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Dade County five-year transportation disadvantaged plan, 1992-1996

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Title:
Dade County five-year transportation disadvantaged plan, 1992-1996
Physical Description:
1 v. (various pagings) : charts ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
University of South Florida -- Center for Urban Transportation Research
Metropolitan Planning Organization (Metropolitan Dade County, Fla.)
Publisher:
University of South Florida, Center for Urban Transportation Research
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
People with disabilities -- Transportation -- Planning -- Florida -- Miami-Dade County   ( lcsh )
People with disabilities -- Transportation -- Planning -- Florida -- Miami Metropolitan Area   ( lcsh )
Older people -- Transportation -- Planning -- Florida -- Miami Metropolitan Area   ( lcsh )
Genre:
technical report   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available online.
General Note:
Performed for the Metro-Dade Metropolitan Planning Organization.
General Note:
"August 1992."
General Note:
Final report.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030237954
oclc - 28968021
usfldc doi - C01-00196
usfldc handle - c1.196
System ID:
SFS0032296:00001


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DADE COUNTY FIVE-YEAR TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED PLAN {9921996 Final Report

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. DADE COUNTY FIVE-YEAR TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED PLAN 1992-1996 Final Report Prepared for the Metro-Dade Metropolilan Planning Organization by the Center for Urbu Trauportatton Researdl College of Engineering Univenlty of South Florida August 1992

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CONTENTS List of Figmes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . u1 List of Tables . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv Chapter 1 Introduction and Goals and Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Study Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Goals and Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Chapter Z Population aud Demand Estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 'ID Poplllation Forecasts ......................................... 7 TD Categocy I Forecasts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 TD Category II Population Forecasts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Poplllation Growth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Demand for TD Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Forecasts of Total Demand, Supply, and Unmet Demand .................. 18 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Chapter 3 The Community Transportation Coordinator Program . . . . . . 21 CTC Or ga n ization and Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Paratransit Operations Division Operating and Financial Data . . . . . . . 27 Chapter 4 Ioveotory Of Otber Transportatioo Programs . . . . . . . . . . 31 Resource Availability ........... ....... ............................ 33 Public Participation Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Chapter 5 Needs Assessmeot aod Program Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . 35 U nmet Deman.d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5 Peer Group and Trend Analys i s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Chapter 6 .. Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Issue/Problem Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 RecoiDDlendations ................................... : . . . . 47 1

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CONTENTS (Cont.) Chapter 7 Transportation Disadvantaged Five-Year Plan FiveYear Plan Actions Financial Plan . . . 0 0 0 49 49 52 Chapter 8 Service Monitoring Program . . 0 0 55 MDT A's Monitoring Procedures ReC0111Dlended Improvements . Service Quality and Accessibility . . . Service Utilization Effectiveness and Efficiency Safety and Maintenance Data Collection . . Appendix A 0 0 0 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix B 0 0 0 0 0 0 AppendiiC 0 0 ii 56 57 57 58 58 59 60 A-1 B-1 C-1

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Figure I Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figur e 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 LIST O F F IGURES Dade County TD Plan Development Process . . . . . . . . . . 2 Goals and O b jectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Dad e County TD Category I population, 1992 . . . . . . . . . . 11 High Growth Rate Census Tracts, 1 990 ..................... .. 14 CTC Organizational Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Pro ject Implementation Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 S am ple Data Coll e ction Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 iii

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Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 4 Table 5 Table 6 Table 7 Table 8 Table9 Table 10 LIST OF TABLES Dade County Disabled, Elderly and Low-Income Population Projections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 TO Category I Population Projections by Discrete Subgroups . . . . . 12 TO Category U Population Projections by Discrete Subgroups . . . . . 13 Trips Supplied in 1990 ..................................... 16 Forecasts of Program Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Forecasts of General T rips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Forecasts of Total Demand ................................... 18 Summary of Projected Demand and Umnet Needs . . . . . . . . . 19 Dade County ere Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Inventory of Human Service Agency Transportation Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Table 11 Peer Group Data, 1990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Table 12 Dade County Operating Trends .................. ............. 39 Table 13 Funding Projections .... : .................................. 53 Table 14 Sample Performance Evaluation Report ......................... 64 iv

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Cbapter 1 Introduction and Goals and Objectives The Dade County Tnnmortation Dbadygtaged
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Figure 1 Dade County TD Plan Development Process . Develop Goals and Objectives (Chapter 1) < Develop County -Wide Population Estimates (Chapter 2) J Identify TD Population and Level of Specialized Transportation Services Provided (Chapter 2) Estimate Demand for sgecialized Transportation Services ( hapter2) + + Assess ExlstlnR Network of TD Identify Unmet Demand on Services (Chapter 2) (C apters 3 and 4) Develop Recommendation for Critical Issues Improvements (C apter 5) Develop Five-Year TD Plan (Chapter7) 2

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To date, efforts to coordinate the available specialized transportation services in the county have been limited. However, the MDTA, in its role as the CTC of Dade County, recently made coordination a priority and has assigned a full-time staff person to carry out the tasks associated with increasing the level of coordination within the county. Since the state's enabling legislation supports coordination as a means of enhancing the mobility of transportation disadvantaged persons, this study also includes an assessment of each human service agency for which transportation data was available in terms of its potential for inclusion in a coordinated network of specialized transportation services in Dade County. Goals and Obje(tjves One of the initial tasks in the development of a plan is to identify the intent of the plan and what is to be accomplished with the plan, from the local peapectiye. Therefore, one of the initial steps taken in this study was to meet with the TD Coordinating Board and the public at a workshop to obtain local inputs for the development of goals and objectives. The initial meeting for this project was held in December 1991 with representatives from the TD Coordinating Board, the CTC, and the MPO. At that time, there was a detailed discussion concerning the purpose and objectives of this study from the perspective of each individual present. Representatives from the Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR) who attended the meeting had prepared a tentative list of goals and objectives as a starting point for the discussion. This tentative list was refmed into a draft set of goals and objectives as a result of the discussion at the first meeting to incorporate the concerns of the TD Coordinating Board. The draft goals and objectives were then presented at a public workshop in January to solicit inputs regarding the TD program in Dade County. Comments from those in attendance at the public workshop were used to revise the draft goals and objectives into a final set to provide direction for the completion of this project and to help shape Dade County's TD Program through the next five years. 3

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The final goals and objectives are presented in Figure 2. There are four principal goal statements: Maximize use of existing resources; Expand coordinated service program; Develop and implement quality standards; and Meet additional needs of transportation disadvantaged persons. Objective 1 Objective 2 Objective 3 Objective 4 Objective 6 Objective 6 1 2 Figure 2 Goals and Objectives Reduce duplication of services. IdentifY and utilize additional specialized transportatiOn resources. Improve management and operating programs and procedures. Develop and Implement operating and financial monHoring programs. Educate social sefVice agency staff on the benefits of coordination and use of fixed route transit services. Train clients of social service agencies to use existing frxed-route transit service. Provide additional non-sponsored trips. with ADA Within each of the four goal areas are two to four objectives, which are more specific statements of intent geared to the concerns of Dade County. Thus, for example, regarding the goal to maximize use of existing resources, the specific objectives sre to reduce duplication of services, obtain additional provider resources, improve management and operating programs and procedures, develop and implement operating and financial monitoring programs, educating social service agency staff on the benefits to their clients of coordinated transportation services and of using fixed-route transit services., and training social service agency clients to use existing fixed route transit services. 4

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The second goal, to expand the county's coordinated service, includes, as objectives, establishing connections between Dade County's fixed route transit services and the specialized services in the area, increasing the number of participating agencies, and promoting the use of volunteers where appropriate The third goal of developing and implementing quality standards includes two objectives. The first is to improve employee training programs in areas such as passenger assistance techniques, CPR, and first aid. The second is to improve the quality of the marketing and outreach programs used to promote the specialized services in Dade County. The fourth and fmal goal is to meet additional needs of transportation disadvantaged residents of the county; objectives focus on proyiding additional non sponsored trips and identifying the impact on the MDT A -in its role as the CTC-of complying with requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The intent of this five-year plan is to giv e Dade County some guidelines on how to improve the delivery of TD transportation services overall in a manner that will enable the CTC to take steps toward accomplishing the broader goals and objectives. Specifics on how to actually carry out activities to achieve the stated goals and objectives, such as improving employee training programs for passenger assistance techniques and CPR sl)ould be developed locally so tlult the programs are consistent with local practices. The goals and objectives are linked to other aspects of the project in several ways. First, they identify areas of concern tlult provide direction to the data analysis phase of the study. For example, attention was given to the degree of service duplication, to what problems (if any) exist in the areas of operating and management performance, and to which agencies should be targeted for participation in an expanded coordinated services network Second, they help to establish the performance measures and evaluation criteria that are used to evaluate recommendations for improvements to the existing specialized transportation program. And finally, they ensure that the study will be responsive to the needs of the local community. s

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Chapter 2 Population a n d Demand Estimates The demand for paratransit service by transportation disadvantaged (TD) persons is influenced by many factors. The most important factor affecting the demand is the size and compositio n of the TO populatioo. Cbapter 427 of the Florida Statutes (FS) defines transportation disadvanlaged persons as: w those persons who because of physical disability, income status, or age are unable to transport themselves or to purcha.se transportation and are, therefore dependent upon others to obtain access to. health care, employment, education, shopping; social activities, or other life-sustaining activities, or children who are handicapped or hlgh-rl.sk or at-risk as defined In s. 411.202. Many disabled, low income, or elderly persons are in fact, able to transport themsel ves and therefore, uoder a strict interpretation of the statute, may not be transportation disadvantaged. However, the transportation services provided by Dade County's specialized transportation providers are not limited only to those persons who are transportation disadvantaged according to Chapter 427 guidelines TO transportation services provide trips to agency programs and trips to geoeral, or non-program related, destinations. A program trin is one made by a client of a government or social service agency for the purpose of participating in a program of that agency. Examples of program trips are trips to congregate dining facilities, sheltered workshops, and job training facilities A general ll:lJl is one made by a transportation disadvantaged person to a destination of his or her choice, not to an agency program. Examples of general trips are trips to work, grocery sto res, and recreational areas. Agencies that purchase TO transportation services to transport clients to programs typically serve peiSOns who can be classi.fied as disabled, elderly andlor low income. These agency programs are open to all persons within the specific demographic groups served (subject to available funding), regardless of their need for TD transportation services. In addition to the program trips that these agencies subsidize, some agencies also subsidize general trips. General trips are also 6

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subsidized with TD Trust Fund monies. Eligibility for Trust Fund monies follows the guidelines contained in Chapter 427 (i.e., persons must be unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation). More persons are eligible for agency-funded trips than for trips subsidized by the TD Trust Fund. Therefore, Dade County's speciallz.ed transportation providers serve two population groups. The first group, referred to as the TD Category I population, includes disabled, elderly, and income persons. These persons arc eligible to receive governmental and social service agency sub$idies for program trips and general trips, and are not necessarily transportation disadvantaged. The second group, the TD Category II population, includes those persons who are transportation disadvantaged according to the eligibility guidelines in Chapter 427. These persons are eligible to receive the same subsidies as Category I persons plus they are eligible to receive TD Trust Fund monies for general trips. The Category I population includes all disabled individuals regardless of the degree of disability while the Category II population includes only those disabled individuals wbo are incapable of transporting themselves. The Category II population is a subset of the Category I population. Chapter 427 also includes the establishment of the TD Trust Fund to provide a source of fmancial assistance to CTC' s in providing general trips to persons from the TD Category II population. Funding sources that comprise the TD Trust Fund include a percentage of the state's vehicle registration fees, a percentage of a state public transit block grant and one-third of the receipts from the sales of temporary handicapped parking permits. TO Trust Funds are distributed to each county based on its geographic size and the size of its TD population. TD Po pu lation Foruesy Because the Dade County TD transportation system serves two population groups depending on the type of trip subsidy for which a person is eligible (i.e., agency sub$idy or TD Trust Fund subsidy), it is necessary to estimate both the Category I population and the Category II population. The 1990 Census provided total population, elderly population, and low-income population data, by census tract. National percentages from two sources were used to estimate the number of disabled persons. CumnJ Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, 1990 (NHIS) 7

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' provided percentages to estimate the number of disabled persons in the Category I population, and the National Survey of Transportation Handicapped People (NSTIIP) provided percentages to estimate the number of disabled persons in the Category II population Throughout this report, these persons will be referred to as transportation disabled The NHIS uses several degrees of limitation of activity to determine disability incidence rates by age, race, and sex Two degrees of activity limitation were used in this report: "with limitation in major activity" and "with activity limitation". The first tenn, "with limitation in major activity", refers to persons who are limited in the kind or amount of activity that they are able to perform relative to the major activity or activities associated with their age group (e.g attending school, working, or independent living). The second term, "with activity limitation", covers a broader range of activities. It refers to persons who are limited in their major activity QI in other activities (e.g, social or recreational activities). The NHIS definition of "major activity" varies with age. For persons age 18 to 69, the major activity is defmed as working or keeping house, while for persons age 70 and over, the major activity is defmed as the capacity for independent living (e.g., the ability to bathe, shop, dress, and eat without assistance). The percentage of persons age 65 to 69 "with limitation in major activity" (i.e., working or keeping house) is larger than the percentage of persons age 70 and over "with limitation in major activity'' (i.e independent living) because many persons who are no longer able to work or keep house are still capable of independent living. Since the incidence of disability actually increases with age, using the incidence rates for elderly persons "with limitation in major activity" was not considered appropriate because it would result in a lower frequency of disabled persons among the more-advanced elderly than the less-advanced elderly. Therefore, for persons 65 and over, the percent of persons "with activity limitation" was used to estimate the number of disabled elderly. For persons less than 65 years of age, the percent of persons "with limitation in major activity" was used to estimate the number of disabled persons. Use of the NHIS data to estimate disabled persons in Dade County requires some adjustment of the data to match the age used to defme elderly persons in Florida. The age breakdown provided in the NHIS lacks a break between persons who are less than 60 years of age and persons who are 60 years of age or over (the age used to define elderly in this report) Therefore, the Dade County population age 45 to 64 was split into two groups: age 45 to 59, and age 60 to 64. The NHIS national percentage of persons age 45 to 64 with a limitation in a major activity was applied to both of these age groups. 8

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The second population group, the Category II population, required estimates of the number of persons with disabilities that prevent them from transporting themselves. This was estimated using data from the NSTHP, which suggests that 2.7 percent of persons aged 0 to 59 are transportation disabled and that 19.0 percent of persons aged 60 and over are transportation disabled. The definition of transportation-disabled persons in the NSTHP is consistent with Chapter 427 guidelines The Category II population also required an estimate of the number of persons who are unable to transport themselves because of income status. These persons were estimated as follows. The first step was to estimate the number of persons in Dade County below the federal poverty line (i.e., the Category I low-income population). However, since many low-income persons may own automobiles and be able to afford to use them QI they may have access to and be able to afford to use public transit, the poverty line threshold may not provide an accurate assessment of the ability of low-income persons to transport themselves. Therefore, two additional characteristics were used to determine those low-income persons who are unable to transport themselves because of income status: (I) the lack of an available automobile in the household, and (2) the lack of access to public transit. These persons are referred to as "low-income transportation disadvantaged persons" National statistics on automobile availability by household income levels were used to estimate the number of low-income persons who do not have an automobile available in the household. The existence of fixed-route transit service by census tract is used to determine if there is access to public transit. That is, if the census tract has fixed-route service it is assumed that low-income persons residing in that census tract have access to the service For census tracts that are only partially served by fixed route transit service, it was assumed that only one half the TD population of these census tracts have access to fixed route transit services. This may underestimate the number of low-income persons eligible under Chapter 427 because some low income persons who do ROt have an automobile and who live in a census tract with fixed-route transit service may actually not live within the service area of the transit operator (i.e., within one-half mile of a transit route). The number of these persons, however, should be small. Route planning of these services typically considers the location of low-income residents because this group comprises a major market for fixed-route services. It is also true that some low income persons who own automobiles cannot afford to operate them and that some low-income persons who have access to fixed-route transit cannot afford the fare. Again, the number of these persons should be relatively small. 9

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The population estimates contained in this report must be viewed in light of certain issues. The number of disabled persons and transportation-disabled persons in Dade County was estimated using national incidence rates. While these sources are the best currently available, national incidence rates may not accurately reflect those of Dade County In addition, the populatio n characteristics of Dade Cowrty are constantly changing Many changes have taken place even since the 1990 census, such as the continual immigration of refugees from Cuba, Haiti and Central America and the increase in UIICDlployment as a result of the recent closure of Eastern and Pan American Airliues. These events have not been by the census data and could have an impact on the low-income segment of Dade County s population estimates and network of transportation services It is likely that most of these individuals have access to the county's fixed-route transit services and would therefore have a minimal impact on the area's specialized transportation services. However, it may be advisable, as a foUow-up to this study, to undertake efforts locally to identify these population segments assess their impact on local transportation services, and update this report if necessary. It should be noted that underestimating the population docs not pose serious problems for the quality of this report or the resulting recommendations. This report is intended to be used as a planning document, and as such, it does identify a considerable number of transportation disadvantaged persons who need specialized transportation service. Recommendations designed to improve service to those persons who can be identified will only enhance the libility of the existing network of transportation services to accommodate the needs of other population segments as they are identified. TD Category I Populattog Forecasts Table I shows county totals of the three segments of the Category I TD population (elderly, disabled, and low income). There is overlap among these groups (e.g., many disabled persons are also elderly and/or low income). Table 2 shows the Category I TD population broken down by seven distinct market segments (i. e., there are no overlaps among the groups). The methodology used to account for the overlaps among the Ibm: primary TD groups is described in Appendix A. The total number of persons in the TD Category I population is estimated to be 753,725 in 1992, and is forecasted to increase to 796,154 in 1996. The seven market segments are presented graphically in Figure 3. Category I population by census tract is presented in Appendix B. 10

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Table 1 Dade County Disabled, Elderly, and Low-Income Population Projections 1992-1996 Disabled Elderty Low Income 240,467 243,988 247,582 251,203 253,988 372,324 3n, 791 383,336 388,957 393,284 351,352 356,517 361,755 367,060 371,136 Dade County 'I'D Category I Population, 1992 Dloabled 240,467 Low Income 351,352 262,986 Elderly 372,324 I Total = 753,725 I TD Categorv U Population Forecasts The TD Category II population is a subset of the Category I population, accounting for 16.5 percent of the latter population group. As shown in Table 3, the Category II population is forecasted to be 124,024 in 1992 and to increase to 131,030 in 1996. Transportation-disabled elderly persons who do not bave incomes below the federally established poverty guidelines comprise the largest market segment of is population, totaling more tban 58,000. This segment accounts for 46.8 percent of the 1992 Category II population. 11

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' Table 2 TD Category I Populat ion Projections by Dlsl:rete S u bgro ups 1992-1996 Disabled Non-Elderly/Non-13.0% 97,697 99,150 100,581 102,071 Low-Income Elderly/Non13.3% 99,872 101,336 102,826 104,339 Low-Income E l derly/Low2.9% 22,180 22,494 22,833 23,159 Income Non-Elderly/ 2.7% 20,718 21,008 21,322 21,634 Low-Income Elderly Non-Disabled/ 6 0% 45, 488 48,155 48,828 47,524 Low-Income Non-Disabled/ 27. 2% 204,804 207,806 210 ,849 213,935 Non-Low-Income Low-Income Non-Elderly/ 34.9% 262,986 266,860 21o.1n 274,743 Non-Disabled P o p ulation Growtb 103,195 105,491 23,429 21,873 48,032 216,332 277,802 The p o pulation growth rate for Dade County between 1980 and 1990 was 19.2 percent, with some areas experiencing a higher than average growth rate. Specifically, 31 of the total 267 census tracts grew at an above average rate; 23 of those tracts grew between 20 and 60 percent while the remainder grew at rates ranging from 60 to over 100 percent. Together, residents of these tracts represen t 14. 6 percent of the total population and 13. 3 percent of Dade County's TD Category I population. The Key Biscayne and Prince1on-Goulds subdivisions contain the largest percentage of rapidly growing tracts (50 percent and 25 percent respectively) while Kendall Perrine has the smallest number of tracts (5.3 percent) exhibiting aboveaverage growth rates. 12

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Table 3 TD Category ll P o pulati o n Projections by D iscrete 1992. 19% Transportation Disabled, 6.1% 7,517 7,623 7 744 7,857 Non-Elderly, Low Income Transportation D isabled, 28.6% 35,461 35,985 36, 522 37,041 Non-Elderly, Non-Low Income Transportation Disabled, 10.4% 12,875 13,068 13,267 13,452 Elderly, Low Income Transportation Disabled, 46.8% 58,008 58,867 59,720 60,597 Elderly, Non-Low Income Non-Transportation Disabled, 8 2% 10,163 10,315 10,461 10,6 1 8 Low Income, No Auto, No Fixed-Route 7 938 37,471 13 603 61,280 10,738 As can be seen on the census map in Figure 4, shaded areas that indicate census tracts digplaying high growth rates are spread throughout Dade County but the majority of those tracts are on the periphery. Exceptions are three tracts near the downtown area and tracts in Miami Beach which also experienced aboveaverage growth. Among the census tracts that experienced above-average population growth rates, 32.3 percent have TD Category I populations higher than the county a v erage of 37 8 percent. The majority of the tracts with above-average growth and above average proportions of TD Category I populations are located in Miami. Hialeah, Homestead and Key-Biscayne complete the list of municipalities containing census tracts that exhibited rap i d growth in the total population and the TD Category I population. All of these tracts benefit from fixedroute transit service Of the 10 census tracts with higher than average TD Category I population growth rates, nine are fully covered by fixed-route transit service and one is at least partially covered. Thus, a large number ofTD p er sons living in these high growth areas may be able t o use fixed-route transit service and may not be totally dependent on speciallzed transportation services 13

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1 4 c .. .. 0 u -... "' CC114114 troA:ta with 8IOII'Ih ntet greater than average (19.2% ) I

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Demand for TD Trap$portlltion Estimates of demand for TD service in Dade County over the next five years consist of two components: program trip demand (defined as the demand for those transportation services subsidized by an agency for the purpose of transporting clients to programs of that agency), and general trip demand (defined as the demand for non-program trips such as trips to the grocery store, bank, drug store, work, and some trips for medical purposes) Prior to estimating th e demand for program trips and general trips, it is necessary to estimate the current distribution of these trips in Dade County. Within the county approximately 30 soc i al service organizations provide TD transportation services. In addition, the county contracts with Comprehensive Parattansit Services (CPS) to provide transportation services to the transportation disabled. CPS consists of two specialized transportation programs. Special Transportation Service (STS) provides general trips for disabled persons and the Medicaid trip program provides medical trips for eligible Medicaid recipients. Many of the trips currently provided by these social service organizations are program trips, that is, the trips are to programs of the social service organizations. On the other hand, except for Medicaid trips provided by through its contract with Red Top Sedan the majority of trips provided by CPS through the STS program are general trips. As shown in Table 4, there were 1,729,136 TD trips supplied in Dade County in 1990. Of that number, 1,062,804 (61.1 percent) were provided by social service organizations and 252,709 (14.6 percent) were Medicaid trips provided by STS. General trips provided by STS totaled 413,623 or 23.9 percent of the total. The number of trips provided by social service organizations in Dade County, as shown here, is only an estimate based on agency surveys and te1epoone interviews with agency representatives. Many of the agencies do not keep accurate records of their transportation services Therefore, the number of trips provided, as shown in the table, are estimates and may not be completely accurate. Program Trip Demand -The demand for program trips is a "derived demand", that is, the demand for these trips is dependent upon the existence of the program to which transportation disadvantaged persons are transported. For example, demand for trips to sheltered workshops exists only because there are sheltered workshop programs and facilities. Thus, the demand for program trips is equal to the number of trips required to take advantage of the service offered by 15

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Table 4 Trips Supplied in 1990 General STS 413,623 23.9% STS-Medicaid 709 14. 6% Human Service 1,062,804 61.5% the programs. (Whether or not the need for social service programs is being met is, of course, a different issue.) In this respect, demand for program trips will depend on the level of funding for the various social service programs. Assuming that agency programs increase at the same growth rate as the TD population, program trip demand is forecasted to be 1,352,000 trips in 1992 and to increase to 1,428,000 trips in 1996, as shown in Table 5. This implies that social service programs will grow to meet new demand and that budgets for new and expanded programs will include sufficient funds to cover necessary transportation costs. General Trip Demand The approach used in this report involves the use of trip rates derived in a recent study of paratransit demand to forecast general trip demand. This approach was chosen because the trip rates are based on actual experiences of paratransit systems that are meeting most or all of the trip demand in their service areas. Further, this approach has been recommended by the Federal Transit Administration for use in estimating demand for ADA complementary paratransit services and was used in the Florida Five-Year Transportation Disadvantaged Plan. In the aforementioned study, trip rates were developed from an evaluation of seven paratransit systems that were considered to provide high levels of service (e.g., minimal or no restrictions 16

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Table 5 Forecasts of Program Trip Demand 1992-1996 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1,428,000 on the nwnber of trips a person can take, minimal or no waiting list, and minimal or no denial of trip ). These systems are considered to be meeting most, if not all, of the general trip demand in their service areas. According to the results of this study, the trip rate for urban areas is 1.0 trips per month, represents the demand for general trips. Total demand for general trips is simply the Category II population multiplied by this trip rate. The Category II population was used because many general trips are currently subsidized with TD Trust Fund monies and eligibility for these funds is determined based on the definition of transportation disadvantaged persons contained in Chapter 427. Although it is likely that some general trips that are subsidized with agency funds are taken by Category I persons who do not meet the transportation disadvantaged definition in Chapter 427, this number is expected to be small. In an environment where available governmental or social service agency funds are scarce, agencies will tend to allocate funds for general trips to the most needy (i.e., the Category II population) Further, non transportation disadvantaged persons are more likely to have and use other available modes, primarily a personal automobile, to make general trips. Applying the above demand rate to the Category II TD population in Dade County results in a projected demand for 1,488,000 general trips in 1992, as shown in Table 6 The projected demand for general trips is forecasted to increase to 1,573,000 trips by 1996. 17

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Table 6 Forecasts of General Trip Demand 1992-1996 1992 1 1 993 1 1994 1 1995 1 1996 1,573,000 Forecasts of Total Demand. Sgootv and Uomet Dtmud for Paratransit Service Forecasts of total paralransit demand, including program and general trips, range from 2,&40,000 trips in 1992 to 3,001,000 trips in 1996, as shown in Table 7. 1993 1994 1995 1 1996 1 Table 7 Forecasts of Total Demand 1992-1996 2,964,000 3,001 ,000 To calculate the unmet demand in the county, an estimate was made of the number of trips that will be provided during the five-year period. Estimates of the number of program and general trips provided were based on 1990 Section 15 data and operating data supplied through social service agency surveys and direct telephone conversations with agency representativ es. 18

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Projections of the number of program and general trips supplied are based upon the estimated population growth rate for Dade County. The estimates of wunet demand are shown in Table 8. This assumes that program planners should -and will -budget adequately for all program expenses. That is, tliat they will not increase the size of a program without increasing the amount budgeted to transport the additional clients as well. Therefore, both the demand for and the supply of program trips are forecasted to be 1,352,000 in 1992 and to increase to 1,428,000 in 1996. The supply of general trips is forecasted to be 487,000 in 1992 and 512,000 in 1996, based on modest increases in the current level of service offered and on the forecasted supply of trips subsidized by the TD Trust Fund The total supply of trips, therefore, is forecasted to be 1,839,000 in 1992 and to increase to 1,940,000 in 1996 1993 Table 8 Summary of P.rojected Demand and Unmet Needs 1992-1996 1,001,000 1994 2,923,000 1995 1996 Consequently, wunetdemand ranges from 1,001,000 trips in 1992 to 1,061,000 trips in 1996, (all of the unmet demand is for general trips). These estimates suggest that MDT A is meeting approximately 61 percent of the total demand for specialized transportation services in Dade County. Based on a number of other studies, it bas been found that comparable paratransit services meet an average of 25 percent of total demand. Therefore, the level of specialized transportation service provided in Dade County significantly exceeds that provided by comparable paratransit services. The gap between demand and supply is not expected to increase in size substantially, but neither is it going to decrease unless significant changes occur, such as policy changes that would regulate the demand for services or increase supply of services. 19

PAGE 26

Summary This chapter has described the Category I and Category II TD populations and the demand for paratransit services in Dade County The numbers indicate small but steady increases in the population and demand figures At present, the MOTA meets a respectable 61 percent of all trip needs of the county's TD population 20

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Chapte r 3 The Com munity Transportati o n Coo rdinator Program The establishment of a community transportation coordinator (CTC) is authorized by Cha pter 427 of the Florida Statutes. The CTC is responsible for ensuring that transportation disadvantaged (TD) transportation services are provided within its service area, under contract to the state TO Commission. The contract is referred to as a memorandum of agrtement (MOA), and is executed annually. It includes an operations plan and financial data detailing the p rovision of TO transportati on service ere Organization and Overview The CTC for Dade County is the Metro-Dade Transit Agency (MOTA). An organizational chart depicting the structure for the administration and delivery of TD transportation services is shown in Figure 5. Overall direction for TD transportation services in Dade County is provided by the local metropolitan planning organization (MPO), and the local TD coordinating The TD coordinating board for Dade County also has an advisory role in terms of setting policy and resolving critical issues related to TO transporta tion services in Dade County. The MDT A currently provides general purpose paratransit service primarily through its contract with Comprehensive Paratransit Services, Inc.'s Special Transportation Services (STS) program, but efforts are under way to coordinate with several human service agencies in the county to provide additional general trips to the TD population. The responsibilities of the MDT A s CTC program in addition to providing TD transportation servi ce through contra ctual arrangements, include soliciting additional service pro viders for their participation in a coordinated system, conductin g annual reviews of the transportation operato rs, educating the local TD population on how to usc the area's transit servic es, including fixed route service and STS, and complying with the requirements of the state's TD Commission. Day to day activities t o the administration and delivery of TD transportation are divided between two divisions within the MOTA. Efforts to coordinate the provision of paratransit service s of area human service agencies are carried out in the Customer Services Division. Paratransit services for disabled persons and Medicaid recipien ts are handled through the Bus 21

PAGE 28

FigureS CI'C Organizational Structure Transportation Disadvantaged Commission andrunds Offlclal Planning Appoints Coordinating Agency Contracts (MPO) and Staffs Board With Ove sees Community Transportation Coordinator (MOTA) + J Bus Operations Division Customer Service Division Coordnale twman service agency program and general trips Paratranslt Operations AITange 1D !PUlP trips Mobility training Medicaid .-vatlona Staff ere Coubacla IMth CPS lor clsabled (STS) and Medicaid transportation Comprehensive Paratranslt Services Contract with disabled (SI'S) and Medicaid operators t t Disabled Transportation J Medicaid Transportation J (STS Metro Umo) (RedTop) Automated Dispatch Services Medicaid and SIS' achedullng and dispatching SIS NMMII!ona 22

PAGE 29

Operations Division. The coordination of h u man service agency transportation services is in its relatively early stages in Dade County. The Customer Services Division staff have, over the past several months, successfully located several major providers of specialized transportation services and are currently negotiating agreements with at least seven operators that will enable the MDTA to purchase trips for TD persons from these agencies. Other activities of the Customer Service Division include arranging group trips for TD persons, such as the King's Creek Shoppers Tour, trips to Log Cabin and trips to the Community Habilitation Center. Organized trips are made every other week for a group of elderly and disabled residents of a condominium development to a local shopping center. Between October I, 1991 and April 1, 1992, the MDTA purchased 28 one-way vehicle trips from the Handi-Van Cab Company to provide 336 one-way passenger trips. The City of Miami Beach reim burses the MDTA for transportation service to the Log Cabin school for mentally disabled individuals. Between October 1, 1991 and April!, 1992, the MDTA purchased approximately 3,200 one-way passenger trips from Handi-Van The MDTA also purchases service from Handi-Van to provide transportation to the Community Habilitation Center where mentally disabled persons l earn landscaping and plant care job skills. Between October I, 1991 and April I, 1992, there were 236 one-way passenger trips provided to this center. The data described above was not included in the base data that was used for analysis purposes because its time-frame was inconsistent and would therefore decrease the validity of the data. However, the operating and administrative costs, miles, hours and one-way passenger trips associated with these programs should be tracked closely. Provision of specialized transportation for disabled persons and Medicaid recipients who reside in Dade County is subcontracted to Comprehensive Paratransit Services, Inc The MDT A directly handles all reservations for trips that are paid for through the Medicaid program. Comprehensive Paratransit Services, Inc. contracts with Red Top Sedan who provides scheduling and dispatching of Medicaid trips in addition to actual provision of service. Comprehensive Paratransit Services, Inc. also contracts with Metro Limo to provide transportation to disabled persons in Dade County who are not capable of using ftxed route transit services. The service is called Special Transportation Services (STS), and provides all trips, regardless of trip purpose, to disabled residents of Dade County who are eligible for the service. Demand for STS is so grest that it often exceeds the existing capacity of Metro Limo, the contract operator that provides the STS service. Therefore, Metro Limo subcontracts with a number of smaller private operators to serve the overflow demand. Metro Limo also subcontracts with Automated Dispatch Services, Inc. (ADS) to provide all reservation, scheduling and dispatching services for STS. 23

PAGE 30

. According to MDT A staff over 200 social service agenc ies in the county that are providing some level of agency-related transportation services. In addition, the county's Department of Human Resources, Elderly Services Division is providing specialized transportation service to elderly persons. These are not widely known and have very limited capacities. A more detailed descri ption of the various agency-related transportation services available in Dade County is provided in the next chapter. There is, however, a large number of transportation disadvantaged individuals from the elderly and low-income groups who are capable of and do utilize the fixed route transit services. According to state guidelines, one objective of a community transportation coordinator is to ensure that specialized transportation services be made available to all persons in the target populatio n groups who are unab l e to transport themselves. A primary means, being emphas ized by the TO Commission, of enhancing the availability of specialiwl transportation services for these groups is through the development of a coordinated network of human service agency transportation services, as is currently underway through the efforts of the MDT A's Customer Services Division staff Ideally, to avoid rebuilding an entire system from scratch", the network in Dade County would center around the existing STS program with additional capacity provided by other agencies in the county with the capacity to provide general-plll'pose non agency sponsore d trips The MOTA's fixed-route transit service, as well as the existing STS service comprise the "backbone" of providing transportation for TO persons in Dade County. With the above purpose in mind, a component of this project was to explore the advancement of coordination of specialized transportation services in Dade County. In the next chapter a description of the various agency transportation services is provided along with a des ignation of those agencies that have the best overall potential of participating in a coordinated service. Paqtrapsit Operation s Dlv!s!on The MOTA employs 41 full-time equivalent operati ons employees and 6 full-time equivalent administrative employees to oversee and carry out all operating and administrative aspects of the specialized transportation services, both Medicaid and STS. Paratransit Operation s Division St:aff -The MDTA has 47 full-time staff positions for the paratransit operations division. The chief of paratransit operations reports directly to the assistant director of bus operations of the MDT A. This position is responsi ble for management of the entire division of paratransit services. There is an administrative secretary assigned to assist the chief of paratransit operations in carrying out the relevant functions of overseeing the division. 24

PAGE 31

Three additional employees comprise the remainder of the administrative staff including a paratransit administrat ive officer who is responsible for management and supervision of the administrative section and supervision of the day-to-day activiti es of the operations and certification and moni toring sections The administrative section also includes an administrative officer whose p rimary responsibilities invo lve the production and analysis of internally and extemally required reports intended to the performance of the paratransit services division. In addition, this position entails developing recommendations to improve performance and assisting with implementation of approved recommendations. The remaining position involved in administering the paratransit services division is the office systems technician whose responsibilities include daily management and supervision of the computer operations and production of all computer output necessary for service provision, including trip verification and service monitoring The operations portion of the paratransit services division is divided into two sections, the reservations section and the certification and monitoring section. The primary function of the reservation section is to handle incoming calls for paralransit services for Medicaid eligible individuals while the main function of the certification and monitoring section is to provide and coordinate the monitoring of Medicaid and STS, including oversight of vehicle inspection and verification of trips taken by registered users of the services. The reservations section is directed by a manager who is reSPonsible for management of the scheduling function, supervision of the paratransit reservationist supervisors and oversjght of th e paratransit reservationists. The manager of the reservations section is assisted by a clerk typist There are four reservationist supervisors who supervise the reservationists to assure that telephone requests are handled promptly and courteously and that trip information is input accurately. The reservationist supervisors also provide assistance with difficult or unusual customer requests. Finally, in this section there are 25 telephone console opera tors (reservationists) whose responsibilities include answering telephone calls, entering trip information directly into a computer tenninal, responding to requests for information on reservations, service availability, etc., and resolving customer complaints regarding late pick-ups. The certification and monitoring section is directed by a manager who is responsible for developing and implementing the system's annual monitoring work plan, identifying problem areas and determining potential so lutions. The manager is also responsible for all oversight duties involved in the daily operations of the certification unit. The manager is assisted by a clerk typist 25

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The certification and monitoring section is divided into two subsections. The first subsection is made up of staff whose work focuses on monitoring the field operations of the various operators who provide peratransit service for the MDT A. All monitoring activities are managed by a paratransit support specialist who is responsible for overseeing field monitoring staff and staff involved in verifying trips taken by STS customers and periodically inspecting veh icles at the contractor's storage facility. This position is also assisted by a clerk typist. There are three field technicians who work in the monitoring subsection. Their primary responsibilities include collecting data on the operating performance of the contractors involved in providing specialized transportation service for the MDT A. Data collection activities include on-street spot checks to verify vehicle conditions, note driver courtesy, on time performance, and other relevant measures. The eligibility subsection is directed by an eligibility supervisor who is responsible for overseeing the daily activities of two eligibility interviewers. These three staff persons are responsible for certifying all potential registrants for the Medicaid and STS services. The eligibility interviewers must ascertain that each person requesting approval to use either the Medicaid or STS service has all appropriate documentation required and must verify that the documentation is in fact authentic. STS O verview STS operates seven days a week, from 6:00 a.m to 12:00 midnight. Reservations for services are made by contacting the Routing and Scheduling (R&S) office the day before service is required. Calls must be made to the R&S office between 8 : 00a.m. and 3:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, for next-day service. Calls are taken until 4:00 p.m. on Friday for requests for service on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday; until 6:00 p.m. on Friday for Sunday and Monday service; from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00p.m. on Saturday for Sunday and Monday service requests; and from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on Sunday for Monday service. STS users are charged a modest zone-based fare that ranges from $1.50 to $4.50 per one-way trip. STS provides both demand response and subscription service. Persons who require subscription service (i .e ., service that is provided on a set schedule such as Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 8:00 a.m.) are directed to call the STS project office to enroll in the subscription service program. The only requirement for subscription service, other than eligibility for the STS service in general, is that the person must maintain the set schedule for at lesst a one-month time period. The MDT A, in its role as the CTC of Dade County operates as a partial brokerage because some functions are kept in-house while many others are contracted out. The STS and Medicaid services had a fleet of 227 vehicles in fiscal year 1990 that provided 6,103,180 miles of service. 26

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Medicaid Transporta tion -As previously mentioned, the MOTA also provides a Medicaid transportation service. This service is aviillable to Medicaid recipients whose transportation costs for travel to medic al appointments are eligibl e expenses under the Medicaid program. This service is provided from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday The MOTA's guidelines specify that requests for service are to be made the day before service is needed. According to Fiscal Year 1989-1990 operati:Og data, the MDTA provided 252,709 one-way trips through the Medicaid transportation service. Paratransit OPerations DivifiQn Onerati!!& aod Fiuansial Data As described above, the MDT A provides specialized transportation service to disabled persons in Dad e County through a contract with Compreh ensive Paratrans it Services and does so using four primary sources of funding. Because the STS and Medicaid programs comprise such a large share of the overall services provided by th e MDTA, they represent the elements that the overall expenses of the system. 1bis section provides information concerning the operating and financial performance of the Paratransit Operations Division. During Fiscal Year 1989 the MOTA provided 666,332 passenger trips through the STS and Medicai d programs. Of these trips, 413,623 (62.1 percent) were provided through the STS program, and the remaining 252,7 09 (37.9 percent) were provided by the Red Top Sedan and were purchased with Medicaid funding. According to discussions with the study review committee, the number of registered users for the STS service and the number of passenger trips provided on STS have both been increasing by 25 percent per year for the past two or three years. These statements are further supported by the operating data that has been collected over the past three years, which indicate that there has been an increase in ridership of approximately 25 per c ent each year. If this rate of growth continues, the number of p assenger trips provided by the ere through the STS program will be 1.6 million in fiscal year 1996, representing a 281 percen t increase over the current level of ridership. This level of demand would, in all likelihood, overwhelm the existing system and exhaust available financial resources. The MDT A's paratransit operations division incurred operating expenses totaling S I 0,971,50 I in fiscal year 1989-1990. Of this amount, $9,649,724 (88.0 percent) was spent on purchasing transportation from Comprehensive Paratransit Services; $781,319 (7.1 percent) was spent on labor e xpenses-salaries and fringe benefits-and the remaining $540,458 ( 4.9 percent) was spent on materials and supplies, utilities, casualty and lillbillty insurance, services, and other miscellaneous expenses. 27

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As counterpart to its operating expenses, the MDT A paratransit operations division generated $726,111 (6.6 percent) through farebox revenues. Medicaid funding provided an additional $4,045,162 (36.9 percent) while local sources supplied $6,200,228 (56.5 percent). In providing the 666,332 one-way passenger trips during fiscal year 1989-1990, the MDTA paratransit operations division provided 6,233,567 miles of service and operated 495 908 service hours The resulting cost per passenger was $16.47. Cost per mile was $1.76 and the cost per service hour was $22.12 A breakdown of the division's operating and financial data, along with these measures of operating performance, is shown in Table 9. Purchased Labor & Other" Medicaid Local Cash Cost Per Mile Cost Per Hour Table 9 ThreeYear Profde MDTA Paratranslt Operations Division $5,460 ,640 $7,245,377 Benefits $15 62 $15.07 $1.55 $1.39 $17.61 $17 42 *Includes materials and supplies, casualty and liability Insurance, services, and other miscellaneous expenses. 28 $1.76 $22.12

PAGE 35

Table 9 also provides a threo-year profile of the paratransit operations division s operating and financial performance. The data shown was taken from Section IS reports for fiscal years 1988, 1989, and 1990. The threo-year profile shown in Table 9 highlights some interesting trends that took place between 1988 and 1990. Total operating ex penses for the paratransit operations division increased 67.4 percent from $6, 555 539 to $10,971,501, with the largest increase (39.9 percent) occurring between fiscal years 1989 and 1990. Over the three-year period, the largest percentage o f the system's overall operating expense was attributable to the cost of purchasing transportati on from the two private operators. This expense alone accounted for 83.3 percent in FY88, 92.4 percent in FY89 and 88.0 percent in FY90. The increase in this c ost item was 76. 7 percent over the three years, from $5,460,640 to $9,649 724, with an average increase of 33.0 percent each year. To keep pace with operating expenses, service revenues also increased by 67.4 percent. SIUprisingiy, the fastest growing revenue source during the tb.ree-year time period was fare revenue, which increased by 69 percent over the three years, with the largest increase (38. 4 percent) occurring between FY89 and FY90 when fare revenue increased from $524,540 to $726;111. The l arges t p ercentage of system revenu e during each of the three years was made up of local cash, which accounted for 52.8 percent in FY88, 55.3 percent in FY89 and 54.4 percent in FY90. Local cash contributions inc reased by 72.4 percen t overal l during the threo-year period from $3,462,667 to $5,970,284. As a percentage of overall revenue, Medicaid provided a decreasing percent despite an overall increase of 51.9 percent from $3,462,667 in FY88 to $5,970,284 in FY90. In FY88, Medicaid provided 40 6 percent of the paratransit operations division's reveo ues, but in FY90, it provided only 36.9 percent. The MDT A's paratransit operations division's operatin g performance (based only on the three indica tors shown-cost per passenger trip, cost per mile, !Uid cost per hour) improved so m ewh at in FY89 when compared to FY8 8 Operating cost per passenger trip decre ased by 3.5 percent from $15.62 per trip to $15 07; cost per vehicle mile decreased by 10.3 percent from $1.55 to $1.39; and cost per vehicle hour also decreased by 1.1 percent from $17.71 to $17.42. A substantial change took place however, between f1SCal years 1 989 and 1990 when operating cost per passenger trip increased by 9.3 percent from $15.07 to $16.47; cost per vehicle mile increased 26.6 percent from $1.39 to $1.76; and cost per vehi cle hour increased 27.0 percent from $17.42 to $22.12. 29

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To a large degree th e driving force behind the substantial increase in operating cost has been the corresponding increase in ridership In fact, between fiscal years 1988 and 1989, ridership increased 23.9 percent from 419,787 to 520,236. Between fiscal years 1989 and 1990, ridership again increased substantially, from 520,236 to 666,332, or 28.1 percent. 30

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Chapter 4 Inventory of Other Transportatio n P rograms In addition to the specialized traosportation services provided by the MDT A for the 1D population, there exists a wide range of transportation programs operated by human service agencies and govemmeot depaitments throughout Dade County. A survey of agencies involved in 1D traosportation services in Dade County was conducted for this project in August 1991. The 94 organizations identified were sw-veyed and 28 of them use public funding from the Fedefal Transit Administration's 16(2) program, while the remaining agencies use private funding sources to support their traosportation services. The scarcity of suilable data can be attributed to the fact that many human servic e agencies do not normally maintain comprehensive data files on their transportation services. Consequently, many organiv!lions were unprepared to furnish the necessary information for this projec1. As a result, the data in many cases is estimated and should not be considered completely accurate. Howev er, this effort does represent a first step toward coordinating human service transportation resources to better meet the needs of the transportation disadvantaged population in Dade County. Table I 0 provides a summary description of these agencies' transportation services. Most of these agencies offer a combination of fixed-route and modified demand-responsive transportation services. Some agencies offer only fixed routes that are commonly associated with schoo l-related or workshop-related activities. The remaining agencies fix their routes aceording to client demand for recreational, shopping and medical activities. The transportation services provided by the human service agencies and government departments in Dade County are often associated with agency programs and/or are restricted to spel\)itic client groups affiliated with each agency or department. Furthermore, most trips provided are primarily to and from agency-related programs or facilities. These 28 agencies provided a total of 1,062, 804 one-way passenger trips, 395,942 of which were provided by the four agencies with a fleet of more than ten vehicles. 'I'hi3 means that 14.3 percent of the human service agencies provided 37.2 percent of the program-related 1D trips in Dade County. 31

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Table 10 Inventory of Human Service Agency Transportation Resources Action Community Center 7 132,701 108.804 12.560 $379,058 Aging & AduM Services 25 161,721 $650 ,954 Association for Re1arded Citizens 9 126.138 4,734 $116 ,512. Community Counci for Jewish Elderly 9 129.752. 112,921 18,2.79 $331,826 Concept House 4 8,410 27,943 22.952 $22,271 Epworth Vilage 2 24,000 36,000 4,420 $31 ,200 Federation Garde na 1 10,305 5,674 814 $15,838 Haven Center 2 945 10,735 985 $16,826 Hialeah Gardens (City of) 2 18.2.02 11.839 2,949 $25.174 Hope Center 4 13,489 59,140 11,598 $100,670 Group Home 1 27,600 2,920 $11 ,620 Little Havana Activity & Nutrition Center 16 22.945 174,399 23,2.26 $263 ,773 McDonald Senior Center 1 1,907 7,633 1,751 $15.573 .... I Mact<>wn 5 3,541 59,315 10,924 N Mlami Ce
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Operating expenses for providing these trips were $3,569,919. (Because specific data was unavailable, this number excludes expenses for olie agency that provides 3,541 or 0.1 percent of the total trips.) The data indicates that the average cost per trip among the surveyed Dade County human service agencies was $3.36 and ranged from $.74 to $17.59 A wide range in per trip cost such as this is not uncommon among different types of human service ag encies. Those agencies that provide transportation for severely disabled persons will have a significantly higher per trip cost than will agencies that carry primarily able-bodied clients. The average cost per mile among these agencies was $1.34, and ranged from $.14 to $6.75. Resonrc:e Availability The need for increased funding or for maintaining current levels of funding are issues that concern those agencies that receive no financial resources from private donations. For example, the North Mi8llli Foundation for Senior Citizens Services stated that it would be forced to terminate its transportation program if federal funds become insufficient. Vehicle replacement is another important consideration for these agencies. Seventy-one percent of the agencies surveyed will have to replace their vehicles over the next five years; two of these agencies need vehicle replacements as soon as funds become available. It should be noted that the actual vehicle replacement requirements may be higher but is unknown because the rema i ning agencies failed to provide vehicle replacement data. There are four agencies that appear to have strong potential for participating in Dade County's coordinated network ofiD transportation services. They are the county's Department of Aging and Adult Services, Little Havana Activity and Nutrition Center, Mount Sinai Medical Center, and Sunrise Community. They have vehicle fleets ranging in size from 13 to 25 vehicles and appear to have some excess capacity when compared to the vehicle utilization rates of the other agencies. Once agreements have been reached with these four agencies, the MDT A should begin working with the remaining agencies to assess their needs and their capacity to participate in the coordinated system. It may be that some of the smaller agencies have insufficient capacity to provide general trips for their clients and could contract with the MDT A for service, thereby providing additi onal sources of revenue for the MDT A's TD transportation service. It would be advisable for the MDT A's customer services division staff to undertake another survey of the county's governmental and private social service agencies. A detailed questionnaire should be developed that requests information on the overal l mission of each agency, the types 33

PAGE 40

of clients they serve where transportation fits into the operating structure of the agency, the types of trips they provide and the types of transportation services they provide (e.g., demand response, subscription or subsidized fixed-route services). In addition, the MOTA should include in the questionnaire a section that requests detailed expense and revenue information, a vehicle utilization chart, and detailed information on each vehicle, such as age, mileage, general condition, and whether vehicles are equipped with two-way radios and/or wheelchair lifts. Pgblic Particiuation Process A public workshop was held in Miami on January 29, 1992 to solicit input from the public regarding important issues and concerns and to identify additional unmet needs among the TO population in Dade County. The overall Jack of same-day transportation was an important issue and is perceived to be a serious shortcoming in the current level of TD services. This type of service is now available from agencies on a case-by-case basis only and its provision normally depends on whether arrangements can be made between regular routes. Because it is extremely difficult to provide such trips with much efficiency, same-day service is now restricted almost entirely to individuals requiring immediate medical attention. In an effort to accommodate this type of demand, Dade County, through a federally-fUnded demonstration project, currently has fifteen prototype vehicles in operation that are dedicated to responding to same-day service requests. These vehicles are operated by private taxi companies and the user fares are equivalent to regular taxi fares. A second concern "was that the low-income di. sabled segment of the TO population has limited access to transportation services because they are unable to afford STS. It is also not uncommon for low-income individuals to be unable to afford MDT A fares. Insufficient service to ltll\ior destinations wa5 also identified as a problem. For example, West Dade was identified as one of several job centers in the county that receives negligible transportation services. 34

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Chapter 5 Needs Assessment and Program Evaluation This chapter provides an assessment of the demand for specialized transportation services by the TD population in Dade County and how well the existing paratransit network is meeting the identified demand It summarizes the information contained in the preceding chapters, and in doing so creates a statement of needs and issues upon which the plan will be developed. Unmet Demand The level of umnet demand is equal to the difference between the number of trips provided and the number of trips required to fully meet the Category II TD population's demand for specialized transportation services. The characteristics of the unmet need are defined in terms of general versus program trips, using a combination of estimates from the data and insights provided by the participants in this study. Quantitative Data -In terms of absolute numbers, it is estimated that there will be 1 774,000 paratransit trips provided in 1992 by the operators described in the tables in Chapter 3 and 4 ThiS' level of supply, however, is only an estimate because the MDTA staff are just beginning to identify the human service agencies in Dade County and the various means these agencies have of transporting their clients. For instance, MDTA staff recently discovered that Project Independenc e (the federal JOBS program in Dade County) purchases monthly bus passes for clients who would be considered transportation disadvantaged and in need of transportation to and from work and agency programs. These trips should be counted as psrt of the total supply ofTD trips provided by the MDT A and, therefore, the estimate of unmet demand will be reduced. There is also a number of human service agencies that provide specialized transportation to their clients that are just now being identified. Once these trips have been counted they too will increase the number of TD trips supplied in the county. The estimated number of trips supplied, therefore, may be considerab ly lower than what is actually provided It under-counts the number of program trips provided to the TD population of Dade County because, at the time data collection efforts were underway for this study, accurate data on program trips were unavailable. As a follow-up to this plan, the MOTA-should update the estimated supply ofparatransit trips once all data have been collected on the various program-related trips provided in Dade County. 35

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Qualitative Data This section summarizes the information on quality-related issues in regard to the specialized transportation in Dade County. On one band, disabled persons in Dade County have been receiving very high quality service in that STS is essentially an exclusive ride taxi service with only a 30 minute pick-up window. On the other hand, according to representatives from the MDT A staff in charge of administering the STS service, STS vehicles are frequently more than 30 minutes late, and clients are sometimes not picked up at all, or are left stranded at their destinations. The MDTA assesses damages each month in accordance with the penalties specified in the contract with the operator. However, according to MDTA staff, these penalties seem to have little effect on the quality of the service provided. Peer Gronp and Trend Analysis The peer group analysis serves two functions: it provides a comparison of how well Dade County is performing relative to similar programs within the state of Florida, and it helps to establish realistic standards of performance for the evaluation process. Peer group data from three countywide Florida paratransit systems are shown in Table II. For the purposes of comparability, other systems from around the country were also considered as well. However, most areas with comparable populations were found to have paratransit services with considerably smaller vehicle fleet sizes. As a result, the comparison has been limited to other Florida CfCs that are relatively similar in terms of the key elements such as population, vehicle fleet size, passenger trips and miles of service. The peers were also selected because they represent paratransit programs in areas of similar composition (e.g., metropolitan counties with urban and suburban development and with populations over 750,000). As can be seen in Table 11, Dade is slightly higher than the range of the peers in both population and fleet size. The other parameters-trips, vehicle miles, and expensesare related to the performance of each system, and are keys to developing indicators for each system. Dade County ranks above its peers with respect to total miles of service and expenses, but is well within the range in terms of the number of passenger trips provided annually. (Note that the data for Dade County include only the service provided through the STS and Medicaid programs because, as described previously in Chapters 2 and 4, these are the only services for which reliable data are available.) 36

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Table 11 Pee r G roup Data, 1990 Population 1 ,255,488 1 072 7 4 8 851,659 1,937,094 1,059,965 851,659-1,255,488 Fleet Size 180 54 93 188 109 54180 T rips 927,410 203,27 4 666,4 1 3 666,332 599,032 203,274-927 ,410 Vehicle Mi. 4,467,529 1 ,800 110 1 ,099,6 2 5 4 ,880,015 2,455 ,755 1,0 9 9,625-4 ; 467,529 u ..... M .... ..... Trips/V e tlicle Mi. 0.21 0.11 0.61 0. 1 4 0 3 1 0.11-{).61 Trips/Capita 0.74 0 19 0.78 0.34 0 .57 0.19-{).78 CosVTrip $9. 15 $12 .89 $3 .46 $ 1 6.47 $8.50 $3. 46-12.89 CosWehlcle Mi. $1.90 $1.46 $2 .09 $2.26 $1.82 $1.46-2 .09 Vehicle M iNehicle 24,820 33,335 11,824 26, 129 23,326 11,824-33,335 Trips/V e hicle I 5, 152 3,764 7,166 3,582 5,361 3 764-7,166 Veh./100,000 Persons 14.34 5.03 10 92 9.60 10.10 5.03-14.34

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There are several measures used in the peer comparison for assessing Dade County performance. The first two relate to service effectiveness and arEI measures of productivity. Dade County provides an average of .14 trips per mile, which falls at the low end of the peer group range and is considerably below the average of .31 trips per mile. Similarly, trips per capita for Dade County is .34, which is also at the low end of its peer group range and well below the peer group average of .57. Such low performance on these two performance measures indicates that Dade County is not making tbe most effective use of Its resources in providing trips when compared to sys t ems that have similar constraints. The cost effectiveness of the program in terms of cost per passenger trip and cost per vehicle mile eould be improved upon considerably. At $16.47 per passenger trip, Dade County's per unit cost is almost double tbe peer group average and exceeds tbe peer group's range of $3.46 to $12.89 by $3.58 per passenger trip. At 666,332 passenger trips, this represents a difference of at least $2,385,468 in annual operating expenses. Cost per vehicle mile is also quite high when compared to the same measure for the peer group. Dade County is currently SPending $2.26 per vehicle mile while its peers are spending an average of $1.82 The productivity of Dade County's paratransit services, in terms of vehicle utilization also falls short of that of its peers. Dade County's performance on this measure, however does fall within the range of performance experienced by the peer group, which ranges from a low of .11 to .61 passenger trips per mile. Trips per v e hicle is low when compared to tbe peer group. Dade County is onl y providing 3 ,582 trips per vehicle while its pee r s are providing from 3,764 to 7,166 passenger trips per vehicle. Mil es per vehicle, however, exceeds tbe peer group average of 23,326, indicating that Dade County is providing more miles of service for the number of pasSenger trips pro vided. Trend AnalysisA three-year trend analysis for Dade County's STS and Medicaid transportation services is shown in Table 1 2 The number of passenger trips provided by the system has increased since 1988 while tbe number of vehicle miles declined between 1988 and 1 989, which suggests that tbe overall efficiency of tbe service improved somewhat during that time period. However tbe cost per trip increased at an annualized rate of 10.7 percent during tbe same three year period, which is a rate of increase that is significantly greater than the rate of inflation from 1988 to 1990. These conditions indicate a continuing need for further improvements in service productivity and/or tbe implementation of more effective cost control mechanisms to increase the coSt effectiveness of Dade County's paratransit operations. 38

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Summary Table 12 MDTA Paratra. nsit Operations Division Operating Trends Passenger 454,800 680,173 666,332 Trips Vehicle miles 3,271,747 4,952,438 4 ,880,015 Cos1/trlp $13.43 $14.00 $16.47 Cos1/mile $1.87 $1.58 $2.26 0.14 0 .11 0.14 Sources: Florida !"we-Year m Plan, 1990 FTA Section 15 Report When compared to its peers, Dade County's performance could be improved substantially. Given the considerable financial constraints on the system, efforts to improve the cost.effectiveness should begin immediately Several reconunendations on how to improve the cost effectiveness of the existing network of services are presented in the next chapter. The productivity of the system should also be analyzed and improvements should be made where possible However, given the current service arrangements, the MOTA has very little control over how productively the contract operator uses the fleet of vehicles. At the same time, improvements in productivity would have a positive impact on the cost effectiveness of the service. For that reason alone, the MOTA should take steps to increase its level of control of the contract operator's performance. A number of recommendatic;>ns presented in the following chapter address this issue as well. 39

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' Chapter 6 Recommendations Dade County has been providing a very high level of specialized transportation service to the disabled persons and Medicaid recipients who reside in the county. In large part, this is because the MDT A's paratransit services have been limited to registered disabled clients and Medicaid clients. The county's population data and ridership data from the various human service agencies and from the MDT A's fixed route services indicate that there are many more persons residing in Dade County who may be considered transportation disadvantaged and who are cUITently utilizing transportation services that are not yet coordinated with the other specialized transportation services in the county. It is important to note that these additional potentially TD eligible persons do not necessarily need specialized transportation services. Although concentrated efforts to advance coordination of specialized transportation services provided by area human service and government agencies have only recently been undertaken, these efforts have achieved a considerable degree of success and will benefit the county's TD population. In as much as the existing services provide mobility to disabled persons who wouid otherwise have limited opportunities and great difficulties in satisfying even the most basic transportation needs such as traveling to doctors' offices, grocery stores and banks, the MDT A has accomplished a great deal and its efforts are commendable. However, throughout the course of this study, a number of deficiencies in the existing network of paratransit services in Dade County have been identified. In addition, several issues with regard to the county's specialized transportation services have come to light. This chapter, therefore, sets forth recommendations that are intended to assist Dade County in resolving the identified problems and issues and putting the MDT A and its transportation services for the transportation disadvantaged population of Dade County on a more efficient and cost..effective track that will meet a wider range of transportation needs among the target population. Issue/Problem ldentiflqtion The focus of this section is on problems and issues that are impairing the efficiency and effectiveness of the cUITent specialized transportation services in Dade County to a degree that they are limiting the county's ability to meet a broader range of the increasing transportation

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needs of the county's TD population. The recommendations that follow have been prioritized based on our interpretation of the conditions related to specialized transportation service in Dad e (;()unty. As such, they are listed and described according to the order in which they will be addressed in the implementation plan presented in the next chapter. The problems/issues confronting the Dade County CTC are: Limited scope of local coordinating board's role Financial constraintsf"mefficient use of resources Inconsistent reservations/scheduling procedures Fragmented administrative structure Limited use of fixed route transit services Limited Scope of Local Coordinating Board's Role Lack of strong direction from the local coordinating board has evidenced itself by the lack of aggressive efforts to coordinate TD transportation services. According to minutes from meetings of the local coordinating board, meetings are infrequent and topics discussed are fragmented, focusing mainly on STS and service for disabled persons. The local coordinating board seems to have a limited role in terms of establishing policies for Dade (;()unty's specialized transportation services. As a result, such services in the county are somewhat disparate and unlinked. For example, STS and Medicaid transportation services are administered separately from the programs and initiatives to provide specialized transportation services to elderly and low income individuals. In addition, the coordinating board appears to give very little consideration to the efforts at coordination, wbich is contrary to the directive of the state's Transportation Disadvantaged Commission, which has established the TD Trust Fund to provide funding for specialized transportation services that is contingent upon a county implementing an effective plan to coordinate the various transportation services provided by human service and governmental agencies. This mandate has been issued by the TDC in an effort to encourage counties to 6se specialized transportation resources efficiently in an attempt to maximize the availability of transportation service to transportation disadvantaged persons. The lack of an overall policy consisting of sound goals and objectives focusing on the provision of specialized transportation services to the county's transportation disadvantaged residents results in a variety of shortcomings. Examples of such shortcomings include fragmented services as described above that can increase the level of duplication of services. For instance, in Dade (;()unty, there is a distinct possibility that three or more different paratransit vehicles could be in 41

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the same general vicinity providing service to different segments of the TD population. An STS vehicle could be in a certain neighborhood to pick up a passenger while a human service agency vehicle could be in the same area to pick up a client who is eligible for TD services, and at the same time, the MDT A could have a vehicle in the same area to pick up a passenger for one of the group trips it frequently arranges through contracts with the Handi-Van service. This possibility may seem to be remote, but census tract population data for Dade County indicate that certain areas are heavily populated by members of the TD population. Thus, this scenario is more likely to occur than would initially be imagined. The result of a scenario such as this one would be three vehicles picking up three passengers; whereas if the services were coordinated one vehicle might be utilized, thereby reducing the cost per passenger trip substantially. In addition to fragmented services resulting in duplication of services, the lack of a comprehensive policy for TD transportation services can result in providing too little service to certain segments of the population. Currently, in Dade County the elderly and low-income segments have little or no access to general purpose specialized transportation service. As previously described, it may be prudent for Dade County to consider access to fixed-route transit as one of its eligibility criteria, which would limit the need for specialized transportation among the able-bodied elderly and low -income residents only to those individuals that live in areas that are not served by fixed-route transit however, attention has been diverted from the needs of elderly and low-income persons and has focused primarily on the disabled. As a matter of policy, Dade County may with to make specialized services available to the able-bodied elderly. It is important to recognize, however, that these individuals are not necessarily considered transportation disadvantaged according to Chapter 427 guidelineS. According to Chapter 427 of the Florida Statutes, "the purpose of each coordinating board is to develop local service needs and to provide infonnation, advice, and direction to the community transportation coordinators on the coordination of services to be provided to the transportation disadvantaged." Chapter 427 also outlines the duties of each local coordinating board. According to the statute, "each board shall meet at least quarterly and shall: Review and approve the coordinsted community transportation disadvantaged service plan, including the memorandum of agreement, prior to submission to the commission; Evaluate services provided in meeting the approved plan; 42

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In cooperation with the community transportation coordinator, review and provide recommendation to the commission on funding applications affecting the transportation disadvantaged; Assist the community transportation coordinator in establishing priorities with regard to the recipienta of nonsponsored transportation disadvantaged services that are purchased with Transportation Disadvantaged Trilst Fund monies; Review the coordination strategies of service provision to the transportation disadvantaged in the designated service area; and Evaluate multicounty or regional transportation opportunities." As the statute clearly specifies, the focus of the coordinating board's mission should be on coordination of the county's specialized transportation services. A copy of the statute and its accompanying administrative rule is included in Appendix C Given that efforts to coordinate available services have only recently been undertaken, and that there remains a considerable distance between existing conditions and a truly coordinated network of specialized transportation service to all segments of the TD population, the coordinating boud of Dade County hilS a luge mission confronting it. A cornerstone to this mission can be the goals and objectives developed as part of this study. To follow through, the coordinating board should establish some comprehensive policies based on these goals and objectives. Regular meetings should be held to identify strategies to implement the policies and monitor the success of efforts to carry out the strategies. Considering the size of the TD population, the level of unmet demand identified in this study, and the corresponding magnitude of the task of developing a service that meets a broader range of the TD population's transportation needs, meetings may need to be held more frequently than quarterly Financial Constraintsllneflieient Use of Resources Since the MDTA implemented the STS and Medicaid transportation services, operating and administrative expenses associated with the programs have increased from approximately $800,000 annually to nearly $11 million in fiscal year 1990. Current funding sources cannot continue to support this rate of growth in operating expenses. Additional funding sources are difficult to locate. There is a possibility of generating some funding by coordinating with other agencies who may decide to purchase service from the MDT A. However, such funding sources are, at best, minimal, and cannot significantly reduce the potential operating deficit that will result due to the rapid growth in program costs. 43

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A contributing factor to the rapidly increasing expenses associated with the STS and Medicaid transportation services is that the current service is essentially an exclusive ride taxi service. 1bis practice is not typical of publicly funded paratransit services around the county or of other CTC p r ograms in Florida Most other paratransit operations utilize a fleet of vehicles made up primarily of 12-to IS-passenger vans and have scheduling practices that facilitate multiple loading of passengers in order to minimize per-passenger-trip costs. Passengers are often on the vehicles for one to two hours and pick-up windows are normally an hour as opposed to the 30minute policy currently used for the STS and Medicaid programs in Dade County. Of course, the decision to implement multiple loading practices is ultimately a local policy decision, but such practices do merit consideration by the coordinating board of Dade County. Implementing such a program could significantly reduce the current per passenger trip cost of $ 1 6 .47 to a unit cost that comes closer to the peer group average identified in the previous chapter of $8.50 per passenger trip. In the peer group review described in the previous chapter, the cost savings to the program would amount to over $2 million annually even if the MOTA achieves performance equal only to the high end of the range of performance with respect to cost per passenger trip. Another drawback to the current practice of providing exclusive ride taxi service is that it represents a very inefficient use of resources It not only makes multiple loading of passengers difficult but it also lends itself to a higher level of service duplicity by increasing the likelihood of multiple vehicles providing service in the same general vicinity to various STS and Medicaid passenger s Reservatlons/Sehedn lin g Procedu res Current practices for reserving and scheduling STS and Medicaid trips are not consistent between the two programs. For STS both reservations and scheduling are handled by Automated Dispatching Services, Inc. (ADS), a private dispatching company that is under subcontract to Comprehensive Paratransit Services. For the Medicaid service, reservations are handled by the MOTA and are computer downloaded at the end of each day and sent to ADS who schedules the trips. According the MOTA representatives, the process used for Medicaid reservations and scheduling is superior because it gives them greater control over the contract operator's (Red Top Sedan) performance. According to an ADS representative, the process used for STS is superior because it allows reservations to be interfaced with scheduling, which is more efficient. 44

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While arguments on both sides of this issue are probably correct, as long as the STS and Medicaid transportation programs remain exclusive ride taxi serv i ces, either method is adequate The MDT A's assertion that the p r ocess used for Medicaid trips gives them more control over Red Top Sedan's delivery of services may be true. However, it may also be a possibility that Red T op Sedan is simply more efficient than the contract operator that provides STS service in carrying out its end of the contract arrangements There are problems inherent to both procedures, especial l y with regard to providing specialized transportation services to the TD population in Dade County in the long term. First, the process utilized for the Medicaid service, separating reservations and scheduling, is inefficient The two activities should be linked if multiple loading of passengers is ever to become a reality in Dade Ccunty and if a fully coordinated network of specialized transportation services is ever to be effectively established. Reservations and scheduling should be linked because trips should only be reserved based on available seats The current practice is based on unlimited availability because it is an exclusive ride taxi service with no denials. As time goes on, this practice will become cost prohibitive. Most paratransit services have a fixed number of vehicles and a corresponding fixed number of seats. Reservations are taken until all available seats are filled. Therefore, this process must be tied to scheduling so that reservationists know where each of the vehicles is scheduled to be at any given time each day. Requests for service that come in after all seats have been filled should first be responded to by encouraging travel at another time when a seat is available. If this is not possible, then the request should be denied Most p aratransit services have a certain number of denials, although effective services are ab l e to minimize them. Second, the shortcoming with the arrangement with ADS is not necessarily related to the p r ocedures they use. As part of this study, CUTR representatives made a site visit to ADS to observe its operations and found that it appears to be an efficiently run organization The drawback is that ADS is not directly under contract to the MDT A and, therefore, does not have any incentive to comply with the directives of the transit agency Instead, ADS is a subcontractor to Metro Limo, the contract operator that provides the STS service. As such, ADS will follow orders issued by Metro Limo, which may or may not be consistent with MDT A policies. This discrepancy could be avoided, to a large degree, if the MDT A contracts directly with ADS, or a company with similar capabilities, for reservations/scheduling services. 45

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Fragmented Admi n istrative Structut'e As described in Chapter 3 of this report, administrative functions of the CTC are divided between two divisions within the MDTA. The STS and I Medicaid services are housed within the Division of Bus Operations while the coordination and group trip progtamS are a part of the Division of Customer Services. The director of Customer Services is responsible for admi nistering the CTC. The administrative structure has resulted in a fragmented approach io service delivery, as described earlier in this chapter. The efforts and activities being undertaken by the two divisions are commendable but could be more effective with a more centraliml administrative structure. Ultimately, there should be one comprehensive specialized service for the TD population of Dade County. An effective way of accomplishing this would be to centrali2e all administrative activities. There are at least three alternatives for developing a centralized administrative structur e. The first would be to move the STS and Medicaid services under the authority of the Division of Customer Services. This may initially make the most sense because the director of this division is also responsible for directing the CTC. The second option would be to give all responsibilities for coordination to the Division of Bus Operations. The only r eason wby this approach makes sense is because the STS and Medicaid services already have a very large staff that could absorb additional responsibility, albeit existing personnel have not been trained to carry out the type of activities required to promote coordination. The Division of Customer Services currently has a staff that is very appropriate to carry out coordination activities. A third possibility that might be considered would be to establish a separate division within the MDT A for administration o f TD transportation services. Considering that the operating budget for the STS and Medicaid programs will soon be close to $15 million annually it may represent a function that merits its own division. This alternative may be difficult to achieve initially, but in the long run. it may represent the most viable means of effectively administering specialize d transportation services in Dade County. Limited Use of Fixed Route Tnnsit Services The MDTA provides extensive bus and rail fixed route transit service throqghout the COIDlty. Metrorail is fully accessible to disabled persons and Metrobus is in the process of converting to aa:essible buses on all routes. Despite this fact, there is a large number of TD persons who do not use fixed route transit services. This is especially true with regard to the disabled population who have come to depend on STS. MDTA staff provides a training program in which they teach various groups (primarily groups made up ofTD eligibl e individuals) how to use the county's fixed route transit services. These eff orts are 46

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an excellent way to reduce the overall program costs associated with providing TD transportation in Dade CoUilty and should be continued. In addition, the MDT A could also adopt a service policy that is utilized in other parts of the country that have accessible rail systems. Existing paratransit services could provide feeder service to the rail system for long distance trips that follow a course within reasonable proximity to one of the rail comdors. This service arrangement would require a pan!transit vehicle to pick up the individual desiring to travel the length of the county (fo r example) and 1llke that person to the nearest train station. The person would then board the train and alight at the stop nearest their destination. The MOTA would then arrange for a paratransit vehicle to pick the person up and 1llke the passenger to his or her final destination, unless of course, the final destination were located near enough to the train station that the person could get there on his or her own. This type of service arrangement would substantially decrease the number of miles paratransit vehicles would have to travel in order to provide service, and could minimize operating costs for these trips, if in negotiating the contract with the private operator the MOTA elects to reimburse the contractor on a per-mile rather than a per-trip basis as is currently the case. Reco m mendatio ns The following recommendations are intended to provide the MDT A, as the CTC for Dade County, with direction on how to overcome the identified service deficiencies and other issues as described above and begin improving the efficiency and effectiveness of specialized transportation services in the county in meeting the needs of the TD population. An implementation plan is presented in the next chapter that identifies actions that should be 1llken along with a suggested time frame for carrying out the proposed actions. Reco mmendati on No. 1 Expand t h e Focus of t h e Local Coo rdin a tin g Board The TD coordinating board of Dade County should fonnulate an overall policy for the provision of TD transportation services in the coUilty bssed on the goals and objectives identified in this report. Regular meetings should be held to develop strategies to achieve the stated objectives and review the progress made and approprialeness of the strategies after they have been implemented. Given the size of the program in Dade County and the magnitude of the problems confronting it, tbC coordinating board should consider meeting more frequently than quarterly. Monthly or bi monthly meetings may be more effective in facilitating the accomplishment of the duties for which the board is responsible. 47

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Recommendation No.2 -Implement Procedures to Multi-load STS and Medicaid Passengers -This recommendation, if implemented, could reduce the county's operating expenses for the STS and Medicaid programs. It would shift these services to more conventional public paratransit services. At present, the disabled population receive a considerably higher level of service than do fixed route users. Thus, the STS and Medicaid transportation services represent something more than public transportation and call attention to the need for equity in expenditure of public funds. Recommendation No. 3 Place Reservations/Scheduling Procedures Under the Direct Control of the MDTA This recommendation is necessary in order to fully coordinate the county's various paratransit services. It is also necessary in order for the MOTA to have adequate control over the operations of the private contractor, if the STS and Medicaid transportation services co n tinue to be contracted to a private operator. The MOTA should contract directly with ADS (or a similar company) to provide both the scheduling and dispatching functions if possible because the private sector can, in all likelihood, provide these services more cost effectively than can the public sector. The MDTA would have to take steps to assure that ADS is linked to all human service agencies that are part of the coordinated network of operators and that it has accurate daily information regarding how each of the agencies utilizes its vehicles. Recommendation No. 4 Reorganize Administrative Structure All administrative functions of the MDT A in its role as the CTC should be consolidated under one division of the MOTA. Centralized administration is an effective means of achieving a coordinated network of specialized transportation services. It will also minimize any duplication of effort that ma y be taking place as a result of the functions being handled by different divisions. Therefore, it is recommended that the MDT A create a separate division to carry out the tasks associated with providing transportation services for transportation disadvantaged residents of Dade County. Recommendation No. S Continue to Expand Use of Fixed Route Transit This recommendation is self-explanatory. A training program has already been established and should be continued with occasional monitoring to determine its effectiveness in putting people on the fixed route services. In addition, this function could be handled by the marketing service representatives, rather than through the operations planners who are handling this task now. The next chapter presents a five-year plan for Dade County, including an implementation schedule and a five-year operating budget. 48

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Chapter 7 Transportation Disadvantaged FiveYea r Plan This chapter describes the Transportation Disadvantaged Five-Year Plan for Dade County and includes details cooceming the range of actions to be t8ken aad a schedule for their implementation, and an operating bu4get forecasting costs aad revenue requirements to support the program. Five-Year Plan Actions Figure 6 provides an implementatio n schedule for the five-year program that lists all of the actions recoJIUDended for implementation. The primary actions for the program fall into two areas: administration aad operations. The description of the five-year plan that follows provides a chronological record of the recommendations. 199l1 993 Actions -All recommended actionS for the first year of the plan focus on administrative activities. First, the role of the local coordinating board should be strengthen ed. Bi-monthly m eetings should be held to discuss, review, and determine strategies and set policies for TD transportation services in Dade County. Each meeting should be conducted following an agenda that addresses issues relevant to achieving the goals and objectives identified in this report. The MOTA should provide updates to the board regarding progress made on any strategies previously identified and undertaken. It is critical that the board's attention be focused on all TO transportation services and not just the STS and Medicaid programs. Second, the administrative structure of the MOTA's CTC program should be streamlined to incorpor ate all TD transportation administrative functions under one division Since this may prove to be a difficult task logistically, it is recommended that effo rts to accomplish it begin in January 1993. It is estimated that consolidating the administrative functions of the CTC will take approximately six months and should be complete by July 1993. Third, efforts to promote the use of' fixed route transit by the TO population of Dade County should continue on in the same manner in which they are already being carried out. The fixed route transit service s in Dade County are the best transportatio n resources available and can meet a significan t level of the demand for transportation services among low-income and e ld erly able bodied TO persons who live near Metrobus and Metrorail stops. 49

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Figure6 Project Implementation Schedule Dade County Transportation Disadvantaged Five-Year Plan Action 91-92 Administration Improve Role fJI LCB Hold B imonthly Meeflnril I 1 Streamline CTC Admlnl atrallon Create se,.rate Dlvlalon Promote UM ol FindRoute Tranall Operations Conaolldat e Reaervatlona / Scheduling Implement Multi-Loading Procedure Year 92-93

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. 19931994 ActionsIn the second fiscal year of the plan, efforts begun in fiscal year 1993 to improve the administrati on ofTD IIa!lsP<>rtation services should continue. Specifically, the local coordinating board should continue to hold bi-monthly meetings and taking a l ead role in providing direction for the pr ovision of TD transportation services In addition to the administrative activities, attention should also be given to operations in the second year of the plan Efforts to c:oDsolidate the reservations and scheduling functions should begin in the second year of the plan. As described in this report, linking these two functions is critical to improving the efficiency of TD transportation service delivery. Once procedures have been implemented that effectively link reservations and scheduling, the MDTA can begin to multi-load passengers. This service will require the use of 12 to 15passenger vans and will require passengers to spend more time on the vehicles. The 30minute pick-up window currently utilized will have to be extended. The result will be a somewhat lower level of service than the disabled populatio n of Dade County has become accustomed to, but it will be a service that can meet a broader range of transportation needs among the TD population in a more cost-effective manner than is currently possible. 1994-1995 Actions In the third fiscal year o f the plan, the improved administrativ e procedures developed in fiscal year 1993 should be continued. S pecifically the MDTA should be working toward eventually creating a separate division for TD transportation services In terms of operations, the MDTA should co n tinue multi-loading TD passengers on the specialized transportation services provided in the county. Over time, th ese practices should b ecome increasingly efficient and effective as the scheduling and dispatching procedures become more fine-tuned to the transportatio n needs of Dade County's TD populntion. 1995 Action s In the fourth year of the plan, all improved administrati v e and operati onal procedures developed and implemen ted in the first three years of the plan should be continued. By this time, the MDT A shoul d be in a position to create a separate department for the delivery of TD transportation services. A coordinated network should be in place that includes a variety of participating human service agencies as well as the STS and Medicaid programs An overall budget should be developed that i dentifies the cost of all types of special ized and fixed route servi ces provided for the TD population of Dade County. All participating agencies should be linked to the MOTA (o r the contract scheduling/d ispatching firm) by two-way rad io. Service 51

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monitoring procedures should be in place to monitor the performance and cost effectiveness of the participants in the coordinated network. When all of these activities have been combined, it will become increasingly obvious that the size of the operation merits an independent department within the MOTA 1996 ActionsThe final year of the five-year plan should be directed. at ensuring that the new TD transportation services d epartment functions as smoothly as possible. Efforts to improve the level of coordination of specialized transportation services within the county should be continued with the ultimate goal of including all human service agencies in the network. Ideally, once the MDT A has improved the efficiency and effectiveness of i ts specialized transportation services, there will be a number of agencies that will find it more cost-effective to purchase service from the MOTA rather than provide service themselves. Such anangements represent additional funding sources for the provision of TO transportation services in Dade County. In addition, the MOTA should contin ue to promote use of the county's extensive network of fixed route transit service to those members of the TD population who are able to use it. Financial Plan The financial plan for Dade County's TD transportation service over the next five years depends, to a large degree, on the MOTA's success at efforts to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the existing services. The financial plan presented in this chapter is based on a weighted average that combines current per trip operating costs for the STS and Medicaid programs and program trips provided by the various hii!Dan service agencies in Dade County. Table 13 shows the projected costs of providing TD transportation services based on current operating expenses. If the MDT A is successful in its efforts to improve the operating efficiency and effectiveness of the county's specialized transportation services, p ro jected expenses could be considerably lower. The funding sources shown in the table are primarily based on existing funding sources, which include program funds from Medicaid, TO Trust Funds, fare revenue, and local funds. In the future, the composition of program funding may expand to i nclude other program funds such as Title m and Titl e XIX, if the MDT A's efforts at coordinating all specialized transportation services within the county are successful and a number of agencies begin purchasing general trips from the MOTA rather than attempting to provide them directly. Over the past three years, program funding has declined from about 40 percent of total funding to 36 percent. These funding projections are based on the assumption that program funds will stabilize at about 30 percent of the overall operating budget. 52

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..,. "' Funds T O Trust FundsM Fare R e v enue -$4,798,800 $ 1,933,660 Tllbl e 13 Funding ProjedloDJ ,. 11M I ncludes al slate and fedetal fundil1g, I4ICh as Medicaid Tille Ill, and Tdle XIX, assutreS that these fur100g sourt:8S will stabiiz& at approlCimately 30 of the overall opetatlng budget Projections otTO Trust Funds were oblainecl from the Transpottation Disadvantaged Commission --Fare revenue projections are based on the current average fare revenue per passenger trip of $1.09.

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Fare revenue projections are based on the current average fare revenue per passenger trip of$1.09 and the estimated number of trips to be provided over the five-year plan period. A number of factors could affect the amount of fare revenue generated by the MDTA in operating its ere program. The average fare per passenger trip is currently artificially low because it is based on trips provided through both the STS and Medicaid programs. Since there are no fares charged for Medicaid trips, they lower the average fare per trip. As more general trips are provided through the coordinated netwo rk, the fares charged for these trips will offset the effect of the Medicaid trips and the average fare will increase. A higher average fare multiplied by the same projected number of trips will result in more fare revenue. Another factor that could have an impact on the average fare per trip is if the MDT A dec i des to increase fares for general trips provided by the county's coordinated network of specialized transPortation services. With demand currently growing at such a rapid rate, it is unlikely that a small increase in fares would have a negative impact on ridership; therefore, a fare increase is likely to increase the amount of revenue generated through the farebox. The amount of local funding require9 to pro vide specialized transportation services in Dade County based on current operating costs is considerable. Local funds are estimated to represent over SO percent of the operating budget over the next five years, as has been the case for the last three years as well. Improvements in the system; s operating and administrative efficiency as outlined in this report could substantially reduce the amount of local investment required. As indicated in the peer group analysis presented in Chapter 5, the MOTA could save as much as $2 million annually even if it only achieves perfonnance equal to that of the high end of its peers' performance. 54

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Chapter 8 Service Monitoring Program This chapter presents a service monitoring program that can be used to evaluate the performance of specialized transportation service operators. It will be most effective when used to evaluate the performance of human service agency operators that agree to participate in the coordinated network of services. The MDT A will be responsible for ensuring that the agencies learn how to collect and report the relevant data. This monitoring program will be of limited use in terms of evaluating the performance of the contract operators currently providing specialized transportation service in Dade County due to the lack of control the MOTA has, or can even hope to have, over the conduct of the private operator However, it is important that the MOTA have an adequate monitoring program in place as new agencies join the coordinated program in order to identify weaknesses in the system's operating performance and to provide a means to monitor the system's performance as i t expands to meet the growing need. The intent of a performance monitoring program is to assess a system's effectiveness in achieving its objectives and its efficiency in using its resources. An operating performance monitoring program is valuable in assessing and identifying a system's weaknesses and inefficiencies, and is also useful for scheduling and policy decisions. For example performance measures can affect government decisions on the allocation of increasing l y scarce financial resources among publicly financed agencies. In addition, an operating performance monitoring program can be used to monitor the agencies' use of funds and allocation of resources by tracking revenues, expenses and productivity as well as preventative maintenance. Thus, agency managers can more easily identify those vehicles or runs that display signs of diseconomy or under-utilization and effect the appropriat e personnel or scheduling adjUstments. The monitoring program currently used by the MOTA consists of collecting information related to service quality i ssues such as on-time performance and driver conduct It does not capture the operating statistics necessary to prepare operating performance reports that can be used to assess the system's efficiency and effectiveness, which is information that is essential to managing the system effectively However, given the current shortcomings in the contractual arrangement between the MOTA and Comprehensive Paratransit Services, the current monitoring program may be the best means available to assess the performance of the private operators. 55

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MDTA's Monitoriuc Prouclare The MOTA's monitoring program requires random spot checks of vehicle on-time performance and vehicl e safety. The main draw back to the current procedures is that there is no means to assure the MOTA that all vehicles are checked on a regular basis and there is no provision for vehicles that have not been checked. The monitoring program currently used by the MOTA is described below. Vehicle Safety -Field technicians complete the vehicle inspection survey forms to evaluate a vehicle's compliance with regulation safety standards for equipment such as lights, signals, brakes, tires, etc. Technicians also check the drivers' licenses, vehicle types and penn.it numbers, and are also instructed to note any deficiencies or unusual occurrences. Finally the checkers make recommendations to order a vehicle for re-inspection or even remove it from service. Monitoring reports are collated and passed on to the superviso r daily. The field monitoring supervisor reviews the reports for adequacy of information and for content, assesses violations and damages, and authorizes proper conective action according to contract provisions. On-time perfounance MOTA has two data sources for this performance measure: the field technicians' vehicle inspection surveys and the paratransit operations division's reservation section's telephone logs. The MOTA takes reservations only for Medicaid trips. Hence, these are the only trips for which trip logs can be used to make a comprehensive evaluation of on-time pcrfounance. The vehicle inspection assignment sheets are organized according to client pick-up points where the checker notes the vehicle's arrival time and conducts the safety inspection described above. The MDT A's paratransit operations division rcservationists keep daily incident logs on which clients' late vehicle complaints are recorded. Contractually, STS may pick up a passenger up to ten minutes prior to and no later than twenty minutes after the scheduled pick-up time. Both these data sources merely provide a sample of the relevant statistics because field monitors check only sampling trips and the late vehicle complaints can only be received if clients actually call in. Even though this is a common shortcoming in the collection of qualitative operating statistics, the MDT A should periodically assess whether the distribution of trips that are field checked provide an accurate reflection of systemwide performance. The MDT A's current monitoring program, as described above, is limited to evaluating on-time performance and vehicle and driver standards for contract compliance. Three field technicians are responsible for conducting on-street spot checks to evaluate measures such as vehicle 56

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conditions and on-time performance. Mileage checks, on-board surveys and customer satisfaction questionnaires are considered special monitoriilg" and are performed at the request of the field monitoring supervisor. The intent of this chapter is not to suggest that the current monitoring program is inadequate in terms of collecting qualitative data. Nor is its intent to suggest that the program should be discontinued. Rather, this chapter is oriented toward providing the MOTA with some guidelines on the types of quantitative data that need to analyze the system's operating performance in terms of efficiency and effectiveness. This type of analysis, if performed on a regular basis (monthly or quarterly), can aid in holding down operating costs by identifying problem areas that can be corrected. This is especially important for a service such as the one in Dade County that has experienced such a tremendous increase in ridership, and where the cost per trip is much higher than that of other urban paratransit operations. Recommended Improyements The following evaluation measures and standards have been identified for performance assessment because they address shortcomings in MDT A's current monitoring system and allow for identification of potential future problems in the following areas: Service Quality and Accessibility Service Utilization Effectiveness and Efficiency Safety and Maintenance A set of performance measures have been established for each of the above topic areas; their selection was based on relevance and data availability, and because their general use allows for industry-wide comparisons. Service Quality and Accessibility 1) Percent of TD population served This measure can be used as an indicator of transportation availability. Since Dade County has a substantial shortage in its provision of general purpose trips, this indicator could be modified to assess the availability of such trips -in particular and determine the degree to which these services need to be expanded. 57

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2) Area covemae This indicator assesses destination accessibility This measure is a useful supplement to the availability measure because, even with a large percentage of the TD population served, the destination coverage of the service may be incomplete. The MDTA should watch for increasing trends in both of these performance measures as an indication that TD services are expanding numerically as well as geographically. Decreasing trends suggest the need for corrective action such as improved marketing/outreach efforts or evaluating a private contractor's logs to ensure that persons from outlying areas are not being denied service. Servjce Utilization 1) Passenger trlpsfyebicle mile This measure represents passenger volume as related to the quantity of service offered. High values may reflect good vehicle utilization and service economy, wbile low values reflect under-utilion of resources, which is in many cases attributable to inadequate vehicle scheduling procedures. 2) Paswn11er trips/vehicle hour This is a measure of consumed output and reflects the level of utilization of transit services among the service area TD population High values indicate an efficient distribution of services over time, corresponding to demands. Low values again suggest under-utiliu.tion of resources and merit an evaluation of the MDT A's scheduling procedures. This measure is affected by vehicle capacity as well as type and hours of service. 3) vehicle miles/yehicleThis indicator measures the system's intensity of vehicle use and can help determine whether vehicles are being under-or over-utilized. This measure will be most useful fo r evaluating the ability of various human service agencies and their potential for participating in a coordinated system. Effective ness and Effide a n 1) Operati ng cos!S(passengex trip This is an indicator of overall performance and represents the unit cost of providing service. This measure can be used to detect 58

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uneconomical operations and can be compared to peers and industry standards for evaluation. 2) Operating costs!yehjcle mile This measure reflects vehicle utilization efficiency and can be used to evaluate the cost of service expansion. Like cost per passenger trip, this indicator can also be used to identify uneconomical operations. This indicator can be adversely affected in areas with low operating speeds. The MDT A's operating performance in this area can be compared to peers and industry standards for evaluation. 3) Operating costs/vehicle hour This ratio serves as an indicator of efficient utili2lltion of revenue equipment; the lower its value the more efficient the system's management of vehicle time. This measure may be affected by congestion. 4) Vehicle miles/vehicle hour-This indicator measures system speed. It can be used to evaluate whether vehicles are being appropriately rou ted. Low speeds can indicate that vehicles are traveling on congested thoroughfares rather than taking faster moving, Jess traveled side streets. High vehicle speeds are usually only found in less densely populated areas. In urbari areas, such as Dade County, high speeds may indicate under-utilization of vehicles. Safety and Maintenance 1) Accidents/100,000 milesSuch a measure provides system users an indicator of a system's ability to provide safe transportation. 2) Vehicle miles/gallon of fue l This ratio is useful for a system's preventative maintenance program. T)1is measure can provide early warning signs of vehicle problems and help to avoid more costly repairs or prolonged inefficiency. These performance indicators can be reported monthly, quarterly and yearly. Reporting figures for the current and previous months as well as the current month in the previous year is an adequate way to monitor system performance because it provides an overview of the direction in which these measures are moving. This procedure is important because it facilitates 59

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conducting trend analyses, which are an instrumental component of a performance monitoring program T hey allow for inter-period comparisons for each operating statistic and provide a basis for evaluating a transportation system's performance over time. A sample performance sheet i s shown in Figure 6. This particular type of performance report is useful for establishing monthly as well as yearly trends For example, comparing cost/passenger for April 1992 and March 1992 is useful in determining whether the system is becoming more or less economical. Comparing the current month with the same month in the previous year will add perspective to this analysis because it wi ll allow the MDT A to asses whether the change from the previous month is seasonally influenced (i.e . last year's value is comparable to this year's value for the same month) or whether it can be attributed to a change in performance. Calculating and comparing monthly data for a twelve-month period will allow the MDT A to identify the time period during which any trend began and will facilitate determining its cause. Specifically, the MDT A should watch for the following trends among the operating statistics. The service utilization indicators should ideally exhibit an upward trend indicating increased vehicle productivity in serving clients. A downward trend on the other hand, indicates a propensity for vehic l e under-utilization and suggests that corrective measures be taken Similarly, an upward trend in the effectiveness and efficiency indicators with respect to unit costs indicates uneconomical operations and suggests a need for further evaluation. Data Colleeti9.Q Below are suggesti ons for an improved data collection methodology. Operating Expense This data element can be obtained from .the system's accounting office and should consist of a spreadsheet listing line item expenses as well as aggregate budget expenses Line item expenses should include payroll data for labor as well as other i tems such as payments for vehicle materials and supplies suc h as fue l and oil. (The line item expenses should show all rel evant expenses based on the overall service arrangement). Fare Revenue Since contract operators currently collect fare revenue, the CTC should require that they report daily fare revenue at the end of each month. Fare r e venue should be counted at the end of each service day and should be recorded in a ledger or on a computer spreadsheet. Daily fare rev enue data should also be recorded according to each type of fare paid. 60

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. FiguJ"e 7 Sampl e Da t2 C ollection S h eet Date: Vehicle No:-------SPEEDOMETER Closing: Opening: Total mile$: -------SCHEDULE Tme On: Time Off: Number of Passenge!$: 61 ---------------------FARE BOX Closing: --------------Opening: ---------Fare Rev. : -----------Type of Fare Pakl:

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Passenger Counts Information on passenger counts can most easily be obtained by the drivers. For the demand response services, drivers can use a pre-printed computerized trip sheet, which should be available from the MOTA's paratransit operations division telephone operators (who input trip information directly into the computer) Using such trip sheets will provide efficiency to the data collection process because other passenger data (e.g., age, fare category, trip origin and destination) can be pre-recorded in to a format that will facilitate compiling the data at the end of the service day and will minimize the amount of time the drivers have to spend recording the data. For subscription service evaluation, client data can be obtained from the STS project office where clients enroll in the subscription service program. Obtaining a daily passenger trip sheet from this office would be the most efficient way to record the number of passengers riding each day. Passenger counts for both types of services can be verified by the field monitors. Gallons of fuel consumed The most accurate way to measure fuel consumption is to record vehicle fuel intake on a daily vehicle report. This method is superior to taking daily pump readings because it allows fuel usage to be measured on a per vehicle basis and it allows for separate fuel consumption records for fixed route, d emand response, and subscription service. Vehicle Miles The most accurate measure for vehicle miles are odomet e r readings. The opening and closing mileage should be recorded daily, preferably by the drivers on a daily operator report. The importance of recording daily readings is that they prov ide a means to calculate reliable mileage estimates and limit data inaccuracies in the event of odometer failures. For mileage data coming from private contractors or human service agencies, data accuracy can be improved by setting up a system to verify trips made and distances traveled. For example, the operator or the staff person in charge of compiling this data should check for consistency in the contractor's mileage reports. Occasional inquiries with passengers can further serve as a check on the accuracy of such reports. vehicle Hours The most accurate sources for such data are scheduled pay hours or total hours spent on each vehicle. Such data can be obtained from drivers' schedules or driver trip sheets. 62

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An operator's data collection methodology is only one of many factors affecting the accuracy of its operating data Other factors include tlie clariiy of the instructions provided to an operator the operator's data management methods, and the staffs level of motivation to collect and report data accurately. If the operators and their staffs understand the definition and purpose of each data item, they are likely to collect and report the data more accurately and efficiently. A sample operating performance evaluation report is shown in Table 14. The internal data management process is affected by such issues as the availability of standard forms or worksheets for tabulating the raw data, the use of appropriate verification methods and the nature of the work process involved. For example, a regular staff person should be responsible for recording and compiling the data to facilitate verification and the detection of inconsistencies. Furthermore, data should be collected daily to nonnaliu the process and help decrease the probability of errors. 63

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()pefatlng Expense Fate Revenue Passenger Trips Total Vehicle Miles Total Vehicle Hours Gallons of Fuel Expense/Passenger trip ExpenseNehlcle mile Expense/Vehicle hour Passenger trtps/Veh. mile Passenger lrips/Veh. hour Vehicle mUes/Vehlcle Vehicle Miles/Gallon of fuel Accidents1100 000 mies Table 14 Sample Performance Evaluation Report

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APPENDIX A Process to Forecast TD Population.

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Table A-1. Process to Forecast the TO Category I Population by Mar1ulaiiOn (60 and o ... ) c Population D Elderly Populatic!n E Non-Eidet!y Population F Population TOial G Low-Income Eldefty Populal!on H Low-Income Non-Eklerty Population Dlaabeed, Non.etderty, Low Income K Disabled, Non-Eklerly, Non-Low Income L Disabled, Eldet'ly, Low Income M Disabled, Elderly, Non-Low Income N NonDisabled, Elderly, Low Income 0 Nor>-Diseblocl, Elclerty, Income p No.Oisabted, Non.Eiderty, Low Income 32.78% of persons aged 60 aOO over are disabled 7.30% ol persons aged o ID 59 1111 disabled census anct foreoasts from BIEBR. Interview Sutwy percentages of elderty persons of non-elderly persons" (HIC) X E E-J (G/8) X D DL GL B(L+ M +N) H-J A-2

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Table Process t o Forecast 1M TO Category II Popu lat ion by Mar1UI IUo n TranspOn&poltation Hendicapped ponoon tagos persons Nrrl/onal Survey of Hsndicsppod Peop/o p ercentages non-elderty persons Line ttem o + Lin e Item E 1990 Census (base BEBR (forecast to 1996) 1 990 Cens u s (base BEBR (forecasl to 1996). Line Item G + Ute ttem H 19 04% of persons aged 60 and ewer are transportation tt.andicapped 2 .6S% of ponoons aged 0 to 59 ""' transportation han d lcoppod A-3

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APPENDIXB Forecasts by Census Tract of TD Populations

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. / 1 / 1-o-- v I .;; 1.. -/ I.;; 1 -I ""' I 1'\' -;; r-. -l"-!::"' r:: N: "' 1-' '(' i I .':. ,-J -=--..., 1- I 1'. 1-1.., .. II(!!'\ l"jl x \ :t i i" .. I .I f I / --0 IL i / -,_ 'Lll 1,1 - tl \ /; '-'ji lMCTB If ;J J .. lll1110-"IIO 1>-NT(/ B-2 z "' .. ... 0 -

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""' .... .... ..... ..., ...... Ul6 ..... ... $,120 6,171 1.00 ..... ...., ..... ..... ... .. 1m "'" U< .... 7JU2 7,tt1 1 ... 1,$12 .... 1 .... 1..., 1,701 .... >.718 ..., ..... 2,810 ..... .... 2,2$4 .,., ..... ..... ..... .... ...... ...... ._,. ... ..... .... 1,300 1,125 ..... ..... 1.37t ... 2,2<3 ..... 2;1tt US3 Ufl .... 1,798 1,824 1,861 1 879 1,898 2.01 ..... ..... .... U'U ..... 2.04 3,171 .... .... ..,, '"" 1 .01 7.1<0 >.172 2,,.. 2.236 2,280 .... ,.. 740 .. .,.. m .... .. ..... ..... a/.111 .... ... .... ..... ..... ..... ""2 4.01 .. .... t.I02 2.0<4 ...,. .... \701 1,717 ..... .... ..... .... ..... ... .. .. ... .... .. ... .... 2.100 .. .. ...,. ..... U27 .... .... M11 .... 1.&21 ...., .... ..,., :UG ..... ..... ..... .... ...,.. ...%1 .... ..... ...., .... ..... ,..no ,__ .. ...., ..... &01 1 725 t.lSt 1,1l0 1,003 1 .... .... ..... ...., ..... 4.U6 .. 1 .. .... 2,780 2,1110 2, ... ..... 1Jl1 1,758 Uat 1.812 ..... ..... 8.02 1 571 .... U22 ..... 1 ... .... 2,22> 2,218 ..... ..... ..... .... 2 .... 2,301 2,415 2.442 .... 1,417 1 ... 1,$ 19 ..... 1Mt .... 4,765 .... .. ... ""' .... 7 01 10,201 10 .... ... 1o,ns 7#J ..... M18 :1,7.a ..... ..... 7 .04 ..... ),512 ..... ..... .... .... $,018 0,002 a, tee ..... ..... ... 5,071 ..... 5,744 ..... .... .... 2,000 ..... .. .. >.111 .... ... ..... ... .. .. ... ..... ..... ... '"" .... .... '"' V<> 10.01 ..... 1.110 U12 ..... ..... ..... .... ..... 7.,515 ...., 2.000 -.... ..... ... .... .. ... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .... ..... \011 ... . ... ..... V10 ..... ..... .... ..... .... ..... 1,11l0 1 1>4 .... 1 715 .... ... 1M1 1,&n ,,.. 1,e20 1,131 1>.02 3 ;041 ..... .. ... .. 170 2,212 12.03 ..... .... ..... ..... 2 .... 1 ... ..... .., 2,7tt .. .. :r.m 13.01 ..... ..... .. ... ..... 2,.., 13.02 1,115 ..... 2 .... 7.041 2,117> 14 .01 .. 01. ..... ..... 3 ,14t ..1 .. ..... 2,.131 2,1412 2,tt4 2.22. 2,251 1.01 ..... ..... ),11 4 ..... ..... 1.02 4,314 4,507 ...., 1&01 ..... ..... ..... ..... ...... 2 .... .. ... ..... ..... 17.01 ..... 2.011 .... 2,1!2 .. 17.02 1,108 1 .... 1, 182 1;1188 U 10 17,03 ..... ,..,. .. 1l01 .... ..... .. ... ..... 1 1Jl2 B-3

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..... 2,300 3,108 .. 3.241 ... 1 ,978 ..... ..... 2,000 ..... 2,811 .... ..... 2,178 .... ..... ...,. 2.751 2,711 ..... ...,. ..... ...,. 21.00 1:,11:1: 1= 1 ,11n IPI ..,., 22.01 UIO ... liD ,.,.. -... ..... .. ..... ... .... U05 ..... ... ..... ..... .... ..... ..... ..... ..... .... ....., ..,. ..... .... ..... ...... ..... ..... .,.,. U>1 ,., ..... 2.731 zrn ..... .. ... ..... Z7A1 '"" .... ,..,. .... ... 27.112 t,m 1,181!1 1,200 1,223 1)1$ ..... t,$40 ..... UM ..... .... 21.00 I ... ..... 1 1 17 1 ,925 ..... ..... 1,1102 ..... 1,1111 ... .. 1,601 ..... -..... .... .. ... '"' 3t .OO ..... ..... ..... .... U20 ..... ,.., ..... ... '""' .... ..... ..... 1:,758 .... t,t'ft ..... ..... ..... ...... V20 .. ,. ..... ... ... -... ... ., ... "' ... -.... .... 10 1 0 ..... ,..,. .... 111/SI ,,.. .... ..... ., ... ..,., ... ... .. ... ..... .. ..... 1.008 .. ... ..... 2,D1 .... ..... .... ..... 31.0$ 4,411 .. .., ..... 4.616 .... ..... "'' ... ... 1,011 1,00$ .0,00 2, ti'l 2)25 "' 2 .... 2.$17 4t.Ot ..... ..... "''4 4 ,510 ..... -41.02 ..... 1 ... ..... 1,714 1,'132 .... ..... .... "" ..... ... .... 5,215 ..... .... "" .... ..... ..... ..... .. .... Ul> .... ..... l toO ..... 2.0$4 vm ... .... L l .. .... ..... ..... -... ... "" ..... ..... ..... ..... UtS .... 47. 02 ..... 2,044 ..... 2.104 ... ..... ,.., 1W t,M1 1,701 1.7'2! ..... .. .., .. .. II 401 2.1<3 2,171 U11 ,..., .... ...... ..... '"' 2,.81'7 ..... 2,15> 00.01 .. .. ..... .... 2, ... ..... ..... .,., 2,201 2,334 '"" 5UO ..... .. ... .... ...., ..... 7 ..... 2,711 .. ,... 2,711) ..... ..... .... t.HI ,.,,, ..... ..... ..... .... .,_ ...... ..... "'" ..... ... .. ... .... ..... -..... .. ... ..... ..... ..... ..... ...., UZl ...., .... .... U<1 ..... UZ2 ..... .. .. ..... ..... ..... ..... ,., .... ... 1,171 ..... 2,021 ..... .. ... ..... ...... .... ,,,.. .. 2,102 ., ... ..... 1.oot .... 2,027 '"" ..... "'" .. ... ... ... ..170 .... ..... 2,105 .... 2,540 "'" 1!&02 B-4

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..... 1,730 1,755 1,111 1,801 ...., .... 1,100 1,tJ37 1, ... ..... 2,011 at.04 1 .... 1,911 1 .... 1.,9&7 1, ... ..... ..... ... ,..., ... ..... .,., .... .I .. .... 11.01 1,712 1,80t 1, ... 1,862 1 .... 11.02 .... ..... .... 2,121 2.144 ..... .... .... .... ..... ..... ..... ... 3.1S02 ..,.. ..... ...,. ..... ..... ...,. ...,. ..... ...., I.IOl ..... 2JXl5 ..... ...... ... .... ...., ... ..... -1,tu 1,.., Ul2 .... .... .... ., .. 3.8CO ..... .... .... ..... .,,. 3.114 ..... ..... .... ..... ., .. ... 1 ..... .... .... 07.01 .. ,. 2,4UI ..... .... 2.512 ..,.., 1;f10 1,631 ..... I..,. ..... ..... 2;330 ..... 2,3111 ..... 2.<180 01.00 2,7ta ,.. .. ..... .... 7<1.01 ..... ..... '"' 3.002 '"" ...... Uil ..... '"' ..... ,,.., 7UIO .... 2,0112 2.141 """ 2.710 72.00 t,,MIS 1 .... 1,101 ,...,. ... n.oo .,. ... -1P'4 ..... .... .... 2.ZS1 ..... ... .. ..... """ ... ... ... on .. 10.02 ... ... 4t2 417 ., ,._., .. I ... '" ... ... 71.01 125 ... ... ... m ...... .. ..... -2,907 2.941 ...... ,..., I,EEO 1M6 1,700 1.721 ..... 1.81-4 1,901 1.921 1,051' 1.117t """ .... ., .. U-42 ''"' 2.t1t """ .... ., .... .... .... ""' .... .... ... ... .... 7U1 234 :m ... ... ""' ,..., .... .... 2.UO 2,1-41 ..... ,. ... """ ...,. 2,t1Z 2.031 ... ,. ... t.tQ 1.1EIO M71 1,113 ..... ... ., .. 1 1.011 1 ,174 .. .. 1,225 ..... ..... ..... .... ..... .... ..... .... 1 .... l,m 1..... .... 1 .... 1 1 ... 1 .... 1 .... .... 1 .. 1 ... 1.71' .., .. 1.751 00.01 ...... .... .... '"" .... ..... ,.. .. ., .. ..... .... ..... ... .. "$1 8 ..,.1 ... .. .... ..... 4;3\7 ..... .... ..... 1,847 1,874 ..... 1 030 ..... ..... a,211 3.304 ..... 3,433 S,4ft ..... '"' l102 2,114 l184 2,1ot ..... ... ..... '"' ..... ... ..... 1,114 1 ,1. t,t. 1.21$ 1,200 ..... .... .... ..... ..... .... -..... ...., ..... 1.,410 -.... ...,, ... ..... ..... f1.00 """ ..... .... ..... .... ..... ..... .,.., ..... .. """ ..... S.1U ..., ..... .... 2J'Z1 ..... .... 2,to7 .... .... U07 .... 2.112 .. ... ..... .,. .. ... ... ..... .... ... ..... ..... .... ..... 1,500 U" ..... B-5

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.... .. 'tiC. "' .... .... .... .... .... ,ua ...., ..... '""' ..... .... ..... .... ..... ..... ..... .... ... ..... ..... '""' .... .... ..... "'" ..... '"" .... ..... .... 1,611 .... ... ...., ..... ..... .... ..... 2..414 ..... 2;4M ..,. .... ..... ..... ..,. ... ..... .... ..... <.1133 4,71W ..... ..... ..... ..... .. .,. t,015 6,102 '"" ..... ... ..... 1 ,014 ""' 1,041 ..... ..... ..... .. .. .. ... ..... ..... ,,.. .... ..... ,..., ...,. ..... "" .., ... ... ... ...... ..... 2,1 .... ..... 2.257 ...... ..., ..... .... ..... ..... -... ..... 2.$12 2.$10 ..... -..... ..... ,... ...., U22 .. 2.1lO ..,.. .. ... ...... 2.171 101100 ... ...,. ... IOt.CO ..-1 ,114 1 740 .... ..... ...... 1,611 ..... .... ..... '"" tOUl ... ... ... ... 101.1. 1,1 1 8 .... ,..,. ,..,. t,taQ ,ous ...... ..... U>< ..... 2 ,1<0 101.16 ..... 7.01 0 7,na 7,.21'7 ,..., 10U7 1,918 ..... ..... ..... '"" 101.11 '"" .... 2,Jtt """ ...... tOI .tt ..... .... ..... ..... ..,. 101.20 ..... U38 2,710 ..... 2,1$1 101.11 ... 678 ,, ... .... .. ... ,., 101.22 S.176 ... '"" 101.23 ..... .... ...... ..... .. ... 101.2< ., ... "' .., .... 101.25 ,.,, ... s.o" '"" ..... 101.28 ..... t.f.U 1, 741 "' ..... 101.27 ..... 2.117 ..... ..... ... .. 101.21 ..... ..... 1,.115 ..... ,.... ...... .., "' ... .., 10< 102.02 4.<1 0 ,,,, _.,. ..... a.m -..... ..... 2.211 ..., ..... ,....., 1.730 "'" ..... ..... ,..,. ..... ... 102 ... ... ... ...... ..... .... ...0 ,.. .., 100bt ,,.. ..... ..... ..... ..... ...... ,...., -... .. .... -...... ""' ..... ..... ... ...., 107 .0t .... >.m u MOl ..... 101 ,02 ... "" ... '" ... 100.00 U>7 '""' "'* .ar ...... 108.00 ..... 2.117 .... ... .. ...... ..... t ,PO .... 1,817 ..... 110.02 ..... .... ..... 2.n1 2,75a uu:o ... ,, .. ..... 4.111 .... 112.01 ..... 1,111 ..... vm ... t1W ..... l<" .... ..... 2,547 ..... ..... ..... 1,512 .... 5,718 114..11 1,&4t .. 1,8t2 l"" 110.00 1,082 ..... 1 H 4 t,12t 1,142 ...... 0 0 0 B-6

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Table B-2. Forecasts of Dade County TO Category II Population. .... 1 .... 1 .... 1 .... 1. 073 1 .... 1 .05 .., .. 1 ... .,. ... 1.00 ... .... ... "' ... 1.07 t,ats 1,23> 1.2>0 1,200 1 ..... 1 ... 308 313 318 ... ... ... ... ... ... 412 Z02 414 ""' ... ... ..., ... 178 ... 802 .,, .., ... ... ... 211 215 218 ... ,.. ,.. 301 ... 370 .. 200 ,.. ... 212 ,. ., 75t 771 782 ,., 803 ... 471 478 ... .. :1.01 "' 324 329 ,.. 33$ 3.02 12 1 122 124 ,. 127 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .., ... .. 821 4.01 ... ... ... ... ,,. <02 217 ,., 285 ,.. 292 ... ... ... ... 410 ... ... 282 ""' 291 ... ... ... 207 210 214 218 210 ... ... ... ... "' 388 4 .07 512 520 521 ... 541 ... 2S8 ... ,.. .,., 271 5.ot "' ... ... ... 487 5.02 ... .,. .., 1.00 1 1.01 2 ,,. 2 .. "" ... 270 "' $ .<11 310 314 ,. 323 ... a02 311 ,,. "" 325 "" .,. "" ... ,. "' "" 8.04 ... 412 ... 423 .,. 8.05 "' .,., 271 275 218 8.08 751 7111 m 7'84 .. 7 .01 .... ... ... 2.MI .., 7.03 m 7 .. .. ... 820 7 .04 ... 497 ... 512 517 .... ... ,.. 750 '" ,.. &02 ,.. ... ... ... ... .... 3$3 ... ,.. ... 373 .... "" ... ... ... ... &Ol ,., ,.. ... "" 211 1 ... ,., ... "' ... 373 1M2 ... 318 ... ,. 332 1.03 302 ... 311 ... ... 1 ... 314 318 ... ,. 332 11 .01 251 .. "" 282 ,.. n .oz 218 221 224 228 230 U.03 .... 207 211 213 ... U .04 ... 291 ... 300 ... ... "' .. I ... 515 .... ., ... ... 571 578 1-... ... ... -"' 13.01 282 ,.. 290 ... 291 13.02 ,.. "" ... 312 318 1U1 ... 222 228 228 220 14. 02 178 178 ... 184 1 .. .... 107 1 .. 202 ... "" 1$,02 ... ,.. ... ,.. 311 1&01 ... 014 823 ... ... 1& .. ,., ... ... ... ... 17.01 210 213 '218 221) 222 17.02 "" 170 181 184 1 .. 17.03 230 "' "' 250 ... tlOt "" "" 212 215 217 I&Q2 220 "' ... "' ,.. B-7

PAGE 81

Table B-2 (continued) "'" ... ... ... -211 1 ... 117 ""' ... ... .,. 11.04 "' 202 "" ... 211 -218 220 ""' ... ""' 20.03 ,. 108 "" ... "" ,.... 13$ 131 130 ,., 143 21.00 183 18$ 108 101 10S 22.CII ... 290 ,.. ... ""' ..... 330 335 "" ... ... ..... ... ""' ... "" 378 2<0 1 ... w ... 513 "" ...., 252 ... ... ... ,. ..... '" ... "" ... 341 ..... 623 ... ... .., ... 27.01 411 '"' .... ... ... 27.02 101 101 103 106 100 ..... 101 102 103 104 ... 211.00 214 217 220 ... 225 3001 1t1 180 102 108 t97 .... ... 878 ... ... "" 31.00 ... ... .... .... 248 ..... 140 142 ... 1 ... 140 3&01 "' 172 175 178 ,. 3802 ... "' ... "" ... 31.01 .. .. 70 70 71 a1.02 .. .. ,, "' .. ..... 2 2 2 2 2 ..... 1-"' '"' 1 408 1,428 1 .... 2001 ,.,. .. .. 787 ,. 3002 1,>8 1,421 1 .... ..... 1 ..... .... ... ... 3t1 ... ... .... 577 ... ... .., ... ..... 101 1 .. "' 200 202 .... <12 417 .... ... ... t.Ot ,.. ,. .... ... ... 41,02 ... ... 30t 313 317 -42.00 1,317 1,338 ..... U7S 1,391 ..... ... ... 818 ... 831 .... 1,290 1,31 8 1,337 .... 1.372 ..... ... ,.. ,.. ''" ... 4&09 2 2 2 2 2 .... ... .... '" 418 '" .... 194 ,., 200 "" 208 41 .01 ""' ... S18 ... .,. 47.02 .... ...
PAGE 82

OI.IR 211 ,.. ,. ,., ... ..... ... ... ... ... ,.. ..... "" ... .., 345 ... eo.Ot .,. ... .. ... .... ..... ,.. '" ,,. ... ... eut ... ... .,. "" ... ltQ::J: ... ... .... "" .... ..... ... ., ... ... 101 ..... 1117 ... ... ... 630 ..... ... ... ... ..., ... ..... 210 :Ia alt 2110 ""' ..... ,., ,.. 3 1 2 ... ... ..... .,. ... "" ... "" ..... ... .., ... 671 .,. ..... '" '" ... ... ... ..... "" ... .. ... "" "'"' ... ... ... 4\2 ... "'"' .,. ... ... ... .. ..... ... ... ... .... ... .... .., ... ... 4S1 ... ,..., .. .. .... ... ..... r> "" .Ctl ... C4 71.00 ... .. -.. "' ...... .,. Ill ... "' -... ,.. ... 212 21A 7<00 441 .... .... 4111 .., .... ... .. 202 ,.. .... "" !12 ... t2S '"' .... ., .. .. .. .. 78.01 ... .. "' ,,. ,,. ,. .. ... ... ... 520 ... ,.. .. ... .. .. "' ,.. .. ... ... "" 311 ... 77.01 413 ... .., ... .... 77.02 ,., '" .,. ... ... 77 ... ... ... ... .,. ... ..... .. .. .. 51 .. 7&02 ... ... ., ... ... ... ... '" ... .., .., J'I.Ot 211 222 ... 22& ... -... "" .,, 216 .... ... "' .. ... ... ..... ... .. ... ... ... ...., sn .,. .. "" ... -... .., -... ... ..... ... .. .... ... ... .... ... ... '" .,. ... ..... ... ... ... ... .. ..... ... 413 -.... m ,.. "' ... ... ..... "" ... .., ... ""' .... .., ... .,. ... ... .. ., ... ... ... "" ... .... ... ... .. ... ' .... ,.. ... ... ... 007 1&01 412 .... .., ... ... .... 235 ... ... ... ... .... .. "" ... .,. 1133 07. 00 ... ... .,. .., 0&01 ... ... .,, ... .... m ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .... ... ... ... 521 ... ... II ., .. ..... ... ... ... ., 521 ..... ... .. ... ... ... B-9

PAGE 83

..... 231 ... 230 .... ... ..... 1,032 1.00 1 ,.., 1 m 1, ... ..... 1 .... 1 .307 1 317 1,387 1.A13 ..... ..., ... ... .,. .,. ..... .,. ... ISO ... 291 ..... ,., ... ... 273 .,. ..... 1 .. 108 ""' .. ""' 85.02 .,. 383 "" ... ... ..... ... ... ... ..,. ... W.OI 432 ... ... ... 51 9 ({7,02 ... .,. ... .., .,, ..... 1 ,12< 1,141 1 ,167 1 1 74 1,188 ..... ... 173 17$ "' .... ... ... 4 .. ... ... .... 2 U 218 ... 222 .... -.. .. .. ., .. 100.0 1 .,. ... $41 ... ... IOQ.G2 ... ... ... ... "' 100.00 ,., .,. ... "" ... 100.00 312 317 322 ... 330 loo.a7 0$1 ... ... ... ... 100.00 ,, '"' ... ... .,. 10t03 ... .... ... ... ... 10tOEI ... ... ... ..,. 512 t01. t1 I 100 111 174 118 10'1.1-4 ... ..1 ... <74 480 101. 15 '" T5T ,.. ... .. 101.18 1 .708 1,733 1 ,758 1 705 1 ... 1 01.17 ... 623 <31 ... ... un.te 001 610 ... ... ... 10'1. 1 t 1 ... 7 2.027 ... 2,110 IOUO ... 5SI ... ... ... 101.2 1 ... ... ... ... ... 101.22 .. 1,0>2 1 ,017 1 032 1 .043 1012, 1 .223 UA1 1.259 1,271 1 .211 101.2 4 .. .. .. ., .. 101.25 ... ... 1.012 1, ... 1.()30 1 01.218 022 $30 ... ... ... 101.27 ... ... ... $13 ... 10126 .. ... ... ., ... 101.01 ... 218 222 ... 220 102.02 l ,$$4 1,$81 UlfO 1 033 1 ,6$1 102.03 ... ... ... 674 581 103.00 ... ... 371 "' ... 1....., 1 ... 142 I .. 148 1 .. 10$00 ... 221 22 $ m ... 105.01 ., ... ... .,. ... 10802 ... 334 ... 342 '" 100.03 ... "" ., 881 ... 107,01 ... ., ... ... 971 107 ,02 14$ 147 ... lSI 103 108. 00 "' ... 73$ ... 103 100.00 222 ... ... 233 ... 110 .01 001 ... .,. ... ... 110.02 ... ... ... .. I .,. 11UIO 1132 ... ..1 ... ... 112.01 ... ... 708 "' 72 4 112.02 .,. 331 ... ,., ... 113. 00 407 .,, ... 425 ... 1 1498 1,141 '-1. 16& 1,181 1,200 1 .2 1 1 115.00 ... ... ... ... ... 118.98 0 0 0 0 0 B-1 0

PAGE 84

'" .,., "' ..... .... .. 102 1,117 .,. ... ,.., "" 200 ... ... .. ft,7 .... .. .. ,,. ... .. 1,812 ...,. .. .. 57 ,,. ... ... ..,.. .... ,, ... .. ,. ... ..... 101 .. 111 21111 ... .... .. ... .. 101 .. m ... ..... .... .. m .. ... .. '"' ... .... .. .. ... .. 211 ... ,.. 1 790 107 187 ... .. .. ... ,..,. .. .... .... .. ... 12 ... "" ... ..... 3,11t .. If .., 30 ... ., ... 702 2.140 .. 17 ... 7 ,., 1 4 2 .. ... 7 .. .. .. ... "' ... 142 1 ,140 t,tM 3.745 .... .. ... .. ... "' 1 ,000 ... 2 947 tO 211 .,. 1.M ..... 5.02 ... 277 .. "' 201 1 ... 1 .. ,.. .... .. "' 40 ... ... ... 1,1'59 .... .. .., .. "" .. "" ... 1 ,SI7 .... .., .. ., 120 m ... 2.223 .... 37 ... 7 4 .... 100 .,. ... Uf2 .... .. 214 ,. ... .. .,, ,.. .... 108 ... "" 71 4 ... ..... 7 ,01 .. ..... 414 t,.OS ... ..... 3..01$ 10.201 7 .02 ... ..,, >51 711 .., 1 ..... ..... ..... 7 04 ... .,. 122 ... ,.. ... 1.11t .... ... ... ... "' ... 1 ..... 1 .... ..... .... ... ., ... .., .., .... ...... ...,. .... ... ., m .. ,.., ..... .... .. ... 52 ,.. .. ... 1 ... ..... .. ., 12 ... "' ... 160 274 ,.. 1 .... 1Q.01 100 "' ... 212 m .,. ..... >,1111 1o.02 .. ,.. .. "' 112 .,. t ,tto ..... 10.00 ., "" .. 110 .. ... 1 104 U3$ 10.04 227 ,., ,,. 144 ... 201 ..... ... 1 .. 11.C)1 223 ,. ... .. "' ... 1 ,877 81 ... 20 ... .. .., 1,0St 1 .... 1 t.o:t 70 216 .. .. .. ... ... uoe 11.04 22 ... .. ... ., ., 211 U$1 12.02 .. ... .. 808 1 .. 1,24 1 ... 3,041 12.02 .. ... .. ... .. .. 1 ... ..... ..... "' eo .,. 1 171 .,. ..... 1:1.0\ "' w .. 220 101 ... 1.211 .... ...... 121 ... Ill "' ... ..-t.tta ..... "' '"' .. 120 174 ..... ..... 1402 114 "' .. .. ... 120 ._ .. ... 1Ut m 100 117 ... ..... ..... t$.02 ... .. 1 .. ... ,. ... .. 18.01 122 .,, .,. .. ... 1 .... ,..., 1l
PAGE 85

19.01 108 12& .. 101 ,., ... 1,312 2.212 1t.O'l 1 .. Ito .. .. ... 110 ..... a1oe 11.04 .. "' .. 1 ... 100 ... t 140 1,m :10.01 "' II> .. flO 1 .. 2.118 ,. ... I 01 "' 141 ... ..... ...... ..... 1<3 151 100 1 .. "" '1!11 1 121 ..., 2f.OO 1 .. ... ... ... '"' '"' ... ..., I ... .. "" "' "" 1, .. 2,131 21.0 1 "' ,.. .. .., ,, "" I,,., .. ..... .. .. 20 ,. .. 160 .,., 1,171 ..... 12 10 .. .. .. .. t ,100 1,$<0 ..... 1 .. .. 104 ... ... ... 1,142 .... 1 .. 12t ., 1Z4 111 ... 108 l,m ..... ,.. .... ... ... ... ... t .. ,..., ..... ... ,.,. ... 10 1 .. ..... .... ..... 100 .. n .. 141 1 .... ..... ..... ,. .. .., 212 152 .. "'' ..... 110 >II ... ... ... ... Ull '"'" ,. ., 1$4 .. .. m ""' .. .. 10 .. .. ... ... ..... 0 1 a 0 0 3&00 51 ,,. 110 1 ... ""' U14 .... ..... 3f.l)l 1 .. ... ,., 774 .,. ..... 1,710 5,211 ..... '" '" .,, 1,,.. 041 1, ... ,,.., ..... .. 257 61 400 "' ... ... 2.2$1 ..... 100 ... 102 "' 201 t,t08 1 ... ..... ,. ..... 114 12 ... 24 ... .. "' ...... .. ... .. .,, 100 ... ... 2,19'2 411.01 61 ... ... ... ... ,,,.., .,. <41,385 CU2 .. ... .. .., .. "" 200 1,.,. -... .., ... 1,W 1-= ,._ .... ..... ,., ... '" ... ..... UtS ""' -.., ... 122 .... ... 1 ..,.. ... ""' .... .. .. ... 7# ... .... ... ..... 0 0 0 0 41.01 .. 270 21 .... .. .., ,. 2.1>4 402 ... 2 1 .. .... 120 ... <7 ,01 .. m .. "' ., ,. ... 1,151 "'"' ,. ., ... .. "' ... ..... .. ... .. ... ., ... ... 1.., 4100 1 7 " .. ..... ... 10 ""' "' .... ... 2,fA3 ..... ., ... 100 ... ... ... ... 2,$41 ..... 01 ... .. "' 140 .,. m ..,., ..... ., 111 102 ... ... '" ... .. ... IIAO .. ... .... ... ... ... 1 .... ..... ..... .. ... ... ... "' ... t.tll 2.713 ..... 121 ... 1$0 :001 ... .. -...,. AOI 1$1 ... 330 ... m ,..., o.m ..... 52.01 tA1 .., -.., "' ., ,..,. <.m .... 1Z2 ... ... ... "' ... 1-..... "" ... .., ... '" ..... ._ ..... """ .. 220 11< ... ... ... $11 .. .., -.. ,.. 1$0 ... ... '""" ., ... ..... .... 22 011 "' 161 ... "' 1,871 51.00 .. ... 185 427 .,. ., 608 2,85:2 61113 01 ... ... 101 ... 770 1,.., 57 04 ., '" 1 .. ... 'm "" .. aoo1 00 .. ... ... .... ... 1,209 .. ""' ..... .. ,., "' ... 241 B-12

PAGE 86

Table 8-3. (continued). ..... .. ... "' ... "' ... 4U 1,no ..... .. 241 71 ... "' ... ... 1.101 .... ,. ... 71 .. 144 712 ... -40.0 1 !17 .,. .. .... 142 9111 ... 2.17< ..... .. 214 .. .... .. ... .... ...., lt.01 10 273 .. ... .. .., ... 1.712 lt.Cr2 ... ... .. ..... 100 2.020 ..... ,. .... ... "' ""' ..... ... 3,116 00.0 1 $2 238 w ... .., 1.221 .. 1 u.aa ..... "' 221 .. ... 1S1 ... ... 2.21t t<01 $2 144 110 ... 220 ... ... 1.W ..... 154 "' ... .., ... 1,008 .... ..... .. ... .. ,.. 11$ ... .. 1 .... ..... .. ,.,. '" 7W 2C2 1....., ,.. ..... ... 01 "' ... ., ... ... '""' ..,,. ..... ... .... ... ... ..1 ... 1M> .. .... 17.01 .. 221 .. ... 122 ,. ... ...,. ., ... mt .. ... 110 ... 1,h0 ... .. ... .. ... ... ... -1,110 -.. 151 111 .., ... ... 2..J't1 ,.... .. ., 101 ... ... 074 ... 2 101 .. ... .. "" ... .., .. 2.111 71.00 .. 2111 . ... ... ... , .... 12.00 11 121 77 11)1 .., ""' 1.10S 1-..... 212 201 .. ... .. .... .. ... 11 .,. ,. ,,. 210 t,21t ..... 3 137 7 ,. .. ... ... .. "' 0 0 10 .. ... .. .. 1 0 1 .. .. .. .... 14 133 1 11 .. ,.. 103 "' ..... .. ... .. ... .. .., ... 2,713 .... 70 101 100 121 ... ... 1/l37 .... .. .., ... .. .,, ... 1,17-4 77.01 41 .. .. ... 122 .... .,. ..... 77.02 .. ... ,. ... .. m 3n ..... 77,01). 'J1 ... 27 ... .. ... ... ..... .. 2 .. 0 .. 0 10i' ,. .. .. 'J1 .... ,. .., .. .. ... .. ... .. 22 ... .. .,. 77 1 ,0i'2 262 2.137 ...... .. 1n ... $20 ... 1 .... ..... "' "' 7 .... A ... ... ... 1$ .. 121 1 ,174 ..... 7 $:12 ... 1.ol2 .. ...... -., .... .. 321 .. ... m 1 ... .... ... .., .. ... 220 1 .... .. ... ... "" ... 1 .... .... .. 722 .. ... f7 ... 1-..... .. ,.. 71 .,. .. 770 ... ...... ... "" ... 1$0 "" ..... ..... .. 171 171 ... ... 1,14t 1.13a ..... 30 301 ... .. ... ... .... ..... .. ... .. ... 1 .. ... 1 .... 017 kOT 37 ., 12 ... .. 1 13 .,. ..... ...... .. ... ,.. ... <31 ..... ..... .. ... 21 .. .... 101 1 114 1&0 1 21 ... .. ... 10Z ... ... 2,101 .... .. 235 222 ,. .... ... 1, ... ..... ... 72 ... 141 1;0t:l "" ..... ..... .. .. 1 ... .. t,197 ... ..... ... 01 ... 1 .. ... 212 1 .... ... .... ..... .. m ... ... .. 1 .... 1,0i'l ..... 22 ... .. ... 100 1,211 .,. ..... ..... ., ... 120 ... .... ... ... ..... .. .. 0 "" ... ..... .. ... ... u n4 ..... -.. .... 1 .. .. ... ... 1#>7 ... ... ... B-13

PAGE 87

Table B-3. (continued). ..... ... .. ..... .. ... ... ..... ... '" 74 ... . 1to ..... "" 1 041 .. ... f ,HI ..... .... ..... ... ..... .... ... 2.518 ... 1. 11t .... .. .... .. "' .., ... ... ..... .... ... '* %7 ... ... ..... ..... ... Zl .. .. ... ... '"" 91.01 .. ,.. .. ... .. 201 ,.,. U2S ..... ., ... 30 222 ... ..... ..... ..... ... .. ... T7 .. ,.. ..... 17.01 Zl '" .. ... .. 817 210 "' .. .. .... ..... ... 2,010 ... ...... ..... "' ... 1ZI ..... ... 2.5<1 ,.. U.l ..... .. .. "' .. ,.. .. ... ..... ., ... .. ... .. 123 .... ..... .... .. .. .. .. 201 ... ..... -.. ... .. .. ... IZI ,_, .. .,. .. "' .. ... t t ...... ... ... .. --..... .. .., ,. ... ... .., ,..., ._ ...... .. ... .. - ... -.... ...... .. ... .. ... .. ,., ... 2.111 -m "" .. ... ... ..... .... ...... "' ... 12 ... .. ... ... ... ...... 21 .,. .. ... 21 ... ... 1.4H tOUt .. 117 '" 222 ... 101.t4 .., .. 110 ., .,. ... 1,111 101.11 .. ... ... "" "'' ..... telt.lf 221 ..... "' ... m ..... ..... .. ... 101.t7 .. ... 21 ... ... ... 1,1?8 101, 1 1 .. "' 210 .. ... ... '"' 101.11 ... 1,77<4 "' t,HZ .... ..... """ 1,241 101.20 .. ... .. ... .. ... ... .... 101.2 1 ... '"" ... .. .,. '"' ... 101.22 .. 1,1 .. ... .. ..... .... lOll 101.21 ... '"" ... "" '" '"" ..... ..... 101.24 $ ,. 1 110 .. ... tOUI '" ..... .. ... ... .. . .... 4 114 tOt.ZI 21 ... ... .. "' ... I,IM 10t.21 .. IZI .. ... .. ... ... ..,.. 10UI .. ... 17 ... .. ... ... .... 102.01 .. 2 .. liS "" .. ...... ... -... .. .... ... ..., .. ... ..... 11 ... .. ... .. .. ..... ... IOlOO "' ... .. ... $1 ... .. 1 .710 ..... 21 ., ,. .. .. .. ... ... ..... ... 152 .. I .. 112 "' ..... ... tca01 v .. 1%7 ... ,., 1.221 '" ..... ...... .. .. "' 11 ... ... I ,.,. 1 .... ...... .. ... .. ... ,, \,079 ... ., ... "' ro .. ... .. ... ..... ,.,.., "" 0 0 .. .. ... ..... T7 ... 118 no "' ..... .,. ..... 112 ... .. ... 121 "' '"" ..... t10.0t .. ... .. "' "' ... "' ..... 110.02 .. 21 ... .. ... -..... 111,00 ... ... 72 ... .. t ,tto ..... 112.0t .. ,., 12 ... ,. 247 .. .... t12.oa "' .. .. .. ... 1 tOol 2.412: t11A10 .. ... ... 201 ... ...,. l411 114, .. "'' ... .. .. .. 001 1 ,)1.4 "'' UI.OO 212 .. .. 311 211 -0 0 0 B-14

PAGE 88

Dade County TO category II Population 1 .00 .. .. 872 .. 1.<128 1.05 .. .. .. ..... "" .... 1 0 18 ,. ... ..... ... 1 .07 11 "" 118 ... ..... 1,215 UIO 2 .. .. .... ..... ... 201 .. ... 201 ..... ... .... 11 11 4 200 ""' ... ... 11 133 .. .,, ""' rn .... 13 74 1 4 106 "' ""' ... 23 138 18 175 ""' 350 ... 20 .. ,. 124 "'' 2tO 2 07 .. ... .. ... ""' ,., ... .. 1$4 .. 240 ""' ... 101 22 108 18 17> ""' ) 1 9 102 .. 12 "" 121 .... 34 1 .. ... "'' ... ... 24 181 1 9 "" ""' ... "' .. 121 .. 108 ... ... .... .. .. 100 ... m ... .. 108 "' 123 "'' 392 .... 30 13$ .. 101 ... 292 .... 10 80 22 ., ... 207 .... ,. 1 .. :t1 142 ... ..., 4b7 .. 205 .. 161 ... 512 ... ,. ., ,. .. "" ... .... .. "' ,. .. 183 ... ... .. 185 .. .. "' ... aoo 51 <01 .. "' ... .. a01 It ., 23 183 ... 310 .... .. .. 100 "" 311 w 17 .. .. 219 .. ... .... .. 1 .. .. '" ... ... .... 17 .. 182 ... ... .... .. 1,. 11& ... ... 751 7.01 .. 240 ... ,.. ..... .... .. 104 1 .. ... ... m ... .. 134 11 ""' ... ... 8.01 .. 151 114 "' ... '"' &02 .. ltl 140 ... ... .. ao1 .. 130 24 102 ... ... 002 31 12A 30 104 "" ... -23 .. .. ... 19t 1 001 .. .. 17 "' ..... ... 1002 .. 125 32 123 ... .. 1 003 32 Ill .. ... ... ... .... 82 14 14 .. "' ... 11.0 1 11 .. 134 ... '" 11.02 30 .. 12 .. ... ... 11.03 25 ,. 11 .. ... ... 11.CW .. 20 .. "" ... 1202 .. 130 .. '" ... ... 120) .. ... ,. 182 197 ..., 12A4 14 .. ... 332 ... ... 18.01 .. .. .. 120 ... 292 1>.02 I< ,. 115 ... ... t 4.0 1 .. 12 .. .. ... ... .... 42 .. 31 .. ... 1,. 1&01 .. 21 .. .. ... 1.,. ,.02 .. .. .. .. ... ... 1&01 .. "' ... ... "" 18.02 20 loO 30 m "'' .., t7. 0 1 .. .. ., 73 ... 210 U'.02 30 42 24 .. ... 178 1 7 .03 2t 52 ., ... 23e 1&01 .. .. ., "" .. 1&02 .. .. "' 230 nfe = N ot tppllc:ebie because lhe censua net ls tullY cowr8d by tixecHoute lranait eeMoe. 'Q 1 (

PAGE 89

tt.01 .. ., .. ,. ... :101 .... ., .. .. .. ... ,., 1t.ot "' .. .. .. ... .. 20.01 S7 70 .. .. ... .. ..... .. .. .. .. .... .. ..... .. ... .. 2t.OO .. .. "" "' 2>01 .. ,. ... .... "" .... .. .. .. 112 ... ... .... ., 108 .. .. ... ... :U01 .. 111 ... 173 .... ... 2<4.02 ., .. .. .. ... ... .... .. 113 .. ,. ... ... .... .. .. .. 72 ... ... 27.01 .. ... .. ... ., ..... .. .. ... ... lOt 21.00 .. "' 21 f1 ... 101 21.00 .. .. .. ... ... ... -20 (1 n ... 117 -,. .. 217 ... ..... 70 .. .. .. ,.. -.. .. .. .. .. ... ..... ,. .. 77 ... .. ... -n Ill ,. .... .. ... ., ... t ... do .. ,.., " tO ... .. "' 0 0 0 2 ... ..... .. '" '"" ... 1,311 3t.ot 5 1 ,,. ,., .... "" "' ..... .. ,., ... '"" ... ..... ..... .. .. "" ... ... Gt.o5 .. .. '" NO 577 3t.ot ... 7 "' ... ..... .. .. m ... "' A tot "' .. .. ... ... 71$ <41.02 .. 11 ... ... ... ...... 7$ ... .., "' ... l,t17 ...... .. .. ... 712 ...... .. 420 ... ... t,201 ..... 2S "" .. ... .. ...... 0 2 0 0 ... ..... .. 210 ... ... - 75 t "' ... .. ., ... 1 0 tl 200 .... 500 ., ... 15 .. .. ""' tf7 .... 111.00 .. ,., S72 .... 0 2 .. 40.01 .. ., .. '"' .... 275 - ., .. 270 ... .... ... 01 .. .. .. ... ,., ... ..... 11 .. .. 201 ... ... lt.OO ,. "' ,.. 270 ... ... siOt .. ., lOT '" .... .... ..... .. .. 117 .... ... ..... S7 "' ,.. .... "" "'"' .. " ,.. ... ... ... ... ... '" ,.. ... .., .. 02 .. ,., :lj)l .. ... 717 ...... 11 .. ,., .. .. ...., .. 12 ... .. ... ..... .. ... ,., .. ... ., ... 107 .. ... ... ., ... .. ... ,. .. v ..... '" ,. 251 ... '" ..... .. Ill ... ... .,, ..... .. ... "" 1'111 Not lflfllc ......... tM <*'IUa net .. J.ll1 CIOWtld ........... 'A.. II(

PAGE 90

..... 12 .. 10 180 ... ... ...... .. ., 103 ... ... ..... ., 201 ... 331 00.01 .. ... .. "" ... ... 110.02 12 .. ,. ... ... 388 81.01 4 .. 27 ... ... ,.. .,.., 3 110 ... ... .. 82.00 28 1 .. .. 414 ... ... .... 1 .. .. 144 ... ... "' ..... 10 .. 37 :til ,.,. 380 ..... 10 .. .. 1C3 ... "" .... .. .. .. 103 ... .., 84.03 20 .. 151 ... 370 ..... 22 141 .. 410 ... .... 00.01 .. ., 108 ... ... , ..... 41 00 .. 140 ... ... 87.01 .. 120 34 22 1 ... ... 67 .02 13 .. 31 120 ... "" ..... 13 120 .. ... ria 422 09.00 20 .. .. ""' ... .., 10.01 122 .. 278 ... ... .... .. .. ,.. "" ... 71.00 "' 102 .. 117 ... ... 72.00 31 .. .. .. ... ,,. 73.00 3 17 7 117 ... ,.. 74.00 "" 10 30S nit ... 1 .. 139 ... 1 .. 75.02 "' 0 "" 120 ,.., 1 ... .. "" 62 7"-01 .. 10 103 ... .... ..... 18 183 .. ... "" .... ..... ,. .. .. .. "" ,., 7'-04 18 ... 10 182 ... 298 77.01 124 .. "" ... 473 77.02 120 ... "" ""' 77 ... 10 150 18 m "" ... 7&01 1 17 0 .. "" .. ., 10 ,. .. 214 .. ... 7 ... 110 22 303 .... ,,. 7>.01 s .. "" .... 217 ., 1 .. 2 158 .... 204 8000 .. ,., ... 245 81.(0 3 188 10 ... .... ... 82.01 1 .. "' .... "' ..... m 4 143 .. 374 ..... 1. 0 "' .. 412 03.01 .. ,.. 28 ... ... ... ..... .. ... .. .. ... ... ..... ., 138 43 211 ... ... .... 32 ... .. ... ... m ..... .. 1 5 18 107 "" ., ..... "' ... .. 253 ... S67 ..... .. 170 7 ... ... ... ..... 12 .,. ,,. .. ... ..... 110 .. ... .. ,.. .... 130 .. ... "" .., .... 10 10 m .... 23$ .... 10 ... .. ... .... ... .,,., 20 2<0 51 ... .... ... .... ,. 158 .. ... .... ... .... 31 ... .. 473 "" .,. ..... ... .. ... "" ... ..... 17 ... 43 ... ... ... .... 12 8 0 1 .... .. ..... .. 18& .. ... ... ... .,., 147 .. ... ... ..... ... nla .. Not appllc:ab5t becauae lhe c:eneua net ia lllt)' covered by bed-route trlnl&t ser.b. Q_,..,

PAGE 91

Table 84. (continued). ... ,. ,. 1$3 "' ... "" ... 91.00 .. 101 .. 2Z7 "'' .,. 92.00 5 82 .. "' ... ... 83.02 .. 301 100 ... nla 1,COZ ..... "' .., ... 713 ... 1,330 ..... tO 178 10Z 74 .... ..... 109 154 "" 2711 ..... "' ... .. .. "" "" ..... .. .. .. .. "" 195 ..... "' ... 17 12> "" .,. ..... 22 124 22 212 "" ... .., ... 217 .. 240 "'' ... 87.02 19 .. 7 .. "" ... ..... 22 310 71 721 "" 1,124 ..... 17 7 7$ "" 188 ..... "' 229 15 ,.. "" 478 ..... 12 123 .. .. "" 212 .... ,. $$ 17 "" .. 100.01 .. 139 ,. 71 ... 52$ 1000> 178 11 .. "" "" 10<>0$ 30 158 .. 130 ""' "" 100011 30 1 .. .. ., "" 312 100.07 24 "" ,. 212 194 .., 100.08 .. 2$? .. 197 "" 671 101.03 10 202 7 13t 74 ... IOUJ8 10 182 "' 153 ... 101.11 .. 3 .. "" 167 101 14 "' 190 10 ... '"' ... 101.15 2 1 183 .. 198 ... "' 101.18 .. ... ... ... 673 1,708 101.17 11 247 .. 1!12 so 515 101.11 24 ,. t22 .... ... UN.1t "' ... 72 ... ... 1.tt7 101.20 12 240 .. ... ... ... tOUt .. ... 14 '" ... ... ... .. ... .. 418 ..... .., t0t23 .. ., .. ... ... 1.223 U)t2o4 2 ,. 2 47 .. 92 101.25 41 ... 32 2$8 "'' ... 1 01.28 11 206 10 130 1 .. $22 ...... .. 298 8 tT1 "" ... .. ... 10 ... 139 847 103.01 .. 47 123 ,. 102.02 82 ,.. ... 317 ... 1,564 102.03 ,. 1St 24 "' ... ... 103.00 7 1&0 180 ... 342 1 04.00 7 25 27 .. ,.., 105.00 .. 55 .. 72 "" 218 108.01 1 0 ... ... 122 orr 108. 02 31 22 .. 228 326 101J.o:J .. 310 20 ... "" .., 107.01 $3 268 ,. .. ... ... 101.02 2 138 0 "" 14$ 1 .. 00 ,. 149 .. ... "" "' tot.OO "" .. .. 111 "" 222 110.01 2f .. ... 81 ... .. 1 tt0.02 "' ... 17 ,., ... ... tn.co .. ... "' 338 ..... 632 tt2.01 .. 70 70 .,. ... 11 .... 32 ... 15 ISO "' ... ..... 100 ttc:J 111 1>1 "" "" ..... .. 202 .. 282 ... 1.1-47 ..... .. 7 .. "' 329 ..... 0 0 0 0 ... 0 nJa Not appllcal)le because the census net ts Nlty 00'\lered by lbeckoute transit aeMc:e.

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APPENDIXC Chapter 427, Florida Statutes and Rule 41-2, Florida Administrative Code

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CHAPTER 427, FLORIDA STATUTES SPECIAL 1RANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES PART 1: TRANSPORTATION SERVICES (ss. 427.011-427.017) 427.011 427.Ql2 427.013 427.0135 427.015 427 .0155 427.0157 427.0158 427.0159 427.016 427.017 Definitions Transportation Disadvantaged Commission. Transportation Disadvantaged Commission; pwpose and responsibilities. Member departments; duties and responsibilities. Function of the metropolitan planning organization or designated official planning agency in coordinating transportation for the transportation disadvantaged. Community transportation coordinators; powers and duties. Coordinsting boards; powers and duties. School bus and public transportation Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund Expenditure of local government, state, and federal funds for the transportation disadvantaged. Conflicts with federal laws or regulations. 427.011 Definitions.For the purposes of ss. 427.011-427.017: (1) "T ransportation disadvantaged" means those persons who because of physical or mental disability, income status, or age are unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation and are, therefore, dependent upon others to obtain access to health care, employment, education, shopping social activities, or other life-sustaining activities, or children who are handicapped or high-risk or at-risk as defined in s: 411.202. (2) "Metropolitan planning organization" means the organization responsib le for carrying out transportation planning and programming in accordance with the provisions of23 U .S.C. s. 134, as provided in 23 U.S.C. s. 104(f)(3) (3) "Agency" means an official, officer, commission, authority, council, committee, department, division, bureau, board, section, or any other unit or enti ty of the state or of a city, town, municipality, county, or other local governing body or a private nonprofit transportation service providing agency. (4) "Transportation improvement program" means a staged multiyear program of transportation improvements, including an annual element, which is developed by a metropolitan p lanning organization or designated official planning official planning agency. (5) "Community Transportation Coordinator" means a transportation entity recommended by a metropolitan planning organization, or by the appropriate designated official planning agency as provided for in ss. 42 7 .011-427.017 in an area outside the purview of a metropolitaJ:t planning organization, to ensure that coordinated transportation services are provided to the transportation disadvantaged population in a designed service area. (6) ''Transportation operator" means one or more public, private for-profit or private nonprofit entities engaged by the community transportation coordinator to provide service to transportation disadvantaged persons pursuant to a coordinated system service plan. (7) "Coordinating board" means an entity in each designated service area composed of representatives appointed by the metropolitan planning organization or designated official C-2

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planning agency, to provide assistance to the community transportation coordinator relative to the coordination of transportation services. (8) "Member department" means a department whose head is a member of the commission. (9) "Paratransit" means those elements of public transit which provide service between specific origins and destinations selected by the individual user with such service being provided at a time that is. agreed upon by the user and provider of the service. Paratransit service is provided by taxis, limousines; "dial-a-ride," buses, and other demand-responsive operations that are characterized by their nonscheduled, nonfixed route nature. (10) "Transportation Disadvantaged funds" means any local government, state, or available federal funds that are for the transportation of the transportation disadvantaged. Such funds may include, but are not limited to, funds for planning, administration, operation, procurement, and maintenance of vehicles or equipment and capital investments. Transportation disadvantaged funds do not include funds for the transportation of children to public schools. (11) "Coordination" means the arrangement for the provision of transportation services t o the transportation disadvantaged in a manner that is cost-effective, efficient, and reduces fragmentation and duplication of services. (12) "Annual budget estimate" means a budget estimate of funding resources available for providing transportation services to the transportation disadvantaged, and which is prepared annually to cover a period of one state fiscal year (13) ''Nonsponsored transportation disadvantaged services" means transportation disadvantaged services that are not sponsored or subsidized by any funding source other that the Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund. History.-ss. 1,9, ch. 79-180; s. 4, ch. 80-414; ss. 1, 3, ch. 84-56; ss. 1, 14, ch. 89-376; ss. 57, ch. 90-306. 427.012 Transportation Disadvantaged Commission.There is created a Transportation Disadvantaged Commission in the Department of Transportation. ( 1) The commission shall consist of the following members: (a) The secretary of the Department of Transportation or his designee. (b) The secretary of the Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services or his designee. (c) The Commissioner of Education or his designee. (d) The secretary of the Department of Labor and Employment Security or his designee. (e) The executive director of the Department of Veterans' Affairs or his designee. (f) The secretary of the Department of Elderly Affairs or his designee. (g) The president of the Florida Association for Community Action, who shall serve at the pleasure of that association. (h) A person over the age of 60 who is a member of a recognized statewide organization representing elderly Floridians. Such person shall be appointed by the Governor to represent elderly Floridians, and shall be appointed to serve a term of 4 years. (i) A handicapped person who is a member of a recognized statewide organization representing handicapped Floridians. Such person shall be appointed by the Governor to represent handicapped Floridians, and shall be appointed to serve a tenn of 4 years. G) Two citizen advocate representatives who shall be appointed by the Governor for a term of 4 years, one representing rural citizens and one representing urban citizens. (k) A representative of the community transportation coordinators. Such person shall be C-3

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appointed by the Governor to represent all community transportation coordinators and shall be appointed to serve a tem1 of 4 years. (I) One member of the Early Childhood Council. Such person shall be appointed by the Governor to represent maternal and child health care providers and shal l be appointed to serve a term of 4 years. (m) Two representatives of current private for-profit or private not-for-profit transportation operators each of which have a minimum of five years of continuous experience operating a broad based system of ambulatory and wheelchair/stretcher type transportation, utilizing not less than 50 vehicles and including dispatch and scheduling responsibilities. Such persons shall be appointed by the Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services to serve a term of 4 years. (2) The chairperson and vice-chairperson of the commission shall be elected annually from the membership of the commission. (3) Members of the commission shall serve without compensation, but shall be allowed per diem and traveling expenses, as provided ins. ll2. 061. ( 4) The commission shall meet at least quarterly, or more frequently at the call of the chairperson. Seven members of the commission constitute a quorum, and a majority vote of the members present is necessary for any action taken by the commission. ( S) The Governor may remove any member of the commission for cause. ( 6) The commission shall appoint an executive director, who shall serve under the direction, supervision, and control of the commission. The executive director, with the consent of the commission, shall employ such personnel as may be necesssry to perform adequatel y the functions of the commission, within budgetary limitations. All employees of the commission are exempt from the Career Service System. (7) The commission is assigned to the office of the secretary of the Department of Transportation for administrative and fiscal accountability purposes, but it shall otherwise function independent of the control, supervision, and direction of the department. (8) The commission shall develop a budget pursuant to chapter 216. The budget is not subject to change by the department staff after it has been approved by the commission, but it shall be transmitted to the Governor, as head of the department, along with the budget of the department. History.--ss. 2, 8, 9 ch. 79-180; s. 5, ch. 80-414; s. 73, ch. 81-167; s. 76, ch. 83-55; ss. 2, 3 ch. 84-56; ss. 2, 14, ch. 89-376; s. 29, ch.91-282. 427.ot3 Transportation Disadvantaged Commission; purpose and responsibilities.--The purpose of the commission is to accomplish the coordination of transportation services provided to the transportation disadvantaged The goal of this coordination shall be to assure the cost effective provision of transportation by qualified transportation operators for the transportation disadvantaged without any bias or presumption in favor ofmultioperator systems or not-for-profit transportation operators over single operator systems or for-profit transportation operators. In carrying out this purpose, the commission shall: (1) Compile all available information on the transportation operations for and needs of the transportation disadvantaged in the state (2) Establish statewide objectives for providing transportation services for the transportation disadvantaged (3) Develop policies and procedures for the coordination of local government, federal, and state funding for the transportation disadvantaged

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(4) Identify barriers prohibiting the coordination and accessibility of transportation services to the transportation disadvantaged and aggressively pursue the elimination of these barriers. (5) Serve as a clearinghouse for information about transportation disadvantaged services, funding sources, innovations, and coordination efforts. ( 6) Assist communities in developing transportatio n systems designed to serve the transportation disadvantaged (7) Assure that all procedures, guidelines, and directives issued by member departments are conducive to the coordination of transportation services. (8) Develop standards covering coordination, operation, costs, and utilization of transportation disadvantaged services. (9) Develop and monitor rules and procedures to implement the provisions of ss. 427.001427.0 1 7. (1 0) Approve the appointment of all community transportation coordinators. (11) Have the authority to apply for and accept funds, grants, gifts, and services from the Federal Government, state government, local governments, or private funding sources. Applications by the commission for local government funds shall be coordinated through the appropriate coordinating board. Funds acqnired or accepted under this subsection shall be administered by the commission and shall be used to carry out the commission's responsibilities. (12) Make an annual report to the Governor, the President of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives by March I of each year (13) Consolidate the annual budget estimates of each member departmen t and issue a report (14) Prepare a statewide 5 year transportation disadvantaged plan which addresses the transportation problems and needs of the transportation disadvantaged, which is fully coordinated with local transit plans, compatible with local government comprehensive plans, and which ensures that the most cost effective and efficient method of providing transportation to the disadvantaged is programmed for development. ( 15) Review and approve memo r andums of agreement for the provisions of coordinated transportation services (16) Review, monitor, and coordinate all transportation disadvantaged local government, state, and federal funds requests and plans for conformance with commission policy, without delaying the application p r ocess. Such funds shall be available only to those entities participating in an approved coordinated transportation system or entities which have received a commission approved waiver to obtain all or part of their transportation through another means. This process shall identify procedures for coordinating with the state's intergovernmental coordination and review procedures and s. 216 212(1) and any other appropriate grant review process. (17) Deve l op an Interagency Uniform Contracting and Billing and Accounting system that shall be used by all community transportation coordinators and their transportation operators (18) Develop and maintain an interagency transportation disadvantaged manual. (19) D esign and develop interagency transportation disadvantaged training programs. (20) Coordinate all transportation disadvantaged programs with ap p ropriate state, local, and federal agencies, and public transit agencies to ensure compatibility with existing transportation systems. (21) Designate the official planning agency in areas outside of the purview of a metropolitan planning organization (22) Develop needs-based criteria that must be used by all community transportation C-5

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coordinators to prioritize the delivery of noilsponsored transportation disadvantaged services that are purchased with Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund moneys. (23) Establish a review procedure to compare the rates proposed by alternate transportation operators with the rates charged by a community transportation coordinator to detennine which rate is more cost-effective. (24) Conduct a cost-comparison study of single-coordinator, multi-coordinator, and brokered community transportation coordinator networks to ensure that the most cost-effective and efficient method of providing transportation to the transportation disadvantaged is programmed for development. History.--ss.3, 9, ch. 79-180; s. 6, ch. 80-414; s. 274, ch. 81-259; ss. 1, 3, ck 84-56; ss. 3, 14, ch. 89-376. 427.0135 Member Departments; duties and responsibilities.(!) Each member department, in carrying out the policies and procedures of the commission, shall: (a) Assist communities in developing coordinated transportation systems designed to serve the transportation disadvantaged. (b) Assure that its rules, procedures, guidelines, and directives are. conducive to the coordination of transportation funds and services for the transportation disadvantaged. (c) Provide technical assistance, as needed, to transportation operators or participating agencies. (2) The Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services shall assign at least one full-time position to each of its districts and to the central office. The positions shall be responsible for the coordination of all transportation disadvantaged activities in the district or central office. History.--.ss. 4, 14, ck 89-376. 427.015 Function of the metropolitan planning organization or designated official planning agency in coordinating transportation for the transportation disadvantaged.(!) In developing the transportation improvement program, each metropolitan planning organization or designated official planning agency in this state shall inc lude a realistic estimate of the cost and revenue that will be derived from transportation disadvantaged services in its area. The transportation improvement program shall also identify transportation improvements that will be advanced with such funds during the program period. Funds required by this subsection to be included in the transportation improvement program shall only be included after consultation with all affected agencies and shall only be expended if such funds are included in the transportation improvement program (2) Each metropolitan planning organization or designated official planning agency shall recommend to the commission a single community transportation coordinator. The coordinator may provide all or a portion of needed transportation services for the transportation disadvantaged but shall be responsible for the provision of those coordinated services. The coordinator may subcomract or broker those services that are more cost-effectively and efficiently provided by subcontracting or brokering. The performance of the coordinator shall be evaluated by the coordinating board at least annually. A copy of the evaluatio n shall be submitted to the metropolitan planning organization or the designated official planning agency, and the commission. The recommendation of any community transportation coordinator shall be approved by the commission. C-6

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History.-ss. 6 9, ch. 79-180; ss I. 3, ch. 84-56; ss. 5, 14 ch. 89-376. 427. 0155 Community Transportation Coordinators; powers and duties.-Community transportation coordinators shall have the following powers and duties: (I) Develop, implement, and monitor an approved coordinated community transportation disadvantaged service plan. (2) Execute uniform contracts for service. (3) Collect annual operating data for submittal to the commission. (4) Review all transportation operator contracts annually. (5) Approve and coordinate the utilization of school bus and public transportation services in accordance with the transportation disadvantaged service plan. ( 6) In cooperation with a functioning coordinating board, review all applications for local government, federal, and state transportation disadvantaged funds, and develop cost-effective coordination strategies. (7) In cooperation with the coordinating board, develop and negotiate a memorandum of agreement outlining the coordinated community service plan for submittal to the commission. (8) In cooperation wi1h the coordinating board and pursuant to criteria developed by the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission, eSiahlish priorities with regard to the recipients of nonsponsored transportation disadvantaged services that are purchased with Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund moneys. (9} Have full responsibility for the delivery of transportation services for the transportation disadvantaged as outlined in s. 427.015(2). History. --ss. 6, 14, ck 89-376 427. 0157 Coordinating boards; powers and duties.-The purpose of each coordinating board is to develop local service needs and to provide information, advice, and direction to the community transportation coordinators on the coordination of services to be provided to the transportation disadvailtaged. The commission shall, by rule, establish the membership of coordinating boards. The members of each board shall be appointed by the metropolitan planning organization or designated official planning agency. The appointing authority shall provide each board with sufficient staff support and resources to enable the board to fulfill its responsibilities under this section. Each board shall meet at least quarterly and shall: (I) Review and approve the coordinated community transportation disadvantaged service plan, including the memorandum of agreement, prior to submittal to the commission; (2) Evaluate services provided in meeting the approved plan ; (3) In cooperation with the community transportation coordinator, review and provide recommendations to the commission on funding applications affecting the transportation disadvantaged; ( 4) Assiat the community transportation coordinator in establishing priorities with regard to the recipients of nonsponsoied transportation disadvantaged services that are purchased with Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund moneys. (5) Review the coordination strategies'of service provision to the transportation disadvantaged in the designated service area; and ( 6) Evaluate multicounty or regional transportation opportunities. C-7

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Hlstory.-ss. 7 14, ch. 89-376. 427.0158 School bus and public transportation.--( I) The community transportation coordinator shall maximize the use of public school transportation and public fixed route or fixed schedule transit service for the transportation of the transportation disadvantaged. (2) The school boards shall cooperate in the utilization of their vehicles to enhance coordinated disadvantaged transportation by providing the information as required by this section and by allowing the use of their vehicles at actual cost upon request when those vehicles are available for such use and are not transporting students. Semiannually, no later than October I and April 30, a designee from the local school board shall provide the community transportation coordinator with copies to the coordinated transportation board, the following information for vehicles not scheduled I 00 percent of the time for student transportation use: (a) The number and type of vehicles by adult capacity, including days and times, that the vehicles are available for coordinated transportation disadvantaged services; (b) The actual cost per mile by vehicle type available; (c) The actual driver cost per hour; (d) Additional actual cost associated with vehicle use outside the established workday or workweek of the entity; and (e) Notification of lead time required for vehicle use. (3) The public transit fixed route or fixed schedule system shall cooperate in the utilization of its regular service to enhance coordinated transportation disadvantaged services by providing the information as required by this section Annually, no later than October 1 a designee from the local public transit fixed route or fixed schedule system shall provide the community transportation coordinator, with copies to the coordinated transportation board, the following information: (a) A copy of all current schedules, route maps, system map, and fare structure; (b) A copy of the current charter policy; (c) A copy of the current charter rates and hours requirements; and (d) Required notification time to arrange for a charter. Krstory.--ss. 8, 14, ch. 89-376. 427.0159 Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund. (1) There is established in the State Treasury the Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund to be administered by the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission. All fees collected for the transportation disadvantaged program under s. 320.03(9) shall be deposited in the trust fund. (2) Funds deposited in the trust fund shall be appropriated by the Legislature to the commission and shall be used to carry out the responsibilities of the commission and to fund the administrative expenses of the commission. (3) Funds deposited in the trust fund "Omy be nsed by the commission to subsidize a portion of a transportation disadvantaged person's transportation costs which is not sponsored by an agency, ouly if a cash or in-kind match is required. Funds for nonsponsored transportation disadvantaged services aball be distributed based upon the need of the recipient and according to criteria developed by the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission. Hlstory.-ss. 9, 14, ch. 89-376.

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427.016 Expenditure of local government, state, and federal funds for the transportation disadvantaged (1) All transportation disadvantaged funds shall be expended to purchase transportation services from public, private, or private nonprofit transportation operators, except when the rate s charged by proposed alterilate operators are proven, pursuant to review procedures established by the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission, to be more cost-effective and are not a risk to the public health, safety, or welfare. However, in areas where transportation suited to the unique needs of a transportation disadvantaged person cannot be purchased, the service may be provided directly by the appropriate agency. (2) Each state agency, whether or not it is a member of the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission, shall inform the commission in writing, before the beginning of each fiscal year, of the specific amount of any money the agency allocated for transportation disadvantaged services. History. --ss. 5, 9, ck 79-180; ss. 1, 3, ch. 84-56; ss. 10, 14, ch. 89-376 427.017 Conflicts with federal laws or regulations. Upon notification by an agency of the Federal Government that any provision of this act conflicts with federal laws or regulations, the state or local agencies involved may take any reasonable steps necessary to assure continued federal funding. Further, i t is the legislative intent that the conflict shall not affect other provisions or applications of this act that can effectively be imp lemented without implementation of the provision in question, and to this end, the provisions of this act are declared severable. History.--.ss. 7, 9; ck 79-180; ss. 1. 3, ch. 84-56; s. 14, ck 89-376. Note.-Chapter 427 (ss. 427.011-427 017) is repealed effective October I, 1999, by s. 14, ch. 89-376, and scheduled for review pursuant to s. 11.611. C-9

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RULE 41-:Z, Florida Administrative Code 41-2.001 Purpose. 41-2.002 Defmitions. 41-2.003 Commission Organization and Personnel. 41-2.004 Notice and Frequency of Commission Meetings. 41-2.005 Member Depaitment Responsibilities. 41-2.006 Insurance and Safety Requirements. 41-2.007 Reporting Requirements. 41-2.008 Memorandum of Agreement 41-2.009 Designated Official Planning Agency. 41-2.010 Selection of. Community Transportation Coordinator. 41-2.011 Community Transportation Coordinator Powers and Duties 412.012 Coordinating Board Structure and Duties. 412.ot3 Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund. 41-2.014 Grants Program. 41-2.015 Expenditure of Local Government, State, and Federal Funds for the Transportation Disadvantaged. 41-2.016 Accessibility. 41-2.017 Complete Phase-In Date. 41-2.001 Purpose. The purpose of this rule chapter is to implement the provisions or Chapter 427, Florida Statutes, which establishes the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission with the assigned responsibility to accomplish the coordination of transportation services provided to the transportation disadvantaged througb the Florida Coordinated Transit System (FCTS). Specific Authority 427.013(9) FS. Law Implemented 120.53(1), 427.01l 427.017 FS History New 5-2-90. 41-:Z.OO:Z Def"mitlons. For purposes of this rule chapter, the following defmitions will apply: (I) "Agency" means an official, officer, commission, authority, council, committee, department, division, bureau, board, section, or any other unit or entity of the state or of a city, town, municipality, county, or other local governing body or a private nonprofit entity providing transportation services as all or part of its charter. (2) "Annual Budget Estimate" means a budget estimate of funding resources available for providing transportation services to the transportation disadvantaged, and which is prepared annually to cover a period of one state fiscal year. (3) "Commission" means the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission as authorized in Section 427.012, Florida Statutes. (4) "Community Transportation Coordinator (CTC)" means a transportation entity recommended by a Metropolitan Planning Organization, or by the appropriate designated official planning agency as provided for in Section 427.015(1), Florida Statutes, in an area outside the purview of a Metropolitan Planning Organization and approved by the Commission, to ensure that coordinated transportation services are provided to serve the transportation disadvantaged population in a designated service area. C-10

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(5) "Coordinated Comnnmity Transportation Disadvantaged Service Plan" means a three -year plan outlining all the transportation services being provided under the current Memorandum of Agreement Standard Contract, needed in the next Memorandum of Agreement Standard Contract period, and for the first planning year for the transportation disadvantaged in a designated service area. (6) "Coordinating Board" means an entity in each designated service area composed of representatives appointed by the Metropolitan Planning Organization or designated official planning agency, to provide assistance to the community transportation coordinator relative to the coordination of transportation services. (7) "Coordination" means the arrangement for the provision of transportation services to the transportation disadvantaged in a manner that is cost effective, efficient, and reduces fragmentation and duplication of services. (8) "Designated Official Planning Agency" means the official body or agency designated by the Commission to fulfill the functions of transportation disadvantaged planning in areas not covered by a Metropolitan Planning Organization. The Metropolitan Planning Organimtion shall serve as the designated official planning agency in areas covered by such organimtions. (9) "Designated Service Area" means a geographical area, recommended by a designated official planning agency, subject to approval by the Commission, which defines the community where coordinated transportation services will be provided to the transportation disadvantaged. (10) "Local Government" means an elected and/or appointed public body existing to coordinate, govern, plan, fund and administer public services within a designated, limited geographic area within the state. (11) "Local Government Comprehensive Plan" means a plan that meets the requirements of Sections 163.3177 and 163.3178, Florida Statutes. (12) "Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO)" means the organization responsible for carrying out transportation planning and programming in accordance with the provisions of 23 U.S.C. Section 134, as provided in 23 U.S.C. Section 104(f){3). ( 13) "Paratransit" means those elements of public transit which provide services between specific origins and destinations selected by the individual user with such service being provided at a time that is agreed upon between the user and the provider of the service. Paratransit services are provided by taxis, limousines, "dial-a-ride" buses, and other demand-responsive operations that are characterized by their nonscheduled, nonfixed route nature. (14) "Public Transit" means the transporting of people by conveyances or systems of conveyances, traveling on land or water, local or regional in nature, and available for use by the public. Public transit systems may be governmentally or privately owned. Public transit specifically includes those forms of transportation commonly known as "paratransit." (15) "Regional Planning Council (RPC)" means the organi2:Btion created under the provisions of Section 186.504, Florida Statutes, in each comprehensive planning district of Florida to assist local governments to resolve common problems, accomplish area wide comprehensive and functional planning and provide a regional focus in regard to programs undertaken on an area wide basis. (16) "Transportation Disadvantaged (TD)" means those persons who because of physical or mental disability, income status, or age or who for other reasons are unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation and are, therefore, dependent upon others to obtain access to health care, employment, education, shopping, social activities, or other life-sustaining C-11

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activities. (17) "Transportation Disadvantaged Funds" means any local government, state or federal funds that are available/eligible for the transportation of the transportation disadvantaged. Such funds may include, but are not limited to, funds for planning, administration, operation, procurement, maintenance of vehicles or equipment, and capital investments. Transportation disadvantaged funds do not include funds for the transportation of children to public schools. (18) "Transportation Improvement Program (TIP)" means a staged multi-year program of transportation improvements, including an annual element, which will be developed by a Metropolitan Planning Organization or designated official planning agency. (19) "Transportation Operator" means one or more public, private for profit or private nonprofit entities engaged by the community transportation coordinator to provide service to transportation disadvantaged persons pursuant to a coordinated system service plan. (20) "Trust Fund" means the Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund authorized in Section 427.0159, Florida Statutes, and administered by the Commission. (21) ''Nonsponsored Transportation Disadvantaged Person" means an individual who meets the definition of transportation disadvantaged but who is not subsidized for transportation financial assistance for specific trips. (22) "Florida Coordinated Transit System" (FCTS) means a transportation system responsible for coordination and service provisions for the _transportation disadvantaged as outlined in Chapter 427, Florida Statutes. (23) ''Nonsponsored Trip" means a trip for a transportation disadvantaged individual which is not subsidized in part or in whole by any funding source. Specific Authority 427. 013(9) FS. LaW Implemented 427.011 427.017 FS. History-New 5-2-90. 41-2.003 Commission Organization and PenooneL (I) The Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson of the Commission shall be elected annually from the membership of the Commission. (2) The Commission shall appoint an Executive Director, who shall serve under the direction, supervision, and control of the Commission. The Executive Director, with the consent of the Commission, shall employ such persormel as may be necessary to perform adequately the functions of the Commission and operate within approved budget limitations. The Commission will monitor the duties of the Executive Director and shall, from time to time, assign or amend duties as necessary. Annual evaluations of the Executive Director, will be performed by a standing personnel committee of the Commission. Evaluations and other personnel actions relating to the staff of the Commission, excluding the Executive Director, shall be delegated to the Executive Director with input, as needed, by the Commission. (3) The Commission will develop and update such by-laws, policies or procedures as necessary to carry out its responsibilities. ( 4) All fonns designated in this rule chapter are attainable from the Commission at its office located at 605 Suwannee Street, M.S. 49, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0450. Specific Authority 427.013(9) FS. Law Implemented 427.012 FS. History-New 5-2-90. 41-2.004 Notice and Frequency of Commission Meetings. (I) Except in the case of emergency, the Commission shall give at least ten calendar days public notice of any meeting at which policy-making decisions are to be made. The notice shall C-12

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be published in the Florida Administrative Weekly, and provide: (a) The date, time place of the event, the address and phone number at which interested persons may write or call to obtain a copy of th e agenda or available materials (b) Commission members or others desiring placement of agenda items for each meeting shall provide same to the Executive Director three weeks prior to said meeting. The Chairperso n shal l have the authority to coordinate and approve agenda items and, upon a majority vote of the Commission, amend the agenda at the beginning of each meeting. Howev e r, except for emergency situations, such amended items shall be for discussion only with no official action to be taken until the next advertised meeting. (2) An emergency meeting or agenda item is a meeting or issue that requires Commission action because of an imminent detriment or threat to the prognun or to the health, safety and welfare of the State's transportation disadvantaged citizens. (3) The Conunission shall meet at least quarterly, or more frequently at the call of the Chairperson. Seven members of the Commission constitute a quorum and a majority vote of the members present is necessary any official action taken by the Commission. Commission members who are agency heads and desire to appoint a designee, must provide written documentation of this action. Such designee shall have voting authority in the absence of the appointed Commission member but cannot serve as an elected officer of the Commission. Specific Authority 427.013(9) FS Law Implemented 120.53(1), 427.012(4) FS. History-New 5 290. 41-2;005 Member Department Responsibilities (1) Each member department shall develop, monitor and amend, as appropriate, a p l an that assures each member department is carrying out the provisions of Section 427.0135 Florida Statutes. The plan shal l be submitted to the Commission annually by January 1 each year. Any amendments to the plan shall be submitted to the Commission within six months of the effecti v e date of the member department rule or policy change. (2) Each member department or agency purchasing transportation services through the Community Transportation Coordinator shall utilize a Commission approved uniform Memorandum of Agreement Standard Contract, of January 10, 1990, for all transportation disadvantaged services. (3) Each member department shall develop annually, as part of the plan submitted to the Commission, a vehicle inventory and utilization plan for those vehicles purchased with tranSPOrtation disadvantaged funds. (4) No member department may be selected as Community Transportation Coordinator or Transportation Operator. Specific Authority 427.013(9) FS. Law Implemented 427.0135 FS. History-New 5 -2-90. 41-2.006 Insurance and Safety Requirements. (I) Each agency which funds or purchases transportation services from other than. the Coordinator shall ensure that the operators used are in compliance with the minimum liability insurance requirements of$100,000 per person and $200,000 per incident, which are comparable to 768.28(5), Florida Statutes, limits, reqUired by the Commission for all purchased transportation services for the transportation disadvantaged and that the insurance is in force at all times and that all such transportation operators indemnify and bold harmless the agency/entity, Local, State C-13

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and federal governments, their entities, departments, and Coordinator and the Commission from any liabilities arising out of or due to an accident or negligence on the pert of the transportation operator. (2) The Community TransportatiOn Coordinator, shall ensure compliance with the minimum liability insurance requirement of $100,000 per person and $200,000 per incident, which are comparable to 768.28(5) Florida Statutes, limits, for all transportation services purchased or provided for the transportation disadvantaged. The Community Transportation Coordinator will indemnify and hold harmless the Local, State, and Federal governments and their entities, departments, and the Commission from any liabilities arising out of or due to an accident or negligence on the part of the Community Transportation Coordinator and the Transportation Operator under contract to them. Ally liability insurance coverage in excess of $1 Million per incident must be approved by the Commission before it is included in a Memorandum of Agreement. Documentati on from the Coordinator must fully justify the need for the additional insurance coverage The justification will identify the reasons for the additional coverage, the incremental cost of the additional coverage on each unit of transportation service and the estiiDated additional annual cost to each contracting agency/entity. (3) Bach Community Transportation Coordinator and any Transporta tion Operators from whom service is purchaoecl with local government, state or federal transportation disadvantaged funds, sball ensme that their operations and services are in compliance with the safety requirements as specified in Section 341.061, Florida Statutes, and rules thereunder. ( 4) Bach Community Transportation Coordinator and any Transportation Operators from whom service is purchased or funded by local government, state or federal transportation disadvantaged funds shall ensure compliance with any applicable state or federal laws relating to drug testing or any Commission approved drug testing policy Specific Authority 427 .013(9) FS. Law Implemented 427.011(11), 427.013, 427.0155, 427.0157 FS. History-New 5-2-90. 41-2.007 Reporting Requirements. (I) Bach member department shall provide to the Commission by November I of each state fiscal year, an estimate of the transportation disadvantaged funds anticipated to be available through each member department's budget. The estimate shall include the following information identified by county: (a) A brief description of the project or program; (b) The dollar amount of transportation disadvantaged funds by funding source; and (c) The fiscal year that the project or services will be undertaken or implemented. (2) The Commission shall provide a copy of the report to each Metropolitan Planning ()rgani7Jition or Designated Official Planning Agency for information purpo ses. (3) Bach local government agency sball report to the local Coordinating Board, whose jurisdiction incorporates such agency; an estimate of the transportation disadvantaged federal and local government funds anticipated to be available during each state fiscal year. The estimate sball be provided to the local Coordinating Board by November I of each year and shall include the following information identified by county: (a) A brief description of the project Or program; (b) The dollar amount of transportation disadvantaged funds by funding source; and (c)' The fiscal year that the project or services will be undertaken or implemented C-14

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(4) The Local Coordinating Board shall consolidate these estimates and forward same to the Commission no later than December I for reporting pUipOses. A copy of the consolidated report shall be provided to the Metropolitan Planning Organization or Designated Official Planning Agency for planning pUipOses. (5) Each Community Transportation Coordinator shall by October 1 of each year report their operating statistics to the Commission for the most recent operating year on forms provided by the Commission. This Annual Operating Report will be compiled into a Statewide Operations Report by the Commission and utilized as a part of the analysis of the Community Transportation Coordinator's performance evaluation when granting funds from the Trust Fund. The Community Transportation Coordinator's report shall be approved by the Coordinating Board and prior to submittal to the Commission with a eopy provided to the Metropolitan Planning Organization or Designated Official Planning Agency. An annual report of the Coordinating Board may be made a part of such document. ( 6) The ConUnission shall develop guidelines delineating the content and format for the reporting requirements. (7) Each Community Transportation Coordinator shall utilize the Transportation Accounting Consortium Model Uniform Accounting System for Rural and Specialized Transportation Providers for its financial management. Community Transportation Coordinators who are political subdivisions of the State of Florida will not be required to adopt the system in lieu of established accounting systems but will be required to prepare all reports, invoices, and fiscal documents relating to the transportation disadvantaged functions and activities using the chart of accounts and accounting definitions as outlined in the above referenced manual. Such manual is hereby incorporated by reference and made a part of these rules. (8) The Commission shall request from the Florida State Clearinghouse within the Executive Office of the Governor, for review all funding requests containing a transportation disadvantaged component. Said funding request shall be reviewed by the Commission for coordination conformance. (9) The Commission shall make an annual report to the Governor, the President of the Senate, and the Speaker of f\le House of Representatives by March 1 of each year. The report will contain a summary of the Commission's accomplishments for the preceding state fiscal year, the operational statistics for transportation disadvantaged services, identified unmet needs and a fmancial status of the Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund. Copies of the report will also be made available to member departments, Metropolitan Planning Organizations Designated Official Planning Agencies and Community Transportation Coordinators. Specific Authority 427.013(9) FS. Law Implemented 427.012(8), 427.013(3), (7), (8), (9), (12), (13), (16), 427.0135(1), 427.015(1) FS. History-New 5-2-90. 41-2.008 Memorandum of Agreement. The Memorandum of Agreement shall be a one-year binding standard contract between the Commission and a Community Transportation Coordinator. It shall be utilized as the coordinated transportation contract by all agencies/entities using local government, state or federal funds for the purchase of transportation disadvantaged services. In cooperation with the Coordinating Board, the Community Transportation Coordinator shall develop a Memorandum of Agreement ihat includes the format and language approved by the Commission. It will consist of three sections: (I) Standard Contract Language; C-15

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(2) Coordinated Community Transportation Disadvantaged Service Plan; and (3) Attachment "1" that includes the transportation service delivery terms and conditions agreed upon by the Coordinator and all agencies/entities using local government, state or federal funds to purchase coordinated transportation for the transportation disadvantaged in the Coordinator's designated service area. The Coordinator shall prepare and include an Attachment "1" section to show the terms and conditions that will apply to the non-sponsored transportation disadvantaged in the designated service area. The Agreement shall be presented by the Cbailperson of the Board in their respective service area to the Commission for review and approval. Upon approval and when effective, all agencies purchasing covered transportation disadvantaged services from the Coordinator shall hooor valid requisition vouchers of the Coordinator within 45 days of receipt or accept penalty as specified in Section 215.422(3)(b), Florida Statutes. The Agreement is included in this rule by reference. Specific Authority 427. OJ 3(9) FS. Law Implemented 427. 013(1 O},(J 5}, 427. OJ 5(2), 427. OJ 55(7), 427 0157(1) FS. History-New 5-2-90 41-2.009 Designated Official Planning Agency. (1) Metropolitan Planning Organizations shall serve as the designated official planning agency in urbanized areas. In areas not covered by a Metropolitan Planning Organization, agencies eligible for selection as Designated Official Planning Agencies include County or City governments, Regional Planning Councils, Metropolitan Planning Organizations, or Local Planning Organizations who are currently performing p l anning activities in designated service areas. Eligibility for designation will also be conditioned on the agency's resources and capabilities of implementing the responsibilities and requirements of Chapter 427, Florida Statutes Upon rule adoption, all currently existing or eligible designated official planning agencies shall be evaluated by the Commission. The Commission will either renew the existing agency's designation or approve the designation of a new agency. An agency's continued designation as the official planning agency shall be subject to the approval of the Commission. (2) Metropolitan Planning Organizations and Designated Official Planning Agencies shall include a Transportation Disadvantaged element in their Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). Such element shall include a project and program description, the planned costs and anticipated revenues for the services, identification of the year the project or services are to be undertaken and implemented, and assurances that there has been coordination with local public trans it and local government comprehensive planning bodies. (3) Each Designated Official Planning Agency shall provide each Coordinating Board with sufficient staff support and resources to enable the Coordinating Board to fulfill its responsibilities. In areas where a Metropolitan .Planning Organization or Designated Official Plann i ng Agency serves as the Community Transportation Coordinator and desires to utilize the same staff for the Coordinating Board, such agency shall abstain from any official actions that represent a conflict of interest, specifically in the evaluation process of the Community Transportation Coordinator. Specific Authority 427.013(9) FS Law Implemented 427.013(21), 427.015 FS. History-New 5-2-90. 41.010 Selection of Community Transportation Coordinator. (1) Designation selection, or revocation of designation of any Community Transportation C-16

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Coordinator or its Transportation Operators, shall be subject to the approval of the Commission. Minimum qualifications and benefits for the Community Transportation Coordinator shall be developed by the Commission, as outlined in Form No. TDC-002 and TDC-003, incoipOrated herein. (2) Selection of agencies as Community Transportation Coordinators may be negotiated without competitive acquisition, upon the determination of the Metropolitan Planning Organization or Designated Official Planning Agency that it is in the best interest of the transportation disadvantaged. This includes circumstances such as insufficient competition availability, or it is agreed that the appointed Community Transportation Coordinator will competitively acquire a substantial portion of services. (3) Selection of the Community Transportation Coordinator will be accomplished, to the maximum extent feasible, through public competitive bidding or proposals in accordance with applicable laws and rules. ( 4) In cases where selection is accomplished by a request for proposal, (RFP) the RFP shall, lit a minimum, identify the following information: (a) The scope and nature of the services and coordination required, and a request for the proposer's plan to provide same; (b) A request that the proposer identify the resources, and accounting system techniques to be used in their audit trail for all services. (c) A request that the proposer identify their organizational structure and key personnel, their fmancial capacity, equipment resources, and experience and qualifications, including the most recent fl.WIIlcial audit by a certified public accountant. (d) A request that the proposer demonstrate the ability to coordinate a multitude of funding and service provisions, in addition to serving the needs of the general public or other transportation disadvantaged. (e) A request that the proposer identify specific means by which it plans to comply with the provisions of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U. S. C. 794) and any other applicable federal, stale and local regulations governing handicapped accessibility requirements, access to transportation and discrimination. (f) A demonstration by the proposer of plans for the provision of the most economically cost effective, quality services to the transportation disadvantaged, and plans which demonstrate coordination with the public school system, local public transit systems, private sector operators and other governmental agencies that provide services to the transportation disadvantaged within the designated service area. (g) A demonstration by the proposer of plans to comply with safety requirements as specified in Section 341.06l, Florida Statutes. (h) An indication by the proposer of plans to comply with any state of federal laws relating to drug testing or Commission approved drug testing policies. (i) A sample Transportation Disadvantaged Service Plan and Memorandum of Agreement for review by the respondent. 0) A statement advising proposers of any local resources that exist or are planned thllt should be recognized in the bidders proposal. (5) The announcement of the request for proposal shall be published in at least one newspaper of largest general circulation in the designated service area and in the Florida Administrative Weekly. The advertised announcement shall include the time, date and place of a public meeting C-17

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. . to provide information and answer questions about the request for proposal. (6) Upon evaluation of the proposals, each Metropolitan P l anning Organi7Jition or Designated Official Planning Agency, upon consultation with the Coordinating Board, shall recommend to the Conunission a Community Transportation Coordinator. (7) Upon resignation or termination of any Community Transportation Coordinator, the Metropolitan Planning Organization or Designated Official Planning Agency shall complete the selection process within 60 days after termination date for non-bid Coordinators and within 120 days after termination date for bid/RFP coordinators. (8) In cases of termination between the Community Transportation Coordinator, or in unforeseen emergencies, the Conunission shall work with the local Coordinating Board in an expeditious manner to provide for the continuation of services to the transportation disadvantaged in the designated service area through a contractual arrangement. Specific Authority 427.013(9) FS. Law Implemented 427.013(10),(15), 427.015(2), 427 0155(7), 427.0157 FS. History-New 5-2-90. 41-Z.Oll Community Trallsportation Coordinator Powers and Duties. (1) Each Community Transportation Coordinator shall be responsible for the overall planning, administration, monitoring, coordination, arrangement and delivezy of transportation disadvantaged services originating within their designated service area on a full time basis. Local management personnel with day-to-day decision making authority must be physically located in each designated service area, unless otherwise authorized by the Conunission. (2) Where cost effective and efficient, the Community Transportation Coordinator may subcontract or broker transportation services to Transportation Operators. Any such contract shall be subject to the approval of the Coordinating Board. Transportation Operators, as used here, shall also include those agencies/entities that currently have and operate their own vehicles to transport their clients, if such vehicles were purchased in whole or part by local, state or federal government funds. Contracts with the latter group shall have an appropriate Attachment "1" in the Memorandum of Agreement. All Transportation Operator contracts shall be reviewed annually by the Community Transportation Coordinator and the Coordinating Board as to the effectiveness and efficiency of the Transportation Operator (3) The Community Transportation Coordinator shall develop, implement and monitor a three year approved coordinated community transportation disadvantaged service plan. This plan shall be approved by the Coordinating Board and shall be incorporated into the Memorandum of Agreement as described in rule 41-2.008. (4) Each Community Transportation Coordinator shall submit an Annual Operating Report by October 1, each year to the Commission, as specified in rule section 41-2.007(3). A copy should also be provided to the Metropolitan Planning Organization or Designated Official Planning Agency. (5) The Community Transportation Coordinator shall approve and coordinate the utilization of school bus and public transit services in accordance with the transportation disadvantaged service plan and Section 427. 0158, Florida Statutes. (6) In cooperation with the local Coordinating Board, the Community Transportation Coordinator shall review all applications for local government, federal and state transportation disadvantaged funds submitted from or planned for use in their designated service area If funds are recommended for approval, the Community Transportation Coordinator will develop cost-C-18

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effective coordination strategies for their use and integration into the coordinated system. (7) Funding to support the Community Transportation Coordinator's function may be obtained from a surcharge on each trip arranged or from subsidies received or both and upon approval by the Commission. (8) Each Community Transportation Coordinator shall become aware of all of the Transportation Disadvantaged resources available or planned in their designated service area in order to plan, coordinate, and implement the most cost effective transportation disadvantaged transit system possible under the conditions that exist in the designated service area. (9) Contractual administration of Community Transportation Coordinators shall be accomplished through a Memorandum of Agreement between the Commission and the Community Transportation Coordinator in accordance with the procedures of the Commission. Transportation services purchased from or arranged by the Community Transportation Coordinator will be billed to purchasing agencies by the Coordinator at the official Memorandum of Agreement rates and recognize any special conditions specified in the Purchasing Agency Requirements Section "1" of the Memorandum of Agreement. Payment for services will be made directly to the Coordinator unless otherwise agreed upon, in writing, by the purchaser and approved by the Commission (1 0) The Commission, in cooperation with the local Coordinating Board, will develop a statewide program that allows for intercounty transportation opportunities through a certification process. Each Community Transportation Coordinator will honor such certification in their respective service area. Specific Authority 427.013(9) FS. Law ImplemenJed 427 0/55 FS. History-New 5-2-90. 41-2. 0 12 Coordinating Board Structnre and Duties. The purpose of the Coordinating Board is to identify local service needs and to provide infonnation, advice, and direction to the Community Transportation Coordinator on the coordination of services to be provided to the transportation disadvantaged through the Florida Coordinated Transit System (FCTS). The members of the Coordinating Board shall be appointed by the Metropolitan Planning Organization or the Designated Official Planning Agency. A Coordinating Board shall be appointed in each county. The structure and duties of the Coordinating Board shall be as follows: (I) The Metropolitan Planning Organization or Designated Official Planning Agency shall appoint one of its members, who is an elected official, to serve as the official chairperson for all Coordinating Board meetings. If the designated official is a Regional Planning Council, the member appointed shall be an elected official from the county of the Coordinating Board. (2) The Board shall bold an organizational meeting each year for the purpose of electing a Vice Chairperson. The Vice-Chairperson shall be elected by a majority vote of a quorum of the members of the Board present and voting at the organizational meeting. The Vice-Chairperson shall serve a term of one year starting with the next meeting In tlie event of the Chairperson's absence, the Vice Chairperson shall assume the duties of the Chairperson and conduct the meeting. (3) In addition to the Chairperson the following agencies or groups shall be represented on the Board, in every county as voting members: (a) A local representative of the Flori
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(d) A local representative of the Florida Deparlment of Labor and Employment Security; (e) A person who is recognized by the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs, representing the veterans in the county ; (f) A person who is recognized by the Florida Association for Community Action (President), the economically disadvantaged in the county; (g) A person over sixcy representing the elderly in the county; (h) A handicapped person representing the handicapped in the county; and (i) Two citizen advocate representatives in the county; one who must be a user of the system. (4) Additional non-voting members may be appointed. It is recommended that an existing pu blic mass transit operator be appointed. If an existing transportation board or committee exists, the Metropolitan Planning Organization or Designated Official Planning Agency shall review its membership and consider appointing some or all of its members to the Board as appropriate. (S) Except for the Chairperson, the members of the Board shall be appointed for three year staggered terms with initial membership being appointed equally for one, two, and three years. The Chairperson shall serve until replaced by the Designated Official Planning Agency ( 6) The Board shall meet at least quarterly and shall perform the following duties: (a) Maintain official meeting minutes, including an attendance roster, reflecting official actions and provide a copy of same to the Commission and the Chairperson of the designated official planning agency. (b) Review and approve the Memorandum of Agreement including the Coordinated Community Transportation Disadvantaged Service Plan. (c) On a continuing basis, e valuate services provided under the designated service plan. Annually, prior to the Coordinator's annual evaluation, provide the Metropolitan Planning Organization or Designated Official Planning Agency with an evaluation of the Coordinato r s performance in general and relative to Commission standards and the completion of the annual service plan. Recommendations relative to pcrfonnance and the renewal of the Coordinator's contract shall be included in the report. (d) In cooperation with the Community Transportation Coordinator, review and provide recommendations to the Commission and the Metropolitan Planning Organization or Designated Official Plannin g Agency on all applications for local government, state or federal funds relating t o transportation of the transportation disadvantaged in the designated service area to ensure that any expenditures within the designated service area are provided in the most cost effective and efficient manner. (e) Review coordination strategies for service provision to the transportation disadvantaged in the designated service area to seek innovative ways to improve cost effectivene ss, efficiency, safety, working hours and types of service in an effort to increase ridership to a broader population. Such strategies should also encourage multicounty and regional transportation service agreements between area Community Transportation Coordinators and consolidation of adjacent designated service areas when i t is appropriate and cost effective to do so. (f) Appoint a Grievance Subcommittee to process, investigate and resolve complaints and make recommendations to the Board for improvement of service ftom agencies, users or potential users of the system in the designated service area. The Board shall establish procedures to provide regular opportunities for issues to be brought before such subcomtni ttee ana to them in a timely manner (8) In coordination with the Community Transportation Coordinator jointly develop C-20

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applications for funds that may become available. (h) Prepare by October I an Annual Report, to be consolidated with the Coordinator's Annual Operating Report, outlining the accomplishments and activities or other areas of interest to the Commission and the Metropolitan Planning Organization or Designated Official Planning Agency for the most recent operating year period. (i) Consolidate the annual budget of local and federal government transportation disadvantaged funds estimates and forward to the Commission no later than December 1 for reporting purposes. A copy of the consolidated report shall be provided to the Metropolitan Planning Organization or Designated Official Planning Agency for planning purposes. G) Develop and maintain a vehicle inventory and utilization plan of those vehicles purchased with transportation disadvantaged funds for inclusion in the Board Annual Report to the C . ommss1on. Specific Authority 427 .013(9) FS. Law Implemented 427.0157 FS. History-New 5-2-90. 41-2.013 Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund. The Commission annually will evaluate the distribution of the Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund. Funds deposited and appropriated into the Trust Fund will be utilized for: (1) Commission administrative and operating expenses; (2) A Grants Program to provide for the funding of nonsponsored trips, capital equipment and planning activities. SpeciflcAuthority427.013(9) FS. Lowlmplemented427.013, 427.0159, 427 016FS. History-New 5-2-90. 41-2.014 Grants Program. (I) Eligible Applicants. Recipients may not use grant funds to supplant or replace funding of transportation disadvantaged services which are currently funded to a recipient by any federal, state, or local governmental agency. Grant funds may be applied for by following entities: (a) Year One (FY 90-91)-Any current designated Coordinated Community Transportation Provider serving under an approved Memorandwn of Agreement or a newly selected Community Transportation Coordinator selected prior to October I, 1990 may apply for funds associated with nonsponsored trips and capital equipment. Metropolitan Planning Organizations or Designated Official Planning Agencies approved by the Commission, may apply for funds during Year One (FY 90 91). (b) Year Two (FY 91-92) Community Transportation Coordinators who have an executed Memorandwn of Agreement. Determination for eligibility will be made on December 15 each year by the Commission. Metropolitan Planning Organintions or Designated Official Planning Agencies approved by the Commission may apply only if there is a functioning Coordinating Board. Determination of such eligibility will be made by the Commission on December 15 based on docwnented activities of the Coordinating Board and planning agency. (2) Types of Grants. (a) Trip Related. Trip related grant funds may be used for the provision of nonsponsored trips for the transportation disadvantaged and for the purchase of capital equipment to be used for services provided to the transportation disadvantaged. (b) Planning Related. Planning related grant funds may be used by an eligible Metropolitan Planning Organintion or Designated Official Planning Agency to assist in their responsibilities C-21

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under Chapter 427, Florida Statutes, inc luding support to the local Coordinating Board with an emphasis on implementing services for the nonsponsored transportation disadvantaged in the designated service area. (3) Match Requirement. Eligible grant recipients must provide 25% of the total project cost as a local match. At least half of the 25% match must be cash generated from local sources, and the remaining portion may be in-kind services which are documented and acceptable to the Commission. (4) Allocation of Grant Funds. On December 1 5 of each year, the Commission shall allocate a portion identified as the Grants Program of the Transportation D isadvantaged Trust Fund in the following manner: (a) Two-thirds of the Grants Program shall be designated for trip-related grants. B eginning in the second funding year (FY 91-92) and annually thereafter, 200/o of the trip-related grants program will be set aside for performance incentive awards to eligible Community Transportation Coordinators. (b) One-third of the Grants Program shall be designated for planning related grants. (5) Distribution of Trip Related Orant Funds. Each eligible applicant's allocation will be determined for the county or counties within the designated service area for which the applicant provides transportation disadvantaged services. The latest required certified annual operating report which is submitted by October I each year will be used for obtaining the applicant's system vehicle miles and system passenger trips data. Trip related grant funds will be allocated to eligible applicants based on a comparative ranking of all eligible applicants in each of the following four categories: (a) The applicant's total county area in square miles as a percentage of the total square miles of all eligible applicants. (b) Total system passenger trips provided as a percentage of all eligible applicant trips reported in the certified Annual Operating Report. (c) Total system vehicle miles traveled as a percentage of all eligible applicants vehicle miles traveled and reported in the certified Annual Operating Report. (d) Total county population as a percentage of the total population of all eligible applicants. ( 6) Each category will represent one fourth of the trip related grant funds available after 20% Performance Incentive Award allocation has been set aside. (7) Distribution of Performance-Incentive Awards. Beginning in FY 91-92, the eligible applicants for Trip-related grants will be selected to receive Performance Incentive Awards. These Awards are to be used for exemplary projects which are identified in the Trip-related Orant Application but not achievable with the normal allocation. The Commission will make these awards based on any of the following performance criteria: (a) Local financial support as a percentage of total operating expense; (b) Percentage of non-sponsored trips to total trips; (c) System efficiency (total cost divided by total trips); (d) Information reporting (timeliness); (e) Extent to which local comprehensive plan contains transportation disadvantaged plans as a part of the local transit plan; (t) Accidents per I 00,000 miles; (g) Audit findings; (h) Lead time for demand responsive service; C-22

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(i) Promptness of service; 0) Exemplary performance; and (k) Other Performance Related Activities. (8) Distribution of Planning Related Grants Planning related grants will be distributed to eligible applicants based on 50% for county population as a percentage of all eligible applicants total population and a 50% equal distribution for each elig i ble applicant Eligib l e applicants not requiring the total amount of funding available may recommend to the Coordinating Board that any excess funds be applied for by the Community Transportation Coordinator for additional non SPOnsored trip needs. The Commission shall review and reallocate any eligible excess funds to that particular county or service area's normal allocation. SpecljicAII11wrlly427.013(9)FS. Lawimplemented427.013, 427.0159, 427 016FS. History-New 5-2-90. 41-2.015 Expenditure of Local Government, State, and Federal Funds for the Transportation Disadvantaged. (1) Any agency purchasing or providing transportation services to the transportation disadvmrtaged shall contract with the Community Transportation Coordinator. (2) All agency applications for transportation disadvantaged operating and capital assistance funds shall made available to the Coordinating Board for such r eview. Applications by the Commission for any local government funds shall be presented to the Coordinating Board for review in accordance with Section 427. 013(11), Florida Statutes. Spec!ftc Authority 427 013(9) FS. Law Implemented 427.013{16), 427 016 FS. History-New 5-290. 41-2.016 A(cessibility. The Commission shall monitor and evaluate barriers such as accessibility to ensure compliance with any state, federal, or local government regulations relating to accessibility Specljic Authority 427.013(9) FS. Law Implemented 427.013(4) FS. History-New 5-2 -90. 41-2.017 Complete Phase-In Date. It is the intent of the Commission, to the maximum extent possible, that the provisions of this rule chapter be implemented immediately. Complete implementation with the provisions of this rule chapter shall be on or before July 1, 1992. Noncompliance of this rule chapter may result in the termination of eligibility for Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund dollars. Specljic Authority 427.013(9) FS. Law Implemented 427.013 FS. History New 5 2 -90. C-23


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Florida
Miami Metropolitan Area
Transportation
Planning.
Older people
Florida
Miami Metropolitan Area
Transportation
Planning.
2 710
University of South Florida.
Center for Urban Transportation Research.
Metropolitan Planning Organization (Metropolitan Dade County, Fla.)
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t Center for Urban Transportation Research Publications [USF].
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