t information Yes -Transi t oass sales Yes services No Parkina information No Parking management Yes VANPOOL TREND ANALYSIS The following d is c ussion provides anal ysis of Space Coast Area Transit s Vanpoo l program for a five-year ti m e frame from FY 1992 through FY 1996. Sel ected performance, effectiveness, and efficiency measures are ana l y z ed. As a g r o up, these statistics reflect the continued growth of the vanpool program and the impacts of focus t o wards commuter vans Given the rise in Brevard County suburbanization, and the cost 18$ Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 225

of insurance all of which incr e a s ed sig n i ficantly, the rela t ively minor fluctuation s here are a s ign of a strong program. Vanpo o l Performance Mea sures Tab le 2-39 presents data f r om FY 1 9 9 2 t h r ough FY 199 6 concerning v anpo o l performance measures. Passe nger Trips Th e 17.8 perc ent g rowth rat e in passenger t rips is att r ibuta b le t o su s tained interest in vanp ools as a low cost commu t e option. Vehicle Miles The 32. 1 percent i ncreas e i n vehic l e miles is a reflect ion of the ra t e of s u burbanizat i on in B revard C ounty. The increase in low dens it y developmen t i s best se rved by v a n pool and ca rp ool programs. T otal Operating ExpenseThese increases are a resu l t o f the drama tic rise in insurance costs a n d a modera te rise in m aint enance costs bot h of which are di rectly charge d t o the opera t ors Ve h icles A vaila b l e for Maximum Service vs. Vehicles Operat e d i n Maxi m u m Service The di sparity i n these num b ers is r e fl e cted i n the need to acc o mmoda t e back-up vehicles and the pop u l a rity of "buying-up" se ats for add e d com f ort The low cost of the vans f o r users facilitates th e b u y-up. Tabl e 2 3 9 Vanpool Performa nce M e asur es FY 1996 l %Change Performance ln dlca toni FY 1 9 92 FY 199 3 I FY 1994 FY 1995 1992-1996 Passenger Trips (000) 269. 38 261 .44 256.84 I I 17.8% V e hic l e Miles (000) 1521.97 1 ,635.95 1 646 .50 1,875 .76 2.009.95 32.1 % T o ta l Operaling El
PAGE 226

Vehicle Miles per Capita-This measure showed an i n crease of 26.1 percent between FY 1992 and FY 1996 This is reflective of the i ncrease in the number of vans in the van poo l pro gra m Passenger Trips per Revenue Hour-A 10.9 percent decrease over the time period is reported The tact that reve nue hours grew faster than passenger trips most likely reflects the tendency of van pool users to buy-up seats. Average Age of Fleet While the fleet age has increased, the impact of this factor is minima l given the strong maintenance and replacement programs i n place Table 2-40 Vanpool Effectiveness M ea sures Effectiveness Measures FY1992 FY1993 FY1994 FY1995 1 FY1996 %Change 1992 -1996 Vehicle Miles per Capita 3.64 3.92 3.85 428 4.59 26.1% Passenger Trips per 3.n 4.15 4 .20 3 .66 3.36 -10 .9% Revenue Hour Average Age of Fleet 2.59 2 02 2.03 2 .2 8 2 .89 11 .7 % Qn Years) Vanpool Efficiency Measures Efficiency measures for vanpool operat i on are discussed below and p r esented in Table 2-41 Operating Expense per Capita-While the operat i ng expense rose 44 6 percent over the report ing period, this can be attributed to rising maintenance and insurance costs as well as an in crease in the s ize of the vanpool program. Operating Expense per Peak Vehicle Given the rise in Brevard County suburbanization, and the cost of insurance, all of which i ncreased significantly, the increase in this category is expected Operating Expense per Passenger Trip-Because operat i ng expenses are increasing at a rate faster than the passenger t rips, this indicator would be expected to increase. Operating Expense per Revenue Hour -A 15 1 percent increase in operating expense per revenue hour is expected since commuter van operation is li mited to a few hours each day 188 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 227

Vehicle Miles per Peak VehicleCommuter vans tend to operate during peak periods and have long trip lengths (national average trip length for commuler vans is 24 miles). Given these parameters, it is not surprising that vehicle m iles per peak vehicle inc reased by 6 6 percent during the perio d Revenue Hours per Total VehicleThe 3 9 percent inc rease is a reflect ion of the growing commuter van poo l fleet. Table 2-41 Vanpool Efficiency Meas ures FY1993 I FY1994 I %Change Efficiency Measures FY1992 FY1995 FY1996 l 1992-1996 Expense per $0.74 $0.83 $0.87 I $0.98 $1.07 44.6% Capita Operating Expense per $4.58 $5.02 $5 .0 8 $5.23 $5.62 I 22.7% P eak Vehicle (000) Operating Expense per $1.41 l $1.34 $1.4 1 $1.64 $1.81 28.4% Passenger Trip Operating Expense per $5.31 I $5.56 $5.95 $6.02 $6.11 1 5 .1% Revenue Hour Vehicle Mites per Peak 22.72 I 23.71 22 .49 22.87 24.21 6.6% Vehicle (000) Vehicle Hours per Peak 0 .97 0.95 0.90 0.91 0.97 6 .6% Vehicle (000 ) Revenue H ours per Total I 0 77 0.71 0.73 0.76 0 .80 3 .9% Vehicles (000) 8revarrJ County Transit Development Plan 189

PAGE 228

190 Brevard County Trensit Devolopment Plan

PAGE 229

INTRODUCTION CHAPTER THREE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES The identification of goals and objectives for a public transportation system i s a fundamental step in the development of a Transit Development Plan This chapter summarizes the policy issues that were identified from discussions with the TOP rev i ew committee interviews with local officials transit agency staff and the general public The first section of this technical memorandum identifies the proposed five-year transit development plan goals and object i ves that were developed fo r Space Coast Area Transit. The second section lists the L ocal Coordinating Board Goals that were developed for the transportat ion disadvantaged program with i n Brevard County The third section contains transit-related goals and objectives that are contained in other Brevard County documents The final section describes the public meeting held on April 1, 1997 TOP GOALS AND OBJECTIVES The goals and objectives for SCAT's service In Brevard County for the next five years were developed using an approach designed to solicit input from an array of community interests The p r ocess of i dentifying goals began with the March 20, 1997, meet i ng with the TOP Review Committee. At this meeting the committee was asked to identify key issues that should be included in the TOP goals and objectives. With the information from this meeting CUTR staff developed five major goals with corresponding objectives. These goals and objectives were then presented at a public meeting on Apri11 1997. At this meet ing, the public was asked to respond to the following question either through written or verba l comments. What should Space Coast Area Transit do in the next five years to develop service that meets the needs of Brevard County residents? The draft goals and objectives were further modified based on the comments received at the public meeting The TOP goals and objectives were adopted by the B r evard County Board of County Commiss i oners on August 19 1997 when the transit development plan was adopted As stated above the goals focus on five interrelated policy areas for all of the publ i c transportation services offered by SCAT including fixed route paratransit, subscription and vanpool services These five pol icy areas are the fo ll owing Brevard Covnty Transi t Devslopment Plan 191

PAGE 230

Unmet demand Transportation coordination Marketing Transit-friendly land use and regulations Emergency evacuation In addition to the goals and objectives, a mission statement for SCAT, as suggested by the TDP Review Committee is listed below Mission Statement Our mission is to provide quality public transportation services to Brevard County that meets the mobility needs of the general public and which will improve the quality of life in our community, while enhancing customer satisfaction. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Goal 1: Examine and/or address unmet demand. 192 Expand fixed-route service days and hours of operation to meet the weekend service needs (Saturday Sunday and Friday evening). Expand weekday hours of service. Periodically examine the needs of the transit dependent to determine if they are being met by public transportation. Link fixed route service to key service centers (e g., medical facilities, government fac ilities social service agencies) Supply additional public transportation service and/or commuter assistance p rogram s for work trips to major employment centers through partnerships with major employers Expand services to meet the transportation needs of young people in Brevard County. Examine the pote ntia l for coordination with major employers for an employee lunch bus service for their employees. Brevaro Coonly Transit Development Plan

PAGE 231

Goal 2: Expand and reinforce transportation coordination opportunities in Brevard County. Coordinate paratransit trips with other trips in the area (e.g., work, training, after school, school transportation for students within walk zone). Pursue coordination of transportation services with other counties (e.g., Indian River County). Examine potential coordination of taxis in Brevard County with SCAT's services (e g. taxi trips to bus stops, using taxis to expand door-to-door Pursue alternative funding sources. Expand park and ride services to coordinate with other public transportation services (e.g., transit routes, express routes, and Lynx). Goal 3: Expand and refine SCAT's marketing efforts. Evaluate the effectiveness of SCAT's current marketing efforts. Pursue marketing efforts that give people an inc entive to try the system (e.g., free ride coupons) and/or commuter aHernative program services. Invest igate hiring of full-time outreach coordinator (in coordination with marketing consultant) who will focus on information and outreach for fixed route and commute alternative program services, and education about SCAT's roles in the community Goal 4: Pursue transit-friendly land use and regulations. Involve SCAT in the County and municipality p la nning processes to ensure that developments are transit-friendly. This inclu des designing for transit use, providing transit amenities, connecting transit with other modes of transportation such as walking and bicycling, and providing for emergency evacuation. Develop incentiv e programs for developers to promote public t rans portation and ridesharing (e.g., crediting developers for park ing spaces they provide in Park and R ide lo ts transit amenities in lieu of parking or landscaping, impact fee credits for transit Brevard County Transit Development Plan 193

PAGE 232

Goal 5: Improve SCAT's rol e i n emer genc y e v acuat i on. Educate c ommunity about SCAT's role as a resource in emergency evacuati ons Support SCAT's role i n emergency transport a tion function by providing a ppropriate resources for it to functio n effectively Improve p l anning and developmen t process to include improve m ents which reduce the need for emergency evacuatio n or ease the process of emergency evacuation (e. g. coordination with developments to ensure proper t um-a-round are a for b uses). LOCAL COORDI N A T IN G BOARD GOALS FOR 199 7 The follow i ng goals for the transp orta t ion d i sadvantaged program i n Brevard County were devel oped by the Brevard County Local Coord i natin g Board These goal s r epresent the local pol icy tha t will be used to manage the transportat i on d i sadvantaged program coordi nated by SCAT, over the next yea r. GOAL 1 : P r ogra m fundi ng a n d finan ce Objec t i ves St rategies 1. I n vestigate and purs u e all sources Con t inue regu l a r updates t o fee o f fun d i ng. i n c l uding i n c r ea s e s t o c l i ents a n d reso l utions agencies pro vi ding serv i ces M aximize recovery of c ost from human service agen c ies. Look for grant opportunities Maximize current r evenue opport u n ities a n d grant a l locat i ons. Con s ider FOOT serv i ce e n hanceme n t dollars where feas i b l e Seek additio n a l local match Encourage pu rc hase of h and i capped placards and voluntary donaons 2 I den t ify a n d imp l eme n t any potential system Search for methods to I n c r ease mu lt i lo ad i ng cos t sav i n gs act i v i ties Improve efficiency o f d i aly s i s t ransportation. Research t ax i cab back up serv i ces 3 E n co u rage i n d i v i dua l s a g e n c i es a n d Ho l d meet i n gs t h ose who i den t ify needs comm un i ty groups W h o i de n t i fy t ransporta ti on Clearly ex p l a i n vario u s mob i l ity options t o problems to b ecome part n ers in the solut i ons to t hose with nee d s those pro blems. Ask for assistance i n meet i ng needs 194 Brevard County Transit De velopment Plan

PAGE 233

GOAL 2 : Unmet demands Objectives Strategies 1 'Mlile medical tr ansportation needs are critica l Continuall'y review community need surveys. all n eeds should be reviewed so that no segment Parti cipate in community forums wh ich o l o ur community is lelt unserved. encourage communications. 2 Worl< and training trips are Important to self Contin u e peak hour committee efforts sufficiency These opportun i"es should be Continue support of l arge group employee e xpan ded. special a tt ention paid to peak snes. hour employment trips and needs generated by Explore vanpool options. the WAGES, 'Welfare t o Wofk", in itiatives Hold employment transportation meet i ngs Improve communication wf1h agencies involVed in supported employment or job development. Publish and distribute a guide to assist i n t ra nsportation aspects of job development. 3 The transportation needs o f c hildren and Part icipate in specia l program s d esigne d t o families should be regularly consi d ered by the serve families and children CTC with tile objedive of expanding resources Expand fiXed route opportunities and services Continue to coordin ate summer transportation meetings 4 Research and define South Ma inland Meet with community leade rs lor input transportation needs and im p leme nt program s or Conduct focus groups to obta i n needs data services to address those needs Analyze current resources available Review findi n gs and make r ec ommendations Seek funding and any additional resources 5 Expand the Volunteers In M otion Program as Emphasize volunteer recruitment. funding and resources become available. Expand vehicle fleet size . Explore CCE i ntake/eligibility option s Consider sou1h area staff support GOA L 3: Coordination Objectives Stra1egles 1 Coordinate with tne transportation Send out letters seeking coordination resource s i n order to improve the level of agreements coordina tion in Brevard Co unty Identify and meet with secondary providers of service See k coo rdination opportunities GOAL 4 : Public information about services Ob jectives Strategies 1 Improv e efforts to inlorm the public and current Place ADA signs on aD buses. bus users about the benefits o f the Americans InclUde expanded ADA information in w i th D i sabil i tie s Act (A DA ) certification passenger fiterature 2 Improve opportunni es for the public to learn Seek additional outlets for organizations about and purc h ase bus passes by worl
PAGE 234

3. Improve overall knowledge of the public transtt Continue marl
PAGE 235

Policy 1.3: Incentives, such as priority parking, shall be adopted to promote the use of van pools or car pools in the urban and urbanizing service sectors. Policy 1.4: Support the des ignat ion of high occupancy vehicle lanes where deemed feasible and increased peak hour user rates for transrt and other high occupancy vehicles. Policy 1.5: Funding mechanisms shall be adopted that maximize system revenues Criteria A: Fare policies shall be developed Criteria B: loca l government part i cipation shall be analyzed. Criteria C: Agency contracts shall be discussed analyzed. Criteria D: Maximum Federal and State assistance should be sought to defray the costs of capital equipment and operating expenses thereby reducing loca l government subsidy. Criteria E : Utilize the assistance of the Florida Department of Transportation in acquiring funds in coordination wrth the Coordinating Council of the Transportation Disadvantaged Policy 1.6: Mass transit services and facilities shall be considered as an alternative to roadway construction for expanded capacity. Polley 1 .7: Brevard County shall review and consider those recommendation s in the Transit Development Plan being prepared for the Metropolrtan Planning Organization and adopt a plan which supports the efficient development of an intramodal transportation p lan for the County and which is consistent with the following criteria. Criteria A: Connecting 1. Port Canaveral, Kennedy Space Center airports and military establishments 2 Municipalrties and beach-side communities w ith the mainland; 3 Government centers, industrial and commercial center; 4 Education centers Criteria B: Transit connections for Commuter Rail/High Speed Rail/Magnetic Levitation, ports, airports and roadways. Criteria C: ln tracounty links as well as int ercounty connections Criteria D: lnter local agreements should be adopted with other local governments and agencies to provide transport at io n services and faci liti es that are economically and environmentally sound. Criteria E: Jo int venture agreements wrth private interes ts and o the r l eve ls of government should be supported as solutions to mutual problems Brevsrd Covnty Transi t Development Plan 197

PAGE 236

Objective 2 Establish transportation corridors that integrate transportation and land use decisions wi t h infrastructure development. Policy 2.1: All transit corridors designated by Brevard County sha ll consider mass transit as a viable use of that corridor. Criteria A: B r evard County shall review existing transportation corridors to determ ine their current use or potentia l multimodal use. Whe r e feasible, mass transit use shall be encouraged Policy 2.2: Brevard County shall designate specific mass trans i t corridors on portions of se l ected expressways and arterials in urban and urbanizing service sectors. Polley 2.3: Adopt location standards and incentives that will encourage res i dentia l deve l opment and redevelopment to locate along mass transij corridors in urban and urbanizing service sectors. Policy 2.4: Adopt and implement a right-of-way protection plan. Objective 3 Criteria A : Building setback standards shall be established to protect t h e right-of-way of the existing and future transit corridors. Criteria B: 111e plan should propose measures for acquisition of right-of-way that may include but is not necessarily limited to dedication of right-of-way by the land owner at the time of platting, public/private joint venture, and grants from the federal and state governments. Criteria C: The plan shou l d include implementation strategies. The l ocation of t r ansit lines and terminals shall be placed to encourage growth tha t wi ll maximize t h e use of mass transit service and minimize negative impacts on r esidential commu n ities. Policy 3.1: Establish incentives that provide for mass transij services wijhin the urban and urbanizing serv ice sectors and discourage services in ruraUexurban service sectors as designated by the Future Land Use element except to t r ansportat i on disadvantaged res i dents. Policy 3 2 : Mass transit facil i ties and services shall be commensurate wijh and properly timed with projected needs Criteria A: Breva r d County should support the Metropo l itan P l anning Organization in the updating of the Brevard County Transit Development Plan. Criteria B: Once the Brevard County Transit Development Plan is prepared, Brevard County should i mplement those port i ons for wh i ch the County is responsib le. 198 Brevard County TransU Development Plan

PAGE 237

Policy 3.3: Leve l of service standards shall be based on the operational efficiency of the demand-response system as well as the efficiency of the contractual services. Criteria A: If all of the contracts that SCAT is able to sign with agencies are fulfilled, then the level of service i s considered to be adequate Polley 3.4: Brevard County shall promote "infill" development thereby reduCing urba n spread and establishing urban densit i es capable of supporting an efficient mass system. Criteria A: In and evaluating the successes and failures of the Brevard County Comprehensive Plan the reduction of urban spread shall be assessed to determine whether it was reduced. Criteria B: When commenting on the plans prepared by municipalities the densities within municipalities shou ld be examined Densities sufficient to support mass transit systems should be encouraged w ithin the municipalities of Brevard County. Policy 3.5: Brevard County shall evaluate all proposed roadway projects to determine their existing use demands, Mure needs, and the proposed roadway projects role as a catalyst fo r development to promote orderly development and discourage leap frog growth. Objective 4 Criteria A : Brevard County shall consider mass transit as an alternative to new roadw ay construction. Criteria B: Land use designations for development shall be appropriate to the functional classification and the design of the impacted roadways. A mass system of public and private partnership shall be developed and maintained to serve the basic transportation needs of the transportation disadvantaged in Brevard County. Policy 4.1 : Social services and community facilities should be more accessible to the transportatio n disadvantaged through t he provision of mass service programs. Policy 4.2: Mass transit service should be provided to connect elderly residential neighborhoods life support facilities such as shopping centers and medical Criteria A: Brevard County should participate with the Florida D epartment of Transportation in achieving coordination of a transportation system for the transportation disadvantaged Criteria B: In cooperation the Florida Department of Transportation, measures which Brevard County could take to provide mass transit services for the t ransportation disadvantaged shall be identified. Brevanl County Trensit Development Plan 199

PAGE 238

Policy 4 .3: Criteria C: Appropriate measures shall be included along wijh the measures proposed in the Transit Development Plan for consideration for adoption by Brevard County. Specialized transit services should be provided to connect disabled adults to employment, independent living, education and leisu re services Criteria A: As a part of the Brevard County Transit Development Plan and in cooperation with the Florida Department of Transportation. Brevard County should imp lement pro grams which a re identified as necessary to prov ide transportation to the transportation disadvantaged. Policy 4.4 : Brevard County shall implement a plan to assure that the mass transit service effectively serves the needs of the handicapped through properly equipped vehicles. Policy 4.5: Low income neighborhoods should be connected through mass transit services w ith major employment, shopping centers, and other life support facilities and services. Criteria A: This policy should provide guidelines for Brevard County at such a time as the County will provide traditional public mass transportation such as buses. Criteria 8: Brevard County may recommend a mass transit service on a contract basis w ith the County to municipalities that have low inco me neighborhoods. Policy 4.6: Brevard County should expand transportation services for the disadvantaged to those persons in need, and not already participating in a social service program. Policy 4. 7: Transit use priority shou ld be given to those residents who are most dependent upon the transit system for basic transportation needs. Objective 5 Brevard County shall coordinate the planning for mass t ran sit services and facilities with the affected planning and operational agencies and other governmental agencies. Policy 5.1: Brevard County should continue to actively part icipate in the Brevard Area T ransportation Study in support of the Brevard Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO). Criteria A: The Brevard County staff shall continue to participate on the Tech nical Advisory Committee of the MPO. Criteria B: Brevard County shall support the Cijizen Advisory Committee of the MPO. 200 Brevsrd Covnty Trans;, Dev8/optrt9nt Plan

PAGE 239

Policy 5.2 : Brevard County should utilize interlocal agreements as a solution to transporlat ion needs and pro blems Policy 5.3: Brevard County shall utilize to the maximum extent possible the Growth Management Unit in the FOOT District office Policy 5.4: Where mass is feas ible coordinate FOOT and other agencies in enhancing int erurban and interregional mobility within designated statewide corridors as well as designated local corridors. Objective 6 Mass transit faci lities should be environmentally sound and energy efficient. Policy 6.1: Ride-sharing programs and other transit services shou ld be promoted in urban areas to reduce peak hour automobile use thereby improving air quality and reducing gasoline use. Policy 6.2: Brevard County should establish a park and ride program. Criteria A: Evaluate the extent of subsidized transit service in order to establish a viable ridership base. Criteria B: Develop and implement service routes and schedules in respo nse to identified and projected ridership needs. Criteria C: Identify potential park an d ride sites and acquire land as necessary to establish parking facilities. Criteria D: Prepare and disseminate public information programs to promote the park and ride p r ogram Criteria E: Ident ify and procure fundi ng for the park and ride program. Policy 6.3: Adverse impacts upon the cultural and historical resources of the community shou l d be avoided during the construction, operation. and maintenance of the transit system. Criteria A : Utilize guidelines and standards of the Traffic Circulation element. Policy 6.4: Adverse impacts upon the natural resources of the community shall be minimized during t he construction, operation, and maintenance of the transit syste m Criteria A: Utilize guidelines and standards of the Traffic Circulation element. Policy 6.5: The mass t ransit system should minimize adverse impa cts on residential neighborhoods and communities. Brevard County Transit Development Plan 201

PAGE 240

Brevard 2020 Long Range Transportation Plan 1.0 Overall Transportation Goal Prov ide a comprehens ive and coordinated transportation system for the safe, efficient and economical movement of people and goods that also promotes multi-modal mobility and enhances the quality o f the natural and bu i lt environment in the Brevard Area Objective 2.5: The development of the transportation system shall consider method s to enl;ourage expand and enhance safe and sel;ure trans i t serv ire to the general public and to mobi l ity-limited persons Policies Monitor travel development and land use trends to identify opportunities for viable transit solutions to the area's mobility prob l ems. The Long Range Plan shall coordina t ed with the Trans i t Deve l opment Plan (TOP) prepared by Spai;e Coast Area Transit (SCAT ) An object i ve of the TOP shou l d be to prov ide for a safe and secu r e transit system PUBLIC COMMENTS FROM THE BREVARD COUNTY TOP PUBLIC MEETING As stated in a previous section of this chapter a publ i c meeting I n Brevard Co u nty was held on Apri11, 1997 at 6:30p.m. at the County Government Center in Viera At thi s meeting, the public was asked to respond to the following question either through written or verba l comments. What should Space Coast Area Transit do in the next five years to develop serv ic e that meets the needs of Brevard County residents? Comments received were grouped into sections related to the proposed goals and objectives with an additional section for comments that were not addressed by the TOP Review Committee. The sections a r e broken into unmet demand, transportation coord i nation opportunities marketing, transit friendly l and use and regulations, eme r gency evacuation, and other areas not covered by the TOP Review Committee. The comments are further grouped under each Sel;t i on by similar su bj ect. Each indiv i dual o r al and written response is included i n Appendix I 202 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 241

CHAPTER FOUR ESTIMATES OF DEMAND AND ASSESSMENT OF NEEDS INTRODUCTION This chapter estimates t he current and future demand for public transportation i n Brevard County and assesses the mob i lity needs i n the county. Numerous methods were used to estimate demand and assess unme t need over the five year planning period. These techniques utilize the data and findings from all previous tasks as well as add i tional i nformat ion collected and reviewed as part of the ove r all planning process. ESTIMATES OF DEMAND Several d i fferent methods are used to estimate current and future demand for public transportation with i n Brevard County The demand for publ i c transportation can be estimated u sing interview and focus group resuHs public meeting results trend analysis, peer comparisons, service and fare elasticities census b lock group analysis, and route ana l ysis The demand for public transportation including the fi xedr oute system, the transport a tion dis a dvantaged system, ADA complementary paratransit system and vanpool services are estimated in this section. Interview, Focus Group, Discussion Group, and Public Meeting Results Findings from t h e interviews with key loca l offic i a ls, focus groups, and the discussion group are contained in Chapter One Resutts from the first public meeting, which was held on Apri l 1 1997, are contained i n Append i x I The interviews with key local officials r evea l e d perceptions of unmet demand in Brevard County for all modes of public transportation. This unmet demand is in the form of trips that cannot be taken by current riders of the system because of l i mited hours and days of service of the fixed route system as well as trips fo r populations tha t are cu r rently not served by SCAT. Most interviewees believed that SCAT s service should be more extens i ve i n the hours o f service ( expand to late afternoon and evening serv i ce), the frequency of service (more frequent than one hour headways), and the days of service ( provide weekend service on more routes) It was suggested by some interviewees that SCAT shou l d provide more service to young people and workers from low-income househo l ds. I t was ack n owledged by all of the key loca l officials however that all improvements that could be made to SCAT's fixed-route serv i ce wou l d require additiona l funds, whi ch are not available. Brevsld County T ransit Development Plan 203

PAGE 242

Four focus groups young people, age 14 through 18, were conducted in Brevard County. These focus groups (described in more detail in Chapter One) revealed a potential demand for transit by young people in Brevard County These young people however, reported that SCAT's hours and days of operation are not responsive to the their travel needs. If young people were to use the fixed-route system, possible destinations would include movie theaters recreation centers malls, bowling alleys and residential areas. Travel, as indicated by the focus group discussions, would take place after school and on the weekends. In addition, a d iscussion group with residents of the South Mainland section of Brevard County was conducted by CUTR (described in more detail in Chapter One). All of the participants in this group stated that there was unmet demand in the South Mainland area of Brevard County. They ind icated that fixed-route bus service in the southern portion of the County i s very and the needs of the residents are great Many elderly residents are unable to get to doctors' appointments or go grocery shopping because they lack transportation. In addition young people have needs for trips to after-school activities, the movies, malls and the beach The participants had numerous suggestions to meet this unmet demand including establishing i ntercounty service with Indian River County expanding the SCAT Volunteers in Motion transportation program, expanding the van pool program, and increasing the fixed-route services in the area with increased frequency and bus stops. These suggestions will be developed further in the section on needs assessment. Results from the public meeting, that was conducted on April1, 1997 are contained in Appendix I. These re su lts indicated a substantial unmet demand for public transportation in Brevard County. At this meeting, citizens were asked how SCAT should deve lop service to meet the needs of Brevard County residents over the next fiVe years. Many of the comments concerned increasing the frequency of service, increasing hours and days of service, and prov id ing transportation services for workers. Fixed-Route Demand Estimates Rjdersbjp Trends Data for fiXed-route serv ice in Breva rd County are available for five contiguous years (since service began in FY 1992). Over the five years, ridership has in creased by 57.7 percent from 123,211 passenger trips i n FY 1gg2 to 194,262 trips in FY 1g96, This is an average annual increase of 11.5 percent. However, the rate of ridership growth has increased with time; from FY 1994 to FY 1995, ridership grew by 18.0 percent, and from FY 1g95 to FY 1996 ridership increased another 15.0 percent. To provide estimates of future annual ridership levels, a series of simple and multiple l inear regression models were calibrated using SCAT's historical National Transit Database data 204 Bmvard County Tnmsit Development Plan

PAGE 243

(formerly called Section 15 data) from FY 1992through FY 1996 This type of model fits a straigh t line to t h e data p o ints, thereby all ow ing ridership in future ye a rs to be predicted. Regression equations are very usefu l tools for forecasting. C l early, however, the further into the future a forecast is made, the less precise it becomes In t his exercise ridership levels as measured by total numbe r of annual passenger trip s, w ere estimated through FY 2002. The c l assical mu l tiple linear regression model takes the foll owing general f o rm : Yt'' a+ P,x,. + P,x, + ... + P.x,., + e, where y, = dependent variable or the variable t o be forecast, a t time t a = constant term x2t,xnt = i ndependent va riab les tha t infl uence y, at t ime I 13 = parameters on the inde pendent variable (also known as partial reg ression coefficients) e, = error term which represents influence not captured by the i ndependent variab l es For t his model, a r egressi o n li ne was fitted for annual ri dership (in terms of p assenger trips) with respect to two in dependent variables : time and the number o f an nual revenue miles The data set contained observat i ons fo r frve years (FY 1992 to FY 19 96) The regression equation that resu lte d is as f ollows: where y, = 51,586 + 13,393x11 + 0 .1361196x21 y, = annual ridership in terms of passenger trips at t i me t X, = year (year=1 ,2,3 .. ) X., = reve nue miles at time t The coefficient of determination for this mo d el. denoted by R'. is 9796 which means that approx im ately 98 percent o f the varia t ion in the estimated annual ridership is explained by this regression equation. Table 4-1 shows the existing leve l of ridership as r e p o rted for FY 1996 and the estimated future ridership derived from the model for FY 1997 t hrough FY 2002. As can be seen in the t able, ridership is projected to increase to 270 105 annual passenger trips by FY 2002 nearly a 40 percent increase fro m FY 1996. Brevard County Transit Development Plan 205

PAGE 244

It is important to note that the regression model holds all exogenous factors, such as fare changes constant. I n addijion, for simplicity, these forecasts were generated assuming a constant level of service (i e. revenue miles). From the model it is clear that if revenue miles were to increase the number of passenger trips will likewise increase, and if they were to decline the converse would be true. There are some limitations associated w ith these forecasts, however. One drawback is the small number of o bserva tions used in the mode l calibration: only five years of data were available for the estimation. As the number of data points increases, the relia bility of the model increases. Tab le 4-1 Proj&cted Fixed-Route Ridership for SCAT FY 1996 FY 1997 FY 1998 FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001 FY 2002 (Actual) (Projected) (Projected) (Projected! (Projected) (Projected! (Projected) Passenger I 194,262 203.140 216,533 229,926 243,319 256,712 270,105 T rips I Fare and Service E last icities Another means of estimating future demand for transit is through the use of fare and service elasticities. An elasticity is a measure of the of a dependent variable, such as passenger trips, to changes in an independent variable, such as fare or leve l of service. It is also represented by the percent change in a dependent variable divided by the percent change in an independent variable While considerable variations can occur, especially changes at the level of individual routes, fare and service elasticities have been shown to remain relatively consistent across transit systems of all sizes at the aggregate system level. The American Public Transit Association (APTA} has publ i shed a value of -0.43 for the e lasticity of r ide rship with respect to fare (for systems serving areas with populations of less than one million). According to an Ecosemetrics, Inc., report, the elasticity of ridership respect to level of service as measured by vehicle miles is +0.61 The elasticity measures are interpreted as follows: a 10 percent increase in the transit fare would result in a 4.3 percent decrease in ridership while a 10 percent increase in the level of service would generate a 6.1 percent increase in ridership These elasticities show that, generally, transit riders are more sensitive to changes in service levels than to changes in the fare. 1 American Public Transit Association, Effects of Fare Changes On Bus Ridership (Washington: American Public Transit Association, May 1991),7. 2 Ecosemetrics, Inc. Patronage Impacts of Changes In Transit Fares and Services, report prepared for the U.S. Department of Transportation (Washington: Government Printing Office, Septembe r 1980).65. 206 Brevard County Transit Plan

PAGE 245

Ano the r me t hodo l ogy for measuring the elastici t y of ridership with respect to level of service is to use the resu lt s from the regression analysis in the Ri dership Tre n ds" sec t ion which use s revenue mi l es and time to predict ridersh i p Tabl e 4-2 presents the resu lts of two f are p ricing scenarios as well as two scenar i os assuming an i ncrease in the level of service The fi rst scenario predict s how ridership wi ll be affected if the curren t f are of $ 1 0 0 were t o increase an percent to $ 1 10. According to the measure w it h a f are o f $ 1 1 0, the syste m can expect a decrease in ridersh i p (as m easure d by the number of passenger trips) of 8,353 trips, all o t her t h i ngs being equal However because the demand for transit is considered ine lastic with respect to fare (indicating a l esser degree of sensitiv i ty t o fare changes), the increase in revenue from passen g ers paying the higher fare w ill more than offset the l oss of passenger fare revenue fro m fewer trips resuHi ng i n an annual net financial imp a c t of $4,0 1 1 (based on the average fare) Tab l e 4 Imp a cts of Far e and Serv i ce S cen ari os EXlsflng Scen ario 1 I Scen ario 2 I Scenario 3' Sce nario 41 Mouu,. (FY 199 6 ) 10-nt,.,. 1ktnt fire 10% Increase 10% Increase inerease -...... i n &&rvlce In service Base Fare $1.00 $1.10 $0.90 $ 1 .00 S I.OO Average Fare $0. 4 1 $0.45 $0.37 $0.4 1 $0. 4 1 Ve hicle M iles 579, 3 1 6 579 3 16 579,316 I 637,248 Revenue M i les 523.039 --I 575 ,343 Passenger Trips 194,262 185. 9 09 202 6 1 5 206,112 196,867 Oper a ting Exp e nse $ 1,207,730 $1 207 730 $1,207,730 $ 1 .328,503 $1 ,328, 503 Cha nge i n Riders h i p -8,353 +8,353 1 1,850 I +2,605 C hange i n R e ve n u e +$4,011 -$4 ,680 +$4,859 +$1,068 C h ange i n Opera!ing Expense +$120,n3 +$120 ,77 3 Net Financi a l I m pact +$.4,011 -$4,680 I 4 116,914 $ 11 9,707 'Soen ario 3 a n d 4 utilize fully-allocated costs per veh i c l e mile to generate the Htim a ted annual operating expense. It ls anlle!pated that variable oost d iffe-rentials could be less. I n the seco n d pri cing scenario t he effec t s of a f are decre as e f r o m $ 1 .00 t o $0.90 are reported. As evid en c ed in Table 4 2, the 1 0 percent d ecrea s e in the fare wou ld cause an in crease in ridersh i p equal t o the decrea s e f rom the first scenario : 8 353 passen g er trips, hol di ng all other f actors constant. Due to th e of transit demand w it h respect to fares, t h e i ncrease i n r iders wou l d not generate e no ugh revenue to offse t the l oss from the l owe r far e and an annual net financ i al impac t of -$4. 6 8 0 w o uld be r ealized. Brevard County Transit Development Plan 207

PAGE 246

The third scenario in Table 4 exhibits the resuKs if there was an increase in SCAT's level of service, as measured by veh i cle miles. Transit demand with respect to the rever of service is considered to be elastic, which indicates a higher sensitivity to the service levels provided by the system As shown in Table 4-2 a 10 percent increase in vehiCle mi l es would stimulate 11,850 passenger trips, which would generate additional passanger revenues of $4,859, all else being equal. However, a 10 percent increase in the level of service provided is presumed to require a 10 percent increase in operating expense. The increase in operating expense to provide the add i tional service would resuH in an annual net financial i mpact of -$115,914 (additional operating expenses minus additional passenger revenues) Scenario Fou r is a different approach to measure the effects of an increase in service. I n this scenar io, as shown in Table 4 2, the regression analys i s, that was developed using SCAT's National Transit Database trend data. was used to estimate how a 10 percent increase in revenue miles would effect ridership (as measured by passenger trips). Us ing this methodology a 10 percent increase in revenue miles would stimulate 2,605 passenger trips, which would generate $1,068 addit i onal passenger revenues, all else being equal. However as in Scenario Thnee, a 10 percent increase in the level of service provided is presumed to r equire a 10 percent increase in operating expense. The increase in operating expense to provide the additional service would resun in annual net financial impact of -$119,707 (additional operating expenses minus additional passenger revenues). The results of the elasticity calculations indicated that increasing service levels does not necessarily produce the results one might expect, because the cost involved in service expansion is significant. A 10 percent increase in lever of service would represent a major financial challenge for any small transit agency These resuHs imply that proposed service improvements must be closely scrutinized for impacts on cost as well as ridership. Also important, however is the fact that all service extens i ons are not equal; an improvement targeted at a specific corridor or location where there is significant demand may perform much better than aggregate system-wide averages. Table 4-3 contains the original fixed-route ridership projections from Table 4 1 as well as estimates assuming an annual 3 5 percent increase in service using the methodology in Scenario Four. The growth rate of 3.5 percent was chosen because it is the approximate historical annual service growth rate for SCAT fixed-route service. 208 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 247

Tab l e 4-3 Base and Enha n c e d F ixed Ro ute Ridersh i p P rojections for SCAT R i dershi p I F Y 1996 FY 1997 FY 1998 FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001 FY 2002 1 ( Actua l ) ( P rojected) (Projected) (Projected) (Pro j ected) (Pro j ected) (Projected) Base (no I service 1 94 ,262 203, 140 216, 5 33 229,926 243, 319 256,712 270, 105 increase ) Enhance d : Using Seen alio 4 194,262 205, 731 22 1 ,766 238,174 254,884 271,925 287, 73 5 (3 5% yearly s ervioe I incre ase) Census Block Group Analys i s Fo r this demand estimat i on method, CU TR use d the census block group (CBG) da t a avai l ab l e from the 1990 Census Da t a on charac t eris t ics t ha t are h i ghly correlated w i th a person's or a househo l d s t ransit dependence were ana l yzed for each CBG w it h i n Breva r d County. The demogra p h i c characterist i cs that were chosen to indicate trans i t dependence i n cl ude the percentage in each CBG of pers o ns age 0 to 17 years, persons 60 years o r o l der, hou s eh o l d s with an annua l i nc o me less than $1 0 ;000, a n d h o useho l d s without a cc e s s to a ve h i c le The first ste p in id e ntify i ng the CBG that have persons o r ho u seh o lds with the greatest p r o pensity f or trans i t use i nvo l ve d the cal culat i o n of the percent d i stributi o ns of the fou r demographic characteristics for ea c h CBG The process resulted in a tab l e of va l ues i ndicat ing the per cent of youths elderly persons househo lds, and zero-vehicle households for each o f Brevard County's 336 C B G s The CBGs were t h en sorted for each characteristic in descending order of percent d i stribut i on so that the CBGs w ith higher percentages for each characterist i c wou l d appe a r at the top of thei r respective ranges Each CBG w a s ass i gned a value for each of the four character i stics based on the percent value f o r that characterist ic. The va l ues were der ived based on the distance the pe r cen t age was away f rom the mean f o r that ch a ra cterist i c All percen t ages that were bel ow the mean were assigned a va lue o f o n e All per centages above the mean w e r e assigned values based on distance fro m the mean For example if the mean for a ch aracteristic i s 21 pe r cen t and the percentage for a part i cular CBG was 42 per cent then the value assigned to that CBG w ould b e two. The purp ose of these scores is to p r ov ide uniform rank i ng to all o f the CBGs w i th i n a particu l ar category and to p r ovide a method i n which the sco r es f o r the four d i fferent characterist i cs cou l d be summed The next step was t o add the sc o res, by CBG for the f our character i s tics, thereby creat i ng a compos i te score. The C BGs we r e then ranked by compos it e score and stra t i fied into f our leve l s Brevard County Transit Devel o pment Pl an 209

PAGE 248

based on thei r standard deviation from the composite score mean. Statistically, the standard deviation may be thought of as a measure of distance from the average value. According to an empirical rule of thumb, for most moderately-sized data sets with a bell-shaped normal distribution, approximately 68 percent of the data values will lie within one standard deviation of their average and approximately 95 percent of the data values will lie within two standard deviations of their average. The composite scores for the CBGs were stratified into four segments based on the following break points: average percent, average percent plus one standard deviat ion, and average percent plus two standard devia1ions. Thus the CBGs fell into one of the following four categories: below average, above average but below one standard deviation (average), between one and two standard deviations (above average), and more than two standard deviations (far above average). The CBGs that fell into the "far above average" category were defined as primary tran sit-depende nt CBGs, i.e. census block groups with the greatest propensity for transit based on the CBGs" percentages of youths, elderly persons, low income households, and zero-vehicle households. Secondary transit-dependent CBGs included those that fe ll into the "above average" category; tert iary transit-dependent CBGs Included those in the "av e rag e category. Table 4-4 lists the transit-dependent census block groups that are not served directly by any fiXed routes. The list of all census block groups and their respective composite scores from the analysis are contained in Appendix J. Of the 366 CBGs, 20 were identified as primary transit-dependent. As shown in Figures 4-1 a and 4-1 b these 20 CBGs are primarily located in the downtown areas of Titusville Cocoa, and Melboume All of these census block groups are served by a fixed-route except CBG 697.003 i n Me rritt Is land Also from the analysis, 13 CBGs were identified as secondary transit-dependent, and 54 CBGs were identified as tertiary transit-dependent. As shown in Figures 4-1a and 4-1b most of these CBGs are served by at least one fixed route. Contained in Table 4-4 are the secondary and tertiary transit-dependent census block groups that are not currently being served Table4-4 Transit-Dependent Census Block Groups Not Served by Transit, Brevard County Census Bloek Group Location "' GROUPS 697.003 Merrill Island ;; )EC.ONDARY. QL09K GROIJP,S (aliove
PAGE 249

,, Figure 4-1a Trans i t Dependent Block Groups North Brev ard County 10 Route 1 1 Roota 12 Roota 21 Rout$26 Route 'Z1 Roul$28 Aoule 29 Route32 Roule35 ---RouteS :==:Rol.M6 Routo 7 ---RouteS Aout&9 Transi t Dependent Bloc k Groups Primary S.. condof}' TertiQry

PAGE 250

212 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 251

Figure 4-1b Transit Dependent Block Groups South Brevard County Tronsit Dependent Block Grou ps Prlmo1y Secondary T e rtiary

PAGE 252

214 Brevard Coun1y Trensit Development Plan

PAGE 253

Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Ridership Demand Estimates In addition to requ iring transit agencies to provide accessible fixed-tol.lte bus service, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) requires that complementary paratransn services be provided by agencies that operate fiXed-route bus service. The paratransit service must "shadow" the fixed route service a rea and a comparable l evel of service must be provided for persons who cannot use the fixed-route service The regulations define the service criteria that must be met when implement ing complementary paratransit service. The seven service criteria, described in Section 37.31 of the federal r egulations (49 CFR Part 37), are: Service area Trip purpose Response time Hours and days of service Fares Capacity constraints Eligibility Only individua ls who are ADA-eligible may use the complementary paratransit service ADA eligible persons fall into three categories: Category 1: Persons who are unable to board, ride or d i sembark from a vehicle even if they are able to get to the stop and even if the vehicle is accessible Category 2: Persons who cannot use vehicles without lifts or other accommod ations These persons are e l ig i ble for paratransit service if accessible fixe d -route vehicles are not available on the route on which they need to travel when they need to travel. Category 3: Persons with specific impairment-related conditions who cannot trave l to a b oarding location or from a disembark ing location to their fina l destination SCAT operates a total of 18 fixed routes All of SCAT's fixed routes currently are served by buses that are wheelchair lift-equipped While all of SCAT's fixed-route vehic l es are equipped with wheelchair lifts only 25 of SCAT's 49 vehicles have wheelchair lifts that meet ADA guidelines regarding the size and weight that can be accommodated. SCAT is responsible for providing comp l ementary paratransit services to persons that are ADA-eligible and to date SCAT is fully compl ia nt with the requi rements for ADA complementary paratransit serv ice. SCA T has exper ience d very little growth in terms of demand fo r ADA complementary paratransit services and this demand has n ot significantly impacted Brevard County s public transit system. Brevard County Tronsit Development Pian 215

PAGE 254

A unique exists in Brevard County that has in low growth of the demand for ADA complementary paratransit As discussed previously, SCAT currently provides a wide array of transportation services that serve individuals with mobility limitations: including door-to-door transportation, subscription routes, agency-sponsored van pool services, a volunteer transportat ion program, and fixed-route transit Brevard County has been providing mobility to persons with disabilities since 1974 with the creation of the CATS program. Since that time, the evolution of public transportation in Brevard County has focused on providing transportatio n for those persons who need it most, includ ing persons with disabilities. Currently SCArs services are very inclusive and only capacity constraints related to a lack of vehicles and/or time exist Th is means that individuals with disabilities in Brevard County have very little difficulty, at the present time, obtaining trips through SCAT's umbrella of services. The fare for ADA complementary paratransit services (twice the fixed-route fare $2.00) may also contribute to the low number of persons who have sought to become certified as ADA-eligible in Brevard County. Virtually all trip requests can be acoommodated by one of SCAT's transportation programs at reduced fares for persons with disabilities, therefore, there is little incentive for persons who are ADA-eligible to apply for the more expensive complementary paratransit service. Systems that have les s extensive transportation programs for persons with mobility impairments can expect that many persons with disabilities w ill seek to become certified as ADA-eligible to ensure that their mobility needs will be met In fact, SCAT reports that a majority of the people currently certified as ADA-e l igible in Brev'iJrd County have actually sought to become certified so that they are able to receive ADA complementary service when they visit other areas. Although SCAT is currently very successful at meeting the transportation needs of persons with disabilities through its varied array of transportation services, the possibility does exist that some time in the future capacity constraints could become a reality for Brevard County's public transportation system. If that were to happen, SCAT might see t remen dous growth in the number of indi v i duals wishing to become certified and use ADA complementary paratransit serv ices. In fact, many of SCAT's subscription route s currently provide a large number of trips to sheltered workshops for persons who are most likely ADA-e li gible. If the agencies that currently subsidize these trips were no longer able to provide transportation for their clients, SCAT could expect that many of these ind iv iduals would become certified as ADA-eligible in order to oontinue attending the sheltered workshops. However, because ADA oomplementary paratransit service is only required during the same days and hours of service that the fixed route operates, most of these trips would not be required to be accommodated through SCArs ADA complementary paratransit program, In short while growth in the ADA complementary paratransit program would certainly be expected in the event SCAT experiences capacity constraints in other transportation programs, this growth would be minimized by the limited availability of fixed-route services in Brevard County. 216 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 255

Thus, any considera t ion of expansion of fixed-route services and/or reduction of other transportation services provided by SCAT shou l d inclu d e d i s c ussi o n of the potentia l impact on the demand for ADA comp l ementary paratrans i t services. In oider t o faci l itate these discussions and assist in planning for future impacts of the ADA legis l at i on, it is necessary to develop estimates o f the ADA-el i gib l e population residing in Brevard County as well as the potentia l demand for ADA complementary paratr a nsit trips by t his popu l at ion. Estimates of the eligible population for all three categories of ADA-eligible persons we r e developed for Brevard County based o n the method o logy presented in the ADA Paratransit Handbook prepared by the U.S Department o f Transportation The estimates are presented in Table 4-5 and Table 4-6. The population est i mates were developed for SCAT's fixed route transit serv i ce area Census b l ock group data for 1990 were used to determine total population estimates for the three quarter mile ADA corridor surrounding SCAT's fixed routes Brevard County's fixe d -route service area and the th r ee-quarter mi l e ADA corridor which surrounds the route network are ill ustrated in Figure 4-2. As shown in this figure, a small amount of population duplication ex i sts where SCAT routes overlap. Estimates of the population within the three-quarter mile buffer zones throughout the c o unty were deve l oped under the assumpt ion tha t the percentage tha t these populations are o f total county populat i on currently, wou l d remain the same as in 1990 Esti mates of tota l c o unty popu l ation are based on countyl evel data from the Bureau of Econ o m i c and Business Research (BEBR) at the University of F l orida. BEBR provides estimates of popu l a t ion for the years 1995, 2000, and 2005. Total county population estimates for intermediate years were deve l oped under the assumption that the rate of population growth would rema i n constant within the five-year periods. The ADA-e l ig i ble populations we r e determined by multiplying each service area popu l ation by 1 5 percent for ADA Category 1 and Category 3 c o mbined and by 1 percent for Category 2 Category 2 i s broken out because these persons would use the fixed-route system if the vehicles were access i ble Therefore the numbe r of ADA-e ligi ble persons within this category will become smaller over t i me as the fixed route system becomes more accessible These population estimates were then adjusted for Brevard County by weight i ng the po pulations by the percent of persons in Breva r d County r eport ing a "public transportation d i sability" i n the 1980 Census (3.4 percent) d i v i ded by the nationa l percentage (3.5 percent). ( I nformation from the 1980 Census was used because this question was not asked in the 1990 Census.) Brevard County Transit Development Plan 217

PAGE 256

.. I i f f l Table 4 Brevard County ADA Population and Low Rid ers hip Demand Estimates Brevord CounW Fixed-Rouie Se rv ice Area "' . : . < SeJVice Area Est Est Adj. Est Adj Est. Adj Est Peroent Est Trips Population Category Category Welght Category Category Total Regi stered Category 1&3 2 1&3 2 1&3 1997 358 ,311 5,375 3.583 0 9714286 5.221 34111 8 702 1 0% 627 1998 365.699 5,485 3657 0 9714286 5 ,32 9 3 553 8881 1.7% 1087 1999 373,240 5,599 3 732 0 9714286 5439 3,626 9064 2.4% 1 566 2000 380 936 5,714 3.809 0 9714286 5,551 3 701 9 251 3 .1% 2,065 2001 387 896 5818 3879 0 9714286 5,652 3 768 9420 3.8% 2577 2002 39'\.m 5925 0 9714286 5755 3837 9.592 4.5% 3108 i Est T rips Est. Total Category Trips 2 418 1044 725 1 812 1044 2 611 1,377 3441 1,718 4296 2072 5180

PAGE 257

Figur e 4-2 Thre e-Qu a rter Mi le Buffer A roun d SCAT F ixed Routes L.fGEND ( ) 3/4 Mila Buffer Bus Roote

PAGE 258

220 Brevard County Transit Dev&lopment Plan

PAGE 259

!!' <:i a 1 ::;t i ;a :!! Table 4-6 B revard County ADA Population and High Ridership Demand Estimates a revard cour;t;Ftxed-ROUte Sei'ViCft:An;a ;;. ; i$!7 --. > _:: 4 : : L.rrr ,., '''--' ,,, , ,._ /''<} > Service Area Est. Est. Adj. Est. Adj. Est. Adj. Est. Percen t Est. Trips Est. Trips Est. Tot a l Population Category Category Weight Category Category Total Registered Category Category Trips 1&3 2 1&3 2 1&3 2 19 97 358 311 5 375 3,583 0.9714286 5221 3 481 8702 1 .0 % 62 7 418 1 ,044 1998 365,699 5 485 3657 0 .9714 286 5 329 3,553 8,881 6.8% 4348 2 899 7 247 1999 373,240 5 .599 3,732 0.9714286 5.439 3,626 9064 1 2.6% 8 ,223 5,482 13,705 2000 380,936 5 7 1 4 3809 0 9714286 5 551 3 701 9,251 18.4 % 12.256 8,1 7 1 20,427 2001 387 ,896 5,818 3 879 0.9714286 5 652 3.768 9.420 24.2% 16414 10 943 27,357 200 2 394 983 5925 3950 0 .9714286 5755 3837 9592 30.0% 20720 13 8 1 3 34533

PAGE 260

Two sets of demand estimates were developed for the fiXed-route service area in Brevard County The methodology called for in the ADA Paratransit Handbook assumes 100 percent utilization by the entire ADA-eligible population in the ADA service areas. However; the principal author of the ADA Paratransit Handbook has reporte d that national experiences since the publication of the ADA Paratransil Handbook have demonstrated that communities never achieve 100 percent certification of the ADA-eligible populat ion. Rather, most rural communities can expect to certify approximately 50 percent of the ADA-eligible population and urban communffies tend to range from 20 percent to 40 percent, based on the level of urbanization. Additionally, mature systems have averaged between four and six ADA complementary paratransit trips per u ser per month. According to SCAT staff, the current trip-making rate at SCAT has been approximately 1 trip per user per month (12 trips per user per year). Based on this information, CUTR modified the methodology to better represent the current situation in Brevard County. The first set of demand estimates included in Table 4-5, represents a "lo w estimate of demand for ADA complementary paratransit in that this set of demand estimates is based on the current situation in Brevard County The estimates of demand presented in Table 4-5 are based on the assumption that ADA co mpl ementary paratransit utilization within the SCAT fixed-route service area begins in 1997 at the current rate of certification among the ADA-eligible population (1.0 percent), as reported by SCAT, and will increase in crementally at the same rate of growth that SCAT has experienced over the past year (less than one percent per year). Using th is rate of growth, SCAT can expect to certify 4.5 percent of the ADA-eligible population in Brevard County by the year 2002. The tow estimates are also based on a trip-making rate of 1 trip per month per ADA-certified paratransit user (12 trips per year). This trip-making rate was provided by SCAT and represents the current rate of utilization of paratransit services by ADA-certified SCAT passengers Using this approach the demand for ADA complementary paratransit can be expected to grow from 1 ,044 trips in 1997 to 5,180 trips in 2002. The second set of demand estimates, presented in T able 4-6 represents a "high" demand fo r ADA complementary paratransit in Brevard County. This set of demand estimates is intended to illustrate the potential impact of the ADA provisions fo r complementary paratransit in the event that capacity constraints were introduced in the SCAT paratransit program. It is assumed that the introduction of capacity constraints would resu l t in many more ADA-eligible persons in Brevard County applying for ADA complementary paratransit service. Therefore, the "high" estimates of demand a lso assume that ADA complementary paratransit utilization within Brevard County begins in 1997 at the current rate of certification among the ADA-eligible population (1.0 percent). as reported by SCAT. However this set of demand es timat es includes a n incremental increase in the rate of ADA certification from 1 0 percent of the ADA-eligible population in 1997 to 30 percent of the ADA-eligible population in 2002. The "high" demand estimates, as shown in Table 4-6, are also 222 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 261

based on a trip-making rate of 12 paratransit trips per year per ADA paratransit user. However this trip-making rate could increase in the event that capacity constraints related to the reduction of agency-sponsored transportation we re introduced into the SCAT paratransit program. The "hig h" demand estimates presented in Table 4-6 reveal a dramatic increase in demand for ADA complementary paratransit service. Us ing this approach, demand for ADA complementary paratransit in creases from 1,044 trips in 1997 to 34, 533 trip s in 2002. Based on the i nformation currently available, the "low" set of demand estimates presented above best represents the current, unique situatio n i n Brevard County (demographically and statistically) and, therefore is the set of demand estimates used throughout the remainder of this report for planning and budgeting purposes. However, because any combination of the variables described above could result in Breva rd County's ADA paratransit program becoming more im portant to the mobility of persons with disabilities, it is recommended that SCAT continue to monitor the average ADA paratransit certification rate, trip-making rate and ridership demand estimates on a regular bas is. Given the data currently available and using the average trip cost of $6.73 for general paratransit trips provided by SCAT in the Annual Operating Report (AOR) for FY 1996 the total cost of providing the "low" estimates of ADA complementary paratransit trips in 2002 would be approximately $34,861, while the total cost of providing the "high" estimates of ADA paratransit trips in 2002 would be approximately $232,407 Transportation Disadvantaged Demand Estimates Estimates of TO Populations Brevard County provides trips for persons who are transportation disadvantaged (TO) in two populat ion groups. The first group includes all persons who are elderly, disabled. or low -income These persons, the Potential TO Population (formerly referred to as TD Category 1), are eligible for program trips purchased by governmental and social service agencies. According to the 1993 report Methodology Guidelines for Forecasting TO Transportation Demand at the County Level, prepared by CUTR for the Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged, a program trip is one made by a client of a government or social service agency for the purpose of participating in a program of that agency E xamples of program trips are Medicaid non-emergency medical trips, sheltered workshop trips, or trips to congregate meal sites. The second population group the TO Population (formerly referred to as TO Category II), includes persons who are transportation disadvantaged according to the eligibility guidelines in Chapter 427 (i.e., they are unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation, and children who are "high-risk or at-risk ") These persons are eligible for general purpose trips purchased through the state TD Trust Fund as well as for trips purchased by social service agencies. Thus, the TD Brevard County TrenSrl Development Plan 223

PAGE 262

Population i s a subset of the Potential TO Population. General trips are trips made by a transportation disadvantaged individual to a destination of her or his choice, rather than only to agency-sponsored programs. Ex amples of general trips include trips to worl<; grocery stores and recreational areas While some general trips within t he coordinated system are subsidized by governmental or social service agencies, the majority of general trips are subsidized with TO Trus t Fund monies. The general trips that are not subsidized by governmental or social service agencies are referred to as non-sponsored' trips and the TO Trust Fund monies are referred to as "non sponsored funds Forecasts of the total population of Brevard County in 1995, 2000, and 2005 were obtained from a Bureau of Economic and Bus iness Research (BEBR) publication Florida Population Studies: Population Projections by Age, Sex and Race for Florida and Its Counties, 1995-2010. Population forecasts for intermediate years were developed under the assumption that the rate of population growth would remain constant w ithin the five-year periods. Under this methodology, the tota l population of Brevard County Is forecasted to increase from 473 091 in 1998 to 510,974 in 2002. The total population forecasts were used in the development of forecasts of the Potential TO Population and the TO Population. Those forecasts and a description of the methodology developed to derive them are presented in the following pages Pencentages referred to in the text are provided in Table A-1 of the 1996 CUTR report, Florida Statewide Transportation Disadvantaged Plan: Population and Demand Forecasts, 1996-2015. Potential Transportation Disadvantaged Population The first step in forecasting the Potential TO Population was to forecast the number of persons who are elderty, disabled, or low-income The next step was to allocate each member of each of these groups to a particular marl
PAGE 263

groups. These percentages were used to forecast the number of persons who are disabled in each year of the study period. The 1990 Census provides data on the number of persons reporting a 'mobility limitation and/or a 'self-care The first term includes persons who have limitations in the ability to go outside the home alone, and the second includes persons who have limitat ions in self-care activities such as bathing or dressing For this report, persons who reported a mob ility limitation or a self-<:are were considered to be disabled. The NHIS provides data on the number of persons reporting one or more types of 'activity l imitat ion" due to a chronic condition. Two of these types of activity limitation were used to estimate disability rates for Brevard County: 'with limi tation in major activity" and 'with activity limitation. The first of these consists of persons who are limited in the major activity of their age group. For persons age 18 to 69, the NHIS defines major activity as wor1
PAGE 264

percentage of persons who are disabled would remain unchanged. Therefore, these percentages were appl i ed to the 0 to 59 and the 60 and older age groups to forecast the number of persons who are d i sabled i n each year of the study period Using this methodology the estimated number of persons who are disabled in Brevard County is forecasted to increase from 48,807 in 1998 to 53,409 in 2002. Low-Income PopulationCounty-level data from the 1990 Census were used to develop estimates of the percentage of the 1990 population who were low income (i e., who lived in families wnh an i ncome below the federal poverty level) in the 0 to 59 and the 60 and older age groups To estimate the number of low -income persons in each year of the study period, it was assumed that the percentage of low-income persons would remain unchanged. Therefore, the percentages were app li ed to the 0 to 59 and the 60 and older age groups in each year of the study period to for ecast t he number of lowincome persons. Using this methodology the estimated number of low-income persons in Brevard County is forecasted to increase from 43,088 in 1998 to 46,470 in 2002. Allocation of Potential TD Population to Market SegmentsTo avoid doubleand triple-counting of persons who are elderly disabled, or low -income it was necessary to develop a methodology to allocate each of these persons to one of seven market segments The methodology for this allocation is described in the 1993 CUTR report Methodology Guidelines for Forecasting TO Transportation Demand at the County Level. The seven Potential TO Population market segments, as illustrated i n Figure 4-3, are: Disabled Non-elderly, Low Income. Disabled, Non-elderly, Non-low Income. Disabled Elderly Low Income. Disabled Elderly, Non-low Income Non-disabled Elderly Low Income. Non-disabled, Elderly Non-low Income Non-disabled Non-elderly Low Income. 226 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 265

Disabled D i u bled Elderly Disabled Elderly Low Income Low Income Figure 4-3 Elderly Overlap Among Persons Who Are Disabled, Elderly, and Low-Income Forecasts of Potential TD Population, 1998-2002Tab l e 4-7 presents f orecasts of the Brevard County Potentia l TO Population by marl
PAGE 266

Table 4-7 Foreeast of Br eva r d Co u nty Pot ential Transporta ti on Disadva n taged Pop ulation YEAR SEG MENT I 1998 1999 2000 D isabled Non -elderly. Low Income 1 ,843 1 ,878 -1,91 3 1 D isabled, Non .. e lderly. Nonlow Income 17,353 1 7 683 1 8,019 Disabled, E l d e r l y Low Income 2 ,221 2 278 2 .337 Disabl ed E lderl y Income 27,390 28 100 28,828 Non d i sabled. E l derly, Low Income 6,09 7 6 255 6 417 1 Non-d i sab l ed E l derty, N on low I ncome 75 195 77 144 79,14 1 Non-disable d Low Income 32 9 2 7 33 ,553 34, 1 9 1 Tota l 1 63 028 166 ,891 1 70,846 Transportation Disadvantaged Population 2001 2002 1,943 1 ,974 18,302 18,588 2 400 2 463 2 9 ,595 30,384 6 58 7 6 784 8 1 250 83,410 34 727 35, 269 1 74 ,804 178 ,852 The TD Popu l ation includes t hose persons who are transport a tion d i s ad vantaged ac co r ding to the e li gibility guidelines I n Chapte r 427, F l o r ida Statu t es ( i e ... t hose persons who because o f physica l or menta l d i sab ility, i ncome status, or age are unab l e to transport themse l ves or to purchase transportation and are therefore, depende n t upon o t hers to obta i n access to hea lth ca re, employment e d ucat i on shop ping social or other life-susta i n i ng activities. or children who are ha n d i capped or h i gh-risk or at-risk as defined in s. 411 202 ) Thi s definition i ncludes persons who a r e unab l e to tra n sport themselves because of (i.e transportat i on d i sabled persons) pe r sons who a r e unab l e t o transport the mse lves because of income stat u s ( i. e. l ow-Income transp o rtat i o n d i sadvantaged persons) Transportation Disabled Population -County -l ev e l data fro m the 1980 Ce n sus and nati onal data from The National Survey of T ransportation Handicapped People (NSTHP) were used to develop es t imates of t h e perc entage of the 1 990 p o pu l ation who were transportation d isab led i n t h e 0 to 59 a n d t h e 60 and o lder age groups. These p e r centages were used to for ecas t the num ber of persons who are transportatio n disab l e d in each year of the study perio d The 1980 Census p rov i des data on the n u mber of persons with a "pu blic tra n s p ortat io n d i sability This ca te g o ry wa s defined as persons who have a hea lt h cond i tion that has l asted fo r six or m o re m o nths that makes d i fficu l t or impossib l e to use publ i c t ransportation The 1990 Census does not prov ide t hese data 228 Brevard County Transit Dev elopment P lan

PAGE 267

The NSTHP sponsored by the Urban Mass Transportation Administration (now the Federal Administration) provides data on the number of persons with a "transportation handicap This was defined as persons who (1) had experienced one or more general problem's iri the past 12 months that affected their mobility, (2) perceived that they had more difficulty in using pub l ic transportation than persons without their general problem, and (3) were not homebound The county-level1980 Census data were adjusted using the national NS THP data as control totals; that is, the 1980 Census data for Brevard County (as for all Florida counties) were adjusted so that the total percentage of pe rsons in Florida who are disabled would match the national NSTHP data This meth odology was chosen because both data sources have advantages The countyl eve l data provide usefu l information on the variability in the percentage of persons who are t ransportat ion d i sabled among counties ; however many organ izat ions that have evaluated the 1980 Census data have suggested that it underest i mates the number of persons with a publ i c transportation disabil ity. The nalional NSTHP data provide the best representation of the total percentage of persons who are transportat ion disabled This methodology (i.e., adj usting the county-level data usi ng the nationa l data ) allowed the retention of the valuable features of both data sources. Th i s methodology was used to develop estimates of the 1990 percentage of persons who were transpcrtation disabled in the 0 to 59 and the 60 and older age groups in Brevard County (as for each Florida county). To estimate the number of persons who are transpcrtation disabled in each year of the s tudy period it was assumed that the percentage of persons who are transportation disa b led in each county wou l d remain unchanged. Therefore, these percentages we r e applied to the 0 to 59 and the 60 and older age g roups t o forecast the number of persons who are transportation disabled in each year of the study period Using this methodology. the estimated number of persons who are transportation disabled In Brevard County is forecasted to increase from 26,430 in 1998 to 29, 042 in 2002. Low-Income Transportation Disadvantaged Population-The process for estimating this population is i llustrated in Figure 44. The first step was to estimate the total low-income pcpula t ion, using the same methodology as was used to estimate the pctential TO low-income population. The low inc ome transportat ion disadvantaged pcpulation cons ist s of two groups of lowincome persons. The fi rst group is those lowincome persons who are Brevard County Transit Development Plan 229

PAGE 268

I Exclude Yeo L. __ Exclude Yeo Other Low-Income Auto Available? Other Low-Income no Auto Acceaa to Public Tranaft? f No Other LowIncome no Auto no P.T. Ace Total Lowlncome Population Flguro ..,. Tranaportatlon Dloablod Low-lneome low-Income Tranaportatlon Dlaadvantaged Population Proceaa to Eatlmate the Low-Income Tranaportatlon Dtaadvanuged Population transportation d isabled (i.e those who are unable to transport themselves because of physica l or mental disability). These persons are included in the estimates of the transportation disabled population, described previously. Of the other low-income persons (i e., those who are not transportation disabled) many are able to transport themselves because they have an automobile availab l e or they have access to fixed-route public transrt services. These low-income persons are not members of the TO Population. Therefore, the second group is other lowi ncome persons (i.e., 230 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 269

those who are not transportation disab led) who do not h ave an automobile available and lack access to publ i c t ran sit. County-level data from the 1990 Census were used to estimate the percentage of the 1990 l ow income populat ion With no automobile available. It was assumed that low-income persons who are also transportation d isabled are less likely to have an automobile available than are other low income persons. Therefore, the percentage of transportation-disabled low-income persons with no automobile available falls somewhere between the percentage of all low-income persons with no automobile available and 100 percent of transportation-disabled low-income persons It was assumed that the midpoint of this range would best represent the percentage of t ransportation disabled low-income persons with no automobile available. Florida data from the 1990 Nat i onwide Personal Transportation Study (NPTS), analyzed in the 1993 CUTR report, NPTS Demographi cs and Travel Behavior : A Comparison of Florida and the United Stales, were use d to estimate the percentage of the 1990 low-income populat ion with no access to fixed-route transit. Based on these data it was assumed that in Brevard County 42 percent of low-income persons do not have access to the fix ed-route service. Using this methodo logy, the estimated number of low-income transportation disadvantaged persons in Brevard County is forecasted to inc rease from 5, 763 in 1998 to 6,244 in 2002. "High -Risk or "At -Risk ChildrenMost "high-risk" or at-risk" children are transportation disabled and/or are members of low-income transportation disadvantaged families, and, the refore are included in the TO Population forecasts described in t he preceding sections. The small number who are not included in the TD Population forecasts (those "high-risk" or "at-risk" children who are not transportation disabled and are not members of low -income transportat ion disadvantaged families) are not include d because they generally do not make use o f TO transportation for general trips Their demand for gene ral trips would typically be served by an aduH in a private automobile. Allocation of TD Popu lation to Market Segments -As with the Potential TO Population, it was necessary to develop a methodology to allocate each TD person to a particular market segment to avoid doubleo r triple-counting The methodology for this allocation is described in the 1993 CUTR report, Methodology Guidelines for Forecasting TD Transportation Demand at the County Level. The five TD Population marl
PAGE 270

Forecasts of TO Population 1998-2002Table 4-8 presents forecasts of the Brevard County TO Populat ion by marl
PAGE 271

offered by the programs. Therefore, the demand for program trips depends on the leve l of funding for the various social service programs. Many factors at various lev els of g o vernment determine the level of funding for social service programs. The lack of clear indicators of the future funding levels of these programs make it necessary to make funding assumptions. For this report, is assumed that funding for socia l service programs, and for t ransportation to and from the programs, will increase at a rate sufficient to continue to provide the current l evel of service to members of the potential TO population in Brevard County That is, funding for these programs will increase at a rate sufficient to allow the number of trips supp li ed in the county to grow at the same rate as the potential TO population. Unde r these assumpt io ns, the demand for p r ogram trips in Brevard County is forecasted to i ncrease from 860,373 in 1998 to 949,691 in 2002. Table 4-9 sh ows the forecasts of the Brevard County Potential TO population, as well as demand and supply estimates for program trips by the Potential TO population for the years 1998 throug h 2002 Table 4-9 Forecasts of Brevard County Potential TO Population and Program Trip Demand and Supply Year Potential TO Population Demand for Program 1 Supply of Program Trips (Category I) Trips 1998 163,026 860 373 860,373 1 999 166,891 831 .883 881 883 2000 170,846 903,930 903,930 2 001 174 ,804 926,528 926.528 2002 178,852 949,691 949,691 Source Est mates prepared by CUTR us ng the methodology descnbed 1n the 1993 CUTR report Methodology Guidelines for Forecasting TD Transportation Demand at the County Level. Demand for General Trips General trips are trips made by transportation disadvantaged persons to destinations of their choice (not to agency programs) Examples of general trips are trips to work or grocery stores and non-Medicaid medical trips. I n this report the demand for genera l trips is forecasted differently from the demand for program trips The methodology developed to forecast demand for genera l tri ps in volves the use of trip rates derive d in a study of demand conducted in 1 990 for the San Francis co Bay Area Metropolitan Transportation Commissi o n by Crain & Associates, Inc. and others (San Francisco Bay Are a Regional Paratransit Plan: Final Report). The trip rates were developed from the actua l experiences of paratransit systems around the country that were meeting most or all of the tri p demand in their service areas. The use of these trip rates has been recommended by the Federal Transit Administration for estimating demand for ADA complementary paratransit. Brevard County Trans;t Development Plan 233

PAGE 272

In the San Francisco study trip rates were developed from an evaluation of seven paratrans" systems that provided high level s of service. These trip rates, 1.0 and 1.2 trips per month per capita in urban and rural areas, respectively, represent the demand for gen<:>rat trips. Total demand for general trips is simply the TD Popu l ation multi p lied by the trip rates. The TD Population (rather than the Potential TD Popu l ation) was used to forecast demand because the TD Population is the pool of persons eligible for general trips funded by the state The rate of 1.0 trip per month was used for TO persons with access to fixed-route trans" and the rate of 1.2 trips per month was used for TD persons access to fixed-route trans". Ta b le 4-1 0 shows the forecasts ofthe B revard County TD Population, as well as demand and supply estimates for general trips by the TD population for the years 1998 through 2002. Based on this methodology, the demand for general tri ps is forecasted to be 391,007 in 1998 and to Increase to 428,549 in 2002. Table 4-10 shows the f o recasts of t h e B r evard County TD Population (Category 1), as well as demand and supply estimates for general trips by the TO Population for the years 1998 through 2002. Year 1998 1 999 -2000 2001 2002 Table 4-10 Forecasts of Brevard County TO Population and Genera l Trip Dema n d and Supply Brevard County Demand for Supply of General TO Population General Trips Trips 30,059 391.007 173,262 30,765 400.191 177,594 31,489 409,609 182 034 32,208 418 962 186 584 32,945 428 549 191,249 Unmet Demand for General Trips 217,745 222 597 227,575 232.377 237,299 . Source Esllmales prepared by CUTR u$1nglhe methodo l ogy described'" the 1 993 CUTR report Methodology Guld
PAGE 273

that 75 percent of the TD trips supplied were supplied within the coordinated system, and the remaining 25 percent were supplied outside of the coordinated system. Supply of Program Trips -As discussed previously, the demand for program trips is a derived demand-the demand depends on the existence of social service programs. Therefore assuming that these programs provide sufficient funding to transport their clients to their programs, the supply of program t r ips will equal the demand for the trips. For this report, as discussed in the section on demand, it is assumed that the demand and supp ly of program t rips both within the coordinated system and outside of it will increase at the same rate of growth as the potential TD population (see Table 4-9}. Under these ass umptions, based on the estimated number of program trips supplied in 1995, the supply of (as well as the demand for) program trips in Brevard County is forecasted to increase from 860,373 in 1998 to 949,691 in 2002. However, it should be noted that the supply of program trips will remain equal to the demand for those trips only as long as the various governmental and social service p rograms maintain sufficient funds to accommodate the transportation needs of their clients. Currently, many of these programs are facing serious threats to their funding in general and, in some cases, their t ransportation funding specifically (i.e., Medicaid) If the budgets of these programs are cut or eliminated the demand for non-sponsored trips can be expected to grow significantly. This is particularly true in the case of Medicaid non emergency transportation. The transportation budget for this federal program has already been cut by 30 percent. However, demand for t hese trips can be expected to remain at the current leve l regard less of agency funding. This type of scenario potentially represents a serious challenge that will have to be met by SCAT in the future. Supply of General Trips Supply forecasls for general trips among the TD popu latio n in Brevard County are presented in Tab le 4-10. General trips will be purchased through the TD Trust Fund through local subsidies, and by social service agencies. Within the coordinated system, it is assumed that the supply of general trips purchased through the TD Trust Fund will increase at the same rate as the TD population and that the supply of genera l trips purchase d through local subsidies and by social service agencies will increase at the same rate as the p otentia l TD population. Outside of the coordinated system, it is assumed that the supply of general trips purchased through local subsidies and by social service agencies will grow at the same rate as the growth in the potential TD population. (Outside of the coordinate d system, no trips will be purchase d through the TD Trus t fund ) Under these assumptions, based on the estimated number of general trips supplied in 1995, the supply of genera l trips is forecasted to increase from 173 ,262 in 1998 to 191 ,249 in 2002. Unmet Demand for TD Trips A significant gap exists between forecasted trip demand for general trips among the TD population in Brevard County and the forecasted supply of these trips. The forecas ted unmet demand for TD Brevard County Transit Development Plan 235

PAGE 274

trips is the difference between the demand and the supply of these trips. All of the unmet demand consists of demand for general trips. As discussed previously, there is no unmet demand for prog ram trips b ecause the demand for program trips is assumed to equafthe supply. Unmet demand refers to demand that currently exists in the TO transportation marke t, but is not being met due to factors such as funding, price, convenience, comfort, eligibility, and the availability of other transportation modes. The unmet demand is for ecasted to increase from 217,745 in 1998 to 237,299 trips in 2002, as shown in Table 4-10. Data from surveys on the trip purposes of genera l trips suggest that approximately 35 percent are medical, 20 percent are work or educational, 10 percent are shopping, and 35 percent are other" (e g., social and recreat ional trips). Assuming that these data also apply to the unmet demand for general trips the unmet demand in 1998 would be for approximately 76, 000 medical trips, 44,000 education and work trips, 22,000 shopping trips and 76, 000 other trips. Barriers to Coordination of TO Services The CTC has been extremely successful at bringing other agencies into the Brevard County coordinated system. Much of this success can be attributed to SCAT's innovative approach to providing mobility options that are tailored to the unique needs of clients and agencies. The CTC is able to provide very cost-effective and efficient transportation to a great number of socialand community service agencies through agency-sponsored subscription bus routes and agency sponsored vanpools. These two programs make it possible to deliver a l arge number of trips to Individuals who are transportation disadvantaged at a much lower cost than providing door-to-doo r transportation for each of these trips. The following areas represent existing or potential barriers to the coordination of transportation disadvantaged services in Brevard County: Currently, the lack of funding for TO services poses a potential barrier to meeting additional needs in Brevard County. Ma ny of the needs identified later in this chapter can only be met through expansion of t h e TD paratransit program in Brevard County. Capacity constraints in terms of lack of vehicles and time make it difficult to meet additional requests for standing orders (subscrip t ion trips) Additional capacity could be introduced in the paratransit system through expansion and enhancement of the fixed-route bus service and/or expansion of the paratransit p rogram. However, both of these options would entail the addition of staff and vehicles Additional funding is necessary to accomplish the expansion of TO services. The geography of Brevard County also poses a barrier to coordination. A majority of the trip attractors in the county, including medical facilities, shopping and work sites. are locat ed in the population pockets of Cocoa Beach Melbourne. and Palm Bay. Many residents of the 236 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 275

northernand southern-most portions of the county who are transportation disadvantaged are fairly isol a ted from these activity centers. I n many cases, residents of these areas might expect to trave l up to 40 minutes to get to a grocery store within Brevard County (see South Main land discussion group analysis in Chapter One). The extensive travel distance coupled with limited availability of fixed-route bus service in these portions of the county, as well as paratransit system capacity constraints make if difficult to meet the mobility needs of these individuals Another barrier to coordination faced by the CTC in Brevard County re lates to a lack of incentive for agencies that provide transportation to execute a coordination contract w ith the CTC. Among several agencies in Brevard County there appears to be reluctance to enter into a coordination contract with the CTC when the provider agencies will not receive any benefit from submitting trip data to the CTC This is particularly the case among agencies that provide a higher level of service to thei r clients than the coordinated system is able to offered (e.g., demand response service versus advance reservation). A related barrier to coordination is a lack of knowledge of Chapter 427 requirements among local offices of state and federal social service agencies. Recently, an agency charged with imp lemen ting welfare reform in Brevard County went out to bid for a number of services needed to facilitate the reform process One of the services that went out for bid was transportation The CTC was not notified regarding the need tor such services When t he agency was contacted regarding th i s it became clear that there was no knowledge of Chapter 427 requirements at the loca l level. This is an ongoing problem that needs to be resolved at the local, state, and federa l level. The FCTD should work st ate and federal social service representatives to ensure that information pertaining to TD practices and policies is to local programs. As discussed previously in this chapter SCAT, to date, has not experienced significant demand for ADA complementary paratransit trips. This is due, in part to the inclusiv eness of SCAT's services Many clients who would potentially be "high users," such as sheltered workshop clients, currently utilize subscription bus route services or agency-sponsored van pools for many of their mobility needs However, many agencies are facing the threat of reduced funding for programs, inc luding transportation. The reduction or loss of transportation funding could h ave a significant impact on the Brevard County TD program If agencies are no longer able or willing to sponsor subscription bus routes and/or vanpools, the demand for ADA complementary paratransit and/or TO non sponsored paratransit trip can be expected to rise sharply. Increased demand for door-to door paratransit service w ill also result in significant increases i n costs associated with coordinated transportation services. The LCB along with the Florida Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged (FCTD), should actively seek to safeguard existing resources at local. state and federal levels of government. The FCTD should also continue to work at the state and federal level to secure funding for transportation disadvantaged services. Brevard County Transi t Development Plan 237

PAGE 276

Vanpool Demand Estimates While fixed route service demand can be estimated by using such techniques as trend analysis, peer comparisons, and service/fare elasticities vanpool service estimates, especially in Brevard County, are extremely difficun In Chapter Two a trend analysis was conducted on National Transit Database (formerly Section 15) data for the vanpool service. This analysis reveals the difficulty in dealing with vanpool service estimates During the review period the vanpool program continued its shift away from service agency vans and towards commuter vans. These markets are vastly different, with hours of operation lim ited to peak periods. As a result, some categories showed phenomenal growth while others were plagued by severe declines. Projects of need or demand using these statistics wo u l d yield unrealistic estimates and lead to service development that could prove both unnecessary a nd extremely costly. Service and fare elasticities are also not appropriate tools to use in estimating demand for vanpools It should be noted that the vanpool program that exists in Breva rd County is intended to be a cost-recoverable program. Fares forvanpool participants are priced to recover all operating costs. While the federal government, using Section g money and Brevard County make the capital investment by purchasing the vans, at the end of the four-year lifespan of the commuter van, the vans are sold and this money is returned to the County. Al l of the local purchase price (10 percent ma tch for Brevard County) is recovered by the aftermarket sale of the vans. Therefore, changes in fares of the vanpool program would only occu r If the county decided to reduce its capital purchase subsidy. Therefore, in an effort to provide a fair estimate of demand for the vanpool program, census tract ana lysis, interviews, and focus group results will serve as the basis for much of the appraisal in this section. Below are the results of t he evaluation conducted on the Brevard County vanpool program with particular emphasis on census data analysis and the results of focus groups and in terviews Ridership Treml As discussed in Chapter Two, trend analysis reveals a steady growth rate in vanpool ridership in Brevard County. Between FY 1992 and FY 1996 the vanpool fleet grew by 27 percent, from 75 to 95 vans. During that time period, the vanpool program showed a healthy growth rate of approximately 6 percent per year. Ho w ever, between FY 1993 and FY 1995, the program grew at a rate of 8 percent during an economic downturn Historic trends from other TOM program suggests that economic slowdowns leads to an increase in program use since commuters look for lower cost options to compen sa te for wage freezes. Conversely, between FY 1g95 and FY 1996, when economic recovery took place the growth amounted to one van. P rojec ted into the fu t ure, a six percent annual growth rate would make the Brevard vanpool program larger than benchmark 238 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 277

vanpool p r ograms in Seattle and Hartford, two of the nat ion's largest. Given that agency demand for vans, which makes up roughly 45 percent of vans in operation, is expected to remain fairly small during the next five years a six percent growth rate is p r obably unre'alistic: Therefore, a three percent annual growth rate was selected as an appropriate projection for the vanpool program Based on FY '996 van pool ridership totals of slightly over 256 ,000 per year. the projected van pool ridership at the end of the five-year period would be approximately 300,000 as shown in Table 411. Table 4-11 Vanpool Ridersh i p Projections tor SCAT FY 1996 FY 1997 FY 1998 FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001 FY 2002 (Aetual) (Projected) (Proj&Gted) (Projected) (Proj&Gted) (Projected) (Projected) Van poo l 256,836 257,000 264 ,710 272 651 280,831 289.256 297.933 Ridership Census Tract Analysis According to a 1990 report by Commuter Transportation Services, Inc., van poo l success is attributed to three criteria of wh ich certain thresholds must be met. The firs t is distance. Vanpooling becomes a v i ab le option for most commuters if the distance they travel is greater than 20 miles The second is travel time. For van pooling to be attractive, travel time f o r the commuter must exceed 30 minutes. Finally, for a vanpooling program to be successful, the cluster area (the maximum distance all participants must be from each other at either or both ends of the trip) must be 3 miles or less. These cri teria make sense, given the importance of time and money in the eyes of most commuters. Because a large portion of the price f o r a van pool seat remains relat ively constant for all vans (i.e. insurance), for shorter distance trips, vanpools do not appear to provide a sign ifi cant enough cost savings Also, additional tim e to pick up all riders is not as significant to long-distance commuters (30 minutes) as is to a shorter distance commuter (10 minutes), because the additional time to pick up other riders is a smaller percentage of the entire trip When making travel cho ices, vanpooling thus becomes a trade -off The additional t ime to pick up riders is the trade-off to the cost savings. According to the 1993 Inst itute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) h and book Implementing Effective Travel Demand Management Measures, approximately 8 percent of all workers meet the cme r ia for vanpool commuting. According to Census JourneyTo-Work data for Brevard County, the total employment populatio n is 183,26 9. Thus, 14,662 Brevard County workers have the potential to fill vanpool seats. However, on average, only one pe rson in ten of the potential market Brevard County Transit Development Plan 239

PAGE 278

will actually consider switching to a vanpool. This limits the existing market for vanpools in Brevard County to approximately 1 ,466 persons. Under these conditions, a number of scenarios evolve, which are depicted in Tables 4-12 through 4-15. As an example, If we assume a national vanpool occupancy average of 12, then 122 vans would be needed to achieve a 100 percent marl
PAGE 279

Percent of Interest 5% 10% 20% n 14 ,662 Percent of Interest 5% 1 0% I 20'/o n=14 ,662 Table 4-14 Potential Brevard County Vanpool Market 12 Passengers per van average . Number of necessary vanpools by Potential Pen:ent of Vanpool M arket Penetration Vanpool Participants 100% 75% 50% 25% 733 61 46 31 15 l 1 ,466 122 92 I 61 I 31 2,932 244 183 122 61 Tabl e 4-15 Potential Brevard County Vanpool Marke t 1 5 Passengers per van average Number of necessary van pools by Potential Percent of Vanpool Mart
PAGE 280

Other Transportation Demand Management Options The following section discusses several of the TDM strategies thaf could be implemented in Brevard County. While the list below is not exhaustive of all TDM programs in t he country, they rep resent the basic elements from which specific programs can be tailored to meet local needs. Ridesharing Ridesharing involves the shared use of a vehicle by two or more people for the purpose of getting to or from work, school, or other locations. Ridesharing applications range from private automobiles and privately-owned and operated vans to publicly-owned and operated vans and buses. The points of origin and final destinations of riders vary. Carpools The most common form of ridesharing is the use of a private vehicle by two or more passengers generally for transportation to and from work. The passengers may use one vehicle and share expenses, or may rotate vehicles with no additional costs to passengers. From 1990 Census data, the average travel time to work was slightly over 20 minutes. Commute times in this range are conducive to carpool mode choice by those considering a commute alternative. Thus, carpool programs in Brevard County would be a viable option. For Space Coast Area T ransit, the role would be one of marketing, promotion, and matching services. This marketing could be complementary to a strong transit marketing program, with an emphasis on a mobility management theme However, given the limited budget dedicated to CAP promotional efforts, additional resources should be focused in this area. SCAT s TOM p rogram marketing efforts are somewhat limited Employers in the service area have ample free parking congestion is minimal, and a variety of housing types in various price ranges, are available in close proxim ity to most worksites. About 10 to 15 site visits are made each year to loc a l employers; however, most of these are to rein force the efforts of existing participants. TDM program staff also make presentations at local public meetings. Other outreach activities include establish ing rideshare road signs, and direct advertising of the program on existing vanpools as well as on fixed-route buses When commuters request assistance from SCAT they are asked how they heard about the program. The majority point to the vanpool and bus advertising as what led them to make the call for assistance. SCAT also recognizes the need for continued training, as TDM p rogram staff attend TOM training programs, national TDM conferences, and other professional development opportunities. 242 Brevard Counl)' Transit Dsvslopmenf Pfan

PAGE 281

Guaranteed Ride Home Programs A guaranteed ride h ome program reduces the anxiety of ridesharing by guaranteeing employees, in case of an emergency, a convenient and rel iab le mode of transportation to thei r home or to the site of the emergency The most common transportation options for guaranteed ride home programs are tax i service, short-term auto rental, fleet vehicle, shuttle services and public transit. Recent studies have shown that as many as 80 percent of new carpool participants agreed to participate because of the existence of a guaranteed ride home program Given that only about 1 0 percent of registered users ever need to use the program (and for most of those, the program is rarely used more than twice in any given year) a guaranteed ride home program is a low cost complementary program that should be considered in Brevard County. Space Coast Area could be the local sponsor of a guaranteed ride home program. Hart line, in Tampa, sponsors a guaran teed ride home program for commuters who use carpools, or vanpools at lea st two days a week to get to work. Any program should in clude transit commuters as well as carpool and vanpool commuters. Space Coast could also provide technical assistance to employers interested in developing a guaranteed ride home program for its employees. Alternative Work Hours Alternative work hours refers to any variation in the typical 8-to-5, Monday-through-Friday work schedule. Flexible work hou rs allow employees to adjust work schedules to accommodate transij and ridesharing arrangements. The three most common types of alternative work schedules are staggered work hours, flextime, and the compresse d work weeks. According to available census journey-to-work data commuters in Brevard County have similar start times. More than 55 percent of all Brevard County commuters report t heir departure time to work as being between 6:00 a m. and 8:00 a m.. Spreading the peak departure times outside this window could alleviate some roadway congestion in Brevard County. Space Coast Area Transit could provide techn ica l assistance to employers interested i n alternative work hour arrangements Staggered Work Hours In this alternative work schedule the employer staggers the arrival and departure time of groups of employees to disperse the overall impact of their travel. These schedules usually are designed so groups of employees arrive and depart f rom work at anywhere from 15-minute to two-hour intervals. The three most common types of work hour adjustments are: Brevard County Transit DevelOpment Platt 243

PAGE 282

1. Departmental: Employers assign different starting times f or ind i vidual departments or unns 2 Ind i vidual: Employers assign starting times to individual empl oyees. 3. Modal: Starting and ending times are deteimined actordin1! to transportat i o n arrangements. This approach i s generally used in conj u nct ion with other TOM measures, such as rideshar ing and mass transH. Flextime In flextime arrangements employees select their arrival and departure times and the length of their l unch pe riod. They work eight hours each day and have specified hours in which they are in the office Most flextime schedules include a core period during the work day when all employees are present. Four common flextime schedu l es are: 1. Gliding Schedule : Employees start time determ i nes their ending time. The start of the morning period may range from 6 :00a. m to 9:00a.m. The work day ends as employees complete their usua l number of work hours. 2. Modified Glid i ng : Under th i s schedule, an empl oyer selects hours during which coverage must be maintained. 3. F l ex i tour : The employees select a starting time, for example between 6:00 a m and 9:00 a m. Their start ing time remains until the option to change is extended. 4. Maxiflex : Employees earn ho u rs by working any number of hou r s within a 24-hour period. The hours are "banked" and then used to shorten future work days or work weeks. Compressed Work Week A com p ressed work week allows employees to complete the typicai4Q-hour work week in less than the norma l five days Common variations include a four-day work week, or working 80 hours in n i ne days and taking the tenth day off. There are three ways i n which work schedules are normally compressed : 244 1. 4/40 Schedule: Employees work a 40hour week in four 10-hour days 2. 9/80 Schedule : Employees work 80 hours in nine days. 3 5/4/9 Schedule: Employees work more than eight hours on four days of the week and work a shortened schedule on the fifth day. While thi s practice may reduce peak-hour traffic it has litt l e o r no impact on energy conservat ion or a i r quality improvement efforts Brevan:l County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 283

Telecommuting Telecommuting refers to the option of an employee working at home or' at im office close to home on a full or part time basis Although computers and other technology telecommuting, the telephone is still the most basic tool for worl
PAGE 284

for drive-alone commuters or reduce parking charges for carpoolers and vanpoolers. Fees collected then can be used to offset the cost of the company's TOM program. 2. Preferential Parking: Employers and developers elm reserve themost desirable parking spaces fo r rid esharing vehicles as an incentive for participation in a ridesharing program. 3. Transportation Allowances: Employers can provide financial assistance to employees for their roundtrip commute to and from the work site. This involves employer distribution of a pre-determined dollar amount to subsidize all or part of the employee's commuting costs. Availability of parking throughout Brevard County precludes most parking management strategies. Parking price which i s mostly free or hidden in lease arrangements, also l imits the applicability. Since the transit agency actively supports ridesharing programs and active ly develops vanpools, preferential parking programs should be marketed and promoted. agency staff should be able to assist local employers i n establishing such programs, by providing guidance on space selection, signage, and other requirements. Such assistance is available from the Space Coast Area Transit CAP office HOVLanes High occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes are specially dedicated lanes on highways and other commuting corridors that are reserved for vehicles carrying more than one person. Dedicating traffic lanes for vehicles carrying two or more people expands roadway capacity and reduces travel t ime. There are four basic types of HOV lane s currently in operation: 246 1. Separated Lanes: These lanes are physically separated from other trave l lanes, usually by concrete barriers, median strips, or guard rails, and can be developed within existing roadway righ ts-of-way. Generally, these lanes are inbound lanes in the morning a n d outbound lanes in the afternoon, with accompanying signs and barriers identifying the direction of flow. 2. Concurrent Flow Lanes: These are lanes adjacent to existing travel lanes and are not separated from the general traffic lanes by a physical barrier. HOV lanes are closest to the median and are separated from the general purpose travel lanes by a solid white line 3. Contraflow Lanes: Traffic on these lanes travels opposite the directional flow of the highway. These lanes are separated from other lanes by cones or other easily-removable barriers Generally, these lanes are closest to the median and operate only during peak periods. 4. Exclusive Roadways: Only HOV vehicles can use exclusive HOV roadways, which require their own rights-of-way. Because of the high costs involved, exclusive HOV roadways are usually developed by l ocal transit authorities for the exclusive use of buses. Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 285

Given the rela t ive ly low level s of traffic congestion on the majority of county roadways, HOV lanes have only limited applicability in Brevard County While U.S. 1 travelers and travelers to and along beach corridors can face traffic delays, the congestion is nor significant enciugl\ to warrant the large capital to construct HOV lanes. Pedestrian and Bicycle Altematiyes Non-motorized transportation, such as walking and bicycling, has the added advantage of replacing some automobile trips altogether. Walking and bicycling are especially effective travel modes for trips of less t han five miles. The success of bicycle and pedestrian transportation depends upon coo rdina tion of l and development with transportation p lanning. Bicycle and pedestrian amenities may include near-side pedestrian or bicycle access to f requented stores and services such as banks or convenience stores, sidewalks, secure bicycle parking showers and lockers at the work place, and convenient access. Most communities in Florida suffer from inadequate bicycle and p edestria n l inkages between residential and non-residential areas. Imp roved bicycle and pedestrian access and p rograms are needed in all including Brevard County. The transit agency could p lay a major advocacy role for bicycle and pedestrian programs since many of these programs also improve trans it access. In addition, the t ran s it agency has dev eloped a bikes-on-bus program t o improve intermodal Brevard County. Finally, a transit agency representative should be involved in the l and p lanning review process to ensure that transit, bicycle and pedestrian access is accommodated in new development Transportation Management Organizations Transportation Management Organizations (TMOs), also know n as Transportation Management Associations (TMAs), have emerged as a new approach to addressing transportation needs TMOs are grass-roots organizations formed to address mobility needs in major centers. They provide a forum through which building owners, merchants, developers, policymakers, and public sector agencies can act collectively to establish prog rams,' policies, and services that resolve local and regional transportation problems. Currently, the Viera development is in the process of establishing a TMO, in part to fulfill loca lly mandated conditions of development As this TMO develops, CAP staff should work with the newly-established organization to prov ide commute serv ice s to employees in the Viera development Trip Reduction Ordinances A trip reduction ordinance (TRO) is a regulat ory tool for mandating participation in TOM. Generally, a TRO requires certain organizations, such as major employers or developers, to plan and carry Btevar'd County Transit Development Plan 247

PAGE 286

out measures aimed at reducing the number of single occupant vehicle trips generated to and from a given location Given the r e l ative lack of traffic congestion, and the existence of deve lopment regu lations already in existence there is little need for a trip reduction ori:linanee in Brevard County 248 Bmvard County Tnmsit Development Plan

PAGE 287

ASSESSMENT OF NEEDS The concept of unmet demand' ca n be interpreted in more than one way: It can mean those persons who use pub lic transportation (including fixed-route subscript ion route, agency and non agency vanpool, and door-to-door paratransit) today, but are not able to do so for all of their travel needs. It can also be v i ewed more broadly to incl ude those persons who do not currently use public transporta t io n but who might be induced to become riders through various changes o r expansions i n the system The primary focus in this needs assessment is on the first group, because the mobi l ity issue is more press i ng for t hese riders The latter group of potential riders must also be addressed in any needs assessment s i nce they comprise the most promising market for future growth. This future growth will result in better serv i ce for all riders captive as well as d i scretionary. This section identifies the service needs for all of the transportation provided by SCAT. Many of the patrons of the publ i c transportat ion services provided by SCAT use mult i ple services (e g fixed-route subscription, demand-responsive, vanpools) Therefore, it was necessary to address needs from a system-wide perspective. Public Meeting At this poi nt in the TOP process a second public meeting was conducted. (The first public meeting in the T DP process was held on April1, 1997.) The meeting was held on May 13, 1997, at 6:30 p.m. at the County Government Center i n Vie r a All written and oral comments received at the meeting are contained in Appendix I. The meeting was attended by over 65 people. As in the first publ i c meet i ng on April1 1997, participants were asked to respond to the following question either through written or verbal comments. What should Space Coast Area Transit do in the next five years to develop service that meets the needs of Brevard County residents? Attendees were asked to subm i t written comments and/or give oral comments at t he pod i um. Oral comments were written on fli p charts and at the end ofthe meeting part i cipants were asked to mark the i r top three priorities on the flip charts. The four comments that received the most votes as top priorities were the following in order by the numbe r of votes "Need benches and shelters at bus stops. "Veterans Administration clinic will be opening in Viera in November 1998. Will need more public transportation for VA Clinic services. Barefoot Bay and other area veterans should be a priority for the five-year plan." BrevarrJ County Transit Davslopmsnt Ptan 249

PAGE 288

"Buses that connect thoughout the county. "Bu ses past 5 p.m." . Service Needs The previous section outlined demand estimates for fixed-route service in Brevard County. In this section mobil ity needs are assessed and ways to meet unmet demand are presente d Information from multiple sources was used to assess the pub li c t ransporta t ion needs in Brevard County. These sources include the TOP Review Committee, Goals and Objectives developed in Chapter T hree interviews with key local officials focus groups, the discussio n group, comments from the public meetings and SCAT staff Based upon all of these sources the following mobility needs have been ident ified. Note that these are not l i sted in priority order Increase hours of service Expand days of service Improve frequency of service Coordinate service with other counties Expand vanpool services Expand Volunteers In Motion program Increase publi c outreach/marketing Improve bus stop amenities and related infrastructure Clarify role in emergency evacuation Focus on needs of t he transit dependent Maxim ize use of half-price bus pass program Increase coordination with major employers Continue coordination with the WAGES Progra m Provide additional work transportation Provide more multi-leg paratransit trips Provide additional medical standing orders Establish ADA complementary paratransit eligibility certification Establish eligibility for TO non-sponsored transportation Increase Hours of Service At present the 18 fixed routes that SCAT operate do not offer service past the late afternoon. Expanding service to evening hours was suggested by the goals and objectives citizens attending t he public meetings, participants in the focus groups, discussion group, and key l ocal officials 250 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 289

Information fro m t he focus groups conducted w it h young people indicated that evening serv i ce w ould be necessary for this group to consider using the fixed-route service Trips from school to recreat i onal act ivijies, friends' homes and shopping would be potential trips taken in the evening hours. I n add i t ion, ci t izens attending the public meetings indicated that evening service would be necessary to accommodate work tri ps as well as rec r eation and shopping trips that cannot be made during cu r rent service hours. Un f ortunate ly, financing even i ng serv i ce is problematic The veh i cles used for fixed-route service are also us e d for subscription service before and after the SCAT fixed route servi ce hours. Therefore, additional vehicles wou l d be required to prov i de this service. Addit i onal labo r c o sts for this service w o u l d be significant. In addition, the demand for ADA complementary paratransit cou l d be impacted by any service enhancements Expand Days of Service Currently SCAT operates from Monday through Friday wijh the exception of Route 21 in Melbourne, which a l so is operated on Saturday and Sunday. The need to expand the days of service on more routes to include Saturday and Sunday was expre s sed by the goa l s and objectives, citizens attending the pub li c meet i n g and part i cipants in foc us groups. Weekend service would meet some of the needs of persons who do not work the standard M o n d ay through Friday schedule as well as meeting the recreation and shopping needs of current riders and potential new riders such as young people Imp r ove Frequency of Service Currently, SCAT operates routes at various frequencies Route 21 runs at 30-minute interval s However, the majority of routes operate only every hour or two. Citizens attending the public meeting and participants i n the fo c us and discussion groups indicated the need for increased service frequency. It was sug g este d that many people do not consider transit as an o p tion because of the infrequency of serv i ce Potential riders are fearful of arriving at their destination and nol being ab l e to return. In many cases current riders must a ll ocate a whole day to shopping trips or medical tri ps because of the infrequency of service. This is a concern part icul arly for those who are fra il. The fiscal i mplica t i ons of improved frequency are s i gnificant. Additional equipment would be required along with addijiona l labor costs and no funding source is immediately ident i fiable. One poss i ble approach is to se l ect the most promising route as a test case. This method has already Brevard County Transit Development Plan 251

PAGE 290

been tested to some extent, on Route 21 where frequencies recently were i ncreased to 30 minutes from 60 m i nutes. Coordinate Service Wit h Othe r Counties The geography and development patterns of Brevard County produce unique service patterns for publ i c t r ansportat ion. In some areas, the c l osest access point for med i cal and sho p ping services lie outside of Brevard County. For example, the South Mainland portion of the county is closer, by distance to the community of Sebastian in Indian River County than it i s to serv i ces in Brevard County. Currently, residents in this area must travel as much as 20 miles by public transportat ion to Palm Bay and Melbourne rather than trave l ing 2 miles to Sebastian. It was suggested by residents of South Mainland that public transportat i on services be coord i nated with other counties. In the case of South Mainland, public transportation could be coordinated with serv i ces prov i ded by Indian River County. Coordination with other contiguous counties to B r evard County should also be examined For example citizens attending the public meeting suggested that express bus service should be coordinated with Lynx to transport workers to the Orlando Metropolitan Area Expand \lanpool SeNices The vanpool program (employment and agency-sponso r ed) that SCAT coordinates has proven to be an extremely successful transportation alternative. SCAT should exp lore the possibility of expanding the agency-sponsored vanpool program in Brevard County so that more agencies are able to take advantage of this al t ernative to door-to-door transportation. as agency-sponsored van pool trips are much less expensive than trad i tional paratransit trips. Vanpool services may also be a v i able option for providing work transportation to former welfare recipients. As discussed during focus groups with young people, the discussion group wijh residents i n South Mainland and the public meeting with Brevard County residents, add i tional t r ansportation needs exist among residents in remote portions of the county T hese needs cannot currently be met by fixed-route service due to the limijed nature of the system Expans ion of the vanpool program that incl udes partnerships between SCAT and local communijies may result in additional needs being met in the remote areas of Brevard County. Expand Volunteers in Motion Program The Volunteers in Motion (VIM) program currently helps to meet the specialized needs of transportation disadvantaged persons in Brevard County I n to providing transportation this program a l so addresses the specific needs of frail elderly persons. The VIM p r ogram uses 252 Brevard County Tran&t Development Plan

PAGE 291

volunteers in all aspects of the program including as dispatchers, schedulers drivers and escorts The VIM program provides another low-cost alternative to traditional door-to-door paratransit serv ice and expansion of this program would result in additional transpottafton needs being met i n Brevard County. In addition to providing additional transportation resources, the expansion of the VIM program could result in freeing up capacity in the non-sponsored paratransit programs. As with many volunteer-based programs, the VIM program must have volunteers to provide additional trips Potential partnerships w it h other Brevard County volunteer programs, as addressed by participants in the South Mainland d is cussion grou p could result in a larger volunteer-base for the VIM program. Improve Public Outreach and Marketing Public outreach is a way for SCAT to educate th e area's residents and about the fixed-route system and the advantages of pub lic transportat ion in gen eral. Currently, SCAT is receiving a grant for marl
PAGE 292

Focus on Needs of the Transit Dependent The majority of SCAT's fixed-route riders are considered "transit d epe ndent. In other words, these persons do not have other mobility choices. The TOP Review Committee expressed concern that the needs of the transit dependent be periodically examined to determ ine if they are being met by public transporta t ion Maximize Use of the ljalf-Price Bus Pass program SCAT currently offers half-price ($14.00) fixed-route monthly bus passes to seniors persons with disabilities, and youth in Brevard County. Little knowledge of this program exists among governmental and socia l service agencies in Brevard County that have c lients that need transportation. The existence of the halt-price bus pass program needs to be advertised to the general public and agencies This could be a particularly useful resource for agencies that would l ike to assist their clients with mobility needs, but are unable to do so because the costs associated with door to-door paratransit service are prohibitive The fixed-route monthly bus passes can be used for trips to agency-spo nsored programs, as well as any other trips on the fixed-routes that the client wishes to make. Expansion of this program will be greatly facilitated by expanding fixed-mute days and hours of service and enhancing bus stops with amenities. Increa se Coordination with Major Employers The TOP Review Committee and citizens attending the public meeting suggested that SCAT pursue Increased coordination with major employers in the provision of fixed-route services. Suggestions included coord i nating with major employers for a lunch bus service for their employees. In addit i on, employers should be given incentives to subsidize public transportation for their employees. Cont i nue Coordination with the WAGES Program Work transportation for former welfare recipients is essential to ensure the success of the WAGES program. SCAT has been successful in working with companies such as Excell Corporation to provide transportation for employees. SCAT should pursue additional coordination efforts with employers and WAGES. Proyjde additiona l Work Transportation A significant need for pub lic transportation for work trips exists in Brevard County. Currently, the hours and days of operation on the fixed -ro ute system make it difficult, if not impossible to use the fixed-routes for work transportation. The need for this type of transportation will continue to grow 254 Brevard County Trensit Dsvatopment Plan

PAGE 293

in the near future as welfare recipients are required to obtain at lea st part-time employment in order t o continue to r eceive benefits Vocational rehabilitation clients in the county a lso have work transportation needs that cannot be accommodated through the TO transpOrtation program due to t h e existence and maintenance of trip purpose priorities. While many of the Vocational rehabilitation clients may be able to use the fixed-r oute system the hours and days of service prohibit the use of the system for work trips. H owe ver, expansion of the fixed-route system and/or TD program would require additional vehicles and labor that could be quite cost prohibitive. Proyjde more Multi-leg Paratraosjt Trjps An i ssue menti oned at the discussion group in South Mainland and public meetings as well as by SCAT staff is the p rov ision of muHi-leg paratransit trips to enable individuals returning from doctor visits to pick-up prescription medicine at local pharmaci es. Individuals who require transportation ass i stance for medical trips often also need help getting to pharmacies. Rather than provid i ng two, separate round-trips passengers already on SCAT vehicles could be transported to a nearby pharma cy to pick-u p prescription s on their return trip home. Provide Addi tional Medical Standing O!ders Stand i ng orders for paratransit service to medical services allow individu a ls with regular, recurring medical needs, such as dialys is, to receive these trips without having to call to request a ride for each individua l trip Currently, SCAT cannot accept any additional medical standing orders due to the maintenance of trip priorities set by the TO Local Coordinating Board (LCB) Additional standing orders are needed to serve t ransportation disadvantaged individuals receiving radiation therapy. However add i tional vehicles and labo r would be required to increase capacity in the TD paratransit program in order to provide this service Establis h ADA Complementary Paratransit Eljgibiltty Certification Current ly only a small number of persons have applied for and have been certified as eligible for ADA complementary paratransit service. As discussed prev iousl y there has not been much i ncentive for potentially ADA-eligible persons in Brevard County to apply for ADA complementary paratransit service given the inclusiveness of SCAT's many transportation programs and the limited avai l abil ity of fixed-route transportation in Brevard County. H owever, the issue of transferabili t y of ADA eli gibi l ity certification has been rai sed several times at LCB meetings Individuals who are certified as ADA-eligible in Brevard County may also use ADA complementary paratransit services in other localit i es. Ther efore even though many of the transportation needs of ADA-eli gible persons are bei ng met outside o f the ADA paratransit p rog r a m in Brevard County these persons may requ ire ADA complementary paratrans i t services when they visit other localities. A more active approach needs to be t aken to ensure that ADA-eligible individuals are able to obtain Brevard County Transit Development Plan 255

PAGE 294

certification of eligibility In addition, SCAT needs to implement a formal certification p rogram that details conditions of eligibility that can be transferred to other localities Establish Eligibili!Y for ID IransportaliQn The Florida Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged recently set forth eligibility criteria for local TD programs to use to determine el i gibility for trips subsidized by TD Trust Fund monies ( i.e general purpose t rips) At this time, SCAT uses self-cert ification of eligibility for TD non sponsored trips Under the TD eligibility policy adopted in May 1997 SCAT will need to modify its procedures to administer eligibility detenninations for the TD program, similar to the application process used for the ADA program and the Medicaid program. SUMMARY The various analyses suggest that while there may be some level of unmet demand for fixed-route and/or paratransit service in Brevard County, overall, SCAT does a good job in providing service where it is needed Demand projections suggest that ridership will continue to grow for both the fixed route and Transport ation Disadvantaged system. As indicated in the fixed-route ridership estimates the potential demand for service is great In addition, the demand estimates for TD general p urpose transportation indicate that a large amount of unmet demand currently exists in Brevard County The unmet demand for general trips is also forecasted to grow over the next frve years. Vlhlile the supply of TD program trips is assumed to equal the demand for those trips, it should be noted that reductions in governmental and social service budgets could resu l t in r eductions and/or the complete elimination of transportation funding for agency programs The loss of agency funding could significantly impact SCAT, both as Brevard County s public transportation system and as the community transportation coordinator by causing the demand for ADA complementary paratrans it service and TD non-sponsored paratransit service to grow to even higher levels than forecasted. The needs assessment introduces methods to meet this potentia l demand These methods and broad aHematives for the future direction of SCAT will be presented and evaluated in the next chapter A series of recommendations will also be developed in the next chapter 256 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 295

CHAPTER FIVE PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES AND RECOMMENDATIONS INTRODUCTION Previous chapters in th is report have taken as their primary focus the description of existin g public t ransportation conditions in Brevard County The purpose of this is to identify and eva lua te various service alternatives for SCAT over the next five years. In keep in g with the strategic nature of the Transit Development Plan, options are broadly defined to indicate possible directions for the transit agency as it considers how best to meet mobility needs over the next five years. These attematives are not necessarily mutually exclusive and could be pursued simultaneously Many transit systems have discovered over the years that they cannot serve all demands, but must select the most promising markets or the areas where the need for transit service is greatest. This is especially true in t imes of limi ted budgets. While FOOT has suggested that the process of identifying alternatives in the TOP not be constrained by fiscal resources a successful approach avoids "blue sky" wish lists in favor of app ropriate decisions regarding the best course of action. PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES Broad alternatives for the f utur e direction of SCAT are presented in the following paragraphs. These alternatives reflect overall policy decisions r egarding the markets served by public transportation the extent of service and the emphasis of service. Serve New Martsets? Many comments were received through the pub lic involvement process identifying public transportation needs of groups not traditionally served by SCAT These groups include yo ung people and workers SCAT has not made an effort to exclude these individuals from service, however, the days and hours of service that the fixed-routes operate do not correspond with the needs of these populat ions. i;XI2i!Dd Area of Service? Another major question for the future of SCAT is the geographic area for which it provides service. SCAT currently focuses services in the urbanized areas of Brevard County. Shoul d SCAT expand the service area to include more outlying i solated areas (e.g. South Mainland)? In addition, should SCAT coordinate or provide services outside of Brevard County? Brevard County Transit Development Plan 257

PAGE 296

Expand Extent of Fi xed Route Serv ice Many of the comments rece i ved from the public meetings focused on the 'need for more frequent service more days of service, and more hours of service on the exi sting fixed routes. Expanded serv ice would provide more trips for current riders as well as open up service to new markets More Emphasis on Fixed-Route Services? Perhaps the most fundamental question facing SCAT is what kinds of serv i ce it shou l d provide. This quest i on is more directly relevant to SCAT than to other transit agencies in Florida because of the diverse types of publ i c transportation currently offered Along with operating the fixed-route bus system. SCAT clearly has the most active and successful vanpool p r ogram in the state, and is the local Community Transportation Coord i nator for TD serv i ce It is the except i on rather than the rule in Fl orida that the same agency i s responsible for and operates both fixed-route and TD service Thus SCAT has real choices to make In answering questions regarding service. What are the relative priorities among the fixed-route, subscription demand responsive and vanpool modes? Comments from the public meetings were mainly concerning fixed-route services offe r ed by SCAT Comments i ncluded expansion of hou r s and days of service area of service, and frequency of serv i ce to meet more of the needs of the community. However, as indicated by the public meet i ngs, interviews with local officials, and the discussion group the paratransH services provided by SCAT are well received Vanpool service was not discussed much in these forums however, this is a spec i alized prog r am with limited public awareness. ACTIONS ON PAST RECOMMENDATIONS This section summarizes the actions taken by SCAT concerning the recommendations from the last major update of the TDP completed in 1 994 This information i s useful in showing the actions that SCAT has taken in the past three years to accomp l ish these recommendations. P l ease note that all recommendat i ons contained i n Table 5-1 have been discussed and implementation responsibiiHies have been assigned to SCAT staff Therefore if there is a no" l i sted under the "Action Taken" column, that means that work has not yet begun on the recommendation, but it has not been ignored o r placed aside by SCAT. When "yes appears in the "Action Taken column, SCAT has begun activity but the imp l ementat i on is not complete. Please note that some of the recommendations by their nature, can never be completed those recommendations involve a continuing process. 258 Brevard County Tl8ns i t Development Plan

PAGE 297

Table 5 Summary of Actions on Past Recommendations I Recommendation Action Other Comments Taken Actions to be Initiated Im mediately I dentify bus stop l ocations and i nsta ll bus stop l Yes I 1. signs. Qn.going 2. Pain t all SCAT vehicles. Completed 3 I TO as the transition t o SCAT 1 ope rat1on continues. Comp leted 4. Develop a p lan for using new TO Trust F und money Completed 5 E stabl i s h and hire a new staff posftion t o Compl eted Decision was made to not fund t he oversee the TO p r o gram. position Con tinue to research and implement computerI mp l ementing Harris Co rpo ratio n 6 based ap plicati ons th at e nhance system Yes Automatic Veh icle Loca tor (AVL) and operation C ompute r Ai d ed Dispatch (CAD). Estab l ish superstopltransfer centers at major Plans for a transfer center at the 7. Yes Government Cente r are being l ocations whe re bus routes i ntersect 1 developed. I 8. f I n stall bus she-lters and benches at a ppropria te l l ocations. No Impl ementation expected thi s year 9 Retain a South Terminal for transit use Completed Explo r e the future of Medicaid Contract with Medicaid expires 10. Yes 4/30198, staff wO
PAGE 298

Recommendation Action Other Comments Taken I Study the possibility of using ISTE A funds lor I I . 22. I vehicle repl aceme n t in the years 1999 through I 2001. 23. I j F o llow and coordinate with the Empowennent Zone and Enterprise Community application. Completed 24. Ensure fixed-route seNice is i n compliance with Yes Ongoi ng. the ADA. 25. Continue impl ementation of SCATs ADA plan Yes Ongoing. I Held WOfl
PAGE 299

I Recommendation AcUon I Other Comments i Tat(en Arrange fo r a bus system map an d TD!vanpoo l . 43. infonnatio n to be i ncluded i n the telephone directory for Brevard County. Yes Ongoing. 44. Examine the poss i bility of operat ing a beach No tr o lley a l ong A 1 A. 45 l Pursue a dedicate
PAGE 300

RECOMMENDATIONS This section presents recommendations for SCA T over the next five years. Recommendat i ons are prioritized by time frame for implementation: immediately, over the next one to th r ee yea r s and over the next four to five years. Most of the recommendations fall into the near-term time frames, and it i s expected that the transit dev elopment plan will be updated annually to account for changing conditions in Brevard County and to track the progress in accomplishing these recommendations. Within each time frame the related actions are grouped as appropriate but are not listed in priority order. Actions To Be Initiated Immediately 1. Continue the public Input process. As in dicated by the outstanding turnout for the two public meetings conducted for the Transit Deve l opment P l an there is a strong interest in public transportation in Brevard County. SCAT has a good r ecord in the area of sponsoring public hearings and meetings in an attempt to keep the commun i ty informed and receive input. This process should continue. 2. Continue the employee Input process. SCAT's emp l oyees gain important informati o n about the operation of the service through input from the public as well as the i r own insights. This valuable resource should be tapped wheneve r possible. SCAT makes a tremendous effort to involve vehicle operators in procurement and service decisions through in-service meet ings. SCAT should continue efforts at using employee-based teams to determine solut ion s to problems and incnsase SCAT's productivity. As indicated from comments at the public meetings, these efforts should be continued. 3. Establish new members on the Local Coordinating Board ( LCB) representing the riders of SCAT's services. These new members can serve as an effective conduit in communications between the LCB, SCAT, and the genera l public. 4. Improve coordination with cities in the county. As a county agency SCAT should continue to keep the cities informed wilh regard to transit issues, and to enlist their cooperation in matters such as for installing signage shelters and benches and perhaps secu ri ng fund ing for the transit system general operations. 5. Complete installation of bus stop signs. SCAT shou ld continue to coordinate with appropriate state, county and municipal governments in placing signs at bus stops. 262 Elr&van:l County Transit Plan

PAGE 301

6. Establish superstop/transfer centers at major locations where bus routes intersect. SCAT is currently considering establishment of t he first of these centers at the Government Center Once established. these centers should be the first 'to reeeive new signage; information displays on SCAT routes shou ld also be provided at these locations. 7. Install bus shelters and benches at appropriate locations The busiest bus stops should have bus shelters to protect waiting passengers from inclement weather, unless there is a sheHered area nearby (e.g., shopping centers) where passengers can see an approaching bu s Benches shou ld, also be provided at these stops, as well as at less busy stops. 8. Expand the use of illustrated buses on SCAT's fixed-route system. Specially painted "supergraphic" buses at SCAT and around the state have proven to be extremely popular and can be a major source of revenue to the transit system These types of buses can liven up" the streets and get the transit system no ticed Similar advertising is used on buses in Orlando, Tampa, and Fort Myers SCAT would bene fit from continuing to look for more creative ways to market its services. Therefore, expanding the current illustrated bus program should be considered. SCAT should, however take care to ensure a consistent visual ident ificati o n on all of its buses. 9. Optimize the size of buses In SCAT's fleet to match ridership patterns. SCAT should, when replacing vehicles, purchase buses tha t match the ridership patterns on specific routes The traditional40-foot buses are not necessary on all of the fixed-routes. Optimizing the size of the buses will conserve capital expenses. 10. Fonnalize internal perfonnance measures to help measure the success of individual routes SCAT keeps track of ridership and system performance of the fixed-route system on an ongoing basis. This information should be used as one way of measuring the success of indivi dual fixed-routes The tables in Appendix K contain individual route operation data for FY 1995 and FY 1996 From this information, six scoring indicators were developed: riders/mile, riders/hour, rev enue/mile revenue/hour, operating ratio, and cosVrider. Scores were then d evelo ped for each route based on these six indicators. A route's score for a particular measure is based on a comparison of the measure as a percentage of the system average for that particular measure These indiv idual measure scores are added together and divided by six to get a final aggregate score This final score is an indication of a route's performance for the six measures when compared to the system average for t hose measu res. A higher score represents better overall performance when compared to other routes. The fina l column rank-orders the routes based on their aggregate score. Brevard Transit Devel opment Plan 263

PAGE 302

As previously stated, th i s information helps to measure the success of individual fixed routes. However, the results of this analysis should not be the only factor used to determine the success of a route. The resutts of this analysis should trigger furtlier review of routes that are performing below the average of the system. 11. Conduct an In-depth study of the new fixed routes implemented in October 1996. Performance measures developed in Recommendation #9 should be used to study the success of new fixed routes. Results should be used to determine if adjustments in these routes are necessary. 12. Conduct a full on-board survey of fixed-route service, Including on-off counts by bus stop. This survey will provide valuable information regarding origins and destinations of current riders as well as in-depth information about the demographic characteristics of SCAT's passengers. The survey will also collect data related to customer satisfaction of the system and operators. The data gathered will be useful in determining future changes in service. 13. Review the route numbering scheme used for bus routes. There may be a more logical scheme which makes it easier for potential riders to identify where a bus goes (e.g., routes starting with a certain number serve a particular part of the county, numbers ending in zero connect different parts of the county). 14. Continue to ensure that the fixed-route service is in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Besides providing lift-equipped fixed-route service, SCAT is required to provide other amenities for passengers with disabilijies such as announcing major stops and transfer points along routes, and making schedule information available in alternative formats. In SCAT must continue to replace all vehicles with fully accessible buses. 15. Establish ADA complementary paratransit certificate of eligibility (I.e., 10 Cardl. Currently, only a small number of persons have applied for and have been certified as eligible for ADA complementary paratransit service. However, the issue of transferability of ADA eligibility certification has been raised several times at LCB meetings. Individuals who are certified as ADA-eligible in Brevard County may also use ADA complementary paratransit services in other localities A more active approach needs to be taken to ensure that ADA eligible ind iv iduals are able to obtain certification of eligibility 16 Work with the Local Coordinating Board to review, d iscuss, and begin to establish a TO Eligibility Process. Currently, SCAT uses self-certification to determine eligibility for TO 264 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 303

non-sponsored trips. The Florida Commission for the Transporta t ion Disadvantaged has set forth criter ia for local programs to use to determine eligibilrty for trips subsidized by TO Trust Fund mon i es (i.e., general purpose trips). The eligibility elements forth by the FCTO include criteria t hat must be imp l emented by all local TO programs as well as elements that may be customized by each local program to reflect the unique situation in that locality Although t h e e li gibility criteria set forth by the FCTO will be phased into the Florida TO p rogram, SCAT should begin working wrth the LCB to establish e lig ibility criteria t hat reflect the unique situation in Brevard County. In addition, SCAT and the LCB should consider a coordinated one-step process for all eligibilrty certifications including TO non-sponsored trips, ADA services and Medicaid services. Administrative costs could be minimized if all cert ifi cat ions were performed together. 17. Determine the future method of service delivery tor Medicaid non-emergency transportation. The current Medicaid transportation contract expires May 1998. SCAT, as the CTC, needs to determine th e most cost-efficient and effective method to serve Medicaid transportation needs. SCAT will need to seek input from the Agency for Health Care Admin istr ation, the Local Coordinating Board, and the Brevard County Board of County Commissioners while developing the request for proposals. 18. Implement Eligibility Process for Medicaid Non-Emergency Transportation. SCAT identified an eligibility process to use in the Medicaid non-emergency transp orta tion program. The purpose of this eligibility process is to determine the mode of transportation service needed to meet the transportation needs of each Medicaid client. The eligibility process adopted by SCAT is designed to consider all modes of transportation available including family and friends, fixed-route services, and the more costly paratransrt service. This process should be implemented so that SCAT can identify Medicaid clients who are able to use fixed route bus service to meet their transportation needs. This would help to increase capacity on para tra nsrt vehicles, reduce costs, and provide increase d mobility to Medicaid clients 19. Begin Medicaid bus pass program. SCAT and the Agency for Health Care Administration should develop a bus pass program for Medicaid clients determine d to be ab le to use fixed route bus service for their Medicaid-reimbursable medical trips (see recom mendat ion 17) These persons should be issued monthly bus passes good for any number of trips on the fixed-route bus service in place of paratransit eligibility. This program may result in impr oved overall cost effectiveness and free up capac ity on the paratransit system In addrtion, the bus pass program could prov ide gre ater mob ility and independence by providing more transit options. Brevaftl County Transit Development Plan 265

PAGE 304

20. Coordinate public transportation services with Indian River County and expand service for residents and veterans of the South Mainland area of Brevard County. Residents of South Mainland who use public transportation foi shopping and medical trips currently must travel to Palm Bay for these services. It was suggested by participants in the discussion group and citizens attending the public meetings that transit service should be provided by SCAT to Sebast ian in Indian River County. SCAT shou l d continue to work with loca l officia l s representatives and private businesses from I ndian River County to identify possible transportation coordination opportunities and determine cost-sharing opt i ons with India n River b u sinesses 21. Continue the park-and-ride lot program. The County's first park-and ride lot opened at Eau Gallie and 1-95 in July 1996 SCAT should develop a list of potential locations for additional park-and-ride l ots and work towards developing these srtes for the park-and-ride program. This lot is currently used by participants i n the vanpool p r ogram Ultimate l y, such lots could be a centra l point for TD shuttles operating to and from the passenger's home, and passengers who were able cou l d transfer to fixed route service. I n addrtion, SCAT should i n vestigate public/private partnerships {joint ventures) fo r park-and-ride lots and mini park and-ride l ots. 22 Continue to support the vanpool program. The van pool program housed at Space Coast Area TransH is v i ewed as a mode l for other Aori da vanpool programs to emulate L ocally, the program cont i nues to provide a vital service to an important n i che market that wou l d otherwise go unserved Support fo r efforts in this a r ea should be an integral part of the S p ace Coast Area Transit service delivery program Actions To Be Initiated Over The Next One To Three Years 23. Address changing public transportation needs for the planned VA Clinic. The p l anned Veterans Admin i stration 0/A) Cli n ic, in Viera is expected to be a major trip generator for TO eli gible and ADA-el i gible persons. SCA T will n eed to rev iew service pa r ameters to ensu r e that these persons are well served In add i t i on, the VA clin i c will need to be co n sidered as a destination on futu r e fixed-routes. 24. Consider extending weekday hours of service In the morning and evening on fixed routes. At present many of the 1"8 fiXed-routes that SCAT operate do not offer service in the morn i ng and late i n the afternoon. Expanding serv i ce hours i n both the morning and afternoon would open up new markets fo r SCAT incl u ding providing trips for young peop l e and workers. Expanding the hours of se rv ice was suggested i n the Goals and Obje c tives, 266 Brevat
PAGE 305

the pub lic meetings, the focus groups and discussion group, and by key local officials. Suggested routes for expansion include Routes 6, 7, 8, 26, 23, 27, 24, and 28 25. Consider expanding days of service to Saturday on selected routes. Saturday service on Route 21 in Melbourne has been successful. This service should be tested on other routes. Routes oriented toward shopping and social trips are the best ini tial candidates for Saturday service. Weekend service would meet some of the needs of persons who do not wori< a stan dar d Monday through Friday schedule, as well as meeting the recreation and shopping needs of current riders and potential new riders such as young people. The need for weekend service was expressed in the Goals and Objectives, the public meetings, and the focus groups. Suggested routes fo r Saturday service, in order of priority, include Routes 9, 26, 7 23, 8, 27, 6, 24. and 28. 26. Consider Increasing frequency of service on selected routes. More frequent service in areas where demand is heaviest will enable transit-dependent passengers to travel more easily and will attract choice riders Inc reasing the frequency to every 30 minutes on Route 21 proved to be very popular to riders. This improvement in frequency should be tested on one or two other routes. Incr eased frequency was suggested by citizens attending the public meetings and participants in the focus and discussion groups. Suggested routes for inc reased frequency of service include Routes 6 . 26, 23, 27, and 25 27. Conduct an operations analysis of SCAT's fixed route service. A comprehensive operations analysis examines the entire transit network as well as underserved areas of the County and re co mmends specific changes at the route level. 28. Examine the feasibility of connecting the two beach fixed routes. Currently Route 9 (serving Cocoa Beach) and Route 26 (serving the South Beaches) do not connect. SCAT should invest igate the cost of connecting these two routes and providing North-South service without increasing headways on these routes. 29. Examine the feasibility of operating a beach trolley atong A1A, possibly connecting with other SCAT services. Other systems in Flor ida have had success with rubber-tired beach trolleys Service is provided free or at a reduced fare, with the private sector and/or the localities contributing to the ope rating cost. A beach trolley could make i t easier for tourists to get around without requiring automobiles. 30. Consider implementing a trave l training program to assist seniors with the utilization of the fixed-route bus system. The ADA requirement that tra ns i t agencies prov ide complementary paratransit service for ADA-eligible individua ls who cannot access the fixedBrevard County Transit Development Plan 267

PAGE 306

route system could have a sign i ficant impact on the demand fo r all services in B r eva r d County. However, many i nd i viduals can use t he fixed-route system if they are assisted with learning to do so. SCA T shou l d consider i m plementing a trave l train i ng program that focuses on how to access SCAT buses, use and understand route maps an d route schedules and how to transfer from one bus to another. This type of training will make i t possible to move individuals f r om the more costly paratransit serv i ce to the less expensive fixed -r oute bus service. Travel training will also he l p seniors feel more comfortable whi le using the fixed-route bus system 31. Consider the expansion of the agency-sponsored vanpool program in Brevard County so that more agencies are able to take advantage of this alternative to door-to-door transportation. The vanpool program that SCAT coordinates has proven to be an extreme l y successful transportation alternative that should be expanded to include more agency programs. T he vanpool trips a r e much less expensive than traditional paratransit trips. I n addit i on, vanpoo l services may also be a viab l e option for p r oviding work transportation to former welfare recipients. 32. Consider the expansion of vanpool program partnerships between SCAT and local communities to meet the needs of remote areas of Brevard County. The vanpoo l partnership between Barefoot Bay and SCAT has proven to be very successful. Thi s partnership should be duplicated for other remote areas of Brevard County These needs cannot currently be met by fixed-route service due to the nature of the system 33. Explore the possibility of an expanded role for the Commuter Assistance Program (CAP) Wlile the v a npool program is exemplary, other transportat ion demand management services cou l d be added or enhanced. The rise of telecommuting, other flexible work arrangements a guaranteed ride home program and prefe r ential parking at the works ite could lead to an expanded technical assistance role for CAP staff County officia l s should approach Florida Department of Transportation staff for funding to expand the prog r am Any funding increases require a 50 percent local match 34 Expand CAP Program marketing efforts. Wlile the CAP program has a modest marketing budget funds a ll ocated to the program do not meet needs. Because the CAP is housed in the trans i t is possible to comb i ne fixed route serv i ce promotion with CAP promotion under a muHi-moda l approach. Such an approach wou l d be managed by the commun ity outreach coordinator as part of their overall marketing duties. In any event, the first two steps in changing drive alo n e commuters to ridesharing arrangements involves strong marketing and outreach efforts Neither of these efforts can be effective l y done under exist i ng funding condit i ons. 268 Brevard County Trans;t Development Plan

PAGE 307

35. Consider alternate methods to fund transit capital needs. SCAT's public transportation fleet will become eligible for replacement in the next severa l years. In addition with Fed e ral operating cuts, SCAT will need to optimize avai lable capija l funding New federal funding programs allow transit agencies to lease capital equipment. SCAT should investigate alternat i ve methods for funding the purchase of vanpool vehicles such as l easing the vans rather than purchas i ng 36. Consider the expansion of Volunteers in Motion (VIM) program through partnerships with other Brevard County volunteer programs. The VIM program currently helps to meet the specia l ized needs of transportation disadvantaged persons i n Brevard County. In addition to providing transportation. th i s program addresses the specific needs of frai l elderly persons The VIM p r ogram uses volunteers in all aspects of the program including as dispatchers, schedulers, drivers, and escorts The VIM program provides another low-cost aHernative to traditiona l door-to-door paratrans i t serv i ce and expansion of this program would result in addi t i onal transportation needs being met i n Brevard County. In addition to providing addnional transportation resources, the expansion of the VIM program could result in freeing up capacity in the non-sponsored parat r ansit p r ograms As with many volunteer-based programs, the VIM program must have volunteers to provide additional trips. There a r e other Brevard County volunteer programs, as addressed by participants i n the South Main l and d i scussion group. Partnerships wijh these groups could result in a larger volunteer-base for the VIM program SCAT should act i vely pursue partnerships with these groups to enable VIM to provide additional mob i lity to residents in remote areas of Breva r d County 37. Investigate hiring of a full-time community outreach coordinator. A community outreach coordinato r would coordinate all marketing public invo l vement and publ i c informat i on/education efforts for all serv i ces p r ovided by SCAT. Act i vijies such as public presen t ations, l i aison with local publ i c officia l s resolution of ongoing service issues coordina t ion of agreements wrth other agencies, provis ion of Information and design and conduct of marketing campaigns would be Included i n the job description for this position The person i n this posnion would be responsible for taking action on many of the recommendations contained in this document i ncluding Recommendations 1, 4 12, 23, 29, 30, 31, 32 33, 34 36, 38, 39, 40, 46 48. In addit i on, this employee would coordinate all public inpuVeducation in regards to planned and imp l emented changes of service. A full time coordinator would more effect i vely gather useful information from the public that could be used for future planning efforts. The best-run most efficient public transportation system still needs someone to spread the news among potentia l riders. Other small transit systems in Florida have attributed ridership growth to innovative marke ti ng activities. Such a person can a lso free up existing staff time spent on similar act i vities, and i ncrease product i vity and morale throughout the agency. Brevard Gaunty Transit Development Plan 269

PAGE 308

38. Examine SCAT's current marketing program. The current SCAT contract with its marketing firm expires in 1998 SCAT will need to examine the best method to continue market i ng program before issuing a new marketing RFP. 39. Clarify SCAT's role in emergency evacuation. SCAT is an important resource for many residents of Brevard County in the event of an emergency evacuation. SCAT should work to educate the general public about the agency's r ole in emergency evacuation 40. Increase education about Ute half-price bus pass program. SCAT currently offers half price ($14.00) fixed-route monthly bus passes to seniors persons with disabilities and youth in Brevard County. It appears that few governmental and social service agencies in Brevard County are taking advantage of this program The existence of the half-price buss pass program needs to be advertised to the general pub lic and agencies. 41. Consider alternative fare structure on the fixed-route system to promote increased ridership. Many agencies across the country and Florida have successfully increased ridership by l owering or eliminat i ng fares on their fixed-route service SCAT should cons i der temporary or permanent changes in its fare structure to promote the fixed-route service. 42 Provide more multi-leg paratransit trips. An issue mentioned at the d i scussion group i n South Main l and and publ i c meetings, as well as by SCAT staff is the provis i on of multi-leg paratransit trips to enable ind i vidua l s returning from doctor visits to pick-up prescription medicine at l ocal pharmac i es Individuals who require transportation assistance for medica l trips often also need help getting to pharmacies Rather than providing two separate round tri ps, passengers already on SCAT vehicles could be transported to a nearby pharmacy to pick-up prescriptions on their r etum trip home. SCAT should work with the schedu l es to allow for the provision of multi-leg paratrans i t trips. 43 Investigate the ability of SCAT to provide additional standing orders on paratransit services to medical services for individuals wiUt regular, recurring medical needs, such as dialysis. Stand i ng orders for paratranslt service to med i cal services allow indiv i duals with regu lar, recurring medical needs, such as dialysis, to receive these trips without h aving to call to request a ride for each individua l trip Currently SCAT cannot accept any medical standing orders due to the maintenance of trip priorities set by t he TO Loca l Coordinati n g Board. Additiona l standing orders are needed to serve transportation disadvant a ged i nd i viduals receiving radiation therapy. SCAT should work to increase capacity on the paratrans i t system to allow for additional standing orders. Howeve r stand i ng 270 Brevard County Transit Development Plan

PAGE 309

orders should not fill the system to capacity. Several of the recommendations already presented, if imple mented could result in add iti onal capacity on the paratransit system 44 Reduce the number of paratransit cancellations and no-shows. Paratransit trip cancellations and no-shows hamper system efficiency and overall productivity by preventing full utilizat ion of vehicle capacities. Currently, cancellat i ons and no-shows at SCAT account for approximately 15 percent of total paratransit trips. Although no statewide cancellation standard currently exists nationally accepted industry norms suggest that a combined cancellation and no-show rate should not exceed 10 percent of total trips on average. Therefore is recommended that SCAT consider establishing a stricter cancellation and no show policy a goal of achieving a combined no-show and cancellation rate that does not exceed 10 percent of total trips. 45 Continue coordination with WAGES (Welfare to Work) to provide transportation for work trips. Many of the recommendations address the current needs of work transportation; however; t his need will continue to increase in the future given the recent "welfare to work initiatives (access to jobs). Work transportation for former welfare recipients i s essential to ensure the success of the WAGES program. SCAT has been successful in working with companies such as Excell Corporation to provide transportation for employees. SCAT should pursue addi tio nal coordination efforts potential employers throughout the County. SCAT should also periodically examine the public transportation needs of working people in the commun ity through outreach. 46. Continue coordination with the Brevard MPO and local governments to consider transit opportunities In conjunction with corridor or area transportation studies and follow-up on transitrelated recommendations resulting from corridor or area transportation studies. SCAT has worked with the Brevard MPO in studies of State Road 3, State Road 513, Northwest Palm Bay, and Palm Bay Road. studies are p lanned in the MPO work program. SCAT should also consider, where feasible, implementation of transit-related recommendations resu lting from these studies. 47 Consider incorporating Intelligent Transportation Systems Technologies (ITS). SCAT should consider equipping all of its buses and paratransit vehicles automatic vehicle location (AVL) units to facilitate dispatching and scheduling and to improve accountability. If feasible, SCAT should acquire the hardware and software needed to l ink t he AVL system to its paratransit scheduling program (PASS) to take advantage of potential productivity imp rovements gained by l inking data collection with scheduling and dispatching. Further, the use of electronic fare collection and documentation would facilitate agency billing and reduce cash handling. In addition, SCAT, in coordination with local municipalities, should examine Brevard County Transit Development Plan 271

PAGE 310

the feasibility of coordinating traffic control systems and private gated-entryways with public transportation. 48. Develop an Incentive program for developers to promote public transportation and ridesharing. SCAT should work with the County and municipalities to develop incentives for developers to provide transit-friendly infrastructure. Examples include crediting developers for par1
PAGE 311

suggested that exp ress service should be coordinated with other counties' public transportation networks in order to transport workers. SCAT should examine the potential demand and feasibil ity of this service. FIVE-YEAR TRANSIT DEVE LOP MENT PLAN : FINANCIAL PLAN Up to this point, the TOP process has not been constrained by fiscal considerations, in accordance with its strategic intent. Demographics, community input in various forms, and peer and trend analyses have all been used to assess the demand for public transportation services and to identify mobil ity needs in B revard County. The recommendations presented above have been based on previous findings and future directions. The final step in the transit development plan process is to estimate the unfunded costs for these recommendations by comparing them against current and anticipated financial resources Table 5-2 contains the status of all of the recommendations. This step is necessary to determine which recommendations could be accomplished within the current budget and/or current staffing and wh ich would requ i re funding. The next step in developi ng a financial plan is to determine the costs associated with the recommendations that are unfunded in the current budget. These recommendations and the ir anticipated date of action are contained in Table 5-3. For Recommendations 24, 25, and 26, annual operating costs and revenues, in Table 5-3, are given for expansion of service on one r oute. The planned expansion year by year (for multiple routes) is contained in Table 5-6 and is explained below. Table 5-4 contains budgeted capital and operating expenses and revenues projected through the end of the five-year planning period Table 5-5 contains the expenses and revenues associated with the unfunded recommendat ions added to the expenses and r evenues contained in the current budget (Table 5-4). The bottom row of this table contains the net additional funding required if action was taken on all of the recommendations Table 5-6 contains the year by year additional expenses and revenues associated with each of the unfunded recommendations. The assumptions for the costs and revenues assoc iate d with these unfunded recom men dati ons are also listed below. Starting in FY 1999 weekday service hours would be extended (Recommendation #24) on one route each year. Therefore. by FY 2002 four routes would have weekday hours of service. BrevarrJ County Tronsit Development Plan 273

PAGE 312

274 Starting in FY 1998 Saturday service (Recommendation #25) would be added to one route each year. Therefore by FY 2002 Saturday service would be on five additional routes In FY 2000, one route s frequency would be doubled (Recommendation #26). In FY 2002, a second route's frequency would be doubled (Recommendation #26). A community outreach coordinator would be hired in FY 1999 (Recommendation #37). In FY 1999, fiXed-route fares wou ld be decreased by 25 percent (Recommendation #41). One express bus route within the County would be started in FY 2002 (Recommendation #51). One express bus route that coordinates with other counties would be started in FY 2002 (Recommendation #53). Btevard County Development Plan

PAGE 313

Table 5 2 Status o f Recommendations Recommendation Status 1 C o ntinue publ i c input process O ngoing no additional cost 2 Conti n ue employee Input process Ongoing no add itio nal cost 3 New member'$ on LCB Ca n be ccomplished with existing staff. no addi tio n a l cost 4 Improve coordination with cities Ongoing no additional cost 5 Bus stop signs Fu nded i n current 5-year budget 6 S u perstol)ll ransfer centef'S F unded In current 5-yeai budget 7 Bus s h e l t ers F u nded I n current 5--yeaJ budget 8 Expand i U ustl'ated bus&& Fun ded I n evrrent 5 -year bu
PAGE 314

I SDtus 33 Expanded role for CAP. Funded In c:urfent 5-yeat budget 3-4. Expa nd CAP progtam martue coordlnalion-Blovard MPO Cost of progr"" c:cweOft1'Ushod -existing scoff no additional COSI $).ex.-tea.lbllily of COOfdination ..,. ... bus Unflolded relor toT-5-3 --ne;ghborillg ccunllos. 276 Brevaitl County Transit Dovo/opment Plan

PAGE 315

Table 5 3 Estimated Costs of Unfunded I Annual Annual Capital i Fioeal Action Unit Cost I of Units Operating Revenue Cost Years C0$1 Affected I 16 TO e li g ibility I $12,885 (for 0 5 FTE 0.5 FTE $12 .885 1998-2002 of D i spatcher) (20 h r SJWeek) -process 2 1 Conti nue park $3, 500 per s p aoe 1 and-ride 100spaces -I $350, 000 1 999 24 Exten d weekday I $2.31/ rev mne 1 21,700 rev mites per $50.127 1 $2.016 I 1998-2002 hours of seNice t rout e{4 hrs f day) (1 route) (1 route) -25. Satu rday tervloe I $ 2 .31/rev mile 7 .899 rev m i les per $18 246 $734 I 1998-2002 route (7 hrslday) ( 1 route) ( 1 route) -26. I ncrease $2. 31/rev m il e 43,400 rev miles per $100. 254 $4.033 $200,000 2 000-2002 frequency of s&rvie& route (1 route) I ( 1 route) ( 1 vehicle) 37 H ire commu ni1y $27,100 piV$ 40'% 1 FT E $37,940 1999-2002 outreach coordinato r fri nge - 41 Attemstive fare 25% dectease in fare ($13 ,352) I 1999 Structure ---5 1 Express Bus $2 31/rev miae 45,000 Servioe (wi t h in 6 dai ly trips of 30 $103,950 $4, 182 2002 Coonly) m iles rev miles S3. Express bus $2. 31 / rev mile 45,000 $200,000 service (coo r d i nate 6 da i ly ttips of 30 rev m ile s $103, 950 $4 ,182 (1 ve h i cle} I 2002 wi1h oth e r cou nties) mUes T h s cost assum&.& a stand-alone parkand-nde l ot. The cost per spaoe could be less if a shared lot was used. Brevard County Transit DevefopmtJnt Plan 277

PAGE 316

;;! ; a "" !t ri' f .. ill Table 5-4 Projected Base Five Year Budget for SCAT EXPENSES FV 1998 FV 1999 L abor & F rin $197,1145 $200,000 &MaW.-$ 2 ,0S3, 3 1S suwlios and OCIIo< e $>150, 423 $400,000 MedieQei F .... $622,302 S-'30 .000 OCIIet $593,343 $560,000 Loca l Clp100000 S400.ooo I $>100,000 $1 ,650,000 $1,650,000 $1.650,000 $1,790,000 sa,ezo.ooo $6650 000 $2,057 000 $2,057,000 $2,057,000 sa &<7 ooo S8 877 000 S8 907 000 FV 2000 FV 2001 FV 2002 $150,000 $ 150.000 $150 000 saso.ooo $850,000 saso.ooo $560,000 $560,000 $560 ,000 $930000 $960 ,000 $990 000 $ 2,300,000 $2,300 ,000 $2,30 0 ,1!!!2... $350. 000 $350 ,000 $350.000 $1,650,000 $1 650 000 $1 ,660,000 $8790,000 $1,120,000 $8,850 000 $206,000 $206 .000 $206,000 $206.000 $206,000 $206 000 $ 1 ,645.000 $ 1 ,1145,000 $ 1 ,645 .000 $2,0$7 000 $2,051,000 $2,0 5 7 ,000 $81147000 $1177 000 $8 907 000

PAGE 317

f j l. I Table 5-S Projected SCAT Budget Plus Unfunded Recommendatlons Item FY 1998 FY 1999 FY 2000 Original Operating Expenses $6,947,882 $6,640 ,000 $6,790,000 .. ---. Operating Expenses Res u lting from $31,131 $137,444 $306,071 Unfunded Recommendations 1 Revised Operating Expenses $6 .97 9.013 $6, 777,444 $7,096.071 OriginaJ Capital Expenses $3,123,121 $2,057 .00 0 $ 2,057,000 Capital Expenses Resufting from so $350 ,000 $200,000 Unfunded Recommendations' Revised capital ExpenseS $ 3,123 121 $2 ,407, 000 $2.257 000 TOTAL EXPENSES $10,102,134 $ 9,184,444 $9,,$3,07 1 Original Operating ReYalUe $6 947 ,882 $6 ,640,000 $6,190, 000 Increase in Operating Revenue Resulting $734 $3,484 $10,267 from Unfunded Recommendations' Decrease in Operating Revenue Resulling from Unfunded Recommendations $0 ($13,352) ($13,352) -Revi$ed Operating Revenue $6,948,616 $6,630,132 $6 786,9 15 Capital Revenue $3,123,121 $2,057.000 $2 057,000 TOTAL REVENUE $10 ,071,003 $8,687 ,132 $8 843,915 ADDtnONAL FUNDING REQUIRED ( $ 31,131) ($497,312) ($509,156) Table s.8 cont a in s detailed iofonmatlon regamiog the unfunded reoommendatlons. FY2001 I FY 2002 $6,820,000 $6.860 000 $374 ,444 $750.971 -$7,194 ,444 $7, 610.971 $2,057,000 $2 057 .000 $0 $400 ,000 $2 ,057,000 $2.457 .000 $9,251 444 $1 0,067,911 $6,820,000 $6,860,000 $13,017 $28,164 ($13,352) ($ 1 3,352) $6,619,665 $6.874,8 1 2 $2,057 ,000 $2.057 000 $8,876 ,665 $8,931,812 ($374 ,779) ($1 138,1591

PAGE 318

a i t l? ; i Ta b l e 5-6 E x penses an d R even ues Resulti n g From Un fu nde d Recomme n d ations Item I FY 199 8 I F Y 1999 I FY 2 000 Operating E xpenses Resulting from Unfunded Recommend ations 1 6. TD Eligibility Process $12, 885 $ 1 2 885 $ 1 2,885 24. Exlen
PAGE 319

APPENDIX A INTERVIEW GU IDE .

PAGE 320

A-2

PAGE 321

Brevard County Transit Development Plan Interview Questions A. Where We Are 1 2. How much interest in and support for p ublic tra nsportatio n (transit a nd is there i n the community? Have the levels of inte rest and support changed i n the last two y ears? How is Space Coast Area Transit pe rceived in the community? 3. What is your pe rceptio n of public tra nspo rtatio n's current an d potential role i n the community? 4. Are there community needs that could be met by public transporta tio n (transit and paratransit)? Is the current system responsive to th ose needs? 5. Is traffic congestion a problem i n any part of Brevard County? If so, what role might transit play in alleviating this prob l em? 6. Is t he re a parking problem in any part of Brevard County? If so. how does this affec t transit's role in the community? B. Where We Want to Be 7. 8. 9. 10. 1 1 12. Wha t goa l s have the community and elected officials voiced for public transportation i n the county? What do you see as appropriate goals for a public transportation system? How can SCAT better meet community n eeds? What Is happening i n Brevard County in terms of residential and commercial d eve l opment? How much? Where? Does this development suggest a need for transit that does no t previously exist? What groups are most likel y to use transit service? Should SCAT be looking at new markets for public transportation or should it concentrate on existing markels1 Is there a willingness in the commun ity to consider additio n al loca l funding sources to support a transit system? I f so, what type of fu nding methods? C. How We Get There 13. What im p rovemenls are needed in the transit system to attract more riders and meet community goals? 1 4 Are th ere areas currenUy not served or underserved by transit that should receive a higher Priority? 15. AJe there policies th at should be changed to help better support a transtt system? 16. Is the current mix of public transportation appropriate? D. Summary 1 7 What are the major strengths and accompl i shments of SCAT? 18. I f you could pick o n e thi ng to change about the transit system what would it be A-3

PAGE 322

A-4

PAGE 323

APPENDIX B INVENTORY OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION PROVIDERS

PAGE 324

B-2

PAGE 325

SPACE COAST AREA TRANSIT 401 S. Varr Avenue Cocoa FL 32922 ( 407 ) 635-7815 Contact: Ji m Liesenfelt GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service Fixed-route paratransit, subscription vanpool Service Area Brevard County Service Users Transportation Disadvantaged. ADA General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts TO Commission OPERATING STAIJSTICS Annual Passenger Trips Total Passengen; Vehicles Operated FINAN CIAL INFORMAT ION T ota l Expenses Fare Structure COASTAL HEALTH SYSTEMS Rockledge, FL ( 4 07) 632-7030 GENERAL INFORMATION 811, 396 N/A 154 $6,202,347 varies by type of service Type of Service Paratransrt Service Area Brevard County Service Users Medicaid Service Agreements/ Contracts AHCA OPERATING STATISTICS Annual Passenger Trips Total Passengen; Vehic l es Operated FINANC IA L INEOBMAIJOti Total Expenses Fare Structure included in SCAT included in SCAT i n c l u ded in SCAT i ncl uded i n SCAT $1.00 copay SERVICE HOUBS varies by type of service SERVICE HOUBS 24 ho urs/day B-3

PAGE 326

B-4 A-CAB 823 Cocoa Blvd. Suite B&C Cocoa, FL 32922 ( 407) 639-9942 Contact: Tom Biddle GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service Paratransit Service Area Beaches, Merritt Island, & Port St. John Service Users General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts None OPERATING STATISTICS Ann ual Passenger Trips Total Passe ngers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION Tota l Expenses Fare Structure N/A N/A 1 Taxi Cab N/A $1.20/mile SERVICE HOURS Monday Saturday 5am-7pm senior and disabled $.90/mile AAA YELLOW CAB 112 S. Lemon Ave. Titusville, FL 32796 (407) 268-1208 Contact: Bruce Whiteley GENERAL I NFORMATION Type of Service Paratransit Service Area Titusville Service Users General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts None OPERATING STATISTICS An nua l Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANC I AL INFORMATION N/A N/A 4 Taxi Cabs N/A SERVICE HOURS 24 hours/day Total Expenses Fare Structure $1.50plus $1.25permile

PAGE 327

ALWAYS READY CAB & ISLAND SHUTILE SERVICES 322 W M l. Cswy Merritt Island, FL 32952 (407) 459-0107 Contact Israel Cruz GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service Taxi Shuttle Service Area Beaches Service Users General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts Creative Care Center OPERATING STATISTICS AnnuaiPassengerTnps Tota l Passengers Veh i c l es Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure ATLANTIC STAR 160-B W. Palm Or. Satellite Beach, Fl 32925 (407) 258-5355 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATION N/A N/A 12 shuttles N/A $1. 50/mile Type of Service Paratransit Service Aiea Melbourne Area Serv i ce Users General Public Serv i ce Agreements/ Contracts None QPERAIJNG STATISTICS AnnuaiPassengerTnps Total Passengers Veh i cles Operated FINANCIAL INFQRMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A SERVICE HOURS 24 hours a day SERVICE HOURS N/A B-5

PAGE 328

B-6 B&DCOACHES 2117 S. Babcock Sl 126 Melbourne, FL 32901 (407) 9517723 (407) 768-1234 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATION Type or Service Parattansit Service Area Melbourne Area Service Users General Pub l ic Serv ic e Agreements/ Contracts None OPERATING STATISTICS Annual Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicte Operated FINANCIAL I NFORMA TION To tal Expenses Fare Structure N/A N/A 2 Tax i Cabs N/A $1.75 m i l e $1.50 mile BREVARD YELLOW CAB TRUST 7800 Indu s t ria l Rd Melbourne, FL 32940 (407) 723-1234 Contact Ronald Knight GENERAL INFORMATION Type or Service Paratransit Service Area Brevard Service Users General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts N / A OPERATING STATISTICS Annual Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure N/A N / A NIA N/A N/A :2ERVICE HOURS 24 hOurs/day base senior/student SERVICE HOURS 24 hours/day

PAGE 329

BROWN SHUTTLE SERVICE 9225 Christopher Co lu mbus Dr. Cape Canaveral, Fl 32920 (407) 639-3698 Co nt act: GENERAL I N FOR MA T ION Type of Serv i ce N/A Serv i ce A!ea N/A S e rv i ce Users General Public Service Agreements/ Co ntra cts N/A OPERATING STA T I STICS Annual Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicles Operated E ltlANCIA L I NEORMAT ION T ota l Expe nse s Fare Structu r e N/A NIA NIA N/A N/A BUSY TRAVELER TRANSPORTATION 262 E Merritt I s l and Cswy. Suite 1 3 Merritt Is la nd FL 32953 ( 407 ) 453-5278 Contact Robyn Schanck GENERAL IN FORMAT I ON Airport Shuttle SERVICE H OURS N/A Type of ServiCil Service Are a Serv i ce Use r s Mel bou m e-Vero Beach-Orla n do General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts OPERA T ING SW!S T IC S An nu al Passe ng er Trips Total Passengers Veh i cles Opera ted FINANCIAL ltlfORM AT ION Total Expenses Fare Structure No n e NIA N/A 3vans N / A SERV I CE HOURS 24 hours/day $ 2 0-$75, d epending on pick-up point B-7

PAGE 330

B-8 CANAVERAL CAB CO. 739 Scallop Dr. Cape Canaveral, FL 32920 (407) 7Ss 8294 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service Parat ransit Service Area N/A Service Users General Public Serv i ce Agreements/ Contracts N/A OPERATING STADSTJCS Annual Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A CHECKER TAXI, BEACH YELLOW CAB 4155 Dow Rd., Unit L Melbourne, FL 32904 (407) 728 Contact: Bill Moreland GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service Paratransit Service Area NIA Service Users General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts N/A OPERATING STATISTICS Annual Passenger Trips To tal Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure N/A NIA NIA NIA N/A SERVICE HOURS N/A SERYICE HOURS N/A

PAGE 331

CITY SHUlTLE & TAXI 5602 N. Atlantic Ave. Cocoa Beach, FL 32931 (407) 783-5151 Contact: Jerry Laws GENERAL I NFORMATION Type of Service Paratransit Service Area N /A Service Users General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts N/A OPERATING STATISTICS Annual Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicles Operate d FI NANCIAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure CLARK'S TRANSPORTATION 3665 Bryce St. Cocoa, FL 32926 (40 7) 631-3176 Contact Oavid Clar1< GENERAL INFORMAT!Q!i N/A N/A N/A N/A NIA Type of Service Paratransit Service Area N/A Service Users General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts N/A l)ERYJCE HOURS N /A OPERATING STATISTICS SERVICE HOURS Annual Pass enge r Trips Total Passengers Veh i c l es Operated F I NANCIAL lfiFQRMA TIQ!i Total Expenses Fare Structure N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N /A B-9

PAGE 332

B-10 COCOA BEACH CAB CO. 134 N. O rl ando Ave Cocoa Beach, FL 32931 (407) 783-7200 Contact: Marcel A. Ross GENERAL I NFORMATION Type of Service Paratransit Serv ice Area Beaches Merritt I sland Service Users General Pub lic Service Agreements/ Contracts None OPE RAT ING STATI ST ICS An nu aiPassenge r Trips Total Pa ssengers Veh i cles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMAT I ON Total Expenses Fare Structure COMFORT TRAVEL 707 Mullet Ln. U nit #206 Cape Canaveral, F L 32920 (407) 799-0442 Contact: Deborah Gartley GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Serv ice Service Area Service Users Service Agreements/ Contracts OPERATING S TATI STICS Annual Passenger Trips Tota l Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIA L INFORMATION I otal Exp enses Fare Struct ure N/A N / A NIA NIA NJA N/A Genera l Publ i c None N/A N/A N/A NIA NIA SERVICE HOURS 24 hours/day SERVICE HOURS N/A

PAGE 333

COTE'S TAXI 790 Mullet Ln Unit #33 Port Canaveral, FL 32920 (407) 543-4833 Con t act: Jean P.J Cote GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service Pa rat ransit Se rvice Area Central Brevard Service Use r s General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts None OPERATING S TA TISTICS Annual Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicles Operated F I NANCIAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure CREW TRANSPORT 3245 N Courtney Pkwy. Merritt Isl and, FL 32953 ( 407) 453-6417 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATION N/A N/A 2 sedans NIA $ 1.80 /mile Ty pe of Serv i ce Serv i ce Area Centra l Breva r d Service Users General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts None OPERATING STATISTICS Annu a l Passenger Trips T ota l Passengers Veh i c l es O p erated N/A N/A 1 sedan FINANCIAL INFORMAT I ON Tota l Expenses Fare S tr ucture COMMENTS NIA $1.75/mi le SERVICE HOURS N/A SERVICE HOURS Monday Friday 6am-11pm B-11

PAGE 334

B-12 CRYSTAL DOLPHIN SHUTTLE 310 Grant Ave. Unit C-13 Cocoa Beach Fl 32920 ( 407) 784-()646 Contact GENERAL INFORMAT(Q!::j Type of Service Paratrans it Service Area Me lbo urne Area Service Users General Publ i c Serv ice Agreements/ Co n tracts None OPERATING SWISTICS Annua l Passenger Trips Total Passengers Veh ic les Operated FINANC IAL INFORMATIO!::j Tota l Expenses Fare Structure CTMSHUTTLE N/A N/A 1 van N/A N/A 1 77 S. Banana R iver Dr. Unit 1 75A Merritt Island FL 32952 ( 407) 453-4020 Contact: E ugene Bishop GE!::jERALI!::jEOBMAT ION Type of Service N/A Service Area N/A Serv ice Users N/A Service Agreements/ Contracts N/A OPERAT ING STATISTICS A n nua l Passenger Trips Total Pa ss engers Vehicles Operated F INANCIAL !!::lFORMAJIO!::j T otal Expenses Far e Structure N/A N/A N/A N / A N/A SERVIC E HOURS N/A SERVICE HOURS N/A

PAGE 335

D & L SHUTILE SERVICE INC. a nd D & L TAXI 644 Eyster Blvd. Rockledge FL 32955 (407) 63 1 -4142 Co nt act: Davi d Hoskin G ENERAL INFORMATION T ype of Service Service Area Serv ice Users Service Agreements/ Contract s OPERATING STATISTICS Ann u a i PassengerTnps Total Passengers Veh i c l es Operated F INANCIA L INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structu r e DAVE S TAXI 2720 B r andyw ine L n. W. Melbo urne, FL 32904 (407) 951-4205 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Serv i ce Service Users Service Agreemen t s/ Contracts OPERA TING STATIST IC S Annual Passenger Trips Tota l Passengers Veh i c l es Operated F I NANCIA L INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Struct u re Paratransit & Shuttle Brevard Co unty General Pub lic None N/A N/A 4 sedans 1 van N/A $3 s h u ttle $ 1 .50/mile taxi Paratra n slt Melbourne Area General Public None N/A N/A 1 van N/A $1.80/mi l e SERVICE HOURS 7am -6pm Days are dependent on the cru i se sh i ps SERVIC E HOURS Monday Friday 7 a.m. 11 p .m. B-13

PAGE 336

B-14 DIRECT TRAVEL SERVICES 310 Brunson Blvd. Cocoa, FL 32922 ( 407) 690..()093 Contact GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service N/A Service Area N/A Serv i ce Users N/A Service Agreements/ Contracts N/A OPERATING STATISTICS SERVICE HOURS Annual Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure ECONO CAB, INC 2117 Babcock St. #103 Melbourne, FL 32901 (407) 258 -8731 Contact: Richard Fulmer GENERAL INFORMAIJON N/A N/A N/A NIA NIA Type of Service Paratranstt Service Area Melbourne Area Service Users General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts None OPERATING STATISTICS Annua l Passenger Trips Total Passengers Veh i cles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A NIA SERVICE HOURS NIA

PAGE 337

EXECUTIVE TOUR 106 Merritt Island Cswy Merritt Island FL 32953 (407) 783-()455 Contact: George Ricardo GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service N/A Service Area N/A Service Users NIA Service Agreements/ Contracts N/A OPERATING SWISIICS SERYICE HOURS Ann u aiPassengerTnps Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATIO N Total Expenses Fare Structure JBLSHUTTLE 800 Waikiki Dr. Merritt Isla nd, FL 32953 (407) 449..0042 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATION N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Type of Service Shuttle Service Area Brevard County Service Users General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts None OPERATING STATISTICS Annua l Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION T ota l Expenses Fare Structure N/A N/A N/A N/A NIA N/A SERYICE HOURS N/A B-15

PAGE 338

B-16 JOHNSTON TRANSPORTATION SERVICE 20 Cape Sho res Blvd. I Cape Can anvera l FL 32796 (407 ) 783-0940 Co ntact: Bobby and Barbara Joh nston G E NERAL INFORMA T ION Type of Serv ice Service Area Central Bnevard Service Users Genera l Publ i c Service Agreements/ Co n tracts None OPERATING STATISTJCS Annual Passenger T rips Tota l Passe n gers Veh i cles Operated FINANC I AL INFORMATION Total E xpenses Fare Structure L EISURE SHUTTLE AND TAXI 5602 N Atlantic Ave. Cocoa Beac h, FL 32920 (407) 783-5155 Contact: GENERA L INFORMATION N/A N/A 1 sedan NIA NIA Type o f Service N/A Service Area NIA Service Users NIA Service Agreeme nts/ Co n tracts NIA OPERATING STATISTICS Ann u al Passenger T rips Total Passengers Veh i cles Operated F I NANC I A L INFORMATION Tota l Expe n ses Fare Struc tu re N/A N/A N/A N/A N / A SERVICE HOURS NIA SERVICE HOURS NIA

PAGE 339

LEONARD WILKINS' SHUTILE & TAX I 99 George J King Blvd. Port Canavera l FL 32920 (407) 456 0922 Contact: G E N ERAL INFORMATION Type of Service Serv ice Area Serv ice Users Service Agreements/ Contracts OPERATING STATISTICS A n nual Passenger Trips Total Passengers Veh i cles Operated F I NANC I AL INFORMAT I ON Total Expenses Fare Struct ure M ARK'S TAX I 530 Challenger Rd. Suite 295 Cape Canaveral FL 32920 (407) 454-7338 Contact: GENERAL INFORMAT I ON Type of Service Service Area Serv i ce Users Serv ice Agreements/ Con t racts OPERATING STADSTICS An n ua l Passenger T ri ps T ota l Passengers Vehi cles Ope r a ted FINANCIAL I NFORMATION Tota l E x penses Fare Structure Shuttle & Paratransit Brevard County Genera l Pub l i c None N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Paratransit Central/North Brevard Genera l Public None N/A N/A 1 sedan N/A $1.65/m i le SERVICE HOURS N/A SERV I CE HOURS N/A B -17

PAGE 340

B-18 MELBOURNE AIRPORT SHUTTLE, TAXI & UMO 1 Air Term inal PKwy. Melbourne, Fl 32901 (407) 724-1600 Contact GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service Serv ice Area Service Users Shuttle, Paratransit & limo service Brevard County Service Agreements/ Contracts OPERATING STATISTICS AnnuaiPassengerTnps Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION General Public None N/A N/A N/A N/A SERVICE HOURS 24 hours/day Total Expenses Fare Structure vanes depending on serv ice PARAMOUNT CAB INC. 399 Challenger Road, Sutte 102 Port Canaveral, FL 32920 (407) 784-4499 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service N/A Service Area N/A Service Users N/A Service Agreements/ Contracts NIA OPERATING STATISTICS Annual Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANC IAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure NIA N/A NIA N/A N/A SERVICE HOURS NIA

PAGE 341

PATRICIA G CASEY TAXI 3112US#1 Mims FL 32754 ( 407) 383-8269 Co ntact: GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Serv i ce Service A rea Service Users Service Agreements/ Contracts OPERAT I NG STATISTICS Annual Passenger Trips T otal Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANC I AL INFORMATION T otal Expenses Fare St ru cture RAPID CAB 180 Minna Ln Merritt I sland FL 32953 (407) 452-8 193 Con t act: GENERAL INFORMATION Paratransit South Brevard General Public None N/A N / A 1 sedan N/A N/A Type of Service N/A Service Area N/A Service Users N/A Service Agreements/ Contracts N/A OPERATING SWISIJCS Annual Passenger Trips T ota l Passengers Vehic l es Operated F INANCIA L I NFORMATION Tota l Expenses Fare Structure N/A NIA N/A N/A N/A SERVICE HOURS N/A SERVICE H OURS N/A B -19

PAGE 342

B-20 SCL TAXI, INC. 262 E. Merritt Island Cswy. Merritt Is la n d FL 32952 (407) 453-7779 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service N/A Serv i ce Area N/A Serv i ce Users N/A Service Ag r eements/ Contracts N/A OPERATING STATISTICS SERVICE HOURS Annual Passenger Tri ps Tota l Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure N/A N /A N/A N/A N/A SEAVIEW SHUTTLE AND TAXI SERVICE 677 George King Blvd Cape Canaveral, FL 32920 (407) 454 Contact GENERAL INFORMA TION Type of Service N/A Service Area N/A Service Users N/A Service Agreements/ Contracts N/A N/A OPERATING SIADSDCS SERVICE HOURS Annual Passenger T rips Total Passengers Veh i c l es Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATIOI:j I otal Expenses Fa re Structure N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

PAGE 343

SNAPPY CAB 658 Darlington Ave Palm Bay FL 32908 (407) 723 Contact: GENER A L I NFORMATION Type of Service Service Area Service Users Service Agreeme nts/ Contracts OPERATING STATISTICS AnnuaiPassengerTnps Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATIO N Total Expenses Fare Structure SPACE COAST LIMOUSINE 252 E Merritt Island Cswy. Merri tt Island, FL 32952 (407) 452 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATION Brevard County General Public None N/A N/A 1 sedan N/A NIA Type of Service Multi-Purpose Service Area Brevard County Service Users General Public Service Agreements/ Contracts Many OPERATING STATISTICS Annual Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION N/A N/A 28 N/A SERVICE HOURS Monday Friday 6 a.m. 10 p.m. SERVICE HOURS 24 Hours/day I otal Expenses Fare Structure Varies Depending on Vehic l e B-21

PAGE 344

B-22 SPACE COAST TAXI 99 George King Blvd. Unit #240 Port Canaveral, FL 32920 (407) 698-6863 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATIO N Type of Service Service Area Service Users Service Agreements/ Contracts OPERATING SWISTICS Annua l Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicles Operaled FINANCIAL STATISTICS Total Expenses Fare Structure Paratra nsi t N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A SUMMER WIND LIMOUSINE SERVICE 2112-A Sarno Rd Me lbo urne. FL 32935 (407) 254-3200 ( 407 ) 631-5466 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service N/A Service Area N/A Service Users N/A Service Agreeme nts/ Contracts N/A OPERATING STATISTICS Annual Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION T ota l Expenses Fare Structure N/A N/A N/A N/A NIA SERVICE HOURS N/A SERVlCE HOURS N/A

PAGE 345

TAXI DAVE 404 Harrison Ave Cape Canaveral, FL 32920 (407) 7841049 Contact: GENERA L INFORMAT I ON Type of Service Service Area Service Users Se rv ice Agreements/ Contracts O P ERATING STATISTICS Ann u al Passenger Trips Tota l Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIA L INFORMAT ION Tota l Expe n ses Fare Structure Paratransit Central Brevard General Publ i c None N/A N/A 1 sedan N/A $1.75/mile SERV!CE HOURS NIA B-23

PAGE 346

B-24 BIBLIA CREATIVE CARE CENTER 300 Tucker Ln. Cocoa, FL 32926 (407) 631-9014 Contact: GENERA L I NFORMAT ION Type of Service Service Area Service Users Service Agreements/Contracts OPERATING STATISTICS AnnuaiPassengerTnps Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL I NFORMATION Total Expenditures Fare Structure COMMENTS Non-profit Adult Day Care Paratransit SuntreeTitusville elderly 60+ N/A N/A N/A 2 Limous ines N/A $1.50/mile CHI L D CARE ASSOCIATION OF BREVARD COUNTY, INC. 18 Hamso n Street Cocoa, FL 32922 (407) 634-3500 Contact: Luis GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service Serv ice Area Service Use rs Service Agreement/Contracts OPERATING STATISTICS Ann uaiPassenge r Tnps Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure COMMENTS Paratransit for children Paratransit to pres choo l Brevard County Childre n Non e N/A N/A 18 Passenger Vans 30 Passenger Buses N/A varies SERVICE HOURS M-W,F 8 a.m. 4 p.m. SERV!CE HOURS Monday-Friday 7 a.m. -4:30p.m.

PAGE 347

HEALTH FIRST CAPE CANAVERAL HOSPITAL P.O. Box 320069 Cocoa Beach, FL 32932 0069 (407) 799-7198 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service Serv i ce Area Service Users Service Agreements/Contracts OPERATING STATISTICS Ann u aiPassengerTnps Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure non-emergency medical transport N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A no actual fare structure SERVICE HOURS Monday-Sunday As Needed HEALTH FIRST HOLMES REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER 1350 S Hickory St. Melbourne. FL 32901 (407) 727-7000 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Serv i ce Service Area Service Users Service Agreements/Contracts OPERATING STATISTICS Annua i PassengerTnps Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION I ota l Expenses Fare Structure Non-Emergency Transport South Brevard Health First Patients None N/A 3,000 5vans N/A no charge SERVICE HOURS Monday-Sunday As Needed B-25

PAGE 348

B-26 RESURRECTION RANCH, I NC 5925 Old Dixie Highway Melbourne FL 32940 (407) 259-4970 C
PAGE 349

SPACE COAST MARINE INSTITUTE 4 70 Friday Road Cocoa, FL 32926 (407) 752-3200 Contact: GENERAL INFORMATION Type of Service Service Area Service Users Service Agreements/Contracts OPERATING STATISTICS Annual Passenger Trips Total Passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure Paralransit Brevard County enrolled children none N/A N/A 1 bus N/A N/A SERVICE HOURS Monday-Friday 8 a.m. -5 p.m. VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION OF BREVARD COUNTY (VNA) 1335 Gateway Drive Melbourne FL 32901 (407) 664-9222 Contact: GENERAL INEOBMATJON Type of Service Service Area Service Users Service Agreements/Contracts OPERATING STATIST ICS Annual Passenger Trips Total passengers Vehicles Operated FINANCIAL INFORMATION Total Expenses Fare Structure Paratransit Brevard County Patients N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A HOURS N/A 8-27

PAGE 350

B -28

PAGE 351

APPENDIXC DEFINITIONS OF PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PAGE 352

C-2

PAGE 353

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS Countv/Service Area Pooulation For 199 1 and prior years county population is used to approximate the service area population f o r each of the Florida transit systems and is taken from the Florida Statistical Abstract for each year. The only exception is Smyrna Transit System (STS), for which the population of the city of New Smyrna Beach is used to approximate the service area population for these years. This measure provides a approximation of overall market size for comparison of relative spending and service levels among communities in the absence of actual service area popu l ation. H owever, in 1992, FTA began re q uirin g transit systems to provide serv i ce area population in their Section 15 r eports As a result, this is the measure that is now utilized in th i s study. National Inflation Rate Used to deflate the operating expense data to constant 1984 dollars. Inflation-adjusted dollars provide a more accurate representation of spending changes resulting from agency decisions by factoring out the general price i nflation. The infl ation rate reported is the percentage change in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for all items (including commodit ies and services) fro m year to year. During the 1984 to 1993 period, service and labor cost s tended to i ncrease at a faster rate than did commodity prices Therefore, transit operating expenses which are predom i nantly comprised of service and labor costs, may b e expected to have incr eased somewhat faster than inflat ion even if the am ount of serv i ce provided were not increased Passenger Trips Annual number of passenger boardings on the transit vehicles A trip is counted each time a passenger boards a trans i t vehic l e. Thus if a passenger has to transfer between buses to reach a destination, he/she is counted as making two passenger trips Passenger MilesNumber of annual passenger trips multiplied by the system's average tri p length (in miles) This number provides a measure of the total number of passenger miles of t ransportation service consumed Vehicle Miles To tal distance traveled annually by revenue service vehicles, including both reven ue miles and deadhead miles Revenue MilesNumber of annual miles of vehicle operation while i n active service (available to pick up revenue passengers) This number is smaller th an vehicle miles because of the exclusion of deadhead miles such as vehicle miles from the ga r age to the start of service veh i cle m i les f rom the end of service to the garage, driver t rain ing, and othe r miscellaneous m i les that are not cons ide red to be in direct revenue serv i ce. Vehicle Hours Tolai hours of operat i on by revenue servi ce vehicles inc l uding hou r s consumed in passenger serv i ce and deadhead travel. Revenue HoursTotal hours of operation by revenue service vehic les in active r evenue serv ice. Route Miles Number of directional route miles as reported in Section 15 data ; defined as the mileage that service operates i n each d irect ion over routes traveled by public transpo rtation vehicles in revenue serv ice. Total Operating Expense Reported total spending o n operations, inc luding adm i nistration, ma i ntenance and operatio n of service vehicles C 3

PAGE 354

Total Operating Expense (1984 S) Total operating expenses deflated to 1984 dollars for purposes of determining the real change in spending for operating expenses. Total Maintenance Expense Sum of all expenses categorized as maintenance expenses; a subset of total operati ng expense. Total Maintenance Expense (1984 $)-Total maintenance expenses deflated to 1984 dollars for purposes of determining the real change in spending for maintenance purposes Total Capital Expense Dollar amount of spending for capital projects and equipment. Total Local Revenue All revenues originating at the local level (excluding state and federal assistance). Operating Revenue Includes passenger fares, special transit fares, school bus service revenues freight tariffs charter service revenues, auxiliary transportation revenues, subsidy from other sectors of operations, and non-transportation revenues. Passenger Fare Revenue Revenue generated annually fro m passenger fares. Total Employees-Total number of payroll employees of the transit agency. It is use ful to note that the increasing tendency to contract out for services may resuH in some significant differences in this measure between otherwise similar properties It is im portan t to understand which services are contracted before drawing conclusions based on employee levels. All employees classified as capital were exc luded from this report. Transoortation Operating EmployeesAll employees classified as operating employees : vehicle drivers, supervisory personnel, direct personnel. Maintenance Employees -All employees c lass ified as maintenance employees who are directly or indirectly responsible for vehicle maintenance. Administrative Employees -All personnel classified as administrative in nature. This report includes all general admin istration, ticketing/fare collection, and system security employees as classified by ETA in Form 404. Yel)lcles Available for Maximum SgrvlceNumber of vehicles owned by the transit authority that are available for use in bus service. Vehicles Operated in Maximum Service -The largest number of vehicles requi red for providing service during peak hours (typically the rush period). Spare Ratio Vehicles operated in maximum service subtracted from vehicles available for maximum service divided by vehicles operated in maximum service. This measure is an indicator of the number of spare vehicles available for service. A spare rat io of approximately 20 percent is considered appropriate in the industry. However, this varies depending on the size and age of fleet as well as the condition of equipment. Total Gallons ConsumedTotal gallons of fuel consumed by the vehicle fleet. C-4

PAGE 355

Average Age of Fleet Traditionally, a standard transit coach is considered to hav e a useful life of 12 years. However, longer service lives are not uncommon. The vehicle age and the re liability record of the equipment, the number o f miles and hours on the equipment, the sophistication and featu res ( i.e. wheelchair lifts electronic destination signs, etc.), and operating environment (weather, roadway grades, and passenger abuse) all affect the maintenance needs and depreciation of the bus fleet. Number of Incidents Total number of unforeseen occurrences resulling in casualty (injury/fatality), collision, or property damage in excess of $1,000. For an incident to be reportable, it must involve a transit vehicle or occur on transit property. Revenue Service Interruptions A revenue service interrup tion during a given reporting period caused by failure of some mechanical element of the revenue vehicle or for other reasons not inc luded as mech anical failures. EFFECTIVENESS MEASURES Vehlclt Miles Per Capita Total number of annual vehicle miles d i vided by the service area's population. This can be characterized as the number of miles of service provided for each man, woman, and child in the service area and i s a measure of the extensiveness of service provided in the service area. Passenger Trips Per Cap ita Average number of trans i t boardings per person per year. This number is larger in areas where public transportat ion is emphasized and in areas where there are more transit de penden ts, and is a measure of the extent to which the pub li c utilizes transit in a given service area. Passenger Trips Per Revenue Mile The ratio of passenger trips to revenue miles of service; a key ind i cator of service effectiveness that is influenced by the levels of demand and the supply of service provided. Passenger Trips Per Revenut Hour The ratio of passenger trips to revenue hours of operation; reports on the effectiveness of the service since hours are a better represen tat ion of the resources consumed in providing service. Average Speed Average speed of vehicles in operation (including to and fro m the garage) calculated by dividing total vehicle miles by total vehicle hours. Revenue Miles Between Incidents Number of revenue miles divided by the number of incidents; reports the average interval, in miles, between incidents. Revenue Miles Between !nterruDtjons Number of revenue miles divided by revenue service interrup ti ons; an indicator of the ave r age frequency of delays because of a problem with the equipmen t. Revenue Miles Per Route Mile Number of revenue miles divided by the number of directional route miles of service. C-5

PAGE 356

EFFICIENCY MEASURES Ooerating Exoense Per Capita Annual operating budget divided by the county/service area population; a measure of the resource commitment to transit by the community Operating Expense Per Peak Vehicle Total operating expense per vehicle operated in maximum service (peak vehicle); provides a measure of the resources required per vehicle to have a coach in operation for a year. 0Qerating ExQense Pe r Passenger Trill Operating expenditures divided by the total annual ridership; a measure of the efficiency of transporting riders ; one of the key indicators of comparative performance of transit properties since it reflects both the efficiency with which service is delivered and the market demands for the service. Operating Ex!M!nse Per Pauenger Mile Reflection of operating expense divided by the number of passenger m iles; takes into account the impact of trip length on performance since some operators provide lengthy trips whi le others provide short tri ps. Oooratjng Expense Per Revenue Mile-Operating expense divided by the annual revenue miles of service ; a measure of the efficiency with which service is delivered and is another key comparative indicator Operating Expense Per Revenue Hour Operating expense divided by revenue hours of operation ; a key comparative measure which differs from operating expense per vehicle mile in that the vehicle speed is factored out. This is often importan t since vehicle speed is strongly i nfluenced b y loca l traffic conditions. Maintenance ExQense Per Revenue Mile Maintenance cost div ided by the revenue miles. Maintenance Expense Per Omuatjng ExQense Calculated by dividing maintenance expense by operating expense; expressed as a percent of tota l operating expense. Earebox Recovery Ratio of passenger fare revenues to total operating expenses; an indicator of the share of revenues provided by the passengers. Local Revenue Per Operating Expense Ratio of total loca l commitment with respect to total operat ing expense. Operating Revenue Per Operating ExQense Operating ratio calculated by dividing operating revenue by total operating expense Vehicle Miles per peak Vehicle miles divided by the number of peak vehicles. It is an indicator of how intensively the equipment is used and is influenced by the bus travel speeds as well as by the levels of service in the off-peak time periods A more uniform demand for service over the day would result in a higher number. Vehicle Hours Per Peak Vehicle Substitutes vehicle hours for vehicle miles and again reflects how intensively equipment is utilized C-6

PAGE 357

Revenue Miles Per Veh icle Mile-Reflects how much of the tota l vehicle operation is in passenger service. Higher ratios are favorable, but garage l ocation training nee
PAGE 358

C 8

PAGE 359

APPENDIX D FIXED-ROUTE PEER ANALYSIS

PAGE 360

0 2

PAGE 361

BN'IIard County F lltifdRotM PNt R 1*W A.n.alylt, 1991

PAGE 362

APPENDIX E ADA COMPLEMENTARY PARA TRANSIT APPLICATION

PAGE 363

E-2

PAGE 364

Dear Space Coast Area Transit ADA Paratransit Applicant: Thank you for your interest in Space Coast Area Transit's (SCAT) ADA Paratransit Service. SCAT's service area includes most of Brevard County from Titusville to Palm Bay. To enable us to determine your eligibility, please complete the enclosed application The application will explain to Space Coast Area Transit staff how your disability prevents you f rom riding SCAT's fixed route buses. You may complete the fonm yourself or have it filled out by a qualified professional fa milia r with your condition If you fill the fonm out yourself you must complete the bottom of Page 4. This provides permission for SCAT to contact a qualified professional to verity your condition. Applications in Braille, large type and on tape are available upon request. Return the completed application to: Space Coast Area Transit 401 South Varr Avenue Cocoa, FL 32922 If you qualify for SCAT's ADA Paratransit service, you will be mailed your ADA Eligibility Card and ride reservation information within three weeks of the date your application is received. The ADA Eligibility Card is valid for three years from the date of issue. I f you do not qualify for SCAT ADA Paratransit, a letter will be mailed to you explaining t he reason and advising you of procedures to follow if you wish to appeal. If you have any questions about the SCAT ADA Paratransit program, or if you need help filling out the application p lease ca ll Jim Liesenfeit at 636-7815 E-3

PAGE 365

SPACE COAST AREA TRANSIT REQUEST FOR CERTIFICATION OF ADA ELIGIBILITY 1. NAME: ____________________ 2. ADDRESS: __________________ CITY: STATE: ZIP : --------------3. PHONE:------4. Social Security Number--------5. What is t he disability wh ich prevents your from using Space Coast Area Trans it's fixed route service? Is this condition temporary? ___ If yes, expected duration until ----''----'' ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------E-4

PAGE 366

6. How does this disability prevent your from using the Space Coast Area Transit's fixed r oute serv i ces? Please explain completely. 7 Are there any other effects of your disability or which we need to be aware? T H E FOLLOWING INFORMAT ION WI L L B E USED TO ENSURE THAT AN APPROPRIATE VEHICLE I S UTILIZED TO PROV IDE YOUR TRANSPOR T ATION AND THA T AN ACCURATE ANALYSIS OF YOUR TRIP REQUESTS CAN BE MADE BY SPACE COAST AREA T RANS IT. 8. Do you use any of the follow i ng a i ds for mob i lity? (Check all that apply) Manual wheelchair D Powered scooter D Crutches D Service anima l D Oxygen Tan k D Electric whee l chair D Cane D Personal attendant Walker careD D 9. Do you r equire a Personal Ca r e Attendant w h en you travel using transit? YesD No D E -5

PAGE 367

10. Please answer the following quest i ons: Can you wa l k 200 feet without the assistance of another person? Yes D NoD Somet i mes D Can you travel 1/4 mile without the assistance of another person? Yes D No D Sometimes D Can you climb four (4) 12-i nch steps w i thout assistance? YesD NoD Somet i mes D Can you wait outside without support for ten minutes? Yes D NoD Sometimes D 11. I hereby certify that the information g i ven above is correct Signature Date E-6

PAGE 368

12. If th i s application has been completed by someo n e other than the person requesting cert i fication that person must comp l ete the f ollow i ng : N am e : ____________________ __________________ ________ __ __ __ Address: __________________________________ City : _________ State : ____ Zip code _ _ Dayt i me Phone: ------------------------S i gnatu r e Date E-7

PAGE 369

REQUEST FOR PROFESSIONAL VERIFICATION -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------I n order to allow Space Coast Area Transit to evaluate your request i t may be necessary to contact a physic ian or other professional to confirm the informat i on yo u have provi ded. P l ease comp l ete the f ollow i ng informatio n and autho r izatio n form The fo ll ow i ng p h ys i cian ____ Health Care Professional _ Rehab i l i tation Profess i onal __ Othe r ___ (check one) is famil i a r w i th my disability and is authorized to p r ov i de information to Space Coast A r ea Transit r equ ired to complete this certificat ion. Name : __________________________ Address: ________________________ City : ________ State : ___ Z i p code ___ --------------Signatu r e Date -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Office Use Only : Date Received:-----------Category :------------T ype:------------E-8

PAGE 370

APPENDIX F CTC CURRENT VEHICLE INVENTORY

PAGE 371

F 2

PAGE 372

PTMS FORM 2-A R.EVENUE VEHICLE INVENTORY FO RM ooooov _,., """ """""' ........ .... S1ANO .. VIOHOCU ..... ,.., MOSI un ru> ..... COM .... ,. --... --.; --.,. ... NU CONf.. --..... ..... """" ....... ltfC:PtT noN COO< COO< ...... Cu. _....YbCI.I PN QCJif vt..tJI -...... ..... - ::E:: ICAI "" ""' .. ... ..,.. "" ""' .. .. -..... .,.. """"' .... ..... .. kx, ... -... 1.., "" .. .. ,.. .. ...... ono> '"""" .... I',M:.t ()(Ill-.... co " .. ... Jot'fl\1 .. "" .. ,. I -_, ._ '""" ... li'JoCICOAIT ....... 00 " .. TRANS f 1."""" NO O "' .. 0 ""' """ """" ""' "' """' "' 00 "" - ACTIVI NO .. .. ..... ....... "'"' """' - 1 "' 00 " .. 'I'RAt.ISIT .... ACT IVIII: N O ,. "' ., -wu I ,.,,., """' ,.., l .. i "' co " .. TA.ANSIT "' .. ,.rlVIt NO NO ... ...... ,..., """' ,.,. ... 1 .. 00 "" TRANSIT hu &t".1\VII NO NO "' ., 0 2 21110 _, -"""" ,.,. i PA l ... i. .. 00 "' .. TRANSIT ... "''"" NO NO "' 2 .. ... ..... -"""' '""" .. .. 00 "" .. ""'""' ... "" "' ,. .... ... ,_ ,,_ 2000 .. 1 .,.., .. 00 "" ""'"'" 1,--"" .. ... ,. 0 """ ..... ,,..,.,. - 1.. 00 .... .. ........ 1.. "" .., "' 2 ..... _, """" - .. 1.,., .. kx, ... .. ......... .. --l..a .., .. .. 2 ...,. ., ... ..... """"" - '1- .. co ... .. ....... h-1--.., .. .. ,. 2 ... .. .. .,.., """"' .. 1 .... .. co ... ., TttAHSIT NO NO .. ,. 2 "'" '""' t iS& I """"' ,. 1 - !, "" .. lltANSIT 1,_ .... HO ,., .. .. '"" t15$1 '"""' ,.,., l ... i, co '"' .. IAANS il' 1 .. NO .. 2 ... .. ,2312: $$)H i P M:I"""'"ST I ""'"T .. co .... .. TRAHSIT NO Of 2 ..... ) !10 1 0 95311 ""' - DOII.IT ""' ... 00 "" .. TIWIQT 1,. ... 1 .. .. .. ..... 210110 -t1SOXI .. "' ............. "'" co "" .. TRAMSIT A Cf l\1'1 HO .. .. HJI:t nuu ...., ,.., ,.., ocu 00 "" >CO """" ' ... AO'TI\1'1 .. "" .. 0 .. ... .... ..... """" 2:M .. l ... i .. co "" ... TlltAHStt ... NO .. "' .. .. ... ... ... ..... """" - I .. ..,...., .... .. 00 "" ... lltAHSIT ... "" .. 0 !U&)t ..... """"' - ""' .. !, .... .. ........ ... """"' NO .., "" t lfNif ''P '"""" - 1..,., .. -"" ... ......, ... NO .. ... 0 .... -...... '"""' """ luo.o.y .. !, "'" .. ... I. NO NO .. 0 2 -,...,., """ ...

PAGE 373

PTIIS FORM 2A REVENUE VEHICLE INVENTORY FORM ACfHCY "'""'" """"" ,.... YEHOCU MDOa. ........ AC"""' A .. EMEFIO. RIB. SE CAP. CAP """' ON VEHICU! ....., .. AEPt..ACEIItEMT RECERT COASTA TBB ....,. VE$ NO OF .. 0 """' """ 0 7.379 '""' ,.., ' "''""' CCA.CeOOA$T SCAT 8 00 .... '" >ASTA TOO "'""" VES NO OF .. 0 27-407 $2!.&? 0737$ """' s SPACEOOAS T SCAT 8 00 .... >ASTA T O O """"' Vll$ "" .. .. 0 ""' ..... 67)71 '""" "" ' SPACE COo\ST SASTA T8B """"' YES N() OF .. 0 > 0028 ''"' &n?t '""" ""' SCAT 8C 00 .... ,,. srA TOO "'""" VE$ HC OF .. 0 """' ..... ''"' """' "" SPACE CO.O.ST SCAT 8C 00 .... .... TBB "'""' V ES N() OF .. 0 '''" ..... """' , , ;PACECOASf SCA T 8 C 00 "' "' .., TOO """"' VE$ NO OF .. 0 3 1't7 0 ...... ..,, """' "" iPA CE CQ.\ST SCAT ac 00 .... "' 'ASTA .. ...,. VE8 HO DF .. 0 """ IIO?M ""' """' "'' iPACECOAST SCAT oc 00 .... STA .. ACYIVE VES NO DF .. 0 27 US293 ""' """' ""' iPACE COAS T BCAT oc 00 .... "' lAS T A .. ACnv< Vfi$ HO ... .. 0 "'" ...... '"" """' ""' ' lPACE (X)t.$T ISCAT oc ()() .... "' 'liST A "'"""' VES "" .. .. 0 ""' ...... ,.,., ..... 201)1 ' IPAC&COAST SCAT oc 00 .... "' VIStA ... ACnvt T!$ NO "' .. ' 0 0 '"" """' ,,., lPACfCOA.$T SCAT BC 00 "" "' ....,ST A TOO """"' YES "" "' .. 0 0 ..,,. """' ,,., lPACECOAST SCAT BC 00 "" "' sr TOO ACTm .. .., 21419 .... ,.,. PACE COAST SCAT Y N 00 .... 810 DTO ACnVE HC HO GA .. ' "" 2S1M .,... .... -s PA.CEOOAST SCA T YH ()() .... OTD ACnve HC HO .. .. 0 0 ... ""' ..... ,..,. -

PAGE 374

PTMS FORII 2-A REVENUE VEHICLE INVENTORY FORM lll1f'MC'r M..UA.If. taEMi.. fUa. SUT S-TANO A.'IOtAGE WHQ.. UftiU.tlD Oif Ul*AlEO IWIE -10 T'lft: COOt: W11 T 1'1'PE Cl#. C. 0WR UFl1IIIE lllltCOff OOIIIIOJnOiil CClO wr./1 ---.... YDU VUtiC\.f NIICf COST fiiOWI WA11t SC(IM iCOii -----. -:.a .. ..... SCAT V!t 00 l t11' le7 01'0 M:T\Vl N O H() leA 1 5 0 0 u 719 ..o e o '' U!tJJ 2l r .s a. SCAT lw oo -. sn foro NO NO GA s t ._ -.e1 20000 I .r .s t SCA T W 00 ,_. +I S oro ACTIW NO NO GA. 1$ It 0 11.. 14eeS 19119 1"7 4 t SCAT VN 00 !MOl 4U OTO ACTIW. NO GA. 1$ 0 0 7016 $o$M7 19179 2!1000 t9t7 4 I SCJ.T VN 00 l m 449 OTO A.CTIV! NO NO GA. 11 0 0 H 81'37 Z14S4 IHT 4 t SCAT \IN 00 leal 4a:l OTO ACTIVe. NO JNO Gil It 0 0 21-M2 UT.SO 22908 MOOO IHT t SC.T \IN 00 4N OTD ACTl'lf NO NO GA. 11 0 0 121l'8 22908 10$7 <4 I o'.$l se--t \IN 00 1HI 4lS OTO ACTI'o'l N() NO QA. 11 0 0 naco 14$)00 22908 :MOOO 1001 4 c;:o..$T \81 00 Qt tJT0 IIC1:N'f lNo NO GA. II 0 0 ttMS WO Z29CI 1!00 *1 4 I l#loCt(X)oi..Sl SCAT M. oo ...., dO oro Lo IMo GA. u o o """' :2'2!9C* :MOCO tot7 .. JI'I!CtCOot41' SCAT ON 00 4tt OTU M::frVf )ol() HO GA. 1S 0 0 ... 7 11n:i'9 a:.IS _2CC 100 7 4 I $CAT VH 00 1M2 4t3 OTO ACTIVE /110 HO CiA 7 0 0 110)$ $3553 15'iE8 21(;(() 199 1 4 I W'.4CeCOAtt SCAT vN oo .m. oro ACTM! IHo OA ts o o mtt tOT&w 2101t1s 21t000 1991 1 U'ACECO...&T &CAT liN 00 1 m <4t1 OTO ACTIVE tiO INO GA 7 0 14512 05$44 15Q61 21000 199 ? <1 I tll'.ACECOfoST SCAT VN 00 ltrl 498 OTO ACTIVE '10 H0 (;A t S 0 0 ... 96944 Xlt15 2tOOO 1991 <1 JPA.CE<::OUT SCA-t w ttu soo oro J.CTI\11 INO NO> 1 5 o o 1Ut;r t01DM mts 2 t997 c:::c:M$T SCA.T fw Joo ttU mt 0'1'0 AC1WI NIO H0 GA \S 0 e .. 111 4&61$ lQH$ HOOO att1 J11.::t ..... 00 '8t 51 CMO M":IJW'l M0 NO GA. U 0 0 ..,.. _,. 209'tS *CO ttt1 4 1 OCIMT SCAT VH loo 1m !i( oro ...:TM. lwo INC o.-. 1 5 o o s.= 20t1s *00 t99 7 .. IPAQii COUT SCAT 11M 00 1102 600 OT1) ACnv-. NO NO CA IS 0 0 1ot7IISI 20t1 S MCOO 1991 <1 S IP,o,C SCAT VH 00 1902 &07 010 A( 'riVE NO 1iO GA. 15 0 0 t200 66500 201US HOOO 1991 <1 t

PAGE 375

PTMS FORM 2A REVENUE VEHICLE INVENTO RY FORM ""'' OWIER ..... ooa. ""'"' ......... ... '""'"' OWL ... &TAHO WHEEL TOTAL ........ VEH I CL ESTUIAttO MO&T ESTU I A1(0 f'tll'&I CAL fUNCnONA L .... ID m>E .... Of NU.IIISER cooe INAClW'I! ACCOS CDHT ""' CAP. CIWR ON UFEnME PIOICHA REPU.CENENT RECENT REI'UOA.CE Co.t.ST SC" "" 00 ,.., ... OTD ACTvE .. NO .. 0 ...... ... """ ""' .... $Po\CE COAST '''" "" 00 "" '" OTO ACOVE .., NO GA .. 0 .... ..... ""' "'" .... SPACE OOo\St ,,,., VN 00 "" sso DTO ACTM .. .. CA .. 0 0 ""' 0)1$7 ,,.., ..... .... s SPACE COAST ""'' ... QQ ''" ... D T D """"' .. NO GA 0 0 1 0315 H:l180 ""' ... ,I ; SPACE OOA$1 SCAT VN QQ '"' .., OlD ACTIVE .. NO "" 0 0 ,, .., "'" """ ..... .... s SPACECOA.$ 1 SCAT "" QQ " ... O T O ACnvt .. N O GA 0 0 .... "'"' ..... ..... .... SPACE 00>\ST SGAT VN 00 "" "' om ACTivE NO .. CA 0 """ 100713 2 180) .... "" s s l SPACEOOASY .,., VN 00 .... .. OlD ACT0 ... s I SPACE OOo\ST SCAT "" 00 "' '" oro J.CT M .. HQ "" 0 0 "'"' I UnO ,., ..... .... s SPACEOOA.ST SCAT "" 00 "" "' DTO AC""" "" NO GA 0 0 ""' """' ,.., '""' " SPACI! CCMST $CAT "" 00 .... "' OTO ACnve NO .. GA .. 0 0 """ 8 1937 ""' ,., .. "" SPA.C:E COAST SCAT "" 00 .... .. DTD ACnve NO HO GA 0 0 .... Ul16$ ..... "" '

PAGE 376

[J IIi --; ! I i I ! f ! I ; l I l 1 i j ; j l l l li 0:: I 0 1 1 ... > 0:: 0 ,.... z w ' ' ' < w ..J 0 :r ' : ' : ; ' : w ::J I 1 ; 1 ; ..l z I I I I I w ai I r-l r-l I-' I I I I-' I r-l 0:: I 1 i l J I J fl l 1 1 I I I J _j .J .J e--1 .J E i E i J _j rJ .J I ' l l i i J J L.J J J w J J J l _j J J _j J J s l l ! ' l ! l ' ! ..I l j l ! j j l l l ' I-' I-' .J ' ' ...J ,.... i ' ...J I-' ' l ...J I-' "-I .. I I

PAGE 377

:I! 111: e w -w .... 0 3: w > w :) z 111: fir lll lil l l l r 1 ltf l l j i j l I j I I I i I I I j 1 l l i I ; i i ' 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 : : : a a .. J s J I J J j .1 i j j i j J l J l J _j w _j ..J u J _j u J _j u l 5 il i ll i li i I i I i I ' I 1 8 8 1 8 1 8 8 8 8 8 8 j 8 .l l .l .1 l .l .J j i lll i:i l l i l I I i 1 ! I -1 I J J f.J I j I .1 i I j I j I J J w j j ' ;; l j ! j ! 1 8 w 8 8 j _j _j j l l ...! 5 i i ; ;

PAGE 378

' -; . I . I i i l ! ! ! I l ! i l l I ! l l I I ! l l ! l j n I l l l 1 l l l l l l l l l l :IE a: 0 ... I l I i ; ! >-I I l a: g z i l ! l i ; ; ! ; l w ...J (.) :r : ' ' ' ' f-l W :;:) z J .Jj_! w .Jf-J I g I I.J I l Ji-J w _j J J ...Ju _j j w l I J I _j l J J_j ...JW I _j l l a: 5 l ! I l l l 1 1 i I !J w I t-' ! 1---' i i I i i i ! l ! i i i i i ! i i ! I __8 J E 8 B J w ..J _j J s a J E J a J _j .J l l i l ! ; l .J I Q ; i ; i i i l l l i i ! i i l I .. ... I I 1 1 i

PAGE 379

PTIIS FORM 2A REVENUE VEHICLE INVENTORY FORM

PAGE 380

..f S FO M 2 I IN\< 'I'QRM ---1---1 ===t=-I -.. ,. -+-. 1-. AOEHCY AGEHCY VEHIC VEHICLE MOOEL MANUF. ACTIV ADA M lOTALML AVERAGE VfiHICU: ll$nMA'l1i0 MOST ESnMATEO PHYSICAL AJNCnOH NAMf 1 0 T"n' --sHiP ,--()p HUMBER CODE ACCES&-7 CONT. OH VIIHICL! Li FI!nME PUitCHA.S R!P\AC!.M!H RfCIN f UPlACiMlN CONOinoN COOOIOON ---_ cooe 0 LViNI -VlH.? CAP. 'iNG V!HICL! )tRfti' RI!Ho\8 'tEAR SCORE SR! -I-p 0 MILEAGE YilR -(ii. -: b .... < b < l4i ..... -;;; j::::iic I=L .. I k I "' o o T,r A CECOAST SCAT VN 00 19e8 323 DTO ACn\IE NO NO GA 6 0 6 1 01 IIXW IJ1'04 17000 1999 3 6 'ACECOAST SCAT fVN 00 l{m 400 OTO ACTIVE NO NO & 0 4370 1383Q6 1 8257 24000 Hl99 4 5 ACECOAST SCAT VN 00 19!19 4(>1 OTO ACn\IE NO NO GA 6 0 63&$ t16094 IGZ$7 24000 1999 4 6 ACEOD.\ST SCAT VN 00 198$1 3&9 PLY ACnv NO NO GA 8 0 S451 lnc&e 18157 24000 1999 4 5 ACEC
PAGE 381

APPENDIXG SYSTEM SAFETY PROGRAM PLAN

PAGE 382

G 2

PAGE 383

.. . HtlS. TR,\NSlT SYSTEl\-1 . . . A'NNU;AL.SAFETY CERTlHCATION . DATE: lB. !996 NAME: SPACE 00'<51' AREII TRANSIT ADDRESS: 401 S VARR AVENUE . 1. 2. o::x:x:l1>., nDRIDA 32922 . . IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTE 341.061, THE BUS TRANSIT SYSTEM NAMED ABOVE HEREBY CERTIFIES TO THE FOLLOWING: The adoption of a System Safety ProgtaDi. Plan (SSPP) pursuant to Florida Department of T r ansportation safety standards .set forth in Rule Chapter 14-90, Florida Administrative Code. I Compliance with adopted safety standards in the SSPP . . Performance of annual safety insP,ections on all operational buses in mo,don" MY, Signature: Name: tTr?" or P:"int) Title: TRANSIT SERVlC. DlREClOR :-.::arne Address of enlity(ies) which has (have) performed s.1fcty inspections: N;J.mc: 401 S. V!
PAGE 385

APPENDIX H CTC PEER ANALYSIS

PAGE 386

H-2

PAGE 387

CTC Peer Review Analysis, 1998 lktvtfd a ,..vd DU\'11 Et.camblt .... PtiCO Polk Volutla PterMin P19rM1 x PHrMen % FromMun PERFORMANCE INDtCATORS PopuhUiOn 450, 735 726,7.3 m.zn 31M1.378 312,8$1 4$1 ,115 415,758 286,277 726,783 4 33,701 $3% Potentlal T O 156.-444 229,648 103, 214 183.488 181, 600 1 72..608 1n.ea2 103.2t4 166,409 ...... Paueng.tt Trips 70S 70S 753.$88 497,382 U4,8&0 23&,03-4 950,380 536.592 194,860 950,380 553,533 27 5% Pats Possengtr Trips 59$, 961 745,11-4 39-4,555 194,832 217,184 568,871 312.n1 1 9-4,832 74.$,114 -441, 777 35.8% Total Vetide Miles -4,175,065 8 52'9 6'30 1,83 1,184 1,847 ,533 1,361 ,708 4,783,191 3 ,S"30,274 1,381,706 8,529,$SO 3.379.798 23.5% Toeat Re...enue Min 3,675,324 6.202, 9$4 1.$12.155 1,406 ,143 1.273,9$2 2,8M 309 2,844,4 13 1, 273 962 2 ,838, 487 2U% Opeqting ExpeMoe $4,269. 188 $9,115,542 $2,854 ,520 u.zn.o3t SV93,217 $4,748, 485 $4.87 9.735 2,193,217 9,115,542 $4,333.954 .5% $4,449;30$ $9,3$9,8131 $2,213,281 $2,193 .217 $.4, 748,269 $4 879,735 2.193 .21 7 9,369,931 $4,397, 299 1 .2% T ota l f teet m 123 .. 57 130 235 ... ' 235 t33. 4 32.7% Revctlut 158,589 1a&J.548 $91 796 $56,844 $49,267 $43,123 $151,973 43,123 363,548 $117,183 ..SO.O% l..ocal Govt Revenu. $706,314 $124,895 S18,731 St$1,854 $398,5.58 $420,380 S U 24 .04S 16, 731 t 1 2 4,04S $421,540 87.6% EFFECTIVENESS MEASURES Vehk:J& Milts ptt TD Clpi!;t 26.89 28 43 17. 74 10.08 8.43 27. 71 18. 72 8.43 28.43 19.89 3S.G% V e h. Mies per Pass $.$2 UG 3.1$8 OAS 5.77 5 ,0) 3 .68 8.6$ 6.25 .S.3% Veh. Miles per Pcran&it P#St T rip 8.97 .,. 4 .... 6.48 8.27 8 41 4 .... 8 .93 7 .49 .7.0% Pns per 10 Capita 4 5 1 4 .8Z 1.19 1 48 5 .51 3.02 t H I 5 ,$1 3 40 32 .8% Patti T rip$ per 3 .83 .... 3.52 1.10 1.34 >.30 2.10 1.19 3 .83 2 ... 4 2 4% Pus T rips pet Veh Mile o 17 0.12 0 27 0 12 0.17 0 .20 0.16 0 .12 0 21 0 17 2.0% Patti PoiSJ Trip$ pet Veil. Mile 0.14 0 t1 0 .22 0 .12 0.1 8 0.12 0 11 0 1 1 0.22 0 1 4 0 .0% AWtage Age
PAGE 388

H-4

PAGE 389

APPENDIX I PUBLIC COMMENTS

PAGE 390

1 2

PAGE 391

ORAL AND WRITTEN COMMENTS AT THE APRIL 1, 1997 PUBLIC MEETING Unmet Demand Increase frequency Expand and enhance system Need more frequency on routes Need more serv i ce to make residents more productive Increase number of buses to run more f r equently Decrease trip l ength -shorter routes w i th more transfer points Some routes are too long Have a good schedule, and from my experience in thi s area I think it would wor k better if each part of Brevard County (Melbourne, Pal m Bay, and other parts) have the i r vans and buses and then have transfers so each bus does not have to trave l too far I think this could move people around faster, especially for shopping for groceries and going to K-Mart and Wai Mart Need bus schedule from 6:00 am to 11 :00 pm Provide evening serv i ce Need night and weekend service I mprove hours of service Expand days and hours of service Expand service to holidays Extend ho u rs of service beyond 6:00 pm Extend hours of service Weekend service is needed B u ses should run on Saturdays Buses could run unti l 5:00 in the even i ng We should expand fixed-route service days and hours of operation Expand hours and days (really need some n i ghts/weekends) Emphasize, through surveys etc the need for greater areas and hours of service Add mo r e routes and hours of operation to go beyond 6 :00 pm Expand opera t ion times Weekend service Expand service to weekend ridership throughout the county Weekend service there are people who have to work weekends and have no carl I am one. Longer hours WeekendsSaturday and Sunday Express service for worke r s a t the Space Center and Patrick Air Force Base. Need service to more a r eas of the county. -5 days per week for work trips. Needs serv i ce hours to accommodate work trips. Need tra n sportat i on to get more industry to Brevard. Need t r ansportation that meet needs of welfare recipients (e.g., more hours ) E xpand bus service to accommodate workers (e.g night, weekends, early am). Pursue employer subsidized transportation. Need job bus" to link employees and employers More service for working people 1

PAGE 392

Supply additional public transportation service for the public that need to get to work and back home. Make routes more employment friend l y Negot i ate with large employers for ded icated route service to them Partner with welfare r eform transport efforts Extended services Ex : Have a bus servi ce t o m ajo r work areas Patrick AFB Kennedy Space Center. Expand beach routes to connect North and South corridors via the beach. Provide services in areas not served at present. Expa nd the fixed -routes to cover a larger area. Not going in circle routes. but North and South I East and West. Routes that int ersect each other (transfers available) Need to expand routes (Move some areas of shopping, become more diverse, M elbourne area). Connect North and South routes on Beach side. Expand beach area routes (dedicated beach bus) Extend routes to areas of the county where no transportation is available Serve more areas so that trips w ill consume less time. Have two or three buses i n one area so that drivers can get to clients on time. More tax i s in W Melbourne area Unk doctor trips with prescription trips, have the driver wait. Allow a stop a t a pharmacy when returning from the doctors to pick up a prescription that has been phoned in as not to delay the driver. For pick-ups to doctor clinic, etc or other engagements seven days for an appo i ntment is not always possible Need bus service to major tourist attractions -Marke t to tourists -F lyer s in motel rooms. Get tourists on SCAT and out of rental cars Provide feeder services. especially for shopping trips Make available transportation to grocery stores for people without automobiles on a weekly basis Routes running North to South and East to West criss-cross. Affordable taxis for blind. More buses in Palm Bay Route deviation -need more flexibility -community circulators. Concentra te service in particu lar areas. More transfers between routes. There are no serv i ces for people who are blind. Improve door-to-door services Serve college students, teenagers. Bus stops could have a cement block to stand on or a shed. Transit service to special events (e.g airshow at AFB) Expand park and ride to more special events Total examination of population to ensure proper allocation of service to all. 1-4

PAGE 393

Follow standard procedures used by all successful, cost-effective bus systems in use all over the U.S. and foreign countries. Be more dependable! Transportation Coordination Opportunities Pursue alternative funding sources Increase local government support for public transit. Raise fares to $2 on the weekend More state and federal dollars Avail itself of all possible state and USDOT grants that would assist in overall better service Get people out of their cars Too many people in too many cars." SCAT should partner with daycare services Reinvent welfare support services to include transportation services Use taxis to serve people with visual impa irments Link services with other counties (e.g., Lynx on SRSO) Consider connection to Lynx in Both North and South areas Prov ide service only in Brevard County Marketing Need bus passes (not tickets that get punched). -psychologic factor. All day passes for the bus-sold throughout the community (e.g. convenience stores). Bus passes sold on the bus Post route maps at stops and transfer points. Simplify schedules and maps. -one map with all routes. -pocket size cards. Need easy to understand route maps and schedules. Publish routes, times and fares In newspaper. More advertisements sell t-shirts, bumper stickers, etc. Provide bumper stickers to passengers More publicity -TV, newspapers radio More publicity. Advertise in Sunday paper -bus schedule and route maps. Advertise carpool services. Get the word out through churches. Pursue free advertising opportunities. Pursue incentives to ride system. Bus stop signs at each stop with route and schedule information. Highlight the benefits of transit. -less parking lots -save energy 1-5

PAGE 394

-save money on cars. -less pollution. -allows kids to get part-time jobs. -cuts insurance rates Market to tourists Be more informative to the public More public awareness bumper stickers, tee-shirts (to purchase), newspapers Put more facts before public Make SCAT service more user-friendly Have a rider present informat ion to the public and local organizations Transit-Friendly Land Use and Regulations SCAT should not get involved in land-use issues. Emergency Evacuation Use the word "Hurricane' instead of emergency evacuation" Other Areas Not Covered by The TOP Review Committee 1-6 Need buses with well-trained drivers Give drivers the opportunity to provide input. SCAT has excellent drivers, drivers should have input Excellent drivers Give drivers more flexibility and more time to render service Allow drivers to attend meeting for i nput Higher fares for those who can afford it. Get drunk drivers off the road Strict OUI LawsImpound cars and give them bus passes Get the uninsured off the road and into transit. Impound cars of deadbeat parents, give them bus passes Impound cars of reckless drivers Urge legislature to increase funding for support service f o r welfare recipients Use smaller buses SCAT bus service is an excellent value now instead of bureaucratic self-defeating paper Plans, plans, 40 years of plans

PAGE 395

ORAL COMMENTS AT MAY 13,1997 PUBLIC MEETING Priority Votes Comments 19 Need benches and shelters at bus stops. 14 Veterans Administration clinic wilt be opening in Viera in November 1998. Wilt need more public transportation for VA Clinic services. Barefoot Bay and other area veterans should be a pr i or ity for the five-year plan. 13 Buses that connect throughout the county. 12 Buses past 5 pm. 9 Need transportation for work trips (self-sufficiency). Need buses earlier and later in day. 9 Need service later in the evening (e.g evening movies). 8 Need court Alternatives Transportation" More frequent buses To and From Courts, public safety center. community service agencies, work. 8 One rider from Palm Bay was transported by SCAT to several destinations today However, there are more buses needed in Palm Bay. There are only two routes now. Need service on Babcock, Waco, Eldron, Breakwater, Caballero, Jupiter, and Malabar Rd EIW. Need a shuttle to connect with Route 23. 8 Need more transportation to doctors' offices. There are 80,000+ retirees in county. Micco is an expanding area with 10,000+ senior citizens. 7 Need Orlando to Melbourne Airport Shuttle. 7 Need access to SCAT paratransit vehicles. Where are the 21 vehicles? (Not in Barefoot Bayl) Consider distance from Barefoot Bay to Melbourne. 6 Ensure quality transportation is available to disabled (not just elderly) Comfortable Timely Available throughout county 6 Saturday service 6 Mobile Home parks will continue to need more and mons transportation. Older people unable to drive 6 Advertise regularly is Florida Today Service routes and schedules 1-7

PAGE 396

5 Elderly need more transportation service in the Barefoot Bay area. 5 Need exclusive use van f or Barefoot Bay resident use 5 Need weekend buses A1A on Sunday 4 Use rap i d transit from M i cco and Barefoot Bay to Melbourne and Pa l m Bay. Use existing Railroad tracks or US 1 4 Use mini buses to connect 22, 24, and 30 to Barefoot Bay and Rapid Transit 4 Increase phone lines. 4 Public transportatioo needed several times/week but need to make appointment 7 days ahead. Rider should be able to make standing appointment for longer period of t ime 4 Need viable transportation to and from wori<, child care, education, available odd hours and on weekends 4 Need affordable, state of the art transportation for residents of deep South County. 4 Use citizen commi\\ee. 3 High Msk pre-natal go to Orlando hard to coordinate service between SCAT and Orlando. 3 Think big. South Brevard is expanding West. 2 "Out and abou t service is helpful for disabled. 2 Shorter ride time. 2 Fun ding sources needed to be broadened to include community destinations, not just center programs 2 Review restriction of 3/4 mile from route (need to inc lude unincorporated area) 1 Welfare to work. 1 The polijical reality in no\ door-to-door service Need broader base of fixed route with longer hours. 1 En la rge paratransit 1 Transportation for physical therapy and occupational therapy etc. 1 Recreational and social trips should only be provided after medical trips are satisfied. 1 Rarely see buses in Barefoot Bay. 1

PAGE 397

1 Use modem information tools 1 Need transportat ion from M ims to Micco (not Mims to Palm Bayas stated in "Facts at a Glance') 1 Need publ ic transportation to alleviate parking problems. 0 Increase operators (schedulers) 0 Paratransit bus cannot take me to Easter Seals where I do volunteer work. Why not? 0 Reduced wait time for pick-up. 0 For transportatio n to pre-natal clinic need to bring other children with them 0 Barefoot Bay has a great demand for trips on public transportation 0 Change trip priorities 0 ARCneeds Most clients don't drive. Continue to try and find a variety of services 1-9

PAGE 398

WRITTEN COMMENTS FROM MAY 13,1997 PUBLIC MEETING As a parent of a 20 year old disabled daughter who cannot receive transportation to become employed or participate in social activfties during the day I believe SCAT need to expand their serv i ces on south Merritt Island (S. Courtney and S. Tropical Trail.) Currently, she cannot ride the bus on a daily basis because the bus stop is not near our home, off S. Tropica l Trail. I believe it is assumed that S.M. I. resi dents can afford to provide their own transportation Unfortunately, the e lderly and disa b led who have working parents/guardians are left alone all day with nothing to do because there is no transp orta tion. Expand serv ic es available to the working families. 1 Expand hours 2 Expand routes 3 Expand paratransit to working poor and WAGES (Welfare) reci pients. 4 F or many the lack of reliab l e transportation is a major barrier to work. Accommodate wishes of elderly and disab led to be able to attend important functions on time and in a reasonable amount of time and in comfort. Do you have any service for emergency to doctor, instead of one (1) week in advance What should SCAT do in the next five (5) years to develop service that meets the needs of Brevard County residents. 1 More conven ient routes with enough buses to prov ide timely service to allo the working poor to use the bus system to go to and from work 2. Convenient transfer stations to be able to travel from one end of the county to the other in a r easonable time frame 3 More flexible scheduling of buses for field trips for children's programs. 4. Provide for working mothers a way to drop off children at child care centers. Perhaps have stops at designated centers to facilitate this. 1. I feel that due to the new Welfare Reform that went into affect October 1, 96. Where all parents/people receiving assistance (A.F.D.C., etc.) Must be employed at least 20 hrs. a week. That there should be public transportation that will transport the public from point A to point B and back. We must realize that not everyone has transportation, nor is able to drive, and if we want Welfare Reform to work we as l eaders must bo our parts. 2. Buses should be on a regularlfiexible schedule for the conveyance of the public. 3. Bus system from one end of the county to t he other. Why can't buses let Scooters on Buses. When does the ADA program begin I am having a problem w ith the bus coming early to pick me up from therapy. They should give drivers bette r schedu l es. Barefoot Bay is a r eti r ement community with a population of approximately 9,000. We assist residents in need of transportation that cannot transp ort themselves by a volunteer force using personal vehicles We need help in getting people to doctor's offices, hospitals dentists, eye doctors, therapy clinics etc ... 1-10

PAGE 399

1 A shuttle from Melbourne Air Port to Orlando Air Port 2. Bus is along Babcock to Wako around to Emerson Drive-Eiderson and connect the#23. 3. A bus along Malabar Road to the end of the line as there is ball field in that vicinity. 4. A bus along Jupiter Dr. through Caballero to Collings around Barbados, back to Elder son Clarification of how ADA works, or should be working in regard to wheelchair users. I was appointed to a committee over a year ago What are future goals, i f any regar ding door -to-door pick-up qualifications, etc. Why does one have to call one week ahead for a ride to where ever? I think it should be a day or two, that what computers are there for; to do things fast. The bus should carry six or eight people at once, not one or two I live at T T South. We would like a bus toW. Dixie on #192 stopping at different stores along the way and back. Some of us get confused with the t ransfers bus could something be done to help. Also at Wai-Mart in Palm Bay we have to cross a huge street to get the bus back Expand hours/days. Fixed routes-5:00a.m. to 10 p.m. so people can use to get to/from work. More connecting routes between North/Central -Central/South -Cocoa Beach to South of Pineda Causeway. Expand service to Saturdays add more schedulers train them on your services ... especially to those who are ADA eligible and have been certified eligible. Add more shore lines. Concerns I have representing Brevard County Health Dept. clients: a. Being able to have children accompany parents to their appointments b. Difficulty scheduling of high risk OB clients to ORMC when bus transportation is unknown. c. When clients are not medical yet or at all difficulty traveling to appointments Supply buses for Veterans for the V.A. clinic from South of the county Transportation for the elderly for doctors and hospital appointments. The residents of Barefoot Bay have a real need for transportation to area clinic, and other facilities. Coincide with open ing of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility at Viera (1998) provide public transport for Barefoot Bay's Veterans living in deep south Brevard County. 1 think the Barefoot Bay community needs available transportation to doctors in Melbourne and even Vero Beach. We have volunteers now who use their private cars to help, but that is not always reliable. Announce stops for visually impaired. Need bus service throughout Palm Bay. A! th is time we need to see bus service in Eldron Unit 50. 1 believe the bus service should be advertised as !here are many, many peop l e who are not aware 1-11

PAGE 400

of this service Palm Bay needs bus service for Saturday and Sunday so that church goers can have the privilege to go to church Transportat i on fo r those unable to drive for shopping and medica l n eeds Some hand i capped Transportation to government bui ldings for meetings 1 Increase phone l i nes and operators, so that people can access scheduling without 2. 3. 4. a busy tone. Buy more buses so that people do not need to wait lengthy amounts of t i me after appointments to be picked up Change the system for people who have standing appointments (i.e. Physical therapy 2 3 t i mes per week for 1 -3 months, so that they don't have to call 7 days ahead for every appointment. I ncrease amount of buses so that patients have reduced length of t i me to ride on t h e bus. 1 Would li ke know what's a l ready in the p l an. 2 Would s u ggest continued coordi n ation wit h the other agencies to make individua l vehicles less necessary. I wou l d like !he bus to run on Saturdays I l i ve in Pal m Bay West on Emerson and extended hours to 5:00p.m. or 6 :00 p.m If all poss i ble, hoping to ru n on Sundays. Also i f they would run every half hour instead of every hour Representing individuals with D i sabilities (100%) Dependent on pub lic transportation (98%) More early and later busses for persons worl
PAGE 401

I wou l d like to see door-to-door serv i ce for me to go to my volunteer's work at Easter Seals I am menta ll y and emotionally i mpai red individ u al Recommendat i ons: 1 Evening service to 8 :00p.m. 2 Saturday and S u nday service i n Cocoa Beach. 3 Benches at bus stops 1 P r ovide Saturday 7 Sunday service. 2 Develop Dial-A Ride sim i lar to other counties Provide a tria l run for Sat. & S u n. fixed routes i n the most populated areas. Provide covered bus stop areas w ith signs indicat ing bus schedu l es. Buses should be going in opposne directions A bus going to the Mall A bus leaving the Mall Both bus serving f rom both direction a t the same time with transfers in either d i rect i on. A bus route i s neede d on Eldron B lvd. S E Pa l m Bay to accommodate residents of Unit 50. Wou l d also app reciate weekend s erv i ce. We would like to have bus service on Saturday through Emerson, #23 At noon the hour wai t is long when a ll drivers go to lunch 1. Have increased bus service instead of one (1) bus doing a two (2) bus route, so as the waiting t i me were not an hour. 2 Later service than 4 : 0 0 p m leaving the mall 3 A regular Saturday service i nstead o f only Ch ri stmas t i me For bus r oute #23. 1 Develop a transportation system that allows adu lts with disabilities t o get to and from work during non-tradnional hours. 2 Increase number of fixed -r outes that would allow more members of the community wnh the opportunny to ride a bus to work or leisure activities. 1-13

PAGE 402

WRITIEN COMMENTS RECEIVED FROM NEWSPAPER ADVERTISEMENTS 1 14 I live near 20'" street south. I have a bad back and so does my wife. We can only walk to 13m street with great difficulty. To be able to catch the bus o n Orlando Ave. and 20 .. street near E xpress Gregory. Expanding service and hour for elderly and disabled using SCAT Disadvantaged serv ice s. Softer suspensions on buses used to transport elderly and disabled To tell people to ride SCAT. Many people wou ld prefer to take the bus Instead of driving. They need more buses down the main streets. More buses running down US#1 and Babcock street from S. Brevard all the way to Coca. Also more buses to the beach from Palm Bay. That a bus could connect with the #9 at the Merritt Square Mall going back to Cocoa later than 3:10p.m. say at least 5 or 6 p.m Occasional weekend service to Mall & Beach from Cocoa Terry Ruth, Dawn, Ulysses Hester, etc. for being exceptionally n ice & helpful to passengers. Bus service from Sharpes (US 1 and Cammerrse Groves Blvd) To Bryd Plaza, Coca Library, Coca Village, Merritt Square To go to B C. C To swimming pool. Run bus every Saturday. To go to Merritt square mall to shop I have no car. A taxi is too expensive. My only income 1$ a pension check. P.S. I ride the bus 7:30a.m. Monday thru Thursday to shop at Winn-Dixie for 3 poor w id ows free of charge. Run bus every Saturday between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00p.m. to retum home. Both I and Ms. Hazel Mecchi who li ves on the 'Z"' floor of this apartment building, think it wou l d be nice for many of us who don't have cars, for SCAT to run Saturday bus service. To use public transportation in a year or two as my car and I get older and serv ice is extended. I realize this is difficult, people hate to waH; don't you? Some how get the word out more survey some condos areas such as US 1 and Parl
PAGE 403

Buses transportation the elderly and handicapped need safer suspensions. They ride like army tanks and severely strain spinal column. To use the bus to go shopping, get to and from Walmart and f rom Merritt Mall for shopp ing and movies. Weekend service. Direct return from Merritt Mall route to Port takes too long One l ater return f rom Mall-7:00p.m. I don't drive and I am handicapped and would like public transportation. Canl got to bus stop. Pick-up in private developments. I understand the bus may be coming closer to Patrick Air Force Base. I hope does, since I am handicapped on my left side, be easier fo r me to use your bus. to do my errands To be able to use the bus system in more direct routes that will serve all of Brevard County. Also on Rt. #21 have earlier Sunday service so people could attend churches Would like to have bus go up directly on New Haven Ave past the Mall and to 1-95. There are places there that are unaccessible unless you h ave a car. I am not currently a bus rider, however I have comments from the times that I was 1 The buses shou ld go in BOTH directions on the route. Now they only "go od" ride is for someone who lives in the middle of the route and does not waste time on "the other side.' 2. The busses are too large I have never seen a FULL bus To evaluate this, calculate "Passenger Miles per Gallon. 3. If a 12 or 14 passenger bus was employed, additional busses could be placed in service. The operating cost have to be lower, even including the extra drivers Visibility, parking & maneuvering is easier too. 4 Special needs people could be accommodated on demand in small vans for less money/year than required for a standard full size "kneeling bus. School, training, shopping, medical appointments Bigger and Better signs. More bus benches. Route stops on garden street. Easy accessshort amount of time to transit. More routes connecting central to south and north corner serv ice hours for people to use SCAT for getting to wo r k and home a nd weekend hours for all areas. When I went to Tampa a couple of weeks ago, I observed HARlline promoting lighUheavy rail using existing rail. Germany I believe has passenger trains that can be used on our r ail system. Would rail be an atternative in Brevard County for the work force. I believe I saw something about future expansion of routes. North West Cocoa South Rockledge/Suntree maps could be prepared showing this I sort of done it before. To have several buses for the night shift wor1
PAGE 404

1-16 That the handicapped physical ride free any wher e even to worl<, more buses with wheel chair lifts. To have several buses for the right shifts worl
PAGE 405

Have a route which travels through each major housing area. More people would participate if this were the ease. Hopes for needs to be met even on short notice. Regular riders at regular times should not have to call only for changes. More availability of needed scheduling t imes. When clients have problems with reservation and supervisor with no reso lve to normal situations client should have access to higher command, instead of being told they' ll call back and then they never do. To encourage development of a Brevard County system that provides city to city and within-city transportation. To develop Board of County Commissioners support for project, as well as a 100% city council support. Wrthou1 all players you will not develop a system. New found harbor drive bus route needed sou1h of 520 closest P/a Walmart 3 miles for Walmart. To avoid traffic jams and limited parking and r ide the bus. At 50 cents for seniors-it's a good deal and less stress than driving. More buses-more frequent runs. Add Saturdays, Sundays and evenings. It would be nice to catch dinner and a movie at the mall. To continue to use this excellent service as often as possible. It's good, convenient and over the past year I've found all your employees, office/drivers great. Why not try for a limited bus service to Play-A-Unda Beach once a day or a day a week for a start would generate interest. To assist disab le d patients with transport when needed. The Kidney Center carefully screens patien ts to determine to that they really need transportation to the center. That tra n sportation continues to be used for our center on need onlyI would like to see more transport to general areas in Palm Bay and Melboume since there is such a transport crunch. Our major concems were improved hou rs for the existing bus service, particularly for aftemoon or evening runs that would permit residents availability to movies, school events and the beach. In Barefoot Bay we felt a need for a jitney or tram service to bring people to the bus stops It is three miles from the bus stop to the farthest po int in the Bay. Much too far for older people to walk. In such a service could transport people to various medical here in the Bay. It was a major concem of all the people from the Micco area (discussed at Micco Meeting) that some solu1ion be achieved between Indian river County and Brevard so that county run buses could cross the county line. The closest and most convenient food and shopping centers for Sou1h Brevard are in Roseland, North Indian County. That is also the location 1-17

PAGE 406

1-18 of many, many doctors and the closest hospital. There i s no public transportation serv ing this need. The Visiting Nurses Association also expressed a need for a door-to-door reservation type service to transport people to doctor offices or other medical services The present service located in Cocoa i s too far away to provide adequate serv i ce. I woul d like service on #26 to go after 4:00 or 5:00p. m. everyday. I f I want to go to the movies I can get there but can't come back-????? Transportation -when I lived in Des Plaines Illinois, the town had a taxi service for seniors ($1 each way). Very handy! Half hour notice. In San Antonio, busses parked at the Mall and carried folks downtown to various places (You parked at the mall.) Very cheap fare, every 15 mi n utes 'til11:00 p.m In many areas. shuttle buses delivered you from your d oor to a i rport; $8.00 Here are needed pick-ups at door, (limit $5. 00 a trip). To grocery, bank. doctor, lunch out, mall, etc. Large Greyhound buses on pre-arranged routes (as down Babcock Street ), not best idea as too/many folks have trouble getting to the bus stopl. Large buses could be lu crative for all ages as to transport folks to GAMES, DISNEY WORLD, SIGHTSEEING etc. from a mall parking area Brevard is chock full of seniors who don't drive, but need to do errands No one likes to depend on neighbors!! Some seniors 50 65 years could have good jobs being drivers possib l y paid 1. Town subsidy 2. Cash from passengers Certain shuttles should be wheelchair accessible but not all. If one brings groceries home (as meat) you do not like pic king up 6 or 7 mo r e folk before you are taken home! Spoil age!

PAGE 407

APPENDIXJ CENSUS BLOCK GROUP ANALYSIS

PAGE 408

J-2

PAGE 409

Tabl e J-1 Bravanl County Tracts : Distributions and Scoras c-... "' I "' "'low %0. Block P ertons Ste HHs Hils Sc-YHns I v .... I 60100 1 18.411% i 1 .00 21. 4 9 % 1.00 2 .64% 1 .00 7.22 % 1.00 4 .00 e
PAGE 410

Table J-1 (Contin u ed) Breva rd County C en s u s Block Grou ps: D IStri b utions and Scores % I % I l I Census %0' %Low Prsons Persona Composite Bloc:k 0 i Score 80+ Score Vehicle I Score Income Scono Score Group HHI I HHo j Years Yell'$ l I 2osa% 1 4 22% i 610005 20.20% I 1 00 1.00 1 00 7.08% 1 .00 4 00 20. 58% I 11. 93% 1 610006 1 02 16.74% 1.00 0.00% 1 .00 1 06 4.07 1 0.70% 6 10007 20.64% ( 1.02 3UO% 1 .50 1 .94 23.98% 2 .12 6 .58 611001 1 8 2 9 % l 1 00 29.98% 1.30 4 12% l 1 00 8 85% 1 00 4.30 611002 20.07% i 1.00 18 79% 1 00 0.00% 1.00 3 01% 1 00 4.00 611003 30. 37% I 1.50 15.18% 1.00 0.00% 1.00 0 00% 1 .00 4.50 611004 0 .00% 1 00 3 1 .03% 1 .35 0 00% 1 00 0.00% 1 00 4 .35 612001 28 76% 1 1.42 6 05% 1 00 2 .14% 1 .00 8.59% 1 .00 4.42 612002 22 40% 1 1.11 25.3)% 1.10 2 58% I 1 00 10 .16% 1.00 4 ,2\ 612003 9 22% 1 1.00 50. 00% 2 17 5.84% 1 .06 17.49% 1.55 5 78 612004 19 74% 1 1.00 23 68% 1 03 6 09% 1 1.1 1 6.86% 1.00 4 14 61200 5 27 07% 1.34 2 .33% 1.00 1 32% \ 1 00 2 23% 1.00 4 .34 6 1 2006 100 00% 4 .94 0 00% 1 00 0 00% 1.00 0 00% 1 .00 7.94 612007 0 .00% 1 00 0.00% 1 00 0 00% 1.00 0.00% 1 .00 4 00 612008 6.49% 1.00 55.33% 2.4 1 5.40% 1 00 17 .60'-' 1. 56 5.96 621 0 1 1 33.03% 1.63 5.71% 1.00 0 .84% 1 .00 2.80% 1 .00 4.63 621012 30.07% 1.49 6.66% 1.00 1 05% 1 00 4.20% 1.00 4.49 621013 31.98% 1 .58 9.33% 1 00 0 00% 1 00 2.35% 1.00 4 .5a 621 0 1 4 2 3. 02% 1.14 4.68% 1.00 2.47% 1 .00 7 39% 1 .00 4.14 621021 22 .72% 1.12 16.15% 1 .00 1.99% 1.00 9 86% 1. 00 4. 12 6 2 1022 22.47% f .11 27. 28% 1.19 6.85% 1.24 26 07% 2 31 5 .85 621023 2 1 65% 1. 07 1 2.37% 1 00 0.00% 1. 00 12 82% 1.13 4 2 1 6 2 1024 16.62% 1 00 34.72% 1.5 1 0 00% 1.00 1 4.76% 1 31 4.62 621025 1 6 80% 1 00 27.05% 1.18 0 .00% 1 .00 OJXI% 1 .00 4 .18 621 031 31.07% 1.54 8.10% 1.00 2.37% 1 00 7 03% 1 00 4.54 621032 28.52% 1.41 9 .73% 1 .00 1 37% 1.00 6.47% 1.00 4 4 1 621034 30.6 1 % 1.51 13 61% 1.00 0 00% 1.00 2 17% 1 00 4.51 6 2 1035 17.19%, 1 00 1 4.69% 1.00 0 00% 1 00 7.17% 1.00 4 .00 621036 30.62% 1 51 8 9 8 % 1 .00 0.87% 1.00 0 76% 1.00 4 51 622001 30. 30% 1.50 14 39% 1 00 0 00% 1 00 6 98% 1 00 4 .50 62200 2 15. 12% 1.00 3a. 51% 1 .33 5.49% 1. 00 15. 45% 1.37 4 .69 I 622003 19. 32% 1 00 1 1 .07% 1.00 13 78% 2.50 16. 8 1 % 1 .49 5.99 6 2 3001 26.38% 1 .30 9 .48% 1. 00 10 91% 1.96 23.23% I 2 06 6 3 4 623002 18 75% l 1 00 33. 49% 1 46 37 20% 6.76 44.03% 3.90 13. 1 1 623003 1 8.96% 1 1.00 20 .17% 1.00 2.10% 1 00 9 66% 1 1.00 4 00 623004 34. 26% 1 .69 8 95% 1.00 17 30% 1 3 1 4 25 84% l 2 29 8 12 623005 25.00% 1 24 21.61% 1.00 1. 83% I 1 .00 4.97% 1 1 00 4.24 623006 25 97% I 1 28 13 .7 1 % 1.00 20.95% 1 3 81 26.69% 1 2.36 8.45 624001 23. 04% I 1.14 17 64% I 1.00 3 42% 1 00 4 .7s% 1 1 .00 4 14 5.23% 1.00 \ 1 3 14% l 624 002 10.17% 1.00 0 00% I 1 00 U6 4. 1 6 J-4

PAGE 411

Tabl e J 1 (Continued) Brevard County Ce nsus Block Groups: Distributions and Scores % I Cen&us % 0-%low Block Persons I Score Persons SCO SC:OI'9 Group HHs HHs Ytars I Years 624004 28 40% : 1 .40 7 22% i 1 .00 4.06% 1.00 1 3. 68% 1 1 .21 4 .61 624005 27.28% I 1 .35 97% I 1.00 7 87% : 1 .43 16 6S% I 1 .47 5 2$ 6250 0 1 30.77% : 1.52 0 00% 1.00 0 00% 1.00 0 00% 1 .00 4.52 625002 18. 54% I 1 00 28 13% 1 1 .22 6 29% 1 14 5 90% 1.00 4 .37 625003 8 22% 1 00 0.()0% 1.00 0.00% I 1 00 0 00% 1.00 4.00 625004 7 64% 1.00 40 07% 1 .74 4 90% 1.00 11.ss% I 1.03 4 n 625005 35. 05% 1 .73 9 65% 1 00 19.15% I 3 48 17.53% 1 .5$ 7. 7 6 625006 15.95% 1 .00 31.89% 1.39 4.55% 1. 00 5.04% 1.00 4.39 626001 37.55% 1.86 11. 56% I 1 .00 35. 19% 1 6 .57 41.47% 3 .67 13.10 626002 40 57% 2.01 5 .71% 1.00 1 5 .12!' 2 .75 5 1 88% 4 .59 1 0 .34 626003 24.60% 1 22 1 3.39% 1 1 00 3.10% 1 00 24.71% 2.19 5.40 626004 41, 16% 2 04 14 96% I 1 00 55. 87% I 10.15 61 ,43% 5.44 18 .62 627001 2.85% 1 00 40.93% 1.78 4 68% 1. 00 26.15% I 2 32 6.09 627002 21. 35% 1.06 19 75% 1 00 33.43% ) 6.07 27. 93% 2.47 10.60 627003 0 .00% 1 .00 0.00% 1.00 0 .01)% 1 .00 Q.QQ% I 1 00 4 .00 626001 9.52% 1 00 35.26% 1.53 2 .23% 1 00 18.91% 1.67 5 .21 628002 18 37% 1.00 24.29% 1 .06 2 63% 1 .00 14.57% 1 .29 4.35 628003 14.86% 1 .00 51.35% 2.23 4 .49% 1 .00 15.38% 1 .36 5 .59 626004 8 99% 1.00 28.25% 1 23 2 11% 1.00 t 1 .22% 1 .00 4.23 628005 3 1 71% 1 57 15.85% 1 00 0 00% 1.00 13. 79% 1 .22 4 .79 629001 20.23% 1.00 19 48% 1.00 0.74% 1.00 5.78% 1 00 4 .00 6 2 9002 20.55% 1 .02 18.24% 1.00 3.48% 1.00 6.51% 1.00 4 02 629003 28. 12% 1.39 11.61% 1 .00 3 31% 1.00 10.12% 1.00 4 .39 6 2 9004 33.61% 1 .66 10.11% 1.00 13.49% 2.45 23 .08% 2 04 7 .16 630001 27.20% 1.34 2 1 18% 1.00 0.8 1 % 1.00 5 12% 1 .00 4.34 63000 2 31.93% 1 .58 7.07% 1.00 0.00% 1 .00 4 ,40% 1 .00 4 .$8 631001 18.46% 1 00 21.04% 1.00 5 02% 1 00 4.57% 1 00 4 .00 631002 29. 18% 1 44 16.09% 1.00 2.36% 1.00 5 .86% 1.00 4.44 631003 15.59% 1.00 45.84% 1 .99 0 62% 1.00 2.2 1 % 1 00 4.99 641 011 1 7 76% 1 .00 30. 13% 1.31 0.96% 1.00 4 .02% 1 00 4 31 641012 10.45% 1.00 0 00% 1.00 0 00% 1 00 0.00% 1 .00 4.00 641013 11,58% I 1 00 -41.93% 1.62 9.17% 1 .67 19.11% 1.69 6 1 8 641014 I 1.18 0.00% I 1.00 0.00% 1,1)0 0 00% 1 .00 4 .18 23.81 % I 641015 9.21% l 1.00 29.37% 1.28 1 .59% 1 .00 24.81% 2.20 5 47 641211 21.54% 1 06 lo.88% I 1 00 2 34% i 1.00 5 .16% 1 00 4.06 6412 1 2 30.54% J 1 5 1 16 60% 1 .00 o.89% I 1 00 15.82% 1 1 40 4 91 641213 34.40% \ 1.70 9.57% 1.00 o.OO% I 1.00 26.6 2 % 1 2.36 6.06 641214 8 55% 1 1 00 36. 7 1 % 1 68 3 69% 1 1 00 12,91% I 1,14 4 .83 64122 1 28.74% I 1 .42 10 99% 1 .00 2 .n% 1 1.00 10 78% 1.00 4.42 641222 0 00% I 1 00 0 .00% i 1 .00 0 00% i 1.00 0 .00% 1 .00 4.00 J-5

PAGE 412

Tabla J-1 (Continued) Brevard Cou nty Census Block Groups: Distrib utions a n d Scores Census % [ % %11-I %L-j Block Person.t. Score Prson Seora Vhh;te I Scont lnene 1 Score ComposiU. 0-17 &0+ I Sc:oro Group HHs I Years v .... HHs I 64122 4 12.98'4 1 1 .00 23 74% j 1 03 i 1 07 9 66% I 1.00 4 10 641225 17. 94% 1.00 21. 68% 1.00 0 00% \ 1 .00 I 1 .00 4.00 5.<1% l 641226 8.77% 1.00 22.81% 1 00 o.oo% I 1.00 o.oo% I 1.00 4 .00 642001 14 22% 1 00 38.48% 1.67 4.17% I 1 .00 17. 33% i U3 5 .21 642002 4 .39%' 1 00 43 62% 1 90 5 69% 1.03 21. 98% I 1.95 5 .88 13.63% I I 642003 1 00 25 51% 1 .11 15. 40% 2.60 22 87% 2 02 6 93 64 2 004 17.99% l 1.00 17.07% 1.00 6.30% 1 .14 14.93% 1.32 4 ,47 642005 25.83% I 1 28 6 25% 1 .00 24.59% 4 .47 13 .4 6% 1.19 7.94 642000 17.20% 1.00 36.50% I 1.59 24. 62% 4-47 32.74% 2.90 9 96 642007 14.96% 1.00 32.06% 1 .39 2.05% I 1.00 10.99% 1.00 4 .39 642008 21. 07% 1.04 28.99% 1.26 a .3a% 1 U2 16.08% 1. 4 2 5.24 643012 27.03% 1 .34 18.97% 1 .00 3 .71% 1.00 17 3 0 % 1.53 4 .87 643013 1 .36 15. 03% 1 .00 13 92% 2 .53 1 7 33% 1.53 6 42 64302 1 21.21% 1 .05 15.29% 1.00 2 .56% 1 00 13.78% 1 22 4 .27 643022 37.82% 1.87 7.32% 1.00 22.27% 4 .04 32.81% 2.90 9 .82 643023 22 97% 1. 1 4 22 97% 1.00 2 .14% 1 00 9 .94% 1 00 4 .14 643024 1 8.32% 1 .00 1 00 5 7 2 % 1 .04 10.11% l 1.00 4.04 644001 21.16% 1.05 25 38% 1.10 6.59% 1.20 12 .90"A> 1 1 4 4.49 644002 20 33% 1.0 1 23.67% 1.03 1.71% 1.00 7.93% 1 00 4 03 646001 22.62% 1.12 23.69% 1 00 2.470..{. 1.00 8.88% 1.00 4.1$ 20.18% 1.00 17.41% 1 00 3.56% 1 .00 5.73 % 1.00 4 .00 646001 0 .00% 1. 00 0 00% 1.00 0.00% 1 .00 0.00% 1.00 4 .00 646002 12.82% 1 .00 0.00% 1 .00 9.38% 1.00 648003 14.39% 1 .00 1&.40% 1 00 2.02% 1.00 13.41% 1.19 4 .19 646004 1 7 .28% 1.00 28.88% 1.26 3 63% 1 .00 12.60% 1 .12 4.37 646005 15 .48% 1 00 27 .17% 1.18 3.03% 1.00 5.96% 1 .00 4 .18 647001 21.60% 1.07 26.67% 1 16 0 00% 1.00 11.11% 1 .00 4.23 647002 0 00% 1. 00 0 00% 1 00 0 00% 1 .00 0.00% 1.00 4 .00 647003 0.00% 1.00 94.63% 4 .11 26.55% 4 .62 31. 63% 2.8 0 12.74 647004 5.35% 1.00 73.02% 3.1 8 0 00% 1.00 0 00% 1 .00 6.18 647005 1 7.73% \ 1.00 2 1 .21% 1 .00 4.01% 1.00 18.08% 1.60 4.60 647006 21. a2% 1 1.07 37.27% 1 62 6.62% 1 .2 0 11. 1 7% 1 .00 4.69 647007 11 88% I 1.00 33.43% 1.45 21.:W% j 3.88 23.35% 2.07 8 .40 647008 23.39'k I 1.16 22 05% 1 00 17.35% l 3 15 16.67% 1 .C8 6 78 64 8 001 2 4 .68% 1. 23 24.21% 1.05 7 78% 1. 41 1 1.00% 1.00 4.70 648002 43.66% 2 16 11.97% 1.00 15 22% \ 2.76 0 00% f.OO 6.92 64 8 003 6.01% 1.00 59.39% 38.52% 6 .63 55.n% l 4.94 15 15 648004 8 87% 1.00 22 66% 1.00 8.09% 1.47 14,02% 1.24 4.71 649011 21.52% I 1 .06 1.10 1.52% 1.00 s.3o% 1 1.00 4 16 649012 "''"% f 1 .01 16.81% 1.00 6 70% 1 22 2 2 24% i 1.97 519 J-6

PAGE 413

T able J-1 (Continued) Brevard County Census Bloc k Groups : Distribu t ions and S cores c.nsua lC. I lC. %0-lC.L-I Bloe-k Penoos I Sco,. Persons Sco.. Vehlc .. -lnecnw I Score Com -'to o-17 Score Group Years I YeaJS HitS HHs I &
PAGE 414

Tble J-1 (Continued) Brevard County Census Block Groups : Distributions and Scores I '4 '4 Low I C. no us '4 ......... '40. I Compoe.lte Bloc p.,..,.,. Score. -Vtlllclo I Score lneomo i Score Score Group 0..17Ynrs 1 YNR Htta Htta I 652322 z.es% I \ .00 50. 61'.4 2.20 5 .&8'4 I \.03 16.70% t U8 5 71 652323 55.47'4 I 2 .74 0 .00'4 1 .00 0 .00'4 i 1.00 0 .00'4! 1 .00 5 .74 &61011 15.71'4 I 1.00 36.86% 1 .60 1.33% j 1.00 7 S7% 1 .00 4 .60 661012 8 .54'4 1 .00 34. 16% 6 .67% 1.21 0.00% 1.00 4 .70 861013 17.67% 1.00 34.24% 1 4 9 1 .o1% 1 1.00 4 .87% 1.00 4 .49 66102\ 0.00% 1.00 100.00% 4 .35 0 .00'41 1 .00 o.OO% I 1.00 7 .35 661022 7.89'.4 1 .00 37.19% 1 .62 0 00% 1.00 5 .59% 1 1.00 4 .62 861023 17 .13% 1.00 24.96% 1 .09 0 .00'41 1 .00 6.31% 1 1.00 861024 13 .39% 1.00 24. 64% 1 .06 o .oo% I 1 .00 2 .64% i 1 .00 4 .08 661023 20.24% 1 .00 32. 71% 1 .42 0 .00'4 1 .00 5 .60% i 1.00 U2 661026 7.08% 1.00 32.08% 1 "0 0.00% 1 .00 8 16% 1 1 .00 4.40 662001 13 .n% 1 .00 28.26% 1.23 1.&4 % 1 .00 6 71 % 1 .00 4 .23 662002 18.34% 1 .00 32.23 % 1 .40 US% 1 .00 5 .37% 1 .00 4.40 663011 11.41% 1 .00 44.81% us 4 .04 43.73% 3.87 10.85 66301 2 11.28% 1.00 18 56% 1 .00 5.t2% 1 .08 8.54% 1 .00 4 .08 863013 20.82% 1.02 25.36% 1 .10 2 ,64% 1 .00 7.53% 1.00 4 12 863015 8 .45% 1 .00 53.05 % 2 .31 0 .00'4 1.00 9.01% 1 .00 5 31 663021 1 7 ,77'4 1 .00 23.44% 1 .02 0 .00'4 1 .00 2 .66% 1.00 4 .02 663022 14.94% 1 .00 24.15% 1 .05 4 .08% 1.00 10.78% 1.00 4 .05 883023 24.44% 1.21 23.19% 1 .01 3 16% 1.00 9 .70'4 1.00 4 .22 663024 7 ,12% 1 .00 46.30% 2.01 5 .91'4 1.07 6.00% 1.00 5.00 864001 19.S.C% 1 .00 31.99% 1 .39 0.00'4 1 .00 4 .36% 1.00 4 .39 664002 10,$8% 1 .00 38. 34% 1 .67 2 .57'4 1 .00 8.82% 1.00 4 .67 864003 15 18% 1.00 33. 19% 1 .44 7 17'4 1.30 8 .75'4 1 .00 4-75 68SOI)1 20.25% 1 .00 14 76% 1 .00 M9% 1.02 10.34% 1 .00 4 .02 865002 20.42% 1.01 22.31 % 1 .00 1 .00 11.92% 1 .08 4 07 666001 20.08% 1 .00 26.17% 1 .14 1 2 1% 1 .00 2 .74% 1 .00 4.14 666002 23.47% 1 .16 17 .41% 1.00 U7% 1.00 8.26% 1 .00 4-18 667001 24..55 % 1.21 25.811% 1 13 2 .75'4 1.00 2.27% 1 .00 4 34 667002 0 .00% 1 .00 100.00% 4.35 o.ocw. 1.00 0 .00% 1.00 7 .35 667003 20.4 1 % t.OI 21 .63% 1 .00 3 .35% 1 .00 6 .84% I 1 .00 4 01 4 .22 667004 1 7 .56% 1.00 28.04'4 1 .22 2.23% I 1.00 5 .55% 1 .00 668001 42.&6% 2 11 2.72% 1 .00 0 .79% 1 .00 1.50% 1.00 5 .11 669001 18 50% 1.00 33.64% 1.48 1 .54% 1 .00 3 .95% 1.00 4.46 669002 20.57% 1.02 .21.45% 1 .00 4 19% 1 .00 5.44% I 1 .00 4 .02 869003 12 14% 1.00 28.49% 1 2 4 0 .00% 1 .00 2 .97% 1.00 4 .24 869004 14. 82% 1.00 35.60% 1.55 2 98% 1 1 .00 11.11% 1.00 4.55 671001 25.41% 1.26 0.30% 1 .00 0 .00% 1 .00 3.77% 1.00 68\001 21.31% 1.05 30.90% 1 34 0 .00% 1.00 6 .76% i 1 .00 4 4 0 188100 2 12 23% I 1.00 38.69% 1 .80 "47% 1.00 1.16% I 1.00 480 J 8

PAGE 415

T able J-1 (Co ntin ued) B r evard Co unty Census Block G r o ups: Distributions and Scores Census % r % %1). i %Low B lock Persons j Seo.. Persons ScoN: Vel11ele Score Income StO
PAGE 416

Tab l e J-1 ( Contin u edl Breva rd C o unty Ce n sus Block G roups: Distributio n s a n d Scores Census % r % %0-I %Low P ersona Persons B lock 0-17 I Score Score Vohlclo I Score lnc:om Score Score G roup I HHs I HHt I Years v ..... 698G21 I 1.00 23. 54% I 1 .G2 6 .64%; 1.21 9 6 1 % 1 .00 4 23 20 00% I 698022 1 .00 28A6% 1 .24 MO%! 1.0G 4 72% 1 .0G 4.24 698023 2 6 56% 1.31 13.21% 1 00 3 80% l 1 .00 8 13% 1.0G 4 3 1 699011 27 52% 1.36 13 23% 1 00 G.8S% 1 00 8 48% J 1 00 4.36 699012 26.22% 1.30 9.65% 1.00 G .OO% 1.GO 7 69% 1 .0 G 4.30 690013 2G.I7% 1.00 21.84% 1 00 3.61% 1 00 6.27% 1 00 4.00 699014 16 91% 1.00 20. 77% 1.00 0.00% 1.00 10. 63% 1 .0G 4.GO 699021 22.78% 1.13 13 92% I.OG G.OO% 1.00 7.29% I .GO 4.13 699G22 24 77% 1. 22 19 83% 1 00 12.00% 2 18 0.00% f 1 .00 5.40 699023 26.16',0 1.29 21.96% 1 .00 6 14% 1 00 1 2.43% 1.10 4 .39 690024 27 45% 1 .36 12.44% 1.00 21.88% 3 .97 32. 42% 2 87 9.20 701001 MO% 1 .00 G .OO% 1 00 G.OO% 1.00 0 00% 1 .00 4 00 711001 27. 4 5% 1.36 2.61% 1.00 7.41% I 1.35 0.00% 1. 00 4.70 7110 02 2 8 54% I 1 .41 1 4 77% 1.00 0 00% 1.00 4 97% 1 .00 4,41 711003 33. 33% 1 1.65 0 00% 1 .00 0.00% 1 00 0.00% 1.00 4 6 5 711004 38. 30% 1. 8 9 0 00% 1 .00 0.00% 1.00 0 .00% 1 .00 4.89 711005 0 0 0 % 1.00 28.79% 1.25 0 00% 1 .00 0 .00% 1 .00 4.25 71200 1 27.52% 1.36 4 78% 1.00 0.00% 1 00 0.72% 1 .00 4.36 712002 34 72% 1 .72 1 0.56% 1 .00 0 00% 1 00 0 00% 1.00 4.72 712 00 3 20.18% 1 .00 13.30% 1 .00 0.00% 1 00 0 00% 1.00 4.00 713011 27.88% 1.38 12.33% 1 00 0.00% 1.00 0 .00% 1.00 4.38 713012 16.38% 1.00 8.84% 1.00 0.00% 1.00 3 14% 1 00 4 00 713013 37.50% 1 .85 0 00% 1.00 0.00% 1.00 0.00% 1.00 4.85 7 1 3014 0.00% 1.00 o .oo% 1.00 0 00% 1.00 0.00% 1 00 4 00 713015 25 81% 1 28 1 1 82% 1 .00 0.00% 1 .00 4.48% 1 00 4 28 713016 25.28% 1 .25 6.74% 1 00 0 00% 1.00 0.00% 1.00 4 .25 7 1 3211 29.44% 1 48 1296% 1.00 0 00% 1.00 0.00% 1.00 4.46 7132 1 2 36.88% 1 .82 11.83% 1 00 0.00% 1.00 2 29% 1 .00 4.82 7132 1 3 3 1 83% 1 1 .57 11.n% 1 .00 0.00% 1 00 0.00% 1.00 4 .57 71321 4 31.10% 1.54 10 17% 1.00 0 .00% 1 00 9.26% 1 00 4 .54 713215 2 .93% 1 .00 78.86% 3 43 3 .18% 1 .00 2 3.22% 2.06 7 .48 7132 1 6 26.82% 1 .33 15. 12% 1.00 3 89% 1 00 13.13% 1 1 6 4.49 1'13221 3 1 89% I 1.58 11..44% 1 .00 2.30% 1.00 6 .39% 1 00 4.58 713222 32.$5% 1 .62 6.22% 1.00 1 65% I 1 00 4 .32% 1 00 4 .62 7132 2 3 39 03% 1 .93 5 09% 1.00 4.46% 1.00 5 77% 1 1.00 4 .93 32 65% i 713231 1 .61 9 .35% 1. 00 1 57% 1.00 5 94% I 1 00 4 61 713232 J 1 16 9 .63% 1.00 o oo% 1 1. 00 2.26% 1 .00 4 16 23.44% I 7 13233 32. 00% 1.56 7 .67% 1 .00 0.00% 1.00 5 37% 1. 00 4.56 7132 34 0.00% 1 00 100.00% 4 .35 0 00% 1.00 0.00% 1.00 7 .35 713235 4 6 88% I 2 .3 2 0 00% 1 .00 0.00% 1.00 0 00% 1.00 5 32 J-10

PAGE 417

T able J-1 ( C o ntinued } B re vard Cou n ty Census Bloc k G rou ps : Distr i b utions and Scores % I % I census Persons I Persons %0. %Low Composite Block Score Score V ehieJo Score Income Score Group 0 60+ HHs I HHs Score Yers v .... I 7133 1 1 34. 67% 1 1. 7 1 4 32% 1.00 1.27% i 1.00 2.64% 1 .00 4.71 71331 2 30. 64% I 1.52 9.85% 1 00 1 21% I 1.00 4 ,49% 1.00 4 .52 7133 1 3 29 23% 1 4 5 11.46% 1 00 0 40% 1.00 5 45 % 1.00 4 45 713314 I 1.00 31 S4% 1 1.37 0 .00% I t.OO 0 .00% 1 .00 4 .37 9 96% I 7 1 3315 2 5 .03 % i 1 .24 1 4 25% 1 00 3 .74% l 1 .00 17. 52% 1 .55 4 .7 9 7 13316 30.08% I 1 .49 9.36% 1 .00 2 .76% 1 .00 4 .66% 1.00 4.49 7 1 3321 34. 5 1 % 1 1 7 1 5 50% 1 00 1.01% 1 .00 1 .n% 1 .00 4 71 713322 27.67% 1 .37 19 .n% 1 00 0 00% 1.00 0 00% i 1 .00 4 .37 71332 3 40. 2 1 % 1 .99 1 9 1 % 1.00 0 00% 1 .00 2 .70 % i 1.00 4.99 Ave ( age C o mpos.ite Score : 5 .34 Standard Devia t i o n : 2 .20 Average Composite Scor e + One Standard Deviation: 7 54 Average Composite Soore +Two St.anelard DeviatiOns: 9 74 J-11

PAGE 418

J-12

PAGE 419

APPENDIX K ROUTE ANALYSIS

PAGE 420

K-2

PAGE 421

Route# Total Riders Total Route 32 was operating for 6 monlhs i n FY 1995. Table L-1 SCAT FY 1995 Route Statistics Operating Cost 2 Routes 33 and 34 are opera!ed only in June. July, and August. Indicators 3 The City of Melboume contributes $21, 000 to subsidize farebox revenue. The f are is free on Rout e 21. Cost Sc<>
PAGE 422

R outell Total Riders Tabl e L-2 SCAT FY 1996 R oute S t a tistics Operating Coet Routes 33 and 34 are operaled only in June. Ju l y and August. The Qty of Meii>O
PAGE 423

APPENDIX L LOCAL COORDINATING BOARD

PAGE 424

James BREVARD COUNTY LOCAL COORDINATING BOARD FOR TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED PROGRAM Transit Services Department Space Coast Area Transit 401 s. VarT Ave. M .P.O. Staff Director Coasta l Systems of Brevard Cocoa, Fl. 32922 Phone 635 7815 Assistant County Attorney 2725 Judge Fran Jamieson Way Bldg A Melbourne Fl. 32940 Phone 633 2085 FAX 2725 Judge Fran Jamieson Way B ldg. C Transit Services Department Space Coast Area Tra nsit 401 S VII'T Ave Me lbourne, Fl. 32940 Pho ne 633-20 90 FAX 633-2096 Cocoa, Fl. 32922 Phone635-7815 FAX : 833-1905 !!i, ;, { '-I :;'; "W Board of County Organization Commissioners 1311 E. New Haven Ave. Melbourne, Fl. 32901 . or 1 & OepL ofH RS Services Hurst on Bldg. S. To w er#1129 400 W Robi nson Orlando, Fl. 32801 Phone 423-62 08 FAX 423-6157 Kare n Adamson DepL Of F lo rida DepL o f T ra n sportatlon Transportation 5151 Adonson SL Orlando F l. 32804 Phone 623-1085 X109 FAX Transportation Department Community Brevard County School Board 2901 W King St. Cocoa Fl. 32926 Pho ne 633-3681 FAX -633-6238 1855 Cogswell St Rockledge, Fl. 32955 Phone 633-7050 FAX 632-3005 605 Suwannee St., MS-49 Tallahassee F l. 32399-0450 Phone ( 904 ) 488..036 FAX ( 904 ) 922 TOO 1..00.--6094 '"} m:Ei':st "'--!. ... 1

PAGE 425

Florida Jobs & Bonofrts Center 840 Forrest Ave. Cocoa Fl. 32922 Phone 690-3220 Employment Security FAX Veteran Serv i ces Offi ce Services 2725 Judge Fran Jamieson Way B l dg. B Viera, Fl. 32940 Phone 633-2012 2418 Colon i al Drive Melbourne, Fl. 32901 Phone 725..0045 946 Golden Beach Blvd. Indian Harbour Beach, Fl. 32937 Phone 632..0130 School Board of Brevard County Elementary Program 2700 St. Johns Street Melbourne, Fl. 32940-6679 Phone-631-1911 X345 Comm unity Services Council 1149 Lake Drive Cocoa, Fl. 32922 Phone-631-2744 F AX -632..0469 H u man Services Program Spec 400 W. Robinson St.. S-309 Orlando, Fl. 32801-1782 Phone(407) 245..0862 X151 FAX 245..0847 632 W is teria Drive Mel bourne, F l 32901 Community Action Ag e ncies Economically over Elderly of the County for Early Child h ood Services Office Committee uplres 1131/98 Non-agency Member Selection Committee Grievance S ub Committee, 2

PAGE 426

3

PAGE 427

Alternates & Florida Dept. of HRS (HRS) 400 W Rob inson St Orlando Fl 32801 Pl\one (407) FAX -1407)4 1'0ri1 """FiOrliia of Florida Dept. of Transportation Transportation 5151 Adanson St. Orlando, Fl. 32804 1 Phone X109 I Pete cof Vocational R eh ab ilitation Employ,.nt Securlty 1018-B S. Florida Ave Rockledge Fl. 32955-2132 Phone -190-3280 No FAX !A cof tW. ..v 1545 Carmen St. Affairs Rep. Ve1arana M erritt Island, Fl. 32952 Phone lA .of Community Action Agencies re p Economically IT .. 7 rep. ofthe' '7/00 Space Coast Dloabllity Rights Aaaoc 331 Ramp Rd Cocoa S.ach, Fl. 321131 Jim "'CiiiUii 2127 N Wickham Rd., 10 Melbourne, Fl. 32935 ucura 240 Willow Ave User Merritt .Fl. 32953 4

PAGE 428

School Board of Brevard County for Early Childhood Services Elementary Program 2700 St. Johns Street Melbourne, Fl. 32940-6679 Phone-633-1911 X344 2800 Aurora Road, Suite H Melbour n e, Fl 32935 Phone 254-6325 FAX Human Services Program Spec. Office Medicaid Progl'llm Office 400 W Rob inson St. Orlando, F l 32801 1782 Phone (407) 423-6254 5