John Stuart Allen Papers, USF Archives

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John Stuart Allen Papers, USF Archives

Material Information

Title:
John Stuart Allen Papers, USF Archives FLIC Loose
Series Title:
Florida Legislative Investigation Committee (Johns Committee)
Creator:
Allen, John Stuart 1907-1982
Place of Publication:
Tampa, Florida
Publisher:
University of South Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 folder

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Subjects / Keywords:
Academic freedom -- Florida -- Tampa ( lcsh )
History -- Tampa (Fla.) -- 20th century ( lcsh )

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Original Version:
USF Archives

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Source Institution:
University of South Florida
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
A49-00011 ( USFLDC DOI )
a49.11 ( USF Handle )

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Mixed Material

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In accordance with its Policy Statement 22, the University' of South Florida provides complete and accurate information to off-campus media of communications on all matters of interest to the public. The University does not suppress information of a controversial nature, but instead hastens to explain its position objectively. for the conduct of this program of news and publicity is delegated to the News Bureau, and more specifically to its Editor, who is a staff officer directly responsible to the President. The News Bureau is the central clearing house of the University for prepa'ration and dissemination o f news and publicity releases. In general, faculty and staff members having information about which they desire a release are expected to channel it through the News Bureau. However, if a faculty or staff member is approached by an off-campus reporter, he may provide information requested of him if he is in po.ssession of such information and if in his judg ment the release of such information is appropriate. If the person has_ any doubt about the a ppropriateness of such release, he is expected to refer the reporter to the Editor of the News Bureau. The Editor himself must exercise discretion and good judgment in determining the ap propriateness of any release sent otit from his office. If he has any about the content, timing, necessity or I propriety of any material being considered for release, he is expected to clear such materia l with. t h e President. In the field of public information, particularly information about a public institution, it is natural that differences of will exist about a majority of the releases which are disseminated. yrrit must be recognized, however, that it is possible to satisfy everybody all the time. Bditor's position, then, requires scrupulous accuracy,

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must :J-.7 ) rength of a University---and public confidence in it---depend upon quality of its raduates. In other words, / fup.ction of versity is to educate, and ttfe better i performs this function, e more it will ( L But the fias the midst o f establishing an educational program o f high quality, it must also establish itself as' a new member in the community, as a and asset to the surrounding area, and as a large physical and financial complex worthy of of these things it must do before it can the taxpayers 1 dollars. All begin to provide a steady of respon,sible a nd well educated graduates into the stream of community life. Florida Johns Ther he Univers ty has not adequately attempted t build public confidence facts are,Jleweter; that the University and its employees have made many significant contributions 'to the welfare of the community at all levels, not only in its normal areas of operation but in religious, cultural, civic, social and service activities as well. In the two years since it opened, the University has staged 140 concerts, plays, art exhibits, lectures, forums and film classics, all o en to the public. Attendance records show that 100,000 persons witnessed cultural p erformances. Two of the University's cultural organizations, a symphony orchestraand a theatre group, utilized the talents of many area residents who previously had no outlet for thei. r musical and theatrical talents. Thirteen members of the University faculty and student body performed regularly with the Tampa Philharmonic, providing that group with a healthy infusion of new talent.

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.. In addition to the cultural events, the University served as host for 150 conventions, worksho ps, dinners and similar occasions during the past two years, despite the fact that it had only one cafeteria with limited facilities to serve its student body and staff. Some 20,000 persons attended these 150 events. Many of the occasion s were for local civic organizations, women's groups and service clubs, w h o e n j oy e d a m e a l o n the campus, a tour of the facilities and a talk by a University official on the progress, plans and purposes of t h e institution. During the two-year pe riod, University personnel gave some 225 talks to groups and organizati o ns in County and surrounding are0 This was done i n mos t cases without cost to the organization involved, and provided a source of voluntary service to these organizations. Individual contributions of the University faculty and staff in the area of religion have also been extensive. More than a dozen persons have occupied pulpits in and around the Tampa B ay are a in the p a s t year, and several of these have been arrang ed on a permanent basis. -At 6hut :i&& n y other members of the faculty an d staff have accepted i mportan t o ffices and oth e r positi: ons of leader;-ship in their churches and still others ha ve spoken to church groups on a v ariety of subjects. There are still other a .reas i n which the University has given extensive service to the community. Four faculty members write weekly columns for daily newspapers in the city; the three local television stations and several radio stations have drawn he avily on University personnel for ap p earances, some of these on a permanent basis; and members of the faculty frequently contribute book .reviews to the Tam pa Tribune. Onerecent performance of the University Symphony Orchestra on television station WTVT drew so many letters of praise that the station presented t h e program a second time.

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I Many local service groups,' including the1 Family Service, the Tampa Urba n Lea gue, the Friends of .the Library, the American Association for the United Nations and the Chamber of Commerce, have utilized University personnel in important administrative positions and committee assig nments, and other members of the faculty have served as consultants to a variety of public and private-organizations:} of the faculty also served as consultants with t hepublic schools in the area, and have assisted the schools in such areas as curriculum revision, course desig n and administrative structure. In addition, more than a score of faculty wives teach in the public sc hools, helping to relieve a serious teacher shortag e there. Personal contact with a number of influential community residents has revealed a number of surprising reason' s for much of the lack of public confidence in the University. There are, for example, some citizens who are disillusioned because the University has no football team, an d has inaicated it will not have one. There are,others w any form of integration, and are upset because the IInj;y: has relaxed 1;bi& eerfi.er. p.o the insti.tuti....on a: th exiS-tence of privately-own-ed mf>a having sons and daughters in the University, are disturbed to learn that college is more demanding than high school, and since these parents did not attend college themselves, they are having a difficult time adjusting to the change along with their children. Still another group feels the University has not been conservative eno u gh in its selection of faculty, textbooks, re uired reading and guest s peakers, and has g one too far in exposing students to a variety of points of view.

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groups Together, they constitute a c:..-._!lllllilre body of opinion which has had its confidence in the University shaken by the institution's failure to conform to on e or more of their personal images. This\ is an unfortunate situation, compounded by the ironic fact that the inst"tutional decisions which prompted this disillusionment were judiciously made decisions by responsible people whose highej t obligation is to provide the state of Florida with an outstanding new institution of higher /The University of South Florida 1 s objective has not diminished. It will continue to seek new avenues by which it can build public confidence in itself, while a the same time rernaLning

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J ,) OFFIC E of the DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS December, 196 2 REVIEW 0 A MEEriNG HELD SEPTEMBER 22, 1961, BETWEEN A GROUP OF TAMPA CITIZENS AND REPRESENI'ATIVES OF THE UNIVERSITY OP SOUTH FLORIDA StatemeDt s have been made in public and private by member s of the citizens group concerned with this meeting and by others whic h express or i mply in various tha t the group received a "brushoff," was received with hostility, was not given time to state their case, were called "crackpots, 11 and "witch hunters" and that the chaieman ''turned on his heel and walked out." It seems therefore, that the c a s e of the University be presen t ed even at this late date. T he following statements summ.a. rize \vha;: the University repr e sentatives believe took place at the meeting. Th e meeting w a s arranged for 2 P .M., Sep t ember 22, 1961 i t was known prior to the meeting what t h e visiting group wished to talk about Unive rsity representat ives qualified to discuss these matters were asked t o attend, These w ere: Dr. Russell C ooper, Dean Col lege of Liberal Arts, Dr. Robert Zetler, then Chairma n of the course in Functional English, and now Director of the Division of La nguage and Literature Dr. Le slie Malpass, Cha irman of the course in Human Behavior, Dr. Clifford Stewa rt, Director of Evaluati on Services, and Dr. Sidne y J. French, then Dean of the College of Basic Studies, and now Dean of Academic Affairs, who served as chairman. The visiting group inclu ded Mrs Stockton S m i th, who served as spoke sman and whose s on was a member of the Student body, Mrs. M L F u n khauser, and Dr. and Mrs J B Hod ge

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The discussion centered lar ge l y aroun d the following five situations, (1) certain books used in the course in Functional English, (2) The book Caste and Class in a Southern Town, used as one of a number of readings in Human Behavior, (3) use of the test, Ioventory of Beliefs, (4) an incident alleged to have taken place in a class in Human Behavior, (5) allegation that atheism was being taught in the University, and that professors stressed ,1' non-religious points of view These five situations are considered in numerical order. 1 Several of the books objected to in the Functional English course were Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath, Huxley's Brave New World and Eiseley's The Iamense Journey. The t-ionkey Trial mentioned at one time. Dr Zetler explained why each of these was used and the part it played in the course. He also mentioned other books used such as the Screw Tape Letters, one of the most moral of modern books with a deeply religio us point of view Dean 2 Cooper also spoke on the choice of books, noting the desirability and necessity of choice of teaching materials by vote of the faculty n:ambers teaching the course. 2 Dr. Malpass discuesed the use of the book Caste and C lass in a Southern in the Human Behavior course, giving among others the following reasons why the faculty of the course had selected the book (a) it represented an a pp roved sociological met hod of obtaining data, (b) it contained appropriate material on social stratification, (c) it was explicit with respect to social problems This particular book has not been used since the Summer of 1961. It was pointed out that Dr. Malpass had been an ordained minister and had served in the Salvation Army. Mrs. Smith, Dr. Hodge and Dr. Malpass discussed some views on the morality of college students today.

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3 3 The meeting discussed the use of the test, Inventory of Beliefs used at that in the orientation test battery for freshmen Members of the visiting felt that some of the questions were inappropriate for college freshmen This test, prepared and published by the American Council on EducatiQn, is stmilarly used in many hundreds of colleges and universities around the country. (The preparation of this test has been attributed by Mrs. Smith to Dean French. This is a misstatement. He was formerly a member of the Council's Committee on Evaluation but had nothing to do with the construction o f its tests. ) The visiting g roup asked to have a copy of the test. This was not possible since all tests of this nature which are used over and over again are in the category of "secure" tests. However, a copy was obtained for inspection and review during the meeting. Dr. Stewart spoke about the purpose of this type of test, which does not call for a "grade. It is used principally to help advisers decide whether or not a student could profit from independent study since it gives some indication o f degrees of rigidity of belief on various social aipects of life. This particular test has since been deleted from the orientation battery because similar information can be obtained from other measures 4 The alleged incident was concerned with a mature student, a minister, who, it was claimed, objected to the offensive language of a teacher in a Human Behavior class and walked out. The was alleged to have called the student back and promised that if he would remain he would g e t an "A" in the course, but t he student allegedly still lef t in disgust. The Registrar's records were immediately chec ked.. These showed that the course had been com pleted with a grade of B This was brought to the attention of the group

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4 and the matter was then dropped This same incident came up in the Johns Committee investigation. It has been clear)y shown by the writtea statements of many students in this teacher's classes that he does not use profane or vulgar language. The incident was one in which he had taped a short section of a modern novel to indicate the type of conversational language used in a certain stratum of society. He explained this carefully to the class and apologized for the language found in the taped reading. Dr. Malpass indicated that he had already discussed this matter with the faculty member involved. 5 The statements that atheism was being taught and anti-religious views presented in classes stemmed from some of the books used. Dr. Malpass stated that he was confident that students' religious views were respected in the Human Behavior course. Dean French added that while there might be an atheist or two on the faculty he felt thatmne of them advocated atheism in their classes. Books containing chapters which departed from the Hebraic-Christian views of religion were not used in an effort to change students' religious views but to give them an opportunity to examine other points of view The view was expressed by the visitors that it was not appropriate to use teaching material which might affect the religious views of any student. The meeting lasted about an hour and a half and ended about 3:30 P. M Dean French made a concluding statement in which he thanked the group for coming and invited them to return at any ttme. In the course of his remarks he stated that he felt they, like other groups seeking to influence the University in various ways, were a pressure group, and that while the University was always ready to l isten to criticism and give careful consideration to suggestions, it must, in the final analysis, make its own decision in order maintain its

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/ 5 integrity as a university. None of the University repreaentatives recall that the visitors were at any t:ime called "crackpots." If the term "witch hunting" was ever used it waa not applied to the visitors. There appeared to be plenty of time available to state and discuss the matters raised by the The chairman did not "turn on his heel and walk out.tt The meeti113 appeared,to the University representatives, to end on a most amicable note. No notes or minutes of the meeting were taken at the ttme. The above document reflects and summarizes written statements made later and separately by each of the Univers-ity representatives and is subscribed to as being their considered interpretation of what took place at the aeetina.

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OFFICE ? of the '). c \ DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS REVIEW OF A MEETING HELD SEPTEMBER 22, 196l,J) BETWEEN A GROUP OF TAMPA CITIZENS AND REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA J ;"\) ') Statements have been made in public and private by members of the citizens group concerned with this meeting and b.y others which express or imply in various ways that the group received a "brushoff, 11 was received with hostility, "' their case, were called "crackpots, 11 and (that was not given time to state the chairman''turned on his heel and walked out." It seems important, therefore, that the case of the University be presented, even at this late date. The following statements summarize what the University representatives believe took place at the meeting. The meeting was arranged for 2 P.M., September 22, 1961. Since it was known prior to the meeting what the visiting group wished to talk about University representatives qualified to discuss these matters were asked to attend. These were: Dr. Russell Cooper, Dean, College of Liberal Arts, Dr. Robert Zetler, then Chairman of the course in Functional English, and now Director of the Division of Language and Literature, Dr. Leslie Malpass, Chairman of the course in Human Behavior, Dr. Clifford Stewart, Director of Evaluation Services, and Dr. Sidney J. French, then Dean of the College of Basic Studies,and now Dean of Academic Affairs, who served as chairman. The visiting group included Mrs. Stockton Smith, who served as spokesman -fA l and whose son was a J now ie a member of the-Student body, Mrs. Funkhauser, and Dr. and Mrs. Hodge.

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The discussion centered largely around the following five situations, (1) certain books used in the course in Functional English, (2) The book, Caste and Class in a Southern Town, used as one of a number of readings in Human Behavior, (3) use of the test, Inventory o! Beliefs, (4) an incident alleged to have taken place in a class in Behavior, (5) allegation / 2 that atheism was being taught in the and that professors stressed non-religious points of view. These five situations are considered in numerical order. 1. Several of the books objected to in the Functional English course were Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath, Huxley's' Brave New World, and Eiseley1 s The Immense Journey, The Monkey Trial was mentioned at one time. Dr. Zetler explained why each o.f these was used and the part it played in the course. He also mentioned other books useo such as the Screw Tape Letters, one of the most moral of modern books with a deeply religious point of view. Dean Cooper also spoke on the choice of books, noting the desirability and necessity of choice of teaching materials by vote of the faculty membersteaching the course. 2. Dr.Malpass discussed the use of the book Case and Class in a Southern Town in the Human Behavior course, giving among others the following reasons "t;-r.._ covrse... why the selected the book (a) it represented an approved sociological method of obtaining data, (b) it contained appropriate material on (3) it was explicit with respect to social problems. This ioa>D'K 'VIo'"t .... use:c.\ 511'\l"Q.. (4:} ie \IIlii 1ni'if aad av..a i Jahl e in paper eack editi:cn at rea10oaaMe eO'S o-lv ... J be e r\. It was pointed out that Dr. Malpass an ordained minister and

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I / I / I /' I Mrs. Smith, 9f Hodge and Malpass The meeting discussed the use of the used at in the the visiting group felt college freshmen. This orientation test l students today. J / Inventory of Beliefs attery for freshmen. Members of similarly used in many alleges and universities around the The visiting group of the test. This was not possible since all tests of are used over and over 3 again are in the category of cure" tests. However, a copy was obtained for inspection and review during f e meeting. Dr. Stewart spoke about the purpose of this type of which df:)es ,not call for a "grade. 11 It is used principally -ft; o.f c:{VIS("r_s or-rttJ'"t o.._ si-.. t fr" ""c\-e...r.o."'de."""'t ow-1_1'"-it'" students.J This particular has since been r-eplaced by aoftetaQ. f tO INI S '"""', 1 .,.,_r-1 n-f'o r ""-"'-'t t J v. c "-"' lo ., fvo""' o o-:0 4. The alleged incident was concerned with a mature student, a minister, f o._.s. who, it was claimed, to the offensive language of a teacher in a e. Human Behavior class andiwalked out. The teacher was alleged to have called the student back and that if he would remain he would get an "A" in the course, but the student allegedly still left in disgust. The Registrar's records were immediately checked. These showed that the course had been com-pleted with a grade of "B." This was brought to the attention of the grou and the matter was then dropped. This same incident came up in the Johns Committee investigation. It has been clearly shown by the written statements

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of many students in or vulgar language. this teacher's classes that he does ot use profane The incident was one in which he hru6 taped a short section of a modern novel to indicate the sational language used in a certain stratum of society. He explained th s carefully to the 4 for the lan$uage found theta ed reading. '-"" I 5. The statements that atheism was being taught an4 anti-religious views presented in classes stemmed from some of the book/ used. Dr. Malpass stated respected in the an atheist classes. Books containing views of religion were not used in an students' religious lasted about an hour and a kalf and ended about 3:30 P. M. French made a concluding statement in which he thanked the group for coming them to return at any time. In the course of his remarks he stated like other groups seeking to influence the University in a pressure group,.and while the University was always ( criticisms and careful consideration to suggestions, it must, in the final analysis, --integrity as a university. its own decision inorder to maintain I ot'\. The meeting appeared/to end wi:t'h a most amicable to
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.. C' / / ;' / No notes or minutes of the meeting were taken at the time. The above / document reflects and sunnnarizes written stat.ements made later and 5 separately by each of the University representatives and is subscribed to as being their considered interpretation of what took place at the meeting.

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' \ \ \ MEMORANDm\ TO: Dean Sidney J. French FROM: -Robert L. Zetler DATE: December 3, 1962. SUBJECT: Recollection of the meeting with Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Funkhauser, Dr. Dodge, and Mr. Niel Smith. My recollection of the meeting is that it was largely an objection to certain books which we were teaching including Huxley's Brave Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath, and Eiseley's The Immense Journey. Mrs. Stockton Smith indicated that the use of books of this sort would lead the students' morals "to a point of no return." You queried the meaning of her she was not exactly clear on what it was intended to mean. Objections were also offered by this group to the use of The Monkey Trial and Mrs. Smith pointed out that although there might be something in the theory of evolution, she for one hardly subscribed to it and thought that it ought not to be taught. When the committee pointed out that in their op1n1on, the books used tended to be immoral and in bad taste, I added the comment that The Screwtape Letters was perhaps the most moral of modern books and represented a deeply religious point of view. The visitors said that they believed that atheism was being publicly taught in our classrooms. The course in Human Development and Behavior was described as being one in which such beliefs were being promoted. Professor Malpass answered this charge by pointing out that he was an ordained minister of one of the most conventional of churches--The Salvation Army. You indicated that you did not believe that atheism was being taught in any course in this university. The committee also drew Dr. Kahn into the discussion and attempted to make a case that he was preaching immorality. I made the point that I had spoken to Dr. Kahn and asked him to limit somewhat references to sex in the modern writings which were being used in an American literature class. Dean Cooper defended the book choices ably, indicating that specialists in this field had chosen them and that they were chosen by a faculty vote. When the meeting adjourned you thanked the committee for coming to talk with us. Robert L. Z

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Dean Sidney J. French -2 December 4, 1962 The discussion closed with Dean French saying that he welcomed this group and any other group bringing questions to the university; that the administration and faculty were responsible for determining curriculum, textbooks, etc. but that the thinking of people outside the university would always be considered. He said something abeut the idea that "we cannot let our policies be dictated by pressure groups", but -again assured the group of his interest and that of other people here in their and that their suggestions would be carefully considered. /me

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December 3, 1962 MEMO TO: Dean French FROM: R. M. Cooper SUBJECT: Meeting With The Citizen's Group In reply to your request for a report concerning our conference with Mrs. Stockton Smith and others, my memory of the event is as follows: In the summer of 1961, I believe it was in August, you informed me that a group of Tampa citizens were complaining about some of the materials read at the university and invited me to sit in on a discussion of the matter them. The conference was held in AD 2096 and included six or seven people from downtown in addition to Drs. Malpass, Zetler, Stewart and ourselves. The group seemed to have two or three major points of criticism. One was a personality inventory given to our freshmen which apparently procured a copy.of the inventory and showed it to the group, including the offensive items, but said that he could not give them a copy to keep since he must protect its confidentiality and security. He pointed out that the test is used in several hundred institutions over the country and is regarded as a rather useful instrument to gain information on the adjustment problems of students. The group also made considerable point of an alleged incident in Dr. Winthrop's class when Reverend Mel Martin of the Seminole Heights Baptist Church was said to have objected to some of Dr. Winthrop's offensive language and walked out of the class. The group said that Dr. Winthrop called Dr. Martin back and promised that if he would remain he would get an "A" in the course but that Reverend Martin left anyway in complete disgust. The whole incident seemed so unbelievable that Dr. Stewart was asked to go to the Registrar's Office and determine what record we have of Reverend Martin's work in the course and he returned to report that he had completed the work and received a "B". This obviously completely contradicted the story of the citizen's group and they dropped the subject. (I later had a conversation with a member of Reverend Martin's church who told me that she was in the class and that no incident of this kind ever occurred. She said she was most distressed at the kind of stories that were going around and felt that Reverend Martin was a serious,ly disturbed individual.) The group also protested what they felt to be anti-religious comments made by the instructors in the human behavior course, whereupon Dr. Malpass told them that he had once been a Salvation Army chaplain, was deeply interested in religion himself, and was confident that the student's religious views were respected.

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-2-There was also complaint about one or two books used in freshman English and Dr. Zetler queried them rather precisely as to what the difficulties were but without getting a very satisfactory or explicit response as I recall. In the course of the conversation you explained to the group that this was a state university which must develop the best possible program according to its own lights and without yielding to special pressure groups. I added that I was sure that all of us had the same ultimate goals of a wholesome education for our young people and that if we differed it was simply on matters of interpretation. The discussion seemed to be quite frank and free and without apparent rancor. After an hour or so of this interchange the group broke up amid mutual expressions that the problems here discussed would work out satisfactorily. RMC/jd

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INTER-OFFICE MEMORANDUM DATE TO: Dean Sidney J. French FROM: Leslie F. Malpass SUBJECT: Conference with Mrs. Stockton Smith and others in conference room AD 2072 Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Funkhauser, another lady and Dr. Hodge were introduced community people interested in the university and having some questions some of the courses and one of the tests used in the freshman battery. recall the introductions and continuing discussion were very friendly. as about As I Mrs. Stockton Smith was the most vocal person of the community group. She said she realized the functions of the university but felt that some of the books in English and one of the Human Behavior texts contained material that was "too strong" (my quote) for freshman. My impression was that she felt that other literature which did not use the language of the "harsh realism" literary set should be stressed in courses for freshman. Particularly, I remember her saying something about Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath. Dr. Zetler replied in terms of the duty of the university to provide students with a spectrum of literary effort including examples of good writing in several areas (e.g. the contents of each of the Basic College programs was represented in at least one of the English paperback textbooks) and of different aspects of man's attempts to deal with significant problems. Memory tells me that Dr. Zetler's explanation was accepted as valid but the visitors were not convinced that other books than those selected could not be used for this purpose. I do not remember any particular discussion of evolution in this context, but it may have occurred. I think it was Mrs. Smith who raised a question about the use of Caste and Class in a Southern Town, by John Dollard, in Human Behavior. I was introduced and gave the following reasons for selection of this text: (1) it re-presented the participant -observation method in collecting sociological data; (2) it contained excellent chapters on the concepts of social strati fication (caste and class); (3) it was explicit with respect to social problems in contemporary USA, and particularly in the south, even though some examples were "dated"; and (4) it was economical in terms of presentation by instructors and cost for students. Again, memory tells me that this explanation was accepted politely but the disagreement about utility of the text remained. It was during this discussion that I remember telling the group that I had been a minister at one time, and Mrs. Stockton Smith and I discussed morals in college students briefly. The only other discussion I recall concerned the Inventory of Beliefs. At least two of the ladies and the physician talked about this point. They asked if they could have a copy of the test and were told they could not take a copy away from campus, but they were welcome to examine it at the university at their leisure. Subsequently, the test was brought in and two items, including one dealing with possible brother-sister sexual relationships, were discussed. The visitor group expressed strong disapproval of the use of this test with freshman and did not accept, as I recall, the reasons offered for its use (the index of authoritarianism that it provides, confidentiality of results, wide use by other universities, etc.).

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MEMORANDUM TO: Dean S. J. French FROM: Clifford T. Stewart page 2 I believe it was also at this meeting that Mrs. Smith referred to the number of times certain four-letter words and/or distasteful phrases were used in certain of the books. Mrs. Smith was of the opinion that it is not safe to present such materials as are contained in the books used in Functional English or in the Inventory of Beliefs to college students, for fear that by this exposure they will be changed for the worse. This main idea was expressed a number of times in a number of different ways, but this seemed to be the crux of the matter. * Now I would like to make a comment on this entire matter, apart from the specific meeting referred to above. As I mentioned before, Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Funkhouser had s oken with me twice before the above meeting took place. I had the impression that they were honestly concerned about certain things at the university. At the same time, it was evident that we did not agree about these areas of concern nor about what should be done about them. Most of the discussion at these two meetings dealt with the required reading materials in Functional English and Human Behavior and about the Inventory of Beliefs. I mentioned at both these meetings that should they care to discuss these matters with Dr. Mayhew, the Deans, the President, or for that matter, anyone at the university, they would certainly be welcome to do so. I found it very difficult to follow a specific line of discussion or to pursue a given point for any period of time. It seemed to me that irrelevant factors were always popping into the conversation and getting off the subject we were discussing. Briefly, I found it quite difficult to follow the type of reasoning used As an example, Mrs. Smith asked why The Grapes of wrath was required reading in Functional English I indicated that Dr. Zetler could better speak to this point but I assumed that it was chosen not only for the story or ideas that it carried, but to illustrate a literary style, in addition. I then mentioned that Mr. Steinbeck had been awarded the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for this particular book. Mrs. Smith's answer to this was simply that he should not have been awarded the Pulitzer Prize for such a book. It seems to me that if a person honestly believes they can make such a decision then it is quite reasonable that they would also expect that they could make other decisions such as what material should be used in the classroom, what should be taught, and how it should be taught, and it bacame quite evident that Mrs. Smith followed this type reasoning and felt that she, indeed, did know what materials were good, which were bad, and there was no question about it. Therefore, even if we had verbatum transcripts of the meeting you referred to, and all other conversations or correspondence between this group and all the university personnel concerned, I don't know of what value it would be since this would be factual material, and facts have played a very minor role from the beginning. We are working on different sets of ass.umptions. We are not communicating with these people and I don't know how willing they are to communicate.

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INTER -OFFICE MEMORANDUM DATE: December 5, 1962 FROM: Clifford T. Stewart TO: Dean S J French SUBJECT=-------------------------------------Of"c (j I Following is what I recall of the meeting held about a year ago referred to in your memorandum of December 3, 1962. Where quotation marks are used, these are not necessarily quotes, of course, but are simply what I remember as having been said. I had talked with Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Funkhouser on one or two occasions prior to this meeting amd with Skipper Smith once or twice prior to this meeting, also. I believe, however, that I have managed to keep the specifics of these meetings separate from the one you referred to. I can't recall anything specific that Mrs. Funkhouser said at this particular meeting, nor do I remember Mr. Neil Smith being at this meeting. I can't place him. Most of the talking was done by Mrs. Smith and by Dr. Hodge. I'm assuming that Dr. Hodge was the Dr. tlhat was at this meeting. I can't remember too much about him except that he had a mustache. Mrs. Stockton Smith started off the meeting with a rather long statement about their reasons for being here. The statement was apologetic in some parts, indicating that they did not want the university to feel that they were trying to run our business, but on the other hand, there were certain things that had come to their attention that they felt in all good conscience, they had to point out to the responsible people at the university. Most of the discussion centered about the impact of the University of South Florida on the students. This, in part, was in relation to the books currently being used in Functional English, and a number of these were on the table. Someone in the group indicated that they thought that these books would be bad for the students. Dean French: "'For all the students or just some?" They flilhally agreed that it might be just J some of the students that would be affected' adversely by these books. Dean French: "Do you think then, if such materials have a negative effect on only one student, that they should be eliminated?" The answer to this was yes, they should be eliminated. Dean French: "I cannot agree with this." At another time in the meeting, Dean French said, "We recognize you for what you are, a pressure group." Dr Hodge made several connnents about the falling morality of the current generation indicating that venereal diseases were now more wide spread than ever before. Dr. Malpass asked whether he meant in, or percentage wise. Then Dr. Hodge indicated that he meant both number wise and percentage wise, but I don't recall any specific reference to what population;

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" .. .. December, 1962 J2 OFFICE { 1 of the b DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS .\> \ \ REVIEW OF A MEETING HELD SEPTE BETWEEN A GROUP OF TAMPA CITIZENS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SO ER 22, 1961, D REPRESENrATIVES 9 H FL0RIDA '-' Statements have been made in by members of the citizens group concerned with this which express or imply in various ways that the group received a 'brushoff," was with hostility, was not given time to state their cas were called "crackpots," and "witch hunters" and that the on his heel and walked out." It seems important, therefore, that the the University be presented, even at this late date. The following summarize what the University representatives meeting. The meeting was arranged for 2 M., September 22, 1961. Since it was known prior to the meeting the visiting group wished to talk about University representatives to discuss these matters were asked to attend. These were: Cooper, Dean, College of Liberal Arts, Dr. Robert Zetler, then n of the course in Functional English, and now Director of the Divisio Language and Literature, Dr Leslie Malpass, Chairman of the course in uman Behavior, Dr. Clifford Stewart, Director of Evaluation Services, and Jr. Sidney J. French, then Dean of the College of I Basic Studies, and now Dean of Academic Affairs, who served as chairman. The visiting group included Mrs. Stockton Smith, -who served as spokesman and whose a member of the Student body, Mrs. M. L. Funkhauser, and Dr. and Mrs. J. B. Hodge.

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.. The discussion centered largely around the following five situations, I (1) certain books used in the course in Functional English, (2) The book, Caste and Class in a Southern Town, used as one of a num er of readings in an incident alleged to have taken place in a class in Human ior, (5) allegation I that atheism was being taught in the University, that professors stressed non-religious points of view. These five situat ons are considered in numerical order. I I 1 Several of the books objected to in the yunctional Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath, Huxley's Brave/New World, English course were and Eiseley's The Immense Journey. The Monkey Trial was meqtioned at one time. Dr. Zetler I explained why each of th,ese was used and fthe part it played in the course. I / He also mentioned other books used such,as the Screw Tape Letters, one of I the most moral of modern books with a deeply religious point of view. Dean 2 Cooper also spoke on the choice of books, noting the desirability and necessity of choice of teaching materials by vo,te of the faculty members teaching the course. I I 2. Dr. Malpass discussed the use o f the book Caste and Class in a Southern Town in the Human Behavior course,igiving among ethers the following reasons why the faculty of the course had selected the book (a) it represented an approved sociological method of obtaining rata, (b) it contained appropriate material on social stratification, (a) it/ was explicit respect to social "'11\Jt.\ "-"-11+'( .,. 7"6 r...v h'1 e-" eThis particular book has not beep used since the Summer of 19617. It was '\ (ct..&..p. 1/ pointed out that Dr. Malpass had been an ordained minister and had served in .1 the Salvation Army. Mrs. Smith, Dr. Hodge and Dr. Malpass discussed some views on-the morality of college students today.

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3 3. The meeting discussed the use of. the test, Inventory pf Beliefs used at that time in the orientation test battery for Members of the visiting group felt that some of the questions inappropriate for ;;. f college freshmen. This test, prepared and published by the American Council \-. "'s fOI'! on Education, used in many hundreds of colleges and universities around the country. (The preparation of this test has been attributed 111! sa Smith to Dean French. This is a misstatement. He was formerly a member of the Council's Committee on Evaluation but had nothing to do with the construction of its tests.) The visiting group asked to have a copy of the test. This was not possible since all, tests of this nature which are used over and over again are in the category of "secure" tests. However, a copy was obtained for inspection and review during the meeting. Dr. Stewart spoke about the purpose of this type of test, which does not call for a "grade." It is used principally to help aqvisers decide whether or not a student could profit from independent study since it gives some indication of degrees of rigidity of belief on various 1ocial aspects of life. This particular test has since been deleted from orientation battery because similar information can be obtained from other measures. 4. The alleged incident was concerned with a mature student, a minister, who, it was claimed, objected to the offensive language of a teacher in a Human Behavior class and walked out. The teacher was alleged to have called the student back and promised that if he would remain he would get an "A" in the course, but the student allegedly still left in disgust. The Registrar's records were immediately checked. These showed that the course had been com-pleted with a grade of "B." This was brought to the attention of the group

PAGE 79

I 4 and the matter was then dropped. This same incident came up in the Johns Committee investigation. It has been clearly shown by the written statements of many students in this teacher's classes that he q .oes not use profane or vulgar language. The incident was one in which he had taped a short section of a modern novel to indicate the type of language used in a certain stratum of society. He explained this ,carefully to the class and I apE>logized for the language found in the taped reading. Dr. Malpass indicated f I that he had already discussed this matter w tth the faculty member involved. 5. The statements that atheism was taught and anti-religious views I presented in classes stemmed from some 6 f the books used. Dr. Malpass stated I that he was confident that students' views were respected in the / Human Behavior course. Dean French that while there might be an atheist / or two on the faculty he felt thatrone of them advocated atheism in their classes. Books containing chapters which departed from the Hebraic-Christian views of religion were not used in an effort to change students' religious views but to give them an opportunity to examine other points of view. view was expressed by the visitors that it was not appropriate to use teaching material which might affect the religious views of any student. The meeting lasted about an hour and a half and ended about 3:30 P. M. Dean French made a concluding statement in which he thanked the group for and invited them to return at any time. In the cours. e of his remarks he stated that he felt they, like other groups seeking to influence the University in various ways, were a pressure group, and that while the University was always ready to listen to criticism and give careful consideration to suggestions, it must, in the final analysis, make its own decision in order to maintain its

PAGE 80

5 integrity as a university. None of the University representatives recall that / the visitors were at any time called "crackpots." I f the term "witch hunting" was ever used it was not applied to the visitors. /There appeared to be c / plenty of time available to state and discuss matters raised by the / visitors. The chairman did not on his and walk out." The meeting / appeared,to the University t o end on a most amicable note. I r No notes or minutes of the meeting were at the time. The above / document reflects and summarizes statements made later and ,./ separately by each of the Univ ersity i'epresentatives and is subscribed to as being their considered of what took place at the meeting. I I

PAGE 81

'l'O: December 10, 1962 Til I COliiCUN CC to; Allen llel"ew1tb b a draft o f e proposed atat nt an our etina of ept ft 22, 1961, c oaed ft"oa y-our meaaoraada. The stataaent ahould be aa factual a& poeible, and un otional. fl g o over 1t very t:al"efully for fecu and tone and return any c ata to me a ooa possible. Thanks. JF:l Ba.el osure Sidney J. Preocb Dun

PAGE 82

'"
PAGE 83

2 The cU.teutti a c tu lU' ely aroUDd the foUowtaa five tituatio (l) c rtatu ooa a.i ta. be coul'te ill IUDCtioul lqltu. (2) 'f book, C.t51 !1!!1 (:left &! a Olltb!'gl Jnp, Uf at of a ft" of l"eNi f 1D a -......... (4) aa locld t allqed to have t.aa.o place iD a claat ta ---hbaYlor 1 (S) aU that athet vat t.etaa tauaht ta the thUveralty, altid that profe.,ora aueaeed aonl'eli&iou.e poiuca f vi. th te five tltuatiou are co Uue4 ta -.rtcal ordft'. 1. everal of the kt jeeted to to the ruactt 1 le.J a:I!Dt...!!!!L5JL!a !J!!!rape Jo9MZ tl!t !pD!Iu r&-tfl wee tt lie eoute wre llaelq !Jl! at o u.. Dt'. tetler la!aed vhy each of theta uted aod the ,. .. it plqed ia t cowH aleo loud other ookt uaed tvcb .. the !sra T!p! sm. ODe of tbe mott ral of M.'D kt vtth a eplJ reU. lOt.lf tat of view. Cooper alt pou the e tee of ooka, aot t etlrablltty a eaaity of choice t c .. cht terlalt by voce of tiM faculty a t a co 2. Dr. lpatt cSlacuated the uta of t bOok S!l!l a!!!l Clatt t 9 th!rp L-1a t giv othera t followt rea tba faculty aa1eet4MI the book (a) it tolo leal of obullat ata, (It) tt c tiMid ..... ruce aatertal oa\ eoc:tal atrattficatiora, (3) it vat explicit vlth reapect to aoclal pcoobl ... (4) it waa brief ad .vatlable. 111 paper back edttio at reaa Ide c oat to tttacS.c lt vee p i ed out that Dr. Malpass was an ordained minister and /

PAGE 84

3 1tcu1Wecl eocae vi 1 o n t lflOraUty of eoU e ltv nta today. uted at tn the orieacation teat attcry for freahmen. ere of the arovp felt that laM of the q-.tlou tuppropd.ate for coll e freahMn. Thia teat, pobU.abecl by t Univeralty of MlDI\eaota. le aiallarly ued in May of eollegea a11d aroua4 the coUDti"J. T e vlatttoa aaked to have a copy of t teat. Thta wa not poa1ihle tlDee all tuta ot thia nature vllleh. ueecJ over aad over aaata are in tbe ateao.-y of aacure'' teata. ever a vat for i apectln ad review the .eU.113. k. It wart apoke ab t the purpoae of tbb type ot tUt, vhic doet not call for a utrede. u lt 11 UltM priaeipaUy 4. The alle&ed l icleut vaa eoacerDed with a tve atucl
PAGE 85

of MllJ ia thia tMchera claaaea tbat he do a cot uae profaae. or vulaar laaa e. The iuicle t vaa oae '"which he bad tape4 a ehort aeot,oa. of a IIOden to c.,. o f comrerutiowaa1 1 uaaa uaed 1 a certaia auat of a ootety. uplabed tbia, carefully to the c1 NI 1 b for the laauage f ouDd ta tbe taped teadtq. in elaaaea at..... from t.hat be wet c ootideot tba reU tOWJ vt.wa wee r .. paeted la the 4 ehuio r c.oUI'ae. Deal\ reradl edcl that vbil ture Laht e aa atbeiet or two OG th faculty he felt that QODe of tlua eCNOC&ted atheilm 1ft their elaaaea. viewa of reUa,t o a wen attt. uaed la an effort to chan& atudeat' l*eU. 1oua vlwa ut to &ive c to ....-tae other pout a of vtev. The view.,., r led 'by the vleitOI'a that it vae aot. appropriate to .a tu.cht .. c.ertal Whtch t .affect tb reU. ieta vi ewe o f aoy atu4eat Deea Pre b .,. a coaelud.t atat....at ia Whtch he tbaaJ;ed the al'oup f o r cOiaiaa ad tavttecl th t o ret;Wil at auy u.... la the course o f !lie reatarka be stated that e felt they 11 Uke othu aroupt to bflwmce the thatveraity in varlowa vaya. were pneawe poo"f, arad tut vbtle t ll e Uatvertf.ty w alway ready to list n to ... aQd $f.Ve careful couldereticm to 8\IQeattou. it au.at, la ttnal aulJata, .. ke ita awn decf.:l o n 1a ordu to Mtauin :lta The tina appeared t o eDd with a. eat. note wtth ba.Dda.ha.king arouad.

PAGE 86

5 o ootae or adllut.. of the document r fl. eta aDd a later aDd by .-oh of the Un1vata1ty r pre lativea and ia s acrt..a to eioa th ir coulderecl 1Dt t'pretat1on of wbat took place at tiHa MeU. Diatrf.IJ-1 to: Copy tos Den au. .. u CQoper Dr. waU.e Kalpaaa Dr. Cliff tewart Dr. Iebert z. t ler

PAGE 87

.. OFFICE of the Decembell!'p 1962 DEAN. OF ACADDIXC AFFAIRS REVIEW OF A MEE'l'lNG HELD SutnmER 22, BETWEEN A GROUJP OF TAMPA C:rJ:lZENS AND BEPRESMATli.VES OF TliiE \UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA. Statements have been made in public and private by members of the citizens concerned with this meetius and by others or imply in various ways that the grouU!l received a "brusboff," recei"ed tl1ith hostility, was not a!ven tim to state their case, tl7ere "cu-ackpots," altd "witch hWlters" and that the chaiMn tU!'ned on his heel and walked out." lt seems therefore, thmt the case of the Uniweraity be even at this date. The following at:11tuenta &Ummali:'ize the University beU:eve took place at the meat:l.ag The meetiq "'aa arra1m3ed for 2 lP. H. 11 September 2211 ll.96l. Since it was lcmotm l?riolf: to the JUatilll& the visit:iog group wished to talk bout University qU&lified to discuss these were asked to attend. these udre: Dr. R.us11eU ll)eanp of Liberal Arts, Dr. Robert Zetler. then Cbairman .of the coursa in Functional !nglish, and now Director of the Division of Language and Literaturew Dr. Leslie Malpass, of the course in Human Behavior, Dr. Clifford Stewart, Director of Evaluation Services9 and Dr. Sidney J. P'rench9 then Dean of the College of Basic Studies, and now Deem of Academic Affairs, who served as chairman. The visiting group included Mrs. Stockton Smith, who served as spokesman and whose soa is a member of the Student bocly, Mrs. M. L. Punkh:auser, and Dr. Mrs. J. B. Hodge. ThQ centered br;ely around the following five situa.tions, (1) bookS used in the course Inglish, (2) The Caste and Class in a Southerm Town, used as one of a number of readings in Bunum Behavior, (3) use of -the test, luventorx of I l:iefs, (4) an incident alleged to have taken in a class in Human (5) allegation that atheism being tauaht the and that proeeeore non-religious points of These five situations considered in numerical order. 1. Several\. of .the books objected to in the Functional English course 'tvere Steinbeck's GrspJ!_s of Jirath, Brawe N _e-t World, a nd Eisely0s :f.M Immense Journe.x... The Monke;t Trial. was mentioned at one Uuae. Dr. Zetler explained each of these was used and the part it played in the course. Be also mentioned other books used such as the one of the moral of modern books 'ith a deeply religious .. point of view. Dean Cooper also spoke on the choice of books, doting the desirability and necessity of choice of teaching materials by vote of the faculty members teachiag the course.

PAGE 88

2 2. Dro Malpass discussed the use of the boolt Caste and Class in a Southern Town in the Human Behavior course, giving among others the following reasons why the faculty of the course had selected the book (a) it represented an approved sociological method of obtaining data, (b) it contained appropriate material on social stratification, (c) it was explicit with respect to social problems. (This particular book has not been used since the Summer of 1961, and the particular chapte;: to which e::ception has bee n taken ( Chapter 7) t-Tas never assigned as required .reading.) It was pointed out that Dr. Malpass had been an ordained minister and had in the Salvation Army. Mrs. Smith. Dr. Hodge and Dr. Malpass discussed some views on the morality of college students today. 3. The meeting discussed the use of the I nventory of Beliefs used at that time in the orientation test battery for freshmen. Members of the visiting group felt that some of the questions were inappropriate for college freshmen. This test. prepared and published in 1951 by the American Council on Education, has long been used in many hundreds of colleges and universities around the country. (The preparation of this teet has been attribut d to Dean French. This is a misstatement. Be was formerly a member of the Council's Committe e on Evaluation but had nothins to do with the construction of its tests.) The visiting group asked to have a copy of th testo This was not possible since all tests of this nature which are used over and over again are in the category of "secure" tests. However, a copy was obtained for inspection and review during the meeting. Dr. spoke sbout the purpose of this type of t .est, which does not caU for a "grade." It is used principally to help advisers decide whether or not a student could from independent study since it gives same indication of degrees of rigidity of belief on various social aspects of life. This particular test has since been deleted from the orientation battery because simila r information can be obtained from other measures. 4. The alleged incident was concerned with a mature student, a minister, who, it was claimed, to the offensive language of a teacher in a Human Behavior class and walked out. The was alleged to have called the student back and p1:omised that if he to1ould remain he t-1ould get an "A" in the course, but the student allegedly still left in disgust. The Registrar's records t vere immediately checked. These showed that the course bad been com pleted uith a grade of "B." This was brought to the attention of thegr-oup and the matter was then dropped. This same incident came up in the Johns CQIIIllittee investigation. It has bee n clearly shown by the written statements of many students in this teacher's cl&sses that he does not use profane or vulgar language. The incident {vas one in 'tfhich he bad taped a short section of a modern novel to indicate the type of conversational language used in a certain stratum of society. He explained this carefully to the class and apologized for the language found in the taped reading. Malpass indicated that he had already discussed this matter with the faculty member involved. 5. The statements that atheism was being taught and anti-religious views presented in classes from some of the books used. Dr. Malpass stated that he was confident that students' religious views wer e respected in the Human Behavior course. Dean French added that while there might be an atheist or two on the faculty he felt that none of them advocated atheism in their classes. Books containing chapters which departed from the Hebraic-Christian views of religion were not used in an effort to change religious views but to give them an opportunity to examine othe r points of vimg.

PAGE 89

3 view was expressed by the visitors that it was not appropriate to use teaching material whiCh might affect the religious views of any student. The meeting lasted about an hour and a half and ended about 3:30 P. M Dean French made a concluding statement in which he thanked the group for coming and invited them to return at any time. In the course of his remarks he stated that he felt they, like other groups seeking to influence the University in various ways, were a pressure and that while the University t.,as always ready to listen to criticism and give careful consideration to suggestions, it must, in the final analysis, make its decision in order to maintain its integrity as a university. Nona of the University repzesentatives recall that the visitors were at any tima called "crackpots. If the term "tdtch hunting" was ever used it was not applied to the visitors. There appeared to be plenty of time available to state and discuss all the matters raised by tha visitors. The chairman did not "turn on his heel and walk out." The meeting appeared, to the University representatives, to end on a most amicable note. No notee or minutes of the meeting were taken at the time. The above document reflects and summarizes written statements made later and by each of the University representatives and is subscribed to es being their considered interpretation of took place at the meeting.

PAGE 90

\ \ \ MEMORANDUM TO: DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS December 10, 1962 THOSE CONCERNED CC to: President Allen Herewith is a draft of a proposed statement on our meeting of September 22, 1961, composed from your memoranda. The statement should be as factual as possible, and unemotional. Please go over it very carefully for facts and tone and return any comments to me as soon as possible. Thanks. SJF: lad Enclosure Sidney J. French Dean

PAGE 91

. \ i 3, 1962 You will no 4oubt recall the coafennace ve laad ut a :rur a o ttlth Seith, Puak!Muael', b.. Wae and Mr. Riel Wtb. SCIIM t..t ... beiDI c _..,., by thi. 81"0111 to ot v a o t tb. eoafere-.:e Ml' to lte quite atdU.DI. Siaee thel'e ie o te,pe rec:ol'dl of t o llferace eJid no tout. or ootee w re bpt 1 voulcl appreciate it U each of you vithGut ccm!errtaa toaet r would aelld JOU a.ut objective rec.ollectlona f tlae ooater e, f.Mlvdi ..., !l'tiact tat...,..tt Mde by you., or ot T1d.a o....S t lte a 1-athJ cioeu.ellt ut I would appl'eciate aactaa it HG poeailtle. SJP:lacl $14 q J. Jreooh Dean

PAGE 92

... MEMORANDUM TO: Dean Sidney J. French DATE: December 17, 1962 FROM: Robert L. Zetler SUBJECT: Report of meeting with Mrs. R. Stockton Smith and Committee I have looked over the preport with considerable care and the only point that I .thimk of that might be added was the discussion which centered around the inventory of beliefs test. The point was made that this was a test of rigidity of the students' beliefs and that it was advisable to have this in order to guide students into independent study courses. RLZ:bl

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INTER-OFFICE MEMORANDUM DATE: December 12, 1962 FROM: Clifford T. Stewart TO: Dean S. J. French -----------------------------------------------SUBJECT=---------------------------------------Following is a list of brief comments to the review of the meeting held September 22, 1961, referred to in your memorandum of December 10, 1962. 1. I can't recall Mrs. J. B. Hodge. 2. On page 3, under the number 3, relative to the Inventory of Beliefs. My comments about the Inventory of Beliefs were that it was used currently to help advisors decide whether or not a student could profit from Independent Study or whether his time would be better spent in classroom under the more direct guidance of the teacher. I may have mentioned that it was a measure of authoritarianism or of rigidity, but I don't believe I would have said, and don't recall saying that it's used to get information about the adjustment needs and problems of students. Also, this test has been replaced by another in the sense that we can get essentially the same information from other measures which were previously used. 3. On page 4, the last paragraph, I recall that the meeting ended in a friendly manner, though I don't recall any instances of hand-shaking.


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MLA

Cras efficitur magna et sapien varius, luctus ullamcorper dolor convallis. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Fusce sit amet justo ut erat laoreet congue sed a ante.

CHICAGO

Phasellus ornare in augue eu imperdiet. Donec malesuada sapien ante, at vehicula orci tempor molestie. Proin vitae urna elit. Pellentesque vitae nisi et diam euismod malesuada aliquet non erat.

WIKIPEDIA

Nunc fringilla dolor ut dictum placerat. Proin ac neque rutrum, consectetur ligula id, laoreet ligula. Nulla lorem massa, consectetur vitae consequat in, lobortis at dolor. Nunc sed leo odio.