John Stuart Allen Papers, USF Archives

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John Stuart Allen Papers, USF Archives

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Title:
John Stuart Allen Papers, USF Archives John Caldwell
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Florida Legislative Investigation Committee (Johns Committee)
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Allen, John Stuart 1907-1982
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Tampa, Florida
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University of South Florida
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English
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1 folder

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Academic freedom -- Florida -- Tampa ( lcsh )
History -- Tampa (Fla.) -- 20th century ( lcsh )

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Some student names have been redacted from this document.
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USF Archives

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University of South Florida
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University of South Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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A49-00005 ( USFLDC DOI )
a49.5 ( USF Handle )

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9/11/62 REPORT FROM THE .-f>RESIDENT OF THE UNIVE.RSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA. .... TO THE SPECIAL COMMlmE OF THE BOARD OF CONTROL ON THE FINDINGS OF THE'.l.eGISl.ATIVE INVESTIGATING COMMITTEE IN THE SPRING OF 1962 Faculty and Staff a} John S. Born 1925 Illinois { Single) the recOi'a Wflldi IS summarized below indicates that Mr., was employed during the fil'.'St M;> in September 1960, iust befare the opening of classes for our first semester of operations on September 26, 1960. TI1e dossier of his educational experience as summarized below Indicates on Incomplete recOrd betvieen 1949 and 195'2, which was apparently not checked at the time of his employment 1942-43 University of Southern California Student 1943-46 UoSo Navy 1946-49 University of Southern California B.A. degree ( cum laude) 1952-53 Litchfield School Teacher 1953-55 Columbia University degree 195.5-57 Clemson College Teacher 1957-59 University of North Carolina Tchg.Asst. Ph.D. OJndidate 1959-60 Easterr,a Carolina State College Teacher 1960-62 of South Florida Teacher June 6, 1962 Terminated for conduct connected with a psychological di sorder. (This phrase was the one worked out by the University of Florida In coMultation with the law faculty, in order to avoid possible future legaf after the Johns Committee had made its investigation there a few years agoo This phrase was approved by the Johns Committee and has been used for this purpose since. I reported that this phluse had been entered on Mac Kenz le 's record to Sena Jw Johns and it received his approval.) b) James Do Teske was a member of the staff who was assisting in the teaching of o course in visual aids to school teachers during the 1962 summer sessi0n. He was discharged as of the end of the summer session, August 11, 1962. c) 'h3f Winthrop Born July 20, 1910, New York City { married) College of City of New York BoS o degree 1937-41 War Dept., WG$hington, DoCo Librarian 1938-40 George Washington University MoAo degree i t. 1941-44 UoSo Dept. of labor, Washington, DoCo lndust. Psychologist 1940""42 George Washington University Grad. Student 1942--46 Muhlenberg .Adult Educ. Forum, No Y.Co Dir. & Lecturer 1944-48 Abbe Institute, N o Yo Co Instr. Psychology 1944-47 Offiee of Price Adm., N. Y o Co Economist 1947-48 N oY o State Div. of Housing No Yo Co Stat. & Economist 1947-49 New School for Social Research, VoC. Ph.D. degree -1-

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d ) Henry Winthrop (Continued ) 1948-49 Wor Assets Adm., No Yo.Co Analyst 1950-51 UoSo Dept. of Labor, WCJihington, DoCo Economist 1951-52 Office of Price StobUization, Wash. DoCo Economist 1952 Washington Public Opinion Lab, Seattle, Wash.lecturer 1953-54 Richmond Prof. Inst. of College of Wm. & Mary Asst.Prof. 1956-57 Hollins College, Va. Asst. Prof. 1957-60 of Wichita Asst.Prof. 1960-62 U\iversity of South Florida Assoc.Prof. Has published numerous books and articles on psychology, education, soclology, and philosophy. Recommendations from: V oJo Biellauskas, Richmond Prof. hist. of College of Wm. & fo.k:Jry E. Shouby, Chrm., Psychology Dept., State Univ. of New York Herbert Feigl, Dir., Minnesota Center for Ph11osophy of Science, University of Minnesota Robert Hofstadter, Assoc. Prof., Stanford University Professor Winthrop does not use profanity in the classroom. This charge seemed to come about amesult of a misunderstanding by one person. In the study of a certain book, in Human Behavior classes, Professor Wintlvop wished to illustrate the difference in ways of conversing of people of different social and economic levels. He selected passages from Salinger's "Catcher in the Rye" to illustrate the vulgarity of con versational language in a certain 50Cial class. He taped the passages and ployed them for his classes, explaining clearly what he was doing _and apologizing in advance and after for the offensive nature of the conversation. Many of his students have testified in writing to the fact that he does not use foul either inside or outside of fteclCJSil'oom; that he is not anti-religious, and that he does not over-emphasize sex. These testimonials are available far review if desired. Max O. Hocutt Born July 3, 1936, Berry, Alabama ( married ) Tulane University BoAo degree (With Honors) (Major and minor fields: Philosophy and Political Science ) Elected to Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Sigma Tau 1958 Tulane University MoAo degree 1958-60 Yafe University Ph .. D. dewee 1957-58 Tulane University part -tlme teaching as Grad .. Asst. 1957-58 Held Fellowship -Southern Fellowship Fund 1958-60 Held Yale Fellowship letters of recommendation were received from: Prof. Edward G. Ballard, Dept. of Philosophy, Tulane University Prof. James Ko Feibleman, Chmn .. Dept. of Phtlosophy, Tulane University Harold N. lee, Prof. of Philosophy, Newcomb College Prof. George A. Schrader, Prof. of PhllOSophy, Yale University Prof. John E. Smith, Prof. of Philosophy, Yale University Prof. Frederic 8. Fitch, Prof. of Philosophy, Vale University -2-

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Oo Jiocutt .W:.-e.nch talked to Prof. James K. Feibleman about Hocutt. Al I of these weae favorable No of any spec(f .ic e:flarges are made concern.1'19 Dr. Hocutt. <-ppalsals written of his teaching have bee(' renK.Jrlcably strong, pfoclng among the superier Instructors In the Uotiversity.. S'11dents seem be enthusiclstic about the way in which he them to think through philosophical qW;Sti-. for. themselves. are: 50Rl8 students who find it disconcerting to subiect tha ir thinking CHld beliefs to sef f 't.al)ISiao This, however, represents good teaching at the level. He Is deeply concerned obou.t religtous values that are d<>.ctrlnalre, lnsist-1.-g tbat .Wdents should examine such iudgmants for the111S9lvei;, rationally, and,;. reach their own conclusions their own faith, and philosophy of life'! This, all thinking must eventually do. a&cause of Or. Hocutt's a$ a scholar and pomoted in l962, to the rank 'of Asslsta.-t Professor. Thet recommendation of his chairman, division director, and the. two deans of Basic Liberal Arts was .. e) In case of John W .. Caldwell, who was by t.he President under dote of July 25, 1962, to take effeci" August 11. 1962. attached are: 1) 2) 3) 4) 6) Prof. Caldwell's letter of appeal Report from Dean .French as to how the appeal was handled Biograph teal of members of the Faculty Committee appointed tQ consider the Caldwell case Report to President Allen from James Ao Parrish, Chairman of the Committee on the Coldwell hearing Report of the Committee for Evaluating Caldll's suspension doted August 9, 1962 Report from A aA o Beecher, giving biogrophical dossier on Mr. Caldwell, copies of of recommendation, other informa tion obtained about Mr o Caldwel I at the time of appointment in 1960 Report on additim.xil investigation conducted personally by the President Investigations on Ro Wo Hugoboom and Rodger C,. Lewis are still in proEJ'eSS. wlll be made later. -3-

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. 0 r. John S A 11 en Off Ice of the President University of South Florida Tampa, Florida Dear Dr. Allen, August 7, 1962 I am In receipt of your letter notifying me that I have been suspended fl"om ll1Y position with the University of South Florida. I find It difficult to understand your decision, particularly In the absence of any direct accusations. and therefore ask that I be allowed to appeal this declston through the channels which have been established in the University system. cc: Sidney French Russe 11 Cooper A. A. Beecher Sincerely yours, S/John W. Caldwell

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August 16, 1962 MEMORANDUM CONFIDENTIAL TO: PRESIDENT JOHN S. ALLEN FROM: SIDNEY J. FRENCH. DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS RE: THE JOHN CALDWELL CASE I am submitting herewith the report and recommendations of the special committee appointed by me to conduct hearings in connee tton with the suspension of Professor John Caldwell. You should also know the procedures which were fol lowed. I discussed the membership of the committee with the Executive Committee, and separately with Dean Cooper and Dr. Beecher. It was obvious that we did not have a standing con111ittee to handle this job. Kr. Chambers felt that his Personnel Committee was not qualified or Intended to conduct hearings at the presidential level. The Committee on Educational Problems of the Senate was not established to perform this function. The following guide Jines were used in selecting the special committee: 1. There should be no one on It from the Fine Arts Division. 2 It should be representative of the whole University. 3. It should have no member of rank lower than Mr. Caldwell. 4. It should not lru:lude members whose major duties were administrative. The committee appointed con&isted of the foUowlng members: Professor James Parrish, Chairman Pro fessor James Ray Profess0r Harris Dean Associate Professor Pau1 Givens Associate Professor Gene Kctlung following formal request for the hearing, received at 9:30 A.M., Monday, August 6th. I called the proposed committee together at 11:00 A. M. to inform it of the job to be done. The Committee was to hear all the evidence avallabte, to go beyond this where it seemed necessary to do so and hear other "'itnesses, and to submit its recommendation to the Presldant.

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11Et>RANDUM CONFIDENTIAL RE: JOHN CALOW LL CASE PAGE TWO I provided the Committee wtth the Universitys tape recording of John Ca1dwe111s hearing before the Johns Committee. I checked with Broward Culpepper and Baya Harrison to determine if other evidence which we did oot have was available. (There was none.) I provided the Committee with Mr. Sta11worth1s confidential statement to you concerning the Caldwell hearings before the Johns Committee. At the suggestion of Hr. Harrison who had cheeked with Mr. Hawes concerning additional evidence, t requested from the State Police Office In Lakeland that Officer Dan Futch be permitted to COflle before the Committee to tel 1 about his arrest of Kr. Caldwell In the Polk County incident. I did not attend any of the Cosrmittee meetings but conferred quent1y with the Chairman as the hearings proceeded. The COR1111ittee went to work immediately. In my judgment they did a competent and highly conscientious job. They first listened to the tape. They heard the Po11ce Officer. investigated a reported incident at the Ca>US View Motel, heard several witnesses and spent some time with Mr. Caldwell. The proceedings \ltt!re completed by Friday, August 10th. The report was turned over to me on August 13th since t was at:tay o" the 10th.

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/ ( L BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE MEMBERS OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO CONSIDER THE CALDWELL CASE Note: Members of the Committee were selected on the basis of the following Ct.'ita"ia. l o To represent a cross-section of the University. 2o To include no administrative officers. 3. To include no one of lower rank than Professor Caldwell. 4. To include individuals of recognized good juggment and who were recognized on the campus as level headed1i con scientious and without any known bad habits. Curiously enough it turned out that all are members of Methodist churches but denominational affiliation played no part in the selectiono L,AMES PARRISH., Chairman,, Dro Parrish joined the University faculty in 1960 as Associate Professor of English. In Julyo 19620 he was promoted to the rank of Professor and appointed Chairman of the Course in Functional English. Dr,, Parrish was born in Auburno educated in the schools of that city and received the B.s. degree from the University of Auburno His graduate work for the M.A. and Pho D. degrees was done at Florida s tate University. He taught at Auburn1Air University and Western Illinois Uni versity before coming to the University of South Floridao He holds the rank of Colonel in the United States Air Force Reserve. He is a member of the Methodist Churcho married and has two children. He is regarded on the campus as conservative, level headedo and steady, and was asked to serve as chairman. Age 470 HARRIS DEAN(} joined the faculty of the University of South Florida in February0 19610 as Professor of Education. He had previously

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES t1 continued. served at Florida State University as Professor and Department Head in Education since 1948. His work as Chairman of the Secondary School Commission of the Southern Association is well known in Florida and throughout the South. He was born in Indiana6 received the B. Ed. degree from Illinois State Norm.al University and the graduate degrees of M. ed. and Ed. D. from the University of Illinois. He taught in the public schools of Illinois and at Ball state Teachers College before ccming to Florida State University. He is married, the father of two teenage children and the family betlongs to the Methodist Church. He served in World War I:t achieving the rank of Lt. Commander in the Navyq and is presently a retired member, USNR. Dr. Dean is very highly regarded as one of Florida0s outstanding leaders in secondary education. He is quiet, un assuming, and conservative. Age, 53. joined the University of South Florida faculty as Associate Professor of Botany a year before the University opened. Durinq the year 1959-60, he was carrying on Botanical rese8rch at Chinsegut Hill under a grant to the University. Dr. Ray was born and reared in Starkvilleq Mississippi. Be received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Mississippi State University and the Ph. D. degree from Illinois. He served as instructor, Assistant Professor and Associate Professor of Botany at Mississippi State from 1946 to 1959. In July0 1962, Dr. Ray was promoted to the rank of Professor and appointed Chairman of the Basic Studies course in Biologyo He served in the United States Navyo reaching the rank of Lt. Commander and is now in the inactive reserve. He is married, has four children, and the family belongs to the Methodiert Church. He served as a YMCA Director at Mississippi State University. Age, 44. GENE Es MeCUJNG4 was born in Texas. He received his B.A. and M.A. deqrees from Hardin-Simmons University. He is a C.P.A : 1 -2-

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I I : BIOGRAPHIC SKETCBES0 continued. Prior to coming to the University of south Florida in 1960, he had taught at Hardin-simmonsu Arkansas Polytechnic College, and West Texas State College. He served in the Air Poree, starting as a private and reaching the rank of Captain. He was medically discharged with wounds in both legs. He is married, has two children and the family belongs to the Methodist Church. He worked bis way through college, has worked as a laborer in the oil fields, and in drafting and geoloqical oil work. Age, 41. PAUL GIVENS, was born in west Virginia, received the B.A. and M.A. deqrees from Peabody and the Ph. D. degree from Vanderbilt. Prior to joininq the Univexsity of South Florida faculty as Associate Professor of Psychology in 1960, he had taught at Lawrence College, 1949-51 and Birmingham Southern, 1953-60. He is married and has four children. The family belongs to the Methodist Church. He has served as a camp counselor. He served in the United states Navy, 1943-46. He is the Chairman of the University of South Florida Committee on Xnstruction. Age, 39. SJF 8-30-62

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August 29, 1962 REPORT TO PRESIDENT All.EN FROM JAMES A. PARRISH ON THE JOHN W. CALDWELL HEARING The speclal conmlttee Investigating the suspension of Kr Caldwell first listened, at four o clock Monday, August 6. to the tape of Mr. Ca 1 dwe i I's appearence before the Johns Committee. Although the tape runs for less than an hour and a half the comnlttee met unt11 nearly seven octock, playing back passages that were not clear the first time and discussing the Issues raised. Four specific Items were eq>hasized by the Johns Conmittee: Mr. Ca1dweJls action in the Hlchae! Wynn case. Hr. Calchtcelta trip to Tallahassee w1th Charles Hadley and other students. Mr. Cald\fell's arrest by the Highway Patrol in Polk County. Hr. Caldwell s Intervention In the elopement of Terence Tessem and Cathy Fleming. In addition, Dean French at our first meeting and in tater conferences with me said we should also consider Mr. Caldwe11'5 general conduct. After listening to the tape, the committee members expressed a Sentiment to this effect: "If this is alt there is, It Isn't enough to justify dfsm,SNI ."But to pur-sue al 1 of these matters as best we could, we met again on Tuesday aftemo0n. At this time we talked to Officer Dan Futch of the State Patrol, who arrested Mr. Caldwelt in Polk County in August of 1961. Kr. Futch, in an unfavorable report0 said that of the approximately six thousand persons he has arrested, Mr. Caldwelt '-' was one of a dozen on whom he ha& had to use force. He believed that Mr. Calchllell. after walking around the cart .,,as gettin g ready to hit him. Mr. Caldwell in hla Interview stated that he thought he could have beaten the charge of resisting arrest but that the less publicity the Incident received the better. Extenuating cf rcumstances surrounding Mr. Caldwell's attitude toward the arresting officer seemed wel 1 worthy of consideration by the committee. Another traffic incident involving Mr. Caldwell was mentlc:>ned on the Johns tape recording. Because the Johns Conmlttee did not spend much time on this Incident, we did not consider It of sufficient importance to Include In the formal report. On second thought, I feel that the outcome of this Incident is worth lncludlng tn this supplementary report. On October 5, 1960, Mr. Caldwell ran into a stalled truck aUeged1y without lights. at Fifty-sixth street and Fowler Avenue. The fact that on January 20, 1961, the Insurance company, In a negotiated settlement. paid Mr. Caldwell $2.500 damages indicates that he was not at fault In this lncJdent. After talklng to Officer Futch, the committee next talked to Dr. Margaret Fisher, who knew Mlc:hael Wynn 8ftd Charles Hadley. Although Dr. fisher's account of Caldwe11 's reporting of the episode involving Mr. Wynn was some\fdiat murky, she apparently was mre expHclt than the account In the paper indicated she was before the committee. She cannot remember Mr. CalcM&11's te.I!ing her about Wynn's c.oa.,lalnt against Mr. Teske. but she has a vague recoJlectlon of telling Dean Johnshoy about It. She said th&t this would be the most llke1y procedure,slnc:e Dean Johnshoy at that time counseling "r. Wynn in regard to hls other difflcultles: his grades (all Fs) and his stealing of University property. She added that It \'laS possible that a report of this sort might have been handled by Dean Johnshoy without a record being made. Dr. Fisher, furthermore. Included lylng as another of Mr. Wynn's faults. 1_,,-... Since this unrellabl Hty was also to Mr. Caldwel 10 bis reluctance to 'accept Mr. Wynns account of Hr. Teske1s homosexual advances seems understandable. The committee next asked Dr. Fisher about her evaluatlon of Charles Hadley. She reported that In Karch or April of 1961 Mr. Hadley and Judy Graves. a student,

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"" REPORT TO PRESIDENT ALLEN RE: THE JOHN W. CALDWELL HEARING PAGE TWO came to her to express concern about gossip that labeled them both as homosexuals. They denied this charge and a short time later they were In fact secretly married. Mr. Ca1dwe11 a1so knew they \
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0 REPORT TO PRESIDENT ALLEN RE: THE JOHN W. CALOWELL HEARING PAGE THREE One Item which did not appear in any report was nevertheless checked Informally by a member of a conmittee. This was the Inquiry directed to Mr. Stallworth by the manager of the Campus View Hotel. The manager wondered who Mr. Caldtdell was he, brought by Terence Tessern, checked In there the night Mr. ca1c1we11 and his wife separated. Sllghtly suspicious, he observed Hr. Caldwell during hla stay there and found nothing out of the ordinary. As a personal Inquiry I asked Dr. Chris Kiefer, who worked In Hldsurmners Nlsht Dream In the SUl'ID8r of 1961, whether he had observed any .thing out-of-the-ordinary al"OCD'ld the theater. He replied negatlvely. It might be that Jack Fernandez, Max Hocutt, and Don Dougherty of the Library l*>uld al I substantiate Or. Kiefers view (al I of whom have been 1n theater proctuetlons.) The most unpleasant moinent of the hearings came ""1en Mr. Calct.11 wanted to see the "charges" against him. Even though I had a copy of the docment from Mr. Stallworth which Includes the word ''Charge." Dean French and I did not feel we should let him re8' this. It did not satisfy Hr. Caldwell to tell him that Me tere working on thl: genera I charge set forth in your letter to him and the. l111p I led contained In the tape. Later that aftemoon t c:.al1ed him, and he Dr. Givens. Both of us told him In effect that he had been suspended because : of conduct. generally unbecoming a college professor and because of the four charges given above. Having talked with Mr. Caldwell from nine to almost twelve, the committee discussed untl I 1:30 the sc:ope of our recommendation. From a brief orlginal draft, prepared Wednesday afternoon, we decided after several rewritings and expansions, ...ttlch took most of Thursday, to expand our discussion of Item 2 to Its present form. In concluslon, I think most members of the committee thought that Mr. Calchell's arrest In Polk County was the major Item on the tape. But we felt that, as IA discreet as this was, Mr. Catmi.en should not be charged for this one derellctlon, especlaUy since he has appare.ntly been working to solve his drinking problems as 'llMll as his marltal situation. The coamlttees reconmendatlons were based on three and a half fairly ful I days of work on this 4;a&e (approximately eighty man hours.) With 111Dre ti and with train ed investigators. we could have produced a recommendation based Oil more evidence. lut within the limits of what we knew. we believed unanimously that Hr. Caldwell should be reinstated. James A. Parrish 3-

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REPORT T O : FROO:: August 9, 1962 PRESIDENT JOHN S. ALLEN IBE CCMMITTEE FOR EVALUATING MR. JOHN CALJ:MELL'S SUSPENSION At the request of Sidney J. F rench, Dean of Academic Affairs, University of South Florida, this conmittee has considered the evidence made available to it pertaining to the suspension of John Caldwell from the staff of the University of South Florida. First we shall present our findings on the two items in Mr. Stallworth's memorandum to you dated May 29, 1962. Item 1. That Caldwell received a direct complaint from a student charging overt homosexual act on student by James Teske, member of Educational Resources staff, a n d that Caldwell failed to report this to his superior and thus no investigation of the matter was made. Of Item l, the conmittee concludes that there is no indication that Mr. Caldwell acted irresponsibly in view of the evidence reviewed by the coamittee. On the contrary, the conmittee feels that Mr. Caldwell's handling of the situation was directed toward the welfare of the student and it seems reasonable that he would question the veracity of the student's report. Item 2. That Caldwell, after having been told by various students that student Charles Hadley was homosexual and after having told Hadley that he (Caldwell) did not want any "fairies" around his theatre and thus to stay away from it, spent the night with student Hadley in a motel room in Tallahassee. Hadley charges

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President Allen Page Two August 9, 1962 that duri ng that night Caldwell said, "If a homosexual friend of mine came to me for homosexual action, I couldn't turn him down." Assuming the facts in sentence one of Item 2 to be true, there is no proof of irresponsibility inherent in them. A number of con-siderations must be applied: First, Charles Hadley, after he had been warned by Mr. Caldwe ll, later told the director and Dr. Fisher that he was not a homosexual. Second, before going to Tallahassee, he had married. Third, Mr. Hadley had worked extremely hard on the theatre crew and the other students wanted him to make the trip to Tallahassee to read plays submitted to the Dowling Foundation. In another sense, it may have been a responsible act for Mr. Caldwell to room with Hadley, on the possibility .that Mr. Hadl ey had lied to him and Dr. Fisher regard-ing homosexual tendencies. Against this possibility, by rooming with Hadley Mr. Caldwell could keep Mr. Hadley under surveillance and away from other students. Mr. Caldwell categorically denies the accusation in sentence two. On both items the committee took into account the character of Mr. Hadley. Mr. Hadley has been described as "unsavory," "irresponsible," and "inconsistent," by Dr. Margaret: Fisher. The -collIIlittee also considered reports of Mr. Caldwell's behavior which might substantiate the charge of "conduct unbecoming a college professor."

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President Alle n Page Three August 9, 1962 Specifically the conunittee examined the following two incidents: Mr. Caldwell's arrest in Polk C ounty o n charges of public drunkenness and resisting arrest (without violence). His role in the attempted e l opement o f Terence Tessem and Cathy Fleming. In regard to his arrest, the cormnittee held a personal interview with Mr. Dan Futch, arresting officer in the case. Mr. Futch indi-cated that Mr. Caldwell had been drinki ng and was belligerent. While normally it is difficult to understand such behavior, there were extenuating circumstances in this situation. Mr. Caldwell had just been informed by the driver of the car of a personal matter that made him extremely irritable. Thus, when Officer Futch spoke to Mr. Caldwell he was in an emotional state that made h i m quite hostile. It appears that he too k out h i s anger at the world at large on the highway patrol man. Mr. Caldwell stated that this episode constitutes the only one in his life of which he is genuinely ashamed. Although the cormnittee agrees that Mr. Caldwell was indiscreet in this incident, it does not believe that the incident is sufficiently serious to justify suspension from the University faculty. The committee next pursued with Mr. Caldwell the problem of maintaining the proper moral tone in his theatrical work. Mr. Caldwell stated that he had been constantly vigilant to keep his drama work free from homo-sexuals, adding that he believed his theatre to be the cleanest theatre in the United States in this regard. At the same time, he said that

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President Allen Page Four August 9, 1962 during his first year on the staff he drank too much. 11lis derived from a tumultuous domestic situation, now ending in divorce, and his consequent reluctance to go directly home after work It seems reasonable that the long hours Mr. Caldwell spent in initiating the theatre program here at a new University also contributed to his emotional stress. He said that he had discussed his drinking problem with his superiors and that since the first of the year he had drunk alcoholic beverages only moderately. 11le conmittee is inclined to think that this problem had been resolved. lbe last matter dwelt on at length on the tape recording was the attempted elopement of two students, Terence Tessem and Cathy Fleming. lbe conmittee concluded that in this matter Mr. Caldwell had acted in a responsible manner to prevent these two young people from making a serious mistake. In investigating the validity of the information against Mr. Caldwe l l the committee talked to Officer Futch and to Dr. Margaret Fisher ( i n regard to Items 1 and 2),in addition to reviewing the tape recording of the Johns Committee and conducting a personal interview with Mr. Caldwell. Mr. Caldwell was handicapped in his interview because of his ignorance of the specific charges directed against him. Moreover, Father Fred Dickman appeared as a character witness for Mr. Caldwell and as his personal counselor. He Gdnfirmed that Mr.

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President Allen Page Five 'August 9, 1962 Caldwell, whom he has known since college, has had serious domestic trouble. He unequivocally stated that Mr. Caldwell is a worthwhile person who is currently making progress in resolving his difficulties. In view of these conclusions, the coumittee respectfully reconmends that the suspension of Mr. Caldwell be rescinded. (1/am.es A. Parrish, Chairman : ; ---7 "' f : r '-4 -.... .... .,,. /t-t,....t -e:-i,.. Paul R. Givens I --p z.-Z-;:;?. a ris W. Dean /

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September 7. 1962 MEMORANDUM TO s President John So Allen FROM: A. A. Beecher RE: JOHN W CALDWELL I am attaching herewith copies or correspomence an.i some notes on telephone conversations I had prior to recomnending Mr. Caldwell to 10u aa a st.arr member at the University. In looking through 'tq file0 I tJnd I do not have notes on the long dist.anee telephone oomersations with Dr. mastrom, Head or the English Depart.ment, and Dr. Oppenheimar, who I beline 18 Dean of the Liberal Arts College at the University ot U>uisville. I do recall asking them the same questions as those asked ot President Davidson and that their answers helped me to decide reco .. mending Mr. Caldwell to you. I also want to assure JOU that it bas always been my policy not onq to haTe written recommendations from previous employers but also to baTe telephone conversations with them and at least two other members or their start. This, along with tun dossiers f'rom placement services am personal il)terriews with the candidate and his spouse, are common procedures before any recommendations are made. Ao Ao Beecher AAB/bc

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1923 BIOQRAPB".CCAL SKETCH ON JOHN WALDROP CALDWELL September 7,, 1962 Bom September Winter Haven, P'lorida. 19ll-l Graduated Lake Wales High Sohoolo In the Summer of 1941, his back was broken in a horse riding accident which confined his activities for several months. 1942 In early Spring of 1942, his back was broken in a similar accident. In late SUDllller of that year, he was employed by the Shell Oil Ooropany or Winter Haven driving an oil truoko 194) Sworn into the United States Army in January, 19430 Serial Number 34.541.($1, Basic training was at Camp m.anding and Oamp Swift; the latter located in Austino 'l'exas. Assigned to ASTP where he studied at the following institutions: Texas A&M, Syraeuse University, and the University of D.linoiso These assignments lasted about one and one half' '3ears after which he was assigned. to Camp Crowder Missouri as a cryptogra pher in the Signal Corps. Tbe remainder or bis A.rut$' servioe was in the Pacific Theater and he was diS.Cbarged f'rom the .Ar'lf'l5' in March0 1946. 1946 Returned to Winter Haven, ll'lorida. In the meantime. his K:>t,her bad d1ed; his Father bad moved to San Franoisoo. Deciding that he wanted u, go to college ard that he would need financial help, he went to live with his Unole, The Reverend Pindell Manning0 Rector of the Episcopal Churoh in BaJ:timora, where from the SUllllOOr of 1946 through December of that year, he worked for the Veterans" Administrationo 1947 Januaryu 1947 -enrolled at the tf.l'iive1"'sity or The South at Sewanea wheie he graduated in Juneo 1949 with high bonors0 majoring in EnglfSh Literature and minoring in -Philosophy. An Aui1t living in Winatchee., Washington, who had given him financial assistance during f"1 his college days, invited him to vi.sit her after his graduation from Sewanee in the \___.. Summer of 19490 She also financed a pack horse trip through the Rockies as a gradua ... tion present.

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Page 2 John Waldrop Caldwell 1949 Bi mr:peoted enrollment in the Yale Graduat.e School in the Fall of 1949 was rupted bJ' a telephone call troa bis Dean at Sews.nee inviting him to return to that institution to teaoh Speech and 'theatre on a one year assignment. 19.50 In September, 1950, he entered the Graduate School at the Univers1:t7 of lbrth Carolina where in August, 19.51 he received his Ml Degree in Dramatic Art. In December, 19SO, he Jlal'l'iecl Helena Boellaard. 19.51 .. larolled at Val'Jderbilt University tor 1'1.rther stud7 tmile at the same time acting ae Teolm1cal Director for the NashvUle Comunity Playhouse which posit.ion he held witn the Spring of 1953. 1953 llo't'ed to Lake Wal.ea, Florida where he was :invited by the Passion Play Theatre to produce his play FLORIDA AFLAMi. In October, 1953, he moved to Satev Harbor, norida, where the Pinellas County Commissioners bull t an outdoor theatre especially for the production ot his plaJ' FLORIDA AFLAME. 1954 After the theatre had been built am the contracts let for the wintel' season ot 1954-.5.5, he, along with his wUe, sailed for a three months vacation in Europe. In the Fall of 1954, returned to Safety Harbor for preparation of the production of his play. 1955 Janua.170 1955, FLORIDA .AFLAME opened and ran for 12 weeks. Because or except1onallJ' cold weather and a poor tourist season, the show lost money am was abandoned. In June, 19SS, he nturned to Nashville where he was commissioned b7 the sam Davis Jti.storica1 Society to write a play on the lite ot Sam Daviso '?he play was later (-.,., anti tlecl THE BANKS or JORDAN. In August, 1955, he was invited to X.Ouisville, Kentucky as a consultant on the problems of the Universitq. ot Loui8Ville Drama Department and the Loui8'11lle Little

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Page 3 r,,--. Jolm waJ.drop 'Bleat.re. Soon after tbs report was made, he was invited by Dr. Pbilip Dav1dson, President of the UniftrSity ot Louisville, to accept a position as Director ot the Un1vers1:t-7 'lbeatre, Director of the LouilVille Little Theatre, ard Superv1s1ng Direotor ot the Louisrille Playhouse. Be continued in this pos1.tion until the Sumner of 19.'1. During t.bis period, his professional work drew national accl.a1m. Be was elect.i President ot the SoutJieastern Theatre aonterence. Be env181onecl and promoted a theatre circuit 1n the "provinces outside of New York Clq producing new plays b'1' or playwrights. He was appointed to the Ford Foundation Conterence on Comnmnicat1on in the American Theatre. Because of these and other successes, ba asked for a leave or absence from bis Uni:nrsity' ot Iou1sv11.le assignment and went t.o Nsw York City to produce pl.a.J's there am, bopetul.].T 1 on the road urder the sponmrship of "Lin-Well Productions, a a company formed 'bJ' bimaelt and Mr. George Hamlin. 1960 In Janaa17, 196o, having heard of the University ot South Florida, he came to Tampa tor a private interview. Receiving so. encouragement, he and his wite took residence 1n Blbson Park. On JamJal7 29, 196o, he was ottered an appointmant as Associate Pl'ofenor at the Univwait.7 of Sout.b FlOrida tor the academi.C year beginning September l, 1960. Between January 29th and Ma7 15th, he spent part time 1n Bew York dis90l.Y1ng his com1.1mnt11 there and working part time planning tJJ.e Theatre Arts program at the Un1versiv of South norida. From May' 15, 1960 through June 30, 1960, he was retained b1' the Un1verait7 of South Florida as a 1'll1 time consultant. During the 111>11ths ot Jab' and August of the same )'8al", he was 1n New York City making t1ml dissolution of his comndtments there. Ba bas been on continuous appointment at the til1Ters1ty of South Florida f'l'om September 1, 1960 to August 11, 1962.

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.. -THE NE\V DRAMATISTS COMMITTEE {l'-&1,4./A/_,t' JAN 6 1960 ONE THIRTY WEST FIFTY STH E ET N E W YOlUC 19, N. Y. PLAZA 7-6960-61 re.rid cnt HOGER L. STEVENS C/1oin11on of the Board HOWAlU> LU."DSAY MA..'\."WELL ANDERSON llOllEHT AND ERSON RUSSEL CROUSE OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN II :i.mss HAIIT JOSEPH J.."RAMM o'HARRA ELMEn RICE lllCHAlU> RODGERS I l\OBERT E. SH[RWOOD JOHN F. \VHAfTON i ; 1,;x ccutivc GEORGE IiAltil-IN '.t' '/"lie Committee" PLAN FOR PLAYWRIGHTS SiaD U. J. WHITING ELSA RAVEN 11URIAM BALF JACJC BOSTICK ROBERT ELLENSTEIN JANET PERKINS '-" WILLIAM DA VlDSON Plan Projecu I Thl'atrc Admissions II Craft Discussions III Production Observance IV 1 "11e Elinor Morgenthau New Dramatist Workshop v Nation-wide New Play Circulation January 3, 1959 Dr. A. A. Beecher Director of Division of Fine The University of South Florida 349 Plant Avenue Tamp a F I or id a Dear Dr. Beecher, took the liberty of calling the University this morning and asking an appointment to see you sometime on .IJ:Lv__r_s_d..a.y_. As your duties there have just begun, I know that you wi 11 be quite busy, and so I wt l t attempt to make this letter as informative as possible in order to conserve as much of your time as possible during our act u a I in t er v i ew. While in Washington last week, I was informed by a number of friends that the university of South Flortda was opening next fal I, and that there was an opening in the department of Dramatic Arts. I am, for many reasons, interested in this position. At present, I am on a one year leave of absence from The University of Louis vi I Ii, where I serve as Chairman of the Drama Department, and also as Director of The Louisville Playhouse MY leave was granted by The University to give me an opportunity to direct STRANGERS IN THIS WORLD off Broadway, and to co-produce, with George Ham I in, THE KIDS on Broadway. Both of plays are original scripts which I directed and produced int he the a t r e at Lou i s v i I I e. I am per son a I I y co mm i t t e d to the idea of getting major American writers, not particularly tn the field of the theatre, to write for the American stage. After working for the past several years with a group composed of Robert Penn Warren, Francis Fergusson,_ Catherine Anne Porter, Caroline Gordon, Brainerd Cheney, Andrew Lytle and about ten other writers, I came to the conclusion that I did not know enough about the Broadway stage, economic and political, to really accomplish what I was attempting. I' have at least concluded that the hope of the American theatre I ies in plays written outside of New York, by writers of imagination with something to say about our culture, who are creative thinkers; and in having these plays produced with perfection in a provincial theatre where the play's power (or failure) can be proved before it is forced to undergo the political and economic pressures necessari Iv attendant upon a Broadway production. I believe that I know enough about Broadway now to understand what is happening here, and enough about the mechanics to get a Broadway production should we produce a play of sufficient magnitude to interest \ "To enco14rage and tl1melt>p ''"'new t1ller:l 11f Anrnrir.u" I

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.. ... Dr. A. A. Beecher, Cont'd: While I was President of the South Eastern Theatre Conference two years ago, I initiated a 1 New Play Project which is now tn its first year of operation. Many theatres cannot afford to do a new play, because they face the economic difficulty of sel I ing tickets to an unknown play by an unknown playwright. Our idea was to get a number of theatres (we aimed for a hundred productions and it looks .as if we will make it) to do the same new play during the same year. The attendant pub I icity, both regional and national would relieve much of the uncertainty. Furthermore, with that number of guarant ed productions, we could invade the Broadway playmarket. As Chairman of a committee consisting pf, of Paul Green, Samuel Selden of the University of North Carol Leighton Ballew of the University of Georgia, Bob Telford of th e Virginia Museum Theatre, Burnett Hobgood of Catawba Col lege,and the l 'ate James S. Helms of The University of Virginia, I came to New York and began collecting scripts from agents and playwrights. We also solved another recurrent problem in our f i n an c es Aft er f he p I a y w a s f i n a I I y chosen we made an arrangement with the playwright whereby the conference would collect the royalty payments as producer, and keep 30% of them as the Qroducer's share. This has given us a considerable amount of' other projects, and to meet unexpected expenses, and with which to pay the inevitable annual deficit. The New Play Project has received wide pub! icitY and serious attention. In October, I was invited to address the South Western Theatre Conference in convention at San Antonio, Texas on the idea of the Project, and that Conference has now moved to adopt the plan in their Region. I gave two addresses last week in Washington on the New Play Project. (I do think of other things, though tt mustn't sound like it, for I was also Chairman of a Panel Discussion on UNDERGRADUATE TRAINING, RAl\GE .Al'JD STANDARDS, which, thanks to the britl.tance of Dr. Leighton .. Ballew of The University of Georgia turned out to be an exciting and stimulating session.) I was a member of a group which the formation of the American Community Theatre Association under AE'TA auspices, and am a member of the new Board of Directors of that organization. Last month, I was invited to attend a meeting in New York at The Ford Foundation together with twenty two other people from various professional, educational and community theatres throughout the United States. The meeting turned out to be an investigation tnto the lack of communication within the American Theatre, and, as a body, we formed the Ford Foundation Program f o r t h e I n c r ea s e of Co mm u n i c a t i o n i n th e Ame r i can Th ea t r e I t really isn.'t that ridiculous, and promises to be most helpful to everyone c'Oii'Ce r ned. If you wl 11 pardon a personal remark, after al I of the use of the pronoun I in the above, I'm embarrassed. But never a pp I i e d f o r a po s i t i o n b e f o r e -an d I am so r e I y a tt em p t e d t o begin saying "it did

PAGE 25

. c. .. 3. Dr. A. A. Beecher, Cont'd: I have written a number of plays, two of which have been produced. One of them ran two years, and sti 11 lost money, which is a difficul.t, but not impossible, feat. Currently, I am writing a text book: THE HISTORY OF DR Mv1 AT I C CR I T I C I SM, a n d am de s p e r a t e I y I 6 o k i n g f o r ai co I I ab o r a to r with a good Greek and Latin background it will be William Arrowsmith of the University of Texas who af.so happily combines a thorough knowledge of the tbeatre with his unusual abilities asa classical scholar and translator. Background: I was born in Winter Haven, Florida. I was graduated from Lake Wal es High School in 1941. I matriculated at Sewanee, The Universi tv of The South in 1 .946,. a'f'ter 4 years in the Army, and was graduated, Optime Merens, in' 1949. I 1 received an M.A. from the University of North Carolina in Dramatic Arts in 1951. (My B. A. was in English Literature, and I won the Guerry Medal for Attainmen.t In English literature at Commencement) I then spent two years of post-graduate work at Vanderbtlt University in the Engltsh Department limiting my pursuits somewbat to dramatic I lterature. I have taught at Vanderbilt as a Fellowship Instructor, at and since 1955 at The University of Louisvi lie. My i n t e r e s t i n a ct u a I p I a y s i s I hope e c I e c t i c bu t c en t e r s a round th e E I rz ab e th a n t h ea t re and n e w p I a y s I 'm some w ha t bored by most of what is current Iv cal led "Broadway," and I am the world's worst director of Greek Drama, a title which I am an.xious to relinquish if I can only learn something more about it. I have directed almost forty plays at louisvi I le. Have also been quite active in the Outdoor Historical Drama movement. ) am thirty six vears old, married, and have one son who is four years old. You may inquire about me: Paul Green, Chapel Hill, North Carolina I have directed a new play of his, have served as Assistant Director 6n one of his outdoor dramas with Sam Selden for a summer, and have worked on endless comtttees, etc. with him. Robert Penn Warren, Reading Road, Fairfield Connecticut have worked with him on various projects, and was engaged in an attempt, which failed, to get a Broadway production for a new play of his. Dr. Philip Davidson, President, University of Louis vi I le, louisvi I le, Kentuckv have worked under him since 1955, both tn harmony and adversity, though little of the latter. Because of the peculiar situation at I was responsible directly to h i m r a t h e r t h an to t h e De an of t he l...o I I e g e of Ar t s a n d S c i en c e s Dr. Leighton M. Ballew, Universi tv of Georgia, Athens, Ga Have worked with him very closely on South Eastern Theatre Conference affairs, and he succeeded me as President. We have also been involved in Southern Speech Association programming and in AETA.

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. () o 4. Dr. A. A. Bee ct1 e r, Con t d : If you des.ire, I can give you additional references. Since my schedule is somewhat uncertain at the moment, I am unable to say when I wi 11 be there, but wi 11 el ther wire you, or telephone you. It seems t ikely that I w i 11 arrive in Tampa from New York early Thursday morning, and wi I I have to visit you without benefit of sleep. My apologies for the 1 ength of this letter, but hope it will save you some time. 'tn the final analysis ..

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.. -0 Dr. A. A. Beecher Dean of the Division of Fine University of South Florida 349 Plant Avenue Tampa, Florida Dear Dr. John W. Caldwell % A. W Ward Babson Park, -JAN 1 3 1960 Our visit with all of you at Tampa was certainly a most enjoyable one, and if the present staff is an, y indication of what the final faculty is going to be like, The University of South Florida is off to an exhilanting birth and should rr osper and grow: with a vigor which will bring warmth and pride to the founders. Both Helena and I were much impressed with your plans and ideas and ftn joye
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.. 2. Dr. A. A. Beecher, Cont'd: (I hadn 1 t really intended to make a stock catalogue for you but as long as I've started it ) Draftsman's set for designer T-5 Bostich staplers Staples pliers cutters tin snips celastic & softener measuring tapes folding rulers -wrecking bars mitre box and saw scissors razor knives bolts, nuts, nails, tacks, glue, etc. Paint Room: initial stock of scenery paint double unit hot plate bucket: s whiting glue brushes Costume room: sewing machin e scissors initial stock of thread needles, pins, snaps, hooks and eyes, fasteners, safety pins, measuring tapes (a carefully planned request in the papers should bring in enough trim, buttons, and otherstuff from "grandmother's trunks" to last a good while.) I would imagine that such thing s as canvas and lumber could be budgeted for each show, thoug h it will be difficult at first where there is absolutely no backlog of used flats, door units, e ,tc. The initial purchase of make-up will be large, but then you need only purchase it for one year. The above list does not pretend to be complete, but a theatre can certainly be operated with tha_ t equipment. It can al so be operated with less, and some of the above items which are expendable can be purchased from the budget for the firs t year. As I told you, I admire the way in which you are setting up the Division, and think that it holds promise for a stimulating experience in the Fine Arts. But, in thinking back over our conversation, it occurs to me that I may have mislead you about my opinion on the faculty in the dramatic arts. Someone ls going to have to be the head of that group as soon as it gets larger than one person. It doesn't make any difference what you call him, but final authority in t:he theatre must always rest with one person, or absolute chaos results. The authority may never be used, and all. 'the better if it is not, but someone must shape the direction of the theatre, and formulate the plans, and look to tomorrow, or you have a which is going in all different directions at once. Yesterday I talked to Philip Davidson on ,the telephone, and he is writing to you about me. I have written to the other people,.-

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3. Dr. A. A. Beecher, Cont'd: whom I have listed as references, and asked theril to write to you also. Davidson and Harrison can speak about my, teaching abilities as I have taught under both of them. Charles Harrison was Dean at Sews.nee, has sines resigned, and is now Chairman of the Department of English Literature. Paul Green is a close personal friend of mine, whom I have worked with in various ways. At. Louisville, I directed the premiere of his THE FOUNDERS, which was finally produced the following summer in with the Jamestovm Festival in Williamsburg, Virginia. I was also the Assistant Director for THE CONFEDERACY which opened in Virginia Beach in 1958 so had considerable professional experience together. Leighton Ballew and I have worked together in AETA, SSA, and SETC, as officers, board members, panelists, etco George Hamlin is my partner in Ne. w York, and is thoroughly. familiar with my work in connection with new plays. If you want more references, please let me know, but I just asked about twelve people to to the Guggenhiem Foundation for me last year, and I don't want to have any of them listing their occupation as "Writing recommendations for John Caldwell." Seriously though, I shall be glad to send other references if you wish. I'll be here, with the exception of two _brief trips west until about the end of the month. My family, will, of course, be here until summer, so you can write me here at any time. We drove by the University after we left you, but didn't attempt to drive in. It looks enormous already! We then went to see the houses, saw yours as we drove past, and think that it is a gran"" ace. If we come there, we think that we will rent until we can find a place which we can't live without. W e really want several acres, and are willing to go further out in order to get a larger place. But we need room for dogs, and it won 1 t be long before we' 11 have to have a horse Charles. Well these are decisions that can be made later. Could you let me know when your decisions there will be .. ______. .......... made? I have been forced to tell one place that I will give them a definite answer by the first week in February. Then too, in addition to my o w n necessity for making a decision, if I should come to The University of South Florida, I will need ev-ery moment between now and September that I can get to make plans and preparations for the season there. 0

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. ) PreferenceTool () 1 l 1 1 1 l 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 .2 1 2 1 1 1 l 1 l 1 1 i' 2. l l 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 Hammer, Curved Claw Ham.rner, Stra:l.ght Claw Hammer, Curved Claw 8 @ .91 ea. Tuck Hammer Dunlap Tack Puller 7 pc Brace and_ j:?i t Set Wreckine Bars 2 @ .81 Cross Cut saw 2@ 3.71 Keyhole Savi Coping Saw Miter Box and Back Saw Four edge Plane Plane Draw Knife Utility 3 @ .89 Steel tape 501 Picke. t tape 10' Hardwood folding rule 3 @ .46 Steel Square Steel Square Combination Square 2 @ 1. 74 (1211) Chalk and_. plumb l"ine Steel letter stamps Wood level 24" Wood chisels Hand or Brea.st Drill (with 8 bits) G Clamps 2 ea. 211, 11 ", 6" G Clamps 11 ii Tin snips Punch Set, Pin, 5 pc 7 Piece Screwdriver set Automatic Return Screwdriver 2 @ 6.60 Auto Pliers, 2 @ .43 Linemen's Pliers 2@ 1.69 Electricians Knife 2@ 9K9478 1.70 Hack Saw Mill files, 10 inch 2 @ .64 Soldering Gun Adjustable end Wrenches 611,811,1011,1211 Electric Hand Saw Electric Sabre Saw Electric Drill Electric Drill Set, 17 pc 2-Wheel Band Saw, complete Craftsman Heavy Duty 8-Inch Bench Saw Vice Paint Sprayer Pain.t Brushes, 4" 4 @ 3. Paint Brushes,, 2 ea, 2",, 12", 111 Step ladder, 101 Step ladder, 101 9K3825 9K3827 9K3808 9K3802 9K3811 9Kh2483 99K6599C 99K3613C 9K3158 9K35l.i..l 99K36302C2 9K3740 9K3743 9K3678 9K9515 9K3900 9K3910 9K39116 99K39732C It 9K3954 9K3773 9K3792 9K39743 9K3187 9KL.246, 9K6667 II 9K4543 9KJ+285 9K4127 9K4141 9K4503 9K3192 9K9478 9K3562 9k3129 9K5380 9KJ083 99K2796C 9K27946 9k772 9K6711 99K2425L 99Kl3305N7 99K5181L JOK1435K2 30K3561 30K3561 30K2950N 30K2950N 1158 1158 1158 1158 1158 1159 1159 1160 1160 1160 : 1160 1161 1161 1161 1161 1162 1162 1162 1162 1162 1162 1162 1164 1164 1164 1164 1165 1167 1169 1169 1170 1170 1170 1171 1171 1172 1177 1184 1185 1186 1188 1192 1201 1204 843 852 852 Price 3.3h. 3. 34. 7.28 ;62 .44 10.59 1.62 7.42 1.17 1.18 31.10 2.98 7 .40 2.98 2.67 4.17 1.45 1.38 3.58 3.58 3.48 1.49 4. 75 1.79 2.36 7.21 5.00 5.00 1.97 1.80 2.58 iJ.20 .86 3.38 3.40 1.56 1.28 10.95 4.76 42.95 25.95 21.95 9.87 146.44 299.88 18.80 83.50 15.16 5.52 13.94 13.94

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r r Page 2, Tool list for Theat r e Unive r sity o f Florida ... c 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Paint palls 10 @ 6 0 Singer Sewing Machine, Rotary Head (not included In Sears Catalog) Single SpeeB Washer Ironinf board and cover Steam Iron Scissors 2 @ J.00 Pinking Shears Embro idery scissors 5" Bostitch of Ohio Guns, T-5 Tacker 2@ approx 10.00 ea,(not in Sears) Draftsman's for scene designer 30K2695 W26K6420N -11K640L 2 34K6205 2_5K2024 25K2001 25K2052 3K5066L 854 875 9 8 2 897 336 336 336 1031 6.oo 1)0. 00 169.95 14.94 15.95 6.oo 7.50 _2. 00 20000 . . . . Other items, expendable, which will be needed first year are: Make-up, initial order Geiatins, initial order Paint, Initial order Sewing room supplies (other than cloth) Canvas Lumber (will vary according to shows done) N a ils, screws, tacks, etc. Lighting crew supplies (cable, male and female plugs) $40.00 $125.00 $25.00 50.00 300.00 50.00 50.00 . . . . If there are going to be one set of and teazers for main stage, I would suggest that it be specified that they be black._Colored ones can almost never be used in actual production ..

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"'----.: -: -::--::: .-. : .. : 3. I .... r t.<..1,._ ,?t17r,:1 711 ... --, iy;-u'..t tuu:' ( )

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.;:: .. ---/. --.,. .---------=--.... __ ---..:---:. ___ .. __ __...._ -. .. .. -... .: .. : .. ,.. ... -.. :; .. ... ; J I I I -.. .... .. .. -.. 1 : 11l,\'il1 ;:. .. 1;1J, tUJ.() 1/1 /too .a-u..1e. c01 ift-L4z:-t. '((d..A..,1.,#_..,,A/ Wt.. rL -(L 'J1;.._j!4 ll.+.__ ..P.,..\(..C.(..'-t....t.,.1 CtL-< ..-.l tfA!-4- ..,t.. ; Ul.llt_ (t.. .. u ,"" .... q ,..,,V
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( esident _...,OBERT ANDERSON Chairman ol lho Board HOWARD LINDSAY Executive O i reclor GEORGE HAMLIN THEODORE APSTEIN MIRIAM BALF RUSSEL CROUSE O SCAR HAMMERSTEIN II MOSS HART JOSEPH KRAMM HENRY MORGENTHAU Ill M ICHAELA O 'HARRA PHILLIP PRUNEAU EUGENE RASKIN ELMER RICE R ICHARD RODGERS ROGER l. STEVENS JOHN f. WHARTON Adminislrollvo Sloll 8. J. WHITING ELSA RAVEN THOMAS ERHARDT Tho Commlllo .... Pu.N FOR PLAYWRIGHTS Pion Projecll I Theatre Admissions II Craft Dlscuulons Ill Production Observance IV The Elinor Margonlhau New Oramalisls Warbhap v Nation-Wide New Play Orculallan fl .t o (__,/J_,d4/), c,,lfl I '/ ...{) I THE NEW DRAMATISTS CO,MITTEE ONE TWRTY WEST FIFTY SIXTH STREET, NEW YORK 19, N Y. January 18, 1960 Dr. H. A. Beecher Dean, Division of Fine Arts University of South Florida 349 Plant Avenue Tampa, Florida Dear Dr. Beecher, INCORPORATEDJAN 20 1960 PLAZA 7-6960 Mr. John Caldwell has requested that I send you a recommendation for him. I understand that he is applying for a position at the University of south Florida. I have known Mr. Caldwell-for a period of approximately five years and have worked closely with him on both his projects in Louisville and New York. I know him very well as a person; I am well acquainted with his views, and I believe that I can make a fair estimate of his scholarly attainments. Without reservation, I consider Mr. Caldwell superior in all three of these categories. As a person, I have found Mr. Caldwell a man of excellent character, human perspicacity and zeal. His enthusiasm what he believes to be right and his devotion to a project seem almost unbounded. He is easy to work with and he gives much of himself. Mr. Caldwell's views and opinions are well and because he has a definite viewpoint toward his work, his aims and purposes have always appeared valid and practical. He has definitely evolved his own philosophy of the theatre and of teaching ; the plays he has directed and students he has taught reflect the stimulus of his viewpoint. As for scholarship Mr. Caldwell has covered his field extensively. In my estimation, one of the important criteria of a true scholar is his ability to relate his own to other fields; the then becomes a man of wisdom, not merely a man of "To encourage and develop the new playwriting talent of America"

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.,. ( ... Dr. H. A. Beecher -2 January 18, 1960 knowledge. Mr. Caldwell demonstrates this capacity in an always increasing degree. His breadth of understanding as a teacher indicates that little in the field of humanities is beyo!ld the scope of his attention. I know from talking wiitih them that his students find him an inspiring and wise teacher. My recommendation of John Caldwell is without reservatigns. I believe it would be next to impossible to find a better man for the position. GH/e Sincerely 1 -George Hamlin .Executive Director

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' .. "" .'I ,r l'J (} .. {l,i!J # E. UJ ti COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 5EWANEE,TENNESSEE :l.l.J1 ,,lf .... ///;..,,r <. vr ..... _,., J (/ JAN 2 0 1960 DEPARTMENT Cl" ENQLl&H Dean A. A. Beacher Division of Fina Arts The University of South Florida 349 Pl:mt Avenue --Tampa, Florida Dear Dean Beecher: January 18, 1960 John w. Caldwill informs ma that he is applyin g to you for .a position in your Drama Department. This is to I haTe known him, and have remained in fairly elose touch with him, since I first joined the Sewanoa faculty thirteen years ago. I consider him the SOlllldest and tha most effective teacher of dramatic literature that I have known. His distinguished qualification is a capacity to grasp and to communicate the literary quality or a play, both to actors and to an audienci. Thus, although he is an acute student of stage resources and techniques, he seems never to become intoxicated with theatrical device as an end in itself. While John Caldwell was at Sewanee, first as undergraduate and then as instructor, I saw him produce such things as Dr. Faustus, Henrz IV Part I, Everyman. Just last year, I saw his production of Richard III. rn every instance, he has succeeded in stirring the imaginations of student performers. And I must acknowledge that I am greatly indebted to him for my own understanding of drama.tic There can be no question of his effectiveness as a teacher. His grasp and conviction become the community between him and his students. He is a tireless worker, and he naturally inspires effort in other persons. Mr. Caldwell's involviment with drama.tie writing and dramatic production is so energetic a vocation that its effects inevitably extend beyond the limits of a campus. H e has affected a whole region, and has, I think, served it most valuably. I should think that the opportunity provided him for usefulness at such a university as yours would be very groat. In my opinion, you would be fortunate to have John Caldwell as a member of your staff. Yours sincerely, Charles T. Harrison Chairman, Dipartment of English CTH:dd

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Dr. A. A. Beecher THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH AND DRAMA ATHENS, C E 0 R C I A January 14, 1960 Director, Division of Fine Arts University of South Florida 349 Plant Avenue Tampa, Florida Dear Dr. Beecher: ........... JA N 1 R !qso This letter is a recommendation for Professor John W. Caldwell who has applied for a position at the University of South Florida for next year. I have known John Caldwell for the past five years. During this time Caldwell has done a remarkable job at the University of Louisville and at the Louisville Playhouse, a community theatre. He wishes to be engaged entirely in educational theatre. The problems that faced him at the Louisvi.lle Playhouse were almost impossible. Not only was he the director of all the community theatre productions but was also responsible for the direction and staging of three classics each year by and for undergraduate students. In attempting to do these two jobs, Caldwell worked literally twenty-four hours a day. He is an eager, intense, driving personality with inventive resources and a great deal of enthusiasm and eagerness for hard work. When he was president of the Southeastern Theatre Conference, I worked with him as vice-president. In addition, the following year when I was president, Caldwell worked even harder. He is particularly interested in the development of new playwrights. He is largely responsible for the initiation and success of the New Play Project of the Southeastern Theatre Conference. Caldwell has an excellent academic background, a major in English from Vanderbilt University and a major (MA) in Dramatic Arts from the University of North Carolina ._9ne of Caldwell 's major limi .... can work 15.!-,?.1!..;!, f and .. .. Consequentmy, he has not helped his physlcai health in recent years because of the vast amount of work that he has undertaken. In view of your plans for the University of South Florida, I would recommend John Caldwell for the position of Director of Theatre because of his training, background, practical experience, and personl traits that have been enumerated above. We are all tremendously interested here in the plans 'for Fine Arts at t h e University o{ South Florida. Flook foward to meeting you in the near future. I hope that you are planning to attend the meeting of SETC in March and/or the Southern Speech Association meeting in Aprill If there is any further information that I can send regarding John Caldwell's very real abilities and potentialities, please let me know. Sincerely, Head, Department of Speech and Drama

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..... '---" UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE LOUISVILLE 8, KENTUCKY OFFICE OF TiiE PRESIDENT I. Dr. A. A Beecher Dean of the Division of Fine Arts University of South Florida 349 Plant Avenue Tampa, Florida. Dear Dean Beecher: Mr. John Caldwell tells methat he is applying for a position at the new University of South Florida and has asked me to write a letter of recommendation for him. I am delighted to do this. John is one of the most imaginative and creative people in university theater work I have known. His idea of commissioning new works was a dopted by the Southeastern Theatre Conference with notable results and has been adopted with some modification by the Ford in one of its recent programs. He has great drive and energy and is widely and favorably known throughout the collegiate theater world. In add.:i.tion to his professional qualifications, he is a delightf'ul person, and Mrs. Caldwell is charming. They will make a delightf'ul addition to any university PD:et / i JAN 2 5 1960

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PAUL GREEN Grtw:uoo d !?Md ClwjJd Hill J \ or tit Carolina _,I! &.d D / PAUL GREEN CHAPEL HILL NORTii CAROLINA ti-a.-.-_. ,,.< ,r; ; i b o ?..'-:....;;_. _; .t., JA N 2 8 1 96 0

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I V ,,, .... I \ ... Conf'eronce .... .. .. r 'J'Olm V C e.ldvsll, Hea d Louisette Rc!i:ier ( 'Tb.eat.r e Uni'ftra ty of Lcr.11sv1lle It'o_rnerly Hee.d, Naticr.,.J.l Service. -... ) P. .. Nc.tioncU. a!:d F eurt'1,.e .. -Otl:lf 1 ..... School'9f Yale Uniwroity Zelda F1chMd.l.ar 1 Producin3 Director >..rena Stage, Bll'rt French, Dil' ctcr The Civic Players .. Levin GG:tt 1 Director Univarsfty Uniwrsity ot Kimse.s Wiili'nm Vice President Catholic ot America B arnard Producing Director Un1'\"'a'reit1 University of Illinois Theodore Hof'f't1wl, Head Depart1!nt of Drama Carn egie I nDt1tute ct Technology Hm ard Ol-ms, Director Des Moinc13 Co:mmmity Playhc-..tS.a om.f:l.n Philbrick, '"':iwcutive of Speech an!\ trsa Stan.for d University Rober t Porterfield Fo un ... r oZ...d Dll'-ctor BQJ.ter TLeatre Cl Virginia John R eich, Head Goo1i.Tl'lrl M":!morial Theatre. Art Institute cf Cbi cego George Se.\.-age, Prof.esoor of Arte Unive rsity of hck Scism, Dfrector Th eatre 1 Okl&h o:Mi. Cit y Frencis -Sidlauslm s c:.l!l:irvsn Division of Boatoa Univ.;r ,ity Jules Irving, Managing Director Actor's Uarkehop, Son Fre.nc11co c. Lowell Leso Bead, S peec h an d Theatre Al-ts University of Utah JC. BlJ&> Director The Clevalud PayhoW3e Fleeiley, Curator OI> CollootiM New Yark Public Libre!..17 t.-.. L. l {evell Tm-rant, Director Eric Playhous e Robert Telf'ord Producer-Director The Virginia z ,useum Theatre ... Nina Ve.ne e Dire ,: .. ... Alle y Th .. a.tre, Houston r ; Robert Whitcha a d Produ cers' Th ;:;dtre, BI!d consuitant on the the&tcr to \ Lincoln Center for the Perform.in; roundo.tion Staff' I Hu.'!\ani ties and the Arts Proz.r0a r d1 d r I>'ic!" Aasociate Director Jc..ne 1>1c ly, Secrete.ry to Mrs. Tho!Jlllson ()Phyllis llor.atz, e ... cretary to. Mr. Lowry ,' .._, ... ..... """a w. M c."eil Lomy, Dire c t m ., Willie.a LcP .... 8.k, Vice Pre::iid.ant Marcia ThOV;pson, Progt"e.:i AsdstUlt ) ... ) l:, ,,,

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J Mr Joh&) w. Cald-'>Rll c/o A. w tYa;-d Babson Florida Dear Y.ir. 1 m wd.tins -.n cmfimation 01.zgo com:re:rsill.Uoo Thu:f'sdta.y in order to make explicit the tems cf you;r et UnivaraJ.ty of Scr.z.th Florida year will ba ctp?ointed es ea asocciate ?rofessor at a of $7000 for tha aeademie year 'beginning l, 1960. The appointment suot yat be conf1rmad by the Stats Boa.?"d of bu t th.ere be no diffi culty at this point Ve shall urant yw to t nko for t!ie University including both tlw drama::ic productiroSl and t heatre courses dll?iag the year. The p:recir;;e of the ba! wot"ked out a'ith Mr. chairman of the Fina Arts Divlsion we are slad add you of outr ftmily, know that the theatre tr!U yct.t:: leoo'!r:sM .. tJ9 s"ulU. vant yo a r ccr.m:ael frcm to Une during l'i.irid ... e9 mate ploos fer ne:t year' activity and l hope uill feel to call upon us tb.Gre are ways wura w can bei halI?ful. cc: Dr. Allen Mr. Beecher v Ri. Coopei'

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ft.B 2 1960 Dr. Ru-ssell M Cooper, Dean College of Liberal Arts University of South Florida Tampa, Florida Dear Dr. Cooper, John W. Caldwell % A. W. Ward Babson Park, Florida January 30, i 960 Thank you much for your letter of January 29th, in which you confirmed the terms of my at the University of South Florida. I am most delighted about the prospects for the University, and accept the appointment with great pleasure. With the exception of a brief visit to N e w York next week, I intend to be in Florida permanently now. I shol 'ld like to assure you of my interest in the entire University, and in the theatre in particular. I f I can be of any service to you during the coming months, please do not hesitate to call on me. I should like to take this opportunity to tell you how deeply impressed I am with the calibre of the staff of the University, and with your collective determination to triumph in meeting the exceptional opportunity which the .. foundation of this new University offers In looking through the program for the A merican Nat.ional ':l.1heatre and Academy assembly which is being held in New York next week, I note that George Izenour is also speaking, so I shall have an opportunity to discuss t h e theatre building vdth him. Sincerely yours, i

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9/11/62 Report on lavestigation Conducted by President Allen Personally on the John W. Coldwell Case It should be noted in Dr. Beecher's documentary on P,ofessor Caldwell that he included a thermofax copy of pencilled notations of his telephone conversation with President Davidson of the U,iversity of louisvtlle, before he nomi11C1ted Mr. Caldwell. HI& purpose was to determine Mr. Caldwell 'a status at the Uniwrslty of Louisville. The telephone comments were favorable. Dr. Beecher called the Dean at Louisville, and OM other person there, and got slmilar comments, but apparently did not keep In the flies his pencilled notations of the octual telephone conversations. Mr. C. Wesley Houk is a member of the Art faculty at the University of South Florldo, mad he visited the President to say that he has known Mr. Coldwell for 11 or 12 years. He was In Nashville when Ml. Caldwell came there as Technical Director of the Nashvtlle Community Playhouse in 1951-53. Mr. Coldwell came to Flortda to direct "Florido Aflame" ot Lake Wales, and later in Safety Harbor, (1953-55) and Mr. Houk came as Business ManoEJer of the venture. Mr. Houk cooftrms that Mr. Caldwell was at the University of Louisville from 1955-60. In 1960 when Caldwell came to the University of South, he and Mrs. Caldwell visited the Houks a couple of times at their home in Clearwater. m 1961, the Houks were Invited to the Caldwlls and went to their home when the playwright, Abel Plenn, was there. Mr. Houk reported that Caldwell has been married at least ten years and that, In his opinion, it has never been a happy marriage for either of the parties, and he feels that both are better off separatedo Mr. Houk has no evidence that Caldwell is or has been a homosexual, and could give no reason known to him for our not having hired Mr. Cofd\'Vell tn 1960. A report came to the President that Mr. Caldwell had a police record In Clear water, so I checked personally with Police Chief Booth of Clearwater. Mr. Booth checked the <;:learwater pol1ce records and also the Ptnellas County Sheriff's records, and reported back that there is no police record there on John Waldrop Caldwell. In the legislative Committee hearings, Mr. Hawes asked Mr. Caldwell a question about his having been in Miami and Coral Gables, and whether he had been known there by any other name, etc. Mr. Hawes went no further with this line of questioning. On September 4th, I called Mr. Hawes to determine the purpose of this question ing, to see if there was something further which the Committee knew and which did not come out In the hearing. Ml. Howes asked for time to check with tnvesti91tor Strlckland, and called me back within half an hour to report that Strickland thinks a rrofessor at the University of Miami said he had heard that Caldwell had been at a nldlt club known as the Cocoanut Grove. However, the responses that Mr. Caldwel I gave did not cause them to investigate further. He told me that they knew nothing 1) more on Caldwell tn Miami. The questioning seemed to be a "fishing expedition." '-.__/ -1-

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( \_ However, I checked through an official of the Dade County School System II\ the Miami and Dacie County pollc:e and sheriff's records, and found nothing that wa119fd confirm susp1 that John Waldrop Caldwel I has a police record In that area They did find a person by the name of Johnson Wlfliam Caldwell, who was 19 years of age In 1941 when he was wanted for esc:aptng"]oll Jn Texas. He was 6 feet tall, 1'ielghed had 11ght brown ha tr, blue 8)49$ This descrtptton could conc:elvably flt Mr. Caldwell. However, a later report from Dade County Indicated that they had discovered that Johnson William Caldwell, described above, was electrocuted In CaUfarnia in 1955. His FBI number was 1426850. Another report from Dade Couaty was that the FBI at their request looked for all J. Calclwells born In Florida, aged 38-40, who had police records. They found a James C. Caldwell, born in 1925, who had been arrested tn April, 1960, for dis crderly conduct and being In places frequented by homosexuals. He was 5 feet 5 inches tall, weighed 135 pounds, witb brown hair and brown eyes. His description does not match that of John W. Caldwell at all. On September 4th, a USF student by the name of Paul Morton come to see the President, and stated that he has had a couple of rather harrowing experiences with homosexuals and that he abhors them. He thinks that Charles Hadly is a homosexual and he has had to repulse Charles Hadley. He does not belleve that Mr. Caldwell Is a homosexual. He was on the Tallahassee trip with the drama group which was led by Mr. Coldwell. He reported that the others had chosen their room mates for motel accommodations and that Caldwell a'ld Hadley were left over and had to share a room or pay extra for single rooms. Morton said that he would not be prepared to believe that Caldwell had had homosexual relatlons with Hadley. On August 31st, Nr. Baya Harrison, Chairman of tie Board of Control, stated that he had asked Mr. Hawes If the Conunittee had anything more on Caldwell than was IR the transcriptions and the reply was "no 11 On August 30th, Dr. Parrish, Chairman of the Faculty Investigating Committee, reported the circumstances of Caldwell's arrest by officer Futch in Polk County. They are as follows: The sports car was stopped on the side of the road. Officer Futch stopped to see what was going on and asked the occupants -Smith and Caldwell to get out. His pwpose was to see If they were armed. Smith, the driver, complied, but Caldwell refused belllgerently to get out. Futch went back to his car to get his stlc:k. Caldwell was then out of the car and made a move that made Futch think that Caldwell might try to hit him. Futch moved to protect himself and took Caldwell flnnly in hand and put handcuffs on him. This Incident oecurred shortly after Smith had told Coldwell that while Caldwell was away In New York, Smith had been sleeping with Caldwell's wife. Caldwell was mad at Smith, and mad at the world when Futch came along, and blames this for his belligerency toward Futch. Caldwell has since left his wife and ls getting a divorce. Caldwell s with the parked truck, which is mentioned in the testimony '---' of the Leglslatlw brought a damage payment to Caldwell ofter a threatened suit. -2-

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0 .. Dr. Margaret Fisher classlfles studeRt J. Michael Wynn as an unreliable witness. He has" appeciatlOft for the truth aad needs, but wlfl not take, psychiatric counseling. Caldwell's escapades were a year ago. He has had few, ff any, this yea_r. He is not drinking as he was, and has been receiving personal and spiritual counseling from Rev. Fred Dickman, advisor to the Episcopalian students at the University of South Florida. Even tf he ts reinstated, It would be only for a minimum contract year, i.e., two trimesters, unttl Aprll 30, 1963. He wlll not be given tenure. We have a signed undated letter of resignation which can be dated and activated at any time, should he be Involved in any unprofessional conduct. Courts and churches give a man a second chance If he shows passibility of lmp-ove ment. I am not poposing this. Nr. Coldwell has improved markedly since a year ago. He should not then be dismissed summarily, but he should be dismissed as of April 30, 1963. All of this shows the Importance of thoroughly checking rumors, rather than assuming tho t rumor is truth. ohn S. Allen President

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(_' .. 0 :II. Conskler and dew:: procedures for handling faculty members announcing tn t'81r classe$ tliat t y are atheists. We have no specific evidence that such announcements haw ever been made o It Was reported by a student that the statement "There ts no God," was an the blackboard of a classroom as students assembled there for a class, prior to the entrance of the instructor. The Instructor who had used the room the prior period denied having written any such statement. It could have been written by a student. Under the Constitution of the United States, an atheist ts not barred from teaching la a public: Institution. In general, however, if the facts were known in advance and If there were other candrdates, the University would be tncUned not to select the athe tst. There Is no more reason for a faculty member to announce to his class that he is cm atheist than there ts to announce that he Is a Jew, a Buddhm, a Catholic, a Protestant, an agnostic, a Democrat, or a Republican. Such annoncement should certainly not be made merely to "shoclc" students. However, there may be times In certain classes and in certain discussions when a professor should make his position known In order that the class will better understand the background from which he speaks. Hence, there should be no arbitrary rule on thfso Through recent discussions with deans, directors, and chairmen, it is felt that this matter is under suitable control. The only "untimely" press release In our iudgment involved the Fleming matter. The release was made following a suitable check. However, later developnents not then foreseen made this release appear to be untimely. In accordance with its Policy Statement 22, the University of South Florida provide$ complete and accurate information to off-campus media of communications on all matters of interest to the public. The University does nof suppress Information of a controversial but hastens to explatv. its position obiectlvely. for the conduct of this program of news and is delegated to the NeY15 Bureau, and mc:>re specifically to its Editor, who is a staff officer directly responsible to the President. The Bureau is the I clearing house of the University for preparation and dissemination of neW5 and publicity refeases. In general, faculty and staff members having information about which they desire a ar$ expected to chann$1 It through the News Bureau. However, if a faculty or staff member is app-oached by on off-campus reporter, he may provide inforroatl0n requested of him if he is in posseaato,,.,of such information and if in his iudgment the release of such lnfarmatlon is If the person has any doubt about the appropriate ness of $Uch releaie# he is expected to refer the reporter to the Editor of the News Bufaau. -4.

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0 The Editor himself must e>iCercise dlscietion and good 1udgJDeftl' ia determining the appropriateness of Gl)y release sent out from his offlcie.. If he has Off/ abOut the content, tlmfl'.\g, necessity, or propriety of any material being considered for release, he is expected to clear such wlth the President. In the ffelcl of public Information, particularly information about a public: insti tution, It Is natural that differences of opinion wlll exist about a maJority of the ..-releases which are dlssemtnated. It must be recognlud, however, that It Is not possible to satisfy ewr}'body all the time. The Editor's pc>sttion, then, ntqulres scrupulous accuracy, and sound Judgment. The abo\ie proceclur:a, In conformity with Polley Statement No. 22, quoted below, has been followed In all releases. With the exception noted above, there have been no unttmety or inac:curQte releases as far as we can Judge. University Polley Statement No. 22 Polley Rellrdlng News and Publicity July 25, 1961 The Unlwrsity of South Florida provides complete and accurate information to off campus media of communications on all matters of interest to the publtc. The University wlll not suppress Information of a controversial nature, but rather will hasten to explain Its position obJectively. It shall be the responsibility of the News Btweau to conduct a program of news and publicity which presents a true reflection of the Un. lversity's over-all operation. The News Bureau Is the central clearing house for preparation and dissemination of all news and publicity releases to off-campus media of communicotionso Memben of the faculty, staff and administration, desiring to release such information to off-campus media shall channel it directly to the News Bureau, with the followlng exceptions: 1) News and publicity for all student or faculty social organizations wtll not be handled by the News Bweau. The publicity chairmea of these organ ization; should communicate directly with society editors of the local media for this purpose. 2) Student reporters 9Jtherlng news for the student newspaper will request such material from individuals and offices on the campus,. and wlll not clear through the News Bureau. 3) Reporters representing off-campus media may seek news from time to time from sources other than the News Bureau. Faculty and staff members may provide complete and accurate information when requested if, in their fudgmant, the release of such information is appropriate. If a person is in domt as to the Foprlety of a request or of the release of certain information, he wlll refer the reporter to the Editor of the News Bureau. -s. i

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IV. .. 0 4) Off-campus organizations using University facilities for meetings of oay sort wlll arrange for publicity through their publicity chairman. The News Bureau wlll assist in this respect whenever possible The University wtll not permit the use of Its name in commerclal advertising if suc:h use suggests or implies U.iverslty endorsement of the advertfser or his p-oduct. All requests f'or the use of pictures or text concerning the University tn any form of adwrtlsing shall be referred to the News Bureau. S/ John S. Allen, President This statement assumes that there fs not public Confidence in the University at the present time. We believe that there is o great deal of public confidence in the University. This was never so evident as during the time of the Johns Committee hearing. Statements of confidence then came from students, ministers, public offlclals, and many citizens. lack of confidence was expressed chiefly by a small intent upon forcing the University into an untenable position. Pressures of various sorts exist upon a publlc institution. The University Is new. It has no alumni yet to speak for It a defend It. In the midst of establishing an educational program of high quality It must also establtsh Itself as a new member In the community, as a cultural and economic asset to the surrounding area, and as a large physlcol and flnanciol complex worthy of the taxpayers' dollars. All of these things it must do before it can begin to provide a steady flow of responsible and well educated graduates Into the stream of community I ife. The facts ore that the University and its emplo)'6eS have made many signincant contributions to the welfare of the community at all levels, not only in its normal areas of operation, but tn religfous, cultural, civic, soclal, and service activities as well. In the two years since it opened, the University has staged 140 concerts, plays, art exhibits, lectures, forums and film classics, all open to the public. Attend ance records show that 100 000 persons witnessed these cultural performances. Two of the University's cultural organizatiOftS, a symphony orchestra and a theatre group, utilized the talents of many area residents who previously had no outlet for their musical and theatrical talents. Thirteen members of the University faculty and student body performed regularly with the Tampa Philharmonic, providing that group with a healthy infusion of new talento -6-

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la addition to the cultural events, the University served as host for 150 eonventlans, workshops, dinners., and similar occasions during the past two years, despite the fact that it had only one cafeteria with limtted facllltles to serw Its student body and staff. Some 20,000 persons attended these 150 events. Many of the occasions were for local civic Ol'SJJniza tlons. women's groups and service clubs, who enfoyed a meal on the campus, a tour of the factfltles, and a talk by a University offlcial on the progress, plans and purposes of the institution. During the two-year period, University personnel gaw some 225 talks to groups and organizations in Hillsborough County and surrounding areas. This WCJI done ln most eases without cost to the organization involved, and povtcled a wluable source of voluntary service to these organizationso lndivldual contributions of the University faculty and staff in the area of religion have also been extensive. ft/ore than a dozen persOftS have occupied pulplts Jn and around the Tampa Bay area in the pnt year, and several of these have been arranged on a permanent basis o Many other members of faculty and staff haw accepted important offices and other positions of leadership In their churches, and still others have spoken to church groups on a variety of subfects. There are stilt other areas in which the University has given extensive service to the community. Four faculty members write weekly columns for daily news papen in the city; the three local television stations have drawn heovtly on \Miverslty personnel for appearances, some of these on a permoaent basts; and members of the faculty frequently contribute book reviews to the Tampa Tribune. One recent performance of the University Symphony Orchestra on television station wrvr drew so many letters of praise that the station presented the P'ogram a second time. Many local service groups, including the Family Service, the Tampa Urban League, the Friends of the Ubrary, the American Association for the United Nations, and the Chamber of Commerce, have utilized University personnel In important administrative positions and committee assignments, and other merri>ers of the faculty have served as consultants to a variety of public and private organizations. Members of the faculty have also served as consultants with the public schools In the area, and have assisted the schools in such areas as curriculum revision, course design, and administrative structure. In addition, more than a score of faculty wives teach in the public schools, helping to relieve a serious teacher shortage there. Personal contact with a number of influential community residents has revealed a number of surprising reasons for much of the expressed lack of public confidence -7-

PAGE 50

.. in fh, u,.1versity. There ore, example, some citizens who are disillusioned because.._ University has" f()Otball team, and has it will not have one. are others o oppose any form of Integration, upset be cause thfs barrier has .,__. Another group having sons a,,d daughters In the University, are disturbed to learn that college i s than high and since these did not attend college they are a difficult to the change along with children. Stilt -Other group feels the Urtlversity has not been CORSEpl'\IQttve enough In Its sefectlon of faculty, textbooks, required reading and guest speakers, and has a.om far In exposing stucf.9nt$ to a variety of points of view. Ma.ly of these groups overlqp Together, they a body of opinion which has had in the University by the Institution's fatlure to conform to one or their personal images. is an unfortunate situation, compounded by fu,e ironic fact that the Institutional which prompted this disilluslonment were (udicfously made decisions by responsible professional people whose highest obligation is to provide the State of Florida with an outstanding new iftStitution of higher learning. The University of South Florida's dedication to this objective has not diminished. It wUI continue to seek ..,ew a\,19nues by which it can build public confidence in Itself while at the same ttme remaining faithful to the principles on which American higher education is Dlscussi"5 within the staff have brought forth additional ide(is which wil I help to form a stronger bond between the Institution and the public served. We be lleve, for instance, that more can be done to educate the parents of our students to better Understand the true meaning of a university educati" We have been promoting a series of television programs in which members of the faculty speak about their courses and their teaching. A special committee on public relations has been organized. It should be clear, however, that the University has been actively at work in th1$ field from the beginning and that it merely expects to continue, intensify, and extend these operations for the good of the University and the community. It must also be said that a new publtc university starting as we have with considerable numbers of students, high standards, and in a community which has not ex perienced an operation of this nature, is bound to cause some dislocatlons of thought in the community as wel 1 as some disaffection by those whose wishes cannot be satisfied. As the University grows such dtsfoeotions ond disaffections should be lessened. To give you an Indication of the confidence of the public in the University of South FIOrido, I am enclosing the following: SermOA preached at St. Mary's Episcopal Church on Septo 2, 1962 by the Rev. Carroll E. Simcox, Rector -8-

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Tampa Tribune August 28, 1962, article entitled Temple Terraee Ministers U,itlcal of Johns Re pert" Tampa Tribune August 29, 1962, article entitled "Last Word Has Not Been Said" Tampa Tribune August 30, 1962 -article entitled "A OollorWould Be Too Much" Gatnesvflle Sun, August 28, 1962 Editorial 11An Report" Sonnota Herald Tribune, August 29, 1962 Editorlol "Johm Report Unfair to USF" St. Petersburg Times, August 27, 1962 Editorial 11Underqourtshed Mouse" Tampa Times, August 27, 1962 Edltorlal1\JSF and the Johns Committee" Tampa Tribune, September 1, 1962 Editorial 11A Show of Confidence" Tampa Tribune, August 29, 1962 Editorial "Who Speaks for Education?11 Florida Times Union, Sept. 1, 1962 Editorial 01.et Florklians Work for Goad Results" Tampa Tribune, August 26, 1962 Editorial "A Growing Pain" Daytona Beach Evening News, August 28, 1962 Edltorlal "Not Saving America" WLCY-Radio Station, St. Petersburg Editorial August 30 and 31, 1962 WLOF-TV Orlando Editorial August 30, 1962 letter. September 6, 1962 from Hillsborough County Education Association St. Petersburg Independent, August 27, 1962 Editorial ''Stwely Shocking"

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1 0 1-"' THIS SERMON WAS PREACHED AT ST. MARY'S CHuatH, TAMPA, FLOlllOA' B,Y THE REVo CARROLL E. SIMCOX, B. Do. PH.D.' RECTOR SEPTEMBER 11 2, WtiERE THE SPIRIT OF THE LORD IS11 THERE IS LIBERTY. 11 CORINTHIANS J: 170 The recent report of Committee coneerning lidlat has been going on at l)ew unherslty Is by no muns a Ntter of po11tlca1 or educatlonal l11pOr.tMC8 only. The issue raised. by that lnvestlgatloo :re moral religious lsi!CS and the Church cannot stand by and say that It is all very Interesting but none of our spiritual buslne&s. '. There is an obvious CC>Aflict between the state leglslatures COl'lllllttee and the of the University of Smith Florida. But this ls, only a focussing of ,the btoader between those Ataerlcans "1o c1o 'not _really,belleve In freecba of thought -here, represented by the JohnS: and those .t10 do. We who. are the wie "'1o profess and call ourselves Christians,. are forced to ask ourseIVes dlere tie stand. ,:, I .think we need to begin a confession of 'gul Ito ef I wanted to make the understatement of the eentury l'. d say something like this: the Christian: Church has not always stood unequlvOieally and hero1l1y for freedom of thoUght, of speech. freedom of-regearch. The ChurCh hits, 0n the whole, a s<>rry Jn this area. It .,ul_ d be hard to find a shag1e great step forward .blch been de In medical Sf;lence; physlcal science,, or Soc:lal science, which cllctnot to overcom fierce .-.d fanatical ecclestaatlca1 resistance. Aftd It .'8ay .be that we twentieth-century Christians, knOwlltg. our record ancl being as,huled of It, are Inclined. nowadays to go to the opposite extreM and to say thB\,W: stand for the right of .-.ybody to teach and to. do anything -no matter ...W.t. it. That Is a very attitude, and .many of us fall Into It. be :we are afraid of being: cal:led bigots and : What does our Lord Jesus teaeh us about this matter? iVe shall know the truth," He Says, 11and the truth shall .make you free,," Yea: but He ldentlfi.es Hhileff with the truth. 111 am tho way, the truth0 and the life: no man cometh ,the Father but by me." Now,. as Christians, you aftcl I have to stick to tha_t. We may admit .the right of the atheist or the Hlndu 'to teac;h In our schoots, and ev.n to teach our young people t: he believes and But 1 subftllt that If tb_er..e l.s to be that acact.nlc freedom for non-Chrlstlans there ought to be the freedom for Christian teachers. President Allen says that there Is, at: the Unl ;veral'ty 'of South Florlcla, and I beilew him. 'Where the Spirit of the Lord ls," says St. Paul, "there Is liberty." Too often and too easily these d>rds are quoted gllbly to support the propo&itlcm that "'8re the Spirit of the L.Ord prevalls cares what anybody thinks. aays, or does. That bland toleranee of ewrythlng is not Christian liberty. St. t-aul Is .aklng the profoundly tr assertlan that tldhert a llian Is moved by the Spirit of be becoms glorle)U&ly Says c;>ne recentcommentator on this paaaage : liberty Is n0t the freedom to do aa we Hke; It h the p*Br to.,, as we oUght We are free_ orily when our capacities are released through clhl>tlon to greater thaA oarselves. An artist fl_nds freedom In devotl.on to' h .ls art. A craftsman finds It .,_ t,J, IJC*erS are released by the vision of""at he 1 s trying to Most of a1 l, Ne find release through love for others tthOse fare. we seek." We must be clear about this: as Christians we be11eve i n liberty, but we-do not beUeve In Hbertarlanlsa;. Thomas Huxley
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. ..... AAaerlcan. educatlon today. I W!S.,. student chaplain for eight years at b>. .of. ou.-large universities. I met aU too many profes90rs said sllly and things In their.classes slmply to get a follQWlag, to get a reputation for being "advanced" and "orlglnal" and ''emancipated." There Y -.hat the Unlvers .lty of South Florida. hope there are not. For th_at is not academic freedom: t .hat Is academic President Allen Is right In his coaceptlon of the proper function of a University. and the Johns eoi.Bittee Is wrong. The Committee and hosts of others belleve that an American university exists speclflca1Jy to propagate r-=-sm. anticomunl, and a knowledge 'of bc>Oks a s harmless as 'the Bobbsey Tt111ins and Peter Rabb5t: Although raised by anxious lovers of raci<1l purlt.Y OM rabbit book In ch black rabbit 'ancl a mite rabl>lt faU in love We .blwo to race this: If by the time our go to college we have not .. theiro the way life we think is right,, we have falJed, aad .they., are no t ready face t9-world as .it Is. There are atheists; and thcne are holllosexuals; and there are not only cUr.ty .ords a n t .heat but even people who use these dirty .,rc1s. SollliehoW a University has got te.ch its students how to live and to deal wli,h these facts. .. It has been establlshecl t .hat there are no coanunlsts teaching at Florida. Even so, If are to have a real university, doing the proper t11>rk of a ,university,. the case for communism has to be fairly and fully presented. If w do not study our enemy by llst.enlng to him, how can w cope with him lnte111gently and effectively? About the dirty there is plenty of obscenity in the holy Blble, say nothing of Shakespeare. The of Hawthorne's T he Scarlet Letter is adultery. Great 11.terature ha& to mirror human life as it is,. and It must reflect the mud and of aan as as the gr_..r. It does :seem to me toae of our best contemporary wrtters "'811ow rather e>ccesslvely In the mud, a If t .hey like It. But It Is for the student to ask hlBlielf why this Is &O. Writers like Steinbeck, Wllllaias. Faulkner, and Salinger present to us the Ufa of man In our troubled and ttittsted era. If the student would understand the '*>rid he Is growl,.g up tnto he must 1eam t o take a cool. c1fnlca1 loOk the garbage. The purpose of the aiverslty 15 to teach it& students. how to think and hOW to deal with the 110rld and whh Hfer.'8s they experience It. Where th8n are our young people to get their religious faith, their moral ideals? First and foremst, In the..,.. If you don't .snt child to be an atheist or a communlat or a moral degenerate It's up to you to get his life established on the right foundations ...tten he Is young. To be sure, many of us run lnt. o one great dlfflculty with this, when tbs child reaches college age or even high school age: he decides that he wants to think and to choose for himself. Almat any lnte11igent youngster rebals against his parents religious convictions and aoral standards. This Is bound to be an anxious time for parents. The only thing I can tel I when they bring this problem to me Is that they IRUSt N patient and understanding. The adolescent reballlon does not last forever. -Most people tend to come back to the faith and the Ideals of their fathers once they themselves have lived as adults for a while. But as parents we should want our ch'lldren to go beyond us at last not simply to coma back to us. The Church has a tremendous responslblllty for Its young people of college age. and we are doing our best to fulfl I It .at South Florida. We have a full-time chapla.ln there and we are building a chapel and student center. It is the student chaplain's job to apply the Christian answer to those re11glous and moral problems of Hfe. Our Episcopal chaplain, Father Dickman, has received nothing but COMPiete and earnest co-operation from the University authorities. I do .. ;".": .. 2 -

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) .. not see how can ask mre of a t-ax&upported publle ititutlon tban that. Behind the report of the Johns: see one of the saddest and lllOSt ominous phenomena of present-day' Aaerican life, and that Is fear of the Intellectual Why are so many pe0ple convinced thiit our colleges and are Infested with atheists and commuc;'lsts and moral perverts? I wish I knew the '*>le answr to that question. big part of it Is th&: that many of us are afraid to examine honestly _, tntelllgent1y the foundation$ of our rallglone our 11>rallty9 our Wily oflffe: and a university Is of necessity clewted to the tal&k of examlnlng amt explorlng everything. A university Is not 1y Trinity, In the Bible, lia personal Why'l What are ycur reasons?" ''Here are these books by Steinbeck, _Md Faulkner and D. H Sofie people ca 11 them n lthy. What do yuu iaake .of them?, Do they represent to you II fe as it .'5?11 .. There ;are unavoidabie Jn all true edueatlon, especially In higher edlica :tlon. There ts alway the risk that the studilibt wut not be able .. or willing -to think his way through tO a sound to such quastlons. 1 t la my ""' belief that not everybOdy ()ught to go to 'ollege Higher educa1: -hm slD,tld beontt for those capable of .Nc.ivlng It without -being ruined for 'Ufe by It. I don't know whose fault Is ls If It Is a fault -t .hat there are some pebple who Just can't think their way.through Issues of llfe, but certainly ft Is not the fault of 'Oclr. unlversities-.u lnte11ectua1s. We are not gotng to preserve the faith Jn -too 11ves of our yc)ung people by keeping them in a spir1tual. kfnderga r. tGit in which nc> '41sturblng questions are ever ra.ised in their Now I'd like to sea .the Christian professors at South f 1orlda and ewrywere else become much ..Ore bdc:Uy arid aggressively than many of. them are. Christians In acadeailc circles ha"9 let them!&elves be put on the defensive In our age. I suppose It's the old fear of bigoted and fanatical. We do have to get' c>ver that complex of ours. But .the answer Is not to suppose the non Christians and the anti-Christians. The answer Is for a11 of us to speak out 110re boldly and clearly the reasans for the faith that is. In us. Our Sunday School starts next Sunday. I hope that all this controversy about the Johns Conni ttee report wl 11 make a I I of tis rea 11 ze how essent I a I It is that our Children be wt grounded "in the faith wile they are children That Is Whcit ..e try to do a n our' Sooday .School. 1 ask a11 of you to pray for our teachers and our chi 1dren and to use and to SUpport our ltlho1e educat1ona1 We.will soon be starting Instruction classes for children and adults. If y0u are an adult communicant you would ftnd it most helpful to attend the adult class to think through once again what you beUeve and why you be11eve It. The 8rrswr to co1111tlinlsm and lrre11glon and all the evlls of our day Is SDQre intelligent and dedicated Chri 'stlan faith and 'Hfe beginning with our. _, ... '. .. .. the Spirit of the Lord ls, there is,ltberty.11

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NEWS From FUN RADIO 138 TAMP4 ST. PETERSBURG IDITCllIAL Auaut 30, l 9 6 2 The Johna State i11Yeeti&&ti11& report OD. the Unlvereity of South Florida h.aa oot helped to induce more public rpect for our atate supported colleaea. The John s Comd.ttee va perfectly within ite riaht to k the ineatlption1 vbich we wpport however. it promlaed Preeident John Allen a copy of the report' contents before it public releaae, which promiae they did aot keep. Therefore. the Johns Ceaaittee'e are eotlrely under auepect. Belna ao, we tend to place leae reliance an the cententa of the entire dlaclo.uree, of the interpretation placed upon them WLC! believe that the Florida Board of Contrel,haviI juriedietion ever t h e Univeraity of Seuth Florida, 1hould have been the channel t vhome the J ohn Colllli ttee should hav e .ubmitted it findina. Thi wo.ald have afforded the Univeraity and the Board of Coatrcl au opportunity to aubmit thir own rebutb\l t the points raiaed in the report and tbeo the public would have had both idea of the .atter befr t he m a t the NM time.
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9 This is a WIDF-TV News Editorial in the public interest -entitled: A SECREI' REPORI' The free world gets reports from behind the Iron Curtain which tell of purges, secret organizational activities and human beings forced to submit to the tyranny of dictatorships. We don't like it, but we have come to accept it and attack such a system as one of the basic differences between those living under ColllllWli.sm and those living in a free world. It s no wonder then that we are astonished to hear reports which read like a page from Isvestia circulating the state of Florida. The reports we ref er to were instigated by a 53-page document presented to Governor Farris Bryant and the Florida Cabinet, and points a critical finger at the University of South Florida. The 53-page report is the result of a secret investigation conducted.on that campus during the final crucial weeks of the academic year this past summer. Selfserving pseudo patriots in the area prompted an by passing out pamphlets which charged that 11subversive and related activities (were going on) at the Univer sity of South Florida.11 After Senator Charley Johnst Legislative Investigating Com mittee completed its probe none of the information in the Committee report was made public. Suddenly, a few weeks before the University is to reopen for the fall semester, and before University officials have returned from vacation, the report is made public. Information in the report is not so important as the fact that the contents of the report were made available to the people of Florida before it could even be studied by University of South Florida officials. This is against the basic principle of American justice. In the eyes of the people of Florida, the University of South F-J..orida was judged "guilty until proven innocent" If the University of South Florida or any of its faculty is guilty of subversive or related activities as charged, then the University or faculty members under investigation should have been given an open public hearing, or a closed hearing before the State Cabinet. All testimony should have been weighed on both sides and after a decision was made by responsi))l.e officials and Cabinet members, the people of Florida should have been told of the The Southezn Association of Colleges and Schools, the official accrediting agency for Southern educational institutions, made an objective analysis of the University of South Florida. The Southern Association reported the University was "a remarkable and virile University and that the faculty is young, excellently qualified and equal, if not superior, to that of any university in the region." Maybe the dif ference is that the Southern Association report was made by a qualified group of educators rather than a legislative investigating cami.ttee which delffd into the re ligious and political beliefs of the faculty, and into the private lives of the staff. As Dr. Allen says, ''the purpose of the University is to educate not indoctrinate; to help students learn how to think, not what to think; and to this purpose the University of South Florid.a must remain dedicated." The Communists are engaged in a battle to "brainwash" children under cODlllU11ist rule into believing only what they want them to believe. The free world and academic freedom provide American students with exposure to all of the facts and the reasons we believe as we do. You can't protect students from controversy. We don't have to defend our ideals by supressing religion, or literature, or a free exchange of ideas. Channel 9 urges that before further damage is done to a fine University and its staff, the Board of Control conducts an objective analysis of all of the facts and makes its recommendations and findings known to the people of Florida. There is no lace in our American system of justice for the so-called secret report and one-sided prosecutor's ihdictrrrnt. Americans are, and must remain, innocent until proven guilty. And we must _protect free education from malicious intruders. 639 WEST CENTRAL B()X 5795 # #qR.w.t..NDO, FLORIDA PHONE: CH 1-6543 (Used three Editorial cartoons.)

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It. Ii J DIA'ANI:. l"ll&SID&NT MR l'lOl:RT I:. Dl:EN. V tca.f'RHIDENT MR. L C REYNOLDS. 2ND VICl
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\ v. Consider and take steps to bulld lines of cornmun1catlon between ana cmnong adnllftistrators, faculty rs, stUdeftts, Oftd ffi8 Pi8SkJ8nt. This statement gives the impession that little or nothing has yet been done In this area, whereas we believe we have developed excellent lines of communica tlon during the first two years, both formal and Informal. The formal llnes according to the following pattern: The Executive Committee consists of the President, DeOA of Academic Affairs, Dean of Student Affairs, and Business Manager. It meets regularly once a week, and often meets more frequently. Each of these officers meets with his staff once a week or more frequently on occaston. .. Each dean meets with his Counctl or staff once a week. Each chairman or director meets with his Councll or staff once a week, or more frequently. In this way, most members of the faculty are engaged in meetings. The U,lversfty Senate consisting of 30 elected members of the faculty, 5 members of the non-academic staff and 5 students, meets monthly on educational matters. The President meets frequently with the officers of the Student Association. The Deem of Academic Affairs meets fortnightly with the Academic Standards Corrrnittee Students serve on the Senate, on the Student Affairs Committee, and on the Traffic CommJttee There ore advisory student committees to the Registrar and the Business Manager. The formal lines of communication are fully adequate and are working well. However, in a rapidly growing institution with few old-time traditions and frequent changes, continuing effort is neceSiary to keep them working well. For e>mmple, the Dean of Academic Affairs C1SSumed his post in February, 1962. Prior to that the President had carried these dutieso It was necessary at that time to shift the organizational structure of the Executive Committee and add a new staff unit --the Academic Affairs Staff --which was formerly included In the temporary Executive Committee. Real communication depends more on the spirit than the form. The Uliwrsity started with an "open door" policy. This still P'ewlls. Aay faculty member can see the President -and many do --or, any of the deans, or other officers, upm request. The faculty and administration usually lu1tch iA the same room. Unes of communication within the student body and between students and student afl'aln staff offieiars did not develop as rapidly as mtght have been hoped for. They have Improved greatly in recent months and under the new Dean of Student Affairs it Is anticipated that this Improvement will be accelerated. -10-. .. ... :._ -'.'

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. .. 0 It should be remembered that la 1960-61 we had only freshmen. We stlll haw no nlorso lower classmen tend to look to seniors for leadenhlp and guidance. Despite thia haM.Ucap we haw found a number of good student leaden emerging from the freshman and sophomore classes. Sewral unfortunate Incidents have occurred during the second year of oper ation to Increase the problem of better understanding between faculty, ad ministration and students. From each of these has come a need far refinement of proceckns In the area of communications. From the registration p-oblem came the student advisory committee to the Registrar, from t"8 Davis incident came Improved communication procedures on clearances of speakers and publicity; from the Fleming lnclde1tt came clearer appointment and publtclty procedures. This is not lo say that the University learns only by such experiences. They do confirm, however, the need for adhering to establlshed procedures. As a young university with a small group of admlnlstraton and faculty In the beginning, It ts natural that actual communication procedtnS would be somewhat less than formal. In fact, it Is desirable that as much informality as poss Ible be retained within establtshed procedural channels as we grow larger. It Is CM plan, therefore, to continue lo clarify established communication channels, examine the need for others, but to retain within this framework as na1ch flexlbillty and lnformallty as Is consistent with effective communica tion In an effort to avoid slow-downs, bottlenecks, and mistakes. Polley Statements Issued by the President have been sent, until now, only to deans, dlrec:tors, and course chairmen. Now, the old ones and all new ones are being sent to all members of the faculty, as well. The second edition of our Staffb Faculty and Advtson' Handbook is In the P'ess and wtll be available early fft ctob8r. It gives pertinent Information for the faculty and staff and Includes statements of policy. VI. Consider and take C!J>PrOf!iate steps to be certain of the ''tone" In the classrooms Of the Onivenlty ... It has been our pollcy from the beginning to provide a good learnlng situation for ow students In the classroom. For this reason we emphasize discussion as an Important adiunct to lecturing Good discussion calls for give-and-take between student and student and between student and teacher. It also calls for a less formal atmosphere than Is p-esent In a lecture. We expect, therefore, that the ''tone" of the classroom Is more relaxed than Is found In lecture courses. Since "tone" la Intended also to Include the intellectual and $0Cial level of the discussion It Is important that relaxatton does not lead to degeneration of dlscvalon. With one or two exceptions there are no reasons to bellew that this Ii happening. The case of Professor Winthrop has already bee referred to as a rnlsundentandlng. Mr. Thomat Wenner used his class discussion periods largely to talk about his own experiences and stir students up to "demand their rights." -11 ,I

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.. Beyond these Incidents there is no reason to believe that the 11tone11 of the classroom Is unsatisfactory. Student appraisals (taken anoaymously) Indicate an overwhelming balaac:e In favor of satisfaction with classroom p-ocedures and discussions. We expect, however, to keep in close touch with these procedtns and where there Is any Indication that the "tone11 ts improper will take steps to change It. At the same time the faculty Is fully aware of the desirability of maintaining good relations with students based on high cultural and ethical standards. We wtll COAtinue to emphasize this. The Dean of Academic Affairs meets frequently with the other c:leansconc:erntng proorams under their direction The following statement has submitted iecently :by the Dean of Basic Studies to the Dean of Academlc Affairs. These procedures are those whtdi haye been In effect since the Unlver$.ity started. It should be pointed out, how:ever, that the American Idea cour$e ts a sophomore lewl cour1e and was in multl-secttons for the first tlrns in 1961-62. As o result the first year of' operation a number of changes in pr.ocedures and rnaterlals are being introduced to improve the course. "ht respoase to your request, the followlng Is submftte:d concemlng of teaching In CB 103-104 (Human BehaviQ.-) and CB 201-202 (Amerldin ,. the C:OtneS In Human Behavior and The American ta other courses of the Col ,age of Basic Studies, teac:h Ing methods and are selected for their effectiveness In achieving the obfecttves of the course5. "The obiectlves are chosen to contribute to the obiectives of Untwrsity and the College. They are reviewed by the staff, chairman, and clean ''Classroom activities are developed by the staff, usually worktng as ad hoc eonmlttees, in consultation with the chairman of the courseFrequent discussion between the chairman and the dean of the College occurs. Weelcly reviews and revisions of the methods ond materials are accomplished in meetings of the teach ing staff, presided over by the chairman. "Both the chairman and the dean vJslt .classrooms and diseuss teaching activities with the staff. "This procedure for selection of teaching ac tlvtties Is rJOt errorless; there Is no .. perfect thod. It does, however, the Initiative for developing methods with the men who teach the course, and pi'ovlcles conwnient mechanisms for rapid ldefttlflcatlon and correction of poor selectlon. In my opinion, this systera Is working tatlsfactorily. II -12-i j 'j L f

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0 L Attached Is ci description of The American Idea, which is one of the general education counes required of all students. VIII. The Dean of Academic Affairs has lust issued a supplement cm New Faculty Appointment Procedures, copy of which Is attached, and which is designed to malce certain that our appointments are correctly and carefutly made. Of. Usted below are some of the speakers which the University has hod during its first two years: l.M. levltt Space Scientist Roscoe Drummond Washington Correspondent Arthw Cronquist Botanist Frec.ferlck Sleight Archaeology Director, Central Fla .. Museum & Planetarium Herwy H. Hiii Education (Former President Peabody College) Morie Van Doren Poet Winthrop N. Kellogg Flori State University porpoises Herrick B. Young Florida Chain of Missionary Assemblies Meet the Author series Audubon lectures J.B. CUipepper -Board of Control AoJo Brumbaugh -Board of Control Undley J. Stiles Education (Deem, School of Education, Univ. of Wisconsin) Wiii iam H. Weston Harvard lecturer Do Wo Jenkins Wales Educator Governor leRoy Collins Governor Farris Bryant Harold BenJamin EduCt'ltional Administration (author of Saber-Tooth Curriculum) Harlow Shapley Harwrd Astronomer Harry Golden newspaperman Sanuel McCutchen History ( New York University) Harold Taylor fmmer President Sarah Lawrence Education Felix Robb Education Ludd M. Spivey Fonner President Florido Southern College Wllllam Hugh McEnlry Dean of Stetson University Bishop Henry I. Loutttt -Episcopal Bishop Virgll Rogers Education (coming in Nov. 1962) Fritz Friedmann (coming in Oct. 1962) Allatalr Cooke (coming in Nov. 1962) Norman Cousins (coming In Jon. 1963) Saturday Review Wllltam F. Buckley, Jr. (coming in Jan. 1963) There have been others who haw been Invited and who were unable to accept. Among these are several who could be truly labeled as conservatives, as follows: David lawrence Dwight 0. Eisenhower Richard M. Nixon 8any M. Goldwater Felix M. Morley -13-

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DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS August 23, 1962 1VEW PACOIJ.fY. APPOINTMENT PROCEDURES The following general procedures will be used in making new appoint ments to the faculty. These apply to all ranks including fuil and part-time personnel, lecturers and teaching associates or assistantso 'lhese regulations merely clarify procedures already in use. 1. Contacts Original contacts are made in various ways. 2. Checkin__g_ on likely candidates should be beyond requesting letters from references listed and should include telephone calls to one or more of the .references as well as to others not listed as references when possible. 'l'his can be particularly helpful if there is a reliable. personally known contact in the institution. Papers should be checked for time gaps and for recency of references. Reference letters should be checked carefully for oinisaions. It should be determined whether or not the indiviidual is being released by his institution. 3. Interview 4. O" Normally, following screening of the candidatesq the most likely applicant should be invited to visit the campus o 'l'his can be varied in case the dean and several faculty members the candidate dt acme professional meeting. Expense of the cand,idate 's trip should be borne by the College and should cover air coach fare (or mileage if this is less) .and per diem. Normally the candidate should meet the Dean of Academic Affairs and as many of the faculty members in his area as possible. For a high-level appointment (professor and associate professor) he should; if possible, meet the President. '!'bis should also be done in any case of doubt as to the appropriateness of the appointment. Nomination Following a canvass of opinion the director of chairman may ally nomi.Date the candidate to the dean,, or the dean may propose the nomination. 'the rank and aaiary proposed should be checked with the Dean of Academic Affairs before a verbal offer is Appointment procedure should be explained to the candidate. Before =1-

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u 0 (New Faculty Appointment Procedures, a letter is sent to the candidate proposing his nomination to the President a final check is advisable, preferably by telephone, with the candidate's superior, or other source, even though there may be in the file a letter of reference from that individual. In such case the candidate should be advised that this check is about to be made so that he can contact his superior in advance of the check. It should, of course, be determined as far as possible that the candidate will accept the offer if it is made. 5. t,etter of Nomination The letter to the candidate offering him a position should specifically indicate (1) that the candidate is being nominated to the w President and will receive from the President official confirmation of his appointment and (2) (if the salary is $10,000 or more) confirmation must finally be made following action of the Board of Control. Following is a sample letter which may be used with variations and additions to suit the situation. near -: Following your visit to the campus and our discussion of the matter I am happy to nominate you to the President for (joint) appointment as Crank) of (subject) for the coming ten month academic year at a salary of $ payable in ten monthly installments. As you know0 this involves teaching two and one half trimesters in the academic year. All appointments effed:ive September 1., carry employment through April 30 (trimesters one and two unless otherwise specified.) 'l'he additional two months employment for 10 months appointees may be either for term 3a or 3b. Each faculty member will be notified in writing by the Division of Personnel Services no later than January 15 of each year regarding that portion of the third trimester for which employment is stipulated. APPOIN'l'MEN'rS OVER AND ABOVE THE 10 MONTH PERIOD will be compensated for at the same monthly rate specified in the 10 months appointment. your official letter of appointment will be from the President. Your papers must be cleared through the personnel and business offices before going to the President s office. You should hear from him officially in about ten days. -2-

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0 (New Faculty Appointment Procedures, continued) (Alternate paragraph for salaries of and over.) "Your official letter of appointment will be from the President. Since all salaries of $10 000 and over must have formal approval by the Board of Control at one of its regular monthly meetings there may be a slight delay in receiving your official appointment letter. You will hear from the President officially as soon as the matter is cleared. 6. Expediting: Appointments In some cases where we are competing with another immediate of fer it may be necessary to make a final commitment at once. In such cases the President4 or in his absence, the Dean of Academic Affairs, should be contacted directly with respect to a final commitment. The papers ilay then be walked through to the President for signature. Salary and rank should be checked with the Dean of Academic Affairs. Both of these officers should lM!e the candidate if possible. 7. 12.i,stribution of copies of appointment letters Dean of the College Dean of Academic Affairs Director of Personnel Office a. Letters of Introduction and Orientation The President will send a letter of introduction to the newly awofn.t:etl$ membert... This will be followed at appropriate intervals by a packet (if not previously sent) and letter from the Director of Personnel0 a letter from the Dean of Academic Affairso a letter from the Business Manager and a brochure from Educational Resources. '!his procedure is presently in operation. Deans of the colleges, directors, and/or chairmeno will also no mubt be in communication with their new members prior to arrival on the campus. SFJalad 8-24-62

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THE AMERICAN IDEA .__., AMERICA Mfil I,!!! This course is organized and set in the contemporary life and problems of America today, to proVide understanding and preparation for your citizenship and participation in public opinfon today --and tomorrow. There are manifold means and sources -for such education --television, radio, newspapers, magazines and the book press, as well as personal experiences all of which you have used to davelop the background you bring to this course. We consider valuable your experience and ideas, and important that you share them with your fellows and with us, and we consider valuable your judgmento in developing this course best to serve the above purpose. Tell us of good articles and publications, of good T.V.o programs and movies ; and discuss your ideas at every opportunity. We also seek your suggestions and comments on the activities and experiences of the course. Your regular self-education in relevant current affairs and events is a part of this course and you should --(1) Plan to read a daily newspaper and/or a weekly news magazine, and (la). good articles in monthly and magazines. In the last few years the American book press has developed the provision of paperbound books in great profusion and range of quality. Some of these are sound, valuable, and in some cases the best books by the best authors. We use paperbacks in this course instead of a standard text, therefore, in order to adjust the reading continually to the best, and.-most interesting and challenging available. The paperback way-of-life is a new opportunity available to those who aspire to. be informed, and leaders in our dynamic society. This course will be presented through paperbacks. It is about what America means, to ourselves and to the world, the experience, "the American way-of-life"; and the realities of our situation in the world faced with and challenged by World Communism and by the compiexities. and problems of all the peoples everywhere. "The American Idea; America and the World": it h an impossible subject' but ineluctable and compelling in the atomic age. No .2!!! man, no "exPert", can tell what American life means; or rather, onlt each and every American can know and it; and t .he foreigners will tell what it means to them. Similarly, in our "democratic" society the ideal is that the laws and policies of the govemment should be the decision. and will of each and all of us. The problems of America and of the world are vast and complicated; the the ro:te, and policies 'of America crucial. His tory moves on and pei'h8ps we' fail adequately to direct it. Drift threatens disaster to ourselves and even to mankind. This is an ove:rwhelming thought, but it is our dilemma. ,.. .. : : ; We Americans must haste. n to consider and to reconsider our tradition, our values, our practices, our.policies, our relations with other peoples, and their ideas if disaster is to be avoided; and if as Americans we are going

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-2-to be able to live successfully in a world no longer but all en compassing and insistently challenging in each man's private soul. The second semester we will consider systematically the confrontation with World Communism: "They" and "We" in the world of Today.. We will survey t:he facts of organization and action as well as the ideas which inspire and pattern each, and we will undertake a sample study of a significant area which claims to be uncoamitted --India. Sane of you may undertake as your independent study another people and culture> or area, as an additional sample (See outline on Independent Study Project). This semester our objective is to survey our total situation on the background of recent contemporary world events and our policies of response and of pur pose to affect and direct history; and then to explore with considerable intensity our history and experience as a nation and a people. The first will take about a third, the second about two thirds of the semester. First we must discover and analyze our situation --where we are and how we got here. For this purpose we rely primarily on John Spanier's American Foreign Policy Since World War !! We will be much concerned with his thesis that our "liberalism", our dislike of power politics, and our"moralism" are the causes of our inadequacies of policy. We will use for this analysis Lefever's study Ethics !!!!! United States Foreign Policy. But we also use other readings and our own oU:line; see the calendar of assignments and outline below. The study and analysis of our history and experience as a nation and a people is by means of Richard Hofstadter's The Anierican Political Tradition and Frederick Lewis Allen's !!!2. Big Chan&e:" Since the authors consider themselves respectively a "conservative", and a "liberal", and both are authorities; the facts, and possible "the truth" should be available for each student to discover for himself. The objective is not so much to master and absorb all the history, but to discover and to work out the principles and the values of the American way-of-life and of government so that we may preserve it and 8pply it --insofar as we find it may be applicable in our relations with and leadership in today's world. One word as to methods: --Although the course is not doctrinaire P .nd, we hope, innocent of dogma; there one assumption we make. It is that America is freedom. What is "American" indwells in all Americans and is born in freedom. Through freedom of the mind, and free (though patterned) discussion, American consensus and policies are to be achieved and In a course of this character, therefore, candid, responsibk1, and conscientious sharing of views is equally important with the mastery of accurate information. The classroom activities are to provide the maximum of such discussion and the most of genuine freedom of the mind. Say what you think, and, as you learn from others and the history, think differently, if you wish, but think responsibly to the facts which surround us, conscientiously to your l..mericans and their views and interests, and loyally to the Americans of our past; remembering, of course, with Thomas Jefferson that, "the earth belongs to the living, not to the dead."

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( CB 201 -3-The American Idea America and the World Calendar of Assignments: I Required Reading '. Unit I: Introduction: Due Monday, Sept. 17 (one week or less) Due Monday, Oct. l (2 weeks; instructor may divide into weekly asstgnments) (1) (2) Our Dilemma in the World Lederer and Burdick, !!!! !!&!I American (entire) Syllabus: Documents I and II pages 6-13 Our World Dileama and Our Foreign Policy Ernest Lefever, Ethics Foreign Policy John Spanier, American Foreign Policy Since World War'.!! (both (3) Our World Stance and World Image: Summary and DUe Monday, Oct. 8 (1 week) Conclusions Unit 11 Due Monday, Oct. 22 (2 weeks) D.C. Coyle,_!!!! U.S Political System (entire} Overview of the American System Project topic selection, if possible (1) TheDevelopment of the American Republic Saul K. Padover, The Oenius of America Chapters 1, 7';8, 12 The Constitution (Document III in the Syllabus) Richard Hofstadter, The American Political Tradition. To page Mid Term Grades Due October 25 III Due Monday, Nov. 5 (2 weeks) Unit J!V Due Monday, Nov. 19 (2 weeks) Unit V Due Monday, Nov. 26 (1 week) Last Weeks (1) The Growth to a Great Nation Coylo Political System, reviewed Hofstadter, pages 164-237 Padover, Chapters (1) America Comes of Age in the 20th Century Frederick L. Alle:i, !!!.! Big Change (read entire, if .possible; then study 1-127) : Hofstadter, pages : 238-314. (1) Crisis and Responsibility in a World of Change Allen, pages 128-257 Hofstadter, pages 315-352. aeview and Conclusions: What has America to offer as a civilization? Note Well: We assume that you use, as needed, both a dictionary and an atlasgazetteer and become informed about the world and its geography. :. ... It is recommended that you obtain from the Bookstore the outline maps for this course and compile and learn the relevant geographic facts.

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-4-II. Calendar of Films Besides the required reading and study of printed comnunication, the course requires the experience and study of movie and television materials: (1) Specified films arranged according to the caiendsr below, (time 50 minutes to an hour per week) tested) (2) Your own selection of TV programs or movies from those currently on the air or available --to average one hour per week. reported; see III, below) The following films will be presented in Chemistry 100 repeatedly and continuously, Periods 1 through 12 Thursdays for your viewing. Tests will !!!. given on this meterial. (a poll of students unable to attend one of these periods will be taken the first week and an additional period scheduled to serve them) CB 201 1st week Sept. 13 2nd week Sept. 20 3rd week Sept. 27 4th week Oct. 4 5th week Oct:. 11 6th week Oct. 18 7th week Oct. ZS 8th week Nov. 1 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) '.(9) (10) (11) Twentieth Century Revolutions in World Affairs: The U.S. in a Revolutionary World. CS-1109 United States Responsibilities to the Rest of the World (Heritage of the Land) NET-338 Henry Steele Commager: Part I (Heritage V). NET-914 Co-existence (The World We Want: 1958) NET-1411 Twentieth Century Revolutions in World Affairs: The Russian Communist Revolution. CS-1103 Twentieth Century Revolutions in World Affairs: The U.N. in A Revolutionary World. CS-1108 Henry Steele Commager: Part 5 (Heritage V). NET-918 Odegard. The Power and the Glory Odegard. Ethical Basis of Political Power Odegard. The Frontier in a Space Culture .Q! The Necessity of (The Great Ideas). NET-1 Odegard. People of Plenty Order: Coronet United States Expansion: Florida United States Expansion Overseas (1893-1917) : United States Expansion: Settling the West (1853-1890) (12) Odeg:.\rd. The Transcendental Paradox (13) Constitution: With Liberty and Justice for All. CS-961 Parts 1 & 2 OR Odegard. What is Constitutional Government? Odegard. The P..merican Revolution -The Social Issues .Q!1 Odegard. Ratification and Rationalization (15) (16) Odegard. Permanence and Change Odegard. The Alien-American Paradox

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' .. 9th week ':Nov. s .. 10th week Nov. 15 11th week Nov. 21 & Nov. 23 12th week Nov. 29 (17) (18). (19) (20) (21) (22) -5Odegard. and Couconsus OR Odegard:. Opinion and the Consent of the Govemed Odegard. Party systems OR Odegard. The Myth of Tweedledum and Tweedledee OR Odegard. The : Grand Congress and the President(From capitol Hill; Party Government and the U.S. Congress) NET-1401 Q! Odegard. The Engineering of Consent Q!. The Costs of Democracy Odegard. Future of American Politics Building Political Leadership: A Look at Local Government CS-1194 Building Political Leadership. Tides of the Future. CS-1191 QR Odegard. The Legislative Struggle Pressure Groups Odegard. Tba President as Party Leader (23) Valley of the Tennessee CS-.376 .Q! TVA and the Nation. CSC-1159 (24) Odegard. The Presidency as an Institution: The Vice in a New Role. OR Odegard. The President as a Party Leader -. 13 .th week (25). Odegard. The President and Foreign Policy ., Dec. 6 .Q! Big City l,980. CS-1174 ... The President and Congress -Rivals or Partners? IJ:I. Besides the campus viewing of these films. you should make your own selection of TV prograqas or filuis which relate to the subject of this course. Required: average !:2!. per to be reported on a standard blank and turned into your instructor. Please be candid in your evaluation and coaments, since we_ wish to the information to recommend the program to others, or not; or even perhaps to obta1.n a kineoscope, IV. Required Interest or Independent Study Project In the ha if .-of the second semester of the course an extensive period is to be devoted to reporting and conferring about atudies selected and undertaken individually and carried out independently. The plan and organization of Chis part of the course 'will" be presented you : later but it will be in the nature.of a return to. the broad context of the first part. for drawing conclus.ione and summaries _'! Preparing for.it, each student.will select an area or a topic of interest and study it independently -with the advice and c onsent of his instructor. For best_ results he should pursue this and subject of study through out the year and .. absorb it. into the general study of the course. But most important of all is that be self selected, that it seem to the student the most impo.rtant or most intere_sting of the subjects brought up in or related to the course.

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-6-Therefore, make your selection get your instructor'e O.K.) as early as you feel prepared to do so, read, study, and reflect upon it as convenient. confer with your instructor or others about it, and prepare yourself to report it as you will be required to do during the last half of CB 202, A list of suggestions appears later in this outline. Paperback Browsing: In the browsing collection and area of the University Library (at the entrance), there is a bookcase of paperbacks related to this course, under its title "The American Idea". We recommend that you look through them. Some are not stocked at the Bookstore. but will be ordered for you on request. Some are suggested as the introduction into a subject for your Independent Stt1dy. DOCUMENTS I. AFRO ASIA When, in the spring of 1955 the American people and most Europeans were focussing their attention on the "summit conference" with the USSR. there was held the first Conference at Bandung, Indonesia. Twenty-nine (29) countries from Turkey to the Philippines. and in Africa to the Gold Coast. met at the invitation of the Prime Ministers of Bunna. Ceylon. India, Indonesia and Pakistan. "Great'' powers and European oriented powers were not invited. though some sent "observera". Communist China was allowed a delegation which was headed by Ctou En-lai who addressed the conference and did his best to influence it. Since this conference represents the first alignment of the. powers which. with additions. have now come to wield a new influence in the United Nations, it may be important to analyze the attitudes and spirit at Bandung and the response of the Afro-Asian "public opinion" represented. The document excerpted below is a publication called Jana issued by the Associated Newspapers of Ceylon in a format which shoWS"its model Time or Newsweek. It is the May 1955 issue and reports the Bandung Conference. It represents viewpoints, probably, of the intellectuals and journalists of the Afro-Asian area which participated. Here is reflected an authentic view of the world and of America .. The idealistic Editorial with which it begins, finishes: "Indeed, one of the moot striking. facts which emerged f-rom was that a great many of the inarticulate presumptions which have been the background of Western thinking on international questions are not accepted by the free Afrasian coi.-utries.. It is in this sense that the a>nference was evidence of a new factor in world affairs which the rest of the world must recognise and begin to take account of Tte renaissance of the Asian and African peoples will undoubtedly release vast creative forces in the future. The question which faces Afrasia is: Will it utilise these forces for its own sectional interests

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-7alone or for the whole of man kind? To make tha former choice would be to leave the wo-rld divided It. w()uld, _in a different way, repeat the mistake tha. t the European rulers made wh2n. they relegated Asia adn Africa to a position of inferioritY and began the division between the' whites and the non-wbite61 the haves and the have-note. It is Afrasia's task, then, to use the forces of new creative energy atits command for the.benefit of the World. It must act as a catalyst in bringing into being a genuine international coamunity1 f .ree of the tensions and confiicts that now darken the world with and scientific advance has brought mankind to the point where it must be one or.perish. In the age of airways and atomic weapons there is no political alternative to international brotherhood. Having become conscious of itself and its own rights, Afrasia must play its part in bringing into being a world in which all men, .of whatever race, colour or creed, are.free and equal and in which human knowledge and energy are directed not towards death and destl:'Uction but towards their proper ends of liberating mankind from poverty and bondage to nature." The news account begins: : ... FIGHT FOR FREEDOM "In a recondit'toned army club, in Bandung, formerly reserved exclusively for Dutch off ice rs, twenty nine newly independent nations of Asia and Africa met todtscover how to secure peace in the world, how to promote cooperation among how to defend their sovereignty from all forms of subjugation and how to extend the precious heritage of freedom to other peoples in thei. r region still suffering under an oppressive foreign yoke." President Soekamo of Indonesia "'the day they. began their deliberations April 18 -was full of historic memories. On that day 180 years ago (President sOek&rno of Indonesia reminded the delegates) had occurred the first dramatic in-. cident in the American War of Independence, tbe first war of a subject peoples against imperialist domination. The times have since then. The u.s. which first pealed the bell of freedom is.n
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-8-resolutions were a w arning to all Colonial Powers and white settlers in colonies that their dowinat:ion should come to a n end. Some delegations. naturally. interpreted the Colonial Powers to include Soviet Colonialism as practised in countries in Eastern Europe and the Baltic. 2. It devised concrete schemes for economic co-operation among underdeveloped peoples of the world. Hitherto economic co-operation has been among the developed countries on the one hand and under-developed countries on the other. But while preserving these fol'Uls of co-operation. the Conference resolved on a series of special measures directed to achieve economic co-operation between all the countries present at the Bandung Conference. Here it opened up new vistas of economic development which had been hitherto untouched. 3. Zt evolved schemes for cultural co-operation. The renaissance of Asia and Africaextends equally to the spiritual and cultural fields and without any signs of exclusiveness or rivalry to the other groups of nations and their cultures. It sought in the lerger context of world co-operation to promote cultural co-operation among the countries of Asia and Africa directed towards making the various cultures and philosophies prevailing in the region known throughout the whole region. 4. It provided another opportunity for settling the problem of Formosa. This was done outside the conference room. Formosa was a problem whi'h had been evading all efforts even to secure a discussion on it. It was a notable concession the Colombo Powers got from China when it agreed to negotiate directly with the United States on a matter which China bad been insisting concerned her sovereign rights. 5. It called upon the U.N. to admit all nations qualified for admission to the U.N. including the various countries of the Asian and African Conference qualified for admission but which had not been admitted. It also called for the revision of. the constitution of the Security Council to give adequate representation to the countries of Asia and Africa. This marks a change in the balance of power in world affairs which hitherto had been controlled by a group of Western Powers, principally the United States and the Soviet Union. Asia and Africa are sure to play a decisive part in world affairs. The primary issue to which the Bandung Conference gave its attention was that of coexistence with the Coamunist powers. Was it possible to live together in friendship with Communist countries which many delegates would use devious techniques of subversion and infiltration? The Communists too had their fears. It has been abundantly clear that the mistrust of the Communists and the non-Conmunists of each other's policies and techniques was the principal' reason for the mounting world tension. The conference had a unique quality. It was the first time a non Communist group of nations were meeting the Communists in a situation where the primary purpose was not the securing of tactical advantages or sterile debating points. Early in its life the conference bad to ask itself the question: should it confine itself to the letter.of the Bogor declaration and the agendi1 set for it then and seek only 'common grounds of agreement' That meant an appearance of hal'Ulony would certainly prevail but both sides would depart with mental reservations about getting on with the other. In free frank speech both sides had nothing to lose but their fears."

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-9The.President of the Conference Ali Sastroamidjojo, Prime Minister of lndonesia was reported to have said he received the letter from the sub' and the letter was g;lven prominerice 1n a box: "We hope your prospective meeting with other Asian and African leaders will fUlfU your highest .expectations 11any people in the world are in desperate need, many are full of fear, many are zealous fpr partisan Amid the pressures and perplexities of this situation we write to urge upon you not caution but fearlessness, not calculation but wiodoin, not effusion but discipline, not a partisan program but the development of universal ideals. '. We shall be watch;lng you, because any solution you discover should help uo all. The world is tired of oppression, dogma, and war. It is tirod of the efforts of various governments to dominate, or to build defensive. associations. We count upon you to develop independent solutions; to the principles of a new society. Deeper than t h e need for among starving people is the. need for a new confidence in man --the confidence upon which democratic institutions can be established, the confidence upon which liberating philosophies can be the confidence upon which can aspire toward economic brotherhood. Because of great wealth our own country in supe:ri stition which you can no longer afford to tole1ate You are aware of our weakness: our people in large measure still adhere to political, religious, and economic institutions based upon survival interests, rather than upon fulfilment. Survival is important, but su .rvival is not growth. Survival effort breeds conflict division, and stagnation. In contrast, evolution and progress depend primarily upon a capacity of energy to integrate and harmonize; to fulfil potentials. The way of caesar, of grasping for strength, is fa!lins in Moscow and Washington as it has in Rome. We have need that you shall be the Asokas to reintegrate our world into a coamunity pf a matrix in which people of understanding, of-technical skill, and of artistic genius ma7 mature. sincerely yours, Emily G. Balch (Nobel Peace Prize Winner), Wellesley, Mas3; Roger Baldwin (American Civil Liberties Union), New York City; Van Wyck Brooks, (Literary Historian), Bridgewater, Conn; Pearl Buck (Ncpel .Prize nqvelist), New York City; Henry Crane (Methodist lecturer), Detroit, Michigan; Kemit Eby (sociologist)', University of Chieago, Chicago,Illinois; Henry Pratt Fairchild (sociologist)., New York University, New York City; 5. Ralph Harlow (Professf>r Re.ligion) Smith College, Northampton, Mass; James Hupp (Dean), West Virginia Wesleyan, Nnckh.."lnnon, West Virgi.nia; Homar A. Jack (Unitarian minister and author), Evanston, Illinois, Philip Mayer (UniversaU.st miniSter), ferry, New Yoi:k; Lewis Mumfort (Philosopher),. Amenia, New Yo-rk; Howard. Thuman (Dean of the Chape1), Boston University, Boston, Mass; David Rhyo Williams (Unitarian minister and author), New York.'! Chou En-lai's speech and replies to criticisms of it were printed as was an account of an unexpected stop-over, required by bad weather, en route to the conference, at Singapore. suspicious, security-minded behavior was reported tbus:

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-10"First down the steps were six grim-looking bodyguards. hands thrust well down their side pockets. Four of them stood at the bottom of the steps leading from the plane, the other two faced round and looked towards the air port building on the roof and round the entrance of which a silent crowd stood watching. Nothing happened for five minutes. A police official boarded the plane. Still nothing happened. The police officer descended and stood at the foot of the ladder. Another long pause followed --a quarter of an hour had passed since the place drew up to a stop. Its engines had been switched off. Then a short hatless figure appeared at the door of the aircraft, his stiff hair pasted down to his head over which he brushed a hand as he stood for a minute looking round. Then he descended, followed by the rest of his retinue." There was a survey and account of the situation in each of the countries and areas at the Conference, reports on Cinema, The Preas, Religion, Sports, etc. etc., and a poem. "BETWEEN TWO WORLDS Moving towards doom beneath a darkened eun, Two worlds we see where we had dreamed of one; Cold war inflamed in spasms and the threat Of cataclysmic conflict's blast oAnd yet A new hope now illumines Asian skies, In Africa new vibrant voices rise; Peace is a victory that we can win, It need not be annihilation's twin; This peace between two worlds that co-exist Is not on far horizons lost in mist; Itsshape is clear and its foundations laid Deep in the hearts of millions. Yt is made The goal of men of vision born to lead Two worlds away from violence, hate and greed To friendly planning for a way of life Free from the grip of fear and stress of strife The East will not bow low before the Nor let the Western legions thunder past, And plunge in thought again Asia is awake, Africa's spirit no tyranny can break; The races long despised, enslaved, oppressed Arise to teach new wisdom to the West. Brighter for its eclipse, June's radiant sun May see the wonder of two worlds madP. one. Jay Quill. What do you conclude about the attitudes of these Asian i.ntellectuals and newsmen about the U.S.? About Communist China?

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Documents II. -11-President Kennedy's Inaugural Address January 20, 1961 "The New Frontier" My fellow citizens: We observe today not a victory of partybut a celebration of freedom an end as well as a beginning --signifying renewal as well as change. For 1 have sworn before you and Almight)' God the same solemn oath our forebears prescribed nearly a century and three quarters ago. The world is yery different now. For man holds in his mortal hands the pc:)wer.to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life. And yet tQe same revolutionary beliefs for which our forebears fought are still 1,s'sue around the globe --the belief that the rights of man come not from the generosity of the state but from the hand of God. We dare not forget today that we are the heirs of. that first revolution. Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans --born in this century, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, proud of our 'ancient heritage --and unwilling to witness or permit the sl0w un-doing of those human rights to which this.nation has always been committed, and to which we are comm'itted today at home and around the world. Let every nation know, whether it wish us well or ill, that we sh.dl pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend or oppose any foe in order to assure the survival and success of libetty. This much we pledge --and more. To those old allies whose cultural and spiritual origins we share, we pledge the loyalty of faithful friends. United, there is little we cannot do in a host of cooperative ventures. Divided, there is little we can do for we d .ire not meet a powerful challenge at odds and split asunder. To those new states whom we welcome to the ranks of the free, we pledge our word that one form of colonial control shall not have passed away merely to replaced by a far more iron tyranny. We shall not always expect to find them supporting our every view.' But we shall hope to find them strongly supporting theirciWri and to remember that, in the past, those who to .find power by riding on the tiger's back ended up inside. To those peoples iri the .hut11 and villages of half the globe struggling to break bonds of mass misery, we pledge best efforts to help them help themse'tves, for whatever period is tequlred --not because the Communists are doing it, not because .:leek their but because it is right. If the free cannot he'tp the. many who are poor, 'it can never save the few who are rich. .. To our sister .. republics south o f our botder, we offer a special pledge --to convert our good words into good deeds in a new alliance for progress -'to assist free men and free off the chains of poverty. But this peaceful revolutipn of hope cannot become the prey of hostile powers. Let all our neighbors knoW that we shall join with them to oppose aggresdon or subversion anywhGre in Americas. And let eve1-y other power know that this' hemisphere intends to remain the mast .er of its ow house. 'To.that world assembly of :sovereign states, the United Nations, our last best hope in an age where the instruments of war have far outpaced the instruments of peace, we renew our pledge of support -to prevent it from becoming merely a fortim for invective --to strengthen its shield cf the new and the weak --and to enlarge the -area in which its writ may run. Finally, to those nations who would make themselves our adversary, we

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-12-offer not a pledge but a request: That both sides begin anew the quest for peace, before the powers of destruction unleashed by science engulf all humanity in planned or accidental self-destruction. We dare not tempt them with weakness. For only when our arms are sufficient beyond doubt can we be certain beyond doubt that they will never be employed. But neither can two great and powerful groups of nations take comfort from their present course --both sides overburdened by the cost of modern weapons, both rightly alarmed by the steady spread of the deadly atom, yet both racing to alter that uncertain balance of terror that stays the hand of mankind's final war. So let us begin anew --remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof. Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate. Let both sides explore what problems unite us instead of belaboring those problems which divide us. Let both sides, for the first time, formulate serious and precise proposals for the inspection and control of arms --and bring the absolute power to destroy other nations under the absolute control of all nations. Let both sides join to invoke the wonders of science instead of its.terrors. Together let us explore the stars, conquer the deserts, eradicate disease, tap the. ocean depths and encourage the arts and commerce. Let both a .ides unite to heed in all corners of the earth the. command of Isaiah --to "undo the heavy burdens (and) let the oppressed go free. 11 And if a beachhead of cooperation can be made in the jungles of suspicion, let both sides join in the next task: Creating, not a new balance of power, but a new world of law, where the strong are just and the weak secure and the peace preserved. All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days. Nor will be finished in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this adminis tration, nor even perhaps in our on this planet. But let us begin. In your. hands, my fellow citizens, more than in mine, .will rest the final success or failure of our course. Since this country was founded, each gener ation of Americans has been. summoned to. give testimony .to its national loyalty. The graves of young American s who answered the call to. s .ervice surround the globe. Now the trumpet summons us again --not as a call to bear arms though arms we need --not as a call to battle, though embattled we are --but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation" --a struggle against tl'e common enemies of man: Tyranny,. poverty, disease and war itself. Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, north and south, east and west, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort? In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shrink from this responsibility --1 welcome it. 1 do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith and the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it -and the glow from that fire can truly light the world. And s o my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you --ask what you can do for your country.

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" -13My fellow citizens of the world: Ask not .Amerieo-u:lll do for you. but what together we.can do for the freedom of. man. Finally, whether you are citizens of America or of the world. ask of us heTe the same high standards of strength and sacrifice that we ask of you With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final.judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God's work must truly be our own. Document Ill The Constitution of The United States of America. Begins on page 14 ... : :'" : 1 -! : fl'.., .. !.1. ) : ) ....... 1.

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-14-THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA We; the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insdre domestic tranquillity; provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the, blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of .America. ARTICLE I Section 1 All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and a House of Representatives. Section 2 The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature. No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age of _twenty-five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen. Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to SeTVice for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons. The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each State shall have at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut five, New York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South Carolina five, and Georgia three. When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies. The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers; and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment. Section 3 The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof, for six Years; and each Senator shall have one Vote. Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first Election, they shall be divided as equally as may oe into three Classes. The Seats of the Senators of the first Class shall be vacated at the Expiration of r-\ the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth Year, ....._; and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that one-third may be chosen every second Year: and if Vacancies happen by Resignation,

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-15-or otherwise, during the ReceS'S of the Legislature of any State, the Executive thereof may make temporary Appointments until the next Meet < ing of the Legislature, which shall then fill such Vacancies No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years ; and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall no .t, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall be chosen. .. The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided. The Senate shall chuse their other Officers, and also a President pro tempore, ui the Ahsence of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise the Office of. President of the united States. The Senate shall have theaole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting for that Purpose tbey shall be on Oath or AffiJ:mation. when the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no :Person shall be cot'lVicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the Members .-present. 3udgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from Office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor, Trust or Profit under the United States: but the Party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to Law. t', Section 4 The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators arid Representatives shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but theCongress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting shall be on the. first Monday in December, unless they shall by:Law appoint a .different" Day. Section 5 Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Qualifications of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do Business; but a smaller number may adjourn from day to day and may be authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner, and under suc b Penalttes. as. each Houa e may pn>Vide. Bouse uy de. termine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members for disQrderly. Behavior, and, with the. Concurrence of two thirds, expel a Member. Each House shall keep a Journal of its.Proceedings, and from time to. time publish the same, excepting such Parts as mayin their Judg1J1ent require Secrecy; and .the. Yeas and Naysof the Members of either House on any question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those present, be entered on the Journal. Neither House, during-the Session of Congress, shall, without the Consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other Place than that in which .the two Houees : shall be sitting. Section 6 The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compensation for their Services, to be ascertained by taw, and paid out of the Treasury of the United States. They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the

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-16-same; and for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in any other Place. No Senator or Representative shall, during the Time for l-?hich he was elected, be appointed to any civil Office under the Authority of the United States, which shall have been created, or the Emoluments whereof shall have been encreased during such time; and no Person holding any Office under the United States, shall be a Member of either House during his Continuance in Office. Section 7 All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as on otherBills. Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, shall, before it become a Law, be presented to the President of the United States; If he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his Objections to that House in which it shall have originated, who shall enter the Objections at large on their Journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If after such Reconsideration two thirds of that House shall agree to pass the Bill, it shall be sent, together wUh the Objections, to the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two thirds of that House, it shall become a Law. But in all such Cases the Votes of both Houses shall be determined by Yeas and Nays, and the Names of the Persons voting for and against the Bill shall be entered on the Journal of each House respectively. If any Bill shall not be returned by the President within ten Days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the Same shall be a Law, in like Manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its Return, in which Case it shall not be a Law. Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concurrence of the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of Adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and before the Same shall take E feet, shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two thirds of the Senate and House of Representatives, according to the Rules and Limitations prescribed in the Case of a Bill. Section 8 I The Congress shall have Power to lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debes and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United Stat.es; but all Duties, Imposts end Excises shall be unifonn throughout the United States; To borrow Money on the credit of the United States: To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with tbe Indian Tribes; To establish an uniform of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States; To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix the Standard of Weights snd Measures; To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and current Coin of the United States: To establish Post Offices and post Roads; To promote the of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive right to their respective Writings and DiscoverieR; To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;

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-17'l'.e> 4ef ine and punish Piracies and l''elonies committed en the. high Seas, and ... Qffenceff against the Law .Nations; To .declare War, grant Letter s of M arque and Reprisal, and mske Rules conceming ... J ;,;Captures on Land and Water; ,To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer Term than two Years; To provide and 111aintain a Navy; To make Rules for the. Government and Regulation of the land and naval Forces; To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrecti9ns and repel Invasions; To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the Militia, and for govern ing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the United States, .reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the Officers, and the AutAority of training the Militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress; To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased by the Consent of the.Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be, for the Erectioll'.of Forts, Magazines, Arsenab, dock-Yards, and needful buildings --And To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for-carrying into Execution .the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United Stat.es, or in any Department or Officer thereof. Section 9 The Migration or IaJportation of such Persons as any of the States now existing shall think proper to admit shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a Tax or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each Person. The Privilege of the Writ of Corps aball not be suspended, unless when in Cases of or Invasion the public Safety may require it. No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed. Wo Capitation, or other direct, tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to the Census or Enumeration herein before directed be taken. No Tsx or Duty shall be laid on Articl.es exported from any State. No Prefere. nce shall be given by any Regula .tion qf Commerce or Revenu e to the Ports of one State ove r those of another: nor c:sb.$11 VeiJsels bound to, or from, one State, i:>blige d to clear,. or pay Duties in another. No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of Appropriations ma. de by Law; and a regular and of the Receipts Ex .Penditures of all public Money shall be published from tiJD,e to time. No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them. shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of ariy present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign .. Section 10 No State .. 11ha.ll ente:r into any Trea 'ty' .. Alliance. or Gonfederation; grant letters of Marque and Reprbat; coi:n Money;. Bills oLCredit; make any Thing but g9ld and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts; pass any _Bill .of Attainder, Law, or Obligation of C9ntx:acts, or grant any Title 9 Nobility.

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-18-No State shall, without the Consent of Congress,, lay any Imposts or Duties on Imports or except what may be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection Laws: and the net Produce of all Duties and Imposts, laid by any State on Imports or Exports, shall be for the Use of the Treasury of the United States; and all such Laws shall be subject to the Revision and Controul of the Congress. No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of Tonnage, keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement of Com pact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in War, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of delay. ARTICLE II Section 1 The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of fou:Years, and, together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as follows Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Represen tatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the Unf.ted States, shall be appointed an Elector. The electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by ballot for two Persons, of whom one at least' shall not be an Inhabitant of the same State with themselves. And they shall make a List of all the Persons voted for, and of the Number of Votes for each; which List they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the Seat of the Government of the United States, .directed to the President of the Senate The President of the Senate shall, in the Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the Certificates, and the Votes shall then be counted. The Person having the greatest Number of Votes shall be the President, if such Number be a Major ity of the whole Number of Electors appointed; and if there be more than one who have such Majority, and have an equal Number of Votes, then the House of Representatives shall immediately chuse by Ballot one of them for President; and if no Person have a Majority, then from the five highest on the List the _.said House shall in like Manner chuse the President. But in chusing the President, the Votes shall be taken by States, the Representation from each State having one Vote; A quorum for this Purpose shall consist of a Member or Members from two thirds of the States, and a Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every Case, after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number of Votes of the Electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should remain two or more who h ave equal Votes, the Senate shall. chuse from them by Ballot the Vice Prt:=s:i.dent.. The Congress may deten:iine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day on which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States. No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office who shall !".ot have attained to the Aga of thirty five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States. :=:> In Case cf the Removal of the President from Office, or of his Death, Resignation or Inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the said Office, the same shall devolve on the Vice President, and the Congress may by Law provide for

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-19th4 Caaa of R.emVll'a1. Rad.gnat1gn e-:.. "i'l"l."l!"iili.ty. both of the President and Vice PrcDident, dtclaring what Officer ohall then cu .. '.... r ........ .And such Officer shall act accor(angly, until the Disability be removed, or a President shall be elected. The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a Compensation, which shall neither be encreased nor diminished during the Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the following Oath or Affirmation:--"1 do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States." Section 2 The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when c3lled into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offences against the United states, except in Cases of Impeachment. He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the Supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law; but the Congress may by Law vest the of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments. The President shall have Power to .fill up all Vacancies that may happen during the Recess of the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall expire atthe End of their next Session. Section 3 He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as be shall judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary Occasions, convene both Houses, or either of them, and, in Case of Disagreement between them, with respect to tha Time of Adjournment, he mayatljourn them to such Time as he shall think proper; he shall receive Ambassado ts and othei: public Ministers; he shall take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed, and shall Conunission all the Officers oE the United States. Section 4 The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and misdemeanors. ARTICLE III Section 1 The judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court,

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-20and in such inferior Courts a:'3 the Congress :ney from d .me to time ordain and establish, The Jud ges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts, shall h old their Offices during goo d Behaviour, and a t Times, receive for their Services, a Compensation, -which shall not be diminished during their in Office. Section 2 The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising under this Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made, or which shall be made, under their Authority;--to all Cases .affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls;--to all Cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction;--to Controversies to which the United States shall be a Party;to Controversies between two or more States;--between a State and Citizens of another State;--between Citizens of different States,--between Citizens of the smQe State claiming Lands under Grants of different States, and be tween a State, or the Citizens thereof, and foreign States, Citizens or Subjects. In.all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, and ... those i n which a State shall be Party, the supreme Court shall have original Jurisdiction. In all the other Cases before mentioned, the supreme Court shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law an. d Fact, with such Ex-1 .. captions, and under such Regulations as the Congress shall make. i The Trial of all Crimes, except in Cases of Impeac_bment, shall be by Jury; and \ such Trial shall be held in the State where the said Crimes shall have been committed; but when not comnitted within any State, the Triai shall be at \ such Place or Places as the Congress may by Law hav e directed. \ Secti.on 3 Treason against the United States, shall consist only in. levying War against them, or in adhering their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort No Person shall,. be convicted o f Treason unless on the Testimony of two Witnesses to the save overt Act, or on Confession in open Court. The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of but no Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except during the Life of the Person attainted. ARTICLE "!Jr Section 1 Full Faith and Credit shall. be. given in each State to the public Acts Records, and judicial Proceedings. of every o ther State. the Congress may by general Laws prescri. be the Manner in which such Acts:> Records and Proceedings shall be proved, and the. Effect thereof,. Section 2 The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to Privileges and Inmunities of CitizenS in. the States.. A person charged in any Treason, Felony,; other Crime, who shall flee from Justice, and be found in another State, shall on Demand of the executive Authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having Juridiction of the Crime. No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof, escaping .into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be delivered up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labor may be due. \

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( -21Section 3 New S\;. e.tee may be admitted by the Congress into thb tfoi..vn; no new State shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or Parts of States, without. the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as well of the Congress. The Congress shall have Power to dispose of and make all needful Rules and Regulations respecting the Territory or other Property belonging to the United States; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so as to Prejudice any Claims of the United States, or of any particular State. Section 4 The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Unf on a Republican Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and on Applicatiou of the Legislature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature cannot be convened) against domestic Violence. ARTICLE V The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a .convention for proposing Amendments, Yhich, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of .the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made prior to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner affect the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article; and that no State without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage in the Senate. ARTICLE VI All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of this Constitution. shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation. This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties. made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in ever; State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State lo the Contrary notwithstanding. The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support .this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Off ice or public Trust under the United States. ARTICLE VII The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States, shall be sufficient for the Establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the Same.

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-23-AMENDMENTS ARTICLE I (The first ten articles proposed 25 Oeptcmber 1789; Declared in iorce 15 December 1191) Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peacably to assembie, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. ARTICLE II A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be ARTICLE III No Soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. ARTICLE IV The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things be seized. ARTICLE V No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment. .or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or liinb; nor shall be compelled in any Criminal Case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation. ARTICLE VI In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the r ight to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the 3tate and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertai .ned by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining in his favor, and to have the Assistanr.e of Counsel for his defence. ARTICLE VII In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

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-24-ARTICLE VIII Excessive bail shall not be required> nor excessive fines cruel and unusual punishments inflicted .An.TIGLE IX The enun'ler::it-inn in t;be Const:it:ution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparagaothers by .the people. ARTICLE .lt The powers not delegated to the United States by Constitution, nor pro hibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. ARTICLE XI (Proposed 5 March 1794; Declared ratified 8 January 1798) The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by Citizens of another State, or by Citizens or Subjects of any Foreign State. .!. : ARTICLE XII (Proposed 12 December 1803; Declared ratified 25 September 1804) The Electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of -the same state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the peron voted for as triee-President, and they _shall maka distinct lists of all persons voted for as President. and of all persons vot_ed for as Vice President, and of the numbeT of votes for each, which lists.they shall sign and certify and tranStnit aaaled to the seat of the GoVernment of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate;--The-President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Sene .te and House ()f Representatives, open all the certificates and the votes shall then be counted;--The person having the greatest number of votes for President, shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole num.be, r of Electors appointed; and if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers no t exceeding three on the. list of .those voted for as President, the House of Representatives shall choose by ballot, the Pres.ident. But 'in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from ea.ch state having one .vote; a quorum for this putp<'se : shal.l consist of t member or members from two ... thirds of the states, and a majority of all the-states-shall be neceseary to And if the House of Representatives shall not choose a President whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of March next following, then the Vice-President shall act as President, as in the case of the death or other const;ltutional disability of the President. The person having the greatest numbe. r of votes as Vice-President, shall be the Vice-President, if such be a majority of the whole ntimber of .Electors and if no person have a majority then from the two highest n.timbers ort the lbt, the Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum fo17_the purpose shall conoist of two-thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the

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-25-whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no per0on constitutionally ineligible to the office of shall be eligible to that of VicePresident of the United States. ARTICLE XIII .(Proposed 1 February 1865; Declared ratified 18 December 1865) Section 1 Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. Section 2 Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. ARTICLE XIV (Proposed 16 June 1866; Declared ratified 28 July 1868) Section 1 All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the or inmunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. Section 2 Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice President of ... t:he United States, Representatives in Congress, the Executive and Judicial officers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and citizens4of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion, or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be redu ced in the proportion which the number of such male cftizens shall bear to the whole number : _of male citizens twenty-one years of age in such State. Section 3 No person shall be a Senator or Representative in. congress, or elector of, President and Vice President, or hold any office, civil, or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, having previously taken an Oath, as a member of Congress, or as an officer of the United States, or as a member cf any State legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any State, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may by a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove tuch disability.

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-26Section 4 The validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection. or rebellion, shall not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any or '"LU.gat'.inn :iau;urted in' aid of or rebellion agains.t the United States, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, and claims shall be held illegal and void. Section 5 The Congress shall have power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article. ARTICLE XV .. (Proposed 27 February 1869; Declared. ratified 30 March 1870) Section 1 .lfhe right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or byany"State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. Section 2 The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. ARTICLE.XVI .(Proposed 12 July 1909; Declared ratified 25 1913) .'.!'he Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from what ever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration. ARTICLE XVII (Proposed 16 May 1912; Declared ratified 31 May 1913) "'1 The Senate of the United.States shalt.be. composed .of two senators from each State, elected by the P'90ple thereof; for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each State ahall have the qualifi cations requisite for electors of the moat numerous branch of. the -State legislature. When vacancies happen in the representation of any State in the Senate, the executive authority of such State shall issue writs of election to fi11 such vacancies: PROVIDED, That the legislature of any State may the executive to make temporary appointments until the people fill the vacancies by election as the legislature may direct. This alliendment sl\aU .not be so construed as to affect the election or term of any senator chosen before it becomes valid as.part of the Constitution .. ARTICLE XVII.I (Proposed 18 December 1917; Declared ratified 29 January 1919) After one year from the.ratification of this article, the manufacture,. sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof

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-27-into, or the exportati. on thar.eof from the United S u u::es and all t:erritor.r subject to the jurisdiction tle reof for beverage p u rposes iS hereby prohibited. The Congress and the several States shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of the severai States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by Congress. ARTICLE XIX (Proposed 4 June 1919; Declared ratified 26 August 1920) The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any States on account of sex. The Congress shall have power, by appropriate legislation, to enforce the provisions of this article. ARTICLE XX (Proposed 2 March 1932; Declared ratified 6 February 1933) Section 1 The terms of the President and Vice-President shall end at noon on the twentieth day of January, and ther terms of Senators and Representative& at noon on the day of January, of the years in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been ratified; and the terms cf" ... their successors shall then begin. Sect:!.on 2 j The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such meeting shall begin at noon on the third day of January, unless they shall by law 1ip,point a different day. Section 3 If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the President, the President-elect shall have died, Vice-President-elect shall become President. If a President shall not have been chosen before the time fixed for the beginning of his term, or if the PresidEnt-elect shall have failed to qualify, then the shull act as President until a President shall have qualified; and the Congress may by law provide for the case wherein neither a President-elect nor a Vice-President-elect shall have qualified, declaring who shall then act as President, or the manner in which one who is to act shall be selected, and such person shall act accordingly until a President or Vice-President shall have qualified. Section 4 The Congress may by law provide for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the House of Representatives may choose a President whenever the right of choice shall have developed upon them, and for the case of death of any of the persons from whom the Senate may choose

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-28-a :Vice-President whenever the. right of choice shall .have devolved upon them Section 5 Sections 1 and 2 .shall take effect on the 15th day of October following the ... ratification of this article :. Section 6 This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within 1even years from the date of its submission. ARTICLE XXI (Proposed 20 February 1933; Adopted 5 December 1933) Section l The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed. Section 2 The transportatiion or importation into any State, Territory, or .possession of ; "the United States .:for delivery or use therein of intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is. hereby prohibited Section 3 This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by convention in the several States, as provided in the C:onstitution, years from the date. of the ... submission hereQf to the States by the Congress. ARTICLE XXII (Proposed 2 June 1924; Ratification pending) .-Section 1 'J:he Congress .shall have to limit, reguiate, and the labor of under eighteen years of age. .. \ .' 2 Tlie, power of the several .States. ts unimpaire. d by this article except that the of State laws shall be suspended to the extent necessary to give effect to legislation enacted by the Congress. : (.

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-29OuTLINE EQ! _DISCUSSION Unit I. Introduction First week Are we living on a'hew frontier"? Christopher Fry in his verse play t:, Sleep .Q.f. Prisoners portrays it as a moral frontier :the frozen misery Of centuries breaks, cracks, and begins to move. The thunder is the thunder of the flows; The thaw, the flood, the upstart Spring. Thank God our time is now when wrong Comes up to face us everywhere Never to leave us till we take The longest stride of soul men ever took. Affairs are now soul size." Or is it instead a "frontier" of hazard surrounded by"Reds", of hardshi'ps taxes and military service, of violence and treacherous attack, maybe atomic annihilation? Does it matter what we think it is? What is this freedom for which we are asked to fight and sacrifice? At what cost? We bear the cry (from afar) "Better Red than Dead'." Do we answer "Better Dead than Red"? Or "Better neither, thank you". What decision between hope and fear? Our hopes are founded on our own self-image; and the notoriety of The !!&!I. American may be partially due to theaffront to our self-image and pride. What do you think of The !!&!z. American? QUESTIONS What do you think are the primary purposes of the authors in writing this book? to make money? to write sensationally in order to arouse, empassion and enflame people? to inform the American people about our refutation and activities in Southeast Asia? to effect reforms in the behavior, and the recruitment of our representatives abroad? to elect or to overthrow particular political What are the authors' values? What do they believe in?

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-30e.g. The story of Blown's inspection visit': Was the Senator on a "vacation junket"? Was he a knave, a fool? Was his visit a success? Why? Was it important? What was the outcome? Who are their heroes? their villains? What are the causes of the shocking failures andtragedies? What are the conclusions to be drawn? What can be done about it? .. How can competent, dedicated, Americans equal to (or 'Superior to) the Comnunists, be sent abroad to fight the spread of Communism? How could you be recruited? Would you join the Peace Corps? (it is unpaid, hard work, under-difficult living at)d eating conditions prohably dangerous). Would you be willing to undergo the training needed? The hardships involved? Is our American situation hopeless? What assets and hopes do the authors mention? Are 'there any "Ugly Russians"? "Ugly Chinese"? Dramatis Personnae (presented so you do not need to memorize them in order to discuss the book) The American Louis "Lucky Louis"; ambassador politician who wants a judgeship. The Russian Louis -Krupitzyn: peasant, born 1917, both shot, 1934 .WOf\ Lenin Prize, 1935 chauffe\l.r of Trade commlea'ion iri New York, 1937 Prague, 1939 Foreign Institute Academy, 1945 Military Observer with Mao, 1949 Asia Section USSR Foreign Office, on survey of Sarkhan Water. John Colvin: Wiscondn milk dryer, ex-guerilla fighter, back to Sarkhan to sell dried milk. neong, his friend in OSS Communist. Prince Ngong: intellectual, _poet_ ; dramatic protocol representative Father John X. Finian: Burma, Navy Chaplain who meets the Communist Marine. and T. Tien, his friend. Joe F. Bing. ("Everybody knows .Joe Bing!")

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-31ltomor Atkins (worth three millio;:1 "self-earned" dollars) heavy construction man, but advises against heavy construction. 1. brick factory and building materials, 2. canning plant, 3. access roads. and Emma, learned Sarkanese, invents a pump and long-handled broom. Ruth Jyoti: Eurasian, Burmese journalist, to U.S. Marie Macintosh -"girl who got recruited", who telephoned Prince Moyang for George Swift. Bob Maile of USIS, (and Dorothy} Hamilton Bridge Upton, Dartmouth, State Department Consul Honorable Gilbert MacWhite, Princeton and Molly Senator Jonothan Brown: "honest but tough", who visits, later attacks MacWhite's testimony. Col. Edwin B. Hillandale: Philippine darling, "the ragtime kid", harmonicaist, air forces, palmist; gives George Swift a black eye. Major James Walchek: Texas paratrooper, Military Observer in Indo-China and Monet, French legionnaire and Jim Davis. U. Maung Swe: tells Ma'CWhite of-Martin, short term Bunnan adviser, spoke Burmese --introduced seeds and home. canning. Tom Knox: single, Shelton, Iowa, to Cambodia. Chicken expert --Conference at Phnom Penh, in the American Mission, gets mad, elaborately "cooled out". Solomon Asch: East Side Jew, Union Negotiator, Conference Head in Hong Kong Meeting. Capt Boning USN and Doctor Ruby Tsung. ( tch tch ) Unit I. Continuation Suggested breakdown of assignments: Second week: Lefever (entire, 180 pages) Spanier, Chapter 1. (13 pages) Topics: 1. What is realism in our world dilemma? a reliance on power? a reliance on ethics? a reliance on liberalism? a reliance on faith? (Spanier's Chapter and Lefever's Chapter 1) 2. Are we winning or losing ground? Lefever, Chapter 2

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-32-Was Harbot e. jap victoi;y and advant" ael? or the beginning o f their def eat? Has the atomic' deterrence policy more helped or the Communists? Wquld a coexistence policy more help us, or the Communists? 3. What is diplomacy and what can it achieve? 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Lefever, Chapters 3 and 4 Is secret, traditional balance-of-power and consent-of-power diplomacy better, or "open", "democratic", "parliamentary" diplomacy? Words and deeds in international relations Lefever, Chapters 5, 6 Should we engage in a propaganda war with Communism? Is the USIA one? Will the truth prevail? Does it? What should be our policy in regard to "the truth" 1 what !! the truth about us and our policy? Are we at war with World Communism, or coexisting? Is post ponement of action to wipe it-out a decision to "coexist"? or just to continue to exist? Abraham Li.ncoln said that the U.S. government could not endure half slave and haif free. DOea this apply to today's world? If the "Cold War" and refusal of "coexistence" (as Dean Rusk said of Cuba) is a moral (all out) and political (so far as expedient) war against Communism, should we recognize diplomatically Red countries, and deal with Red regimes? What change in our military defense _policy is represented in the new administration by Gen. Maxwell Taylor? Should we, since for sixteen years there have been no changes in the political boundary between the "Red" and the "free" wodds that we actually were willing to fight about, except Korea, decide to make peace and stabilize that boundary by diplomatic agreement; or should we continue to press to 11llbcrate" Eastern Europe and mainland China? (i.e. adopt what Rennpn has called a policy of "disengagement") Or is any such suggestion "appeasement" arid both morally conteuiptible and proven by history to be disastrously impractical? 9. How, on the whole, have the Communht gains been made in recent years in. Africa, Asia, and Latin America? By military aggression, or by revolution .. and. subversion? 10. How may we best counter and prevent them. 11. Why should giving American arms and money to countries threatened by Coumunism to help them resist it, actually increase American unpopularity?

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-33-Third Week Spanier, Chapters 2,3,4; 5,6 Topics: 1. World geopolitics How did we get into this mess? Was it impossible to "deal with" Stalin? Should we have acted to rescue "satellite Europe'? Was the rescue of Greece and Turkey enough? Compare the rescue of western Europe (by the Marshall Plan) with the loss of China --the near loss of Korea Could we have done better? ts containment of Communism by geopolitical possible? Best? Necessary? Where does the strategic situation favor the Communists? Where favor us? What, by strategic power could we take? What in a military struggle could we hold? Which points of struggle Korea, Indo-China, Laos, Formosa Straits, Berlin, the West Indies, Africa --can we hold defensively? How best? By massive threat and use of power, by guerrella tactics, by "military aid", by economic program? 2. The test of leadership in a democracy Fourth Week Spanier, Chapters 7,8,9 Is the U.S. rising to the challenge of our world position? As a prosperous nation in a world of poverty and overpopulation. Should we undert. ake a Marshall Plan for the underdeveloped world? What leaders have failed to arouse us to adequate policies? Or are the American people -the followers -at fault? What is the role, what is the responsibility, what is the significance of the President of the U.S. in our world today? As Chief of State, Chief Executive, Chief Diplomat, Commander in Chief of the Army, Navy and Air Force, Chief Director of Legislation, Head of Party, and Personal Embodiment (."One-man distillaticn", Rossiter says), of the American people, is the Presidency an impossible, super human role? Can one man do all these and also be responsible for "the ethics, loyalty, efficiency, and the two and a third million

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-34. people who work for the Federal Government? How else, in these days of crisis and congestion in world and national affairs, can we act effectively otherwise than through Presidential leadership? In country after country, in the last twenty years, one leader has loomed up, sometimes a military man, in default of ail adequate political leader.' Are centralized authority, responsibility, and decision nowadays demanded for order and the long-term welfare of the people? Do the times requite a leader who can per$uade and tell us what we need to do? At home and abroad? For example --take time of war --Rossiter says, 11in the event of war the next wartime President, who may well be our last, will have the right to take any measure that may best subdue the enemy, and he alone will be th judge of what is 'best for the survival of the republic'." To prosecute the "Cold War" what powers should the President execute? Truman believed, in April,. 1952, when the "Cold War" was hot in Korea, he had to keep the steel mills running. Was he right or was Clarence Randall who opposed him and won in the federal courts? To end : World War II, Truman decided to' use the new atom bomb on two cities considered "military targets". Should atomic bombing be used in the future without the advice and consent of the people or their representatives? --except in retaliation for atomic of us? e.g. the Korean fracas is still only in 11truce"; ah:d : shelling by Red China sometimes still takes place in Quemoy and Matsu --should atomic weapons be used to end this Cold War struggle. without. the advice and consent of the people The first significant act by Kennedy was the attempted "liberation" of Cuba --the advised planned April, 1962 return of refugees in a military stroke to upset Castro. Hho was at fault in this catastrophic failure? i ; By 1961, there were over 100,000 Cuban refugees in the U.S.; Castrog regime had been revealed as a dangerous despotism; neve::theless the Eisenhower a dmini 'stration had only small Cuban forces in training in Guatemala. Was lice" to blame? .'. Wag Allen.lfolles? There was no upriSing to welcome and assist t:he invasion; had potential opposition been even informed and pre'pared. ,!' .. ... Was Kennedy? The'charge was that his refusal of U .s. military support.to the: landing, speci:fically of. air support, doomed it. Was he wrong to decide against official U.S. military involvement? -t. a.ow .. can Castro be fought or ove : rthrown? Kennedy in. a speech April 20, 1961, suggested that the parts played by arms and politics

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r -35urgently needed re-examination.. Let no one doubt the importance .. of Castroism as sedition and mobilizer of revolutionary force in Latin Ameriea. We have here, near at hand, the problem of how to liberate a Soviet satellite. Would a successful military intervention in Cuba by the U.S. strengthen or weaken our world position? Our security? What policy with Soviet satellites and with leading Coamunist countries will increase our security and advance our interests? Should we oppose all Communists, or deal with them as nations? Or attempt to reach them as individuals and peoples? In which area is the Soviet Union stn>ngest? In which the U.S.? resources production science political available? secure reserves? actual potential mobilized potential influence thru fear thru voluntary consent and support ideological unity and effectiveness Has Kennedy's .administration changed the picture any? The present All-University Book is Barry Gol
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-36_ (You should know of, and read, if this is an interest of yours, Theodore H. White's Making of !.!'!! President, which describes how. It is a masterpiece, and very readable) The P resi:dency is such an iinportant part of our government and so inadequately covered in Coyle, U.S. Political System that at the end of this section of the Syllabus we provide you with an outline of an excellent previous All-University Book, Clinton Rossiter' a The American .Presidency. It may be of help in the histor.ical study which follows. Rossiter: The American Presidency, Outline .2 I. Powers: II. Limits: Congress Civil servant s Federal System Chief of State Chief Executive Chief Diplomat Commander in Chief Chief Legislator Chief of Party Representative of the General Will Protector of the People and Law and Order Manager of Prosperity. Examples Supreme Court Steel Seizure Case AAA NRA elaborate rules and specifications in laws qualifications specified in appointments protection of officials from removal independence and spirit of Congress requirement of reports investigations riderson bills; (pork barrell laws) budget control censure (at risk of public .:.anger impeachment advice and consent -treaties nominations many expert esprit de corps State sovereignty of corporations, mone.y, management, conservatism ... III. The Presidency in History .:. Modeled on .the colonial governorships and intended to establish a strong and independent executive. By 8 decisions: James Wilson won ; 1. (Randolph and others wanted a multiple executive) 2 or 3 (troika?)

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-37-2. Both the Va. and N.J. provided for election by the legislative branch. Voted 5 times for it, Morris got election by the people. 3. Fixed term -(did not recognize it prevented patliamentary, responsible government.) 4. Eligible for re-election indefinietly 5. Specific authority and powers 6. Not encumbered with a council. 7. Prohibition on dual executive aNd legislative positions. The availability of Washington relieved the fear of monarchy. Developed out of this "Republican Kingship." More involved in making national policy Became a democratic off ice -rise of American Democracy Increases in prestige of the office even vs. Congress Importance of international role; Major Contributions of Major Presidents-Pre Civil War Ratings----1. Washington -institutionalism, dignity, authority, patriot, and thanks to Hamilton, legislation. 3. Jefferson -republicanism democracy assertion of power -Louisiana purchase of independence -rejection of subpoena in Burr Trial {Marshall) development of a party appeal to and support from House 2. Jackson -re-establishment of Presidency man of frontier personal control vs. cabinet clear chief of state and party vs. money power Whiggery tried to reverse this. Civil War to Modern 1. Lincoln the powers "VJar i1vwe:-a" Martial law and preserver of the union a democrat as well as a dictator,-"martyred Christ of democracy's 'Passion Play'" followed by a reaction.

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3. Theodore aooseve 1t .7" vi,gor "All..-American B<>Y" broad interests -382. Wiison before Congress Went to Congress for emergency powers, and he cooperated "Blundered in_ appeal for a Democratic Congress" Moral and political leadership Unique. F.D.R IV. Creditable performances: Polk, Johnson, Hayes, Cleveland, Truman Eisenhower. technical point-of-view, both Adamses, Madison, VanBuren, Arthur, McKinley, Taft, and Hoover better than Johnson but not so important. Modem Presidency Initiator and guide of legislation and legislative piogram. TR, WW, and FDR, came as governors of progressive and refonning states. Press Conference and mass media Law and order: intervention in disputes maintenance of wartime production general welfare moral leadership e.g. race relations Broad authority in administration FEPC by executive order Anned f?rces Coamittee on Equality Loyalty and security (Consexvatism vs. Congressional radicalism.) Through the courts: appointments, Friend of Court intervention Commissions .of enquiry Spokesman of the nation The Executive Office: 1939 (September 8) Brownlow, Men:iam, Gulick CommiSsion 1936-7 Six executive assistants, (except for 19 agencies) 100 odd under large departments .. Executive ordr 8248 Off ice Around 12 perscnal aides 24 aides to aides 325 clerks, etc. (p. 97) National Security CoUn.cil 1947 President, Vke-President, State, Defense ODM 1953 CIA and chiefs of ataf Counc:JJ. of Economic Advisors -3 economists 30 staff Arthur F. Burns of the Budget Although those in immediate cooperation are.his personal choices, the staffs have tenure. "The fact is that the Presldency ha s become institutionalize{

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and/ SPECIAL INTEREST STUDY OR INDEPENDENT PROJ'ECT Mode of Procedure: 1. Select a subject or topic for special study or a project to be undertaken on your own. (la) Have it considered and OK1d by your instructor. 2. Prepare to represent the subject as a lay expert in.debate, panels, and/or committee discussion. (You may wish to make a notebook illustrated with clippings, but _if you assemble a scrapbook," it is supplementary to a serious effort .to study and acquire understanding of subject. It will be judged on evidences of such study and understanding and on the quality of systematic organization --not on bulk and quantity.) or 3. Prepare a well-balanced report or essay on your topic to be sbmitted, in good fotm, with bibliography and footnotes, if needed. (typed, if possible). Due Date: in the last half of the second semester (i.e. CB 202), calendar date to be announced, in some cases individually. Note: Since you may select a subject which is related to CB 201 or CB 202, your planning should take note of the fact that no time is released by light assign ments in CB 201, whereas in the last third of CB 202 there will be a period of light or no new assignments during the final period of. recap.itulation, summary and conclusions. You may find it necessary to postpone intensive work on your topic until that time, when your contribution and report will specifically be due. On the other hand, the benefit of this supplementary project will be greatest to you and your contribution to the course increased if you can select and begin your study prior to or simultaneously with the discussion of the related area in the course. Subjects and Subject Areas: This list is suggestive only, and mainly based upon the which are available and which have been stocked by the Bookstore as related to the course. Browse among them, but also browse generally in the Library in making your selection of subject. The selection should be yours. Apliilosophical cultural approach to world understanding F.s.c. Northrop, The Meeting of East and West (Macmillan. $2.65) Americans abroad: the representation of the u.s. abroad. Or, the possibilities of a career abroad and how to prepare.for it. Cleveland, Mangone, and Adams, Overseas American s The University and World AffaiIS The Representation of the U.S. Abroad American Assembly 1956 Study Abroad p.s. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare New Dimensions series #6 The goals and prospects of the u.s. today The Rockefeller Panel Prospect for America (Doubleday President 1 s Commission on Polit.ica. l Goals. Goals for Americans 14!! series on America's National Purpose .: $1.45)

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-2-The Military in American Life Walter Millis, Arms and .Men (Mentor 50) Louis Smith, American Democracy and Military Power Political leadership; the achievement and exertion of personal power and influence. (a) A comparison between American patterns and those in.some other country or culture. e.g. Compare J.F.K. or Eisenhower with Gandhi or Nehru or with Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana (See, for example Richard Wright's Black Power, this American Negro novelist's straight reporting of his visit when the nation was being born) Machiavelli Taylor H.D. Lasswell David Spitz Public Opinion The Prince The Statesman (Mentor 50) preface by c. Northcote Parkinson Power and Personality Psychopathology and Politics Patterns of Anti-Democratic Thought (Compass. $1.65) Its nature, evolution, and role in a democracy. Walter Lippmann, Public Opinion .(Macmillan $2.25) Walter the' Rublic Philosophy Related A. A survey of opinion on a significant political issue or problem area. e.g. Florida opinion on American foreign policy and international problems. B. A study of political activity or organization e.g. How the elements and sections of Tampa (or Hillsborough County) voted in the last election. c. Participant political activity; in precinct and ward, and party; in campus arena le.a.dersfiip .. D. A of public opinion and its impact on the of California at Berkeley. (See David Harowitz Student (Ballantine. 50) The atomic age dilemma,; mutual -the stalemate of horror. The possibility of relief from the prospect of all-out war ____ i.e. disarmament of mass destruction weapons: atomic, chemical Who Wants Disarmament? R.J. Barnet (Beacon. $1.45) On War, Raymond Aron (Anchor, 1959. 95) Disarmament; Alternatives to the H-Bomb, James P. Warburg (Beacon,1955)' Strategy for Survival, Wayland Young (Penguin, 1959. 65) The Price of Power, America since 1945, Herbert Agar (University of Chicago Press) The Causes of World War Three, c. Wright Mills, (Simon and Schuster. $1.50) See also On the Beach (novel), Nevil Shute (Signet 50)

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-3-War and peace from a religious point of view Is Peace Possible, Kathleen Lonsdale (A Quaker View), Penguin, 1957. 65) The United States and the Soviet Union, (Yale University Press) 1949 In Place of Folly, Norman Cousins (Harper. $1.50) Foreign Policy Foreign policy in the United States (work out what you think should be the lines of the foreign policy of the U.S.) Has Man a Future, Bertrand Russell (Penguin. 85) May Man Prevail, Erich Fromm (Anchor. 95) Russia, the Atom, and the West, George P. Kennan See also the Foreign Policy Association. Headline Books A. Historical: Our departure from isolation The Revolution in American Foreign Policy, 1945-1954, William Carleton Doubleday, 1954. $1.75) for the documents see Hofstadter, Great Issues, use II Part VII, (Vintage Books) Lippman, U.S. Foreign Policy Agar, Herbert The Price of Power; America since 1945 (University of Chicago Press. $1.75) B. In Asia: Rostow and Hatch, An American Policy in Asia c. China: See Fa .reign Policy Association, Headline Books Nos. 129 & 136. Derk Bodde, 'China's Cultural Traditions -What and Whither A. Doak Barnett, Communist China and Asia; A Challenge to American Policy (Vintage $1.65) Ch'u Chai and Winberg Chai, The Changing Society of China (Mentor. 75) D. USSR: Ellsworth, Raymond, Soviet Economic Progress Henry L. Rpberts, Russia and America; Dangers and Prospects (NAL) Robert w. Campbell, Sov:fet Economic Power (Houghton Mifflin) w. w. Rostow, The Dynamics of Societ Society, (NAL, MD 121) Philip Moseley, Kremlin and World Politics (Vintage Rl002) Zbigniew K. Brzezinski, Ideology and Power in Soviet Politics (Praeger. $1.75) E. Middle East: William A. Williams, America and the Middle East Egypt F. Latin America The Population Problem The World Revolution in Expectations and Technology New Dimensions of Peace, Chester Bowles Ideas, People, and Chester Bowles (Harper, 1958) Hoffman's Article in "'!he Search for America." Cultural Patterns and Technical Change, Margaret Mead (NAL) America's economic relations with the world Robin w. Winks, The Marshall Plan and the American Economy

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-4-Especially Significant Countries India and Pakistan The Wonder that Was India Wallbank, Short History of India and Pakistan (.NAL, MD 224) Nehru, Toward Freedom (Beacon. $1.95) Nehru, The Discovery of India (Anchor. $1.45) Gandhi, -}.n Autobiography (B_ eacon. $1.95) Japan Cuba USSR (See D above) Af r:i.ca Immanuel -Wallerstei.n,_:Afr i-ca; Politics of $1.25) Middle East Williams, America and the Middle East China American Society The courts and legal tradition Henry J ." Abraham, The Judicial Powers (Oxford Paperback) Roscoe Pound, -An Introduction to the Philosophy of Law (Yale. $1.25) Edmond Cahn, The Moral Decision; Right and Wrong in the Light of American Law (Midland. $1, 75) An overall look at Aiiierican civilization Max Lerner, America as a Civilization Huston Smith, The Search for America American Affluence : J.K. Galbraith, The Affluent Society David Potter, People of Plenty Vance P4ckard, The Hidden -Persuaders (Pocket Book, Inc _.) The American Tradition Federalism as a principle for the modem problems of nationalism The relations of wealth and property to the national purpose Part V and Bibliography of Goldman, Eric, Rendezvous with Destiny Heath Series, Problems, Roosevelt, Wilson, and the Trusts The conservative point of view. See Clinton Rossiter, Conservatism in America (Vintage 212) The liberal point of view H.K. Girvetz, Wealth to Welfare

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-5-The gospel of wealth and success Heath Series, Democracy and the Gospel of Wealth Heath Series, Benjamin Franklin and the Ame,rican Character Hofstadter's Great Issues, II and Part II, (Vintage Books) The cosmopolitan or multi-cultural tradition Immigration, Oscar Handlin, editor (Prentice-Hall. $1 95) Louis Adamic: Marcus Lee Hansen, The Atlantic Migration 1607-1860 (Torchbook. $2.25) Oscar Handlin, The Uprooted, 23 Universal Immigration an issue See Heath Series, Problems Immigration an American Dilemma Historical Cases Joseph Charles, The Origin of the American Party System (Torchbook. $1.25) Age of Andrew Jackson: A Case History'in the Origins. of' ;Liberal Capitalism. Heath Series, : Problems. Jackson Biddle. Compare Hofstadter with A.M. Schlesinger, Jr., The Age of Jackson. (NAL) The New Deal Hofstadter's Issues, II Part VI Books) Heath Series, F. D. R,. and the Supreme Cou.rt Heath Series, New. Deal, Revolution .pr Evolution Davies and Goetztiiann, New Deal and Business Recovery Potter and Goetzmann, New Deal and Employment Trade Unions: in line with or in conflict with American ideals and Heath Series, Industry-Wide Collective Bargaining E. David Cronon, Contemporary Labor Management Relations Ely Chinoy, Automobile Workers and the American Dream Labor in a Free Society, M Harrin. gton and Paul Jacobs, editors American "capitalism" J.K. Galbraith, American Capitalism (Houghton Mifflin. $1.30) J.K. Galbraith, The Affluent Society Allen M. Sievers, Revolution, Evolution and the Economic Order (Spectnim. $1.95) The South Cash, Mind of the South (Anchor. 95) Heath Series, Desegregation and the Supreme Court Huston Smith, The Search for Tomorrow See Ante-Bellum, H.R. Helper and George Fitzhugh.cla .ssic writings. (Capricorn. $1.35) and Incident at Harpers Ferry (Prentice-Hall sourcebook) Reform: the wave of the future or sentiment of the past? Compare the of The Age of Reform (Vintage. $1.25) with Goldman's approach Rendezvous with Destiny (Vintage. $1.45) Loyalty in a democratie state Heath Series, Loyalty in a Democratic State Barth, Loyalty of Free Men

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-6 .. The growth of the American economy Cochran and Miller, The Age of Ente:rprise; a Social History of Industrial America. (Torchbook. $2.35) World Problems Our age of revolution Crane Brinton, Anatomy of Revolution Eric Hoffer, The True Belie?er Arthur The Yogi and the Commissar The history of Communism Edmund Wilson, To the Finland Station (Anchor. $1.25) c. Wright Mills, The Marxists (Dell. 75) James H. Michener, The Bridge at Andau (Bantam 35) The Communist faith Koestler, Qerkness at Noon Koestler, The God that Failed (Bantam F20n} Koestler, The Invisible Writing (Beacon Press) Sidney Hook, Marx and the Marxists (Anvil) Hoestler, The Yogi and the CommiS"Sar Science in a free society J. Stefan Sanford A. Lakoff, Science and the Nation (a good survey of the issues which developed with atomic research including the Oppenheimer case}(Spectrum. $1'.95) Reference: The Research Revolution. Leonard s. Silk (McGraw Hill 1960) Don K. Price, Government and Science Bulletin of the Atomic Scienctists S-:>viet economics Schwartz, Harry, Russia's Soviet Economy (Prentice-Hall) Campbell, Robert w. Soviet Economic Power (Houghton Mifflin) A study of The Standard Oil Company: Rise of --Holt Problems in Historical Interpretation Present status and organization of one affiliate Oil as an international, managed industry Sugar as an international, managed industry Coffee as an international, managed industry The agricultural surplus problem and policies The "Alliance for Progress" The United Fruit Company Intellectual developments of our day Daniel Bell, The End of Ideology (Collier. $1.50) Frederick L. Schuman, The Commonwealth of Man The "health revolution" the conquest of disease e g. Victor Heiser, An American Doctor's Odyssey (US $1.25)

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. CB 202 : .. The American Idea America and the World This is the second half of a tWo semester course so we begin by repeating the preamble of t:be "first' half: This course ts organized andset in the contemporary life and problems of America and the world today, to provide understanding and preparation for your citizenship and partic.ipation in public opinion today and tomorrow There are manifold means and sources for such education --television, radio, newspapers, magazines and tha book press, as .weli as personal experiences -'.".all _of which you have used to develop the background you bring to. this course. We consicie r valuable your ext>erience and ideas. and important tijaf you share thein with your fellows and with us and we .consider your judgments in developing this course best to ,erve the above purpose. Tell us of good articles and publications, of good T9V programs and movies, and discuss your ideas at every We :also seek your suggestions and coaments on the activities and experiences of the course. .. Your regular self-education in relevant current affairs. and .events is a part of this course and you should (1) Plan to read a daily and/or a weekly news magazine, and (la) good articles in monthly and quarterly magazines. In the last few years the American book press has developed the provision of moderately-priced paperbound books in great profusion and range of quality. Some of these are sound, valuable, and in some cases the best books by the best authors. We use paperbacks in this course instead of a standard text, therefore, in order to adjust the reading continually to the best, and most interesting and challenging available. The paperback way of-life is a new opportunity available to those who aspire to be informed, and leaders in our dynamic society. This course will be presented through paperbacks. It is about what America to ourselves and to the world, the American experience, "the American way-of-life"; and the realities of our situation in the world faced with and challenged by World Communism and by the complexities and problems of all the peoples everywhere.---This year it is also being presented through movies selected and providad you from those made (mostly) of T.V. programs nationally broadcast --see list below; and you are expected to supplement these by yourself selecting and viewing current T.V. programs or movies which relate to the subject of the course. average hour per -to be reported on a standard blank and turned in to your instructor. The blank includes questions of evaluation

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-2-and comment.. Please be candid and frank since we wish to use the information to recomnend the program to others, or not; or perhaps even to decide to obtain a kinescope. And, you of course recall the special interest or project each of you are expected to develop and carry out and to report in the second semester of the course. The last three weeks of this trimester is reseived for these reports and includes no general assigmnents required of all. We hope you have already found and selected this interest and now need only to work out with your instructor the plans for reporting or representing this special study and competence to seive the class. See the outline for s2ecial Interest .2.I Independent Project. CB 202 deals with the confrontation with Communism and other "Isms", the most significant ideological movements of the world and in the particular context of economic and dynamics. We first suivey the "isms" and for this purpose use William Ebenstein'& Today's Isms, probably the most widely used paperback on the subject by the colleges of the country; and then we undertake a rather more extensive s tudY of the western developments and tradition of an economic society, finally focussing on the particular and most important institution the corporation and its relation to government. How the corporation has been adjusted and adapted to the American traditions and values of government and of human relations is one interest and the other major one is its adequacy, adaptability and seivice in the development of the world economy and the competition with the Soviet economy. Since our objective is to feel out --to sense the truth or science of Political Economy, the.title is -The.!!!!!.! Political.Economy of Today.

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THE ISMS AND THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF TODAY Required Reading Calendar of Assignments Completion Date Due Monday, Sept. 24 2 wee'ks ,, Due Monday, 15 3 weeks I. Divergent applications of contemporary political economy II. A careful study of Today's Isms: Comnunism, Fascism, Capitalism, Socialism by-William Ebenstein The be1Jt preparation would be a prompt reading of the book followed by intensive study of each part for the scheduled class hours, as the instructor will announce. Some instructors may assign deadlines for completion Of each part; SOO!e may take up the topics _in same other order, and so announce. The theory and the emerging science: A careful study of The Making of Economic Society by R. L. Heilbroner gconomics and the Art of Controversy by J.K.Galbraith Mid Term Grades Dtie Oct. 25 Due Monday, Oct. 2 weeks Due Monday; Nov. 12 2 weeks Due Monday, Nov. 19 1 week 3 weeks III. A major aspect of the American system; a study in some deptll of the institution !!!! corporation A careful reading of The 20th Century Capitalist Revolution by Adolf A. Berle,Jr. complete including Foreword (b) The Economy; Under Law by w.u. Ferry (a pamphlet) (c) Unions and Union Leaders of Their Own. Choosing Kerr (a pamphlet) (d) A survey of the 1961 Annual Report Standard Oil Company (New Jersey) This will be provided you in class. IV. lo att sropt to apply conclusions to tbe world communit-y A careful study of The United Nations and How it Works by D.C. Coyle complete The Rich and the Poor by Robert Theobald Gandhi by -Fischer pages 67-104 Roots of Change -The Ford Foundation in India This will be prov:ided you in cllss. Review ,. The of the course will be devoted to a General Sumnaty and Conclusions of the entire two seD1ester organized by me-ans of reports from the! Independent Projects undertaken

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-4-Calendar of Films, Requirea v--<>rwi.ne 1st week Sept. 10-14 2nd week Sept. 17-21 3rd week Sept. 24-28 4th week Oct. 1-5 5th week Oct. 8-12 6th week Oct. 15-19 7th week Oct 22-26 8th week Oct. 29 Nov. 2 9th week Nov. 5-9 10th week Nov. 12-16 (1) See It Now: Clinton and the Law. (2) (2 reels. 27 minutes each) .QB. Twisted Cross. (3) (4) OR OR (5) (6) OR OR !i (7) (8) OR OR (9) .. (10) OR. .Q!! Twentieth Century Revolutions in World Affairs; The Revolution in Human Expectations. CS-1107 Twentieth Century Revolutions in World Affairs; The Russian Communist Revolution. Cheddi Jagan. as substitute for either Nightmare in Red. as substitute for both Foreign Aid and Economic Policy (used this summer) Co-existence (The World We Want:l958), NET-1411 Odegard. The President and Foreign Policy. Odegard. The United Nations Challenge and Response Odegard. The United Stateo -The United Nations The Population Explosion. CS-1138 Workshop for Peace. CS-1149 Odegard. Diplomacy -First Line of Defense Odegard. The Struggle for the Minds of Men Economic and Social Council at Work. CS-791 Beardsley Ruml: Part 1 (Heritage X). NET-936 Economic Policy for World Peace Odegard. Underdeveloped Lands and the Democratic Dilemma (11) Guatemala (America Looks Abroad). NET-1021 (12) Gandhi. CS-1124 OR Odegard. (13) The Constitution and the Labor Union. CS-1071 (14) See It Now: The Fifth Amendment and Self-Incrimination cs-841 OR Working Together. EBF #598 (15). See It Now: Report fran Africa, Part 1. CS-983 (16) Two reels -28 min. and 25 min.) OR Odegard. The United Nations Challenge and Response .Q! Odegard. Economic Policy for World Peace (17) (18) OR Europe Without Frontiers (used this summer) Living City, CS-734 Odegard. Local Government and Politics Theory and Practice Odegard. BalkanizatiQt\ of Urban Life (19) Mexico and Peru. Parts 1 and 2 EBF #470101 &470102 Puerto Rico. NET-1019 (20) OAS .NET-1017

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11th week Nov. 19 12th week Mov. 26-30 13th week Dec. 3-7 CB 202 (21) & (22) Qi\ Q! Q! (23) OR (24) .Q! (25) OR (26) Q!! -5-Toynbee's. Lee Chapel Lectures #8 Arab Worlds Past and Future Parts 1 & 2 #470801 & 470802 3 parts of and Ceylon #470601,2,3 .(1 hour, 16 mip.) Odegard. Democratic and the Power Struggle Odegard. Lands and the Democratic Dilemma Jawaharlal Nehru. EBF 11648 Odegard. Physics and Politics Government in the Age of Permanent Revolution Alfred P. Sloan, Jr. EBF #1657 .. Odegard. Mythology and Reality in World Affairs F ather John LaFarge. EBF #1802 Odegard. Secrecy, Security and Responsible Government Margaret Mead, EBF #1803 Odegard. The State of Nature or the Commonwealth of Man. DISCUSSION OUTLINE Our ge9politic&l,Economic, and Social Relations with.the Nations and Peoples of the world. From study and reading about our own nation and our history, and the patterns of our life, of government, and of personal hOpes, ideals we may well takeg\Jidance for our study of our neighbors in the wo.i'ld. Other peoples and nations are like us in that they are human, but unlike us in.that their.experience of life has been different. \. There are. and perplexities as well as similarities which may afford insight. If we. are to achieve fi'11li understanding upon which to base our policies, we must organize our approach; and we must always keep in mind that there is one unavoidable breach between us---the breach of interest and .tliat-. a'd. they are. they. To o .rganize the. study, .the outline may be helpful: The c0mmunity (;f T he Principles: I ,,, (1) Power; m:i.1itary1 polit:!cal, ideological; and their limitations (2) The organization and the history behind it. (3). The leadership; the elites, classes, groups. ct) The values, and the morale (5) The system, roles, operations, organizations. (6) The interests, purposes, instruments.

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... -6Our rel.iat:.:Lons t:o t:be countries and people Our general assets, instniments, The conclusions: needed preparation mobilization of assets reform of liabilities purposes, goals and their clarification in all their aspects and parts. For example, let us take the USSR. Since the late Fifteenth Century, the European West has held world hegemony, or preponderance of power. Today, with the relative decline of Great Britain, France, and Germany, the u.s. and Russia vie for predominant power the one through the traditional sovereign nation-state system and the other' by means of the Communist Party dictatorship and revolution. Both the u.s. and Russia have and seem to respect advanced military pONer, and advanced science and technology. Both are, of course, derived from and mainly variants of the general European culture base and history. But the u.s. was derived particularly from the western Europe tradition -of Rome and Paris and London, from the Renaissance and Reformation and from the value systems of the English yeoman and Puritans, whereas Russia derives from Byzantium, Kiev, and Moscow; from Germany and eastern Europe, not to mention the Mongols. The radical revolutionary movement of Communism,born of the West and its socio-economic upheavals and idealisms, was amended and adap:ed, by Lenin primarily, to the Russian scene. The point is that the U.S. and the USSR now confront each other and both claim or seek political hegemony today or in the "inevitable" future. Can they coexist? The growth in relative Saviet power since 1945 severely challe' nges the military s9periority of the u.s., if indeed, it has not already disappeared. A stalemate has developed in this day of space craft and stockpiled atomic bombs and missiles sufficient for mutual annihilation. For the present, military dominance is out of the question. Each combatant is free to do what it insists on doing at the risk of destruction. Of course each must continue to convince the other of the realistic will to resist, but neither can wholly control or prevent the actions of the other. Stalin first declared the "Cold War" February 9 1946, when he stated that a peaceful world order was "impossible under the present capitalist develop ment of the economy." He implied that the Revolution doctrines of the USSR were to prevail over the wartime "alliance" agreements and the United Nation's commitment; and the pattern of Soviet policy soon confirmed the implication. The struggle is politico-economic as well as military. But it is also ethical, religious, and philosophical since the !!!m.! involve faiths and values. The nature and the range of these issues is the subject of Ebenstein's Today's Isms, the first reading in this semester of the course.



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9/11/62 REPORT FROM THE .-f>RESIDENT OF THE UNIVE.RSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA. .... TO THE SPECIAL COMMlmE OF THE BOARD OF CONTROL ON THE FINDINGS OF THE'.l.eGISl.ATIVE INVESTIGATING COMMITTEE IN THE SPRING OF 1962 Faculty and Staff a} John S. Born 1925 Illinois { Single) the recOi'a Wflldi IS summarized below indicates that Mr., was employed during the fil'.'St M;> in September 1960, iust befare the opening of classes for our first semester of operations on September 26, 1960. TI1e dossier of his educational experience as summarized below Indicates on Incomplete recOrd betvieen 1949 and 195'2, which was apparently not checked at the time of his employment 1942-43 University of Southern California Student 1943-46 UoSo Navy 1946-49 University of Southern California B.A. degree ( cum laude) 1952-53 Litchfield School Teacher 1953-55 Columbia University degree 195.5-57 Clemson College Teacher 1957-59 University of North Carolina Tchg.Asst. Ph.D. OJndidate 1959-60 Easterr,a Carolina State College Teacher 1960-62 of South Florida Teacher June 6, 1962 Terminated for conduct connected with a psychological di sorder. (This phrase was the one worked out by the University of Florida In coMultation with the law faculty, in order to avoid possible future legaf after the Johns Committee had made its investigation there a few years agoo This phrase was approved by the Johns Committee and has been used for this purpose since. I reported that this phluse had been entered on Mac Kenz le 's record to Sena Jw Johns and it received his approval.) b) James Do Teske was a member of the staff who was assisting in the teaching of o course in visual aids to school teachers during the 1962 summer sessi0n. He was discharged as of the end of the summer session, August 11, 1962. c) 'h3f Winthrop Born July 20, 1910, New York City { married) College of City of New York BoS o degree 1937-41 War Dept., WG$hington, DoCo Librarian 1938-40 George Washington University MoAo degree i t. 1941-44 UoSo Dept. of labor, Washington, DoCo lndust. Psychologist 1940""42 George Washington University Grad. Student 1942--46 Muhlenberg .Adult Educ. Forum, No Y.Co Dir. & Lecturer 1944-48 Abbe Institute, N o Yo Co Instr. Psychology 1944-47 Offiee of Price Adm., N. Y o Co Economist 1947-48 N oY o State Div. of Housing No Yo Co Stat. & Economist 1947-49 New School for Social Research, VoC. Ph.D. degree -1-

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d ) Henry Winthrop (Continued ) 1948-49 Wor Assets Adm., No Yo.Co Analyst 1950-51 UoSo Dept. of Labor, WCJihington, DoCo Economist 1951-52 Office of Price StobUization, Wash. DoCo Economist 1952 Washington Public Opinion Lab, Seattle, Wash.lecturer 1953-54 Richmond Prof. Inst. of College of Wm. & Mary Asst.Prof. 1956-57 Hollins College, Va. Asst. Prof. 1957-60 of Wichita Asst.Prof. 1960-62 U\iversity of South Florida Assoc.Prof. Has published numerous books and articles on psychology, education, soclology, and philosophy. Recommendations from: V oJo Biellauskas, Richmond Prof. hist. of College of Wm. & fo.k:Jry E. Shouby, Chrm., Psychology Dept., State Univ. of New York Herbert Feigl, Dir., Minnesota Center for Ph11osophy of Science, University of Minnesota Robert Hofstadter, Assoc. Prof., Stanford University Professor Winthrop does not use profanity in the classroom. This charge seemed to come about amesult of a misunderstanding by one person. In the study of a certain book, in Human Behavior classes, Professor Wintlvop wished to illustrate the difference in ways of conversing of people of different social and economic levels. He selected passages from Salinger's "Catcher in the Rye" to illustrate the vulgarity of con versational language in a certain 50Cial class. He taped the passages and ployed them for his classes, explaining clearly what he was doing _and apologizing in advance and after for the offensive nature of the conversation. Many of his students have testified in writing to the fact that he does not use foul either inside or outside of fteclCJSil'oom; that he is not anti-religious, and that he does not over-emphasize sex. These testimonials are available far review if desired. Max O. Hocutt Born July 3, 1936, Berry, Alabama ( married ) Tulane University BoAo degree (With Honors) (Major and minor fields: Philosophy and Political Science ) Elected to Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Sigma Tau 1958 Tulane University MoAo degree 1958-60 Yafe University Ph .. D. dewee 1957-58 Tulane University part -tlme teaching as Grad .. Asst. 1957-58 Held Fellowship -Southern Fellowship Fund 1958-60 Held Yale Fellowship letters of recommendation were received from: Prof. Edward G. Ballard, Dept. of Philosophy, Tulane University Prof. James Ko Feibleman, Chmn .. Dept. of Phtlosophy, Tulane University Harold N. lee, Prof. of Philosophy, Newcomb College Prof. George A. Schrader, Prof. of PhllOSophy, Yale University Prof. John E. Smith, Prof. of Philosophy, Yale University Prof. Frederic 8. Fitch, Prof. of Philosophy, Vale University -2-

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Oo Jiocutt .W:.-e.nch talked to Prof. James K. Feibleman about Hocutt. Al I of these weae favorable No of any spec(f .ic e:flarges are made concern.1'19 Dr. Hocutt. <-ppalsals written of his teaching have bee(' renK.Jrlcably strong, pfoclng among the superier Instructors In the Uotiversity.. S'11dents seem be enthusiclstic about the way in which he them to think through philosophical qW;Sti-. for. themselves. are: 50Rl8 students who find it disconcerting to subiect tha ir thinking CHld beliefs to sef f 't.al)ISiao This, however, represents good teaching at the level. He Is deeply concerned obou.t religtous values that are d<>.ctrlnalre, lnsist-1.-g tbat .Wdents should examine such iudgmants for the111S9lvei;, rationally, and,;. reach their own conclusions their own faith, and philosophy of life'! This, all thinking must eventually do. a&cause of Or. Hocutt's a$ a scholar and pomoted in l962, to the rank 'of Asslsta.-t Professor. Thet recommendation of his chairman, division director, and the. two deans of Basic Liberal Arts was .. e) In case of John W .. Caldwell, who was by t.he President under dote of July 25, 1962, to take effeci" August 11. 1962. attached are: 1) 2) 3) 4) 6) Prof. Caldwell's letter of appeal Report from Dean .French as to how the appeal was handled Biograph teal of members of the Faculty Committee appointed tQ consider the Caldwell case Report to President Allen from James Ao Parrish, Chairman of the Committee on the Coldwell hearing Report of the Committee for Evaluating Caldll's suspension doted August 9, 1962 Report from A aA o Beecher, giving biogrophical dossier on Mr. Caldwell, copies of of recommendation, other informa tion obtained about Mr o Caldwel I at the time of appointment in 1960 Report on additim.xil investigation conducted personally by the President Investigations on Ro Wo Hugoboom and Rodger C,. Lewis are still in proEJ'eSS. wlll be made later. -3-

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. 0 r. John S A 11 en Off Ice of the President University of South Florida Tampa, Florida Dear Dr. Allen, August 7, 1962 I am In receipt of your letter notifying me that I have been suspended fl"om ll1Y position with the University of South Florida. I find It difficult to understand your decision, particularly In the absence of any direct accusations. and therefore ask that I be allowed to appeal this declston through the channels which have been established in the University system. cc: Sidney French Russe 11 Cooper A. A. Beecher Sincerely yours, S/John W. Caldwell

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August 16, 1962 MEMORANDUM CONFIDENTIAL TO: PRESIDENT JOHN S. ALLEN FROM: SIDNEY J. FRENCH. DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS RE: THE JOHN CALDWELL CASE I am submitting herewith the report and recommendations of the special committee appointed by me to conduct hearings in connee tton with the suspension of Professor John Caldwell. You should also know the procedures which were fol lowed. I discussed the membership of the committee with the Executive Committee, and separately with Dean Cooper and Dr. Beecher. It was obvious that we did not have a standing con111ittee to handle this job. Kr. Chambers felt that his Personnel Committee was not qualified or Intended to conduct hearings at the presidential level. The Committee on Educational Problems of the Senate was not established to perform this function. The following guide Jines were used in selecting the special committee: 1. There should be no one on It from the Fine Arts Division. 2 It should be representative of the whole University. 3. It should have no member of rank lower than Mr. Caldwell. 4. It should not lru:lude members whose major duties were administrative. The committee appointed con&isted of the foUowlng members: Professor James Parrish, Chairman Pro fessor James Ray Profess0r Harris Dean Associate Professor Pau1 Givens Associate Professor Gene Kctlung following formal request for the hearing, received at 9:30 A.M., Monday, August 6th. I called the proposed committee together at 11:00 A. M. to inform it of the job to be done. The Committee was to hear all the evidence avallabte, to go beyond this where it seemed necessary to do so and hear other "'itnesses, and to submit its recommendation to the Presldant.

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11Et>RANDUM CONFIDENTIAL RE: JOHN CALOW LL CASE PAGE TWO I provided the Committee wtth the Universitys tape recording of John Ca1dwe111s hearing before the Johns Committee. I checked with Broward Culpepper and Baya Harrison to determine if other evidence which we did oot have was available. (There was none.) I provided the Committee with Mr. Sta11worth1s confidential statement to you concerning the Caldwell hearings before the Johns Committee. At the suggestion of Hr. Harrison who had cheeked with Mr. Hawes concerning additional evidence, t requested from the State Police Office In Lakeland that Officer Dan Futch be permitted to COflle before the Committee to tel 1 about his arrest of Kr. Caldwell In the Polk County incident. I did not attend any of the Cosrmittee meetings but conferred quent1y with the Chairman as the hearings proceeded. The COR1111ittee went to work immediately. In my judgment they did a competent and highly conscientious job. They first listened to the tape. They heard the Po11ce Officer. investigated a reported incident at the Ca>US View Motel, heard several witnesses and spent some time with Mr. Caldwell. The proceedings \ltt!re completed by Friday, August 10th. The report was turned over to me on August 13th since t was at:tay o" the 10th.

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/ ( L BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE MEMBERS OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO CONSIDER THE CALDWELL CASE Note: Members of the Committee were selected on the basis of the following Ct.'ita"ia. l o To represent a cross-section of the University. 2o To include no administrative officers. 3. To include no one of lower rank than Professor Caldwell. 4. To include individuals of recognized good juggment and who were recognized on the campus as level headed1i con scientious and without any known bad habits. Curiously enough it turned out that all are members of Methodist churches but denominational affiliation played no part in the selectiono L,AMES PARRISH., Chairman,, Dro Parrish joined the University faculty in 1960 as Associate Professor of English. In Julyo 19620 he was promoted to the rank of Professor and appointed Chairman of the Course in Functional English. Dr,, Parrish was born in Auburno educated in the schools of that city and received the B.s. degree from the University of Auburno His graduate work for the M.A. and Pho D. degrees was done at Florida s tate University. He taught at Auburn1Air University and Western Illinois Uni versity before coming to the University of South Floridao He holds the rank of Colonel in the United States Air Force Reserve. He is a member of the Methodist Churcho married and has two children. He is regarded on the campus as conservative, level headedo and steady, and was asked to serve as chairman. Age 470 HARRIS DEAN(} joined the faculty of the University of South Florida in February0 19610 as Professor of Education. He had previously

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES t1 continued. served at Florida State University as Professor and Department Head in Education since 1948. His work as Chairman of the Secondary School Commission of the Southern Association is well known in Florida and throughout the South. He was born in Indiana6 received the B. Ed. degree from Illinois State Norm.al University and the graduate degrees of M. ed. and Ed. D. from the University of Illinois. He taught in the public schools of Illinois and at Ball state Teachers College before ccming to Florida State University. He is married, the father of two teenage children and the family betlongs to the Methodist Church. He served in World War I:t achieving the rank of Lt. Commander in the Navyq and is presently a retired member, USNR. Dr. Dean is very highly regarded as one of Florida0s outstanding leaders in secondary education. He is quiet, un assuming, and conservative. Age, 53. joined the University of South Florida faculty as Associate Professor of Botany a year before the University opened. Durinq the year 1959-60, he was carrying on Botanical rese8rch at Chinsegut Hill under a grant to the University. Dr. Ray was born and reared in Starkvilleq Mississippi. Be received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Mississippi State University and the Ph. D. degree from Illinois. He served as instructor, Assistant Professor and Associate Professor of Botany at Mississippi State from 1946 to 1959. In July0 1962, Dr. Ray was promoted to the rank of Professor and appointed Chairman of the Basic Studies course in Biologyo He served in the United States Navyo reaching the rank of Lt. Commander and is now in the inactive reserve. He is married, has four children, and the family belongs to the Methodiert Church. He served as a YMCA Director at Mississippi State University. Age, 44. GENE Es MeCUJNG4 was born in Texas. He received his B.A. and M.A. deqrees from Hardin-Simmons University. He is a C.P.A : 1 -2-

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I I : BIOGRAPHIC SKETCBES0 continued. Prior to coming to the University of south Florida in 1960, he had taught at Hardin-simmonsu Arkansas Polytechnic College, and West Texas State College. He served in the Air Poree, starting as a private and reaching the rank of Captain. He was medically discharged with wounds in both legs. He is married, has two children and the family belongs to the Methodist Church. He worked bis way through college, has worked as a laborer in the oil fields, and in drafting and geoloqical oil work. Age, 41. PAUL GIVENS, was born in west Virginia, received the B.A. and M.A. deqrees from Peabody and the Ph. D. degree from Vanderbilt. Prior to joininq the Univexsity of South Florida faculty as Associate Professor of Psychology in 1960, he had taught at Lawrence College, 1949-51 and Birmingham Southern, 1953-60. He is married and has four children. The family belongs to the Methodist Church. He has served as a camp counselor. He served in the United states Navy, 1943-46. He is the Chairman of the University of South Florida Committee on Xnstruction. Age, 39. SJF 8-30-62

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August 29, 1962 REPORT TO PRESIDENT All.EN FROM JAMES A. PARRISH ON THE JOHN W. CALDWELL HEARING The speclal conmlttee Investigating the suspension of Kr Caldwell first listened, at four o clock Monday, August 6. to the tape of Mr. Ca 1 dwe i I's appearence before the Johns Committee. Although the tape runs for less than an hour and a half the comnlttee met unt11 nearly seven octock, playing back passages that were not clear the first time and discussing the Issues raised. Four specific Items were eq>hasized by the Johns Conmittee: Mr. Ca1dweJls action in the case. Hr. Calchtcelta trip to Tallahassee w1th and other students. Mr. Cald\fell's arrest by the Highway Patrol in Polk County. Hr. Caldwell s Intervention In the elopement of and In addition, Dean French at our first meeting and in tater conferences with me said we should also consider Mr. Caldwe11'5 general conduct. After listening to the tape, the committee members expressed a Sentiment to this effect: "If this is alt there is, It Isn't enough to justify dfsm,SNI ."But to pur-sue al 1 of these matters as best we could, we met again on Tuesday aftemo0n. At this time we talked to Officer Dan Futch of the State Patrol, who arrested Mr. Caldwelt in Polk County in August of 1961. Kr. Futch, in an unfavorable report0 said that of the approximately six thousand persons he has arrested, Mr. Caldwelt '-' was one of a dozen on whom he ha& had to use force. He believed that Mr. Calchllell. after walking around the cart .,,as gettin g ready to hit him. Mr. Caldwell in hla Interview stated that he thought he could have beaten the charge of resisting arrest but that the less publicity the Incident received the better. Extenuating cf rcumstances surrounding Mr. Caldwell's attitude toward the arresting officer seemed wel 1 worthy of consideration by the committee. Another traffic incident involving Mr. Caldwell was mentlc:>ned on the Johns tape recording. Because the Johns Conmlttee did not spend much time on this Incident, we did not consider It of sufficient importance to Include In the formal report. On second thought, I feel that the outcome of this Incident is worth lncludlng tn this supplementary report. On October 5, 1960, Mr. Caldwell ran into a stalled truck aUeged1y without lights. at Fifty-sixth street and Fowler Avenue. The fact that on January 20, 1961, the Insurance company, In a negotiated settlement. paid Mr. Caldwell $2.500 damages indicates that he was not at fault In this lncJdent. After talklng to Officer Futch, the committee next talked to Dr. Margaret Fisher, who knew 8ftd Although Dr. fisher's account of Caldwe11 's reporting of the episode involving Mr. was some\fdiat murky, she apparently was mre expHclt than the account In the paper indicated she was before the committee. She cannot remember Mr. CalcM&11's te.I!ing her about n's c.oa.,lalnt against Mr. Teske. but she has a vague recoJlectlon of telling Dean Johnshoy about It. She said th&t this would be the most llke1y procedure,slnc:e Dean Johnshoy at that time counseling "r. in regard to hls other difflcultles: his grades (all Fs) and his stealing of University property. She added that It \'laS possible that a report of this sort might have been handled by Dean Johnshoy without a record being made. Dr. Fisher, furthermore. Included lylng as another of Mr. 's faults. 1_,,-... Since this unrellabl Hty was also to Mr. Caldwel 10 bis reluctance to 'accept Mr. s account of Hr. Teske1s homosexual advances seems understandable. The committee next asked Dr. Fisher about her evaluatlon of She reported that In Karch or April of 1961 Mr. and a student,

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"" REPORT TO PRESIDENT ALLEN RE: THE JOHN W. CALDWELL HEARING PAGE TWO came to her to express concern about gossip that labeled them both as homosexuals. They denied this charge and a short time later they were In fact secretly married. Mr. Ca1dwe11 a1so knew they \
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0 REPORT TO PRESIDENT ALLEN RE: THE JOHN W. CALOWELL HEARING PAGE THREE One Item which did not appear in any report was nevertheless checked Informally by a member of a conmittee. This was the Inquiry directed to Mr. Stallworth by the manager of the Campus View Hotel. The manager wondered who Mr. Caldtdell was he, brought by checked In there the night Mr. ca1c1we11 and his wife separated. Sllghtly suspicious, he observed Hr. Caldwell during hla stay there and found nothing out of the ordinary. As a personal Inquiry I asked Dr. Chris Kiefer, who worked In Hldsurmners Nlsht Dream In the SUl'ID8r of 1961, whether he had observed any .thing out-of-the-ordinary al"OCD'ld the theater. He replied negatlvely. It might be that Jack Fernandez, Max Hocutt, and Don Dougherty of the Library l*>uld al I substantiate Or. Kiefers view (al I of whom have been 1n theater proctuetlons.) The most unpleasant moinent of the hearings came ""1en Mr. Calct.11 wanted to see the "charges" against him. Even though I had a copy of the docment from Mr. Stallworth which Includes the word ''Charge." Dean French and I did not feel we should let him re8' this. It did not satisfy Hr. Caldwell to tell him that Me tere working on thl: genera I charge set forth in your letter to him and the. l111p I led contained In the tape. Later that aftemoon t c:.al1ed him, and he Dr. Givens. Both of us told him In effect that he had been suspended because : of conduct. generally unbecoming a college professor and because of the four charges given above. Having talked with Mr. Caldwell from nine to almost twelve, the committee discussed untl I 1:30 the sc:ope of our recommendation. From a brief orlginal draft, prepared Wednesday afternoon, we decided after several rewritings and expansions, ...ttlch took most of Thursday, to expand our discussion of Item 2 to Its present form. In concluslon, I think most members of the committee thought that Mr. Calchell's arrest In Polk County was the major Item on the tape. But we felt that, as IA discreet as this was, Mr. Catmi.en should not be charged for this one derellctlon, especlaUy since he has appare.ntly been working to solve his drinking problems as 'llMll as his marltal situation. The coamlttees reconmendatlons were based on three and a half fairly ful I days of work on this 4;a&e (approximately eighty man hours.) With 111Dre ti and with train ed investigators. we could have produced a recommendation based Oil more evidence. lut within the limits of what we knew. we believed unanimously that Hr. Caldwell should be reinstated. James A. Parrish 3-

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REPORT T O : FROO:: August 9, 1962 PRESIDENT JOHN S. ALLEN IBE CCMMITTEE FOR EVALUATING MR. JOHN CALJ:MELL'S SUSPENSION At the request of Sidney J. F rench, Dean of Academic Affairs, University of South Florida, this conmittee has considered the evidence made available to it pertaining to the suspension of John Caldwell from the staff of the University of South Florida. First we shall present our findings on the two items in Mr. Stallworth's memorandum to you dated May 29, 1962. Item 1. That Caldwell received a direct complaint from a student charging overt homosexual act on student by James Teske, member of Educational Resources staff, a n d that Caldwell failed to report this to his superior and thus no investigation of the matter was made. Of Item l, the conmittee concludes that there is no indication that Mr. Caldwell acted irresponsibly in view of the evidence reviewed by the coamittee. On the contrary, the conmittee feels that Mr. Caldwell's handling of the situation was directed toward the welfare of the student and it seems reasonable that he would question the veracity of the student's report. Item 2. That Caldwell, after having been told by various students that student was homosexual and after having told that he (Caldwell) did not want any "fairies" around his theatre and thus to stay away from it, spent the night with student in a motel room in Tallahassee. charges

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President Allen Page Two August 9, 1962 that duri ng that night Caldwell said, "If a homosexual friend of mine came to me for homosexual action, I couldn't turn him down." Assuming the facts in sentence one of Item 2 to be true, there is no proof of irresponsibility inherent in them. A number of con-siderations must be applied: First, after he had been warned by Mr. Caldwe ll, later told the director and Dr. Fisher that he was not a homosexual. Second, before going to Tallahassee, he had married. Third, Mr. had worked extremely hard on the theatre crew and the other students wanted him to make the trip to Tallahassee to read plays submitted to the Dowling Foundation. In another sense, it may have been a responsible act for Mr. Caldwell to room with on the possibility .that Mr. had lied to him and Dr. Fisher regard-ing homosexual tendencies. Against this possibility, by rooming with Mr. Caldwell could keep Mr. under surveillance and away from other students. Mr. Caldwell categorically denies the accusation in sentence two. On both items the committee took into account the character of Mr. Mr. Hadley has been described as "unsavory," "irresponsible," and "inconsistent," by Dr. Margaret: Fisher. The -collIIlittee also considered reports of Mr. Caldwell's behavior which might substantiate the charge of "conduct unbecoming a college professor."

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President Alle n Page Three August 9, 1962 Specifically the conunittee examined the following two incidents: Mr. Caldwell's arrest in Polk C ounty o n charges of public drunkenness and resisting arrest (without violence). His role in the attempted e l opement o f and In regard to his arrest, the cormnittee held a personal interview with Mr. Dan Futch, arresting officer in the case. Mr. Futch indi-cated that Mr. Caldwell had been drinki ng and was belligerent. While normally it is difficult to understand such behavior, there were extenuating circumstances in this situation. Mr. Caldwell had just been informed by the driver of the car of a personal matter that made him extremely irritable. Thus, when Officer Futch spoke to Mr. Caldwell he was in an emotional state that made h i m quite hostile. It appears that he too k out h i s anger at the world at large on the highway patrol man. Mr. Caldwell stated that this episode constitutes the only one in his life of which he is genuinely ashamed. Although the cormnittee agrees that Mr. Caldwell was indiscreet in this incident, it does not believe that the incident is sufficiently serious to justify suspension from the University faculty. The committee next pursued with Mr. Caldwell the problem of maintaining the proper moral tone in his theatrical work. Mr. Caldwell stated that he had been constantly vigilant to keep his drama work free from homo-sexuals, adding that he believed his theatre to be the cleanest theatre in the United States in this regard. At the same time, he said that

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President Allen Page Four August 9, 1962 during his first year on the staff he drank too much. 11lis derived from a tumultuous domestic situation, now ending in divorce, and his consequent reluctance to go directly home after work It seems reasonable that the long hours Mr. Caldwell spent in initiating the theatre program here at a new University also contributed to his emotional stress. He said that he had discussed his drinking problem with his superiors and that since the first of the year he had drunk alcoholic beverages only moderately. 11le conmittee is inclined to think that this problem had been resolved. lbe last matter dwelt on at length on the tape recording was the attempted elopement of two students, and lbe conmittee concluded that in this matter Mr. Caldwell had acted in a responsible manner to prevent these two young people from making a serious mistake. In investigating the validity of the information against Mr. Caldwe l l the committee talked to Officer Futch and to Dr. Margaret Fisher ( i n regard to Items 1 and 2),in addition to reviewing the tape recording of the Johns Committee and conducting a personal interview with Mr. Caldwell. Mr. Caldwell was handicapped in his interview because of his ignorance of the specific charges directed against him. Moreover, Father Fred Dickman appeared as a character witness for Mr. Caldwell and as his personal counselor. He Gdnfirmed that Mr.

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President Allen Page Five 'August 9, 1962 Caldwell, whom he has known since college, has had serious domestic trouble. He unequivocally stated that Mr. Caldwell is a worthwhile person who is currently making progress in resolving his difficulties. In view of these conclusions, the coumittee respectfully reconmends that the suspension of Mr. Caldwell be rescinded. (1/am.es A. Parrish, Chairman : ; ---7 "' f : r '-4 -.... .... .,,. /t-t,....t -e:-i,.. Paul R. Givens I --p z.-Z-;:;?. a ris W. Dean /

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September 7. 1962 MEMORANDUM TO s President John So Allen FROM: A. A. Beecher RE: JOHN W CALDWELL I am attaching herewith copies or correspomence an.i some notes on telephone conversations I had prior to recomnending Mr. Caldwell to 10u aa a st.arr member at the University. In looking through 'tq file0 I tJnd I do not have notes on the long dist.anee telephone oomersations with Dr. mastrom, Head or the English Depart.ment, and Dr. Oppenheimar, who I beline 18 Dean of the Liberal Arts College at the University ot U>uisville. I do recall asking them the same questions as those asked ot President Davidson and that their answers helped me to decide reco .. mending Mr. Caldwell to you. I also want to assure JOU that it bas always been my policy not onq to haTe written recommendations from previous employers but also to baTe telephone conversations with them and at least two other members or their start. This, along with tun dossiers f'rom placement services am personal il)terriews with the candidate and his spouse, are common procedures before any recommendations are made. Ao Ao Beecher AAB/bc

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1923 BIOQRAPB".CCAL SKETCH ON JOHN WALDROP CALDWELL September 7,, 1962 Bom September Winter Haven, P'lorida. 19ll-l Graduated Lake Wales High Sohoolo In the Summer of 1941, his back was broken in a horse riding accident which confined his activities for several months. 1942 In early Spring of 1942, his back was broken in a similar accident. In late SUDllller of that year, he was employed by the Shell Oil Ooropany or Winter Haven driving an oil truoko 194) Sworn into the United States Army in January, 19430 Serial Number 34.541.($1, Basic training was at Camp m.anding and Oamp Swift; the latter located in Austino 'l'exas. Assigned to ASTP where he studied at the following institutions: Texas A&M, Syraeuse University, and the University of D.linoiso These assignments lasted about one and one half' '3ears after which he was assigned. to Camp Crowder Missouri as a cryptogra pher in the Signal Corps. Tbe remainder or bis A.rut$' servioe was in the Pacific Theater and he was diS.Cbarged f'rom the .Ar'lf'l5' in March0 1946. 1946 Returned to Winter Haven, ll'lorida. In the meantime. his K:>t,her bad d1ed; his Father bad moved to San Franoisoo. Deciding that he wanted u, go to college ard that he would need financial help, he went to live with his Unole, The Reverend Pindell Manning0 Rector of the Episcopal Churoh in BaJ:timora, where from the SUllllOOr of 1946 through December of that year, he worked for the Veterans" Administrationo 1947 Januaryu 1947 -enrolled at the tf.l'iive1"'sity or The South at Sewanea wheie he graduated in Juneo 1949 with high bonors0 majoring in EnglfSh Literature and minoring in -Philosophy. An Aui1t living in Winatchee., Washington, who had given him financial assistance during f"1 his college days, invited him to vi.sit her after his graduation from Sewanee in the \___.. Summer of 19490 She also financed a pack horse trip through the Rockies as a gradua ... tion present.

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Page 2 John Waldrop Caldwell 1949 Bi mr:peoted enrollment in the Yale Graduat.e School in the Fall of 1949 was rupted bJ' a telephone call troa bis Dean at Sews.nee inviting him to return to that institution to teaoh Speech and 'theatre on a one year assignment. 19.50 In September, 1950, he entered the Graduate School at the Univers1:t7 of lbrth Carolina where in August, 19.51 he received his Ml Degree in Dramatic Art. In December, 19SO, he Jlal'l'iecl Helena Boellaard. 19.51 .. larolled at Val'Jderbilt University tor 1'1.rther stud7 tmile at the same time acting ae Teolm1cal Director for the NashvUle Comunity Playhouse which posit.ion he held witn the Spring of 1953. 1953 llo't'ed to Lake Wal.ea, Florida where he was :invited by the Passion Play Theatre to produce his play FLORIDA AFLAMi. In October, 1953, he moved to Satev Harbor, norida, where the Pinellas County Commissioners bull t an outdoor theatre especially for the production ot his plaJ' FLORIDA AFLAME. 1954 After the theatre had been built am the contracts let for the wintel' season ot 1954-.5.5, he, along with his wUe, sailed for a three months vacation in Europe. In the Fall of 1954, returned to Safety Harbor for preparation of the production of his play. 1955 Janua.170 1955, FLORIDA .AFLAME opened and ran for 12 weeks. Because or except1onallJ' cold weather and a poor tourist season, the show lost money am was abandoned. In June, 19SS, he nturned to Nashville where he was commissioned b7 the sam Davis Jti.storica1 Society to write a play on the lite ot Sam Daviso '?he play was later (-.,., anti tlecl THE BANKS or JORDAN. In August, 1955, he was invited to X.Ouisville, Kentucky as a consultant on the problems of the Universitq. ot Loui8Ville Drama Department and the Loui8'11lle Little

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Page 3 r,,--. Jolm waJ.drop 'Bleat.re. Soon after tbs report was made, he was invited by Dr. Pbilip Dav1dson, President of the UniftrSity ot Louisville, to accept a position as Director ot the Un1vers1:t-7 'lbeatre, Director of the LouilVille Little Theatre, ard Superv1s1ng Direotor ot the Louisrille Playhouse. Be continued in this pos1.tion until the Sumner of 19.'1. During t.bis period, his professional work drew national accl.a1m. Be was elect.i President ot the SoutJieastern Theatre aonterence. Be env181onecl and promoted a theatre circuit 1n the "provinces outside of New York Clq producing new plays b'1' or playwrights. He was appointed to the Ford Foundation Conterence on Comnmnicat1on in the American Theatre. Because of these and other successes, ba asked for a leave or absence from bis Uni:nrsity' ot Iou1sv11.le assignment and went t.o Nsw York City to produce pl.a.J's there am, bopetul.].T 1 on the road urder the sponmrship of "Lin-Well Productions, a a company formed 'bJ' bimaelt and Mr. George Hamlin. 1960 In Janaa17, 196o, having heard of the University ot South Florida, he came to Tampa tor a private interview. Receiving so. encouragement, he and his wite took residence 1n Blbson Park. On JamJal7 29, 196o, he was ottered an appointmant as Associate Pl'ofenor at the Univwait.7 of Sout.b FlOrida tor the academi.C year beginning September l, 1960. Between January 29th and Ma7 15th, he spent part time 1n Bew York dis90l.Y1ng his com1.1mnt11 there and working part time planning tJJ.e Theatre Arts program at the Un1versiv of South norida. From May' 15, 1960 through June 30, 1960, he was retained b1' the Un1verait7 of South Florida as a 1'll1 time consultant. During the 111>11ths ot Jab' and August of the same )'8al", he was 1n New York City making t1ml dissolution of his comndtments there. Ba bas been on continuous appointment at the til1Ters1ty of South Florida f'l'om September 1, 1960 to August 11, 1962.

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.. -THE NE\V DRAMATISTS COMMITTEE {l'-&1,4./A/_,t' JAN 6 1960 ONE THIRTY WEST FIFTY STH E ET N E W YOlUC 19, N. Y. PLAZA 7-6960-61 re.rid cnt HOGER L. STEVENS C/1oin11on of the Board HOWAlU> LU."DSAY MA..'\."WELL ANDERSON llOllEHT AND ERSON RUSSEL CROUSE OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN II :i.mss HAIIT JOSEPH J.."RAMM o'HARRA ELMEn RICE lllCHAlU> RODGERS I l\OBERT E. SH[RWOOD JOHN F. \VHAfTON i ; 1,;x ccutivc GEORGE IiAltil-IN '.t' '/"lie Committee" PLAN FOR PLAYWRIGHTS SiaD U. J. WHITING ELSA RAVEN 11URIAM BALF JACJC BOSTICK ROBERT ELLENSTEIN JANET PERKINS '-" WILLIAM DA VlDSON Plan Projecu I Thl'atrc Admissions II Craft Discussions III Production Observance IV 1 "11e Elinor Morgenthau New Dramatist Workshop v Nation-wide New Play Circulation January 3, 1959 Dr. A. A. Beecher Director of Division of Fine The University of South Florida 349 Plant Avenue Tamp a F I or id a Dear Dr. Beecher, took the liberty of calling the University this morning and asking an appointment to see you sometime on .IJ:Lv__r_s_d..a.y_. As your duties there have just begun, I know that you wi 11 be quite busy, and so I wt l t attempt to make this letter as informative as possible in order to conserve as much of your time as possible during our act u a I in t er v i ew. While in Washington last week, I was informed by a number of friends that the university of South Flortda was opening next fal I, and that there was an opening in the department of Dramatic Arts. I am, for many reasons, interested in this position. At present, I am on a one year leave of absence from The University of Louis vi I Ii, where I serve as Chairman of the Drama Department, and also as Director of The Louisville Playhouse MY leave was granted by The University to give me an opportunity to direct STRANGERS IN THIS WORLD off Broadway, and to co-produce, with George Ham I in, THE KIDS on Broadway. Both of plays are original scripts which I directed and produced int he the a t r e at Lou i s v i I I e. I am per son a I I y co mm i t t e d to the idea of getting major American writers, not particularly tn the field of the theatre, to write for the American stage. After working for the past several years with a group composed of Robert Penn Warren, Francis Fergusson,_ Catherine Anne Porter, Caroline Gordon, Brainerd Cheney, Andrew Lytle and about ten other writers, I came to the conclusion that I did not know enough about the Broadway stage, economic and political, to really accomplish what I was attempting. I' have at least concluded that the hope of the American theatre I ies in plays written outside of New York, by writers of imagination with something to say about our culture, who are creative thinkers; and in having these plays produced with perfection in a provincial theatre where the play's power (or failure) can be proved before it is forced to undergo the political and economic pressures necessari Iv attendant upon a Broadway production. I believe that I know enough about Broadway now to understand what is happening here, and enough about the mechanics to get a Broadway production should we produce a play of sufficient magnitude to interest \ "To enco14rage and tl1melt>p ''"'new t1ller:l 11f Anrnrir.u" I

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.. ... Dr. A. A. Beecher, Cont'd: While I was President of the South Eastern Theatre Conference two years ago, I initiated a 1 New Play Project which is now tn its first year of operation. Many theatres cannot afford to do a new play, because they face the economic difficulty of sel I ing tickets to an unknown play by an unknown playwright. Our idea was to get a number of theatres (we aimed for a hundred productions and it looks .as if we will make it) to do the same new play during the same year. The attendant pub I icity, both regional and national would relieve much of the uncertainty. Furthermore, with that number of guarant ed productions, we could invade the Broadway playmarket. As Chairman of a committee consisting pf, of Paul Green, Samuel Selden of the University of North Carol Leighton Ballew of the University of Georgia, Bob Telford of th e Virginia Museum Theatre, Burnett Hobgood of Catawba Col lege,and the l 'ate James S. Helms of The University of Virginia, I came to New York and began collecting scripts from agents and playwrights. We also solved another recurrent problem in our f i n an c es Aft er f he p I a y w a s f i n a I I y chosen we made an arrangement with the playwright whereby the conference would collect the royalty payments as producer, and keep 30% of them as the Qroducer's share. This has given us a considerable amount of' other projects, and to meet unexpected expenses, and with which to pay the inevitable annual deficit. The New Play Project has received wide pub! icitY and serious attention. In October, I was invited to address the South Western Theatre Conference in convention at San Antonio, Texas on the idea of the Project, and that Conference has now moved to adopt the plan in their Region. I gave two addresses last week in Washington on the New Play Project. (I do think of other things, though tt mustn't sound like it, for I was also Chairman of a Panel Discussion on UNDERGRADUATE TRAINING, RAl\GE .Al'JD STANDARDS, which, thanks to the britl.tance of Dr. Leighton .. Ballew of The University of Georgia turned out to be an exciting and stimulating session.) I was a member of a group which the formation of the American Community Theatre Association under AE'TA auspices, and am a member of the new Board of Directors of that organization. Last month, I was invited to attend a meeting in New York at The Ford Foundation together with twenty two other people from various professional, educational and community theatres throughout the United States. The meeting turned out to be an investigation tnto the lack of communication within the American Theatre, and, as a body, we formed the Ford Foundation Program f o r t h e I n c r ea s e of Co mm u n i c a t i o n i n th e Ame r i can Th ea t r e I t really isn.'t that ridiculous, and promises to be most helpful to everyone c'Oii'Ce r ned. If you wl 11 pardon a personal remark, after al I of the use of the pronoun I in the above, I'm embarrassed. But never a pp I i e d f o r a po s i t i o n b e f o r e -an d I am so r e I y a tt em p t e d t o begin saying "it did

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. c. .. 3. Dr. A. A. Beecher, Cont'd: I have written a number of plays, two of which have been produced. One of them ran two years, and sti 11 lost money, which is a difficul.t, but not impossible, feat. Currently, I am writing a text book: THE HISTORY OF DR Mv1 AT I C CR I T I C I SM, a n d am de s p e r a t e I y I 6 o k i n g f o r ai co I I ab o r a to r with a good Greek and Latin background it will be William Arrowsmith of the University of Texas who af.so happily combines a thorough knowledge of the tbeatre with his unusual abilities asa classical scholar and translator. Background: I was born in Winter Haven, Florida. I was graduated from Lake Wal es High School in 1941. I matriculated at Sewanee, The Universi tv of The South in 1 .946,. a'f'ter 4 years in the Army, and was graduated, Optime Merens, in' 1949. I 1 received an M.A. from the University of North Carolina in Dramatic Arts in 1951. (My B. A. was in English Literature, and I won the Guerry Medal for Attainmen.t In English literature at Commencement) I then spent two years of post-graduate work at Vanderbtlt University in the Engltsh Department limiting my pursuits somewbat to dramatic I lterature. I have taught at Vanderbilt as a Fellowship Instructor, at and since 1955 at The University of Louisvi lie. My i n t e r e s t i n a ct u a I p I a y s i s I hope e c I e c t i c bu t c en t e r s a round th e E I rz ab e th a n t h ea t re and n e w p I a y s I 'm some w ha t bored by most of what is current Iv cal led "Broadway," and I am the world's worst director of Greek Drama, a title which I am an.xious to relinquish if I can only learn something more about it. I have directed almost forty plays at louisvi I le. Have also been quite active in the Outdoor Historical Drama movement. ) am thirty six vears old, married, and have one son who is four years old. You may inquire about me: Paul Green, Chapel Hill, North Carolina I have directed a new play of his, have served as Assistant Director 6n one of his outdoor dramas with Sam Selden for a summer, and have worked on endless comtttees, etc. with him. Robert Penn Warren, Reading Road, Fairfield Connecticut have worked with him on various projects, and was engaged in an attempt, which failed, to get a Broadway production for a new play of his. Dr. Philip Davidson, President, University of Louis vi I le, louisvi I le, Kentuckv have worked under him since 1955, both tn harmony and adversity, though little of the latter. Because of the peculiar situation at I was responsible directly to h i m r a t h e r t h an to t h e De an of t he l...o I I e g e of Ar t s a n d S c i en c e s Dr. Leighton M. Ballew, Universi tv of Georgia, Athens, Ga Have worked with him very closely on South Eastern Theatre Conference affairs, and he succeeded me as President. We have also been involved in Southern Speech Association programming and in AETA.

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. () o 4. Dr. A. A. Bee ct1 e r, Con t d : If you des.ire, I can give you additional references. Since my schedule is somewhat uncertain at the moment, I am unable to say when I wi 11 be there, but wi 11 el ther wire you, or telephone you. It seems t ikely that I w i 11 arrive in Tampa from New York early Thursday morning, and wi I I have to visit you without benefit of sleep. My apologies for the 1 ength of this letter, but hope it will save you some time. 'tn the final analysis ..

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.. -0 Dr. A. A. Beecher Dean of the Division of Fine University of South Florida 349 Plant Avenue Tampa, Florida Dear Dr. John W. Caldwell % A. W Ward Babson Park, -JAN 1 3 1960 Our visit with all of you at Tampa was certainly a most enjoyable one, and if the present staff is an, y indication of what the final faculty is going to be like, The University of South Florida is off to an exhilanting birth and should rr osper and grow: with a vigor which will bring warmth and pride to the founders. Both Helena and I were much impressed with your plans and ideas and ftn joye
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.. 2. Dr. A. A. Beecher, Cont'd: (I hadn 1 t really intended to make a stock catalogue for you but as long as I've started it ) Draftsman's set for designer T-5 Bostich staplers Staples pliers cutters tin snips celastic & softener measuring tapes folding rulers -wrecking bars mitre box and saw scissors razor knives bolts, nuts, nails, tacks, glue, etc. Paint Room: initial stock of scenery paint double unit hot plate bucket: s whiting glue brushes Costume room: sewing machin e scissors initial stock of thread needles, pins, snaps, hooks and eyes, fasteners, safety pins, measuring tapes (a carefully planned request in the papers should bring in enough trim, buttons, and otherstuff from "grandmother's trunks" to last a good while.) I would imagine that such thing s as canvas and lumber could be budgeted for each show, thoug h it will be difficult at first where there is absolutely no backlog of used flats, door units, e ,tc. The initial purchase of make-up will be large, but then you need only purchase it for one year. The above list does not pretend to be complete, but a theatre can certainly be operated with tha_ t equipment. It can al so be operated with less, and some of the above items which are expendable can be purchased from the budget for the firs t year. As I told you, I admire the way in which you are setting up the Division, and think that it holds promise for a stimulating experience in the Fine Arts. But, in thinking back over our conversation, it occurs to me that I may have mislead you about my opinion on the faculty in the dramatic arts. Someone ls going to have to be the head of that group as soon as it gets larger than one person. It doesn't make any difference what you call him, but final authority in t:he theatre must always rest with one person, or absolute chaos results. The authority may never be used, and all. 'the better if it is not, but someone must shape the direction of the theatre, and formulate the plans, and look to tomorrow, or you have a which is going in all different directions at once. Yesterday I talked to Philip Davidson on ,the telephone, and he is writing to you about me. I have written to the other people,.-

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3. Dr. A. A. Beecher, Cont'd: whom I have listed as references, and asked theril to write to you also. Davidson and Harrison can speak about my, teaching abilities as I have taught under both of them. Charles Harrison was Dean at Sews.nee, has sines resigned, and is now Chairman of the Department of English Literature. Paul Green is a close personal friend of mine, whom I have worked with in various ways. At. Louisville, I directed the premiere of his THE FOUNDERS, which was finally produced the following summer in with the Jamestovm Festival in Williamsburg, Virginia. I was also the Assistant Director for THE CONFEDERACY which opened in Virginia Beach in 1958 so had considerable professional experience together. Leighton Ballew and I have worked together in AETA, SSA, and SETC, as officers, board members, panelists, etco George Hamlin is my partner in Ne. w York, and is thoroughly. familiar with my work in connection with new plays. If you want more references, please let me know, but I just asked about twelve people to to the Guggenhiem Foundation for me last year, and I don't want to have any of them listing their occupation as "Writing recommendations for John Caldwell." Seriously though, I shall be glad to send other references if you wish. I'll be here, with the exception of two _brief trips west until about the end of the month. My family, will, of course, be here until summer, so you can write me here at any time. We drove by the University after we left you, but didn't attempt to drive in. It looks enormous already! We then went to see the houses, saw yours as we drove past, and think that it is a gran"" ace. If we come there, we think that we will rent until we can find a place which we can't live without. W e really want several acres, and are willing to go further out in order to get a larger place. But we need room for dogs, and it won 1 t be long before we' 11 have to have a horse Charles. Well these are decisions that can be made later. Could you let me know when your decisions there will be .. ______. .......... made? I have been forced to tell one place that I will give them a definite answer by the first week in February. Then too, in addition to my o w n necessity for making a decision, if I should come to The University of South Florida, I will need ev-ery moment between now and September that I can get to make plans and preparations for the season there. 0

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. ) PreferenceTool () 1 l 1 1 1 l 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 .2 1 2 1 1 1 l 1 l 1 1 i' 2. l l 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 Hammer, Curved Claw Ham.rner, Stra:l.ght Claw Hammer, Curved Claw 8 @ .91 ea. Tuck Hammer Dunlap Tack Puller 7 pc Brace and_ j:?i t Set Wreckine Bars 2 @ .81 Cross Cut saw 2@ 3.71 Keyhole Savi Coping Saw Miter Box and Back Saw Four edge Plane Plane Draw Knife Utility 3 @ .89 Steel tape 501 Picke. t tape 10' Hardwood folding rule 3 @ .46 Steel Square Steel Square Combination Square 2 @ 1. 74 (1211) Chalk and_. plumb l"ine Steel letter stamps Wood level 24" Wood chisels Hand or Brea.st Drill (with 8 bits) G Clamps 2 ea. 211, 11 ", 6" G Clamps 11 ii Tin snips Punch Set, Pin, 5 pc 7 Piece Screwdriver set Automatic Return Screwdriver 2 @ 6.60 Auto Pliers, 2 @ .43 Linemen's Pliers 2@ 1.69 Electricians Knife 2@ 9K9478 1.70 Hack Saw Mill files, 10 inch 2 @ .64 Soldering Gun Adjustable end Wrenches 611,811,1011,1211 Electric Hand Saw Electric Sabre Saw Electric Drill Electric Drill Set, 17 pc 2-Wheel Band Saw, complete Craftsman Heavy Duty 8-Inch Bench Saw Vice Paint Sprayer Pain.t Brushes, 4" 4 @ 3. Paint Brushes,, 2 ea, 2",, 12", 111 Step ladder, 101 Step ladder, 101 9K3825 9K3827 9K3808 9K3802 9K3811 9Kh2483 99K6599C 99K3613C 9K3158 9K35l.i..l 99K36302C2 9K3740 9K3743 9K3678 9K9515 9K3900 9K3910 9K39116 99K39732C It 9K3954 9K3773 9K3792 9K39743 9K3187 9KL.246, 9K6667 II 9K4543 9KJ+285 9K4127 9K4141 9K4503 9K3192 9K9478 9K3562 9k3129 9K5380 9KJ083 99K2796C 9K27946 9k772 9K6711 99K2425L 99Kl3305N7 99K5181L JOK1435K2 30K3561 30K3561 30K2950N 30K2950N 1158 1158 1158 1158 1158 1159 1159 1160 1160 1160 : 1160 1161 1161 1161 1161 1162 1162 1162 1162 1162 1162 1162 1164 1164 1164 1164 1165 1167 1169 1169 1170 1170 1170 1171 1171 1172 1177 1184 1185 1186 1188 1192 1201 1204 843 852 852 Price 3.3h. 3. 34. 7.28 ;62 .44 10.59 1.62 7.42 1.17 1.18 31.10 2.98 7 .40 2.98 2.67 4.17 1.45 1.38 3.58 3.58 3.48 1.49 4. 75 1.79 2.36 7.21 5.00 5.00 1.97 1.80 2.58 iJ.20 .86 3.38 3.40 1.56 1.28 10.95 4.76 42.95 25.95 21.95 9.87 146.44 299.88 18.80 83.50 15.16 5.52 13.94 13.94

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r r Page 2, Tool list for Theat r e Unive r sity o f Florida ... c 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Paint palls 10 @ 6 0 Singer Sewing Machine, Rotary Head (not included In Sears Catalog) Single SpeeB Washer Ironinf board and cover Steam Iron Scissors 2 @ J.00 Pinking Shears Embro idery scissors 5" Bostitch of Ohio Guns, T-5 Tacker 2@ approx 10.00 ea,(not in Sears) Draftsman's for scene designer 30K2695 W26K6420N -11K640L 2 34K6205 2_5K2024 25K2001 25K2052 3K5066L 854 875 9 8 2 897 336 336 336 1031 6.oo 1)0. 00 169.95 14.94 15.95 6.oo 7.50 _2. 00 20000 . . . . Other items, expendable, which will be needed first year are: Make-up, initial order Geiatins, initial order Paint, Initial order Sewing room supplies (other than cloth) Canvas Lumber (will vary according to shows done) N a ils, screws, tacks, etc. Lighting crew supplies (cable, male and female plugs) $40.00 $125.00 $25.00 50.00 300.00 50.00 50.00 . . . . If there are going to be one set of and teazers for main stage, I would suggest that it be specified that they be black._Colored ones can almost never be used in actual production ..

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"'----.: -: -::--::: .-. : .. : 3. I .... r t.<..1,._ ,?t17r,:1 711 ... --, iy;-u'..t tuu:' ( )

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.;:: .. ---/. --.,. .---------=--.... __ ---..:---:. ___ .. __ __...._ -. .. .. -... .: .. : .. ,.. ... -.. :; .. ... ; J I I I -.. .... .. .. -.. 1 : 11l,\'il1 ;:. .. 1;1J, tUJ.() 1/1 /too .a-u..1e. c01 ift-L4z:-t. '((d..A..,1.,#_..,,A/ Wt.. rL -(L 'J1;.._j!4 ll.+.__ ..P.,..\(..C.(..'-t....t.,.1 CtL-< ..-.l tfA!-4- ..,t.. ; Ul.llt_ (t.. .. u ,"" .... q ,..,,V
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( esident _...,OBERT ANDERSON Chairman ol lho Board HOWARD LINDSAY Executive O i reclor GEORGE HAMLIN THEODORE APSTEIN MIRIAM BALF RUSSEL CROUSE O SCAR HAMMERSTEIN II MOSS HART JOSEPH KRAMM HENRY MORGENTHAU Ill M ICHAELA O 'HARRA PHILLIP PRUNEAU EUGENE RASKIN ELMER RICE R ICHARD RODGERS ROGER l. STEVENS JOHN f. WHARTON Adminislrollvo Sloll 8. J. WHITING ELSA RAVEN THOMAS ERHARDT Tho Commlllo .... Pu.N FOR PLAYWRIGHTS Pion Projecll I Theatre Admissions II Craft Dlscuulons Ill Production Observance IV The Elinor Margonlhau New Oramalisls Warbhap v Nation-Wide New Play Orculallan fl .t o (__,/J_,d4/), c,,lfl I '/ ...{) I THE NEW DRAMATISTS CO,MITTEE ONE TWRTY WEST FIFTY SIXTH STREET, NEW YORK 19, N Y. January 18, 1960 Dr. H. A. Beecher Dean, Division of Fine Arts University of South Florida 349 Plant Avenue Tampa, Florida Dear Dr. Beecher, INCORPORATEDJAN 20 1960 PLAZA 7-6960 Mr. John Caldwell has requested that I send you a recommendation for him. I understand that he is applying for a position at the University of south Florida. I have known Mr. Caldwell-for a period of approximately five years and have worked closely with him on both his projects in Louisville and New York. I know him very well as a person; I am well acquainted with his views, and I believe that I can make a fair estimate of his scholarly attainments. Without reservation, I consider Mr. Caldwell superior in all three of these categories. As a person, I have found Mr. Caldwell a man of excellent character, human perspicacity and zeal. His enthusiasm what he believes to be right and his devotion to a project seem almost unbounded. He is easy to work with and he gives much of himself. Mr. Caldwell's views and opinions are well and because he has a definite viewpoint toward his work, his aims and purposes have always appeared valid and practical. He has definitely evolved his own philosophy of the theatre and of teaching ; the plays he has directed and students he has taught reflect the stimulus of his viewpoint. As for scholarship Mr. Caldwell has covered his field extensively. In my estimation, one of the important criteria of a true scholar is his ability to relate his own to other fields; the then becomes a man of wisdom, not merely a man of "To encourage and develop the new playwriting talent of America"

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.,. ( ... Dr. H. A. Beecher -2 January 18, 1960 knowledge. Mr. Caldwell demonstrates this capacity in an always increasing degree. His breadth of understanding as a teacher indicates that little in the field of humanities is beyo!ld the scope of his attention. I know from talking wiitih them that his students find him an inspiring and wise teacher. My recommendation of John Caldwell is without reservatigns. I believe it would be next to impossible to find a better man for the position. GH/e Sincerely 1 -George Hamlin .Executive Director

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' .. "" .'I ,r l'J (} .. {l,i!J # E. UJ ti COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH 5EWANEE,TENNESSEE :l.l.J1 ,,lf .... ///;..,,r <. vr ..... _,., J (/ JAN 2 0 1960 DEPARTMENT Cl" ENQLl&H Dean A. A. Beacher Division of Fina Arts The University of South Florida 349 Pl:mt Avenue --Tampa, Florida Dear Dean Beecher: January 18, 1960 John w. Caldwill informs ma that he is applyin g to you for .a position in your Drama Department. This is to I haTe known him, and have remained in fairly elose touch with him, since I first joined the Sewanoa faculty thirteen years ago. I consider him the SOlllldest and tha most effective teacher of dramatic literature that I have known. His distinguished qualification is a capacity to grasp and to communicate the literary quality or a play, both to actors and to an audienci. Thus, although he is an acute student of stage resources and techniques, he seems never to become intoxicated with theatrical device as an end in itself. While John Caldwell was at Sewanee, first as undergraduate and then as instructor, I saw him produce such things as Dr. Faustus, Henrz IV Part I, Everyman. Just last year, I saw his production of Richard III. rn every instance, he has succeeded in stirring the imaginations of student performers. And I must acknowledge that I am greatly indebted to him for my own understanding of drama.tic There can be no question of his effectiveness as a teacher. His grasp and conviction become the community between him and his students. He is a tireless worker, and he naturally inspires effort in other persons. Mr. Caldwell's involviment with drama.tie writing and dramatic production is so energetic a vocation that its effects inevitably extend beyond the limits of a campus. H e has affected a whole region, and has, I think, served it most valuably. I should think that the opportunity provided him for usefulness at such a university as yours would be very groat. In my opinion, you would be fortunate to have John Caldwell as a member of your staff. Yours sincerely, Charles T. Harrison Chairman, Dipartment of English CTH:dd

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Dr. A. A. Beecher THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH AND DRAMA ATHENS, C E 0 R C I A January 14, 1960 Director, Division of Fine Arts University of South Florida 349 Plant Avenue Tampa, Florida Dear Dr. Beecher: ........... JA N 1 R !qso This letter is a recommendation for Professor John W. Caldwell who has applied for a position at the University of South Florida for next year. I have known John Caldwell for the past five years. During this time Caldwell has done a remarkable job at the University of Louisville and at the Louisville Playhouse, a community theatre. He wishes to be engaged entirely in educational theatre. The problems that faced him at the Louisvi.lle Playhouse were almost impossible. Not only was he the director of all the community theatre productions but was also responsible for the direction and staging of three classics each year by and for undergraduate students. In attempting to do these two jobs, Caldwell worked literally twenty-four hours a day. He is an eager, intense, driving personality with inventive resources and a great deal of enthusiasm and eagerness for hard work. When he was president of the Southeastern Theatre Conference, I worked with him as vice-president. In addition, the following year when I was president, Caldwell worked even harder. He is particularly interested in the development of new playwrights. He is largely responsible for the initiation and success of the New Play Project of the Southeastern Theatre Conference. Caldwell has an excellent academic background, a major in English from Vanderbilt University and a major (MA) in Dramatic Arts from the University of North Carolina ._9ne of Caldwell 's major limi .... can work 15.!-,?.1!..;!, f and .. .. Consequentmy, he has not helped his physlcai health in recent years because of the vast amount of work that he has undertaken. In view of your plans for the University of South Florida, I would recommend John Caldwell for the position of Director of Theatre because of his training, background, practical experience, and personl traits that have been enumerated above. We are all tremendously interested here in the plans 'for Fine Arts at t h e University o{ South Florida. Flook foward to meeting you in the near future. I hope that you are planning to attend the meeting of SETC in March and/or the Southern Speech Association meeting in Aprill If there is any further information that I can send regarding John Caldwell's very real abilities and potentialities, please let me know. Sincerely, Head, Department of Speech and Drama

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..... '---" UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE LOUISVILLE 8, KENTUCKY OFFICE OF TiiE PRESIDENT I. Dr. A. A Beecher Dean of the Division of Fine Arts University of South Florida 349 Plant Avenue Tampa, Florida. Dear Dean Beecher: Mr. John Caldwell tells methat he is applying for a position at the new University of South Florida and has asked me to write a letter of recommendation for him. I am delighted to do this. John is one of the most imaginative and creative people in university theater work I have known. His idea of commissioning new works was a dopted by the Southeastern Theatre Conference with notable results and has been adopted with some modification by the Ford in one of its recent programs. He has great drive and energy and is widely and favorably known throughout the collegiate theater world. In add.:i.tion to his professional qualifications, he is a delightf'ul person, and Mrs. Caldwell is charming. They will make a delightf'ul addition to any university PD:et / i JAN 2 5 1960

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PAUL GREEN Grtw:uoo d !?Md ClwjJd Hill J \ or tit Carolina _,I! &.d D / PAUL GREEN CHAPEL HILL NORTii CAROLINA ti-a.-.-_. ,,.< ,r; ; i b o ?..'-:....;;_. _; .t., JA N 2 8 1 96 0

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I V ,,, .... I \ ... Conf'eronce .... .. .. r 'J'Olm V C e.ldvsll, Hea d Louisette Rc!i:ier ( 'Tb.eat.r e Uni'ftra ty of Lcr.11sv1lle It'o_rnerly Hee.d, Naticr.,.J.l Service. -... ) P. .. Nc.tioncU. a!:d F eurt'1,.e .. -Otl:lf 1 ..... School'9f Yale Uniwroity Zelda F1chMd.l.ar 1 Producin3 Director >..rena Stage, Bll'rt French, Dil' ctcr The Civic Players .. Levin GG:tt 1 Director Univarsfty Uniwrsity ot Kimse.s Wiili'nm Vice President Catholic ot America B arnard Producing Director Un1'\"'a'reit1 University of Illinois Theodore Hof'f't1wl, Head Depart1!nt of Drama Carn egie I nDt1tute ct Technology Hm ard Ol-ms, Director Des Moinc13 Co:mmmity Playhc-..tS.a om.f:l.n Philbrick, '"':iwcutive of Speech an!\ trsa Stan.for d University Rober t Porterfield Fo un ... r oZ...d Dll'-ctor BQJ.ter TLeatre Cl Virginia John R eich, Head Goo1i.Tl'lrl M":!morial Theatre. Art Institute cf Cbi cego George Se.\.-age, Prof.esoor of Arte Unive rsity of hck Scism, Dfrector Th eatre 1 Okl&h o:Mi. Cit y Frencis -Sidlauslm s c:.l!l:irvsn Division of Boatoa Univ.;r ,ity Jules Irving, Managing Director Actor's Uarkehop, Son Fre.nc11co c. Lowell Leso Bead, S peec h an d Theatre Al-ts University of Utah JC. BlJ&> Director The Clevalud PayhoW3e Fleeiley, Curator OI> CollootiM New Yark Public Libre!..17 t.-.. L. l {evell Tm-rant, Director Eric Playhous e Robert Telf'ord Producer-Director The Virginia z ,useum Theatre ... Nina Ve.ne e Dire ,: .. ... Alle y Th .. a.tre, Houston r ; Robert Whitcha a d Produ cers' Th ;:;dtre, BI!d consuitant on the the&tcr to \ Lincoln Center for the Perform.in; roundo.tion Staff' I Hu.'!\ani ties and the Arts Proz.r0a r d1 d r I>'ic!" Aasociate Director Jc..ne 1>1c ly, Secrete.ry to Mrs. Tho!Jlllson ()Phyllis llor.atz, e ... cretary to. Mr. Lowry ,' .._, ... ..... """a w. M c."eil Lomy, Dire c t m ., Willie.a LcP .... 8.k, Vice Pre::iid.ant Marcia ThOV;pson, Progt"e.:i AsdstUlt ) ... ) l:, ,,,

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J Mr Joh&) w. Cald-'>Rll c/o A. w tYa;-d Babson Florida Dear Y.ir. 1 m wd.tins -.n cmfimation 01.zgo com:re:rsill.Uoo Thu:f'sdta.y in order to make explicit the tems cf you;r et UnivaraJ.ty of Scr.z.th Florida year will ba ctp?ointed es ea asocciate ?rofessor at a of $7000 for tha aeademie year 'beginning l, 1960. The appointment suot yat be conf1rmad by the Stats Boa.?"d of bu t th.ere be no diffi culty at this point Ve shall urant yw to t nko for t!ie University including both tlw drama::ic productiroSl and t heatre courses dll?iag the year. The p:recir;;e of the ba! wot"ked out a'ith Mr. chairman of the Fina Arts Divlsion we are slad add you of outr ftmily, know that the theatre tr!U yct.t:: leoo'!r:sM .. tJ9 s"ulU. vant yo a r ccr.m:ael frcm to Une during l'i.irid ... e9 mate ploos fer ne:t year' activity and l hope uill feel to call upon us tb.Gre are ways wura w can bei halI?ful. cc: Dr. Allen Mr. Beecher v Ri. Coopei'

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ft.B 2 1960 Dr. Ru-ssell M Cooper, Dean College of Liberal Arts University of South Florida Tampa, Florida Dear Dr. Cooper, John W. Caldwell % A. W. Ward Babson Park, Florida January 30, i 960 Thank you much for your letter of January 29th, in which you confirmed the terms of my at the University of South Florida. I am most delighted about the prospects for the University, and accept the appointment with great pleasure. With the exception of a brief visit to N e w York next week, I intend to be in Florida permanently now. I shol 'ld like to assure you of my interest in the entire University, and in the theatre in particular. I f I can be of any service to you during the coming months, please do not hesitate to call on me. I should like to take this opportunity to tell you how deeply impressed I am with the calibre of the staff of the University, and with your collective determination to triumph in meeting the exceptional opportunity which the .. foundation of this new University offers In looking through the program for the A merican Nat.ional ':l.1heatre and Academy assembly which is being held in New York next week, I note that George Izenour is also speaking, so I shall have an opportunity to discuss t h e theatre building vdth him. Sincerely yours, i

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9/11/62 Report on lavestigation Conducted by President Allen Personally on the John W. Coldwell Case It should be noted in Dr. Beecher's documentary on P,ofessor Caldwell that he included a thermofax copy of pencilled notations of his telephone conversation with President Davidson of the U,iversity of louisvtlle, before he nomi11C1ted Mr. Caldwell. HI& purpose was to determine Mr. Caldwell 'a status at the Uniwrslty of Louisville. The telephone comments were favorable. Dr. Beecher called the Dean at Louisville, and OM other person there, and got slmilar comments, but apparently did not keep In the flies his pencilled notations of the octual telephone conversations. Mr. C. Wesley Houk is a member of the Art faculty at the University of South Florldo, mad he visited the President to say that he has known Mr. Coldwell for 11 or 12 years. He was In Nashville when Ml. Caldwell came there as Technical Director of the Nashvtlle Community Playhouse in 1951-53. Mr. Coldwell came to Flortda to direct "Florido Aflame" ot Lake Wales, and later in Safety Harbor, (1953-55) and Mr. Houk came as Business ManoEJer of the venture. Mr. Houk cooftrms that Mr. Caldwell was at the University of Louisville from 1955-60. In 1960 when Caldwell came to the University of South, he and Mrs. Caldwell visited the Houks a couple of times at their home in Clearwater. m 1961, the Houks were Invited to the Caldwlls and went to their home when the playwright, Abel Plenn, was there. Mr. Houk reported that Caldwell has been married at least ten years and that, In his opinion, it has never been a happy marriage for either of the parties, and he feels that both are better off separatedo Mr. Houk has no evidence that Caldwell is or has been a homosexual, and could give no reason known to him for our not having hired Mr. Cofd\'Vell tn 1960. A report came to the President that Mr. Caldwell had a police record In Clear water, so I checked personally with Police Chief Booth of Clearwater. Mr. Booth checked the <;:learwater pol1ce records and also the Ptnellas County Sheriff's records, and reported back that there is no police record there on John Waldrop Caldwell. In the legislative Committee hearings, Mr. Hawes asked Mr. Caldwell a question about his having been in Miami and Coral Gables, and whether he had been known there by any other name, etc. Mr. Hawes went no further with this line of questioning. On September 4th, I called Mr. Hawes to determine the purpose of this question ing, to see if there was something further which the Committee knew and which did not come out In the hearing. Ml. Howes asked for time to check with tnvesti91tor Strlckland, and called me back within half an hour to report that Strickland thinks a rrofessor at the University of Miami said he had heard that Caldwell had been at a nldlt club known as the Cocoanut Grove. However, the responses that Mr. Caldwel I gave did not cause them to investigate further. He told me that they knew nothing 1) more on Caldwell tn Miami. The questioning seemed to be a "fishing expedition." '-.__/ -1-

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( \_ However, I checked through an official of the Dade County School System II\ the Miami and Dacie County pollc:e and sheriff's records, and found nothing that wa119fd confirm susp1 that John Waldrop Caldwel I has a police record In that area They did find a person by the name of Johnson Wlfliam Caldwell, who was 19 years of age In 1941 when he was wanted for esc:aptng"]oll Jn Texas. He was 6 feet tall, 1'ielghed had 11ght brown ha tr, blue 8)49$ This descrtptton could conc:elvably flt Mr. Caldwell. However, a later report from Dade County Indicated that they had discovered that Johnson William Caldwell, described above, was electrocuted In CaUfarnia in 1955. His FBI number was 1426850. Another report from Dade Couaty was that the FBI at their request looked for all J. Calclwells born In Florida, aged 38-40, who had police records. They found a James C. Caldwell, born in 1925, who had been arrested tn April, 1960, for dis crderly conduct and being In places frequented by homosexuals. He was 5 feet 5 inches tall, weighed 135 pounds, witb brown hair and brown eyes. His description does not match that of John W. Caldwell at all. On September 4th, a USF student by the name of come to see the President, and stated that he has had a couple of rather harrowing experiences with homosexuals and that he abhors them. He thinks that is a homosexual and he has had to repulse He does not belleve that Mr. Caldwell Is a homosexual. He was on the Tallahassee trip with the drama group which was led by Mr. Coldwell. He reported that the others had chosen their room mates for motel accommodations and that Caldwell a'ld were left over and had to share a room or pay extra for single rooms. said that he would not be prepared to believe that Caldwell had had homosexual relatlons with On August 31st, Nr. Baya Harrison, Chairman of tie Board of Control, stated that he had asked Mr. Hawes If the Conunittee had anything more on Caldwell than was IR the transcriptions and the reply was "no 11 On August 30th, Dr. Parrish, Chairman of the Faculty Investigating Committee, reported the circumstances of Caldwell's arrest by officer Futch in Polk County. They are as follows: The sports car was stopped on the side of the road. Officer Futch stopped to see what was going on and asked the occupants -Smith and Caldwell to get out. His pwpose was to see If they were armed. Smith, the driver, complied, but Caldwell refused belllgerently to get out. Futch went back to his car to get his stlc:k. Caldwell was then out of the car and made a move that made Futch think that Caldwell might try to hit him. Futch moved to protect himself and took Caldwell flnnly in hand and put handcuffs on him. This Incident oecurred shortly after Smith had told Coldwell that while Caldwell was away In New York, Smith had been sleeping with Caldwell's wife. Caldwell was mad at Smith, and mad at the world when Futch came along, and blames this for his belligerency toward Futch. Caldwell has since left his wife and ls getting a divorce. Caldwell s with the parked truck, which is mentioned in the testimony '---' of the Leglslatlw brought a damage payment to Caldwell ofter a threatened suit. -2-

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0 .. Dr. Margaret Fisher classlfles studeRt as an unreliable witness. He has" appeciatlOft for the truth aad needs, but wlfl not take, psychiatric counseling. Caldwell's escapades were a year ago. He has had few, ff any, this yea_r. He is not drinking as he was, and has been receiving personal and spiritual counseling from Rev. Fred Dickman, advisor to the Episcopalian students at the University of South Florida. Even tf he ts reinstated, It would be only for a minimum contract year, i.e., two trimesters, unttl Aprll 30, 1963. He wlll not be given tenure. We have a signed undated letter of resignation which can be dated and activated at any time, should he be Involved in any unprofessional conduct. Courts and churches give a man a second chance If he shows passibility of lmp-ove ment. I am not poposing this. Nr. Coldwell has improved markedly since a year ago. He should not then be dismissed summarily, but he should be dismissed as of April 30, 1963. All of this shows the Importance of thoroughly checking rumors, rather than assuming tho t rumor is truth. ohn S. Allen President

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(_' .. 0 :II. Conskler and dew:: procedures for handling faculty members announcing tn t'81r classe$ tliat t y are atheists. We have no specific evidence that such announcements haw ever been made o It Was reported by a student that the statement "There ts no God," was an the blackboard of a classroom as students assembled there for a class, prior to the entrance of the instructor. The Instructor who had used the room the prior period denied having written any such statement. It could have been written by a student. Under the Constitution of the United States, an atheist ts not barred from teaching la a public: Institution. In general, however, if the facts were known in advance and If there were other candrdates, the University would be tncUned not to select the athe tst. There Is no more reason for a faculty member to announce to his class that he is cm atheist than there ts to announce that he Is a Jew, a Buddhm, a Catholic, a Protestant, an agnostic, a Democrat, or a Republican. Such annoncement should certainly not be made merely to "shoclc" students. However, there may be times In certain classes and in certain discussions when a professor should make his position known In order that the class will better understand the background from which he speaks. Hence, there should be no arbitrary rule on thfso Through recent discussions with deans, directors, and chairmen, it is felt that this matter is under suitable control. The only "untimely" press release In our iudgment involved the Fleming matter. The release was made following a suitable check. However, later developnents not then foreseen made this release appear to be untimely. In accordance with its Policy Statement 22, the University of South Florida provide$ complete and accurate information to off-campus media of communications on all matters of interest to the public. The University does nof suppress Information of a controversial but hastens to explatv. its position obiectlvely. for the conduct of this program of news and is delegated to the NeY15 Bureau, and mc:>re specifically to its Editor, who is a staff officer directly responsible to the President. The Bureau is the I clearing house of the University for preparation and dissemination of neW5 and publicity refeases. In general, faculty and staff members having information about which they desire a ar$ expected to chann$1 It through the News Bureau. However, if a faculty or staff member is app-oached by on off-campus reporter, he may provide inforroatl0n requested of him if he is in posseaato,,.,of such information and if in his iudgment the release of such lnfarmatlon is If the person has any doubt about the appropriate ness of $Uch releaie# he is expected to refer the reporter to the Editor of the News Bufaau. -4.

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0 The Editor himself must e>iCercise dlscietion and good 1udgJDeftl' ia determining the appropriateness of Gl)y release sent out from his offlcie.. If he has Off/ abOut the content, tlmfl'.\g, necessity, or propriety of any material being considered for release, he is expected to clear such wlth the President. In the ffelcl of public Information, particularly information about a public: insti tution, It Is natural that differences of opinion wlll exist about a maJority of the ..-releases which are dlssemtnated. It must be recognlud, however, that It Is not possible to satisfy ewr}'body all the time. The Editor's pc>sttion, then, ntqulres scrupulous accuracy, and sound Judgment. The abo\ie proceclur:a, In conformity with Polley Statement No. 22, quoted below, has been followed In all releases. With the exception noted above, there have been no unttmety or inac:curQte releases as far as we can Judge. University Polley Statement No. 22 Polley Rellrdlng News and Publicity July 25, 1961 The Unlwrsity of South Florida provides complete and accurate information to off campus media of communications on all matters of interest to the publtc. The University wlll not suppress Information of a controversial nature, but rather will hasten to explain Its position obJectively. It shall be the responsibility of the News Btweau to conduct a program of news and publicity which presents a true reflection of the Un. lversity's over-all operation. The News Bureau Is the central clearing house for preparation and dissemination of all news and publicity releases to off-campus media of communicotionso Memben of the faculty, staff and administration, desiring to release such information to off-campus media shall channel it directly to the News Bureau, with the followlng exceptions: 1) News and publicity for all student or faculty social organizations wtll not be handled by the News Bweau. The publicity chairmea of these organ ization; should communicate directly with society editors of the local media for this purpose. 2) Student reporters 9Jtherlng news for the student newspaper will request such material from individuals and offices on the campus,. and wlll not clear through the News Bureau. 3) Reporters representing off-campus media may seek news from time to time from sources other than the News Bureau. Faculty and staff members may provide complete and accurate information when requested if, in their fudgmant, the release of such information is appropriate. If a person is in domt as to the Foprlety of a request or of the release of certain information, he wlll refer the reporter to the Editor of the News Bureau. -s. i

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IV. .. 0 4) Off-campus organizations using University facilities for meetings of oay sort wlll arrange for publicity through their publicity chairman. The News Bureau wlll assist in this respect whenever possible The University wtll not permit the use of Its name in commerclal advertising if suc:h use suggests or implies U.iverslty endorsement of the advertfser or his p-oduct. All requests f'or the use of pictures or text concerning the University tn any form of adwrtlsing shall be referred to the News Bureau. S/ John S. Allen, President This statement assumes that there fs not public Confidence in the University at the present time. We believe that there is o great deal of public confidence in the University. This was never so evident as during the time of the Johns Committee hearing. Statements of confidence then came from students, ministers, public offlclals, and many citizens. lack of confidence was expressed chiefly by a small intent upon forcing the University into an untenable position. Pressures of various sorts exist upon a publlc institution. The University Is new. It has no alumni yet to speak for It a defend It. In the midst of establishing an educational program of high quality It must also establtsh Itself as a new member In the community, as a cultural and economic asset to the surrounding area, and as a large physlcol and flnanciol complex worthy of the taxpayers' dollars. All of these things it must do before it can begin to provide a steady flow of responsible and well educated graduates Into the stream of community I ife. The facts ore that the University and its emplo)'6eS have made many signincant contributions to the welfare of the community at all levels, not only in its normal areas of operation, but tn religfous, cultural, civic, soclal, and service activities as well. In the two years since it opened, the University has staged 140 concerts, plays, art exhibits, lectures, forums and film classics, all open to the public. Attend ance records show that 100 000 persons witnessed these cultural performances. Two of the University's cultural organizatiOftS, a symphony orchestra and a theatre group, utilized the talents of many area residents who previously had no outlet for their musical and theatrical talents. Thirteen members of the University faculty and student body performed regularly with the Tampa Philharmonic, providing that group with a healthy infusion of new talento -6-

PAGE 49

la addition to the cultural events, the University served as host for 150 eonventlans, workshops, dinners., and similar occasions during the past two years, despite the fact that it had only one cafeteria with limtted facllltles to serw Its student body and staff. Some 20,000 persons attended these 150 events. Many of the occasions were for local civic Ol'SJJniza tlons. women's groups and service clubs, who enfoyed a meal on the campus, a tour of the factfltles, and a talk by a University offlcial on the progress, plans and purposes of the institution. During the two-year period, University personnel gaw some 225 talks to groups and organizations in Hillsborough County and surrounding areas. This WCJI done ln most eases without cost to the organization involved, and povtcled a wluable source of voluntary service to these organizationso lndivldual contributions of the University faculty and staff in the area of religion have also been extensive. ft/ore than a dozen persOftS have occupied pulplts Jn and around the Tampa Bay area in the pnt year, and several of these have been arranged on a permanent basis o Many other members of faculty and staff haw accepted important offices and other positions of leadership In their churches, and still others have spoken to church groups on a variety of subfects. There are stilt other areas in which the University has given extensive service to the community. Four faculty members write weekly columns for daily news papen in the city; the three local television stations have drawn heovtly on \Miverslty personnel for appearances, some of these on a permoaent basts; and members of the faculty frequently contribute book reviews to the Tampa Tribune. One recent performance of the University Symphony Orchestra on television station wrvr drew so many letters of praise that the station presented the P'ogram a second time. Many local service groups, including the Family Service, the Tampa Urban League, the Friends of the Ubrary, the American Association for the United Nations, and the Chamber of Commerce, have utilized University personnel In important administrative positions and committee assignments, and other merri>ers of the faculty have served as consultants to a variety of public and private organizations. Members of the faculty have also served as consultants with the public schools In the area, and have assisted the schools in such areas as curriculum revision, course design, and administrative structure. In addition, more than a score of faculty wives teach in the public schools, helping to relieve a serious teacher shortage there. Personal contact with a number of influential community residents has revealed a number of surprising reasons for much of the expressed lack of public confidence -7-

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.. in fh, u,.1versity. There ore, example, some citizens who are disillusioned because.._ University has" f()Otball team, and has it will not have one. are others o oppose any form of Integration, upset be cause thfs barrier has .,__. Another group having sons a,,d daughters In the University, are disturbed to learn that college i s than high and since these did not attend college they are a difficult to the change along with children. Stilt -Other group feels the Urtlversity has not been CORSEpl'\IQttve enough In Its sefectlon of faculty, textbooks, required reading and guest speakers, and has a.om far In exposing stucf.9nt$ to a variety of points of view. Ma.ly of these groups overlqp Together, they a body of opinion which has had in the University by the Institution's fatlure to conform to one or their personal images. is an unfortunate situation, compounded by fu,e ironic fact that the Institutional which prompted this disilluslonment were (udicfously made decisions by responsible professional people whose highest obligation is to provide the State of Florida with an outstanding new iftStitution of higher learning. The University of South Florida's dedication to this objective has not diminished. It wUI continue to seek ..,ew a\,19nues by which it can build public confidence in Itself while at the same ttme remaining faithful to the principles on which American higher education is Dlscussi"5 within the staff have brought forth additional ide(is which wil I help to form a stronger bond between the Institution and the public served. We be lleve, for instance, that more can be done to educate the parents of our students to better Understand the true meaning of a university educati" We have been promoting a series of television programs in which members of the faculty speak about their courses and their teaching. A special committee on public relations has been organized. It should be clear, however, that the University has been actively at work in th1$ field from the beginning and that it merely expects to continue, intensify, and extend these operations for the good of the University and the community. It must also be said that a new publtc university starting as we have with considerable numbers of students, high standards, and in a community which has not ex perienced an operation of this nature, is bound to cause some dislocatlons of thought in the community as wel 1 as some disaffection by those whose wishes cannot be satisfied. As the University grows such dtsfoeotions ond disaffections should be lessened. To give you an Indication of the confidence of the public in the University of South FIOrido, I am enclosing the following: SermOA preached at St. Mary's Episcopal Church on Septo 2, 1962 by the Rev. Carroll E. Simcox, Rector -8-

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Tampa Tribune August 28, 1962, article entitled Temple Terraee Ministers U,itlcal of Johns Re pert" Tampa Tribune August 29, 1962, article entitled "Last Word Has Not Been Said" Tampa Tribune August 30, 1962 -article entitled "A OollorWould Be Too Much" Gatnesvflle Sun, August 28, 1962 Editorial 11An Report" Sonnota Herald Tribune, August 29, 1962 Editorlol "Johm Report Unfair to USF" St. Petersburg Times, August 27, 1962 Editorial 11Underqourtshed Mouse" Tampa Times, August 27, 1962 Edltorlal1\JSF and the Johns Committee" Tampa Tribune, September 1, 1962 Editorial 11A Show of Confidence" Tampa Tribune, August 29, 1962 Editorial "Who Speaks for Education?11 Florida Times Union, Sept. 1, 1962 Editorial 01.et Florklians Work for Goad Results" Tampa Tribune, August 26, 1962 Editorial "A Growing Pain" Daytona Beach Evening News, August 28, 1962 Edltorlal "Not Saving America" WLCY-Radio Station, St. Petersburg Editorial August 30 and 31, 1962 WLOF-TV Orlando Editorial August 30, 1962 letter. September 6, 1962 from Hillsborough County Education Association St. Petersburg Independent, August 27, 1962 Editorial ''Stwely Shocking"

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1 0 1-"' THIS SERMON WAS PREACHED AT ST. MARY'S CHuatH, TAMPA, FLOlllOA' B,Y THE REVo CARROLL E. SIMCOX, B. Do. PH.D.' RECTOR SEPTEMBER 11 2, WtiERE THE SPIRIT OF THE LORD IS11 THERE IS LIBERTY. 11 CORINTHIANS J: 170 The recent report of Committee coneerning lidlat has been going on at l)ew unherslty Is by no muns a Ntter of po11tlca1 or educatlonal l11pOr.tMC8 only. The issue raised. by that lnvestlgatloo :re moral religious lsi!CS and the Church cannot stand by and say that It is all very Interesting but none of our spiritual buslne&s. '. There is an obvious CC>Aflict between the state leglslatures COl'lllllttee and the of the University of Smith Florida. But this ls, only a focussing of ,the btoader between those Ataerlcans "1o c1o 'not _really,belleve In freecba of thought -here, represented by the JohnS: and those .t10 do. We who. are the wie "'1o profess and call ourselves Christians,. are forced to ask ourseIVes dlere tie stand. ,:, I .think we need to begin a confession of 'gul Ito ef I wanted to make the understatement of the eentury l'. d say something like this: the Christian: Church has not always stood unequlvOieally and hero1l1y for freedom of thoUght, of speech. freedom of-regearch. The ChurCh hits, 0n the whole, a s<>rry Jn this area. It .,ul_ d be hard to find a shag1e great step forward .blch been de In medical Sf;lence; physlcal science,, or Soc:lal science, which cllctnot to overcom fierce .-.d fanatical ecclestaatlca1 resistance. Aftd It .'8ay .be that we twentieth-century Christians, knOwlltg. our record ancl being as,huled of It, are Inclined. nowadays to go to the opposite extreM and to say thB\,W: stand for the right of .-.ybody to teach and to. do anything -no matter ...W.t. it. That Is a very attitude, and .many of us fall Into It. be :we are afraid of being: cal:led bigots and : What does our Lord Jesus teaeh us about this matter? iVe shall know the truth," He Says, 11and the truth shall .make you free,," Yea: but He ldentlfi.es Hhileff with the truth. 111 am tho way, the truth0 and the life: no man cometh ,the Father but by me." Now,. as Christians, you aftcl I have to stick to tha_t. We may admit .the right of the atheist or the Hlndu 'to teac;h In our schoots, and ev.n to teach our young people t: he believes and But 1 subftllt that If tb_er..e l.s to be that acact.nlc freedom for non-Chrlstlans there ought to be the freedom for Christian teachers. President Allen says that there Is, at: the Unl ;veral'ty 'of South Florlcla, and I beilew him. 'Where the Spirit of the Lord ls," says St. Paul, "there Is liberty." Too often and too easily these d>rds are quoted gllbly to support the propo&itlcm that "'8re the Spirit of the L.Ord prevalls cares what anybody thinks. aays, or does. That bland toleranee of ewrythlng is not Christian liberty. St. t-aul Is .aklng the profoundly tr assertlan that tldhert a llian Is moved by the Spirit of be becoms glorle)U&ly Says c;>ne recentcommentator on this paaaage : liberty Is n0t the freedom to do aa we Hke; It h the p*Br to.,, as we oUght We are free_ orily when our capacities are released through clhl>tlon to greater thaA oarselves. An artist fl_nds freedom In devotl.on to' h .ls art. A craftsman finds It .,_ t,J, IJC*erS are released by the vision of""at he 1 s trying to Most of a1 l, Ne find release through love for others tthOse fare. we seek." We must be clear about this: as Christians we be11eve i n liberty, but we-do not beUeve In Hbertarlanlsa;. Thomas Huxley
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. ..... AAaerlcan. educatlon today. I W!S.,. student chaplain for eight years at b>. .of. ou.-large universities. I met aU too many profes90rs said sllly and things In their.classes slmply to get a follQWlag, to get a reputation for being "advanced" and "orlglnal" and ''emancipated." There Y -.hat the Unlvers .lty of South Florida. hope there are not. For th_at is not academic freedom: t .hat Is academic President Allen Is right In his coaceptlon of the proper function of a University. and the Johns eoi.Bittee Is wrong. The Committee and hosts of others belleve that an American university exists speclflca1Jy to propagate r-=-sm. anticomunl, and a knowledge 'of bc>Oks a s harmless as 'the Bobbsey Tt111ins and Peter Rabb5t: Although raised by anxious lovers of raci<1l purlt.Y OM rabbit book In ch black rabbit 'ancl a mite rabl>lt faU in love We .blwo to race this: If by the time our go to college we have not .. theiro the way life we think is right,, we have falJed, aad .they., are no t ready face t9-world as .it Is. There are atheists; and thcne are holllosexuals; and there are not only cUr.ty .ords a n t .heat but even people who use these dirty .,rc1s. SollliehoW a University has got te.ch its students how to live and to deal wli,h these facts. .. It has been establlshecl t .hat there are no coanunlsts teaching at Florida. Even so, If are to have a real university, doing the proper t11>rk of a ,university,. the case for communism has to be fairly and fully presented. If w do not study our enemy by llst.enlng to him, how can w cope with him lnte111gently and effectively? About the dirty there is plenty of obscenity in the holy Blble, say nothing of Shakespeare. The of Hawthorne's T he Scarlet Letter is adultery. Great 11.terature ha& to mirror human life as it is,. and It must reflect the mud and of aan as as the gr_..r. It does :seem to me toae of our best contemporary wrtters "'811ow rather e>ccesslvely In the mud, a If t .hey like It. But It Is for the student to ask hlBlielf why this Is &O. Writers like Steinbeck, Wllllaias. Faulkner, and Salinger present to us the Ufa of man In our troubled and ttittsted era. If the student would understand the '*>rid he Is growl,.g up tnto he must 1eam t o take a cool. c1fnlca1 loOk the garbage. The purpose of the aiverslty 15 to teach it& students. how to think and hOW to deal with the 110rld and whh Hfer.'8s they experience It. Where th8n are our young people to get their religious faith, their moral ideals? First and foremst, In the..,.. If you don't .snt child to be an atheist or a communlat or a moral degenerate It's up to you to get his life established on the right foundations ...tten he Is young. To be sure, many of us run lnt. o one great dlfflculty with this, when tbs child reaches college age or even high school age: he decides that he wants to think and to choose for himself. Almat any lnte11igent youngster rebals against his parents religious convictions and aoral standards. This Is bound to be an anxious time for parents. The only thing I can tel I when they bring this problem to me Is that they IRUSt N patient and understanding. The adolescent reballlon does not last forever. -Most people tend to come back to the faith and the Ideals of their fathers once they themselves have lived as adults for a while. But as parents we should want our ch'lldren to go beyond us at last not simply to coma back to us. The Church has a tremendous responslblllty for Its young people of college age. and we are doing our best to fulfl I It .at South Florida. We have a full-time chapla.ln there and we are building a chapel and student center. It is the student chaplain's job to apply the Christian answer to those re11glous and moral problems of Hfe. Our Episcopal chaplain, Father Dickman, has received nothing but COMPiete and earnest co-operation from the University authorities. I do .. ;".": .. 2 -

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) .. not see how can ask mre of a t-ax&upported publle ititutlon tban that. Behind the report of the Johns: see one of the saddest and lllOSt ominous phenomena of present-day' Aaerican life, and that Is fear of the Intellectual Why are so many pe0ple convinced thiit our colleges and are Infested with atheists and commuc;'lsts and moral perverts? I wish I knew the '*>le answr to that question. big part of it Is th&: that many of us are afraid to examine honestly _, tntelllgent1y the foundation$ of our rallglone our 11>rallty9 our Wily oflffe: and a university Is of necessity clewted to the tal&k of examlnlng amt explorlng everything. A university Is not 1y Trinity, In the Bible, lia personal Why'l What are ycur reasons?" ''Here are these books by Steinbeck, _Md Faulkner and D. H Sofie people ca 11 them n lthy. What do yuu iaake .of them?, Do they represent to you II fe as it .'5?11 .. There ;are unavoidabie Jn all true edueatlon, especially In higher edlica :tlon. There ts alway the risk that the studilibt wut not be able .. or willing -to think his way through tO a sound to such quastlons. 1 t la my ""' belief that not everybOdy ()ught to go to 'ollege Higher educa1: -hm slD,tld beontt for those capable of .Nc.ivlng It without -being ruined for 'Ufe by It. I don't know whose fault Is ls If It Is a fault -t .hat there are some pebple who Just can't think their way.through Issues of llfe, but certainly ft Is not the fault of 'Oclr. unlversities-.u lnte11ectua1s. We are not gotng to preserve the faith Jn -too 11ves of our yc)ung people by keeping them in a spir1tual. kfnderga r. tGit in which nc> '41sturblng questions are ever ra.ised in their Now I'd like to sea .the Christian professors at South f 1orlda and ewrywere else become much ..Ore bdc:Uy arid aggressively than many of. them are. Christians In acadeailc circles ha"9 let them!&elves be put on the defensive In our age. I suppose It's the old fear of bigoted and fanatical. We do have to get' c>ver that complex of ours. But .the answer Is not to suppose the non Christians and the anti-Christians. The answer Is for a11 of us to speak out 110re boldly and clearly the reasans for the faith that is. In us. Our Sunday School starts next Sunday. I hope that all this controversy about the Johns Conni ttee report wl 11 make a I I of tis rea 11 ze how essent I a I It is that our Children be wt grounded "in the faith wile they are children That Is Whcit ..e try to do a n our' Sooday .School. 1 ask a11 of you to pray for our teachers and our chi 1dren and to use and to SUpport our ltlho1e educat1ona1 We.will soon be starting Instruction classes for children and adults. If y0u are an adult communicant you would ftnd it most helpful to attend the adult class to think through once again what you beUeve and why you be11eve It. The 8rrswr to co1111tlinlsm and lrre11glon and all the evlls of our day Is SDQre intelligent and dedicated Chri 'stlan faith and 'Hfe beginning with our. _, ... '. .. .. the Spirit of the Lord ls, there is,ltberty.11

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NEWS From FUN RADIO 138 TAMP4 ST. PETERSBURG IDITCllIAL Auaut 30, l 9 6 2 The Johna State i11Yeeti&&ti11& report OD. the Unlvereity of South Florida h.aa oot helped to induce more public rpect for our atate supported colleaea. The John s Comd.ttee va perfectly within ite riaht to k the ineatlption1 vbich we wpport however. it promlaed Preeident John Allen a copy of the report' contents before it public releaae, which promiae they did aot keep. Therefore. the Johns Ceaaittee'e are eotlrely under auepect. Belna ao, we tend to place leae reliance an the cententa of the entire dlaclo.uree, of the interpretation placed upon them WLC! believe that the Florida Board of Contrel,haviI juriedietion ever t h e Univeraity of Seuth Florida, 1hould have been the channel t vhome the J ohn Colllli ttee should hav e .ubmitted it findina. Thi wo.ald have afforded the Univeraity and the Board of Coatrcl au opportunity to aubmit thir own rebutb\l t the points raiaed in the report and tbeo the public would have had both idea of the .atter befr t he m a t the NM time.
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9 This is a WIDF-TV News Editorial in the public interest -entitled: A SECREI' REPORI' The free world gets reports from behind the Iron Curtain which tell of purges, secret organizational activities and human beings forced to submit to the tyranny of dictatorships. We don't like it, but we have come to accept it and attack such a system as one of the basic differences between those living under ColllllWli.sm and those living in a free world. It s no wonder then that we are astonished to hear reports which read like a page from Isvestia circulating the state of Florida. The reports we ref er to were instigated by a 53-page document presented to Governor Farris Bryant and the Florida Cabinet, and points a critical finger at the University of South Florida. The 53-page report is the result of a secret investigation conducted.on that campus during the final crucial weeks of the academic year this past summer. Selfserving pseudo patriots in the area prompted an by passing out pamphlets which charged that 11subversive and related activities (were going on) at the Univer sity of South Florida.11 After Senator Charley Johnst Legislative Investigating Com mittee completed its probe none of the information in the Committee report was made public. Suddenly, a few weeks before the University is to reopen for the fall semester, and before University officials have returned from vacation, the report is made public. Information in the report is not so important as the fact that the contents of the report were made available to the people of Florida before it could even be studied by University of South Florida officials. This is against the basic principle of American justice. In the eyes of the people of Florida, the University of South F-J..orida was judged "guilty until proven innocent" If the University of South Florida or any of its faculty is guilty of subversive or related activities as charged, then the University or faculty members under investigation should have been given an open public hearing, or a closed hearing before the State Cabinet. All testimony should have been weighed on both sides and after a decision was made by responsi))l.e officials and Cabinet members, the people of Florida should have been told of the The Southezn Association of Colleges and Schools, the official accrediting agency for Southern educational institutions, made an objective analysis of the University of South Florida. The Southern Association reported the University was "a remarkable and virile University and that the faculty is young, excellently qualified and equal, if not superior, to that of any university in the region." Maybe the dif ference is that the Southern Association report was made by a qualified group of educators rather than a legislative investigating cami.ttee which delffd into the re ligious and political beliefs of the faculty, and into the private lives of the staff. As Dr. Allen says, ''the purpose of the University is to educate not indoctrinate; to help students learn how to think, not what to think; and to this purpose the University of South Florid.a must remain dedicated." The Communists are engaged in a battle to "brainwash" children under cODlllU11ist rule into believing only what they want them to believe. The free world and academic freedom provide American students with exposure to all of the facts and the reasons we believe as we do. You can't protect students from controversy. We don't have to defend our ideals by supressing religion, or literature, or a free exchange of ideas. Channel 9 urges that before further damage is done to a fine University and its staff, the Board of Control conducts an objective analysis of all of the facts and makes its recommendations and findings known to the people of Florida. There is no lace in our American system of justice for the so-called secret report and one-sided prosecutor's ihdictrrrnt. Americans are, and must remain, innocent until proven guilty. And we must _protect free education from malicious intruders. 639 WEST CENTRAL B()X 5795 # #qR.w.t..NDO, FLORIDA PHONE: CH 1-6543 (Used three Editorial cartoons.)

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It. Ii J DIA'ANI:. l"ll&SID&NT MR l'lOl:RT I:. Dl:EN. V tca.f'RHIDENT MR. L C REYNOLDS. 2ND VICl
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\ v. Consider and take steps to bulld lines of cornmun1catlon between ana cmnong adnllftistrators, faculty rs, stUdeftts, Oftd ffi8 Pi8SkJ8nt. This statement gives the impession that little or nothing has yet been done In this area, whereas we believe we have developed excellent lines of communica tlon during the first two years, both formal and Informal. The formal llnes according to the following pattern: The Executive Committee consists of the President, DeOA of Academic Affairs, Dean of Student Affairs, and Business Manager. It meets regularly once a week, and often meets more frequently. Each of these officers meets with his staff once a week or more frequently on occaston. .. Each dean meets with his Counctl or staff once a week. Each chairman or director meets with his Councll or staff once a week, or more frequently. In this way, most members of the faculty are engaged in meetings. The U,lversfty Senate consisting of 30 elected members of the faculty, 5 members of the non-academic staff and 5 students, meets monthly on educational matters. The President meets frequently with the officers of the Student Association. The Deem of Academic Affairs meets fortnightly with the Academic Standards Corrrnittee Students serve on the Senate, on the Student Affairs Committee, and on the Traffic CommJttee There ore advisory student committees to the Registrar and the Business Manager. The formal lines of communication are fully adequate and are working well. However, in a rapidly growing institution with few old-time traditions and frequent changes, continuing effort is neceSiary to keep them working well. For e>mmple, the Dean of Academic Affairs C1SSumed his post in February, 1962. Prior to that the President had carried these dutieso It was necessary at that time to shift the organizational structure of the Executive Committee and add a new staff unit --the Academic Affairs Staff --which was formerly included In the temporary Executive Committee. Real communication depends more on the spirit than the form. The Uliwrsity started with an "open door" policy. This still P'ewlls. Aay faculty member can see the President -and many do --or, any of the deans, or other officers, upm request. The faculty and administration usually lu1tch iA the same room. Unes of communication within the student body and between students and student afl'aln staff offieiars did not develop as rapidly as mtght have been hoped for. They have Improved greatly in recent months and under the new Dean of Student Affairs it Is anticipated that this Improvement will be accelerated. -10-. .. ... :._ -'.'

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. .. 0 It should be remembered that la 1960-61 we had only freshmen. We stlll haw no nlorso lower classmen tend to look to seniors for leadenhlp and guidance. Despite thia haM.Ucap we haw found a number of good student leaden emerging from the freshman and sophomore classes. Sewral unfortunate Incidents have occurred during the second year of oper ation to Increase the problem of better understanding between faculty, ad ministration and students. From each of these has come a need far refinement of proceckns In the area of communications. From the registration p-oblem came the student advisory committee to the Registrar, from t"8 Davis incident came Improved communication procedures on clearances of speakers and publicity; from the Fleming lnclde1tt came clearer appointment and publtclty procedures. This is not lo say that the University learns only by such experiences. They do confirm, however, the need for adhering to establlshed procedures. As a young university with a small group of admlnlstraton and faculty In the beginning, It ts natural that actual communication procedtnS would be somewhat less than formal. In fact, it Is desirable that as much informality as poss Ible be retained within establtshed procedural channels as we grow larger. It Is CM plan, therefore, to continue lo clarify established communication channels, examine the need for others, but to retain within this framework as na1ch flexlbillty and lnformallty as Is consistent with effective communica tion In an effort to avoid slow-downs, bottlenecks, and mistakes. Polley Statements Issued by the President have been sent, until now, only to deans, dlrec:tors, and course chairmen. Now, the old ones and all new ones are being sent to all members of the faculty, as well. The second edition of our Staffb Faculty and Advtson' Handbook is In the P'ess and wtll be available early fft ctob8r. It gives pertinent Information for the faculty and staff and Includes statements of policy. VI. Consider and take C!J>PrOf!iate steps to be certain of the ''tone" In the classrooms Of the Onivenlty ... It has been our pollcy from the beginning to provide a good learnlng situation for ow students In the classroom. For this reason we emphasize discussion as an Important adiunct to lecturing Good discussion calls for give-and-take between student and student and between student and teacher. It also calls for a less formal atmosphere than Is p-esent In a lecture. We expect, therefore, that the ''tone" of the classroom Is more relaxed than Is found In lecture courses. Since "tone" la Intended also to Include the intellectual and $0Cial level of the discussion It Is important that relaxatton does not lead to degeneration of dlscvalon. With one or two exceptions there are no reasons to bellew that this Ii happening. The case of Professor Winthrop has already bee referred to as a rnlsundentandlng. Mr. Thomat Wenner used his class discussion periods largely to talk about his own experiences and stir students up to "demand their rights." -11 ,I

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.. Beyond these Incidents there is no reason to believe that the 11tone11 of the classroom Is unsatisfactory. Student appraisals (taken anoaymously) Indicate an overwhelming balaac:e In favor of satisfaction with classroom p-ocedures and discussions. We expect, however, to keep in close touch with these procedtns and where there Is any Indication that the "tone11 ts improper will take steps to change It. At the same time the faculty Is fully aware of the desirability of maintaining good relations with students based on high cultural and ethical standards. We wtll COAtinue to emphasize this. The Dean of Academic Affairs meets frequently with the other c:leansconc:erntng proorams under their direction The following statement has submitted iecently :by the Dean of Basic Studies to the Dean of Academlc Affairs. These procedures are those whtdi haye been In effect since the Unlver$.ity started. It should be pointed out, how:ever, that the American Idea cour$e ts a sophomore lewl cour1e and was in multl-secttons for the first tlrns in 1961-62. As o result the first year of' operation a number of changes in pr.ocedures and rnaterlals are being introduced to improve the course. "ht respoase to your request, the followlng Is submftte:d concemlng of teaching In CB 103-104 (Human BehaviQ.-) and CB 201-202 (Amerldin ,. the C:OtneS In Human Behavior and The American ta other courses of the Col ,age of Basic Studies, teac:h Ing methods and are selected for their effectiveness In achieving the obfecttves of the course5. "The obiectlves are chosen to contribute to the obiectives of Untwrsity and the College. They are reviewed by the staff, chairman, and clean ''Classroom activities are developed by the staff, usually worktng as ad hoc eonmlttees, in consultation with the chairman of the courseFrequent discussion between the chairman and the dean of the College occurs. Weelcly reviews and revisions of the methods ond materials are accomplished in meetings of the teach ing staff, presided over by the chairman. "Both the chairman and the dean vJslt .classrooms and diseuss teaching activities with the staff. "This procedure for selection of teaching ac tlvtties Is rJOt errorless; there Is no .. perfect thod. It does, however, the Initiative for developing methods with the men who teach the course, and pi'ovlcles conwnient mechanisms for rapid ldefttlflcatlon and correction of poor selectlon. In my opinion, this systera Is working tatlsfactorily. II -12-i j 'j L f

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0 L Attached Is ci description of The American Idea, which is one of the general education counes required of all students. VIII. The Dean of Academic Affairs has lust issued a supplement cm New Faculty Appointment Procedures, copy of which Is attached, and which is designed to malce certain that our appointments are correctly and carefutly made. Of. Usted below are some of the speakers which the University has hod during its first two years: l.M. levltt Space Scientist Roscoe Drummond Washington Correspondent Arthw Cronquist Botanist Frec.ferlck Sleight Archaeology Director, Central Fla .. Museum & Planetarium Herwy H. Hiii Education (Former President Peabody College) Morie Van Doren Poet Winthrop N. Kellogg Flori State University porpoises Herrick B. Young Florida Chain of Missionary Assemblies Meet the Author series Audubon lectures J.B. CUipepper -Board of Control AoJo Brumbaugh -Board of Control Undley J. Stiles Education (Deem, School of Education, Univ. of Wisconsin) Wiii iam H. Weston Harvard lecturer Do Wo Jenkins Wales Educator Governor leRoy Collins Governor Farris Bryant Harold BenJamin EduCt'ltional Administration (author of Saber-Tooth Curriculum) Harlow Shapley Harwrd Astronomer Harry Golden newspaperman Sanuel McCutchen History ( New York University) Harold Taylor fmmer President Sarah Lawrence Education Felix Robb Education Ludd M. Spivey Fonner President Florido Southern College Wllllam Hugh McEnlry Dean of Stetson University Bishop Henry I. Loutttt -Episcopal Bishop Virgll Rogers Education (coming in Nov. 1962) Fritz Friedmann (coming in Oct. 1962) Allatalr Cooke (coming in Nov. 1962) Norman Cousins (coming In Jon. 1963) Saturday Review Wllltam F. Buckley, Jr. (coming in Jan. 1963) There have been others who haw been Invited and who were unable to accept. Among these are several who could be truly labeled as conservatives, as follows: David lawrence Dwight 0. Eisenhower Richard M. Nixon 8any M. Goldwater Felix M. Morley -13-

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DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS August 23, 1962 1VEW PACOIJ.fY. APPOINTMENT PROCEDURES The following general procedures will be used in making new appoint ments to the faculty. These apply to all ranks including fuil and part-time personnel, lecturers and teaching associates or assistantso 'lhese regulations merely clarify procedures already in use. 1. Contacts Original contacts are made in various ways. 2. Checkin__g_ on likely candidates should be beyond requesting letters from references listed and should include telephone calls to one or more of the .references as well as to others not listed as references when possible. 'l'his can be particularly helpful if there is a reliable. personally known contact in the institution. Papers should be checked for time gaps and for recency of references. Reference letters should be checked carefully for oinisaions. It should be determined whether or not the indiviidual is being released by his institution. 3. Interview 4. O" Normally, following screening of the candidatesq the most likely applicant should be invited to visit the campus o 'l'his can be varied in case the dean and several faculty members the candidate dt acme professional meeting. Expense of the cand,idate 's trip should be borne by the College and should cover air coach fare (or mileage if this is less) .and per diem. Normally the candidate should meet the Dean of Academic Affairs and as many of the faculty members in his area as possible. For a high-level appointment (professor and associate professor) he should; if possible, meet the President. '!'bis should also be done in any case of doubt as to the appropriateness of the appointment. Nomination Following a canvass of opinion the director of chairman may ally nomi.Date the candidate to the dean,, or the dean may propose the nomination. 'the rank and aaiary proposed should be checked with the Dean of Academic Affairs before a verbal offer is Appointment procedure should be explained to the candidate. Before =1-

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u 0 (New Faculty Appointment Procedures, a letter is sent to the candidate proposing his nomination to the President a final check is advisable, preferably by telephone, with the candidate's superior, or other source, even though there may be in the file a letter of reference from that individual. In such case the candidate should be advised that this check is about to be made so that he can contact his superior in advance of the check. It should, of course, be determined as far as possible that the candidate will accept the offer if it is made. 5. t,etter of Nomination The letter to the candidate offering him a position should specifically indicate (1) that the candidate is being nominated to the w President and will receive from the President official confirmation of his appointment and (2) (if the salary is $10,000 or more) confirmation must finally be made following action of the Board of Control. Following is a sample letter which may be used with variations and additions to suit the situation. near -: Following your visit to the campus and our discussion of the matter I am happy to nominate you to the President for (joint) appointment as Crank) of (subject) for the coming ten month academic year at a salary of $ payable in ten monthly installments. As you know0 this involves teaching two and one half trimesters in the academic year. All appointments effed:ive September 1., carry employment through April 30 (trimesters one and two unless otherwise specified.) 'l'he additional two months employment for 10 months appointees may be either for term 3a or 3b. Each faculty member will be notified in writing by the Division of Personnel Services no later than January 15 of each year regarding that portion of the third trimester for which employment is stipulated. APPOIN'l'MEN'rS OVER AND ABOVE THE 10 MONTH PERIOD will be compensated for at the same monthly rate specified in the 10 months appointment. your official letter of appointment will be from the President. Your papers must be cleared through the personnel and business offices before going to the President s office. You should hear from him officially in about ten days. -2-

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0 (New Faculty Appointment Procedures, continued) (Alternate paragraph for salaries of and over.) "Your official letter of appointment will be from the President. Since all salaries of $10 000 and over must have formal approval by the Board of Control at one of its regular monthly meetings there may be a slight delay in receiving your official appointment letter. You will hear from the President officially as soon as the matter is cleared. 6. Expediting: Appointments In some cases where we are competing with another immediate of fer it may be necessary to make a final commitment at once. In such cases the President4 or in his absence, the Dean of Academic Affairs, should be contacted directly with respect to a final commitment. The papers ilay then be walked through to the President for signature. Salary and rank should be checked with the Dean of Academic Affairs. Both of these officers should lM!e the candidate if possible. 7. 12.i,stribution of copies of appointment letters Dean of the College Dean of Academic Affairs Director of Personnel Office a. Letters of Introduction and Orientation The President will send a letter of introduction to the newly awofn.t:etl$ membert... This will be followed at appropriate intervals by a packet (if not previously sent) and letter from the Director of Personnel0 a letter from the Dean of Academic Affairso a letter from the Business Manager and a brochure from Educational Resources. '!his procedure is presently in operation. Deans of the colleges, directors, and/or chairmeno will also no mubt be in communication with their new members prior to arrival on the campus. SFJalad 8-24-62

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THE AMERICAN IDEA .__., AMERICA Mfil I,!!! This course is organized and set in the contemporary life and problems of America today, to proVide understanding and preparation for your citizenship and participation in public opinfon today --and tomorrow. There are manifold means and sources -for such education --television, radio, newspapers, magazines and the book press, as well as personal experiences all of which you have used to davelop the background you bring to this course. We consider valuable your experience and ideas, and important that you share them with your fellows and with us, and we consider valuable your judgmento in developing this course best to serve the above purpose. Tell us of good articles and publications, of good T.V.o programs and movies ; and discuss your ideas at every opportunity. We also seek your suggestions and comments on the activities and experiences of the course. Your regular self-education in relevant current affairs and events is a part of this course and you should --(1) Plan to read a daily newspaper and/or a weekly news magazine, and (la). good articles in monthly and magazines. In the last few years the American book press has developed the provision of paperbound books in great profusion and range of quality. Some of these are sound, valuable, and in some cases the best books by the best authors. We use paperbacks in this course instead of a standard text, therefore, in order to adjust the reading continually to the best, and.-most interesting and challenging available. The paperback way-of-life is a new opportunity available to those who aspire to. be informed, and leaders in our dynamic society. This course will be presented through paperbacks. It is about what America means, to ourselves and to the world, the experience, "the American way-of-life"; and the realities of our situation in the world faced with and challenged by World Communism and by the compiexities. and problems of all the peoples everywhere. "The American Idea; America and the World": it h an impossible subject' but ineluctable and compelling in the atomic age. No .2!!! man, no "exPert", can tell what American life means; or rather, onlt each and every American can know and it; and t .he foreigners will tell what it means to them. Similarly, in our "democratic" society the ideal is that the laws and policies of the govemment should be the decision. and will of each and all of us. The problems of America and of the world are vast and complicated; the the ro:te, and policies 'of America crucial. His tory moves on and pei'h8ps we' fail adequately to direct it. Drift threatens disaster to ourselves and even to mankind. This is an ove:rwhelming thought, but it is our dilemma. ,.. .. : : ; We Americans must haste. n to consider and to reconsider our tradition, our values, our practices, our.policies, our relations with other peoples, and their ideas if disaster is to be avoided; and if as Americans we are going

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-2-to be able to live successfully in a world no longer but all en compassing and insistently challenging in each man's private soul. The second semester we will consider systematically the confrontation with World Communism: "They" and "We" in the world of Today.. We will survey t:he facts of organization and action as well as the ideas which inspire and pattern each, and we will undertake a sample study of a significant area which claims to be uncoamitted --India. Sane of you may undertake as your independent study another people and culture> or area, as an additional sample (See outline on Independent Study Project). This semester our objective is to survey our total situation on the background of recent contemporary world events and our policies of response and of pur pose to affect and direct history; and then to explore with considerable intensity our history and experience as a nation and a people. The first will take about a third, the second about two thirds of the semester. First we must discover and analyze our situation --where we are and how we got here. For this purpose we rely primarily on John Spanier's American Foreign Policy Since World War !! We will be much concerned with his thesis that our "liberalism", our dislike of power politics, and our"moralism" are the causes of our inadequacies of policy. We will use for this analysis Lefever's study Ethics !!!!! United States Foreign Policy. But we also use other readings and our own oU:line; see the calendar of assignments and outline below. The study and analysis of our history and experience as a nation and a people is by means of Richard Hofstadter's The Anierican Political Tradition and Frederick Lewis Allen's !!!2. Big Chan&e:" Since the authors consider themselves respectively a "conservative", and a "liberal", and both are authorities; the facts, and possible "the truth" should be available for each student to discover for himself. The objective is not so much to master and absorb all the history, but to discover and to work out the principles and the values of the American way-of-life and of government so that we may preserve it and 8pply it --insofar as we find it may be applicable in our relations with and leadership in today's world. One word as to methods: --Although the course is not doctrinaire P .nd, we hope, innocent of dogma; there one assumption we make. It is that America is freedom. What is "American" indwells in all Americans and is born in freedom. Through freedom of the mind, and free (though patterned) discussion, American consensus and policies are to be achieved and In a course of this character, therefore, candid, responsibk1, and conscientious sharing of views is equally important with the mastery of accurate information. The classroom activities are to provide the maximum of such discussion and the most of genuine freedom of the mind. Say what you think, and, as you learn from others and the history, think differently, if you wish, but think responsibly to the facts which surround us, conscientiously to your l..mericans and their views and interests, and loyally to the Americans of our past; remembering, of course, with Thomas Jefferson that, "the earth belongs to the living, not to the dead."

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( CB 201 -3-The American Idea America and the World Calendar of Assignments: I Required Reading '. Unit I: Introduction: Due Monday, Sept. 17 (one week or less) Due Monday, Oct. l (2 weeks; instructor may divide into weekly asstgnments) (1) (2) Our Dilemma in the World Lederer and Burdick, !!!! !!&!I American (entire) Syllabus: Documents I and II pages 6-13 Our World Dileama and Our Foreign Policy Ernest Lefever, Ethics Foreign Policy John Spanier, American Foreign Policy Since World War'.!! (both (3) Our World Stance and World Image: Summary and DUe Monday, Oct. 8 (1 week) Conclusions Unit 11 Due Monday, Oct. 22 (2 weeks) D.C. Coyle,_!!!! U.S Political System (entire} Overview of the American System Project topic selection, if possible (1) TheDevelopment of the American Republic Saul K. Padover, The Oenius of America Chapters 1, 7';8, 12 The Constitution (Document III in the Syllabus) Richard Hofstadter, The American Political Tradition. To page Mid Term Grades Due October 25 III Due Monday, Nov. 5 (2 weeks) Unit J!V Due Monday, Nov. 19 (2 weeks) Unit V Due Monday, Nov. 26 (1 week) Last Weeks (1) The Growth to a Great Nation Coylo Political System, reviewed Hofstadter, pages 164-237 Padover, Chapters (1) America Comes of Age in the 20th Century Frederick L. Alle:i, !!!.! Big Change (read entire, if .possible; then study 1-127) : Hofstadter, pages : 238-314. (1) Crisis and Responsibility in a World of Change Allen, pages 128-257 Hofstadter, pages 315-352. aeview and Conclusions: What has America to offer as a civilization? Note Well: We assume that you use, as needed, both a dictionary and an atlasgazetteer and become informed about the world and its geography. :. ... It is recommended that you obtain from the Bookstore the outline maps for this course and compile and learn the relevant geographic facts.

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-4-II. Calendar of Films Besides the required reading and study of printed comnunication, the course requires the experience and study of movie and television materials: (1) Specified films arranged according to the caiendsr below, (time 50 minutes to an hour per week) tested) (2) Your own selection of TV programs or movies from those currently on the air or available --to average one hour per week. reported; see III, below) The following films will be presented in Chemistry 100 repeatedly and continuously, Periods 1 through 12 Thursdays for your viewing. Tests will !!!. given on this meterial. (a poll of students unable to attend one of these periods will be taken the first week and an additional period scheduled to serve them) CB 201 1st week Sept. 13 2nd week Sept. 20 3rd week Sept. 27 4th week Oct. 4 5th week Oct:. 11 6th week Oct. 18 7th week Oct. ZS 8th week Nov. 1 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) '.(9) (10) (11) Twentieth Century Revolutions in World Affairs: The U.S. in a Revolutionary World. CS-1109 United States Responsibilities to the Rest of the World (Heritage of the Land) NET-338 Henry Steele Commager: Part I (Heritage V). NET-914 Co-existence (The World We Want: 1958) NET-1411 Twentieth Century Revolutions in World Affairs: The Russian Communist Revolution. CS-1103 Twentieth Century Revolutions in World Affairs: The U.N. in A Revolutionary World. CS-1108 Henry Steele Commager: Part 5 (Heritage V). NET-918 Odegard. The Power and the Glory Odegard. Ethical Basis of Political Power Odegard. The Frontier in a Space Culture .Q! The Necessity of (The Great Ideas). NET-1 Odegard. People of Plenty Order: Coronet United States Expansion: Florida United States Expansion Overseas (1893-1917) : United States Expansion: Settling the West (1853-1890) (12) Odeg:.\rd. The Transcendental Paradox (13) Constitution: With Liberty and Justice for All. CS-961 Parts 1 & 2 OR Odegard. What is Constitutional Government? Odegard. The P..merican Revolution -The Social Issues .Q!1 Odegard. Ratification and Rationalization (15) (16) Odegard. Permanence and Change Odegard. The Alien-American Paradox

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' .. 9th week ':Nov. s .. 10th week Nov. 15 11th week Nov. 21 & Nov. 23 12th week Nov. 29 (17) (18). (19) (20) (21) (22) -5Odegard. and Couconsus OR Odegard:. Opinion and the Consent of the Govemed Odegard. Party systems OR Odegard. The Myth of Tweedledum and Tweedledee OR Odegard. The : Grand Congress and the President(From capitol Hill; Party Government and the U.S. Congress) NET-1401 Q! Odegard. The Engineering of Consent Q!. The Costs of Democracy Odegard. Future of American Politics Building Political Leadership: A Look at Local Government CS-1194 Building Political Leadership. Tides of the Future. CS-1191 QR Odegard. The Legislative Struggle Pressure Groups Odegard. Tba President as Party Leader (23) Valley of the Tennessee CS-.376 .Q! TVA and the Nation. CSC-1159 (24) Odegard. The Presidency as an Institution: The Vice in a New Role. OR Odegard. The President as a Party Leader -. 13 .th week (25). Odegard. The President and Foreign Policy ., Dec. 6 .Q! Big City l,980. CS-1174 ... The President and Congress -Rivals or Partners? IJ:I. Besides the campus viewing of these films. you should make your own selection of TV prograqas or filuis which relate to the subject of this course. Required: average !:2!. per to be reported on a standard blank and turned into your instructor. Please be candid in your evaluation and coaments, since we_ wish to the information to recommend the program to others, or not; or even perhaps to obta1.n a kineoscope, IV. Required Interest or Independent Study Project In the ha if .-of the second semester of the course an extensive period is to be devoted to reporting and conferring about atudies selected and undertaken individually and carried out independently. The plan and organization of Chis part of the course 'will" be presented you : later but it will be in the nature.of a return to. the broad context of the first part. for drawing conclus.ione and summaries _'! Preparing for.it, each student.will select an area or a topic of interest and study it independently -with the advice and c onsent of his instructor. For best_ results he should pursue this and subject of study through out the year and .. absorb it. into the general study of the course. But most important of all is that be self selected, that it seem to the student the most impo.rtant or most intere_sting of the subjects brought up in or related to the course.

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-6-Therefore, make your selection get your instructor'e O.K.) as early as you feel prepared to do so, read, study, and reflect upon it as convenient. confer with your instructor or others about it, and prepare yourself to report it as you will be required to do during the last half of CB 202, A list of suggestions appears later in this outline. Paperback Browsing: In the browsing collection and area of the University Library (at the entrance), there is a bookcase of paperbacks related to this course, under its title "The American Idea". We recommend that you look through them. Some are not stocked at the Bookstore. but will be ordered for you on request. Some are suggested as the introduction into a subject for your Independent Stt1dy. DOCUMENTS I. AFRO ASIA When, in the spring of 1955 the American people and most Europeans were focussing their attention on the "summit conference" with the USSR. there was held the first Conference at Bandung, Indonesia. Twenty-nine (29) countries from Turkey to the Philippines. and in Africa to the Gold Coast. met at the invitation of the Prime Ministers of Bunna. Ceylon. India, Indonesia and Pakistan. "Great'' powers and European oriented powers were not invited. though some sent "observera". Communist China was allowed a delegation which was headed by Ctou En-lai who addressed the conference and did his best to influence it. Since this conference represents the first alignment of the. powers which. with additions. have now come to wield a new influence in the United Nations, it may be important to analyze the attitudes and spirit at Bandung and the response of the Afro-Asian "public opinion" represented. The document excerpted below is a publication called Jana issued by the Associated Newspapers of Ceylon in a format which shoWS"its model Time or Newsweek. It is the May 1955 issue and reports the Bandung Conference. It represents viewpoints, probably, of the intellectuals and journalists of the Afro-Asian area which participated. Here is reflected an authentic view of the world and of America .. The idealistic Editorial with which it begins, finishes: "Indeed, one of the moot striking. facts which emerged f-rom was that a great many of the inarticulate presumptions which have been the background of Western thinking on international questions are not accepted by the free Afrasian coi.-utries.. It is in this sense that the a>nference was evidence of a new factor in world affairs which the rest of the world must recognise and begin to take account of Tte renaissance of the Asian and African peoples will undoubtedly release vast creative forces in the future. The question which faces Afrasia is: Will it utilise these forces for its own sectional interests

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-7alone or for the whole of man kind? To make tha former choice would be to leave the wo-rld divided It. w()uld, _in a different way, repeat the mistake tha. t the European rulers made wh2n. they relegated Asia adn Africa to a position of inferioritY and began the division between the' whites and the non-wbite61 the haves and the have-note. It is Afrasia's task, then, to use the forces of new creative energy atits command for the.benefit of the World. It must act as a catalyst in bringing into being a genuine international coamunity1 f .ree of the tensions and confiicts that now darken the world with and scientific advance has brought mankind to the point where it must be one or.perish. In the age of airways and atomic weapons there is no political alternative to international brotherhood. Having become conscious of itself and its own rights, Afrasia must play its part in bringing into being a world in which all men, .of whatever race, colour or creed, are.free and equal and in which human knowledge and energy are directed not towards death and destl:'Uction but towards their proper ends of liberating mankind from poverty and bondage to nature." The news account begins: : ... FIGHT FOR FREEDOM "In a recondit'toned army club, in Bandung, formerly reserved exclusively for Dutch off ice rs, twenty nine newly independent nations of Asia and Africa met todtscover how to secure peace in the world, how to promote cooperation among how to defend their sovereignty from all forms of subjugation and how to extend the precious heritage of freedom to other peoples in thei. r region still suffering under an oppressive foreign yoke." President Soekamo of Indonesia "'the day they. began their deliberations April 18 -was full of historic memories. On that day 180 years ago (President sOek&rno of Indonesia reminded the delegates) had occurred the first dramatic in-. cident in the American War of Independence, tbe first war of a subject peoples against imperialist domination. The times have since then. The u.s. which first pealed the bell of freedom is.n
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-8-resolutions were a w arning to all Colonial Powers and white settlers in colonies that their dowinat:ion should come to a n end. Some delegations. naturally. interpreted the Colonial Powers to include Soviet Colonialism as practised in countries in Eastern Europe and the Baltic. 2. It devised concrete schemes for economic co-operation among underdeveloped peoples of the world. Hitherto economic co-operation has been among the developed countries on the one hand and under-developed countries on the other. But while preserving these fol'Uls of co-operation. the Conference resolved on a series of special measures directed to achieve economic co-operation between all the countries present at the Bandung Conference. Here it opened up new vistas of economic development which had been hitherto untouched. 3. Zt evolved schemes for cultural co-operation. The renaissance of Asia and Africaextends equally to the spiritual and cultural fields and without any signs of exclusiveness or rivalry to the other groups of nations and their cultures. It sought in the lerger context of world co-operation to promote cultural co-operation among the countries of Asia and Africa directed towards making the various cultures and philosophies prevailing in the region known throughout the whole region. 4. It provided another opportunity for settling the problem of Formosa. This was done outside the conference room. Formosa was a problem whi'h had been evading all efforts even to secure a discussion on it. It was a notable concession the Colombo Powers got from China when it agreed to negotiate directly with the United States on a matter which China bad been insisting concerned her sovereign rights. 5. It called upon the U.N. to admit all nations qualified for admission to the U.N. including the various countries of the Asian and African Conference qualified for admission but which had not been admitted. It also called for the revision of. the constitution of the Security Council to give adequate representation to the countries of Asia and Africa. This marks a change in the balance of power in world affairs which hitherto had been controlled by a group of Western Powers, principally the United States and the Soviet Union. Asia and Africa are sure to play a decisive part in world affairs. The primary issue to which the Bandung Conference gave its attention was that of coexistence with the Coamunist powers. Was it possible to live together in friendship with Communist countries which many delegates would use devious techniques of subversion and infiltration? The Communists too had their fears. It has been abundantly clear that the mistrust of the Communists and the non-Conmunists of each other's policies and techniques was the principal' reason for the mounting world tension. The conference had a unique quality. It was the first time a non Communist group of nations were meeting the Communists in a situation where the primary purpose was not the securing of tactical advantages or sterile debating points. Early in its life the conference bad to ask itself the question: should it confine itself to the letter.of the Bogor declaration and the agendi1 set for it then and seek only 'common grounds of agreement' That meant an appearance of hal'Ulony would certainly prevail but both sides would depart with mental reservations about getting on with the other. In free frank speech both sides had nothing to lose but their fears."

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-9The.President of the Conference Ali Sastroamidjojo, Prime Minister of lndonesia was reported to have said he received the letter from the sub' and the letter was g;lven prominerice 1n a box: "We hope your prospective meeting with other Asian and African leaders will fUlfU your highest .expectations 11any people in the world are in desperate need, many are full of fear, many are zealous fpr partisan Amid the pressures and perplexities of this situation we write to urge upon you not caution but fearlessness, not calculation but wiodoin, not effusion but discipline, not a partisan program but the development of universal ideals. '. We shall be watch;lng you, because any solution you discover should help uo all. The world is tired of oppression, dogma, and war. It is tirod of the efforts of various governments to dominate, or to build defensive. associations. We count upon you to develop independent solutions; to the principles of a new society. Deeper than t h e need for among starving people is the. need for a new confidence in man --the confidence upon which democratic institutions can be established, the confidence upon which liberating philosophies can be the confidence upon which can aspire toward economic brotherhood. Because of great wealth our own country in supe:ri stition which you can no longer afford to tole1ate You are aware of our weakness: our people in large measure still adhere to political, religious, and economic institutions based upon survival interests, rather than upon fulfilment. Survival is important, but su .rvival is not growth. Survival effort breeds conflict division, and stagnation. In contrast, evolution and progress depend primarily upon a capacity of energy to integrate and harmonize; to fulfil potentials. The way of caesar, of grasping for strength, is fa!lins in Moscow and Washington as it has in Rome. We have need that you shall be the Asokas to reintegrate our world into a coamunity pf a matrix in which people of understanding, of-technical skill, and of artistic genius ma7 mature. sincerely yours, Emily G. Balch (Nobel Peace Prize Winner), Wellesley, Mas3; Roger Baldwin (American Civil Liberties Union), New York City; Van Wyck Brooks, (Literary Historian), Bridgewater, Conn; Pearl Buck (Ncpel .Prize nqvelist), New York City; Henry Crane (Methodist lecturer), Detroit, Michigan; Kemit Eby (sociologist)', University of Chieago, Chicago,Illinois; Henry Pratt Fairchild (sociologist)., New York University, New York City; 5. Ralph Harlow (Professf>r Re.ligion) Smith College, Northampton, Mass; James Hupp (Dean), West Virginia Wesleyan, Nnckh.."lnnon, West Virgi.nia; Homar A. Jack (Unitarian minister and author), Evanston, Illinois, Philip Mayer (UniversaU.st miniSter), ferry, New Yoi:k; Lewis Mumfort (Philosopher),. Amenia, New Yo-rk; Howard. Thuman (Dean of the Chape1), Boston University, Boston, Mass; David Rhyo Williams (Unitarian minister and author), New York.'! Chou En-lai's speech and replies to criticisms of it were printed as was an account of an unexpected stop-over, required by bad weather, en route to the conference, at Singapore. suspicious, security-minded behavior was reported tbus:

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-10"First down the steps were six grim-looking bodyguards. hands thrust well down their side pockets. Four of them stood at the bottom of the steps leading from the plane, the other two faced round and looked towards the air port building on the roof and round the entrance of which a silent crowd stood watching. Nothing happened for five minutes. A police official boarded the plane. Still nothing happened. The police officer descended and stood at the foot of the ladder. Another long pause followed --a quarter of an hour had passed since the place drew up to a stop. Its engines had been switched off. Then a short hatless figure appeared at the door of the aircraft, his stiff hair pasted down to his head over which he brushed a hand as he stood for a minute looking round. Then he descended, followed by the rest of his retinue." There was a survey and account of the situation in each of the countries and areas at the Conference, reports on Cinema, The Preas, Religion, Sports, etc. etc., and a poem. "BETWEEN TWO WORLDS Moving towards doom beneath a darkened eun, Two worlds we see where we had dreamed of one; Cold war inflamed in spasms and the threat Of cataclysmic conflict's blast oAnd yet A new hope now illumines Asian skies, In Africa new vibrant voices rise; Peace is a victory that we can win, It need not be annihilation's twin; This peace between two worlds that co-exist Is not on far horizons lost in mist; Itsshape is clear and its foundations laid Deep in the hearts of millions. Yt is made The goal of men of vision born to lead Two worlds away from violence, hate and greed To friendly planning for a way of life Free from the grip of fear and stress of strife The East will not bow low before the Nor let the Western legions thunder past, And plunge in thought again Asia is awake, Africa's spirit no tyranny can break; The races long despised, enslaved, oppressed Arise to teach new wisdom to the West. Brighter for its eclipse, June's radiant sun May see the wonder of two worlds madP. one. Jay Quill. What do you conclude about the attitudes of these Asian i.ntellectuals and newsmen about the U.S.? About Communist China?

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Documents II. -11-President Kennedy's Inaugural Address January 20, 1961 "The New Frontier" My fellow citizens: We observe today not a victory of partybut a celebration of freedom an end as well as a beginning --signifying renewal as well as change. For 1 have sworn before you and Almight)' God the same solemn oath our forebears prescribed nearly a century and three quarters ago. The world is yery different now. For man holds in his mortal hands the pc:)wer.to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life. And yet tQe same revolutionary beliefs for which our forebears fought are still 1,s'sue around the globe --the belief that the rights of man come not from the generosity of the state but from the hand of God. We dare not forget today that we are the heirs of. that first revolution. Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans --born in this century, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, proud of our 'ancient heritage --and unwilling to witness or permit the sl0w un-doing of those human rights to which this.nation has always been committed, and to which we are comm'itted today at home and around the world. Let every nation know, whether it wish us well or ill, that we sh.dl pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend or oppose any foe in order to assure the survival and success of libetty. This much we pledge --and more. To those old allies whose cultural and spiritual origins we share, we pledge the loyalty of faithful friends. United, there is little we cannot do in a host of cooperative ventures. Divided, there is little we can do for we d .ire not meet a powerful challenge at odds and split asunder. To those new states whom we welcome to the ranks of the free, we pledge our word that one form of colonial control shall not have passed away merely to replaced by a far more iron tyranny. We shall not always expect to find them supporting our every view.' But we shall hope to find them strongly supporting theirciWri and to remember that, in the past, those who to .find power by riding on the tiger's back ended up inside. To those peoples iri the .hut11 and villages of half the globe struggling to break bonds of mass misery, we pledge best efforts to help them help themse'tves, for whatever period is tequlred --not because the Communists are doing it, not because .:leek their but because it is right. If the free cannot he'tp the. many who are poor, 'it can never save the few who are rich. .. To our sister .. republics south o f our botder, we offer a special pledge --to convert our good words into good deeds in a new alliance for progress -'to assist free men and free off the chains of poverty. But this peaceful revolutipn of hope cannot become the prey of hostile powers. Let all our neighbors knoW that we shall join with them to oppose aggresdon or subversion anywhGre in Americas. And let eve1-y other power know that this' hemisphere intends to remain the mast .er of its ow house. 'To.that world assembly of :sovereign states, the United Nations, our last best hope in an age where the instruments of war have far outpaced the instruments of peace, we renew our pledge of support -to prevent it from becoming merely a fortim for invective --to strengthen its shield cf the new and the weak --and to enlarge the -area in which its writ may run. Finally, to those nations who would make themselves our adversary, we

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-12-offer not a pledge but a request: That both sides begin anew the quest for peace, before the powers of destruction unleashed by science engulf all humanity in planned or accidental self-destruction. We dare not tempt them with weakness. For only when our arms are sufficient beyond doubt can we be certain beyond doubt that they will never be employed. But neither can two great and powerful groups of nations take comfort from their present course --both sides overburdened by the cost of modern weapons, both rightly alarmed by the steady spread of the deadly atom, yet both racing to alter that uncertain balance of terror that stays the hand of mankind's final war. So let us begin anew --remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof. Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate. Let both sides explore what problems unite us instead of belaboring those problems which divide us. Let both sides, for the first time, formulate serious and precise proposals for the inspection and control of arms --and bring the absolute power to destroy other nations under the absolute control of all nations. Let both sides join to invoke the wonders of science instead of its.terrors. Together let us explore the stars, conquer the deserts, eradicate disease, tap the. ocean depths and encourage the arts and commerce. Let both a .ides unite to heed in all corners of the earth the. command of Isaiah --to "undo the heavy burdens (and) let the oppressed go free. 11 And if a beachhead of cooperation can be made in the jungles of suspicion, let both sides join in the next task: Creating, not a new balance of power, but a new world of law, where the strong are just and the weak secure and the peace preserved. All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days. Nor will be finished in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this adminis tration, nor even perhaps in our on this planet. But let us begin. In your. hands, my fellow citizens, more than in mine, .will rest the final success or failure of our course. Since this country was founded, each gener ation of Americans has been. summoned to. give testimony .to its national loyalty. The graves of young American s who answered the call to. s .ervice surround the globe. Now the trumpet summons us again --not as a call to bear arms though arms we need --not as a call to battle, though embattled we are --but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation" --a struggle against tl'e common enemies of man: Tyranny,. poverty, disease and war itself. Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, north and south, east and west, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort? In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shrink from this responsibility --1 welcome it. 1 do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith and the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it -and the glow from that fire can truly light the world. And s o my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you --ask what you can do for your country.

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" -13My fellow citizens of the world: Ask not .Amerieo-u:lll do for you. but what together we.can do for the freedom of. man. Finally, whether you are citizens of America or of the world. ask of us heTe the same high standards of strength and sacrifice that we ask of you With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final.judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God's work must truly be our own. Document Ill The Constitution of The United States of America. Begins on page 14 ... : :'" : 1 -! : fl'.., .. !.1. ) : ) ....... 1.

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-14-THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA We; the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insdre domestic tranquillity; provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the, blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of .America. ARTICLE I Section 1 All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and a House of Representatives. Section 2 The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature. No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age of _twenty-five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen. Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to SeTVice for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons. The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each State shall have at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut five, New York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South Carolina five, and Georgia three. When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies. The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers; and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment. Section 3 The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof, for six Years; and each Senator shall have one Vote. Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first Election, they shall be divided as equally as may oe into three Classes. The Seats of the Senators of the first Class shall be vacated at the Expiration of r-\ the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth Year, ....._; and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that one-third may be chosen every second Year: and if Vacancies happen by Resignation,

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-15-or otherwise, during the ReceS'S of the Legislature of any State, the Executive thereof may make temporary Appointments until the next Meet < ing of the Legislature, which shall then fill such Vacancies No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years ; and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall no .t, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall be chosen. .. The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided. The Senate shall chuse their other Officers, and also a President pro tempore, ui the Ahsence of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise the Office of. President of the united States. The Senate shall have theaole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting for that Purpose tbey shall be on Oath or AffiJ:mation. when the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no :Person shall be cot'lVicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the Members .-present. 3udgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from Office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor, Trust or Profit under the United States: but the Party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to Law. t', Section 4 The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators arid Representatives shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but theCongress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting shall be on the. first Monday in December, unless they shall by:Law appoint a .different" Day. Section 5 Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Qualifications of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do Business; but a smaller number may adjourn from day to day and may be authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner, and under suc b Penalttes. as. each Houa e may pn>Vide. Bouse uy de. termine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members for disQrderly. Behavior, and, with the. Concurrence of two thirds, expel a Member. Each House shall keep a Journal of its.Proceedings, and from time to. time publish the same, excepting such Parts as mayin their Judg1J1ent require Secrecy; and .the. Yeas and Naysof the Members of either House on any question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those present, be entered on the Journal. Neither House, during-the Session of Congress, shall, without the Consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other Place than that in which .the two Houees : shall be sitting. Section 6 The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compensation for their Services, to be ascertained by taw, and paid out of the Treasury of the United States. They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the

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-16-same; and for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in any other Place. No Senator or Representative shall, during the Time for l-?hich he was elected, be appointed to any civil Office under the Authority of the United States, which shall have been created, or the Emoluments whereof shall have been encreased during such time; and no Person holding any Office under the United States, shall be a Member of either House during his Continuance in Office. Section 7 All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as on otherBills. Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, shall, before it become a Law, be presented to the President of the United States; If he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his Objections to that House in which it shall have originated, who shall enter the Objections at large on their Journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If after such Reconsideration two thirds of that House shall agree to pass the Bill, it shall be sent, together wUh the Objections, to the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two thirds of that House, it shall become a Law. But in all such Cases the Votes of both Houses shall be determined by Yeas and Nays, and the Names of the Persons voting for and against the Bill shall be entered on the Journal of each House respectively. If any Bill shall not be returned by the President within ten Days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the Same shall be a Law, in like Manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its Return, in which Case it shall not be a Law. Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concurrence of the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of Adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and before the Same shall take E feet, shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two thirds of the Senate and House of Representatives, according to the Rules and Limitations prescribed in the Case of a Bill. Section 8 I The Congress shall have Power to lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debes and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United Stat.es; but all Duties, Imposts end Excises shall be unifonn throughout the United States; To borrow Money on the credit of the United States: To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with tbe Indian Tribes; To establish an uniform of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States; To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix the Standard of Weights snd Measures; To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and current Coin of the United States: To establish Post Offices and post Roads; To promote the of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive right to their respective Writings and DiscoverieR; To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;

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-17'l'.e> 4ef ine and punish Piracies and l''elonies committed en the. high Seas, and ... Qffenceff against the Law .Nations; To .declare War, grant Letter s of M arque and Reprisal, and mske Rules conceming ... J ;,;Captures on Land and Water; ,To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer Term than two Years; To provide and 111aintain a Navy; To make Rules for the. Government and Regulation of the land and naval Forces; To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrecti9ns and repel Invasions; To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the Militia, and for govern ing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the United States, .reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the Officers, and the AutAority of training the Militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress; To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased by the Consent of the.Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be, for the Erectioll'.of Forts, Magazines, Arsenab, dock-Yards, and needful buildings --And To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for-carrying into Execution .the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United Stat.es, or in any Department or Officer thereof. Section 9 The Migration or IaJportation of such Persons as any of the States now existing shall think proper to admit shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a Tax or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each Person. The Privilege of the Writ of Corps aball not be suspended, unless when in Cases of or Invasion the public Safety may require it. No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed. Wo Capitation, or other direct, tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to the Census or Enumeration herein before directed be taken. No Tsx or Duty shall be laid on Articl.es exported from any State. No Prefere. nce shall be given by any Regula .tion qf Commerce or Revenu e to the Ports of one State ove r those of another: nor c:sb.$11 VeiJsels bound to, or from, one State, i:>blige d to clear,. or pay Duties in another. No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of Appropriations ma. de by Law; and a regular and of the Receipts Ex .Penditures of all public Money shall be published from tiJD,e to time. No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them. shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of ariy present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign .. Section 10 No State .. 11ha.ll ente:r into any Trea 'ty' .. Alliance. or Gonfederation; grant letters of Marque and Reprbat; coi:n Money;. Bills oLCredit; make any Thing but g9ld and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts; pass any _Bill .of Attainder, Law, or Obligation of C9ntx:acts, or grant any Title 9 Nobility.

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-18-No State shall, without the Consent of Congress,, lay any Imposts or Duties on Imports or except what may be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection Laws: and the net Produce of all Duties and Imposts, laid by any State on Imports or Exports, shall be for the Use of the Treasury of the United States; and all such Laws shall be subject to the Revision and Controul of the Congress. No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of Tonnage, keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement of Com pact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in War, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of delay. ARTICLE II Section 1 The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of fou:Years, and, together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as follows Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Represen tatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the Unf.ted States, shall be appointed an Elector. The electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by ballot for two Persons, of whom one at least' shall not be an Inhabitant of the same State with themselves. And they shall make a List of all the Persons voted for, and of the Number of Votes for each; which List they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the Seat of the Government of the United States, .directed to the President of the Senate The President of the Senate shall, in the Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the Certificates, and the Votes shall then be counted. The Person having the greatest Number of Votes shall be the President, if such Number be a Major ity of the whole Number of Electors appointed; and if there be more than one who have such Majority, and have an equal Number of Votes, then the House of Representatives shall immediately chuse by Ballot one of them for President; and if no Person have a Majority, then from the five highest on the List the _.said House shall in like Manner chuse the President. But in chusing the President, the Votes shall be taken by States, the Representation from each State having one Vote; A quorum for this Purpose shall consist of a Member or Members from two thirds of the States, and a Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every Case, after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number of Votes of the Electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should remain two or more who h ave equal Votes, the Senate shall. chuse from them by Ballot the Vice Prt:=s:i.dent.. The Congress may deten:iine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day on which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States. No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office who shall !".ot have attained to the Aga of thirty five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States. :=:> In Case cf the Removal of the President from Office, or of his Death, Resignation or Inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the said Office, the same shall devolve on the Vice President, and the Congress may by Law provide for

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-19th4 Caaa of R.emVll'a1. Rad.gnat1gn e-:.. "i'l"l."l!"iili.ty. both of the President and Vice PrcDident, dtclaring what Officer ohall then cu .. '.... r ........ .And such Officer shall act accor(angly, until the Disability be removed, or a President shall be elected. The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a Compensation, which shall neither be encreased nor diminished during the Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the following Oath or Affirmation:--"1 do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States." Section 2 The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when c3lled into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offences against the United states, except in Cases of Impeachment. He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the Supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law; but the Congress may by Law vest the of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments. The President shall have Power to .fill up all Vacancies that may happen during the Recess of the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall expire atthe End of their next Session. Section 3 He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as be shall judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary Occasions, convene both Houses, or either of them, and, in Case of Disagreement between them, with respect to tha Time of Adjournment, he mayatljourn them to such Time as he shall think proper; he shall receive Ambassado ts and othei: public Ministers; he shall take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed, and shall Conunission all the Officers oE the United States. Section 4 The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and misdemeanors. ARTICLE III Section 1 The judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court,

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-20and in such inferior Courts a:'3 the Congress :ney from d .me to time ordain and establish, The Jud ges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts, shall h old their Offices during goo d Behaviour, and a t Times, receive for their Services, a Compensation, -which shall not be diminished during their in Office. Section 2 The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising under this Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made, or which shall be made, under their Authority;--to all Cases .affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls;--to all Cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction;--to Controversies to which the United States shall be a Party;to Controversies between two or more States;--between a State and Citizens of another State;--between Citizens of different States,--between Citizens of the smQe State claiming Lands under Grants of different States, and be tween a State, or the Citizens thereof, and foreign States, Citizens or Subjects. In.all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, and ... those i n which a State shall be Party, the supreme Court shall have original Jurisdiction. In all the other Cases before mentioned, the supreme Court shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law an. d Fact, with such Ex-1 .. captions, and under such Regulations as the Congress shall make. i The Trial of all Crimes, except in Cases of Impeac_bment, shall be by Jury; and \ such Trial shall be held in the State where the said Crimes shall have been committed; but when not comnitted within any State, the Triai shall be at \ such Place or Places as the Congress may by Law hav e directed. \ Secti.on 3 Treason against the United States, shall consist only in. levying War against them, or in adhering their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort No Person shall,. be convicted o f Treason unless on the Testimony of two Witnesses to the save overt Act, or on Confession in open Court. The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of but no Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except during the Life of the Person attainted. ARTICLE "!Jr Section 1 Full Faith and Credit shall. be. given in each State to the public Acts Records, and judicial Proceedings. of every o ther State. the Congress may by general Laws prescri. be the Manner in which such Acts:> Records and Proceedings shall be proved, and the. Effect thereof,. Section 2 The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to Privileges and Inmunities of CitizenS in. the States.. A person charged in any Treason, Felony,; other Crime, who shall flee from Justice, and be found in another State, shall on Demand of the executive Authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having Juridiction of the Crime. No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof, escaping .into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be delivered up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labor may be due. \

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( -21Section 3 New S\;. e.tee may be admitted by the Congress into thb tfoi..vn; no new State shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or Parts of States, without. the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as well of the Congress. The Congress shall have Power to dispose of and make all needful Rules and Regulations respecting the Territory or other Property belonging to the United States; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so as to Prejudice any Claims of the United States, or of any particular State. Section 4 The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Unf on a Republican Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and on Applicatiou of the Legislature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature cannot be convened) against domestic Violence. ARTICLE V The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a .convention for proposing Amendments, Yhich, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of .the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made prior to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner affect the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article; and that no State without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage in the Senate. ARTICLE VI All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of this Constitution. shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation. This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties. made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in ever; State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State lo the Contrary notwithstanding. The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support .this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Off ice or public Trust under the United States. ARTICLE VII The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States, shall be sufficient for the Establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the Same.

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-23-AMENDMENTS ARTICLE I (The first ten articles proposed 25 Oeptcmber 1789; Declared in iorce 15 December 1191) Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peacably to assembie, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. ARTICLE II A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be ARTICLE III No Soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. ARTICLE IV The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things be seized. ARTICLE V No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment. .or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or liinb; nor shall be compelled in any Criminal Case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation. ARTICLE VI In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the r ight to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the 3tate and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertai .ned by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining in his favor, and to have the Assistanr.e of Counsel for his defence. ARTICLE VII In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

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-24-ARTICLE VIII Excessive bail shall not be required> nor excessive fines cruel and unusual punishments inflicted .An.TIGLE IX The enun'ler::it-inn in t;be Const:it:ution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparagaothers by .the people. ARTICLE .lt The powers not delegated to the United States by Constitution, nor pro hibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. ARTICLE XI (Proposed 5 March 1794; Declared ratified 8 January 1798) The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by Citizens of another State, or by Citizens or Subjects of any Foreign State. .!. : ARTICLE XII (Proposed 12 December 1803; Declared ratified 25 September 1804) The Electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of -the same state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the peron voted for as triee-President, and they _shall maka distinct lists of all persons voted for as President. and of all persons vot_ed for as Vice President, and of the numbeT of votes for each, which lists.they shall sign and certify and tranStnit aaaled to the seat of the GoVernment of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate;--The-President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Sene .te and House ()f Representatives, open all the certificates and the votes shall then be counted;--The person having the greatest number of votes for President, shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole num.be, r of Electors appointed; and if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers no t exceeding three on the. list of .those voted for as President, the House of Representatives shall choose by ballot, the Pres.ident. But 'in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from ea.ch state having one .vote; a quorum for this putp<'se : shal.l consist of t member or members from two ... thirds of the states, and a majority of all the-states-shall be neceseary to And if the House of Representatives shall not choose a President whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of March next following, then the Vice-President shall act as President, as in the case of the death or other const;ltutional disability of the President. The person having the greatest numbe. r of votes as Vice-President, shall be the Vice-President, if such be a majority of the whole ntimber of .Electors and if no person have a majority then from the two highest n.timbers ort the lbt, the Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum fo17_the purpose shall conoist of two-thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the

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-25-whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no per0on constitutionally ineligible to the office of shall be eligible to that of VicePresident of the United States. ARTICLE XIII .(Proposed 1 February 1865; Declared ratified 18 December 1865) Section 1 Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. Section 2 Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. ARTICLE XIV (Proposed 16 June 1866; Declared ratified 28 July 1868) Section 1 All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the or inmunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. Section 2 Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice President of ... t:he United States, Representatives in Congress, the Executive and Judicial officers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and citizens4of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion, or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be redu ced in the proportion which the number of such male cftizens shall bear to the whole number : _of male citizens twenty-one years of age in such State. Section 3 No person shall be a Senator or Representative in. congress, or elector of, President and Vice President, or hold any office, civil, or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, having previously taken an Oath, as a member of Congress, or as an officer of the United States, or as a member cf any State legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any State, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may by a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove tuch disability.

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-26Section 4 The validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection. or rebellion, shall not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any or '"LU.gat'.inn :iau;urted in' aid of or rebellion agains.t the United States, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, and claims shall be held illegal and void. Section 5 The Congress shall have power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article. ARTICLE XV .. (Proposed 27 February 1869; Declared. ratified 30 March 1870) Section 1 .lfhe right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or byany"State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. Section 2 The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. ARTICLE.XVI .(Proposed 12 July 1909; Declared ratified 25 1913) .'.!'he Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from what ever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration. ARTICLE XVII (Proposed 16 May 1912; Declared ratified 31 May 1913) "'1 The Senate of the United.States shalt.be. composed .of two senators from each State, elected by the P'90ple thereof; for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each State ahall have the qualifi cations requisite for electors of the moat numerous branch of. the -State legislature. When vacancies happen in the representation of any State in the Senate, the executive authority of such State shall issue writs of election to fi11 such vacancies: PROVIDED, That the legislature of any State may the executive to make temporary appointments until the people fill the vacancies by election as the legislature may direct. This alliendment sl\aU .not be so construed as to affect the election or term of any senator chosen before it becomes valid as.part of the Constitution .. ARTICLE XVII.I (Proposed 18 December 1917; Declared ratified 29 January 1919) After one year from the.ratification of this article, the manufacture,. sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof

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-27-into, or the exportati. on thar.eof from the United S u u::es and all t:erritor.r subject to the jurisdiction tle reof for beverage p u rposes iS hereby prohibited. The Congress and the several States shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of the severai States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by Congress. ARTICLE XIX (Proposed 4 June 1919; Declared ratified 26 August 1920) The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any States on account of sex. The Congress shall have power, by appropriate legislation, to enforce the provisions of this article. ARTICLE XX (Proposed 2 March 1932; Declared ratified 6 February 1933) Section 1 The terms of the President and Vice-President shall end at noon on the twentieth day of January, and ther terms of Senators and Representative& at noon on the day of January, of the years in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been ratified; and the terms cf" ... their successors shall then begin. Sect:!.on 2 j The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such meeting shall begin at noon on the third day of January, unless they shall by law 1ip,point a different day. Section 3 If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the President, the President-elect shall have died, Vice-President-elect shall become President. If a President shall not have been chosen before the time fixed for the beginning of his term, or if the PresidEnt-elect shall have failed to qualify, then the shull act as President until a President shall have qualified; and the Congress may by law provide for the case wherein neither a President-elect nor a Vice-President-elect shall have qualified, declaring who shall then act as President, or the manner in which one who is to act shall be selected, and such person shall act accordingly until a President or Vice-President shall have qualified. Section 4 The Congress may by law provide for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the House of Representatives may choose a President whenever the right of choice shall have developed upon them, and for the case of death of any of the persons from whom the Senate may choose

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-28-a :Vice-President whenever the. right of choice shall .have devolved upon them Section 5 Sections 1 and 2 .shall take effect on the 15th day of October following the ... ratification of this article :. Section 6 This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within 1even years from the date of its submission. ARTICLE XXI (Proposed 20 February 1933; Adopted 5 December 1933) Section l The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed. Section 2 The transportatiion or importation into any State, Territory, or .possession of ; "the United States .:for delivery or use therein of intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is. hereby prohibited Section 3 This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by convention in the several States, as provided in the C:onstitution, years from the date. of the ... submission hereQf to the States by the Congress. ARTICLE XXII (Proposed 2 June 1924; Ratification pending) .-Section 1 'J:he Congress .shall have to limit, reguiate, and the labor of under eighteen years of age. .. \ .' 2 Tlie, power of the several .States. ts unimpaire. d by this article except that the of State laws shall be suspended to the extent necessary to give effect to legislation enacted by the Congress. : (.

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-29OuTLINE EQ! _DISCUSSION Unit I. Introduction First week Are we living on a'hew frontier"? Christopher Fry in his verse play t:, Sleep .Q.f. Prisoners portrays it as a moral frontier :the frozen misery Of centuries breaks, cracks, and begins to move. The thunder is the thunder of the flows; The thaw, the flood, the upstart Spring. Thank God our time is now when wrong Comes up to face us everywhere Never to leave us till we take The longest stride of soul men ever took. Affairs are now soul size." Or is it instead a "frontier" of hazard surrounded by"Reds", of hardshi'ps taxes and military service, of violence and treacherous attack, maybe atomic annihilation? Does it matter what we think it is? What is this freedom for which we are asked to fight and sacrifice? At what cost? We bear the cry (from afar) "Better Red than Dead'." Do we answer "Better Dead than Red"? Or "Better neither, thank you". What decision between hope and fear? Our hopes are founded on our own self-image; and the notoriety of The !!&!I. American may be partially due to theaffront to our self-image and pride. What do you think of The !!&!z. American? QUESTIONS What do you think are the primary purposes of the authors in writing this book? to make money? to write sensationally in order to arouse, empassion and enflame people? to inform the American people about our refutation and activities in Southeast Asia? to effect reforms in the behavior, and the recruitment of our representatives abroad? to elect or to overthrow particular political What are the authors' values? What do they believe in?

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-30e.g. The story of Blown's inspection visit': Was the Senator on a "vacation junket"? Was he a knave, a fool? Was his visit a success? Why? Was it important? What was the outcome? Who are their heroes? their villains? What are the causes of the shocking failures andtragedies? What are the conclusions to be drawn? What can be done about it? .. How can competent, dedicated, Americans equal to (or 'Superior to) the Comnunists, be sent abroad to fight the spread of Communism? How could you be recruited? Would you join the Peace Corps? (it is unpaid, hard work, under-difficult living at)d eating conditions prohably dangerous). Would you be willing to undergo the training needed? The hardships involved? Is our American situation hopeless? What assets and hopes do the authors mention? Are 'there any "Ugly Russians"? "Ugly Chinese"? Dramatis Personnae (presented so you do not need to memorize them in order to discuss the book) The American Louis "Lucky Louis"; ambassador politician who wants a judgeship. The Russian Louis -Krupitzyn: peasant, born 1917, both shot, 1934 .WOf\ Lenin Prize, 1935 chauffe\l.r of Trade commlea'ion iri New York, 1937 Prague, 1939 Foreign Institute Academy, 1945 Military Observer with Mao, 1949 Asia Section USSR Foreign Office, on survey of Sarkhan Water. John Colvin: Wiscondn milk dryer, ex-guerilla fighter, back to Sarkhan to sell dried milk. neong, his friend in OSS Communist. Prince Ngong: intellectual, _poet_ ; dramatic protocol representative Father John X. Finian: Burma, Navy Chaplain who meets the Communist Marine. and T. Tien, his friend. Joe F. Bing. ("Everybody knows .Joe Bing!")

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-31ltomor Atkins (worth three millio;:1 "self-earned" dollars) heavy construction man, but advises against heavy construction. 1. brick factory and building materials, 2. canning plant, 3. access roads. and Emma, learned Sarkanese, invents a pump and long-handled broom. Ruth Jyoti: Eurasian, Burmese journalist, to U.S. Marie Macintosh -"girl who got recruited", who telephoned Prince Moyang for George Swift. Bob Maile of USIS, (and Dorothy} Hamilton Bridge Upton, Dartmouth, State Department Consul Honorable Gilbert MacWhite, Princeton and Molly Senator Jonothan Brown: "honest but tough", who visits, later attacks MacWhite's testimony. Col. Edwin B. Hillandale: Philippine darling, "the ragtime kid", harmonicaist, air forces, palmist; gives George Swift a black eye. Major James Walchek: Texas paratrooper, Military Observer in Indo-China and Monet, French legionnaire and Jim Davis. U. Maung Swe: tells Ma'CWhite of-Martin, short term Bunnan adviser, spoke Burmese --introduced seeds and home. canning. Tom Knox: single, Shelton, Iowa, to Cambodia. Chicken expert --Conference at Phnom Penh, in the American Mission, gets mad, elaborately "cooled out". Solomon Asch: East Side Jew, Union Negotiator, Conference Head in Hong Kong Meeting. Capt Boning USN and Doctor Ruby Tsung. ( tch tch ) Unit I. Continuation Suggested breakdown of assignments: Second week: Lefever (entire, 180 pages) Spanier, Chapter 1. (13 pages) Topics: 1. What is realism in our world dilemma? a reliance on power? a reliance on ethics? a reliance on liberalism? a reliance on faith? (Spanier's Chapter and Lefever's Chapter 1) 2. Are we winning or losing ground? Lefever, Chapter 2

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-32-Was Harbot e. jap victoi;y and advant" ael? or the beginning o f their def eat? Has the atomic' deterrence policy more helped or the Communists? Wquld a coexistence policy more help us, or the Communists? 3. What is diplomacy and what can it achieve? 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Lefever, Chapters 3 and 4 Is secret, traditional balance-of-power and consent-of-power diplomacy better, or "open", "democratic", "parliamentary" diplomacy? Words and deeds in international relations Lefever, Chapters 5, 6 Should we engage in a propaganda war with Communism? Is the USIA one? Will the truth prevail? Does it? What should be our policy in regard to "the truth" 1 what !! the truth about us and our policy? Are we at war with World Communism, or coexisting? Is post ponement of action to wipe it-out a decision to "coexist"? or just to continue to exist? Abraham Li.ncoln said that the U.S. government could not endure half slave and haif free. DOea this apply to today's world? If the "Cold War" and refusal of "coexistence" (as Dean Rusk said of Cuba) is a moral (all out) and political (so far as expedient) war against Communism, should we recognize diplomatically Red countries, and deal with Red regimes? What change in our military defense _policy is represented in the new administration by Gen. Maxwell Taylor? Should we, since for sixteen years there have been no changes in the political boundary between the "Red" and the "free" wodds that we actually were willing to fight about, except Korea, decide to make peace and stabilize that boundary by diplomatic agreement; or should we continue to press to 11llbcrate" Eastern Europe and mainland China? (i.e. adopt what Rennpn has called a policy of "disengagement") Or is any such suggestion "appeasement" arid both morally conteuiptible and proven by history to be disastrously impractical? 9. How, on the whole, have the Communht gains been made in recent years in. Africa, Asia, and Latin America? By military aggression, or by revolution .. and. subversion? 10. How may we best counter and prevent them. 11. Why should giving American arms and money to countries threatened by Coumunism to help them resist it, actually increase American unpopularity?

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-33-Third Week Spanier, Chapters 2,3,4; 5,6 Topics: 1. World geopolitics How did we get into this mess? Was it impossible to "deal with" Stalin? Should we have acted to rescue "satellite Europe'? Was the rescue of Greece and Turkey enough? Compare the rescue of western Europe (by the Marshall Plan) with the loss of China --the near loss of Korea Could we have done better? ts containment of Communism by geopolitical possible? Best? Necessary? Where does the strategic situation favor the Communists? Where favor us? What, by strategic power could we take? What in a military struggle could we hold? Which points of struggle Korea, Indo-China, Laos, Formosa Straits, Berlin, the West Indies, Africa --can we hold defensively? How best? By massive threat and use of power, by guerrella tactics, by "military aid", by economic program? 2. The test of leadership in a democracy Fourth Week Spanier, Chapters 7,8,9 Is the U.S. rising to the challenge of our world position? As a prosperous nation in a world of poverty and overpopulation. Should we undert. ake a Marshall Plan for the underdeveloped world? What leaders have failed to arouse us to adequate policies? Or are the American people -the followers -at fault? What is the role, what is the responsibility, what is the significance of the President of the U.S. in our world today? As Chief of State, Chief Executive, Chief Diplomat, Commander in Chief of the Army, Navy and Air Force, Chief Director of Legislation, Head of Party, and Personal Embodiment (."One-man distillaticn", Rossiter says), of the American people, is the Presidency an impossible, super human role? Can one man do all these and also be responsible for "the ethics, loyalty, efficiency, and the two and a third million

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-34. people who work for the Federal Government? How else, in these days of crisis and congestion in world and national affairs, can we act effectively otherwise than through Presidential leadership? In country after country, in the last twenty years, one leader has loomed up, sometimes a military man, in default of ail adequate political leader.' Are centralized authority, responsibility, and decision nowadays demanded for order and the long-term welfare of the people? Do the times requite a leader who can per$uade and tell us what we need to do? At home and abroad? For example --take time of war --Rossiter says, 11in the event of war the next wartime President, who may well be our last, will have the right to take any measure that may best subdue the enemy, and he alone will be th judge of what is 'best for the survival of the republic'." To prosecute the "Cold War" what powers should the President execute? Truman believed, in April,. 1952, when the "Cold War" was hot in Korea, he had to keep the steel mills running. Was he right or was Clarence Randall who opposed him and won in the federal courts? To end : World War II, Truman decided to' use the new atom bomb on two cities considered "military targets". Should atomic bombing be used in the future without the advice and consent of the people or their representatives? --except in retaliation for atomic of us? e.g. the Korean fracas is still only in 11truce"; ah:d : shelling by Red China sometimes still takes place in Quemoy and Matsu --should atomic weapons be used to end this Cold War struggle. without. the advice and consent of the people The first significant act by Kennedy was the attempted "liberation" of Cuba --the advised planned April, 1962 return of refugees in a military stroke to upset Castro. Hho was at fault in this catastrophic failure? i ; By 1961, there were over 100,000 Cuban refugees in the U.S.; Castrog regime had been revealed as a dangerous despotism; neve::theless the Eisenhower a dmini 'stration had only small Cuban forces in training in Guatemala. Was lice" to blame? .'. Wag Allen.lfolles? There was no upriSing to welcome and assist t:he invasion; had potential opposition been even informed and pre'pared. ,!' .. ... Was Kennedy? The'charge was that his refusal of U .s. military support.to the: landing, speci:fically of. air support, doomed it. Was he wrong to decide against official U.S. military involvement? -t. a.ow .. can Castro be fought or ove : rthrown? Kennedy in. a speech April 20, 1961, suggested that the parts played by arms and politics

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r -35urgently needed re-examination.. Let no one doubt the importance .. of Castroism as sedition and mobilizer of revolutionary force in Latin Ameriea. We have here, near at hand, the problem of how to liberate a Soviet satellite. Would a successful military intervention in Cuba by the U.S. strengthen or weaken our world position? Our security? What policy with Soviet satellites and with leading Coamunist countries will increase our security and advance our interests? Should we oppose all Communists, or deal with them as nations? Or attempt to reach them as individuals and peoples? In which area is the Soviet Union stn>ngest? In which the U.S.? resources production science political available? secure reserves? actual potential mobilized potential influence thru fear thru voluntary consent and support ideological unity and effectiveness Has Kennedy's .administration changed the picture any? The present All-University Book is Barry Gol
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-36_ (You should know of, and read, if this is an interest of yours, Theodore H. White's Making of !.!'!! President, which describes how. It is a masterpiece, and very readable) The P resi:dency is such an iinportant part of our government and so inadequately covered in Coyle, U.S. Political System that at the end of this section of the Syllabus we provide you with an outline of an excellent previous All-University Book, Clinton Rossiter' a The American .Presidency. It may be of help in the histor.ical study which follows. Rossiter: The American Presidency, Outline .2 I. Powers: II. Limits: Congress Civil servant s Federal System Chief of State Chief Executive Chief Diplomat Commander in Chief Chief Legislator Chief of Party Representative of the General Will Protector of the People and Law and Order Manager of Prosperity. Examples Supreme Court Steel Seizure Case AAA NRA elaborate rules and specifications in laws qualifications specified in appointments protection of officials from removal independence and spirit of Congress requirement of reports investigations riderson bills; (pork barrell laws) budget control censure (at risk of public .:.anger impeachment advice and consent -treaties nominations many expert esprit de corps State sovereignty of corporations, mone.y, management, conservatism ... III. The Presidency in History .:. Modeled on .the colonial governorships and intended to establish a strong and independent executive. By 8 decisions: James Wilson won ; 1. (Randolph and others wanted a multiple executive) 2 or 3 (troika?)

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-37-2. Both the Va. and N.J. provided for election by the legislative branch. Voted 5 times for it, Morris got election by the people. 3. Fixed term -(did not recognize it prevented patliamentary, responsible government.) 4. Eligible for re-election indefinietly 5. Specific authority and powers 6. Not encumbered with a council. 7. Prohibition on dual executive aNd legislative positions. The availability of Washington relieved the fear of monarchy. Developed out of this "Republican Kingship." More involved in making national policy Became a democratic off ice -rise of American Democracy Increases in prestige of the office even vs. Congress Importance of international role; Major Contributions of Major Presidents-Pre Civil War Ratings----1. Washington -institutionalism, dignity, authority, patriot, and thanks to Hamilton, legislation. 3. Jefferson -republicanism democracy assertion of power -Louisiana purchase of independence -rejection of subpoena in Burr Trial {Marshall) development of a party appeal to and support from House 2. Jackson -re-establishment of Presidency man of frontier personal control vs. cabinet clear chief of state and party vs. money power Whiggery tried to reverse this. Civil War to Modern 1. Lincoln the powers "VJar i1vwe:-a" Martial law and preserver of the union a democrat as well as a dictator,-"martyred Christ of democracy's 'Passion Play'" followed by a reaction.

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3. Theodore aooseve 1t .7" vi,gor "All..-American B<>Y" broad interests -382. Wiison before Congress Went to Congress for emergency powers, and he cooperated "Blundered in_ appeal for a Democratic Congress" Moral and political leadership Unique. F.D.R IV. Creditable performances: Polk, Johnson, Hayes, Cleveland, Truman Eisenhower. technical point-of-view, both Adamses, Madison, VanBuren, Arthur, McKinley, Taft, and Hoover better than Johnson but not so important. Modem Presidency Initiator and guide of legislation and legislative piogram. TR, WW, and FDR, came as governors of progressive and refonning states. Press Conference and mass media Law and order: intervention in disputes maintenance of wartime production general welfare moral leadership e.g. race relations Broad authority in administration FEPC by executive order Anned f?rces Coamittee on Equality Loyalty and security (Consexvatism vs. Congressional radicalism.) Through the courts: appointments, Friend of Court intervention Commissions .of enquiry Spokesman of the nation The Executive Office: 1939 (September 8) Brownlow, Men:iam, Gulick CommiSsion 1936-7 Six executive assistants, (except for 19 agencies) 100 odd under large departments .. Executive ordr 8248 Off ice Around 12 perscnal aides 24 aides to aides 325 clerks, etc. (p. 97) National Security CoUn.cil 1947 President, Vke-President, State, Defense ODM 1953 CIA and chiefs of ataf Counc:JJ. of Economic Advisors -3 economists 30 staff Arthur F. Burns of the Budget Although those in immediate cooperation are.his personal choices, the staffs have tenure. "The fact is that the Presldency ha s become institutionalize{

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and/ SPECIAL INTEREST STUDY OR INDEPENDENT PROJ'ECT Mode of Procedure: 1. Select a subject or topic for special study or a project to be undertaken on your own. (la) Have it considered and OK1d by your instructor. 2. Prepare to represent the subject as a lay expert in.debate, panels, and/or committee discussion. (You may wish to make a notebook illustrated with clippings, but _if you assemble a scrapbook," it is supplementary to a serious effort .to study and acquire understanding of subject. It will be judged on evidences of such study and understanding and on the quality of systematic organization --not on bulk and quantity.) or 3. Prepare a well-balanced report or essay on your topic to be sbmitted, in good fotm, with bibliography and footnotes, if needed. (typed, if possible). Due Date: in the last half of the second semester (i.e. CB 202), calendar date to be announced, in some cases individually. Note: Since you may select a subject which is related to CB 201 or CB 202, your planning should take note of the fact that no time is released by light assign ments in CB 201, whereas in the last third of CB 202 there will be a period of light or no new assignments during the final period of. recap.itulation, summary and conclusions. You may find it necessary to postpone intensive work on your topic until that time, when your contribution and report will specifically be due. On the other hand, the benefit of this supplementary project will be greatest to you and your contribution to the course increased if you can select and begin your study prior to or simultaneously with the discussion of the related area in the course. Subjects and Subject Areas: This list is suggestive only, and mainly based upon the which are available and which have been stocked by the Bookstore as related to the course. Browse among them, but also browse generally in the Library in making your selection of subject. The selection should be yours. Apliilosophical cultural approach to world understanding F.s.c. Northrop, The Meeting of East and West (Macmillan. $2.65) Americans abroad: the representation of the u.s. abroad. Or, the possibilities of a career abroad and how to prepare.for it. Cleveland, Mangone, and Adams, Overseas American s The University and World AffaiIS The Representation of the U.S. Abroad American Assembly 1956 Study Abroad p.s. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare New Dimensions series #6 The goals and prospects of the u.s. today The Rockefeller Panel Prospect for America (Doubleday President 1 s Commission on Polit.ica. l Goals. Goals for Americans 14!! series on America's National Purpose .: $1.45)

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-2-The Military in American Life Walter Millis, Arms and .Men (Mentor 50) Louis Smith, American Democracy and Military Power Political leadership; the achievement and exertion of personal power and influence. (a) A comparison between American patterns and those in.some other country or culture. e.g. Compare J.F.K. or Eisenhower with Gandhi or Nehru or with Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana (See, for example Richard Wright's Black Power, this American Negro novelist's straight reporting of his visit when the nation was being born) Machiavelli Taylor H.D. Lasswell David Spitz Public Opinion The Prince The Statesman (Mentor 50) preface by c. Northcote Parkinson Power and Personality Psychopathology and Politics Patterns of Anti-Democratic Thought (Compass. $1.65) Its nature, evolution, and role in a democracy. Walter Lippmann, Public Opinion .(Macmillan $2.25) Walter the' Rublic Philosophy Related A. A survey of opinion on a significant political issue or problem area. e.g. Florida opinion on American foreign policy and international problems. B. A study of political activity or organization e.g. How the elements and sections of Tampa (or Hillsborough County) voted in the last election. c. Participant political activity; in precinct and ward, and party; in campus arena le.a.dersfiip .. D. A of public opinion and its impact on the of California at Berkeley. (See David Harowitz Student (Ballantine. 50) The atomic age dilemma,; mutual -the stalemate of horror. The possibility of relief from the prospect of all-out war ____ i.e. disarmament of mass destruction weapons: atomic, chemical Who Wants Disarmament? R.J. Barnet (Beacon. $1.45) On War, Raymond Aron (Anchor, 1959. 95) Disarmament; Alternatives to the H-Bomb, James P. Warburg (Beacon,1955)' Strategy for Survival, Wayland Young (Penguin, 1959. 65) The Price of Power, America since 1945, Herbert Agar (University of Chicago Press) The Causes of World War Three, c. Wright Mills, (Simon and Schuster. $1.50) See also On the Beach (novel), Nevil Shute (Signet 50)

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-3-War and peace from a religious point of view Is Peace Possible, Kathleen Lonsdale (A Quaker View), Penguin, 1957. 65) The United States and the Soviet Union, (Yale University Press) 1949 In Place of Folly, Norman Cousins (Harper. $1.50) Foreign Policy Foreign policy in the United States (work out what you think should be the lines of the foreign policy of the U.S.) Has Man a Future, Bertrand Russell (Penguin. 85) May Man Prevail, Erich Fromm (Anchor. 95) Russia, the Atom, and the West, George P. Kennan See also the Foreign Policy Association. Headline Books A. Historical: Our departure from isolation The Revolution in American Foreign Policy, 1945-1954, William Carleton Doubleday, 1954. $1.75) for the documents see Hofstadter, Great Issues, use II Part VII, (Vintage Books) Lippman, U.S. Foreign Policy Agar, Herbert The Price of Power; America since 1945 (University of Chicago Press. $1.75) B. In Asia: Rostow and Hatch, An American Policy in Asia c. China: See Fa .reign Policy Association, Headline Books Nos. 129 & 136. Derk Bodde, 'China's Cultural Traditions -What and Whither A. Doak Barnett, Communist China and Asia; A Challenge to American Policy (Vintage $1.65) Ch'u Chai and Winberg Chai, The Changing Society of China (Mentor. 75) D. USSR: Ellsworth, Raymond, Soviet Economic Progress Henry L. Rpberts, Russia and America; Dangers and Prospects (NAL) Robert w. Campbell, Sov:fet Economic Power (Houghton Mifflin) w. w. Rostow, The Dynamics of Societ Society, (NAL, MD 121) Philip Moseley, Kremlin and World Politics (Vintage Rl002) Zbigniew K. Brzezinski, Ideology and Power in Soviet Politics (Praeger. $1.75) E. Middle East: William A. Williams, America and the Middle East Egypt F. Latin America The Population Problem The World Revolution in Expectations and Technology New Dimensions of Peace, Chester Bowles Ideas, People, and Chester Bowles (Harper, 1958) Hoffman's Article in "'!he Search for America." Cultural Patterns and Technical Change, Margaret Mead (NAL) America's economic relations with the world Robin w. Winks, The Marshall Plan and the American Economy

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-4-Especially Significant Countries India and Pakistan The Wonder that Was India Wallbank, Short History of India and Pakistan (.NAL, MD 224) Nehru, Toward Freedom (Beacon. $1.95) Nehru, The Discovery of India (Anchor. $1.45) Gandhi, -}.n Autobiography (B_ eacon. $1.95) Japan Cuba USSR (See D above) Af r:i.ca Immanuel -Wallerstei.n,_:Afr i-ca; Politics of $1.25) Middle East Williams, America and the Middle East China American Society The courts and legal tradition Henry J ." Abraham, The Judicial Powers (Oxford Paperback) Roscoe Pound, -An Introduction to the Philosophy of Law (Yale. $1.25) Edmond Cahn, The Moral Decision; Right and Wrong in the Light of American Law (Midland. $1, 75) An overall look at Aiiierican civilization Max Lerner, America as a Civilization Huston Smith, The Search for America American Affluence : J.K. Galbraith, The Affluent Society David Potter, People of Plenty Vance P4ckard, The Hidden -Persuaders (Pocket Book, Inc _.) The American Tradition Federalism as a principle for the modem problems of nationalism The relations of wealth and property to the national purpose Part V and Bibliography of Goldman, Eric, Rendezvous with Destiny Heath Series, Problems, Roosevelt, Wilson, and the Trusts The conservative point of view. See Clinton Rossiter, Conservatism in America (Vintage 212) The liberal point of view H.K. Girvetz, Wealth to Welfare

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-5-The gospel of wealth and success Heath Series, Democracy and the Gospel of Wealth Heath Series, Benjamin Franklin and the Ame,rican Character Hofstadter's Great Issues, II and Part II, (Vintage Books) The cosmopolitan or multi-cultural tradition Immigration, Oscar Handlin, editor (Prentice-Hall. $1 95) Louis Adamic: Marcus Lee Hansen, The Atlantic Migration 1607-1860 (Torchbook. $2.25) Oscar Handlin, The Uprooted, 23 Universal Immigration an issue See Heath Series, Problems Immigration an American Dilemma Historical Cases Joseph Charles, The Origin of the American Party System (Torchbook. $1.25) Age of Andrew Jackson: A Case History'in the Origins. of' ;Liberal Capitalism. Heath Series, : Problems. Jackson Biddle. Compare Hofstadter with A.M. Schlesinger, Jr., The Age of Jackson. (NAL) The New Deal Hofstadter's Issues, II Part VI Books) Heath Series, F. D. R,. and the Supreme Cou.rt Heath Series, New. Deal, Revolution .pr Evolution Davies and Goetztiiann, New Deal and Business Recovery Potter and Goetzmann, New Deal and Employment Trade Unions: in line with or in conflict with American ideals and Heath Series, Industry-Wide Collective Bargaining E. David Cronon, Contemporary Labor Management Relations Ely Chinoy, Automobile Workers and the American Dream Labor in a Free Society, M Harrin. gton and Paul Jacobs, editors American "capitalism" J.K. Galbraith, American Capitalism (Houghton Mifflin. $1.30) J.K. Galbraith, The Affluent Society Allen M. Sievers, Revolution, Evolution and the Economic Order (Spectnim. $1.95) The South Cash, Mind of the South (Anchor. 95) Heath Series, Desegregation and the Supreme Court Huston Smith, The Search for Tomorrow See Ante-Bellum, H.R. Helper and George Fitzhugh.cla .ssic writings. (Capricorn. $1.35) and Incident at Harpers Ferry (Prentice-Hall sourcebook) Reform: the wave of the future or sentiment of the past? Compare the of The Age of Reform (Vintage. $1.25) with Goldman's approach Rendezvous with Destiny (Vintage. $1.45) Loyalty in a democratie state Heath Series, Loyalty in a Democratic State Barth, Loyalty of Free Men

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-6 .. The growth of the American economy Cochran and Miller, The Age of Ente:rprise; a Social History of Industrial America. (Torchbook. $2.35) World Problems Our age of revolution Crane Brinton, Anatomy of Revolution Eric Hoffer, The True Belie?er Arthur The Yogi and the Commissar The history of Communism Edmund Wilson, To the Finland Station (Anchor. $1.25) c. Wright Mills, The Marxists (Dell. 75) James H. Michener, The Bridge at Andau (Bantam 35) The Communist faith Koestler, Qerkness at Noon Koestler, The God that Failed (Bantam F20n} Koestler, The Invisible Writing (Beacon Press) Sidney Hook, Marx and the Marxists (Anvil) Hoestler, The Yogi and the CommiS"Sar Science in a free society J. Stefan Sanford A. Lakoff, Science and the Nation (a good survey of the issues which developed with atomic research including the Oppenheimer case}(Spectrum. $1'.95) Reference: The Research Revolution. Leonard s. Silk (McGraw Hill 1960) Don K. Price, Government and Science Bulletin of the Atomic Scienctists S-:>viet economics Schwartz, Harry, Russia's Soviet Economy (Prentice-Hall) Campbell, Robert w. Soviet Economic Power (Houghton Mifflin) A study of The Standard Oil Company: Rise of --Holt Problems in Historical Interpretation Present status and organization of one affiliate Oil as an international, managed industry Sugar as an international, managed industry Coffee as an international, managed industry The agricultural surplus problem and policies The "Alliance for Progress" The United Fruit Company Intellectual developments of our day Daniel Bell, The End of Ideology (Collier. $1.50) Frederick L. Schuman, The Commonwealth of Man The "health revolution" the conquest of disease e g. Victor Heiser, An American Doctor's Odyssey (US $1.25)

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. CB 202 : .. The American Idea America and the World This is the second half of a tWo semester course so we begin by repeating the preamble of t:be "first' half: This course ts organized andset in the contemporary life and problems of America and the world today, to provide understanding and preparation for your citizenship and partic.ipation in public opinion today and tomorrow There are manifold means and sources for such education --television, radio, newspapers, magazines and tha book press, as .weli as personal experiences -'.".all _of which you have used to develop the background you bring to. this course. We consicie r valuable your ext>erience and ideas. and important tijaf you share thein with your fellows and with us and we .consider your judgments in developing this course best to ,erve the above purpose. Tell us of good articles and publications, of good T9V programs and movies, and discuss your ideas at every We :also seek your suggestions and coaments on the activities and experiences of the course. .. Your regular self-education in relevant current affairs. and .events is a part of this course and you should (1) Plan to read a daily and/or a weekly news magazine, and (la) good articles in monthly and quarterly magazines. In the last few years the American book press has developed the provision of moderately-priced paperbound books in great profusion and range of quality. Some of these are sound, valuable, and in some cases the best books by the best authors. We use paperbacks in this course instead of a standard text, therefore, in order to adjust the reading continually to the best, and most interesting and challenging available. The paperback way of-life is a new opportunity available to those who aspire to be informed, and leaders in our dynamic society. This course will be presented through paperbacks. It is about what America to ourselves and to the world, the American experience, "the American way-of-life"; and the realities of our situation in the world faced with and challenged by World Communism and by the complexities and problems of all the peoples everywhere.---This year it is also being presented through movies selected and providad you from those made (mostly) of T.V. programs nationally broadcast --see list below; and you are expected to supplement these by yourself selecting and viewing current T.V. programs or movies which relate to the subject of the course. average hour per -to be reported on a standard blank and turned in to your instructor. The blank includes questions of evaluation

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-2-and comment.. Please be candid and frank since we wish to use the information to recomnend the program to others, or not; or perhaps even to decide to obtain a kinescope. And, you of course recall the special interest or project each of you are expected to develop and carry out and to report in the second semester of the course. The last three weeks of this trimester is reseived for these reports and includes no general assigmnents required of all. We hope you have already found and selected this interest and now need only to work out with your instructor the plans for reporting or representing this special study and competence to seive the class. See the outline for s2ecial Interest .2.I Independent Project. CB 202 deals with the confrontation with Communism and other "Isms", the most significant ideological movements of the world and in the particular context of economic and dynamics. We first suivey the "isms" and for this purpose use William Ebenstein'& Today's Isms, probably the most widely used paperback on the subject by the colleges of the country; and then we undertake a rather more extensive s tudY of the western developments and tradition of an economic society, finally focussing on the particular and most important institution the corporation and its relation to government. How the corporation has been adjusted and adapted to the American traditions and values of government and of human relations is one interest and the other major one is its adequacy, adaptability and seivice in the development of the world economy and the competition with the Soviet economy. Since our objective is to feel out --to sense the truth or science of Political Economy, the.title is -The.!!!!!.! Political.Economy of Today.

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THE ISMS AND THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF TODAY Required Reading Calendar of Assignments Completion Date Due Monday, Sept. 24 2 wee'ks ,, Due Monday, 15 3 weeks I. Divergent applications of contemporary political economy II. A careful study of Today's Isms: Comnunism, Fascism, Capitalism, Socialism by-William Ebenstein The be1Jt preparation would be a prompt reading of the book followed by intensive study of each part for the scheduled class hours, as the instructor will announce. Some instructors may assign deadlines for completion Of each part; SOO!e may take up the topics _in same other order, and so announce. The theory and the emerging science: A careful study of The Making of Economic Society by R. L. Heilbroner gconomics and the Art of Controversy by J.K.Galbraith Mid Term Grades Dtie Oct. 25 Due Monday, Oct. 2 weeks Due Monday; Nov. 12 2 weeks Due Monday, Nov. 19 1 week 3 weeks III. A major aspect of the American system; a study in some deptll of the institution !!!! corporation A careful reading of The 20th Century Capitalist Revolution by Adolf A. Berle,Jr. complete including Foreword (b) The Economy; Under Law by w.u. Ferry (a pamphlet) (c) Unions and Union Leaders of Their Own. Choosing Kerr (a pamphlet) (d) A survey of the 1961 Annual Report Standard Oil Company (New Jersey) This will be provided you in class. IV. lo att sropt to apply conclusions to tbe world communit-y A careful study of The United Nations and How it Works by D.C. Coyle complete The Rich and the Poor by Robert Theobald Gandhi by -Fischer pages 67-104 Roots of Change -The Ford Foundation in India This will be prov:ided you in cllss. Review ,. The of the course will be devoted to a General Sumnaty and Conclusions of the entire two seD1ester organized by me-ans of reports from the! Independent Projects undertaken

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-4-Calendar of Films, Requirea v--<>rwi.ne 1st week Sept. 10-14 2nd week Sept. 17-21 3rd week Sept. 24-28 4th week Oct. 1-5 5th week Oct. 8-12 6th week Oct. 15-19 7th week Oct 22-26 8th week Oct. 29 Nov. 2 9th week Nov. 5-9 10th week Nov. 12-16 (1) See It Now: Clinton and the Law. (2) (2 reels. 27 minutes each) .QB. Twisted Cross. (3) (4) OR OR (5) (6) OR OR !i (7) (8) OR OR (9) .. (10) OR. .Q!! Twentieth Century Revolutions in World Affairs; The Revolution in Human Expectations. CS-1107 Twentieth Century Revolutions in World Affairs; The Russian Communist Revolution. Cheddi Jagan. as substitute for either Nightmare in Red. as substitute for both Foreign Aid and Economic Policy (used this summer) Co-existence (The World We Want:l958), NET-1411 Odegard. The President and Foreign Policy. Odegard. The United Nations Challenge and Response Odegard. The United Stateo -The United Nations The Population Explosion. CS-1138 Workshop for Peace. CS-1149 Odegard. Diplomacy -First Line of Defense Odegard. The Struggle for the Minds of Men Economic and Social Council at Work. CS-791 Beardsley Ruml: Part 1 (Heritage X). NET-936 Economic Policy for World Peace Odegard. Underdeveloped Lands and the Democratic Dilemma (11) Guatemala (America Looks Abroad). NET-1021 (12) Gandhi. CS-1124 OR Odegard. (13) The Constitution and the Labor Union. CS-1071 (14) See It Now: The Fifth Amendment and Self-Incrimination cs-841 OR Working Together. EBF #598 (15). See It Now: Report fran Africa, Part 1. CS-983 (16) Two reels -28 min. and 25 min.) OR Odegard. The United Nations Challenge and Response .Q! Odegard. Economic Policy for World Peace (17) (18) OR Europe Without Frontiers (used this summer) Living City, CS-734 Odegard. Local Government and Politics Theory and Practice Odegard. BalkanizatiQt\ of Urban Life (19) Mexico and Peru. Parts 1 and 2 EBF #470101 &470102 Puerto Rico. NET-1019 (20) OAS .NET-1017

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11th week Nov. 19 12th week Mov. 26-30 13th week Dec. 3-7 CB 202 (21) & (22) Qi\ Q! Q! (23) OR (24) .Q! (25) OR (26) Q!! -5-Toynbee's. Lee Chapel Lectures #8 Arab Worlds Past and Future Parts 1 & 2 #470801 & 470802 3 parts of and Ceylon #470601,2,3 .(1 hour, 16 mip.) Odegard. Democratic and the Power Struggle Odegard. Lands and the Democratic Dilemma Jawaharlal Nehru. EBF 11648 Odegard. Physics and Politics Government in the Age of Permanent Revolution Alfred P. Sloan, Jr. EBF #1657 .. Odegard. Mythology and Reality in World Affairs F ather John LaFarge. EBF #1802 Odegard. Secrecy, Security and Responsible Government Margaret Mead, EBF #1803 Odegard. The State of Nature or the Commonwealth of Man. DISCUSSION OUTLINE Our ge9politic&l,Economic, and Social Relations with.the Nations and Peoples of the world. From study and reading about our own nation and our history, and the patterns of our life, of government, and of personal hOpes, ideals we may well takeg\Jidance for our study of our neighbors in the wo.i'ld. Other peoples and nations are like us in that they are human, but unlike us in.that their.experience of life has been different. \. There are. and perplexities as well as similarities which may afford insight. If we. are to achieve fi'11li understanding upon which to base our policies, we must organize our approach; and we must always keep in mind that there is one unavoidable breach between us---the breach of interest and .tliat-. a'd. they are. they. To o .rganize the. study, .the outline may be helpful: The c0mmunity (;f T he Principles: I ,,, (1) Power; m:i.1itary1 polit:!cal, ideological; and their limitations (2) The organization and the history behind it. (3). The leadership; the elites, classes, groups. ct) The values, and the morale (5) The system, roles, operations, organizations. (6) The interests, purposes, instruments.

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... -6Our rel.iat:.:Lons t:o t:be countries and people Our general assets, instniments, The conclusions: needed preparation mobilization of assets reform of liabilities purposes, goals and their clarification in all their aspects and parts. For example, let us take the USSR. Since the late Fifteenth Century, the European West has held world hegemony, or preponderance of power. Today, with the relative decline of Great Britain, France, and Germany, the u.s. and Russia vie for predominant power the one through the traditional sovereign nation-state system and the other' by means of the Communist Party dictatorship and revolution. Both the u.s. and Russia have and seem to respect advanced military pONer, and advanced science and technology. Both are, of course, derived from and mainly variants of the general European culture base and history. But the u.s. was derived particularly from the western Europe tradition -of Rome and Paris and London, from the Renaissance and Reformation and from the value systems of the English yeoman and Puritans, whereas Russia derives from Byzantium, Kiev, and Moscow; from Germany and eastern Europe, not to mention the Mongols. The radical revolutionary movement of Communism,born of the West and its socio-economic upheavals and idealisms, was amended and adap:ed, by Lenin primarily, to the Russian scene. The point is that the U.S. and the USSR now confront each other and both claim or seek political hegemony today or in the "inevitable" future. Can they coexist? The growth in relative Saviet power since 1945 severely challe' nges the military s9periority of the u.s., if indeed, it has not already disappeared. A stalemate has developed in this day of space craft and stockpiled atomic bombs and missiles sufficient for mutual annihilation. For the present, military dominance is out of the question. Each combatant is free to do what it insists on doing at the risk of destruction. Of course each must continue to convince the other of the realistic will to resist, but neither can wholly control or prevent the actions of the other. Stalin first declared the "Cold War" February 9 1946, when he stated that a peaceful world order was "impossible under the present capitalist develop ment of the economy." He implied that the Revolution doctrines of the USSR were to prevail over the wartime "alliance" agreements and the United Nation's commitment; and the pattern of Soviet policy soon confirmed the implication. The struggle is politico-economic as well as military. But it is also ethical, religious, and philosophical since the !!!m.! involve faiths and values. The nature and the range of these issues is the subject of Ebenstein's Today's Isms, the first reading in this semester of the course.


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