Child nutrition and physical activity in the Monteverde Zone: An exploratory study [powerpoint]

Citation
Child nutrition and physical activity in the Monteverde Zone: An exploratory study [powerpoint]

Material Information

Title:
Child nutrition and physical activity in the Monteverde Zone: An exploratory study [powerpoint]
Translated Title:
Nutrición y actividad fisica en los niños de Monteverde: Un estudio exploratorio [powerpoint]
Creator:
Green, Simone
Shuford, James
Vázquez-Otero, Coralia
Whitney, Melissa
Publication Date:
Language:
Text in English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children--Nutrition
Niños--Nutrición
Costa Rica--Puntarenas--Monteverde--Monteverde Zone
Costa Rica--Puntarenas--Monteverde--Zona de Monteverde
Community Health 2011
Salud comunitaria 2011

Notes

Abstract:
This study assesses objective levels of children's physical activity as well as children's subjective perceptions of nutritional knowledge and physical activity in the Monteverde zone. ( English,Español,,,,,,, )
Abstract:
Este estudio evalúa los niveles de los objetivos de la actividad física de los niños, así como las percepciones subjetivas de los niños de los conocimientos nutricionales y la actividad física en la zona de Monteverde.
General Note:
Student affiliation: University of South Florida

Record Information

Source Institution:
Added automatically
Holding Location:
Added automatically
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
M38-00079 ( USFLDC DOI )
m38.79 ( USFLDC Handle )

Postcard Information

Format:
Book

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Child Nutrition and Physical Activity in the Monteverde Zone : An Exploratory Study July 22, 2011

PAGE 2

Research Objectives Children s perceptions about nutrition. Children s perceptions about physical activity Objective measurements of children s physical activity

PAGE 3

Justification Physical activity and nutrition are important for children s growth and development Cameron 2002. The Monteverde clinic wants to focus on children for the prevention of chronic diseases. Children are an important population for health research because they are agents of change. Working with children is essential for population wide preventative health. Free living conditions are an especially important element of overall physical activity, as younger children's physical activity tends to be dominated by unstructured activities e.g. walking, running, play.

PAGE 4

Target Population Monteverde Zone Children ages 7 12: 14 total 4 males, 9 females Cognative development Children in this age range are able to arrange objects according to their size, weight, classification, and relation Marlowe, & Canestrari 2006. Social development Juveniles are defined as, prepubertal individuals that are no longer dependent on their mothers parents for survival Pereira & Altmann 1985.

PAGE 5

Methods: The San Luis Health Fair

PAGE 6

Nutrition Game Pile Sort Categories not mutually exclusive Food I eat everyday My favorite foods Food I don t like Healthy foods 41 food items We chose food items that were a broad range of healthy and unhealthy as well as culturally salient foods.

PAGE 7

Nutrition Game

PAGE 10

What I eat every day

PAGE 11

My favorite foods

PAGE 12

What I don t like

PAGE 13

Healthy Food

PAGE 14

Quotes from the children : Nutrition La comida saludable es como producida de la tierra, no como la coca cola que son qumicos. Healthy food is produced from the earth, not like Coca Cola which are chemicals. 12 year old female Todas las frutas son saludables. All fruits are healthy. 9 year old female

PAGE 15

Results and interpretations: Nutrition Children identified fruits and vegetables as healthy Water was also commonly identified as healthy Healthy/Unhealthy Test USDA Dietary Guidelines were used to create categories: Healthy, Unhealthy, Neutral Children received a score on their ability to identify healthy foods. Healthy: Mean score 57% Unhealthy: Mean score 96% Average Mean score 72%

PAGE 16

Results and interpretations: Nutrition Mann Whitney Test Significant difference in the median test score: Children who reported eating >6 healthy foods, received a mean score of 89% of identifying healthy foods. Children who reported eating <6 healthy foods, received a mean score of 43% of identifying healthy foods. Statistically significant: p = .021 The more diverse healthy foods children eat, the more they can correctly identify what foods are healthy. Lack of diversity in food is linked to food insecurity

PAGE 17

Collage: Methods The collage distinguished between exercise, physical activity and play. We provided materials ex: magazines, glue, markers for the children who were instructed to cut and paste and write whatever they thought fit into the 3 categories. Observations and children s comments were recorded in fieldnotes.

PAGE 18

Collage: Physical Activity Play Exercise

PAGE 19

Results and interpretations: Collage There seems to be a trend in how the children interpreted the different categories : Physical Activity milking the cow sweeping the floor playing music Play soccer, hide and seek jump rope Exercise biking running walking

PAGE 20

Quotes from the children : Collage Jugar es para divertirse. Play is for having fun. El ejercicio es bueno para bajar de peso. Exercise is good for losing weight. 9 year old female

PAGE 21

Methods : Anthropometrics and Accelerometer

PAGE 22

Anthropometrics ID Age Sex Height Weight BMI BMI Percentile 01G 10 Girl 137.5 36.5 19.3 78 02B 7 Boy 119.3 27.2 19.1 92 03G 7 Girl 117.5 23.1 16.7 72 05G 10 Girl 138.7 43.3 22.5 93 06G 12 Girl 127.0 63.3 28.6 97 07B 7 Boy 131.0 26.7 15.6 45 08G 10 Girl 151.0 43.3 19 78 09G 9 Girl 135.5 40.8 22.2 94 Weight Status Category Percentile Range Underweight Less than the 5th percentile Healthy weight 5th percentile to less than the 85th percentile Overweight 85th to less than the 95th percentile Obese Equal to or greater than the 95th percentile

PAGE 23

Accelerometer: Actigraph GT3X Objective measurement techniques increasingly popular mode of gathering data on physical activity in order to avoid bias in self reporting. Colley et al. 2011, Troiano et al. 2007 Measure amount, frequency and duration of physical activity additionally capture "free living" conditions which have been shown to increase mortality rates. Murphy 2009:109

PAGE 24

Accelerometer : Methods The accelerometers were worn on children s right hip for a total of 48 hours. A journal was given to the children in order for them to write about the physical activities they performed during those days For the younger children, the parents helped fill out the journal Used to calculate the waking activity time Afterwards, each child was given an All About Me book with educational games and their individualized accelerometer data.

PAGE 25

Accelerometer : Results Light Moderate Vigorous

PAGE 26

Accelerometer : Results Example of one child s waking activity over 48 hours Awake time over 48 hours Levels of Activity

PAGE 27

Accelerometer : Results The children achieved the recommended amount of time of physical activity. 60 minutes per day Each child€s waking activity over 48 hours Percentage of waking activity over 48 hours

PAGE 28

Conclusion Children are aware of healthy and unhealthy foods, and seem to be better able to perceive what is unhealthy There seems to be an association between food diversity and nutritional knowledge Children perceive a distinct difference between physical activity, play, and exercise. Children are achieving the recommended amount of daily activity.

PAGE 29

Limitations Convenient Sample Size School was on vacation during our research period Accelerometers Limited numbers and time Direct observations Require more time, training, and expense, but provide more accurate data

PAGE 30

Recommendations : Research with children should take into account their cognitive level when developing methods ex. Interactive games Our community adviser, Kim, is a Child Life Specialist and provided many helpful suggestions for methods development It would be beneficial to keep the learning styles of each gender in mind while developing research tools and interventions. Play should be used in health promotion and disease prevention programs to promote physical activity.

PAGE 31

Community Suggestions Play should by not only as a research tool, but also as a teaching tool It can be used to educate about nutrition as well as physical activity Health promotion and prevention programs should educate the whole family about food nutritional value For example, the ongoing nutritional research project is planning on providing cooking classes to promote healthy nutrition to give back to the community

PAGE 32

David Himmelgreen, PhD. y Nancy Romero Daza, PhD. Heide Castaeda, PhD. Jenny Pea y Daniel Vargas Kimberly Acosta Cruz, M.S. Kate Brelsford, M.A. y Ernesto Ruiz, MPH Ashley Gallentine y Kerry Mclver, PhD. Gene Cowherd Especially the families and the children who participated in our research

PAGE 33

€Listen to what the children are telling us!


printinsert_linkshareget_appmore_horiz

Download Options

close
No images are available for this item.
Cite this item close

APA

Cras ut cursus ante, a fringilla nunc. Mauris lorem nunc, cursus sit amet enim ac, vehicula vestibulum mi. Mauris viverra nisl vel enim faucibus porta. Praesent sit amet ornare diam, non finibus nulla.

MLA

Cras efficitur magna et sapien varius, luctus ullamcorper dolor convallis. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Fusce sit amet justo ut erat laoreet congue sed a ante.

CHICAGO

Phasellus ornare in augue eu imperdiet. Donec malesuada sapien ante, at vehicula orci tempor molestie. Proin vitae urna elit. Pellentesque vitae nisi et diam euismod malesuada aliquet non erat.

WIKIPEDIA

Nunc fringilla dolor ut dictum placerat. Proin ac neque rutrum, consectetur ligula id, laoreet ligula. Nulla lorem massa, consectetur vitae consequat in, lobortis at dolor. Nunc sed leo odio.