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Peg Barnes oral history interview

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Title:
Peg Barnes oral history interview
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University of South Florida -- Library. -- Special & Digital Collections. -- Oral History Program

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interviewed by E. Charlton Prather.
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Full cataloging of this resource is underway and will replace this temporary record when complete.

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University of South Florida Library
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University of South Florida
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usfldc doi - C53-00001
usfldc handle - c53.1
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text E. Charlton Pratcher: Good. We are very pleased this afternoon to have Pamalee Barnes, who we call Peggy, here as our guest. Mrs. Barnes was the long time secretary to the State Health Officer of Florida. Actually, she had six tours of state health officer duty under five, Im sorry, under four state health officers. Then actually spent a tour with an assistant state health officer, and had other responsibleresponsibilities within the public health organization of Florida. She is a lady that sat in a high place, and who is in just the ideal position to see the progress and the regress of the public health movement in Florida from her position in thewell, for the lack of a better term, the head shed of the state health department. Mrs. Barnes, it is truly a pleasure to have you here today. And I thank you for your willingness to come. Because whether you will share with them or notshare them with us or not, you are justjust loaded with just all sorts of interesting observations of how it is that the public health department in Florida works. First of your observationswhat got you involved with public health? How did you get into the public health department?
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Peg Barnes: Well, I started in the Office of Vital Statistics in Jacksonville.
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CP: Is Mr. Williams still living?
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PB: Im not sure of it.
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CP: Okay.
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PB: I dont know, but then Iwhile I was working there, I was mending birth and death certificates.
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CP: Yes.
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PB: And then theDr. Ford, who was the Assistant Health Officer
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CP: Yes.
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PB: He needed a secretary, and I applied, and he accepted me as his secretary.
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CP: Yes.
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PB: And I worked for himand he was also the head of the local health services, which dealt with the county health units.
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CP: Ah.
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PB: All of the country health units.
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CP: Yes.
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PB: So, thatwe covered that; and he alsoDr. Ford had been in charge of the public health residency program, where the physicians would go to different counties, and serve their residency, and be certified as.
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CP: In preventative medicine.
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PB: Thats true.
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CP: Yes.
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PB: And then, uh, I worked for him and then started the legislature found fit, to send the (inaudible), which they found fit to reorganize health, and the.
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CP: Oh.
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PB: To bring us all to Tallahassee.
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CP: Oh yes. I remember it withI remember it.
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PB: I remember it very well. (CP laughs) And we all
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CP: You said to Tallahassee; where were you from?
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PB: ImSt. Augustine and Jacksonville.
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CP: Oh, you mean.
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PB: Im sorry, Iit all started in Jacksonville.
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CP: Oh, and the legislature moved the headquarters of the state health department.
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PB: They wasfrom Jacksonville to.
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CP: Jacksonvilleto here.
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PB: To Tallahassee.
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CP: Uh-huh.
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PB: To get us all together under one roof, Id say.
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CP: Yes.
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PB: Butwhen I retired in May of ninety-five, we still werent under one roof. We was all.
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CP: So you werent?
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PB: We were still spread all over the state.
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CP: Huh.
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PB: But itswaswonderful and I must say now that the thirty-four and a half years that I worked and helped in the (inaudible) state health office and just simplyjust most enjoyable of my whole career.
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CP: Would you do it again?
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PB: Yes, I would.
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CP: In spite of all the trauma you had to suffer?
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PB: Well, there was a
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CP: I understand you had to stay up almostmost of the nights many a times.
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PB: Well, that was during the moving from Jacksonville to Tallahassee, and I was your secretary at that time. And we all
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CP: Im surprised youd admit that. (laughter)
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PB: But we stayed up many nights, late working to restructure health and to make the transitionmake the plans for transition.
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CP: Yes.
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PB: And it was exciting even thoughand I was a lot younger then too, so that, that.
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CP: Yeah, yeah, I wasntIm still young.
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PB: But we stayed upI know one night until about one oclock, trying to get everything; and then another occasion, it was a Fathers Day, we were all working Sundayon a Sunday morning, and I worked until about noon, and my father lived in St. Augustine, so I justI just had to leave and go and, at least, see him.
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CP: Yes.
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PB: But it was allit was just, well, wonderful years and thehealth offices Ive worked for are just wonderful. Including you.
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CP: Um-hm. (laughs)
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PB: Then afteryou came over first in 76, and then, youI came first, you came second, over to Tallahassee.
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CP: Yeah, physically moved.
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PB: And wewell, yes. We found an apartment, and I didnt have any ties in Jacksonville, so it was easy for me to make the transition.
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CP: Oh. Ive always been curious about that, because that was a significant event in your life. You lived and
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PB: And it wasveryit was a blessing really. It was just a veryit was the smartest move I had ever made and if I had turned it down I dont knowI dont know where Id be now. But it was justit was just.
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CP: Well, Im glad you accepted it.
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PB: AndYoud asked me to come over here with you and I was promoted to the executive secretary. Then I worked with you for about four or five years, and thenyou were transferred, I think, to the district, if Im not mistaken.
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CP: Not about four or five years.
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PB: And then they brought inthroughoutI was working with Dr. Ford and doing the public health residency program. Dr. Howell was doing his residency down in Palm Beach County under Dr. Broombeck.
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CP: Yes.
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PB: Soand it was my job to provide the information to go on the certificatesyou know the years, and.
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CP: Yes.
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PB: So, this (inaudible), the next one after you had moved on was Dr. Howell. And I haveworked with him in the residency program, he washe came on board as staff health officer. I worked for him for a number of years, and he was very delightfuland there was one thing I would like to say to itall of the health officers were different, that had different fields, different personalities, I mean it was justyou knowexciting.
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CP: Did you have any trouble adapting?
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PB: Well, itat first, Dr. Howellsince hesince he was a Yankeeand.
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CP: Thats all right; he knows hes a Yankee.
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PB: Hes ait was his mannerisms I didnt fully understand, and it took me a little while to get used to him, but he turned out to be one of the dearest friends I have ever had. And if I had to choose my favorite, I couldnt do that.
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CP: No not here, not whensince Im one of them. Im dont want to ask you for no favorites.
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PB: (laughs) NoI have enjoyed all of them, and every one of them had different ways of doing things; different ideas, andand all of them in different fields: you, epidemiologist; Dr. Howells, public health; Dr. King came on next, and Im not really sure what his specialty was.
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CP: Whered he come from?
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PB: He came as federal assignee. They
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CP: This was Dr. Howellwhat happened to Dr. Howell?
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PB: Well, hemoved on and hehe served a number of prestigious positions throughout the state. I bet, even now, hes a secretary for the new department oflast year. So heshes a new head of thethe new Health Care Administration, and I think he went back to Palm Beach for a little while; and he has been a very important in the progress of public health.
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CP: Yes, Very prominent in (inaudible) administration and public health for a long time.
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PB: And actually, I had served you two terms, and I served Dr. Howell two terms. It appeared in thein the movement and all that, our health officer would be gone, and we were short; so you came in and filled in, and Dr. Howell filled in for maybe a year or so each time, and then I
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CP: Dr. Howell and I used to tease each other. You knowwe didnt get enough beating one time, so were back for a second chance.
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PB: Back again. Thatsthats true. And, of course, I enjoyed secondthe second time, at least I understood you a little bit better. (CP laughs) And then, you
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CP: Well, I would think that different with you; you had us fairly well trained by the time we came back second time.
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PB: Wellwell that could be too. And then the third one was Dr. Steve King, he was a federal assignee.
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CP: Oh-oh yeah-what happened to Dr. Howell? How comeWhered Dr. Howell go?
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PB: Oh I think helets see.
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CP: Did he go to be the deputy secretary of the department?
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PB: Yes he did, thats true. In November of eighty-one, he went up to be the deputy.
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CP: Okay, so now we had a vacancy.
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PB: Since we were short a health officer. There was a period of six months where we didnt have a health officer; but heguided the actions andthe progress in the program. Yes, he did go to the secretary of H.R.S. [Health and Rehabilitative Services] and got the secretariat.
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CP: Yes.
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PB: And that was in eightyNovember of 81. And then, while hethey foundafter a while he was upstairs, they found Dr. Steven King, of thefederal government. And they assigned him onI guess a federal assignment. [They] assigned him to us, and he was about three years. ButI dontI have a hard time explaining exactly what his progress did to Floridas public health. I meant, he just seemed not to fit in, and there were a lot of people throughout the state didntespecially didnt see what he was accomplishing in Floridas public health.
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CP: Andand he was ahe was a federal assignee.
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PB: He was a federal employee, and they assigned him to us.
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CP: Well, that one of his maybe deficits was that he did not have formal training in public health.
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PB: Thatsthat could very well be; because when he left, there was nothing that Im aware of, and I could be wrong, to show what had accomplished. It justjust seemed like it washe was just there to keep us together, I guess.
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CP: Housekeeper.
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PB: Thats right, and keep everything going and all. And I dont mean to be uglyyou knowand make remarks about him
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CP: No, but thenthen, he left.
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PB: He left.
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CP: Did he leave of his own volition or was he invited to go back home?
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PB: Well, I think he was more or less asked toI meant, the department asked the federal government to
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CP: To recall him.
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PB: To recall him.
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CP: Recall him.
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PB: Yeah, that
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CP: Yeah. Okay, I just remind you that Dr. Sauder, Floridas most outstandingor second mostSauder corrected meSauder considers that he would accept the accolade as being the states second most outstanding health officer. With Porter being the first.
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PB: Oh, well II didnt know about Dr. Porter, and I didnt serve Dr.
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CP: Sauder.
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PB: Sauder, but he was head of the department when I went to work for the state but I had noworking relationship with him.
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CP: I justremind both of us that he was a federal assignee, to when he became acting state health officer; he did that on permission as a federal assignee
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PB: And I
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CP: Also.
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PB: Excuse meand actually, during his term, I think they recalled him to Washington.
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CP: Thats right, for a two-year stint.
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PB: Stint toIm not sure what
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CP: Yeah, he was continuing on leave from the public health service all the years he served.
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PB: And then he wouldbut thenI understand and know that he was a magnificent and wonderfulbut I didnt have the privilege to work for him.
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CP: Yeah. Well, well after Dr. King left, who came?
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PB: Dr. Mahan.
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CP: Wrong.
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PB: Wrong.
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CP: Um-hm.
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PB: You came back. (Laughter)
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CP: Dr. Howell came back.
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PB: Dr. Howell came back see--.
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CP: Dr. Howell came back.
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PB: Dr. Howell came back and I think he served about a year and a half, keeping us together. I mean, they brought these health officers in to keep us going and provided, you know, to guidance to the fieldthe employees in public health, and the professionalsand
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CP: Did you have trouble making transitions between all these guys?
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PB: Well, when uh, actually, the thing that was my security, at that pointI was career service. So, they uh, would have to
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CP: They couldnt have any tract with you.
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PB: They couldnt actually just tell me to get lost (CP Laughs). But uh, then uh, Dr.now, it was Dr. Mahan came on after Dr. Howell.
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CP: Wrong.
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PB: Now who? Was it you?
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CP: Yeah. (Laughter)
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PB: Well, I had you again.
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CP: Thats right, you had to put up with me again, for two years and two months.
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PB: But anyway thethey were wonderful years, as well.
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CP: And then Dr. Mahan came.
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PB: Now can I tell about Dr. Mahan?
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CP: Yeah, then Dr. Mahan came.
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PB: Yes, he wasprofessor at the University of Florida, and he and the secretary of H.R.S. [Health and Rehabilitative Services] signed a contract to bring him in as our State Health Officer. And that was in January of 88.
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CP: Yes.
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PB: And Iand you asking me if Ive been about serving all of then, but by then I think I might have been exempt, career exempt.
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CP: You were.
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PB: So, Iasked him
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CP: So, you had to be nice to him?
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PB: Well I was to (CP laughs)I asked him if he wanted me tostay on as his secretary or he had some other desire, people wanted to interview, what he wanted, and he told me no, he wanted me to stay on and look after him. And thats what being a secretary amounted to
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CP: Whatwhat, what, why do you think he wanted you he wanted you to stay on?
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PB: Well, maybe I had a fairly good reputation at the time?
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CP: Who, who is the only person that had the answer to institutional history going back all the way? Who is the only person who had the files? Who is the only person who had the memory of it all? Who was that person?
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PB: Well Ihe chose me to stay, (Laughter) andand actually very wonderful working for him, and as I said, hethe secretary of H.R.S. and the university agreed to give him to us on contract, which he did, and he performed very well, and he was just fine
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CP: Delightful person to work with?
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PB: Justjust wonderful.
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CP: I knew it.
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PB: I mean that he was just wonderful, and I had him longer than anyone else; I had him seven years.
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CP: Well, if you add up another wayyou can add up another way, and you had another one, essentially, the same amount.
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PB: Youre talking about you.
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CP: Yeah, (Laughter) but not in oneone sit.
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PB: OneI had I had Dr. Mahan all one time. But he was a delight to work for and actually he retiredleft, Im sorry, he went to the University of South Florida, the Dean of the College of Public Health; and he left February 28 in 95; and then, I retired, because I had just taken all the health officers I could. (CP laughs) I retired in May. He asked me to stay on until the legislature was over, so that I could help whoever came intothrough it. He wasnt really mad. Thatthere was other staff that could have helped, but I did stay untiland I left May 1 of 95.
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CP: Yeah, your knowledge of the files in the past history, though, Peggy, was profoundly valuable.
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PB: You know, time passes, and you dont remember all these little incidents. Theyre all
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CP: I know it. I heard, just this morning; I washaving some conversation with Dr. Howells secretary. Dr. Howells secretary at the Department of Health and she was speaking to my address and she has no problem, I had Peggys Rolodex. I have all the knowledge I need.
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PB: And Iand they have complimented me on my files, too. That, you know, if they needed itI think they called me one time trying to, not find something that there wasnt in the file. They wanted to know thehad a question about something. Thatthey have complimented me on the filing systems soI hated the files so that was
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CP: But you did it very well, and you kept up with it.
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PB: But I had to. But I had to.
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CP: You know I had other secretaries. You ask for then for the file, it would take them thirty minutes because there was large stacks of paper.
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PB: I try to keep itI like that. (Laughter)
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CP: And you did very well, or at least you kept it hid. Yep.
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PB: But anyway, you know, of all the years, and all the people weve worked for, the public health professionals have just been outstanding; I dont know of any that have not proven themselves to helpwith other (inaudible).
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CP: Yeah, you started with the State Board of Health.
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PB: Yes, Iour campusactually, they changed things so much its hard for me keep up as to which way it followed, The State Board of Health.
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CP: Yep, and then we became the Division of Health.
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PB: Then, the Health Program Office.
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CP: Yeah, we stayed as individualsyou became the secretary to the State Health Officer while we were still a Division of Health, but it was just a few months after you joined that we became the office of
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PB: State Health Office?
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CP: No.
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PB: It was the Health Program Office
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CP: Health Program Office. We became the Health Program Office.
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PB: And then we became the State Health Office.
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CP: Thats right, much later. When you joined, you joined when we were division, thenbut just a few months after that; we became the Health Program Office. Try to remember some of that transition. You were brand new to Tallahassee, we were trying to get used to the name, we had just lost about sixty five hundred staff, and we were in the process to trying to get a state level public health organization out of a hundred and fifty seven people. Can you remember any of that? Thatthats the beginning of your beginning in the State Health Office.
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PB:  Well, lets
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CP:  With the State Health Office.
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PB: Well, it was a wonderful and a learning session for me. Actually, I began to understand what public health was all about; and its just a wonderful you know, a wonderful field, but I had not been able to appreciate whatthe extent of what we did about diseases and allwe had to be sure to have cover and work towards eradicating all that. It was onejust one thing afterand public health has never been dull, Im telling you. If it wasnt one thing, it was something else.
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CP: No two days alike, either.
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PB: Thats true.
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CP: Not even for the secretaries.
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PB: Well, Iwhen I first came over here, I could hardly wait for daylight to come so I could get up
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CP: Come to work.
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PB: Come to work. Thats, thats
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CP: WellI remember you were here about daylight every morning.
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PB: Well, actually in the later years, I was here at seven, and then I conned Dr. Mahan into letting me leave at four thirty. (CP laughs) But I did; I worked early, and it was verylearning experience; and, like I said, all the health officers had different ideas, and they were in different fields. But you had justI mean, the whole realm of public health; you have to get a little bit of everything, so you could at least follow through with whichever area. You may not know the whole thing, but you will know enough toto handle it, and get it on through the
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CP: In those early years of me and you, I remember your, for the lack of a better word, networking with thewith thewith the secretary to the departmental secretary, and with the secretaries of the other program officers.
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PB: Yeah, that was very crucial.
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CP: Very crucial indeed. And I dont recall that any of us tried to stimulate you to do that. You did that of your volition. Speak to that.
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PB: But you had to have a rapport with the other girls and all theyou knowif you needed them and they needed you; and I, actually, I was going through the files to gettry and [get] information for this interview; and there was a little piece of paperand your handwriting was on too, but this little piece of paper from one of the girls that was an executive staff, at that time, and she made the remark of how pleasant it was to handle the things, the mail, the correspondence, I sent to the executive staff, which was the secretary as well. That it was so well organized and it wasntI meant she could understand it and it was complete, and which made me feel good, and then you had written a little kind note on it. But we hadwith all thethe other secretaries like, Larcell, who is now aI think shes Dr. Howells secretary.
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CP: Yes, yes.
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PB: She hasover the years weve worked together andand been very wonderful, and actually all of the executive staff, the ones at the (inaudible), and the different ones and legislative planning. Thethe young lady that was legislative planning, and I always had a habit of saying darling, on everybody darling. So, one day she said something. She said II have tried to quit saying that but it doesnt work. And she told me not to, and it was too, uh, personal, you know, it made you feel comfortable. So I have been
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CP: Amen, and timely.
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PB: It worked out.
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CP: You did that very well, you did that very well, but I want to recall that was on your own volition. Did your otherother bosses notice this?
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PB: Well, they never pointed it out to me like youlike you did.
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CP: They just assumed it.
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PB: But they felt, they felt theyI guess they saw it a just assumed it was part of the plan.
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CP: Part of being executive secretary.
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PB: Thats right.
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CP: Yeah.
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PB: I meant youI meant you didnt have to be told and took it upon yourself. WhichI mean, thats what my job was to look after them, the health officers, keep them in their right place at the right time and
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CP: And you did that profoundly well.
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PB: And have them, as far as the meetings, and then when they traveled and make sure all their hotelsyou know and airline was all correct and they didnt get stranded somewhere. One timeone time doctor I think it was Dr. Mahan went to a meeting and Id hadI had the reservation, I had thethe umber and all. He got there and they didnt have a room, but they had
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CP: Oops.
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PB: Loused up.
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CP: Oops, you had the reservation number.
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PB: But thats thebut thats the only time Ive ever heard of that they got there and they didnt have a place to sleep, so(laughter) but they found him one so it turned out all right. But you tried tomaking their job as easy, thats the main thing, making sure that their job is easy, because theyve got enough to worry about. About where theyre going to sleep and what plane theyve going to catch, you know.
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CP: Thank you for that. That reminds me, what dowhat sort of secretarial pre-training did you have hadhow did you come up to be a secretary?
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PB: Well, I was
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CP: Instead of a governor of Florida or something.
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PB: Well, I, uh, had, uhafter my husband was killed, I went back to Jones Business College, where I took a secretarial course, and then when I went to, uh, work in vital statistics, uhI, I, uhworked there because I just wanted to get into something and not especially secretarial; that didnt reallybut then when uh, in vital statistics and then uh, the doctors secretaryDr. Fords secretary had leftwho was Lewis Willis, who was a dear friend of mine, he encouraged me to refresh my secretarial positionuh, talent and apply for Dr. Fords secretary. So I did, I took thethey gave you exams and I meant the regular secretarial exams so I took that. And then he chose me with Lewiss help, Im sure, but heuh, chose me and then another new offside thing that happened while I was there, Dr. Fords wife became very ill with cancer; in fact, she passed away.
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CP: Yes, I remember.
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PB: And he wasand I tried tothere were things I tried to make his lifehis office life more easier, you know? And (inaudible) they would call; and hed be in a meeting; and if it wasnt too important, Id go get him, and put him on the telephone; just tried to ease his problem with his wife andand
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CP: And youre aware hes passed now.
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PB: He was a verya very wonderful man.
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CP: Yes he was.
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CP: Ms. Ballard didnt want to come.
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PB: She didnt? Sorry about that.
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CP: You know shes passed away too.
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PB: Your kidding?
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CP: Just for your knowledge. She did pass away aboutabout three months ago.
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PB: I didnt know that.
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CP: Too bad.
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PB: (inaudible)
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CP: Very badcancer.
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PB: Im sorry to hear that. She wasnt a very good friend of mine but I
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CP: But I interrupted your train of thought. Just keep onIm trying to get you to outline, your secretarial training and experience but
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PB: Well, when I hadIm sorry, I left out a little bit in there too. In vital statistics, Mr. Carter came onboard as assistant director in vital statistics, and he needed a secretary, so I worked for him. Im sorry, I wasthat slipped my mind.
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CP Its okay.
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PB: But I worked for him as uh, uhI was a steno at that time.
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CP: And that was youryour beginning real secretarial job?
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PB: That wasthat was the beginning and then afterwork with him in the secretarialposition and allwith that knowledge he uhDr. Ford chose me.
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CP: Yeah. All right, thats good. Then you cameyou came uhto the state health officer directly from Fords office?
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PB: Yes, I came up with you to umbecause he wasDr. Ford was notwould not have accepted the state health office. He didnt want to leave. And he didnt really have to; he was retired from the federal government also. So, uhwhen you became it, you asked me to come with you, which I did, and we came over here and had a good time.
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CP: We did, and
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PB: We worked, Im telling you, it wasit was exciting though.
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CP: Yeah, and youyou demonstrated all the executive secretarial qualities, you know, of independence and self-thinking.
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PB: A little instinct. But thats what I haveI guess Ithe last thirtythirty years I have (inaudible), because I was over here twenty years and I was secretary through all ofall of
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CP: Yeah, thats right. Just uhnot all of your highlights but give us some examples of highlights of your career with the state health office. I know you know all ofwhere all the skeletons are, and I know you know where all the interesting little files are; Im not asking you exhume any of that; some of the highlights of your career.
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PB: Well lets justlets see (pause). Thisthis time you forget as you get older.
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CP: Well no, I cantI dont
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PB: You dont know about that.
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CP: No, I dont know about that. (laughs)
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PB: Well, theres onethis ishas nothing to do with uh, the uh, action of a secretary of the state health officer in any way, but that was doctorI was Dr. Fords secretary, and there was local health services who Dr. Ford was over also, and this one incident theycame Christmas time, and everybodyof course all the sections were planning on having a Christmas um
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CP: Decorations.
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PB: Nodinner out. Well, there was only Dr. Ford and I. I meant, that was all that was in our office, soDr. Sauders office and his assistant, they planned a big luncheona Christmas luncheon for their group, and someoneand something was said as to Dr. Ford and I were attending with him. Well, that was a no-no. I meant, we were told right then, no. So Dr. Crane, who was head of local health services, he and his group asked us out to have Christmas with them. So, thatit worked out.
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CP: (Laughs) You gotyou are loaded with those, tell me some more.
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PB: Well, I
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CP: Tell me another one.
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PB: I dont know exactly which ones would be
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CP: I remember you laughing a lot.
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PB: Oh, well, I haveyou have to, or cry. (Laughter)
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CP: Did you want to use my highlighter?
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PB: No, this is fine. One of the things thatwas uh, part of the health offices job was doing the hurricane of Miami of 92
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CP: Two, yeah, Andrew.
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PB: When itwhen it was quite devastating. And Dr. Mahan um, flew down there uh, we spent quite some time down there.
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CP: Yeah, yeah, he spent several months down there for essence.
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PB: Trying totrying toand he andactually, he and the Governor flew down in a helicopter together overI meant, over the area.
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CP: The impact area.
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PB: Seeing, surveying the, theto see what waswhat was really being needed, and there were uh, a lot of peopleuh, actually, they were recruiting throughout the state, people to
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CP: To go down and help.
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PB: To go take turns and go down and fill in for that and we were trying toto keep in planes and busses and all available to take them, and they would take turns to go down and assist with that so, but there were a lot ofour professionals volunteered their time, left their families to go down there and it wasit was needed and everybody filled in and worked.
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CP: Hm. You didnt go, but, apparently, that was very traumatic for you; that you would remember that; that you were responsible [for] coordinating all of that?
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PB: No, well, not actually coordinating. I was involved in it. I meant, and they ensured that everybody waswell, of course, they would be contacting Dr. Mahan, and I would be the go-between to doto do that, because he washe would stay up to, uhget people to volunteer to go, and then, they would call; and then, between it, I would have to relay messages of, ofyou knownot per seI was not that deeply involved, just the go-between to the
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CP: But it was an impressive event, even for you.
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PB: Yeah.
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CP: Yeah.
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PB: But it was, and uhhear everyday its something traumatic happening down there and all. Actually, they did one of the newslettersour (inaudible) state health office newsletters; the whole thing was dedicated to the hurricane, because it was devastating and itit took years to recover from that.
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CP: They really havent recovered yet.
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PB: Nope.
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CP: Theyre not totally recovered yet.
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PB: And uhactuallytheres a publication in this-this 1988, uhprinted by the institute of publicuh, institute of medicine, and its called The Future of Public Health; and it is just filled withand I didnt really realize it as much. I had aIve got a copy and I kept it so that wouldand getting prepared for this interview, I highlighted, you know, and looked it over, and it is just filled with what public health was about, what it should be about, and what theyre hoping it will be about in the future. And Dr. Mahan was on one of the committeesI meant, not the committee member, but he was asked to
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CP: Make a contribution at least.
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PB: Contributions and thoughts towards that, and it was a really exciting book. Although, I dont know how theyI think, the institute distributed a bunch of them. Of course, since its so old, they might not be available now, but it was reallyit really gives you an insight into public health.
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CP: And that was a highlight for you?
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PB: Yes.
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CP: The reading of that book?
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PB: Yeah, I enjoyed it and I just thelast few days did that because
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CP: Yup, read it again.
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PB: Well, the highlights of it. And all the areas of apublic health, you just think maybe its AIDS or VD or you know, syphilis and all that, but thats not theits a whole realm of
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CP: Everything touches a human being is
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PB: That is true, maternal and child health, health education, toxicology, waste management.
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CP: Did you see in the future of public health--much that Florida was doing or does Florida have a long way to go?
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PB: Well itwell it wasntit didnt pinpoint it. It had various charts, which showed uh, the life span
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CP: Relative standing of the states.
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PB: and how much, you knowhow muchdid notit was not set out to point out in a particularin this state, it was overallthe future in public health. About the whole
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CP: Yes, well we should be some time in the future.
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PB: Yup. Well that was towards the end of
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CP: Are we getting there? Are we, Florida, moving in that direction?
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PB: Well, I hope so
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CP: From your observation?
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PB: I hope so. It seems like theywith all the re-organization, I cant really keep up with it, since Im not dealing with it any longer.
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CP: Yeah, and its hard, its moving quickly these days.
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PB: It is. And so, not being immediately involved, its hard to see whats going on and what theyre trying to do.
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CP: Yeah, with our new Department of Health I dont know either, I dont either. I dont.
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PB: I dont um, and I cant keep in the knowlike the childrens, the department of childrens and mediuh, nothe children and medical services.
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CP: Children and medical services, children and families, yeah, the department.
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PB: (Inaudible) has been nice and qualified.  He used to be our
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CP: Deputy.
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PB: Thats correct.
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CP: Yeah, he was a number of positions with you.
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PB: Really?
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CP: Yeah.
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PB: He was
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CP: Yeah, all right. Dr. Howell, who is now the new secretaryor was it Dr. King? Do you remember the environmental agriculture department? We had some sort of chemical pollutant that appeared in the water, while on Dr. Kings watch, we call it. That became a state widea very critical issue. I cant remember the chemical, but Dr. King was on TV, and hed travel around, and went a lot with the Commissioner of Agriculture.
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PB: This is Stephen King?
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CP: Yes. Do you recall any of that? You personally didnt get too much involved with it.
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PB: No; but there were a lot of epidemics and likeyou knowwith seafood parts, and oysters in particular, and the oysters were hazardous to the public health. And, I think, one time, you just quit eating oysters, if Im not mistaken.
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CP: Thats correct, I dont eat them raw at all.
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PB: So, there was dangerous thing to do because you never knew when they were going to be
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CP: Thats right, thats right. Im trying to get you to think about highlights with each of yourwith each of your state health officers. You spoke of one with Ford, which was an interesting one, and II dont necessarily want to go in order, Ill jump to Howell. What was a highlight of your career with Dr. Howell?
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PB: Well, it was exciting. (Laughter) I have to tell you this one thing about Dr. Howell, hehe is theI guess antsy would be a good word.
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CP: Hes got a lot of energy.
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PB: Ah well, maybe that
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CP: A lot of energy and he cant stay still.
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PB: Buthe would havehe would be on the telephone, he would have two meetings going on. One in the office he was in and one in (inaudible), and he would participate in all of them, I meant he would just go from oneand he knew what he was doing. I meant he carried through it. (Laughter) But hehe was a[the years] they were wonderful.
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CP: Did you have any difficulty keeping him straight?
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PB: Well not really, becauseyou just go along with him. You follow him andand thenif there was a problem with something you could talk to him about it.
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CP: Okay, good.
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PB: But he, but he was
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CP: Okay, in the normal sequence of things, give me a highlight of your career with me.
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PB: Well, now thats hard to say.
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CP: All right, go to Mahan.
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PB: Well, heand you know, this is what surprised me; I had breakfast with Dr. Mahan about three weeks ago.
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CP: Good.
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PB: He had called me, and I hadthis is the first time I had seen him since I had retired and he had left, and it amazed mewe were talking and conversation and he has aa doctor that works for him in his office down there; and he said heDr. Mahan made the remark that he was not a good administrator, and it had never entered my mind to think that about him. I meant, I guess he was good at carrying out what should be done and he left, I guessI never thought of it in that way.
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CP: You never thought of Mahan as not being an administrator?
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PB: No. Anduh, because hes always so involved and sohes established so many programs that, you know, health and others, healthy babies, and he hadhe told me he had been working on a programI think its the headquarters is in the university nowwith the governor, and the governor had sent back tohe didnt want his name to be put in, you know, in with it or be connected with it; that he would have todoctorthey would have to get funding from some one on the outside, he didnt want to be
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CP: Part of the funding right now, yes.
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PB: But then, heDr. Mahan did say thatI think it wasthe governors wife and his daughter came in to see Dr. Mahan, down in Tampa, and they had changed their mind; that they were willing to have the governors name mixed in with the programs of child health, and then have his name in withon the program as part of it, and they would do what they could to havethat was
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CP: And this is
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PB: That wasso that was a big step.
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CP: Just another one of the programs that Dr. Mahan has initiated.
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PB: They had uhI forgot the name of it. It was one of thesince the governor wasnt back and I didntyou know, get involved inat the t[ime]the beginningI meant, just his name was used. So, uhI couldnt really, I cant remember, but it had to do with child health, which isis one of Dr. Mahans
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CP: So, that part of the highlight of working with Dr. Mahan was all the programs he initiated, and the fun that you had with
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PB: (Inaudible) with allwith uh
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CP: You had to do all the paper work(inaudible) all of them.
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PB: I had to contactyou know, make the appointments, and all the stuff like that. So, nowand now you; let me see what I can think of.
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CP: Youyou canyou can skip me. Thats perfectly all right. (laughter)
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PB: No, ISee, thats my first news is
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CP: You were brand new.
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PB: I was brand new.
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CP: You were young and uninitiated.
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PB: And you were an epidemiologist, and involved with all those good diseases that came through.
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CP: Thats right, really, all the juicy stuff.
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PB: You werethats when public health first meant to me was all these diseases, and infections, and viruses, and E. coli, and all that kind ofthat stuff.
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CP: Yeah, yeah, let me change your focus to the colorful personalities that you run into as being the secretary to the state health officer; some colorful personalities that youve dealt with, whether they be with the feds or locally.
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PB: Well, um, can I say
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CP: Yes, yeahyou can say, then well decide.
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PB: Well, IIm stuttering because Im thinking whether I should say this or not. But anyway, Dr. Stephen King was fed to us by the feds, I already said; but, in my eyes, and I have heard from many people throughout thenot everybody, but throughout the state that he was a health officer who contributed the least memorable activity, you know, notablememorable activities. Now, you may think differently, that may be true, but what I think and a lot of other people throughout the state, and I have heard others tell the same thing.
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CP: Thats too bad.
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PB: And I think he was a self-centered
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CP: Person.
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PB: Person, he wasnt cut out for Floridas public health. I think
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CP: He was one colorful person. Surely, you would have others that would be useful for us to know about.
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PB: Well, Ive always thought you, in your mannerism of
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CP: Present company excepted, well except this
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PB: No, Ive got to say this. That you, in the way you always present yourself, and like nobody else does, I meant, you just
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CP: Thats because Im a redneck.
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PB: Well, (laughter), you make everybody feel very warm and comfortable; I was about a nervous wreck before I came on this program.
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CP: Well, I dont notice it now.
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PB: But you have certainlybut you make everybody feel at ease and welcome
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CP: Whether Im at ease or not.
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PB: Well, you always appeared to be. (CP laughs) Buteven with the staff whom weve had problems and youyou found time to talk to them.
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CP: Dont tell me we had problems?
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PB: Well, some.
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CP: Okay.
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PB: But youyou always found time soothe their feathers
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CP: Wasnt that necessary? Thats necessary.
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PB: ThatThats true. I meant that when theyre not happy, then our job isnt
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CP: Okay, but there are other colorful personalities, let me think of some that came throughthat you had to relate with that caused you great pleasure, too, andthe other sides. Those which you had to deal with that didntthat caused you pain. Highlight some of those that it was a pleasure to work with outsideas a part of your duties with the state health office.
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PB: Are you speaking of the people who were not state health officers?
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CP: Yes, yes, yes, yes, staff and otherwise.
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PB: Okay, wellthere are several of our wonderful professionals who have now passed on, and who haveneed to give credit for what they have done.
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CP: Oh, please tell us.
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PB: Dr. Dell Miller, who iswas loved by everybody, he was head of the dental health program.
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CP: Okay, he was a dentist.
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PC: He was a dentist, and he was just a delightful
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CP: And how did you know him?
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PB: He workedhe washe was over here in Tallahasseein the district office carrying on, as he could from the Jacksonville; so he was a go-between us and them. And he was here when I camewhen I came over.
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CP: Yes, and he befriended you very quickly, and helped you get settled in.
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PB: He and his family were just wonderful; helped me with all my transition. And then, Mr. Fred Ragon, who is also passed away, he was head ofin Jacksonvillehe was head of the finance and accounting area over there, and he came over here withwith us, and, actually, one timeat the time of his death, you were having a meeting down at, I think it was uhCapital Inn and one otheryou were having a meeting
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CP: It was at Capital Inn.
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PB: He had aMr. Ragdon had been there.
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CP: He was supposed to be there. He went home to lunch, went home to lunch.
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PB: He went home, and heexpired after he got home. His wife, was
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CP: Yeah.
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PB: But he contributedhe carried on, over here, with the financing end of our part. Yeah, the things we had to do to keep our head above water and keep
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CP: Kind of. He was largely expanded; his duties were largely expanded. He was a great person. You and him as a team, in which I kind of looked at him as a chief of staff.
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PB: Well thatsthats a good way of doing it. Because he helpedhe helped in all areas.
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CP: Yes, he did. Yeah, it would be fun to interview him someand who else do you remember?
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PB: Of course, these right now Im mentioning have passed away, and umKen Skutter.
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CP: Ken Skutter, now, who was Ken Skutter?
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PB: He washe actuallyhe was in Jacksonville, also, but then he came over and transferred over here; but he was more or less involved with administrative matters. I mean, helping everybody and everything and all. And there was a period of six months that we didnt have a health boss; he more or less kept us from sinking. So, he was reallyhe was in Jacksonville, but he left here, they foundthey thought it would be better if he went back to Jacksonville, so he went back and worked for Duval County Health Department. Then, I think he retired. But he was riding his bicycle at the beach and had a heart attack and died.
402
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CP: Oh, boy.
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PB: He wasyou knowthese people that have given their lives and all, Im sure the stress and the strain of all of this work and worrying and, you know, trying to keep everybody happy and doing good things.
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00:49:3.9
CP: Well, obviously, me and you didnt have to work and strain too much because were still here.
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PB: (Laughs) I didnt think I was going to be. (Laughter)
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CP: Who else do you remember, Peggy? Thats worthy of notable mention?
407
00:49:19.6
PB: There was one young fellathis is before we ever came up here. It was working forand we were in the process, I mean, we had not actually moved. Vernon Keys, I dont know how many people now remember him, but he worked in sanitary engineering. He was head of the seafood program, and he was uhover in this area, over the panhandle area; working andI think they had tothe bill had passed that we would be coming over here; and I think with his working, and worrying, and caring, you know, trying to do a magnificent job; the strain just got too much; and he was uhI think itI understood they said he had gone to a filling station, somewhere to get gas or something, and he died by heart attack while he was trying to get everything
408
00:50:10.5
CP: Yeah, he was actually in Pensacola. Yeah, I remember Vernon with great affection.
409
00:50:18.2
PB: And uhin other words, Mr. Red Board, who passed away notabout a year or so ago. He has been involved withhad been involvedin fact, hes married to a nurse. Thats Charlotte Board, and he uhbut he was involved in thedata processing and uh, uh
410
00:50:39.4
CP: Which I recall, he was a statistician.
411
00:50:41.5
PB: Yep, statistician and he went back and uhthe last uh, years he transferred back to uh, vital statistics and
412
00:50:49.0
CP: Yes, director of vital statistics.
413
00:50:51.0
PB: After Mr. Williamson retired, so. And then uh
414
00:50:54.5
CP: And hes passed away too.
415
00:50:56.5
PB: Who?
416
00:50:57.3
CP: Mr. Board. Yeah you said hed passed away. Yeah, about a year ago.
417
00:51:3.0
PB: And then, umOh, right, Clark. I dontI dont know how many would remember him. He was head of
418
00:51:10.0
CP: Well, we dont care how many you remember or dont remember.
419
00:51:12.4
PB: Well Ibut the thing is uh, the people that arethey have aknew this, they might, you know, recall.
420
00:51:20.0
CP: I think its very appropriate that we drop the names, though, for people that in your mind are outstanding contributors to Floridas public health who are no longer here.
421
00:51:27.7
PB: Well, they have, uh
422
00:51:29.8
CP: You know, Ray Clark is a good one.
423
00:51:32.0
PB: He was head of radiation control and heshe uh, dedicated his life to his profession. He was widely known.
424
00:51:41.6
CP: Yeah, yeah, yeah, and hes radiological healthhes a radiological physicist, and he too has passed on. As I recall, he retired one month, and four or five weeks later, he died of a heart attack.
425
00:51:54.8
PB: Isnt that (inaudible)?
426
00:51:57.7
CP: Yeah, down in Bartow.
427
00:51:59.1
PB: You retire to have a good timeand rest andso.
428
00:52:7.2
CP: Okay, these arethese are very notablehighlightable people that youve done there, but Im sure there are others that are living. That are colorful characters that uhyou kind ofyou kind of stand out in your career. Bruce Willis, John Witty, uh, uh, oh theres a physiciana physician that came early, head uphead up disease control.
429
00:52:40.9
PB: Talking of Witty?
430
00:52:41.1
CP: No.
431
00:52:42.3
PB: Oh.
432
00:52:43.1
CP: Long before Dr. Witty. Kind of a stout, big man. Im just dropping names.
433
00:52:48.8
PB: Sorry I cant
434
00:52:50.1
CP: II think were colorful characters and that you had special relationships with.
435
00:52:56.1
PB: Well Dr. Witty was very colorful.
436
00:52:57.6
CP: Oh, Dr. Witty is a colorful character. Okay.
437
00:53:0.2
PB: He uh, he was the head of our disease control, and umheallGod, sorry
438
00:53:9.6
CP: You aintyou cant be fired. You is retired, like me.
439
00:53:13.6
PB: Dr. Mahan andIve got a tickleUm, Dr. Wittys secretary would call andfirst  of all let me state Dr. Witty would always have some reason to leave around four oclock to go home. I meant hehed put in his stay or what ever. So he would leave. So his secretary would call me to her department to meet with Dr. Mahan. So I would give him a four oclock appointment. (laughter)
440
00:53:39.7
CP: (laughter) Did he make it?
441
00:53:41.3
PB: No, because uh, he couldnt make it. He had some business to take of. Nine out of ten times hed cancel.
442
00:53:48.9
CP: Really?
443
00:53:49.4
PB: But he knew whatDr. Mahan knew what I was doing but hed never get after me. (CP laughs)
444
00:53:58.0
CP: I think thats a worthwhile note.
445
00:54:1.0
PB: And heDoctorhe transferred down to one of the districts.
446
00:54:5.0
CP: Oh. Okay, he was around here for a long time.
447
00:54:11.8
PB: Yeah, he was a fed, too, that came to us in the
448
00:54:15.0
CP: Thats right. Heyeah-heyeahPublicU.S. Public Health Service. You remember thethe large physician, uhthat came to disease control. I cant remember his name. Mike was his first name. From South Africa.
449
00:54:38.4
PB: Oh, yeah, okay.
450
00:54:41.9
CP: Was he not a colorful character to you?
451
00:54:44.0
PB: Oh, yeah. Yellow.
452
00:54:46.2
CP: Thats right. I knew it was colorful, Yellow.
453
00:54:49.8
PB: Dr. Yellow, he was something else too. I dont remember too muchI didnt work that close with him, but hehe was a character. I dontI dont recall any special
454
00:55:5.1
CP: Features about him.
455
00:55:7.2
PB: Features.
456
00:55:8.6
CP: Okay. Okay, well let me mention Dave Wolf.
457
00:55:11.6
PB: Oh yeah, he was in thewas it the (inaudible)?
458
00:55:15.2
CP: WTs.
459
00:55:16.2
PB: WTs. Well, he was up there. Heis he deceased?
460
00:55:21.8
CP: I dont know. I dont know.
461
00:55:23.5
PB: The last Ithe last uhsaw him, or somebody else saw him in the credit union several years ago. I dont know, but he wasnt well.
462
00:55:34.0
CP: But hehe washe was neat, acute, and he patted on you. He didnt physically, not physically pat on you, but he had figuratively loved you up every time he was by.
463
00:55:45.8
PB: Um, there were a lot of them that were very attentive and
464
00:55:51.3
CP: Which one used to bring you all that candy that I ate?
465
00:55:57.4
PB: I dont
466
00:55:59.8
CP: Some employees bring you a lot of candy.
467
00:56:4.5
PB: I dont
468
00:56:4.9
CP: I dont think they made it through your guard. Though I dont think they got to my office.
469
00:56:8.8
PB: I dont remember that but I do remember Dr. Crockett who is nowstill head of disease control. I used toon the weekendsince Im not marriednor tiesgot plenty of timeI would fix food for theyou know, snacks and all to take in for everybody. Being a good mother, you know. And I would take it in andandand you could bet your bottom dollar Dr. Crockett was going to be down there. I mean, he
470
00:56:38.4
CP: First thing Monday morning!
471
00:56:40.2
PB: He would be about the first one; and, Im telling you, he could eat.
472
00:56:44.0
CP: He still walks around constantly with a cookie or a piece of candy in his hand.
473
00:56:48.2
PB: Well, hehe got to the point where he would call from upstairs to see if they had brought any food, and then, hed come down (CP laughs). I dont think he did that on a regular basis, but he did do it.
474
00:57:4.3
CP: I think, for the record, we need to note that Dr. Crockett looks like a toothpick, but hes about six feet two tall.
475
00:57:11.3
PB: Have you ever seen him riding his bicycle on that old St. Augustine road?
476
00:57:14.4
CP: Im told that he wont pick up anybody and give them a lift.
477
00:57:18.1
PB: I wouldnt want to ride on his bicycle. (Laughter) But Ithe other day, I was riding down old St. Augustine road and I saw thisand it was cool, too. This character, hes on the bicycle, and the seats about this high, and here is (inaudible). The wind was blowing, and I didnt dare wave at him, because
478
00:57:36.3
CP: Dont distract his attention.
479
00:57:38.0
PB: But Id imagine he was going over to the coast.
480
00:57:40.5
CP: Yeah, Im sure he was, because thats the way he goes; he rides his bike back and forth.
481
00:57:44.8
PB: But he was just
482
00:57:45.1
CP: Thats part of the way he keeps his energy up.
483
00:57:46.0
PB: It was cold; he didnt have a shirt on.
484
00:57:48.5
CP: Yeah, hes highly energetic. Heshes got as much nervous energy as Dr. Howell.
485
00:57:55.8
PB: Well, he
486
00:57:57.7
CP: Okay, who are some others? Whoswhoswhos some other outstanding characters in your career?
487
00:58:4.2
PB: Were about to give out some
488
00:58:7.3
CP: Youre not(laughter). I havent asked you about the low points in your career. Im going come to that. Ill do that right now. Ive been trying to get you to focus on the high points of your career. Now, whats some of the low points? What was the thing that caused you closest to quitting?
489
00:58:29.1
PB: Well, actually, the only time Ive thought of retiring was before Dr. Mahan decidedwas when I would have myI guessmy thirty years. And uhI saw that all went well. Thisthis probably time for me to move on and get out. But then he was so kind, and I really didnt know what I was going to do with my time at thatI wasntI was a little younger then.
490
00:59:0.7
CP: Oh yes, of course.
491
00:59:1.5
PB: So Iand he hadmore or less, I think, at that point, said he would be making a change too, and I had enjoyed working for him; that was one reason I considered it. So, I said, Well, Id just stay on.
492
00:59:16.4
CP: Do youand well both go at the same time?
493
00:59:19.7
PB: So heand that was my plan. I would have left the day he did, if I could have; and he asked me to stay until the end of the legislative session.
494
00:59:27.4
CP: That was very valuable to this office.
495
00:59:29.5
PB: So anyway thats what I did and forI got out. I think my time of departure helpedwas very opportune.
496
00:59:42.3
CP: Why?
497
00:59:43.4
PB: I dontI dont know whatfirst of all, myI was getting older as everyone is, but my hearing was getting to be very much of a problem.
498
00:59:55.4
CP: Oh, Im sorry.
499
00:59:57.0
PB: And, just recently, I had cataract surgery, sobut anyway, it just seemed like it was time to move on, and inuh, my financial situation was such that I could
500
01:00:10.3
CP: It was that that good?
501
01:00:12.7
PB: I could do it. I dont regret it at all. It wasit was justI think I was guided by God totouh, make
502
01:00:21.0
CP: Well, praise the Lord for that.
503
01:00:21.9
PB: To maketo make that move, and I have never regretted it.
504
01:00:25.4
CP: Yeah, okay. What other low point? Wont you go by health officer? What was the low point with your service with me?
505
01:00:33.4
PB: Well, I dont think I had a low point.
506
01:00:35.5
CP: Im sure you did. I came in lots of times and found you crying.
507
01:00:38.2
PB: I dont think I remember all of the low points.
508
01:00:40.3
CP: I know it; I forget them, too.
509
01:00:46.4
PB:I uh, I cant think of any.
510
01:00:49.7
CP: Huh, all of us have low points, but umI put those out of my mind too. The unhappy events I dont remember.
511
01:00:55.1
PB: But I have been very happy; and Im sure there are mornings I wish that I didnt have to go to work, but it wasnt because of who I was going to work for. But, then, it wasnt ever, ever dull. It was just
512
01:01:10.0
CP: Never boring.
513
01:01:11.8
PB: Thirty four and a half years. It was reallyIt was exciting. (CP Laughs) If I had to choose my career over again, I wouldnt change it.
514
01:01:21.3
CP: You wouldnt?
515
01:01:21.6
PB: Um-hm.
516
01:01:22.5
CP: And you would come along the same path?
517
01:01:24.5
PB: IYes Im sure I would. It was a blessing for me to leave Jacksonville to come over here. That wasI now own myI have a mobile home and its all mine.
518
01:01:35.7
CP: Hot dog.
519
01:01:37.1
PB: And my careverythingseverythings just
520
01:01:39.2
CP: Everythings paid for.
521
01:01:40.4
PB: Everything is just ship shape.
522
01:01:42.7
CP: And youre keeping all your friends?
523
01:01:44.0
PB: Oh Yes.
524
01:01:44.1
CP: Youre still having fun?
525
01:01:45.9
PB: I have wonderful friends, and, actually, Ive told my childrenmy daughter and the family that uh, I would not move back to Jacksonville or St. Augustine unless itmy health made me. Imtheres no reason. Ive got so many things here, and then I go over there; it isnt that far.
526
01:02:5.5
CP: Yes, yes. You can go busy with them.
527
01:02:7.0
PB: And its far enough that I dont get involved with the day-to-day family problems. (Laughter)
528
01:02:13.8
CP: I understand that. Whatwhat final note would you want to tell your viewers, about a career in public health as an executive secretary, in the highest level of the administration?
529
01:02:27.7
PB: Well, they certainly would not be making a mistake, and it would be justjust wonderful, and the salary is now getting to be
530
01:02:39.0
CP: Reasonable.
531
01:02:39.9
PB: Reasonable, and uh, and if you have a good boss, like Ive had, youll be blessed and youd enjoy it. II would recommend it to anybody.
532
01:02:50.1
CP: What kind of preparation would you want them to have before being an executive secretary? Youre probably the best executive secretary that has ever existed, period.
533
01:02:57.7
PB: No, no
534
01:02:58.3
CP: Yes, you was.
535
01:02:58.8
PB: But theythey need uh, high level secretarial uh, like handling the irate people that call in and theto be able to make decisions on their own. I mean, mywhen you were gonewhen the boss is gone, sometime you [have] to make the decision, which youre sure hell back you up with; and then you have to handle the guests that come in, and the people that are visiting, and see that everything is handled. Its just the little thing
536
01:03:32.5
CP: Is there a preparation you can do for that, or does that kind of come in your genes?
537
01:03:35.8
PB: That comesthat comes, I think in training, through experience. I mean, you cant go to school to get it, but if you just pay attention and be attentive andand dedicated. Thatsthats the thing. I wasntIIve learned since I have retired that I dont have to be so stern and so unso businesslike. I can, you know
538
01:04:4.0
CP: You can smile.
539
01:04:5.0
PB: I can let my hair down and then just enjoy.
540
01:04:8.0
CP: Somebody told me I had let mine down too much and now I dont have any.
541
01:04:11.2
PB: But um, just enjoy and um, do your very best; and that you may have somebody thatll appreciate you, but you cant do anything about that.
542
01:04:24.6
CP: When your great-great grandkids are looking at this tape, do you have a message for them?
543
01:04:32.1
PB: Well, I just want to tell how dear everyone has been to me, and I hope theyre as fortunate with whatever field they go in to, and Imyactually, my granddaughters talking about going toback to school to be a physical therapists assistant, and then she may go on to be a physical therapist. She works at the residence hospital in Jacksonville.
544
01:05:2.1
CP: Yes, yes?
545
01:05:3.3
PB: And my daughter is the secretary uh, to the uh, to one of the vice presidents of this hospital over there.
546
01:05:10.9
CP: Wow!
547
01:05:11.5
PB: So, shes doingshes very well. In the medical field, see, were all in the same
548
01:05:15.8
CP: Youre all the kind of same family.
549
01:05:17.6
PB: So theyre all involved in
550
01:05:21.9
CP: Any advice to your great grandkids?
551
01:05:24.6
PB: Well, I just got my first great grandson, so
552
01:05:28.3
CP: Go one more for that, great great.
553
01:05:30.7
PB: And heswell, my grandson, now, hes twenty-five and hes doing his own thing. Hes working, and is not in the medical field at all, but my little great-grandson who is three months old. So, hes got a long ways to go. Well just see. And of course if Jennifer, my granddaughter, goes into some medical field, Im sure youll try to encourage her, because shes very excited about it. And they justthe people she works for, they just love her. She has a very pleasant personality.
554
01:06:8.0
CP: She always has.
555
01:06:9.0
PB: A wonderful smile and uh
556
01:06:11.1
CP: Shes outgoing.
557
01:06:11.4
PB: Yeah, oh yeah.
558
01:06:12.7
CP: Shed even hug my neck, if you remember.
559
01:06:14.8
PB: So, but thats aI just [feel] grateful that Ive had the opportunity that has been presented to me, and that I took advantage of it; because I could have turned it down, and then (inaudible).
560
01:06:27.9
CP: Youryouryour notes that you brought with you. Is anything there that we havent covered?
561
01:06:33.0
562
01:06:33.2
CP: Did you look through them? I dont want us to miss anything.
563
01:06:36.8
PB: I dont think so.
564
01:06:38.5
CP: Okay. Take a second to look over them.
565
01:06:40.6
PB: Like Ive said, Ive enjoyed public health; and Iits been the most enjoyable years of my life. Because your working in your careers [and] thats what its all about.
566
01:06:49.0
CP: True, thats right. Thats right.
567
01:06:50.8
PB: If you dont accomplish something
568
01:06:52.0
CP: And it was the most of your life.
569
01:06:54.0
PB: And if you dontyou [dont] accomplish something, then youve goofed.
570
01:06:59.3
CP: Well, kind of. You did good, you didnt goof. You did good.
571
01:07:4.6
PB: Well, Im just grateful that Ive had
572
01:07:5.3
CP: You kept a lot of important people straight, and on time, and where they were supposed to be, when they were supposed to be there. That is critical.
573
01:07:12.0
PB: Well I had people to work forthatthatthat helps too you know. You dont do it all by yourself.
574
01:07:17.5
CP: Yeah it does. Well Mrs. Barnes, on behalf of the University of South Florida library system and the School of Public Health of the University of South Florida, we just thank you sincerely for your contributions to our oral history collection and(cuts off){{{1:07:34}}}



PAGE 1

COPYRIGHT NOTICE This Oral History is copyrighted by the University of South Florida Libraries Oral History Program on behalf of the Board of Trustees of the University of South Florida. Copyright, 2014 University of South Florida. All rights, reserved. This oral history may be used for research, instruction, and private study under the provisions of the Fair Use. Fair Use is a provision of the United States Copyright Law (United States Code, Title 17, section 107), which allows limited use of copyrighted materials under certain conditions. Fair Use limits the amount of material that may be used. For all other permissions and requests, contact the UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA LIBRARIES ORAL HISTORY PROGRAM at the University of South Florida, 42 02 E. Fowler Avenue, LIB 122, Tampa, FL 33620.


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