The Oracle

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The Oracle

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The Oracle
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The Oracle (Tampa, Florida)
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University of South Florida
USF Faculty and University Publications
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Tampa, Florida
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University of South Florida
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English

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University of South Florida Library
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T39-19670510 ( USFLDC DOI )
t39.19670510 ( USFLDC Handle )

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PAGE 1

. I I M ltJ lt$J Vol.l No. 30 UNIVER SITY OF S OUTH FLORIDA, TAMPA, MAY10, 1967 Subscr i ption Rate Page 2 FREE HOUR' CANCELLED FOR ASSEMBLY TODAY Presidents' Council Says I ' Tuition -Hike Contra-diction By STU THAYER Edito r Everglades? No, USF The Florida Council of Student Body Presidents last Saturday called Gov. C l aude Kirk's proposed in crease in tuition for state universit i es a contradiction of the goals of a state supported educational system and will propose an alternative to the hike to the gov ernor today or Thursday . This could be a p hoto t ake n hy the Flo rida C h a m ber o ( Comm erce for an ad on. the Flor ida Evergla d es but i t is reaJiy a lake o n t he USF cam p u s o n 30th S t reet j ust nort h of Fow ler Avenue. Our ph o t ogr aph e r f ou nd bass a n d brea m to be ple n ti ful j udging fr o m a. string he saw one fis h erma n l eave w it h. Photo bY Richard Smoot At the same time , the Council sai d it will start a campaign to prevent the tuition increase with an as sembly of students at the state universities to inform them of the Council's stand. Senat e Defers Proposed THE ASSEMBLY at USF ---------will be held today at 2 p.m. on the north side of the Universi ty Center. All free hour activi ties have been cancelled, John Hogue, USF student president said . would place undue hardship on our student population." Shepherd --said he would present the Council's alterna tive to the proposed increase to Gov. Kirk today or Thurs day, and may release the plan to the public Saturday when the Council meets in Tallahas' Q uarter Exa m Changes The Council met in Univer sity Center 158 in a day-long session. It consists of the stu dent presidents of the five state universities: USF, Florida, Florida Atlantic, and Florida A&M. The FSU presi dent Gene Stearns works for the Florida Legislature and could not attend. The student government at Florida A&M is not functioning and a repre sentative was not present. B y Ma na gin g Editor A possible change in final exam times was deferred for f urther consideration by col lege officials at the meeting of t he University Senate last week i n the Fine Arts Humanities Building. The University Senate rec ommends academic policy to Pres. John S. Allen and con sists of faculty members, stu dents, administrators and other representatives. It has 53 members. Harris W. Dean, dean of ac ademic affairs, said tllete were considerable problems last trimester with professors who held exams not during the regular exm time, but ei ther earlier than scheduled or the. las t day of classes. DEAN SAID that the sched uling committee would not be able to schedule exams during Quarters Two and Three under the existing exam method. Exams can be sched uled Quarter One because it has a five day exam schedule. MRS. LILLIAN 1}, Y ORKS, secretary of the schedules and space olfice, said that a four-day exam schedule-would not give sufficient time or space following the regular exam schedule. The schedule committee had made two recommenda tions for changing the exam schedule. One was to have only final examinations in the basic studies courses sched uled during the final exam pe riod. All other finals would be given during the alass meet ing time of the tenth week. The alternate recommenda tion was that CB finals be given at night, and the quar ter si:::JUld ]<;, r.,, C'5!:>eHt;a]JJ' 11 weeks with finals given during the last clas.s sessions. DR. JESSE S. BINF OR.D,. associate profest;or of chemis-5,091 Summer Students Register _ For Classes Some 5,091 students havei enrolled for the summer tri mester according to the latest figures released by the regis trar's office last Monday, and James E . Lucas, assistant registrar, said he was happy with the improvement in the registration machinery. Registration was moved from the University Center Ballroom to the larger Gym nasium this trimester. "TH E REGISTRATION aera. was never loaded" ac cording to J . E. Lucas, assis tant' registrar, when USF's "field-house was moved to the new gymnasium for students enrolling for Tri mester III and IliA .. Lucas attributes success of the expanded system to the assigning of registration ap pointments by GP,R to jun iors, sophomores, and fresh men. He also stated "with a controlled entrance" which was effective "the appointment time became very important." THE 1\'EW four-digit course number used to indicate closed sections was effective Lucas said because "the stu dent has immediate knowl edge of closed sections by re ferring to the overhead pro jector screen." He also said that "advising in the Physical Education Classroom Building was well received." The registrar is contemplat ing further changes for the fall registration according to Lucas which would allow "faster payment of fees" and "different area for advisors." Lucas said a "different method for pulling course cards" may be used gaining "better controls at the en trance to the registration area," and adopting a "differ ent procedure for replil.Cing• lost appointments." Lucas said the anticipated enrollment for Trimester IIIB is 1,000 to 1,200. ' At Dance Saturday The V i rginians, show n al)()ve, will be one of the two enter tainment gro up s that w ill be perfor ming at the Cniversity Cen ter's free "S ummer Sound Storm" Saturday night. The 1\lark lli Trio will be the othe r group. l ( try, said that some professors feel that finals should last longer than the one hour class periods, ther7fore an exam period would be needed. Dr. T. W. Graham Solo mons, associate professor of chemistry, suggested elimi exams in upper level courses, under the quarter system . He.. said th9t many students who have two or three exams in one day or four exams in two days do not get the benefit of an overall review of the course which exam study provides because of their crammed exam schedules. At the end of the discussion Pres. Allen referred the ques tion back to the college coun cils for further discussion. Registration Days Changed On CTR List Reg i stration days for Tr i mester IIIB h ave b e e n changed from J u ne 19 to 22, to June 19 and 20. The chauge is for the Univers i ty Center cal .eJJdar w h ic h h ad dates in cor r ect . Tim es aml place will re.. main t he same, noon In 3 p .m . J un e 20 for regu lar IIIB stu de n ts, 9 a.m. to 3 p. m. for con tinuing and former stu d e nts returni n g Eve n ing regi.trati o n i s 6 to 7:45 p.m. , a n d regular Tri m ester lll stude nts may add cou rses f r o m 9 a.m. to n oon June 20. No registra tion take p lace Jwt e 19 and classes f or lllB are sc h e dul ed to begi n J u ne 22. Charles Shepherd, president at Florida, spoke for the Council in expressing its dis may of the proposed hike and at the same time supported the Board of Regents' stand on the issue. The Board re fused to recommend a $50 in crease last March. SHEPHERD S A I D he, USF's John Hogue, and Flori da Atlantic's Hank Petrillo would call a general assembly ot students at their universi ties to inform them of the Council's stand. USF's assem bly will be the first, with Flor ida State's sometime today, Florida's tonight, and Florida Atlantic's set for Thursday. Hogue said "To many of us, the level of tuition can mean the difference between getting a college educ;ation or not get ting a college education. For that reason, and because Sout!T Florida's General As sembly will be the first such meeting held in the -state, I urge all students to attend." The Council said the inten tion of a state-supported edu cational system is to provide higher education for state res idents without regard .to their financial status. "A further increase," it said, "would deny the intention of the state sys tem . "THE UNIVERSITY stu dent already faces rtsmg costs for housing, food, books, and infirmary expenses. A tuition hike, on top of these al ready e n a c te-d increases, see. The Council said a boost in tuition would also adversely affect the already strained loan and scholarship pro grams and would inhibit jun ior college enrollment thereby reducing the quality of educa tion both at the junior college and senior college level. "A TUIT IO N hike would not alleviate the causes of our budgetary limitation," the Council said. "The fault lies in the failure of our state to realize its position and obliga tion. Since we are the ones di rectly involved in higher edu cation in Florida, feel that it is necessary that we work with Gov. Kirk to achieve mu tual goals." Shepherd cited Kirk's cam paign statement that he want ed Florida "first in educa tion," and said Florida was the wealthiest state in ' the South but was spending the least on education. The student legislature at Florida Atlantic, located in Boca Raton near Ft. Lauder dale, passed a resolution May 3 asking Kirk "to reconsider his position pertaining to a change in the proposed tuition fees under the quarter system in the state university systern." PART O F the campaign to prevent a tuition increase, the Council said, would be student assemblies, and media ap pearances, including televi sion and newspaper endorse ments. Hogue was trying to get time on Tampa TV sta tions to explain the Council's position yesterday . Don Gifford, USF student vice president, and Dave Searles, secretary of finance, sat in on the Council discus sion as did presidential aides of Shepherd and Petrillo. CTR Sponsors 'Sound Storm' ' Friday and Saturday the University Center is spon soring a Summer Sound Storm. It will be a series of free entertainment incfuding a jazz concert, big name enter tainment, and a "So u nd MaTheir first national record ing for Epic Records, "It's A Long Walk Back' to Para dise," gained t hem national recogni tlon. T H E VIRGINIANS have written some of their own machine." ' • tcrial and can play several in-The Mk III Trio will kick-off struments. All students are in The Summer Sound Storm vited. Virginians on with a jazz concert on Friday Saturday night the Dance at 8 p.m. in the University Committee will hold a " Sound Center ballroom. J • Machine Dance" in t he CTR They are booked to open a at 9:30p.m . new night club in Las Vegas The Sound Mil-chine wiD this summer and have schedprovide the music. The dress uled tours in the m i dwest. is campus wear (no shorts) They have made two recordand iUs also free. ings and plan to do an a l bum This Friday and Saturday soon. nights the Movie Committee The Mk III features Mark will present "Hell is for Morris on drums, Ron Resler Heroes" at 7:30 p.m. in Fine on bass and Phil Rugh on Arts-Humanities 101. It stars piano. In an evening you can Steve McQueen, Bobby Darin, see the trio play a combina-Fcss Parker, Nick Adams, tion of eight or more i nstruand Bob Newhart. ments . IT I S H O STE D by the CTR Music Committee. Free tick ets are available at the CTR desk. The Virginians will perform as the second entertainment in the Summer Sou nd Storm on Saturday night at 8 p.m. on the north side of the CTR. They are coming from a Bob Hope Show in Montgomery; Alabama. FOR 48 hours during World War II six GI's are left to hold an atea until reinfotce ments come. In the course of their effort each man's char acter emerges from t he se rious, brooding ex-sergeant played by McQueen to the naive Polish refugee played by ' Nick Adams. Vance Packard, social critic and author of many best sellers, will be featured on the Meet the Author Series next Wednesday in the Teaching Auditorium-Theatre at 8 p.m. Books Packard has written that have reached the best seller lists are "The Hidden Persuader, " "The W a s t e Makers," "The Status Seek ers," and "The Pyramid Climbers." He has a ls o con tributed to many major American periodicals. m s books he is able to pinpoint an aspect of modern life that many recognize, turning his titles into house hold words. Packard will talk on the changing American morality in an area of upheaval, the invasion of our privacy, what the waste ma!{ers are doing to us, the exploding technology and other topics . Packard terms today's hap penings as "the most violent revolution in the American way of life in their nation's h ist ory." Students, staff and faculty will be admitted free but a ticket is required. A limited number of tickets are avail able to the public for $1 per person. Tickets are available now at the CTR desk. "Meet the Au,\hor" is sponsored by the Uni versity Center Special Events Commitee. P hot o by Ric h ard smoot Student Presidents ' Council T h ree of the five members or the Florida Council of Student Body Presidents met at USF last S atu rday in CTR 158 to pla n U1eir tu ition increase r epeal campaign against t h e GOP administration. From left are Bank Pe.. trillo of Florida Atlantic University, USF's J o hn Hogue, and Charles Shepherd of the University of Florida. Voting Da t e Is Friday For SA Seats Elections for the Student Association legislature are set for Friday at five places on campus. Some 22 seats are vacant. These will be the voting places by colleges : ,., Basic Studies : l{niversity Center Lobby, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ,., Liberal Arts: Fine Arts Humanities 101 from 2 to 3 p.m. ,., Business Admin istration: aud'itorium from 2 to 3 p.m. / ""' Education: University Center 226 from 2 to 3 p.m. THE BREAKDOWN on the availaole seats is 10 in Basic Studies, three in Liberal Arts, five in Education, and two each in Business Administra tion and Engineering. The people elected at this time will hold office through the next presidential election and until December. Under the new constitution the rep resentatives elected in Sep tember to the legislature will hold office for one calendar year. The f i rst legislature meet ing will be Thursday, May 18 in CTR at 7 p.m. when the new legislators will be sworn in. SA Vice president Don Gif ford said there may be a dis cussion of tl1e new constitu tion scheduled for implemen tation in September and the parking situation. THE LIST of the candida te s are: BASIC STUDIES: Robin Altman, John Boyle, Lee Cas tleton, Jim Cooner, Joan Gross, John Dugger, James Miller, Robert Musselwhite, Susan Orth, Arthur Roberts, John Rodgers , James Sulli van, and Bill Winstead. QUESTION: What is the purpose behind the division stamp on the Liberal-Arts ma jors registration worksheet? ANSWER: Division stamps ide ntify various majors for advisors and keep studen ts and division heads alert and up to da t e on department changes. It provides an easy check to see if the student is meeting his division require ments for graduation. This does not limit the student to taking only courses in this particular division. QUEST I ON: Why do the signatures on the g r aduation diplomas of President Allen and Dean Dennard look alike? ANSWER: Dean Dennard's signature is not on the d iplo LIBERAL ARTS: Marie Hintz, and David Tucker. EDUCATION: Betty Ann Root, Bonnie Westbrook. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: William Keegan Jr., Rober t Swigert , and Sandra Usherson. ENGINEERING: Ronald James Corces, Timothy Da vtds, and Frank Skillen. D ial rna, th e signatures are of Dean Dean and President Allen. They are sepatate sig natu res. QUESTION: Why was the name changed from 'i.e.' to South Florida Review, who changed it and how was the ne w name chosen? ANSWER: The name was changed by the student edito rial board with the approval of the Student Affairs Office of Publications to reflect a broader scope of interes t, to be more closely identified with USF, and also to provide a name that would be more easily remembered. The student editorial board selected the new name from a list of suggestions. Faster Than Speed i ng Bull e t Aikido master K. Toh ei, right, throws his "adversary" iii a li ghtning demonstration in CTR 47 last Fri day. Aikido is related to the art of Tai Chi Chuan as judo is related to karate. The USF Tai Chi Cbnan organization sponsored the event.

PAGE 2

EditorialsAnd Commentary 2-May 10, 1967, -U. of South florida, Tampa An Improved Registration What a relief. If you were like us, registration was almost enjoya ble with facilities in the Gym in stead of the University Center Ball room. We even had piped-in music (or piped out depending on where you heard it) to try and soothe away our haggard feet and eyes after trudging across the arid ex panse of the Business Administra ton Building sands. Yet, we can still envision the same long lines, same tired feet, and same fatigue when registra tion returns to its "normal load" in the fall. We're supposed to have 10,500 students here in September and the only thing the Gym has solved is the lack of space. Nothing will ever change the long lines, frustration over closed courses, and the filling out of all those computer cards. IF, HOWEVER, USF were to install a completely computerized registration system similar to the ones at the nation's largest univer sities, it could be greatly speeded up, the staff could be reduced, and money could be saved in the long run despite the high initial cost. You say you don't want to be just another computer number? We done't either. But the point is that we are already a number, and a computerized registration sys tem will be invaluable, and proba bly indispensible in the not to-distant-future. And being reduced to a number by the computer is not even an issue any more. It will be the super-class, the class with 35, 40, and even 50 students in it, and we don't mean lecture sessions. It will be the large classes that will alien ate the students, not the computer. IT WAS AN improvement over the Ballroom. Should the universi ty system ever get an adequate share of the state's treasury con tents, we hope that somewhere in those vaults will be enough money to speed up registration in order to reduce personnel costs and ener gies, with the use of computers. No New No new taxes. But increased ex penses. That appears to be the for mula for Gov. Kirk's education policy, and if you don't believe it, you will be paying $50 more for four weeks of education at the Uni versity if Kirk's proposals in the field become law. 1 We paid $130 per trimester under that system for 15 weeks of instruction. Kirk would have us pay $150 for 11 weeks of instruction • under the quruier system. We're against it, and so is the Board of Regents. They refused to recommend a $50 increase last trime'ster. A $90 increase in housing fees and a $105 increase in food expens es is already set for the fall, all for' no increase in "real" goods. The scheduled expenses for four years at USF will increase from about $6,700 to well over $7,000. In effect, the $50 increase would cheat the "straight through" stu dent out of one quarter of instruc tion. He will be paying for three quarters of instruction what he would have .formerly paid .for four, plus $50. WITH THESE KINDS of rising expenses, who needs new taxes for OUR READERS WRITE more revenue? With expenses ris ing such as they are, it may mean an increase in Federal money flowing into the state which we as sume the governor would not like if his campaign speeches about "big government in Washington" are taken seriously. Representatives Cramer and Gibbons, seeing the financial straits many of us will be put in, will to aid their constituents by seeking more Washington dol lars for Florida. And we'll need ijlem. But, we guess that higher edu ucation is not important to him', nor is it important to the "rank and file" Floridian with whom some newspapers say he is so popular. We never thought of ourselves as not being rank-and-file Floridi ans. But, history has shown that the majority of a nation's people are not college graduates, and they are the rank-and-file, not us. Now that we know we are "visitors" to this state, perhaps we can adjust to the customs of this strange land. One thing we have found out is that no new tax7> will mean increased expenses. But what is the difference? -Clutter Aid' s Scholar In Blissful Disarray EDITOR: It is deliciously shocking to step into a room where tidiness is a sin. But there are people who march about with their backs rigid as though strapped with an iron rod and profess things like "cleanli ness is next to godliness" or "every thing has its proper place," never realiz ing how antithetic this is to the develop ment of individuality. There must be that of careless aban don about something before it can in spire the growth of intellect How is any one to write an ode or sonnet in an atmo sphere of starched purity? The only way a person's self can be expressed is to allow it to come out and fall how and where it may. If this expression takes the form of clothes on the closet floor, what of it? For instance, my room is an ideal example of discordant harmony. No where on campus is there a more loyal adherent to the laws of cluttering. I work with conscientious fortitude to create a perfect environment for my intellectual pursuits . Books, like snakes writhe over the desk tops, and paper like water between the leaves with some escapmg to the floor to make puddles , carved symmetrically. The bed, with sheets dithyrambic , continuously waiting to be preened and neatly stands with MaylO, 19G7 Vol. 1 No. 30 Published every Wednesday In the school year bY the UniVlrsiiY of South Florida 4202 Fowler Avo., Tampa, Fl• , 33620. S.cond clus POstage paid at Tampa, Fla . • 33601, under of Mar.3, 117t. Printed by The Times Publish in g C:ompany , St. Petersburg. Circulation Rates Single copy (non-students) --------• IOC Mail subscriptions ----S4 School yr. The Oracle Is written end adllod by students at the University of South Florida. Editorial views lltreln are not necunrlly those of the USF adminlstretlon, Ofllctll University Ctnlor 122 , phone 98a.4131; publisher and General Manager, ext. fll; News, ext. 6JJ; Advertising, oxt. 620. Deadlines: general new• and eds, Wednesday for following Wednesday ; letters to editor, 4 p.m .. Friday; clusifitds, t a.m. Monday. ACP ALL-AMERICAN 1U7 Sfuert Theyer Joy lacon Roger Benton Dr. Arthur M . Sanljtrson l"rof . Sltn Yates Editor Menaglng Editor Advertising Manager Publisher Genenl Manager back pressing the wall. It is inconceiva ble that there could be more consum mate surroundings in which to work. However, at regular intervals, just when my -grades are beginning to climb and my spirits to soar , certain unmention able persons decide it is time for a room check. This consists of their going from place to place making marks in a note book and , if everything is not what they conceive as the ideal , they See that it is made so with proper haste. All notebooks creep into their drawers, books line the shelves with disgusting rigidity, clothes cling to hangers so their bones show, the floor lies stark without an oasis in i t s sterile length. Cast in this clinical waste land and Spartan severity, who could concentrate? Always there would be the fear of dirtying . College is an institute of higher learning; yet how i s anyone to acquire knowledge when he constantly fears pun ishment for littering? Is there no pla c e that will, instead of squelching the corn pulsion to release the creative tendency, allow an effusion of the real self? In no apartment or motel does the Jandlord creep into the room to see that the shelves are dusted . Only if sounds of furniture being piled into the center of the room for a bonfire permeates his con science would he invade another's sanctum . Why should college students on campus receive treatment other than this? By the time they achieve college level it is ridiculous to subjugate them to this childish prying. Abolish room i n spection in dorms! JOSEPH NUNES Study First EDITOR: Just a short memo to Mr. Bob Brown . If you could read and know anything of the English language ; maybe you might remember that not once in my letter did I mention your name or make any in whatsoever to you or your CO signers. More specifically, I was adress ing it to most of the students. But thank you . , anyway, that's twice you've put your foot in your mouth maybe you should, shall we say, study the facts first? RICK CATLIN ' STUDENT GROUPS DISSQL VED Detention Of Papandreou By Coup . .. ..... . ,. Causing l1 S . . Academic Sympathy WASHINGTON, D.C. (CP S ) -There cent military takeover i n Greece has caused widespread repercussions in. the Americ an academic community because 'of the detention of Andreas Papandreou, son of the former Greek prime minister George Papand reou. Papandreau had been chairman to the economics department at the Universi ty of California at Berkeley and an eco nomics instru ctorat the UQiversity of Minnesota. He was the leader of the leftwing of the Center Union party, which f ell from power in Jun_l! of 1965 as a result of pressure from the Greek mon archy. The Greek Embassy and the U.S. State Depar tment report t hat Papan dreou is being well-treated during his de tention. A Qreek Embassy spokesman said there were rumors Papandreou would be sent.out of the country. BOTH THE GREEK Embassy and the State Department said it was also possible thllt Papandreou would be re subpoenaed to testify at the Aspida trial, I at which it was charged that he was the leading force behind left.wing secret so cieties with i n the Greek Army. He had been summoned to testify at the trial before the coup took place . A State Department spokesman said Amer ican representatives in Greece had re ceived assurances from the new govern ment that Papandreou would not be harmed. The American Embassy has been In co"tact with Papandreou ' s American w ife, and she is reported well. Papan. dreou came to the Unite d States in 1940 and became a n'\turalized citizen. He re turned t o Greece in 1961 to become the director general of the Athens Center !o r Economic Studies. Since Papandreou is no lo nger an American citizen, the Americ a n g overn ment has little power over any action that might be taken as a res ult o f the Aspida trial. AT THE UNIVERSITY of Colorado, a letter to President Johnson lfrging the President "to use all the prestige and power of your office to prevent the poss l bllity of harm" to Papandreou has been circulated by the eco11omlcs department. States the Colorado lE'tter, 4'We have followed the scholarly work of Mr. An dreas Papan(lreou with admiration and we consider him an asset to Greece ; he must be protected if a nonCommunlst progressive move ment Is to develop in Greece. " The Colotado professors commented that It was unthihkable that "a European country and member state ot NATO should be all owed to fall under an oppressive' military dic tat orship that already abolished the very freedoms for which the Western world stands." A PETITION WlUOil urges the U:S. governmen t to "exercise its Influence hnmedlately i n order to prevent the exe
PAGE 3

5 r e e r r ;. I . CLASSIFIED 1. AUTOMOTIVE FOR SALE: 1963 Impala 327; 3(1(} h,p,; 2 door hardtop. Good condition. Phone 988-4627. 3. FOR RENT WEDNESDAY MAY 10, 1967 Respon si ble person to rent small house on river-quie t . $80. Utilities paid 12 m i n . to U SF, Off • I Notices 1 Exam, Monday, from 8 a.m., CTR 248; "1. HELP WANTED ICia 1uesday from 8 a.m., CTR 248, 251. Graduates or older adult students-part NA_TATORIUM is open for recreational I C D t Book time educational counselors needed _ sw1mmong _from noon t o 2 p.m. Monda)" ampUS a e guaranteed $500 per 10-wk. per iod. Call lhrough Frtdays. Women must wear bath ASOLO THEATRE A charlered bus trip 932-7456 or Write Carmen R. Bronson, ing caps. Outdoor sw•mmmg pool hours to the Asolo Sarasota, will be 3333 W. Columbus Dr .. Tampa, 33603 2 to 6 p.m. Mondays through Satursponsored by The UC To lent Committee 19. RIDES ays, on Saturday, Mav 20. Thirty-eighl persons I must be signed up by today to make the DRIVING TO 'NEW JERSEY leoving AEGEAN DISTRIBUTION for. those who trip po ssi b le. Price o f $4.90 each includes June 15 or 16. Want 1 or 2 driver have reSll!rved copies, w•ll be on CTR 223 round-trip bus ride and first-floor ($4) companions to share driving and oper-from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m . weekdays. Call tickets t() the matinee performance of atlng expenses. Vehicle is 196-4 Volkswag ext. 618 (Office of Campus Publications) carol Goldoni's "The Fan." The bus will en Microbus (slow speedl. 2'h to 3 day for Information concerning the yearbook. l e ave t he Center at 1 p.m. for the 2:30 triP. Call Stevenson, American Idea, performance, returning to the campus by 6:30 p.m. Tickets may be available at the Center desk today. Faculty, staff, students and the public are invited. REGISTRATION now being accepted for the 1967-68 school year, St. Francis Parish School pre-school throygh 5th Grade SLIGH & NEBRASKA AVE. Phone 238-1098 The Rey. J. R. Griffith RECTOR AND HEADMASTER BEAT THE PARKING PROBLEM LOW COST Transpor tat ion PRICES START $2390 , See Bill Munsey-He is your fellow student at U.S.F. HONDA OF TAMPA TODAY READER' S THEATRE Coffee House, 2 p.m., CTR 252. FRIDAY ELECTIONS : Stu dent Association CB election, 10 a.m. to p.m., CTR south lobbY. College of Education elections, 2 p.m. CTR 226; College of Liberal Arts elections. 2 p.m. FAH 101; College of Business elections, 2 p.m. BSA. MOVIE: "Hell Is lor Heroes," 7:30 p.m., FAH 10). MK Ill TRIO in Concert, 8 p.m., CTR 248. , SATURDAY MOVIE: "Hell Is for Heroes/' 7:30 p.m .. FAH 101. , STEREO DANCE : 9 p.m., CTR 248. MONDAY PANHELLENI C : 2 p.m., CTR 216. IFC RUSH MEETING: 7 p.m., CTR 205. Concerts, Lectures, Exhibitions CIV I L WAR ROUNDTABLE: 8 p.m. today , CTR 226. LUNCHEON : North Hillsborough County Rotary Club, noon Friday, CTR 252. CONFERENCE: SFEA LeadershiJ> Con ference, 10 a.m. Saturday, CTR 200. WORKSHOP: Migrant Education Regional W o rkshop; registration 8:30 a.m. Monday, Center secon d floor lobby; meetings from 9 a.m. In the Center ; luncheon, noon, CTR 167-8. SHORT COURSE!: Swimming Pool short c ou rse, TuesdaY, from 8 a.m., CTR 252. EXHIBITION: African Tribal Art, from the collect ion of Jay Left, through today, Library Gallery. EXHIBITION: Rauschenberg: Inferno, through May 19, Teaching Gallerv. EXHIBITION: USF Senior Honors Show, through May 25, Theatre Gallory. 'EXHIBITION: New acqu isitions by MI chael P once de Leon, Romas Ph. 258 Victor Vasaretly, through June 30, Li-brary Gallery. EXHIBITION: "Corbusier: UnIte," 2301 S. MacDill through June 30, Teaching Gallery. CONCERT : Baroque music, Thursday, I May 18, 8:30 p.m. FAH 101. _j WELCOME PLAY: Experimental Theatre: "UMer 11.' U s ' Milk Wood.'' bv Dylan Thomas, June 1, 1 1 2, and 3 at 8:30 p.m .• Theatre. (Reserved .__ -'-----...J. L.. ___ seat tickets, admission charged.) • BACK • RECITAL: Martha Reari ck, flautist, 8:30 p . m .. Jun e 1, FAH 101. CONCERT: University-Community Sym phony, 8:30 p.m., June 7, Theatre. (Re served seats required, no admission charged.) BUY & SELL YOUR TEXTBOOKS UNIVERSITY EXCHANGE , BOOKSTORE; INC. J0024 • 30th (West of Busch Gordens) PHONE 932-7715 Come In And Get Your FREE Discount Card. WE ALWAYS BUY USED BOOKS AT mue l\opal QCres't l\estaurant MON. • FRI 12:00 • 2:00 THE LUNCHEON BUFFET $1.50 ALL YOU CAN EAT your choice of 3 Meats 3 Vegetohles 3 i.lesserts NORTHEAST FOWLER & 30th St. Placement Services Listed below are the dates, names, open ings, maJor fiel d required, of all orga ol zatlons which have scheduled on-campus interviewing dates In Trimester Ill. Check with Placement Services, ADM 280 (ext. 6121 for additional listings and infor mation and to schedule an appointment to interview. MONDAY, MAY 15 IBM: (Openings) Data proc. mkt.' office prod. mkt; data procl engr; bus adm; (maier field) engineeri ng, math, sciences, lib arts. TUESDAY, MAY 16 Floridil Power Corp : various areas In en gineering; engineering, EE, ME, CE. Radio Corporation of America: EDT Divi sion: Electr'lc data processing; back ground for electric data processing. con tinental Baki ng Co.: Training program for plant mgrs, sales and mgmt fields; bus adm-indus. mgmt, or any field In sales or mgmt. WEDNESDAY, MAY 17 Burroughs Corp: Sales rep; DP acctmachine 5ystems !ales; bus admmkt; adm 1 1 1 yr acctgl. First Federal Saving s & Loan Assn. Of Sf . Petersburg; mgmt trainees; bus adm. FRIDAY, MAY 19 J . C. Penney Co.: Mgmt trainees; bus adm, lib arts. MONDAY, MAY 22 Aetna Life & Casualty: Field rep, bond rep, claim rep, underwriter, eng inee r ; all fields. Florida .State Dept . o f Welfare : Check with Pla cement. TUESDAY, MAY 23 Montgomery War d & Co.: Controller, merchandising; acctg -general; bus-lib arts. Will interview iuniors and seniors for summer work. General Electric Co.: physics, engineer ing. WEDNESDAY, MAY Travelers Insurance Co.: Office mgmt (lib arts), underwriting (lib arts), sales, all areas (lib arts). data (math background), actuarial (math thlu calcu l us). Ring , Mahony, & Arner: junior ac countants; 29 Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Co.: sales trng program leads to mgmt; bus adm or lib arts. WEDNESDAY, MAY 31 Southern Bell Telephone Co. : Mgml pes., engirreering; bus, engr, math-phvsics. May continue interviews on June 1. Group meeting on Tuesday, MaY 30, at 3:30 p.m. for all sludents scheduling pointments to interview. or interested; check with Placement f o r location. • WEDNESDAY, JUNE H Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.: Trng prog; all fields. THURSDAY, JUNE 15 M utual of New York Insurance Co.: S a les asst.; all fiel ds . FRIDAY, JUNE 30 u.s. Phosphoric Products: Chemists, en gineers; chemistry, CI].E-EE-ME. Some companies lis ted above may resct>edule earlier dates. Call Placement Office this week to verify interviewing dates. Additional firms may be listed In later Issues of The Oracle. Check a lso Placement Serl'ices bulletin board In lhe patio of the Administration Building, or phone ext. 612 for 11lllst minute" Informa tion. WUSF-TV Channel 16 TODA'r 5:00 The Swedish Scene 5:30 Miss Nancy's Store 6:00 Quest 6: Science Reporter 7:00 General Te le phone Spociat 7:30 The Stock Market THE ORACLEMay 10 , 1967, U. of South Florida, Tampa -l 140 Listed In USF Coonerative every!undayat . . ,-. . Education In 12 And D. C. As USF opened the sum mer trimester 140 students went out on cooperative edu cation assignments with 60 employers in 12-states and the District of Columbia Some 126 students, who had been on cooperative education assign ments during Trimester II re turned to the campus for full time study. With a number of students already placed for the fall term, the University now has approxiomate l y 275 students in its coopera tive education p r o g r a m whereby students blend thee' ry with practice in their areas of professional interest. The 140 now on assignment represent four of the Universi ty's colleges as follows: Col lege of Education, 9; College of Business Administration, 22; College of Liberal Arts, 54; and College of Engineer ing, 55. The employers joining with the University in the program and the students assigned in clude: Alton Box Board Co., Jacksonville -William Cowdrey, mechanical engineer in g. Babcock & Wilcox, St. Pe tersburg John McKey, civil engineering. Boe i ng Co., Cape Kennedy Pe ter Clark, eng i neering. Bureau of Commercial F isheries, St. Petersburg Beach Robert Ernest, zoology_ Chrysler Corp., New Orleans, Lo. -Byron AJ.exander, physics; S. Danie l Bobczynski, physics. Continentol Baking Co.. Tampa -Jeffrey Bardin, management. David Taylor Model Basin, Washing ton, D . C . -Janet Paul, math. Department o f Defense, Washington, D.C. David Castrlcone, geology; Paulette Damm, math; Norman Fergu son. math; Richard Schwartz, math. E . I. duPont de Nemours & Co •• FtorSummer Grads Need To File Degree Form Students who plan to gradu ate at the end of Trimester IliA, must complete an Appli cation for Degree form n o later than 5 pm. Monday in order to be considered for graduation . Students who plan to gradu ate at the end of Trimester III , must complete an Appli cation for Degree form no later; than 5 p.m. May 29 in order to be considered for graduation. 7:40 Call the Doctor 8.00 Babbitt: Electronic Music 8:30 Nine to Get Ready 9:00 Profiles i n Courage THURSDAY 5:00 Arts Unlimited 5:30 Miss Nancy's Store 6:00 Space Flight 6:30 Insight 7:00 Achievement '66 7:30 The Stock Market 7:40 You the law 8:00 State Legislature 8:30 I Spy 9 :00 Desllu Playhouse FRIDAY S: 00 Brother Buzz 5:30 Miss Nancy's Store 6:00 Charlie Chaplin 6:30 Space Flight 7 :00 State Department 7:30 The Stock Market 7: 40 Grow and Show 8:00 Eutoque (Focusl Spanish 8:30 Forum ( Spanlshl 9:00 Teatro Frances (Spanish) 9:30 VictorY at Sea MONDAY 5:00 Functional English (C B 1011 5:30 Miss Nancy's Store 6:00 US Navy 6:30 Safely Afloat 7 :00 Florida Schools Present Music 7:30 You and the Law 8:00 VIctory at Sea 8:30 You Are There 9:00 Destl u Playhouse TUESDAY 5 :00 Func tional English (CB 101) 5:30 Miss Nancy's Store 6:00 I Spy 6:30 Forum (Spanish) 7:00 Flori da Schools Present Music 7:30 Skirt the I sst•e 8:00 f\peration AS" 8:30 Ttalro Frances 9:00 VIewpoint 9:30 You Are T here ALMA HARRISON asks you to call or come to World Travel . Center FOR TICKETS AND RESERVATIONS v Airlines v Cruises v Tours Anywhere -Anytime NO SERVICE CHARGE PHONE 877-9566 World Travel Center 2624 Hillsboro Plaza Tampa, Flor ido ence, S.C. Raymond Jennings, me chanical englneermg. Electronic Cdmmunlcatlons, Inc., St. Pete rsburg James Clayton, electrical Jack Lamphear, electrical engineering; De nnis Watson, electrical engineering. Encephalitis Re..,arch Center, Tampa Robert Penny, mari ne biology. First Data Corp., Tampa Robert Colvin, accounting, Florida Power Corporation, St. Pe tersburg Dennis Dingle, mechan i cal engineering; Jeffrey Jacobsohn. me chanical engineering; Peter Rodriguez Jr. , a ccounting; Karl Wieland, electrica l engineering. Florida State Board of Health, Winter Haven -Barrv Leber, premed. Florida Stale Road Department, St. PetersbUrg David Bower, civil engi neer i ng. Food and Drug Administration, Bos ton. Mass. -Marcia Psiakl, biology. Food and Drug Administration, Wash Ington, D.C. Douglas Kiesling, zoolo gy; Harold Pritchard, zoology; John Roach, chem istry; Michael Stack. chemistry; MIChael Starli ng, chemistry; Martin Stutsman, chl!mlstry; Russell Watrous, zoology. Ford Motor Co.. Dearborn, Mich. John Watts, electrical engineering. Game and Fresh Water Fish Commis sion, Tallahassee -Larry Touzeau, zoology. Genera l Cable Corporation, Tampa Norman Elder, mechanical engineering; David Quarles. mechanical engineering. General Electri c Co., Rome, Ga. e Atl anta, Ga. Boles, mechaniCftl engineering..; JamEb, Krog, pre-law; Robert S i mon, architectural engineer Ing. G e n e r a I Serv ices Administration, Washington, D .C. Brian Aile", prela..v; Judy Gavin , education; Thomas Simard, lndOstrla l engineering; Sandra Smith, art educaflon. General Telephone Company, St. Pe tersburg James Stevenson, e lectrical eng i neering. Genera l Tel ephone Company, Tampa David Rose, math-physics. Goddard Space Flight Center, (NASAl Greenbell, Md. Marjorie Proffitt. math. Gulf life, Insurance Co. , Jacksonville James Berhard, management. Honeywell, St . Petersburg Peter D'Angona Jr., industrial engineering. Interna l Revenue Service, ville -Robert Cotterman, accounting. Internal Revenue Service, Washing ton, D.C. R i chard Char l ton, account ing; Robert Maas. accounting. I nternational Business Machines, I nc., Cape Kennedy Leslie Mann . electrical engienering. I ntermtlional Business Machines, Inc, , Huntsville, Ala. Randall Holm, elec trical International Mineral and Chem i cal Corp . • Bartow Pedro Gomes, chemistrY; Frank Weaver, m a th-physic_}. John F. Kennedy Space Center, (NASA), Cape Kennedy Sleven Am sler, electrical engine.ering; A l an Brown, accounting; Richard Cota, chanica! engineering; Cli f ford Fair banks, accounting; Joseph Glochlck, electrical engineering; Michael Kehl, I ndustrial management; James Kim bler, business administrati on; Charles Los t roscio, electrical engineering; Mi chael Sco1t, bus i ness administration. langley Research Center, (NASA), Hampton, Va . Donald Ehlenbeck, electrical engineering; Jerry Griffin, mechanical engineer i ng. Lockheed-Georg i a Co., Marietta, Ga. Andrew Beltram. accounting; William Fowler, electrical engineering; John Medaglia, aerospace eng i neering; Roger Taylor, math; Gerald Wili, eco nomics. M an ned Spacecraft Center, (NASA l , Ho uston, Tex. -William Shearer, elec-trical engineering . _ Marine Bank and Trust Co., Tampa -Craig Rattleff, management. Marshall Space Flight C enter, (NASAl, Huntsv i lle, Ala. Diane Den n i ng, English; William Dowell, electrical eng i neering; Bruce Moore, liberal arts; John Murray, electrical engineering; Robert Newbern, mechanical engi neering; William Opp, mechanical engi neering; Richard Ploclca, physics; Don a l d Rose 11, math; James Saxton. industrial management; Howard Schmidt, English; Ruth Spau l ding, math; Robert Wilson, astronomy-math. Martin Co., Orlando Thomas Batura, indus trial management; Stanley Blank, Industrial engineering; Robert Martin, electrical engineering. National Archives and Records Ser v i ce, Washington, D.C. William Hey nen, political science; David Klainer, history; Davi d Rosenberger, h istory; Leslie Taylor, English-journalism-edu cation. Nati ona l Park Service. New York, N .Y. Arnold Morse II, political science. National Park Service, Washington, D.C. Michae l Kannensohn, political science; Michae l Tennent, political science . Pan Ameri can , Cocoa Beach Paul Carter, mechan i cal englne.er i ng. Pinellas County School Board, Clear water-Janis Winston, education. Prell end Whi l ney , West Palm Beach -Kurt Frahn, engineering. R F D . Inc., Tampa Davi d Bale taan, electr i cal engineering. Smith, Bral ey, and Johnson. Tampa Robert Dugo, :;ccounling; Joseph Elki ns, accounting . Southern Bell Tel ephone and Tele graph, Melbourne -Don B i nder, math. Tampa Electric Company, Tampa James Cross, electrical engineering; Duane Goodemote, electrical ing; Daniel Ochenrlder, eleclrical engi neering; • John Svers, electrical engi neering. Tampa General Hospital, Tampa John Woos lev , zoology. Tennessee Valley Authority, Chatta nooga, Tenn. Peter Pages, civil engi neering. Texas Instruments. Inc.. New Orleans, La. -LaRay Gei st, math . Union Carbide, Oak Ridge, Tenn. William t:lean, chtmical tnglnetring; David McKee, chemistry, Susan McKee, chem istry. U.S. Army Missile Command, Huntsville, Ala. Ange l a Mal oney, math education; Joseph Mason, mechantca l engineering; Charles May, e lectrical en qlneerlng; Marilyn Munyer, English journalism. M i chael Murphy, e l ec trical engineering . I u.s. Nova! Air Station, Jacksonvil l e -Bryan Be!nkamtl(!n, business admi n istration; Denn i s Dambly, chemical en g i neering ; W illiam Price, industrial en gineering. U.S. Novat Trolning Device Center, Orlando -Arthur Sm i th, eng i neering . U.S. OHice of Education, Wash i ngton, D.C. Ronald Anderson, history education; Susan Cameron , Spanish; Nikki Fleming, \ socia l welfare; Lau rence Pritchard, management-finance; Julie Sayles, psychology; Linda Silas, sociology; M artha Sorensen, E nglish; Sylvia sociology; Doug l as Werth, soci a l science-educat ion; Julia Woods, physical education. U.S. Phorsphor i c Products, Divi sion of Toennessee Corp., Tampa R i chard Bowman Jr .. chem istry; Burton Thorn, 1 chem lea I engineering . Vniversity of South F lori da, Tampa College ofBasic Stud i es, Kathleen Cooney, e lementary education ; Educa tional Resources, Davi d Lich-tenfe l s , personnel management ; Zoology De-Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co . College Master Guaranteed by a top company. No war clause Exclusive benfits at special rates Full aviation coverage. partment, Step h en Bloom, zool ogy.Wallops Stat ion, (NASA), Wallops Isl and , va. -Waller Barbour Jr .• elec trical engineer ing; Lynne B i nder. math. pavid @ Collet• Men of Arrnmca THE COLLEGE Ll FE INSURANCE CO of AMERICA " The Only CC' mpany that sells exclusive ly to College Men." Victor W. McKenzie & Associates Wayne Osborn Representat ive GENEVA .. . .... . _,: ' :-:. :t• •. '.,-:f . . ; -:, . I Tender , s kille t-browned chi ck• en, s now-whipp ed potiltoes. @'reen vegetab l e , festive red cranberry sauce, hot buttered biscu i ts w i th p l enty of honey, for dessertyour choice of ic e cream, sherbet or sparklini gelat i n. The cos t is 1J moderat t $2.50 For Adults, Just $1.25 for Children 18 KT. LUNCHEON BUFFET MON. Thru FRI. HOLIDAY INN Northeast 2101 E. Fowler, Tampa Premium deposits deferred until you are of school. TERMS TO FIT YOUR BUDGET Joe Hobbs Fred Papia Ray Newcomer, Gen. Agent. 3843 Kennedy Blvd., Tampa, Florida Phone 877-8387 GOODA PIZZA NICEA PL:ACEA SHAKE.:!:I S THE ONLY REAL, AUTHENTIC, FIRSf, -ORIGINAL, CERTIFIED GENUINE PIZZA PARLOR ON EARTH OR MOON 8114 N. FLORIDA AYE. 935-310t(AT THE TOWER) 4010 SO. DALE MABRY • PH. 839-6361 OPEN 11:00 A.M. 'Till P.M. DAILY, EXCEPT SUNDAY, 11 A.M. TILL 12 P.M. Try Camaro .!'The Hugger" ' I Camaro hugs a road closer, straightens a cu..;e easier because it's the widett stance sportster at its price. It's lower, heavier, too ••• big-car solid and tteady. You get1a better ride, more precise handling for your money. Ask any owner, he'll tell you. Now, ' during the Pacesetter Safe, Y_OU also get special savings on specially equipped sport' coupes and convertibles. , Save on all this: the 250-cu.-in. Six, whitewalls, wheel covers, bumper guards, wheel opening moldings, body striping, deluxe steering wheel, extra brightwork inside. And, at no extra cost during the Sale, get a floor shift for the 3-speed transmission and the sporty hood I Compare Camaro. See your Chevrolet dealer now. (Sale tavings, too, on 1pecially equipped Fleetside pickups, Model CS 10934.) CAMARQ l!J .... --.. -.. -------------.....

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4--THE ORACLf-May 10, 1967, U. of South Florida, Tampa Faculty-Stall Picnic For Riverfront Area Set Soon Brahmans lose 2; Mother's Day Tribute Goes To Mrs. Wray By JOY BACON Managing Editor There will be a free Fac ulty-Staff Picnic Sunday, May 28, from 2 p.m. p .m. at the USF Riverfront Area. The theme for the day will be "A day In The Park In 1890." S O THE COMMITTEE can determine the number of peo ple attending, tickets sh oul d be picked up by Friday. End Season At/4-8 In1 tribute to Mother's Day this Sunday, The Oracle would like to salute all U SF mothers. A special . compli ment goes to Mrs. Gertrude P. Wray who is helping her son, James Wray III, through school. The menu will consist of barbecued chicken, potato salad, baked beans, rolls and butter, ice cream bar and beverages. There will be a band con cert, barbershop quartet, rec reational games for adults and children, with prizes awarded to the winners, and three booths selling home made baked goods, home made ice cream and a lemon ade stand. The proceeds from these booths will go to the Universi ty Scholar A ward Fund . In case of rain the picnic will be held at Argos Center. The USF' baseball team ended the 1967 season on a sad note last weekend losing their final two games of the season, 7-0 to the University of Tampa Fri day night, and 12-10 to Florida Presbyterian in St. Petersburg Saturday. The l osses ended the Brah man record for the season at 14. They were 132 before final examinations last tri mester but they lost four of Free tickets are available in the following areas: ADM 280Personnel Services; ULI 108-Margaret Chapman; CTR Desk-Dawn Smith; FAH 110-Boots Car Ito n; LIF 160-Mary Alice Thorne; CHE 112-Aura F e r r e ll; ENG 107-Betty N e Is on; PHY 115-Doris Hart 1 e y; BUS 201-Pat Coe; OPM 100 Joan McKee and Argos-Control Desk. Wisconsin Students Vpte For Possible Autonomy UNIVERSITY AUTO SERVICE CENTER YOUR CAR TO THE MAN WHO WEARS THE STAR FREE! • Complete Lubrication with each Oil Change. • Do It Yourself Car Wash Vacuum, Soap and Water Provided. • Pick Up & Delivery for All Maintenan4;,e Work for Students & Faculty, 2911 E. Fowler Ave. PHONE 932-3387 AII1JwJ&.Yctt.u JEWELER S802 NEPTUNE (AT DALE MABRY) TAMPA. FLORIDA PH' 253-31577 MADISON, Wis. (CPS) The University of Wisconsin Student Senate voted unani mously to sponsor a camp us wide referendum on a bill which would abolish all facul'DIAMOND RINGS THE SOUND of SOUL uPSYCHEDELlC DISCOTEQUE" (New York Style) Doors open at 8:30 p.m. 'til? Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun. 18 and over 914 W. KENNEDY. -across from The House of Sandwich When you can't afford to be dull sharpen your wits with NoDoz NoOoz keep alert tablets or new chewable mints, safe as coffee, help bring you back to your mental best ... help you become more alert to the people and conditions around you. Non-habit forming . While studying, or after hours, sharpen your wits with No Doz. ......_. .. -' Tablets or new Chewable Mints ty and administration power over non-cla ssroom student affairs. The referendum , binding on the Wisconsin Students Asso ciation (WSA), would give WSA control of all regulatory aspects of non-classroom stu de nt life. The Senate has alt"eady pasSed a bill which would have stripped the faculty student Student Life and In terest Committee (SLIC) of its regul a tory powers. The bill passed by a 19 vote, with two abstentions. On reconsideration, bill aga i n passed 25-8, with two abstentions. The referendum was then decided upon. The measure to be voted upon would give self-regulating local autonomy to many cam pus g rou ps , with the Wiscon sin Student Association retain ing broad control powers . After the original bill was passed, Dean of Student Af fairs Joseph Kauffman com mented, "While I do not deny that there is significant senti men t within the student body for greater power within the decision-making structure of the university, and while I be lieve we are moving in that direction, the bill . . . c ould confuse or confound that sit uation. " "SLIC subcommittees are already considering measures and in some cases have made decisions which do not differ greatly from the Senate bill," said SLIC chairman Jane Moorman, assistant dean of student affairs. "I hope that these moves already under way are not jeopardized b y this action by the Senate. " After the Senate's action, a university spokesman said the Wisconsin administration's stcfnce is to "wail and see" the referendum result s. The spokesman said, "Ex cept for the shock value of words like 'student power,' this isn't as radical as it might sound from the outside. The Senate's action is in line with a lot of things the univer sity has been strivi n g for." There are questions as to the constitutionality of the Student Senate's a c t i o n s which have not yet been re solved. Veteran's Club Meets May 17 In CTR 47 The Veteran's Club will hold its first meeting of Trimester III on next Wednesday, in Ul'liversity Center 47, at 2 p.m. Any veteran with two years or more active duly i n any branch of the armed forces of the United States or its allies is invited to attend. R efreshments w i II be served. \ Come alive! You're in the Pepsi generation! t five on a grueling road trip and their pitchingran out last weekend, as well as on the road trip. COACH HUBERT Wright said "We were pleased with the play of the whole team until the break. With injuries, and with players going home after the break, our pitching corps was depleted." Pitching ace G a ry Trapp was bothered throughout the whole season almost with a sore pitching elbow, and Mike Mackey and John Sakkis weren't available for the last seven games. Marv Sherzer was the only regular Brahman starter over the final games. He started four of the la st seven games played over two weeks. The Brahman defense col lapsed at Tampa committing four errors and allowing !our unearned runs. Tampa got just seven hits. Sherzer went the distance for USF. At St. Petersburg Saturday, the Bra hma ns staged a come bac k in the seventh i nning. Down 6 after three innings, USF tie d the score at 10-10 with a seven-run outburst in the inning . RELIEF PITCHER Tom Cave lai d down a drag bunt single, McGary walked, and Gray singled loading the bases. Norm Ulmer lined a single to left scoring Cave and McGary, and Dana ..SOuth walked loading the bases again . Ca tcher Jesus Garcia walked forcing in the third run of the inning. After a pop o u t, A u g i e Schenzinger Applications Available For Fellowships The C ollege of Education will offer a one and twoyear Graduate Fellowship Program beginning in the 1967-1968 aca demic year. Applicants for the Universi ty's exceptional child pro gram, which has several fel lowships available in the area of potentially handicapped children, must have a B . A . degree . Each fellowship pro vides tuition, a stipend of $2,000 for the academ i c year and $400 per dependent. Applications for the fellow ships offered for the academic years of 1967-1968 and 1968 1969 are available at the Cen ter f or the Study of Exception al Children and Adults, Engi neering Building, s e c o n d floor. For further information see Dr. Marvin Gold, coordinator of Programs for the Potent ial ly Handicapped , Engineering 239 or phone ext. 114. own a motorcycle? motorscooter? We're experts and can cover you immedi ately with Reserve Motorcy cle Liability Insurance. LOW. LOW RATES ... as tow as $30 a year . No red tape ...• fast countrywide cla i m serv ic e. Rev up I Call me now I aslowas$30 CALL STEVE DITTMAN ph. 932-4333 TOWNSEND NORTH TAMPA INSURANCE 12810 Nebraska ,Ave. Tampa, Fla. PH. 932 I chopped a high hopper to sec ond base and the play on Ulmer at the plate was late. Fisherman singled to ce nter scoring Garcia and South. After a hit batsman, Danny Karr relieved started Maury McDonald for Presby terian and persuaded McGary t o pop to first base, and Gray to fly out to right field. USF Tampa 000 000 5 4 221 JOX-7 7 2 Sherzer and Garcia . Payne and Granda . USF 100 101 9 2 Presbyterian 510 103 2Dx12 13 o Kelly , Cave (5), Schenzinger (8), and Garcia. McDona l d, Karr (7), 1nd My ers. Tests Today ' In 4 Sports Pfoficiency tests will be given today and tomorrow in the Ph ysical Education Build ing in swimming, archery, fencing, bowling, basketball , gol, and tennis. When Wray's wife died three years ago he wp.s left with four children. His par ents stepped in to help when he decided in January of 1965 to go back to school. Since then his mother has been feeding, dressing, wash ing, and i roning for his four children ages three through nine. She is the substitute mother of Wray's children. MRS. \VRAY, who was head cashier _at USF when the Uni versity first began, is now a full-time social wor ker. In a!fdition to mothering Wray ' s four children, the so cial work cases she hand le s deal with children placed in foster homes . Wray, who works a 40 to 50-hour week in addition to carrying 18 hours a trimester, has little time for his chil dren. "I take the kid s to school in the morning and to church 011 Sundays, but my Horseback Riding Club To Meet Today In CTR The . student horseback Rid ing Club will meet t oday at 2 p.m. in University Cent er 213, Murphy Osborne, adviser, said. He asked that all mem hers attend. Regis tration for the swim ming proficiency is in the Na tatorium today at 3 p.m. No written test is re_quired, the student must bring his own towel , and ID card must be presented . Students m a y d ress in the Gym locker room I or in their residence halls. Terrace ARCHERY, FENCING, and bowling proficiencies a r e scheduled for tonight at 7 :30 Beauty Salon in Physical Education (PED) 114 with basketball, golf and tennis set for Thursday night at the same time and place. Students must have registered for these spqrts by yeste rd ay. A written will be given, with a motor skill proficiency to follow if the written test is passed. ALL PHASES OF BEAUTY CULTURE 9303 56th St. Temple Terrace Shopping Center PHONE CAMPUS UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS OVERLOOKING USF 1 BEDROOMS Furnished or Unfurn i shed 30 St. (No. of Fowler) 932-6133 • G 5 we have :those • : • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • r • • • • '62 through • 65 Volkswagen Buses and Campers OUR iALUE ROW I OF OVER 60 VWs • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • • • • • A Used Car That Doesn't Look Its Age • • All Models and Pr.ces-Choice of Equipment • • Several with A ir Conditionina • parents do every t hing else," he said. "This leaves me time to do my homework on weekends." Wray said that the 24-hour babysitting service which his parents provide is priceless. "If I could give my mother my whole pay check it would not be enough." " and Ed i nvite you to visit THE INFIRMARY TAVERN Fowlet' Ave. 2 1/5 miles from USF USF Good Sandwiches plus your . favorite "Medicine" + Opeo + SCUBA DIVERS! ENJOY Tlfl: THRILL OF DIVING IN CRYSTAL CLEAR WATER REEFS (JOHN PENNEKAMP PARK] STAY WITH US FOR AS LITTLE AS $17.50 PER WEEK (Special Rates for Parties o f 4 or more) Everything You Need At One Location • DIVING TRIPS I N OUR OWN BC?ATS • BOAT RENTALS e EQUIPMENT e A I R • DIVING INSTRUCTION e GOOD BEDS WRITE OR PHONE FOR DETA IL S KEY LARGO DIVING HEADQUARTERS BOX 190 e KEY LARGO, FLORIDA 33037 PHONE1 (Areo Code 305) 852.3331 (By !he author Round the Flag, Boys!", "Dobie Gillis," elc.) HOW TO GET A'S IN ALL YOUR FINAL EXAMS In today's column, the last of the school year, I don't intend to be funny. ( I have achieved this objective many times throughout the year, but this time it's on purpose. ) The hour is wrong for l evity. Final exams are looming. Have you got a chance? I say yes! I say America did not become the world's foremost producer of stove bolts and cotter pins by running away from a fight! You wiU pass your finals! How? By studying. How? By learning mnemonics. Mnemonics, the science of memory aids, was, as we all know, invented by the great Greek philosopher Mnemon in 526 B.C. (This, incidentally, was only one of the inventions of this fertile Athenian"He also invented the house cat, the opposing thumb, and, most important, the stair case. Before the staircase people were forced willy-nilly to live out their lives on the ground floor, and many grew cross as bears. Especially Demosthenes who was elected Con sul of A t hens six time& but never served because he was unable to get up to the office of the Commissioner of Oaths on the third floor to be sworn in. But after Mnemon's staircase, Demosthenes got to the third floor easy as pie -to Athens' sorrow, as it turned out. Demosthenes , his temper shortened by years of confinement to the ground floor, soon embroUed his countrymen in a series of senseless wars with the Medes, the Persians, and the Los Angeles Rams. This later became kno w n as the Missouri ,...Compromise.) But I digress. We were d-iscussing mnemonics , which are nothing more than aids to memory little jingles to help you remembe r names, dates, and places . For example; Columbus sailed the ocean blue In fourteen hundred ninety two. See how simple? Make up your own jingles. What, for instance, came after Columbus's discovery of America? The Boston Tea Party, of course. Try this: 1 Samuel Adams fiang the tea Into the briny Zuyder Zee. (NOTE: The Zuyder Zee was located in Boston Harbor until1801 when Salmon P. Chase traded it to Holland for Alaska and two line backers. ) But I digress. Let's get back to mnemon i cs. Like this: In nineteen hundred sixty seven Personna Blades make shaving heaven . I mention Personna because the makers of Personna Super Stainless Steel Blades are the sponsors of this column. If I may ge t a little misty (n this, the final column of the schot>l year, may I say it's been a pleasure working for Personna? May I say further that it's been an even greater pleasure working for you, the undergrads of America? Yo u've been a most satisfactory audience, and I'm going to miss you this summer. In fact, I'd ask you all to come visit me except there is n o access to my room. The makers of Personna, after I missed several deadlines, walled me in. I have no doors or windows-only a mail slot . I s l i p the columns out; they slip in Personnas and such fo od as can . go thrpugh a mail slot. (For the past six months I've been living on after dinner mints.) I am only having my little joke. The makers of Personna have not walled me in, for they are good and true and gleaming and constant-as go od and true and gleaming and constan t as the blades they make-and I wish to state publicly that I will always hold them in the highest esteem, no matter how my suit for back wages comes out. And so, to close the y.ear, I give you one last mnemonic: Study hard and pass with honors, And always shave with good Personnors! * * * 1987, Maz Shu1maa Peraonna and Peraonna'• partn(lr in luxury ahaving, Burma-Shave, regular or m enthol, have enjoyed bring• ing you another year of Max'• uncen11ored and uninhib ited column. We thank you fo r aupporting our products; we wi&h you luck in your exam• and in ,all your other enterpri&ea • I /

PAGE 5

Everglades? No, USF It Vol.1 No. 30 UNIVERSITY OF SC?UTH JfLORIDA , TAMPA, MAY 10,1967 FREE HOUR CANCELLED FOR ASSEMBLY. TODAY I lt$J Subscription Ra1e Page 2 Presidents' Council Says Tuition Hike C.ontradictiOn B y STU THAYER Editor The Florida Council of Student Body Presidents.. last Saturday called Gov. Claude Kirk's proposed increase in tuition for state universities a contradiction of the goals of a sta . te suppo r ted educational system and will propose an alternative to the hike to the gov ernor today or Thursday. This could be a photo taken hy the Florida Fowler Avenue. Our photographer found bass At the same time, the Council said it will start a Chamber of (',ommerce for an ad on the Florand bream t-o be plentiful judging from a campaign " to prevent the tuition increase with an as. Ida Everglades but lt 1's really a lake on th e string he saw one fisherman leave with. Photo by Richa r d smoot , sembly of students at the state universities to inform ...:j:.:..:us.:..:t_no.:..:r.:..tJL..::..:..:.o_f -----------------them of the Council's sthnd. Senate Defers Proposed Quarter Exam Changes By JOY BACON Managing Editor A possible change in final exam times was deferred for' further consideration by col lege officials at the meeting 'of the University Senate last week in the Fine Arts Humanities Building. The University Senate rec ommends academic policy to Pres. John S. Allen and con sists of faculty members , stu dents , administrators and other representatives . It has 53 members. Harris W. pean, dean of ac ademic affairs, said there were considerable problems last trimester with professors who held exams not during the regular exm lime, but ei ther earlier than scheduled or the last day of classes. DEAN SAID that the sched uling committee would not be able to schedule exams during Quarters Two and Three under the existing exam method. Exams can be sched uled Quarter One because it has a five day exam schedule. MRS. LILLIAN D. YORKS, secretary of the schedules and space office, said that a four-day exam schedule would not give sufficient time or space following the regular exam schedule. The schedule committee had made two recommenda tions fm charlging the exam schedule. One was to have only final examinations in the basic studies courses sched uled during the final exam pe riod. All other finals would be given during the class meet ing time of the tenth week. Tt.e> altPrnate recommenda lion was that CB finals be given at night , and the quar ter should last for essentially 11 weeks with finals given during the last class sessions. DR. JESSE S. BINFORD, associate professor of chemis5,091 Summer Students Register For Classes Some 5,091 students have enrolled for the summer tri mester according to the latest fi-gures released by the regis trar's otfice last Monday, and James E. Lucas, assistant registrar, said he was happy with the improvement in the registration machinery. Registration was moved lfom the University Center Ballroom to the larger Gym nasium this trimester. "THE REGISTRATION ment time became very im portant." THE NEW four-digit course number used to irrdicate closed sections was effective Lucas said because "the stu dent has immediate knowl edge of closed sections by re ferring to the overhead prcr jector screen." He also said that "advising in the Physical Education Classroom Building was well received." The registrar is contemplat ing further for the fall registration according to Lucas which would allow "faster payment of fees " and "different area for advisors . " try, said that some professors feel that finals should last longer than the one hour class periods, therefore an exam period would be needed . Dr. T. W . Graham Solo mons, associate professor of chemistry, suggested elimi nating exams in upper level courses, under the quarter system. He said that many students who have tw o or three exams in one day or four exams in two days do not get the benefit of an overall review of the course which exam study provides because of their crammed exam schedules. At the end of the discussion Pres. Allen referred the ques tion ba-::k to the college ccun cils for further discussion. Registration Days Changed On CTR List, Registration days for Tri mester IllB have b e e n changed from June 19 to 22, to June 19 and 20. The change is for the University Center cal endar which "had dates incor rect. Times and place will re main the same, noon IAJ 3 p.m. June 20 for regular IIIB stu dents , 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. for continuing and former stu dents returning Evening registration is 6 IAJ 7:45 p.m., and regular Tri mester m students may add courses from 9 a.m. to noon June 20. No registration \\!ill take place June 19 and classes for mB are scheduled to begin June 22. THE ASSEMBLY at USF ---------will be held today a t 2 p.m. on the north side of the'U ni v ersi ty Center. All free hour a c tivi ties have been cancelled, John Hogue, USF student president said. The Council me t in Univer sity Center 158 in a day-long session. It consists of t he stu dent presidents of the five state universities: USF, FSU, Florida, Florida Atlantic, and Florida A&M. The FSU presi dent Gene Stearns works for t he Florida Leg isl ature and could not attend. T h e studen t government at Florida A&M is not functioning and a scntative was not present. Charles Shepherd, president at Florida , spoke for 1he Council in expressing its dis may o f the proposed hike and at the same time supported the Board of Regen ts' stand on the issue. The Boatd re fused to recommend a $50 in crease last March. SHEPHERD S A I D he, USF's John Hogue, and l''l6rl da Atlantic 's Hank Petrillo would call a general assembl y of students at their universi ties to inform them of the Counc 1l's stand. USF's assem bly will be t he first, with Flor ida State's sometime today, Florida's tonight, and Florida Atlantic's set for Thursday. Hogue said "To many of us, the level of tuition can mean the difference between getting a college education or not get ting a college edqcation. For that reason, an d because South Florida's General A s sembly will be the first su ch . meeting held in the state, I urge all students to attend. " The Coun cil said the inten tion of a state-supported edu cational system is to provide h igher educa tio n for state residents without regard to their financial status. "A further increase," it said, "w ould den y the intention of the state sys tem. "THE UNIVERSITY stu !lent al ready faces nsmg 1 costs for housing, food, books, and infirmary expenses. A tuition hike, on top of these al ready e n a c t e d increases, would place undue hardship on our student popttlation." Shepherd said he would presen t the Council ' s alterna tive to the proposed increase to Gov. Kirk today or Thurs, day, and may release the plan to th e public Saturday when the Council meets in Tallahassee. The Council said a boost in tui tion would also adversely affect the already ' strained loan and scholarship pro grams and would inhibit jun ior college enro llment thereby reducing the quality of educaPhoto by R i chard Smoot Student Presidents' Council tion bot h at the junior college Three of the five members of Ute Florida GOP administration. From left are Bank Peand senior college level. Council of Student Body Presidents met at triUo of Florida Atlantic Uni\'ersity, IJSF's "A TUITION hike would not USF last Saturday in CTR 158 to plan their John Hogue, and Charles Shepherd of the alleviate the causes of our ' tuition increase repeal campaign against the University of Florida. budgetary limitation, " the _______ .:_ __ _:__::._.::.._ _______ ....::, ____________ _ Council said. "The fault lies in the failure of our state to realize its position and obliga tion. Sin ce we are the ones di rectly involved in higher edu cation in Florida, we feel that it is necessary that we work w1th Gov. Kirk to achieve mu tual goals." Shepherd cited Kirk's cam paign statement that he want ed Florida "first in educa tion," and said Florida was th e wealthiest state in th e South but was spending the least on education. The student legisla t ure at Florida Atlantic, located . in B oca Rat on near F t. Lauder dale, passed a resolution May 3 asking Kirk "to reconside r his pbsition pertaining to a change in the proposed tuition fees under th e quarter system in the state university systern." PART OF the campaign to prevent a tuition increase, the Council said, would be student assemblies, and media ap pearances , incl uding televi sion and newspaper endorse ments. Hogue was trying to get time on Tampa TV sta tions to explain the Council's posit ion yesterday. Don Gifford, USF studen t vice president , and Dave Searles, secretary of finance , sat in on the Council discus sion as did presidential a i des o f Shepherd and Petrillo . Voting Date Is Friday For Vacant SA . Seats Ele ctions for the Student Association legislature al"e set for Friday at five places on campus. Some 22 seats are These will be the voting places by colleges: '-' Basic Studies: University Center Lobb,X', 10 a .m. to 4 p.m. '-' L ib eral Arts: Fine ArtsHm;nanities 101 from 2 to , 3 p.m. v Business Administration: auditorium from 2 to 3 p .m. v Education: U nivers ity Center 226 from 2 to 3 p.m. THE BREAKDOWN on the available seats is 10 in Basic S t udies , three in L ibera( Arts , five in Education, and two each iJT" Busi ness Administra tion and Engineering. parking situation. THE LIST of the candidates are: BASIC STUDIES: Robin Altman, John B oyle, Lee Cas tleton, Jim Cooner, Joan Gross, Johii Dugger, James Miller, Robert Musselwhite, Susan Orth, Arthur Roberts, John Rodgers, James Sulli van, and Bill Winstead. QUESTION: What is the purpose behind the division s t amp on the Liberal-Arts ma jors regi&tra tion worksheet? LIBERAL ARTS: Marie Hintz, and David Tucker. EDUCATION: B e t t y Ann Root, Bonnie Westbrook . BUSINESS ADMINISTRA TION: William Keegan Jr. , Robert Swigert , and Sandra Usherson . ENGINEER . ING: Ronald James Corces, Timothy Da vids, and Frank Skillen. Dial rna, the signatures are of Dea n Dean and President Allen. They are separate sig natures . QUESTION: Why was the name changed from 'i.e.' to South Florida Review, who changed it and how was the new name chosen? aera was never loaded" ac cording to J. E. Lucas, assis tant registrar, when USF ' s "field-house regish•ation1 ' was moved to )he new gymnasium for students enrolling for Tri mester III and IliA. Lucas said a " different method for pulling course cards" may be used gaining ' ; better controls at the en trance to the registration area," and adopting a "differ ent procedure for replacing lost appointments." C:TR Sponsors 'Sound Storm' The people elec ted a t this time will hold off ice through the next president ial elec tion and until December. Under the new constitution the rep resentatives elected i n Sep tember to the legislature will hold office for one calendar year. The first le gislature meet ing will be Thursday, May 18 in CTR 252 a t 7 p.m. when the new legislators will be sworn in. SA Vice presiden t Don Gif/ ford said there may be a d is ANSWER: Division stamps identify various majors for advisors and' keep s tudents and division heads alert and up to date on departmen t changes. It provides an easy check to see if the student is meeting his division requ ire ments for graduation. This does not limit the ' student to taking only courses in_ this particular d ivision. ANSWER: The name was changed by the s tu dent edito rial board with the approval of the Student Affairs Office of Publications to reflect a broader scope of interest, to be more closely identi f ied with USF, and also to provide a name that would be more easily remembered. Lucas said the anticipilted enrollment for Trimester IIIB is l,QOO to 1,200. Friday .. and Saturday the University Center is spon soring a . Summer Sound Storm. It Will be a. of free entertainment . including a jazz concert , big name enter tainment, and a "Sqund Machine." • The Mk III Trio will kick-off The Summer . Sound Storm with a jazz concert on Friday at 8 p.m. in tl}e University Center ballroom. They are booked to open a new night club in Las Vegas this summer and have sched uled tours in the midwest. They have made two record ings and plan to do an album soon .• The Mk III features Mark Morris on drums, Ron Resler on bass and Phil Rugh on piano . In an evening you can see the trio play a combina tion of eight or more instru ments. IT IS HOSTED by the CTR Committee. Free tick are available at the CTR desk . The Virginians will perform as the second entertainment At Dance Saturday in the summer sound storm , Saturday night at 8 p.m. on The Virginians, shown above, will be one of the two enter-the north side of the CTR. tainment groups that will be performing at the University They are coming from a Bob (;enter's free "Summer Sound StoSffi" Saturday The Hope Show in Montgomery, Mark m Trio will be the other grouit. J I Alabama. Their first na tiona! record ing for Epic Re co rds. "It's A Long Walk Bac k to Para dise," gained them national recognition. THE have written some of their own ma terial and can p lay several in struments. All students are in vited. After the Virginians on Saturday nigh t the Dance Committee will hold a "Sound Machine Dance" in t he CTR Ballroom at 9:30p.m. The Sound Machine will p r ovide tl,)e music. The dres s is campus wear (no shorts) and it is also free. This Friday and Saturday nights the Movie Committee will presen t "Hell is for Heroes" at 7:30 p.m. in Fine Arts-Humanities 101. It stars Steve McQueen, Bobby Darin, Fess Parker, Nick Adams, and Bob Newhart. FOR 48 hours during World War II six GI's are left to hold an area until reinforce ments come. In the course o f their effort each man's char acter emerges from the se riou s, brooding ex-sergean t played ily McQueen to the naive Polish refugee played by Nick Adams. Vance Packard, social critic and of many best sellers, will be featured on the Meet the Author Series next Wednesday in the Teaching Auditorium-Theatre at 8 p.m. Books Packard has written that have reached the best seller lists are "The Hidden Persuader," "The Waste Makers," "The Status Seekers," and "The Pyramid Climbers." He has also con tributed-to many major Ameri can periodicals. IN HIS books he is ab l e to pinpoint an aspect of modern life that many recognize, tu rni ng his titles into house hold words. Packard will talk on the changing American morality in an area of upheaval, the invasion of our privacy, what the waste makers are doing to us,\ the exploding technology and other topics. Packard terms today's hap penings as "the most violent revolution in the American way of life in their nation ' s history." Students . staff and faculty will be admitted free but a ticket is required. A limited number of tickets are avail able to the public for $1 per person. Tickets are available now at the CTR desk. ''Meet the Author" is sponsored by the Uni versity Special Events Commitee. cussion of the new constitu tion scheduled for implemen tation in September and the QUESTION: Why do the signatures on the graduation d ip lomas of President Allen and Dean Dennard look alike? ANSWER: Dean Dennard's signature is not on the diploThe student editorial board selected the new name from a list of sugges tions. F'hot o by Ric h ard Smoot Faster Than Speeding Bullet Aikido master K. Tohei, right, throws his "adversa.J " in a lightning in CTR 47 last Friday. Aikido is related to the art of Tai Chi Chuan as judo is related to karate. The USF Tai Chi Cltuan organization sponsored the event. ' •

PAGE 6

Edit o rials And Commentary 2 -May 10, 1967, U . of South Flo rida, Tamper An Improv e d Registration What a relief. If you were like us, registration was almost enjoya ble with facilities in the Gym in stead of the University Center Ball room. We even pad piped-in music (or piped out depending on where you heard it) to try and soothe away our haggar d feet and eyes after trudging acr oss the arid ex panse of the Business Administra ton Building sands. Yet, we can still envision the sa111e long lines, same tired feet, and same fatigue when registra tion returns to its "normal load" in the fall. We're supposed to have 10,500 students here in September and the only thing the Gym has is the lack of space. Nothing viill ever change the long lines, frus tration over closed courses, and the f illing out of all those computer cards . IF, HOWEVER, USF ' were to install a completely computerized reg istration system similar to the ones at the nation's largest unive r sities, it could be greatly speeded up , the staff could be reduced , and money could be savedin the long run despite the high initial cost. You say you don ' t want to be just another computer number? We done't either. But the point is that we are already a number, and a computerized registration syp tem will be invaluable, and proba bly indispensible in the not to-distant-future . And beipg reduced to a number by the computer is not even an issue any more. It will be the super-class, the class with 35, 40, and even 50 students in it, and we don't mean lecture sessions. It will be the large classes that will alien ate the students, not the computer. IT WAS AN improvement over the Ballroom. Should the universi ty system ever get an adequate share of the state's treasury con tents, we hope that somewhere in those vaults will be enough money to speed up registration in order to reduce personnel costs and ener gies, with the use of computers. . No New No new taxes. But in c reased ex penses. That appears to be the for mula for Gov. K irk's education policy, and i f you d on't believe it, you will pa y ing $50 more for four weeks of education a t the Uni versi t y if Kirk's proposals in the field be come law. We paid $ 1 3 0 per trimester under that system for 15 weeks of instruction. Kirk would have us pay $150 for 11 weeks o f instruction under th e quarter sys tem. We're against it, and so is the Board of Regents. They refused to recommend a $50 increase last trimester. A $90 increase i n housing fees and a $105 ind'ease in food expens es is a lread y set for the fall, all for no increase in " real" goods . The sch edule d expenses for four year s a t USF will inc r ease from about $6,700 to well over $7,000. ln effect, the $50 increase would c he a t the "stra i ght through" stu dent out of one quarter of instruc tion . He will be paying for three quarters of instruction what he would h ave former l y paid for four, plus $50. WITH THESE KINDS of r i sing expenses, who needs new taxes for OUR READERS WRITE more r evenue? With expenses ris ing such as they are, it may mean an increase in Federal money flowing into the state which we as sume the governor would not like if his campaign spee c hes about "big government in Washington" are taken seriously. Representatives Cramer and Gibbons, seeing the financial straits many of us will be put in, will seek to aid their constituents by see king more Washingtop dol lars for Florida. And we'll need them. But, we guess that higher edu ucation is not important to him, nor is it important to the "rank and file" Floridian with whom some newspapers say he is so popular. We never thou ght of ourselvfs as not being rank-and-file Floridi a ns . But, history has shown that th e major ity of a nation's people are not college graduates, and they are the rankand file , not us. Now that we know we are " visitors" to this state, perhaps we can adjust to the c ustom s of this strang e land . One t hin g w e h ave f o und out is that no new taxes will mean increased expenses. But wha t i s the differen ce? ClUtter Aids Scholar In Blissful Disarray EDITOR: It is delicious l y shocking to step into a roam where tidiness is a sin . B ut t here are people who march about with their .backs rigid as though strapped wit h an iron rod and profess things lik e "cleanli ness is next to godliness" or "every thing has its proper place," never realiz ing how anti theti c this is t o the deve l o p ment of individuality. There must be that of carel ess aban don about something before it can in spire the growth of intell ect. How is anycne to write an ode or s onnet in an atmo s phere of starched purity? The only way cr person's self can be expressed i s to allow it to come out and fall how and where it may. If this expression takes tha form of clothes o n the closet floor, wbat of it? -For instance, my room is an ideal example of discordant harmony. No where on campus is there a more loyal adherent to t he law s of cluttering . I work with conscientio u s fortitude to create a perfe c t e nv iro nment for my int e ll ectual purs u its. Books, lik e s nakes writhe over th e desk tops, and paper lik e water spills between the leaves with some escaping to the floor to make puddle s, carved symmetrically. The bed, with sheets dithyrambic, continuo u s ly waiting to be preened and n eatly s haped, stand s with :May 10, 1967 Vol. 1 No. 30 Published every Wedn esday In lht school yea r by the U ni • ot South F lorida F owler Ave . , Tampa, 33620. second ctan postage paid at Tampa, F la . , 33601, under Act of Mar. 3, Un. Prinltd by Tht Times Publishing Company, St. Petersburg. Circulation Rates Si n g le copy (non s tud en ts) _____ 1 OC Mail subscriptions _ ___ . . Sc hool yr. Tht Oracl e Is written t n d tdlted by students at the Unlvtnity of South F lor i da . Editoritl views he r ein are not necenarily !host of tht USF admln lstratlon. Offices: U niversity Center 222, phOn. fll-4131 ; P'Ubllsher a nd Genera l M;anager, ext . 618; News, e x t. '''; Advertising, e x t. 620. De adline s : genertl n e ws and a ds, W ednes diy for following Wedne sday 1 tell ers t o edi t or, 4 p.m .. Friday; c tas s ifieds , ' t . m . Monday . ACP ALL AMERICAN 1967 Editor Menaglng Editor Advertising Manager P ubli sher General Manager Stuart Thayer JoY B;acon ltoger Benton ' back pressi ng th e wall. It is inconceiva ble that there cou ld be more consu m mate s urrounding s in which to work. However, at regular intervals, just whe n my grades are beginning to climb and my spirit s to s oar, certain11nmen tion. ab l e perso n s d ecide it is time for a room chec k. This consists of t heir go in g from place to place makin g marks in a note book a nd, if everyt hing is not what they co ncei ve as th e idea l , th ey see that it is made so with proper haste. All noteb o oks creep into their drawers, book s line the she lves' with disgu sti n g rigidity , clothes cling to h a n gers so their bones s how, the f l oor lies s tark withou t . an oaSis i n its s terile l e n gth. Cas t in t hi s clinical waste land a nd Spartan severity, who co ul d co ncentra te? Always there would be the fear of dirtying. College is an in sti tu te of higher learn i ng; ye t how is anyone to acquir e knowledge when he constantly fears pun i s hm ent for littering? I s there no place that will, instead of squ e l ch in g the com pulsion to release the creative tendency, allow an effusion of th e real self? In no apartment or motel d oes the l a ndlord creep into t h e room to see that the s helves are dusted. Only if sounds of. furnitur e being piled into the center of the room for a bonfire permeates hl s con-, scie nce would he invade another's sanctum . Why s h o uld college s tudent s on campus receive treatment other than this? By the time th ey achieve co llege level it is ridicu l o u s to s ub j ugate them to this childish prying. Abolish r oom i n spec tion in dorms! JOSEPH NUNES Stud y Fir s t EDITOR: Just a shor t memo to Mr . Bob Brown . It you could read a nd know anyth in g of the Englis h language; maybe you might remember that not once in my Jetter d i d I mention your name or make any in ference whatsoever to you or your CO signers. Mor e specifica ll y, I was adress ing it t o most o f tbe stu dents. B u t t h ank you, anyway, that's twice yo u've put your foot in your mouth m aybe you sho ul d, sha ll we iflY, study th e facts first? 'f RICK CATLIN STUDENT GROUPS DISSOLVED . Detention Of sy Coup Causing U.S. A cad _ mic ympathy WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS)-There cent military take-over in Gree c e has caused widespread repercussions in the American academic community because of the detention of Andreas Papandreou , son of the former Greek prime minister George Papandreou. Papandreau had been cha.i.rman to t he economics departrqent at the Uruversi ty of Califprnia at Berkeley and an eco nomics instructor at the University of Minnesota. He was the leader of the of the Cente r Union party, which from power in June of 1965 as a result of pressure from the Greek mon archy . The Greek Embassy and the U.S. S tate Departm ent report that Papan dreou is being well-treated during his de tention. A Greek Embassy spokesman said there were rumors Papandreou would be sent out of the country. BOTH THE GREEK Embassy and the State Department said it was also possible that Papandreou w oul d be re subpoenaed to test i fy at the Aspida trial, at w hich it was charged that he w the leading forae behind left-w ing secret SO c1eties within the Greek Arm y . He had been summoned to t es ti fy at the trial before the coup took place. A stat e Departmen t spokesman said Amer ican representatives in Greece hall l'tl ceived assurances from the new govern ment that Papandreou would not b!! harmed. The Ameri c an Embassy has been In contact with American wife, and she is reported well. Papan dreou came to the United S ta tes in 1940 and became a. naturalized citizen . He re. turned to Gree c e in 1961 to bec om e the director general of t h e Athen s Center for Economic Studies. Since Papandreou is no longer American citizen, the American govern ment has li ttle power over any action that might be taken as a result of the Aspida trial. , AT THE UNIVERSITY of Color ado, a letter to President Johnson urging the President "to use all the prestige and p ower of your office to preven t the possi bil ity of harm" to Pa:pandreou has been circulated by the e conomics department. S tates t he Colorado letter , 41We have followed the Rcholarly of Mr. An dreas Papandreou with admiration and we cons ider him an asset to Greece; he must be prote cted it a non-Communist progressive movement is to develop in . Greece." The Colorado professors commented that i t was unthin)(able that '' a European country and membe r state of NATO shou ld be all owed to fall under an op pressive military dictators hip that has already abolishe d the very freedoms for which the Western w o rld stands," A PETI'l'ION WHICH the U.S. aovernment to "exercis e its Influen c e immediately in orde r to prevent the exe cution of political leaders" has ' been cir culated at the University of Minnesota. Minnesota economics professor Leon id Hurzwicz said that membez:s o f his de partment have made 1heir "concern known repea tedly and forc efully to peo ple in Washingt on. Our actions are strict ly humanitarian and non-political. We d o not defend or oppose his political views. Our only purpose is to safeguard hi s life . " An American-C anad ian University Committee for Andreas Papandreo u was formed at New York Univeristy (NYU) to urge the American government to offer Papandreou sanc tu ary in the Unit ed States . NYU literature profess o r R obert Cle ments, the committee's co-chairman, said that teaching positions f9r Papan dreou have been offered at Brandeis and several other American universities. PAPANDREOU received his masters and Ph.D . from Harvard, and Clements said that "since Papandreou left Har vard to volun teer for combat service with the U.S. Navy during World War II, it is natural that our country should we i come him back." In B oston, 170 students and professors from. Harvard, Massachusetts Ins titute ' of Technology, Boston University, and Northeastern University picke te d the Greek Consulate pro testi ng the coup. Also present were members of Bos ton's Greek-American community. Faculty members from four Chicago area universities announced the forma tion of a committee for the restoratio n of constitutional democracy in Greece. Represente<\ were the Univ ersity ot Chi the University of Illinois Itt Chlc&JO Circle, R oosevelt Univ ersit y and North western University. Similar groups were reported being formed i n other parts of the country. 'l'HE MAJOR STUDENT groups In Greece have been di ssol ved I>Y new military regime, and it is believed that many student leaders are i mpriaoned. A Qreek Embassy spokesman said he had no knowledge of the atat u s of studen t movement leacter:; , sin c e lists of those detained are not available. Tile EEFE, the National Union of Greek S t ude nts, had been extremely a c tiv e in street clemonstrations the Center Union party Ill Papandreo u and his son. EEFE was c ont r olled by students rep resenting the left-w ing of Center Union, favoring Andreas over his more moder ate father . Andreas, a form e r economics professor at two A merica n universiti es , had successfully organized a 'strong grass-roots movement of s upport, built upon his expe r ience as an organizer in the S tevenson campaign of 1952. Some have called him th e first "20th century Kennedy-style politician" in Greek political history. THE CENTER UNION leader s within EEFE are r epor t ed oppo sed to U. S . foreign policy and involvement in Greece, but they are non-Communist. EEFE ad1 vocates " democratization and reform i n education." F in anced partly by contribution s from the Center Union party, the group has an international policy of non-alignment which leads it to retain members hip in b oth the Communist-dominated Interna tlonal Unio n of S tudents (IU S) and the Western-influenced International Studen t C onference (ISC). EEFE is the only national student union exi sting in GFeece, and a ll uni ver s iti es and technical schools are formally members . Before the coup, its leaders expressed the belief that the principal threat to Greek democracy came from the monarchy and the Army's right-wing f o rces. Last fall, EEFE leaders were acquit ted of charge s of disturbing the peace" stemming from an unauthor ized street demonstration held the previous spring. Some observers saw the trial as an at tempt by the government to discredit the EEFE. '' ... .• _,. . . 'Conlrontation Politics' Obsolete,l By CLARK KERR Professor of Economics U. of Ca lifornia, Berkele y SAN JUAN, P u erto R ic o (CPS) The st uden t political movement of the..--1960's is, in the totality of its means and ends, unique in American history. No single element of its approac h is entirely new but the combination of t hese eleseries of acts and events, with a certain 2. The universi ty as a base for power. style to t hem and moving in the same The campus is the chosen focal point for general direction. activity . It is the place to arouse int erTHERE ARE TWO elements inter est, recru it members raise money, orgatwined in this new political activism. The nize action, and from which to launch atfirst is composed of the issue-by iss ue tacks on choservtargets. protes t ors; the second adherents. to one 3. D istas t e [or the "establishment." or another of the organized g roups on There is a l most total rejection of the or the Left. It i s the first element which is ganizations that administer the status unique and has set the decade of the quo. The status quo is viewed as domi ments is new . T o speak of a "move 1960's aside as different from the past. nated by t he ."militaryindustrial co m ment " at all is to overstate the situation, The e lemen ts of confrontation politics plex." The university is seen as a handfor the .very n ature of the activity makes which have attracted my attention as maiden to this complex, doing research . it dispersed and diverse . There are b ei n g of particular importance are for it and training its servants . Much of c h a n g in g localities of action, vehicles for the se: the intelle ctual establishment is viewed expression, tactics to pursue; and no d e1. A conc e rn for pow er: There is an as bought and paid for. velope d ideology. It is a movement that obsession with power . The refrain again (. Ori entation to specific issues: Ide. can be see n and has bee n see n by many and agai n is the acquisition of power. It ology is suspect. Also, given the variety people in many different ways. see.ms to be assumed that, with power , of IX'ints of view among participants, it "Confr ont atio n politics" i s the esevil can be eradicated; tha t, w it hout it, would be completely divisive. There is sence of the new student movement nothing can be done. n o w no more chewing on the beard o f confrontation with the power s tructure "Student power" can bring pressur e Karl M arx, alth o ugh there is a certai n on main street, or the campus, or in on a university certainly, on a society blindness toward the l eftwing authori Washington. Thi s is the particular form possibly. It requ ires no rel i ance on a retartanis.m o f Cuba and China , even that politi ca l action has taken. C ivil lu c t ant fac ul ty, a qu iescent labor movetho u gh authority in ot he r a nd less 'har sh Rights tactics are t h e great s olirc e of in ment, a non-existent peasant class. It forms is violentl y opposed. If there could spirati on . The tacti c is to pick an issue also requires no fixed ideology . Ideolo -be s a id to be any i nherent central ideo lo-and confront the power stru ct ure w ith it gies divide as well as unite . They d ivided gy, it would be syndicalism with its em , as dramatically as possib l e. There are a students in the 1930's. phasis on means. And syndicalism was .,.,.,..,.,...,...,....,.,,.._ 3 never much of a n ideology. EDIT()R: Your May 3 editorial on the SA l eg i s lature covered quite a bit of ground. As a member of the Legis latu re last tt'i mester and a candidate for re-e l ecti on , I was g l ad to see that you have main tained your inter es t in the effe c tiveness o f the Frankly, w e ne ed a little prod din g once in a while . However, there were several glaring errors in the editorial w h ich I think n eed to be pointed out, as well as some infor mation abo ut the new constit uti o n I wo uld like to pas s on to yo u . LEGISLATIVE VACANCIES: C on trary to your lead paragraph, NONE of t he seats up for e l ec tion this trimester are open beca u se of graduation or sum mer j ob s. T h e seats are open be cause t he term of office for a legis l ator is ' two t rimesters. That 1 means that half of the seats are open EVERY trimester , not just in the summer. This is a dmittedly a bad system and we are going to c han ge it in the new constitution probably to somet hin g a l ong the lines yo u suggested . There are some vacancies caused by grad u ation
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1 t t l i n c l I . . , n . s !r . e . e CLASSIFIED THE ORACLEMay 10,1967, U. of South Florida, Tampa -l 1. AUTOMOTIVE FOR SALE : 1963 Impala 377; 300 h.p.; 2 door hardtop. Good condition . P hone 988. WEDNESDAY MAY 10, 1967 140 In USF, Cooperative S. FOR RENT _., Responsible person to rent small house on river-quiet. $80. Util ities paid -12 min . to USF , 935. Official Notices 7 . HELP WANTED Graduates or older adu lt students-part NP;TATORIUM Is ope n for recreational time educallonal counselors needed _ swommlng from noon to 2 p.m. Monday guarantted $500 per lf).w k. period. Call through Fridays. Women wear balh 932 or Write carmen R. Bronson, lng caps. Outdoor swlmmong pool hours .:. , Exam, Monday, from 8 a.m., CTR Tuesday from 8 a.m .• 248, 251. Campus Date Book ,.;1 Education In 12 Stales And D. 3333 w. Columbus Dr .. Tampa, 3 3 603 are 2 lo 6 p.m. Mondays through Satur 19. RIDES days. ASOLO THEATRE ' A chartered bus trip t o the Aso l o Theatre, Sarasota, will be sponsored by The UC Talent Committee on Saturday, Mav 2b. Thirty-..ight persons must be signed up by todaY to mal<>e the As USF opened the summet trimester 140 students went out on cooperative edu cation assignments with 60 employers in 12-states and the District of Columbia. Some 126 students, who had been on cooperative ednc'ltiDn assign ments during Trimester II re turned to the campus for full DRIVING TO NEW JERSEY AEGEAN DISTRIBUTION for those who trip possible. Price o f SOO each inc l udes June 15 or 16. Want 1 or 2 drlvor have re!lerved copies, will be In CTR 223 round-trip bus ride and first-floor IHl companions to share driving and aperfrom 8 a.m. to 5 p .m. weekdays . Call tickets t o Jhe matinee performance of 1t1no expenses. Vehicle is Volkswag ext. 618 (Office of Campus Publications! Carol Gol donl ' s "The Fan." The bus will en Microbus (slow speed-). 2'1> to 3 day for Information concerning the yearbook. leave the Canter at 1 p.m. for the 2:30 tri p . Coli Stevenson, American Idea, returning to the campus by E;x:': :7 5:2:. 6:30p.m. Tickets may be available at the REGISTRATION now being accepted for the 1967-68 school year, St. Francis Parish School pre-school through 5th Grade SLIGH & NEBRASKA AVE. Phone 238-1098 The Rev. J. R. Griffith RECTOR AND BEAT THE PARKING PROBLEM LOW COST PRICES START Center desk today. Faculty, staff, stu-dents and the public are }nvited. TODAY READER'S THEATRE Coffee House, 2 p.m., CTR 252. FRIDAY ELECTIONS: Student Association CB election, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., CTR south lobby. Collegoe of Education elections, 2 p.m. CTR 226; College of liberal Arts e lections, 2 p.m. FAH 101; College of Business elections, 2 p . m. BSA. MOVIE: "Hell I s for Heroes.'' 7:30 p.m .. FAH 101. c\r' MK Ill TRIO in Concert, I p.m., R SATURDAY MOVIE: " Hell Is for Heroes.'' 7:30 p.m., FAH 101. STEREO DANCE : 9 p .m., CTR 248. MONDAY PANHELLENIC : 2 p.m., CTR 216. IFC RUSH MEETING: 7 p.m., CTR 205. Concerts, Lectures, Exhibitions CIVIL WAR ROUNDTABLE: 8 p.m. today, CTR 226. time study. I With a number of students already placed for the fall term, the University now has approxiomately 275 students pa!'tl.::ipi:tiiug in its coopera tive education p r o gram: whereby students blend theo ry with practice in their areas of professional interest. The 140 now on assignment represent four of the Universi ty's colleges as follows: College of Education, 9 ; College of Business Administration, 22; College of Liberal Arts, 54; and College of Engineer-ing, 55. I Transportation $2390 LUNCHEON: North Hillsborough County Rotary Club, noon Friday, CTR 252. CONFERENCE: SFEA Leadership Con ference, 10 a.m. Saturday, CTR 200. WORKSHOP : Migrant Education Region al Workshop; registration 8:30 a.m. Mon day, Center second floor l obb y ; meetings from 9 a.m. in the Center; luncheon , noon, CTR 167. SHORT COURSE: Swimming Pool shor t course, Tuesday, from 8 CTR 252. The employers joining with the University in the program and the students assigned in clude: See Bill Munsey He is your fellow student at U.S.F. HONDA OF TAMPA EXHIBITION: African Tribal Art, from the collection of Jay Lefl, through today, Libr•ry Gallery. EXHIBITION: Rauschenberg: Infe rno, through May 19, Teaching Gallery. EXHIBITION: USF Senior Honors Show , through May 25, Theatre Gallery. , EXHIBITION: New acquisitions by Ml chael Ponce de Leon, Romas Viesulas, Alton Box Board Co ., Jacksonville William Cowdrey, mechanical engineer ing. Babcock & Wilcox , St. Petersburg John McKey , civil engi neeri n g . Boei ng Co., Cape Kennedy -Peter Clark, Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, St. Petersburg Beach Robe r t Ernest, zoologY. Ph. 258-5811 Victor Vasarelly, through June 30, Li brary Gallery. EXHIBITION : "Corbusler: UnI t e.'' through June 30, Teaching Gallery. CONCERT: Baroque music, Thursday, _j I May 18, 8:30p.m. FAH 101. 2301 S. MacDill Chrysler Corp., New Orleans, La . Byron Alaxander, physics ; S. Daniel . Bobczynskl, physi cs. Continental Baking Co.. Tampa -Jeffrey Bardin , management . \ David T.-.ylor Model Basin, Washing ton , D.C. -Janet Paul. math. us t WELCOME PLAY: Experimental Theatre: "Under t.' • Milk Wood, " by Dylan Thomas, June 1 , • L___ 2, and 3 at 8 :30p.m., Theatre. (Reserved _ v . _ seat tickets, admission charged. l FOILER BACK FACULTY RECITAL : Martha Reari ck , flautist, 8:30 p.m .. June 1, FAH 101. Department of Defense , Washington, D . C . Dav i d Caslriccne, geology; Paulette Damm, math; Norman Fergu son, math; R ichard Schwartz, math. c x "' 0 0 E 0 ,a m l BUY & SELL YOUR TEXTBOOKS UNIVERSITY EXCHANGE BOOKSTORE; INC. Jk>Sti 10024 30th St. (We5t of Buuh Gardens) PHONE 932-7715 Come In And Get Your FREE Discount Card. WE ALWAYS BUY USED BOOKS AT l\opal l\estaurant MON. • FRI 12:00 • 2:00 THE LUNCHEON BUFFET s1.50 ALL YOU CAN EAT your choice of -3 Meats -3 Vegetohles 3 Desse rts NORTHEAST FOWLER & 30th St. CONCERT : University-Community SYm phony, 8:30 p.m., June 7, Theatre. CRe served seats required, no admissi on charged.) Placement Services Listed b e low are the dates, names, open ings, major field required, of all organi zations which have schedu l ed on c ampus Interviewing dates in Trimester Ill. Check withPlacement Services, ADM 2 8 0 jext. 612) for additional Jistlngs and l nfor malion and to s c hedule •n appointment to Interview. E . I. duPont de Nemours & Co., Flor Summer Grads Need To File Degre _ e Form Students who plan to graduMONDAY , MAylu ate at the end of Trimester IBM : (Openings) Data proc. mkt, office prod. mkl; data procl engr; bus adm; . IliA, must complete an Applifield) engineering, math, scien ces, cation for form no T U ESDAY, MAY 16 later than 5 p m . Monday in Florida Power Corp: various areas In en . glneering; engineering, EE. ME, CE. order to be considered for Radio Corporation of America: EDT Dlvl graduation sion : Electric data processi ng ; back ground for electric data processing. con-Students who plan to gradutlnental Bak ing Co.: Training program . for plant mgrs, sales and mgmt fields; ate at the end of Tnmester m-gmt, or any field In III, must complete an Appli w EDNESDAY, MAY 11 cation for Degree form no Burroughs Corp: Sales rep; DP-J h 5 M acct-machlne systems sales; bu s admater t an p.m. ay 2 9 In mkt; adm 1 18 vr acctg). order to be considered for First Federal Savings & Loan Assn . of graduation. St. bus adm. ------------,---,--J . C. Penney Co.: Mgmt trainees; bus adm, lib arts. MONDAY , MAY ll Aetna Life & Casu a lty : Field rep. bond rep, cl 8 lm rep, untferwriter, eng ineer ; all fields. Florida State Dept . of Welfort: Check with Placement. TUESDAY , MAY, 23 Montgomery Ward & CcS.: Controller, merchandising ; b us llb 3rts. Will in.terview juniors and seniors for summer work. General Electric co.: physics, engineering . WEDN ESDAY, MAY 2 4 Tr1Ve1ers Co. : Ofllce mgmt (li b arts), underwriting (lib arts), sales, areas (lib arts), data p r oc (math background!. actuarial (math thru calcu lus). Ring, Mahony , & Arner: junior a c count3nts; a cctg. MONDAY , MAY 29 C onnecllclll Mutual L i fe Co.: sales l rng program leads to mgmt; b us adm o r lib arts. WEDNESOAY , MAY 3 1 7 :of0 8 :00 8:30 9:00 5:00 5:30 6 :00 6 :30 7:00 7 :30 7:40 8 :00 8:30 9 :00 Ca II I be Do ctor Babbitt: Electronic Music Nine to Get Ready Profiles In Courag e THURSDAY Arts Unlimited Miss Nancy's Store Space Fligh t Insight Achievement '66 Th e Stoc k Market You and the Law State Legislature I Spy Desilu P layh ouse 1 F RIDAY 5 :00 Brother Buzz 5 :30 Miss Nancy's Store 6 : 00 Charlie C h a plin 6 :3 0 Space Fli gh t 7:00 Slate Deportment 7:30 The Stock Marke t 7:40 Grow and Show 8 :00 E'uf oque (Foc us) Spanish 8 :30 Forum (Spanish) 9 :00 Teatro Frances (Span ish) 9 :30 VIctory at Sea Southern Bell Telephone Co.: Mgmt pes ., engineering; bus, engr, math-PhYsics. May continue interviews on June 1 . Gro u p meeting on Tue sday, May 30, at 3:30 p .m. for all students scheduling rp 5:00 po lntments to Interview or interes t e d ; 5:30 check with Placement tor l ocallon. 6: 00 Functional 1 .01) Miss Nan cy's Store US NavY WEDNESDAY , JUN. E 14 6:30 G oodyear' Tire & Rubber co.: Trng prog; 7:00 all fields . 7:30 T HUR SDAY, JUN E 15 8:00 Mutual of New York 1nsur1nce Co.: Sales 8 :30 ust.; all field s. 9:00 FRIDAY , JUNE 30 u.s. PhOSPhoric Products: Chemists, en gineers; chemistry, Ch. EEE-ME. Some companies listed above may r e schedule earlier d ates. Call Placement Office this w eek , to verify in t erviewing date s. Additional firms may be listed I n late r Issues of The Oracle. C heck also Placement Services bulletin board in the patio of the Administration Building, or phone ext. 612 for " last minute " informa tton . WUSF-TV Channel16 5 : 00 5 :30 6 :00 6 :30 7 :00 7 :30 TODAY The Swedish Sce n e Miss Nan cy's Store Quest Science Reporter General Tel ephone Special The Stock M arket Present Music You and tne La w Victory at Sea Yo u Ar e There Desilu P layh o use TUESOAY Fanctional English CCB lOll M iss Nancy's S to r e I Spy F<>rum (Spanish) Florida Schoo l s Present Mus ic Skirt the Issue f"lperatlon AS r Teatro Frances Voe wpol n t You Are There ALMA hARRISON asks you to call or come to Sign Up TODAY! FoFOtiTANi iHAoLtl World Travel Center FOR TICKETS • 4t ,..,. , deluxe residence hall for men and I wome n students • FILLING UP FAST! USF approved Open to Hillsborough County residents, including freshm en AND RESERVATIONS v Airlines v Cruises v Tours Anywhere -Anytime NO SERVICE CHARGE PHONE 877-9566 > World Travel Center 2624 HillsbCJro Plaza -t. Tampa, F lorida ence, S.C . Raymond Jennrngs, me chanica! engineering. Electronic Communicat i ons, Inc ., St. Petersburg -James Clayton, electrical eng in eering ; Jack L amphear , electrical eng ineering; Denn i s Watson, electrical engi neering. Encepnalllis Research Center, Tampa Robert Penny, mari ne b i ology. F irst Dat a Corp. , Tampa Robert Colvin , account in g. Florida Power Corporation , St. Pe tersburg Denn i s Ding le, mechanical eng ineering; Jeffrey Jacobsohn, me chanica! engineering; Peter Rodriguez Jr., accounting; Karl Wieland, electrl cal eng in eering. Florida State Board of Health, Winter Haven -Barry Leber, pre-med. Florida State Road Department, St. Petersburg David Bower , dvll engi nee ring. Food and Drug Administration , Bos 1on, Mass . -Marcia Psiaki, b i ology. Food and Drug Administration, Wash Ington, D.C. Douglas K iesling, Ioolo gy ; Harold Pritchard, we logy ; John Roach , chemistry; M i chael Stack, chemistry; Michael Starling, chemistry; Martin Stutsman , c hemistry; Russell Watrous, zoology. Ford Motor Co. . Dearborn, Mich. John Walls, elect r ical e ngineering. Game and Fresh Wate r Fish Commis s lon, Tallahassee -Larry Touzeau, zoology. General Cable Corporation, Tampa Norman Elder, mechanical engineering; Dav i d Quarles, mechanical engineering . General Electric Co.. Rcme, Ga. Richard Dun lap, chemical englneerlrg. G en e r a I Services Administration , Atlanta , Ga. -Terry Boles, mechanl cal eng i nee ring; James Krog, prelaw; Robert Simon , architectural engineer ing. G e n e r a I Services Admi nis1rati on , \Vash ing lon , D.C . Brian Allen , pre Ia"' ; Judy Gavin , education ; Thomas Simard , industr ial engineer i ng ; Sandre Smith, art education. General Te lephone Company, St. Pe tersburg James Stevenson , electrical engineering . General Tel epnone Company, Tampa Dav i d Rose , math-physics . Goddard S pace Flight Center, (NASAl Green belt , Md . Mar,lor i e Proffitt, math. Gulf Life Insu rance Co., Jacksonville James Bernard, management. Honeywell, St. Petersburg Pel
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' 4-THE ORACLE-May 10, 1967, U. of South Florida, Tampa Faculty-Staff Picnic For Riverfront Area Set Soon ' Brahmans Lose 2; Day Tribute Goes To Mrs. Wray By JOY BACON l\Janaging Editor There will be a free Fac ulty-Staff Picnic Sunday, May 28, from 2 p.m.-4 p.m. at the USF Riverfront Area. The theme for the day will be "A day In The Park In 1890." SO THE COMMITTEE can determine the number of peo ple attending, tickets should be picked up by Friday . End Season At 14-8 In tribute to Mother's Day this Sunday, The Oracle would like to salute all USF mothers. A special compli ment goes to Mrs. Gertrude P. Wray who Is helping her son, James Wray , III, through school. The menu will consist of barbecued chicken, potato salad, baked beans, rolls and butter, ice cream bar and beverages. There will be a band con cert, barbershop quartet, rec reational games for adults and children, with prizes awarded to the winners, and three booths selling home made baked goods, home made ice cream and a lemon ade stand. The proceeds from these booths will go to the Universi ty Scholar Award Fund. In case of rain the picnic will be held at Argos Center. The USF baseball team ended the 1967 season on a sad note last weekend losing their final two games of the season, 7-0 to the University of Tampa Friday night, and 12-10 to Florida Presbyterian in St. Petersburg Saturday. The losses ended the Brah man record for the season at 14-8. They were 13-2 before final examinations last tri mester but they lost four or Free tickets are available in the following areas: ADM 280-Personnel Services; ULI 108-Ma-rgaret Chapman; CTR Desk-Dawn Smith; FAH 110-Boots Car Ito n; LIF 160-Mary Alice Thorne; CHE 112-.Aura Ferre 1 1 ; ENG 107-Betty N e Is on; PHY 115-Doris Hart 1 e y; BUS 201-Pat Coe; OPM 100-Joan and Argos-Control l)csk. Wisconsin Students Vote For Possible Autonomy UNIVERSITY AUTO SERVICE CENTER TRUST YOUR CAR TO THE MAN WHO WEARS.THE STAR FREE! • Complete Lubrication with each Oil Change. • Do It Yourself Car Wash Vacuum, Soap and Water Provided. • Pick Up & Delivery for All Maintenance Work for Students & Faculty. 2911 E. Fowler Ave. PHONE 932-3387 YcJ.u. JEWELER :11802 NEPTUNE (AT DALE MABRY) TAMPA. FLORIDA PH' 253-3!577 MADISON, Wis. (CPS) The University of Wisconsin Student Senate voted unani mously to sponsor a campus wide referendum on a bill which would abolish all facul Clearwater • St. Petersburg DIAMOND RINGS THE SOUND of SOUL -tPSYCHEDELIC DISCOTEQUE" (New York Style) Doon open at '8:30 p.m. 'til? Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun. 18 and over 914 W. KENNEDY. -across from The House of Sandwich When you can't afford to be dull sharpen your wits with NoDoz NoDoz keep alert tabl e ts or new chewable mints, safe as coffee, help bring you back to your mental be-st ... help you become more alert to the J)eople and conditions around you. Non-habit forming. ..... J While studying, or after hours, sharpen your wits with No Doz. "'. . .. S ; Tablets or new Chewable Milltr ty and administration power over non-classroom student affairs. The referendum, binding on the Wisconsin Students Asso ciation (WSA), would give WSA control of all regulatory aspects of non-classroom stu dent life. The Senate has already passed a bill which would have stripped the faculty student Student Life and In terest Committee (SLIC) of its regula,tory powers. The bi'll passed by a 19-5 vote, with two abstentions. On reconsideration, the bill again passed 25-8, with two abstentions. The referendum was then decided upon. The measure to be voted upon would give self regulating local autonomy to many cam pus groups, with the Wiscon sin Student Association retain ing broad control powers. After the original bill was passed, Dean of Student Af fairs Joseph Kauffman com mented, "While I do not deny that there is significant senti ment within the student body for greater power within the decision-making structure of the university , and while I be lieve we are moving in that direction, the bill . . . c ould confuse or confound that sit uation. " "SLIC subcommittees are already considering measures and in some cases have made decisions which do not differ greatly from the Senate bill," said StiC chairman Jane Moorman, assistant dean of student affairs. "I hope that these moves already under way are not jeopardized by this action by the Senate." After the Senate ' s action, a university spokesman said the Wisconsin administration ' s stance is to "wait and see" the referendum results. The spokesman said, "Ex cept for the shock value or words like 'student power,' this isn't as radical as it might sound from the outside. The Senate's action is i n line with a lot of things the univer sity has been striving for." There are questions as to the constitutionality of the Student Senate ' s a c t ion s which have not yet been re solved. Veteran's Club Meets May 17 In CTR 47 The Veteran's Club will hold its first meeting of Trimester III on next Wednesday, in University Center 47, at 2 p.m . Any vete r an with two. years or more active du t y in any branch of the armed f orces of the United States or its allies is invited to attend. Refreshments w i 11 be served. Come alive! You're in the Pepsi generatiqn! five on a grueling road trip and their pitching ran out last weekend, as well as on the road trip. COACll IIUBERT Wright said ''We were pleased with the play of the whole team until the break. With injuries, and with players going home after the break, our pitching corps was depleted." Pitching ace Gary Trapp was bothered throughout the whole season almost with a sore pitching elbow, and Mike Mackey and John Sakkis weren't available for the last seven games. Marv Sherzer was the only regular Brahman starter over the final games. He started four of the last seven games played over two weeks. The Brahman defense col lapsed at rampa committing four errors and allowing four unearned runs. Tampa got just seven hits. Sherzer went the distance for USF. At St. Petersburg Saturday, the Brahmans stagep a come back in the seventh inning. Down 6-1 after three inn ings , USF tied the score at 10-10 with a seven-run outburst in the inning. RELIEF PITCHER Tom Cave laid down a drag bunt single, McGary walked, and Gray singled loading the ):lases. Norm Ulmer lined a single to left scoring Cave and McGary, and Dana South walked loading the bases again. Catcher Jesus Garcia walked forcing in the third run of the inning. After a pop o u t, A u g i e Schenzinger Applications Available For Fellowships The College of Education will offer a one and two-year Graduate Fellowship Program beginning in the 1967-1968 aca demic year. Applicants for the Universi ty's exceptional child pro gram, which has several fel lowships available in the area of pptentially handicapped children, must have a B.A. degree. Each fellowship pro vides tuition, a stipend of $2,000 for the academic year and $400 per dependent. Applications for the fellow ships offered for the academic years of 1967-1968 and 1968 1969 are available at the Cen ter for the Study of Exception al Children and Adults, Engi neering Building, second floor. For further information see Dr. Marvin Gold, coordinator of Programs for the Potential ly Handicapped, Engineering 239 or phone ext. 114. own a motorcycle? motorscooter? We're experts and can cover you immediately with Reserve Motorcy cle Liability Insurance. LOW. LOW RATES ... as low as $30 a year . No red tape • , • fast countrywide claim service. '{lev up I Call me now I aslowa$30 CALL STEVE DITTMAN ph. 932-4333 TOWNSEND NORTH • TAMPA INSURANCB 12810 Nebraska Ave . . Tampa, Fla. 'I PH. 932 4333 chopped a high hopper to sec ond base and the play on Ulmer at the plate late. Fisherman singled to center scoring Garcia and South. After a hit batsman, Danny Karr relieved started Maury McDonald for Presbyterian and persuaded McGary to pop to first base, and Gray to fly out to right field. USF Tampa 000 000 000-0 5 4 100 221 10x-7 7 2 Sherzer and Garcia. Payne and Granda. USF 100 101 700-10 9 2 Presbyterian 510 103 20x-12 13 0 Kelly, Cave (5), Schenzinger (8), and Garcia. McDonald, Karr (7), and My ers. Proficiency Tests Today In 4 Sports Proficiency tests will be given today and tomorrow in the Physical Education Build ing in swimming , archery, fencing, bowling, basketball, golf, ana tennis. Registration for the swim ming proficiency is in the Na tatorium today at 3 p.m. No written test is required, the student must bring his own towel, and ID card must be presented. Students m a y dress in the Gym locker room or in their residence halls. ARCHERY, FENCING, and bow ling proficiencies a r e sched ul ed for tonight at 7:30 in Physical Education (PED) 114 with basketball, golf and tennis set for Thursday night at the same time and place1 Students must have registered for these sports by yesterday. A written test will be given, with a motor skill proficiency to follow if the written test is passed. When Wray's wife died three years ago he was left with four children. His par ents stepped in to help when he decided in January of 1965 to go back to school. Since then his mother has been feeding, dressing, wash ing, a'nd ironing for his children ages three through nine. She is the substitute mother of Wray's children. ''MRS. WRAY, who was head cashier at USF when the Uni versity first began, is now a full-time social worker. In addition to mothering Wray's four children, the so cjal work cases she handles deal with children placed in foster homes. Wray, who works a 40 to 50-hour week in addition to carrying 18 hours a trimester, has little time for his chil dren. "I take the kids to school in the morning and to church on Sundays, but my Horseback Riding Club To Meet Today In CTR The student horseback Rid ing Club will meet today at 2 p.m. in University Center 213, Murphy Osborne, adviser, said . He asked that all mem bers attend. Terrace Beauty Salon ALL PHASES OF EEAUTY CULTURE 9303 56th St. Temple Terrace ... Shopping Center PHONE 988-2798 CAMPUS UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS OVERLOOKING USF 1 BEDROOMS Furnished or Unfurnished 30 St. (No. of Fowler) • G 5 wehilve : . thOse • • • • • • • • • • • • 932-6133 • • • • • • 162 through 165 Volkswagen Buses and Campers • • • • • • • • • • • • • r • • • • OUR iALUE ROW OF OVER 60 VWs I A Used Car That Doesn't Look Its Ate: • All Models and Prtc:es-Choic:e of Equipment • : • Several with Air Conditionina • , parents do everything else,'' he said. "This lea ves me time to do my homework on week ends." Wr

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