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John Stuart Allen Papers, USF Archives

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Title:
John Stuart Allen Papers, USF Archives Stockton Smith
Creator:
Allen, John Stuart 1907-1982
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Florida
Publisher:
University of South Florida
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Language:
English
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1 folder

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Academic freedom -- Florida -- Tampa ( lcsh )
History -- Tampa (Fla.) -- 20th century ( lcsh )

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Some student names have been redacted from this document.

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Source Institution:
University of South Florida
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
A49-00008 ( USFLDC DOI )
a49.8 ( USF Handle )

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. --" MEMORANDUM August 7, 1962 TO: Sidney J. French FROM: Elliott Hardaway Roger Lewis was called, during the recent investigation, for questioning by the Johns Committee. From Mr. Lewis' statement, which is enclosed, I would assume that there might be two reasons for ques-tioning him: 1. The matter of pornography in the Library. 2. The matter of his confiscated mail. As pointed out by Mr. Lewis, he has no responsibility for acquisition policy and is in no way involved in the operation o f this policy. As a University staff member he is free to recommend purchase of books, as is any staff member or student. All such requests for purchase are reviewed by the Acquisition Department in the light of their experience and on the basis of standard book reviews. As I recall, Mr. Lewis has occasionally suggested purchases, and they were invariably of a very scholarly nature. From Mr. Lewis' statement, I would infer that the Committee's purpose in questioning him along this line was more to determine Library policy then to fix h i s part in acquisition policy and operation. If this is correct, the Committee was at fault in questioning not only a ) subordinate, but one not employed in this particular area. It would have been more ethical and informative to have questioned me, as the responsible administrator, or Mr. Me Cabe, as head of the Acquisition Department. -continued-

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Page 2. Sidney J. French August 7, 1962 As for the second matter, it would appear that the Committee was on very insecure grounds. Neither they nor Mr. Lewis had seen the materials in question. They were acting on hear-say evidence. Had Mr. Lewis been financially able to fight the matter through the courts, it is entirely possible that Customs would have been ordered to deliver the material to him. Neither the Customs nor the Post Office has too good a court record on thei r conception of pornography. Any American citizen can today read Joyce's Ulysees -a book long banned by Customs. The courts eventually made this book available to any American -young or old. Would a citizen who had his copy of Ulysees confiscated by Customs now be considered addicted to pornography? Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer is a point also in question. Customs, Post Office and many police officials have tried to have this book banned. The courts have held otherwise. The Post Office fought a long and losing battle to ban Esquire from the mails. This is an area of wide disagreement, and one in which definitions have not been determined, nor any guide lines established. There is, I might note, a very perceptible trend in court decisions away from using the "most impressionable'' citizen as a criterion for> the effect of pornography to the "average" citizen. All the methods involved -confiscation of mail, the mail watch, and the communication of unproven suspicion among governmental agencies is more characteristic of a totalitarian state than of a democracy. This trend of events is most d isturbing to any who believe in freedom and the integrity of the individual. -continued-

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Page 3. Sidney J. French August 7s 1962 In my opinions and to the best of my knowledges Rodger Lewis is an honorables upright and moral person. In my experiences he is the only person to return some of his travel moneys saying that he had not spent that much on the trip. Florida will have done itself a real disservice if such a fine person and competent librarian suffers from the irresponsible actions of demagogic individuals. Encl.

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r. Harda way: I submit the following as a very 'eneral, though I hope not inaccurate, account of my interrogation by the Johns' Committee. I was introduced an d I recall that essrs. Hawes, Strickland, Johns, a member of the Board of Control, and a gentleman from Audio-Visual who operated the recording device, were present. I was sworn in, and reminded that I could refuse to answer an y or all of the questions to be asked. I think I am correct in believing it was r. H awes who did the actual questioning. I was first asked to describe my position in some detail. I explained t hat I was a cataloger, and as simp l y as possible I attempted to describe our routine It was apparent from t h e question s whi c h followed t hat the Committee was not very interested in t h e cataloging process, but was concerned more exactly with book acquisition procedures and circulation policies. I replied that since my specialty was cataloging, I was not thoroughly familiar with these other functions of the library, and t hat testimony I migh t give on this subject.would be liable to errors. On being pressed for so m e kind of answer, I did say tha t with qualifications namely the use of Special Collections as a repository for material that it was deemed inadvisable to keep on an open shelf -it was true that all of our boo k s were available to any library user. e then became involved in a more or less futile attempt to agree on a definition of Although the use of this word throughout the inquiry c reated a real to communic ation, I could only suggest at one point that our understanding of t h e term might be as disparate as our philosophies. Mr. H a wes manifested som e satisf action when I was unable to provide him with a formal policy stat e ment pertaining to censorship in book acquisition. I recall, too, that he evinced some amaze m e n t when h e learned that some sort o f faculty review board was not consulted to approve all book purchases. The line o f questioning then centered aroun d the incident of my ordering som e material f rom abroad which t h e Custo m s Dept. and/or t h e ost Office confiscated. I was asked if I would care to elaborate; I replied that I had no objections and proceeded som e what as follows: I n about M ay or June of 1961, I ordered t hree magazines from Denmark advertized as Contintental versions of Playboy. One was to be in Ger man, o n e in French, and the third in Swedish I think. Nothing happened for 3 or 4 months and I h ad given them up an d even forgotten about them In August or September 1 received a car d fro m the Customs Office explaini ng that they or t h e P O Dept. were holding so m e first class mail for inspection because it was believed t o contain 11o bscene11 m aterial. I protested r a t her vigorously and probably sarcastically; but I did give them permission to inspect and dispose of the mate rial as the law oblig e d them to. I protested not kno wing what, exactly, t h e material was. But I feel no w as I must have then, t hat I protested solely o n principle. T h e matter did not end there h owever. I n February of 1962, t he Posta l Inspector in Tampa i nvited me t o see him in regard to a matter he was investigating : it turned out h e was i nvestigatin g a list o f people suspected

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.. of dealing in pornography. H e inform e d me, finally, t hat he was assured I was not a dealer because he had observed our inc o ming mail for more than 30 days and I had received nothing 11suspicious. 11 li e did ask m e about mail we receive regularly from England (my in-l a w Q), the Islands (a daily newspaper), and Lutz (another newspaper). (This interview was not especially m emorable except tha t it struck me as curious tha t he should ask m e if I wasn't worried that the Johns Committee would learn of this. And of course thas Committee s hortly made its local debut. Also I sensed a not too carefully veiled threa t i n his observation that 'onc e you get on one of t hese lists, you never get off.') Except for t h e parenthetical state ment above, I narrated the incident pretty uch in t his fashion before the Committee. Their questioning then returned t o library procedures and t h e liklihood tha t 1) w e probably already possessed some pornography, 2) that be readily available, 3) that pornography could be ordered, received, and m a de available a t any time. I attem pted to rebut this mostly by referring to h uman nature. I expressed the opinion that it was inconceivable to m e that recognizable pornography could be processed without it creating so much stir and so m any varied reactions among, first, the staff, then the students and faculty that surely the commotion would v e r y quickly commandD t h e attention of the Director of the Library and probably the President of t h e University as well. The foregoing, I believe, is as an objective a ccou n t o f the proceedings as I am c ap a ble of providing from m e mory. I would lik e to conclude, h o wever, with a deliberately subjective estimate. I went to t h e interrogation almost directly, and without previous notice, from a Russian languag e ora l examination w hich had left m e m e ntally fatigued. b ile I t hink I said nothing which I would c are to retract, I immensely regret my hesitancy, m y poor elocution and articulation, and the fact tha t this may very well have been construed by the Committee a s a kind o f reverentia l nervousness .And I am not no w nor w a s I t hen, in a n y way a shamed nor embarr assed by t h e Post Office incident. Yet I have no doubt that I w a s selected for interrogation and the incident introduced for thesole purpose of bringing discredit upon the Library and upon the University. T his I regret sincerely. A t the sruae time, I t hink tha t the use of guilt by association or implication is the most despicable w e ap on frequently e mpl oyed b y committees of this sort. I f it is immoral to be occasionally entertained by t h e kind of humor, photographs, and stories that appear in magazines like Playboy, then I am immoral and accept the state's judgment regarding m y future employment withiil its juris diction; but if their judgment is formed out of the vagaries and inflated imaginations of burea u cratic functionaries, t h en a patent injustice is compounded. It is for t hese reasons I am prepared to submit to the Johns' Committee a written supplement to be included with the taped interview elaborating on the Posta l Affair and more clearly defining t h e mora l precepts which guide my actions. Sincerely,

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THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA LIBRARY Sp 1 'l 196l September 1962 MEMORANDUM TO: S. J. French FROM: Elliott Hardaway At President Allen's request, I went to the Post Office and interviewed Postal Inspector C. M. Griffith, concerning the matter about which Rodger Lewis was questioned by the Johns Committee. This interview took place on Tuesday, September 11, 1962, in Mr. Griffith's office. On Wednesday I listened to the .. tape of the questioning of Mr. Lewis by the Johns Committee. Mr. Griffith, of course, refused to give me a copy of his report on Mr. Lewis, but did read it to me. From inspection across the desk I would say there was only a one page_ report on the matter in the folder. Mr. Griffith's report coincided with Mr. Lewis' report as given to me and forwarded to you on August 7, and agreed with his answers to Committee questions. Mr. Griffith stated that his office had been requested on December 19, 1961, by complainant (a term he asked be used rather than the name of the complainant. However, from the hearing tape and Mr. Lewis's report the Complainant was the U.S. Customs) to investigate Mr. Rodger Lewis as a dealer in por-nographic material, based on receipt by Customs of a few (I believe three) magazines addressed to Mr. Lewis from a foreign country, Denmark. Mr. Griffith said that this was a routine request, that an investigation was made and that a mail check had been run on Mr. Lewis during Mar
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Page 2. S. J. French September 1962 23, 1962. Mr. Griffith stated that Mr. Lewis denied dealing in pornography, that his investigation revealed no evidence to the contrary and that, there-fore, his report was negative. He further stated that from his investigation he believed Mr. Lewis was a normal male, l eading a normal home life. The entire problem is complicated by the fact that neither the Post Office nor Mr. Lewis ever saw or were told specifically what the materials in question were. Mr. Lewis stated that he ordered the material as being advertised as Playboy type of magazines. This and many other domestic magazines of a more extreme nature are freely available on American news-stands and are moved through American postal facilities. Mr. Griffith hazarded a guess that the materials were of the nature of "nudist" magazines and he stated that American nudist magazines were legally mailable. All of this is illesswork; we do not really know what Mr. Lewis is suspected of. The University Library has recently added to its collection the follow-ing book: Federal Censorship -ObsCenity in the mail, by James C.N. Paul and Murray L. Schwartz. Free Press, 1961. Mr. Paul is a member of the College of Law, University of Pennsylvania, and Mr. Schwartz on the faculty of the College of Law at the University of California, Los Angeles. The book is a scholarly study of the semantic and legal problems of sex censorship by the Post Department. Attached are excerpts from this study which are especially pertinent to the situation in which Mr. Lewis finds himself involved. d.E. H. Encl.

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DIAPT Auauat 16. 1962 TO: John Hick1, Preeident, USF \Chapter, AAUP FIOM: Sidney J. French, Dean of Aad.-dc Affairs SUBJECT: Inquiry on Suspension of Jolin Caldwell Since Preaident Allen bas been from the c-.pue during the period of thia inquiry I D anevtirtng your recent aeaaoraQdua to him on t he subject. The broad ground for the au1penlioD. of Mr. Caldwell were conin the President's letter to hia. '11le specifics of the1e charges appeared largely in the tape of the Johns COIIIIlitte-e hear inge and were eelfevident to the Colamittee. Mr. Caldwell vae well aware of these. In fact.he requested and was permitted to Ueten to the tape shortly before meetiM vith the C011111ittee. 1 \ aa of,the opinion that matter of not Hating specific charges / (, I is a technicality having little to do spirit of "fair play" \ with which we are ali' concerned. There va'it, neither by intent nor I ). by implication, any attempt to violate fait' play. Indeed, f&iJ.:' play vas the apirit in which the entire ie)peratioll vaa framed. Mr. Caldwell's reappointment for vas informally promised before the results of the Johns investiaation were known to the adainistration, as were those of all other .-hers of the \ returnina faculty. ,, ,. \ Your obaervation implies that a decisio.concerning suapen$ion should .. 1 \ i decision, however, should f 1 I t {'\ I \ have been reached earlier. Perhaps. \ \ .. I

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DRAFT A ; I not be arrived at hastily if there is to be the kind of fair play we all believe in. As matter of fact and incid4lntally, the delay may prove helpful to Caldwell in the financial aspecte of the probla. since it will carry the formal hearings over into a new con-tract period. Your question on whether or not the investigations should have been carried out by a special committee rather than by the Personae! Committee or the Educational Problems Committee is one to which very careful consideration was given before a decision vas aaade. The Chairman of the Personnel Committee feels that his grievance function o f this committee was to hear grievances at this level and of this type. Rather its function is to deal with ainor matters not at the Presidential level. The Committee on Educational. Problems was not intended to be a personnel cOIIWilittee. Its original function waa; to hear complaints about course&, teachers, methods of teaching,, overlapping of courses, and similar matters relating to the educational program. Since there was no established c0111111ittee for the purposes of ..this inquiry it became necessary to appoint a special committee. This was done after consultation and using the following guide lines: 1. The coDIDlittee should be broad'ly representative of the University. 2. It should hav-a no one fr<>al Mr. Caldwell's division. 2 ;

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{ DIAFT ------3. It should consist of men whose rank was equal to or superior to that of Mr. Caldwell. 4. It shou l d not include member whose major duties were in adainistration. It aay well be that conlideration should be given to the forming of a new standing for the specific purposes of dealing with problems of this nature, or that the function of one of the preaent standing ca.mitteee should be broadened to deal with such problema Under the existing every effort was made to comply as far as possible with appropriate forms and procedures. But more ilaportant than this, every effort waa made to aee that the apirit of the p roceedinga was "eminently fair and just" and that Mr. Caldwell was oot deprived of any of his rights. You have stated that the "colDlllittee conducted itself admirably, both in ita considerateness and in its careful attempts to penetrate the substance of its co.anission. I concur fully in this statement. This is what we hoped to achieve. It seems to me that Mr. Caldwell's hearing was eminently fair and just, that he vas not deprived of any riahta, and that your emphasis on unavoidable technical departures is not fair to the integrity of an administration which made every effort to provide qualities of fair play to the inquiry. -3 -

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INTER-OFFICE MEMORANDUM AUG DATE __ A_;ug:::..u_s_t_6....:,_1_9_6_2 __ TO: Dean Sidney J. French FROM: R. M. Cooper SUBJECT: __ Ma_x_H_o_cu_t_t ______________ __ .. Since someone has apparently raised a question concerning the teaching of Dr. Max Hocutt, I have looked into the matter and am pleased to make the following report. Dr. Hocutt teaches in the Human Behavior Course and also in our Philosophy Program. He has a Ph.D. from Yale University in the field of philosophy and came to the University of South Florida with high recommendation. We have found that his services here have fully justified those recommendations. He is a competent scholar, very knowledgeable in his field, and is already becoming productive in the writing of philosophical articles for professional journals. I have seen course appraisals by students in Dr. Hocutt's sections indicating their judgment of his teaching, and these have been remarkably strong placing him among the superior instructors of our university. They seem to be particularly enthusiastic about the way in which he forces them to think through philosophical questions for themselves, taking nothing for granted but submitting all beliefs and superstitions to the searching light of logical analysis. I suspect that there might be some individuals who find this insistence upon re-examining their prejudices to be a disconcerting but this would seem to be the very essence of good education and most students obviously appreciate it. With respect to his own philosophical position, I suspect we would classify Dr. Hocutt as being something of a rationalist with special interest in logical positivism. He is deeply concerned about religious values that are not doctrinaire, insisting rather that religious judgments like all others should be examined rationally. Because of Dr. Hocutt's strength as teacher and scholar, he was promoted this year to an assistant professorship by the unanimous recommendation of his course chairman, his division chairman and the dean. He has had opportunity to go elsewhere at better salary but we are hoping to hold him at the University of South Florida /jd

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..... Relating to the Universi t y of S o u t h F'lor i d a Requ i ring Action P s.ident 1\lle n a n d a Report to tho Board Conmittee: !J, r-.J sped 1 tee .Jt the earliest d t pos lble w i h a writte n rep ort t h e action which has. b e e n o r i 11 b e. en Hugoboan ( hanosexuali ty) 'T'er-ke (homosex-.,la it'{) Caldwell ( anosexuttli t y .and heavy drinkiD;J) Winthroo (profanity in the classroom} Hocu U Roger Lewis (pornography). Review in detail w:th the. B .oard. at an informal session all of the circumstances t o the employm ent of Or o. r. Fle miniJ as in that appropriate .:)Ction may be decided Conside r and procl!td':JreS for hand.ling .t:aculty members annourxand tak e steps to prevent 'untimely press releases a..,d/or and inaccurate releases on side r and take steps to public conf. i dence in the Uriiversi ty (Take steps to end suspicions in the Tanp a area of ath.istic., religious activities; poor counseling, ; and the like in 'tne Consider and develop a progr a m t o effect appropriate lines o f c mmuni. c ation between :--:1ci among administrators, faculty :nembers, student&:r and t h e Presiden t

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.. ,. 7, Consider and ake appro. date' st PS to be certain o f the '\tone" in the class roans of the -,University ft. Re i c Behavior c urscs to be certain that all information presented is in a.r ny with approp.ria t e obj ctives ..... : ... .. ,, ... 'I ... ... i I I, ....... : 0 .. .. ', .' I ; t .; ., I ,.. .. I. .I.

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ugutt 7 1962 MBMO
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understood that university procedures p ermitted a n aceuaed i nd ividua l to have a heariDg in front of his colleagues t o present h i s a i de of the case. I thanked Mr. Hawes f o r th:t information a nd also for his thoughtfulnes i n aeDdiq a carbon of his letter to Baya Harriton clearing. up the collfuUon about D. r. fleming affiliations. a. M. COOPil llC/jd

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.. < \ COLLEGE OF BASIC STUDIES MEMORANDUM TO: Dean Sidney J. French FRCM: Dean Edwin P. Martin JUL 3 u 1962 July 30, 1962 In response to your request, the following statement is submitted concerning supervision of teaching activities in CB 103-104 and CB 201-202. In the courses in Human Behavior and The American Idea, as in other courses of the College of Basic Studies, teaching methods and materials are selected for their effectiveness in achieving the objectives of the courses. The objectives are chosen to contribute to the objectives of the University and the College. They are reviewed by the staff, chairman and dean periodically. Classroom activities are developed by the staff, usually working as ad hoc committees, in consultation with the chairman of the course. Frequent discussion between the chairman and the dean of the College occurs. Weekly reviews and revisions of the methods and materials are accomplished in meetings of the teaching staff, presided over by the chairman. Both the chairman and the dean visit classrooms and discuss teaching activities with the staff. This procedure for selection of teaching activities is not errorless; there is no perfect method. It does, however, place the initiative for developing methods with the men who teach the course, and provides convenient mechanisms for rapid identification and correction of poor selection. In my opinion, this system is working satisfactorily. EPM: jm

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Rell7 Willlthrop j( u i,e 'belephone call with Mr. lfartin Qn XV 29th at 9aJO P .M. I made a aipi.tiaant oall to one ot the oenbal. Vib.._ eo..,.. aft.ilable to the Johna OODilittee. l Galled Mr. Mel Martin at the ot JMOPl who 'Aft hie e.U...,t laet: ,.-..:t" ID4 a1 of fellOY Who ore a110 his olaeet... !hey 1f011CiaNd wtq' I had heittJ.ted to do so until now. I \hilt t Ud not wish to appetll" to kmlokl 4Jl4J Wl4er ta an aacuaer. X was told that ;CJh .u eotion 110uld be en in a pnper liaht OJ' in the opitdon ot thMe cl .... tes I 'Q,S &lao ct.m t hint that M vu \lpttet himalf oYe"l' what he ha4 hdrd Dd probably be U I called hUa. l ... d14 ItO Martin explaind that .,_ ba4n t caUe4 b.eoattae lw tlt l to J.Umattt:r what he b.-at'd the C.Uttee lwi wa. a. oat.,or:tcallt ct.ui.a. that lit bad eftlt ude thoae Qhat"ges a,aiQit 11hioh th9 CQmm1 ttee had J'baaiucl in H Be at& ted Whtn be had giTen tpttmony eN;tnaUy before the. CoMi tt that hie hl4 bMn dUt'Orted at that 'time he :pl'9teated what 11rU 'bei.Ra' nect bM1c w bim aa not What he ha4 ..S.d. U. expnssed peraonal 01'1 i!oi of OIHI aesbel' of tbt (1oa1 u-. for t.hie r.uon. I.e ()n hie claim he tel t no ill-lri.U towud .. adi tilat he urtl' WA\1.:1 bl.ft 4 .Ia ...... Jh19b .!!!! wqcitW l.U!i.-.hY. Jt. He etattll bt hla ftndued to th Cola.itt to o-ne of ita l.Jrf:tis&iorll) ..,.,. to 'rial8 ot tru. ooutq a tc tibt ft!ltttl..-4 !he Cr:? Ot Jua. t .... h1a if he ttoul4 aqt me and Qlk th1a thins o'"r. a. UJII'9aud hia, willo 4o ao. but llt&te that n. WOUld l.1k-. to the CbllmiUee tint,., In puttculu he vanW to tpeU: to* Strickl-.d on the uture ot hi.a arigiW watimony ud tbat he ftllW hiiu-a pl.q'ba,ck o:t the obapa Wbiob Db. WRSiiHA laa 8 atated tht.t be W ..ctn.tlt -.4 ton etton to Bli'bl', ._,hi' or the. :co.uu .. 1n oonne
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August 14, 1962 In light of information brought out by the Johns Committee, the President decided to suspend John Caldwell, associate professor of Fine Arts, pending further investigation. A University faculty committee is now in the process of stttdying the matter further. The President, on his return, will review the findings and recommend whatever final action he feels is .. necessary to the Board of Control. Because the inquiry is incom-plete, the University feels it would be unfair to Mr. to disclose at this time the reasons for the suspension. Careful consideration has been given to the possible appointment of Dr. D. F. Fleming, former research professor of political science at Vanderbilt University, to a half-time lectureship at the Universi'l:y of South Florida. Because he was denied at Vanderbilt, President Allen decided not to offer him an appoint-ment here. vanderbilt0s decision not to renew his appointment there after 34 years on the faculty was based on his age (69) and the belief that his recent effectiveness as a teacher has diminished. The University of South Florida as a rule does not accept transfer students who cannot return to their previous institutionr this same policy has been applied in Dr. Fleming0s case as a teacher.

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.. THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA TAMPA. FLORIDA OFFICE OF T H E R EG I STR A R August 1, 1962 TO: DEAN FRENCH SUBJECT: BACKWASH FROM THE INVESTIGATING COMMITTEE Within the last week both Les Malpass and Bob Zetler have mentioned running into public sentiment which reflects a definite adverse reaction to the activities of the investigating committee Les Malpass was in the Fort Myers area meeting with a group of professional people among whom there were several physicians. Sons and daughters of quite a few of the group were going off to college this fall but he learned that not a single one planned to come to University of South Florida. The explanation given by the physicians' group was that "where there is smoke, there must be some fire." Bob Zetler has run'into in the segment which he describes as the lower third of the middle class this feeling in the immediate area. He has had definite expressions on the negative side concerning the literature which our students are expected to read. These are the only two direct reports which I have heard on either side of the ledger concerning reactions to the activities of the investigating group. Sincerely, ..6 F. H. Spain, Jr. rm 1 "'

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THE TEXT OF .A STATEMENT PREPARED BY MEMBERS OF THE CHURCH COUNCIL .AND FORW.lRDED TO MR .TAMES .A. CLENDINEN, EDITOR, TAMP.A TRIBUNE: Since the founding of Harvard College in 1636 the ional Church and American institutions of higher education have made common cause. The local Congregational Church, founded in 1885, stands in this 325 year When the church. sought a site was chosen near the new University of South Florida. Ours was the first denomination to establish a center for student worship, study and fellowship for USF students. Our minister is chaplain designate and is in residence at the student center. 1hus both by heritage and local action the Church (1) is concerned with and involved in the joint search for truth and the development of inquiring minds. The common concern for a greater understanding of the problems and issues of our time has prompted the church to use many of the same books and materials which are prescribed or recommended reading at the University. The ideas and values in these books have been used in the church's educational program and in worship for the insight they provide into the perplexities and confusions which beset modern mane Faculty members have shared in this examination of our contemporary scene in the pulpit and in study programs for youth and adults. The present investigation (2) at USF is an assault on the conception of the free institutions of college and church. It impugns the judgment of those teachers whese sensitivity tn and translation of the values by whioh men live make a truly outstanding university. .As eitiens, churchmen and concerned parents, deplore the dislocations created by an attempt, no matter how well meaning, to exclude materials from the classroom on the grounds of religion or morality. It is time for the religious community to speak out when in the name of religion men of open minds are judged tbe without the powers of discrimination. This is not religln; it is blasphemy. It strikes at the common cause of church and college. {1) (2) Now a cooperating congregation in The United Church of Christ. Secretly initiated upon the invitation of persons challenging the resource materials and the classroom interpretations in several of the interpenetrating disciplines i n the College of Basic Studies. A legislative committee began interviewing students and disaffected parents in April. A fuller description of the investigation and a copy of this open letter has been furnished the Council for Social Action for ir.formation.

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.. Dear I vlh to challenge your statement i ssued t o the students last oek pertainlna t o the cunent investigatiOD. It b, perhaps, benevol en of you (and your mother) to want to protect the children of USlf from a eh llenge to tbeir biaatJa, prejudices, and tndltiouo I find: your s tat nt to bel rife with fal accuaations and implicatloas aeeaingly baaed upon an d llunaffieient infonation.. I abo surpd.nd b y your implicit appraisal of the role o f edu ation in a democracy. You have a tac k e d the University's judgment and purpo e for inviting Jerou Dav ifl to apeak to the students o f the American Ideao You have implied by vape and unaubatantiated accuaation that Mro Davis is a Coalftuni t., 'fhili i a coapletely false and baa been pzoven s o in TWO eouzt declsionso Th United States Stat e Depal'tllellt and t he Departaaent o f Justice have declared without aetVation that Jeraae Davis is not and bas not bean a C0111m1nbto M!'o D a vi& Ulld the S turday Evening Post for accusing bia cf bain g a Colaun t11 and r ( won a judgtHnt for dmaages of $11, OOOo But thi!i is not the real is The AIBB'icau Id eour&1e at the time o f t i n ident va atudyiag c pitalism and o her fiyst in correlation with the !b t in book11. !!!! l!!!o e Davie 1 a critical bolar o c pitalila and wa achedulad to pres nt l y 1 o f c pit li i faultao D l'o Philip Bordeu w s seh dol d to pnaent a d efen1.1 o f the system the fc.ll_aring w k o In Soviet llus:la no one iii mi.tted t o challenge t h e Collauo:tot sy t n a for ftiar that ight c rica c ing to th point where w vill not critieiBD of our cultur ? By cancelling Mro DaYie w pe itted only one eide of the analyst o f c pitalism t o be preaentedo

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Tho aeeond lane you attacbd :I.e the petitiooo You b&v accuecl tbe .petition by iaapU.cation of belna of ca-uniat You "- allepd that it vaa circulated on eampua by ea..uDiat .,mpathizera to seduce innocent atudenta o You claia that 2/3 of the u.s appearing on the petition an people of "uncleairule" backpoundao Firat, vbat do you ... n 1ry "undesirable" o .,.apathiun on the lutnn But apin9 Ski.pper11 ycu have failed to aee the real i.aau imrolvede 1'CM wer. aakd to a:l.gn tbe (which w.. initiated to public .. backina of tbo Unitd Nationa) if and ooly Sf JOU endonecl the ftABM&Nro Do you really aliwe that the PUC. Pdi.tion ia a Cclllluni11t effort to ...Un Mlet'ica'l Rave you read th atateMilt t You ven not asked to endone the MD Bat to illuatrate the real iaaue let us auppoae one of the n vbo aiped the atateMilt wu a "-oaexual., Woulcl your sianlna tbe petiti.oa incU.cate that you too wen a hoaoauul'l?? YOU BAVI PUBLICLY SIJPPOI'IID A YD1' UtUMDJCAH CONCIPf or JUS1'ICBo I> ., BAT 01 OUD.T BY ASSOCIA'rtoN., In total effel.5t Skipper, you have by irreapouible, lDaccante and PMrile accaaatlone h&J:a&d by 1nc1tlna auapielon thll nputation of a fiae new university that ia .aking .V8XJ effort to afford ita atudenta finest caliber Of educatiODo You han slandered the decU.cated MD who are atrivina to make the University of South Florida pninent aon& the beat univerai.tf.ea: You have sacrificecl the of our school to joar own pKty dopu and prejuclicea o Mod aincenly, /'_L / / Craig Wriaht

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I REPORT OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF CONTROL 9/14/62 At the July, 1962, meeting of the Board of Control of Florida the Board appointed the undersigned committee to study all information furnished to the Board by the Legislative Investigation Committee insofar as its activities were related to the University of South Florida. At that time the Board had received a single set of testimony consisting of twelve volumes and approximately 2,500 pages of testimony. The summary report of the Legislative Investigation Committee was given to a Tampa newspaper, the Board of Control, and the Board of Education on the same day, Friday, August 24, 1962. The Board committee will comment on the following four issues dealt with by the Legislative Committee: 1. Homosexuality: The Legislative Committee's report on homosexuality reads as follows: "The Committee believes this problem not to be of great magnitude at the University of South Florida at the present time." The Board of Control has long had a standing policy designed to eliminate sex deviates from the campuses of our Universities. On December 9, 1961, the existing policy was reduced to writing and became a part of the Board's Policy and Procedure under the title of "Policy on Morals and Influences" (See copy of policy attached. ) Your Board committee recommends that the Board of Control exercise aggressive action to ascertain that its policy is not only known to all concerned but that it is being applied fairly and without

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procrastination on the part of those charged with the responsibility of enforcing it. Further, the Committee urges that immediate appropriate action be taken in all cases in which suspected or proved acts have occurred. 2. Attitude toward identified Communist teaching and/or lecturing on campus: The testimony did not reveal any Communists or any Communist sympathizers among the permanent employees of the University of South Florida. This is gratifying to the Board's committee as well as to the administration of the University. The Legislative Committee received considerable testimony regarding the possible employment of two individuals. One of these has an alleged background of pro-Communist sympathies he was to be employed as a Lecturer for one appearance on the campus. The other individual, who allegedly has been accused of being an apologist for Russian cold war strategy, was to be employed as a teacher on the campus. It must be noted that employment of these two individuals never materialized, although it is conceivable that either of the two could have been employed had it not been for the alertness of private citizens, members of the Legislative Committee, members of the Board of Control and its staff. The Board of Control has been cognizant for some time that its employ ment procedures throughout the System could be improved. Prior to the investigation the Board had instituted improved employment procedures and in compliance with State policy had initiated a plan for -2 -

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fingerprinting all personnel, which is to be implemented within the near future. The Board has constantly and consistently impressed upon the administration of each institution the need for a thorough review of the qualifications of each individual considered for employ ment to insure not only competency but also wholesome influences upon the University communities. Differences of opinion are an essential ingredient in the academic life of our institutions. However, with regard to identified Communists or identified Communist sympathizers, the Board's committee again refers to the Board's policy manual under the title of "Policy on Morals and Influences" wherein it is clearly stated that those having ideologies contrary to our form of Government are not to be employed on the campuses of our institutions. Again, the committee wishes to emphasize to the Board that the administration of each institution must be impressed with the need to see that Board policy is disseminated to and understood by all concerned in each institution. 3. Obscenity in books and teaching materials: For members of a Board of Control, or others, to establish themselves as a censorship group would strike at the very heart of the academic freedom of all of our institutions. The Board's committee fully believes rhat selection of materials should be left in the hands of the faculties. it is noted that the Legislative Committee did not find any material that was obscene by legal definition, it can not be denied that certain materials contained objectionable language. The Board's -3 -

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.. committee agrees that in a few instances revealed by the investigation those persons selecting books and teaching materials exercised poor judgment. It alSo appears that some of the materials were not actually selected as planned. For example, the testimony disclosed that some members of the "All-University Book Committee" had not read the books supposedly selected by the entire group. Your committee did not treat this situation lightly, and it feels that a recommendption is in order whereby the Board adopts a policy to the effect that carefully planned procedures be developed in the Universities for that any material considered for teaching purposes shall be: a. Pertinent to the subject being taught b. The best material available and obtainable c. Within the purview of good taste and common decency. 4. Challenge of basic religious beliefs of students by professors: This is the most difficult of the issues raised by the Legislative Com-mittee. Your committee is of the opinion that: a. It is impossible to conduct classes in a university without certain questions in the religious field occurring; b. Such questions may be discussed and analyzed and that it is proper to do so in an objective manner; c. The teaching faculty in discussing such questions in the classroom should refrain own religious beliefs or zad .. their own personal convictions concerning religion; 4 -

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d. The individual personal religious beliefs of the students shall be respected at all times. The committee finds no testimony received by the Legislative Committee which is evidence that any student has had his basic, fundamental religious beliefs compromised by an instructor advocating in the classroom his own personal convictions. Nevertheless, the Board's committee realizes that such situations are possible and recommends the adoption of a policy covering the several items enumerated above. CONCLUSION The Board's committee wishes to point out that most of the problems cited by the Legislative Investigation Committee were already under scrutiny. Some had already been corrected. Many were brought about because of rapid growth. Some have been the direct result of initiating corrective action too slowly. Some have been caused by poor communication among those concerned. All of these matters are well within the scope of the responsibility of the Board of Control, and the Board has been and continues to be willing to accept this responsibility. This committee urges that it be impressed upon all branches of State Government and upon the citizens of Florida that the Board of Control is the proper body to receive, investigate, and take action upon any and all complaints directed toward or against the institutions under its authority. An investigation such as that made by the Legislative Committee should be viewed in its proper perspective. A procedure of this sort pursues specific areas of complaint. In developing information it accumulates only that of an unfavorable nature because of its limited function. Findings derived therefrom do not reflect -5 -

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the innumerable and laudable activities of the University or of the great majority of its personnel who give no conceivable cause for complaint. On the other hand, the Board realizes that in the conduct of a publicly supported university the administration and the faculty must constantly be aware that academic freedom in the university must be accompanied by corresponding academic responsibility. This committee feels that in the total perspective President Allen, the faculty, and the staff at the University of South Florida have performed well in developing the beginnings of a great university. Advanced planning has been carried forward efficiently and with dispatch. Sound fiscal policies have been established. A well qualified faculty has been assembled. Balanced programs of curricular offerings have been developed and are being given the students attending the University. Beautiful and functional buildings and excellent equipment designed to serve the needs of the students and faculty have been provided. The essential elements have been assembled to provide Florida citizens a quality program and to insure the continued growth and progress of the University. The University of South Florida is a reality because of innumerable and great effort on the part of many individuals. It constitutes an invaluable part of Florida's System of Higher Education. We urge all of the citizens of Florida to support the Universities in attaining the goal of providing high level programs in higher education. Respectfully submitted, Frank M. Buchanan, Chairman Gert H. W. Schmidt Wayne C. McCall, D.D.S. -6 -

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POLICY ON MORALS AND INFWENCES Adopted by Board of Control December 9, 1961 It has long been the established practice of the Board of Control to into the cultural, social, moral, and spiritual as well as the educational background of personnel under consideration for faculty or staff appointments. The Board has also been concerned with the careful selection of students in the various institutions under its management and with their continuing social, economic, moral, and spiritual welfare. In order to insure further the welfare of the institutions under the Board of Control, the faculties, the staffs, and the students, the following policy shall be immediately effective: Each institution shall screen carefully those indiViduals who are employed by it not only with regard to their professional and academic competency but also with regard to their ideology and their moral conduct. Furthermore, the Board directs that the institutions under its control exercise due care in the selection of students, taking into account not only their academic ability to satisfactorily but also their character and behaVior. The Board of Control also directs the administration in each of the institutions to be constantly alert to detect any antisocial or immoral behavior, such as Communistic activities or sex deviation, which may occur among the faculty, the staff, or the students of any of the institutions.

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I I Under this policy, the Board directs further that the responsible officials immediately correct or eliminate tram the institutions my conduct found not to be in the best interests of these institutions. Where serious variations from acceptable behavior occur, the Board requires that a fUll report shall be placed in the pennanent record of the individual concerned. The Presidents of the institutions shall keep the members of the Board of Control infonned of actions taken under this policy. The Board is also concerned with preventing antisocial and illlmoral behavior in the communities where the institutions are located. The Board, therefore, directs the administrations to cooperate With local and state authorities in taking appropriate action to deal With such behavior. -2 -

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.. ADDRESS TO THE STATE LEGISLATURE April 24, 1963 By John S. Allen Mr. President, Mr. Speaker, ladies and Gentlemen of the Legislature, at the request of the Hillsborough County delegation, and with the knowledge of the Board of Control, I am making this response to a series of charges as reported by the press to have been made before an executive session of the two houses of the Legislature on Thursday, April 18, 1963. The statements were reported to have been made by Mark Hawes, counsel to the legislative Investigating Committee. As Mr. Baya Harrison, Chairman of the Board of Control, said on TV Friday, April 19, the report made by Mr. Hawes is essentially the same report that was made public by the legislative Committee last August. The Board of Control, in subsequent months, worked with the administrations of the universities and representatives of the faculties to improve and clarify internal operation procedures. As a part of the execu-tive branch of government, the Board of Control is the duly constituted body for the supervision of the state university system. A review of the press reports indicates that Mr. Hawes' indictment was such a skillful blend of truths, half-truths, and that those who are unfamiliar with the background and the facts of this investigation may wonder about the seriousness of these charges. In order that you may have this matter in sharper focus and perspective, I would like to re-examine with you some of the statements of the committee counsel. -1-

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At the very outset of his presentation, Mr. Howes said the committee came to investigate complaints that the Univenity was soft on Communism and that it harbored homosexuals. He said further that they had rec:eiwd complaints from people in the area about anti-Christian teaching and about the use of teachiP:91 materials filled with filth, profanity, and vulgarity. 1) In the matter of Communists, the fact is that at the University of South Florida, the Committee found not a single member of the faculty, staff, or student body who is or ever has been a Communist or a Communist sympathizer. 2) Mr. 1-bwes said Dr. Jerome Davis, a person known for membership in Communist front organizations, was invited to teach at the University, and that I cancelled his appearance under pressure from legislators and members of the Committee. He said further that a University of South Florida press release stated "falsely" that Jerome Davis was a Professor of Divinity at Yale University. The fact is: Dr. Davis was not invited to join the faculty, but rather to give one lecture, to be repeated to a second section of the same course, at which his background and point of view would be identified when he was introduced to the students, and after which the students would be given time to question him critically. Dr. Davis is not now a Professor of Divinity at Yale, but he was correctly listed in the press re lease as a former member of the faculty of the Yale University Divinity School. When I learned of these plans, I looked into the background of Dr. Davis and decided that his appearance before a formal class would be inappropriate. The decision was solely my own. I sought advice from no one. It is now well established and known to the faculty that we do not expect to have people with Communist front affiliations speak to classes, and there has been no recurrence of such incidents. The record of testimony taken by the Legislative Committee when it was on -2-

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.. our campus shows that I told the Committee that I had received telephone calls concern ing Davis from three legislators. All of these calls came after I personally had cancelled the appearance of Davis. This was in February, three months before we were aware of the Committee or its agents being in Tampa. 3) Mr. Hawes referred to Dr. Fleming of Vanderbilt University, whose recent two-volume work on the 11Cold War11 has been characterized by some critics as an apol ogy for the Communist position. He said the Committee prevented the University of South Florida from hiring Fleming. The fact is: Dr. Fleming was being considered for a half-time teaching position far one year at the University of South Florida. Before the legislative Com mittee carne to campus, or raised a question about Fleming, I became aware of criticisrm of his books and directed an inquiry to Congressman Francis E. Walter, Chairman of the House Committee on Un-American Activities. Under date of April 26, 1962, Congressman Walter wrote me that "the records and publications of the Committee on Un-American Activities failed to reveal any record concerning Dr. Denno Frank Fleming." And I have that letter with me. Later, I received a copy of a letter signed by Dr. Harvie Branscomb, Chancellor of Vanderbilt University, saying that Fleming was no longer on the faculty at Vanderbilt. A further check by telephone with Chancellor Branscomb revealed that Vanderbilt had been unwilling a year prior to continue his contract a fourth year beyond the normal retirement age. At this point, I decided on my own, not to offer a contract to Dr. Fleming. The Legislative Committee had nothing to do with this decision. leter-, ,.lhter the Committee left the campus, Mr. Hawes wrote to Chairman Baya Harrison, of the Board of Control, under date of July 27, 1962, that the Committee's source of information was in error in attributing "Communist front affiliations to Dr. Fleming of -3-

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Vanderbilt Un iversity. It appears there is a Dr. D.J. Fleming, 11 the letter states, "to whom the affiliations are rightly attributable. The clear result is that the Com mittee has no information that Dr. Fleming of Vanderbilt University has any record of Communist-front affiliations," the letter says. I have my copy of that letter here, but Mr. Hawes failed to mention it to you. 4) In the orea of homosexual behavior, psychologists, sociologists, and medical people state that six to ten percent of the population are active In this category. The Investigating Committee established a case against one man out of nearly 500 persons on our payroll. This is one-fifth of one percent. We accepted his resignation the next day and duly reported the facts to the Board of Control. The Committee made charges against two others which could not be supported. For other reosons these two have since been separated from the University. Since then, through our own counselling procedures, we have found two students with homosexual tendencies. They are now under psychiatric care, and are no longer in school. These results are an indication of our careful screening. 5) One of the charges made by Mr. Hawes wos the carefully constructed im plication that the University faculty is anti-religious. I would not attempt to vouch for the religious beliefs of every member of our faculty, but I can assure you that we are not anti-religious. We have at least half a dozen faculty who are ordained min isters, and many, many others who are active in churches of the community, as teachers, elden, stewards, committee leaders, and as parishioners. In the early planning of the University of South Florida, I persuaded the Board of Control and the State Board of Education to allow me to invite state-wide religious organizations to consider putting student religious centers on our campus. One of the centers has already been built, another is under construction, and others -4-

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will get underway soon. These accomplishments and these activities of the University and its individual faculty members are living refutations of the charge that we are anti religious. I might mention also the statement of overwhelming support given the Un iversity by many, many churchmen, as further il hatration of this point. Mr. t-bwes claimed that the faculty attacks orthodox religious beliefs of students and that my only comment was that "it happens on every campus." The Committee record of my testimony shows that I gave a lengthy reply to Committee questions, bosed on my 39 of experience as a college student, teacher, and administrator. I indicated to the Committee that college is a place where ideas are examined and discussed on a rational basis. Students raise questions obout relation ships between science and religion, philosophy and religion, literature and religion. The professor in Ale class where such questions are raised is neglecting hfs responsibility If he fails to help the students recognize the implications of facts as viewed from all sides of the question. The professor may choose not to reveal his own position, or he may make a clear statement of his own position in order to allow the student to discount or make allowance for the teacher's bias, if any exists. The student must come to his own conclusions. The professor is the one who 11elps the student to think logically. It is this kind of discussion that happens on every campus. Mr. Hawes refers to my article in the Fall 1962 issue of the University of South Florida Educational Review as saying that if a professor's personal view is atheistic, that is alright if he does not try to force it on the student. Nowhere in the essay do I make any reference to an atheistic view. As for myself, both my mother's famtly and my father's family were Quakers who came to William Penn's Colony in the 17th century. My father's ancestors fol lowed a migration to North Carolina in 1750. My grandparents moved to Indiana "!" -5-

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about a century ago. When l think of how my anceston worked along with their neighbon and friends to clear the wilderness and help develop three states of thts nation, my love of country swe lis in my heart and I will take second place to no one in my religious sincerity. 6) Mr. Hawes read quotes from writings by two authors, Salinger and Kerouac, and implied that this kind of material is 11typfcal of the trashy, vulgar, and morally offensive literature found in (our) total reading program." The facts are these: The material obiected to by the Committee represents a fraction of one percent of the total reading material used in our classes. In this fraction of one percent there are undoubtedly passages which, when taken out of the total context in which they are used, can be offensive to the serwes. Calm and ration al study in a classroom is a far cry from a street corner conversation about a paragraph or two that otherwise seems salacious. Actually, young people are reading many books by beatnik authors that are available on the downtown news stands, and someone has to find a way to show them the shallowness and poor quality of this so-called literature. One passage which was quoted to you by Mr. Hawes was from a review of beatnik writing. The part that you heard was a passage from a beatnik novel, but he did not read the review itself, which is a scathing criticism of the shallowness and emptiness of such literature. That review first appeared in a national literary iournal, and because it was useful to show students the lack of quality in beatnik writing, it was later reprinted in a college casebook used by more than 75 colleges and universities across the nation. Among these are Duke University, Park College, Peabody College, N.C. State, University of North Carolina, St. Louis University, louisiana State, University of Virginia, Stetson University, Rollins, University of Miami, Oberlin, -e-

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.. University of Tennessee, Washington and lse, Marshall Uniwnity, and Westminster College. The rev lew was used at the Univentty of South Florida in an advanced writing class, where the average age of the 31 students enrolled was 24 years. It is no longer being used at the University of South Florida. Mr. Hawes would have you believe that the faculty and I condone porno graphic literature. The fact is directly opposite from this. When this review was discussed in class, the excef lent writing of the reviewer was analyzed, and the poor writing of the "beat" author was analyzed. The two were compared, contrasted, and identified for what they are. This intensive study of writing style in a classroom can and does develop the perception of students to help them identify for themselws the differences between goad and bad writing. To me it is inconceivable that there can exist a true community of scholars without a diversity of views. It is, therefore, essential that we as individuals be willing to extend to our colleagues, to our students, and to members of the community the privilege of presenting opinions and points of view which moy not necessarily correspond to our own. Criticism of any viewpoint, be it thot of a colleague or of a student, must be reasoned and logical, not dogmatic and emotional. It is inevit able, therefore, that not every sentence in every book we use will be acceptable to any single standard of taste. Yet the fact remains that our selection of textbooks, despite the Committee 1s charges, reflects a sound balance of accumulated knowledge and opinion not unlike that of other fine universities in this state and around the country. 7) In answering charges that the Committee's report was biased and prejudiced against the University, t.Ar. Hawes said the opposite was true, and he blamed the newspapen for harming the University. -7-

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.. The fact is that the news media of the state and nation have generally given full and accurate coverage to the investigation; and strong edttoriat support to the University. As a result, what would otherwise have been a secret investigation has been conducted in the open, and the iniustices which have been committed against the University have been laid open for all to see. 8) Finally, toh. Hawes criticized the University of South Florida Educational Review as a "declaration of de nee of the people and the legislature." I submit that these essays are in no way a defiance of anyone, but rather a thoughtful examination of the ideas of which universities are made. If you will read these essays, I am confident you will agree that they reflect the principles upon which the legislature created the University of South Florida. I have dealt at length with the charges presented by Mr. Hawes. However, I am more interested in having you come to know the real University of South Florida and its strengths. We had 3,500 students of high ability enrolled in this our third year. They came from 46 counties in Florida. Most of them would not be in any college if you had not provided this new state university. The stature of the University of South Florida is indicated by the reports of three accrediting groups after visitations to our campus and intensive study of faculty, program, library, students, and facilities. Their reports stated that our faculty is equal if not superior in training to that of any university in the south. Sixty-eight percent of our faculty hold doctor's degrees. This is twice the average for colleges and univer sities over the nation. Our College of Business Administration meets now all the applicable stand ards of the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business. The State Education Department has officially approved our teacher preparation program. -8-

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our students ore already being accepted in the best graduate and profess ional schools in the country, such as the law schools at Harvard and the University of Florida, the medical school at Tulane, and graduate schools at Johns Hopkins and Yale. In every national test administered at the University of South Florida our students have consistently scored well above national averages. In our Cooperative Work Study Program, NASA is the largest single employer with 42 of our students working at Cape Canaveral, the Redstone Arsenal at Huntsville, Alabama, and at the MaMed Spacecraft Center at Houston, Texas. Despite handicaps of being in a new institution, our students have risen to the challenge and have organized from the ground up activity programs of which we are proud. All of this and more has been accomplished in just three short years. American colleges have two purposes. One is to give an education for earn ing a living. That is, preparing mathematicians, economists, scientists, accountants, teachers, and lawyers. The other purpose is education for citizenship, if you will give a broad definition to that term. I believe this education for citizenship is too important to leave to chance. If we are preparing a student to earn a living as a scientist, he should be a good scientist, but he should not be illiterate about government, international relations, human relations, economics, or fine arts. If we are preparing a student to earn a living as an economist, he should be well trained, but not be ignorant about science, the humanities, or foreign cultures. Every student should know and understand our American institutions in order to know v!!!,y he is patriotic. All of us at the University of South Florida are patriotic. Emotional loyalty and patriotism are fine, but this is not enough. We must understand -9-

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.. why. We must have such a thorough understanding of the reasons and background of our American way of life that aur patriotism can be based on sound logic and reason., in addition to any emotional pride we may have. In this setting, a college will have its students study, among other things, about Communism, in order to understand it and to combat it. The legts.lature has already recognized the importance of this need in our public schools. We do not like Communism and we do not like cancer. But to understand and to control cancer we take the cells into a laboratory to study them and to learn all we can about them. Just as we are careful that no one contracts cancer by careless exposure to it in the laboratory, so we expect that those who really understand Communism from our careful study of it, will know how to defend themselves against it. The minister who talks about sin is not trying to sell it. He is making his parishioners aware of it in order that they may understand it and avoid it. 11A college is not engaged in making ideas safe for students. It is engaged in making students safe for ideas. 11 The teacher in the classroom can exercise his responsibility by seeing that both sides of an issue are discussed with reason and logic. The one-night stand of a visiting lecturer presents a different problem. He is before his audience for an hour of so. He is then on his way, and may never be seen again. The University of South Florida attempts to provide the balance and the responsibility we need in several ways. Therefore, we give our speakers long enough time to develop their themes. Then we insist that they stand for questions from the audience. We will n.2!, have a speaker who will not be questioned, to clarify points for understanding, or to defend a position he has taken which someone in the audience wishes to challenge. This year we had as speakers, William Buckley, Editor of the conservative -10-

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National Review, and Norman Cousins, Editor of the liberal Saturday Review. In that same month we had Dr. Willard libby 1 Nobe I Prize winner in chemistry, and former member of the Atomic Energy Commission, to speak. These are competent people. They speak with authority on subjects in which they are informed. They do not agree with each other. Each stood for questions from the audience, and explained and position,Kfurther. And we in the University community have our minds stretched, our horizons expanded, and a better basis for judgment because of these experiences. You have before you in this session the greatest spending request in the history of Florida, a significant part of it for the strengthening and expansion of higher education. This creates difficult and tremendously important problems which you must face. I am confident that the democratic processes through which this country has prospered will lead you to the right decisions. In closing, let me leave this thought with you. The Florida of the future is a dream of unlimited promise and potential which all of us share and work for. More than any other thing, outstanding universities will make that dream come true. This is the key to our economic advancement, our scientific advancement, our cultural advance-ment, and to the development of sound and intelligent leadership which will be de-manded of us. But our university system cannot prosper, it cannot fulfill its responsibilities for leadership and service 1 in a d imate of fear and distrust. In our system of operation, the Governor appoints the Board of Control; these men in turn, with the approval of the State Board of Education, select the men and women who will lead our universities, and vest in them the responsibility and the trust to bring excellence into the educational process. This must be done by competent and responsible people, sensitive to their professions, and dedicated to educating the youth of Florida which is our future. Only with this quality of responsible teamwork can the state reach its goals of greatness.

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DATE: TO: FROM: SUBJECT: MEMORANDUM August 15, 1962 Heads of Administrative Units Physical Plant Division Air conditioning and water interruption l r I Air conditioning in all buildings will be turned off at 5:30 p.m. Friday until 4:00 p.m. Saturday, August 17th & 18th. During the period from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. there will be no domestic water. ph

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... DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS CONFIDENTIAL August 22, 1962 MEMORANDUM TO: RE: PRESIDENT ALLEN Matters Relating to the Uni by President Allen of South Florida Requiring Comm1ttee: a eport to the Board Special I have drafted statements on ea your consideration. Feel fr ch of these points for ways which will best se hee to change them in any rve t e purpose. SJF:lad J. French Dean 1 p.. 4-:Y
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DEAR OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS LA-1V /( n/..,.., J:-, --f t (-" p CONFIDENTIAL August 22, 1962 MIMORANDUM TO: PRESIDENT ALLEN RB: Matters Relating to the University of South Florida Requiring Action by President Allen and a Report to the Board Special Cc.aittee: I have statements on each of these points for your consideration. Feel free to ehange them in any ways which will best serve the purpose. SJF:lad Enclosures Sidney J. French Dean

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, -CONFIDENTIAL August 21, 1 962 1)..o TO: heaident A .llen FRCM: Sidney J. French RE: DIAI'T 1. Provide the Board special committee at the earliest date poaaible with a written report atating the action which haa been or will be taken concerning: a. Hugo boom Hugoboom (homoaexuality) Teake (homoaeauality) Caldwell (komoaexuality and heavy drinking) Winthrop (profanity in the claaarooa) Hocutt Roger Lewis (pornography) We feel that there is no supportable basis for the auggestion that Profeaaor Hugaboom might have homoaexual tendencies. We reaard the atudent who testified under oath concerning Mr. Hugobooa to be unreliable and unatable. Tbia former atudent had a nU&IIber of problema of various nature while at the Univerai.ty and in the judgment of our Student Affairs officers needs paychiatric help. Profeaeor Hugaboom is highly regarded in National MUaic eirclea ae a national leader. He ia happily married. He miaht vary well put hia arm aroW.d a male student who had perforaed well. He apent two years studying muaic in Parte aa a Fulbright Scholar and in accordance with French custom aiaht easily extend the French .. 1 -

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(Draft to Preddeat Allen, continued CONriDBNTIAL) custom of ki1aing a aale on the cheek following a fine perforaaoee. We are coavlnced that there h po evt4ence luding tO aucb aupected behavior aDd believe that the matter s)lould be dropped. b. Mr. Teske wae diaeharged at the end of the su.aer 1888ion c. Professor Caldwell was auapended ae of the end of the au.aer aeadon. He has had a bearing by a local c:oaaittee ancl b now an appeal to the Board of Control. d. Professor Winthrop does not use p rofanity in the elasaroom. Thia charge eemed to come about as a result of a miaunder standing by one person. In the study of a certain book in Human Behavi .or classes, Professor Winthrop wished to illustrate the differeuce in ways of conversing of peo .ple of different social and economic levels. He selected passages from Salinger's "Catcher in the Rye" to illustrate the vulgarity of conversational language in a certain social He taped the pasaagea and played th.for his classes, explaining clearly what he was doing and f!lpologbiqg in advance and after for the o .ffensive nature of the conversation. Many of his students have teatified in writing to the fact that he does not us e foul language either inside or out aide of the clauroom; that he is not anti-religious, and that he does not overempbashe sex. These testimonials are available for r eview if deeired. .. 2 ..

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' (Draft to President Allen, continued I \ .... CONFIDENTIAL) ... e. Max Hocutt Mu Hocutt. Hta field ia He holda the Ph. D degree from Yale. Thia baa been hh firat fulltbae teaehil\8 poaition. He caae highly tecoMellded. Student appraiaala (a1101lYIJOUI written appraiaah) of hi teachiq have been remarkably strong, placing him among the superior in-structor$ in the Ulliveraity. Studenu ae to be partlculaJ:ly enthusiastic about the way in he forces them to think pbilo$opbical questions for the.aelves. There doubt, some studenu who lind it disconcerting. to ,Jubject their thinking &Jld bUefs to self-analysis. This, how$ver, represents good teachtq at University level. He is deep,ly, concerned about religious .I values that are not doctrinaire, insisting that etuclente should exard.ne such judgments for theuelves, rationally, and reaeh tlteil:' own coneluaiona respecting thei.r own (:aith, doctrines and phUoaophy of life. 'lb:h, all thinldqg persons eventually do. Because of irote .. or Hocutt1' 8 etrength ae a scholar and teacher be wae pro.ote4 ill July, 1962, to the rank of Aasiltant Pro .fenor. The reeoaa.elldatlon '. of hh ebait"MG, ctivilion director, and the two dune of Basic Stud tee and Liberal Arts was unanimous. f. Roger Lew1 (pornoarapby) Mr. Lewis in his position has no responsibility or any relatioa to the acquiaitloa of books by the Library. The incident re ferred to bas to do with his attempt to purchase aQae Buropean magazines which wl'e advertised in an Amer. ican magadoe. Mr. Levie hoped 'to ilQProve hia reading lm01rledge of Prench and German The .. 3 v ., 1 ;, i

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(Draft to Praaidant Allen, eooUaued COlO'l))&NTJ.Al.) magazlaes were advertisiag as being similar to Playboy When tbaae arriYed they were held by the Post Office aa obaeeoe material. Mr. Lewis proteated but gave permission to dUpoae of the material. He never aaw the We believe on inveatigation Mr. Levis is a very respectable, decent person and have no reason to question his explaoation of the incident referred to. His report of the J ohns Coaaittae hearing to his supeTior, Mr. Hardaway, Director of the Library, is available, as is Mr. Hardaway' report to Dean French We believe that his profeaaional work is of high caliber and pro-po1e to retain him on our staff. 2 A review of the D F Fleming situation with the Board has already' taken place. 3 Coaaider aDd develop procedure for handling faculty meabets anaouaciag in their cla that they are athei1ta. We have n o pecific evidence that suc h announcements have ever been made. It waa reported by a student that the statement "There h no God, vas on the blackboard of a. clauroom as s t udents auembled there for a class, prior to the entrance of the instructor. The instructor who had used the room the prior pariod deniad having written any such stateaaent It could have been written by a student. Under the Constitution of the United States an atheiat 11 not barred from teaching in a public institution. lo general, however if the 4 .. -, \

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.. (Draft to Preaident Allen, contiaued COMFlDERTIAL) fact were known in advance and if there were other candidate of equal profeuional ability the Univerlity would be inclined not to aelect the Atheiat. There 1a no 110re for a faculty member to announce to 'hit claas that he is an atheist than there is to announce that he it a Jew, a Buddhi st, a Catholic, a Protestant, an Agnostic, a Democrat, or a Republican Such announcement should certainly not be made qaerel y to shoc k" students. H owever, there may be Umes in certain classe s and i n certain d i s c ussions w he n a profe s sor should make .his .positi o n known i n order that t he clas s will better understand the background fro m which he speaks. H e nce, there should be no arbitrary rule on t his. Through recent discussions with deans, directors, and chairmen, it is felt that this matter 1s udder auitable control. 4. Study and take appropris.te steps to prevent untimely pre .. relea .. a and/or untrue and inaccurate releaaes. The only "untilllely" preu release in our judgment involved the Fling matter. Tbe release was de follQWing a 1uitable check. However later developments not then foreieen made this release appear to be untimely. In accordance with it& Policy Statement 22, the University of South Florida provides complete and accurate infol'I!Wltion to offeaapus media of eODIIlunication.s on all mattet"s of interest ,to the public. Tbe University 5 ..

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.. (Draft to Prelideut Alleu, couttuued CONFIPINTIAL) doea not 1uppre11 iuforaation of a coatroverdal nature, but inatead ha1tena to explaiu ttl poa1tion objectively. leapouaibility for the coaduct .of thll program of nn1 aa4 publicity 11 deleaated to the News Bureau, and more epecifically to it Editor, who 11 a ltalf officer directly responsible to the The News Bureau is the central clearing house of the Univeraity for preparation and diteeminatiou of news and publicity releasee. la general. faculty and staff members having information about which they desire a release are expected to channel it through the Neva Bureau However if a faculty or staff member is approached by an reporter, he may provide information requested o f him if he is in possession of such information and if in his judpent the release o f such information is appropriate. If the person has any doubt about the appropriatenees of such release, he is expected to refer the reporter to the Editor of the News Bureau. The lditor hiuelf must exercise di.scretion and good judgment in deteraining the appropriateness of any releae sent out fro. hit office. If he bas any doubt about the content, timing, aeeeaaUy or propriety of any material being conaidered for release, he ia expected to clear tuch material with the President. In the field of public information, pa.rdcularly :informatiott about a public institadon, it is nAtUral that differences of opiniOJI will exia. t about a aaajority of the press releaaes which are disseminated .! .. 6 ..

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(Draft to Predc:lent Allen, continued CONPIDENTUL) It must be recognized, however, that it 11 not po88ible to sathfy everybody all the time. The Editor' a poaition, then, requires scrupuloua accuracy, honesty, and sound judgment. The above procedure, in Policy Statement No. 22 dated July 25, 1961, has been followed in all releaaes. With the exception noted above there have been no untimely or inaccurate releaaes as far as we can judge. 5. Con&ider and take steps to buUd public confidence in the University. (Take steps to end suspicionl in the Tampa area o atheistic, anti. religious activities, poor counseling; and the like in the University.) This statement auumes that there is not public confidence in the University at the present time. We believe that there 18 a gteat deal of public confidence in the University. This was never ao evident as during the time of the Johns COiilmittee hearings. Statementa of confidence then came frOQ& studeats, ministers, public officiala, and many cit.izena. Lack of confideace was expreued chiefly by a small group intent upon forciag the Univeraity into an untenable poeition. Preuurea of various aorta exist upon a public iaatitution. The Univerlity h new. tt haa no alumni .. {yet to speak for it or de end it. In the midst of establishing an educational program of high quality it must alao eatabliah itself as a new member in the community, as a cultural and economic aaset to the 8urrounding area, and as a large physical and financial complex worthy of the taxpayers' dollars. All of theae things it must do before it can begin to provide a steady flow .. 7 -

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. (Draft to Preaiden t Allen, coatinued COID'IDBBTIAL) of reapondble aad well educated graduatet into the atreaa of co.unity 'lba facu are that the Univetdt y and it.a -.ployeea have m.ade uny lignificaat contributions to the welfare of the coaaunity at all levels, not only in itt normal areas of operation but in religious, cultural, civic, social and service activities at well. In the two years since it opened, the University bas staged 14 0 coacerta, p laya, art exhibits, lectures, forwu and film clauica, all open to the public. Attendance records show that 100 000 persons witne88ed these cultural perfonaances. Two of the University's cultural orgaaizations, a ayaphony and a theatre group, utilized the taleats of maay area residents who previously had no outlet for their musical and theatrical \ ..... talenta. thirteen members of the University faculty and student body per foraed regularly with the Tampa Philhar1110nic providing that group with a healthy infueiou of new talent. In addition to the cultural events, the Univertity served as holt f o r 150 convention, workshops, dinnera, aud timilar occasions during the past two yeart; d espite the fact that it had only one cafetel'i with limited faciUt.iea to aerva ita tudent body and ataff. SOiae 20,000 persons attended these 150 eventl. Many of ,the occaetone ware for local civic organizations, w0111en' s groupe and rvie. e clubs, who enjoyed a meal on the caaput; a tou. r of the facilities and a talk by a University official on the progreu, plans and purposes of the inatitutbn. .. d Durin& the two-year period, Univerlity persouel gave s0111e 225 talks to groups and organizations in Hillsborough County and surrounding areas .. 8 -

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(Draft to President Allen, continued ...... I CONFIDENTIAL) Thia was doat in molt cases without coat to the organization involved, and provided a valuable source of voluntary service to these organizations. Individual contributions of the University faculty and staff in the area of religion have also been extensive. More thall a dozen persone have occupied pulpits in and around the T-.pa Bay area in the past year, and several of thele have been arranged on a pertUnent basis. Many other llleQlber of faculty and staff have accepted important offices and. other position of leadership in their churches, and still others have spoken to church groupe on a variety of eubjecta. There are still other areas in which the University has given extensive eervice to the coiQDiunity Four faculty members write weekly columns for daily newspapers in the city; the three local television stations bave draw heavily on Univereity personnel for appearances, some of these on a permanent basil; and members of the faculty frequently contribute book reviews to the Tuapa Tl'ibune. One recent peJ;'formante of the Univerltity SJ'II'Phony Orchastra on television station W'lVT drew so many letters of praiSe that the etatlon presented the program a second time. Many local setv.ice groups, including the Family Service, the Tampa Urban League, the Friends of the Library, the American Association for the United Nations and the Chamber of Commerce, have utilized University personnel in ilaportant administrative positions and coumittee assignment, and other members of the faculty have served as consultants to a variety of public and private organizations. 9 -

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.. (Draft to President Allen, continued .. CONFIDENTIAL) Members of the faculty have alao served as consultant with the public choola in the area, and have auilted the schools in such areas as curriculum revhion, cour1e design and adminittrative ttructure. ln addition, more than a score o f faculty wbe teach in the public schools, helping to relieve a serious teacher shortage there. Personal contact with a number of influential COIIIPlunity reaidenU has reVealed a number of surpriling reasons for much of the u:preued lack of public confidence in the University. There are, for exaDlPle, some citizens who are disillusioned because the University has no football team, and has indicated it will not have one. There are others who oppose any of integration, and are upset because this barrier has been re-laxed. Another group having sons and daughure in the University, are disturbed to learn that college is more demanding than high school, and since these parents did not attend college themselves, they are having a difficult time adjusting to the change along with their children. Still another group feels the University bas not been conservative enough in ita selection of faculty textbooks, required reading and guest speakers, and has gone too far in exposing students to a variety of pointe of view. Many of these groups overlap or interlock. Together, they constitute a body of opinion which bas had its confidence in the University shaken by the institution' s failure to confo't'Dl to one or more of their personal images. This is an unfortunat e situation, compound ed by the ironic fact that the institutional decisions which prompted this disillusionment were judiciously made decisions by responsible professional people whose highest obligation is to provide the state of florida with an outstanding new institution of higher learning .. 10 .. \ ...

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(Draft to Prelident Allen, continued CON!'IDENTIAL} The Univerdty of South PloTida' dedication to thh objactiva baa not diaainilhed. It will continue to aeek new avenues by which it can build public confidence in itaelf, while at the same time r ... ining faith-ful to the principles on which American higher education b founded Diecuadonl within the staff have brought forth additional ideas vbtch will help to form a stronger bond between the institution and the public 1erved. We believe, for instance, that more can be done to educate the parents of our students to better understand the true meaning of a univerlity education. We have been promoting a aeries of television programs in which members of the faculty speak about their courses and their teaching. A special committee on public relatione has been or ganized. It should be clear, however, that the University has been actively at wotk in_ thia field from the beginning and .that it merely upecte to con tinue, inunlify, and extend these operations for the good of the Univer-sity and the community. It must alao be said that a new public university starting as we have .I with con1iderable numbera of studentl, high atandards and in a i: which baa aot experienced an operation of this nature, il bound to cause some dislocations of thought in the community aa well a some disaffection by thoee whose wishes cannot be satilfied. A1 the Univeraity grows such dhlocationa and diaaffections should be leasened. -11 ..

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(Draft to President Allen, continued ; CONFIDENTIAL) \ '\ 1:, 6 Conaider and take ttepa to build appropriate lines of between and among administrators, faculty members students \he \ \ Preaident. \ \ ,, This statement gives the impression that little or nothing has yet done in thia area; whereas we believe we have developed ex'rellent linea of communication during the first two years both formal and informal. I ;' \ The for.al lines operate according to the following pattern. The Executive Committee cons ists of the President, Dean of Academic Affairs, Dean of Student Affairs and Business Manager It meets regular-ly once a week and often meets more frequently. Each of these officers meets with his ataff once a week o r more frequent ly on occasion. Each dean meets with his Council or staff once a week. Each chairman or director meets with his Council or staff once a week or more frequently. In this way moat members of the faculty are engaged in weekly meetings. The University Senate consisting of 30 elected members of the faculty, 5 IHIIIbers of the non-acaderaic staff and 5 students, meets monthly on educationAl matters. The President meets frequently with the officers of the student association. The Dean of Academic A ffairs meets fortnightly with the student committee on Academic Standards. -12 '-

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(Draft to heaident Allen, coat1nued COBJ'lDBNTJ,AL) .. Studenu aerve on the Seeate, on the Student Affaire COIIIIlittee, and on the Traffic There ere advhory nudeat cOIIIIlitteea to the llegiatrar and the Buaine .. Manaaer The for.al linea of communication are fully adequate and are working well. However, in a rapidly growing institution with few old-time tradition aDd frequent changes,continulng effort ia neeeaaary to keep theill working well. For exaiaple, the Dean of Acad .. ic Affaira aaawaed his pott in February, 1962 Pri.or to that the President had carried these duties. It was necessary at that time to shift the o rganizat'ional atructure of the executive coodttee and add a new staff unit the Academic Affaire Staf. f which was included in the temporary executive cOIIIIlittee. B.eal coaaunication depends more on the spirit than the form. The Univereity started with an "open door" policy. This still prevails. Any faculty member can see the President and many do --or, any .of the deans, or other officers, upon request. The faculty and administration usually lunch in the same roODl. Lines of cOlllllunication within the atudent body and between atudenta and student affairs ataff officers did not develop aa rapidly at might have been hoped for. They have imp roved greatly in recent months and under the new Dean of Student Affairs it is anticipated that thh 1mproveaaent will be accelerated. Several unfortunate incidents )J.ave duriq the secood year of operation to increase the problem of understanding between faculty, admin18trat1on and etudents. From -each of the18 has eome a need for re-1.3 -

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(Draft to Preddent Allen, continued CODIDINTIAL) fin ... nt of procedure in the aru of Prom che f.'e&htratiou problea c .. e the etudent aclvllory coahtee to ) t h e leahtrar, from the Davis incident caae t..,roved communication procedure on clearance of epeaker and puolicity; from the Fl .. ina came clearer appointment and publicity procedures. Tbi1 11 not to say that the Univerlity learna only by auch aperiencee. Tbey do confirm, however, the need for adhering to established proeedurea. As a young university with a small group of adminUtratore and fac\Jlty in the beginning it ia natural that actual communication procedure would be somewhat less than formal. In fact, it 1a desirable that as much informality as possible be retained within established procedural channel as we grow larger. It is our plan, therefore, to continue to clarify eetabliahed channele, examine the need for others, but to retain within thia frame work as much flexibility and informality a1 ia cona .ilteut with eff.ective communication in an effort to avoid slow-downs, bottlenecka, aod htakea. 7 Consider and take ap propriate steps to be certain of the "tona' #.11 the classrooms of the University. It has been our policy froua the begtaing to provide a good learning situation for our student in the claurooaa. for thia reaaon we eapba ehe dilcuseion as ali luaportant adjunct to lecturing. Good diacussion calla f o r giveandtake between ttudeiat aacl etudent and between etudent aad teacher. It also calls for a leas formal aemoaphere tb&n ia present 14 J

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(Draft to President Allen, continued CONFIDENTIAL) in a lecture. We expect, therefor, that the 11tone11 of the clauroom is .-o .re relued than ia found in lecture coursea. Since "tone" il intended also to include the intellectual and' social level of the diacusaion it 11 i111portant that relaxatioll doea not lead to degeneration of discussion. With one or two exception the.re are no reasons to believe that this is happening. The case of Profeaeor Winthrop has already been referred to as a misunderstanding. Mr. 'I'houa Wenner used his class diacussion periods largely to talk about hia own experiences and stir students up to demand their rights. Beyond tlteae incidents there is no reaaoll to believe that the "'tone" of the ia unsatisfactory. Student appraisal$ (taken anonymoudy) indicate an overwhelming balance in favor of satisfaction with classroom procedure& and discussions. We expect, bcn;ever. to keep in close touch with these procedures and where there ia any indication that the "tone" is improper will take steps to change it. At the e tie the faculty 1a fully aware of the deeirabUity of maintaining aood relations with students baaed on high cultural and ethical standards. Wa w .ill eonttnue to emphasize this. 8 Review the teaching activities in the American Idea and Human Behevior courses to be certain that all information presented is in harmony 1 with appropriate objectives. The Dean of Academic Affairs meets frequently with the other deans eonw earning programs under their direction. The following statement has been .. 15 w .. J \

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(Draft to Prelident Allen, continued CONFIDENTIAL) submitted recently by the Dean of Bas i c Studies to the Dean of Acadeaaic Affairs, These procedures a .re those which h ave been in effect aince the University started. It should be pointed out, however, that the American Idea course is a sophomore level course and was offered in multi-sections for the first time i n 1961-62. As a result of the first year of operation a number of c hanges in procedures and materials are being introduced to improve the cour1e. "In response to your request, the following statement is submitted concerning supervision of teaching activities in CB 103-104 and CB 201. "In the courses in Human Behavior and The American Idea, a s in other courses of the College of Basic Studies, teaching methods and materials are 1elected for their effectiveness in achieving the objectives of the courses. "The objectives are chosen to contribute to the objectives of the University and the College. They are reviewed by the staff, chairman and dean periodically. "Classroona activities are developed by the staff, usually working as ad hoc c011111it te4UI; in consultation with the chairman of the cour1e. Frequent di1eussion between the chairman and the dean of the College occurs. Weekly reviews and revi1ions of the methods and materials are accomplished in meetings of the teaching staff, presided over by the chairman. "Both the chairman and the dean visit classrooms and discuss teaching activitie1 with the staff. "This procedure for selection of teaching activities is not errorless; there is no perfect method It does however, place the initiative for developing methods with the men who teach the course, and provides convenient mechanisms for rapid identification and correction of poor selection. In ray opiuion, t his system is working satisfactorily.tt -16 -

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\ .. B. C. to: President Allen Dean Jean A B attle Mrs. Mildred M. aobert 2415 Nad41 load Lakeland, I lorida Dear Mrs. lobert: Kay 2, 1963 Por some daya now 1 have been wantin& to wite you about your exce lent-recent letter to the ld'itor of the T&q)a Tribune concern iDS J o bn8 COIIIIlittee investigation of the University of outh Jlorida. finally I have e ized a IDOIIlent to do 'P' Your letter appeared the rning sev ra1 of us went to 'fallahaaaae where President Allen epoke to a joint aeaaion of the leghlature in refutation of Ml'. Haves' tat Gent. hetident llen' a c018M1lt aa we .started out, vas that yo'Ur letter waa ao quch to tb.e point that he c.o'Uld ea.Uy substitute it f or tiM speech be planned to give. lt is moat heertentn to receive tha kind of support you and huadrada of other tntelltgent people have atven ue in our efforts to e this a real univeraity. We expect with thb kind of support to weather these intera{ttent, but uaplaaeant, and remain true to the objectives of a real ttate untverlity in a daaocrecy. We are also very pleased with Caro lyn' reaction to the Univeraity and her teachers. Tbanka again for your fine atat ... nt. SJF:lad Cordially, Sidney J. lrnch Dean l

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IMPORTANT Note Carefully 1 ,. o ... __ /.__>fiL.____________ "'""----------------------------------FOR lnveatigation ............................... .......... Reply direct with cc to Approval Coneultation with Comment Reply; eia. Prea U11iv Handlina Note and return to ............................ .. Final diepoaition Information on ......................................... .. ................................................................................................... Remarka:

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DIAN OP ACADEMIC AFP ADS December 10, 1 962 TO: THOSE CONCbNED .-------cc tof. \__ __ Herewith is a draft of a proposed statement on our meeting of September 22, 1961, composed fr Ul your memora .nda. The statement should be as factual as poseible1 and uneDlotional. Please go o"ter it very carefully for facts and tone aud return any comments to me as soon es poeeible. Thanks. SJF:lad Inclosure /1)-Sidney J. French Dean

PAGE 86

CUte& of tiM ACA,..,C Ui'Al.U l UQ ,., ..... 12, 1161 li:nriD 4 GIOUJ fll AlD UPUID'.tlltiUI .. fBI Ulllfalttf. IOUrl n.<1llDA Ja.r .... in lie aDd PJ'lvat '1 .....,, .of t cttbeu JI'O coecwa 1f1tta cld.a -.ti., _. .. -., ot.._ whtcb _,.. O'l' S.,l7 fa vari ._,. tlwlt t ,....., r:Matv hnt'h6tf, .. netve4 wtth boa-tU.ty; .. &lY-.. U ... tQ \\ .. 11' c;ua,, a C .alle4 nC.l'Mkpotl,t NMt t'-t tli clt.aS.... '\_..... oa ta !ae;el _. wlQd out.'" lt. .... l.,or.-t.ant" .. ,.. Tl\e foU0 .. atat_..l ._...," .-c th Vatrtt7 cath li coo placa &t tlw tl .... .Dr. l .. t"-Clulli'Mil o'f U. ta hMttoMl -.u.a ail Dirac t t Dirt1toa of L.utaMS aDd Utantve, 8r. LoU ._1,.. CIUI.t,... of tlw e ta ._. a.l:anlor, r. eU.ffo-rcl lc.-rt,. M,eeto-r of o.f Calleae t the Y111ttaa ctoup taelUUf Stocktoa S.tth, wh ..... lpo .... n aa1 aoa : a tl'Jea auct -* ta a ...._r of tu StvCtat 1Jo4y Fuak -:r,B. ..... ..

PAGE 87

t l. ( I t all anl _,._., polata au.ertcal llh co lPP!!! JO!!R. IM..,..,. auo 1 leal Mtbo4 of obUlal d.ta. (It) 4:. at.-appr r:lat'e terial la1 atrati lcaU. ()) t qpU.cit vlt'b to QOU.l. p 1-.., (4) lt bl'ld a.ct avaUdle ,.,., NC ed1tto at J'M't tala t to lt vee pol..llted out that Dr Malpass was an ordained minister and UJ.-!.-r( Sfw ... f I tf b -{J;d /.)( (t:i;, j Cfef.-,1-1-[. k t1t.t --'u_.,_. ,(.t-Q.<.. ...{ _, -tA-v 4--<.. ltl.A .. f. ( Y (, { .. '-( ) ( e).-1 -w tt.N.J ytv c 4'-AA-'....,...< [IUA.Lt .t..-;h; .--.. (6-... I r;?< i, A--lL. v-J

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4tuv. t tbe vtalti., ,..,.. tbU 1 of tile Matt._, ..,.. ... OUU\'1 ..._ vialtba I'"'P UM(l to a.we copy of tu tUt. nt wae aot fOi..,le aU t .t J b utur nk:ta an alii ,Q.., ad over 4>. Thtl al. l M i-.J. eat coacua.a wt.th a Mtura t.u4 t, a ldatt.-. u. ok'-'1, Jtett to tta. offatve 1...-ua t a tMCta. t .,...., ..... .. alaN u4 lblt "' Ya. t-..e.W .... all .... t .... c.lled 14 at .. .. t t.._ .._ Ch.e t*'t alleaedl ntl.l left ta 11M J:corcta ""* ..-...s.ately Mked. Th .taowt4 tut tt)e e;ourae ha4 b eOiiJ. plet.S Wl.tb a ar.Se lhtf -.ro )Jt t.o th tqtioa of the poup .., t-.. M.ttw tlaea 4r_ p.a. Tld.a .... M Ale t -uu \IP 1a tlltl. l9ba e iavetl lt \&a 'b.-olN.rly OWii b7 tbe witt tt.at.,...t

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cl. .or t'W() t faculty ile felt tn.t 1aOM of th acJyoc;atecl athei.-in tbi.r cla. l -:U wbJ.cb ep1rted fl'Cil t hbrte...C,hrf.t:l.u t. ot reU.a,la Qot u.a ta &a to cho& tr polatt of '91. tbe -.t .. vaa r iiled 'by YllitKt that. tt I u *PPl"Ofi'Ute IQ tucbi: Mtutl Wlatelt ql.t &ffect tu 1'elta1-o viat ot P1 a f "*'"''*'' 1* were PO\Jt-Q4! tb&t while! th tfaivd'ti.ty 11 alny J'ea4y to tiateu. to t;ritld .... lad JJlYe C: asldl'l.tton to lua&ettioDI, tt -1t, the flul l)'ab, aalut tte r.nm 4ed.lou
PAGE 90

, ut or -.ilwc of c:U ... u ... nre takea t t Tt-. "- Uct hd ,_,.t,au ftitta tat..-e. later ..S ..-clJ t.7 ell of t.H !Mvut1 ;r; .--.tattvu a.S t.a cJ'ije41 to et cbail' cou14erH iacrpl'cU. cf whllt too pl c at tiM ,., to; hal aeU Dr. li Halpa Cliff twatt Dr. loltwt Ztler fricl t AlleD /

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"> l' } I CONFIDENTIAL MIMORANDUM DIAN OF ACADEMIC An'AIIB 21, 1962 TO: PRESIDENT ALLEN Mrs. Jane Smith' s opus contains a statement that someone told her they knew of a faculty member at the University of South Florida who was fired from a school in Tennessee for being a homosexual. W e ha ,ve che c k e d this o u t a n d here is Herb Wun derlich's report on it. Enclosure Sidney J. French Dean

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.. DIAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS CONJIDINTIAL MEMORANDUM TO: RE: PRESIDEN T ALL E N Matters Relating to the University o f South Florida Requlrlng Action by President Allen and a Report to the Boar d S p ecial Ca.aittee: I have drafted statement on each of these points for your consideration. Feel free to change them in any ways which will best serve the purpoae. SJF:lad inclosures Sidne y J. French Dean

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(). November 7, 1962 12: 10 A women ca 11 ed and wanted to 1 eave a message for Dr. A 11 en. She wanted to know if we were running a "witch hunt or an educational institution?'' She came to class to ay _for the second time, and no teacher. (She Would not tell ine her name, the class or even the college) She was extremely upset, and she added that she didn't live too far-but some of the c l ass had communted from St. Pete. Her idea was that the professors were not teaching because of the limitations put on them by Dr. A 1 len or the Johns Committee. She sounded to me 1 ike an older person, she spoke of teaching herself, how she planned to and it was a dhgrace how our teachers here were told what they could_teach and what they could not teach. She said she had children of her own, and she fully expected them to learn the good and the together -how else would they ever beable to live in a society'if they. were protected all their lives. She spoke about the homosexual mess here, and said all it was was throwing boys and a girls together at much/younger age. Because in the state of Florida if 2 boys or 2 girls were seen being friendly together after the age of 12 or so they were called honosexuals. She went on to say young men here could not share apartmemts to save on expenses because of this "witch hunt". She thoughtwe should go back to the old fashion schools-where we had all boys schools until college level and all girls schools, then put them together. She added she was the north, and up there where Charlie Johns has never been let loose to stir up the homosexual problem, it is almost unheard of but he has ruined the state of Florida, He and his entire committee should be shot. She said that Or. Allen should stand behind his teachers, and why had the Board of Control dictated to him 1 This is the drift of the she was very excited ... ;



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Copyrighted material removed

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. --" MEMORANDUM August 7, 1962 TO: Sidney J. French FROM: Elliott Hardaway Roger Lewis was called, during the recent investigation, for questioning by the Johns Committee. From Mr. Lewis' statement, which is enclosed, I would assume that there might be two reasons for ques-tioning him: 1. The matter of pornography in the Library. 2. The matter of his confiscated mail. As pointed out by Mr. Lewis, he has no responsibility for acquisition policy and is in no way involved in the operation o f this policy. As a University staff member he is free to recommend purchase of books, as is any staff member or student. All such requests for purchase are reviewed by the Acquisition Department in the light of their experience and on the basis of standard book reviews. As I recall, Mr. Lewis has occasionally suggested purchases, and they were invariably of a very scholarly nature. From Mr. Lewis' statement, I would infer that the Committee's purpose in questioning him along this line was more to determine Library policy then to fix h i s part in acquisition policy and operation. If this is correct, the Committee was at fault in questioning not only a ) subordinate, but one not employed in this particular area. It would have been more ethical and informative to have questioned me, as the responsible administrator, or Mr. Me Cabe, as head of the Acquisition Department. -continued-

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Page 2. Sidney J. French August 7, 1962 As for the second matter, it would appear that the Committee was on very insecure grounds. Neither they nor Mr. Lewis had seen the materials in question. They were acting on hear-say evidence. Had Mr. Lewis been financially able to fight the matter through the courts, it is entirely possible that Customs would have been ordered to deliver the material to him. Neither the Customs nor the Post Office has too good a court record on thei r conception of pornography. Any American citizen can today read Joyce's Ulysees -a book long banned by Customs. The courts eventually made this book available to any American -young or old. Would a citizen who had his copy of Ulysees confiscated by Customs now be considered addicted to pornography? Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer is a point also in question. Customs, Post Office and many police officials have tried to have this book banned. The courts have held otherwise. The Post Office fought a long and losing battle to ban Esquire from the mails. This is an area of wide disagreement, and one in which definitions have not been determined, nor any guide lines established. There is, I might note, a very perceptible trend in court decisions away from using the "most impressionable'' citizen as a criterion for> the effect of pornography to the "average" citizen. All the methods involved -confiscation of mail, the mail watch, and the communication of unproven suspicion among governmental agencies is more characteristic of a totalitarian state than of a democracy. This trend of events is most d isturbing to any who believe in freedom and the integrity of the individual. -continued-

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Page 3. Sidney J. French August 7s 1962 In my opinions and to the best of my knowledges Rodger Lewis is an honorables upright and moral person. In my experiences he is the only person to return some of his travel moneys saying that he had not spent that much on the trip. Florida will have done itself a real disservice if such a fine person and competent librarian suffers from the irresponsible actions of demagogic individuals. Encl.

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r. Harda way: I submit the following as a very 'eneral, though I hope not inaccurate, account of my interrogation by the Johns' Committee. I was introduced an d I recall that essrs. Hawes, Strickland, Johns, a member of the Board of Control, and a gentleman from Audio-Visual who operated the recording device, were present. I was sworn in, and reminded that I could refuse to answer an y or all of the questions to be asked. I think I am correct in believing it was r. H awes who did the actual questioning. I was first asked to describe my position in some detail. I explained t hat I was a cataloger, and as simp l y as possible I attempted to describe our routine It was apparent from t h e question s whi c h followed t hat the Committee was not very interested in t h e cataloging process, but was concerned more exactly with book acquisition procedures and circulation policies. I replied that since my specialty was cataloging, I was not thoroughly familiar with these other functions of the library, and t hat testimony I migh t give on this subject.would be liable to errors. On being pressed for so m e kind of answer, I did say tha t with qualifications namely the use of Special Collections as a repository for material that it was deemed inadvisable to keep on an open shelf -it was true that all of our boo k s were available to any library user. e then became involved in a more or less futile attempt to agree on a definition of Although the use of this word throughout the inquiry c reated a real to communic ation, I could only suggest at one point that our understanding of t h e term might be as disparate as our philosophies. Mr. H a wes manifested som e satisf action when I was unable to provide him with a formal policy stat e ment pertaining to censorship in book acquisition. I recall, too, that he evinced some amaze m e n t when h e learned that some sort o f faculty review board was not consulted to approve all book purchases. The line o f questioning then centered aroun d the incident of my ordering som e material f rom abroad which t h e Custo m s Dept. and/or t h e ost Office confiscated. I was asked if I would care to elaborate; I replied that I had no objections and proceeded som e what as follows: I n about M ay or June of 1961, I ordered t hree magazines from Denmark advertized as Contintental versions of Playboy. One was to be in Ger man, o n e in French, and the third in Swedish I think. Nothing happened for 3 or 4 months and I h ad given them up an d even forgotten about them In August or September 1 received a car d fro m the Customs Office explaini ng that they or t h e P O Dept. were holding so m e first class mail for inspection because it was believed t o contain 11o bscene11 m aterial. I protested r a t her vigorously and probably sarcastically; but I did give them permission to inspect and dispose of the mate rial as the law oblig e d them to. I protested not kno wing what, exactly, t h e material was. But I feel no w as I must have then, t hat I protested solely o n principle. T h e matter did not end there h owever. I n February of 1962, t he Posta l Inspector in Tampa i nvited me t o see him in regard to a matter he was investigating : it turned out h e was i nvestigatin g a list o f people suspected

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.. of dealing in pornography. H e inform e d me, finally, t hat he was assured I was not a dealer because he had observed our inc o ming mail for more than 30 days and I had received nothing 11suspicious. 11 li e did ask m e about mail we receive regularly from England (my in-l a w Q), the Islands (a daily newspaper), and Lutz (another newspaper). (This interview was not especially m emorable except tha t it struck me as curious tha t he should ask m e if I wasn't worried that the Johns Committee would learn of this. And of course thas Committee s hortly made its local debut. Also I sensed a not too carefully veiled threa t i n his observation that 'onc e you get on one of t hese lists, you never get off.') Except for t h e parenthetical state ment above, I narrated the incident pretty uch in t his fashion before the Committee. Their questioning then returned t o library procedures and t h e liklihood tha t 1) w e probably already possessed some pornography, 2) that be readily available, 3) that pornography could be ordered, received, and m a de available a t any time. I attem pted to rebut this mostly by referring to h uman nature. I expressed the opinion that it was inconceivable to m e that recognizable pornography could be processed without it creating so much stir and so m any varied reactions among, first, the staff, then the students and faculty that surely the commotion would v e r y quickly commandD t h e attention of the Director of the Library and probably the President of t h e University as well. The foregoing, I believe, is as an objective a ccou n t o f the proceedings as I am c ap a ble of providing from m e mory. I would lik e to conclude, h o wever, with a deliberately subjective estimate. I went to t h e interrogation almost directly, and without previous notice, from a Russian languag e ora l examination w hich had left m e m e ntally fatigued. b ile I t hink I said nothing which I would c are to retract, I immensely regret my hesitancy, m y poor elocution and articulation, and the fact tha t this may very well have been construed by the Committee a s a kind o f reverentia l nervousness .And I am not no w nor w a s I t hen, in a n y way a shamed nor embarr assed by t h e Post Office incident. Yet I have no doubt that I w a s selected for interrogation and the incident introduced for thesole purpose of bringing discredit upon the Library and upon the University. T his I regret sincerely. A t the sruae time, I t hink tha t the use of guilt by association or implication is the most despicable w e ap on frequently e mpl oyed b y committees of this sort. I f it is immoral to be occasionally entertained by t h e kind of humor, photographs, and stories that appear in magazines like Playboy, then I am immoral and accept the state's judgment regarding m y future employment withiil its juris diction; but if their judgment is formed out of the vagaries and inflated imaginations of burea u cratic functionaries, t h en a patent injustice is compounded. It is for t hese reasons I am prepared to submit to the Johns' Committee a written supplement to be included with the taped interview elaborating on the Posta l Affair and more clearly defining t h e mora l precepts which guide my actions. Sincerely,

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THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA LIBRARY Sp 1 'l 196l September 1962 MEMORANDUM TO: S. J. French FROM: Elliott Hardaway At President Allen's request, I went to the Post Office and interviewed Postal Inspector C. M. Griffith, concerning the matter about which Rodger Lewis was questioned by the Johns Committee. This interview took place on Tuesday, September 11, 1962, in Mr. Griffith's office. On Wednesday I listened to the .. tape of the questioning of Mr. Lewis by the Johns Committee. Mr. Griffith, of course, refused to give me a copy of his report on Mr. Lewis, but did read it to me. From inspection across the desk I would say there was only a one page_ report on the matter in the folder. Mr. Griffith's report coincided with Mr. Lewis' report as given to me and forwarded to you on August 7, and agreed with his answers to Committee questions. Mr. Griffith stated that his office had been requested on December 19, 1961, by complainant (a term he asked be used rather than the name of the complainant. However, from the hearing tape and Mr. Lewis's report the Complainant was the U.S. Customs) to investigate Mr. Rodger Lewis as a dealer in por-nographic material, based on receipt by Customs of a few (I believe three) magazines addressed to Mr. Lewis from a foreign country, Denmark. Mr. Griffith said that this was a routine request, that an investigation was made and that a mail check had been run on Mr. Lewis during Mar
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Page 2. S. J. French September 1962 23, 1962. Mr. Griffith stated that Mr. Lewis denied dealing in pornography, that his investigation revealed no evidence to the contrary and that, there-fore, his report was negative. He further stated that from his investigation he believed Mr. Lewis was a normal male, l eading a normal home life. The entire problem is complicated by the fact that neither the Post Office nor Mr. Lewis ever saw or were told specifically what the materials in question were. Mr. Lewis stated that he ordered the material as being advertised as Playboy type of magazines. This and many other domestic magazines of a more extreme nature are freely available on American news-stands and are moved through American postal facilities. Mr. Griffith hazarded a guess that the materials were of the nature of "nudist" magazines and he stated that American nudist magazines were legally mailable. All of this is illesswork; we do not really know what Mr. Lewis is suspected of. The University Library has recently added to its collection the follow-ing book: Federal Censorship -ObsCenity in the mail, by James C.N. Paul and Murray L. Schwartz. Free Press, 1961. Mr. Paul is a member of the College of Law, University of Pennsylvania, and Mr. Schwartz on the faculty of the College of Law at the University of California, Los Angeles. The book is a scholarly study of the semantic and legal problems of sex censorship by the Post Department. Attached are excerpts from this study which are especially pertinent to the situation in which Mr. Lewis finds himself involved. d.E. H. Encl.

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DIAPT Auauat 16. 1962 TO: John Hick1, Preeident, USF \Chapter, AAUP FIOM: Sidney J. French, Dean of Aad.-dc Affairs SUBJECT: Inquiry on Suspension of Jolin Caldwell Since Preaident Allen bas been from the c-.pue during the period of thia inquiry I D anevtirtng your recent aeaaoraQdua to him on t he subject. The broad ground for the au1penlioD. of Mr. Caldwell were conin the President's letter to hia. '11le specifics of the1e charges appeared largely in the tape of the Johns COIIIIlitte-e hear inge and were eelfevident to the Colamittee. Mr. Caldwell vae well aware of these. In fact.he requested and was permitted to Ueten to the tape shortly before meetiM vith the C011111ittee. 1 \ aa of,the opinion that matter of not Hating specific charges / (, I is a technicality having little to do spirit of "fair play" \ with which we are ali' concerned. There va'it, neither by intent nor I ). by implication, any attempt to violate fait' play. Indeed, f&iJ.:' play vas the apirit in which the entire ie)peratioll vaa framed. Mr. Caldwell's reappointment for vas informally promised before the results of the Johns investiaation were known to the adainistration, as were those of all other .-hers of the \ returnina faculty. ,, ,. \ Your obaervation implies that a decisio.concerning suapen$ion should .. 1 \ i decision, however, should f 1 I t {'\ I \ have been reached earlier. Perhaps. \ \ .. I

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DRAFT A ; I not be arrived at hastily if there is to be the kind of fair play we all believe in. As matter of fact and incid4lntally, the delay may prove helpful to Caldwell in the financial aspecte of the probla. since it will carry the formal hearings over into a new con-tract period. Your question on whether or not the investigations should have been carried out by a special committee rather than by the Personae! Committee or the Educational Problems Committee is one to which very careful consideration was given before a decision vas aaade. The Chairman of the Personnel Committee feels that his grievance function o f this committee was to hear grievances at this level and of this type. Rather its function is to deal with ainor matters not at the Presidential level. The Committee on Educational. Problems was not intended to be a personnel cOIIWilittee. Its original function waa; to hear complaints about course&, teachers, methods of teaching,, overlapping of courses, and similar matters relating to the educational program. Since there was no established c0111111ittee for the purposes of ..this inquiry it became necessary to appoint a special committee. This was done after consultation and using the following guide lines: 1. The coDIDlittee should be broad'ly representative of the University. 2. It should hav-a no one fr<>al Mr. Caldwell's division. 2 ;

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{ DIAFT ------3. It should consist of men whose rank was equal to or superior to that of Mr. Caldwell. 4. It shou l d not include member whose major duties were in adainistration. It aay well be that conlideration should be given to the forming of a new standing for the specific purposes of dealing with problems of this nature, or that the function of one of the preaent standing ca.mitteee should be broadened to deal with such problema Under the existing every effort was made to comply as far as possible with appropriate forms and procedures. But more ilaportant than this, every effort waa made to aee that the apirit of the p roceedinga was "eminently fair and just" and that Mr. Caldwell was oot deprived of any of his rights. You have stated that the "colDlllittee conducted itself admirably, both in ita considerateness and in its careful attempts to penetrate the substance of its co.anission. I concur fully in this statement. This is what we hoped to achieve. It seems to me that Mr. Caldwell's hearing was eminently fair and just, that he vas not deprived of any riahta, and that your emphasis on unavoidable technical departures is not fair to the integrity of an administration which made every effort to provide qualities of fair play to the inquiry. -3 -

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INTER-OFFICE MEMORANDUM AUG DATE __ A_;ug:::..u_s_t_6....:,_1_9_6_2 __ TO: Dean Sidney J. French FROM: R. M. Cooper SUBJECT: __ Ma_x_H_o_cu_t_t ______________ __ .. Since someone has apparently raised a question concerning the teaching of Dr. Max Hocutt, I have looked into the matter and am pleased to make the following report. Dr. Hocutt teaches in the Human Behavior Course and also in our Philosophy Program. He has a Ph.D. from Yale University in the field of philosophy and came to the University of South Florida with high recommendation. We have found that his services here have fully justified those recommendations. He is a competent scholar, very knowledgeable in his field, and is already becoming productive in the writing of philosophical articles for professional journals. I have seen course appraisals by students in Dr. Hocutt's sections indicating their judgment of his teaching, and these have been remarkably strong placing him among the superior instructors of our university. They seem to be particularly enthusiastic about the way in which he forces them to think through philosophical questions for themselves, taking nothing for granted but submitting all beliefs and superstitions to the searching light of logical analysis. I suspect that there might be some individuals who find this insistence upon re-examining their prejudices to be a disconcerting but this would seem to be the very essence of good education and most students obviously appreciate it. With respect to his own philosophical position, I suspect we would classify Dr. Hocutt as being something of a rationalist with special interest in logical positivism. He is deeply concerned about religious values that are not doctrinaire, insisting rather that religious judgments like all others should be examined rationally. Because of Dr. Hocutt's strength as teacher and scholar, he was promoted this year to an assistant professorship by the unanimous recommendation of his course chairman, his division chairman and the dean. He has had opportunity to go elsewhere at better salary but we are hoping to hold him at the University of South Florida /jd

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..... Relating to the Universi t y of S o u t h F'lor i d a Requ i ring Action P s.ident 1\lle n a n d a Report to tho Board Conmittee: !J, r-.J sped 1 tee .Jt the earliest d t pos lble w i h a writte n rep ort t h e action which has. b e e n o r i 11 b e. en Hugoboan ( hanosexuali ty) 'T'er-ke (homosex-.,la it'{) Caldwell ( anosexuttli t y .and heavy drinkiD;J) Winthroo (profanity in the classroom} Hocu U Roger Lewis (pornography). Review in detail w:th the. B .oard. at an informal session all of the circumstances t o the employm ent of Or o. r. Fle miniJ as in that appropriate .:)Ction may be decided Conside r and procl!td':JreS for hand.ling .t:aculty members annourxand tak e steps to prevent 'untimely press releases a..,d/or and inaccurate releases on side r and take steps to public conf. i dence in the Uriiversi ty (Take steps to end suspicions in the Tanp a area of ath.istic., religious activities; poor counseling, ; and the like in 'tne Consider and develop a progr a m t o effect appropriate lines o f c mmuni. c ation between :--:1ci among administrators, faculty :nembers, student&:r and t h e Presiden t

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.. ,. 7, Consider and ake appro. date' st PS to be certain o f the '\tone" in the class roans of the -,University ft. Re i c Behavior c urscs to be certain that all information presented is in a.r ny with approp.ria t e obj ctives ..... : ... .. ,, ... 'I ... ... i I I, ....... : 0 .. .. ', .' I ; t .; ., I ,.. .. I. .I.

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ugutt 7 1962 MBMO
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understood that university procedures p ermitted a n aceuaed i nd ividua l to have a heariDg in front of his colleagues t o present h i s a i de of the case. I thanked Mr. Hawes f o r th:t information a nd also for his thoughtfulnes i n aeDdiq a carbon of his letter to Baya Harriton clearing. up the collfuUon about D. r. fleming affiliations. a. M. COOPil llC/jd

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.. < \ COLLEGE OF BASIC STUDIES MEMORANDUM TO: Dean Sidney J. French FRCM: Dean Edwin P. Martin JUL 3 u 1962 July 30, 1962 In response to your request, the following statement is submitted concerning supervision of teaching activities in CB 103-104 and CB 201-202. In the courses in Human Behavior and The American Idea, as in other courses of the College of Basic Studies, teaching methods and materials are selected for their effectiveness in achieving the objectives of the courses. The objectives are chosen to contribute to the objectives of the University and the College. They are reviewed by the staff, chairman and dean periodically. Classroom activities are developed by the staff, usually working as ad hoc committees, in consultation with the chairman of the course. Frequent discussion between the chairman and the dean of the College occurs. Weekly reviews and revisions of the methods and materials are accomplished in meetings of the teaching staff, presided over by the chairman. Both the chairman and the dean visit classrooms and discuss teaching activities with the staff. This procedure for selection of teaching activities is not errorless; there is no perfect method. It does, however, place the initiative for developing methods with the men who teach the course, and provides convenient mechanisms for rapid identification and correction of poor selection. In my opinion, this system is working satisfactorily. EPM: jm

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Rell7 Willlthrop j( u i,e 'belephone call with Mr. lfartin Qn XV 29th at 9aJO P .M. I made a aipi.tiaant oall to one ot the oenbal. Vib.._ eo..,.. aft.ilable to the Johna OODilittee. l Galled Mr. Martin at the ot JMOPl who 'Aft hie e.U...,t laet: ,.-..:t" ID4 a1 of fellOY Who ore a110 his olaeet... !hey 1f011CiaNd wtq' I had heittJ.ted to do so until now. I \hilt t Ud not wish to appetll" to kmlokl 4Jl4J Wl4er ta an aacuaer. X was told that ;CJh .u eotion 110uld be en in a pnper liaht OJ' in the opitdon ot thMe cl .... tes I 'Q,S &lao ct.m t hint that M vu \lpttet himalf oYe"l' what he ha4 hdrd Dd probably be U I called hUa. l ... d14 ItO Martin explaind that .,_ ba4n t caUe4 b.eoattae lw tlt l to J.Umattt:r what he b.-at'd the C.Uttee lwi wa. a. oat.,or:tcallt ct.ui.a. that lit bad eftlt ude thoae Qhat"ges a,aiQit 11hioh th9 CQmm1 ttee had J'baaiucl in H Be at& ted Whtn be had giTen tpttmony eN;tnaUy before the. CoMi tt that hie hl4 bMn dUt'Orted at that 'time he :pl'9teated what 11rU 'bei.Ra' nect bM1c w bim aa not What he ha4 ..S.d. U. expnssed peraonal 01'1 i!oi of OIHI aesbel' of tbt (1oa1 u-. for t.hie r.uon. I.e ()n hie claim he tel t no ill-lri.U towud .. adi tilat he urtl' WA\1.:1 bl.ft 4 .Ia ...... Jh19b .!!!! wqcitW l.U!i.-.hY. Jt. He etattll bt hla ftndued to th Cola.itt to o-ne of ita l.Jrf:tis&iorll) ..,.,. to 'rial8 ot tru. ooutq a tc tibt ft!ltttl..-4 !he Cr:? Ot Jua. t .... h1a if he ttoul4 aqt me and Qlk th1a thins o'"r. a. UJII'9aud hia, willo 4o ao. but llt&te that n. WOUld l.1k-. to the CbllmiUee tint,., In puttculu he vanW to tpeU: to* Strickl-.d on the uture ot hi.a arigiW watimony ud tbat he ftllW hiiu-a pl.q'ba,ck o:t the obapa Wbiob Db. WRSiiHA laa 8 atated tht.t be W ..ctn.tlt -.4 ton etton to Bli'bl', ._,hi' or the. :co.uu .. 1n oonne
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August 14, 1962 In light of information brought out by the Johns Committee, the President decided to suspend John Caldwell, associate professor of Fine Arts, pending further investigation. A University faculty committee is now in the process of stttdying the matter further. The President, on his return, will review the findings and recommend whatever final action he feels is .. necessary to the Board of Control. Because the inquiry is incom-plete, the University feels it would be unfair to Mr. to disclose at this time the reasons for the suspension. Careful consideration has been given to the possible appointment of Dr. D. F. Fleming, former research professor of political science at Vanderbilt University, to a half-time lectureship at the Universi'l:y of South Florida. Because he was denied at Vanderbilt, President Allen decided not to offer him an appoint-ment here. vanderbilt0s decision not to renew his appointment there after 34 years on the faculty was based on his age (69) and the belief that his recent effectiveness as a teacher has diminished. The University of South Florida as a rule does not accept transfer students who cannot return to their previous institutionr this same policy has been applied in Dr. Fleming0s case as a teacher.

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.. THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA TAMPA. FLORIDA OFFICE OF T H E R EG I STR A R August 1, 1962 TO: DEAN FRENCH SUBJECT: BACKWASH FROM THE INVESTIGATING COMMITTEE Within the last week both Les Malpass and Bob Zetler have mentioned running into public sentiment which reflects a definite adverse reaction to the activities of the investigating committee Les Malpass was in the Fort Myers area meeting with a group of professional people among whom there were several physicians. Sons and daughters of quite a few of the group were going off to college this fall but he learned that not a single one planned to come to University of South Florida. The explanation given by the physicians' group was that "where there is smoke, there must be some fire." Bob Zetler has run'into in the segment which he describes as the lower third of the middle class this feeling in the immediate area. He has had definite expressions on the negative side concerning the literature which our students are expected to read. These are the only two direct reports which I have heard on either side of the ledger concerning reactions to the activities of the investigating group. Sincerely, ..6 F. H. Spain, Jr. rm 1 "'

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THE TEXT OF .A STATEMENT PREPARED BY MEMBERS OF THE CHURCH COUNCIL .AND FORW.lRDED TO MR .TAMES .A. CLENDINEN, EDITOR, TAMP.A TRIBUNE: Since the founding of Harvard College in 1636 the ional Church and American institutions of higher education have made common cause. The local Congregational Church, founded in 1885, stands in this 325 year When the church. sought a site was chosen near the new University of South Florida. Ours was the first denomination to establish a center for student worship, study and fellowship for USF students. Our minister is chaplain designate and is in residence at the student center. 1hus both by heritage and local action the Church (1) is concerned with and involved in the joint search for truth and the development of inquiring minds. The common concern for a greater understanding of the problems and issues of our time has prompted the church to use many of the same books and materials which are prescribed or recommended reading at the University. The ideas and values in these books have been used in the church's educational program and in worship for the insight they provide into the perplexities and confusions which beset modern mane Faculty members have shared in this examination of our contemporary scene in the pulpit and in study programs for youth and adults. The present investigation (2) at USF is an assault on the conception of the free institutions of college and church. It impugns the judgment of those teachers whese sensitivity tn and translation of the values by whioh men live make a truly outstanding university. .As eitiens, churchmen and concerned parents, deplore the dislocations created by an attempt, no matter how well meaning, to exclude materials from the classroom on the grounds of religion or morality. It is time for the religious community to speak out when in the name of religion men of open minds are judged tbe without the powers of discrimination. This is not religln; it is blasphemy. It strikes at the common cause of church and college. {1) (2) Now a cooperating congregation in The United Church of Christ. Secretly initiated upon the invitation of persons challenging the resource materials and the classroom interpretations in several of the interpenetrating disciplines i n the College of Basic Studies. A legislative committee began interviewing students and disaffected parents in April. A fuller description of the investigation and a copy of this open letter has been furnished the Council for Social Action for ir.formation.

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.. Dear I vlh to challenge your statement i ssued t o the students last oek pertainlna t o the cunent investigatiOD. It b, perhaps, benevol en of you (and your mother) to want to protect the children of USlf from a eh llenge to tbeir biaatJa, prejudices, and tndltiouo I find: your s tat nt to bel rife with fal accuaations and implicatloas aeeaingly baaed upon an d llunaffieient infonation.. I abo surpd.nd b y your implicit appraisal of the role o f edu ation in a democracy. You have a tac k e d the University's judgment and purpo e for inviting Jerou Dav ifl to apeak to the students o f the American Ideao You have implied by vape and unaubatantiated accuaation that Mro Davis is a Coalftuni t., 'fhili i a coapletely false and baa been pzoven s o in TWO eouzt declsionso Th United States Stat e Depal'tllellt and t he Departaaent o f Justice have declared without aetVation that Jeraae Davis is not and bas not bean a C0111m1nbto M!'o D a vi& Ulld the S turday Evening Post for accusing bia cf bain g a Colaun t11 and r ( won a judgtHnt for dmaages of $11, OOOo But thi!i is not the real is The AIBB'icau Id eour&1e at the time o f t i n ident va atudyiag c pitalism and o her fiyst in correlation with the !b t in book11. !!!! l!!!o e Davie 1 a critical bolar o c pitalila and wa achedulad to pres nt l y 1 o f c pit li i faultao D l'o Philip Bordeu w s seh dol d to pnaent a d efen1.1 o f the system the fc.ll_aring w k o In Soviet llus:la no one iii mi.tted t o challenge t h e Collauo:tot sy t n a for ftiar that ight c rica c ing to th point where w vill not critieiBD of our cultur ? By cancelling Mro DaYie w pe itted only one eide of the analyst o f c pitalism t o be preaentedo

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Tho aeeond lane you attacbd :I.e the petitiooo You b&v accuecl tbe .petition by iaapU.cation of belna of ca-uniat You "- allepd that it vaa circulated on eampua by ea..uDiat .,mpathizera to seduce innocent atudenta o You claia that 2/3 of the u.s appearing on the petition an people of "uncleairule" backpoundao Firat, vbat do you ... n 1ry "undesirable" o .,.apathiun on the lutnn But apin9 11 ycu have failed to aee the real i.aau imrolvede 1'CM wer. aakd to a:l.gn tbe (which w.. initiated to public .. backina of tbo Unitd Nationa) if and ooly Sf JOU endonecl the ftABM&Nro Do you really aliwe that the PUC. Pdi.tion ia a Cclllluni11t effort to ...Un Mlet'ica'l Rave you read th atateMilt t You ven not asked to endone the MD Bat to illuatrate the real iaaue let us auppoae one of the n vbo aiped the atateMilt wu a "-oaexual., Woulcl your sianlna tbe petiti.oa incU.cate that you too wen a hoaoauul'l?? YOU BAVI PUBLICLY SIJPPOI'IID A YD1' UtUMDJCAH CONCIPf or JUS1'ICBo I> ., BAT 01 OUD.T BY ASSOCIA'rtoN., In total effel.5t you have by irreapouible, lDaccante and PMrile accaaatlone h&J:a&d by 1nc1tlna auapielon thll nputation of a fiae new university that ia .aking .V8XJ effort to afford ita atudenta finest caliber Of educatiODo You han slandered the decU.cated MD who are atrivina to make the University of South Florida pninent aon& the beat univerai.tf.ea: You have sacrificecl the of our school to joar own pKty dopu and prejuclicea o Mod aincenly, /'_L / / Craig Wriaht

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I REPORT OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF CONTROL 9/14/62 At the July, 1962, meeting of the Board of Control of Florida the Board appointed the undersigned committee to study all information furnished to the Board by the Legislative Investigation Committee insofar as its activities were related to the University of South Florida. At that time the Board had received a single set of testimony consisting of twelve volumes and approximately 2,500 pages of testimony. The summary report of the Legislative Investigation Committee was given to a Tampa newspaper, the Board of Control, and the Board of Education on the same day, Friday, August 24, 1962. The Board committee will comment on the following four issues dealt with by the Legislative Committee: 1. Homosexuality: The Legislative Committee's report on homosexuality reads as follows: "The Committee believes this problem not to be of great magnitude at the University of South Florida at the present time." The Board of Control has long had a standing policy designed to eliminate sex deviates from the campuses of our Universities. On December 9, 1961, the existing policy was reduced to writing and became a part of the Board's Policy and Procedure under the title of "Policy on Morals and Influences" (See copy of policy attached. ) Your Board committee recommends that the Board of Control exercise aggressive action to ascertain that its policy is not only known to all concerned but that it is being applied fairly and without

PAGE 40

procrastination on the part of those charged with the responsibility of enforcing it. Further, the Committee urges that immediate appropriate action be taken in all cases in which suspected or proved acts have occurred. 2. Attitude toward identified Communist teaching and/or lecturing on campus: The testimony did not reveal any Communists or any Communist sympathizers among the permanent employees of the University of South Florida. This is gratifying to the Board's committee as well as to the administration of the University. The Legislative Committee received considerable testimony regarding the possible employment of two individuals. One of these has an alleged background of pro-Communist sympathies he was to be employed as a Lecturer for one appearance on the campus. The other individual, who allegedly has been accused of being an apologist for Russian cold war strategy, was to be employed as a teacher on the campus. It must be noted that employment of these two individuals never materialized, although it is conceivable that either of the two could have been employed had it not been for the alertness of private citizens, members of the Legislative Committee, members of the Board of Control and its staff. The Board of Control has been cognizant for some time that its employ ment procedures throughout the System could be improved. Prior to the investigation the Board had instituted improved employment procedures and in compliance with State policy had initiated a plan for -2 -

PAGE 41

fingerprinting all personnel, which is to be implemented within the near future. The Board has constantly and consistently impressed upon the administration of each institution the need for a thorough review of the qualifications of each individual considered for employ ment to insure not only competency but also wholesome influences upon the University communities. Differences of opinion are an essential ingredient in the academic life of our institutions. However, with regard to identified Communists or identified Communist sympathizers, the Board's committee again refers to the Board's policy manual under the title of "Policy on Morals and Influences" wherein it is clearly stated that those having ideologies contrary to our form of Government are not to be employed on the campuses of our institutions. Again, the committee wishes to emphasize to the Board that the administration of each institution must be impressed with the need to see that Board policy is disseminated to and understood by all concerned in each institution. 3. Obscenity in books and teaching materials: For members of a Board of Control, or others, to establish themselves as a censorship group would strike at the very heart of the academic freedom of all of our institutions. The Board's committee fully believes rhat selection of materials should be left in the hands of the faculties. it is noted that the Legislative Committee did not find any material that was obscene by legal definition, it can not be denied that certain materials contained objectionable language. The Board's -3 -

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.. committee agrees that in a few instances revealed by the investigation those persons selecting books and teaching materials exercised poor judgment. It alSo appears that some of the materials were not actually selected as planned. For example, the testimony disclosed that some members of the "All-University Book Committee" had not read the books supposedly selected by the entire group. Your committee did not treat this situation lightly, and it feels that a recommendption is in order whereby the Board adopts a policy to the effect that carefully planned procedures be developed in the Universities for that any material considered for teaching purposes shall be: a. Pertinent to the subject being taught b. The best material available and obtainable c. Within the purview of good taste and common decency. 4. Challenge of basic religious beliefs of students by professors: This is the most difficult of the issues raised by the Legislative Com-mittee. Your committee is of the opinion that: a. It is impossible to conduct classes in a university without certain questions in the religious field occurring; b. Such questions may be discussed and analyzed and that it is proper to do so in an objective manner; c. The teaching faculty in discussing such questions in the classroom should refrain own religious beliefs or zad .. their own personal convictions concerning religion; 4 -

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d. The individual personal religious beliefs of the students shall be respected at all times. The committee finds no testimony received by the Legislative Committee which is evidence that any student has had his basic, fundamental religious beliefs compromised by an instructor advocating in the classroom his own personal convictions. Nevertheless, the Board's committee realizes that such situations are possible and recommends the adoption of a policy covering the several items enumerated above. CONCLUSION The Board's committee wishes to point out that most of the problems cited by the Legislative Investigation Committee were already under scrutiny. Some had already been corrected. Many were brought about because of rapid growth. Some have been the direct result of initiating corrective action too slowly. Some have been caused by poor communication among those concerned. All of these matters are well within the scope of the responsibility of the Board of Control, and the Board has been and continues to be willing to accept this responsibility. This committee urges that it be impressed upon all branches of State Government and upon the citizens of Florida that the Board of Control is the proper body to receive, investigate, and take action upon any and all complaints directed toward or against the institutions under its authority. An investigation such as that made by the Legislative Committee should be viewed in its proper perspective. A procedure of this sort pursues specific areas of complaint. In developing information it accumulates only that of an unfavorable nature because of its limited function. Findings derived therefrom do not reflect -5 -

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the innumerable and laudable activities of the University or of the great majority of its personnel who give no conceivable cause for complaint. On the other hand, the Board realizes that in the conduct of a publicly supported university the administration and the faculty must constantly be aware that academic freedom in the university must be accompanied by corresponding academic responsibility. This committee feels that in the total perspective President Allen, the faculty, and the staff at the University of South Florida have performed well in developing the beginnings of a great university. Advanced planning has been carried forward efficiently and with dispatch. Sound fiscal policies have been established. A well qualified faculty has been assembled. Balanced programs of curricular offerings have been developed and are being given the students attending the University. Beautiful and functional buildings and excellent equipment designed to serve the needs of the students and faculty have been provided. The essential elements have been assembled to provide Florida citizens a quality program and to insure the continued growth and progress of the University. The University of South Florida is a reality because of innumerable and great effort on the part of many individuals. It constitutes an invaluable part of Florida's System of Higher Education. We urge all of the citizens of Florida to support the Universities in attaining the goal of providing high level programs in higher education. Respectfully submitted, Frank M. Buchanan, Chairman Gert H. W. Schmidt Wayne C. McCall, D.D.S. -6 -

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POLICY ON MORALS AND INFWENCES Adopted by Board of Control December 9, 1961 It has long been the established practice of the Board of Control to into the cultural, social, moral, and spiritual as well as the educational background of personnel under consideration for faculty or staff appointments. The Board has also been concerned with the careful selection of students in the various institutions under its management and with their continuing social, economic, moral, and spiritual welfare. In order to insure further the welfare of the institutions under the Board of Control, the faculties, the staffs, and the students, the following policy shall be immediately effective: Each institution shall screen carefully those indiViduals who are employed by it not only with regard to their professional and academic competency but also with regard to their ideology and their moral conduct. Furthermore, the Board directs that the institutions under its control exercise due care in the selection of students, taking into account not only their academic ability to satisfactorily but also their character and behaVior. The Board of Control also directs the administration in each of the institutions to be constantly alert to detect any antisocial or immoral behavior, such as Communistic activities or sex deviation, which may occur among the faculty, the staff, or the students of any of the institutions.

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I I Under this policy, the Board directs further that the responsible officials immediately correct or eliminate tram the institutions my conduct found not to be in the best interests of these institutions. Where serious variations from acceptable behavior occur, the Board requires that a fUll report shall be placed in the pennanent record of the individual concerned. The Presidents of the institutions shall keep the members of the Board of Control infonned of actions taken under this policy. The Board is also concerned with preventing antisocial and illlmoral behavior in the communities where the institutions are located. The Board, therefore, directs the administrations to cooperate With local and state authorities in taking appropriate action to deal With such behavior. -2 -

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.. ADDRESS TO THE STATE LEGISLATURE April 24, 1963 By John S. Allen Mr. President, Mr. Speaker, ladies and Gentlemen of the Legislature, at the request of the Hillsborough County delegation, and with the knowledge of the Board of Control, I am making this response to a series of charges as reported by the press to have been made before an executive session of the two houses of the Legislature on Thursday, April 18, 1963. The statements were reported to have been made by Mark Hawes, counsel to the legislative Investigating Committee. As Mr. Baya Harrison, Chairman of the Board of Control, said on TV Friday, April 19, the report made by Mr. Hawes is essentially the same report that was made public by the legislative Committee last August. The Board of Control, in subsequent months, worked with the administrations of the universities and representatives of the faculties to improve and clarify internal operation procedures. As a part of the execu-tive branch of government, the Board of Control is the duly constituted body for the supervision of the state university system. A review of the press reports indicates that Mr. Hawes' indictment was such a skillful blend of truths, half-truths, and that those who are unfamiliar with the background and the facts of this investigation may wonder about the seriousness of these charges. In order that you may have this matter in sharper focus and perspective, I would like to re-examine with you some of the statements of the committee counsel. -1-

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At the very outset of his presentation, Mr. Howes said the committee came to investigate complaints that the Univenity was soft on Communism and that it harbored homosexuals. He said further that they had rec:eiwd complaints from people in the area about anti-Christian teaching and about the use of teachiP:91 materials filled with filth, profanity, and vulgarity. 1) In the matter of Communists, the fact is that at the University of South Florida, the Committee found not a single member of the faculty, staff, or student body who is or ever has been a Communist or a Communist sympathizer. 2) Mr. 1-bwes said Dr. Jerome Davis, a person known for membership in Communist front organizations, was invited to teach at the University, and that I cancelled his appearance under pressure from legislators and members of the Committee. He said further that a University of South Florida press release stated "falsely" that Jerome Davis was a Professor of Divinity at Yale University. The fact is: Dr. Davis was not invited to join the faculty, but rather to give one lecture, to be repeated to a second section of the same course, at which his background and point of view would be identified when he was introduced to the students, and after which the students would be given time to question him critically. Dr. Davis is not now a Professor of Divinity at Yale, but he was correctly listed in the press re lease as a former member of the faculty of the Yale University Divinity School. When I learned of these plans, I looked into the background of Dr. Davis and decided that his appearance before a formal class would be inappropriate. The decision was solely my own. I sought advice from no one. It is now well established and known to the faculty that we do not expect to have people with Communist front affiliations speak to classes, and there has been no recurrence of such incidents. The record of testimony taken by the Legislative Committee when it was on -2-

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.. our campus shows that I told the Committee that I had received telephone calls concern ing Davis from three legislators. All of these calls came after I personally had cancelled the appearance of Davis. This was in February, three months before we were aware of the Committee or its agents being in Tampa. 3) Mr. Hawes referred to Dr. Fleming of Vanderbilt University, whose recent two-volume work on the 11Cold War11 has been characterized by some critics as an apol ogy for the Communist position. He said the Committee prevented the University of South Florida from hiring Fleming. The fact is: Dr. Fleming was being considered for a half-time teaching position far one year at the University of South Florida. Before the legislative Com mittee carne to campus, or raised a question about Fleming, I became aware of criticisrm of his books and directed an inquiry to Congressman Francis E. Walter, Chairman of the House Committee on Un-American Activities. Under date of April 26, 1962, Congressman Walter wrote me that "the records and publications of the Committee on Un-American Activities failed to reveal any record concerning Dr. Denno Frank Fleming." And I have that letter with me. Later, I received a copy of a letter signed by Dr. Harvie Branscomb, Chancellor of Vanderbilt University, saying that Fleming was no longer on the faculty at Vanderbilt. A further check by telephone with Chancellor Branscomb revealed that Vanderbilt had been unwilling a year prior to continue his contract a fourth year beyond the normal retirement age. At this point, I decided on my own, not to offer a contract to Dr. Fleming. The Legislative Committee had nothing to do with this decision. leter-, ,.lhter the Committee left the campus, Mr. Hawes wrote to Chairman Baya Harrison, of the Board of Control, under date of July 27, 1962, that the Committee's source of information was in error in attributing "Communist front affiliations to Dr. Fleming of -3-

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Vanderbilt Un iversity. It appears there is a Dr. D.J. Fleming, 11 the letter states, "to whom the affiliations are rightly attributable. The clear result is that the Com mittee has no information that Dr. Fleming of Vanderbilt University has any record of Communist-front affiliations," the letter says. I have my copy of that letter here, but Mr. Hawes failed to mention it to you. 4) In the orea of homosexual behavior, psychologists, sociologists, and medical people state that six to ten percent of the population are active In this category. The Investigating Committee established a case against one man out of nearly 500 persons on our payroll. This is one-fifth of one percent. We accepted his resignation the next day and duly reported the facts to the Board of Control. The Committee made charges against two others which could not be supported. For other reosons these two have since been separated from the University. Since then, through our own counselling procedures, we have found two students with homosexual tendencies. They are now under psychiatric care, and are no longer in school. These results are an indication of our careful screening. 5) One of the charges made by Mr. Hawes wos the carefully constructed im plication that the University faculty is anti-religious. I would not attempt to vouch for the religious beliefs of every member of our faculty, but I can assure you that we are not anti-religious. We have at least half a dozen faculty who are ordained min isters, and many, many others who are active in churches of the community, as teachers, elden, stewards, committee leaders, and as parishioners. In the early planning of the University of South Florida, I persuaded the Board of Control and the State Board of Education to allow me to invite state-wide religious organizations to consider putting student religious centers on our campus. One of the centers has already been built, another is under construction, and others -4-

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will get underway soon. These accomplishments and these activities of the University and its individual faculty members are living refutations of the charge that we are anti religious. I might mention also the statement of overwhelming support given the Un iversity by many, many churchmen, as further il hatration of this point. Mr. t-bwes claimed that the faculty attacks orthodox religious beliefs of students and that my only comment was that "it happens on every campus." The Committee record of my testimony shows that I gave a lengthy reply to Committee questions, bosed on my 39 of experience as a college student, teacher, and administrator. I indicated to the Committee that college is a place where ideas are examined and discussed on a rational basis. Students raise questions obout relation ships between science and religion, philosophy and religion, literature and religion. The professor in Ale class where such questions are raised is neglecting hfs responsibility If he fails to help the students recognize the implications of facts as viewed from all sides of the question. The professor may choose not to reveal his own position, or he may make a clear statement of his own position in order to allow the student to discount or make allowance for the teacher's bias, if any exists. The student must come to his own conclusions. The professor is the one who 11elps the student to think logically. It is this kind of discussion that happens on every campus. Mr. Hawes refers to my article in the Fall 1962 issue of the University of South Florida Educational Review as saying that if a professor's personal view is atheistic, that is alright if he does not try to force it on the student. Nowhere in the essay do I make any reference to an atheistic view. As for myself, both my mother's famtly and my father's family were Quakers who came to William Penn's Colony in the 17th century. My father's ancestors fol lowed a migration to North Carolina in 1750. My grandparents moved to Indiana "!" -5-

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about a century ago. When l think of how my anceston worked along with their neighbon and friends to clear the wilderness and help develop three states of thts nation, my love of country swe lis in my heart and I will take second place to no one in my religious sincerity. 6) Mr. Hawes read quotes from writings by two authors, Salinger and Kerouac, and implied that this kind of material is 11typfcal of the trashy, vulgar, and morally offensive literature found in (our) total reading program." The facts are these: The material obiected to by the Committee represents a fraction of one percent of the total reading material used in our classes. In this fraction of one percent there are undoubtedly passages which, when taken out of the total context in which they are used, can be offensive to the serwes. Calm and ration al study in a classroom is a far cry from a street corner conversation about a paragraph or two that otherwise seems salacious. Actually, young people are reading many books by beatnik authors that are available on the downtown news stands, and someone has to find a way to show them the shallowness and poor quality of this so-called literature. One passage which was quoted to you by Mr. Hawes was from a review of beatnik writing. The part that you heard was a passage from a beatnik novel, but he did not read the review itself, which is a scathing criticism of the shallowness and emptiness of such literature. That review first appeared in a national literary iournal, and because it was useful to show students the lack of quality in beatnik writing, it was later reprinted in a college casebook used by more than 75 colleges and universities across the nation. Among these are Duke University, Park College, Peabody College, N.C. State, University of North Carolina, St. Louis University, louisiana State, University of Virginia, Stetson University, Rollins, University of Miami, Oberlin, -e-

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.. University of Tennessee, Washington and lse, Marshall Uniwnity, and Westminster College. The rev lew was used at the Univentty of South Florida in an advanced writing class, where the average age of the 31 students enrolled was 24 years. It is no longer being used at the University of South Florida. Mr. Hawes would have you believe that the faculty and I condone porno graphic literature. The fact is directly opposite from this. When this review was discussed in class, the excef lent writing of the reviewer was analyzed, and the poor writing of the "beat" author was analyzed. The two were compared, contrasted, and identified for what they are. This intensive study of writing style in a classroom can and does develop the perception of students to help them identify for themselws the differences between goad and bad writing. To me it is inconceivable that there can exist a true community of scholars without a diversity of views. It is, therefore, essential that we as individuals be willing to extend to our colleagues, to our students, and to members of the community the privilege of presenting opinions and points of view which moy not necessarily correspond to our own. Criticism of any viewpoint, be it thot of a colleague or of a student, must be reasoned and logical, not dogmatic and emotional. It is inevit able, therefore, that not every sentence in every book we use will be acceptable to any single standard of taste. Yet the fact remains that our selection of textbooks, despite the Committee 1s charges, reflects a sound balance of accumulated knowledge and opinion not unlike that of other fine universities in this state and around the country. 7) In answering charges that the Committee's report was biased and prejudiced against the University, t.Ar. Hawes said the opposite was true, and he blamed the newspapen for harming the University. -7-

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.. The fact is that the news media of the state and nation have generally given full and accurate coverage to the investigation; and strong edttoriat support to the University. As a result, what would otherwise have been a secret investigation has been conducted in the open, and the iniustices which have been committed against the University have been laid open for all to see. 8) Finally, toh. Hawes criticized the University of South Florida Educational Review as a "declaration of de nee of the people and the legislature." I submit that these essays are in no way a defiance of anyone, but rather a thoughtful examination of the ideas of which universities are made. If you will read these essays, I am confident you will agree that they reflect the principles upon which the legislature created the University of South Florida. I have dealt at length with the charges presented by Mr. Hawes. However, I am more interested in having you come to know the real University of South Florida and its strengths. We had 3,500 students of high ability enrolled in this our third year. They came from 46 counties in Florida. Most of them would not be in any college if you had not provided this new state university. The stature of the University of South Florida is indicated by the reports of three accrediting groups after visitations to our campus and intensive study of faculty, program, library, students, and facilities. Their reports stated that our faculty is equal if not superior in training to that of any university in the south. Sixty-eight percent of our faculty hold doctor's degrees. This is twice the average for colleges and univer sities over the nation. Our College of Business Administration meets now all the applicable stand ards of the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business. The State Education Department has officially approved our teacher preparation program. -8-

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our students ore already being accepted in the best graduate and profess ional schools in the country, such as the law schools at Harvard and the University of Florida, the medical school at Tulane, and graduate schools at Johns Hopkins and Yale. In every national test administered at the University of South Florida our students have consistently scored well above national averages. In our Cooperative Work Study Program, NASA is the largest single employer with 42 of our students working at Cape Canaveral, the Redstone Arsenal at Huntsville, Alabama, and at the MaMed Spacecraft Center at Houston, Texas. Despite handicaps of being in a new institution, our students have risen to the challenge and have organized from the ground up activity programs of which we are proud. All of this and more has been accomplished in just three short years. American colleges have two purposes. One is to give an education for earn ing a living. That is, preparing mathematicians, economists, scientists, accountants, teachers, and lawyers. The other purpose is education for citizenship, if you will give a broad definition to that term. I believe this education for citizenship is too important to leave to chance. If we are preparing a student to earn a living as a scientist, he should be a good scientist, but he should not be illiterate about government, international relations, human relations, economics, or fine arts. If we are preparing a student to earn a living as an economist, he should be well trained, but not be ignorant about science, the humanities, or foreign cultures. Every student should know and understand our American institutions in order to know v!!!,y he is patriotic. All of us at the University of South Florida are patriotic. Emotional loyalty and patriotism are fine, but this is not enough. We must understand -9-

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.. why. We must have such a thorough understanding of the reasons and background of our American way of life that aur patriotism can be based on sound logic and reason., in addition to any emotional pride we may have. In this setting, a college will have its students study, among other things, about Communism, in order to understand it and to combat it. The legts.lature has already recognized the importance of this need in our public schools. We do not like Communism and we do not like cancer. But to understand and to control cancer we take the cells into a laboratory to study them and to learn all we can about them. Just as we are careful that no one contracts cancer by careless exposure to it in the laboratory, so we expect that those who really understand Communism from our careful study of it, will know how to defend themselves against it. The minister who talks about sin is not trying to sell it. He is making his parishioners aware of it in order that they may understand it and avoid it. 11A college is not engaged in making ideas safe for students. It is engaged in making students safe for ideas. 11 The teacher in the classroom can exercise his responsibility by seeing that both sides of an issue are discussed with reason and logic. The one-night stand of a visiting lecturer presents a different problem. He is before his audience for an hour of so. He is then on his way, and may never be seen again. The University of South Florida attempts to provide the balance and the responsibility we need in several ways. Therefore, we give our speakers long enough time to develop their themes. Then we insist that they stand for questions from the audience. We will n.2!, have a speaker who will not be questioned, to clarify points for understanding, or to defend a position he has taken which someone in the audience wishes to challenge. This year we had as speakers, William Buckley, Editor of the conservative -10-

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National Review, and Norman Cousins, Editor of the liberal Saturday Review. In that same month we had Dr. Willard libby 1 Nobe I Prize winner in chemistry, and former member of the Atomic Energy Commission, to speak. These are competent people. They speak with authority on subjects in which they are informed. They do not agree with each other. Each stood for questions from the audience, and explained and position,Kfurther. And we in the University community have our minds stretched, our horizons expanded, and a better basis for judgment because of these experiences. You have before you in this session the greatest spending request in the history of Florida, a significant part of it for the strengthening and expansion of higher education. This creates difficult and tremendously important problems which you must face. I am confident that the democratic processes through which this country has prospered will lead you to the right decisions. In closing, let me leave this thought with you. The Florida of the future is a dream of unlimited promise and potential which all of us share and work for. More than any other thing, outstanding universities will make that dream come true. This is the key to our economic advancement, our scientific advancement, our cultural advance-ment, and to the development of sound and intelligent leadership which will be de-manded of us. But our university system cannot prosper, it cannot fulfill its responsibilities for leadership and service 1 in a d imate of fear and distrust. In our system of operation, the Governor appoints the Board of Control; these men in turn, with the approval of the State Board of Education, select the men and women who will lead our universities, and vest in them the responsibility and the trust to bring excellence into the educational process. This must be done by competent and responsible people, sensitive to their professions, and dedicated to educating the youth of Florida which is our future. Only with this quality of responsible teamwork can the state reach its goals of greatness.

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I 4f I ... a. .. tu-."'fl,. .,_w. ,/.. i.w.. 4v /)'l-.wl:u1 J a: 0 e. -

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DATE: TO: FROM: SUBJECT: MEMORANDUM August 15, 1962 Heads of Administrative Units Physical Plant Division Air conditioning and water interruption l r I Air conditioning in all buildings will be turned off at 5:30 p.m. Friday until 4:00 p.m. Saturday, August 17th & 18th. During the period from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. there will be no domestic water. ph

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... DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS CONFIDENTIAL August 22, 1962 MEMORANDUM TO: RE: PRESIDENT ALLEN Matters Relating to the Uni by President Allen of South Florida Requiring Comm1ttee: a eport to the Board Special I have drafted statements on ea your consideration. Feel fr ch of these points for ways which will best se hee to change them in any rve t e purpose. SJF:lad J. French Dean 1 p.. 4-:Y
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DEAR OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS LA-1V /( n/..,.., J:-, --f t (-" p CONFIDENTIAL August 22, 1962 MIMORANDUM TO: PRESIDENT ALLEN RB: Matters Relating to the University of South Florida Requiring Action by President Allen and a Report to the Board Special Cc.aittee: I have statements on each of these points for your consideration. Feel free to ehange them in any ways which will best serve the purpose. SJF:lad Enclosures Sidney J. French Dean

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, -CONFIDENTIAL August 21, 1 962 1)..o TO: heaident A .llen FRCM: Sidney J. French RE: DIAI'T 1. Provide the Board special committee at the earliest date poaaible with a written report atating the action which haa been or will be taken concerning: a. Hugo boom Hugoboom (homoaexuality) Teake (homoaeauality) Caldwell (komoaexuality and heavy drinking) Winthrop (profanity in the claaarooa) Hocutt Roger Lewis (pornography) We feel that there is no supportable basis for the auggestion that Profeaaor Hugaboom might have homoaexual tendencies. We reaard the atudent who testified under oath concerning Mr. Hugobooa to be unreliable and unatable. Tbia former atudent had a nU&IIber of problema of various nature while at the Univerai.ty and in the judgment of our Student Affairs officers needs paychiatric help. Profeaeor Hugaboom is highly regarded in National MUaic eirclea ae a national leader. He ia happily married. He miaht vary well put hia arm aroW.d a male student who had perforaed well. He apent two years studying muaic in Parte aa a Fulbright Scholar and in accordance with French custom aiaht easily extend the French .. 1 -

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(Draft to Preddeat Allen, continued CONriDBNTIAL) custom of ki1aing a aale on the cheek following a fine perforaaoee. We are coavlnced that there h po evt4ence luding tO aucb aupected behavior aDd believe that the matter s)lould be dropped. b. Mr. Teske wae diaeharged at the end of the su.aer 1888ion c. Professor Caldwell was auapended ae of the end of the au.aer aeadon. He has had a bearing by a local c:oaaittee ancl b now an appeal to the Board of Control. d. Professor Winthrop does not use p rofanity in the elasaroom. Thia charge eemed to come about as a result of a miaunder standing by one person. In the study of a certain book in Human Behavi .or classes, Professor Winthrop wished to illustrate the differeuce in ways of conversing of peo .ple of different social and economic levels. He selected passages from Salinger's "Catcher in the Rye" to illustrate the vulgarity of conversational language in a certain social He taped the pasaagea and played th.for his classes, explaining clearly what he was doing and f!lpologbiqg in advance and after for the o .ffensive nature of the conversation. Many of his students have teatified in writing to the fact that he does not us e foul language either inside or out aide of the clauroom; that he is not anti-religious, and that he does not overempbashe sex. These testimonials are available for r eview if deeired. .. 2 ..

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' (Draft to President Allen, continued I \ .... CONFIDENTIAL) ... e. Max Hocutt Mu Hocutt. Hta field ia He holda the Ph. D degree from Yale. Thia baa been hh firat fulltbae teaehil\8 poaition. He caae highly tecoMellded. Student appraiaala (a1101lYIJOUI written appraiaah) of hi teachiq have been remarkably strong, placing him among the superior in-structor$ in the Ulliveraity. Studenu ae to be partlculaJ:ly enthusiastic about the way in he forces them to think pbilo$opbical questions for the.aelves. There doubt, some studenu who lind it disconcerting. to ,Jubject their thinking &Jld bUefs to self-analysis. This, how$ver, represents good teachtq at University level. He is deep,ly, concerned about religious .I values that are not doctrinaire, insisting that etuclente should exard.ne such judgments for theuelves, rationally, and reaeh tlteil:' own coneluaiona respecting thei.r own (:aith, doctrines and phUoaophy of life. 'lb:h, all thinldqg persons eventually do. Because of irote .. or Hocutt1' 8 etrength ae a scholar and teacher be wae pro.ote4 ill July, 1962, to the rank of Aasiltant Pro .fenor. The reeoaa.elldatlon '. of hh ebait"MG, ctivilion director, and the two dune of Basic Stud tee and Liberal Arts was unanimous. f. Roger Lew1 (pornoarapby) Mr. Lewis in his position has no responsibility or any relatioa to the acquiaitloa of books by the Library. The incident re ferred to bas to do with his attempt to purchase aQae Buropean magazines which wl'e advertised in an Amer. ican magadoe. Mr. Levie hoped 'to ilQProve hia reading lm01rledge of Prench and German The .. 3 v ., 1 ;, i

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(Draft to Praaidant Allen, eooUaued COlO'l))&NTJ.Al.) magazlaes were advertisiag as being similar to Playboy When tbaae arriYed they were held by the Post Office aa obaeeoe material. Mr. Lewis proteated but gave permission to dUpoae of the material. He never aaw the We believe on inveatigation Mr. Levis is a very respectable, decent person and have no reason to question his explaoation of the incident referred to. His report of the J ohns Coaaittae hearing to his supeTior, Mr. Hardaway, Director of the Library, is available, as is Mr. Hardaway' report to Dean French We believe that his profeaaional work is of high caliber and pro-po1e to retain him on our staff. 2 A review of the D F Fleming situation with the Board has already' taken place. 3 Coaaider aDd develop procedure for handling faculty meabets anaouaciag in their cla that they are athei1ta. We have n o pecific evidence that suc h announcements have ever been made. It waa reported by a student that the statement "There h no God, vas on the blackboard of a. clauroom as s t udents auembled there for a class, prior to the entrance of the instructor. The instructor who had used the room the prior pariod deniad having written any such stateaaent It could have been written by a student. Under the Constitution of the United States an atheiat 11 not barred from teaching in a public institution. lo general, however if the 4 .. -, \

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.. (Draft to Preaident Allen, contiaued COMFlDERTIAL) fact were known in advance and if there were other candidate of equal profeuional ability the Univerlity would be inclined not to aelect the Atheiat. There 1a no 110re for a faculty member to announce to 'hit claas that he is an atheist than there is to announce that he it a Jew, a Buddhi st, a Catholic, a Protestant, an Agnostic, a Democrat, or a Republican Such announcement should certainly not be made qaerel y to shoc k" students. H owever, there may be Umes in certain classe s and i n certain d i s c ussions w he n a profe s sor should make .his .positi o n known i n order that t he clas s will better understand the background fro m which he speaks. H e nce, there should be no arbitrary rule on t his. Through recent discussions with deans, directors, and chairmen, it is felt that this matter 1s udder auitable control. 4. Study and take appropris.te steps to prevent untimely pre .. relea .. a and/or untrue and inaccurate releaaes. The only "untilllely" preu release in our judgment involved the Fling matter. Tbe release was de follQWing a 1uitable check. However later developments not then foreieen made this release appear to be untimely. In accordance with it& Policy Statement 22, the University of South Florida provides complete and accurate infol'I!Wltion to offeaapus media of eODIIlunication.s on all mattet"s of interest ,to the public. Tbe University 5 ..

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.. (Draft to Prelideut Alleu, couttuued CONFIPINTIAL) doea not 1uppre11 iuforaation of a coatroverdal nature, but inatead ha1tena to explaiu ttl poa1tion objectively. leapouaibility for the coaduct .of thll program of nn1 aa4 publicity 11 deleaated to the News Bureau, and more epecifically to it Editor, who 11 a ltalf officer directly responsible to the The News Bureau is the central clearing house of the Univeraity for preparation and diteeminatiou of news and publicity releasee. la general. faculty and staff members having information about which they desire a release are expected to channel it through the Neva Bureau However if a faculty or staff member is approached by an reporter, he may provide information requested o f him if he is in possession of such information and if in his judpent the release o f such information is appropriate. If the person has any doubt about the appropriatenees of such release, he is expected to refer the reporter to the Editor of the News Bureau. The lditor hiuelf must exercise di.scretion and good judgment in deteraining the appropriateness of any releae sent out fro. hit office. If he bas any doubt about the content, timing, aeeeaaUy or propriety of any material being conaidered for release, he ia expected to clear tuch material with the President. In the field of public information, pa.rdcularly :informatiott about a public institadon, it is nAtUral that differences of opiniOJI will exia. t about a aaajority of the press releaaes which are disseminated .! .. 6 ..

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(Draft to Predc:lent Allen, continued CONPIDENTUL) It must be recognized, however, that it 11 not po88ible to sathfy everybody all the time. The Editor' a poaition, then, requires scrupuloua accuracy, honesty, and sound judgment. The above procedure, in Policy Statement No. 22 dated July 25, 1961, has been followed in all releaaes. With the exception noted above there have been no untimely or inaccurate releaaes as far as we can judge. 5. Con&ider and take steps to buUd public confidence in the University. (Take steps to end suspicionl in the Tampa area o atheistic, anti. religious activities, poor counseling; and the like in the University.) This statement auumes that there is not public confidence in the University at the present time. We believe that there 18 a gteat deal of public confidence in the University. This was never ao evident as during the time of the Johns COiilmittee hearings. Statementa of confidence then came frOQ& studeats, ministers, public officiala, and many cit.izena. Lack of confideace was expreued chiefly by a small group intent upon forciag the Univeraity into an untenable poeition. Preuurea of various aorta exist upon a public iaatitution. The Univerlity h new. tt haa no alumni .. {yet to speak for it or de end it. In the midst of establishing an educational program of high quality it must alao eatabliah itself as a new member in the community, as a cultural and economic aaset to the 8urrounding area, and as a large physical and financial complex worthy of the taxpayers' dollars. All of theae things it must do before it can begin to provide a steady flow .. 7 -

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. (Draft to Preaiden t Allen, coatinued COID'IDBBTIAL) of reapondble aad well educated graduatet into the atreaa of co.unity 'lba facu are that the Univetdt y and it.a -.ployeea have m.ade uny lignificaat contributions to the welfare of the coaaunity at all levels, not only in itt normal areas of operation but in religious, cultural, civic, social and service activities at well. In the two years since it opened, the University bas staged 14 0 coacerta, p laya, art exhibits, lectures, forwu and film clauica, all open to the public. Attendance records show that 100 000 persons witne88ed these cultural perfonaances. Two of the University's cultural orgaaizations, a ayaphony and a theatre group, utilized the taleats of maay area residents who previously had no outlet for their musical and theatrical \ ..... talenta. thirteen members of the University faculty and student body per foraed regularly with the Tampa Philhar1110nic providing that group with a healthy infueiou of new talent. In addition to the cultural events, the Univertity served as holt f o r 150 convention, workshops, dinnera, aud timilar occasions during the past two yeart; d espite the fact that it had only one cafetel'i with limited faciUt.iea to aerva ita tudent body and ataff. SOiae 20,000 persons attended these 150 eventl. Many of ,the occaetone ware for local civic organizations, w0111en' s groupe and rvie. e clubs, who enjoyed a meal on the caaput; a tou. r of the facilities and a talk by a University official on the progreu, plans and purposes of the inatitutbn. .. d Durin& the two-year period, Univerlity persouel gave s0111e 225 talks to groups and organizations in Hillsborough County and surrounding areas .. 8 -

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(Draft to President Allen, continued ...... I CONFIDENTIAL) Thia was doat in molt cases without coat to the organization involved, and provided a valuable source of voluntary service to these organizations. Individual contributions of the University faculty and staff in the area of religion have also been extensive. More thall a dozen persone have occupied pulpits in and around the T-.pa Bay area in the past year, and several of thele have been arranged on a pertUnent basis. Many other llleQlber of faculty and staff have accepted important offices and. other position of leadership in their churches, and still others have spoken to church groupe on a variety of eubjecta. There are still other areas in which the University has given extensive eervice to the coiQDiunity Four faculty members write weekly columns for daily newspapers in the city; the three local television stations bave draw heavily on Univereity personnel for appearances, some of these on a permanent basil; and members of the faculty frequently contribute book reviews to the Tuapa Tl'ibune. One recent peJ;'formante of the Univerltity SJ'II'Phony Orchastra on television station W'lVT drew so many letters of praiSe that the etatlon presented the program a second time. Many local setv.ice groups, including the Family Service, the Tampa Urban League, the Friends of the Library, the American Association for the United Nations and the Chamber of Commerce, have utilized University personnel in ilaportant administrative positions and coumittee assignment, and other members of the faculty have served as consultants to a variety of public and private organizations. 9 -

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.. (Draft to President Allen, continued .. CONFIDENTIAL) Members of the faculty have alao served as consultant with the public choola in the area, and have auilted the schools in such areas as curriculum revhion, cour1e design and adminittrative ttructure. ln addition, more than a score o f faculty wbe teach in the public schools, helping to relieve a serious teacher shortage there. Personal contact with a number of influential COIIIPlunity reaidenU has reVealed a number of surpriling reasons for much of the u:preued lack of public confidence in the University. There are, for exaDlPle, some citizens who are disillusioned because the University has no football team, and has indicated it will not have one. There are others who oppose any of integration, and are upset because this barrier has been re-laxed. Another group having sons and daughure in the University, are disturbed to learn that college is more demanding than high school, and since these parents did not attend college themselves, they are having a difficult time adjusting to the change along with their children. Still another group feels the University bas not been conservative enough in ita selection of faculty textbooks, required reading and guest speakers, and has gone too far in exposing students to a variety of pointe of view. Many of these groups overlap or interlock. Together, they constitute a body of opinion which bas had its confidence in the University shaken by the institution' s failure to confo't'Dl to one or more of their personal images. This is an unfortunat e situation, compound ed by the ironic fact that the institutional decisions which prompted this disillusionment were judiciously made decisions by responsible professional people whose highest obligation is to provide the state of florida with an outstanding new institution of higher learning .. 10 .. \ ...

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(Draft to Prelident Allen, continued CON!'IDENTIAL} The Univerdty of South PloTida' dedication to thh objactiva baa not diaainilhed. It will continue to aeek new avenues by which it can build public confidence in itaelf, while at the same time r ... ining faith-ful to the principles on which American higher education b founded Diecuadonl within the staff have brought forth additional ideas vbtch will help to form a stronger bond between the institution and the public 1erved. We believe, for instance, that more can be done to educate the parents of our students to better understand the true meaning of a univerlity education. We have been promoting a aeries of television programs in which members of the faculty speak about their courses and their teaching. A special committee on public relatione has been or ganized. It should be clear, however, that the University has been actively at wotk in_ thia field from the beginning and .that it merely upecte to con tinue, inunlify, and extend these operations for the good of the Univer-sity and the community. It must alao be said that a new public university starting as we have .I with con1iderable numbera of studentl, high atandards and in a i: which baa aot experienced an operation of this nature, il bound to cause some dislocations of thought in the community aa well a some disaffection by thoee whose wishes cannot be satilfied. A1 the Univeraity grows such dhlocationa and diaaffections should be leasened. -11 ..

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(Draft to President Allen, continued ; CONFIDENTIAL) \ '\ 1:, 6 Conaider and take ttepa to build appropriate lines of between and among administrators, faculty members students \he \ \ Preaident. \ \ ,, This statement gives the impression that little or nothing has yet done in thia area; whereas we believe we have developed ex'rellent linea of communication during the first two years both formal and informal. I ;' \ The for.al lines operate according to the following pattern. The Executive Committee cons ists of the President, Dean of Academic Affairs, Dean of Student Affairs and Business Manager It meets regular-ly once a week and often meets more frequently. Each of these officers meets with his ataff once a week o r more frequent ly on occasion. Each dean meets with his Council or staff once a week. Each chairman or director meets with his Council or staff once a week or more frequently. In this way moat members of the faculty are engaged in weekly meetings. The University Senate consisting of 30 elected members of the faculty, 5 IHIIIbers of the non-acaderaic staff and 5 students, meets monthly on educationAl matters. The President meets frequently with the officers of the student association. The Dean of Academic A ffairs meets fortnightly with the student committee on Academic Standards. -12 '-

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(Draft to heaident Allen, coat1nued COBJ'lDBNTJ,AL) .. Studenu aerve on the Seeate, on the Student Affaire COIIIIlittee, and on the Traffic There ere advhory nudeat cOIIIIlitteea to the llegiatrar and the Buaine .. Manaaer The for.al linea of communication are fully adequate and are working well. However, in a rapidly growing institution with few old-time tradition aDd frequent changes,continulng effort ia neeeaaary to keep theill working well. For exaiaple, the Dean of Acad .. ic Affaira aaawaed his pott in February, 1962 Pri.or to that the President had carried these duties. It was necessary at that time to shift the o rganizat'ional atructure of the executive coodttee and add a new staff unit the Academic Affaire Staf. f which was included in the temporary executive cOIIIIlittee. B.eal coaaunication depends more on the spirit than the form. The Univereity started with an "open door" policy. This still prevails. Any faculty member can see the President and many do --or, any .of the deans, or other officers, upon request. The faculty and administration usually lunch in the same roODl. Lines of cOlllllunication within the atudent body and between atudenta and student affairs ataff officers did not develop aa rapidly at might have been hoped for. They have imp roved greatly in recent months and under the new Dean of Student Affairs it is anticipated that thh 1mproveaaent will be accelerated. Several unfortunate incidents )J.ave duriq the secood year of operation to increase the problem of understanding between faculty, admin18trat1on and etudents. From -each of the18 has eome a need for re-1.3 -

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(Draft to Preddent Allen, continued CODIDINTIAL) fin ... nt of procedure in the aru of Prom che f.'e&htratiou problea c .. e the etudent aclvllory coahtee to ) t h e leahtrar, from the Davis incident caae t..,roved communication procedure on clearance of epeaker and puolicity; from the Fl .. ina came clearer appointment and publicity procedures. Tbi1 11 not to say that the Univerlity learna only by auch aperiencee. Tbey do confirm, however, the need for adhering to established proeedurea. As a young university with a small group of adminUtratore and fac\Jlty in the beginning it ia natural that actual communication procedure would be somewhat less than formal. In fact, it 1a desirable that as much informality as possible be retained within established procedural channel as we grow larger. It is our plan, therefore, to continue to clarify eetabliahed channele, examine the need for others, but to retain within thia frame work as much flexibility and informality a1 ia cona .ilteut with eff.ective communication in an effort to avoid slow-downs, bottlenecka, aod htakea. 7 Consider and take ap propriate steps to be certain of the "tona' #.11 the classrooms of the University. It has been our policy froua the begtaing to provide a good learning situation for our student in the claurooaa. for thia reaaon we eapba ehe dilcuseion as ali luaportant adjunct to lecturing. Good diacussion calla f o r giveandtake between ttudeiat aacl etudent and between etudent aad teacher. It also calls for a leas formal aemoaphere tb&n ia present 14 J

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(Draft to President Allen, continued CONFIDENTIAL) in a lecture. We expect, therefor, that the 11tone11 of the clauroom is .-o .re relued than ia found in lecture coursea. Since "tone" il intended also to include the intellectual and' social level of the diacusaion it 11 i111portant that relaxatioll doea not lead to degeneration of discussion. With one or two exception the.re are no reasons to believe that this is happening. The case of Profeaeor Winthrop has already been referred to as a misunderstanding. Mr. 'I'houa Wenner used his class diacussion periods largely to talk about hia own experiences and stir students up to demand their rights. Beyond tlteae incidents there is no reaaoll to believe that the "'tone" of the ia unsatisfactory. Student appraisal$ (taken anonymoudy) indicate an overwhelming balance in favor of satisfaction with classroom procedure& and discussions. We expect, bcn;ever. to keep in close touch with these procedures and where there ia any indication that the "tone" is improper will take steps to change it. At the e tie the faculty 1a fully aware of the deeirabUity of maintaining aood relations with students baaed on high cultural and ethical standards. Wa w .ill eonttnue to emphasize this. 8 Review the teaching activities in the American Idea and Human Behevior courses to be certain that all information presented is in harmony 1 with appropriate objectives. The Dean of Academic Affairs meets frequently with the other deans eonw earning programs under their direction. The following statement has been .. 15 w .. J \

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(Draft to Prelident Allen, continued CONFIDENTIAL) submitted recently by the Dean of Bas i c Studies to the Dean of Acadeaaic Affairs, These procedures a .re those which h ave been in effect aince the University started. It should be pointed out, however, that the American Idea course is a sophomore level course and was offered in multi-sections for the first time i n 1961-62. As a result of the first year of operation a number of c hanges in procedures and materials are being introduced to improve the cour1e. "In response to your request, the following statement is submitted concerning supervision of teaching activities in CB 103-104 and CB 201. "In the courses in Human Behavior and The American Idea, a s in other courses of the College of Basic Studies, teaching methods and materials are 1elected for their effectiveness in achieving the objectives of the courses. "The objectives are chosen to contribute to the objectives of the University and the College. They are reviewed by the staff, chairman and dean periodically. "Classroona activities are developed by the staff, usually working as ad hoc c011111it te4UI; in consultation with the chairman of the cour1e. Frequent di1eussion between the chairman and the dean of the College occurs. Weekly reviews and revi1ions of the methods and materials are accomplished in meetings of the teaching staff, presided over by the chairman. "Both the chairman and the dean visit classrooms and discuss teaching activitie1 with the staff. "This procedure for selection of teaching activities is not errorless; there is no perfect method It does however, place the initiative for developing methods with the men who teach the course, and provides convenient mechanisms for rapid identification and correction of poor selection. In ray opiuion, t his system is working satisfactorily.tt -16 -

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\ .. B. C. to: President Allen Dean Jean A B attle Mrs. Mildred M. aobert 2415 Nad41 load Lakeland, I lorida Dear Mrs. lobert: Kay 2, 1963 Por some daya now 1 have been wantin& to wite you about your exce lent-recent letter to the ld'itor of the T&q)a Tribune concern iDS J o bn8 COIIIIlittee investigation of the University of outh Jlorida. finally I have e ized a IDOIIlent to do 'P' Your letter appeared the rning sev ra1 of us went to 'fallahaaaae where President Allen epoke to a joint aeaaion of the leghlature in refutation of Ml'. Haves' tat Gent. hetident llen' a c018M1lt aa we .started out, vas that yo'Ur letter waa ao quch to tb.e point that he c.o'Uld ea.Uy substitute it f or tiM speech be planned to give. lt is moat heertentn to receive tha kind of support you and huadrada of other tntelltgent people have atven ue in our efforts to e this a real univeraity. We expect with thb kind of support to weather these intera{ttent, but uaplaaeant, and remain true to the objectives of a real ttate untverlity in a daaocrecy. We are also very pleased with Caro lyn' reaction to the Univeraity and her teachers. Tbanka again for your fine atat ... nt. SJF:lad Cordially, Sidney J. lrnch Dean l

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IMPORTANT Note Carefully 1 ,. o ... __ /.__>fiL.____________ "'""----------------------------------FOR lnveatigation ............................... .......... Reply direct with cc to Approval Coneultation with Comment Reply; eia. Prea U11iv Handlina Note and return to ............................ .. Final diepoaition Information on ......................................... .. ................................................................................................... Remarka:

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DIAN OP ACADEMIC AFP ADS December 10, 1 962 TO: THOSE CONCbNED .-------cc tof. \__ __ Herewith is a draft of a proposed statement on our meeting of September 22, 1961, composed fr Ul your memora .nda. The statement should be as factual as poseible1 and uneDlotional. Please go o"ter it very carefully for facts and tone aud return any comments to me as soon es poeeible. Thanks. SJF:lad Inclosure /1)-Sidney J. French Dean

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CUte& of tiM ACA,..,C Ui'Al.U l UQ ,., ..... 12, 1161 li:nriD 4 GIOUJ fll AlD UPUID'.tlltiUI .. fBI Ulllfalttf. IOUrl n.<1llDA Ja.r .... in lie aDd PJ'lvat '1 .....,, .of t cttbeu JI'O coecwa 1f1tta cld.a -.ti., _. .. -., ot.._ whtcb _,.. O'l' S.,l7 fa vari ._,. tlwlt t ,....., r:Matv hnt'h6tf, .. netve4 wtth boa-tU.ty; .. &lY-.. U ... tQ \\ .. 11' c;ua,, a C .alle4 nC.l'Mkpotl,t NMt t'-t tli clt.aS.... '\_..... oa ta !ae;el _. wlQd out.'" lt. .... l.,or.-t.ant" .. ,.. Tl\e foU0 .. atat_..l ._...," .-c th Vatrtt7 cath li coo placa &t tlw tl .... .Dr. l .. t"-Clulli'Mil o'f U. ta hMttoMl -.u.a ail Dirac t t Dirt1toa of L.utaMS aDd Utantve, 8r. LoU ._1,.. CIUI.t,... of tlw e ta ._. a.l:anlor, r. eU.ffo-rcl lc.-rt,. M,eeto-r of o.f Calleae t the Y111ttaa ctoup taelUUf Stocktoa S.tth, wh ..... lpo .... n aa1 aoa : a tl'Jea auct -* ta a ...._r of tu StvCtat 1Jo4y Fuak -:r,B. ..... ..

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t l. ( I t all anl _,._., polata au.ertcal llh co lPP!!! JO!!R. IM..,..,. auo 1 leal Mtbo4 of obUlal d.ta. (It) 4:. at.-appr r:lat'e terial la1 atrati lcaU. ()) t qpU.cit vlt'b to QOU.l. p 1-.., (4) lt bl'ld a.ct avaUdle ,.,., NC ed1tto at J'M't tala t to lt vee pol..llted out that Dr Malpass was an ordained minister and UJ.-!.-r( Sfw ... f I tf b -{J;d /.)( (t:i;, j Cfef.-,1-1-[. k t1t.t --'u_.,_. ,(.t-Q.<.. ...{ _, -tA-v 4--<.. ltl.A .. f. ( Y (, { .. '-( ) ( e).-1 -w tt.N.J ytv c 4'-AA-'....,...< [IUA.Lt .t..-;h; .--.. (6-... I r;?< i, A--lL. v-J

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4tuv. t tbe vtalti., ,..,.. tbU 1 of tile Matt._, ..,.. ... OUU\'1 ..._ vialtba I'"'P UM(l to a.we copy of tu tUt. nt wae aot fOi..,le aU t .t J b utur nk:ta an alii ,Q.., ad over 4>. Thtl al. l M i-.J. eat coacua.a wt.th a Mtura t.u4 t, a ldatt.-. u. ok'-'1, Jtett to tta. offatve 1...-ua t a tMCta. t .,...., ..... .. alaN u4 lblt "' Ya. t-..e.W .... all .... t .... c.lled 14 at .. .. t t.._ .._ Ch.e t*'t alleaedl ntl.l left ta 11M J:corcta ""* ..-...s.ately Mked. Th .taowt4 tut tt)e e;ourae ha4 b eOiiJ. plet.S Wl.tb a ar.Se lhtf -.ro )Jt t.o th tqtioa of the poup .., t-.. M.ttw tlaea 4r_ p.a. Tld.a .... M Ale t -uu \IP 1a tlltl. l9ba e iavetl lt \&a 'b.-olN.rly OWii b7 tbe witt tt.at.,...t

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cl. .or t'W() t faculty ile felt tn.t 1aOM of th acJyoc;atecl athei.-in tbi.r cla. l -:U wbJ.cb ep1rted fl'Cil t hbrte...C,hrf.t:l.u t. ot reU.a,la Qot u.a ta &a to cho& tr polatt of '91. tbe -.t .. vaa r iiled 'by YllitKt that. tt I u *PPl"Ofi'Ute IQ tucbi: Mtutl Wlatelt ql.t &ffect tu 1'elta1-o viat ot P1 a f "*'"''*'' 1* were PO\Jt-Q4! tb&t while! th tfaivd'ti.ty 11 alny J'ea4y to tiateu. to t;ritld .... lad JJlYe C: asldl'l.tton to lua&ettioDI, tt -1t, the flul l)'ab, aalut tte r.nm 4ed.lou
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, ut or -.ilwc of c:U ... u ... nre takea t t Tt-. "- Uct hd ,_,.t,au ftitta tat..-e. later ..S ..-clJ t.7 ell of t.H !Mvut1 ;r; .--.tattvu a.S t.a cJ'ije41 to et cbail' cou14erH iacrpl'cU. cf whllt too pl c at tiM ,., to; hal aeU Dr. li Halpa Cliff twatt Dr. loltwt Ztler fricl t AlleD /

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"> l' } I CONFIDENTIAL MIMORANDUM DIAN OF ACADEMIC An'AIIB 21, 1962 TO: PRESIDENT ALLEN Mrs. Jane Smith' s opus contains a statement that someone told her they knew of a faculty member at the University of South Florida who was fired from a school in Tennessee for being a homosexual. W e ha ,ve che c k e d this o u t a n d here is Herb Wun derlich's report on it. Enclosure Sidney J. French Dean

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,., .. : :I, / ,.\ o11 : : :,,. c ....... ; J : ... .. ;. ,. ,t. .. HI! '\o;, :<. .. ; : j;: ... d-t l f':". t .. ( ;V.,'! : ... a -t 'rt ... \.' ..... i,:.f : :' .,, .. .. .... : .. .'.\...\ ... .' ,, ."., :1 \ 1 0 1 oJ-! W """, "': ..... ..... { # : ... >.,.,:,:t-tl 1 ,;r n ... .. I '. ; : { ,. .. .. ... I ... "-. ... I 1':. ; ; .. ........ ... ... .:.:_.,. n ....... ,. ,, ...... ,'I J : .. '";'"' .. \,r., ; ; .... ....... : '' I. .. ... '\. ..... (' I ... ,.;. t ..... ,.JI r : I .. r : : ;. -&: .. :' ";.: : ... . -: ... \ .. : ... I I

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.. DIAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS CONJIDINTIAL MEMORANDUM TO: RE: PRESIDEN T ALL E N Matters Relating to the University o f South Florida Requlrlng Action by President Allen and a Report to the Boar d S p ecial Ca.aittee: I have drafted statement on each of these points for your consideration. Feel free to change them in any ways which will best serve the purpoae. SJF:lad inclosures Sidne y J. French Dean

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(). November 7, 1962 12: 10 A women ca 11 ed and wanted to 1 eave a message for Dr. A 11 en. She wanted to know if we were running a "witch hunt or an educational institution?'' She came to class to ay _for the second time, and no teacher. (She Would not tell ine her name, the class or even the college) She was extremely upset, and she added that she didn't live too far-but some of the c l ass had communted from St. Pete. Her idea was that the professors were not teaching because of the limitations put on them by Dr. A 1 len or the Johns Committee. She sounded to me 1 ike an older person, she spoke of teaching herself, how she planned to and it was a dhgrace how our teachers here were told what they could_teach and what they could not teach. She said she had children of her own, and she fully expected them to learn the good and the together -how else would they ever beable to live in a society'if they. were protected all their lives. She spoke about the homosexual mess here, and said all it was was throwing boys and a girls together at much/younger age. Because in the state of Florida if 2 boys or 2 girls were seen being friendly together after the age of 12 or so they were called honosexuals. She went on to say young men here could not share apartmemts to save on expenses because of this "witch hunt". She thoughtwe should go back to the old fashion schools-where we had all boys schools until college level and all girls schools, then put them together. She added she was the north, and up there where Charlie Johns has never been let loose to stir up the homosexual problem, it is almost unheard of but he has ruined the state of Florida, He and his entire committee should be shot. She said that Or. Allen should stand behind his teachers, and why had the Board of Control dictated to him 1 This is the drift of the she was very excited ... ;