The Oracle

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The Oracle

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Title:
The Oracle
Uniform Title:
The Oracle (Tampa, Florida)
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University of South Florida
USF Faculty and University Publications
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Florida
Publisher:
University of South Florida
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Varies
Language:
English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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University of South Florida Library
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University of South Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
T39-19671115 ( USFLDC DOI )
t39.19671115 ( USFLDC Handle )

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\ Quarter II 1968 CoUrse Schedule See Section 8 , I H$J I t$J ltJ It lt$J Why Not Join NCAA? See P"ge 4 VOL. 2-NO. 14 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA, TAMPA, NOVEMBER 15, 1967 Subscrhltlon Rate Page 4 Medical School Receives $75,000 Appropriation By ALLAN Sl\UTH Staff Writer The Florida Board of Re gents Friday approved $75,000 for hiring of design engineers for USF's planned $21-million medical school. The funds were approved subject to an okay from Atty. General Earl Faircloth and subject to the approval by the curriculum committee of the Board of Regents of the medical school educational curric ulum. There was no indication of when ruling by Faircloth or the curriculum committee would come. UNTIL complete approval is obtained, USF cannot hire the design engineers. The engineers must complete line drawings of planned buildings to be submitted with a request for $6-million in building funds from the federal gov ernment. The new money will permit USF to hire consultants knowledgeable in medical school planning and Public Health Service requirement to assist in efforts to complete program planning. Federal funds will come from the U.S.Public Health Service. Applications for the federated money must be com pleted before !.'he March, 1968 meeting of the Public Health Service Council. THE PLANNING money comes from surplus interest from prior state bond issues. Photo by Allan Smith Students Vote Nixon In Straw Vote Nixon Wins YR J Straw Hat Poll Richard Nixon will be the Republican Party presidential nominee in 1968 and the U.S. will escalate the Vietnam war -at least if USF students have anything to do about it. The two-time former vice president garnered 22 per cent of the vote, a plurality, to edge out New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller and three others in the Young Republican Club Straw Hat Poll con ducted in the University Center Lobby Nov. 7. Club President Dave Snyder also reports that 58 per cent of some 850 voters favored an escalation of the Vietnam war; 30 per cent a de escalation. Twelve per cent voted to maintain the status quo. VOTERS WERE asked to state their preferences for the '68 GOP presidential nomina tion from among: Nixon, Rock feller, California Gov. Ronald Reagan, Michigan Gov. George Romney, and lllinois Sen. Charles Percy. The results: Nixon -22 per cent• Rockefeller 20 per cent, Reagan and Romney -14 and 9 per cent respectively, and Percy -9 per cent. Eighteen per cent of the voters selected other candi dates or made no selection at all. Others receiving votes, in the order of their preference are Barry Goldwater, John Lindsay, Jacob Javits, Winthrop Rockefeller, and Everett Dirkson. AMONG the many receiving single votes were Florida Gov. Claude Kirk, and the 1936 GOP )oser to Franklin DRoosevelt, Alf Landon, who is now in his 80's. Snyder said the Young Re publicans plan a two-party poll for somet ime this Spring. Snyder w a s "generally pleased with a turnout," but he added, "there's still too much apathy on this cam pus." Approval of the planning money by the Regents came after a statement in The Ora cle last week by a knowledge able source indicating politi cal troubles within the board including two resignations was holding up progress on the medical school. The Oracle reported in correctly last week that Re gent Louis C. Murray of Or lando had resigned. Actually, Vice Chancellor W a y n e McCall of Ocala submitted a resignation several months ago, but the board refused to accept it. THE STATE Legislature last summer approved $3million so USF could obtain two-thirds matching funds from the federal government. But no money was provided for planning. The medical school will be built on the northwest corner of the campus in a developing health complex which will in clude a mental hospital, a community hospital and a Veteran's Administration hos pital. USF Pres. John S . .Allen Oct. 26 presented Sec. of State Tom Adams with the deed to a 45-acre tract on the corner of 30th Street and Fletcher Avenue for the mental hospital. . THE UNIVERSITY Com munity Hospital is being built by a non-profit organization to serve the area. The proposed 200-bed facility will be turned over to the Hillsborough County Board of County Commissioners who sit as the County Hospital and Welfare board. The community hospital will be built on Fletcher Avenue across from the medical school. The Veteran's Administra tion hospital will be built on a 22-acre site on 30th Street across from the medical school and mental hospital complex. Planning on the $18.8-rnillion facility is nearly complete. Completion of the entire complex will mean more than $50-million worth of medical facilities for the USF commu nity. President Allen Vetoes Student Traffic Court By MIKE PATTERSON by the security office. A four establishment of the new Staff Writer student, one faculty, constituboard. USF Pres. John S. Allen's ency was provided for in the Approval of the amendment section. must be obtained in a referenveto of the Student Traffic Court section of the Student The University Traffic Com-dum to the student body early t..ssociation (SA) Constitution m1ttee has been handling next year. SA Pres. Don Gif llaS caused SA officiJls to ll1e anpa.:\1!'; d in the ab ) forot sald the Sturtem Court of seek a.n amendment that sence of the Student Traff1c ReVIew, also compnsed of would restore a student board Court. F'our faculty members five students, would serve as to review traffic aweals. and two students sit on the the traffic appeals board until The court provision, alcommittee. the amendment is voted on. though ratified with the conSA officials are now pushing Ben Brown, Chief Justice of stitution by the SA in August, for a constitutional amendthe Student Court of Review, was diaspproved by the presiment to establish a Student expressed hope that the board dent. Allen said Florida statTraffic Appeals Board that would restore some of the stu utes did not allow state uniwould hear students' traffic dent authority lost when the versities to establish such citation appeals and make Student Traffic Court was courts. recommendations to the Uniabolished. The Constitutional Revisions versity Traffic Committee. "If there is evidence that Committee had given the Stu The board, comprised of five the University Traffic Com dent Traffic Court original students appointed by the SA mittee acts in complete dis jurisdiciton and authority to president, would not have au-regard of the Student Trafmake binding decisions on all thority to make binding de-fie Appeals Board's prior con contested traffic or parking cisions in cases. sideration of appeals, we will violations issued to students Allen has consented to the take every action the student ------------------------government can make availNew Student Rights Bill May Give More Freedom A new bill of student rights that would permit students to join any local, national or in ternational organization in cluding the John Birch Socie ty, the Boy Scouts or the Communist Party, will be in troduced in the Student Association Legislature Thursday night. But no immediate action is expected on the document which was drafted by the SA Acamedic Affairs Committee. SA sources indicate that the bill will be referred to the SA Constitutional Revisions Com mittee since the document, if approved would become Arti cle XII of the SA Constitution. From the Constitutional Re Vlstons Committee the bill must be considered by the SA Legislature, the University Student Affairs Committee and USF Pres. John S. Allen. The Legislature is expected to vote the bill in early J anuary. Item C of the bill guar antees students the right to "participate in on-campus or o f f-c a m p u s acivities in connection with local, national o r international organizations." The item does not specifi cally exclude or include any organizations. SA Sec. of Aca demic Affairs Michael Wood ward explained that a liberal interpretation of the item would permit a student to join any organization including right and left wing political groups. Otherwise the proposed bill of student rights guarantees students: ,.. The rights of religious choice and practice, freedom (Please See BILL, Page 11-A) able," he said. Gifford said that cases viewed by the University Traffic Committee in Quarter I showed a higher rate of traf fic fine suspensions than last year at this time. Parrott, Lutz To Head LA Dean's Board The College of Liberal Arts Dean's Advisory Board has elected Jerry Parrott chair m'b and Robert Lutz vice chairman. The board consists of one representative from each of the 17 departmental clubs in the college plus the Liberal Arts Student Association rep resentatives and the vicepresident of the S.A. According to Dean Russell Cooper, the purpose of the board is as "a representative group of students in the col lege to advise the dean and the S.A. on matters of special interest. Minors Glimpse Jail "THEY GIVE the students' point of view on matters of curriculum .and are the stu dent government's arm in the Liberal Arts College_ Several students have expressed the desire to work with faculty committees concerning academic affairs." By TOM JIMENEZ Staf1 Writer . Along the fringes of the USF campus , on 50th Street, flVe students, three boys and two girls, stand quaffing beer from a recently-purchased six-pack. A crunching of twigs and leaves is heard; headlights emanate from an oncoming car and flicker as it approaches. A uniformed man gets 1 out, slams the door and walks the place where the group is. The group, spreading out, hides the beer behind shrubbery, and regroups in time to meet its visitors. "Good evening. May I please see your identification?," asks the officer. As the group digs for wallets from assort-ed pockets and purses, the officer notices a glimmer of metal reflected by the lights of his car. "WHAT ARE WE charged with?" snaps a young colle gian. "Minors in possession of intoxicating beverages," replies the officer as he pulls out a cold, half-filled can of beer from the bush. After the students are reminded of their rights, the offi cer calls for another car. When it arrives, the men are herded into the car and searched by the officers. The women are also led to the vehicle but are not searched. Motors roar, and carry the human cargo to jail. (Please See JAIL, Page U-A) The major function of the Board until now has been to recommend the allocation of S.A. funds. The College of Liberal Arts has been allocated $500 for activities this quar ter. While the function of this Board, which has been in ex istence three years, is only to recommend, history indicates that no recommendation has been denied to date. Photo by Randy Jones Kicking BaHie USF's Pete Tummlnia, steals ball in !ioccer battle against St. Louis University last Sa.fr orday. The Bra.hman Hooters downed the Billikens 1..0. Please see story page 6. Von Schmidt Featured Today At 2 In CTR Eric Von Schmidt, folksing er, songwriter, illustrator and author of children's books, will be featured in the "Meet the Author" series program today at 2 p.m. in University Center 252. Schmidt appeared on the same program last year. It will be his second guest ap pearance at USF. Four of his books include "The Ballad of Bad Ben Bilge," "Come For To Sing," "The Young Man Who Wouldn't Hoe Corn," and "Mr. Chris and the Instant Animals." He has made personal ap pearances at "Club 47" in Boston and has recorded for Prestige, Elektra, Vanguard and Folkways recording com panies. HIS LATEST SONG, "Bee num & Barley Comin' Soon," will be released on Jim Kweskin's Jug Band's next album. His latest art work is illus trating the "Joan Baez Noel SongBook," On writing children's books, Debate Features Tampa Attorneys Monday Night Focus Debate will feature two Tampa attorneys Monday in its second presentation of the year. The debate begins at 7:30 p.m. in the University Center 252. The topic: Resolved: That Black Power offers more for the Negro than integration. Speaker for the affirmative is Dellano S. Stewart. Stew art, a graduate of Howard College, is a Tampa attorney. The speaker for the nega tive is Francisco A. Rodri guez . Rodriguez is also a Tampa attorney, and he is vice presiednt and a board member of the Tampa Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Coffee will be served. Von Schmidt says, "Chil dren's books should also interest adults -it is possible to write a book of interest to both. I try to keep the pot boiling keep things moving avoid static positions where people sit around." "MEANINGFUL things de velop through action rather than conversation. This condition also holds true in dealing with life," he said. During his program at USF, Von Schmidt will talk about books, and sing several songs, accompanied by his wife on bass guitar. The Von Schmidts spend the winter months at their Sarasota home and spend the rest of the year in New England. Eric Von Schmidt: On Campus Today QUESTION: What areas, if any, are off limits to USF stu dents? ANSWER: Dean Wunder lich , of the Office of Student Affairs, stated that there a.re no areas whatsoever that are off limits to USF students. QUESTION: Would the ad ministration e x p l a i n the "Commonly accepted moral code" as statet} in the hand book. ANSWER: Dean Wunderlich stated that the moral code re ferred to on pa.ge 26 of the Student Handbook was merely a broad phrase that included the criminal codes and stat utes of both the federal and state government. This was done to avoid a voluminous listing of the various laws. that hall go about getting one? ANSWER: There is a fire extinguisher in that area now. however, it took approximate ly four weeks to get it. Richard Cameron, Resident In structor for Beta Hall, said that the delay was due to a mix-up between the Housing Office and the Security Office. James Garner of the security office said that his depart ment is responsible for the ex tinguishers in the academic buildings but that housing is responsible f o r procuring them for the residence halls. QUESTION: When will the washers in Alpha be repaired? ANSWER: James Grubb, resident instructor in Alpha, stated that the washers in the hall are checked periodically QUESTION: Why isn't there when the money is collected a fire extinguisher in Beta one East? How could the men in (Please See ACI'ION, Page Z.A)

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2-ATHE ORACLENov. 15, 1967, U. of S. Florida CLASSIFIED ADS CLASSIFIED Need telephone Girls, fulltime, ADVERTISING Part time, $1.40 an hour. Call Mr. Burton, 833-7781. One time only: 9. LOST AND FOUND 3 line ----------------.50 Each additional line ---.15 LOST: One London FOG RainRepeated: 2 to 4 issues -----------.45* coat, vanilla colored; left on than 4 issues -----.40* bench in front of chem office. •Per 3lines Reward. If found, return to 2 P.l\1. Friday Deadline Oracle Advertising, CTR 224; Room Ctr. 224 Ext. 620, 618 ext. 620. 1. AUTOMOTIVE 11. WANTED Wanted: YOUR messages, for For Sale: STEREO TAPE RECORDER, Portable Transistor, classified ads Call Clare, CTR battery or llOv. $35. BUICK V6 224 S.-xtention 620. high lift rocker set $10. Ph. 238-13. MISCELLANEOUS 2122 1966 Light blue Yamaha Sport Tutorial: Private lessons in cycle. 60cc. Complete with hel Modern Mathematics. Ann a met, goggles & tag. Tarp to keep Belle, B.S., Wayne State '51, out Florida's liquid sunshine. Only $150. Call 225-9883 after 6. Want Quicker Action? Go "Clas-1965 Ramb. Amer., 6 cyl., std. sified"! Let Everyone read your shift, economical, R&H, good messages. Call or see Michele; condition, $700, 876-7069 CTR 224; Ext. 620. 5. FOR SALE 15. SERVICES OFFERED CBS house, 3 bedrooms, radiant Wedding cakes made in my heat, utility room, carpet. Sodhorne at reasonable prices; also ded lawn, five minutes from catering. Phone 935-7919. USF. Down payment, take over 21. PERSONALS payments of $7:5 month. Call after 5 p.m. for appointment. Need the money? Want to sell 932-9M4 that car? Why wait? Call NanSports magazines, all types. Col-lee; CTR 224 Ext. 620. Let me lector's Items. Great shape, Call sell it for you. Jeff, 988-3771 or ext. 619 Take over FONTANA Housing 7. HELP WANTED Contract; deposit of $25 has been paid; call 93:5:55, for John Salesmen Saleswoman Full Logalbo Time-Part Time, "Earn while Save $50. Take over FONTANA you learn", Call Mr. Burton, Lease for Quarters Il, Ill. Ph. Phone: 833-7781. 932-8549, ask for J. D. Commuter needed for pick-up Give a subscription to PLAYand delivery in St. Pete; Friday, BOY Magazine for $6.50 a yr.! before 9am and after 3, Monday Contact John Rodgers, au thoafternoons after 3; call or see rized campus rep., in ETA 202, Pat, CTR 224, ext. 620 ext. 2597. Photo b Richard Smoot New Parking Spaces Lack of parking spaces are a. continual student gripe, but the Physical Plant has installed rest stops for those long jaunts between classes. Charles Butler, director of physica.I plant, says 50 benches have been put in on campus. Twelve were recently placed in the mall betwen University Center and the Administration Building. They . are constructed of precast cement and cost $60 fu $65 each. Action Line (Oontinued from Page 1) and if anything is out of order at that time then it is called to the attention of the mainte nance people. If anything should go wrong in the mean time it should be reported to the resident assistant who will report it to the maintenance department. Grubb also said that he hopes to have two new washers moved into Alpha during Quarter II. QUESTION: Why isn't hot chocolate served by Morrisons as part of their breakfast menu? . .. EVERYBODY NEEDS SOMETHING ANSWER: Hot chocolate is available at every meal said William Hunt, manager of Morrisons food service. The chocolate is in individual packages at each cash regis ter in all of the cafeterias. This type of chocolate is used because it gives a better consistancy, said Hunt. QUESTION: Who operates the dry cleaning service on campus. ANSWER: The campus dry cleaning concession is owned by The Varsity Cleaners of Temple Terrace. PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD 3 LINES for 50 cents ----, I Classified Office Hours .: . . . .. • X, . WEDNESDAY 1 p.m. -3 p.m. % THURSDAY 1 p.m. -3 p.m. I Deadline for Weekly . FRIDAY 1 p.m. -.2:30p.m. I Insertions Friday 2:30 CTR 224, E)!tT. 620 . i , ' I Fleming, Pepper Air Vietnam Topics , U.S. Involvement: 3 Reasons Why By ALLAN SMITH StaU Writer U.S. Rep. Claude Pepper Friday explained President Johnson's Vietnam policy to about 50 people here and blasted outspoken critics of the war includin'g Sen. J. William Fulbright. In his first appearance on campus Pepper said the Unit ed States has a right to be in Vietnam. He gave three rea sons: II' The Constitution provides the President with the power to move troops as he sees fit. The United States has used armed forces in the past to battle the Barbary Pirates, quell the Boxer Rebellion and stop Communist aggress ion in Korea. president if it would get him out of Florida. On Vietnam, Pepper repeat edly emphasized the need for "an honorable way out" of the Vietnam situation. He said the question is not whether the U.S. should be there, but rath er how to find a solution. "It would seem to me any member of congress would be in a weak position to criticize the United States' position in Vietnam," he said. He contended that Congress has put full faith in the Ad ministration by approving funds and materals for the war. Photo by Anthony ZappOne Fleming's View Of Vietnam War Dim B y DANIEL ALARCON StaUWriter "I take a dim view of what we are doing in Vietnam," Dr. Denna F. Fleming told nearly 400 students in BSA Friday afternoon. Fleming a reno wed educa tor, author and critic of the Vietnam war, was rejected as visiting lecturer at USF in 1962, supposedly for his views on American foreign policy. He served in World War I and supported World War II as newsman and author be cause he believed both wars were just. "If I could find a reason for supporting the war in Viet nam, I would support it, " h e said. The war has frustrated Vietnamese nationalism and a much-needed r e v o 1 u t l o n against the prevailing system of landholding. The people re sent this, he said, because they value their nationalism over American occupation. He denied th e notion we are fighting Communism because it can not be checked. Then Fleming refuted Rusk's s tate ment that the reason for the war is the containment of the Chinese dragon. China has helped Vietnam in times of war and peace, he said. This greatly impressed the little Vietnamese troops who fight with such great spirit. II" The United States, as a member of the South East Asia Treaty Organization, has the authority to act to resist a g g r e s s i o n on SEA TO member nations. Vietnam is a member of SEATO. Fulbright has been one of the leading critics of Presi dent Johnson' s Vitnam posi t i on. Pepper and Fulbright, who drafted the Gulf of Tonk in resolution, has said he didn't know it would be used to accelerate the U.S. com mitment in Vietnam. Pepper compared Fulbright to a man who signs a contract then claims he doesn ' t under stand the stipulations of it. Dr. D. H. Fleming Discusses Vietnam "Our entang lement in Viet nam has become the greatest fiasco in our history." He said, "It is an ever-expanding war utilizing all kinds of arms on a small Asiatic people, a genocide of Vietnamese. He disagreed with the American fear of the "domino theory" i. e. if one country falls to Communism, others will follow. "Soldiers are taugh t, 'if we don't defeat them over there, they'll soon be over here.' " II" Congress has backed the President's moves by approv ing funds and ratify ing the GuU of Tonkin resolution, w h i c h commits the United States to assist Vietnam. Pepper, a guest of the USF Politice.l Union, rapped Flori da Gov. Claude Kirk and spoke on other state political matters during a news confer ence after the talk. Pepper discounted Kirk's rumored bid for the vice presidency in 1968. He said he didn't think a man "who has put his fist in the face of education" ; hired a private detective agency to represent the governor in crime fighting, then gone about the state begging for f unds to pay the agency; and labeled the elected state cabi net a committee, had a chance. Pepper said he would gladly work to get Kirk elected vice The representative said the United States' purposes is to protect the Vietnamese people so they can estabish "any kind of government they want." He said President Johnson is ree.dy to pull troops out of Vietnam if the penny indi cates it would do ' the same. But, he said, an independent agency woUld have to be sure such an agreement was kept. Pepper said be felt it was tragic that an election comes up next year. He said this might make Hanoi believe a "better deaf" could be of fered if a new President is elected. Of the presidential election, Pepper told newsmen he believes former Vice President Richard Nixon will be the Republican nominee, but he said he felt New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller would run a better race. Photo by Polly Weaver "President Johnson once said he wasn't g oing to be the first American president to lose a war. And he is a man of great pride," he added. Thus we are faced with an escalating war that divides our country, wastes our re sources and tempts Red C hin a into a world war, he said. "It is a barbarous struggle involving countless numbers of our best men," he s ai d. ll the encirclement of China by U.S. forces con tinues, he said, we may find ourselves in a limited war with no victor or in a nuclear war. "What would we do if China treated us the same way? ' he asked. He refuted various assump tions popular today to justify the war. He said, " The United States has coerced a tiny country and shaken Communist cap itals. When we attacked the 'red domino ' in V ietnam we expec ted Red China and Rus sia to understand we had to do it "A gleaming capitalistic de mocracy in Vietnam is impos s ible," he said, but "our pres tige demands victory and will not let us confess failure.'' Fleming said we try to rule small countries . Johnson ' s dealings in San to Doming o brought forth "a roar from South America. We have for the first time taken our na tional life in our own hands and have come to the first im por tant crossroads in history , whether to pursue peace or declare nuclear war," he said. USF To Host Students From MidWestern Pepper Listens To Senior Leurel Degnon " South Vietnam is consid ered a prize strateg ie spot," he said . "This is true if we police the people but will not submit to whitt! con trol because they know white men have very big feet of clay." In 1962 Fleming, considering a position as a visiting lectur er at USF was rejected by the John s Committee, supposedly because of his views of Amer ican foreign policy, in regard to the cold war. I Chapel Looking Fellowship Three midwestern colleges will send groups of about 10 students to study at the USF Bay Campus and at Chinsegut Hi retreat next quarter, Pres. John S. Allen has an nounced. college the regular student fees and tuition, and Earlham will then pay USF regular out of-state fees for the 10 or so students it sends. For Tutors 'The three colleges, Earlham College of Richmond, Ind., St. Olaf College of Northfield, Minn., and Colgate University of Hamilton, N.Y. have com pleted arrangements with USF to study marine and plant life of the Bay Area. They will arrive in January. Earlham plans to stay the whole winter quarter, with St. Olaf and Colgate leaving after January. THE THREE colleges have a winter "special projects" period, the president said, when groups of students do field work in biology, zoology, botany, and marine biology. The groups will use the pe riod to study sub-tropical plant and animal life. An ad ditional purpose of the study period is to grant biology ma jors access to salt water plant and animal life . The Ameri can Great Lakes are "fresh water." Dr. Allen said the Earlham students will pay the Indiana THEY WILL be housed on the Tampa campus for the quarter w h e n anticipated vacancies in University hous ing materialize. Colgate will have two groups at USF, one at Bay Campus, and another at Chin segut Hill retreat n e a:r Brooksville. The Bay Campus group will study marine biolo gy and be housed at the St. Petersburg campus. The group at Chinsegut Hill will study botany and stay at the Hill . The president said there will not be housing avail able during January until the Colgate group finishes its proj ects at the end of that month. HOWEVER, the Hill will be available during the day as usual, he added. One faculty member, from each college will accompany the students. Dr. Gertrude Ward of Earlham, Dr. Oran Stanley of Colgate, and Dr. Eugene Bakko of St. Olaf will make the trip. The University Chapel Fel lowship (UCF) which consists of the Methodist, Presbyteri an, and United Church of Christ denominations is ask ing for volunteers for their tu torial program. This program provides tu tors for elementary and junior high school students in the Ze phyrhills and Thonotosassa area. There are approximately 50 tutors involved now and a need for about 25 or 30 more. The volunteers work two hours a week, which includes the time needed for traveling to the area. Anyone interested in joining the program should call Rev. Russell at 988-1185. Dr. A. Grant Noble, chap lain of the Episcopal Universi ty Center has anounced that the new liturgy for the Holy Communion Service of the Episcopal Church will be used for the first time Sunday dur ing the 9 :00 and 10 :30 ser vices. The 10:30 service Sunday will be the annual Thanksgiv ing service. NORTHEAST Luncheon BuHet MONDAY thru FRIDAY . $1.50 ALSO: l\opal Qtrest lounge 2701 East Fowler Ave. I Rev. Harwood Sturdevant, D.D., will confirm a class of students and preach at the Episcopal center on Dec. 3 at 10:30 a.m. The Catholic Student Associ ation (CSA) is sponsoring a free tutoring service in the following areas : E n g 1 i s h, business, and Spanish. Anyone interested should leave his name, room number, exten sion number , and area of need, in the study room of the center. The CSA is attempting to build a library and is accept ing donations. For the first time since reli gious associations were initi ated at USF, the chaplains of the different fellowships meet weekly to coordinate some common programs. KINGCOME'S TRIMMINGS Sewing and Costume Suppli" • Millinery and Needle Point Fla. Ave. & Fowler Ph. 935-11168 OUR LABELS COULD ONLY TALK ''You're putting me on ... hopefully." Onc e you've tried on fine clothing with me in side, you won't want to put me back on the store rack. BUT, Kirby's has provided for the inevita ble. We invite your personal student charge ac count for use at hoth our st ores. You may charge up to $30 and pay monthly. Just bri ng your st udent ID card and driver' s licens e, and we'll arrange it. We are the foremost authori ty on college clothing in Central Florida. T here's nothing "put-on" about Kirby's fine quality. . OPEN MONDAY AND FllDA Y 'TIL 9 P.M. MIN'8 WUJt 1707 S, Dale Mabry and Northgatt SERVICE SPECIALS . COMPLETE' BRAKE JOB • ALIGN FRONT WHEELS Caster, Tie-In, Toe-Out • BALANCE FRONT WHEELS • ADJUST YOUR BRAKES • . REPACK WHEEL BEARINGS 995 , Air Conditioned Can Slightly Highlf' • Replace lining, 4 wheels • .030 oversized lining e Rebuild 4 whee.ls cylinders • Turn 4 drums • Bleed system • Add new b .rah fluid • Check master cylinder • Pack front wheel bearings • brakes • Road test car. FORD, CHEVY, PLYMOUTH, DODGE, RAM BLER, FALCON, VALIANT, COR VAIR, LARK. 2895 All Other Amer i can Ca1'131.95 No recappable exchang• nec ess ary, fuat tho old lir•• off your car rogardlotl of condition. No mounting charge. A . 9352 N . Florida Ave. 935-5460 DEALER PRICES FOR STUDENTS AND STAFF WITH U.S.F. I.D. CARD I

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THE ORACLE-Nov. 15, 1967, U. of S. Florida lA Bulletin Board notices should be sent direct to Director, Office of Campus CT R 223, no later than Wednesday for inclusion the tollowlnD Wednesday, Official Notices DR. GEORGE T. LEWIS, associate dean & chairman, Committee on Ad missions School of Med i cine, University of Miami, will be on campus today tor the purpose of Interviewing medical school applicants. This Is the ontv Inter view for students this year. Other stu dents who antic ipate applying to medl cal school in subsequent years are urged to talk to Dr. Lewis. Appoint ments can be made In the off i ce of the Medical Sciences Advisory Committee, 201 •Life Sciences Building . CHINSEGUT CITRUS: Faculty, staff, students & visitors are urged not to help themselves to the citrus at the Chinsegut Hill Grove . The grove is an auxiliarY operation and will, hopefully, begin to pay tor itself in the next few years. The fruit i s the property of the Univer sity and Is not to be picked by Individuals. II will be greatly appreclat ed If, when you see Individuals picking the fruit, you will pass the word along, QUARTER II SCHEDULE: The only University Class Schedule & Regi stra tlon Informa tion will be found In to day's issue of the Oracle. Staff and •to dents are urged to keep a copy of this Issue for reference . LIBRARY RESERVE REQUESTS:_ Reserve requests for Quarter II are being accepted in the Reserve Reading • Room . Forms for requests may be ob tained there, or by phone request at ext. 836. Near the end of this Quarter, faculty members with current holdings In the reserve collection will be sent a memo asking whether materials should remain on reserve or be removed. COPIES of the Annual Institutional Research Report No. 33, Scholarly Con• lribullons of the Academic Staff lor the calendar year 1966, listing off-campus publicat ions, chapters In books, articles, creative writing, current research ptoJ eels, grants, etc., are available to all interested personnel at the Reception Desk, ADM 296. SECOND FLU iNJECTIONS: Today, last name M-Z; Thursday, mak.e up. UNDECIDED ADVISEES whose last name begins with A • K are required to meet with their adviser on one of the following dates for program planning for Quarter II: Monday, Nov. 20: 2 p .m., PHY 211. Tuesday, Nov. 21: 1 p.m., PHY 209. Wednesday, Nov. 29: 2-5 p.m., PHY 211. Thursday, Nov. 30: 1-4 p . m., PHY 209. UNDECIDED ADVISEES whose last name begins with L • Z are required to meet with their adviser, Dr . Frank Dud ley, on one of the following dates for program planning f o r Quarter II: Today: 2 p.m., PHY 211. Thursday : 1-4 p.m., PHY 209. LOWER BUSINESS ADMIN ISTRATION MAJORS: Advisers will be available for program planning until Oec. 1 in BUS 427 Mondays through Fridays from 9 a.m. to 4 p . m . Failure to see your adviser P,.ior to Dec. 1 will result in late registration. ALL BASIC STUDIES STUDENTS WITH ADVISERS FROM THE COL LEGE OF EDUCATION must attend one of the fo llowing sessions to obtain an adviser's approva l of the work sheat necessary for Quarter II registration: Elementary Education : Thursday, 16, 8 a.m., Chem 100. English Education: Friday, Nov . 17, a a.m., Chem 100. Social S tudies Educallont Monday, Nov . 20, 8 a.m., Chem 100. All other Education: Tuesday, Nov . 21, 10 a.m., C hem 100. Mako up session: Wednesday, !Nov. 22, 8 a.m., Chem 100 . BASIC STUDIES STUDENTS: Stu• dents currently enrolled in the College of Basic Studies should make appoint ments with their faculty advisers so that they may have an approved program for Winter Quarter before Dec. 4, da'e of Fall Quarter final Because of th e pressures of the quar ter svstem, advisers will not send lndi vidual Invitations for program planning sessions; students will have to take the lnillatlvo In arranging to meet With ad vlsers. Students who do not have approved Winter Term programs bY the close of the Fall Quarter will have to walt and register during the late period. Advi s ing s tation s for stude nts enrolled In the College of Basic Studies are: AnthrOPOlogy, Area Studies, Georgra• phy , History: FOC 239. Art, Hum a niti es, Theatre, Art end Music Education : FAH 2. Business Administration: BUS Biology, Pre-Med, Pre-Dental and ParaMedical : LIF 202-A. Chemistry : Chem 310-B. Engineering: E N G 304. Education : ADM 121. f';Hn P hilosophy: Geology, Meterology : Chem 304, Languages: FOC 105. Mathematics: PHY 316. Phy sics : PHY 115. Political Science PreLaw: BUS 451. Psychology: Universi ty Apt. 17. Sociology: BUS 451, Speech: ENG 34. Unde cided: PHY 342. NONACADEMIC ORIENTATION: All new non-academic staff (who have not vet participated are urged to attend tllree (3l orientation sessions presented bY Personnel Services as follows: Monday, Oec. 3:30-5 p.m., ADM 296. Wednesday, Nov. 15, Dec. 6, l.m., ADM 280. Friday, Nov . 17, Dec. 8 : 8 :3010 a.m., ADM 280. Monday, Wednesday and Frida>' In any session i s th e order In which orlen• fallon will be given. MAIL SERVICE: T here Is no campus m•ll service either to Bay Campus or Fontana H a ll. Mail addressed to either mus t go through the U.S. mail service. Address for Bay Campus: 830 First St. S., St. Petersburg, Fla. 33701. Address for Fontana Hall : 4200 E . Fletcher Ave . , Tampa, F la. 33612. FACULTY AND STAFF who have not received the S t aff Handbook may call ext. 2881 for a cop y , THANKSGIVING HOLIDAYt Thurs day and Friday, Nov. 23. Campus Date Book TODAY Exam: Stale Board of Engi neering ; 8 a.m .• CTR 248. IFC RuSh Sign Up, 10 a.m., N. l o bby . WEDNESDAY, NOV. 15, 1967 Health Center Shots, 1 p.m., C'llR 226. Meet the Author: Eric Von Schmidt; 2 p.m., CTR 252. Experimental Theatre: "The Hole,'' 2 p.m., TAT. Meeting: RA Evaluation, 2 p.m .• RAR 236. " Kidnap": Lambda Chi Alphll -4 p.m., CTR 255-6. South Florida Review Slaff Melling: 4:30 p.m., CTR 200. Dinner: Andros Men's Activities Com• mlttee; 5:30p.m., RAR 114A. Theatre PrOduction: "Biederman and the Fire Bugs," Sundown, CHE Patio. IFC Rush Committee, 7 p.m., CTR 201. Film Clauic: "Repuls ion," e p.m., BSA. Delta Hall Speaker, 8 p.m., RAR 109. THURSDAY Ex•m: Stale Board of Engineering, a a.m., CTR 200, 204. IFC Rush Sign Up, 10 a.m., Nortll Center Lobby. Luncheon: Tempi> Music Teachers Association; 11 :30 a.m., CTR 104. Faculty Luncheon : noon, CTR 252. Luncheon , 12:10 p.m., Health Center Shots, 1 p.m., CTR 226. Enotas Luncheon, 1 p.m., 'RAN 109 E ,F. Campus Crusade; 5 p.m., Iota 3 Dinner, 5:30 p.m., RAR 1311-9. CFS, 7 p.m. , CTR 205. SG Legoslature , 7 p.m., CTR 252. Faculty Recital: Everett Anderson1 7 :30 p.m., FAH 101. Public Speaking, 7:30 p.m., CHE Science in Pre-School, 7:30 p .m., FAH 133. American Meteorological Society, 8:30 p.m. , LIF 260. FRIDAY IFC Rush Slsn Up, 10 a.m., North Center Lobby. IFC Judiciary, 2 p.m., CTR 203. Movie: "Mutiny on the Bounty," 7:30 p.m., f'AH 10i, Folk Sing, 8 . p.m., TAT. Speech Dep,orlment MaJor Production, 8 p.m., BSA. SATURDAY Speech Tournament, 8 a .m., CHE, ENA, PHY. NDEA Institute for Disadvantaged, FAH rooms . Fencing Club TournAment, a a.m., GYM. workshop: Delta Zeta Rush; 9 t.m., CTR 252W. Film Series, 1 :30 p.m., Soccer: USF vs. !Rollins; 2 p.m., Here. Movie: "Mutiny on the Bounty," 7:30 p.m., FAH 101. Speech Department MaJor Production, 8 p.m., BSA. Artist series, "Duo," 8 :30 p.m., Thea tre. UC Band D1nce, 9 p .m., RAR 231. SUNDAY Della Sigma Tau, 11 a.m. , Chlnsegut. Movie: "MutinY on the Bounty,'' 2. p.m., 7:30 p.m., FAH 101. MONDAY Aegean Sales, from 8 a.m., South Center Lobby. Meet the Author: Poet, Sy Kahn; 2. p . m., CTR 252 E, W. Toot, Whistle, Plunk and Boom, "Ken Harrison Percussion/' 2 p . m . , CTR 2556. Art Ctus: Women's Club, 7 p.m. , CTR ,f/, Bridge: Women ' s Club, 7 p.m . , CTR 202. Focus Debate: 7:30 p.m., CTR 252 E, w. TUESDAY Aegean Sales, from 8 a.m., South Center Lobby. Test: Florida 12th Grade, 8:30 a.m., ULI 512, 513 . Meet the Poet: Sy Kahn, 1:30 a.m .. CT•R 248, 252. Deilll'S Luncheon, noon, CT•R 255. WEDNESDAY Aegean Sales, from a a.m., South Center Lobby. Reader's Thealrt Coffee House, 2 p . m., CTR 248. Panel: Senior Accounting Club, 2 p.m., CTR 251. EXHIBITIONS Ethnic Art of GuAtemala: Masks and musical Instruments, \,.ibrary Gallery1 contemporary textiles, Theatre Gallery1 through Nov. 21. Charles Stoneware; Teaching Gallery; through Nov. 22. Co-op Placement See the Cooperative Education Program Office , Room 37, Eng i neering Building, ext. 171, for Information about the following openings, and tor many other openings In Quarter II. Positi ons open for students available Quarters 23 and 4 with the Depart men! of State, Passport Div i s i on, to work as Junior Passpart Examiners. Salary about $ per month . Locations Include Seattle, San Frenclsco , Los An geles, New Orleans, M i ami, New York, Boston, Philadelphia and Chi,ago, Will train tor positions during January and then spend remaining e ight months as examiners. Must have completed sopho more year and must be available all three quarters. Should be interesting training for political sci ence, lnterna tiona! or American maJors as well as others. Many positions remain open for Quar ter II. Examples of some of these posl liOns In the following cities are: New York City -Park Guide for the Nallonal Park Service at the Statue of Liberty .•. WuhJngton, D.C. Business and art students at the General Services Ad ministration; history, political science and pre-law maJors at the National Ar• chives; engineering, mathematics, ?hvs lcs and education maJors at Goddard Space Flight Center and Naval Ship Research & Development Center; phys lcs and engineering majors at the IJ.'i. Coast Guard; education and liberal ar•s maJors the u.s. Office of three chemistrY and one b i ology majors at the Food and Drug Admin is tration; .and accounting majors at the Internal Revenue Service. Knoxville Olk Ridge , Chemistry, mathematics, phyoics !nd mechanical engineering 'Tlajors at Union Carbide Corporation engf. neerlng and management rnajors et Tennessee Valley AuthoritY: Huntsville, Ala. Eng i neering, math ematlcs and physics major sl Boeing; accounting , engineering and physics maJors at IBM; English, Industrial management, personnel labor relations, mathematics and engi neering majors at Marshall Space Flight Center; electri cal engineer ing, biology and chemistry maJors at Vitro!. Blrminghlm, Ala. -one chemist at Southern Research Institute . • • Atlanta Engineering and account lng maJors at Lockheed-Georg i a Com pany .•• Jacksonville Accounting maJor at Internal Revenue Serv ice; maJors at Corps of Engineers; che n'li cal and Industrial engineering majors at Alton Box Board Company ••• Cape Kennedy Cocoa Boach En glneerlng maJors at Boe i ng; e l ectrical engineering maJors at IBM : englnear ing majors at the Kennedy Space Cen• 1er (NASAl ••• TAmpa Bay Area Education rna tors at Hillsborough County Board of Public Instruction; themlstry an d chemical engineering majors at U.S. Phosphoric ; office work in the Oflice ot the Dean of the College of Basic Studies, USFI prelaw and P91ilical science majors at the Clerk of the Cir cuit Court, Hillsborough County; civil engineering maJors at Florida .-.tate Road Department; engineering maJors at the Corps Of Engineers; -eng inee ring, marketlng and accountlnll majors ot Honeywell at Largo; mathematics , elec trlcal engineering and management ma Jors at Florida Power; eleclr;cal engl. neerlng maJors at ECI, St. Industrial or mechanical engineering majors at Babcock & Wil cox, St. Pe tersburg; mec hanical and electrical tn• glneerlnll majors at General Cable poration ; several openings for account ing majors In CPA firms. Students interested in central Jnteltl genca Agency Quarter Ill or QuartP.r IV should phone Mr. Stubbleblne, ext. 111, ImmediatelY. Interviews may be sCheduled for November. Jobless N\an Master's Degree Has u How does it feel to have a Master's Degree and not be able to find a job? This is the problem of Guillermo Rod riguez. Rodriguez went to h i g h school in Cuba, attended the University of Georgia, has a Doctor of Laws and a Master's Degree in English from The University of Havana, a di ploma of proficiency in Eng lish from the University of Michig an, and a Master of Education and Diploma for Secondary School Teachers of Spanish from the University of Florida. He taught English in Cuba for 14 years, then came to Tampa . "My family was here. We are generations linked to Tampa," he said. "I AM TRYING to find a job teaching Spanish here in Tampa. Thls is where my llie is." Currently he is a substi tute teacher. He is certified only to teach languages In Florida. When asked if he would try to get another kind o f job, he re plied, "It would take too lo ng to train for something else." Married and the father of four children, Rodri g uez said his highest aspiration is to "work and live in Tampa. But for now we have to have some sort of job so that we can sur vive." AT PRESENT BE is sorting mail in the USF Pos( Office. "Tampa didn ' t h ave a lan guage supervisor in the high schools to interview appli cants, so the principal chose a teacher. They recently ap pointed such a supervisor." This may increase t h e chances of Rodriguez. Until then, his time will be o ccup i e d by work other than teachin g, so that .he can remain in the Tampa area. Workman Blows Glass Education Building Ready For Opening By TONY ZAPPONE StaHWriter Furnishings and equipment are being moved into the Col lege Of Education Building this week in preparation for its opening next quarter. The building features circu lar "kiva" type classrooms, the first of their kind on cam pus . It also contains a large photographic darkroom se c tion for use by the student body. Dr. Jean Battle, dean of the College of Education, said the building will be dedicated dur ing the National Conference of School Superintendents to be held here Jan. 22. The build i ng will open for classes at the beginning of next quarter, he said. The first floor of the struc ture will contain an AudioVisual Laboratory. a photog raphy lab, an educatio\Jal rna terials library, Dean Battle's office, and a receiving office. The Audio-Visual Labora tory has a 113 student capaci ty and will be used for presen tation of audio-taped lectures, language lessons, visual instruction and speech-hearing tests. The facility will replace the existing language lab located in the Administration Building. The Kiva is a circular room in which about 250 students can experience educational in olvment on a individual basis, Battle said. It is carpe ted on four different levels of con struction, the lowest level being in the middle of the rooms. Seating arrangements are semi-circular, with open end of the circle available for people and equipment. Each level is furnished with tables which will accommo date four to six people. Any or all levels of the space can be used, according to group size. The comprehensive Instruc tional Materials Center will be the nucleus and primary point of focual for the many specializations in teacher edu cation, Battle said. It con sumes about 14,500 square feet in the building. A listening-preview area will consist of sound-treated booths to be used for speech, making master tapes , and lis tening for a variety of materi als. The booths will vary in size, bu t the largest holds onl y one person. There are six larger so und -treated rooms for the previewing of films . Their capacity ranges from 8 to 12 persons. The special services section of the building will house offices for the coordination of intern, observ ation and teacher-aide programs, main tain cumulative records, certi fication records, and schedule courses and faculty teaching assignments. The facility is on the first floor accessible to all students in the College. There are four science classroom-laboratories for 20 students each. The labs are for Physical and Biological Sciences and two are for pro spective elementary school teachers. The third floor has 66 facul ty offices and secretary reception rooms. The offices are arranged in groups of 12 faculty offices around a space for two secretaries and two student assistants. The building was designed for easy expasnion and such plans are being formulated at this time , Battle said. Conscientious Obiectors Aided By 70 Clergymen "See your chaplain" is the usual advice for people in the armed forces who encounter those everyday probl ems. Fortunately f o r Detroit's conscientious objectors, 70 clergymen and church le aders are now ready and willing to violate the Selective Service Law, which could mean possi ble imprisonment. was made at the Church and Society C o n f e r e n c e of the National Council Of Churches (NCC). Fi fty others also signed the statement. Dr. Harvey Cox, NCC secre tary denied the s tate ment was issued under the sponsorship of the NCC hut added that t he feeling was consistent with those of his organization. Coed Studies In Circular Auditorium A statement, pledging to ''aid and abet" young men who want to be conscientious ob;.jectors is being sponsored by 18 Catholic, Jewish , and Protestant clergymen. They also urged the n ation's clergy men to set up draft counseling centers to aid the objectors. In the statemen t these cler gymen said, "We hereby publicly counsel all who in conscience cannot serve in the armed torces to refuse such service by non-violent means. We pledge ourselves to aid and abet them in anyway we can" Veterans Club Participates In Armistice Day Parade Authorized by t h e 18 churchmen, the statement But wait a minute don't burn your draft card just yet, see your USF chaplain first. Relations Di;;;;-------, cfo Sheraton-Park Hotel, Washington; D.C. 20008 Please send me a free Sheraton Student I. D. Card: The USF Veteran's Club participated recently in T am pa's Veteran's Day Parade. The parade was cond ucted by the Hillsborough County YetSenior Photo Dates Set eran's Council, with which the USF organization recently became affiliated. Name:--------------------------------------Address: : _________________ _ ........... Members heard Dr. Herbert J. Wundelich, Vice President for Student Affairs , and Duane E. Lake, University Cen ter Director, speak on the veteran's responsibility to the '.r;e'-e holding university community last .. ,. 1 IJ! distaff side of Veteran's the cards. Sitting dates for senio r picClub members will gather Get one. Rooms are now up to 20% off w ith a ture s have been set for Jan. today 7:30p.m. for relaxation Sheraton Student 1.0. How much depends on 10, 11 and 12. and ref reshments at th e home Where and when you stay. Seniors may make sitting of Mrs. Rick Per ez, 705 Idleappointments in the Office of wild in Tampa. And the Student 1.0. card is free to begin with. Campus Public ati ons, UniverAny veteran at USF who is Send in the coupon. It's a good deal. And at a sity Center 223. interested in joining the club good place. Any Dec embe r graduate is urged to attend the sched' Sh to H teJs &M t I who has not had his picture uled meeting today at 2:00 era n 0 0 or nns CTR 251 155 Hotels and Motor Inns in major cities . t aken for t.he Aegean may make an appointment with 1 Beverly Studios, 307 Twiggs, Tampa. Stude nts who had t.heir pic ture taken in October are re quested to return their proofs directly to Beverly Studios. ANYONE interested in a HAPPY MARRIAGE? Anyone think it's POSSIBLE? It looks impossible ••• 1 Out CATCH the BUS and' LEAVE the of U.S. MARRIAGES END IN DIVORCE SERVICE to US! SPECIAL BUS for USF SERVICE CUSTOMERS LEAVES for USF ADMINISTRATION BLDG. AT 8:15a.m. Return Trip 4:30p.m. by appointment phone 935-1126 Authorized Sales and Service BIRDSONG MOTORS Ill C. @ 11333 N. FLORIDA AVE. Authorixed Dealers Dr. Pitirim Sorokin found that when the husband and wife read and followed the Bible, the rate was 1 Out of 1,015 HOW MANY TIMES LATELY, HAVE YOU HEARD THE BIBLE MENTIONED RELATING TO LOVE, SEX, AND MARRIAGE? Bill Clarke USF Director, Campus Crusade fo.r Christ speaks THURSDAY NOVEMBER 16,6:30 P.M. CTR47 ,. I :$ .. ! Seats I Sears I I FASHION' 1 BOARD I Says. Glitter's the Thing for holiday '67! Glitter in so many ways: silver and coppersequins in snow-white, jet-black, dazzling col orsand, real stars of the party line, brocades and laces shot with gold and silver lightnins. You'll want at least one new partygoing dress from eur great collec• lion of short afterS sparklers! For Long Gala it's glitter again-in gracefulformals of glit ter-threaded knits and metallics, shimmery satins, dreamy chiffons with jeweled touches. In colors unlimited, our new long" dresses show the return to soft femi ninity via floating panels, fuller danceable skirts, "sexy" necklines, and the important lifted waistline, sashe d or belted. Accessories, Too go the glitter route. Cob webby textures in glit tery stockings. PJ\.1 sho e s in gold, silve r and colors with gleaming buckles or j eweled trims. Smashing cos• tume jewelry in pre• tend-diamonds and colored stones. En chanting doll-sized swagger bags, sparkling gloves, new gold and silver sash belts. At Sears, find everything you need to carry out that exciting new "total look" of holiday glitter!

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Editorials And Commentary !IATHE ORACLE -Nov. 15, 1967, U. of S. Florida USF Athletes What happens when a college or university establishes one of its athletic teams as one of the best in its sector of the country? The team gets invited to a post-season tour nament to test its skills against the very best competition as a reward for its efforts, right? Wrong, if the school is USF. The team in question is of course our soccer team, which HAS estab lished itself as one of the top teams in the nation, most recently on the merit of last Saturday's 1-0 victory over national powerhouse St. Louis University, the winner of the Na tional Collegiate Athletic Associa tion (NCAA) championship five of the last eight years. Under ordinary circumstances, the soccer team, and other high calibre USF teams (like women's tennis, for example), would be in vited to the various NCAA tourna ments to vie for national honors. But ordinary circumstances do not prevail in USF's athletic depart ment. THE SOCCER TEAM will not be invited to the NCAA champion ships because the team is not a member of the NCAA. This was understandable jn the past because USF was a young, growing school which would not have benefited at all from joining such a national or ganization. But things are different now. The soccer team has proven it can play on a par with the best in the country and we feel the team should be given the opportunity to prove its metal. The University athletic policy states that "Schedules shall be ar ranged with quality and reasonable competition which will reflect the high standards of USF.'' It seems that the soccer team has set a fairly high standard, and we urge Dr. Richard Bowers, the University Athletic Council and Pres. John S. Allen will allow USF to join the NCAA and provide the competition that will reflect that lofty standard. THE S C H 0 0 L ATHLETIC policy also places first priority upon basic physical education, then upon recreational sports (in cluding intramurals, sports clubs, and special events), and lastly, upon intercollegiate athletics. This is fine. As the policy state ment points out, physical educa tion and recreational sports serve all the students whereas intercolle giate teams can include relatively few students. The greater number of students should be served first, but this does not mean that the University should unnecessarily suppress the efforts of our intercol legiate teams. And this has seemed to be the case in the past. For example, the policy stipulates that off-campus.. intercollegiate contests may be held only on Saturday, and on campus contests may be held only on Friday night (after 4 p.m.) and Saturday. THIS IS RIDICUWUS. Athletes can practice all during the week, yet they cannot participate with other schools during thaftime. For this reason the soccer team had to play two games within a 24-hour period on three different weekends this year. For this reason the base ball team played games in clusters around the weekends and went idle for the five days in between. If there were a valid reason for this policy, we might comdone it. But we see no intelligence in It. An "Accent On Learning" should not mean a deliberate de emphasis of athletics. Misconceptions Cleared From what we can gather from overheard rumblings and from di rect comment through telephone and word-of-mouth, our editorial last week questioning the merit of putting students on the University Senate Council wasn't too popular -with the students. "Some student newspaper they are, trying to keep us out of aca demic policy decisions. They're really out of it." But we'd like to clear up some misconceptions. Misconception No. 1: The Ora cle is compelled to support student opinion since it is a student news paper. IN OUR statement of editorial policy in the first issue this fall, we said we would print news only on the basis of its news value and not whether someone in the University would or would not like to see the information in print. This includes administration, faculty, and student objections. We said we were not a house organ for the administration. Simi larly, we are not a house organ for the faculty and we are not a house organ for the students. No person can tell us what we can or cannot print except for the publisher named in the masthead of the bot tom of this page, the libel laws of the state of Florida, and the bounds of good taste. We intend to be a newspaper for the whole University community, serving no one in particular and everyone in general. Our opinions reflect what we think best for the University, based on our contacts within the University. Misconception No. 2: The Ora cle doesn't want students to have a voice in academic policy. This isn't true. We said last week we weren't sure if it was wise to put students on the Senate Council. It creates a new arrange ment that will probably have to be modified when the issue of a con stitution for the University is de cided. We would like to keep students in the senate, whatever form it takes. We took this position last spring. BUT WE'RE afraid the stu dents who were voted to the council were not voted there just for the sake of hearing student opinion. They were put there by faculty votes as a stop gap measure, and as a substitute for control of the senate itself. If the time comes for a decision on the senate, the students hardly have any guarantee that they will even remain within the senate it self. We think the students had bet ter think twice before they con clude they have any real power in the senate by themselves. If the fa cui ty voters in the sen ate didn't think student votes would help get the issues onto the senate floor, there would be no stu dents on the council at all. DEPENDING UPON whether either group can control the votes within the senate, the students, if they wish to survive politically, must agree with either faculty or administration views. The alternative could be expul sion by whatever group happens to be in control when a constitution is finally voted. Students would sim ply not serve the interest of the prevailing power. Sure, it would be great to have students have a voice in deciding academic policy. But this is a polit ical issue that will be decided by votes, and not amiable friendship between one group or another. Tuition And Costs Said Incr easing Steadily In State Universities WASHINGTON (CPS) Four-fifths of the nation's state colleges and univer sities have raised tuition, fees, and room e.nd board rates this year. A report just issued by the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges (NASULGC) and the Association of State Colleges and Universities (ASCU) says "There is hardly a student in the country who will pay 'as much for his freshman year of college as he will for his senior yoor. "Tuition, fees, and room and board charges are rising so fast and so often that today ' s state university senior is paying about 15 per cent more for his education this year than he did as a freshman in 1964" the report adds. And that's if you're an in-state student. Non-*** residents are paying 23 per cent more than they did as freshmen. THE NASULGO represents large state universities and the ASCU repre sents smaller state colleges and universi ties. The report shows a 6.5 per cent in crease in in-state tuition and fees at NASULGC institutions, from a median of $330 last year to $351.50 this year, (com: pe.red with USF's in-state tuition of $250 for two trimesters last year, to $375 for three quarters this year.) Out-of-state tuition and fees rose 9 per cent, out-of-state tuition went up 8.4 per cent from $784 to $850 (compared to $660 for two trimesters last year at USF. to $.975 this year). AT ASOU institutions, instatetuition * * * -U.S. Students Not Alone; Londoners Have Woes, Too COLLEGIATE PRESS SERVICE LONDON There's nothing unusual about university students having trouble finding housing and then being forced to take something substandard because nothing else is available. But the housing situation for college students has reached crisis proportions here and England's National Union of Students is seeking a solution. John Hands, a past president of the University of London Union, announced NUS' plans recently by saying that thou sands of students in the London area are forced into substandard and often un healthy housing because of a severe housing shortage. THE NUMBER of fulltime college students in London has shot up 49 per cent in five years and the students now number 89,500. During this year, Hands said, 53,000 were forced to seek housing and most had to settle for a dingy flat seldom closer to their school than hve miles. High rents and pressure on London housing were cited as the reason and the results were that 12 per cent of the stu dents at one college were found to be in very substandard rooms and 15 per cent of the London School of Economics stu dents reported that it took over a mmth to find a place. At the beginning of LSE's winter term last year, 16 per cent of the students were still without accom modations. CHRISTOPHER F 0 L E Y, a 21-year-old second-year student at Bedford College, said his basement flat -two rooms and a kitchen is filthy with fall ing plaster and is so damp his shoes were mildewed in three weeks. Twice the sewer burst outside and flowed into the apartment. NSU sees little hope for ending the problem unless it can get funds to build a cooperative student house in the greater London area. Such a drive is under way, Hands reported. and fees rose four per cent, from $250 to $260. Out-of-state tuition and fees rose nine per cent from $550.50 to $600. Room rates rose sharply at the big schools, increasing 12 per cent for men and 16.3 per cent for women. Room in creases at the smaller colleges and board increases generally were all slightly smaller. The report says there are two major reasons generally given by institutions for fee increases: -FAILURE BY state governments to appropriate sufficient funds for higher education. -Rising costs of food, labor, opera tion, and construction. The report also says tuition increases are often "justified by a desire to keep BOB BROWN 'A Winner Is A Guy Who Spills Catsup On A Bright , Red Shirt' ( I i By PHILIP RUNNELS A Winner is a guy that only gets one Fine Arts Writer station on his television set • • • the Recently, there has been an onslaught of questions and answers concerning what happiness is, what a loser is, and that sort of thing. It's time to recognize the guy that has it made . . the guy that doesn't worry about life 'cause he's • •• A WINNER. neighbor's closed circuit TV system. A Winner is a guy that spends his last dollar on a pack of cigarettes and the cashier gives him change for a S5. A WINNER IS A GUY that takes his date to a Drive-In movie (to a picture he really wants to see) and the projector brealts down for an hour. A Winner is a guy that marries a girl for her personality, and on the way down the aisle she says, "I'm glad you're not going to marry me for all 'o' Daddy's dirty money." A Winner is a guy that has a fantastic beer belly, and meets a girl that's 40-30-20. A WINNER Is a guy that joins the Peace Corps and gets sent to Tahiti . A Winner ls a guy that goes for his draft physical and finds out that he has flat feet. A Winner is a guy that sees his date take a pink pill at 9 p.m. A Winner is a guy that gets his fender bwnped by a police car that ran a stop sign. A WINNER IS A GUY that has been driving for 10 years and never ran out of gas or had a flat tire. A WINNER IS A GUY that has a b-e-a-u-t-i-f-u-l-blonde as his secretary and his wife thinks, "She's cute." A Winner is a guy that says "it" rath er than waiting to say, "I was going to say that." A Winner is a guy that studies the wrong book and the professor gives a surprise test on that book. A WINNER is a guy that gets a job running an automatic elevator. A Winner is a guy that spills catsup on a red shirt. A Winner is a guy that gets caught speeding by an Irish cop -on St. Pat rick's Day. . "A Winner is a guy that thinks he looks like Tny Curtis and somebody says, "Did anyone ever tell you that you look like Tony Curtis?" A Winner is a guy that voted for Goldwater. charges in line with those of comparable neighboring institutions." The need for more funds to compete for "scarce facul ty talent" also results in many tuition in creases. The report says tuition is now nearly three times as high as it was 20 years ago. And out-of-state fees are going up especially fast. Non-resident students are pay)ng one-third more than they paid in 1964-65. In that year only four large uni versities charged more than $1,000 a year; this year there e.re 22. THIS INCREASE in out-of-state tuition "generally reflect moves to non resident students pay a larger share of their costs, while state tax funds are de voted to underwriting costs of instruction for in-state tuitions." By Bob Brown To many who glance at Denis Did erot's accomplishments it might appear that he was the progenitor of modern science fiction. Among Diderot's many achievements was that of the "fourth wall" theory. As a dramatist, his natural concern was the stage, the actors, and their relationship to the audience. The "fourth wall" theo ry delineates this sometimes vague rela According to this theory, the stage should be considered a room with one transparent wall through which the audi ence views the action on stage. What oc curs wltbin the room should be a reflec tion of what life Is, but there should be no interaction between the actors and the audience. WE MAY NOT agree with Diderot if we are devotees of the drema, but the lesson it has to teach may be a bit closer to life than even Diderot himself ever imagined. If you read my first column in Septem ber, you became acquainted with the representative from NIL, the Non In volvement League. This student representative might which the dramatist created, as either the actor or e. spectator, but probably the latter. HOW MANY people do we know, or how many of us, are participants in this drama, sitting in the audience staring through the transparent shield at what is happening around us? How many times have we missed some important event just because we really didn't care? The past three years I have been here have given me the chance to sample nu merous campus productions and activi ties.Needless to say, I have been frus trated many times, not because of the quality of the performance (although there was occasionally justification for that) but because of the dearth of stu dent support for them. Certainly the University should en courage the Tampa community to attend many campus events (God knows they need a little edification) , but this should not necessarily mean a lack of student involvement. ROBERT FROST'S poem ','Mending Wall" begins: "Something there is that doesn't love a wall ... " This is the feel ing I get as I think about the campus. It's not so much that the students aren't concerned about what occurs around them, but that it is so much easier not to participate or get involved. There is a lot happening day, and one of these minor happenings might be one for you. There may be a wall trying to block you from stepping into one of these, but it is transparent, like Diderot's, but cen be easily shattered. On the sidewalk between Alpha and Gamma Halls, someone has nearly painted in blue: "BE A REAL PERSON. TRY TO BE YOURSELF. TEAR DOWN YOUR WALL." It's anonymous, but meaningful, for there are many walls. Vol. 2 Nov. 15, 1967 No. lt ACP ALL-AMERICAN 1967 ANPA PACEMAKER AWARD 1967 Military Draft Has Long, Colorful H istory Published everv Wednesday In lh.e school yea1 by the university of south Florida 4202 Fowler Ave. Tampa, Fla . , 33620. second class postage paid at Tampe, Fla .. 3UD1, under Act of Mar. 3, 187t. Printed BY The Times Publishing Company, 51. Peters burg. Circulation Rates Single copy (nonstudents) ................ . . . IOC Mall subscriptions .... _, ____ $4 School yr. The Oracle Is written and edited by students at the University of South Florida . Editorial •lows htrtln art not necusary those of the USF admln islratlon. OHices : University Center 222, phone fS8 Publisher and General Manager, ox!. 6181 News, ext. '''' Advertising, ext. 620 . Oeodllnes: generoJ news and ads, Wednesday for following Wednesday 1 letters to editor, 5 p .m., Thursday; classifieds, 2 p.m., Frl .-y. Stuart Thayer -----______ .. ___ ,__ _ _ ___ Editor Polly Weaver . ------------_ .. Manoglnv Editor John Calderauo _____ . --. . Editorial Poge Editor LtSJie Taylor -----.. Assistant Manoging Editor connie Halgley __ , -----News Editor Marlo Garclo . ----------Assistant News Editor Jtff Sml!!l ---------------.. Sports Editor RICk Norcross ___ .•• --------_ Fine Arts Editor Barbara Wright ---------Feature Editor Rllblrf D. KellY -'"-Advertising Manager Roter Ahearn __ . ------Circulation Manager Pr.f. Walter E. Grisctl ___ ...... Genual Manager Dr. Arthur M. Sanderson -----.. Publlshtr By JOHN OALDERAZZO Editorial Page Editor "Congress shall have the Power ••• To raise and support Armies," says the U.S. Constitution; and Congress has ex ercised that power time and again in our country's short history. Today its author ity is manifested in the Selective Service System. But the concept of conscription, or the compulsory enrollment of men or women for military service, is probably as old as Western civilization. No one knows how much armtwisting prehistoric lead ers did in drumming up recruits for e. brawl with the boys in the next cave, but in the heyday of the ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, conscription was a common practice . Males were chosen for ' the Roman Legion from the whole body of freeborn cit izens capable of bearing arms. Men be tween 17 and 60 could be drafted (most of the older men were confined to garri son duty) and delinquency was punished by imprisonment and confiscation of the offender's property. TINY SWITZERLAND employed uni versal conscription during the Middle Ages. For almost 400 years, aU men over 16 were called upon to protect the coun try from various invaders. The physical ly unfit paid a tax in lieu of service . Probably the first example of military conscription in modern tim es occurred in France in 1792, soon after the Revolu tion. Until that time , armies were large ly recruited by roving bands of thugs. who were paid to kidnap vagrants and criminals, who were then forced to serve I . ( in the army under the threat of severe penalties. Many spent their whole lives in the service against their will. But after 1792, a draft was instituted with a maxi mum of three-years of , service required. THE DRAFT SYSTEM in the U.S. has had a turbulent history. Although certain colonies and states had employed conscription at one time or another, it wasn't until 1792 that Con gress established a uniform militia. Theoretically, all able-bodied men be tween 18 and 45 were liable to the sys tem, but because no penQ]ties were es tablished for failure to comply with the law, the system provided few involun. tary soldiers even during the War of 1812. The question of conscription wasn't raised again until the Civil War. In April, 1862, the Confederacy adopted the draft, and within a year the Union did the same . IN THE UNION, federal registrars, rather than local civilians, decided which men in the 20 to 45 age group would be drafted. These search and seizure tech niques were highly unpopular, and in the first four months of the draft, 98 federal registrars were killed rounding up reluc tant troops . It was also during this time that sev era! days of rioting broke out in the New York City , where it was reported "hun dreds" of people were killed. As in last swnmer's race riots, federal troops were celled in to quell the disturbance. In both armies, a man called to serve could pay another man to serve for him. AFI'ER THE WAR, conscription for the Army was shelved. A month after the U.S. entered World War I, Congress passed the Select i ve Service Act of 1917, in which, for the first time. registration and selection of recruits were left up to local civilian boards. Within a month, over nine million men between 21 and 31 had been registered; and within eight months, nearly three-million troops had been im mobilized. The draft was constantly challenged on the grounds of constitutionality, but it was continually upheld by the courts. After the war, as was the custom, the conscription policy was dropped . NEX'I.I WEEK'S concluding chapter will trace the development of the draft to the present time and explain why the conscription policy was not dropped after World War II. ' \

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EValuating The '12' By BRIAN BEEDHAM Foreign Editor of T h e Economist LONDON The old saw about not being able to see the woods for the trees is a double-edged saw when it comes to such a tangled thing as the effort to limit the world's arms races. Take, for instance, t h e negotiations about a treaty to curb the spread of nuclear weapons. These negotiations have gone on so long, and have taken such intricate forms, that many of the people who are concerned with them enough to follow them closely are liable to end up focusing on just one aspect of them, and almost losing sight of the as a whole. As for the general public, it 's liable to find the whole thing fading into a blur, out of which occasionally emerges some new development that makes headlines but means very little unless one recalls the full background. A VERY TIMELY reminder of what non-proliferation is all about has just been provided by a distinguished internation al team of experts, whose re port was published on Oct 23. These 12 men were asked by the United Nations Secretary General to set out their views on the effects of nuclear war and on what the acquisition of nuClear arms implies for the security and economic wellbe ing of nations. They produced a startlingly crisp, and even more startlingly unanimous, report. At a moment when it is at last possible to hope that a treaty to curb nuclear spread could actually be ready for signature early next year, it is timely enough to have such an authoritative picture of the devastating risks that go with any resort to nuclear war. But the 12 experts also stress the remarkable useless ness of the mere possssion of nuclear arms. THEY FIND THAT the possession of nuclear arms may even reduce, rather than in crease, a country's influ ence. They "unhesitatingly" conclude that "the path to na tional and international secu rity . . . is certainly not to be found in the further spread and elaboration of nuclear weapons." Two of the 12 signatures on their report strike me as par ticularly significant. One is B e r t r a n d Goldschmidt, of France's atomic energy com mission ; the other is Vikram Sarabhai, of India's. France has been taking a wholly negative attitude to the proposed non proliferation treaty. India has declared the present draft treaty to be un acceptable. Yet now an Indian and a French expert have joined others from the United States, Britain, R u s s i a, Japan, Sweden, Canada, Mex ico, Nigeria, Norway and Po land in stating that "an agree ment to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons . , . would be a powerful step in the right direction." IT IS A PITY that a Brazil ian and a German expert could not have been brought to share this unanimity. At the Geneva disarmament confer ence, Brazil has rejected the present draft of the nuclear treaty as firmly as India. Ger many is not represented at the Geneva talks, but its res ervations about the treaty have clearly emerged else where and have been large ly responsible for the delay in getting a complete text ready for signing. At a pinch, the treaty can go forward without waiting for the Brazilians. This is PLEDGES! WE PROMOTE FUND RAISING ACTIVITIES (CAR WASHES GAS, "PUMP-INS") ALCRANDON PHILLIPS 66 FLETCHER AT 30th ST .. NEXT TO USF THE CAMPUS HELPERS not true of the Germans. Without their signature, the treaty would be regarded by the Russians as of hardly any value at all, and the task of rounding up other countries' signatures would become almost impossible. And any further delay could make this task really impos sible. Already the Japanese, for example, are urging that the treaty must be made ready for signature quickly because with the growth of China's nuclear potential it is be coming more and more diffi cult for them to make a for mal renunciation of nuclear arms. THE OUTSTANDING prob lem remains that of satisfying the claim of the "Euratom" member states (the same six countries as are members of the European Common Mar ket) that they should not have their non-military nuclear ac tivities placed under the same safeguards as other states. Among the six, the Ger mans have taken the lead in insisting that Euratom's own safeguards system should oe preserved, without any direct imposition on the Six of the worldwide system of the In ternational Atomic Energy Agency. Whole arrays of ingenious arguments have been de ployed to support t h e s e claims. Concessions to them have been offered not only by the United States but also by Russia. Compromise is by no means unthinkable, and might indeed be achieved -by some vigorous pulling and hauling in time for a com plete treaty to be presented at the UN General Assembly be fore Christmas and opened for signature early in 1968. THIS LOOKS LIKE being a decisive period for the whole non-proliferation effort. Per haps it is even the moment of make or break . That is why it is of real value that the 12 experts' report should have come just at this time, with its emphatic reminder of the perils against which the treaty project is directed. Never was it more important to stand back and look not at the trees but at the whole wood. You Tell 'Em, Fella j l And we try -tellin' 'em, that is. So, on the same day we get Army, Navy, Marine Corp, and maybe one or two firms that make munitions for use during war time. You think they pro mote unnecessary killing, and so you protest. Yet you also think that war is the necessary price for the freedom to protest against war itsel Just what do you think? And that institutional food is some thing else. Like surely there is no possi ble reason why it can't be improved, and why do you HAVE to pay for it? lt's so bad, they must be-using cheap food to pad their oversized bank accounts. Or are they? ANPA Pacemaker Award 1967 ACP All-American 1967 What is behind it all? Well, that's our job, and we have the duty to tell you about it, and what we think of it. Work ing for a newspaper opens many doors to otherwise unobtainable information, and we think that makes our opinion a bit more informed. Every week, we try to tell you about how we view the action, and maybe we'll recommend a course of action. Maybe we'll say the administration blew it on that case, or the students were wrong on another. We'll express these views on Page 4 in the two left c:olumns with the larger type. That's the editorial page. You won't find them anywhere else. 0RI'\.CLE THE ORACLE Nov. 15, 1967, U. of S. Florida SA OUR READERS WRITE SA Says Oracle 'Gutless,' 'Not Speaking For Students' Et;)ITOR: For the past five years, the five Student Senators have been struggling to gain just one seat on the Senate Coun cil, one of the most influential committees on this campus. When President Allen was ap proached with this idea, he immediately rejected it stat ing that students didn't have time. Finally, a breakthrough came this October, when the Senate voted to grant students two seats on the Senate Coun cil. This was very rewarding to the Student .Senators who had been working futjlely for so long. Now The Oracle has turned "Soothsayer" and predicted that this will only be harmful to student voice in the future; that students "eager to exer cise power in the University," Will lean to either the faculty or the administration. THIS EXAMPLE is ab surd! ! How can no student voice be better than "some" student voice regardless if it takes sides or nol At least students will now, DIRECT LY, have some voice. The Oracle also points out that "the addition of students will increase the political fo liage that must be hacked away when the issue of a con stitution for the University finally comes . . . " Here the Oracle is guilty of exactly what it is accusing future Stu dent Senators of GUTLESSNESS. The Oracle isn't speaking out for the students, it is merely voicing the opinion DON GIFFORD ••• SA President. now prevalent in the faculty. This University doesn't have a student newspaper interest ed in helping students. Its only concern is flexing the way it feels the administration and faculty are bending. This is one of the basic things "det rimental in the long run" to students at USF. D. FRANK WINKLES, SA Vice President DON GIFFORD, SA President A Senator, Too EDITOR: Your lead editorial of Nov. 8 was very disturbing to me as a Student Senator in the Uni versity Senate. I do not feel that your stand is jusifiable or wholly rational. Your statement that "The debate has been whether the faculty alone should decide key curriculum policies, or whether the administration should control it through exec utive decision ... " is incom plete. While this is one of the basic points of controversy, it is not the center of debate. THE CENTRAL issue is whether the Senate should be concerned only with "educa tional policies," thus validat ing the claims of the faculty senate advocates, or whether the Senate, as it is presently constituted, with representa tion from all segments of the University community, should be allowed to legislate on any matter of major concern to a substantial portion of the membership of that communi ty. Your suggestion that "the students, eager to exercise power in University decisions . . . " "may" line up consis tently on either the faculty's or the administration's side to the antagonism of the other party is, to say the least, a slap at the integrity of the student senators. Hopefully, the student sena tors of the future will follow the examples of the vast ma jority of their predecessors in asking, "What is best for the student?" in determining their position on any issue considered by the Senate . YOUR OBSERVATION that "the internal control of Uni versity academic business is up for grabs until some con stitution is passed, in whatev er form," is a very astute ob servation. As was made quite evident at the last Senate meeting, the power of the president is ultimate. The Senate Election FRANK CALDWELL ... 'editorial disturbing.' Rules Committee made five recommendations to the Sen ate. One recommended consider ation of enlarging the Senate to provide more equitable rep resentation. ANOTHER recommended an enlargement of the Senate Council. The Senate Council enlargement was ultimately accepted as amended to pro vide seats for two Student Senators. Regarding the recommenda tion for CONSIDERATION of enlarging the Senate, the president declared, "that the size of the Senate was set up in a University policy state ment and that in effect it was out of order to consider this item at this time" (minutes of University Senate -25 Octo bet 1967). The structure, membership and apportionment of both the University Senate and the Senate Council are delineated in University Policy State ments, yet one may be quick ly changed by majority vote of the Senate, while the other is out of order for considera tion by the same body. HEREIN LIES the power of control of academic business on this campus. The president jealously guards against any encroachment upon his pow ers. The democratic ide a Is which we are taught in the classroom do not apply in t'he concrete situation of our own chief executive presiding over a "legislative" body which may make only "recommen dations to the president" on those matters which the presi dent feels are "safe" enough to allow a democratic recom mendation. As a faculty senator recent ly said, "Even George Wash ington had enough sense not to preside over the Senate!" I DO NOT ' feel that your prediction that the addition of students to the Council will be detrimental in the long run will prove accurate because these are the students who will be leading the fight for the creation of a University Constitution. They win be seeking an eq uitable voice for all segments of the University community. FRANK L. CALDWELL Student Senator Intellectual Void EDITOR: A recent edition of "Coun te rpoint" magazine October 23, suggested that there was an "intellect ual void" on this campus. If an "intellectual void" is found where a vast minority of students elect to wear their hair long and their skirt;; short, where only a handful of students choose to wear no shoes, much less no socks, then this must be the place, because there is no place near this place like this place. If an "intellectual void" is found where young people come to be educated, in the mores of their society; where people come, concerned, to be taught; where students realize that before they can make a wise decision, they must LEARN ... well, they you've come to the right place. I SUGGEST that the only "intellectual void" to be found on this campus is on the East Patio of the University Center everyday around noon, in the Camp of the Uninspired. The boys hide behind profusions of hair, the girls taking illogical d r a g s off their cigarettes. The TRing To Do is done, the unimpeachable 1 a w s con formed to, while the young men and women of tomorrow pass them by, forever. LUTHER ROSS 3CBS A Rosary EDITOR: My Rosary ... So-called Christians like myself are ashamed to attend Mass in our fine church while Dow Chemical is manufactur ing napalm and Twin City Ar senal is making bullets. The intolerable situation of War, Violence, and Brute must be solved or all our self righteousness is for naught and the Prince of Peace is betrayed. I love the American Flag, not because it has the most world-shattering atom bomb, but because it has the biggest heart, the best brains and the most determination to have PEACE, UNITY, and PLEN TY in a World Community. ALL LOYAL, red-blooded Americans should back up a Department of Peace, Co existence and Good-Will with $500-million a week to start • . . a modest request in view of the $1-billion a week now being spent on the presently bogged-down Department of War, Violence and Brute Force. The military is dedicated to the art of killing and mutilat ing people and destroying val uable property. It is interested in getting rather than giving. You can't make friends by shooting at them. All these bloody wars are revolting. All men have a right to live out their years in peace. Common sense is better than brute force. Universal benevolence is better than military vio lence. DIDN'T DWIGHT Eisen hower' advise against letting the military become too strong? Those who prefer peaceful pursuits should not be forced to do violence. "Our country Right"; not "Our country . R i g h t or Wrong." ERNIE SHEFFIELD Minneapolis, Minn. Constitution EDITOR: • Vice Pres. Herbert J. Wun••• fRom thts bay roRwa.RO ahe will treasure this lovely diamond bridal pair ... Ferrell Jewelers Northgate Shopping Par WeeldJ or Moathtr I1MtniJont tdltpd Layaway for Xma• Now derlich's answer in The Ora cle to the Action Line question concerning the lack of a con stitution for the University is a very curious answer. Vice Pres. Wunderlich states that a constitution is not necessary because the University follows policies laid down by the Board of Regents. When you consider that one o! the poli cies o! the Board of Regents is that each institution have a constitution, this answer is very curious indeed. Concerning student welfare, the Board of Regents policy is that the University shall se cure the religious welfare of the student. The University shall enforce "ordinary rules of good conduct," and bring about student compliance with t h e "commonly accepted moral code." No explanation of the very ambiguous terms is given. J:Iowever, you can write the Board of Regents and ask them to explain the terms. THEY WILL explain that the Board does not interfere with school policy and they refer you to Vice Pres. Wun derlich. These are not policy statements, but rather are blank checks for the school to do practically anything it wants. Small wonder the ad ministration is happier than a hippie in a marijuana field to follow the "policies," rather than be confined by a written constitution. The University and the Board of Regents also follow an unwritten policy. "Neither the Board of Regents nor its subsidiaries are bound by any existing state or federal stat utes." This policy is manifest in the new traffic fines on campus. F I o r i d a Statutes (239.53-58) give the Board of Regents authority to make and promulgate traffic regulations for the various cam puses. It explicitly denies them the authority to set the fines or try offenders. This authority is invested in the "adjacent municipality." FOLLOWING their unwrit ten policy, the statutes have been completely i g n o r e d. (Perhaps their desire to put some aspect of Florida educa tion first in the nation is the reason for the existing fines.) HAROLD R. HOOKS lCBS asks you to call or come to World Travel Cente.r FOR TICKETS AND RESERVATIONS y' Airlines y' Cruises y' Tours Anywhere-Anytime NO SERVICE CHARGE .PHONE 877-9566 World Travel Center 2624 Hillsboro Plaza Tampa, Florida a winning duo the. and the c'dimdl',! Gant imports fine Swiss ribbed . cotton, shapes the "Hugger" close to the body and colors it in beige, gold, blue or white! You add the newest skirt style -the Dirndl! Ring hemmed, fully lined and gently shaped for every figure ... in . navy, beige, grey or camel. 8 to 14; shirt, $19; skirt, $28 FLORIDA Sportswear, West Shore Plaza, Downtown, Northgate, Tampa . J.

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!' Gaffney, USF Edge St. Lou • IS 1-0 Photo by Randy Jones Brahmans Barely Miss Brahman Henry Caldas (22) watches Brian Bolt's shot barely miss the comer of the Billiken goal in the first period of Saturday's game with St. Louis. USF dropped the Billikens 1.0 to push its record to 9-1. St. Louis downed the Brahmans 1.0 in St. Louis earlier this sea.<;on. Bill Donley, the diving Billiken goalie, left the game after the first half. IDs sub stitute, Jim Conley, held the Brahmans scoreless but USF goalie Jerry Seifert stopped the Bill oHense. USF has two games left to pla.y this year. South Florida. faces Rollins this week and meets Florida next week. Course Averages 37 Golfers A Day By DORAN CUSHING Assistant Sports Editor South Florida's golf course has been averaging 37 golfers a day since opening Oct. 18, and daily improvements have been made on the manicured greens and fairways. Golf professional Wes Ber ner said, "Everything since opening day bas gone along very smoothly with the golf ers and maintenance. All the normal problems expected haven't shown up yet. " Recently, however, t e e markers and flags were stolen and cars driven across three greens. A PERMANENT chai n link fence has been proposed to replace the barbed wire one now enclosing the Approval hasn ' t been received yet. USF's security force patrols the area as does the Hillsbor ugh County Sheriff's Depart ment. Security officer John Camp b ell said, "We hope to get five additional men soon, and this would allow us to improve protection. The coverage is not on a regular schedule." QUARTER AND year mem berships are available at the pro shop al ong with a variety of golf equipment. Twenty seven memberships have been lie t.ltdlum 111 '9:1;/01 Despite fiendish torture • dynamic BiC Duo writes first time, every time! Btc's rugged pair of •tick pens wins again in unending war against ball point skip , clog and smear. Despi t e horrible punishm en t by mad scientists, BIC still writes first time, every tim e. And no wonder. '" ' Btc's "Dyarnite" Ball is the hardest metal mad e, encase d in a •olid brass nose cone. Will not skip, clog or smear no matter what devilish abuse is d evised for them by sadistic stu d e nts. Get th e dynamic BIC Duo at your campus s t ore now. PlN COAP. MllfOAO, CONN. purchased . Even though more than 80 golfers play the course each Saturday, there has been no lengthy delay. "After the rough is closely cut, there shouldn't be any bottlenecks," Berner said. "The par-3 boles are well spaced, followed by longer holes. This course could take 200 golfers a day easily." A "r i n g e r" tournament began recently and continues through Nov. 30. There is no entry fee. Golfers record their lowest score on each hole and attempt to improve the scores each day or week. Low scores in men 's, women 's, and varsity golf divisions will be com puted Nov. 30. An 18-hole handicap tourna ment is scheduled for Satur day. Merchandise certificates will be awarded to the top three golfers. USF's golf club is sponsoring the tourney. Men, women and varsity members will compete in sep arate divisions. 6A-THE ORACLE-Nov. 15, 1967, U. of S. Florida Brahmans Attempt Record Against Rollins Saturday South Florida risks its nine game win streak Saturday against Rollins, 2 p.m. on the USF soccer field. A USF win would give the Brahmans their longest win streak. Rollins, 39-37-11 overall ex cluding this season, has won three Florida Intercollegiate Conference titles. The Tars took the FIC crown last year. Earlier this season ,Rollins had a 213-minute shutout string (nearly 10 periods) which included a 3 0 win over Florida Presbyterian and a 0 tie with Belmont Abbey. The Tars were 4 1 2 through seven contests , losing to Ap palach ian State 3-1 in their opener. The record includes 6-3 wins over Stetson and Saint Leo. Willie Flohr, an All-Stater two straight seasons, is the top Tar scorer. He scored a record six goals against St. Leo and has scored 13 goals in only seve n games. Chuck Thomas , who scored three times against Stetson, is the second scorer. AU-State Chuck Gordon is sidelined with broken ribs, but Dick Myers, another AllStater, will probably start at goalie. Brahman coach Dan Hol comb expects another tough game from Rollins. "They're having a fine sea son and a win over us could give them the state champion ship," he stated. Horvath Catches One Billiken Tom Bokem kicks USF's John Hor vath (13) while Brahman Henry CaJdas looks on. Horvath was not seriously injured and coach Dan Holcomb said he will start the Brahman sophomore against Rollins Saturday. Bokern fini shed the regu1ar season as the top Billiken scorer. St. Louis is waiting t.a receive its ninth straight NCAA Tourna. ment bid this year. Photo by Randy JonM USF Club Tournament Starts Early Saturday South Florida's goH club is sponsoring an 18-hole handi cap tournament Saturday, 8:30 a.m. Students, faculty, staff and gue s t s are eligible. No en trants may start after 2 p.m . Men's handicap, women's h andica p and scratch di vi sions are open. A 75-cent entry fee is set for each divi sion entered. The handi cap and scratch divisions are open to men, a nd both handicap di visions are open to women. Starting times should be re served before Saturday. Golf pro Wes Berner advises golf ers to schedu l e th eir own four s ome s in advance but it is not required. USF intercollegiate pro s pects are restricted to the scratch category. Men's handicap division has a $10 certificate for first, a $7 for seco nd , and a $4 for third. Scratch and women' s divi si ons include $8 for first (10 entries required), and $5 for second (19 entries required). Longest driv e and closest to the pin contests are set for par-5 and par holes. The Calloway hand ica p system will be used. Additiona l infor mation is a v ailab le at the pro shop (988-1635). Minthorn Bowls 496 Series Bob Minthorn rolled a 496 series a t Temple Mon day n ig ht, Nov. 6, during USF bowling club competition. Stu dent s can s till join th e league, which bowls each Monday at 7 p.m. Entries will be ac cepted until Nov. 24. Ron Shaff led the eight-team league with a 206 game, fol lowed by Bob Hightower's 193 and Claude Engl ish's 191. By JEFF SMITH Sports Editor Freshman forward D a n Gaffney and sophomore goalie Jerry Seifert Jed USF to a 1-0 win over five-time NCAA champion St. Louis Saturday. Approximately 1,600 fans, the largest crowd at a USF sports event, saw Gaffney rip a shot past Billiken goalie Bill Don ley with 8:15 gone in the sec ond period for the only score. Seifert played the best game of his collegiate career as he made me.ny outstanding saves to continually halt Bil liken scoring drives. "He's the best goalie in the nation," USF coach Dan Hol comb shouted after the win. USF, WHO faces tough Rol lins 2 p.m. on campus Satur day, tied its all-time win streak with the triumph. The victory was the ni nth straight for the Brahmans, which equals the record set during the '65 and '66 seasons . The Brahmans have a 21-1 mark in their last 23 contests. Both USF and St. Louis had scoring opportunities but missed key shots. St. Louis outshot the USF charges 25-11. The Bills also led in corner kicks 8-2. Tempers flared early in the crucial game as USF's Henry Caldas and St. Louis' Dave Schlitt were ejected after a f irst period fight. THE TWO rivals played evenly through the first peri od with neither able to mount a sustained scoring drive. Both clubs initiated good at tacks during the second peri od . end when he managed to drive the ball from deep in USF's territory after Seifert had made a diving save. "They probably would have scored if Jacobus hadn't made that play," Holcomb commented. BRAHMAN FANS appeared to consistently lift the USF squad late in the important game. "The fans were the dif ference in the game," Hor vath said. "We wouldn't have won without their support." Bill Sharpless and Robert Drucker contributed fine de fensive efforts in the B rahman win. Holcomb said they probably played their best career Veterans Brian Holt and Houck steadied the team throughout the game. Phil Vi tale, Jack Belford and Gaff ney were able to move the of fense well. "THIS GAME was the best we've ever played," Holcomb said . "The entire squad was ready and wanted , the win. Everyone gave his top ef. fort." USF's big score came after a good drive. GaHney took the ball and dribbled past a St. Louis defendt!r before drilling the shot into the right corner of the goal. Belford Crashes Through Rough play o c c u r r e d t hro ughout the game. Numer ous injuries were received by both teams. Jim Houck and Mike Neminsky were seriously injured for USF. Freshman Jack BeUord battles St. Louis for ward Wally Werner for the ball during Sat urday's first half. Belford was a key player in the USF 1.0 victory, according to South Florida chief Dan Holcomb: "Belford played his best game for the Brahmans against St. Louis," Holcombe commented. The Billikens hav e won five NCAA championships in eight seasons. Photo by Randy Jo nes ST. LOUIS controlled the ple.y late in the second period but was unable to score. USF held the 1 0 halftime lead. Jim Conley started at goalie for the Bills in the second half. Play was extremely rough in the early minutes of the second half as both teams fought for ball possession. St. Louis was able to penetrate into Brahman territory often . Seifert ' s saves were brilliant during the third period as he stopped four Billiken scoring threats, twice with fingertip deflections away from the goal. HOLCOMB MADE important substitutions in the third period to rest Pete Tumminia and John Horvath . Both re turned to action late in the pe riod . USF was continually forced to stop Billiken attacks as the St. Louis squad moved the ball more consistently in the later portions of the game. Right fullback Wayne Jaco bus possibly saved the Brahman effort near the game's USF Competes In State Meet At Tallahassee South Florida's cross coun try squad travels to Tallahassee Saturday for the State Meet. USF dropped its final dual meet Saturday to Florida 22-37. Florida's Don Larene fin Ished first with 20 :31 while USF's Don Crank came in a close second with 20 :33. Team captain Neil Jenkins finished fifth at 21:07 and Bart Smith took seventh with a 21:20. USF finishe d the regular season 1, which included the seventh-place standing in the Aldridge Championship. Other Brahman finishers In cluded Frank Paris with a 22:10 clocking, Risley Long. mire with a 22:13, .and Dave Castricone at 22:36. Jenkins was the only letter man competing for USF this year because Jim Steere was sidelined with an injury. GO GREEK! WEDDING RINGS GROOM'S RING •• -•• 111CT. BRIDE'S..RING • •• •• ta KT. Yellow or white Gold TERMS TO fiT YOUR BUDGET Registered Jewelers A merican Gem Sociaty 510 fftANKliN ST. PHQNE 2 2 916 110 N_Q. WEST SHORE IILVD. 872-9374 Golfers Meet Friday USF's golf club meets Fri day to prepare for Saturday's tournament. T h e meeting starts at 2 p.m. in University Center 255. Prospective mem bers are invited. SINGLES? COMPATIBLE? Let the stars tell you. For !reo questionnaire write to: 1674 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10019 SANDAL SHOP SANDALS BAGS BELTS $14 up l BILLFOLDS $8 up $10 up VESTS $25 up $3.50 up HAIRPIECES $1.50 COME SEE US AT J ALL ITEMS MADE TO ORDER 306 N. DALE MABRY Phone 877-5983 ChriSIOPhar ClOth This is Wren's Christopher Cloth Dress Shirt. You can. really its traditional heritage. Here's a plan for perfection, taken right from Wren's draw ing board. Stllrt with an ex..:lusive all-combed premium grade cotton Oxford. Include special de tails like the box cen ter front, pleat, and locker loop, seven button front ••• all designed by Douglas MacDaid of Princeton and New Haven. sure the cl as sical, traditional button down collar is specially constructed to give that casual, correct look. Set off with wide spaced stripes, boldly colored on white and colored grounds. Now try it on .••• see the hand -some results, $7.00 Jo 10.00 Wren, 1708 So. Dale Mabry

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( tv I Women's PlayoFFS Begin For Basketball Winners Playoffs began this week in women's intramural basket ball. The double-elimination competition has games set through Friday. The top two teams from each league are at 4:20 p.m. on the outdoor courts. First-round pa1rmgs had Kappa Delta and Delta Zeta facing each other, the Basket weavers taking on Gamma 5 East, and the PE Majors meeting either Tri Delta or Gamma 3 West. Last week's top game found the Basketweavers clinching a playoff spot from Delta Gamma. Both teams had a chance for a divisional second but the Basketweavers took it 20-10. TISH AND Jacquie Adams, both members of USF's wom en's tennis team, led Gamma 3 West to a 29-11 romp over Delta. Tish scored 16 points while Jacquie chipped in the other 13. Jane Huck and Lynne Kelly shot Tri Delta past Delta 26-4, scoring 10 and e igh t point s, respectively. Mu 3 West won a forfeit from Phi Gamma Chi. Mu East dropped Delta Sigma Ta u 12-7 a nd rolled over Tau Chi 22-9. Kappa Delta ripped Epsilon's Misfits 23-4, but the Misfits outscored Delta Sigma Tau 4-2. TWENTY SEVEN women entered the archery tourna ment last week. Kappa Del ta's Jan Segers sc ored 145 points for first while Delta Zeta's Karen Casey finished a close sec ond with 144 mark ers. Basketweaver Annette White was third with 138. Today is the women's track and field entry deadline. All entries must be in the InUSF Photo Crank Tunes Up Brahman cross cmmtry star Don Crank warms up for Sat urday's State ' Meet in Tallahassee. The former St. Louis sprinter has been th e top USF runner this season. Crank set the USF course record this year. South Florida finished 1-5. tramural Office before 5 p . m. Women's tennis teams have advanced to the semifinals in double competition. Donna Ur and Lynette Kelly advanced to the finals, defeating Judy Link and Karen Kelly. A semifinals match has Mary Pat Eschenbach and Dana Bartlett against Jane Huck and Kathy Georgius set this week . Rose Verhoestra and Marie Bernard play for the singles championship also. Students Win Tennis Meet Over Faculty USF students ripped the fac ulty 7 in the fifth annual fac ulty-stUdent tennis tourna ment Oct. 28. The win was the first for the students. Larry Broer won the only singles match for the faculty, downing Jack Gore 6-3,. 6 -3. The students, all members of the USF intercollegiate men ' s tennis team, had little trouble capturing the other matches. Bob Shannon teamed with Jim Gould to outpoint Gore and Don Barr 6, 6 for the f a c u I t y's only doubles triumph. Spafford Taylor, USF men's intercollegiate tennis coach, is optimistic about the upcoming season . "This is the first time the faculty hasn't soundly defeat ed the students, and the stu dents competing will probably form the nucl eus of the '67 tennis squad," he said. RESULTS Singles Glenn Brewer (S) defeated Phil Ortwein (F) 6-4, 6-4; Mike Saine (S) defeated Glenn Burdick (F) 8-6, 6-3; Larry Broer (F), defeated Jack Gore (S) 6-3, 6-3; Jim Rinehart (S) defeated Kermit Silverwood (F) 7 -5; 11-9; Dan Perkins (S) defeated Spafford Taylor (F) 6-0, 6-1; Tim Bar rett (S) defeated Don Wyly (F) 8-6, 2-6, 6-4. Doubles Bob Shannon and Jim Gould (F) defeated Gore end Don Barr (S) 6-1, 6-2; Saine and Perkins (S) de ( F) 6-2, 6-1; Banett and Rine feated Burdick and Taylor hart (S) defeated Wyly and Broer (F) 6-4, 11-9. Competition Narrows USF Golfers To 14 Varsity golf prospects have been narrowed to 14 by coach Wes Berner after several weeks of practice and intra squad competition. Match play continues until competition is narrowed to 10 golfers. Berner plans to carry an eig ht -man team for inter collegiate matches in the spring. Top 72-hole scores range from Ron Garcia ' s 311 to 322. The team averaged 79 for 18 hole s. Tom Robertson holds the course record with a one under -par 71, including a 32 on the front nine. Basketweaver Sets 'Trap' A Delta Gamma basketba.Der finds getting rid of the ball a tough job as she is closely guarded by a Basketweaver during last week's battle. The Basketwea. vers won the game 20-10 to clinch second place in their division and a slot this week. Six teams are involved in the women's basket ball playoff, which is a double-elimination tournament. The Basketwea.vers are the de fending women's champions but were defeat ed by Delta Zeta 28-25 this year. Delta Zeta finished 5-0. Soccer Star Remains Out With Illness Jerry Zagani, USF's sopho more forwar d, is still unable to play after a bout with mon onucleosis. Zagarri was a co captain for the St. Louis game. "We don't know if Jerry will be available for action the rest of this season," USF trainer Tony Jonaitis said. Za garri is expected to miss Sat urday's game with Rollins and Joanitis said it is doubtful whether Zagarri will be ready for the final against Florida. Zagarri was the assist and point leader when he became ill He still leads in assis ts but teammate Phil Vitale has taken the leadership in points. Zagarri made the '66 AllState squad at wing forward and w as one of the state's top offensive players. The tal ented performer is one of eight Brahman hooters from St. Louis. Zagarri did not play in the St. Louis game but did sit on the bench in street clothes. USF Blanks Opponents Often Jerry Seifert, USF's goalie, has recorded six shutouts dur ing the past two seasons. Sei fert has four shutouts this year. USF goalies have made seven shutou ts in the short three year history of the soc cer squad. Jim Houck record ed the only shutout during South Florida ' s first season. DAVE YARBROUGH iS To-p DOG A"RDUND HE"RE ess c%nlana d/a/1 THE ORACLENov. 15, 1967, U. of S. Florida-7A Bonanos Roll 26-13 For League Crown The Bonanos captured the Independent League crown as quarterback Willard Brimm scrambled the PE Majors pass defense and led his club to a 26-13 win. Brimm and the undefeated Bonanos started slowly and tied the score 7-7 at halftime . They dominated the second half. Four minutes after the opening kickoff, PEM quar terback Art Ulmer fired a 19-yard scoring pass to Jim Gracey. Gary Mullin caught the PAT pass, giving the PEM squad a 7-0 lead . BRIMM TOSSED a 30-yard TD strike with less than two minutes left in the first half and then connected for the PAT. After pushing the score to Sports Budgets Receive Slice s USF sports clubs, original ly told they had a $500 total budget this year, learned recently that they will receive no funds. Murphy Osbor ne, recrea tio nal sports coordinator, said a preliminary report showed a $500 budget, but the official budget eliminated that alloca tion. Approximately $300 has al ready been spent by the Sports Club Council. Insur ance for two Windjammer sailing boats took much of that expenditure . Money will be taken from the intramural allocations to cover sports dub expenses already in curred. 13-7, Brimm fired his third TD pass 45 yards to Jim Gray. The PAT upped the count to 20-T. Ulmer and the Majors were unable to move the ball, and Brimm led the Bonanos to the final Bonano score on a three-yard run. His squad led 26-7. ULMER FIRED a 30-yard sideline pass to John Jolinski for the final PEM score. The PAT made It 26-13. Ulmer completed 12-20 for 150 yards while Brimm had 10-28 and one intercepted. Play was rough during the contest but the officials kept It under control. Beta 3W22 Beta lEfi Beta 3E-25 Beta 4E-6 Beta 2E-19 Beta GE0 Beta 3W-3 Beta 2W 0 Kawa Sigma. 24 TEP-0 Pi Kappa Alpha30 Kappa Sigma-6 Sig Ep3 Beta Tau. 0 Alpha 2E-14 Alpha 3W0 2W-25 Alpha 3E 6 Alpha 4W-24 Alpha 2E 16 Fontana 3, 27 Fontana 5-7 Bonanos-26 PEM 13 Beavers-15 HEP Cats-14 Kopp's Killers20 Chiefs 0 Weekend Tournaments USF's fencing club is spon soring two tournam ents Satur day in the Gymnasium. The USF F e ncing Tournament be gins at 9 a.m. and includes South Florida students only. A 50-cent entry fee is re quired. USF's Intercollegiate Fenc ing tournament starts at 1 p.m. and includes many south ern univ e rsities . Entry fee is $1.50. Whe n Dave says som e thing, people listen! Yes terday Phil had a swell new idea and Dave said, "Let's run it out to the compost h eap and see how she rots." I mean, it really takes something to say thing s like that. Dave ha s just movedinto Fon tana Hall. He grooves the food and the pool. As Gulliver discovered, falling asleep at the wron g tim e can be downright embarrassing, e ven for a Big Man on Campus. Ah, well, it can happ e n to the best of u s. Your eyelids droop. Your attention wanders. You' re drow s y all ove r . Quick! Take a couple of NoDoz. NoDoz really works to h elp you stay a l ert. Keep some h an dy, in your pocket , your medicine chest, the glove compartment of your car. NoOoz. It' s non habit forming. Take NoDoz. Show 'em th e y can't keep a good man down . THE ONE TO TAKE WHEN Y .OU HAVE TO STAY ALERT. Registration Hours: University Center 10 A.M. 3 P.M. Argos & Andros Center 11 •• 2 P.M. Fontana Hall 11 A.M. • 1 P.M.

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8-ATHE ORACLE-Nov. 15, 1967, U. of S. Florida IBM'S 140 1 , 141 0 Story Of 3 Computers, Their Ups And Downs ByFRANCESDEEN StaU Writer This is the story of USF and the three IBMs -computers, that is. The one we had, the one we have now and the one Jack Chambers hopes will come. Once upon a time, back in the days when USF was just three years old, there came a computer to the campus. Its name was IBM 1401, and it was known as the "first gen eration computer." It worked very hard, but by 1962 the student body had out grown old 1401 and so there came IBM 1410, bigger, smarter and known as the "second generation comput er." DR. JACK CHAMBERS, assistant dean of administration and director of USF's Com puter Research Center, says IBM 1410 works very hard too. So hard, in fact, that it has earned a new home and a facelifting. Plans call for moving the Center from present cramped quarters in the Administration Building to almost an entire floor of the new Science Lab Building, now under construc tion. Here, it will share the second floor with Evaluation Services. More immediate plans have provided additional devices and personnel to help the computer carry on under a staggering load. FOR OLD IBM 1410 is be ginning to wilt beneath the heat wave of increased stu dent records and faculty re search, and, in the director's eyes, its days are numbered It will be used until the financing is available for the "third generation computer," whose name is yet unknown. It will come from any one of eight reputable houses. Representatives from IBM, Controlled Data Corporation, Honeywell, Burroughs, Na tional Cash Register Compa ny, Sperry Rand, General Electric and RCA have already presented slide demon strations and lectures for the university's department heads for their consideration in naming the heir. Second step in the selection process, Chambers said, gets under way this fall when staff members will visit an instal lation of each type throughout the country. Also, a survey of the administration and faculty will be taken to determine their anticipated use for the next five years. EARLY IN QUARTER ll, Chambers expects to be ready with a recommendation for the Executive Committee. It will select one of the new ma chines under consideration to be USF's "third generation computer." Meanwhile, there has been the face lifting for old IBM 1410, which had been limping along under a 53 per cent increase in usage this year. Five show tape drives have been replaced by six fast tapes. The addition of a disc allows handling of up to 25,000 student records and almost in stantaneous access to them. Originally geared to a sin gle basic machine language (autocoder) which limited it to a small operatlon, 1410 has been revamped to switch all programming to the two commonly accepted program ming languages of the computer world, COBOL and FORTRAN, Chambers said. COBOL is the name for c o m m o n business-oriented language, while FORTRAN, (formula translating system) is the language covering all scientific work. "With a student enrollment of about 10,000, we simply ran __ .; Security Officers See Th ld G ory Flies A 51h by 9% foot piece of nylon cloth doesn't have much monetary value but when it is a national symbol, like the United States flag, it deserves special attention. Upholding the code and tra dition of Old Glory at USF is undertaken by University Se c_urity Staff. They see to it that the Stars and Stripes fly seven days a week on the poles in front of the Adminis tration Building and atop the University Library. The Flag Code and Tradi tion Manual, passed by Congress in 1942, provides the patrolmen a guideline for cer emonial procedures. The man ual states tha t the national flag sho uld be displayed at all sc'hools and public institu tions. AT DAWN, security patrolmen Lewis Stuart and Charles Wilson hoist the colors. State and school flags take subordi nate positions below and to the right and left of the American flag in front of the Ad ministration Building. They are raised only on school days or special occasions. At 5 p.m. , patrolmen John Thurman, Edgar Peddie, and John Carrol lower the flags , fold them into the traditional triangular shapes with only the stars and blue field show ing, and return them to the Administration Building infor mation office for the night. The manual originally stated that the flag should not be flown in inclement weather. Congress amended this stip ulation d u r i n g President Eisenhower's administration, and now requires that the flag be flown all day except under extremely severe weather conditions. If a special occasion re quires a color guard, the Se curity Staff provides an ROTC unit from a nearby school or a detachment from a local reserve unit. Teaching Variety Offered Off-Campus Within the College of Educa tion, the clearinghouse for edu cation students who desire to do outside observations or in tern, is the office of director of interns. Calvert Craig, director of interns, co-ordinates all activi ties between USF and the public schools to place stu dents within these schools for the various types of experi ences. Pre teaching experiences, such as teacher aides or stu dents who wish to observe certain classroom procedures go through his office. A TEACHER aide usually works with a teacher and-or administration officials of the public school he or she is as signed to. Teacher-aides usually work as clerks and typists in the school as well as help in grad ing and protecting examina tions. "Some education students decide what they want to teach at this time, or if they want to teach at all , and de cide what level they want to teach, " said Craig. He added that these experiences help them with their internship. ANOTHER part of the pre interning experiences is ob servation co-ordinated by the office of the director of in terns. This includes teacher and student observations, and 512 FRANKLIN STREET BRITTON PLAZA counseling and guidance. "More of this is being done now," said Craig. These types of experiences go through the office of the di rector of interns because if done individually or in a class of students, with o u t co ordination, the person(s) in volved may not see what they want to see. ANOTHER reason is clear ance. Craig explained, "There is then a mutual co-operation between the schools and USF to make better teachers for the schools." Interns, who make applica tion to this office prior to internship are chosen by the various center office staffs of the seven area Boards of Pub lic Instruction. Interns may intern at a school close to where they live, if they live in the seven-county area. PERSONS with f e d e !l' a 1 grants come to the office of the director for outside con tracts. These may be either undergraduates or graduate students. Professors and committees of USF don't have to go through this o f f i c e. Coordination is done by the per son or person individually. Organizations Must Reserve Aegean Space All student organizations wanting page space in the Aegean should return the reserv ing forms to the Office of Campus Publications, Univer sity Center 223. "Any organization which didn't receive an invitation to reserve a page in the Aegean should phone 617 or 618," said Larry Hevia, yearbook consul tant. The G r e e k reservation sheets have been sent to a ll fraternities and sororities. Greeks should make a sitting appointment with Educational Resources Photo Department, ext. 341. There is no charge for the pictures, Hevia saicL Photo by R•ndv Jones Long Shall She Wave Old Glory begins another day of flying over USF as patrolman Charles 0. Wilson hoists her to Dutter in the breeze in front of the Administration Building. Some Surprising Things Come To USF Mailroom Ever wondered how that lit tle f rog you opened up in your zoology class made it to the USF campus? Or that elongated worm which you refused to touch? Besides the regular mail, the USF mail service handles these rather unusual packages. Dr. R. W. Long also sends and !I'eceives plants through the mail for botany bacterio logy in addition to the animals. Speaking of animals, stray dogs on campus are brought to the mail room in the basement of the University Center and kept there until the owner is contacted. Otherwise, they are taken to the dog pound. So if you're missing Rover ... All campus mail goes through the mailroom. They get a lot of mail for students who have moved off campus, transferred or graduated. They also receive mail for Fontan a residents, e v e n though their mail is not sup posed to go through USF. In summary campus mail man J_ Olan Howard said, "You'd be surprised what people send by mail." Order Your 1968 Aegean Nov. 20 Anyone wanting to order a 1968 Aegean can do so, Nov. 20 and 21 in the University Center lobby from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. "So far, fewer than 900 books have been ordered. To avoid the long lines and de lay in January, books may be reserved now . We want to make sure that students and fe.c ulty who want copies will get them," said Dr. Arthur M . Sanderson, d i r e c t o r of Campus Publications. His of fice, in Cl'R223, will accept reservations any week day from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m Jan. 15 is the last day to reserve a copy of t h e 1968 Aegean. They will be de\ iv ered in l a te M ay. The cost of reserving an Aegean is $1. There is no further charge. Let Arthur Yates Be Your Personal Jeweler ••• * Profeuional Engraving While You Wait * 3 Master Watchmakers, Tampa's Finest One Week Service * Your Personal Designs Beautifully Finished By Our Diamond Setter * No Charge For Estimates * Store Front Parking FiNANCING AVAILABLE • • • SERVING TAMPA OVER 20 YEARS SB02 NEPTUNE (AT DALE MABRY) TAMPA, Jri..ORIDA PH• .. out of space," the director stated. EFFICIENCY also got a lift this year by additional per sonnel. Once staffed by one systems consultant, the Center has added three people to key positions. The number of programmers was inoreased from three to seven. Heading Computer Planning this year is Herb Rebhun, past associate registrar with the University of Indiana. Reb hun has a master's degree from the University of Pitts burgh. Ed Can-leton, who has 15 years experience in computer systems and an M.A. in ac counting from New York Uni versity, is now coordinator of Fiscal Operations. Faculty in the Education Social Sciences will be aided by William C. Miller, coordinator of Faculty Consulting, who has a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from the Uni versity of Iowa. ALSO COORDINATOR of Faculty Consulting , but in the area of Natural Sciences and Engineering, is Cu!I'tis Kellogg. Kellogg has a mas ter's degree in mathematics and a background in computer research in the Measurement Research Center, Uni versity of Iowa. Within two years, Chambers said, it is hoped that additional systems planners can be added for the areas of library and medical school. The seven programmers "are now being assigned on a more or less permanent basis to specific areas such as reg istration, or finance and ac counting," the director said. " Also, we are establishing a ' p roga-am and tape library to facilitate use of data in ' ma chine form." IN SPITE OF this major up-dating , (the first since the machine's installation in 1962) 1410 can only be manned by one operator. Chambers looks forward to the day of multi-programming, when several operators can handle many requests simul taneously. This will be when .ever finances make it possible to replace 141 Owith the "third generation computer," perhaps two years from now. Chambers explained how this multi-programming would work. "With receivers scattered around campus, you could have a student in a dorm asking fur certain infor mation for an assignment, Rresident Allen calling from his office for the GPR of a student while a professor might be calling in for research on a class subject, all at the same time. Operators would feed the questions to the machine and all answers would be read back within seconds." MONEY IS the main obsta cle to overcome before this type service becomes a reality. The Board of Regents has to find enough funds from both the State of Florida's education resources and .the National Science Foundation funds. The situation in the Center is handicapped at present by lack of adequate financing by this year's legislature. "The increase we did get in this department for the current year was so tiny as to be infinitesimal," Chambers said. "It didn't even meet the increase in student enrollment." ELABORATING ON the 53 per cent increase in usage, he pointed out that the change to the Quarter system necessi tated a mammoth job of key punching whole new sets of ca.Jrds. "The cost of cards alone is getting to be enor mous," Chambers said. THE MEN OF LAMBDA CHI ALPHA Cordially Invite You To The INTERFRATERNITY RUSH January 2-6, 1968 look for the can LIME, REGULAR AND MENTHOL et961, Componv. See .. The fly ing Nun," Thursday evenings . W :30 NVT. A8CV. I '

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Lambda Chi Presidents l(idnap Set For Tonight LAMBDA em ALPHA Lambda Chi is planning to kidnap the presidents of the fraternities and sororities on campus and 'hold them for ransom tonight. Ransom will be one can of food per member of the fraternities and sororities. The food will be distributed among various charity organizatons. treat was . held last weekend. Representatives from all Flor ida chapters were present. The pledge class is building paddles for their big brothers. DELTA TAU DELTA The Delta Tau Delta Sweet heart will be announced at the Holiday Inn on Saturday . Can didates are: Diane Kulas, Pat Bowers, Terry Johnstone, Rosemary Eppes, L i n d a Lasey, Ginny Pippin, Deanne Serra, Terry Sharpe, Mary Herman, Ginger Brown, and EveHolkum. A brother-pledge picnic was held on t'he riverfront proper ty last Sunday. SlGMA Pm EPSILON Sigma Phi Epsilon is en gaged in the sale of plastic window signs to raise money for their scholarship fund. Hand bills were printed and distributed urging support for the Brahmans against St. Louis. A leadership conference was held at the University Chapel Fellowship Nov. 10-11. New Plans for rush and the pledge program were dis cussed. A social was held last Wednesday with the pledges of Delta Delta Delta in the Fireside Lounge. Music was provided by Roger Coe and "The Helmsmen." Pm DELTA THETA A spaghetti dinner will be Held for the brothers on Fri day. Dystrophy Drive, Kids Party Planned By Sisters A semi-formal dance will be held at the Trowel Trade Union Hall. A delegation recently visit ed the Phi Delta Theta Colony at Rollins College. Larry Ross was recently married to Lavonne Sexton of Jacksonville. SIGMANU Nu will hold a cock tail party with the Tampa area Alumni today. Wade Parsons announced his engagement to Kathy Hess._ Benny Grady has laval iered Lyn Vanderbilt. THETACID A number of brothers recen tly attended the University of Florij:la Homecoming and vis ited the brothers of the Tau chapter while in Gainesville. ALPHA Pm OMEGA ThirteE!n pledges passed the APhiD Pledge test Nov. 1. Formal pledging ceremonies w!ll be held In CTR 255-6 on Nov. 16 at 7 p.m. Pledges are: Dan Dorney, Sylvester T h o m a s, Ken McMillan, Joseph J. D 'Esposi to, John Greer, Charles Kuhn, Ronald Norris, R i c 'h a r d Roper, Skip Koski, Dennis Gunn, Bryson Clevenger, Eric Bush, and Keith Bletzer. APhiD will undertake reno- • vation of the pond on Chinse gut Hill as their service proj ect for Saturday. TAU KAPPA EPSILON The Florida Province Re-t:RICW For their next service proj ect the sisters of Tri Chi will hold a Thanksgiving day party for the underprivileged children of the West Tampa Day Care Center. Sisters are Choosing their new mascot from a list of in terested servicemen now sta tioned in Vietnam . Mrs. Majorie Herrin is the second faculty advisor to join Tri Chi. Mrs. Herrin is a new faculty member on the Li brary staff. Alpha Delta Pi The Pledge class of A D Pi will supervise the muscular dystrophy drive to be held Sat urday by high school service clubs . Sisters were guests of the pledge class Nov. 12 at Rowl ette Park. Entertainment was an "AD Pi Love In." Liani Fernandez was recent ly selected to be a Florida State University Sigma Phi Epsilon ••Little Sister." DELTA ZETA Saturday Maria Traina, rus-h chairman, will hold an all day rush workshop . ' Candlelights were held for Crill Hardin lavaliered to Jim Head; Sheila Michaels laval iered to Pat Eiseman; and Irene Perez pinned to Bob Norton. DELTA DELTA DELTA Tri Delta held an informal pledge party Nov. 10 at the Cruis-a Cade club. Entertain ment was provided by the "Peasants." The new Tri Delt Mascots are: Pete Kenning, Bill McDevitt, and R i c h a r d Moore. Photo by Rlchord Smoot Martinez Speaks For Teachers MARTINEZ SAYS Tuesday alumnae, sisters and pledges met at a dessert party at the Junior League Headquarters to celebrate Founder's Day. Tri Delt pledges attended a social given by Lambda Chi Alphas pledge class, and a so cial given by Alpha Tau Omega. DELTA SIGMA TAU Delta Sigma is planning a luncheon for the sisters and special guests to be held at Fried's Restaurant Sunday. Sister Ede Lamvert was a representative of USF at a de bate conference in Atlanta, Georgia . President Irene Pomerantz has been appointed undersec retary of to the S. A. and Joan Gross to the Speak er's Bureau. KAPPA DELTA Friday the national Treasurer of Kappa Delta , Ruth Williams, will visit the USF chapter. Last Thursday a demonstra tor from Merle Norman Cosmetics gave the sistersa demonstration in make-up ap plications. DELTA GAmiA A Bridal shower was held for Susan Hugely in the Fire side Lounge last Sunday. Delta kappa colony pledges had dinner with Tri Chi pledg es last week. Delta Gamma anchor men chosen at the "Raunchy Ranch party" were Larry Cranor, and Mike Lackman. Hillsborough Not Bad For Teachers Terrace Beauty Salon 9303 • 56th St. By TOM JIMENEZ Staff Writer Ph. 988-2798 Robert Martinez, secretary of the Hillsborough County Classroom Teacher's Associa tion (CTA), told members of SORORITY LIFE e IT'S A GOOD LIFE. IT'S A HARD LIFE, I IT'S A FUN LIFE, THE GREEK LIFE. REGISTER FOR JANUARY RUSH e • NOVEMBER 20, CTR LOBBY PANHELLEN1C COUNCIL SPONSORS REGISTRATION ON , NOVEMBER 20 IN THE CTR LOBBY. ANY WOMAN WHO HAS NOT REGISTERED IS INVITED TO REGISTER. THE OFFICE OF STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS (CTR 156 A) WILL BE OPEN UNTIL DECEMBER 1 .•. , FOR LATE REGISTRATION. RUSH STARTS JAN. 2 at 2:00 P.M. in the TAT the Student Florida Education Association here last week that Hillsborough County is "not a bad place in which to teach . " Martinez began with a brief history of the Florida school system and the changes which have or will be made. He con tinued with a history of the Hillsborough County school system and stressed the pas sage of the bond issue , "If it doesn ' t pass now, we don't know when it will." Martinez said he would like to see the formation of a CTA-type organization at USF. l\lARTINEZ explained Hills borough County's employ. ment process and said the school board does not hire the teachers but authorizes them to seek positions within t h e county. "Make yo11r appointments with the principals," Martinez said. He also reminded the education students that "there are 125 different personalities (Hillsborough County princi pals) with w hom to deal." He emphasized the competi tion within the profession and also mentioned some of the desires of the hiring principals. WARNING STUDENTS who will seek positions in the sys tem, he said, "If you tell them something different, it will reflect poorly on you in many ways." He advised stu dents to make a copy of any thing they sign. He also cautioned students to know, upon entering the school system, the salary schedule, teacher-pupil ratio, lunch and conference hours, system benefits, t y p e s of leaves, promotional policy, dismissal policy and curricu lum development. "If promotional policies are not known, you'd better sus pect they are done on merit," he said, also advising that guarantees be made in writ ing. "THE FIRST teaching year is the most trying," Martinez said. He added that within the first three years, 20 per cent of all new teachers leave the profession and 3 per cent are not renominated. Two reasons for leaving were marriage and service obligations. Martinez discussed the indi vidual a n d his limitations within the school system. He said, "Academic freedom and tools must be obtained through the professional orga nization." After the speech students questioned Martinez. 0 n e question concerned the teacher's individual dress and ac tions, of which Martinez re plied, "Behavior, in a system where there are so many im pressionc:tble minds, has to conform on the teacher's part." No Food Cards Valid During Thanksgiving Students are reminded that their meal cards will not be valid over the Thanksgiving holiday season. No food cards may be used beginning with breakfast Nov. 23 through lunch Nov. 26. They will be valid again be ginning with the evening meal Nov. 26, according to the Housing Office. Students generally go home over this period and they were not charged for these meals in the purchase price of the meal cards. Lest Year's Folk Winners Sing Out Information On Exceptional Children At CTR Booth THE ORACLENov. 15, 1967, U. of S. Florida9A No Aegean Ball, CTR Events Set USF's Fifth Annual Folk Sing rocks out Friday, at 8 p . m. in the teaching auditori um. The contest is open to groups, individuals, organi zations, and residence halls. The event is sponsored by the University Center Music Com mittee . Judges are USF facul ty and staff members. Last year's first place winner in the non-professional category was Robert Fisher, and "1932" was the winner In the professional category. , The Miss Aegean Ball has been cancelled, but in its pI a c e the University Dance Committee is presenting "The San Francisco Earthquake." ••Tms BAND is promising to be one of the best at USF this year," said UC Dance Committee chairman, Milt Morrison. The group not only plays rock 'n roll, but puts on a show too. To the reels of Laurel and Hardy films used with the Marlon Branda, Trevor Howard, and Richard Harris. As a special feature this week two free tickets to the "Bounty" exhibit will be given away at each of the showings. Film times are 7 :30 p.m . Friday, Saturday, and Sunday and a Sunday matinee at 2 p.m. in the Fine Arts, Humanities (FAH) 101. Staff, faculty and married students are invited to bring their children to the UC Mov ie Committee's preSientation of another children's film. "Alakazam the Great'' will be presented Saturday at 10:30 am. in FAH 101. An after show treat will be finger painting. Admission is 25 cents for adults and 10 cents for children. To bring to the attention of areas and what the persons instrobe lights, the band adds Taste that beats the others cold! USF students that through Frivalved in it do. another special effect, singing day is Exceptional Child Week, . in smoke. The dance will be in th E ti al Child Cl b ECC holds meetings once a e xcep on u th d . li . . the Argos Ballroom at 9 p.m. ( ECC) h b th . th U . mon an 1s so c1hng mem. as a oo m e bers at the booth. "W e want our Saturday. Admission is 50 vers1ty Center. Memberships 1 . t' . b th . cents. . . app 1ca wns m y e tune will be taken at this booth. school's out, " said Elizabeth This week's movie is "MuttToday is the last day students Cleveland, club treasurer. ny on the Bounty" starring may get literature on the five special education areas. The five areas are: the culturally deprived child, the gifted, speech and hearing deficiencies, mentally retarded and the emo tionally disturbed. The ECC, which has applied for national membership in the Council for Exeeptional Chil dren, hopes to go national in the near future. AT ONE of the two tables in the University Center, students may see slides of one of the five EVER WONDER WHY Skip Wells, President of Sigma Nu at Univer sity of Wyoming, enrolled in College Mas fer? Ask Glenn Robertson, President of Kappa Sigma1 HERE at USF! or Call Joe Hobbs Pete Agdamag Dick Sullivan 988-1103 Fidelity Union Lift Check Our For Maximum Honest-to Pepsi taste! PEPSI COLA Pick up an extra carton today! Specials Tire Performance OLIN MOn PREMIUM 800 RETREADS RACE TUCK PROVEN ALIGNMENT & BRAKE SPECIAL! HERE'S WHAT WE DO: 1. ALIGN FRONT WHEELS 2. ADJUST BRAKES 3. BALANCE FRONT WHEELS =:f9 , 4. SAFETY INSPECT YOUR CAR \ 4 for 539.95 1.00 each for Whitewalls ALL FOR $995 JUST Including Fed. Tax. Exchange for Smooth Tires Off Car MOST AMERICAN CARS PARTS EXTRA IF NEEDED 37411. HillsbefOIIIh Ave. Phone 237 HOME OF UNIROYAL Ask for Our Surprise Low Price! HIGH PERFORMANCE tested at sustained spMd of 125 mph. WIDE TRACK WRAPAROUND TREAD over 22,500 biting edges on a 10% deeper tread. Means better cornering, greater traction, and longer wear. LOW PROFILE CONTOUR means less flex• ing, less heat buildup. SUPER-STRENGTH NYLON CONSTRUCTION for added blowout protection. PRESSURE TEMPERED pre-shapes the tire to the same shape it will assume in road service. 110LIN MOTT SKIDS YOU NOT11 STUDENTS will Receive SPECIAL DISCOUNT On All Purchases of n res and Parts Upon Presentation of USF Identification Card TAMPA 11003 N. Florida An. Phone 935 1119 W. Ktftlltdy Blvd. Phont 253-3. 111 UKEWID 127 s. lalct Parlttr Ave. Phone 616S Sf. PmRSBURG 2392 • 9th St. N. Phone 196-4641 CLURWATEI 1409 s. Missouri Ave. Phone 446-3051

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Little Things Brighten Up Their lives By TOM JIMENEZ Staff Writer "Penny brought a frog to school," said the teacher to her five students. "Penny brought a frog to school," she repeated. "Who brought a frog to school?" she asked. Then her finger swayed and pointed to one of the five students. "Danny." A brown-haired boy of seven stopped his kicking under the chair and looked . up. Then he replied, "Buppy (puppy)." "No," the teacher answered, "Penny brought a frog to school. Danny, who brought a frog to school?" THE YOUNG MAN with a hearing aid in his ear, thought, a few seconds passed, and he said "Penny .•• This culminated two days of working on a particular lesson with students from the Tampa Oral School for the Deaf. The class is taught by Mrs. Judy Thorne at the University Apartments as part of a USF Speech Patholo gy Department program . The department is part of the special education divi sian of the College of Education. One ftmction of the Speech Pathology department is to evaluate speech defects. PERSONS WITH a hearing or speech deficiency can be refered to the clinic by a doctor, parent, or teacher. "All you need to do is request an evaluation," said Mrs. STEPHEN DOWELL . . . at clinic. DANNY HODGES ••. pilot to navigator • 'You're The Pilot ' • • • • : ;j2 '::t. ,, :.% . a Sharon Hansen, student clinician, puts the e arphones on her young pilot, Danny Hodges, whom she is testing. This test will measure the eonductivltiy of vibrations on the earlobe to the nerves in the ear. "You've got to let me know when you hear the signal by raising your right hand when you hear a sound in your right ear, when you hear a sound in your left ear • • • " Photos by Randy Jones Penny Brought The Frog • • • Mrs. Judy Thorne, teacher of the deaf from the Tampa Oral School for the Deaf, tries to make her pretty seven-year old student un .. derstand the lesson for the day. Sherrie, is pointing to the right answer, which is, "Penny brought a frog to school." When In The Dorms --Lend And Borrow As Your Neighbors Do Jobs in Europe Luxembourg-American Student In formation Service is celebrating its lOth year of successful operation placing students in jobs and arrang ing tours. Any student may now choose from thousands of jobs such as resort, office, sales, factory, hos pital, etc. in 15 countries with wages up to $400 a month. ASIS maintains placement offices throughout Europe insuring you of on the spot help at all times. For a booklet listing all jobs with application forms and dis count tours send $2 (job application, overseas handling & airmail reply) to: c;;-Dept. O , American Student Informa tion Service, 22 Ave. de Ia Libertef Luxembourg City, Duchy o LunmbQUI'go::. Beauty Salon & Wig Center Fletchet Ave. at 22nd St. 'By Appointment 935 • • Even teetotalers are now weartng Whiskey Brown ••• the new color-blend stimulating to the spirit as well as to the wardrobe.' Join us for a taste? South Dale Mabry-Tampa JUST SOUTH OF PENINSULAR BANK • • By CHERI HUCKER Correspondent Apparently a college stu dent needs few belongings of his own to survive at school; he can borrow what he needs. The borrowing system here is prevalent in both the men's and women's dorms. Girls lend and borrow a! most anything, especially clothes, "Best outfits" are in terchanged a m o n g room mates, suitemates, or floor mates, and one outfit shows up at several different par ties, dances, or movie dates • . . never on the same girl. The most congenial exam ple I know of is a suite of eight girls, who all con veniently wear the same size, and have an "open closet" policy so complete that each girl never knows who is wear ing her clothes. The first one to grab gets the best outfit for the day. Besides clothes, accessories such as shoes, purses, gloves, and jewelry are popu1ar among the "inter-borrowers." It may take a half dozen "lenders" to dress one girl for one evening. Although men borrow and lend clothing less frequently, certain circumstances often force them to borrow ironed or clean articles when their own are not suitable. Ties and sportscoats are sometimes lent, but on the whole, the guys don't borrow as much as the girls do. Books are second place among lent items for both men and girls; dictionaries and supplements more than textbooks. Pens and pencils, tape and tacks are lent frequently. Record players, irons, ten nis rackets, clothes racks, ironing boards, spray starch, and transistor radios are third place items for all. The least frequent items to be lent or borrowed are in timacies such as perfume, spray deodorant, soap, tooth paste, hand lotion, or chap stick. Both sexes lend their cars, but girls, who think of a car as a commodity rather than "living status" seem to prac tice this more than men. With abundant supplies in the dorm, it is easy to see that students get along with very little of their own. and then he said. Circle K Goes For Dimes ••• NORTHSIDE CLEANERS IS THE GREATEST FOR QUALITY CLEANING AND LAUNDRY Circle-K will begin their an nual March of Dimes drive on Co-Op Session Slated Monday An information session f o r new cooperative students will be held Monday at 2 p.m. in Engineering Bldg. 3. Before going on their first training period, the students will be briefed on the prob lems they may confront and how to cope with them. Dr. Keith Lupton, coordinator and assistant director of the USF Cooperative Education Pro gram, will speak to the group. According to Lupton, the goal of the session is to "im plant firmly in the students the fact that they are repre senting USF and the coopera tive education program. They are going out on assignments as part of their education" and should so conduc t them selves responsibly. The Co-op Student Advisory Council will present a panel discussion on the vario us as pects and challenges of coop erative education. Campus next January. Scott Peeler, 3SP, has been named chairman of the drive. No quota has been set yet for USF this year. Last year, the junior Kiwaneans collect ed $50. Circle-K will ask other campus organizations to help them with the drive this year. Cans will be placed near cash registers for donation s . Members of Circle-K will also carry cans. Now Forming At Temple Bowling Lanes: Fraternity and Student Body Bowling Leagues Special Bowling and Billiard Club Bowl or play Billiards AU You Want! 7.00 per month For Information Call 988-4338 Membership cards now aoailable for more information Call 988-4338 TEMPlE LANES 5311 Temple Terrace Hwy. ;: : . :-.:' :' . SPECIAL PRICES TO STUDENTS NORTHSIDE CLEANERS 13161 FLORIDA AVE. AT FLETCHER Special Student Rates Twenty Lanes Brunswick Equipment Six Billiard Tables Snack Bar Plenty of Free Parking Jean P. Glover, speech pathologist. When a person comes in for an evaluation, which is usually done by speech pathology students under supervi sion of their professors, he is given two types of tests to determine hearing. The tests are: An air conductive hear ing test, to measure the eardrum and bone mechanism of the ear, and a bone conductive test, to measure the nerves of the ear through vibrations of the earlobe. STUDENTS A.J.SO give tests to measure articulation, the oral mechanism of the person tested, and to estimate the language complexity. Students are told to look for cer tain points during these tests. A boy of eight comes into the room. Within the room there are three chairs and an audiometer on the table. Sharon Hansen , 3CB, gently says to the lad, "Now Danny, we are going to pretend you are an airplane pilot, so you've got to let me know when you hear the signal." Silence then pervades except for the sounds of "o.k." from Sharon and the rusiling of the shirt as he raises his hand. DR. STEWART W. KINDE, speech pathologist, said that deafness comes in degrees of severity. When asked what problems are repairable, he said, "Conductive prob lems are usually repairable, nerve problems are not." After a student is evaluated he is told of the degree of severity. Then the therapy begins. There are many types of therapy given to students by the clinic. Equipment used by the speech pathology department ranges from a 10 pound "Warblett" to detect loss of hear ing in the new born, to a computer-run Evoked Response Audiometer System. OF THE "WARBLETT", Kinde said, "It's a gross kind of screening but it alerts you to the children who should receive continuous testing." Tests are made by students, who go to the Nurseries at St. Joseph's and Tampa General Hospitals. The Evoked Response Audiometer System (ERAS) on loan to USF from the Tampa School for the deaf, will be put into operation in about four months, according to Dr. Kinde. ERAS works by recording brain activity and its response to sound . Involving a computer, ERAS :is programmed to rec ord the signal, number of presentations of the various signals and to indicate the reactions to the signaL HEARING CLINICS, another project of the Speech Pathology department, are held two or three times a year. The clinics are open to all those persons referred to the clinic by a physician or nurse. Doctors, specialists, counselors and clinicians determine the extent of hearing loss. A clinic was held Wednesday, November 8. A mumps test will be started by the Speech Patholo gy dpartment, which is only awaiting the names of per sons from the Hillsborough County Health Department . Those who have recently had the mumps are referred by the Hillsborough County Health Department to the Speech Pathology department. The program is purely voluntary and its purpose Is to determine if mumps cause loss of hearing . 0n ealllP• .1-n (Bu the aullwr of "Rally Round tM Flag, B0111l"1 GiUis," etc.) FOOTBALL FOR SHUT-INS At next Saturday's football game while you are sitting ln. your choice student's seat behind the end zone, won't you pause and give a thought to football's greatest and. alas, most neglected name? I refer, of course, to Champert Sigafoos. Champert Sigafoos (1714-1928) started life humbly on a farm near Thud, Kansas: :tJis mother and father, both named Walter, were bean-gleaners, and Champert became a bean-gleaner too. But he tired of the work and went to :Montana where he got a job with a logging firm. Here the erstwhile bean-gleaner worked as a stump-thumper. After a month he went to North Dakota where he tended the furnace in a granary (wheat-heater). Then he drifted to Texas where he tidied up oil fields (pipe-wiper). Then to Arizona where he strung dried fruit (fig-rigger). Then to Kentucky where he fed horses at a breeding farm (oat toter). Then to Long Island where he dressed poultry ( Then to Alaska where he drove a delivery van for a bakery (bread-sledder). Then to Minnesota where he cut up frozen lakes (ice-slicer). Then to Nevada where he determined the odds in a gambling house (dice pricer). Then to Milwaukee where he pasted camera lenses together (Zeiss-splicer). . Finally he went to Omaha where he got a job in a tan nery, beating pig until they were soft and supple (hog-flogger). Here occurred the event that changed not only Champert's life, but all of ours •. Next door to Champert's hog-fioggery was a mooring mast for dirigibles. In flew a dirigible one day, piloted by a girl named Gratra von Zeppelin. Champert watched Gratra descend from the dirigible, and his heart turned over, and he knew love. Though Gratra's beauty was not quite perfect-one of her legs was shorter than the other was nonetheless ravishing, what with her tawny hair and her eyes of Lake Louise blue and her marvelously articulated haunches. Cham pert, smitten. ran quickly back to the hog-fioggery to plan the wooing. To begin with, naturally, he would give Gratra a pres ent. This presented problems, for hog-flogging, as we all know, is a signally underpaid profession. Still, thought Champert, if he had no money, there were two things he did have: ingenuity and pigskin. So he selected several high grade pelts and stitched them together and blew air into them and made for Graff a a perfectly darling little replica of a dirigible. "She will love this,'' said he contldently to himself and proceeded to make ready to call on Gratra. First, of course, he shav ed with Personna Super Stain less Steel Blades. And wouldn't you? If you were looking to impress a girl, if you wanted jowls as smooth as ivory. dewlaps like damask, a chin strokable, cheeks fondlesome, upper lip kissable, would you not use the blade that whisks away whiskers quickly and slickly, tuglessly and nicklessly, scratchlessly and matchlessly? Would you not, in short, choose Personna, available both in Injector style and double-edge Of course you would. So Champert, his face a study in epidermal elegance. rushed next door with his little pigskin dirigible. But Graff a, .alas, had run off, alsCJ, with a bush pilot who spe cialized in. dropping limes to scurvy-ridden Eskimo vii lages (fruit-chuter). Champert, enraged, started kicking his little pigskin blimp all over the place. And who should walk by just then but Jim Thorpe, Knute Rockne, Walter Camp. and Pete Rozelle! They walked silently, heads down, four discouraged men. For weeks they had been trying to invent football, but they couldn't seem to find the right kind of ball . They tried everything hockey pucks, badminton birds, bowling balls, quoits-but nothing worked. Now seeing Champert kicking his pigskin spheroid, their faces lit up and as one man they hollered "Eureka!" The rest is history. tt tt tt CtN7, Jl'u Bbulma• Speaking of lcielu, if you'"e gol any about your pre•• ena •hat1e cream, 117 regular or menUUIJ.

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., --THE ORACLENov. 15, 1967, U. of S. Florida11A w. 't.-... Minors Glimpse A Trip To Jail (Coo tinned from Page 1-A) NO. THESE are not USF students rehearsing for a part in with Jack Webb. To those who were caught, this is the real McCoy. There is silence in the police car and shadows of the street invade the privacy of its now-thinking inhabitants. When the vehicles arrive at the Tampa Police Department .lail or at the Hillsborough County Jail, a tight security ring surrounds the prisoners. Then comes tne realization, "this is not a laughing matter." The car is driven into a special garage where the vehi cle stops. The officer gets out and then lets out the "prison ers." A VOICE FROM the inside calls for an all-secure from the outside. When it is given, the prisoners line up and wait for the door to open into what is called the "bullpen," or booking area. Security measures vary in all jails. Still, the purpose is to contain the prisoners. Officers following the prisoners leave their pistols in a locked box outside the booking area. Keeping the keys, they enter. The prisoners are asked to wait for booking. If they are not sober, they are placed in a holding cell, or "tank," until their sobriety returns. PERSONS ARRESTED are asked to step forward one by one to be placed on the which contains such information as name, address, phone numbers, charges, ar resting officer, and court date. A list of bondsmen is on the . wall of the jail. If the person is drunk, or is charged with a violation which involves drinking, an officer asks him if he wishes to voluntarily submit to a breath analyser test. If he doesn't want to be tested by the arresting department, he is taken to a local hospital. He must pay for this himself and the findings may be held against him. After booking, the prisoner is allowed to phone anyone he wishes. He is then taken into the fingerprint room, where three sets of prints are made and a photograph is taken. FINGERPRINTS are sent to the FBI in Washington, the Sheriff's Bureau in Tallahassee, and one copy remains in the files of the arresting agency. Further examination is made for sobriety or evidence of drugs by making the person walk down an elevated strip in the fingerprint room. After prints are made, the prisoner is taken to the jail area. Each jail has its own system for processing the pris oners from the booking office into the cellblock. HERE THE AURA of maximum security crackles the air in defense of the "good" citizen. When the prisoner gets settled in his individual or group cell, he meets bookies, pimps, con-men, racketeers, drunks, perverts, emotionally disturbed persons, gamblers, and many other kingpins of the underworld. Then the long, three-hour waif for bondsman, lawyer, and parents begins. Before he was jailed, the person deposited all his belongings in a property room. He is only allowed a few dollars for cigarettes, candy, or a coke, which can be bought from a trusty or a cart which comes around the cellblock. THERE ARE few comparisons between jails. The Tampa Police Department Jail smells of urine and antisep tic. The Tampa Jail has its trusties to get candy and ciga rettes for the inmates. Only their seciruty measures are comparable very tight. All jails are well-lighted and have good ventilation. The prisoners are well-fed. HOW DID THESE people get into jail in the first place? Simply driving while intoxicated, being a minor In possession, breaking and entering, shoplifting, and disor derly conduct Collegians over 17 years of age are charged as adults. Malcolm Beard, Hillsborough County Sher)ff, said, "As far as we are concerned, we have very little trouble with college students." He added that most cases were traffic cases or minors in possession of alcohol and "not a great deal of those. We try to apply conunon sense with law en forcement." When asked if these students were reported to the vari ous deans at USF, he said, "If they are off-campus (local students) we notify the parents, yet we try to have coopera tion with the deans." He added, "It's the policy to notify the school. We try to work closely with the University. We realize that we have the responsibility." ASKED IF A STUDENT living on-campus, instead of . being arrested, could be handed over to the deans, he said, "No, processing is required by law." Yet in smaller offenses, he stated, "If justice can be served in some instances by allowing USF officials to han dle situations, then we will. It depends on many factors." "When students get a permanent record, it will come back later to hurt them," commented Beard. After the USF student is picked up, booked and jailed, the deans, if he is an on-campUs student, will be notified. From this point, the deans will try to arrange bail, legal counsel, and counseling by the school as to the student's rights. The deans will also notify the parents. "WE MAKE SURE they make the hearing," said Dean of Men Charles H. Wildy. Students from USF can also face repercussions, wheth er they are on or off-campus students. If a serious matter comes to the attention of the deans and is investigated, a determination is made depending on the evidence whether it warrants disciplinary action. The matter may be handled administratively or by the USF Board of Discipline and Appeals established by the Student Association. THIS BOARD consists of 13 members. Four are stu dents. The others are from the faculty and the administra tion. The person is first judged administratively by the deans. In this stage of the process he is made aware of the channels of appeal and is told if the offense warrants dis ciplinary action. If it does warrant action, the case is sent before the Board of Discipline and Appeals, which makes the final judgment of the case. "We operate on the theory of discipline as rehabllita. tion," said Dean Wildy. "But when you get to the point where you can't help the guy, then it's suspension or expul sion. However, if we feel that he belongs here, we take a different approach." Wildy said that the basic concern is for the individual. "You work with an individual in a group. If, while we are working with him, we don't succeed, then we work for the group." STUDENTS OFTEN ask, "What if I live off-campus?" Dean Wildy's reply is, "They are citizens of more than one community. What is done in one community may reflect on the other community." Wildy says that he is often asked by students whether civil action downtown, followed by disciplinary action on campus does not constitute double "jeopardy". His answer is, "No. Double jeopardy is trying a person in the same court for the same offense." Dean Wildy was asked about sex offenders. He said, "so far, no serious morals charge has come through . " He also pointed out that 99 out of 100 cases of the emotional type are handled administratively. Concert To Feature Bill Of Rights OHers 'Freedom' ALLSTATE Professor Anderson The University's Faculty Concert series will feature bass vocalist Everett S. An derson in concert Thursday at 8:30 p.m. in Fine Arts Build ing 101. Anderson is professor of music at USF and director of the Opera Workshop. He spent 15 years at Columbia Universi ty, New York City; as head of the Voice Department. UNIVERSITY AUTO SERVICE CENTER TRUST YOUR CAR 1'0 THE MAN WHO WEARS THE STAR FREE! • Complete Lubrication with each Oil Change. • Do It Yourself Car Wash Vacuum, Soap and Water Provldicf. • Pick Up & Delivery for All Maintenance Work for Students & Faculty. 2911 E. Fowler Ave. PHONE 932-3387 He has studied under an array of coaches to include George Ferugsson for voice 'and Herbert Graf for stage direction in opera. From 1943-46 he appeared at Radio City Music Hall as Soloist and has sang aratoria and concert in the midwest and throughout Illinois. Anderson created the role of Benedict in the world pre miere of Otto Luening's opera "Evangeline" and General Grant in the world premiere of Virgil Thomson's "Mother of Us All." He played the leading role in revival of Paisell's "Barber of Seville" with Columbia Theatre Associates under Otto Lenuing and appeared as Plunkett in "Martha." He was soloist for the Na tional Opera Convection in New York City in 1959 and sang "Town Hall Recital" in the same city. Many of his students have sang in Broadway shows. One student was in the finals of the Metropolitan Opera Audi tions. His program will include: "Songs and Dances of Death" (a vocal cycle in four parts) by Mussorgsky; Theodore Hoffman's (USF Humanities professor) song cycle of Scotch songs; Charles Ives' songs; and a group of early Italian compositions. Anderson will be accompa nied by his wife, Helen, who teaches voice at USF, in Hoff man's Scotch songs. Pianist for the evening will be Dr. Armin Watkins of the Human ities staff. Tutoring For EconomJcs Students In BUS 318 Economics students needing help with their studies are in vited to tutoring sessions sponsored by the Economics Club every Wednesday at 2 p.m. in Business 318. Eight or nine upper level economics majors will help students with their problems. Once a week the tutors report the general nature of these problems to economics profes sors who consider the prob lems for use in the class rooms. RECORD. REPEA 'I REMEMBER ON THE GO RECORDING • SONYMATIC 907 BA nERY PORTABLE • • A compact battery powered or instant switch-to-household current unit. The Sony 907-A can be your home or traveling companion. Two speeds: 33A & 1% ips; automatic recording control; 3Y4" reel capacity ond dual track operation. Microphone has remote stop/start switch. A mighty midget weighing only 5% pounds. Complete with dynamic: remote con!rolled mi-OUR LOWEST crophone, personal earphone and vmyl carry-ing case. PRICE EVER $39.50 QUANTITIES LIMITED ......__vi_VIA ____ N------lO T ( a ( 0 c E N TE R OPEN 9 P.M. MON. FRI. 1538 SO. DALE MABRY PH. 253-0076 (Continued from Page lA) or petition, mobility and peaceful assembly, !;* The xight to publish, dis cuss or recommend views without impairing standing in the University, if the student doesn't claim to represent the University. !;* The right to organize university groups as long as they're not discriminatory to race, religion or national ori gin. !;* The right to operate as a campus organization without an advisor, if the group "conPhoto by Randy Jones scientiously continues to find one. Notification In writing of rights in administrative pro cedures dealing with infrac tions of university regulations. Freedom from "arbi trary investigation" unless the investigations pertain "to his academic functions and performances.'' Phone 932-4337 LOW COST AUTO INSURANCE For Faculty and Students -plusSR 22's filed. Located Next to Kirby's Northgate Looking For So.mething?. . . 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I I 12-A-THE ORACLE-Nov. 15, 19&7, U. of 5. Florida Flute And Keyboard Duo Jean-Pierre Rampal and Robert Veyron-La.croix will be ap pearing in the USF Artist Series Saturday evening. It's been said by critics, "Tbe two artists are as stunning in a modem sonata by Prokofieff as in classic pieces. Rampal is unique as a flutist ••• and Veyron-Lacroix is in every respect a. worthy parbter." European Duo To Appear Jean-Pierre Rampal, con sidered by many to be one of the world's leading masters of the flute, and Robert Veyron Lacroix, one of Europe's out standing harpsichordists, will appear in the University's Artist Series Saturday at 8:30 p.m. in the Teaching Auditori um Theatre. The duo became associated in 1946 and worked their way into New York ' s Philharmonic Hall for two engagements in 1966. They played return en gagements in November and December, 1967. Rampal studied the flute at the Paris Conservatoire after dropping out of medical school. He has performed as soloist and chamber music musician throughout Europe , including all major festivals, America, and a good part of the world. He has recorded more works than almost any other flutist. Robert Veyron-Lacroix also studied at the Paris Conserva toire, where he became profi cient in a number of instru ments: he chose the harpsi chord with the piano his second C'hoice. He too has performed ex tensively throughout Europe, Latin America, and the Far East. Between concerts, he teach es haspichord at the Ecole Cesar Franck in Paris and at the International Academy in Nice. 'His solo recordings of works for harpsichord have won the Grand Prix du Disque five times. Their Program will in clude: "Fourth Concert Royal" by Couperin; "Sonata in A Minor" by Vivaldi; "Sonata in E Minor" by Bach; "Three Romances, Op. 94" by Schumann; and "Sona ta in D Major, Op. 94 (1943)" by Prokfieff. Experimental Theatre To Stage 'Biedermann' By PHILIP RUNNELS Fine Arts Writer "Biedermann and the Fire bugs" opens for a two-day run today at 6 p.m. at the north face of the Chemistry Building. It will be given by the Alfred S. Golding. "It began Experimental T h e a t r e of in Europe after World War II. Theatre USF. .The French call it Le Nou"The play is experimental in the sense of a new wave of theatre," said its driector, Dr. veau Vogue." The story, written by a Swiss p 1 a y w r i g h t, Max 'A Modest Beginning': USF Art Collection By BARBARA WRIGHT Feature Editor The University of South Florida's art collection is growing and expanding. Under the supervision of James R. Camp, director of galleries, the University is be ginning a stimulating pro gram centered around build ing a quality art collection. "We have only a modest beginning," said Camp, "largely of original prints and a few paintings and sculptures." THE COLLECTION consists of about 300 items at present. There is also another growing collection of outstanding stu dent works. "It is difficult to begin a collection," Camp said, "because there is no separate acquisition budget as yet." The University relies heavi ly on contributions such as the painting donated by Gloria Vanderbilt. Camp explained that there are three exhibitions on hand at present. They are exhibited in the University Library, the Teaching Auditorium (TAT), and the Fine Arts Building (F AH) galleries. "The publiciAlgebra Proficiency Test Given Today Students planning to regis ter in Economics 331 (Statis tics) during Quarter II are re minded to take the Algebra Proficiency Test this Friday at 2 p.m. in the Business Ad ministration Auditorium. Pas sing the test is a requirement for entering the course. ty from these exhibitions," said Camp, "gives the public an awareness of the University." The materials are in con stant use and are available to public institutions, especially junior colleges on a loan basis. "Most publicity now is by word of mouth, but eventu ally we wili have printed bro chures with pertinent infor mation and reproductions," commented Camp. THE UNIVERSITY puts on about 30 exhibitions per year, "more than any other univer sity in the Southeastern Unit ed States," Camp said. He also said that USF was the first state university in Flori da to pursue a complete pro gram of art exhibitions. Camp, as director of the galleries, established a prece dent in the Florida state uni versity system by having the first job of this kind. "I must be part artist, part business man, part diplomat and part public relations man," he says. He has the entire responsi bility for acquisition of new works and putting on exhibi tions. THERE WAS an addition to USF ' s collection in January when Camp went to New York to make some new purchases. He explained, "I bought five one-man shows by the famous contemporary artists Corbus ier, Viesulas, Vasarely, Mi chael Ponce de Leon, and Rauchenberg." This was accomplished by a grant from the National Foundat ion for the Arts and the Florida Development Com mission. Where will these new exhi bitions be housed? Camp said, "at present there is a propos al for a museum for the cam pus. It will be an 'art bank' and we hope it will work in conjunction with and be locat ed beside the auditorium." HE WENT ON TO say that, "it is only in the conceptual stage, but this is one of the areas that the administrat i on feels is important and desira ble." Included in the 30 exhibits are a wide range of materials. Some of these are two exhib its purchased last month in Guatemala of masks and tex tiles, figurative paintings, photography by Guggenheim award winners, water colors and drawings by George Gorsz, and 19th and 20th cen tury paintings from private collections. Greco Speaks To Students Next Week Tampa Mayor Dick Greco is scheduled to speak at a meeting of the USF Political Union next Wednesday in University Cen ter, 252, at 2 p.m. Union Presi dent Ditti Herr said that Greco will speak about city govern ment. All are invited to attend. NOVEMBER 13 -DECEMBER 23 Frisch , concerns Biedermann (meaning Decent Fellow In German) and his depiction of Everyman . He allows two known arsonists to hide in his attic. He knows too well that they will be burning some one ' s house and he hopes that it won't be his. Biedermann will be played by Jerry Peeler, a USF Thea tre graduate. Frau Bieder mann is being done by Barba ra Moloy. T h e arsonists, Eisenring and Sepp Schmitz, are John Greco and Dr. Tom McCauley a doctor at Mac Dill Air Force Base. Costuming, design and set are the work of William Lo renzen. Its subtitle, "A Learn ing Play Without A Lesson," lends itself to a most inter esting theme. It is a very thinly disguised allegory of what happened in Europe as a result of Hitler. Fresch has joined Genet in attempting to make a serious statement by the use of devic es found normally in vaude ville and cabaret theatre: te c hniques of low comics and clowns. It was first done as a radio play and became a stage play in 1958. Although it will be done for the first time outside (to the best of Golding's knowledge) the play has been a "smashing s u c c e s s " throughout Europe. Dusk (the twilight zone ) has been chosen as the time to present i t because it is at that time that the possibility of a new day presents itself. We may drop into Hell or we may go into a night that will give us a new day. Fireworks will be used along with experimental light ing (done by technical direc tor, E ldon Meehan) to give it a most interesting texture. The play is to be viewed objectively. Its purpose is to separate the audience from the p l ay and view it as an idea rather than identify with it. Dr. Sy Kahn To Appear Former USF English Professor, Dr. Sy Kahn, will appear in two programs in which he will read his poetry and give a lecture on concentration camps, Dr. Kahn has traveled ex tensively In Poland, where he taught at the University of Warsaw in 1966-67. Kahn To Visit USF Monday Dr. Sy Kahn poet , teach er, director, performer and publishing scholar will be featured in a two-day visit to USF Monday and Tuesday. Kahn is a specialist in 19th Cent ury American Literature, and a professor of English at Raymond College, University of the Pacific. He is a graduate of the Uni versity of Pennsylvania, holds an M.A. from the University of Connecticut and a Ph.D. from the University of Wis consin. Monday he will be speaking at 2 p.m. in University Center (CTR) 252 on concentration camps: a result ot a year's study in Poland and Israel. Slides and tapes will accent the lecture. Tuesday's program wiH be given at 8 p.m. in the CTR Ballroom. Kahn will present a Jazz and Poetry Coffee Hour with the Mark III Trio of Tampa. Free coffee will be served. Kahn is the author of four books of poetry: "Our Separate Darkness"; Triptych"; "A Later Sun"; and "The Fight Is With Phantoms." Kahn has been Fulbright Professor of American Lit er ature (under a State Depart ment Grant) at the Univ ersity of Warsaw, Poland in and also lectured at four other Polish Universities. He has been active as a scholar in recent years with articles on S t ephen Crane, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Glenway Wescott , Harry Crosby and Tennessee Williams appearing in journals -of literary criti cism. Kahn bas received various awards for his work in poetry, fiction and the essay, as well as for a one act play and hls skill as a director. Huxley Novel Friday The Department of Speech presents Aldous Huxley's "The Devils of Lounon" Fri day and Saturday at 8 p.m. in the Business Administration Auditorium. Admission 1 s free. On Purchase Over $1.00 (EXCEPT TEXTS) MANY SElECTIONS General SAVE %-mm (Art, Cook, Etc) Children's Books Paperbacks (Over 7,000 Titles) S P E C I A L B D . D I S OVER 1 000 SEL. ON HAND FOR CHRISTMAS -., (EXCEPT "X" ITEMS. ) MANY SELECTIONS Christmas Cards USF Clothing Personal Items and Others !I RACING iAACING ........ ..,., lRACING RACING 0 RE BOOKSTORE HOURS: SAM. 8PM M-R: BAMSPM F; 10 AM 1:30PM only $2.98 Ong. ARGOS & ANDROS SHOP HOURS: 12N to 2PM-3PM fo 7PM M F.

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.; QUARTER ll1968 COURSE SCHEDULE NOVEMBER 15, 1967 Protect Gym Floor--Wear Soft Soled Shoes To Registration Pay Your Registration Fees And See An Adviser PRIOR To Registration I RAMP-DOWN I I BLEACHERS KEY PUNCH 0 INFORMATION STAFF TICKET rP WINDOW u X GYMNASIUM I PACKETS -NEW & )( t I FSR STUDENTS .. PACKETS-ee CONTINUING STUDENTS IIIII ••••• 1 X J I •••H )( ' LEGEND -+-+ PATH OF STUDENTS eeeee BARRICADES . )0()()()( LOCKED DOORS POOL NORTH TABLE I ENTRANCE FEE CARDS 0 J COURSE CARD AREA. I L-------------------------------I I I LOANS &0 DODO FEE ASSESSORS 1111 Not Drawn To Scale TEtLERS JJIIJJIIJ.L..s:::;--EXIT+sEc IUR lTV IMPORTANT DATES FOR ON-CAMPUS STUDENTS APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR ADMISSION TO QUARTER II, 1967-68 FOR NEW AND FORMER STUDENTS ,RETURNING IS 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1967. REGISTRATION IS BY APPOINTMENT: CONTINUING STUDENTS, TUESDAY, 2, 1968----------------9:00 A.M. 4:00 P.M. CONTINUING STUDENTS, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 1968--------------9:00A.M. 11:00 A.M. NEW & FORMER STUDENTS RETURNING, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 1968---12:00 NOON 4:00 P.M. EVENING REGISTRATION, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 1968-------------6:00 P.M. -7:45 P.M. OFF-CAMPUS OR CONTINUING EDUCATION STUDENTS SHOULD SEE SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS. LAST DAY TO REGISTER AND CLASS CHANGES CLASSES BEGIN CLASS DROPS: WITHOUT PENAL'I"!r. WITH PENALTY (AUTOMATIC "F" GRADE) WITHDRAWAL: WITHOUT PENALTY WITH PENALTY (AUTOMATIC "F;' GRADE) REFUNDS: FULL REFUND . PART.IAL REFUND LAST DAY TO REMOVE AN "X" .GRADE APPLICATION FOR DEGREE DEADLINE LAST DAY TO FILE CHANGE OF MAJOR WITH RECORDS OFFICE LAST DAY OF CLASSES FINAL EXAMS .QUARTER II ENDS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 1968 THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1968 BEFORE 4:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 1968 AFTER 4:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 1968 BEFORE 4:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1968 AFTER 4:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1968 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, 1968 THURSDAY, JANUARY 4 MONDAY, JANUARY. 8, 1%8 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 1968 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 1968 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 1968 THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1968 FRIDAY, MARCH 15 -WEDNESDAY 1 MARCH 20, 1968 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 1968 GENERAL REGISTRATION INFORMATION :riREE HOURS (7 MWF) ARE RESERVED EXCLUSIVELY FOR UNIVERSITY EVENTS. EVENING SESSION COURSES CARRY A SECTION NUMBER OF "900" OR HIGHER. 'l'HE SECTION "800" SERIES ARE REQUIRED LECTURES FOR DAY STUDENTS AND ONE MUST BE LISTED ON THE STUDENT'S SCHEDULE FOR EACH COURSE CARRYING A SECTION "800" SERIEs:--SECTION "900" SERIES ARE REQUIRED LECTURES FOR EVENING STUDENTS AND ONE MUST BE LISTED ON THE STUDENT'S SCHEDULE FOR EACH COURSE CARRYING A SECTION "900" SERIES. --THE s ECTION "700" SERIES ARE OFF-CAMPUS (CONTINUING EDUCATION) COURSES AND MAY NOT BE BY ON-CAMPUS STUDENTS WITHOUT ADVISER'S CONSENT. A $25 FEE WILL BE CHARGED FOR MUSIC COURSES IN WHICH INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION IN VOICE OR A MUSICAL INSTRUMENT IS GIVEN. THIS PEE WILL COVER ONE OR MeJRE SUCH COURSES TAKEN WITHIN THE SAME QUARTER. j (' . ' I I I Produced By The Graphics Department, Division of Educational Resources PART-TIME STUDENTS PAY REGULAR RATES FOR NON-CREDIT COURSES AT THE RATE OF TWO QUARTER HOURS PER NON-CREDIT COURSE. . PERIOD NUMBER CODES: 1 8:00 8:50 2 9:00 9:50 3 -10:00 -10:50 4 -11:00 -11:50 5 -12:00 -12:50 pAY CODE: "R" = THURSDAY BUILDING CODES: ADM-ADMINISTRATION BCA-BAY CAMPUS "A" BSA-TEACHING AUDITORIUM-BUSINESS BUS-BUSINESS CHE-CHEMISTRY CTR-UNIVERSITY CENTER EDU-EDUCATION ENA-ENGINEERING AUDITORIUM PE CODES: 6 1:00 1:50 7 2:00 2:50 8 3:00 3:50 9 4:00 4:50 10 5:00 5:50 11 6:00 6:50 127:00-7:50 13 8:00 8:50 14 9:00 9:50 TBA TO BE ANNOUNCED ROOM CODES: NRS = NO ROOM SCHEDULED TBD = TO BE DETERMINED ENG-ENGINEERING FAH-FINE LIF-LIFE SCIENCE I.OI<-PE LOCKERS PED-PE ADMINISTRATION CLASSROOM PHY-PHYSICS RAR-ARGOS CENTER TAT-TEACHING AUDITORIUM-THEATRE CERTAIN PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES HAVE A LETTER AFTER THE TITLE: "M" =MEN "W" =WOMEN "C" = COED FBL = FLORIDA LANES-FLORIDA AVENUE FHA = FOREST HILLS RIDING ACADEMY POO = POOL PES = PE SHELTER IMPORTANT INSTRUCTIONS REGARDING REGISTRATION: Do not report to registration earlier than your appointed time. If you have lost your registration appointment time, report to Ticket Window, University Gymnasium to reclaim your appointment time. All undelivered Registration Appointment Cards will be returned by the Post Office Department to the Office of Admissions and Records. Therefore, if you did not receive a Registration Appointment Card, you may pick it up at the Records Office, ADM 272, prior to 4:00 P.M., Friday, December 22, 1967, or during any registration period at the Ticket Office in the Gymnasium. DEGREE SEEKING STUDENTS should obtain a schedule worksheet from their adviser during the current.term. If you are enrolled in the College of Basic Studies and have not been assigned an adviser, contact the Office ofthe Coordinator of Advisers, College of Basic Studies, ADM 299. NON-DEGREE SEEKING STUDENTS may obtain a schedule worksheet at the Office of Admissions and Records or at the Entrance Door during registration.

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'2 THE ORACLE, We'dnesday, U, 1967 'EVENING STUDENTS Non-degree) may obtain the schedule worksheet from the Office of Continuing Education, CTR (University Center) from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. on any day except Friday or at the Entrance Door during registration. Evening students may register between 6:00 and 7:45 p.m.'on the day indicated. COOP-EDUCAT:ON STUDENTS must follow registration instructions issued by the COOP OFFICE. CONTINUING STUDENTS will not be admitted to the registration area unless an appointment time and signed worksheet are presented. NOTE: COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS STUDENTS Your worksheet must be stamped by the Division. No exceptions will be made. Adviser's signature alone is not sufficient. COLLEGE OF BASIC STUDIES STUDENTS Your worksheet must be stamped by the Advising Corps, College of Basic Studies. No exceptions will be made. Adviser's signature alone is not sufficient. ON-CAMPUS REGISTRATION INSTRUCTIONS-CONTINUING STUDENTS 1. ADVISING: Note: If possible, have your adviser assign you a few alternate courses in case some sections are closed. Important: You will NOT be allowed in the registration area to see an adviser earlier than your registration appointment time. A. Pre-Registration -It is imperative that you see your adviser in advance of registration. 1) Lower Division Students advisers are located as follows: Anthropology, Area Studies, Geography, History Art, Humanities, Theatre, Art and Music Education Business Administration Biology, Pre-Med, Pre-Dent and Para-Med. Chemistry Engineering Education English, Journalism, Philosophy Geology, Meteorology Languages Mathematics Physics Political Science/Pre-Law Psychology Sociology Speech Undecided FOC 239 FAH 240 BUS 427 LIF 202-A CHE 310-B ENG 304 ADM 121 FAH 240 & 242 CHE 304 FOC 105 Pm 316 PHYllS BUS 451 Univ. Apt. 17 BUS 451 ENG 34 Pm 342 2) Upper must make an appointment for advising in THEIR Office. During-Registration Some advisers are located as indicated below but do not have the time or the information (your file) for complete advising. l) LOwer Division Advisers: (New Students Only) Biological Science, Pre-Med Business Administration Elementary Education Engineering Fine Arts, Secondary Ed -Art & Music Language Literature Physical Science, Mathematics Political Science, Pre-Law Secondary Education Social Sciences Undecided BUS 106 BUS . 108 BUS 114 BUS 113 FAH115 BUS 112 BUS 109 BUS 111 BUS 115 BUS 110 BUS 107 BASIC STUDIES ADVISERS: Continuing Students Only PED 113 and 114 2) Upper Division Advisers: Business Administration Elementary Education Engineering Fine Arts, Secondary Ed -Art & Music Language Literature Faculty Offices EDU 302 Faculty Offices FAH 115 Natural Sciences-Astronomy Botany Chemistry Geology Math Physics Zoology Secondary Education--English, Speech and Foreign Languages Mathematics and Science Social Sciences All Other Secondary Ed. & K-12 Social Sciences 2. When to Register: Register at your appointment time. PED 105 PHY 342 LIF 172 CHE 104 CHE 304 PHY 316 Pmllo LIF 161 EDU 208 EDU 209 EDU 202-C EDU 202-D PED 109 3. Tickets to Registration: To enter the registration area, you will berequired to present your Registration Appointment Card and your Adviser-Approved Class Schedule Worksheet. COLLEGE OF BASIC STUDIES and LIBERAL ARTS STUDENTS PLEASE NOTE: I f you a r e in the college of Basic Studies, your class schedule worksheet must be stamped by the Corps of Advisers. If in the College of Liberal Arts, your class schedule worksheet must have the division stamp. ' , f 4. Special Door Stamp: As you enter the your class schedule worksheet will be stamped with a "RECORDS" stamp. Course cards will not be issued without this stamp. only .Qlli! worksheet per student will stamped. 5. Packet Station: Pick up your registration packet prior to entering the course card area (Gymnasium). 6. Course Cards: The next step is to obtain your course cards. 7. Complete All Cards: Fill in the information requested on the cards before advancing to the Approving Clerks. YOU MUST INDICATE YOUR ZIP CODE. Only the University of South Florida has the ZIP CODE of 33620. The area surrounding the University of south Florida does not have the same ZIP CODE as the University. ----B. Placement, Health Center and Student Affairs: TUrn in your completed Student Affairs card and your Health Center card. If you are a graduating senior, stop at the Placement Table. 9. Pavment of Fees: All students will be mailed an invoice for Quarter II registration fees along with their Registration Appointment Card. This will be mailed approximately November 20, 1967. Those students who elect to prepay Quarter II registration fees must make the payment by December 15, 1967. It is recommended that part-time students wait until January registration to pay their fees. Prepayment of Quarter II fees may be made by mailing the Certificate of Registration and your check or money order to the cashier's Office or by placing your envelope with the Certificate of Registration and check enclosed (no cash) in one of the. drop boxes located as follows: Administration Building University Center Argos Center Andros Center Fontana Hall The validated Certificate of Registration will be mailed to the students who' prepay in December. Those students who prepay will by-pass the Cashier's area when they register on January 2 or 3. Payment of Fees During Registration: First Step Obtain your Fee Card Second Step --Have your fees assessed Third Step Pay fees Students with Scholarship Loans should advance to the appropriate table prior. to the third step. 10. Parking Decal: If you do not have a parking decal, stop at the Parking Decal Table ON-CAMPUS INSTRUCTIONS --NEW AND FORMER STUDENTS RETURNING You should follow the procedure outlined for continuing students with a few minor exceptions: l. Your instruction letter from the Admissions Office serve as your Registration Appointment card. 2. If you do not have a permanent Plastic Photo-ID, then see schedule and information presented below. SPECIAL REGISTRATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR OFF-CAMPUS OR CONTINUING EDUCATION STUDENTS l. REGISTRATION FORM: 2. 3. 4. 5. A. Those students who have applied to the Admissions Office, University of South Florida and have been accepted by the University should register with the "Off-Campus Degree Program Registration Form for continuing Education course(s)". B. Those students' who have not applied to the Admissions Office, University of south Florida should register with the "Application-Registration Form for continuing Education Course(s)". NOTE: REGISTRATION IS LIMITED TO COURSES WITH A "700" SERIES SECTION NUMBER FEES: Registration fees (for all courses with a "700" series section number) are $12 per quarter hour. Students enrolling for seven or more quarter hours are required to pay full-time registration fees of $125 •. PROCEDURE: Mail your Registration Form with your fees (or valid Intern Certificate) directly to the Office of Admissions and Records, ATTN: Records Office, Tampa, Florida 33620. DO NOT SENT CASH. The University does not assume any obligations for your registration if this procedure is not followed. REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Your registration form and fees MUST be mailed to the Records Office within twenty-four hours following the second class session. PREREQUISITES: The student should consult the University Catalog or contact the Instructor at the first class session. 6. DUAL REGISTRATION: If you plan to take both ON-CAMPUS and OFF-CAMPUS courses, the ON-CAMPUS registration procedure should be followed. However, to register for on-campus courses, you must have applied and been accepted by.the Admission• University of South Florida. 7. AUDIT: You must indicate "audit" on your form if you do not wish to register for credit. CHANGE (DROP-ADD) INSTRUCTIONS FOR ON-CAMPUS STUDENTS You can process a change in your registration only if you have completed all the steps of registration indicated above. You must have your validated Certificate of Registration. , I j, l

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The time set aside for changes is between 12:00 Noon and 4:00 p.m., Wednesday, January 3, 1968. The change (Drop-Add) Form must be turned in at the Approving Clerk Tables. Change Forms will not be accepted under any circumstances after January 3, 1968. You do not need to obtain a Dean's signature during the established change period, unless your registration will be for more than eighteen quarter hours. If you wish to add a course, then you will have to obtain the course card at the course card tables. CHANGE (DROP-ADD) INSTRUCTIONS FOR OFF-CAMPUS OR CONTINUING EDUCATION STUDENTS A change in your registration can be processed if you advise the Records Office in writing prior to twenty-four hours the second class session. You cannot change from CREDIT to AUDIT after your initial registration. PHOTO ID CARDS All students at the University of South Florida, except those enrolled in the .continuing Education Program (700 section courses only) must have a permanent Plastic Photo ID card. Students now holding permanent Plastic Photo ID cards will not be issued another one. The schedule for processing the Plastic Photo ID cards is: Tuesday Wednesday January 2, 1968 January 3, 1968 ID CAlmS MUST BE MADE DURING THIS TIME. 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. 9:00 A;M. to 8:00 P.M. ID cards will be made in the Division of Educational Resources located in the basement of the Library. ENTRANCE to the ID card processing area during the scheduled time MUST be made at the East exit of the Library. Signs will be posted at this guide you. To be admitted to the ID processing area, all students will present their Notification of Acceptance from the Admissions Office. To pick up your finished ID card, you must appear in person and present your . Certificate of Registration. The card pick-up area will be located in the basement of the Library, but entrance to this area must be made through the main entrance of the Library. ID cards may be picked up one hour after processing. Hours for pick-up will be the same as those for processing. Beginning January 4, cards may be picked up between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00p.m., weekdays. Quarter II 1968 Course Schedul e COURSE SEC PFX NO NO 0001 ACC 201 001 0002 ACC 201 002 0003 ACC 201 003 0004 ACC 201 004 0005 ACC 201 005 0006 ACC 201 006 0007 ACC 201 007 0008 ACC 201 901 0009 ACC 201 902 0010 ACC 202 001 0011 ACC 202 002 0012 ACC 202 003 0013 ACC 202 004 0014 ACC 202 005 0015 ACC 202 006 0016 ACC 202 007 0017 ACC 202 901 0018 ACC 301 001 0019 ACC 301 002 0020 ACC 302 001 0021 ACC 302 002 0022 ACC! 302 901 0023 ACC 305 001 0024 ACC 323 901 0025 ACC 402 001 0026 ACC 411 001 0027 ACC 412 901 0028 ACC 421 001 COURSE TITLE ELEM ACCTG I ELEM ACCTG I ELEM ACCTG l ELEM ACClG I ELEM ACCTG I ELEM ACCTG I ELEM ACCTG I ELEM ACCTG I ELEM ACCTG I ELEM ACCTG II ELEM ACCTG II ELEM ACCTG II ELEM ACCTG II ELEM ACCTG II ELEM ACCTG II ELEM ACCTG II ELEM ACCTG II INTER ACCTG I INTER ACCTG I INTER. ACCTG II INTER ACCTG II INTER ACCTG II MANAGRL ACCTG GOVNMNTL ACCTG ADV ACCTG II FEDRL TAXES I FEDRL TAXES II COST ACCTG I 0029 ACC 422 001 COST ACCTG II 0030 ACC 423 901 AUDITING 0031 4CC 502 901 ACCTG CONCPTS QTR HRS 03 03 03 03... 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 o 3 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 oj 03 03 03 03 03 '03 03 I ,, PERIOD DAY 1 MWF 1 2 T 2R 4 MWF 4T 3 4 R 6 MWF 5 6 T 6R 7 8 T 7R 12-14 M 12-14 w 2 MWF 1 2 T 2R 4 MWF 4T 3 4 R 6 MWF 5 6 T 6R 7 8 T 7R 12-14 M 1 2 T 2R 4 MWF 2 MWF 6 MWF 12-14 M 5 6 T 6R 12-14 T 8 MWF 9 MWF 12-14 R 4T 3 4 R 5 6 T 6R 12-14 M 12-14 w BLDG CODE BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS DUS BUS sus BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS DUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS ROOM NO 318 318 318 318 318' 318 318 318 318 31B 319 319 319 119 319 319 319 320 320 320 320 320 122 320 320 320 320 320 320 321 320 \ !. THE ORACLE, We-dnesday, November 15, 1967 3 FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE, QUARTER II, 1968 EXCEPT FOR CERTAIN SPECIFIED COURSES; EXAMINATIONS HAVE BEEN DETERMINED BY TIME OF REGULAR CLASS MEETING. EXAM PERIOD 2. 3 4 5 6 TIME MARCH 15 MAR'CH 16 MARCH 18 MARCH 19 FRIDAY SATURDAY MONDAY TUESDAY 1 MWF, or 2 MWF, or 3 MWF, or 4 MWF, or 1 M-F, or 2 M-F 3 M-F, or 4 M-F 8:00:00 A. H. 1,2 MWF 3,4 MWF CBS 101 CBS 306 4T 3,4R,or 5,6T 6R,or ... CBS 102 CBS 121 34 TR 56 TR 10:30-12:30 P. H. CBS 215 CBS 118 I CBS 302 CBS 201 CBS 205 CBS 202 CBS Ill CBS 112 CBS 206 1:00-3:00 P.M. CBS 120 CBS 114 CBS 224 CBS 115 CBS 208 CBS 109 CBS 124 CBS 209 CBS 110 CBS 301 CBS 221 CBS 218 3:30-5:30 P. H. SPE 201 CHM 212 6 MWF, or 8 MWF, or CBS 211 9 MWF, or 6:00-8:00 P. H. 6 M-F 8 M-F, or CBS 214 9 M-F, or ' 89 M\'JF CBS 220 9,10 MWF 8:15:15 P.M. THURSDAY 11 MWF MONDAY TUESDAY Evening 11 M-F Evening Evening .. .. ----.. .... .. .. ACC 201 ECN 201 !ill! 303 ACC 202 ECN 202 EXAMINATION EXPLANATION FOR QUARTER II, 1968 CFRIDAY, MARCH 15 • WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20, 19681 MARCH 20 WEDNESDAY 5 MWF, or 5 M-F, or 5,6 MWF 1,2T 2R,or 1,2 TR 78T 7R,or 78 TR lOT 9,10R,or 9,10 TR 10 MWF,or 10 M-F WEDNESDAY Evening Courses -----Conflict Make-Ups As shown on the preceding page, all I MWF, I M through F, and I, 2 MWF courses will take examinations at exam period I on Friday; 2 MWF, or 2 M-F courses will take examinations at exam period I on Saturday. 4T 34R, or 3, 4 TR courses will take examinations at exam period 2 on Monday. An "800" uction regularly meeting only at I or 2T or 2R, for example, would take an examination at exam period 2 on Wednesday, and so forth . NOTE EXCEPTIONS WHERE COURSES ARE SPECIFIED BY PREFIX AND NUMBER. ' ALL "900" SECTIONS will normally be given at examination period 6 on the regular class night. The follow i ng exceptions, however, can be used as examples for those courses meeting more than one night: 1\, Example CAl GBA 351-901 11/12 MW CBI MGT 421-901 13/14 MW Example A ( 11/12 MWI will take its examination at ex am period 6 on MONDAY night. Example B ( 13/14 .MWJ will take its examination at exam period 6 on Wednesday night. ROOM ASSIGNMENT: . Examinations will be given in the regularly-scheduled classroom, except for those courses specifie d by prefix and number. ; Room assignments for NON-CBS common finals will be made by the space office, during quarter II, for d istributi on by the college or department involved. In case of conflicts involving NON-CBS common finals, students shall contact their individual PROFESSOR. THURSDAY EVENING CLASSES: Please note: All THURSDAY night classes are scheduled to take examinations on FRIDAY, March 15, 1968, in the regularly scheduled classroom. OTHER night classes will take examine tions on the same night as the regular class meeti ng. CBS EXAMINATIONS: Time of individual CBS examinations has been determined by evaluation services, and room assignment lists will be dis tributed by them during Quarter II. In case of exam conflicts involving CIS courses, contact EVALUATION SERVICES, Ext. 741. Examinations for CBS courses may be given in the daytime for both day and evening students. COURSE SEC PFX NO NO 0032 ACC 602 001 0033 ACC 607 901 00.34 .At.C _6..09 901 0035 AMS 291 001 0036 ANT 201 800 0037 ANT 201 001 0038 ANT 201 002 0039 ANT 201 003 0040 ANT 201 004 0041 ANT 201 005 0042 ANT 201 006 0043 ANT 201 007 0044 ANT 201 008 0045 ANT 20i 009 0046 ANT 202 001 0047 ANT 203 001 0048 ANT 303 004 0049 ANT 325 001 0050 ANT 461 001 0051 ANT 491 001 0052 ANT 501 001 005 3 ART 201 001 0054 ART 201 002 0055 ART 201 003 0056 ART 202 001 0057 ART 202 002 0058 ART 202 003 COURSE TITLE MGR ACC & CNTRL SYS & DATA PROC CONTEMP PROBS INTRO SEMNR AMS INTRO ANTHRO INTRO ANTHRO lNTRO ANTHRO INTRO ANTHRO INTRO ANTHRO INTRO ANTHRO INTRO ANTHRO INTRO ANTHRO INTRO ANTHRO INTRO ANTHRO HUMAN ORIGINS SOCIAL ANTHRO CULT PACIFIC ARCHLGY & CIVIL COM A'NTHRO PERS SR SEM ANTHRO CULT & PERSNLTY Vs FNO DRAw I VS FNO DRAW I VS FNO DRAW I VS FNO DSN I VS FNO DSN I VS FNO DSN I 0059 ART 301 001 VS FNO DRAW II 0060 ART 301 002 VS FND DRAW II 0061 ART' 301 003 VS FND DRAW II QTR HRS 03 03 03 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 * PERIOD DAY 4T 3 4 R 12-14 w 12-14 R 3 MTWR 8 MWF. 2M 3R 4M 5T 6F 7T 7R 8T 9R 2 TWRF 3 MTWF 6 MTWR 4 TWRF 5 MWRF 1 8 TR 1 MWRF 1 2 MWf 3 4 MWF 5 6 MWF 1 2 MWF 3 4 MWF 5 6 MWF 8 9 MWF 1-3 TR 7-9 TR '->(. BLDG CODE BUS BUS BUS FAH BSA LIF LIF LIF llf LIF LIF LIF LIF LIF llf LIF LIF LIF LIF LIF FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH. FAH ROOM NO 321 321 321 218 263 263 263 263 263 263 263 263 263 263 263 263 263 263 235A 263 287 287 287 284 284 284 287 287 287

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4 THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE 0062 ART 302 001 VS FNO OSN II 0063 ART 302 002 VS FND DSN II 0064 ART 302 003 VS FNO DSN II QTR HRS 03 03 03 0065 ART 401 901 VS FND DRAW Ill 03 0066 ART 402 001 VS FND DSN III 03 0067 ART 411 001 PAINTING TECHNS 03 D068 ART 411 002 PAINTING TECHNS 03 0069 ART 411 003 PAINTING TECHNS 03 0070 ART 421 001 SCULPTURE TECH 03 0071 ART 421 002 SCULPTURE TECH 03 ART 423 001 NEOCLASS-CONTMP 03 0073 ART 431 001 CERAMICS TECH 03 0074 ART 001 GRAPHICS INTAG 03 0075 ART 441 002 GRAPHICS LITHO 03 0076 ART 481 001 DIRECTED STUOV 0077 ART 481 002 DIRECTED STUOV 0078 ART 481 003 DIRECTED STUDV 0079 ART 481 004 DIRECTED STUDY 0080 ART 481 005 DIRECTED STUDY 0081 ART 481 006 DIRECTED STUDY 0082 ART 511 001 PAINTING 0083 ART 511 002 PAINTING 0084 ART 511 003 PAINTING 0085 ART 521 001 SCUlPTURE 0086 ART 521 002 SCULPTURE 0087 ART 531 001 CERAMICS 0088 ART 541 001 GRAPHICS INTAG 0089 ART 541 002 GRAPHICS 0090 ART 5 . 81 001 RESEARCH 0091 ART 581 002 RESEARCH 0092 ART 581 003 RESEARCH 0093 ART 581 004 0094 ART 581 005 RESEARCH 0095 ART 581 OOo RESEARCH 009& ART 611 001 PAINTING 0097 ART 613 701 ART HISTORY 0098 ART 621 001 SCULPTURE 0099 ART 631 001 CERAMICS 0100 ART 641 001 GRAPHICS INTAG 0101 ART 641 002 GRAPHICS LITHO 0102 ART 681 COl RESEARCH 0103 ART 681 002 RESEARCH 0104 ART 681 003 RESEARCH 0105 ART 681 004 RESEARCH 0106 ART 681 005 RESEARCH 0107 ART 681 006 RESEARCH 0108 ART 699 COl 0109 ART 699 002 THESIS 0110 ART 699 003 THESIS 0111 ART 699 004 THESIS 0112 ART 699 C05 THESIS 0113 ART 699 006 0114 AST 201 001 lNTRO ASTRO 0115 AST 201 001 INTRO ASTRO LEC 01 02 03 04 05 06 03 03 03 03 0'3 03 03 03 01 02 03 04 05 06 03 03 03 03 03 03 01 02 03 04 05 06 01 02 03 04 05 06 06 0116 AST 202 001 INTRO ASTRO 06 0117 AST 202 001 INTRO ASTRO LEC 0118 AST 361 001 AST OBSV & MEAS 01 0119 AST 371 001 CNTMP THINK AST 05 0120 AST 481 001 UNDERGRAC RSCH 0121 AST 481 002 UNDERGRAD RSCH 0122 AST 481 003 UNDERGRAD RSCH c ' { (' 01 02 03 PERIOD DAY 8 9 MWF l-3 TR 4-6 TR 11-13 TR 1-9 TR 1 2 f'WF 3 4 MWF 7-9 TR 1 2 foiWF 3 4 J4WF 5 MWF 5 6 t4WF 1 TR 4-6 TR TBA TBA teA TBA TBA TSA 1 2 MWF 3 4 MWF 7 TR 1 2 MWF 3 4 MWF 7 TR 1-3 TR 4-6 TR TBA T8A TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA ll-13 M TBA TBA TBA T8A TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA fBA 13 14 M 3 M-F 13 14 T 4 M-F TBA 9 .M-F TBA TBA TBA K I SLOG ROOM CCDE NO FAH 284 FAH 284 FAH FAH 287 I=AH 284 FAH 291 FAH 291 FAH 291 FAH 142 FAH 142 FAH 288 FAH 139 , fAH 14i FAH. 141 NRS NRS NRS .NRS NRS NRS FAH Z.91 FAH 291 FI\H 291 FAH 142 FAH, 142 FAH 139 FA._. 141 FAH 141 NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS FAH 291 RNG LNG FAH 142 FAH 139 FAH 141 FAH 141 NRS NRS 1\JRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS p ... y 109 PHY 109 PHY 109 PHY 109 NRS PHY J.41 NRS NRS NRS COURSE SEC OTR PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE 0123 AST 491 001 ASTRO SEMINAR 01 0124 AST 583 001 SEL TOP BIN STA 05 0125 AST 683 COl SEL TOP STE ATM 04 AST 691 001 GRADUATE SEt41NR 02 0127 AST 699 001 MASTER THESIS 0128 AST 699. 002 THESIS 0129 AST 699 003 MASTER THESIS 0130 810 202 800 FND BIOLOGY II 0131 BIO 202 801 FND BIOLOGY II 0132 810 202 001 FND BIOLOGY It 0133 BIO 202 002 FND BIOLOGY II 0134 BIO 202 003 FND BIOLOGY II 0135 810 202 004 FNO BIOLOGY II 0136 BID 202 005 FNO BIOLOGY II 0137 BlO 202 006 FND BIOLOGY II 0138 BIO 202 007 FNO BIOLOGY It 0139 BIO 202 008 , FNO BIOLOGY II 0140 BIO 202 009 FND BIOLOGY II 0141 BIO 202 010 FND BIOLOGY 11 0142 BID 202 011 FND BIOLOGY II 0143 BIO 202 012 FNO BIOLOGY II 0144 BIO 202 013 FND BIOLOGY II 0145 BIO 202 014 FNO BIOLOGY II 0146 BID 331 800 GEN GENETICS 1 0147 BID 331 001 GEN GENETICS I 0148 BID 331 002 GEN GENETICS I 0149 BID 331 003 GEN GENETICS I 0150 BID 331 004 GEN GENETICS l 0151 BIO 331 005 GEN GENETICS 1 0152 BID 351 800 INTRO MICROBIC 01 02 03 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 Oft 04 04 04 03 03 03 0'3 03 0153 BID 351 001 lNTRO HICROBIO 05 0154 BIO 351 002 JNTRO MICROBIO 05 0155 BID 422 800 CELL BIOLOGY II 0156 BIO 422 001 CELL BIOLOGY II 04 0157 810 422 002 CELL BIOLOGY 11 04 0158 810 422 003 CELL BIOLOGY II ' 04 0159 BID 422 004 CELL BIOLOGY II 04 0160 BID 445 001 PRIN OF ECOLOGY 03 0161 BOT 481 001 UNDERGRAO RSCH 0162 BOT 481 002 UNDERGRAO RSCH 0163 BOT 481 003 UNDERGRAD RSCH 01 02 03 0164 .BOT 551 001 BACT PHYSIOLOGY 05 0165 BOT 551 001 BACT PHYSIOLOGY 0166 BOT 583 001 SEL TOP BOT BAC 01 0167 BOT 583 002 SEL TOP BOT BAC 02 0168 BOT 583 003 SEL TOP BOT BAC 03 0169 BOT 615 001 ELEC MICROSCOPY 06 0170 BOT 615 001 ELEC MICROSCOPY 0171 BOT 621 001 DVL BO TIS CULT 05 0172 BOT 621 001 DVL 80 TIS CULT 0173 BOT 681 001 GRAD RESEARCH 01 0174 BOT 681 002 GRAD RESEARCH 02 0175 BOT 681 003 GRAD RESEARCH 03 0176 BOT 681 004 GRAD RESEARCH 04 0177 BOT 683 001 SEL TOP BOT BAC 01 0178 BOT 683 002 SEL TOP BOT SAC 01 0179 BOT 683 003 SEL TOP BOT BAC 03 0180 BOT 683 004 SEL TOP BOT BAC 04 0181 BOT 691 001 GRAD SEMINAR 01 0182 BOT 699 004 THESIS 04 0183 BOT 699 005 MASTERS THESIS 05 0184 BOT 699 006 MASTERS THESIS 06 0185 CBS 101 001 FUNC ENGLISH 0186 CBS 101 002 FUNC ENGLISH t 04 04 PERIOD OAY TBA TBA TBA TSA TBA TBA TBA 1 MWF 5 MWF 8-10 H 8-10 M 2-4 T 2-4T 7-9 T 7-9 T 2-4 w 2-4 w A-10 W 8-10 w 2-4 R 2-4 R 7-9 R 7-9 R 1 TR 2-4 M 7-9 T 2-4 w 2-4 R 8-10 f 4 MWF 8-10MW 8 TR 2 HWF 2-4 T 2-4 R 7-9 T 7-9 R l MWF TBA TBA TBA 2 3 4 TR 3 HWF TBA TBA TBA BLDG ROOM CODE NO NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS tHE 100 CHE 100 LIF l31B LIF 131C . liF 1318 llF 131C LIF 1318 llF 131C LIF 1318 l[F 131C LIF 1318 liF 131C llF 1318 LIF 1'31C LIF 1318 LIF 131C CHE 111 LIF 131A LIF l31A LIF l31A LIF 131A l IF 131A LIF 269 LIF 101C LIF 101C CtiE 100 LIF 101B LIF 1018 LIF 1018 LIF 1018 CHE 111 NRS .NRS NRS LIF lOLC LIF 179 NRS NRS NRS 8-10 MW PHY 207 6MWF 789R PHY 207 1 8 9 T liF lOlD 5 MWF LlF 179 TBA NRS TBA NRS TBA TBA NRS TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA 1 HWRF 1 MHRF NRS NRS NRS NRS TBD NRS NRS NRS FAH 132 FAH 133

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COURSE SEC PFX NC NO COURSE TITLE 0187 CBS 101 003 FUNC ENGtiSH 0188 CBS 10l 004 FUNC ENGLISH 0189 CBS 101 005 FUNC ENGLISH 0190 CBS 101 006 fUNC ENGLISH 0191 CBS 101 007 FUNC ENGLISH 0192 CBS 101 008 FUNC ENGLISH 0193 CBS 101 009 FUNC ENGLISH 0194 CBS 101 010 fUNC ENGLISH 0195 CBS 101 011 FUNC ENGLISH 0196 CBS 101 012 FUNC ENGLISH 0197 CBS 101 013 FUNC ENGLISH 0198 CBS 101 014 FUNC ENGLISH 0199 CBS 101 015 FUNC ENGLISH 0200 CBS 101 016 FUNC ENGLISH 0201 CBS 101 017 FUNC ENGLISH 0202 CBS 101 018 FUNC ENGLISH 0203 CBS 101 019 FUNC ENGLISH 0204 CBS 101 020 FUNC ENGLISH 0205 CBS 101 021 FUNC ENGLISH 0206 CBS 101 022 FUNC ENGLISH ' 0207 CBS 101 023 FUNC ENGLISH 0208 CBS 101 024 FUNC ENGLISH 0209 CBS 102 001 FUNC ENGLISH 0210 CBS 102 002 f . E MASS MEDIA 0211 CBS 102 003 FUNC ENGLISH 0212 CBS 102 004 F E MASS MEDIA 0213 CBS 192 005 FUNC ENGLISH 0214 CBS 102 006 FE MASS'MEDIA 0215 CBS 102 007 FUNC ENGLISH 0216 CBS102 008 FE MASS MEDIA 0217 CBS102 009 FE MASS MEDIA 0218 CBS 102 010 FUNC ENGLISH 0219 CBS 102 011 FUNC ENGLISH 0220 CBS 102 012 FUNC ENGLISH 0221 CBS 102 013 FUNC ENGLISH 0222 CBS 102 014. FUNC ENGLISH 0223 CBS 102 015 FUNC ENGLISH 0224 CBS 102 016 FUNC ENGLISH 0225 CBS 102 017 FUNC ENGLISH 0226 CBS 102 018 FUNC ENGLISH 0227 CBS 102 019 FUNC ENGLISH 0228 CBS 102 020 FUNC ENGLISH 0229 CBS 102 021 FUNC ENGLISH 0230 CBS 102 022 FUNC ENGLISH 0231 CBS 102 023 FUNC ENGLISH. 0232 CBS 102 024 F E MASS MEDIA 0233 CBS 102 025 FUNC ENGLISH 0234 CBS 102 026 FUNC ENGLISH 0235 CBS 102 027 FUNC ENGLISH 0236 CBS 102 028 FUNC ENGLISH 0237 CBS. 102 029 FUNC ENGLISH 0238 CBS 102 030 FUNC ENGLISH 0239 CBS 102 031 FUNC ENGLISH 0240 CBS 102 032 FUNC ENGLISH 02_ 41 CBS 102 033 FUNC ENG LISH 0242 CBS 102 034 FUNC ENGLISH 0243 CBS 102 901 FUNC ENGLISH 0244 CBS 102 902 FUNC ENGLISH 0245 CBS 109 001 FUNC MATH i 0246 CBS 109 002 FUNC MATH I 0247 CBS 109 003 FUNC MATH I 0248 CBS 109 004 FUNC MATH I 0249 CBS 109 005 FUNC MATH I 0250 CBS 109 006 FUNC MATH I 0251 CBS 109 007 MATH I 0252 CBS 110 001 FUNC MATH II 0253 CBS 110 002 FUNC MATH II 0254 CBS 110 003 FUNC MATH II 0255 CBS 110 004 FUNC MATH IJ 0256 CBS 110 005 FUNC MATH II 0257 CBS 110 006 FUNC MATH II 0258 CBS 110 007 FUNC MATH II CTR HRS 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 PERI CD DAY 3 MTWF 3 MTWF 3 MTWF 3 MTWF 6 MTWR 6 MTWR 6 MTWR 6 MTWR 6 MTWR 6 MTWR 1 2 TR 1 2 TR 3 4 TR 3 4 TR 3 4 TR 3 4 TR 5 6 TR 5 6 TR 5 6 TR 1 8 TR 7 8 TR 1 8 TR 2 MTWR 2 MTWR 4 MTWR 4 MTWR 4 MTWR 5 MWRF 5 MWRF 8 MWRF ' 8 MWRF 8 MWRF 8 MWRF 8 MWRF 8 MWRF 1 2 MW 1 2 9 10 MW 9 10 MW 9 10 MW 9 10 MW 1 2 TR 1 2 TR 3 4 TR 3 4 TR 3 4 TR 3 4 TR 5 6 TR 5 6 TR 5 6 TR 5 6 TR 1 8 TR 1 8 TR 7 8 TR 7 8 TR 2 MTWR 12 13 TR 12 13 TR 1 M-F 1 M-F 3 M-f 3 M-F 5 M-F 5 M-F 8 M-F 1 M-F 1 M-F 2 M-f 2 M-F 3 M-F 3 M-F 3 M-F BLDG ROOM CODE NO CHE 206 FAH 137 FAH 277 CHE 102 FAH 135 FAH 137 FAH 280 CHE 104 CHE 106 CHE 107 FAH 137 CHE 101 CHE 101 CHE 104 CHE 108 CHE 201 FAH 136 CHE 101 CHE 102 FAH 137 CHE 108 CHE 101 FAH 133 FAH 278 FAH 137 FAH 277 CHE 102 FAH 133 FAH 134 FAH 132 FAH 133 FAH 134 FAH 135 FAH 136 CHE 104 FAH 134 FAH 135 FAH 132 FAH 133 FAH 134 FAH 135 FA-H 134 FAH 135 CHE 106 CI-IE 207 CHE 208 204 CI-IE 103 CHE 204 CHE 203 CHE 202 CHE 204 CI-IE 20 ' 1 CHE 106 CHE 102 CI-IE 107 FAH 134 FAH 136 PHY 107 CHE 205 PHY 118 PHY 107 PI-IV 118 PHY 107 PHY 107 CHE 106 CHE 103 PHY 118 PHY 107 CHE 105 CHE 103 CHE 107 THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 5 COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE 0259 CBS 110 008 FUNC MATH II 0260 CBS 110 009 FUNC MATH II 0261 CBS 110 010 1FUNC MATH II 0262 CBS 110 011 FUNC MATH II 0263 CBS 110 012 FUNC MATH II 0264 CBS 110 013 FUNC MATH II 0265 CBS 110 014 FUNC MATH II 0266 CBS 110 015 FUNC MATH II CBS 110 901 FUNC MATH II 0268 CBS 110 902 FUNC MATH II 0269 CBS 111 001 FUNC FRENCH 0270 CBS 111 002 FUNC FRENCH 0271 CBS 111 003 FUNC FRENCH 0272 CBS 112 001 FUNC FRENCH 0273 CBS 112 002 FUNC FRENCH 0274 CBS 112 003 FUNC FRENCH 0275 CBS 112 004 FUNC FRENCH 0276 CBS 112 005 FUNC FRENCH 0277 CBS 112 006 FUNC FRENCH 0278 CBS 112 901 FUNC FRENCH 0279 CBS 114 001 FUNC GERMAN 0280 CBS 114 002 FUNC GERMAN 0281 CBS 115 001 FUNC GERMAN 0282 CBS 115 002 FUNC GERMAN 0283 CBS 115 003 FUNC GERMAN 0284 CBS 115 004 FUNC GERMAN 0285 CBS 115 005 FUNC GERMAN 0286 CBS 115 006 FUNC GERMAN 0287 CBS 118 001 FUNC RUSSIAN 0288 CBS 118 002 FUNC RUSSIAN 0289 CBS 120 001 FUNC SPANISH 0290 CBS 120 002 FUNC SPANISH 0291 CBS 121 001 FUNC SPANISH 0292 CBS 121 002 fUNC SPANISH 0293 CBS 12L. 003 FUNC SPANISH 0294 CBS 121 004 fUNC SPANISH 0295 CBS 121 005 FUNC SPANISH 0296 CBS 121 901 FUNC SPANISH 0297 CBS 124 001 fUNC ITALIAN 0298 CBS 124 002 FUNC ITALIAN 0299 CBS 124 003 FUNC ITALIAN 0300 CBS 201 001 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0301 CBS 201 002 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0302 CBS 201 003 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0303 CBS 201 004 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0304 CBS 201 005 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0305 CBS 201 006 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0306 CBS 201 007 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0307 CBS 201 008 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0308 CBS 201 901 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0309 CBS 202 001 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0310 CBS 202 002 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0311 CBS 202 003 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0312 CBS 202 004 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0313 CBS 202 005 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0314 CBS 202 006 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0315 CBS 202 007 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0316 CBS 202 008 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0317 CBS 202 009 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0318 CBS 202 010 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0319 CBS 202 011 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0320 CBS 202 012 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0321 CBS 202 013 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0322 CBS 202 014 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0323 CBS 202 015 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0324 CBS 202 016 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0325 CBS 202 017 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0326 CBS 202 018 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0327 CBS 202 019 BEHAVIORAL SCI CTR HRS 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 PERIGO DAY 4 M-F 4 M-F 4 M-F 5 M-F 5 M-F 5 M-F 8 M-F 8 M-F 12-14 MW 12-14 TR 2 f.4WF 4 MWF 6 MWF 2 MWF 2 MWF 4 MWF 4 MWF 6 MwF 8 MWF 11-13 M 2 MWF 4 MWF 3 MwF 4 MWF 6 MWF 6 MWF 8 MWF 5 6 T 6R 6 MWF 1 2 T 2R 2 MWF 2 MWF 4 MWF 4 MWP 6 MWF 1 2 T 2R 1 MWF ll:-13 w 2 MWF 3 MWF 7 8 T 7R 1 2 T 2R ItT 3 4 R 4T 3 4 R 2 MWF 3 MWF 6 MWF 6 MWF 1 8 T 7R 11-13 M 4T 8 MWF 2 MWF 2 MWF 2 MWF 2 MWF 2 MWF 2 MWF 2 MWF 3 MWF 3 MWF 3 MWF 3 MWF 3 MWF 3 MWF 3 MWF 4 MWF 4 MWF 4 MWF I BLDG ROOM CODE NO PHY 118 PHY 107 CHE 107 PHY 131 CHE 106 CHE 104 CHE 105 CHE 107 PHY 118 PHY 118 EDU 202C LIF 270 EDU 202C EDU 2020 CHE 201 CHE 201 CHE 203 FAH 283 FAH 283 FAH 278 FAH 283 CHE 208 PED 109 BUS 206 FAH 286 ENG 310 FAH 286 LIF 179 PED 112 LIF 179 FAH 146 PED 113 PED 113 PED 114 CHE 101 FAH 283 CHE 107 FAH 283 PHY 109 FAH 136 FAH 278 CHE 100 LIF 271 LIF 179 LIF 269 CHE 202 LIF 179 LIF 271 LIF 271 CHE 111 CHE 100 CHE 111 LIF 179 CHE 203 LIF 261 Llf 262 LIF 266 LIF 271 LIF 268 LIF 261 LIF 266 CHE 201 CHE 207 LIF 269 LIF 271 LIF 262 LIF 266 Llf 271 CHE 108 . • I

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THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 COURSE SEC PFX NO NO c OURSE TITLE 0328 CBS 202 020 BEHAVIORAL SCl 0329 CBS 202 021 BEHAVIORAL SCI Q330 CBS 202 022 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0331 CBS 202 023 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0332 CBS 202 024 BEHAVIORAL SCI . 0333 CBS 202 025 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0334 CBS 202 026 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0335 CBS 202 027 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0336 CBS 202 028 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0337 CBS 202 029 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0338 CBS 202 030 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0339 CBS 202 031 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0340 CBS 202 032 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0341 CBS 202 033 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0342 CBS 202 034 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0343 CBS 202 035 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0344 CBS 202 036 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0345 CBS 202 037 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0346 CBS 202 038 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0347 CBS 202 039 BEHAVIORAL SCI ' 0348 CBS 202 040 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0349 CBS 202 041 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0350 CBS 202 042 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0351 CBS 202 043 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0352 CBS 202 044 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0353 CBS 202 045 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0354 CBS 202 046 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0355 CBS 20i 901 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0356 CBS 205 800 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0357 CBS 205 001 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0358 CBS 205 002 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0359 CBS 205 003 BIOLOGICAL SCI ClTR HRS 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 PERIOD DAY 4 MWF 4 MWF 6 MWF 6 MWF 6 MWF 6 MWF 6 MWF 6 MWF 6 MWF 8 MWF 8 MWF 8 MWF 8 MWF 8 MWF 1 2 T 2R 1 2 T 2R 1 2 T 2R 1 2 T 2R 4T 3 4 R 4T 3 4 R 4T 3 4 R 4T 3 4 R 1 8 T 7R 7 8 T 7R 7 8 T 7R 1 8 T 7R 1 8 T 7R 11-13 T 2R 3 WF 4 WF 6 WF BLDG ROOM CODE NO CHE 202 LIF 179 LIF 261 liF 262 LIF 266 CHE 202 CHE 203 CHE 207 CHE 201 LIF 179 LIF 261 LIF 262 LIF 266 LIF 268 LIF 261 LIF 262 LIF 266 LIF 269 LIF 261 Llf 262 LIF 266 CHE 202 LIF 179 liF 261 LIF 262 LIF 266 CHE 202 CHE 111 CHE 111 LIF 268 LIF 268 LIF 268 NOTE-CBS 206 800 STUDENTS MUST ALSO ENROLL IN ONE SECTION OF CBS 206 SECTIONS 001 THROUGH 018. 0360 CBS 206 800 BIOLOGICAL SCI 2M TAT 0361 CBS 206 801 BIOLOGICAL SCI 3M TAT 0362 CBS 206 001 BIOLOGICAL SCI 03 2 WF LIF 267 _0363 CBS 206 002 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0364 CBS 206 003 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0365 CBS 206 004 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0366 CBS 206 005 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0367 CBS 206 006 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0368 CBS 206 007 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0369 CBS 206 008 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0370 CBS 206 009 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0371 CBS 206 010 BIOLOGICAL SCI CBS 206 011 BIOLOGICAL SCI : 0373 CBS 206 012 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0374 CBS 206 013 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0375 CBS 206 014 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0376 CBS 206 015 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0377 CBS 206 016 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0378 CBS 206 017 BIOLOGICAL SCI 0379 CBS 206 018 BIOLOGICAL SCI 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 3 WF 4 WF 2 W F 6 WF 6 WF 2 TR 2 TR 3 TR 3 TR 4 TR 4 TR 6 TR 6 TR 7 TR 7 TR 8 TR 8 TR LIF 267 LIF 267 CHE 111 LIF 267 LIF 269 LIF 267 LIF 268 Llf 267 LIF 268 L IF 2 .67 LIF 269 LIF 267 LIF 268 LIF 267 LIF 269 LIF 269 liF 268 NOTE-CBS 283 STUDENTS MUST ALSO ENRCLl IN CBS 206 800 AND IN ONE SECTION OP CBS 206 001 THROUGH 018. 0380 CBS 283 001 SL TP LAB 81 SC 01 7 8 9 R LIF lOlA 03Bl CBS 208 800 PHYSICAL SCI . . 0382 CBS 208 001 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 0383 CBS-208 002 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 0384 CSS 208 003 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 0385 CBS 208 004 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 0386 CBS 209 800 PHYSICAL SCI 0387 CBS 209 801 PHYSICAL SCI 0388 CBS 209 802 PHYSICAL SCI 0389 CBS 209 001 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 0390 CBS 209 002 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 0391 CBS 209 003 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 0392 'CBS 209 004 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 0393 CBS 209 005 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 0394 CBS 209 006 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 0395 CBS 209 007 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 0396 CBS 209 008 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 ( 8M 4T 3 4 R 4T 3 4 R 7T 7 8 R 7T 7 8 R 3 TR 4 TR 6 TR 2 WF 2 WF 3 WF 3 WF 4 WF 4 WF 5 WF 6 WF , ( I PHY 141 PHY 209 PHY 211 PHY 209 PHY 211 PHY 141 PHY 141 PHY 141 PHY 209 PHY 211 PHY 209 PHY 211 PHY 209 PHY 211 PHY 209 PHY 209 COURSE SEC QTR PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE HRS 0397 CBS 209 009 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 0398 CBS 209 010 PHY SCI DIS-LAB 03 0399 CBS 211 001 FUNC FRENCH 0400 CBS 211 002 FUNC FRENCH 0401 CBS 212 001 FUNC FRENCH 0402 CBS 212 002 FUNC FRENCH 0403 'CBS 214 001 FUNC GERMAN 0404 CBS 215 001 FUNC GERMAN 0405 CBS 218 001 FUNC RUSSIAN 0406 CBS 220 001 FUNC SPANISH 0407 CBS 220 002 FUNC SPANISH 0408 CBS 221 001 FUNC SPANISH 0409 CBS 221 002 FUNC SPANISH 0410 CBS 221 003 FUNC SPANISH 0411 CBS 224 001 FUNC ITALIAN 0412 CBS 301 001 AMERICAN IDEA 0413 CBS 301 002 AMERICAN IDEA 0414 CBS 301 003 AMERICAN IDEA 0415 CBS 301 AMERICAN IDEA 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 04 04 04 04 PERIOD DAY 6 WF 8 WF 4 MWF 5 MWF 6 MWF 5 MWF 5 MWF 5 MWF 2 MWF 2 MWF 3 MWF 4 MWF 5 6 T 6R 8 MWF 6 MWF 3 MTWF 3 MTWF 9 MTWF 9 MTWF BLDG ROOM CODE NO PHY ' 211 PHY 209 BUS 207 EDU 208 EDU' 209 FAH 135 FAH 137 FAH 278 FAH 137 PHY 129 CHE 208 BUS 208 LIF 261 FAH 137 FAH 278 PED 114 BUS 214 PEO 113 PED 112 NOTE-CBS 301 005 AND 302 005 ARE A ONE QUARTER COMBINED COURSE AND MUST BE TAKEN TOGETHER FOR 8 HRS CREDIT. NOTE-CBS 301 005 WILL ACTUALLY MEET IN PED 110 AND 111 WHICH ARE ADJOURNING ROOMS OPENING INTO ONE LARGE ROOM. 0416 CBS 301 005 AMERICAN IDEA 04 9 MTWF PEO 110 0417 CBS 302 001 AMERICAN tOEA 0418 CBS 302 002 AMERICAN IDEA 0419 CBS 302 003 AMERICAN IDEA 0420 CBS 302 004 AMERICAN IDEA 04 04 04 04 1 MWRF 1 MWRF 5 MWRF 5 MWRF BUS 214 BUS 213 BUS 215 BUS 112 NOTE-CBS 301 005 AND 302 005 ARE A ONE QUARTER COMBINED COURSE AND MUST BE TAKEN TOGETHER FCR 8 HRS CREDIT. NOTE-CBS 302 005 WILL ACTUALLY MEET IN PED 110 AND 111 WHICH ARE ADJOURNING ROOMS OPENING INTO ONE LARGE ROOM. 0421 CBS 302 005 AMERICAN IDEA 04 8 MWRF PEO 110 0422 CBS 302 006 AMERICAN IDEA 04 5 MWRF BUS 108 0423 CBS 302 007 AMERICAN IDEA 04 0424'CBS 302 008 AMERICAN ICEA 04 0425 CBS 302 009 AMERICAN IDEA 04 0426 CBS 302 010 AMERICAN IDEA 04 0427 CBS 302 011 AMERICAN IDEA l 04 0428 CBS 302 012 AMERICAN InEA 04 0429 CBS 302 013 AMERICAN IDEA 04 0430 CBS 302 014 AMERICAN IDEA 04 0431 CBS 302 015 AMERICAN IDEA 04 0432'CBS 302 016 AMERICAN IDEA 04 0433 CBS 302 901 AMERICAN IDEA 04 0434 CBS 302 902 AMERICAN IDEA 04 5 MWRF 6 MTWR 6 MTWR 8 MWRF 8 MWRF 8 MWRF 8 MWRF 9 MTWF 9 MTWF 10 MTWR 11 12 TR 12 13 MW PED 104 PED 113 PED 114 PED 114 PED 113 PED 104 FAH 288 BUS 112 BUS 113 BUS 214 FAH 288 PHY 107 NOTE-CBS 303 001 MEETS ONE TIME'ONLY ON THE 1ST FRIDAY OF THE QUARTER. MUST BE TAKfN SIMULTANEOUSLY WITH CBS 302. . 0435 CBS 303 001 AMERICAN IDEA 01 10F SSA NOTE-CBS 306 STUDENTS SHOULD REGISTER FOR BOTH A GENERAL SECTION, 001 OR 0021 AND ONE WORKSHOPy 011-070, AND PLAN. TO ATTEND ONE uR MORE TUTORIALS. 0436 CBS 306 001 HUMANITIES 03 2 WF TAT 0437 CBS 306 002 HUMANITIES 03 3 WF TAT 0438 CBS 306 011 IW HUM WORKSHOP. 2M FAH 0439 CBS 306 012 IW HUM WORKSHOP 3M FAH 0440 CBS 306 013 IW HUM WORKSHOP 3T FAH 0441 CBS 306 014 IW HUM WORKSHOP 5T FAH 0442 CBS 306 015 IW HUM WORKSHOP 4W FAH ' 0443 CBS 306 016 IW HUM WORKSHOP 6R FAH 0444 CBS 306 017 IW HUM WORKSHOP 4F FAH 0445 CBS 306 018 IW HUM WORKSHOP 3M .FAH SHOULD 276 276 276 276 276 276 276 228 0446 CBS 306 019 DA HUM WORKSHOP 0447 CBS 306 020 DA HUM WORKSHOP 0448 CBS 306 021 DA HUM WORKSHOP 0449 CBS 306 022 DA HUM WORKSHOP 0450 CBS 306 023 DA HUM WORKSHOP 0451-CBS 306 024 OA HUM WORKSHOP 0452 CBS 306 025 DA HUM WORKSHOP 0453 CBS 306 026 OA.HUM WORKSHOP 0454 CBS 306 027 DA HUM WORKSHOP 0455 CBS 306 028 DA HUH WORKSHOP 5M 8M 2T 4T 6T 7T 6W 8W 2R 3R FAH 276 FAH 276 FAH 228 FAH 276 FAH 276 FAH 276 FAH 276 FAH 228 FAH 276 FAH 276 J. \

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SEC QTR PFX NO NO COURSE TITlE HRS 0456 CBS 306 029 OA HUH WORKSHOP 0457 CBS 306 030 OA HUH WORKSHOP 0458 CBS 306 031 OA HUH WORKSHOP 0459 CBS 306 032 OA HUH WORKSHOP 0460 CBS 306 033 HU HUM WORKSHOP 0461 CBS 306 034 MU HUM WORKSHOP 0462 CBS 306 035 HU HUM WORKSHOP 0463 CBS 306 036 MU HUM WORKSHOP 0464 CBS 306 037 MU HUM WORKSHOP 0465 CBS 306 038 MU HUH WORKSHOP 0466 CBS 306 039 MU HUM WORKSHOP 0467 CBS 306 040 MU HUH WORKSHOP 0468 CBS 306 041 HUM 0469 CBS 306 042 MU HUH WORKSHOP 0470 CBS 306 0 . 43 MU HUM WORKSHOP 0471 CBS 306 044 MU HUM WORKSHOP 0472 CBS 306 045 HU' HUM WORKSHOP 0473 CBS 306 046 MU HUM WORKSHOP 0474 CBS 306 047 MU HUM WORKSHOP 0475 CBS 306 048 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0476 CBS 306 049 VA HUK WORKSHOP 0477 CBS 306 050 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0478 CBS 306 051 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0479 CBS 306 052 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0480 CBS 306 053 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0481 CBS 306 054 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0482 CBS 306 055 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0483 CBS 306 056 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0484 CBS 306 057 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0485 CBS 306 058 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0486 CBS 306 059 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0487 CBS 060 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0488 CBS 306 061 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0489 CBS 306 062 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0490 CBS 306 063 AR HUM WORKSHOP. 0491 CBS 306 064 AR HUM WORKSHOP 0492 CBS 306 065 : AR HUM WORKSHOP ' 0493 CBS 306 066 AR HUM 0494 CBS 306 067 AR HUM WORKSHOP 0495 CBS 306 068 AR HUM WORKSHOP 0496 CBS 306 069 PH HUM WORKSHOP 0497 CBS 306 070 PH HUM WORKSHOP 0498 cas 306 901 HUMANITIES 03 0499 CBS 306 902 HUMANITIES 03 0500 cas 306 905 OA HUM WORKSHOP 0501 CBS 306 906 MU HUM WORKSHOP 0502 CBS 306 907 VA HUM WORKSHOP 0503 CBS 4 o 1 0 0 1 SR sM FREE REsP 03 0504 CBS 401 002 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0505 CBS 401 003 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0506 CBS 401 004 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0507 CBS 401 005 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0508 CBS 401 006 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0509 CBS 401 007 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0510 CBS 401 008 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0511 CBS 401 009 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0512 CBS 401 010 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0513 CBS 401 011 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0514 CBS 401 012 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0515 CBS 401 013 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0516 CBS 401 014 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0517 CBS 401 901 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0518 CBS 401 902 SR SM FREE RESP 03 0519 CBS 406 001 BEHAVIORAL SCI 0520 CBS 410 001 SCI HUMAN LIFE 03 0521 CBS 471 OOl COOP EO RES 01 0522 CBS 471 002 COOP ED RES RPT 02 0523 CBS 471 003 COOP EO RES RPT 03 0524 CBS 004 COOP EO RES RPT 04 0525 CBS 471 005 COOP EO RES RPT 05 0526 CBS 483 003 SELECTED TOPICS 03 PERIOD DAY 7R 8R SF 6F 4M SM 6M 8M 3T 4T 6T 7T 5W 6W 2R 3R 4R 5R 4F 2M 3M SM 3T 5T 6T 7T 8T sw 6W ltR SR 6R' 7R ltf 4H 6M 2T 4W SF 6F 8W 9W 12M11-12W 12M11-12W 11 ,. 11 M 11 M 4T 3 4 R 2 MWF 4 MWF 4 MWF 6 MWF 6 MWF 10 MWF 1 2 T 2R 4T 3 4 R 4T 3 4R 5 6 T 6R 1 8 T 7R 7 8 T 7R 9 lOT lOR 11-13 T 11-13 R 4T 3 4 R 1 2 T 2R TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA 3 MWF BlDG ROOM CODE NO FAH 228 FAH FAH FAH ) FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH 228 228 228 228 228 228 228 228 228 2 .28 228 228 228 228 228 228 228 228 145 145 145 145 14 5 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 FAH 145 FAH 145-FAH 145 FAH 276 FAH 276 FAH 275 FAH 276 FAH 276 FAH 228 FAH 145 FAH 274 BUS 217 BUS 217 BUS 218 FAH 274 BUS 217 FAH 274 I FAH 274 BUS 210 FAH 274 FAH 274 BUS 217 BUS 218 FAH 274 FAH 274 FAH 274 CHE 203 PHY 116 NRS ) NRS NRS NRS NRS CHE 203 THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 7 COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE 0527 CHM 211 800 GEN CHEM I 0528 CHM 211 001 GEN CHEM I 0529 CHM 211 002 GEN CHEM I 0530 CHM 211 003 GEN CHEM I 0531 CHM 211 004 GEN CHEM I 0532 CHM 211 005 GEN CHEM I QTR HRS 04 04 04 04 04 PERIOD DAY It MWF 1-3 T 7-9 T 8-10 w 1-3 R 7-9 R NOTE-CHM 212 800 STUDENTS MUST ENROLL IN ONE OF THE FOLlOWING SECTIONS 001-005. 0533 CHM 212 001 GEN CHEM II 0534 CHM 212 002 GEN CHEM II 0535 CHM 212 003 GEN CHEM II 0536 CHM 212 004 GEN CHEM II 0537 CHM 212 005 GEN tHEM II 04 04 04 04 04. 1-3 M 1-3 T 1-3 w 1-3 R 1-3 F NOTE-CHM 212 801 STUDENTS MUST ENROLL IN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS 006-010. 0538 212 801 GEN CHEM II 0539 CHM 212 006 GEN CHEM 11 0540 CHM 212 007 GEN CHEM II 0541 CHM 212 OOS GEN CHEM II 0542 CHM 2i2 009 GEN CHEM II 0543 CHM 212 010 GEN CHEM .II 04 04 04 04 04 8 MWF 1-3 M 1-3 T 1-3 w 1-3 R 1-3 F NOTE-CHM 212 STUDENTS MUST ENROLL IN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS 011-014. 0544 CHM 212 802 GEN CHEM II 3 MWF 0545 CHM 212 011 GEN tHEM II lAB 04 0546 CHM 212 012 GEN CHEM II LAB 04 0547 CHM 212 013 GEN tHEM II lAB 04 4-6 T 4-6 R 8-10 M BlDG ROOM CODE NO CHE CHE tHE tHE CHE tHE CHE CHE tHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE 100 110A llOA 110A llOA 110A 109A l09A 109A 109A 109A 100 1108 1108 1108 110B 1108 111 109A 109A l09A NOTE-CHM 212 803 STUDENTS MUST ENROll IN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS 015-018• 0548 CHM 212 803 .GEN CHEM II 4 MWF CHE 111 109A 1108 109A 1108 l09A 0549 CHM 212 014 GEN CHEH II LAB 04 0550 CHM 212 015 GEN CHEM II LAB 04 0551 CHM 212 016 GEN CHEM II LAB 04 0552 CHM 212 017 GEN CHEM II LAB 04 0553 CHM 212 018 GEN tHEM II LAB 04 8-10 w 8-10 M 7-9 T 8-10 w 7-9 R CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE NOTE-CHM 212 804 SlUOENTS MUS1 ENROlL 'IN ONE OF THE FOLlOWING SECTIONS. 019-022. 0554 CHM 212 804 GEN CHEM II 6 MWF CHE 111 0555 'CHM 212 019 GEN CHEM II lAB 0556 CHM 212 020 GEN CHEM II LAB 04 0557 C H M 212 021 GEN CHEM II LAB 04 0558 C H M 212 022 GEN CHEM II LAB 04 0559 CHM 322 800 ANAL CHEM 0560 CHM 322 001 ANALYTICAl CHEM 04 0561 CHM 322 002 ANALYTICAL CHEM 04 0562 CHM 322 003 ANALYTICAL CHEM 04 0563 CHM 331 800 ORG CHEM I 0564 CHM 331 001 ORG CHEM I 04 0565 CHM 331 002 ORG CHEM 1 04 0566 tHH 331 003 ORG CHEM I 04 0567 CHM 332 800 ORG CHEM II 0568 CHM 332 801 ORG CHEH It 0569 CHM 332 802 ORG CHEM 11 0570 CHM 332 001 ORG CHEH II 04 0571 CHM 332 002 ORG CHEM II 04 0572 CHM 332 003 ORG CHEM II 04 0573 CHM 332 004 ORG CHEM II 04 0574 tHM 332 005 ORG CHEM II 04 0575 CHH 332 006 ORG CHEM II 04 0576 CHM 332 007 ORG CHEM II 04 0577 CHM 332 008 ORG CHEM II 04 0578 CHM 332 009 ORG CHEM It 04 0579 CHM 332 010 ORG CHEM II 04 0580 CHM 433 800 QUAL ORG LEC 0581 CHM 433 001 QUAL ORG ANALY 0582 CHM 441 001 PHYS CHEM 1 0583 CHM 442 001 PHVS CHEM II 0584 CHM 444 800 PHYS CHEM lAB 0585 CHM 444 001 PHYS CHEM lAB 0586 CHM 444 002 PHYS CHEM LAB 0587 'CHM 481 001 UNOERGRAD RSCH .. 04 04 04 03 03 01 4-6 T 4-6 R 7-9 T 7-9 R 2 MWF 7-9 T 7-9 R 4-6 f 3 MWF 1 T 8-10 w 4-6 M 3 MWF 4 MWf 8 MWF 1-3 M 1-3 w 1-3 R 8-10 M 4-6 T 7-9 T 4-6 R 7-9 R 4-6 w 4-6 f 6T 8-10 MWF 5 -HTWF 2 MTWF tHE CHE tHE CHE tHE CHE CHE tHE CHE CHE CHE tHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE CHE tHE CHE 1108 1108 1108 1108 105 2098 2098 2098 104 1098 1098 1098 106 106 106. 1098 1098 1098 ---1098 1098 1098 1098 1098 1098 1098 CHE 105 CHE 2098 CHE 105 CHE 106 2R CHE 106 3-5 TR CHE 209A 8910W789R CHE 209A TBA NRS

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8 THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 COURSE NS0EC PFX NO COURSE TITLE 0588 CHM 481 002 UNDERGRAD RSCH 0589 CHM 481 003 UNDERGRAC RSCH 0590 CHM 552 001 BIOCHEH II 0591 CHM 553 001 . TECH IN BIOCHEM 0592 CHM 611 001 STRC INORG CHEH 0593 CHM 621 001 ADV ANALY CHEM QTR HRS 02 03 03 02 04 04 0594 CHM 632 001 AOV ORG CHEM II 02 0595 CHM 643 001 QUANTUM CHEM I 04 0596 CHM 681 001 GRAD RESEARCH 0597 CHM 681 002 GRAD RESEARCH 0598 CHM 681 003 GRAD RESEARCH 0599 CHM 699 001 THESIS 0600 CHM 699 002 THESIS 0601 CHM 699 003 THESIS 0602 CLS 102 001 ELEM LATIN II 0603 CLS 202 001 INTER LATIN II 01 02 03 01 02 03 03 03 PERIOD DAY TBA T8A 4 HWF 7T89MT10H 6 MWRF 5 HWRF 10 TR 1 MTWF TBA TBA TBA T8A TBA TBA 2 MWF 4 MWF 0604 CLS 321 001 ANCIENT CIVILIZ 05 1 H-F 0605 CLS 331 001 BASIC GREEK II 03 5 MWF 0606 CLS 411 001 LA LIT & BKGRNO 03 6 MWF 0607 CLS 527 001 GREEK HISTORY 04 2 3 TR 0608 COE 171 001 CO-OP EDUCATION ,.. T8A 0609 COE 172 001 CO-OP EDUCATION TBA 0610 COE 271 001 CO-OP EDUCATION TBA 0611 COE 272 001 CO-OP EDUCATION TBA 0612 COE 371 001 CO-OP EDUCATION TBA 0613 COE 372 001 CO-OP EDUCATION TBA 0614 COE 471 001 CO-OP EDUCATION TBA 0615 COE 472 001 CO-OP EDUCATION TSA 0616 COE 671 001 CO-OP EDUCATION 0617 COE 672 001 CO-OP EDUCATION TBA BlDG ROOM CODE NO NRS NRS CHE 105 CHE 209A CHE 105 CHE 107 CHE 105 CHE 105 NRS NRS NRS FAH FAH NRS NRS NRS 136 136 FAH 288 FAH 136 FAH 136 FAH 136 NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NOTE-STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR DHA 001 OR OMA 002 SHOULD CONTACT THE MATHEMATICS OFFICE, PHY 316, AFTER REGISTRATION. 0618 OMA 001 001 BAS CON ALGEBRA -TBA NRS 0619 OMA 002 001 ANALYTICAL TRIG 0620 ORE 001 001 DEVELOP READING 0621 ORE 001 002 DEVELOP READING 0622 ORE 001 003 DEVELOP READING 0623 ORE 001 004 DEVELOP READING 0624 ORE 001 005 DEVELOP READING 0625 ORE 001 006 DEVELOP READING 0626 ORE 001 007 DEVELOP READING TBA 2 MWF 3 MWF 4 MWF 6 MWF 8 MWF 8 9 T 8R TBA ADM ADM ADM ADM ADM ADM NRS 154 154 154 154 154 154 172 NOTE-EBX COURSES ARE TRIMESTER SYSTEM PHASE-OUT COURSES. 0627 EBX 307 001 ELECTRONICS I 05 4 M-F ENG 208 0628 EBX 417 001 COMMUNICATIONS 0629 EBX 421 001 FIELDS WAVES 0630 EBX 421 001 FLO WVS LAB 0631 EBX 423 001 LINEAR SYSTEMS 0632 ECN 201 001 ECON PRIN I 0633 ECN 201 002 ECON PRIN I 0634 ECN 201 003 ECON PRIN I 0635 ECN 201 004 ECON PRIN I 0636 ECN 201 005 ECON PRIN I 0637 ECN 201 901 ECON PRIN I 0638 ECN 202 001 ECON PRIN II 0639 ECN 202 002 ECON PRIN II 0640 ECN 202 003 ECON PRIN II 0641 ECN 202 004 ECON PRIN II 0642 ECN 202 005 ECON PRIN II 0643 ECN 202 006 ECON PRIN II 0644 ECN 202 007 ECON PRIN II 04 05 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 3 4 P4W 11 12 TR 2 3 4 T 3 4 TF 1 MWRF 3 MTWF 5 MWRF B MWRF 9 MTWF 11 12 TR 1 MWRF 3 HTWF 5 MHRF 8 MWRF 9 MWRF 1 MWRF 3 MTWF ENG 205 ENG 310 ENG 227E ENG 205 BUS 106 BUS 106 BUS 106 BUS 106 BUS 106 BUS 318 BUS 107 BUS 112 BUS 107 BUS 107 BUS 107 BUS 110 BUS 110 COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE 0645 ECN 202 008 ECON PRIN Ii 0646 ECN 202 009 ECON PRIN II 0647 ECN 202 901 ECON PRIN II 0648 ECN 301 001 0649 ECN 301 002 0650 ECN 301 003 0651 ECN 301 004 0652 ECN 301 901 INT PRICE THRY INT PRICE THRY INT PRICE THRY INT PRICE THRY INT PRICE THRY QTR HRS 04 04 04 05 05 05 05 05 0653 ECN 313 001 COLL BARGAINING 05 0654 ECN 323 001 INC MON ANALYS (}5 PERIOD DAY 5 HWRF 8 . MWRF 11 12 TR 2 M-F 4 M-F 5 H-F 6 M-f 11 12 'tR 6 M-F 2 M-F BlDG ROOM CODE NO BUS 110 BUS 111 BUS 107 BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS 106 106 321 106 322 BUS 107 BUS 107 NOTE-STUDENTS WHO ENROLL IN ECN 331 800 MUST REGISTER FaR CNE SECTION OFECN 331 001-015. 0655 ECN 331 800 BUS EC STAT 1 -5 MWRF BSA 0656 ECN 331 001 BUS EC STAT I 05 1M BUS 316 316 316 316 316 316 316 0657 ECN 331 002 BUS EC STAT J 05 2M BUS 0658 ECN 331 003 BUS EC STAT I 05 3M BUS 0659 ECN 331 004 BUS EC STAT I 0660 ECN 331 005 BUS EC STAT I / 0661 ECN 331 006 BUS EC STAT I 0662 ECN 331 007 BUS EC STAT I 0663 ECN 331 008 BUS EC STAT I 0664 ECN 331 009 BUS EC STAT I 0665 ECN 331 010 BUS EC STAT I 0666 ECN 331 011 BUS EC STAT I 0667 ECN 331 012 BUS EC STAT I 0668 ECN 331 013 BUS EC STAT I 0669 ECN 331 014 BUS EC STAT I 0670 ECN 331 015 BUS EC STAT I 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 0671 ECN 361 001 INTRO MATH ECON 04 0672 ECN 405 001 COHP EC SYSTHS 04 0673 ECN 451 001 . INTRNTL COM POL 04 0674 ECN 461 001 THRY EC OVLPHNT 04 0675 ECN 501 901 ECON PRICE THRY 03 0676 ECN 601 _ 001 RSCH METHOD 03 0677 ECN 604 901 MANGRL STAT Jl 03 0678 ECN 607 001 AGGREGATE ECON 03 0679 EDA 377 001 BASES ART EO 03 0680 EDA 441 001 . TCH MTH SEC ART 04 0681 ECA 661 901 ADM SUPRVSN ART 04 0682 EDC 101 800 INTRO TEACHING 0683 EOC 101 001 INTRO TEACHING 0684 EDC 101 INTRO TEACHING 0685 EOC 101 003 INTRO TEACHING 0686 EOC 101 004 INTRO TEACHING 0687 EOC 101 005 INTRO TEACHING 0688 EDC 101 006 INTRO TEACHING 0689 EOC 101 007 INTRO TEACHING 0690 ESC 101 008 INTRO TEACHING 0691 EOC 101 009 INTRO TEACHING 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 4H lT 2T 3T 4T lW 3W 6W ew 2R 4R 6R 2 MWRF 5 MWRF 3 M -TWF 8 HWRF 12-14 R 4 MWF 12-14 R 5-6 T 6R 4 MWF 1 MWRF 10-13 T 3 4 R 1 2 T 1 2 T 5 6 T 5 6 T 7 8 T 7 8 T 1 2 T 5 6 T 7 8 T BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS 316 BUS 316 BUS 316 BUS 316 BUS 316 BUS 316 BUS 316 BUS 316 BUS 108 .. BUS 318 8US 108 BUS 108 BUS 109 BUS 108 BUS 112 BUS 108 FAH 147 FAH 147 FAH 147 EDU EDU EDU EOU EDU EOU EDU EDU EDU ECU 302 214 215 212 213 212 213 209 2020 208 NOTE-ALL ELEMENTARY MAJORS WHO PLAN TO INTERN DURING QUARTER -III SHOULD ENROLL IN EOC 401 SECTION 005, 006t 007 OR 008. 0692 EDC 401 CURRIC INSTR 05 1 2 TR ECU 202A 0693 EDC 401 002 CURRIC INSTR 05 0694 EDC 401 003 CURRIC INSTR 05 0695 ECC 401 004 CURRIC INSTR 05 0696 EDC 401 005 CURRIC INSTR 05 0697 ECC 401 006 CURRIC INSTR 05 0698 ECC 401 007 CURRIC INSTR 05 0699 EDC 401 008 CURRIC INSTR 05 0700 EOC 480 001 OS CLRM OB TECH 04 0701 EDC 485 001 DIR READING 0702 EDC 485 002 DIR READING 0703 EDC 485 003 DIR READING 0704 EDC 485 004 DIR READING 01 02 03 04 1 2 TR 1 2 TR 1 2 TR 7 8 TR 7 8 TR 7 8 TR 7 8 TR TBA TBA TBA TBA , TBA ECU 202B EDU 202C EDU 2020 ECU 202A EDU 2028 ECU 202C EDU 2020 NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NOTE-STUDENTS ENROLLING IN EDC 498 001 OR 002 WILL ATTEND ADDITIONAL DISCUSSION SECTIONS TO BE ANNOUNCED. 0705 ECC 498 001 SR SMR El EDUC 03 8 9 W EDU 302 ,l ) J I

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I COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE QTR HRS PERIOD DAV BLDG ROOM CODE NO NOTE-EDC 498 002 WILL MEET ON ALTERNATE THURSDAYS. 0706 EDC 498 002 SR SHR SEC EDUC 03 8-11 R NRS 0707 EOC 498 121 SR SMR EL EOUC 03 4-8 R EOU 216 0708 EOC 498 123 SR SMR El EOUC 03 4-8 R EOU 217 0709 EDC 499 001 SUPERVSO TEACH 0710 EDC 499 701 SUPERVSD TEACH 12 12 0711 EDC 501 701 CUR t INST ELEM 05 0712 EDC 501 702 CUR t INST SEC 05 0713 EDC 501 901 CURR INST ELEH 05 0714 EDC 501 902 CURR INST SEC 05 0715 EOC 661 701 PRIN ED SUPRVSN 04 0716 EOC 661 901 PRIN EO SUPRVSN 04 0717 EDC 671 701 PRIN EDUC ADMIN 04 ' 0718 EDC 671 702 PRIN EDUC ADMIN 04 0719 EDC 681 701 OS ELEM SCI CUR 04 0720 EOC 681 703 OS CUR THRY El 04 0721 EDC 681 704 OS INT COM DIS 04 0722 EOC 691 004 INTERNSHIP GUID 04 0723 EDC 691 008 INTERNSHIP GUIO 08 T8A 1-7 M 9-13 M 9-13 M 10-14 w 10-14 w TBA 10-13 w 10-13 R 10-13 M 9-12 R 10-13 w TBA TBA TBA NRS BCA 136B FT MYRS FT MYRS EDU 202A EOU 2028 ORL ANDO eDu 2020 CCC OA FT MYRS TAM PA ST PETE ORL ANDO NRS NRS NOTE-STUDENTS TAKING EOC 691 304 MUST ALSO TAKE EOS 598 304. 0724 EOC 691 304 INTERNSHIP MR 04 TBA NRS '0726 EOD 311 001 RETAILING EOUC 0727 EOO 431 001 SPVSO FLO EXP 0728 EDO 445 901 TCH MTH SEC DE 0729 EOO S07 701 PRIN VOC-EO 0730 EOE 409 001 READ FOR CHILO 0731 EDE 409 002 READ FOR CHILO 0732 EOE 409 003 READ FOR CHILO 0733 EDE 409 004 .READ FOR CHILD 0734 EDE 409 211 FOR CHILO 0735 EOE 409 212 READ FOR CHILD 0736 'EDE 409 701 READ FOR CHILD 0737 EDE 409 901 READ FOR CHILD 0736 EDE 411 001 LANG ART CHILD 0739 EDE 411 002 LANG ART CHILO 0740 EOE 411 003 LANG ART CHILO 0741 EDE 411 004 LANG ART CHILD 0742 EDE 411 OOS LANG ART CHILD 0743 EDE 411 006 LANG ART CHILD 0744 EDE 411 121 LANG ART CHILO 0745 EDE 411 122 LANG ART CHILD 0746 EDE 411 701 LANG ART CHILO 0747 EDE 413 001 LIT FOR CHILO 0746 EDE 413 002 LIT FOR CHILO 0749 EDE 413 003 LIT FOR CHILD 0750 EDE 413 004 LIT FOR CHILD 0751 EDE 413 005 LIT FOR CHILD 0752 EDE 415 001 ARITH FOR CHILD 0753 EDE 415 002 ARITH FOR CHILD 0754 EDE 415 003 ARITH FOR CHILO 0755 EDE 415 004 ARITH FOR CHILO 0756 EDE 415 211 ARITH FOR CHILO 0757 EDE 415 212 ARITH FOR CHILD 0758 EDE 415 701 ARITH fOR CHILO 0759 EOE 415 702 ARITH FOR CHILO 0760 EDE 417 001 SCIENCE CHILD 0761 EDE 417 002 SCIENCE CHILO 0762 EDE 417 003 SCIENCE CHILD 0763 EDE 417 121 SCIENCE CHILD 0764 EDE 417 701 , SCIENCE CHILO 0765 EOE 417 702 SCIENCE CHILO 0766 EDE 419 001 SO ST CHILO 0767 EDE 419 002 SO ST CHILD 0768 EDE 419 003 SO ST CHILD 04 04 04 04 OS 05 05 05 05 05 05 OS 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 OS 05 05 05 05 05 OS 05 TBA NRS TBA NRS 11-14 R aus 211 11-14 T SAR ASOT 3 4 TR 3W PEO 113 3 4 HW 3F EDU 5M 5 6 WF EOU 5H 5 6 WF EOU 4-8 R EDU 209 202A 2028 215 4-8 R 9-13 w 10-14 M EDU 214 FT MVRS eus 212 1 MWRF 1 MWRF 3 MTWF 3 MTWF 5 6 TR 5 6 TR 4-6 8 w 4-6 8 w 1-7 T EDU 212 EDU 213 EDU 216 EDU 217 EDU 202A EOU 202B EDU 217 EDU 216 BCA 136B 3 4 MW EDU 3 4 MW EDU 1 2 MW EOU 1 2 MW EDU 7 8 TR BUS 1 2 TR 2W EDU 1 2 TR 2W EDU 3 4 TR 4W PED 5 6 MW 5R EDU 4-8 T EDU 4-8 T EOU 3-7 s coc 1..;6 F BCA 202A 2028 202A 202B 215 216 217 109 2020 215 214 OA 1368 1 2 MF 1W EDU 203 3 4 TR 4W EDU 203 5 6 WR SF EDU 203 4-6 8 M EDU 203 10-13 T CDC OA 1-6 W 8CA 136B 3 4 TR 3W BUS 215 1 2 MW lR BUS 215 4 5 TR SF BUS 214 ' I ( THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 9 COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TtTLE 0769 EDE 42l .800 ART FOR CHILD 0110 EOE 421 001 ART FOR CHILO 0771 EriE 421 002 ART FOR CHILO 0772 EOE 421 003 ART FOR CHILD QTR HRS 04 04 04 0773 EDE 423 001 MUS CHILD SKill 02 0774 EDE 423 002 MUS CHILO SKill 02 0775 EDE 423 701 MUS CHILO SKILL 02 0776 EOE 424 001 MUS CHILD METH 03 0111 EOE 424 002 MUS CHILO METH 03 0118 EPE 424 OQ3 MUS CHILO METH 03 0779 EOE 425 001 HEALTH PE CHILO 04 0780 EOE 425 002 HEALTH PE CHILD 04 0781 EOE 425 003 HEALTH PE CHILO 04 0782 EOE 425 901 HEALTH PE CHILO 04 0783 EOE 440 800 TCH METH EL SCH 04 0784 EOE 440 001 TCH METH EL SCH 04 0785 EOE 440 002 TCH.METH EL SCH 04 0786 EDE 440 003 TCH METH EL SCH 04 0787 EDE 440 211 TCH METH EL SCH 04 0788 EDE 440 212 TCH METH EL SCH 04 0789 EOE 530 901 PROG NS KIND 04 0790 EOE 603 702 SEMNR CURR RSCH 02 0791 EOE 603 712 SEMNR CURR RSCH 02 0792 EOE 603 902 SEMNR CURR RES 02 0793 EOE .609 901 CUR TRND READNG 04 0794 EDE 611 701 NEW TRNOS LANG 0795 EOE 613 901 CRTVE ART INST 0796 EOE 613 902 CRTVE ART INST 04 04 04 0797 EOE 617 701 NEW TRNOS SCI 04 0798 EDE 617 901 NEW TRNOS SCI 04 0 799 EOE 619 701 NEW TRNOS SO ST 04 0800 EOF 303 001 INTMEAS & EVAL 04 0801 EOF 305 001 HUM DEV & LRNG 04 0802 EOF 305 002 HUM DEV & LRNG 04 0803 EOF 305 003 HUH DEV & LRNG 04 0804 EOF 305 004 HUM OEV & LRNG 04 0805 EOF 305 005 HUM OEV & LRNG 04 0806 EOF 305 211 HUM DEV & LRNG 04 0807 EOF 305 212 HUM OEV & LRNG 04 0808 EOF 307 001 SOC FNOTNS EDUC 04 0609 ' 307 002 SOC FNDTNS EDUC 04 0810 EDF 307 003 SOC FNOTNS EDUC 04 0811 EDF 307 004 SOC FNOTNS EOVC 04 0812 EDF 307 005 SOC FNDTNS EOUC 0813 EOF 307 006 SWC FNDTNS EDUC 0814 EOF 307 007 SOC FNOTNS EDUC 0815 EOF 307 121 SOC FNDTNS EOUC 0816 EOF 307 122 SOC FNDTNS EOUC 0817 EDF 307 701 SOC FNOTNS EOUC 0818 EOF 309 001 PHILOS OF EDUC 0819 EDF 309 002 PHILOS OF EOUC 0820 EDF 3i1 001 COMPARATIVE ED 0821 EOF 311 002 COMPARATIVE EO 0822 EDF 481 901 INOIV RESEARCH 0823 EOF 481 902 INOIV RESEARCH 0824 EDF 481 903 INOIV RESEARCH 0825 EDF 481 904 INDIV RESEARCH 0826 EDF 601 901 FNDTNS EO RSCH 0827 EDF 601 902 FNOTNS EO RSCH 0828 EDF 601 903 FNDTNS EO RSCH 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 01 02 03 04 04 04 04 0829 EOF 601 904 FNDTNS EO RSCH 0 . 4 0830 EDF 605 901 FNDTNS MEASRMNT 04 0831 EDF 605 902 FNDTNS MEASRHNT 04 0832 EDF 605 903 MEASRMNT 04 ' \ P .ERIOO DAY 2M 5 6 T 5R 5 6 M 5W 2 3 T 2R 2 TR 3 TR 11-12 w 1 MWF 4 MWF 5 MWF 1 2 TR 3 4 MW 3 4 TR 10-13 T SR 4T 3 4 R 5 6 T 6R 5M 4 5 W 4-6 8 M 4-6 8 M 10-13 M 13-14 M 13-14 M 10-13 T 10-13 M 9-12 M 10-13 R 10-13 R 10-13 T 10-13 w 11-14 w 1 2 MW l MTWR 6 7 TR. 3 4 MW 8 9 MW 3 4 TR 4-6 8W -4-6 aw 2 MWRF 2 3 MW 3 MTWF 3 MTWF 4 MTWF 5 MWRF 6 MTWF 4-8 T 4-6 T 1-6 R 2 MTWF 2 MHiF 4 HTWF 4 MTWF TBA TBA TBA TBA 11-14 M 10-13 M 11-14 T 11-14 T 10-13 w 10-13 w 10-13 R BLDG ROOM CODE NO FAH 101 FAH 147 FAH 147 FAH 147 FAH 106 FAH 106 ORL ANOO FAH 106 FAH 106 FAH 107 PED 105 PED 105 PEO 105 PEO 104 EOU 302 Eou 202c Eou 202c EOU 202C EOU 215 EOU 214 EOU 202C COC OA ORL ANOO EDU 209 EOU 208 COC OA EDU 212 EDU 213 COC OA EDU 203 ORL ANOO EDU 209 EDU 208 EDU 302 EDU 208 EDU 208 EDU 209 EOU 215 EOU 214 EDU 208 EDU 302 EDU 214 EDU 215 EDU 2020 EOU 209 EDU 208 EDU 211 EDU. 216 BCA 1368 EDU 212 EDU 213 EDU 212 EDU 213 NRS NRS NRS NRS BUS 112 BUS 113 EDU 214 EDU 215 EDU 214 EDU 215 EDU 214 ' I

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10 THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 COURSE SEC QTR PFX NO NO TITLE HRS 0833 EDF 605 904 FNDTNS HEASRMNT 04 0834 EDF 605 905 FNOTNS MEASRMNT 04 0835 EOF 605 906 FNOTNS MEASRMNT 04 0836 EOF 611 701 PHY FNOTNS EOUC 04 0837 EDF 611 901 PSY FNDTNS EDUC 04 0838 EOF 611 902 PSY FNOTNS EOUC 04 0839 EDF 613 901 PRIN OF LRNG 0840 EDF 617 901 MEAS IND INTELL 0841 EDF 621 901 SOC-ECON FND ED 0842 EOF 621 902 SOC-ECON FNO EO 05 05 04 04 0843 EDF 625 901 PHIL FNOS AM EO 04 0844 EDF 625 902 PHIL FNOS AM EO 04 0845 EOG 581 001 PRIN OF GUIO 04 0846 EDG 581 701 PRIN OF GUIONCE 04 0847 EOG 581 901 PRIN OF GUID 04 0848EOG 611 901 TEST SERV GUIO 04 0849 EDG 619 901 GROUP PROC GUID 03 PERIOD DAY. 10-13 R 10-13 R 10-13 R 9-12 M 10-13 T 10-13 T 11-14 R 10-14 M T 11-14 T 11-14 M 11-14 M 3 4 TR 9-12 w 10-13 M 10-13 R ' 10-12 T BLDG ROOM CODE NO EOU 215 ECU 216 ECU 217 ORL ANDO EDU 216 EDU 217 EOU EDU EOU EOU 2020 212 212 213 EOU 202A EOU 202B EDU 208 FT MYRS ecu 2020 EOU 208 eou 208 0850 EDG 623 001 COUNS SERV GUIO 05 6 7 TR BR EDU 209 0851 EDG 627 901 PRAC GUIO COUNS 06 EDG 627 902 PRAC GUIO COUMS 06 0853 EDG 633 901 SEMNR GUIDANCE 01 0854 EOH 651 901 JR COL AM HI EO 04 0855 EOL 412 701 ORG LiB MAT CTR 05 0856 EDL 412 901 ORG liB MAT CTR 05 0851 EOL 412 90Z ORG LIB MAT CTR 05 0858 EDL 419 001 AUD-VIS MAT INS 04 0859 EOl 419 002 AUO-VIS MAT INS 04 0860 EOl 515 701 TECH SER IN LIB 04 0861 EDL 901 8KS RELAT MAT I 03 0862 EOL 518 901 BK RELAT MAT II 03 0863 EOL 523 901 PRE PRO INS MAT 04 0864 EOL 601 901 BIBLIO-BK SELEC 05 0865 601 902 BIBLIO-BK SELEC 05 0866 EDL 605 701 HIST CHILDLIT 05 0867 EDL 609 001 FLO WK SCH LIB 04 0868 EOL 611 901 AOV SBJ REF BIB 04 0869 EDL 625 701 RDG GUID LIB CR 04 0870 EOL 681 IND RSCH LIBR 04 0871 EDL 681 701 IND RSCH IN ST 04 9-13 M 9-13 w 11-14 R 10-13 T 9-13 R 11-14 M 11-14 M 3 4 TR 3 4 TR TBA TBA TBA 11-14 R 10-14 M 10-14 M 9-12 R TBA 11-14 T 11-14 M TBA 9-12 H NOTE-STUDENTS ENROLLING IN EOM 431 MUST ALSO ENROll IN MUS 387 002. 0872 EDM 431 001 INST MUS EL SCH 04 8M 8 9 WF 0873 EDM 432 001 INST MUS JR HI 0874 EOM 437 001 VOC MUS JR HI 0875 EOM 437 001 VOC MUS JR HI 04 05 0876 EON 459 001 TCH MTH SEC SCI 04 0877 EON 459 701 TCH MTH SEC SCI 04 0878 EOP 217 001 FIRST AID 03 0879 EOP 321 001 SEM & FLO EXP 0880 EOP 321 002 SEM & FLO EXP 05 05 0881 EDP 322 001 HUMAN KINETICS 06 0882 EDP 353 001 TCH S OFF SWIM 03 0883 EOP 354 001 FOLK & SQ DANCE 03 0884 EOP 357 001 PE ACTIVITIES M 03 0885 EDP 359 001 PE ACTIVITIES W 03 0886 EOP 459 001 ATH TRAINING 03 0887 EOR 509 901 TRN SEC READ 04 5 MWF 2 MWF 3 MF 1 2 TR TBA 2 MWF TBA TBA 1 2 M-F 4 MWF 1 2 MWF 5 6 MWF S 6 MWF 8 MWF 10-13 M EDU 209 EOU 209 EDU 2028 EDU 202B COC OA EDU 216 EDU 217 EOU 202A EDU 2028 lAK ELNO TBD TBD EDU 203 EDU 214 EOU 215 ORL . ANOO NRS EDU 2020 BCA SAR FAH FAH FAH 136C NRS ASOT 106 106 106 FAH 206 EDU 203 ORL ANOO PED 105 NRS NRS PEO 109 PED 112 PED 112 PEO 109 PED 105 PEO 109 BUS 210 COURSE SEC QTR PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE HRS 0888 EDR 530 901 COR READ CLASS 04 0889 EOR 631 701 OIAG READ DISAB 04 0890 ECR 631 901 OIAG READ DISAB 04 0891 EOR 634 901 CUR SUP PRO RDG 04 0892 EOS 311 901 EX CHitON SCH 04 0893 EOS 322 901 0894 EDS 371 001 0895 EDS 371 002 0896 EOS 371 701 0897 EOS 371 901 INT MNTL RETARD tNT COM DISORO INT COM OISORD INT COM DISORD INT COM OISORD 04 04 04 04 04 0898 EOS 423 001 EOUC M RETAR II 04 0899 EOS 423 . 701 EOUC M RETAR I 04 0900 EOS 423 901 EOUC M RETAR I 04 0901 EDS 531 001 BHAV DISORD SCH 04 0902 EOS 550 901 NAT NEED GIFTED 04 0903 EOS 551 901 ED PROC GIFTEn 04 0904 EOS 573 001 MTH AUO COM DIS 04 0905 EOS 574 001 MTH ORL COM DIS 04 0906 EDS 598 001 FLO WK GIFTED 0907 EDS 598 002 FLO WK GIFTED 0908 EDS 598 no3 FLO WK GIFTED 0909 EOS 598 004 FLO WK GIFTED 0910 EOS 598 005 FLO WK GIFTED 0911 EOS 598 006 FLO WK GIFTED 0912 EDS 598 007 FLO WK GIFTED 0913 EOS 598 008 FlO WK GIFTED 0914 EDS 598 009 FLO WK GIFTED 0915 EDS 598 010 FLO WK GIFTED 0916 EOS 598 011 FLO WK GIFTED , 0917 EDS 598 012 FLO WK GIFTED 0918 598 013 FLO WK GIFTED 0919 EDS 598 014 FLO WK GIFTED 0920 EDS 598 101 FLO WK SH HEAR 0921 EOS 598 102 FLO WK SH HEAR 0922 EDS 598 103 FLO WK SH HEAR 0923 EOS 598 104 FLO WK SH HEAR 0924 EOS 598 105 FLO WK SH HEAR 0925 EDS 598 106 FLO WK SH HEAR 0926 EOS 598 107 FLO WK SH HEAR 0927 EOS 598 108 FLO WK SH HEAR 0928 EDS 598 109 FLO WK SH HEAR 0929 EDS 598 110 FLO WK SH HEAR 0930 ED$ 598 111 FlO WK SH HEAR 0931 EDS 598 112 FLO WK SH HEAR 0932 EOS 598 113 FLO SH HEAR 0933 EOS 598 114 FLO WK SH HEAR 0934 EOS 598 201 FlO WK EM DIS 0935 EOS 598 202 FLO WK EM CIS 0936 EOS 598 203 FLO WK EM DIS 0937 EOS 598 FlO WK EM DIS 0938 EDS 598 205 FLO WK EM DIS 0939 EDS 598 206 FLO WK EM DIS 0940 EOS 598 207 FLO WK EM DIS 0941 EOS 598 208 FLO WK EM DIS 0942 EOS 598 20q FLO WK EM DIS 0943 EDS 598 210 FLO WK EM DIS 0944 EOS 598 2il FLO WK EM DIS 0945 EDS 598 21Z FLO WK EM DIS 0946 EOS 598 213 FLO WK EM DIS 0947 EDS 598 214 FLO WK EM 0948 EDS 598 301 FLO WK MTL RTO EOS 598 302 . Flb WK MTL RTO 0950 EOS 598 303 FlO WK MTL RTD 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 01 02 03 04 OS 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 01 02 03 PERIOD DAY 10-13 R 11-'13 T 10-13 M 10-13 w 11 .-14 R 11-14 w 3 MTWF 3 MTWF TBA 11-14 T 5 6 TR 9-12 T 11-14 T 3 MTWF 11-14 T 11-14 w 3 4 TR 3 MTWF TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA 8 9 MW TBA TBA BLDG ROOM CODE NO EDU 202C BCA l36C BUS 213 eou 202c eou 302 EOU EOU EOU ORL BUS 302 2020 202C ANOO 218 BUS 218 LAK ELNO EOU 202C EOU 213 EDU 202A EOU 217 BUS 218 EOU 212 NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS EOU 202A NRS NRS NOTE-STUDENTS TAKING EDS 598 304 MUST ALSO TAKE EOC 691 0951 EOS 598 304 FLO WK MTL RTD 04 TBA 304. 0952 EDS 598 305 FLO WK MTL RTD 05 TBA 0953 EDS 598 306 FLO WK MTL RTO 06 TBA 0954 EOS 598 307 FLO WK MTt RTD 07 TBA NRS NRS NRS NRS

PAGE 23

COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE QTR HRS PERIOD DAY BLDG ROOM CODE NO NOTE-STUDENTS TAKING EDS 598 MUST ALSO TAKE EOC 691 308. 0955 EOS 598 308 FLO WK MTL RTO 08 TBA NRS 0956 EDS 598 309 FLO WK MTL RTO 09 TBA NRS 0957 EOS 598 310 FLO WK.MTL RTD 10 TBA NRS 0958 EOS 598 311 FLO WK MTL RTO 11 TBA NRS 0959 EDS 598 312 FLO WK MTL RTD 12 TBA NRS 0960 EDS 598 313 flO WK MTL RTO 13 TBA NRS 0961 EDS 598 314 FLO WK MTL RTO 14 TBA NRS 0962 EDS 598 401 FLO WK poT HAND 01 TBA NRS 0963 EDS 598 402 FLO WK POT HAND 02 TBA NRS 0964 EOS 598 403 FLO WK POT HAND 03 TBA NRS 0965 EOS 598 404 FLO WK POT HAND 04 0966 EOS 598 405 FLO WK POT OS 0967 EOS 598 406 flO WK POT HAND 06 0968 EOS 598 407 FLO WK POT HAND 07 0969 EOS 598 408 fLO WK POT HAND 08 0970 EDS 598 409 FLO WK POT HAND 09 0971 EOS 598 410 FLO WK POT HAND 10 0972 EOS 598 411 FLO WK POT HAND 11 0973 EOS 598 412 FLO WK POT HAND 12 0974 EOS 598 413 FLO WK POT HAND 13 0975 EDS 598 414 FLO WK POT HAND 14 0976 EDS 613 901 AD EXC CHLO PRG 04 0977 EDS 632 001 EM DIS CHILO I 04 0978 EDS 633 001 EM DIS CHILO II 04 0979 EDS 672 901 COM DISOR ART I 04 0980 EDS 675 001 COM DISORO lANG 04 0981 EDS 676 901 SPCH LNG CISORD 04 0982 EDS 699 004 THESIS 04 0983 EDT 447 001 MTH TCH SEC ENG 04 TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA • TBA 11-14 R TBA TBA 11-14 T 9 MTWF 11-14 R TBA 2 MWRF NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS EDU 209 TBO. TBD BUS 216 EOU 216 BUS 218 NRS BUS 209 NOTE-EDT 447 002 iS TAUGHT BY OR. KEARNEY AND SPECIALIZES IN THE AREA OF SPEECH. 0984 EDT 447 002 MTH TCH SEC ENG 04 1 2 TR ENG 205 0985 EDT 463 001 TCH METH JOURN 04 0986 EDT 631 901 CUR TRNS SEC EN 04 0987 ECW 461 001 TCH METH SEC SS 04 0988 EDW 461 901 TCH METH SEC SS 04 0989 EDW 643 701 CUR TRND SEC SS 04 I 0990 EDX 449 001 MTH SEC FGN LAN 04 0991 EDY 633 901 CUR TRN TCH HUM 04 TBA 10-13 w 5 6 TR 10-13 T 11-14 w 3 MTWF 11-14 T TBO BUS 209 PED 112 BUS 209 ORL ANOO BUS 319 FAH 275 NOTE-STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR EGB 101 800 MUST ALSO REGISTER FOR EGB 101 001 OR 002. 0992 EGB 101 800 GRAPHIC I LEC 0993 EGB 101 001 EGR GRAPHICS I 0994 EGB 101 002 EGR GRAPHICS 1 0995 EGB 102 001 EGR GRAPHICS II 0996 EGB 102 002 EGR GRAPHICS II 0997 EGB 102 003 EGR GRAPHICS II 0998 EGB 102 004 EGR GRAPHICS II 0999 EGB 102 005 EGR GRAPHICS II 1000 EGB 102 006 EGR GRAPHICS II 1001 EGB 102 701 EGR GRAPHICS 11 0 2T ENA 04 8M 7 8 TR ENG 301 04 3M 3 4 TR ENG 301 03 4M 3 TR ENG 302 03 8M 7 8 TR ENG 309 03 2M 2 3 WF ENG 301 03 3M 3 4 WF ENG 302 03 2M 1 2 TR ENG 302 03 8M 8 9 TR ENG 302 03 11-13 MW ENG 301 1002 EGB 201 001 FORTRAN PROGRAM 02 1003 EGB 201 701 FORTRAN PROGRAM 02 1004 EGB 201 702 FORTRAN TV 02 7-9 T 11-13 T TBA ENA ENA NRS 1005 EGB 203 001 EGR MEASURMNTS 03 4WF 4-6 T ENG 310 1006 EGB 301 001 THERMODVNAM I 1007 EGB 301 002 THERMODVNAM I 03 03 1 MWF 4 MWF NOTE-STUOENTSREGJSTERING FOR EGB 302 800 MUST ALSO ENG 201 ENG 004 REGISTER FOR EGB 302 OOlt 002, 003, OR 004. 1008 EGB 302 800 SOLID MECHAN I 3 MWF ENA 1009 EGB 302 001 SOLID MECHAN t 05 4 TR ENG 201 1010 EGB 302 002 SOLID MECHAN I 05 1 TR ENG 201 lOll EGB 302 003 SOLID MECHAN I 05 6 TR ENG 201 1012 EGB 302 004 SOLID MECHAN I 05 7 TR ENG 201 1013 EGB 303 001 SOLID MECHAN Il 04 4 MWRF ENG 003 THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 11 COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE QTR HRS PERIOD DAY BLDG ROOM CODE NO NOTE-STUDENTS FOR EGB 304 800 MUST ALSO REGISTER FOR EGB 304 001 OR 002. 1014 EGB 304 800 fGR MATERIALS I -2 M-F ENG 003 019F 019F 1015 EGB 304 001 MATERIALS LAb I 06 3 4 T ENG 1016 EGB 304 002 MATERIALS LAB I 06 3 4 R ENG 1017 EGB 305 001 EGR VALUATION 1016 EGB 305 002 EGR VALUATION 03 03 3 MWF 6 MWF ENG ENG 003 201 NOTE-STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR EGB 308 800 MUST ALSO REGISTER FOR EGB 308 001 OR 002. 1019 EGB 308 "BOO FLUID MECHAN I 2 M-f ENG 004 122c 122C 1020 EGB 308 001 FLUIDS LAB I 06 3 4 T ENG 1021 EGB 308 002 FLUIDS LAB I 06 3 4 R ENG 1022 EGB 309 001 DYNAMIC RESP 102 " 3 EGB 309 001 OYNAM RESP LAB 1024 EGB 309 002 DYNAMIC RESP 1025 EGB 309 002 DYNAM RESP LAB 1026 EGB 311 001 THERMODVNAM I 1027 EGB 311 002 THERMOOYNAR I 1028 EGB 316 001 INT ELE MOD t 1029 EGB 317 001 INT ELE -MOD IT 04 04 03 03 03 0 . 3 1030 EG& 321 001 NUM METH FORTRN 01 1031 EGB 321 002 NUM -METH FORTRN 01 1032 EGG 402 001 TRANS PHEN 03 1033 EGL 312 001 ELECTRL lAB I 01 1034 EGL 316 001 ELECTRCL LAB 2 01 1035 EGL 317 001 ELECTRCL LAB 3 01 1036 EG( 318 001 ELECTRCL LAB 4 01 1037 EGR 301 001 DIG COMP PROG 02 1038 EGR 311 001 El CIRCUITS l 03 1039 EGR 312 001 ELECTRONICS I 03 1040 EGR 313 001 fiELDS WAVES I 03 1041 337 001 ENER CON LAB. I 02 1042 "EGR 410 004 SP TOP ENGR Itl 04 1043 EGR 410 104 SP TOP ENGR 111 04 1044 EGR 411 001 . El II 03 1045 EGR 413 001 FIELDS WAVES II 03 1046 EGR 431 001 MACH DESIGN I 03 1047 EGR 431 001 MACH DES LAB I 1048 EGR 437 001 ENER CON LAB II 02 1049 EGR 443 001 MEAS & CONT 1050 EGR 443 001 MEAS & CONT LAB 1051 EGR 446 001 FUELS & COMB 1052 EGR 446 001 FUELS COMB LAB 1053 EGR 447 001 REF & AIRCN 1054 EGR 447 001 REF & lAB 1055 EGR 450 003 ST ENER CONV It 1056 EGR 452 001 CNCPT STRUC DSN 03 03 03 03 04 1057 EGR 455 001 MATERIAL II 04 1058 EGR 455 001 MATERIAL 11 LAB 1059 EGR 470 001 INTRO INDUS SYS 03 1060 EGR 471 001 INDUS PROC ANAL 03 1061 EGR 473 001 FNO PROD DSN II 03 1062 EGR 474 001 PROD .CON SVS 1 03 1063 EGR 478 001 INT OP RSCH t . 1064 EGR 479 001 INTRO STAT 1 03 1065 EGR 480 001 INTRO STAT II 03 1066 EGR 481 001 STAT QUAL CONTR 02 1067 EGR 502 701 EGR ANALY 11 03 ! 1 MWF 1 8 9 T 4 MWF 7 8 9 R 1 MWF 3 MWF 3 MWF 2-MWF 7 8 9 T 1 8 9 R ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENA 310 120C 201 120C 003 203 004 ENG 003 ENG 003 BMWF 910F ENG 206 2-4 T ENG 227G 1-3 R 6-8 T W 3 MWF 2 MWF 8 MWF 6-9 R 6 MWRF Z MWRF 3 MWF 8 MWF 1 TR 3-5 T 6-9 T 6 MW 6-8 R 4 MW 8 9 M 4 MW 8 9 w TBA 8 -9 MW 3 MWF TBA 4 MWF ENG 227G ENG 227G EN. G 227G ENG 310 ENG 309 ENG 201 ENG 20t ENG .019A ENG 004 ENG 203 ENG 206 ENG 004 ENG . 310 ENG 309 ENG 019A ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG ENG 309 120A 309 120A 301 019A NRS 204 ENG 201 ENG 019F ENG 204 8MWF 910M ENG 208 8MWF 910F ENG 205 T 3 4 R ENG 204 2 MWF 3 MWF 6 -MWF 5 MWF ll-13 M .ENG 205 ENG 310 ENG 206 ENG 201 ENG 201 /

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12 THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 COURSE SEC . PFX NO NO COURSE OTR .HRS PERIOD 04Y BlDG ROOM COD NO NOTE-THE NEXT TWO COURSES9 EGR 514 ANO.EGR 520 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY. 1068 EGR 514 001 El CONTR SYS II 03 3 MWF ENG 208 1069 ENG 517 001 STRUCT AMER ENG 04 3 4 TR FAH 280 1070 EGR 520 001 SP ELEC TOP I 01 2-4 T ENG 227F NOTE-EGR 521 SECTIONS 001 AND 003 MUSTBE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY. 1071 EGR 521 001 SP ELEC TOP II 01 2-4 R ENG 227F 1072 EGR 521 003 SP ElEC TOP II 4 MWF ENG 206 1073 EGR 531 701 MECH VIBR ' BAL 03 1074 EGR 535 001 HEAT TRANS II 1075 EGR 550 003 SP TP 1076 EGR 552 001 STRUCTURES Ill 1077 EGR 553 001 SOLID MECH Ill 1078 556 70.1 EGR POLYMERS 1079 EGR 560 001 EXPER SMF II 1080 EGR 560 001 EXP SMF II LAB 03 03 04 03 03 04 1081 EGR 569 003 SP SMF 03 1082 EGR 570 001 RESEARCH IN SMF 01 1083 EGR 570 002 RESEARCH IN SMF 02 1084 EGR 570 003 RESEARCH IN SMF 03 1085 EGR 570 004 RESEARCH IN SMF 04 1086 EGR 572 701 INVENTORY CNTRL 03 1087 EGR 574 701 OSN INO EX II 03 1088 EGR 588 703 SP INO TOP I 03 1089 EGR 603 701 E M FLO WVS II 03 1090 EGR 607 701 NTWK SYNTH I 03 1091 EGR 616 701 SOL ST ELEC II 03 1092 EGR 619 701 THRY COMMU I 03 ; 1093 EGR 633 701 THERMO Fl FLOW 03 1094 EGR 656 001 EGR MATER V 04 1095 EGR 656 001 MATERIALS V LAB 1096 EGR 670 001 RESEARCH IN SMF 01 1097 EGR 670 002 RESEARCH IN SMF 02 1098 EGR 670 003 RESEARCH IN SMF 03 1099 EGR 670 004 RESEARCH IN SMF 04 1100 EGR 675 701 NONLIN DYN PROG 03 1101 EGR 689 703 SP INC TOPICS I 1102 ENG 201 001 BRIT WRIT 1660 1103 ENG 201 002 BRIT WRIT 1660 1104 ENG 201 003 BRIT WRIT 1660 1105 ENG 201 004 BRIT WRIT 1660 1106 ENG 202 001 BRIT WRIT 1798 1107 ENG 202 002 BRIT WRIT 1798 . 1108 ENG 202 003 BRIT WRIT 1798 1109 ENG 202 004 BRIT WRIT 1798 1110 ENG 202 901 BRIT WRIT 1798 1111 ENG 203 001 BRIT WRIT 1912 1112 ENG 203 002 BRIT WRIT 1912 1113 ENG 203 003 BRIT WRIT 1912 1114 ENG 203 004 BRIT WRIT 1912 1115 ENG 305 001 AMER WRJT 1865 1116 ENG 305 002 AMER WRIT 1865 1117 ENG 305 003 AMER WRIT 1865 111B ENG 305 004 AMER WRIT 1865 1119 ENG 306 001 AMER WRIT 1912 1120 ENG 306 002 AMER WRIT 1912 1121 ENG 306 003 AMER WRIT 1912 1122 ENG 306 004 AMER WRIT 1912 03 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 1123 ENG 307 001 BR-AM WRlT 1945 04 1124 ENG 301 002 BR-AM WRIT 1945 04 r 10 11 MW l HWF TBA 1 TWRF 3 MWF 11-13 T 6 MWF 7-9 T TSA TBA TBA TBA TSA 11-13 w lf-13 M 11-13 w 11-13 T 11-13 R 10-12 w 10-12 M 10 11 TR 1 MWF TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA 11-13 R 11-13 T 8 MWRF 8 MWRF 4 MTWR 4 MTWR 2 MTWR 2 MTWR 5 6 TR 5 6 TR 12 13 MW 3 MTWF 3 MTWF 4 MTWR 4 MTWR 6 MTWR 6 MTWR 8 MWRF 8 MTWR 2 MTWR 5 MWRF 1 2 TR 1 2 TR 1 MWRF 2 MTWR ENG 204 ENG 309 NRS ENG 204 ENG 204 ENG 201 ENG 203 ENG 122C NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS ENG 203 ENG 203 ENG 201 ENG 203 ENG 203 ENG 206 ENG 206 ENG 206 ENG 205 ENG 019F NRS NRS NRS NRS ENG 201 ENG 208 FAH 277 FAH 278 FAH 146 FAH 278 FAH 277 FAH 279 FAH 277 FAH 278 FAH 279 FAH 146 FAH 282 FAH 279 FAH 283 FAH 146 FAH 282 FAH 279 FAH 280 FAH 280 FAH 279 FAH CHE 146 102 FAH 279 FAH 282 I COURSE SEC QTR PFX NO NO COURSE TITlE HRS 1125 ENG 307 003 BR-AM WRIT 1945 04 1126 ENG 307 004 BR-AM WRIT 1945 04 1127 ENG 307 005 BR-AM WRIT.l945 04 1128 ENG 307 006 BR-AM WRIT 1945 04 1129 ENG 321 001 ADV WRITING 1130 ENG 321 002 ADV WRITING 1131 ENG 321 003 AOV WRITING 1132 ENG 321 004 ADV WRITING 1133 ENG 321 005 ADV WRITING 04 04 04 04 04 1134 ENG 335 001 WRLD LITERATURE 04 1135 ENG 336 001 WRLD LITERATURE 04 1136 ENG 411 001 PLAY SHAKESPEAR 04 1137 ENG 411 002 1138 ENG 411 003 1139 ENG 411 004 PLAY SHAKESPEAR PLAY SHAKESPEAR PLAY SHAKESPEAR 1140 ENG 423 001 JMAG WRIT FICT 04 04 04 04 1141 ENG 437 001 CONTINENTAL NOV 04 PERIOD DAY 3 MTWF 8 MWRF 9 MTWR 5 6 TR 4 MTWR 4 MTWR 5 6 TR 9 IO TR 5 MWRF 5 MWRF 5 6 MF 3 MTWF 3 MTWF 6 MTWR 6 MTWR 5 6 TR 6 MTWR BlDG ROOM CODE NO BUS 209 FAH 282 FAH 282 FAH 286 FAH 282 BUS 216 FAH 283 FAH 280 FAH 280 FAH 146 FAH 277 sus 213 FAH CHE CHE 279 108 205 FAH 2 08 FAH 279 NOTE-ENG 483 WILL HlVE AN ADDITIONAL 2-HOUR LAB TO BE DETERMINED AT CLASS SESSIONS. 1142 ENG 483 001 PERSUASIVE WRIT 04 8 MWF FAH 146 1143 ENG 501 001 CHAUCER 04 1144 ENG 511 001 EXIST REL THEME 04 1145 ENG 515 901 HIST ENG LANG 04 1146 ENG 517 001 STRUCT AMER ENG 04 1147 ENG 517 002 STRUCT AMER ENG 04 1148 ENG 520 001 SHAKES? TRAGEO 04 1149 ENG 521 001 RES 18 CEN LIT 04 1150 ENG 528 001 MOO BR AM FICT 04 1151 ENG 531 001 LITERARY CRIT 04 1152 ENG 53S 901 TRANSFORM GRAMR 04 1153 ENG 581 001 INOIV RESEARCH 1154 ENG 581 002 INOIV RESEARCH 1155 ENG 581 003 INOIV RESEARCH 1156 ENG 581 004 INOIV RESEARCH 01 02 03 04 1157 ENG 583 703 STRUCT AMER ENG 03 1158 ENG 681 001 INDIV RESEARCH 01 1159 ENG 681 002 tNDIV RESEARCH 1160 ENG 681 003 INDIV RESEARCH 1161 ENG 681 004 INDIV RESEARCH 02 03 04 1162 ENG 683 904 ST STU COM SATR 04 1163 ENG 687 901 LATE 19 AM LIT 1164 FIN 201 001 PERS FINANCE 1165 FIN 301 001 PRIN FINANCE 1166 FIN 301 002 PRIN FINANCE 1167 FIN 301 003 PRIN FINANCE 1168 FIN 301 004 PRIN FINANCE 1169 FIN 301 901 PRIN FINANCE 1170 FIN 303 001 PRIN INSURANCE 04 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 1171 FIN 411 001 AD CORP FINANCE 04 1172 FIN 421 001 PRIN INVESTMENT 04 1173 FIN 421 901 PRIN INVESTMENT 04 1174 FIN 431 001 FINAN INSTITNS 04 1175 FIN 461 001 POL PROB COR FI 03 1176 FIN 471 001 PORTFOLIO MGMT 03 1177 FIN 601 901 FINANCE MGMT 03 1178 FNA 423 001 COMP AR MUS AR 0 . 3 1179 FNA 553 001 SENIOR SEMINAR 03 1180 FRE 301 001 ADV COMPOSITION 04 1181 FRE 303 001 ADV CONVER PRON 04 6 MTWR 3 4 kF 12 13 MH 3 4 TR 8 MWRF 3 MTWF 4 MTWR 2 MTWR 9 10 TR 12 13 TR TBA T-BA TBA TBA 10-12 w TBA TBA TBA TBA 12 13 TR 9 10 MW 6 M-F 2 .M-F 6 M-F 4 M-F 8 M-F 11 12 MW 1 M-F 5 MWRF 8 MWRF u 12 9 MWRF 5 6 T 6R 1 8 T 7R 12-14 R 6 MWF 2 MWF 1 MTWF 6 MTWR CHE 208 FAH 280 FAH 134 FAH 280 CHE 207 BUS 113 CHE 103 CHE 103 FAH 278 FAH 280 BCA NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS FAH 278 FAH 278 BSA BUS BUS 111 115 BUS 114 BUS 321 BUS 106 BUS 322 BUS 111 BUS 109 BUS 111 BUS 109 BUS 109 BUS 109 BUS 113 FAH 101 FAH 288 LIF 267 LIF 270

PAGE 25

/ COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE 1182 FRE 306 001 SURV FR LITER HRS 03 1183 FRE 521 001 OF 17TH CEN 03 1184 FRE 542 001 LIT OF 19TH CEN 03 1185 FRE 583 001 SELECTED TOPICS 03 1186 FRE 691 001 GRAD SEMINAR 1187 FRE 691 002 GRAO SEMINAR 1188 GSA 351 001 DATA PROC PRIN 1189 GBA 351 901 DATA PROC PRIN 1190 GSA 361 001 BUSINESS 1 1191 GBA 361 002 BUSINESS LAW I 1192 GBA 361 003 BUSINESS LAW I 1193 GBA 361 901 BUSINESS lAW 1 1194 GBA 362 001 BUSINESS lAW II 1195 GBA 362 901 BUSINESS lAW II 1196 GBA 371 001 BUS COMMUNICTNS 1197 GBA 489 001 INDIV RESEARCH 1198 GBA 489 002 INDIV RESEARCH 1199 GSA 499 001 SR SEM BUS AD 03 03 05 05 05 05 ()5 05 05 05 04 I 01 02 03 1200 GBA 499 002 SR SEM BUS AD 03 1201 GER 301 001 AD COMP CONYERS 04 1202 GER 307 001 SURVEY GER liT 03 1203 GER 551 001 LIT OF 20TH CEN 03 1204 GLY 201 800 INTRO GEOL 1205 GLY 201 801 INTRO GEOL PERIOD DAY 4 MWF 5 MWF 9 MWF 3 MWF 10 MWF 10 MWF 4 M-F 11 12 MW 1 M-F 6 M-F 8 M-F 11 12 MW 2 M-F 11 12 TR 3 MTWF TBA TBA 6 MWF 8 MWF 6 MWRF 4T 3 4 R 2 MWF 2 MWRF 4 MTWF SLOG ROOM CODE NO liF 261 llF 261 EDU 217 liF 270 liF 235A BUS 217 BUS 110 BUS 110 BUS 111 sus 110 BUS 114 BUS 114 sus 110 BUS 110 -BUS 111 NRS NRS BUS 216 BUS 216 liF 235A liF 235A FAH 208 CHE 206 CHE 206 NOTE-STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR GLY 201 802 MUST TAKE GLY 201 006. 1206 GLY 201 802 INTRO GEOL -6 MWF CHE 206 1207 GLY 201 001 INTRO GEOL 05 3 4 T 'CHE 210C 1208 GLY 201 002 INTRO GEOl 05 5 6 T GHE 210C 1209 GlY 201 003 INTRO GEOl 05 7 8 T CHE 210C 1210 GLY 201 004 INTRO GEOL 05 3 4 R CHE 210C 1211 GLY 201 005 INTRO GEOl 1212 GLY 201 006 INTRO GEOL 1213 GLY 301 INT HI GEOL 1214 GLY 301 001 INT HI GEOL 1215 GLY 301 002 INT HI GEOL 1216 GLY 301 003 INT HI GEOL 1217 GLY 301 900 INT HI GEOL 1218 GLY 301 901 INT HI GEOL 05 05 04 04 04 1219 GlY 301 902 INT HI GEOL 04 1220 GLY 302 800 tNTRO PALEO I 1221 GLY 302 001 INTRO PALEO I 04 1222 GLY 302 002 JNTRO PALEO I 04 1223 GLY 312 800 MINERALOGY II 12?4 GLY 312 001 MINERALOGY II 04 1225 GLY 312 002 MINERALOGY II 04 1226 GLY 361 001 STRUCT GEOLOGY 05 1227 GLY 361 001 STRUCT GEOL LEC 1228 GLY 473 800 EARTH SCIENCE 1229 GLY 473 001 EARTH SCIENCE 1230 GLY 473 002 EARTH SCIENCE 1231 GLY 481 002 UNDERGRAD RS'CH 1232 GLY 481 003 UNDERGRAD RSCH 1233 GLY 481 004 UNDERGRAD RSCH 1234 GLY 481 005 UNOERGRAO RSCH 1235 GLY 504 800 SEDIMENT II 1236 GLY 504 001 SEDIMENT II 1237 GLY 504 002 SEDIMENT II 05 OS 02 03 04 05 03 03 1238 GLY 583 003 ST GEOPHYSICS 03 1239 GLY 583 004 SEL TOP 04 1240 GLY 583 005 SEL TOP GEOLOGY 05 1241 GLY 681 002 GRAD RESEARCH 02 1242 GlY 681 003 GRAD RESEARCH 03 1243 GLY 681 004 GRAD RESEARCH 04 •, 5 6 R 8-10 R 3 MWF 2 3 T 5 6 T 3 4 R 11-13 M 11-13 w 11-13 R 5 6 T 6R 6 8 9 M 8-10 ' R 6 MWF 7-9 T 7-9 R 6 8-10 w 4 MWF 9 MTWF 10 11 M 9 10 T TBA TBA TBA TBA 4 TR 8-10 F 8-10 T 2 MWF TBA TBA TBA TBA T8A CHE 210C CHE' 210C CHE 100 CHE . 210A CHE 210A CHE 210A CHE 206 Cl-IE 210C CHE 210C CHE 206 CHE 2108 CHE 2108 CHE 204 CHE 210A CHE 210A CHE 323 CHE 207 CHE 206 CHE 210C CHE 210C NRS NRS NRS NRS CHE 205 CHE 2108 CHE 2108 NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS THE ORACLE, Wedneiday, November 15, 1967 13 COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITlE 1244 GLY 681 005 GRAD RESEARCH QTR HRS 05 1245 GLY 683 002 SEl MAR GEO 02 1246 GLY 683 003 SEL TOP MAR GEO 03 1247 GLY 683 004 ST ADV HYOROGEO 04 1248 GLY 683 005 SEL TOP MAR GEO 05 1249 GLY 699 002 THESIS 1250 GLY 699 003 THESIS 1251 GLY 699 004 THESIS 1252 GLY 699 005 THESIS 1253 GLY 699 006 THESIS 1254 GLY 699 007 THESIS 1255 GLY 699 008 THESIS 1256 GLY 699 009 THESIS 1257 GPY 201 800 INTRO GEOG 1258 GPY 201 001 INTRO GEOG 1259 GPY 201 002 INTRO GEOG 1260 GPY 201 003 INTRO GEOG I' 1261 GPY 201 004 INTRO GEOG 1262 GPY 201 005 INTRO GEOG 1263 GPY 201 006 INTRO GEOG 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 04 04 04 04 04 04 1264 GPY 301 001 SYSTEMATIC GEOG 04 1265 GPY 301 002 SYSTEMATIC GEOG 04 1266 GPY 301 003 SYSTEMATIC GEOG 04 1267 GPY 302 001 SYSTEMATIC GEOG 04 1268 GPY 403 005 CLIMATOLOGY 1269 GPY 405 004 ECONOMIC GEOG 1270 GPY 407 004 ANGLO AMERICA 1271 GPY 409 005 CARTOGRAPHY 1272 HTY 211 001 AMERICAN HIST 1273 HTY 211 002 AMERICAN HIST 1274 HTY 211 003 AMERICAN HIST 1275 HTY 211 004 AMERICAN HIST 1276 HTY 211 005 AMERICAN HIST HTY 211 006 AMERICAN HIST 05 04 04 05 03 03 03 03 03 03 1278 HTY 212 001 AMERICAN HIST 03 1279 HTY 212 002 AMERICAN HIST 03 1280 HTY 212 003 AMERICAN HIST 03 1281 HTY 212 004 HIST 03 1282 HTY 231 001 MOO EUROPE HIST 03 1283 HTY 231 002 MOO EUROPE HIST 03 1284 HTY 231 003 MOO EUROPE HIST 03 1285 HTY 231 004 MOO EUROPE HIST 03 1286 HTY 232 001 MOD EUROPE HIST 03 1287 HTY 232 002 MOD EUROPE HIST 03 1288 HTY 311 001 AM FORGN RELTNS 04 1289 HTY 316 001 CIV WAR & AFTER 04 1290 -HTY 331 001 EUR IN 20 CENT 04 1291 HTY 335 001 GERMAN HISTORY 04 1292 HTY 337 001 HIST OF RUSSIA 04 1293 HTY 342 001 BRITISH HISTORY 04 1294 HTY. 352 oat lAT AM HISTORY 04 1295 HTY 361' 001 REVOl MOD WORLD 04 1296 HTY 485 001 DIR READING 01 1297 HTY 485 002 DIR READING 1298 HTY 485 003 OIR READING 1299 HTY 485 004 OIR READING 02 03 04 1300 HTY 587 001 HISTORIOGRAPHY 04 1301 HTY 591 001 PS MOO AMER HIS 04 1302 HTY 591 002 PS AM COLONIAL 04 1303 HTY 591 901 PS MOD EUROPE 04 1304 HTY 592 001 SENIOR SEMINAR 04 PERIOD DAY TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA 4 MWF lR SM ST 5W 5F 7R 2 MTWF 6 MTWF 8 MTWF 1 MTWF 2 M-F 3 MTWF 4 MTWF 6-10 T 1 MWF 4T 3 4 R 5 MWF 6 MWF 7 8 T 7R 9 MWF 1 2 T 2R 5 6 T 6R 7 8 T 7R 6 MWF 1 2 T 2R 4 MWF 5 MWF 4T 3 4 R 7 8 T 7R q MWF 1 MWRF 3 MWF 4 MWF 6 MWF 2 MWF 3 MTWF 1 MWRF 3 M-F TBA TBA TBA TBA 9 MWF 5MWRF 8 MWRF li 13 MW 5 6 T 6R BLDG ROOM CODE NO ENA Llf llF llf LIF LIF llf NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS 260 260 260 260' 260 260 llf 260 LIF 260 LIF 260 liF 260 ENG 311 liF 260 LIF 260 ENG 311 BUS 115 BUS 111 BUS 210 BUS 210 eus to6 BUS 111 BUS 115 BUS 210 BUS 107 BUS 211 BUS 210 BUS 115 BUS 211 BUS 115 BUS 110 BUS 115 BUS 210 BUS 210 BUS 210 sus 212 BUS 210 BUS 211 BUS 211 BUS 212 NRS NRS NRS NRS BUS 216 BUS 216 sus 217 BUS 217 sus 217 (

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14 THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 COURSE SEC PFX NO NO 1305 HTY 685 00 . 1 1306 HTY 685 002 1307 HTY 685 003 1308 HTY . 685 004 COURSE TITLE DIR READING DIR READING DIR READING OIR READING QTR HRS 01 02 03 04 1309 HUM 312 001 HUM & HU VALUES 03 1310 HUM 412 001 20 CEN ART LET 03 1311 HUM 416 001 ART LET ROM PER 03 1312 HUM 420 001 03 1313 HUM 427 001 MEDVL ART LET 03 1314 HUM 432 001 CLASSIC ART LET 03 1315 HUM 536 001 HUM IN AMERICA 03 1316 HUH 539 001 SEL NON-WEST HU 03 1317 HUM 542 001 HU nRIENT CHINA 03 1318 HUM S81 001 DIRECTED STUDY 01 1319 HUM 581 002 DIRECTED STUDY 02 1320 HUM 581 003 DIRECTED STUDY 03 1321 HUM 581 004 DIRECTED STUDY 04 1322 HUM 591 001 SEL PROS HUMAN 03 1323 HUM 623 901 STUDIES RENAIS 03 1324 HUH 692 001 MASTERS ESSAYS 02 1325 HUM 693 001 MASTERS ESSAYS 02 1326 ITA 306 001 SURVEY ITAL LIT 03 1327 JNM 341 001 BASIC JOUR WRTG 02 1328 JNM 342 001 BASIC JOUR WRTG 03 1329 JNM 342 002 BASIC JOUR WRTG 03 PERIOD DAY TBA TBA TBA TBA 5 MWF 4 MWF 1 8 T 7R 2 MWF 1 2 T 2R 3 MWF 5 6 T 6R 4T 3 4 R TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA 11-13 w TBA TBA 2 MWF 4 TR 4T 3 4 R 7 8 T 7R BLDG ROOM CODE NO NRS NRS NRS NRS FAH 227 FAH 227 FAH 227 FAH 227 FAH 227 FAH 227 FAH 227 FAH 227 FAH 227 NRS. NRS NRS NRS NRS FAH 227 NRS NRS LIF 235A BUS 212 BUS 208 BUS 209 NOTE-JNM 343 Will HAVE AN ADDITIONAL 2-HOUR LAB TO BE DETERMINED AT CLASS SESSIONS. 1330 JNM 343 001 ADV JOUR WRTG 04 1 MWF BUS 325 NOTE-JNH 347 Will HAVE AN ADDITIONAL 2-HOUR LAB TO BE DETERMINED AT CLASS SESSIONS. 1331 JNM 347 001 NEWS EDTG WRTG 04 7 8 T 7R BUS 216 1332 JNM 349 001 MAG FEAT WRTG 1333 LIN 411 001 DESCRIP LIN 1334 MGT 301 001 PRIN OF HGMT 1335 MGT 301 002 PRIN OF MGMT 1336 "MGT 301 003 PRIN OF MGMT 1337 MGT 301 901 PRIN OF MGMT 1338 MGT 341 001 PERSONNEL MGMT 1339 MGT 341 901 PERSONNEL MGMT 1340 MGT 343 001 PERSONNEL PROB 1341 MGT 371 001 lNDUST RlTNS 1342 MGT 381 001 MGMT SYSTEMS 1343 MGT 381 002 HGMT SYSTEMS ' 04 04 05 e5 05 05 04 04 04 04 05 05 1344 MGT 421 901 PRODUCTION MGMT 04 4T 3 4 R 3 MTWF 3 M-F 1 M-F 6 M-F 11 12 TR 5 MWRF 11 12 MW 3 MTWF 9 MWRF 2 M-F 3 M-F 13 lit M . W BUS 206 FAH 135 BUS 114 sus 114 BUS 114 BUS 114 BUS1 114 BUS. 107 BUS 115 BUS 110 sus 114 BUS 107 BUS 110 NOTE-MGT 431 RESTRICTED TO MANAGEMENT MAJORS GRADUATING AT THE END OF QUARTER 11. 134S MGT 431 001 ORGANIZ THEORY 04 5 HWRF BUS 1346 MGT 445 001 BEHAV FACT ORG 04 1347 MGT 471 001 MGHT I 03 1348 MGT 472 001 MGMT SCI II 03 1349 MGT 501 " 901 SURVEY OF MGMT 03 1350 MGT 603 901. COM THRY INOUST 03 13S1 MKT 301 001 BAStC MARKETING 05 1352 HKT 301 002 BASIC MARKETING 05 13S3 MKT 301 BASIC MARKETING 05 1354 MKT 301 901 BASTC MARKETING OS 1355 MKT 312 901 PR FN STRAT II 03 1356 HKT 316 001 MKT CMNLS II 03 1351 HKT 413 . 001 CONSUMER 03 ( ( 8 MWRF 4 HWf 4 HWF 12:-14 R 12-14 T 4 M-F 6 M-F 8 H-F 13 14 TR12-14 T 4 MWF 6 MWF 115 BUS 110 BUS 109 BUS 112 BUS 206 BUS 109 BUS 107 BUS 111 BUS 115 sus 107 sus 111 BUS 111 BUS 215 \ ; COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE 1358 MKT 419 001 MARKETING PROS 1359 MKT 459 001 INTNl MARKETING 1360 MKT 489 001. -SP ST. MARKETING 1361 MKT 501 901 SURVEY OF MKT 1362 MKT 603 901 .SMNR MKTG 1363 MTH 101 001 FNO UNJV MATH 1364 MTH 101 002 FND UNIV MATH 1365 MTH 101 003 fND UNIV MATH 1366 MTH 101 004 FNO UNIV MATH 1367 MTH 101 005 FNO UNIV MATH 1368 MTH 101 006 fND. UNIV MATH QTR HRS 04 Oft. 03 03 03 OS 05 05 05 05 05 PERIOD DAY 5 MWRF 3 MTWF 1 8 T 7R 12-14 M 12-14 M 2 M-F 2 M-F 4 M-F 6 M-F 10 M-F 10 M-F BLDG ROOM CODE NO BUS 109 BUS 109 BUS 108 BUS 109 BUS 108 PHY 120 PHY 122 PHY 120 PHY 120 PHY 120 PHY 122 NOTE-MTH 203 SECTIONS 001, 003, 004, 006, AND 009 ARE FOR ENGINEERING SCIENCE. 1369 MTH 203 001 CALCULUS! 05 2 M-f PHY 130 1370 MTH 203 002 CALCULUSi 05 2 M-F PHY 131 1371 MTH 203 003 CALCULUSI 05 4 M-F PHY 122 1372 MTH 203 004 CALCULUSI 05 4 M-F PHY 130 1373 MTH 203 005 CALCULUS! 05 4 M-F PHY 131 1374 MTH 203 006 CALCULUSI 05 6 M-F PHY 122 1375 MTH 007 CALCULUS! 05 6 M-F PHY 130 1376 MTH 203 008 CALCULUS 1 05 6 M-F PHY 131 1377 MTH 203 009 CALCULUS I 05 10 PHY 130 1378 MTH 203 010 CALCULUS I 05 10 PHY 131 1379 MTH 212 001 ELEM CALCULUS 03 6MWF PHY 129 NOTE-MTH 303 SECTIONS 001, 002, 006, 008 ANO 901 ARE FOR ENGINEERING SCIENCES. 1380 MTH 303 001 CALCULUS II 04 1 MWRF PHY 120 1381 MTH 303 002 CALCULUS II 04 1 MWRF PHY 122 1382 MTH 303 003 CALCULUS II 04 1 MWRF PHY 130 1383 MTH 303 004 CALCULUS II 04 3 MTWF PHY 120 1384 MTH 303 005 CALCULUS II 04 3 MTWF PHY 122 1385 MTH 303 006 CALCULUS II 04 5 MWRF PHY 120 1386 MTH 303 007 CALCULUS II 04 5 MWRF PHY 122 1387 MTH 303 008 CALCULUS II 04 8 HWRF PHY 120 1388 MTH 303 009 CALCULUS II 04 8 MTWF PHY 122 1389 MTH 303 901 CAlCULUS II NOTE-MTH 304 SECTIONS 001, 003, FOR ENGINEERING SCIENCES. 1390 MTH 304 001 CALCULUS III 1391 MTH 304 002 CALCULUS III 1392 MTH 304 003 CALCULUS Ill 1393 MTH 304 004 CALCULUS III 1394 MTH 304 005 CALCULUS III 1395 MTH 304 006 CALCULUS III 1396 MTH 304 007 CALCULUS III 04 12 13 TR 005 AND 007 ARE 04 '1 MWRF 04 1 MWRF 04 3 MTwF 04 3 MTWF 04 S MWRF 04 8 MWRF 04 8 MWRF 1397 MTH 345 001 INTRO STATISTIC 05 9 M-F 1398 MTH 401 001 DIFFNTL EQUAT 04 1399 MTH 405 001 AO CALCULUS I 03 1400 MTH 406 001 AD CALCULUS Jl 1401 MTH 409 001 SET THEORY 1402 MTH 409 002 SET THEORY 1403 MTH 421 001 LIN ALGEBRA 1404 MTH 421 002 LIN ALGEBRA 1405 MTH 422 001 LIN ALGEBRA II 1406 MTH 422 002 LIN ALGEBRA.II 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 9 MTWF 6 MWF 6 MWF 5 MWF 8 MWF 3 MWF 10 MWF 2 MWF 4 MWF PHY PHY PHY PHY PHY PHY PHY PHY 120 131 118 130 131 130 130 131 PHY 108 PHY 120 PHY 118 .r PHY 107 CHE 205 CHE 205 CHE 205 PHY 107 CHE 205 CHE 205 1407 MTH 423 001 SYN GEOMETRY 03 9 MWF PHY 130 1408 MTH 447 001 NUMERICAL ANALY 03 4 MWF CHE 104 1409 MTH 514 901 REAL ANALY II 03 12 -MW 13W PHY 108 1410 MTH 521 001 COMPLX ANAL II 03 8 MWF PHY 108 1411 MTH 524 901 ALGEBRA II 03 12 TR 13R PHY 108 1412 MTH 531 001 TOPOLOGY I 03 9 MWF PHY 109 1413 MTH 532 001 TOPOLOGY II 03 9 MWF PHY 129 1414 MTH 542 901 APPL MATH II 03 10-11 MW PHY 129 141S MTH 583 011 SELECTED TOPICS OS 6 M-F PHY 108

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COURSE SEC PFX.NO NO COURSE TITLE 1416 MTH 625 001 ABS ALGEBRA II 1417 M1H 633 001 .AD TOPOLOGY II 1418 MTH 644 001 PAR OF EQUA II 1419 MTH 691 901 GRAD SEMINAR QTR HRS 03 03 03 01 PERIOD DAY TBA 9 MWF TBA TBA BLDG ROOM CODE NO TBO PHY 107 TBO TBO NOTE-ALL STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR MUS 213 800 MUST ALSO REGISTER FOR MUS 213 001• 002. OR 003. 1420 MUS 213 800 MUS THEORY BLK -3 TR FAH 101 1421 MUS 213 001 MUSIC THEORY 03 2 MWF FAH 226 1422 MUS 213 002 MUSIC THEORY 03 4 MWF FAH 226 1423 MUS 213 003 MUSIC THEORY 03 6 MWF FAH 226 NOTE-A S25 FEE, WILL BE CHARGED fOR MUSIC COURSES IN WHICH INOIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION IN VOICE OR A MUSICAL 1NSTRUMENT IS GIVEN. THIS FEE WILL COVER ONE OR MORE SUCH COURSES TAKEN WITHIN THE SAME QUARTER. 1424 MUS 215 001 BEG STRNG INSTR 01 2T FAH 210 1425 MUS 215 002 BEG STRNG INSTR 01 2T FAH 220 1426 MUS 215 003 BEG STRNG INSTR 01 2T FAH / 1427 MUS 225 001 BEG PlANO 1428 MUS 225 002 BEG PIANO NOTE-BEGINNING PIANO MUS 225 003 PROFICIENCY SECTIONS. 1429 MUS 225 003 BEG PlANO PROF 1430 MUS 225 004 BEG PIANO PROF 1431 MUS 225 005 BEG PIANO 1432 MUS 225 006 BEG PIANO ' 01 4 TR 01 1 TR AND 004 ARE 01 1T 01 lR 01 3M 01 2M 1433 MUS 235 001 BEG VOICE 01 51 4T 1434 MUS 235 002 BEG VOICE 01 1435 MUS 245 001 BEG WOWND INSTR 01 1436 MUS 245 002 BEG WOWND INSTR 01 1437 MUS 245 003 BEG WDWND INSTR 01 1438 MUS 255 001 BEGBRASS INSTR. 1439 MUS 255 002 BEGBRASS INSTR 1440 MUS 265 001 BEG PERC INSTR 1441 MUS 303 001 ENJOYMNT Of MUS 01 01 01 03 1442 MUS 305 001 CH MU ENS OPERA 01 51 5T 6T 8W 8W 4M 3 MWF 5 TR FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH 225 2 . 25 225 225 217 218 FAH 107 FAH 226 fAH 226 FAH 106 FAH 107 FAH 226 FAH 223 FAH 102 FAH 102 FAH 102 1443 MUS 305 001 CH MU ENS OPERA 1444 MUS 305 002 CH MU ENS MDGL 01 1445 MUS 305 003 CH MUSENS LB BD 01 1446 MUS 305 004 CH MU ENS BR CH 01 1447 MUS 305 005 CH MU ENS BR QT 01 1448 MUS 305 006 CH MU ENS PIANO 01 1449 MUS 305 007 CH MU ENS WW QT 01 1450 MUS 305 008 CH MU ENS ST QT 01 1451 MUS 305 009 CH MU ENS HN QT 01 1452 MUS 305 010 CH MU ENS CL CH 01 1453 MUS 305 011 CH MU ENS PERC 01 121314TWR FAH 102 6 TR FAH 226 1454 MUS 308 001 MUS LITERATURE 02 2 TR 2 WF 2M 6R 7T 8 TR 8F 7R ST 3 MWF FAH 102 FAH 102 FAH 102 FAH 204 FAH 102 FAH 226 FAH 102 FAH 102 FAH 102 FAH 226 NOTE-ALL STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR MUS 313 800 MUST ALSO REGISTER FOR MUS 313 001. 1455 MUS 313 800 MUS THEORY BLK 4 TR FAH 106 1456 MUS 313 001 MUSIC THEORY 03 4 MWF FAH 107 NOTE-A $25 FEE, WILL BE CHARGED FOR MUSIC COURSES IN WHICH INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION IN VOICE OR A MUSICAL INSTRUMENT IS GIVEN. THIS FEE WILL COVER ONE OR MORE SUCH COURSES TAKEN WITHIN THE SAME QUARTER. 1457 MUS 315 001 INT STRNG INSTR 02 2R FAH 210 1458 MUS 315 002 INT STRNG INSTR 02 2R FAH 220 1459 MUS 315 003 lNT STRNG INSTR 02 2R FAH 214 1460 MUS 001 INT PIANO 1461 MUS 325 002 INT PIANO 1462 MUS 325 003 INT PIANO 02 02 02 1463 MUS 335 001 INT VOICE 02 1464 MUS 335 002 lNT VOICE 02 1465 MUS 335 003 INT VOICE 02 1466 MUS 345 001 INT WDWND INSTR 02 1467 MUS 345 002 INT HDWNO INSTR 02 1468 MUS 345 003 INT WDWND INSTR 02 1469 MUS 355 001 INT BRASS INSTR 02 1470 MUS 355 002 INT BRASS lNSTR 02 1471 MUS 365 001 INT PERC INSTR 02 1472 MUS 385 901 UNIV ORCH 01 3T lR lR 7T 8R 7R 3T 5W 3T 7T 7T 4W 12-14 FAH 226 FAH 107 FAH 226 FAH 101 FAH 101 FAH 101 FAH 102 FAH 224 FAH 212 FAH 106 FAH 107 FAH 102 FAH 102 THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 15 COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE 1473 MUS 387 001 UNIV CONC BAND 1474 MUS 387 002 UNIV RDNG BAND QTR HRS 01 01 1475 MUS 389 001 UNIV CHORUS CRL 01 1476 MUS 389 901 UNIV CHORUS COM 01 1477 MUS 413 001 MUSIC THEORY I 03 1478 MUS 481 001 DS MED & RN MUS 01 1479 MUS 481 002 DIRECTED STUDY 02 ' 1480 MUS 481 003 DIRECTED STUDY 03 1481 MUS 481 103 OS ARTS SOC FDN 03 1482 MUS 4B1 902 OS ISSUES MUSIC 02 PERIOD DAY 9 10 MTR 9 10 WF 5 MWF 12-14 H 8 MWF 7R TBA TBA 4T 3 4 R 12 13 w BLDG ROOM CODE NO FAH 102 FAH 102 FAH 102 FAH 1'01 FAH 107 FAH 107 NRS NRS FAH 208 FAH 101 NOTE-A $25 FEE, WILL BE CHARGED FOR MUSIC COURSES IN WHICH INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION IN VOICE OR A MUSICAL INSTRUMENT IS GIVEN. THIS FEE WILL COVER ONE OR MORE SUCH COURSES TAKEN WITHIN THE SAME QUARTER. 1483 MUS 515 001 ADVSTRNG INSTR 02 lW FAH 210 1484 MUS 515 002 ADV STRNG INSTR 02 1W FAH 220 1485 MUS 515 003 ADV STRNG INSTR 02 lW FAH 214 1486 MUS 525 001 ADY PIANO 1487 MUS 525 002 ADV PIANO 1488 MUS 525 003 ADV PIANO 1489 MUS 535 COl ADV VOICE 1490 MUS 535 002 AOV VOICE 1491 MUS 535 003 ADV VOICE 02 02 02 02 02 02 1492 MUS 545 001 ADV WDWNO lNSTR 02 1493 MUS 545 002 ADV WOWND INSTR 02 1494 MUS 545 003 ADV WDWND INSTR 02 1495 MUS 555 001 ADV BRASS INSTR 02 1496 MUS 555 002 ADV BRASS INSTR 02 1497 MUS 565 001 ADV PERC INSTR 02 1498 MUS 571 001 -sTU TCH PIANO 03 4 5 f 3T 3T 6R 2T ST 4R 4R 4R 8R 8R 4F 2R FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH FAH 101 217 218 101 101 101 fAH 226 FAH 107 FAH 101 FAH 107 FAH 102 FAH 102 FAH 101 NOTE-MUS 571 001, 002 AND 003 1499 MUS 571 002 STU TCH VOICE WILL HAVE 2 ADDITIONAL HOURS TBA. 03 4M FAH 101 1500 MUS 571 003 STU TCH WINOS 1501 MUS 571 004 STU TCH STRINGS 1502 MUS 575 001 AOV ORGAN 1503 MUS 601 001 SYMPHONIC LIT 03 03 02 05 1504 MUS 609 001 MUS COMPOSITION 04 8M 4W TBA 6 M-F 2 MTWR FAH 101 FAH 101 TBO FAH 106 FAH 107 NOTE-A $25 FEE, WILL BE CHARGED FOR MUSIC COURSES IN INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION IN .VOICE OR A MUSICAL INSTRUMENT IS GIVEN. THIS FEE WILL COVER ONE OR MORE SUCH COURSES . TAKEN WITHIN THE SAME QUARTER. 1505 MUS 615 002 STRING INSTR 02 lOW FAH 210 1506 MUS 615 004 STRING INSTR 04 lOW FAH 210 1507 MUS 615 102 STRING INSTR 02 lOW FAH 220 1508 MUS 615 104 STRING INSTR 04 lOW FAH 220 1509 MUS 615 202 STRING INSTR 02 lOW FAH 214 1510 MUS 615 204 STRING INSTR 04 1511 MUS 618 001 GR REV MUS THRY 02 1512 MUS 623 001 TEACH MUS THRY 03 1513 MUS 625 002 PIANO 1514 MUS 625 004 PIANO 1515 MUS 625 102 PIANO 1516 MUS 625 104 ... PIANO 1517 MUS 625 202 PIANO 1518 MUS 625 204 PIANO 1519 MUS 627 001 KEYBOARD LIT 1520 MUS 630 001 SONG LIT 02 04 02 04 02 04 03 03 1521 MUS 633 901 EVOL MUS STYLES 03 1522 MUS 635 002 VOICE 02 1523 MUS 635 004 VOICE 04 1 524 MUS 635 102 VOICE 02 1 525 MUS 635 104 VOICE 04 1526 MUS 635 202 VOICE 02 1527 MUS 635 2 04 VOICE 04 1528 MUS 645 002 WOODWIND INSTR 02 1529 MUS 645 004 WOODWIND INSTR 04 1530 MUS 645 102 WOODWIND tNSTR 02 1531 MUS 645 104 WOODWIND INSTR 04 lOW 9 TR 9 Mwr lOR lOR lOR lOR lOR lOR 3 MWF 9 MWF 12 MWF lOT lOT lOT lOT lOT lOT 10M 10M 10M 10M FAH 214 FAH 107 FAH 107 FAH 209 FAH 209 FAH 217 FAH 217 FAH 218 FAH 218 FAH 101 FAH 226 FAH 107 FAH 222 FAH 222 FAH 211 FAH 211 FAH 213 FAH 213 FAH 221 FAH 221 FAH 224 FAH 224

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16-B THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE 1532 MUS 645 202 INSTR 1533 MUS 645 204 WOODWIND INSTR 1534 MUS 655 002 BRASS INSTR 1535 MUS 655 004 BRASS INSTR 1536 MUS 665 002 PERC INSTR 1537 MUS 665 .004 PERC INSTR 1538 MUS 699 003 M M THESIS 1539 OAO 141 001 INTRO TYPING 1540 OAD 141 002 INTRO TYPING 1541 OAD 142 001 INTER TYPING 1542 OAO 143 001 ADV TYPING QTR HRS 02 04 02 04 02 04 " 03 02 02 02 02 1543 OAO 251 001 lNTRO SHORTHAND 04 1544 OAO 252 001 INTER SHORTHAND 03 1545 OAO 253 001 ADV SHRTHNDDIC 03 1546 OAO 353 001 OFFICE ADMINIS 03 1547 OAD 361 001 BUS MACHINES 04 1548 OAD 461 001 SECRETARIAL PRO 04 1549 PES 101 001 FUNCTIONAL PE 1550 PEB 101 002 FUNCTIONAL PE 1551 PEB 101 003 FUNCTIONAL PE 1552 PEB 102 001 BASKT BL M PERIOD DAY 10M 10M lOF lOF 10F 10F TBA 2 MWF 1 2 T 2R 1 8 T 7R 4 MWF 1 MTWF 5 MWF 6 MWF 8 MWF 4 M-F 3 MTWF 1 2 T 2R 4T 3 4 R 7 8 T 7R 5 6 MW NOTE-PEB 116 IS BY PERM I SSt ON OF INSTRUCTOR-ONLY. 1553 PEB 116 001 SPEC COND C TBA 1554 PEB 119 001 FOLK SQ DNC M 1555 PEB 119 002 FOLK SQ DNC W 1556 PEB 120 001 INTER MOO DNC 1557 PEB 126 001 BEG RIDING 1558 PEB 126 002 AOV -RIDING 1559 PEB 130 001 BEG SWIMMING 1560 PEB 130 002 BEG SWIMMING 1561 PEB 130 003 BEG SWIMMING 1562 PEB 130 004 BEG SWIMMING 1563 PEB 130 005 BEG SWIMMING 1564 PEB 132 001 INTER SWIMMING 1565 PEB 132 002 INTER SWIMMING 1566 PEB 136 001 LIFE SAVING 1567 PEB 138 001 SCUBA DIVING PEB 138 002 SCUBA DIVING 1569 PEB 150 001 ARCHERY 1570 PES 150 002 ARCHERY 1571 PES 152 001 BADMINTON 1572 PES 152 002 BADMINTON 1573 PEB 156 001 BOWLING 1574 PEB 156 002 BOWLING 1575 PEB 156 003 BOWLING 1576 PES 156 004 BOWLING 1577 PES 158 001 FENCJNG 1578 PEB 158 002 FENCING 1579 PES 160 001 GOLF 1580 PES 160 002 GOLF 1581 PES 160 003 GOLF 1582 PES 160 004 GOLF 1583 PEB 160 005 GOLF 1584 PES 160 006 GOLF 1585 PES 160 007 GOLF 1586 .PEB 164 001 HNDBAL PADL BAL 1587 PEB 166 001 BEG MOD DANCE 1588 PES 166 002 BEG MOD DANCE 1589 PES 168 001 TENNIS 1590 PEB 168 002 TENNIS 1591 PES 168 003 TENNIS , , 8 9 MW 8 9 MW 5 6 MW 8 9 TR 9 10 TR 1 2 MW 4 5 MW 3 4 TR 5 6 TR 6 1 TR 5 6 MW 7 8 TR 4 5 TR 1 2 T 2 3 T 2 3 MW 3 4 MW 3 4 MW 5 6 TR 8 9 MW 9 10 MW 8 9 TR 9 10 TR 3 4 TR 7 8 TR 2 3 MW 3 4 MW 5 6 MW 8 9 folW 5 6 TR 7 8 TR 8 9 TR 5 6 MW 4 5 MW 6 7 TR 1 2 MW 3 4 MW 4 5 MW BlDG ROOM CODE NO FAH 212 FAH 212 FAH 223 FAH 223 FAH 226 FAH 226 NRS BUS 325 BUS 325. BUS 325 BUS 325 BUS 321 BUS 325 BUS 325 BUS 318 BUS311 BUS 325 GYM 100 BSA BSA GYM 100 GYM 107 GYM 005 GYM 005 GYH 005 FHA FHA GYM 108 GYM 108 GYM 108 GYM 108 GYM 108 GYM 108 GYM 108 GYM 108 GYM 108 GYM 108 GYM 107 GYM 107 GYM 100 GYM 100 FBl FBL FBL FBL GYM 006 GYM 006 GYM 006 GYM 006 GYM 006 GYM-006 GYM 006 GYM 006 GYM 006 GYM 100 GYM 005 GYM 005 GYM 101 GYM 101 GYM 101 , ,I COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE 1592 PEB 168 004 TENNIS 1593 PEB 168 005 TENNIS 1594 PEB 168 006 TENNIS 1595 PEB 168 007 TENNIS 1596 PES 168 008 TENNIS 1597 PEB 169 001 WRESTLING M QTR HRS PERIOD DAY 5 6 MW 3 4 TR 4 5 6 1 TR 1 8 TR 6 7 TR B 'LOG ROOM CODE NO GYM 101 GYM 101 GYM 101 GYM 101 GYM 101 GYM 101 1598 PEB 170 001 GYMNASTICS ' 4 5 MW GYM -107 1599 PES 178 001 WT TRAINING M 1600 PEB 178 002 WT TRAINING M 1601 PHI 301 001 PROB PHILOSOPHY 05 1602 PHI 002 PROB PHiiOSOPHY 05 1603 PHI 303 001 LOGIC 05 1604 PHI 334 001 RENAIS MOO PHIL 05 1605 PHI 415 001 PLATO ARISTOTLE 05 1606 PHI 507 001 PHILOS OF SCI 05 1607 PHI 575 001 SMNR CONTMP ETH 03 1608 PHY 211 001 GENERAL PHYSICS 03 1609 PHY 212 001 lAB FOR 21l 01 1610 PHY 212 002 LAB FOR 211 01 1611 PHY 212 003 LAB FOR 211 01 1612 PHY 213 001 GENERAL PHYSICS 03 1613 PHY 214 001 lAB FOR 213 1614 PHY 214 002 lAB FOR 213 1615 PHY 214 003 LAB FOR 213 1616 PHY 214 004 LAB FOR 213 01 01 01 01 1617 PHY 221 001 GENERAl PHYSICS 03 1618 PHY 222 001 LAB FOR 221 01 1619 PHY 222 002 LAB FOR 221 01 1620 PHY 222 003 lAB FOR 221 01 1621 PHY 222 004 LAB FOR 221 01 1622 PHY 223 001 GENERAL PHYSICS 03 1623 PHY 223 002 GENERAL PHYSICS 03 1624 PHY 224 001 LAB FOR 223 1625 PHY 224 002 LAB FOR 223 01 01 1626 PHY 224 003 LAB FOR 223 01 1627 PHY 224 004 LAB FOR 223 01 1628 PHY 224 005 LAB FOR 223 01 1629 PHY 224 006 LAB FOR 223 01 1630 PHY 225 001 GENERAL PHYSICS 03 1631 PHY 226 001 lAB FOR 225 1632 PHY 226 002 LAB FOR 225 1633 PHY 323 001 MODERN PHYSICS 1634 PHY 331 001 GEOMET OPTICS 1635 PHY 341 001 INT LAB 1 01 01 04 04 01 1636 PHY 341 002 INT LAB I 01 1637 PHY 405 001 KI THRY STA MEC 03 1638 PHY 407 001 MECHANICS II 03 1639 PHY 409 001 ELEC & MAGNT II 03 1640 PHY 441 001 ADV LAB 01 1641 PHY 002 ADV LAB 01 1642 PHY 481 001 UNDERGRAD RSCH Ql 1643 PHY 491 001 PHYSICS SEMINAR 01 1644 PHY 501 001 NUCLEAR PHYSICS 03 1645 PHY 521 001 SOL STA PHY II 03 1646 PHY 537 001 QUANTUM MEC II 03 1647 PHY 608 001 CLASS MECH II 03 1648 PHY 632 001 ELMAG THRY II 03 1649 PHY 699 001 MASTERS THESIS 01 2 3 TR 3 4 TR 4 M-F 3 M-F 1 -M-F 2 M-F 3 M-F 5 M-F 1 8 R 1 MWF 2-4 T 5-7 T 8-10 T 2 MWF 2-4 T 5-7 T 8-10 T 8-10 w 3 MWF 8-10 w 2-4 I} 5-7 R 8-10 R 4 MWF 5 MWF 2-4 T 5-7 T 8-10 T 2-4 R 5-7 R 8-10 R 6 MWF 2-4 R 5-7 A GYM 003 GYM 003 FAH 286 FAH 286 FAH 286 FAH 286 FAH 283 FAH 282 FAH274 PHY 141 PHY 203 PHY 203 PHY 203 PHY 141 PHY 204 PHY 204 PHY 204 PHY 204 PHY 141 PHY 203 PHY 203 PHY 203 PHY 203 PHY 141 PHY 141 ' PHY 205 PHY 205 PHY 205 PHY 205 PHY 205 PHY 205 PHY 141 PHY 204 PHY 204 8 MTWF PHY 118 4MWF8910R PHY 134 2-4 T 2-4 R 6 MWF 3 MWF 2 MWF 2-4 T 2-4 R TBA TBA 1 MWF 8 MWF 5 MWF 10 MWF 9 MWF TBA . 1 PHY 102 PHY 102 PHY 013 PHY 013 PHY 013 PHY 102 PHY 102 NRS NRS PHY 013 PHY 013 PHY 013 PHY 013 PHY 013 NRS

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COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE 1650 PHY 699 002 MASTERS THESIS 1651 PHY 699 003 MASTERS THESIS 1652 PHY 699 004 MASTERS THESIS QTR HRS 02 03 04 1653 POL 199 001 INTRO POLIT SCI 04 1654 POL 201 001 AMER NATL GOVMT 04 1655 POL 201 002 AMER NATL GOVMT 04 1656 POL 201 003 AMER NATL GOVMT 04 1657 POL 203 001 STATE LOC GOVMT 04 1658 POL 203 002 STATE LOC GOVMT 04 1659 POL 203 001 STATE LOC GOVHT 04 1660 POL 311 001 COMPAR POLITICS 04 1661 POL 331 001 INTNATL.RELATNS 04 1662 POL 331 002 INTNATL RELATNS 04 1663 POl 351 001 INTRO PUB ADMIN 04 1664 POL 351 002 INTRO PUB ADMIN 04 1665 POL 351 003 INTRO PUB ADMIN 04 1666 POL 411 001 SE ASIA WRLD PO 04 1667 POL 432 001 CONSTITUTNL tAW 04 1668 POL 432 002 CONSTITUTNL LAW 04 1669 POL 441 001 AMER PRESIDENCY 1670 POL 462 001 CLS POLIT IDEAS 1671 POL 481 001 1672 POL 481 002 1673 POL 481 003 1674 POL 481 004 INDIV RESEARCH INDIV RESEARCH INDIV RESEARCH INOIV RESEARCH 1675 POL 491 001 SENIOR SEMINAR 1676 POL 561 001 POLT DEV AREAS 1677 POL 571 001 FIELD WORK 04 04 01 02 03 04 04 04 04 1678 POL 573 901 . GOV POL CON AFR 04 1619 .PSY 201 001 INTRO PSYCH 04 PERIOD DAY TBA TBA TBA 3 MTWF 3 MTWF 4 MTWR 6 MTWF 1 MWRF 4 MWRF 2 MWRF 8 .MWF 8 MWRF 5 MWRF 4 MWF ' 8 MWF 5 .MWRF 6 MWF 1 8 TR 1 2 TR 5 MWRF 2 MWF TBA TBA TBA TBA 3 4 TR 4 MWF 8 MWRF 11 12 TR 2 MWRF NOTE-PSY 213 001 OPEN TO COOP STUDENTS ONLY. 1680 PSY 213 001 APPLIED PSYCH 04 TBA 1681 PSY 311 001 EXPER DESIGN PSY 311 002 EXPER DESIGN 1683 PSY 311 901 EXPER DESIGN 1684 PSY 323 001 PERCEPTION 1685 PSY 323 002 PERCEPTION 1686 PSY 331 001 SOCIAL PSYCH 1687 PSY 331 002 SOCIAL PSYCH 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 168B PSY 335 001 PSYCH OF ADJUST 04 1689 PSY 335 002 PSYCH OF ADJUST 04 1690 PSY 341 001 CHILD PSYCH 04 1691 PSY 34 1 002 CHILD PSYCH 04 1692 PSY 431 901 ABNORMAL PSYCH i693 PSY 433 001 PERSONALITY 1694 PSY 433 002 PERSONALITY 1695 PSY 481 001 INDIV RESEARCH 1696 PSY 481 002 INDIV RESEARCH 1697 PSY 481 003 INDIV RESEARCH 1698 PSY 481 004 INDIV RESEARCH 04 04 04 01 02 03 04 1699 PSY 485 001 DIR READING 01 1700 PSY 485 002 DIR READING 02 1701 PSY 485 003 DIR READING 03 1702 PSY 485 004 DIR READING 04 i703 PSY 491 001 SR SMNR PSYCH 04 1704 PSY 501 001 PHYSIO PSYCH 04 1705 PSY 503 001 HIS & SYSTH PSY 04 1706 PSY 505 001 LEARNING 04 1707 PSY 603 001 PERCEPTION 05 1 2 MW 1 2 TR 11 12 TR 89MW 5 6 TR 3 4 TR 7 8 TR 3 4 MW 1 8 TR 1 2 MW 5 6 MW 11 12 MW 1 2 MW 3 4 MW TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA 3 4 TR 1 2 TR 5 6 MW 5 6 TR 3 4 MW BLDG ROOM CODE NO BSA NRS NRS NRS BUS 318 BUS 113 BUS 113 BUS 113 BUS 211 BUS 211 BUS 212 BUS 113 BUS 113 BUS 212 BUS 213 BUS 212 BUS 214 BUS 212 BUS 212 BUS BUS 213 115 NRS NRS NRS NRS BUS 217 BUS 213 BUS 214 212 BSA NRS CH. E 101 PHY 013 PHY 013 CHE 101 PHY 013 PHY 013 CHE 103 CHE 204 CHE 203 CHE 204 CHE 103 PHY 013 CHE 104 CHE 101 NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS PHY 116 PHY 108 PHY 109 PHY 109 PHY 108 THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 17 COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE 1708 PSY 607 001 EXP SOC PSYCH QTR HRS 05 1709 PSY 611 001 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY 05 1710 PSY.617 001 INDV INTEL TEST 05 1711 PSY 620 001 SUPRVSO RSCH 1712 PSY 620 002 SUPRVSO RSCH 1713 PSY 620 003 SUPRVSO RSCH 1714 PSY 620 004 SUPRVSO RSCH 1715 PSY 620 005 SUPRVSD RSCH 1716 PSY 623 001 AD INDUS PSY I 01 02 03 04 05 05 1717 PSY 682 001 PRACTICUM PSYCH 05 1718 PSY 690 001 THESIS 05 1719 ROM 517 001 ROMNC PHILOLOGY 03 1720 RUS 306 001 SURVEY RUS LIT 03 1721 RUS 564 001 RUS SOVIET LIT 03 1722 SOC 201 001 INTRO SOCIOLOGY 04 1723 SOC 201 002 INTRO SOCIOLOGY 04 1724 SOC 201 003 lNTRO SOCIOLOGY 04 1725 SOC 201 004 INTRO SOCIOLOGY 04 1726 SOC 201 005 lNTRO SOCIOLOGY 04 1727 SOC 201 006 INTRO SOCIOLOGY 04 1728 SOC 201 007 INTRO SOCIOLOGY 04 1729 SOC 201 008 INTRO SOCIOLOGY 04 1730 SOC 201 901 INTRO SOCIOLOGY 04 1731 SOC 201 902 INTRO SOCIOLOGY 04 1732 SOC 251 001 MARRIAGE 04 1733 SOC 251 901 MARRIAGE 04 1734 SOC 261 001 SOCIAL PROBLEMS 04 1735 SOC 261 002 SOCIAL PROBLEMS 04 PERIOD DAY 3 4 TR 8 9 MW 5 6 MW TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA 1 2 MW TSA TBA 10 MWF 3 MWF 5 MWF 9 MTWF 8 MWRF 1 HWRF 8 MWRF 5 MWRF 1 8 TR 5 MWRF 3 MTWF 11-13 M 11-13 T 1 MWRF 11-13 M 1 MWRF 5 6 TR BlDG ROOM CODE NO PHY lOB CHE 102 tHE 102 NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS PHY lOB NRS NRS FAH 282 FAH 208 FAH 208 BUS 206 BUS 206 BUS 206 BUS 207 BUS 206 BUS 208 BUS 207 BUS 206 BUS 206 BUS 206 BUS 207 BUS 207 BUS 209 BUS NOTE-SOC 261 003 OPEN TO CO-OP STUDENTS ON TRAINING PERIOD ONLY. 1736 SOC 261 003 SOCIAl PROBLEMS 04 TBA NRS \ 1737 SOC 321 oat SOC INVESTlGATN 04 1738 SOC 331 QOl SOCIAL PSYCH 1739 SOC 331 002 SOCIAL PSYCH 1740 SOC 003 SOCIAL PSYCH • 1741 SOC 331 901 SOCIAL PSYCH 04 04 04 04 1742 SOC 341 001 SOC ORGANIZATN 04 1743 SOC 371 001 RAC ETHNC RLTNS 04 1744 SOC 481 001 INDIV RESEARCH 1745 SOC 481 002 INDIV RESEARCH 1746 soc 481 003 INOIV RESEARCH 1747 SOC 481 004 INDIV RESEARCH 01 02 03 04 1748 SOC 491 901 SENIOR SEMINAR 04 1749 SOC 515 001 fNDTNS THEORY 04 1750 SOC 571 901 POPULATION 04 1751 SOC 611 901 CONTHP SOC THRY 04 1752 SOC 681 001 INOIV RESEARCH 1753 SOC 681 004 INDIV RESEARCH 1754 SPA 301 001 AOV SPAN COMP 1755 SPA 303 001 AOV SPAN CONY 1756 SPA 306 001 SURVEY SPA liT 1757 SPA 524 001 GOLDEN AGE LIT 01 04 04 04 03 03 175B SPA 542 001 19TH CENT LIT 03 1759 SPA 545 001 GENERATJON 1898 03 1760 SPE 20 . 1 001 FNDHTLS SPEECH 05 1761 SPE 201 002 FNDMTLS SPEECH 05 1762 SPE 201 003 FNDMTLS SPEECH 05 1763 SPE 201 004 FNOMTLS SPEECH 05 1764 SPE 201 005 FNDMTlS SPEECH 05 1765 SPE 201 006 FNOMTLS SPEECH 05 1766 SPE 201 007 FNOMTlS SPEECH 05 1767 SPE 201 008 FNOMTLS SPEECH 05 1 2 TR S MWRF 9 MTWF 8 MWRF w 3 HTWF 3 MTWF TBA TBA TBA TBA 11-13 M 9 10 TR 11-13 T 11-13 w TBA TBA 3 .MTWR 3 HTWR 4 MWF 3 MWF 5 MWF TBA 1 M-F 2 H-F 3 H-F 4 M-F 5 M-F 6 M-F ( 8 M-F 2 M-F BUS 208 BUS 209 BUS 207 BUS 209 BUS 206 BUS 207 BUS ?OS NRS NRS NRS NRS BUS 208 BUS 20B BUS 207 BUS 216 NRS NRS PEO 111 PEO 110 LIF 262 tHE 108 LIF 262 NRS ENG 203 ENG 206 PHY 129 PHY 129 ENG 203 FAH 133 ENG 203 ENG 208

PAGE 30

18 THE ORACLE, Wednesday, November 15, 1967 COURSE SEC PFX NO NO COURSE TITLE 1768 SPE 201 009 FNDMTLS SPEECH 1769 SPE 201 010 FNDMTLS SPEECH 1110 SPE 201 901 FNDMTLS SPEECH 1771 SPE 203 001 SPE IMPRV PHON QTR HRS 05 05 05 05 1772 SPE 203 002 SPE IMPRV PHON 05 1773 SPE 203 003 SPE lMPRV PHON 05 1774 SPE 203 004 SPE IMPRV PHON 05 1775 SPE 203 005 SPE IMPRV PHON 05 1776 SPE 321 001 FNDM ORAL READ 05 1777 SPE 321 002 FNOM ORAl READ 05 1778 SPE 321 003 FNDM ORAL READ 05 1779 SPE 321 004 FNDM ORAt READ 05 1780 SPE 322 001 ORAL INTRP PERF 02 1781 SPE 322 002 ORAL INTRP PERF 02 PERIOD DAY 3 M-F 4 M-F 12-14 MW 2 M-F 3 M-F 6 M-F 4 M-F 8 M-F 2 M-F 3 M-F 4 M-F 6 M-F 9 M-F 10 M-F BLDG ROOM CODE NO FAH 133 FAH 134 ENG 208 'ENG 310 FAH 134 FAH 134 FAH 135 PHY 109 FAH 132 FAH 132 FAH 132 ENA FAH 101 FAH 101 NOTE-SPE 347 001 STUDENTS SHOULD PLAN FOR ADDITIONAL lAB TIME 2 3 TR ROOM ANNOUNCED AT FIRST CLASS MEETING. 1782 SPE 347 001 RADIO PROD OIR 05 2F FAH 278 1783 SPE 361 001 GRP DlSCON MTH 05 6 M-f ENG 204 1784 SPE 363 . 001 PUBLIC SPEAKING 05 4 M-F FAH 133 1785 SPE 366 901 FORENSICS 02 12-14 MW ENG 310 NOTE-SPE 441 001 STUDENTS SHOULD PLAN FOR ADDITIONAL LAB TIME 2 3 MW ROOM ANNOUNCED AT FIRST CLASS MEETING. 1786 SPE 441 001 TV PROD & DIR 05 3F FAH 278 1787 sPE 481 001 INDIV RESEARCH 01 1788 SPE 481 003 INOIV RESEARCH 03 1789 SPE 481 005 INDIV RESEARCH 05 1790 SPE 491 001 SS PROS ORL COM 02 1791 SPE 492 001 SS PROB ORL COM 03 1792 SPE 492 002 SS PROS ORL COM 03 1793 SPE 492 003 SS PROB ORL COM 03 1794 SPE 492 004 SS PROB ORL COM 03 1795 SPE 492 005 SS PROB ORL COM 03 1796 SPE 503 001 AP PHON TRNSCRP 05 1797 SPE 511 901 EXPPHONETICS 05 1798 SPE 521 901 ORL INTP PO ORA 05 1799 SPE 621 901 HI THRY ORL INT 05 1800 SPE 662 901 RHETOR THRV 05 1801 SSI 301 001 SOC SCI STAT 1802 SSI 30: 002 SOC SCI STAT 1803 SSl 301 003 SOC SCI STAT 1804 SSI 301 004 SOC SCI STAT 1805 SSI 301 005 SOC SCI STAT 1806 SSI 301 006 SOC SCI STAT 1807 SSI 321 001 HU ALTNS PROD 1808 SSI 341 001 LATIN AMERICA 1809 SSI 343 001 ASlk JAPAN 1810 SSI 345 001 AFRICA 1811 SSl 413 001 LEISURE lN SOC 1812 SSI 415 001 COMMUNITY PLAN 1813 TAR 111 001 PANTO & IMPROV 1814 TAR 111 002 PANTO & IMPROV 1815 TAR 112 001 STAGE MVMT SPE 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 04 03 03 03 TeA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA 8 M-F It 12-:14 TR 9-11 MW 9-11 TR 12-14 HW 1 2 TR 6 MTWF 8 MWRF 1 2 MW 1 8 TR 6 MWRF 3 MWRF 9 MTWf 4 MTWR 2 MTWF TBA 4 MWRF 5 MWF 6 MWF 4 MWF NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS PHV 129 ENG 206 ENA ENG 204 PHY 120 CHE 108 BUS 112 BUS 112 BUS 112 BUS 210 PEO 104 PEO 104 BUS 114 BUS 209 PED 104 TBO P E O 104 TAT TAT TAT NOTETAR 113 001 WILl HAVE ONE ADDITIONAL HOUR JBA. 1816 TAR 113 001 INTRO TO DANCE 03 8 TR GYM 005 NOTE-TAR 123 001 WILL HAVE TWO ADDITIONAL HOURS TBA. 1817 TAR 1 2 3 001 INTRO DANC TECH 02 4 5 TR GYM 005 1818 TAR 201 001 STAGE MAKE-UP 1819 TAR 221 001 STAGECRAF T 1820 TAR 2 2 1 001 STAGECRAFT 1821 TAR 301 001 PERFORMANCE 1B22 TAR 3 03 800 HOD THE PRAC 1823 TAR 303 001 MOO THE PRAC 01 03 01 05 1 8 T 3 4 R 4T 3 4 l 6M 5 6 TR TAT TAT FAH 141 TAT FAH 102 FAH 132 • r J COURSE SEC PfxNo NO COURSF" TITLE 1824 TAR 303 00? MOO THE PRAC 1825 TAR 325 ooi tECH DIRECtiNG 1826 TAR 325 TECH DIRECTING QTR HRS 05. 03 1827. TAR 404 001 PL-AYWRIGHT II 03 ' 1828 .TAR 412 001 ACTING It 03 l829.TAR 001 DlRECTING I 03 1830 TAR 422 001 SCENE OESGN 03 1831 422 001 SCENE nesJGN II 1832 TAR 423 aot COSTUME DESGN 1 Ol 1833 TAR 425 001 STAGE LIGHTNG I 03 1834 'TAR 425 001 STAGE LIGHTNG 183S TAR 436 001 LIT 19 CENT THE 03 TAR 501 001 DR CRITICISM I 03 1837 ZOO 312 800 COHP EMBRYOLOGY 1838 ZOO 312 001 COMP EMBRYOLOGY 06 1839 ZOO 312 002 EMBRYOLOGY 06 1840 ZOO 312 003 CDMP EMBRYOLOGY 06 , 841 ZOO 312 00 . 4 COHP EMBRYOLOGY 06 1842 ZOO 4Sl 001 UNOERGRAO RSCH 1843 ZOO 481 . 002 UNDERGRAO RSCH 1844 ZOO 481 003 UNDERGRAO RSCH 1845 ZOO ' 481 004 UNDERGRAO RSCH 1846 ZOO 483 001 SEL TOP lOO 1847 ZOO 483 002 SEL TOP ZOO 1848 ZOO 483 003 -SEL TOP ZOO 01 02 03 04 Ol 02 03 1849 ZOO 483 004 SEL TOP ZOO 04 1850 ZOO 483 104 ST AQUA ENTOMOL 04 1851 ZOO 483 104 ST AQUA ENTOMOL 1852 ZOO 491 001 ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 01 1853 ZOO 513 001 PARASITOLOGY 05 ' 1854 ZOO 513 001 PARASIT LEC 1855 ZOO 521 001 COMP PHYSIOLOGY 05 1856 ZOO 521 001 COMP PHYSIC lEC 1857 ZOO 561 001 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR 05 1858 ZOO 561 001 ANIML BEHAV lEC 1859 ZOO 613 001 AD INVERT ZOO 03 1860 ZOO 613 001 AD INVERT LEC 1861 ZOO 619 001 ADV ICHTHYOLOGY 05 1862 ZOO 681 001 GRAD RESEARCH 01 1863 ZOO 681 002 GRAD RESEARCH 02 1864 ZOO 681 003 GRAD RESEARCH 03 1865 ZOO 681 004 GRAD RESEARCH 1866 ZOO 681 005 GRAD RESEARCH 04 05 1867 ZOO 681 006 GRAD RESEARCH 06 1868 ZDO 683 001 SEL TOP ZOO 01 1869 ZOO 683 002 SEL TOP ZOO 0 2 1870 ZOO 683 003 SEL TOP ZOO 03 1871 ZOO 683 004 SEl TOP ZOO 04 1872 ZOO 683 005 SEL TOP ZOO 05 1873 ZOO 683 006 SEL TOP ZOO 06 1874 ZOO 683 104 ST AD MAMMALOGY 04 1875 ZOO 683 104 ST AD MAM LEC 1876 ZOO 683 204 ST CONSERV PROS 04 1877 ZOO 683 204 ST CONSERV L E C 1878 ZOO 6 9 9 001 MASTERS THESIS 1879 ZOO 699 002 MASTERS THESIS 1880 ZOO 699 003 MASTERS THESIS 1881 ZOO 699 004 MASTERS T H ESIS 1882 ZOO 699 005 MASTERS THE SIS 1883 ZOO 699 00 6 MASTERS THESIS 1884 ZOO 699 007 MASTERS THESIS 1885 ZOO 699 008 MASTERS THESIS 1886 ZOO 699 009 MASTERS THESIS 01 02 0 3 04 05 06 07 08 09 PERIOD DAY 5 6 Wf 8 9 R 9T 4 MWF 8 9 M 8W 9W 8 9 . f 1 8 T 7R 5 6 T 6 . R 5 6 T 6R 3 MWF s MWF 6 MWRF 2-4 TR 7-9 TR 2-4 HW 8-10 MW TBA TBA TBA T.BA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA 1 TR TBA 11-13 TR 5 TRF TBA 8 MWF 6-8 TR 2 3 T 2R TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA T8A TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA BlDG ROOM CODE NO fAH. 132 TAT FAH 147 FAH 274 TAT TAT FAH 147 TAT TAT 001 TAT FAH 147 FAH 274 FAH 274 CHE 100 LIF 1310 llf 1310 LIF 1310 t.lf 1310 NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS N R S NRS N R S T B D LIF 2 7 2 TBO llf 1310 LIF 272 TBO LtF 272 TBO Llf 272 T B D T.BD T 80 NRS N R S NRS N R S I NRS NRS NRS NRS N R S NRS NRS NRS TBD TBO TBO TBD NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS NRS


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