John Stuart Allen Papers, USF Archives

Citation
John Stuart Allen Papers, USF Archives

Material Information

Title:
John Stuart Allen Papers, USF Archives Henry Winthrop
Series Title:
Florida Legislative Investigation Committee (Johns Committee)
Creator:
Allen, John Stuart 1907-1982
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Florida
Publisher:
University of South Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 folder

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Subjects / Keywords:
Academic freedom -- Florida -- Tampa ( lcsh )
History -- Tampa (Fla.) -- 20th century ( lcsh )

Notes

Original Version:
USF Archives
General Note:
Some student names were redacted from this document.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
A49-00004 ( USFLDC DOI )
a49.4 ( USF Handle )

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Mixed Material

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INTER-OFFICE MEMORANDUM DATE M ay 29, 1962 TO: ____ ____ __ ......... ,r--SUBJECT: Photostat copies of materials given the Johns Committee. Enclosed you will find materials I have transmitted to the Johns Committee and certain mem orand a which are self-explanatory,

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President John &. Allen Henry Winthl'op Phototat oopi .. of given the Johns Committee. May X tranaudt tor your filtta wh:leh I han turni"hed to tbt Johna Committee. These materials han been used to make oleu 'the tals1ty o-f oertain ooapl..ute which bav been mad me by being l"M4 inio the taped record ot lhe eo.ittee on May 28th,. 1962 from 4t:;<) to 5:30 P M P'hotoatat aopi of thel!l h&Ye aleo been lett with the Commit. tee. I should e.l..o likt to to your attention that ot these. letter writers W'81"9 olasSIIII.tea Qt X.l Martin, the .man who hail lD&de chargee. and that they would willing to tea1:ity to the t&laity ot thia mans charges against me, either before the ttee o:t in your pl"eatnc _j

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.. Donald ltaimeaa, President, USP Chapter AA'JJP Henry inthrop MaiY 29, 1962 Photostat copies of gi.Y.n the Johns Committee. 'May t pace 1n the hands of the M some materials which establish fairly well, I bal1eYe, the falsity of certain allegations w: ich haft been made against Theae materials ban been rQ4 into the taped record of the ec.u.u" on May' 28th, 1962 trca 4s30 to ?.M ln addition phote-*Mt copies ot than ban bMn furnished to President John Allen and Deans aemor.mau. A copy or the lll8!llO!"a1:l sent to the heaident is attached. I hope tbeae -.terials will be U88d by the UT1P if and when any i.nequi titNJ ba'v'e to redressed, trbich llltir be d.ireotly or ind.Uectly related to heee charges I abould a1ao lilt.e to brina to the attention of tho AAl1P the tact tbat I ve Qroucb\ a v1-.. of higb oharacter and intelligenoe raoe to tee with Deans c h Cooper ad Martin. This vi tnese 'bal!t pl'Ovided wrbal teeti.motJ;r which makes clear the falaity ot asainst ... :Beoause ot tbe special nature of thia witnees, a Mttar which 1 t would lJa UiPJ'Opar for ae to. tl!'Y to .plain in this DL4111lorandum, and beclaiM I auat this witneea and do eY&.rythi.rl(f can to a.voi d tWJ authoriti .. I teal tbat. it 1a proper to y o more on thi-s: ecore.

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' ./ .. 'I I/ ; I I f I .I / !I I : i I I .. I UNITED STATES POST' OFFICE May 26, 1962 TO 'WHOM IT MA.Y CONCERN: Re: Dr. Henry Winthrop IN IIJILY URI TO I'os tma.s ter I would like to take thi:s opportunity to express my views on several subjects that seem to have become important at the University of South Florida First, I would like it known that Dr. Winthrop is one of the most qualified and conscientious College Instructors that I have known. You may ask yourself why I have an interest in this investigation since I no longer attend the University of South Florida. You may also ask yourself why I had enrolled as a freshman student at the age of thirty, having attained a : measure of success in the merchandising business. These questions in reality are the foundation of my personal belief as to what College is 11 all about. 11 I know I am a Baptist and I also know I believe in a free Democracy. These beliefs were handed down to me by my parents. To know what I believe is not enough, I must also have a complete knowledge of the things that I am against. College education does not all together teach us what we should know, but it also teaches us h
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I I r .. I I IN UPLY ama TO UNITED STATES POST OFFICE Page 2: Re: Dr. Henry Winthrop someone were to say he were Anti-Religious or Anti-Christian in his teachings, I would take exception to this charge and claim it to be an untruth. If my son were of age to enroll in the University, it would be my desire that he study under Dr. Henry Ylinthrop. I trust one or two people with uelfish -interest will not deprive this area of the vast knowledge and well qualified teaohing of Dr. Winthrop. Sincerely, Postmaster SPN1rn I

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Hay 26, 1962 TO HHOY I T EAY C OUCERH: It has been broucht to my attention t'hat certain have been made ar-ainst Dr. Hen::. .... v Hinthron. As Iu_"'lclersta.nd these '-' v cha r tje s are of vulgarity, over-emphasizinc; sex, professing non-religious belief's, and using profane language. I I \vas a studmt :i. n D::.". t s Human Behavior classes' for one year. In thi$ year1s t i m e I missed class period TI1e man these char2;es attended about five weeks. It app e a r s to me that the man 1 !Jlo brou[_,ht these cnar ges against Dr. Has judging a man from an unfair or nom"epresentative sample. Before I c;o any farther, let me state that t h e charr;es against Dr. V!inthrop are f alse and 1nalicious. These c har;::;es are rational ones, that is good ones instead o f the real reason. Dr. Hinthrop and :Hr. Martin had a difference in per2.onal opinion. .. Tb.cclash of Has caused by Hr. Hartin's belief that only 1rJhi te men are created equally in the eye,s of God. You cannot teach a course in comparitive relic;ions Hith ou. t discussing more than one rclic;ion. You cannot teach social class differences ':Jithout O.isCl-';Ssing social classes. You cannot teach learnedsexual differences a mong different peoples of the 1-JOrld Hithout talking about sex. If something should b e investi gated it is whether or not a course in Hwaan Behavior should be .-.taught on a freshman level. The books used in the course are also used b y other tmiversities including the U niversity of Florida. One of these books Sex and Tempera_rn.ent in Three Primitive Societies by Hargaret Head, Associate Curator of Ethnolo.::;y of the American of Natural History, was used by the University of Florida while I was in attendance there. I doubt the. t Hr. Hartin read t;he book because of the title. If he had, he v-rou.ld have been disappointed b y the lack of, s .ex involved .in the bock. It was a f'actl:lal narrative about three tribes in New Guinea. Dr. 1dinthrop stated many views that 1rrould contradict with what we have been taught from birth, but he never stated them as his own philosophy. The cours e is a controversial one and Dr. 'Vlinthrop attempted to get class participation and argument on all controversial portions. Nr. Hartin never joined in the class discussions. This :letter may appear to be overly qomplimentary tmv-ard Dr. \rJinthrop. It is intended to be. so. This is the third univer sity I have attended The other th'O Here the United Stated Coast .Guard Academy and. the University of F lorida. I had to change schools for financial reasons. I have now been able to work full time at Tampa Electric Company and go to colleg e part time. I feel Dr. is the: .'finest educator I have had to date, but he is --::_ ...... .._ ) I I i I i I i

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Kay 26, 1962 not far ahead of the other professors I have had at the University of South Florida. This is the first I have attended Hhei'e the faculty showed a truo desire to help the individual student personally and academically. For the record let m e state that Dr. Hinthrop can be of no further help to me as a student. I am approaching my senior year in the school of business, and I have completed .all of my free electives. A good professor, except in technical matter, must teach from all points of vieH. I ara a salesman, and if I didn't knoH my opponents selling .points, I coul<1."1' t sell against them. All philosophies have-their selling points. \men 1-fe learn their strong points their fallacies we can adequately combat them. In.conclusion let me say that if these chai'ges had been true, I would not have taken my wife along to sit in on Dr. vlinthrop' s lectures. ... Very truly yourS,J, t ;;-Ji Jl John L. Terrell, Jr.

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TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: For a number of years it h a s been my desire to continue rnw education and yet meet my fru1uly obligations. The advent of the University of South Florida seemed to solve my problems. One of the first classes :C applied for was the Human Behavior 1 course, since my occupation puts me in touch with many personalities. It was my fortune to be assigned to Dr. Henry Winthrop. I made it a point to atte nd e a ch and every class of both semesters. In fact I also had Dr. Winthrop for The American Idea course. i i I Dr. Winthrop's lectures were well prepared, stimulating, and excellently presented. Since human nature itself is an enigma, controversial subjects were often discussed in class panels as well as lectured u p on. It v ;as enlightening. and extremely educational that subjects pertaining to all aspe .cts of human behaviour (both the g ood and bad of it since it is inherent in man) could be discusse d o penly and frankly. I am 35 years of age, m a rried, and the father of eight children, yet I learned man y .thing s in t he s e classes concerning the raising of children w h i ch even I didn't kno w and since which I have be e n able to put to goo d use. I have felt that throug h t hese classes the youn ger students just out of high school had bee n given a solid background in order to prepare for the transition from a formal educ ation to the goals they ultimately hoped to achieve. In no manner could Dr. winthrop's teaching s be construed as anti-religious. Every t hinking student with whom I spoke came away from these classe s exhi.bi ting a more tolerant view of the beliefs of others. Certainly this was one of the direct results of this course i n m y o pinion. Since this course deals vvit h human behaviour, the subject of sex must of necessity be inter j ected and it was. Due to Dr. Winthrop s learned back g round in psychology, this sub ject was handled properly and efff:ciently. I am certain that had any of my o v m attended these classes no one would have been offended, least of all t h e children. My only'tomplaintn with D r lJ' Tinthrop was that he taught u s much more than we neede d to know in order to pass the final examination. But this knovl'ledg e which he imparted has assisted me in my own line of endnavors. I have been the manager of the Tampa Barber College for the past five years. It is necessary

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for me to teach many subject.s t o our sixty students. The experiences which I h ave received from Dr. Winthrop have been invaluable to me. I confess to having attempted to imitate his wann and personal method of lecturing. Ke imparts to all a profound kno wledge of human behavior. I shall always be grateful and indebted for having made the acquaintance of Dr. Heru7y Winthrop. We need more men of his calibre. Sincerely, Stephen V. Yovino Rt. # 2 ,' Box 3.52 Lutz, Florida P.S. Before I forget I have heard that charges have been made somewhere that Dr. Winthro p expressed anti-religious and antiChristian sentiments. I have also heard that his lectures were supposed to overemphasize sex, were vulgar and were given in foul language unbecoming to a professor. Having been in the Human Be havior section in which these charges were have been true, I can honestly state that there is nothing to any of them. I cannot even imagine the circumstances which would have prompted anyone to make such misinterpretations or distortions.

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... I I \ I .. I I ; I I 1 j I ; 1 1

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From : Hrs 1-Iartha T. RoJ!fsen of south Florida To. Whom. It : 1'1a.y 27' 196 2 I t has been brought. to m y attention that the follo1.-1ing allegati.ons have been mad. e concerning the material taught in the G B 103-lOl.tHuman Behavior c ourse, and the instructor of: f:dl the evening: section: (Sec.90) _Dr.R a:i:'cla Winthrop : 1. Teaching, anti-relj.gion. '2. .. Being; anti-religious. 3. Teaching anti-Christianity 4. Overemphasis. on sex and matters in classroom instruction. 5 .. Habitual use of foul languag,e. 6 II t.t tt. u. c ommon vulgarity.. The folloviing is a statement of my eXperience in Dr.Winthrop1s class. pertaining to the.above allegations. I can not. rem e mber Dr.Winthrop ever m a king any anti-religious. or anti-Christian statements to t h e class,or to any student, 1ri thin my. hearing outsid e the classroom. Early in the course vie discussed various philos: o phers from the Ancient Greek s to contemporaryeach of their philosophies 1vere presented and discussed in an objective manner I. did not feel. that Dr. Winthro:R_ agre.ed -vri th those philosophers -vrho r.a.i.ght be. considered. anti-religious,nor did he. make any attempt to force on. us in our o-vm religious concepts.Re

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... Page 2.. T. Rolfsen asked us_ to use. our ovm minds I do not reme mber Dr. Winthrop ever mentioning his m m religious. persuasion,:other-than once stating that he
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Page 3 Na.rtha T. Rolfsen \ .Jhen in. our study. of American cultu.re \ole discussed lmver class morals. :,language,and custor1s ,one source of material concerning language. \las ;; .D ... Salinger 1 s 11Catcher in the Rye11.Before. v.re heard the tape recording of excerpts from the book,a.popular best s .eller fevr years ago,Dr.\V'inthrop apologized to the class for the rtvu.lgari ty11 of the. language,and again, vrhen the tap e had 'been. COncluded,he ap0l0gizecl.L anc'{ reminded us that: the SOUrCe. of the language \vas Lower Class but that an a'.vaTeness that tl1is -.. typa of was: normal in part of the "American Lovrer Clas s .. should be par. t of our; unde:rs:tanding of this segment of our society. I per::-sonally.-did not fin9: the use of this excerpt. offensive in any. Dr .l-linthro p d i d not it usa either foul, vulgar: language.;ei ther in class or outside the classrooiiL 1.-li thin our hearing I \>Tould like to state that. I found Dr. Winthrop to be one of thosa s pecial teachers \vho can make a variety of r:1a terial interesting and alive Ha is a vital,strong: teacher,.not one vlh o simply stru1ds in front of the class and re-read s assigned material to make sure that those vrho didn 1 t_ com e prepared vrouldn 1 t suffer because their. lack of. preparation.He.mliid not accep t lame excuses from those \ rho : came unprepare. d to class .He did not accep t sloppy thinki..ng in classroom rec i tati.on,but he vras. 'l:rilling,. to d o his utnost to help the s.tudent think. logically and clear'ly in order to find the correct s :olution. to a problem If he-\!Tas ever 11intolerant11 it lras o i1ly of' thos e students .. who displayed an. obvious la.ck of interest .. and preP,:. \ ,... arat:Eon.

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Page l;. Hartha T.Rolfsen Rmrever,he lvas all-rays fair inn h:ii.s examinations and his grading ,and 1 ras al1 1ays lvilling to give e xtra tir.'le outside of class to those. vTho had trouble t h any o f the lvork.He made .full use of outside material to illustratethe units as He studied them,includ-ing films ,records )and occasional outsi d e lecturers, but he also. used student study.projects on local e xam ples that fit into the course p a nel discussions o f case studies. At: no time can I recall his attem pting to force his m-m o pinions or conclusions o n us.Rather ,he I TOuld present various vimTs on the subject under discussion,and t h en. give us the tool s vrhich vle might need to our m m conclusions.Re gave us all credit .for having t h e abiJ_::_ty to use our own minds,rather than become lazy parasites. of his ovm l mm..rled.ge .. This,I aB sure, toolc a great deal of patience and und eistanding on his part,because not every student believed. in his 0\ m a bility to think clearly through a problen,;and many -vrould havo just as soon narroted the exact facts for each problem straigh t i'ro::1 the text I,for one, believe t hat his careful guidance along t hese lines -vras perhap s the most vi tal part of t h e Hhole course.Finally,I'd lik e to say that I respect Dr. Winthrop and the kind of educatio n that he stand s for vrhere t h e student learns hovr dto "Do it yourselfu in matter of the mind as vlell. as more i:rnrnediately practical matters. The above statement in its t entirety is volontary,offered by m e a .fter leal"ning of the allegations a gainst Dr. \Vinthropoi \Till be. happy to volonteer as a vli t ness before the cornrri. ttee at t heir convenience. 7!( rrL.fh<__/ z r;;; -7 7.J d.

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... Nay 26, 1962 James V. Skipper Jr. 8106 Ola Avenue Tampa, Fla. To Whom It May Concern: I understand that Dr. Winthrop has been accused of certain false charges. The charges are that Dr. vlinthrop has used vile language and that he has taught anti-religious beliefs. I feel that this is a gross false accusation. I have been in Dr. Winthrops class. one year and have listened to several lectures of his and have never heai-d any language of this type that he is being accused of. The worst language I have heard has be en during the 10 minute breaks in the halls, and this came from students themselves. I understand that he has also been accused of being anti-religious, but in all his classes and lectures he has always over emphasized the personal relationship to God as Ghandi and Albert Schweitzer portrayed in their life time and was discussed in the books that we read for this course. It has also been stated that Dr. Winthrop emphasized sex in his courses. As far as The American Idea course is concerned (and this is the only one I have taken with Dr. Winthrop), sex has never to my knowledge come up as a topic. I have had occasion to speak to s .tuden ts w h o took Dr. Winthrop' s course in Human Behavior. They do not have an that sex was emphasized, that ity occurred, or that language unbecoming a college teacher was used. I feel that Dr. Winthrop is one of the greatest assets the University has. You cannot sit in his class without recognizing his outstanding ability in a wide range of subjects. He has given to me an understanding that is deeper than any presented in the class. I would be willing to do anything in my power to justify the position whi c h Dr. Winthrop feels and teaches in the Univ 1 feel that my positi o n is more than an average student and that I am a successful manager of two businesses and also participate in the Baptist Minis and hold my own standards very high. I feel that vle are fortunate to have professors as dedicated to the American principal and to the religious beliefs as possessed by Dr Winthrop. I must emphasize these religious beliefs because. have heard that Dr. Winthrop has been a ccused of being anti-Christian and antireligious. The very opposite is the case He feels that each individual should have a personal relation to God and a deep concern for one's fellow man. I have been attending the University since it opened and have never heard any student complain about Dr. Winthrop in this manner and feel that these charges are v1ay out of line .J.qurs truly: J o t/ Jltif l) V.-Skipper, Jr. Witnessed by: Sworn and subscribed to before me this aZ t, .?'day of 11/R V. 1962 7

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.. H ay 27, 196 2 TO 1 lEO H IT HAY CON CERN: It h a s been bro u g h t t o our atte ntion that, during t he current inves <:i;:;ation a t the University of South Florida, Dr. Henry Hinthro p Associate Professor -Hum an Beha v ior, has s uffered allegations questioning his professi onal c o n duct at the versity. l;Je understand these allegations to be: 1. 2. Teaching Teachi..r1g anti-relig o n Regularly using fou l Being vulgar a nd over e mphasizing sex It is also our unde r standing that t hese allegations center abound t he c urriculum of t b e semester o f 1 96 1 of H u m a n 3 e havior vrhich dealt 'Hi th social organization an d social class influences upon learning. A s students (even i n g c l a ss) o f Dr. Hinthrop in the course in question 1 1 e feel o urselves qualifie d to ans-vrer these char ges on his behalf. It is difficult t o avoid a study of lmmr class structure in a study o f s ocia l class structure. S t udying the socia l s t r ucture o f the lmrer classes (u n s kille d l aborers, v agrants, etc.) inevitably involves t h e abusive l a n g u ag e ru1d sex e m phasis vrhich is characteristic o f that social class. Expressions of vulga rity an d e m ph asis on sex Here m ade by Dr. V linthrop i n illustration of particu l a r learning situation s t o a particula r group o f social cla s ses -the upper lmver class and the lm i eJ: lo1 ver class In a study of hmnan rela t i ons i t is i m possible to avoid acknm rledgment o f the i m portance of sex and l a n guag e influences u p o n t he learning behavior of any social class. T o d eny their predominant

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influence in social class structure w ould be an attempt to deceive a nc"l vJould be educational perjury. The material used for this c ourse 'i'JaS, in our opinion, relavant and educational. To our 1L.'101.-rledge Dr. throp did not at any tir.1e express his personal religious vie'\"TS, nor did he at any time attempt to influence any person or persons concerning their beliefs. It is our opinion that the allegations of teaching anti-christianity and anti-religion stem from the fact tha t a fei-i students ,.,ere unable to adjust to open discussions in 'Hhich Dr. vTinthrop did not participate. Duri...'1g a fe,, i of these discussions some students introduced religious beliefs for use as objective criteria for analysis pf given social class situations. These students 'vere challenged as to tho validity of their argument by felloH students and s oon found themselves in a hot debate v r i th their fello-vr students A small group (2 or 3) of these students found themselves e mbarrassed because they could not \Tin or hold their ground in their arguments based upon religious belief. .. Upon this kno\Tled g e vJe feel tha.:t it is reasonable and valid to judg e the allegations filed against Dr. as invalid for the follm>Ting consideratipns: 1. The 'use of vulgarity' and 'en.-phasis upon sex' vmre course related and \ Jere quotes taken from subject material. 2. Discussions of religious illssue s \:Tere student introduced and .rer e student participated exclusively. In closing vie Hould like to say that the course and course material -vrere non-discrim inatory, valid, and educational. H e feel that the course has proven to beof invaluable aid

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in that it has given us a greater understanding of our social structure and the todls necessary to understan d the social strl.:ictures of other sociaties. vle rate the manner in Hhicb Dr. Hinthrop conducte d his responsibilities as superior to the adverage professor and .rate his personal conduct as above question. Respectfully, A. Shokes Barbara 1 1 Sbokes (lvir. and Hrs. R. A. (5912 Central Ave., (Tm 1pa Florida Shokes) Apt. 6) )

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... >- r-! 1ay 27, 1 9 6 2 To \fuom It Hay Cone ern : It has been brought to my attention that during the course of the present investigat1on, Dr. Henry Winthrop has been accused of the following: being anti-religious, being anti-Christian, over-emphasizing sex in class-room discussions and lectures, and regularly using language unbecoming a college professor. After being associated with Dr. vlinthrop in class for three semesters, and consulting with him out of class on many occassions, it is my opinion that the charges are unfair and unfounded.: If Dr. Winthrop is anti-religious or anti-Christian, it is only toward those forms that one to escape from, rather than to face, the complex problems of the world of today. He m a de me realize that the heart of all issues today is the moral and social standards of individuals. Any sex or foUl language that I have heard in his class has been used only to emphasize and illustrate the issues being discussed; in this area, he is only guilty of not sheltering his students from life as it really is. I do have one complaint about Dr. \tfinthrop t s teaching: the issues discussed in his classes are always so ,ital and thought-provoking, that by comparison the things discussed in many .of my other classes seem trivial. ) As a point of information, I am a sophomore < at : : u.s.F., lvhere I am maintaining .:of j.O holding a state teaching scholarship. I was not fortunate enough i ; o be assigned to Dr. l>J'inthrop 1 s class for this semester, so my only obligation to him is the indebtedness that I };lave to him for challenging_ me to think-a quality 'cha t my high school teachers failed to encourage, making me re-evaluate my whole purpose of life, extinguishing much of the apathy that characterized my attitudes, and helping me to see through complex situations to the basic issues involved. In my experiences at the of South Florida, I have found Dr. Henry Winthrop to be one of the most intelligent, concerned, and stimulating figures on campus. Yours truly, Shirley Jackman ::: ..... .........

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li1y 28, 1 962 September of 19o0 I was in one of the Huma.n :Behavior Sections o f t h e U. S.F tzy-class-room_ .teacher was Dr \ /inthro p In the class I was in he never cond.u.cted himself in a n w.nne r a or s aid or else's. Nor did he use profanity or vul gar l a ngua g e or place tmdue emphasis on sex. T o the best o f my knowl ed ge, as far as I am co n ce : cned he is not guilty of acy of t hese tld.nbs. I am a ,pe1so n vJh o d oes not ;li'ks to get involved in sitt t e.tions o f this sort; but when a fellow hULlall beh'lf;' is bein g pnjustly accused I feel it is my c hL t y to ste p forward and s peak the truth s.nd do rny part to h e l p t o tell WJlEl.t I know. /7 /!. .//c/24. _u. -ed'4

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q. ,., '". }v' llenry / e eal.la 'boa 111'1ten ot letteta on WI lMbalt On 30th I forwarded a ..-ol"aDduuii. to you q tall w1 th 1r. Xel JIIaltin. In that .-o:NXldua 1 aate4 0!18 otMr thizllll ht he4 ... erte4 .. .10. lllllil etf"Oft to oou'\llot lle.n:.r, a .-be ol ... Coalmi tt, 1n OOJmNUon with b1B {Mr. Martin) I'Ole in the aituation, but 'IU un-$ble Olar1f.T the .m1oh .. .,.. on b1a a1n( b ....... He W that he would trt to oontact the OatUt" {5/YJ/62) an4 110Ul4 uetina 'ltith attethe had mecetdecl 1n 1Dg '\M Coar.n1 ttee. Jfr KarUn alao eta ted. to O'f'er the phone maey otheJ" tbilJ&II ot relet'anOAt to thia altu&tion wbidh X may have to cter into at a late2' date, Jthould it pro'Ve tt 'fU neoMai.V to wb1oh l 2'eter, baa now up. On Jun 4th 1 oalla ani contact. baa NYeral o the people who htid vUt.m latter. for !hey all atatecl thi.t bo ._ben ot the W enteftd. their home with taP" and. wre intv'f'i.Winl th .a. ftOOMinc the 1n"l'f'i4nra on th-. tapes They M&W 'that one of the two me Who wen queation.in th WU lu.1c:er hom tidJJ% p.th M3:' .. Bake bad. by that U.e be.n contacted by xr JlelJiariin. IDoidtnially Kr. JC..rtin to14 0..1' the phone that be knn larbr personally ao tbat, tg X cOIICftruJ4;, Mr. lluker ia not a da!.nte ate4 :pa1!'ty in tld l.nfteticati.on. Xn a4ct1 tion let e atate that when l made ay 'hlephone ...U )br. Marlin on b\r 29th, he knew that I wa *ing etudeta who bad. been in hi olan With ae to p'f8 ae tMtr nraiona of W olM81'0CIII poature and coDluot 1 mow of one of hia cU..-.t .. a l.&d;y who wiah.S. to ae a letter on rq bebal.t and 1lbo telt that,.,. .. aharcn wue 'f'&l.H, Who wu tlWl sivi.D& it to b.Y haY1n&' Ulka4. nth !lzt.. fhU 10UJi&' 4!4 not t.ll ae that ahe .,.. going to ... Martin W!Oil tlh kn pel"llinall.y. Xutin Uke oYer the phone 110t to hurt hel" beoatee ahe b&4 oonoealed 'thil 'YUit h'oa me. lle apparently kDft that she bad upruaetl a 'ltillirl&n ... to d180redit h1a againet .. an4 I ahou14 like to add that 8he had aprused We wil.l.ixlane in the p Hl1IM of a wi tneaa whoa I had 'btouaht hiDe to face vi th Deans hench, 0oopeJ" an4 Jlartin. 'l'hia relun.nt la4y UMCl u an the tact that if abe p.n 11.9 the proaiaed letter, then woulcl be & poaaibil1ty that ehe would the oareer of her -.ploye 11ho tru a nry pJ.'CII81nent penon in th.ta OOIIIII.U1i v Sbe atated thai her ployer h-' api:nst giving thia letter. Sh ftuiber atated that abe q4 l.Ht .ach al.-p and waa aiok OYV the tao:t that llhe bed to renege on he
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..._..u. on a ..:ru.n W..t:uwu vi .... -.. to c.u" ........ at l.ut bT phou. ttM1 potai:Oq t: -f-., r 'belitYf _. f01 bg nat n. ,_... bHr1 tiTatecl. to th1a t U.. I lf
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According to infonn-tion ll0\ 1 V.D.l:inr:, t.ho rol.mds of the cm.JT.i'Js, Dr. H e mry Hinthrop has been n.ccuscd hy nn ex-student. of' tonchinr. in n fc.s hicn ing a. university He, the undersigned, uho hnve either h c n r d Dr. Hinthrop tea c hi'"!g in a or in the. teachine nuditoriur. l no_,tj fou."ld hi a concuc-11 or his function ns a tea cher to be il::propcr. On the contr{n:-.r, liO find t h nt n.c o. teacher and ns m1 individu.:'"'.l he poooesscs t h e follolr.i.n g attributes: -stirrulntes our thoughts end challenges cur minds -hns a lively sense of humor --presents -is vors.."ltile end nruccs usc of his "L-rldc ra."lge of kno;rlcdcc o f r:.::n:JY fields -shous co:mplote fairncos in crn.d ing -is vitilly concerned 'l-r.i:th t h e q-uestion of hur::."ln vcluos studonts n.nd is interested in t h e n c.s i!lClividu.<:l s I ,I l I .}

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I I l I .. I I 'i?a//1 z1.b.cJ 7/tc, (}

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,. .a : r i I X:::;r/C"" / J,;fc&< fo:< .. 0 T"'l cJtuC[IR fr(d &f.tC)ei%1 : / !i/t/. /. l u i-1-.:"r-.. C/u:evJ t. o!i o lkJk-(> A

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...

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.. According to information novr making the rounds of the campus Dr. Henry Winthrop has been accused by an ex-student of teaching in a
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0 r 4:fr ,. \ !?l;dt;! KtdP 0 dWl '2\:::tkJ (trr-Q.D-J ...

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.. According to inform."l.fion noH IP.aking the rounds of the c ampus, Dr .. Henry \Unthrop has been accused by an ex-student of tea c hing in a fashion unbecoming a university professor. We, the undersigned, v{i..o have either h eard Dr. Hinthrop teaching in a classromm or in the teaching auditorium have not found his conduct or his function as a teacher to be improper. On the contrary, .;e find that as a teacher and as an individual he possesses the follotdng attributes:-stimulates our thoughts and challenges our minds -has a lively sense of humor -presents interesting, well-organized lectures -is versatile and makes -,.-.ride use of his knowledge of many fields -shovs complete fairness ingrading -is vitally concerned -vrlt h the question of human values -is friendly '-rl.th students and is interested in them as individuals t Oo.V-ftrr t g.kt-1 (__
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I I ... a .. /}_ r J .-. -



PAGE 1

INTER-OFFICE MEMORANDUM DATE M ay 29, 1962 TO: ____ ____ __ ......... ,r--SUBJECT: Photostat copies of materials given the Johns Committee. Enclosed you will find materials I have transmitted to the Johns Committee and certain mem orand a which are self-explanatory,

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President John &. Allen Henry Winthl'op Phototat oopi .. of given the Johns Committee. May X tranaudt tor your filtta wh:leh I han turni"hed to tbt Johna Committee. These materials han been used to make oleu 'the tals1ty o-f oertain ooapl..ute which bav been mad me by being l"M4 inio the taped record ot lhe eo.ittee on May 28th,. 1962 from 4t:;<) to 5:30 P M P'hotoatat aopi of thel!l h&Ye aleo been lett with the Commit. tee. I should e.l..o likt to to your attention that ot these. letter writers W'81"9 olasSIIII.tea Qt X.l Martin, the .man who hail lD&de chargee. and that they would willing to tea1:ity to the t&laity ot thia mans charges against me, either before the ttee o:t in your pl"eatnc _j

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.. Donald ltaimeaa, President, USP Chapter AA'JJP Henry inthrop MaiY 29, 1962 Photostat copies of gi.Y.n the Johns Committee. 'May t pace 1n the hands of the M some materials which establish fairly well, I bal1eYe, the falsity of certain allegations w: ich haft been made against Theae materials ban been rQ4 into the taped record of the ec.u.u" on May' 28th, 1962 trca 4s30 to ?.M ln addition phote-*Mt copies ot than ban bMn furnished to President John Allen and Deans aemor.mau. A copy or the lll8!llO!"a1:l sent to the heaident is attached. I hope tbeae -.terials will be U88d by the UT1P if and when any i.nequi titNJ ba'v'e to redressed, trbich llltir be d.ireotly or ind.Uectly related to heee charges I abould a1ao lilt.e to brina to the attention of tho AAl1P the tact tbat I ve Qroucb\ a v1-.. of higb oharacter and intelligenoe raoe to tee with Deans c h Cooper ad Martin. This vi tnese 'bal!t pl'Ovided wrbal teeti.motJ;r which makes clear the falaity ot asainst ... :Beoause ot tbe special nature of thia witnees, a Mttar which 1 t would lJa UiPJ'Opar for ae to. tl!'Y to .plain in this DL4111lorandum, and beclaiM I auat this witneea and do eY&.rythi.rl(f can to a.voi d tWJ authoriti .. I teal tbat. it 1a proper to y o more on thi-s: ecore.

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' ./ .. 'I I/ ; I I f I .I / !I I : i I I .. I UNITED STATES POST' OFFICE May 26, 1962 TO 'WHOM IT MA.Y CONCERN: Re: Dr. Henry Winthrop IN IIJILY URI TO I'os tma.s ter I would like to take thi:s opportunity to express my views on several subjects that seem to have become important at the University of South Florida First, I would like it known that Dr. Winthrop is one of the most qualified and conscientious College Instructors that I have known. You may ask yourself why I have an interest in this investigation since I no longer attend the University of South Florida. You may also ask yourself why I had enrolled as a freshman student at the age of thirty, having attained a : measure of success in the merchandising business. These questions in reality are the foundation of my personal belief as to what College is 11 all about. 11 I know I am a Baptist and I also know I believe in a free Democracy. These beliefs were handed down to me by my parents. To know what I believe is not enough, I must also have a complete knowledge of the things that I am against. College education does not all together teach us what we should know, but it also teaches us h
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I I r .. I I IN UPLY ama TO UNITED STATES POST OFFICE Page 2: Re: Dr. Henry Winthrop someone were to say he were Anti-Religious or Anti-Christian in his teachings, I would take exception to this charge and claim it to be an untruth. If my son were of age to enroll in the University, it would be my desire that he study under Dr. Henry Ylinthrop. I trust one or two people with uelfish -interest will not deprive this area of the vast knowledge and well qualified teaohing of Dr. Winthrop. Sincerely, Postmaster SPN1rn I

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Hay 26, 1962 TO HHOY I T EAY C OUCERH: It has been broucht to my attention t'hat certain have been made ar-ainst Dr. Hen::. .... v Hinthron. As Iu_"'lclersta.nd these '-' v cha r tje s are of vulgarity, over-emphasizinc; sex, professing non-religious belief's, and using profane language. I I \vas a studmt :i. n D::.". t s Human Behavior classes' for one year. In thi$ year1s t i m e I missed class period TI1e man these char2;es attended about five weeks. It app e a r s to me that the man 1 !Jlo brou[_,ht these cnar ges against Dr. Has judging a man from an unfair or nom"epresentative sample. Before I c;o any farther, let me state that t h e charr;es against Dr. V!inthrop are f alse and 1nalicious. These c har;::;es are rational ones, that is good ones instead o f the real reason. Dr. Hinthrop and :Hr. Martin had a difference in per2.onal opinion. .. Tb.cclash of Has caused by Hr. Hartin's belief that only 1rJhi te men are created equally in the eye,s of God. You cannot teach a course in comparitive relic;ions Hith ou. t discussing more than one rclic;ion. You cannot teach social class differences ':Jithout O.isCl-';Ssing social classes. You cannot teach learnedsexual differences a mong different peoples of the 1-JOrld Hithout talking about sex. If something should b e investi gated it is whether or not a course in Hwaan Behavior should be .-.taught on a freshman level. The books used in the course are also used b y other tmiversities including the U niversity of Florida. One of these books Sex and Tempera_rn.ent in Three Primitive Societies by Hargaret Head, Associate Curator of Ethnolo.::;y of the American of Natural History, was used by the University of Florida while I was in attendance there. I doubt the. t Hr. Hartin read t;he book because of the title. If he had, he v-rou.ld have been disappointed b y the lack of, s .ex involved .in the bock. It was a f'actl:lal narrative about three tribes in New Guinea. Dr. 1dinthrop stated many views that 1rrould contradict with what we have been taught from birth, but he never stated them as his own philosophy. The cours e is a controversial one and Dr. 'Vlinthrop attempted to get class participation and argument on all controversial portions. Nr. Hartin never joined in the class discussions. This :letter may appear to be overly qomplimentary tmv-ard Dr. \rJinthrop. It is intended to be. so. This is the third univer sity I have attended The other th'O Here the United Stated Coast .Guard Academy and. the University of F lorida. I had to change schools for financial reasons. I have now been able to work full time at Tampa Electric Company and go to colleg e part time. I feel Dr. is the: .'finest educator I have had to date, but he is --::_ ...... .._ ) I I i I i I i

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Kay 26, 1962 not far ahead of the other professors I have had at the University of South Florida. This is the first I have attended Hhei'e the faculty showed a truo desire to help the individual student personally and academically. For the record let m e state that Dr. Hinthrop can be of no further help to me as a student. I am approaching my senior year in the school of business, and I have completed .all of my free electives. A good professor, except in technical matter, must teach from all points of vieH. I ara a salesman, and if I didn't knoH my opponents selling .points, I coul<1."1' t sell against them. All philosophies have-their selling points. \men 1-fe learn their strong points their fallacies we can adequately combat them. In.conclusion let me say that if these chai'ges had been true, I would not have taken my wife along to sit in on Dr. vlinthrop' s lectures. ... Very truly yourS,J, t ;;-Ji Jl John L. Terrell, Jr.

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TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: For a number of years it h a s been my desire to continue rnw education and yet meet my fru1uly obligations. The advent of the University of South Florida seemed to solve my problems. One of the first classes :C applied for was the Human Behavior 1 course, since my occupation puts me in touch with many personalities. It was my fortune to be assigned to Dr. Henry Winthrop. I made it a point to atte nd e a ch and every class of both semesters. In fact I also had Dr. Winthrop for The American Idea course. i i I Dr. Winthrop's lectures were well prepared, stimulating, and excellently presented. Since human nature itself is an enigma, controversial subjects were often discussed in class panels as well as lectured u p on. It v ;as enlightening. and extremely educational that subjects pertaining to all aspe .cts of human behaviour (both the g ood and bad of it since it is inherent in man) could be discusse d o penly and frankly. I am 35 years of age, m a rried, and the father of eight children, yet I learned man y .thing s in t he s e classes concerning the raising of children w h i ch even I didn't kno w and since which I have be e n able to put to goo d use. I have felt that throug h t hese classes the youn ger students just out of high school had bee n given a solid background in order to prepare for the transition from a formal educ ation to the goals they ultimately hoped to achieve. In no manner could Dr. winthrop's teaching s be construed as anti-religious. Every t hinking student with whom I spoke came away from these classe s exhi.bi ting a more tolerant view of the beliefs of others. Certainly this was one of the direct results of this course i n m y o pinion. Since this course deals vvit h human behaviour, the subject of sex must of necessity be inter j ected and it was. Due to Dr. Winthrop s learned back g round in psychology, this sub ject was handled properly and efff:ciently. I am certain that had any of my o v m attended these classes no one would have been offended, least of all t h e children. My only'tomplaintn with D r lJ' Tinthrop was that he taught u s much more than we neede d to know in order to pass the final examination. But this knovl'ledg e which he imparted has assisted me in my own line of endnavors. I have been the manager of the Tampa Barber College for the past five years. It is necessary

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for me to teach many subject.s t o our sixty students. The experiences which I h ave received from Dr. Winthrop have been invaluable to me. I confess to having attempted to imitate his wann and personal method of lecturing. Ke imparts to all a profound kno wledge of human behavior. I shall always be grateful and indebted for having made the acquaintance of Dr. Heru7y Winthrop. We need more men of his calibre. Sincerely, Stephen V. Yovino Rt. # 2 ,' Box 3.52 Lutz, Florida P.S. Before I forget I have heard that charges have been made somewhere that Dr. Winthro p expressed anti-religious and antiChristian sentiments. I have also heard that his lectures were supposed to overemphasize sex, were vulgar and were given in foul language unbecoming to a professor. Having been in the Human Be havior section in which these charges were have been true, I can honestly state that there is nothing to any of them. I cannot even imagine the circumstances which would have prompted anyone to make such misinterpretations or distortions.

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... I I \ I .. I I ; I I 1 j I ; 1 1

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From : Hrs 1-Iartha T. RoJ!fsen of south Florida To. Whom. It : 1'1a.y 27' 196 2 I t has been brought. to m y attention that the follo1.-1ing allegati.ons have been mad. e concerning the material taught in the G B 103-lOl.tHuman Behavior c ourse, and the instructor of: f:dl the evening: section: (Sec.90) _Dr.R a:i:'cla Winthrop : 1. Teaching, anti-relj.gion. '2. .. Being; anti-religious. 3. Teaching anti-Christianity 4. Overemphasis. on sex and matters in classroom instruction. 5 .. Habitual use of foul languag,e. 6 II t.t tt. u. c ommon vulgarity.. The folloviing is a statement of my eXperience in Dr.Winthrop1s class. pertaining to the.above allegations. I can not. rem e mber Dr.Winthrop ever m a king any anti-religious. or anti-Christian statements to t h e class,or to any student, 1ri thin my. hearing outsid e the classroom. Early in the course vie discussed various philos: o phers from the Ancient Greek s to contemporaryeach of their philosophies 1vere presented and discussed in an objective manner I. did not feel. that Dr. Winthro:R_ agre.ed -vri th those philosophers -vrho r.a.i.ght be. considered. anti-religious,nor did he. make any attempt to force on. us in our o-vm religious concepts.Re

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... Page 2.. T. Rolfsen asked us_ to use. our ovm minds I do not reme mber Dr. Winthrop ever mentioning his m m religious. persuasion,:other-than once stating that he
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Page 3 Na.rtha T. Rolfsen \ .Jhen in. our study. of American cultu.re \ole discussed lmver class morals. :,language,and custor1s ,one source of material concerning language. \las ;; .D ... Salinger 1 s 11Catcher in the Rye11.Before. v.re heard the tape recording of excerpts from the book,a.popular best s .eller fevr years ago,Dr.\V'inthrop apologized to the class for the rtvu.lgari ty11 of the. language,and again, vrhen the tap e had 'been. COncluded,he ap0l0gizecl.L anc'{ reminded us that: the SOUrCe. of the language \vas Lower Class but that an a'.vaTeness that tl1is -.. typa of was: normal in part of the "American Lovrer Clas s .. should be par. t of our; unde:rs:tanding of this segment of our society. I per::-sonally.-did not fin9: the use of this excerpt. offensive in any. Dr .l-linthro p d i d not it usa either foul, vulgar: language.;ei ther in class or outside the classrooiiL 1.-li thin our hearing I \>Tould like to state that. I found Dr. Winthrop to be one of thosa s pecial teachers \vho can make a variety of r:1a terial interesting and alive Ha is a vital,strong: teacher,.not one vlh o simply stru1ds in front of the class and re-read s assigned material to make sure that those vrho didn 1 t_ com e prepared vrouldn 1 t suffer because their. lack of. preparation.He.mliid not accep t lame excuses from those \ rho : came unprepare. d to class .He did not accep t sloppy thinki..ng in classroom rec i tati.on,but he vras. 'l:rilling,. to d o his utnost to help the s.tudent think. logically and clear'ly in order to find the correct s :olution. to a problem If he-\!Tas ever 11intolerant11 it lras o i1ly of' thos e students .. who displayed an. obvious la.ck of interest .. and preP,:. \ ,... arat:Eon.

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Page l;. Hartha T.Rolfsen Rmrever,he lvas all-rays fair inn h:ii.s examinations and his grading ,and 1 ras al1 1ays lvilling to give e xtra tir.'le outside of class to those. vTho had trouble t h any o f the lvork.He made .full use of outside material to illustratethe units as He studied them,includ-ing films ,records )and occasional outsi d e lecturers, but he also. used student study.projects on local e xam ples that fit into the course p a nel discussions o f case studies. At: no time can I recall his attem pting to force his m-m o pinions or conclusions o n us.Rather ,he I TOuld present various vimTs on the subject under discussion,and t h en. give us the tool s vrhich vle might need to our m m conclusions.Re gave us all credit .for having t h e abiJ_::_ty to use our own minds,rather than become lazy parasites. of his ovm l mm..rled.ge .. This,I aB sure, toolc a great deal of patience and und eistanding on his part,because not every student believed. in his 0\ m a bility to think clearly through a problen,;and many -vrould havo just as soon narroted the exact facts for each problem straigh t i'ro::1 the text I,for one, believe t hat his careful guidance along t hese lines -vras perhap s the most vi tal part of t h e Hhole course.Finally,I'd lik e to say that I respect Dr. Winthrop and the kind of educatio n that he stand s for vrhere t h e student learns hovr dto "Do it yourselfu in matter of the mind as vlell. as more i:rnrnediately practical matters. The above statement in its t entirety is volontary,offered by m e a .fter leal"ning of the allegations a gainst Dr. \Vinthropoi \Till be. happy to volonteer as a vli t ness before the cornrri. ttee at t heir convenience. 7!( rrL.fh<__/ z r;;; -7 7.J d.

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... Nay 26, 1962 James V. Skipper Jr. 8106 Ola Avenue Tampa, Fla. To Whom It May Concern: I understand that Dr. Winthrop has been accused of certain false charges. The charges are that Dr. vlinthrop has used vile language and that he has taught anti-religious beliefs. I feel that this is a gross false accusation. I have been in Dr. Winthrops class. one year and have listened to several lectures of his and have never heai-d any language of this type that he is being accused of. The worst language I have heard has be en during the 10 minute breaks in the halls, and this came from students themselves. I understand that he has also been accused of being anti-religious, but in all his classes and lectures he has always over emphasized the personal relationship to God as Ghandi and Albert Schweitzer portrayed in their life time and was discussed in the books that we read for this course. It has also been stated that Dr. Winthrop emphasized sex in his courses. As far as The American Idea course is concerned (and this is the only one I have taken with Dr. Winthrop), sex has never to my knowledge come up as a topic. I have had occasion to speak to s .tuden ts w h o took Dr. Winthrop' s course in Human Behavior. They do not have an that sex was emphasized, that ity occurred, or that language unbecoming a college teacher was used. I feel that Dr. Winthrop is one of the greatest assets the University has. You cannot sit in his class without recognizing his outstanding ability in a wide range of subjects. He has given to me an understanding that is deeper than any presented in the class. I would be willing to do anything in my power to justify the position whi c h Dr. Winthrop feels and teaches in the Univ 1 feel that my positi o n is more than an average student and that I am a successful manager of two businesses and also participate in the Baptist Minis and hold my own standards very high. I feel that vle are fortunate to have professors as dedicated to the American principal and to the religious beliefs as possessed by Dr Winthrop. I must emphasize these religious beliefs because. have heard that Dr. Winthrop has been a ccused of being anti-Christian and antireligious. The very opposite is the case He feels that each individual should have a personal relation to God and a deep concern for one's fellow man. I have been attending the University since it opened and have never heard any student complain about Dr. Winthrop in this manner and feel that these charges are v1ay out of line .J.qurs truly: J o t/ Jltif l) V.-Skipper, Jr. Witnessed by: Sworn and subscribed to before me this aZ t, .?'day of 11/R V. 1962 7

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.. H ay 27, 196 2 TO 1 lEO H IT HAY CON CERN: It h a s been bro u g h t t o our atte ntion that, during t he current inves <:i;:;ation a t the University of South Florida, Dr. Henry Hinthro p Associate Professor -Hum an Beha v ior, has s uffered allegations questioning his professi onal c o n duct at the versity. l;Je understand these allegations to be: 1. 2. Teaching Teachi..r1g anti-relig o n Regularly using fou l Being vulgar a nd over e mphasizing sex It is also our unde r standing that t hese allegations center abound t he c urriculum of t b e semester o f 1 96 1 of H u m a n 3 e havior vrhich dealt 'Hi th social organization an d social class influences upon learning. A s students (even i n g c l a ss) o f Dr. Hinthrop in the course in question 1 1 e feel o urselves qualifie d to ans-vrer these char ges on his behalf. It is difficult t o avoid a study of lmmr class structure in a study o f s ocia l class structure. S t udying the socia l s t r ucture o f the lmrer classes (u n s kille d l aborers, v agrants, etc.) inevitably involves t h e abusive l a n g u ag e ru1d sex e m phasis vrhich is characteristic o f that social class. Expressions of vulga rity an d e m ph asis on sex Here m ade by Dr. V linthrop i n illustration of particu l a r learning situation s t o a particula r group o f social cla s ses -the upper lmver class and the lm i eJ: lo1 ver class In a study of hmnan rela t i ons i t is i m possible to avoid acknm rledgment o f the i m portance of sex and l a n guag e influences u p o n t he learning behavior of any social class. T o d eny their predominant

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influence in social class structure w ould be an attempt to deceive a nc"l vJould be educational perjury. The material used for this c ourse 'i'JaS, in our opinion, relavant and educational. To our 1L.'101.-rledge Dr. throp did not at any tir.1e express his personal religious vie'\"TS, nor did he at any time attempt to influence any person or persons concerning their beliefs. It is our opinion that the allegations of teaching anti-christianity and anti-religion stem from the fact tha t a fei-i students ,.,ere unable to adjust to open discussions in 'Hhich Dr. vTinthrop did not participate. Duri...'1g a fe,, i of these discussions some students introduced religious beliefs for use as objective criteria for analysis pf given social class situations. These students 'vere challenged as to tho validity of their argument by felloH students and s oon found themselves in a hot debate v r i th their fello-vr students A small group (2 or 3) of these students found themselves e mbarrassed because they could not \Tin or hold their ground in their arguments based upon religious belief. .. Upon this kno\Tled g e vJe feel tha.:t it is reasonable and valid to judg e the allegations filed against Dr. as invalid for the follm>Ting consideratipns: 1. The 'use of vulgarity' and 'en.-phasis upon sex' vmre course related and \ Jere quotes taken from subject material. 2. Discussions of religious illssue s \:Tere student introduced and .rer e student participated exclusively. In closing vie Hould like to say that the course and course material -vrere non-discrim inatory, valid, and educational. H e feel that the course has proven to beof invaluable aid

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in that it has given us a greater understanding of our social structure and the todls necessary to understan d the social strl.:ictures of other sociaties. vle rate the manner in Hhicb Dr. Hinthrop conducte d his responsibilities as superior to the adverage professor and .rate his personal conduct as above question. Respectfully, A. Shokes Barbara 1 1 Sbokes (lvir. and Hrs. R. A. (5912 Central Ave., (Tm 1pa Florida Shokes) Apt. 6) )

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... >- r-! 1ay 27, 1 9 6 2 To \fuom It Hay Cone ern : It has been brought to my attention that during the course of the present investigat1on, Dr. Henry Winthrop has been accused of the following: being anti-religious, being anti-Christian, over-emphasizing sex in class-room discussions and lectures, and regularly using language unbecoming a college professor. After being associated with Dr. vlinthrop in class for three semesters, and consulting with him out of class on many occassions, it is my opinion that the charges are unfair and unfounded.: If Dr. Winthrop is anti-religious or anti-Christian, it is only toward those forms that one to escape from, rather than to face, the complex problems of the world of today. He m a de me realize that the heart of all issues today is the moral and social standards of individuals. Any sex or foUl language that I have heard in his class has been used only to emphasize and illustrate the issues being discussed; in this area, he is only guilty of not sheltering his students from life as it really is. I do have one complaint about Dr. \tfinthrop t s teaching: the issues discussed in his classes are always so ,ital and thought-provoking, that by comparison the things discussed in many .of my other classes seem trivial. ) As a point of information, I am a sophomore < at : : u.s.F., lvhere I am maintaining .:of j.O holding a state teaching scholarship. I was not fortunate enough i ; o be assigned to Dr. l>J'inthrop 1 s class for this semester, so my only obligation to him is the indebtedness that I };lave to him for challenging_ me to think-a quality 'cha t my high school teachers failed to encourage, making me re-evaluate my whole purpose of life, extinguishing much of the apathy that characterized my attitudes, and helping me to see through complex situations to the basic issues involved. In my experiences at the of South Florida, I have found Dr. Henry Winthrop to be one of the most intelligent, concerned, and stimulating figures on campus. Yours truly, Shirley Jackman ::: ..... .........

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li1y 28, 1 962 September of 19o0 I was in one of the Huma.n :Behavior Sections o f t h e U. S.F tzy-class-room_ .teacher was Dr \ /inthro p In the class I was in he never cond.u.cted himself in a n w.nne r a or s aid or else's. Nor did he use profanity or vul gar l a ngua g e or place tmdue emphasis on sex. T o the best o f my knowl ed ge, as far as I am co n ce : cned he is not guilty of acy of t hese tld.nbs. I am a ,pe1so n vJh o d oes not ;li'ks to get involved in sitt t e.tions o f this sort; but when a fellow hULlall beh'lf;' is bein g pnjustly accused I feel it is my c hL t y to ste p forward and s peak the truth s.nd do rny part to h e l p t o tell WJlEl.t I know. /7 /!. .//c/24. _u. -ed'4

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q. ,., '". }v' llenry / e eal.la 'boa 111'1ten ot letteta on WI lMbalt On 30th I forwarded a ..-ol"aDduuii. to you q tall w1 th 1r. JIIaltin. In that .-o:NXldua 1 aate4 0!18 otMr thizllll ht he4 ... erte4 .. .10. lllllil etf"Oft to oou'\llot lle.n:.r, a .-be ol ... Coalmi tt, 1n OOJmNUon with b1B {Mr. Martin) I'Ole in the aituation, but 'IU un-$ble Olar1f.T the .m1oh .. .,.. on b1a a1n( b ....... He W that he would trt to oontact the OatUt" {5/YJ/62) an4 110Ul4 uetina 'ltith attethe had mecetdecl 1n 1Dg '\M Coar.n1 ttee. Jfr KarUn alao eta ted. to O'f'er the phone maey otheJ" tbilJ&II ot relet'anOAt to thia altu&tion wbidh X may have to cter into at a late2' date, Jthould it pro'Ve tt 'fU neoMai.V to wb1oh l 2'eter, baa now up. On Jun 4th 1 oalla ani contact. baa NYeral o the people who htid vUt.m latter. for !hey all atatecl thi.t bo ._ben ot the W enteftd. their home with taP" and. wre intv'f'i.Winl th .a. ftOOMinc the 1n"l'f'i4nra on th-. tapes They M&W 'that one of the two me Who wen queation.in th WU lu.1c:er hom tidJJ% p.th M3:' .. Bake bad. by that U.e be.n contacted by xr Jiariin. IDoidtnially Kr. JC..rtin to14 0..1' the phone that be knn larbr personally ao tbat, tg X cOIICftruJ4;, Mr. lluker ia not a da!.nte ate4 :pa1!'ty in tld l.nfteticati.on. Xn a4ct1 tion let e atate that when l made ay 'hlephone ...U )br. Marlin on b\r 29th, he knew that I wa *ing etudeta who bad. been in hi olan With ae to p'f8 ae tMtr nraiona of W olM81'0CIII poature and coDluot 1 mow of one of hia cU..-.t .. a l.&d;y who wiah.S. to ae a letter on rq bebal.t and 1lbo telt that,.,. .. aharcn wue 'f'&l.H, Who wu tlWl sivi.D& it to b.Y haY1n&' Ulka4. nth !lzt.. fhU 10UJi&' 4!4 not t.ll ae that ahe .,.. going to ... Martin W!Oil tlh kn pel"llinall.y. Xutin Uke oYer the phone 110t to hurt hel" beoatee ahe b&4 oonoealed 'thil 'YUit h'oa me. lle apparently kDft that she bad upruaetl a 'ltillirl&n ... to d180redit h1a againet .. an4 I ahou14 like to add that 8he had aprused We wil.l.ixlane in the p Hl1IM of a wi tneaa whoa I had 'btouaht hiDe to face vi th Deans hench, 0oopeJ" an4 Jlartin. 'l'hia relun.nt la4y UMCl u an the tact that if abe p.n 11.9 the proaiaed letter, then woulcl be & poaaibil1ty that ehe would the oareer of her -.ploye 11ho tru a nry pJ.'CII81nent penon in th.ta OOIIIII.U1i v Sbe atated thai her ployer h-' api:nst giving thia letter. Sh ftuiber atated that abe q4 l.Ht .ach al.-p and waa aiok OYV the tao:t that llhe bed to renege on he
PAGE 28

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PAGE 29

According to infonn-tion ll0\ 1 V.D.l:inr:, t.ho rol.mds of the cm.JT.i'Js, Dr. H e mry Hinthrop has been n.ccuscd hy nn ex-student. of' tonchinr. in n fc.s hicn ing a. university He, the undersigned, uho hnve either h c n r d Dr. Hinthrop tea c hi'"!g in a or in the. teachine nuditoriur. l no_,tj fou."ld hi a concuc-11 or his function ns a tea cher to be il::propcr. On the contr{n:-.r, liO find t h nt n.c o. teacher and ns m1 individu.:'"'.l he poooesscs t h e follolr.i.n g attributes: -stirrulntes our thoughts end challenges cur minds -hns a lively sense of humor --presents -is vors.."ltile end nruccs usc of his "L-rldc ra."lge of kno;rlcdcc o f r:.::n:JY fields -shous co:mplote fairncos in crn.d ing -is vitilly concerned 'l-r.i:th t h e q-uestion of hur::."ln vcluos studonts n.nd is interested in t h e n c.s i!lClividu.<:l s I ,I l I .}

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,. .a : r i I X:::;r/C"" / J,;fc&< fo:< .. 0 T"'l cJtuC[IR fr(d &f.tC)ei%1 : / !i/t/. /. l u i-1-.:"r-.. C/u:evJ t. o!i o lkJk-(> A

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.. According to information novr making the rounds of the campus Dr. Henry Winthrop has been accused by an ex-student of teaching in a
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.. According to inform."l.fion noH IP.aking the rounds of the c ampus, Dr .. Henry \Unthrop has been accused by an ex-student of tea c hing in a fashion unbecoming a university professor. We, the undersigned, v{i..o have either h eard Dr. Hinthrop teaching in a classromm or in the teaching auditorium have not found his conduct or his function as a teacher to be improper. On the contrary, .;e find that as a teacher and as an individual he possesses the follotdng attributes:-stimulates our thoughts and challenges our minds -has a lively sense of humor -presents interesting, well-organized lectures -is versatile and makes -,.-.ride use of his knowledge of many fields -shovs complete fairness ingrading -is vitally concerned -vrlt h the question of human values -is friendly '-rl.th students and is interested in them as individuals t Oo.V-ftrr t g.kt-1 (__
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