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Analysis of Florida Department of Transportation Transit Corridor Program/Projects : technical memoranda numbers one, t...

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Analysis of Florida Department of Transportation Transit Corridor Program/Projects : technical memoranda numbers one, two, and three
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Book
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English
Creator:
Hinebaugh, Dennis P
United States. Office of Research and Special Programs
Dept. of Transportation. National Center for Transit Research
University of South Florida. Center for Urban Transportation Research
Florida. Dept. of Transportation
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Center for Urban Transportation Research (CUTR)
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Tampa, Fla
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Local transit--Florida--Planning--Evaluation   ( lcsh )
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letter   ( marcgt )

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usfldc doi - C01-00216
usfldc handle - c1.216
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ANALYSIS OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF . TRANSPORTATION TRANSIT CORRIDOR PROGRAM/PROJECTS T e chnical Memoranda Numbers One, T w o and Thre e

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REVIEW AND SUMMARY OF TRANSIT CORRIDOR PROJECTS TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION PAGE PURPOS E . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 TRANSIT CORRIDOR PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 FOOT DISTRICT OFF ICES ................................... .. . . 3 PROJEC T SUMMARIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Summary of Funded Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1 Project Summaries ................... : . .............. : 13 . Distric t 2 Project Summaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 District 3 Project Sum maries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 District 4 Project Summaries . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . .. . .. 30 District 5 Project Summaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 District 6 Project Summaries ...................... . . . . . . . . 34 District 7 Project Summaries .................................... 44 N E XT STEP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 07

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Review and Summary of Existing Transit Corridor Projects PURPOSE The purpose of this project is to undertake a consolidated, comprehensive review of the Florida Department of Transportation Transit Corridor Program. The project team will review all transit corridor projects completed on or after July 1, 1993. Speciflc tasks associated with this effort will be the review of the project scopes defined in the joint participation agreements (JPAs) betWeen the district offices arid the various recipients; the identification of the goals and objectives of each of the projects and the milestones established as a measure of the progress in meeting and for exceeding established goals and objectives; and quarterly and final reports submitted by the grantee for the project. Based on the information obtained through this effort, CUTR will seek to establish the relative S!JCCess of each project in meeting the goals and objectives established and the overall statewide goal of the program to relieve congestion and improve system capacity along designated corridcir.s. Along with this exercise, CUTR will also identify those areas that have demonstrated significant local commitment to ensuring the success of the project. Finally, the lessons learned from the implementation of these projects will be shared with other transit systems within the State of Florida. In an effort to assist the Department in streamlining andfor improving current procedures and policies, during this review and subsequent discussions with FDOT staff, CUTR will review the overall Transit Corridor Program process. Recommendations for procedural changes are contained in Technical Memorandum Three. Consistent with Task 1 of this project CUTR has summarized all the project descriptions from the Joint Participation Agreements for the Transit Corridor Program executed from July 1, 1993 through December 31, 1999 and for those projects which began prior to July of 1993 but have continued Into the review period through supplemental agreements. Recently implemented projects have been summarized in lesser detail using the scope contained In the JPA and any available progress reports. Where critical reportingfdata was lacking, CUTR interviewed FOOT and transit agency personnel in an attempt to gather the required informat ion. As necessary, site visits were made to the FOOT district offices Transit Corridor Program Review Technical Memorandum #1

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and/or transit agencies (or other grantees) in order to interview personnel and observe project accomplishments. . Task 2 builds on Task 1 with the emphasis on Identifying the success and failure of Trans i t Corridor projects This information Is provided In Technical Memorandum Two entitled "Summary of Transit Corridor Projects Strengths and Weaknesses." It is intended that the resu lts of this analysis may also be presented at the Florida Transit Association's annual or mid-year conferences. Finally, in Task 3 CUTR interviewed Involved FDOT personnel at both the Central Office and District Offices to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the overall Transit Corridor Program. CUTR also studied the FDOT Transit Corridor Procedure, Topic Number 725-030-003-d, reviewing the sections developed for program management and imp l ementation; funding and eligible costs; capital acquisition and management; and project implementat ion and monitoring. From these efforts recommendations have been provided In Technical Memorandum Three to improve the Transit Corridor Procedure and related processes. TRANSIT CORRIDOR PROGRAM Section 341.051, Florida Statutes defines the authority of the FOOT for funding transit corridor projects. The FOOT Transit Corridor Program was enacted by the Florida . Legislature to provide fund i ng to public agencies to undertake projects .. to relieve congestion and improve capacity within identified transportation corridors by increasing people-carrying capacity of the system through the use and facilitated movement of high-occupancy conveyances (341 .031 (10), Florida Statutes) The Department is authorized to fund up to 1 00 percent of the capital and net operating costs of transit corridor projects (Section 341.051(5)(e), F.S.). The initial duration of these projects shall not exceed a period of two years unless the pr oject is reauthorized by the legislature. Reauthorizations are based on a determination that the project has meet or is exc eeding the goals and objectives established for the project. T ransit corridor projects must have clearly defined goals and objectives. Milestones must be developed by that will allow a measurement of progress toward achieving the goals and objectives. Goals, objectives, and milestones must be consistent with the local government comprehensive plan(s) of the affected jurlsdiction(s), the strategic regional Transit Corridor Program Review 2 Tectmlcal Memorandum #1

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policy plan developed for the region, the MPO's long range transportation plan, and the Florida Transportation Plan and must be approved by the district FOOT office initiating the project. As mentioned previously, after the initial two-year period, projects consistently meeting milestones may be reauthorized through the Department's Work Program. The FOOT Central Office annually reviews existing Transit corridor projects and allocates to the district offices sufficient funds to cover these ongoing projects. Priority for f unding is given to those projects meeting the adopted goals and objectives. Any funds that remain are allocated to each of the district offices by a formu la based on each district's percentage of the total urbanized population for the state. The district offices may program up to 100 percent of the cost for implementing the project. Upon the approval of a project, a technical advisory group (TAG) is established with membership that may include but not be lim ited to representatives from the district's public transportation, planning, traffic engineering, and design offices; the MPO; city and/or county planning, traffic operations, and law enforcement offices; the local transit agency and transportation providers; regionaJ commuter service program; transportation management' o.rganizations/associations: and FOOT Central Office. The TAG is chaired by the FOOT district office. This group is responsible for establishing the goals and objectives for the project; evaluating the project's successes and/or failures; and recommending future actions relative to the project. District offices are required to review and, if necessary, assist in the development of, and approve transit corridor plans; select transit corridor projects for funding based on priorities established in consultation with the Central Office; select membership and chair the TAG; monitor and evaluate all transit corridor projects within their district; provide biennial reports to Central Office OIJ the success and/or failure of each of the projects; manage contr acts with each recipient; and provi de technical assistance to grantees, as required. FOOT DISTRICT OFFICES There are currently seven FOOT District offices serving the 67 counties of Florida . Figure 1 shows the boundaries served by the District offices. Each district's Public Transportation Office is responsible for project management and implementation of the program at the local level. This Includes the execution of the Joint Participation Transit Corridor Program Revfew 3 Te<:hnical Memorandum #1

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Agreements (JPAs) and any supplemental agreements that change the project's scope, expiration date, or budget; invoicing; monitoring of the project's progress; and other activities as discussed above. Transit Corridor Program Review 4 Technical Memorandum #1

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1 FLORIDA DE P AR T MENT OF TRANSPOR T ATION DISTRICT BOUNDARIES 4 ; Corridor Program Re11iew 5 Technical Memorandum #1

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Table 1 Transit Corridor Program Participants By FOOT District FOOT District! Public Transport ation Agency Recipient Other Recipient Public Transit Office location 1-Bartow/ Lee County Transit (leeTra n ) Ft. Myers Sarasota County Area Transa (SCAD Manatee County Area Transit (MCAD 2 Jacksonville Jacksonville Tran spo rtation Authority (JTA) Ga inesville Regional Transit System (RTS) . 3 Chipley Escambia County Araa Transit (ECAD 4-Ft Lauder dale Broward County Mass Tran sit DMsion (BCT) 5Orlando Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority .(LYNX) 6 Miami M iami-Dade Tra nsit Agency (MOTA) City of Miami Beach 7 -Tampa H il lsborougll Area Regional rransa Aulhority (HAAD Pasco CountY Public Transportation Division Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PSTA) 6

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PROJECT SUMMARIES Summary of Funded Projects Between July 1, 1993 and December 31, 1999, funding for 27 transit corridor projects was awarded by the FOOT to local providers of public transportation services. The total FOOT transit corridor program funds allocated for these projects was $31,602,626. This total includes projects that were initially started prior to July 1, 1993 that have been continued thr ough subsequent or supplemental JPAs and project that were awarded prior to January 1, 2000 but are not yet under a JPA. Table 2 summarizes the projects funded by each of the seven FOOT districts. This table also shows the Work Program Ident ificat ion (WPI) numl)er or financial project number (FPN) used by the FOOT to identify JPAs by district, and provides the execution date of any supplemental agreements for the pro]e?t, if applicable. Finally, the table shows the funds allocated by the FOOT, and whether written progress or final reports were completed for each project. Based on the progress and final reports submitted by the recipients of the. transit corridor funds, as well as interviews with FOOT staff and/or the recipients, summary project descriptions have been developed and are highlighted by district and by recipient in the following pages. Tra.nsit Corridor Program Review 7 Technical Memorandum #2

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SUMMARY OF FOOT TRANSIT CORRIDOR PROJEC T S Projects Awarded Betwe e n July1, 1993 and Decembe r 31,1999 District til WPIIFPN# SJPA JPA FDOTFuncfs Agency Name / (Nor Execution Allocated Project Name Date(s)) Date District 1 LeoTran U.S. 41 Corridor Project #1814972 12/98 4124/96 $8,264,661 Sarasota County Area Transit U.S. 41 (S. Tamlami T rail) Corridor Project #4071071 N/A N/A $267,000 M anatee County Area Transit Manatee Avenue/S.R. 64 Conidor Project #4071171 N/A 3130/00 $261 000 District 2 Jocksonvllle Transportation Authority (JT A ) Park-N-Ridq Comm uter Express Routes #2814311 12/97; 12199 12/22195 $109,000 Gainesville Regional Transit System (RTS) sw Gainesville EManced Bus Service #2810791 6198 12/18/97 $248,335 6199 Night Bus Service #2810829 N 9/2198 $140,000 Tower Road Corrido r Service #2810830 N 12131198 $83,000 8 ProgrHs Final Reports Report (Y or N) (Y, Nor N/A) y N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A . y N/A y N/A y. N/A y N/A

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SUMMARY OF FOOT TRANSIT CORRIDOR PROJECTS Projects Awarded Between July 1, 1993 and December 31, 1999 District Ill WPI/FPN# SJPA JPA FOOT Funds Agency Name / (Nor Execution Alloeated Pro)ect Name Date(s)) Date Di strict 3 Escambia County Area Transit (EC AT) . Davis Highway Corridor Project #2258251 N 1197 $873, 962 Blue Angel Highway Corridor #2258341 N 12197 $468 500 District 4 Broward County Transit (BCT) Southwest Broward Express #4811331 7/96; 4/99 6/94 $1,125000 District 5 . Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority (CFRTA), d.b.a. LYNX 1-4 Express Survey #5815144 N 3195 $10,000 District 6 . . . Motro-Dade Transit Agency Northwesl27" Avenue MAX #6819003 6/91; 6/94 6126181 $1,216,000 10/95 . 9 Progress Final Reports Report (Y or N) (Y, Nor N/A) I y N/A y N/A y N/A ' . y y y y

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SUMMARY OF FOOT TRANSIT CORRIDOR PROJECTS Projects Awarded Between July 1,1993 and December 31,1999 District #I WPIIFPN# SJPA JPA FDOTFunds Agency Name/ (Nor EXecution Allocated Project Name Date(s)) Date AaglerMAX 1168101841 6193; 6194 11114/91 $6,722,172 #6810237 10/95; 6/96 6197; 12/97 1199; 12/99 10195 South Dade Busway 6810309 12197; 1/99 213197 $2.996.976 12199 City of Miami Beach M iami Beach Elec tric Shulll e 6810341 10/96; 11/98 6120196 $650,000 2100 District 7 . . Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority (HART) Express Bus Service from Downtown 7813923 6/88;11188 10/26195 $2,270,000 Tampa to CleaJWater (200)() 8190; 4191 8191; 5192 12/94 10 Progress Final Reports Report (Y or N) (Y, Nor N/A) y NIA y NJA y N/A . y NJA L__ __ -------

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. SUMMARY OF FOOT TRANSIT CORRIDOR PROJECTS Projects Awarde
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. SUMMARY OF FOOT TRANSIT CORRIDOR PROJECTS Projects Awarded Between July 1, 1993 and December 31, 1999 District#/ WPI/ FP N # SJPA JPA FDOTFund s Agency Name/ (Nor Execution Allocated Project Name Date(s)) Date Fixed Route S ervice rrom T arpon M all to 4064 781 N 1119199 $28 ,0 7 6 Oldsmar (SR 584 Conidor ) Pasco County Public Transportation US 19 Conidor Pr o ject 4084811 N 10/28199 $285.856 TOTAL FOOT CORRIDOR FUNDS $31,60 2,626 12 Progress Final Reports Report (Y or N ) (Y, Nor N/A) N N / A N N/A

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District 1 Project Summaries During the project lime period from July 1, 1993 through Qecember 31,1999 the FOOT District 1 Office awarded $8 264,881 in .Transit Corridor funding to L eeTran, $267 000 to Sarasota County Area Transit (SCAT) and $261,000 to Manatee County Area Transit (MCAT) The SCAT and MCAT projects have been awarded, however, JPAs were not in place on December 31, 1999. The project summari e s are as follows : LeeTran Lee County Transit (LeeTran) is an independent division of the Lee County Government and Is governed by the Lee County Board of County Commissioners. Lee Tran operates fixed-route motorbus service and contracts the demand response (ADA) service. US 41 Transit Corridor Project-WP/ #1814972 Project Scope This is a transit corridor project selected based on Lee County's transit corridor proposal which was approved by the Lee County Metropolitan Planning Organ i zation on September 22, 1995. The project originally included the acquisition of buses, fareboxes and related equipment for use along the US 41 corridor; promotion and marketing of services; a n d operating assistance. The joint participation agreement, in the amount of $8 : 264,881 (1 00% state funds) between Lee Tran and the Department provided for the purchase of nine (9) full size, accessible, heavy duty, diesel powered transit coaches, nine (9) fareboxes and related equipment. The nine buses were to be used exclusively in the corridor. A'minimum of three information kiosks, 40 information signs, and eight park-n-ride s i gns were to be purchased by Lee Tran In addition, a minimum of four (4) shelters were to be purchased and installed by Lee Tran. Total estimated capital costs provided In the project budget was $2,227,850. The balance of the total project cost (an estimated $5,711,031) was, and continues to be used to fund 100 percent of the op e rating deficit and for marketing (an estimated $326,000). Thi s is a five year project that commenced on Aprll24, 1996 (actual service start.date 5/1/97) and will continue through State Fiscal Year 2000/2001. Transit Corridor Program Review 13 Technical Memorandum # 1

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Project Milestones/Goals The follo w ing annual ridership goats were initially establis!Jed fo r the program: RldauhiR .eoDYill !;hang2 % Chang! f[gm Current Prior to Project Start 251,588 ........ End o f First Year 280.481 11.4% 11.4% End of Second Year 327,228 16.7% 30.0% End of Third Year 373,975 14.2% 48.6% End of Fourth Year 420,722 12 .5% 67.2% Service Description On May 1, 1997, service was implemented along the US 41 corridor. The hou rs of service at that time were 5:25a.m. to 8:05 p.m., Monday throl!gh Saturday. Seven buses were placed in service with two additional buses available as spares. The 18 .2 mile r oute foi l owed US 41 from SR 78 (Pine Island Road) south to Sanibel Boulevard and returned with 20 minute headways. The r oute mad e appropriate connections and tran sfers wi th other Lee Tran buses in the system and with park-n-ride l ots on both ends of the cor r idor and along the route. I n December 1998, the JPA was moditied extending the hours of operation to 10:00 p.m. and temporarily placed an additional vehicle in service for a total of eight, with one spare. The additional bus was needed to meet headways during road construction along the route. Project goals were changed with the extension of operating hours as follows: #Passengers %Change 1'1 Y ea r 280,481 0% 2"d Year 346,380 19% 3"' Year 433 879 20% 4th Year 488,114 11% Transit Co
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Progress Year OneAt the close of the first year of operation, Lee Tran reported that the project had been very successful, exceeding all the goals that were established. Ridership was 51 percent higher than expected with 423,451 passenger trips and farebox revenues were 77 percent higher than original estimates. Operating expenses came in at 10.5 percent under budget even though an additional bus had to be used to maintain 20 minute headways . Year Two-The second annual report noted continued success for the project. During this year, Lee Tran added an additional1 hour and 40 minutes of service In the evening providing service until10:00 p.m. The expansion of service hours resulted in a ridership increase during December 1998 of 18 percent over that of December 19_ 97. The annual ridership goal established for the second year of service was 346,380 passengers. Le e surpassed this goal providing service to 493,988 passengers, 42.61 percent more than the established goal. The annual farebox goal for year two wa s $152,407. Lee Tran collected $259,021 in passenger fares, 69.95 percent higher than the established goal. . Year Three In February 2000, Lee Tran submitted the third q uarterly report for the third year of operation. As provided in that report, the project ridership, farebox revenue, and operating expense statistics demonstrates that the project is exceeding the goals established for year 3. During the third quarter, there were 167,277 passenger trips and $82 ,329 collected in farebox revenues for the Monday through Saturday service. Comparing the third quarters of the 2"" and 3 "' year of operation, for the prior year there were 124,759 passenger trips, representing a third year increase of over 30percent. The farebox revenue for the quarter ($82,329) represents an increase of over 25 percent from the same quarter In year 2 . Sunday service for the quarter carried 3,758 passengers and collected $2,477 in farebox revenue. The measure of average passenger trips perdayfor . Sunday during this quarter was 289. When this service began, the average number of trips per day for Sunday was 150. The marketing for the start-up of this project was exceptional. During the Winter of 1996, LeeTran partnered with 96K-Rock (a local radio station) to sponsor a "Magic Bus Design" contest. Nine division awards, one in each division, were made representing designs made by a person within a particular age group (i.e., under 7 years old; 7-13; 14 -19; 2029; 30 39; 40 49; 50 59; 60 69; and 70+ years of age). Each contestant was Transit Corridor Program Review 15 Technical Mem<>randum #1

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required to design one side of a Lee Tran bus (designs were placed on both sides of each bus; and each individual winners name and SJlOnsor logos were placed on the rear of the bus) The contest was extremely successful. An unveiling of the buses was held on Friday, April25, 1997 The nine winning artists received computers from a local computer store and public recognition for their designs. District Department staff indicated that while the service was and continues to be extremely successful, it has served an even greater purpose as a catalyst to significantly increase systemwide ridership The example given was that for a 20 percent increase in ridership on the U S. 41 route a 10 percent increase in overall system ridership is gained Sarasota County Area Transit (SCA T ) The Sarasota County Transportation Authority functionally operates as the trans i t department of Sarasota County government. The t r ansit system is i nformally known as the Sarasota County Area Transit system and uses the acronym "SCAT" for marketing purposes. SCAT i s governed by a five member board of county commissioners SCAT serves the urbanized portion of Sarasota County inciuding the cities ofL ongboat Key, Sarasota, Venice, Englewood and North Port. SCAT provided fixed route motorbus service and provides demand r esponse services via a contracted ope r ator. U.S. 41 (South Tamiami Trail) FPN # 4071071 Project Scope Route 17 is SCAT's principal spinal route in Sarasota County, connecting downtown Sarasota to downtown Venice via U S. 41 (Tamiami Trail). SCAT Route 17 serves the ' most densely populated, intensively utilized land in the county, including two large hospitals three regional malls two large downtowns, and hundreds of service . . establishments. W ith hourly service, some trips are actually overloaded at certain points along the route during particular times of the day. As the land uses along this corridor ' cont i nue to intensify, SCAT's planning and operations personnel have forecast that with no improvements made, "crush loads" will begin to oceur within the next two years Some passengers may even be left stranded for an hour to walt for the next bus if service is not added. At the same time, SCAT also saw an opportunity for increasing ridership in the corridor by offering more frequent service. Transit Corridor Program Review 16 Technical Memorandum #1

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This project is for the purchase of four new 35-foot transit coaches to enable SCAT to operate at 30 min u te frequencies along the U.S. 41 corridor from Sarasota to Venice. . Additional expe nses include a doubling of operating expenses for the route, promotional and marketing activities: The Department is funding 50 percent of the project cost of $534,000 ($267 ,000 state/$267,000 local). Project Milestones/Goals . SCAT has criteria for project success that Includes ripership on the e ntir e corridor at or above the SCAT minimum standard of 16 passengers per hour and a 52 percent increase In existing route ridership (an increase of 123,370 passenger t(ips) during the first year; nine percent (or 32,440 additional passenger trips) in the second year; and a stabilization of ridership In the third year. Service Description To provide 30 minute service along the U.S 41 corridor from downtown Sarasota to downtown Venice, integrating the service into the existing SCAT Route 17. Progress This is a new project. The JPA has not been signed and therefore, service has not begun. Manatee County Area Transit (MCAT) Manatee County Area Transit is a division within the Community Services Department of Manatee County government. MCAT is governed by the Manatee Cciunty Board of County Commissioners. The system provides service to the urbanized areas of Manatee County. MCAT operates fixed route motorbus service as well as demand response transportation services. Transit Corridor P rogram Review 17 Technical Memorandum # 1

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Manatee Avenue/SR 64 Corridor Project FPN # 4071171 Project Scope . This project consists on adding one bus to the Manatee Avenue/SR 64 corridor (MCAT Route 3). The project includes operating assistance, promotion and marketing of service. The project is expected to improve headways and contribute towaqrd a reduction of vehicle congestion along the SR 64 corridor The Department is funding 50 p e rcent of the total p { oject cost of $522,000 ($261 ,000 state/$261 ,000 local}." Project Milestones/Goals The primary goa l is to increase ridership on MCAT's fixed route system, specifically for Routes 3, 5 and 6 The benchmarks established for ridership on these routes are 170,777 annual passengers and 15.8 passengers per revenue hour. Phase I Goals (3/31/01) . A 15 percent increase in ridership over the benchmark period bringing the project routes total to 196 394 passengers. This r epresents ari average of 12.4 passengers per revenue nour for the three routes . Phase II Goals (3/31/02) An additional 15 percent increase in ridership over the Phase I period bringing the project routes to tal to 225,853 passengers at an average of 14.2 passengers per revenue hour Phase Ill Goals (3/31/03) An additional15 percent increase in ridership over Phase II bringing ridership to 259,731 passengers with an average of 16.4 passengers per revenue hour. Progress This is a new project. The JPA was signed on March 3, 2000. Transit Corridor Program ReView 18 Technical Memorandum #1

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. District 2 P roject Summaries During the project time period from July 1, 1993 through December 31, 1999, the FOOT District 2 Office awarded $580 ,335 in transit corridor funds. The project summaries are as follows : Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) The Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) Is an indepeni:lent authority governed by a seven member board of directors. Three of those members are appointed by the Governor of Florida, three are appointed by the Mayor of Jacksonville, and the final member i s the FOOT district secretary. provides services in Duval and northern Clay County. JTA direct l y operates fixed-route motorbus and automated guideway service Demand responsive services are provided via contract with private providers. . Park-N-RldeCommuter Express Routes-WPI # 2814311 Project Scope This project provides enhanced express commuter service to park-n-ride lots along high l y congested areas in the north. south, and southwest areas of the City of Jacksonville, specifically, but not l i mited to the areas of Baymeadows, Southpoint Deerwood the Barnett Office Park, and the Naval Air Station. Project Goals/Milestones Milestones were established for the project as follows: First Year Develop public awareness campaign/schedules for the express services; prepare for the implementation of the express service; and implement Year Two1 Quarter: Increase service express services and ridership by 1% 2nd Quarter. Increase ridership by 1.5% 3"' Quarter: Increase ridership by 1 5% 4'" Quarter. increase ridership by 1% and review project Trarlslt Corridor Program Review 19 Technical Memorandum #1

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The criteria for the overall success of the project will be measured in the increased patronage of park-n-ride lots and mass transit services. Service Description Service is provided between Orange Park and the Naval Air Station through the areas mentioned above. Two trips in the "primary direction" are provided during the a.m. peak period and two trips in the "primary direction" are provided during the p.m. peak period on the established express routes. Progress The primary expenses that have been paid by FOOT were for marketing and promotional activities and the purchase and installation of 13 automated passenger counters (APCs). As of the latest billing, made in October 1999, $74,396 had been spent on the project. Ridership data was not provided in the invoicing support materials. Gainesville Regional Transit System (RTS) Gainesville Regional Transit System (RTS) is a department within the City of Gainesville The board ofdirectors is the City of Gainesville Board of City Commissioners who are responsible for policy decisions regarding RTS as well as other City of Gainesville departments. RTS has an advisory board that Is composed of citizens from the community who provide input to the City Commission regarding the transit system and its structure. RTS provides service within the City of Gainesville and adjacent areas of Alachua County. RTS directly operates fixed-route motorbus service and provides demand responsive services via contract with private providers. SW Gainesville Enhanced Bus Service-WPI # 2810791 . Project Scope The objective of this project is to increase weekday service on SW 20th Avenue from the Oaks Mall to the University of Florida (UF) campus (Route 20, old Route 4); on SW 13 Street from Landings to UF campus (Route 13, old Route 3); on SW 23"' Terrace! Archer Road to UF (Route 9); and on 341 h StreeUCampus Club Apartments to UF (Route 12. old Transtt Corridor Program Review 20 Technical Memorandum #1

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. Route 9). The service enhancements include increased service hours, frequency of service, and number of buses. Project Milestones/Goals There were no project milestones/goals included in the documentation in the project file. However, district staff personnel indicated that goals were not established for the project initially because RTS needed to review the performance of the project following the first year of operations. Once the performance and operating characteristics of the route are well established and baseline data are avai lable, goals and objectives will be established for the project. SeiVice Description The UF Express provides express bus service between the Oaks Mall and the University campus. This route was created to provide an alternative to on-campus parking. The service is provided f ree to UF students, and UF and Shands faculty and staff members. The hours of operation are Monday through Friday from a :2o a m to 8:55a.m. and from . 3 :40p.m. to 6:15p.m. Service was originally provided every 20 minutes but was increased to every 15 minutes in the Spring of 1999. In the Spring of 1998, Route 3 was improved by adding one bus, increasing frequency . from 60 to 45 minutes. Route 9 was divided into two new routes (Routes 9 and 12) going from 30 to 15 minute frequency and from two buses to three on Route 9 and three buses on Route 12. The headways on Route 4 were improved from 30 to 15 minutes with an adjustment from two to four buses. During the Summer of 1998, serVice was enhanced through the addition of three buses: one on Route 3 (now called Routes 13 and 15); and two buses on Route 9 (one on the new Route 9 and one on Route 12). Beginning in the Fall of 1998 students we r e permitted to ride the bus for free by showing their student card resulting in tremendous ridership i nc reases. As a result, Route 3 (new Routes 13 and 15) was enhanced with one more bus, with rerouting result ing in a 15 minute headway during peak hours (Route 13); Route 9 (new Routes 9 and 12) was enhanced with eight more buses (four for each route) with 10 min u te headways; and Route 4 (new Route 20) added two additional buse!;, reduc ing headways to 15 minutes. By the Transit Corr i dor Program Review 21 Technical Memorandum #1

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end of September 1998, Route 9 was reduced by two buses, leaving six total buses ( t hree for each route). In January 1999, a new route, the Lexington Express, was added providing service in the morning and afternoon peak hours within the same area as Route 9. The Lexington Exp r ess Is served by one bus that runs on 30 minute headways from two differel)t apartment complexes to the University Project Progress Ridership has dramatically increased since the Implementation of the enhanced service. The following table i den tifies the changes In ridership from 1997 t o 1 999 (includes only t hose months with significant student populations due t o the f ocus on student transportation), ba sed on data provided I n the most recent report submitted in May 19g9 R i de rship 1997-1999 . Routes 3, 9 and 4 (20), Inclusive .(January April; September December) Month 1997 Ridership 1998 Rid ership 1999 Ridership %Chango January 33,236 -146,07 6 339.51% February 34, 126 153,54 1 349.92% Mar c h 26,981 135,772 300. 4 9% April 29,337 -126,306 330.54% Septomber 23,695 60 282 152. 28% October 70,4 33 158,463 124.98% -. November 48, 969 117,112 1 39.15% December 38,157 73,408 92.38% Total 307,134 409,265 561,697 Note: Service enhancements implemented In Fall1998. Data available through A pr il 1999. In summary, this enhancement project h as significantly increased the transit ridersh i p within the major tra nsportation corridors In Southwest Ga inesvill e a lleviating t raffic congestion within the area and reducing parking demands within the University area. Transh Co
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Night Bus Service "Later Gator" WPI # 2810829 Project Scope At the time this service was implemented, service on RTS bus routes ended between 8:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. On Saturdays, service ended at between 6:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. The University o(Fiorida Student Government approached RTS identifying a need for students to have access to safe, reliable, and comfortable public transit much later into the evening and early morning hours. The UF Student Government, UF Administration, and the City of Gainesville established an objective to provide public transit service to meet the mobility requir ements of UF students by operating all sutdent oriented bus routes until at least midnight on a six day per week . basis and that additional after midnight service be operated to provide a safe ride home for students after regular bus servic e stops. Project Milestones/Goals There were no project milestones/goals inc luded in the documentation in the project file. However, d istrict staff personnel indicated that goals were not established for the project initially because RTS needed to review the performance of the projecrfollowing the first year of operations. Once the performance and operating characteristics of the route are well established and baseline data are available, goals and objectives will be established for the project. Service Description Prior to full imp lementa tion of the service, interim service was provided on selected weekends during the Fall Semester, 1998. The interim service consisted of modified existing routes linking a number of onand off-campus student housing areas with destinaiions cush as the Reitz Union, the libraries, downtown, the. Oaks Mall, Butler Plaza, etc. A successful interim service period justified the full implementation of the service. The "Later Gator" began running on Thursday, September 3, 1998. Durin g the spring of 1999, this service was provided on Thursday, Friday and SatJ,Jrday evenings, running every 10 minutes from the Reitz Union to the RTS Downtown Plaza. Five routes were established using nine buses. Buses operate with 15 minute headways, except for the Transit Corridor Program Review 23 T echnlcal Memorandum #1

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. : campus to downtown connector which operates every 10 minutes. The hours of operation is from 9:30 p.m. to 3:00a.m. University of F lorida students ride for f ree. All other passengers pay $1.00 per ride or $0.50 for all other students, the disabled, and the elder1y. Progress The following table ide ntifies the ridership totals and average passengers per hour for the service with data for September 1998 through April 1999. Month Ridership Passengers/ Hour September 1998 2,561 8.9 October 1998 5,139 14.3 November 1998 7,244 17.6 December 1998 3,770 17.5 Jan uary 1999 6,677 33.7 February 19 99 7,394 37.3 March 1999 3,912 19.8 April1999 6,956 32.4 Total 43,653 Average/Month 5,457 22.69 Significant ridership Increases were reported through the period Decreases in December 1998 and March and April1999 can be attributed to low student populations during the University's Winter and Spring breaks, respectively. Tower Road Corridor Service WPI # 2810830 Project Scope The scope of the project included the enhancement of bus service within the Tower Road Corridor, including development and Implementation of the service. FOOT funds are used for operating and capital costs association with the service. T ransit Corridor Program Review 24 Technical Memorandum #1

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Project Milestones/Goals There were no project milestones/goals included In the dqcumentation in the project file. SeNice Description Service is provided via Routes 1 and 75 running between the University of Florida and the Oaks Mall along Archer Road and Tower Road (SW 751 Street); Route 4 running from downtown to Shands; and segments of Route 5 running from Cedar Ridge to the Oaks Mall. Route 1 provides service every 30 minutes during peak hours on weekdays and hourly service during off-peak Service is provided every hour on Saturdays and holidays. Route 4 provides ser:vice every 30 m i nutes during weekdays and Saturdays. Route 5 provides service every 30 minutes during peak hours and every 40 minutes during off-peak hours. Route 75 provides service every 30 minutes during peak hours on weekdays and hour l y service during off-peak hours. Progress In Spring 1998, Route 1 carried a total of 60,293 passengers from the month of January through April, with an average of 24.1 passengers per hour. The ridership data for the segment o f Route 5 included in the enhanced service is not available. In Spring 1999, Route 1 carried a total of 60,514 passengers from January through Apri l. The average boardings were 28.4 passengers per hour. Route 4 carried a total of 42,399 passengers over the same four month period, with an average of 28 3 passengers per hour. Route 75 carri ed a total of 42,414 passengers at an average o f :20.2 passengers per hour. Service availability was significantly increased between the spring of 1998 and the spring of 1999. Total in service hours increased from 3,414.3 hours in 1998 (January through April) to 5,728.1 hours in 1999 (January through April). Along with this increase in service was a corresponding increase In the overall cost to provide the service, from $131,451 in the spring of 1998 to $220,528 In the spring of 1999. T ransit Corridor Program Review 25 T<>chnlcal Memorandum #1

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This project is scheduled to be terminated on December 31, 2000. It is unknown whether a supplemental agreement will be established extending the project. District 3 ProJect Summaries During the project time period from July 1, 1993 through December 31, 1999, the FOOT District 3 Office awarded $1,342,462in transit corridor funds to two projects. The project summaries are as follows: Escambia County Area Transit (ECAT) Davis Highway Transit Corridor Project (Route 19)FPN # 22582518401 Project Scope The project scope is to provide 30 minute express bus service on Davis Highway between the ECAT transfer facility and West Florida Regional Medical Center to relieve <;ongestion in the corridor. During the first year of an aggressive marketing campaign was . . established to promote ride rship among commuters and shoppers for Davis Highway businesses, the University Mall and West Florida Regional Medical Center. Project Milestones/Goals The goals established for the program include the following: FY 1997 FY 1998 FY 1999 FY2QQO Passengers/Mile .70 .77 .85 1.3 Revenue/Mile $0.42 $0 46 $0.50 $0.80 The following table summarizes the annual goals established with correspond ing averaged system performance data for FY 1997 through FY 1999 Transit Corridor Program Review 26 T ethn ical Memorandum #1

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FY 1997 FY 1998 FY 1999 Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Actual Pass.IMile 0.70 1 13 0.77 1.14 0.85 1.35 Rev .tivlile $0.42 $0.68 $0.46 $0.73 $0.50 $0.83 SeNice Description Service is provided at 30 minute intervals between the ECAT transfer facility and the West Florida Regional Medical Center via Davis Highway Progress This project has been significantly successful i n meeting and ex.ceeding the goals established. Ridership and route revenue continue to increase at a healthy rate T he following annualized ridership and revenue data was provided by ECAT to the District 3 Publ i c Transportation Office. %Increase %Increase Fiscal Year Ridership oye r FY 97 Revenue over FY 97 FY 1997 109,099 N/A $66,044 N/A FY 1998 147,342 35.1 $93,863 42.1 FY 1999 166,963 53.0 $103,401 56. 6 Blue Angel Highway Corridor Project (Route 18) -FPN # 22583418401 Project Scope The Blue Angel Express transit corridor project was deve l oped to provide express service along t he heavily congested central northeasVsouthwest cor r ido r within Pensacola The original JPA e xecuted on January 2 1993 provided $200,000 in fund i ng to support the first year of operation of the express bus service A supplemental JPA was signed on May 23, 1994 adding an additional $200,000 to support the second year of operation. I n 1996, Transit Corridor Program Review 27 Techni cal Memorandum #1

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ECAT requested an annual allocation of$150,000 for fiscal years 1998 through to continue the pro je ct with additional marketing efforts and enhanced service levels I ncluding limited Saturday and Sunday service, the continuation of a parkandrlde Jot feeder system, and airport service to accommodate Incoming/outgoing Naval A ir Station personnel. Project Milestones/Goals The goals originally established for the program include an annual increase of 5 percent in both ridership and revenue over the 1996 base year as follows! 1996 Base Year EY 1998 FY 1999 FY20QQ Ridership 16,800 17,640 16,500 19,500 Revenue $11,140 $11,700 $ 12,285 SeNice Description The B l ue Angel Express provides expre&s bus service on the Blue Angel Highway, M onday through Friday with limited Saturday and Sunday service. The Blue Angel Express also serves parkand-rid e lots along the corridor and also provides airport service to accommodate Incoming/outgoing Naval Air Station personnel. Progress Actual annual ridership and revenues collected on the route for FY 1998 and FY 1999 are as follows: 1998 Goal 1998 Actual 1999 Goal 1999 Actual Ridership 17,640 35,985 18,500 55,743 Revenue $11,700 $29,637 $12,285 $41,184 As illustrated in the tables above, the Blue Angel Highway Corridor Project has been extremely successful in meeting and exceeding the goals established for the project. In 1996, ridership was 104 percent above the goal established and the revenue w as over Tlanslt Corridor PrQgrem Review 28 Technical Memorandum 11. 1

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153 percent above the established goal. Likewise, ridership and revenue in FY 1999 were also well above the goals established for the project. Additional goals were esiablishe d for passengers per mile and revenues per mile. The following table summarizes the annual goals established with corresponding averaged system data for FY 1998 and FY 1999. 1998 Goal 1998 Actyal 1999 Goal 1999 Actual Passengers/Mile 0.28 0.58 0.75 0.69 Revenue/Mile $0.18 $0.47 $0.53 $0.51 Again, the Blue Angel Highway project has well exceeded the goals established in FY 1998. In FY 1999, the project fell short of the goals established. However, the system data does show an improvement over FY 1998 I n addition, Information contained In the most recent status reports provides that the net cost per passenge r for the route decreased from $3.96 per passenger in FY 1998 to $2.87 per passenger in FY 1999, a 27.5 percent decrease. C onsidering all factors, this project has been significantly effective in meeting the overall goals established for the corridor. District 4 Summaries During the projec t time period from July 1, 1993 through December 31, 1999, the FOOT District 4 Office awarded $1,125,000 in transit corridor program funds to Broward County Transit. The project summary is as follows: Broward County Tran.sit (BCT) The Broward County Mass Transit Division is a division of the Broward County Community Services Department. The Transit Division is governed by the Board of County Commissioners of Broward County. The service area of BCT is Broward County. Connections are made to Palm Tran in Boca Raton and to Miami-Dade Transit Agency in North Miami Beach and Carol City. The system directly operates fixed-route motorbus service as well as contracting for some services such as Tri -Rail Commuter Rail feeder bus service and community serv[ce to Cooper City, Margate, Pembroke Pines, Coconut Creek; Miramar, Hillsboro Beach, Deerfield Beach, Davie, and TSI which provides Transit Corridor Program Review 29

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express peak service from western Broward County to downtown Ft. Lauderdale. In paratransit service is off e red via cont r a c t with a private p rovider. 0 The Broward Urban Shuttle (BUS) and Western ExpressWPI # 4811331 Project Scope The original contract, dated June 27'", 1994 was for $700,000 to tie used to develop a neighborhood shuttle that would f e ed into BCTs mainline. Included I n the costs were cont r acted services, lease vehicles, marketing, and a passenger and preli minary ridership report. A supplemental agreement was signed on July 15, 1996 prqvid i ng an additional $200,000 to th e p r oject to expand ttie service provided and purchase and install bus shelters In Aprll1999 a second supplemental agreement was s igned prov i ding an additional $200,000 fo r service expansion and operation and $225,000 for the purchase of electric buses. Project Milestones/Goals The following goals have been established for the project: Goal 1: To' increase mass transit accessibiiity. Objectives: Provide and encourage intermodal access to Ft. Lauderdale Tri-Rail Station, the FOOT park-and-ride lot, and Lauderhill Mall Provide enhanced accessibility for neighborhood residents according to their expressed needs. Goa l 2 : Increase productivity/ridership in designated residential communities contiguous to the corridor. Objectives: Increase transit ridership by 25% within the expanded study area. Decrease t r ansit travel times along the Broward Boulevard Corridor by examining the feas i bility of enhanced fixed route service along major corridors that intersect the study area. Transit Corridor Program Review 30 Technical Memorandum #1

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Schedule timed transfers between fi xedroute services a nd neighborhood service. Goal 3: Divert paratransit trips onto th e fi x ed-route or onto alternative neighborhood circulator service Objectives: Maintain statistics on wheel c h ai r ridership. Develop a l ist of compreh e n s iv e public participation plan . Prepare a comprehens ive plan for marketing and .promotion of services within the study area. Coordinat e marketin g efforts with Tri-Rail M arketing staff. Attend meetings with affected neighborhood and homeowners' associations. Conduct regula r on-board and community surveys to assess th e sui tabil ity o f the transit services being provided. Evalua te community Input to enhance transit services and improve passenge r ame n i t ie s. In cl ude representatives of all transportation modes i n promotional processes {e.g. Tri-Rail, Gold C o ast Commuter Services, Cou nty Bicycle Coordinator, etc. ) SeNice Description The Mini BUS pro vide s doorto-door service t o residents who live in an area bounded by Sunrise Boulevard to t he n orth; Northwest 271h Avenue/Riverland Road and the Tri-Rail Station to the east; Davie Boulevard to the south and State Road 7 ill Mall to the west. Progress Passe nger and community surv e y s w e r e complete d in the Winter of 1998 A report w as developed, dated February 1999. 72 s urveys were dis t ributed to r i ders of th e BUS with 71 responses 9,074 surveys w e r e mailed to the community 8,646 w ere delivered successfull y and 522 were compl e t ed and r e turned. The rider survey asked questions r e l ated t o trip purpose car availability, demographics {age), and service rating. The community survey focused on the communities awa reness of the BUS, the vehicle availabil i ty, trip purpose, and demographics. Transh Cotridor Program Review 31 T echnlcal Memo
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The most recent progress report was received by the Department in July 1999 for the fourth quarter of FY 1999 (April through June) and included year-to-date statistics Compared with the prior year, ridership on the BUS and Southwest Broward Express increased 11. 6 percent (a 19.1 percent increase for the Southwest Express and a 6.7 percent increase on the BUS). Comparing the fourth quarter of FY 1997 (service began in late March 1997) to the fourth quarter of FY 1999, total ridership on the routes increase 114 percent, with the BUS ridership increasing 1 02 percent and the Southwest Broward Shuttle increasing by 127 percent. Favorable performance data for both routes and for the project. District 5 Project Summary During the project t ime period from July 1, 1993 through December 31, 1999, the FOOT District 5 Office awarded $10,000 in transit corridor program funds to LYNX. The project summary is as follows: LYNX (Central F lorida Region a l T ra nsportation Authori ty) . . . The Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority (LYNX) is an independent authority created under Florida Statute, and is governed by a Board of Directors with members from Orange, Seminole and Osceola Counties, the Cities of Orlando, Altamonte Springs, and K i ssimmee, the FOOT District Five Secretary, and two gubernatorial appointees. LYNX operates fixed-route motorbus service, and is the CTC for the three county region providing demand-responsive service. 1-4 Express Survey-WPI #5815144 Project Scope Tliis project was undertaken to determine the relative feasibility of establishing exp r ess bus service along Interstate 4 between Volusia, Seminole and Orange Counties. The total project budget for the survey was $10,000 (100% sta t e funds). Project Milestone/Goals To develop and conduct the survey and provide a written summary of the results. Transit Corridor Program Review 32 #1

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Service Description Not Applicable Progress In May 1995, origin and destination surveys were conducted at three 1-4 interchanges in Volusia County. The survey was established only those drivers who would be traveling westbound (toward Orlando) on 1-4. The survey instrument asked drivers to identify the purpose of their trip, the number of times the t ri p was made during a week, the closest major intersection to their home, the closest intersection to their work place, the number of vehicles owned by the household, and whether or not they would ride a non -st op bus from a Deltona area park-and-ride location to their work destination. The interviewer was asked to make a number of observations including the estimated age range within which the person fell, the sex of the driver, their ethnic origin and the auto occupancy Of those interviewed 95 to 97 percent were traveling to the Orange County/Seminole County area. When asked if they would ride a non-stop bus from a Deltona area park-and ride location to thei r work destination, 39 to 44 percent indicated that they would consider riding a non-stop bus to their work area. (LYNX and VOTRAN have since implemented express bus service between Volusia and Orange/Seminole Counties with FOOT Service Development funds.) District 6 Project Summaries During the project time period from July 1, 1993 through December 31, the FOOT District 6 Office awarded $11 ,585,148 (includes $2,066,944 in funds awarded to the Northwest 27"' Avenue MAX and Flagler MAX projects prior to July 1, 1993) in transit corridor program funds to Miami Dade transit Agency and the City of Miami Beach. The project summaries are as follows: Miami-Dade Transit Agency The Miami -Dade Transit Agency (MOTA} is a department of Miami-Dade County, and is governed by the Board of County Commissioners. MOTA operates fixed-route motorbus Transit Conidor Program Review 33 Technical Memorandum #1

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service, heavy rail and automated guideway services. Demand-response service is both directly operated and purchased. N.W. 27"' Avenue MAX WPI # 6819003 Project Scope In 1987 the Flor ida Departrl}entofTransportation completed a study of the N .W. 27"' Avenue/University Drive corridor in northern Dade and southern Broward Counties. The purpose of the project was to develop public transit operation treatments for Implementation within this corridor. The study recommended severa l improvemen ts to public transit in this corridor. One of the recommendations was a demonstration project using small buses to link residential areas within the N.W. 27"' Avenue corridor to the Metrorail stations. At the time, a similar service was being successfully demonstrated in the Kendall area (Kendall Area Transit (KAT)) To implement the recommendation, the Miami-Dade Transit Agency (MOTA) entered into a joiot participat i on agreement with the Department for a project aimed at improving transit service In the .N.W. 271 h Avenue . corridor in northern Dade County. The first step in the project was to define the N W. 271 h Avenue corridor study area defined as an area bounded by the County line on the north; SR-112 (Airport Expressway) on the south; 1 -9 5/Fiorida's Turnpike on the each and N.W. 57"' Avenue on the west (except the area bounded by N.W. 1191 h Street and N.W. 42"" Avenue). The second step involved detailed market research in the study area. MOTA on board surveys of current transit passengers and a random telephone survey of households In the study area helped determine the travel patterns of transit and non-transit travelers within the corridor. The survey findings indicated that there was a need for a limited, high speed bus service to major N.W. 271 h Avenue corridor activity centers and the Metrorail Project Milestones/Goals Two productivity measures were used to eva lua te the project: average passengers per revenue hour and net cost per passenger. The resource-measurement goal of the project was for average boardings per revenue hour to be at least half of th e average for comparable peer routes and for the net cost per passenger to be less than twice the average for Comparable routes. Transit Corridor Program Review 34 Technical Memorandum #1

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. Service Description WHh the potential market Identified, the route design of new limited stop service on N.W. 27'" Avenue was finalized The route was designed to operate between the North Dade neighborhood west of Calder Race Track and Martin Luther King (MLK), Jr. Metrorail Station via N.W. 27' Avenue. / The new service, the 27'" Avenue MAX, was inaugurated on December 9, 1991. The route operated every 15 minutes during peak periods as a limited stop service along N.W. 27 Avenue. The service level remained unchanged during the demonstration period Service was provided a lo ng N.W. 27'" Avenue between N.W. 211 '" Street and the MLK Metrorail Station. There were 10 stops spaced an average of one-mile apart including stops at major activity centers and tranfer points At the north end of the route, local stops were placed at shorter intervals along a loop via N.W. 207'" Street and N.W. 211 '" Street between 27'" and 32"d Avenues. The alignment remained unchanged with the exception of the following modifications: In April1994, the service was extended west from N.w: 32"d Avenue to N.W. 37'" Avenue between N.W 207'" and 211'" Street to serve the Vista Verde neighborhood. This improvement was in response to r equests at MDT A community meetings in the northwest Dade area. In November 1994, several momlng and afternoon trips were extended south from the MLK Metro rail Station to N.W. 36"' Street and 27'" Avenue to link passengers ot the airport. In August 1996, a stop was added at Ali Baba Avenue in Opa-Locka Minor running time adjustments were implemented through the to improve service reliability to account for changing traffic conditions in the corridor. The minibus vehicles were so successful in attracting potential riders and building a steady base of passengers that MOTA assigned full size (45 seat) transit coaches to the route in July 1993 to provide additional capacity. Transit Corridor P rogram Review 35 Technical Memorandum #1

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Progress For the first two years of operation, ridership steadily rose from slightly over 300 boardings per day to almost700 boardings per day in the Winter of 1993/1994. From that time through the last quarter of the project, ridership declined somewhat to approximately 550 riders per day. However, while ridership declined during the period, actual transit ridership in the corridor increased by 3. 7 percent from the Winter of 1991, prior to the start of the 27'" Avenue MAX to the Winter of 1997, the last quarter of the project. Metrorail also showed increasing ridership since the implementation of the 271 h Avenue MAX. Boardings at the MLK Metrorail Station increased by 16 percent from the Winter of 1991 to the Winter of 1997. Total. Metroraii ridership increased only 1 percent during the same time period. The 27'" Avenue MAX was terminated by the Department in the Winter of 1997 due to low ridership. Flagler MAX-WPI# 6810184 Project Scope The Flagler MAX projectwas established in November 1991 through a JPA with the FOOT. The project purpose is to reduce congestion along the Flagler Street corridor from downtown Miami to Miami Beach. Project Milestones/Goals The resource management goal of passengers per revenue hour was to be at least one half the average of comparable peer routes (the Biscayne MAX and the 27'" Avenue MAX); and the cost per passenger trip was to be less than twice the average on comparable routes. SeNice Description The Flagler MAX is a limited stop express bus route from west Dade County to downtown Miami primarily through the Flagler Street corridor and to Miami Beach via the MacArthur Causeway. It operates every 15 minutes during weekday rush hours Transit Corridor Program Review 36 Technical Memorandum #1

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Progress The Flagler MAX compares favorably to the peer routes eJ>tablished for the project. During the last report available for the project (April 1, 1999 through June 30, 1999), average daily ridership was 1, 726, a two percent increas\) above the same period within the prior fiscal year and a three percent increase above the prior quarter. South-Dade Busway-WP/ # 6810309 Project Scope The scope of this project Is to provide express service, within exclusive bus lanes, along the US Highway 1 corridor Project Milestones/Goals The resource management goal of passengers per revenue hour was to be at least one: half the average of comparable peer routes and the east per passenger trip was to be less than tWice the average on comparable routes. Service Description The South-Dade Busway connects the Dadeland South Metrorail Station and Cutler Ridge, providing exclusive roadway lanes for buses operated by or for the Miami-Dade Transit Agency and emergency vehicles Areas east, west, and south of the Busway are served by five bus routes also operated with transit corridor funds through this project: the Busway MAX; Busway Local; Coral Reef MAX, Saga Bay MAX, and the 1 Busway (description and ridership information provided below). They offer local and limited-stop service on the Busway and in the neighborhoods between Florida City and the Dadeland South Metrorail Station. Progress The South-Dade Busway Is one of the most successful transit corridor projects discussed within this report. The Busway corridor ridership continues in an upward trend. Average weekday corridor ridership for the most recently reported period (April 1 1999 through June 30, 1999) was 11,578, a 10 percent increase over the average corridor ridership in Transit Corridor Program Review 37 Technical Memorandum #1

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the same reporting pe riod for the previous year, and a 70 percent Increase over the same period in 1996 (the year before the busway opened). Average weekend ridership for the most recent reporting period was 12 ,576, a 26 percent increase from the average ridership for ihe same period during the prior fiscal and a 118 percent increase over the same quarter in FY 1996. Ancillary Routes Busway MAXThe Busway MAX is a limited -s top route between Florida City and the Metrorail. The route 6perates on the Busway north of Cutler R idge and along US 1 south of Cutler Ridge, seiVing Goulds, Homestead, and Florida City. SeiVice between the S.W. 152"" Street Busway Station and the Dadeland South Metrorail Station is non-stop during weekday rush hours The route serves ail Busway stations during off-peak. The Busway MAX operates every 15 minutes during weekday rush hours and every 30 minutes during off-peak. Average boardings per day during the most recently reported period (April through June) were 3,283 for weekdays ; 2,905 for Saturdays, and 2,392 for Sundays. Average passengers P er revenue hour was 28.4 passengers per weekday hour, 35.2 for Saturdays, and 29.0 for Sundays for the quarter ending June 30, 1999 The average cost per passenger was $1.57 during the weekdays, $0.45 on Saturdays, and $0 65 for Sundays. T he au sway MAX continues to meet and exceed the resource-measurement goals of average passengers per. revenue hour (at least one-half the average of comparable peer routes) and the average net cost per passenger (less than twice the comparable average of the peer routes). 8usway LocalThe Busway Local operates on the Busway salVing all Busway Stations between Cutler Ridge and the Dade l and South Metrorail Station, seven days per week. . Full-sized transit coaches are used during weekday rush hours and mini-buses are used at all other t im es. The Busway Local operates every 15 minutes during weekday rush hours and every 30 minutes during off-peak. Average boardings per day during the most recently reported period (April through June) were 1,581 for weekdays, 1,105 for Saturd.ays, and 972 for Sundays. Average passengers per revenue hour was 33.4 passengers per weekday hour, 34.2 for Saturdays, and 30.1 for Sundays for the quarter ending June 30, 1999 The average cost per passenger was $1.01 during the weekdays, $0.65 on Saturdays, and $0.69 for .Sundays The Busway Local continues to meet and exceed the resource-measurement goals of average passengers per revenue hour (at least one-half the average of comparable peer routes) and the average net cost per passenger (less than twice the comparable average of the peer routes). Transit Corridor Program Review 38 Tecllnlcal Memorandum #t

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Cora/Reef MAX-The Coral Reef MAX provides lim ited stop service seven days a week service between Country Walk and the Dadeland South Metrorall Station via S.W. 152nd Street and the Busway. The. route provides service to the MetroZoo during its operating hours. The service, provided by mini-buses, runs every 20 minutes during weekday rush hours, every 45 minutes during weekday off-peak and every 40 minutes on weekends Average boardings per day during the most re c ently reported period (April through June) were 1,037 for weekdays, 592 for Saturdays, and 339 for Sundays. Ave rage passengers per revenue hour was 23.8 passengers per weekday hour, 22.6 for Saturdays, and 12.9 for Sundays for the quarter ending June 30, 1999. The average cost per passenger was $0.92 during the weekdays, $1.12 on Saturdays, and $2.52 for Sundays. The Coral Reef Max quarterly boarding averages for the most recent reporting period were down slightly over the prior quarter. While weekday average boardings remained the same, Saturday and Sunday boarding declined by five percent and 19 percent respectively. It is suggested that this decline, similar to one experienced during the same quarter as last year, is most likely due to seasonal fluctuations. Although the Coral Reef MAX has experienced a slight decrease in boardings, it meets the target goals of average passengers per revenue hour (at least one-half the average of comparable peer routes) and for average net cost per passenger (less than twice the comparable average. Saga Bay MAX-The Saga Bay MAX is a limited stop, weekday rush hour service between Saga Bay and Metrorail. The route operated by mini-buses, serves Busway stat ions between S.W. 168'h Street and the Dadeland South Metrorail Station. Service is every 15 minutes during weekday rush hours. Average boardings per day during the most recently reported period (April through June) were 344 (only operates on weekdays). Average passengers per revenue hour was 20 .2 for the quarter ending June 30, 1999. The average cost per passenger was $1. 17. . Average boardings declined 40 percent from l ast quarter,.although ridership is consistent with the levels experienced during the 1998 reporting year. Overall, the Saga Bay MAX meets and exceed the resource-management goals of the project. Transi t Corridor Program Review 39 Technical Memorandum #1

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1 Busway-The Route 1 Busway provides local service seven days per week between the South Miami Heights area, east Perrine, and Metrorail. The route serves all Busway stations between S.W. 168 Street and the Dadeland South Metrorai l Station. It operates every 15 minutes during weekday rush hours. Average hoardings per day during the most recently reported period (April through June) were 1,563 for weekdays, 907 for Saturdays, and 511 for Sundays. Average passengers per revenue hour was 21. 0 passengers per weekday hour, 22.1'for Saturdays, and 17.6 for Sundays for the quarter ending June 30, 1999. The average cost per passenger was $2.13 during the weekdays, $2.18 on Saturdays, and $2.96 for Sundays. The Route 1 Busway quarterly boarding averages were four percent below weekday ridership for the previous quarter, 15 percent below Saturday hoardings, and 27 percent below Sunday hoardings. While the previous quarter fell behind in passenger hoa rdings, the Route 1 Busway continues to meet the resource-measurement goals established for the project. In the most recently submitted quarterly report, the Route 1 Busway met or exceeded the average for comparable peer routes on weekdays and weekends. n also met the goal for average net cost per passenger. This was the first ql!arter that the route . met the target goal for Saturdays. City of Miami Beach The City of Miami Beach Is a municipal government within Miami-Dade County. Miami Beach Electric Shuttle "Electrowave" Project-WPI # 6810341 Project Scope The original scope 'of this project was to purchase and operate seven electric buses to link under-utilized City of Miami Beach parking facilities with a newly created park-n-ride program to help alleviate the congestion and parking problems in South Beach. Transit Corridor Prooram Review 40

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Project Milestones/Goals The goals of this project are to: provide a cost effective and environmentally sensitive transportation alternative in the South Beach area. demonstrate the effectiveness of a public/private partnership in solving existing transportation problems. demonstrate the effectiveness of electric vehicle technology to address traffi9 congestion problems. increase the use of existing under-utilized City of Miami Beach parking facilities in the South Beach area. The following are objectives to measure the project success: Operating cost of the shuttle service wlll be compared with the operating cost of traditional powered vehicles with a criteria for success of having lower operating costs. $35,000 in outside advertising will be obtained In the first year to promote the shuttle, rising to $85,000 in the second year of operation. Operating performance in South Florida's climate will be compared to traditionally powered vehicles, with a criteria for success of better reliability. Parking utilization at the Seventh, Twelfth, and seventeenth street will increase by 5% during the first year, and 10% by the end of the second year of shuttle operation. Service Description The project supports the operation shuttle services in the South Beach area of Miami Beach 365 days per year. Service is provided by seven electric trolleys. Headways are anticipated to be between 8 and 10 minutes. On July 1, 1999 a $0 .25 fare was instituted Prior to that time, the shuttle provided free service. Transit Corridor Program Review 41 Technical Memorandu m #1

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Progress The electric shuttle project known as th e "Eiectr owave had its dedication and inauguration reception on Friday, January 30, 1998 from 3:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m .. At 7:00 p :m. on the of January, service began. The charging, storage and maintenance of the vehicles will be done by the City of Miam i Beach fleet management department at a prefabricated bullding next to its facility on Terminal Island (at the eastern end of MacArthur Causeway). The City of Miami Beach Is In the process of obtaining funding for the development of a permanent multi-modal center to be constructed at the terminus of MacArthur Causeway on Fifth Street. This will provide permanent shuttle terminal, along with storage, charging equipment, maintenance facilities, and a 750 plus parking facility. Shuttle drivers are provided by American Bus Lines Red Top, a subsidiary of Coach USA. A total of 26 drivers have been hired for the 365 days per year/20 hours per day operation. American Bus Lines also provides dispatch, backup vehicles, as well as general operations assistance. Vehicle tracking systems have been installed in each of the seven vehicles. This system provides accurate ridership counts and provides system management control for shutt l e dispatch and operation. Each vehicle can be tracked by street location and nearest cross street. The system will also track and record service delays, movement, speed of the vehicle, direction, and safety problems. In addition, an energy monitoring system has been installed in six of the seven vehicles that provides driver and vehicle performance summaries, battery energy-efficiency and depth of discharge histories, fuel reports, and battery recharge and driving profiles. The City of Miami Beach has leased property at the terminus of the MacArthur Causeway, on the south side of Fifth Street, for a park and ride lot for Electrowave users. The M iami Beach TMA has worked with employers and employees in the shuttle service area to encourage the purchase of special parking permits that will allow them on this lot. Permits a llow employees and employers the use of the lot from Monday through Saturday, 6 a.m. until 8 p.m., at $25 per month, plus tax. With other City lots in the area charging $50 per month for parking, this has been quite popular. The Electrowave has been extremely popular, carrying 1,392,454 passengers in its first year of operation. In 1999, the trend continued with monthly passenger trips averaging Transit Corridor Program Review 42 Technical MAmnrandum #1

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112,284. If the trend continues, the second year of operation for the Electrowave will continue to be successful. The most important aspect of this project Is the pu!:Jiic-prlvate partnerships that have been created. Only 18.51 percent of the total project budget was FOOT funds (Transit Corridor and Service Development). The remaining budget was funded by the City of Miami Beach, Florida Power & Light (FP&L), the Florida Alliance for Clean Technologies (donation of the energy monitoring system along with FP&L), the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, and the Clean Cities Coalition. Additional support was provided by the Miami Beach TMA the Miami Beach Police Department, the Miami Dade Transit Agency, and the merchants and other employers in South Beach. District 7 Project Summaries During the project time J:>eriod from July 1, 1993 through December 31 1999, the FOOT District 7 Office awarded $4,500,204 in transit corridor funds to HART, PSTA, and Pasco County (includes $1,269,493 for the US 41 Corridor project that was originally awarded prior to July 1, 1993 but Was continued through supplemental agreements and $2,270,00 for the 200X that began under WPI # 7813923 in April1988). The project summaries are as follows: Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority (HART) The Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority (HART) was created in October 1979 as a subdivision of the State of Florida. HART's Board of Directors consists of eleven members. Hillsborough County appoints five members, the of Tampa three members, the City ofT em pie Terrace one member, and the State of Florida appoinls two members. The Board of Directors selects an Executive Director who appoints or promotes Individuals to the various positions of responsibility within the organi:zation. HART directly operates fixed-route motorbus service and provides paratranslt services through the County's Share-A-Van program. Transit Corridor Program Review 43 Technical Memorandum #1

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Tampa/Clearwater Express Service Courtney Campbell Causeway (200X) WPI # 7813923/# 7814028 Project Scope This proje ct began in August 1985 as the Gandy/Courtney Campbell corridor project providing Intra-county services between Pinellas and Hillsborough Counties via the Gandy Boulevard/Gandy Bridge and Courtney Campbell Causeway corridors to relieve congestion within those corridors. In 1990, service along these corridors was reducted by .. 20 percent to : .. maintain a balanced budget ... (due to low ridership). At the same time, fares were increased from $1.00 to $1.50. In October 1990, the Gandy corridor portion of the project was transferred to the Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PSTA) and became PST A's 100X (discussed below). The Courtney Campbell Express remained with HART and became the 200X. Under WPI #7813923, $2,270,000 in state funds was provided to the project. The project is continuing through funding allocated to HART under WPI # 7814025. The budget of $500,000 (under WPI # 7814025) is primarily for operation and administration of the project, but does include funds for the installation and/or constructio'n of two passenger shelters; leasing of park-n-r ide lot space at Clearwater Mall and marketing expenses. Project Milestones/Goals The goal originally established for the project was a 30% farebox recovery. In 1990, the goal was changed to a 2% per year increase i n ridership. SeNice Description This project provides commuter express bus service from downtown Tampa in . Hillsborough County to Clearwater in Pinellas County. The service runs through the Westshore area of Tampa and utilizes the Courtney Campbell Causeway (SR 60) to cross Tampa Bay. The 200X stops at Westshore once in the morning on the way to and once in the evening on the way out to Clearwater. Two midday trips also stop at Westhore. With the addition of a stop at Clearwater Mall greater accessibility is provided to mall patrons. It Transil Corridor Program Review 44 Technical Memorandum #1

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also allows for easy transfers between and PSTA bus routes 19, 60, and 63. The 200X then continues to Drew Street via US 19, serving the HART/PSTA park-and-ride lot located that the Drew Shopping C enter Progress The following table identifies ridership and farebox recovery trends since the first quarter of Fiscal Year 1991 (100X was separated between PSTA (the Gandy Express) and HART (the Courtney Campbell Express) in October 1990). In this table the fiscal year begins on October 1 and ends on September 30. Fiscal Year FY 1991 FY 1992 FY 1993 FY 1994 FY 1995 FY 1996 FY 1997 FY 1998 Estimated Annual Ridership 41,730 44,460 43,160 48,685 Not Available 47,580 46,280 42,987 Average Farebox Recovery Ratio 18.4% 26.4% 30.7% 30.2% 26.1% 22 .8% 22 .9% 19.9% *Based on average daily boardings multiplied by 260 operating days per year (Monday through Friday, excluding holidays). Annual ridership has fluctuated since October 199 0 however, a gradual decline in ridership began in 1996 (although it may have occurred during FY 1995complete ridership data for FY 1995 was not provided in the progress reports). Since 199 4 ridership has decreased 11.7 percent. The average fare box recovery ratio has also fluctuated through the period, peaking at 30.2 percent in FY 1994 and gradually decreas ing iri the years following to 19.9 percent in FY 1998, a decrease of 34. 1 percent. The annual ridership goal of 2 percent over the previous year was met in FYs 1992 and 1994 The average farebox ratio goal of 30 percent was met in FYs 1993 and 1994. Transit Corridor Program Review 45 Technical Mem o randum #1

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US 41 Corridor Improvement Project-WPI# 78100101# 7814114 Project Scope This project was initiated in Mar ch 1992. The purpose of the project is t o provide more frequent service in the US 41 corridor In Tampa b y providing frequent north-south service north of downtown Tampa on transit. The fixed route service is designed to attract riders to. bus service for the work commute as a congestion m i tigation strategy with a goa l to Inc rease ridersh i p and reduce cong estion on the corridor. A supplement a l agreement was signed o n July 15 1996 providing an add i tional $200,000 to the project to expand the service provided and pu. rchase and i nstall bus shelters. In April 1999 a second supp l emental agreement was signed providing an add i tiona l $200,000 for service expansion and operat ion arid $225,000 for the purch ase of e lectric buses. Project Milestones/Goals Goal 1 : Increase transit ridership on routes participating in the project (Routes 1, 2, 7, 12, 20X, 26X,50X, and 56X). Performance Measure : Ridership will increase by 3 percent in 2000 on the eight participating routes. Goal 2: Mainta i n a reason able f arebox recovery ratio. P erforma nce Measure: Maint ain an average farebo x ratio of at least 30 percent on local routes and 10 percent on e x press routes. Service Description In order to relieve co n gest ion a l ong th e US 41 Corr i dor (defined as Nebrask a Avenue and Interstate 275), a num b er of routes were established and are supported by funds received by HART from the FOOT. The r o ute s p a rti c ipating in the project include the following: Route 1 p r oviding north /south fixed route service between HART's downtown Marion Street Transit Parkway to North Boulevard and Bearss Avenue. Northbound departures begin from the Marion Street facility at 5:23a.m. with 15 minute Transit Corridor Program Review 46 Tedu\ica l Memorondum #1

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headways until 9:00 a.m. At that time, neadways go to 30 minutes and then retum to 15 minutes after 3:00 p.m. Service is available until 9:00 p.m. Southbound departures begin at 5:05 a.m. until 9:05 a.m. with 30. minute headways. After the 9:05a.m. departure time, service is provided on an hourly basis, resuming 30 minute service at 3:30 p.m. until 9:05 p.m. Saturday service is provided from 6:29 a.m. until 8:29 p.m. with 30 minute headways. Hourly service is provided Sunday from 6:28 a.m. until 6:25 p.m. Route 2 providing north/south fixed route service between HART's downtown Northern Terminal to the University Area. Transfer Center. Northbound departures begin at 5:00 a.m. with headways averaging 15 minutes. After 9:00 a.m. seryice is provided with 30 minute headways and returns to 15 minute headways after 3:00 p.m. Service is available unti110:00 p.m. Southbound departures begin at 4:45 a.m. until 8:30 a.m. with 15 minute headways. Headways are increase to 30 minutes from 9:00 a.m. until 10:50 p.m. Saturdays service is provided from 6:35 a.m. until 7:20 p.m. with tieadways that average 30 minutes. Southbound service is provided until 8:2.0 p.m. Hourly service is provided cin Sunday from 6:35a.m. until 6:25 p.m. northbound and 6:35 until 8:35 sou1hbound. Route 7 providing north/south fixed route service between HART's Tampa downtown Washington Street Station to North Boulevard and Bearss Avenue. Northbound departures are provided from 5:23 a.m. until 7:21 p.m with headways averaging 30 minutes Southbound departures begin at 5:15a.m. until7:15 a.m. with 60 minute headways. Saturdays service is provided from 6:28 a.m. until 7:23 p.m. with headways that average 60 minutes. Southbound service is provided until 7:55p.m. Hourly service is provided on Sunday from 6:19a.m. to 7:02p.m. northbound and from 6:19 to 7:55 p.m. southbound. Route 12-providing north/south fixed route service between HART's downtown Tampa Northern Terminal to University Area Transfe r Center. Northbound departures begin at 5:00 a.m. with headways averaging 15 minutes. After 9:00 a.m. service is provided with 30 minute headways until 3:00 p.m. From 3:00 p.m. until4:00 p.m. service is provided with 15 minute headways. Service is available until10:00 p.m. Southbound departures begin at 5:15a.m. unti110:05 p.m. with an average headway of 30 minutes. Saturdays service is provided from 6:35 a.m. until 7:35 p.m. with headways that average 30 minutes. Southbound service is provided Transit Corridor Pro9ram Review 47 Tocjlnical Memorandum #1

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. until 7:33 p.m. Hourly service is provided on Sunday from 6:35a.m. until 7:35 p.m. northbound and 6:35 until 7:35 s.outhbound. Route' 20X providing north/south peak period express bus service from HART's lot facility i n Lutz to Tampa General Hospital. Southbound departures begin at 6:10a.m. from the 1" Babtist Church in Lutz with an average headway of between 35 and 40 minutes until7:10 a.m. There are 3 southbound departures Northbound departures are provided from 3:50 p.m. until 5:05 p.m with an average headway of between 35 and 40 minutes. There are 3 northbound departures. T his route does not provide services on weekends. Major s e rvice centers for this express route include the 181 Babtist Church Park-N-Ride-Lutz, Fletcher Plaza Park N-Ride, the Tampa Tribune, and Tampa Gene ral Hospital. Route 26X providing south/north peak period express bus service from HART's park-n-ride facility in Lutz to Tampa General Hospital. Southbound departu res begin at 6:10a.m. from the 1'; Babtist Church in Lutz with an average headway of between 35 and 40 minutes until7:10 a.m. There are 3 southbound departures. Northbound departu r es are provided f r om 3 : 50 p.m. until 5:05 p.m. with an average headway of between 35 and 40 minutes. T here are 3 northbound depa rt ures. This route does not prov i de services on weekends Major service centers for this express route include North Lakeview Park-N Ride, Mission Bell Shopping Center the Tampa Tribune, and Tampa General Hosp i tal. Route SOX -providi n g south/north peak period express service between H ART's . Citrus Park Park-N-Ride facil ity to the Mar i on Street Transit Parkway. There are two southbound departures from C i trus Park at 6:30 a m. and 7:20 a.m. each with an average headway of 50 minutes. There are two northbound departures from the Marion Street Tra nsit Parkway at 4:40p.m. and 5 :15p. m with a 35 m i nute headway This route does not provide services on weekends Major serv ice centers for this express route include Citrus Park Pa r k-N-Ride facility Carrollwood Park-N-Ride facility Casey Park-N-Ride facility, and Orange Grove Park-N-Ride facility. Route 56Xproviding northbound peak period express serv i ce between Tampa General Hospital and Citrus Park Park-N-Ride facility There is one northbound departure at 5:30 p.m. from Tampa General. No southbound travel is available. (Service will be eliminated in April 2000 due to low ridership.) Corridor ProgramRevle w 48 Technical Memorandu m #1

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Progress In a status report for the project, dated November 1999 : it was reported that fare box . recovery averaged 27 percent. Also ln that report, It was suggested that the 56X be eliminated and that the funds that had been spent on the route be used to provide extended evening service hours on the 20X and the 50X In the justification prepared by the district office in October 1999 for a budget Increase, it was stated that ... This project has contributed to increasing and stabilizing transit ridership on all routes participating in this project... Oldsmar/Tampa Express Service -FPN #40647918401 Project Scope The purpose of this project is to p rov ide express service within Hillsborough County from Net Park through Downtown Tampa to Oldsmar. This project is needed to respond to employment growth and congestion in the Tampa/Oldsmar corridor. At the present time, there is no direct transit servlce from Tampa to Oldsmar. Oldsmar's Industrial and manufacturing industries have job openings that cannot be filled. Employers express interest in whether public transportation would have an impact on reducing their job vacancies. HART also received pet i tions from riders on Route 200X, Westchase area residents, and others commuting from west of Oldsmar to downtown Tampa requesting direct transit service. The project budget is $125,000, includ ing $100,000 for the operation of the express service and $25,000 for marketing. The project is 100 percent state funded. The JPA was executed on November 22, 1999 with service anticipated to begin by April 2000. Project Milestones/Goals There were no project milestones/goals included in the documentation in the project file. SeNice Description The service will provide two morning express bus trips and two evening express bus trips to/from Net Park through downtown Tampa to Oldsmar. Transit Corridor Program Review 49 Technical Memorandum 111

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Progress This is a new project. There have been no progress reports submitted to date. . Pinellas Sun coast Transit Authority (PSTA) The Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PSTA) is an independent authority created by a special act of the Florida Legislature, and is governed by a Board of Directors comprised of one appointee from Pinellas County and one from the City of St. Petersburg, one elected County Commissioner and 8 elected officials representing the 24 municipalities served by PSTA. PSTA dir. ectly operates fixed-route motorbus service and demand response services, with some of the demand response service purchased from local private provide r s ; Route 59/Route 73 Service WPI #7816678 Project Scope The purpose of this project was to provide continuous fixed route service along the Ulmerton Road/Roosevelt Boulevard/9th Street North from Indian Rocks Shopping Center in western Pinellas County to the Gateway Mall in eastern Pinellas County via PSTA Route 59. {Route 59 was initiated in October 1992 with a Service Development grant from the Department). It also includes the extensjon of Route #73 from its original terminus at Starkey and Ulmerton Roads to downtown Clearwater in order to provide linkages to major residential areas and employment and other attractors along County Road 1 and northwest Clearwater via other PST A bus routes. From October 1992 through December 1994, the FOOT and PSTA jointly funded Route 59 as a Service Development project. Effective November 21, 1995, service was f unded by FOOT and PSTA under the FOOT Transit Corridor Program. Project Milestones/Goals Separate goals and objectives have been established for Routes 59 and 73. The following goals and objectives have been established for Route 59: Tyanslt Corridor Program Review 50 Technical Memorandum #1

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Goal: Facilitate intra-county transit work trips to/from western Pinellas County to/from the Gateway area of Pinellas County via Ulmerton Road and Roosevelt Boulevard. Objective: Provide service ato'ng the Ulmerton Road/Roosevelt Boulevard Corridor linking I ndian Rocks Shopping Center on the west with Gateway Mall on the east. Object i ve: Provide at a minimum, 30 minute peak-period service frequency and 60 minute service frequency during off-peak periods Objective: Maintain schedule transfers when possible at off-street transfer locations including Indian Rocks Shopping Center, Largo Mall, and Gateway Mall. Goal : Increase the level of ridership by continually monitoring serv ice performance and comparing performance with established performance standards . Objective : Total ridership of 130,000 one-way passenger trips in FY 1995-96. Once this goal is r eached, a 5 percent ridership increase in FY 1996-97. Compare passenger productivity with the system average for passengers per revenue hour and mile. Maintain 11.2 passengers per rev enue hour in FY 1995-96 and 11.76 passengers per revenue hour in :1996-97 Goal: Minimize operating deficits and maximize fare revenue. Objective : Fare box recovery ratio shall be at a minimum 20 percent. Objective: Review average fare quarterly and institute system wide fare increases as necessary, to keep pace with increased operating costs. Project Goals/Objectives Route 73 The following goals and objectives we re established for Route 73: Transit Corridor Program Review 51 Technical Memoranduni#1

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. Goal: Faci li tate intra-county trar1slt trips to/from southern Pinellas County to/from the downtown area of Clearwater, via Starkey/Keene road and Gulf-to-Bay Boulevard/Court Street. Objective: Provide transit service along ihe Keene/Starkey Road and Gulf-to-Bay Boulevard/Court Street corridors linking Tyrone Square Mall In St. Petersburg with the Park Street Terminal in downtown Clearwater. Objective: Provide, at a minimum, 60 minute service frequency during weekday periods Objective: Maintain scheduled transfers when possible at off-street transfer loeations Includ ing Tyrone Square Mall and Park Street Term in a l. Goal: Increase the l evel of ridership by continually monitoring serv ice performance and comparing performance with the established performance standards. Objective: Total additional ridership 213, 192 one-way passenger trips over the course of the three -year demonstration period. Approximately 40,000 additional passenger trips in FY 1997/98. Objective: Compare passenger productivity with the system average for passengers per revenue hour and mile. Achieve 10.3 passengers per r evenue hour in FY 1998-99 and 10.8 passengers per revenue hour in 1999/00 Goal: Minimize operating deficits and maximize fare revenue. Objective: Farebox reco very ratio .shall be at a minimum 20 percent at the conclusion of the three-year demonstration period. Objective: Review average fare quarterly and Institute system -wide fare increases as necessary to keep p ace with increased operating costs Transit Cotrldor Program ReW>w 52 Technical Memorandum 11

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Service Description Route 59 Route 59 provides service along the Ulmerton Road/Roosevelt Boulevard COrridor linking Indian Rocks Shopping Center on the west with Gateway Ma ll on the east. Service is provided at a 30 minute peak-period frequency and a 60 minute service frequency dur i ng off-peak periods. Service Descript i on Route 73 Route 73 provides transit service along the Keene/Starkey Road and Gulf-to Bay Bouleva r d/Court Street corridors linking Tyrone Square Mall in St. Petersburg with the Park Street Terminal in downtown Clearwater. Service is provided at a 60 minute frequency during weekday periods. Progress Route 59 In meet i ng the f i rst goal established for Route 59, the route currently provides continuous fixed route serv i ce along the Ulmerton Road/Roosevell BouJevard/9th Street N q rth corridor from I ndian Rocks Shopping Center in western Pinellas County to Gateway Mali in eastern P i nellas County. In addition, the provision of f r equent peak period service (30 minute service frequency) on Route 59 helps facilitate cross-county movements through feeder service to/from other line haul routes, such as Routes 18, 19, and 52 Route 59 also provides for a maximum number.of transfer opportunities from minor conne'ctors in the PSTA system. Ridership has shown steady increases since the impl e mentation of the service in Octobe r 1992. During FY 1996, weekday ridership on Route 59 totaled 144,771 one-way passenger trips, which is an Increase of 11.21 percent over the prior fiscal year. In FY 1997, ride r ship increased an additional14. 7 percent with 165,992 one-way passenger trips. In FY 1 998, ridership i ncreased 25.31 percent to 208,003 one-way passenger trips . Passenger productivity (passengers per revenue hour) was 12.37 in FY 1996 and was 14.18 in FY 1997, exceeding the goal of 11. 76 for the entire year While this was short of the system average of 20 passengers per revenue hour, productivity in more recent fiscal years are closer to the overall system average. Dur i ng the first nine months of FY 1999, passengers per revenue hour increased to 19.11 percent. Transa Corridor Program Review Tecllnical Memorandum #1

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.. Growth in average daily ridership on RoLI!e 59 has reduced the operating deficit and as a result, improved the farebox recovery ratio. In FY 1996, the operating ratio was 20.53 percent. Through the first six months of FY 1999, the operating ratio was 29.36 percent. . Progress Route 73 PSTA has met the first goals established for Route 7q. The route currently provides continuous fixed route service along Park Street/Starkey/Keene Road and Gulf-to-Bay Boulevard/Court Street corridors from Tyrone Square Mall in western St. Petersburg to Park Street Terminal in downtown Clearwater. Service frequency is 60 m inu t es during weekdays and on Saturday. Ridership growth has occurred on Route 73 as a result of the extension of service form the mid-county area to downtown Clearwater. An additional 3,457 one-way passenger trips were recorded during the first two months of operati 0n. Ridership growth In FY 1998 resulted in an additional 31,348 one-way passenger trips for the entire fiscal year. Passenger productivity for the first two quarters of 1999 was 12.35 passengers per revenue hour. In the most recent report available, it was stated that continued ridership growth on Route 73 will be needed to offset the operating deficit and improve the operating ratio (at that time, 19.97 percent). Route 100X WPI # 7816679 Project 'Scope The Route 1 OOX was originally Implemented in August 1985 by HART as a commuter express route providing inter-county service between Hillsborough and Pinellas Counties In an effort to help relieve congestion and Improve capacity on east-west P inellas to Hillsborough connectors. In October 1990, the operation of Route 100X was transferred from HART to PST A. The original Joint Participation Agreement between FOOT and PSTA was for $124,949, providing operating, administrative, management and marketing support for the project. Subsequent supplemental agreements provided an additional $1,024 ,316 to the project. Transit Corridor Program Review 54 Technical Memorandum #1

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Project Milestones/Goals Goal 1: Facilitate inter-county transit work trips to/from the Gateway area of Pinellas . County to/from downtown Tampa, via the Gandy Bridge and the Crosstown Expressway. Objective: Utilize Gateway Mall as an intermodal transfer point for cross-bay commuter express service via Route 1 OOX. Objective: Provide commuter bus service during periods of peak congestion with limi ted stops with premium fares and multi-ride tickets and coordinate the Route 1 OOX schedule for the convenience of work trip commuters and major employers in both downtown Tampa and the Gateway area in Pinellas County. . Objective: Establish Route 1 OOX as an alternative to the automobile for work trips, Goal2: thereby reducing traffic congestion . I ncrease the leve l of ridership and customer satisfaction by continually monitoring service performance and comparing performance with established performance standards. Objective: Achieve annual ridership level of 50,000 passengers in Fiscal Year 1g95/96. Beginning in FY 1996/97 strive for ridersh ip increases of 2% annually. Objective: Utilize focus groups and continue conducting periodic on-board surveys to ascertain customer satisfaction and Identify potential service Improvements. Goal 3: Minimize operating deficits and maximize fare revenue. Objective: Farebox recovery ratio shall be a minimum of 20%. Objective: Average vehicle load of 10 passengers for each scheduled bus trip. Objective: Review average fare quarterly and institute fare increases as necessary to keep pace with increased operating costs. Transit Corridor Program Review 55 T echnical Memorandum #1

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Service Description Route 1 OOX remains a commuter route providing service from the Gateway Maillot in St. . Petersburg to the Marion Street Transit Parkway in Tampa, via 4'" Street No_rth, the Gandy Bridge, Gandy Boulevard, Dale Mabry Highway, and the Crosstown Expressway. Progress Consistent with the first goals established for the route, Route .100X provides round-trip commuter service from Gateway Mall to the Marion Street Transit Plaza In Tampa with 30 minute service frequency during a.m. and p.m .. peak periods, Monday through Friday. Gateway Mall serves as the transfer point for the Route 1 OOX, PSTA Routes 1, 4; 9, 11, 16, 59, and 74. HART also has local feeder routes providing frequent and direct access to Route 100X. As part of a public-private partnership, PSTA has worked very closely with the management of the Gateway Mall to replace existing shelters and provide accessible paths oftravel those shelters in accordance with the Americans wiih D.isabilities Act requirements. Unfortunately, the improvements at the mall resulted in the elimination of park-n-ride spaces used by 1 OOX patrons. A replacement lot was established at Derby Lane on Gandy Boulevard, effective April 1998. Ridership totaled 49,621 one-way passenger trips in Fiscal Year 1994/1995. While this was short of the annual ridership objective, there have been subsequent and continued improvement. Total ridership increased again in FY 1995/96 to 50,726 one-way passenger trips, achieving their ridership objective. In FY 1996/97, ridership increased 11.65 percent to 56,636 one-way passenger trips. In FY 1997/98 ridership increased an additional 2.17 percent. In October 1995, PSTA Implemented service Improvements which combined PSTA routes 4 and 24 to provide frequent and continuous service along the 4'" Street corridor from the Pinellas Point area to 1161h Avenue north. This allowed passengers residing along 4'" Street south to travel to/from the Gateway Mall without having to transfer, thereby providing a direct connection to Route 1 OOX. In 1998, a market research project was conducted using focus groups and an on-board survey instrument. One of the major conclusions of the report Is that PSTA is growing as a Transit Corridor Program Review 56 Technical Memorandum #1

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. transportation option for workers. At the time the study was conducted, 76 percent of PST A riders were using the bus to get to work, versus 53 percent in 1995. Average vehicle load is currently less than 10 passengers As a result, .PST A will continue to monitor those trips that fall below the norm. However, the operating' ratio .for this period was significantly greater than the minimum goal of 20 percent, 27.03 percent. The average fare collected was $1.45. Alternate US 19 and SR 686 Corridors. Route #98 Express ServiceFPN # 40390118401 Project Scope Express Route #98 was designed to provide intra-co1,!nty transit work trips to/from the Clearwater and Largo areas of Pinellas Courity to/from Carillon Business Park In an effort to alleviate congestion along the Alternate US 19 and SR 686 corridors, following PSTA Route #52. Immed iately prior to the initiation of Route #98, the Carillon Business Park experienced a tremendous amount of employment growth. The new employers within the office park request ed additional transit service for their employee commutes. A zip code analysis revealed that those employers had a significant number of employees who resided along the Alternate U.S. 19 and SR 686 corridors, justifying the need for the additional service within the corridor. The joint participation agreement betwe en the FOOT and PSTA Provided $98,064 for the operation of the project. A supplemental JPA was signed In Septemb .er 1999 providing an additional $127,648 to the project for a total approved budget of $225,712 The project is 100% state funded. Project Milestones/Goals Goal1: Facilitate intra-county transit work trips to/from the clearwat!lr and Largo areas of Pinellas County to/from Carillon Business Park, via the Alternate US 19 and SR 686 corridors effective October 1998. Transit Corridor Program Review 57 Technical M&morandum #1

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Objective: Provide 30 minute service frequency during morning and attemoon peak periods. . Objective: Provide commuter bus service in only one direction during periods of peak congestion with limited stops, connecting downtown Clearwater with Carillon Business park along the Alternate US 19 and SR 686 corridor. Goal 2: Increase the level of ridership and customer satisfaction by continually monitoring service performance and comparing performance with established performance standards. Objective: Annual ridership of 16,000 passengers in FY 1998/1999, with a 1 0% ridership increase in FY 199912000. Objective: Compare passenger productivity with the system average per passengers per revenue hour and mile for PSTA commuter routes. Goal 3: Minimize operating deficits and maximize fare revenue. . Objective: Farebox recovery ratio shall be at a minimum of 10%. Objective: Review average fare quarterly and institute fare increases as necessary, to keep pace with increased operating costs. . Service Description Route I#J8 operates from 5:45 a.m. to 7:40 a.m. and from 4:05 p.m. to 6:05 p.m., Monday through Friday with 30 minute service frequency. Three trips are provided during the a.m. peak period and three are provided In the p.m. peak period to/from the Clearwater and Largo areas of Pinellas County to/from Carillon Business Par k via Alternat e US 19 and the SR 686 corridors. Progress The most recent progress report forth is project Is for the 1., quarter of FY 2000. Based on information contained in this report, PSTA met the first goal for the project and the Transit CofTidor Program Ralliew 58 Technical Memorandum #1

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corresponding objectives. Route 98 provides peak commuter bus service along the SR 686 and US 19 corridors connecting downtown Clearwater with the Carillon Business Park. Service is provided Monday through Friday with 30 minute service frequency . The second goal and corresponding objectives were met over the past year and through the first quarter of FY 2000. FY 1999 ridership was 21,251 persons well above the goal of 16,000 passengers. Ridership during the reporting period was 6,912 passengers. Annual ridership for FY 2000 is expected to increase significantly over the next year at a (ate in excess of the 1 0 percent established as the objective. PSTA als? exceeded the objective of 1 0% fare box recovery, reporting a recovery ratio of 13.4 percent for the quarter. They also maintained a level of average fare at $0.77 per trip that was greater than the current system average of $0.753. The Action Plan provided in the progress report suggested that PSTA improve passenger amenities along the route and promote Increased participation in Medicaid, Transportation Dis advantaged, and the WAGES bus pass programs and continue the performance monitoring and passenger productivity monitoring of the route. Ulmerton Road (SR 688) Corridor-Route #99 Express Service -FPN # 40390318401 Project Scope Express Route #99 was designed to provide intra-county transit work trips to/from western Pinellas County to/from Carillon Business Park In an effort to alleviate congestion along the Alternate US 19 and SR 686 corridors During the months Immediately preceeding the establishment of Route #99, the carillon Business Park experienced a tremendous amount of employment growth. The new employers within the office park requested additional transit service for their employee commutes. A zip code analysis revealed that those employers had a significant number of employees who resided along the Ulmerton Road corridor from the Walsingham area in western Pinellas County east to US 19. Using the results of the zip code analysis as justification PSTA proposed this new express route that would provide service from the Indian Rocks Shopping Center to Carillon Business Park via Ulmerton Road (SR 688). Trarisit Corridor Program Review 59 Tecllnlcal Memorandum #1

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Project Milestones/Goals Goal1: Facilitate intra-county transit work trips to/from western Pinellas County to/from the Carillon area of Pinellas County, via Ulmerton Road effective October 1998. Objective: Provide commuter service in only one direction during periods of peak congestion with limited stops, connecting outlying suburbs with Carillon Business Park along the Ulmerton Road (SR 688) corridor. Objective: Provide 30 minute service frequency during morning and afternoon peak periods. Goal 2: Increase the level of ridership by continually monitoring service performance and comparing performance with established performance standards. Objective: Compa r e passenger productivity with the system average for passengers per revenue hour and mile for PSTA commuter routes. Goal 3: Minimize operating deficits and maximize fare revenue. Objective: Farebox recoyery ratio shall be at a min i mum 10% Objective: Review average fa res quarterly and institute system-wide fare increases as necessary to keep pace with increased operating costs. Service Description Route 99 provides commuter service in only one direction during periods of peak congestion with limited stops, connecting outlying suburbs with Carillon Business Park along the Ulmerton Road (SR 688) corridor. Service is provided with 30 m i nute frequency during morning and afternoon peak periods. Transi t Corridor Progral'i'l Review 60 Technical Memorandum #1

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.. Progress The most recent progress report for this project I s for the 3'd quarter of FY 1999. Based on information contained in this report, PSTA m.et the first goal for the project and the corresponding objectives. Route 99 provides peak commuter bus service along the SR 688 corridor connecting suburban areas in western Pinellas County with the Carillon Business Park. Service is provided Monday through Friday with 30 minute service frequency. The second goal and corresponding objective was not met during this period. Ridership during the perlo9 was 3,221 passengers. It was suggested that the target rlders)llp of 14,000 one-way passenger trips for the fiscal year was too high based on the current level. PSTA did not meet the objective of 10% "farebox recovery, reporting a recovery ratio of 7.5 percent. However, they did maintain a level of average fare at $0.82 per. trip that was greater than the system average of $0.725 The Action Plan provided In the progress report suggested that PSTA Improve passenger amenities along the route and promote increased participation in Medicaid, Transportation Disadvantaged, and the WAGES bus pass programs. Additional activities included extending service to Scherer Drive and 341h Street to generate additional ridership in the mid-county industria l area; continue the performance monitoring and passenger productivity monitoring of Route 99. US 19 Corridor Service Marketing-FPN # 406476100507 Project Scope To market new U.S. 19 intercounty bus route services. Project Milestones/Goals The goal established for the project is the implementation of the following marketing program elements that were adopted for this project. Transit Corridor Program Review 61 Te<:hnical Memorandum # 1

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Advertising Elements: Pasco Utility Billspromotional flyers will be inserted into all West Pasco County utility bills. The flyer will introduce the service and have a map and schedule. Radio-WGUL-AM/FM, the Gull, dual broadcast station that caters to the senior audience Spots will be produced by the WGUL at not cost. Suncoast New.s This neighborhood newspaper reaches all areas of Pasco County and is printed on Tuesdays and Saturdays. Inserts will be provided targeting the U.S. 19 corridor. The St. Petersburg Times-Several cost effective programs are recommended with the St. Petersburg Times to reach the target audience: advertisements should be run in the and North Pinellas Neighborhood Times sections. The insert flyer will be placed in the vendor machine papers in Pasco County to reach more transient populations. In addition, an advertisement w ill be developed and placed in the monthly . Seniority Publication that has a circulation of 50,000 Public Relations Elements: Ribbon Cutting/Pre-Opening Day Event local politicians and the press will be invited to ride the route the day before the service begins This pre-promotion will provide an opportunity to capture the press for entry i nto the next day's news. Press Releases Preand post-start press releases should be written and issued to the local media County Access .TV Coordinate with Government Access channels in Pinellas and Pasco Counties to air feature stories. Pasco County Website Create an information page about the new Pasco-Pinellas U.S. 19 Route highlighting details such as schedules and other route connections Pre-promotion Event at Gulfview Square Mall Make arrangements with the mall to set up a display booth to introduce the bus service prior to implementation. Distribute materials and tell people the basics of how to ride. Transit Corridor Program Review 62 Technical Memorandum #1

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, .. Employer/Business Outreach Develop a mailing l ist of loeal employers, employme nt agencies and temporary services Communicate the availability of service for their employees and clients. Make supplies of schedules availab l e to them. Attend local job fairs and employment oriented programs. since this route serves the commercial corridor of U.S. 19, there may be some opportunities for cross-promotional advertisements with local businesses. Retail establishments should be contacted as the marketing materials are developed to solicit their support and cooperation Outreach to St. Petersburg Junior College and Pasco-Hernando Community College (PHCC)Request their assistance through the use of articles in the campus newspapers and admissions materials. Highlight the Bikes on Buses progra111 for St. Petersburg Junior College. Churches al)d Community Organizat i ons and Chambers of Commerce, Mobile Home Parks and Senior Housing Conduct mailings and presentations to local community organizations such as seniors, etc. who can help market the new service to their members. Ask various locations to post the bus schedule. Additionally, contact should be made with local s cout troops to ask for their assistance In distributing schedules. . PSTA "On Board N ews Include Information in the Fall o r Winter issue of this publication. On-Board AnnouncementsDisplay special posters behind the drivers of all PSTA routes in and out of Countrys ide Mall Employee Communication -Information should be included in employee newsletters such as PST A's FOCUS on Communications. Service Description Not Appl i cable Progress There have been no progress reports submitted to date. Transit Cotridor Program Review 63 Technical Memorandum #1

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Cross-County Service (CR 296) Corridor Route #58 FPN # 40647118401 Project scope The OR 296 corridor is a major arterial roadway in Mid-Pinellas County, which links residential areas in western Pinellas County with commercial and Industrial employment in eastern Pinellas County This east-west corridor is located between Ulmerton Road (SR 688) and Park Boulevard (SR 694) and is designed to eve congestion on both of these major urban corridors. Currently, PSTA has very productive transit s e rvice on both Ulmerton Road and Park Boulevard but not service on CR 296. Implementation of public transit service along CR 296 will serve to facilitate transit strips to/from western Pinellas County and the ICOT Center Business Park il)cluding service to the new St. Petersburg Junior College Campus in Seminole. Moreover, the route will provide the opportunity for t r ansfers to/from routes serving the Seminole Mall (Routes 18 and 74) and the Bay Area Outlet Mall (Routes 19,51,79, and 98). Project Milestones/Goals . The following objectives and criteria for success have been established for the project. Project Objectives: Funding for the initiation of service from the Seminole Mall to the Bay Area Out l et Mall and establishment of CR 296 as a primary east-west transit corridor Criteria for Success: Total ridership of 250,000 passengers during the course of the three year demonstration project. Service Description Route 58 operates from 5:30a.m. tp 7:30p.m. Monday through Friday, with 30 minute service frequency during peak periods and 60 minute service frequency during off. peak. The service ali gnment provides opportunities for off-street transfers at Seminole Mall and the Bay Area Outlet Mall, thereby increasing access to numerous routes systemwide. Transfer activ i ty is also availab l e to routes serving Seminole Boulevard, Starkey Road, Belcher Road, 66'h Street and Ulmerton Road, thereby increasing ridership on Routes 18, . 59, 62, 73, and 79. This further facilitates intra-county movements particularly for commuters. Transit Corridor Ptogram Review 64 Technical Memorandum #1

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Progress This is a new project. There have been no progress submitted to date. Fixed Route Service from Tarpon Mall to Ofdsmar (SR 584 Corridor) FPN # 40647818401 Project Scope Funding has been provided for the initiation of fixed route transit service from the Tarpon Mall to the Tri-County Business/Industrial Park in Oldsmar, lending to the establishment of Tampa Road (SR 584) as a primary east-west transit corridor. Project Milestones/Goals There were no project milestones/goals Included in the documentation in the project file. Service Description This project will enable the agency to provide fixed route transit serv i ce from the Tarpon Mall to the T ri-County Business/Industrial Park in Oldsmar. Progress This is a new project. There have been no progress reports submitted to date Pasco County Public Transportation US 19 Corridor Project FPN # 40648118401 Project Scope To provide fixed route .bus servic e along the U.S. 19 corridor through a joint effort with the Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority. Transi t Corridor Program Review 65 Technical Memorandum #1

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Project Milestones/Goals There were no project milestones/goals Included in the d9cumentation in the project file. SeNice Description Fixed route bus service along the U.S. 41 corridor between Pasco and Pinellas Counties. Progress This is a new project. There have been no progress reports submitted to date. NEXT STEP The next step in the process of reviewing the FOOT Transit Corridor Program is to develop a lessons learned" document that provides insight into the relative success and/or failure of each .of the corridor projects identified .in this technical memorandum in mE!eting the goals, milestones that were established In order to adequately evaluate the projects' effectiveness in meeting the goals established, the next effort will include interviews and/or dis cussi ons with FOOT district and central office staff members and staff from Florida's transit agencies. This effort will result in a second technical memorandum. During the interviews diSC\.ISSed above, Investigators will also be reviewing the overall effectiveness of the Transit Corridor Program i n meeting the statewide program goals of relieving congestion and improving the capacity along and within constrained travel corridors. FOOT district and central office staff will also lie asked to share any strengths or weaknesses they see in the program in the areas of program management and implementation, includ ing the project selection process, eligible activities, funding issues, and monitoring. If there are areas iden tified as problematic, by those interviewed, recommendations will be made to the Department to aid In the continual imp rovemen t of the Transit Corridor Program. The results of the Interviews and any recommendations that develop as a resu)t of the interviews will be contained in a third technical memorandum Transit Corridor Program Review 66 Memorandum.#1


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