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Florida five-year transportation disadvantaged plan, 1992-1996

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Title:
Florida five-year transportation disadvantaged plan, 1992-1996
Physical Description:
xviii, 101 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
University of South Florida -- Center for Urban Transportation Research
Florida -- Commission for the Transportation Disadvantaged
Florida -- Dept. of Transportation
Publisher:
Center for Urban Transportation Research
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
People with disabilities -- Transportation -- Planning -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Paratransit services -- Planning -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Older people -- Transportation -- Planning -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre:
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (p. 99-101).
Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
prepared for the Florida Transportation Disadvantaged Commission and the Florida Dept. of Transportation by the Center for Urban Transportation Research, College of Engineering, University of South Florida.
General Note:
"June 1992."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 028862222
oclc - 747505691
usfldc doi - C01-00201
usfldc handle - c1.201
System ID:
SFS0032301:00001


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Florida five-year transportation disadvantaged plan, 1992-1996.
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PAGE 1

FLORIDA FIVE-YEAR TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED PLAN 1992-1996 Technical Memorandum No. 3 Population and Demand Forecasts and Technical Memorandum No. 4 Cost and Funding Prepared for the Florida Transportation Disadvantaged Commission and the Florida Department of Transportation by the Center for Urban Transportation Research College of Engineering Un i vers i ty of South Florida June 199Z

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PREFACE This is the third and fourth of five technical memoranda to be produced by the Cerrter for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR) for the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission and the Florida Departmerrt of Transportation. These memoranda, along with a final report, win comprise the Florida Five-Year Transportation Disadvantaged Plan that is mandated by Chapter 427.013 (14), Florida Statutes. Technical Memorandum No. I provided an introduction and historical perspective to transportation disadvantaged services in Florida. Technical Memorandum No. 2 reported on statewide operating data, on results of an attitudinal and needs survey, and on an evaluation of the existing transportation disadvantaged system in Florida. Technical Memorandum No. 3 presents demand forecasts for transportation disadvantaged transportation services over the next five years. Technical Memorandum No. 4 provides estimates of the cost of meeting the demand and explores the ability of current funding resources to meet that cost. Technical Memorandum No. 5 will discuss policy issues, goals and objectives, and implemerrtation strategies . The preparation of this report has been financed in part through a grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration (formerly the Urban Mass Transportation Administration), under the Federal Transit Act. 11

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FLORIDA FIVE-YEAR TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED PLAN Technical Memoranda Nos. 3 and 4 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The technical memoranda that are summarized here present several forecasts for Florida's transportation disadvantaged (ID) system for the fiveyear period from 1992 through 1996: This summary presents forecasts of: (1) the transportation disadvantaged population, (2) demand for specialized 1D transportation services, (3) the number of 1D trips that will be supplied, (4) the funding required to supply these trips, (5) unmet demand, and (6) the number and cost of add i tional and replacement vehicles requ ir ed during the flve-year period. TD transportat ion services provide trips to agency programs and trips to general, or non program-related destinations A program trip is one made by a client of a government or socia l service agency for the purpose of participating in a program of that agency. Examples of program trips are trips to congregate dining facilities sheltered wor kshops, and job training facilities. A general trip is one made by a transportation disadvantaged person to a destination of his or her choice, not to an agency program. Examples of general trips are trips to work, grocery sto res, and recreational areas The difference between these two trips are important because these trips are provided to two categories of TD persons. Agencies that purchase ID transportation services to transport clients to programs typically serve persons who can be classified into one or more of three demographic groups: the disabled, the elderly, and the low-income. These agency programs are open to all persons within the specific demographic groups served (subject to available funding), regardless of their need for m transportation services. In addition to the trips that these agencies subsidize Ill

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY for transportation to programs, agencies also subsidize general trips. Most general trips currently made, however, are subsidized with 1D Trust Fund monies. The eligibility guidelines contained in Chapter 427, Florida Statutes require that disab led, e l derly, and low-income persons be ... unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation .... As a result, some persons who use TD transportation services for program trips may not be eligible for TD Trust Fund subsidies for genera l trips under the Chapter 427 guidelines. Because of these differences i n eligtbility, the state's coordinated TD system serves two population groups. The first group incl udes disabled, elderly, and low-income persons, and children who are "high-risk" or "at risk". These persons are eligible to receive governme ntal and social service agency subsidies for program tri ps and general trips, and are referred to in this report as the 1D Cate:gocy I popul ation. The second popul a tion gro\lp includes those persons who are transportation disadvantag e d according to the eligibility guidelines in Chapter 427 (i.e., t hey are unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation). These persons are eligible to receive the same subsidies as Category I persons plus they are eligible to receive TD Trus t Fund monies for non-sponsored general trips. They are referred to as the TD Categocy II population. This population i s a subset of the Category I population. (It should be noted, however, that it also is commission policy to provide service, subject to available capacity, to persons who are not eligib l e for funding as long as those persons pay for their trips.) Florida's estimated 1992 TD Category I population, made up of disab l ed, elderly, and low i ncome persons, is shown in Figure ES-1. The total number of these persons is estimated to be 5.3 million in 1992. The Category I population is forecasted to increase from 5.3 million persons in 1992 to 5.7 million persons in 1996 The Florida Department of f{ealth and Rehabilitative Services estimates that approximately 28 percent of Florida's children under the age o f five are "high-risk" or "at-risk". Forecasts based on the 1990 Census indicate tha t there are approximately 903,000 children under iv

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY the age of 5 in the state in 1992; 28 percent of these children is 253,000. Most of these children are disabled and/or are members of low-income families, and, therefore, are included in the population forecasts of Florida's disabled and low-income persons. If the number of "high-risk" or "at-risk" children increases at the same rate as the projected growth in the state's population of preschool children, the number of these children will increase from 253,000 in 1992 to 281,000 in 1996. Disabled 1.8 Million Low Income 1.8 MllUon Elderly 3.2 MUIIon I Total = 5.3 Mllbon J FIGURE ES-1. Florida TD Catesary I papulation, 1992. The 1D Category n population is composed of persons who, because of disability, income status, o r age, are unable to themselves. Disability refers to physical or mental limitations that may prevent a person from transporting him or herself, while income status refers to the financial capability of a person to purchase transportation. The reasons associated with age are not as apparent. Age alone should not affect a person's ability to transport him or herself. It may, however, relate to other factors that are associated with the aging process or to demographic characteristics of the elderly population; namely, the higher incidence of disability and poverty among the elderly. Therefore, the Chapter 427 guidelines imply that physical or mental disability or income status, v

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY regardless of age, are the criteria that determine eligibility for TO Trust Fund subsidies. The number of person with disabilities that prevent themfrom transporting themselves was estimated using data from the National Survey of Transportation Handicapped People, conducted by the Federal Transit Administration (formerly the Urban Mass Transportation Administration) in 1977. The survey suggests that 2.7 percent of persons aged 0 to 59 are trans portation handicapped and 19.0 percent of persons aged 60 and over are transportation handicapped. The number of persons who are unable to transport themselves because of income status was estimated from income data from the U.S. Census and national statistics on automobile ownership by income le vel. For the purpose of this report low-income persons are considered to be unable to transport themselves if they do not have an automobile available in the household and if they lack access to public transit. T able ES-1 shows forec asts of Florida's Category II population. This TABLE ES-1. Forecasts of Florida's TD Category II Population, 1992-1996 Transportation Handicapped, Non-Eld erly. 37,777 38,894 39,431 <0.290 <0,952 Low Income Transpotta11on Handiceppe7,000 Non-Low Income Transportation Handicapped, Elderly, 71,283 72!823 74,401 76,000 77,2119 Low rnoome Transpor1a0k>n Handicapped, Elde
PAGE 7

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . population is estimated to be 1.0 million persons in 1992 and is forecasted to increase to 1.1 million persons in 1996. As shown in Figure ES-2, the total demand for transportation disadvantaged trips is forecasted to be 26.6 million trips in 1992 and to increase to 28.9 million trips in 1996. This total demand consists of demand for both program trips and general trips by persons in TD Categories I and II. 40 35 !lllllllll General Trips llj Program Trips 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 FIGURE ES-2. Total demaDd for trips. Total demand for general trips was forecasted by applying per capita trip rates to the Category II population. These trip rates were developed from seven paratransit systems around the U.S. that were considered to provide high l evels of service (e.g., minimal or no restrictions on the number of trips a person can take, minimal or no waiting list, and minimal or no denial of trip requests). These seven systems are meeting most or all of the tri p demand in V1l

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY their service areas. The demand for general trips is forecasted to be 13.5 million trips in 1992 and to increase to 14.7 million trips in 1996. The demand for program trips is dependent upon the existence of the programs to which transportation disadvantaged persons are transported. If there is no program, program-related transportat ion is not demanded. For example, demand for transportation service to a sheltered workshop exists because there is a s h eltered workshop program and capacity in the program for persons who will demand trips. Assuming that agency programs increase at the same growth rate as the Category I population, program trip demand is forecasted to be 13.1 million trips in 1992 and to increase to 14.2 million trips in 1996 This implies that social service programs will grow to meet new demand and that budgets for new and expanded programs will include sufficien t funds to cover necessary transportation costs. The commission has, on a limited basis, provided subsidies for transpo rtation. to agency programs when program funds have run out. However, the commission is making efforts to ensure that the various governmental and social service programs maintain sufficient funds to accommodate the transportation needs of their program clients. {Whether or not the need for social service programs is being met is, of course, a different issue.) The total supply of 1D trips is forecasted to be 15.9 million trips in 1992 and to increase to 17.0 million trips in 1996, as shown in Figure ES-3. As suggested in the previous section, the demand for program trips is assumed to be equal to the supply of program trips. This assumes that program planners should--and willbudget adequately for all program expenses. That is, that they will not increase the scope of a program without increasing the capacity of the program to transport the additional clients. Therefore, both the demand for and the supply of program trips are forecasted to be 13.1 million in 1992 and to increase to 14.2 million in 1996. The supply of trips is forecasted to be 2.8 million in both 1992 and 1996. Forecasts of trips supplied by operators in the coordinated system include general trips subsidized with the 1D Trust Fund and general and program trips viii

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 30 llilll General Trips II Program Trips ... ................... 20 15 10 5 0 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 FIGURE ES-3. Total supply of trips. subsidized with governmental and social service agency funds. The supply of gener al and program trips funded by governmental and social service agen c ies i s fo r ecasted to increase at the same rate as the Ca t egory I population. General trips supplied w ith 1D Trust Fund monies were forecasted based on projectio n s of the TD Trust Fund and future trip costs. The supply of trips in the coordinated system is forecasted to be 8.6 million trips in 1992 and to increase to 9.1 million trips in 1996 A significa n t number of trips will also be supplied outside of t he coordinated system 1D funds that are expected to be spent outside the coordinated system cou l d supply an additional 7 .3 million trips in 1992 and 7.9 million trips in 1996. ix As shown in Figure ES-4, to supply the number of forecasted trips in the coordina ted system, funding from the various TD sources is forecasted to increase from $66.3 million to $81.6

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EXECUTIVE SUMM"RY . million during the five-year period. Approximately 90 percent of these funds will be provided by governmental and social service agencies, whi!e the remainder will be Florida 1D Trust Fund monies. $100 Willi 1D Fund Agency Funds $80 $60 $40 $20 $0 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 FIGURE ES-4. Operadng funds available through the coordinated system. Total statewide funds for 1D transportation, including those passing through the coordinated system and those expended outside the coordinated system, are estimated to increase from $1223 million in 1992 to $152.6 million in 1996 if growth in tota l funding matches the growth in the Category I population. If at some point the funds spent outside the coordinated system begin to pass through the coordinated system, the system's trip and funding data will be more representative of the total 1D transportation services being provided in the state. There i s a significan t gap between fore casted trip demand and the forecasted supply of trips. Figure ES-5 shows that unmet demand for TD transportation services is f orecasted to total 10.6 million trips in 1992 and 11.8 million trips in 1996. X

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 40 .. ---j 30 25 20 IS 10 5 0 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 FIGURE ES-5. UDmet demand for trips. The level of urunet demand for 'ID transportation services is due to a number of factor s. One im portant factor is trip subsidization. Nearly every 'ID trip provided in Florida is partially or fully su bsidized. The disparity between the true cost of a trip and the price paid by the passenger after subsidy creates a situation where the person generally will demand more trips than the subsidizing organization is willing or able to provide. Surveys on the trip purposes of general trips by transporta tion disadvantaged persons in other U.S. paratransit systems indicate that approximately 35 percent of the trips taken are medical trips, 20 percent are work or educational trips, 1 0 percent are shopping trips, and 35 percent are social, recreational, and other trips. There is no reason to suspect that in Florida the distribution of demand by these trip purposes would be any different. If the general trips made serve these purposes in approximately the same proportion, then the unmet demand by trip purpose will also be in these same proportions This suggests that the unmet demand lor medical trips will be on the order of 3.7 million trips in 1992. The unmet demand by other trip purposes is calculated to be 2.1 million trips for education and work trips 1.1 xi

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY million trips for shopping trips, and 3.7 million for social, recreational, and other trips. The operating cost of meeting all of the unmet demand is substantial compared to the size of the current coordinated TD system. The cost of providing additional service to meet this demand would total $471.5 million over the five-year period, or $94.3 million per year. The annual cost of unmet demand by trip purpose is shown in Figure ES-6. Of the annual need, $33.0 million would be required to meet all of the estimated unmet demand for medical trips, $ 18.9 million to provide work and educational trips, $9.4 million to provide shopping trips, and $33.0 million to provide social, recreation, and other trips. Given the scarcity of financial resources, the commission obviously must consider ways of regulating the amount of this demand, as well as i ncreasing the supply of trips, if 1,mmet demand is to be substantially reduced. Medical Trips Education/ Work Trips Shopping Trips Social/ Recreation( $0 $10 $20 $30 $40 FIGURE ES-6. Annual cost to meet unm.et demand. xii I

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The number and cost of additional vehicles required during the five-year period to handle both the expected supply of trips and the remaining unmet demand for trips are shown in Table ES-2. These forecasts include new vehicles for increased service and those required to replace old vehicles. It is assumed that average trip lengths and service effectiveness will remain constant through the forecast period and that there is minimal or no excess vehicle capacity. To provide the forecasted supply of trips, 324 additional vehicles will be required each year as replacements and for service expansion at a cost of $ 10.0 million. To meet all of the demand for service (i.e., the expected supply plus the remaining unmet demand), a total of 830 additional vehicles would be required each year at an annu. al cost of $25.7 million. These forecasts do not include additional vehicles that may be added by ID operators to provide ADA complementary paratransit services on behalf of fixed-route transit operators. TABLE ES-2. Forecasts of Vehicle Needs, 1992-1996. Number of Vehldea 4,15 1 $128.681.000 xiii 830 $25,736.200

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY XlV

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C ONTENT S Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii Ex t Summary ... eru tve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.1 List of F igures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii list of T ab les . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii Introduc tion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Transportation Disadvantaged P opulation . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TD Trip Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 TD liip Supply, Funding, and Unmet Demand . . . . . . . . . 11 I ssu es Re l a ted to t h e Demand .ror T D Tra nsportallo n S e rvices . . . . . . 15 Americans With Disabilities Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 TD Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Aging of the Population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Travel Characteristics of Transportation D isadvantaged Persons . . . 18 Types of TD Transportation Service Demand . . . . . . . . . 21 Unmet Demand . . . . . . . . . . o o 0 o 24 l.a t ent Demand . 0 0 o 0 25 Derived Demand . . . . . . o o 26 Transportatio n Disadvantaged Population Forecasts . . . . . . . . . 27 TD Category I Population . . . . . . . . ... : . . . . . . 27 Disabled P opulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Elderly P opulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Low-Income Population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 "High Risk" or At-Risk" Children . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Allocation of TD Category I Population to Market Segments . 30 Forecasts of TD Category I Population, 1992-1996 . . . . . 30 TD Category ll Population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 'Transportation Handicapped" Popu lation . . . . . . . . 32 Low-Income Transportation Disadvantaged Population . . . 32 "High-Risk" or Children . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Forecasts of TD Category ll P opulation, 1992-1996 .......... 35

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tomms (Cont.) of Demand, Supply, Funding, and Unm et Demand, 1992-19% . . 35 Demand for Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Supply of Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 37 Operating Funding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1 Unmet Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Capital Funding Needs, 199219% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Summaey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Appendix A Directory of Funding Sources .. . .. .. . .. . . . . . . 49 Appendix B Process to Forecast TD population . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Appendix C Forecasts by County of TD . . . . . . . . . 59 Appendix D Forecasts by County of TD Trip Demand, Supply, and Funding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 List of Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 List of References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 xvi

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Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 F igure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 UST OF FIGURES Results of disability surveys . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Age cohorts as percent of total population, 1990 . . . . 17 Levels of trip making by various market segmen t s . . . . 19 Mode splits for various market segments . . . . . . . . . 19 Market supply and demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Market for 1D transportation services . . . . . . . . . 24 Increase in total market demand . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Florida 1D Category I population, 1992 . . . . . . . . 31 Process to calculate the number of low-income persons who are transportation disadvantaged . . . . . . . . . . 33 Florida populations, 1992 to 1996 . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Total demand for trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Total supply of trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Trips supplied through the coordinated system . . . . . 38 Trips supplied outside the coordina ted system . . . . . . . 40 Operating funds available through the coordinated system . . 41 Unmet demand for trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Annual cost to mee t unme t demand . . . . . . . . . . 44 xvii

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Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 4 Table 5 Table 6 Table 7 Table 8 Table 9 Table 10 Table 11 LisT OF tA8uis Florida Statewide TD Operating Funds as Reported in 1989 AORs . . . . . . . . . . 12 Estimates of Nationwide Funding Available from Federal Programs, 1990-1996 .................... 14 Paratransit Mode Splits of TD Category I Population, 1990 . . 20 Florida Disabled Population . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Florida Elderly Population . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Florida Low-Income Population . . . . . . . . . . 30 Forecasts of Florida's m eategory I Population, 1992-1996 ... 31 Florida "Transportation Handicapped" Population . . . . . 32 Forecasts of Florida's TD Category ll Population, 1992-1996 ... 35 Fo. recasts of TD Trust Fund Monies, 1992-1996 ...... . .... 42 Forecasts of Vehicle Needs, 1992-1996 ................... 46 xviii

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FLORIDA FivE-YEAR TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED PLAN Technical Memoranda Nos. 3 and 4 IN'IRODUCilON This is the third and fourth of five technical memoranda that comprise the Florida Five-Year Transportation Disadvantaged Plan. This report presents forecasts for the five year period from 1992 through 1996 of: (1) the transportation disadvantaged (ID) population, (2) demand for specialized 1D transportation services, (3) the n umber of lD trips that will be supplied, ( 4) the funding r equ ir ed to supply these trips, (5) unmet demand, and (6) the number and cost of additional and replacement vehicles requ i red during the five-year period. The focus of this report is the forecasts of the demand for, and supply of, specialized 1D transportation services Other forecasts, such as funding, population, unmet demand, and capita l needs, are used to derive, or are derived from, the trip demand and supply forecasts. Transportation disadvantaged persons use many different modes of travel to meet their trip-making needs, including private automobiles, taxicabs, public transit, and specialized 1D transportation services. These specialized transportation services are often referred to as paratransit services While typically used by transportation disadvantaged persons, these services may also include those used by persons who are not transportation disadvantaged (e.g., commuters who rideshare). For this report, however, paratransit ref ers onl)' to those specialized 1D transportation services that provide trips for transportation disadvantaged persons. (For simp l icity, these services are referred to in this r eport as 1D transportation services.) The types of trips served by 1D transportation services inc l ude trips to agency programs and trips to general or non-program-rela ted destinations. The distinction between program trips and general trips is important because these trips serve two categories of lD persons and the demand for each type of trip will be different. The demand and othet forecasts, as well as discussions of the methodologies used to develop these forecasts and discussions of issues related to demand, are presented in the five sections of the report that follow this introduction. The first section describes the 1

PAGE 20

methodologies used to develop the forecasts The second section disa!sses a number of significant issues related to the demand for 1D transportation services. Forecasts of the size of two 1D population groups are presented in the third section. The fourth section presents forecasts of the demand for program trips and general trips, the supply of program trips and general trips, the funding required to supply these trips, and the unmet demand. The fifth section of this report presents forecasts of the number and cost of additional and replacement vehicles that will be required during the five-year period The forecasted numbers of vehicles include those required to serve both the forecasted supply of trips and the forecasted total demand for trips. METHQDOLQGY This section of the report describes the methodologies used to develop the forecasts. These include forecasts of the two population groups mentioned above, 1D trip demand and trip supply, funding, and unmet demand. Transnortation Disadvan taeecJ, Popu l ation Backamund. Chapter 427 of the Florida Statutes defines transportation disadvantaged persons as: : .. those persons who because of physical or mental disability, income status, or age are unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation and are, therefore, dependent upon others to obtain access to health care, employment, education, shopping, social activities, or other life-sustaining activities, or children who are handicapped or high-risk or at -risk as defined in s 411.202" Governmental and social service agencies that purchase 1D transportation services to transport clients to programs sponsored by the agency typically serve persons who can be classified into one or mor e of three demographic groups: the disabled, the elderly, and the low-income These agency programs usually are open to all persons within the specific demographic groups served--subject to available funding-regardless of their need for specialized transportation services. In addition to the trips that these agencies subsidize for transportation to programs, agencies also subsidize general trips Of the general trips made in the coordinated system, most are subsidized with 1D Trust Fund monies. (The commission refers to the trips that do not receive governmental or social service agency 2

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subsidies as "non-sponsored trips and to the TD Trust Fund monies that are used to subsidize these trips as "non sponsored funds".) To be eligible for a trip subsidy from the 1D Trust Fund, tbe Chapter 4r/ guidelines require that disabled, elderly, and low-income persons be .. unable to transport themselves or to pure/rase transportation. ... As a result, some persons who have e ither program or general trips subSidized with agency funds are not eligible to receive 1D Trust Fund monies for general trips under the Chapter 427 gUidelines. Because of these differences in eligibility, the state's coordina ted ID system serves two population groups. The flfSt group includes disabled, elderly, and low-income persons, and children who are "high-risk" or "at-risk" ". These persons are eligible to receive governmental and social service subsidies for program trips and general trips, and are referred to in this report as the 1D Categozy I population. The second population group includes those persons who are transportation disadvantaged according to the eligibility guidelines in Chapter 427 (i.e., they are unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation). These persons are eligible to receive the same subsidies as Category I persons plus they are eligible to receive 1D Trust Fund monies for non-sponsored general trips. They are referred to as the 1D Category n population. This population is a subset of the Category I population. (It should be noted, however, that it also is commission policy to provide service, subject to available capacity, to persons who are not eligible for funding as long as t hose persons pay for their trips. The eligibility guidelines in Chapter 427 state that disability, income status, and age are the reasons why persons may be unable to transport themselves and, therefore, are transportation disadvantaged. Disability refers to physical or mental capabilities that may prevent a person from transporting him or herself, while income s tatus refers to the financial capability of a person to purchase transportation. The reasons associat ed with age are not as apparent. Age alone should not affect a person's ability to transport him or herself. It may, however, relate to other factors that are associated with the aging process or to demographic characteristics of the elderly population; namely, the higher incidence of disability and poverty among the elderly. Therefore, the Chapter 427 guidelines imply that physical or mental disability and income status, regardless of age, are the criteria that determine eligibility for 1D Trust Fund monies. Chapter 411 of the Florida Statutes defines a "high-risk" or atrisk" child as a preschool child with one or mort of thitteen chtmzCttristlcs. 3

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Studies that estimate the number of persons who are disabled, elderly, and low income (i.e., the Category I population) and studies that estimate the number of persons who comprise the more narrowly defined Category D population generally use one or more of three data sources. One of these data sources, the U.S. Census, provides county-level data on population by age group. The census also provides county-level data on the number of persons below the federal poverty line. These population statistics are widely used to estimate the number of eldedy and low-income persons. In 1980, the census also identified persons with a public transportation handicap (i.e., persons who have a health condition that makes it difficult or imposSible to use public transportation). Many organizations that have evaluated this data, including the U.S. Department of Transportation, have suggested that it underestimates the number of transportation handicapped persons. One problem cited is the uncertainty of how broadly the public interpreted the term "public transportation handicap". For the U.S., the 1980 Census found that 3.6 percent of non-institutionalized persons age 16 and older were transportation handicapped. The 1990 Census did not separately identify these persons. Another source provides sample survey data of the transportation handicapped population. The National Survey of Transportation Handicapped People (NSlHP), sponsored by the Federal Transit Administration, surVeyed nearly 16,000 households in 1977. "Transportation handicapped people" were defined as persons who (1) had experienced one or more general problems in the past twelve months that affected their mobility, (2) perceived that they had more difficulty in using public transportation than persons without their general problem, and (3) were not homebound. The survey found that in urban areas 5.0 percent of persons over the age of five were transportation handicapped. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services sponsors the third source of data, Current Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This survey, which is updated annually, estimates the number of persons with various degrees of limitation of activity. The physical activities used in the NHIS to measure disability, however, do not specifically include activities related to the use of public transportation. Results from the NHIS suggest that, in 1990, 9.3 percent of the population had a "limitation in a major activity" (i.e a limitation in the amount that persons are able to perform of the major activity or activities associated with their age group, such as attending school, working, General probkms included a visual or hearing problem, a problem requiring use of a mechanical aid or wheelchair, and problems in walkin& standin& or going up or down st.W.. 4

PAGE 23

or indepen dent living). The NHIS is often cited as a reference by national organizations, including the American Association of Retired Persons and the National Research Council. The percentages of persons who have an "activity limitation" or a "major activity limitation", as shown in the NHIS, are greater than the percentage of persons found in the NSTHP to be "transportation handicapped". This suggests that some of the persons with "activity limitations" (NHIS) may be able to use public transportation and, therefore, are not "transportation handicapped" (NSTIIP). Thus, the NHIS provides a broader estimate of persons with disabilities than the survey of transportation handicapped persons. The three sources of data described above are the ones most commonly used to estimate the number of disabled, transportation handicapped, elderly, and low-income persons. Another source is local surveys conducted by state and local governments and social service agencies. Figure 1 shows results of surveys and that have been conduct ed to determine the number of persons who are disabled :or transportation handicapped. The definition of disabled and transportation handicapped varies somewhat with the survey or study. (Included in the figure are the results of both the NIDS and the NSTIIP.) These other surveys and studies support the conclusion that the transportation handicapped population is a subset of the total disabled population. The survey conducted for the International Center for the Disabled (ICD) in 1986 suggests that 8.0 percent of the population have a disability or health condition that is "somewhat or very severe". This percent, again, is higher than the estimate of transportation handicapped persons from the NSTHP and from other local studies shown in the figure. The NSTHP estimate of 5.0 percent falls near the middle of the ran ge of results of these local studies that have estimated specifically the transportation handicapped population. Approach. Because the coordinated system serves two population groups depending on the type of trip subsidy for which a person is eligible (i.e., agency subsidy or TD Trust Fund subsidy), it is necessary to estimate both the Category I population and the Category n population. Several data sources were used to estimate the Category I population. The 1 990 Census and population forecasts from the Burea u of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) at the University of Florida were used to estimate the elderly population by county. (The forecasts from BEBR are based on the 1990 Census.) National disability rates from the NHIS were used to estimate the disabled population. Income data from the 1980 Census were applied to the 1990 Census population data to estimate the low-income 5

PAGE 24

NATIONAL HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY (NHIS), 1990 With odMty ltmltatfcn With llmltotlon In mo)or odMty NSTHP, ALL URBAN AREAS, 1977 CENSUS TRANSPORTATION DISABLED, U.S., 1980 CENSUS SPECIAL SURVEY, 1984 With a severe. functlonalllmltotlon Can walk 3 city blocks with difficulty or not at all Not able to walk 3 city blocks Has clifflculty getting around outside the house Needs help getting around outside the house lCD SURVEY OF DISA8LED AMERICANS, 1986 Consider thernseM!s disabled Disability or health condition somewhat or,.,. -ACTRANSIT, TRANSPORTATION HANDICAPPED, 1977 MARIN COUNTY E&H STUDY, 1977 Transportation handicapped, FTAestlmatlng method Special surwy; need specialized tronsporto11on Spec:lalsurwy, need lmp.......,ents to transit PORTl.AND, OREGON FTAST\IDY, 1977 WASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF COWMBIA. 1977 CHICAGO SURVEY OF MOBILITY UMITED PERSONS, 1978 MILWAUKEE TRANSPORTATION HANDICAPPED, 1978 DAYTON OHIO E&H DATA COLLECTION STUDY, 1981 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA RAPID TRANSIT DISTRICT, 1987 LOUISVILLE TRANSPORTATION NEEDS ASSESSMENT, 1988 SANTACI.ARACOUNTYTRANSP. DISA81UTY, 1989 I 0% 3% 6% 9% 12% 15% FIGURE 1. Reaulta of disability sutVeys 6

PAGE 25

population. The Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services provided estimates of the number of "high-risk" or "at-ris!C' children. For the second population group, the Category ll population, data from the NSTHP were used to derive estimates of "transportation handicapped" persons. The definition of transportation persons in the NSTiiP is generally consistent with the guidelines expressed in 47:7 for persons with physical and mental disabilities. Further, as noted above, the results of this survey fall near the middle of the range of results from other local studies that have estimated this population. The number of persons who are unable to transport themseNes because of income status was estimated using census data. The first step was to estimate the number of persons in Florida below the federal poverty line the Category I low-income population). However, since many low-income persons may own automobiles and be able to afford to use them or they may have access to and be able to afford to use public transit, the poverty line threshold may not provide an accurate assessment of the ability of low income persons to transport themselves. Therefore, two additional characteristics were used to determine those low-income persons who are unable to transport themselves because of income status: (1) the lack of an available automobile in the household, and (2) the lack of access to public transit. For the remainder of this report, these persons are referred to as "low-income transportation disadvantaged persons" National statistics on automobile availability by household income levels were used to estimate the number of low-income persons who do not have an automobile available in the household. The county of residence is used to determine if there is access to public transit. That is, if the county has fixed-route service it is assumed that low-income persons have access to the service. This may underestimate the number of low-income persons eligible under Chapter 427 because some low-income persons who do not have an automobile and who live in a county with fixed-route transit service may actually not live within the service area of the transit operator. The number of these persons, however, should be small. Route planning of these services typically considers the location of low income residents because this group comprises a major market for fixed-route services. It is also true that some low-income persons who own automobiles cannot afford to operate them and that some low-income persons who have access to fiXedroute transit cannot afford the fare. Again, the number of these persons should be relatively small I ncome statistics from the 1990 Census were not awzilllble otthe time of this repott. 7

PAGE 26

m TrJg Demand Jlai:kmund. There is no single accepted method used to estimate demand for 1D uansponation services. Forecasting approaches vary among studies but can generally be grouped into three types. One approach involves the use of ridership elasticity measures to estimate demand. An elasticity measure estimates the change in one variable based on a change in one or more other variables. I n the case of demand, this method e s tima t e s the change in ridership based on changes in various service characteristics, such as levels of service, quality, or price. These measures are derived from historical changes in ridership that have occurred as a result of changes in these service characteristics. Elasticity measures are used frequently by fixed-route transit agencies to estimate ridership changes resulting from changes in fares. An agency may know from past experience, for example, that when fares are increased 30 percent, ridership decreases 10 percent. This approach is very useful in estimating incremental changes in demand but it is not particularly helpful in estimating total demand for a service. Further, this technique is not sultcd for estimating Florida's statewide demand for 1D transponation services because of the great number of individual operators and the diversity in the types of services, eligibility guidelines, fare policies and other factors. A second approach estima t es demand based on a correl a tio n between ridership and market or service characteristics of similar services provided i n other areas. For example, trip rates per capita, per dwelling unit, or per 1,000 square feet of office space in an area with similar services and market conditions as the proposed s e rvice area are used to estimate demand in the proposed area. Demand can be estimated for new service to a specific geographic area or to a specific market group. It is important when using this approach to select existing systems with service characteristics (e.g., hours of operation, reservation requirements, eligibility guidelines, and fares) that are similar to the proposed service. A third approach involves using data from consumer preference surveys to estimate demand. This approach is commonly used by smaller organizations with fewer clients and small, well-defined service areas. Surveys are generally structur e d to obtain information about trip patterns and the propensity to make trips based on various service characteristics. The City of Louisville recently conducted a study in which paratransit demand was estimated with data obtained from an extensive attitudinal survey. The Nationwide Personal 8

PAGE 27

Transportation Study, conducted by the FMer3.! Transit Administration, is an example of a consumer preference survey. In this survey, the travel characteristics of the general public, the elderly population, and the low income population were analyzed. groach. The approach used in this report involves the use of trip rates (the second approach discussed above) derived in a recent study of paratransit demand in San Francisco. This approach was chosen because the trip rates are based on actual experiences of paratransit systems that are meeting most or all of the trip demand in their service areas. Further, this approach has been recommended by the Federal Transit Administration for use in estimating demand for ADA complementary paratransit services. In the San Francisco study, trip rates were developed from an evaluation of seven paratransit systems that were considered to p r ovide high levels of service (e.g., minimal or n o r estrictions on the number of trips a person can take, minimal or no waiting list, and mi nimal or no denial of trip requests). These trip rates, 1.0 and 1.2 trips per month in urban and rural areas, respectively, represent the demand for general trips (i.e., trips by individuals to destinations of their choice, not associated with any agency programs). Total demand for general trips is si m ply the Category D population multiplied by the trip rates. The Category II population was used b e cause most general trips are currently subsidized with m Trust Fund monies and eligibility for these funds is determined based o n the definition of transportation disadvantaged persons contained in Chapter 4TT. Although it is likely that some general trips that are subsidized with agency funds are taken by category I persons who do not meet the transportation disadvantaged definition in Chapter 427, th i s number is expected to be small. In a n environment where available governmental or social service agency funds are scarce, agencies will tend to allocate funds for general trips to the most needy (i.e., the category II population). The seven paratransit systems that the trip rates were derived from have eligibility guidelines that are similar to, but not exactly the same as, those contained in Chapter 4TT. In all of those systems, as in Florida, "transportation han dicapped" persons are eligible for general trips Several of the systems also provide services for non-disabled elderly persons. On the other hand, all of the systems exc l ude low income persons and children who are defined in Florida as being high-risk" or "at-risk", except those who are disabled or "transportation handicapped". 9

PAGE 28

The primary difference between the populations fro m which the trip rates were derived and Florida's Category n population is the inclusion in Florida of persons who are unable to transport themselves because of income status (i.e. low income transportation disadvantaged persons) Because of their additiona l mobility barriers, as discussed previously, (i.e., no automobile and no access to fixed-route transit service) these persons have limited travel options and a similar need for TO transportation services for general trips as do the persons who are "transportation handicapped" 'I_'herefore, the trip rates derived from these other systems should be representative of the demand for general trips by all segments of Florida's Category D population. The treatment of TO trip demand by "high-risk" or "at-risk" children requires special consideration. Many of these cln1dren are "transportation handicapped" and/ or members of low-income transportation disadvantaged families and, thus, are included in the Category D population. Since the trip rates used to forecast general trip demand are per capita rates (i.e the trip rates represent an average rate of travel by broad population groups that also include children), the general trip demand forecasts include any trip demand that may be attnoutabl e to children who are transportation disadvantaged under the eligibility guidelines contained in Chapter 427. Those 'high-risk" or at-risk'' children who are not transportation disadvantaged under the eligibility guidelines contained in Chapter 427 are not included in the general trip demand forecasts because these children typically would not use TO transportation services for general trips. Any general trips required by these children would most likely be provided by an adult in an automobile. The demand for program trips is forecasted differently from the demand for general trips. As previously discussed, these are trips supplied or by governmental or social service agencies for the purpose of transporting clients to and from programs of those agencies The demand for program trips is a "derived demand", is, the demand for these trips is dependent upon the existence of the program to which transportation disadvantaged persons are transported. For e xample, demand for trips to sheltered workshops exists only because there are sheltered workshop programs and facilities .. (Whether or not the need for social service programs is being met is, of course, a different issue.) Thus, the demand for program trips is equal to the number of trips required to take advantage of the service offered by the programs. In this respect, demand for program trips will depend on the level of funding for the various social service programs. A discuslion of derived denumd is provided in a lattr titled "l)>pts of TD Trans portation Suvice Dtmtllld". 10

PAGE 29

In Florida's coordinated 1D system, trips are commonly referred to as either sponsored or non-sponsored. To understand the application of the San Francisco methodology in Florida, it is important to understaild how general and program trips relate to sponsored and non-sponsored trips. "Program" and "general" refer to the purpose and destination of a trip trips to an agency program or to a destination of the person's c hoice), while "sponsored" and "non-sponsored" refer to the funding source for the trip. Non-sponsored trips are subsidized with the commission's 1D Trust Fund, while sponsored trips are subsidized by other governmental or social service agencies. General trips are not program-related and can be either sponsored or non-sponsored. All program trips are sponsored because, by definition, they are trips funded by agencies for transportation to agency programs. The commission has, on a limited basis, provided subsidies for transponation to agency programs when program funds have run out. However, the commission is making effons to ensure that the various governmental and sUnty cash conlribunons. 11

PAGE 30

TABLE L Florida Statewide TD Operating Funds as Reported In 1.989 AORs. C h i l dren'a Medical Service Children Youth and Families Comm. Care for the Eldet1y $792.753 Comrn. Care for Cis. Adults $318,215 Oev. Servfcee-RNk:lntia l $1 065,560 Dev. Sefllloesl nd Uvl ng $959,603 Oev. SeMeetCi ient SeMce $218,383 Heal1h Program $1, 770 lnttitutfontj&ate HOSf)itala $14,488 Medicaid $6,791 439 Rolugee ProgOrtation Donations Contributions ln-l
PAGE 31

included in the operating figures shown in Table 1.) The remaining $27.9 million were funds spent by federal and state sources on 1D transportation outside of the coordinated s%tem. (In fis(al year 1992, the annual budget estimates indicate that total identified spending for 1D transportation services increased to $122.3 million. The increase is due in large part to the inclusion of revenue sources that were not previously included and t o implementati o n of the 1D Trust Fund.) Most of the trips outside of the coordinated system are Medicaid-sponsored trips, the costs of which are reimbursed on the basis of trip mileage either direct to relatives or friends who provide the transportation or to private taxi operators. Other trips are provided by emergency and non-emergency medical vehicle operators. Of the non-coordinated trips, most are not coordinated for one of three principal reasons: ( 1) the coordinated system lacks capacity, (2) the trip can be more costeffectively provided by a relative or a friend who receives a mileage reimbursement, or (3) the urgency, unpredictability, and nature of the trip makes it difficult, or inappropriate, to arrange the trip through the local coordinator. However, there are other trips that currently are not arranged through the coordinated system for some reason other than one of these three. The commission expects that, eventually, these latter trips will be arranged through the local coordinators. . The amount shown in the annual budget estimates represents most, but not all, of the total funds spent on 1D transportation services in the state. An example of funds not included in the annual budget estimates is some of the costs incurred by employees of state agencies who use state-owned vehicles or personal automobiles to provide trips for transportation disadvantaged persons. Many such trips are provided by employees of Florida's Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS). One example of such a trip is a social worker who transports an abused child to a shelter facility. These trips are typically sporadic in nature and ancillary to the normal duties of the employee. Because the level of need for these types of services is difficult to predict, HRS does not provide cost estimates of these services in the annual budget estimates. HRS has indicated to the commission, however, that the cost of these other transportation services is relatively small. The level of current and future federal funding for 1D transportation services is an important factor in the forecasts of transportation disadvantaged funding in Florida because the coordinated system recei v es a significant amount of federal funds, and because some of these funds are matched with state and local funds. Estimates of federal funding leve ls for programs of the U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) and the U.S. Department 13

PAGE 32

of Health and Human Services (U.S DHHS) are shown in Table 2. (The 1991 Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance provided estimates of funds provided by U.S. i>HHS. from 1990 to 1992 and by U.S. DOT in 1990 and 1991. Forecasts of funds provided by U.S. DOT from 1992 to 1996 are based on amounts included in the $151 billion Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1992.) The amounts shown are total program funds, not just TO transportation funds. For example, the Medicaid funds shown are primarily for the purchase of medical services, but transportation funding also is provided to ensure that the clients can get to the medical services. Therefore, an increase or decrease in the level of funding for a program such as Medicaid signals a corresponding increase or decrease in the demand and funding for transportation to the service provided by the program. The projections of both U.S. DOT and HHS funds are nationwide totals and may not reflect growth rates for individual states because allocations among the states vary. TABLE 2. Estimates of Nationwide Funding Available from Federal Programs, 1990-1996. Soction 3 Soction 9 18(b)112ll Section 18 Total --Title I l l n/a No! available $1,145.3 $1.702.S $35.0 $89.3 $2,912.0 $41,103.2 $1'08.8 $41,811.8 $989.8 $1,941.7 $35.1 $64 2 $3,0S0.8 $53,797.4 $761.9 $1,942 2 $1,822.8 $54.9 $106.1 $751.11 $2,030.0 $2,604.1 $70.2 $161.8 I n/ a n/a $2,050.0 $88.7 $153JI $4,915.1 nfa nja n/a $2.050.0 $2,050.0 $2,642.6 $2,642.6 $&8.7 $68.7 $153JI $153JI nfa nfa n/a n/a nja nja Approach. T ransportation disadvantaged trips will be supplied by operators who are part of the coordinated TO SYStem, by operators who currently are not part of the coordinated SYStem, and, starting in 1992, by the complementary paratransit and fully accessible fixed-route transit services mandated by ADA (see the next section for a discussion of ADA). W ithin the coordinated TO system, it is assumed that the supply of program trips and those general trips purchased with agency funds will increase at the same rate as the Category I population. The number of general trips to be supplied with the TO Trust Fund are forecasted based on expected future trip costs and forecasts of TO Trust 14

PAGE 33

Fund monies. The supply of trips by operators who are not part of the coordinated system is also forecasted to grow at the same rate as the growth in. Category I population.. By predicting that the supply of agency-funded program trips and general trips will increase with population growth, it is implied that program funding will increase sufficiently to purchase these trips at prevailing trip costs and trip subsidy levels. This assumption can be very speculative, given that social service program funding is difficult to forecast and given, also, that future trip costs may change significantly. In Florida's ooordinated system, growth in funding has historically increased at a rate that allowed the provision of service to increase faster than the growth in the Category I population. Some of this growth was due to a real increase in funding and service, and some was due to expansion of the coordinated system into areas that had previously been served, but not coordinated (i.e., the funds had been spent in the state, but not through the coordinated system). Thus, the increase in funding partially reflects a real increase in 'ID funds spent in the state and partially reflects a redistribution of funds through the coordinated system. The commission expects that, over time, more of the currently non coordinated trips will be arranged through the coordinated system. ISSUES BElATED TO THE DEMAND FOR TD TRANSPORTATION SERVICES There are a number of important 'ID demand-related issues that should be discussed prior to the presentation of the demand forecasts. These issues include the potential impacts of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), 'ID policy changes in Florida, the aging of the population, travel characteristics of transportation disadvantaged persons, and the types of demand for 'ID transportation service. Alnericans With Disabilities Act The ADA may significantly affect mobility options for many of the transportation disadvantaged. Two important aspects of the act are requirements for full accessibility of fixed-route public transit systems and for the provision of complementary paratransit service by those systems. Persons eligible for the ADA-mandated complementary paratransit service are those who have temporary or permanent disabilities and are unable to make use of a fully-15

PAGE 34

accessible fixed-route system (e.g., a system in which vehicles are equipped with a wheelchair lift and other means of assisting disabled persons). Based on population forecasts developed in this report, 1.4 million disabled persons will liv e in Florida counties with fixed-route transit serv.ice in 1992 Of these persons, 666,642 are "transportation handicapped" based on survey data from the National Survey of Transportation Handicapped People. Many of these transportation handicapped persons will be eligible to use the complementary paratransit services provided by the fixed-route operators for some of their trips. The act contains specific service parameter guidelines for the complementary paratransit service. First, the complementary paratransit service must be provided between all origins and destinations within a certain distance of each fixed route Second, the service must operate the same days and hours as the fixed-route service. Third, the service must not charge more than twice the fare of the fixed-route service. This required high level of service will, in some ways, affect 1D transportation services in Florida and elsewhere. Although it is uncertain how services will be affected, it is likely that there will be some shifting of trips from the coordinated system to the new ADA services by those eligible for these services. It is also likely that these services will increase the overall supply of transportation services for transportation disadvantaged persons. This will reduce the level of unrnet demand for these services. Although unlikely, it is also possible that the fvced route systems will contract with local coordinators to provide the complementary service and that there will not be a corresponding increase in service supply in the coordinated syste m The potential outcome, in this case, could be an overall decrease in quality and leve ls of service available to existing users of 1D transportation services. The commission should clqsely monitor the impacts of the implementation of the act during the five-year plan period. TD Policy Policy decisions by the commission and other constituents can also affect demand for 1D transportation services. For example, policy decisions concerning eligibility for transportation services provided by the coordinated 1D system and eligibility for programs sponsored by various governmental and social service agencies will affect the size of the market for these services and, thus, the demand for trips. Fare policy can also affect demand for these services. Fares can be an effective tool used to regulate demand. In the public transit industry, for example, fare structures have been developed to encourage 16

PAGE 35

greater use of the service in off-peak time periods. Another policy area that can affect demand concerns the type and level of services provided. For example, the overall availability and convenience of 1D trailsportation services, as characterized by the days and hours of service, advance reservation time, and trip lengths and times are important considerations in transportation disadvantaged persons' modal choice decisions. Agine of the Population Figure 2 compares the percentage of elderly in Flor ida in 1990 to the percentage of elderly in the U.S. as a whole. The U.S. Administrat ion on Aging forecasts that the elderly (60 and over) population in the U.S. will increase 9 4 percent over this decade, from 4 1 .7 mil lion persons in 1990 to 45.6 mill ion in 2000. In Florida, forecasts of the elderly population, from the Bureau of Economic and Business Research at the University of Florida, suggest that the Florida elderly population will increase 23.3 percent over this sa m e period, from 3.0 :million to 3.7 million persons. 25% 20% ..... . ............. . ........................... ......... 1& Rorlda II 15% 10% 5% 60+ 65+ 75+ 85+ FIGURE 2. Age cohorts as percent of total populatioDt 1990 Forecasts of changes wjtbjn Florida's elderly population suggest that the advanced e l derly (75 and over) are becoming a larger percentage of the total elderly populatioiL The 75 and over population is forecasted to increase from 328 percent of the total elderly 17

PAGE 36

population in 1990 to 39.4 percent in 2000. The 85 and over population is fo r ecasted to grow from 6.9 percent of the total elderly population to 9.8 percent during the same period. These aging trends are significant for Florida's 1D system. National statistics indicate that older persons are more likely to become afflicted with a disability than non elderly persons. Additionally, because fewer elderly persons are in the workforce (either by choice, forced retirement, disability, or other reasons), the incidence of poveriy among elderly persons is grea ter than that of the general p u blic. Therefore, these trends suggest that a growing proportion of the future demand for 1D transportation services will consist of disabled and/or low-income elderly persons. Trav e l Characteris t ics of Ttanmortall o n Disadyapt aeed Persops Tbe travel characteristics of transportation disadvantaged persons, as of the general population, result from a complex relationship among many factors including income employment status, social and psychological factors, and modal options and costs In general, the frequency and distribution of trips made by transportation disadvantaged persons is somewhat different from that of the general population. For example, because fewer transportation disadvantaged persons are employed than are members of the general public, these persons make fewer work trips. On the other hand, transportation disadvantaged persons may make more medical trips than the general pub lic. Two national surveys, the Nationwide Personal Transportation Study (NPTS) and the National Survey of Transportatum Handicapped People (NSIHP), provide data on personal trip-making. These surveys suggest, as shown in Figure 3, that disabled elderly, and low income persons make fewer trips per month than the general public. Disabled persons make slightly less than half the number of monthly trips as either elderly or low-i n come persons and only 37 percent of the number of monthly trips made by the general public Although the frequency of trips by disabled persons is less than members of other demographic groups, disabled persons generally use 1D transportation services for more of their trips than do elderly or lowincome persons. usually, Teduced empluyment among the 1D population is due to factors other th1111 trtutsponatioo baniers. ReseOJ'Ch conducud in 1989 for the Trnonto Tnznsit Commission suggests tlwt over 60 percent of non-worl
PAGE 37

82 80 60 40 20 0 General l'llbRc Disabled Eldetly t-lncome FIGUBE 3. Levels of trip-making bJ varloua market segments. National mode choices estimated from the NPTS and the NSTIIP for the general public, the disabled, the elderly, and low-income persons are illustrated in Figure 4. The automobile is the preferred mode of transportation for all groups. Disabled and low-income persons use the automobile for approximately 70 percent of thejr trips, either as driver or passenger, while elderly persons use the automobile for more than 85 percent of their trips. Remaining trip needs are met by walking. public transit or paratransit service and other 80% 60% 40% 20% General l'llblic Disabled t-lncome Ill Auto Driver 0 Wolk Auto Passenger Trimsit/PaJalrwtSit FIGUBE 4. Mode splits for various market &egllleftts. 19

PAGE 38

modes (e.g., taxi, rail, and auplane ). Disabled and low-income persons use transit and/ or paratransit more than do the elderly and the general public. (Paratransit typically is used more than public transit by the disabled, while low-income persons use public transit more often than paratransit.) A significant number of trips by low-income persons (19.5 percent) are made by walking. The use of 1D transportation services and fixed-route transit by Florida's elderly, disabled, and low-income population (i.e., Category I population) is somewhat different from the national average. As shown in Table 3, paratransit mode splits by county vary from 0.05 percent to 1.73 percent. These mode splits are weighted average mode splits of disabled, elderly, and low-income persons and were calculated by dividing the number of 1990 coordinated 1D trips by the estimated total number of trips made in 1990 by the Category I population. The total number of trips made on any mode for any purpose was estimated by multiplying the average annual trip rates of disabled, elderly, and low-income persons by the population of each of these respective groups, The 1990 total travel of the Florida TABLE 3. Paratransit Mode Splits of TD Category I Population, 1990. Sake< O.SS% Han!" 0.55% Orange 0.11'% Bay 0.43'1!. Hendry 0 30% Otceola 0.11'1!. Bnldfo
PAGE 39

Category I population was estimated at 2.9 billion one-way trips.. This is for ll.l1 trips, inc l uding automobile trips, walking trips, etc. (Category I I!opulation by county is presented in Appendix C.) The 1990 TD trips used to calculate these mode splits include only those reported in the annual operating reports and do not account for those provided outside the coordinated sYStem. Including these trips would increase the mode split percentages. As shown in the table, those counties with a fixed route transit operator generally have lower paratransit mode-splits than those without fixed-route transit. (Brevard County's paratransit is comparative l y high because its Section 9 fixed-route service is provided by vans and the trips are counted as paratrans i t trips). This suggests that fixed-route transit is an important supplement for meeting the trip needs of some disabled, e l derly, and low-income persons. Data on fixed -route transit usage by Florida's disabled, elderly, and low-income persons are avai l ab l e from several on-board surveys conducted over the last several years by Florida's fixed-route systems and from Section 1 5 reports submitted to the Federal Transit Administration. The data suggest that, of the trips supplied by the state's fiXed-route transit operators, approximately 2.6 percent are made by disabled persons (i.e., perso n s usi n g special fares for the disab l ed), 165 percent are made by elderly persons, and 42.2 pe r ce n t are made by low-income persons. Based on the estimated 1990 total travel of the Category I population and on the estimated number of fixed route transit trips made by these persons in 1990, statewide fixed-route transit mode-splits for the Category I population were derived. These mode splits are 0.7 percent for disabled persons, 1.5 percent for elderly persons, and 5.5 percent for low-income persons. 'bPes of TD Transportation Service Demand TD transportation service is one o f several modes of transportation that transportation disadvantaged persons use to meet travel needs. Of those transportation disadvantaged persons that use TD transportation services, some use the service for the majority of their trip needs, whil e others use it l ess frequently. Some transportation disadvantaged persons do not u se the service at all. Of those persons who do not currently use the service, some would if they knew about it, if it were cheaper, or if other conditions (e g., convenience or comfort) change. Other persons who do not currently use the service *These flgum Include overlap among the groups; for wimple, some of the persons are also disabled and/or elderly. 21

PAGE 40

. would not consider changing modes even if conditions change (within a reasonable range) because they have alternative transportation arrangements that they consider better. Understanding the differences in the types of demand for, and consumers of, m transportation services is important because these differences cmi influence policy decisions and service planning. Many of these differences can be explained through a discussion of the economic the'oiy of supply and demand, as it relates to lD transportation services . like any good or service that has value, lD transportation service creates a "market" that brings buyers and sellers together to exchange that service (i.e., operators provide transportation for persons to places where they want to go, and these persons pay a price for the service, or have someone else pay). Price is an important market factor that regulates demand for these services. If a good or service were free, demand for such a good or service would be relatively high. In Florida, nearly ail lD trips are partiaily or fully subsidized, but demand for these services is not unlimited. The reason is that other market conditions, in addition to price, regulate demand for the service. These market conditions include the operating characteristics of these services, consumer income, consumer awareness of the service, availability and costs of other modes, eligibility requirements, and other factors. Demand is the amount consumers are willing to buy of a good or service at certain prices and market conditions. Prices and market conditions can change constantly, so demand for a good or service also can change constantly. The quantity demanded is usuaily measured for a specific moment in time (i.e., the price of the good or service and other market conditions are fixed, or held constant). Further, a basic law of demand is that demand is inversely related to price (i.e., as the price of a good increases, demand for that good wm decrease). Supply is similar in concept to demand in that the amount of a good or service supplied by se llers is also constantly changing, depending on its price and other market conditions. The types of market conditions other than price that affect supply include the cost of inputs (e.g., wages and materials), prices of related goods or services, technology, expectations of demand, and competition in the marketplace. The amount of a good or service supplied is also measured for a specific moment in time. Unlike demand, supply is directly related to price as the price of a good increases, sellers are willing to supply more). 22

PAGE 41

The basic principles of market supply and demand, as they relate to 'ID transportation services, can be shown graphically using supply and demand curves. These curves are a "snapshot" of the prevailing 'ID market, showing both the deman<;l for a specific type of 'ID transportation service and the supply of that type of service, at various prices. All other market co nditions (e.g., the cost of other modes, the cost of inputs, and consumer awareness) are fixed. Figure 5 shows hypothetical supply and demand curves (labeled "S0 and "00") for 'ID transportation services. The quantity of service supplied or demanded, in passenger trips, is measured on the horizontal axis, w hile the price of service is measured on the vertical axis. According to the basic law of demand demand increases as price decreases), the demand curve will slant downward to the right. Conversely, the supply curve slants upward to the right, indicating that operators will supply more service if the price increases. The curves intersect at what is known as the equilibrium point. This means that at price P0 consumers would purchase, and operators would supply, 00 trips. Price s, P, D, '--------'--------Quantity a, FIGURE S Market supply and demand. "7)'pe of selllice refen to specific selllice cluuacteri.ltics, such as days and houn of selllice, vthil:le and resuvation .. It con be argued that 1M supply auve may be vemcal (i.e., fixed at 11 given level of supply) because almost all of the service provided is subsidized. Wtthout additional subsidies, supply cannot increase.. The s/Qpe of tlJe supply curve, while an important usue in economil: theory, u not tlltlris point in describing the Vllrious types of demand for TD /lrlnSportotion selllices. 23

PAGE 42

Numerous terms have been used to refer to specific types of TO demand. 1\vo types that are frequently discussed and estimated "unmet" and '1atent" demand. While these terms are often used interchangeably to describe the additional, or unserved, demand for TO transportation services, they are not related. These terms refer to different aspects of demand and to different types of consumers. The differences in the meanings of unmet demand and latent demand are eastly explained using supply and demand curves. Unmet Demand. At any moment in time, under prevailing market conditions, there are persons in the market for TO transportation services. As shown In the previous figure, these persons would demand 00 trips at equilibrium price PoHowever, the majority of TO trips are subsidized, meaning that persons are not paying the full cost of the trip. The disparity betWeen the cost of a trip and the price paid by the passenger creates a situation where the passenger will generally demand more trips than suppliers (or the subsidizing are willing or able to proVide. Figure 6 shows that in the market for TO transportation services, subsidized price ? 1 is paid by transportation disadvantaged persons. At this subsidized price, 01 trips will be demanded. Since operators receive price P 0 (the amount consumers pay plus the amount of subsidy provided by fundirig organizations), only 00 trips will be supplied. Therefore, there is an unrnet demand for 01 minus 00 trips at price P1 P rice P, 1 ....... ....... ...... p D, 1--Quantity a, a FIGURE 6 Market for TD transportation services. Many are fylJJ!. sub.sid'IZtd. As can be inferred from 1M gNph, at a zero prict the dtnUmd for would be consideiVbly gr<41er than Q 24

PAGE 43

Unmet demand results from service levels that are not sufficient to meet the total demand for the present type of service at the present level of trip subsidization. The level of unmet demand will change as the price or the level of subsidization changes. In addition to price and the level of trip subsidy, other factors (e.g., the convenience and comfort of the service, program eligibility, and availability and cost of other modes) also affect demand and, consequently, unmet demand for TD transportation services. Latent Demand. Latent demand is the potential demand for 1D transportation services by persons who are not presently in the market for these services. If this latent demand becomes active (i.e., if additional persons enter the market), total demand for service will increase. The entry of new persons into the market is illustrated in Figure 7 as a shift in the demand curve to the right (shown by the shift to line "Dt"). An increase in total demand for 1D transportation services without a corresponding increase in supply will result in an increase in unmet dem;mil, for example, from Q1 to Q2 trips. Price s. P. P, f ....... ..... .,..r.. ........... ; ................ -......_ : D. D Quantity a. a, a, FIGURE 7. Increase In total market demand. There are several groups of persons that have latent demand for 1D transportation services. Those persons who are elig ible for subsidized 1D transportation services but are unaware of these services are one group not presently in the market. H these persons become aware of these services through additioual advertising and marketing, for example, they may choose to use them. 25

PAGE 44

Another group not presently in the 1D market is eligible persons who are aware of the services but are not users because they have better transportation alternatives. These alternatives are superior due to factors other than price (e.g., reservation requirements, convenience, or comfort). Some of these persons would consider using 1D transportation services if these factors changed. Persons who would consider using these services, but are not eligible for trip subsidies under existing guidelines, are a third group not p resen tly in the market for these services. The extent that their laten t demand becomes "active" depends on changes in eligibility guidelines. For example, income eligibility criteria for several programs funded by Medicaid were made less restrictive in 1991. Before the change in eligibility criteria, some of the persons affected by the change would have used 1D transportation service if they were eligible for trip subsidies. In this case, there was latent demand for service by these persons. As the criteria changed, and these persons entered the market for service, their demand was no l onger latent, it became active. Once in the market, if service is not available to meet the additional demand of these persons, there will be an increase in unmet demand. DeriVed Demand. Another economic concept that is relevant to the discussion of demand for 1D transportation services is derived demand. Demand for program trips (i.e., transportation to an agency program) results from (is derived from) participation in an agency program. Therefore, demand for transportation to an agency program, such as a sheltered workshop, is dependent upon the existence of that program. In other words, if there is no sheltered workshop, there can be no demand for sheltered workshop transportation. The total demand for these trips depends upon the enrollment capacity of these programs, while the extent to which demand is met depends upon the level of funding that these programs allocate to transportation. To summarize, there are different types of demand for, and consumers of, 1D transportation services. First, there are persons who are currently in the market for services at prevailing prices and market conditions. Because of trip subsidies, these persons likely will demand more trips than are supplied, resulting in unmet demand. There is also latent demand among persons who currently are not in the market for 1D transportation services. If certain conditions change and these persons enter the market, latent demand becomes active and total demand for service increases. Derived demand is an important economic concept that relates the demand for transportation to agency programs to the existence of those programs. 26

PAGE 45

The demand for 1D transportation services changes coustantly and is affected by many factors. The analysis of demand presented in this report assumes that overall current market conditions (e.g., fares, subsidies, levels of service, and service quality) will not change significantly during the 1 992 to 1996. time period. In this report, total demand for 1D transportation services is forecasted. The number of trips that will be supplied with forecasted operating funds, and levels of unmet demand are also estimated. Latent demand is not forecasted separately. However, demand that is currently latent is forecasted to the extent that it will become active demand due to changes in program funding. The following sections present forecasts of Category I and Category n populations, trip demand, the supply of trips, funds available to supply these trips, and unmet demand. TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED POPULATION FORECASTS The coordinated 1D system serves two population groups: (1) the 1D Category I population (i.e., those disabled, elderly, low-income persons, and ''high-risk" or "at-risk" children who are eligible to receive governmental or social service agency subsidies for program and general trips), and (2) the 1D Category n population (i.e., those persons who are transportation disadvantaged according to the eligibility guidelines in Chapter 427 and are eligible to receive 1D Trust Funds for general trips). The following sections present forecasts of these two populations. TD Cate&Qcy I Population Disabled POJ!ulation National percentages Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, 1990 (NHIS) were used to estimate the number of disabled persons in F1orida. The NHIS uses several degrees of limitation of activity to determine disability incidence rates by age, race, and sex. Two degrees of activity limitatio n were used in this report: "with limitation in major activity" and "with activity limitation". The first term, "with limitation in major activity", refers to persous who are limited in the kind or amount that they are able to perform of the major activity or activities associated with their age group (e.g., attending school, working, or independent living). The second term, "with activity *There are, of COIU:Ie, likely to be some changes in faatm that affea demand, both positively and negatiVely. FOT example, fares may increase over time to, at /eas4 offset inflation. These changes may cause slight tkcreases in the demand for service. Changes in eligibUity requirements may also occur. For example, the recent changes in Medicaid as p!tvious/y tDscussed, will increase fulure demand for service. 27

PAGE 46

limitation", covers a broader range of activities. I t refers to persons who are limited in their major activity QI in other activities (e.g, social or recreational activities). The NHIS definition of 'major activity" varies with age. For persons age 18 to 69, the major activity is defined as working or keeping house, while for persons age 70 and over, the major activity is defined as the capacity for indep endent living (e.g the ability to bathe, shop, dress, and eat withou t assistance). The percentage of persons age 65 to 69 "with limitation in major activity" (i.e., working or keepiqg house) is than the percentage of persons age 70 and over "with limitation in major activity" independent living) because many persons who are no longer able to work or keep house are still capable of independent living. Since the incidence of disability actually increases with age, using the incidence rates for elderly persons "with limitation in major activity" was not considered appropriate because it would r esult in a lower frequency of disabled persons among the more-advanced elderly than the less-advanced elderly. Therefore, for persons 65 and over, the percent of persons "with activity limitation" was used to estimate the number of disabled elderly. For persons l ess than 65 years of age, the percent of persons "with limitation in major activity" was used to estimate the number of disabled persons. Use of the NHIS data to estimate disabled persons in Florida requires some . adjustment of the data to match the age used to define elderly persons in Florida. The age breakdown provided in the NHIS lacks a break between persons who are less than 60 years of age and persons who are 60 years of age or over (the age used to define elderly in this report). Therefore, the Florida population age 45 to 64 was split into two groups: age 45 to 59, and age 60 to 64. The NHIS national percentage of persons age 45 to 64 with a limitation in a major activity was applied to both of these age groups. Using the disability rates corresponding to the two definitions of limita tion of activity by age group, the Florida disabled population by age group was estimated from 1992 through 1996 and is shown in Table 4. The total number of disabled persons is forecasted to increase from 1 8 million in 1992 to 2.0 million in 1996. Elderly Po p u l atio n. Table 5 shows Florida's elderly (60 and over) population from 1992 through 1996. The elderly population is forecasted to increase from 3.2 million in 1992 to 3.5 million in 1996 The greatest change in the elderly age group is among the advanced The NHIS age breaktk>wn is "under "18 to .u; "45 to 64"; "65 to and '70 and ovu". 28

PAGE 47

TABLE 4. Florida Disabled Population. elderly (i.e., age 75 and over). In 1992, persons age 75 and over accounted for 34 percent of the elderly population. By 1996, this group will account for nearly 37 percent of the total elderly population. TABLE 5. Florida Elderly Population. E01064 6S., 74 7511>84 85 and over 1,418,388 848,728 23S,384 619,839 1 ,443,403 878,785 680,106 1,468.8S9 907,909 680,372 693,152 1,494,783 1 495,271 940.138 9eS,939 278,048 Low-Income Population Income data fro m the 1980 Census was applied to the 1 990 Census population data to estimate the number of Florida persons in families with incomes below the federal poverty level (income data was not yet available from the 1990 Census). The percent of persons in families below the federal poverty level in each Florida county was applied to population forecasts for each county to arrive at estimates of total low income persons by cou nty. Low-income persons were allocated to elderly and non-elderly age groups based on the distribution of the low income population between elderly and non elderly as reported in the 1980 Census. Low-income population estimates for 1992 through 1996 are shown in Table 6. The number of low-income persons in the state is forecasted to increase from 1.8 million in 1992 to 2.0 million in 1996. 'Blah-Risk" or 'At-Risk' Children. The Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services estimates that approximately 28 percent of Florida's children under the age of 5 are "high-risk" or "at-risk". BEBR forecasts based on the 1990 Census indicate 29

PAGE 48

that there are approximately 903,000 children under the age of 5 in the state in 1 992; 28 percent of these children is 253,000. Most of these children are disabled and/or are members of low-income families, and, therefore, are inc luded in the population forecasts of Florida's disabled and low-inco me persons. Allocation of TD Cateeon I P011ulation to Market Se11Qumts. To avoid double and triple counting of disabled, elderly, and low-income persons, a methodology was developed to allocate each of these persons to only one of seven 1D market segments. The methodology used to segment the population into these groups is described in Appendix B. The seven 1D market segments are: Disabled, Non-Elderly, Low Income Disabled, Non-Elderly Non-Low Income. Disabled, Elderly, Low Income. Disabled, Elderly, Non-Low Income. Non-Disabled, Elderly, Low Income. Non-Disabled, Elderly, Non-Low Income Non-Disabled, Non-Elderly, Low Income. These seven 1D market segments for 1992 are depicted graphically in Figure 8. The total number of persons who are classified as disabled, elderly, or low income is forecasted to be 5.3 million. Of these persons, 1.8 million will be disabled. Of the disabled persons, 1.0 million will be elderly, 0.2 million will be low-income, and 0.1 million will be both elderly and low income. Forecasts ofTD Cateeon I Populatiop.1992-1996. Population forecasts of the seven 1D market segments for the period 1992 to 1996 are presented in Table 7. The total Category I population is forecasted to increase from 5.3 million persons in 1992 to 5.7 30

PAGE 49

Disabled 1.8 Millon a.-lnCIOfl18 1 .8 MlUlon Elderly 3.2 Million [Total = 5.3 MIIUan i FIGURE 8. Florida TD Categoey I population, 1992. TABLE 7 Forecasts of Florida's TD cat egory I Population, Im-1996. Oisabled, Non-Elderly, 104,068 106,3 1 6 108,6H 110,988 Low Income Oisabled Non-Sderty, 650,675 665,463 15S0, 642 696,211 Non-Low Income Oisabled, E ldOfly, 122,724 125,376 128.092 130,877 Low lncomt Disabled Bderly, 920,014 940,018 960,600 981 ,778 Non-.low Income Non-llbal>led, Sderly, 251,662 ,101 268,3S6 low Income Sderty, 1,886,825 1 927,634 1,.969,837 2,013,270 NonLow fnoome Non-Oiublod, NonEklotly. 1,321,493 1,3$0,037 1 379,313 1,409,324 Low fnoomt 1 12,8 10 701',968 999,061 272 801 2,048,719 1 ,432,488 million in 1996. (Individual county totals for the period 1989 to 2001 are provided in Appendix C. The 2001 populations were obtained b y extrapolating the 1995 to 2000 annualized growth rate in each 1D market segment.) I f the number of "hig h-risk" o r "at31

PAGE 50

risk" children increases at the same rate as the projected growth in the state's population of preschool children, the number of these children will increase from 253,000 in 1992 to 281,000 in 1996. TD Catuoa n POJ!ulatlon The Categ01y IT population is composed of persons who, because of disability or income status are unable to transport themselves. These persons include "transportation handicapped" persons and lo w-income transportation disadvantaged persons. "TransPOrtation Hand!caaaed" PQgglat!on. The number of persons with disabilities that prevent them from transporting themselves was estimated using data from the National Survey of Transportation Handicapped People (NSTIIP), which suggests that 2.7 percent of persons aged 0 to 59 are transportation handicapped and that 19.0 percent of persons aged 60 and over are transportation handicapped. As shown in Table 8, based on the NSTiiP data Florida's population of "transportation handicapped" persons is forecasted to increase from 0.9 million in 1992 to 1.0 million in 1996. Low-Income Transportation D!sadvanta&ed Po11ulation. The number of persons who, because of income status, are unable to transport themselves, was estimated in several steps. First, the state total l ow -income population was estimated by applying income data from the 1980 Census to the 1990 Census population data. Many lqw-income persons, however, are able to transport themselves because they own automobiles and can afford to use them or they have access to and can 'afford to use fiXed-route transit services. Therefore, t he low income transportation disadvantaged population was estimated for this report by identifying the number of low-income persons who (1) do no t have an automobile available in the household, and (2) lack access to public transit. The process followed to estimate this population is shown in Figure 9. 32

PAGE 51

' Exclude Yea 11.o47,2s1 1 Exclude Yea 1 478,oa91 Lowlnoome Population Total Low Income Other L.l. 11,690,890 1 No No Transportation Handicapped L.l. l1o9,os1 1 Tranapor tall on Disadvantaged FIGURE 9. Process to calcolate the number of low-income persons who are transportation disadvantaged. As shown in the figure, ihe forecast of ihe 1992 low-income population is 1,799,947 persons. Of these persons, 109,057 are also "transportation handicapped" and, ihus, are already incl uded in ihe Category n population. The remaining 1,690,890 are oiher low income persons who are not transportation handi capped. The number of these other lowincome persons" who do not have an automobile available was estimated by making 33

PAGE 52

inferences from national statistics. These data suggest that approximately 40 percent of low income households do not mm an automobile. Using the assumption that household size is constant across income levels, 40 percent of low-income persons do not have an automobile available in the household. Using these assumptions, it was estimated that of the "other low-income persons", 1,047,251 have an automobile available and, therefore, they are not included in the Category II population. Of the 643,639 other low-income persons who do not have an automobile available, 478,039 live in a county with a Section 9 fixed-route transit operator. It is assumed that these 478,039 persons all live within the service area of the fixed-route transit operator and, thus, have access to the service. Therefore, all "other low-income persons" living in counties with public transit operators are not included in the Category II population. The remaining persons are other low-income persons who do not have an automobile available and who lack access to public transit because they do not live in a county with a public transit operator. The total number of these persons is estimated to be 165,600 in 1992 and is forecasted to increase to 182,549 in 1996. These other low-income persons, as well as those low-income persons who are transportation handicapped, are included in the Category II population. Thus, the total number of low-income persons who are included in the Category II population is estimated to be 274,657 in 1992 and is forecasted to increase to 300,770 in . 1 996 "Hieh-Risk' or At-Risk' Children. For the purpose of estimating demand for general trips (i.e., trips that are not program related), the ''high-risk" or "at-risk" children that are included are those in the groups estimated above (i.e., those children who are transportation handicapped and/ or are from antilles that are transportation disadvantaged because of income status). The children who are not included (those "high-risk" or "at -risk" children who are not transportation handicapped and not from families that are transportation disadvantaged because of income status) are not included because they generally do not An additional assumption is that/ow-income persons who are also lrtliiSpMation handicapped are less likely to hove an automobile available than other low-lncome persons. 1herej'ore, the percent of low-income persons who are trtliiSpMation handicapped that db not have an automobile available is at least 4fJ pe1te11t (the same percent as fw ail/ow-income pef3QnS) and could be theOfttical/y as high as 100 pm;ent. A percentage midway between the minimum and maximum was choserL Thus, it was assumed lhaJ 70 pe1te11t Q/ low-income persons who are also transportlllion handicapped db no( have an automobile available in the household. There are estimoted to be 1,799, W low-iMOme persons in 1992. Of these persons, 4fJ pm;ent (719,'779 persons) db not have an automobile available. 1Mre are 109,057 /ow-income persons who are transpo1fation handicapped. Among these persons, 70 percent (76,340 penons) are assumed not to have an automobile available. Thus, among the low-income persons wito are not transp(Ntdlion handicapped persons, 643,639 persons (719,979 minus 76,340) do not have an auu:nnobfle available and 1,047,251 db have an automobile availablt 34

PAGE 53

m ake u se of 1D transportati o n for gener al trips Their demand for general trips would typically be served b y an adul t in an automob ile Fo recasts o r TD Cateaoa II Population 192 2: 1996 T a ble 9 sho ws forecasts of the Category U popula tion fo r 1992 through 1996. Figure 10 compares t otal Flo rida pop ulation to Category I and Catego ry U popul ations for the period 1992 to 199 6 The Florida total popul a tion i s forecaste d to increase from 13.5 millio n in 1992 to 14 7 nullio n in 1996. The Categ o ry I p o pulation is forecaste d to grow from 5.3 million t o 5.7 millio n, which is approximat ely 39 percent of the state s total populati o n. The Cat egory n pop ulati o n is forecaste d to gro w fr o m 1.0 million in 1992 t o 1 .1 milli o n in 1996 w hi ch is approximatel y 7 4 perc e n t o f the s t ate's total popul a tion. T ABLE 9 Forecasts of Florida's TD Category II Popul a ti on, 199Z-1996. Transport4!1on Handicapped, 37,717 38,694 39.<430 40,290 40.954 Low lnoomo Tran$i)Onallon Handicapped Non-Elderly, 238 207 241.572 247,019 252,733 2157,001 Non-Low Income Transponation Handicapped, Elde
PAGE 54

20 Mlllons 18 _J l .. ---..... 1 ... _,_, _ ___ __ ..... .................. I I i 16 14 12 10 8 6 ----r------------r--------'fotarrojiiiiliiiOn -------... ---"f'"'"'"'' -----. .......... .. .1 ............ ....................... ---------J ..... ___ .. .......... .... I I I ---v ------r------------+----------------+---. ..... 4 2 i i t--------------0 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 FIGURE 10. Flodda Populations, 1992 to 1996. 40 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 FIGURE 11. Total demand for trips. Total demand for general trips was forecasted by applying rates of 1.0 or 1.2 trips per month to the estimated Category II population. The rate of 1.0 trips per month was used in counties with a Section 9 transit operator, and .1.2 trips per month was used in all other counties. The demand for general trips is forecasted to l>e 13.5 million trips in 1992 and to increase to 14.7 million trips in 1996. 36

PAGE 55

The demand for trips is dependent upon the existence of the program to which transportation disadvantaged persons are transported If there is no program, . program-related transportation is not demanded. Assuming that agency p rograms incr ease at the same growth rate as Category I population, program trip demand is fore casted to be 13.1 million trips In 1992 and to Increase to 142 million trips In 1996. Suu!y or Trips The supply of 'ID transportation services is the amount that subsidizing agencies can fund at prevailing trip costs. The total supply of 'ID trips is forecasted to be 15.9 million trips in 1992 and to increase to 17.0 million trips In 1996, as shown in Figure 12. As suggested in the previous section, the demand for program trips is assumed to be equal to the supply of program trips. This assumes that program planners should--and will--budget adequately for all program expenses. That is, that they will not increase the scope of a program without increasing the capacity of the program to transport the additional clients. Therefore, both the demand for and the supply of program trips are forecasted to be 13.1 million in 1992 and to increase to 142 million in 1996. The supply of general trips is forecasted to be 28 million in both 1992 and 1996. 40 35 30 IJllll GellefGI Trips flliil Program Trips ........ .......................................... I 15 10 5 0 1992 1993 1994 FIGUBB 12. Total supply of trips. 37 1995 1996

PAGE 56

Program uips and general trips will be supplied by operators within the coordinated system and by operators not currently within tbe coordinated system. Trips supplied within the coordinated system are forecasted to grow from 8.6 million trips in 1992 to 9.1 million trips in 199.6. Trips supplied outside the coordinated system are forecasted to grow from 7.3 million trips to 7.9 million trips during the period. (To the extent that the non coordinated trips become part of the coordinated system, the supply of non-coordinated trips will decrease and there will be a corresponding increase in the supply of coordinated trips.) Within the coordinated system, general trips subsidized with governmental or social service agency funds are assumed to increase at the same rate as the growth in the Category I population. Trips subsidized with the 1D Trust Fund were forecasted based on projections of the fund's revenue sources. As shown in Figure 13, the number of general trips supplied, which includes general trips subsidized with the 1D Trust Fund and general trips subsidized with governmental and soci!!l service agency funds, is forecasted to decrease from 2.1 million trips in 1992 to 1.8 million trips in 1993 (due to an expected decline in trip funds available from the 1D T rust Fund) and then to increase to 2.0 million trips in 1996. 12 JoJt----............... ...................................................................... -------------..... 8 6 4 2 0 1992 D General Trips (TD Tn1st Fund) llllllllll General Trips (Agoncy Funds) IIJ Program Trips (Agency Funds) 1993 1994 1995 1996 FIGURE 1). Trips supplied through the coordinated system. A klephone SU1V<)I of ten CTCs (fiw: u>ban and five """I) reVealed th4t from S to 10 percent of trips supplied were genua/ trips. Only one of the ten CTCs Tt!ported a of genetrJI trips outside of this range (23 percent of trips supplied we"' general trips). For this report, a stizlewide aw:trJge percentllge of 90 uercent fli'08"'nn trips and 10 RezreJII general trips is used in the fom:ost of trips supplied. 38

PAGE 57

The supply of trips within the coordinated system is assumed to increase at the same rate of growth as the Category I population. This implies that social service programs will grow to meet new demand and that budgets for new or expanded programs will include sufficient funds to cover necessary transportation costs. The result would be 6.6 million program trips supplied in 1992 and 7.1 milllon program trips supplied in 1996. A significant number of trips will also be supplied outside the coordinated system. In fiscal year 1991-92, the commission estimates that total statewide funding for TO transportation will be approximately $122.3 million. Of the $122.3 million, $66.3 million is expected to pass through the coordinated system and the remaining $56.0 miUion is expected to be provided to operators who are not within the coordinated system. It is difficult to estimate the number of trips that will be supplied outside the coordinated TD system because the commission does not currently receive detailed data on these trips. Without detailed cost data it is uncertain whether the average cost of a trip supplied outside the coordinated system is more or less than the average cost of a trip supplied by the coordinated system. (The number of trips supplied is estimated by dividing trip funds by the average cost per trip.) Most of the trips outSide the coordinated system are Medicaid-related. Some of these trips, such as emergency medical trips and long-distance medical transport, are significantly more expensive than those provided in the coordinated system. On the other hand, many trips that receive a direct mileage reimbursement (e.g., $0.20 per mile) may cost less than the average trip of the coordinated system. Assuming that the average cost of these trips is equivalent to those of the coordinated system, and that the funds used to purchase trips outside the coordinated system also increase at the same rate of growth as the Category I population, tbe TD funds that would be expected to flow outside tbe coordinated system could supply 7.3 million trips in 1992 and 7.9 million trips in 1996, as shown in Figure 14. Assuming that the trips supplied outside the coordinated system are in the same proportion of general trips and program trips as those supplied by operators in the coordinated system, 6.6 million program trips and 731,000 general trips will be supplied in 1992, and 7.1 million program trips and 793,000 general trips will be supplied in 1996. It should be stressed, however, that the average cost per trip outside the coo rdina ted system is not likely to be the same as the cost within the coordinated system and may vary significantly. Therefore, the estimate of trips supplied outside the coordinated system should 39

PAGE 58

12 10 llllllllll General Trips 1!11 Program Trips 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 FIGURE 14. Trips supplled outside the coordinated system. be viewed with caution. The commission expects to receive additional data from state agencies on these trips in the future, which should allow for a more accurate trip estimate. The implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act is also expected to affect the supply of trips. The act requires that an fixed-route public transit systems be fully accesSible to disabled persons and that complementary paratransit service be provided by the fixed -route transit systems for disabled persons who are unable to use a fully-accessible fixed route system. Based on population forecasts developed in this report, 1.4 million disab led persons will live in Florida counties with ftxed-route transit service in 1992. Of these persons, 667,000 are estimated to be ''transportation handicapped" based on survey data from the National Survey of Transportation Handicapped People. Many of these transportation handicapped persons will be eligible to use the complementary paratransit services provided by the fixed-route operators for some of their trips. The high l evel of para transit service required under the Americans with Disabilities Ac t will affect 1D transportation services in Florida and e l sewhere. Although it is uncertain how services will be affected, it is likely that there will be some shifting of trips from the coordinated system to the new ADA services by those eligible for these services It is also like l y that these new services will increase the overall supply of transportation services for 1D persons, which will reduce the level of urunet demand for 1D 40

PAGE 59

transportation. It is also possible that at the local lev el there will be some diversion of funds from the current coordinated services to the ADA paratransit services. The potential outcome, in this case, could be an overall decrease in the quality and levels of service available to existing users of 1D transportation services. 011eratinc Fundlnc To supply the number of forecasted trips in the coordinated 1D system, funding from the various sources, as shown in Figure 15, is forecasted to increase from $64.5 million to $81.2 million during this five-year period. Approximately 90 percent of these funds woul d be provided by governmental and social service agencies, while the remainder would be 1D Trust Fund monies. The number of trips that these funds will purchase is based on 1990 average trip costs by county, adjusted to reflect cost growth due to inflation. Trips costs are inflated because the sources of funding are not inflation -sensitive they do not automatically change with overall price-level changes). $100 fl!!!!!!.!'---------,-------., lllllllilll TD T rustFund Agency Funds $80 $60 $40 $20 $0 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 FIGURE lS. Operating funds availahle through the coordinated system. These forecasts do not include funds presently used to provide 1D transportation services outside of the coordinated system. Total statewid e funds for 1D transportation, including those passing through the coordinated system and those expended outside the coordinated system, are expected to increase from $122.3 million in 1992 to $152.9 million in 1996 if total funding matches the growth in the Category I population. If at some point 41

PAGE 60

the funds spent outside the coordinated system begin to pass through the coordinated 1D system, the trip and funding data reported by the local coordinators in the annual operating reports will be more representative of the total 'ID transportation services being provided i n the state The trust fund forecasts p r ovided by the commission are shown in Table 10. The amount of funds available in 1992 is larger than in the following years for several reasons. First, the funds available from vehicle registration fees in 1992 includes fees collected during an 18-month period; second, estimates of handicapped parking permit funds after 1992 were reduced*; and, third, local match for trip/equipment funds is expected to decrease from 25 percent in 1992 to ten percent in the following years and local match for planning funds is expected to decrease from 25 percent in 1992 to zero in the following years. TABLE 10. Fom:asts of TD Trust Fund Monies, 1992-1996. TO Trut Fund Sources and Una Vehicle Registration Fee Public Tranti1 Bklck Gtarrt Handicapped Patklng Pormit Svb1o1al L.ocal Match TOIIII Administration Planning (Cash) $5,3:25.494 $4,110...000 $700,000 $10,135,494 $2,934,994 $13,069,888 $1,332,313 st,n4,747 $8,717,474 S1, 24S,3S4 $4,620,000 $5,210.253 $10.000 $9,840,2:53 $743,680 $10,583,933 $1,816,075 $1,331,0E0 $7,436,798 $0 $4,SI!O,OOO $5,900,253 $ 10,000 $10.790,253 $839,657 $11,629,910 $1,902,279 $1,331,0EO $9,396,571 $0 $5,000,000 $6,620,253 $10,000 $11,630,253 $9.23,808 $12,554,o&1 $1, 964,920 $1,331,060 $9,238,081 $0 $5, 110,000 $7,070,253 $10,000 $12,190,253 $978,178 $13,1158,431 $2.055,690 $1,331,0E0 $9,781 781 $0 $13,059,888 $10,583,933 $11,829,9 1 0 $12,s54,081 $13,1158,431 The forecasts of trips purchased with 'ID Trust Fund monies are based on several assumptions. First, it i s assumed that the cost of trips purchased with 'ID Trust Fund *The commusion's 1991 forecast of funds availubk from handicapped parldngpetmils In 1992 was much h iJIIter than the funds that tu;tua//y were colkcted from tlrlll SOIIJ'U. Because the ccmmission had contracted with local coordinillm.s to provide this higher amount, the comm;.sion used funds from the l nttrtst earned on the TD TtUst Fund account to meet tht obligation. 42

PAGE 61

monies will be the same as the cost per trip of other trips purchased within the coordinated system. Secon d, it i s assumed that all of the cash portion of trip/equipment funds will be used to purchase trips. Third, for 1992 it is assumed that one-half of the 25 percent local match for trip/equipment funds will be cash and that the other half will be in -kind services, as allowed in Rule 4 1 -2 of the Florida Administrative Code. (Only the cash portion of this local match was inc luded in the computation of trips purchased with TD Trust Fund monies.) For the following years, all of the ten percent local match for trip/equipment funds will be cash. Under these assumptions, trust fund monies available for the purchase of trips are expected to decrease from $8.7 million in 1992 to $7.4 million in 1993, and then . to increase to $9.8 million in 1996. Unmet Demand There is a significant gap between forecasted trip demand and the forecasted supply of trips This unmet demand for 1D transportation services is forecasted to total 10.6 million trips in 1992 and 11.8 million trips in 1996 The tota l supplY of trips and the unmet demand for trips (which together represe n t total demand for trips) are shown in Figu r e 16. 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 FIGURE 16. Uumet demand or trips. Surveys on the trip purposes of transportation disadvantaged persons in other U.S. paratransit systems indicate t hat approximately 35 percent of the trips taken are medical trips, 20 percent are work or educational trips, 10 percent are shopping trips, and 35 percent are social, recreational, and other trips. There is no reason to suspect that in Florida the 43

PAGE 62

distribution of demand by these trip purposes would be any different These percentages apply to general trips rather than program trips. If the general trips forecasted to be supplied serve these purposes in approximately the same proportion, then the unmet demand by trip purpose will also be in these same proportions. This suggests that the unmet demand for medical trips would be on the order of 3.7 milli
PAGE 63

Forecasting the number and cost of these vehicles is challenging given that 1D transportation services are provided by a wide variety of vehicles including automobiles, vans, mini-buses, transit buses, and school buses. Each type ofvehicle has unique operating characteristics, maintenance schedules, replacement cycles, and costs. The estimates that follow are based on the assumptions that current average trip lengths and average service efficiency will remain constant through the period and that there currently is little or no excess vehicle capacity in the system. The number of replacement vehicles was forecasted based on the additional assumption that vehicles have an average replacement cycle of 150,000 vehicle miles. According to several operators, this replacement cycle is representative of 12-to 24-passenger vans (a typical vehicle use!\ to provide 1D transportation services), and is relatively close to that of other frequently used vehicles, assuming routine and major maintenance schedules are followed. An average price per vehicle of $28,000 (in 1991 dollars), based on information provided by these operators, was used to forecast total capital funding needs for vehicle purchases. (The average cost per vehicle was inflated for the five-year period to reflect inflationary price increases.) The number of vehicles required for service expansion was estimated based on the incremental increase in vehicle miles operated due to additional trips supplied during the period. The number and cost of additional vehicles required during the five-year period to handle bOth the expected supply of trips and the remaining unmet demand for trips are shown in Table 11. To provide the forecasted supply of trips, 324 additional vehicles will be required each year as replacements and for service expansion at a cost of $10.0 million. To meet all of the demand for service the expected supply plus the remaining unmet demand), a total of 830 additional vehicles would be required each year at an annual cost of $25.7 million. These forecasts do not include additional vehicles that may be added by 1D operators to provide ADA co mplem entary paratransit services on behalf of fixed-route transit operators. SUMMARY The purpose of this report was to present forecasts for the five-year period from 1992 through 1996. These forecasts and other report findings are summarized below: Transportation disadvantaged persons use many different modes of travel to meet their trip-making needs. 45

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TABLE 11. Forecasts of Vehicle Needs, 1992-1996. Number of Vehldes Cost of Vehicles 4,151 $128,681,000 830 $2$,736,200 These modes include private automobiles, taxicabs, public transit, and specialized 1D transportation services. Specialized transportation services are often to referred to as paratransit services. These services are provided by niany types of vehicles, including automobiles, vans, and small buses. An imponant type of 1D transponation service in Florida is demand responsive service, w hich provides origiil.-to-destination service on demand. Another type is subscription service, which is a regular, prearranged service tbat patrons sign up for in advance. The Americans with Disabilities Act will significantly aft'ect mobility options for many of the transportation disadvantaged. Two imponant aspects of tbe act are requirements for full accessibility of fixed-route public transit systems and for the provision of comp l ementary paratransit service by those systems Implementation of tbe act is likely to result in some shifting of trips from the coordinated system to the new ADA services by tbose eligible for these new services. Florida's coordinated TD system serves two population groups. The first group, tbe 1D Category I population, is composed of persons who are eligible to receive governmental or social service agency subsidies for program and general trips. This group is composed of disabled, elderly, and low-income persons. 46

PAGE 65

The second group, the ID Category n population, is composed persons who are eligible to receive ID Trust Fund monies for general trips according to \he eligibility guidelines contained in Chapter 427. The Category ll population is a subset of the Category I population. To be considered transportation disadvantaged under Chapter 427, disabled, elderly, and low-income persons must be : .. unable to transpol1 themselves or to purchase transportation. ... Florida's I population is forecasted to Increase from 5.3 million persons In 1992 to 5.7 million persons In 1996. 1.8 million persons are estimated to be disabled in 1992. 3.2 million persons are estimated to be elderly in 1992. 1.8 million persons are estimated to be l ow-income in 1992. The number of "high-risk" or at-risk" children is estimated by HRS to be 253,000 in 1992. Most of these children are included in the population forecasts of disabled and low-income persons. Florida's Cai!!IWIJ' II population Is forecasted to increase from 1.0 million persons in 1992 to 1.1 million In 1996. The Category n population was estimated by identifying those persons who are "transportation handicapped" and those low-income persons who do not have an automobile available in the household and who l ack access to pub lic transit. Transportation disadvantaged persons typically make fewer trips than the general public. A major reason for the l ower trip rate among these groups is that a lower percentage of transportation disadvantaged persons are employed. Thus, work trip needs are reduced. Nearly all of the trips in the coordinated TD system are subsidized in whole or in part. In 1989, 98 percent of the system's operating funds was provided by sources other than farebox. Total demand for TD trips is forecasted to be 26.6 million trips in 1992 and to increase to 28.9 million trips in 1996. Demand for general trips accounts for s lightly more than half of the total demand: 13.5 million trips in 1992 and 14.7 million trips in 1996. 47

PAGE 66

Demand for program trips is forecasted to be 13.1 million trips in 1992 and to increase to 14.2 million trips in 1996. The demand for these trips is dependent upon the existence of the programs to which transportation disadvantaged persons are transported. Total supply of TD trips is forecasted to be 15.9 million trips in 199Z and to increase to 17.0 million trips in 1996. Trips will be supplied by operators in the coordinated system and by operators outside the coordinated system. Total funds spent staleWide on TD transportation, which Include funds that now through the coordinated sYStem and funds outside the coordinated system, are forecasted to reach $122.3 million in 199Z and $15Z.6 miiUon in 1996. The cost of supplying trips in the coordinated system Is forecasted to be $66.3 million in 1992 and to increase to $81.6 million in 1996 Unmel demand for TD transportation services Is quite large. Unmet demand is forecasted to be 10.6 million trips in 1992 and to increase to 11.8 milli o n trips in 1996. The additional cost of meeting the wunet demand is forecasted to total $94.3 million per year. The next technical memorandum addresses a variety of issues raised by the above forecasts. It discusses, in particular, m eans of reducing the wunet demand through the use of both supply-side and demand-side policies. 48

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APPENDIX A. Directory of Funding Soin'Ces. The directory of funding sources describes the various agencies and programs that provide funds for transportation disadvantaged services in the state. The directory lists the program name for each funding source, the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance or Florida Statute reference number for the program, information concerning eligibility guidelines for the program, and allowable uses of the program funds. 49

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::s TABLE A. Directory ol Funding Sources. Community Otrllelopment Block GUIIlion and urban c:ournios wid\ at 1oast 200.()001n populolion .,. ollgjble to apply lor funda to uallt lowend rnodere .. -lnoomt ptrsons. u.s. Dop-1 of Lobor Job Tnolnln9 Patlnotshlp ADI (JTPA). 17. 2!50 Stilt. agencltl that Mrve eoonomicatly disadvantaged eduttt and youth and othtt noftoot)OOI lndMduals facing serious barrlera to emplOyment who are In spte lal need of training to obtain productive employment (Goyamol"'& Offlc. and alloeates thiN funds to ollglblo ogonciloln the ) U.S. o.o-or Tron__. Uban Mass Transpoitdon c.p;tol inlpranllOd -Ia Grants, -18). 20-509 Copilal-stanoe l'lograrn lor Elderly and Hardcapped Potoont (8delly and Handkloppod, Soction 20.6 1 3 State and 10011 gov.tnmtnt agtndes, nonprofit organiutfon' Indian trlbel, net operttora of public transportation sei'VicoM In rutl nd 11"1'1111 u1ban II'Ht, The general public and ptlva.tt and public prcwldtrl of publlo tlllnsportation in nonll'baniztd was may btn6fft from the fundt. nonprofit thid provlclt transpottalio n stMots lor oldony and handicapped .,.,....., and public bodies 11\at -.linolotl>oooooMoos. Suppo
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VI ..... TABlE A. (continued). TtMiit PW.'ling and AtsNR:h Prog,.., (No CFOA refer""'" numborlo available. lbls is a new pJogrun ...... d by ISTEA.) ;l n JGailf ,.,, .,... . If..,., ond locol po.C>Io bocftH and priYalo nc>r>plc -.ponation. Thianow -111111-111 flo .,.-.....,..,.,._ ... ..-. lolm Socdono 8 -ch. 8 Planning, 10 Manogoclal Tl1folfng, 11(a) Ao...,.h, 18(11) I'IJtal Tra nsit No;....,. Progtom, ond 20 ltlmon Roaourcos Progrom. U.S. Department of V Nrana Affalta Automobile and Equipme nt for Coflaln Oloablod Veterans and Me.,.,_t$ of the Armed Forcoa 64.100 AohaiH!iUdlon"" Oiaolllod 64. 116 --! -iMg VA. 64. 122 V eteran whh honoratMe a lfVioe and aeMCHelated per$0n l on duty I Ptcwld11 uslatanoe toward purdla&f of 110 automobl6t ot olhtr t\wl n g Mrvloe-conntoe.d disability. oonveyanoe with necessaty adaptlve qulpmen t -anooiWoQ--roqWM ljlOdolzod ,___ -.. ond 10-ptOIIIdoto """' -coot ......... boob, ..... auppl1ot.--r,.,_...so. 11 prcWied 10 _,ng .. w11on d...,.llty 10qultot opociollad banSj)OIIation -Pfogram ( F odorol) Fosler Graoctparent Progfam. 72. 001 Atllfecl Senior Volunaeer Progrn. 72.002 Stttt and toce1 goyemmtnt agencies and ptlvate nonproftt cwgonlzaUona may a p ply lor funds for Footer Grondparonla, who mutt bt lowlnoome plfSOn s 60 years of age or ovet State and toollgovemment egenolet and prrvatt nonpcofit oogonltatlono may apply tor funds for Flolirod So'*" Vol-, who mus1: bt f'riNd pettOn$ eo .)'\till ol1!98 or (N8( who wrve tflelr 1hrough ---Provld .. ptrt-timo .--oppcrw nllllo for .....,..mo ptriOM aged GO and cw.f' Gt8ntt Ulld tor foiMr Grandporom 011ponds, 1nWpcl
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Senior Compenlon Program. 72.008 Slate and local government agencies and private nonJ)fOfit cwoanl2ations may apply fOf funds for Senior Companions, who must M klw-lnoome persons 60 yurt of .age or over. u.s. Dtpartmont of-Rehabilitation Stf\lici$-Basic Suppon (Vocational Rehabilitation SeNicea Program). 84.126 Centef'S tor Independent Uving. 84.132 Comprehenlive Sel'\lices for lndependOfltlMng (Comp
PAGE 71

Admlnlslrallon fOt' Children. YOtlth and Families-f-Ield Start. 93.600 Adminiatfation on Oevefopmental Cisabilitleo-Basic Support end M.-Grants. 93.630 Special Programs lot the AgingTitle IU, Part 8-Gtanta for SupportiYe Services and Senior Centers 9a633 Social Services Block Giant. 93.667 Admini-for Chlldten, YoUlh and Families-Child Abusa ond Nogloct State Gtarrta. 93.669 lndeporldent Uvlng. 93.674 Mtdloal-ce (Medicaid; Tille XIX). 93.na ltderdy-lxed Indian ttlbes and pllvai<> nonproffl agencies. The program Is primarily tor chidren 3 )'Nil of a.ge up to ttle age when the child enters the &chool system. At least 90 pei'Clt of the pel'10n.s enrolled In a progtam must come from famil* whose inoome Is at or below the poverty guidelines ot AFOC. The Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services Is designated to adm!nlsler thJs program. The program b for persons five yeatS of ao Of with MVtfl, chronic dewlopmental disabilities ref.ltcting a lifelong need fDf &ervioes. T he Oepa.rtment of Eldef AffaJrs is deaig_nated to administer this program. The program ts for persons age 60 and over. The Oepanment of Health and Rehabiitative Services Is the designated a.gency In the state to adminiater this program. Eactl $late .. tht MMcu that '#rill be prolfkted and the individualS ttl&t Will be ellglb'-to receive services. The Department of Heellh and RohabiiWMI Servl-Is the deslgnmd agOflcy In the 8lalo 1o admlnilllr !lilt program. Al>utad and neglected d'lltdren and the!r families. Stale gowmments Ctlildren to whom fo$Mir care mainttnance payments are made or have been made and who haw of 16. (See Aorida De-nt of Heallh and Rollobilitalivo Servlcoo.) Comprohomlvo heallh, eclucollonol, nuttitlonal, social and Oilier M!VIoes, Including tfanSpOitatfon MIVIces.. Basic support fundt may be used for acfmlnlllrative costs, tor capital costa:, to refOcuS IXi&ting MNicts, end 10 betllf mut tht needs of petSOnt wilh Mvelopmemat dilabilltita, including transportation. Advot8t:J'I Nnda may be used to pi'Otect the t ights of persons with deveklpmenta4 dlsablities. To develop or ...-lncludlflll transportsllon servl.,.. tlvo41gh des;g...,.d stall ogenclts on oglng end ares agencies on aging Various sodalteMco programo. Includes -sportadon 10 prog11rn tacilitlM. To develop and Implement programs to prevent and treat chtld abuse and ntgllact. Includes transportation of abused and negloc:tad children 10 program faci lities. Granis may be -d on behalf ol ellgll>le youltlo for aldll cttv.Jopment, and education or training rtCaltd to Independent living, inetodlng tranaportation to program facilities. (See Florida Departmonl of Heallll ond RolloblitatiYO SalVI-)

PAGE 72

TABLE A. (contiooed). "" .. '' ' ....... .... ......,. "''*'' ..... . ........., -" -_, Orug""'-llld -111<1 U.S. Tonto>ty --lndllft T T ribll To de slop n'ICIIte .,...,. pa:.enllon trelttMnt. Mel -----om lof-ond drug ohu3o; alld 10 "'ffpoct Gront (ADMS Ellcclc Gtont). """*" heahh centllf8. b:fudea transpottdon to Pf'OG'I"' tdi!M. 93.!m Florida Commltllon TO Trust r..nd Community trantportation coordlnaton: and official planning Planning and operating TD transportation ...vloM.. tQencltt. TranapMrion disadvantaged perwne. Chapt 427, FS. Pubio Trons/1 Blod< Grant A.Jnda .,. to Section 9 and Section 18 opwaeors and to Public buo hnllit Ond ._ publlo fixed IIUidoway capital Pre b' 1111 Bclerly -.eo_. 011110 or-pii)Oioalmonlll .......,_,. -.. Dlliotry ... .eritty ol-ed-dqeoro------.;...__,-ChapW 410. F$. IMng and tllallmpecfe hdMduol capacily .. 1M lndtpondontly -1111 pnMtlon ol core ooMces. -a.a-of EduM-OMilon of Blind Servicea Bllndporaont To tnOOUtfGt and asalat blind JndMdualt to MIJdmum lndudos NMcet. Cl>apror 413, FS. fklaptor 290, FS. oondlions and expand h'"'ldng cpportunlllla, dlrool banafitro persons of low moderall lnootno '"'*'dN aubtl-nnoportation tor ........ modonllf.lncomo peraono.

PAGE 73

T ABL A. (condnued) llt .......... .... .. fiOitda oii.Mor ond l!mploymontS..urlly Vocallonal Reht.blllllll0<1 My penon with a tUbaantlal employment handloap. -., __ --.. --Orug ondHNIItoflognom Ctl-394 Pan FS. Clllldren'o ModlcoJ StMoes Ptogram Chap18t 3&1, FS. Qlitdren Youth, and FamiliN Program 4011, FS. Community eo.. lor ()lo Adufts Ctlap410r 410, FS. Oevol-nlll S.r;lceo Ctlapler 3&3, FS. ModicaiAai-Plognom (lAo Tltlo )(1)(1. -Ollllibiliogof ...... Oo..,.or,.,.'*"'"""' phytbl"' mental.,_,. 1hotindMdual t.bllly to poors o1 -with clopondoM c:Nidren qualifiod dlildran ond _.m women. Qlllified Medlen benefic:iarin and. in some ....,.. OlfUiin ---. Services that ace neoeuary to oompenu.te dleabltd petiOM tor In employment handicap and to enable disabled persona to tngaga an an oocupa1ion. lncfud" trtn:aportltlon to workplace. T o Oo,.,. -nlng, -case plennlng. monllollng, r.sot.Re malet*lg, Wid .aluatlons. indUdtt transporUdlon 10-ond progtam --Programs that haw the pSiiant and OoJ1i>Oiionl hotpltal -nnl -clinlo soMc:a; -.--y""' "'Y soMOoo; nwslng ---lo<-
PAGE 74

APPENDIX B. Process to Forecast TD Population. In this Appendix, the process followed to estimate the transportation disadvantaged Category I population and the transportation disadvantaged Category D population is illustrated. The 'ID Category I population is composed of all disabled, elderly, and lowincome persons, and c:hlldren who are ''high-risk" or at-risk". The 'ID Category II population is composed of persons who are eligible for 'ID Trust Fund monies based on the Chapter 427 guidelines. This second group includes persons who because of physical or mental disability or income status (regardless of age) are unable to transport themselves. 56

PAGE 75

9 Population (80 and c Population D Bdotly Population E Non.fkl-Eidorly Populallon K Oioab4od, Non-Elderly Non-Low lnoomo L CiMbled l.J)w Income M Oi&ablod, Elrlorly, Nor>-Low lnoome N Non-Dieel>led, Elderly, Low Income 0 Non-DIW>Ied, Bdlfly, Non-Low Income 32.78% of persona aged 60 and ewe r ar6 disabled 7 ,3()% of pet&Ona aged 0 to 59 are disabled 1990 c.nsua and from SEBR. SUIWY peteenta91 1 of elderly persons petQent of Une tt:em I for each county (from 1980 Cen1Us) percent ol Une Item I for each -nty (from 19110 Conaua) 57 L

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TABLE 8. Process to Forecast TO Category II Populalioo by Marl
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APPENDIX C. Forecasts by county ot TD population. 1bis appendix presents the forecasts of the TO Category I and Category II populations by county for the period from 1992 to 1996. In addition, these population forecasts are shown for each of the unique market segments (e.g., elderly and disabled, and transportatiOn handicapped and low-income). The forecasts by market segment are provided for the period from 1989 to 2001. The appendix contains the following tables: TABLE C-1. Forecasts of the TO Category I Population, 1992-1996. TABLE C-2. Forecasts of the TO Category II Population, 1992-1996. TABLE C-3. Forecasts of the TO Category I Population by Market Segment, 1989-2001. TABLE C-4. Forecasts of the TO Category II Population by Market Segment, 1989-2001. 59

PAGE 78

eo, -- ..-_. ..,.. ...., 7 -...... ,.,...,. ....... -7 ...... ....... 2 .. .,., ..... ..,. -.... ... 7. ., .... 'IOM1 ,.., ...... ...... ...... ...... tt,OU - ....... 30,0CU ......, ..... -1 1 ..... 1 ...... .,.,., ...... $4,711 3 18,700 II,IKtl .. .... ...... """' 11 -7 lt,"i0 ....... ,. ..... 1 ...... 11, 416 .. .... ''-'" .. .... ..... ... l.t71 ...,. ..... ....... 221,101 """" ... - 1 -....., 00,110 t7,070 .. .... tU74 17,741 1 .... 20.ot1 21- .. ..... ..... ...... 4,.741 ,...,. 1t,070 11.41tt ... ,...., ..... ..... ..... ..... .... 1 ...,. ..., 3,711 11,1 11,171 ..... ...... ..... ..-.... ..-..... ""' .... ..... ..... U10 U12 .. ,. .... ..... 10.1 .. 1-1._ 1 ..... 7 3 eo,7T7 ...... ...,.. ...... ...... ...,....,.. 1 ...... ..... .... .. -.ce,e-ta 7 ....... .. 1 .... 117,\N ...... --- 2 7 ... 7..,. 7, ... 7M1 7,-- ..... ., .... ....00 ...... 00 ,100 11,:18(1 ,_ 17,01. f1,72 1 17,117 ... ..,_, 3 6,301 ... 1 .... ..... .... ..., ... 3 U< .. ,.. ... ,. 2,422 ..... ...... ...... 64 ,170 .. .... et,ittt .... 1 Ult,438 1 ...... lot, IN .. ..... 178,t7& ...... 3 $1,888 ...... t4,1T7 ......, tr,l3t ..... 3 1U21 ...... 13,111 """' 2,1.., U10 2,207 U87 ..... ......... ,,., 7 .... 7,.., 7 ... 1 7,570 -1 104,52 1 ....... 100,000 111,180 112,fM7 ...... 101 ... 104,1110 1 ...... 11o.l17 1 ...... ...... -1 OS,071 - 11 ...... ...... -...... .. .... ...... ...... ...1 .. 1 ..... .._ 1 4 1.,14$ ...... ...... .._ ....,. 1 ..... 1 ..... ...... 1 ..... ,.,.. - 7 -Zlt,101 .... ....,... ....... """"" 7 -.. -... 1 .. ..... -- -.... 1 .. -....... ....... 7 ....... 100.m ,....,, tee..tw 171,81!1 7 .. .... ....... 3llil$.71t - taa,uw ....... ....... ''""'' 170.-- 31,o&7 31,7M 32,<17S ..... ... ... -...... ...... -07,7ta --...... ........... 72,703 7..,.. 77,900 ...... ...... ..,,._ ...... a, no ...... :31,5ti ........ 1 1,818 '''* 1 -,.,e hmlno .. 7 &1,110 17.,3181 to,111 t7, 13a .,_ 18,472 fUll 1 7,31t ,, ..... lt,1 7$ _. .. ta,M ... lt,lfO 1 ..... 13, 1 U - 7,111 7,111 7, ... 7,371 7,<0> ..... .... ... ..... .... ... .. 173,377 ..... 111.-....... 111,8 -. .. ..... ...,, .... ... .. ..,.. - 13-,251 1 ..... ...... 1 .... 1 ,.,s u 60

PAGE 79

-2 ,_ ._ ..-..... ..... .. ,.,., 0 11.114 -111.74 1 ,,., -2 ..... ..., ..-..... - 7 .. ,. 27.111 -...,, -- ...... ...... 10,741 ....,, 3 2 .... ..... .... -. .... ,...,. .. ,. .. .... t7.AI10 ta.tlll CftNo 3 14,180 ,,,.. 11,211 15.817 te,aeo ct .. ..... .... 10,()41 ,....., 10,7&1 """' 20,311 ...... at, ett ...... ., ... .,.,_ 2 3 ..... ... 5,758 ... .... II ttllt:U. ,, ..... ue;zee 119,1108 ...... a.eus ...,. ..... .... ,,,,. 2 ..... ..... 1 ,117 .... .... """" ...... ...... ..... 38, 7!5$ """ ........ I .. .... ...... ,, ... .. .... 140711 ""'"' 4,.1US .. ,.. ..... ,...,. .... - ..... ..... .... '"'' .... 2 "''" 7 .... .... 7,'lo02 7 132 - ..... ..... .,_ .... -' ... ''"' .. .. 1,1 71 ... 2 ..... -..-1,t17 ..... 3 -'"" ,,.. ,,.. vcr -' .... ..... ..... ..-..-I ...., .... .... ..... 3,744 7 ..... ..... 17,1 .... ,._ 11.M t II,J07 ...... ..... .. ,.. 7 .ti7,Ao4t ....... ...... .._ ....... 3 2 ..... ..... ..... .. .. 2 .... 12,119 ...... ..... 13.1153 ..... 2 ...., .... ..... ...... .... 3 ..... ..... ... ,..,. 1 ,8'l't _.... 2 3 "' m 700 808 820 ,_ 21,50 7 ,1115 a;I,JQ ...... ...... ,_ ...... ...... .. .... ,..., 31,1214 ..... ..... .... Ill, oM I ..... ..... ..... 2 3 ..... ... .... 4,141 4,214 """"' 7 .. ,., 710 "' ,. ........ 2 2 2,721 ... .. o.m ..... - ,, ... ....... tt, OII'l .. .... ..... - ,._ -...... ...... ..... - 13,11 t ...... U,OII ...... ,,.,., - II ..... ..... 1,1:17 ..... ..... ..... ..... ,_ ..-._ u.,tm ....... ,..,.,. 1 4,01 1 ... 1 I ,...,. ..... ... ..... ..... 1 ...... .,,., """' .... 7 ..,. '' 7-7 .... ..... -- ....... 10.1 ... ,._ 7 .. ,., ..... 41 .,01 4 -=n .... ... 7 ...,,. ..... ...... .,...,. "''"' -' "'""' ..... ...... ...... ... ,.. - ..... ...., IO,H t 1.., 10,50Q 2 ...... .... 11,171 '' 12,010 -""' ...... 22.113 G,lllt 7J,712 -- ..,. ..... .... 10,1.$6 10,<0> I ...... ...... 27,341 ...... 21,2!7 - 7 1!1,304 ,..,, 1 7.21 .. 1 7,n.a ........ 3 4,910 ..... 1,111 ... .., ,.._.,.. ..... ..... '"" ... ,,., ..... ..... ..... ..... .... .. 1,120 1 1 44 1,117 1,190 '""' ...... -...... ...... ...- 1,1>0 1 ,711 ..... ,..,. 1 ..... .... ... <111,551 ..... 2 6 1

PAGE 80

... H 2 4 '" .. .,. <74 ... "" t.an ._ .. ... 1,1l!ill ... .,., ...., 0,002 u,ua ...... .. ... 1,100 ... ... ..... .... .. 7T ......... 7 ..... 2,040 ..... .... .. _.. .,. ... 134,91 -4 ..... ...... .... ...... ...... ...... ...... ... ..., ""'*'" 2 ... ... "' ... ... 1.010 .... 4, ... - ... ..,. .,. ...... .... 21l.718 ..... ..... ., ... ...... ..... ...... ...... ..... 2 4 ... .. ..... 1;111 ..... ,_ ..... .,_ 1 1,11D _. ..... ...... .. ,.. -...... -C. 11Tto ... ._ ... ..... t,IM .... ..... .. ,35 .... .. ,..., -...-...... -... .. ""-- ... .. ... ..... ....,. Ul4 ...... ... ,., ... ,,. .. ... ..... .... ..... """' 4 ... ., .. 7,132 -...... ...... -t lll,tzr: .... '"-..... ...... IUtCI ,:tiO r,ttt ...... ....... 4 ... ... ., ...... ... ... 13,373 2 ... ... 170 .. "" -..... 4,450 O e.dtdtn 770 ,,.. ... .... ,...,. ..... 10,2157 O IIOtlll .. ... .... ... ... ... 812 .... ...... .. ""' ... ... .. ''" ... .... ... .. ... ... ... ,..,. ,,, .. 4, ... -2 3 ... ... ... ... ... 710 .... ..... ...... ... ... "" ... ,.. ..... .. ,.. ..... ,..,. ... .., 100 ,,. ..... ..... ,.. ..... ... ...... 1.741 ...... ... ... ... "' .... ... .... ,,.. ...... .. ... ...... 7 ..... .... 7,.. .. .. ... 7._120 ... ... ... .... -3 2 ... ... 287 ,.. ... '"" .. ... 7 .... ... ,.._ ... .. ,. ---...... 7,olt 41,11214 ..... 2 ""' .... ... -..... ..... .... 1MU - 2 ... "' 217 -... -.... ... -2 .., ... .,. ... ... .., ... .... .... 1 ,188 MIO .... HIAt l 31,41(1 ..... 7!1,()1)5 ... 2 ... ...... '"" ...... ...... ...... ,..,.. 1-Q,()M ""' 2 t,O&t ..... ..... 4, ... .... ...,, at.014 O?,'IV)' ..... 2 ... ..... ... 1,780 "' ..... ..... .._ 2 .. ... ... .. ... ... ...,. 2 ... ... ... ... ... .... ..... 7,141 ..... .... ..... ...... ...... tl,tot """" .... .,,.,, ...,. ...... .... ..... .._.. .. 4 ... ,.... 730 tD,Ial ,_ -7JIIJ> ...... ... .., .. ...,. .... -7.010 ...... 2 ... ..... ,. ..... "" ._ ..... ...,.,. ata ... ,..,. ..... .... ... 1Q.At .. .... ...,. ... ..... .... ,,,., ... ..... .... .. .... 7 ..... ... .. ..., ...... ...... ,.,.n t:U11 ....... ... .... ... .... .... 10,11# l,t#l ..... 4 4,tQ ...... 6.111 11,7tll 1&4,7&0 11,4ot ...... 7 1,lD7 tO,Vt .... 3Utt 4,121 ...... 1 1,014 ''"-"' 7 4, ?61 01,9<42 .... ...... tt,.at 1$8,211l ...,., ....... I ..... I I ,MO .... .,_.. .,.. ..... 100,150 ,., t,71f ... '"" ..... .... .... ...... 4 ""' ... ..... 1,7 41 1 0.123 t,t41 31,12& 4 ..... '"' ..... 11, 111 ..... ..... ...... ,.. ... -...,. 1,710 ..... .... ... ... -..... ...... ..... ..... ""'' ,,.,, 7 -..... 1,721 ...... ..... ....,. .... 7 .... 3 ... ..... ... ..... ... .. .. .... .... ... '"' ... ..... .,. ...,. ..... - 2 ... "' ... 770 ... .... .. ... ..... 3 "" .., 470 .... ,_ 4 ...... ... ,., ...,.. - ,..., ..... ... .. .... 62

PAGE 81

f77 1JH& ... ... ... ... ..... .... ... 1,110 ..... .... ...., ...,. ,_ ll,t04 ... on - "" t ,,na ... .. t,886 ..... ...,. - .,. ...,.. ..... .... ,. ..... ...... ...... ..a.a - 10 --81,121 ,,,.. .. ... 1W4 1 ... ,.. .. .... 471AA .,.._ 151 ... "' 001 ,.. -1,t1t ..... """'""' 1 571 ..... "' ... 1,311 ...... ..... ...... Cllf\lt ,,. ... ., ,,,...., 1,m 23,414 ..... ...... "'"' ... ..... "" ...... 1, ... ... 7,711 11,111 Collltr '" e,eu 1,410 t&,:lt l ..... ...... 10,117 .. 1 .. ... ...,.. .,. t.llt 1,\74 4,cnt e,tiW 1 .... .... 11 18,788 .. .. ... ,, .. ,, .. ...... -213,8 ,..., ... 1P10 ... 1,101 ,.. ..... ...... "'"' ... ... 1U ... .,. 1,111 1, ... ..., ...., ... ... ,. -...1 .. ..... 51,4?$ 7&,0111 .,. .... ........ 1 ..... 1 ..... a.na """ ..... ... .,. .... ,. ...... ..... "" 1,100 ... .. 1. ... .. 171 ..... ,.,,.,.. "'' ... 17> ... "" 1,cot 1 .... .. ... ,.,. 1,n2 ... ..... ...... ..,., ..... ...... ... ... '" ... t.l'l'O ,_ 1 .. 311 .. .. ... .... 1,t70 ..... ... ... "' "' ... ...--..... -""' -,.. ..... ..... - ... ... ... -,..,. ..... ..... .., ,..,. .,. .. ,.,. -....... ,.. ..... ... ..... -...... ..... ..... ..,_ 1 .. .. 1 .. '" ""' 1,7tt t7,.c3a ..... -...... t,J$1 .. 1 .. .... S1,f114 1..,. -...... .,..,. ... .,. ... '" ... ..... Q.UI ,..,. ... ..... m .... ,. ..... ...... ..... ...., ... 1... ..... ..... ..... .... 17',501 '" .,. ... ... .. 1,(131 ..,.., &110 ... m 11 ... '" ""' ., ..... ..... -...... .. "'""' ...... .... 1 2,131 ...... 2,611) ;12,305 5.1-54 ...... ., ..... ...... 1,981 1D,488 ..... 4,7ft 4,191 9,768 25,150 ...... '" 1.000 ... ''"' '" ..... ..... .. ..,. 11 "'' .. ... ,. ... ... .. ....... ... .. ... .. "'' 1,310 .3,014 7,1'24 """"" 1 1 .... a,na 1 .... ...... ..... ...... 17,011 ,,.,, ..... ..... ... 1;171 11.132 '""' ...... ..... IIZ.17S - ... <11,174 ,.. ..... 1, ... ...... ..... ...... ....... ... ..... "' ..... ,, ..... 11110 ... ..... .. v "" ..... .... .. 1 ... 0,1. .. .. .. ... ...... n.oot .. ,. ... -,.. ..,.. .... ..,. ..... ...... .. ..... --,,_ "" ..... .... -t,m ..... ...,. ..... - ..... oo.on .... ,..,. ... 111.ta:s ...... -' 1.m -. ... ...... ..... "'-""' ...... 1 .. ,.. ._ .,..., ... 1 ...... ...... ,._ .. .., ....1 1 .. ... 1t.01t ..... -..., !51 .eta ...... - "" .. ,.. ... m ..... e,no 10,11'8 ... ,., ............ "" ..... ... ..... ... 1 ..... .... .. ... I.IIC .. ..... ,_ 1,7&1 11,7M ..... ...... ...... -- .... ...,. ... '"' ..... ..... t,708 ....,. .... ,,_ ..... .. .... ..... ,...., .... ...... .... 1._ 1,104 lt,t:IO -...... tt,422 ,.., .. 378 ..... ... t ,l1a ... 0$ 4,178 1UI1 .,. 1 147 ... .... ... 3,133 ..... :uoo ... ,., ... "' ... 1, ... 2,7U ._ 100 ... .. ... w ... 1 .... ..... ..... 1e,a.e ..... .. .... .... .. ..,., 31.10ol ....... ... "' ,,. .. ... t,te? 1,117 8 ,071 ... .... ... ..... ... .. .... 63

PAGE 82

TABLE C-3. (continued). ..... Boy 3 ........ 2 ........ ........ O'IIIIOIIe 1 CIII'U' 5 CO.y Oolftf t Columbia 2 ""' DoSolo 1 2 """' etc.nbl a Ataler 6 Ftanl:lln 3 G-3 Ollctl lltl 2 Glodes t .... 3 H ammon 2 ....... 1 Mondry 1 ........... 7 HIQhtltlde 1 HlfebcCugh 7 ..,_ 3 fndlan AMir 4 3 --3 ........ 2 ,_ ... 1 ..... 3 ....., 2 3 1 3 1 7 7 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 3 7 10 2 3 11 3 1 2 2 3 2 3 3 2 2 2 3 3 2 11 1 7 7 3 1 7 3 3 2 3 2 180 1.212 ... 2,3CO ,720 1 .. ... ,.. ... 1,2<0 ... 17,04$ ... 107 ..... ..., .,. 1 .. m 112 .. ... 170 ... 3U 821 784 .... 1 ... ... ... 1e8 71 1 .... ..... 2.01 & ... 72 ... 1,381 ..... 870 ... ... ... ,.,. "17 ,.. MOO 1 .... .... ..... 817 782 1 .... 7 .. 1 .... I .eo> ... 371 "" 1 .. 3 .... 1 .. l.o32 8.831 1,103 ...... ...... "" ..... ..... ,.,. .... .. ot,712 1 ,.,. 487 ...... 1,153 ... 1,7%7 ... 1 320 ... ... ... """ ...., .... ...... 872 .... 1 .... 481 ... e.m 1._ IO,ee2 1 122 273 703 ..... ..... .... ..... .. ,.. I,W 3&,023 ... ...... 1 .... 1 3f. us ""' ...,. ...... ..... 11,128 ., .... 1,:m 1 18& ... m 18,720 ,... ... 1.. 2:,712 7,838 100 701 ... "' 1 .... 061 20,102 ... 1 .. ,,... 3,14$ 320 .,. ... 131 111 1 .. 201 ... ... ... 801 8.118 201 ,. ... .... .. 1-.... :>,381 ... .. ... 1,630 ..... ,.. '" ., 1 .... ... .... 007 8,121 ,, .. 4,U1 ... ... 1,818 .., 1,,.. 1,.., ... ... 200 "'' ..... 111 64 ... "'"" ... ....... ... .., ... 1 .... 11..., .... 11 .... .... 1. ... ,. ... ..... 11,123 U l t ... 1,341 ... ... ... 382 ... ... 1" ..., 37,t10 ,. 8,700 1 ... ... 201 ...... ...... ..... 1 841 ... ... ... ,., 1 .... 1 .... .... 1,771 ..... 1.#Z7 ., .... ._ ...... 011,218 .... 1 ..... 4,391 15,370 12,133 .. ... ...... 12,0QO ..... 1,.., ,.. ... ...... ... ... 2 820 ... ..... 18,274 ,.. 1,406 1, .... 1,.,. MOO 1,1813 ...... 1'11 ... 1&,081 .... 057 "" 1,#71 270 .., ... ... 708 ,., 1-1 .... 1 .... 1 ... 1 .... 1,$37 ... 171 .... ..... ..... 771 174 700 3,342 .... 1 119 1 ,488 m ..... 7 .. .. .... 1 .... I = .... ., 11.4UI ..... 1..., 1.et0 ..... 1,90> 3.G1 ..... ... ... ... 281 1,410 ... ... ... 1,o28 11 .... 1,803 .. .... 201 .... 1,Q20 31,tet 24,314 7,381 ...... .... ... .... ... 1,131 ...... a:l,811 MOO t,10oll ... 1,1!!13 1 .... 7 .. 1 .... 1.874 ....1 17,172 T7,1i#O 1 .... 1 ..... ...., 1" 1 .. .... .. .... 10 .... 3,771 ... 1 .... .. .... 34,185 22,472 ... 11 ,057 .. ...... 184,#74 ,.,.., I ..... -I ..... 11,0115 ...... ..... 71.. .._ .... 3,111 1,820 407 ....., 1,ZI8 ..... ........ 3,302 ...... ...... 1,830 ..... .... '""' ..... 2tt.480 ... 1,11117 7&,087 .. 1 ... 1 1 ,883 ..... 1,191 .. 0 2,183 4,108 1...,. '"" ,_ ..... 7.CI21 ..... ... .. ... ...... .... 012 3,888 17,64& .. .... ... 7,108 4,0M 11,1218 3,&12 81JII17 am ...... .. .,..., ...... 111,381 .... 1 .... 1 . ., 19,013 2(1,10& .... '"' .... 1 ,318 31,178 1,028 .... "1" ..... 1 ..... ....... a>.oe1 ....., ..... ,..,. 1 ..... ...... 1 11,084 ...... ....... ..... 1 us.en ..... 18,22'& ..... ..... .... .... .... 9,7&1 ...... 41,885 279.1S01 7,308 ... .... 17,S&O ..,., 2.115 ., .... l""'m ...... 1 ... 1 2.1 .. 7 .... 1,.,... ...1 .. ....,, ...... ...... 40,749 12,3>0 2 13, 707 ,, ... 37(1, 198 149,880 37a,eoe 188,000 30,371 34,047 ...... ...... 1 ...... 81,105 1 8#>7 12,371 .... .. 1 ...... ..1 .. 12,832

PAGE 83

TABLE C-3. (continued). I ... ._ Ill ... ... -,_ ..... ...... e,7411 .... ..... ..-1:z,ta ....... ....,., ... M ... "" ... -..... ..... ...... .., .. ...... .... ...... ... ., - to ..... ...... --"'"' ,...., -., .... .....,. ... ... ... .. .,. ..... ..... ..'107 ... ..... ,.,. ,.., .... ... ., ,,.., 04i,74t "" ..... ... lt,2111 '" ...... 10,0. ...... .... ..., m ,,.. ..... '""' 1 ,31t .... ,. I ..... 7,t-4 1 ..... ... ..... ...... '" .. .,. ... 2 "" ..... ... ..... 1.2'13 .. ... .... 11.701 tJ,alt 101,a3t ,...., 101,1015 -,,.,..,. 2lt,t31 t "" ..... ... ..... ,.. ..... 3,131 ...... I ... ... ... ... 1,1$ 1 2,000 ..,. .... ... .,., ,j ... lt,Hf ..... ....., ...... ....... -,...,, ),11'1: ...... .... ...... ...... ...... ,., .... .... ..... .. .... .... ,,,.,. .. ... "" ,.,.,. ... ... ,,HO ..... .... .,. ,., ... ..... -.. ,., ... ...... ... ... ... ... ... ..... -..... .. ... ,, ... ... ""' 1,212 .... I ... ... ... .., ..... ..... .... ., ... ... '" ,.. ... ...... - ... .., ... ... "" ..... .... ..... - ... -.. -... ,. ..... -....,....,. ... ...,.,. 1,01 1 ...... ._ V.IUI ...... ...., .. U ... ..... ..... te.ns ...,. .... ... -...,. ... .. ... ,....... ..... - 2<7 ., ... "' -3,13e ... .......... ... ..... ... t,ll)t '"'' ...... ..... -.-. ... ..... ... ..... ..... ..... ,, ... ... -- 1 1 1 ... ... ... ... ..... 2,374 .... .....,.., 72 "' .. ... '" ... ..... ..... ..... ..... ... 3,\.W .. .... 18,1$7 ...... .... t U77 ,._ .... ... .., '"" 70 ,1-1& 21,914 -..... ..... ,...,. ..... ... .... ,. 1 0,351 211,141 -...., ... 1.1 ... ... ,, .. ., .. ..... .(,t3t ...... 72 270 .. ... ,,. -121 .. 2 ... 710 .., ... ,.. .... .... , .. ...... ..... ,.,, ...... ... Cf,4t1 1 1,011 ...... 2,1151 ..... ...,, .... ...... -2:1,311 .. ... t ... .... ... u.ar t,t1A ""'"' ..... ... ..... .. ...., .... ...... ,..., 30.111 ... ...., ... ,,,.. ,.. .... .. ,,... II ... ...... I,UO ..,, ..,. ..... ...... 41,746 0111 1r 1b 1 317 ,..,. "' ..... ,.. .... .... ...... ...... .... -..... ...... ..... ..... -- ... ,,,, ... .... ..... ...... tQ,2t2 -- ..., ... .,.. .... .... ,...., ., .... ,_ 7 ,..,. .. ..,. ..... -.... ..... ...... ,......,. ..... ... .. ..... ..... ., 11.t12 1"13202 ...., -' .... ...... .. ....... ...., ...... -. .. .. ""- ... .._ .. ..... ... .... lO,tiO ....., Unl.lot'lllf 2 ..,. ...... ... ... .... li ... U ...... ..... lelh1 Welt -..... ..... lUll .... .... ,. :i0,271 t.llr."-' .. ..... ... ..... .... lO,'Ht "'"" t ..... .. ,... ..... ...... . ,.. ,..... 1R;471 -8em l ncte 1 ..... .,..,. ..... !2,120 3;fl83 ..... 10,111 .. ... ....... ... '""' .., 2,744 ... ..... ..... '"""' .._. ... ... t,nu ... ..... ... 3,181 ..... ..... T-2 ... ,., ... '" ... 2,1tt ... ... ... ,,,. -1,170 '" "' ..... 65

PAGE 84

TABLE C-3. (contlnued). 2 3 7 10 3 3 4 3 11 1 2 3 2 3 4 3 2 2 3 3 1 3 7 3 .. liE . 2 3 2 3 1 .......... .......... Santa RoM. 3 3 1 5 3 4 11 2 3 1 1 7 5 7 1 1 5 1 3 4 3 5 1 5 3 3 ..... ..... ... ... .,. & 77 ..... ... 17,$50 307 ... ""' 2.712 "" ... 182 "" ., 144 '" ... ... 903 "" 7,148 ... ,., ... ... '"" 2,,., ..-"" "' ... .... ..... 710 ... 333 ... ... ..... 842 ..... 1.933 a,ot& 3.tt8 ... ... .... ... 1,572 ..... ... ... 1,143 ...... .. .... ... ..... ..... 7.42 2.102 toa.7815 1 .... ... 13,72& 1,207 ... 1,73$ 51 5 ... ... ... ... ..... 4,1ta ''"' ...... .,. ..... 1,81t ... ... ..... ,...., 11,080 t,no 271 7>8 ..... .... ""' ...,. ..... .. 17 1,$14 40,018 ..... ...... 11.00 ...... """" ...,. ..... 7,208 .718 11..., ...... 1 ... 1,214 7M ... 17,70$ "' ,..., na .... '" ._ ...., ... ,.., ""' ,.. .... 001 -... ... 7 .... ..... .., ,,. ... '" 110 171 ... "' ... "'" ... -... ... ... ... .. IA18 :a,7J'5 2,4711 ... .. 344 1,7t7 2,921 ... ,. 303 383 M27 ... ..... ..... .... .,.. ... ..... .., 1,8S3 2.001 "" ... ... "' ..... 187 ... 66 ...... 100;21St ""' ..... 12,121 3,881 14,088 1, ... 1CQ,#14 1,847 178 ..... 11,31!18 ... 1 ... 1,3151 ... "" ... 311 ... .. 1 ,.,.. -...... .. 10.1$$ ,..., ... ... 17; 30.111 ..... ,.., ... ... ...... 17,770 11,084 5 ... 1,8U 5,7$5 1 ... ...... 8,7&& ...... .. ... ..... 4,023 M83 12,817 m ,..,. 13,061 2,032 1,584 838 ... ...., ... 1 .111 opt ...... 377 .... 1 .... ..... 3.24< ,..., ...... 742 ... 1$,458 0,500 ... ... 1 .... ... ... ... ... "' .., 2, 183 1,9&1 17,288 ""' .... ,,.., ... "" ..... .... ..... ""' "' 707 ..... ..., 1,130 ..... ... ..... 787 ...... ..... .,. f 23,283 .... t,ne 2,770 1,070 1,1.28 ,..,. 77 4 ..... 1, ... ...... "...... 1 ,81 8 ...... .... .., ...... 12,146 448 ..... ...,.. ...... .. ,., ..... ..... ...... .... 81,151 "'''" 172,01t ....... 174,460 .., .. 9,4& 1 .. .... ...... . .,. 73,m 28,7 84 .eoe 3,200 1,71& .., 88,881 ..... ..... ._ ...... ..... ..... 10,447 ..., 171J3 1 ...,. ....... ._ ..., 81.170 ...... ..... 1, ... 8.91 9 1,5'9 ...... ..... ..... 3,730 .... 11,4815 ...... ... ,., .... '""' zoe, ... 11,007 ..... .. ... ..... ... ..,.,. ...... ...... ...,.. .... ..... 12.180 .. ... .... I Mao .....7 .. .... .... ,. ...... ...... 10,eo8 ...... 10,1543 UM158 21,$43 ... 4,803 ... .... .. ,,.,2 2,011 .... 47,180 .... ,..., .. .... ... ...... ., .... ...... ...... 7e.333 .... 1 ..... .. ,. ...,., ...... ....., 17,7C2 ..... ,...,. 4.1711 ...., ._ ''"" .. .. 1 0,.1$8 ...... .... .. "''"""' 7.375 ., .... tM,. 5,35 1 2340 80A18 ....... 83.218 .. 2,210 7, ... ...... 101,11!!8 .. ,.., ...... ... """ t:2,t:i0 22&.1 9:l '* 3t4, 137 158.773 ....... ,,..,.. 31,158 ...... ,.,.,. "'"' .... ,.. ...... ta.tta ...... 7 ,18& ..... . ..., 13,$75

PAGE 85

TABLE C-3. (continued). ......, ....... .....,. ...... -......... -PIMII&t ""' """"" ..... .-.. Salntluole ---......... Sumler -,_ ....... v ..... ....... """'" 2 > 2 2 3 7 10 2 3 2 1 2 3 11 1 2 3 2 1 3 3 2 3 1 2 2 3 1 1 7 3 1 T 0 > 2 2 1 2 2 3 3 2 2 2 11 2 3 1 7 7 7 1 2 3 2 > 1 1 7 3 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 1 .. 1,2BO "" ... 7,t18 1 .. .,. ... 1'00 1 ... &ta .... 312 107 ""' ...... .. 1 "' ,.. 124 .. .. I,. ,. "" ., .,. 7,W ... ,.. .. lat ,. "'" ..... ... ... 1, ... ..... ,.. ... ... t77 ... '"" 880 11.811 ..... "'""' ..... ... ... 1,717 "" 1.811 1,700 411 ... ... 100 """ 1,074 ..... 1,183 ...... 17,181 $31 4,134 ..... -7 ,713 ...., 10< .... 1,100 ... 37,521 ,,.., 1 .... .., t ,7.W ... ... ... ... ... ''"' .. .., U77 ., .... "'' .. I,S30 ... 2117 ,.,.. 1,.,., ...... t,tM 278 = .... ..... ..... 4,113 .... .. ,.. 1,$00 41,061 e,1o1 .. .... 11,886 ...... ,.,,. ..... .... ... ._ tt-181 1 ..... 1.3<0 1.237 ""' "" 11.211 ... 1,1110 ... ..... .... "' "" 1,tm ... 1,N3 ., 21.001 "" ... 7 ... 7 ..... '" 1$1 ... .. "' 112 ... ... "' 1,117 "" ..... ... ... ... ... .. ..... 2,000 ... .. ... 1,702 2,707 1172 ,.. '" 1,153 "" ..... 1,CIS7 ,..,. ..... ..... ..... 1,003 2,CQ5 1,007 1,000 2,0TI ... ... ... I .. ..... "' ., ... 67 ... ..., ... -101,401 ... 17,742 -4,219 1 .... 1,031 ...... '""' ... 27,171 1M1t ..., .., 1 .... ... ... 021 ... ... .,. 1 ... ,. 8,177 !,SSt ,.. 10. ... ... 233 .... 38,183 ..... '"' ... ... ...... I .... 11 .... M30 ..... .... ..... .. .... 7,170 .. .,.. ,.,... .. ... .. ... 4,744 &.1110 3,$16 ...... ...... 2,t2ol t,57 t ... 213 ..... '" 1,0117 ... 3,000 ... ... ... ..... ... 1,000 3,370 1 .... ...... "' ... ..... .... ,.,. .,. ..... ""' 230 ,., ... ,,. ... ..... ._ ,..., ... 1 700 ..... "" loa ..,, ..... G,174 ... ,. .. 3,813 ..... '"" .... ... 2 .... ... 1-3,81'4 2, 12$ ...... 4.112 ,..., ,.., ,_ ..... <.152 ..... ._ .... ... ... ... ... I lot 302 ., 1,11!12 IU$3 1 .... ...... ....... 1.C>1l ..... 271>20 .... ...... ..., 212,31 7 ..... ..... 55,71t ...... ...,. 1,123 ...,. 1,108 1,1U i '"' 781 1,810 1,981 .... 1 ..... $3.111 1,828 ,_ ..... 1,103 ..,. ...... 7 .... 151 ..... ..... ... ,..,, 49,112 ""' 24,420 10,1135 .. ,. 12,1 .. ..... """ 14,701 17UOZ ,.., ...,. ..... ...... .,..., "'' ..... ., .... ..... .... 1,780 ... 71,707 1 ... ..... ..... ..... 1 .... 7 ..... 3U1'7 .. .... ..... ..... 10 .... 17,885 .... ....... .... 2.U1 ...... .. ..... .... ... 1.>13 1,2$0 1,847 2 .... ..... ,...,, ..... ...... 3,10$ 0.100 f t :at 2,401 ... 17M! 21, 107 ..... "' 3,n, 11,112 29,147 .., .. 1,112 '"" 1 2,41:) ..... 13,31'7 11,174 7f,868 ..... -.,.,., ,_ ,,_ ...... ..... ...... .....1 .... ..... ..... 1 .... a,sn .... ..... ..,,, ..... 1 ..... ,,._ .. ,. '"""' ...... .._ 70,271 17.000 = ...... &.171 232,417 98,180 ...... .... 18,411 ..... 3,717 ..... .m a,e1 2 10,400 ...... 44,114 297,1$3 .... -,..,. .,.. ..... .. .,. 161MS12 84,&77 ... ... .,., ... 1,.,... 10<&'3,941 ...... 14.1$8 .. 12 13.a28 235,e1e .,,.7 ... ..,. 183,371 Mt.144 172,5ei8 31,718 77,000 29,710 1&1 ,1!60 90,_718 17,37'8 ,...,. ,,.. ..... ...... ..... 13,1100

PAGE 86

TABLE c-a. (continued). ,_ ... .... """"' """"' P.tltn 8eedl Pinellu """ ......... SGJniJohrlt SGJntl.uGie ---........ Sl.mltt -,., .. """" -... w.IIDn 3 2 2 3 7 4 10 3 1 3 2 4 1 2 3 2 4 3 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 7 7 3 2 4 3 2 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 3 1 7 7 4 7 7 1 2 3 4 4 3 I 1 7 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 ..... ,.. ..... ,..., ... "" 807 ,., ..... tiZ1 ...... 018 ;,. .... 1 .. .. ... 105 .. ... 101 148 ... ... ... ... ... 7,428 250 .. ... 100 .,. 1,418 ..... 2..161 ... ... 1,533 2,371 .. ... ... ... ... 801 .., ..... .... ... ... 1.7&1 ..,. 1 .... 1,818 .... <01 ... 111 ...., ... ... ,,,., ...., ... 4,801 ...,. 7,211 ., .. .... 1 ...... 1,121 "" a7JII1 13,057 1.382 .,. 1 ,748 ... ... ... ""' 870 1,420 ..... ..... -1 ... ...... 1,843 '" ... ,_ .... ...... 1,221 ... ,.. 10,233 ..... ..... 4,18& 2,Jt7 8,91& 1,007 .ta,n3 ..... ... ,. 12,303 ..0,$78 ...... ... ..... ..... .... 12,15tn' -1 ,373 ..., "" ... 1&,747 "" 1,302 .... .,,. 3,023 ._ ... ... ..... ... 1,707 ... 21,308 378 ... ,., ..... ,.. 183 ... 1.1 ... "" 212 ... ... t,U't ..... ,,.. ... ,. ... ... .. ..... ..... ... ,. 410 .. ""' 1-.. ,.. to1 m 410 1.176 ... .... 1.D8S 8,672 ..... .-4,427 1 .... ''"' 2,100 ..... ..... t,14A ... ,,. ,.. 13t ..... 100 ... 68 ..... ... ...... 1 ...... ... ...... tU
PAGE 87

TABLE C-3. (continued). -......... ...... .... """"' SaJntJoMt Saini Luole -....... Seninolo """"" .__ """" ....... Wtllutl -3 2 2 2 8 2 8 2 3 8 8 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 8 3 3 1 8 3 7 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 2 3 2 3 ' . 7 7 7 2 3 3 ' 7 3 2 3 2 2 3 3 2 3 '"' ., 2,81 7 7 .... ... ,., ... 741 ...... ... . .,., ... 173 .... ..,.,. ,.. ... ... "' ... ... ''" ... 1,11Z7 ""' 7.W "" ... ... ... 78 ..... ..., 2.214 ... ,. ... ...... ..... 703 ... ... 1,011 ... ",.., ... .... ZC03 .... '"" ... ... ..... ... ..... ..... 4ZF ... 226 '" .... ... 7,177 1,173 ...... ...... ... ..... 4,t9 t 7,305 ..... ..... 101, 157 t,s..a ... ...... 1-4,038 '"" 377 '"' "' ... ... "' ,. 1,.t&t 4 ,718 ..... .. ... ... .,... ..... 4 ... 7.001 ,..., ...... ..... ... .. 1Q,i71 8 ,745 5,137 .... Z"" ..... ..... 42,9\t 7 .... 47,070 12,817 41,030 2 1 818 .... ...., .... ..,.. 1Zfm ..... .... ,.. >.080 ..... ... ... "'" "" '"'' ... ...... ... ... 7..81-3 ...,. ... .. ... ... ... '" ... "" ,,. ..... ..... 8 .... ""' ... ... ... 1,701t ..... 2 ,0'10 "' .. 347 .... ..... ... 781 "' 1,182 ... 7,100 1,12t 7/124 ..... 8,1:2& ..... ..... 1,078 2,1$7 1,081' 1,861 '""' ... .,. ... ... ... 1151 ... ... 69 ...... ... .... a. ..... .... ,..., '" ...... .. .... ..... ... ,..., .,. ... ... ... ... 1.011 ,...., ..... ....,, ... ...... ..... ... 11, 7 37,931 .... 2,011 ., 24,7211 19t,411 ...... .... ..... .... ''*' ,.... ...,... -..... ...... ..... ..... .... 7 .. .. 14,718 3,01l ..... ... ... ...... .. ..... 3,188 ... ..... 17,78<1 ... 1,744 ..... 1,781 .... '"" ... ... If.. all e.n ... "' .... 318 ... ... .,. ,.. ... Z483 Z103 ..... """ .... ..... ... ... ..... 8.233 ..... ... 181 713 3,742 S.tU ..... ..... ... '"' ... 14.&'74 zooo ""' zoo ..., 2,174 Z212 ..,... Zte8 ..... ..... ... ... ... '" a,&t4 ... ..... ... Ell(l,tta 212,8U 1,011' ..... 28,728 ..... 34,1 ... ::zte.m .... .... .. .... ...... .... 1 120 .... I U t 1,109 '"" ... ,..,. 2/110 ...... ,,_ ..... """ 22.218 ""' 1,137 ... 38.413 77,78:1 .. .... .... 470 1,110 $1,l'O J * ...... 10, 737 3,M2 12,801 ..... ..... '""'' ,...., ...... """" -10.182 13.01$ ...... 7,>17 ...... 30.103 U12 3,273 ..... ... 74 .... ..... .... 3 .... ., .... .. ... ..... .... 11,5.74 -18,&10 ""' "'""' ... ..... ......, ...... ...... ..... ..... .... ''"' ..... .... am ... .. '""" "'"" 85,712 3.181 ..... 7 ,180 .... ... tU74 ...... U,tO$ .... ... 3,741 ...... "'' ..... .... .. 4,480 12,836 .... 771102 tPJ< ..... ...... ...... ..... U,.41S tUtt ...... ...... ...... .. ... ..... G,IM .... ..... ...,708 2,134 5.28 1 ... . ...... ..... ..... ,..... -...... .... ,., ,,.,. ....... .. .... ... ... ... ... ,.. 21,049 4,741 19,557 ..... 3,770 ..... ..... 8,&12 72,851 48,81 2 ....,.. 7,4&4 ...... 17,717 .... .... ...... na, t7& 87,13$ ..... .... 71>70 t12.,9fl HO.tTI ..... 31,4173 ..... .. ..,. 13,750 2!50,014 "'"" _., 171,051 39&,719 17t,4M ,., .. ...... .. .... ) 1.$19 1$8,.718 t'l" ,l32 1&,179 13.1 7 4 7.>3 3,432 ... ..,. 0.784 ,..,11

PAGE 88

"' 1.1to ... ... m ...,.. ..... ..... ... ..... ""' ... -.... .. ,.. """' - ... 1.1 .. ... '" ... ... ...,. .... ...,. -I 3,100 ---., .... _, ,, ... ....... .. ,., ....... --21 ..... ... ,.. ,., ..... ... ... Ill .., ,.. .... .... ...,. ,. ..... ,. '"121 1,181' .. .... ..... ...... CliN t 1107 .c_.:n.c 1,101!1 '"'"' ..... ...... 11,-- .. '""' ... ..... .... 10,1M ..... ..,.. I 1, ... .... 1,100 IJ,tM -35,1 .. .. .... .,..,. ... ...., ., ..... 1 .... ... .... .. .... .... II 1 e,.f7) 101,317 lt,TU ,., .. 44,814 att,tu 2S4,Ut -...... .., 1,111 ... 1.1'11 ,.. 3,017 4,UU 1 .... 7 .... 17S ... .. ... ... 1,21 ..... ..... ..... ... ...... ... ... ,. ,._,.,. ... ...... 141 ... ._ ... I ..,.. .. ,121 .... n,no 24,138 ..,., .... - -..... ... ...,. ... ..... .... ..... "" ,.. Ill ... ,., ,,,,, -'"' """""' .. .,.. ... ..... ..... ..... ..... ,._ '"' ... ... ... ,.. ...,. ..... .,.,, I ... ., ... ... "" 1,U! ..... ..... "' ... "' .... -.... ,., 5<7 ... .,. ... .,, .... ..... - ... ... ,.. ,.. ,_ ..... ..... - ., ...,. ... ..... .. 2.1tt .... 11.011 .......... -...,. ...... 17,0\1 ..... -,,... 11,181 - ... ..-1J><' ... .. ,.. 1 1,2'74 .,_ .... ... ,.,. ...... a,n.c ,,_ ..... .. 81,12 t ....... .... 251 ... ... ... ... ,..., .... ,__ .. ..,., ... 1 t,OQO -...... .... . .., .., -..... 1,311 .... .... U',713 .. ... ... ... ... t,tt.z .... .., .......... """ .. ,., .. ... .... ..... ,_ ,...,. .... 1 743 11; 104 3,074 38,17& II, HI ...... .... 2,8o42 .... ,. 3,tll ,.,,.. .... ...... lla,141 ..... 2,247 ...... ..... ,.. ..... 11,87$ 2t,ut .. ... ..... 310 ..... ... r .ua '" .... 4,510 13i,t2 1 ........ ,. ... .. ""' 183 ,,. ... ... .......... "" 731 ... ... '" 1,1$2 7,101 ..... ..... 10.114 .... ...... .... 61,385 ... ., t14,7U - .... -..... ..... t.Ott ... .,., ...... ,,,Ma ...... .., o.:m .. tt.:na ..... ..,. .. .. "'' ..... ,.. ..... ..... ...... ..., ...... - ,., 2,11 2 ... -"" .... ._ ...... 01 luu I ..... ...... -.... ..... '""" ...... -O'IUifll ... .... ... ..... ..... ..... - 1 .. ...... .... ._ --...... -7,.411 ... .... ...,. .,..,. ...... ...... - --"'"' 7,f,. ..... ...,.. -, .... -' ..... ..... ... 4 1.)01 ...,.. ..... 27,tl't -1 ..... 41,480 ..... .. .., t2,183 17f.1S. -.... .. .... ..... ...... ._ ..... .... eo.n 2 .. ., ,,..... ......... ... ..... ,..,. ..... ...., 11,M1 ...... ..... ,...,. ... .. 1 107 ..... ..... ... ... U,Jrl 41,04$ .......... 1,..., .... 2,216 tW4 ... ,.,.,. ..... ...... -- ... . ., .. ,. .. ,.. :1,212 '""" 11.117 Ol,31t - 1,711 ...... Z,Otl .... ,,,. ,.,, .. .. .... 1ot,OQI S.Mnol 1,i14 ...... .... ..... ... --100,111 8umlt ... t.A17 '" ..... '""' ..... ..... II,Ote -- ... ..... ... ..... ... ..... ..... ..... ,_ ... ,.. ... ... ... -IMI '1',-431 """" ... ... ... ... ,. ... ,..,, ..... - ..... ...... ..... ., .. ,. .... ,...., ...... -_,, .,. ... ... ... "' ..... .. . .... .... .. ..-1 .... 4,11t ..... t4on'4 70

PAGE 89

.... 1,300 1 .... .. .... I ... 1.1-ta .. .., ... ...... 1,211 ..... ...... .,..I 10 .... ''"'' .... ..... 217,113& ..... - ... ... ,., ... ... 1 .... ..... -"""'"' I ,. .,.. ... -1,8&1 41,700 t ; 72t .,,.. Clll\l l ... ..... 1,130 1<,100 '"" ..... ... ... ... a,. no '"' "' .... 1,000 10,708 ..... .,. .. 001 1 1 I t,Ont a,rot ..... .,, .. 3,6l1 ...... ...... ...... """"" .. '" ..... ... 1,110 ..... ..... .. ...... "''" tt lt.010 108,e10 .....,. ,.,_ 4&,170 221,2'74 237,118 .,.I_ ,..... t .,, 1,111 ... ..... OOt ..... 11,101 - "' ... 210 ... .... ,..., ..... .... """' ..... -7,tl1" .... .. '""" """ ... ,., a&ot..t10 ._ .. >,J10 ...... 3.1" .. .... ..,.. 24,:113 --N.tfl """' ... ... ..... ,.._ ...-a, lot - ... ,., tiT "" ,., 1,102 ..... ,,,., - .,.. ,,.. ... .... .... ..-,,_ ,,,7 ... - .. ... ... ... ,..,. .,. ..... -' ... .,. ... "' ... .... ..... ... .... ... ... ... -... ..... ... .. ... ... ... ... ... .... .... .., -,.. -... ---I ,. 1 .... ... 1 .... ... 2,1t3 .. 711 U.tlt -' 1.-._ ..... n.-..... 31.tU 1>.* ""' -I ... -..... ... -.. 7,761 ...... ..... 1 8 ,118 00,110 :nt.m - ,.. ... .., .. -1,101 3,114 J,el3 lfldiMiflfwr ,. ..... .. I U,J:IO 1,030 ...... IO,tla .,._ ... I,WI 011 ..... 1,3-11 ... .... 17,710 ... ... .. .. ... 1,117 ... ..... ...,... .. .. '"' ... ... l.()ti ..... """ 1, ... 7 ,31'1 1,780 1 ..... .. I ...... 18,112 ...... .... I 2.'1'011 3,10<4 -. ..., ...... 34,381 lll;a07 .._ .,.., 11,110 ..... .... ..... t2.teei ..... ...... ,..., ... '""' U1 ..... ... "'"'' ..... '"'"" """" ... .. 201 ... ,,. .., .... ........ ... ,.. .... ... ,,. 1,134 .... '"" -1 -...... .... ...... ...... Ul,tU - ...... 0/1117 ...... ,,., u,-,, ...,., 111,41:1 ...... ... ..... 171 1 .... ....... ...... 0 .. .... ...., ... ..... -,..,. ..... .,,,, - ... .... 1 .. 1 ... ..... ..... 1 .... a 11 an I "' ..... 1 .... ..... UIJ 13,230 ..... Cluad'o'u 1 0 ... ,,. f01 2PI1 ... ... 1,. ..... 14,t .. .._ ..... ....,. -....... ,,_ 1>,MO -.... - 1RI$ ,_ t,lN .... ..... ,..., ...... 11JM -- .... -'"" -1 ..... ...... ....... 0,1 ... ...,. ...... .... ...... w;m 1l'l,lt6 ..... ...... ..... .,. ...... 1 ... 300 ...... l1,7fl .... I ..,., ..... ...... .n ...... ...,. nt.w .......... ... 1 ... 6,1:1< ... I 1 ..... tt,n!ll .. .... &alnl..lolwlt ... '"" 1,134 ..-..... 10.>a> t2.210 """ &alnlWGII 1 .... .... 2,271 ,._ .... 30,000 ...... .., -- ... ..., 1,1oa ..,. .... ,..,. ...... """" - t,7.W ..... .. .... "'"' """" ...... lll,,J& &tmtnol 1 -"""' 2,311 ,, .. ,. ,,.. ...... -1 1 ...... ...mr ... ..... ... .... 1.-..., ... 11,101 -- ... MM .. 1,., 1.007 3,3U ..... ,_ ... ""' ... 001 ... -..... '"" u"' ... ... 1 .. ... '" 011 ..... UOI ......... .,.,. ...... .-t7,fllil ..-,_ ... 1_,,, 1n ... .,. ,.. ... ..... ..... ..... - .... ,..., "" ..... ,..,. ..... ..... 1 .... ... 71

PAGE 90

TABLE C-3. (continued). 1,133 1,A&I 1,1127 .... 3 .... ... ., 1 ....., ,.... 34, 7"3 - 1 0 7.816 ....., .... 107,$4$ .,_ 033,874 """""" 3 ... ... .. ... -._ .... c-. 180 .... ... 2 1 .012 111/11 -10.01 6 ...... c ... 3 ... ....,. I Hilt 1 5,148 .... 31lUTe f1,011 Cloy 121 1 .... ... .... -11 .... tO, 127 3 ... 21 ""'"' ,..,, ..... 1 ,911 ...... ..... .,,,,. ...... .. .... """" ... 2 3 ... ..... ... -,..,. ..... 1"" 1 7 ,717 .,_ 11 ..... 11 .... ,...,. ....... .....,, ........ -,.., ... CoSoiO I ... 1.118 ... 1,16:1 ... .... .... 12',351 ""'' 2 3 '" ... 213 ... ... ,..., .... .... ._ 2 '""' .... 20,120 ...... -...... ::rn.oeo 3 1 ..... ..... """' ... 1 ...... ...... ...... ... ..... ... 5,184 ... ...... ..... ...... 3 2 ... ... ... ... ..... ..... .. .. ........ 3 2 ,. 1 ,187 ... 1,.07 .... .... 1 10.11 $ ..... Gllchllll 2 3 .. ... .. '" ... ..... ..... ...... 1 . 303 ... ... 257 1,127 .... ... ... 3 2 ... ... "' ... ... ,..,. .... ..... ......... 2 3 .. ... ..., ... ... ... ._ ... ..... ... ... ,.. ... 721 .... ..... .... H el'ldfY ... ..... ... ,..,.. ... .... ._ tt,420 1 3 1 137 ..... 1 341 ...... .. ,.. 31M$ ,....,. ...... Hlgl\t.-. 1 ... 2 .... .... .... ... 11.746 -. ,........,., 1 7.875 51.081 ..., .. .... ".c< 81 .97 1 ,......,. 324 ,121 ........ 3 2 ... ... ..,. 811 .,. ,..,. 3,200 1 ..:1 MlanAM! r ._ ... 11,403 1 ,97 ...... .... 5).7'12 -3 ... ..... 873 .... ..... .. 1 7,708 3 2 ... ... ... '"' 1,182 2 .... ..... ..._. 2 3 .. 3 1 5 ... '" '"" ... ,. ..... 3 ..... 1A31 1.111 ..... 3.128 00, 100 ...... ..... ... .. ,. ,,_ .... ...... 8 714 ...... .. ... ....,., .... 3 2 ..... 12.,133 ..,.,. e,tot .... ...... ..... ,.,, .. ...., 3 313 1 .300 ... :.il,tM ... ..... ,nl' ...... ""'"' 3 1f ... .. ,., ... ., ... ... ......... 2 2 ... "" ... TIT '"' 3,167 ,..., 1 ..... 11.2-18 IIJIST ...... 4 ,014 &2,&tZ 2 1,074 11 ..... 3 2 813 ..... :>.oil 20 ,861 U1t 33 ,teo UU!ill ... ..... ... ,,.,.. 2 .042 .,,.. 1 0 ,71& ...... 11 ... ..... M11 .... 1f,Ot7 ...... 2 3n ..... ... ..... ... 3, ... 4,717 ..... 3 1 .... ..... .... ... .... ...... 1:),407 47,71 8 1 313 1 ,1>0 ... .... ... 4,1-$$ 4,73$ ,...,. 1 ..... ...... 1 .... ... ... U i ,831 711i, 7&7 8:2, 061 - 1 ....... 1 .... .... ,,0 ... 18.878 1 :),314 ... .. 0,300 $),&1) 1-&4,1:)0 1 0,381 1 83,o31t 80,10) .. .... 1 ..... ...... ...., ..... .... ...... .. .... ....... 7 .... 42, 42<1 ..... ...... 12,92& 1 61, 411& 87,880 ....... 1 3,872 2l, 751 ... 9,807 ...... .. .... 181.&10 2 ... ..... 1 11 0 .... .... 1M1t 11, 850 ...... 2 4 ... 6,207 1,183 .... ,.. 1 4 0!!8 1 2 ,017 43,187 4 ..... 8,70$ ..... '"'"" 4,787 ...... ..... ...... I ... ..... <.OZ1 .... .... 1 1,118 13,884 23$,1210 ..... ...... ...... 183,708 2 01$ 21,440 ..., ,...., 4 ,674 ...... ... ... t0EMll3 ,., ...... .. .... 1,08 7 8,687 Ut3 ..... 2 3 ... 1,333 091 -' "" 3 331 .,.. 13,Mt ... .. .. ... ..1 1 ,67!1 2 ,870 ._ .. w ... 300 .,. .., .... ...... -...... 1 '" ... ..... 72

PAGE 91

TABLE Q.3. (continued). 3 2 2 3 7 10 2 1 3 2 1 2 11 1 2 3 2 4 3 I 3 2 3 2 3 I 6 2 3 1 7 3 7 0 3 2 3 1 2 2 3 2 ' 1 3 11 3 1 7 7 4 7 7 1 3 2 4 3 1 7 3 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 1,300 ,.., 2,&42 7,110 1 M 013 1,018 817 1,887 .. 1 19,085 340 ... ... ... 410 181 "" ... ... ... ... 302 ,.. 1,179 ... 7,081 .., ... ... 1 .. .. 1,&78 2 .... 2 .... ,. 77 .., ..... ... ... ... 1,071 ,., ..... ... I ..... .,.. ..... ... 1.011 .... ... 1-..... .,. 427 "m ... 3,130 7,$01 1,2.11 25 .. 7 .. ...... ... '"' .. ,704 7,01l0 t,TIIO 2; 11a,na 1,213 ... 3t,t15 14,311 ..... ,., 1,171 ... ,.. ... 081 ... 1,547 2,&18 51,782 ... ..... ..... ... ,,. 7,700 1 9,812 12,8 1,321 ""' .. 11,479 10,741 5,717 ..... ..... t,&'10 1,81) t.tOI IU.7115 4 ..... 23-,UI .... ..... ..,., .... 1 ...... .. .... 1, ... 1 .... ,., ... 241 1 .... 331 8.111 100 ... .... ... ..... ... 22.&10 ... fl7 a.ta.. ..... ... ... ... 172 127 178 = .,. ... .... 1,114 ... ... '" ... 07 1 .... ..... 2,770 ... 3$1 ..... 3,157 .... .,. ... 1,263 ... 7,78& 1,277 7 .... 2 .... ..... 4,782 1,1t7 1,11112 2,403 1,149 2,133 2,.,. .., 003 .., '"' 73 .. .... ...... 1"" .... ...... . .,. ... .,.,... ...... ...... ""' 1,421 ... ... ... ... ... 1..... ...... 4$,7 ... 021 .. ... ,..,. ... ... ...... 41,128 ..... ... ... ...... 1 ..... $,471 .... 8,073 2.042 3l,001 ..... ...... 44,2$1 ...... .... .... 7 ... ...... 4,18 1 30 .. 1 17,131 ..... .... ... .. ...... ..... ... '"' 18,828 ... ..... Z482 1,917 ..... '"" ... ... 1, ... '"" ... ,.. ..... 363 .. "" ... '"' ... ..... ..... 1&,320 810 2,019 1, ... ... ""' .... ... """ 018 ... 718 4,D04 8,474 """ ...., ... .... I ... 1 .... ..... t5,7a l ..... 1 ..... '"' U10 ..... ...... ..... 5,001 1 108 1,(132 ... ... ..... ... .. ,514 un 73,0t1 223,170 1 .... ...... 31,885 11,808 ...... ... ....... ... .... 24,111 ...... ..... 2,tt8 1,200 1,133 1 ,21 2 ... 1 ,003 ..... ... .... ,. ... ... 1, ... "n.787 t ,tN ... 41,5$4 ..,:wt 12,881 4 .... .. 1 100 ..... ....... ...... ...... ..... ..... 7 ..... 1 ..... ....... 80.7 .. 182,.811 1 0,910 1""' 31,-..... ., .... 30.108 ..... ..... ... ..... ..... ..... 17,788 MOO ...... ...... 2,114 10, 318 1 2 ,9QI ... at,tft 7,123 ........ ... Z"" 87,47'&1 30,122 $,212 ..... 11),151 '"" 1 ,070 1 ... 2,3&1 3,832 4,031 14,N7 11,98) 101,474 ... 10,801 7 .... ..... ..... ... .,. 30.137 ....... 4,l07 001 3,770 ...... ..... ..... ..... 4 ... ..... ..... ...... 1M .. lZ$48 .. ..,... 51,185 12,134 12.l3> ...... 12.30& ....,. ..... 1 ... .. ..... ..... 1,403 ....1 ..... ..... ""' ....... ... 81i1,747 311,851 .. .... 17,831 ....... 12,505 !1,730 ..1 .... 100.27> 2:5.374 18,$34 ..... 3,t:41 ... 8,100 .... ..... ...... ..... ... .... 7 ... 7 IS4,7fo8 17,704 .... 2,832 ee.no 184, ,., ... 14,701 2,33l 7,$08 120 .... 122,199 .. M,11'& 111,483 48,45:) 14,$31 m.on ... 45$,518 181 ..... ... .... 183,4&4 .. .... ...... 81, 15!5 "'"" 168,179 108,884 ... 13.718 7,52$ ..... ... .... ..... ...

PAGE 92

TABLE C-3. (continued). -"'"'" H endry """"""""" -......... .......... ..... ... ..... ...., Ubo23 *3,37& ...... 3,320 8,470 8,318 ..,. ...... ...... 1 .... ''"' ,.. ... 21,377' 073 1,873 ... .... 1 .. .. ... ., 1 .... ... ..... 0'71 ,.,,.. "" ... 8,204 ...,. ... 181 ... "' ... "' ... .. 7 .., ..... 1,137 ..... ... ..... 0'77 ... .. ..... .. ..., 2,8U ... .. ... .... .... ''""' ... .... 1,211 ... 7 ... 1 1,.3111 7 .... ...... ..... ...,., 1,144 .... ...... t-173 2,1n ..... ... ..,. ... "' .,.,2 ... .,, 320 74 .. ,..,. ... "'"7 110.121 ... 22,:t76 15,8 8,1a& ...... ..... 111,1.27 1,181 ... ,.., .. ... ..... 847 ... ... 420 ., 1,122 18,eot to,na ...... ... 11,7119 ... .. ... ... .._ 41,870 ..... .. ., .... ... ...... 21,an 1:t,918 8,831 1, 803 8,7&1 .. ... 38,4&1 ..... 8l' ,U2 8t,817 ...... $,415 7,215 41,341 ... ... 17,7N .. ,., 1,844 '" ...... "' 2 180 3,.43l ... 7,018 ...... -2.o24 2,$31 ..... 4.14117 1.;173 ... ...... .... 1.001 ... .... ... ... ... ... ,.. ... 2 .... 2-ltAIO 011 ..... 1 ... 7 "' ... """' ..... ... ... ... "" 4.178 .... 2. 1 .. 1,703 ... 2.020 .. 1 ...... 2,707 1 ..... ..... 13,180 ..... .... 2,!100 .... ..... ... ,., 5, 13: 1,1.25 1,04 $ ... ... t,45t .. 1 .... 1.<128 ...... ... ,., 12M$ 30,701 3,770 ,., .... 3,$72 1,>06 .,,38 ...... .. 1,07 8 .... 1,327 1 ,13t 1,201 878 1,7*1 ..,.. ...... -...... 1,GM 24,1 1 7 .... 1,214 ......,. -1,.., ..... 477 1,oe3 ...... ...... .._ ...... ._ 13.810 ..... ..... ...,, -...... 183,77 5 $1,197 11, 10$ 1 4 ,7118 ...... ..... 12.31& 30,487 ...., ..... ..... 00 1 ...... 1-._., 18.018 ..... ,. ... 101U73 ..... 1 .... ...... 1 .... 21,m 7,213 Z4a,178 ..... 2.317 ...... "'""' 5At7 ..... 10.187 1,t02 1 .... "'" ..... ._ ..... ..... 1'-243 1 ..... 3,21 2 ..... "'"' ..... 1...... Y11J43 oo.270 ...... ... 3,783 21,9.24 ...... ..... .... 1 U14 1 ..... ..... ts,et4 14,2 1 0 ...... ..... ..... 01 .... ,,..., 13,1!15 ...... 12,630 ...... 211, 047 S,9n ,..., .... 1,47 4 ...... 2,)18 5,715 ... """' t,.Ht ........ .. ,...., .... -71,832 .. .... ... ... 17,080 12,6$1 ..... -1"""" ...... ._ 2M>> "212 ... 4, ... ..... 1t,t35 ... ... ........ -' "' ...... 1 7,703 .... 2 ... ...,.. 188,843 73,346 1 4,91& ..... 7,&1 7 ...... 125,178 ...... .. .., 1.,.. .. .,., 14,840 2M,Z&t .... ,. .... ... 1 ...... 4t1,COS 1 ..... 1 ....., ..... ....... oe.gro 1 ...... ....... .. .... 1>084 7-3,$10 211,7'37 ...,. ,...,.

PAGE 93

3 2 '" 3,107 7,18!1 13,8154 2 .. 174 528 Mn ..,.., 7 7 .. 7,124 .. ,. .... I ....., - 10 ..... .. .... 4;431 ... I .. ...... """""" 3 2 .. "' ICO ... 017 1,030 ,., .. I 104 "'" ,., 8,134 3,313 13,300 ...... 3 ... t,15:2 n ..... <311 12,4815 - 212 401 ... 1 ..,.. """"' 410 ..., ,. 7,348 ..... 17,783 .. 2 3 173 ... ... 1 ,11-1 ..... ..... - 11 ..... -11,307 ..... I tot,NO .,..., I 10> "" 100 ... l,'l'a1 .... .. 181 ICO 300 ... 1,1547 2 7.1 .. ""' .ua 1<344 nlo ...... ......... 3 I ... ... 1,7110 ... .. n{a 13-"""" .. "" 180 IM7 1.-M,. Ff'tii'!Nin .. 120 .. ... ... 1,478 ........ 2 ... ... 001 .. ,,.. 7,001 Ollctllled 2 3 37 181 10 ... ... 1,180 -I .. 110 .. = ... 1,083 .... 2 .. 188 .. ... ... 1,., ...,., ... .. "" 11> 201 1,017 1,571 ...... 100 .., .,. .. I 1,8111 Z,081 HtndiV ... ... ... ... 1,818 3,105 "'""""' 7 ... 1..,. ... ..... ..... 12,8'7'7 I ... .,., .. 1 ...... ...... 10,7011 H llboiOUSih 7 ..,.. IS,ItO '"'" ,_ nl ..,._ 3 2 .. ..I 167 ..., 1,.., Z4St lndiMm.otr ... l.zr7 ... ..... .... 11,018 3 2 180 .... ... 1,1$7 ..... 3 87 170 11!11 ... 137 1,783 2 .. .. .. 107 413 ... ..... 3 <31 2,101 613 ...., 7.>30 18,5Ta .... I ,., .... 1.00 17,918 I ,.,.,. ....., 701 3,710 1, ... 2,101 .. ... ""' 2 110 ... """ 1,018 I,B78 ....,1 ""'"' 2 .. .. .. 118 ... 713 2 104 ... 108 ... 1,770 2,701 -I m 3,073 ... 12 .... I 18,880 ...,"' 3 ... 7.101 1,3 1 8 ..... 11,905 ...... - 225 ..... ... 5,9ta :>.827 11 .... .., ... 11 215 1 .... ... 2,831 .... I '"''' 110 ... "" .. 7 I ,B78 ..... ()QJooM I 320 ..... ... 2,Mt .,_ 1 2,225 .,._,..,. 105 ... lot 1 ... t.7M """"' 7 1,810 ...... 3, '"''"' I ...... 7 247 ... 3 .... .,. 1, 756 ,,.... 3,317 .,..,. .,. ...... 1 5 ... 3,128 Met 11M 5 7 00,551 ,...,, 7 1.125 ti),AIO U84 ...... .,. ..... 1,214 0,7 .. ..... 1!1,948 .,. ... ... 2 .. ... ... ..... ..... '"" ... .... .... ..... ..... ,_ ... ..... ... .... ..... ..... 3 287 l.o29 ... ..... ..... """' I ... ""' 18,271 ,. ...... ... 6.711 I,OXI 8 ,302 n/ ...... 133 ... "" 1,467 ..... ...... 2 "'' ... ... '" 2 ... 7 3 2 .. ... ... "" 1 ,363 ... .. 2 .. ... 70 ... ... 1,018 5 l,o51 ..... 17,872 .,. ..... .. ... .. 331 ... ..... ... ... ..... ...., ... ,.,. ..... .... 75

PAGE 94

..... ... .... ... 1 -2 .. ... .... ... .... .... nf ....,. - ..... .. ..., ..... fa .. .... "'"""" .. 111 ... '" ""' ..... 1 >111 t;471 ... ...,. 1 4,271 """' .., ..... ... .... ... 13,164 ""' ... ..... .. "'" ueo "'""' 1 ... ..... ... 7,7'11 l.'ln 11,oat Oolumbl ,. .. ... 1 ,131 ... Uot - ..,.., ...... 11M7 .. .... 110,80() ...... 1 ... .. .. ... 1,eQI .... - 3 .. ... .. .. &03 1,!1116 ...... 2 ..... ,._ 4.1'1 14,581 ., - ... ._ t,ltt .... nl U,OZ7 .. .. -"' 1 7-'t 1 ... 1 ... ,_,.. 2 .. "' 100 ., ... ..... -3 2 201 .. A1 .. ,,.. 1,012 ....... 2 ,. 1 072 .., ..... ...... 1 .. ,. .. ... ""' t ,no ""' 01 100 "' .,. ..... - .. .. ... ... - 101 ... .. 1JII ..... 1 .. -... ... .... ..... -7 ... ,.,.. "" "'"' ..... .... ..... 1 .,. .. .... .... ll,t04 HM'' oowa" 7 ..... tt,011 ..... .._ fa .. .... ..,_ .. ... ... ... 1,5 11 2,41& -- ... ..... ... ...... 11 .. 71 .... ... ... m 1,184 ..... ... - 2 ., '" .. 7 ... 1,143 .... - .. ... ., "' ..., "' .... 447 2 ,181 ... .... 7 ;11& .,.,. ... m UM .... I &,lie .. ..,.. ,_, 7tt .... 7 nf .... ..... 2 ... ... ... .... .... ,., """" .. .. .. .. "" "' 2 2 ... ... ... ... .... 2,131 - .. ... 12,.,. .. .... 5 ,. ..... ,,., ... .... ....... ... I,& til ... ..... ""' - ... 1 ... ... ..... .. ,.. ..... 2 ... ... .... .... <.100 01 .. 0. 1 ... ..... ... ...... ._ ..... Cllllci&U 1 101 ... .... .., .. - 11117 ...... ..... ... "" ... .. """"' 7 .., ... 1 ... .... o}a " - t ..... ...... .. ...... "'' ... ... 7 ... ..,, -.au ...... lo,ool ........ 7 ,,... ...... ..... -""' t7,074 .... 1 ..... ... -tUtt ., -........ 2111 t,OU ... ..... ..... UIO ............ ., ..... .. uu ...,. ... lelntiNele ... ..... l,OH' ._ .. 1 .. 19,111 ......... .., ..... ... 1,814 .,,., 1 ... .... 1,001 ..... ,. ..... ..... ,., ... ... .... ..... 8,100 ., 14,288 """'"' "' ... ... 1,411& ..,. .,.,.. .._._ ,, "' ... ... .... .... ,.,.., 2 2 .. ,., ... ... ..... ..... Union ., ..,. 10 ... ... I.O?J - 1,oat .... .... ..,.., ...... - .. .. 1 ... ,.. ... ., 1M ... ... ... ..... ..... .. ... ... ... ...,. 76

PAGE 95

... .,. ... .. l,11!o ...... .., ... ..., ... ..... 7.-t.UI;S - .. -,,. .. -.... 7 ... 7, ... ..... ft/ a ...... ..... ..... ..... -ft/ a oo,m ........ 3 .. ... 100 .. ... 1,000 - ... 1,.., "" ..... ... 1 .... 7 ..... m 1 .... ... -1...,. ..... ... ... ... .... 3,01 7 -""'"' 1 .. .... .. I ...,. 7, ... 1 ..... 170 ,.. ... 1, 1:1$ ... .... .... II O.I N ... I., 11,tfl ...... I 112.o&G Dolola 100 on ... ... .... .... .... ., 1 .. ... .,. 1,.., ....., Uti ,,., ... .... ,...,. nf ....... - 1 .. ..... ...,. .... 1 .,. .. ... IN .... l.,ttt .... .. ... ... ... ... ''" ... ... ... 7 .. --7- .. ,,.. ., ... .. ..... .. ... .. w ... 1 111 ... ..... .. "' 117 ... """ ..... ... ... ... ... -2Jt7< ... .,. ... ... .... ..... ..... 7 ... ..... ... Mn ...., ...... .......... 217 .., ... ll,m ............ 7 ...... 11.310 """ .,. ..... - 2 .. ... ... 1 .... M70 ll'ldllln..,., ... ,,. ... .. ... 11,714 ... '"" ... ... 1,1 81 ...... .... ....... 2 ff1 ... .. .., t ,UO t,al7 - .. ... .. ... ... ... ._ ... .. 7 8 ;&ce 7 ,832 ...... .... ... 8,4 N -l t,:MI 21', 1 H ..... ,., "'" .... .... ..... ..... 2 3 ... ... ... .... 1, 911 0.712 "- .. .. .. .. ... 7 .. 2 ... ... ... .,.. 1,711 2,730 "" UM ... ..... "'' ...... .... ._ ... 7 .. ., 12,181 27,173 ... l,t7t ... ..... 4.140 12.771 - II ... ... .., ..... ..,.. .. 110 ... ... .... .._ Clll1a- I ""' ..... ... .. ... :.nl IUOO Clufla\u I 112 ... ... 1 ... 1 ,_ ,_ - 7 1.-..... 1 .... "'" ... .. - 7 .,. .. I ... .... "'" ..... - ..... ...... ..... -nl ...,., 7 ... ...., ...... ll..m .,..., 7 ...... ...... .... ...,.. n/& .. .... .... ..... 7 .... ... ''"" 2:7,1 ........ "" ..... ... ._ ..... &.IN..IoMI ... ..... ... ).111 .... 10,21$ hlnll.a!C: .. ... ..... .... 71/KT ..... .. .... - I "" .... ... IM7 ..... .... - ... ..... ..... -"'' .. ..,. ....... 7 ... MOO ..... ..... I ... ..... I M "" ... ... ..... a,3ns ... , - "' "" .. ... ..... .... - .. ... '" "' ..... 2,3<18 .,_ .. .,. I
PAGE 96

-... ... ..... 7 ... ... - .. ... .. .... ...., - 7 .., 1,112 .. ,. 1 .... I 00,77 6 - 10 ...... ...... ., .... ...... """""' .. liT .. "" ... 1 .... ""-I ... 1,1111 ... ..... M .. ... "''" ,.. t,sta ... f,133 4,801 14..180 ""' .. 7 ..... ... ..... ..... ..... """" I ... ..... ... .... 7, ... 2o,31:J 001\lft'lbl$ ... .. ... 1,1; 3,1CII2 S,S3J' .,.., ..... 311,780 11,.147 .. ... I 113.t0t ...... 1 ... ... ... ... 1 .... :J.Sll - .. I n ... .., ... ..... ..... .... ,, . .... 11,11(1 nl ...... - I m ..... ..... ..... I .. .... ... "" 137 1 1,m .,.St 5 -- .. 100 ... ... "" .... - ,., ... .,. ... ..... 7 .... - .. ltl ,. ... ,.. ..... -I ,. 10> .. ... .. '"' .... .. I D .. .. -. .... .. ... ... "" ... ..... ..... -' ... ... 2,tf10 ,..., -7 3 1 2 ..... ... 7,172 ..... IUOO .......... I ... ... 631 ,131 .... 7 Uoll!lt ... 7 ..... ... , .... ZJ,.$11 - .. ... ... ... ..... .. ... ...... .., ... ..... ... 0.7 .. 4,1t:J \2,111 J .. -' ... ... ... 1,1 57 ..... ....7 ... -. .. ... ... 1,1111 -........ .. .. .. .. ... 747 ..... ... .... ... '"" ..... 21,GQ1' ,.. I .., 5,111 ..... ...... .,. 27,04) ..... ,., .. ... 1,410 ..... "'' .... .... ,,. .,. ... .... 2,015 ..... """" .. ... .. ... ... "' -- 100 .. 1 .. ... 1 ,801 1 515 ..... 111 I ..... nja 1 ..... - ,.I ..... ,,., ... ,..,.. .. .... - 251 -"' '"" ...... tJ,tft, ... .... .., 2,1137 ...., .... - ... ... ... ..... ..... 01ua I ... ...,. ..... ta,U!IO O'IUfltll ... ... .. 7 IPII 1 .... .,_ - 1 .... ,.._, ., .. 7 .. nJ --..... 7 ... ..... ... .... nJ ..,. - 1 .... 14,\&t ..... 47/172 "'' ...... 7 0&1 ..... 1 .... .. .... .. , ...,.., -7 ,,.. ...... ..... ...... nJ ...,,. .... ..... 7,217 .... I'"'" nJ .,..,, """""" "" ..... 071 .., .. --............ "" .... ... ..... '"" 10 .... IIJnt luCile ,. ..... .... 7.m .. 7$ ..... -- I "" I,ITO ... "" ..... U 7 1 "" 4,110 I ,oil - I ..... ......... ... e,40t l,lU ...... I 1Stl0. 8-.-nl ..- 3 1<3 ... ... 1,5113 .... 4,810 -- 130 .... ... ..I ..,.. .... T ..... .. ... 1 .. "'' 1,370 ..... Union .. ... 72 .. ... 1,120 \IOIIAIIa 1,151 ..... .. .... .... .. "' 357" 78

PAGE 97

.. -... .. MSf ..... ... ..... ... ..... 1.n .. IS.IU .. ... ... ... t,t38 un 1 ... 1...... 11 .... ., 27,117 ... ...... .. ,.. ..,... I ...... 61 ... ,., ... ... -... U71 ..... .. ,.a ... '""' ... 1,,.. .... ....... ... ..... ... U02 ...... .... <17 ..... ... ..,.. ..... 21.000 ... ,.. ... 1,1211 3,1M .... ...... ... ., "' ... ... 061 .... ..... a .. ... ... ..... - ..... 13,411 ..... 1 .. ,.. ...... ... ..... ..... .... of ....... ... ... ... .. ,..,. .. ,.. a .. ... ... ... .. .... ... .. 1 ... .... ...,, 7,DM .. 111 .. "" "' ..... 1 .. ... .. .. ... 1,145 .. ... .. - .. ... .. ... ..... ,..,., "" ... ... ... ..... ._ 1 ... ... ... ... 2.117 ,.... 7 3 "" 1.,611 .... .... ...,.. ... .,. ... ..... ..... U,tcl7 ..... ...... "'' .. .... .,. <0',.441 .. ... "" .. ..... ..... ... ,..,. ... .... ...... ... 54 ... .. ... 1,114 3,4!53 .... .. "" ... .., 1,1t3 ..... 3 27 ... .. ... '"' ... ..... 1 11 10,070 ..... 22-,tile ... .... t,IHt ...... ,. ..... 2 "' ..... t,43t 3,011 . .... 3 ... .... ... 1,123 ..... .. 3 27 ... .. ,., ... "" "' ... ... ... ,..., .. ... a ... ..... '" ..... .,. 1 0.705 ..., .... ..... ..... ,74S - ... .... ... .., .. ..... ..... "" .... .,. ..... ..... ..... 121 ... .. .... ..... ... .... "' ..... ..... ...... ... ... ... t,tcn ..... ._ 1 ._ ..... ..-11.,311 ..,. .,,.., - -...,. ... .... ""' 1,1..0 -- -..... ..,., ..,.. ..,. ...... -' "" ..... ..... 2t..e-...... .. .... ..... ,....,. ..... .... .. .. ... 1.,313 7.>1> t,471 ...... .,. 27 .... ""'"" -1Pf7 .., 2 .... .... ,.., --... ... ..... ,. ...... ..... ..... ,_ludo ... ...,. t,t:M '"" ..... U,t13 ... 1 ,712 .. .... ..... "'" ., -um ...... ,. ...... &.!ninole ... Uti I, ttl 7,M1 I ..,a ... ... .,. ..... ..... .... 2 ... ... ... ..... "'"' .. ... ... ... 1,37& ..... " ... -1,144 ...., t""" ...... .. ... t.7at 1,,.. ..... ...... ... 79

PAGE 98

.., ... .., , ..- "" ..... m ._ 7,111 ...... .. "' "' ... ..... ..- 7 "" ..... ..... ., .... nf -' ..... -,.., ...... ., ... ,., 2 ... ... .. .,. ..... "' t,71t ... ..... 4,151 ..... ... ... ..... Ul,26t ... .... "' ..... .... ..... "' .... ... ..... ... .. 2 t,tte 2 3 ... .. ,.. 1,121 """ ..... ..... .. .... 12,111 eo,tae nf 11t,884 '" ..,, ... ... ,..., -2 '" "' .. ''"" t,7:t7 .... ..... .... 10.711 ta 311,180 ... --1,l14 ..... nf '"* "' ... ... ..... ..... ... 1 2 .. .. ... ... ... ..... ... ... ... .. ..... ..... .. .. .. .. ... I .. ... ... ..,,. .. ... ... -2 .. .. .. ... -' ""' .. l14 .,. ... -.... .. ... .... ... ..... .... twMI. 1 .., .... .. ..... .... 17, 1 ... "'' ... ... .... .. ...... ,.. .. "". 1 ..... ., .... ..... ., ....... ...,_ .. .. ... .. . .... ..... ... ..... ... .. ... .... ..... -- 2 "" 700 ... 1,11!0 ..... .... 3 .. "' ... ... 1,18t ..... - ., 101 .. ... .. .... 3 5CO ..... ... .... 8 ,!118 ...... ... ... t,007 ..... .. .,. .... ..... 2 m ..... .... .. .,. ..... ..... 2 3 "' ... ... 1,101 2,100 ...... """"' ., ... .. '"' ... ,.. ....... 2 2 ,., ... ... ... 1,612 2.727 .. ... .. .... ..... n/o ...... ...... "" ... ..... .... .. ,, .. ,.,_ ...... ... ,.,., ... ... ., .... 14.,018 ... -... ..... ..... l.tU .. .. .,. .. .. ..... ()11111 !Jill 3 ... ..... -..... ..... ...... Clldtcll'u .. .. ... ..... ._ .. - 7 ... .... ..... ..... ., 3UU - 7 311 --.,. 7- ... .. ... .. -.,. -7 ... ...... .... ...... ..... ..,,. 1 ...... ..... ... ... ., ...... .... ,..,. .... .... '""' .,. "'"' ........ 2 ... ... u .. ..... 10.UI .... ...,m ... .... ... ... ..... 11,371 Saii'IWC'- .., 2,131 1 ,17t 1,na ...... ...... -- ... t,7!1f ... ..... a;n a .... ... ........ lo.J .. .... I ...... S.ll'llnol 1 ... ... ,...,. ..... n/& ..... lutnlt ... ... ... ..... 2 .... a.t e t --2 ... ... ... .. 2,442 ...... '"'" a .. .. '" ... ..... ..... ...... 2 3 "' ... ,. ,,. .,, t,1f1 ..,_ 1,217 e,t14 ..... ...... .,. -........ 2 .. ... '" .,. .... .... ... ... ... ..... ..... ..... ..... .. ... 80

PAGE 99

TABLE C-4. (continued). 2 ,. ,.. ,,. .,. 1,187 ..... ... ... ..,. .., . ,.,. """' 115,741 ....... 3 .. ... ... ... ..... 2.000 - 7 830 .... 1,1!58 ..... 7 nl - ._ ..,... ..... ..,., nl .... 3 .. 1 .. 100 ... ..7 U37 .,.,_ I ... .... ... 10.780 ... 17,810 """' 3 ... ..... ... 7 .. ... 1!5,617 a., 2 4 ... ... 1 ... ..... ... ..... """" I ... ..... ... ... .... 22,784 Colombia ltl ... ,.1 1,11 7 .,.. 8 ,7!8 Dodo ..... ,..... t.;t,$77 ....... "'' 118,ast .,_ I ... 410 ... ... 1,008 ..... Ill 2 .. ,., 117 ... ... t,'M t """' .... ..... .... ..... "' 38,75$ ......... -.... ..... 1,737 .,. .. .... - ... ..,. ... ..... .. ... .... ....... 3 2 .. 135 108 ... 067 1,574 3 ... ... .,. 7aa .... 7 ,toa "'""" 2 3 ... .. .,. ... 1_ .. """" I "' 130 .. 30> ... 1,171 """ 3 2 .. ... .. .... ... 1,81'1' ,_,"" 2 .. 188 123 "' t ,ua 1,720 - 107 316 ,., 837 -2 ... ... ... ... ... .... """"""" 7 3 .... 1 .... ... ... .. ... 18,087 I0 316 1,178 1,870 ,.,.,. .. 2 3 .. 100 .. 141 ... ... ..... ... ..... "" 10 .... M81 23,41& ... &13 CIA I& ...... 21,&81 ., .. .... Loon 3 2 .. ... .... 3,180 I 0,848 ..... 2 3 ... ... ... 1,180 2.153 4,141 Ubo3 ..... ..... -" 2 3 1 .. .., ... ... 2, ... .... T""'' 2 ... 154 ... .... .... """' 3 .. 222 ,. ,., 6a7 1 ,19e - ... ... ... .,.... nl 31.260 - 2 .. ... H3 ... 1, ... 1,870 -472 .... 1,118 2, ... ..... ... 179 ... 1,818 un 81

PAGE 100

' ... ... ,. .. .. ... ,..,. ... ..... .... fa ...,. ...... ..... "'' .. .... .. "' no ... ... ..... -I ,.. ,..,. ... 11,104 ..... ta.t u ... ..... ... t,\37 ..., """ a., ... ...,. Otf1 2,727 """ 10,7151 ""'" I ... .... .... .... .... .,..,. CoiUmll .. 3 .. ... ... 1,101 ..... .... .... II ... --11,115 .,. 11&,6015 ...... I "' ... .. ... -. .,. - 3 .. ... ... ,.. ..... .... .. """' ..... .... 1 ..... 11,1U .,. .ll7,22l' - I ..... ... .... .. ... .,. .. ,.., ...... ... ... ... .... .. ... ... ........ "' ,,, ,., ... ... ..... ....... ... ... ... ... ...... 7,131 2 .. .. ... ,,, ..... I "' ... .. ... ... I,ID ... .. -100 .., ... 1 .... -2 100 ... ... ''22 ., .. .., ... ... 531 ..... ._ ... ... ... ""' ..... ..., .. t,..,.,. ... 1.71 ) ,.. .... ..,., ...... ......... I ... ... ... . ...,. 12,150 "' .. ,. """' ... ...... f'l/ a .,..., - ... '" .., 1 ... 2, ... --- 211 ..... ... ..... ...... 3 2 ... "" ,., 1,1-3t ,..., ..... .. m Ia I ... 1,180 1 ,671 - .. 110 .. .. ... ... .... ... ..... "' 10 ... 1 .... ...... ... I "' .... 1,711 ...... .,. :11,22>1 ,_ ... ..... 1 .11 1 ..,. .,. .... ,.... ... ... ... .... ..... 4,21.t """" ., "'' .. .. -710 ........ '" ... ... ... ..... ..,.. """"" I .. ..... ,..,, "' .,. tUOO - ... ...,, ..... .. .... 1$,024 ...... - ... .... "" ..... ..... ,,,., II ... .... ... .... ...-un 121 ..... ... I ... .. ... ..... Ql .. lllll I .., ..... .. ..... ..... .... 0' II t t II I ... .., ... \,. til .. . ..... - 7 ..... ..... .... "'' ...... - 7 ... ..,. ... ... "" ..... -- ..... ,,., """ ....... nfo ...... 7 ,.. ..... ...... ...... I>.MI ...... -, -...... .... -,., """' -I ..... ..... -...... "'' ..... ,.,._ ... .u:a ... ..... .... ..... -....... ... ''"' ... uoo .... ... ,.. ......... ... 1 .... e,tM 11.,314 ....... -' I ... ..... .. . .... ..... '""" ........ ... ._ 'lit I 21,107 .,. .. S.mtnole 1 071 .... 1,171 ..... .,. n,m S11M1tr ... ... "" 1,788 ..... ..... -' ... ... 211 .., 2,5tl ..... - .. .. .. .. ..... .... ........ 00 ... .. ... ..... ........ 1,21e l ;tllf ..... .. .... "'" ...... Wllllilll. .. ... ... ... ..... -Will"' ... .. ... 1,142 ...,. ..... .. ,. Ill ... 82

PAGE 101

TABLE C-4. (continued). n ... ... "" t.all t,, .. ... .... ... ..... ..... ..... ... .. ... ..... ...., .,. "'"" ..... 11,.216 ""'""' ,. ...... 1,110 ..... .,. ...... .. ... .. ...... - ,. ..... ... ...... ..... ... -... -- ,. ..... ... U1t ..... ...... ... ..,. ..... ..-.... ,. .. 24.118 ... ... ,. t,IOI 3,341 .... ..... ...... ...... .._ I ,.,.,.. ... ... ... -... 3,78) .. ... '" ... -, .. ,. ..... '""' 4;113 ...., .,. .,,,.. ..... "" t,tt3 ...,. ...... ... ... ... 2,714 ..... .... ... .. .,. .... ..,. ... ... ... ..... 1 111 .. ... .. ... ... ..... .. ... n ... -.., .. .. ... ... ... ... .... .. ... ... ... ... 1 ,757 ... ... ... ... ...., ,... ... ... ... ... ...., ,... ....... 7 ... '-'" "" ..... ...,., ,..,.. ......... ,.. -... .... .... ..... H..._.,.. 7 .. ,.,. 11,0... ..... ...... 61,101!1 ...,_ .. ,., 172 ... ..... .... Jndltl' AM, ... ..... ... .. ... ..... ..,,,, ....._. "" tlt "' 1,1:11 .,., ..... -... .. t77 '" "" 1,186 -- .. .. .. ... ... .... ... 2,tt7 1.011 ...... 8,141 .. .... .... ... ..... ..... .. .... I :u.ata ..... ... ..... ..... .... ., ,...,. ...., ... ... ... .... = ..... ...... 27 ... .. ... ... ,... M- '" .., ... ... -"'"' M..- ... ..... .... .... I 20.111 ........ ... .... ..... .. .... ..... 3:3.174 - ... 1,t11 ... 7 .... -15,147 - ... ..... ... ...,. ..... ..... ... ..... ... 1,101 ..... .. .,.,. a.,- .,. UOt ,.. ..... ..... ..... 0 ..... ... ... ... 1,151 ..... ..-- 7 ..... ...... ..... ... ... .,. """ - "" .... .,. ..... ., ...., - ..... n.-. ... ,. ...,., ., -' m ....,. ..... ..... ...... ... ... 7 -.... ..., .. ., .. ..... ..... ,, ... .... 1l,al1 -""""' ... 1,13a ... ... ..... .... ............ ... 1,110 ... ,,, .. .... -taint Lucl ... 3,014 ..... ....... ....., -- ., '"' .... ..... ...... ... 4,1'&2 1,172 .14. .,. -""'"lr!oe. 1 ... 7,422 tAll .... ,. ..... ... ... "' ... .... ..... .,.., .......... ... ... ... "" ..... ... ,. TJ'IO< .. ... ... ... '"' ..... u .... .. ... "' ,., ...... ..... 1',110 ..... t1,ellt ., 32,52& -- .. ... "' -,..., .... -.. "' 1 ,tt7 ..... .. ,. .,. ... -83

PAGE 102

2 72 ., .. m ..... ..... ... 2 .. I ... ..... 1...,. 2 100 ... I. ... 1,700 ..... .., ... 1 ... "'' 3:1,6 10 .. ,., ...... 0,1&) ....... "'' 815.7 10 .. 201 ... .. 1,012 1,87 - .,. 1, ... ... .. .... '"" 1..,.. .,.,.. ... ''" ... ... ,. ... 17,152 Cloy ... .... ... ..... 4,812 .. .... Cdllat I .,. 1,011 lOom ...... 2 lot 070 ,. 1 .... .... .... II .. .. ...,.. 12,7M .... n/o 122,038 I 120 ... "" 1,007 ..... ... I .. Ill 112 ..,. 1,103 I ... 2 ..., ... ,. .... .... nf )1,111 1.000 1 ... ... nfa ... .. 1 .. ..I ... ..... ..... 1,151 2 .. 1 .. 100 ... ... l,oot 2 ... ... .., &10 ... 1 7,111 .. '" ... .., I .. 131 72 "" .. 1,212 .. ... 101 ... ., ., ... "' .. 1,142 1,m ... ... ... ... -..... I 131 ... .. ... U20 ..... .. 1 .... ,.. 1 ..... o;m ...... ..,_ I ... 1,000 ... .., ..... 1...., MMoooqh 7 ... YIO ...... $1,.fJI .... .. ... 11t .,. 1 .... 2..,. -- ... t,nlt 8< 7 ..... ..... .. ... .-. "" "' -1,123 3,511 ..... .... 2 70 "" l>t ... 1,118 1 .... .. ... .. 1&7 ... ... ... ... 1 .... 11.317 .... 24,013: 1 ... 1, ... ...... I .. .... 2 ... ..... 1, ... a,4ll& ., 10, 110 l>a ... ... 1.2112 ..... ..... 3 .. 10< .. "' <71 .. 2 2 100 ... ... ... 2,731 I ... .... I,Ut 14,7tNI ., ...... ... 1.111 1,?47 ...... 15,772 ...... ... 1.1101 ... 7,112 ..... 1 ..... 11 .., l.s10 .. 0.100 ..2 ... 1 ... .. 1.,117 2,2181 ..,.. I .,. ..., ,. ..,.. ..... ,._ 1 ... .., ... ,,,. ..... ._ 1 ..., , ,., ...,. ....,. .,. - 1 .. >.m .... ..,.. -- .... 17,1 1 0 ...,.. "" ,..,., 1 ,.. .. ,. ....., ....., ... I .. 1 .... 15t,(F11 .,. 71,1&1 I 1 .... 1.111 .... 17,104 .,. .. .... 2 338 1, 154 ... .. ... 6,732 2 ... 1 .... ... 3.ett ..... tt,eeo 701 .. I .. 1 .... ..... .. ..... ... .... 3 I ... 1 .. 1 ... .... .,m to.ttt I &3> ..... I,IM .. ...... "'' ,. .. 1 113 7,800 1 .... .,. 1 .... 181 ... ... 1 ,180 2,138 ..... 3 ,., m ... ... 2,57 8 .... 2 .. ... 1 .. ... 1 .... ..... 2 3 .. ... 174 .. 1,221 1 .... 7,W7 U18 ....., .,. ...I .. .. ... ... 411 1,074 1 .. 70 1 ... ... 1,1N 2 .... .... 177 1&8 m 84

PAGE 103

a ,. .. a ... -..... ..., ... a "" ..... -...... ..... ... ,.. ........ 3 ... ... ... ... ,, 11,01'7 - 1 l,OU ... -..... "'' >2,111 -' ,. .. ...... ... 7 .,. -........ .. ... ,, ... .... .... -' 8 ... ..... ... ...... .,678 ...-"""" ... .... ..... ..... t7.tat a.., ... .... ... ..... ... ,...,. Oo11tt ... .... t,no ...... ... .. .... "'"'""'" 201 ... .,. .... .... ""' .... 8....... 12,001 ...... ,,_ ...... .. "" ... 1,01 6 ...., ..... """ 3 .. .. .. 1 121 1,870 ..... """ -..... .... ., 38,87& ........ ' '""' ..... .... ,,.., .,. 15,011 "'""' 5 ... $17 ., ..... ..... .... ....... .. "' ... ... "" -- ... .. ... .. 4/ ,,.. -2 .. ... ... ..,o ,. 111. ... -.,.., 2 .. ... ... .., ... ..... - 11 ... ... ... ..,.. ... ... ... .. .... 3,015 - ... ... ... ... ... .... I MI!IIIIIfo 7 41;3 -m -""'" .,,., ._, ..... ... ..... ... ..,.. e,m ,...,, -7 ..... ... ., ..... "'' ...... " ... "" ..... ...... ........... ... v ... ...., ..... t ,21:t 2 20T "' '" 1 ,111 ..... 70 "' ,,. ... 1,194 ..... ... .. "' .. .. ... .., ,_ 3 ... .... t1,.6tt ..... 25,
PAGE 104

TABLE C-4. (continued). .. .. .. 4,H1 ... .. I .. ... 1-...., ,, .. -nf 10 2-...... .... 83,212 ,., 2 .. ..,. ... ... ..... 1,110 I ... ..... .., 12 .... .... .. .... .,. 1 ,707 .., -..., 11,10) 2 .., ..... ... OAU .... 12,117 I ""' ..... 1 141 l(l,ttt 10,.31 2 ... ,.. 2 3 ... ... ,.. 1,078 """" It MOO <0,7<10 I MOO .... .,. 124,1110 I ... ... ... .... 2.106 .. I ., ,., Ill 301 1.1 t,tto 2 ..... 14,11.1 .. ,,. 1 1;173 .,. 18,174 I ..... 0,21 .... .. I ,._., ... ... 011 ,),174 ...,. .,.. .. ... 110 ... ... 1,111 ... ... .., ... ...... ... 1 ' .. ... too .., ... .... I 30 141 ,. 321 "' ..... .. ... ... ... ... I.OSI 3 .. ... 1 .. ... ''"-,...,. I ... .., .., ,..., """ I '" ... ... .. ...... ..... 3 .., 1... ..... ,..,. 21,411 I ... ..... .., ,_ ... I 13,111 ..... I ... I ,.l'oi. ....,. .,. 6:1,741 .. ... ,. "' .... I .... I - ... 1,7111 '" .. ,, .I .. 14,511 3 2 ... ,.., ... 1,10& ., ,, "' 130 "" t,tN l,ttl 2 3 "' 110 1 .. ... ... 3 .,. .. ,., 1;07t 11,170 25 ,Dt1 1 .... ,..,. 1,t4t ..... I 34,101 2 ... ...... l;eot .... .,. IO,oet 2 "' ... ... 1,302 .... '"" 3 ,. 100 .. 1:10 '" ... ,.,. 272 "" 311 1.B3& .,. 1 .,. 4,117 1,1 1$, 113 .,. 21,10!1 m ..... ..... ...... 1 .... 7 ... ... ... ... .., .. ,, ..... ,..., n ... ... ...,. ...... U21 131 1P70 ... 1,140 ..... ..... I -"" 1>4 ...,. U>5 ,...., II I ... ... ... ..,.. ..... 1 .... 1 .. ... ..... "'" ...... 1 ... ... 1 7<2 --"'" ... ,0 .... .. ,. ._ .... nt ...... ... -. .-... ,.. ,,,., .,..,, 1 1-1 U70 t.. '''" .,. ,.,,.. I 1-..... 1,110 11.201 .,. ... ... 341 ''" ... 3 ... .. .. I 1,110 .., 1.137 ... .... ..... 740 ..... 1, ... ..... I .... ... .. 3 I ... t,ert 111 2,429 ..... .... I .. 5,011 ..... ..... ., ...... 751 1,41 7 ..... .,. ....... ... ... .. .... 2.831 ,,.. 1 .. ... ""' ... ..... ..,.., .. ... ... lo401 ..... 3 .. .,. Ill 712 ... ., ..... ...... ., ..... .. ... 1,108 ..... .., .. ..... ..... 86

PAGE 105

... ..,. .. 1,1 <0 ..... 1; ... '''" of ..-...... -"'' "" ..... .. "" ... ... ,..,. 1,7t2 ... f. H I '" ,...., ,,,.. at,tft C11No ... .m "' .., ,.7. tl,fllt CIOJ "" .... '" 3 .00 7 ,,., 12,flt ""'" 1 ... ..... 11,245 ...... -n,on Colom>lo ,., ... ... ,..,. ..... 1,081 .... 7..,. 41,11S ... .. ... .,. ...... """"' ,,. ... ..... ..... ..... Cliolo .. ... ... ... 1,1S7 ,, ... """' ..... ,..,_ .... ,, ... .,. ....,. ._. .. '""' U07 ,..., 711 .,. .... ...... ... ... .. .... ._ ,_ 2 .. .. Ill ... ..... - "" ... .. ... < ...... 7-....... .. ... ,., .,. 127 -1 .. .. 71 ... .,. ..... - .. ... ... ... -- 3 ... 130 ... 1.17'1 ..... 1 .. ... "' 1,17 0 ..... -' ... .,, .,. ... .,_ ._ -' ... tpZI ... 1t,33 t 7$/IJ 22,110 ... ..... ..., !3,810 7 ..... 1 .... "" 2'7,100 njo ...... -3 .. ... "' ... 1 .... ... 7 -- 310 1 .... ... ..... ..... ...... .... 3 ... "' ... 1,100 ...., "" 3 70 "' 1 .. ... .... '"" - .. "' .. ,, .. .. .. ...... ... ..-1 102 .. .... ..... 2e, IIOt .... 1,000 .... ..... 24,3rt .,. ..... ... .... 1 .... 3,141 ,,. ..... ' 1:1& ... ... 1,120 ..,.. ,.,. .._ .. 107 .. 130 .. 1 ... --2 ... '" ... ... ... 2 ..... 1 .., ..... I, tiS 10,310 "'' ...... ...... ... ... 1A111 t.a;roc 18,to0 ..... 1 "" t.lSt ... -..... ...... 11 ... .... ... U10 ...... ...., - "' 1-... 1,152 ...,. ..... 01 .. 1 -..... ... .... "" ...... OI11P ... ... .,, ,., 1,115 .,_ ._ """'"" 7 ...., .... ...... ""' .,, ,, - 7 -.... "' 0,160 ... ...., - ..... 1 ..... ..... _,. .. ...... .... -... ..... ..... ..... ...... -7 tl.7tf 1,100 -oJ n-suli ""'' -..... ,,,.. .... JQ111 - ... ,...,. ... 3,1 ... ...,, ...... ......... .,. -,.. 4,1t1 .... ..... Unti.Ait'- ,.. ..... ..... 12,048 ., .... -- ,., 2,00 1 ... ... t',l$1 11,722 ........ ... tl,lai ..... ..... I -........ "' .. ..... ... 0/& ... .. ........ ... ... ... 1 .o1 0 .... ... .,_,.., 3 ,., ... ... ... .... 4,518 ,_ .. ... ... ... ..... ...,. ...... .. ... .. ... "' .... - .... 7,710 .. ,. ..... "'' )5,224 ........ .. !117 '" .., 1,127 ...... - ... .. ... ,..,. .,.. ..... ... ... .... 87

PAGE 106

APPENDIX D. Forecasts by of TD Trip Demand, Supply and Funding. This appendix presents forecasts by county of ( 1) demand for general TD trips, (2) program and general trips supplied through the coordinated system, and (3) the funding required to supply these trips. Forecasts by county of demand for program trips are not provided because the information needed to forecast demand for program trips is not available at the county level 88

PAGE 107

TABLE D-1. Forecasts of Demand lot Genenll Trips, 1992-1996 .... 2 .. ...,. ...... "'"" .,.,, 31,040 ""' 2 ....... an.-222,100 ....... 2:30,H ........ 2 3 41,071 ...... .., .. ,., ... 1 .. ... 0101 - 7 3:21,3.)4 ....... 3olt,ne -....... - 1 0 1,051,138 t,on.1oa 1I I Of,..8tl2 1,118,217 ""3 2 ...... 23,1151 ...... ....,3 ...7 .. -1 ....... Zl>,100 2,1115 ....... 281,488 20<1,1812 2'U,'1e5 218,819 227.700 .,.., 2 134,314 ,._.., a t.u,ne 1 ...... 1 ...... 1 312,51 2 -31 ..... :m .... 337.420 2 3 78, 731 ... ,., "''" ...... ..... ""'' 11 1,383,2215 1,381,M8 1..COO,ao3 1,41i,01'2 111$4,046 ,...,. eo,tto 51,41t ...... $),071 ... ... "''" 2 3 ...... ....,, ...... ...... "'"' """' 2 ....... ..,..,. ....... .. ..... .... .. ........ 1 '""'*" l'm,oM 17 ... 708 1 70,300 .... ""'"' ...... 7 ..... 17,1110 ...... - 2 22,011 22,227 ..... .._ .. ,,. - 2 101,488 101,748 1 02 001 102,200 102 ... """"' 2 3 1 ..... 19.1517 ...... .. .... 21,<8> GlodM I 1&,319 .._ 1 ..... 18,882 ., .... """ 2 .. .... ..... 7 23.111 23,286 .. ,., Hatn l llol'l 2 3 .,.,., ... 138 24,467 ...... ... ., ....... 1 ......
PAGE 108

TABLE D-2. F o recasts of Trips Supplied T h rough the Coordinated System, 1992-1996. 1S0,744 154.,3 1 1 ..... ..... 7 NCI,788 - 1,013,200 t,Oot0,113 ......... ........ t..t'O' m 3 2 .. .... ...... 27.031 21.518 77,,., 8 ...... 57 .0tt 6t,780 ..... .. 88,247 7 1,430 'te,tet 83,781 63.P7 ...... ...... 80,008 8 218,188 Ul&..114 21 0 ,00& ....... ....... 2 87, 783 ....... -83, 711 771.(12 1 772.200 788,754 ..... 8 ....... 8 ...... G 1.7 1 8 ...... """' .. .... 2 ..... 8 703 7 .... 7,18& 2 ....... ....... .,..,. ,,_ 3 1 4 ,41:21 ' 1et,Mt ,.,...,.. 181,183 172 ,3$2 Cl1,851 ..... ... .. 71,113 7 4,250 2 ...... 11,'103 -...... 1 2,427 3 1 83,483 ....... 183, 036 ....... 145,970 2 3 8 082 .... ... ...., .... 1 8 ...... .... .... ...,. a Itt 2 12, 978 ..... 1 2.000 ,...,, 12 ,9t2 20 122 21,711 22,324 ...,, .,_,.. t ...... -...... 4115 t ...... ...., ..... ...... .,,.. 7 3 ...... 31.:.1 ...... 38,074 .. ..,. ...... 113,1 3 7 oe.sra ...... 7 8 222.770 ...... ... .... .,..,. ....... 2 ...... """' . .,. .... ,. ...... ea, 101 ...,. 1 01,Q IQ.t.744 10$,747 ...... ... ... ,_ 87,2&4 3 4t,881 ....,., ...... ...... 2 6, 42$ .... .... .... .. .,. 1 7&,881 ,,.... 180,14 1 1e8.171 180,8013 t 8 1154,288 181.A22 188,281 ..... 178,050 ...... ...... ... ... ea1>01 .. .... 2 3 1 7,332 '""" '"'' ,_ 17,917 2 ...... -30.61& ...... 31 ,808 2 2 ..... ...... 84,:tn ...... ... ,. t ....... ....... ... ,484 ,., .... 1 00. 1 26 1 04 ,$10 100 .... 111,U;Q 37 822 ., .... .. ... .. ... 41,180 8 n.m ... ,.. ...,.,. 83,8t0 84,418 2 72,010 7 ... 146 ,.,..,. 77, 128 3 30,.31 2 ...... ,.,.,. .._ ...... t ..... .. .... .. ... $3,114 ..... 7 -1 1 80,41-4 ,...., 172,878 7 ..... .. .... ,.,.., ...... ....... .. ._,. 29$.374 ...... 3t1,1&ll 7 1 29.114 128.271 ,....,. 137 ,11& 7 ....... 784,107 78t.3 1 8 8 1f,(J44 8te,21 8 1 71.41t ...... ...... 70 ,1e& ... 3 .,..,. 83,313 ..... .. ... ..... 1 2 ...... 105,104 ....... 113,868 118,1510e .._ ...... 31 .... 32381 ... ... 3 t 71JSIO ,. ... 00.1 .. .. .... ..... 1...,., IST,eoe 1 8'l,.0 1 t t8&.ea 168,311 1 81_.&81 ta, 341 ...... """" ...,.. 3 .,...,. ...... 31,783 .. 1 3 ...... ...070 ...... ... .... ...... 2 2 81 .... .. .... .... .. .. ... wn 2 3 ....... ...,. 1 ..... 1 ...... 3 1 90

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TABU: 0-3. Forecasts of Funds Supplied Through the Coordinated System, 1992-1996. ,., .... IUit,tCQ ..-,1 80 $:210..2t1 .... .m -.. .. Sll$1 ,710 .... ... 1 2 ....... _,.. .... ... ......,. 7 .......... .......... .......... .......,.. $.5,53e,G 1 0 1 10,107..t0 1 S10.121,f08 111 ,333.888 1 1 1 ,tlii8,40it 1 1 2,6$4, 1&5 2 ,.,.,., 1 1 84,203 ........ &'208,t.'/'4 $01 7 $ 1 -........ ..,..,. 81, 811 - ...,..., ........ ---........ 2 $281,74 --$31<4,.774 0342 081 .,..,,.,. 1 -1,770 5478,811' $&01.112 2 ... ..., ...... ,. ... ,...,., .... $483Jl03 S I2.42:),0UI .......... $13 ,&.71.318 $1....-,S 1 1!5,11&.487 ........ 1232 1tl8 -....... ..,.,., 2 .... ..,. .,..., ...... ....... ......, """' 2 ... ,..,., UA07, t..O Q ,$41.812 .. .......... .......... 1 ..,_ .......... $2,1 88.182 ....... ... &2,411,21) '""" .,..,,.., 1412, 117 -....... ...7_ 2 .,._,., 174,167 S.11l.1tl0 ...... 7 ... .... $881 ,102 .., ..... ...,.,,. ........ lt,ot3,879 2 ...,,, ....... ..7 .... "''* ......., -117,520 .. ..,. $20.772 2 .,..., .,..,., ..,. ....... ....... 2 3 SU3,3!50 1101,270 s u .uro ttat, 54a $ 12'1'.9M $t14,.511 t111.t30 .. ....,. ...,, ... 1213,008 ..._.., $15Q, eG I ....... $68,41 $ ....... 7 ........ ......... t287-.....728 ,..,., .. $.7t1,14t 1838,81)7 -.... -$1, 018.aa& Hlh borevg,l'l 7 S t,$80,.77.3 .......... Sl,t..., 52.303.&&8 &2, 431l,248 2 -........ ........ $)18.381 .,.,., ... $874,tU .,..,,. $77&. 103 .... .... 2 $&1MIO ...,,,.. -742 $I ,1 S t3Uas -........ ..,...,, .......... St,tH.$38 -....... ........ 11.007 ,104 St,01Q,650 3 2 ........ ... ....... ,,.,._.,. ........ 2 ........ ....... $ 107M2 .,...., 2 IIM.110 S1te,!l35 ........ ....... ........ 2 134Q,61-5 S368.131 ....... ........ 1385;S 1 & ,_" $ 1,(::83,908 Sl, t25.5el S t ,198 ,13t $1,2'1U7'8 $ 1,31SC1,!43 """"' 3 -........ S7C0,731 17418,()88 ..... $440,7'8 1 $4155, 481 ....... .....,. .... _.. -- 11 ...,. .... ...._.,., ....... 7 ......... <67,882 2 1414.,742 14t7,m ........ ........ ""1"" 1 ........ ._, ........ ..... ... ........ ........ ........ .... .... -.., ..... 7 .... 1,043 $2 ,554.11:2: U.74CI,3&1 "'-13.180 ,121 ........ le04,518 ........ SSIM,IAO -- "** .. _,.. ........ Sl!,404.,101 p_, ' -11,1 04.8-'0 11,185,272 11, 212.422 t t -*.G32 P lnellu 13,008,352 ., ........ ............ $3,407, $&1 13,.157t 133 ""' ........ ......... &a58,147 ... ..., ........ """""' 2 ........ .. ,..,.. ........ $ot.30.174 ......... .... ..., .. 2 ICIM,t13 ......... ........ ..,. ... 18Ut.285 SolntWde $182,418 .. .._ 1177,!573 """"' ......... ......... $1181,1 3 1 .. ,.,... ..,10.380 ....... $58 1 109 51,17!1, 721 $1,204..311 11,280,976 S t ,3tQ,G1 4 51,440,741 .......... 7 1946, ?)2 -tU44, & U Suml.r 3 1208 748 .. ....., ........ 5218,304 1231 412 - $301, 1!54 ........ &304,72 1 ........ ..... ... T""' 2 2 ........ $331,878 ........ ..,...,. $381 ,447 .,_ ........ St27.G ........ '"'"' """" 11,1 21 ,47& $ 1 ,148,. 1 8:1 $1,321,340 ,,,. ,8:)2 2 1 1 .. 180 1180,410 ........ ........ 1 ......... ...,.,.., ........ 1601.,811 $531,811 91

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ABE ADA AOR ARC COA CP I CTC CUTR DR FAC FOOT FTA FS RHS HRS ISTEA MOA MPO NHIS NPTS NSTHP RPC 'I'D TDC UMTA Li s t of Abbreviations Annual Budget Estimate Americans with D isabilities Act of 1990 Annual Operating Report Association of Retarded Citizens Council on Aging Consumer Price Index Community Transportation Coordinato r Center for Urban Transportation R esearch Demand-Responsive Florida Administrative Code Florida Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration Florid a Statutes Health and Human Services Health and Rehabilitative Services Intennodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 Memorandu m of Agreement Metropolitan Planning Organizati o n Current Estimates From the Naticnal Health Interview Survey Nationwide Pel'$onal Transportation Study National Survey of Transportaticn Handicapped P ecple Regional P lanning Counci l Transpo rtation Disadvantaged Transportation D isadvantaged Commission Urban Mass Transportation Administration 92

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Glossary Accidents the total number of reportable accidents resulting in propert damage and/or personal injuxy. Annual Budget Estimate a budget estimate of funds available for providing transportation services to the transportation disadvantaged that is prepared annually and covers a period of one state fiscal year. Annual Operating Report an annual report prepared by the community transporta.tion coordinator detailing its designated-area operating statistics for the most recent operating year. Brokered CTC Network -type of ere network in which all transportation services are contracted out to other operators (the ere operates no service). Chapter 427, FS the Florida statute establishing the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission and prescribing its duties and responsibilities. Community TranspOrtation Coordinator (CfC) -a transportation entity recommended by an official planning agency to ensure that coordinated transportation services are provided to the transportation disadvantaged population in a designated service area. Formerly known as a coordinated community transportation provider. Coordinated Community Transportation Provider predecessor to the community transportation coordinator Coordinated Trips passenger trips provided by or through a ere. Coordinating Board entity in each designated service area composed of representatives appointed by the official planning agency. Its purpose is to provide assistance to the community transportation coordinator concerning the coordination of transportation services. Coordinating Council for the Transportation Disadvantaged created in 1979 \vith the express purpose of coordinating transportation services for the transportation disadvantaged by developing ru l es and procedures to implement Chapter 427, FS. Also known as the Coordinating Council. The predecessor of the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission. Demand the amount consumers are willing to buy under certain prices and other market conditions, such as consumer tastes and preferences concerning the good or service, consumer income, consumer awareness of the good or service, and prices of substitute goods or services. 93

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Demand for TD Trips the amount of 1D trips that would be made at prevailing trip costs, level of trip subsidies, and market conditions. In the five-year plan, total demand for 1D trips is the sum of demand for general trips and demand for program trips. Demand tor Travel the number of trips desired on all modes and for any purpose. Demand-Responsive Service a transportation service characterized by flexible routing and scheduling that provides door-to-door or point-to-point transportation at the user's request. Derived Demanddemand for a good or service that is linked to (derived from) the demand for another good or service (e.g., demand for participation in an agency-sponsored program, such as c9ngregate dining, creates demand for transportation to the program). Designated Service Area the geographical area, consisting of one or more counties, in which the ere is the designated provider. Effectiveness Measure a performance measure that indicates the level of consumption per unit of output. Passenger trips per vehicle mile is an example of an effectiveness measure. Eftlclency Measure a performance measure that evaluates the level of resources expended to achieve a given level of output An example of an efficiency measure is operating cost per vehicle mile. Fixed-Route Service transit service in which the vehicles follow a schedule over a prescribed route. Full1ime Equivalent (FTE) a measure used to determine number of employees based on a 40-hour work week. One FTE equals 40 work hOurs per week. General Trips passenger trips by individuals to destinations of their choice, not associated with any agency program. Goal broad-scoped conditions that define what the organization hopes to achieve. High-Risk or At-Risk Child a preschool child with one or more of thirteen characteristics that place a child in greater risk of developmental disabilities. Latent Demand demand that is not active (i .e., the potential demand of persons who are not presently in the market for a good or service). Memorandum of Agreement a binding standard contract between the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission and a ere. This contract and its provisions serve as a performance and reporting standard to guide the delivery of services by all agencies or entities that provide transportation disadvantaged services. Metropolitan Planning Organization the organization responsible for transportation planning and programming in urban areas. Also serves as the official planning agency referred to in Chapter 427, FS. 94

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Mode Choice a choice among possible means of making a trip. Possible modes include automobile, fixed-route transit, paratransit, walking, and others. Multi-Provider CTC Network type of erC in Which the ere operates some transportation services and contracts other service with other operators . Non-Coordinated Trjp, a passenger trip provided outside of the coordinated m system. Non-Sponsored 1iip a passenger trip that is not subsidized in part or in whole by any local, state, or fed)lral government funding source. Non-sponsored Transportation Disadvantaged Person an individual who meets the definition of a transportation disadvantaged individual and is not subsidized for transportation financial assistance. Non-sponsored Transportation Disadvantaged 1iip a trip for a transportation disadvantaged individual that is not subsidized in part or whole by a funding source. Objective specific, measurable conditions that the organization establishes to achieve its goals. Official Planning Agency the agency designated by the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission to appoint the community coordinating board and recommend the community transportation coordinator for each service area. Metropolitan planning organizations are automatically the official planning agencies in urban areas. Operating Cost r eported total expenses on operations, including administration, maintenance, and operations of service vehicles, and excluding capital spending. Operating Revenue all revenues and subsidies utilized by the operator in the provision of transportation services. Operating Statistics operating data on various characteristics of operations, including passenger trips, vehicle miles, operating costs, revenue, vehicles, employees, accidents, and road calls. Operating Status Report an annual report issued by the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission that compiles all the data submitted in the Annual Operating Reports. Paratranslt specialized transportation service provided by many types of vehicles (including automobiles, vans, and buses) that is typically used by transportation disadvantaged persons. Examples of paratransit service include demand-responsive service and subscription service. Passenger 1iip a trip made by a passenger on a single vehicle. H a passenger transfers from one vehicle to another to reach a destination, he or she is counted as making two passenger trips. Also known as a one-way, unlinked passenger trip. 95

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Peer Group Analysis a common technique used to evaluate the general performance of a single operator relative to the performance of a comparable group of operators of similar size, operating environments, and modal characteristics. Performance Measure statistical representation of how well an activity, task, or function is being performed. Usually computed from operating statistics by relating a measure of service output or utilization to a measure of service input or cost. Program Trip -a passenger trip supplied or sponsored by a human setvice agency for the purpose of transporting clients to and from a program of th.at agency (e.g., sheltered workshops, congregate dining, and job training). Roadcall a revenue service interruption caused by failure of some mechanical element or other element. Rule 41-2, FAC the rule adopted by the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission to implement provisions established in Chapter 427, FS. Section 15 Report an annual report required of all Section 9 transit agencies by the Federal Transit Administration. Section 9 Transit Agency -an agency that receives federal funding under Section 9 of the Federal Transit Act. Single-Provider C1'C Network the network type in which the CfC operates all of the transportation services. Sponsored Transportation Disadvantaged Person -an individual who meets the definition of a transportation disadvantaged individual and is subsidized for transportation financial assistance. Sponsored Transportation Disadvantaged Trip a trip for a transportation disadvantaged individual that is subsidized in part or whole by a funding source. Sponsored Trip a passenger trip that is subsidized in part or in whole by a local, state, or federal government funding source (not including monies provided by the 1D Trust Fund). Subscription Service a regular service with prearranged routes and schedules for persons who sign up in advance. Supply the amount of goods or services provided by suppliers at various prices and other market conditions, such as cost of inputs (e.g., wages and materials), prices of related goods and services, technology, expectations of demand, and competition in the market place. Target something established by authority, custom, or general consent as a model or example. 96

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Transportation Disadvantaged in Florida, those persons who because of physical or mental disability, income status, or age are unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation and are, therefore, dependent upon others to obtain access to health care, emp l oyment, education, shopping, social activities, or other life-suslaining activities, or children who are handicapped or high-risk as defined in s.411.202. Transportation Disadvantaged Commission -an independent organization created in 1989 to accomplish the coordination of transportation services provided to the transportation disadvantaged population. Replaced the Coordinating Council for the Transportation Disadvantaged. Transportation Disadvantaged Funds any federal, state, or local funds available for the transportation of the transportation disadvantaged. Includes funds for planning, administration, operations, and capital equipment. It does not include funds used for the transportation of children to public schools. Transportation Disadvantaged Category I Population disabled, elderly, low-income persons, and "high-risk" or "at-risk" children who are eligible to receive governmental and social service agency subsidies for program and general trips. Transportation Disadvantaged Category II Population persons who are transportation disadvantaged according to the eligibility guidelines in Chapter 427 (i;e., they are unable to transport themselves or to purchase transportation). Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund -a fund administered by the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission in which all fees collected for the transportation disadvantaged program shall be deposited. The funds deposited will be appropriated by the legislature to the commission to carry out the commission's responsibilities. Transportation Improvement Plan -a staged multi-year program of transportation improvements, including an annual element developed by an MPO specifying program activities for the current fiscal year. Transportation Operator one or more public, private for profit, or private non profit entities engaged by the community transportation coordinator to provide service to transportation disadvantaged persons. Trend Analysis -a common technique used to analyze the performance of an organization over a period of time. Unmet Demand tbe number of trips desired but not provided because of insufficient service supply. Urbanized Area -an area designated by the Bureau of the Census that contains a central city or cities and surrounding closely settled urban fringe (suburbs), which together have a population of 50,000 or more. 97

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Vehicle Miles the number of miles traveled by vehicles providing passenger service. Vehicles number of ve hi cles owned by the transit agency that are avai l able for use in providing services. 98

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List of References Annual Operating Reports. Submitted by Community Transportation Coordinators (previously Coordinated Community TransP<>rtation Providers) to the Transportation Disadvantaged Commission (formerly the Coordinating Council for the Transportation Disadvantaged). 1985 1989. Carter Goble Associates, Inc. A Program Analysis for the Coordinating Council on the Transportation Disadvantaged. n.p.: Carter Goble Associates, 1989 Crain & Associates, Inc., Pat Piras Consulting Services, Nelson\Nygaard Consulting Associates. San Francisco Bay Area Regional Parattansit Plan. Oakland, California: Metropolitan Transportation Commission, 1990. Ecosometrics, Inc. Study to Identity the Transportation Needs of the Elderly and Disabled in Kent and Sussex Counties. Bethesda, Maryland: Delaware Transportation Authority and Delaware Department of Transportation, 1990. Bcosometrics, Inc. and the University of Delaware College of Urban Affairs and Public Policy Study to Perform a Survey of the Transportation Needs of the Elderly, Disabled and Economjcally Disadvantaged in Northern New Castl e County. Bethesda, Maryland: Delaware Transportation Authority and Delaware Department of Transportation, 1990. Florida Committee on Aging. Pathways to the Future: The Re.port of the Florida Committee on Aging. n.p.: Florida Committee on Aging, January 1985. Florida Committee on Aging. Pathways to the Future II: Implementation. n.p .: Florida Committee on Aging, January 1986. Florida's Ap,proach to Coordinated Transportation for the Traru;portation Disadvantaged Tallahassee, Florida: TO Commission, 1988. H utchinson, Jo Ann. A Case Study: Coordination of Rural TranSJ)Ortatjon in Florida. Tallahassee, Florida: TO Commission Library, n.d. H utchinson, JoAnn. Florida's Decade of Experience in Coordinated Transportation for the Tallahassee, Florida: TO Commission Library, 1990. Kimley-Hom and Associates, Inc. Statewide Transit Needs Plan Phase I. n.p.: Florida Department of Transportation Bureau of Multi-Modal Systems Planning, 1986. Liu, H. C., Perkins, G. The Assessment of Disability jn MiMesota: A Homehold Survey. Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Miwesota Department of Economic Security, 1978. 99

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McBride, Timothy D. Projections of the Disabled Elderly in Florida: 1990-2000. Wash i ngton, D C.: The Urban Institute, 1990. Merrimack Valley Plann i ng Commission Elderly and Df$1lhled Transportation Plan for the Merrimack Yalley. UMTA Report MA..()S-0128. U.S. Department of Transportation, 1987. National Center for Health Statistics. Current Estimates From the National Health I nterview Survey. 1989. DHHS Publication No. (PHS) 89. Hyattsville, Maryland: Department of H ealth and Human Services, 1989. Nichols, W. 1... The California Disability Survey Survey Research Center, U niversity of California, Berkeley: California Department of Rehabilitation, 1979 Qperatins Status Reports. Tallahassee, Florida: Transportation Disadvantaged Commission (previously the Coordinating Council for the Transportation Disadvantaged). 1985 1989 Post, Buckley, Schuh & Jernigao, Inc Public Transportation Coorainatjon for the Disadvantaged in Florida. UMTA Report 904..()05. 00. Tallahassee, Florida: Post, Buckley, Schuh & J ernigao, I nc., January 1981. Ruffin, Roy J. and Gregory, Paul R Princjples of Microeconomics 4th edition. Glenview, Dlinois: Scott, Foresman/Little, Brown H igher Education, 1990. Savant, I ncorporated, National Association of State Unit s on Aging FOCUS Forecasts of Service Needs of Older Persons S.E Florida Center on Aging. Florida International University, 1990. Schimpeler-Corradino Associates. Florida Statewide Five-Year Transit and Paratransit Development Plan for the Transportation 5 vols. n.p.: Schimpeler Corradino Associates, June 1984. Shaw, G. W. Pl:Qject Ohioans: Ohio s Handicwed Individuals Occurrence and Needs Study. Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission, Bureau of Program Support, 1983 Schimpeler Corradino Associates. Florida Statewide Transit System Plan Development Phase D : Short-Range Transit System Plan. n.p.: Florida Department of Transportation, 1987. Senate Commi ttee on Transportation. A Revjew of the Coordinating Council for the Transportation in the Department of Transportation. n.p :. Senate Committee on Transportation, January 1989. State of Florida Office of the Audiror General. Performance Audit of the Transportation for the Disadvantaged of the Coordinating Council on the Transportation Disadvantaged and the of Transportation. Tallahassee, Florida: State 100

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of Florida Office of the Auditor General, 1987. Toronto Transit Commission. Transit Services for Disabled and E l derly Perso.ns. n.p .: Toronto Transit Commission, 1989. Transportation Disadvantaged Commission. State of Florida Transportation Disadv8ntaced Handbook. Tallahassee, Florida: TD Commission, 1989. University of Louisville, Urban Studies Center. A Needs Asses.5ment and Planninc Study of the Tramportation-Disab!ed Population of Louisville and Jefferson County. n.p.: University of Louisville, 1988 Urban Mass Transportation Administration. Su!!!!llllO' Rel)ort of Data From National Survey of Transportation Handkru!ped feQple. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Transportation, 1978. U.S. Bureau of the Census 1990 Census of the United States. Preliminaxy Results. Washington, D C.: Bureau of the Census, 1991. U.S. Bureau of the Census. 1980 Cemus of the United States. Washington, D.C.: Bureau of the Census, 1981. U.S Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration. 1983 -1984, Nationwide Personallhnsportatjon Study. Personal Travel in the U.S. Washington D.C.: U .S. Department of Transportation. 101