Suniland


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Suniland

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Title:
Suniland
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A magazine of Florida
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Florida
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The Peninsular Publishing Company
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English
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3 v. ill.

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Periodicals -- Florida ( lcsh )
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University of South Florida
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University of South Florida
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The University of South Florida Libraries believes that the Item is in the Public Domain under the laws of the United States, but a determination was not made as to its copyright status under the copyright laws of other countries. The Item may not be in the Public Domain under the laws of other countries.
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020391587 ( ALEPH )
15210433 ( OCLC )
S49-00014 ( USFLDC DOI )
s49.14 ( USFLDC Handle )

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University of South Florida
Suniland [Magazine]

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[ -FO .00 AMA I WANT to find a man who can determine the relative value of two widely eparated pieces of property after having investigated only one of them, who can sit down here, read new paper isements, tell me what property is like t inspecting it ... Give it strategic location of surrounding country ... Visualize topography ... Its present growth and develop, ent ... Its future possibilities ... You say "Absurd!" ... Of course it's absurd ... such a man would not be a man at all ... He would be a miracle ... Such a man would be worth more than $1 ,000,000 a year to me ... And yet some people apparently are doing just this thing without getting paid for it. .. But I find that before I can intelligently decide upon a development investment I mnst spend hundreds of thou ands of dollars and week and months of time to arrive at a definite conclusion regarding its permanent possibilities ... Have you seen Haines City? ... Its surrounding country ... Its back country ... Beautiful home, sites ... High rolling hills and clear, sparkling, spring,fed lakes with white sand bottoms? ... Haines City is on the main line of the Atlantic Coast Line railroad ... Eighteen passenger trains daily ... Five main automobile highways pass through it ... Plenty of beautiful water,front lots .. 221 feet above sea level. .. That's 195 feet higher than New York City ... 152 feet higher than Boston ... 136 feet higher than San Fran, cisco ... And Haines City is in Florida ... Haines City is in Polk County ... The riche t county per capita in the entire United States ... Its 80,000 acres of citrus fruit trees annually bring its growers more than $10,000,000 ... The yearly revenue from its phosphate mines i $12,135,000 ... Its manufactured products are worth $10,000,000 a year ... That's what I call a good Back Country ... Did you know that? ... My development program to occupy five years9 totals $50,000,000 in and around Haines City .. I havt. invested already more than $450,000 in office buildings, transportation equipment, etc., as the nucleu of my sales and development machinery for this mammoth development ... This is the best assurance that I can give you of my confidence in Haines City and my belief in its future growth ... Haines City is ..1 young. growing community ... "Grow with a yo .. ng growing community" is good advice to any investor .. That's what I'm doing ... How do you know without seeing it that my velopments in and around Haines City do not offi r you a better opportunity for a home or an 7 mvestment .... Unless you are this million dollar man you ought to see Haines City ... If you are this man you do. not need to see .. But if you are not this man I will be glad to have you come to Haines City as my guest ... Call at my nearest office and make your re servation for the journey ... Maybe you would like to bring along a friend ... Tampa Terrace Hotel ISiq .. Tampoa. Fla.. tot Main Street, Daytona Beach. Fla. fl ranle Brqc5on Polly Prim Tea ltoom, Arcadia. Fla. Z07 Central Avenue, Sarasota, Fla. Princeu Martha Hotel. St. Ptenbura-, Fla. Thelma Hotel, 17 Pine St., t...kek.d, Fla. Orkndo. Fla. Realtor CaU Mr. I. M. Martin. El Verano Hotel, Palm Beach, Fla. lOS Bay Str.et. s-tis, Fla. HAINES Cl'i'Y, FLORIDA MS Clc>veland Annue, Oearwater, Fla. 33f F..-.,th Street, J..,._dle, Fla. I

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida I The Best Located Property in Florida! The remarkable location of Davis Islands in Tampa. and Davis Shores in St. Augustine, make these two projects outstanding in Florida today. Man-made Islands in the very center of two great cities. One facing the Gulf of Mexico in Tampa Bay and the other the broad Atlantic Ocean. The most fascinating real estate developments in America today! The South's Greatest Development! WHILE in Florida do not fail to see Davis Islands in Tampa and Davis Shores in St. Augustine, the two great Island developments of D. P. Davis, whose fame has spread all over the country. Every known record for sales, for development work and for gigantic achievement has been broken by these two Florida projects. Sales in little over twe1ve montns totcueo more tnan average of $1,000,000 a week continuously for more than a year! Building and development progress has been even more spectacular. And profits made and refused by lot owners have established new records for Florida real estate. See These Great Island Prrojects While in Florida! D. P. Davis Properties Tampa-8t. Augustine, Florida 1

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2 Sunil and: The Magazine of Florida The Dignity and Solidity of the GRECIAN PARTHENON AT the end of the Causeway residents and visitors to TAMPA BEACH will be welcomed by an ?.r chway of simplicity and dignified beauty, resembling and in fluenced by the architecture of old Athens and Rome This arch will be a fitting entry to th e finest development of the West Coast, whi ch, like the archway, does not depend on filigree or bizarre ornamentation to recommend it, presenting it self and i ts cla i ms in the terms of co n servative so lidity. THE arch, leading to the plaza o n TAMP A BEACH, is but one of the hundreds of structures which will be or already are being built a t the gateway t o Tampa. The Administration Buildin g i s nearing completion, the first unit of seven hundred homes has been started, the first study for plans of the TAMPA BEACH HOTEL are on the draughtsman' s tabl e, the temporary bridge on the Causeway is completed -and the official opening of t he Causeway took place February the tenth. All of which i s a momentous reaso n why you should in vest igat e and invest in TAMPA BEACH AT ONCK MAIN SALES OFFICE, TAMPA BEACH BUILDING Franklin and Lafayette Streets TAMPA, FLORIDA j. R CLARK, Preoident

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REG. U.S.PAT. Off /he MAGAZINEof F LORIDA V olume Ill Number VI Contents/or March 1 9 2 6 PAG E OYSTERS' THE INDUSTRY AT APALACHICOLA .... J>AGJ} DESIGN W A Gordon J M. Schlocnbach 48 FIRST ROTOGRAVURE SECTION lnftnltude. A Poem Ma : y Clifford Foster 25 with photographs. SEVEN BILLION DOLLARS WORTH OF FOOD Illustrated with photo decoration. More In Sunlland's $1,000.00 Camera Contest 26-29 Illustrated with photographs awarded by Sunlland's judg es Dr. W. Aughlnhaugh 50 Illustrated w\ t !l n. portrait of tho author. ARCHITECTUR""!. IN FLORIDA. The Quest of Mcdittrrancan Celebrities tn Sunlland 30 Illustrated wlth photographs of George Ad e John G o lden, Count Eltah Tolstol, Countess Mlllt ccnt R ogers Sa l m and Art in Architecture .......... Folger Johnson 51 Illustrated wlUl a drawing and plans. AdJ Gen J C lltrord R Foste r INTERIOR DECORATION. Failures and Achievements Mark Florida News and Views 31 Dlustrated with photograohs or automobiles on Ormond-Daytona Beach, radng at Miami Track, Captain Btlly the Renaissance Mode Georgiana Whitby 5t Illustrated wit h l>hotographs and bnthtng gtrls In hula-huln: skirts. John D. Rockefeller : 32 THE FLORIDA HOME ..... Conducted by Jane Way An exclusive photograph of the ri c h es t man In the world. THE STORY OF THE PHANTOM WOMAN. A Serial In Four EDITORIALS Bllt Times Ahead; Axe Florida Bonds Sound? Curative Parts.-Part II Maurice Coons 58 Florida 3! "FLORIDA HAS ADDED FIVE YEARS TO MY LIFE" ... Thomas A. Edison An Interview b y George Holland, Illustrated with a portrait of Mr. Edison. THE CONQUEST OF THE EVERGLADES ltoy H. F rlcken Illustrated wtth pho tQ'traph.s I .ET THERE BE LIGHT! Dr. Coleman Illustrated with photographs. A STATE-WIDE SURVEY OF FLORIDA CONDITIONS ... A symposium by J. M. Schloenbach. G. T. Altnew, Georlle Gallow. C C McKinney. Harold D. Hascall. C J. McGurty, N. K Concannun, } 'rank 0. Lander, Jr., and Richard J. Sloman. VENGEANCE. A Short Story Mary Roberts Rinehart Illustrated with drawings by Dudley G S umm e rs FLORIDA'S BIG BUSINESS PUNCH Jock Demosey Jllns t r n.t e d wtth exrluslvf' photogrn.pbs of the '\Vorld's H e n .vywc l ght PuqUJst Chamoton 35 36 42 '"' 47 Illustrated with drawings by George Olsen. ONE WOMAN'S FAITH IN FI.ORIDA Dudley Malcolm Illustrated with photographs THE "MYSTERY" BOAT THAT WON Harris Glenn Illustrated wltb photogrnt>hs. BAMBOO' THE GIANT GRASS WONDERFUL Dr. B. T. Galloway Illustrated with photographs. FLORIDA' S SEACOAST BEACONS Charles Adamo Illustrated with photographs. SECOND ROTOGRAVURE SECTION Tampa: Florida's All-the-Year-Round City Illustrated with pbotographs BAD BREAKS. A D epartment of Humor PIECES OF EIGHT. With the Florida Wits THE PUBLISHER'S PAGE Suniland's Executive Famtly Illustrated wtth 3. group photog-r a p'l. Cart Edward Perry 60 64 66 11 3 130 132 114. S UNILAND MA GAZINE i s fully protected by cop y right, and n o thing that appears in it may b e r eprinted eithe r wholly o r i n part w ithout permission f rom the pub1isher Published Monthly by the Peninsular Publishing Company Warner Building, Tampa, Florida B C. SKINNER Pres iden t and Treasur e r WALTER G. SPRINGER. Busin ess Manage r WrLL IAM KrowELL H UTSON, Producti o n Manage r Tl!os. W. HEWLETT Vice-Pr es ident and Mana g e r JoSEPH E. BROWNE, Advertising Manage r GEORGE B. GALLUP. F o reig n Ad verti Sing Manager P&RRITON MAXWELL, Editor M. J. DOWLING Direc t o r of Sales W K H. SHAFTO, Circul a tion Manage r N e w Y ork Offi ce. 5 2 V ande r b i l t A venue jacksonville Offi ce, 22 Laura Stree t Miami Offi ce, 2 15 Hahn BUildm g Philadelph i a R epresenta t i ve, j Frank C o le, 27 N orth 36th Stree t Atlanta R epresentative, George M. Kohn, I nc., 704 Walton B u ildin g C hi cago Representative, F E. M. Cole Inc., 122 S. Michigan Boulevard ADVERTISING RATES ON APPLICATION Fifteen cents per copy. Subscription rates In U. S. and Possessions, $1.50 perlear; Canada. $1.50; F oreign. $2.50. Chanl!.e of address, corrections or additions to address on wrapper or failure to ecelve Sunllan should be reporte d to the Circulation Department. In sendl.nt!. chanl!.e of address, l!.ive both new and old address. Copyril!.ht 1926 Peninsular Publlshinl!. Company (Inc. ) All rights reserved. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at TRmpa, Florida, and additional entry at the Post Office at New York. N. Y.

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4 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida SAN JOSE The Greatest Investment in Florida Today !-LOCATION-San Jose is located on the Dixie Highway, fifteen minutes' drive from Jacksonville and fifteen miles from the world famed Jacksonville-Atlantic beaches. 2-AREA-One thousand acres of heavily wooded land, with a frontage on the beautiful St. Johns River of over one and one-half miles, were selected and carefully laid out by one of the foremost city planners in the United States. 3-DEVELOPMENT-The magnificent San Jose Hotel, situated on twenty-foot Muff overlooking the beautiful St. Johns River opened January, 1926. The Country Club, withits 18-hole golf course designed by Donald Ross, is now ava!lable to guests at the San Jose Hotel. 4-COMMUNITY UTILITIEs-San Jose has a high pressure water system, up-to-date telephone service and a most modern system of sewerage. E1ectricity has been extended to San Jose and sites for schools, churches, play grounds and parks have been set aside. A rapid transit Pullman Bus system is in operation. 5-RECREATION-The eighteen-hole golf course covers one hundred and twenty-five acres, natura! and artificial hazards making it exceedingly interesting and sporty. For those who love sailing, the Yacht Club will offer every facility when completed. 6-SIZES OF LOT&-The average lot in San Jose is 15 x 150 or over twice the area of a standard s1ze Jot. This .lends itself very well to any desired effects in house planrung. Write for interesting litttrature relating to accommodations at the San Jose Hotel, or the San Jose develop ment as a whole for homesite or investment. Deve lop ed by SAN JOSE. ESTATES 220222 West Forsyth Street Jacksonville, Florida

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida ords that mean Profits and Permanence _) -on Sarasota Bay and the Tamiami Trail HIGH type water front property is rapidly being bought off the market throughout all of Florida. Frontage on Sarasota Bay is particularly desirable, and will always be. Property bounded by, or even near the Tamiami Trail is ranked high in the estimation of all wise investors-who foresee the importance of this highway that links the west coast with the east. Here Are Both! In all of Florida, no two more alluring factors can be found than gorgeous Sarasota Bay and the Tamiami Trail. ; Yet, at Whitfield Estates, the fortunate investor finds both-a per-fect union, for profit and for glorious life. These are but two of the m"!.nifold reasons why the future of Whitfield Estates is positively assured; why bankers praise it as the best buy on Florida's western coast; why so many have already reaped vast profits from their the stupendous (abso-investment-why it of-lutely assured) program opportu-of improvements which mty to you. d.l h Investigate it fully toIS so spee 1 Y en ancmg day; learn of the revalues. markably low prices and Act now! WHITFIELD 6,......... On 13ay Adair Realty & Trust Company Atlanta Bradenton Selling Agents Sarasota Miami St. Petersburg Tampa Jacksonville 1 ( 5

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6 Suniland: The Mag_azine of Florida A Distinctive Property In Belleair Estates Improvements Among the many improve ments which are now being in stalled-in fact, nearing com pletion, are Gas, Water and Electricity; 15 Miles of Per fectly Paved Streets, traversing the entire property; 30 Miles of Curb, Gutter and Sidewalks; a White Way Lighting System, Beautifully Landscaped Parks and Plazas, a Magnificent Pom peian Pool and Casino which will offer extremely colorful functions, a Palatial Golf and Country Club, and a host of other attributes, all added to one of the most beautiful areas in Florida, on a bluff overlook ing the bay 40 feet below. BELLEAIR Greater Clearwaters ''Next Door'' to Exclusive When you seek a site for your home, the paramount ques tions are location and desirability-particularly as to the desirability of the neighborhood-and what kind of neighbors you will have. This moot question is happily answered at BELLEAIR ESTATES. Your big neighbor will be the Belleview-Biltmore Hotel, one of the fashionable Bowman Biltmore units, with its fastidious clientele, famous for a quarter of a century as a tourist mecca. Surrounding this famous resort are many large and beautiful estates owned by people of wealth and culture. "Buy Today, With the Vision of BELLEAIR 0. Sam Cummings, Administration Offices Branch Offices: New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Miami, Palm Beach, Lake Worth, Fort Lauderdale, Lakeland,

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida An Exclusive Neighborhood E8TATE8 Master Developmenl Belleview .. Biltmore Hotel Your neighbors at BELLEAIR ESTATES will also be people of good taste and refinement-those who seek to avoid the rigors of Northern winters and who want the uttermost in life and find it on the 40 foot bluff overlooking Clearwater Bay and the Gulf beyond Most of those who have bought estates here intend to build, in fact, many are now building attractive homes. More than $1,500,000 is being expended for quality improvements, including all modern comforts 72 acres of Parks and Plazas, a palatial Golf and Country Club, and a magnificent Pompeian Pool and Casino are among the refinements. Tomorrow, on the History -of Yesterday" ESTATES, INC. Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. Clearwater, Florida Sarasota, Bradenton, Tarpon Springs, New Port Richey, Tampa and St. Petersburg, Fla. The Pelican Golf & Country Club The Pelican Country Club Mail This Coupon Today now forming will no doubt be one of the finest in the South, not alone from the angle of I club appurtenances, clu.b house 1 and golf green, but also from the standpoint of a distinI guished roster. Among the I Board of Governors are James I Studebaker, Jr., John McE. I Bowman, Rex Beach, Ring I Lardner, Geo. K. Morrow, and 1 Belleair a number of others equally Estates, prominent in the world of literature, science and art. I Be. ach, the famous 11 Gmtlemm: wnter, IS the President. .Please s e 11 d me The 18-hole Sporty Golf I without anv obliaaCourse is now being 1 tion or cost built by Donald Ross, trated literature of your America's foremost I develoPmmt. Golf Architect. / I Name ............... Address ...................... I City and State .................... 7 ;'

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I I Suniland: 'l'he Magazine of Florida NASSAU LAKES BAHAMAS Restricted and improved sites for winter homes apartments shops casinos hotels clubs ocean front bay front lake front hill-top hill-side LOTS $800 to $150,000 One-fourth down and balance semi-annually at six per cent. All W. E. Brown Developments Illustrated folder upon request ROBERT STEELE ORGANIZATION Executive Office: 200 N. E. 2nd AVENUE, MIAMI New York, 565 Fifth Avenue. Nassau, 282 Bay Street Atlantic City, 811 Boardwalk West Palm Beach, Datura and Narcissus Sts. Miami Bea('h, 215 Fifth Street NO LAND TAXES NO PROHIBITION

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Suni/and: The Magaz in e of Florida a wonderful present a brilliant future the beautiful Clty of Sarasota Scene at Whitfield Estates Country Club The finns listed below are all members of the Sarasota Realty Board and bound by a code of ethics go.verntng their business. Anyone wishing information regarding Sarasota may ask for it with the utmost confidence that they will recetve honest advice. P. H. ENNISS Pre s i d e nt Sarasota R e alty Board A city of substantial growth Located on picturesque Sarasota Bay; with one of the most fertile back in Florida, and beaches that are second to. none in all America :Sarasota'samazing growth during the past few years is easily accounted for. As the city's alluring qualities attraCted the thousands who have already settled there, it now offers larger possibilities for those who are yet to come. Here will be found inestimable inducements to the capitalist, the business man, the pleasure seeker-the man of modest means. Opportunity. presents itself in Sarasota. The established firms listed below will be glad to supply you with information concerning your particular, requisites in the city. Write or wire any one of them TODAY! Kagay Realty Co., Inc. 212 Main Street Enniss & White First Bank & Trust Company Gallup Realty Company 213 Main Street Bacon & Tomlin Palm Avenue Henry Langsner 118 Pineapple Avenue Martin and Clifford Roehr Watrous Hotel Building -------. 1 9

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10 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA To those who seek a North Florida home, 36 hours by rail out of New York and Chicago-in Jacksonville's last close-in suburb built throughout on a high standard of Quality Construction---on Jacksonville's most highly restricted aristocratic St. Johns River front--with a deep water Yacht Basin, a half mile long and five hundred feet wide---with an exclusive Yacht Club, as pictured above-VENETIA OFFERS MANY CHARMS Write for Illustrated Literat11re. CONSOLIDATED DEVELOPMENT & ENGINEERING CORPORATION, INC. Jacksonville, Florida

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida The Soundest Investment Opportunity in the New Empire I I I F SUPPLY and demand is the basis of profitable boulevard beautiful Civic Center business, Brentwood Park is the soundest invest$250,000 Mediterranean Chimes Tower ment opportunity in theN ew Empire of West Florida. $350,000 Rosalyn Apart m en t $100,000 The facts are simply told: Country Club $50,000 Roman Swimming Pensacola, tpe Metropolis of the l ew Empire, is Pool oversize 9 hole golf course Florida's third largest port, tennis courts aero-Florida's third industrial plane landing field city, Florida's center of even FACTS ABOUT THE NEW EMPIRE sound building restrictions. climate and one of Florida's The New Empire consists in Florrda's f a s t e s t growinecttles. nine northwest counties. Climate is even the year 'round. Land is recognized as Pensacola people are busy the most fertile in the state. Agricultural and prosperous and because possibilities are unlimited. Power re-o their very activity are be-sources are numerous and well developed. ing forced out of their old Industry occupies third position in the state. Commerce, shipping and trans-homes. They require and portation are growing rapidly. Population must have larger, m o r e has doubled in the last few years and is modern and more beautiful doubling again. home accommodations. In other words the New Empire possesses every element required for steady, healthy, Brentwood Park supplies economic development-a formula which this ever increa ing vital de-guarantees fortune to the investor with mand. This Masterpiece vision. Home Center now being de-\Ne maintain the largest equiprpent and veloped comprises 1100 lots sales organization and are the largest owners and listers of property in West 10 minutes from Florida. We will be glad to send you Pensacola's City Hall information on any phase of V/est Florida every lot faces a park or i n which y ou may be interested. Pensacola people are investing in Brentwood Park because it supplies everything they require. "Outsiders" are taking advantage of p r e s e n t pre-development prices and are holding their lots for profitable resale to those Pensacolans who are waiting but must buy later. Write today for descriptive literature. A study of the facts will show you that Brentwood Park is one of the soundest investment opportunities in the New Empire. WEST LORIDA DEVELOPMEN PETER L ROSASCO, PRES. JAS.H.SWEARINGEN, V P & GEN. MGR. A.Y. AYDELOTT, SALES MGR. VE;STMENT co. 20 SOUTH PALAFOX ST PENSACOLA FLORI OA Inc.

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12 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Come now to I' {"'' ; I I I I WITHOUT the usual bla!l"e of advance pub licity, Homosassa, the mystery city of the W E!st Coast has been quietly building for months, on a tremendous scale. Favored by the new transportation plans, by the great natural beauty of its rivers and forests, by vast agricultural and horticultural productivity-no wonder Homosassa attracted the millions of dollars that are now being spent building this scientifically planned modern metropolis. The beautiful, new Hotel Homosassa is in operation. It invites you. The Arcade, the bank, office buildings, stores and many fine residences are finished or under construction. Wide boulevards and 100 miles of streets, water-mains, sewers and all city improvements are rapidly progressing. Entire trainloads of visitors from Miami, Jacksonville, Tampa and other Florida cities, and the North, are arriving at Homosassa Business and residential property is available at prices that are sur prisingly reasonable. Now is the time to invest to make big at Homosassa GOLF I One of Flor ida's finest 18-hole medal play counes i.s now being corutructed on the picrwresque, rolling country at Homosassa. Florida W Coast Development Company (Known as the Hoover Interests) HOMOSASSA, FLORIDA .. ... Suite 101, T ampa Bay Hotel Tampa, F lorida Telephone 81850 Mackintosh & Dawe Talla hassee, Florida 811 Dime Bank Bldg. Detroit, Mich. 462 First Avenu e, N orth St. P etersburg, Florida Ground Floor. Mason Hotel Jacksonville, Florida Telephone 56166 332 South Michigan Avenue Chicago, Illinois Ad. ChKago

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Suniland: The Magaz ine of Florida REAL ESTATE INSURANCE "This Policy protects our Investment until I am well again!,. A powerful factor in increasing sales A safeguard to the investor A protection to the seller T HE United American Life Insurance Co., after many months of study, offers a totally new type of blanket insurance on real estate development projects. It is now in force with three leading realty companies and will shortly be employed by six more. This new insurance idea protects individual investors in case of death, disability thru sick ness, or accident.. In case of death this com pany assumes the entire obligation of the policyholder-jnvestor. Should diSablement take place this company shoulders the finan cial obligation under the policy until the in vestor is physically able to carry out his contract. This new policy presents important sales argument of great assistance to the sales force. It protects the development company against e}\tangl in g compcations. It safeguards the investor and his heirs against loss in carrying out his contract. The premium upon the new policy is so low that aggressive organizations are incorporating it into their :programs. It will shortly be adver tised as a v1tal sales feature by a number of Florida realty companies, and it is obvious that the first so to employ it will reap the largest sales rewards. For full particulars, use the convenient coupon below. The UNITED AMERICAN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Consolidated Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla. 13 TEAR 0!"!" THIS COUPON AND MAIL TODAY --------------------------------United American Life Insurance Co ., Consolidated Buil ding, JacksonYille, Florida. Please send full information regarding your new i nsurance policy for real e1tate development. NAME ....... oooooooo o ooooooooo o oo o 0 0 00 ooo.o o o o ADDRESS .... o o o o. o o o o. o. o o o 0 o 0 o o o CITY oooooo : .o oo oo-oo

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14 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida WHERE LOCATION ASSURES PROFIT! It is likened to Miami Beach before the Causeway opened. A splendid beach, an hour's drive from Tampa, largest city in Florida;a few minutes from St. Petersburg, the "Sunshine City." NOW COMES THE CAUSEWAY TO MADEIRA, TO OPEN WITHIN THIRTY DAYS There are sixteen miles of Gulf Beaches in the Tampa-St. Petersburg Area. None except Madeira will be accessible by a Free Causeway this season. Madeira i s experiencing a stounding popularity. When the Causeway opens the demand for Madeira property will greatly exceed the supply. THAT IS WHY, IN ADDITION TO BEING AN IDEAL BEACH, -MADEIRA IS A PREFERRED PROFIT INVESTMENT

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Suniland: The Ma. gazine of Florida LIVING BECOMES A JOY Building a Mediterranean recreational community is an inspiration to the builders, and a joy to those who wilt banish the cares of life in a healthful existence amid charming surroundings. The clear, fresh air of the Gulf of whose azure waters break softly on a broad white beach: A community whose architect has ,"' caught the Charm of the Riviera at its best, and set it ,,"' here, by the Turquoise Sea. .. "' ..... La Casa Madeira is where you will dance, dine, bathe or enjoy a quiet hour. This, the most uniquely ar tistic Casino, WILL BE OPEN THIS SEASON. It Is the first of a series of Mediterranean structures planned to include the Villa Mar Del Oro, de luxe hotel, and a Yacht Club Fisher Village that lures the nimrod. AI ready a fascinating fleet of Mediter ranean-type boats cruise Madeira's waters. Ott ,,,"':.,.,t'!,t .. -' ,,' p \<'0 Go .. !>' '*""'"' -"'* 11 a'". ,/ t.tt"t ot ''' ., .. "'-(' "'tt" J"'*'t..,. oil-'* "'o\J \ ,..t ._., C' 1 \ tJO" .. """ 'o""' \ O" '"' \ (\6 <" \ ". \ ,. ._,o" \ ---'\ ,, \ r:,"'"""' ,,,'' '\ &-,t.o ,,'' \ .s" ,,'' \\ .. \ G\'Cf ,,, adeilto GULF AND Robert E. Lent, President 649 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida

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16 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Fine Fast Daily Service via Direct Routes The On Time Record oftheOrangeBlossom Special and the Sea board Florida Limi teds between Florida and eastern cities has neYer before been equaled. O nly R oute (Jia Camden. Sou.cher n Pines, and Pine hurst Fine hotel s gol f and outdo o r in t he hi g h anddry air of the Carol ina P i nes. Stopovers on one way and reduced Tate r ound trip t ickecs. All that is best in modem travel-WITH NO EXTRA FARE and with Seaboard perfect dining car service. Daily from Florida's East and West Coasts and from Central Florida via famous trains that have enviable records. ORANGE BLOSSOM SPECIAL SEABOARD FLORIDA LIMITED (East Coast) SEABOARD FLORIDA LIMITED (West Coast) These three trains are the finest from Florida, carrying the very latest type of railway equipment-club cars, observation cars, and maid for the ladies. FIVE ADDITIONAL FAST DAILY TRAINS All Florida Special Suwanee River Special Special New Orleans-Florida Limited Seaboard Fast Mail Eve ry Seaboard Air Line ticket office is an Travel Bureau where all information is courteously and quickly given. G. Z. PHILLIPS Assistant Passenger Traffic Manager, Seaboard Air Line Railway Jacksonville, Florida eaboard, Air Line Railway FLORIDA ROUTE"

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.A 'Per$pertwe blrd:t-e)<' Yiew of CITRA HlOH DS Jhowin.g f/j proxim;ty lo tbc .Air RtZilroad & TampaJac&onvi/Ja Hiway ... "'-v-/()rTRA HIGHLANDS is daily attuning the at l./tention of the threwde.t lnvetton and the mott discernjng home-buUdera in the state. Louted at Citra I n Marion County; on the Jacksonville-Tampa Dixie Hiahway, (noted u one of the best paved highway in the tate); In the center of Flortda' finett cl trua and farming section; with churches, sc:hool.s, and theanes readily acceulble;Citta Highlands o!'era an opportunity unmatched anywhere for investment in a County bu=ing with Evtty Inch of Citra lands high and dry. Citra Highlands Iota are clcand and Ka.ked, tbe treett graded and paved. We o!'er In the First Plot, SO loot lots a t $12S.OO t o $200 .00 on terms c11h, balance monthly. McGRIFF-LASETER, Inc. Selling Agents 316 Datura St. P. 0. Box 3417 WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA An illustrtUtd &ook.ltt wiU SDII t
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FLORIDA'S most unique ,__..____selling plan is in Cl...OERE' where e\cry lot huyer parc..11, h ipates in one-third of the profit cpmpany in all of its projects. Profit begin immediately and ar added to the already ta h hco value of t he lot you have purchased You .har< in the profi of ever;-sale and not o ly do our roftt accumulate through sale, hut value of our lot hoi ings incr ase correspo dingly. And when \'OU can ee and know the beaut ies of our property holding, h full meaning of thi opportunity \\'ill he plain to you. This i without qu.\ t ion th fairest and square t and t in uroo profit-makmg 581 plan in u l l Florida At all times you are the O\\'ner of the > t of realty values. and to thl is heing a ldoo the profi t a cruing from the sale ma e an l from nsmg -alue Th1s 1. better than a yndicatc because you Jo not depend on profit alone you a I rcadv nave your money' \\Orth and \\ i) get more 60% in twelve months \\' i{hm the pa t twelve months two thirty per ccm dividends have been deTHE CALHOU ctared. Our c(lrl\ ixlvc have sur h ga1ncd thfOtJ.t!h th. ir purchase You in\'ltcc to pa 1 11 ne in l ike futurt' J roltt thi company may have. 0\lr two great ubJi\'i ion.-i\1aPar!and Park and Lake ide I !eight are the present builder of dh id nds J hese propert1c ar' a of the hills and lakes of thr Columhw C.-c>l.mty real to hustl ing 1--u Lake City \\" c want to tell you ahout thi cit\ and countv. and o( course \VC \ ant vou to know th<: e ccial feature of :'\.be. Farlond Par k am.l L ake ide I tcights nd 00\\ ea it i to purch S(' on of the"<: lot and he a f oftt hurer in thi com par y \\'hen we tell you tha tock to the amour t of one-third o( the purcha. price of the lot is i ueJ 1 denomtnations of (tft, lotla each. and that thi toe'-. i ssa Jc, and hat thi s tack i -a gift tO you as a purchaser you can ea il flgurc we are justified tn ying '' e ha, c the mo t inwrei profit plan i 1 all Flor ida. l\ k u to tell you more EVELOPMENT CO. E. C. CALHOU ale Manager Developers of Lake City, Florida MACFARLA 0 PARK 216 N. Marion St. LAKE SID HEIGHTS Phone 42

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Beautiful KEY LARQO FOR you there is a home in the tropics-land o f romantic sunsets-luxuriant t'l"opical vegeta tion-a Florida sea-i land home with gentle zephyrs w h ispering a mon_g the palms and the gentle roar of the surf on cry tal white and in the di -tance. Here springtime i eternal. Beautiful Key Largo, just off the Florida coast, south of Miami, offers you Missouri Subdivision. Here you will find the full realization of your dreams plus the thrill of profitable owners hip, with the adde d attr ac tion of modern conveniences and railway service. For Key Larg o is located on t h e famed Key West Extension of the Florida East Coast Railway. And Missouri Subdivi ion, one-half mile from the Key Largo S t ation, is the beauty spot of Key Largo. Every lot has tropical hardwood trees. R esidences only permitted. Bui lding restricted to residences of attractive design in the Spanish o r similar style of FREE FISHING LODGES With First Ten Lots Sold T o e ncourage actual settler the developer will it'l clude at no charge, with each of t h e first ten l o t s old an attractive fishing lodge. T hese lodges are sixteen by twenty feet in size and consist o f one living room and parking shelter for one car. These lodges may be used as a base for a season's fi hing o r outing, rented to others for the same pur po s e, or as a temporary residence while the real home is being b u ilt. P r ices are $3,400 and up for inside lots on W e s t Dixie Boulevard. Canal front and lots with riparian easement s are slightly higher. Terms: One-third ca h and balance in emiannual pay ment$. arc hi t ectu r e. Construction of hot els, a partments and stor es will n o t be permitted in this exc usive residential park. MISSOURI SUBDIVISION T itle insured : W e s t Dixi e Boulevard and 80f oo t canal guaranteed by dev e lo per. Subdivision of original l o t into smaller units is pro hibited. T hese will be s o ld quick. Clip and m a il the co).lpo n N O W for reservation. F l oating dredge i s now w orking on the canals. C. E. SEXTON OWNER-DEVELOPER OP THE PLAZA AT KEY LARGO ___________ ,_ ______ C. E. EXTO!\ Key I .argo, Florida. 0 Resen e fo r me ........ l o t s in M iss0uri Snbdi t io n of Key Largo, a p e r your 5;pecial offer t o fir t ten purchasers 0 Plea e end me at once full infom1ation about Key L argo and Mi ssonri Subdivision. X a n t e ......................................... 1\ddres .......... ..... ........ .... .... ....... City ..................... State 19

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''IN THE 20 LAND OF THE Heres Where Vision HERE, in the realm of the world greate t ong-(Way own. pon the Suwanne River"is the opportunity to realize your life'. dream-whether it be of financial ucce or of a cozy home in the great outhland's mo t romantic pot. Here' where looking ahead-eeing thing -and noting ectional trends and de elopment will make money for you, for] u t a ure a the uwannee River flow there will flow a tream of profit-making. One purcha e and you are a part of it.

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SONG--SUNG SUWANNEE'' Will Make Millions Predevelopment Prices $60 Per Lot and Up No Lot Smaller Than 50 Feet by 130 Feet For the homeseeker here i a setting beyond compare--that rare t of combi'nations-a pro perou and productive community and country et forever p rvaded by an atmo phere of hi toric and romantic legend. 'l hi will be one of the opportunities where a f w dollar can be put to ork and made to produce a. prolifically a doe the ground in thi section-and it a big producing country. Clo e to Branford is uwannee Ri er "hores property, ju tone and a quarter miles. Bran ford will grow through the influ nee of thi property and of cour e Branford now make thi: property valuable. Branford i a real town. one of great promise-one soon to g1vc big reward to the pioneer in nearby t rritory. Thi. i the head of U\i annee River na igation. Big boats ply the trcam. Her e are good treet. ice plant, chools, churche Atlantic Co a t Line Railroad and other facilitic Her i the hipping point of a great agricultural community. Our farm. r id ntial ection and bu ines property will feel the well of Branford's progres Other developers are buying from us. We have the property-we have the location we have the oil-all ufficicnt to attract buyer of con equence, but it is not our plan to 11 big blocks, we ant to sell the in. dividuals who want one lot or a few lot a n d tho e seriou ly intere ted in profit -making from a mall inve tment. For cveral month we have been taking r s nation now we are ready to deliver a limited number of l ots, nearly all at the original prede elopment price. Some lot s alr e ady advanced Means othe r advanc es will come. Today i the day. Thi section commands rapid enhancement of value to keep pace with as ured development. Profits arc mad. by acti n in getting closer to Florida il. You can do thi by sending the coupo n. Thi will give you lots at today's prices providing you u the coupon p romptly. There' a profit for you at uwannee Ri er hore Opening up of this most lamed section ha. but just begun. The early buyer reaps the largest profit. First applications assure first opportunity. Mail the coupon today. Suwannee River Shores 415 F lorida Avenue TAMP A L ORI A .------------------------------------: Suw nnee River hore : 415 Florida venue, 4ran\pa, Florida. G entlemen: PI a e f o r me w ithout obligation to huy. ............ at each .............. Lots at 100 each 1i'lme .................. ... .......... ddress ..... ........... ... .... ... City ... State .. : 2 1

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22 IF your goal is profits, here i the a sured pot. If your goal i to be near thnv i n g citie here you will find the pro perous and beautiful. If your goal i to be surrounded by Florida' most productive s oi l here you will find Dixie Estates in the mid t of it. Whatever your goal as to F lor id a, D i xie Estates will satisfy you. One thing is sure-you want to buy where there is a po sibility of profit. Here you find i t-everything that adds quick profits to property is in or near to Dixie Estates. Thes home spots are feeling the swelling influences of Plant City's rapid rise to municipal greatness. F L Oreanization 1314 FBnklln StrHt T ampe, Florld6 end m e without co t or obl i g 1io n f u I I p artic ular al>o u D ix ie E sta t e li' i DIXIE ESTATES on '"'" Di _, M$/t,.,., The Goal of Your Heart's Desire in Sunny Florida Right on the Dixie Highway. one and onehalf mile from the city limit of Plant City .. Only a few miles to the splendid city of Lakeland. P lant City i the winter straw berry capit al of the world. It i s a great center of agricul tural and commercial activity. The immediate future in numerable opportunities for success. As a merchant, pro fe ional man. artisan, or in ve tor. you are wanted in this Plant C ity ection and here you w ill find the goal i n dollars and the atisfaction of liv ing Florida' most desirabl location. Right now price and terms are right. L i ke all high-clas develop m nt the initial and introduc tory prices now existing in Dixie Estates are con iderabl y lower than the invariable pdce of the future. The surround ing wealth in farm land and developments, means t h a t values will rise in proportion until they reach the minimum stage of their actual value. Come to Plant City and s ee these values, or write and per mit u to send de criptive liter ature. F. L. Greenfield Organization REALTORS 1314 Franklin treet Tampa, Fla.

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ST HILLS K E L A N D F L 0 last V>. here ts answer Our booklet tells you what you wish to know about Florida and the Home of Your Dreams. It picture& things as they really exist-both with actual photographs taken on the spot, and with text matter that deals with the subject fully and frankly. FOREST HILLS is in the Lakeland Highlands, in the ridge section of Polk County, the very heart of the citrus belt and a region rich in agricultural reources. FOREST HILLS estates are wide and deep, grouped on wooded slopes and in shady glens, with vistas of hills and lakes such as seem im possible to the Northerner who doesn't know Florida. Development work has only just begun, but thousands will be spent in carrying out the landscaping already suggested by Nature's handi work. SALES AGENTS ]. J. GILLIAM W. V. HALLAM We want you to know all about these plendid estates in FOREST HILLS. That is why we have prepared this booklet, which is yours for the asking. It will answer your every question. You can reserve your FOREST HILLS estate without even coming to Florida. We urge you to supplement what we tell you in this FOREST HILLS book let by correspondence with the State Bank of Lakeland, the First National Bank of Lakeland, or the Central Bank & Trust Company, also of Lakeland, as to our financial responsibility and re liability. Could anything be more fair? I D A 'JhePeak of the 7amous Ridge Section

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24 The warm waters of the Magic Gulf Stream wash the shores at the en .. trance to Del.Raton Park Delray The master subdivision on the gold coast of Florida. The vision of W. G. Mathes, a great financier ,and the genius of Henry Lage, a noted development engineer, are making of Del-Raton Park A veritable Garden of Eden It is a W. G. MATHES PROJECT WEST PALM BEACH Clematis at Olive

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INFINITUDE By MARY CLIFFORD FOSTER T HE cobalt dome-tlze height of it, The vast expame, far-reaching, wide! 0, how can man at siglzt of it But kneel and pray, in awe and pride! Tile boundless sea-the migllf of it, The trackless waste, the restless tide, 0, how can man, at light of it, But kneel and pray, in and prde! Tlu vast Beyond-the thought of it, infinitude, tlu Great Divide. 0, how can man, when taught of it, But kneel and pray, in and pride! The Jou/ of man, the worth of it, Surpassing ali thingr else beside. 0, how can man, at birth of it, But kneel and pray, in aue and pride! 25

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MORE PRIZE, WIN ERS $1,000.00 CAMERA 26 IN SUNILA CONTEST D'S ''LOW TTDF: DAYTON ,. lly R. H. Lc Sene Daytona. Fla I $25 f'ri.=r-Wimru i11 thr l'ro{I' Ssior:ol Closs. ''THE TA.\1E BL 'EJA \"' By Frank C. Shay Miami, Fla. 1 l $25 l'rr=r -U imrtr in tlu: l'rc>fc ssim1<1f Clas.

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"OX I. KE DORA, LAKE COt;.rTY." By .J. R. Clark, Orlando, Fla. A ,25 ?riu-Wim1cr iu the Professional Class. Ry D. \'an De\' enter. Tampa, Fla. A Prir-1-f'imtrr itt tlu Professio1111J "THE DOOR GRILl.; FLORIDA HO. IE." Hy Edward Frede ric Fo l ey, New York City. J $2" Prize-Winner in the Professional Class. PIRIT OF THE E "(LO. OLAS BEt\ 'H) By Eugene Kelcy. Fort Lauderdale. Fla. zs f'nu-U urnu iu tltr CluM. 27

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AMATEUR CAMERA ARTISTS WHO 28 "0 THE HILLSBORO RIVER, NEAR TAMPA.'' By Mrs. H. Fairclough-A $5 Priee-Winncr. ''GRASSHOPPER," BY H. H. ScHRODER. A $10 Pri.::e-WiNtrtr "MYSELF." BY J. A. MATHERS A $3 Pri.::e-Wi1111cr. "SoME SniPS oF THE SPONGE FLEET." By G. J. $5 Pri.ct-WinNer. "lJNDER THE SuRF.\CE .\T SILVER SPRJ Gs. FL .\.'' Hy l>1n Smith. I $5 Priu-Winna. This uas pltotographi!d wtdcr wa t e r at a depth of 17.-o a11d o1u-holf fut. "fLORIDA LAND CRAB." nv H. H ScHRODER. .4 $5 Pri.sr-11 'i11nrr by the ma11 who wo11 Fourth (Amalrttr ) l'r1zc and two othe rs in the Camera Co11test.

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WON IN SUNILAN D'S CONTEST "LIVE 0Al
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CELEB RITES George Ade, (left) famous American humor ist-philosopher, and John Golden, well-known play producer, snapped at St. Augustine, Fla. Couht Eliah Tolstoi, son of the great Russian novelist Leo Tolstoi, who is living at Ormond, Fla. Count Tolstoi has come to Florida to finish A History of the Russian Peopl e IN SUNILAND Countess Mary Millicent Rogers Salm, who is spending the at her cottage "Wawaka" at Palm Beach. Fla. ]. Clifford R. Foster, Adjutant-General of the Florida Na t ional Guard, who was recently elected President of the National Guard Association of the United States. Gen Foster lives at St. Augustine, Fla. (All plwtvs tilis page
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FLORIDA NEWS lnttrnotioual A few of the thousands o f automobiles from all states in the Union as they appear on the Ormond-Daytona Beach 1 Hlt'nrotioHol AND VIEWS "Nor'west er, with Jockey W all a ce up, w i nning the si xth race o n the second d a y's r acing a t t h e p opular Miami Track Captain Billy Mickler, one hundred and one years old, standing in front of his home in St. Augustine, the oldest Miami modesty now dictates that bathing suits should not be worn away from the beach except house in Am e rica when concealed by hula-hula skirts 31

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32 Exclusive c o pyr i ght pho t o made l>y Fotograms for S1milalld JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER, RICHEST 1\IAN L THE WORLD, NEARING EIGHTY-SEVEN, IS GOLF CHAMPION OF HIS AGE AND A FLORIDA ENTHUSIAST AND INVESTOR

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%e Ma9azine oj'Jlorida PERRITON MAxwELL. Editor Cditorials GOOD TlMES AHEAD! In the early days of not. We believe in the common-sense of the American last summer when the conventional vacation seapeople, in their ability to read between the lines of son had set in and millions of Americans were obvious printed lies and siJly stories detrimental to this supposedly planning to go to far northern resorts state To the alert American mind "every knock is a :to escape the so-called "heated term," Floridians preboost." When a great traffic : system like the Illinois pared for a long, dull period, believing that but few tourCentral Railroad has contracted to extend a new line into ists would be courageous enough to brave a trip to this Florida at a cost of $7,500,000; when hundreds of sky tropical peninsula. Every native of Florida knows that scrapers, representing an outlay of millions of: few places on the map are so favored in summer as is are being erected in Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa and this state; that the cooling breezes of the Atlantic on one other Florida citieS; when men side and the fresh zephyrs on the Gulf side create one like Barron Collier Cornelius Vanderbilt,' Jr.,. lleiiry of the most equable climatic conditions in the world Ford, John Ringling, the DuPonts; .the : Hoovers',. But for so long a period had Florida been exploited as a Rockefellers ar.e investing vast fortunes tn Florida place of torridity and discomfort during the summer, ground and pfnning their faith .ori ils 'future; how .. can that one expected in 1925 the usual hiatus of visitors anyone doubt.the hutp-,of Flor:ida' s phet>menal when vacation-time arrived. and .: ; : .: .. J And what happened? 'Fhe totally unexpected, the To enumerate the mtllions legally recorded fbr the -surprising influx of more than a million tourists during upbuilding of the new Southern empire on this peninJune, July and August. They came by automobile, by sula would fill the present issue of this magazine. No :train, by boat-some even on bicycles and afoot; men, need to use superlatives, no need to bally boo Flor.ida 's women and children of every social strata and from present substantial status, .future growth and assured -every corner of these United States. Some foolish ones prosperity. When anyone talks loosely of "the Florida came with less money in their purses than would be reboom," ''the bursting bubble" and similar nonsense, ask -quired to provide for their needs on a picnic within thl! the speaker for details; insist that the knocker quote :borders of their own home county. In the main, howchapter and verse; pin him down to facts and watch him ever, Florida-bound tourists were able to pay their way eat his words. to any part of the state and with enough left over to Summer is coming and with it a bigger influx of visi invest in cheice land Many came here with the avowed tors than ever before Florida is the new vacation land intention of turning a quick profit in real estate deals; the ideal objective for everyone who wants a thrill, a : and many accomplished that purpose. Some have since new perspective on life, a chance to make money or returned home with snug fortunes; others have stayed merely some "different" place to go to. Floridians m ust : here permanently, completely "sold" on the actualities be prepared for the big exodus southward. The Ameri of ph ysical comfort and easy competence. It is estican people want to see with their own eyes "what it's mated that at least twenty-five per cent of last summer's all about They are coming here next summer two casual visitors have settled r-----------------------, million strong. Let us give in Florida no thought them a hearty welcome. Let -of ever leaving. The development of Florida is a won-us convince them with the And what of the coming simple evidence on every summer? Will northern derful thing, but not more wonderful hand that not since the and western green-eyed than Florida. g reat West was opened up propaganda against t h i s h as history recorded such state deter any considerable WILLIAM LYONS PHELPS an amazing growth of proportion of tourists from Yale University. civilization as is evidenced -visiting Florida next June in every section of fair July and August? We think and favored Florida. 33

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J\ RE FLORIDA BONDS SO,UND? A North "1. of importance writes _to SuNIL;'-ND thts subJect He asks two leadmg questions, m substance: "Aren't Florida improvement bonds stagnat ing the market?" and Inasmuch as some $150,000,000 of these bonds were sold last year, will not s uch securi ties gl? begging?" Let us first take up these two propositions. Then we can proceed to answer the other alarms of our corres pondent All of America, indeed man y foreign countries, have awakened to Florida's great assets -soi l and climate. How else could such a stupendous bonding have been floated? No substantial bonding house which participated in these issues failed firs t to in v estigate ; What did they find? They witnessed awakened communities. They saw sound development. They, like Floridians, acquired faith in the future of Florida. They inquired at banks in Tampa, Jacksonville, Miami and other of the State's great banking center s Thej learned that Florida's legal rate of i nterest is 8% They inspected the statements of these banks. They .found that Florida banking on an 8% interest rate is sound : At .first, n() doubt, they were puzzled. They were accustomed to 6% interest rates How could Florida enterprise pay 8% ? Faith That was their own conviction, because they thetnselves had bought millions in bonds. Faith in this soil ; and this Climate. Faith, because native Floridiah::. arid hordes of Northern investors had backed their be lief with their dollars, a:nd 8% interest. pay sro for our bonds. We are developing. We are growing healthily. Our public improvements are neces sary to full production of soil and the enjoyment of climate. Possibly we are paying a little "through the nose." Perhaps we expected it. Perhaps our bonding house friends could have answered their own questions if they had considered the inevitable supply and demand. The demand for improvements in every community in the State will continue to govern both the number of bonds to be floated and the interest rate to be paid. The influx continues. Florida has found herself Folks outside the State have found Florida. They come, the y see, they in v e s t They and we develop and we bond our communities. The enhancement of values and the governing hand of supply and demand rule our develop ment; consequently, our rate of interest. Our State has 22, 000,000 acres more of fertile soil upon which riches in crops and development will be b ased The one million acres now under cultivation ar e but a scratch. Florida has faith-so, the cycle: soil de velopment, home-building and then industrial develop ment. Our gateways are open and still they come in increas ing numbers; yet, we build and there remain 22,000,000 rich acres undeveloped. Soil and climate, plus enter prise are the answers to those who counsel against 5% bond interest rates. Our legislators wisely voted a legal rate of 8% at banks. Our progress has become the talk of the nation and far beyond its borders. We can afford to pay for vol ume, because, we have faith that our future is secure. Soil climate, enterprise, plus faith; this is the answer t o timid inquirers about future. Flo rida needed money hom the outside for develop. It was willing to for it. Florida possessed faitldnfierself, in her re5Qurces : Northern bankers and Northern individual capitafcame into the State. They ; invested. pe r them. THetr tattl i m the future of Flonda msptred them to cURATIVE FLORIDA. The sunshine of Florida They con_ has been praised so many tit?es that. repetition ttrrue tot elifiartce. All based on fatthl And the hordes would seem superfluous. Its atr and chmate have State with won many words of eulogy And the excellence NoW/to, return to bonds. Our banker frtend from grapefruit, the lusciousness of its strawberries, the1-deh-tpe market tnay stagnate. ,Will it? cacy of its melons and tomatoes have been commertted -A ag{i improvement from upon very often in the past. Yet we venture to assert 4 :?5% ',to f :40%. Today, according to his letter, they that the health-giving qualities of the State have sell at 5% interest. He thinks they may go begging. begun to be appreciated at their real worth. And Ctb-.. This bri ngs us t() the second proposition. Will Florida zens of the peninsula should look to it now that the bOn as go }?egging? Not at the jncreased rate of interest. health factors of Florida may forever be conserved and !'fot so dollars pour into the State and filter into utilized for the betterment of themselves, their friends these rapidly developing communities. Not so long as and the great commonwealth that will flourish here tothese new citizens with their high faith keep redeeming morrow. the waste lands and building upon them. Not so long as To escape from generalities which may seem meaning they keep planting the soil less boasts, it is the purpose that or four of these words to point out crops per year for profit-FLORIDA has only just started on a very definite thing; nameable Northern markets. a new era in its history. The ly, Florida as nature's preFlorida publiC improve-hectic atmosphere of the moment will ventative of cancer. The inment bonds are sound. That crease of this disease among 1 1 p ass, but in my view, Florida will con-c 1 'v1'lt'zed peoples has been we are paymg a 1tt e more concerns Northern capital. tinue to grow and will become} I believe, rapid and alarming. Twv It does not need concern the wealthiest and most powerful and years ago an article in a the bonding houses so long populous commonwealth in the South. medical journal summarized as they come into the State Indeed, I think it will be th e Empire an investigation of cancer with dollars and help mortality in thirty-eight us improve our God-given State of the South. American cities for a decade. assets, productive soil and IRVING BACHELLER As the population of tHese climate. cities exceeded one-fifth We were willing to pay Author of "Eben Holden," "A Man for the that of the entire nation, the 8% interest at banks At Ages," "D'ri and I/' ((Silas Strong," Etc. figures may safely he taken present, we are willing to (Continued on page 96)

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Photo by Geo. Hyatt. Thomas A. Edison Arrives at Fort Myers, Florida "FLORIDA HAS ADDED FIVE YEARS to MY LIFE" In An Interview by George Holland ,, M y FIRST trip to Florida was made forty-three years ago, and there are certain details of it that I am n o t likely to forget. "Our party had landed in Jacksonville on this first trip and then we took what was locally known as a railroad going from Jacksonville to Cedar Key, where Faber, the pencil manufacturer, had purchased a large tract of cedar." It is Thomas A. Edison talking to a representative of SuNILAND. "That railroad was one of the roughest riding affairs I have ever encountered. The trip took three or four days, and during that time we ran off the track at least three times While we were waiting for the cars to get back on the rails, we had plenty of opportunity to observe the fauna and flora of the State. You may realize just how ordinary a thing it was for the train to run off the track when you learn what th e telegraph company did. The Western Union Company, I think, owned the poles that ran alongside the roadbed, and they got tired of having them knocked down by the train, so they took the poles up and placed them farther away from the tracks." Mr. Edison chuckled. "We cruised around in Florida, and finally reached Fort Myers en the Caloosahatchee River. We observed the trade winds, the temperatures, and the tropic al vegetation, and I decided that here was the place for me. "I looked forward to the time when I would be getting on in years and would want to come to Florida every Winter, and I c o uldn't imagine a nicer place than Fort Myers. There were wild ducks by the acre, the river was full of fish, and it seemed t<> afford a perfect opportunity for rest and recreation." Mr. Edi s on stretched himseli luxuriously and gazed abou t him with satisfaction. "So having fallen in love with Fort Myers, with its hundred inhabitants and its sand streets, I bought ten acre s on the banks of the Caloosahatchee River. Shortly afterwards I had a CO'\)ple of houses built up in Maine, shipped them to Florida knocked down, and then put them up on the tract of land "Not infrequently I am asked what contributions Florida has made to me. Pleasure, rest and recreation are real but not ne cessarily tangible assets, but in additi o n to these things, I feel that at the least Florida has given me five years of additional life. Perhaps I can stretch it out to six or seven years, but of five added years I am reasonably certain. I am not over-fond of pneumonia so common in the North. F lorida is a great State f o r the old folks, when they haven't the vitality they once had. This has been discovered by a great many people, and to me it affords assurance that Florida will never be forgotten. There are a great many more men and women l iving up North who only have to get in the sunshine for one Winter to become real enthusiastic for the State, as well as annual visitors." A question brought out the Edisonian viewpoint on the subject most vital to Floridians. "Whether the so-called 'boom' will continue is not of so much moment. If the State's development has been pushed too fast, neces s arilv there will come a lull, but in any event all these things will adjust themselves. The real Florida will never lose its appeal." 35

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One of the lateral canals of a sub-drainage project in process of excavation. These canals, dug at intervals through a tract of land being reclaimed, link up with the huge State canals which discharge into the ocean and gulf. '7/ze CONQ!JE ST oj An Area of Four Thousand Square Miles Is Being Drained for the Farmer Nearly Five Hundred Miles At a NEARLY three million acres oi America's most fertile land, enriched with the animal and vegetable r emains of thousands of years, constituting an empire of potential agricultural wealth, are well on the way to a complete subjugation. Man is again asserting his mastery over the ele ments. And this time he is achieving a task so colossal that imagination halts in an effort to grasp its astounding and multifa riou s details. Where once as far as the eye could reach there was but waving saw-grass rising from its bed of gently moving waters, impenetrable and unyielding, the merry music of the power-tractor is heard. The dugout of the Seminole Indian has become a gang plow; the paddle which feathered the waters of a great uncharted inland sea has become a disc which is breaking the rich, black soil and preparing it for the seed. In short, the Everglades of Florida, whic h man has looked upon for hun 36 dreds of years as the prize agricultural area of all the North American Continent, if not the world, is being reclaimed. Ever since the little red school-house existed as an institution in America, the Everglades of Florida h ave exerted a powerful appeal to the imagination of childhood Geography might be a dull and prosaic struggle, and t he memory o f the task it was to learn the capitals o f all t h e states may still linger, but there came a day when even geography was touched with the magic of mystery T h e perils of "Dead-Eye Dick," whose career was being breathless l y followed behind the huge pages and maps, was forgotten for the nonce, and the lure of the Everglades was strong upon u s. It may have been the pictures w hich accompanied the text, or perhaps it was due to the enthusiasm o f the teachers who resolved to make the most of our tremendous interest; but in any event, there has remained through many )'ears aP impressiou of reeking, miasmatic By Roy swamps, huge creeping reptiles and crawling alligators, fleeing negroes, im penetrable jungles and rich tropical growth. This, we thought, was the Everglades. The dictionary has it that an ever g lade is "a low, swampy tract o f land, with patches of tall grass." The dictionary may be right, but, in that event, the area in Florida generally assigned that name has been incorrectly designated. The Everglades are not lower than hundreds of thousands of acres of lan d which are along the shore lines of F lorida; neither are they swampy. Much misunderstanding might have been gener a lly avoided if the Indian name "Pah -bah okee," meaning "grassy wat e r ," had been taken into the America n vocabulary. To J effcrs (>n Davis, Secretary of \Var in 1856, must go the credit for obtaining the first authentic rlescription of the Evergl ades. In that year he directe d two topographical to under-

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., Compared .with the. Ev:erglades, much of the so-called flat prairies of the West are hilly and mountainous. Contrary t o general impro. asiona the Everglades area is neither aw ampy nor jungle-like, but covered with grass and brush. the EVERGLADES and Sixty-Eight Million Cubic Yards of Earth Excavated for a L ength Cost of Twelve Millions of Dollars H. Fricken take a reconnaissance of the area, and in their report there appeared the following paragraphs, which admirably and concisely describe the district: "The Everglades of Florida, the authors stated, "cover an area of about four thousand square mil es, embra<.:ing more than half of the portion of the State south of Lake Okeechobee. The subsoil of this vast re gion is coralline limestone. Upon the surface of this, which is very rough and irregular, lies an immense accumulation of sand, allu vial deposits and decayed mat ter, forming a mass o f quicksand and soft mud from three t o ten feet or more in depth, tha t overspreads all but a few points of the fir s t stratum. Upon the mud rests a sheet of water, the depth varying with the cop.formation of the bottom, but seldom, at dry seasons, greater than three feet "The whole is filled with a growth of coarse and tough grass, from eight to ten feet high, having a sharp. serrated edge like a saw, from which it obtains its name of saw grass. In many portions of the Everglades this saw grass is so thick as to be impene trable, but it is intersected by numerous narrow and tortuous channels that form a kind of labyrinth, where outlets pre sent themselves in every direction, most of them, howeve r terminating, at longer or' shorter distances, in an impassable barrier of grass, mud and quicksand. The surface of water is quickly affected by rains; the alternate rising and fall ing during wet seasons being very r ap id The general surface of the Everglades is, therefore, s ubj ec t to g r eat changes; the character of marshy lake o r mud flat predominating according to the wetness or dryness of the season An under t anding of the Everg-lades of Florida may best be gained b y first seeking an exp lanation for their being. Once this has been made plain, the na ture, area and extent of the grassy waters hecomes easily apparent. To the northward of Lake Okeecho bee, which has been described as the great liquid heart of Florida, is a water shed 5,336 spuare miles in area. As the rain descends on this basin, its accumulated waters, principally joining with the Kissimmee River, empty into Lake Okeechobe. This lake covers approximately seven hundred and forty square miles of ter ritory and is nearly circular in shape. With the exception of Lake Michigan, it is the larges t fresh-water lake lying wholly within the limits of the United States. Lake Okeechobee has no natural out let, and when its basin is full the waters slowly spill over the southern edge of the lake's border and gradually flow southward over an area of four thousand square miles which constitute the Everglades. Had not this area of land been alm:lst as flat as a billiard table, the course of the water would in time have worn its 37

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Water;). 9cked, with a rich of saw-grass waving in the breeze, occasionally inter.spersed with a growth of pa] ms, the land of. the Everglades lies useless until drainage is established. Compare with picture on opposite page. own channel, cuttmg deeper and deeper into the earth, and there would now probably be no problem of drainage or water control. Considering its size, the tract of land lying between Lake Okee chobee and the Gulf is believed to be the flattest known to man. Mile alter mile, and as far as vision can range, the unbroken expanse of grassy water11 stretch away to merge with the honzon, unrelieved save for the hammocks, or dry spots, in certain sections. Slowly and massively, moving ever southward because the land slopes two or three inches to the mile toward the sea, adding to its bulk the annual heavy rainfall of the area, the waters of Lake Okeechobee spre ad out like an all engulfing sheet, water-locking the land from successful cultivation. The physical characteristics and geo logical formation of the Everglad es is believed to be unique At one time it was generally taught that the State of Florida was of coral formation, but ge ologists are now agreed that its forma-The St. Lucie, or main drainage canal in the reclamation of the Everglades. This control canal has a capacity of 10,000 cubic yards of water per second, and carries off eighty-five per cent. of the excess waters of Lake Okeechobee. It averages two hundred feet wide. 38 tion is similar t o that of the coast of Georgia and South Carolina, belonging to the "post-Pliocene age. Underneath the entire southern part of the Florida p enin s ula there is a limestone founda tion, which was once the bed of a great inland s ea Wind and wave combined with sand and particles of stone to render some what shallow the waters of this sea Aquatic liie sprang into being. Vegeta tion arose and decayed to be succeeded by new outcroppings; silt and decayed vegetation poured into the area from the watershed to the north, and thus was formed the vast treasure of rich muck lands which are now being sub jugated for the farmer. Having no outlet of any kind save the surface of the glades, man has set about the construction of artificial channels, seeking not to drain Lake Okeechobee, but to control its waters. Uncontrolled, it constitutes a menace to agriculture; when its expansive waters can be di verted to orderly can als, it becomes the greatest asset of the region, providing irrigation in a time of drought and assur ing adequate drainage in the period of greatest rainfall Despite the immensity of the program o f water control and drainage, there has scarcely ever been a difference of opin ion concerning the process. Granted that the water of Lake Okeechobee was above sea level-a fact that was estab lished by governmental surVeys-then it was only necessary to dig canals suf ficiently large and deep to carry off the surplus waters. No attempt was to be made to diminish the amount of water which entered the lake It was sought o nly to divert the waters which the lake basin could not hold. into regular channels which led to the sea and the gulf. Added to this was the additional

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Once the land has been cut with canals and ditches so that the excess waters can drain off the soil quickly assertti ita rich qualities Where only a short time ago nothing save entangling saw-grass was visible sleek aairy herds graze at will. problem of disposing of the rain fall of the Everglade region. which ordinarily would interfere with agricultural de velopment From the edl!"e of Lake Okee chobee straight to the ocean eastward, is a di tance of twenty-five miles. D redge and dynamite cut through this narrow rim, releasing the imprisoned waters of Lake Okeec hobee into the At lantic Ocean. Gravity drainage was easily e s tablished. fo r at the beginning of the work in 1903 the surface of the Everglades was approximately twentythree feet above sea lev el. More than twentv-one million cu: Jic yards of earth and rock will have been excavated when the St. Lucie Canal now almost dredged to its maximum depth. i entirely completed. This is the key to the entire drainage problem. The canal varies from one hundred and fift:v to two hundred and fift y feet in width. with a depth of from ten to twelve fe et. Engineers are agreed that this single canal will carry off eighty-five per cent of the surplus waters which the lake basin cannot accommodate at flood time. Fifteen per cent of the se waters, it is estimated, through the action of sun and wind, will ev aporate. Ten other canals have been con truc t ed which or dinarily have no part in carrying off the w aters of Lake Okeechobee. Ranging in depth from ten t o fifteen feet, and with a width of forty to o ne hundred and forty feet they r ad iate from the At lantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico into the area of the lake's basin. These channels ar
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. The Forum Auditorium at Daytona, Florida, showing a typical cr.owd gathering for one of the meetings "LET THERE BE. LIGHT" George W. Coleman, LL.D., Director Ford Hall Forum, Boston, Mass., President Open Forum National Council, and President The Babson Insti t\!,te. He is the author of the fVith This Slogan the Florida Open For'JI,m in Ni?ze Cities Stimulates the State's Culture Dr. Robert Shailor Holmes of Daytona, Fla., retired business man and founder and director of the Florida Forum and Assembly and its Sister Forums organized in eight other accompanying article F LORIDA is flourishing Everyone knows that. But how many people realize the great advances she also is making in the finer things of life? Someone more gifted with spiritual insight and wield-By Dr. George Coleman Presidmt Babso n Inst it ute and D i rector Ford Hall Forum ing a more facile pen than I should tell that whole region. The Florida Forum the American people what remarkable and Assembly, founded and ably directprogress is being made in the civic, .. ed during its entire history by Dr. intellectu:H, and religious life of one -".< Robert Shailor Holmes, is the father of the oldest .states in the Union. There of a whole flock of forums nine in nuinis an .awakening al0ng these lines comber, located in various cities and_ towns parable only to the marvelous develop-throughout the State. This great enments in real estate and finance. Did terprise of Dr. Holmes had its begin you know, for example, that Florida is ning as a tourist Bible Class in a Methat the forefront in her adoption and odist Church b ack in 1912. Under the u J e of the open forum, rapidly co ming name of the Chri s tian Forum it grew to be one qf the most effective agencies so fast tha t the church was too small for adult education in this c ountry? t o acc o mm odate i t s increas ing numbers, The Carne gie Corporation, deeply in-notwiths tandin g the fact that the e.di terested in the question of cultural ad-fice w as enlarge d three times within vancement jn the United States, has re-five years. E v en th e Casino at Daycently mad e an extended survey in this ton a : with a capacity of about twelve direction and gives hi g h comm e ndation huridred, whi c h hou s ed this growing to the work of the open forum as an Op e n 'Forum (as it finally came to be agency of liglit and lead i n g to men called) f o r two years proved inadand women who have completed their equ a te, and it became n e ce ssary to build forma1 education in the sch o ols an a udit o r i um t o ac c ommodate the grea t The largest, and one of the oldest cro wds that sou ght admi s s ion every open forums in the country is estabSunday afte rnoon during January, Feblished at Daytona Beach, Florida, and ruary and March. in thirteen years it h a s ri se n to a plac e At this juncture Mr. Simon ] Pea of unquestioned l e adership throughout h ody, a retired lumber man from C o40 cities of the State. lumbia City, Indiana, came to the rescue with seven of his friends, all from northern centers. Mr. Peabody presented a handsome building site, and he and his friends gave the money for the building of an auditorium which comfortably seats three thousand people. The attendance at the Forum sessions averages over two thousand right through the season, and for the Assembly entertainments during week days the building is frequently crowded to capacity Professor James Heaton, for many years the platform manager for the Winona Lake Assembly in Indiana: is respon sible for the success of these entertainment features whi ch run throug h the entire s eas o n and bring to Daytona some o f the greatest speakers and musical artists of t he world and many oth e r attrac t ions of n a ti o nal fame But the Sunday afternoon Forum dis cus s io n s are the he art a nd center of the whole enterprise. Here are presented, by experts of the greatest reputation, the live is s ues of our time and the audi ence, with the utmost freedom under orderly r estraint, j o ins in each discus sion ch a llen ging the speaker, supplementing the material presented, or looking at it from a different ang le as the case may be. The net result to all concerned, Including th e speaker, is stimu l ating a nd informative.

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Crowd outs ide of For d H a ll, Boston, waiting i n a snow sto r!ll for the doors t o open for a Forum meeting Dr. Holmes, a genius of good will -and f r iendliness, is one of "those selfmade business men who has succeeded in keeping out of the ruts and, although past fifty years of age, is still growing like a house afire. In all my wide ac -quaintance I have never seen a man well a long in m iddle life who has shown so much initiative and adaptabality in mastering new l ines of endeavor as has this farmer's boy from Lansing, MiC'h. Having early in life won a modest competence in real estate and industrial -deve lopments in his own fast-growin g home city, he went to Florida for the health of the older people in his and his wife's family and there began to carve out a new career for himself, adding very substantiall y to his eet)llomic rc-sources, revelling in the joys of outdoor life, and gradually winning for himself a great reputation as a public character devoted to all the highest interest s of hi s community and state. His wonderful success as the founder, promoter, and director of the F lorida Forum and Assembly, together with a wide range of public. service in other di recti ons, won for him a few years ago the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters from the University of Georgia: D r Holmes is now the Secretary of the Open Forum National Council. He has recently published a volume entitled "Builders and Other Poems." He has something of the gift of the beloved Edgar A. Guest in his power of appeal, in melodious lines to the heart of the average Amer ican. Although retired from active business, except for looking after his investments, Dr. Holmes is no victim of ennui, the bugaboo of t h e average man "out of harness." He is the busiest of men, very happy in a ll his work, and exerting a wide and bene ficent influence that might well be t h e envy of any publi cist Dr. Holmes has not only been fortunate in the handsome support given his work by such hardheaded, forwardlooking men as Mr. Peabody; but he has also been able to enlis t the support of leading professional and business m e n and women for the wide r promotion o f the open forum idea Dr. 0 I. Woodley, at one time Secretary of the State (Continued on page 90) Inte rio r of the Auditorium at Daytona, Fla. showing a n Open Forum i n session 4 1

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A S 'TATE-WIDE suRVEY Suniland's Representatives Present Timely Business Jacksonville's Solid Business Progress By J. M. ScHLOENBACH J;acksonville Representative of SuNILAND FTER a Abriei pause rega1n its breath, follow ing a long perio
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OF FLORIDA CONDITIONS Reports of Activt'ties in the States Key Counties. and Cities diately preceding a time for intensive and successful work. This is a section wherein conservatism prevails and where reported de velopment and construction mean exactly what the words imply. Every city and every county is doing its full share of constructive work-municipal and otherwise. And every county, even to the remotest section shows a healthy tendency. Sanford, Orlando, Melbourne and other cities have municipal programs of consequence. Our Jake citie s look to a greatly increased business. Kis simmee, already surrounded with act ivity, is momentarily expecting to announce another monster development. This whole section has at1d will feel the effect of well-directed, wholesome publicity. Things are happening to justify optimism. "The people are coming," is the way we feel about it. So, we are adding millions to the comforts and conveniences of urban and suburban locations. Streets and highways are being built and improved to accommodate traffic. Home con struction is predominately prominent. New towns are growing in tht' agricultural areas. Hotels are building and rebuilding. Tourist spots are increasing manyfold, and without quoting figures it is s afe to predict that the past and the present are n o more comparable than will be the present :. nd future. The analysis of this territory, which qoasts of its agricultural and com mercial productivity, readily gives proof :tnd assurance through it s accomplishment. Where there are so many advantages, supported by such soil wealth, and with so many mil lion s invested, there i s surely reason for a great future. Farmer, merchant, banker, operator, official or Mr. Citizen will tell you that the agricultural and commercial phases are now as usual sufficiently favorable to attract and hold the tourist, the homeseeker or the investor. He will tell you and show you that the apparent preparation for the future reception of tourists and permanent population i s a striking example of the courage and faith in the future of this part of our busy state. Fort Myers Has a Substantial Future By C. C. McKINNEY Fort Myers Representative o f SuNILAND FORT MYERS and Lee County, together with the county of Collier, will go steadily forward. This section has been, to some extent, a shut-out, in that transpor ta!ion in the modern sense has not been available until within the year. Based upon competent authority, May, 1925, witnessed the first upward swing in this territory, and the activity was pronounced during the Summer and Fall months of that year. This activity is still apparent, and it is predicted that the year 1926 will show far greater activity than that of the former year. The activity in building i s never-ending. January, 1926 showed a seven-time increas(' over the same month in 1925. And it is well to note that the type ot building, both business and residen tial, i s of so lid character, not of a temporary nature. An outstanding feature is the architecture employed in all structures; it i s in keeping with the natural beauty of this South-west territory. It is a freely predicted and accepted fact that Fort Myers will be the metropolis of South-West Florida. Recently, the citizens underwrote the cost of a $750,000 community hotel. They also subscribed to the largest fund ever attempted by a community of its size for the Chamber of Commerce, $110,000, thus giving Fort Myers the honor of setting a new record per capita of any city in the country. The Seaboard Railroad will enter Fort Myers within the coming three months, making the place a two ratiroad city instead of a one railroad town. East Fort Myers was recently annexed and at the present time the population of greater Fort Myers is 15,000 ; and it i s growing daily. Fort Myers is destined to have a steady and healthy growth rather than a mushroom start and stop. Land values are s table and fair. Building is substantial and continu ous. Industry i s gaining ground monthly. The Fort Myers-Palm Beach Hig h way, plus the Tarriiami Trail places this section in a conspicuous p 'osition, one which should, and doubt will, give Fort Myers a most enviable and strategic point in this fast-coming State. The Barron G. Collier interests, so largely represented in this locality, are being watched with interest by the whole business world. Mr. Collier and his many Eastern co-invest:. ors represent a vast amount' ofcapital and energy. Once tur11ed Jodse, if is believed that these intere;'is' wiil eclipse any development' ever in this State, or indeed, iri the United States. No Bo'om But Steady Growth In Polk County By HAROLD D. HASCALL Polk County Representat,ive of SuNILAND HAROL D D. HASCALL POLK' County has never ltad a boom. It has bee n t i v e l y estimated' that'thi s is the rich: est County in the United States per capita-$6,198. Polk County produces more citrus fruits than any other in Florida. Forty-five per cent. of the phosphate supply of the world emanates from it s mines. There has been a steady growth in real estate values in this county, practically unsupported by any great national advertising campaign. There has been little, if any, gambling in speculative buying. Con servativ e prices and fair profittaking has been the rule. Pure ly owing to extremely unusual climatic conditions there has been a period of qui e t in business over the months of December and January. There has been a steadily increasing volume of business during the past ten d ays and there i s a quiet feeling of absolute faith as to the future and what the rest of this year holds in store for realtors in Poll';: County. Almost without exception, "high pressure selling is frowned upon by Realty Boards throughout this County. People know that Polk (Continued on page 70) 43

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DIXON scowled as he reassem bled the typewritten pages of h i s report and glanced at the clock. 'i'he sound of clicking machines across the hall had been fol lowed by the hurrying steps of home ward bound clerks. Now that was gone, and from the street below came the noise of the grating progress of trolley-cars, inching their way one after another in a long line, loaded with supper-seeking humanity. Dixon touched the button of an electric buzzer beside him. "Is MacClure' s report here yet?" he asked, when White appeared in the doorway. "Not yet, Mr. Dixon Johnson got him by phone and .he said he would be here himself; he asked you to wait." It was characteristic of Dixon that he showed no. sign of annoyance. He had the impassive, immobile face of the executive type--lacking the fineness, possibly, but with the reserve of strength and irresistihle power of one of his 44 "Sit down and don't make a noise/' said the intruder sharply. The man by the door, without shifting his gaze, slipped his hand back to the bolt of the door and fastened it. VENGEANCE By Mary Roberts Rinehart Author of "The Amaz ing Interlud e / Tish Seven Days / "The Bat," The Red Lamp," etc. Illustrat e d b y DuDLEY G S uMMERS M oguls And now he merely nodded. "I'll stay if you will need anyone, Mr. Dixon, White ventured from the doorway. "I-I don't have to hurry home tonight." "Boy better?" D ixon queried absently, his hand on the receiver of the desk phone. "Much better. I-1 started them both away this afternoon on the four thirty, my wife and the youngster. Went to her mother's." "That's right. A little change some times-sevenfive -six Court, Central." "So if you want me-" White began. But Dixon was rattling the hook of the receiver impatiently. "Hello! Hello! No, don't stay, White. Close the vault-that's all. Is that y ou, Clara? Tell your mother I will be late for dinner. No, don't wait; I may d i n e downtown. Did Harry get the four thirty? All right. Good-by. W HITE clo s ed the big door of the vault. and drew down a window. At the door, however, he stopped un certainly and turned around. "Mr. Dixon," he said nervously, "Mary wanted me to th;mk you for the check. I told her I didn t like to rub it in, but she wanted you to know how she felt. It--more than paid the nurse." "That's all right, White," Dixon' s tone had 'ln unexpected note of warmth. "I have a boy of my own. Good night. White went the n humming a little as he walked toward the elevator. When the cage stopped a man got out, a tall man with shrewd eyes and drooping, sandy mustache. He was mud-stained and rather di sreputable as to clothes, but he went with the long firm stride of the outdoors man along the hall toward the general manager' s office. He tapped at the door and entered with out ceremony. "How are you, Tom?" he said briefl y. He and Dixon had been civil e ngin eers together years before, and al though one now general manager of the z. & Y and the other its chief en ginee r, on MacCiure' s part, at least, there had been no change of attitude. ."I looked for you this morning,'' Dixon's one glance had taken in every detail of his engineer' s appearance from the mud ori his boots to the scarcelv restrained excitement in his face.

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''What's ali this row about the Deepwater bridge?" MacClure did not sit down. Instead, he began to walk nervously across the office floor and back, leaving muddy prints on the Persian rug. "It's just this," he sa i d at la st, stoppin g. "That bridge is a death-trap, and has been since the February flood "That's not what Robert says," Dixon returned c oldly. "He's been repairing it for-well, you know what he did to it. It has cost as much as a new bridge already. "Roberts is a fool." MacClure bit savagely at the end of a stogy. "He's an ass with an engineer's diploma. Look at me; look at this mud. I've been seven hours in the creek bottom there, trying to find out what Roberts thought he was doing to that bridge. It's going to come down with the next high water, Dixon, and there will be another Armitage disaster. Dixon was irritated, but above everything else he was the general manager of the Z & Y. He listened attentively to MacCiure's concise statements, but at the end he leaned back and surveyed stack of blueprints and drawings. "You're an alarmist, MacCiure," he said. "You've cried wolf too often. Why, you want to build a new road. I couldn't have a new bridge at Deep W3ter if I ask ed for it-and I'm not going to ask for it." "Then send all passenger traffic around by Flamingo Creek and the Junction," MacCiure said incisively. "And lose ttA-ty minutes I This is a railroad, MacCiure-not a trolley-line. Thirty minutes!" MacCiure stopped his nervous pacing and bent over the desk. "I tell you, Tom, he said impressively, "there are places on the Bakewell branch. today that will mean eternal damnation some time to every director in the company. "And do you know," Dixon stormed, finally losing his temper, "do you know that the Z. & Y. would have to reduce its dividend to make one-half those improvements?" MacClure snatched up his hat with an exasperated gesture. "Improvements!" he snarled. "Do you improve a ship when you patch a hole in her side? Improv.ements !" AS he flung through the door Dixon opened his mouth to call him back. But did not. Instead he sat down rather opened 'his mouth to call him back. But did not. Instead, he sat" 'down rather heavily in his chair and comn.enced to gather up the scattered drawings. It was ridiculous; a road that had run for twenty years wasn't going to pieces in a night. Every calamity-howler came to him He couldn't satisfy them all. If a man went over a railroad with a miscroscope he'd be bound to find flaws. A scrubwoman outside was attacking the dust of the uncarpeted hall with vigor Lik e dry leaves along a road, bits of paper flew into the air, circled in the eddy, scurried through the open door, and sought the refuge of the corner under the stenographer's desk. "0, Kathleen Mavourneen, my heart it is breakin', sang the elderly woman fr om the corridor, pursuing the flying debris of the day with an energetic broom. At the door she paused, still singing, and wiping the dust out of her eyes with her apron, felt for the knob nf the door. "To think that from thee I must part!" she shrilled. "Confound it, Annie," Dixon ejaculated, blowing a gray-white cloud from the hat he had just picked up, "you make as much dust as a steam-s hovel." Annie suddenly took her apron from her eyes. "My goodness!" she said fervently, and banged the door. So frazzled were Dixon 's nerves that the very slam of the door made him jump. Deflt:cted for a moment, his thoughts went back at once to Mac Clure's visit and the Deepwater Bridge Harry had gone on the four-thirty. He would be at Bayard or near there now. Why on earth couldn't boys settle down at home? When he was a boy he didn't go jumping over the country. He closed his desk absently. Cer tainly MacClure had been very insistent about the bridge, but then Mac Ciure was a Scot and cautious. If only Harry had stayed at home-in threequarters of an hour the train would be at Deepwater, and-Then came before him sudrlenly, a stereoscopic memory of that other bridge at Armitage; of the gap in the centre where the middle span had gone' down into the river-of the charred coaches burned to the water's edge, their truc: ( s and twisted pipes ris ing above the shallow current; of the silent crowds and the growing row of sheeted figures on the bank. HE pulled himself together with an effort. Nonsense! Roberts knew his business The bridge at Deepwater was well enough; i t had stood the pounding of heavy freigjlt all day. He was tired. Seven-five I He'd better get something to cat and look up a good vaudeville show. The soft closing of the office door caused him to turn; with his hand stil l on the lock of his desk he took in the fact that a man had entered the office, closed the door behind him and now stood, his back aga.inst it, levelling a re vo lver at him. The same glance that showed Dixon his menacing attitude and powerful physique, revealed the utter hopelessness of any attempt to escape. And his philosophy came to his assistance; he had a keen sense that anything valuabfe on his person or in the offi ce vault might be replaced, but that a random shot from a revolver was likely to do mischief that was less easily undone So he indulged in nothing theatrical. "Well?" he asked, in much the tone he used when. his deprecating clerks interrupted him ::",. "Sit down and' don't make a noise," said the intruder, sharply. Dixon sat down. The man by the door, without shifting his gaze, slipped his hand back to the bolt of the door and fastened it Then he came a step or two for-ward. "Put your hands up!" Dixon did so, without undue has te. He was not alarmed. The intruder was far the more nervous of the two;. his face was covered with fine drops of moisture afid the revolver in his shak ing hand described fragmentary arcs through the air. "Put up that gun, if you can't hold it steady." Dixon expostulated nervously. "You've no business with a revolve r unless you-" "I'm not going to hurt you Mr. Dixon, unless I have to. But-I'm going to tie you to that chair. "It won t be necessary," Dixon protested, with visions of a night in the chair, and of being discovered, limp and undignified, by the early clerks the next morning. But his voice trail e d off un certainly as the revolver came to rest within a few inches of his ten1ple There was an instant when the tw o men eyed each other grimly, and Dixon's gaze was unafraid. Then the revolver was slowly lowered and placed on the desk, whil e the invader fumbled in the pockets of his overcoat. For a burglar he was unprofessional to the point of absurdity, and Dixon, watching wearily, made a sudden catlike spring for the weapon. Before he realized it. he found himself back in his office chair, dizzy and breathless, while his adversary fastened him awkwardly but effect ually with round after round of hemp rope. Dixon's philosophy did not cover physical discomfort. He was outraged, f urious. It occurted to him that his visitor meant to blow open the vault, and that the door would fall perilously close to him. And then the burglar did two unexpected things. He broke the connection of the desk telephone with a couple of vicious jerks, then he drew up a chair, across the desk from Dixon, and sat down. "My name is Hargis," he said, "Asa Hargis. I reckon you don't remember me." He stopped, as if to prepare something he wanted to say. "Perhaps you'd know me by my brother," he said. "Walter Hargis." The name was familiar Some time, somewhere-and then Dixon knew. "You'll remember Walter. I reckon. He was the eighteen-year-old boy who was criminally neglig ent, according to the railroad; dropped asleep after thirty-six hours on duty, and sent the Gatorville express to hell at sixty miles a .fl, hour." With the introduction of the personal element the situation took on a new aspect. For the first time Dixon real ized that the man across the desk was actuated by some vital motive, by some emotion that seemed to be fighting its way out over the barri.er of an iron repression. "That was five years ago. He couldn't seem to stay around the States after that; he went to C.:ntral America. I reckon -you .know that, too," he ended. significantly "He died down there last year-fever." DIXON made no response; the steady ticking of the office clock was the only sound in the room, and the two men stared at each other across the inlervening desk. "The railroad-your railroad-has brought me a lot of bad luck," Hargis went on, steadily. "I lost my wife and two little boys last year when the Armitage bridge went down." The hand that held the revolver tightened its grip-that was all. But under the tragedy in his voice Dixon seemed to shrink in his chair; the. rope no longer chafed him. The voice went on, even, inflection less, clean -washed of emotion. "My wife and my two little boys I Think of it, Mr. Dixon. I never saw any of them again. You'd been buying another railroad, they said, and you hadn't money to fix the bridges Dixon moistened his dry lips with his tongue. "We were going home to my folks for Christmas," Hargis said, with a glance at the clock. "Everybody in the train had bundles; we had a lot of Santa Claus stuff for the kids. : They were so excited they couldn't sit stillkept rubbing the frost off the window 45

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co see if we were there yet. And then the crash came, and I never saw any of them again. I stood by-God! when I think of it !-stood by and watched the fire that came after the wreck, with everything I cared for on earth somewhere down in that hell of flame. And-I-couldn't raise my hand to help." The low, impressive tones were more terrible than any tumult of emotion. The hand that held the r e volver was steady enough now; the white face beyond the desk-lamp was ominous with hate. I was crazy for a while," the voice went on. "My wife's p eo ple were afraid I'd kill myself. But-I had something to do. It kept me alive, thinking about it. I don't sleep any more, for thinking. Tom Dixon, do you ever lie awake at night and hear the splintering of wood, and women scream ing, and feel children's hands clutching at you for help when there isn't any help?" The little veins in Dixon's t emp l es stood out like twisted cords "An eye for an eye; a tooth for a tooth. Did you ever hear that, Tom Dixon?" "What are you going to do?" Dixon asked d espe rately. "You've got me, I can't get away.'' "You have a boy of your own. What would you do to the man who killed him ?" There footsteps in the hall; the sound of Annie s shuffling feet, the clatte r of her scrubbing pail as she put it down ou tside the door. As she turne d the knob H argis lifted the revolver a couple of in ches from the desk, and waited grimly, his eyes on the prisoner's face. The call for help died in an ineffectual gurgle in Dixon's throat; Annie picke d up her bucket and retreated, singing under her breath. Hargis dropped the r evo lve r, and getting out an old-fashioned, heavily engraved watch, compared it carefully with the clock. "Fifteen minutes," he said. "The Flyer ought to be a t Citrus Junction." He turned the watch ove r in his hand, laid it, open, on the desk before mm. "Famil y watch," he said almost conversationally. "Grandfather's, father's, mine. I meant it for Eddie. Ever since the wreck the hands kind of stick at seven-forty-five; that's the time the wreck happened. Seem s like they're afraid I'll forget. DIXON scarcely hear d. He was listening with the sharpened senses of mental stress to a sound that seemed to come from the next office, White's. But whatever it had been it was not Harry's clear, boyish eyes stared down at him. Hatty, .with' his mother's soft, dark hair and buoyant spirit, who was sweepmg on to torture and death l 46 repeated, and he relaxed again in his chair, faint from reaction. Death isn t so bad,'' Hargis was saying. "There's worse things. There's losing your folks, the way I lost mine, and not being able to help. But I figure it would be pretty bad to have to sit by and know you were going to lose them, the way I stood by that wreck-and not be able to raise your hand. A flame sprang up in Dixon's eyes and the dawn of a new fear, not for himself and infinitely more terrible than if it were. "Seven-thirty two. In thirteen minutes the Flyer is due at the Deepwater Bridge. It's a fine train, Tom Dixon. Only the best is good enough for the g eneral manager's son I People like you can't go to New York and back without t he papers being full of it I How I've waited for this chance I" "What d o you mean?" Dixon panted. "What are you going-to do?" Hargis was on his fee t and his voice was sudden l y shr ill and exultant. "Do I I have had a year of agony I You're going to crowd a li fetime in the next thirteen minutes. Tom Dixon, in thirteen minutes the Flye r will be in Deepwater C r eek, and you-can't-raiseyour-hand!" With a s u d d e n frenzie6 plunge Dixon threw h i mself forward. He hit impotently against the desk; only the weight of the office chair kept him from f alling. His shoulder struck the electric desk lamp a nd sent it crashing to the floor. The room was suddenl y gray, the light from the corridor st reamed through the transom directly onto the face of the office clock; and in the shadow below Hargis push c d his orisoner contemptuous l y into hi s form e r p osi tion, and ( Con. tinued on page 140) ) I ,i ,-,, ,j ;' I

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Dempsey scores in. the first round of the boxing bout in Tampa's North Country Club Area to the plaudits of a huge crowd of fight fans Dempsey's fighting face as caught by the camera when the champion lands a clean right to the jaw of his opponent in the Tampa boxing contest FLORIDA'S BIG BUSINESS PuNcH The World's Heavyweight Pugilist C'hamp"ion Writes Some Shrewd Observations on Florida As He Found It By Jack Dempsey Illustrat e d with Exclusive Photographs F LORIDA shows wonderful promise I find from my trips. through the State that the reports are far from being exaggerated, and that it is, indeed, embarking upon a wonderfully bright future. One of the greatest advantages of Florida is its nearness to New York and eastern points. A bus in ess man is able to keep in close touch with his affairs in the north and at the same time enjoy his winter vacation in the land oi sunshine. In fact-to go back and forth easily between his New YorK office and his Florida home, ab ly combining bu si ness with pleasure. Many of the big men take advantage of this. TAMPA, FLORIDA. The growth in the State has been remarkable. There is a spirit of progression everywhere, and an optimistic outlook for the future. I can see no reason why this faith shouldn't be justified. There is plenty of money here and plenty of opportunities. As for the Florida people, I find them delightfu t and enenjoyable. Your climate is warm and pleasant, so, all in all, Florida has little else to wish for in its onward march to success. It has the big, winning punch I wish it luck! 47

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Some types o f the succulent bivalves gathered in Apalachicola Bay and a group of oyster boats at anchor. OYSTERS Each of the F ifteen !palachicola Packers Ship an Average of One Thousand Gallons of the Bivalves Per Week THE fog hung thick upon the bay. The' J essie May, reduced to half speed, felt her way care fully over the oyster bars. Navigation was a matter of dead reck o n ing. Range-finders and channel-buoys were of no avail, for the mi st was so en veloping that objects an arm's length away were indistinguishable. The ship's search light made a brave attempt to stab the fog blanket ahead but its beam traveled bt1t a few fee t in a yellow blur and w as quickly swallowed in the haze Captain Wing, who had been navigating the waters of Western Florida for sixty six years, knew the bay like a book, but he was taking n o chances. A deckhand, planted at the port quarter, called depth soundings to the bridge at one minute in tervals and his cries "six foot, hard shell sounded s pectral in the afternoon darkness. Even such navigation knowledge and skill as that possessed by Captain Wing was not infallible in a time like this, for wind and t ide action cause a drift that plays helter-skelter with the best d ead reckoning. Came a quick cry from the deckhand forward who was manipulat ing th e sound pole: "Four foot harr\ shell ... three." 48 By J. M. Schloenbach There was a grating sound on her bot tom and the vessel r ose s lightl y in the wa ter, trembling. Bell s clanged in th e en gine-room and her screw, pumping full ste rn, churned the shallow water. The boat shuddered and rocked slightly, but re fused t o bud ge The Jessie May was, fortunately not for long, hard aground or. a reef of Apalachicola oysters, fame
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by so doing they were propa gating th e oyster race and thereby perpetuating the oyster industry. times used by lighter-dratt vessels, those familiar with. these waters, ente ri ng from or. leaving for western Gulf ports. There is a channel. separated from the main channel which extends to the docks. The depth at the wharfs is ten feet. Steamboat lines ply between this port and Mobile, Pensacola, Carrabelle and Bay ports. Two light houses at thi s pass have lights that are visible from seven to nine miles. Apalachicola Bay is, in round numbers, thirty miles l ong and eight miles wide and expert oys termen estimate that one third of its area is covered with oyster bars. Nature has hc ; e provided an ideal place for the breeding of this delicious sea food, for the salt of the Gulf of Mexico, alter na t ing in tidal flow with the fresh water of the Apalachicola River, with its silt of red clay from its estu a ri es, combine in producing an ideal nourishment for the oyster that has chosen this bay for its abode. Oyster men say that this sweep of alternating salt and fre sh The oyster bars of Apala chicola Bay are nationally known, although the demand for this particular project is so great in F l orida, south ern Georgia and southern Ala bama that it is all the pack ers of Apalachicola can do to supp l y this so-called local demand. Covering one-third of the area o! the bay, the oyster bars, as they are known, are peculiar formations. Nature. causes the bivalves to cluster in layers and tiers of layers. Strange to say, these ba rs on the western side are perpendicular, cleanly cut from top to bottom as though they had been sliced down with a knife. The western side of these oyster forma tions is like a solid wall of shell, made up of count l ess l ayers of oysters, one upon the other, all flush with the straight West side. From this western wall they taper toward the East. Just why this is true is something the oystermen have never been able t o fathom. There are miles upon miles of these oyster formations or bars in Apalachicola Bay, and sometimes they attain such a height from the bottom of the bay that there is scant room for boats to pass over and even at high-tide and in clear weather the boats are 01bliged to feel their way cautiously when crossing these bars The choicest oysters in Apalachicol a Bay are said to come from around St. Vincent bland and Indian Pass. Small sloop used in tonging oysters near Apalachicola returning with a load. water over the oyster beds, plus a wealth of oyster forage in t he red c l ay silt is mainly respons i ble for the great delicacy of the Apa l achicola oyster. Living in clean water and eating clean food gives this oyster a cka n taste which has been commented upon by lovers of this particular form of sea fo od. Apa la chicola, the center of the Apala chicola oyster industry, lives and breathes and has its being in this industry. A part of Apa la chicola is situated on the North shore of the bay of the same n ame. Two miles North .is the mouth of the Apala c hicola River and three mil es further North t he Jackson River emp ties out of Lake Wimico and flows into the broad stream. Apalachicola Bay is an exte n sion of St. George Sound on the East, in which i s located Dog Island, St. George's Island, Cape St. George, Flag Island and St. Vincent Island. St. Vincent Sounu joins Apalachicola Bay on the West. Brother's River passes on the West of Forbes Island, above the port, and the Apalachicola flows on the East of this island. The entrance to this pass is made through the West Pass, which is skirted by Flag I sland, St. Vincent Island and the Sand Island Pass, which entrance is be-Car of oysters ready to be run aboard a steamer. tween Cape St. George N.ew Pass is between St. George Island and Cape St. George and the East Pass is between Dog Island and Fox Point. The East Pass is used for vessels of deep draft entering th e bay. The water in this pass is twenty and one-half feet in a dredged channe l of one hundred and fifty f eet, well-marked by bell buoys. The West Pass is some-It was something like fifty years ago that the oysters from Apalachico la Bay were first commercialized. That was be fore the railroads were dreamed of in (Continued on page 80) Converted destroyer used by Florida State Shellfish Commissioner Hodges. 49

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. .. It is an accepted fact that the population of the world --and that means the United States as well-is .increasing faster than the food production. Right .he r e in the most favored land man has ever known we have ample evidences of the truth of this statement at first hand. N othing, however, is more indica tive of the situation than the high prices now being paid f o r the actual necessities of life. Within a decade they have practically quadrupled. What will they be fifty years from now?" "History records certain which can be easily verified, and, because this nation has not experienced the pangs of hunger and seen the gaunt figures of the wasted forms pathetically awaiting the call of the s h a d o w y boatman, the h orror of it has not been i m p r e s s e d upon us N e v e r t h e 1 ess it is a pro phecy, as sure to come true as the rising and setting of the c;un, that, with a slowly increasingj food supply and a rapidly increasing population, starva .. tion a w a i t s many now living and millions yet unborn." Dr. Aughinbaugh, who makes some astounding statements of fact in his article herewith presented. SEVEN BILLION DoLLARS wORTH of FooD Florida Can Contribute to the Dining Tables of a Hungry World Enough Food Materials to Hold Off the Famine Juggernaut for a Oentury By W E A ughin baugh, M.D., LL.B., LL. M. Formerly Professor of Forei_qn Trade and Economics, New York University; Profess or of Foreign Trade and Economics, Columbia University; Editor, The New York Commercial Member of the Bar, Supreme Court of the United States. APPROXIMATELY two hundred years ago, Carlyle, the great Scotch philosopher said: "The thinking of the world is done by one-half of one per cent. of its popu lat ion. Had Carlyle lived today, he unquestionably would have amended that remark by substituting "one one thousandth of one per cent." for the phrase "one-half of one per cent." and been nearer the truth. Another profound economist, Dr. East, says: "A few thousand brains have given the world all that has brought it above savagery. As agents of civilization, the other hundreds of millions are negli gible." Substantially the same thoughts have been expressed by such mental leaders as Fisher of Yale, Stoddard of Harvard, Ross of the Universit,Y of Wisconsin, Johnson of the Univet;s1ty of Pittsburgh, so Laughlin of Carnegie Institute, Davenport of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Whitney, Secretary of the Eugenics Committee of the United States, Madison Grant, Edward Albert Wig-gam, and others. These thinkers of this nation, as well as the intellectual giants of other coun tries know that the entire world is right now confronted by a food famine, the like of which mankind has never ex perienced. There have been world food famines before when death stalked through the land claiming his tens of millions, when cannibalism broke out and men ate their own flesh and blood, such as during the years 1581 to 1603 in both Ireland and Persia, and right down through the centuries, until as recently as ten years ago in China, when human beings fought for and destroyed forests in order that they might eat the leaves the roots a nd the barks of trees to keep the spark of life glowing. History re cords these facts which can be easily verified, and because this nation has not experienced the pangs of hunger nor seen the gaunt figures of wasted forms pathetically awaiting the call of the shadowy boatman, the horror of it has not been impressed upon us. Never theless, it is a prophesy, as sure to come true as the rising and setting of the sun, that with a slowly increasing food sup ply and a rapidly increasing popula tion, starvation awaits many now living and millions yet unborn. The student, the scientist and the thinker feel that it is exceedingly questionable if a suffi cient food supply can be provided, with in this century, even if the birth rate be reduced by such appropriate means as selective breedipg. Let us for the moment eliminate the

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United States and briefly consider statement as it applies to two of the most populous countries-India and China. India with her 350,000,000 popu lation is always facing famine. Between 1876 and 1900, in that country, there were eighteen famines which killed 26 ,000,000 Hindus. It is a sad fact that at present but four per cent. of her inhabitants eat three meals daily, while the remaining ninety-six per cent. eat when they can and what they can, averaging a little better than one square meal per person per day. THE dark cloud of famine has at ways hovered over C hina, and often its stifling mantle has fallen upon the land. In the past century starvation alone has snuffed out the lives of more than !50,000 000 Chinese. The one thing that has kept China, with her 450,000 000 souls, subdued and in the background in every sense of the word is her enormous infant mortality-the heaviest in all the world. Startling as it may seem, it is nevertheless true that four out of every five children born in that country die before reaching the age of three months. This unprecedented death rate permitted China to exist, although at all times fully ninety-five per cent. of her inhabitants were either starving or on the verge of starvation. What will happen to the world when China raises her standards of civilization to those of this country baffles imagination, and today China is in the process of doing that very thing. The situation is rapidly changing. Due to the work of the Rockefeller Foundation, which is now spending millions of dollars in what was once poetically called the "Flowery Kingdom," in th< establishing of medi cal missions and medical colleges for the purpose of teaching the natives sanitation and preventive medicine, it will not be long before millions of children whose lives might formerly have been extinguished on the altar of ignorance will live to adult life. What will then happen? Is it not fair to assumt: that within twenty-five yea rs the popu lation of China, one-third of which is now Mohammedan, consequently polyg amous and therefore more apt to increase its birth rate than a natio n strictly monagamous, will increase to approximately 600,000 000 souls? And will not modern medicine and modern sanitation, either through contact or through the same agency now at work in China, be introduced to other Orien tal and polygamous nations, already over-populated, with the inevitable result that there will be hundreds of mil lions of people with which to reckon, for remember that practically two-thirds of the world's population are today followers of the Prophet and literal be lievers in the Koran, which obligates the faithful to have a minimum of three wiyes. WHAT will be the first demands of these teeming milli ons ? Food! What next? Clothes I And then what? Habitations-habitations more modern than those to which their ancestors were accustomed. By that time the standards of living of the entire world will be raised to the same standards which we today recognize in this country. What will be the result? These jostling, surging, forceful millions must be fed clothed and housed, or wars and pestilence more violent than ever before known will come, as sure as night follows day. I claim no originality for these expresstons of opinion. They have been the subject of numerous profound works by thoughtful, studious men. There is no need for me to dilate on this thought. It is an accepted fact that the population of the world-and that means the United States as wellis increasing faster than the food production. Right here in the most favored land man h as ever known, we have ample evidences of the truth of this statement at first hand. Nothing, however, is more indicative of the situation than the high prices now being paid for the actual necessities of life. With in a decade they have practically quadrupled. What will they be fifty years from now? Europe cannot feed its own population. Asia for more than three hundred years has always been on the verge of starvation, one fa,mine treading upon the heels of another. The United States and Canada, which formerly exported foodstuffs, are today heavy buyers of grains, meats and other necessi ties. The available productive areas of "The available productive areas of Central and South America, and Africa as weU, are being worked as never before to help in the pressing d e mands of the rest of the wor ld for food Certainly before a, n o t h e r fifty years hav e passed the crisis will be upon the inhabitants of this e arth and in many places the pangs of hunger will be felt whe re, l ess than half a cent14ry previous, p len t y and pros perity r e igned Central and South America, and Africa as well, are being worked as never before to help in the pressing demands of the rest of the world for food Certainly before another fifty years have passed, the crisis will be upon the inhabitants of this earth and in many places the pangs of hunger will be felt where less than half a century previous plenty and prosperity reigned There is no guess work about this. It is a cold-blooded statement of fact, as capable of being demonstrated as any geometric theorem. The grave problem now confronting the world is how we can accomplish the expansion in food production and how we can cut down the excessive waste in food use, for which this countary above all others is noted. Herbert Joseph Spinden answers thts query in the only sane manner and offers the only possible solution. He says: "The expansion must come from first putting more lands under the plow; secondly, heavier yields from present areas by Improved agricultural methods; thirdly, from developing the sources of food in non-arable land; fourthly, from retrieving such food as the wide seas offer. Beyond this, there is the wild gamble that food will found in the chemists' retorts in such quantities as to shame the miracles of the loaves and the fishes." The greatest chance offered man for staying this catastrophe already rushing upon us is through the cultivation of the soil -the true basi s of wealth. And this gives Florida the opportunity of serving the world as no state, no nation ever did or could. Florida has available for productive purposes-and by that I do not mean swamp lands and other acreage that cannot be tilled-but land the husbandman, a total area of 22,000,000 acres, of which 999,520 acres were in cultivation last year, yielding a total of $103,550,000 worth of foodstuffs; ex clusive of dairy and poultry products. HENRY FORD says that farmer in the northern states, using modern agricultural machinery and up-to-date metho ds, can plant, till and harvest his crops and do all the farm work necessary in forty five days of actual labor, reckoning eight !hours to the day. Bear this thought in mind, for it IS pertinent to the issue. Under cultivation using modern methods and _improved farming machin ery, Florida's 22,000,000 acres, which can due to richness of soil and climatic conditions-yield three crops per year, are easily able to produce the equivalent of 66,000,000 acres of food necessities in what would amount to about five months of actual labor, thereby releasing the farmer for factory work, other employment or relaxation, for seven months of each year. There is nothing complex or involved in this estimate. A school boy can easily make the calcula tion. And now let us have another example in mental arithmetic. If 999,520 acres of land produced in one year foodstuffs to the value of $103,550 000 exclusive of dairy and poultry produ{;ts, how much will 66,000,000 acres of similar land produce in one year? Simple mn! tiplication will show that these 66,000 ,000 acres are P
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ARCHITECTURE A spacious home showing strong Mediterranean the firr.t of one thousand large homes de signed for erection at Tampa Beach. The house was originally intended for placement on an inside plot facing a canal but, as shown in the plan on opposite page, it has been modified for placement on the beach itself. FLORIDA'S QUEST OF MEDITERRANEAN ART IN ARCHITECTTJRE MUCH has been written and told about what is popularly known as the Mediterranean or ..l. Riviera type of Architecture. Unfortunately, a few examples have been taken as descriptive of all that it took centuries to produce. This raises the question as to what influences among the diverse nations bordering on the Mediterranean have made it pos sible to class the architecture unde r one heading. It is common to say tha t a thing is as old as Egypt. Everyone has heard of the Pyramids, but .so much is not known of other civilizations that flour ished on the shores of the Mediter ranean. Although these Mediterranean people may not have shared the same race or language, yet they have been subject to certain of the same traditions. At one time, they all bore the yoke of Imperial Rome. At another, when the Crescent rose in the South and the Arab turned to the founding of an Empire, he, too, faced the Mediterranean and brought with him an influence from Asia and the Mohammedan. Later, when the 52 By Folger Johnson Member American Institute of A rch itects revival in classic art became general, the Mediterranean countries felt equally the influence of the Renaissance The Mediterranean was the natural channel of intercourse between the North and South, the meeting place or mart in which the refinement and lux ury of the known world were brought together. Roads were few and danger ous while the sea offered easy access to those dwelling along its shores. Thus the architecture of these Mediterranean nations was knit together through con quest, migration, the interchange of commerce, and the spread of certain architectural forms through trade guilds such as the famous Commachine Guild of Italy. In Spain, Northern Africa, and Sicil y, the classic tradition in architecture was tempered by the influence of Moorish, Arab, or Saracen art. Along the Adria tic a t Venice, Rimini, Ravenna, and Dalmatia, there a blending of the classic with the Oriental derived from old Byzantium. The g reat empires of the M e d iterran ean, while composed of merchants, en-joyed military anc,l naval supremacy with which they guar'ded the wealth of the world on a solid basis of reat achievement. They enjoyed a sense o f permanency and set themselves to de velop a style of architecture suitable to. their position as a haunt of pleasure and: luxury for the known world. But even greater than the influence of historica l tradition was that of cli mate, in Spain, Southern France, North. Africa, and Dalmatia. All these coun tries have a high degree of heat, bril liant sunshine. and a requisite of cooL rooms and shaded court yards. In all of them the heat is tempered by the sea. It is no wonder the Northerner came down from his land of snow and ice to find a patio in which he could regale himself with grapes and oranges which grew above his head, fruits of which before he had only heard, while all his dreams of a cold and pitiless North were wafted away by the balmy breezes of an opalescent sea. So he paved his. walks with parti-colored tile s, stuccoed his house in harmonious colors, and introcluced carved capitals and enrich

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IN F'LORIDA ments which nowhere else were to be .seen. His home was open and the sea was his playground, well exemplified by the Venetian ceremony of the "Marriage of the Sea." He designed his ibuildings to give charm as well as comfort and to grace official functions. It is to this culture and this back ground that Florida turns in quest of "Art in Architecture. The physical conditions of the Mediterranean are strikingly like those of Florida, but Florida escapes the aridity of certain sections of Spain .and Italy; suffers no droughts, and thus has a distinct advantage over the Mediterranean coun tries. However, this climate should produce the same habits of life The same type of architecture developed by the Moor of house and patio should sene as well here. It may truthfully be said that Florida can find no better art to draw from than the varied, yet harmonious examples that edge the water from Venice to the great Rock of Gibraltar. In Dalmatia, especially, there is a great field of inspiration which i s yet untouched. That land of palms and a loes facing a sheltered sea, felt the in fluence of many nations and its archi-tects early learned to appropriate loggia and cortile Saracen arabesque and Byzantine dome and blend them into a symphonic whole. Those who have seen the orange boats loading at Spalato and the bathers on the white sands of Ragusa cannot doubt that the climate is reminiscent of Florida and the vatiety of choice offered for agricultural inspirat ion as tempting in Dalmatia as in Spain. Appropriation of Mediterranean art cannot fail to have its effect upon the tastes and habits of the people of Florida. An environment is being obtained here which is different from that in any other state in the Union. The absence of industrial life, the deliberate establishment of communities in which the chief object is the enjoyment of leisure, together with the creation of harmonious backgrounds in which to express it, is rapidly producing social conditions in which art may grow and live. Natural reactions to these surroundings will tend eventually to recreate the culture of the Renaissance. In turning to the Mediterranean in its quest, Florida seeks to express those human qualities in art which make the architecture of Spain, Italy, and Dalmatia so alive today. Florida need offer no defense in appropriating the patio of the Moor and Spaniard or the cortile of the Italian with loggia and fountain. Florida, however, includes one aped fie change. If the exterior of the house on the Mediterranean was simp le and ratl:ter bare w ith only the interior en riched and the patio intended for the master and not the public, Florida is bringing the charm of the interior to the street and allowing the passer-by to glimpse the patio. Thus the enrichment is bestowed to a certain extent upon the public. High, white-washed garden walls of Andalusia, against which are placed trees or grown vines, give way in Florida, under the spell of democratic mood, to lower walls and screen planting. However, in Florida have reappeared the polychrome tile of the Moor with its geometric pattern and the Lucca Della Robbia tile of Renaissance Italy. Wrought or cast metal work with ornamental cresting as in the Cathedrals of old Spain, woodwork in brown and gray, enriched in color, (Continued on page 103) Ci\Cu,.,;o FLOOR.. PLAN f'O LG!':!L JOttti.::>OH h .. c n 1 rtc. T Lower floor plan showing the patio surrounded by living-room and kitchen, on either side of the front, with the dining-room and stairs leading to the upper floor stretching across the back; the library extends toward the right and is flanked on both sides by a garden. The combination garage and boathouse is a unique feature. 53

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I N T E R I 0 R C o urlesy Parkland Estates L i v ing-room in the home of Mr. William L V a n Dyke, P arkland Esta t e s, Tampa. The chief p oint s of i n t e r est i n the fu r n ishi ngs are the d ivan and chair i n t h e Italia n Renaissa n ce mode. The divan is a des c endant o f t h e cass apanca or chest-bench s e t u pon a platform, and g iven a r m s and b a ck. I t was origi n a lly a wall p ie ce but comfort-loving Americ a d raws i t up to the firep la ce A SUCC ESSFUL I NTERIOR IN THE SP ANISH MANNER I F America's prosperity forces her to plead guilty to money-madness -and we do not grant that it does -she is seeking, at lea st, a worthy conva lescence in art; art in the abstract sense of the study of aesthetics; art in the practical sense as applied to decoration in the home. Presumably, it is this very maligned prosperity that has awakened the urge for art by giving leisure for cultural advantages that alone can pave the way for life on a higher plane: travel read ing, study, intercourse with the initiate observance of works of art. And the most widespread benefits o f this revived interest in art is finding its best expression in the latter field-the art of the interior decorator. His i s the opportunity to make art vital, practical, intimate, so that it becomes a part of the daily routine of living. Never before have so many American homes shown such artistry in their 54 By Georgiana Whitby decoration as they do today. Americans at l eas t a r e demanding the same high quality in home furnishing that they insist upon in their clothes, their transportation faciliti es their food; in fact, in every phase of living The horrors of shiny oak furniture, and the so-called "missio n modes are ancient history and the deve lopment of the present brings us to the idealistic in workmanship, the best in form, the most exquisite in texture, the purest in color. In Florida the strongest influence is toward the Renaissance mode, both Spanish and Italian, with all the color ful atmosphere which its introduction implies But there are two very de cided dangers that are threatening, or rather that are evident, in the interior decoration being practiced here. One is the patent or standardized Renaissance interior, with no individual touch to establish the identity of the owner of the home. This interior displays "type" furniture, usually very good, but the identical number of pieces, the identica l draper ies, the identical conglomeration of colors c in c hes the paten t stamp with an identical grouping of the pieces a s set to rule as a geometrical problem. The other is a Renaissance interior o f the extreme opposite style: the bizarre interior, the result of an imagination run riot. Both are the works of inexperienced decorators who, like the unlicensed archi tect, have had this whole sale opportunity for original work dumped at their front doors and are not sufficiently full grown to do it justice. Such actual fortunes are being spent in Florida for homes, and home decoration that it seems a lmost a tragedy for home-makers to rush into the thing due consideration. A home should be bought to last a lifetime: furniture, tapest ries, rugs, accessories, should be of permanent quality; colors

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DECORATION Two posi t ions of the d ivan and chair have been pic tured in order to a ffo r d adequat e v iew of the exquisite carving in which the Italian a s w ell as Spa ni ard excelled The lion' s p a w beloved emblem of the Roma n is p r o minent in the desi g n. The p ieces are buil t on a walnut base, are monumental i n outline and m assive i n cons t r u c t ion, as was much of the Italian Renaissance furniture. employed should be easy to live with, both restful and stimulating. The ancients had color brought down to a science as exact in combination, almost as mathematics; the Mediaeval peoples reached their more romantic, but quite as worthy style through adventure in color experimentation, and it is in this uncertain stage that many Floridans are, at present, foundering. Some decorators have achieved the gold inlays, the rich reds and blues, so harmonious with Renaissance furnishings, but others have merely gathered together a hodge podge of crude colors Yet even in this failure there is hope, for it marks, at least, a movement away from the subdued tones that have been looked upon too long as the essence of r efinement, and most certainl y are not suitabl e for semi-tropical Florida Notwithstanding this formative stage through which Florida is struggling, and long after the "Spanish" house that is a charlatan has been torn down, the Renaissance furnishings that have no kinship to noble craftsmanship have been discarded, it will be found that the truly artistic home will have survived the pionee r stages of development when the most garish h o mes a n d furnish ings were stamped Renaissance and imposed upon unsu_specting Flori dians. There is this promis ing feature in the present situation, too: in every home that we have visited we have found many attractive features embodied in the decoration even though we could not give wholehearted endorsement to the entire scheme. In fact, in the borne of Mr. and Mrs. William L Van Dyke, Parkland Estates, Tampa, we discovered a divan and chair of the Ital ian Renaissance period worthy of a story in t hemselves. They are monumental in outline, massively constructed as was much of the furniture of that period, and built on a walnut base exquisitely curved and upholstered in velo u r in deep rich tone of rose and tan. Like the Spaniard, the Italian excelled in wood carving and his facility in this medium is attested to by the beautifully carved choir stalls of the churches, some of which are being r eproduced for use as seats in the music rooms of Florida homes. In real ity, Italian and especially Florentine furniture can be classed as mini ature monuments of architecture, so closely did the designers follow the carved pi l asters, portals, arches and cornices of building des igns in the making of their cabinets, and o f t he latter day chests That Italians were as successful in the minor arts as they were in the fine arts and created the inost exqu1s1te and originall styles in furniture, was partly due to the fact that the most renowned sculptors and artists designed and dec orated\ chests and other furni t ure, Miche langelo himself havi ng painted panel decorations on some of these rare pieces. But the decoration on most of the Italian furni ture, particularly the F lor entine, is restrained in accordance with the use for which the piece was intended. Thus in the divan and chair illustrated, it will be noticed that the carving is confined to the legs and the base of the piec es, so that it does not interfere with their function as a resting: place. There was yet another reason for this restraint in decoration: the Italians grouped all massive pieces of furniture against the wall and left lit tle in the center of the room. This. gave the room an appearance of importance and grandeur that it would have lacked otherwise. When seats, other than those against the wall were need ed, the easily carried X chairs were brought forward and these, with a. small table and a wrought iron standing-lamp, that were usually allowed a permanent place in the center df the room, were all sufficient for the formal' Italian. (Continued page 104) s s

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Courtesy of Torr Furnitltre Co. The Sarouk is a rug of short nap variety but woven so closely and out of such a fine quality of wool as to make it one of the most desirable of Oriental rugs. It is noted for its soft shades of blue and rose and the pleasing designs formed by the of these co l o r s The F'LORIDA HOME A DEPARTMENT OF PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS FOR THE BUSY HOUSEWIFE Conducted by Jane Way G ive Forethought to the Floor Cove ring I N furnishing a home we are likel y to lose our perspective in the rela tive importance of things and lay too great a !!tress upon objects which will be on the lev el of the eye rather than on floor coverings. Yet it is the floor covering as part o f the background of a room, tha t assembles the objects in the room, brings them into focus knits the scheme of decoration into a harmonious whole instead of leaving it in broken fragments. Granted that floor coverings are a most important feature of decoration, let us make a survey of the rugs most generally used for this purpose, both fr o m a practical and aesthetic viewpoint. The first point to be considered is the floor space. A long, narrow hall would naturally take a runner rug and a rectangular room, a rug of similar shape, but variations in shape, as well as in type and color, must be decided upon through an understanding of the use to which the room is to be put and of the 56 styl e of furniture employed. Oval Wiltons intro duce a nice note of variety in a bed-room, whi l e an oval rag or hook rug is delightful in either a bed or living-room, if it is of Colonial atmosphere. Broadly, a rug that covers the entire floor, without showing a margin, kes the room appear larger; scatter-size rugs, by breakin g up the space have the opposite effect. Decorators, as a rule, advise that a rug be large enough to allow the important pieces of furniture to stand upon it; but, con trarily, one of the most noted decorators in the country used an Oriental runner on either side of the dining-room table in a wealthy Florida home. This room, however, was more in the dimensions of a dininghall than of the smaller dining-room of the average home, so, in the last analysis, individual taste and the floor space must be the deciding. factors. The solid color, or two-toned rug, like the neutral toned wall, is always a safe choice but i t has this in common with all perfectly safe things; it i s unin-teresting and not nearly so suitable to the Florida home as a rug disp laying harmonious co lors in good design: that is, if the other furnishings a r e selected in accordance with such a scheme. An Oriental rug used in a room of Italian or Spanish atmosphere has the faculty of erasing period and sec tional lines and making a pleasing ensemble of the scatter ed units, and a Persian Orien tal is eminently adaptable to homes of this type since it was the Persian that was originally used during the Renai ssance period. Hand-tufted rugs of Ital:v France. Spain and other countries of Southern Europe have gained welldeserved favor, and the Chinese Orien tal is a lso being used to good effect. The Chinese rugs were not available as were the Persian, in Mediaeval t i mes, beco.use of lack of transportation, and their use i s of more recent date. Some decorators claim success in employing them with delicate French furniture, and still others declare they can be introduced into Colonia l rooms if a piece or two

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ot lacquered furniture, bits of Chinese embroidery and pieces of Chinese porcelain are utilized as details to complete the scheme. Not one specimen of the very ancient Chinese rugs exists today. Most of the Chinese Orientals n o w available were woven in the Ch'ien Lung period and their value was not recognized until the Boxer uprising brought all things Chinese, including Chinese art, to our notice. The colors of the Chi nese rugs are character istically different from those of the other Orientals; here we have the famous "Chinese blue," dark blue, robin's egg b lue, turquoise; the Imperial yellow, and the odd shades of red always escaping the primary color. Unlike the Persian rugs, the Chinese show restraint in use of color and keep within the range of but a few colors for each rug. Courtesy of Tarr Fmniful'e Co. Pit<:ii N ,of ai'Jt>o.Wi h the re propnctiops at are on the '!rltnow 111 9 der to secure one as nearly hke them as poss 'ble. Contrary to'the. general impression regarding Ori ental rugs, they are not all Persian rugs. We have spoken of the Chinese Oriental, but there is also the Japanese Oriental, and yet other fine pieces woven in Asia Minor, in and around the Caucasus Mountains and the Transcaspian Territory. In comparison with the perfect products of the Persian Court manufactories oi the sixteenth and seventeenth centurie s, such as the Williams Tree Rug, which is now on display in the Metropolitan Museum, New York, the Persian rug shows a deplorable decad ence. Their designs are always symbolic of their philosophies. There is the Swastika or sacred cross, the wave embl em, the Knot oi Destiny, the Circle of Happiness the Dragon that de -The Lilahan is a high-pile rug made of very much heavier wool than the Sarouk but woven more loosely. The colors of this particular rug are old Of the carpets of Asia Minor, the Bergama is probably the one most faorably known to the average buyer. The old Pergamus of the Greeks, now the modern city of Bergama, has for centuries been the seat of an extensive carpet manufactory, notes power, and certain flowers that signify joy. A familiar pattern is that of a flower and leaf carried out in an all -over diaper design. The warp of the Chinese Oriental is somewhat thicker than that of the other rugs which gives a slightly looser weave, but the rugs are rich and beau tiful nevertheless, and the ear-marks may be accepted as a dignified use of symbolism in design, and a distinctive employment of the characteristic Chinese colors. The rush rugs from Chi na, woven from swamp grass in natural color. b rown, red, and green. are well adapted for sun porches and terraces, but only where they are protected from the weather. Handsome chenille rugs, although machine -made, can be counted on to iook well in any type of room, particularly now that this rug can be woven seamless in almost any width and length. Linen rugs are practical for homes of Winter tourists in Florida, for they are moth-proof and can be left safely to take care of themselves when the home is closed. In the purchase of all rugs there are three general features that must be kept in mind: Texture, col or and design; but in selecting an Oriental these qualifications must be raised to a standard of rare excellence. rose and dark blue, which give it a rich tone. there are so many varieties of Orientals and the range in price is so great, that one should know something ahout them, if only a little, before the purchase is made. Antique Orientals are exceed ingly rare and should never be bargained for except by an expert. But the layman should study the fine points of these antique rugs in museums or wherever they can be seen, so that one can compare the qualities of these rare Courtesy of Davis Island Corp. and in addition it plays the role of a place of export for the entire products of the rural population of the hinterland of Asia Minor and of the nomadic tribes roaming between Armenia and the West. For this reason all o f these carpets bear the common name of Bergama. Some of them show a great resemblaace in reproduction to the very ancient and purely Turkish patterns with a constant geometrical tendency and the ever re-curring striped Kelmin ou the narrow sides. There is also a similarity in the manner of knottmg and in the type of wool used The warp and welt are always of wool and the knotting material often has a strong brilliancy and a high pile. Through this high pile they appear rather coarser in knotting than they are in reality. As products of primitive art they are decided in color but, nevertheless, harmonious in tone. In this and many other points they resemble the car;cts from the Caucasus. Their variety is inexhaustible and they offer an interesting field for the home decor ator. Of the rugs made in and The selection of a domestic rug of standard make is not a difficult task if one deals with a reliable firm and is willing to pay for a good example, but Nothing adds so much to the convenience of housekeeping as a breakfast nook. a r o u n d t h e Caucasus Mountains the Kasak is said to be the most popular one availab le here. This type is of special interest because, while its units of design are abrupt and somewhat scattered and its colors a r e powerful and b rilliant there is a strong sense of unity created by these very contrasts. The prophet-green, r a n g i n g ( C 011 page 76) 57

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"These gentlemen have just offered you half a million dollars for those papers and Gross would prob ably pay twice that amount for them, said Mahoney. "But there's another angle to this case," replied Franklin, his mind beginning to function normally again The Story of THE PHANTOM WOMAN By Maurice Coon: s of '1The Skeleton of Warwic k Manor," "Threads of Gilt," "The R e d Mark," "Pretense," "Cattle Barons," etc. THE STORY THus FAR: PhiliP Franklin, a -bond salesman, is brusquely rejected as a prosPective son-in-law by Gregory Rogers, millionaire financier, at the latter's winter place at Florida. Fxrious, young Franklin discusses the maH6r that night in the garden with Eli,c a beth Rogers :who tells him that he approached her /ather at the wroflg time. Rogers has four other fina,.ciers down from New York, auisting him to Plan a .stock market coup to ruin a lifelong enemy of his, Henry T. Gross Elieabeth says her father is .excited about the conference and asks Franklin to approach him at some future time. Franklin suggests a mctor ride Elizabet h -return s to the house for a wrap. Franklin, lefl -alone in the ga_rden, he ars a .bins the and engineered the mMrder in says he was in the pantry when the shot sounded. orde r to get possession of the plans for tht cou p But he teUs of a strange woman who arrived which was .tntended to rttin him. half an hour before the tragedy and demattded Arthur Kent, Rogers' secretary, claims to have to stay all night as her car had broken down been itt his r o om reading since ten o'clock. nearby. He told her it would be necessary for Frankliu voltinteers the fact of his havin g htard her to see Mr. Rogers and had seated her in the something i'l the garden and they all hurry out drawing-room adjoi,.ing the librar y, until the there to search for possible clues financial conference was concluded. She is gone Franklin, eluding the works a lone. 'H1 now. fittd. a gun tond firm whic/1 i s a the dining-room for a bit of suppe r Almost al substdiary selling organization of Gross's These once he had remembtred that the written f>/ans eve latY.ms, in conjunction with several others, for the coup were still on his desk itt the l ibrary although harmless in thems elves, make a stron1 and hurried l>ack to get them. The shot had case of circum stan tia l evidence a gaitt s t Franklitt followe d immediattly. They had rushed to tht when jnined to gether. He is arrested, chargld' library tog ether and fovnd him dead. The plans'llith {he murder of Gregory Rogers.

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PART II. Chapter IV Deserted FOR some moments all present stood in tense silence. The officers appeared grim but plainly triumphant. T h e financiers seemed dazed at the sudden turn events had taken. Thev stared at each other in wordless amazement. Kent, pale and shaken, licked his dry lips and glanced about with as much nervous apprehens ion as thoug h he were the accused man. B-ut Philip Franklin, his gaze shifting with the de speration of a trapped animal, could find no sign of sympathy in the circle of faces about him. The officers were obviously elated at having, as they were convinced, solved a crime which had threatened for a time to remain an enigma. The financiers were surprise d at the guilty man having been found within the murdered man's own household, so to ipeak, but the important thing was that he had been found. They were incensed not only <>ver their associate's murde r, but be -cause of the disappearance of the plans for the great coup. They wanted to see someone pay the penalty and it mattered but little to them who the culprit was. Kent was harder to analyze From his actions and facial expression it was possi ble to see only that he was -confused and decidedly uncomfortable. "Those plans mean millions to us,'' said the man with the gloomy eyes and -pessimistic mouth. His despondent manner had fled for the moment. His 1ips was set grimly, his eyes flashing .angrily in the direction of Franklin. "We would appreciate your m aking an effort to recover them as quickly as possible." That seemed to bring a new thought to Mahoney. He whirled on F ranklin "Have you still got those papers with you?'' ht: demanded. "No" snapped the young man furi ously.' "I never did have them." "I'll look, replied Mahoney simply' and stepped forward. He and Egan made a thorough job <>f the search but they found nothing 1n the way of incriminating evidence. "Th ey're not here, mister,'' admitted Mahoney regre tfully "But, of course, be's had plenty of time to disp ose of ., em. "That's what we know," gritted the capitalist. He consulted his associat.es in low tones then turned to Franklm. "'We regret Mr. Rogers' murder and bope to see justice done in payment for it but those papers are still more important to us We'll pay you half a million dollars for them." Franklin smiled ruefully and shrugged. "I'm mighty sorry but it's imposs ible for me to accept your offer. I haven't seen your plans, so it would be impos sible for me to produce them, eve n for such a handsome figure as you offer." He turned away and lightecl a cigarette. He had aged perceptibly in the past fifteen minutes. His face had become haggard; his eyes had taken on the expression of the hunted. Then he seeme d to r ealize his peril; he began t a lking excitedly, amplifying his remarks with quick, nervous gestures. "You can't hold me for this crime," h e argued, hi s vo ice shaking with apprehens ion "You have nothing against me but a fragile bit of circumstantial e vidence.'' "Haven't we?" answered Mahoney griml y. "Listen to the evidence in our possession from Oltr point of view. We're called to investigate the murder of Gregory Rogers, a New York mil lionaire spending the winter at his estate in Florida. We find that he has been holding a conference during the evening with four other eastern capitalists to get :lP a plan to wreck an old enemy of his. The papers outlining the plan are gone. "We find your shirt stud on the floor of the r oo m where the murder occurred. You admit that you had bee n here early in the evening to ask Rogers' consent to marry his 'daughter. He refused and it made you mad. That's enough of a motive in itself. But yo u knew all ab0ut this confere nce and its importance. These gentlemen have just offered you half a million ciollars for those papers which proves their value. Gross would probably pay twice that amount for them. Furthermore, we find that you work for Gross. And as additional damaging evidence, Mr. Egan discovers you trying to hide the ;,evolver with which the deed w as done. "I wasn't trying to hide it!" burst out Franklin. I had just found it.'' Mahoney shrugged and Egan grinned. He could visu a liz e his own and Mahoney's names strung in large black type across the front pages of the local newspapers. He had no doubt but what they would also 'make' the headlines of the Tampa papers and the dailies of other Florida cities Even the New York papers might prove generous with space in giving credit fo r the solving of the Rogers murder. An offer from other police departments o r from some famous private detective agency might follow. It was an intoxicating thought. "Well, that's the way the ev idence wou ld be presented in court,'' replied the chief complacently. "And I think you'll find it fairly complete when you go to trial. Of course, we'll probably haye a good deal more on you by that tim e.'' Franklin was dazed, panic-stricken at the conclusive summing up of the various details which he had considere d of such slight importance. From the viewpoint of the law he cou l d see that there was a damaging case against him. He fumbled at his collar The thought of the gallows for so m ething one hadn't done was a horrible thing. He wondered if he should be ab l e to retain (Continued 011 page 74) Franklin went to his cell i n what might be considered, under the circumstances, a cheerful frame of mind.

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Edna O'Harra with "Cappy Ricks," one of her Spitz dogs. I N Clermont, Florida, lives a woman who long cherished a beautiful faith and held steadfastly to a high ideal. She is Miss Edna L. O'Harra and in her you will find one who is far removed above the commonplace. She is fortunate in having lived to see her faith completely justified :Moreover, she is today in the enviable position of one who watches events pleasurably effect the realization of her ideal. Hers is an interesting story in which property and human values are strangely intermingled and pervaded by the spirit of a fourmonths' old baby girl whom she took to her heart, mothering it as her very own. Ten years ago Miss O 'Harra attended the University of Iowa, at Iowa City, Iowa. During her early girlhood nothing seemed quite so remote as a college education. Her father had died when she was a tot, leaving the family in unhappy circumstances. Her mother toiled, and toiled hard, to provide for herself and two children-the girl, Edna, and a boy who later died. Spurred by a desire for learning, Miss O'Harra, after graduating from preparatory school enrolled in the University. She had no money with which to defray the expenses of tuition. It was evident to everyone including herself, 60 One of the fertile stretches of Clermont where Nature yields her bounty. (lnsetJ Miss O'Harra's adopted sons, James and Sylvester. ONE FAI,TH WOMAN'S in FLORIDA Overcoming Monetary Troubles, Miss O'Harra of Clermont Has Achie ved Independence and Now Brings Happiness to Others By Dudley Malcolm Illustrat e d with Exclusive Photographs that if she was to acquire an education she would have to work her way through college. "And it was not an easy job," said Miss O'Harra in discussing this stage of her career. "I had absolutely no training in any kind of work that would enable me to earn a living while pursu ing my studies. The only things I knew were the tasks I had done at home But I put my limited knowledge to good use during the first term. I did anything that help ed me tow;trd my desired goal. I even washed dishes in the school cafeteria. And anyone who has ever washed dishes in any kind of cafeteria knows it is not too pleasant an occupa tion." But this was merely a transitory con dition. It was not long before the girl had b ecome acquainted with the necessities of her classm a tes and had capitalized them. Every school, every college has its dullards who require special tutoring in the evening to help them keep up with their clas ses. Sometimes this coaching is done by residents of the town ill' which the school or college is located sometimes it is done by the students attending the same institution The work pays well. Starting with one pupil, Miss O 'Harra increased her night clas s es until they had developed in .to a profitable venture. Tutoring was a step above her previous work, both in remuneration and congeniality. You who read this will probably say such conditions were ideal for the girl. She was earning a good living and at s a me time, getting a college tlon True enough But a new complica tion arose, one which altered matters greatly and was responsible for Miss O'Harra's later association with the Peninsula of Golden Opportunity. Iowa, despite its many charming as pects suffers from severe winters. With a blanket of snow and ice upon the ground and the thermometer registering many degrees below zero, the first and last seasons of the year play some un pleasant pranks with one's health All

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her 1ife, Miss O 'Harra bad suffered from ex <:essive colds during the winter months. It is true her natural inclination toward constant activity may have been respon sible for her against confinement dur ing the stormy months, tempting her to risk ex posure to the elements more frequently than was wise. But she loved the big outdoors and even the thought of long con .Unemen t within her home -irritated her. During the second year o f college work her cold s intensified, grew more frequent. Doctors warned her against ex posure. Her third year in -college was interrupted by a serious case of in,fiuenza The medicos shook their heads and said : "I told you so I" After her recovery they issued additional warn ings. The girl, young, .active, a dynamo of unused energy, r e strained her natural impulses. Never theless, she dreamed of a place in the South where the climate was delightful all the year round, where there were sunkissed hills and crystalline lakes, where the breezes were cool in summer .and warm in winter. A hard order to fill? Miss O 'Harra would h ave agreed with you untilOn a momentous day she happened upon a descriptive booklet announcing the desirability of Clermont as a place of residence. And it was not all descrip t ion that booklet. There were pages of One of the attractive homes of Cler mont snuggling among the deep ver dure of its environment. photographs supporting, verifying the text. Miss O'Harra read it entranced. The booklet seemed to be aimed direct ly at her. It promised a fulfillment of her dreams. Her heart ached to go to the land of sunshine ancl flow e r s, of hill s and lakes of delightful breezes during all four o f the seasons. But she remembered the necessity for an education It was a rather hard que stion for a girl to decide; here was a conflict between heart's desire and com pelling necessity On the one hand was her college work, on the other her longing for an ideal climate and this longing was abetted by seriously issued medical mandates. While she was still try ing to reach a decision a peculiar turn of cir cumstances complicated yet simplified the situa tion for her. During her stay in Iowa City, Miss O'Harra had formed one of those intimate friendships that endure throughout a life time Her friend was Miss Edyth Litzrodt, who conducted a con servatory of music in the same town. With this friend M i s s O 'Harra shared her dreams and her desires She spoke of Florida in such glowing terms, painted the l,)icture with such brilliant color s that before she was through Miss Litz rodt, too, was "sold" on the idea of going there. Much interest is b eing dis played at present in the Lure of Florida. [nnumerable theories have been ad vanced, many of them contradicting other s that have gone before. Regard less of what the explanation might be, che Lure exists. And it was sufficient ly strong to induce Miss Litzrodt to abandon h e r conservatory of music and th e bright future it promjsed. As soon as she could settle her affairs in Iowa In and around Clermont are many entrancing views like this. It is a "p1cture country" in the best sense. 61

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City satisfactorily, she bought a ticket for the Peninsular State and boarded the next train going in that direction. The impression which Miss Litzrodt received of Clermont and Florida generally was more than favorable. When she was certain this impression was a lasting one, she telegraphed back to Miss O 'Harra; "CUT SCHOOL IMMEDIATELY AND COME DOWN HERE STOP THE MOST WONDERFUL COUNTR Y I HAVE EVER SEEN." That message was all .Miss O'Harra needed as an impetus. The desire and the urge had existed for months yet she had hesitated. But her indeci s ion was abruptly terminated by Miss Litzrodt's telegram. A few hours after the message had been received Miss O'Harra was bound F lorid award. Arriving at Clermont she knew that here was the place of her dreams. Her eyes encountered a gently undulating country encrusted with clusters of crystalline lakes. She was enc hanted The two girls decided between them selves that, after a sight of this part of Florida, Iowa would henceforth be im possible. They strained their resources to the limit and managed to meet the first payment on a fifty-five acre farm which happened to be fo r sale and which suited both their fancies It was fortunate for them that real estate transfer at that time was co11ducted on the basis of' a small payment down and subsequent payments at lon g interva ls. Otherwise, with their extremely limited capital neither of them could have even con sidered the possibility of becoming land owners in their own right. Miss O'Harra's next move was to pay a flying visit to Iowa City and "sell" the idea of Florida to her mother. The girl's enthusiasm must have been infectious, because Mrs. O'Harra's conversion proved to be immediate and complete. However, one of the most difficult (if not the "lnost difficult) thing in view, was to find enough money with which to move their household effects and buy transportation for them selves. Miss O'Harra solved the problem by going to a bank in Iowa City and borrowing five hundred dollars on her open note. One is moved to wonder if this same transaction could be repeated today should the potential borrower be frank enough to confess that he intended using the money to defray the expenses of moving to Florida. proceeded to till the soil. It is an ironical fact that Miss O'Harra and Miss Litzrodt were known to everybody in Clermont as the "Iowa Farm Girls." The truth of the matter is, neither of them had been on a farm before they came to the Peninsular State. Both crops, as time passed, promised to net the girls a very satisfactory profit abov e their loan of four thousand dol lars. But as the harvesting season drew near their inexperience proved their downfall. A doctor will tell you that germs are the natural foes of man's physical health. A qualified farmer will tell you that the plant kingdom suffers additionally from insects, which science has, more or less placed under control. An experienced farmer, whether in Maine or Florida, Oregon or California uses preventives against these plant enemies The girls and their mothers were ambitious; they were energetic; but they lacked the knowledge of the qualified farmer. Their thirty acres of watermelons seemed to be prospering excep tionally well and, to them, there seemed to be no danger in leaving them for a brief interval during the ripening processes of nature. They went away. Two weeks later they returned to their watermelons. Although it was mid-summer the appearance of the field was precisely the same as if a light snow had fallen upon the vines during the previous night. A white blanket seemed to have spread over vines and fruit during the women farmers' absence. This puzzled them. It was beyond their range of farming knowledge. They sought expert advice on the phenomenon And they got it -much to their dismay. The truth was that during their absence the field had been attacked by melon aphis, an insidious little insect, and their crop was ruined, utterly, irreparably ruined. As a result, their year's labor yielded them exactly one hundred and fifty dollars against the four thousand dollars they had borrowed This naturally threw them more deep ly into debt. But instead of being dis couraged they attacked their job with even zeal. Their second year' s activlttes were a bit more profitable than the first. They couldn't help but appreciate the fact, nevertheless, that money was not coming in fast enough to amortize their debt. So Miss Litzrodt opened a conservatory of music in Clermont, while Miss O'Harra looked around for what profitable work she could find. An opportunity presented itself in the form of a Y. W. C. A. secretaryship at Beaumont, Texas. It was with a dull heart that she left Floridahowever brief her absence might prove. It will be seen that the attitude of the Iowan s toward the State and taken an entirely new turn. They had come to F lorida primarily because they had been attracted by the beautie s of the climate and country. It would have been a simple matter for them, when debts started to pile up, to surrender their land in payment. But both Miss O 'Harra and Miss Litzrodt had acquired a profound respect for the future of the State. They realized that it would be extremely difficult for them to meet the payments as they fell due but they a l so had faith in the future value of their land. This faith is further attested by the fact that Miss O'Harra bought a twenty-eight acre orange grove in the neighborhood of Clermont even before she had reached the point of clearing up her other long-over due obligations on the farm. It was a run-down grove and she was able to buy it for, as they say, a song. Moreover, the first "down-payment" was small enough to be an added temptation. It was in 1917 that Miss O 'Harra went to Texas. Be fore the end of 1919 she was back in the State of sunshine and flowers But in the meantime, she had formed another of those lasting frieni:lships with Miss Juanita Moore, financial secretary of the Y W. C. A at Beaumont. The friendship was so strong that when Miss O'Harra decided to return to Florida, she asked Miss Moore to accompany her. Of course, Miss Moore accepted promptly. (Try to picture anyone being invited to Florida and refusing to go!) But this move met with objections from Miss Moore's family who believed that a girl should not be away from the constant attention and protection of her mother. However, the family finally was won over and Miss O'Harra returned to Florida in company with her friend. The family was reunited a little later when Miss Moore's mother and brother moved to Clermont where they still live with her. However, the girls, together with their mothers, found themselves facing another serious problem in Florida. They had a fifty five acre farm on their hands, no capital with which to work it and no experience in farm cultivation. With characteristic c;01trage, the young woman went to a bank in Clermont and borrowed four thousand dollars for the crop. With this money they planted thirty acres in watermelons and ten acres in squash. Inexperienced though they were, Miss O'Harra, Miss Litzrodt, and their maternal aids ignored their city history, rolled up their sleeves and Miss O'Harra tries to interest little Polly Anna in the By 1920 Miss O'Harra's faith in Florida's future was (Continued on page 94) camera-man.. 62

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,. The "mystery" motor-boat, "Miss St. Petersburg," was built amid the jungleland of Maximo Point, Florida, and it was constructed in their spare hours by the Ballard boys. (In circle) "Miss St. Petersburg" hits a thirty-five mile gait on Tampa Bay's water speedway St. Petersburg's "mystery" speed-boat is willing to contest her capabilities with a _ny of the crack racers of her class at Miami or. Palm Beach, and this is no icUe boastfulness. (Above) .Bob" Ballard, who handled the craft in the first race, is here seen at the wheel The "MYsTE-RY" BoAT that WoN How Three Brothers in St. Petersburg Built Their Own Power Craft and Defeated All Contestants in a Thrilling Race Y EARS ago, a famous steamboat race was run down the Missis sippi River from St. Louis to New Orleans in which one of the vessels falling short of fuel burned furniture, fittings, fixtures and even part of her freight that she might keep up a full head of steam and win the race. When she finally docked at New Or leans, this particular steamship was the most dismantled boat that ever churned the waters of the Mexican Gulf. She was stripped of everything that could be pried or twisted loo se. About all of her original tonnage that remained were the en-gines and hull. By Harris Glenn -The Florida race was a motor-boat contest won by a craft of mystery which, when it glided to the starting line, looked for all the world like a packing case equipped with a gasoline engine. The race was-but this is getting away ahead of the story. The "why," and "how" and "wherefore" of the "mystery" boat which, like the pirate schooners of old, sailed under no national flag are first of all deserving of explanation. And here are the thrill ing facts in the case. If you have heard anything about motor-boat racing down Florida way, yeu will probably recall that the sport has long been a specialty of the Miami and Palm Beach neighborhoods. The West Coast sportsmen with as favor able, if not more favorable, natural boating advantages, have entirely neglected them and allowed the speedsters of the other side of Florida's face to monopolize the pastime. Things drifted along in this way until finally a trio of brothers fresh from the cornfields of Indiana established residence and a marine store in the sunshine city of In St. Petersburg, Florida, another boat race was run and won by a dismantled craft and in many respects this extraordinary contest, held over a triangular twelve mile course in Tampa Bay, was even more miraculous than the historical Missis sippi tilt in which the winner almost burned herself up in her strenuous efforts to be first to make port. "Bob" and "Bert" Ballard alternate in driving their marvelous home-made racing craft St. Petersburg. These boys had raced automobiles back on the dirt tracks of Hoosier dam. They had tried airship speeding when the thrills of mile -a-minute-motoring wore away. They knew how to build and repair engines. They could talk engineers' lingo. And despite the fact that they had been born in land far away from the sea, they loved salt water. (Continued on page 82) 63

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A close-up of edible bamboo shoots. They are eaten like asparagus. Many tons are imported yearly. Florida could supply the world market. Early morrung in a Florida bamboo rove, the ground with leafy light and shadow." New shoots and roots of the bamboo as they grow without cultivation. BAMBOO The Giant Grass Wonderful, Grown for Wealth, Food and Beauty By Dr. B. T. Galloway r4gricu.ltural Explorer Bureau of Plant Industry, United State s D e partment of Agriculture IMAGINE cool, luxuriant, tall and willowy bamboo growing in your backyard, on your farm, your vacant lot, and in the city's parks. It may be difficult for you to envision this, but not so the scientists of your Uncle Sam. If, however, you l iv e in Florida, it is a simple matter to listen to the whisperings of the delicate leaves and feel something of the mystery of the Orient in the swaying of their giant stalks. After long years of experiment and painstaking effort Dr. B. T Galloway, one of the great authorities on the bamboo, and his fellow scientists are enthusiastic over the possibilities of adding to the beauty of the nation, as well as its wealth, through the widespread cu lt iva-64 As Told to UTHAI VINCENT WILCOx tion of the many specie s of bamboo Right now there are groves 111 Brooksville, Florida, where the Department of Agriculture has studied the tall growing grasses in order to learn those most suitable for various l ocalities There are, in one or two other sections of the South, bamboo groves as a result of the study given to this most use ful plant. The visitor at Brooksville can catch beneath the bamboo a breath of the old-age mysteries of the East and find real rest beneath i t s branches. Dr. Galloway says it is noticed "that even the blase auto tourist, who probably gives little or no thought to the trees and shrubs past which he rushes, often pauses with astonishment and frequent-l y with awe as the towering culms of the giant grass come into view. Many of the culms are more than sixty feet high. A man entering such a grove for the fir s t t im e is like an ant entering a wheat field The ant, accustomed to being on smooth ground in short grass, suddenly finds itself in a new world where everything is out of proportion. But the beauty of bamboo grown in Florida is not' all. There is the opportunity of adding a new source of wealth to be found in the thousand and one purposes for which it is adapted. Dr. Galloway, speaking of the Orient, the native home of the bamboo, waxes eloquent. He says: "The uses of the bamboo in those parts of the world

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the house as well as the thatch on the ro of and paper for windows and awnings, for sheds and blinds for the veranda. Also beds, tables, chairs, cupboards and a thousand and one small articles of daily use come from bamboo Shaved, it is used for mattresses. Waterwheels are made from the stalk s as well as cages for birds. Vessels for holding wine and various liquids, the flower-stands that are so beautifully lacquer ed, the boatman's raft and his pole and his mat, all come from this where it flourishes are so numerous that to cata logue them would make a volume. It has been well stated that there is not in the entire vegetable kingdom another plant so intimately bound up with the life of man. This applies particularly to such thickly populated countries as China, Japan, Ceylon and Java. In the last-named country, which is only a little larger than Cub a, but has a popula tion of nearly 30,000,000 the bamboo is so woven into the life of the natives that i t is doubtful whether they could long exist without it." To some extent, what has been done in the Far tall grass,' A six year old growth of edible bamboo. When cooked the taste is similar to that of young sweet corn. "Plaiting and wickerwork of all kinds from coarse cups and baskets down to the delicate filigree with which porcelain vessels are en, cased are taken from the bamboo fiber. ;The fiber is also used to make great hats to protect their wearers frorrt 'the tropical sun. Fortune-telling is carried on by sticks of bamboo, and pipes of bamboo are smoked. Bamboo shoots are eaten with chop-sticks. Bamboo is everywhere, from the cradle to the grave. There could hardly be life in the Orient without it." East can be done here, according to those who have studied the grass. Dr. Galloway painted a word picture of the place which bamboo occupies in the scheme of life as found in these cen tury-old civilizations. "In the Orient the bamboo lends an indescribable charm to the landscape. In the cool of the evening, after the usual daily tropical rain, one may stand on an eminence overlooking lovely valleys, and the landscape for miles will be seen dotted with clumps of most wonderful bamboos. From beneath all these clumps the natives begin to emerge and soon the banks of the stream are alive with bathers dressed in their gay colored sarongs. "Nearly every bamboo clump shelters a little native hut or two. These picturesque homes blend so wonderfully into the bamboo frontage it is difficult to see them at all from above." He plainly indicated that this beauty of Java, Cey lon, and Japan and other countries could, in large measure, be duplicated here, when those living in suitable re gions awake to opportunity's call However, bamboo has another beauty; that of adaptability. It is all but im possible to appreciate the extent to which this giant grass is utilized in the regions where it is best-known and most appreciated. Dr. Galloway gives a partial glimple : "Bamboo furnishes the framework of Dr. Galloway cites these instances as evidence of the great use that can be made of this grass in Florida, now that it has been fully established that it can be grown in America. "Who knows," (Continued on page 84) A bamboo grove makes an ideal playground or children. It is very cool in summer and sheltered in winter. Poultry o all kinds and the bamboo seem to have an affinity, one with the other. They flourish together remarkablY. 65

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Li"hthouse at Mosquito Inlet, one of Florida's famous and picturesque East Coast beacons. The Cape Florida Lighthouse viewed from the land's end, photographed by H. Armstrong Roberts. SEACOAST L[ghthouse on Dry Tortugas, Florida, its black and white tower a signal by day and night. BEACONS For a Century Government Lighthouses Have Pointed a Path Along the Peninsula's Eastern Shore s By Charles Sterling Adams ONE of Florida' s famous heroes lies unwept, unhonored, and un sung. Be was only a lighthou se keeper. His was the education of so l itary vigil and lonely watch. He was not schoo l ed in science. He was a son of tbe sea who venerated the trade wind's voice. A man reared in a tropical jungle land A man of c o urage
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Suniland: The Magaz ine of F lorida 67 Do you want a "home and garden" or a "house and lot"? you look at the place in which you live, do you ever feel that thi is not the home deep imaged in your heart? When you dream of a place that satisfies your wish for comfort and pleasure, your l ove of beauty ... do the words "hou'se and lot" stir your imagination or-"home and garden"? IF YOU feel that what you want is still beyond your reach-then turn your home-bound fancy to the South-to Coral Gables. The investment .of just a few hun d red dollars can secure you a building plot in Coral Gable And a home there, gra cious and beaut iful can be built as cheaply as anywhere in the country. A home! Not a mere hou se! A home that combines with its neighbors to per. petuate in architecture and landscape the traditions of old Spain. That is designed to take full advantage of the climate and the landscape. That is built to enjoy to t he u tmost the pageant of a tropical year Cool in summer, warm in winter. Freshened daily by the spicy trade-winds. Sun-drenched, wreathed with tropical shrubbery Coral Gab les Opportunities for Profitable Investments are f: uerywher e Coral Gables offers unlimited opportu nit ies for investment. The home you will bu ild and which must be in accord with a definite city plan must increase in value as the city grows and the extraordinary developments mature. Countl ess inves-. to rs and home-builders have already secured substantial profits. Constant ex pansion is forcing a legitimate and rea son;lble advance on all property in this district. The Coupon Will 'Bring You 1(ex 'Beach's Vramatic Story-Free Rex Beach has written a fascinat ing tale about th e miracle of Coral Gab les. It tells the complete story of this city. We will also tell you about the special t rains and steamships that we run to Coral Gables at frequent intervals. If you shou l d take one of these trips, and buy property in Coral Gable.s, the cost of your tran sport3:tion will be refunded upon your r eturn. But first of allsign and mail the coupon-now! The 'J?..emarkable Opportunity for Investment 1920 census showed a growth i n Miami's population of Name'----------------------------------440 per cent in ten years Since then it has increa sed even more rap idly. Bank clearances today are ten times those of a year ago. Every ac tiv ity feels the stimulus of this tremendous growth, and especially is it mani fested in the increase of property values in the city and suburbs. In Coral Gables the values of home and industrial sites have increased amazingly 1 I l ...................................................... ... ..... ........... .. ... ........ .... .. ....... J every year for the past three years. Yet building plots in Coral Gables may now be secured by a small initial invest. ment. These plots a re offered in a wide range of which include all improve ments such. as streets, street l.igh.tin g elec tricity and water Twenty -five per cent 'is requ ired in cash, th e balance will be d i stributed in payments over a period of three years The Factsufbout (oral (]abies Cor al Gables is a city, adjoining the city of Miami itself. It is incorporated with a com mission form of government. It is h i ghly r estricted. It occup i es about Io,ooo acres of h igh, well-drained land. It is four years old. It has roo miles of w i de paved streets and bou l evards It has seven hotels comp l eted or und e r const ru ction It has 45 miles of wh i te way and so mi.les of intersectional street lighting. It has 6;4 m iles of beach frontage Two golf courses are now com p let ed, two more are building. A theatr e, two country dubs, a military academy, public schools and a college for young women are now i n actua l use. More than one thousand homes have already been erected, another thousand now under construction. Thirty million dollars have already been expended in development work. Additional plans call for at least twice that amount Seventy-five mil lion doUars worth of property has already been bought in Coral Gables. Mr. John McEntee Bo wman is now build ing the t en m i llion-dollar hotel, country club and bathing casino in Coral Gables to be known the Miami-Biltmore The Miami B iltmore Hotel opened tn j anuary, 1 9'l6 Coral Gables will als o contain the following build ings and improvements: The $rs,ooo,ooo University of Miam'i, the 1soo,ooo Mahi Temple of the Mystic Shrine, a$l ooo,ooo University HighSch,ool, a $150,000 Railway Station, a Stadium, a Conservatory of Music, and other remarkab]e proj ects.

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(Continued f rom page 66) the limit And then a point was reached where the iron and stee l grew no hotter. The conflagration had spent its fury. How e ver, the heat was so intense on the upper platform of the tower that the two cap tives marooned there thought they must surely cook to death The Indians far below were strangely quiet. Believing they had departed, the negro peered over the edge of the balcony. The reward of his curiosity was death. A Seminole killed the man with an arrow. The assistant light-keeper, a lmost un conscious, his bqdy a torment of burns, crazy for food, and water and with the sun beating down upon him mercilessly, lay like one dead on the crown of the metal tower. The Indians retired believ ing the white man had been burned to death. Night fell. Cooling breezes laved the wounds and sores of the skyhigh suf ferer. Despite these aids of nature, he spent a night of agony. Each hour he grew weaker. The next morning he was delirious. Death stalked in the offing. And then Providence intervened. A sail appeared as a dot on the distant horizon. Slowly, it grew larger and came nearer. T o the maro o ned victim of the Seminole attack, it seemed only a fan tasy. Nevertheless, he summoned all his remaining strength and using his shirt as a flag signaled the approaching vessel. It was a lighthouse cutter on an inspection tour. Its lookout saw the signal waved feebly from the top of the scarred struc ture. When the cutter anchored and sent a small boat ashore with officers and men, a problem arose; how to rescue the crip pled man from his precarious perch ninety feet above the ground. An improvised bow and arrow were ineffective in shooting a rescue line to the top of the tower Finally, the line was fastened to a ramrod which was then shot from a gun. The thin line fell within grasp of the sufferer, By means of it he hauled up a block a nd Pacific Reef Light, one of the many smaller Florida beacons. fall and fastened them, somehow, some where. A sailor ascended with the agility of a steeple-jack and bore the injured man in safety to terra firma. In the early days of lighthouse-keeping in Florida, perils and loneliness, isola tion and exile were the main rewards of the keepers Yet, without flinching, thes e pioneers stuck to their posts. The lights had to burn every night as long as ships passed along the commerce lanes. Most of the early lightkeepers deserve homage among Florida's unknown but faithful heroes. There were always the danger s from Indians the wilderness and jungle, sickness and disease, impure water supp ly, food shortage, hurricanes and tempests to be watched for and warded against. post of lightkeeper, with its responsibili ties, risks and hazards, was an unenviable one Candidates for the position were few. But t hose who qualified for the work and enlisted in its service were impregnated with devotion and loyalty. After the termination of the last Semi nole War, a new lighthouse was built at Cape Florida, in 1846, to replace the one ruined by the Indians. This light was ope rated efficiently and effectively until the Civil War when its illuminating apparatus was destroyed. The Federal light-station at Cape F lorida was discontinued for thir teen years after the last gun of Secession was fired The venerable old beacon tow er, however, still stands and is now main tained as a private aid for shipping in that vicinity. It is now a part of the recently sold Deering Estate and is operated for the benefit of pleasure yachts and commer cial shipping which chance to pass that way. If you are familiar with the navigation perils of the Florida east coast, you will appreciate the fact that the majority of the wrecks which have occurred in recent years have inv ariably been south -bound' ships that were hugging the shore too closely in an effort to escape the north ward surge of the Gulf Stream's mighty current. Northbound vessels plying through Florida waters hold their courses far from shore to gain benefit from th e flooding torrent racing toward the ice zone. The lower rockbound Florida coast, better known as the Florida straits or keys. is the danger zone of navigation. Even during the pioneering days of American commerce, skippers and coasting captains soon learned to steer clear of the shoals and reefs that abutted the southerly shores. The Florida reefs, if ob served carefully on a large map, show a pronounced con vex curvature as related to the shipping lanes of that vicinity. These rockribbed (Continued on p8ge 88) The old lighthouse at St. Augustine completed by t he U S. Government in 1842, and destroyed durinc a hurricane in 1874, when the site was washed away. 68

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Homes of Refinement in Artistic Surroundings Af:'ROM all c orners of the continent, folks J are coming to this land of inspiring subtropical beauty, seeking their ideal Southern home and the unique opportunities for t he enjoyment of life to the maximum which are available here throughout the year. Just such a plac e is --and particularly Miami Shores Island, wher e is being developed a complete community, with its own business sections, hotel and apartment house sections, and residential areas-its great park, and its nine-hole golf course-its in land waterway and its charming lake. And most of those who come hope to make their homes on or near the water, and in some. section deve loped with an eye to the artistic, as well as the pract ical-and in some sect;i o n where generous provi sio n has been for recreational facilities MIAMI S HORE S Entirely surrounded, as it is, by Biscayne Bay -the chid arbiter of values in the Miami d i s tri c t-"y o u will appreciate the fact tha t lo t prices will continue to advance rapidly as has b een the case with all Miami property located on or near thi s matchless body of water. And TODAY you may yet buy Miami Shores Island lots at the first price, a lthough the suppl y is diminishing daily. We advise you to act without delay. 12 5 E. F lagler Street MIAMI SHORES America's Mediterranean 'I Miami, F loriqa 69

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SuRvEY oF from page 43 \fS. ,yery cream of the famous Ridge Section. In point of be auty as well as from a practical point of view, this County offers land uns urp::t ssed anywhere in Florida. The principal factors necessary.are better transportation facilities on the part of the railroads, both for pas senger and freight traffic. This condition prevails all over the State of Florida,' however, owing to its unprecedented growth in population. Florida has only just begun to come into her own. When people realize that there is something more to Florida than just the National Playgrounds of the East Coast, and certain old, well -founded industries centering in Tampa, the seaport of the W Coast, there will be a steady influx of inhabitants who will farm to the very best advantages the extremely rich and fertile land abounding throughout the central portion of the State. As to opportunities for various popular sports, Polk County cedes the palm to no section or county in Florida. With its beautiful fresh water lakes as a center for aquati<: sports, and its already many completed golf courses, constructed by expertS, in conjunction \vith wellplanned and governed clubs, the rolling h 'i11s of this section offer a year (.1, round residence place whtch cannot be surpassed. As one prominent New Yorker recently remarked re garding the country adjacent to Lakeland, the largest city in Polk County, "This reminds me of \V estchester County back home, without the snow and ice and the many annoyances caused by Winter." Lakeland alone has one hundred and forty-nine residences scheduled so far for the next five weeks. The expenditures for building, according to permits issued so far this year, will amount to $1,399,790.00. Summing up: the Realty Boards of Polk County, without exception, are thoroughly satisfied as to the outlook for 1926, realizing that stable values caused by the qua lity of soil are sure to create the best of business. The. types of architecture, generally speaking, are well suited to the country. Good taste is the rule rather than the exception. The pictul"esque Spanish, diversified with the Colonial 70 and the English stucco and cross beamed effects, in the proper settings of graceful shade trees, offer a home land suitable to people of moderate means a s well as the wealthy. Big B u s in ess E n te rpri ses on The E a st C o ast By FRANK D. LANDER, ]R. Florida East Coast R epresen tati ve of SUNILAND Two buildings, the $12,500,000 Urmey Arms a p a r t m en t s in Coral Gables and the $10,000,000 FRANK D. LANDER,JLVilla Biscayne on Miami Beach, both to be started and completed in 1926, will represent a total cost of more than one-third the entire 1925 Miami building program; millions of dollars of development work such as laying streets, building country clubs, golf courses, hotels, parks and all the other features which go to make ideal living conditions, de layed in 1925 becaus, e of lack of materials resulting from inadequate transportation, are being rushed to completion; the spending of the $11,500 ,000 for which the citizens of Miami recently bonded themselves for harbor improvement, new bridges, new streets more street lighting and other public improvements, is being rushed forward with all speed consistent with business economy. Nineteen hundred and twenty-six will be Miami's greatest building year. The gigantic plans of the past are being converted into the reality of the present almost as rapidly a s new plans, even more stupendous, are being announced for the future. And what is true of its metropolis is true also, in an equal ratio, of all the other citie s of Florida's East Coast. In West Palm Beach, Fort Pierce and Fort Lauderdale, as well as dozens of splendid cities-in-themaking that are springing up so rapidly as to make one believe the entire East Coast will shortly be one continuous city, millions of dollars are being paid out, each Saturday night to laborers and more millions for materials. Transportation is better and will be still vastly better within ninety clays when the Seaboard has completed it s Miami extension. Northern manufacturers have greatly improved the facilities for Florida construction. Nothing looms up as a poss ibility for stopping, or even checking the work now in progress. It will not surprise even the mos t conservative of East Coast business observer:> if the money actually expended in 1926 building and improvements exceeds the amount spent in all previous years of Florida's development. And, after all, building-the investment in permanent improvements of stupendous sums by business men wise enough to have acquired them-is the surest barometer of permanent prosperity. T he C i t ie s o f Pinella s Are Building fo r the Futu r e By RICHARD J. SLOMAN Pinellas County Representative of .. ND PINELLAS COUNTY boasts such cities as Clear water, the County seat, ''\:Vhere it is Springtime all of R. J. SLOMAN the Time"; St. Petersburg, "The Sunshine City," a great tourist center; Beiieair, of goli fame, and Tarpon Springs, the largest sponge market in the world, and the home of the only sponge exchange in the United States. These cities, together with Dunedin, Pass-A-Grille, Largo, Safety Harbor, Ozona and Sutherland are all growing rapidly, and are connected with a network of fine hard-surfaced roads which cost over ten million dollars to construct. Pinellas County is growing substantially, because real money is being invested here for permanent developments for all year round usage. Thousands of homes, and business buildings and scores of fine hotels are being completed at a very great outlay. With all of this growth, however, Pinellas County is not on a "boom." Its values will continue to go higher, where real improvement is being made. The rapid growth of this section been heralded all over the world, (Contimted on page 72)

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida THE MASTER ACHIEVEMENT OF A MASTER COMMUNITY BUILDER YOU WILL FIND THAT SATISFYING FLORIDA INVESTMENT IN TAMPA Y OU will rarely find a bet ter i n v e s t m e n t than Tampa's North Side Country Club Area in Tampa on the West Coast-the Treasure Coast of Florida. For Tampa is Florida's Greatest City and the Country Club Area is the M a s t e r Achievement of B. L. Hamner -Tampa's Master Builder. T a m p a-a great port, a thriving industrial city, a rail road center, a distributing point, a delightful resort-offers the charm of all Florida with distinctive advantages for the home-seeker and investor. In Tampa prices have not kept pace with progress; values do not reflect activity, and great profits are still to be made on modest investments. The North Side Country C I u b Are a-Tampa's latest great developmentis being created as a home-land, play land with golf courses, bath ing beaches, club houses, shop ping districts, a p a r t m e n t houses, playfields, educational facilities, bridle paths, social centers. A city within a city, offering the refinements of a country estate, the conve niences of a cosmopolitan cen ter, the pleasures of a resort, and the investment stability of a municipal bond. Conceived by B. L. Hamner -a dreamer who makes dreams come true; designed by J. Franklin Meehan, famed land scape engineer and practical artist-the Country Club Area is being built by the B L. Hamner Organization, FIori d a's. Foremost Developers, as a place where happy folks will want to live, and where investment profit will mature as nat urally as flowers blossom in the gentle warmth of the Flor ida sun. Wri t e today lor a copy ol the North Side Coun try Club booklet. B. L. HAMNER ORGANIZATION 311 FRANKLIN STREET TAMPA TAMPA'S NORTH SIDE COUNTRY CLUB AREA TAMPA IN THE HILLS 71

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(Contin ued from ;age-70) a nd this growth oeen based u po n climate, location and other more or less accidental advantages. However, one great attribute beyond these is the remarkable spirit, oi friendline ss and hospitality that makes any stranger in its midst feel that he is a part of the community. Pinellas County is human," and this is quickly sensed by those who visit its shores. As to accommodations for visitor,s: up until a month or so ago, it was difficul t to p roperl y c are for the thousands who flocked here. Now, with the completion of many new hotel and the building of homes on a large scale Pinellas County is amply prepared to properly ho use all incom ing vi sitors or permanent residents. One of the great factors in the rapid growth of this Florida West Coast section, is the linking of the mainland with the i sland beaches by great causeways, which are now being con structed. Just as the causeways on the Florida East Coast have done s o much to promote the growth .of its c ities so these new causeways on the West Coast are accomplishing simila r results. Business opportunities in Pinellas County, are literally unlimited. Just as in any other location personal ef for. t, plus time and ability, must be linked with capital to properly achieve the de si red results. The specu lation in raw land is being greatly super ceded by consideration of the devel opment of that land, aJld after all, that is the real bas is for growth. When one considers the recrea" tiona! facilities and the fine religion:. and social institutions here, together with the manifold business opportunities, it is easy to understand why so many thousands have come to Pinel las County, and found it a haven of contentment and succ ess. Sarasota is Plugging Not Shouting By C. J. McGuRTY Sarasota R'f'rtsmtati v e of UNDOU .BT. ED L Y, one of the best indica t ion s of genuine activity o n t b e-W e s i Coast was the re-c. J. MC GUR TY cent January report o.f the SAtasota.. P
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8uniland: The Magazine of Florida >-) '1.' '. The creation of VE ETIA ISLES brings to you this opportunity again -and in so doing brings an opportunity heretofore not even dreamed of, because these waterfront proper ties with their location right out in the heart of Biscayne Bay and by virtue of their accessibility are placed in an absolutely incomparable positiOn. This will bring about, incidentally, the natural result of ) ,... J ; The opportunity you thought was lost-i s now knocking at your door again! pOSSIBLY you were one ot many who have said to themselves and expressed to others the thought that, had you been in Miami a few years ago, y o u would have tied on to som e waterfront lots above anything else in this entire district, and you have regretfully added "! came too late." most remarkable values and the greatest a surance possible of the stability of these values. And today these properties a r e within your reach! Sooner or later VENETIAN ISLES will all be sold out, just as these other properties are sold out that you would have liked to have bought few years ago. This is a proposition that calls fo r your early decision. VENETIAN. ISLES Gems of America's Mediterranean .107 N. E. Second Ave. Miami, Florida 7 3

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THE PHANTOM \\rOMAN-Continued from page 59 his mental balance if he were tried and convicted. He doubted itl But his mind was functioni11g now, it seemed to him de sperately Automatically i t was gro ping for facts, for theories in his defense. And it caught one. The wo man I The one who had waited to see R o g e rs and then fled before seeing him Or had she seen him? There was no 'proo f that the murderer was a man He turned to Mahoney. "There' s another angle to this case I want to tell you about, chief ,'' he began slo wly. "It didn t occur to me in its full until just now." And he related in detail the story Stebbins had told him. The financiers seemed excited, the officers adamant. But the butler was summoned to the library. Questioned at some length by Mahoney he corroborated everything Franklin had said ; 'then departed quick ly after the chief's curt dismissal. The young man waited with bated breath some word of leniency from the officers. "A very pretty story," said Mahoney finally. "But I think that's all it is.'' "But the butler said-'' "Yes, I know he backed you up. But you h z d plenty of time before we got here to hatch up something with him. Them servants will do anything for mone y .'' Franklin should have been utterly downcast but his mind was still work ing for the defense. H e smiled sud denlv "This farce has gone far enough," he s a id w ith a tremendous effort at calm ne ss. "It might interest you gentlemen t o know that I can prove a complete alibi.'' The financiers stared in c r e d!llously The officers frowned "Do you mean that?'' demanded Mahone y after a long pause. I do I told you I was in the garden some distance from the house when the shot was fired Miss Rogers was out there with me. She will c orroborate every detail of my story at the proper time.' "Damn I" exclaimed Mahoney disap po i ntedly. This is too imp ortant to let go. Keep an e y e on things here, Egan. I'm going to talk to the girl .'' THE cfiief hurried from the rOQill, his face lined with con s ternation. But now Franklin could have bitten his tongue out for having allowed himself to men ti o n that the girl could prove an alibi for him She was in no condition to be questioned tonight He would go to jail rather than have her sub j ected to an examination by Maho ney. He started for the door. Egan's right hand leaped into his coat pocket and his l e ft w aved the young man away from the portal. Almost without conscious movement Franklin backed away. There was something omnious in the officer's silent but complete command of the situation Kent was wandering around the room, pretending to read the titles of the books on the shelves Franklin's gaze strayed to the financiers. One of them motioned furtively to him and he joined the group. "We want those papers," said the gloomy capitalist in a hoarse whisper with a sidewise glan c e at Egan. "We'll match any offer Gross made you Name your price I' Despit e the tenseness of the situation, 74 Franklin a lmost s miled at the overp owering eagerne s s o f these wealthy men to recover the half doz e n sh ee t s of paper which would add millions to what they already possessed. And he reflected grimly on the price he would demand were it in his power to do so "For the second time, gentleme n, I am sorry to say it will be impos s ible for me to accept your offer, generous as it is,'' he answered firmly. "I haven t the slightest idea where those papers are. I've never seen them, either before or since Mr. Roge rs death.'' He strode away without another word, leaving consternation behind him He was confident of his immediate release the moment Mahoney returned. Upset as she was, Elizabeth would be sure to prove his alibi. so his mind, relea s ed from working out his own defense, set out on the task of finding the real criminal OB VIOUSLY it had been a simple mat ter for the murderer to make his, or her, escap\!. Three pairs of wide French doors led from the library out onto the s un porch. All were open Just beyond lay the moonlit, man-made jungle of the beautiful Rogers' estate. Two hundre d feet straight ahead lay shimmering Sarasota Bay, offering an easy escape by boat to a hundred different ports. In the opposite direction, three hundred yards away, a perfect hard surfaced highway led northwar d to Sarasota and Tampa or southward to Fort Myers, through the Everglades and eventually Miami With so many avenues of es cape open it would be a difficult proceeding to track down the guilty person. He turned suddenly as quick footsteps indicated Mahoney's return. The officer's face was a study. "I thought you was bluffin' I snapped the chief triumphantly. "And I called your bluff I Miss Rogers says she was in the hall when the shot sounded She admits she had been with you in the ga rd e n but s h e d o n't kn o w whe 1e you was wh rn t h e f a t a l s h o t w as fire d Chapter V Diacoveriea FOR a long moment Philip Franklin stood as though petrified, unable to realize that Elizab eth Rogers had refused to help him, while the color drained from his face. Then his eyes, dulled by stupefa ction, widened and gleamed with anger; his bloodless lips set until his plea sant mouth was an almo s t invisible line and his fists clenched at his sides "I'll be back in a minute I he snapped and rushed out of the roo m with Egan. after him. His peremptory knock was answered by the maid who had assisted Stebbins in carrying the girl upstairs. The servant started as she recognized the visitor and attempted to shut the door, but he threw his weight against it and pushed aside. Elizabeth was propped up in bed, much engaged with a cut glass bottle of smelling salts and a handkerchief ; her eyes 'red from prolonged weeping; convulsive sobs still jerking her slender figure at uncertain intervals She looked up startled as Franklin approached the bed. "I said I'd c o me as soon as the police were through with their investigation!" he said gri mly "Here I am!" She stared at him a long t i me while her eyes slowly filled with t e ars. Then they narrowed abruptly and her mouth set with a cruel twist that he would not have belie ved possible in her. "The pol i ce say you murdered daddy I" she said accus i ngly "Elizabeth i" There was the agony of a man crucified in his tone. "Surely y ou don t believe that!" "Oh, I don't know what to believe, Phil! I only know that he-he's gone.' She sobbed afresh. Franklin sat down b esid e the bed. "But dearest, surely you know me well enough-love me well enough to know that I wouldn t do such an awful thing.'' She dabbed at her eyes with the handkerchief. "I thought I did she admitted final ly "But the chief of police says he h as all the evidence and that he's going to take you to jail." "Yes I'm going to jail," admitted Frankli n bitterly "And it's all your faull I told them you could prove my alibi that I was out in the garden when the shot was fired. And you could -but you wouldn't. You deserted me when I needed you most I" PHIL! Don't say such dreadful things I I didn't desert you Mahoney gave no hint of my statemen t being so important. He asked me to tell him what I had seen and heard. I did Then he asked me where you were when the shot was fired and I told him I didn't know. I didn t know, Phil. I had to tell the truth. And when he asked m e questions until t was ready to scream. Finally, he told me about guilty I" I'm not, guilty, Elizabeth. I'm inn o cent; innocent, I tell you I" "They said you did it to get the papers for Gross," she persisted. "I didn't," he almost shouted. "I've had nothing to do with Gross "But you work for him I You never told me that," she said accusingly "Maybe I did wrong in not telling you, dear. But I knew if I admitted be ing even remotely connected with Gross it would make trouble because of the enmity between him and your father. I was making plenty of money with Gross's concern; I had a lot of good! customers worked up for his lines of bonds, and I didn't want to make <\ change right now." "Well, Phil, we can't settle it tonight, I don' t know what to believe or what to think. My brain is in a whirl. I can't talk any more now.'' There was a heavy knock at the door, Franklin saw the maid staring at him accusingly and rushed outside into the strong arms of Egan and Mahoney. "Come on I commanded the chief "We're ready to go." Mahoney and Franklin drove into Sarasota in the latter's roadster while Egan took the police car back alone. The little .city was beautiful in the moonlight the rows of light stucco buildings looming against the background of dark sky and silver-splashed bay with the great round moon overhead like a glorifying halo. Peace hovered over it all like a benediction (Continued on page 101)

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida The surpassing natural beauty of FLORIDA BEACH will be retained THE GREAT building and dev elopm .ent program of the Majestic Homes Corporation-thorou
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THE FLORIDA HOME-Continuedfrompage57 f rom yellow to b l ue, is t ypical of this rug as art the high pi led shining wool effects. T h e strictl y geometrical pattel'ns have but little in common w it h the motives of the Aryan Persians. The Kasaks are wov en by the Tartar tribes in the highest mountain regiolls of the Caucasus and are generally inexp en sive, as far as thrs type of rug is con -cerned. -Of the small or Orientals t he Mos ouls are the most common. The-se rugs are the work or the nomadi-c trible s of Northern aod Central Persia and are all collected in the town of Mosoul, from which they take their nam e. Nat urally, t hey vary in q,iral. ity, some showin$" a beauttful shiny wool, others seer:nmg dull. Thi-s Jack lustre appe a rance is said t o be due to the use o f the wool from dead sheep in the weav ing, and the purchase of one of them can easi ly guarded against i f one is alert. Loos e knotti ng is comlltOn to them a ll ; they are simple carpets a nd strictly Per s ian. The Kirma11shah ij from l?ersia, an wb!le 1t be comp are d to the,1 anc 1e11t Kirman either in desi'gn or it is still very lo vely carpet. It denves its name from its commercial market place, llir manshah. Of the rugs illustratedL the smaller is a Sarouk, the larger a ilahan. The Sarouk is of the short nap variety but woven so closely and of such fine ity o f wool tllat it i s very desirable It i s noted for its soft of b lue and ro-se and the i nterm ingling of these co lor s in an arresting design. The fine diate ly discover which rug shows depth and clar ity of tone, wl'lich ones display weak and blurred tortes. The buyer will be able to stand a l ittle distance away and judge the coloring of the rug as one would a pa intin g in its completeness. The t1Se to which an Oriental rug i s to be put is still another quest i on. If 76 Chicken Soup One quarl okra, sttud thm; 1 goo d sized onion, ,m,ad 6 spoonfuls bacon fru; 1 nfltnbff thue can tomatou: 1 small ccm crushed ccrrn, or three., gQod si,;_ ed ears; 1 fry:ing chicken. Cm cltickm in pieces to fry; dredge Wl!ll in sail, p e/lf' er, flour; fry to rich brO'Wif. T11m chckm i"to s.oup kellle, cover with 4 quarts bQiling watw, boil. Into tM iron skillet in whin be returned. Address The Florida Home Editor SuNJLANJl Box 2711, Tampa Fla.. Orientals imported and made on hand looms: Sarouk, 4 ft;. 6 ins. by 6 ft. 6 ins ., as illustra ted, $230.00; Lilah an, 8 ft 8 ins by 12 ft as illustrated, $625 00; Ch in ese 9 ft. by 1 2 ft. (wooH, $375 00; (silk) $900.00. Chinese rush rug, 9 ft. by 12 ft. $54.00; or 75 cents a square foot. Anglo .Persian wool Wiltoo, do mestic r .ug of antique design, 9 ft. by 12 ft., $150 .00. grade W i lton _I>lain or plain Jines, I) ft. by 12 ft., $157.50. Linen rugs, 9 ft. 12 ft., $49.00. Hook rug, $2.00 a sqttare; foot. The Convenience 'Of a Breakfast Nook I N count'\ng one's b les sings in this Twentieth Ce ntury band box mode o f living, the brea k fas t nook gains a po sition of bi.gh favor. It is indeed a great convenience for the Florida house wi fe whose t raditi o nal hospitality must flow unchecked, notwithstanding the fact that she must o ftena ccompl is h it sans man, sans maid, sans help of every k i nd that formerly set into moti on t he sm.ooth -running wheels of eotertaining in th e old Southland. The well -p laced breakfast nook i s but a. step from the kitchen. It is small, eas i ly cared for b,ut cozy, dainty and opens onto the garden. It i s pert ect for a s i ngle or double cover, bu1 it can be stretched to accommodate four per sons. I t is a vailable for a hurry-up Pull man bite, and it is equally adaptable to r a leisurely meal for the man of the house and a cove ted glance at the morn ing newspaper before the children come down. It has a delightful air of hce dom for tbe children b.ecause it is so simply furnished. It is just the place to serve breakfast for the week-end guest w bo can thus have her morning nap without i nconveniencing ner hostess. It has resolved i tsetr into a l uncheon -as well a breakfast room, for since alm.ost every member of the fam i l yb botb young and old, i n kcceping with t e trend of the times, has an in terest that takes the m out of the home all day, lunc heon has ceased to be a meal an.d become almost a ''pick-up ." Lastly, n o better place cou ld be chosen for a tete-a-tete chafing dish supper t h a!l t he. .nook The chtna c.abmet 1S w1than r each, the kitchen at hand, and i f i t i s t o be an after-theatre party the table ean be set, and most of the materi'als and ingredi ents assembled before one leaves home, with .out inconven iencing the family or cluttering the dining-room for the ent il'e evening. Suggestion after suggestion presents its e lf for making use of this l ittle room until it beco mes almost an automat in its sphere of helpfulness. We have selected menus and recipes this month that can be served an d easily in the b reakfast nook. Tete-a-tete Breakfasts Florida Strawberries Cer eal Plain Omelet Muffin s Coffee Orange Juice Farina Broiled Bacon Corn Pones Coffee Grapefru i t Sliced Pineavple Break fast Sausage Prepared Cer ea t Cre a m ed Dried Beef on Toa t Toa:..t, Coffe e Coffee (Continued on page 78)

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida cAnnouncing VERO GJ3EACH VILLAS .. .. nearly a MILE of OCEAN FRONT and THREE MILES facing INDIAN RIVER give this great development an important place among the waterfront properties of the EastCoastofFlorida-theRiviera of America ERO BEACH VILLAS lie entirely within the city limits of Vero Beach and will be reached by a great causeway leading di, reedy from the mainland section of Vero Beach to Vero Beach "'" Villas. VERO BEACH VILLAS is under contract with the city ofVero Beach to build this causew ay. Moreover, the city of Vero Beach will install all city improve, ments in VERO BEACH VILLAS, and has authorized the prep, aration of plans and specifications to this end. These include paved streets, sidewalks, lights and water, and sewers. Parks on the ocean front, a golf course adjacent, and a yacht club assured, provide the facilities for taking the fullest advan, tage of the wonderful opportunities for recreation for which the Southern Florida beaches are famous. And rememberYou can buy VERO BEACH VILLAS today for pre-develop ment prices-just as you might have bought Miami Beach property years ago. Why not take advantage of today's opportunity, and profit as those have profited who bought Miami Beach properties in the early stages of that magnificent development. VERO BEACH VILLAS MAREE, HOOD & SPITZLEY Exclusi"Ve Sales cAgents VERO BEACH, FLORIDA 77

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(Continued from page 76) Guest Omelet (Individual Size) Separate the yolks and whites of two -eggs, beat whites until very stiff, yolks until well mixed. Season yolks with ,salt and stir into them 2 teaspoonfuls of hot milk; mix lightly with whites. Pour -into a greased skillet over a low fire. Raise edges of omelet occasio n ally. When the bottom is brown, brown the -top by placing under a hot but unlit broiler. When browned sprinkle with ;grated cheese, fold over, serve on hot platter and garnish with parsley. Luncheonettes Savory Meat Roll: One cupful chopped meat, 1 cupful chopped ham, I cupful meat stock, 1 egg. Onions, salt, mustard to taste. Season meat and ham, stir into meat stock and egg. Mix bi!>CUit crust and roll out, keeping just thick enough to hold the filling. Cut -in neat, wide strips, spread with meat filling, roll and cut in individual sl ices. Bake in medium hot oven; serve with gravy. Tongue Glace One cupful cold, chopped tongue, 1 cupful cream, beaten stiff; 1 cupful of hot chicken stock, 0 tablespoonful of _gelatine dissoled in a little water. Stir d issolved gelatine into hot stock, strain, add the meat and stir until it thickens. Add the cream, season, mold, and chill. Serve surrounded by crisp lettuce leaves -on which have been placed slices of to matoes that have been covered with French dressing. Italian Tomatoes If to be used for main luncheon dish select good-sized tomatoes, otherwise rather small ones. Wash, cut, slice from stem-end and scoop out part of center. Season hollowed out tomato, and fill with spaghetti that has been -cooked with sauces and cheese. Sprin kle top with cheese Bake unti l to matoes are soft, serve on buttered toas t cut in circle or stars. Supper Dishes Combination Orange and Meat Salad: Two cupfuls cold veal chopped into osmall pieces; (duck can be used also) 4 oranges, French dressing. Peel or-anges and cut into cubes removing skin -and seeds M1x the oranges and juice well with the meat. Place on lettuce eaves with French dressing. Suniland Fruit Salad Cut 1 .grapefruit and 2 oranges Into -eubes removing skin and seeds. Cut of small pineapple in star or cres cent shapes. Cover a platter with leaf lettuce, on lettuce place pineapple and in center place orange and graefruit. Garnish with strawberries and walnuts. Serve with cream mayonnaise. Lobster on Toast Mix lobster meat that has been prepared and cut in small pieces with -mayonnaise. E.emove the crust from bread and toast on one side only. Make a sandwich, placing the lobster mixture On the untoasted side of the bread. Place in the grill for from five to ten minutes. Sprinkle with paprika, garnish with slices of lemon. Spanish Rarebit Make a paste of equal parts of butter :and flour, season with salt and paprika 78 and add milk. Two tablespoonfuls of butter and flour each to 1 cupful of milk is about right. Cut a half cup each of mild cheese and pimentos into small cubes. Place over boiling water and sti r diligently until smooth. Its chief virtue is in being served very hot. Pour over toasted bread or crackers. Orange Toast Peel and seed oranges, chop or grind, mix with sugar. Slice bread rather t hin, r emove crust, butter. Spread with orange mixture, making a sandwich. Place the sandwich in the grill and toast. Cut oblong or diagonally and garni sh with parsley and crystallized Florida fruit. Caramel Sandwich Cut bread with fancy cutter. On t h e bread sprinkle g rated chocolate that has been thoroughly swel!tened. Place in g rill and toast. Use sal t ed pecans for garnishii1g. Creamed Chicken Cut cooked chicken into small until there is 7:4 lb. Take small oman, tablespoonful salt, Yz tablespoonful celery salt, quart chicken stock, 0 quart milk, cupful flour, cupful chic ken fat, bread for toasting. Brown flour in chicken fat season stock and slowly stir in the milk, which has first been heated. Serve on toasted bread. MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES Banana Sherbet Make a boiled syrup of one cup of water and lYz cups sugar. Cool. Add 2 cups orange juice, 2 table s poonfuls lemon juice, and stir in about five good sized bananas that have be e n mashed through a sieve. Now add the white of one egg beaten stiff. Pour into the cubed pans and set in refrigerating compartment of electric refrigerator. Orange Sherbet Make sugar and water syrup as directed above. To this add one cupful of orange juice, one cupful of orange pulp, 2 tablespoo nfuls lemon juice Add the white of one egg stiffly beaten. Lemon Sherbet Punch Correct amount for six or eight thirsty guests. To one cup of strong, cooled tea, add 1/3 cup of strawberry syrup, the juice of 3 oranges, 2 lemons, 1 /3 cup of finely chopped fresh pineapple. To this add a plain syrup made by boiling a cup of sugar in cup of water for a few minutes. Chill the whole mix ture and just before it is served add one pint of charged water, and a p int of lemon sherbet, frozen hard. This is better than ice, since it adds to rather than weakens the flavor of the punch. Sealdsweet Hot Orange Posset (Three Pints) If the weather man decides to fling a little frost toward Florida at any time, nothing could make a better nor more wholesome drink than Hot Orange Posset. I pint orange juice, 1 pint milk, pound sugar, 1 teas poonful soda, 4 eggs, 0 teaspoon orange rind grated 1 tea spoonful nutmeg. Mix juice with sugar, heat slowly. Beat eggs with milk, add rmd, salt; soda (dis solved in t ab l es poonful milk) ; stir into juice mixture. When hot remove at once and serve. (Home Uses and Juices of Florida Sealdsweet Oranges.) Pineapple Pastry The spread for the pineapple pastry may b e made of minced pineapple alone or of a mixture of pineapple and maraschino cherries, chopped fine. To this add 3 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar; after spreading on the cut out dough sprinkle with more sugar and dash with lemon juice This pastry may be decorated with a cube of the fresh pine apple, a cherry, or crystallized roug} lemon peel. The two first decoratiom must be baked with the pastry, the laS' added just before the pastry is removej from the oven. Strawberry Pastry The preserve for the strawberry pastrJ is good either with the individual flavo1 or combined with pineapple. To on cup of fresh strawberries and two slice1 of pineapple minced fine, add 3 table spoonfuls of granulated sugar and until it thickens. When cool spread on cut out dough and bake as directed above. Decoration of a crystallized straw berry will add to the attractiveness of the pastry. Roselle Jelly (Sometimes called the Florida Cranberry) Roselle is an East Indian plant cui tivated for its fleshy calyces which are used for making tarts, jellies, etc. Break the calyces from the seed pods, measure, and for each measure of fruit allow 2 measures of water. Boil 10 minutes. Cover vessel and set aside to cool. Pour into a flannel jelly bag and press until no more juice can be obtained. Determine amount of sugar to be used by pectin test (given in October issue, this magazine). Boil until the jellying point has been reached, which is indicated by the flaking or sheeting from the spoon. Extreme care must be .exercised at this point because over-cooking will cause it to syrup. (Bulletin 42 Home Demonstration Divisi on Florida State college for Women.) Broiled Pompano Moisten the fish thoroughly in oil place on a very hot oiled broiler. Turn frequently, cook thor o ughly. Serve with melted butter or lemon. Red Snapper with Shrimp Sauce A two pound slice of fish and some lemon juice. One cup minced shrimp meat; 3 tablespoons butter; 4 tablespoons flour; Ph cups milk; lh cup cream; 1 tablespoon anchovy essence; 2 teaspoons lemon juice; cllopped parsley to taste. Bring rather heavily salted water to a boil in pan, add a dash of lemon juice. Allow fish that has first been skinned to cook from a quarter to a half hour, but remove before it loses its firmness. Make a paste of melted butter and flour and add milk which has been heated in another saucepan, stirring until smooth. Next stir in cream, seasoning and other ingredients, pour over sliced fish and serve.

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida DIXIE HIGHWAY"' fhe 7 INTEROCEAN CIIYS J='loridalo Name ____________ __ Steef.,--_________ __ City ,. I n terOcean City is located at the cross ro ads of Florida, in the geographic center of the state, seve nty-two miles from Tampa sixty-three miles from Melbourne t wenty-five m iles from Orlando two h ours fr o m Atlantic or Gulf ST_R,EET RT 1-1 IGHW A YS have played the leading part in civilization's march of progress ever since the days of the Roman Empire. They are the arteries through which the life streams of cities and commonwealths flow. InterOcean City fronts nine miles on the famous Dixie Highway, Florida's great inland artery of traffic from North to South and from East to West. "The Dixie" is InterOcean City's Main Street. For four and a half miles, this great highway, now being widened to form a magnificent 100-foot boulevard, parallels the 100 foot right of way of the Atlantic Coast Line Rail way, while across this right of way Osceola Avenue, 90 feet wide, is being laid out. Thus through InterOcean City stretches a great traffic artery 290 feet wide, boulevard, railway and avenue, the most magnificent Main Street ever designed for any American City. Stately, giant fronded palms, tropical shrubbery, electric white ways, and lovely walks will complete the beauty of InterOcean City's Main Street. Business blocks, stores, fine hotels, apartment houses, homes, manufacturing plants and industrial establishments will flank this Main Street throughout its entire length. Astride Mainline of the A. C. L. A great city, old or new, must be adequately served by railways. InterOcean City is located in the heart of Florida's great agricultural and industrial devd.opment astride the Mainline Tracks of the great Atlantic Coast Line Railway system. Direct railway communication to aU points will prove a vital factor in the development of this community as a resort, as a manu facturing center and as Central Florida' s great inland market for farm produce. A system of lovely lakes and winding canals will link InterOcean City with Florida's proposed Inland Waterways System. You will soon. be able to sail your yacht from InterOcean City to Atlantic and Gulf ports at your pleasure. FLORIDA TROPICS DEVELOPMENT COMPANY (Agents for Wile Properties Holding Co.) lnterOcean City and Kissimmee, Florida HO.M.J!S A..GR.ICULTURE 79

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0 Y S T E R S-Contiwued from page 4 9 this neck of the woods. A little stern wheel river boat began plying between the Gulf villages and Apalachicola, doing a trading business in commodities for which there was a market. Someone conceived the idea of shipping oysters to such of the outside world as was traversed by the river steamer and presently certain dare devi l plungers in commerce went down to the sea in their oyster boats and brought the unshucked oysters into port, where they were loaded into empty flour barrels and thence put aboard the river steamer for northern markets." These markets were Bainbridge, Eufaula, Colurnbia and Columbus. The steamer sailed out of Apalachicola once a week and if any of the oystermen failed to reach ship side be fore the steamer sailed they were com pelled to haul their oysters back to the bay, dump them overboard and hope for better luck next time. At the beginning of this industry the prevaling price to the oysterman for his product, delivered in barrels, was twenty-five cents a barrel. Apalachicola oysters found favor in the towns touched by the river steamer and quite a thriving business was developed. Then came a mighty change, coincident with the coming of the "steam horse" into this territory. IT was approximately twenty-five years ago that the Georgia, Florida & Alabama Railroad made its way into the little vii. !age. of Carrabelle, diagonally in a north easterly direction across the bay from Apalachicola. Thomas Gowdy, a Kansas City fish dealer, came to this little out-of the -way place in quest of cat fish, for which there was a great demand and which abounded in the waters of Apala chicola Bay. He vi s ioned possibilities in the oyster business and he soon had a going business established. H e ; too, ship ped his oysters in flour or rough-hewn barrels to Lake City and Valdosta to .catch the train for Kansas City. This continued for three years when the line was con nected up between Bainbridge and Talla hassee. From ther e the shipments went to Cuthbert and Montgomery But for the first five years of Mr. Gowdy's opera tions the oysters went to Kansas City and Omaha. Then came another momentus change. About eight years after the establi s h ment of a railroad into Carrabelle, th e Apalachicola & Northern Railroad was built from River Junction to the port of From that moment the oyster business, which had been diverted by the Georgia, Florida & Alabama Railroad to Carrabelle, came back to its original home, and Apalachicola has ever since been the center of the oyster industry. The canned oyster business, started by Mr. Gowdy, was the main industry. The in tervening eighteen years have brought to Apalachicola an ever-increasing oyster business, which has been brought to a state of perfection by scientific hanC:ling, from the oyst e r lugger to the expre ss car It is a wonderful business, full of romance and hardship, and so well-handled that no matter how the storms may rage on sea and land, you who are reading this may get your fresh-caught Apalachicola oysters any day in season if you are fortunate enough to be within the trade radius of this product. There are at present fifteen packing houses and four canneries in Apal achicola By a packing house is meant a place where shell oysters are brought in by the oyster luggers and either shipped out in iced barrels in the shell or else are 80 husked and shipped raw in iced containers to the trade. A cannery is .. a place wher e the oy s ters are steamed in the shell and then husked and canned About two hun dred boats are at present engaged in the oyster business in Apalachicola, each boat manned by two and sometimes three men Approximately one thousand men and wo men are engaged in the oyster industry of Apalachicola. Of the men who go down to the sea in oyster ships, very little is known Yet here is a hardy, venturesome race, whose daily lives are filled with excitement, ad venture, hardships, peril a romance, if you please, cloaked in the guise of com mercialism. The nearest oyster beds are located about five or six miles from Apalachicola; the farthest about eighteen Plucking the dainty bivalves from their watery beds is a grim business, where faint hearts have no place. The oysterm e n go out to their favorite bars a t sunrise and the weather is not always conducive to their peace of mind or bodily comfort. The oyster lug gers are small but tough and rarely is wind or wave too rough for these tiny vessels to poke their noses into the weather and make their way out to the oyster bars. To get the oysters the boatmen manipulate long hand-tongs, not unlike a pair of large rakes, fastened together and operating like a pa ir of fire-tongs. The luggers anchor abreast the oy ster reefs and the work of tongin g up the bivalves is a strenuous business, hard work, calling for consider able knowledge and skill, and when a stiff northwest wind is blowing, beating sheets of rain and tossing the little oyster boats like chips, the oystermen are rarely, if ever, driven from their work. Their day's work is done when their b oat is filled, and if it is not filled at the close of day it will, perhaps, rema i n out. all night and into another day, unless it is close enough to run back home conveniently. Fishermen's luck does not run the same all over the bay and there is always a stream of oyster luggers pulling up along side the Apalachicola packing houses with holds filled full and decks piled with oysters. Here, if one would enJOY the Apalachic ola oyster in all its succulent glory, one need only be armed with a bot tle of pepper, vinegar and a box of crack ers and a voic e strong enough to cry "ho ld" to the boy who opens the shells and loosens the oyster. In season the packing plants usually ru n with full crews all day. To the uninitiated one might as well try to force a time lock on a bank vault as to successfully open a fresh shell o yster, but nearly everybody in Apalachi cola is an expert at this oyster opening bu sines s and the men and women engaged in the work are adept in extracting the oyster from its shell. -The oysters them selves are not touched by hand and they are subjected to several washings, in the process of sorting. The fresh oysters are sealed immediately and placed in iced con tainers, rr.uch like freezers of ice cream, where they are held in cold-storage rooms until the express car calls. When the weather gets a little too warm to make the shipment of fresh husked oysters an entirely safe venture, the canneries steam the oysters. This means--that the shell oysters, loaded into metal cars direct from the boats, are l ocked for about eight minutes in a steam chamber. When they are wheeled out again the shells are open and the oyster is deliciously steamed. Here again is a fitting place for a pepper-vinegar bottle and box of crackers. These cooked oysters are scooped out o f the shell and canned on the spot; they are after wards known as cove oysters. When the oyster season is over the oystermen become shrimpmen and their boats become shrimp luggers. The shrimp around Apal achicola are a l most as popular as the oyster and they abound in great numbers. The shrimp are handled in the canning facto ries. Strange to say, the New England:_ States consume the largest number of, shrimp. Ohio, Michigan and Indiana come next, after which comes the Pacific Coast. Large quantities of shrimp are exported to England, under the trade name of prawn. Each of the packing houses operate their own oyster fleets. There are als() many independent o yster boats which de pend upon selling their catch to the highest bidder. There are several different spe cies and grades of oysters in Apalachicola Bay and the choicest products bring higher prices than those of lesser degree. The packers have organized their industry in a thoroughly scientific manner by p utting in the newest and m o st approved machin ery and devices to cover the whole process of oyster marketing from bar to iced con tainer. Modern methods have entire ly sup planted the primitive ways of handling bi valves. Insofar as possible, man-power has been supplanted by machinery and strict sanitation prevails throughout the packing plants. 0 NE large packer has cut his overhead to a considerable extent by building a curious contrivance which, for want of a better name, might be called a float ing shucking house. This contraption consists. of two barges, fastened together. On one barge the oystermen receive the catch from the oyster luggers and do the husking. They live and sleep on the other barge. This floating husking house can be to wed to any gi\'en point in the bay and anchored, and moved about in this manner at will. Some of the packers also maintain husk ing camps on the mainland so that the Oyster boats w ill not have to go all the way to Apalachicola to deliver their catch. The express train leaves Apalachicola each night with the day's oyster catch in shell, iced containers or cans, and the oyster shipments conne c t at River Junction for all points within the Apalachicola trade radius, so that the people of Florida. southern Georgia and Alabama can eat oysters that were alive in the bay the pre ceding day. Like the pork packers of Chicago, the oyster packers of Apalachicola save the whole of their product. The pork packers pride themselves on saving everything but the squeal and one enterprising packer has even transmitted this squeal to th<> phonographic record. The oyster packers of Apalachicola have no squeal to save and, consequent ly, no waste, for the moun tains of oyst e r shells that are taken out of the bay are commercialized. Most of this shell is used on Florida roads and there is a factory at Apalachicola that grinds up shell for poultry feed. Each of the fifteen Apalachicola packers ship on an average of one thousand gallons of oysters per week-some industry!

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida 81 ''BE PREPARED'' ? WALLNER HAYNES REALTY CO ? Siegfried Wallner R. Taylor Haynes 66 N. E. Second Street Telephone 4697 MIAMI FLORIDA

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THE MYSTER Y BoAT THAT WON Continued from page 63 The Ballard boys, "Bill," "Bob" and "Bert," knew something about the lure of spe
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.Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Th e growi ng of s t r a wbe rri e s m b o x es w a s ori g inat e d and p e r f e cte d at N ation a l G a r d e n s Fi v e a c res of berries can be g r own by this method w h e re one a c re can be grown in the o/4 w ay. What Is a Lot? A L O T t o many people is m e rely a LOT -all ought to be priced the same Price t o such p eople i s the o n l y impo rtant consideration T h ere is where the trouble usually b egins. A lot which can be used only for building purposes, of course, is s u perior to a swamp l o t but a lot purchased fo r bui lding purposes is not always used for building. What is your bui lding lot going to be worth to the next buyer if you decide to sell? Suppose you can't sell? How long will it take the taxes and assessments to wipe away your investment? We believe the average buyer overlooks these impor tant points. At any rate he does not always use the best judgment. Another class of buyer, buying solely for inve s t ment, frequently considers the possibilities of future development only, that is, he reasons it out that in so many months or years so many people will build in the vicinity of his purchase and his lot will be worth so much. But-what happens to his profits if in so many months the section has not grown? Why, he has lost his profits, his investment is jeopar dized, and unfortunately sometimes lost completely. The only way to buy lots is to use the same care a s in buying shoes You want quality there and you ought to want quality when you buy lots. The lowest priced lot is not always the ch e .1pest, a higher pric'ed lot may include certain improvements, and the cost of such improvements deducted from the price might make the land cost very low. Then, the s oil ou ght to be productive, that is, of such nature th a t it can be used for growing purpos e s This is what dP.termin e s R EAL value, because such a lot can be r ented, cultivated and be come a source of in come rather tha n a loss or a lo a d on your hands. Jus t to the north of Daytona, Florida, lies some o f the riche s t and most productive soil of the entire southland. A comfortable income can be derived fr o m a single lot. A profit of $2,000 to $4 000 can be realized from a five-lot tract, f our and fiv e crops per year can be grown. Such a tract in the north without Florida's wonderful climate and vegetation would be worth a fortune. Yet it can be purchased here for a few hundred dollars, with all improve ments and conveniences This property, "National Gardens," has been talked about all over the United States. It will be made one of the most beautiful places in Florida. We have lots for the home seeker, acres for the busy man, and little farms for those who want to cultivate more extensively. We believe this entire property will be taken up within eighteen months, and if so, pur chasers will reap exceptional profits. Y o u ow e it to yours e lf to investigate "National Garden s ." A c r e s of n a rcissus in bloom I Fie lds of gladioli in their gorgeous
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l 84 Are Y ouLiving or Just Existing If you enjoy around in the ice and snow for six months of the year and like dark gloomy days, Florida will not appeal to you. IF YOU REALLY WAN;r TO LIVE and enjoy life in a wonder fully balmy climate, where you can go swimming during any month of the year yet where a sunstroke is un known you will enjoy South Florida. If you want the best that South Florida has to of fer as a place to live and for business you should investigate Tampa. Come to Tampa and See for Yourself We shall be glad to as sist you in finding the piece of real estate that you need, whether you want it for a business, a home or for an investment. L. w. LEE REAL ESTATE 504 Franklin Street, Tampa, Florida Suniland: The Magazine of Florida A clump of bamboo such as is easily grown in Florida.. It lends beauty to any landscape arrangement and may be sold profitably. BAMBOO (Continued from page 65) he asks, "but that soon these giant grasses will play an important role in our own welfare? As our forests dis appear and the need is more and more felt for quick-growing and easily worked wood material, the bamboo will find an important place here, as it has found a vital niche in the countries of the Old World. The fact that agricultural scien tists have found that the giant grass can be successfu lly grown brings a chal lenge to farmers, landscape artists and industry for its utilization." There are many practical purposes that may well stimulate interest as well as the great call of beauty. For Florida, with its opportunities of fertile soil and summer climate the year round, these possibili ties indicate a new source of wealth. To the owner of several acres there is the opportunity of developing l?amboo on a larg:e scale. The giant timber variety and one or more of the small growing kinds such as stake bamboo, would become highly profitable. Such groves, if properly handled, in the course of a few years, would prove a source of profit. J u stto listen to this scientis.t' s out line of the more obvious uses of this newly Americanized Oriental is to be amazed and to wonder why all these years have slipped by without having known its possibilities. Light fencing is self-suggestive. Bamboo poles lend themselves to the making of a fence that is durable economical and artistic. The poles are easily cut and easily handled. Such fences can be used for chicken yards and rabbit runs, the slender poles being used for pickets. In Japan and China bamboo fences are seen every where and the fences are tied together with tops of the branches themselves in stead of nails. Trellises are ideal when made of bamboo. What garden-lover but would be delighted to have bamboo trellises for summerhouses, and which can be ( page 86)

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Suniland: The Magaz ine of Florida fteLMdofthe Sky ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA The land of the sky Truly the world's choicest year 'round climate-the most g1orious scenery up in these friendly majestic mountains, where nature is at her best. A Wonderful Homeland The purest water supply-the finest roads, hotels, amusements, and friendly people from the world at large. On the Dixie Highway between Asheville and Hendersonville we own one thousand lots, perfect lots with shade. Our opening prices, $850 to $15,000. In this magnificent subdivision we also own twelve acres--the most won derful hotel site. World travelers acchiim it the Wonder Hotel Site of Americaand it is We are big acreage headquarters W. T. Rowland & Cotnpany Owners and Developers UIT CAN BE DONE" TAMPA, FLORIDA, and ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 85

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86 PEAK CITY of the Highlands of Polk County. Famed for its fifteen lovely lakes -its fruit and farm products mineral phosphate and dustries. Commercial center of the wealthiest county per capita in the United States. Thrifty, progressive and prosperous, Lakeland has grown from 10,000 to a manding city of 22,000 in five ye a rs. Over $3,000,000.00 spent for civic improvements last year. A pleasing, spirited place with a satisfying present and promising future. This all-year Florida city calls merchants, manufac turers, builders, professional and business men. More stores, homes, hotels, indus tries needed at once. No state income or inheritance taxes in Flo rida. Lakeland's taxes are low. Outs t anding opportu nities for commercial, indus trial and inve stment openings await you in Lakeland now. FoT further information write JOHN D. MORRIS "OPPoTiunitys Year 'Round Playground" Suniland: The Magazine of Florida (Continued from page 84) easily and quickly erected and taken down. Moonvines, morning-glories and other climber q uickly make of these structures delightful shady retreats. There are r ea l uses .o! bamboo for grape and the trai.nmg of brush fruit blackbernes and raspbe rrie s. A single pole trellis serves excellently for tomato plants. Bamboo are admirable f o r bean po l es, pea stakes, and stakes for flowers and you11g trees. Clean, hard and rigid, they may be used for several years and when employed with their braoche' left ?n they blend with all growing things 111 an I deal way. Well-ripened bamboo poles of the hardwood type make good handles for rakes and other tools where there is not much downward stress. They also make fine clothes-drying poles and for props they are excellent. BY using bicycle inner-tubes for J Oints the bamboo has been most eco nomically used for water-carrying pipes. Such a system can be flexible or can be buried in the ground where under t est, it has lasted for more two years. Dr. Galloway suggests that the growing of bamboo on a small scale would h elp others to carry on the1r busmes;; while putting into culti vation big tracts of land. P ARTICUJ;-ARL Y i s the large timber ba m boo of va lue in construction work As says : The and strength of th1s vanety make It very valuable in many kinds of construction work. Lack o f knowledge as to how to handle such material is one of the drawbacks i n this country. A Japanese or Chinese crafts will. this wood and do many tlungs wtth 1t that would be entirely beyond our own c arpente r s. ] l iSt note the scaffolding where large construc work _is under way in any Japanese City. It IS made entirely of bamboo poles lashed together in such a fashion that it is quickly put up, quickly taken down, and used over and over again. Many of the cozy homes of Japan a r e bui lt a lmost entir ely of timber bamboos. Unsplit poles a re \Ised f o r siding and many other purposes. This variety is also suitable for light bridges, f en c e posts. telegraph and telephone poles p lac ed temporarily Another variety of bal"nboo i s suitabl e for paper making, if handled in the proper way ." Mrs. C. ]. Edwards at Abbeyville, Louisiana, secured some bamboo p lants from the Department of Agriculture. not so long ago, and put them out in her back yard. The grove n o w covers a space about one hundred by one hundred f ee t a11d contains upward of 1,000 canes forty to fifty feet in height anrl three to sixteen inche s in circumference. A yea r ago she c u t one hund r ed and seventy large canes, or poles, from this small g rove and sold them for one thousand dollars. T hey were used in the building of a tea house. In telling of th is Dr. Wil on Popcnce. another scienti t intensely interested in bamboo, said that this grove should easily y ield from two hundred to four hundred good canes a year. This example i s given to show the commercial value of bamboo. In Florida there have been developed during the past fifteen yea r s boys' anrl girls' club s for the r a i s in g of poultry. Bamboo an d J?Oultry, whethe r cultivated by boys or by adults, make an ide al combination. A grove not only fur ni hes excellent protection from hawks and other birds of prey but provides shelter from the hot suns of summer the chilling winds of winter. There IS an affinity between poultry and bamboo, for where there are domestic fowls as. a rule, the bamboo grows h1gher, Wider and faster. Rural schools, factories, new homes urrounded with bare ground are ali too often unsightly, but in many such dreary-looking places bamboo cou l d be grown for aesthe t ic reasons as well as a grateful shade and protection. But the utilization of this giant gras:s for beauty, for practical utility and for purposes is not all, for there 1s to be added bamboo to t ickle the palate. Young bamboo shoots consti an important article of diet in Onental countries, particularly China and Japan. Considerable quantities of the canned shoots are imported into this chiefly for those who like to diiJe m chop suey restaurants fhe bamboo grove at Brooksville, londa, has furnished on several occasions delightful dishes for and other functions. Accord mg to Dr. Galloway, "Cooked with cream sauce or in butter, many epicures have them delicious. They look hke asparagus a nd taste like almonds." The very shape, size and quality of bamboo suggests numerous methods of using it 'There will always be new ways for those who are ingenious. Per haps, however, the value of bamboo can 11ever be over-estimated or over-praised for landscape adoromen t," asserts Dr. Galloway. "Someone has said that flowers must be for_. but bamboos spring into nohce by v1rtuc of their individu al charm. There i a distinctiveness a softness, and a grace about the bamboo that appeals t o everyone. T his is partly due to their novelty, for there is no other v egetation lik e it; yet it blends a nd harmonizes with practically every thing w ith which it is associated. "ln garden culture, the plans are not difficult to grow. ome a r e shy a nd easily kept w:thin bounds. Others are bold and aggressive, and unless care fully watched not onl y overwhelm their neighbors but will take pos ession of the walks and roadways." There i s a ystematic qual it y about them that plant sc i entists h a ve recognized but not They seem to grow best when cultivated by those who are lovers of plants and possess t he sympathetic touch. Thi is a part of their my t ic ism H ENRY :1\EHRLING, who has been someth ing of a pioneer i n t he growing of bamboo in America, and h as clos ely co ope rated with Government scientists. says : "There i nothing that can compa r e wi t h bamboo in distinctness, in t hrilling beauty a nd picturesqueness. In a very few years it forms an impressive feature in the l andscape. It grows everywhere w i th equal vigor and its demands on the soil are few and easily satisfied. The bamboo hides the small cabin and the plain cottage and endows t hem with as much beauty as t he costly mansion of the wealthy. Along lakes a nd streams they have no equal, their arching w a n d-l ik e stems hanging over the water in graceful mas es. They look well as isolated specimens on the lawn. but th ey look still better in the foreground of noble evergreens. A bench under a large bamboo i s an ideal resting place after the day' work is over

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida The Way to His Heart The Big Companies Sell Serve) New York Edison Philadelphia Edison Chicato Edlsolt Brooklyn Ed I son Buffalo General Electric Consumers Pow11r, M leb. ConnecUcut Light nnd Pnwer Co. Tn"' Llaht aad Power Co. Uhh PoWAr Geora l a Rllway And Power Colorado Publl e Service Oklahoma Public Service Kentucky Utilities Hundreds of other big power companiesThere is a reason. The grand old custom of raiding the refrigerator, practiced by old and young alike, has a new joy in the home refrigerated by Serve!. Frozen dainties, chilled drinks, foods of all kinds, are so temptingly delicious taken. from the cold, crisp, dry air of Serve!. Electric refrigeration is here. Jus t as electricity has largely eliminated the k erosene lamp. has given u s the vacuum cleaner, the electric washer, the electric iron, so has electric refrigerati o n come to eliminate the use of ice with all its unc e rtainty, bother and muss. Servel brings new faci lit ies to food and drink preparati o n that ice never provided It guards the family health by keeping foods pure, fresh and whol esome for long periods of time. It operates automatically day and night without attention. The savory foods -the crisp, firm salads-the frozen desserts are but a few of the m any r easons why elec tr ic refrigeration is destined to become universal. Truly these delights-and the con veni ence, the dependability, the cleanliness and economy of Servel Ideal Electric Refrigeration, will prove a revelation to you. S end .for illustrated booklet, "The Realization of an I deal. Skinner Machinery Company SKINNER General Offices and factory: 300 Broadway-Dunedin, Florida OFFICES AND DISPLAY ROOMS 1'ampa-Zl06 Grand Central Ave. JacksonvUie-8Z4 W. Bay St. Daytona Beach-Z68 'First Ave. Miami-122!1 N. E. 2nd Ave. Orland<>-575 W. Central Ave. St. Peter..burg-1726 Central Ave. Lakeland-80S E. Palmetto Bradenton.--516 Broad St. 87

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88 Florida:s Five Reasons J'ir 8%andSafety THE five reasons for the 8% rate Florida pays on first mortgage security are directly and clearly stated in a Trust C ompany of F lorida pam phlet. W e want to send this f ree to those who desire to investigate be f o re they invest. Write for it toda y 1-at ;,. Florit/4 at "' $100, $JOO arul $1,000 BoruJ. Ptmial p.,.,._.ts ArTtmcN Write., TRUST CoMPANY OP FLORIDA Pai4in Capital an4 Surpl.u SJoo, ooo I -..ttolmow Florida's ftvel'tlllll008for8"&Dd safety. N am e ................................... .... ..... .............. u ........... .. Street ... ... ....... .... .. .......... .. ..... ..... ........ .... ....... City................................. State ... ............ 2303 ::..,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, .. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,c; REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS ------= 5 SALES THAT SATISPY :: -----:: DeWITT-STAHL:: ---]. D. STARKEY CO. :: 1 0 5 Hyde Park Ave. P hone 81-4151 :: :: TAMPA, FLORIDA :: 5 Refer e n ce: Firat N ational Bank :: ACR IEAGE IUIDIVIIIOIII A. B Peters & Company REALTORS CONSOLIDATED ARCADE BUJLDINO HAINES CITY FLORIDA HOMES &ROVES w e Specialize in FLORIDA ACREAGE Buoineaa Property-Home-Lots We KNOW Values and have the choice listings. c.Jhoqn-Co lee R eal t y Co mpany Room rol, Warner Building Lalayette StTeet T--. Florida Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Flo r ida Se a Coa s t B e acon s ( C outinued from page 68) reefs are abrupt hazards which poke th eir boundaries right out into the channelways. The shi ps that steer close to the reefs to escape the Gulf Stream current are likely during black, stormy weather to run onto the rocks. T he U. S Bureau of Lig hth ouses when first inaugurat e d began immediate ly to campaign for the construction of an essen tial battery of lighth ouses as identifying beacons along the Florida c oast. tive of the heavy tribute which the Florida keys annually exacted, it is notable that during the p erio d from 1834 to 1841, a fleet of more than fifty wrecking vessels found it very profitable to operate in that latitude Many of the professional wreck ers were Conchs from the Bahama Islands. They used to pray during their religious ceremonies for more wrecks to come their way. Wrecks were their major cash crops. Fees as high as ten thousand dollars were charged in some cases for aiding land locked ships to get off the reefs. THE w reckers even gained possession of the first lightship which the U. S Government sent to Florida The vessel sailed for New York in the early summer of 1825. It ran into a violent tempest off the Florida coast and was finally blown on the reefs The crew abandoned the ship. It was salvaged as a derelict by the pro f essio nal wreckers and the ship's contract ors had to pay a considerable ransom to get their boa t from the hands of the sea ghouls Ultimately the lightship was an chored near Carysfort Reef, where it re mained for twenty-six years, being the only beacon during the period from 1825 to 1851 which warned navigation of the danger spots along that one hundred and thirty mile stretch of coast In fact, dur ing most of that period the lightship at Carysfort Reef was the only beacon be tween St. Augustine and Key West. The year after the Indians attacked the Cape Florida lighthouse a similar onslaught was made against the Carysfort lightship. The ca ptain of the vessel and one of the crew were killed, but the Seminole invasion wa s repulsed The Government authorities, to better protect our domestic and foreign shipping, i n 1852 built the first openwork, metal light-tower at Carysfort Reef. At that time the Florida coast and key s were prac tically barren of habitations and in habitants As a consequence, it was n eces sary to construct the lighthouse at Phil a delphia, where it was set up and tested out thoroughly and then loaded on a special schooner and sent to Carysfort Reef with an expert crew of workmen. There the metal tower was permanently erected as a guidepost to safety. It stands today a s useful as e ver in warning navigation of the perils that lurk nearby. The four hun dred and fifty ton tower is of pyramidal shape and is anchored securely in three feet of water to bedrock far below The structure is one hundred and seventeen feet hi gh and fifty feet in diameter at its base The twinkling light is visible twelve miles at sea. The lighthouse at Carysfort Re e f was o ne of a half d oze n which subsequently wer e built along the keys. In 1853 a sec ond metal lighthouse was erected at Sand "Key near Key West. Orig i nally a sixty foot brick tower was constructed at this point and equipped with a practical bea con. A terrible hurricane which swept that neighborhood washed away the sandbar on which the lighthouse stood. The build ing was undermined and finally fell, bury ing the light-keepers and their families Seven year s later the existent metal light house was built. "It is an openwork struc ture one hundr ed and twenty-one feet h igh and quite si milar to the light-station at Carysfoot. It rests on seventeen l arge iro n lJJies sunk fourteen feet in the rock. The Sand Key light -t ower stands on a tin y island of sand. It was designed and built by Lieutenant G G. Meade, who a decade ago gained international fame as the Union commander at the battle of Gettysburg. The Sombrero Key lighthouse, the loft iest of the Florida key beacons, was built in 1858. It is a handsome tower of steel fifty-siX feet in diameter at its base and one hundred and sixty feet high. The signal light is one hundred and forty-two feet above the sea surface. Every night from twilight to dawn it flas hes at regular intervals a warning o f adjacent dangers. The tower stands in five feet of water and is securely anchored to a base of steel pi!. ing set into the rocky reef. Lieutenant G. G Meade was also the designer of this lighthouse although it was built under the supervision of a fellow-officer. The Sam brero Key lighthouse cost $120,000 at the time it was built. ANOTHER well-known light is located on A ll igator Reef midway down the Florida keys. Engine eri ng science even today recognizes this particular light-tower as one of the finest metal, sea-swept struc tures of its kind in the who l e world. This lighthouse cost $185,000. Another of the efficient reef lighthouses raises its pin nacle high above American Shoal, fifteen miles east of Key West. At Dry Tortu gas, the most westerly of the Florida r eefs, a brick lighthouse one hundred and fifty seven feet high was built in 1858, the same year that the one hundred and seventy-one foot brick light tower was comp l eted a t Pensacola. As early as 1826, a Federal beacon burned nightly in the vicinity of Dry Tortugas. It was located on Garden Key and is still maintained as a harbor light. During the Civi l War one hundred and sixtyfour lighthouses along the South At lantic coa s t were put out of commission by the Confederates. Several of the reef lights in Florida were all that remained unmolested This was part of the drive made ag;dnst northern shipping. The tro uble began up in Charleston harbor, South Carolina, right under the nose of Fort Sumter. The charleston lighthouse dates back to colonial days. For twenty two years o n e of its lights was main t ained in the spire of a Charleston church whence it beamed forth its me ss age of guidance to sailors far from shore. The lighthouse -'It Charleston was the first which the gray garbed soldiers seized when the Civil War began. All the federal beacons darkened during the War of Secession were restored to service shortly after the termination of hosti l ities. The principal lighthouses along the Florida coast from Fernandina to Miami are at St. Augustine, Mosquito Inlet, Cape Canaveral, Juniper Inlet and Hillsboro In let. The first lig hthou se at St. Augustine was a square tower built in mission style Congressional records mention a special appropriation of five thousand d olla rs, ratified March 3, 1823, for the com p le ti on o f the St. Augustine lighthouse on Anastasia Island. This l ight-tower was used for a half century Then its site was washed away in a violent storm Soon afterward the present St. Augustine lighthouse wa s constructed It is a circu lar brick tower one hundred and sixtyone feet high. It is painted in black and white spirals so that it becomes a valuable day signal for navigators.

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida 89 If the Northern Investor Knew His Power What Pro/its Await Him! Th Florida Blou Book giflu autht.Uic. fact/ul itl(ornta.liarlils tf{>#tl reqvt.rf. ARE you one of that vast army of northern investors who just sit idly by listening to the stories of Florida profits made by others? Do you say, "Oh, the big fellows make all the money. What can Florida offer for my few dollars when I cannot go there?" We repeat! 'If the northern investor knew his power, what profits await him in Florida! Florida is the treasure chest, the golden gateway of opportunity for the large operator and small investor alike. There is a p lace for your $100 to $5,000 in Florida. There is a safe investment here for your funds. There is a big profit to be made by the man with moderate investment who cannot come to the "Sunshine State. Thousands of "stay at home" investors have made hand some profits and other thousands will make more profits in Florida through the method employed by millionaires the country over-the syndicate. This company, efficiently managed by experienced officers who know Florida real estate thoroughly, is forming syndi cates in the interests of the northern investors. Such syndi cates are based on property in the path of Florida's new and greatest e r a of prosperity-building Our syndicates are for the out-of-state investors seeking soundest money making opportunities in Florida today. Bother or worry is eliminated, safety and soundne ss are assured under rigid conditions explained in our descriptive syndicate folder. You owe it to yourself to read this free circulas. Use the coupon GULF ATLANTIC REALTY CO WARNER BUILDING TAMPA, FLORIDA Gu l f Atlantic Realty Co., Warner Building, Tampa, Fla. Pleaae amd me the literature checked below: 0 Blue Book 0 Syndicate Folder Date ........... .......... .... ...... ....... .... Name Addres.1 .... ................................. ..... ............. City ...... ...........................................

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90 GREATER CLEARWATER This organization specializes m GREATER CLEARWATER Realty and enjoys a reputation for e f f e c t i n g large profits f,or clients who invest in this growing section. LoFORTE HARRISON REALTY CORPORATION Scranton Arcade Clearwater :-: Florida New York Office: 1133 B r o a d w a J' Makes a wonderful little home, easily carried, and quickly erected. Designed for comfort a nd convenience-no stooping to get in or out-a 6-footer can walk erect in "RedRoom" without even mussing his hair. "Hed-Room" is made in four sizes-one for every need. If your dealer cannot supply you, write or wire us for complete descriptive matter and prices. DEALERS Gl ito t ouch with u s tmmediatel:y r gardiKg "Hd-Riom" and other tents o f oNr fll
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Suniland: The Magaz ine of Florida IF you would like to learn more about Florida; her acreage, cultivated and uncultivated; her inland lakes; her population compared with other states; her tax rates; her inheritance laws; her net return per acre; her railroad mileage and highways; her. fisheries; her phosphate mines, and all the other facts that determine wealth, it is available on request. Ask for it. You will receive at the .same time information on Sumter County ranking 6th out of 63 counties in productiveness, although the smallest agricultural county in the State. You will also learn about Orange Home, acknowledged the outstanding city development in the county and highly regarded throughout the state as one of the operations most deserving of public confi dence for its investment values. TABLOID NEWSPAPER ON REQUEST ORANGE HOME uThe City of Lakes and Groves'' Executive Offices : Leesburg, Fla. 91

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92 NOW that everything possible that can be said and done against Florida by un scrupulous or misinformed writers has been refuted by personal investiga-tionFLORIDA HAS BEEN EXONERATED and particularly the justly famous RIDGE SECTION. ----o-IMPERIAL POLK with a per capita wealth of $6,198, the richest county in the UNITED STATES is the cream of the RIDGE SECTION, and leads the whole State in AgriCulture, Manufacturing a n d Phosphate Mining Industries. ----o-To you who cannot come down because of the nature of your business, we have a few splendid opportunities requiring comparatively small outl.ay o f cash in a County whic h HAS NEVER HAD A BOOM. A County with untold possibilities in Truc.k Farmin g, Dairy and Chtcken Farming, to aay nothing of nat ural Fruits. Polk County produces more Citrus Fruits than any other county in Florida. Our records are at your service, Write us now for the riJ(ht Prices based 011 Pra ctical values. Desk H HUDGINGS & SHERIDAN REALTORS 111 SOUTH TENNESSEE AVE. LAKELAND, FLORIDA SUBDIVISION8-ACREAGEBUSINESS PROPERTIE8-FARM8-GROVES and HOMESITES ACREAGE FOR WATERFRONT DEVELOPMENT OF MASTER SIZE IN THE LAND OF THE COCOANUT AND ROYAL PALM, 23 ,577 ACRES with approximately 15 miles of salt water frontage and ap proximately 15 miles of hard road frontage, which can be bought at a price no greater than has been paid for adjoining acreage without waterfront. Location is in the real trop ical part of Florida on lower West Coast. You will be surprised how well this will bear investigation-but it is neither a shoe string nor a piker proposition. ACREAGE IS MY BUSINESS J. FORREST CALDWELL REALTOR "A LITTLE MAN BUT A BIG HUSTLER" BARTOW, FLORIDA Wire via Poat.al or Western Un io n Loni: Dlltan
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Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida HE ever delightful, ever sunny land of Southern Florida calls you-calls you now. Whether it's June or January, it calls you to happiness; to pleasure and profit. Both pleasure and profit await you if yo u can come in person now. But, for your profit, whether your call be in person o r by mail or by wire, there is here for you a tried and proven realty organization ready to aid you. For more than twelve years we have been watching and studying realty values. herehave been earnestly and honestly servmg our clients-and making profits for them. During that time of clients have found our service of mestlmable value. Sunnyland can serve you too-Sunny land invites you. -Write Us Wire Us or Call Some_ offerings now m Mian!I Cit! and Miami Beach ?roperttes, Impro ve d and unImproved. Ocean frontage from Cocoa to Key West. We specialize in large and small tracts of selected acreage all over Florida, suitable for farm purposes. -A11d We Want Your Listings, Too. 93 .. \ / J ) B uy and Sell through SUN YLA D ALVIN LOVINGOOD President HARVEY F. ROBISON Secy and Treas. J.DN Vail MIAMI

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94 lbtsacola FLO R..IDA (ity of .Jfappiness THERE is a note of happiness in the air a t Pensacola. It's in the rays of a g l orious s uns hin e that k iss th e oran g es to a golden ycl io' in the rippling crysta l waters of the harbor that pl'ay with the sil very beams of a Southern moon -in the invi g orAting caresses of Gulf hreezes, fragrant with the per fum e of p i ne and magno l ia You c a n see it reflected in the laug hin g faces of c h i l dren nt piny -in the stimubting youthful ness of men at work. But, happines s in Pen sacol a is not d e pendent n l one upon nat ur a l bea uties the a tmosphere of it s en, i ronment. Here, too, exis ts both the opportunity And the inc entive to achieve worth-while things. For, here, arc l o n g es tabli s hed industries-a profit a b l e agr i cul tur e a thrivin g commer c e by l and a nd sea two great trunk line r a ilways the finest ha, bor on the Gulf. Thes e bespeak the sound b a sis for _perma nen c y an d pro s perity in Pen sacol<'la c ity set upon gently rising s lope s flanked by bea utifu l exp anses of wale a modern city of homes, s chools, pa_rks b m ad s lrcci s and be a uli ful drlVCS. i\ nd every palm tree a nd l i,e oak whisper the n!"ac o l a a r e lnjrigu e d by it. Tha t i s ,.,. h y many (."orne back t o calli t honle. If y o u ho vc neve r \xoc n f o sho uld loave our handbookofdcpendable }""l ori. IA by 2 2 Cham [t g ives facts n e < e d by investors. h o me -builders or farrn c n A copy will be sent free upon rccusacola. Fla. J S Morww, S ec r etary. Pleas e send rne y o u r free e n cydoJ)eJia o f Florida. o f Florida."' Name ....................... A ddreS& .. Sun/and: Tlze Magazitze of Florida One Woman's Faith in Florida "We Are Proud of Dunedin" ( C o11tinued from page 62) further being East Coast property was soarmg sky-high and the value of West Coa t property was beginning to climb steadily to higher levels. It remained for the hinterlands to be discovered by the winter tourists. That discovery of Qermont came in r ecen t years when a sudden elemental di turbance played havoc with the road s of the East and West coasts and steady streams of autos were detoured via Oermont; it is an interesting fact that a large percentage of them, instead of continuing on their route, stopped at CLermont, went no further. All of which, as Kipl ing puts it, is an other story Nevertheless, property values in Cler mont, as early as 1920, h ad begun to mount to such an extent that Miss O'Harra was no longer worried about payments falling d u e A ll that was necessary was to lop off a small lo t and the re ale value was more than enou gh to take care of any payments on the original p u rchase. Her faith in F lorida confirmed, she took delight in buying four dollars of new r eal estate for every dollar she made in resal es; than wpich no further evidence of he r sterling trust in the State's future prosperity need be advanced. T ODA Y the orange grove, which was in a deplorable condition when Miss O 'Harra bough t it, is as healthy and well-groomed as -any in F lo rida. Of all her original property, she told me, that grove will be the last "to go-provided she can ever bring her self to part with it. Nestling on the fertile banks of Palatlakaha River, it yields a bountiful harvest of golden fruit each year. And Miss O'Harra is generous enough to place the credit where it rightfully be lon gs. "While I was away in Texas, doing w a r work," she said, "someone had to give undivided attention to the grove. That someone was my mother. M on ey was anything but plentiful. Every penny I could spare from my living expenses in Beaumont was given over to the pay ment of the debt. Therefore, it was not often that Mother could afford capable help. In other words, she did most of the work on the grove herself. But she worked uncomplainingly and the grove was in spl endid condition when I returned. Do you b l ame me for having a sent imental attqchmen t to it?" In the begining of this story I mentioned a beautiful ideal which lifts Miss O'Harra above the commonplace. It is rare that we come across examples of genuine altruism. But during my brief stay in Clermont I found it emb o died in the person of Edna O'Harra. In Octob e r, 1923, Miss O'Harra pa i d a vis i t to the Chjldren's Home Society in Jacksonville, and there had an inter view with "Daddy" Fagg. It was while she was closeted with him that she modestly outlined her ide a l and asked him to help he r realize it. She wanted to adopt, rear and educate (even to the point of financ ing them throu g h col lege) at least a dozen children. Daddy Fagg approved her plan and before the interview was over she had agreed to adopt two of the little inmates of the Home. They were boys, though Miss O'Harra had set heart on a girl. But even in this she displayed her character -Natural Setting Unsurpassed Opportunities Unlimited "The Best Water in Florida We Offer Our Services and Invite Your Inquiries Acreage and Waterfront Estates Business and Residence Property GRANT & SKINNER REALTY CO. Realtors Phone 6177 DUNEDIN FLORIDA Please seJJd me, without obligation, comp le te information about Duned in. NA1lE ............................. ADDRE ........... .............. CITY ............... .. ............. STATE ............................ FORT MYERS The City of Palms We l!ways choice offering s in good acrellgo and cloae>in City Correspondence is invited from i n vatora and others deeiring intimate information regarding Fort 1\olyen and Lee Co unty. ANCHOR REALTY CO. .234 Firat Street Fort Myers, Florida Landscape Designer Prt &t Pttrk and Home l'arka aD4 Uout ... rd WOUb--sUI>\libell SUbdlYIIIOIII i LEE LaTROBE BATEMAN, Ocala F1a.

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Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida ''Largest Circulation in PineUas County'' W HEN a publisher declines to quote his circulation you can put it down in the book that he's holding a "busted" flush. And when you pay good money for ad vertising space you are entitled to see hether the publisher's hand is genuine or otherwise. In the final show-down on advertising value, it is not age, or number of pages, or size or make-up that wins. It is CIRCULATION, because circulation measures results, and RESULTS ARE WHAT YOU PAY FOR, WHETHER YOU GET THEM OR NOT. The DAILY NEWS puts its circulation cards on the table. F ron k F. Pulver, Owner ST. P E T ERSBURG .7he Jack Mitchell Realty Company says: "On actual checkup the Daily News brought four times as many inquiries as any other paper, on our Daytona Shores advertising." Major A !fred BirdsaLL, G ene ral Nana_(jqr-N.eur.s PICTURE Sunshine C d y FLORIDA 95

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Don't Gamble Get the Facts Regarding PAGELAND Nature's Paradise ''In The Kingdom of The Sun" Marion County Florida The real Florida with her high rolling hills, charming lakes, wind ing rivers, splendid coast, magnifi cent paved highways, health impart. ing breezes, tropical clime, fruits and vegetables. The Boom has just struck Pageland. Send for this handsome 36 page FREE booklet. Fill oul lhe coupon PAGE BROTHERS Owners and Developers 559 Central A venue ST. PETERSBURG, FI:.A. Suniland: The Magazine of Florida istic generosity, and the boys were brought into the O 'Harra household. "Remember," she warned Daddy Fag-g, "I want the first little blue-eyed baby girl that you get. And the younger she is the better I'll be pleased." One day in September, 192.5, nearly two years later, Miss O'Harra was told that "Long Distance" wanted her on the telephone. It was Daddy Fagg and he adv ised her to come to Jacksonville with all dispatch. And there in Jack sonville she found a three-weeks o ld baby girl waiting for her. Polly Anna, was the name given the baby at the Home and Miss O 'Harra could find no logical reason for changing it afterwards. Anyone visiting Clermont, today, will find there a decidedly happy family circle. Miss O'Harra has surrounded herself with perpetual friends in the persons of Miss Litzrodt and Miss Moore, not to mention their familiesl Then, there. is Mrs. O'Harra; fair skinned fifteen-year old James; ten-year old Sylvester who' boasts that you can't place a pin-point on his face without encountering a healthy freckle; laughing and gurgling little Polly Anna and (how could anyone forget them?) Ted and Cappy Ricks, two snowy-white Spitz dogs of fine breed. A happy family? You should s ee i t I As for Miss O'Harra, herself, success and the acquisition of extremely satisfactory profits through the resale of her Florida holdings have not spoiled her in the least. Her ready smile is delight fully warm, contagious. She is always alert for the comfort of the other person, particularly if that other person happens to be one of the "O'Harra Dozen," which, while not numerically complete at the mom,ent, has, at least, an excellent start in that direction. Editorials (Continued from page 34) as representative. In ten years cancer mortality increased fourteen per cent It now equals one hundred per hundred thousand population. The grim truth is that cancer threatens one in eight people over forty years of age. The cause of this disease of civiliza tion has received attention from the ablest medical minds. It is highly sig nificant that Indians on reservations and primitive Africans scarcely ever have the dise a se. Dr. Isaac Levin of Columbia University with the co-opera tion of a large number of doctors practicing among Indians investigated this subject. Dr. Levin found that out of 115,455 Indians treated during twenty years only twenty-nine cases of cancer were encountered. The explorer Stanley established the fact that the negroes of the interior were free from cancer. It has been demonstrated that neither alcohol, tobacco, coffee, tea nor meat are causes of cancer. Indians are he av y smokers and great meat-eaters. Arabs a nd Turks are excessive coffee drinkers but suffer little from cancer. The Chin ese have drunk tea for centuries without incurring cancer. The Eskimos who live on meat are practically free from cancer, while the vegetarian tribes of India have as much c ancer as the meat-eating peoples. The conclusion has been forced upon a number of medical authorities, in cluding the British surgeon Sir Arbuthnot Lane that cancer is the result of long-continued poisoning of the human body. This poisoning is of forms. It is chiefly from auto-intoxication, the a ccompaniment of constipation. And, on the other hand, the breathing of products of partial combustion-fumes from motor exhausts, for instance, and city chimneys-may have equally bad effects upon the human system. An. additional source of chronic poisoning is had in the artificial preservatives and dyes with which much of our prepared foods are saturated. And, finally, cancer is thought to be in part a deficiency disease, like pellagra and scurvy, in duced by vitamine starvation. As researches continue, further evidence ac cumulates to enforce these inferences and to point the way to prevention. It may be tpat cancer is the scourge which will reverse the tide of popula tion and set it toward the country again. The menace of the metropolis is its reeking streets and foul o ffice s; its restaurants and delicatessens ; its subways and elevators. The peri l of the white race is not yellow or brown men, but can cel'. It determines the ultimate size of cities ; it may be indeed that our largest centers are veritable death-traps whose insidious influences operate over fifteen or twenty years before making themselves evident in incurable and dread ful disease. But the danger of America is Florida's opportunity. Like the brazen serpent in the wildern e ss, they who see i t may live And what a mighty multitude have turned their faces toward the land of salva tion wherein they may l ive out their natural span of life For Florida is nature's answer to cancer. If cancer be the evil in indolent living, the curse upon adulterated food, and the penalty for deficiencies of diet, this State provides its antidote. In the lakes and surf of Florida plunge and splash the merry bathers. Along its beaches men and women run races and play tag. Over its prairies hunters stalk their quarry. And into its streams and shallows wade the intent fishermen. Muscles that had grown stiff and shrivelled with disuse come to life in Florida. Business men who have forgotten how to smile learn to laugh in Florida. And constipation, which like the poor is ever with us, vanishes with exerci se. A nation is returning to play in Florida. The builders of America's cities, the rulers of finance, the leaders of government, have discovered that all work and no play makes us cancerous and irritable. Whereas an afternoon of golf, a day's hike in the forest, or a row across the lake renews jaded minds, inspires ideas, and prolongs existence. \ !:...THOUGH the United Sta tes produces r\. enormous quantities of foodstuffs, it is unfortunate how little of this output reaches our tables in natural forms. It has been overcooked at best; at worst it is a sorry substitute for such food as our bodies need. What a commentary upon our intelligence that the best-fed nation should have so many underweight children in our public schoo l s. Out of the homes of the rich come many ane mic and mal-nourished children. Our pocketbooks provide lavish meals but little food. We stuff ourselves with sweets but starve for' fruits and green vegetables. Then what a promised land is Florida to our starved bodies. Every dooryard with its trees of oranges and grapefruit. Along the roadsides boys and girls peddling ripe strawberries. And all year long lettuce, tomatoes and celery are growing somewhere in the State. The fountain of youth has been discovered; it is the juice of oranges,.

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Suniland: The Magaztne of .Florida 9'1 the sap of ground cane, the milk of .. coconuts Florida is the suburb of metropolitan HODGSON PORTABLE HOUSES e;, America. It is in easy reach of our most congested centers. More and more .the families of our nation will live in Florida wherever the men must work :part of the year. Florida means long life to grown folks and longer lives to .children. With the advent of aerial transportation business men may week .end in Florida as they now commute .along the Hudson River or along Lake Michigan' s shore. This State is not .only the conqueror of cancer; it is the champion of a healthy America and to its standard are rallying a hundred mil1ion men, women and children, Florida -land of the free from d isease! Mystery Boat That Won (Continu ed from page 82) use in rough water. The planking con sists of the best quality of clear cedar material, free of all checks and cracks There is no after-deck, a seat for a third occupant being placed instead between the girders. A special six inch hogginggirder is installed from stem to stem to add rough weather strength. Instead of making the stern three fourths of an inch thick, the Ballard boys cut it to three-eighths of an inch .and then fastened oak cleats all around the inside e\fge, up the center and also between the center and the side. This achieved a strong and light construc tion. A mahogany cap was placed over the high-crowned transom instead of decking The engine is a three-cycle, 18-25 horsepower high speed model. The gasoline tank abaft the engine holds 7.5 gallons of fuel. The propellor is a two-blade, 15-in ch diameter affair which, when turning at two thousand revolutions, drives the boat at a speed .of thirty-five miles an hour. "Miss St. Petersburg" is as fleet as an African ostrich and as safe as a family horse. The high-grade lumber used in her construction cost one hun -dred and fifty dollars. Her engine lists .at five hundred .and twelve dollars and fifty cents, while the rudder, strut and Other casting work, added s eventy-five dollars to the expense bill. The equip ment, including instruments and steering gear, amounted to two hundred and twenty-five dollars. The cost of this type of boat can be curtailed by substituting less expense instruments, .. equipment and finish. The Ballard brothers suggest to prospective own -ers of racing boats of this style that "a stitch in time SiJ.ves nine"; that is, if they are going to build boats and race them the same season, n o t to flirt with time and wait until the last possible minute to begin the carpentry task. Our Automobile Speed Law Florida's speed law for automobiles is -getting general mention from the of other states. The Dunkirk (N. Y.) Observer says: "Florida's new speed law seems to approach nearer to what the nation wants than automobile legisla tion in any other state. There is little logic in enforcing dirt-road speed limit -on hard-surfaced highways." The Pittsburg GazetteTimes says : "Florida beats some other states to virtual elimination of the speed limit for automobiles. While -others talked, Florida acted. It also has a pro blem of congestion owing to the immense number of tourists in the state annually. Florida raised the speed limit =to forty-five miles per hour." Let us supply you with one of our charming bungalows. We can do this quickly. We have sold thousands of our portable houses during the last 30 years. They are.ideal for the Florida climate. Our catalog showing photographs and plans of houses owned by many people whom you know will interest you. See our Exhibit just off the road from Manatee to Sarasota, where the A. L. aosses the A. C. L. Send for our wtalo No. 29 HODGSON HOUSE Co., BRADENTON, FLA. A R A 0 'lf' A,J ,. SARASOTA ACREAGE GROVES SUBDIVISION OPPORTUNITIES APARTMENT SITES BUSINESS INVESTMENTS Call, Wire or W rite LONGMIRE & WILLIAMS, Inc. REALTORS 1 115 Pineapple Sarasota, Florida P. 0. Arcade L 0 JI TO MAKE SURE OF GETTING SUNIL AND every month for a year, send $1.50 and your name and address to CIRCULATION MANAGER, SUNILAND MAGAZINE P. 0. Box 2711, Tampa, Fla. ACREAGE SUBDIVISIONS The Hnrt If tilt Hill lolllo PAUL D. JOYCE REALTOR Real Eatate and lnveatmenta SELLIN& AGENT FOR RID8EWOOD AND HINSON AVI. BUILDINI HAINEI CITY, FLO ..

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98 Suniland; The Magazine of Florida ONE 5-ACRE TRACT !/>200 cash Bal. 6 Mos. TWOS-ACRE TRACTS Only$1,500 $375 cash Bal. 6-12-18 Mo1 Our References: Any Bank or Business Firm in Miami. MANATEE FLORIDA FARMS CO. 66 N. E. 2nd Street, Miami W YNES CO. cxclusiYe Sales Agents ARAH L. HUNGERFORD Sales Manager

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida WHERE HUNDREDS OF HAPPY AND CONTENTED FAMILIE$. WILL ENJOY OUR FLORIDA CLIMATE, OUR BOATING --SWIMMING, FISHING AND SHOOTING AND AT THE SAMt: TIME, BE OF BENEFIT TO MANKIND BY PRODUCING FROM THE FERTILESOILS OF "MAGIC ACRES, FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, POULTRY AND----OF THE FROZEN NORTt-1.----------------. N ....--Fr. gEN .SRRII'tG-S-E -. 7MILES T O FOUR 5-ACRE TRACTS ONLY $2,900 $725 cash All tracts absolutely guaranteed to be dry and farmablelakes have been surveyed out. 8lfail .... Your Order Today _:;. .. C H .&N 99 -----=--;--? ---.:r-==. 4 --)E. i:: -Mail your order today for one, two or four of these wonderful tracts, inclose money order or your check for the initial payment and, be sure and state your desire as to whether you prefer your location close to the lake or on the outside of the tract.

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100 ADVERTISING SERVICE "ADVERTISING that gets what it goes after," has been my slogan for many years. I am specializing in direct-mail campaigns, sales plans and copy for financial, mail order, syndicates and real estate advertisers. Also complete pub licity service for manufacturers. This includes high powered l e tters, circulars, folders, boo k lets, catalogues and newspaper copy. To me, e'!ery proposition anci project is in a clas s by itself. I study every problem from data you send to me and then prepare your advertise ing to meet the specific needs. My Flor ida clients and others will endorse my qual i ty advertising I am now in sp l endid position to serve sever a l F l orida adver tisers. Wri te me in detail and I will make a prompt reply. Ernest F Gardner 560 Ridge Arcade Kansas City, Mo. BEACH CLASS INSTRUCTOR A PHYSICAL instructor who for several years bas conducted a class on one of the very prominent Jersey Coast beaches, is ava i lable for similar work in Florida. The very be s t references and end o rsemen t s a re a va i lable, and I can report for work on short notice. Ad dress, Box 25, Suni land M a gazine, P. 0. Box 2711, Tam pa, Florida. CLAY INDUSTRY SITE FROM a recent ad verti s e ment we have secured some exceptional informat i on relative to clay desposits in Flori da We will gladly give th i s da t a to any in dividua l or company planning to estab lish a plant f o r the manufacture of clay products. Address, Res earch and Serv ice Division, Suniland Magazine, Box 2711, Tampa, F l orida. FARM LANDS REAL farming land in F lorida at mod erate prices. Zolfo Springs is center of territory producing large quantities of winter vegetables citrus fruits and is especially adapted to dairying and poultry. Write Kistner Brothers, Zolfo Springs, Florida. FIDELITY SERVICE of Fidelity Abstract Corpora tion is unequalled. Complete abstracts and continuat i on s 3 to 10 days. Within a day's time after instruments are filed in Vo l usia County Court House they are placed in our records, and for that reason we can save time and much in convenience. Service means money. You need our services and we want your business. Miller Block, N. W. cor. Blvd. and New York Ave. Daytona Office, Phone 867-J, D. Chrisman, Rep resentative, 2Z2 S. Beach St. George Printz, Sec'y, Deland, Florida. MAILING LISTS REACH thousand s of wealthy northern investors through my guaranteed, up to-date, neatly typed lists. $10.00 per M cash with order. Write for complete information and addressing prices. Bunch Advertising Service, 701 Holly wood, Jacksonville, Florida. Suniland: The Magazine of Florida ILAND'S TUNITI FLORIDA FARM FOR a subdi vis i on or development or estate, here is a clo s e in property that will satisfy the requirements of the most exact i ng buyer. Location is in the heart of the famous Manatee County fruit and vege t able section, one m i le from Palmetto and two mile s from Braden ton, both exceptionally fine towns and a wonderful pla c e to live. Manatee County is the eleventh richest agri c ul tura l county i n th e United States, ship ping over 8,000 carloads of fruit and v egetables annually 40 acres of _thi s property are on a hard surfaced road. 15 acres bearing orange and grapefruit This Is Suniland's New Market Place For as little as $5.00 you can tell your story to the realms of more than 80,000 copies of SUNILAND. There is no better way to reach all Florida and no way of equal qual ity in carrying your message to Florida thinking people. Try an ad of this size or larger: The rat e of S U NILA D class i fied i s $1.00 for each line. This is a five line ad and would cost five dollars. Address SU ILAND Magazine, Classified, Box 2711, Tampa. Please aend caah or chec:k with order and have your advert.Uement in our banda by the 15th of month preceding date of i .. ue. Suniland Brings Buyers t rees; 1 3 a cre s of h ighly l>roduc t ive gar den truc k land; 12 acres r i ch virgin ha m mock land Dwelling hou s e surrounded my magnificent oaks. Flowing Arte s ian well. Raw p i ne l and ten miles further from town is sell ing at $500 to $1,000 per acre T hi s farm a bargain at $80,000 one-four t h cash balance to suit pur chaser. Direct from owner who has other interests requiring full attention. Write today for full information or ap pointment. Box 3(), care SUNILAND Magazine, Tampa, Florida REAL ESTATE 300 ACRES and up. North Polk County near highway and railroad. Write John B. Dorman, Polk Building, Des Moines, Iowa. FLORIDA HOMES: If you are inter ested in a homesite a home or a co op e rative apartment in or near Tampa, write us. We are planning and will have to offer shor t ly complete homes and apartments to fit every purse for home seekers or in v estors. Gulf Atlantic Realty Company, Warner Building, Tampa, Florida. FOR SALE: If you are looking for an exceptionally good site for a real Flor ida home with attractive scenic surround ings in one of Tampa's best and most exclusive sub div i sions, let me tell you what I have to offer. All particulars will be mailed upon request. Address owner, P. 0. Box 565, Tampa, Fla. WHERE are you go i ng to stay in Flor ida? I have plenty of homes and some at most modest prices. Move in at once. 42 miles sou t h of Palm Beach. Edward H. Mohr, Room 201, Palm Court Ar(;ade, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. PHOTOGRAPHS WEST Florida views showing the agri cultural development of this part of the state: Sats uma orange groves, cane fields, blueberry and trucking scenes, poultry raising etc. In loose-leaf albums peculiarly fitted for salesmen. T. Hope Cawthon, Commer cia l Photographer, De Funiak Springs,. Fla. REAL ESTATE SALESMEN BROKERS and Salesmen wanted to sell.: Florida lots that have an irresistible ap peal because the location and price and! plan is so plainly profit-looking. Two. di s tinct subdivisions enable you to meet classes not ord i narily approached but which should be worked as they will buy on our plan of low prices and very easy terms. We have the property and the plan for men or organizations who can sell. We are owners Gainsborough & A s sociates, 1317 East Broadway, Tampa. SUMMER HOMES SPEND your summ e r at Cre s cent Beach, near New London Conn. Cottages and lo t s for sale and rent. Send for infor mat i on. J os eph T. Cruttenden, Crescent Beach, Conn. SYNDICATES HERE' S a w i de-open o p p o r tunity for a few "individuals," w i th $100 to $1,000. Profits f r om three or more sources come to this Synd i cate a n d we want to share wit h you We buy and sell land sub div i de and sell-build and sell houses all highly profitable in Florida and de mand is growing eve r y day. This is the big rea so n of Florida s greatest year. We now own a very attractive property a Florida corporation--conservatively managed and have the finest syndicate plan in the state. Write us for the evi dence. M. B. Gainsborough, President, Florida Syndi cate Estates, 1317 East Broadway, Tampa. WATER FRONT PROPERTY WE HAVE TO OFFER: 1220 acres ten miles from Pens acola, one and hali mil es beach frontage, on Perdido Bay. Two miles fine river fron t age. Price, $175.00 per acre 1360 acres Santa Rosa County, eight mile s from Milton, County site, twenty m i les hom Pensacola, pine timbered,. six miles from Ringl i ng & White Devel opment, suitable for colonization. Price, $23.50 per acre. Only twenty-nine residential water front lot s l eft in city l imits of Pensacola .. facing beautiful Bayou Texar, in Lake view, Pensacola s be s t residential section $1,800 each. Write or w ire-J. B Beck or H D Case, 26 South Palafox St. Pensacola Florida.

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida 101 Phantom Woman (Co11tinued from page 74) But Franklin saw none of it. His eyes stared straight ahead, unseeing His mind was in a turmoil. But he was more upset at Elizabeth's desertion of him than at the thought of facing a trial and possi ble conviction for murder. "What's the next step ?" he asked dazedly at the station. "We'll have to put you in a cell for the night," answered Mahoney. "The evidence we have will be put before the district attorney tomorrow. It's up to him then on. Have you a lawyer?" "No. I've never needed one before But I have a friend in Jacksonville who is a good one. "Better get him down here. You ought to have somebody who knows the ropes to look after your interests. There was a telephone handy and Franklin called Robert Lane in Jack sonville. The young attorney expressed great surprise at his friend's predica ment and promised to leave for Sara sota early the following morning F RANKLIN went to his cell in what might be considered, under the cir cumstances, a cheerful frame of mind There was somebody on his side now. Lane was considered a good attorney and his father was a noted one, head of a most powerful legal firm. Frank lin had been acquainted with both father and son for years and he knew that with them on the job his interests would be well protected. But when he lay down on the hard bunk his mind reverted to Elizabeth. It hurt him terribly for her to doubt him even for an instant. She knew he was innocent. Why, they had met in the garden immediately after the sho\ sounded. He still wondered about her presence there. It seemed unlikely that an unarmed girl would pursue an unknown intruder in the darkness. But women did the most unlikely things at times. He finally slept fitfully, wak ing and tossing at frequent intervals Three times during the morning he telephoned the Rogers place. And each tim; he was informed by Stebbins that Miss Elizabeth was not at home. He didn't believe it. She was there but refused to talk to him. She believed him guilty. If he could only see her, talk to her, make her believe the truth. Lane arrived shortly after two, a short, chunky chap with a high fore head and kindly blue eyes, who had a habit of jingling the change in his right hand trousers pocket. "Nice mess you're in,'' he remarked cheerfully as he sat down beside Frank lin on the bunk. "Tell me all about it." Franklin explained everything in de tail. Lane stared vacantly at nothing in particular for some moments while he softly whistled and rattled his spare silver until Franklin was ready to yell. Then he began asking questions. "Do you suspect any particular person of this crime?" "No-unless it t:night be Kent." "Why Kent?" "Well, he acted rather queerly last night, very nervous and so on, almost as if he were the accused man instead of me." Lane made a notation in a small leather notebook. "Has he been with Rogers long?" A Telegram May Mean Your Fortune Nearly six months ago I purchased three 40-acre tracts in Bay County, Fla., near Burnt Creek and the famous St. Andrews Bay. The price of $100 per acre which I paid for these lands was low even at that time. And of course Bay County land has advanced tremendously in value during the past year. To protect other investments, however, it becomes necessary for me to sell these tracts, and in order to do so quickly, I am pricing them at exactly what they cost me, only one hundred dollars an acre. I w,ill not divide any of the forty acre units, but the three units are adjoining and you may purchase one, two or three units, provided you act Where else in Bay County can you purchase 40 acre tracts for less than $200 per acre? Where else in all Florida can you buy land today at what it sold for six months ago? This is truly an unusual op portunity, and one on which the fortunate investor may rightfully expect to make a small fortune, so rapidly are Florida acreage tracts advanc .. ing in value. Remember that in purchasing one or all three of these tracts you will profit not alone from the future ad vance .in Florida land values, but you already have the bene fit of the advance that has taken place during the past six months. Naturally, these three tracts will be sold quickly after the appearance of this magazine. There are only the three tracts, so to be sure of getting one of them it is advisable to wire me your reservation, then mail immediately your check for the cash payment. The price is $4,000 per forty are tract; terms, $2,100 cash, balance of $1,900 to be retired in semiannual payments of $240 each, with interest at 6 per cent. Will be glad to furnish full legal description, etc, but to be sure this opportunity does not slip by you, better wire your reservation immediately. JOHN H. DOLAN 215 HAHN BLDG. -------------------------:--------------; 1 W. E. BURKE REALTOR SELLING WESTOVER PARK Bartow's In-town Subdivision Whue "A Look Mean a Lot" PRICES AND TERMS RIGHT 150 S. BROADWAY BARTOW, FLA. ---------------------------------------MIAMI, FLA. Daily Steamship Excursions to ST. PETERSBURG PALMETTO BRADENTON SARASOTA See daily papers for schedulu The Florida Line TAMPA Write /01' our booklet

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102 FLORIDA'S SAFEST INVESTMENT Share in ib old-e.tablihed Building and Loan Auociation Become a member of the Lakeland Build ing and Loan Aaaoclation and lnveat In ita capital stock. RETURNS 8% WITH 100% SECURITY Dividends of 2% are payable, In ca1b, every three months on full paid abarea. Subject to Supervi sion and Examination of the Comptroller of the State of Florida. Lal.. .. ....... n f':tJIu t t. ., ( :-. ... .. SAN CARLOS HOTEL Fireproof PENSACOLA, FLORIDA Dear Folka, Listen-Adjoining St. Peteraburg Lots $385.00 Only 5 miles from P. 0. Near Hlehwayo I sed aomethlne-Nuf sed DAN MORRIS REALTOR 344 Central Ave. St. P etenburo, Fla. Suniland: The Magaz ine of Florida "Only a few months. But the old man considered him a treasure." "Where'd he come from? Who is he?" "I llaven't the slightest idea." Lane made another notation in his little book and pursed his lips reflec tively. "You don't suspect any of the men who were here for the conference?" he said at last. "Of course not. They're all above suspicion. "Why so? Had you thought of the possibility of a daring criminal, who was well up on financial matters, masquerading as one of the financiers who were to come here for this conference to get his hands on the plans for the coup to sell to Gross ? "No I hadn't answered Franklin breathlessly. "Well Sl!Ch things have been done," replied the attorney positively and made another notation. "You can't give me a hint as to who this phantom woman was or what she really wanted at the house?" "No. I can't figure her out at all. "Well, we'll have to find a motive for some of these people before we can be gin to hang the thing on any of them. The motive is the big thing in a murder case. Find that and you've nearly al ways got your man-or woman. You don't know of anyone who would have a motive for killing Rogers?" "No, though he probably had plenty of enemies if one could find them." Lane rose suddenly. "I must be off," he said briskly "There are a lot of nice possibilities in this case with which to work. I'm go ing to make the preliminary investiga tion here and after I have the matter lined out dad will come on and shoot the dynamite. He's just aching to get his teeth in another good murder trial." "If yo u should see Miss Rogers,'' said Franklin hesitantly, "tell her I would like to talk to her." "I imagine she knows where you can be found if she wants to communicate with you," answered Lane dryly and departed. He was back before five o'clock, hi s plump face slightly flushed, his eye s gleaming with suppressed excitement. "I've unearthed a few things, old timer. You're a long way from the gal lows yet. You'll probab.ly rave at what" I'm going to tell you, but it's all fact s and facts worth considering. Rogers left every cent of his money to Eliza beth. And she isn't his own daughte r She s an adopted child and 'her mothet was a tall ar1gr4lar, bony woma11." (The third installment of this thrilling Florida mystery story will appear in the April issue of "Sunilancl" Don't miss it.) Orange Growing Countries The five leading countries of the world engaged in growing 1 citrus fruits, in order, are the United States, Spain, Italy, Japan and Palestine. According to a farmers' bulletin iss ued by the United States Department of Agriculture, de voted to Citrus Fruits in the Gulf States, a map is shown which gives Florida more territory to grow citrus products than any other American state. The total production of the world is estimated at about 90,000,000 box es, over half being credited to Florida and California The WEST COAST CORPORATION OF FLORIDA MARIANNA, FLORIDA (Our Own Buildinl') CHICAGO, ILLINOIS (Fisher Buildinl') Improved Farms ACREAGE SUBDIVISIONS CITY INCOME Water Front Properties Operating from Marianna to Panama City-Jackson-Bay -Calhoun-Gulf Counties. We Have the Goods Members of this corporation were born and raised in these countiea and many of our properties show continuous ownership by them for years back. Our titles are unques tioned. Our delivery is certain. Write us what you can handle and what amount you wish to invest. We will advise with you and for you -with man-to-man treatment where in you cannot go wrong. We know minutely every condition and every detail throughout this territory. This expert advice and. coopera tion should be worth more to you than anything you can BUY, for r we will tell you only the truth and give conditions only as they actu ally exist. We will serve you as long as you are interested in the property we sell. Our clients have said we do i:nore for them after they buy than we do to make the sale. Let us assist you in this manner and claim you as a "booster." Our references are "Everybody" wherever WI! are known The Florida Movement has now turned our way. Marianna and Panama City are the centers of two great activities. Prices are yet virgin. Values only slightly ad vanced now but already starting. The big profits of the South and East Coast can be duplicated here the next year or two. Get yours now. Write us today what you can handle. We will submit a proposi tion to fit. Let's do it now. THE WEST COAST CORPORATION Nat West, P ...... -w. H. MIDcm, Vice Pl-M. -F. M. GolS
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Sunil4nd: Magazine of Florida Architecture 103 (Continued from page 52) .. ud hand-made tile roofs, are, in Florida, as on the Mediterranean, a counterpart of stucco walls and stone trim. Building achvtty in Florida is demanding wider areas; a distinctive style of architecture is calling for a distinctive setting. The art of city planning is receiving no less attention than the architecture itself. Absen ce her. e, to a great extent, of commercial life, with leisure and recreation uppermost, affords opportunity for the unconventional charm of the Mediterranean city. Broken or winding streets and closed plazas, framing some gem of architecture, are reappearing as distinctive parts of the Renaissance plan. With tree lined boulevards, diagonal or looped streets, long, straight avenues with architectural features interpolated, the Florida city has interest and beauty in the making. affords opportunity to carry forward the growth of town planning in America which has been retarded by industrialism and modern modes of traffic. In the new cities of Florida, build ings may be constructed without such high regard for industrial economics as elsewhere. The and town planner is in position to record the grandeur of the Renaissance and also regain the charm and quaintne ss of the preRenaissance town. The quest of a naturay setting for a Mediaeval art may result in the recovery of much that was exce!lent in the Mediterranean plan Old plazas may become glorified civic or community centers. Vaulted passage ways through buildings and arcades serving as shelter are important tors in the Florida city plan. Leisure and the demand for air and space may render tall structures unnecessary and at the same time rrduce our traffic problems The mechanica l city of America is in Florida giving way to Old World charm and beauty. While many development companies are striving with the zeal and enthus Iasm of the Mediaeval church builders in their efforts to secure much that has been lost to us in architecture and civic art, still a word of praise may be given one or two of these companies for the way in which they have from the first sought to achieve the forgotten ideals of a golden past. Some of the developmen ts in and around Tampa are ide&lly situated for European prototypes in town planning, gardens, and buildings. Abundant water frontage, is lands lying picturesquely off shore, lots served by waterways as in Venice, arcaded pas sage-ways through buildings, boulevards looping the city, are all reminiscent of Madrid and Val encia. Large buildings are b e ing placed at important points to give to these 'new communities their full monumental value as in Renaissance towns. Against the buildings of white and colored stucco will be palm and evergreen foliage. Parks in sections give the ef fect of tropical gardens. Fruit trees for bloom, aromatic evergreen and shrub, yllow garden walks bordered with red earth and tile, add a distinctive touch to the house or patio. At certain spots, on the East Coast of Florida, nature has again provided a graceful, tropical forest as a setting for the houses; one is reminded of the pin e forest near Ravenna or of the Clean, Quick, Economical Comfort on Chilly Days The Skinner way of installing WEIR steel warm-air furnaces requires no excavationbut provides for the owner the cleanest source of comfort on those chilly days that come oc<;asionally even to this most wonderful climate. The WELDED seams of THE WEIR STEEL FURNACE forever prevent any fine ashes or soot from entering your rooms and soiling the walls or hangings. And the quick responsiveness of its construction enables the WEIR to meet a drop in temperature almost before you have realized the chill yourself. The economy of the WEIR appeals because even those with ample money to spend dis like to tie up unnecessary amounts of it in heating plants that operate but occasionally in this climate. Our display rooms in all leading Florida cities are ready to give you detailed information .about this superior source of comfort. SKINNER MACHINERY CO. DUNEDIN FLORIDA Tampa, Jac ksonville Miami, St. Petersburg, Orlmtdo, W Palm Beach Lakeland and Brad e nton The WEIR is nwde in Peoria, Ill by the Meyer Furnace Co. SHEPHERD !POUCE) DOGS The Ideal Companion and Protector Tocfly for Booklet FLORIDA HEADQUARTERS Dixie Highway Delray, Florida FREE TRIP in FLORIDA is Unequaled for Investors Any kind of Rea.! Esta te-'Any place In Florida Lots $100 up. Easy Payment: Call or Wire for Particulars-or Write Name above-Addres$ below--and mail To the 44-Year Old Reliable I "Bruce Service" for Investors 303 Tampa St., Tampa, Fla. Phone Z279

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida The Big Real Estate Profits In Florida Are Made By Those Who Invest When Towns Are Beginning Their Development. This Opportunity Is Presented By The Town Of ZOLFO SPRINGS In the center of the famous farming and citrus region of HARDEE COUNTY, a town with facilities lacked by many big cities. Sewers, Paving (plus $340,000 in new paving now under way), Electricity, Railroad, 6 Highways (including the Dixie), Bus Lines, 4 Churches, Graded School, Senior High School, 2 Hotels, Bank, 2 Packing Houses, Tourist Camp, Pure Water, medicinal mineral springs, finely appointed swimming pool, newspaper, 150 homes, stores, office. This town is complete in its improvements. We are helping it become a city. Our lots are all within the town limits. They are 50 x 150 feet, carrying Pure Water, Paved Streets, Electricity, Sewers. Deed issued by Trust Company. Title policy. Prices as low as $450. Terms: One-third down, balance in 6 quarterly payments at only 6 per cent interest. ZOLFO SPRINGS REALTY CORPORATION Zolfo Springs 1109 Franklin St., Tampa 216 N. 4th St., St. Peter-Sburg 32 Arcade Bldg., Lakeland 12 P. 0 Arcade, W. Palm Beach Joe E. Jenkins, Plant City 1 Baker-Waters Building, Auburndale 18 East Center St., Sebring Bradenton Wauchula Avon Park Lake Alfred Haines City Winter Haven 1 ZOLFO SPRINGS REALTY CORP., Zolfo Springs, Fla. Gentlemen: Without obligation to me, please tend me li terature giving full information about your project at Zolfo Springs. Name ..... .... ...... ........................ Street Address .............. ................ City and State ........................ .__---.................. -.. -......... -----------------_ ._-----------
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106 Develope. rs Attention! We specialize in high class Duval County waterfront and highway acreage tracts for in vestment or development. Nineteen years' expedence in constantly selling Duval County acreage is offered you. Investments Made in Suburban Jacksonville Acreage Are Bringirt{J Handsome R e t u r n s Tracts From 10 to 600 Acrea SEWELL& NEWWN,Inc. 316-18 Dyal-Upchurch Builclinlf Jacksonville, Florida Phone 5-11%8 Let Us Tell You About CLEARWATER and Pinellas County THE GEO. T. PINDER ORGANIZATION 511 Cleveland St. Phone 2380 Clearwater, Florida lJncolna Fordaona "Perfect Sernce" THE UNIVERSAL CAR Authorized Ford Deal FRED FARISS Pbonea 4245-3294 1701-3 Franklin St., Tampa, Fla. Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Entering the room from the hall at the right, one faces the inglenook with windows set on either side of the fireplace, and two more windows in the wall beyond The opposing wall is made interesting with the wall painting and the alcove designed in imitation of the s iesta nook of a Spanish home. The front wall is broken by a battery of arched doors leading to the sun porch, while the back wall has a single arched door opening onto a cloistered balcony at the side al}d an arch opening into the dining-room The cost of furnishing this room, ir respective of draperies, was three thou sand dollars. The Chinese rug is valued at something over nine hundred dollars; and as the other furnishings consist mainly of two tapes tried chairs and the refectory Italian table, the value of the divan and chair can be com puted approximately. The dining-room furniture, consisting of table, chairs, buffet and cabinet, is again in the Italian mode. The cabinet, which is not shown in the picture, is de signed on architectural lines, which was such a strong point with the Italians. While this furniture is much less ex pensive than the furniture in the living room, it has the appearance of being elegant because the lines and the wood are good. The cost of rug and furni ture, without draperies, approximates one thousand dollars. The draperies are the same as those in the living-room and the rug is a Chinese with tan background and rose and blue design A battery of glass doors open onto the cloistered balcony, already mentioned, while solid wooden doors open into the hall But the most interesting part of the dining-room is, perhaps, its offspring, the breakfast nook, seen through the archway, and the most interesting part of the break fast nook is the intriguing design of the Chinese rug, which includes a tea pot and tea basket. We are told, generally, that obj ects not meant to be walked upon should never be included in the design of a rug, but the perfect yet shadowy trac ing of the design of these objects gives a distinct and delightful essence to this rug as a feature of the breakfast nook. The Chinese have an uncanny psychol ogy in introducing these little things of every-day life: a fan, a book, or a tea pot, in perfect artistry, even in the design of. a rug. Seven Billion 'Dollars Worth 1 1 of Food from page 51) way one turns in this true modern E l Dorado. Let us take for example, the lowly hen. Few realize her importance in the gen eral scheme of civilization, yet an analysis of what this barnyard fowl might contribute to the wealth of Flor ida and help in filhng the depleted mar ket baskets of the world, will be sur prising. In 1924, the United States exported eggs to the value of $28,1i7,102. P r actically eighty-five per cent. of these came from west of the Missis. sippi River; from as far as California Oregon and Washington. Most of them were shipped from York. England purchased 13,855,620 dozen; Cuba, 13,080 ,680 dozen; Mexico, 5,848,032 dozen; Brazil, 4,780,060 do..:cn; ( C 011tinued on page 112) Mr. Foster's Tours to Cuba Unequalled in Scope, Character and Efficiency From St. Petersburg and Tampa every Thursday and Sunday. Every deta'il pre-arranged Escort with party all the time Four days in Havana and environs Every worth-while place visited Accommodations at the finest hotels. Sightseeing and service by excellent pri.vate automobiles. Entertainment of the highest order. fi.sk Mr. Foster St .. Petersburg, Central Ave. and Secood St. Tampa, Hotel Hillsboro Jacksonville St. Augustine Palm Beach Mia 'mi Daytona Orla ndo West Palm Beach a he fi.sl( Mr. Foster Travel Information Service Accurate and dependable information and literature relative to Travel, Hotels, Local Sightseeing, Automobile Lines and Roads cheerfully given, without c harge. Reservati01fs for steam1rs, traiou a"d hot els tflerywhu1. Tickets {Ot' Odlawaha River, E.verKiadu Ca"al a"d other Florida water triPs. A NATIONAL SERVICE SZ OFFICES

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Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida Florida Farm Information Furnished FREE D o you k no w that F l o rida land will yield a greater variety of the produ c t s per acr e w hich are useful t o man than any other state in the Union? Do you know that all of this pro duction is put on the market at a time when the greater portion of the United States is covered by snow and ice? Do you know that all of our fruit, vegetable and everythin g grown here is shipped n orth at a time when prices are highest? Do you know that producers receive three t imes as much for their milk per gall o n as you receive in the north? Do you know that we do. not need expensive barns and poultry houses t o properly care for stock? Do you know that you can buy exactly the kind of a farm wanted at an attractive price on long tenns and at a low rate of intere t in a land "flowing with milk and honey," a land posses ing a perfect climate? WE NEED DAIRY FARMERS Why'l This state imported in 1925 over $24,000,000 worth of Dairy product WE NEED POULTRY RAISERS Why? This state imported $12,000,000 worth of poultry and eggs in 1 925. Information relating to all sections and counties regarding their productiveness will be furnished free gratis on reque t. 107 MAIL THIS COUPON ) r ----------------------------------BUREAU OF INFORMATION 2 1 1 E. F irst A v enu e Miami, Fl orida BUREAU OF INFORMATION, 211-213 N. E. First Ave Miami, Florida. 1\indly send me information about the opportunity Florida offers Farmers. I am interested in (d'airying)-(poultry (fruit growing)-(dirt fanning) Check item information wanted upon. Nam e .... ......... ............................................ Address .................................... ................ ..

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108 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida MiaiDi Buyer's Guide Bonds and Mortgages 8% GOLD Doublt security for every dollar i,.vested Free booklei Southern Bogd & Mortgage Co. IJKorporated Electrical Supplies CONTRACTORS-DEALERS Realtors EUGENE PA TIERS ON AGENCY REALTORS BNy, S#ll or Acl IU YoNr Atet irt Arty Ki"d of Re11lly Tr111WJcliott AppllaDC:ee Call, Write or Wire nnr 28 N. Miami Ave. Sappllee Phone 3024 Hotel For Your Comfort w. R. Bmw, M1r HOTEL TA-MIAMI :MIAMI FLORIDA lllual'a t-erdal Hotel. Opera all Je&r Clean, Comfortable Accomm od ationa a t Moderate Ratee Maps New Location. Subd lviaion and Road Map of Dade CoUDty and Browad County, lndudhtg Xq Lar1o. Se-al.: 1 1 mile. New E d i ti010 of M iami Map New Map Browud CoUDtJ. Sule: 2 lnebea, 1 mile. KARL SQUIRES Phone 1133 m Bedlorcl BJd&. Realtors EDWIN W. FISKE R&r\LTOR 0 SOO South Miami Avatu e Telepho n e 657 1 MIAMI, FLORIDA New York Olllc:a I So I 4 Depot Place MOUNT VERNON, N. Y. CAUSEWAY REALTY CORP. N E. Seco n d Avenue Miami -:Florida Memb, of Mill'"i Clt4,.ber o f Comi'!W'Cf o.a Millmi Re.JI'J Bt>ud Real Estate EMERSON REALTY CO. 21 N. E. Fll'lt An11ae Complete Real Estate Service In All Florida See Our Page Ad. In This Inue Owners, Subdividers, Developers Local and F oreig,. Properties We Handle Every Phue of Real Eatate, Lal'&'e Tracta a Speelal.ty. Look for Our Full-Pace Ad. This Iaaue PHONE, WRITE OR WlRE Wallner-Haynes Realty Co. SERVIC&-EF'P'ftttNCY 1111 N. E. Second St. Phocle 46911 MIAMI, VLI)RIDA Real Estate WE HAVE OR CAN GET Far You Any Klud ol Praperty lD An7 Pert o1 FLorida Write Us Today M.D. MORSE 111 S. E. Flrot Street M 1Ami, Florida ON GRA TIGNY BOULEVARD A Beautlfut Placo for YOUR HOME W1 Will Gladly S1"d Northern Development Co. 51 N. E. SECOND STREET P. B. BECHARD & CO. MIAMI, FLORIDA Tents and Awnings Thomas Awning & Tent Co,. Inc. That Fit a11d s.u,r,. 1$4 S. W Flrtt St. Phoae 7at Brancbea : Ft. Lauderdale, West Palm Beach, Cocoa Transfers MOVING TO MIAMI? Conai111 Sbl pmerata to Ua E11pert Mo..,..., Packen, Cnt .. "If If4 Mt>Wble, W Mtit! It'' H. & S. TRANSFER CO. N W. Flnt Av.Due car-n1n1 k.

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida COVE HOTEL, PANAMA CITY, FLA. BUNKER'S COVE, SUBDIVISION DE LUXE ON BEAUTIFUL ST. ANDREWS BAY lW A $5,500,000.00 subdivision development. outside money we are bringing in for investment here. Sales of lots to date in excess of $3.000,000.00. Two-thirds of these sales, or more than $2,000,000.00, to people from other places. Profits on re-sales made through our offices or reported to us already over tooo.ooo.oo. Helping to Build tbe Greater Panama CityBy the millions we are spending on lm provements. By the millions ot By the millions of local money invested in our lots and in homes to be erected on them. By the millions of profit we are helping our buyers to IJ?ake on re-sales, most of which Will be reinvested in the City. NLIIIt ..................... AddrtM .... ............... : C11J ............ l!&a ....... Telling Florida's Wonderful Story The magazine of Florida is SUNILAND-each month portraying in picture and story the "forward march" of Florida. Interesting articles by Florida men who know the possi bilities and needs of the state, who are authorities on their subjects. Entertaining fiction by America's well known writers. Every issue contains beautiful rotogravure sections pictur ing vividly the varied achievements of Florida and the many reasons why 1ife is delightful there. Subscribe now and keep in touch with all the state Tear out this page and send it with $1.50 to the Circulation Manager SUNILAND MAGAZINE P.O. BOX 2711 TAMPA, FLORIDA

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110 Suniland: The Magazin e of Florida 10 ACRES FLORIDA LAND FOR $250. $25 per acre ]. S. Blain's Sensational LandOffering is still open to you. Never before could you purchase Florida land in such small tracts and at such a low price. And remember that this land is well located-in the northern part of Florida where some of the best agricultural land in the entire State is producing from two to three crops a year. It is impossible for us to tell you the exact County these 10 acre tracts will be in-owing to the rapidity of sales. However, at the time of writing this copy we have lands in such well known counties as Columbia -Baker-Je. fferson and Taylor. But at $25 per acre-you cannot go wrong. Future activity may center anywhere-prices may sky-rocket in any one of these sections. We are offering these tracts on the most reasonable terms -only $62.50 cashbalance $25 quarterly at 6% interest. Either send us your check for $62.50 today and let us make a desirable selection for you or write for further informa tion as to the exact location. We would suggest sending your check at once-the present price of $25 per acre will not last long. J. S. Blain's All-Florida Organization Executive Office 211 .. 215 N. E. First Avenue, Miami, Florida

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Suniland: The M_agazin e of Florida FOLLOW A SUCCESSFUL OPERATOR The record of J. S. Blain is his best recommendation. He offered you Merritt's Island acreage at $50 per acreinvestigation will show you that that same acreage is today selling at $200 per acre and up He offered you St. Andrews Bay Acreage at $100 per acre -and created such activity in that section that all his property was withdrawn from the market. He offered you Flagler County acreage-from which many profitable resales have been made. He created one of the greatest sensations in Florida by. offering acreage in 10 acre tracts at real wholesale pnces. Today He Has A Message Regarding the Future of Florida Every live-wire investor should send us the coupon below and learn what]. S. Blain's belief as to the future of Florida is-he knows Florida-knows values -and is ready to tell you his opinion. SEND US THIS COUPON TODAY 111 .-------.-..----------------------___ ,_ ----.-..--------I f ( I I I f I I I I I J. S. Blain's All-Florida Organization, 211-215 N. E. First Avenue, Miami F lorida Without obliga tion p l ease send me your message a s to the Futur e of F l orida. Name .................. ........ .......... .............................. ............. Addres s : ............ .......... ............... .... ....... ...... .. ...

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112 A Florida Home that meets Expectations Residents tn Pulver Islands, known as "Florida's Most Beautiful Mile," will actually live in an atmosphere of Florida home-life as northern vis itors picture it. Entirely surrounded by water, planted with trop ical shrubbery, palms and pines, and the site of beautiful homes, P ul ve r Islands will truly be "Florida's Most Beautiful Mile." Three separate islan ds connected one to the other and from Pass-a Grille key to the mainland with a mile long perma nent causeway, will form the island community. Tbe gulf beaches, boat ing and fishing social life and the bus iness cen ter of St. Petersburg are all easily accessible. Residents will live in an ideal home community in the center of the pre ferred. residential center of the Sunshine City. Further information on application to Frank For tune Pulver, president. Pulver Islarids Development Corporation Su.ite 5 Hotel Detroit St. Petersburg, FIL Suniland: The Magazine of Florida (Co11tinu e d from page 106) Argentine, 1,881,710 dozen ; Central America and the West Indies about 2,000 000 dozen And let me impress this one fact upon my readers: not one country bought all the eggs it could use In other words, the market is always short of this almost food necessity, and could con s ume more than. three times the present pro duction of the United States. It is worthy of more than mere comment to say that Florida almost across the street from Cuba, did not ship one single egg to a m arket buying more than thir teen mimon dozens and willing to buy twenty-five million dozens of eggs annually. If Florida raised hens and exported this one industry alone would help relieve the world famine for eggs and in addition throw into the laps of those engaged in this line of work at least $50, 000,000 worth of business each year. Furthermore, hens must be fed and the food for their maintenance would mean more land under cultivation, more in comes and more contented husbandmen, removed from possible famine. 'I might enumerate fully twenty-five different industries specially adapted for Florida's climate and soil wherein the same conditions exist and where it is equally possible to help stop the on coming holocaust, but space forbids. Perhaps it might be well, since I have spoken of the lowly hen, to refer to her equally ignored aqueous cousin, the duck. It is a fact that New York City has never had its full quota of ducks; ne i the r has the rest of the world for .that matter, for all Europe and Asia look upon the duck as a delicacy The possi bilities offered for duck raising in Florida outrival anything anywhere in all the world, and in other l ands wou l d be taken advantage of to the full limit. Florida is dottcd with l akes wherever one goes. Lake County alone boasts of 1,400 spring-fed, fresh water lakes, teeming with edible fish. Yet I have never sern 1 400 domesticated ducks on all of these lakes. If some man with vision, appreciative of the fact that the majority of his fellow men are hungry for fresh ducks, would engage in this line of work, he could make a fortune Cold storage cars, winter and summer. await his offerings for northern and European markets and a hungry world is anxious to buy atl of this food de li cacy that can be produced Twenty-eight years of my life have been spent in the congested and the remote p l aces of the earth, where men of all nations traded. I know, through having lived in the marts of Europe, Asia, Africa, Mexico, Central and South America Canada the East and the West Indies, whereof I speak, and without fear of contradiction I say that Florida, and only Florida can aid in postponing the coming of the day when men. women and children wilt be crying for food. And what is _greatest of all, thos e who till the soil of Florida and thereby come to the relief of their fellow men, can with g reat rrofit to themselves, accom plish all o this work in six months' time and still have the remaining six months of the year for other lucrative employment or recreation Will Florida ri s e to the challenge which civilization has made and give from her ri ch fields, her fertile orchards and her numerous waters, the essentials so vital to keep the world from wit nessing the horrors of pestilence, famine andwars? A MID the hills and lakes of Lake County, in Central Florida, lies Tavares, the Copnty Seat of Lake. Here nature has been lavish in her gifts. Sit uated on Lake Dora, Lake Harris, and Lake Eustis, three of the larg-. est Lakes in the State; the great Inland Water way, with good roadways and scenic boule vards, she sits like a Gem. An all year cli mate, boating, fishing, golf and the best of hunting, furnish activity for the sportsman, cher ishes age and challenges y o u t h. H e r groves, truck farms, and fern eries give those who seek occupation an opportu. nity. Lake County has available six and a half million dollars for the improvement of roads and bridges, and the bui l ding program in Tavares, now under way, amounts to near ly a million dollars. LAKEWOOD PARK is in Tavares, five blocks from the Court House and New Hotel, one block from the City School Buildings and on Beautiful Lake Eus tis. It is highly improved and sensibly restricted. Build a home here. Prices in keep ing with location and desir ability. For full information, write or wire .. SippleBaker Realty. Corporation Biltavern Hotel Tavares, Fla.

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Turreta of the unique Tampa Bay Hotel, owned by the city. TAMPA Florida's All-the-rear-Round Metropolis A Mooriah influenced oourthouae and a modem city hall are outatandinC featuret of Tampa. 113

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TwTeta of the unique Tampa Bay Hotel, owned by the city. TAMPA Florida's All-the-rear-Round Metropolis A Moorilh influenced oourtbouae and a modem dty ball ue outltaDc1mc features of Tampa. 113

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Tampa's magnificent Bay Boulevard, a favorite city drive. FLORIDA'S GREATEST PoRT CITY 'The Stor y of 'Tatnpa and Its Varied Activ ities By Carl Edward Perry FOCR hundred years ago they came to Tampa Bay seeking gold. Adventurer from far off lands, fired with Storie of fab ulous mountains of the precious metal to be found in the new world, sailed the high seas to the penin ula of the virgin country, hunting a ready-made fortune of nuggets, fighting or de frauding the J ndians as occasion de manded. dustry, sagacity and investment. In all the dramatic recital of the wonders of the awakened Florida there ha been one overtone. The pessimists and skeptics might shake their heads at the prodigious manner in which the cities and towns of the state were growing; the cautious and ultra-conservative might wonder at the eventual future of the state, but always there has been agreement on one cardinal point: Tampa is sound. Tampa is stable. It was in the year 1528, according to the historians of the period, that Pamphilio de Narvaez sailed into Tampa Bay, accompanied by three hundred adventurers who were quite frankly out for the money. Failing in quest, the remnant of the band finally reached Mexico; carrying with them the tale that Florida was a frost, without a vestige of gold, but having in stead a plenitude of sand and unfriendly I ndians A thousand pages of history, political, industrial, economic and social, have been made in the Tampa area since that time. Still the adventurers come: industrious ar tisan business men, laborers, tourists and pleasure-seekers this time, looking for no unearned gold, but willing to find their fortunes in thepayenvelope and the prof it of their own inThe artistic entrance to one of the attractive new homes in Beach Park, Tampa. As the more recent historians of Florida might chron icle, however, these stories did nothing at all to deter other ad venturers from com ing, and eleven years 114

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The imposing skyline of Tampa viewed across the Hillsborough River. later, in 1539, there came the fleet of Spanish vessels under the command of Hernandez De Soto. Landing at a point not far from Safety Harbor, the seekers for gold penetrated the wild country toward the site of Tampa, which was clo e to the stronghold of the most powerful Indian tribe then dwelling on the penin ula. UNDER a rna ive oak, which tradi tion has it, still stands in one of the city's parks, De Soto met the chieftain of the Indians in a counci1 of peace, and shortly afterwards the Spanish invaders marched on to their tragic fate in the new world. It was not until after a formal trans fer of the province of Florida had been made from Spain to the nited States, that a permanent settlement of whites wa made on the ite of Tampa. De termined to get their money's worth out of the transaction, the Vnited tates military author ities arranged fo, a series of forts to be built to serve as strongholds against the 1 ndians, and among the strategic locations chosen, was the site of the present city of Tampa. Here was built the important military post which came to be known as Fort Brooke, after its commander, General George Marshall Brooke. The mil itary reservation about the fort covered a territorv of sixteen square miles, at the of the Hillsborougb river. To this day, the impress of the old fort lingers in the colloquial designation of the area as "the Garrison." Assured a reasonable degree of pro tection from the Indians by the pres ence of the army post, civilians short ly drifted into the region, to engage in business and trade, and thus was formed the nucleus of the coming metropoli Even at that time, .and for many years before, the entire area about the ite of the old fort was known as Tampa, from the Indian r.ame which means "split wood for quick fires," generally traced back to the large quantities of lightwood, or fat pine knots, to be found in the region. From its earliest days, Tampa has always been distinguished as a trading point. From the territory around it, Speedboat warming up for a race in Tampa Bay. within a radius of a hundred miles the early pioneers of the state came to transact their business and make their purchases. Ships from Mobile, Ala bama, encouraged by the natural port facilities of Tampa, brought mer at frequent intervals, and other goods to line the shelves of the early merchants came by ox team overland. Just before the middle of the nineteenth century, with the Indians vir tually subdued, there was given to Hil1sborough county, in which Tampa is located, a grant of land from the federal government in the form of one hundred and sixty acres of the Fort Brooke site. Coincident with the gift, the name of Fort Brooke was re linquished and the official title of the little village became Tampa. In 1883 the government discontinued entirely the military reservation and shortly afterwards it was opened for home by the department of interior. IN 1849, the entire citizenry of Tampa joined in a mass meeting to consider the question of incor poration. When the ballots were counted or hands tallied, as the case may have been, there was a unanimous vote for the decision to apply w the legislature for a charter, all fourteen of the voters being for the measure. 115

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A Carnegie Library is one of Tampa's civic assets. Despite the decision, l ife being pleas ant and the necessity not urgent, it was six years before Tampa was legally assigned a place on the map. It may be gathered that the great, open spaces about the village were frequent and commodious. At the time of the mass meeting, there were not more than 185 persons who looked upon Tampa as their home town, and for many years life wagged on in the most serene manner im aginable. By 1864 the village was looking up, and there were those among the five hundred population who were confidently predicting that Tampa would one day be a city with three thousand, perhaps even five thousand people. The first real impetus the population came when the "homestead ers" arrived, and by the end of the year 1883 the census gave Tampa per manent residents to the number of 1,450, a most creditable showing con sidering the fact that the village had not yet felt the magic touch of a railroad. THEN in 1884 the South Florida Railroad, now incorporated with the Atlantic Coast Line, brought its 116 tracks into Tampa, and in the state census of 1885 the city's population had risen to 2,376 people. About this time the genius of Henry B. Plant came to bear upon Tampa. He purchased a three-fifths share of stock in the first railroad to enter the city, and then he proposed to capitalize the interest that he felt sure would be awakened by the From the seven teas sh.ipt e<>me to Tampa's great port. bettered transportation facilities with the construction of a modern hotel. Even Tampa's most optimistic citizens were agreed that Plant was really too hopeful for the future of the modest city when he proposed to build a hotel of three hundred rooms on the west bank of the Hillsborough river. Tampa was coming along, to be sure, but there was a limit to the progress that might be expected. It was more than faith, however, which was pushing the genius of the west coast to ward this decision. He knew, for instance, that within the first eighteen months of the opening of the railroad, a total of 45,000 persons had been brought to the terri tory. From this number, which he foresaw as increasing each year, Plant hoped to gain patronage for his hotel. Slowly the Moorish minarets above the pro digious pile of brick and mortar took form against the western sky. Plant spared no expense m either the erection or the fur nishing of the hotel, and on the day it opened, special trains and distinguished guests came to view its splendor from such sophisticated and metropolitan centers as New York,

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\\'ashington, Philadelphia, Boston, avannah, New Orleans and Atlanta. YEARS later, after the death of its builder, the hotel was sold to the city of Tampa for $125,000. \\'ith the structure, the city acquired title to the surrounding grounds, and now thi showplace of tropical vegetation is known as Plant Park. Both the hotel and ground are now conserva tively estimated to have a value of five million dollar and operated by the city, the hotel annually attracts to its doors a host of notables. With the outbreak of the Spanish American war Tampa was again in the limelight of national attention. The city was chosen as the port of em barkation for the American troops and thousands and thousands of northern soldiers for the first time were afforded an opportunity to come into intimate contact with a Florida city. In 1890 the population had in creased to 5,532, and between that date and 1910 Tampa's.growth was the largest of any city in its class in the l nited States, the percentage of increase being 596. In the next ten years Tampa came close to duplicat ing the performance, the percentage of increase being 143.2, exceeded by only one other city in the nited States. The habit of doubling its popula tion every decade apparently became fixed. The national census of 19 accorded the city a population of 15,839, and ten years later it was 37,782. Each succeeding year has noted an increase, as may be seen from the following census figures: 1912-44,470; 1913-46,792; 191449,156; 1915-50,104; 1924-94,808. He would be a rash statistician, in deed, who would attempt to fix the city's population at the beginning of 1926. The estimates vary from 125,000 up, and every Tampa citizen, sup ported by an increasing number of other Florida residents, are asserting positively that it is the largest city in the state. The chorus of protests that this assertion first evoked grows weaker; Tampa has a disconcerting record of making good its predictions. TAMPA's growth has been logical and orderly, and those factors which contribute towards continued progress of any metropolis are made more manifest each year. Consider the triumvirate that has made Tampa: industry, port and fa cilities, and a rich trade territory. Add to this the presence of valuable raw materials and a climate whlch attract thousands of winter tourist each year, and Tampa's future seems adequately assured. First among Tampa's industries is the manufacture of cigars. In 1886 the first two factories came to the city, one under the guidance of Sanchez and Haya, and the other that of Vin cente Martinez Ybor. The first deft fingers of the Spanish and Cuban workmen who rolled the smokes that have made a city famous have been multiplied many hundreds of times since the industry came to Tampa, and now there is invested in the city's cigar factories more than Hundreds of huge steamers make the pOrt of Tampa each year carrying a burden of merchandite. 117

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Attractive Spanish homes are to be found in every section of the city. $15,000,000. The workers number nearly 22,000 and their annual payroll is approximately $15,000,000. Within the year just ended the combined factories manufactured a total of 483,509,088 cigars, not just ordinary smokes, for the most part, but clear Havana cigars, in which Tampa leads the world. Associated with the cigar industry is the business of making cigar boxes from cedar logs imported from Cuba and Mexico. The cigar industry has lent an old-world charm to the city of Tampa. The workers have their own clubs, theaters, res taurants, churches, schools and libraries, and no one has achieved an appreciation of the city until he has dined in one of the luxurious Spanish restaurants of the foreign sec tion. Despite the predominance of the cigar industry in Tampa, manufacturers of other ucts are choosing the city as factory locations in increasing numbers. In a survey of the county recently, it was demon strated that 825 different arti cles are being manufactured, about three-fourths of them for 118 Florida markets. Among the major in dustrie are the manufacture of ships, fertilizer, mattresses, soap, china, ex and marmalades, auto acces sories, bricks and heavy hardware. TAMPA is. theheadquartersof the Flor ida Citrus Exchange, theco..opera-'t'he huge workroom of one of Tampa's largest cigar factories. tive orange and grape-fruit marketing association, an organization whose presence automatic:ally makes the city the citrus center of the state. From the headquarters is directed the national advertising campaign of the association, and to the banks of Tampa come the millions of dollars which is paid the growers for their fruit. In its port facilities Tampa has easily taken first rank among those of the southeast, exceed ing in the total tonnagesuchlong established ports as Charleston and Savannah. The city ships more phosphate than any other port in the world, and during the year 1925 more than a mil lion and a quarter tons of this important fertilizer ingredient were shipped from the city's harbors. In the south Florida section, of which Tampa is the distributing center, according to a government estimate, is located more than half of the world's known supply of phos phate. y UMBER is another important L export, and duringoneyear a total of21,361,279 feet of pitch pinelumber.wasexported. From the ports of the world there

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' come the ship with cargo I ace for Tampa' product and hy harge, schooner and steamer shipment are made to such far off countries a Argentine, Bel gium, Cuba, Dominican Repub lic, Italy, England, Germany, Italy, Martinique, The. 1e ther lands, Porto Rico, pain and l'ruguay. The large t import tonnage i that of crude and re fined oil, while the greate t money value of imports i in Havana tobacco, which in the year 1925 paid a custom toll of on every hand he will see the tangibleevidcnce of this growth and prosperity in building and impro\fement. Perhaps he may be urprised if he i informed that in the year 1924 Tampa' building permit ran into the sizeable figure of $5,496,055. If he appears mildly incredulous, go easy before ou shock him with the as tounding information that in the following year, when the city was getting into its tride, the building permits issued called for the construction of $23,41 ,836. And then, if you deem it advi able, go ju t a Jittle further and spread the Fortu..nate by virtue of being the nearest port of call to the Panama Canal, and sheltered in a splendid land-locked harbor thirty-five miles from the open sea, yet Tampa's supremacy has not b en entirely ac ident al. plendid new municipal docks costing $600,000, for whi h the citizens voted a bond is ue, has done much to Huge cedar logs from Cuba and Mexico are sawed into cigar boxes. tiding that if the pace of the first two month of the new year is kept up, the final figure for 1926 will be not far from make the port attractive and considerably in exec of has been spent in dredging the harbor to a minimum depth of27 feet, making it available to the largest ships afloat. TH. are the solid, sub tantial things upon which Tampa ha built her unexampled prosperity, enriched by a similar if le spectacular growth which ha come to the trade territory which the city ser e If ou will lead a stranger into Tampa, et him down where you will in the 150 quare mile which now mark the boundaries of the city H UCE apartment houses, hotels, of fice building churche homes, civic tructures and every other type of building are changing the city's kyline and spreading out into areas which only a ftw hort years ago was looked upon as almost so much waste land. One of the fine new high chools of Tampa's educational system. 119

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In the deep water channel of the port of Tampa, even the largest ships of the ocean can enter in .afety. On every side the city was rapidly overspreading its boundaries, until an alert electorate sanctioned the addi tion of much new territory to the con stricted municipality. Out in the bay, a powerful suction dredge built up a grassy and useless key into a residen tial wonder known as Davis Islands; Temple Terrace, on the banks of the Hillsborough River, afforded an at tractive and beautiful outlet to the northeast; in another section Beach Park found its natural charms en hanced by scores of residential palaces; across the bay in a direct line from the city there is coming into being a mam moth creation known as Tampa Beach, with its own business centers and six miles of incomparable water-front. Temple Crest, Country Club Estates, GoJden Hills-who can name off-hand the scores of new suburban areas which are clustering about the city? Despite the unparalleled activity which has characterized the Tampa of the last few years, ht-r citizens have not forgotten how to play. Florida is the winter playground of the nation, and Tampa is in the center of things, with a variety of sports and recrea tions which appeal to the visitor and permanent resident alike. But how, save in staccato utter. ances, is one to chronicle all the facts concerning Tampa? Tampa has a com mission form of government, one of the first large cities in the south to adopt the measure; the city churches have grown with the population and within twelvemonthsspent$1,000,000 in physical expansion; Tampa is the first city in the south to adopt the au tom a tic telephone system; the health of her citi-zens is zealously guarded; her parks and playgrounds are notable for their beauty; the marvelous ex panse of the city's school system has done m1,1ch to attract winter residents who have a regard for their children's education. MayorP.G. Wall hassaidofTampa: "Tampa, acknowledged by all im partial investigators to be the most substantial city in the state, invites good people everywhere to enjoy its famed hospitality and to participate in its unequalled advantages. Here will be found opportunity for both the man with capital and the man who works. The one may invest his money with profit and the other may earn his liv ing amid comfortable surroundings and the best climate on earth." The Gandy Bridge stretches six miles acroes Old Tampa Bay, the longest autotnobile bridge ;n the world. 120

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Gsloles FLORIDA'S MASTERPIECE Greatness is measured by the capacity to serve. Temple Terrace Estates, even with becoming modesty, may be called a great development. Its service to Florida, to Tampa and to hundreds of their representative citizens is an achievement of which its owners and projectors are duly proud. To make a place where life is LIVING, where wholesome recreation and social pleasures are part of the days' routine, is good work well done. Temple Terrace Estates with its gayeties and gath .. erings, its many beautiful and quaintly artistic residences, its air of restfulness and peace, has done much to broaden the significance of the word "home." It is a truly satisfying setting for "jewel" homes. / / / / / / TEMPLE TERRACE ESTATES T If t'1 PC.Cl ,. a MCC. IIUTA -.s C4IINT.'r .U. / // / / TEMPLE TERRACE // ESTATES OFFICES IDLLSBOROUGH HOTEL BlDG. TAMPA, FLORIDA / -6mas, HJLLSBORouoH HOTEl / Sc. PdeJ'JbNrg Sczlu Of/it:a // Pleaae send me descriptive literature -410 CENTRAL AVENUE // of Temple TemLoe Estates. Tampa Sate. 200 EAST LA.PAYETI'E ST. Colem.,. &.aadt OrcaftioadoD. Coleman&. / / Write name and addre11 on thlapeteand mall 121

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122 T_HE modern 1wme requires a combination of perfect taste and distinctive individ, uality. Tlwse who insist on both inva, riably seek the service of this organization which has amply demonstrated its superior skill in home decoration. Here you receive the aid of an organization qualified by long experience in developing interi, ors, and this service is available for the small bungalow as well as the great mansion. INTERIOR FURNISHERS AND DECORATORS TYLER NEAR FRANKLIN STREET TAMPA T

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Outdoor Sports all winter longMotor boating in palatial yachts, or trim staunch cruisers and sporty sailboats ... the dashing spray and thrilling joy of a hairpin turn at fifty miles an hour in a racing speedboat .. aquaplaning behind a speeding motor boat .. tennis, with leading stars from all America ... thrilling outdoor ports every day in Flor, ida's winter sunshine! This fun program of outdoor recreation con, tinues all winter long at Davis Islands and is making happier, healthier persons of thousands every day. And they are making Davis Islands known throughout the land as the winter sports center of Florida. D P DAVIS PROPERTI E S Tampa, Fl orida Branches Flori d a 123

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124 'lie small investor 'luitlt Jfoo or more can now share in the pro.fits of our unusual Floni:lct investments IN response to countless letters from small investors throughout the United States who wish to share in the profits being made in Florida real estate, we have in corporated our company to provide a rare profit oppor tunity for their funds. Our profits are derived from the buying, selling and developing of Florida real estate, by skilled executives of long e)tperience, backed by a bril liant record of success. We know Florida thoroughly and hold the confidence of countless satisfied clients. $40,000 in Stock (all common) McMASTER and McMASTER Incorporated You may subscribe for one to ten shares at $100 each in this well-known firm and share every profit possibility of our unusual Florida invest ments. Because we wish to distribute this investment opportunity over a wide circle of investors. subscriptions are limited to not more than 10 shares; in fact, one share to each of 400 different people would be most desirable. Reservations only are being accepted at this time because every indica tion points to an over-subscription and we wish to accommodate the greatest number of investors. Send in your application today, stating the number of shares desired with a remittance for only 2S% of the amount. Applications will be filed in order as received and if accepted you will be notified regarding the 7S% balance due. We reserve the right to return any applications or re mittances. ( See opposite page for details of a new development now being offered .) McMASTER and McMASTER, Inc. 311 Warner Bldg. Tampa, Florida C R. McMast PrHidenl OFFICERS R H McMaster Ylce-Preldenl DIRECTORS R J McMast S#c11. and Trea. C R McMa ter, Tampa, Fla. R H McMaster, Tampa, Fla. R. J. McMuter, Tampa, Fla. G. H McMaster, Columbia, S C. ( Vlce-Prea It National Bank) (Retired Col. of U.S. Arm//) W E Grable, Tampa, Fla. H. E McMorris, Tampa, Fla. W J Bivens, Atty., Tampa, Fla.

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One .. half mile from city limits of TAMPA Florida1s Metropolitan Center of the West Coast ACOZY home and a safe investment in sunny Florida is now possible to the family of moderate means in Pineknoll. the fully restricted and highly improved subdivision within a half mile from Tampa. the growing metropolis of the West Coast. Lot prices include the modern conveniences of water. electricity, hard-surfaced streets and ornamental shrubbery Several homes will be built by the developen this year. and it is expected that investors will also start the erection of their hornell here Such activity is bound to i ncrease values on these lots which can be bought for a small down payment and easy monthly terms. Busines lou 25x80 on 100 foot treet will be sold for $15.00 per front foot. Apartrnent lob 55x120 on 100 foot street will be sold for $400.00 to $600.00 each. Residential lob 50xl15 will be sold for $350.00 to $550.00. TERMS: l i S cash, balance $15.00 per month and intere t. The.e prices are for a limited time onl,.. CALL WRITE WIRE MCMASTER AND MCMASTER, Inc. REAL ESTATE 311 Warner Bldg. Tampa, Fla. 125

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126 ItS Open The New Causeway Connecting Metropolitan !Jampa with the Venice of the West Coast On Wednesday, February the tenth, Gov. emor John Martin, of Florida, cut the white ribbon across the entrance to the new Causeway, connecting the heart of business Tampa and TAMPA BEACH, the West Coast's greatest suburb. This act of Florida's Chief Executive marked the official opening of an area destined to relieve the territorial congestion of Tampa, the metropolis of Florida-and in addition made pos!lible investment opportunities in gilt-edged Florida Realty, not excepted in the History of Florida's prosperity. Buy NOW in TAMPA BEACH-Six full miles facing on the water front-Deep waterways-High sea wall-Water boule vard-AU civic improvements. "Only ten minutes from City Hall of Tampa" General Offices: Tampa Beach Bldg. Tampa, Florida

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' Enchanting View of Tampa Skyline -from TAMPA BEACH 127

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128 The Dawn of a New Era Florida Profit Making In F LORIDA'S period of frenz1ed land specu lation is rapidly coming to a close. The land hark and realty gambler have va nish ed like mi t before a morning sun. History has run true to form and has rer>eated itself once more. Today is the beginning of a new era. The builder and the producer arc taking command The architect, the engineer, the manufacturer, the agriculturist and the merC"hant sense the growing opportunities in Florida and are assuming their respon sibilities Here again history is re peating itself. Obviously, the largest profits of the future will accrue to those who invest in realty directly in the path of Florida's predetermined building program. AFTER careful appraisal, the executives of this organization have accepted choice list ings of de irable property including moderate priced homes, business sites, and favorably situated lots in fast growing subdivisions. We are intcre ted in hearing from buyers seeking lmilding space and from those who wish prompt ales of holding in established sections. Before buying or selling, we urge investors to call, or to write us for a copy of our "F1orida Blue Book" containing facts, figures, and useful information regarding the present status of the trend in Florida real estate. This book has been compiled for the express purpose of serving our clients by present illg the true conditions in Florida realty opportunities as they exist today. The book is free and a rtquest for your copy implies no obligation COUPO.:\ .. Gulf-Atlantic Realty Co. warner Bldr. Tampa, Fla. \Vithout cost or ohhgation kindly send my copy of the Florida Blue lhok Name 0. 0 0. 0 ...................... Busi11css Finn ......................................... Address ............. Tn7<'11 ................

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Suniland : The Magazine of Florida Conquest of the Everglades (Continued from. page 39) The cana l s constitute the huge ar teries of the drainage project; the es tablishment of veins and capillaries in the form of lateral canals and ditches is the work of private capital. Under the authorization of the State's major drainage district, approval is given for the formation of minor d rainage divi sions. Only in this manner can utilization of the State's work be made, for necessarily the main canals are too far apart to drain the land effectively. A typical development may contain ten thousand acres, and this entire area is viewed as one engineering project. Straight across the tract of land. usually at a point to take advantage of even a slight grade if one is present, the com pany canal is constructed. Every half mile a lateral canal is dug, emptying mto the main channel. Thus every twentyacre farm borders on one of the lateral canals and every forty-acre farm has two of these canals skirting its borders. Then, as a final link in the chain, every one hundred and fifty or two hundred feet there is dug a farm ditch a few feet wide, which discharges into the taterals. Drainage was the first thought of those who were intent upon the reclamation of the Evergl ades, but with the years of development there has come a new factor, that of irrigation. Under ordinary circumstances, the rainfall of the Everglades is copious enough to satisfy the most thirsty vegetation and plants, but to provide for those rare oc cisions when the rainfall is not abundant, the pumps of these minor projects are being made reversible, to d r a in and irrigate at wilt In a recently announced drainage pro ject, which has met the approval of the State Drainage Board, the control system comprises cross-section canals at three-mile intervals from twentyfour to thirty f eet wide by approximately ten feet deep, connecting with the main State canals These major waterways of the sub-district are in turn supplemented by eight-foot lateral ditches at half-mile intervals, an open waterway abutting each farm. Control is centered in power stations scientifically located, each equipped with a battery of 54-inch pumps driven by 180-horsepower Diesel engines. Each pump has a capacity of 56,000 gallons a minute, and by the end of the current year eleven will have been installed in four drai nage units em-bracing 32,000 acres. This system also for the construc tion of dikes and levees to make i t impossible fo r the l an d to be flooded from adjacen t ter-r i tory. This type of development and reclamation calls for the expenditure of large sums of money and only the b i g capi talist can undertake it, but happily this response to the work that has already been done is not lacking. Some large projects are already realities and others are under way, affording an opportunity to the f arme r to purchase little farms, h ang up his coat and go to work. Each purchaser shares in an annual tax tor the maintenance of the diking, ditching and pum\)ing equ ipment and operation, a cost which is covered by a few dol-lars per acre. The sole justification for the drainage of the Everglades ls to be found in the fertility of the soil. If it i s not fertile if it i s not a daptabl e to the growing of ( Cont inue d on page 136) O f the tactors that go to make up a self-sustaining community, Marion County probably has a greater variety than any other county. It is an important grower of eight o f the eleven leading vegetables grown in the state Its citrus fruits excel in quality, grading SO to 75 per cent. "brights" and "golden." It is a wonderful region for dairying, poultry and livestock. It has varied substantial industries. It is the rail and highway center of the s tate. Its sceni c marvel is Silver Springs, largest springs in the world. In addition, it has all kinds of recreational attractions including fishing, swim ming, hunting, motoring, golf. Marion County is now experi endng a period of rapid expan s i on. It will pay you to investigate its attractions and oppor tunities for homeseekers, busi ness men, builders and investors. For illustrated booklet, address Marion County Chamber of Com merce, 317 Broadway, Ocala, Florida. Courit CHAMBER. OF IIIII!. COMMEl\.CE Ocala Florida cAtarion. Counlg-7he1(ingdom. of '1/u Sun A Certainty-Not a Proba .bility The opening on February lOth of the Z2nd Street C auseway, which ahort e na the distance between Tampa and all Southwest Florida cities by MVenJ mil ea, makea Z2nd Street the main artery of travel, traversed by more than 10,000 automobil.es dally. We have aevera! choice corners on 22nd S treet, in the city limita o f T ampa, pric.ed for quick action V isualiz e what the$e l ocationa will be worth one year-or today-.tnd oce us now. Write, wire phont or call. BARNARD-BLOUNT COMPANY TAMPA 107 Madison St. or 249 Plant Ave. FLORIDA 129

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This humorous department will be a regular feature of SuNILAND. We will pay $1.00 each for accepted "Bad Break" which may be clip ped from newspapers, magazines or books, and all readers are invited to contribute. For the most amming error of the types or a twisted expression SuNILAND will pay $5.00. The original clipping with its source indicated in each instance, must be sent in to show the bonafide nature of the "break." No rejected "Bad Breaks" will be returned to senders, and the editor cannot enter into correspondence with contributors to this department. Clipp.ed jokes already published are not "Bad Breaks." A Wales Fluke-"Famous dance orchestra, whose vktims include HlS MAJESTY, the Prince of Wales."-Tampa (Fla.) Daily Times. (John Wescott, Tampa, Fla ) Out of Countenance-"lke Bloom's Deauville FACE in the Chicago Rialto in the central business district, was held up at 3 p. m., today by robbers."-Florida (Jacksonville) Times-Union. (Laura Bostwick, Jacksonville, Fla ) For Sybarites-"Extra clean rooms, running water, SINK to refined people. 47 W. State."-Advt. in Florida Times-Union. (Mary H Self, Umatilla, Fla.) Short Skirts Play Havoc-"His chest was crowding his vest, because a girl with a little dimple on her SHIN was sitting so close to him."-New York Heraw Tribttne. (Mrs. Charles Willets, Allen dale, N. !.) S pringtime-"Miss Pauline Armitage, well-known actress who jumped to her This Month's Prize "Break" Contributed by FREDERICA HuBBARD Ottawa, Ohio. The W rong Ro a d to W e llville \Veil on the road to recovery after an illness which caused h i m to lose his life, Will Cressy nationally known vaudeville artist and humorist, at his home here today announced his in tention to write another book." -Tampa (Fla ) Morning Tribune. death yesterday from her fourteenth floor A Young Devil-"Nurmi, in the $30,000 suite i n the Hotel She l ton to her home in New Orl eans Handicap, won from a FIEND Nashville, Tenn." Tampa (Fla.) Daily of 21."-St. Louis (Mo.) Post-Dispatch. Times (D. C. McLeod, Tampa.) (L H B k H 'b 1 M ) an s, anm a o. An Uplift Emotion-" 'Even Anthony Educating a Town---"The formation of Hope WINCHED,' M r Bigelow wrote."a Booster Club for Mechanicsburg, with Tampa Daily Times. (D. C. Andrews, the intention of putting Mechanicsburg St. Petersburg, Fla.) more in the auditorium of the High School Lights and Shades of Mona Lisa!-"The to live and do business.''-Saturday Jourartist said the painting was a genuine nal, Mechanicsburg, (Pa.) (Mary E. (Leonardo) da Vinci, painted in 1840."Myers, Butler, Mo.) Tampa Daily Times. (Henry Hewitt Liquid Looks-"Per Gallon, Genuine Fort Myers, Fla.) Army and Navy Field Glasses. Going This Motor Age-"Wanted, four men to Saturday at only $5.50."-Advt. in Burlington Gautte. ( Walter E. Kohrs, Burboard in nice family garage. Phone 4103." lington, Iowa ) -Montgomery (Ala. ) Journal. (Ala11 Woodallen, Montgomery, Ala.-) C old Storage-"Delicious refreshments were served late in the afternoon WRAPS. Sarasota (Fla.) Herald. (Mildred A. Dennis, Oneco, Fla.) A Born Soldier-"Logee was born at Burrillville, R. 1., during the Civ i l War. He was in the ordnance department of the army with headquarters at Chattanooga, Tenn.''-Atlanta Journal (Mrs. Daisy Miller, Atlat1ta, Ga.) Just Fancy !-"Fancy Lig.ht Pork LION Roasts, lb. 29 cents."-Advt. in Mi!}mi Herald. (Anne McKee, Miami, Fla.) A Basket Party--"The pallbearers were Walter Bechtel, A. Wippert, C. Shafer. Martin Woolever and a basket of carna tions from the neighbors."-Allcntown (Pa.) Chronicle & News: (Mrs. W. Kuntz, Treichlers Pa.) Warm Friends-"Mr. and Mrs. Jones wish to express thanks to their many friends and neighbors who so kindly as sisted at the burning of their residence.''Los Angeles (Calif.) Titnes (Mrs. P.M. Kokcmove, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.) 130 His Comedy Hat Why Muai cia n a Bob The i r H air Piano Advertisement in National Magazines New Pronunciation-''The pastor pro nounced the RING ceremony."-The Chris tian, Oklahoma City, Okla. (Henrietta Heron, Cincinnati, Ohio.) Notification Beca1ne Mortification"League is MORTIFIED That U. S. Accepts Arms Invitation,"-H eadline in Atlanta Journal. (John C. Wayt, Peachtree Road, Atlanta, Ga.) A Tense Occasion -:-"The funeral of the late William Schart WILL BE held at the family home YESTERDAY afternoon.'' P,ov idence (R. I.) News. (fda Canaipi, Providence, R. I.) Lacteal Engineering-"Wanted-man on a farm by the month or year, to milk and run a tractor."-Clinton, (N. !.) Demo cmt. (Harry Anderson, Washington, N. ) Doggone It !-"They searched for some time but could not find the l ost pocketbook. Mr. Alexander, tired, sat down on a DOG. His hand fell upon the object of their search!'-Daytona (Fla.) he w (Mrs. B. f Blair, Daytona Beach, Fla.) A Royal Feast-"Refreshments of chicken and A KING were served."WasMngton (D. C.) Daily News. (Eliza beth Hughes Harding, Washington, D. C.) Improperly Brought Up-"A roadway will be constructed over the white sand brought from the bottom of the BOY."-St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times (Mrs. G .11. Noyes, St. Petersburg, Fla.) Versatile Birds "Marshall Latshaw says the council has inst r ucted him to en force the ordinance against chickens run ning at large and riding bicycles on the sidewalks." -Otnak (Wash.) Chronicle. (Lucille A. Weatherstone, 01nak, Wash.) Fore and Oft-"Hensler said that Miss Handley had been knocked down by a blow from behind, when struck repeatedly from in front, probably as her assailant leaned over her prostrate form.''-Allianct (Ohio) Review. (Mrs. C J. Garrity, Alliance, Ohio ) Maybe Armless, Too-"Legless Torso of Woman ldentified." H eadline in Flint (Mich.) Daily Journal. (Mrs. lt. R. Moag, Flint, Mich.) Daming the Current-"M'Pherson Is a Dam Speaker.''-Headline in Vallejo (Calif.) Chronicle. (!. N. Lawrence, Mare Island, Calif.) How to Pass Out-"If one DIES com pletely relaxed and in a comfortable posi tion sleep will come."-Jacksonville (Fla.) Journal. (Marian Altschwager, Jackson ville, Fla.)

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida DON' T BE MISLED BY THE ASSUMPTION that you can have a real acquaintance with Florida until you have visited the St. Andrews Bay district. HERE YOU WILL FIND A MARVELOUS water area, affording splendid opportunities. for amusement and recreation, and a climate free from extremes of cold or heat. HERE, TOO, THERE ARE TO BE FOUND UN surpassed advantages for agriculture, commerce and industry, combining to make the St. Andrews Bay country the most rapidly developing part of Florida. ON YOUR WAY NORTH FROM THE southern part of the state, stop off in Panama City and enjoy the delightful springtime weather, or come direct from your home at any season. For further infbrmation write the PANA.MA OF CITY CHAMBER COMMERCE PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA On St. Andrews Bay 131

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PIECES of EIGHT Don't Sleep "Just think of it!" exclaimed Flora of Avon Park. "A few words mumbled ovl'r your hl'ad and you' re married. "Yes,"' agreed Dora the cynical. "And a few words mumbled in your s le ep and you're divorced." But Unpainted "Now that you've seen m_y son and heir," said the proud young Fort Myers father, "which side of the house do you think he resembles?" "Well ," said his astonished bachelor friend, "his full beauty isn't developed yet, but surely you don't suggest that be-er-looks lik e the side of the h o use, do you?" Was It Edible? "What do you think o f this pudding?" a Kissimmee bride, inquired of her husband. "I call it mediocre." "No, dear, it's tapioca." Suppose She Shrinks? "Tight-fitting, isn't she?" A Palm Beach bathing beauty had just passed by. "Dear me, yes I She looks as though she's been poured into her clothes and forgotten to say 'when.' Color Test Frank-"! don't see how you can tell those Smith twins from Sarasota apart." Hank-"That's easy Mabel always blushes when she sees me. Not Unusual "I want some golf balls for a gentleman, p lea se." "Certainly, madam. \Vhat sort does he like?" "Well, the only time I saw him pl a y at Palma Ceia he used a white ball. But I cannot say I gathered the impression that he exactly liked it." The Grammarian Daphne-"Good gracious, that's father back from Miami! You must fly, darling!" Gilbert-"Y ou mean flee, sweetheart." Daphne-"As you like, but it's no time for etymological distinctions!" s. R. 0. "What can I do for you, madam?'' asked a Miami merchant. "I want to buy a bedstead." "I regret exceedingly, madam, that theatrical managers have contracted years ahead for all the beds we can get." 132 Who Pays the Bill? "Miss Smythe-Mabel,'' declared an ardent Manatee suitor, "I have long worshipped you from afar and now I can contain myseli no longer. How would you like to change your laundry mark? Time Enough She-"I bought a piano awfully cheap today from a Jacksonville firm He-''How much? "I pay $10 a month." "For how many months?" "Oh! I forgot t o ask them that.' Not So Soon "Henry," said Mrs. Glipping, in tearful tones. "Well, my dear?" replied Henry, look ing up from his Tampa tablo id. "What is it?" "If I were to die tonight, would you marry again?" "Not tonight." The Reason Why I By c. M. LINIJ::OAY NAY, lad; no more with you I'll vie Upon the links today! I care not how your ball may li e, Nor if mine be away! have gone 'round this course in par Though never yet with you l-It's not your vacant "Ha! Ha! Ha !" When I fail to come through; Nor yet your irritating pose, Which any saint would rile; Nor your fat finger to your nose, And idiotic smile! It's not your comments on my score Which thus stir up my spleen; Nor the rude way you holler "Fore!" \Vhen I dig up the green It's not you r strokes th at me annoy; Nor you r abnormal stance N o; it's the awful pattern boy, Of your new .e:olfine: oants I Doing His Best A young criminal lawyer was always full of quips, according to a story being told by a St. Augustine banker. A few years ago he attended the funeral of a millionaire financier, one of those "high financiers" whose low methods he loved to turn the light on. He arrived at the funera l a little late and took a seat beside the lawyer and whispered: "How far has the service gone?" He nodded towards the clergyman in the pulpit and whispered back tersely: "Just opened for the defense : Financiers Sebring Lady-"Witl you stop fight ing if I give you a dime each?" Urchins-"Wot about makin' it a quarter to the winner, Lady?" Cheerfully Admitted "It appears to be your record, Mary," said the Palm Beach magistrate, "th a t you have already been convicted of stealing thirty-five times." "That's right, your honor," answered Mary. "No woman is perfect." No Overtime Voice from the ground: "Can you manage to 'ang on a bit longer, Albert? We're gettin' a rope from Manatee." Albert (a conscientious union man): "Well for goodness sake. feller hurry up I'm due to knock off in about ten minutes." Good Night! Mother-"It seems as if it takes Ethel's young man from St. Petersburg a frightfully long time to say good night." Father-"Y es, much adieu about nothing. A Cat Tale "Dickey," said an Ocala mother, "you mustn't pull the eat's tail." "I'm only holding it. The cat is pulling!" Thirty-two Drinks "My dentist was a fine fellow. Each time he extracted a tooth he gave me a g lass of wine." "Don't you go to him any more?'' "I haven't any more teeth. Trade Secret Tarpon Springs Judge-"You are charged with stealing hay from the loft of the accused. How did you come to do it?" Accused-"With a ladder.

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Suniland: The Magazin e o f Flori d a The Farmer Is The Backbone Of The Nation! TO the farmer, Manatee County offer s every inducement and opportunity! Ranking among the first se v en of Florida's rich agricultural counties, with hundre ds of thousands of acres yet untouched b y developer or farmer; with celery, tomatoes eggpl ant, lettuce cu c umbers, squa s h s pinach, beans, peas and other money crops yielding immen s e returns; Manatee County's future as a t r ucking center can hardly be estimated, so great are her possibilities! Florida's Ideal Climate BRINGS thousands of investors to Bradenton, Palmetto, Manatee and other Manatee County c ities. They are all modern thriving cities boasting of great pro ,. jects, beautiful hotels and apartments, excel lent schools, churches and all up-to-date civi c impro v ements. Let us tell you about Pomello Park and Pomello City, Manatee C ounty's newe,st home building community, served by three county highways, the Seaboard Air Line R a ilroad and only a few minutes drive over s m ooth r o ads from Sarasota, Bradenton and other Florida West Coast Cities. 133 O.INC. 1 ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. Use the coupon o r wri t e You will receive all avail able req u e s t e d and will b e under no obligation. H ou k Realty C o I nc. St. P etersburg, Fla. Gentl e m en: Ki n d ly send me i nforma tion rea rding t h e development of Pomello Park a nd Pome ll o C ity. I am parti cu l a rl y interest ed in truck f arming ........ in vestments ..... s pecu l a t i o n ..... ... homesite. .... I am u n de r n o o bliga ti o n t o y ou. Thankin g y o u f o r requested lnforma t i on I am, Yours truly, N'a m e ....... ............ ..................... ... .. ........ ..... .......... Addres s .......... ... ..... ............... ....... ......... ............ City and State ....... ......... ..........................................

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134 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Cook with Gas Made by the Skinner Gas Maker "Where the City Gas Mai11 ends the Ski1111er Gas M begins." SKINNER Own your own p r ivate Gas plant and cook with Gas-the universal city fuel. Bu il d your home wherever yo u please, put in a Skinner Gas Maker and y ou have all the advantages of city gas. This wonderful equipment w ill give you gas at a turn of a gas valve-a clean, intensel y hot, blue flame of uniform quality and constant pressure at a cost of about $1.40 a thousand cubic feet. Just imagine the conveni ence, economy and comfort such a plant will b ring to your home-no fires to b uild no ashes o r dirt to contend with, no wicks to clean no smok e or oi.l fumes to bother with. Hundreds of these private gas p l ants are now giving splendid service in Florida homes. And the remarkable part of i t all is that the man of modest means can afford one. Send for illustrated catalog "The Ski nner Gas Maker" or see the equipment demonstrated at any of our offices Skinner Machinery Company General offices and factory: 300 Broadway-Dunedin, Florida OFFICES AND DISPLAY ROOMS <> Tampa-2101 Grand Central Ave. M iami-1229 N. E. 2nd Ave St. P etersburr-1126 Central Ave. Jack!.Ollville-824 W. Bay St. Orlando-575 W. Central Ave. Lakeland-80S E. Palmetto Daytona Beach-268 First Ave. Bradenton-51& Broad St.

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida 135 She Never Will "I must give you a list of books you ought to read," said the kindly resorter at Winter Haven. "Oh, don't! I haven't half finisi1ed those I oughtn't to r ead," the young lady replied. Good Reason Judge-"Do you know why the constable arrested you?" Accused-''Y es, because I was the smallest man in St. Petersburg at the time Excuse It, Please "Why is it that confounded new maid never answers when we ring the bell?" the Lake Wales husband asked. "I don t think we'd better be too exacting at first, Horace. The girl tells me she used to be employed at a tele !)hone exchange." Plenty of Time Tampa Employer (finding his clerk asleep at the desk)-"Look here, Meyer, you can clear out at the end of the month." Clerk (peevishly )-"Well, you needn't have wakened me so soon for that!" My Hero! "I forgot myst:lf today and spoke sharply to my wife," a Daytona man confided to a friend. "Did she resent it?" "For a moment she did. But Marie is a fair-minded woman. After she had thought it over she shook hands with me and congratulated me on my pluck." Quack! Quack! Customer-''Have you any eggs that have no chickens in them. Canal Pomt Grocer-"Yes, ma'am; duck eggs." His Only Worry Mother-"Tommy, you mustn't eat ice cream like that. I knew a hoy in Fort Pil!rce who ate his ice cream so fast that he died before he had eaten half." Tommv--"vVhat happened to the other haif?" Only An Insomnia T ack--"They say that a Gainesville student should have eight hours sleep a day." Mack-''True, but who wants to take ciasses a day?" On a Florida Peach "1fy dear, don't you think that a trifle too short for cne of your years? "Possibly, auntie, but not for one of my legs .Realism "These two members of your ::ast don't seem to be hitting it off in rhe Tight way. What's the matter?" a5ked the Miami theatrical magnate. "Oh, they are about how they will play thetr btg love scene m tne first act." The Limit "The marvels of electricity have s e t me thinking,'' said the Fort Pierce wit. "Yes; isn't it wonderful what elec \ricity can do?'' "My Sincerity Is Your Security" HAPPINESS! The place you would most love to be in-. The thing you would most love to, doaboard the "Arcadiau-. A rare opportunity is offered to buy this floating palace of a : houseboat now on Lake Worth, Palm Beach, at bargain price. 7 staterooms, 2 baths, and 2 room master's suite and bath-salon-observatiop.room -dancing deck-dining salon-large galley-parquet floors-open fireplace-steam heat-completely furnished. Designed by Tams, Lemoine & Crane-Built by Brown & Sons. WRITE, PHONE OR WIRE I MARGUERITE OSBORNE WOLTERS Suite 804, The Ambassador, Piuk and 51st Street, New York City NOTE :-Mrs. Wolters' Florida address is 224 First Avenue N. st. Petersburg SPECIALIST IN ACREAGE AND EXCLUSIVECITY PROPERTY General Practice H. C. DOZIERARCHITECT JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Phone 5-8545 BISBEE BUILDING Landscape Design Interior Decoratiotl -----------------------------------------I I Let WI baDdJe your ProPertY for you ba Fort Myers and Lee County. "Trstworlllin644 rGtller tha" Sit:e" : J. B. Conyera Realty Co., Inc. i 36 Patio de Leon : FORT MYERS FLORIDA

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136 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida The New Fogarty Bldg. in Fairview Heights, Largo CITY .QF LARGO on the GULF of MEXICO PINELLAS COUNTY BUSINESS OPPORT.UNITY Two Solid Blocks of Large Lots Priced Low Enough to Prove Profitable for Small House Building These houses can be for rental or for sale. In the city limits of Largo on the Gulf. Three-fourths mile from Largo Post Office -on Seminole Boulevard-which is already paved. About eighty per cent of these lots bearing orange and grapefruit trees. An eighty-acre development across the street. Priced for a quick sale $33,000. $20 000 cash. Balance over a period of over three years. Write o r wire for particulars. FOGARTY BROS., INC. FOGARTY BUILDING LARGO, FLORIDA A Through Message to You Who Are Interested in Florida Real Estate Your own personal business keeps you from coming to Florida NOW. Service is our specialty. Amid the rolling, wooded hills of Polk County we have well located tracts of acreage; also business properties in Lakeland. We have subdivisions of character and distinction for those who can appreciate a refined community-lots and homes at prices YOU can afford to pay on convenient terms. Our integrity and our responsibility are well known. Our bank references are :-Central Bank and Trust Company-State Bank of Lakeland. MARTIN, GILMORE AND LINDSEY Desk S, lOt South Tenn. Avenue, LakelaDd, F1oricla LakelaJui-The Oty of HEART'S DESIRE llke a jewel -. fifteen Lk-. (Continu e d from page 129) crops, then much money has been wasted. The soil chemist is interested in a de tailed analysis of the chemical constituents of the muck; the percentage of moisture, organic matter, oxide of iron, lime, nitroge n, potash and phosphoric acid. The farmer wants to know what it will grow and in what quantities, and to aid in the solution of this question the State Department of Agriculture has established an Everglades experiment station. Within the last two y ears, under the direction of George E. Tedder, the superintendent, an area of land has been tilled and worked from its original state of saw grass expanse into rich blackbrown soil, and twenty-two different va rities and species of grasses, legumes and other plants are being tested, in cluding rubber, bananas, palms, pecans, sorghums, corn and pineapples. Among the problems which are receiving a major share of attention is that of a water level. The agricultural authorities are endeavoring to learn if the crops will grow better on muck land if the water table is kept twenty-iour inches below the surface of the land, or if a more profitable result may be achieved by lowering or raising the level of water. Here the real scientific farming of muck lands is being undertaken for perhaps the first time in Florida. All of the resultant data is being carefully tabulated, and at some future time one may expect a handbook for the Everglades' farmer to issue from the State agricultural authorities, setting forth the farming methods to insure the greatest and most profitable yields. In the meantime, there is an increasing number of farmers who are already tapping this reservoir of natural wealth with much success by the trial and erro. r method. Concerning all soils in general and particularly peat or muck soil, there is still much information to be gained, but of the one great fact that Everglades' soil is capable of growing huge and various crops, everyone has been amply assured. The Everglades shares with Rome the inescapable fact that it was not built in a day. With the water drained from the land, there yet remains much to be done before the soil may exert its best qualities. Two years' time is required to subdue the luxuriant saw-grass, to introduce the highly essential bacteria into the soil, and to establish a circulation of air in the muck. Thus prepared the reclaimed area, under the urge of Florida's warm sun ;md her sixty inches of annual rainfall, is able to fulfill the rich promise that has been extended to the intrepid and eager farmers who early ventured into the district to begin the agricultural redemption of the region along the banks of the canals Among the crops that are now being raised in the Everglades are such truckgarden commodities as potatoes, tomatoes, egg-plant, beets, strawberries, pep pers, beans, onions, cucumbers, lettuce and celery. Considered of a more gen eral agricultural importance to the area is the success that is attendant upon the growing of such stable crops as kaffir corn, sorghum, alfalfa, peanuts, corn, rice and sugar cane. In the older drained areas, oranges, limes grapefruit, bananas and avocades are yielding abundant returns, pointing to the wisdom of a future agricultural policy of growing fruit, winter vege tables and some stable crop. The stories of the huge yields and

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida 137 profits made from the reclaimed muck land are often astonishing, principally from the raising of winter vegetables. Consider bean s, for instance, a firs t crop of which is planted along about Septem ber. From forty-five to sixty days later the beans are r eady for picking, and a yield of one hundred and fifty to two hundred hampers per acre is not u n usual, and the pnce may be anywhere from two dollars and fifty cents per hamper up to seven and eight dollars a hamper. This return might be considered an ample one for any tract of land, but the fertile muck soil is ready for more work. So another crop of beans is planted, with similar res ults sometimes varied with tomatoes and beans growing on the same soil. By the time the tomato plants have attained a spread the beans are harvested, and one crop does not in terfere with the other. Following this, the farmer is assured further yield from his land in the same growing season if he wishes to plant corn, cow-peas or peanuts. pEPPERS are a favorite crop with a number o f E verglade farmers and this is not to be wondered at when the yield and return are noted. It is not unus ual for an acre of soil to grow from five hundred to eight hundred crates of pep pers and the price ranges from three dollars and fifty cents to seven dcllars a crate when the farmer is ready to put them on the market. The vast area of the Everglades, how ever, precludes the cultivation of more than a comparat ively few thousand acres for winter vegetable crops, and it is to some stable crop that the Florida farmer must look for the utmost utilizatiol' of the muck land. Of all these crops, the one which holds forth the most prom ise is sugar cane. Muck land has always been considered the prize soil for sugar cane and in com bination with the sunshine, the moisture and the long growing season in Florida, the Everglades constitute the best known natural area for the production of sugar, not even excepting Cuba. Government experts have certified that in the areas adapted to sugar cane growing, a yie l d of fifty to seventy-five tons of cane per acre is not uncommon, and that under ordinary weather and growing conditions an average of fifty tons to the acre may reasonably be ex pected. In addition to this, and here is the secret of the potential riches ot Everglade cane land, the sugar content of the cane is higher than that grown anywhere else. From eleven to thirteen per cent. of the cane weight is sugar; or dinarily a sugar content of from nme to ten per cent is considered a good re turn. To the cane farmer this means that the net profit per acre of sugar cane in the Everglades sho nld r un from sixty five to one hundred dollars an acre. fwo sugar mills have already been built tor the commercial production of sugar and two other extensive developments :1.re under way, one of 40,000 acres and an other of 20,000 acres. The cultivation of sugar cane is astonishingly simple, and a field, once planted, requires no more attention, save for the harvesting, for eight or ten years. Still in its experimental stages, with no such success assured as that whict has marked the sugar industry in Flor ida is the rubber growing experiment being conducted in Hendry County on eighteen thousand acres of land near the town of Labelle. If America can produce her own rubber, surely Florida (Continued on page 143) Superb Venice--Nokomis Substantial and Growing The Pearl City offers an unpara!leled investment opportunity as well as unsurpassed homesites. Venice-Nokomis has far more beh ind it than just a desire of a developer to sell lots. It is substantial-the result of natural laws creating cities where they belon g. T h e Pearl City is Florida's J'rcttiest natural beauty apot. A building program running into millions is under way an planned. Venice-Nokomis is right on the Gull; not miles from it. It is on the Tamiami Trail and the Seaboard A irline R. R. Recent opening of the Venice-Nokomis Bank is a marked indication of ita substantiality. THE ROGER C. RICE CO., Inc., Realtors Main Office: SARASOTA, FLA. -------Roger C R ice Co., Inc., Sarasota, Florida. Gentlemen: Kindly send me copy of your new folder on Venice -Nokomis. Name ..................................... ..... .................. Address ..................... ............ .............. .... ........ WINTER HAVEN R. B. McMILLAN ASSOCIATES INTERLAKES A beautiful property located within easy walking distance from Center of City on our most wonderful lake LAKE HOWARD All improvements, including concrete bulk heading, streets paved, sidewalks, sewerage system, water, lights, etc. Each lo t individuall y landscaped. NO ASSESSMENT Terma al. Purche.se: 10% cash, S % ea.ch three months or tt-YEAR LEASE w ith privileges of purchase at any time. We finance home or apartment building. INTER-LAKES DEVELOPMENT CORP. Desk H Winter H aven, Florid a Sales Control, R B McMILLAN ASSOCIATES

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138 Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida Where My Heart Is Turning Ever'' That's the big line and thought in the greatest of sentimental ongs-Way Down Upon the Suwannee R iver. THE M I GHTIES T P OWER IN THE WORLD IS THE UNITED THOUGHT O F TS PEOPLE. When these millions know a story a name an article, a quality, it bec omes valuable and powerful beyond measure or expres sion. For many years through the medium of a soulful theme and alluring melody, millions have learned to love the beautiful s ong "Suwannee River." There is united thought in its soulful purpose and now in the heyday o f Florida' progressive movement, we bring to these millions the word of intention to further immortalize the great song by developing on the shores of its inspiration, SUWANNEE RIVER GARDENS Nature has provided value abundantly and the beautili.cation process continue A great Sa annee River boulevard ill border the stream. Radiant Springs Hotel will cater to tourist, hunter, fisher and those seeking health and repose. A great golf course and a great meeting place. Boats will ply the river and the whole schem.e of things will cause owners to sing even more joyfully, "There's where my heart is turning ever I" These millions in value will be divided among buyers of Suwannee River property. Do you want a Price begin at 500 for splendid re idtntiallot ; others u p to $1500. Terms are favorable and these are the first days of selling. V alue will move a ha been the hi tory of all good Florida proper ties. Wealth has its beginning in mother earth. A ddress to us your application for reservation. If you cannot call at ou.r New York or Jacksonville offices. you can buy by mail with that certainty and satisfaction which makes the purchase what you wa n t it to be. The pr-incipals of thi development have trackd by mail and find it pleasant and profitable to talk and aet the same as if across the de k. Do not hesitate to write us or to send us your first or further payments to an initial reservation payment. SUWANNEE RIVER GARDENS 1711 Main S treet, Jac ksonvill e, Fla. 170 Bro adway, ew ):ork, Y.

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, _miland: The Magazine of Florida Lafayette County has voted overwhelmingly for a big bond issue for making route SA a great highway. This and our Suwannee River Boulevard wiU be .. come two extensively trav, eUed thoroughfares. Every lot is already worth more.

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140 *YOU* will never find a better t i me to invest in FLORIDA properties. We are offering all class es of realty investments at right prices, and on good terms. Groves Acreage City Business Property Homes, and Vacant Lots Will be glad to submit descripti o ns and full de tails relative to any property you inquire a b out. We have never so l d a Florida property that the purchaser has not re alized a profit from, if it has been resold, or can be resold at a profit if owner wishes to sell now. R. C. RICKER Realtor 403 E. Lafayette Street TAMPA, FLORIDA Reference: National Bank of Commerce, Tampa. Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Venge a nce (Continued from page 46) watched his convulsed face and the cords that strained out in his neck. "You fiend! You De vil!" mouthed Dixon. "Ten minutes 1" said the voice of doom. "Just think o f it-you and I sit ting here, and those folks fly ing to-" He broke off and listened, but the sound, whatever it was, was not re peated. "The bridge has been in bad shape, anyho w," resumed the voice. "I l ive near there, and for the las t year I reckon I ain t thought much but bridges-dream about them, too. Some times it seemed like the Deep wate r Bridge wouldn't hold out till I got my ch ance. But today, when the paper sai d your boy was goin' East, I knew it had come. Sixt y feet to the creek, that middle span, and enough d y namite to send the whole Flyer to kingdom come BUT Dixon was deaf to everything but that awful onward rush of the train in his ears. His eyes were fixed on the clock, on the pendulum that swung back and forth and visibly marked the approach of death, on the hands that moved and seemed to fly. And then he tried to argue. "Think what you are doing," he gasped "You're sending a train full of people to an awful death because of something that happened to you. Chil dren too-do you want their blood on your hands? They haven't injured you I'm the one you're after-not those other people What did my boy ever do to you? There's still time t o stop that train." Then suddenly : "Take me into the telephone in the other room I beg of you. Let me get the operator at KI Tower and stop the express, and you can blow my brains out the next minute ." Hargis leaned forward in the dusk. "Dying is easy," he said oracularly. "It's the going home at night that's hard, and seeing empty rooms and dust y toys. It's having to go out to a mound in a cemetery when you want to talk things over wi th your wife. And when you know it ain't your own fault; that some money-grabbing bunch is going to chalk up a casualty list-Don't-youcall 1" There was unmistakably now the sound of a voice, or voices, not far away. Dixon's impulse to raise the a larm, even with the certainty of a bullet through his brain the next min ute, was checked as he opened his mouth for the call Hargis was stoop ing over the desk, the l o aded revolver in his hand. "Don't do it," he said quietly. "I want to kill you, you've got five mmutes of torture left. But, so help me, if you make a break, you'll never be able to tell what the trouble is." The v o ices died away. Dixon's e yes never left the clock. He no longer struggled-but every mental faculty was fiercely wildly alive He tried to pray, but only a meaningless jumble of words came. The d i al of the cloc k grew d im and indistinct, and i nstead Harry's face. Harry's clear boyish eyes, stared down at him. Harry with his mother's soft, d ark hair and spir it who was s w eeping on to torture and death-God, how that pendulum flew l "Four minutes!" Why, it was only a day or two since the boy had been a little fellow toddling around the house. It must be only A S U RE PRO F IT 40 a c r e s close to center o f city. Sub di v i s ions go in g in a ll around. P r ice $ 1 250.00 per acre. O nethird cash balance 1, 2 and 3 years. R. K. Brandon Realty Co. W E Be ll, Saleo M......., W e o t ern Union Arcade C l earwate r Fla. Cleaf'Waler'l Olden Enablisltd Real Enate Firm ((JACKSON VILLE' S greatest asse t is its w onderful muni ci pal el ectr i c pl ant which offe r s e x ce ptionally low p o w e r rates to industria) plants." F o r Particulan W ri te F rankli n H. O w e n. Chairman City C ommission JACK SO N VILLE FLO RIDA

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Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida 141 yesterday that he had the diphtheria, and Margaret and he had sat up and waited, listening to him, choking and gaspmg, helpless to aid, while the long night crept past, hour by hour, minute by minute. "Three minutes 1 Two minutes!" The light on the clock grew faint; there was a gray mist over everythingthe walls were fading away. And now they grew dim and were gone, and there was nothing but the open country, with the hills looming against the starlight and the black girders of the Deep water trestle reachin'g up out of the gorge like beckoning figures. "They're around the hill now," a voice was saying. "There's the headlight; can't you see them coming? Nothing can stop them. Don't she look great, with her red candles in the dining-car and the porters in their white coats. Look-it's on the middle span 1 Listen!" The voice rose into a shriek, or was it the blast of an engine's whistle? There was a crashing, grinding noise-the splintering of wood. Dixon's head dropped forward on his breast. The s h attered door l ay where it had fall e n on the floor, and in the gap stood Annie, her broad face full of alarm. Dixon's heavy eyes saw her first. Someone was rubbing vigorously a t his arm, and he felt the jab of a hypodermic needle. Consciousness came slowly and painfully; he realized he was stretched out on the floor, and he saw White, haggard and drawn, lean ing against the desk. And finally he realized that he was saying something to him, over and over. "They're all right," White was re peating. Dixon nodded dully without comprehension. All right. Can you understand. They're safe!" But Dixon had slipped back into the gray world of dreams. When he aroused again the hypodermic had taken effect; from its place on the walt the clocked looked down and mocked him, like a face with a sinister drooping mouth. "Twenty minutes after eight!" White was saying. "I tell you, doctor, I was a raving lunatic in that next office for a while. I had to come back to look over some papers I'd got behind a little, sending my wife and the kid away-and I heard voices in here. Then there was a crash, and I tried the' door. It was locked, and I knew something terrible was up. I heard some, and guessed the rest. Lord, what a scare I've had. I couldn't stop him; as the door
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142 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida =-------'Opening of HOMOSASSA ?lorida" THE first sale of home sites, villa sites and business sites in Homosassa, Florida's new west coast metropolis, opened Monday, February first. Millions have been spent improving this famous beauty spot. All the west coast needed was transportation. This is now assured. When this railroad construction is completed the neck of the traffic bottle at Jacksonville will be broken. Homosassa and the Tampa Bay and Miami districts will be two hundred miles closer to Chicago Fortunes will be made in real estate here. Millions are being spent in predevelopment construction. A scientifically planned city is under construction. Wide boulevards, streets, water mains, sewers, sidewalks, hotels, homes and business blocks are completed, others under way. The west c oast and the new city of H omosassa offer you excep tional opportunities, beginning Monday, February first. The Florida West Coast Development Company was for merly the Hoover Interests, Homosassa, Florida. Branchesand representatives throughout Florida and all principal Northern cities. An unusual opportunity is offered syndi cates and reliable subdividers HOMOSASSA FLORIDA WEST COAST DEVELOPMENT CO.

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. ( C m1tinued from IS the one State in the can be done pmfitably Everglades seems to be for the future devellon.rr dustry, if the expenm cessful. T h e Everglades of our rap hies is passing. It years before the oldtime geogbe mar.y is released llbtPro and aquatic sc:lllllloo lboy of the fu of the new such following fr o m the bondage vegetation, but t ure will some Everglades in manner: "The r iches t United States," will declare "is is still known State of area or tht revised geography to be found in wnat the Everglades, in the although the designation has original meaning. Milof the most ferti l e soil was reclaimed from the Lake Okeechobee b y a lions o f known floo d and canals. o f muck land is n o w t he the world and the great 'nn n r tinn of cane sugar consumed State!'! comes f rom the o f Florida. The drained traversed onl y with a canoe, criss-c r ossed with a network of hard roads and railroads, provid exc ellen t transportation. the d r uinage ope rations of the com p let e d, the migration .... ,u_, .. ..,.,.., o f farmers fro m the North t o the Everglades o f Flor ida gained impetu s. W ithin a the farm population o f the State tri pled in number, and du r jng h same period of time, according to t l States Bureau of Census, the ave ge income of the F lorida farmer he highest of any State in the nton. The oy may regard all this as tn-swa'rea
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The PUBLISHER'S J swat east-"Refresh m with f 1 C J M G S t T KING. were s d but First row, left to right: W. K. H. Sha to, ClfCU atlon manager; c urty, arasota represen ative; c) Daily News Hewlett, vice-president and publisher; M. J. Dowling, director of sales; R. J .. Sloman, Pinel.las WashingtQ sentative; Glenn Slaughter, office boy. Second row: J. M. Schloenbach, Jacksonville representa.tive; Per. nqucst well, editor; Walter G. George Gallow, Orange her as one determined to further the prestige arm."-A/).nd power of the foremost, magazine c., J. Gal'\ld the South. As Florida's recognize( >f national mouthpiece, SuNILAND is solid. i ly established and is without real com-less. Tj]J petition. m 1 On the evening of the long business 1t h session referred to, a dinner-dance was given by Mr. Thomas W. Hewlett, vicem Is a president and publisher of SuNILAND, Vallejo to the Company 's executives and not able Tampans at the Davis Island Coun try Club. The banquet was followed by a cabaret performance given by well known professional entertainers from New York, rounding out the big day in a highly pleasurable and memorable manner. J rence, com 'lOS i la.) o n-

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H O E who have seen t he counrry surroumilng ClermOI'lt at to be another W utchuter --a W estchester with a tropica l background. Here we have verd.tnt and wooded halls which th row themKivu to the hom.on wath the majuty of a Catskall settmg Here also we have beautaful sandy bo t tom, pnng lakes good m.ed lakes over wluch the sun and t he moon cast a romantic sparkle Entrancang clouds pl.l.y tag wan moss hung cypresa t reu, the sun nses and sets m a flare of glory and hfe u made Joyful to the heart that ap p rectates the charms of natural beauty. And Clermont ha.5 a substantaal agricu l tural bac k ground Grea t citrus groves yaeld their golden w ealth and profitabl e vmeyard developments are adding prosperity to the entare section 1. ctty Ckrmonc. w yourtg ytt-)-oung 10 a to the ...,hn """"""lok< to "' tbt ol ncxhn-...hk. MOO "' &rban.-on f'londo. We 1M1tc' your m Do ptrftctJM? You \t.oUI 6od It herr-Do )'OU wnt .a .:ho.ec tn flond. hil &net lakt I('CtKWl chen ln. tn tdl you more 4boul a.,_,. MO T FLORIDA A Scarsdale in the Making ... .. ...... &adl .... .. Melt ....... ..._ ..... ll(r (Wy Ill,..,. .. ""'",.w4 ,_ u,..u ..._ _,-""'"" WI ........ --. ....... M..t-.1 .. A $\O.f)I)OH.p lwd.,.._m-_,._ ku! h "'" ... !:r ... ": = -.:c,r.-.p;IOCI,.,...._ elermontJJ m ost alfraet. iYe otreet o N08THEIIN IIEPREIENTAT IVEI N .. En1 1nt1: oeor .. A.. D111 15 Trs>ont .. B cotou, M.a-. C..tla: & Co. UK:I.qll-tJaao&

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YOUR FLORIDA INVESTMENT Proper consideration and careful investigation will make your Florida investments the soundest ones you have. Investigate Daytona High lands and you will find it is un excelled as an investment oppor tunity. It is a part of the city of Daytona Beach, has the highest ele vation on the entire East Coast, has city water, city lighting, White Way, ten miles of asphalt-paved streets, a chain of lakes, a beautiful golf course and club house and many beautiful homes built under protec tive restrictions. Over a thousand satisfied buyers have realized liberal profits in this beautiful section of Daytona Beach. jJ Send for Folder entitled Golf Club "B" P. 0. Box 325 I II 'II' ,, ..... ,, ,, .. 'jll 'T II J !... il I 1 1 !., ./t. :\t .11 ),..1 .J 1\ .tl. ....... '\1'' '\' 'lj' : '\!'" 11"1[ ;11 'Ill 'lj' 'fj'''l IP'' :":II' .l "11h. .I ::. L J .1. 1111 ... J t i d as S-ub\trb or Hi l .s at'\d Lake .s Executive Offices: 162 S. Beach Street Daytona Beach Florida



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$l_,_Q OO,OOO .00 -FORA MAN I WANT to find a man who can determine the relative value of two widely separated pieces of property after having investigated only one of them, who can sit down here, read newspaper tell me what property is like inspecting it ... Give it strategic location of surrounding country ... Visualize topography ... Its present growth and t ... Its future possibilities ... You say "Absurd!, ... Of course it's absurd ... such a man would not be a man at aU ... He would be a miracle Such a man would be worth I'QOre than$1,000,000 a year to me .. And yet SOfTie people apparently are doing just this thing without getting paid fOr it ... But I find that before I can intelligently decide upon a development investment I mnst spend hundreds of thousands of 40llars anq weeks and months of time to arrive conclusion regarding its permanent p p ssibilities ... Have you seen Haines Cjcy? .. Its surr.ounding country .. Its back cour)try .. Beautiful home, sites .. High rolling hills clear, sparkling, spring--fed lakes with white bottoms? ... Haines is on the mal.n line of the Atlantic Coast Une railroad ... passenger trains daily ... Five main autorhobile highways pass through it ... Plenty of beautiful lots .. 221 feet above sea .. That's 195 feet higher than New York City ... 152 feet higher than Boston ... 136 feet higher than San cisco .. And Haines City is in Florida ... Haines CitY is in Polk County ... The richest county per capita in the entire United States ... Its 80,000 acres of citrus fruit trees annually bring its growers more than $10,000,000 ... The yearly revenue from its phosphate mines is $12,135,000 ... Its manufactured products are worth $10,000,000 a year ... That's what I call a good Back Country ... Did you know that? ... My development program to occupy five yearso totall'l $50,000,000 in and around Haines City .. i have invested already more than $450,000 in office buildings, transportation equipment, etc., as the nucleus of my sales and development machinery for this mammoth development ... This is the best assurance that I can give you of my confidence in Haines City and my belief in its future growth ... Haines City is J. young. growing community ... "Grow with a yo ... ng growing community" is good advice to any investor ... ... How do you know without seeing it that my velopments in and around Haines City do not offer you a better opportunity for a home or an investment? ... Unless you are this million dollar man you ought to see Haines City ... If you are this man you do not need to see .. But if you are not this man I will be glad to have you come to Haines City as my guest Call at my nearest office and make your reservation for the journey ... Maybe you would like to bring along a friend ... Tampa Terrace Hotel T._ Fla. .. MaiD Street, DaytOIUl Beach, Fla. fl /Jrqc5on Polly Prim Tea Roam, Ana.U., Fla. 7Jt1 Central Avenue, Sarasota, f1a. Prlnceaa Martha Hotel, St. Petenbur,., Fla. Thelma Hotel, 17 Pine St., Fla. OrkDdo, Fla. Rea l tor CaD Mr. I. M. MartiD, E1 Verau Hotlol, Palm Beach, Fla. te Euatia, Fla. BAINES CITY, FLORIDA RS Cleveland. Avenue, Clearwater, Fla. 33S F ..-.yth Street, J--vCie, Fla.

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I Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida The Best Located Property in. Florid.a! The remarkable location of Davis lslands in Tampa. and Davis Shores in St. make these two projects outstandi.Jlg in Florida today. Man-made Islands in the very center of two great cities. Ont facing the Gulf of Mexico in Tampa Ba:v and the other the broad Atlantic Ocean. The most fascinating real estate developments in America today I The South's Greatest Development! WHILE in Florida do not fail to see Davis Islands in Tampa and Davis Shores in 'st. Augustine, the two great Island developments of D.P. Davis, whose fame has spread all over the country. Every ktlown record for sales, for development work and for gigantic achievement has been broken by these two Florida projects. --... :" ,, : : Sales in little over twelve months totaled more than $60,000,000-an average of $1,000,000 a week continuously for thap. a year! Building and development progress has been even more spectacular. And profits made and refused by lot owners have established new records for Florida real estate. See These Great Island Projects While in Florida! D. P. Davis Properties Tampa-st. Augustine, 1

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2 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida The Dignity and Solidity of the GRECIAN PARTHENON AT the end of the Causeway residents and visitors to TAMPA BEACH will be welcomed by an archway of simplicity and dignified beauty, resembling and in fluenced by the architecture of old Athens and Rome. This arch will be a fitting entry to the finest development of the West Coast which, like the archway, does not depend on filigree or bizarre ornamentation to recommend it, presenting itself and its claims in the terms of co nservative solidity. f THE arch, leading to the plaza on TAMPA BEACH, is but one of the hundreds of structures which will be or already are being built at .the gateway to Tampa. The Administration Building is nearing completion, the first unit of seven hundred homes has been started, the first study for plans of the TAMP A BEACH HOTEL are on the draughtsman's table, the temporary bridge on the Causeway is completed-and the official opening of the Causeway took place February the tenth. All of w h ich is a momentous reason why you should investigate and invest in TAMPA BEACH AT ONCR MAIN SALES OFFICE, .TAMPA BEACH BUILDING Franklin and Lafayette Streets TAMPA, FLORIDA

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TRADE MAR.K REG. U S PAT. OFF Jhe MAGAZINEofFLORIDA Volume III Number VI March 1 9 2 6 ,:oVER DESIGN PAGE W A. Gordon FIRST ROTOGRAVURE SECTION loftoltude. A PoeOJ ; Ma T Cllftord Footer 15 Illustrated with photo decoration. More Prlze-Wiaoera Ia Suallaad'a Sl,OOO.OO Ca.aera Contest ..... ........ ...... .,. 16-19 30 AdJ Gen. J Cllt!ord R. Foster Florida News and Vlewl . 31 Illustrated with photographs of automobUes o n Ormond-Day-tona Beac h racing at Miami Track, Captain Billy Mickler and bathing girl s In hula-hul a skirts. .Jobo D. Rockefeller : 31 An exclusive photograph of the richest man In 'be world. Ji.DITORIALS lZ "FLORIDA HAS ADDED FIVE YEARS TO MY LIFE"...... Thomas A Edloon 35 Aa Interview by Georae Holland, Uluatrated with a portrait of Mr. Edloon. THE CONQUEST .OF THE EVERGLADES IUustrated with lloy H. Frlcken 36 J.I!.T THERE BE LIGHT! ; Dr. Georlle Coleman 48 Illustrated with photographs. A STATE-WIDE SURVEY OF FLORIDA CONDITIONS ... ; 41 A J: Frank D Lander, Jr., and VENGEANCE. A Short Story Mar;or Roberta Rinehart 14 Illustrat
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4 ... :. Suniland: The Magazine of'Florida SAN JOSE. Tlte Greatest Investment in Florida Toda:Y !-LOCATION-San Joee Ia located on the Di>:ie Highway, fifteen minutes' drive from Jaclllllonville and fifteen miles from tho world famed Jaclllllonville-Atlantic beaches. Z-AREA-Qno thousand acres of heavily wooded land, with a frontage on the beautiful St. Johns River of over one and one-half miles, were selected and carefully laid out by one of the foremost city planners In the United States. 3-DEVELOPMENT-The magnificent San Jose Hotel, situated on twentyfoot bluff overlooking tho beautiful St. Johns River opened January, 1926. The Country Club, witli-its 18-hole golf course designed by Donald Rosa, Ia now available to cuests at the San Joe Hotel. 4-COMMUNITY UTILITIEs-San Jose has a high pressure water system, up-to-date telephone service and a moat modern system of sewerage. Electricity has been extended to San Jose IUld altea for Khoola, churches, playgrounds and parks have been set aaide. A rapid Pullman Bus system is in operation. '5-RECREATION-The eighteen-hole golf course covers one hundred and twenty-five acres, natura! and artificial hazards making it exceedingly intereatln& and sporty. For those who love sailing, the Yacht Club will offer every facility when completed. lli--SIZES OF LOT8-The avera&e tot In San Jose ia 15 x 150 or over twice the area of a standard stze lot. Thla lends itself very well to any desired effects In house planniJi&. ..: Write fo-r interesting liteorature relating to accommodations at the San Jose Hotel, or the San Jose develop ment as a whole for homesite or investment. Devr.loped by SAN JOSE ESTATES 220 .. 222 West Forsyth Street Jacksonville, Florida

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t l ,. Suniland: The Magazine of Florida ords that .mean Profits and Permanence .J-on sarasota Bay and the Tamiami Trail HIGH type water front property is rapidly being bought off the market throughout all of Florida. Frontage on Sarasota Bay is particularly desirable, and will always be. Property bounded by, or even near the Tamiami Trail is ranked high in the estimation of all wise investors-who foresee the importance of this highway that links the west coast with the east. .. Here Are Both!In all of Florida, no two more allucing factors can be found than gorgeous Sarasota Bay and the Tamiami Trail. i Yet, at Whitfield Estates, the fortunate investor finds both-a per-fect union, for' profit and for glorious life. These are but two. of the manifold reasons why the future of Whitfield Estates is positively assured; why bankers praise it as the best buy on Florida's western coast; why so many have already reaped vast profits from their the stupendous (abso-investment-why it of-lutely assured) program boundless opportu-of improvements which ruty to you I dil nh Inve-Stigate it fully to-1s so spee Y e ancmg day; learn of the re-values. markably low prices and. Act now l WHITFIELD On Adair Realty & Trust Company Atlanta Bradenton Selling Agenta Sarasota Miami St. Petersburg Tampa Jacksonville I ( s i i

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6 Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida A Distinctive Property In Belleair Estates Improvements Among the many improvements which are now being installed-in fact, nearing com pletion, are Gas, Water and Electricity; 15 Miles of Perfectly Paved Streets, traversing the entire property; 30 Miles of Curb, Gutter and Sidewalks; a White Way Lighting System, Beautifully Landscaped Parks and Plazas, a Magnificent Pom peian Pool and Casino which will offer extremely <;olorful functions, a Palatial Golf and Country Club, and a host of other attributes, all added to one of the most beautiful areas in Florida, on a bluff overlooking the bay 40. feet below. BELLEAIR Greater Clearwater's uN ext Door" to Exclusive When you seek a site for your home, the paramount ques tions are location and desirability-particularly as to the desirability of the neighborhood-and what kind of neighbors you will have. This moot question is happily answered at BELLEAIR ESTATES. Your big neighbor will be the Belleview-Biltmore Hotel, "one of the fashionable Bowman Biltmore units, with its fastidious clientele, famous for a quarter of a century as a tourist mecca. Surrounding this famous resort are many large and beautiful estates owned by people of wealth andculture. "Buy Today, With the Vision of BELLEAIR 0. Sam Cummings, Administration Offices Branch Officea: New York, Philadelphia, Chicaeo, Miami, Palm Beach, Lake Worth, Fort Lauderdale, Lakeland, l

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Suniland: The Magazine of F_lorida An Exclusive Neighborhood E8TATE8 Master Developmenl Belleview .. Biltmore Hotel Your neighbors at BELLEAIR ESTATES will also be people of good taste and refinement-those who seek to avoid the rigors of Northern winters and who want the uttermost in life and find it on the 40-foot bluff overlooking Clearwater Bay and the Gulf beyond. Most of those who have bought estates here intend to build, in fact, many are now building attract ive homes. More than $1,5 00 0 00 is being expended for quality im p rovements, including all modem comforts. 72 acres of Parks and P lazas a palatial Golf and Country Club and a magnificent Pomp eian Pool and Casino are among the refinements. To morro w on the H ist ory 'Of Y esterday" ESTATES, INC. Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. Clearwater Florida Sarasota, Bradenton, Tarpon Springs, New Port Richey, Tampa and St. Petersburg, Fla. The Pelican Golf & Count r y Mail Thi s Club Coupon The Pelican Country Club T oda y now forming will no doubt be one of the finest in the South, 11 not alone from the angle of club appurtenances, club house and golf green, but also from the standpoint of a distin-I guished roster. Among the I Board of Governors are James I Studebaker, Jr., John McE. I Bowman, Rex Beach, Ring 1 Lardner, Geo. K. Morrow, and 1 'Belleair a number of others equally Estates, Prominent in the world of Clearwater, I Florida literature, science and art. Be.ach, the 11 Gentlemen: writer, IS the President. Please send me The 18-hole Sporty Golf I without anv obliaaCour s e is now being 1 tion or cost illusbuilt by Donald Ross, trated literature of your America's foremost I develo(>ment. Golf Architect. / I Name ...................... '--------/ / Address ..................... City and State .......... .......... 7

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!I Suniland :. ,1'he Magazine of Florida \ ..... .. LAKES BAHAMAS Restricted and improved sites for winter homes apartments shops casinos hotels clubs ocean front bay front lake front hill-top hill-side LOTS $800 to $1.50,000 !] .. One-fourth down and balance semi-annually at six per cent. All W. E. Brown Developments Illustrated folder upon request ROBERT STEELE ORGANIZATION Executive Office: 200 N. E. 2nd AVENUE, MIAMI New York, 565 Fifth Avenue Nassau, 282 Bay Street .. Atlantic City, 811 Boardwalk West Palm Beach, Datura and Narcissus Sts. Miami Beac-h, 215 Fifth Street NO LAND TAXES NO PROHIBITION

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, I Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida a wonderful present a brilliant future the beautiful City of Sarasota The firms listed below are all members of the Sarasota Realty Board and bound by a code of ethics governing their business. Anyone wishing information regard-. ing may ask for it with the utmost confi dence that they will re ceive honest advice. Scene at Whitfield Estates Country Club P. H. ENNISS President Sarasota Realty Board T/ -. A city of substantial growth Located on picturesque Sarasota Bay; with one of the most fertile back countrie_s in Florida, and beaches that are second to none in all AmericaSarasota's.amazing growth during the past few years is easily accounted for. As the city's alluring qualities attracted the thousands who have settled there, it now offers larger possibilities for those who are yet to come Here will be found inestimable inducements to the capitalist, the business man, the pleasure seeker-the man of modest means. Opportunity presents itself in Sarasota. The established firms listed below will be glad to supply you with information concerning your particular requisites in the city. Write or wire any one of them TODAY! Kagay Realty Co., Inc. 212 Main Street Gallup Realty Company 213 Main Street Henry Langsner 118 Pineapple Avenue Enriiss & White First Bank & Trust Company Bacon & Tomlin Palm Avenue Martin and Clifford Roehr Watrous Hotel Building -------I 9

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10 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA To those who seek a North Florida home, 36 hours by rail out of New York and Chicago---in Jacksonville's last close-in suburb built throughout on a high standard of Quality Construction--on Jacksonville's most highl y restricted aristocratic St. Johns River front--with a deep water Yacht Basin, a half mile long and five hundred f eet wide-' -with an exclusive Yacht Club, as pictured above-VENETIA oFFERS MANY CHARMS Write for Illustrated Lite ratur e CONSOLIDATED DEVELOPMENT & ENGINEERING CORPORATION, INC. Jac ksonville, Florida

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Sun-iland: The Magazine of Florida The Soundest Investment Opportunity in the New Empire I F SUPPLY and demand is the basis of profitable boulevard beautiful Civic Center II business, Brentwood Park is the soundest invest-$250,000 Mediterranean Chimes Tower ment opportunity in theN ew Empire of West Florida. $350,000 Rosalyn A p a r t m en t $100,000 The facts are simply told: Country Club $50,000 Roman Swimming Pensacola, tpe Metropolis of the New Empire, is Pool oversize 9 hole golf course Florida's third largest port, tennis courts aero-Florida's third industrial plane landing field city, Florida's center of even FACTS ABOUT THE N E W EMPIRE sound building climate and one of Florida's The New Empire consists in Florida's f a s t e s t growing cities. nine northwest counties. Climate is even Pensacola people are invest-the year 'round. Land is recognized as 1'ng in Brentwood Park be Pensacola People are busy -the most fertile in the state. Agricultural 't 1' th' and Prosperous and because 'b'l't' 1 t d p cause 1 supp 1es every mg poss1 1 1 1es are un 1m1 e ower re-o their very activity are be-sources are numerous and well developed. they require. "Outsiders" irtg forced out of their old Industry occupies third position in the are taking advantage of st_ ate. Commerce, shipping and trans-p r e s e n t pre development homes. 'J;hey require and -portation are growing rapidly. Population. d h ld' th -ust have larger, m o r e h d bl d th 1 f d pnces an are 0 mg e1r .,. as ou e m e ast ew years an Js modern and more beautiful doubling again. lots for profitable resale to home accommodations. In other words the New Empire possesses those Pensacolans who are every element required for steady, healthy, waiting but must buy later. Brentwood Park supplies economic development-a formula which this ever increasing vital de-guarantees fortune to the. investor with This Masterpiece vision. Home Center now being de-We maintain the largest and veloped comprises 1100 lots sales organization and are the largest owners and listers of property in West 10 minutes from Florida. We will be glad to send you Pensacola's City Hall information on any phase of West Florida e very lot faces a park or .in which you may be interested. Write today for descriptive literature. A study of the facts will show you that Brentwood Park is one of the soundest investptent opportunities in the New Empire. WEST LORIDA DEVELOPME VESTMENT c 0. Inc. PETER l. ROSASCO, PRES. JAS. H SWEARINGEN, V. P. & GEN. MGR. A.V. AYDELOTT, SALES MGR. 20 SOUTH PALAFOX ST PENSACOLA FLORIDA

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12 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Come now to GOLF f One of Flor ida' ajinest IBhole medal play courses ia now &eing constn&cted on the picturesque, rolling country at Homosa.tsa. WITHOUT the usual blare of advance pub licity, Homosassa, the mystery city of the W E!st Coast, has been quietly building for months, on a tremendous scale. Favored by the new transportation plans, by the great natural beauty of its rivers and forests, by vast agricultural and horticultural productivity-no wonder Homosassa attracted the millions of dollars that are now being spent building this scientifically planned modern metropolis. The beautiful, new Hotel Homosassa is in operation. It invites you. The Arcade, the bank, office buildings, stores and many fine residences are finished or under construction. Wide boulevards and 100 miles of streets, sewers and all city improvements are rapidly progressing. Entire trainloads of visitors from Miami, 'Jacksonville, Tampa and other Florida cities, and the North, are arriving at Homosassa. Business and residential property is available at prices that are surprisingly reasonable. Now is the time to invest to 1:11ake big at Homosassa Florida West Coast Development Company (Known as the Hoover Interests) HOMOSASSA, FLORIDA Suite 101, Tampa Bay Hotel Tampa, Florida Telephone 81850 Mackintosh & Dawe .rallahassee, Florida 811 Dime Bank Bldg. Detroit, Mich. 462 First Avenue, North St. Petersburg, Florida Ground Floor, Mason Hotel Jacksonville, Florida Telephone 56166 332 South Michigan Avenue Chicago, Illinois "''" PropoMd RCIIlt oHitw WtstCoat ililway Paved State HifhwiV From Alliin& tO Tampa Rlilwy Under ContNC.tion -Eiistjtttiailroaclt

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.. Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida REAL ESTATE INSURANCE "This Policy protects our Investment until I am well again!'' A powerful factor in increasing sales : A safeguard to the investor A protection to the seller T HE United American Life Insurance Co., after many months of study, offers a totally new type of blanket insurance on real estate development projects. It is now in force with three leading realty companies and will shortl y be employed by six more. This new insurance idea protects individual investors in case of death, disability thru sick-. ness, or accident In case of death this company assumes the entire obligation of the Should diSablement take place this company shoulders the finan cial obligation under the policy until the in vestor is physically able to carry out his contract. This new policy presents important sales argument of great assistance to the sales force It protects the development co:Rany against It eguards !the investor and his heirs against loss in carrying out his contract The pretn.ium upon the new policy is so low that aggressive organizations are incorporating it into their l'rograms. It will shortly be adver tised as a VItal sales feature by a number of Florida realty companieS, and it is obvious that the first so to employ it will reap the largest sales rewards. For full particulars : use the convenient coupon below. The UNITED AMERICAN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Consolidated Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla 13 I -----------------TEAR 0!"!:" THIS COUPON AND MAIL TODAY -------------------------------------United American Life Insurance Co., Consolidated Building, JacksonYille, Florida. NAME ................................................... .. Please send full information repolicy ADDRESS .............................. ... ............................. CITY ............................. : .......................................

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14 Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida WHERE LOCATION ASSURES PROFIT! It is likened to Miami Beach before the Causeway opened. A splendid beach, an hour's drive from Tampa, largest city in Florida;-a few minutes from St. Petersburg, the "Sunshine City." NOW COMES THE CAUSEWAY TO MADEIRA, TO OPEN WITHIN THIRTY DAYS There are sixteen miles of Gulf Beaches in the Tampa-St. Petersburg Area. None except Madeira will be accessible by a Free Causeway this season. Madeira is experiencing astounding popularity. When the Causeway opens the demand for Madeira property will greatly exceed the supply. THAT IS WHY, IN ADDITION TO BEING AN IDEAL BEACH, -MADEIRA IS A PREFERRED PROFIT INVESTMENT

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4 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida LIVING BECOMES A JOY Building a Mediterranean recreational community is an inspiration to the builders, and a joy to those who wilt banish the cares of life in a healthful existence amid charming surroundings. The clear, fresh air of the Gulf of Mexico, whose azure waters break softly on a 15 broad white beach: A community whose architect has ,,, ,, caught the Charm of the Riviera at its best, and set it ,,,,'' here, by the Turquoise Sea. La Casa Madeira is where you will dance, dine, bathe or enjoy a quiet hour. This, the most uniquely artistic Casino, WILL BE OPEN THIS SEASON. It is the first of a series of Mediterranean structures planned to include the Villa Mar Del Oro, de luxe hotel, and a Yacht Club Fisher Village that lures the nimrod. Already a fascinating fleet of Mediterranean-type boats cruise Madeira's waters. / .. J1'.,"' ot\t o''"r",. / pt, .. fl ,, / tO "'" o ,/ .. \)' o" \'C'o oo"!,"' i i ... ,c ., .. flo-\ ........ t' .. 1' \ "o"" (to \ o"" '"' '(('. \ .... \ ...... ) \ .,\ ... tb \ ... ,.. \ ..:;J',,,'' \ ., \ -.. &-.. ,,' \ .,.. .. ,,'" \ \\ c,\lid ,,,''' adeino ON--GULF AND Rober:t E. Lent, President 649 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida

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16 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida I De trains,. Florida to Non Fine Fast Daily Service via Direct Routes The On Time Record oftheOrangeBlossom Special and the Seaboard Florida Limi teds between Florida and eastern cities has ne..-er before been equaled. OnZ, Route via Camden, Southern Pines, and Pine .. hurst. Fine hotels, golf and outdOOT sporu in the high and dry air of the Carolina Pines. Stopovers on one wa,. and reduced rate round trip tickeu. All that is best in modem travel-WITH NO EXTRA FARE and with Seaboard perfect dining car service. Daily from Florida's East and West Coasts and from Central Florida via famous trains that have enviable ORANGE BLOSSOM SPECIAL SEABOARD FLORIDA LIMITED (East Coast) SEABOARD FLORIDA LIMITED (West Coast) These three trains are the finest from Florida, carrying the very .latest type of railway equipment-club cars, observation cars, and maid for the ladies. FIVE ADDITIONAL FAST DAILY TRAINS All Florida Special Suwanee River Special Carolina-Florida Special New Orleans-Florida Limited Seaboard Fast Mail Every Seaboard Air Line ticket office is an to-date Travel Bureau where all information is courteouslyand quickly given. G. Z. PHILLIPS Assistant Passenger Traffic Manager, Seaboard Air Line Railway Jacksonville, Florida eaboard Air Line Railway FLORIDA ROUTE"

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JJ 'Perspective birds-eye Yiew ''J of C liRA HIGHlANDS Jhowin,g m proximity fo the Seaboard .llir Line Railroad & Tampa-Jac&o11Yil/e Hiway ; I '' "-y-/l)lTRA HIGHLANDS Ia daily attracting the at \...'tention of the ehrewdeat lnveatcm and the moet diecernlng home-builden In the state. Located at Citra in Marion County; on the Jack sonville-Tampa Dixie Hishway, (noted as one ofthe best paved highwayt In the state); In the center of Florida's finest citrus and farming eecdon; with churches, schools, and theatres readily acceutble;Citra Highlands offers an oppottunlty unmatched anywhere for investment in a County buzzlils with ectivity. Every Inch of Citra Hiihlande high and dry. Highlande lots are cleared and staked, the streets graded and paved. We offer In the Fim Plot, SO foot lou at $125.00 to $200.00 on terms cuh, balance monthly. McGRIFF-LASETER, Inc. Selling A&:mts 31'6 Datura St. P. 0. Box 3417 WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA An illustraud booklet will be sent upon request. 17

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FLORIDA'S most unique t---... selling plan is in G"'llJERE'S where every lot buyer parclared. Our early buyers have surely V1.-ticipates in one-third of the profits gained through their purchases. You are of the cpmpany in all of projects. invited to participate in whatever like Profits begin immediately and are future profits this company may have added tq the already established value of Our two great the lots you have purchased You share Farland Park and Lakeside Heightsin the profits of every sale and not only are the present builders of dividends. do your profits aecumulate through sales, These properties are a part of the hills but the value of your lot holdings inand lakes of this wonderfLtl Columbia creases correspondingly. County-real, adjacent to hustlingAnd when you can see and know the bustling Lake City beauties of our property holdings, the We want to tell you about this city full meaning of this opportunity will be and county, and of course we want you plain to you. This is without question the to know the. especial features of Mac. fairest and squarest and most insured Farland Park and Lakeside Heights and profit-making sales plan in all Florida. how easy it is to purchase one of these At all times you are the owner of the lots and be a profit-sharer in this corn best of realty values, and to this is being pany. When we tell you that stoc.k to. the added the profits accruing from the sales amount of one-third of the purchase made and from rising values. This is price of the lot is issued in denominations better than a syndicate 'because you do of fifty dollars each, and that this stock not depend on profits alone-you already is non-assessable, and that this stock is a have your mo11ey's worth and will get gift to you as a purchaser you can easily more. 60% in twelve months Within the past twelve months, two thirty per cent dividends have been defigure we are justified in saying we have the most insured profit plan in all Flor ida. Ask us to tell you more. THE CALH OUN DEVELOPMENT CO. E. C. CALHOUN, Sales Manager De'velopers of Lake City, Florida MACFARLAND PARK 216 N. Marion St. LAKESIDE HEIGHTS Phone 42

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BeautifuL KEY LARQO FOR you there is a home in the tropics-land of romantic sunsets-luxuriant tropical vegetation-a Florida sea-island home with gentle zephyrs whispering amon.g the palms and the gentle roar of the surf on crystal white sands in the dis tance. Here springtime is eternal. Beautiful Key Largo, just off the Florida coast, south of Miami, offers you Missouri Subdivision. Here you will find the full realization of your dreams plus the thrill of profitable ownership, with the added attraction of modern conveniences and railway service. For Key Largo is located on the famed Key West Extension of the Florida East Coast Railway. And Missouri Subdivision, one-half mile from the Key Largo Station, is the bea.uty spot of Key Largo. Every lot has tropical hardwood trees. Residences only permitted. Buildings restricted to residences of attractive design in the Spanish or similar style of FREE FISHING LODGES With First Ten Lots Sold To encourage actual settlers, the developer will iii elude at no charge, with each of the first ten lots sold, an attractive fishing lodge. These lodges are sixteen by twenty feet in si'ze and consist of one living room and parking shelter for one car. These lodges may be used as a base for a season's fishing or outing, rented to others for the same purpose, or as a temporary residence while the real home is being built. Prices $3,400 and up for inside lots on West Dixie Boulevard. Canal fronts and lots with riparian easements are slightly higher. Terms: One-third cash and balance in semiannual payments. architecture. Construction of hotels, apartments and stores will not be permitted in this exclusive residential park. M IS S 0 U R, 1 U B D IV 1 S I ON Title insured: West Dixie Boulevard and 80-foot canal guaranteed by developer. Subdivision of original lots into smaller units is prohibited. These will be sold quick. Clip and mail the coupon NOW for reservation. Floating dredge is now working on the canals. C. E. SEXTON OWNER:-DEVELOPER OF THE PLAZA AT KEY LARGO C. E. SEXTON, Key Largo, Florida. 0 Reserve for me ........ lots in Missouri Subdivision of Key Largo, as per your special offer to first ten purchasers. D Please. send me at once full information about Key Largo and Missouri Subdivision. Nan1e ......................................... Address .............................. ..... City ..................... State 19

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''IN 20 THE LAND THE Heres Where Vision OF HERE, in the realm of the world's greatest song -"Way Down. Upon the Suwannee River"-is the opportunity to realize your life's dream-whether it be of financial success or of a cozy home in the great Southland's most romantic spot: Here's where looking ahead-seeing things-and noting sectional trends and developments, will make money for you, for-Just as sure as the. Suwannee River flows, there will flow a stream of profit-making. One purchase and you are a part of it.

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SONG .. SUNG. SUWANNEE'' Will Make Millions Predevelopment Prices $60 Per No Lot Smaller Than 50 Feet Lot by and Up 130 Feet For the homeseeker here is a setting beyond compare-that rarest of combinations-a prosperous and productive community and country, yet forever pervaded by an atmosphere of historic and romantic legend. This will be one of the opportunities where a fe w dollars can be put-to .work and made to produce as prolifically as does the ground in this section-and it's a big producing country. C lo s e to Branford is Suwannee River Shores property, just one and a quarter miles. Branford will grow through the influence of this proper t y and o f course Branford now makes this property valuable. Branford is a real town one of great promise-one soon to give big reward to the p ioneer in nearby territo ry. This is the head of Suwannee River navigation. Big boats ply the stream. Here are good streets, ice plant, schools, churches, Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and other facilities. Here is the shipping point of a great agricultural community. Our far m s, residential sections and business property will feel the swell of Branford's Other developers are buying from us. We have the property-we have the location -we have the soil-all sufficient to attract buyers of consequence, but it is not our plan to sell big blocks, we want to sell the in. dividuals who want one lot or a few lots and those seriously interested in profit-making from a small investment. For several months we have been taking reservations, now we are ready to deliver a limited number of lots, nearly all at the original predevelopment price. Some lots already advanced Means other advances will come. Today is the day. This section commands rapid enhancement of values to keep pace with assured development. Profits are madt by action in getting closer to Florida soil. You can do this by sending the coupon. This will give you lots at today's -prices providing you use the coupon promptly. There' s a profit for you at Suwannee River Shores. Opening up of thi mori famed ection ha but jut HlfUtl. The early buyer reap the larget profit. Firt application a .. ure lirt opportunity. Mail the coupon today. Suwannee River Shores 415 Florida Avenue TAMPA, FLORIDA -.. --... -... -... ---... -... -... -.. -..... .. -... -.. --..... ----.... ----.. -.. --.. Suwannee River Shores, 415 Florida Avenue, Tampa, Flori da Gentlemen: Please re serv e for me without obligation to buy-. ............ Lots at $60 each .......... Lots at $100 each Name ....... .... ...... ...... ............ Address ......... ........ .. ..... City . State o I 21

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22 IF your goal is profits, here is the assured spot. If your goal is to be near thriving cities, here you will find the prosperous and beautiful. If your goal is to be surrounded by Florida's most productive soil, here you will find Dixie Estates in the midst of it. Whatever your goal as to Florida, Dixie Estates will satisfy you. One thing is sure-you want to buy where there is a possibility of profit Here you find it-everything that adds quick profits to property is in or near to Dixie Estates. These home spots are feeling the swelling. influences of Plant City's rapid rise to municipal greatness. F. L. Greenfield Orcanization 1314 Franklla S 1reet Ta;.,..., Florida Send me, without cost or obligation, f u II particulars about Dixie Estates. The Goal of Your Heart's Desire in Sunny Florida Right on the Dixie Highway, one and one-half miles from the city limits of Plant City .. Only a few miles to the splendid city of Lakeland. Plant City is the winter straw berry capital of the world. It is a great center of agricultural and commercial activity. The immediate future offers innumerable opportunities for success. As a merchant, professional man, artisan, or investor, you are wanted in this Plant City section and here you will find the goal in dollars and the sul?reme satisfaction of living in Florida's most desirable location. Right now prices and terms are right. Like all high-class developments, the initial and introductory prices now existing in Dixie Estafes are considerably lower than the invariable price of the future. The surrounding wealth in farm land and developments, means t h a t values will rise in proportion until they reach the minimum stage of their actual value. Come to Plant City and see these values, or write and permit us to send descriptive literature. F. L. Greenfield Organization REALTORS 1314 Franklin Street Tampa, Fla.

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ST HILLS K E L N D L 0 last 1/>. here ts answer Our booklet tells you what you wish to know about F lorida and the Home of Your Dreams. It picture11 things as they really exist-both with actual photographs taken on the spot, and with text matter that deals .with the subject fully and frankly. FOREST HILLS is in the Lakeland Highlands, in the ridge section of Polk County, the very heart of the citrus belt and. a region rich in agricultural resources. FOREST HILLS estates are wide arid deep, grouped on wooded slopes and in shady glens, with vistas of hills and lakes such as seem im possible to the Northerner who doesn't know Florida. Development work has only just begun, but thousands will be spent in carrying out the landscaping already suggested by Nature's handiwork. SALES AGENTS J. J. GILLIAM W. V. HALLAM We want you to know all about these splendid estates in FOREST HILLS. That is why we have prepared this booklet, which is yours for the asking. It will answer your every question. You can reserve your FOREST HILLS estate without even coming to Florida. We urge you to supplement what we tell you in this FOREST HILLS booklet by correspondence with the State Bank of Lakeland, the First National Bank of Lakeland, or the Central Bank & Trust Company, also of Lakeland, as to our financial responsibility and re liability. Could anything be more fair? I D A 'JhePeak of the 7amous Ridge S ectioTL 23

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24 The warm waters of the Magic Gulf Stream wash the shores at the en .. trance to Del .. Raton Park In Delray The master subdivision on the gold coast of Florida. The vision of W. G. Mathes, a great financier,and the genius of Henry Lage, a noted development engineer, are making of Del .. Raton Park A veritable Garden of Eden It is a W. G. MATHES PROJECT WEST PALM BEACH Clematis at Olive

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INFINITUDE By MARY CLIFFORD FOSTER T HE cobalt dome-the height of it, The vast expa!tse, far-reaching, wide! 0, how can man at siglzt of it But kneel and pray, in awe and pride! The boundless sea-the might of it, The trackless waste, the restless tide, 0, how can man, at light of it, But kneel and pray, in awe and pride! The vast Beyond--the tltought of it, lnfi'nitude, the Great Divide. 0, how can man, when taught of it, But kneel and pray, in awe and pride! The soul of man, the worth of it, Surpassing all thing.r else beside. 0, how can man, at !Jirth. of it, But kneel and prav, in awe and pride! 25

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.MORE PRIZE--WINNERS $1,000.00 CAMERA. 26 IN SUNILAND'S CONTEST "LOW TIDE-DAYTONA" By R. H. Le Sesne Dayto11a, F1a. A $25 Prize-Winner in the Professional Class. "THE TAME BLUEJA Y" By .Frank C. Shay Miami, Fla. A $25 Prize-Winner it1 tile Professional Class. (See Next Page)

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"ON LAKE DORA, LAKE COUNTY." By J R. Clark, Orlando, Fla. A $25 Prize-Witmer i11 the Pro{cssioua / Class. "THE SPORTSMAN'S FERRY." Ry D. VanDeVenter, Tampa, Fla. A $10 Prizc-vVi11ner in the Professiotuu Clas.s "THE DO<)R GRILL.; A FLORIDA HOME." By Edward Frederic Foley, New York City. A $25 Prizc-Wimzer in the Professional Class. "SPIRIT OF THE SEA" (LOS OLAS BEACH) By Eugene M. Kelcy. Fort Lauderdale. Fla. A $25 Ptiu-H"inner i11 tlu Pro{euiomzl Class. 27

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28 CAMERA "ON THE HILLSBORO RIVER, NEAR TAMPA.'' By Mn H. Fairc/ough--A $5 Pri.ee-Winner. ARTISTS WHO "GRASSHOPPER," BY H. H. ScHRopER. A $10 Prize-Wiuer "MYSELF.'' BY J. A. MATHERS A $3 Pri::e-Winncr. "SoME SHIPS OF THE SPONGE FLEET.'' By G. I. Clem-A $5 Prille-WiJJtUr. "UNDER THE SuRFACE AT SILVER SPRINGS, FLA.'' By Inez Smith-A $5 Prize-Witmer. This was photographed under water at a depth of two and one-h4lf feet. "FLORIDA LAND CRAB," nv H. H. ScHRODER. A $5 Pri.ae-Winner by the man who won Fourth (Amateu) Prize and two others in the Camera Contest.

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W .ON IN S U N ILA N D'S CONTES T "HOGAN's CREEK, NEAR jACKSONVILLE, FLA." By R. 'F. Morse-A $10 Pri::e-Winner. "LivB OAKS oN THE RoAD TO LITTLE RIVER." By Jacob D. Moore-A $5 "ON THE ST. JoaN'sRivEk, By Dorothy Marsh---,A $3 Prize-Winner. "SUNIUSE. ON INDIAN RIVER., 'FLA/' By Mrs. May Stuart .. Swifton, Arkansas. A $10 Pfise-Winner. "NEGRO .BOATMAN," By Inez Smith. A Second $5 Prize-Winner. (More Prize-Wi"ntJing Photos Next Month) 29

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CELEB RITES George Ade, (left) famous American humorist-philosopher, and John Golden, well-known play producer, snapped at St. Augustine, Fla. Couht Tolstoi, son of the great Russian novelist Leo Tolstoi, who is living at Ormond, Fla. Count Tolstoi has come to Florida to finish :'A History of the Russian People" IN SUNILAND Countess Mary Millicent Rogers Salm, who is spending the at her cottage "Wawaka" at Palm Beach. Fla. ]. Clifford R. Foster, Adjutant-General of Florida National Guard, who was recently elected President of the National Guard Association of the United States. Gen. Foster lives at St. Augustine, Fla. (All photos 011 this pa.gr copyrigh.t by Uudrr-wood & U11dcrwood) 30

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FLORIDA NEWS. AND VIEWS lnteruational .]ntcnralional A few of the thousands of automobiles from all states in the Union as they appear on the Ormond-Daytona Beach "Nor'wester," with Jockey Wallace up, winning the sixth race on the second day's racing at the popular Miami Track 1 J-lternational Captain Billy Mickler, one hundred and one years old, standing in front of his home in St. Augustine, the oldest house in America I ntertlatio.nal Miami modesty now dictates that bathing suits sh,ould not be worn away from the beach except when concealed by hula-hula skirts 31

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32 Exclusive rop:y,,right photo made by Fotograms for Su11il01!d JOHN. D ROCKEFELLER, RICHEST MAN IN THE WORLD, NEARING EIGHTY-SEVEN, IS GOLF CHAMPION OF HIS AGE AND A FLORIDA ENTHUSIAST AND INVESTOR

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PERRITON MA.xw:ELL. Editor editorials GUUD TlMES AHEAD! In the early days of not. We believe in the common-sense of the American last summer when the conventional vacation seapeople, in their ability to read between the lines of son had set in and millions of Americans were obvious printed lies and siJly stories detrimental to this supposedly planning to go to far northern resorts state. To the alert American mind "every knock is a to escape the so-called "heated term,'' Floridians preboost." When a great traffic system like the Illinois pared for a long, dull period, believing that but few tourCentral Railroad has contracted to extend a new line into ists would be courageous enough to brave a trip to this Florida at a cost of $7,500, 000; when hundreds of sky tropical peninsula. Every native of Florida knows that scrapers, representing an outlay of millions of. dollar:s few places on the map are so favored in summer as i:s are being erected in Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa and this state; that the coolinf breezes of the Atlantic on one other Florida cities; when men side and the fresh zephyrs on the Gulf side create one like Barron Collier, Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jr., Henry, of the most equable climatic conditions in the world. Ford, John Ringling, the DuPonts, the Hoovers, the But for so long a period had Florida been expl0ited as a Rockefellers are investing va5t fortunes in -Florida place of torridity and discomfort during the summer, ground and pinning their faith on ils future; how can that one expected in 1925 the usual hiatus of visitors anyone doubt the .truth of Florida's phenomena l growth when vacation-time arrived. and prosperity. And what happened? The totally unexpected, the To enumerate the millions legally recorded for the surprising influx of more than a million tourists during upbuilding of the new Southern empire on this peninJune, July and August. They came by automobile, by sula would fill the present issue of. this magazine. No train, by boat-some even on bicycles and afoot; men, need to use superlatives, no need to ball y hoo Florida's women and children of every social strata and from present substantial status, future growth and -every corner of these United States. Some foolish ones prosperity. When anyone talks loosely of "the Florida -came with less money in their purses than would be reboom," ''the bursting bubble" and similar nonsense, ask quired to provide for their needs on a picnic within the the speaker for details ; insist that the knocker quote : borders of their own home county. In the main, howchapter and verse; pin him down to facts and watch him ever, Florida-bound tourists were able to pay their way eat his wonis-. to any part of the state and with enough left over to Summer is cominf and with it a bigger influx of visi invest in cheice land Many came here with the avowed tors than ever before. Florida is the new vacation land intention of turning a quick profit in real estate deals; the id ea l objective for everyone who wants a thrill, a : and many accomplished that purpose. Some have since new perspective on life, a chance to make money or returned home with snug fortunes; others have stayed merel y some "different" place to go to. Floridians must : here permanently, completely "sold" on the actualities be prepared for the big exodus southward. The Ameri of physical comfort and easy c ompetence. It is estican people want to see with their own eyes "what it's mated that at least twenty-five pe r cent. of last summer's all about." They are coming here next summer two casual visitors have settled .------------------------., millio n strong. Let us give in Florida no thought them a heart y welcome. Let of ever leaving. The development of Florida is a won-us c onvince them with the And what of the coming simple evidence on every summer? Will northern derful thing, but not more wonderful hand that not since the and western green-eyed than Florida. great West was opened up propaganda again s t t h i s has histor y recorded such state deter any considerable fVILLJAM LYONS PHELPS an amazing growth of proportion of. tourists from y z U civilizati on a s is evidenced a e -visiting Florida next June. in every section of fair ,fuly and August? We think and favored Flo rida 33

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J\ RE FLORIDA BONDS SO,UND? .A Northfi ern banker of importance writes to SuNILAND on this subject. He asks two leading questions, in substance: "Aren' t Florida impro v ement bonds stagnat ing the market?" and "Inasmuch as some $150,000,000 of these bonds were sold last year, will not such securi ties go begging?" Let us first take up these two pn;positions. Then, we can proceed to answer the other alarms of our corres pondent. All of America indeed many foreign countries have awakened to Florida s great a ssets-soil and climate .How else could such a s tupendous bonding have been floated? No substantial bonding hou s e. which participated in these issues failed first to i nvestigate ; What did the y find? They witnessed awakened communities They saw s ound development. They, like Florid i ans acquired faith in the future of Florida. They inquired at banks in Tampa, Jacksonville, Miami and other of the State's great banking center s Thej learned that Florida' s legal rate o f interest is 8%. They inspected the statements of these banks. They found that Florida banking on an 8% interest rate is sound : At first, no doubt, they were puzzled They were accUstomed to 6 % interest rates. How could Florida enterprise pa y 8 % ? Faith That was their own conviction, because they themselves had bought millions in bonds. Faith in this soil and this climate. Faith, because native and hordes of Northern investors had backed their be lief with their dollars, and 8% 'interest. pay S!fo for our bonds We are developing. We are growing healthily. Our public improvements are neces sary to full production of soil and the enjoyment of climate. Possibly we are paying a little "through the no s e Perhaps we expected it. Perhaps our bonding house friends could have answered their own questions if t hey had considered the inevitable supply and demand. The demand for improvements in every community in the State will continue to govern both the number of bonds to be floated and the interest rate to be paid. The influx continues. Florida has found her s elf. Folks outside the State have found Florida. They come, the y see the y invest. They and we develop and we b ond our communities The enhancement of values and t he governing hand of supply and demand rule our de v elopment; consequently our rate of interest. Our Sta:te has 22 000,000 acres more of fertile soil upon which r i ches in crops and development will be based. The one million acres no w under culti v a ti on a re but a scratch. Florida has faith-so, the cycle: soil de velopment home-building and then, industrial de v elop ment. Our gateways are open and still they come in increas ing numbers; y et we build and there remain 22,000,000 rich acres undeveloped. Soil and climate, plus enter prise are the answers to those who counsel again s t 5 % bond interest rates. Our legislators wisely voted a legal rate of 8 % at banks. Our progress has become the talk of the nation and far beyond its borders We can afford to pay for v ol ume, becaUSt'l we have faith that our future is secure. Soil climate, enterprise, plus faith; this is the answer to timid inquirers about Flonda' s future Florida needed money !rom the outside for de v elop It was willing to pay for it. Florida possessed faitldnherself, in her resources : Northern bankers and Northern individual capital' caine into the State. They 'l'hey invested. Eighfper cent. attracted them. Their faith in the future of Florida inspired them to cURATIV E FLORIDA. T h e sunshine of Florida irivestme11ts have They conhas been praised so man y times that repetition tmiie tt:J. etthartce. All based on ruth I And the hordes would seem superfiuous. Its air and climate ha:ve s till pour into the State with their dollars. won many words o_f eulogy the o f Now ; return to bonds. Ottr banker friend from grapefruit, the lusciOusness of Its strawbernes, the1 deh-thi'11ks the market tnay stagnate Will it? cacy of its melons and tomatoes have been commented A agq improvement netted from upon very often in the pas t Yet we venture to assert to. 4:40%. Today according his letter, they that the health-giving qu a J1tie s of t he State have sell at 5% intere s t He thinks they may go begging begun to be appreciated a t their real worth. And cttl-This brings us to the second proposition. Will Florida zens of the peninsula should look to it now that the bonds go begging? N otat the increased rate of interest. health factors of Florida may forever be conserved and Not so long as dollars pour into the State and filter into utilized for the betterment of themselves, their friends these rapidly developing communities. Not so long as and the great commonwealth that will fiourish here to these new citi,zens with their high faith keep redeeming morrow. the waste lands and building upon them. Not so long as To e scape from g e ner a liti es which may seem meaning they keep planting the soil 1-----------------------, less boast s, it is the purpose that 'yields three or four of these word s to point out crops per year for profit-FLORIDA has only just started on a ver y definite thing; nameable Northern markets. a new era in its history. The ly Florida as nature's pre-Florida public 1' mprove-h h f h '11 ventative of cancer. The in-ecttc atmosp ere o t e moment wt ment bonds are sound That crease of this disease among 1 1 p ass, but in my vie w Florida will con-c1v, l, zed peoples has been we are paymg a Itt e more, concerns Northern capital. tinue to grow and will become, I believe, rapid and alarming. Twc. It does not need concern the wealthie st and most powerful and y ears ago an article i n a the bonding hou s es so long populous commonwealth in the South. medical journal s ummari z ed as they .come into the State Indeed, I think it will be th'e Empire an investigation of cancer with dollars and help mortality in thirty -eight us improve our God-given State of the South. American cities fora decade. assets, productive soil and IRVING BACHELLER As the population of tliese everlasting climate. citie s exce e d e d one-fifth We were wnling to pay Author of E b e n Holden," "A Man for the that of the entire nation, the 8% interest at banks. At Ages," "D ri a n d I "Silas Strong Etc. figures may safel y he taken oresent, we are willing to (Continu e d on page 96) 34

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Photo by Geo. Hydit Thomas A Ediso n Arrives at Fort Myers, Florida "FLORIDA HAS ADDED FIVE YEARS to MY LIFE" In An Interview by George Holland ,, My FIRST trip to Florida was made forty-three y ears ago, and there are certain details of it that I am not likely to forget "Our party had landed in Jacksonville on this first trip and then we took what was locally known as a railroad, going from Jacksonville to Cedar Key, where Faber, the pencil manufacturer, had purchased a large tract of cedar." It is Thoma!' A. Edison talking to a representative of SuNILAND. "That railroad was one of the roughest riding affairs I have ever encountered. The trip took three or four days, and during that time we ran off the track at least three times. While we were waiting for the cars to get back on the rails, we had plenty of opportunity to observe rhe fauna and flora of the State. You may realize just how ordinary a thing jt was for the train to run off the track when you learn what the te l egrap h company did. The Western Union Company, I think owned the poles that ran alongside the roadbed, and they got tired of having them knocked down by the train, so they took the poles up a n d placed them farther away from the tracks Mr. Edison chuckled. "We cruised around in Florida and finally reached Fort Myers on the Caloosahatchee River. We observed the trade winds, the te m pe r atures, and the tropical vegetation, and I decided that here was the place for me. "I look ed f o rw ard to the time when I would be getting on in years and would want to come to Florida every Winter, and I couldn't imag ine a nicer place than Fort Myers. There were wild ducks by the acre, the river was full of fish, and it seemed to afford a oerfect oooortunity for rest and recreation." Mr. Edison stretched himself luxuriously and gazed about him with satisfaction. "So having fallen in lave with Fort Myers, with its hundred inhabitants and its sand streets, I bought ten acres on the banks of the Caloosahatchee River. Shortly afterwards I had a C01,1ple of houses built up in Maine shipped them to Florida knocked down, and then put them up on the tract of land. "Not infrequently I am asked what contributions Florida has made to me. Pleasure, rest and recreation are real but not ne cessarily tangible assets, but in addition to these things, I feel that at the least Florida has gi v en me five years of additional life Perhaps I can stretch it out to six or seven years, but of five added years I am reasonably certain. I am not over-fond of pneumonia so common in the North. Florida i s a great State for the old folks, when they haven't the vitality they once had. This has been discovered by a great many people, and to me it affords assurance that Florida will never be forgotten. There are a great many more men and women living up North who only have to get in the sunshine for one Winter to become real enthusiastic for the State, as well as annual visitors." A question brought out the Edisonian viewpoint on the subject most vital to Floridians. "Whether the so-called 'boom' will continue is not of so much moment. If the State's development has been pushed too fast, necessarilv there will come a lull, but in any event all these things will adjust themselves. The real Florida will never lose its appeal." 35

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One of the lateral canals of a sub-drainage project in process of excavation. These canals, dug at intervals through a tract of land being reclaimed, link up with the huge State canals which discharge into the ocean and gulf. 'Jize CONQ!JEST of An Area of Four Thousand Square Miles I s Being Drained for the Farmer Ne a rly Five Hundred Miles At a NEARLY three million acres of America's most fertile land, en riched with the animal and vegetable remains of thousands of years, constituting a n empire of potential agricultural wealth, are well on the way to a complete subjugation. Man is again asserting his mastery over the elements. And this time he is achieving a task so colossal that imagination halts in an effort to grasp its astounding and multifarious details. Where once as far as the eye could reach there was but waving saw-grass .. rising from its bed of gently moving waters, impenetrable and unyielding, the merry music of the power-tractor is heard. The dugout of the Seminole Ind ian has become a gang plow; the paddle which feathered the waters of a great uncharted inland sea has become a disc which is breaking the rich, black soil and preparing it for the seed. In short, the Everglades of Florida, which _man has looked upon for hun 36 dreds of years as the prize agricultural area of all the North American Continent, if not the world, is being reclaimed. Ever since the little red school-house existed as an institution in America, the Everglades of Florida have exerted a powerful appeal to the imagination of childhood. Geography might be a d ull and prosaic struggle, and the memory of the task it was to learn the capitals of all the states may still linger, but there came a day when even geography was touched with the magic of mystery. The perils of "Dead-Eye Dick," whose career was being breathlessly followed behind the huge pages and maps, was forgotten for the nonce, and the lure of the Everglades was strong upon us. I t may have been the pictures which accompanied the text, or perhaps it was due to the enthusiasm of the teachers who resolved to make the most of o u r tremendous interest; but in any event, t he r e has remained through many years av impressioD of reeking, miasmatic B y Roy swamps, huge creeping reptiles and crawling alligators, fleeing negroes, impenetrable jungles and rich tropical growth. This, we thought, was the Everglades. The dictionary has it that an everglade is "a low, swampy tract of land, with patches of tall grass." The dictionary may be right, but, in that event, the area in Florida generally assigned that name has been incorrectly designated. The Everglades are not lower than hundreds of thousands of acres of land which are along the shore lines of Florida; neither are they swampy. Much misunderstanding might have been generally avoided if the Indian name "Pah -hah -okee," meaning "grassy water," had been taken into the American vocabulary. To Jefferson Davis, Secretary of \Var in must go the credit for obtaining the first authentic liescription of the Everglades. In that year he directed two topographical eng-ineers to und
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' Compared ,with the much of the so-called flat prairies of the West are hilly and mountainqtts. Contrary to general the Everglades area is neither aw ampy nor jungle-like, but covered with grass and brush. the EVERGLADES and Sixty-Eight Million Cubic Yards of Earth Excavated for a Length Cost of Twelve Millions of Dollars H Fricken take a reconnaissance of the area, and in their report there appeared the following paragraphs, which admirably and concisely describe the district: "The Everglades of Florida," the authors stated, "cover an area of about four thousand square miles, embracing more than half of the portion of the State south of Lake Okeechobee. The subsoil of this vast region is coralline limestone. Upon the surface of this, which is very rough and irregular, lies an immense accumulation of sand, allu vial deposits and decayed matter, forming a mass of quicksand and mud from three to ten feet or more in depth, that overspreads all but a few points of the first stratum. Upon the mud rests a sheet of water, the depth varying with the conformation of the bottom, but seldom, at dry seasons, greater than three feet. "The whole is filled with a !'ank growth of coarse and tough grass, from eight to ten feet having a sharp. serrated edge like a saw, from which it obtains its name of saw grass. In many portions of the Everglades this saw grass is so thick as to be impene trable, but it is intersected by numerous narrow and tortuous channels that form a kind of labyrinth, where outlets present themselves in every direction, most of them, however, terminating, at longer or shorter distances, in an impassable barrier of grass, mud and quicksand. The surface of water is quickly affected by rains; the alternate rising and falling during wet seasons being very rapid. The general surface of the Everglades is, therefore, subject to great changes; the character of marshy lake or mud flat predominating according to the wetness or dryness of the season." An understanding of the Everglades of Florida may best be gained by first seeking an explanation for their being Once this has been made plain, the nature, area and extent of the grassy waters hecomes easily apparent. To the northward of Lake Okeechobee, which has been described as the great liquid heart of Florida, is a watershed 5,336 spuare miles in area. As the rain descends on this basin, its accumulated waters, principally joining with the Kissimmee River, empty into Lake Okeechobe. This lake covers approximately seven hundred and forty square miles of territory and is nearly circular in shape. With the exception of Lake Michigan, it is the largest fresh-water lake lying wholly within the limits of the United States. Lake Okeechobee has no natural outlet, and when its basin is full the excess waters slowly spill over the southern edge of the lake's border and gradually flow southward over an area of four thousand square miles which constitute the Everglades. Had not this area of land been alm::>st as flat as a billiard table, the course of the water would in time have worn its 37

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Water;.tocked, with a rich.lrowth of saw-grass waving in the breeze, occasionally with a growth of cabbage pafms, the land of the Everglades lies useless until drainage is established. Compare with pictw-e on opposite page. own channel, cutting deeper and deeper into the earth, and there would now probably be no problem of drainage or water control. Considering its size, the tract of land lying between Lake Okeechobee and the Gulf is believed to be the flattest known to man. Mile alter mile, and as far as vision can range, the unbroken expanse of grassy stretch away to merge with the honzon, unrelieved save for the hammocks, or dry spots, in certain sections. Slowly and massively, moving ever southward because the land slopes two or three inches to the mile toward the sea, adding to its bulk the annual heavy rainfall of the area, the waters of Lake Okeechobee spread out like an all engulfing sheet, water-locking the land from successful cultivation. The physical characteristics and geo logical formation of the Everglades is believed to be unique At one time it was generally taught that the State of Florida was of coral formation, but geologists are now agreed that its forma-The St. Lucie, or main drainage canal in the reclamation of the Everglades. This control canal bas a capacity of 10,000 cubic yards of water per second, and carries off eighty-five per cent. of the excess waters of Lake Okeechobee. It averages two hundred feet wide. 38 tion is similar to that of the coast of Georgia .and South Carolina, belonging to the "post-Pliocene age." Underneath the entire southern part of the Florida peninsula there is a limestone foundation, which was once the bed of a great inland sea. Wind and wave combined with sand and particles of stone to render somewhat shallow the waters of this sea. Aquatic life sprang into being. Vegetation arose and decayed to be succeeded by new outcroppings; silt and decayed vegetation poured. into the area from the watershed to the north, and thus was formed the vast treasure of rich muck lands which are now being subjugated for the farmer. Having no outlet of any kind save the surface of the glades, man has set about the construction of artificial channels, seeking not to drain Lake Okeechobee, but to control its waters. Uncontrolled, it constitutes a menace to agriculture; when its expansive waters can be diverted to orderly canals, it becomes the greatest asset of the region, providing irrigation in a time of drought and assuring adequate drainage in the period of greatest rainfall. Despite the immensity of the program of water control and drainage, there has scarcely ever been a difference of o pin ion concerning the process. Granted that the water of Lake Okeechobee was above sea level-a fact that was established by governmental surveys-then it was only necessary to dig canals sufficiently large and deep to carry off the surplus waters. No attempt was to be made to diminish the amount of water which entered the lake. It was sought only to divert the waters which the lake basin could not hold. into regular channels which led to the sea and the gulf. Added to this was the additional

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Once 'the land has been cut with canals and ditches so that the excess waters can: drain off the ac)U quickly aasena ita rich qualities. Where only a short time ago nothing save entangling saw-gra88 was visible sleek CJairy herds' graze: at wilL problem of disposing of the rainfall of the Everglade region, which ordinarily would interfere with agricultural de velopment. From the e astern ed!le of Lake Okeechobee straight to the ocean eastward, is a distance of twenty-five miles. Dredge and dynamite cut through this narrow rim, releasing the imprisoned waters of Lake Okeechobee into the Atlantic Ocean. Gravity dra1nage was easily established, for at the beginning of the work in 1903 the surface of the Everglades was approximately twenty-three feet above sea level. More than twenty-one million cuaic yards of earth and rock will have been excavated when the St. Lucie Canal, now almost dredged to its maximum depth, is entirely completed. This is the key to the entire drainage problem. The canal varies from one hundred and fifty to two hundred and fifty feet in width, with a depth of from ten to twelve feet. Engineers are agreed that this single canal will carry off e i ghty-five per cent of the surplus waters whic h the lake basin cannot accommodate at flood time. Fifteen per cent of these waters, it is estimated, through the action of sun and wind, will evaporate. Ten other canals have been constructed which ordinarily have no part in carrying off the waters of Lake Okeechobee. Ranging in depth from ten to fifteen feet, and with a width of forty to one hundred and forty feet, they radiate from the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico into the area of the lake's basin These channels are designed primarily for the purpose of carrying off the waters which would otherwise stand inches a.nd feet deep on the flat lands following the summer rainfall. Despite the belief of the drainage engineers that S t Lucie Canal is of a sufficient size to take care of all the overflow of Lake Okeechobee, assurance has bee!\. made doubly sure by the simple Jlft>cess of connecting some of the accessory canals with the lake also, to be called into duty in time of stress. Up to January 1 of this year, a total of 68,163,000 cubic yards of earth and rock have been excavated from the canals, which now have a total length of slightly more than fo .ur hundred and eighty-six miles Fourteen masonry locks and dams have been constr. ucted. All this work has been done at a cost of $12 750,000 in round numbers; an in significant sum when compared with the quantity and quality of the land which is now in the last stages of reclamation. In the Everglades themselve s there is a total of 2,862 000 acres of land, while in the Everglades Drainage District, which takes into its area contiguous territory within the same drainage area or basin there are 4 370,096 acres. (Continued on page 129) Planting sugar cane on a completely reclaimed area of Everglade land, the sections of cane are laid in the furrow and then covered over with a layer of the rich muck soil. Sugar cane grows luxuriantly in much of the Everglades region, with a maximum content of sugar, 39

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. The Forum Auditorium at Daytona, F lorida, showing a typical crowd gathering for one o f the meetings "LET T H E R E BE LIGHT" George W Coleman, LL. D ., Director Ford Hall Forum, Boston, Mass. President Open Forum National Council, and President The Babson Institute. He is the author of the fV i t h Thi s Slog an the Florida Open Forum i n Nine Cities Stimulates the S tate's Culture Dr. Robert Shailor Holmes of Daytona, Fla. retired b u s iness man and found e r and director o f the Florid a -Forum and Assembly and its Sister Forums organized i n e ight o ther accompanying article By Dr. George Coleman President, Babso11 !11stitute a1rd Director Ford Hall Forum F LORIDA is flourishing. Everyone knows that. But how many people realize the great advances she also is making i n the finer things of life? Someone more gifted w ith spiritual insight and wield-ing a m ore facile pen than I should tell that whole region. The Florida Forum the American people what remarkable and Assembly, founded and abl y directprogress is being made in the civic, ed during its entire history by Dr. intellectual, and religious life of one Robert Shailor Holmes, is the father of the oldest .states i n the Union. There of a whole flock of forums nine in nutn is an _awakening along these lines com -ber, located in various cities and_ towns parable only to the marvelous d evelop-throughout the State. This great enments in real estate and financ e. Did terprise of Dr. Holme s had its begin you know, for example, that Florida is ning as a tourist Bible Class in a Methat the iorefront in her adoption and odist Church back in 1912. Under the use of the open forum, rapidly c oming name of the Christian Forum it grew to be one of the most effective agencies so fast that the church was too small fot -adult education in this country? to accommodate its increasing n)lmbers, The Carnegie Corporation, deeply in-notwithstanding the fact that the terested in t,he question of cultural ad-fice was enlarged three times within vancement the United States, has refive years. Even the Casino at Dayc::ently mad e an extended survey in this ton. a, :. with a capacity of about twelve direction and gives high commendation hurtdr e d which housed this growing to the work of the open forum as an Open 'Forum (as it finally came to be agency of liglit and leading to men called) for two years proved inadand women who have completed their equate, and it became necessary to build formal education in the schools. a n auditorium to accommodate the great The largest, and one of the oldest crowds that sought admission every open forums in the country is estab-Sunday afternoon during January, Feblished at Daytona Beach, Florida, and ruary and March. in thirteen years it has to a place At this juncture Mr. Simon J, Peaof unquestioned lead t'rship throughout hody, a retired lumber m a n from Co -40 cities o f the State. lumbia City, Indiana, came to the rescue with seven of his friends, all from northern centers. Mr. Peabody presented a handsome building site, and he and his friends gave the money for the building of an auditorium which comfortably seats three thousand people. The attertdance at the Forum sessions averages over two thousand right through the season, and for the Assembly entertainments during week days t h e building is frequently crowded to capacity. Professor James Heaton, for many years the platform m _anager for the Winona Lake Assembly in Indiana: is responsible for the success of these entertainment features which run through the entire season and bring to Daytona some of the greatest speakers and musical artists of the world and many other attractions of national fame. But the Sunday afternoon Forum dis cussions are the heart and center of the w hole enterprise. Her e are presented, by experts of the greatest reputation, the live issues of our time and the audience, with the utmost freedom under orderly restraint, joins in eac h discus sio n challenging the speaker, supplementing the material presented. or looking at it from a different angle, as the case may be The net result to all concerned, including the speaker, is stimul ating and informative.

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Crowd outside of Ford Hall, Boston, waiting in a snow storm for the doors to open for a Forum meeting Dr. Holmes, a genius of good will .and friendliness, is one of those selfmade business men who has succeeded in keeping out of the ruts and, although past fifty years of age, is still growing like a honse afire. In all my wide ac -quaintance I have never seen. a man well along in middle life who has shown so much initiative and adaptabality in mastering new lines of endeavor as has this farmer's boy from Lansing, Mich. Having early in life won a modest competence in real estate and industrial developments in his own fast-growing home city, he went to Florida for the health of the older people in his and his wife's family and there began to carve out a new career for himself, adding very substantially to his eomomic rcsources, revelling in the joys of outdoor life, and gradually winning for himself a great reputation as a public character devoted to all the highest interests of his community and state. His wonderful success as the founder, promoter, and director of the Florida Forum and Assembly, together with a wide range of public. service in other directions, won for him a few years ago the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters from the University of Georgia: Dr. Holmes is now the Secretary of the Open Forum NatiGnal Council. He has recently published a volume entitled "Builders and Other Poems." He has something of the gift of the beloved Edgar A. Guest in his power of appeal, in melodious lines, to the heart of the average American. Although retired from active business, except for looking after his investments, Dr. Holmes is no victim of ennui, the bugaboo ef the average man "out of harness." He is the busiest of men, very happy in all his work, and exerting a wide and bene ficent influence that might well be the envy of any publicist. Dr. Holmes has not only been fortunate in the handsome support given his work by such hard-headed, forwardlooking men as Mr. Peabody;but he has also been able to enlist the support of leading professional and business men and women for the wider prometien of the open forum idea. Dr. 0. I. Woodley, at one time Secretary of the State (Continued on page 90) Interior of the Auditorium at Daytona, Fla. showing an Open Forum in sesaion -H

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A STATE-WIDE SURVEY Suniland's Representat'ives Present Timely Business Jacksonville's Solid Business Progress By J. M. ScHLOENBACH JcltsMVille RepresentatifJe of SuNILAND FTER a Abriei pause regain its breath, following a long perio
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OF F LORIDA CONDITIONS Reports of Activities in the States Key Counties. and diately preceding a time for intensive and successful work. This is a .section wherein conservatism prevails and where reported development and mean exactly what the words imply. Every city and every county is doing jts full share of constructive work-municipal and otherwise. And every county, even to the r 'emotest section shows a healthy tendency. Sanford; Orlando, Melbourne and other cities have municipal programs of consequence. Our lake cities look to a greatly increased business. Kis simmee, already surrounded with activity, is momentarily expecting to announce another monster develop. ment. This whole section has and will feel the effect of well-directed, wholesome publicity. Things are happening to justify op timism. "The people are coming," is the way we feel about it. So, we are adding millions to the comforts and conveniences of urban and suburban locations. Streets and high. ways are being built and improved to accommodate traffic. Home construction is predominately prominent. New towns are growing in thr: agricultural areas. Hotels are building and rebuilding. Tourist spots are increasing manyfold, and without quoting figures it is safe to predict that the past and the present are no more comparable than will be the present :.Tid future. The analysis of this territory, which qoasts of its agricultural and commercial productivity, readily gives proof and assurance through its accompli shment. Where there are so many advantages, supported by such soil wealth, and with so many mil lions invested, there is surely reason for a great future. Farmer, merchant, banker, operator, official or Mr. Citi zen will tell you that the agricultural and commercial phases are now as u sual sufficiently favorable to attract and hold the tourist, the homeseeker or the investor. He will tell you and show you that the apparent preparation for the future reception of tourists and permanent population is a striking example of the courage and faith the future of this part of our busy state. Fort Myers Has a Substantial. Trail this section in a conspie-Future .-. position, one which should, and By C. C. McKINNEY doubt will, give Fort Myers Fort Myers Representative of Sumi.AND a most enviable and strategic .point F ORT MYERS and Lee' County, in this fast-coming State. together with the county of The Barron' G. Collier inter.ests, so' Collier, wilt' go steadily for-largely represented in this locality, ward. This section hasJ:ieen, to some are being watched with interest by extent, a shut-out, in' that transporthe whole business world. Mr. Colta!ion in the modern has not lier and his many Eastern been available until within the past ors a vast amount'o{capital year. Based upon competent author-and energy; Once turil.ed 'lodS,e, if ity, May, 1925, witnessed the first up-believed that' these wiil ward swing in this territory, and the eclipse any development; ever. activity was pronounced during the in this State, or indeed, irl Summer and Fall months of that the United States. year. This activity is still apparent, and it is predicted that the year 1926 will show far greater activity than that of the former year. The activity in building is never-ending. January, 1926, showed a seven-time increa;;!' over the same month in 1925. And it is well to note that the type of building, both business and. residential, is of solid character, not of a temporary nature. An outstanding feature is the architecture employed in all structures; it is in keeping with the natural beauty of this South-west territory. It is a freely predicted and accepted fact that Fort Myers will be the metropolis of South-\Vest Florida. Recently, the citizens underwrote the cost of a $750,000 community hotel. They also subscribed to the largest fund ever attempted by a community of its size for the Chamber of Commerce, $110,000; thus giving Fort Myers the honor of setting a new record per capita of any city in the country. The Seaboard Railroad will enter Fort Myers within the coming three months, making the place a two rai:road city instead of a one railroad town. East Fort Myers was recently annexed and .at the present time the population of greater Fort Myers is 15,000 ; and it is growing daily. Fort Myers is destined to have a steady and healthy growth rather than a mushroom start and stop. Land values are stable and fair. Building is substantial and continuous. Industry is gaining ground monthly. The Fort Myers-Palm Beach Highway, plus the Taniiami No Bo'om But Steady Growth : In Polk County By HAROLD D. HASCALL Polk County Representa#'ve of SuND.Ain) HAROLD D. HASCALL POLK County has .never rad a boom ... It has bee n conservai:. t i v e ( { estimated' that'this is the est County in' the United States per caP i t!l ::-$t!. 198. Polk County oroduces citrus fruits than any in Florida. Forty-five per cent. of the phosphate supply of the world emanates from its mines There has been a steady growth in real estate values in this county, practically unsupported by any great national advertising campaign. There has been little, if any, gambling in speculative buying. Con servative prices and fait: profittaking has been the rule. Purely owing to extremely unusual cli matic conditions there has been a period of quiet in business over the months of December and January. There has been a steadily incre asing volume of business during the past ten days and there is a quiet feeling of absolute faith as to the future and what the res. t of this year holds in store for realtors in Polk County. Almost without exception, "high pressure" selling is frowned upon by Realty Boards throughout this County. People know that Polk (Continu e d on page 70) 43

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DIXON scowled as he reassem bled the typewritten pages of his report and glanced at the clock The sound of clicking machines across the hall had been fol lowed by the hurrying steps of homeward bound clerks Now that was gone, and from the street below came the noise of the grating progress of trolley-cars, inching their way one after another in a long line, loaded with supper-seeking humanity. Dixon touched the button of an electric buzzer beside him. "Is MacClure's report here yet?" he asked, when White appeared in the doorway. "Not yet, Mr. Dixon Johnson got him by phone and he said he would be here himself; he asked you to wait." It was characteristic of Dixon that he s h owed no sign of He had the impass i ve, immobile face of the executive type-l acki n g the fineness, possibly, but with the reserve of strength and irr esistible power of one of his 44 "Sit down and don' t m ake a noise/' said the intruder sharply. The man by the door, without shifting his gaze, slipped h i s hand back to the bolt of the door and f a s tened i t VENGEANCE By Mary Roberts Rinehart Author of The Amazing Interlude," Tish," ''Seven Days," "The Bat," "The Red Lamp," etc. Illustrat e d by DUDLEY G. SUMMERS Moguls. And now he merely nodded. "I'll stay if you will need anyone, Mr. Dixon," White ventured from the doorway. "I-I don't have to hurry home tonight." "Boy better?" Dixon queried absently, his hand on the receiver of the desk phone. "Much better. I I started them both a way this afternoon on the fourthirty, my wife and the youngster. Went to her mother's." "That's right. A little change sometimes-seven-five-six Court, Central." "So if you want me-" White began. But Dixon was rattling the hook of the receiver impatiently. "Hello! Hello I No, don't stay, White. Close the vault-that's all. Is that you, Clara? Tell your mother I will be late for dinner. No, don't wait; I may dine downtown. Did Harry get the fourthirty? All right. Good-by." W HITE clo sed the big door of the vault and drew down a window. At the door, however, he stopped uncertainly. and turned around. "Mr. Dixon," he said nervously, "Mary wanted me to thz-.nk y ou for the check. I told her I didn't like to rub it in, but she wanted you to know how she felt. It--more than paid the nurse." "That's all right, White," Dixon's tone had 'ln unexpected note of warmth. "I have a boy of my own. Good night." White went then, humming a little as he walked toward the elevator. When the cage stopped a man got out, a tall man with shrewd eyes and drooping, sandy mustache. He was mud-stained and rather disreputable as to clothes, but he went with the long firm stride of the outdoors man along the hall toward the general manager's office. He tapped at the door and entered without ceremony. "How are you, Tom?" he said briefly. He and Dixon had been civil engineers together years before, and although one now general manager of the z. & Y. and the other its chief engineer, on MacC!ure's part, at least there had been no change of attitude. ''I looked for you thi s morning,'' Dixon's one glance had taken in every detail of his engineer's appearance from the mud ori his boots to the scarcelv restrained excitement in his face ..

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''Whaes all this row about the Deepwater bridge?' MacCiure did not sit down. Instead, he began to walk nervously across the office floor and back, leaving muddy prints on the Persian rug. "It's just this," he said at last stopping. "That bridge is a death-trap, and has been since the February flood." "That's not what Robert says," Dixon returned coldly "He's been repairing it for-well, you know what he did to it. It has cost as much as a new bridge already. "Roberts is a fool." MacClure bit savagely at the end of a stogy. "He's an ass with an engineer's diploma. Look at me; look at this mud. I've been seven hours in the creek bottom there, trying to find out what Roberts thought he was doing to that bridge. It's going to come down with the next high water, Dixon, and there will be another Armitage disaster. Dixon was irritated, but above everything else he was the general manager of the Z. & Y. He listened attentively to MacClure's concise statements, but at the end he leaned back and surveyed z stack of blueprints and drawings. "You're an alarmist, MacCiure,'' he said. "You've cried wolf too often. Why, you want to build a new road. I couldn't have a new bridge at Deepwater if I as k ed for it-and I'm not going to ask for it." "Then send all passenger traffic around by Flamingo Creek and the Junction," MacCiure said incisively "And lose tt.8ty minutes I This is a railroad, MacChire-not a trolley-line. Thirty minutes I" MacCiure stopped his nervous pacing and bent over the desk "I tell you, Tom," _he said impressively, "there are places on the Bakewell branch. today that will mean eternal damnation some time to every director in the company. "And do you know," Dixon stormed, finally losing his temper, "do you know that the Z. & Y would have to reduce its dividend to make one-half those improvements?" MacCiure snatched up his hat with an exasperated gesture. "Improvements I" he snarled. "Do you improve a ship when you patch a hole in her side? Improv.ements !" AS he flung through the door .Dixon opened his mouth to call him back. But did not. Instead he sat down rather opened his mouth to call him back. But did not. Instead, he sat down rather heavily in his chair and comntenced to gather up the scattered drawings. It was ridiculous ; a road that had run for twenty years wasn't going to pieces in a night. Every calamity-howler came to him. He couldn't satisfy them all. If a man went over a railroad bridR"e with a miscroscope he'd be bound to find flaws. A scrubwoman outside was attacldng the dust of the uncarpeted hall with vigor. Li' < e dry leaves along a road, bits of paper flew into the air, circled in the eddy, scurried through the open door and sought the refuge of the corner under the stenographer's desk. "0, Kathleen Mavourneen, my heart it is breakin'," sang the elderly woman from the corridor, pursuing the flying debris of the day with an energetic broom. At the door she paused, still singing, and wiping the dust out of her eyes with her apron, felt for the knob nf the door "To think that from thee I must part!" she shrilled. "Confound it, Annie," Dixon ejaculated, blowing a gray-white cloud from the hat he had just picked up, "you make as much dust as a steam-shovel." Anhie suddenly took her apron from her eyes. "My goodness I" she said fervently, and banged the door. So frazzled were Dixon's nerves that the very slam of the door made him jump. Deflected for a moment, his thoughts went back at once to MacCiure's visit and the Deepwater Bridge Harry had gone on the four-thirty. He would be at Bayard or near there now. Why on earth couldn t boys settle down at home? When he was a boy he didn't go jumping over the country. He closed his desk absently. Cer tainly MacC!ure had been very insistent about the bridge, but then Mac Ciure was a Scot and cautious. If only Harry had stayed at home-in threequarters of an hour the train would be at Deepwater, and-Then came before him sudrlenly, a stereoscopic memory of that other bridge at Armitage ; of the gap in the centre where the middle span had gone down into the river--i>f the charred coaches burned to the water's edge, their truc:
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ro see if we were there yet. And then the crash came, and I never saw any of them again. I stood by-God l when I think of it !-stood by and watched the fire that came after the wreck, with everything I cared for on earth somewhere down in that hell of flame. And-I-couldn't raise my hand to help The low, impressive tones were more terrible than any tumult of emotion. The hand that held the revolver was steady enough now; the white face be yond the desk-lamp was ominous with hate. "I was crazy for a while," the voice went on. "My wife's people were afraid I'd kill myself. But-I had something to do It kept me alive thinking about it. I don t sleep any more, for thinking. Tom Dixon do you ever lie awake at and hear the splintering of wood, and women scream ing, and feel children's hands clutching at you for help when there isn't any help?" The little veins in Dixon's temples stood out like twisted cords. "An eye for an eye; a tooth for a tooth. Did you ever hear that, Tom Di:?Con?" "What are you going to do?" Dixon asked desperately. "You've got me I can't get away.' "You have a boy of your own. What would you do to the man who killed him ?" There wei:e footsteps in the hall ; the sound of Annie s shuffling feet, the clatter of her scrubbing pail as she put it dmvn outside the door. As she turned the knob Hargis lifted the revolver a couple of inches from the desk, and waited grimly, his eyes on the prisoner's face. The call for help died in an in effectual gurgle in Dixon's throat; Annie picked up her bucket and retreated, singing under her breath. Hargis dropped the revolver, and getting out. an old-fashioned, heavily engraved watch, compared it carefully with the clock. "Fifteen minutes," he said "The Flyer ought to be at Citrus Junction." He turned the watch over in his hand, laid it, open, on the desk before mm "Family watch ," he said almost con versationally. "Grandfather's, father's, mine. I meant it for Eddie Ever since the wreck the hands kind of stick at seven-forty-five; that's the time the wreck happened. Seems like they're afraid I'll forget." DIXON scarcely heard. He was lis tening with the sharpened senses of mental stress to a sound that seemed to come from the next office, White's. But whatever it had been it was not Harry's clear, boyish eyes stared down at him. Hany, with his mother's soft, dark hair and buoyant spirit, who was sweeping on to torture and death I 46 repeated, and he relaxed again in his chair, faint from reaction. '"Death isn t so bad," Hargis was say ing. "There's worse things. There's losing your folks, the way I lost mine, and not being able to help. But I figure it would be pretty bad to have to sit by and know you were going to lose them, the way I stood by that wreck-and not be able to raise your hand." A flame sprang up in Dixon's eyes and the dawn of a new fear, not for himself and infinitely more terrible than if it were. "Seven-thirty two. In thirteen min utes the Flyer is due at the Deepwater Bridge. It's a fine train, Tom Dixon. Only the best is good enough for the general manager's son I People like you can't go to New York and back without the papers being full of it I How I've waited for this chance I" "What do you mean?" Dixon panted. "What are you going-to do?" Hargis was on his feet, and his voice was suddenly shrill and exultant. "Do I I have had a year of agony I You're going to crowd a lifetime in the next thirteen minutes. Tom Dixon, in thirteen minutes the Flyer will be in Deepwater Creek, and you-can't-raiseyour-hand I" With a s u d den frenzie6 plunge Dixon threw himself forward. He hit impotently against the desk ; only the weight of the office chair kept him from falling. His shoulder struck the electric desk-lamp and sent it crashing to the floor The room was suddenly gray, the light from the corridor streamed through the transom directly onto the face of the office clock; and in the shadow below Hargis p u s h e d his nrisoner contemptuously into his f o r m e r position, and (Continued on page 140)

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Dempsey scores in. the first round of the boxing bout in Tampa's North Country Club Area to the plaudits of a huge crowd of fight fans Dempsey's fighting face as caught by the camera when the champion lands a cleaa riJht to the jaw of his opponent m the Tampa boxing contest FLORIDA'S BIG BUSINESS PuNCH The World's Heavyweight Pugilist Champion Writes Some Shrewd Observations on Florida As He Found It By Jack Dempsey lllustrated with Exclusive Photographs F LORIDA shows wonderful promise I find from my trips, through the State that the reports are far from being exaggerated, and that it is, indeed, embarking upon a wonderfully bright future. One of the greatest advantages of Florida is its nearness to New York and eastern points. A business man is able to keep in close touch with his affairs in the north and at the same time enjoy his winter vacation in the land oi sunshine. In fact-to go back and forth easily between his New Y or!;: office and his Florida home, ably combining business with pleas11re Many of the b i g men take advantage of this. TAMPA, FLORIDA. The growth in the State has been remarkable. There is a spirit of progression everywhere, and an optimistic outlook for the future. I can see no reason why this faith shouldn't be justified. There is plenty of money here and plenty of opportunities. As for the Florida people, I find them delightful and enenjoyable. Your climate is warm and pleasant, so, all in all, Florida has little else to wish for in its onward march to success It has the big, winning punch I wish it luck! 47

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Some types of the succulent bivalves gathered in Apalachicola Bay and a group of oyster boats at anchor. OYSTERS of the fifteen !palachicola Packers Ship an Average of One Thousand Gallons of the Bivalves Per Week THE fog hung thick upon the bay. The' Jessie May, reduced to half speed, felt her way care fully over the oyster bars. Navigation was a matter of dead reckon ing. Range-finders and channel-buoys were of no avail, for the mist was so en veloping that objects an arm's length away were indistinguishable. The Ship's search light made a brave attempt to st;;b the fog blanket ahead but its beam traveled but a few feet in a yellow blur and was quickly swallowed in the haze. Captain Wing, who had been navigating the waters of Western Florida for sixty six years, knew the bay like a book, but he was taking no chances. A deekhand, planted at the port quarter, called depth soundings to the bridge at one minute in tervals and hi cries "six foot, hard shell." sounded spectral in the afternoon darkness. Even such knowledge and skill as that possessed by Captain Wing was not infallible in a time like this, for wind and tide action cause a drift that plays helter-skelter with the best dead reckoning. Came a quick cry from the deckhand forward who was manipulating the sound pole: "Four foot, bani shell ... three." 48 By J. M. Schloen bach There was a grating sound on her bot tom and the vessel rose slightly in the wa ter, trembling. Bells clanged in the en gine-room and her screw, pumping full stern, churned the shallow water. The boat shuddered and rocked slightly, but re fused to budge. The Jessie May was, fortunately not for long, hard aground or. a reef of Apalachicola oysters, fame
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by so doing they were propa gating the oyster race and thereby perpetuating the oyster industry Apalachicola Bay is, in round numbers, thirty miles long and eight miles wide and expert oystermen estimate that one third of its area is covered with oyster bars. Nature has he r e provided an ideal place for the breeding of this delicious sea food, for the salt of the Gulf of Mexico, alter nating in tidal flow with the fresh water of the Apala chicola River, with its silt times used by lighter-dratt. vessels, those familiar with. these waters, entering from. or. leaving for western Gulf ports. There is a channel separated from the main channel which extends to the docks The depth at the wharfs is ten feet. Steamboat lines ply between this port and. Mobile, Pensacola, Carrabelle and Bay ports. Two light houses at this pass have lights. that are visible from seven to nine miles. of red clay from its estu aries combine in producing an ideal nourishment for the oyster that has chosen this bay for its abode. Oyster men say that this sweep of alternating salt and fresh The oyster bars of Apala ch i cola Bay are nationally known, although the demand for this particular project is so great iri Florida, south ern Georgia and southern Ala bama that it is all the pack. ers of Apalachicola can do to supply this so-called 1ocal demand. Covering one-third of the area of the bay, the oyster bars, as they are known, are peculiar formations. Nature causes the bivalves to cluster in layers and tiers of layers. Strange to say, these bars on the western side are perpendicular, Small sloop used in tonging oysters near Apalachicola returning with a load. water over the oyster beds, plus a wealth of oyster forage in the red clay silt1 is mainly responsi?le for the delicacy of the Apalachicola oyster L1ving in clean water and eating clean food gives this oyster a clt:an taste which has been commented upon by lovers of this particular form of sea food Apalachicola, the center of the Apala chicola oyster industry, lives and breathes and has its being in this industry A part of Apalachicola is situated on the North shore of the bay of the same name. Two miles North ,is the mouth of the Apala chicola River and three miles further North the Jackson River empties out of Lake Wimico and flows into the broad stream. Apalachicola Bay is an exten sion of St. George Sound on the East, in which is located Dog Island, St. George s Island, Cape St. George, Flag Island and St. Vincent Island. St. Vincent Sound joins Apalachicola Bay on the West Brother's River passes on the West of Forbes Island, above the port, and the Apalachicola flows on the East of this island. The entrance to this pass is made through the West Pass, which is skirted by Flag Island, St. Vincent Island and the Sand Island Pass, which entrance is be-Car of oysters ready to be run aboard a steamer. tween Cape St. George. N ew Pass is betwC!en St. George Island and Cape St. George and the East Pass is between Dog Island and Fox Point. The East Pass is used for vessels of deep draft entering the bay. The water in this pass is twenty and one-half feet in a dredged channel of one hundred and fifty feet, well-marked by bell buoys. The West Pass is somecleanly cut from top to bottom as though they had been sliced down with a knife The western side of these oyster forma tions is like a solid wall of shell, made up of countless layers of oysters, one upon the other, all flush with the straight West side. From this western wall they taper toward the East. Just why this is true is something the oystermen have never been able to fathom. There are miles upon miles of these oyster formations or bars in Apalachicola Bay, and sometimes they attain such a height from the bottom of the bay that there is scant room for boats to pass over and even at. high-tide and in clear weather the boats are obliged to feel their way cautiously when crossing these bars. The choicest oysters in Apalachi cola Bay are said to come from around St. Vincent bland and Indian Pass. It was something like fifty years ago that the oysters from Apalachicola Bay were first commercialized. That was before the railroads were dreamed of in (Continued on page 80) Converted destroyer used by F1orida State Shellfish Commissioner Hodges. 49

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.. 'It is an accepted fact that the population of the world --and that means the United States as well-is .increasing faster than the Iood production. Right .here in the most favored land man has ever known we have ample evidences Of the truth of this statement at first hand. Nothing, however, is more indica tive of the situation than the high prices now being paid for the actual neces sities of life. Within a decade they have practically quadrupled. What will they be fifty years from now?" "History records certain which can be easily verified, and, because this nation has not experienced the pangs of hunger and seen the gaunt figures of the wasted forms pathetically awaiting the call of the shadowy boatman, the horror of it has not been i m p r e s s e d upon us. N e v e r t h e 1 ess it is a prophecy, as sure to come true as the rising and setting of the c;un, that, with a slowly increasing food supply and a rapidly in creasing population, starvation a w a it s many now living and millions yet unborn." Dr. Aughinbaugh, who makes some astounding statements of fact in his article herewith presented. SEVEN BILLION DoLLARs wORTH of FooD Florida Can Contribute to the Dining Tables of a Hungry World Enough Food Materials to Hold Off the Famine Juggernaut for a C'entury By W. E. Aughinbaugh, M.D., LL.B., LL.M. Formerly Professor of Foreign Trade and Economics, New York University, Professor of Foreign Trade and Economics, Columbia University; Editor, The New York Commercial, Member of the Bar, Supreme Court of the United States. APPROXIMATELY two hundred years ago, Carlyle, the !;eat Scotch philosopher said: 'The thinking of the world is done by one-half of one per cent. of its popu lation." Had Carlyle lived today, he unquestionably would have amended that remark by substituting "one onethousandth of one per cent." for the phrase "one-half of one per cent." and been nearer the truth. Another profound economist, Dr. East, says: "A few thousand brains have given the world all that has brought it above savagery. As agents of civilization, the other hundreds of millions are negli gible." Substantially the same thoughts have been expressed by such mental leaders as Fisher of Yale, Stoddard of Harvard, Ross of the Universit;r of Wisconsin, Johnson of the Univei;sJty of Pittsburgh, 50 Laughlin of Carnegie Institute, Davenport of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Whitney, Secretary of the Eugenics Committee of the United States, Madison Grant, Edward Albert Wig-gam, and others. These thinkers of this nation, as well as the intellectual giants of other coun tries, know that the entire world is right now confronted by a food famine, the like of which mankind has never ex perienced. There have been world food famines before, when death stalked through the land claiming his tens of millions, when cannibalism broke out and men ate their own flesh and blood, such as during the years 1581 t<' 1603 in both Ireland and Persia, and right down through the centuries, until as recently as ten years ago in China, when human beings fought for and destroyed forests in order that they might eat the leaves, the roots and the barks of trees to keep the spark of life glowing. History re cords these facts which can be easily verified, and because this nation has not experienced the pangs of hunger nor seen the gaunt figures of wasted forms pathetically awaiting the call of the shadowy boatman, the horror of it has not been impressed upon us. Never theless, it is a prophesy, as sure to come true as the rising and setting of the sun, that with a slowly increasing food sup ply and a rapidly increasing popula tion, starvation awaits many now living and millions yet unborn. The student, the scientist and the thinker feel that it is exceedingly questionable if a suffi cient food supply can be provided, within this century, even if the birth rate be reduced by such appropriate means as selective breedipg. Let us for the moment eliminate the

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United States and briefly consider tim statement as it applies to two of the most populous countries-India and China. India with her 350,000,000 population is always facing famine. Between 1876 and 1900, in that country, there were eighteen famines which killed 26,000,000 Hindus. It is a sad fact that at present but four per cent. of her inhabitants eat three meals daily, while the remaining ninety-six per cent. eat when they can and what they can, averaging a little better than one square meal per person per day THE dark cloud of famine has always hovered over China, and often its stifling mantle has fallen upon the land. In the past century starvation alone has snuffed out the lives of more than !50,000,000 Chinese. The one thing that has kept China, with her 450,000,000 souls, subdued and in the background in every sense of the word is her enormous infant mortality-the heaviest in all the world. Startling as it may seem, it is nevertheless true that four out of every five children born in that country die before reaching the age of three months. This unprecedented death rate permitted China to exist, although at all times fully ninety-five per cent. of her inhabitants were either starving or on the verge of starvation. What will happen to the world when China raises her standards of civilization to those of this country baffles imagination, and today China is in the process of doing that very thing. The situation is rapidly changing. Due to the work of the Rockefeller Foundation, which is now spending millions of dollars in what was once poetically called the "Flowery Kingdom," in th< establishing of medi cal missions and medical colleges for the purpose of teaching the natives sanitation and preventive medicine, it will not be long before millions of chi!dren whose lives might formerly have been extinguished on the altar of ignorance will live to adult life. What will then happen? Is it not fair to assumt: that within twenty-five years the population of China, one-third of which is now Mohammedan, consequently polyg amous and therefore more apt to crease its birth rate than. a nation strictly monagamous, will increase to approximately 600,000,000 souls? And will not modern medicine and modern sanitation, either through contact or through the same agency now at work in China, be introduced to other Oriental and polygamous nations, already over-populated, with the inevitable result that there will be hundreds of mil lions of people with which to reckon, for remember that practically two-thirds of the world's population are today fol lowers of the Prophet and literal beli e vers in the Koran, which obligates the faithful to have a minimum of three wives WHAT will be the first demands of these teeming millions? Food I What next? Clothes I And then what? HabitationS-habitations more modern than those to which their ancestors were accustomed. By that time the standards of living of the entire world will be raised to the same standards which we today recognize in this country. What will be the result? These jostling, surging, forceful millions must be fed, clothed and housed or wars and pestilence more violent than ever before known will come, as sure as night follows day. I claim no originality for these ex-pret;slons of opm10n. They have !>een the subject of numerous profound works by thoughtful, studious men. There is no need for me to dilate on this thought. It is an accepted fact that the population of the world-and that means the United States as wellis increasing faster than the food pro duction Right here in the most favored land man has ever known, we have ample evidences of the truth of this statement at first hand. Nothing, however, is more indicative of the situa tion than the high prices now being paid for the actual necessities of life. Within a decade they have practically quadrupled. What will they be fifty years from now? Europe cannot feed its own popula tion Asia for more than three hundred years has always been on the verge of starvation, one fap:tine treading upon the heels of another. The United States and Canada, which formerly exported foodstuffs, are today heavy buyers of grains, meats and other necessi ties. The available productive areas of "The available productive areas of Central and S014th America and Africa as w eU, are b e i n g worked as never befor e to help in the pr e ssing d e mands of the rest of th e world for food. Certainly befo r e a, n o the r fifty years have pass e d the crisis will be upon the inhabita nts of this e arth and in many place s the pangs of hunger w ill be felt where less than half a centur y previous plenty and pros perity r e igned." Central and South America, and Africa as well ; are being worked as never before to helf in the pressing demands of the rest o the world for food Certainly before another fifty years have passed, the crisis will be upon the inhabitants of this earth and in many places the pangs of hunger will be felt where less than half a century previous plenty and prosperity reigned. There is no guess work about this. It is a cold-blooded statement of fact, as capable of being demonstrated as any lleometric theorem. The grave problem now confronting the world is how we can accomplish the expansion in food production and how we can cut down the excessive waste in food use, for which this countary above all others is noted Herbert Joseph Spinden answers th1s query in the only sane manner and offers the only possible solution. He says: "The expansion must come from first putting more lands under the plow; secondly, heavier yields from present areas by Improved agricultural methods; thirdly, from developing the sources of food in non-arable land; fourthly, from retrieving such food asthe wide seas offer. BeYond this, there is the wild gamble that food will bt.. found in the chemists' retorts in such quantities as to shame the miracles of the loaves and the fishes." The greatest chance offered man for staying this catastrophe already rushing upon us is through the cultivation of the soil-the true basis of wealth And this gives Florida the opportunity of serving the world as no state, no nation ever did or could. Florida has available for productive purposes-and by that I do not mean swamp lands and other acreage that cannot be tilled-but land awa1ting the husbandman, a total area of 22,000,000 acres, of which 999,520 acres were in cultivation last year, yielding a total of $103,550,000 worth of foodstuffs, .exclusive of dairy and poultry products. HENRY FORD says that farmer in the northern states, using modern agricultural machinery and up-to-date methods, can plant, till and harvest his crops and do all the farm work necessary in forty five days of actual labor, reckoning eight !hours to the dar. Bea,r this thought. in mind, for it ts pertinent to the issue Under cultivation using modern methods and _improved farming machinery, Florida's 22,000,000 acres, which candue to richness of soil 'nd climat i c conditions-yield three crops per y ear, are easily able to produce the equivalent of 66,000,000 acres of food necessities in what would amount to about five months of actual labor, thereby releasing the farmer for factory work, other employment or relaxation, for seven months of each year. There is llOthing complex or involved in this estimate. A school boy can easily make the calculation. And now let us have another example in mental arithmetic. If 999,520 acres of land produced in one year foodstuffs to the value of $103,550,000, exclusive of dairy and poultry prodoct s how much will 66,000,000 acres of similar land produce in one year? Simple mn!. tiplication will show that these 66,000,-000 acres are pc::>ssible of producing approximately worth of food materials, and if we add to this the sum of $400,000,000, which is a con servative estimate for the value e>f dairy and poultry products for the year, under effi ci ent management, the sum total reaches the very respectable amount of $7,000,000,000. Otherwise expressed, Florida has the opportunity of contributing to the dining-tables of the hungry world enough food materials to at least hold off for practically a century the famine Juggernaut, whose approaching rumble has already been heard. FLORIDA is, relatively speaking, un known Her wealth of farm field, orchards and water are limitless. From her northern boundary to her wavewashed shores, north and south, cast and west rich soil, vivifying artesian water and a warm sun make thi s pos sible Nowhere else in all the world does such a combination exist Never before was man given such a g l orious opportunity to serve his fellowman, as by the cultivation of the mell o w acres ready for the plow. I might write a book on the chances which exist for Florida to serve the world. Wherever I go to see them, and I marvel why men have not had the vision to profit by the possibilities which are to be found, no matte r which (Continued on pag e 106) 51

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ARCHITECTURE A spacious home showing strong Mediterranean the first of one thousand large homes de signed for erection at Tampa Beach. The house was originally intended for placement on an inside plot facing a canal but, as shoWn in the plan on opposite page, it has been modified for placement on the beach itself. FLORIDA'S QUEST OF MEDITERRANEAN ART IN ARCH ITECTlJRE MUCH has been written and told about what is popularly known as the Mediterranean or J.. Riviera type of Architecture. Unfortunately, a few examples have been taken as descriptive of all that it took centuries to produce. This raises the qHestion as to what influences among the diverse nations bordering on the Mediterranean have made it possible to class the architecture under one heading. It is common to say that a thing is as old as Egypt. Everyone has heard of the Pyramids, but .so much is not known of other civilizations that flour ished on the shores of the Mediterranean. Although these Mediterranean people may not have shared the same race or language, yet they have been subject to certain of the same traditions. At one time, they all bore the yoke of Imperial Rome. At another, when the Crescent rose in the South and the Arab turned to the founding of an Empire, he, too, faced the Mediterranean and brought with him an influence from Asia and the Mohammedan. Later, when the 52 By Folger Johnson Member American Institute of Architects revival in classic art became general, the Mediterranean countries felt equally the influence of the Renaissance. The Mediterranean was the natural channel of intercourse between the North and South, the meeting place or mart in which the refinement and luxury of the known world were brought together. Roads were few and dangerous while the sea offered easy access to those dwelling along its shores. Thus the architecture of these Mediterranean nations was knit together through con quest, migration, the interchange of commerce, and the spread of certain architectural forms through trade guilds such as the famous Commachine Guild of Italy, In Spain, Northern Africa, and Sicily, the classic tradition in architecture was tempered by the influence of Moorish, Arab, or Saracen art. Along the Adria tic, at Venice, Rimini, Ravenna, and Dalmatia, there wail a blending of the classic with the Oriental derived from old Byzantium. The great empires of the Mediterranean, while composed of merchants, en-joyed military and naval supremacy with which they guar'ded the wealth of the world on a solid basis of rea) achievement. They enjoyed a sense of permanency and set themselves to de velop a style of architecture suitable totheir position as a haunt of pleasure and: luxury for the known world. But even greater than the influence of historical tradition was that of climate, in Spain, Southern France, North Africa, and Dalmatia. All these countries have a high degree of heat, bril liant sunshine, and a requisite of cooL rooms and shaded court yards. In all of them the heat is tempered by the sea. It is no wonder the Northerner came down from his land of snow and ice to find a patio in which he could regale himself with grapes and oranges which. grew above his head, fruits of which before he had only heard, while all his dreams of a cold and pitiless North were wafted away by the balmy breezes of an opalescent sea. So he paved his. walks with parti-colored tiles, stuccoed his house in harmonious colors, and introduced carved capitals and enrich

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IN F'LORIDA ments which nowhere else were to be His home was open and the sea was his playground, well exemplified by the Venetian ceremony of the "Marof the Sea." He designed his ibuildings to give charm as well as comfort and to grace official functions. It ia to this culture and: this background that Florida turns in quest of "Art in Architecture." The physical conditions of the Mediterranean are strikingly like those of Florida, but Florida escapes the aridity of certain sections of Spain ,and Italy; suffers no droughts, and thus has a distinct ad. vantage over the Mediterranean coun tries. However, this climate should produce the same habits of life. The same type of architecture developed by the :Uoor of house and patio should se"e as well here. It may truthfully be said that Florida can find no better art to draw from than the varied, yet harmonious examples that edge the water from Venice to the great Rock of Gib raltar. In Dalmatia, e specially, there is a great field of inspiration which is yet untouched. That land of palms and aloes facing a sheltered sea, felt the in fluence of nations and, its architects early learned to appropriate loggia and cortile, Saracen arabesque and Byzanti"ne dome and blend them into a symphonic whole. Those whQ have seen the orange boats loading at $palato and the bathers on the white sands of Ragusa cannot doubt that the climate is reminiscent of Florida and the va1 iety of choice offered for agricultural inspira tion as tempting in Dalmatia as in Spain. Appropriation of Mediterranean art cannot fail to have its effect upon the tastes and habits of the people of Florida. An environment is being obtained here which is different from that in any other state in the Union. The absence of industrial life, the deliberate establishment of communities in which the chief object is the enjoyment of leisure, together with the creation of harmonious backgrounds in which to express it, is rapidly social conditions in which art may grow and live. Natural reactions to these surroundings will tend eventually to recreate the culture of the Renaissance. In turning to the Mediterranean in its quest, Florida seeks to express those human qualities in art which make the I .'IJI c _] D ( l I 'J :---architecture of Spain, Italy, and Dal matia so alive today. Florida need offer no defense in appr opriating the patio of the Moor and Spaniard or the cor tile of the Italian with loggia and fountain. Florida, however. includes one apeci fic change. If the exterior of the bouse on the Mediterranean was simple and rat.,er bare with only the interior :endefied and the patio intended for the master and not the public Florida is bringing the charm of the interiot to the street and allowing the passer-by to glimpse the patio. Thus the enrichment is bestowed to a certain extent upon the public. High, white-washed garden walls of Andalusia, against which are placed trees or grown vines, give way in Florida, under the spell of democratic mood, to lower walls and screen planting. However, in Florida have reappeared the polychrome tile of the Moor with its geometr.ic pattern and the Lucca Della Robbia tile of Renais. sance Italy. Wrought or cast metal work with ornamental crestinc as in the Cathedrals of old Spain, woodwork in brown and gray, enriched in color, (Continued on page 103) ... c:Rcuy.,;D FLOOR..PLAN f"OLGtlt. JOttii!>OH h .... C ttl T !:C. T Lower floor plan showing the patio surrounded by living-room and kitchen, on either side of the front, with the dining-room and stairs leading to the upper floor stretching across the back; the library extends toward the right and is flanked on both sides by a garden. The combination garage and boathouse is a unique feature. 53

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I N T E R I 0 R CD14rtesy Parkland Estates Living-room in the home of Mr. William L. Van Dyke, Parkland Estates, Tampa. The chief points of interest in the furnishings are the divan and chair in the Italian Renaissance mode. The divan is a descendant of the cassapanca or chest-bench set upon a platform, and given arms and back. It was originally a wall-piece but comfort-loving America draws it up to the fireplace. A SUCCESSFUL INTERIOR IN THE SPANISH MANNER I F America's prosperity forces her to plead guilty to .money-madness -and we do not grant that it does -she is seeking, at least, a worthy convalescence in art; art in the abstract sense of the study of aesthetics ; art in the practical sense as applied to decoration in the home. Presumably, it is this very maligned prosperity that has awakened the urge for art by giving leisure for cultural advantages that alone can pave the way for life on a higher plane: travel reading, study, intercourse with the initiate, observance of works of art. And the most widespread benefits of this revived interest in art is finding its best expression in the latter field-the art of the interior decorator. His is the opportunity to make art vital, practical, intimate, so that it becomes a part of the daily routine of living. Never before have so many American homes shown such artistry in their 54 By Georgiana Whitby decoration as they do today. Ameri cans at least are demanding the same high quality in home furnishing that they insist upon in their clothes, their transportation facilities, their food; in fact, in every phase of living. The horrors of shiny oak furniture, and the so-called "mission" modes, are ancient history and the development of the present brings us to the idealistic in workmanship, the best in form, the most exquisite in texture, the purest in color. In Florida the strongest influence is toward the Renaissance mode, both Spanish and Italian, with all the color ful atmosphere which its introduction implies. But there are two very decided dangers that are threatening, or rather that are evident, in the interior decoration being practiced here. One is the patent or standardized Renaissance interior, with no individual touch to establish the identity of the owner of the home. This interior displays "type" furniture, usually very good, but the identical number of pieces, the identical draperies, the identical conglomeration of colors cinches the patent stamp with an identical grouping of the pieces as set to rule as a geometrical problem. The other is a Renaissance interior of the extreme opposite style: the bizarre interior, the result of an imagination run riot. Both are the works of inexpe rienced decorators who, like the unlicensed architect, have had this whole sale opportunity for original work dumped at their front doors and are not sufficiently full grown to do it justice. Such actual fortunes are being spent in Florida for homes, and home decoration that it seems almost a tragedy for home-makers to rush into the thing due consideration. A home should be bought to last a lifetime: furniture, tapestries, rugs, accessories, should be of permanent quality; colors

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DECORATION Two positions of the divan and chair have been pictured in order to afford adequate view o f the ex quisite carving in which the Italian as well as the Spaniard excelled. The lion's paw, beloved emblem of the Roman, is prominent. in the design. The pieces are built on a walnut base, are monumental in outline and massive in construction, as was much of the Italian Renaissance furniture. employed should be easy to live with, both restful and stimulating. The ancients had color brought down to a science as exact in combination, almost as mathematics; the Mediaeval peoples reached their more romantic, but quite as worthy style through adventure in colot experimentation, and it is in this uncertain stage that many .Floridans are, at present, foundering. Some decorators have achieved the gold inlays, the rich reds and blues, so harmonious with Renaissance furnishings, but others have merely gathered together a hodge podge of crude colors. Yet even in this failure there is hope, for it marks, at least, a movement away from the subdued tones that have been looked upon too long as the essence of refinement, and that most certainly are not suitable for semi-tropical Florida. Notwithstanding this formative stage through which Florida is struggling, and long after the "Spanish" house that is a charlatan has been torn down, the Renaissance furnishings that have no kinship to noble craftsmanship have been discarded, it will be found that the truly artistic home will have survived the pioneer stages of development when the most garish homes and furnishings .were stamped Renaissance and imposed upon unsu_llpecting Floridians. There is this promising feature in the present situation, too: in every home that we have visited we have found many attractive features embodied in the decoration even though we could not give wholehearted endorsement to the entire scheme In fact, in the borne of Mr. and Mrs. William L Van Dyke, Parkland Estates, Tampa, we discovered a divan and chair of the Italian Renaissance period worthy of a story in themselves. They are monumental in massively constructed as was much of the furniture of that period, and built on a walnut base exquisitely curved and upholstered in velour in deep rich tone of rose and tan. Like the Spaniard, the Italian ex celled in wood carving and his facility in this medium is attested to by the beautifully carved choir stalls of the churches, some of which are being reproduced for use as seats in the music rooms of Florida homes. In reality, Italian and especially Florentine furniture can be classed as miniature monu ments of architecture, so closely did the designers follow the carved pilasters, portals, arches and cornices of building designs in the making of their cabinets, and of the latter day chests. That lians were as successful in the minor arts as they were in the fine arts and created the inost exquisite and original styles in furniture, was partly due tothe fact that the most renowned sculptors and artists designed and decorate
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Courtesy of Tarr Furniture Co. The Sarouk is a rug of short nap variety but woven so closely and out of such a fine quality of wool as to make it one of the most desirable of Oriental rugs. It is noted for its soft shades of blue and rose and the pleasing designs formed by the of these colors The FLORIDA HOME A DEPARTMENT OF PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS FOR THE BUSY HOUSEWIFE Conducted by Jane Way Give Forethought to the Floor Covering I N furnishing a home we are likely to lose our perspective in the rela tive importance of things and lay too great a stress upon objects which will be on the level of the eye rather than on floor coverings. Yet it is the floor covering as part Qf the background of a room, that assembles the objects in the room, brings them into focus, knits the scheme of decoration into a harmonious whole instead of leaving it in broken fragments. Granted that floor coverings are a most important feature of decoration, let us make a survey of the rugs most generally used for this purpose, both from a practical and aesthetic viewpoint. The first point to be considered is the floor space. A long, narrow hall would naturally take a runner and a rectangular room, a rug of similar shape, but variations in shape, as well as in type and color, must be decided upon through an understanding of the use to which the room is to be put and of the 56 "style of furniture employed. Oval Wiltons introduce a nice note of variety in a bed-room, while an oval rag or hook rug is delightful in either a bed or living-room, if it is of Colonial atmosphere. Broadly, a rug that covers the entire floor, without showing a margin, makes the room appear larger; scatter-size rugs, by breaking up the space have the opposite effect. Decorators, as a rule, advise that a rug be large enough to allow the important pieces of furniture to stand upon it; but, contrarily, one of the most noted decorators in the country used an Oriental runner on either side of the dining-room table in a wealthy Florida home. This room, however, was more in the dimensions of a dininghall than of the smaller dining-room of the average home, so, in the last analysis, individual taste and the floor space must be the deciding. factors. The solid color, or two-toned rug, like the neutral toned wall, is always a safe choice but it has this in common with all perfectly safe things; it is unin-teresting and not nearly so suitable to the Florida home as a rug displaying harmonious colors in good design; that is, if the other furnishings are selected in accordance with such a scheme. An Oriental rng used in a room of Italian or Spanish atmosphere has the faculty of erasing period and sectional lines and making a pleasing ensemble of the scattered units, and a Persian Oriental is eminently adaptable to homes of this type since it was the Persian that was originally used during the Renaisperiod. Hand-tufted rugs of ltal:v, France, Spain and other countries of Southern Europe have gained welldeserved favor, and the Chinese Oriental is also being used to good effect. The Chinese rugs were not available as were the Persian, in Mediaeval times, bec;;use of lack of transportation, and their use is of more recent date. Some decorators claim success in employing them with delicate French furniture, and still others declare they can be introduced into Colonial rooms if a piece or two

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oi lacquered iurniture, of Chinese embroidery and p ieces of Chinese porcelai n are utilized as details to complete the scheme. Not one specimen of the very ancient Chinese rugs exists toclay. Most of the Chinese Orientals n ow available were woven in the Ch'ien Lung period and their value was not recognized until the Boxer uprising brought all thin&s Chinese, including Chinese art, to our notice. The colors of the Chinese rugs are characteristicall y different from those of the other Orientals; here we have the famous "Chinese dark blue, robin's e&g blue, tur11.uoise; the Imperial yello w, and the odd shades of red always escaping the primary color. Unlike the Persian rugs, the Chinese show straint in use of cGior and keep within the range of but a few colors for each rug. C ourtesy of Tarr Furnilu1 e Co p ieces
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"These gentlemen have just offered you half a million dollars for those papers and Gross would probably pay twice that amount for them," said Mahoney. "But there's another angle to this case," replied Franklin, his mind beginning to function normally again. The Story of THE PHANTOM WOMAN By Maurice Coons Author of '1The Skeleton of Warwick Manor," "Threads of Gilt," "The Red Mark," "Pretense," "Cattle Barons," etc. THE STOilY THus FAll: PhiliP Franklin, a 'bond salesman, is brusquely rejected as a prospective sonin-law by Gregory Rogers, millionaire financier, at the latter's winter place at Florida. Furious, young Franklin discusses the matter that night in the garden with El{zabeth Rogers, 'lllho tells him that he approached her father at the wrong time. Rogers has four other financiers down from New York, as.risting him to Plan a .s1ock market coup to ruin a lifelong enemy of his, Henry T. Gross. Elizabeth says her father is .ercited about the conference and asks Franklin to approach him at some future time. Franklin suggests a motor ride. Elizabeth uturns to the house for a wrap. Franklin, left -alone in the garden, hc_ars a .
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PART II. Chapter IV Deserted FOR some moments all present stood in tense silence. The officers appeared grim but plainly triumphant. T h e financiers seemed dazed at the sudden turn events had taken. Thev stared at each other in wordless amazement. Kent, pale and shaken, licked his dry lips and glanced with as much nervous apprehenSion as though he were the accused man. B-ut Philip Franklin, his gaze shifting with the desperation of a trapped animal, could find no sign of sympathy in the circle of faces about him. The officers were obviously elated at having, as they were convinced, solved a crime which had threatened for a time to remain an enigma. The financiers were surprised at the guilty man having been found within the murdered man's own household, so to &peak, but the important thing was that he had been found. Tht;y were incensed not only over their associate's murder but be-cause of the disappearance of 'the plans for the great coup. They wanted to see pay the penalty and it mattered but httle to them who the culprit was. Kent was harder to analyze. From his actions and facial expression it was possible to see only that he was -confused and decidedly uncomfortable. "Those plans mean millions to us '' said the man with the gloomy eyes an'd pessimistic mouth. His despondent l!lanner had fled for the moment. His l1ps was set grimly, his eyes flashing .angrily in the direction of Franklin. "We would appreciate your making an effort to recover them as quickly as possible." That seemed to bring a new thought 'to Mahoney. He whirled on Franklin. "Have you still got those papers with _you?'' he demanded. "No," snapped the young man furi-ously. "I never did have them." "I'll look," replied Mahoney simply and stepped forward. He and Egan made a thorough job -of the search but they found nothing in the way of incriminating evidence. "They're not here, mister,'' admitted Mahoney regretfully. "But, of course, Jle's ,, had plenty of time to dispose of em. "That's what we know," gritted the capitalist. He consulted his associates in low tones then turned to Franklin. "'We regret Mr. Rogers' murder and hope to see justice done in payment for it but those papers are still more important to us. We'll pay you half a million dollars for them." Franklin smiled ruefully and shrugged. "I'm mighty sorry but it's impossible for me to accept your offer. I haven't seen your plans, so it would be impos sible for me to produce them, even for such a handsome figure as you offer." He turned away and lighted a cigarette. He had aged perceptibly in the past fifteen minutes. His face had become haggard; his eyes had taken on the expression of the hunted. Then he seemed to realize his peril; he began talking excitedly, amplifying his remarks with quick, nervous gestures. "You can't hold me for this crime," he argued, his voice shaking with apprehension. "You have nothing against me but a fragile bit of circumstantial evidence.'' :'Haven} we?" answered Mahoney gnmly. L1sten to the evidence in our possession from our point of view. We're called to investigate the murder of Gregory Rogers, a New York mil lionaire spending the winter at his estate in Florida. We find that he has been. hold!ng a conference during the w1th four other eastern capitalIsts to get up a plan to wreck an old enemy of his. The papers outlining the plan are gone. "We find your shirt stud on the floor of the room where the murder occurred You admit that you had been here early in the evening to ask Rogers' consent to marry his 'daughter. He refused and it Y?U mad. That's enough of a mot1ve m 1tself. But you knew all abgut this conference and its importance. These gentlemen have just offered you half a million dollars for those papers which proves their value. Gross would probably pay twice that amount for them. Furthermore, we find that you work for Gross. And as additional damaging evidence, Mr. Egan discovers you trying to hide the revolver with which the deed was done." "I wasn't trying to hide it!" burst out Franklin. "I had just found it.'' Mahoney shrugged and Egan grinned. He could visualize his own and Mahoney's names strung in large black type across the front pages of the local newspapers. He had no doubt but what they would also 'make' the headlines of the Tampa papers and the dailies of other Florida cities. Even the New York papers might prove generous with space in giving credit for the solving of the Rogers murder. An offer from other police departments or from some famous private detective agency might follow. It was an intoxicating thought. "Well, that's the way the evidence would be presented in court,'' replied the chief complacently. "And I think you'll find it fairly complete when you go to trial. Of course, we'll probably haye a good deal more on you by that time.'' Franklin was dazed, panic-stricken at the conclusive summing up of the various details whi.ch he had considered of such slight importance. From the viewpoint of the law he could see that there was a damaging case against him. He fumbled at his collar. The thought of the gallows for something one hadn't done was a horrible thing. He wondered if he should be able to retain (Continued on page 74) Franklin went to his cell in what might be considered, under the circumstances, a cheerful frame of mind.

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Edna O'Harra with "Cappy Ricks," one of her Spitz dogs. IN Clermont, Florida, lives a woman who long cherished a beautiful faith and held steadfastly to a high ideal. She is Miss Edna L. O'Harra and in her you will find one who is far removed above the commonplace. She is fortunate in having lived to see her faith completely justified Moreover, she is today in the enviable position of one who watches events pleasurably effect the realization of her ideal. Hers is an interesting story in which property and human values are strangely intermingled and pervaded by the spirit of a fourmonths' old baby girl whom she took to her heart, mothering it as her very own. Ten years ago Miss O'Harra attended the University of Iowa, at Iowa City, Iowa. During her early girlhood nothing seemed quite so remote as a college education. Her father had died when she was a tot, leaving the family in unhappy circumstances. Her mother toiled, and toiled hard, to provide for herself and two children-the girl, Edna, and a boy who later died. Spurred by a desire for learning, Miss O'Harra, after graduating from preparatory school, enrolled in the Univer sity. She had no money with which to defray the expenses of tuition. It was evident to everyone, including herself, 60 One o f the fertile stretches of Clermont w here Nature yields h e r bounty. ( Inset) Miss O'Harra's adopted sons, James and Sylvester. ONE FAITH WOMAN'S tn FLORIDA Overcoming Monetary Troubles, Miss O 'Harra o f Clermont Has A chie ved Independence and Now B rings H appiness to O thers B y Dudley Malcolm Illustrated 'With Exclusive Photographs that if she was to acquire an education she would have to work her way through college. "And it was not an easy job," said Miss O'Harra in discussing this stage of her career. "I had absolutely no training in any kind of work that would enable me to earn a living while pursuing my studies. The only things I knew were the tasks I had done at home. But I put my limited knowledge to good use during the first term. I did anything that helped me towjlrd my desired goal. I even washed dishes in the school cafeteria. And anyone who h as ever washed dish es in any kind o f cafeteria knows it is not too pleasant an occupation." But this was merely a transitory condition. It was not long before the girl had become acquainted with the necessities of her classmates and had capitalized them. Every sc hool, every college has its dullards who require special tutoring in the evening to help them keep up with their classes. Sometimes this coach-ing is done b y residents of the town ill' which the school or college is located; sometimes it is done by the brighter students attending the same institution. The work pays well. Starting with one pupil, Miss O'Harra increased her night classes until they had developed in.to a profitable venture. Tutoring was a stepabove her previous work, both in remuneration and congeniality. You who read this will probably say such conditions were ideal for the girl. She was earning a good living and at the same time, getting a college tion. True enough. But a new complica tion arose, one which altered matters greatly and was responsible for Miss O'Harra's later association with the Peninsula of Golden Opportunity. Iowa, despite its many charming aspects, suffer s from severe winters. With a blanket of snow and ice upon the ground and the thermometer registering many degrees below zero, the first and last seasons of the year play some unpleasant pranks with one' s health. All

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her life, Miss O'Harril had suffered from ex <:essive colds tl.urinc the winter months. It is true her natural inclinatien toward constan' t activity may have been respon sible for her .against confinement dur.ing the st&rmy months, tempting her to risk exposure to the more frequently than was wise. But she loved the big outdoors and even the thought of long conwithin her home irritated her. During the second year -of colle&'e work her colds 'became intensified, grew more frequent. Doctors warned her acainst exJPosure. Her third year in -college was interrupted bY a serious case of in.ftuenza. The medicos shook their heads and said: "I told you so!" After her recovery they issued additional warnings. The girl, young, .active, a dynamo of unused energy, restrained her natural impulses. Nevertheless, she dreamed of a place in the South where the climate was delightful :au the year round, where there were sunkissed hills and crystalline lakes, where the breezes were cool in summer .and warm in winter. A hard order to fill? Miss O'Harra would have agreed with you until-On a momentous day she happened upon a descriptive bGoklet announcing the desirability of Clermont as a place of residence. And it was not all description, that booklet. There were pages of One of the attractive homes of Clermont anuggling among the deep verdure of ita environment. photographs supporting, verifying the text. Miss O'Harra read it, entranced. The booklet seemed to be aimed directly at her. It promised a fulfillmt:nt of her dreams. Her heart ached to JitO to the laati of sunshine and tlewers, ef hills and lakes, deli&"htful breezes durillC all four I'" of the seasons. Bat she remembered the neessity for an education. It was a rather hard flUestien for a girl to decide ; here was a conftict between heart's desire and compellinc necessity. On the one hand was her c&llege werk, on the other her lencing for an ideal climate and this longinJ was abettetl. lty seriously issued metl.ical mandates. While she was still trying to reach a decision a peculiar turn Gf circumstances complicated yet simplified the situation for her. urine her stay in Iowa City, Miss O 'Harra had fonnetl. one of those intimate frienthhips that endure throughout a life time. Her frienci was Miss Etl.yth Litzrodt, whe cenducted a conservatory of music in the same town. With this friend M i s s O'Harra shared her dreams and her desires. She spoke of Florida in such glowinc terms, paintetl. the victure with such 8rilliaat colors that before she was through :U:iss Litz retlt, too, was "seltl." on the idea of gain&' there. Much interest is IJein&' dis played at present in the Lure of Florida. lnnumerahle theories have 8een ad vanced, many of them CGiltradictillg others that have gone before. Recardless of what the explanation aicht be, che Lure exists. Ana it war. suliciently stronc to induce Miss Litzrodt to itbantl.en _her cGmservatery of music and the ltricht future it promisetl.. As soon as she could settle her aairs in Iowa In and around Clermont are many entrancing viewa like thi a. It ia a "p1cture country" in the best sense. 61

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City satisfactorily, she bought a ticket for the Peninsular State and boarded the next train going in that direction. The impression which Miss Litzrodt received of Clermont and Florida generally was more than favorable. When she was certain this impression was a lasting one, she telegraphed back to Miss O'Harra; "CUT SCHOOL IMMEDIATELY AND COME DOWN HERE STOP THE MOST WONDERFUL COUNTRY I HAVE EVER SEEN." That message was all M.iss O'Harra needed as an impetus. The desire and the urge had existed for months yet she had hesitated. But her indecision was abruptly terminated by Miss Litzrodt's telegram. A few hours after the message had been received Miss ()'Harra was bound Floridaward. Arriving at Clermont she knew that here was the place of her dreams. Her eyes encountered a gently undulating country encrusted with clusters of crystalline lakes. She was enchanted. The two girls decided between themselves that, after a sight of this part of Florida, Iowa would henceforth be impossible. They strained their resources to the limit and managed to meet the first payment on a fifty-five acre farm which happened to be for sale and which suited both their fancies. It was fortunate for them that real estate transfer at that time was co11ducted on the basis of' a small payment down and subsequent payments at long intervals. Otherwise, with their extremely limited capital neither of them could have even considered the possibility of becoming land owners in their own right. Miss O'Harra's next move was to pay a flying visit to Iowa City and "sell" the idea of Florida to her mother. The girl's enthusiasm must have been infectious, because Mrs. O'Harra's conversion proved to be immediate and complete. However, one of the most difficult (if not the lnost difficult) thing in view, was to find enough money with which to move their household effects and buy transportation for themselves. Miss O'Harra solved the problem by going to a bank in Iowa City and borrowing five hundred dollars on her open note. One is moved to wonder if this same transaction could be repeated today should the potential borrower be frank enough to confess that he intended using the money to defray the expenses of moving to Florida. proceeded to till the soil. It is an ironical fact that Miss O'Harra and Miss Litzrodt were known to everybody in Clermont as the "Iowa Farm Girls." The truth of the matter is, neither of them had been on a farm before they came to the Peninsular State. Both crops, as time passed, promised to net the girls a very satisfactory profit above their loan of four thousand dol lars. But as the harvesting season drew near their inexperience proved their downfall. A doctor will tell you that germs are the natural foes of man's physical health. A qualified farmer will tell you that the plant kingdom suffers additionally from insects, which science has, more or less, placed under control. An experienced farmer, .whether in Maine or Florida, Oregon or California, uses preventives against these plant enemies. The girls and their mothers were ambitious; they were energetic; but they lacked the knowledge of the qualified farmer. Their thirty acres of watermelons seemed to be prospering excep tionally well and, to them, there seemed to be no danger in leaving them for a brief interval during the ripening processes of nature. They went away. Two weeks later they returned to their watermelons. Although it was mid-summer the appearance of the field was precisely the same as if a light snow had fallen opon the vines during the previous night. A white blanket seemed to have spread over vines and fruit during the women farmers' absence. This puzzled them. It was beyond their range of farming knowledge. They sought expert advice on the phenomenon. And they got it -much to their dismay. The truth was that during their absence the field had been attacked by melon aphis, an insidious little insect, and their crop was ruined, utterly, irreparably ruined. As a result, their year's labor yielded them exactly one hundred and fifty dollars against the four thousand dollars they had borrowed. This naturally threw them more deeply into debt. But instead of being discouraged they attacked their job with even zeal. Their second year's activities were a bit more profitable than the first. They couldn't help but appreciate the fact, nevertheless, that money was not coming in fast enough to amortize their debt. So Miss Litzrodt opened a conservatory of music in Clermont, while Miss O'Harra looked around for what profitable work she could find. An opportunity presented itself in the form of a Y. W. C. A. secretaryship at Beaumont, Texas. It was with a dull heart that she left Floridahowever brief her absence might prove. It will be seen that the attitude of the Iowans toward the State and taken an entirely new turn. They had come to Florida primarily because they had been attracted by the beauties of the climate and country. It would have been a simple matter for them, when debts started to pile up, to surrender their land in payment. But both Miss O'Harra and Miss Litzrodt had acquired a profound respect for the future of the State. They realized that it would be extremely difficult for them to meet the payments as they fell due but they also had faith in the future value of their land. This faith is further attested by the fact that Miss O'Harra bought a twenty-eight acre orange grove in the neighborhood of Clermont even before she had reached the point of clearing up her other long-overdue obligations on the 'farm. It was a run-down grove and she was able to buy it for, as they say, a song. Moreover, the first "down-payment" was small enough to be an added temptation. It was in 1917 that Miss O 'Harra went to Texas. Before the end of 1919 she was back in the State of suns hint and flowers. But in. the meantime, she had formed another of those lasting friendships with Miss Juanita Moore, financial secretary of the Y. W. C. A. at Beaumont. The friendship was so strong that when Miss O'Harra decided to return to Florida, she asked Miss Moore to accompany her. Of course, Miss Moore accepted promptly. (Try to picture anyone being invited to Florida and refusing to go!) But this move met with objections from Miss Moore's family who believed that a girl should not be away from the constant attention and protection of her mother. However, the family finally was won over and Miss O'Harra returned to Florida in company with her friend. The family was reunited a little later when Miss Moore's mother and brother moved to Clermont where they still live with her. However, the girls, together with their mothers, found themselves facing another serious problem in Florida. They had a fifty" five acre farm on their hands, no capital with which to work it and no experience in farm cultivation. With characteristic c;ourage, the young woman went to a bank in Clermont and borrowed four thousand dollars for the crop. With this money they planted thirty acres in watermelons and ten acres in squash. Inexperienced though they were, Miss O'Harra, Miss Litzrodt, and their maternal aids ignored their city history, rolled up their sleeves and Miss O'Harra tries to interest little Polly Anna in the By 1920 Miss O'Harra;s faith in Florida's future was (Continued on page 94) eames-a-man.. 62

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The "mystery" motor-boat, "Miss St. Petersburg," was built amid the jungleland of Maximo Point, Florida, and it was constructed in their spare hours by the Ballard boys. (In circle) "Miss St. Petersburg" bits a thirty-five mile gait on Tampa Bay's water speedway St. Petersburg's "mystery" speed-boat is willing to contest her capabilities with a_ny of the crack racers of her class at Miami or Palm Beach, and this is no i
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A close-up of edible bamboo shoots. They are eaten like asparagus. Many tons are imported yearly. Florida could supply the world market. Early moniing in a Florida bamboo ITOVe, the grollJld with leafy light and shadow!' New shoots and roots of the bamboo as they grow without cultiva-tion. BAM B oo The Giant Grass Wonderful, Grown for Wealth, Food and Beauty By Dr. B. T. Galloway tf.gricultural Explorer, Bureau of Plant Industry, United States Department of Agriculture IMAGINE cool, luxuriant, tall and willowy bamboo growing in your backyard, on your farm, your vacant lot, and in the city's parks. It may be difficult for you to envision this, but not so the scientists of your Uncle Sam. If, however, you live in Florida, it is a simple matter to listen to the whisperings of the delicate leaves and feel something of the mystery of the Orient in the swaying of their giant stalks. After long years of experiment and painstaking effort Dr. B. T. Galloway, one of the great authorities on the bamboo, and his fellow scientists are enthusiastic over the possibilities of adding to the beauty of the nation, as well as its wealth, through the widespread cultiva-64 As Told to UTHAI VINCENT WILCOx tion of the many species of bamboo Right now there are groves in Brooksville, Florida, where the Department of Agriculture has studied the tall growing grasses in order to learn those most suitable for various localities There are, in one or two other sections of the South, bamboo groves as a result of the study given to this most useful plant. The visitor at Brooksville can catch beneath the bamboo a breath of the old-age mysteries of the East and find real rest beneath its branches. Dr. Galloway says it is noticed "that even the blase auto tourist, who probably gives little or no thought to the trees and shrubs past which he rushes, often pauses with astonishment and frequent-ly with awe as the towering culms of the giant grass come into view. Man) of the culms are more than sixty feet high. A man entering such a grove for the first time is like an ant entering a wheat field The ant, accustomed to being on smooth ground in short grass, suddenly finds itself in a new world where everything is out of proportion. But the beauty of bamboo grown in Florida is not" all. There is the opportunity of adding a new source of wealth to be found in the thousand and one purposes for which it is adapted. Dr. Galloway, speaking of the Orient, the native home of the bamboo, waxes eloquent. He says: "The uses of the bamboo in those parts of the world

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the heuse as well as tlte thatch en the reef, aai paper fer winiews aai awaincs, fer sheis ani linis fer the verania. Alse eis, ta.les, chairs, cup.earis ani a theusaai ani ene small articles ef iaily use ceae fre111 a Shavei, it is usei fer mattresses. Waterwheels are 111aie frea the stalks as well as cares fer iris. Vessels fer heliinc wine ani varieus the flwer-stanis that are se eautifully the atman's raft ani his pele ani.ltis aat, all "c;.llle frem this "Witere it leurishes are se au111ereus that te catale&"Ue them weuli 111ake a velu111e. It ltas een well &tatei that there is net in the .ewiice. vecetale kici anether plant se intiaately ui up with the life ef man. This ap plies particularly te suth thickly pepulatei ceuntries as China, Japan, Ceylen ani Java. In the last-na111ei ceuntry, which is enly a little larcer than cua. ut has a pepula tien ef nearly 31,HI,HI, the am is se weven inte the life ef the natiTes that it is iutful wltether they ceuli lenc exist witheut it." Te some exteat, what has eea iene ia the Far tall .. "Plaitinc 'ani wickerwerk ef all kinis, frea cearse cups ani askets iewn to the ielicate with which percelain vessels are are taken frem the bamboe fiber.-)The fiber is alse usei te make hats to prote<;1 tlteir wearers frort("the tropical sun. F41rtune-tellinc ii carriei en by sticks f am .ant pipes ef ba111 are smekei. airl'liee shoots are eaten with chep-sticks. a"o is everywltere, fr. the craile te the craTe. There ceuli harily e life in the erient: withA six year ctewtb ef eii.le ah. When ceoked the taste is similar te that ef yeunc aweet cern. East can e iene here, acceriinc te these whe have &tuiiei the crass. r. Galleway paintei a weri picture ef the place which alll eccupies in the sche111e ef life as feuni in these century-eli civilizatiens. "In the erient the am Ienis aR iniescriale char111 te the laniscape. In the ceel ef the eveninc, after the usual iaily trepical rain, e may stani en an eainence everleekic levely valleys, ani the laniscape fer 111iles will e seen iettei with cluaps ef 111est weaierful alllltees. Fre111 eneath all these clumps the natives ecin te e111erce ani seen the anks ef the stream are alive with athers iressei in their cay celerei sarencs. "Nearly every alll clump shelters a little native hut er twe. These picturhe111es leni se wenierfully inte tlte am freatace it is iifticult te see them at all fr aNTe." He plaialy iniicatei that this eauty ef Jya, Cey len, ani Japan ani eeuntries ceuli, in larce measure, ie iuplicatei here, when these livinc in suitale reciens awake te eppertunity's call. Hewever, am has anether eauty; that ef aiapta.ility. It is all ut impessi.le te appreciate the extent te which this ciant crass is utilizei in the reciens where it is est-knewn ani 111est appreciatei. r. Galleway cives a partial cli111ple: "am furnishes the framewerk ef eut it." <" .. r. Galleway cites these instances as eviience ef the creat use that can e maie ef this crass ih Fleriia, new that it has een fully esta.lishei that it can e crewn in America. "Whe knews," ( C ntinuefl n it: 14) A ltallllt cre makea an iieal playcreuni fer chiliren. It ia Yery ceel in summer ani ahelterei in winter. Peultl'y ef all llinis ani the ltamltee aeei. te have an alinity, one witlt the etlter. They tleurish tecetlter re111arkaltb. '5

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Li,..hthouse at Mosquito Inlet, one of Florida's famous and picturesque East Coast beacons. FLORIDA'S The Cape Florida Lighthouse viewed from the land's end, photographed by H. Armstrong Roberts. SEACOAST Lighthouse on Dry Tortugas, Florida, its. black and white tower a signal by day and night. BEACONS For a Century Government Lighthouses Have Pointed a Path A long the Peninsula's Eastern Shores By Charles Sterling Adams ONE of Florida's famous heroes lies unwept, unhonored, and un sung. He was only a lighthouse keeper. His was the education of solitary vigil and lonely watch. He was not schooled in science. He was a son of the sea who venerated the trade wind's voice. A man reared in a tropical jungle land. A man of courage l!Jld f.ortitude, his mainspring of life was :the effkient daily performance of his duty. Hark back to the stirring days of Semi nole warfare if you would have the beginQing of this story. For the wary Semi noles, sensing the importance of the light houses which warned shipping of shoal and reef dangers in Florida waters,. attacked the isolated beacon stations and massacred their keepers. Perchance you have heard "ghost stories" about the ancient Spanish lights reputed to have acted as pathfinders to safe harbors for the early galleons. If the Spanish invaders built light towers when they first came to Florida or during their later occupancy, neither ruins nor records remain as historical proof of such constructions. The colonials or Spanish soldiers evi dently knew approximately when to expect the arrival of foreign ships. They kindled signal bonfires at the appointed places. The mariners far out on the Atlantic watched attentively for these flares. And when, finally, the nautical lookout cried "Light 66 to lee.ward," the sailors knew the voyage was over, that the harbor was but a few miles away. THE explorations and investigations of the U. S. Bureau of Lighthouses dem onstrate that such signal fires were the primitive mystical guides of night-time shipping along the far-flung Floridian coast. They also prove that the first lofty tower used as a light beacon in the Penin sula was the lookout station at Fort Marco, St. Augustine,': where signal lamps were displayed to guide incoming ships. When Uncle Sam purchased Florida from Spain, in 1821, for the sum of $5,000,()(X), one of the first subsequent actions of Congress took the form of an appropria tion for the building of lighthouses at Cape Florida in Biscayne Bay and at Dry Tortugas. Suffice it to say that during the next few years a metal lighthouse ninety feet high, with a wooden-lined stair way, was built at Cape Florida. It was in 1836 during the Seminole outrages that this lighthouse was partly destroyed and another hero was added to Florida's ex tensive roster of brave sons. Th,e lightkeeper was warned in time of the coming of the Indians. He hurried to remove his wife and family to a place of safety, leaving the assistant lightkeeper in charge until he could return. One negro man also remained at the lighthouse. When the pair saw the Seminoles approaclutlg, they ascended to the light-room at the top of the tower and barricaded the heavy door behind them. The bloodthirsty Semi noles broke in the lower door, ravaged the living quarters of the keepers and finally climbed the stairs. The assistant keeper shot .at the redskins severaJ. times, wounding two of them. The Indians re treated to the ground. After a brief con sultation, they heaped debris and under brusb' around the base of the tower and then touched tinder to the mighty bonfire. The flames destroyed the cottages of the keepers at the base of the tower and then crept gradually up the wooden stair case. The enclosed stairway acte4 as a huge chimney and carried the smoke and heat to the lofty light-room. The assist ant keeper and the negro quickly appre ciated the fearful fate that faced them. They were trapped like rats. If they attempted to descend, the flames would suf focate them or the Indians would shoot and scalp them. If they remained where they were, they would be slowly roasted to death. The metal posts and girders of the house tower grew hotter and hotter. The floor of the light-room was like the top of a cooking range. Ultimately, all the combustible material was wreathed in flames. Human endurance was goaded t(} (Continued on page 68)

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T he Magazine of Florida 67 Do you want a "home and garden"-or a ''house and lot"? you look at the place in which you live, do you ever feel that this is not the home deep imaged your heart? When you dream of a place that satisfies your wish for comfort and pleasure, your love of beauty do the words and lot" stir your imagination or--"home and garden"? IF vou feel that what you want is still beyond your reach-then turn your home-bound fancy to the South-to Coral Gables. The investment.of just a few hundred dollars can secure you a building plot in Coral Gables. And a home there, gracious and beautiful, can be built as cheaply as anywhere in the country. A home! Not a mere house! A home that combines with its neighbors to perpetuate in architecture and landscape the traditions of old Spain. That is designed to take full advantage of the climate and the landscape. That is built to enjoy to the utmost the pageant of a tropical year. Cool in summer, warm in winter. Freshened daily by the spicy trade-winds. Sun-drenched, wreathed with tropical shrubbery Coral Gables. Opportunities for Profitable Investments are everywhere Coral Gables offers unlimited opportunities for investment. The home you will build and which must be in accord with (oRAL {fABLES CoRPORATION ,: Administration Building a definite city plan must increase in value as the city grows and the extraordinary developments mature. Countless inves tors and home-builders have already secured substantial profits. Constant ex pansion is forcing a legitimate and reasonable advance on all property in this district. The Coupon Will 'Bring You '](ex 'Beach's 'Dramatic Story-Free Rex Beach has written a fascinating tale about the miracle of Coral Gables. It tells the complete story of this city. We will also tell you about the special trains and steamships that we run to Coral Gables at frequent intervals. If you should take one of these trips, and buy property in Coral Gables, the cost of your will be refunded upon your return. But first of allsign and mail the coupon-now! The 'l(emarkable Opportunity for Investment I 920 census showed a growth in Miami's population of SN-68 i Coral Gables, Miami, Florida i Please send me Rex Beach's story upon the miracle of i Coral Gables. I understand that this places me under I 440 per cent in ten years. Since then it has increased even more rapidly. Bank clearances today are ten times those of a year ago. Every ac-. tivityfeelsthestimulusof this tremendous growth, and especially is it manifested in the increase of propertyvaluesin thecity and suburbs. In Coral Gables the values of home and industrial sites have increased amazing! y i I Street------------------'--. i City------,--:-----StQte:_,..,.... ___ ':. ................................................ ........................ ............................................... ; every year for the past three years. Yet building plots in Coral Gables may now be secured by a small initial investment. These plots are offered in a wide range of prices, which include all improvements such as streets, street lighting, electricity and.water. Twenty-five per cent is required in cash, the balance will be distributed in payments over a period of three years. The FactscAbout (oral(}ables Coral Gables is a city, adjoining the city of Miami itself. It is incorporated, with a commission form of government. It is highly restricted. It occupies about IO,ooo acres of high, well-drained land. It is four years old. It has 100 miles of wide paved streets and boulevards. It has seven hotels completed or under construction. It has 45 miles of white way lighting and so miles of intersectional street lighting. It has 6U miles of beach frontage. Two golf courses are now com pleted, two more are building. A theatre, two country clubs1 a military academy, public schools and a college_ for young women are now in actual use. More than one thousand homes have already been erected, another thousand now under construction. Thirty million dollars have already been expended in development work. Additional plans call for at least twice that amount. Seventy-five mil lion dollars worth of property has already been bought iri Coral Gables. Mr. John McEntee Bowman is now build ing the. ten-million-dollar hotel, country club and bathing casino in Coral Gables to be known as the Miami-Biltmore The Miami Biltmore Hotel opened in january, 1926. Coral Gables will also contain the following buildings and improvements: The $1s,ooo,ooo University of Miami, the $soo,ooo Mahi Temple of the Mystic Shrine1 a $I ,ooo,ooo University High School, a '$I so,ooo Railway Station, a Stadium, a Conservatory of Music, and other remarkable projects.

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(Cntinueti frm iJe 66) the limit. And then a point was reacheti where the iron ami steel crew no hotter. The contlacration hati spent its fury. How ever, the heat was so intense on tlte upper platfortll of the tower that the two cap tives mar .. neti there thoucht they must surely c"k to tieath. The Inliians far below were stranrely .lelievinr they hati tieparteti the necro peereti over the etire of the J.alcony. The rewarti of his curiosity was tieath. A Seminole killN the tllan with an arrow. The assistant licht-keeper, altllost un conscious, his a torment of iurns, crazy for fo oti, ami water anti with the sun ieatinl!" tiown upon him mercilessly, lay like one tied on the crown of the tlletal tower. The Intiians retiree, ine the white man haa ieen iurneti to death. Nirht fell. Coolin&" breezes laved the wountis anti sores of the skyhich sufferer. espite these aids of nature, he speat a nirht of acony. Each hour he crew weaker. The next morninc he was tielirious. Death stalketi in the oftinc. Anti then Provitience interveneti. A !ail appeareti as a tiot on the tiistant horizon. Slowly, it crew larcer ami came nearer. To the marooneti victim of the Seminole atW.ck, it seemeti only a fan tasy. Nevertheless, he summoneti all his remaininc strencth anti usinc his shirt as a lac si&"llaleti the approachinc vessel. It was a lichthouse cutter on an inspection tour. Its lookout saw the si&"llal waved feeltly from the top of the scarreti struc ture. When the cutter anchoreti anti sent a 1mall !teat ashore with officers and men a proilem arose; how to rescue the crip pled man frotll his precarious perch ninety feet altove the crounti. An improviseti !tow and arrow were ineffective in shootill&" a rescue line to the top of the tower. Finally, the line was fasteneti to a ramroi which was then sh&t from a run. The thin line fell within crasp of the sufferer .ly means o f it he hauleti up a i l ock ami Pacific Reef Lickt, one of the many amaller !!'lorida beaconL fall and. fastenee them, somehow, some where. A sailor ascentieti with the acility of a steeple-jack anti :Jtore the injureti 111an in safety to terra firma. In the early tiays of lirhthouse-keepinc in Florida, perils anti loneliness, isola tion anti exile were the main rewartis of the keepers. Yet, without tlinchinc, these pioneers ituck to their posts. The lichts hati to iurn every nicht as lone as ships passeti alone the commerce lanes. Most of the early lichtkoepers tieserve homace amonr Floritia's unltnown ltut faithful heroes. There were always the tiancers from lntiians, the wiltierness and juncle, sickness anti tlisease, impure water supply food shortace, hurricanes anti tompests to ie watcheti for ami wartioti acainst. The post of lichtkeeper, with its responsiiili ties, risks and hazartis, was an unenviable one. Cantiitiates for the position were few. .lut those who for the work ane enlisteti in its service were illlprecnate& with ticvotion and loyalty. After the termination of the last Setlli nole War, a new lirhthouse was iuilt at Cape Floritia in 114,, to replace the one ruileti iy the Intiians. This Iicht was operateti efticiently anti effectively until tlte Civil War when its illuminatinc apparatus was tiestroyeti. The Fetieral li(ht-station at Cape Floritia was tiiscontinuee for thir teea years after the last run of Secession was fireti. The veneraile old ieacon tow er, however, still stantis and is now tllaill taineti as a private a iti for shippinc in tlaat vicinity It is now a part of the recently solti eerinr Estate and is operateti for the ienefit of pleasure yachts anti commer cial shippinr which chaaoe to pass tlaat way. If you are familiar with the navica.on perils of the Floritia east coast, you will appreciate tlte fact that the majority of the wrecks which have occurreti in rocont years ltave invariaily south-ltounti ships tltat were huccinc the shore too cl01ely in an effort to escape the aorthwarti surce of the Gulf StreaM's ckty current. Northltounti vessels plyinc throuch Floritia waters hold their courses far from shore to cain ienefit frotll the tlootiinp; torrent racine towarti the ice zone. The lower rockiounti Floritia coast, letter ltnown as the Floritia straits or keys, is the tiancer zone of navication. Even tiurinc the pioneerinr tiays of American commerce, skippers anti coastinc soon learneti to steer clear of the shoals anti reefs that altuttee the southerly shores The Floritia reefs if oiserveti carefully on a larce map, show a pronounceti ooa vex curvature as relateti to the shippiJtC' lanes of that vicinity. These rockriiiee (Continued on iJe II) The old lichtbouae at St. Aup1tine completed lty the U. S. GoYwnment in 1142, and ieakoyed darinc a hurricane in 1174, when the aite was wuhed away.

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Homes. of Refinement in Artistic Surroundings jfROM all corners of the continent, folks are coming to this of inspiring subtropical beauty, seeking their ideal Southe.rn home and the unique opportunities for the enjoyment of life to the maximum which are available here throughout the year. Just such a place ts --and particularly Miami Shores Island, where is being developed a complete community, with its own business sections, hotel and apartment house. sections, artd residential areas-its great park, and its nine-hole golf inland. waterway and its charming lake. And most of those. who come hope to make their. homes on or near the water, and in &PnJ.t;, developed with an eye to tl).e, as well as t4e practical---,and in some section,. where generous pro:vision has been madetar recreational facilities. MIAMI SHORES Entirely surrounded, as if is, by Biscayne 1,3ay -the chief arbiter of values in the Miami district...:....yotr will appreCiate the fact that lot prices will continue to advance rapidly as has been the case with all Miami property located on or near this matchless body of water. And TODAY you may yet buy Miami Shores Island lots at the first price, although the supply is diminishing daily. We advise you to act without delay. 125;E. Flagler: Street MIAMI SHORES America j-Mediterranean Miami, Florida 69

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SuRvEY oF FLORIDA CoNDITIONS-Continued from page 43 t:he .very cream of the famous Ridge Section. In point of beauty as well as from a practical point of view, this County offers land unsurp:tssed anywhere in Florida. The principal factors necessary are better transportation facilities on the part of the railroads, both for pas senger arid iieight traffic. This condition prev al\s all over the State of however, owing to its unprecedented growth in population. \ Fl()rida has only just begun 'to come into her own. When people realiz e that there is something more to Florida than just the National Playgrounds of the East Coast, and certain old, well-founded industries centering in Tampa, the seaport of the West Coast, there will be a steady influx of inhabitants who will farm to the very bes t advantages the extremely rich and fertile land abounding throughout the central portion of the State. As to opportunities for various popular sports, Polk County cedes the palm to no section or county in Florida. With its beautiful fresh water lakes as a center for aqtiatiG sports, and its already many completed golf courses, constructed by experts, in conjunction with wellplanned and governed clubs, the roll ing h l!ls o f this section offer a year rounc( place which cannot be surpass ed. As one prominent New Yorker recently remarked regarding the country adjacent to Lakeland, the larges t city in Polk County, "This reminds me of \Vestchester County back home, without the sno w and ice and the many annoyances caused by Winter." Lakeland alone has one hundred and forty-nine residences scheduled s o far for the next five ;weeks. The expenditures for building, according_ to permits issued so far this year, will amount to $1, 399,790.00. Summing up: the Realty Boards of Polk County, without exception, are thoroughly satisfied as to the outlook for 1926, realizing that stable values caused b y the quality of soil are sure to create the best of business. The. types of architecture, generally speaking, are well suited to the country. Good taste i s the rule rather than the exception. The picturesque Spanish, divers ified with the Colonial .iO and the English stucco and crossbeamed effects, in the proper settings of gTaceful shade trees, offer a home land suitable to people of moderate means as well as the wealthy. Big Business Enterprises on The East Coast By FRANK D. LANDER, }R. Florida East Coast Reprnmtfltive of SuNILAND Two buildings, the $12,500 000 Urmey Arms apartments in Coral Gables and the $10 000 000 FRANK D. LANDER, Ja. Villa Biscayn e on Miami Beach, both to be started and completed in 1926, will represent a total cost of more than one-third the entire 1925 Miami building program; millians of dollars of development work such as laying streets, building country clubs, golf cours es, hotels, parks and all the other features which go to make ideal living conditions, de layed in 1925 becaus.e of lack of materials resulting from inadequate transportation, are being rushed to completion; the spending of the $11, 500,000 for which the citizens of Miami recently bonded themselves for harbor improvement, new b ridges, new streets, more street lighting and other public improvements, is being rushed forward with all speed consistent with business economy. Nineteen hundred and twenty-six will be Miami's greates t building year. The gigantic plans of the past are being converted into the reality of the present almost as rapidly as new plans, even more stupendous, are being announced for the future. And what is true of its metropolis is true al s o in an equal ratio, of all the other cities of Florida's East Coast. In West Palm Beach, Fort Pierce and Fort Lauderdale, as well as dozens of splendid cities-in-themaking that are springing up so rapidly as to make one believe the entire East Coast will shortly be one continuous city, millions o f dollars are being. paid out, each Saturday night to laborers and millions for materials. Transportation is better and will be still vastly better within ninety days when the. Seaboard has completed its Miami extension. Northern manufacturers have greatly improved the fa ciliti e s for Florida construction. Nothing looms up as a po ssibility for stopping, or even checking the work now in progress. It will not surprise even the most conservative o f East Coast business if the money actually expended in 1926 building and improvements exceeds the amount spent in all previous years oi Florida's development. And, after all, building-the investment in permanent improvements of stupendous sums b y business men wise enough to have acquired them-is the surest barometer of permanent prosperity. The Cities of Pinellas Are Building for the Future By RICHARD J. SLOMAN PmelltJ.S Cunty Representati v e of PINELLAS COUNTY boasts such cities as Clearwater, the County seat, ''\,Yhere it is Springtime all of R J. the Time"; St. Petersburg,' "The Sunshine City," a great touris t center; Beiieair, of goli fame, and Tarpon Springs, the largest sponge market in the world, and the home of the only sponge exchange in the United States. These cities, together with Dw.nedin, Pass-A-Grille Largo, Saf ety Ha.rbor, Ozona and Sutherland are all growing rapidly, and are connected with a network o f fine hard-surfaced roads which cost over ten million dollars to construct. Pinellas County is growing substantially, because real money is being invested here for permanent developments for all year round usage. Thousands of homes, and business buildings and scores o f fine hotels are being completed at a very great lay. With all of this growth, however, Pinellas County is not on a "boom." Its values will continue to go higher, where real improvement is being made. The rapid growth of this section has been heralded all over the world, (CotJti nued on pa_qe 72)

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Suniland: The Maga"Zine of Florida THE MASTER ACHIEVEMENT OF A MASTER COMMUNITY BUILDER YOU WILL .FIND THAT SATISFYING FLORIDA INVESTMENT IN TAMPA y OU will rarely find a bet. ter investment than Tampa's Side Country Club Area in Tampa on the .West Coast-the T r e as u r e Coast of Florida. -For Tampa is F I o i" ida's Greatest City and the Country Club Area is the M a s t e r Achievement of B L. Hamner -Tampa's Master Builder. T a m p a-a great port, a thriving industrial city, a railroad center, a distributing point, a delightful fers the charm o-f aU Florida with distinctive advantages for the home-seeker and investor. In Tampa prices have not kept pace' with progress;values do not reflect activity, and great profits are still to be made on modest investments. The North Side Country C I u b Are a-Tampa's latest great development is being created as a home-land, play : land with golf courses, bath. ing beaches, club houses, shopping districts, a p a r t m e n t houses, playfields, educational facilities, bridle paths,. sociat centers. A city within a city, offering the refinements of a country estate, the conve niences of a cosmopolitan center, the pleasures of a resort, and the investment stability of a municipal bond. Conceived by B. L. Hamner -a dreamer who makes dreams come true; designed by J. Franklin Meehan, famed landscape engineer and practical artist-the Country Club Area is being bwlt by the B. L. Hamner Organization, F 1 o r i d a's. Foremost Developers, as a place where happy folks will want to live, and where investment profit will mature as naturally as Rowers biO.Ssom in the gentle warmth of the ida sun. B. L.. HAMNER Write today lor a copy ol the North Side Coun try Club boolrlet. \ ORGANIZATION .lll FRANKLIN STREET TAMPA TAMPA'S NORTH SIDE cOUNTRY CLUB AREA TAMPA IN THE HILLS :'l 71

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(Continued from -70) and this'growth has' lieen based upori climate, location and other more or less accidental advantages. However, one great attribute beyond these is the remarkable spirit_ oi friendliness and hospitality that makes any stranger in its midst feel that he is a part of the community. Pinellas County is "human," and this is quickly sensed by those who visit its shores. As to accommodations for visitor.s: up until a month or so ago, it was difficult to properly care for the thousands who flocked here. Now, with the .completion of many new hotels and the building of homes on a large scale, Pinellas County is amply prepared to properly ho use all incoming visitors or permanent residents. One of the great factors in the rapid growth of this Florida West_ Coast section, is the linking of the mainland with the island beaches by great ca-useways, which are now being constructed. Just as the causeways on the Florida East Coast have done so much to promote the growth of its cities so these new causeways on the West Coast are accomplishing similar results. Business opportunities in Pinellas County, are literally unlimited. Just as in any other location personal effort, plus time and ability, must be linked with capital to properly achieve the desired results. The speculation in raw land is being greatly superceded by consideration of the development of that land, and after all, that is the real basis for growth. When one considers the tiona! facilities and the fine religiou, and social institutions here, together with the manifold business opportunities, it is easy to understand why so many thousands have come to Pinellas County, and found it a haven of contentment and success. Sarasota is Plugging Not Shouting By C. J. McGuRTY Sarasota Representative of Su;NILAND UNDOU.B'I'-:.. E D L Y, one of the best indications of genuine activity on-the West Coast was the re-c. J. MC GURTY cent January -re-worth ot realty transfers in that month. January of 1925 produced slightly in excess of two and one half million. In other words, January-of 1926 showed nearly three times the amount of business which 1925 produced. Nothing exceptional in this, one might add; merely the natural growth of a hustling Florida town that is almost ready to put on Metropolitan long pants. But the really interesting sidelight is that the past January was one of the most unseasonable months within the memory of the oldest Cracker, while January. 1925, was a true replica of a mindpicture focused on a log-fire at Green Bay, Wisconsin, by a former tourist. "We've become metropolitanized," said Pat Ennis, President of the Sarasota Realty Board." Last year we used to shoot off a cannon, so to speak, every time a good transaction was put over, but thfs year everyone goes quietly about his busineSs and of shouting is plugging. You know, we're nearly entirely made up of formeQ New York and Chicago people, their customs and mannerisms have centainly put a stamp on this town. And, somehow Sarasota Bay reminds one of Lake Michigan." From Ocean to Gulf and Back Again By N. K. CONCANNON Central Florida Representative of SUNILAND THINGS are happening here about which the world knows n o t h i n g. That seems to be the method of the N. K.' CONC.ANN()N most modern velopers. Soon there will be public ity given to these plans and then the doubting Thomases will change their names. But, let's look over the field and see what's growing for the coming days ; yes, the early days, for this part of Florida is looking toward a big S'eason right now and on and on. Business is already much better than thirty days ago. The Gulf Coast lines of Citrus, Levy and Dixie counties, is the western boundary of a territory of great activity. Fifty millions of dollars in one initial outlay-a single development that has spent many millions before, is offering properties to the public. port. Ci.f the Siit"a,sofa:_' lf showed nearly seven million dollars __ A new rall.road.. import_ will skirt this shore and break into 72 the unearthed and hence untold wealth o.f this territory. Whole counties are feeling the thrill of this great combination of wealth and empire builders Soon the world will know the Suwannee River much better than now. The wealth of sentiment in the great song "Way down upon the Suwannee River" is now being blended with wondrous development. an agricultural industry in Alachua County that is of world-wide signifi cance. I refer to Tting Oil. This county and section is credited with being second to none in the world for the production of Tung Oil, which is used extensively in the varnish industry. There are wise men who predict that Florida will economically accommodate much of the varnish industry. I emphasize this item since we are discussing things meaning .millions of dollars continuously produced. This industry is now build ing. Just over the line in Marion County is to be one of the country's largest cement plants. Now we go to Silver Springs, known as one of the world's show places. I mention this as incidental to the millions being spent thereabouts in developing a national recreational and health center. Beginning at Ocala is building a statewide highway that shortens by many miles the distance to Daytona. Thus additional millio ns in this one highway will open the path to agricultural and other industries. Every day in every way the spending of millions silences all attempts to talk pessimistically. How can anyone visit Daytona and note its progress and listen to its citizens without increasing faith in Florida's future? Everywhere we are guided by what is being done and not by paper promises of what is to be. I am purposely refraining from figures because of the existing graphic evidence. Near Palatka several developments are now working almost entirely for future display. Farm development projects are here on a scale almost bewildering. And there are subdi visions of equal value. This is also true of Deland and other places in Volusia, Flagler and Putnam Counties. Near Leesburg in Lake County is another tremendous development. Wildwood, a coming railroad town, and Bushnell and other towns through Sumpter County are parad_ing their reasons for the continuation of progress and prosperity.

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Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida The creation of VENETIAN ISLES bringsto you this opportunity a g ain .-and in so doing brings an oppor tunity heretofore not even dreamed of, because these waterfront properties with their location right out in the heart of Bisca y ne Bay and by virtue of their accessibility, are placed in an absolutely incomparabl e position This. will bring about, incidentally, the natural result of The opportunity you thought was lost-is now knocking at your door. again! pOSSIBLY you were one ot many who have said to them-. selves and expressed to others t'he thought that, had you been in Miami a few years ago, you would have tied on to some waterfront lots above anything else in this entire district, and you have regretfully added" came too late most remarkable values and the greatest assurance possible of the stability of these value s And today properties are within your reach! Sooner or later VENETIAN ISLES will aJl be sold out, just as these other properties are sold out that you would have liked to have bought few years ago. This is a proposition that calls for your early decision. VENETIAN ISLES -Gems of America's Mediterranean N. E. Second Ave. Miami, Florida 73

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THE PHANTOM \\7 OMAN-Continued from page 59 his mental balance if he were tried and convicted. He doubted; itl But his mind was functionir.g now, it seemed to him desperately. Automatically it was groping for facts, for theories in his defense And it caught one. The wo man I The one who had waited to see Rogers and then fled before seeing him. Or had she seen him? There was no proof that the murderer was a man. He turned to Mahoney. "There's another angle to this case I want to tell you about, chief,'' he began slowly. "It didn't occur to me in its full until just now." And he related in detail the story Stebbins had told him. The financiers seemed exc1ted, the officers adamant. But the butler was summoned to the library. Questioned at some length by Mahoney he .corroborated everything Franklin had said, ; then departed quickly after the chief's curt dismissal. The young man waited with bated breath some word of leniency from the officers. "A very pretty story," said Mahoney finally. "But I think that's all it is.'' "But the butler said-'' "Yes, I know he backed you up. But you hi!d plenty of time before we $'ot here to hatch up something with h1m. Them servants will do anything for money.'' Franklin should have been utterly downcast but his mind was still working for the defense. He smiled sud denlv. "This farce has gone far enough,'' he said with a tremendous effort at calm ness. "It might interest you gentlemen to know that I can prove a complete alibi.'' The financiers stared incred!llously The officers frowned. "Do you mean that?'' demanded Ma honey after a long pause. "I do. I told you I was in the garden some distance from the house when the shot was fired. Miss Rogers was out there with me. She will corroborate every detail of my story at the proper time.'' "Damn I" exclaimed Mahoney disap pointedly. "This is too important to let go. Keep an eye on things here, Egan. I'm going to talk to the girl.'' THE c&ief hurried from the rOQm, his face lined with consternation. But now Franklin could have bitten his tongue out for having allowed himself to men tion that the girl could prove an alibi for him. She was in no condition to be questioned tonight. He would go to jail rather than have her subjected to an examination by Mahoney. He started for the door Egan's right hand leaped into his coat pocket and his left waved the young man away from the portal. Almost without conscious move ment Franklin backed away. There was something omnious in the officer's silent but complete command of the situation. Kent was wandering around the room, pretending to read the titles of the books on the shelves. Franklin's gaze strayed to the financiers. One of them motioned furtively to him and he joined the group. "We want those papers,'' said the gloomy capitalist in a hoarse whisper with a sidewise glance at Egan. "We'll match any offer Gross made you. Name your price I' Despite the tenseness of the situation, 74 Franklin almost smiled at the overpowering eagerness of these wealthy men to recover the half dozen sheets of paper which would add millions to what they already possessed. And he reflected grimly on the price he would demand were it in his power to do so. "For the second time, gentlemen, I am sorry to say it will be impossible for me to accept your offer, generous as it is,'' he answered firmly. "I haven't the slightest idea where those papers are. I've never seen them, either before or since Mr. Rogers' death." He strode away without another word, leaving consternation behind him. He was confident of his immediate release the moment Mahoney returned. Upset as she was, Elizabeth would be sure to prove his alibi. So his mind, released from working out his own defense, set out on the task of finding the real criminal. OBVIOUSLY it had been a simple mat ter for the murderer to make his, br her, escape. Three pairs of wide French doors led from the library out onto the sun porch. All were open. Just beyond lay the moonlit, man-made jungle of the beautiful Rogers' estate. Two hundred feet straight ahead lay shimmering Sarasota Bay, offering an easy escape by boat to a hundred different pbrts. In the opposite direction, three hundred yards away, a perfect hard surfaced highway led northward to Sarasota and Tampa or southward to Fort Myers, through the Everglades and eventually Miami. With so many avenues of escape open it would be a difficult proceeding to track down the guilty person. He turned suddenly as quick footsteps indicated Mahoney's retum. The officer's face was a study. "I thought you was bluffin' I" snapped the chief triumphantly. "And I called your bluff I Miss Rogers says she was in the hall when the shot sounded. She admits she had been with you in the garden but she don't know where you was wlu'll th e fatal shot was fire d!" Chapter V Diacoveriea FOR a long moment Philip Franklin stood as though petrified, unable to realize that Elizabeth Rogers had refused to help him, while the c:olor drained from his face. Then his eyes, dulled by stupefaction, widened and gleamed with anger; his bloodless lips set until his pleasant mouth was an almost invisible line and his fists clenched at his sides. "I'll be back in a minute I" he snapped and rushed out of the room with Egan after hln His peremptory knock was answered by the maid who had assisted Stebbins in carrying the girl upstairs The servant' started as she r ecognized the visitor and attempted to shut the door, but he threw his weight against it and pushed aside. Elizabeth was propped up in bed, much engaged with a cut glass bottle of smelling salts and a handker-. chief; her eyes 'red from prolonged. weeping; convulsive sobs still jerking her slender figure at uncertain intervals She looked up startled as Franklin approached the bed. "I said I'd come as soon as the police were through with their investigation I" he said grimly. "Here I am!" She stared at him a long time while her eyes slowly filled with tears. Then they narrowed abruptly and her mouth set with a cruel twist that he would not have believed possible in her. "The police say you murdered daddy 1" she said accusingly. "Elizabeth I" There was the agony of a man crucified in his tone. "Surely you don't believe that I" "Oh, I don't know what to bdieve, Phil I I only know that he-he's gone. She sobbed afresh. Franklin sat down beside the bed. "But dearest, surely you know me well enough-love me well enough to know that I wouldn't do such an awful thing.'' She dabbed at her eyes with the handkerchief. "I thought I did,'' she admitted final ly. "But the chief of police says he has all the evidence and that he's going to take you to jail.'' "Yes I'm going to jail,'' admitted Franklin bitterly. "And it's all your fault I told them you could prove my alibi that I was out in the garden when the shot was fired. And you could-but you wouldn't. You deserted me when I needed you most 1" up HILI Don't say such dreadful things 1 I didn't desert you Mahoney gave no hint of my statement being so important. He asked me to tell him what I had seen and heard. I did. Then he asked me where you were when the shot was fired and I told him I didn't know. I didn't know, Phil. I had to tell the truth. And when he asked me questions until i was ready to scream. Finally, he told me about you-being guilty!" "Byt I'm not, guilty, Elizabeth. I'm innocent; innocent, I tell you 1" "They said you did it to get the papers for Gross,'' she persisted. "I didn't,'' he almost shouted. "I've had nothing to do with Gross.'' "But you work for him I You never told me that,'' she said accusingly. "Maybe I did wrong in not telling you, dear. But I knew if I admitted being even remotely connected with Gross it would make trouble because of the enmity between him and your father. I was making plenty of money with Gross s concern; I had a lot of good customers worked up for his lines of bonds, and I didn't want to make cha_nge right now.'' "Well, Phil, we can't settle it tonight, I don't know what to believe or what to think. My brain is in a whirl. I can't talk any more now.'' There was a heavy knock at the door, Fra!lklin saw the maid staring at him accusingly and rushed outside into the strong arms of Egan and Mahoney. Come on 1 commanded the chief. "We're ready to go.'' Mahoney and Franklin drove into Sarasota in the latter's roadster while Egan took the Police car back alone. The little .city was beautiful in the moonlight the rows of light stucco buildings looming against the background of dark sky and silver-splashed bay with the great round moon overhead like a glorifying halo Peace hovered over it all like a (Continued on page 101)

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida The surpassing natural beauty of FLORIDA .BEACH will be retained T HE GREAT building and development program of the Majestic Homes Corporation-thorough and permanent builders of reputationwill retain as much as possible of the existing superb woodlands of century-old oaks, palms, holly, magnolias and pines entwined as they are with brilliant shrubbery and foliage now growing abundantly on the FLORIDA BEACH properties-Where Jacksonville Faces the Sea. THE DISTINCTIVE homes, apartments, hotels and other buildings to be built at Florida Beach will blend into thebeautiful natural setting of this develop ment with harmonious design and color. Nothing will be built that does not conform to the old Spanish, Moorish or Mediterranean type of architecture, thus insuring for home-owners of this community an oldworld atmosphere, delightfully restfuland healthful. A vtston of the future of FLORIDA BEACH With its desirability and beauty, its ideal location, its picturesque domain and its assured development program, make Florida. Beach one. of the very best buys, from an investment standpoint, in Florida today. And the opportunity to purchase Florida Beach property at pre-development prices is NOW-not som e time in the future. Bay and Laura Streets FLORIDA BEACH Where ]ackson'!Jille Faces the Sea owned and being developed by MAJESTIC HoMEs CoRPORATION Jacksonville Florida 'II), 75

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THE FLORIDA HOME-Continuedfromp,age57 from yellow to blue, is typical of this rug as art the high-piled shining wool effects. The strictly geometrical patterns have but little in common with the motives of the Aryan Persians. The Kasaks are woven by the Tartar tribes -in the highest mountain regions of the Caucasus and are generally inexpen sive, as far as this type of rug is con<:erned. Of the small or Orientals the Mosouls are the most common. These rugs are the work of the nomadic tribles of Northern and Central Persia and are all collected in the town of Mosoul, from which they take their name. urally, they vary considerably in qttal ity, some showing a beautiful shiny wool, others seeming dull. This lack lustre appearance is said to be due to the use of the wool from dead sheep in the weaving, and the purchase of one of them can be easily guarded against if <>ne is alert. Loose knotting is common tci them all; they are simple carpets and strictly Persian. The Kirmanshah is l( carpet from Southwest Persia, while it cannot be compared to the,; ancient Kirman either in design or coloring, it is still a, very lovely carpet. It derives its from its commercial market place, K.irmanshah. Of the rugs illustrated, the smaller is a Sarouk, the larger a Lilahan. The Sarouk is of the short nap variety, but woven so closelv and of such fine qual-ity of wool that it is very desirable. It is noted for its soft shades of blue and rose and the intermingling of these colors in an arresting design. The fine quality of material used and the closeness of the weave make the weaving of a Sarouk a long and tedious process and place it among the higher priced rugs. The Lilahan is a high-piled rug made of a much heavier yarn than the Sarouk and woven more loosely. The colors of this particular rug are a deep shade of rose with dark blue intermingled, giving it a soft, rich appearance. F ROM the above brief survey, the following conclusions can be drawn and kept as an aid in the purchasing of Orientals: The best Orientals are not thick, neither are they loose and thin. There is substance to the texture but little weight. They are pleasant to the touch whether their weave offers a certain resistance, as in the old Kirmans, or is yielding as in the early Keshons and Herats. If poor wool has been used it will exhibit dullness and harshness and will give a gritty sensation when manipulated between the fingers. Many of the modern Orientals are given a chemical bath when they reach this country, but it is far better to se cure an unwashed rug and allow it to become mellowed by time. The perfect blending of colors in an Oriental rug is its chief attraction; color makes or mars it, and if one is not adept in color valuation one should certainly yield the selection of Orientals to someone who is. The lover of color will immt-diately discover which rug shows depth and clarity of tone, which ones display weak and blurred tones. The buyer will he able to stand a little distance away and judge the coloring of the rug as one would a painting, in its completeness. The use to which an Oriental rug is to be put is still another question If 76 Chicken Gumbo Soup One quart okra, .tliced thin; 1 good sized onion, minced; 6 table spoonfuls bacon faJ; 1 number three can tomatoes; 1 small can crushed corn, or three good sized ears; 1 frying Cut chicken in pieces to fry; drellge well in salt, pePf'er, flour; to rich brown. Turn chicken into soup kettle, cover with 4 quarts boiling water, boil. Into the iron skillet in which chicken has been fried put bacon fat, okra, onion; fry until tfle okra is cooked but not brown. Add toma toes and tlren corn, and cook all to gether about half hour. Should all the juice of the tomatoes cook down, add a cupful of boiling water. Stir co11stantly to keep from sticking to skillet. Turn all ingredients into krttle with chicken, let boil fast for fifteen minutes; lower flame awl boil slo w ly for four hours. Should the soup get thicker than desired, thin with boiling water, but let cook 'alter the water has been added. Sea son to taste; half of red pepper will give added relish. Serve with small corn po11es. This with dessert makes a whole meal. NE LIE GRAHAM JoHNSON, Sarasota, Florida Orientals are to be employed on the entire lower floor, for instance, one should visualize the position of each rug before making a single choice. In this way one will be able, perhaps, to expend a little more on one rug, a lit tle less on another to economic advantage. The finest rugs should be placed where there will be least wear on them; the iess expensive ones in a protective position to the others, where they will catch the brunt of the dust and sand brought in from the street. It is, of course, impossible even to make mention of all the various types of rugs now on the market, Oriental and domestic, but to g-ive an idea of the general value of some of the rugs mentioned, a list of prices is given below. We have purposely selected the Oncntals within the reach of the average horne-maker and not the rarer and more expensive pieces. TO OUR READERS: We are sure that some of you have valuable recipes featuring Florida products which have been handrd down from generation to generation that you would like to share with other Flor ida h o usewives. If you will send them to us we will pa} one dollar for every one used tn this depart ment. Co11tribution must be marked with the correct name and address of the sender, and should be concise. No manuscripts can be returned Address The Florida Home Editor, SuNtLAND MAGAZINE, Box 2711, Tampa, Fla. Orientals imported and made on hand looms: Sarouk, 4 ft 6 ins. by 6 ft 6 ins. as illustrated, $230.00; Lilahan, 8 ft. 8 ins. by 12 ft., as illustrated, $625 00; Chinese, 9 ft. by 12 ft. (wool), $375.00; (silk) $900.00. Chinese rush rug, 9 ft. by 12 ft., $54.00; or 75 cents a square foot. Anglo Persian, wool Wilton, do mestic r .ug of antique design, 9 ft. by 12 ft $150 .00. High grade Wilton, plain or plain lines, 9 ft. by 12 ft. $157 .50. Linen rugs, 9 ft by 12 ft., $49 00. Hook rug, $2.00 a squa,e foot. The Convenience of a Breakfast Nook I N counting one's blessings in this Twentieth Century band-box mode of living, the breakfast nook gains a po sition of high favor. It is indeed a great convenience for the Florida house wife whose traditional hospitality must flow unchecked, notwithstanding the fact that she must often accomplish it sans man, sans maid, sans help of every kind that formerly set into motion the smooth-running wheels of entertaining in the old Southland. The well-placed breakfast nook is but a step from the kitchen. It is small, easily cared for, b ,ut cozy, dainty and opens onto the garden. It is pertect for a single or double cover, but it can be stretched to accommodate four persons. It is available for a hurry-up Pullman bite, and it is equally adaptable ior a leisurely meal for the man of the house and a coveted glance at the morning newspaper before the children come down. It has a delightful air of fleedam for the children because it is so simply furnished. It is just the place to serve breakfast for the week-end guest who can thus have her morning nap without inconveniencing uer hostess. It has resolved itself into a luncheon as well as a breakfast room, for since almost every member of the family, both young and old, in keeping with the trend of the times, has an interest that takes them out of the home all day, luncheon has ceased to be a meal and become almost a "pick-up." Lastly, no better place could be chosen for a tete-a-tete chafing-dish supper than the breakfast nook. The china cabinet is within reach, the kitchen at hand, and if it is to be an after-theatre party the table can be set, and most of the materials and ingredients assembled before one leaves home, without inconveniencing the family or cluttering the dining-room for the entire evening. Suggestion after suggestion presents itself for making use of this little room until it becomes almost an automat in its sphere of helpfulness. We have selected menus and recipes this month that can be served suit:.bly and easily in the breakfast nook. Tete-a-tete Breakfasts Florida Strawberries Cereal Plain Omelet Muffins, Coffee Orange ] uice Farina Broiled Bacon Corn Pones, Coffee Grapefruit Sliced Pineavple Breakfast Sausage Prepared Cereal Creamed Dried Beef on Toast Toat-t Coffee Coffee (Continued on page 78)

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida cAnnouncing VERO '13EACH VILLAS .. .. nearly a MILE of OCEAN FRONT and THREE MILES facing INDIAN RIVER give this great development an important place among the waterfront properties of the EastCoastofFlorida-theRiviera of America .. ERO BEACH VILLAS lie entirely within the city limits of Vero Beach and will be reached by a great causeway leading di, reedy from the mainland section of Vero Beach to V ero Beach llililiiiiiiJil,iiiii=lll Villas. VERO BEACH VILLAS is under contract with the city of Vero Beach to build this causeway. Moreover, the city of Vero Beach will install all city improve, ments in VERO BEACH VILLAS, and has authorized the prep, aration of plans and specifications to this end. These include paved streets, sidewalks, lights and water, and sewers. Parks on the ocean front, a golf course adjacent, and a yacht club assured, provide the facilities for taking the fullest advan, tage of the wonderful opportunities for recreation for which the Southern Florida beaches are famous. And remember-You can buy VERO BEACH VILLAS today for pre .. develop .. ment prices-just as you might have bought Miami Beach property years ago. Why not take advantage of today's opportUnity, and profit as those have profited who bought Miami Beach properties in the early stages of that magnificent development. VERO BEACH VILLAS : MAREE, HOOD & SPITZLEY Exclusi11e Sales cAgents VERO BEACH, FLORIDA 77 I I

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(Continued from page 76) Guest Omelet (Individual Size) Separate the yolks and whites of two eggs, beat whites until very stiff, yolks until well mixed. Season yolks with salt and stir into them 2 teaspoonfuls of hot milk; mix lightly with whites. Pour -into a greased skillet over a low fire Raise edges of omelet occasionally When the bottom is brown, brown 'the top by placing under a hot but unlit broiler. When browned sprinkle with ;grated cheese, fold over, serve on hot platter and garnish with parsley. Luncheonettes Savory Meat Roll : One cupful -chopped meat, 1 cupful chopped ham, 1 cupful meat stock, 1 egg. Onions, salt, mustard to taste. Season meat and ham, -stir into meat stock and egg. Mix bi&--cuit crust and' roll out, keeping -just thick enough to hold the filling Cut -in neat, wide strips, spread with meat filling, roll and cut in individual slices. Bake in medium hot. oven; serve with gravy. Tongue Glace One cupful cold, chopped tongue, I cupf u l cream, beaten stiff; 1 cupful of h o t c h icken stock, tablespoonful of g el a t ine d i ssoled in a little water. Stir -dissolved gelatine into hot stock, strain, add the meat and stir until it thickens Add the cream, season mold, and chill. Serve surrounded by crisp lettuce leaves -on which have been placed slices of to-matoes that have been covered with French dressing. Italian Tomatoes If to be used for main luncheon dish select good-sized tomatoes, otherwise rather small ones. Wash, cut, slice from stem-end and scoop out part of -center. Season hollowed out tomato, and fill with spaghetti that has been -cooked with sauces and cheese. Sprin kle top with cheese Bake until to -matoes are soft, serve on buttered toast cut in circle or stars. Supper Dishes Combination Orange and Meat Salad : Two cupfuls cold veal chopped imo o small pieces ; (duck can be used also) 4 oranges, French dre ssing. P eel or .anges and cut into cubes removing skin and seeds Mtx the oranges and juice well with the meat. Place on lettuce leaves with French dre ssing. Suniland Fruit Salad Cut 1 .grapefruit and 2 oranges Into -cubes removing skin and seeds Cut slices of small pineapple in star or cres cent shapes. Cover a platter with leaf l e t t u ce, on lettuce place pineapple and in c enter place orange and graefri.tit. Garnish with strawberries and walnuts. Serve with cream mayonnaise Lobster on Toast Mix lobster meat that has been prepared and cut in small p i eces with mayonnaise. E.emove the crust from bread and toas t on one side only. Make a sandwich, placing the lobster mixture -on the untoasted side of the bread. Place in the grill for from five to ten minutes. Sprinkle with paprika, garnish with slices of lemon. Spanish Rarebit Make a paste of e q ual parts of butter and flour, season with salt and paprika 78 and add m il k. Two tablespoonfuls of butter and flour each to I cupful of milk is about right. Cut a half cup each of mild che e se and pimentos into small cubes Place over boiling water and sti r d i ligently until smooth. Its c i 1ief virtue is in being served very hot. Pour over toasted bread or crackers. Orange Toast Peel and seed oranges, chop or grind, mix with sugar. Slice bread rather thin remove crust, butter. Spread with orange mixture, making a sandwich Place the sandwich in the grill a n d toast. Cut oblong or diagonally and garnish with parsley and crystallize d Florida fruit. Caramel Sandwich Cut bread with fancy cutte r On the bread sprinkle grated. chocolat e t hat has been thoroughly sweetened Place in grill and toast. Use salted pecans for garnishing. Creamed Chicken Cut cooked chicken into small until there is lb. Take small oman, tablespoonful salt, tablespoonful celery salt, quart chicken stock, quart milk, cupful flour cupful chicken fat bread for toasting. Brown flour in chicken fat, season stock and slowly stir in the milk, which has first be e n heate d Serv e on t oasted bread. MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES Banana Sherbet Make a boiled syrup of one cup of water and cups sugar. Cool. Add 2 cups orange juice, 2 tablespoonfuls lemon juice, and stir in about five good sized bananas that have been mashed through a sieve. Now add the white of one egg beaten s tiff. Pour into the cubed pans and set in refrigerating compartment of electric refrigerator. Orange Sherbet Make sugar and water syrup as directed above To this add one cupful of orange juice, one cupful of orange pulp, 2 t a blespoonful s l emon j uice. Add the white of one egg sti ffly beaten. Lemon Sherbet Punch Correct amount for six o r eight thirsty guests. To one cup of strong, cooled tea, add 1/3 cup of strawberry syrup, the juice of 3 oranges, 2 lemons 1/3 cup of finely chopped fresh pineapple To this add a plain s y rup made by boil ing a cup of sugar in cup of wate r for a few minutes. Chill the whole mixture and just before it is served add one pint of charged water, and a pint of lemon sherbet, frozen hard. This is better than ice, since it adds to rather than weakens the flavor of the punch. Sealdsweet Hot Orange Posset (Three Pints) If the weather man decides to fling a little frost toward Florida at any time, nothing could make a better nor more wholesome drink than Hot Orange Posset. I pint orange juice, 1 p int milk, pound sugar, 1 teaspoonful soda, 4 eggs, teaspoon orange rind grated 1 teaspoonful nutmeg. Mix juic e with sugar, heat slowly. Beat eggs with milk, add nnd, salt, soda (dissolved in tablespoonful milk); stir into juice mixture. When hot remove at once and serve. (Home Uses and Juices of Florida Sealdsweet Oranges.) Pineapple Pastry The spread for the pineapple pastry may be made of minced pineapple alone or of a mixture of pineapple and mar aschino cherrie s chopped fine To this add 3 table s poonfuls of powdered sugar; after spreading on the cut o u t dough sprinkle wit h more sugar and dash with lemon j u ice. This pastry may be decorated with a cube of the fresh pine apple, a cherry, or crystallized rougl lemon peel. The two first decoratiom must be baked with the pastry, the last a dded just before the pastry is removej fr'om the oven. Strawberry Pastry The preserve for the strawberry pasti':y is good either with the indi v idual flavot or combined with pineapple. To on cup of fresh strawberries and two slice r of pineapple minced fine, add 3 table spoonfuls of granulated sugar and steVI until it thickens. When cool spread on cut out dough and bake as directed above. Decoration of a crystallized straw berry will add to the attractiveness of the pastry. Roselle Jelly (Sometimes called the Florida Cranberry) Roselle is an East Indian plant cultivated for its fleshy calyces which are used for making tarts, jellies, etc. Break the c a lyces from the seed pods, measure, and for each measure o f fruit allow 2 measures of water. Boil 10 minutes. Cover vessel and set a si de to cool. Pour into a flannel jelly bag and press until no more juice can be obtained. Determine amount of sugar to be used by pectin test ( given in October issue, this magazine) Boil until the jellying point has been reached, which is indicated by the. flaking or sheeting f rom the spoon. Extreme care must be exercised at this point because over-cooking will cause it to syrup. (Bulletin 42 Hom e Demon .stration Division Florida State college for Women. ) Broiled Pompano Moist e n the fish thoroughly in oil place on a very hot oiled broiler. Tura fr eq u e n tl y cook thoroughly. Serve with m elted butter or lemon. Red Snapper with Shrimp Sauce A two pound slice of fish and some lemon juice. One cup minced shrimp meat; 3 tablespoons butter; 4 tablespoons flour; 1 ., cups milk; lh cup cream; 1 tablespoon anchovy essence; 2 teaspoons lemon juice ; cliopped parsley to taste. Bring rather heavily salted water to a boil in pan, add a dash of lemon juice. Allow fish that has first been skinned to cook from a quarter to a half hour, but remove before it loses its firmness. Make a paste of melted butter and flour and add milk which has been heated in another saucepan, stirring until smooth. Next stir in cream, seasoning and other ingredients, pour over sli ced fis h and serve.

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Suniland: T he Magazine o f Florida DIXIE fhe INTEROCEAN CIIYS Name ____________ __ Strect.,.--------=-City" InterOcean City is located at the cross roads of Florida, in the geographic center of the state, seventy-two miles from Tampa, sixty-th1ee miles from Melbourne, twenty-five miles from Orlando, two hours from Atlantic or Gulf. STI{EET 1-I IGHW A YS have played the leading part in civilization's march of progress ever since the days of the Roman Empire. They are the arteries through which the life streams of cities and commonwealths flow. InterOcean City fronts nine miles on the famous Dixie Highway, Florida's great inland artery of traffic from North to South and from East to West. "The Dixie" is InterOcean City's Main Street. For four and a half miles, this great highway, now being widened to form a magnificent 100-foot boulevard, parallels the 100-foot right of way of the Atlantic Coast Line Railway, while across this right of way Osceola Avenue, 90 feet wide, is being laid out. Thus through InterOcean City stretches a great. traffic artery 290 feet wide, boulevard, railway and avenue, the most magnificent Main Street ever designed for any American City. Stately, giant fronded palms, tropical shrubbery, electric white ways, and lovely walks will complete the beauty of InterOcean City's Main Street. Business blocks, stores, fine hotels, apartment houses, homes, manufacturing plants and industrial establishments will flank this Main Street throughout its entire length. Astride Mainline of the A. C. L. A great city, old or new, must be adequately served by railways InterOcean City is tocatecl in the heart of Florida's great agricultural and industrial development astride the Mainline Tracks of the great Atlantic Coast Line Railway system. Direct railway communication to all points will prove a vital factor in the development of t his community as a resort, as a manufacturing center and as Central Florida's great inland market for farm produce. A system of lovely lakes and winding canals will link InterOcean City with F!orida's proposed Inland Waterways System. You will soon. be able to sail your yacht from InterOcean City to Atlantic and GuH ports at your easure. FLORIDA TROPICS DEVELOPMENT COMPANY (Agents for Wile Properties Holding Co.) lnterOcean City and Kissimmee, Florida On t.h.c Dixie HOMES TVRE 79

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0 Y S T E R S-Contiwued Jron: page 4 9 this neck of the woods. A little stemhusked and shipped raw in iced containers wheel river boat began plying between the to the trade. A cannery is--a place where Gulf villages and Apalachicola, doing a the oysters are steamed in the shell and trading business in commodities for which then husked and canned. About two hun there was a market. Someone conceived dred boats are at present engaged in the the idea of shipping oysters to such of oyster business in Apalachicola, each boat the outside world as was traversed by the manned by two and sometimes three men. river steamer and presently certain dareApproximately one thousand men and wo devil plungers in commerce went down to men are engaged in the oyster industry the sea in their oyster boats and brought of Apalachicola. the unshucked oysters into port, where Of the men who go down to the sea in they were loaded into empty flour barrels oyster ships, very little is known. Yet and thence put aboard the river steamer here is a hardy, venturesome race, whose for "northern markets." These markets daily lives are filled with excitement, ad were Bainbridge, Eufaula, Colurnbia and venture, hardships, peril-a romance, if Columbus. The steamer sailed out of you please, cloaked in the guise of com Apalachicola once a week and if any of merctalism. the oystermen failed to reach ship side be-The nearest oyster beds are located about fore the steamer sailed they were comfive or six miles from Apalachicola; the pelled to haul their oysters back to the farthest about eighteen. Plucking the bay, dump them overboard and hope for dainty bivalves from their watery beds is better luck next time. At the beginning a grim business, where faint hearts have of this industry the prevaling price to no place The oystermen go out to their the oysterman for his product, delivered favorite bars at sunrise and the weather in barrels, was twenty-five cents a barreL is not always conducive to their peace of Apalachicola oysters found favor in the mind or bodily comfort. The oyster lug towns touched by the river steamer and gers are small but tough and rarely is quite a thriving business was developed. wind or wave too rough for these tiny Then came a mighty change, coincident vessels to poke their noses into the weather with the coming of the "steam horse" and make their way out to the oyster bars. into this territory. To get the oysters the boatmen manipulate long hand-tongs, not unlike a pair of large I T was approximately twenty-five years rakes, fastened together and operating like ago that the Georgia, Florida & Alabama a pair of fire-tongs. The luggers anchor Railroad made its way into the little viiabreast the oyster reefs and the work of !age; 'of Carrabelle, diagonally in a .northtonging up the bivalves is a strenuous easterly direction across the bay from business, hard work, calling for consider Apalachicola. Thomas Gowdy, a Kansas able knowledge and skill, and when a stiff City fish-dealer, came to this little out-of-northwest wind is blowing, beating sheets the-way place in quest of cat fish, for of rain and tossing the little oyster boats which there was a great demand and like chips, the oystermen are rarely, if which abounded in the waters of Apalaever, driven from their work. Their day's chicola Bay. He visioned possibilities in work is done when their boat is filled, the oyster business and he soon had a and if it is not filled at the close of day going business established ; He; too, ship. it will, perhaps, remain out: at! night and ped his oysters in flour or rollgh-hewn into another day, unless it is close enough barrels to Lake City and Valdosta to catch to run back home conveniently. the train for Kansas City. This continued Fishermen's luck does not run the same for three years when the line wa s conall over the bay arid : there is always a nected up between Bainbridge and Tallastream of oyster luggers pulling up along hassee. From there the shipments went side the Apalachicola packing houses with to Cuthbert and Montgomery. But for holds filled full and decks piled with the first five years of Mr. Gowdy's operaoysters. Here, if one would enJOY the tions the oysters went to Kansas City and Apalachicola oyster in all its succulent Omaha. Then came another momentus glory, one need only be armed with a bot change. tie of pepper; vinegar and a box of crackAbout eight. years .after the establish-a voice strong enough to cry ment of a ratlroad mto Carrabelle, the 'hold to the boy who opens the shellS Apalachicola & Northern Railroad was and loosens the oyster. In season the built from River Junction to the port of packing plants usually rQn with full crews Apalachico!a. From that moment the oyall day. To the uninitiated one might as Iter business, which had been diverted by well try to force a time lock on a bank the Georgia, Florida & Alabama Railroad vault as to successfully open a fresh shell to Carrabelle, came back to its original oyster, but nearly everybody in Apalachi home, and Apalachicola has ever since been cola is an expert at this oyster opening the center of the oyster industry The business and the men and women engaged canned oyster business, started by Mr. in the work are adept in extracting the Gowdy, was the main industry The inoyster from its shell. The oysters them tervening eighteen years have brought to selves are not touched by hand and they Apalachicola an ever-increasing oyster are subjected to several washings in the business, which has been brought to a process of sorting. The fresh oysters are state of perfection by scientific hanclling, sealed immediately and placed in iced con from the oyster lugger to the express car. tainers, much like freezers of ice cream It is a wonderful business, full of romance where they are held in cold-storage and hardship, and so well-handled that no until the express car calls. matter how the storms may rage on sea When the weather gets a little too warm and land, you who are reading this may to make the shipment of fresh husked oy get your fresh-caught Apalachicola oysters any day in season if you are fortunate enough to be within the trade radius of this product. There are at present fifteen packing houses and four canneries in Apal achicola. By a packing house is meant a place where shell oysters are brought in by the oyster luggers and either shipped out in iced barrels in the shell or else are 80 sters an entirely safe venture, the canneries steam the oysters. This means .. that the shell oysters, loaded into metal cars direct from the boats, are locked for about eight minutes in a steam chamber. When they are wheeled out again the shells are open and the oyster is deliciously steamed. Here again is a fitting place for a pepper-vinegar bottle and box of crackers. These cooked oysters are scooped out of the shell and canned on the spot; they are after wards known as cove oysters. When the: oyster season is over the oystermen become shrimpmen and their boats become shrimp luggers. The shrimp around Apal achicola are almost as popular as the oyster and they abound in great numbers. The shrimp are handled in the canning facto ries. Strange to say, the New England:_ States consume the largest number of shrimp. Ohio, Michigan and Indiana come next, after which comes the Pacific Coast. Large quantities of shrimp are exported to England, w1der the trade name of prawn. Each of the packing houses opetate :their own oyster fleets. There are also many independent oyster boats which depend upon selling their catch to the highest bidder. There are several different species. and grades of oysters in Apalachicola Bay and the choicest products bring higher prices than those of lesser degree. The packers have organized their industry in a thoroughly scientific manner by putting in the newest and most approved machin. ery and devices to cover the whole process of oyster marketing from bar to iced con tainer. Modern methods have entirely sup planted the primitive ways of handling bi valves. Insofar as possible, man-1>9wer has been supplanted by machinery and strict sanitation prevails throughout the packing plants. 0 NE large packer has cut his overhead to a considerable extent by building a. curious contrivance which, for want 'of a better name, might be called a floating shucking house. This contraption consists. of two barges, fastened together. On one barge the oystermen receive the catch from the oyster luggers and do the husking. They live and sleep on the other barge This floating husking house can be towed to any gi\'en poiot in the bay and anchored and moved about in this manner at will. Some of the packers also maintain husk. ing camps on the mainland so that the Oyster boats wm not have to go all the way to Apalachicola to deliver their catch.. The express train leaves Apalachicola each night with the day's oyster catch in shell, iced containers or cans, and the oyster shipments connect at River Junction for all points within the Apalachicola trade radius so that the people of Florida. southern Georgia and Alabama can eat oysters that were alive in the bay the preceding day Like the pork packers of Chicago, the oyster packers of Apalachicola save the whole of their product. The pork packers pride themselves on saving everything but the squeal, and one enterprising packer has even transmitted this squeal :to thf' phonographic; record. The oyster packers of Apalachicola have no squeal to save and, consequently, no waste, for the moun tains of oyster shells that are taken out of the bay are cormnercialized Most of this shell is used on Florida roads and. there is a factory at Apalachicola that grinds up shell for poultry feeq. Each of the fifteen Apalachicola p ackeis ship on an average of thousand g'ttJorrs of oysters per week-some industry!

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Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida 81 ''BE PREPARED''. ? ? WALLNER HAYNES REALTY CO Siegfried Wallner R. Taylor Haynes 66 N. E. Second Street Telephone 4697 MIAMI FLORIDA

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THE MYSTERY BoAT THAT WoN-Continued from page 63 The Ballard boys, "Bill," "Bob" and "Bert," knew something about the lure of racing, for they had attended nome of the popular tournaments at Peoria, Illinois, held on the Missis sippi River. These contests attract thousands of spectators from hundreds of miles in every direction. Believing the West Coast of Florida was neglecting its opportunity to develop a great water sport, the Ballards quietly got busy and began to take interest in salt sea motoring. To cap the climax, they 'finally put up a valuable silver cup as a prize to be raced for by the West Coast speed-boats, the trophy to become the permanent property of the sportsmen who won it three times in succes sion. The first speed-boat races held in Tampa Bay were watched by twentyfive thousand interested spectators and were highly successful in every respect, except that a boat from Tampa won and carried home the Ballard trophy. Immediately, St. "Pete" sportsmen began to lay plans for the following year to win back the cham_pionship cup. The plans in some cases went even so far as the blueprint stage. There, they withered away and died Sixty days be fore the race of the following year, no new St. Petersburg boat had been built. It looked as if the Tampa speedster would again show heels to all motor-boats in the West Coast classic. : The Ballard family held a council of war. How were they to conjure up a new boat, fast and formidable enough to furnish the Tampan entry with her 220-horsepower engine and her 50-mile an hour speed real rivalry? "Bill" asked "Bob," "Bob" queried "Bert" and "Bert" questioned "Bill" how the miracle was to be worked with only sixty days left in which to achieve their goal. Then almost in unison, the three brothers, modern musketeers of motor-boating, said: "We'll build a boat ourselves and turn the trick." If you are familiar with the complexj ties associated with speed-boat composi tion and construction, you will understand that the Ballard brothers had bitten off a considerable mouthful when they tackled the task of building a racing boat and equipping her for a speed contest in the short period of two months. The project was all the more astonishing since the boys decided to build the boat in their spare hours away from their store. A friend skilled in sailboat construction agreed to aid them when he heard of their secret plan. The Ballards knew where they could purchase the new knock-down frame of a speed-boat in New York City. They ordered an eighteen horsepower racing engine from a reputable firm Then they were obliged to wait in impatience for several weeks until the material ar rived. In the interim, they stirred up renewed interest in the speed-boat by announcing that an unknown crafta "mystery" boat of miraculous speed and prowess-would compete in the forthcoming contest. I T was a bare three weeks before the big race when the knock-down frame and engine were finally de livered. Secretly, the Ballards hauled the "fixings" out to a jungleland wilderness known as Maximo' s Point sev-82 eral miles down the Pinellas Peninsula from St. Petersburg. The song of the saw, the thud of hammers and the bustle of construction awakened the slumbers of the tropical jungle. Piece by piece, bit by bit, the boat was put together. Time, however, was even more quick in its passage tl.!an the efforts of the workmen to complete their job. The day before the race arrived to find the boat not much more than half-completed. The boys worked all night and finally carried their craft on ropes slung over their shoulders. four hundred yards from shore, out to where she would float. The engine had only just been laid as dawn streaked the eastern hori zon. The speed-boat was nothing more than a stubnosed hull, fourteen feet in length, with neither deck nor engine hood and minus every vestige of paint as the sun first looked down upon her in wonderment as she rode at her anchorage in Tampa Bay. In her hull more than thirty-six gross of screws had been countersunk but no time had been left to putty up the holes. There was neither a pressure pump on the gasoline tank nor controls such as are the outstanding feature in the equipment of most motor speed-boats. The Ballard boys worked all morning tightening up the engine, rigging up a piece of canvas over the front part of the hull and fastening in place an engine spray hood made from an old barrel stave and a piece of discarded carpet. Gas was placed in her tank and oil in the lubrication system. The hull was half full of chips, sawdust, shavings and carpenter's tools, when the engine was first turned over and the gasoline made its initial explosion on the trip to the Yacht Club b;tsin There was no time to tune up the engine or make a trial trip. It was one o'clock when the half-built boat finally reached the basin only a short time before the races were to start. If you can imagine the reception a ragged tramp would receive at a presi dential soiree in the White House at Washington, you will pretty well sense the commotion created by the appear ance of the "mystery" boat in the St. Petersburg harbor. "Plenty of miss in her mystery," laughed one Spectator as he noticed how the untried engine of the cigarbox affair was failing to func tion. "Where are you going with that piano crate?" cried another racing fan. "If you want to kill yourselves, try a gun; don't put to sea in that skeleton," shouted a third. "She'll blow up before she covers the first leg of the course cried out another critic. The crack of the starter's gun found the "mystery" boat with her engine dead and her nose headed in the wrong direc tion. The other entries in the speedboat race got away in nice order and were five hundred yards down the course when the Ballard boat finally flashed across the starting line. It seemed as if the half-finished boat was defeated before she started. "Bob" Ballard, who was driving the freak craft, thought otherwise. The engine's "put-puts" were rhythmic and forceful. The hull shot through the water at a handsome speed for a boat that was making her trial trip. Roscoe Jones, a friend of Bob Bal lard, was his crewmate. Jones lay prone in the bottom of the boat alongside the engine and under the exhaust pipe The boat had no controls which could be operated from the driver's set. t was Jones' duty to hold the throttle open and turn the carburetor needle at Ballard's order. Never did a man ride in a speed-boat race in a more uncomfortable position. Jones was bumped about until he was black and blue by the time the race was finished. AT the end of the first lap the stiff ness began to wear out of the untried engine and the "mystery" boat commenced to hum. She picked up a little of the "lost ground" and started the second leg of the race with a burst of speed that startled the forty-five thousand spectators thronging the neighboring piers and shore. Little by little, the Ballard boat crept up on her opponents. The space between them was cut down one-third, then one-half. The "mystery" boat was just beginning to find her true speed. Half way around the lap of the course, the homespun craft was hitting a an hour gait and passed several of her anversaries. She was well on her way to overtake the leading defender, the 220 horse-power speedster from Tampa when the latter unexpectedly battered; loose a couple of bottom planks and sank as suddenly as if a big wave had engulfed her, for the sea was rough and the wind high. "Bob" Ballard did not know the leading boat had been passed. He con tinued to drive his midget racer as fast as she would go. Hundreds ashore prophesied that the "mystery'' boat would burst to pieces. However, she came no such cropper. She sped rapidly over the course and finished the race far in the van of all the other boats. Her time of 24.40 for the twelve miles was very good considering the circumstances under which she com peted. The Ballard boys brought the silver loving cup back to St. Petersburg and have kept it there ever since, f9r "Miss St. Petersburg," the name they have given their boat, has never been the fact that she has raced in a half dozen contests from that day to this. After the excitement of the first race was over, the brothers got busy and completed their boat. "Miss St. Petersburg" has been instrumental in popularizing motor-boat racing on Florida's West Coast. She is the type of a speedboat which sportsmen of moderate means can afford. Her replica can be built at present for froni nine hundred to a thousand dollars. Oak frames fiveeighths of an inch thick are used instead of spruce to fortify the craft for ( C01ttinued on page 97)

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida The growing of s t r awberries in bo:res was originated and p e rfected at National G a r d e n s Five a c res of berries can be grown by this method where one acre can be grown in the okJ way. .: .. ,,. ,.What Is a Lot? {''' A LOT to many people is merely a LOT-all ought to be priced the same. Price to such people is the important consideration. : There is where the trouble usually A lot which can be used only for bui lding purposes, of course, is superior to a swamp lot, but a lot purchased for building purposes is not always used for building. What is your building lot going to be worth to .the next buyer if you decide to sell? Suppose you can't sell? How long will it take the taxes and assessments to wipe away your investment? We believe the average buyer overlooks these important points. At any rate he does not always use the best judgment. Another <>f buyer, buying solely for invest ment, frequently considers the possibilities of future development only, that is, he reasons it out that in so many months or year's so many people will build in the vicinity of his purchase and his lot will be worth so much. But-what happens to his profits if in so m any months the section has not grown? Why, he has lost his profits, his investment is jeopardized, and unfortunately sometimes lost completely. The only way to buy lots is to use the same care as in buying shoes. You want quality there and you ought to want quality when you buy lots. The lowest priced lot is not always the che ... pest, a higher pric ed lot may include certain improvements, and the cost of such improvements d educted from the price might make the land cost very low. Then, the soil ought to be productive, that is of such nature that it can be used for growing purposes. This is what determines REAL value, because such a lot can be rented, cultivated and become a source of income rather than a loss or a load on your hands. Just to the north of Daytona, Florida, lies some of the richest and most productive soil of the entite' ;southland. A comfortable income can be derived from a single lot. A profit of $2,000 to $4;000 can be real ized from a five-lot tract, four and five crops per year can be grown. Such a tract in the north without Florida's wonderful climate and vegetation would be worth a fortune. Yet it can be purchased here for a few hundred dollars, with all improvements and conveniences. This property, "National Gardens," has been talked about all o ver the United States. It will be made one of the most beautiful places in Florida. We have lots for the home seeker, acres for the busy man, and little farms for those who want to cultivate more extensive ly. We believe this entire property will be taken up within eighteen months, and if so, purchasers will reap exceptional profits. Yo u o we it to yourself to inv estigate "National Gardens." Acres of narcissus in bloom I Fields of gladioli in their gorgeous 'l-rray of color! Strawberries growing out of the four sides of boxes above the ground in January, when the north is snowbound I Let us tell you what YOU can do. W. A. SUITLE, Inc. 406 N. E. 2nd Avenue, Miami, Florida -----------INFORMATION COUPON ---------W. A. SUTTLE, Inc., 406 N. E. 2nd Avenue, Miami, Fla. Gentlemen: Please send me Location Maps, Prices, etc., of Daytona National Gardens Park. Name ............. ....... .' ........... ,, Street Address ............ ... ..... ...... ....... :rown .................... .................. ... State .... ...................... .................... 83

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84 Are Y ouLiving or Just Existing If you enJOY sloshing around in the ice and snow for six months of fhe year and like dark gloomy days, Florida will not appeal to you. IF YOU REALLY TO LIVE and enjoy life in a wonder fully balmy climate, where you can go swimming during any month of the year yet where a sunstroke is un known you will enjoy South Florida. If you want the best that South Florida has to offer as a place to live and for business you should investigate Tampa. Come to Tampa and See for Yourself We shall be glad to as sist you in finding the piece of real estate that you need, whether you want it for a business, a home or for an investment. L. W. LEE REAL ESTATE 504 Franklin Street, Tampa, Florida Suniland: The Magazine of Florida A clump of bamboo such as is easily grown in Florida .. It lends beauty to any landscape arrangement and may be sold profitably. BAMBOO (Continued from page 65) he asks, "but that soon these giant grasses will play an important role in our own welfare? As our forests disappear and the need is more and more felt for quick-growing and easily worked wood material, the bamboo will find an important place here, as it has found a vital niche in the countries of the Old World. The fact that agricultural scientists have found that the giant grass can be successfully grown brings a chal lenge to farmers, landscape artists and industry for its utilization." There are many practical purposes that may well stimulate interest as well as the great call of beauty. For Florida, with its opportunities of fertile soil and summer climate the year round, these possibili ties indicate a new source of wealth. To the owner of several acres there is the opportunity of developing bamboo on a large scale. The giant timber variety and one or more of the small growing kinds such as stake bamboo, would become highly profitable. Such groves, if properly handled, in the course of a few years, would prove a source of profit. Just to listen to this scientist's outline of the more obvious uses of this newly Americanized Oriental is to be amazed and to wonder why all these years have slipped by without having known its possibilities. Light fencing is self-suggestive. Bamboo poles lend themselves to the making of a fence that is durable, economical and artistic. The poles are easily cut and easily handled. Such fences can be used for chicken yards and rabbit runs, the slender poles being used for pickets. In Japan and China bamboo fences are seen everywhere and the fences are tied together with tops of the branches themselves instead of nails. Trellises are ideal when made of bamboo. What garden-lover but would be delighted to have bamboo trellises for summerhouses, and which can be (Continued on page 86)

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Sunila11d: The Magazine of Florida fie Lcmd of the Sky ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA The land of the sky Truly the world's choicest year 'round climate-the most glorious scenery up in these friendly majestic mountains, where nature is at her best. A Wonderful Homeland The purest water supply-the finest roads, hotels, amusements, and friendly people : from the world at large. On the Dixie Highway between Asheville and Hendersonville, we own one thousand lots, perfect lots with shade. Our opening prices, $850 to $15,000. In this magnificent subdivision we also own twelve acres-the most won derful hotel site. World travelers acclaim it the Wonder Hotel Site of America-and it is. We are big acreage headquarters W. T. Rowland & Cotnpany Owners and Developers "IT CAN BE DONE" TAMPA, FLORIDA, and ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 85

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86 pEAK CITI of the Highlands of Polk County. Famed for its fifteen lovely lakes -its fruit and farm products mineral phosphate and in: dustries. Commercial center of the wealthiest county per capita in the United States. Thrifty, progressive and prosperous, Lakeland has grown from 10,000 to a manding city of 22,000 in five years. Over $3,000,000.00 spent for civic improvements last year. A pleasing, spirited place with a satisfying present and promising future. This Florida city calls merchants, turers, builders, professional and business men. More stores, homes, hotels, tries needed at once. No state income or inheritance taxes in Florida. Lakeland's taxes are low. Outstanding nities for commercial, trial and investment openings await you in Lakeland now. FoT fautheT infonnarion WTite JOHN D. MORRIS Lakeland Chamber of Commerce Ltkeiand "OppoTtvnitys Y eaT 'Rou.nd Playga-ovnd Suniland: The Magazine of Florida (Continued from page 84) easily and quickly erected and taken down. Moonvines; morning-glories and other Climbers quickly make of these structures delightful shady retreats. are real uses of bamboo for grape trellises and the training of brush fruits blackberries and raspberries: A smgle pole trellis serves excellently for tomato plants. Bamboos are admirable for bean poles, pea stakes, and stakes for flowers and young trees. Clean, hard and rigid they may be used .for several years, and when employed w1th their branches left blend with all growing things m an 1deal way. Well-ripened bamboo poles of the hardwood type make good handles for rakes and other tools where there is not much downward stress. They also make fine clothes-drying poles and for props they are excellent. By using bicycle inner-tubes for joints the bamboo has been most eco nomically used for water-carrying pipes. Such a system can be flexible or can be buried in the ground where under test, it has lasted for more two years Dr. Galloway suggests that the growing of bamboo on a small scale would help promoters and others to carry on their business while putting into cultivation big tracts of land. P is the large timber bamboo of value in construction work. As he says : The lightness and strength of this variety make it very valuable in many kinds of construction work. Lack of knowledge as to how to handle such material is one of the drawbacks in this country. A Japanese or Chinese craftswill. this wood and do many thmgs w1th 1t that would be entirely beyond our own carpenters. Just note the scaffolding where large construction work is under. way in any Japanese city. It is made entirely of bamboo poles lashed together in such a fashion that it is quickly put up quickly taken down, and used over and over again. Many of the cozy homes of Japan are built almost entirely of timber bamboos. Unsplit poles are used for siding and many other purposes. This variety is also suitable for light bridges, fence posts, telegraph and telephone poles placed temporarily. Another variety of bamboo is suitable for paper making, if handled in the proper way." Mrs. C. J. Edwards at Abbeyville, Louisiana, secured some bamboo plants from the Department of Agriculture, not so long ago, and put them out in her back yard. The grove now covers a space about one hundred by one hundred feet and contains upwards of 1,000 canes forty to fifty feet in height and three to sixteen inches in circumference. A year ago she cut one hundred and seventy large canes, or poles, from this small grove and sold them for one thousand dollars They were used in the building of a tea house. In telling of this Dr. Wilson Popence, another scientist intensely interested in baiJ!boo, said that this grove should easily yield from two hundred to four hundred good canes a year. This example is given to show the commercial value of bamboo. In Florida there have been developed during the past fifteen years boys' and girls' clubs for the raising of poultry. Bamboo and poultry, whether cultivated by boys or by adults, make an ideal combination. A grove not only furnishes excellent protection from hawks and other birds of prey but provides shelter from the hot suns of summer the chilling winds of winter. There IS an affinity between poultry and bamboo, for where there are domestic fowls there, as a rule, the bamboo grows higher, wider and faster. Rural schools, factories, new homes surrounded with bare ground are ali too often unsightly, but in many such dreary-looking places bamboo could be grown for aesthetic reasons as well as a grateful shade and protection. But the utilization of this giant gras.s for beauty, for practical utility and for purposes is not all, for there IS to be added bamboo to tickle the palate. Young bamboo shoots constitute an important article of diet in Oriental countries, particularly China and Japan. Considerable quantities of the canned shoots are imported into this C?Unt_ry chiefly for those who like to dme m chop suey restaurants. The e xperimen.tal bamboo grove at Brooksville, Flonda, has furnished on several occasions delightful dishes for and other functions. Accordmg to Dr. Galloway, "Cooked with cream sauce or in butter, many epicures have them delicious. They look hke asparagus and taste like almonds." The very shape, size and quality of bamboo suggests numerous methods of it. "There will always be new ways for those who are ingenious. Perhaps, however, the value of bamboo can never be over-estimated or over-praised for landscape adornment," asserts Dr. Galloway. "Someone has said that flowers must be for, but bamboos spring into notice by virtue of their individual charm. There is a distinctiveness a softness, and a grace about the bamboo that appeals to everyone. This is partly due to their novelty, for there is no other vegetation like it; yet it blends and harmonizes with practically everything with which it is associated. "ln garden culture, the plans are not difficult to grow. Some are shy and easily kept w:thin bounds. Others are bold and aggressive, and unless carefully watched not only overwhelm their neighbors but will take possession of the walks and roadways." There is a systematic quality about them that plant scientists have recognized but not named. They seem to grow best when cultivated by those who are lovers of plants and possess the sympathetic touch. Thi s is a part of their mysticism. HENRY NEHRLING, who has been s omething of a pioneer in the growing of bamboo in America, and has closely cooperated with Government scientists. says: "There is nothing that can compare with bamboo in distinctness, in thrilling beauty and picturesqueness. In a very few years it forms an impressive feature in the landscape. It grows everywhere with equal vigor and its demands on the soil are few and easily satisfied. The bamboo hides the small cabin and the plain cottage and endows them with as much beauty as the costly mansions of the wealthy. Along lakes and streams they have no equal, their arching wand-like stems hanging over the water in graceful masses. They look well as isolated specimens on the lawn, but they look still better in the foreground of noble evergreens. A bench under a large bamboo is an ideal resting place after the day's work is over.

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida The Bla Companies Sell Serve) New York Edl11n Philadelphia Ed ison Chicago Edi,.ot Brooklyn Ed I s on Buffalo G e n era l Electric Consumers Pewf'lr, lllleb. Conne eU c ut Llgb t and Pnwer Co. T exu Llaht aad Pewer Co. Ubb PO\Wftr Geala Railway Rnd Power Colorde Publlo Service Oklahoma Public service Kentucky Utilities Hundreds ot other bla power corwpanlea-Th.ere Is a reason. T he grand old custom of raiding the refrigerator, practiced by old and young alike, has a new joy in the home refrigerated by Serve!. Frozen dainties, chilled drinks, foods of all kinds, are so temptingly delicious taken. from the cold, crisp, dry air of Serve!. Electri c refrigeration is here. Just as electricity has largely eliminated the kerosene lamp, has given us the vacuum cleaner, the electric washer, the electric iron, so has electric refrigeration come to eliminate the use of ice with all its uncertainty, bother and muss Serve! brings new facilities to f ood and drink preparation that ice never provided. It guards the family health by keeping foods pure, fresh and who les ome for long periods of time. It operates auto:natically day and night without attention. The savory foods-the crisp, firm salads-the frozen desserts are but a few of the many reasons why electric refrigeration is destined to become universal. Truly these delights-and the convenience, the dependability, the cleanliness and economy of Serve! Ideal Electric Refrigeration, will prove a revelation to you. Send .for illustrated booklet, "The Realization of an Ideal." Skinner Machinery Company SKINNER General Offices and factory: 300 _Broadway-Dunedin, Florida OFFICES AND DISPLAY ROOMS Tampa-%106 Grand Central Ave. W. Bay St. Daytona S...<:h-:!68 'Fb-st Ave. Mlami-1%29 N. E. Znd Ave. Orlan.do--575 W. Central Ave. St. Peterabura-17Zii Central Ave. Lakeland-80S E. Palmetto Broad St. 87

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88 Flori Us Five Reasons JPr 8%andSafe THE five reasons for the rate Florida pays on first mortgage security are directly and clearly stated in a Trust Company of Flo rida pam p hlet. W e want to send this free to those who desire to Investigate befor e they invest. Write for It t oday. lrrratillF/ariJ# at&fo $100, $500 arul $1,000 &rub PartitiiPaymnm .4f'NII&ed Writ."' 1kusT CoMPANY oF FLORIDA Paldln and Surpid oafety. Name-..... ----------Street .. .... ...... ---.. "''"'"'' cny. .................... ----State ................ 2303 5 REAL ESTATE 5 INVESTMENTS = ----:S SALES THAT SATISFY :S ----DeWITT-STAHL---J. D. STARKEY CO. --:S 105 Hyde Park A v e. Phone 11-461 :S :S TAMPA, FLORIDA :S :S Reference: Flnt National BllDII: :S iJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIii A GRUOE aUBDIVI810Ma A. B Peters & Company R EALTORS CONSOLIDATED ARCADE BUlLDINO HAINES CITY, FLORIDA HOMES &ROVU we Specialize in FLORIDA ACREAGE Buaineal We K OW Values and have the choice listings. Realty Compan y R
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Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida 89. If the Northern Investor Knew His Power What Profits Him! The Florida Blue Book gives authentic, factful information, profMsely illustrated, KPOfl Flor ida's fleW era of Prospmtybui/diflg development. It also contains choice listings of Property ifl varicu.r sections of the state, iflcludiflg acreage, buildiflg .rites, home property, residences afld industrial tracts. A copy of this valuable book will be .refit free to iflterested parties upOfl request. ARE you one of that vast army of northern investors who just sit idly by listening to the stories of Florida profits made by others? Do you say, "Oh, the big fellows make all the money. What can Florida offer for my few dollars when I cannot go there?" We repeat! If the northern investor knew his power, what profits await him in Florida Florida is the treasure chest, the golden gateway of opportunity for the large operator and small investor alike. There is a place for your $100 to $5,000 in Florida. There is a safe investment here for your funds. There is a big profit to be made by the man with moderate investment who cannot come to the "Sunshine State." Thousands of "stay at home" investors have made handsome profits and other thousands will make more profits in Florida through the method employed by millionaires the country over-the syndicate. This company, efficiently managed by experienced officers who know Florida real estate thoroughly, is forming syndicates in the interests of the northern investors. Such syndicates are based on property in the path of Florida's new and greatest era of prosperity-building Ou.r syndicates are for the out-of-state investors seeking soundest money making opportunities in Florida today. Bother or worry is eliminated, safety and soundness are assured under rigid conditions explained in our descriptive syndicate folder. You owe it to yourself to read this free circulal'. Use the coupon GULF ATLANTIC REALTY CO WARNER BUILDING TAMPA, FLORIDA Gulf Atlantic Realty Co., Warner Building, Tampa, Fla. Please send me the literature checked below: 0 Blue Book 0 Syndicate Folder Date .... .... _.. ................................ Name Address ... -.............. ................................. City ............................................

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90 GREATER CLEARWATER This organization specializes m GREATER CLEARWATER Realty and enjoys a reputation f o r e f f e c t i n g large profits tor clients who invest in this growing section. LoFORTE HARRISON REALTY CORPORATION Scranton Arcade Clearwater :-: New York Office: 1133 B r o ad w a J' Make a wonderful little home, easily carried, and quickly erected. Designed for comfort and convenience-no stooping to get in or out-a 6-footer can walk erect in "RedRoom" without even mussing his hair. "Hed-Room" is made in four sizes-one for every need. If your dealer cannot supply you, write or wire u.s for complete descriptive matter and price. DEALERS Gd m tovch with vs immediately rgarding "Hfi-Rom" aftd other teftts of ovr maftu facture. FULTON BAG &: COTTON MILLS Ma,.ufacturers nftce 1870 ATLANTA Now Orleans Brooklyn -St. Wuls Dallao Minneapolis Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Let There Be Light (Continued from page 41) Teachers' Association and editor of its publication, watching Dr. Holmes' work in Daytona, became enamored of the forum idea and led out in a movement which has resulted in the establishment of open forums patterned after the Daytona Forum in such centers as Mount Dora, Leesburg, Clermont, Winter Haven, Bradenton, Orlando, Lakeland and Clearwater. In each of these places a leader of outstanding influence in the community has taken -the chairmanship of the local forum enterprise, Under Dr. Holmes' management they have all pooled their interests in the way of securing outstanding speakers, many of them from the North, who appear first at the Forum in Daytona and then make the circuit on succeeding nights for a week 6r ten days, speaking at a different forum every day. In Leesburg, for example, the Forum Chairman is Dr. W. A. McKenzie, member of the State Legislature, scholar and poet, and one of the best-known platform men in the State of Florida. It is the Superintendent of Schools at Lakeland, Mr. G. E. Everett, who heads up the forum interests there. Dr. Duncan C. Milner carries on at Mount Dora; Dr. Woodley at Clermont; Mr. W. B. Caldwell at Winter Haven; Mrs. Cora B. Fitzpatrick at Clearwater, and at Bradenton, Miss Josephine Chrichton is the Secretary of the Forum. This open forum development in Florida is only part of a nation-wide movement with headquarters in Boston. It is plain that Florida can not only attract capital and business energy from all over the country, but that it is also reaching out to appropriate for itself the best that the country affords along the lines of intellectual and civic development. Dr. Holmes first came into vital contact with the national leaders of the open forum movement at one of their annual conventions in Buffalo about fifteen years ago. It was there he first met the writer of this article, who is responsible for the initiation and development of the Ford Hall Forum in Boston and who has also been President of the Open Forum National Council from its inception. THE Ford Hall Forum, now in its eighteenth year, modeled after the original forum in Cooper Union, New York City, has been backed from the beginning, and meets in the hall owned by the Boston Baptist Social Union. During these eighteen years this forum's influence has spread throughout the country. It is now recognized as one of Boston's most useful institutions and has received the acclaim of the most eminent leaders in the life' of BostonCatholic, Protestant and Jew, capital and labor, native American and recent immigrant, and the daily newspaper and the religious press. The hall, which will accommodate only thirteen hundred is crowded to overflowing. The entire program, including an hour's address and an hour of questions from the audience is broadcast. every other Sunday by the Westinghouse WBZ Station. Enthusiastic letters by the hundred pour in commending the forum program as the most stimulating and worthwhile feature that on the air. Not only folks in Flonda listen in on our meetings, (and distant friends of the Chairman tell him they can even recognize his laugh) but people have written in, Desks For CHAIRS Every TABLIU! Purpou WICKER Files Wood ADDING and HACBIND Steel TYPJ:WRITEBS Safes CBJ:CK WRITII!Ila Iron FLOOR COVImiNGI! and Steel II:LECTRIC FANS Gooct. bouaht of ua returnable wltbln three daya If they can be bouabt elaewbere at low a price. Office Economy Index 811-S Twice St. Pbaoa 2811 Tampa, Fla. FLORIDA FARM TRACTS FOR SALE We haTe aenral fine tracta from 1 to 4.0 &erll that can be boul'ht on terms u low $%1 PER MONTH Theee tncta are hlh and dry. and opiODdld land for truck-rololna or cltrua fruit l!lowiD&". Write or wire for partleulan. JOHN H. WOLF cl: CO., Deland, Florida TAMPA DRUG COMPANY WHOLESALE Tampa, Fla. Orlando, Fla. Real Estate [nvestment Corporation (P.....,Ident LOUIS S. HORTON) HAINES CITY, FLA. Buaineu Property-Grovea-Homea

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida IF you would like to learn more about Florida; her acreage, cultivated and uncultivated; her inland lakes; her population compared with other states; her tax rates; her inheritance laws; her net return per acre; her railroad mileage and highways; her. fisheries; her phosphate mines, and all the other facts that determine wealth, it is available on request. Ask for it. You will receive at the same time information on Sumter County ranking 6th out of 63 counties in productiveness, although the smallest agricultural county in the State. You will also learn about Orange Home, acknowledged the outstanding city development in the county and highly regarded throughout the state as one of the operations most deserving of public confidence for its investment values. TABLOID NEWSPAPER ON REQUEST ORANGE HOME uThe City of Lakes and Groves'' Executive Offices: Leesburg, Fla. 91

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92 NOW that everything possible that can be said and done against Florida by un scrupulous or m i sinformed writers has been refuted by personal investigation-FLORIDA HAS BEEN EXONERATED and particularly the justly famous RIDGE SECTION. IMPERIAL POLK with a per capita wealth of $6,198, the richest county in the UNITED STATES is the cream of the RIDGE SECTION, and leads the whol e State in AgriCulture Manufacturing a n d Phosphate Mining Industries. ---o-To y ou who c annot c o m e d own be cause of the n ature of your b u siness w e have a f ew splend id opportu ni tie s r equiring comparati v e l y sm all outi a y Of cas h i n a Co unty which HAS NEVE R HAD A BOOM. A C ounty w ith untold possi b ilities i n Truck F armi n g, Dairy and C ht cken Far ming to s a y nothing o f n atural Fruit s. Polk County pro duces more Citrus Fruits than any othe r county In Florida. Our records are at your service. Write us now for the right />rices based 011 practical values. Desk H HUDGINGS & SHERIDAN REALTORS 111 SOUTH TENNESSEE AVE. LAKELAND, FLORIDA SUBDIVISIONs-ACREAGEBUSINESS PROPERTIEsFARMs-GROVES and HOMESITES ACREAGE FOR WATERFRONT DEVELOPMENT OF MASTER SIZE IN THE LAND OF THE COCOANUT AND ROYAL PALM, 23.577 ACRES with approximately 15 miles of salt water frontage and ap proximately 15 miles of hard road frontage, which can be bought at a price no greater than has been paid for adjoining acreage without waterfront. Location is in the real tropical part of Florida on lower West Coast. You will be surprised how well this will bear investigation-but it i s neither a shoestring nor a piker proposition. ACREAGE IS MY BUSINESS J. FORREST CALDWELL REALTOR "A LITrLlll MAN BUT A BIG HUSTLER" BARTOW, FLORIDA Win 1'11 PoaLal cr Western Union. Lana Dlatanoe Phooes 898 and 348. Desk S Sum/ and : The M a gazine o f Florida also, from points as far away as Cuba, Texas, Iowa, the Dakotas, Ontario, Quebec. Nova Scotia and England. The motto of the open forum every where is "Let there be light ." In the midst of our complex, rapidly changing modern civilization with its over-em phasis oil the things that divide men, there is a crying need felt everywhere for some instrumentality that will promote mutual understanding, good will and friendliness and impart authoritative information concerning great issues of c ommo n interest. We are developing to an extraordinary degree the special ist and the expert in every direction and neglecting woefully the promotion of general knowledge concerning affairs that are of vital concern to all of us. Many men and women who are expert in some particular line of endeavor don't know enough about national issues and local problems to be able to cast an intelligent vote. And the amount of prejudice and .misunderstanding o n the part of one class, group or clique con. cerning another class, group or clique is amazing, disheartening. The f o r u m by continuous educational processes seeks to dispel all this, and after nearly twenty years' experience with it the testimony is clear and strong that it works powerfully in that direction. H. G Wells has said that our modern civilization is a race between education a :nd disintegration. The open forum is a mighty engine for fighting disintegra tion It is a combination of the old New England Town Meeting and the modern University Extension development. It is almost a lineal descendant of the old Lyceum and the popular lecture course with the dynamic added of intimate participation in the discussion by the audi ence When a speaker is cross-exam ined at the close of his lecture by a wide-awake audience he makes a much more careful preparation and tempers his manner of expression accordiqgly. The audience, on the other hand, is continuously on the alert, knowing that there will be an opportunity at the close of the lecture to give expression to thetr own reactions. This question and answer method of presenting any serious subject is in accordance with the high est pedagogical standards. There are now several hundred forums scattered throughout the United States and Canada. The Operi Forum Speakers' Bureau, with headquarters in Boston, supplies trained forum Speak ers, not only to forums, but to other liberal platforms scattered over twenty states. For five years the Open Forum National Council conducted a school of forum methods at the great Mother Chautauqua in New York State. Some of the leading men and wome n of the nation have freely given enthusiastic testimony as to the va l ue of the op en forum as a method of' inc ul ca t i n g and promoting the true A m e ri can s pi rit. T h e forums have adopted for their platform the following set of p ri nci ples: First: The complete d e v e l opment of democracy in America. Second : A common meeting-ground for all the people in the interest of truth and mutual understanding, and for the cultivation of a community spirit. Third: The fullest and freest open public discussion of all vital questions affecting human welfare. Fourth: Free participation from the forum floor either by question or dis cussion. Fifth: The freedom of forum man agement from responsibility for the utterances by speakers from the plat form floor. TAMPA VALUES are the soundest in Florida because the steady continued development of the city as the metropolis of the state is assured. Those who invest now this year, will reap the greater profits Our listings are extensive, selected .and offer sure profits. WILLSONS .UMMERS CO. Hotel DeSoto, Tampa, Fla. HOTEL MASON, JACKSONVILLE. FLA SOO RH,.I, oil wltll Botto. Flro .. NI. Yoar ro""d Hotol. a_,, H Muon, M1r. MIAMI REAL ESTATE Will Make You BIG MONEY We hav e the best offerings ob t ain able both in Miami Cit y property as well as ACREAGE Any Size-Any Part of State -Consult Us-f'IRSTNAnB.t.fBc.oo.Mwu ,F\A.

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Suniland: The. M a!Jazine of Florida HE ever delightful; ever sunny land of Southern Florida calls you-calls you now. Whether it's June or January, it calls you to happiness; to pleasure and profit. Both pleasure and profit await you if you can come in person now. But, for your profit, whether your call be in person or by mail or by. wire, there is here for you a tried and proven realty organization ready to aid you. For more than twelve years we have been watching and studying realty values here. have been earnestly and honestly serving our clients-and making profits for them. During that time hundreds of non-resident clients have found our service of inestimable value. Sunnyland can serve you too-Sunny-land invites you. -Write Us Wire Us or Call Some. offerings now p Mmn;u Clt;v and Miami Beach roperhes, Improved and 1mproved. un-from to Y West. We specmhze in large and small tracts of selected acreage all over Florida, suitable for farm purposes. J.DN vail ATcadp,,unnyland R..ealty. Co. SERVICE WITH VALUE KNOWLEDGE 11 93 ) MIAMI S:LA

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94 lbtsacola FLO R.IDA (ity of .Jfappiness THERE is a note of happiness in the air at Pensacola It's in the rays of a glorious s un sh ine that kiss the oranges to a golden yellow-in the rippling crystal waters of the harbor that play with the silvery beams of a Southern moon-in the in vigor ating caresses of Gulf breezes, fragrant with the perfume of pine and magnolia. You can see it reflected in the l aug hing faces of children a t play -in the stimulating youthful ness of men at work. Bu t, happiness in Pensacol a is not dependent alone upon natural beauties-the atmosphere of its environment. Here too, exists both the opport unity and the incentive to achieve worth-while things. For, here are lon g established industries-a profitable agricul ture-a thriving commerce by land and sea-two great trunk lin e railways-the finest harbor on the Gulf. These bespeak the sound basis for permanency and prosperity in Pensacola-a city set upon gently rising slopes, flanked by beautiful expanses of water-a modern city of homes, schoo ls, pa.rks, broad streets and beautiful dnvcs. And eYery palm tree and great l ive oak whisper that note of contented h appiness. People who come to Pensacola are intrigued hy it. That it> why many come back to call i t home. If youha vcnevcr been to Pensacola, you shoul d have our handbook of dependa bl e Fl orida infOrmation, edited by 22 Cham b e rsof Commerce. It g ives facts nceJ c d hy home-b uilders or farmers. A copy w ill b e sent free upon request. FREE COUPON PUBLICITY COMMITTEE Chamber of Commerce, Pensacola, Fla., J. S Morrow, Secretary. Please send me your free encyclopedia of Florida, entitled-uPractical Handbook of Florida. Name ...................... .... Addre ............................. Suniland: The Magazine o f Florida One Woman's Faith in Florida We Are Proud of Dunedin ( C o11tinued [1om page 62) further being justified. East Coast property was soaring sky-high and the value of West Coast property was beginning to climb steadily to higher levels. It remained for the hinterlands to be discovered by the winter tourists. That discovery of Oermont came in recent years when a sudden elemental disturbance played havoc with the roads of the East and West coasts and steady streams of autos were detoured via Clermont; it is an interesting fact that a large percentage of them, instead of continuing on their route, stopped at Clermont, went no further. All of which, as Kipling puts it, is an-other story. Nevertheless, property values in Clermont, as early as 1920, had begun to mount to such an extent that Miss O'Harra was no longer worried about payments falling due. All that was necessary was to lop off a small lot and the resale value was more than enough to take care of any payments on the original purchase. Her faith in Florida confirmed, she took delight in buying four dollars of new real estate for every dollar she made in resales; than w)lich no further evidence of her sterling trust in the State's future prosperity need be advanced. T ODA Y the orange grove, which was in a deplorable condition when Miss O'Harra bought it, is as healthy and well-groomed as any in Florida. Of all her original property, she told me, that grove will be the last to go-provided she can ever bring herself to part with it. Nest ling on the fertile banks of Palatlakaha River, it yields a bountiful harvest of golden fruit each year. And Miss O'Harra is generous enough to place the credit where it rightfully belongs. "While I was away in Texas, doing war work," she said, "someone had to give undivided attention to the grove. That someone was my mother. Money was anything but plentiful. Every penny I could spare from my living expenses in Beaumont was given over to the payment of the debt. Therefore, it was not often that Mother could afford capable help. In other words, she did most of the work on the grove herself. But she worked uncomplainingly and the grove was in splendid condition when I returned. Do you blame me for having a sentimental attqchment to it?" In the begining of this story I mentioned a beautiful ideal which lifts Miss O'Harra above the commonplace. It is rare that we come across examples of genuine altruism. But during my brief stay in Clermont I found it embodied in the person of Edna O'Harra. In October, 1923, Miss O'Harra paid a visit to the Children's Home Society in Jacksonville, and there had an interview with "Daddy" Fagg. It was while she was closeted with him that she modestly outlined her ideal and asked him to help her realize it. She wanted to adopt, rear, and educate (even to the point of financing them through col lege) at least a dozen children. Daddy Fagg approved her plan and before the interview was over she had agreed to adopt two of the little inmates of the Home. They were boys, though Miss O'Harra had set heart on a girl. But even in this she displayed her character-Natural Setting Unsurpassed Opportunities Unli m ited "The Best Water in Fl
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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida ''Largest Circulation in Pinellas County'' W HEN a publisher declines to quote his circulation you can put it down in the book that he's holding a "busted" flush. And when you pay good money for advertising space you are entitled to see whether the publisher's hand is genuine or otherwise. In the final show-down on advertising value, it is not age, or number of pages, or size or make-up that wins. It is CIRCULATION, because circulation measures results, and RESULTS ARE WHAT YOU PAY FOR, WHETHER YOU GET THEM OR NOT. The DAILY NEWS puts its circulation cards on the table. Jack Mitchell Realty Company says: "On actual checkup the Daily News brought four times as many inquiries as any other paper, on our Daytona Shores advertising." Frank F. Pulver, Own e r Major Alfred Birdsall, General Nana_(jq>-ST. PETERSBURG"S N.eurs PICTURE ST. PETERSBURG "7/ie Sunsh/ne Cdy/1 FLORIDA 95

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96 Don't Gamble Get the Facts Regarding PAGELAND Nature's Paradise ''In The Kingdom of The Sun" Marion County Florida The real Florida with her high rolling hills, charming lakes, winding rivers, splendid coast, magnificent paved highways, health imparting breezes, tropical clime, fruits and vegetables. The Boom has just struck Pageland. Send for this handsome 36 page FREE booklet. Fill oul the coupon PAGE BROTHERS Owners and Developers 559 Central Avenue ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. Suniland: The Magazine of Florida istic generosity, and the boys were brought into the O'Harra household. "Remember," she warned Daddy Fag-g, "I want the first little blue-eyed baby girl that you get. And the younger she is the better I'll be pleased." One day in September, 1925, nearly two years later, Miss O'Harra was told that "Long Distance" wanted her on the telephone. It was Daddy Fagg and he advised her to come to Jacksonville with all dispatch. And there in Jacksonville she found a three-weeks old baby girl waiting for her. Polly Anna, was the name given the baby at the Home and Miss O'Harra could find no logical reason for changing it afterwards. Anyone visiting Clermont, today, will find there a decidedly happy family circle. Miss O'Harra has surrounded herself with perpetual friends in the persons of Miss Litzrodt and Miss Moore, not to mention their families1 Then, there. is Mrs. O'Harra; fair skinned fifteen-year old James; ten-year old Sylvester, who" boasts that you can't place a pin-point on his face without encountering a healthy freckle ; laughing and gurgling little Polly Anna and (how could anyone forget them?) Ted and Cappy Ricks, two snowy-white Spitz dogs of fine breed. A happy family? You should see it! As for Miss O'Harra, herself, success and the acquisition of extremely satisfactory profits through the resale of her Florida holdings have not spoiled her in the least. Her ready smile is delight fully warm, contagious. She is always alert for the comfort of the other person, particularly if that other person happens to be one of the "O'Harra Dozen," which, while not numerically complete at the moment, has, at least, an excellent start in that direction. Editorials (Continued from page 34) as representative. In ten years cancer mortality increased fourteen per cent It now equals one hundred per hundred thousand population. The grim truth is that cancer threatens one in eight people over forty years of age. The cause of this disease of civilization has received attention from the ablest medical minds. It is highly sig nificant that Indians on reservations and primitive Africans scarcely ever have the disease. Dr. Isaac Levin of Columbia University with the co-opera tion of a large number of doctors practicing among Indians investigated this subject. Dr. Levin found that out of 115,455 Indians treated during twenty years only twenty-nine cases of cancer were encountered. The explorer Stanley established the fact that the negroes of the interior were free from cancer. It has been demonstrated that neither alcohol, tobacco, coffee, tea nor meat are causes of cancer. Indians are heavy smokers and great meat-eaters. Arabs and Turks are excessive coffee-drinkers but suffer little from cancer. The Chin ese have drunk tea for centuries without incurring cancer. The Eskimos who live on meat are practically free from cancer, while the vegetarian tribes of India have as much cancer as the meat-eating peoples. The conclusion has been forced upon a number of medical authorities, including the British surgeon Sir Arbuthnot Lane, that cancer is the result of long-continued poisoning of the human body. This poisoning is of two forms. It is chiefly from auto-intoxication, the accompaniment of constipation. And, on the other hand, the breathing of products of partial combustion-fumes from motor exhausts, for instance, and city chimneys-may have equally bad effects upon the human system. An. additional source of chronic poisoning is had in the artificial preservatives and dyes with which much of our prepared foods are saturated. And, finally, cancer is thought to be in part a deficiency disease, like pellagra and scurvy, in duced by vitamine starvation. As researches continue, further evidence accumulates to enforce these inferences and to point the way to prevention. It may be tpat cancer is the scourge which will reverse the tide of popula tion and set it toward the country again. The menace of the metropolis is its reeking streets and foul offices; its restaurants and delicatessens; its subways and elevators. The peril of the white race is not yellow or brown men, but can cer. It determines the ultimate size of cities; it may be indeed that our largest centers are veritable death-traps whose insidious influences operate over fifteen or twenty years before making them-. selves evident in incurable and dread ful disease. But the danger of America is Florida's opportunity. Like the brazen serpent in the wilderness, they who see it may live. And what a mighty multi tude have turned their faces toward the land of salvation wherein they may live out their natural span of life. For Florida is nature's answer to cancer. If cancer be the evil in indolent living, the curse upon adulterated food, and the penalty for deficiencies of diet, this State provides its antidote. In the lakes and surf of Florida plunge and splash the merry bathers. Along its beaches men and women run races and play tag. Over its prairies hunters stalk their quarry. And into its streams and shallows wade the intent fishermen. Muscles that had grown stiff and shrivelled with disuse come to life in Florida. Business men who have forgotten how to smile learn to laugh in Florida. And constipation, which like the poor is ever with us, vanishes with exercise. A nation is returning to play in Florida. The builders of America's cities, the rulers of finance, the leaders of government, have discovered that all work and no play makes us cancerous and irritable. Whereas an afternoon of golf, a day's hike in the forest, or a row across the lake renews jaded minds, inspires ideas, and prolongs existence. A[.. THOUGH the United States produces enormous quantities of foodstuffs, it is unfortunate how little of this output reaches our tables in natural forms. It has been overcooked at best; at worst it is a sorry substitute for such food as our bodies need. What a commentary upon our intelligence that the best-fed nation should have so many underweight children in our public schools. Out of the homes of the rich come many anemic and mal-nourished children. Our pocketbooks provide lavish meals but little food. We stuff ourselves with sweets but starve for fruits and green vegetables. Then what a promised land is Florida to our starved bodies. Every dooryard with its trees of oranges and grapefruit. Along the roadsides boys and girls peddling ripe strawberries. And all year long lettuce, tomatoes and celery are growing somewhere in the State. The fountain of youth has been discovered; it is the juice of

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Suniland: The M agaztne or Jl'torida 91 the sap of ground cane, the milk of coconuts. {', Florida is the suburb of metropolitan HODGSON PORTABLE HOUSES tJ America. It is in easy reach of our most congested centers. More and more .the families of our nation will live in Florida wherever the men must work part of the year. Florida means long life to grown folks and longer lives to With the advent of aerial transportation business men may week-end in Florida as they now commute .along the Hudson River or along Lake Michigan's shore. This State is not -only the conqueror of cancer; it is the champion of a healthy America and to its standard are rallying a hundred million men, women and children. Florida -land of the free from disease! Mystery Boat That Won (Continued from page 82) use in rough water. The planking con .sists of the best quality of clear cedar material, free of all checks and cracks. There is no after-deck, a seat for a third -occupant being placed instead between the girders. A special six inch hogginggirder is installed from stem to stem to add rough weather strength. Instead of making the stern threefourths of an inch thick, the Ballard 'boys cut it to three-eighths of an inch .and then fastened oak cleats all around the inside e9ge, up the center and also between the center and the side. This .achieved a strong and light construc tion. A mahogany cap was placed over the high-crowned transom instead of -decking. The engine is a three-cycle, 18-25 horsepower high speed model. The gasoline tank abaft the engine holds 7.5 gallons of fuel. The propellor is a two-blade, 15-inch diameter affair which, when turning at two thousand revolutions, drives the boat at a speed -of thirty-five miles an hour. "Miss St. Petersburg" is as fleet as an African ostrich and as safe as a family horse. The high-grade lumber used in her construction cost one hun dred and fifty dollars. Her engine lists .at five hundred .and twelve dollars and fifty cents, while the rudder, strut and -other casting work, added seventy-five dollars to the expense bill. The equip ment, including instruments and steering gear, amounted to two hundred and twenty-five dollars. The cost of this type of boat can be curtailed by substituting less expense instruments, .equipment and finish. The Ballard brothers suggest to prospective own -ers of racing boats of this style that "a stitch in time S!I-Ves nine"; that is, if they are going to build boats and race them the same season, not to flirt with time and wait until the last possible -minute to begin the carpentry task. -Our Automobile Speed Law Florida's speed law for automobiles is getting general mention from the of other states. The Dunkirk (N. Y.) Observer says : "Florida's new speed law seems to approach nearer to what the nation wants than automobile legisla tion in any other state. There is little logic in enforcing dirt-road speed limit on hard-surfaced highways." The Pittsburg GazetteTimes says: "Florida beats some other states to virtual elimination -of the speed limit for automobiles. While -others talked, Florida acted. It also has a problem of congestion owing to the immense number of tourists in the state .annually. Florida raised the speed limit cto fOI'b'-five miles per hour." Let us supply you with one of our charming bungalows. We c:an do this quickly. We have sold thousands of our portable houses during the last 30 years. They are.ideal for the Florida climate. Our catalog fhotographs and plans of houses owned hv many people whom you know wil11nterest you. See our Exhibit just off the road from Manatee to Sarasota, where the S. L. Send for our eat 115 Pineapple Sarasota, Florida P. 0. Arcade = L 1 TO MAKE SURE OF GETTING SUNIL AND every month for a year, send $1.50 and your name and address to CIRCULATION MANAGER, SUNILAND MAGAZINE P. 0. Box 2711, Tampa, Fla. ACREAGE SUBDIVISIONS The Howt If tilt Hill ltftlte PAUL D. JOYCE REALTOR Real Eatate and lnveatmeob IIELLINB ABINT P'OR RIDGEWOOD AND HINSON AVL SUBDIVISIONS OONSdLIDATED ARCADE BUILDINI .HAI.fiiQ CITY, P'LO_R_ID_A ____

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98 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida ONE 5-ACRE TRACT {l200 cash Bal. 6 Mos. 'I'WO 5-ACRE TRACTS Only$1,500 $375 cash &t. 6 Mo1. Our References: Any Bank or Business Firm in Miami. MANATEE FLORIDA FARMS CO. 66 N. E. 2nd Street, Miami WALLNER-HAYNES CO. cxclusi..-e Sales Agents ARAH L. HUNGERFORD Sales Manager

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida WHERE HUNDREDS OF HAPPY AND CONTENTED FAMILIE$-WILL ENJOY OUR. FLORIDA CLIMATE, OUR BOATING ---SWIMMING, FISHING AND SHOOTING AND AT THE SAME TIME, BE OF BENEFIT TO MANKIND BY PR.ODUCING FROM TI-lE FERTILE-SOILS OF -MAGIC ACRES, FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, POULTRY AND-------OF THE FROZEN NORTt-1.-----------------. N -------FT. gEN :::.---SRRINC"..-S._.. :::._----_--w E FOUR 5-ACRE TRACTS ONLY $2,900 $725 cash All tracts absolutely guaranteed to be dry and farmablelakes have been surveyed out. tMail .,t,_ ...... Your Order 'Today -. --99 --.;;r:. ---)E --Mail your order today for one, two or four of these wonderful tracts, inclose money order or your check for the initial payment and, be sure and state your desire as to whether you prefer your location close to the lake or on the outside of the tract.

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100 ADVERTISING SERVICE "ADVERTISING that gets what it goes after," has been my slogan for many years. I am specializing in direct-mail campaigns, sales plans and copy for financial, mail order, syndicates and real estate advertisers. Also complete publicity service for manufacturers. This includes high-powered letters, circulars, folders, booklets, catalogues and newspaper copy. To me eYery proposition and project is in a class by itself. I study every problem from data you send to me and then prepare your advertise ing to meet the specific needs. My Florida clients and others will endorse my quality advertising I am now in splendid position to serve several Florida advertisers. Write me in detail and I will make a prompt reply. Ernest F. Gardner 560 Ridge Arcade Kansas City, Mo. BEACH CLASS INSTRUCTOR A "PHYSICAL instructor who for several years has conducted a class on one of the very prominent Jersey Coast beaches, is available for similar work in Florida. The very best references and endorsements are available, and I can report for work on short notice. Ad dress, Box 25, Suniland Magazine, P. 0. Box 2711, Tampa, Florida. CLAY INDUSTRY SITE FROM a recent advertisement we have secured some exceptional information relative to clay desposits in Florida. We will gladly give this data to any in dividual or company planning to establish a plant for the manufacture of clay products. Address, Research and Service Division, Suniland Magazine, Box 27il, Tampa, Florida FARM LANDS REAL farming land in Florida at moderate prices. Zolfo Springs is center of territory producing large quantities of winter vegetables and citrus fruits and is especially adapted to dairying and poultry. Write Kistne r Brothers, Zolfo Springs, Florida. FIDELITY SERVICE of Fidelity Abstract Corporation is unequalled. Complete abstracts and continuations 3 to 10 days. Within a day's time after instruments are filed in Volusia County Court House they are placed in our records, and for that reason we can save time and much inconvenience. Service means money. You need our services and. we want your business. Miller Block, N. W cor. Blvd. and New York Ave. Daytona Office, Phone 867-J, D. Chrisman, Representative, 222 S. Beach St. George Printz, Sec'y, Deland, Florida. MAILING LISTS REACH thousands of wealthy northern investors through my guaranteed, upto-date, neatly typed lists. $10.00 per M., cash with order. Write for complete information and addressing prices. Bunch Advertising Service, 701 Holly wood, Jacksonville, Florida. Suniland: The Magazine of Florida ILAND'S bRTUNI FLORIDA FARM FOR a subdivision or development or estate, here is a close-in property that will satisfy the requirements of the most exacting buyer. Location is in the heart of the famous Manatee County fruit and vegetable section, one mile from Palmetto and two miles from Braden ton, both exceptionally fine towns and a wonderful place to live. Manatee County is the eleventh richest agricultural county in the United States, ship ping over 8,000 carloads of fruit and vegetables annually. 40 acres of this property are on a hard surfaced road 15 acres bearing orange and grapefruit This Is Suniland's New Market Place For as little as $5.00 you can tell your story to the realms of more than 80,000 copies of SUNILAND. There is no better way to reach all Florida and no way of equal quality in carrying your message to Florida thinking people. Try an ad of this size or larger: The rate of SUNILAND classified is $1.00 for each line. This is a five line ad and would cost five dollars. Address SUNILAND Magazine, Classified, Box 2711, Tampa. Please send c:aah or check with order and have your advertisement in our hands b:v the 15th Of month date of i .. ue. Sunilancl Brings Buyers trees ; 13 acres of highly productive gar den truck land ; 12 acres rieh virgin ham mock land. Dwelling house surrounded my magnificent oaks. Flowing Artesian well. Raw pine land ten miles further from town is selling at $500 to $1,000 per acre. This farm a bargain at $80,000 one-fourth cash-balance to suit purchaser. Direct from owner who has other interests requiring full attention. Write today for full information or ap pointment. Box 30, care SUNILAND Magazine, Tampa, Florida. REAL ESTATE 300 ACRES and up. North Polk County near highway and railroad. Write John B. Dorman, Polk Building, Des Moines, Iowa. FLORIDA HOMES: If you are interested in a homesite, a home or a co op e rative apartment in or near Tampa, write us. We are planning and will have to offer shortly complete homes and apartments to fit every purse for home seekers or investors. Gulf Atlantic Realty Company, Warner Building, Tampa, Florida. FOR SALE: If you are looking for an exc epti onally good site for a r e al Flor ida home with attractive scenic surround ings in one of Tampa's best and most exclusive sub-div i sions, let me tell you what I have to offer. All particulars will be mailed upon request. Address owner, P. 0. Box 565, Tampa, Fla. WHERE are you going to stay in Florida? I have plenty of homes and some at most modest prices. Move in at once. 42 miles south of Palm Beach Edward H. Mohr, Room 201, Palm Court Arcade, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. PHOTOGRAPHS WEST Florida views showing the agricultural development of this part of the state: Satsuma orange groves, cane fields, blueberry and pecan orchards. trucking scenes, poultry raising, etc. In loose-leaf albums peculiarly fitted for salesmen. T. Hope Cawthon Commer. cial Photographer, De Funiak Springs,. Fla. REAL ESTATE SALESMEN BROKERS and Salesmen wanted to sell< Florida lots that have anirresistible appeal because the l ocation and price and' plan is so plainly profit-looking. Two. distinct subdivisions enable you to meet classes not ordinarily approached but. which should be worked as they will buy on our plan of low prices and very easy terms. We have the property and the plan for men or organizat i ons who can. sell. We are owners. Gainsborough & Associates 1317 East Broadway, Tampa. SUMMER HOMES SPEND you r summer at Cre scent Beach, near New London Conn Cottages andl lots for sale and rent. Send for infor. mation. Joseph T Cruttenden, Crescent Beach, Conn SYNDICATES HERE'S a w id e-open opportunity for a few "individuals with $100 to $1,000. Profits from three or more sources come to this Syndicate and we w ant to shar e with yoti. We buy and sell land-subdivide and sell-build and sell housesall highly profitable in Florida and demand is growing every day. This i s the big reason of F l orida's greatest year. We now own a very attractive property -a Florida corporation-conservativelymanaged and have the finest syndicate plan in the state. Write us for the evi dence. M B. Gainsborough, President. Florida Syndicate Estates, 1317 East Broadway, Tampa. WATER FRONT PROPERTY WE HAVE TO OFFER: 1220 acres. ten miles from Pensacola, one and half miles beach frontage, on Perdido Bay. Two miles fine river frontage Price, $175.00 per acre. 1360 acres Santa Rosa County, eight miles from Milton, County site, twenty miles hom Pensacola, pine timbered, six miles from R ingling & White Devel opment, suitable for colonization. Price, $23.50 per acre Only twenty-nine residential water front lots left in dty limits of Pensacola, facing beautiful Bayou Texar, in Lakevi e w, Pensacola' s best residential se c tion. $1,800 each. Write or wire-J. B. Beck or H. D. Case, 26 South Palafox St. Pensaco. la, Flqr i da

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Phantom Woman 101 (Cot1tinued from page 74) But Franklin saw none of it. His eyes stared straight ahead, unseeing. His mind was in a turmoil. But he was more upset at Elizabeth's desertion of him than at the thought of facing a trial and possible conviction for murder. "What's the next step?" he asked dazedly at the station. "We'll have to put you in a cell for the night," answered Mahoney. "The evidence we have will be put before the district attorney tomorrow. It's up to him then on. Have you a lawyer?" "No. I've never needed one before. But I have a friend in Jacksonville who is a good one." "Better get him down here. You ought to have somebody who knows the ropes to look after your interests." There was a telephone handy and Franklin called Robert Lane in Jacksonville. The young attorney expressed great surprise at his friend's ,predicament and promised to leave for Sarasota early the following morning FRANKLIN went to his cell in what might be considered, under the cir cumstances, a cheerful frame of mind. There was somebody on his side now. Lane was considered a good attorney and his father was a noted one, head of a most powerful legal firm. Franklin had been acquainted with both father and son for years and he knew that with them on the job his interests would be well protected. But when he lay down on the hard bunk his mind reverted to Elizabeth. It hurt him terribly for her to doubt him even for an instant. She knew he was innocent. Why, they had met in the garden immediately after the sho'\: sounded. He still wondered about her presence there. It seemed unlikely that an unarmed girl would pursue an unknown intruder in the darkness. But women did the most unlikely things at times. He finally slept fitfully, waking and tossing at frequent intervals. Three times during the morning he telephoned the Rogers place. And each he was informed by Stebbins that Miss Elizabeth was not at home. He didn't believe it. She was there but refused to talk to him. She believed him guilty. If he could only see her, talk to her, make her believe the truth. Lane arrived shortly after two, a short, chunky chap with a high forehead and kindly blue eyes, who had a habit of jingling the change in his right hand trousers pocket. "Nice mess you're in," he remarked cheerfully as he sat down beside Franklin on the bunk. "Tell me all about it." Franklin explained everything in de tail. Lane stared vacantly at nothing in particular for some moments while he softly whistled and rattled his spare silver until Franklin was ready to yell. Then he began asking questions. "Do you suspect any particular person of this crime ? "No-unless it might be Kent." "Why Kent?" "Weii, he acted rather queerly last night, very nervous and so on, almost as if he were the accused man instead of me." Lane made a notation in a small leather notebook. "Has he been with Rogers long?" A Telegram May Mean Your Fortune Nearly six months ago I purchased three 40-acre tracts in Bay County, Fla., near Burnt Creek and the famous St. Andrews Bay. The price of $100 per acre which I paid for these lands was low even at that time. And of course Bay County land has advanced tremendously in value during the past year. To protect other investments, however, it becomes necessary for me to sell these tracts, and in order to do so quickly, I am pricing them at exactly what they cost me, only one hundred dollars an acre. I will not divide any of the forty acre units, but the three units are adjoining and you may purchase one, two or three units, provided you act Where else in Bay County can you purchase 40 acre tracts for less than $200 per acre'? Where else in all Florida can you buy land today at what it sold for six months ago? This is truly an unusual opportunity, and one on which the fortunate investor may rightfully expect to make a small fortune, so rapidly are Florida acreage tracts advanc .. ing in value. Remember that in purchasing one or all three of these tracts you will profit not alone from the future ad vance in Florida land values, but you already have the bene fit of the advance that has taken place during the past six months. Naturally, these three tracts will be sold quickly after the appearance of this magazine. There are only the three tracts, so to be sure of getting one of them it is advisable to wire me your reservation, then mail immediately your check for the cash payment. The price is $4,000 per fortyacre tract; terms, $2,100 cash, balance of $1,900 to be retired in semiannual payments of $240 each, with interest at 6 per cent. Will be glad to furnish full legal description, etc, but to be sure this opportunity does not slip by you, better wire your reservation immediately. JOHN H. DOLAN 215 HAHN BLDG. ----------------------------------------:1 W. E. BURKE i REALTOR SELLING WESTOVER PARK Bartow's In-town Subdivision Where "A Look Mean a Lot" PRICES AND TERMS RIGHT 150 S. BROADWAY BARTOW, FLA. I __________________________________________ ,, MIAMI, FLA. Daily Steamship Excursions to ST. PETERSBURG PALMETTO BRADENTON SARASOTA See daily papers for schedules The Florida Line TAMPA /01' our booklet

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102 FLORIDA'S SAFEST INVESTMENT Share in it. old-etablihed Building and Loan A.sociation Become a member of the Lakeland Build lng and Loan Aasodatlon and lnveat In ita capital atock. RETURNS 8% WITH 100% SECURITY Dividends of 2 "k are payable, In caah, every three months on full paid sharea. Subject to Supervision and Examination of the Comptroller of the State of Florida. Florida's higheat city; Florida's largeat inland citJT, finest climate and best water in the State; in Polk County, the largest citrus-producing county In the world. Let us tell you how you "'ay take advantage of thes facts and increas your iflcome. Ad: ua to aencl :you our boololet. LAKELAND BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOClA TION BOX 35 LAKELAND, FLORIDA In AUBURNDALE Imperial Polk County An old town of beautltal wide streets, well lighted. and haTing all improvements. 5 acres only 3 blocks from center of rapidly growing town-suitable for business or residence. Should double in valne withln twenty-four months. Bearing orange grove on propercy should provide for deferred pll7-ments. Conservatively priced at e21i,OOO. Terms, :1.4 cash-balance 1, 2 and 3 years. Communicate with owner. J. E. FORTNER, Realtor P. 0. Box lllZ, Lakeland, Florida, or 215 S. Tennessee Avenue SAN CARLOS HOTEL Fireproof PENSACOLA, FLORIDA Dear Folka, Listen-Adjoining St. Petersburg Lots $385.00 Only 5 mlles from P. 0. Near B1a-hways. I sed something-Nut sed. DAN MORRIS REALTOR 344 Cerrtral Ave. St. Petersburg, Fla. Suniland: The Magazine of Florida "Only a few months. But the old man considered him a treasure." "Where'd he come from? Who is he?" "I haven't the slightest idea." Lane made another notation in his little book and pursed his lips reflec tively. "You don't suspect any of the men who were here for the conference?" he said at last. "Of course not. They're all above suspicion." "Why so? Had you thought of the possibility of a daring criminal, who was well up on financial matters, masquerading as one of the financiers who were to come here for this conference to get his hands on the plans for the coup to sell to Gross?" "No I hadn't answered Franklin breathlessly. "Well such things have been done," replied the-attorney positively and made another notation. "You can't give me a hint as to who this phantom woman was or what she really wanted at the house?" "No. I can't figure her out at all." "Well, we'll have to find a motive for some of these people before we can begin to hang the thing on any of them. The motive is the big thing in a murder case. Find that and you've nearly al ways got your man-or woman. You don't know of anyone who would have a motive for killing Rogers?" "No, though he probably had plenty of enemies if one could find them." Lane rose suddenly. "I must be off," he said briskly. "There are a lot of nice possibilities in this case with which to work. I'm going to make the preliminary investigation here and after I have the matter lined out dad will come on and shoot the dynamite. He's just aching to get llis teeth in another good murder trial." "If you should see Miss Rogers," said Franklin hesitantly, "tell her I would like to talk to her." "I imagine she knows where you can be found if she wants to communicate with you," answered Lane dryly and departed. He was back before five o'clock, his plump face slightly flushed, his eyes gleaming with suppressed excitement. "I've unearthed a few things, old timer. You're a long way from the gallows yet. You'll probably rave at what I'm going to tell you, but it's all facts and facts worth considering. Rogers left every cent of his money to Elizabeth. And she isn't his own daughter. She's an adopted child and her motlze1 was a tall, angular, bony woma11." (The third installment of this thrilling Florida mystery story will appear in the April issue of "Suniland." Don't miss it.) Orange Growing Countries The five leading countries of the world engaged in growing citrus fruits, 'in order, are the United States, Spain, Italy, Japan and Palestine. According to a farmers' bulletin iss.ued by the United States Department of Agriculture, devoted to Citrus Fruits in the Gulf States, a map is shown which gives Florida more territory to grow citrus products than any other American state. The total production of the world is estimated at about 90,000,000 boxes, over half being credited to Florida and California. The WEST COAST CORPORATION OF FLORIDA MARIANNA, FLORIDA (Our Own CHICAGO, ILLINOIS (Fiaher Improved Farms ACREAGE SUBDIVISIONS CITY INCOME Wate.r Front Properties Operating from Marianna to Panama City-Jackson-Bay -Calhoun-Gulf Counties. We Have the Goods Members of this corporation were born and raised in these counties and many of our properties show continuous ownership by them for years back. Our titles are unquestioned. Our delivery is certain. Write us what you can handle and what amount you wish to invest. We will advise with you and for you "With man-to-man treatment wherein you cannot go wrong. We know minutely every condition and every detail throughout this territory. This expert advice and. cooperation should be worth more to you than anything you can BUY, for r we will tell you only the truth and give conditions only as they actually exist. We will serve you as long as you are interested in the property we sell. Our clients have said we do i:nore for them after they buy than we do to make the sale. Let us assist you in this manner and claim you as a ''booster." Our references are "Everybody" wherever are known. The Florida Movement has now turned our way. Marianni!l and Panama City are the centers of two great activities. Prices are yet virgin. Values only slightly advanced now but already starting. The big profits of the South and East Coast can be duplicated here the next year or two. Get yours now. Write us today what you can handle. We will submit a proposition to fit. Let's do it now. THE WEST COAST CORPORATION Nat West, P.-.-W. H. Millon, Vice Pt-., -F .. M. GolS
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Suni/q.nd: The Magazine o f Florida Architecture 103 (Continued from page 52) .. ud hand-made tile roofs, are, in Florida, as on the Mediterranean, a counterpart of stucco walls and stone trim. Building act1v1ty in Florida is demanding wider areas; a distinctive style of architecture is calling for a distinctive setting. The art of city planning i s receiving no less attention than the a r chitecture itself. Absen.ce here, to a great extent, of commercial life, with l eis ure and recreation uppermost, affords opportunity for the unconventional charm of the Mediterranean city. Broken or winding streets and closed plazas, f ram ing some gem of architecture, a r e reappearing as distinctive parts o f the Renaissance plan. With tree lined boulevards, diagonal or looped streets, long, straight avenues with architectural features interpolated, the Florida city has interest and beauty in the making. Florida affords to carry forward the growth of town planning in America which has been retarded by industrialism and modern modes of traffic. In the new cities of Florida, build ings may be constructed without such high regard for industrial economics a s elsewhere. The ;.rchitect and town planner is in position to record the grandeur of the Renaissance and also regain the charm and quaintness of the preRenaissance town. The quest of a naturay setting for a Mediaeval art may result in the recovery of much that was excellent in the Mediterranean plan. Old plazas may become glorified civic or community centers. Vaulted passageways through buildings and arcades serving as shelter are important tors in the Florida city plan. Leisure and the demand for air and space may render tall structures unnecessary and at the same time reduce our traffic problems. The mechanical city of America is in Florida giving way to Old World charm and beauty. While many development companies are striving with the zeal and enthusiasm of the Mediaeval church builders in their efforts to s ecure much that has been lost to us in architecture and civic art, still a word of praise ma;v be given one or two of these compames for the way in which they have from the first sought to achieve the forgotten ideals of a golden past. Some of the developments in and around Tampa arc ideally situated for European prototypes i n town planning, gardens, and buildings. Abundant water frontage, islands lying picturesquely off shore, lots served by waterways as in Venice, arcaded passage. -ways through buildings, boulevards looping the city, are all reminiscent of Madrid and Valencia Large buildings are being placed at important points to give to these new communities their full monumental value as in Renaissance towns. Against the buildings of white and colored stucco will be palm and evergreen foliage Parks in various sections give the effect of tropical gardens. Fruit trees for bloom, aromatic evergreen and shrub, yllow garden wal ks bordered with red earth and tile, add a distinctive touch to the house or patio. At certain spots, on the East Coast of Florida, nature has again provided a graceful, tropical forest as a setting for the ho u se s ; one is reminded of the pine forest near Ravenna or of the Clean, Quick, Economical Comfort on Chilly Days The Skinner way of installing WEIR steel warm-:air furnaces requires no excavationbut provides for the owner the cleanest source of comfort on those chilly days that come occasionally even to this most wonderful climate. The WELDED seams of THE WEIR STEEL FURNACE forever prevent any fine ashes or soot from entering your rooms and soiling the walls or hangings. And the quick responsiveness of its construction enables the WEIR to meet a drop in temperature almost before you have realized the chill yourself. The economy of the WEIR appeals because even those with ample money to spend dis like to tie up unnecessary amounts of it in heating plants that operate but occasionally in this climate. Our display rooms in all leading Florida cities are ready to give you detailed information .about this superior source of comfort. SKINNER MACHIN:ERY CO. DUNEDIN FLORIDA Tampa, Jacksonville, Miami, St. Petersburg, Orlando, W. Palm Beach, Lakeland and Bradenton The WEIR is made in Peoria, Ill. by the Meyer Furnace Co. SHEPHERD (POU CE) DOGS The lclea/ Cmnpanion a nd PTotector Today for tUuwar.d Booklee FLORIDA HEADQUARTERS Dixie Highway Delray, Florida FREE TRIP in FLORIDA is Unequaled for Investors Any kind of Real Estate--Any pla.ce in Florida Lots $100 up. Easy Payment: Call or Wire for Particulara-or Write Name abCil!e-Address below-and mail To the 44Year Old Reliable I "Bruce Service" for Investors 303 Tampa St., Tampa, Fla. Phone 2279

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida The Big Real Estate Pro/its In Florida Are Made By Those Who Invest When Towns Are Beginning Their Development This Opportunity Is Presented By The Town Of ZOLFO SPRINGS In the center of the famous farming and citrus region of HARDEE COUNTY, a town with facilities lacked by many big cities. Sewers, Paving (plus $340,000 in new paving now under way), Electricity, Railroad, 6 Highways (including the Dixie), Bus Lines, 4 Churches, Graded School, Senior High School, 2 Hotels, Bank, 2 Packing Houses, Tourist Camp, Pure Water, medicinal mineral springs, finely appointed swimming pool, newspaper, 150 homes, stores, telegraph office. This town is complete in its improvements. We are helping it become a city. Our lots are all within the town limits. They are 50 x 150 feet, carrying Pure Water, Paved Streets, Electricity, Sewers. Deed issued by Trust Companty. Title policy. Prices as low as $450. Terms: down, balance in 6 quarterly payments at only 6 per cent interest. ZOLFO SPRINGS REALTY CORPORATION Zolfo Springs 1109 Franklin St., Tampa 216 N. 4th St., St. Petersburg 32 Arcade Bldg., Lakeland 12 P. 0. Arcade, W. Palm Beach Joe E. Jenkins, Plant City 1 Baker-Waters Building, Auburndale 18 East Center St., Sebring Bradenton Wauchula Avon Park Lake Alfred Haines City Winter Haven I ZOLFO SPRINGS REALTY CORP., Zolfo Springs, Fla. Gentlemen: Without obligation to me, please send me literature giving full information about your project at Zolfo Springs. Name .... : .... ................................. Street Address ..................... : City and State ........................ I 1 I I (BunllaDd) 105

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106 Developers Attention! We specialize in high class Duval County waterfront and highway acreage tracts for investment or development. Nineteen years' experience in constantly selling Duval County acreage is offered you. Investments Made in Suburban Jacksonville Acreage Are Bringing Handsome R e t u r n s Tracta From 10 to 600 Acrea SEWELL & NEWLON, Inc. 316-18 Dyal-Upchurch Buildin1r Jacksonville, Florida Phone 5-llZS Let Us Tell You About CLEARWATER and Pinellas County THE GEO. T. PINDER ORGANIZATION II 511 Cleveland St. Phone 2380 Clearwater, Florida LiucoiDa F cmlaona "Perfect Senice" THE UNIVERSAL CAR Authorized Ford Deal FRED FARISS Phone 4245-3294 1701-3 St., Tampa, Fla. Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Entering the room from the hall at the right, one faces the inglenook with windows set on either side of the fireplace, and two more windows in the wall beyond. The opposing wall is made interesting with the wall painting and the alcove designed in imitation of the siesta nook of a Spanish home. The front wall is broken by a battery of arched doors leading to the sun porch, while the back wall has a single arched door opening. onto a cloistered balcony at the side al).d an arch opening into the dining-room. The cost of furnishing this room, irrespective of draperies, was three thousand dollars. The Chinese rug is valued at something over nine hundred dollars ; and as the other furnishings consist mainly of two tapestried chairs, and the refectory Italian table, the value of the divan and chair can be computed approximately. The dining-room furniture, consisting of table, chairs, buffet and cabinet, is again in the Italian mode The cabinet, which is not shown in the picture, is designed on architectural lines, which was such a strong point with the Italians. While this furniture is much less expensive than the furniture in the livingroom, it has the appearance of being elegant because the lines and the wood are good. The cost of rug and furniture, without draperies, approximates one thousand dollars The draperies are the same as those in the living-room and the rug is a Chinese with tan background and rose and blue design. A battery of glass doors open onto the cloistered balcony, already mentioned, while solid wooden doors open into the hall. But the most interesting part of the dining-room is, perhaps, its offspring the breakfast nook, seen through the archway, and the most interesting part of the breakfast nook is the intriguing design of the Chinese rug, which includes a tea pot and tea basket. We are told, generally, that objects not meant to be walked upon should never be included in the design of a rug, but the perfect yet shadowy tracing of the design of these objects gives a distinct and delightful essence to this rug as a feature of the breakfast nook. The Chinese hav e an uncanny psychology in introducing these little things of every-day life : a fan, a book, or a tea pot, in perfect artistry, even in the design of a rug. Seven Billion 'Dollars Worth of Food (Continued from page 51) way one turns in this true modern El Dorado. Let us take for example, the lowly hen. Few realize her importance in the general scheme of civilization, yet an analysis of what this barnyard fowl might contribute to the wealth of Florida and help in filltng the depleted market baskets of the world, will be surprising. In 1924, the United States exported eggs to the value of $28 117,-102. Practically eighty-five per cent. of these came from west of the Missis. sippi River; from as far as California Oregon and Washington. Most of them were shipped from York. England purchased 13,855 ,62 0 dozen; I Cuba, 13,080 ,68 0 dozen; Mexico, 5,848,032 dozen; Brazil, 4,780 060 do zen; (Continued on page 112) Mr. Foster's Tours to Cuba Unequalled in Scope, Character and Efficiency From St. Petersburg andTampa every Thursday and Sunday. Every deta'il prearranged Escort with party all the time Four days in Havana and environs E very worthwhile place visited Accommodations at the finest hotels. Sightseeing and service by excellent. private a utomobiles. Entertainment of the highest order. ../IJk Mr. Foster St Petersburg, Central Ave. and Second St. Tampa, Hotel Hillsboro JacksonviJle St. Augustine Palm Beach Miami Daytona Orlando West P alm Beach ohe ..fi.sl( Mr. Foster Travel Information Service Accurate and dependable information and literature relative to Travel, Hotels, Local Sightseeing, Automobile Lines and Roads cheerfully given, without charge. Rese rvatioos for steamers, traifls and holels evwywher. Tickets for Ocklawaha River, Everiladu Canal and other Florida water trips. A NATIONAL SERVICE 5Z OFFICES

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Florida Farm Information Furnished FREE Do you know that Florida land will yield a greater variety of the products per acre which are useful to man than any other state in the Union? Do you know that all of this. production is put on the market at a time when the greater portion of the United States is covered by snow and ice? Do you know that all of our fruit, vegetables and everything grown here is shipped north at a time when prices are highest? Do you know that producers receive three times as much for their milk per gallon as you receive in the north? Do you know that we do. not need expensive barns and poultry houses to properly care for stock? Do you know that you can buy exactly the kind of a farm wanted at an attractive price on long terms and at a low rate of interest in a land .. flowing with milk and honey," a land possessing a perfect climate? WE NEED DAIRY FARMERS Why? This state imported in 1925 over $24,000,000 worth of Dairy products. WE NEED POULTRY RAISERS Why? This state imported $12,000,000 worth of poultry and eggs in 1925. Information relating to all sections and counties regarding their productiveness will be furnished free gratis on request. 107 MAIL THIS r -----------------------------------BUREAU OF INFORMATION 211 E. First Avenue Miami, Florida BUREAU OF INFORMATION, 211-213 N. E. First Ave., Miami, Florida. Kindly send me information about the opportunity Florida offers Farmers. I am interested in (dBirying)-(poultry (fruit growing)-(dirt farming) Check item information wanted upon. Nam,e ........................................................... Address ........................................................

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108 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida MiaiDi Buyer's Guide Bonds and Mortgages 8% GOLD BONDS Double security for every dollar invested Free booklet Southern Bond & Mortgage Co. lncorp<>rated Electrical Supplies CONTRACTORS-DEALERS AppliaDeH nstar 28 N. Miami Ave. Sapplln Phone 3024 Hotel For Your Comfort W. R. Bevier, Mgr HOTEL TA-MIAMI MIAMI, FLORIDA lOami' Commen:W Hotel, Open all year. Clean, Comfortable at Moderate Ratee Maps New Location, Subdiviaion and Road Map of Dade County and Broward County, Including Key Largo. Scale: 1 inch, 1 mile. New Edition City of Miami Map Ready, New Map Broward County. Scale : 2 inchee, 1 mile. KARL SQUIRES Phone 8833 7117 Beclfonl Bid&'. Realtors EDWIN W. FISKE REALTOR 0 300 South Miami Avenue Telephone 6571 MIAMI, FLORIDA New York Ollicee 13 Depot Place MOUNT VERNON, N. Y. Realtors EUGENE PATTERSON AGENCY REALTORS We Bvy, Sell or Ad 01 Yovr AKtfff ;,. A"Y Ki"d of Realty Call, Write or Wlre Z87 Hahn Blq. CAUSEWAY REALTY CORP. 19-21 N. E. Second Avenue Miami -:-Florida Membr of Mi11mi Chamber of Commerce a"d Miami Realty Board Real Estate EMERSON REALTY CO. 21 N. E. Flnt AnDae Complete Real Estate Service Ia All Florida See Our Page Ad. In This Issue Owners, Subdividers, Developers Local and Properties We Handle Every Phue of Real Eatate, Large Acreage Tracta a Specialty. Look for Our Full-Page Ad. This Ieaue PHON E WRITE OR WIRE Wallner-Haynes Realty Co. -'-RELIABILITY 66 N. E. Second St. Phooe 46116 MIAMI, 'FLORIDA Real Estate WE HAVE OR CAN GET For You Any Kla.cl ol Property In Any Part ol Florida Write Us Today M.D. MORSE IDI S. E. First Street Miami, Florida ON GRA TIGNY BOULEY ARD A Beautiful Place for YOUR HOME We Will Gladly Send lr
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Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida COVE HOTEL, PANAMA CITY, FLA. BUNKER'S COVE, SUBDIVISION DE LUXE ON BEAUTIFUL ST. ANDREWS BAY lW A $5,500,000.00 subdivision development. outside money we are bringing in for investment here. By the millions of local money invested in our lots and in homes to be erected on them. Sales of lots to date in excess of $3,000,000.00. Two-thirds of these sales, or more than $2,000,000.00, to people from other places. Profits on re-sales made through our offices or reported to us already () v e r 8600,000.00. Helpiog to Build the Greater P--.na CityBy the millions we are spending on improvements. By the millions of By the millions of profit we are helping our buyers to ll}ake on re-sales, most of which will be reinvested Jn the City, lluddort Rulb c... 1-., P111ao City, Flwldo, Owoert &114 D-11 ...... e1 Baakw'o C.... Pleoeo tielld al ODGe Withoul obUrotlon 1o me. run IDformottoa llq. Name Acldr-.................... Cltr. .. .. .. .. !Mala ...... Telling Florida's Wonderful Story The magazine of Florida is SUNILAND-each month portraying-in picture and story the "forward march" of Florida. Interesting articles by Florida men who know the possi bilities and needs of the state, who are authorities on their subjects. Entertaining fiction by America's well known writers. Every issue contains beautiful rotogravure sections picturing vividly the varied achievements of Florida and the many reasons why life is delightful there. Subscribe now and keep in touch with all the state. Tear out this page and send it with $1.50 to the Circulation Manager SUNILAND MAGAZINE P. 0. BOX 2711 TAMPA, FLORIDA

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110 Sunila n d: The Magazin e of Florida 10 ACRES FLORIDA LAND FOR $250. $25 per acre J. S. Blain's Sensational Land Offering is still open to you. Never before couid you purchase Florida land in such small tracts and at such a low price. And remember that this land is well located-in the northern part of Florida where some of the best agricultural land in the entire State is producing from two to three crops a year. It is impossible for us to tell you the exact County these 10 acre tracts will be in--owing to the rapidity of sales. However, at the time of writing this copy we have lands in such well known counties as Columbia-Baker-jefferson and Taylor. But at $25 per acre--you cannot go wrong. Future activity may center anywhere--prices may sky-rocket in any one of these sections We are offering these tracts on the most reasonable terms --only $62.50 cash-balance $25 quarterly at 6% interest. Either send us your check for $62.50 today and let us make a desirable selection for you or write for further information as to the exact location. We would suggest sending your check at once-the present price of $25 per acre will not last long. J. S. Blain's All-Florida Organization Executive Office N. E. First Avenue, Miami, Florida

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Suni/and: The M_agazine of Florida FOLLOW A SUCCESSFUL OPERATOR The record of J. S. Blain is his best recommendation. He offered you Merritt's Island acreage at $50 per acre-investigation will show you that that same acreage is today selling at $200 per acre and up He offered you St. Andrews Bay Acreage at $100 per acre -and created such activity iii that section that all his property was withdrawn from the market. He offered you Flagler County acreage--from which many profitable resales have been made. He created one of the greatest sensations in Florida by, offering acreage in 10 acre tracts at real wholesale pnces. Today He Has A Message Regarding the Future of Florida Every live-wire investor should send us the coupon below and learn what]. S. Blain's belief as to the future of Florida is-he knows Florida-knows values-and is ready to tell you his opinion. SEND US THIS C.OUP.ON TODAY 111 r------------..---------._--------------------------J. S. Blain's AU-Florida Organization, 211-215 N. E. First Avenue, Miami, Florida. Without obligation please send me your message as to the Future of Florida. Name ...... ; ........................................................................... Address ............................................... -................................

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112 A Florida Home that meets Expectations Residents m Pulver I sIan ds known a s "Florida's Most Beautiful Mile," will actually live in an atmosphere of Florida home-life as northern visitors picture it. Entirely surrounded by water, planted with tropical shrubbery, palms and pines, and the site of beautiful homes, Pulver Islands will truly be "Florida's Most Beautiful Mile." Three separate islands, connected one to the other and from Pass-aGrille key to the mainland with a mile long permanent causeway, will form the island community. The gulf beaches, boating and fishing-social life and the business center of St. Petersburg are all easily accessible. Residents will live in an ideal home community in the center of the preferred residential center of the Sunshine City. Further information on application to Frank Fortune Pulver, president. Pulver Islands Development Corporation Suite S-6 Hotel Detroit St. Petersburg, Fla. Suniland: The Magazine of Florida (Continued from page 106) Argentine, 1,881,710 dozen; Central America and the West Indies about 2,000,000 dozen. And let me impress this one fact upon my readers: not one country bought all the eggs it could use. In other words, the market is always short of this almost absolute food necessity, and could consume more than three times the present production of the United States. It is worthy of more than mere comment to say that Florida, almost across the street from Cuba, did not ship one single egg to a market buying more than thirteen million dozens and willing to buy twenty-five million dozens of eggs annually. [f Florida raised hens and exported eggs, this one industry alone would help relieve the world famine for eggs and in addition throw into the laps of those engaged in this line of work at least $50,000,000 worth of business each year. Furthermore, hens must be fed and the food for their maintenance would mean more land under cultivation, more in comes and more contented husbandmen, removed from possible famine. 'I might enumerate fully twenty-five different industries specially adapted for Florida's climate .and soil wherein the same conditions exist and where it is equally possible to help stop the oncoming holocaust, but space forbids. Perhaps it might be well, since I have spoken of the lowly hen, to refer to her equally ignored aqueous cousin, the duck. It is a fact that New York City has never had its full quota of ducks; neither has the rest of the world for-that matter, for all Europe and Asia look upon the duck as a delicacy The possi bilities offered for duck raising in Florida outrival anything anywhere in all the world, and in other lands would be taken advantage of to the full limit. Florida is clotted with lakes wherever one goes. Lake County alone boasts of 1,400 spring-fed, fresh water lakes, teeming with edible fish. Yet I have never sef'n 1,400 domesticated ducks on all of these lakes. If some man with vision, appreciative of the fact that the majority of his fellow men are hungry for fresh ducks, would engage in this line of work, he could make a fortune. Cold storage cars, winter and summer, await his offerings for northern and European markets and a hungry world is anxious to buy all of this food deli cacy that can be produced. Twenty-eight years of my life have been spent in the congested and the remote places of the earth, where men of all nations traded. I know, through having lived in the marts of Europe, Asia, Africa, Mexico, Central and South America, Canada, the East and the West Indies, whereof I speak, and without fear of contradiction I say that Florida, and only Florida, can aid in postponing the coming of the day when men. women and children will be crying for food. And what is greatest of all, those who till the soil of Florida and thereby come to the relief of their fellow men, can with great profit to themselves, accomplish all of this work in six months' time, and still have the remaining six months of the year for other lucrative employment or recreation. Will Florida rise to the challenge which civilization has made and give from her rich fields, her fertile orchards and. her numerous waters, the essentials so vital to keep the world. from witnessing the horrors of famine andwars? A MID the hills and lakes of Lake County, in Central Florida, lies Tavares, the County Seat of Lake. Here nature has been lavish in her gifts. Situated on Lake Dora, Lake Harris, and Lake Eustis, three of the largest Lakes in the State; the great Inland Waterway, with good roadways and scenic boulevards, she sits like a Gem. An all year climate, boating, fishing, golf and the best of hunting, furnish activity for the sportsman, cherishe& age and challenges y o u t h. H e r groves, truck farms, and ferneries give those who seek occupation an opportunity. Lake County has available six and a half miilion dollars for the improvement of roads and bridges, and the building program in Tavares, now under way, amounts to nearly a million dollars. LAKEWOOD PARK is in Tavares, five blocks from the Court House and New Hotel, one block from the City School Buildings and on Beautiful Lake Eustis. It is highly improved and sensibly restricted. Build a home here. Prices in keeping with location and desir ability. For full information, write or wire. Sipple-Baker Realty Corporation Biltavem Hotel Tavares, Fla.

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Turreta of the unique Tampa Bay Hotel, owned by the dty. TAMPA Florida's All-the-rear-Round Metropolis A Mooriah influenced courthouae and a modern city hall are outltanclinl featurea or Tampa. -118

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Turrets of the unique Tampa Bay Hotel, owned by the city TAMPA Florida's All-the-rear-Round Metropolis A Moorish influenced courthouse and a modem city haU are outstan<:lina: features of Tampa. 113

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Along Tampa's magnificent Bay Shore Boulevard, a favorite city drive. FLORIDA'S GREATEST PoRT CITY The Stor_y of Tatnpa and Its Varied Activities By Carl Edward Perry FOL'R hundred years ago they came to Tampa Bav seeking .gold. Adventurers from far off lands, fired with stories of fab ulous mountains of the precious metal to be found in the new world, sailed the high seas to the peninsula of the virgin country, hunting a ready-made fortune of nuggets, fighting or de frauding the Indians as occasion demanded. dustry, sagacity and investment. In all the dramatic recital of the wonders of the awakened Florida there has been one overtone. The pessimists and skeptics might shake their heads at the prodigious manner in which the cities and towns of the state were growing; the cautious and ultra-conservative might wonder at the eventual future of the state, but always there has been agreement on one cardinal point: Tampa is sound. Tampa is stable It was in the year 1528, according to the historians of the period, that Pamphilio de Narvaez sailed into Tampa Bay, accompanied by three hundred adventurers who were quite frankly out for the money. Failing in thei\. quest, the remnant of the band finally reached Mexico; carrying with them the tale that Florida was a frost, without a vestige of gold, but having instead a plenitude of sand and unfriendly Indians. A thousand pages of history, political, industrial, economic and social, have been made in the Tampa area since that time. Still the adventurers come: industrious artisans, business men, laborers, tourists and pleasure-seekers this time, looking for no unearned gold, but willing to find their fortunes in the pay en velope and the prof its of their own in-The artistic entrance to one of the attractive new homes in Beach Park, Tampa. As the more recent historians of Florida might chronicle, however, these stories did nothing at all to deter other adventurers from coming, and eleven years 114

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The impoaing sky-line of Tampa viewed across the Hillsborough River. later, in 1539, there came the fleet of Spanish vessels under the command of Hernandez De Soto Landing at a point not far from Safety Harbor, the seekers for gold penetrated the wild country toward the site of Tampa, which was close to the stronghold of the most powerful Indian tribe then dwelling on the peninsula UNDER a massive oak, which tradi tion has it, still stands in one of the city's parks, De Soto met the chieftain of the ,Indians in a councii of peace, and shortly afterwards the Spanish invaders marched on to their tragic fate in the new world. It was not until after a formal trans fer of the province of Florida had been made from Spain to the United States, that a permanent settlement of whites was made on the site of Tampa. De termined to get their mone y's worth out of th e transaction, the United States military-au thor ities quickly arranged fo, a series of forts to he built to serve as strongholds against the Indians; and among the strategic locations chosen, was the site of the present c ity of Tampa. Here was built the important military post which came to be known as Fort Brooke, after its commander, General George Marshall BrooMe. The mil itary reservation about the fort covered a territory of sixteen square miles, at the mouth of the river. To this day the impress of the old fort lingers in the colloquial designation of the area as "the Garrison." Assured a reasonable degree of pro tection from the Indians by the pres ence of the army post, civilians short ly drifted into the region, to engage in business and trade, and thus was formed the nucleus of the coming metropolis. Even at that time, and for many years before, the entire area about the site of the old fort was known as Tampa, from the Indian name which means "split wood for quick fires," generally traced back to the large quantities of lightwood, or fat pine knots, to be found in the regton. From its earliest days, Tampa has always been distinguished as a trading point From the territory around it, Speedboat warming up for a. race in Tmpa Bay. within a radius of a hundred miles the early pioneers of the state came to transact their business and make their purchases. Ships from Mobile, Ala bama, encouraged by the natural port facilities of Tampa, brought mer cil;lndise at. frequent intervals, and other goods to line the shelves of the early merchants came by ox team overland. Just before the middle of the nine teenth century, with the Indians vir tually subdued, there was given to Hillsborough county, in which Tampa is located, a grant of land from the federal government in the form of on.e hundred and sixty acres of the Fort Brooke site. Coincident with the gift, the name of Fort Brooke was re linquished and the official title of the little village became Tampa. In 1883 the government discontinued entirely the military reservation and shortly afterwards it was opened for home steads by the department of interior. IN 1849, the entire citizenry of Tampa joined in a mass meeting to consider the question of incor poration. When the ballots were counted or hands tallied, as the case may have been, there was a unanimous vote for the decision to apply to the legisla ture for a charter, all fourteen of the voters being for the 115

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A Camqie Ubrary is one of Tampa's civic a1111ets. Desp1te the decision, life being pleasant and the necessity not urgent, it was six years before Tampa was legally assigned a place on the map It may be gathered that the great, open spaces about the village were frequent and commodious. At the time of the mass meeting, there were not more than 185 persons who looked upon Tampa as their home town, and for many years life wagged on in the most serene manner im aginable. By 1864 the village was looking up, and there were those among the five hundred population who were confidently predicting that Tampa would one day be a city with three thousand, perhaps even five thousand people. The first real impetus to the population came when the "homestead ers'' arrived, and by the end of the year 1883 the census gave Tampa per manent residents to the n\lmber of 1,450, a most creditable showing con. sidering the fact that the village had not yet felt the magic touch of a railroad. THEN in 1884 the South Florida Railroad, now incorpOrated with the Atlantic Coast Line; brousht its IU6 tracks into Tampa, and in the state census of 1885 the city's population had risen to 2,376 people. About this time the genius of Henry B. Plant came to bear upon Tampa. He purchased a three-fifths share of stock in the first railroad to enter the city, and then he proposed to capitalize the interest that he felt sure would be awakened by the From the seven leU tbipe come to Tampa' pnt port. bettered transportation tac1hnes w1th the construction of a modern hotd. Even Tampa's most optimist i c citi zens were agreed that Plant was really too hopeful for the future of the modest city when he proposed to build a hotel of three hundred rooms on the west bank of the Hillsborough river. Tampa was coming along, to be sure, but there was a limit to the progress that might be expected. It was more than faith, however, which was pushing the genius of the west coast to ward this decision. He knew, for instance, that within the first eighteen months of the opening 9f the railroad, a total of 45,000 persons had been brought to the terri tory. Fr9m this number, which he foresaw a.S increasing,,each year, Plant hoped .to gain patronage for his hotel. Slowly the Moorish minarets above the prO.. digious pile of brick and mortar took form against the western sky. Plant spared no expense m either the erection or the fur nishing of the hotel, and on the day it opened, special trains and distinguished guests came to view its splendor from such sophisticated and metropolitan centers as New

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Washington, Philadelphia, Boston, Savannah, New Orleans and Atlanta. YEARS later, after the death of its builder, the hotel was sold to the city of Tampa for $125,000. With the structure, the city acquired title to the surrounding grounds, and now this showplace oftropical vegetation is known as Plant Park. Both the hotel and grounds are now conserva t:ively estimated tv have a value of five dollars, and operated by the city, the hotel annually attracts to its doors a host of notables. With the outbreak of the Spanish American war Tampa was again in the limelight of national attention. The city was chosen as the port of em barkation for the American troops and thousands and thousands of northern soldiers for the first time were afforded an opportunity to come into intimate contact with a Florida city. In 1890 the population had in creased to 5,532, and between that date and 1910 was the largest of any city in its class in the United States, the percentage of increase being 596. In the next ten years Tampa came close to duplicat. ing the performance, the percentage of increase being 143.2, exceeded by only one other city in the United States. The habit of doubling its popula tion every decade apparently became fixed. The national census of 1900 accorded the city a population of 15,839, and ten years later it was 37,782. Each succeeding year has noted an increase, as may be seen from the following census figures: 1912-44,470; 1913-46,792; 1914-49,156; 1915-50,104; 1924-94,808. He would be a rash statistician, in deed, who would attempt to fix the city's population at the beginning of 1926. The estimates vary from 125,000 up, and every Tampa citizen, sup ported by an increasing number of other Florida residents, are asserting positively that it is the largest city in the state. The chorus of protests that this assertion first evoked grows weaker; Tampa has a disconcerting record of making good its predictions. TAMPA's growth has been logical and orderly, and those factors which contribute towards continued progress of any metropolis are made more. manifest each year. Consider the triumvirate that has made Tampa: industry, port and transportation fa cilities, and a rich trade territory. Add to this the presence of valuable raw materials and a climate which attracts thousands of winter tourists each year, and Tampa's future seems adequately assured. First among Tampa's industries is the manufacture of cigars. In 1886 the first two factories came to the city, one under the guidance of Sanchez and Haya, and the other that of Vin cente Martinez Ybor. The first deft fingers of the Spanish and Cuban workmen who rolled the smokes that have made a city famous have been multiplied many hundreds of times since the industry came to Tampa, and now there is invested in the city's cigar factories more .than Hundreds of huge steamers make the port of Tampa each year carrying a burden of merchandiee. 117

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Attractive Spanish homes are to be found in every section of the city. $15,000,000. The workers number nearly 22,000 and their annual payroll is approximately $15,000,000 Within the year just ended the combined factories manufactured a total of 483,509,088 cigars, not just ordinary smokes, for the most part, but clear Havana cigars, in which Tampa leads the world. Associated with the cigar industry is the business of making cigar boxes from cedar logs imported from Cuba and Mexico. The cigar industry has lent an old-world charm to the city of Tampa. The workers have their own dubs, theaters, res taurants, churches, schools and libraries, and no one has achieved an appreciation of the city until he has dined in one of the luxurious Spanish restaurants of the foreign sectiOn. Despite the predominance of the cigar industry in Tampa, manufacturers of other u cts are choosing the city as factory locations in increasing numbers. In a survey of the county recently, it was demonstrated that 825 different arti cles are being manufactured, about three-fourths of them for 118 Florida markets. Among the major in dustries are the manufacture of ships, fertilizer, mattresses, soap, china, ex tr;Jcts and marmalades, auto acces sories, bricks and heavy hardware. TAMPA is. theheadquartersof the Flor ida Citrus Exchange, the co-opera-The huge workroom o( one o( Tampa't largett cigar factoriet. tive orange and grape-fruit marketing association, an organization whose presence automatically makes the city the citrus center of the state. From the headquarters is directed the national advertising campaign of the association, and to the banks of Tampa come the millions of dollars which is paid the growers for their fruit. In its port facilities Tampa has easily taken first rank among those of the southeast, exceed ing in the total tonnage such long established ports as Charleston and Savannah. The city ships more phosphate than any other port in the world, and during the year 1925 more than a mil lion and a quarter tons of this important fertilizer ingredient were shipped from the city's harbors. In the south Florida section, of which Tampa is the distributing center, according to a government estimate, is located more than half of the world's known supply of phos phate. T UMBER is another important L export, and during one year a total of 21,361,2 79 feet of pitch pinelumber.wasexported. From the ports of the world there

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come theships with cargo space for Tampa's. products, and by barge, schooner and steamer shipments are made to such far otf countries as Argentine, Belgium, Cuba, Dominican Repub lic, Italy, England, Germany, -Italy, Martinique, The Netherlands, Porto Rico, Spain and Uruguay. The largest import tonnage is that of crude andrefined oil, while the greatest money value of imports is in Havana tobacco, which in the year 1925 paid a customs toll -of $2,210,105.11. Fortupate by virtue of being the nearest port of call to the Panama Canal, and sheltered In a splendid land-locked harbor on every hand he will see the tangible evidence of this growth and prosperity in building and improvement. Perhaps he may be surprised if he is informed that in the year 1924Tampa's building permits ran int
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In the deep water channel of the port of Tampa, even the largest ships of the ocean can enter in safety. On every side the city was rapidly overspreading its boundaries, until an alert electorate sanctioned the addi tion of much new territory to the con stricted municipality. Out in the bay, a powerful suction dredge built up a grassy and useless key into a residen tial wonder known as Davis Islands; Temple Terrace, on the banks of the Hillsborough River, afforded an attractive and beautiful outlet to the northeast; in another section Beach Park found its natural charms en hanced by scores of residential palaces; across the bay in a direct line from the city there is coming into being a mam moth creation known as Tampa Beach, with its own business centers and six miles of incomparable water-front. Temple Crest, Country Club Estates, Golden Hills-who can name off-hand the scores of new suburban areas which are clustering about the city? Despite the unparalleled activity which has characterized the Tampa of the last few years, h("r citizens have not forgotten how to play. Florida is the winter playground of the nation, and Tampa is in the center of things, with a variety of sports and recrea tions which appeal to the visitor and permanent resident alike. But how, save in staccato utter. ances, is one to chronicle all the facts concerning Tampa? Tampa has a com. mission form of government, one of the first large cities in the south to adopt the measure; the city churches have grown with the population and within twelve monthsspent$1,000,000 in physical expansion; Tampa is the .first city in the south to adopt the au tom a tic telephone system; the health of her citizens is zealously guarded; her parks and playgrounds are notable for their beauty; the marvelous ex panse of the city's school system has done much to attract winter residents who have a regard for their children's education. Mayor P.G. WallhassaidofTampa: "Tampa, acknowledged by all im partial investigators to be the most substantial city in the state, invites good people everywhere to enjoy its famed hospitality and to participate in its unequalled advantages. Here will he found opportunity for both the man with capitaland the man who works. The one may invest his money with profit and the other may earn his liv ing amid comfortable surroundings and the best climate on earth." The Gandy Bridge stretches six miles Old Tampa Bay, the longest automobile bridge in the world.

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remJJ/i/JiJT(Ja lJsloles FLORIDA'S MASTERPIECE Greatness is measured by the capacity to serve. Temple Terrace Estates, even with becoming modesty, may be called a great development. Its service to Florida, to Tampa and to hundreds of their representative citizens is an achievement of which its owners and projectors are duly proud. To make a place where life is LIVING, where wholesome recreation and social pleasures are part of the days' routine, is good work .well done. Temple Terrace Estates with its gayeties and gath .. erings, its many beautiful and quaintly artistic residences, its air of restfulness and peace, has done much to broaden the. significance of the word "home." It is a truly satisfying setting for "jewel" homes. / / / / / / TEMPLE TERRACE ESTATES Tl!1'1f'LI! 'TMCC. I!STAIN.S t:AII NTR" ca..u / ,"" .OFFICES HILLSBOROUGH HOTEL BlDG. / // TEMPLE TERRACE / ESTATES TAMP A, FLORIDA "6mCES: HIU,.SBORouoH HOTEl /' FLORIDA St. Peteraburg Sala Of/it;a /' / Please send me descriptive literature 410 CENTRAL AVENUE -',-'' of Temple Terrace Estates. Tampa Sala Otlica 200 EAST LAFAYETI'E ST. Coleman &. Clark Onranlsadoll ColeiDIUl &. Clark Otpnla,don / / Write name and addreos on 11Ul1111nof thllpqemd mall 121

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122 Our Show Room T_HE modern home requires a combination of perfect .taste and distinctive individ .. uality. Those who insist on both inva .. riably seek the service of this organization which has amply demonstrated its superior skill in home decoration. Here you receive the aid of an organization qualified by long exPerience in developing interi .. ors, and this service is available for the small bungalow as well as the great mansion. INTERIOR. FURNISHERS AND DECORATORS TYLER NEAR FRANKLIN STREET TAMPA

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Outdoor Sports all winter long-Motor boating in palatial yachts, or trim staunch cruisers and sporty sailboats .. the dashing spray and thrilling joy of a hairpin turn at fifty miles an hour in a racing speedboat .. !lquaplaning behind a speeding motor boat .. with leading stars from all America ... thrilling outdoor sports every day in ida's winter sunshine! This fun program of outdoor recreation tinues all winter long at Davis Islands and is making happier, healthier persons of thousands every day. And they are making Davis Islands known throughout the land as the winter sports center of Florida. D.P. DAVIS PROPERTIES Tampa, Florida Brancha FIOTida 123

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124 small investor with 4oo or more can now share in the profits of our unusual FloridCl investments IN response to countless letters from small investors throughout the United States who wish to share in the profits being made in Florida real estate, we have incorporated our company to provide a rare profit opportunity for their funds. Our profits are derived from the buying, selling and developing of Florida real estate, by skilled executives of long experience, backed by a bril liant record of success. We know Florida thoroughly and hold the confidence of countless satisfied clients. $40,000 in Stock (all common) McMASTER and McMASTER Incorporated You may subscribe for one to ten shares at $100 each in this well-known firm and share profit possibility of our unusual Florida investments. Because we wish to distribute this investment opportunity over a wide circle of investors, subscriptions are limited to not more than 10 shares; in fact, one share to each of 400 different. people would be most desirable. Reservations only are being accepted at this time because every indicatiOn points to an over-subscription and we wish to accommodate the greatest number of investors. Send in your application today, stating the number of shares desired, with a remittance for only 25 % of the amount. Applications will be filed in order as received and if accepted you will be notified regarding the 75% balance due. We reserve the right to return any applications or re-. mittances. (See opposite page for details of a new development now being offered.) McMASTER and McMASTER, Inc. 311-313 Warner Bldg. C. R. McMaster President OFFICERS R. H. McMaster Vice-President DIRECTORS Tampa, Florida R. J. McMaster Secu. and Treatt. C. R. McMaster, Tampa, Fla. R. H. McMaster, Tampa, Fla. R. J. McMaster, Tampa, Fla. G. H. McMaster, Columbia,S. C. (Vice-Pres., 1st National Bank) (Retired Col. of U.S. Armjl) W. E. Grable, Tampa, Fla. H. E. McMorris, Tampa, Fla. W ]. Bivens, Atty., Tampa, Fla.

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One-half mile from city limits of TAMPA Florida's Metropolitan Center of the West Coast ACOZY home and a safe investment in sunny Florida is now possible to the family of moderate means in Pineknoll, the fully restricted and highly improved subdivision within a half mile from Tampa, the growing metropolis of the West Coast. Lot prices include the modern conveniences of water, electricity, hard-surfaced streets and ornamental shrubbery Several homes will be built by the developers this year, and it is expected that investors will also start the erection of their homes here. Such activity is bound to increase values on these lots which can be bought for a small down payment and easy monthly terms. Business lots 25x80 on 100 foot street will be sold for $15.00 per front foot. Apartment lots 55x120 on 100 foot street will be sold for $400.00 to $600.00 each. Residential lots SOx115 will be sold for $350.00 to $550.00. TERMS: 1/S cash, balance $15.00 per month and interest. These prices are for a limited time only. CALL <\\' WRITE <\\' WIRE MCMASTER AND MCMASTER, Inc. REAL ESTATE 311 Warner Bldg. Tampa, Fla. 125

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126 ItS Open The New Causeway Connecting Metropolitan Tampa with the Venice of the West Coast On Wednesday, February the tenth, Gov. ernor John Martin, of Florida, cut the white ribbon across the entrance to the new Causeway, connecting the heart of business Tampa and TAMPA BEACH, the West Coast's greatest suburb. This act of Florida's Chief Executive marked the official opening of an area destined to relieve the territorial congestion of Tampa, the metropolis of Florida-and in addition made possible investment opportunities in gilt-edged Florida Realty, not excepted in the History of Florida's unusual prosperity. Buy NOW in TAMPA BEACH-Six full miles facing on the water front -Deep waterways-High sea wall-Water boule vard-All civic improvements. H Only ten minutes from City Hall of Tampa" General Offices: Tampa Beach Bldg. Tampa, Florida Jhe Venice PI the west Coast [ J. R .CLARK.. PresiJe,f jfJ

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. Enchanting View of Tampa Skyline .. -fronl, TAMPA BEACH I 127

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128 The Dawn of a New Era in Florida Profit Making F LORIDA'S period of frenzted land specu lation is rapidly coming to a close. The land shark and realty gambler have vanished like mist before a morning sun History has run true to forn1 and has repe.ated itself once more. Today is the beginning of a new era. The builder and the producer are taking command The architect, the engineer, the manufacturer, the agriculturist and the merchant sense the growing opportunities in Florida and are assuming their respon sibilities Here again history is re peating itself Obviously, the large:;t profits of the future will accrue to those who invest in realty directly in the path of Florida's predetermined building program. AFTER careful appraisal, the executives oi this organization have accepted choice list ings of desirable property including moderate priced homes, business sites, and favorably situated lots in fast growing subdivisions. We are interested in hearing from buyers seeking building space and from those who wish prompt sales of holdings in established sections. Be fore buying or selling, we urge investors to call, or to write us for a copy of our "F1orida Blue Book" containing authentic facts, figures, and useful information regarding the present status of the trend iri Florida real estate. This book has been compiled for the express purpose of serving our clients by present ing the true conditions in Florida realty opportunities as they exist today. The book is free and a request for your copy implies no obligation. ----------COUPON Gulf-Atlantic Realty Co. WarDer Bldr. Tampa, Fla. Without cost or obligation kindly sen4 IllY copy of the Flor i da B l u e Name 0 ..... .................. 0 0 BusiiCss Fi.t:1U ... I I I Address ... ... : ... t t I I I t l I.''. t t 0 o I t I Tmtn ............ t t t ; I

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Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida Conquest of the Everglades (Continued from page 39) The canals constitute the huge arteries of the drainage project; the establishment of veins and capillaries in the form of lateral canals and ditches is the work of private capital. Under the authorization of the State's major drainage district, approval is given for the formation of minor drainage divi sions. Only in this manner can utilization of the State's work be made, for necessarily the main canals are too far apart to drain the land effectively A typical development may contain ten thousand acres, and this entire area is viewed as one engineering project. Straight across the tract of land, usually at a point to take advantage of even a slight grade if one is present, the company canal is constructed. Every half mile a lateral canal is dug, emptying into the main channel. Thus every twentyacre farm borders on one of the lateral canals and every forty-acre farm has two of these canals skirting its borders. Then, as a final link in the chain, every one hundred and fifty or two hundred feet there is dug a farm ditch a few feet wide, which discharges into the taterals. Drainage was the first thought of those who were intent upon the reclamation of the Everglades, but with the years of development there has corne a new factor, that of irrigation Under ordinary circumstances, the rainfall of the Everglades is copious enough to satisfy the most thirsty vegetation and plants, but to provide for those rare oc cisions when the rainfall is not abundant, the pumps of these minor projects are being made reversible, to drain and irrigate at will. In a recently announced drainage project, which has met the approval of the 'State Drainage Board, the control system comprises cross-section canals at three-mile intervals, from twenty-four to thirty feet wide by approximately ten feet deep, connecting with the main State canals. These major waterways of the sub-district are in turn supplemented by eight-foot lateral ditches at half-mile intervals, an open waterway abutting each farm. Control is centered in power stations scientifically located, each equipped with a battery of 54-inch pumps driven by 180-horsepower Diesel engi_n_es. Each pump has a capacity of 56, 000 gallons a minute, and by the end of the current year eleven will have been installed in four drainage units em-bracing 32,000 acres. This system also provides for the construction of dikes and levees, to make it impossible for the land to be flooded from adjacent ter-ritory. This type of development and reclamation calls for the expenditure of large sums of money and only the big capitalist can undertake it, but happily this response to the work that has already been done is not lacking. Some large projects are already realities and others are under way, affording an opportunity to the farmer to purchase little farms bang up his coat and go to work. Each purchaser shares in an annual tax tor the maintenance of the diking ditching and pumping equipment and operation, a cost which is covered by a few dol-lars per acre. The sole justification for the drainage of the Everglades is to be found in the fertility of the soil. If it is not fertile if it is not adaptable to the growing of (Continued on page 136) Of the tactors that go to make up a self-sustaining community, Marion County probably has a greater variety than any other county. It is an important grower of eight of the eleven leading vegetables grown in the state. Its citrus fruits excel in quality, grading 50 to 75 per cent. "brights" and "golden." It is a wonderful region for dairying, poultry and livestock. It has varied substantial industries. It is the rail and highway center of the state. Its scenic marvel is Silver Springs, largest springs in the world. In addition, it has all kinds. of recreational attractions, including fishing, swim ming, hunting, motoring, golf. Marion County is now experi enCing a period of 0 rapid 0 expan sion It will pay you to itivesti-0 its and opportunities for homeseekers, busim!ss men, builders and investors. For illustrated booklet, address 0 Marion County Chamber of Com merce, 317 Broadway, Ocala, Florida. Countt CHAMBEI\, OF llllllf. COMMEI\.CE Ocala Florida v+tarion. of71u S(UI, A Certainty-Not a Probability The opening on February I Oth of the 22nd Street Causeway, which shortens the distance between Tampa and all Southwes o t Florida cities by several miles, makes 22nd Street the main artery of travel, traversed by more than 10 000 automobila daily. We have eeverat choice comers on 22nd Street, In the city limits of Tampa, prlc_ed for quick action. Visualize what these location& will be worth one year--or lellll-'from today--and see us now. Write, wire, phone or call BARNARD .. BLOUNT COMPANY TAMPA 107 Madison St. or 249 Plant Ave. FLORIDA 129

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This humorous department will be a regular feature of SuNILAND. We will pay $1.00 each for accepted Bad Break" which may be clipped from newspapers, magazines or books, and all readers are invited to contribute. For the most amHsing error of the types or a twisted expression SuNILAND will pay $5.00. The original clipping, with its source indicated in each instance, must be sent in to show the bonafide nature of the "break." No rejected "Bad Breaks" will be returned to senders, and the editor cannot enter into correspondence with contributors to this department Clipp.ed jokes already published are not "Bad Breaks." A Wales Fluke-"Famous dance or chestra, whose v.ictims include HIS MAJESTY, the Prince of Wales."-Tampa (Fla.) Daily Times. (John Wescott. Tampa, Fla.) Out of Countenance-"Ike Bloom's Deauville FACE in the Chicago Rialto in the central business district, was held up at 3 p. m., tOday by robbers."-Florida (Jacksonville) Times-Union. (Laura Bostwick, Jacksonville, Fla.) For Sybarites-"Extra clean rooms, running water, SINK to refined people. 47 W. State."-Advt. in Florida Times-Union. (Mary H. Self, Umatilla, Fla.) Short Skirts Play Havoc-"His chest was crowding his vest, because a girl with a little dimple on her SHIN was sitting so close to him."-Ne w York Heralu Tribune. (Mrs. Charles Willets, Allen dale, N. J.) Springtime-"Miss Pauline Armitage, well-known actress who jumped to her death yesterday from her fourteenth floor suite in the Hotel Shelton to her home in Nashville, Tenn."-Tampa (Fla.) Daily Times. (D. C. McLeo&, Tampa.) An Uplift Emotion-" 'Even Anthony Hope WINCHED,' Mr. Bigelow wrote."Tampa Daily Times. (D. C. Andrews, St. Petersburg, Fla.) Lights rmd Shades of Mona Lisal-"The artist said the painting was a genuine (Leonardo) da Vinci, painted in 1840."Tampa Daily Times. (Henry H ewi tt, Fort Myers Fla.) This Motor Age-"Wanted, four mim to board in nice family garage. Phone 4103." -Montgomery (Ala.) Journal. (Alan Woodallen, Montgomery, Ala.-) Cold Storage-" Delicious refreshments were served late in the afternoon WRAPs." -Sarasota (Fla.) Herald (Mildr e d A. Dennis, Oneco Fla.) A Born Soldier-"Logee was born at Burrillville, R. 1., during the Civil War. He was in the ordnance department of the army with headquarters at Chattanooga, Tenn."-Atlanta Journal. (Mrs. Daisy Miller, Atlanta, Ga.) Just Fancy -"Fancy Lig .ht Pork LION Roasts, lb. 29 cents ."-Advt. in Mipmi Herald. (Anne McKee, Miami, Fla.) A Basket Party--"The pallbearers were Walter Bechtel, A. Wippert, C. Shafer. Martin Woolever and a basket of carna tions from the neighbors." Allentown (Pa.) Chronicle & News: (Mrs. W. rv. K Ulltz, Treichlers, Pa.) Warm Friends-"Mr. and Mrs. Jones wish to express thanks to their many friends and neighbors who so kindly as sisted at the burning of their residence."Los Angeles (Calif.) Times. (Mrs. P.M. Kokooove, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.) 130 This Month's Prize "Break" Contributed by FREDERICA HuBBARD Ottawa, Ohio. The Wrong Road to Wellville ''Well on the road to recover-y after an illness which caused him to lose his life, Will Cressy. nationally known vaudeville artist and humorist, at his home here today announced his in tention to write another book." -Tampa (Fla.) Morning Tribune. A Young Devil-"Nurmi, in the $30,000 New Orleans Handicap, won from a FIEND of 21."-St. Louis (Mo.) Post-Dispatch. (L. H. Banks, Hannibal, Mo.) Educating a Town-"The formation of a Booster Club for Mechanicsburg, with the intention of putting Mechanicsburg more in the auditorium of the High School to live and do business." -Saturday Jour nal, Mechanicsburg, (Pa.) (Mary E. Myers, Butler, Mo.) Liquid Looks-"Per Gallon, Genuine Army and Navy Field Glasses. Going Saturday at only $5.50." -Advt. in But lington Gazette. (Walter E. Kohrs Bur lington, Iowa.) His Comedy Hat Why Musicians Bob Their HairPia no Advertisement in National Magazines New Pronunciation-''The pastor pro nounced the RING ceremony ."-The Chris tian Oklahoma City, Okla. (Henrietta Heron, Cincinnati, Ohio.) Notification Became Mortification-"League is MORTIFIED That U. S. Accepts Arms lnvitation."-Headline in Atlanta Journal (John C. Wayt, P e achtree Road, Atlanta, Ga. ) A T ense Occasion-;-"The funeral of the late William Schart WILL BE held at the family home YESTERDAY afternoon."P,o v idence (R. I.) News. (Ida Canaipi, Providence R. I.) Lacteal Engineering-"Wanted-man on a farm by the month or year, t o milk and run a tractor."-Clinton, (N. J.) Demo crat. (Harry Anderson, Washington, N.J. ) Doggone It -"They searched for some time but could not find the lost pocketbook. Mr. Alexander, tired, sat down on a DOG. His hand fell upon the object of their search.''-Daytona Beach (Fla ) lv e'l.w. (Mrs. B. J. Blai1, Daytona B e ach, Fla.) A Royal Feast-"Refreshments o f chicken and A KING were served."Washington (D. C.) Daily News. (Eliza beth Hughes Harding, WashingtQn D. C.) Improp erly Brought Up-"A roadway will be constructed over the white sand brought fro m the bottom of the BOY."-$t. Petersburg (Fla.) Times. (Mrs. G. A. Noyes, St. Petersburg, Fla.) Versatile Birds-"Marshall Latshaw says the council has instructed him to en force the ordinance against chickens run ning at large and riding bicycles on the sidewalks." -Omak (Wash.) Chron icle (Lucille A. Weatherstone Omak, Wasil.) For e and Oft-"Hensler said that Miss Handley had been knocked down by a blow from behind, when struck repeatedly from in front, probably as her assailant leaned over her prostrate (Ohio) Review. (Mrs. C. J Garrity, Alliance, Ohio.) Maybe Armless, Too-"Legless Torso of Woman ldentified ."-H e adlin e in Flint (Mich.) Daily Journal. (Mrs. 1:1. R. Moog, Flint, Mich.) Daming the Current-"M'Pherson Is a Dam Speaker."-Headline in V all ejo (Calif ) Chronicle. (J. N. Lawrence, Mare Island, Calif.) How to Pass Out-"If one DIES com pletely relaxed and in a comfortable posi tion sleep will come."-Jacksonvill e (Fla.) Journ al. (Marian Altschwag e r, Jackson vill e Fla.)

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Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida DON'T BE MISLED BY THE ASSUMPTION that you can have a real acquaintance with Florida until you have visited the St. Andrews Bay district. HERE YOU WILL FIND A MARVELOUS water area, affording splendid opportunities for amusement and recreation, and a climate free from extremes of cold or heat. HERE, TOO, THERE ARE TO BE FOUND UNsurpassed advantages for agriculture, commerce and industry, combining to make the St. Andrews Bay country the most rapidly developing part of Florida. ON YOUR WAY NORTH FROM THE southern part of the state, stop off in Panama City and enjoy the delightful springtime weather, or come direct from your home at any season. For further information write the PANAMA OF CITY CHAMBER COMMERCE PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA On St. Andrews Bay 131

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PIECES of EIGHT Don't Sleep -"Just think of it!" exclaimed Flora of Avon Park. "A few words mumbled your hl'.ad and you're married." "Yes,'' agreed Dora the cynical. "And a few words mumbled in your sleep and you're divorced." But Unpainted "Now that you've seen m_y son and heir," said the proud young Fort Myers father, "which side of the house do you think he resembles?" "Well," said his astonished bachelor friend, "his full beauty isn't developed yet, but surely you don't suggest that be-er-looks like the side of the house, do you?" Was It Edible? "What do you think of this pudding?" a Kissimmee bride, inquired of her husband. "I call it mediocre." "No, dear, it's tapioca." Suppose She Shrinks? "Tight-fitting, isn't she?" A Palm Beach bathing beauty had just passed by. "Dear me, yes I She looks as though she's been poured into her clothes and forgotten to say 'when.' Color Test Frank-"1 don't see how you can tell those Smith twins from Sarasota apart.'' Hank-"That's easy. Mabel always blushes when she sees me." Not Unusual "I want some golf balls for a gentle man, please." "Certainly, madam. What sort does he like?" "Well, the only time I saw him play at Palma Ceia he nsed a white ball. But I cannot say I gathered the impression that he exactly liked it." The Grammarian Daphne-"Good gracious, that's father back from Miami! You must fly, darling!" Gilbert -"You mean flee, sweetheart Daphne-"As you like, but it's no time for etymological distinctions l" s. R. 0. "What can I do for you, madam?'' asked a Miami merchant. "I want to buy a bedstead." "I regret exceedingly, madam, that theatrical managers have contracted years ahead for all the beds w e can get." 132 Who Pays the Bill? "Miss Smythe-Mabel,'' declared an ardent Manatee suitor, "I have long worshipped you from afar and now I can contain myself no longer How would you like to change your laundry mark?" Time She-"I bought a piano awfully cheap today from a Jacksonville firm." He-"How much?" "I pay $10 a month." "For how many months?" "Oh! I forgot to ask them that.' Not So Soon "Henry," said Mrs. Glipping, in tear ful tones. "Well, my dear?" replied Henry/. look ing up from his Tampa tabloid. 'What is it?" "If I were to die tonight, would you marry again?" "Not tonight. The Reason Why! By c. M. LINDSAY NAY, lad; no more with you I'll vie Upon the links today! I care not how your ball may lie Nor if mine be away I I have gone 'round this course in Though never yet with you!-It's not your vacant "Ha I Ha I Ha !" When I fail to come through; Nor yet your irritating pose, Which any saint would rile ; Nor your fat finger to your nose, And idiotic smile I It's not your comments on my score Which thus stir up my spleen; Nor the rude way you holler "Fore!" When I dig up the green It's not your strokes that me annoy; Nor your abnormal stance I No; it's the awful pattern boy, Of your riew .Q:olfiru!: vants l Doing His Best A young criminal lawyer was always full of quips, according to a story being told by a St. Augustine banker A few years ago he attended the funeral of a millionaire financier, one of those "high financiers" whose low methods he loved to turn the light on He arrived at the funeral a little late and took a seat beside the lawyer and whispered: "How far has the service gone?" He nodded towards the clergyman in the pulpit and whispered back tersely : "Just opened for the defense;" Financiers Sebring Lady-"Will you stop fight ing if I give a dime each?" Urchins-"Wot about makin' it a quarter to the winner, Lady?" Cheerfully Admitted "It appears to be your record, Mary," said the Palm Beach magistrate, "that you have already been convicted of stealing 'thirty-five times." "That's right, your honbr,'' answered Mary. "No woman is perfect." No Overtime Voice from the ground: "Can you manage to 'ang on a bit longer, Albert? We're gettin' a rope from Manatee." Albert. (a conscientious union man): "Well, for goodness sake. feller, hurry up. I'm due to knock off in about ten minutes.'' Good Night! seems as if it takes Ethel's young man from St. Petersburg a frightfully long time to say good night." Father-"Yes, much adieu about nothing." A Cat Tale "Dickey,'' said an Ocala mother, "you mustn't pull the eat's tail.'' "I'm only holding it. The cat is pulling!" Thirty-two Drinks "My dentist was a fine fellow. Each time he extracted a tooth he gave me a glass of wine." "Don't y ou go to him any more?" "I hav en t any more teeth.'' Trade Secret Tarpon Springs Judge-"You are charged with stealing hay from the loft of the accused. How did you come to do it?" Accused-"With a ladder."

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Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida The Farmer Is The Backbone Of The Nation! TO the farmer Manatee County offers every inducement opportunity! Ranking among the first seven of Florida's rich agricultural courities1 with hundreds of thousands of acres yet untouched by developer or farmer; with celery, tomatoes, eggplant, lettuce, cucumbers, squash spinach, beans, peas and-other money crops yielding immense returns; Manatee County's future as a trucking center can hardly be estimated, so great ari her possibilities! Florida's Ideal Climate BRINGS thousands of investors to Manatee and other Manatee County ctttes. They are all modern thriving cities asting of great pro jects, beautiful hotels and apartments, exc.el lent schools, churches and all up-to-date civic improvements Let us tell you about Pamella Park and Pomello City, Manatee County's newest home building community, served by three county highways, the Seaboard Air Line Railroad and only a few minutes' drive over smooth roads from Sarasota, Bradenton and other Florida West Coast Cities. 133 O.INC. M 1.. '.,. "' FOR -DVK.EII 'P\JI'. I..IC.IT't SER"I'ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. Uae the coupon or.write. You will receive all available requeated ancl will be uncler no obliptioa. Houk Realty Co. Inc ., St. Petersburg, F1a. Gentlemen: Kindly eend me IDfonnation refarding the developmaat ol Pomello Park and Pomello Oty. I am partlcularly interested ill truck fanning ........ inveetments ........ speculation ........ homesitee. ....... I_ am under no obl igatiOQ to you. Thanking you for requested lnforma tton, I am, Y oura truly, Io."'ame .............. .................. .......... ................................ Address ....... ..... .... ......................... ............................ .. City and State ............ .............................. ................... ..

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134 Suni/and: The Magazine of Florida Cook with Gas Made by the Skinner Gas Maker "Where the City Gas Mai11 m d s the Ski11ner Gas Maller b e gins SKIMMER Own your own private Gas plant and cook w ith Gas-the universal city fuel. Build your home wherever you please put in a Skinner Gas Maker and you have all the advantages of city gas. This wonderful equipment will give you gas at a turn of a gas valve-a clean, intensely hot, blue flame of uniform quality and constant pressure at a cost of about $1.40 a thousand cubic feet. Just imagine the convenience, economy and comfort such a plant will bring to your home-no fires to build, no ashes or dirt to contend with, no wicks to clean, no smoke or oH fumes to bother with. Hundreds of these p rivate g a s plants are now giving splendid service in Florida homes. And the remarkable part of it all is that the man of modest means can afford one. Send for illustrated catalog "The Skinner Gas Maker" or see the equipment demonstrated at any of our offic es Skinner Machinery Company General offices and factory: 30 0 Broadway-Dunedin, Florida OFFICES AND DISPLAY ROOMS <> Tampa-2186 Grand Central Ave. Miam>--1229 N. E. 2nd Ave. St. PetersburB-1725 Central Ave. JackoonvUie-824 W. Bay St. Orlando-575 W. Central Ave. Lakeland-305 E Palmetto Daytona Beach-258 First Ave. Bradenton-51& Broad St.

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida 135 She Never Will "I must give you a list of books you ought to read," said the kindly resorter at Winter Haven. "Oh, don't! I haven't half finisned those I oughtn't to read," the young lady replied. Good Reason Judge-"Do you know why the constable arrested you?'' Accuscd-"Yes, because I was the smallest man in St. Petersburg at the time." Excuse It, Please "Why is it that confounded new maid never answers when we ring the bell?" the Lake Wales husband asked. "I don t tnink we'd better be too exacting at first, Horace. The girl tells me she used to be employed at a telephone exchange." Plenty of Time Tampa Employer (finding his clerk asleep at the desk)-"Look here, Meyer, you can clear out at the end of the month." Clerk (peevishly)-"Well, you needn't have wakened me so soon for that!" My Hero! "I forgot myself today and spoke sharply to my wife," a Daytona man confided to a friend. "Did she resent it?" "For a moment she did. But Marie is a fair-minded woman. After she had thought it over she shook hands with me a'nd congratulated me on my pluck." Quack! Quack! Customer-''Have you any eggs that have no chickens in them." Canal Pomt Grocer-"Yes, ma'am; duck eggs." His Only Worry Mother-"Tommy, you mustn't eat ice cream like that. I knew a hoy in Fort Pierce 1who ate his ice cream so fast that he died before he had eaten halt." Tommv--"\Vhat happened to the other haif?" Only An Insomnia T ack--"They say that a Gainesville sttident should have eight hours sleep a day." Mack-''True, but who wants to take classes a day?" On a Florida Peach "My dear, don't you think th<>t .skirt a trifle too short for one of your years?" "Possibly, auntie, but not for one of my legs." Realism "These two members of your cast don't seem to be hitting it off in the right way. What's the matter?" asked the Miami theatrical magnate. "Oh, they are quarreling about how they will play their big love scene m tht' first act." The Limit "The marvels of electricity have set. me thinking,'' said the Fort Pierce wit. "Yes; isn't it wonderful what elec\ricity can do?'' "My Sincerity Is Your Security" HAPPINESS! The place you would most love to be inThe thing you would most love to do-aboard the "Arcadia"-A rare opportunity is offered to buy this floating palace of a houseboat now on Lake Worth, Palm Beach, at bargain price. 7 staterooms, 2 baths, and 2 room master's suite .and bath--salon-observatiop .room -dancing deck-dining salon-large galley-parquet floors-open fireplace--steam heat-completely furnished. Designed by Tams, Lemoine & Crane-Built by Brown & Sons. WRITE, PHONE OR WIRE MARGUERITE OSBORNE WOLTERS Suite 804, The Ambassador, Park Avenue and 51st Street, New York City NOTE:-Mrs. Wolters' Florida address' is 224 First Avenue N., st. Petersburg SPECIALIST IN ACREAGE. AND EXCLUSIVE CITY PROPERTY Landscape Design General Practice H. C. DOZIER ARCHITECT JACKSONVILLE, FLA. PhODI! 5-8565 BISBEE BUILDING Interior Decoration -----------------------------------------I Let ua haDdle your pnJperty for you ID Fort Myera and Lee County. FREDA.LONG "Tro.stwortllinu ratllr tiuJ11 Sillr' J. B. Conyera Realty Co., Inc. 38 Patio de Leon CONTRACTORS MACHINERY' c&, EQUIPMENT '2'2:1 Graham Building: JaciiiOflVille. Florid wareh, .. ea at Jacksonville and St. Petersburg I FORT MYERS FLORIDA

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136 Suni/and: The Magazine of FloridtJ The New Fogarty Bldg. in Fairview Heights, Largo CITY OF LARGO on the GULF of MEXICO PINELLAS COUNTY BUSINESS OPPORT.UNITY Two Solid Blocks of Large Lots Priced Low Enough to Prove Profitable for Small House Building These houses can be for rental or for sale. In the city limits of Largo on the Gulf. Three-fourths mile from Largo Post Office -on Seminole Boulevard-which is already paved. About eighty per cent of these lots bearing orange and grapefruit trees. An eighty-acre development across the street. Priced for a quick sale $33,000. $20,000 cash. Balance over a period of over three years. Write or wire for particulars. FOGARTY BROS., INC. FOGARTY BUILDING LARGO, FLORIDA A Through Message to You Who Are Interested in Florida Real Estate Your own personal business keeps you from coming to Florida NOW. Service is our specialty. Amid the rolling, wood e d hills of Polk County we have well located tracts of acreage; also busines s prope rties in Lakeland. We have subdivisions of and di s tinction for those who can appreciate a refined community-lots and homes at prices YOU can afford to pay on convenient terms. Our integrity .and our responsibility are well known. Our bank references are :-Central Bank and Trust Company-State Bank of Lakeland. MARTIN, GILMORE AND LINDSEY Desk S, 1 South T8111L Avenue, Lalcelend, F1aric1a Lakelaad-The City ol HEAR'rS DESIRE aet like a L>ba. (Continu e d from page 129) crops, then much money has been wasted. The soil chemist is interested in a de tailed analysis of the chemical constitu ents of the muck; the percentage ol moisture, organic matter, oxide of iron, lime, nitrogen, potash and phosphoric acid. The farmer wants to know what it will grow and in what quantities, and to aid in the solution of this question the State Department of Agricu lture has established an Everglades experiment station. Within the last two years under the direction of George E. Tedder, the superintendent, an area of land has been tilled and worked from its state of saw grass expanse into nch blackbrown soil, and twenty-two different va rities and species of grasses, legumes and other p lants are being t ested, in cluding rubber, bananas, palms, pecans, sorghums, corn and pineapples Among the problems which are receiving a major share of attention is that of a water level. The agricultural authorities are endeavoring to learn if the crops will grow better on muck land if the water table is kept twenty-four inches below the surface of the land, or if a more profitable result may be achieved by lowering or raising the level of water. Here the real scientific farming of muck lands is being undertaken for perhaps the first time in Florida. All of the resultant data is being carefully tabulated, and at some future time one may expect a handbook for the Everglades' farmer to issue from the State agricultural authorities, 'Setting forth the farming methods to insure the greatest and most profitable yields. In the meantime, there is an increasing number of farmers who are already tapping this reservoir of natural wealth with much success by the trial and erro. r method. Concerning all soils in general and particularly peat or muck soil, there is still much information to be gained, but of the one great fact that Everglades' soil is capable of growing huge and various crops, everyone has been amply assured. The Everglades shares with Rome the inescapable fact that it was not built in a day. With the water drained from the land, there yet remains much to be done before the soil may exert its best qualities. Two years' time is required to subdue the 1uxuriant saw-grass, to introduce the highly essential bacteria into the soil and to establish a circula-tion of air in the muck. Thus prepared the reclaimed area, under the urge of Florida's watm sun :md her si xty inches of annual rainfall, is able to fulfill the rich promise that has been extended to the intrepid and eager farmers who early ventured into the district to begin the agricultural redemption of the region along the banks of the canals. Among the crops that are now being raised in the Everglades are such truckgarden commodities as potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant, beets, strawberries, pep pers, beans, onions, cucumbers, lettuce and celery Considered of a more general agricultutal importance to the area is the success that is attendant upon the growing of such stable crops as kaffir corn, sorghum, alfalfa, peanuts, corn, rice and sugar cane. In the older drained areas, oranges, limes grapefruit, bananas and a vocades a r e yielding abundant returns, pointing to the w isdom of a future agricultural policy of growing fruit, winter vege tables and some stable crop The stories of the huge yields and

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida 137 profits made from the reclaimed muck land are often astonishing, principally from the raising of winter vegetables. Consider beans, for instance, a first crop of which is planted along about Septem ber. From forty-five to sixty day s later the beans are ready for picking, and a yield of one hundred and fifty to two hundred hampers per acre is not un usual, and the pr1ce may be anywhere from two dollars and fifty cents per hamper up to seven and eight dollars a hamper. This return might be considered an ample one for any tract of land, but the fertile muck soil is ready for more work. So another crop of beans is planted, with similar results, sometimes varied with tomatoes and beans growing on the same soil. By the time the tomato plants have attained a spread the beans are harvested, and one crop does not in terfere with the other. Following this, the farmer is assured further yield from his land in the same growing season if he wishes to plant corn, cow-peas or peanuts. pEPPERS are a favorite crop with a number of Everglade farmers and this is not to be wondered at when the yield and return are noted. It is not for an acre of soil to grow from five hundred to eight hundred crates of pep pers and the price -ranges from three dollars and fifty cents to seven doliars a crate when the farmer is ready to put them on the market. The vast area of the Everglades, how ever, precludes the cultivation of more than a comparatively few thousand acres for winter vegetable crops and it is to some stable crop that the Florida farmer must look for the utmost utilization of the muck land. Of all these crops, the one which holds forth the most prom-ise is sugar cane. Muck land has always been considered the prize soil for sugar cane, and in com bination with the sunshine, the moisture and the long growing season in Florida, the Everglades constitute the bestknown natural area for the 2roduction of sugar, not even excepting Cuba. Government experts have certified that in the areas adapted to sugar cane growing, a yield of fifty to seventy-five tons of cane per acre is not uncommon, and that under ordinary weather and growing conditions an average of fifty tons to the acre m,ay reasonably be ex pected. In addition to this, and here is the secret of. the potential riches ot Everglade cane land, the sugar content of the cane is higher than that grown anywhere else. From eleven to thirteen per cent. of the cane weight is sugar; ordinarily a sugar content of from mne to ten per cent is considered a good re turn. To the cane farmer this means that the net profit per acre of sugar cane in the Everglades should run from sixty five to one hundred dollars an acre. fwo sugar mills have already been built tor the commercial production of sugar and two other extensive developments ue under way, one of 40,000 acres and another of 20,000 acres. The cultivation of sugar cane is astonishingly simple, and a field, once planted, requires no more attention, save for the harvesting, for eig_ht or ten years. Still in its experimental stages, with no such success assured as that which has marked the !lUgar industry in Florida, is the rubber growing experiment now being conducted in Hendry County on eighteen thousand acres of land neal' the town of Labelle. If America can produce her own rubber, surely Florida (Continued on page 143) Superb Venice--Nokomis Substantial and Growing The Pearl City olfera an unparalleled invatment opportunity u weD u homeaitea. Venice-Nokomia baa far more behind it than JUit a daire of a de9eloper to Iota. It La aubltantial-the reault of natural lawa creatiri1 cltlea where the,> The Pearl City ia Florida' prettieat' natural beauty apot. A bulldin1 procram 1 Into mi!liona bi under way and planned. Venice-Nokomia La richton the GUlf; not milea from it. It Ia on the Tamiaml Trail and the Seaboard Airline R. R. Recent open1nc of the Venice-Nokomis Bank Ia a marked Indication of ita aubltantlallty. THE ROGER C RICE CO., Inc., Realtors Main Oflice: SARASOTA, FLA. _________ .._ ____ Roger C. Rice Co., inc., Sarasota, Florida. Gentlemen: Kindly send me copy of your new folder on Venice-Nokomis. Name ..... ; .......... : .... : .... ...... ........................ Address ............... ..... .... ........ .... .................... WINTER HAVEN R. B. McMILLAN ASSOCIATES INTERLAKES A beautiful property located within ea:r walkiDir distance from Center of at, Oil our moat wonderful lake LAKE HOWARD All improvements, includin1r concrete bulk atreets paved, aidewalka, system, water, etc. Each lot individually landscaped. NO ASSESSMENT Te..-of PUn:hue 10% c:uh, 5% each. three -tba ar It-YEAR LEASE with of purchase at any time. We finance home or apartment INTER-LAKES DEVELOPMENT CORP. Deak H, Winter Haven, Florida Salea Control, R. B.: McMILLAN ASSOCIATES

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138 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida ''There's Where My Heart Is Turning Ever'' That's the big line and thought in the greatest of sentimental song&-Way J?own Upon the Suwannee River. THE MIGHTIEST POWER IN THE WORLD IS THE UNITED THOUGHT OF ITS PEOPLE. When these millions know a story, a name, an article, a quality, it becomes valuable and powerful beyond measure or expres. sion. For many years through the medium of a soulful theme and alluring melody, millions have learned to love the beautiful song "Suwannee River." There is united thought in its soulful purpose and now in the heyday of Florida's progressive movement, we bring to these millions the word of intention to further immortalize the great song by developing on the shores of its inspiration, SUWANNEE RIVER GARDENS Nature has provided values abundantly and the beautification proceaa continues. A ereat Sa.anaee River boulevard will border the 1tream. Radiant Spring& Hotel will cater to tourist, hunter, fi1her and thole &eeking health and repose. A ereat golf course and a great meeting place. Boats will ply the river and the whole scheme of thinp will caaae OWDel"' to sing even more joyfully, "There's where my heart il turning evez-r Theae millions in value will be divided among buyers of Suwannee River pi'Operty. Do you want a ahare? Prices begin at 1500 for splendid residential lots; others up to 11500. Terms are favorable and remember these are the first days of aelling. will move as ha1 been the history of all good Florida propertieL Wealth has its beginning in mother earth. Addresa to us your application foe reservation. If you cannot c:a11 at our New York or Jacksonville offices, you can bay by mail with that certainty and satisfaction which makes the pmc:haae wbat you want it to be. The principals of this development have traded by mail and find it pleaaant and profitable to talk and ac:t the same aa if ac:rosa the deak. Do not hesitate to write us or to send us yom firat or further payments to an initial reservation payment. SUWANNEE RIVER GARDENS 1711 Main Street, Jacksonville, Fla. 170 Broadway, New rork, N. Y.

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1 h e Magazi n e of Florida Lafayette County has voted overwhelmingly for a big bond issue for making route 5A a great highway. This and our Suwannee River Boulevard wiU come two extensively trav elled thoroughfares. Every lot is already worth more. 139

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140 *YOU* will never find a better time to invest in FLORIDA properties. We are offering all classes of realty investments at right prices, and on good terms. Groves Acreage City Business Property Homes, andVacant. Lots Will be glad to submit descriptions and full de. tails relative to any property you inquire about. We have never sold a Florida property that the purchaser has not re alized a profit from, if it has been resold, or can be resold at a profit if owner wishes to sell now. R. C. RICKER Realtor 403 E. Lafayette Street TAMPA, FLORIDA Reference I Natfoual Bank of Commerce, Tam)Ml. Suniland: The Magazine of Florida Vengeance (Continued from page 46) watched his .convulsed face and the cords that strained out in his neck. "You fiend! You Devil!" mouthed Dixon. "Ten minutes!" said the voice of doom. "Just think of it-you and I sit ting here, and those folks flying to-" He broke off and listened, but the sound, whatever it was, was not re peated. "The bridge has been in bad shape, anyhow,'' resumed the voice. "I .live near there, and for the last year I reckon I ain't thought much but bridges-dream about them, too. Some times it seemed like the Deepwater Bridge wouldn't hold out till I got my chance. But today, when the paper said your boy was goin' East, I knew it had come. Sixty feet to the creek, that middle span, and enough dynamite to send the whole Flyer to kingdom come." BUT Dixon was deaf to everything but that awful onward rush of the train in his ears. His eyes were fixed on the clock, on the pendulum that swung back and forth .and visibly marked the approach of death, on the hands that moved and seemed to fl.y. And then he tried to argue. "Think what you are doing,'' he gasped. "You're sending a train full of people to an awful death because of something that happened to you. Chil dren, too-do you want their blood on your hands? They haven't injured you. I'm the one you're after-not those other people. What did my boy ever do to you? There's still time to stop that train." Then suddenly: "Take me i_nto. the telephone in the other room I beg. of you. Let me get the operator at KI Tower and stop the express, and you can blow my brains out the next minute." Hargis leaned forward in the dusk. "Dying is easy,'' he said oracularly. "It's the going home at night that's hard, and seeing empty rooms and dusty toys. It's having to go out to a mound in a cemetery, when you want to talk things over with your wife. And when you know it ain't your own fault; that some money-grabbing bunch is going to chalk up a casualty list-Don't-youcall!" There was unmistakably now the sound of a voice, or voices, not far away. Dixon's impulse to raise the alarm, even with the certainty of a bullet through his brain the next min ute, was checked as he opened his mouth for the .call. Hargis was stoop ing over the desk, the loaded revolver in his hand. "Don't do it," he said quietly. "I don't want to kill you, you've got five minutes of torture left. But, so help me, if you make a break, you'll never be able to tell what the trouble is." The voices died away. Dixon's eyes never left the clock. He no longer struggled-but every mental faculty was fiercely, wildly alive. He tried to pray, but only a meaningless jumble of words came. The dial of the clock grew dim and indistinct, and instead, Harry's face. Harry's clear boyish eyes, stared down at him. Harry with his mother's soft, dark hair and spirit who was sweeping on to torture and death-God, how that pendulum flew! "Four minutes !" Why, it was only a day or two since the boy had been a little fellow, toddling around the house. It must be only A SURE PROFIT 40 acres close to center of city. Subdivisions going in all around Price $1250.00 per acre. One-third cash, balance 1, 2 and 3 years. R. K. Brandon Realty Co. W. E. Bell, SaJe. Mlmaaw Weatern Union Arcade Clearwater, Fla. Olden EsttJblulutJ RetJl EsttJie Firm ((JACKS 0 N-VILLE'S greatest asset is its wonderful munici pal electric plant which offers excep tionally low power rates to industrial plants." For Particulara Write Franklin H. Owen. Chairman, City Commission JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA

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Suniland: The Magazine of Florida 141 yesterday that he had the diphtheria, and Margaret and he had sat up and waited, listening to him, choking and l{aspinir, helpless to aid, while the long night crept past, hour by hour, minute by minute. "Three minutes I Two minutes I" The light on the clock grew faint; there was a gray mist over everythingthe walls were fading away. And now they grew dim and were gone, and there was nothing but the open country, with the hills looming against the starlight and the black girders of the Deepwater trestle reaching up out of the gorge like beckoning figures. "They're around the hill now," a voice was saying. "There's the headlight; can't you see them coming? Nothing can stop them. Don't she look great, with her red candles in the dining-car and the porters in their white coats. Look-it's on the middle span I Listen I" The voice rose into a shriek, or was it the blast of an engine's whistle? There was a crashing, grinding noise-the splintering of wood. Dixon's head dropped forward on his breast. The shattere d door l a y where it had fallen on the floor, and in the gap stood Annie, her broad face full of alarm. Dixon's heavy eyes saw her first. Someone was rubbing vigorously at his arm, and he felt the jab of a hypodermic needle. Consciousness came slowly and painfully; he realized he was stretched out on the floor, and he saw White, haggard and drawn, leaning against the desk. And finally he realized that he was saying something to him, over and over. "They're all right," White was repeating. Dixon nodded dully without comprehension. "All right. Can you understand. They're safe I" But Dixon had slipped back into the gray world of dreams When he aroused again the hypodermic had taken effect; from its place on the wall the clocked looked down and mocked him, like a face with a sinister drooping mouth. "Twenty minutes after eight I" White was saying. "I tell you, doctor, I was a raving lunatic in that next office for a while. I had to come back to look over some papers. I'd got behind a little, sending my wife and the. kid away-and I heard voices in here. Then there was a crash, and I tried the' door. It was locked, and I knew something terrible was up. I heard some, and guessed the rest. Lord, what a scare I've had. I couldn't stop him; as the door dropped he was over it, and gone. Yes, I got the train stopped, but there was nothing wrong with the bridge. Crazy? Of course; crazy as a loon." But Dixon lay staring at the clock from the rug, among the fragments of the lamp. "I stood by," he remembered, "not able to raise my hand I" He knew now. Crazy? No And with the memory of a tortured face before him, he lied to the swarm of detectives White's solicitude had summoned. "I don't want any fuss about it," he said irritably. "I'm not hurt-nobody's hurt. No, I don't know his name, and I don't remember what he looked like. The watch? Oh-it's mine. White, is the car he .re yet?" In a little drawer in Dixon's desk, there reposes today, a thick, old fashioned gold watch. It is not kept as a timepiece, for it is never wound ; the hands point to fift ee n minutes before eight. Now and then the general manof the Z. & Y. takes it out and studies it. And when he does, things happen. A CITY lar&e enou11h to have public IIChoola, churcbe., atorea, theatryet friendly cnou11h to 11ive you a warm wdcomc. An all-year perfect dimatc. Golfin&. Water aportL Kiaaimmee ia such a pivot of commerce that Ita baa nearly doubled In a lear I Junction of the Dlzie and Ocean-to-Gulf Atlantic Coaat Line Railway and the Inland Watct"Way to Atlantic and Gulf. Write for illuatnted booldct. Address D. D. Wbeelin11, Secretary, Chamber of Commerce. GORTON REALTY COMPANY REALTORS A. GORTON, Pres. and Broker Tenth Year of Successful Business in "The City of P!ilm&" Five-Acre Tracts in the City Limits Several of. Them Business Property The Best to Be Had in Town Water Front Lots Water Front Property Subdivision Tracts of the Best Let Us Serve You Efficiently FORT MYERS 400 First Street FLORIDA TheW alsh Investment Corp. 109 Hyde Park Ave., Tampa, F1 ... ridll REALTORS This corporation, recognizing a moral roto ita clientele, tendera ita aerVJcea to only worthy enterprises.

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142 Suniland: The Magazine of Florida 'Opening of HOMOSASSA ?lorida" THE first sale of home sites, villa sites and business sites in Homosassa, Florida's new west coast metropolis, opened Monday, February first. Millions have been spent improving this famous beauty spot. All the west coast needed was transportation. This IS now assured. When this railroad construction is completed the neck of the traffic bottle at Jacksonville will be broken. Homosassa and the Tampa Bay and Miami districts will be two hundred miles closer to Chicago. Fortunes will be made in real estate here. Millions are being spent in predevelopment construction. A scientifically planned city is under construction. Wide boulevards, streets, water mains, sewers, sidewalks, hotels, homes and business blocks are completed, others under way. The west coast and the new city of Homosassa offer you excep tional opportunities, beginning Monday, February first. The Florida West Coast Development Company was formerly the Hoover Interests, Homosassa, Florida. Branchesand representatives throughout Florida and all principal Northern cities. An unusual opportunity is offered syndicates and reliable subdividers. HOMOSASSA FLORIDA WEST COAST DEVELOPMENT CO.

PAGE 145

of Florida 143 (Continued from page 1s the one State in the u can be dorie pmfitably, if Everglades seems to be for the future dustry, if the cessful. The Everglades of our raphies is passing. years before the from !'he bondage of =._.r .. r vegetation, but the ture will some day Everglades in manner: "The richest a"-!!Wr:tcultur area of tht United States" revised geography will declare, to be found in wnat is still known the Everglades, in the State of although the designa-tion has original meaning. Millions of of the most fertile soil known was reclaimed from the flood of Lake Okeechobee by a and canals. of muck land is now the the world and the greatof cane sugar consumed States comes from the r.vPnna'"'" of Florida. The drained traversed only with a canoe, criss-crossed with a network of hard roads and railroads, providexcellent transportation. ith the droinage operations of the virtually completed, the migration .... of farmers from the North to the Everglades of Florida gained impetus. Within a the farm population of the State tripled in number, and during h same period of time, according to t < ll United States Bureau of Census, the income of the Florida farmer he highest of any State in the Thd sll hoolboy may regard all this as reading, compared to the allig:\'f -'th p-crocodile-tropical jungle s u WI which his grandfather was regaled, bu behind it all there will for ev':[ to'!'erlt ne of the great engineering raJ romances of America-Je of the Everglades. ke City, Florida .,;.,d Lake City are twin ld :r<.a:.ers" speaking in parlance, with diary-like ill tell you about its early his if you have a modicum of ion, you can picture in your eye a phantom panorama of all er and abandon of the olden days Florida, and especially Columbia ty, was, indeed, the land of daring terms. legendary fidelity' tory an imagina mind's the c whet Cou uerors and Indian Warriors. ut the onward flight of time has lifted curtain of progress and changed e scene to a land of happy people, oductive farms, and other industries emmensurate with the rare and abunant unexploited resources which, when cem.inelli, make this an area of gen erous prosperity, truly a land of stable values, excellent opportunities; educational, religious and recreational facili ties that are not commonly found. Like the artist who senses his inability to truly reproduce the golden rays of the setting sun, so, also, is it impossible to aepict the beautiful environs of Lake City and Columbia County-spotted with natural. lakes, whose placid waters relect in a mirror-like w;ry the huge moss laden live oaks, palms and wild flowers which nature has endowed to all who follow the peaceful pursuits of life in this new land of paradise. Consultants on Florida Investments -Specialty-LARGE ACREAGE For WEATHER PROTECTION of roofs, fences, poles, piling, etc., and for making stains-Use CREOSOTE the cheapest effective protection against the ravages of sun and water. Double-distilled .......... per gal. 35c-per bbl. $'18.00 Distilled ................. per gal. 30c-per bbl. 15.00 Coal Tar ................ per gal. 15c-per bbl. 7.00 WE PAY THE FREIGHT ANYWHERE IN FLORIDA Write-Phone-Wire TAMPA DISTILLING CO. R. H. McMASTER 312 Warner Bldg. WE BELIEVE: In Florida, Lee County. and Fort Myers; BUSINESS will be better and more stable in 1926. C. A. PITTS Phone 4868 Realtors CHARLES W. ROSS, Manager 140 Main Street Fort Myers, Florida C. R. McMASTER Tampa, Florid/a Our Service Includes Everything in Real Estate Offices: Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Daytona Beach, West Palm Beach, Tallahassee, Tampa.

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The PUBLISHER'S J AGE c J M G s T KING. First row, left to right: W. K. H. Shafto, arculation manager; c urty, arasota representative; c) Daily Hewlett, vice-president and publisher; M. J. Dowling, director of sales; R. J .. Sloman, PinelJ.as Cou;rd11g, Washing senta.tive Glenn Slaughter, office boy. Second row: J. M. Schloenbach, Jacksonville representative; Per. well, edit'or; Walter G. Sprini:er, George Gallow, Orange C::
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who have seen the country surrounding -l9 Clermont declare it to be another Westchester --a we.tchester with a tropical background. Here we have verdant and wooded hills which throw themselves to the honzon with the majesty of a Catskill settmg Here also we have beautiful sandy bottom, spnng lakes --good s1zed lakes over which the sun and the moon ca!t a romantic sparkle. Entrancmg cloud play tag Wltn moss hung cypress trees, the sun rises and sets m a flare of glory and life is made Joyful to the heart that appreciates the charms of natural beauty. And Clermont has a substantial agricultural backl!round. Great c1trus groves y1eld the1r golden wealth and profit able vmeyard developments are adding prosperity to the entire ""ction. ,\ City Clermont 1S young yet-young cnoash .!o appeal to tht ptnoo who\IIOUld hke to share m th( of ano ther Scamale. a Lenox or a Santa Barbara-in Flonda We mv1te your mterest in Clermont. Do you !k chmotttc perfection? You will tlnd it htre. Do you want a choice in Florida's hill and lake section-then let us tell you more bout Clermont. BIIAitOH B,IBII: l!lt Poloraloara, Ill 0111 tral Are '1'1!111>&. 181 "' Hapolla .A.n. Orlaade, 101 loutll onnc Ae. Wlnlor Hn. II I!Mll Bank ll4J.ac. 111 Kapella .... CLERMONT FLORIDA A Scarsdale in the Making Moft bu.lllif11l l..wnc 1lwn 01hcrtiry jp l'b-ida ++ CIDdc en the. ,..;ch ..-.. brm>dt.itM. r\nl.m.. and Mlltrifll. .... n d aplmdM:I d.W.n1 w.wr, ffft tro.....,.wrictaaeandodvr 1!. }'UI ro.N a-nrr fi '11 .. ..._.. pa* lln>N per apiu tJ..n anr <11"'n (ity .. I'IOrid.l-widr.. lhMial. t.e. ... if\11 bid-and -11 bpi. @rwpj etermont most atlrnet tF'estreeto NOITHEIIN IEPRESENTATIVEI Now En: George A. DIU 7 5 Tremont Street Boalon, Maoo. Olalla: MootgomOQ' & Co. u K1Q sweet 11a11

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YOUR FLORIDA INVESTMENT Proper consideration and careful investigation will make your Florida investments the soundest ones you have. Investigate Daytona Highlands and you will find it is un excelled as an investment opporIt is a part of the city of Daytona Beach, has the highest elevation on the entire East Coast, has city water, city lighting, White Way, ten miles of asphalt-paved streets, a chain of lakes, a beautiful golf course and club house and many beautiful homes built under protec tive restrictions. Over a thousand satisfied buyers have realized liberal profits in this beautiful section of Daytona Beach. Send for Folder entitled Golf Club "B, P. 0. Box 325 I \ "" "'"/-' D.J-Erner'} Executive Offices: 162 S. Beach Street Daytona Beach Florida


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