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Deerfield Beach transit option study: technical memorandum #1: background information

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Title:
Deerfield Beach transit option study: technical memorandum #1: background information
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
University of South Florida. Center for Urban Transportation Research
Deerfield Beach (Fla.). Office of City Manager
Publisher:
Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR)
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla
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Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Traffic congestion-- Florida--Broward County--Deerfield Beach   ( lcsh )
Fringe parking--Florida--Broward County--Deerfield Beach   ( lcsh )
Local transit--Florida--Broward County--Deerfield Beach-- Evaluation   ( lcsh )
Local transit--Florida--Broward County--Deerfield--Planning   ( lcsh )
Genre:
letter   ( marcgt )

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University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
usfldc doi - C01-00091
usfldc handle - c1.91
System ID:
SFS0032209:00001


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DEERFIELD BEACH TRANSIT OPTIONS STUDY Technical Memorandum Ill BaclcgrollllCI Information Prepared for: City of Deerfield Beach By: Center for Urban Research College o f Engineering University of South Florida April 1995

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR) has been approached by the City of Deerfield Beach to help develop transportation methods for alleviating traffic congestion and parking problems at the beach The following CUTR staff helped in the research and preparation of this technical memorandum. CUTR Director: Project Manager (s): Staff Support: Gary L. Brosch Eric Hill, Research Associate Joel Volinski, Senior Research Associate Vicky Perle, Research Asscx:iate Tony Rodriguez, Graduate Research Assistant Suzi Dieringer, Graduate Research Assistant Shelly Happle, Graduate Research Assistant Martin Catala, Graduate Research Assistant

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TABLE OF CONTENTS List of Figures .................................................... lntrod.uction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 I: Overview of the City of Deerfield Beach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 U: Survey of Transportation Problems in Beach Communities ......... ...... 5 III: Beach S llrV'ey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : . 15 IV : Vebicle Surv ey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 APPENDIX A Detailed information o n Beach Communities APPENDIX B Detailed information on Vebicle License Plates .'

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Figlire l. Figure 2. Figure 3. F i gure 4. Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 LIST OF FIGURES C ity of Deerfield Beach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Parking Locations at Beach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Aie y o u a permanent resident of the City of Deerfie l d Beach? . . . . 16 Are you a seasooal resident or Visitor? . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 If yes to I a,how long ? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 If yes Ia, is it East or West of Intracoastal Water? ..... . . ....... 19 Are you a pennanent resident of Broward Co un ty? . . . . . . . . 20 Figure 8 Where do you res i de? ................... .................. 21 Figure 9. Where do you reside? (Florida reSP,Ondents only) .................. 2 2 F i gure I 0 How did you get to the beach? . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 Figure II. H ow many in your party? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Figure 1 2. When you leave the beach today, how will you get to your destination? . 2 5 Figure f 3. Is there a traffic problem at the beach? . . . . . . . . 26 Figure 14. Is there a parking problem at the beach? . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Figure 15. Use transit servi<:e from a parking facility on the main l and every ten min u t es 30 Figure 16 Use transit from a parking facility on the main l and every 20 minutes . . 3 1 i

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LIST OF FIGURES (cont.) Figure 1 7 Use transit from locations in Deerfield Beach every 30 mi n utes ... . ... 32 Figure 18. Use transit from locations in Deerfield Beach every 60 m inutes . . . . 33 Figure 19 How long will you be at the beach today? . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Figure 20 Resident location by traffic at beach . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Figure 21. Resident location by parking at beach . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 7 Figure 22. Resident location by transit service from parking facility on the mainland . 38 Figure 23. Resident location by transit service from locations in City of Deerfield ... 39 Figure 24. Vehicle Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 11

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INTRODUcnON The Center for Urban Transportation Resean:h (CUTR) bas been approached by the City of Deerfield Beach to help develop transportation alternatives for meeting r:rausportation demands to the beach areas located on the barrier island. Limited access is available to the beaches from the mainland. County Road 810 (Hillsboro Boulevard) provides the only bridge to the beach. Tourists, visitors, residents, and employees needing access to the beach create traffic bottlenecks on both sides of the Hillsboro Boulevard bridge Additionally, these traffic demands have been alleged to cause parking capacity problems at the beach. This situation is not unique to the City of Deerfield Beach. Similar traffic conditions occur in other barrier island communities in Florida. Historically, additional roadway and parldng expansion have been the primary options considered. This project considers the role that traosit services could provide in meeti.llg the travel needs of petsoos goiag to and from the beach. The study has been jointly funded by the City of Deerfield Beach and CUTR. CliTR identified four tasks for completing this study. In Task I, CliTR collected information on transpOrtation problems in other Florida beach communities, and the role of transit as a solution. The objective of Task 2 was to evaluate existing transportation capacity and demands to/from the beach area in the City of Deerfield Beach. The purpose of this Technical Memorandum is to present information gathered in Task I and 2. The mcmonmdum begins with an overview of the City of Deerfield Beach that includes a review of traffic congestion, and parking problems, in the beach area. Information from the survey of other beach cities in the Stat e of Florida is presented. Visitors at the beach were surveyed on a Thw-sday and a Saturday to determine their perception of traffic congestion and parlcing in the beach area. The resulu from these surveys are provided. The final section of the memorandum includes summary data from the survey of vehicles in city operated parking spaces. A transit service option that mitigalcs traffic to the beach and helps to meet traVel demands will be developed in Task 3. Service cost and financing for transit service will be evaluated in TIS& 4. CliTR will consider special service features, policies, or couditioos that may influence the attractiveness of transiL Additionally, approaches that alleviate congestion other than transit WIU be presented. CUlR will assemble the ftndings in Tasks 3 and 4 into a Final Technical Memorandum with recommendations. Copies of the questionnaires used to survey beach communities and beach visitors are provided in Appendix A. Detailed information about vehicles parked in city parking spaces b pmented in Appendix B. I

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I. OVERVIEW OF THE CITY OF DEERFIELD BEACH The City of Deerfield Beach is located in northeast Broward County on the east coast of Florida The City is bordered on the north by the City of Boca Raton, in Palm Beach County, and on the south by the Town of Hillsboro Beach and the City of Lighthouse Point. Parts of unincorporated Broward County border the City on the west and the Atlantic Ocean serves as a natural barrier on the east. The City is presented graphically in Figure 1. The major north-south roads in the City include Interstate 95, Powerline Road, Dixie Highway, State Road AlA, and US I. Major east west arterials include State Road 810 (Hillsboro Blvd.) and Southwest lOth Street. Most of the City area is located on the mainland; the City's beach is located on a narrow barrier island, which is east of the mainland. Hillsboro Blvd . serves as the major access road to the beach area from the mainland (see shaded area in Figure 1). Hillsboro Blvd. crosses a drawbridge to span the Intracoastal Waterway and i ntersects with State Road (SR) A I A, which is the major north south road on the island. Congestion from residents and visitors traveling to the beach occurs on segments of Hillsboro Blvd., and near the intersection of Hillsboro Blvd. and SR AlA. However, the most recent Traffic Circulation Element of the City Comprehensive Plan i ndicates that the segment of Hillsboro Blvd. which intersects with SR AlA, and the segments of SR AlA that intersect with Hil lsboro Blvd., are functioning at an acceptable Level of Service (LOS) . -J 0 Figure 1 City of Deerfield Beach In Broward County, Florida Palm Beach County Broward County , ............. j ;..., .. 0.5 1 2

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Parking on the island includes on-street angle parking along 21st Avenue (Ocean Way Avenue), at four parking lots, and a nwnber of side streets that are perpendicular to Ocean Way Avenue. Figure 2 presents parking locations at the beach. On-street and lot parlcing is controlled by meters; parking is priced at $.25 for 15 minutes. During the peale season (October to March), approximately I 00 parking spaces in the lot at 21st A venue and Southeast I st Street are reserved for residents with parking pennits. Broward County Transit (BC1) provides throughout the County, including the City of Deerfield Beach. Weekday and Saturday are operated from approximately 5:00am to !O:OOpm. Sunday service is provided from approximately !O:OOam to 7:00pm. The regular fare for each one-way trip is $1.00 (effective April4, 1995). The reduced fare for senior citizens, disabled persons, and youth is $.50. BCT operates two fiXed-routes that provide servii:e to the beach area. Route 50 provides service between south Deerfield Beach and the beach area using Dixie Highway and Hillsboro Blvd. Hcadways on this route vary from 30 minutes on weekdays, to 45 minutes on Saturday and 60 minutes on Sunday. Route 92 provides limited along Hillsboro Blvd. on the mainland and the beach area. The service operates on 45 minute headways.. Service is free to residents of the Village, and passengers are pennitted to transfer to BCT for $.1 0. The Town of Hillsboro Beach provides a limited amount of transit that serves Deerfield's beach. From Monday through Saturday, from 9am fo Spm, the Town's single transit vehicle provides service once a hour. The service is a one-way, clockwise route that travels north on US 1 from 14th Street to Hillsboro Boulevard, then east to SR AlA, and then south to 14th Street This service is provided free of charge, but its utility as a transit option to the beach is limited, and it does not operate on Sundays. PalmTran (Palm Beach County's newly named transit agency) also provides service of limited utility for beach access. Route IS provides once every two hours along Hillsboro Boulevard between SR AlA aDd US I for westbound trips only. The regular and reduced fare is the same as Broward County Transit's. is not provided on Sunday. 3

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.,., ' 4 Flpre 2 hrkJaa Locat iont at IH.Icb c;.r.tCA,. Q C:. ciT1 Of" t:Ea .. (c.rt) 111"-AJ1e:.A

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II. SURVEY OF TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES Introduction This section summariz.es the results of the initial task of lhe study, which included a statewide survey of Florida beach cities (communities) with significant beach population and The section begins with a presentation of the cities thai were SUJVeyed. This is followed by an overview of the methodology used in the SUJVey to gather information. Information obtained on mobility and parking issues in these cities and the effort made by these communities to mitigate these problems, is presented. Transit service in the communities surveyed, and how it has served as a method to resolve traffic issues, is provided in this section. Additionally, studies being conducted by these communities to resolve traffic circulation and parking problems are discussed. A copy of the survey, and detailed information for each community that was surveyed, is provided in Appendix A. Methodology of Survey The initial step in this task was to identify appropriate cities to include in the survey. The following Cities were surveyed: Anna Maria Hollywood St. Petersburg Beach Boca Raton Indian Rocks Treasure Island Boynton Beach Jacksonville Beach Clearwater Beach Lake Worth Cocoa Beach Madeira Beach Daytona Beach Miami Beach F ott Lauderdale Palm Beach Shores Fort Myers Beach Sanibel Island 5

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The State of Florida Department of Community Affairs Directory of Planning Officials was used to identify the appropriate city official to contact for the survey. The directory includes the nanies of Mayors, City Commissioners, Planning Directors, and Traffic Engineers that are respoc.sible for transportation planning in Florida cities. For the cities that were included in the survey, the appropriate official was contacted by telephone and asked to respond to a series of questions about traffic, and parking problems, that result from nesidents and visitors traveling to beacb areas in their city. Information collected about beach communities include road and/or parking capacity problems, transit service in the community, and the approaches used to resolve traffic circulation problems. In addition, copies of the traffic circulation and/or mass transit elements of the City Comprehensive Plan were requested. Copies of these elements were received from most of the cities surveyed. However, information from these documents is omitted for cities that did not provide a copy of a Plan. All local government comprehensive plans are required to contain a traffic circulation element, as required by Chapter 163, Florida Stalutes A mass transit element is also required for units of government having populations greater than 50,000, but is optional for governments with smaller populations. These elements provide fw1her documentation of the transportation problems in beach communities throughout the State of Florida, and include potential solutions and policy efforts that may be applicable to the traffic problems at the beach in the City of Deerfield Beach. 6

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Mobility Issues In general, the beach communities surveyed reported traffic circulation problems resulting from residents and visitors traveling to the beach Many cities surveyed are on a barrier island, which is typical of most beach communities in Florida. Several of Florida s barrier islands bave a length of between one and five miles; the widths of these islands are typically one to two miles. This limited land space hinders opportunities for improving traffic circulation by increasing capacity on local roads. Many of these barrier islands have limited access to/from the mainland. For most of these communities access from the mainland is by a state or county roads which is usually a major transportation facility on the island. Several communities reported that traffic congestion occurs on these roads, especially on the segments which access the island. For example, in the City of Cocoa Beach, State Road (SR) 520 is a major access to the central beach area, and intersects with SR AI A which is another major road on the island. The most recent Traffic Circulation element of the City of Cocoa Beach Comprehensive Plan reported that the segment of SR 520 which accesses the island and is adjacent to SR AlA functions at LOS F. In addition, most of the access roads to these cities cross drawbridges to span Intracoastal Waterways between the barrier island and the mainland. Congestion in these communities frequently occurs because of a drawbridge opening. Few communities reported thai to Us are applied to access roads to the island. I n addition to having access to/from the mainland by one road, which for many cities serves as the major eastwest road, most of the communities have one or two major road(s) thai provide north south traffic movement The County or State are responsible for maintenance and improvements to these roads. This limits the amount of control thai these cities have to make improvements to mitigate congestion or to make changes to increase capacity. The major north south road in man)' of these cities provides the only continuous transportation linkage between access point(s) from the mainlaad and the local street network. For most communities surveyed, traffic volumes and congestion are highest from November to March, or Easter. During this period, traffic congestion occurs on the weekends and during special events. Many cities reported that congestion on the weekends occur from approximately I O:OOam to I :OOpm and from 4:00pm to 6 : 00pm. The City of Daytona Beach reported that congestion is worst during Spring Break, and when activities are convened at the Ocean Center and Peabody Auditorium concurrently. However, an extreme example of congestion in a beach community was reported by the City of Anna Maria. Despite the adequate traffic circulation 7

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system, tta.ffic in the City is at its peak on weekdays between !0:30am and !2:00pm. for mail piclcup at the Post Office. In the City of Palm Beach, the beaches are with surfers in south Florida, and traffic is usually related to this market. Thus, traffic congestion is a problem when weather conditions include high winds and surfs, and ironically when a hurricane approaches the east coast of Florida. Cities with acceptable LOS on state roads operating within their limits, and with no traffic congestion reported, are not considering any plans to improve traffic circulation. Several barrier island communities surveyed are accessed from the mainland by state roads, which also serve as a principal road on the island. Because of this, planning efforts to resolve traffic congestion are usually initiated by the Florida Deparlment of Transportation (FOOl). Thus, the City's role would be one of coordinating with FDOT and the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) on proposed projects. The role of these cities is revealed in objectives and policies of the Traffic Circulation Element of The City Comprehensive Plan, vis-a vis the Intergovernmental Coordination Objective. However, a few of the cities have introduced some of their own approaches to mitigating traffic congestion. To relieve pressure on the local road network. the City of Cocoa Beach implemented an interconnected signal system to improve traffic flow along SR AlA. A transit route has also been established for visitors and residents to augment traffic flow. The City of Clearwater Beach . uses various methods to alleviate traffic congestion including preempting patterns for bridge openings, an aati-cnlising ordinance manual override of traffic signals for police department control, barricades and tum restrictions are established at critical locations by police aides (non officers), "BEACH LOTS FULL" signs, and a rain gauge sensor on the beach that will adjust the timing pattern of traffic signals to allow for max.imwn outflow of traffic from the beach when it begins to rain. To alleviate traffic and parking problelllS on the island, over the past few years the City of Miami Beach bas increased the amount of public parking for visitors and residents. A Transportation Management Association (TMA) bas been established to mitigate traffic impacts in the City. TMA's are partnerships between business and local government designed to help solve local transportation problems associated with rapid suburban growth. The regional transit operator, Metro Dade Transit, has also increased service on the island. Using the intergovernmental coordination approach bas also been effective in providing solutions to congestion. The City of Madeira Beach's most recent Traffic Element of the City Comprehensive Plan (1989) revealed that within the City, the segment of Gulf Boulevard (SR 699) &om the nortbem City limit to the Welch Causeway is functioning at LOS E Since then, this section of the Gulf Boulevard bas been reconstructed to a four-lane divided facility alleviating the capacity deficiency 8

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Parking mues Mo.st cities reported on-street parking, in parallel and angle spaces. Several cities provide on street parkiDg at beach accesses, and provide p ublic lot parking near the beach Parking in the cities surveyed is usually controlled by meters, but there are some cities that charge a flat rate for lot parking. There are some cities that allow residents with permits to park free in on-street and lot parking In the City of St P e tersburg Beach, City employees are given permits to park in metered spaces. Meter controlled parking in the cities surveyed ranged from $.25 for IS minutes to a flat rate of $1.00 for 60 minutes. Some cities also use daily parking rates in public lots. Various control methods are used in the cities surveyed. Selected variations are provided below. In the City of Boynton Beach, lot pricing for visitors is $5 00 per day during the off-peak season and $10.00 during peak season. Lots in the City of Clearwater Beach were converted several years ago from metered to pay when exiting the lot Lot pricing is $1.00 per hour with a $7.00 per day maximum In the CitY of Daytona Beach, on-street and lot parking at the beach is available f or residents and visitors Parking meters are not used to control spaces. Beach visitors and residents can park in on-street spaces for an unlimited amount of time. Lot pricing is $4 00 a day Residents can purchase parking decals for $5.00 per year or $12.00 for three years. The City of Miami Beach provides onstreet parallel parking in the beach area and garage parking at major activity centers near the beach. On-street parking is controlled by meters and is priced at $.25 for IS minutes. Garage parking is priced at $1.00 for 60 minutes. Parking at lots near the beach is provided to residents and visitors in the City of Palm Beach Shcnes. Residents and visitors are required to have a permit to park in the lot. Permits are priced at $10.00 per year for residents. Visitors have the option of paying $100.00 for a seasonal permit, or parking in the City of Riviera Beach and walking to the beach in the City of Palm Beach Shores; the distaDce is approximately one mile. 9

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The City of Sanibel Island offers lot parking to residents and visitors. Lot parking is priced at $3.00 a day. A parking permit that is valid for one yea: can be purchased by permanent residents and visitors that own property in the City of Sanibel Island for $5.00. Visitors that do not own property in the City can purchase a similar parking permit for $30.00. As mentioned in the introduction of this section, the limited land !!paCe available to barrier island communities contributes to congestion, and restricts efforts to increase parking capacity Thus, the survey of beach island communities revealed that additional parking for most cities is not a viable option. However, there are some exceptions. The City of Fon Lauderdale is evaluating the potential of building a parking garage near the beach. To increase parking for residents and visitors, the City of Hollywood constructed a four-level parking facility near the central area of the beach. Additional parking lots were also established in the south and nonh beach areas. For now, the City has concluded that additional parking is not advisable but may consider building another multi-level parking facility in the future. Additionally, the City of Indian Rocks is planning to add between 100 and !50 parking !!paCeS on Gulf Boulevard (SR 699). TrsasitService transit services in many cities surveyed are provided by a county transit system. For most beach cities, the operaior provides fixed route service, using one or two routes, to connect the island community with services and activities on the mainland. Service is usually on a one hour headway, along one principal road on the island, and using typical transit vehicles (buses). Generally, the hours of service are Monday through Saturday from approximately 6:00am to 7:00pm. Fares for a one-way trip range from $.75 to $1.25; discounted fares are usually provided for senior disabled riders, and youth. Additionally, the routes have strong connections with other fixed routes in the system. Attempts by many cities surveyed to include transit in mitigating traffic congestion have bad to be coordinated with the transit operator, MPO, and FOOT. The City of Cocoa Beach has been successful in using this process with Space Coast Area Transit (SCAT) to provide exclusive service on the island. Congestion in the City of Cocoa Beach is generated by worlc trips from the mainland to large employment sites on the island. The route provides service to shopping centers, hotels, condominiums, public, and recreatioaal facilities. While service is not provided to the beach, the route operates within walking distance of the beach. Ridership on the service has been marginal and since the service was intended to provide mobility for pennanent and seasonal residents, its impact on reducing traffic congestion caused by worlc trips has been minimal. 10

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Given that it is usually difficult to justify spending limited resources to accommodate, i n most cities, an insignificant transit market, developing more transit service through this process has not successful for inost island communities in the past. The survey revealed that many cities have made efforts to contract or operate their own transit system as a means to alleviate traffic congestion, rather than rely soley on established transit service in their area. Some notable exceptions to the intergovernmental coordination process are provided below. Besides the service provided by Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PSTA) in the C ity of Clearwater Beach, a public/private entity operates the Jolley Trolley. The system is a distinctive rubber-tired trolley that provides fiXed-route service from Downtown Clearwater, around Clearwater Beach, and across the Clearwater Pass Bridge to Sand Key. Jolley Trolley reports 350 average daily passenger trips on the trolley. The trolley is governed by the Jolley Trolley Executive Committee and is partially subsidized by the City of Clearwater Beach. Another public transportation service being provided is waterborne. The Clearwaler Ferry provides service from CoachJDan Park, adjacent to Downtown Clearwater to the Clearwater Harbor side of Clearwater Beach. In the City of Fort Myers Beach, Lee CoWlty Transit (LeeTran) operates a free rubber tire trolley service in Fort Myers Beach and Bonita Springs at the south end of the island The trolley operates from park-and-ride lots on the mainland to recreational, retail, and business locations on the island. Connections with regular fixed route service are available at park-and-ride lots on the mainland. The service i s available to residents and visitors. Service is operated from approximately 7:00am to 6:00pm. Lee County Transit reports that the trolley has been successful in reducing traffic congestion on the island. LeeTran reports approximately 3,500 daily passenger trips on the trolley during pcU season. and 2,500 during off-peak season. Transit representatives have also stated thai during the peak season the trolley has standing room only. Visible signs marketing the service are located throughout the City of Fort Myers Beach. In the City of Hollywood, a trolley provides service between downtown Hollywood and the beach area. Service is free and available to residents and visitors. The trolley is operated by The City of Hollywood Community Redevelopment Agency. Service is provided Monday from !1: 00am to !O:OOpm. Friday !2:00pm to ll:OOpm. and from I 1:00am to S:OOpm the remaining days of the week. The service operates on a 60 minute headway. The City reports 37S daily passenger trips on the trolley during peak season. and 17S passenger trips during the off-peale season. 11

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The Lake Worth Trolley, which is operated by the City of Lake Worth, provides trolley service throughout the City and to the beach area from the mainland. The service includes three trolleys. One connects the mainland and the beach area, while the remaining two trolleys are used exclusively for mainland service. Service is operated Monday to Saturday, from 9:00am to 5:00pm, and operates on a 60 minute headway. Limited service is provided Sunday, and includes a three-hour headway. The base fare is $1.00. Riders under 18 years of age, seniors, and the disabled can ride for $ .50. The service also connects with Palm Beach County Transit (CoTran) at locations on the mainland. The trolley service is available to residents and visitors. The City of Lake Worth reports approximately 266 average daily passenger trips on the trolley In the City of Sanibel, a privately operated trolley service is provided by The Sanibel Transit Company This service operates along Periwinkle Way and provides service to stops along the beach, including shopping centers in the City, and to stops on the mainland. The service i s operated Monday through Friday. The company reported average daily ridership lietween 25 to 50. The City of St. Petersburg Beach contracts with Bats Transit to operate fixed route service on the island and to the mainland. Bats Transit uses minibuses and service is provided to stops along the beach and to .m.ajor retail and tourist locations on the i sland. Additionally the service connects with Treasure Island Transit and with PSTA service on the mainiand. Res i dents and visitors use the service .. Weekday and Saturday service i s operated from approximately 7:00am to 6:00pm. Sunday service is provided from approximately 7 : 45am to 6:00pm. The regular fare for each o n e-way trip is $1. 00. The reduced fare for senior citizens and people with disabilities is $.75, and for youth is $.50. Bats reports approximately 270 average daily passenger trips on the transit service. Treasure Island Transit operates service in the City of Treasure Island It connects with Bats Transit in the City of SL Petersburg Beach to the south and with PSTA service on the mainhmd The service uses regular buses, and residents and visitors are permitted to use the service. Service is operated each day of the week from approximately 8:00am to 5:00pm. The regular fare for a one way trip is $1.00 and discounted fares are offered to senio r citizens, disabled persons, and youth. Treasure Island Transit reports approximately 40 average daily passenger trips on the service In addition to the C i ties that contract or operate transit service to the beach, some Cities reported having transit service to the beach by a private operator. These services are provided by a local 12

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business and are not funded by public resources. Two examples of this type of transit service are presented below In addition to the beach service operated by the Palm Beach CoWJty Transportation Authority (CoT ran) in the City of Boca Raton, the Royal Palm shuttle operates betw.:eo the Royal Palm shopping center, hotels in Boca Raton, and the beach. The shuttle also makes stops along the beach in the City of Deerfield Beach. Service is operated by the owners of the shopping center and service is free to shoppers and hotel guests. The Wave Line, the City of Fort Lauderdale s subsidized trolley, operates along the beach. The service is operated mainly for tourists and plans are being considered to extend service to downtown Fort Lauderdale. The regular fare is $1.00. Service is provided Monday through Saturday from !O:OOam to 8:00pm, and Sunday from !O:OOam to 6:00pm. However, City officials and trolley operators concede that the Wave Line has not been as successful as planned, ridership is significantly lower than projected. Latest ridership figures show that there approximately 100 average daily passenger trips on the Wave Line. Besides the Wave. Line, two beach restaurants have started opCr&ting a free train a replica of an old steamer along the beach and Las Olas Blvd. for their customers. . Several cities indicated that developing a transit system is not feasible However, the City of Boynton Beach is developing plans to operate its own system with service to the beach. I n addition, the Jolley Trolley Company in the City of Clearwater has recently expanded service and plans to increase headways to five minutes during peak service periods. Four additional vehicles are needed to accomplish this. In support of this effon, the PST A has submined a Section 3 application for $400,000 to be used to purchase four trolley-type vehicles to be leased to the Jolley Trolley Company. Studies City officials surveyed were asked if any studies were being completed on methods to mitigate traffic congestion and parking problems. In addition, copies of the traffic circulation and/or mass transit elements of the City Comprehensive Plan were requested to augment responses about plans to resolve transportation problems in these cities. Many officials indicated that no studies are being conducted on this subject. However, selected responses by these officials, and information 13

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reviewed in Comprehensive Plan elements that can be applied to transportation problems in the beach areas of the City of Deerfield Beach, ace presented below. Review of the Traffic Circulation Element of the City of Anna Maria's Comprehensive Plan indicates that: "Pu an ongoing objective, the City shall encourage the utilization of a multi-modal transportation system." Policy 1.5.1 states that : "Through the continued distribution of bus schedules and senior citizen discount cards, the City shall encourage the increased use of available public transportation. The Traffic Circulation Element of the City of Boynton Beach Comprehensive Plan shows that the City is making an effort to mitigate traffic congestion on Boynton Beach Boulevard. This effort will improve access to the beach and dovetails with the City's future traffic circulation plans. Policy 2.2. 7 states: "the City shall cooperate with and support the Florida Department of Transportation and the Palm Beach Metropolitan Planning Organization on implementing the extension of Boynton Beach Boulevard across the Intracoastal Waterway. A3 part of the City of Hollywood's redevelopment plans for the beach area, the City is studying opportunities to expand parking to facilitate commercial development. The impacts on beach traffic will be included in the plans for this area. Policy TC.I.l i.2 of the City of Jacksonville Beach's Traffic Element states: "As a major population cenier in the Jacksonville metropolitan area, the Beach areas, including Jacksonville Beach, will join together to seek a seat on the governing board of the Metropolitan Planning Organization through direct conw:t with the current members, FOOT and other state administrative officials, Federal agencies, and legislative officials to secure an additional venue for presenting the transportation needs of the Beach areas to those m.a.lcing the transportation funding decisions." 14

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ID. BEACH SURVEY Surveys were conducted of people at Deerfield's beach to determine their.perception of traffic and parking conditions in the beach area. This element of the study serves as a marlcet analysis to more specifically determine the nature of the problems and whether a demand elcists for transportation altemati ves. Copies of the surveys are presented in Appendix A. Key findings are presented here. A survey was conducted on Thursday, December 8, 1994, by representatives from CUTR. The weather was warm and Slllllly. Before questioning beach visitors about their perception of traffic and parking in the beach area, surveyors were instructed to give potential respondents an overview of the study. The intent was to make people aware of the public purpose of the study, and to encourage useful responses. The survey resulted in a sample size of 169. Surveyors reported that almost all of the visitors that were asked to participate in the survey responded, resulting in a response rate of almost I 00 percent The survey was also conducted on Saturday, February 11, 1995, by one representative from CUTR and personnel from the City ofDeerfield Beach. The weather was warm and sunny. This survey resulted in a sample size of !59. Surveyors reported a response rate of approximately 85 percent The Saturday questionnaire was modified slightly to gather additional information. Two questions were added for respondents that said they were seasonal residents or visitors Saturdily's respondents were asked to provide information about the length of time of their visit in the City of Deerfield Beach (question !b), and if they resided east or west of the Intracoastal Waterway during their visit {question lc). Additionally, respondents were given a fifth option to questions ?a and 8a. Both questions attempt to determine respondents interest in using transit between locations on the mainland and the beach. An analysis of the survey questions on beach visitors' perception of traffic and parking in the beach area is presented below. Results from Thursday and Saturday surveys are analyzed together to show comparisons between the samples. IS

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QUESTION #1 Are you a permanent resident of the City of Deerfield Beach? Most respondents in the Thursday and Saturday survey indicated that they are not pennanent residents of the City of Deerfield Beach. Approximately 76 percent of respondents in the Thursday's survey and 82 percent of respondents in the Saturday's survey do not live in the City on a permanent basis. Less than one quarter of the respondents from both surveys indicated that they reside year-round in the City of Deerfield Beach. This information is provided in Figure 3. If a respondent answered "Y es to this question, surveyors wen: instructed to skip to Question 3. Questions I a through 2a were designed for non-permanent residents of the City of Deerfield Beach. As mentioned in the. introduction to Section Ill, Questions I b and I c were not part of the survey that was conducted on Thursday. Therefore, the responses to these questions are analyzed for Sa!Urday's survey only. The analysis of th ese questions does not include permanent Deerfield Beach residents. Figu"' 3 An you a permaoen1 mid. at of Deerf .. ld Beach1 Thur S.t. 16

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QUESTION l#la -Are you a seasonal resident or vitilor? Restiondents that are not pennanent residents of the City of Deerfield Beach were asked if they were a seasonal resident or visitor. Saturday's survey revealed that 60 percent of respondents indicated that they were seasonal residents or visitors. A greater share of respondents in the Saturday survey (73%) said that they were non-permanent residents. Figure 4 shows the results for this question. Figure 4 Are you a seasonal resid
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QUESTION lllb -If yes to I a, how loug? The greatest share of seasonal residents o r visitors (57%) will reside in the City of Deerfield Beach for more than 4 weeks. Twenty-three percettt will suy between 2 to 4 weeks and 12 perceut will stay in the City for less than a week. Figure S depicts this information. Ficu"'s If yes to Ia, how lons1 Less th m 1 wk 18

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QUESTION #lc:If yes to la, is it East or West of Intracoastal Water? A slight majority of non permanent residents of the City of Deerfield Beach (51%) live East o f the Intracoastal Waterway Generally, i t is presumed that non residents cause most of the traffic congestion on the drawbridge over the Intracoastal Waterway (Hillsboro Blvd.), which connedS the island and the mainland. However, the $111'Vey results show that over half of Saturday s visitors already reside near the beach area. Results to this question are presented in Figure 6 F igure 6 U yes to Ia, is i t Eut or Welt oflntrxouul Waterl 1 9

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QUESTION Ill Are you a permanent ruldent of BToward County? Non-permanent residents of the City of Deerfield Beach were asked if they live in Browarr:t Co101ty. Results of the Thursday survey show that n percent of people in this group reside outside Browud County. The predominant sbare of Saturday's survey respondents live outside of Broward County. This suggests a large tourist population and visitors from other parts of Florida using the beach. This information is presented in Figure 7. l'isure 7 Ate you a permanent resident of Broward County? Thur SaL tOO% 20

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SURVEY QUESTION #2A Where do you reside ? For respondents to the survey that are not permanent residents of the City of Deerfield Beach, Figure 8 shows the percent distribution of respondents' home state or country. This infonnation is presented for Thursday and Saturday respondents. As expected, the State of Florida represents the highest group of visitors to the beach for both days Thursday's survey results show that 28 percent were from Canada and I 0 percent were from the State of New York. These results were reversed in Saturday's survey, which sho w that 17 percent of respondents were from the State ofNew York and ten percent were Canadian. Visitors from Canada and New York represent the "snowbird" population in Florida and are typical for this season. Furthe r analysis of Florida respondents is presented in Figure 9 This analysis of Thursday's survey results show that a significant population of Florida respondents (39"/o) live in the City of Coconut Creek which is located southwest of the City of Deerfield Beach in Broward County. Additionally, many Florida respondents (19"/o) live in the City of Boca Raton, which borders the City of Deerfield Beach on the north and is in Palm Beach County. However, respondents from the City of Boca Raton account for over half of Saturday's sample. Thursday Connecticut Delaware Florida Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michi Mis.WiP'! New ":k New Yo lrp.D!2 Canada E.tlgland France Germany 0% 10% 20% 30% Figure 8 Where do you reside? Flo' Illinois Keorucky M' MassMi= N ... jeneJ N.,.Yo Pe"""lvaoia RhodiWand Vi' s'E:?. = Ge= Sweden 50% ()% 21 Saturday 10% 20% 30% 40"1. 50%

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Figure 9 Where do you reside? (Florida respondenu only.) Thurs. Boca Raton Coconut Creek Coral Springs Fort Lauderdale Lighthouse Point Marpte Oakland Park Palml!eoch Pine Tree Park Pompano Beaclt Sunri.e West Palm Beaclt Boca Raton Coconut Creek Coral Springs Delnyl!eoch Ft. Lauderdale Gainesville Liglu House Pt. Paltnl!eoch Pompano Beaclt sunn.e Tamar O'lfo Sat. 22

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SURVEY QUESTION N3 How di d you get to the beach toda y ? . Respondents were asked how they arrived at the beach on the day of the survey. The analysis of Thursday's survey shows that 86 percent said they traveled in a car, 10 pen:ent walked, 2 percent used a bicycle, and only I percent used transit While a significant share of respondents in Slllllrday's survey results used a car to get to the beach, almost a quarter of respond ents (24%) walked to the beach. This is consistent with the information in Question I C that shows a substantial portion of non-permanent residents living cast of the Intracoastal Waterway This infonnalion is presented in Figure 10. The predominan t share of respondents traveling to the beach by car is typical of Florida travel patterns and reflects the large number of "snowb irds" with access to a car. The small amount of respondents that used transit is also typical of people living in Florida. Surprisingly, surveyors observed that transit to the island stops within 150 fee t of the beach. This is significantly shorter than the natiooal average for walking distance to a bus stop, which is approl
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S URVEY QUESTION #3A How many in your party? Fig'ure II shows the distribution of pany size Over half of respOndents in Thursday's survey were in a party of two. Fewer than one-quarte r of respondents (23%) on this day are at the beach alone. Almost 10 percent of respond ents are i n a pany of fi v e or more peopl e Saturday's surve y shows an increase in the 3 and 4 pany size category. Fisure II How m any in your party? I 2 3 4 5 6 Thws 7 S a t. 8 9 1 0 II ()'!(, 2 0% 24

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SURVEY QUESTION H4 When you leave the beach today, how will you get to your destination ? Simi lar to responses to Question #3, Thursday's survey shows that 88 percent of respondents will leave the beach by car, 9 percent will walk, 2 percent will use a bicycle, and I percent will use transit. Saturday's survey shows that slightly less than a quarter (23%) of respondents will walk from the beach to their destination. This infonnation is shown in Figure 12. T...Wt Figure 12 When you leave the beach today, how will you get to your destination? Thun. Sat. 100% 25

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SURVEY QUESTION #5 In your opinion, is there a traffic problem for people traveling to/from the beach? Figure 13 presents responses about perceived traffic in the beach area. Over half of Thursday's respondents (59%) said that there is no traffic problem in the beach area. Approximately 30 percent of respondents indicated that sometimes there are traffic problems for people traveling to/from the beach. Only II percent of respondents said there is a consistent traffic prob lem. A significantly larger share of SatUrday's respondents (37"/o) stated that traffic is a consistent problem. Forty-eight percent of SatUrday's respondents said there is no traffic problem and only IS percent said that traffic is sometimes a problem. These different perceptions of traffic (Thursday versus Saturday responses) are somewhat predictable, but very important to document The results strongly suggest that a continuous traffic problem does not exist on weekdays, but is considered a greater problem on the weekends. Yes No Somecimes Figure 13 In your opinion, is there a tnffiC problem for people traveling to/from the 20% 26

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In addition, respondents that answered "Yes or "Sometimes" to this question were a!= given an opportunity to say where and when most traffic problems occur. Selected comments were chosen out .of the pool of responses in the Thursday and Saturday survey and are ;uso presented below Thursday's Respondents On the roads, 3 p .m. Hillsboro, before II am, after 3 pm. All around here, over the bridge especially; anytime A lA; weekends. If there's an accident; off season. Bridge; I 0 2 weekends. Dixie Highway; rush hour. Bridge; weekends On Bridge; weekends. A I A; all peak hours On bridge; different times throughout Bridge; lunchtime, 4 p.m. Bridge, AlA ; weekends and in seasou. During season. Fedend and AlA; all the time. Bridge, can't come across bridge straight to beach. 27 Saturday's Respondents Beach parking lot between 12 to 4 At the bridge; all the time. Bridge and weekends. Bridge, especially weekends. Hillsboro Bridge, when bridge is OpeJI Bridge when open. Bridge; season and weekends. Traffic problem when bridge is open. D ifficult to cross the street and not be killed. Worst during later part of the day. Hillsboro Blvd. and intracoastal when bridge is opeD. "S" curve on AlA. Traffic light most of the time. Peak season and weekends

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SURVEY QUESTION 116 -In your opinion, is there a parking problem Cor people at tbe beach? Regarding parking at the beach. S O percent of respondents in Thursday's survey indicated that this is n ot a problem. A greater share of respondents ( 23%) said that parkiaa is a prob l em as compared to the ttaffic in the beach area. Rccall that oaly II percent of respondents perceived ttaffic as a problem. Results from Saturday's survey show that SO percent of respondents said that parking i s a consistent problem. A significant share of Saturday's respondents (38%) said that parking is not a problem. Figure 14 depicts the responses to this question. Again, the responses to this question suggest that parking, like traffic, is more of a problem on the weekends than during the week. It also suggests a larger population at the beach during the weekends, which leads to greater for parking Surveyors observed that many respondents have concerns about parking policies at the beach. During the peak season the City reserves parking spaces in metered lots at the beach for residents with parking permits Many respondents suggested that i f the City would allow vjsitors to purchase parking permits, it would make parking at the bach more con'Yellient aod elim i nate the need for having quarten to put in the meters. Other suggestions about paddng policy include providing dollar change machines, increasing meter parking from 15 minutes for $ 25 to 30 for $ 25, and ticketing people for uslog handicap parking illegally. r""n 1 4 lD your opinio11, is there a parkin& problem for people at !be bca
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Similar to Question 5, respondents that answered "Yes" or Sometimes" to this question were also given an opportunity to say where and when most parking problems occur. Selected comments are presented below. Tbunday's Respondents Any place; all day Avoid by coming off peak times Meters; between II3 Meters too expensive; afternoon. Meters; on weekends. Meters; all the time. The whole beach; seasooally during the summer. All along the bel)ch; from 9:00 on. Along the beach; Cbristmas. Meters, don't like cost. On beach; after holiday Have sticker, can't find place ; weekelld and in season. No quarters, meters; 10 am-11 a.m Front meters, and lots with stickers. Feed the meter, too expensive and not enough time. 29 Saturday's Respondents Beach parking lot between II to 3 For the disabled, all the time All over Weekends and holidays between 10 to 4. Sticker for parking. Penni! parking is too high. In the beach area all the time during the season. Parking is a problem. Pennit parking spots all filled between 2pm and 3pm on the weekends. Lack of public parking all the time Handicapped parking not a problem. Pier area, lack of parking. Lots are usually full around II :OOam. All the beach areas and shops then it leads to illegal parking. Charge handicap parking on beach.

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SURVEY QUESTION #7 -If trauit Hrviee we r e ope rated from a parkiD& facility on tbe mailllud to tbc beach cveey tell m iauta, "ould you u s c tbe service if tb. c fare for a way trip is:? When presented with a question about using transit fro01 a parking facility on the mainland to the beach every ten minutes, almost two-thirds (64%) of Thursday and Saturday respondents said they would not use service even if it was free. While the remaining respondents for both days indicated a willingness 10 use the service, i t is interesting that 25 percent of Thursde.y's re.o;pondents and 20 percent of Salurday's respondents are willing to pay a fare of $.75 for a one way trip. Figure IS provides graphically the distribution of actual responses to this question It can be assumed respondents are willing 10 use the service at a fare below the fare they selected. For example, 31 percent of all Thursday's would be willing 10 use the service if the fare was S.SO (6 percent willing at S.SO plus 25 percent willin g at $.75). . Ficure IS Iftnruit servi"' """' openred from pa(king facility on the mainbnd to the beocb everr. tea IIWIUteS, would you use the $UYIU if the faR fort oae-"")' trip is; I Thur. Sat. 80% 30

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SURVEY QUESTION tn A If tramit service were operated from a parking facilily ou tbe maiDiaDd to tbe beads every 20 mill uta, would you use tbe service if die fare for a oue-way t rip b:? Respondents that indicated they would use the transit service ill Question 117 were also asked if they would use the service if frequency was reduced to every 20 minutes. Respondents that said they would not use tbe service are excluded from this analysis. Surprisingly, of the group of respondents in Thursday's survey wbich showed an interest in tbe transit service, over half (57%) said they were willing to pay the higher fare of S. 75. AJJ mentioned in the introduction to this section of tbe report, tbe survey that was used on Saturday included a "wouldn't use" selection. Seventy-one percent of Satwday's respondents said they wouldn't use the service presented in this question. The results of this analy sis are presented ill Figure 16. Fm $.25 s.so S.lS Woui.U. 'tuot Figure 16 U tnnsit service were from parking.f:o::ilit)' oo mainland to the beach every 20 wOuld you use the sernce 1f the fare ror. one-way trip is: I Thur. Sat. 80% 3 1

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SURVEY QUESTION 1#8 If transit service were operated from locations in the City of Deerfield Beach (Le., sboppiDg centen along Hillsboro Blvd., Federal Hwy., and Military Trail) to the beach every 30 minutes, would you use tbe service if tbe fare for a one-way trip is:? Respondents were also asked about their williDgoess to use transit service from locations in the City of Deerfield Beach to the beach area every 30 minutes. Eighty-three percent of Thursday's respondents said they would not use the service. The same share of respondents ill Saturday's survey said tbat they would not use the service. Approximately II percent of Thursday's sample and 5 percerit of Saturday's sample are willing to pay the higher fare of $.85 which is the current fare for Broward County TransiL Figure 17 presents this information. s.so $.75 us Wouldn't we Figure 17 If transit service.,...,.. opented from locations in the City of Deerfield Be..:h (I.e. sho_pping centtn along Hillsboro Blvd., Federal Hwy., and Miliury Trul) to the beoch evety 30 minutes, would you use the service if the fare for a one-way trip is:? Thur Sat. tOO% 32

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SURVEY QUESTION #SA If tramit service were operated every 60 minutes, would you we the service if the Care for a one-way trip is:? Respondents that said they would use the transit service iD Question 8 were also asked if they would use the service if frequency was reduced to every 60 minutes. Again, respondents that said they would not use the service are ex:cluded from this analysis Respondents in the survey on Saturday were also given a "wouldn't use" selection to this question. Fifty four percent of those respondents thai indicated an iatetest in the service said they would be willing to pay a fare of $.85. From this group, 23 percent of respondents are wil l ing to pay a fare of S.SO. This is inleresting when compared to Saturday's responses to this question. However, the important aspect of this question is that 94 percent of respondents in Saturday's survey said that they would not use this service. This data is presented in Figure 18. $.25 $.50 S.75 $.85 Wouldn't we Figure 18 If service were operated 60 would you use the service if the fare for a one-way trip is:? Thurs. .SaL ----. 100% 33

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SURVEY QUESTION 119 Row long wiU you be at the beach today? When asked about the duration of their visit to the beach, the majority of respondents indicated that they would be at the beach between one and four hours. Fifteen percent of respondents said they would be at the beach for more than four hours. This information is shown in Figure 19. Fisure 19 How long will you be ot the be:ach tody? IOO'lfo 34

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Cros,tabulations Crosstabulations were performed in an attempt to identify respondents that indicated they perceive a traffic and parking problem in the beach area, and that would use transit service if it were made available to them. By using the results to Question 1 (permanent resident of Deerfield Beach) as the controlling variable, crosstabulations were performed with the following questions. By traffic perception for people traveling to/from the beach (QS). By parking perception for people at the beach (Q6). By willingness to use transit service from a parking facility on the mainland (Q7). By willingness to use transit service from locations in the City of Deerfield Beach (Q8). The results of these crosstabulalions are presented in Figures 20 through 23. 35

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-Figure 20 shows that permanent Deerfield Beach residents in Thursday's survey are more likely to gera:ive a traffic problem at the beach sometimes (41%) o r regu!arly_(200/o) than seasonal residents and visitors. Thirty-nine percent of Deerfield Beach residents and 64 percent o f visitors and non-permanent residents do not perceive a traffic problem at the beaeb.. Fewer than 10 percent of visitors and non-permanent residents perceive a continual traffic problem in the beaeb area. Forty-two percent of permanent residents of tbe City of Deerfield Beach in Sarurday's surv ey said that traffic is a problem sometimes, 33 percent said that traffic is a problem regularly. Interestingly, 51 percent of seasonal residents and visitors in Saturday's survey said that traffic is not a problem. Thun
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Regarding parking in the beach area, almost half of all respondents in Thursday s survey do not peruive any parking problems. Perma.ocnt re5idents and seasooal reported neal'ly identical perceptions about parking at the beacb, as shown in Figure 21. Permanent residents of the City of Deerfield Beach in Saturday's survey are almost split on the issue of parking. The same share of respondents ( 40%) said yes and no to this question. Fifty-two percent of seasonal residents and visitors said that parking is a problem. The availability of parking stickers may make parking less of a problem for Deerfield residents on weekends. Thun. Ficure 21 Parking pniblem u the beach Deerfield Rt$denta 0 NonOecriield Residena Yes No SometimeJ. 37 s ... 20%

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Figure 22 shows the distribution of responses for pennanent residents and seasonal residents and visitors to the question about using transit from a parking facility on the mainland, if the servia: . were opetated every ten minutes. In Thursday's survey, 83 peroent of permanent residents of the City of Deerfield Beach said they would not use the service, and approximately 59 percent of seasonal residents and visitors stated they would not usc: it. However, 28 percent of seasonal rcsidenu and visitors said they would use the service at a fare of S 75 as compared to nonpermanent residen ts {12%). In Saturday's swvey, 65 percent of seasonal residenu and visitors said that they would not use the service; 59 percent of permanent residents said the sam e Twenty-two percent of seasonal residents and visitors and 19 percent of permanent residents said they are willing to use the service at a fare of $.75. Thursday Fisure 22 T.-arWt from parking hcility on mainlud Deerfield Resident> 0 NonO .. rfield 1\aiden,. Free S .25 s .so $ .75 Wouldn'tuoe 38 -Saturday 80%

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Ninety percent of pennanent residents in Thursday 's survey said they would not use transit servjc:e that is operated from locatioiiS in the City. E i ghty-three percent of seasooal res i dents and visitors said they would not use the service. However, 7 percent of pennanent residents and 10 percent of seasooal residents and visitors indicated they would be willing to pay a fare of $ 85. Similar results arc provided to this question in Saturday's surv ey. This is depicted in Figure 23. Thursd ay Figure 23 Transit from locations in the City ofDe erf,.Jd Beach Dee meld R.esidena 0 NonDeeriield R.esidena $.25 s.so $.75 $.85 Wouldn't use 39

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' Comments . At the conclusion of the survey, respondents were given the opponunity to provide c omments and/or suggestions. Sample comments from respondents arc presented below. l would like to use the mini buses/shuttles Likes the beach don't like the pier charge. Difficult to caay stuff. If I was old especially. Don't like price. Would use serv i ce i f I could caay stuff with me. I f had the time would use the Don't like construction, can park in 'stickers ooly" spot because handicapped Prefer to have parking but would use if lwl lift for wheel chair and you had no other choice. Because I have kids, I wouldn t use the service. Meters cost too mucb. Peop l e park on swales at church. Some people park at the cove and walk over Provide change machines. They do not like IS minute meters. People not likely to use transit because of the stuff they carry. Would like to be able to buy a Deerfi el d Beach sticker. Make sticker spots weekday only. 40

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IV. VEIUCLE SURVEY In Sddition to the survey of beach visitors, CUTR conducted a license plate survey of v e hicles parked in the beach area. The survey only included vehiCles parked in City metered parking spaces. The license plate survey infonnation was evaluated with the assistance of the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHMV) to determine the origin of vehicles surveyed. Information provided on the vehicles includes owners' name and address Other data on the owner and vehicle an: also available but an: not useful for the purpose of this report An example of the DHMV report is provided in Appendix B. An analysis of the origin of vehicles surveyed is presented in Figure 24 and shows the origin of vehicles registered in Florida. Additioually, this graphic compares Florida vehicles with out-ofstate vehicles. The data show that the largest shan: of vehicles surveyed is from the City of Deerfield Several vehicles an: registered in the City of Boca Raton. The Cities of Pompano and Orlando an: also represented significantly. However, a further analysis of the data provided from DHMV reveals that many vehicles registered in Orlando an: rented Figure 24 Vehicle Survey 41 100 FloridaVebides 0 0ut-ot-s-200 300 400

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Summuy Technical Memorandum presents information gathered in Tasks I and 2 of the transit alternative study for the City of Deerfield Beach. Information from the survey of other beach cities in the State of Florida is presented. Generally, the communities surveyed reported traffic and parking problems that are similar to the problems at the beach in the City of Deerfield Bcacb. Various methods arc being used by cities surveyed to mitigate tranSpOrtation problems, including roadway improvements, transit alternatives, additional parking, coordinating efforts through the MPO and FOOT, and studies of the issues. The beach surveys revealed significant information about visitors' perception of traffic and parking problems at the beacb. Information from the survey suggest that traffic and parking are a problem on Saturday but not on Thursday. Additionally, thc survey showed the vast majority of pcnnanent and seasonal residents arc not willing to use a transit service to the beach from western locations in the City of Deerfield Beach. Comments from respondents on both days of the survey also suggest that most traffic congestion problems are not on the beach, but along Hillsboro B lvd. and SR AlA, especially when the drawbridge is open. An overwhelming share of comments revealed that having a change machine for quarters would make parking more convenient. An analysis of the origin of vehicles surveyed showed that thc largest share of vehicles surveyed is froin the City of Deerfield Beach. Several vehicles are registered in the City of Boca Raton The Cities of Pompano Beach and Orlando are also represented significantly. However, a further analys is of the data provided from DHMV reveals that many vehicles registered in Orlando are rented. CUTR will present a transit altcmative based on Tasks 3 through 4 in a final Technical Memorandum. The 1 eport will show potential transit options that improve mobility and meet travel demands to the hea<:hes in the City of Deerfield Beach. The findings in this study will be generalized to show their applicability to other barrier island communities in Florida. 42

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APPENDIX A Appendix A presents detailed reports on the traffic circulation problems in the beach communities that were surveyed Information about mobility, parking, and transit issues is presented for each community Additionally, studies that are being conducted to find solution to the problems in these communities are discussed. This is followed by copies of the questionnaires used to survey Florida beach communities and beach visitors

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF ANNA MARIA The City of Anna Maria is the northernmost of three beach communities on the barrier Island of Anna Maria in Manatee County, which is south of Tampa Bay on Florida's Gulf Coast. The City is bounded on the south by the north City limits of Holmes Beach and on the remaining sides by the Gulf of Mexico and Tampa Bay. Mobility Issues Traffic congestion from visitors to the beach has not been a problem for the City of Anna Maria. There are no traffic lights in the City, and there is no indication from the City that any will be installed. Normal traffic is controlled at intersections by stop signs. Gulf Drive is the major transportation route to Anna Maria and is the only route to connect with State Road 64 to the mainland. The City has one draw bridge to access the beach; a toll is not required . Despite the adequate traffic circulation system, traffic in the City is at its peak between I 0:30am and !2:00pm, for mail pickup at the Post Office Piaza. Traffic volumes are highest from January through March or April, depending on the month that Easter is observed. Because of limited available space for roadway expansion, the City has adopted LOS D to be an acceptable standard for peak hour in the jurisdiction on all collector roadways. There are no road segments at unacceptable peak hour levels of service Parkillg Issues On-street parallel paridng is provided on the beach. Visitors and residents are permitted to in these spaces_ free. According to the City Comprehensive Plan, the City does not plan to increase parking for visitors to the beach. A 2

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Transit Service The Manatee County Transit Authority currently serves the City of Anna Maria six days a week, Monday tluough Saturday. An hourly schedule is maintained from approximately 7:00am to 7:00pm using standard diesel buses. Residents and visitors have access to this service. Park and ride service in not available from the mainland. Studies There was no indication that any studies have been completed for the City of Anna Maria's traffic and parking congestion or on transit alternatives to alleviate congestion. Review of the Traffic Circulation Element of the City of Anna Maria's Comprehensive Plan indicates that: "As an ongoing objective, the City shall encourage the utilization of a multi-modal transportation system." Policy 1.5.1 states that: '"Through the continued distribution of bus schedules and senior citizen disco1mt cards, the City shall encourage the increased use of available public transportation." A-3

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF BOCA RATON The City of Boca Raton is located in Palm Beach County on Florida's east coast The City is bounded on the east by the Atlantic Ocean, on the soulb by the City of Deerfield Beach, on the north by the Cities of Delray Beach and Highland Beach, and on the west by unincorporated Palm Beach County. MobiUty Issues City officials believe that there are traffic and parking problems at the beach. ThCTe are three main roadways in the City that provide east-west access to the beach: Spanish River Boulevard, Palmeno Park Road, and Camino Real. Each of these roadways have draw bridges, and Camino Real has timed openings every IS minutes The Traffic Element of the City of Boca Raton Comprehensive Plan did not include information on existing conditions in the City. Thus, an evaluation of LOS for these roadways is omitted. Traffic congestion in the beach area is worst between !2:00pm and 3:00pm on the weekends Officials stated that the worst traffic congestion occurs from bctober to April. Parking I.uues In the beach area, there an: on-street parallel and slant parking spaces. Public parking lots are also provided for residents and visitors at six lots and one pavilion. Lot pricing varies by lot, and a daily rate is used. In addition, residents and visitors can purchase beach stickers to use public lots. Parking stickers go on sale in October City officials have also concluded that because of the lack of available space, addition parking is prohibitive. Transit Service The Palm Beach County Transportation Authority (CoTran) is the primary transit operator in Palm Beach County. CoTran's route IS provides fixed-route service in Boca Raton, including A-4

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the beach area. The service operateS Monday through Friday. An hourly schedule is maintained from approximately 5:30am to 8:30pm using standard diesel buses. Saturday service operates from approximately 7:30am to 7:00pm. Residents and visitors have access to this service. CoTran's basic adult fare is $1.00, with reduced fares available at $.50 for the elderly, disabled, and children. Co Trans officials are reviewing opportunities to operate shuttle service between downtown Boca Raton and the beach. In addition the beach service operated by CoTran, the Royal Palm shuttle operates between the Royal Palm shopping center, hotels in Boca Raton, and the beach. The shuttle also makes stops along the beach in the City of Deerfield Beach. Service is operated by the owners of the shopping center and service is free to shoppers and hotel guests. Studies There was no indication that any studies have been completed for the City of Boca Raton's traffic and parking congestion or on transit alternatives to alleviate congestion. Tbe City is considering a Trolley Study. In the Traffic Circulation Element of the City of Boca Raton Comprehensive Plan, policy 1.5.2 states that: "The City shall provide for provision of bicycle and pedestrian facilities as a means of travel Within and between residential area, schools, employment areas, retail centers, recreational 81'eas, and other public facilities." Public facilities include beach areas in Florida communities. In addition, objective 1.4.0 of the Mass Transit Element states that: The City Boca Raton, with the cooperation of Palm Beach County, Cotran, and local employers will strongly encourage the use of mass transit to alleviate roadway congestion. A 5

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF BOYNTON BEACH The City of Boynton Beach is located in Palm Beach County on Florida's east coast. The geographic area is approximately defined by Hypoluxo Road on the north, the Intracoastal. Waterway on the east with unincorporated areas, the L-30 Canal on the south, and Lawrence Road and Barwick Road on the west. Mobility mues The perception by the City is that there are traffic and parking problems at the beach. There are two major roads that access the beach from the mainland: Woolbright Road aDd Ocean Avenue. These roadways also connect with SR A I A, which provides north/south movement along the beach. Review of the last Traffic Element in the City of Boytnn Beach Comprehensive Plan showed that the roadway segments which access the beach on Woolbright Road and Ocean Avenue operates at LOS "A" during the peak season. . Another east/west arterjal in the City is Boyton Beach Boulevard. This roadway is an interchange . with 1-95 and links traffic from the west to Ocean Avenue for access to the beach. The traffic element showed that the segment of roadway between the interchange and Ocean Avenue is operating at LOS "D" during the peak season. This linkage is further exacerbated because traffic going to the beach on Ocean A venue is reduced from four to two Janes as it crosses the intracoastal waterway. Traffic congestion is worst on weekends and holidays. Peak season for visitors to the beach is between November and April. The City has one draw bridge. to access the beach. Parking Issues To alleviate parking problems, the City increased parking capacity last year but has done nothing during this year. Residents are required to have a beach pass to park in public lots. For visitors, Jot pricing is $5.00 during the off-peak season and $10.00 during peak season. There is no on A 6

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street parking at the beach. Because of space l imitations, the City concluded that providing more par!cing spaces is not feasible. Service The Palm Beach County Transportation Authority (CoTran), the primary transit operator in Palm Beach County, provides transit service in Boynton Beach. Bus routes directly serving the City include Routes IS and the "Shopper Hopper." No siogle route serves the City exclusively, but portions of routes traverse the City as part of a larger areawide route. Additiooally, no service is provided to the beach. The City, however, is developing plans to operate its own system with service to the beach. Transit service in Boyton Beach operates from approximately 5:30am to 8:30pm on 60 minute headways, Monday through Friday. Saturday service operates from approximately 7:30am to 7:00pm. Residents and visitors have access to the service. CoTran s basic adult fare is $ 1.00, with reduced fares available at $.50 for the elderly, disabled, and children. Studies There was no indication that any recent studies have been completed on Boyton Beach's traffic and parking congestion at the beach, or on transit alternatives to alleviate congestion. Review of the Traffic Circulation Element of the City of Boyton Beach Comprehensive Plan shows that the City is making an effort to mitigate traffic congestion on Boyton Beach Boulevlt1! This effort will improve acss to the beach and dovetails with City's future traffic circulation plans. Policy 2.2. 7 states: "the City shall cooperate with and support the Florida Department of Transportation and the Palm Beach Metropolitan Planning Organization on implementing the extension of Boynton Beach Boulevard across the Intracoastal Waterway. A 7

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF CLEARWATER BEACH The City of Clearwater Beach is located in Pinellas County on a barrier island in the Gulf of Mexico. Its natural borders are the Gulf of Mexico and Clearwater Harbor. Mobility Issues The City of Clearwater Beach reported traffic congestion, and parking problems, in the beach area from residents and visitors. Access to Clearwater Beach is from the east by the Memorial Causeway, coming from downtown Clearwater, and from the south by the Clearwater Pass Bridge, coming from Sand Key. Both access points have draw bridges and the Clearwater Pass Bridge has a SO. 75 toll for automobiles. To complicate matters, Clearwater Pass. has severe structural damage from water currents flowing into the Gulf of Mexico from Clearwater Harbor. The bridge has severe weight restrictions and a speed limit of fifteen miles per hour. These conditions give the roadway to the bridge a Level of Service F and. it is not anticipated to improve until a new bridge is built over Clearwater Pass. Besides the congestion associated with the operation of the Clearwater Pass Bridge, significant traffic congestion is occurring along the roads on the beach. The peak period for congestion occurs on the weekends from I Oam to I pm. Clearwater also experiences a peak season from January tluough April. Traffic is at its peak during the college spring break period at the end of March. Some techniques the City has used to alleviate traffic congestion include preempting patterns for bridge openings, an anti-cruising ordinance, manual override of traffic signals for police department control, police aides (non-officers) at critical locations to put up barricades and rum restrictions, "BEACH LOTS FULL" signs, and a rain gauge sensor on the beach that will adjust the timing pattem of traffic signals to allow for maximum outflow of traffic from the beach when it begins to rain. A 8

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ParkiDg Issues Parking on Clearwater Beach during the peak season can be quite a challenge. Most spaces ace occupied by I pm. There is both slant and parallel metered parking on-street and public parking lots on the beach. The lots were converted several years ago from meters to pay when exiting lots. Lot pricing is $1.00 per hour with a $7.00 per day maximum. On-street meters are priced at $0.75 per hour. The City is looking at providing more parking in the beach area, but lack of available space is a major factor. Tra.ult Service Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PSTA) is the primary public transportation provider in Pinellas County. PST A's Route 80 provides fixed-route service from the Downtown Clearwater Transfer Center to Clearwater Beach using standard transit buses. Besides PST A, a public/private entity operates the Jolley Trolley, which is a distinctive rubbertired trolley that provides fixed-route service from Downtown Clearwater, around Clearwat .er Beach, and across the 'Clearwater Pass Bridge to Sand Key. The trolley is governed by the Jolley Trolley Executive Committee and is partially subsidized by 'the City of Clearwater. Another public transportation service being provided is waterborne. The Clearwater Ferry provides service from Coachman Park, adjacent to Downtown Clearwater to the Clearwater Harbor side of Clearwater Beach. Currently there are no park and ride services from the mainland to the beach. Studies There was no iDdication that any recent studies have been completed on Clearwater Beach s traffic and parking congestion or on transit alternatives to alleviate congestion. Review of the Traffic Circulation Element of the City of Clearwater Comprehensive Plan indicates that: "Clearwater Pass Bridge is a critically deficient roadway link which should be replaced as quiclcly as possible. Funding from outside the City should be used to help build this A-9

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replacement." Also, improvements to access Clearwater should streSS bus, ferry, and bicycle modes for recreational access. Policy 5.5.4. states that: "Due to unique conditions of the natural and built environments, and the recreational, discretionary basis of peak system demand, Clearwater Memorial Causeway, Gulfview/Coronado Boulevards, and the Clearwater Pass Bridge shall be considered environmentally constrained facilities. Review of the Mass Transit Element shows that Policy 8.2.3. states: "Due to the constraints of development and available land, mass transit service shall be urged to provide recreation and commuter access to Clearwater Beach and Sand Key. Policy 8.2.4 reads: "The existing beach trolley system shall be retained and enhanced to allow for nonautomobile circ:ulation on Clearwater Beach." Finally, Objective 8.5 says: "By 1990, a ferry service between Clearwater and downtown shall be established by a private service provider; City expansion of docks shall facilitate this i.mprovemenL Along with Policy 8.5.1.: The City shall obtain necessary permits and shall build mainland and beacbside docks to provide dockage for ferry service. The Jolley Trolley Company has recently expanded service and plans to increase headways to five minutes during peak service periods. Four additional vehicles are needed to accomplish this. In support of this effort, the PSTA has submitted a Section 3 application for $400,000 to be used to purchase four trolley-type vehicles to be leased to the Jolly Trolley Company. A 10

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF COCOA BEACH The City of Cocoa Beach is located in Brevard Cowtty on Florida's east coast. The City is situated on a barrier island. It is bordered on the north by the City of Cape Canaveral and the Patrick Air Force Base on the south. Cocoa Beach is an intensely developed coastal commwlity with no room for additional developmenL Mobility Issues The City has reported that traffic congestion, and parki.Dg problems, occurs from visitors traveling to the beach area Three causeways provide access to the island from the mainland: SR 528, SR 520, and SR 404. These roads connect with SR AlA, which provides the only north/south continuous transportation linkage between these causeways. Additionally, SR AlA provides direct access to retail uses, offices, motels, high-density condominiumS, and the beach. The intersection of SR 520 and AlA is a majpr focal point of traffic congestion. Land adjacent to SR AlA is heavily developed with uses that have major impacts on traffic conditions. The Traffic Circulation Element of the City Comprehensive Plan states that SR AlA operates a LOS "F" over much of its length. The intersection of SR 520 and AlA operates well into the LOS "F" range during the afternoon peak period. While visitors destined for the beach contribute to this congestion, the largest share of trips is generated by commuters working at the Kennedy Space Center and Patrick Air Force Base. To relieve pressure on the local road network, the City has implemented an interconnected signal system to improve traflic:-flow along SR AlA. A transit route has also been established to provide pedestrians and local residents another transportation option. Parking Issues The City has between 13,000 and 19,000 parallel on-street parking spaces. Most of these spaces are at the beach and are controlled with meters. Residents and visitors are permitted to park in these spaces. The parking rate is $.25 for 30 minutes. It the perception of the City that more A II

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parking at the beach is needed, but the City is built-out so adding more parking spaces or bui!ding parking lots is prohibited. Transit Service Space Coast Aiea Transit (SCA'D provides transit service in Brevard County and is a unit of the Division of Health and Social Services of the County. Service is provided for the City of Cocoa Beach on Route 9. The route provides service to shopping centers, hotels, condominiums, and public and recreational facilities. While service is not provided to the beach, the route operates within walJci.ng distance of the beach. Residents and visitors can use the service. The adult fare is $1.00 and a half fare is paid by seniors, disabled, and children. Service frequency varies from 70 to 120 minutes, and service hours are from approximately 7 :00am to 7:00pm. Riders can transfer to another mainland transit route at the Canaveral Plaza in Cocoa Beach. Studies In 1993, CUTR conducted a study for the City of Cocoa Beach to determine the potential for transit to relieve h-affic congestion on SR AlA. The transit service that is described above was established in accordance with recommendations from this study. Additionally, the study recommends express service for commuters working at the Kennedy Space Center and Patrick Air F orcc Base: The Traffic Circulation Element of the City Comprehensive Plan recommends that: "the business community and State tourism interest should consider institution of a jitney or shuttle system in the areas most frequently patronized by tourists. This could help eliminate very short trips from SR A I A during the tourist season." A-12

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CflY OF DAYTONA BEACH The City of Daytona Beach is located in Volusia County on Florida's northeast coast. The City is bordered on the east by !he Atlantic Ocean and on the remaining sides by unincorporated Volusia County. MobWty Issues The City has stated that traffic congestion, and parking problems, exists on roads near the beach area. There are four points to the barrier island from the mainland: Seabreeze, Main, Carlton Blank (Broadway), and Memorial. These bridges provide direct acGeSS to the beach and to SR A I A, wbich provides the only north/south continuous transportation linkage between these access points. The segments of SR AlA that connects with these access points are operating at LOS 0 or better. Tbe City however, has adopted a LOS D to be acceptable for these segments of SR AlA. Traffic congestion occurs most often on the Seabreeze and Broadway. The City states that traffic congestion is most severe on weekend nights, wbich is different from most barrier island communities. Traffic is worst from February to April, during Spring Break, and when special events occur. Parking wues On-street and lot parlciDg at the beach for residents and visitors is provided by the City. Parking meters are not used to control spaces. Beach visitors and residents can park in on-street spaces for an unlimited amount of time. Lot pricing is $4.00 a day. Residents can purchase parking decals for $5.00 per or $12.00 for three years. The parking issue is further complicated during special events, especially when the Ocean Center and Peabody Auditorium have concurrent events. Al3

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T rtDJit Service Transit service in the City of Daytooa Beach is provided by the Volusia Trausit Authority (Vottan). Vottan operates a radial route S1rueture that is focused on a downtown Daytona Beach Transf er Center. Four fiXed-routes provide service to stops along the beach on SR AlA; these routes operate with 30 minute headways. Service bours are generally betMen 5:30am and 7:30pm on weekdays and 6:00am and 7:30pm on Saturdays. There is no Sunday service. In additio n the fixed-route service to the beach. Votran provides a special trolley service along SR AlA serving beachfront hotels and businesses. The trolley operaleS betMen !2:00pm and I :OOam on weekdays and Saturdays with 45 minute head ways. Additional trolley service is provided for special events. Residents and visitors are p_ermitted to use Vottan service. The adult fare is S0.7 S ; senior citizen, you th ( ages 6-17), and disabled fare is $0 .35. There is no fare for children under age six. The City is planning to explore the potential f o r a private/public partoe:rship to opeme tram service along the beach. S tudies The Traffic Circulation Element of the City Comprehensive Plan includes a regiooal effort to make improvements on constrained segments of SR AlA. These constrained segments of SR A I A also occur at access points to the beach from the mainland. The element include s other policies to improve traffic circulation on local streets near the beach. Policy 1.4 3 reads: "The City shall investigate the establishment of a system of paired one-way streets to improve capacity and level of servi ce on sheets projected to fall below LOS by 1995. Policy 1.6.5 states : "Th e City's Main Street Redevelopmcot Prognm shall support Volusia County's efforts .to improve traffic circulation and increase off-street parking 10 serve the Ocean Center and Peabody Auditorium especially when the facilities have coocurrent events." A-1 4

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE The City of Fort Lauderdale is located in Broward County on Florida's east coast. I t is bounded on the east by the Atlantic Ocean and on the west by the Towns of Mel Rose Park and Plantation. The City is bounded by the Cities of Dania, Hollywood, and Davie on the south and the Cities of Pompano Beach, Oakland Parle, and Wilton Manors on the north. Mobility Issues The City reports that traffic congestion, and parking problems, occurs in the beach area. The City Circulation Element of the Comprehensive Plan reports that traffic in the beach area increases by 13 percent during the peak season. Three major roadways provide east/west mobility in the City, and connect the mainland to the beach area. These roadways include Sunrise Boulevard, Las Olas Boulevard and the 17th Street Causeway. These roadways also connect traffic from the mainland with SR AlA. The City Comprehensive Plan shows that the segments of Oakland Parle, Sunrise, and Las Olas Boulevard, which connect the mainland with SR AlA, opera!C between. LOS C and D during the.peak Traffic congestion occurs most during special events, i.e., Fall Boat Show. Peak season for congestion is from November through Easter, and peaks during Spring Break. The City states that traffic congestion is most severe on weekends during this period. Parking Issues The City provides on-stteet and lot parking at the beach for residents and visitors. Parallel spaces are provided for on-stteet parking. Parking meters are used to control spaces and cost $.50 for 30 minutes. Beach visitors and residents can park in on-stteet spaces. A lot on Las Olas Blvd. provides public parking for residents and visitors. Lot pricing is $1.00 for hourly parking between 6:00am and 6:00pm. The City is evaluating the potential for building a parking garage near the beach. A 15

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Transit Service Bmward County Transit provides service throughout the County including Fort Lauderdale. Weekday and Saturday service are operated from approxim ately 5:00am to !O:OOpm; Sunday service is provided from approximately 9:00am to 8:30pm. The regular fare for each one-way trip is $.85; the reduced fare for senior citizens, disabled persons, and youth is $.40. Broward County Transit operates three fiXed-routes that provide service to the beach area. Route 36 provides service to the beach area using Sunrise Blvd.; Route II provides service to the beach on Las Olas and along the beach on SR AlA; and Route 40 provides beach service on the 17th St. Causeway and SR A I A. Each route is on a 30 minute headway for weekday and Saturday service Sunday service is on a 60 minute headway In addition to the fixed route service to the beach area, the Wave Line, a City subsidized trolley, operates along the beach. The service is operated mainly for tourists and plans are being considered to extend service to downtown Fort Lauderdale. The regular fare is S 1.00 Service is provided Monday through Saturday from !O:OOam to 8:00pm, and Sunday from !O:OOam to 6 : 00pm. However, City officials and trolley operators concede that ridership on the Wave Line is below what was projected. An informal survey by the City suggested that ridership is low on the trolley because service is not provided to popular shops and restaurants along Las Olas Boulevard on the mainland. Additionally, business owners on the island have been slow to promote the service. Besides the Wave Line, two beach restaurants have started operating a free train a replica of an old steamer along the beach and Las Olas Blvd. for their customers. Studies The Traffic Circulation Element of the City Comprehensive Plan does not include any significant effort or policy initiative to reduce traffic congestion in the beach area. However, Objective II states: "[The City) Recognize downtown Fort Lauderdale, the Ji!each Revitalization Area, and the Northwest as unique transportation development areas and evaluate accepting lower levels of service on area roadways." Review of the Mass Transit Element of The Comprehensive Plan shows that a respectable increase in mass transit demand is anticipated for the beach area. Redevelopment and increased development along SR AlA will increase the need for mass transiL The element recommends that the City encourage the County to increase transit service to and from the beach. A-16

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF FORT MYERS BEACH The City of Fort Myers Beacll is localed in Lee County on Florida's west coast. It is bounded on the east by Estero Bay and on the west by the Gulf of Mexico. The City is bowtded by San Carlos Pass on the north and by the City of Bonita Beach on the south. Mobility Issues The City concedes that traffic congestion and parking are ptoblems in the beach area of the barrier island. County Road 865 (San Carlos Boulevard) provides access to the island and beach area. 1bis roadway continues through the City of Fort Myers Beach as Estero Boulevard and serves as the major north-south road on the island. However, since Estero Blvd. travels the entire length of the island, access is possible at both ends of the island. Hurricane Pass Bridge connects the island with the mainlaad at the north end. Mantanlll$ Pass Bridge, a drawbridge, connects the island with the community of Bonita Beacll to the south. Most of the congestion occurs on San Carlos Boulevard as traffic is accessing the island using Hurricane Pass Bridge The Traffic Circulation Element of the 1990 Lee Cowtty Settlement Agreement shows this road segment fUnctioning at LOS E and was estimated to be fUnctioning at LOSE in 1994. Congestion is worst during the period from Thanlcsgiving to Easter. Traffic volumes in the beach area are highest between !O:OOam and 3 : 00pm, and most of the congestion occurs on the weekends. Parldug Isaacs . The City provides some on-street parallel parking at the beach. Additionally, the county operates twO public parkillg lou at the beach. Meters are used to control on-street and lot parkinc. Parking is priced at $.25 for 30 minutes. While the City has no plans for providing additional parking lots or spaces, it is looking for ways to increase capacity. A 17

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Transit Service . The Lee County Transit Authority (LeeTran) provides transit service throughout the County. Weekday and Satutday service are operated from approx.imately 6:00am to 8:00pm. Sunday service is not provided. The regular fare for each one-way nip is Sl.OO; the reduced fare for senior citizens, disabled penons, and youth is $.50. In addition, LeeTran operates a free rubber tire trolley service in Fort Myers Beach and Bonita Springs at the south end of the island. The trolley operates from park-and-ride lots on the mainland to recreational, retail, and business locations on the island. Connections with regular fixed-route service are available at parkaod ride lots on the mainland. The service is available to residents and visitors; service is operated from approximately 7:00am to 6:00pm. Lee County Transit report! that the trolley has been successful in reducing traffic congestion on the island. LeeTran reports approximately 3,500 daily passenger nips on the trolley during peak season. and 2,000 during offpeak season. Transit representatives have also stated that during the peak. season the trolley has standing room only. Visible signs marketing the service are located throughout the City of Fort Myers Beach. Studies The City of Fort Myers Beach has not and is not considering any studies on this subject A copy of the Traffic Circulation Element of the Cit}< Comprehensive Plan was not received. Therefore, infonnation from this document that reveal other efforts by the City to mitigate traffic congestion in the City is omitted. A 18

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF HOLLYWOOD The City of Hollywood is localed in Browanl County along the Atlantic Ocean in south Florida. Part of the City is located on a barrier island. The community is bordered by the City of Dania on the north and the City of Hallandale on the south. The remaining borders are the natural barrier of the Atlantic Ocean on the east and the c i ties of Miramar and Pembrook Pines on the west. Mobility wues The City reported that recent parking deficiencies in the beach area have been resolved by providing additional parking. However, the City indicated that there are traffic congestion problems in the beach area. Sheridan Street and Hollywood Boulevard are the two most traveled east/west roads in the City Both roads provide direct access to the central beach area of the barrier island and conne .ct with downtown Hollywood and other north/south roads on the mai nland. These roads conneet with SR AlA, the major north/south road on the barrier island. Additionally, both roads cross drawbridges to connect the mainland with the barrier island. M ost of the congestion occurs on segments of SR AlA from Sheridan Street to Hollywood Boulevard. This is further exacerbated by the congestion that also occurs on the bridge that connects Hollywood Boulevard to SR AlA. Traffic volumes are seasonal. Highest volumes of traffic are experienced from October to April, when many activities occur in the central beach area. Congestion during this period of the year is worst on Saturdays from I O :OOam to 8:OOpm. Since SR AlA is maintained by the state, any improvements would need to be initiated from the Florida Department of Transportation (FOOl). Thus, the City's role would be one of coordinating with the FOOT and the Metropolitan Planning Organi7lltion on proposed p r ojects. A 19

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Parking usues The City provides on-street parallel and slant parking in the beach area. To increase parking for residents and visitors, the City constructed a four-level parking facility near the central area of the beach. Additional parking lots were also established in the south and north beach areas. On street and lot parking is priced at $.25 for IS minutes Residents and visitors are permitted to use on-street and lot parking. For now, the City bas concluded that additional parking is prohibitively expensive but may consider building another multi-level parking facility in the future. Transit Service Broward County Transit provides transit service throughout Broward County. Transit service is provided on two fixed-routes in the City of Hollywood. Route 7 provides service from the mainland along Hollywood Boulevard and SR AlA north of Hollywood Boulevard. Route 28 provides similar service on Hollywood Boulevard but operates along SR AlA south of Hollywood Boulevard. Weekday and Saturday service are operated from approximately 5:00am to !0:30pm. Headways vary from IS to 30 minutes. Sunday service is operated from approximately !O:OOam to 7:00pm and headways vary from 40 to 60 minutes. The regular fare for each one-way trip is $1.00 (effective April 9, 1995); the r educed fare for senior citizens, disabled persons, and youth is $.50. In addition to Broward County Transit, a trolley provides service between downtown Hollywood and the beach area. Service is free and available to residents and visitors. The trolley is operat ed by The City of Hollywood Commllllity Redevelopment Agency Service is provided Monday from II :OOam to !O:OOpm, Friday !2:00pm to ll:OOpm. and from ll:OOam to 5:00pm the remaining days of the week. The service operates on a 60 minute headway. The mass transit element of the Comprehensive Plan reports that many households in the beach area have no cars. This suggests a transit dependant population residing in the beach area. Studies Neither the Traffic Circulation nor Mass Transit Elements of the City Comprehensive Plan provide any evidence of plans by the City to take significant steps to improve traffic and parking A 20

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problems in the beach area. However, as part of the redevelopment plans for the beach area, the City is srudying opportunities to expand parking to facilitate commercial developmen t The impacts on beach lrllffic will be included in the p lans for this area. A-21

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF INDIAN ROCKS BEACH Indian Rocks Beach is a community located in Pinellas County along the Gulf Coast of central Florida on a barrier island. The community is bordered on the north by the Town of Belleair Beach and on the south by the Town of!ndian Shores. The remaining boundaries are the natural barriers of the Gulf of Mexico and Clearwater Harbor. Mobility Issues The City reports that traffic congestion and, parking problems, occurs when visitors and residents travel to the beach area. SR 688 and Gulf Boulevard are the major road facilities in the City Gulf Boulevard is SR 699 south of SR 688 and CR 208 north of SR 688. Indian Rocks Road Bridge (SR 688) provides access to Indian Rocks Beach from the mainland, and crosses a drawbridge. The City reported that the state is planning to add a second span to the Indian Rocks Road Bridge. Most of the congestion in the City occurs on Gulf Boulevard where it intersects with SR 688. Several small buSinesses are located in this area. Review of the 1990 Traffic Circulation Element of the City Comprehensive Plan showed that the segment of SR 688 from Gulf Boulevard to Indian Rocks Road Bridge functioned at LOS E in 1990 The segment of Gulf Boulevard from the north City limits to SR 688 functioned at LOS F; Gulf Boulevard from SR 688 to I st Avenue functioned at LOS D; and Gulf Boulevard from 1st Avenue to the south City limits functioned at LOS C. The latter segment of road is also identified as a constrained facility in the Traffic Circulation Element. Most of the traffic congestion in the beach area occurs on the weekend. However, congesuon is also a problem on weekdays dwing peak periods of the day. Similar to other beach communities in Florida, the peak season for traffic volumes in Indian Rocks Beach is from October to March. A 22

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Parking Issues The City provides free on-street parallel and slant parking along Gulf Boulevard. While parking is not immediately adjacent to the beach, there are approximately 27 beaches accesses in the City. These accesses are informal sand/shell parking areas in the public street rights-of-way between Gulf Boulevard and the Gulf of Mexico. Additionally, the City is planning to add between 100 and !50 parking sj>aces on Gulf Boulevard. Public parking lots are not available in the City. Transit Service The Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PSTA) provides transit service in Pinellas County. PSTA provides two fixed-routes in the City of Indian Rocks Beach. Route 66 provides service from the mainland along Gulf Boulevard north of SR 688. Route 71 provides similar service but operates along Gulf Boulevard south of SR 688. Headways for both routes vary from 30 to 60 minutes. Service is provided weekdays, Saturday, and Sunday from approximately 6:00am to I O:OOpm. The regular fare for each one-way trip is $ .90; the reduced fare for seniors and disabled persons is $.45; and youth is $.40. Both routes provide direct connection between the beaches and various tourist and shopping-oriented land uses, and connect with other fixed-routes in the PSTA system. Studies The City has not conducted any studies that focus on parking or traffic problems. However, the Traffic Element includes goals, objectives, and policies to improving traffic circulation along Gulf Boulevard. Beside structural improvements to Gulf Boulevard, the element recommends installation of traffic signalimtion 81 intersections on this road. A 23

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TRANSPORTATION PROBL EMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY O FFIClALS CITY OF JACKSONVILLE BEACH The City of Jac ksonville Beach is located in Duval Coun ty on the Atlantic Ocean, approximately fifteen miles east of downtown Jacksonville Th e City is bordered on the north by the City of Neptune Beach, on the south by unincorporated StJohn's County, and on the east by the Atlantic Ocean. Mo bWty wues The Ci ty reports no traffic congestion or parking problenu from residents and visitors traveling to the beach area. However, there is a signifiC4Dt morning and afternoon peak hour traffic due to commutin g to and from the employmen t centers in Duval County. The major transportati on facilities in the City axe Beach Boulevard (U.S. 90) and 3rd Street (S.R. AlA). Beach Boulevard provides direct to the beach area from the mainland, and crosses a drawbridge to span the Intracoastal Waterway. Third Street is the major north-south road in the City. Additionally, these roads intersect in the central beach area. While it appears that traffic congestion in the beach area i s not a problem, the Traffic Circulation Element of the City Comprehensive Plan (amended in 1992) projects that segments of U.S. 90 and SR AlA in the central beach area will be functioning at LOS 0 in 1995. Parlciac Issues The City provides free on-street parking in the beach area. Additionally, two public parlr:ing lo ts axe located on Beach Boulevard near 3rd Streel Since parlcillg in the beach area is not a problem, the City has no plans for providing additional park.ing. Tran1it Service The Jaclcsonvill e Transportation Authority (IT A) opera tes three fixed-routes on 3rd Street wb.ich provide transit access to the beach area. Route AR-1 provides direct access to the beach area A 24

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from the mainland. Routes BH-1 and BH-3 serve the beach area from the City of Neptune Beach. Service is operated Monday through Thursday from 6:30am to 7:30pm, Friday from 6:30am to I O :OOpm, and Saturday from !O:OOam to !O:OOpm. Sunday service is not operated. The base fare for travel in the beach area is $.60 Seniors, disabled, and children under 42 inches ride free. These routes provide connections to other routes in the JT A system on the mainland. Studies The City has not conducted any studies that focus on parking or traffic problems. However, the most recent Traffic Element includes goals, objectives, and policies to improving traffic circulation to beach areas. The element shows Beach Boulevard functioning at LOS D and recommends that it be widened to a six-lane divided road before 199S to accommodate anticipated traffic at LOS D or better. Additionally, Jrd St is shown as functioning at LOS E between the Intracoastal Waterway and the beach area and needs to be widened to a six-lane divided road to handle existil,lg traffic. The element also recommends that the City of Jacksonville should foster an intergovernmental approach to tnmsportation planning. Policy TC.I.I 1.2: "As a major population center in the Jacksonville metropolitan area, the Beach areas, including Jacksonville Beach, will join together to seek a seat Oo. the governing board of the Metropolitan Planning Organization through direct contact with the members, FOOT and other state administrative officials, Federal agencies, and legislative officials to secure an additional venue for presenting the tnmsportation needs of the Beach areas to those making the transportation funding decisions. A 2S

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF LAKE WORm The City of Lake Worth is loCated on the east coast of Florida in Palm Beach County. The City is bordered on the north by the City of West Palm Beacb, on the south by the City of Lantana, on the west by part of unincorporated Palm Beach County, and is bordered on the east by the Atlantic Ocean. Part of the City is located on a barrier island and includes the beach area. Mobility Issues The City reports some congestion problems from residents and visitors traveling to the beacb area. The major transportation facilities in the City are Lake Avenue (S R 802) and S.R. AlA. Lake A venue provides direct access t o the beach area from the mainland, and crosses a drawbridge to span the Intracoastal W81erway. Lake Avenue also provides access to a golf cowse th8l is loealed on the bmier island from the mainland. S.R. AI A i s the major north-south roa d on the bmier island. These roads intersect in the beacb area. As mentioned above, the City stated th8l there are some congestion problems during the peale season. of December to February. Congestion is worst on weekends from II :OOam to 2:00pm. Besides the occasional parking problems there is a slight baclclog of traffic coming from the west when the drawbridge is open The most recent Traffic Element of the City Comprehensive Plan does not include information about the LOS of Lake Avenue or S.R. AlA in the City of Lake Worth. Par kiAg Iss ues The City provides slant parking along Lake Avenue, and two parking lots in the beach area. Onstreet parking is priced 81 S.2S fur IS minutes; lot parking is priced 81 S.2S for 20 minutes. Onstreet and lot parking is available to residents and visitors. The City has concluded that there is n o need for additional parking in the beach area. A -26

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Tra111it Service The Lake Worth Trolley, which is opetated by the City of Lake Worth, provides trolley service throughout the City and to the beach area from the mainland. The service includes three trolleys. One connects the mainland and the beach area, while the remaining two trolley s are exclusively for mainland service Service is o perated Monday to Saturday, from 9:00am to 5 :00pm. and operates on a 60 minute headway. Limited service is provided Sunday and includes a three-hour headway. The base fare is $1. 00; riders under 18 years o f age, Seniors, and the disabled can ride for S .SO. The service also connects with Palm Beacll County Transit (CoT ran) at locations on the mainland. The trolley service is available to residents and visitors. The City of Lake Worth reports approximately 266 average daily passenger trips on th e trolley. Studies The City bas not conducted any studies that focus on parking or traffic problems, and the most recent Traffic Element of The City Comprebellsive Plan is without a specific goal, objective, or policy designed to improve traffic circulation to beach areas. A 27

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OmCIALS CITY OF MADEIRA BEACH The City of Madeira Beach is located in PineUas County along the Gulf Coast of Central Florida on a barrier island It is bordered on the north by the City of Redington Beach, on the south by the City of Treasure Island. Th e remaining boundaries are the narural barriers of the Gulf of Mexico and Boca Ciega Bay MobiUty Issues The City states that traffic congestion, and parking problems, occur from residents and visitors traveling to the beach areL The major transponati on facility in the City is Gulf Boulevard ( SR 699) which CWlS north and south th e length of th e barrier island, providing north and south ac cess to the City from Redington Beach and Treasure Island. Gulf Boulevard c:rosscs a drawbridge to access the City from the south. The Welch Causeway (S R 666) also provides access to the City and beach area and linla the City of Madeira Beach to the mainland. The most recent copy of the Traffic Element ofthe City Co mprehensive Plan (1989) revealed that within the City, the se gment of Gulf Boulevard (SR 699) from the northern City limit to the Welch Causeway is functioning at LOS E. Since then, this section of Gulf Boulevard has been reconsttucted to a four lane divided facility, alleviating the capacity deficiency In addition, th e City reported that most of the con gestion in the beach area occurs on the Welch Causeway from traffic traveling to the beach area. Since SR 699 and Welch Causeway are state roads. improvements would require intergovernmental coordination with FOOT and the Metropolitan Planning Organi1\lltion. Most recently, FOOT has been discussing the possibility of replacing the drawbridge on the Welch Causeway. Congestion occurs during summer months and winter months because of the "snowbirds." Traffic congestion is worst on the weelcends between I 2:00pm and 2:00pm and from 4 : 00pm to 5:00pm. Parkillg Issues Th e City prohibits on-street parldog in the beach area, but public parldog Jots are provided for residents and visitors tr av eling to the beach area. L ot parking near the beach is priced at $1.00 A 2 8

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for 60 minutes and parking at remote lots is priced at S.SO for 60 minutes. While additional parking might be needed in the beach area, the City contends that the road network will not accommodate more spaces.. TraaJit Service The Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PST A) provides transit service in Pinellas County.' PSTA provides one fixed-route in the City of Madeira Beach. Route 71 provides service from the mainland along Gulf Boulevard south of SR 666. Headways for this route vary from 30 to 60 minutes. Service is provided weekdays, Saturday, and Sunday from approximately 6:00am to I O:OOpm. The regular fare for each one-way trip is $.90; the reduced fare for senior citi:zens, disabled persons is $.45; and youth i.s $.40. Route 71 P'Qvides direct connectio n between the beaches and various tourist and sbopping-orieated land uses, and connects with other fixed-routes in the PST A system. Stu dlea The City bas not conducted any studies that focus on parking or traffic problems, and the most recent Traffic Element of the City Comprehensive Plan is without a specific goal, objective or policy intended to improve traffic circulation to beach areas. However, the FOOT is planning to conduct traffic counts on the Welch Causeway and Gulf Boulevard to determine if f\J.rther improvemen ts are needed. A 29

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF MIAMI BEACH The City of Miami Beach is located in Dade County on a barrier island. It is bordered on the nortb by parts of unincotpOrated Dade County, and the mnaining boundaries are the natural barriers of Biscayne Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. Mobility Issues The City reports tbat traffic congestion, and parking problems occur from residents and visitors traveling to the beach area. There are four major connections to the island from the mainland that also serve as or COIIDect to the major transportation facilities in the City. MacArthur Causeway connects the mainland with the south beach area of the island. From this access point, traffic movement the island is diverted to either Alton Road or Collins Avenue (S R. AlA). Both roads are major transportation facilities in the City. The Venetian Causeway links the mainland with the City of Miami Beach. This is the ol)ly toll facility to coi!Dect the island with the mainland. The toll for vehicles lising the Causeway is $.50. It provides access to Dade Boulevard/Pine Tree Drive on the island which is a major north/south road in the City. It also intersects with Alton Road immediately after crossing Biscayne Bay. Julia Tuttle Causeway (l-195) provides access to the central beach area of the City from the mainland. Additionally, this road intersects with Alton Road. Pine Tree Drive, and Collins Avenue on the island. John F. Kennedy Causeway connects the mainland with the north beach area of the is land From this access point, traffic movement on the island is diverted to either Normandy Drive or 7lst Stand merges again at 71st before intersecting with Collins Avenue in the beach area. Except for the Julia Tuttle Causeway, the access roads presented above cross multiple drawbridges to span Biscayne Bay. A30

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The City reports that most of the occurs along Collins Avenue in the south beach area. Additionally, the congestion on Collins Avenue causes traffic attempting to reach the island 011 the MacArthur Causeway to backlog. Traffic volumes in the City are ihe highest between December and April. Congestion is worst during the weekends. T o alleviate traffic and parking congestion on the island, the City has increased the amount of public parking for visitors and residents over the past few years. A Transportation Management Association has been established to mitigate traffic impacts in the City, and the regional transit operator, Metro-Dade Transit, has increased service in Miami Beach. Parking Issues The City provides on street parallel parking in the beach area and garage parking at major activity centers near the beach. On-street parking is controlled by meters and is priced at $.25 for I 5 minutes. Garage pariOng is priced at $1.00 for 60 minutes. Transit Service The Metro-Dade Transit Agency (MDT A) proVides transit service throughout Dade County. The agency offers extensive fiXed-route service between the mainland and the City of Miami Beach. Service includes four fixed-routes accessing the island on Mac Arthur Causeway, one fixed-route on the Venetian Causeway, and three fixed-routes on the Julia Tuttle Causeway. These routes provide service to the beach areas in the City and have strong connections with routes on the mainland. Service is provided weekdays from approximately 4:30am to 2:30am. Saturday and Sunday service is operated from approximately 4:30am to I :OOam. Headways for most of these routes vary from 37 minutes during off-peale to 35 minutes during the peak. Since all routes use Collins A venue and Alton Road, the combined frequency is much greater for a passenger bound for downtown Miami. Tbe regular fare for each one-way trip is $1.25. The reduced fare for senior citizens, disabled persons, and youth is $.60. Studies The City has not conducted any studies that focus on parking or traffic problems, and the most recent Traffic Element of The City Comprehensive Plan did oot adopt a specific goal, objective, A-31

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or policy intended to improve traffic in the beach However, the MDT A is considering an extension of its metro-rail service to the south beach area of the City. In addition, the Dade Coun ty Metropolitan Planning Organization will soon authorize a study to develop parking policies that would apply throughout the county. A 32

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO C ITY OFFI CIALS CITY OF PALM BEACH SHO RES The City of Palm Beach is located in Palm Beach County on a barrier island. The City is bordered on the north by the City of Riviera Beach, on the sol11h by the Lake Worth Inlet, on the west by Lake Worth, and on the east by the Atlantic Ocean. Mobility WUCI The City reports no traffic congestion o r parking problems in the beach area. Aceess to the City from the mainland is made by crossing Blue Heron Boulevard into the City of Riviera Beach to the north. This road is linked with the two major transportation facilities in the City of Palm Beach Shores which are Lake Drive and Ocean Avenue. Lake Drive is a northlsol11h road that serves the western perimeter of the island. Similarly, Ocean Avenue provides north/south traffic along the Atlantic Ocean on the eastern perimeter of the island. These roads are connected at the sol11hem end of the island by Inlet Way; which provides east/west traffic movem,ent. In the most recent Traffic Circulati on Plan of the City Comprehensive Plan, these roads were functioning at _LOS .A. In addition, the pedestrian system includes a Parkway, a pedestrian path and park extending north-south through the center of the City. Traffic volumes in the City are highest between January and March. Daily traffic volumes are at their peak during the weekends &om I :OOpm. and 4 :00pm. Parking Issues The City does not provide on-street parking in the beacli area. However, parlcing at lots near the beach is available to residents and visitors, who are required to have parlcing permits. Pcrnlits are priced at $10.00 for residents, per year. Visitors have the option of paying $100.00 for a seasonal permit or parking in the City of Rivera Beach and walking to the beach area in the City of Palm Beach Shores. The City's position is that there is no need for additional parking, since most residents waiJc to the beach and there is no problem with accommodating visitors. A 33

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Tr1Uisit Service The Palm Beach County Transportation Authority (CoTran), the primary transit operator in Palm Beach County, provides transit service in Palm Beach Shores. CoTran operates one ftxed-routc in the City of Palm Beach Shores. Route I C provides service from the mainland along Lake Drive, Ocean Avenue, and Inlet Way. The route provides a strong connection with other routes in the CoTran system. Transit service in the City of Palm Beach Shores operates from approximately 5:30am to 8:30pm on 60 minute headways, Monday through Friday. Saturday service operates from approximately 7:30am to 7:00pm. Residents and visitors b.ave access to the service. CoTran's basic adult fare is $1.00, with reduced fares available at $.50 for the elderly, disabled, and children. Studies The City's most recent Traffic Element includes goals, objectives, and policies for improving traffic circulation to beach areas. However, the Element includes a policy to assist travelers needing access to the City and beach area through improved signage on the island. Policy 02.01.08.01 states: "The City should request the cooperation of the City of Riviera Beach in improving access via Parle Avenue by removing the four-way stop sign at Beach Road,. by repaving the street sUrface and by placing appropriate signs at the intersection of Blue Heron Boulevard and Park A venue indicating access to Palm Beacli Shores." A-34

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIE S RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF S ANIBEL The City of Sanibel is located in Lee County on a barrier island (Sanibel Island) in the Gulf of Mexico. It is bordered on the north by Blind Pass, which separates it from Captiva Island, and on the remaining sides by the Gulf of Mexico and San Carlos Bay. MobiUty Issues The City reported that there is little traffic congestion, and minor parking problems in the beach area. The major transportation facility in the City is Periwinkle Way (SR 867). Periwinkle Way i s the principal north -so uth road on the island and changes to San ibel-Captiva Road as i t moves north through the City. Sanibel Causeway serves as the only access to the island, and provides traffic from the mainland with a direct connection to Periwinkl e Way. The Causeway is a toU facility and crosses a drawbridge to span San Carlos Bay. The Traffic Circulation Element of the 1990 Lee County Settlement Agreement estima ted those segments of Periwinkle Way that connects with the Causeway would be functioning at LOS F in 1994 for freeway service volumes . . Minor congestion is reported to occur on the Causeway as ttaffic from the mainland approaches Periwinkle Way, on the island. This congestion occurs during the morning peak as visitors from the mainland are trying to gain access to the beach area. Cong estion occurs most often during weekdays, and is heaviest from the Christmas Season through Easter. ParkiDg Issues On-street parlcing in the beach area is not pennitted. The City offers lot parking to residents and visitors. Lot parltiog is priced at $3.00 a day. A parking permit that is valid for one year can be purchased by residents for $50.00 and by non-residents for $30.00. The City indicates that it plans to inc rease the parking capacity in lots. A-35

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Traasit Se rvice The Lee County Transit Authority (LeeTran) provides transit service throughout the CoWity. LeeTran does not operate any service in the City of Sanibel. However, a privately operated trolley service is provided by The Sanibel Transit Company. This service operates along Periwinlde Way aod provides service to stops aloog the beach, including shopping centers in the City, and to stops on the mainland. The fare is $2.00 for an all-day ticket aod $4.00 for trips to neighboring islands. The service is operated Monday through Friday. Additionally, Sanibel" Trans it Company provides a narrated tour on the island for $10.00. The company reported average daily ridenhip between 25 to SO. Studies Th e City has no plans to study traffic or parking conditions. A copy of the Traffic Circulation and Mass Transit Element of the City Comprehensive Plan was not received from the City. Therefore, information regarding specific goals, objectives, or policies that were adopted by the City to i mprove transportation has not been reviewed as part of this evaluation. A-36

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF ST. PETERSBURG BEACH The City of St. Petersburg Beach is located in Pinellas County on a barrier island in the Gulf of Mexico. It is bordered on the north by the City of Treasure Island, Boca Ciega Bay on the east, and on the remaining sides by the Gulf of Mexico. Mobility Issues The City reports traffic and parking problems from visitors and residents accessing the beach area. There are three major roads in St. Petersburg Beach. State Road 699 (Gulf Boulevard/Blind Pass) operates north and south the length of the barrier island. The SL Petersburg Beach Causeway and the Pinellas Bayway connect the City with the mainland to the east, and cross drawbridges. The Pinellas Bayway is a toll road; and the toll for vehicles using the Bayway is $.75. State Road 699 provides continuous transportation linkage between both access roads on the island In addition, SR 699 operates as Blind Pass north of St. Petersburg Beacli Causeway, and as Gulf Boulevard south of the Causeway. Traffic congestioq is reported to occur on segments of Blind Pass where the road intersects with the Pinellas Bayway on the island. The FOOT plans to enhance capacity on this segment of Blind Pass to reduce congestion and to reach an acceptable LOS. Congestion also occurs on the access roads to the island when the drawbridges are open. Several bidirectional traffic counts on SR 699 and the roads that connect the island and the mainland have been completed. These counts reveal that volumes are highest on the weekends from II :OOam to I O:OOpm. During the year, traffic volumes are highest between December and March. Parking wues The City provides metered on-street parallel and slant parking. Additionally, the county operates a public parking lot at the beach, which is also conttolled by meters. Parking is priced at S.2S for 15 minutes. City employees are given permits to park in metered spaces. Residents are also given special permits that allow them to use spaces in residential areas. The City has no ::>lans to increase parking, especially in the beach area. However, parking in the Pass-A-Grille area os A-37

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limited and the City is considering plans to meet the parking demand for special events such as the "Taste of Pass-A-Grille." Transit Service Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PST A) is the primary public transportation provider in Pinellas County. The PST A does not operate service in the City of St. Petersburg Beach. However, the City contracts with Bats Transit to operate fixed-route service on the island and to the mainland. Bats transit uses minibuses and is provided to stops along the beach and to major retail and tourist locations on the island. Additionally, the service connects with Treasure Island Transit and with PSTA service on the mainland. Residents and visitors can use the service. Weekday and Saturday service is operated from approximately 7:00am to 6:00pm. Sunday service is provided from approximately 7:45am to 6:00pm. The regular fare for each one-way trip is $1.00; the reduced fare for senior citizens and people with disabilities is S.7S; and youth is $.50. In addition to providing fixed-route service, Bats operates the only taxi service in the City. Bats reports approximately 270 average daily passenger trips on the transit service. Studies of the limited parking in the Pass-A-Grille area, the City is considering plans to operate a specialttansit service to mitigate parking problems during special events. In addition, review of the most recent Traffic Circulation Element of the City of St. Petersburg Beach Comprehensive Plan indicates that the City is interested in promoting transit as an option to driving a car. Policy I. S l states: "The City shall evaluate the need for public transportation. A-38

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS ASKED TO CITY OFFICIALS CITY OF TREASURE ISLAND The City of Treasure Island is located in Pinellas County on a barrier island in the Gulf of Mexico The City is bordered on the north by Johns Pass, which separates the City from the City of Madeira Beach, and is bordered on the south by Blind Pass, which also separates the City from the City of St Petersburg Beach. On the west, the City is bordered by the Gulf of Mexico and Boca Ciega Bay serves as a natural border to the east. Mobility Is11ues There are two major roads in the City of Treasure Island. SR 699 (Gulf Boulevard) runs north and south the length of the barrier island, and provides access to the cities of Madeira Beach and St. Petersburg Beach. The Treasure Island Causeway coMects the City to the mainland to the east. These roads cross drawbridges to access the island, and the Treasure Island Causeway is a toll facility. The toll for vehicles using the Causeway is $.50. Traffic and parking problems from residents ani! visitors to the beach area are not reported to be a concern of the City. The most recent Traffic Circulation Element of the City Comprehensive Plan states that: "[a]t the acceptable LOS D standard for peak hour on all collector and arterial roadways within the City, there are no road segments operating at unacceptable peak hour levels of service . However, the element reports that some traffic congestion occurs on segments of the Treasure Island Causeway. In addition, the City reports that there are marginal variations in traffic volumes during the year, or week, and that volumes are highest on week days from 7:00am to !O:OOam and from 3:00pm to 6:00pm. ParkiDg Issues The City provides on-street parallel and slant parking and maintains parking lots near the beach. Meters are used to control on-street and lot parking Parking is priced at $.25 for 15 minutes. While the City has not concluded that additional parking is prohibitive, there is no demand for more parking. A-39

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Traa.sit Service Pinellas Suneoast Transit Authority (PSTA) is the p rimary public provider in Pinellas County. The PST A does not Openlte service in the City of Treasure Island However, the City operates fiXed-route transit system, Treasure Island Transit, on the island. It connects with Bats Transit in the City of Sl Petersburg to the south and with PST A service on the mainland. The service uses regular buses, and residents and visitors are permitted to use the service. Service is operated each day of the week from approximately 8:00am to 5:OOpm. The regular for each one-way trip is $1.00 and discounted fares are offered 10 senior citizens, disabled persons, and youth. Treasure Island Transit reports approximately 40 average daily passenger trips on the service. Studies Th e City has not conducted any stUdies that focus o n parking or traffic problems, and the most recent Traffic Element of The City Comprehensive Plan did not adopt a specific goal objective, o r policy for improving traffic in tbe beach area. . A 40

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TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS IN BEACH COMMUNITIES QUESTIONS TO ASK CITY PLANNING DIRECTORS Do you have any traffic or parking problems that result from people going to the beach? Aze there bridge tolls to access the beach? If so, how much? Do you cross drawbridges to access the beach? How many? If there have been problems, what methods have you used to alleviate traffic and parking congestion? At what locations has traffic congestion occurred? Beach? Bridges? Mainland? During what time of day is traffic congestion the worst? During what day of the week is traffic congestion the worst? During what month or months of the year is traffic congestion the worst? Is there on-street parking in your city? What type (i.e., parallel or slant)? What type of parking is provided on the beach (lots, onstreet, public, private)? Have you concluded that providing more parking is prohibitive? Can visitors park in parking lots operated by the city? What is the charge for parking? Aze parking meters used to control parking? A 41

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Is transit available to persons going to the beach? If you have instituted transit alternatives, what are they? Is regular public transit provided by the public transit agency or some other entity? Does the beach transit service coD!Iect to the regular transit service prov i ded within the region? What kind of vehicles provide tbe transit servic e to tbe beach? What is tbe fare? Is it the same as regular transit or Do you have any partnerships that support the expense of tram service such as boteVciry/ cowtty / stal!detc? Is there any park and ride servi c e from the mainland to tbe beach? What are tbe houn of operation? Who owns the park and ride lots? If you use a private operator, who is it and what are tbe hourly rates? Do beach residents have access to transit? I Have you done any studies on this subject? Would i t be possible to receive a copy of your city's Comprehensive Plan ? Would you be able to send us a copy of your Transportation, Traffic Circulati on Transit Elements from your Comprehensiv e Plan? A42

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;.. t: CITY OF DEERFIELD BEACH Buell Visitor (Tbunday) D
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> t CITY OF DEERFIELD BEACH U .. tb Visilor Oat Beach Visitor. The City of Deerfield Beach would like infonnation about your perception o f traffi c and patl I J Beach? I_ Yes, 2_No If yes, >ki p to qu<:Stlon n. Arc you a seasonal rcsidellt or v isitor? I Yes 2 _No If yes to Ia, how ion&? _____ If yes to Ia, is it east or west of illtracoutal Water ? I_ Yes l_No Are you a permanent resi dent of Broward County? I_ Yes 2_No Where do you res ide ? How did you get to !be beach today? I_ Car 2_ Walk 3_ Bicyc le 4_ Transit How many in your party? Whco you leave the beach today how will you get tO' your destination? I_ Car 2_ Walk 3_ Bicycle 4_ Transit In your opinion, is there 1 traffiC problem for people lravclin& tol&om lbe beach? !_Yes 2_ No 3_ SometimC5 If ye5 or somelimcs, where? -----------Wilen ? ________ ______ ___ 6. 6L 1 71. a. Sa. 9 In y our opin i on is there a plllkip to que5tion *8) If tb i s were opualcd cvuy 20 minutes, w ould you use the service i f tbc far e foe 1 one-way trip is: I free 2_ S.2S 3_ $.50 4 S .7S s Would J>ever usc it if transi t service were operated from localioru in the Cit y o f Deerfield Beach (i e ., shopping centers along Hillsboro Blvd. Federal Hwy and Milicary T rail) to the beach ev.,Y 30 minutes, would you usc the service if tbc fare for a onew ay trip is: I_ SlS 2_ $.SO 3_ $ .7S 4 $ 8 S 5 Would never usc it (>kip to question N9) I f t.hisauv ice were operated every 60 minulel, would y o u use 1he service if tbc fare for a one-way trip is : I $.2S l_ S.50 3_ S.7S 4 U S $ Would never use it How lon& will you be at the beach todaY? ______ THANK YOU

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APPENDIXB Appendix B presents detailed data on vehicle license plates !hal were surveyed.

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B 2

PAGE 94

POE97L 1TY48M REN82.1C PNS66L 1VE78C IHQ IJQ IlW ISE KAK liT RFR 121 PNRSIN PKWIOA IHS671 QQJ47J PXI61S QOH90N IFP93A IFP 93A IFP93A NUM97V HMZ062 HMZ062 QQ020K KAF79V HLQS7L LRE89V liJB S03 'LQP97B POE02Q QMB97F QFVJSW QQA93T QMCJ6X HNW2.23 QG039V JUBSJG HHS734 PKP300 RJV4SH RJV4SH POR021 NRWSIF AZEOJ3 JIU93U JIU93U JIU93U RFR72M KQS931 Broward Palmlle..:h Palmlle..:h PIIIZI Be..:h Broword P&lalBacb P&lal Bcooll PalmBeoob P&lall!each Palm Beach Palm a-ll Palm a-ll P&lal Bcooll Palm a-ll P&lals-.b Palm a-ll Palm Beach Palm Bcooll Dade Save. cbc Mancee Save tbc Mntee Palm&och PalmBcooll !!toward Broword Save tho Mntcc PalmBacb Browanl Palm&och Palm Bach Palm a-ll Palm a-ll Saw tbo Mcatee Palmlleocb Po!D.IIeocb s .... Polm&och Polms-.b Polm&och Polm&och Polmlleocb ('l!o!lcnF Polm&och Palm&och Polms-.b PllmBcooll Polm&och Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. FL Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. FL Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Fl. Boca Rol
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QLV20V QLV 20V QQA41S PDF69Y GHB83R KQW 61D KAM19 X LWV 26J RVX62W PPP 141'1 RHKSSV LXC32I HRZ27M NLWOSP HDW61T RJV ISV LGP040 LGP040 PCS3 7 C NRZ87N NRZ87N NMT 8 9Z QTLSOC PNY54P PHZ84D NUD39N JCS 14Q KPASSR LWS88A PPX20Z HRR44M HDS39Y IIQ 22L PKP31W P PP9SO Palm Beach Palmlleocll Palmlleocll Browud Browud Palm Beach Palm Beach Browa:d Browud Browud Browa:d Browa:d Browa:d Palm Beach Protect 1be Panlher Florida Panther Browa:d Bro w a:d Browa:d Palm Beach Palm Beach Browa:d B1owa d Browan! Btowa:d Blowa d Palm Beach Browa:d Browa:d Oransc Browa:d Browa:d Browa:d Palm Beach Browa:d Fl.. Fl.. FL Fl.. Fl.. Fl.. Fl.. FL Fl.. FL FL FL Fl.. Fl.. Fl.. Fl.. Fl.. Fl.. FL FL FL Fl.. FL Fl.. Fl.. Fl.. FL Fl.. Fl.. FL FL Fl.. Fl.. Fl.. FL Fl.. CO
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