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Speeding into the 21st century, Florida's high speed trains

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Title:
Speeding into the 21st century, Florida's high speed trains
Uncontrolled:
Florida's high speed trains
Physical Description:
20 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida High Speed Rail Transportation Commission
Publisher:
The Commission
Place of Publication:
Tallahassee, Fla
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
High speed trains -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre:
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Online version available.
Statement of Responsibility:
Florida High Speed Rail Transportation Commission.
General Note:
Title from cover.

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Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 028946233
oclc - 28998029
usfldc doi - C01-00398
usfldc handle - c1.398
System ID:
SFS0032424:00001


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Florida will soon have a new way to travel. Before the close of this decade, high speed train transportation will offer Floridians and vlsftors a safe, convenient, and fast way to travel between three of th e state's urban centers Following the lead offapan, France, Sweden and other foreign countries with high speed rail, Florida's ten -year ef{01t will provide the first U .S. sys tem In addition, a dem.onswatton project to be built In Orlando will test for the first lime a commercially run, magnetic levitation t echnol ogy, bfgh speed train. 'Ibis 'IY!f>Oit outlines both of these projects and the benefits they will bring to Florida's economic high tech industry environment, and g r owth management. I lrwtle you 10 read this brief look at Florida's lransportaJion future. We look forward 10 answering your q uestions or providing you with more inform ation. Sincerely, Malcolm Kirschenbaum Chairman

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Florida's trattsportatie west ern expansion of Orlando's International Ol'ive a major tourist hotel and shopping area I

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2 In 1982. a S l a l e-appoi mt'([ High Speed Rail Commi nee bega n SIUdying !he feasibility of high speed train travel for florida. TI1e fa\orable findings of !his commill<'<' led 1 0 che 19114 High Speed Rail Act and the appoincmenc of !he seven-member High Speed Rail Transportation Co mmission The Commission is charged wic h seuing the specifi c re<1uiremems for !he aw.ud of che High Speed Rail ffanchis e and to o th e rwise implement the Act Jn r espo nse to th ose effort s and lh:ot e ncouragemenc. c h e Boca Rmon-bascd Florida Hig h Spee d n ai l Corporatio n is seekin g !he f ran c h is.: chac will auth o ri ?.e it t o bri n g a scmew i de High Speed R a i l system 1 0 Flori da In 198 8, t h e Legis l att 1 r e enac1ed che Magn e t ic Levit a t ion Oemonstr-J.tio n Pr o ject Act which directed the Commission 10 oversee dev elopment o f a maglev project Tran.ssing the positive and negat ive impacc.s of the high speed mil proposals, EPAC fou nd chat with r espons ibl e developmen t and with reasonab l e an d pC1.1dent safegml r ds t o the environmenc-High Speed Hail lran sporwlion connecting Dade, Orange and H ills b orough co umles provides s i g n ificnnc a<.lvantages L o the c iti z e n s o f F l orida over the transportation a hernarlves.'1

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In 1 854, the F l orida Legis l ature passed itS first railroad legis l ation 'Through private sector ini tiat ives and incentives f rom the State, the s t age was set fo r Florida 's First Great Tmi n Age. In the m i d 1880's He nry Mo rr iso n F lagler p ioneered F.lorida's first Statewide r a il system, the florida East Coast Railway, which ra n from j ackso nville down the east coast and eve ntu ally all the w a y to Key West. Also in the mid-1 880's, lienry B. Pl ant's vision of a state railway system resulted i n speeding up the economic d e velopment of wes t, north and centra l F lori d a Ute t rain syst ems i ntroduce d by F l agler rutd Plant le d to the early development of the s ta t e of F l o r ida lly l inking the state from it s southernmos t tip to the industr i al areas in the north, railroads played a n important parr i n hel ping F lorida develop and i ts i n dustry thrive and grow. T h e U.S. J ags behind the rest o f the wor ld i n th e development and use of r ail trave l. But a renaissa ttce in train travel i s taking p lace i n th is country, and high speed tr ain s are the forerunners A renais sance in train trawl is taking place in this countr y, and high speed trains are the f o r e runners. 3

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FasTratn Transrapid 4 H igh spee d trains h ave been in Japan since 1964 and i n E urope si n ce 1981, with a u n iform networ k expec t e d t o be in ::;<:rvke th rou g hout the Eu ropean Economic Community by 1992 SimUnr pl a ns for moving passengers bet ween major U.S. melropolitan :
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Tallahassee ......... .. .. .. .... -' ' ' ....... _____ .. ' ' ' Gaines-ville ' ' ... __ ' ' ' FLORIDA FASTRAIN ROUTES Curre n t route u nder deve lopment .. Possil>'e f uture toutes based on 1984 tea sabiUty study 5

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s I 2 8 6 l 0 FLORIDA POPULATION PROJECTIONS (Millions) 14$7 : -. . .. ,.... 1Ulj . ----"'!-_:_,_-_..;.,.._,;,. .......... __ . e.7! 1)\ ............. ............. ,,,,,,, ,_,,, . ..... ...... [)< l'll' 6.711 'rt ..... .............. jt'' if-h .:== "' ;11. n;. .! 2.n_... :; ,, I .. :.J!;i . '"' ,. 11150 fY 1960 17 1ml tt 11110 I/ 19!0 1 \ 21100 v ... High Speed Tmins will serve as an that quality of life 11eed noT be sacrificed To accommodate hiRh population densities 6 .. .. . By ohe en d of the cemury, F l orida will be the third lafllest state in the country. This growth will slgnll1camly influence the ur ... styles in lhe male's mo;1 populous areas. Automobile and airplane cong<,;tioo and poUution, alrc-dy ma;or urban problems, will become even g > cnler burden s High Speed R a;J and Maglev ca n h e l p :tllev i ,ne these probl e ms. By l inking the largcs 1 c ities in th e sla t e an d prov i ding environm e ntally posit i ve high-quality modes of t r ansportatio n. they will serve as examp les 1 ha1 qual ity of life need rl()( be sacrifiCed to acwmmodat e high popula1ion densities. TI1c construction and operation or high speed train systems in Florida will yield subsutn tial benefits, incJudi n g irnprov e ments in our: <.'<."
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Project Finartcing Pethaps the most attractive feature o f Flor i da's high speed train system is that financing is accomplished in a publk/privatc partnership between government and the privare sector. This financing will come from several sources: real estate development profits, Impact fees, special assessments, tax increment ftnancing, fares and other rail revenues. Togelher, tl1ey will provi d e a solid b ase for funding the oons truction and operation of ct1e syste ms; thus the State and its taxpayers will hav e an alternative means of tt".lnsportation that will help alleviate the burden on highway infrastructure and commuter air traffte. To encourage the private sec>r t o rake those ftnancial riSks, d1e State has provided several incentives. The Florida High Speed Rail Transpo rta tion Commission was insttumental i n secur ing tax exempt bond author ity from the tOOth Congre s s. Thi s provides a financial incentive for private enterprise by allowing the State to issue (li.J(exernpt bonds secured by the Speed Rail franchisee's assets to fmance, oonstruct, and operate the $2 5 billion H.igh Speed Rail system. The State also offers other incentives, including expedited and coordinated property develop ment rights and access to existi n g publi cly owned highway and rail rights of-way In add iti o n assistance roay be pi'Ovided for con 5uuc tion of railroad/high way grade crossing separations. HIGH SPEED RAIL F INANCING SOURCES (llllolillions ol1987 Dollars) Real Estate Related Revenuts 40% Perhaps the most attracttvefealure of Florida's high speed train system Is that ftnarn;ing Is accomplished in a public/private pattnership between government and the private sect01. 7

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71Je increased mobilit y resulting from tbe high speed sys t e m s will cont1i.bute to greater eco11o m ic g rowtb and opportu.ni(J' a11d a more diversified Fl o 1 ida economy. Reduced ltifrastrru:ture Expetrditure By constructin g a statewide Hig h S peed Rail system, the need for infrastnocturc e x pend i tures will be reduccYSICmrdated p rt>pert ies will be borne by the develope r and <.lwellinl! occupa nt. Growth opportu,ity The i n cre-Jscd mobility resulting from the High Speed R ail sys t e m will contribute t o grc:ucr "'--onomlc growth and opponunity and a more divt"1Sifledl-1orida economy. Loc-lit ics with High Speed R ail s t ations will likely experie nce signifi cant but ('Ontr ollc d growLh, especial!) rhosc F loridH are;-1s 1h: n are expe r i e n c ing l imited growth and l imite d eco n o miC a c tivity The ad diti o n of Hig h S p ee d Rail will rn:tk<. adjacent al'eas more attr. ctivc t o bus iness t nve:st ors as a result o f th e i r l ocatio n near newly estab lished rail stations. Also. smaller areas will he able to enjoy the benefits of to the economics of major cilies in the s rate.

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Inc r eased The high speed t rain S}'Stems will generate greater tourism in IWO ways : fiJ'St, High Speed Rail and Maglev will d>emselves be major rouds! aaractioos since they will be the first systems of their kind in the United States; and second, improved a ccess to the many Florida a ltraction .. <; will generate additi o nal tou rism. Th e Florida High Speed R ail Transportation Commission (1984 s cudy ) High S peed Railuave l to boost tourist spending by $1 billion a year because of improved access to major points of interest. Research by Maglev Transit, Inc., predicts that tourism in the Orlando area as a result of the Maglev project could increase by 425,000 people per year. lm;;reased Employ ment atrd Income Construction and opera tion of th e High Spee d Rail syste m w ill c reate jobs all along the routes and in the communities where stations, support offices, and maintenance facilities are located. Estimates indicate that through the year 2020, the systems will create: up to 217 ,000 ma n years in direct and indirect constru ction employment over 4,558 d irect and indi rect penMnent o p e rat .ions j obs annua ll y over $ 292 million annually in and indirect employment Income. INCREASE IN TOURIST EXPENDITURES (Bilions ol Dollars) Constructio n and operation oftbe b igb speed rail systems will create jobs all along th e t outes and in the communities where stat ions, offices and maintenance facili ties are located. 9

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High Speed R ail and Magle v will c ontribute to the c1eation of a ./itlly integrated tra nspo11ation network jor th e slate and will encourage ji-t1t h e 1 development of local public tmnspo1tation 10 ltu;reased S igni ficant savings i n tr:-m.jpon:nion <:oots for t h ose tvho sw i tc h f rom a u t omobile or a i r p f :H\e t O the $1:Hewide H i g h Rail syste-m w ill b e realized induding: re d uced wear and tea r on automobiles (S44 millio n reduce d a utom o bil e acciden t propeny aod inj\uy losses (SIO million annu ally) reduced tea vel time savings ( $136 rnillion onnually) redu<:ed d etedonui o 1 l of exi sting r oadNa)1S : } n d O lh t: r nut High S peed Rail sys t e m w i ll be t:x:u e r t o a<.x:ommocl1tc inc r eases in r kk:n;hip a nd t hu s m inimize costs by spreading t hem over a g r e : uer rmmhc o f Transportatio11 Network H igh Speed R:li l a n d M<'tg.IC\' w ill <:omribute to t he creat i o n o f a f ully in1egrmed networ k for t h t. s tat e and will e n cou ra ge furthe r d eveloprnem of loC:JI p1..abli<.: tmnsponati o n systerns. These l oca l syste m .:; will serVe as feeder sysletns t o pn.:-scnt and fl..tttll':; (l.i.r. a u t o miJ t rnns po11mo des. These w ill contribute loa hjghcr kvd o f service for all trnn s ponati<>n a hemmives Increased Safety a11d Reliabflity 11 1e s a fety and reliability re<."Qa'ds of l-Ugh Sp eed R : liJ $)'stem:; h::wc been nearperfe t 't Since Jap:ln' s Tokaido Shinkansen b egan OJXmtin g i n 196-.i, i t has had no a ccident s, injuries. ordc:!tlas, : l n d n o acddc::n t <:oot::;. In a ddition. i t boasts a 99% tirne perfo r m ance r<.>cord. The french TGV has a record.

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Reduced Travel Times High Speed Rail and M agleY will travel t hree to six fa ster than an automobil e, r esulting in tmvcl dxnes that are highl y competi t ive wid\ doo r-1:0-door air line service. It is est im ated t hat automobile delays will in crease 400 p e rcent b)' the y ear 2005 and a i rline delays will COSt Atrtericans SlO bill io n by 1 996 High Speed RaiJ can help reduce those amounts High Speed Rail service will a lso Increase d>e effective caj!e proposed system I n the last d ecade, t h ese areas have experienced o ver 65 percent of the state 's population growd>, over 72 percen t of employmem gtOV\1h, a o d over 71 percent of business sxowth. The Maglev demonstration project will be the first to the f easibility of this newes t type of t rain n .. ve l It will eva l u ate M agl ev service at rugh speeds with tickeced passengers on sched\l led trips. TRAVEL TIMES :. :. ,. . ' . .. . . . . . . . lnte, f1ialio nai'Cir, .s.s mlp ult$ -High Speed Rail will offer fast, convenient service for most of the state. Sixtyseven percent of Florida's residents live in counties to be s erved by the p1oposed system. 11

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1he bigh speed train systems will lead to achieving the objectives of growth management by providing statewide, fv:.ed corridor tmnspo1tation alternatiues conducive to stable growth. 12 With nearly 900 new residents moving t o Flor id a daily, it is evi dem that t he state is experiencing sub s tantial population growth. New and existing residents are increasingly choosing L O live in the suburbs, resu lting in "urlY.lfl sprawl," viewed by many as be ing detrimental to local and smce infr.lstr u cture T h e 1985 F l o r ida Legislawre passed the Growt h Managem ent Act which requires th e int egration of the planning process for state, r eg ional, and loca l governments. The intent of th is Act is to s top to th e ext em possible much of tht' unchecked urban spmwlthat has char.tccerizcd Florida s g.rowch in recent years. Til e h ig h tntin sys tem s w ill lead to ach ieving the objectives of growth by p roviding s wtewid e fLXCd corridor transpottation conducive to s mble growth. In addition, th e cons t ruction of the system.') encour-.ages compact urban growth because it focuse s major d evelopment a round stntions in exi sting d ensely -popul ated In essence. th e High Speed nai l A ct and its projects will h e lp im p l ement the Growth Management Ac t and it s goals.

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-----The design, constru c tion, and o perat i o n of th e Hig h Speed Rail sys tem will be sensi tive t o major env ironm entaJ conce .rns : Negative bnpacrs on air qualiLy, water q u ality, unique and endangere d plants and animals, and h istoric and archaeologic a l treas u res will be m i n imized Beca us e High Speed Rail trai n s are powered by clean and efficient ele ctric locomotives, a i r quality l evels a long d1e rou t e will not be adversely affected. S i gnifican t reduct ion s i n emissions t hat pollute air and water will be rea lized Si nc e th e proposed route s clo sely follow or are located widlin exist ing transportation rights -ofw a y considerably less disntption can be e xpecte d in the constr u ction of the sys tem S ignific a ntly le ss damage to natu ral resources will occur with High Speed Rail than With h i ghway c onstruc tion. Ah d by attracting r i d er s away f rom other more polluti n g transportation alternatives, the systems can a ctually improve air quality conditi ons H1GH SPEED TRAINS' TOTAL EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS Sulfur Dioxides 'FasTraln 325 mile route, Maglev B y attracting t'idet'S away ftom other; more polluting, tr ansporta ti on alternatives the system s can actually imprwe ait quality conditions. 13

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ENERGY CONSUMPTION PER PASSENGER MILE ( Gross BTU' s Mile) High tech High Speed Rail and Magleu will enhance the stale s already enuietble hi,gh t ech reputatio12. 14 Efficient u tilization of e n e rgy i s one of the widely pu blici zed adva ntage s of H igh Speed l{;lil and Maglev. Eneri,,>Y consumptio n o f the wheel/rail Hi g h S peed l!ail i s only 21 percent o f ai rplanes and 1 9 percent o f automobile s for trips of simila r d i s tanc e. Mag lev techn o l og) enjoys a gross energy effic i ency o f twi ce t hat of t h e a utomobile and f ou r t im es that of the airplane. Flori da 's high spee d tr ain sys t em s will r h e need for m i lli ons o f g 'lll o n s of imponed fue l oil ea c h year. The stat( will do ils pa r t in contri b u t ing to th e nat i on's goals o f s trengthen i ng our energy i ndependence e q ualizing our int ematio nal b al ance of paym e nt s deficit, a n d reduci n g our econ O m}''S vulnerahilily to inte r m tt iQm t l l'conomk tluctuations The constr uction of h i gh s pee d trai n s ystems will enhance f lorid a's i mage as a q u ality l ocat i o n i o to con ducf bu s ines s. H igh t ech H i g h Spee d Rail :lnd Maglev will enhance th e s t ate s alread y enviable high tech repu ta tion Man y benefits associated with an economy chamcte riz ed by high tech in dustry : a h ig her standard o f liv ing, a \Veil educated work forte. imp rovcm c nr i n t h e business clima te. and an overall positi ve feeling abou t the economy as a who l e.

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Jncteased Conifort aJJd Cotwetlience Discomfort and inconvenience are two of the more common excuses for ll()( using public transportation. However the speed and oomfort offered by High Speed Rail and Maglev will be closer to d1e conditions offered by the privately-owned automobil e o r first class air travel than any oth er cuncnt t1ansportat i o n a lt e r n a tiv e B y p ro v idi n g m o d e rn, aura c t i v c and comfor ta b l e coache s, Higll Speed Rail and Maglev will h e l p convince potential passengers to leave their vehicle s at h ome. Itrcreased Productivity Business travelers lose many working hours through delays on airplanes and h igh ways resulting in direct l osses in productivity. P e rhaps eve n m ore s i gnificant are lhe indirect prod uc tiv ity losse s due t o fr u StraUons res ulting f ro m these d e l a y s A l thou gh lt is diffic u l t t o quantify the e ffect of tr.ln sporl2tionre lated delays and time losse s on productivity, these COStS are real Since the train systems will provide a form of lraOSportation that is safe, reliable, and comfortable they will contribute tO increased productlviry by helping to e llminate the delays associated w ith existing forms of transportation. Also, the general e conomi c e fficiencies of High Speed Rail and Mag lt'V s y s t ems will enable th e state and national economies to do mo r e w i th expenditure of the sam e or fewer resources due to increased speed and advanced technology. The high speed rail'systems tui/J comrlbute to ittcreased produ.ctivity by helping to eliminat e the delays associate d wit b existin g forms of t r ansportation. 1 5

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_ l ;; 1 6 I e "Twentyfirst Cenru r y h igh spee d trains will b e gin i n i t i a l opera tion s i n the m i d1 990's i n l'l orid;1. The proposed High Spee d Rail and Ma glev p r o je c t s will ben efit the swte's, econotny transpo1tmion growth managefnent e nvironment e n ergy usage high te<:h i nd\ls try >:

PAGE 19

17

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The Florida High Speed Rail Transportation Commission Cbai.rman Kit'SChe-nbauOl ("))(;M ll&lCb r><>n:dd R. O izn("y Qr/(illdO 18 [)avid H Rush Tam/Xr ChMlt>$1.-:. i\ttJldeZ Jr. '/.CWl/)(1 Anhuf E Tee l e.jt. Miami Vice Chairman C Oockt:>l)' Ulk(>lt..md Oona l d H Rc<:d,Jr. Nat()n

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Commission Accomplishments The CommissiotJ has made significant pt"Ogress toward b-ringi11g High Speed Trai11 travel to the state of Florida. Accamplishments include: With the Florida Legislatu,e, deve loped an d p a ssed th e nation's most progressive, far sighted and pragmatic H igh Speed Rail and Maglev srotute; Hel d over 50 full Commission meetings and numerous other subcomm ittee meetings, public hearings, and workshops throughou t the s t ate; Helped Florida become recognized as a nationa l leader i n High Speed Rail and .M. aglev by th e High Speed Rail A ssoci a tion, the med i a, and the r est of the nation; Promoted th e organization of 1 3 l ocal H i gh Speed Rail Task Forces to promote H ig h Spee d Rail locally, assist applicants, and prepare l oca l reports and ana l yses of High Speed Rail; Solicite d and helped i dentify private and local govemment property parce l s that will be made a\ a.ilable as a contrib ution o r on a jo int venture basis to the selecte d franchisee ; Traveled to Canada, Japan, Germany, Sweden, and France (mostly at che perso nal expense of the Commissioners) to study and u nderst>md the High Spee d Rail and Maglev systems in those nations; Worked with the U nited States Senat e and House o f Representatives in developing l egislation and lobbied to secure authority for tax exempt bond financ ing for l'Jo rida' s and other states' high speed .rail pr o jects. Thi s l egislation is a major achievement and a sig nificant step towa rd a viab le private secto r financed hig h speed rail project for F l orida; Sought applications and receive d tv.o p ro posals to finance, build, a n d operate the f irst High Speed Rail s ystem in the U.S. Required fees have totalled $685,000; Established a formal coop erative agreement with the U.S Department of Transportation for che Fe deral Rai lroad Administrat ion t<> serve as the lead agency to coordinate federal require ments fo r ra il safety, environmental protec t ion and other applica b le federal polic i es; Sought applications and received proposal ro finance, build and operate the world's first commercial super s peed magnet i c lev i tation train projec t. The proposal also included a S500,000 application fee 19

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For more infonnation, comac t : Florida High Speed Rail Transportation Commission 20 311 South Calhoun Sreet, Stoite 202 florida 32301 (904 ) 487 4261 H. Smith, Executive Director Diana L enhardt Hu ll, Communica t i ons Director Assistance prov ided by Center for Urban Transportation Research U niversity of So uth F l o rida, Tampa This publication was produced :u -an e ost of $6 200.00 or $4.43 p e r < :opy, t O diSlribut e :1bout th e benefits o f hig h speed rail. Cover Illus t r a t ion : St u a n S impson. Graphic r>e.sign: Sirnpson Design S t ttd i o FL. The Univ etsi t y of So ut h F l o rid : l i s :ln opponunity emp loyer.


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