Bonanza Bardie; or, The treasure of the Rockies

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Bonanza Bardie; or, The treasure of the Rockies

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Title:
Bonanza Bardie; or, The treasure of the Rockies
Series Title:
Old Sleuth library
Creator:
Old Sleuth
Place of Publication:
New York, New York
Publisher:
George Munro's Sons
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Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 p. ; 32 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Dime novels ( lcsh )
Detective and mystery stories ( lcsh )
Bankers -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Gambling -- Fiction ( lcsh )
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serial ( sobekcm )

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University of South Florida
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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032559130 ( ALEPH )
875163496 ( OCLC )
O13-00006 ( USFLDC DOI )
o13.6 ( USFLDC Handle )

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No. 4 2 OR BONANZA BARDIE; O r THE TREASURE OF THE ROOKIES. U y O L D l 'i r !irt II a lf'. A SERIES OF THE MOST THRILLING DETECTIVE STORIES EVER PUBLISHED. } SINCLE I l NUMBER. f GEORGE lltUNHO, PUBLlSHEH, Nos. 17 to 27 VAND&WATER STREET, N1tw Yon&. 5 PRICE { 10 CENTS.S Old SIP.uth Library. Issued Quarterly.-By SubscripLiou, Fifty Cents per Annum. Copyrighted 1888, bv flpmge Munro.-Entered at the Post Office at New 'York at Second Class Rates.-November 1, 1888. Cooyri"htfld 1888. by Geo rgfl Munro. BONAN.ZA BARD IE; Vol. III. THE TREASURE OF THE ROCKIES. BY OLD F I R S T HAL F NEW YORK: GEOlWE MUNRO, .PUBLISHER, 17 TO 27 VANDEWATER STREET.

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MUNRO'S PUBLICATIONS. O L D SLEUTH LIBRARY. A Series of the Most Thrilling Detective Stories Ever Published! ISSUED QUARTERLY. FE.:CCE 1. 0 E.A.C::S:::. The Follo,ving UooJo; are No'v Ready. NO. 1.-0LD SLEUTH, THE DETECTIVE. NO. 2.-THE KING OF THE DETEO'l'l VES. NO. 3.-0LD SLEUTH'S In two parts-JO cents each. NO. 4.-UNDER A i\IlLLIO DISGUISES. In two parts-10 cents each. NO. 5 NIGHT SCENES IN NEW YORK. NO. 6.-0LD ELECTRICITY, THE LIGH'l'NING D ETEO'l'IVE. NO. 7.-THE SHADOW DETECTIVE. In two parts-10 cents each. NO. 8.-RED LIGHT WILL, THE RIVER DETEO'l'IVE. In two parts-10 cents each. NO. 9.-IRON BURGESS, THE GOVERNMEN'l' DJ!j'l'EOTl VE. In two parts-10 cents each. NO. 10.-'l'HE BRIGANDS OF NEW YORK. In two parts-10 cents each. NO. 11.-TR.AUKED BY A VENTRILOQUIST NO. 12.-THE 'l'WIN SHADOWERS. NO. 13.-'l'E-IE FRE OH DETECTIVE. NO. 14.-BILLY WAYNE, THE S'l'. LOUIS DE 'l'EO'l'IVE. NO. 15.-THE NEW YORK DETECTIVE. NO. 16.-0'NEIL i\IcDARRAGH, 'l'HE DETEO'l'IVE; OR, 'l'HE STRATEGY O.F A BRA VE MAN. NO. 17.-0LD 8L1UTH IN HARNESS AGAIN. NO. 18.-THE J_,ADY DE'l'J!j01'IVE. NO. 19.-'l'HE YANKEE DETEO'l'IVE NO. 20.-'l'HE FASTEST BOY IN NEW YORK. NO. 21.-BLAOK RAVEN, 'l'HE GEORGIA DETEO'l'l VE NO. 22.-NIGH'l'-HA WK, THE MOUN'l'ED DE 'l'EOTlVE. NO. 23.-THE GYPSY DETECTIVE NO. 24.-THE MYSTERIES AND MISERIES OF NEW YORK. NO. 25.-0LD TERRIBLE. NO. 26.-'l'HE SMUGGLERS OF NEW YORK BAY. Othe r s of this Series in 1re1>aratio11. NO. 27.-MANFRED, THE i\IAGIO 'l'lUOK DE 'l'EO'l'IVE NO. 28.-MURA, THE WESTERN LADY DE'l'EOTIVE NO. 29.-MONSIEUR ARMAND; OR, THE FRENCH DE'l'EO'l'IVE IN NEW YORK. NO. 30.-LADY KATE, THE DASH.I JG FEMALE DE'l'EO'l'IVE. In two parts-JO cents each. NO. 31.-HAMUD, THE DE'l'EOTIVE. NO. 32.-THE G I ANT DETECTIVE IN FRANCE. In two parts-10 cents each. NO. 33.-THE AMERICAN DETECTIVE IN RUSSIA. NO. 34.-'l'HE DUTCH DETECTIVE NO. 35.-0LD PURITAN, THE OLD-TIME YA JKEE DETECTIVE. In two parts-JO cents each. NO. 36.-MANFRED'S QUEST; oR, THE MY 'l'ERY OF A TRUNK. In two parts-JO cents each. NO. 37.-TOM THUMB; o.R, THE WO DERFUL BOY DETECTIVE. In two parts-JO cents each. NO. 38.-0LD IRONSIDES ABROAD. Jn two parts-JO cents each. NO. 39.-LITTLE BLACK TOM; OR, THE ADVENT URES OF A MISCHIEVOUS DAHKY. Jn two parts-JO cent each NO. 40.-0LD IRON S IDES AMONG THE COWBOYS. In two parts-10 Ct'nts ea. c h. NO. 41.BLAOK TOM IN SEARCH OF A FATHER; OR, THE FUR'l'HER ADVE TURES OF A MISCHIEVOUS DARKY Jn two parts-JO cents each NO. 42.-BONA JZA BARDIE; oR, THE TREASURE OF THE ROOKIES. Jn two partsJO cents earh. NO. 43.-0LD TRA JSFORM, THE SECRET SPECIAL DETECTIVE. In two parts-10 cents each The foregoing works are for sale by all newsdeal e r s at 10 cents each, or will oe to any address, po s tage paid, on r eceipt of 10 cents, by the publi s h e r Address MUNRO, Munro's P nbli s hiu g Hon se, t. 0. Box 3'itil. 1.,.. to 2,. Vn.nde,, n 1 .e1 Sucet, N. Y. HUNTERS' YARNS. Juliet Carson's New Family Cook Book. A WONDERFUL BOOK. A OOLLls mailed to any address on receipt of price. Address GEORGE MUNRO, Mmmo's PUBLISHING HousE, P. 0. Box 3751. 17 to 27 Vandewater St., N. Y. BY MISS JULIET CORSON, Author of "Meals for t .he Million," etc. Superintend ent of the New York School of Cookery. HANDSOMELY BOUND IN CLOTH, $1.00. A comprehensive cook h oo k for family use in city and c.>untry: containing practical recipes and full and of cooking meats, fish, vegetables, sauce s, salads. puddings and pies. How t o prepare r elishes and savorl accessories, picked-up dishes, soups, seasoning, stu -ting and stews. How to make good bread. biscuit, ome lets, jellies, jams, pancakes, fritters and fillets Miss Corson is the bes t American writer on cooking. All of her recipes have been CHrefully tested in the New York School of Cookery. If her directions are care fully followed there wil) be no failures and no reason fo r complaint. Her directions are always plain, very complete, and easily followed. Juliet Corson's New Family Cook Book is sold by all newsdealers. It will also be sent, postpaid, on receipt of the price $1.00. Address UEORGE MUNRO, MUNRO' S .OBLISHING HOUSE, P. 0. Box 3751. 17 to ',ll Vandewater St. N. Y. GRAHAM'S INVIGORATING PILLS. For LADIES of all ages these Pills are invaluable. No Lady should be without them. No medicine equals Graham's Invigorating Pills for removing all obstruction or irregularity of the system. They strengthen the whole muscular system, restore the long-lost complexion, bring back the keen edge of appetite, and arouse the whole physical energy of the human frame. Grab.an's Invigol.'ating Pills cure indiges tion, nervous debility, headache, Joss of appetite, sleeplessness, constipation, hiliou oess, and all disorders of the stomach, liver, bowels, and kidneys. SURE CURE for PIMPLES and all eruptions o f the skin. If take!l according to directions, they will speedily r es t ore the sufferer t o sound and robust health. 50 cents p e r box, 6 boxes for $2.50 Sent b y mail on r eceipt of price Address GRAHAM MEDICAL COMPANY, No. 191 Fulton St., Brooklyn, N. Y. or P. O. Box 2124, New York. Pleas e mention this publication Jhe A<obiography of a Barrel of Bourbon. WEIRD, UNIQUE, POWERFUL. An Extraordinary Handling of the Drink Question. VIVID LIFE P ICTURES. A THRILLING, REALISTIC NARRATIVE. A STARTLING PRESENTMENT OF THE EVILS OF INDULGENCE. Replete with Original and Suggestive Illustrations. WRITTEN BY THE KEENEST OF OBSERVERS, "OJ,D SLEUTH." Every man, woman, and child in the United States should read this singular narrative. Wi.,es should pre sent it to their husbands fathers to their sous, sisters to their brothers, friends to frieuds. IT IS THE GREAT BOOK OF THE AGE. Price Cents. For sale by all n ewsdealers, or s en t by mail, postage free, on receipt of price, 25 cents, by the publisher. Address GEORGE MUNRO, MUNRO'S POBLISIUNG HOUSE, P 0 Box 3751. 17 to 27 Vandewater St., N. y,

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BONANZA BARD IE; Or, THE TREASURE OF THE ROCKIES. HJ' 01.D !lil,l:IJ'l'll. First Half". A SERlES OF THE J\IOST THIULLING DETECTIVE STORIES EVER PUBLISHED. No. 4Z j SINGLE I I NUMBER. I GEORGE MUNRO, PVBLlSHEH, Nos. 17 to 'irl V.um&WAT&R STRE&T, Ne:w YoRK. 5 PRICE { l 10 CENTS.S Vol. III. O ld Sleuth Library, Issued Quarterly. -By Subscription, Fifty Cents per Annum. Copyriltftced 1888, ny GAorge Munro.-Entered at the Post Office at New York at Second Class Rates.-November 1 1888. Copyrighted 1888, by George Munro. BONANZA BARD IE; OR, THE TREASURE OF THE ROCKIES. CHAPTER I. "HATJT!" A dark fi!?nre had just issued from a tunnel, through winch the great Prince of Wales Road passes in Ireland, when four other dark figures suddenly leap ed forward, and the one word "Halt!" sounded upon the night air. It was a startling tableau that was presented at that moment under the moonlight in that whil e road, with the mouth of the tunnel as a dark background, and the dist ant. hills lying still further hack, in their rugg ell austerity. The figure that emerged from the tunnel was that of a stalwart young man, and it WllS evi dent from his motions as he stepped out under the broad moonli ght that he was anti cipating pursuit as he moved cautiously, and ever and anon cast furtive gla n ces l :ac kward, as though expecting some f oe to spring upon him; bnt in stead hi s enemies confronted him in the person s of four of the rura l constabulary, and as the command to hult was uttered t\\ o ritles were aimed at the yo un g man's breast, and their glit terin g barrels g leam ed under the rays of the moon. The young man was cool as a encumber, as the sayiu.,. g oes, under the thrilling circum stance s He did not recoil or utter au outcry of alarm, but a c lose observer would have noticed a steady, cl ea r g leam in his eyes, as in a firm voi ce he said, speaking with a rich and melli flu e nt brogue: "Lower yer guns. Would yees shoot a man down in cowld blood?" We know ye, Barclie O 'C onor, and yc'll down on yer knees and up wicl yer hands, or, man. we ll shoot." "Ye call me Bardie O'Conor?" "We do, and we know ye well, although you're gotten up in the garb of the boa tman clown at Bayside.'' "Faith, if yees hev that idea in yer heads it's no use for me to stand here arguing wid yee s so yees can lower yer guns." Will ye surrender?" EY OLD FIRST HALF. "Well, don't yees see I will? What else would I do when yees hev that crowd behind yees there?" As the young man spoke he raised his hands, und sudden ly leaning forward, pointed as thou g h there were others behind the constab les. The l a tter turned and that momentary inattention proved fatal to the ir purpos e for quick as a flas h the m a n whom thev had commanded to h a lt drew a lon g stick wliich he had evidently held concealed a t his side, and with the quick n ess of a practi ced s wordsman he got to work. He leaper! fornarll b e tween th e b a rr e ls of the two rifles and ere the assailed knew what was to occur, both m e n receiv e d a welt upon the head that s tretched them senseless upon the road, and the other two were t ap ped as qui c k ly, ere they had time to rai se their ritles, even to use them as clubs. The assailant proved himself to be not only a man of extraordinary strength, but also one pos sessed of remarkabl e quickness and agility, as within five seconds from the period wh e n h e struck his fir s t foe, he had all four l ying help l ess in the dust, and leaping ove r their prostrate bodi es he started along the road at a running pace so swift as to defy pursuit. The fugitive ran for about a mile, wh e n he came to where the ro a d made a tnru around a rocky bluff. Here he came to a halt, and after waiting a moment he put his fingers to his lip s and ther e issued forth a sh rill whistle and the next instant there came an answe rin g whi s tle, and still a moment l ater there stood before him a grotesque-looking figure. Teddy, i s that you?" Begorrn, Bardic but it's no one else." "And hev ye the jaunting-car at hand '/" "I hev." "Where?" A small bit of a piece down the road. "Well, it's at once we'll flit me lad ; for it's n ot t e n minutes ago I had a tus s l e will th e con s t ab l es." And did they overtake ye Barclie clear ? "No; but they waylaid me, and they had their l('uns ranged on me, ready to blow off the top of me head, when I p a rleyed wid them a moment, and th e n I flung the stick ag'iu their guns, and when they lay down to let m e pass I just l ept over them, and h ere I am "It's a wonder y e are, B a rdi e." "We've no time for compliments, Teddy. Shure they'll be up and afther me or passin' the word along the line th a t Bardie O 'Co nor is flitting thi s way. The two m e n hurried a l ong down the road, and soon came to wher e a jauntin g -car was h a lt e d beside a hed ge. ln a trice the horse was unhit c hed the two men ascend ed to th e seat and away the auimal was put to his speed along the road, and so through the nig ht the hors e was driven at a good gait, until jus t before dawn he ""'.as to a h a lt, and passenger, Bar0 Conor, shook hancts with the driver, and SaJcl : "It's good-mornin' and it' s good -bye Teddy." "And will ye take the train, Bardie? "No; ifs by car I 'll go to Queenstown." "And will ye trav e l in the daylight?" "That will b e as circumstances clircet, my lad. We can never tell what it before i s at such times, but ye ca.n moind this, l'll not be taken alive and I've got in me h ea d b e tt e r than a dream to fix it th ere, that I ll be off safe and sound from me enemies ere Sunday night comin'.'' And we'll h ea r from ye when ye arrive in Am erica?'' ." Ye will h ea r from me some of our friends, Teddy, d ea r; and now 1t s once again goorlmo,nin' and got>cl-bye." "But, m a n clear, ye are givin' yersel' away." "Neve r f ear, Teddr, y e can trust me. I'll b e l ayin' low until nig ht and then I've a m eet iu"wicl some one of our friend s anrl a fth e r that it' s goocl.lJye to old Ireland ; and in a low but full ric h voice, the f ugitiv c s ung: "It may be for years and it may be forever-"

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4 BONANZA BARDIE; OR, He stopped singing suddenly, for steps were heard, and without another word he darted into the bush beside the road and disappeared. The driver of the jaunting-car he11ved a sigh and urged his horse forward at a ')Valk, a pair of constables suddenly confronted him. Halt!" came the command. Let go the horse," called Teddy. The men had halted the horse, and they stPpped beside the driver's seat and fixed their eyes on the owner of the cart demanding: Where did you come?" "Where did I come from, are ye askin'?" "Yes; where did you come?" "Well, it's no secret; shure I came from Kenmare." And who were you talking to a moment ago?" Who was I talkin' to, are ye askin' me?" "Yes." Well that's no secret. Shure I was talki11' to Teddy Farrel." "And who is Teddy?". "I'm Teddy Farrel, at your service, me gay boys in yer fine clothes." mine will come, and, if I live, some day I'll a good ride we'll hev to Cork. I've plenty to come into possession of my own with my name ate and I've plenty to drink." c l eared and my honor fully established, and I "Mike, you're a thoughtful friend, and I'll will some day return to be a friend to my friends never forget r_e.'' and also!\ good friend of old Ireland, my native "Shure. its all yer friends hev shared in the l and which 1 so dearly love, and no new scenes thoughtfulness, and it was at joint expense we will ever tear from my heart a recollection of provided for your journey. We all love ye, either my friends or the land of my birth; and Bardie, and we know ye are the true heir, and again, good friends, you need not fee l sad on that ye were wronged of yer rights, and we'll my account. Sure, l'm glad to go abroad for a all rejoice should the day come when ye will season, and if there is any land on earth whereget possession of yer own." in I'd choose to make a temporary home that A short time later an old man and old woman land i s America, and now, to show yees I'm not were driving along the road, and they jogged sad at heart, bnt full of hope and bright anticiit until morning, and it was then for the first pations, I'll sing yees one song. as when we time they were halted by a coupie of constables were won't to hold our meetings for the fun who encountered them upon the road. and enjoyment we could coin out of them." Here, stop where ye are," came the c om-Bardie O'Conor did sing a brave, merry song mand in restrained tones, but his voice was sweet and The car was brought lo a sudden halt. clear, and when he had concluded one of the And where are yees going?" came the n e xt masked men said: question. Bardie, tell us one more story afore ye go It was the old woman who undertook to be from us?" spokesman, and she said: I will," sa id Bardie, in a merry tone and "Shure it's mane men ye are to stop us this he asked: "Do yees all remember old Loughway." Ian that lived back from Bantry Well? 1 well "Is it now?" remember the time he died, but it is only the It is." CHAPTER II. othe r day I beard the following 8tory told by "But we're stoppin' every one going this TnE constables put Teddy Farrel under a one who was pres ent when he drew his last road." cross-fire of questions, but they learned nothing bre ath. Sure, men, the last moment he said to "Yees are?" from him and in good time the rnau drove on those around his lied: "Yes. to Killarney wh e re he rested hi8 horse and re "'I've no fortune to lave yees, boys; all I "Well, then it's meaner ye are than I thought maine d until late in the afternoon, when he hev is a few shillings, an' it would be of little yees at first to go stoppin every one goin on started on his return to Bantry. l a sting benefit to any one of yees, s o I'll bemindin' their own business and it' s only yerOn th e night following the incidents p r eviousqueath it to be spent in whisky at the toime of sel's rnindin other people' s bu s ine ss.' 1y r e cord e d, a man leaped the hedge surroundme funeral.' "Go on now, and l e t us hear no more of your fog the Iler b e rt Mansion, and made his way past Well, there came a moment's silence, when opinions, said one of the con sln bit s :Muckro s s Abbey ruin to the shores of the lake, one of the friends, with the tears streaming 'fhe two travelers were glad to be ord e r e d where he found a boat which he entered, and down from his eyes, leaned over the dying man on. and in due time they r e a c hed the c ity of :rowed hims e lf over to the famous ruins of In-and asked : Cork, and still later onr hero arriv ecl at Queen s nisfallen. A soon as he had reached the ruin, 'Is it going to the cemetery or coming home town, and for two day s he was comp elle d to lay and passed beneath the ivy-buried arch that that we shall drink the whisky?' Well, boys, low until Sunday, when a freight steamer, comstill remained of the long crurnblinl? walls, he old Loughlan meditated a moment, and then in monly called an oceun tramp, was to beheld a strange and weird sight. 'I here were a merry tone for a dying man said: stay over at the steamer port in order to make a dozen weird-looking figures ga th ered in th e Yees, had better drink the whisky going some repairs to her machinery iuin ; a solitary torch the scene, but to the cemetery, boys, for I won't be wid yee s The latter was the chance for which our hero -cast sufficient light to reveal the fact that the coming back.' had b e en waiting, and through the influ e n ce o f :figures were clad in masks and loug, black Bardie O'Conor was known as a good singer, friends he secured a position as fireman on the gowns, and were it not for the silence preserved a merry man, and a famous story teller, and steamer, and on the follow Monday morning an on-looker would have declared the tFJu t e n his anecdote was received with a roar of laughbid adieu to the land of his birth. as grotesque ter from his friends. We will here state that Bard ell O'Conor w a s The man who had crossed in the boat, and An hour passed, and atlengthBardie O'Conor a remarkable man. He was but five and-tw enty who joined the s trange group, was not d is-said: at the time we first introduce him to our r e ad guised at all, and as the evening was warm he Well, my fri e nds, it's time for me to be e rs. He was a singularly handsome young fel <:arried hi s coat upon his arm. As he stepped going." l ow, well-educated, being a graduate of e;ollege in the midst of the group of masked men, he There followed the l1and-shaking once more, and was an accomplished linguist, he having said: and the exchange of many kind and hopeful been educated in France and Germany "Good ev e ning, my good fri e nds!" words, and the prospective imigrant at length, There was a great myEtery onr And it wa s uoticeable that there was a tot.al a ccompanied by one of the party, returned to hero. He had never known father nor moth er, :absence of the liro g ue in his speech; his prohis boat, and the two entered; and when in the and yet he had been reared in luxury by s o m e 1Uunciation lieing cl e ar and fine, as is charactermiddle of the lake, our hero s companion threw secret friend or relative, but nev e r had one word istic of an educated Iri s h gentleman. off his mask and gown, and stood revealed as been whispered to him as concerned his real "A foine greeting to ye, Bardie," replied one attir e d like an old woman. Wig and all were to id e ntity until the information cam e in a mo s t l()f the men, and th e y all gathered around him, aid in the dis guise. remarkable and unexpected manner, and from and there followed hearty hands hakings and "Well, well, Mike! what does this mean?" a strange source about a year preceding the many kind and en c ouraging words; and after exclaimed Bardie, in surprise. opening of our narrative. ihe greetings one of the men stepped forward "Yer goin' to Cork?" We have stated that Bardie had been reared and said: I am in luxury, and that the supplies had c ome from "Bar dic, we've put together a small snm here Aud from there to Queenstown?" some secret source. Such was the fact, and in this purse, and we're asking you to accept it "I am." never had he stood face to face with his b e ne-from your fri e nds. "And the constables are on yer track?' factor; but he received letters from him and in. There was deep emotion in the tones of Bar" I've good reason to know that." structions as to what he do and about die O'Conor' s voice, as he said: "And that's why ye see me as I am shure! the time our hero r eached th e age of one-and "I am very thankful to you, my good friends, I'm goin wid ye; and it s me own plan I hev twenty he received a very important letter from for this offer of your good will and kindness; to carry ye safe to yer journey's end. And the same mysterious source as his previous let but I am more thankful that I'm not in need of shure I'm yer ould woman now and yet my ters and supplies had come it, as I have a fair supply of money to do me good man, and it s a foine foolin' we'll give the The final letter, for it was a final letter, con until I reach old America; and as I've suc c eedofficers should any of them fall upon us by the tained quite a sum in b anknotes and conveyed ed in escaping the police we have good rea s on way." the information that from the d a te of the receipt for making m erry inste a d of looking a s sol e mn Shure, Mike, your idea is a good one, but I of the letter the young man must look out for as 1 know yees all do under your masks. It' s can improve upon it." himself. He was advi s ed to go to America and dnde e d a dark day and poor times for Ireland, Ye can?" carve out his own fortune, but, at the s ame whe n a man's fri e nds mu s t come hooded and "Yes." time, was informed that it w a s merely a matte r ;gowned at midnight to bid him a God sp e ed ; "How?" of advice, and he was at liberty to follow his but I t ell you brighter days are coming, and I'll "It's ruesel' will be the ould woman, an' ye own heart, and our hero decided to return to t ake this occa s ion to s ay a few words for myshall be my onld man. Ireland. :self I am the true heir of the Bardell est a te s "As ye l oike, Bardie, only that ye m a ke shure Bardie oconor had not alway s been knows all the fa c tory inter e sts thereunto, and the to evade the police, for ye hev no idea how clo s e as Bardie O'Conor. The name by which his sep resent holder of the s ame is no kin to m e nor the w a t c h will b e for ye." cret b e nefa c tor had always addre s sed him in his has he the r e mote s t ri g ht to a foot of th e land or The m e n m a de a change in the boat and many letters was Terence O Conor; and it wa s :any of the buildin gs th e reon; but h e i s in pos :when both had nssumcd their disguise s they not until our hero had m e t with a startling ad a nd b eca u s e he h a s wronged m e and e re fair representatives of a g ood hone s t old ventur e that he a s sumed the name under which robbed me of my rights he has become my bit Iri s hm a n and his wife, and with that they he had ever after been known. t ere s t foe, and it i s he who trumped up th e pulle d for the shore B a rdi e h a d b e en in Ire land about a y e ar, and charges a g ain s t me It was he who h a s "ma de it had made his home in Dublin, when a friend appear that blood is on my hands, and it i s he wanted him to visit the classic ie g ion a round who has caused m e to be hounded all ov e r Ire CHAPTER HI. Bantry Bay and the lakes of Killarney; and it land and who has compelled me at len gth to UPON reaching the shore the two men stule was when, at Glengariff, he was walking along fiee from my nativ e land with a stain upon my across the meadow, and finally struck the road, the road one evening, he met an old cr<>ne The name and not a p e nny, comparatively speaking, when our hero's companion s aid: young man stepped aside to let the old woman Jin my pocket. But, boys, it is his day now; I've a jaunting-car all ready, and shure it's have the best of the path, when suddenly the Entere d according to Act of Congress in the v e a r 1 888, by G EORG E MUNR O in the offi c e of the Lib1a rian of Conare ss, lVashirigton, D. C

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THE TREASURE OF THE ROOKIES 5 old creature approached him, peered in his face with her wild eyes, and she clutched his hand, and, in the most excited manner, demanded: Where did you come from? Has the grave given up its dead?" Bardie was greatly surprised ; and yet there had al ways remained with him a hope that some day there would come a recognition and a reve lation. He was a very smart fellow, and a young man of excellent sense and judgment, and many and many an hour of his leisure time was spent in dreamy contemp l ation of an an swe r to the self-proposed questions : "Whence ca me I? Who am I ? When shall I learn?" We will add that the young man quite ambitious dre a ms as concerned his ongin, and he felt himself without knowing anything to the contrary, second to no man in Ireland, so far as linea ge is concerned. When the old woman utte re d the startling ejaculation, a thrill shot throu g h our hero's heart, and he d ema nded. What do you mean, oulcl mother mine?" We will here also state that for reasons upon certain occa s ions Bardie spoke with a rich brogue, but the broad brogue was assumed, as his usual speech was that of an Irishman of education, and his pronunciation was but slight ly tinged with the brogue, making his speech rich and pleasant to hear. What do I mane?" called back the old crone. "Yes, that's what I'm askin' ye." Ah boy, me eyes are growin' old, an' I nade clear light to sec well, but dimly as I see ye standin' there, I consider me question well put." It's a queer question ye were afther puttin ', ould mother mine." "Do ye think so?" "I do." "Well, it's not the nade of me eyesight that's required now; faith, I'm rep eatin' me question. Has the grave give n up it's dead?" "And why do ye ask that question?" "And why do I ask that question?" ''Yes." I'll tell ye; I'm no fool, but I stood beside the coffin of one who looked once upon a toime as you look now, and what is more his voice was like your voice. Ah, well I remember every tone. Yes, yes; but miud ye, young m an, I change me question, who are ye?" "And what does it concern you who I am?" "Well, it m a y concern ye more than it concerns me; that is true for ye." My name is Terence O'Conor." "Terence O'Conor?" "Yes." A moment the old woman was silent but at length she said: "I've a bit of advice to give ye." "I am always willing to listen to good ad-vice." "Ye are?" "Yes." "Well, moind ye, now, from this time out call yersel' Bardie O'Conor, and see what will come some day." CHAPTER IV. "vVHY should I call myself Bardie O'Conor?" demanded our hero. Why?" ejaculated the old woman. "Yes, why?" It was your father's name, and a nobler man never Ii ved than your father." Is my father dead?" He is; and he was murdered in cold blood. I know it; but the world at large believes he died from natural causes; but I tell ye he was murdered." Will you tell me all the circumstances?" "Faith, and if I should do so it might but get ye in trouble." "You need not fear; but how do you know that Bardie O'Cohor, the man who was mur dered, was my father?" "How do I know it?" "Yes." Do ye moined the manner of me address whirr I first m et ye?" "I do." "What did I say?" "Ye cried out 'Has the grave g iven up its dead?'" "And can ye not moind the m'anin' of the words? Shure they re plain enough!" What do they mean?" That you are the perfect image of your father as he looked at your age-and he was but a few years older, I reckon, when he was mur de red." And who murdered him?" "I'll never tell ye that, lad; but I always thought there was an heir, and the moment I saw ye I reco gnized ye." Come, my good woman, tell me about my parents." A moment the old woman meditated, and then said: "Troth an' I will tell ye all I know! Come sit down beside me there on the b a nk, an' ye sha ll know all that I can make known to ye.'' The old woman made strange, startling, and tragic revelations to our hero, and put him in possession of facts that settled beyond all ques tion the truth as concerned his parentage; and on the strength of the facts, upon the following clay our hero paid a visit to the owner of a large estate in the near vicinity, and at once all the statements of the old wom an were confirmedn o t by any willin g admission, but by an invol untary betrayal; for the lord of th e manor, upon beholding the young man, gave utterance to the same exclamation that had fallen from the lips of the old crone, and immediately after he had sought to conceal the betrayal of hi s own weak ness, and when pre ssed, accounted for his strange ejaculation by telling an entirely diff er ent story from that told by the old woman. But, as has been stated, Bardie O'Conor was no fool, and he sa w that the revelations made to him by that same old woman were correct. We are not prepared at present to reveal to our readers the remarkable tale that was told, but later on, under still more exciting circum st a nces, w e will the tale unfold. From the moment of his meeting with the old crone our h e ro assumed the name of Bardie O'Coaor, and he took up his re s idence near the place where the revelation had been made. Soon s trange stories were told about him, and he was looked upon with great respect and love by the p eop le living around, and soon the young man discovered that he had a bitt e r foe, and his' enemy was the owner of the estate. This foe, thi s secret e n emy, pursued the young man with bitter hatred, and finally managed to make him an outlaw and a fugitive, and the l atter fact a lso went far to confirm the r evelations of the old woman, else why should this great land-owner relentlessly pursue a comparatively unknown and friendless youth? The enemy was s tronger than his victim, and, as has been intim ated, easily succeeded in mak iog the high-spirited youth an outlaw and a fugitive, and forced the young man eventually to flee from his native l and, and it was through these persecutions that he was driven abroad to encounter the thrilling adventures that made him beyond all question the Iris h Monte-Cristo, and it is with these thrilling adventures that we have to deal in our narrative; but later on we will make plain to our read e rs the revel ations poured into his ear by the old woman, and ex plain many other strange and startling and tragic iocidents in his career As stat e d in a preceding chapter, Barclie O'Conor lay around Queenstown for a few days, and then secured passage on an ocean tramp steamer; and in good time he was tossing on the wild waves of the Atlantic, bound for New York. There was but one other passenger on the steamer-a old man, who occupied a part of th e captam's cabin-a man who rarely appeared on deck, and with whom our hero held no converse until the two were brought together under the most exciting circumstances The steamer ran into rough weather when but a few hours out from Queenstown, and upon the fourth day out' the sea was a seething mass of boiling foam, and the vessel, which had been laboring terribly, threatened at every moment to make its last plunge and sink to the bottom. Bardie could be of no assistance, and he sought his berth and slept throu g h a night which must have been one of horror to those who remained awake, and when our hero did awake he crawled upon deck on l y to make the most terrible discovery. The storm had abated, and the s hip was settled deep in the water; in deed at a g lance h e expected h e r to go clown in one minute, and not a soul wa s in s i g ht. The crew had evidently deserted the s hip, leaving the sleeping on board. Possibly they had forgotten him in the excitement, as it did not seem possibl e that his fellow-men could thus have lP.ft him to his fate deliberately. But he had no time to spend in speculation and regrets ; the ship was fast settling; indeed, the decks were a lre ady beginning to burst up, pressed by the gas that formed in compressure as the water filled the hold. Bardie looked around and his eye fell upon a life m ft. It had ev i dently been gotten out and left when some other means of escape had pre sented itself to the man who had gotten it ready The young man had presence of mind enougil to secure some water and provisions that lay near, and which had been provided by the same party who had placed the raft iu readiness. Our hero was a good swimmer. He saw that he had but a moment to spare, and he l aunched his raft and soon got aboard, and was forcing i t away from beside the sinking vessel, when he heard a cry, and upon lookin g back he saw that anothe r man had been l eft on the s inkin g steam er. He recognized the old man, the only other passenger besides himself. The man ran to the s id e of the boat and illl frantic tones called: "Come back! come back!" "To be sure I'll come back," said Bardie and he sought to do so, but one can not handle a raft as he can a boat, and he called: "Can ye swim?" "Yes.'' "Well, plunge over into the sea, and I'll save ye." The passenger made the plunge. CHAPTER V. IT was with some difficulty that our her<> managed to resr.ue the old gentleman, but he finally got him upon the raft, and as the sea was settling down there seemed a bare chance of their final rescue When the old man had recovered somewhat he asked: "What has happened?" "Look there," said our hero. The old man did l ook in the direction indicat ed, and both saw the great ship ingulfed in the sea Down she went bow first, and within ten minute s from the time the old man had plunged over the rail from her deck into the sea "Were you one of the crew?" asked the old man "No, sir; I was a passenger." And where is the capta in and his crew?" "That, sir, I can not tell you; I came forth from my berth and found the ship sinking, and, as I supposed, not a soul on board. Yes, sir, until I saw you I supposed I was the only on e who had been left upon the sinking ship." They must have deserted the ship during the night?" Yes, sir ".And left vou and me to our fate?" "Yes, sir.'r "The cold-blooded assassins." I will not say that, sir " And what othe r term can you apply to them?" Sir, it is possible they expected the ship to go down at any moment, and in the exc itement the! forgot us." But what sort of a captain can he be who will thus desert his passenge rs?" "You must remember, s ir, that that was not a regular passenger vessel, and I can never be lieve th at we were deliberately and thoughtfully l ef t behind. I sha ll a lways hold that in the ex citement of the moment we were really forgot ten." We will not dwell upon our h e ro's exper ience upon the raft, but it was s ixty hours before they were rescued; in deed both men had made UJ> their minds to die, believing that they were out of the track of vessels, when Bardie, just as evening was setting in, espied a ship, and wild ly shouted: "We are saved!" Fortunately for the two men their signals were seen from the ship, which bore down upon them, and an hour after our hero 's first sighting of the vessel he and his companion on the raft were safe l y taken aboard the steamer, which as it proved, was bound for New York. The two rescu ed men were treated with everv kindness by the captain and passengers of th"e ste amer, and it was proposed to make up a purse for them, as it was known that they had lost all their effects when the steamer went down. The old man who had been rescued with Bar die came to him and said: "You must decline anything in the way of money th a t may be offered to you by the pas sengers." Bardie flushed and answered: '' You may rest assured I will, sir, without being told to do so."

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6 I will tak e care of you," sa id the old man, and he turned and walked away. He i s a queer old chap,'' muttered our hero, and he had good reason for the conclu i on, as, until the old man came to speak to him about refus ing the purse, he h ad h ard l y spoken an other word to him s in ce their rescue from the raft. Whe n it was made known to our h e ro that the pass e ngers were making up a purse Bardie told his informant that h e and his compan ion on th e raft were exceedingly gratefu l, but th at neith e r could accept assi s tance, as they would be all right when th e y reach e d New York. The weather h a d become beautiful; the sea after th e r escue was as calm and unruffled as a summer lake, and our h ero delight ed in remain in g on deck und e r the starlight, and one ni g h t while thus e njoying the surroundings h e met with a thrillin g ad venture. Ere was passin g a long by the rail when he saw a female fignre asce nd from the cabin and lo ok about h e r, and Bardie could hardly repress an exclamation of amazement. It was a beautifu l face he b e h e ld, but it was contorted at the mom e n t hy agitation and terror and excitement. Indeed, its owner was so excit ed s he did not obse rv e that she was b eing watch e d, and with a catlik e step s he walked toward the side of the vessel. "Great mercy!" exclaimed our h e ro, as he sprung toward lie r. "She me a ns to plunge into the sea." Bardie cau ght the desperate girl about the waist and drew h e r back just as she was about to take the fatal leap, and as he drew h e r away from the side of the ves se l he reached down, and peering in h e r face, asked: Are you mad?" Yes, I am mad," came the r esponse, i n tones so sad and plaintive that it thrilled O!Jr hero's h ea rt. What could possess you?" he said, to at tempt the plun ge into the sea?" "Do not ask me; and please l et m e go." "Yes, and when no one i s near you will carry a ll this beauty to the fis hes." "No; p l ease l e t me go; I w ill not make a sec ond attempt." I must take you to the ca ptain " Oh plea s e do not do thnt; I know you are a chivalrous man ; you are an Irishman; you will keep my secret?" I will keep your secret?" "Yes.'' But you hav e rev ea l ed no secret to me." "You know what I just attempted to do?" The beautiful gir l spoke in a weary tone, and in a very lo w voice. "Yes, I know what you attempted to do, and it s my duty to see th a t you are not permitted to attempt it again." "I will n ot atte mpt it aga in. " Oh, yo u may promise." I will keep my promise. I swear I will not again at tempt to leap into the sea." The l ove ly gi rl a roused herself, and spoke in tone s of great decision and firmness. I will accept your word and keep you r secret, said our h ero, and after a moment h e added: "There must be some sad reason wh y you should see k to end your life." "Yes, there i s a sad reason why I should seek to end my life, but there i s no good re aso n why I s hou lcl do so. I was very cowardly." "Will you t e ll me why you sought to jump into the sea?" A moment the fair g irl hesitated, and then said: Because I a m a l one and friendl ess in th e world. There i s no oth e r r eason why I should seek to die." "There are circumstances where your reason m i ght se rv e as a n excuse, but where oae i s young and beautifnl like yourself I ca n not see that it is a s ulli c ient excuse." The young man sr,oke in a kindly tone, and re l easing his hold upon the fair g irl stood and watched her as sh e g lid ed away. "vYell, well, he muttered, "she i s alone in t h e world and fri e ndl ess so am I; antl it i s the similitude of our two fates that draws me toward her. I will h ave an eye to th a t g irl. Three clays l ater our hero land e d in New York, and within an hour nfter his arrival was the hero of a thrilling adven ture. CHAPTER VI. WE have intimat ed th a t our hero sometimes spoke with a broad brogue and we will h ere add tha t upon his arrival in New York he re-BONANZA BARDIE; OR, so l ved to adopt the brogue upon all occasions save when some particular ex i ge n cy demanded otherwise. While in Queenstown, previo u s to hi s s a ilin g upon the t r amp steamer, he had r ece iveecl wor d th at very ser i ous charge s had been trumped up against him by his enemy, the wron g ful owner of the estates, which our hero had eve r y reason to b e lieve once b e lon ged to his imm ed iat e ances tors, and wh i c h by right at the very mom e nt should hav e been in hi s own possess i on. The charge s we r e of such a character that hi s di sco very would l ead to extrad ition and b e furthermore had reason to believe t .bat hi s e nemy would offer, through the authorities, a l arge r eward for his ca pture, and the se facts l ed the MonleCristo to r eso lv e to adopt a dual c haract e r. Sometimes h e would be the gentle man and at other tim es the regular Micky Free boy, and h e felt well a s u rnd that under the two rol es h e would be able to batl:le a ll det ectives. As s tated at the clo se of our preced i ng c hap ter, Bardic O Connor met with a sta rtlin g ad venture within an hour after his arrival in New York. The steamer land e d at her cloc k after d a rk, but when it was still ear l y in the evening, and the m a de an immediate rush to get as h ore, as 1t was known that all baggage would have to wait until the followin g mornin g for custom in s pection, save what little hand bag gage mi ght be carried off for imm e diate and necessa r y use. Onr hero b ad no baggage, and he was among the first to pass clown the gang-plank and Janel on the dock, and as b e stood watching t h e other passenge r s clescend hi s eyes fe ll upon theyoung l a dy whom he had prevent ed from l ea ping i nto th e sea. He had see.n but littl e of the my s t e riou s g irl after the i ncide nt alluded to, s h e having r e mained in her state-room, but he k e pt a con stant watch over h e r during the remainder of the vowage, as he had re ac hed the conclusion that s he was the heroin e of some tra g ic event. Indeed it struc::k him that s he lik e himself, was a fugitive and he had become deeply interest e d in h e r fate, and very desirous of l earning her history, and the true cause of h e r attempt to l eap into th e ocean. As s tated, he saw h e r descend to the wharf, and as she moved off toward the street he fol low ed h e r and strange l y enough a moment lat er he saw another man following her, and th e actions of pursuer numbe r two were very strange. The girl reach e d the street; every one was e xcited: backmen w e r e s h outing, and relativ es of the l anded passengers were hurrying h e r e and ther e ; every one was looking out for them selves save our hero and the maa who was evi dent l y upo n the tra c k of the mysterious female passenger. Upon rea c hin g the street th e l atter stood for a moment evident l y und ecide d which way to go. Sevc:ral h ac km en acc o s t ed h e r, but to their offers of a conv eyance sh e made no answer, a nd at l e ngth she crossed the st r eet and w as pro ceeding up the thorou g hfare leadin g fr o m the river, when s udd en ly a carriage drew to the curb. A man alighted, and was joined quickly by the man whom our h ero had seen followin g the girl, and th e latter accosted h er. Barclie O'Conor did not know what to do, and was watching the incident, when suddenly the two m en se ized th e g irl, stifled her cries, and carried her st ruggling to the coac h, into which th ey thrus t her, and away drove the car ri age at a rapid gate For an in stant only Barclie was over come with astonishment, and then, with a muttered e ja c ulation, h e s tart ed to follow the coach, an d h e was compelled to run like a de.er. Fortu natel y he did not encounter any peclestriaas for a couple. of squares, and then th e driver of the coac h slackened th e s peed of his hors es a ad drove at a m or e l e i s urely gai t, thus e n a blin g our h ero to follow with g reater euse, a nd aga in fortunate l y, the coach was not driven a l ong distance before it was brought to a h a lt. Barrlie hncl m ade up his mind how to act while runnin g in pursuit of the coach. The mann e r of the g irl's abduction was sufficient to him to indi ca te that the m e n had no right to thus se iz e her-that on the face of it the ir action was ille ga l and an outrage-and h e determined to re sc u e h e r without stopp ing to ask any ques tions. He was a pow e rful fellow, a pract i ca l a thl e te aad pu g ili s t, and felt him self well able to assail th e two abductors The moment the carriage h a lt ed th e men a lighted and lifted th e g irl from the coach and as sh e offered no res i stance our hero deemed that she had either been drugged or had become insensible through fright. He dashed forward, and in a low firm tone as be. approached, said: "Unhand the l ady, ye villains!" One of the men did unhand the p-irl, and he sprung toward Bardi e and sought to deal our hero a powerfu l blow, but instead received one himself, which sent him reeling to the middle of the street, where he fell, and at once the young Irishman l eaped tow ard villain number two, and as the man let go the g irl, who fell to the walk, he, too, received a blow whi c h sent him under the horses' feet, and the l atter com menced to dan ce and prance over him caus ing him to ye ll with fright. Bardw did not stop to ask any quest i ons, but rai sed the g irl in his arms an _cl darted away with h e r. Turning the first corner and seeing an alley-way he darted in a nd walked back, and had gone but a few steps when he was hailed w ith the ques tion : "Is that yo u Mike ?" The speaker was an Irishm a n and our hero felt re ass ured in hearing th e voice of a country woman, and he said: "No, madame, it's not Mike but it's country man of your own who nades h e lp and r escue "Eh? what's th a t yer sayin'?" "Do ye li ve h ereabouts madame?" asked Bardie. Troth an' I do." "And will ye yer people shelter for a few mom e nts until I can exp l a in to ye why I ask it?'' I can, shure; come thi.s way; and is it a lady ye hev in yer arms there?" It is sbure." "Well, do ye moincl e f yer up to any divil ment I'll send for a cop at onct, but ye can come in and I ll hear what ye hev to say." The woman opened the door of a rear ten e mea t hou se and our hero carried his burden in side aacl l a id her upon a lounge in the room. "Is the lady d ead? demanded the woman. "No, madame, I do not think she's dead but s he' s bee n dru gge d an' it's insensible sh e i s from fright.'' "Well, well, now, what does all thi s m ane? But we ll see can w e bring the l ady back to life." CHAPTER VII. BARDIE and the goodhearted Irish wom an se t to work to revive the insensible girl, and soo n they recognized signs of returnin g con sciousness, an d at th e sa m e instant the Irish woman r e m arked as s h e sn iff ed: Well, well, do ye moind ? "11Ioincl what ? asked Bardie. Do ye not s mell it?" "Smell what?" Faith, it' s plain eno u g h, shure. It's chlor oform. l ca n sme ll it as plain as though it were a cut onion " Yer ri ght," sa id Barclie. ''The girl was c hloroformed as shure as yer live, and who did it; did you, ye villain?" I flicl not," answered Bardie, and if ye will wait a mom e nt till the girl fully revive s I w ill exp l a in it all toyer." "Yer mu s t. "I will." "An' I'll se e that ye do. Shure what a purty creature she is. and so young and inno cent-looking; fa ith it wer' a shame whoever do sed h e r wid th e s l ap ing s tuff." The young lady bad ind eed been chloro formed and in good time the effects wo r e off, and s he look ed wildly about, demanding: wh e r e am I ?" "Shure, darlin', ye are safe enough; ye nacle have no fear now, whatever wer' done to ye aforetime." Bard i e s t e pped into the shadow He did not wish the g irl to see him until sh e had recovered fully from h e r first bew ild erment After a few moments she appeared to fully recover, and she asked : "What bas happ e ned?" Shure, miss, the r e i s no one h e re who can t e ll ye better than this man, and he will g iv e a fair exp l anation, or by the powers I'll tell the police on him." B a rdie s tepped to the front, and at on ce the victim of the outrage recogniz e d him and she e xclaimed: "You here?" "Yes, mi ss, I'm here, and shure it's lucky for vo11. I reckon that I wer' there a minute

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THE TREASURE OF ROOKIES. 7 ago, OT no one knows what might have h a p pened .'" What has happened? " Firs t let me m ake a n explanation to this good woman who gave us shelter for the time being" "Yes, it's an immedi ate explanation ye"ll give me, for I do not understand this at all, I'm tellin' yces that." My good woman, this lady and I were pas sengers on the steamer that just arriv ed an hour or so ago at her dock. I had no particnlar acquaintance with the lady-shure I do not know h e r name now-but when I came ashore I waited on the do c k aw hile to see the passen ge r s land, and I saw this lady descend from th e ship. a nd I saw her walk off the dock, anrl at the same time I saw a fellew wid a wicked face sta l e aft her her, and I didn't like his looks nor his ac tions, and says I to m escl' that feller i s up to some rlivilment, a nd I'll just follow and keep m e eye on him. Well, the lady l e ft the wharf aud re ac h ed the street, and she started to go n p another stre e t leading from the one that runs along wid the riv er, aud whin she h ad crossed there was a carriage druv up and was s topped, a man l ept out, and the other man who had been followin th e girl join e d him, an the two of them seized the girl and run her into the carriage, and away the carriage was driven, and away I sped a fter it, and when it stop ped I wer' at hand and I commanded them to let go the g irl whin they lift e d her from th e coach, and one of thim made a clip at me and I gave it to him and away he went reeling to the street and down he we nt into the mud, and I made for the other one, and he mac:c a lick at me, and I gave him one that sent him under the horses' feet, and th e n I seiz e d the lady, and I brought her here, and that's all I know about it, and \Vhat more th e r e is to tell the lady must spake for herself. t3hure, it's all a mystery to me, and the why and the wherefore, so it is, shure. The victim of the outrage lis ten ed with dilat ed eyes to the statement of our hero, as also
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8 "No, I a m not; I can name the steamer in which you Railed." "Yer can?" "Yes." "Would yer moind doin so?" The man named the very steamer on which B a rdi e had sa iled from Queenstown, hut our hero did not betray any s urprise, as he suid, with a l a ugh : Shure I knew h e had made a mistake "Didn't you sail on that s team e r ?" "I did not; shure I never heanl of such a ship.'' "Nonsense! Why do you say so? Isn't your name Burdie O'Conor?" "No, sir: me name is not Bardie O'Conor, and, do ye moind, I've an ide a \\'hai yer game i s but ye can't play it on me. I've some knowledge of the games ye play in New York, but ye can make no fool of me Shnre I don't believe there is any suc h s hip as th e one ye mentioned, nor do I believe th e r e i s any such person as the one ye name; and, what i s more, I hev n eve r been in Que e n s town in me life. When I sailed for America, a year ago, I started from Glasgow, crossing over from Belfast, do ye moind; and, do ye moind further, I don't want yer to try and come any of yer snap games over me. I'm no s t ranger here, nor am I as g r een as I look." "It's possible I've made a mistake," said th e stra n ger. "Shure ye h ev made a mistake, and ye had better make off wid ye r sel', or begorra I ll hand ye over to the police, so I will. I'm no fool. and I'm up toyer tricks, do ye m o ind, and ye can't fool and rob me. 8hure, as I t o ld ye, I don't believe there i s such a ship as the one ye named, and I'm thinking ye coined the name ye mentioned, and it's now I'm biddin' of ye good-eveni n', and ye may consider ye r se l lucky I don't hand ye over to the police." It's all rig ht, sa id th e man, with a l augh, and h e turned off down the street, while o ur hero walked a lon g in the opposite direction, as he had been proceeding when hailed by the stranger. As Bardic walked along he muttered: Begorra, it i s a ll right, but on me word that wer' a narrow escape, shure. He knew me name well e nou g h and h e nam ed th e s hip in whicil I sailed. Well, well, me enemy h as got word over here a h ead of me, and if I'm not a fool in me that feller was an American detective, and he is on the lookout for one Bardie O 'Co nor, and do ye moind, it's Bardie O'Conor will be on th e lookout for the detectives, and it s smart th ey are if they catch m e asleep; but, be the powers, it s lucky I h ave tile money to work a change in me ap pearance, or they may give me a close hunt all night. We'll see about it, that's all.'' Bardic kept on along Broadway until he reached Twenty-third Street, a nd then h e turned down toward Sixth Avenue and he h ad proceeded but a s hort di s tance when he became aware that there was a man followin9 him. "Be the powers!" he muttered, 'I do not loike that altogether. Shure, there is a man m e s teps." Bard1e walked along until be crossed a g lare of light tha t shot forth from a brilliantly lighted r estaura nt, and then h e s l ackened hi s pace and turned suddenly jnst i:\ time to catch a full view of th e man who was following him. The man, for a momeut, was unde r th e strong light, and our hero had a good, sq u are view of him, and r ecog niz ed the fact th at it was not th e same man who h a iled him on Broad way, and yet it struck him he h ad seen the man b efo re; and as he wa lk ed along sudden l y it flashe d across hi s mind that the fellow follow in g him was one of the m e n from whom he had rescued th e g irl imm ed i ate l y after th e l anding from the s teamer. Well, now, that i s qnare." B arclie We will here sta re aga i n that our hero had resolved to speak wit h a broad brogne at a ll times even when and b e had good r easons for so doing, and his resolve was strength e ned after hi s encounter with the man on Broadway. Upon deciding that the man who was follow in g him was one of the two who h ad sought to abduct the girl, he made up his mind to give the fellow a chance to overtake him, muttering at the same time: "He is not on my track as B a rdie O 'Co nor, and shu r e I may find out somewhat of the game they were playin when they s ought to stale th e girl int o the carriage." Bardie reacher] Sixth Avenue, and finally BONANZA BARDIE; OR, after strolling down that avenue a short dis tance entered a lager beer saloon, saying: "I'll see if the feller will follow me in, and if he does mebbe he'll open his head, and I'll get on to him shure. There's a game of some kind go in on, and it's quare how I've rnn into a series of adventures within an hour after my arrival in New York, but it 's lik e ly I'll meet wid many of them afore I touch foot again on the good old shores of Bantry Bay." Bardie entered the saloon, and see ing a pile of sandw i ches on the bar h e called for a sand wich and a glass of lager, and seating himself at a table mmmenced to A few moments only passed and he saw the man who had been following him enter the rnloon, a nd be a t once fully identified him as one of the men whom he had knocked down in defense of the m ysterious young lady. The man peered around, and finally hi s eyes rested upon our hero, and there came a satisfied and pleased look to his face, and b e stepped across th e room and t ook a seat at the very same table where Bardie had loc ated. He also called for a sandwich and a g la ss of l ager. Bardic was not at a ll disturbed. There was one trait h e possessed to a remarkable degree, and that was nerve and coolness. He was one of the nerviest men in th e world; nothing caused him to lose his head, as th e saying goes; and as he was an advent urer, with nobody but himself in th e world to look out for, as far as he knew, he ca rried hi s life and comfort in his hauda, and was re a dy at a ll times for whatever fortune might open up to him Bardie was also a \ e r y keen obs erver and a good reader of men's faces, and he di sc over e d at a g l a nce that the man who h ad been follow ing him was seekin g to have a few words with him, and he discerned, further, that the man did no. t s uspect that he had been recogniz e d, and our hero gave no sign that h e bad recog nized th e man. Indeed, he wab prepared to play as deep a game as the fellow who was play ing against him. For a few mom ents th e men sat ea ting and drinking their beer without the exchange of a word, but at l e n gth the strange r said: I think I've seen you before." CHAPTER. X. BARDIE was cool as a frozen chicken as he looked the man over, and after a moment. said: Ye think ye hev see n me afore?" "Yes." Well, i s th ere anyt bin g wonderful in that? Shure, mebbe I've see n you afore, but I don't moind that i ver I did." "You've just l anded?" "Wha t is that yer sayin'? "You've just lan ded?" Just l anded, i s it?" ''Yes." "And what do you m a n e by that?" "You h ave just arrived in New York." Do ye think so?" "Yes." "Well, rer off-'way off-there. I've lived in New 'York these five or six years, do ye moind "You have? exclaimed the strange r, in surprise. To ue sure I hev and what difference does it make whether it's so or not, since I dou 't owe you It's pos s ible I may mistake you for another person." Mebbe it is possible, and m ebbe ye did see me afo r e Shure I'm not ce rt a in, wh e n l come t o l ook at ye, that I don't remember seei n' you afore. Who gave you th at thump on th e nose? S hu re it was a good one, by the mark ye h ev there!" It was true, the man's nose and cheek di
PAGE 9

THE T.REASURE OF THE ROOKIES. 9 "'Yes." "How?" "And put me in jail?" I do not desire to do that." Ye don't?" ''No.11 "Faitll an' I belave ye, for ye are more of the jail yersel' than I am, do ye moind." "We will not talk about that now; you may need a friend." Sure we all need friends IJetimes." I may be your friend and do you a good turn." "Yees may?" "Yes." "And what good turn shall! do ye first?" "Tell me how you came to interfere with the arrest of the young lady?" With her arrest?" '!'hat's what I said." And ye want to know how I came to inter fore?" "I do." A moment Bardie meditated. It ran through !his mind that possibly, after all, there might be -some trntll in what tile man said. He did not fancy the man's good nature; under all the cir <:umstances there was something very ominous in the man's abso lut e calm and easy manner, in the presence of a man who had knocked him clown. "See here, mister, I don't know what yer name is, I had good reason for interferin' to save tile gi r 1." "I suppose you had, and will you name your reason?" "Faith and I will," came the answer CHAPTER XI. BARDIE was really a very shrewd fellow and a very rapid thinker, and certain facts began to group themselves in his mind, and he began to feel just a trifle of respect for the man who bore the mark of his fist upon his cheek. Our hero sat a moment in a meditative mood, when the stranger said: Come; you are to tell me why you interfered "I will. ' Do so." Bardie related, fictitiously, how he was a worker on the dock, and then he told, truth fully, how he l.rnd seen the gir l seized upon and yun into the carriage, and how he had followed tile carriage and made the rescue. When he Jiad concluded the man said: I think you have told me the truth." "I h ev, s ir. Shure I've no interest in the girl, save that I tuk her away from yees." "Now, answe r me one more question: Where did you take the girl?" Where did I take her?" ''Yes .'' '' Well do ye mo ind, I found her insensible." "Well? " I tuk her in me arms." Proceed." '' I carried her around the corner. Ye will iremimber it wer' near the corner where I found yees?" ''Yes." "Well, I'd ca rri ed her but a bit when she <>pened her eyes, and says she : 'Let me go.' Well, I had no right with her, and I did let her go; and go she did, and I've not seen her since." The man was thoughtful for a moment, and then asked: Where did you go?" "Where did I go?" "Yes." "Well I wandned off, sir; yes, I did, and that's all.'' "And you know nothing about the g irl?" "Nothing, sir." Where do you live?" See here, now, I've answe r ed your ques tions pretty well, and I think it's none of yer !business where I live." ''I have someth in g to tell you, my friend.'' Faith, I'm always a good listener." I am an officer." "Ye are?" "I am." Well now, that's qua re." I am a detective." Well welll" "That' girl a prisoner." Well well I" "' You a prisoner from the officers." "Well, well!" "And it is my duty to arrest you." "well, well! did ye iver h ea r the loike of that?" ''I must know a ll about you; and if I'm not satisfied that you r statements are true I must arrest you and hold you until the girl is found." "Well, well!" You must tell me where you live " Do ye moind," sa id Bardie, I've no rai son to believe that ye are an officer." "I ao1." "Shurely?" ''Yes.'' "Well, well! Now, luk here; if ye will tell me a good raison for arrestin' tha t girl I may give ye an idea." "An idea?" "Yes; I may put ye on her track, for, do ye moind, I'm uo fool.'' You do not appear like one." I'm not; and, whin that girl ran from me faith I just 'skip ped along and kept me eye on her; and do ye moind, I've an idea I can put me hanc'I on her?" way, when he turned southward and walked clown severa l squares, and, crossing to a parallel street, made a second turn and reached the Bowenr We \viii here remark that every time he made a turn he took tile bearing s ; and, so clear and accurate was his memory, that he could have retr aced hi s steps and have gone straight to the tenement where Mrs. Maguire resided had he so de s ired. As it was, he kept on down the Bowery until he came to one of the rrany cheap louging-hou ses, when he e ntered and re g i s tered, paid his money, and wa s shown to a hom. No questions were asked, as no information was re quired in the place where he sought a night"s refuge. These places are open for all. You pay your money and g o where you are "put," and our hero was soon put," and very soon afterward was sound asleep, caring little for his surroundings aud only anxious to rest. Upon th e following morning Bardie awoke and passed down to the street. He entered a cheap re staurant and settled down to a hearty meal. CHAPTER XII. That is my idea, my friend; I am no more a fool than yourself." "Well, well!" WHILE at his meal Bardie thought over the "You must tell me where I can find the girl situation, and he was compell e d to remark, or I will arrest you." mentally, that h e seemed to have fallen into an "Arrest me ?" odd lot of au ventures s ince hi s departure from "Yes." Ireland, and he pondered more carefully the Well, well! Now, see here; will ye give me words of the detective. a good raison for yer wan tin' to find the girl?" Bardie could not believe the fair g irl whom "I a m not bound to give you a reason." be had r escued was a cr iminal and yet he did "Nathur am I bound to tell ye where ye can believe that she was being pursued on some find the g irl. c rimin a l charge; and he was th e better prepared You do not realize that you are in a pretty to believe in her innocence because of the fact serious scrape." that he, also, was being pursued on a trumped" Am I. now?" up charge, and he was certainly conscious of his You are." own innocence. He was still meditating upon "How?" the previous night's adventures when a lad en We received a cable from the other side to tered the restaurant with the daily papers. Our _rrest that gir l on a very serious charge." hero bought one, and, after reading awhile, wail lndade?" startled to behold his own name in print. There is a large reward offered for her arThere was a full account of the wreck of the rest." tramp steamer on which our hero had been a There is, now? And of what is she acpassenger, and also a narrative of the re scue of <'used?" the two missing passengers, accompanied with "I can not tell you; but it is a very serious the further information that it was suggested crime; and, if you do not tell me where I can that one of the passengers was Bardie O'Conor, find her, I shall he compe lled to arrest. you." a man for whom there was a reward of two Faith, that's what ye will hani.to do. thousand pounds; a nd the acc.,unt contained a Shure l can't tell ye where ye can foiod the description of Brclie, aad intimated further, girl." that the detectives were on the man's track, and I think you can." I that he would soon be captured and returned to "Well, well! You're wrong; yes, sir, ye are Ireland. wrong; but, do ye moind, I'll go with ye and Bardie O'Cooor was a young man of iron show ye where I think she wint. Faith, I've nerve. He read the actount through carefully, no idea of being arrested when I've not done and not a mu s cle quivered; nor did his face wrong.'' change expression; n>r was there the slightest "Will you go with me?" tremor in his hand ; nor did hi s appe tit e s lack en. I will." He finished his breakfast with as much calm" At once ?" ness as he had commenced it, but he kept up "Shurely." considerable thinking. It was plain that his Come." enemy in Ireland had trailed him to Qneeos-The two men settled their score and l eft the town, had discovered how he had left Ireland, beer-shop; and, when once on the street, Bardie had cabled to New York for his arrest, and, be discovered that two other men were following sides, there was evidence that he intended to them. He recognized then that the so-called pursue our hero to the bitter encl. detective had re-enforcements at hand; but he "Well, well, it's all right! I've had a nar was determined to s hake off this new-found row escape, that is certain," muttered Barclie; friend, all the same; when outside the man said: "but I am forewarned now, and I'll be on my There's one thing I wish to tell you: I'm guard. One fact is certain: the first fellow I prepared for you now." met must have been a detective, and he i s the Are ye?" one who i s on my track. The second detective "If you attempt any capers it will be bad for was not seeking for me as Bardie O'Conor; you." but," added the fugitive, after a moment, it "Do ye moind, a ll I've to do i s to give ye is strange the similarity between my fate and what inform ation I can?" that of the beautiful young lady whom I res" That is all." cued, and, by my faith, I'll stand by her yet. The two had reached the cross-street. Bardie I'll make common cause with her against those looked over his shoulder and saw that the two detective hounds, and if they take her theyn otller men were half a block to the r ear, and the take me; but now what must I do?" side-street looked dark and lik e a fair course for Bardie remembered his promise to visit the a fugitive; and, as the man said That i s all," place in Wall Street, as requested by his fellow Bardie sudden ly dealt him a clip behind the ea r passenger upon the raft; and at the same time that sent him reeling, accompanied with the ex-he fully realized his ri s k in keeping his promc l amation: ise. It was a pretty serious thing to have de,, Well, take that first!" tectives on one's track, especially when one is As the man reeled, Barclie started to run lik e an absolute stranger in the city, not practically a deer down the sidestreet, and, indeed, he was knowing one stree t from another, and liable at a good runner. Reaching the avenue, he t urned any moment to arrest. to the north and ran for some distance, when he Bardie was in no hurry to leave the restaurant. doubled on his track, crossing to the opposite He pretended to be reading the paper, but in side of the street, and, making a turn, moved fact he was thinking over the situation. He had along back to the very corner where he downed but little money, and it was necessary that he the detective. should change his appearance. His garb was a "Well," he muttered, "I think I've lost plain" g ive away." He sat thinking over matthern." ters, and mechanically l et his eyes wander Our hero was not at all acquainted in the city, around, and he discovered that the keeper of but he took a straight course and reached Broadthe restaurant was an Irishman, and he saw that

PAGE 10

10 he was an honest, well-meaning and good-heart ed man. Our hero recognized these traits without eve r havin g spoken to the man; and after a time he said, in a low, meditative tone: "In that man's goodness rests my sr.fety." There was one waiter in the place--a young Irish lad-and Bardie beckoned the boy to him and asked him to send his boss to the table. There were no other customers in the place, and its proprietor approached and took a seat at the table oppos.lte to our hero. "From part of Ireland did you come?" asked I came from Dublin." "And how long have you been in America?" "Five years." "And what l ed ye to lave the Ould Dart?" "And what i s that t.o you?" "Well, if it wer' nothing to me I'd not be afther askin' ye." I came here because I chose to come." We have frequently intimat ed during the course of our narrative, that Bardie was a very shrewd and observant man. He was, in fact, a born detective. He r ead men like a book, and he was fully capable of con tractin g hi s observa tions and so grouping them as to reach certain deductions; and he at once reach ed a conclusion from the fact that the proprietor of the little cafe betrayed irritation when asked his reasons for having immigrated from hi s native l and. "Have you forgotten ould Ireland?" de manded Bardie. I niver hev and I niver will," came the an-swer. Do ye iver expect to re turn?" "I do." "Whia?" What is that to you?" It may be much or it may be littl e; but I'm askin' ye the question a ll th e same The re staurant man was a shrewd fellow, and, looking keenly at our hero, he sa id, after a moment: "Ye bev a raison for cross-questioning me?" Shure I hev." And what i s yer raison?" "Well, I'll not attimpt to decaive you. I'm not certain when I sha ll return mesel'." "And what may yer name be?" "Wait now till I luk ye clare in the face before 1 answer ye." "Luk; and it's an honest face, me boy." I believe ye." "Well?" Hev ye read the moraia' papers?" "I hev." "Well?" "Be the powers, but it's Bardie O'Conor ye are!" If ye spake that name loud ye're a mane man and no frind of ould Ireland; faith ye' re a traitor and a villain." The restaurant man, whose name was O'Shayne, reched over and said, in a low tone: "Ye nade not fear m e, my man; but what is it ye are accused of that they're afther ye?" "I'm accused of murderin' a collector." "Ye are?" "Yes." "And what are ye guilty of, me man?" Bein' a patriot and a lover of me race and the traditions of ould Ireland." "Aud why h ev ye made yersel' known to me?" "Can ye not guess?" I can not." "I nade a friad; that's why I've put me fate in yer hands." Shure, man, there's a large reward offered for yer capture and delivery " There is; but that's no temptation to you." "Yer right; I'd lo se me loife before I'd r a ise a hand to put ye in charge." I knew it." "Yer did?" "Yes." "How?" "Faith, I could read yer wer' an honest man in yer face, and it's for th a t raison I gave mesel' away to ye." "And hev ye any friends in America?" "Yes, one." "And wher e is he?" "Here," came the answer. CHAPTER XIII. THERE followed a moment's silence, when O'Shayae said: Shure, ye would make me yer friend by the confid ence ye put in me." BONANZA B.A_RDIE; OR, That's what I was after s hure, and I knew it. t) "And what will ye do? Shure, the d e t ec t ives are on yer track.'' "I know that; didn't I g ive one of thim a to ss l ast night; but I didn't know at the toim e bi s game." Bardie related hi s adventure with the detect i ve, th e one who had ca lled him by nam e. Ye had a narrow escape, so ye did?" I did; but l'm all right now." "And what do yer mane to do? Ye must get out of New York." Sorra a step will I get out of New York." "Ye'll be caught shure; faith the best detect ive s in the wor Id are here." "I don't moind them for me little finger, only I hev one friend who will save me now." "Aud what i s i t ye want?" "I'll t e ll ye; I've one pound, do ye moiad, and I've. me watch. Now it's the money ye can hev and the watch I'll l ave wid ye, only ye will get me a change of clothes, so whin I lave this place th ey' ll not pounce ou me at the first go and unaw a res.'' I'll stand to ye as yer friad, so I will, at all co sts; but do ye moiad, ye must lave here." "I must?" "Yes." "And where will I go?" "West." In good time mebbe I will, but not to-day nor to-morrow.'' Bardie, ye must hev a care." Do ye moind, aiver agen must ye call me Bardie; sbure I thought ye would hev moiaded that yersel'." "Yer right; and what i s yer name?" "Michae l O'Brien I'll ca ll mesel' until the day comes when I can take back the name me father bore." "It's Mike I'll ca ll ye?" Yes; and ca ll it often, so that like a dog wid a new master I'll l earn to wag whin I hear it." "And what are ye goin' to do, Mike?" Make a call." "Yees are?" ''Yes." Upon the mayor?" "Yes; the Mayor of San Francisco I think he is. " And what do ye mane?" I'll tell ye. I h ad a passenger v;id me on the raft-au ould feller, an American-and I saved his l o ife shure." "Ye did?" "I did." "Well?" "He i s a quare man; but he bid me call on him th e first thing this mornia'." ' And it's he manes to give ye over to the police." "Do ye think so?" Yes sure." "Well, I know better. I was not floatin' round on the rnft in mid-ocean wid the man who se loife I had saved not to know his parts. No, s ir, I've no danger to fear from that quar ter." "Ye are sure?" I am, and I'll stake me loife on it." "But ye'll run great risk in goiu' there." I know that." Ye had better wait a day or two." He bid me come to -day, and it' s to-day I ll go; and, if ye will prove the friend to me that ye are, it will be a ll right." "Ye will come wid me," said O'Shayue. The res taurant-keeper called his waiter and gave him certain orders, and then led our hero through a rear door to a side hall, and so up two pairs of stairs to a room ou the top floor, when he pointed to a closet and said: "There; ye will foind all me c lothes the re and, as ye and I are of the same build, faith I think th ey'll fit ye well. I'll return down-stairs, and ye can m ake a change to suit ye and thin come down." How about the lad? " Oh, ye nade not moind him. "He may nade more moindin' than ye think. " I'll answer for him." Remember, it's ten thousand, Amer i can money!" I'll fix the lad. Shure, ye are me cousin just over eh?" "No, that will not do; it's yer cousin from the west I am. " Ob, but I moind that's better; yes, it's that way we'll hev it; an d now ye can to g yersel' out; but it's a great risk yer ruuaiu' all the same, and if ye would tak e my advice ye'd lave the cit7 at onct and go west." We'll talk that over later on, me good fri e nd; but do ye moiarl, th e day may come when I can do as much for you as ye are doia' for me now. "Don't ye ever mintioa tlu:.t aga in an ye'd hev me remain yer friend. Shure, it 's a fugi tive I am mesel', do ve moiad, and now I've g iven confidence for confidence, I'll tell ye more ; shure, there is a reward haagin' over me own head, and I am not bearin' me own father's name at this blessed minute, do ye moiad, s o ye can make yer rnoiad aisy." O'Shayne l eft the room, and Bardie se t to look over a pretty well assorted wardrobe. Shure, he h as good clothes, and be i s a goodlookia' man, so he i s; and it's in luck I am; and it's a long chase I ll be after g i ven them detectives afore they cage me, so I will. Our hero found razor and bru s h, and the first thing he did was to shave off all hi s whiskers and then sefectiag a business suit be amazed him self. And a more complete transformation i s rarely seen As he look ed in the glass he was compelled to remark: Shure I hardly know mesel'." Our hero was fully an hour iu working the transformation, but when he had conc lud ed h e was a fine-looking man, indeed, a remarkably gentee l and h a ndsome-lookin g fellow, and there remained not the appearance of the g r eenhorn about him, nor anything that would suggest a r ecent arrival in New York. In bis changed appearance he wa s like one to the manor borna gen uin e New Yorker as h e stood there; and aga in he muttered: "Well, well; but I'm a fiae-lookin' Yankee after all." Bardie descended the stairs, and being a grea t joker he did not an ter the s tore by the door through which h e had passed with O'Slrnyae but passed out to the street and entered the restaurant through the main door, and going to a tabl e he took a seat, and in good Englis h called for a cup of coffee The l ad serverl the coffee, and the man O'Sbayne look ed at his customer, littl e dreaming of his identity. CHAPTER XIV. h was a s ingular in c ident that O 'S hayn e did not r ecogn iz e our hero, even though the latter wore one of bis own 2uits of clothes. .But iD> New York there are many who wear clothes after the same cut and fashion. Barrlie drank off his coffee and advanced to the pay-counter, and in good English, without any tremor iu his voice, sa id : "Your n ame is O'Shayae?" That is my name." You are the proprietor of thi s place?" "lam." Well, be careful." "Be ca reful, i s it?" ''Yes.' What do you mean?" I am telling you to be careful or you may get into trouble. The Iris h blood of O'Shayne began to boil and he said: Faith, an' if ye don't moind what yer sayin' it's yersel' 'nil! hev to be careful, or I'll toss ye into the s treet sbure. Pay for yer c offee and be off wiu ye. I don't loike yer looks." Our hero leaned over and said in a whisper: It's reported you are a friend of Bardie O'Conor, the man the detectives are lookin g for, and they may keep an eye on your pla ce." "Eh? what's that yer sayia'? Well, now, I don't know who ye are, nor do I care, but who ever tells ye that had betther come here and let out their slander to me face and not be goin' behind me back wid their talk." Our hero laughed, and changing back to th e brogne, exclaimed: "Well, well, ye are a bright man, and ye don't know yer own clothes." O'Shayae's eyes bulged. "Be the powers!" he exclaimed, i s it possi ble?" "Do ye think now I'd better go west?" "Well, well, it bates the divil. Shure, ye are the divil or a play actor. Faith, I never saw anythin' l o ik e it in my loife." "I reck on I'll g ive the detectiv es a chase now." "Will ye? Well, I'll ate me hash if ye ain't the divil himsel'; and how did ye do it?" I let go me whiskers, and I put on a good JI1an's clothe&." And it's a wonderful change. Shure ye

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THE TREA.SU RE OF THE ROOKIES. 1 1 could walk straight into head-quarters wid yer I And did the shadow fall before or behind finger to er nose for all the detectives there are him?'' in New 1' ork, shure." "Behind him." "And I'm givin' you credit, O'Shayne." "Ah! I take it. Yes, yes; I see!" "Ye are?" "There was a strange man in our office this "Yes.'" morning. He was making inquiries. "For what?' "Yes?" "It was good and cool ye tuk it wbin I gave "But I made up my mine! he was a detectye the warnin' about O'Conor." ive." "It wer' testin' yees wer', eh? well, well, "A detective?" but ye bale a play actor. Shure ye are a magi" Yes." cian." "And who was he after?" Well now, do ye moind, will ye tell me 1 think he was lookin g for you." bow I'll get to Wall Street?" "Looking for me?" "Can ye foind it alone?" "Yes.'" "If it's to go straight east or \Yest 1'11 foind Bardie thought a moment and asked: it shure " J\Ir. Kneiss m ade a confidant of you?" '" Weli, it's nayther east nor we s t ye'll go, I He did." but to the south directly. Come here till I show "Told you about me?" ye." "Yes.,, O'Shayne led our hero outside and directed What did he tell you?" him to Wall Street; and any one who knows I "Only what I have repeated. He believed New York well knows it is a lmo st a straight you were a fugitive. rout e from the Bowery. "And be believed me inno ce nt ? Bardie bid llis friend good-morning and sta rt"Yes." ed off, and as lie walked along Ile indulged Ami Ile discovered men following him?" bright hop es He was inspired by th e s how of '' Yes, and Ile thought they were trailing him life and activity around him, and he muttered: in order to find you." Well, if I don't gel as ri ch as Monte-Cristo "And what is your name?" iu this !nod of milk and honey, it's me own "Brush." fault." "Your name is Brush?" Bardic reached Wall Street without much I "Yes." difficulty, but h e spent fully two hours on the "Mr. Brush, you are a gentleman. I will r oute. He knew it was ea rl y, and he was atI r emember this warning, and some day I may tracted by the thousant.l and one s ights to be I make a return." seen by a stranger in New York. In due time, "I feel I have m e rely done my duty in warnbowever, he re i tched the street, and hat.! little ing you." difficulty in finding the number to which be bad You nude not fear; I will Le on me guard, been directed to go. He entered th e office and Mr. Brush, and wllen a detective takes me he presented the card tllat had been g iven to llim. will get up very early in the morning." The clerk who r ece iv ed the card bander! him a "You may be too confident, sir." l a rge enve l ope, without asking him a question "I will moind about that shure." or exchanging oue word; and, as the c lerk sa id "But l ook you!" nothing, our h ero a lmost maintained silence, Well?" anrl upon receiving the envelope stood a mo-The man Brush bad given a sudde n sta rt and ment, looking rather undecided, wllen the clerk I he was glariug toward a man who was standing said: upon the opposite side of the street, and in a low That i s all." tone b e warned: Thank you," was the re sponse of our hero, "There is the man who called!" and he left the office; and, 001.;e outside, h e muttered: Well, but that was short aucl s w eet; but I wonder what I have in here?" Bardie walked along the street for a s hort dis t auce moving s lowly and thoughtfully. He did not break the envelope; and bad go n e seve ral squares when a hand was laid upon his shoul der. Our hero turned and recognized the clerk who had given him the envelope. "You will excuse me," be said," but I could n ot speak to you in th e office." "That is wh a t I thought," answered Bardic, with a twinkl e in bis hantisome eyes. "I thought I'd follow you out and \Yarn you." "Warn me?" ''Yes." Warn me?" repeated Bardie 11 Yes sir" you mean?" "You were a passenger with n!r. Kneiss?" ''I \Ver'." 0 n the raft?" "Oh, did Ile tell yon about that?" "He did." Well?" )fr. Kneiss had a strange suspicion." "He did?" Yes." Well?" ''He is a fine man. "He is a quare man." "You will learn when you open your en velope that Ile is not an u ugrateful man." "Eh, what's tllat?"' "You will find he i s not an ungrnteful man ii be is queer; but I came after you to warn you." "To warn me?" "Yes.,, "Well, let's have it." '' l\Ir. Kneiss thought it possible that you were a fugitive." ''He did, eh?" '' 1,..es,' "Well?" Ile believes you to be an innocent man." "Well, that is good of him." '' He has been dogged ever since he left the ship." Eh, what is that?" He bas been s hadowed." CHAPTER XV. BARDIE glanced in the dire ct ion indic ated and saw a well-dressed, shrew d faced man seemingly lolling around without any s pecial interest in auytbiug that was going on around him. Do not let him see that you are looking at him, whispered the clerk. "All right; I've had my eye on him ; it's all right." "I'm satisfied be is a d e tective. He may fol low you." He will not make anything out of me if he does, but now, do you remember so we'll agree. I shall represent my self as a Scotchman who has been in this country a number of years. I am a broker; do you understand?" "I do; ves." He may come back and question you after I am through with him." I see: anrl I will merely know you as a Scotchman, a broker, with whom I have but a slight acquaintance." That's it. I was merely asking you about a certain line of securities." u I see." "Well, I'll bid ye good-morning in a formal manner, do ye moind ?" "You mus t be careful," said the clerk. "How so? "You may betray yourself in your speech. Sometimes you adopt the brogue and sometimes you drop it." Yes, I am glad you reminded me; I'll look out for that, and now good-morning." The two men separated. Our hero wandered on up-town, anxious to return to his friend, O'Sll ayne, and examine the l e tter he had re ceived from Mr. Knei ss Bardie bad not gone far when a man stepped beside him, and in an off-hand manner sa id: "Good-morning, Mr O'Conor." Our hero was cool as a cucumber, and in most excellent English, but with a Scotch ac ce nt, said: "Beg your pardou, sir, you have made a mi s take. The man, who was the detective who had been pointed out to our hero, looked a little disconc e rted, but said : Is it possible I am mistaken?" In one dire c tion you are most assuredly mistaken. I h ave met you before, but you have made a mistake in the name." Oh, you think we have met before?" '' It is possible. I do not recollect having met you, but one thing is certain, you have made a mistake in the name." Our hero spoke rn coolly and in such a natural m an ner the detective was completely uonplused; but he said: "You were in the office of --this morning?" I just came from there, sir." "You were to call by appointment?" I beg your pardon; my call th e re was but the thought of a moment. I bad some business there and dropped in, sir." "But did you not a package?" "I did; a circular, a descriptive circular concerning some stocks I am inquiring about "I beg your pardon," said the detective, I see I have made a mistake." "You are very excusable, s ir. Good-morning." 'l'he detective disappeared, and our hero pro ceeded on bis way, muttering: Well, I can be thankful that I have a good bead, cool nerv e and a l eve l wit, or that fellow would have had me. H e certainly had good points on me, and must have been watchiug down at the banking office, and it is lucky no words were excllanged there. Bardie did not go straight back to bis friend O'Sbayne's place, but wandered up Broadway and took a very roundabout course. As iR well known, New York is the best city in the world for a strange r to wander around in without any fear of gelling lost, and if a man once gets au id ea as to the lay-ont of the great town be can go fr om place to place l\ith perfect ease; and it was not long before our hero found bis way to O'Shayne's, and, once there, be sat down to a table and opene d his letter. Within the letter was a packet, and upon opening the packet our hero 's eyes opened wide, and he called his friend. See here." sa id he His friend glanced at th e crisp bit& of paper taken from the package, a nd sa id: WbNe dit.l yo u get these?" From her e " The letter?" "Yes. What are they?" 0 'S hayne lauglled and said, as he ran over the bills: It's aJortunc." A fortune." "Yes." "And bow much?" Five thou sand rlollars in American money. These are one thousand dollar bills." And can I change them into sovereigns?" "You can, but ye have no nade for sovereigns in this country. Shure it's now ye can go west." "Do you think so?" ''Yes.'' Well, do ye moind, I'm not lavin a city where fortunes drop into yer bands, rlo ye moind?" What will you do?" I'll make up me mind later on." And what does yer letter say? Shure, the man who gave ye the fortune may bev given ye some ad vice as well Hev ye read the letter ?" "I've not "Read it." Bardie glanced over the letter, which read as follows: "'MY DEAR FRCEND,-lndosed find five thou sand dollars. I give it to you willingly and gladly. But for you I would have been food for the fishes. I am well able to present you the money. I've no advice lo offer, as I believe you to be a smart as well as a bright and pru dent man. But tear up this letter at once, and forget that you ever met me, unless fortune should turn against you, and you should need, at some future time, a friend, whom you will always find in yours, gratefullv, 'JOHN KNEISS.' Well, that's a foine letter," said our hero handing the missive to O'Shayue. The latter read the letter, and said: Indeed it is a foine letter, and now what will you do?" What shall I do?" Put the money in a bank." "And betray mesel'?" No, take the name M O'Brien."

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12 I'll do it, and how will I p ay you for the clothes; faith they fit me well, and I'll uade no oth e r for the present. "We can t a lk that over later on. Come, we'll go to the bank." The two men went to the bank where O'Sbayne knew one of the officers. The de posi tfwas rnacle, and our hero drew some small money for convenience' sake, and after taking a lesson from O'Shayne as to money values he started to visit the home of J\Irs Maguire. Bardie was quick at "catching on," as the term goes, and he was not slow in asking ques tions, and when he started for the home of Mrs. Maguire he felt as though be were as much at home in New York as though he bad lived in that great city all his life. Bardie bad little .di fficulty in finding Mrs. Maguire's borne, but be was very careful about presenting himself until lie had made an exami nation to see if be had been followed. He was satisfied that sharp men were on his track, and he did not mean to be caught napping. Finally satisfied that all was right he walked up the alley-way and presented himself at Mrs. Ma guire's door. CHAPTER XVI. THE door was opened by Mrs. Maguire, who did not recognize in the handsome, clean-shaven young man the rather uncouth-looking immigrant who bad brought to her care the hand some girl the previous night. Good-morning, Mrs. Maguire." "Good-mornin' to ye, and what is it ye want?" Will ye ask me in?" Mebbe I will when I know yer business wid me." "My business i s very important." "Well, stand where ye are and tell me yer business. Shure, ye look loik e a sewing rnacbine man, and may be ye are looking for book subscriptions. Shure, them fellers always 11ev important bu s iness, but I've no toime to badder wid it if it's on them questions ye are here." "No, madame, my business is secret and very important." "It is?" '"Yes.', 1 "Well, come in, but do ye moind, if ye offer a sewing-machine or a book to me I'll just bate ye over the head wid me broom, so I will.'' The good woman flung open her door and our hero walked in. The lady whom he had rescued sat in the room looking pale and wor ried, but the moment our hero eutered she arose and approached him, and sa id, in the sweetest of tones: I am glad to welcome you." "Well, now, I declare!" ejacu l ated Mrs. Maguire, this i s very fine, and it's very de satefnl at that. Did ye not tell me ye had no friends her e in America?" Do you not recognize this gentleman, l\Irs. Maguire?" Shure, I do not; I ne'er set eyes on him afore, I'm shure of that." Our hero was very mu c h pleased. The lady to whom be had perform eel such a signa l service upon two occasions, and who was so charming and beautiful, was the only one who recognized him at a glance. He l eanecl toward her and said, in a low voice: "You recognize me?" "I do.'' It's strange." I would know by your eyes, and I can never forget your voice." Bardie was well pleased, for th e unfortun ate girl was decidedly beautiful and charming, and our hero had an eye for female beauty. Turning to l\Irs. Maguire be said: "You need not fear, Mrs. Maguire; no deceit bas been practiced upon you." '' I'm not sbure about that, shure." "You have seen me before." "I hev?" "Yes." "When?" Last night." "And w\Jo the divil are ye?" "I'm the man who brought thi s young lady here." "You are?" "lam." See here; do you t ake me for a fool because I'm a woman ? Look out, now, or I will g ive ye the broom anyhow, so I will." "It is the gentleman Mrs. Maguire BONANZA. BARDIE; OR, And are you enteriug into the plot ag'in aftber I've given ye c lothin' ?" But it's true, Mrs. Maguire." "It is, eh?" "Yes." '' Aud do you mane to tell me you are the man who brought that lady here l ast night?" "I am the same man, shure." Our hero fell to the brogue, and the widow bent her ears and a s t artled look came to her eyes. "Ye are?" she said. "I am." Where's yer whiskers? " I cut thim off." "Ye did?" '' 1 ... es.'' "And where are the clothes ye wore?" "It's aisy, shure, to change one's c lothes." "But ye tould me ye had no baggage." I found a friend, Mrs Maguire." "Ye did?" "Yes." "And why did ye cut off yer whiskers?" So me frinds would know me and me ene mies wouldn't know me." Well, there may be logic in that "Do ye moind, I knocked over the men who were carrying the "Yes, and now lt comes to me but I do ruiud yer voice.'' "Yes, and I am the same man, Mrs. Ma-guire." And what is yer name? "O'Brien." "It is?" "Yes .' And ye are afeerd of the men ye knocked over?" "I am; they were detectives." Our h ero did not think when he spoke, but he was immediately reminded, as an involuntary cry of distress fell from the lips of the lady. He saw his mistake, and said: Ye nade hev no fear." Come, now," said Mrs. Maguire, what do ye mane when ye say they were detectives? Is trouble ye will be get.tin' me, and I onlr, a lone widow seek in' to earn an honest livin'? "No harm shall come to ye, Mrs. Maguire, and whin I explain all to ye and make a propo sition ye 'll be well satisfied." "I will?" "Sllurely!" "How dove know that, sir?" I know you are a very sensible woman." "Well, well; thank ye for the comp lim ent And no\\-, what is your proposition?" I must talk the matter over with thi s lady first." Ah! it's a scharne yees hev bet ween yees; I see that, sir." ' On my honor, no." Meantime the fair g irl had sat, pale and trembling, with a terrified look upon her face. But it was not 1be look of a guilty person, by any means, so our hero decided, for he had fixed his eyes upon her several times, and read well her lovely face "See here; now, do ye moind," said Mrs. Maguire, "I do not loike this matter at all, au' I'll not let yees get me in trouble. I've a son, an' I'm moindiu' bis reputation, an' if there is evil between yees, go away. The lady is wel come to the night's shelter; sbure I 9ave it from the goodness o' me heart. But I m not harborin' thim as the detectives are lookin for -do yees moiud that?" "You shall have a full explanation, Mrs. Maguire " I sha ll ?" Well, the first I want is how ye spake in one moment wid a brogue, and tbe next wid the most illegant English Will ye explain that, ef ye plaize?" I will." "vVhin?" "As soon as you have permitted me to hold a few moments' private conversation with this lady." "Ye would spake to her in private?" "I would." "Well, well, I'm goin' to tile market; I'll l ave yees here, but ifs make it all plain to me when I come back ye will, or, faith, out yees go, and ye'll not get me in trouble." ''All shall be explained to you, Mrs. Maguire, and I assure you, on my honor, we are hon est people.'' "Ye may be, but it looks mighty quare to me, do ye moind? And you will hev to explain it all or I may turn ag'iu yees to save meself. Faith, it's me own boy I'm lukin' for, just re member that, plaize!" The woman went out, l eaving our hero and tile l ovely girl alone, and for a moment the gazed at each other in sil e nce, but at length Bardie said in a kindly and reassuring voice; '' It is necessary that you should confide fully in me.'' "I will," came the answer. CHAPTER XVII. "MAY I ask your name? said Bardie I told you my name on the steamer." "But have you observed I have never addressed you by that name?" I did not ob s erve the fact." I never have." "Why not?" It is not your real name." "How do you know?" she asked, with a smile, evidently for the moment forgetting her trouble. I so decided the moment you gave me the name, and I reached the conclusion because of the manner in which you gave it." You are very obsening." "I am." '' My real name is Grace Parrish.'' "Thank you." You are satisfied that is my real name?" "Yes." "You recognize it; and now you know how I am at your mercy?" "I do not." "You do not recognize the name? "I do not." And you are from Ireland?" You have not r ead the papers of late? "I hav e not, simply because, like yourself, I am a fugitive." A moment 1he girl was silent, and our hero said: "You need not fear to confide in me. Let me tell you something; I know detectives are on your track." A s hadow passed over the girl's delicate form. "I repeat you need not fear, for I know fur ther, whatever the cha r ge, you are innocent." "Ob. thank you for those words, but do you really mean them?" "I do." "Have you any intima1iou of 1he charge against me?" "I have not." "And yet you have decided that I am inno cent?" '' Yes.'1 Will you explain how you reached that decision?" Did I not tell you I was a fugitive?" "You did." I am innocent, and I can readily see how one can be a fugitive and be innocent." "In your case, ye, but how does your case serve as a parallel to mine?" "Shall I
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THE TREASURE OF THE ROOKIES. 13 he recovered from the first shock of surprise he said: "I still believe in your innocence " Thank you." And now you must tell me all the circum stances." "I will." Proceed, and do not reserve one fact from me; tell me all, and re s t assured that I am your friend, and will so prove myself to be for I can aid you and I will." I am the daughter of an English clergy man; my mother died when I was a mere child; I was educated by my father, who died two years ago, leaving but little of thi s world's goods behind him; I received an appointment, after my father's de at h, as governess to an heir; his guardian was his brother-in law; six months ago the lad, who was about six years of age, began to fail in health; he had previously been a robu st child; bis father had been a wealthy merchant; the bulk of his property was to go to the liLtle son, but in case of bis death the whole property went to his sister the wife of the boy's guardian. "The cause of the lad's sickness was a mys tery; the doctor was baffied antl pronounced it a decline; the l ad died, and after his death a terribl e discovery was made; a post-mortem re vealed the fact that the lad bad been slowly poisoned. I was in the house upon the tluy the inquest was h e ld. The boy's guardian during the in quest came to me. iVe were alone; bis face was ghastly. I shall never forget its ex pression. H e came to me and seized my hand. He trembled like an aspen leaf, and in a husky voice said : The doctors have just made a terrible dis covery. Alfred, my little brother-in-law, was murdered.' I gazed aghast; I had never suspected such a terrible fact; and then, after a moment, and with a wild crl are in his eyes, he said: Grace, I know you are inno cent, but, ahisl circumstances point to you 11s the murderess.' There came a fierce look to our hero's eyes, as he exc l aimed: "The villain: he was himself the assassin." "Hush!" said Grace, "let me piocee d. I declared my innocence, and he said: It is needless for you to proclaim your inno cence to me; I know you a re innocent, but circumstances point to you as the murderess; you must be saved." But,' l declared, I am innocent.' I know that,' he repeated; but you must flee.' !' 'Never!' I cried. "No, no! that would be acknowledging my g uilt.' Listen,' he said. I am on the track of the real assassin. If you will follow my advice you will aid me in proving his guilt; if you do not follow my ad vice you will be accused, and afterward it will be impossible to trail the real assassin.' Aud what would you have me do?' I asked. Merely go into concealment for a few days, and all will be well.' "And did you consent?" demamled Bardie. I did," came the answer. And there you made a fatal mistake," said our hero. CHAPTER XVIII. "YES, I did make a fatal mistake," said Grace, continuing her strange narrative. The man was seeking to cast suspicion upon you .'' ''Yes.'' "By your flight you aided him." "I did, bul li sten He llad always been very kind to me. He was a good-hearted man, and I can sec now that his good-hear tedn ess l ed him into troubl e "It is not good-heartedness to fix upon a n innocent girl a foul crime." "Let me proceed with my narrative. He gave me money, and, indeed, he had everyt hing arranged for my flight, and I felt very to him, for he made me feel that he was doing me a great kindn ess and liftiog me away from a great peril. He presented to me several facts that were, inde e d, unfortunate. The dead boy had been almost entirely under my care, and it did not seem possible that poison could have been admin i stered to him during s ix month s without my connivance." "But what m o tive could you have had?" Ah, there comes the most singular part of it. The boy's father had put a singu lar proviI sion in his will. He knew that his child would upon my mind. When I had the sume dream be placed under the care of a governess or some three nights successively I determined to flee.'' other hireling, and h e provided that said gov"And you made your escape unaided?" erness or whoever might be appointed to watch I did; I assumed a disguise and fled to Ire over his child should at the heir's arriva l at the laud, and from Queenstown I took th e steamer age of sixteen received one thou sa nd pounds, for America, and I am now convinced that the and in case of the heir's death previou s to the course of my flight has been discovered and age of sixteen the money was to be paid to the that I will be captured." governess who should be over him at the time "Never fear for one moment ; you shall not of bis death, provided proof of good and gentle be captured, but it does appear that you h ave treatment of the lad cou ld be ptoduced." been trailed, and that it was a pair of detectives It was a strange provision." who sought to kidnap you." "It would appear rn, bnt really all the pro"Were they English detectives?" visions of th e bequest were s uch as to insure for "I think they were." the lad gentle and good treatment, and faithful "How could they get to this country ahead instruction, and such gentleness and faithful of me?" ness in a teacher were to he rewarded l had They mus t have been in Ameri ca on some been the lad's governess for over two years, and other case and they w e re most likely commu it would be or ha s been made to appear that I nicated with from the other side; but now, poisoned the boy in order to secure the pen sio n mark my word s it was lucky you escaped and of one thousand pounds, which were to be p a id are safe." within three months following the little heir's "Until you come to believe in my guilt.'' death." "I will never believe in your guilt until you "And who benefited by the boy's death?" confess it." "His siste r the most l argely, but in case the "You will some day read the evidence against boy died ten thousand pounds were to go abso-me." lute ly to his brother-in-law." "And if I do?" Well, well, it was a will calculated to en" You will think it convi ncing." courage a fatal illne ss on the part of the heir, "Never; your word is better to me than evi-but go on with your story." deuce, but now see here. I have a strange tale I did flee, and almost immediately dete c t to tell; there is a singular coincidence in our ives were placed upon my track, and the papers fates. I am a fugitive." were filled with the horror of the murder, and "Yes, but you are not accused of murder." they were conveyed to me, and l read how terri-'' I am accused of murder and detectives are ble were th e circumstances that pointed to me on my track, and there is a reward of two thou as the murderess, and had I read the same cirsand pounds for my cepture, and I am as inuo cumstances as concernetl another I certainly cent as yourse lf. should have believed him The fair girl gazed in amazement. "A month passed, and l was securely guarded agaiost a rr est, and th ere were all maouer of rumors connected with my whereabouts; some maintained I bad commit t ed suicide, others pro tested I had fled to France or Italy; but one thing was certain, my flight had fixed the cer tainty of my guilt m the eyes of the whole commun ity." Ah, it was a sad mistake, your flight." "In one sense, yes, but only in one sense, for, had I not fled, I would have been found guilty and have been executed, and a ll would have been over." Our hero stared. What do you mean?" he demanded. I mean that, had I not escaped the evi dence was such that I would have surely been convicted; the real murderer, in order to save himself, would h ave let me go to the gallows." "You are satisfied the brother-in law is the real assassin?" ''lam." "You did not suspect him at first?" l did not." How did you come to discern that he was the murderer?" He came to me at the end of a month, came secretly and in disguise, and he sa id i t was ne cessary for me to flee from the country. I proposed that I should surrender myself and seek to prove my innocence, but be protested, and fioally shocked me by the announcement that lie believed in my guilt, but would aid me to escape all the same, believing a lso that when I committed the crime I was out of my mind, and it was then I first suspected him." '' And did you l et him know of your suspicions?" ''I did." "And di-cl you accuse him." I did not at the first interview, but later on I did. I had come to think the matter over, and many incidents were recalled that con vinced me beyond all possible doubt that he was the cold blooded assassin. He had done for the ten th ousand pounds what I had been accused of doing for the one thousand pounds, for I did not know of the provision in the will until after the boy s death; but, you see, I am a helpless girl, and all the plans had been ar ranged to make it appear that I was the mur deress." And you did accuse him of the murder?" "I did." And what did he say?" He threatened me; he told me I had sacri ficed his sympathy; he said he would not betray me, but l must l ook out for myself." Was that the last time you saw him?" "Yes." And how did you escape?" I had made up my mind to surrender my self when I had a dream mging me to flee to America. The dream made a deep impression CHAPTER XIX. BA RDIE proceeded and related hi s own strange story, and the g irl list ened attentively, and when he had concluded, she said : How strange that you and l should meet as we have!" "Yes, it i s strange; but now see here, fate and circumstances make us brother and sister. You must trust me, and you must permit me to treat you as though you were my sister indeed." I can not consent to any such arr angement." "You can not consent to any such arrangement?" "No." "Why not?" In seek in g to save me you will but betray yourself." "Don't let any s uch id ea enter your head; on the contrary, having you to serve me as a cover I can save myself, a nd a t the same time save you. But there is one thing: we can not make a confidante of ll'.Irs. Maguire, good old sou l that she is." If you will allow me to suggest, I think that we can, and if she cun be convinced of my innocence she can aid us both in concealing ourselves." Bardie thought a moment, and the fair Grace cont inu ed: '' If we can secure the co-operation of :Mrs. Maguire I will start in with hope, otherwise I s hall look for arrest, and indeed there will be no need for me to seek to avoid it.'' "Why?" I can not sta nd the strain." The fair gir l dropped another hint that sent an idea whirling through our hero's head, but h e said: Suppose she should feel it her duty to be tray you?" "We must take that chance. l need not be tray to her your secret; I a lone will run the risk." "I tlo not app rove of your plan." "Leave it to my jurlgmeut; I can so manage it that if she does not become our friend, my chances will not be imperiled more than they are at present." Bardie thought for a long time, and they argued toget her; and finally our hero consented to leave the matter to the lovely girl's judgment. Upon l\lrs. Maguire's return Bardie took his departure, promising to call again after the d in ner-hour. Relying upon his changed appearance, our hero walked around without any fear of reco g nition, although there was a reward of ten thou sand dollars offered for his apprehension, Upon leaving the rooms of Mrs. Maguire he walked around to the squa re where be had made the res c ue, determined to tak e a look at the house into which the detective had sought to

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14 BONANZA BARDIE; OR, take the girl. He discovered that the house was I cerity. Bardie was too well read in human nat an English hotel, or rather an English emigrant ure to be deceived, and he said hoarding-house, and as he passed along he saw "You need not have th e least fear, Mrs. the man whom he had met in the uptown restauMaguire: it's all right." rant the previous night. The man bore the mark "What is all upon his cheek and our hero look ed him The lady is safe straight in the face, but the man did not recog "Ah, it's aisy to say so; but shure thim denize him, and Bardie, as he walked a lon g, muttectives, they're the divil, so they are." tered: "You need have no fear. We will talk mat" Well, I reckon my change in appearance is ters over and make our arrangements, and now, all right when that fellow does not recognize my good Mrs. Maguire, you must enter into my ine." se rvice." One fact our hero had established; it was, in"Enter into your service?" deed a pair of English detectives who had sought Yes.'' to kidnap the girl, and, what is more, their act I can not do that, shure; I must look out was an illegal one and a clear case of abduction for me boy." without warrant of l aw. The men had evident"You can look out for your boy, and what Jy intended to smuggle the fugitive on an outi s more, you can give him that which will de going steamer and return her to England with-light your heart, I know." out going through the regular l ega l require"And what is that?" ments. "A good educat ion." I am glad to get on to that fact," muttered "How can I de. that, and I depindint upon B d me day's wages, goin' out to wash?" ar ie. It may serve well in case the worst I will attend to that part of it; so, see here, comes to the worst, and I will see those fellows Mrs. Maguire; I want you to go uptown, and in good time and I will g iv e them a few hints you will find a nice little house, and vou'll hire that may be of use to them." it." Bardie had really encountered two detectives, "Hire it?" and neither of them bad r ecogn i zed him, and he Yes.,, felt greater confidence. He spent three hours walking abouf the city. He was making him"And how will I pay the rint, shure?" If d d 1 r I will pay the rent, and you shall have se acquarnte with streets an oca it1es, or, money enough to provide .,0u with everything: as he put it," he was becoming a Yorker;" and l y k b 1 d and you shall send your boy to school. and you 1e was qmte a or er w en 1e returne to the shall act as protector to this young lady until home of Mrs. Maguire. such time as her innocence is established. and-" Bardie found Grace awaiting him; but the Bardie came to a halt suddenly. He saw a good mistress of the house was not at home, man advance to the door of Mrs. Maguire's and a shadow fell over his face. rooms, and be sa id, in a startled tone: "Where is lVIrs. J\faguire?" he asked. "Who is that?" She has gone out." "Did you make a confidante of her?" "I did." "And she went out immediately afterward, I suppose?" B Yes." You and I must l eave at once." "No, no; I must wait for lVIrs. lVIaguire's re turn." "How long has she been gone?" About ten minutes." "That is lucky; we will have time to gt!t away." "Get away?" "Yes." "Why should we get away?" She has gone to police head-quarters, you may be sure." To betray me?" "Yes." "Never; I would risk my life in her hands." "Have you told her your story?" "Yes." "All the facts?" ''Yes.'' "And does she believe in your innocence?" She does." She said so possibly." "She is a true and faithful woman; we have nothing to fear from her; she will prove a true friend." ' I wish I could feel so.'' "Wait until you see her and you will be satisfied." If we wait it may be too late." "For what?" "Escape." ""\Ve need not fear her." It is leaving all to the cast of a die." "vVait and see her." Even as Grace spoke Mrs. lVIaguire entered the room. The woman's face wore an expres sion of dr.ep concern, and our hero's heart foll. He mistook that look of concern for treachery. The woman closed her door and looked fur tively around, and after a moment, glancing at our hero, said: Well, well, did ye ever hear the loikes of the story this yonng lady tells? Well, well, but it's terrible! Faith, I'm losin' me sinses, so I am!'' said l\frs. Maguire. "Look me straight in the face, lVIrs. lVIaguire," said our hero. The woman fixed her clear, honest eyes on our hero, when the latter asked, in slow, delib erate tones: "Do you believe in this young l ady's lnno cence?" "Do I belave in her inno cence?'' "Yes.'' I do, as I belave in me own existence at this moment, so I do." There was no doubting the good woman 's sinCHAPTER XX. THERE came a smile to Mrs. lVIaguire's face as she said: Ye nade not fear that man." "Who is he?" My landlord, to be shure! An, faith, he will go away a disappointed man to-day." "He will?" "Yes.'' "How is that?" I've not me rint ready." Here, Mrs. Maguire-you are a friend, and you've found friends-pay the man and let him go, and we'll make our arrangements." Bardie passed over to the good woman money enough to pay her rent, and when she went forth to talk with the owner of the rooms, Grace rose, and approaching our hero, laid her hand upon his arm, and looking up sweetly in his face, said: You must not carry out your plans." What do you mean?" "You must not go to all this expense on my account." Listen: do not l et me hear one word from you from this time forth. You are my sister, you will do as I say; you are under my care and protection." "But I am not your s i ste r, and I have known yon but a few days." Fate has made us brother and sister in ad versity in the most remarkable manner." But you do not know that my story is true; you have no proofs." Why, yes; I have proofs." "You have?" ''Yes.'' "What proof have you?" "The proof is your bonny eyes. Now listen: this protest arises from a sense of pride, but re member the day will come when you can repay me eve r y cent." "Where will I, a fugitive, eve r get money to pay you?" "Your innocence will soon be established, and then in this land, with your talents and ac complishments, yon can earn all the money you need. Now mind, I will keep an account of all I expend on yonr account, and some day you can pay me back." Is that a solemn agreement?" "It is." On those terms I consent." There was a merry gleam in our hero's eyes when she spoke, and it was her inexperience that led him to feel that, under certain circum stances, the day might come when she could earn enough money to repay him. Mrs. Maguire dismissed her landlord and re turned to the room, when Bardie sa id: "Now then, madame, do you understand my plans? You are to find a nice little hou se, you are to buy nice furniture for it and make a home for this young lady, and your boy you shall s1md to school, and he sha ll become a man of education." The mother's eyes brightened. It had been the desire of her heart to g ive her son a good education; but, alas! it was lack of means that compelled her to put him to work instead. Barclie remained a l ong timetalkingover mat ters with lVIrs. Maguire, and finally he took his departure with the understanding that he was to call on the following afternoon to hear her report. Our hero had made up his mind to turn the detectives on a new scent. He was a very kee n fellow and capab l e of carrying out any scheme that might enter his head. He returned to his friend O'Shayne, and in the evening went to the theater, and, indeed, set out to learn New York through and through. When the theater closed Hardie walked up town and entered the bar room of a noted hotel, and there he found assembled a great company of men, and he was highly amused and enter tained, as everything w11s strange and novel to him. Be took a seat, and soon an elderly man took a seat near him, and still later a young man entered the place, glanced around, and finally advanced and took a seat near the e lder ly man. The two were soon engaged in an ani mated conversation. Barclie 'l>as not seeking to overhear what pass ed, but was compelled to do so or change his seat. Feeling it was just as convenient for the two talkers to change if they did not desire to he overheard he maintained his i;:osition, and the result was he fell into the knowledge of a stock deal. The two men were brokers, and one was giv ing the other some sure' points Bardie was up a little in stocks. He had played the game for a short season on the French Bourse, and he was not loath to get a "pointer" for Wall Street. He remembered that he had a pretty big contract on hand, and he knew he would require money; his five thousand would not last always, and, besides, if our hero indulged bis r eal tastes, be was quite an extrava gant liver. He enjoyed the luxuries of life as well as the next man, as the say ing goes, and he was just. that age when men J ove to be reckles s and extravagant in their expenditures. vVhen our hero returned to O'Shayne's place he had made up his mind to risk two thirds of his fortune on a stock deal. He did not betray his intention to his friend, but made up his mind to take the chance. Bright and early upon the following morning be was up and about; and, as it was too early for Wall Street, he took a lon g walk over the c ity, determined to improve every opportunity for making himself acquainted with the great metropolis. His walk took him to the river front, and he spent a long time lookin g at differ ent objects of interest, until, looking at his watch, he found it time to go to Wall Street. Bardie proceeded direct to th e office of the banking-house where he had received the pack age from Mr. Kneiss, and he recognized and went direct to the desk of J\ir. Brush. The lat ter turned pale upon seeing our hero, and warned him, by a signal, to speak low. Bardie paid no attention to the warning, but said : I've made up my mind to run in a margin on a stock that suits my fancy." The clerk understood the remark to be a "blind" merely, aucl said in a whisper: "The place is under surveillance." "Is it?l) "Yes; detectives are watching here every hour of the clay." Well, it's all right." Our hero spoke in a low tone when the sub ject of the conversation changed Why did you come here?" demanded the clerk. "You need have no fear; I am as safe here as anywhere. "Don't you recognize that if I was guilty I would not come here ? " I do not understaud." "Didn't the detective come back here after his interview with me?" "No." "Then you need have no fear; they're look ing for another man." CHAPTER XXL BARDIE went into a full explanation, and made lHr. Brush understand that it was all right:

PAGE 15

THE TREASURE OF THE ROOKIES. 15 t h at he had certainly thrown the detectives of! the track, as far as he was concerned, under his d i sguise as then assumed, and he again made his statement in relation to the stock So you r ea lly wish to invest?" I do?" But you had better hold on to the money you have; Wall Street is a dangerous place." It's win more, or lorn what I've got with me," said Bardie. "You a r e a sort of l\Joute-Cristo?" That is what I a m exactly." If you are bouud to risk your money, do not buy the stock you name." That is just the stock I wish to put my money in as long as I am spending a dollar that way." "I can g ive you a better 'point.' "I am taking the points' I have; and I wish to risk three thousand dollars." "Three thousand dollars on one deal!" ex claimed Brush. ''Yes." "But stock fluctuates; what will you do if you are compellell to corner.' " It's my way it will come." You will lo se eve ry dollar of your money "That's it; you ve named it; it's my money, and I've the ri 9ht to do with it as I choose." "You have. "And that i s the direction in which I wish to ris k it." As you choose, since you are so persistent, but you will be penniless inside of eight-and forty h ours .'' Let h e r go; it's all right." Bardie drew a e;heck for the amount and left the office, but not until he had uttered one caution: Do you mind." be sa id "if you attempt to know more than I do and withhold the purchase for the purpos e of showing me where I would have lost you will do so at your own risk. I wish you to mak e that investment for me, and if yo u are not willing to do so say so now." I am perfectly willing to do as you direct." It's all ri ght then." Two day s passed. Mrs. Maguire had found a nice little hou se far uptown, and our hero went with her to view it, and he bid Mrs. Maguire it for one year. "In me own n ame, shure?" ''Yes.'' "But I ll niver be able to pay the rint." Come with me, Mrs. J\Iagnire." The two went to a savings bauk, and our hero deposited one thousand dollars in the name of l\Irs. Maguire, and upon l eav ing the bank he said: '' There, I think you will be able to pay at least one year's,rent. " Well, well! what does it all mean?" ejacu lated Mrs :Mag-uire. "Sure you're a r eg ular l\fonte-Cristo.'' "I am?" "You are, shurel" "And what do you know about 1\fonte C risto ?" "That wonderful Frenchman?" "Yes." "Well, wasn t me son Mike readin to me all about him? Shure, l\Iike can read loikeaschool master, so he can-and many books has he read to his ould so he has!" "I reckon l\Iike i s a good son?" "He is, shure-there's none belher!" ' You will say nothing to llliss Grace at present." "And whin will I mov e into me new house, Mister Monte-Cristo?'' We will wait a day or two until you have it furnished." "Ah! and will ye furnish it?" I trust so." On the second morning following the deposit of the three thou sand dollars Bardie secured the papers early in the morning, and his eyes fell upon the stoc k report s He ran down the li sts and an exc lamation burst from his lips. "By a ll that's st range and wonderful," he excl aimed, "I've got 'em!" At a seaso n able hour our hero proceeded to Wall Street, aud was greeted cheerfully by Mr. Brush, the latter exclaiming: "It's wonderful!" "Eh what's that? inve stment has doubled!" Has it, now? "Yes; it is one of the most remarkable inci dents of the Street, the jump of that stock " And you were advising me not to buy it!" "I did so adv i se; but where did you get your 'tip'?" Never mind now; but will you sell? Later in the day Bardie called and rec e ived nearly six thousand dollars, a nd as b e s tarted to deposit the check in his bank, he muttered: "This is a wonderful country. Sure, dollars grow upon the bushes." Having made his deposit our hero proceeded to the hom e of Mrs. M ag uire. The two went uptown together. "I've been thinking over about the house," said Bardie. "Well, h ave you changed your moind?" "No; but it's the rent l'm thinking about." Shure, that's paid." "I know; but rent day comes around pre tty regularly, you know, and Mrs Maguire, I'm going to have you buy that house. "Buy it, shure?" "Yes." How can I buy it?" "I will give you the money, and you will buy it in your own name; you are a good, hon est woman "vVell, well, it's a Monte-Cristo you are, shure. Fnith, I'll expect to hear ye spakin' French next, so I will." Our hero wa s a good French scholar, and he r a ttled off a few words in French, and Mrs. Maguire leaped into the air with astonishment. "I knew it she cried I knew it!" "And what is it you "Ye are the real Monte-Cristo himself; yes, ye are, shure! Ten days passed, a nd Mrs. Maguire became the owner of the little hou se, anrl she had it newly furnished; and, when all was settled for, our h e ro counted up his balance and saw that he had about fifteen hundred dollars remaining. Enough for me," he said, since I'll make it fifteen thousand before I am three months older in this land of milk and honey and g old dollars." Mrs Maguire moved into her new house, and a nice room, nicely furnish e d and equipped, h a d been set aside for Grace Parrish Strangely enough, our hero had talk e d but lit t l e with the lovely g irl following the morning when the mutual explanations occurred between them. But two days after the settlement in the n ew hou se our hero called to spend the evening with his friends. He was admitted to the house by Mike, who had been well c l ad and was an attendant at one of the public schools. Grace came down to the little parlor to meet Bardie She closed the door and said: I desire an e xplanation from you, sir." "Is it sir yon say to me? No, no; call m e Bardie. " I can not permit you to provide for me in this manner. I shall go forth and earn my own living." "You will?" "I will." "When?" "At once." "Hol d on, Miss Grace! You will listen to what I have to say before you do anything so foolish CHAPTER XXII. TaERE followed a moment's silence, broken at length by our hero, who said: "l\Iiss Parrish, there is a strange similarity in your fate and mine; indeed, the coincidences are simply marvelou s You are an orphan without a relative in the world." It is possible that I have a rel at ive living here in America. My father had an oluer brother who came to this country many years ago, and for ten years he corresponded with my father; but for twenty years my father had not heard from him. He never received any intimation of his brother s death." The chances are that your un c le i s dead." "Yes; but the possibility exists that he still Ii ves, and I have an idea that I will endeavor to find him." Our hero lau g hed. He had been Jong enough in America to form some ide a of the va s tn ess of the country, and he knew how u se less it was to seek for a person who had been mis s in g for so long a time; but he merely suid: At present it would not be wise for you to inaugurate a sea rch, for you will remember de tectives are on your track. Remember a man who has committed a foul murder has arranged to have you convicted in order to save himself from the penalty of his own crimes." "No, no; that man would not turn against me.'' It is certain that he has turned aga inst you, otherw i se the detectives would qot be upon your tra ck. Now, listen: Mrs. Maguire has betrayed your secret; you have something to live for." The l ovely g irl' s face assumed a crimson hue. l\lrs. Maguire has betrayed my secret?" "Yes; there is one whom you love, on e before whose eyes you would like to he vindicated." The g irl s eyes fell, and the crimson blush was s ucceeded by a deathly pallor It is not necessary for me to say more in that direction. Yes, you have everything to live for; you are young, accompli s hed, and be loved by an honorable man You are now under a cloud, but that cloud will be r e moved. You will be vindicated; the really guilty assas sin will some day make a full and complete confessiou. '' "Never." Oh, yes, he will; leave that to me." "But why should you be my friend ? "Beca use of all men in the world I am in a better position to sympathize with you I am a fugitive and I am innocent ; I a m an orphan, but I have one advantage over you-I am a man. Now li 8 ten: you will find a hom e here with Mr s Maguire, and yon must reconcile yonrself to abso lut e seclusion for some months, and possibly for a year, but in good time you will be vindicated. In the meantime I will sea rch for your uncle. I shall be a wanderer over this broad land; I can not stay in New York. I am assured that the officers are on my track; I am being pursued by a more relentless enemy than you, but I can aid myself, you can not." But you are devoting your money to my maintenance." Do not speak of that. I have plenty of money; indeed, the want of money I do not know." You did not tell me this before." "But you must know I have pl e nty of money for I have bought and paid for this house and presented it to Mrs. Maguire. Just see what a benefit your misfortune has been to her. She bas a good home and a chance to indulge in the great desire of her heart, the educati o n of her son. Mike i s a smart boy. We will hear from him some day. Now not one word from you; here you will ab ide until the cloud that hovers over you clears away. "You are a good and noble man." Do not mention it; you and I met under the most remarkable cir c umstances, and there is a wonderful similarity in our fates. It's all ri g ht; promise me you will remain here until your good name is cleared or you hear from me." "You are going away?" "lam." "When?" "Possibly within a week, possibly within a few hours I do not know. I have told you the dete c tiv es I fear are on my track. I do not de sire to be captured just yet. The day will come when I shall proclaim myself; the day will come when your innocence will be established. Will you promise to abide here as I have asked? " First let me make an explanation to you." "Proceed." "Mrs. Maguire you say has reveal ed my se cret?" Yes; she did it unintentionally, but it is bet ter that she did-bette r for you." There is a man in England who studied with my fathe r. He is th e son of a rich m e rchant. We were thrown much tog ether, and we learned to love each other; but he dared not reveal the truth to his father, as hi s parent hopes, b eca use of his great wealth, to gain for bis son a wife of high soc ial standing. My affianced correspond ed with me up to th e time when this terrible charge was made against me. I have not heard a word from him since." But he did not have your address." "Yes: I wrote to him a letter giving him a full explanation. I received no answer. I wrote to him again, revealing my plans." "You w r ote to him revealing your plans?" "Yes. " Your plans for flight?" "Yes." 'I here came a shadow to the face of the llfonte Cr isto, for our hero had tak e n a fancy to the appella tion and had come to look upon himself as a sort of Irish Monte-Cristo. The shadow was the reflex of a suspicion that had flashed

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16 through his active mind. Bardie was a man possessed of a noble disposition, and he said: "Possibly he did not receive your letters." lt is possible." He really loved yon?" "Yes; I am sure of that; and he taught me to love him, for he loved me first." The girl spoke with sweet simplicity. It's all right, and will come out all right," said Bardie. I tell you that your innocence will be establi s hed; it is only necessary for you to escape arrest for a time and all will be well. You can return to England, only your name will be brighter because of your trials following this false charge against you; and it is possible I may find your uncle. It may be proved after all that you are an heiress." The Monte-Cristo spoke in a joking tone, lit tle dreaming at the moment how prophetic his words might prove. I believe Charles is true to me, and oh, how be must suffer! I would seek once more to communicate with him." "No; you must not. I demand that you promise not to do so until you have permission from me." Our hero spoke in tones of great decision. "You do not think it best?" No; if he loves you, this is but a test of his love. He knows that you love him-have sent him a full explanation. You have declared your innocence in the most solemn manner. If he does not believe your story, he does not love you; you do not desire his love." There came a moment's silence, broken at length by Grace, who said in firm tones: It is true." CHAPTER XXIII. OUR readers will remember that we intimated that our hero had indulged but little conver sation with Grace Parrish, and he had good reasons for his failure in that direction. He possessed a secret, and, incidentally, Mrs. l\'Ia gure bad made to him a revelation. The good woman in a conversation with Grace had asked if she had no friends, and the girl had told to one of her own sex her love tale, and Mrs. Ma guire had, as stated, incident ally repeated the story to our hero, and hence his studied re straint. Bardie held a mGre extended conversation with Grace, and made many pointed inquiries concerning her father's family, and especially did he make inquiries concerning the missing brother of her father. When our hero left the home he had provided for Mrs. Maguire he went to his own lodgings. He bad left the residence of his friend O'Shayne and had made a home of his own for reasons. He had hired furnished rooms and had his own housekeeper. Bardie had intimated that there were reasous why he might be compelled to leave Ner York, and the fact was that he had a intimation that a well-laid plan had been orgamzerl to cap ture him, and his being under constant sur veillance and the necessity for constant watch fulness was becoming irksome. The young man having money in his posses sion had provided himself with many disguises, and he was a sort of Protean genius. He was fully capable of carrying out his several as sumed characters Upon reaching his lod gings he set to work to assume a disguise, and he matle a transforma tion that was simply wonderful. Bardie had traveled much in Engl and, and was well acquainted with men and localities, and he was also well acquainted with the pecu liar patois of the different counties and towns in England, and besides he was an exce llent imita tor as well as a sp l endid linguist. He could speak German like a native, having been P.du cated at a German university, as related in our opening chapters. Having assumed his disguise he issued forth and proceeded direct to the English immigrant boarding-house, where he had seen the detective who was on the track of Grace Parrish. He entered the place, going into the bar room, and sitting down at a table ca ll ed for a glass of ale, speaking in broken English. The bar-tender, a regular cockney, was amused at the Dutchman's calling for ale, and said: It's beer you want." "No, I vos vant ale." "You are a German." '' Ya-a-s.'' "German's drink beer." BON ANZ.A. BARDIE; OR, '' I know dot, but I vos !if a long times in England." Where did you Ii ve in England?" "Vhen I vos first go to England I vent to Lemington, and afterward I vos !if in Birming ham, and den I vos lif in Chester." The conversation was in progress when the very man our bad set to pipe walked in, and he listened to the conversation; and later on, when our hero took a seat at the table, the English detective took a seat near him, and en gaged him in conversation, and he, too, re marked that it was a strange thing to see a German drinking ale. The detective had been in Germany and could speak a little of the lan guage, and he asked Bardie in German what part of Germany he had come from. Our hero answered promptly, speaking in most excellent German, and, as far as the de tective was concerned, the fact was established that he was indeed a geneuine Dutchman, and the conversation proceeued. "You have lived in England?" "Yes." How long cl id you Jive in England?" Six years." "How long have you been in this country?" Two weeks." "Only two weeks?" "Ya-a-s." "How do you like it here?" I vos like it, and 1 vos like it England." "Was there any special news in England when you left?" Veil, most of der English news is learned here dot vos very vonderful. Der bay der pa pers in this country to publish der news, but der vos one t'ing vat vos happen in England dot too make me surprised." "What is that?" "You vos heard about dot murder?" Our hero ment i oned names and incidents, and the detective was all attention at once. "Yes, I have heard about that murder. What do you know about it?" "I vos know dot der detectives in England vos looking up der tree." 'What do you mean? Veil, dot vos shust vot I mean." What do you know about the murder?" I vos know noddings much, but I vos know somedings." The detective eyed the speaker sharply, and at that moment his comrade entered the room and took a seat at the same table. The latter had evidently overheard our hero's first remark. You know something about it?" "Ya-a-s. ,, "'W"hat do you know?" Shust vot I vos tole you; dey vos looking up der wrong tree." "How?" Dey vos not looking for der real murderer." \Vho is the real murderer?" ' It vos strange dot nobody vos suspect the r eal murderer." "And do you know the real murderer?" "I vos supect him." What do you know about the case that leads you to suspect?" "All I know about der case I vos read in der bapers; dot vos all in one vay." All you know in one way?" ' Ya-a-s." What do you know in another way?" I know somedings of dot man Adranfelt." "You know something of Adranfelt?" 0 Ya-as." "He i s the brother in-law of the murdered boy?" 11 Ya-a-s.'' And what do you know about him?" "Veil, I vos know dot oof I vos a detective he vos der man I vould follow. Eh, you vos not read der case?" Yes, I have read all about it." "Veil, who vos you t'ought poisoned der boy?" The girl, his governess." You vos t'ought so, eh?" ''Yes." "Veil, you vos like everybody else; dey all t'ought so, hut dey vos all wrong, I vos t'ink. See, dey vos only search mit de girl, eh? Vy don't deylook up der mans? Now, I vos shust tell you one leetle dings. Dot mans Adranfelt, he vos say noddings until the girl vos get avay -he vaits a long times, eh ?-den all at once he out speaks, eh? Dot vos one leetle t'ing dot vos queer." Bardie proceeded and basing his theory upon the facts really in his possession, he pointed out some singular and remarkable circumstances that were certainly very suspicious as concerned the brother-in-law of the murdered lad, and when he had concluded the two detectives sat silent, looking into each other's faces. They had received food for thought. CHAPTER XXIV. As related, Bardie pre s ented a remarkable .statement of facts, anrl the two English deter.t ives we;e 'l'ery much impressed with what he had said, and we will stute that the same day one of them wrote to another detective in Lou don, presenting as his own ideas the theory that had b een so inp:eniously presented by our hero. In tile meantime the conversation had con tinued, the detectives asking many que stions and our hero making important answers. Bardie at length went forth from the place feeling he had played a good game, and having succeeded so well in one direction he retired to his lodging, and assuming a new disgui s e started out to interview another detective in a matter which more directly concerned himself. He still held to the character of a German, but affected the appearance of a young German student, ancl under the cover named he wan dered up and down Broadway for the whole day and saw nothing of the detective. W 'hen night came Barclie entered a well known hotel for his supper, and later on ad journed to the reading-room to indulge in a cigar. But a few moments passed when the very man he most desired to see entered the room, and the next question presented was how should he get int0 conyersation with the officer. Bardie was reading the paper, and in it there was an account of the rescue of the two men from the raft in mid-ocean, the incident having been revived because of the fact that there had come a report of the rescue of the crew and officers of the ill-fated steamer. There had been a German student aboard the steamer that had rescued our hero, and Bardie had held several conversations with him and had learned not only his name but his d e sti nation, he being determined to go right on to Denver, and it was the same recollection that had suggested to our hero the idea of taking the character of a German, one he was so well fitted to maint&in, and again, by speaking in broken German he was able to conceal the inevitable tinge of brogue characteristic of his talk wheu speaking English. There was a youncr man sitting near our hero, and the stranger addressed a remark to Bardie, and then the latter had a chance to refer to the article he had been reading, and he said: "I was on the vessel that rescued the two men from the raft." Bardie, as intimated, spoke iu broken Ger man, but not as broken as when he had been talking with the other detectives, and the mo ment he made the announcement of the fact that he had been on the rescuing steamer he observed that the eyes of the detective were fixed upon him. The officer did not approach him at once, but Bardie knew that the keen scented human sleuth-hound was on his track, and that sooner or later he would give a signal bark. The two young men continued in conversa tion for awhile, and the detective pretended te> be reading an afternoon paper, but our hero knew that in fact he was listening to every word that was spoken, and one of the talkers spoke just those words !Lat he desired the listening detective to overhear. The young man who had been talking with Bardie at length rose and left the room, and our hero commenced reading a paper, when the de tective crossed over and took a seat beside him. "1 think I heard you say you were on the steamer that rescued the two men from the raft?'' "Yes, I was a passenger." I have been deeply iu that rescue," said the detect.i ve. "It was a verr, pleasant day when they were brought aboard. "Did you have any conversation with them?" Yes, with one of them." Which one?" "The Irishman; the older gentleman did not appear inclined to talk to any one." "You are a German?" "Yes." "Have you come to remain in the United States?" H Yes.'' "Will you remain in New York?"

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THE TREASURE OF THE ROOKIES. 17 No; I will go west." The detective asked our hero a g r eat many quest ions about Germany and about him self and finally asked: Did the young Irishman make any confes sion to you?" "No, be did not make a confession, but he gave me his confidence." "Then yon have seen him s ince you have been in New York?" "No, I have not seen him, but I heard from him once." You heard from him?" "Yes.,, What did you hear?" He was to ca ll upon me. but sen t word that, for rensons 1 would imderstand, he would not ca ll, and that he expected to sa il the next day for Australia." The detective moved uneasily in his chair. He sent you a note, eh?" You seem to be greatly inte re ste d in that yonngman." I a1n." "Ab, I see," said the pretended young German "You see?" ''Yes." The pretended German had spoken fo a very significant tone when be had said "I see." What do you see?" demanded the detective. You h ave been following me." I have been following you?" "Yes." Why should I follow you?" B eca use I was a passenger on the steamer. Yes, I see it all; you are a detective." Our hero had worked matters down just where he wanted to get them. He had played his ga m e well. "You think I am a detective?" "Yes." And you think I have been following you?" "Yes." 'Vhy should I follow you?" I told you way and you came here and spoke lo me. I did not seek you. I think I've met yo u before, and you mu st have been follow ing me." You are mi,staken, young man " If I am mi sta ken why do you ask me so many questions?" I have a reason, but I never saw you until I came into this room. I did not know you had any knowl edge of the matter we have been talking about until I heard you say yourself that you were on that steamer." But you seem to take great interest in the incident." "I do." "Why?" "I will tell you later on. Now, answer me. You sav you received a note from the young Iris hman?'' No, I did not say I received a note." '' I thought you did." I sa id I had received word from him " And what was the word you rec e ived?" He said he was going to Australia." For reasons that you knew '?" "Yes.'' "What were those reasons?" Reasons that he had confided to me." "He expected to be arrested," said the de tective Ah, I told you that you were an officer." "Well, I am an officer, and I e xpect you to tell me a ll you know about this affair CHAPTER XXV. THE pretended student laughed in an amused manner, and sa id: I'd like to know why I must tell you all I know?" '' If you do not I will arrest you _'' "You will arrest me?" "Yes; unde r our American Jaw I can arrest you for havin g g uilty knowledge of a criminal." Bardie knew but little concerning our Ameri can laws, and believed it pos ibl e th a t the de tective told the truth; hut as in fact he really desired to make a confidant of the detective, he pre tended immediately to be considerably fright ened, and he sairl: "I am willing to give you all the information in my po ssess ion on oue condition. I have heard one side of the story." You have beard one side of the story?" "Yes.'' Of what story?" "The story told me by the young man who I was re scued from the raft. " He told you his story?" 1 Yes." "How did he come to tell you bis story?" "Because I had told him my own." "Then you have a hi s tory ? "I hav e." What dirl the yo ting man tell you?" "He told m e first hi s real name." What did he say his real name was, if you plea se?" He sa id bis re a l name was Bardie O'Conor. There was con s iderabl e significance in the question and answer. "And what did he tell you about himself?" Our hero proc eeded and told his own historytold the facts even to his meeting with the old woman, and the occasion of his assuming the name of Bardie, and the incidents th at followed his visit to hi s ancestral estates. The dete c tive was an inte r este d li stener, and when our h ero had concluded the na1 rative the officer said: Quite a romantic story." "Yes." And vou believe it? "I do.r' And you have not seen him since you arrived in New York?" ''No sir'' H e sent you a note? "No, sir; h e merely sent me a scrap of paper." By whom?" "A boy." He knew where you were stopping?" "Where are you stopping?" Bardie was prepared for the question, and had arranged to answer it. He had taken a room in f lodging-house several ni ghts in suc cession, under the di sgu ise of the German student, and und e r an assumed name, and he promptly gave th e add ress. "You have not heard from him since?" "No. " And you really think he has gone to Aus tr a li a? "I do." I am much obliged to you, young man; I see this fellow anticipated arrest." "Certainly; be was a fugitive." The detective did not say any more to our hero, and after sitting a few moments took bis departure. Bardie had prep a red himself and working a change in his appearance, he followed the de tective out, and saw him proceed direct to the address our hero had g iven. '''\Veil, well!" multered the fugitive; "what does that mean? Does be doubt my word, after all?" B a r die stole into the lodging-hou se, satisfied he had assumed a change in appearance that would conceal his identity. He saw the detec tive hold a consultation with the clerk who had charge of the rooms, and be saw him go up stairs to talk with one of the maids. Bardie followed up and got position on the floor above, nnd leaning over the baluster, overheard every word that passed as the cletective and maid held their t alk in the hall below llim. "You have charge of room 92?" said the detec tive. "I hev, sir." '' Have you ever seen anything of the lodger in tllat room? ' "I bev, sir." See here, my good girl, I see you are smart. I am an officer, and you can be of great service to me. I am after a G e r man who committed a forgery in Germany, and I have reason to believe that th e mau who lodges in 92 is the man I am after, and if you will give me any valuable information I will give you a five-doll a r bill." YOU will?" "I will." "And it's a German you're afther?" "Yes." "well, you're chasin' the wrong man when you chase the lodger. "I am?" exclaillled the detective, in a surprised tone ''You are.'' "How do you know?" "I know well enough." "But how do you know ? I'll tell you; the lodger is no German." "He is no German?" "No, sir "How do you know?" He is a Scotchman "A Scotchman?" "Yes." "I reckon I have not got the right room." "Yes, ye llev, if ye mean :Mr. Gu s tav Indig; for that mau lodges in 92." "But you say he is not a German " And n ay tll er is he, s ir; he is a Scotchman, as I tould ye." How do you know?" Faith I've h eerd him talk in' to hims e lf in his room, and I heerd him singing a Scotch tune one mornin', and besid e s that he i s in disguise, for I've seen him wi1... hi s wig off so I have, and h e may be a scamp and a forger, but he is no German." The dete ctive uttered a peculiar exclamation, and said: "You are sure?" "Av coorse I am sure." I'm much obligell." The detective started to go away when the g irl called : Ye h ave forgot, sir." "'\Yhat?" The five dollars There came a shadow to the aetective's face, and it crossed his mind that after all the girl was deceiving him, and had told the story for the money. I would give you the money, but I've no proof that your story is true " I d hev no rasin to tell ye a lie; no, s ir, what I told ye is true." You will solemnly swear it is true?" "I niver swear, but, on my honor, it is true, ivery word of it." ' And why did you not report the circumstances in the office?" "I did." "You did?" "Yes.'' To whom?" ''The night watchman." "You t old him just what you have told me?" "I did." Here is your money, my girl." The det ect ive paid the five dollars and pro ceeded down-stairs, and our h ero from above stairs muttered: "I am in good and had luck-in good luck in having l ea rned of my dan ger, but in bad luck in being thus hounded Hang the girl! She has t a ught me a lesson, howev er, and I will know how to act in th e future; but one thing is certain, that fellow mean s to capture me at all hazards." CHAPTER XXVI. THE detective went down-sta i rs and asked for the;, watchman, but l ea rned the man did not go on duty until night Bardie watched until be saw the officer go away, when he descended and stole out of the house Matters had assumed a very serious as pect, and he made up his mind to leave New York. H e came to the conclusion with a great deal of regret, but the circum s tances were suoh that no other alternative remained to him. Our hero spent the evening at the home of .M:rs. l\iaguire, and he announced the fact that i t was necessary for him to leav e New York. "Are you really determined to go?" asked Grace. "I am really determined to go, and now I've advice to give you. Do not write to a living soul; do not make any attempt to discover your unc le, but remain in seclusion for a year if necessary, and watch tile papers daily, and some day you may read good news." Will you explain?" "I will. I have had an interview with the detectives who are on your track. I have cer tainly diverted them from pursuit at present. 1 know the officers ar e here on another affair, and they will not waste any time searching for you at present, a nd if you just 'lay low where you are you will be all right "And why can not you do the same?" "My ca se is very different; I h ave a relent less enemy pursuing me, and the officers have got on my track; they have a greater incentive than the advertised reward. I know if I re mained I wou l d be discov e red, and before I'd wear a pri son garb and stand trial I'd kill my self No, I must go." There came a sad look lo the face of Grace, and in plaintive tones s he said: "lf you go away I will be alone and friend less in New York." Will ye?" excla i med Mrs. Maguire. Faitb, ye are very comp li mentary to me."

PAGE 18

18 "I do not mean, J\Irs. 1\Iaguire, just as it sounds, lmt yon ca n not advise me as my dear friend can adyise.'' "Well, h e has given ye advice to last you for a year.'' I have nothing to live for," muttered the g irl. You forget Charles," said our h ero. A blush mantled the girrs face. Yes," s h e sa id, that is true.,. Remember, J\Iiss Parrish," sa id our hero further, I a m fully satisfied yonr innocence will be established. and the day will come when you can return to England, and, to tell you the trnth, I do not believ e 1hc day is far removed. Will you act according to my advice?" I will; but we may me e t again some day." "It i s possible: but it will be many years from now, mo st likely. "Why so?" '' I am satisfied I will be hounded over the earth; I am satisfied I ill be traced from place to place." '' But your innocen ce will be established some day." '' IL may, and it may not; I can not tell. One thing is certain : I will have no re s t as long as my enemy live s unless-" The young man s1oppcd o h o rt. "Unless what?" asked th e fair girl. "I ean not tell you now." "wm you leav e me some remembrance of you-some mark which will se rve as an identi fication of each o t h e r s hould it so h appen that we do not m eet until afte r many years?" "You have a riug upon your finger." The g irl removed it in stant ly. It is the old, ol 1 l tric k," sa id Bardie: but we will adopt it," and bet1Yeen bis powerful finge r s he spl it the rin g in half. There," h e said; you take one, I will keep the other." I s hall never forget yon!" Thank you.' And so me clay I may wish to communicate with you." "Well?" "On the first clay of every year I will put my addr ess iu the 'Personal column of the New York Ileralcl. ' A good scheme,'' said Bardic. And how about your address?" "It may not be cnvenient for me to do so, but if circumstances permit it I will commnni Catc with you Little di1l either of these two realize at the moment what a r eal ly delightful reward was to be the outcome of the arrangements they were making at that m olllcnt, and n e ither realized the grand fortunes that awaited them both, n o r did one realize the wonderful ad ventures through which he was to pass, and one of the m 'ms to occur that very night. The conversa tion between them was pro longed. The fair girl did not seem to be willing for BarLlie to go away, and she looked so lovely and seeme d so loving the young man was not at all anxious to depart, and despite the fact that he had schooled his feelings, he could not })reveut the m en tal exclamation, "Hang that rascal, Charles!" At l e ngth I3ardie was compelled to depart, .and when he rose to go the fair girl said: I wiil sec you once again before yon leave Kew York?" "Yes, I will see you once again, if possible, but, r emem\Jcr, you a rc to obey my instructions whether we meet or not.'' "I will obey your in s t ructions to 1be l ette r." "I helieYC a fm1 months will see your innoestablished, and then-" "well'!" "You can return to EoglanYe owe rent; I liave not oue BONANZA BA.RDIE; OR, cent. I have no money to buy them bread. If the rent i s not paid to-morrow, or at least a part of it we will he turoecl into the st reet." What you tell me i s the truth, my good \VOtnan ?" "It is the trnth, sir, as sure as we two stand face to face, a nd as sure as some day we will stan d before the Judgment seat." Bardic drew from his pocket a roll of bills, saying: "Here, my good woman, take i t; you are welcome to it. The woman took the money, and Bardie walked away. H e had gone but a few squares when a voice called to him: Look out ; you are being tracked!" "Well, what do you want here?" "I want Bardie O 'Conor." "Yon do?" ''Yes." "You have come to the wroug pla ce for the man you name.'' "Yon deny your identity?" I deny nothing. Your impertinence does not entil l e you to a denial. " All r ight; but listen to me: I propose to arres t you .. " Arrest me?" ''Yes." What for?" "You know well enough; but you can tell me your story and I will consider it. " Oh, you are very !duel, but I have nothing to tell you." CHAPTER XXVII. Will you go with me quietly?" BAnDIE was taken aback, hut was perfectly "Go where?" cool as he g lanced around and saw the woman "To headquarters." whom he had just aided standing in a door"It is tough to be led out at midnight." way How she had got aronnd ahead of h i m "But you do not want to make a row?" he ditl not kno\\r, but he \vas q_uick, aud said: No.'' I will walk slow. l\Ianage to get ahead of "And you will go quietly?" me Keep wal king, and tell me what you mean, I will if you will give me any good reason so no one "ill know you are talking to me." why I should go." Our hero, while speaking, kept walking along, "You are accused of and his utterance was rapid. "I am?" A few moments later a woman crossed from "You are." an opposile co rn e r and passed on ahead of him, "Who is mv accuser?" and as she walked she managed to say: "You know well enough; it is no use for you "I started to follow you when I saw tbat to deny your identity. I have you down fine." some one else was on your track. I desired to "And you want me to go ith you?" thank you, but when I saw that some one else "Yes." was following I lai1l back and watched and As a prisoner?" made sure. It is possibly a thief who saw you "Yes. g ive me money, and wlio means to rob you. "See here, I will admit I am Barclie O'Conor. I ran around and got ahead of you to warn "You admit your identity?" you." "Yes. ,. "It is all right," said Barclie. "I am much "And you were the young German who obliged, but I ca n take care of myself. Now, talked with me at the New York hotel? you go on to your home and re l ieve your fam"\Vas I?" ily. You are welcome to what I have given "You were." you." Bardic laughed, and said: The woman kept on to the corner, and then Do I look like a German?" disappeared down a cross-street. "No; but you are a v ery smart man." Bardic knew well enough it was no thief. He And you want me to go with you?" made up his mind that a detective was on his "You must." track, and he determi ned to throw liim off if But I may fight." possible. The office r shewed hi s wcapo11, and said: The fugitive kept walking straight ahead for "Make one move and you are a dead man. I several squares, :incl tlicn be made a sudden will take you dead or alive." turn and caught sight of bis pursuer and so tlie This is hard on students." chase continued for fully half an hour, when "You're a student, ell?" Bardie con c l ucled he had thrown the man off Y cs." hi s track, and he started for h i s home, mutterI See here, I will give you a point. I do not desire to be ban.I on you. I do not think you I must get away at once, they are closing can b e returned to Irel and-not if you get a good in on me, and at any moment I may be arrest-l awyer; but l must clo my duty." eel." The young man reacherl his lodgings at I am an innocent m an." length, and wben in his room sat down to think "It is possible you are, but you must go with over the situation He did not disrobe and re-me a ll the same." tire, although it was very late. Probably lialf I will, on
PAGE 19

THE TREASURE OF THE ROCKIES, 19 "I can not give you any more chances than I have already. "You say there is a man here from Ireland?" '' l.es." What sort of a lookin g man?" The de tee ti ve
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20 "By all thnt's unfortunate," muttered Bardic, "I am greatly harassed! There are two of them, and th ey ha vc their eyes on me.'' Our hero did not move or betray any trepida tion; he even fixed his eyes several times direct l y on the officer, and he was as cool as a cucum lier when he saw the detective approaching him, and muttered: Well, well! Now the trial begins, but I am ready." CHAPTER XXX. B.rnmE had discerned correctly. The detect iv e approached him, and asked: What time does the train go?" The fugitive put his hand to his ear with the characteris tic look of helplessne ss of a deaf man, and asked in return: "What did you say?" "What time does the train go?" The old man rose and put hi s face close to the lips of the cletect i ve, and with his hand still to his ear, ancl repeated: "What did you say?" "What time does the train go?" '' Whiclt train?'' demanded the pretended old m a n. The train we take." "What train do you take?" "The twelve o'cloek train," ca m e the answer. That i s the train I take," said the old man. "Where do you go'I" "Eh?" "l'Vhere do you go?" "Albany." Do you live there?" "No." Where do you Jive?" "Albany." The last answer was a cunnin g one. It was really an indication of genuine deafness, and a very characterititic one The pretended old man harl just answered he did not live in A lb any, and when asked where he did Jive, answered, "Albany." "You Jim in Albany?" "No." "Where do you live?" came the quest ion." "Eh?" \
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THE TREA-8URE OF THE ROOKIES. 2 1 ing in di sguis e, l>ut one tbing I know; whoever you arc you will lie glad you aided me to escape when you hear my narrative.'' The conversation l>etwcen the two men had pas sed rnpi otb were eating, and tin ally our h e ro s aid: I urn \\'ith Y O U I will take the chance." "You will ne,er regret it. And now I will re turn to the station. You come a few moments later, and do not notice me or speak to me until we are seated s ide by sid e in the train; and then let m e op e n th e c omersalion, and I can trust you to play your part well. But remember, you must stick to th e d e afness a s a good dodge." "All ri ght; an d you will plea s e remember all I have s aid." I \\'ill." The stran ger returned to the depot, and looked a s demure as could be, and a moment after his return one of the detectives approached him. "You were talking to the old man over in the re staurant?" "I wa s tryin g to talk to him." Tning t o talk to him? "Yes, liut h e i s so deaf. I do not see how he gets I think it is dangerous for him to trave l alone. The dete c tive walked away, and to the cleri cal-lo o kin g man two fa c ts were established on top of the confe s sion he had made to our h e ro. He had not be e n recognized, was not under suspicion, and the pretended d eaf man was still under suspi c ion, and the forme r fact explained why the detcetives had not entered the restau rant. Having no suspicion of the preten r led clergyman, hoped to get what information they need e d from him, as lrnd they been seen in the s aloon th e deaf man, if really a crimin al, would have b een on his guard. A few moment s passed, and our hero entered the saloon, and in a moment he discovered that the information of the stranger wa.s correct in one partic ular; th e detectives were indeed still watc bin g him, noel not quite satisfied as to his real irle utity, and while our hero was revolving the matt e r in his mind the door was opened for passengers to go aboard the train. CHAPTER XXXIL TnE cl e ri cal gentleman made a rush for the train; our hero moved more slowly, l>ut in time got aboard. Ile sa\'> that he ,,as being follo1\ed and watc hed and licgan to realize that if the cleri cal g entleman was not up to a trick that it might prove, after all, a lncky meeting. Bardic moved ou until he came to where the s tranger was seated, "hen he asked if he" conlcl occupy part of th e scat. "Certainly,'' came the ansn er. "Eh?" cried Bardic putting hi.s hand to his ear. You can ;;it here if you want, my friend came the au s wcr, spoken in a tone loud enough to be overheard by every one in the car. Thank you," said Bardic, and he look the seat, and ob eeu too smart for me." '' :F'or you ? '' ''Yes.'' It may be me." "No; but yon need not fear. Remember, even if I am doomed I will not give you away." "What makes yon think there is trouble ? " I caught a glance of that fellow's eye as Le touched bis pa rd on the shoulder." You think they are on to you?" I fear they are." All the passengers around were asleep, or try in$' to, and little attention was paid to what neighbors might be doing, and the two fugitives were enabled to talk without l>eing observed. "What will you do?" demanded Bardic. "I do not know." There are but two of them" said our hero. "Two; one too many for me." ''But I am with you for lJetter or worse.'' "You arc?" ''Tes." "You can do nothing." "But ire can." "No." "Why not?" I will not fight ; I will not harm them. They are doing their duty." "We need not harm them, but we can save ourselves." "You are safe now." "Am I ? "Yes." You are the same." "I an1 ?" "Well, you shall be as safe as am I before I l eave yo u." 'No, leave me to my fate." We shall see. llleantime the two officers had goae to a rear car, and the one ,,-ho had summoned his com panion sa id : We have been barking up the wrong tree. " Eb? On the wrong lay ?" "Yes." And we can not leave the train until we r each Poughkeepsie." That's all right." I do not understand." Our man is on the train." Our man i s on the train?" Yes; but he is not the old deaf man." "Where is our man?" "The fellow in the same seat with the deaf man.'' "Get out!" '' It's true.'' "That is a c lergyman." "Is it?" "Surely." "We have been well fooled, but we're all right now; that man is Tom Gadding." "Nonsease1 "It's true." "Impossible!" \Vhat makes you think so?" '' Tom Gaddiag could never assume that role.,, "You think so?" "l-es." You arc mistaken. I've jus t got all the points. I tell you that is our man and we are in lnck after all." "You a r e sure?" "l-es." But where did you get your clew?" "I had jus t a slight susp i cion : I saw tho s e two go into the restaurant together, and I jus t m ade up my mind to have my eye on them." Yon did not say anythin g to me." "No, I had a point' there." "And are you sure you are right?" I am dead sure. "How about the old fellow?" "He's a pa11 I reckon; bnt don't you notice how nice they rnn together? I'm an old hand, Andy, at this bu s ine ss. I tell you we ve got our man." But the oth e r fellow?" "He's on l y a convoy, that's my idea, a 'cov-er for the other one." Will you nip them both?" ''No; one is all we want.'' "How will you do it?" "We must think it out. \Ve may have to kill him." He is a bad one, eh?" I just thought I'd talk the matter over. That fellow is a dead shot, and possilily armed to the teeth under his clerica l dre s s. If he makes fight one of us goes down unle s s we get on to him so quick he can't 'pull.' " Will you take him in the train?" "No; that will not do, we will not have room, hut I only wish we had 'got on to him' before we left York." We stop at Poughkcet)sie?" ... Yes." "\Vcll, what' s your game?" "\Ve will have to chance i t there, and it's my idea one of us three is a doomed man." CHAP'fER XXXIII. A the two detectives stud i ed each other's face, and possibly the thought was rnn ning through their minds which of them would be the doomed man in caRe the chances were reduced down to an average of two. You will do your work at Ponghkeepsie," said one of the officers. That's my idea." You antic i pate he will leave the train?" "Yes." Why not wait our chance and shoot him down like a a clog while in the act of leaping from the train'/ Why should we take any chances?" No, we can not do that; ia the first place there is a possibility that we are mistaken, and then again we might not be jnstified. You know there will be a hundred witnesses, and they would swear we did not make an attempt to arre s t him, and sympathy always goes with the dead, but know, even a de a d crimin a l and still further, our warrant calls for an arrest, not a murder." "I should a l ways feel I was a murderer if we were to sh0ot that man down in cold blood without having made an attempt to arrest him.'' What is your scheme?" I have thought over several plans .'' Ami have you deci L lcd ?" '' I have a suggestion to make.'' "Go it." "One of us will jump in on him, and the other will stand by with a cocked revolver, aud if he makes fight then shoot, and he will be the d o omed man. " A good scheme." You like that idea for a plan?" "I do." Who will pounce on him?" I rill." And I will stand by with the cocked weapon." Hold on; that won t do." "Well?" "You pounce on him. You may have s c rn ples as to shooting, and may make up your mind when too l ate.'' ''And fear you may fire too soon. " You uccd not fear." '' You will hold your temper ? "I will." All right, then; that is our plan." while the two deteetives were talking Bardic and the clerical looking gentleman sat with ap pre h ens i ve express i ons upon their faces; hut as the time passed, and the detectives did not re tu ru, our hero said: I reckon we were mistaken." How?" They have not marked us." "Don't you run away with that id ea." \Vhy do they not come and attempt an ar rest?" They are arranging their plans. They will not attempt it until we reach Poughkeepsie. They think I will leave the car.'' L et's do i t said Bardie. \Vhy, man, we are running at the rate of

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22 forty.five miles an hour. It wonk! be certain death to leap." "I don't m ean that; we will not l eao, but how long IJefore we rea c h Poughkeepsie ?;, "We ought to be th.ere in alJout thirty minutes." I have an idea. " \\-ell?" You arc a quick man?' "Yes." Go forward to the other car." 'Well?" I will follow you." "B,11J.! They will have us dead sure then." "Not if we can get in the baggage car." \Vhat do you mean?" .. We will make a change; I will take yoLu disguise, you cau take mine." "A good sc heme, if it were practical, but we can not work it, we have not time. It woukl have been all ri;ht if we had worked the game before we left New York." \Ve can work H afterward." "No; I am a doomed man. They arc dead on my track; th ere is no hope for me now. But you take <:are of yourself; I believe you are a good man and I d o not desire to run you inthc same danger as myself." "See h ere my friend; I like you. I have not known you Jong, but I h ave no friends in tl1is country, and I've l)eeu in tight places be fo re. I'll staoLl by you. Now, remember, keep cool, no matter what happens, and I'm your man, and I am \\ith you clean througll. '' I do not reli s h being taken." You sha ll oot be." "You will stand by me?" "To the death." 'Ko, no: we must not come to death deals. I have no blood on my hands now; I never will luwe I can s ni!e r; I can not kill-that i s, with out sufficient provocatiou. As I said thcs c men arc doing th eir duty; I will not harm them." "But you arc willing to escape ?" Then leave the affair to me." All ri ght; I will trust to chance." How did you di sc over their plan?" asked Bardie. They expect I \Vill leave the trnin for refres hm ents at Poughkeepsie." 'And then they will pounce on you?" ,. Yes." "All ri ght, let them pounce; \\"C will be ready for them." Remember, no harm must come to them." That's all right." The train thundered on, and at l ength the shr ill signal whi s tle for a sta ti o n and a stop 5oundcd. The detectives had not re appea red in th e car. Herc i s Poughkeepsie," said the stran ge r. "All ri gb.t Do not mind me. You get o!I the car and go for refre sh ment s, and leave the r est to me If these men do not come near you do not attempt to board tile train again, and after it starts I will be at hand. You just lay arouml and look out for me l fear you mean rr..ischief." "Do you?" "Yes.'' You need not; I am not a murderer." But you may thiak yourself justified." "You need not fear; you do not know me; I have a way for getting men off my tra ck with out killing them." Tell me what you mean to do?" I can in a few \\ords." Do so." I mean to save you from arrest, that's all." "How?" "Oh, yon will see when it is clone. " Yon will force a fight." "Will I ?" "Yes ; you do not know these men; they are old hands, veterans and wllen tb.ey start in they mean business." You know them?" "I do." "That's all ri g ht. I do not care if they are veterans, as you call them; they shall not cap ture you." I haYc your promise there shall be no blood shed at a ll hazards." BON ANZ..1:1. BARD IE; OR, CHAPTER XXXIV. BARIJI E was cool as a cucumber, and that was one of hi s good traits; and it is an excellent and useful characteristic in an emergency. Coolness enables a man to do more at a critical moment th a n any other human attribute. The clerical gentleman rose aud left the car, and a few seconds later our hero left the car. Ile saw the two ofticers. Re was watching for the m. He saw them glide after the clerical looking gentleman, and he saw one of them touch him upon the slloulder. Can I speak to you a moment, sir?" sa id the detective. Onr hero 's late com panion was perfectly cool, as h e repeated : Speak to me?" "Yes.'' '' IV hat do you desire to sa:v to me?'' "You were talking to the deaf man in the car?" 1 I 'vas." Will you step this way. I wish to ask you a few questions?" The clerical gentl e man considered a moment. He saw the game. They desired to get him away from the crowd, and under all the circum slauces he favored the plan hims e lf. If he was to be arrested it was l.Jetler, and if there was to be a c hance for escape it was still bet.ter; but h e did oot acquiesce at once, but said: I do not see why you should question me about that man." "You know him?" "Yes." I wish to ask you some questions." Do so here." I have a reason why I desire you to step beyond the crowd." And I will lose my supper." I will detain you but a moment." The clerical mau steppe d along with the de tective. They walked do1Vn the long platform to the end of tlJC building, and stepped across the track behind a lot of freight-cars. It was a v ery singular proce eding, but, as it clrnucerl, bolll men were agreed as to the plan, although from dilleren t motives. The moment tlley were behind the freight cars tb.e detective s udrlenly grasped hold of tb.e clerica l gentleman by both wrists, and ex cla imed: "Tom Griddiug you are my prisoner!" At the s ame iu sta nt Detective Number two leaped forwarLl, as though appraring from the g ronnd, and he exclaimed, as he aimed a cocked r evolver at the man's head: "Show fight, and you are a rlead man." The words had h ardly left the lip s of Detective Number two when he went sprawling, and as he fell the pistol was kicked from his grasp, and at tile same instant the clerical gentleman broke loo se from his captor, and dealt him a blow that downed him. The wllole episode occurred in a few seconds. Cover your man," said Bardie, and if he speaks s ilence him." Our hero l eaped upon his man, and quick as thought went tllrough his clothes and found a pair of handcuffs, w hich he clapped upon tile man's wists, and, taking the hint, Tom Gadding a l so found a pair of handcuffs and c lapped them on the wri s ts of his man, when suddenly there came a shout, and half a dozen men came rushing to the scene of action. Ah, you villains, we've got you this time," sa id Bardic. Strong men crowded around and asked ques tions and Bardie sail!: "We are a couple of detectives; we've been shadowing these men and we've go t 'em." The two detectives protested, and announced tllemselves as the detectives, but tb.eir protes tations were received with laughs of derision. As the srtyi ng goes, our hero had the bulge oo them-they were handcuffe d, and tile condi tions favored the fugith-es. The two det ectives protested vigorously and Bardic, who h ad rec ove r ed his heariag in a most r e markal.Jle manner, said: That's it, my beauties, protest, but you will have a better c hance when we get you back to York." :Ko." The signal whi stle sounded, the train was I will accept your word." about to start, and the traiu-men and passen, That i s a ll right." gcrs hurried away on. The t rain began to slow up, and soon came to Barrlie said: a halt before the flashing lights of the Pough" Tom, we'll l ead the rascals down the road keepsic sta ti o n, and our hero sa id: a bit amt take them up to the hotel till morn.. Now is your time." in g I reckon we've got 'em good enough." The two dete ct ives sought to protest ao d r e sis,t: when Bartlie wllispercd: If you fellows make any troql.Jle we 'll silence you, do you mind?" The two m en w ere compelled to walk along, and two or.three idle men attempted to follow, when Bardic ordered them back; and, when th e m e n refused to obey the order, he dre w a weapon-the pistol h e had captur ed from the d e t ective-and tile men scattered. The two fugitives hurrie d their m en do,vn the track, and came to a pluce where a lot of boats were moored. Bardie led the way down to the river. One of the boat s had the oars in it, and tile two dctccthcs \\ere tos s ed into th e boat. Our h ero, as our readers kn ow, was a splendid oarsman, and he rlrorn the bortt for ward just a s a man came running down to th e river-bank, shoutiag. Is this your boat called Bardic. Yes; bring it back. "IV"e will in about half a u hour. 'Ye do not want your old boat, and w e will pay you well for the u se of it. "Briug l.Jack my boat!" "Yes, in half an hour," ca lled Bardie, and he pulled more vigorously. What are you rnsc als going to do?" de manded one of the clctccth es. See how you fellows can S\\ im with yonr hands tied," said Bardic, in '.I cold, r e lcntlcs::; tone. "You m ea n to murder us in cold blood. "No; in cold wat e r my friend. "WhaCs that?" suddenly demande d Gad cliag. Tb.e llight was very dark, and the f'Jllash of oars wn s b ea rd "It's the fellow coming after boar. L e t him come; we ll drown him with these other fellows.'' Tb.e l\rn detectives mt side by s ide like a pair of s tatue s east in bru nze A ruoment later and the man in the boat came along after th em, and Bardie cu1seLl ro\Ying and waited for the man to c o me aloogsiLle "'ell, what do yon wautf' "My boat." "And you want ns to get out of it'(' "I waut you to pull back ashore." "And suppos e we refu se" "I will hav e you arrested." YOU WiJI ?" I will, by thunder!" "All right, sonny; call a policeman. Even the detectives were compelled to laugh. '' See here, my friend, you keep boats t0< hire?" "I do." Consider this one hired." "Tb.at won't do. " Pull up here, and I will pay the money. "No; you fellows are lhierns." "You're right, my man," sa id the dctc ctirn. "You pull back ashore and give tb.e alarm. CHAPTER XXXV. "You can't play that on me, said the man; I'm no countryman." lt was Bardie's turn to lau g h am! he did so right heartily. "Come" cried the man; "will you g h e m e my boat 1'' "And do you expect us to walk ashore 1" "No.'1 What will we do ? "Give me my boat." See here, Mi s ter :\fan, you annoy me." "You fellows turn round \Yith that boat ancl pull ba c k to where you came from." There came a sudde n report, aocl a l.Jullet whistled over the boat owner's h ead. The man utte red a shriek, and commenced to pull away like mad, and r esu min g his oars, Bar die pulled toward the oppo s ite s hore, and in due lime he arrived, aarl the two detecti,es were as sisted out of the boat. "Now, my friends," said Bartlie, you are in luck." Who arc you?" asked one of th e detect ive s." I'm a stranger, eh? 11 l'"es." Well, I prefe r to r ema in one. "We will get you so me day; l.Jut I \rill tell you this much, we arc not after you." "Oh, thank yo11!" "And as to Tom Gadding, \\e'll get him some day, and then we wut make him pav for this job. "You fellows are not

PAGE 23

THE TREASURE OF THE ROOKIES. 23 to be. You ought to admire the manner in w!Jich it was doue." We do admire the manner in which it was done-it was well clone; but we'll do our act yet.., Oh, you fellows arc tragedians, I sec; you do the heavy act. \Veil, we are only come dians. \Ye do the farce, you know; aud now you fellows can walk the track to Sing Sing; am! c ross over quick or the countrymen may take you for run a ways." Take these things off, you fellows; will you?" Why should we? They belong to you," said Bardie; and he added: "Now, gentlemen, goodmorning; will soon appear; llut rcmcmller, if you ana I ever n1cct again it will go harder witll you than it has this tim e; good night, sweetheart, good-night." Bardie pulled away from the shore, and headed llis boat up st ream. \\That will you do?" asked Gadding. What will I do?" ''Yes.'' "I will pull up s tr ea m a mile or two and land." Ou this side?" '' l ..... es." "\Yhy?'' "\Veil, those fellows will think we have gone back to the other side." "I reckon you have it right. We have lost our baggage," said Gadding. "Not wuch," sa id Bardie. I have mine here." Ollr hero had ingeniollsly stored all his really valuable baggage abollt bis person, and as be pulled along h e said: "I've a change of clothing for both of us That's lucky." Indeed it i s, for within an hour after day :igh t there will b e telegrams all over the state." "And what will we do'/ We will be hunted 2ike "Will we?" "You just l eave that matter to me, ou one condition. I must know all about you, and if I am sat i stied with your sto ry, you can stick to me, and 1 ill stick to you, and we can defy all the detectives in the laud. Dardic pulled allout three miles up the river an t l then said: W c will land h e re. He ran the boat ashore and both men alight ed. Dardie l ooked at his watch, and sa id: "It is within an hour and a half of dayligbt; >rn can get over a good deal of ground." Whic h way will you go?" '' Do you know the country around here?" "Yes I do I know eve ry foot of it" Cau' we over to the mountains?" "'Ve cau . How long a tramp is it?" l::ieveu or eight hours. " Suppose we find a nook under the river llank here where we can rest until to-morrow night. I do not think it safe to move at present." Tile two fugitives wandered along the bank until the y came to an overhanging clill', and crawling up its face, they found a natural cave, and into the latter they crawled, and under all the circumstances they were very fort.uuate, as a rain set in, and in a few moments they wou l d have b een drenched to the skin. It was lat e in the fall of the year when the in cidents we have narrated occllrred There had been a warm but the rain was a break i n the weather and an intimation of a colder sea oo. It w as a shallow cave, a mere indentation in the face of the rock practically, bllt a she! ving ledge w e ll s hield ed them from the rain as it be:tt at the time, aml they were all right. The two m e n were pretty well tired out, and they st retched them se lves on so me leaves and ri l'er drift that they hall gathered, and were soo n fast asleep. It was well into the day when they awoke, and a cold, drizzling, disagreeable day it was, and yet they were comparatively romfortable, as they were sheltered from the wind and were l.Joth warmly clad. This is comfort," said Gadding. \Veil, yes; a sort of comfort," answered Bardie. 1t is comfort, b eca use for the time being it is safety and freedom," said Gaddin!!'. "You arc right there," confirmed Bardic I tell you it is hard to be hllnted and hollndcd, and to know no peace or security," continued Gadding . It is corroborated," said Bardie. "Then you are a fugitive ?" "lam." And for how long a time have you been a fugitive?" Long enough to get u sed to it," sa id Bar die ; adding decisively, how e\c r: but I am not used to it, and 1 never will be." "Nor am I." "How loiig have you lJeen a fugitive?" asked Bardie. About all my life, I may say." There came a shadow to Ollr hero's face. Ile had hoped his new companion was an innocent man, but his confession intimated the contrary. I mllst hear your sto r y," said our hero. "You shall hear my story; you are a good fellow, and you h ave done me a good se rvi ce; but I can not stand it much longer; I will be taken some day." "You will be taken so me day, ch? "Yes." "Well, that depends; and you say I have done you a good service?" "Yes ." I may do you a greater service yet before we separate; but lJetween you and me, my friend, I am hnngry." Bardi e smiled as he s poke the words. CH APTER X:XXVI. Trrn '.\w my parentage until I was a man grown." Will yoa tell me your s tory?" Bardic proceeded nnd told his storr, and when h e lmd concluclcd Gadding r esumed hi s own narrative, and sa id: From th c nursery I was placed in an orphan asylum, and there I r ece ived pretty fair tea c h ing, bllt at the age of thirteen I was wrongfully accu s ed of c rime The proofs w ere all against me; I protested my inno ce nce, but wa s sent to a reformatory, as the c rime of which I had lJeen accused was a very seriou s 0ne. '' "And you were innot:cnt?" I was as innocent of that crime as you are toclay. Anoth e r lad comm itted the crime and accused me. ' "Did yon never get square with him?" Alas! hi s own s in found him out. Ile died upon the gallows when lJut twenty-thrt:e, poor fellow." "And you sent to a reformatory?" I was, and very badly treated; and, \ratch ing a chance, I ran away, and start ed out in th e world, resolved to be au hone st man and make an honest living. I wand e r ed around the country for a co uple of years, and then secu red, by a c h a n ce, a position in a country sto re But, alas! my llad luck followed me. The s tore was robbed; I was accused of the rollb er.r. and ar. rested. I again protested my inno cence; but they secu r ed my previous record and ou that and the evidence I was convicted and sen t to jail under a sentence for five years I remained one yea r in th e jail, and escaped. Then I went west and in good time got anot h er position on a railroad. Again my lJad luck followed me. The express car was rolJbed one ni ght, and after liome weeks I was arrested as one of the rob bers, and every effor t was made t<> induce me to name my confederates " How did it come about that you were ar rested ?" "Ah! my prcvions r eco rd. Yes. s ir ; a de tecti1e was put upon the case, and h e started out to study up the re co rds of the men on the road, and h e soon mana ged tu find Ollt that I wa s au escaped convict; and my r cconl was my doom, for on that alone I was convicted and sent to jail once more .'' 'And up to that time you had lived au honest life?'' I bad." w e ll, you were in had luck." "Yes, I was wrongfully convicted; indeed, I barely escapee! beiag Jyncherl, as the expr ess m esse n ge r at the time of the robbery was lJadly wounded; indeed for a loug time it was thought be would not recover." And you were sent to jail again?" I was, and I managed to escape once more; but I had a worse reco r d than ever, and I was still au honest man, and I was determined to re ma i n honest. I came cast and went to Penn sylvania, and secured work unde r an assumed name as a common coal miner. I worked bard; but again my bad luck followed me. There was a strike and a riot, and houses were burned and much property de s troyed. I took no band in the affair. I was in court as a spectator at the time of th e trial of several m e n who had been arrested on sus picion, and again I was re cognized by a detective, and at once I was ar re s ted, and soo n it was made to appear that I was a de s perate character, and at the bottom of all the mi sc hief. At any rate, they had a good chance to get rid of me, and I was returned to fini s h a sentence of ten yea rs for the express robbery.'' And you were still an hone st man?" "As I live, I wa s an honest man: but ill luck attended me, and in the end I bccnme desper ate." CHAPTER XXXVII. "I cA_,_..,never approve of a man'!! becoming a criminal under any circumstances," sa id Bardie; but J "ill say it i s not strange that you were forced to the committa l of crime." "l did not voluntarily commit c rime. When I was returned to the jail they treated me with

PAGE 24

24 ___ BONANZA. BARD IE; OR, the utmost harshness because of my former es cape: indeed, mf\ny times I was tempted to take my O\Yn life, lJut, woulLl you lJelieve it? con scientious scrn:':es alone prevented me. I have a lways lJccn a lJeliever in God and future punisliments and rewards, and I diLl not dare take my 01Yn life; lJutI made up my mind to attempt my escape once more, anrl in good time 1 suc ceeded, but I was fired upon an LI wounded, and still 1 kept on anLl reacbeLl the woods, and there I found a horse, and on this I mounted. The horse \Yas saclLll ed a nd l.Jritllcd and the taking of him was my first crime. \\'ouncled as I was, I ro t le for sixteen l1011rs, ancl then from sheer cxlmustion was compelled to dismount and let the h or se go. lt was nl'a r morning, and I strng glcd on to where I saw a light gleaming from a hous'l \\ indow I crept to the the peo ple were moving alJout and I \\as admitted, and I told them I had lJeen hunting anJ. bad "ouncled myself with my own gun. I was taken in, and discovered that the house was occ-upieLl l.Jy a widow and her daughter." Did they suspect who you were?" '.'. L.et me tell yo_u all." 1 es, go ahead, said Barc11e. "The widow would have sent for a doctor, nearly twenty miles lJut I begged her not to do so, and I lhrnk from that moment s h e suspected something wrong, lJut she saicl no m o re about a doctor and trcHtcd me with every att ention alld kindness I remained in h e r houoe six weeks, and in the cnrl fully recov ered, aud when I was alJout able to go away she came to my room one day and said: You arc now fully rec ove red?' I said: I am, thanks to your kind care.' '' I can harbor you no longe r,' she sa id and from her words I knew that she knew, or at lea s t suspected, my identity, alld a moment lat e r she confirmed my suspicion with the remark: "'I do not know as I did ri g ht. You came t o my house a follow-mortal, wounded, in sore distress, and I gave you shelter, and 1 have clone all that 1 can to r estore you to life. I trus t you "ill receive 'vhat has befallen you as a warning am! will sin no more.' 1 said: n!adamc, you think I am a crim illal ?' maoy, m ally miles I crossed with her one state after another, coming eastward, and I traveled to New England." "How did you live by the way?" I begged for what we eat, and we slept where we coul d, anti every night I \\'atched over the child, anrl when we arrived in Jew England I took her to a hous e to board. I said she was my sister, that I "'as a mechanic out of work, and tlrnt as soon as I got work I would co m e for her, and that I would pay good board." what pros pect had you for work?" "Ah I had broken up at la st. I resolved to do for the child of my benefactor that whic h I had nc\er done for myself I determined to b ec ome a crimin a l anti stea l, and I did rob a farm-house. 1 secured one hundred dollars in cash. " You were a thief at last." "Yes; I was a criminal at lflst; but, mark you, I took clown the name of my victim and the exact amount of 1Yhic h I had robbed him." '" Why did you keep the record?" "I have kept the rccordof every crime I have comm i lted." That is strange. " I know the names of every one of my v ic titns. 1 have their addresses and the elate of the robbery, and the amount of which I robbed them." \Vbat was your purpose in keeping the record?" "I always indulged a hope that some day I would be able lo refund all that I had stolen; and now I've a strange statement to make: I have repaid every victim, and I have one cred itor for the ho le amount, and what i s more, I never used one dollar of all my robberies for my own personal benefit." '' That is indeed a strange stalemen t. '' "It is; and I have some s till stranger revela tions to make. Ye;:, my life has been a strange one I can claim I am an odd criminal." "You are; but proceed with your weird story." CHAPTER XXXVIIL "'Yes; I know who you are. You arc Tom CoNTINUI!\G his narratile Gaddin& said: Gadding, tllc wicked man of many crimes; hut "First let me explain bow it is 1 have but cnu for you there i s forgilcness and mercy. one victim." Your life has lJceu spar ed and I trust you "ill Yes do so make a \Jetter me of your opportullilics. "I !Jank of five thousand dollars, "Then I told her my story." and with that amount I repaid every one of my "Did she believe your strange tale?" other victims, and I ha1 e l etters from some of "Yes, she di1l believe my story; for from the them, offering to return the stolen money to me moment 1 told her s h e treated me in a decidedagain." Jy difierent manner. I went away." did you refuse it?" '' Allll have you ever seen her since?" "I did." "Ko." "You say you expect some day to settle with "How long ago did this occur?" your last victim?" "About nil1c )cars ago. I told you she had a There \\as a time "hen 1 hoped to do so, daughter. The girl, at the time I was taken in but now 1 am hope l ess I shall be taken some at the house, was al.Jout nine years of age. One clfly, and my career will end. I shall die in year later the witlow died. Her death was the jail." result of an accident, and her claugl1ter was left "See h ere, my friend; you will do no such helpless in the world. 1 went in the neighborthing." hood in tlisguisc lo learn about them, and l ea rn-"Do you call m e your friend?" eel, as 1 have said, that the widow was deatl, "Yes, I do-on the strength of your story, and I learned further that there was a mortgage I which 1 believe to he true." on the farm, and after h e r death the O\rner of "The talc I have told you is the truth-noth-the mortg:igc fo1eclo sc d am! se iz ed the property, iug but the truth." J ea,illg the cl:tughtcr a beggar. I learned that "And it is a very remarkable story. And the child had been adopted by a farmer, and I were you ever arrested again?" determinctl to go and see her sec retly. when I "Yes, and again I esca ped from prison, a!.ld .approac h ed the h o u se I heard cries and screams, these escapes gained for m e a reputation for am! rushing to the window, beheld the man being the most desperate burglar on the face of lJeating the orphan in the most brutal manner. the earth. _[ rnshed in aml knocked the brute down, and I s your real name Gadding?" seizinothe g irl in my arms ran out with her. "I have no real name." \Ye to the "oods, am! the ch ild told "But v:as that the name under which you me h ow brutally she had lJeen treated, and I were registcrccl in the asylum?" said to her: "Yes." '1 owe my life to you and your mothr; r. I "But it is not your real name?" will take ca re of you, I will become your broth"I am at liberty to adopt any name I choose, er, and see tlutt no harm comes to you. for I a m nameless." "It was but a fair return on your part," sa id "And you have never heard anything to inBarclie. dicate your parentage?" "Yes; bnt 1 had really promised more than I The rolJher for a moment was silent. could perform. I said I would take care of her, "Why do you not answer me?" but I w as a houmlcd fellow, homeless and pen"You would laugh -were I to relate a very niless." singular experi e nce." "But you hail not committed any crime. "No, I would not lau gh." "Up to that time 1 had committed no crime "I think I have see n my mother?" save the stea lin g of a horse, and I learned that "You think you have see n your mother?'' the owner evcotually r ecoverell him, and I a m "Yes." only responsible in that affair for the cost I put "Under what circumstances?" him to in get.l in g back the animal." 'Ah, I dare not tell you." "\'Veil, that i s a fair way of lookin g at it; but "Yes, t e ll me ; do not fear." what diu you do?" "You will laugh?" "I started with the g irl and we walked "Ko, I will not." "I can not h elp it if you do, I.Jut I will tell you the truth; I have seen her in my dreams." Bardie did not laugh, lJut an involuntary look of incredulity did overspread hi;; face "Ah, l thought you would laugh." "I am not laughiug, I.Jul I do uot take much stock in dreams." "Nor I; and I do not really attach any supernatural importance to my own dreams; and I think I can account for them; lJut one thing I will say, they arc pleasant to me, and the angel of my dreams has exerted a great in!iucncc over me; indeed the only incentive to honor has come through this apparition of a dream." Tell me about your dream " When I was in the orphan asylum I heard some of the children who rememi.Jcrcd their parents tell about th e m, and I often wondered that I had no parent to recollect, and I asked one of our teachers or matrons one dtiy about it, and she being a kind, good soul, told me my parents were in H eaven Her statement made a g reat impress ion upon my mind, and al once my itm1gination became excited, and I pictured an angel as my mother, :in(! one night iu a dream there C'amc to me a beautiful woman, and in my s l eep I called her rnamma, aucl she called I.Jack to me 'lily child,' and s he seemed to lay her !Ja11CI on my lJrow, and she talked to me and told me to lJc a good boy, and some day I would come to h e r and lJe her angel son." Bardic 1vas deeply affected ; the story was, indeed, under all the circumstances, a very affecting one. "Have you seen your mother often in your drertms?'' "Often when I was a child, but only rarely s ince I have lJeen a man, and only once s in ce I became a criminal." And does this of your dreams always talk to yon'(' "'Not si n ce I really became a thief; no, she came just once, and then for an instant cast upon me a reproachful glance and disappeared." I think your dream can lJe accountPcl for on natural grounds, but it is a very i:trange inci dent all the same. " It is an incident that has exerted a great in fluence over me, and now I've a still more strange incident to relate; I have a photograph of the apparition." "You have a photograph of the apparition?" "!have. '' The apparition of your dream?" "Yes." Our hero felt a suspi cio n creeping through hi s mind. It came to him that after all he wa s talking to a maniac and li stening to the wild, w eird narrative of a disordered \Jrain. That seems strange to say, Gadding." "It does." And yet is ea ily explained." "I wish you would explain to me how you made a photograph of a fantasy of the lJrain." I will do so." '' Proceed.'' I dreamed often of seeing the apparition, and it was always the same face. and it made a deep impress ion upon my mind and memory; indeed, the features fixed themse lves as a tangi ble portrait on my remembrance, and one clay I had a pencil in my hand and I commenced to draw a face. I diseovered that I was a uat ural artist, and when I had completed the face I r ecognized that T had reproduced the face of the apparition of my dreams. Afterward, when in prison, I secured mate rials through the kind ness of the k eepe r, and carefully reproduced the face, and when I again escapetl from prison I took the ink drawing to one of those photo engravin g companies, and had th e face reprn duced, and it is a splendid picture." "This is a r emarkable story." "Ah! but 1 have a s till more remarkable sequel to r e late. About six weeks ago I pub lis hed the picture i n an illustrated paper, and a week later rece ivcLl a letter askingabout the original of the picture. I answered the Jetter, but never received an ans\\er in r eturn." And you are a natural artist?" "lam.: Why did you not seek to earn an honest living n s au artist?" I did do so, and I became an art student, but a l as! I was lloundcd from place to place. I never dared r eveal my real identity to those with whom I studied, and the d e t ec tives always got on my track, and I was compelled to liec." "vVhy did you not flee to Europe?" I never had the money." "You had the proceeds of your robberies?"

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THE TREAS URE OF THE RO UKIE:S. 25 I never used one cent of those robberies for my own benefit n ever." Anrl for whose benefit have you used them?" "Your question brings me back to the part of my narrative where I tell of my first crime." "Yes, and now t a k e up your story there and tell me in detail." CHAPTER XXXIX. I TOLD yon I stole a hundred dollars; well, I went ba<'k within a week to where I had left the little gi rl my c h a r ge." You ha,'e not told me the girl' s name?" Ile r name i s C l aire." "Iler l ast name?" I will tell you so m e other clay, not now. " 'Vhy n o t?" Well, at l east let me first finish my narrithe. '' All right." I r e tn med and paid one week's board for the littl e g irl and then went away. I sent mon ey for h e r board, and s h e rem ained with the people for three months; at the encl of that time I suc ceccled in ha,'ing a nice warclro!Je prepared for h e r. And I took her to a boarding-school, and the r e s h e h as r e mained ever since. S h e i s a you11g larly now, one of the most beautiful g irl s you eve r saw, and she i s well educated. She i s a tPa c h e r in the schoo l where she was educated. She i s now self.supporting, and since she has been t eac hi11g [ h a,e not taken a dollar that did not rightfully b e long t o me." '' How l ong h as s h e been t eac hing?'' "}""or over a year no,v." Do you ever sec h e r?" I have see n h er; yes, often at the sc hool. They think I am her brother-that I am an artist. They do not dream that the pretended Henr.v Armour i s the notorious c riminal, Tom Gadding.'' "Then the g irl's name i s Armour?" "Yes. I t ook her name so as to carry out the d ecep tion as to being her brother." \ncl do es the girl know who you really are?" Yes." D oes s h e know that you are really a crimiu a l ?'' "She does." Am! s h e respects you still?" She lov es me as though I re ally were h e r own brother.'' Does s h e know that you became a criminal solely on h e r account?" "No; I would not t e ll her that. On the con trary, I\c made her believe that every dollar spent for h e r education has been honestly ea.rued. ' And doe s s h e believe you?" I fear not; but s h e pretends to believe me." 'Vhat docs s h e r eally suspect?" I beJic e in my h ea r t that sbe really s11spects the absolute truth." Say, Tom, let m e be your friend?" You arc my friend." Then tell m e al 1." What s h a ll 1 t ell you?" You love this g irl?" A s a siste r." Bah! yon love her beyond that." "No no'' do." ' I will 11ot permit myself to do so. I am a crimina l.'' \Yell, te chnica ll y you are; morally you are not. You rs ha s l>een a bard lo t; but it s trikes m e that your g reat misfortune b as be e n in not having a fri en d "ith whom t o aclYisc. For what are you being so clo sely pursued now?" "The bank robbery. The officer s of that bank are cletcrminecl to run me clown, and I am sure they will succeed some day." "They never will old man." "They will. Y cs, I know t h ey will." "Tell me about this Cla ire Armour." i s supporting me now with the money she earns." And she loves you?" .As a brother, yes." "Bah! I see through this strange r omance, and now li ste n to me; I am your frie nd; e will pull together. I ha,e a scheme in my mind, and you shall become a partner with me." 'Vhat i s your sc heme?" " e are both fugitives." '\""es.'' "We are both well meaning men. I am inno. cent, and you prefer to l ead an honest life." '' I would be willing to die if permitted to Ii ve five years in peace. "You shall live very many years in peace barring the usual chances of human li{ e "No, no: thos e m e n are on my trac k. They will follow me up, and in the eud they will close in on me, and I will never again at tempt to escape from j a il. " You shall not go to jail, old man. I tell you I lrnvc a scheme." "Anrl what is your scheme?" We will go where there are no jails, judges, juries, or detectives." \Vh e re can we go t o escape them?" "To the far, far west. Yes we will go out and become prospe<:tors, and some day we will strike a mine, and we will both co,e r our iden tity. We will make a fortune, and you can settle with the bank and flee to Europe, and you can take Claire with you, and dwell in peace where no one will know of your pa s t career, and I can also manage to arrange with the wretcbes who are pursuing me." There came a cold smi l e over the face of Tom Gadding as h e said: "I've tried that; your sc h eme i s but a wilcl dream." "You have tri ed it, eh?" "Yes; I s pen t two years in the wilds, and if it had not b een for one thing I should have re mained there as a reclu se, but as true as I sit here I was trail e d even to tbe wiiclerness, and one clay in a ranch l was confronted with my own portrait in an illu strated pape r, anrl I was compe lled to flee. No, there i s no place on earth where I can hide from my pursuers." Bah, man! you a r e in a nervous condition. Diel the parties who confront.eel you with your portrait accuse you of being the man?" No, but tbey knew me a ll th e same." "They did?" "Yes.'' How do you know?" I know they did." "Bah! it wa s all your imagination; you came east again?'' "Yes, I believe I am safer here; there are m ore hiding-places. "Well, speakin g from a certain standpoint, you are right, but now, li sten: you have ac t ed unde r your own volition all th ese years, and you h ave passed from h a r d luck to harde r luck; would it n o t b e well to t a lrn the advice of another?" "What do you propose?" "I propose that you write to Miss C l a ire Armour, and tell her tha t she may not h ea r from you for a year or two; t e ll lier th a t you have found a good friend, and that some clay you will return a free man.'' "Have you really confidence in your scheme?" I have." And you propose that I should write?" "Ye s, and tell me, hav e the detectives got on to this Armour cover?" "No." "Then the r e is no risk iu writing the letter." I think not." You are home l ess and penniless?" "1 am.'' You h ave no sc h e m e of your own? You are prac ti ca lly but a hunted criminal?" "1 un1." Had you been alone las t night you would have !Jeen arres ted.'' "1 would h ave been, sorely." But as there were two of us we escaped?" ''Yes.'' Good; we will try it again together, and see what will come." CHAPTER XL. THE two men eat a good, hearty meal, and our hero produced pen, paper, and envelope, anrl Tom Gadding wrote the letter as clirccteLl, and Bard i e agreeLl to post it. After the l ette r was written 'I'om Gadding sa id: You a r e not well posted in this land?" "No, but I am a man without any nationality at present. I've beeu called a i\Ionte-Cristo. Well, it's a Monte-Cri s to I"ll be some Jay." 'Ve will be tracked before to-morrow ni g ht. These American detective s a r e li ke s leutbhouncl s." Are they?" "They are." well, they will not capture me nor you either, if you follow strictly my advice." "Upon your invitation I have ca s t in my lot with you." And you will never regret it." " T hat i s your scheme?" To go we s t Yes, way west. " But I mean your immed i ate scheme. ti rst gam e will be to throw those detec tive s off our track." You will not succeed unless we sepa rate." That will not be in accordance with my plan." lf we attempt to travel together we will b e overtaken." "Now let u s see. You are acqu ai nt e d with the trail s in those mountains over t o th e west ward?' I am." "My idea i s to go there and hide ourselves for a few weeks un1il the immediate excitement following l ast night's adventur e has settled clown and th e n we will make our way west. "Ah but we will not travel far. "We will travel all th e way. I've some thing to teach you, Tom; I'm quite a poteen artist, I am, and l will work a scheme that will plP.ase yo u and prove a winning game." "You really inspire me wit h co urage." I'll make a man of you, and now don't you forg e t ii, a nd I'll place you in a position from where you can defy a ll your enemies." One moment; I never hall liut one r ea l enemy. The men who are pursuing me look upon me as a de s perate criminal." W ell, you do take a fair view of the situat ion. "I do." "Wh o w as your r ea l enemy?" The lad who first accused me of crime, and to him I owe all m y misfortune. I owe all to a fal se rccorrl, a bad re cord, and it i s that re cord that has pursued me." But your career has its compensation." "l!ow?" "You have been the means of r escu in g a helpl ess orphan, and to h e r you have been a great ben r!factor." '' 'l' hat i s true '' Well, old man, look ahead n ow. I 've got big ide as in my h ead as concern s you and m y self a l so, and I believe all will come ri ght in the encl for both of us. we may h ave a hard tim e to get west, bnt we ll get there all th e same in spite of all the detectives in this broacl land, and we will be winners after we get the re. " You fill my h eart with hope and courage." "And tbat is what I want to do, anrl to nigl1t we make ou r start. But, I say, it \\as a nice game we worked on those detectives." "It was, but they will b e on our track. Yes, you ca n make up your mind that every farmer within t1Yenty miles around h e re i s on the look out for us. There i s a l arge r ewa rd offered for me, you know. I was engaged in but one bank r obbe r y, and I ca rried out the sc b eme all alone but they connect me with several other bank robbe ri es, and tbey believe if they catch m e th e y get the prin c ipal man." How large i s the reward offered for you? "Twenty. five thousand dollars in all." "well, there i s abou t the same amount o!Ier ecl for me. 1-V e would prove a fortune t<> a pair of detectives. "That is so, in case of our idcutification. " They will h ave to catch u s before t hey identify us." l 1hink they will." What h as become of your h ope and courage?" W c are playing against too great odds." \\"ell, now, you trust to me. I am only a po o r Paddy, a s they call u s in thi s land of yours, but I'll s h ow them hat Paddy can doand that's what' Paddy gave the drum!'" The two men r ested Ulltil nigbt. Toward evening the rain ceas e d, and it blew up c l ea r and f"Olcl. It wa s about nine o'clock wi1en Bardic said : Now, w e w ill make a start." The two men h ar l changed their appcarauce in a mo s t remarkable manner. On r h ero had assumed the role of a poor immigrant Dutch m r111, and Gadding was got up in similar style. Their other disg ui ses were pac kccl and bound in a parce l, and they is s ued from th e cave. They were compelled to descend to th e riYcr bank, and th ey walked a l ong until they came to a place wh ere they could climb up to the road, and along the latte r they proceed ed until they came to a place "here a li ght g leam e d, and Barclie said: "It's a German beer s hop. We will go in." No, no, that will not do," said Gadding.

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2G "Why not? a s k e d Barclie. "We will g iv e th e m a c l e w from the very start I've had lots of expe ri e n ce J e t m e t e ll you.'' W e ll it's to throw the m off tha t I go in h e r e D o you mind, it w ill b e kno wn tha t two m e n pass e d alon g h e r e If they do n ot know what so rt o f m e n the y were why w e will b e purs u e d; but if the y do know, our pursue rs will go iu a n other d ir ec ti o n. " The ri s k is too g reat; you h a d b ette r take m y a d vice. ' "And wh a t i s your advic e ? " 'Ve w ill k ee p on our way and dodge a ll houses and a void b e in g see n i f po ss ihl e " .Just t hi s o nce t a k e m y a d v i ce and the n we will act u po n my jndg m e n t un t il w e make o n e mis t ake, a f te r t hat w e w ill a c t upo n yo u rs "It may be t o o l a t e bnt d o as y o u c h oose." I 'll b ring y o u o u t a ll ri g h t D o not h ave a n y fea r fo r m e ; I gen e rall y know what I a m a b o ut. The t w o m e n b o ldl y entered the beer sa l oon, whic h was l oca t e d o n the outskirts of a s m all rive r v ill age, and findin g severa l Germa n s gath e r ed around Bardie sa id in mos t e x ce ll e n t Germa u : Good-eve nin g country m e n." Gaddin g w as snrprisecl a m o m e n t l a t e r t o hear our h e ro t alking Dutc h like a n a tiv e a nd li e co ul d sec fro m the a p proYin g n o d s o f the m e n th a t h e as di s pl ay in g a g r ea t kn o wl edge of l o c alit i e s and in dee d actin g the r u l e of a Germa n to the l etter. T he two m e n h a d se v e ral g l asses o f b ee r and Barcli e pnrc h ase d q ui te a good s t o r e of Dutc h food in t h e way of sa usage, r ye brea d and t h e like, aucl whe n the t w o m e n came out t o t a k e the roacl our h e ro a s k ed: W e ll wha t do you think of it n o w?" CIIAPTEH XLI. T m r GADDC "G expresse d hi s sati sfact1011. I r ec k o n w e a rc c ov e r e d a little," sai d B a rdi e Indee d ''" e a re, m y fri e n d. I d id n o t know you coulil s peak Ge rm a n so w e ll. " Ah. 1 c a n a n d seve ral oth e r l a n g u ages and m y gift w ill se r ve u s w e ll. " l t will." 'An d now, said B a r < li e w e wan t to p os t your letter. I've got the direc ti o n t o the post oflic c, a nd when w e h a v e dropped th e n o t e w e 'll m o v e 011 towar d the mounta in s a n d I r e c k o n we've a h i t o f fo od to la s t u s for a fe w clays 'If we m a k e for the m ounta in s of S ulli van Co unt y w e will find all the game we n eed," sa i d T o m G aclcling. A ll rig h t, th e Iris h n a m e of the county s uit s me,'' r espo nded our h e ro. 'Ve \Yill as k of our r ea d e r s p e rmi s s i o n to d i g r e ss ri g h t h e r e fo r a fe w p a ra grap h s, in o rder t o point o n t an importa n t fac t, one t h a t i t will be we ll to remem be r T o m Gad1lin g t old his remarkable story, and BONANZA BARDIE. showe d how it is pos s ible for an innocent man t o b e purs u e d as a criminal, and the whol e troulrle lay in hi s bad r ec ord. It was this r e cord that purs ued him, it w as this record that fir s t attrac t e d s u s pici o n t o w ard a nd each time l e d to hi s convi c ti o n and imprisonment. It i s a fa c t t h a t the r ecord of a n a ccuse d p er so n a lmost d aily d ec id es his fate in the courts. When the te s timony i s c o nflictin g the judge goes into the m aI.1 's pre vious r ecord: if tha t i s goo d the a ccuse d gets the benefit of it. If it i s bad it w e i g h s in the judge's mind in confirm in g hi s judg m ent as t o g uilt. In other words a good charact e r i s a b out the b est s afe guard a young m a n can thro w around himself. It i s a rare thin g for a p e r s on to r eceive a b a d r ecord throug h accident o r m a l e v o len ce ; but it i s a frequ ent thin g fo r young 11w1 to b e care l es s a b o u t their r ecord, and a b a d r ecord on ce a t t ac h e d to o ne's n a me it i s almos t impos sibl e to c l ea r i t off a nd as s t a t e d, the b es t safeguard a ga in s t poss ibl e fal se a cc u s ati o n s i s a goo d re co r d. The s w o rd that s t a b s unfair s u s pi c i o n i s a goo d pre viou s c h aracte r, and a ll young m e n a nrl wo m e n should b e ca reful throughout their wh o l e liv es to a v o id d o in g anything tha t will aflix t o the ir nam es a bad r ecord. H a r d i e a nd T o m Galldin"' fonnd the post otlk e and droppe d in the l a tt er's l e tt e r, and the u the t'>YO m c u s tarted for the m ountains By mi dnig ht t hey b a d co v e r ecl twelve mil es, a n d sa t down t o r es t a t a s m a ll country place w h e r e had bee n comme n ced a s t a tion for a n e w railr oa d t h a t w as b e in g built throug h tha t sec t i o n o f count r y, an d B a r d i e r e m arked: "I'd lik e t o crawl in h e r e and spend the nio-h t 9 But i t w on't d o," said Gadding. The \\'Ord s h a d h a rdl y left hi s m outh. wh e n the r e s h ot acro ss th e m a gl ea m o f lig ht. On the next in s t ant three m e n carry in g lanterns ap p roac h ed wha t a r e you fe llows doin g there? d e m a nd e d on e o f the m e n. B a r d i e undertoo k to ac t as s p o k es m a n, and he said: Y ot w os dot your piz z in ess? "'Ye ll yo u w ill expl a in who y o u are, or y o u will fin d o u t whet h e r it i s mv bus ines s or not. " I v os o xpl a i n n o dclin gs; h vo s not your pi z zin ess h o I vos." 'Veil, I r ec k o n I kno w who you are: your n a m e i s T o m Gaddin g, a nd tha t fe ll o w m a y be Barcli e O 'Conor. The man spo k e ""it h a flo uri s h a s thoug h h e exp ec t e d to see b oth men b etray co n s i de rable tre pida t i o n ; but in s tead b oth m e r e ly lau g h e d in a quie t m a nner. The tln e e m e n h e ld a fe w moments' consultati on, an d th en started away. It i s t ime for u s t o get," said Gadding ' It i s?'' 'Vhy so'!" Those fell o w s a r e goin g fo r a ss i s t a n ce: t h e y susp ec t u s, a n d it i s as I t old y on it w ould END O F FIRS T IlALF. be, we h a ve bee n advertised throughout twenty counties and w e're going to have a hot time " The n you propose that we run?" lr es." "And those f e llow s will the n c on clude tha t the y a r e ri g ht, and will g et upo n our trail." ''But we will get a few h ours' start." '' This i s a m a tt e r we must c on s id er.' I t e ll y o u the b es t thing for u s t o d o i s t o flit I " It will make it a chas e." "That i s jus t what I have anticipate d W e will b e taken." "You think s o?" I do." W ell, I'm no t the l a d to b e t a k e n 1 Jo,e m y free d o m t o o w e ll ; but I a m settled t o your opinion: w e h a d b ette r tlit. The two men s t arte d to m o v ed r .way, w hen Gadding whi spe r ed: H nllo o see the re!" 'Vlrnt i s it ? "They h a v e l e ft a fellow t o w a t c h us." "Is t h a t so?" "The re h e i s, b ehind that pile o f boards!" We will have to nab tha t fe ll o w!" s ai d B a rdi e W e will have to a c t qnickly." "The re i s a cree k clo wn the re. ' The s neak and the cree k will g o w e ll to gethe r o r rathe r the c r ee k will run fr ee r i ( the fell o w i s run into it. N o w w e will separat e; and b e t wee n o n e or the othe r of u s in the rlar k n ess can <'Om e upon that fe ll o w a n d we'll let him take a swim. Y es it's '>Ye ll t o go with the s witn n o w a d ays Gadding ca u g h t on to B arclie's hint, a n d th e two m e n se p a rat e d and at o n ce they saw th e fel l o w m a k e a move. Our h e ro w as a regular cat in his m o v e m ents, and in l ess than tw o minu t es h e w as o n t o the 'sneak" am! n ul.Jbed him. The m a n w ould h a v e m a d e a n outc r y. hut B a r die h a d h o ld of him by the throa t so q uickl 1 and with s u c h a firm g ra s p th e fellow w as u n abl e to utte r a s in g le sound Jus t as B arclie se i z e d the mau GaLhling ca m e up, and th e t\\ o li f t e d t h eir p ri so n e r fro m hi s fee t a n d rnn him toward a littl e hri clge t hat overhung the c r ee k. The man struggl ed bnt h e '>Yas h e lpl ess in t he hands o f his two p o w erful capto r s, a n d with a o n e two, three they l e t him swing aud over he w ent into the w a t e r with a s pl as h. "Now we'll flit,'" s ai d B a rdi c The two m e n s t a rt e d forward, but h a d gon e but a s h ort di s t a nce wh e n they h eard v o i ces, and the n ext m o m ent the re came a sound m ore s t a rtlin g a nd ominous. "The y r e o n t o u s said Gadding, and a pal l o r ovc r sprcacl his face. "Tha t w as t h e bay of a hound," said Bar die. 11 "'Yell. t hey a re o n our trac k?" "They a r e " L e t tll e m come," w as the q ui e t r e j o in de r Works by Emile Gaboriau Contained in the Seaside Library, Pocket Edition: N O 7 File No. 113. 12 O t h e r Peopl e s 20 'Yit h i n an Inc h of His Life 26 :Jl onsicur L ecoq Y o l. I. '.26 l\Io u s i c m L ecoq V o l. II. 3 8 The Cl i q u e o f Go l d 38 T h e Widow L c ro ugc "1:3 The o f Orc i va l 1 !-i Promis e s of :Marriage PRICE. 20 20 2 0 20 2 0 2 0 2 0 20 10 NO. 9 7 9 The Count's Secr et; o r A T errib l e Life P a r t J. 9 7 9 The Count's Sec r et; o r A T e rri b l e Life. P a r t IL 1 0 0 2 M a rri age at a Y e n turc 1015 A Tho u sa nd Frnncs R e ard 10 45 The 13t h Hussa r s 1078 The S l aves o f Paris. First h alf 1078 The S l aves o f P a ri s Seco n d h a l f 1 083 The Little O l d l\Ian o f the B a ti g n o ll es P R I CE 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 10 T he al.Jove w orks a r e fo r sa l e by a ll n ews d ea lers o r ""ill b e sent by m ail t o a n y address, p os tage pre p a id o n r eceipt o f th e price Address P. 0. Box 3751. GEOR G E l\luKRO, l\I mrno's Pcsu s urN G I-IousE 17 to 27 V ande w a t e r Stree t N e w Y ork

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'rHE SEASIDE LIBRARY-POCKET EDI'l'IOX. The Seaside Library---Pocket Edition. ALWAYS UNCHANGED AND UNABRIDGED. "'"V\Tith ::a:::andsor.ne Lithographed Paper Cover. Persons who wish to purchase the followin(J" works in a complete and unabridged form are cautioned to order and see that they get THE SEASIDE Lrn1tAHY, Pocket Edition, as works 0publ i shed in othe r libraries are freq uently abridged and incompl ete. Every number of TnE S1<:ASlDE LmRARY is unchanged and unabridged. Ncll'sdealers wishing catalogues of THE SEASIDE LIBRARY, Pocke t Edition bearing th e ir imprint, will be s upplied on sending their names, addresses, Rnd numbe r r equ ir ed. Tile work s in THE SEASIDE LIBRARY, Pocket Edition, are printed from l arger type and on better pap e r than any other series publi s hed. The following works a r e for sa l e by all newsdealers, or will be sent to any address, po stage free, on receipt of 12 cents for single numbers, ancl 2.5 cents for double numbers, by the publisher. Address P.O. Hox 37GI. 'Vol'ks by tl1e nntbor of" Addie's lln!'ihnud." 388 Husband; o r, Through Clouds to Suushiue ...... .... 10 50.J i\Ir p,,.,r Wife ................. 10 10-16 Jessie .......................... 20 by I h e author ot "A Fatal l>ower.'' 246 A Fa1:1I Dower ................. 20 m :: :: : ::::::: 829 The Actor's Ward ............. 20 '\VorRs by .. lien 111 hor of 0 A Grent :l l isl 1llcc." 244 A Great Mistake ............... 20 588 C h erry. . ........ ........... 10 1040 Clarissa's Ordeal. 1st half ... 1040 C'larhsas Ordeal. 2d half ... 20 \Vories by the autho1 of "A \Vomnus l.ove-Story." 322 A \Vn111a11's Love-Story ....... 10 '677 Griselda... ............. 20 lll 1"1. :\ ltxnndcr's \Vo1ks. 5 The Adnrirnl's Ward ......... 20 17 The Wooiug: O't ............... 20 The Executor ................. 20 1 89 Valerie' s Fate ................. 10 :2tY MaiLl, Wife, or Widow? .. ... . 10 :2.36 Whi c h Shall it Be? ...... ...... 20 8.39 Mrs. Vereker's Courier Maid .. 10 490 A Stcond Life.. .......... At l3a_r... . ................ 10 794 Beaton1s Barg-ain .... .......... 20 797 Look Bdore Y o u Leap ....... 20 805 The Freres. lst half .......... 20 805 The F'rt:>n-s. 2d half. ........ 20 .S()li H e r Dearest Foe. !st half. ... ;)() SOG HPr Dearest F ne. 2d half .... 20 -SH The Heritage of Langdale ... 20 15 Halph Wilton's Weir44 Cut by the Couuty; or, Grace 1055 Katharine Regina .............. 20 Darnel . . .. .. 10 1065 H err Paulus: His Rise, His 548 The Fatal Marriage. and The Greatness, and His Fall ... 20 Shadow i u the Corner. ..... IO M. Detham0Edwa1ds's 2W Loveandl.\'lirage; o r,TheWaitin g o n an Island ............. 10 579 The Flower of Doom.and Other Storie s ... .......... 1 0 594 Docto r Jacob ................. 20 1023 N ext of Kin->Vanted ......... 20 William Hlnck's Wol'l6 Phantom Fortune .............. 20 74 Aurora Floyd .................. 20 110 U11der the Red Flag ............ 10 153 The Golden Calf. ... ........... 20 204 V ixen ........................... 20 211 The Octoroon.... . 10 2-34 Bar hara: o r Splendid Misery .. 0 263 An lshmaelite .................. 20 315 The Mistletoe Bough. Christ mas, 1884. Edited b.v Miss i\I. E. Brnddon ..... ............. 20 434 \Vyllard's \\'eird ............... 20 478 Diavola; or. Nobody1s Daughter. Par t I..... ....... 20 478 Diavola; o r. Nobody' s Daughter. Par t II........ ..... 20 480 Married in Haste Edited by Miss M. E. Bradd o n ......... 20 487 Put to the Test. Edited by Miss ill. I:. Bradd on ................ 20 488 .Toshua I-laggard's Daui::hter .... 20 489 Hu pert Godwin ................. 20 495 Mount Ro.ml. .................. 20 406 Onll n Womnn. Edited bv l\Iis s M'. E. Brnddn n ......... : ...... 20 497 The Lady's Mile. .... 20 498 Only a Clod. :!O 499 The C loven Foot. . . 20 511 A Strang-e World.... 20 519 Dudley Carl eon: or, The llroth ers Secret, and George Caulfie ld 's Journey ............. 10 Hostages t o Fortune ......... 20 553 Birds of Prey. . . . . . . . 20 551 Charlotte's Inheritance (Se quel t o "Birds o f Prey") .... 20 557 To the Bitter End .... . ....... 20 559 Taken at the Flood ........... 20 560 Asphodel.................... 20 561 Just as I am; or. A Living Lie 20 567 Deat.l M en's Shoes ............. 20 570 John 1\larchmont' s Legacy .... 20 618 The Mistletoe Bough. Christ mas. 1885. Edited hy Miss M. E. Bradd n11 . . . . 20 8.JO One Thing Needful; or, The P enalty of Fate ............... 20 881 Mohawks. l 8 t half. ........... 20 88 1 :td half ..... ..... 20 800 Tli..-Bnug-b. Christ Illas, 1886. Edited l>y Miss 111. E. Bradd on ................... 20 943 ane edition) ......... 20 295 A "'omau's 1Var ............. . 10 952 A W nrnans \Var. (Large type edition) ...................... 20 296 A Rnse in Thorns.. ... IO 297 Folly; er, H e r Marriage Yow ....................... 10 95-3 Hilary' s Folly: or, Her Mar riage Vow. (Large type edi-tion)... ..... 20 299 The Fata l Lilies. and A Bride from the Sea ................. 10 300 A Gilded Sin, nnd A Bridge of Love ........................ 10 303 Ingledew House, and More Bit ter than Dearh....... . . .. 10 304 Iu Cupid's ............... 10 305 A D ead Heart. and Lady Gwen doline's Dream ............... 10 306 A Golden Dawn, and Love for a DaL . ....... 10 307 Two Kisses, a11d Like no Other Love ................... ....... JO 308 Beyond Pardon. ............ 20 3:C2 A \Vornans Love-Story ....... 10 32:J A Willful Maid....... .. .... 20 411 A llitter Atonement . ......... 20 43:l l\Iy Sister Kate..... . . . ... 10 459 A \Voman1s Temptation. (Large type editi o n ) ......... 20 951 A W oman's Temptatio n ....... lO 460 a Shado" ............. 20 465 The Earl's Atonemeut. ........ 20 466 Between Two Loves ........... 20 467 A Struggle for a Hing ........ 20 469 Lady Darner's Secrtt: or, A Guiding Star .......... 20 470 Evelyn1s Foll.r ................. 20 471 Thrown nn the World ......... 20 476 Betwee n Two Sins: or, Married in Haste ..................... 10 516 Put Asunder; or. Lady Castlemai ne's Divorce ............. :20 576 H e r Martyrdom............ 20 626 A Fair Mystery ................ 20 741 The Heiress of Hilldrop; or-, The Romauce of a l o u ng Girl............. ........ 745 For A n otller,s Sin; Qr, A Struggle for Love.... 20 792 Set in Diamonds ............... 20 821 The World Between Them ..... 20 853 A True MaC'daleu. . ... 20 85-.J A \Vomau's lrro1 20 922 Ma1jorie........ .. .. . .. ... 20 924 'Twixt Smile and Tear ......... 20 927 Sweet Cymheline .............. 20 921l The Bellt of Lynn; or, The Mill e r"s Daughter ........... 20 9;31 Lady Diana's Pride ........... ;)() 949 Claribel's Lm e Story; or,Love's Hidde n Depths. . . . . . . 20 958 A Haunted Life ; or, Her Terri .................. 20 969 The My stery o f Colde Fell; or, Not Proven ................. 20 973 The Squire's Darling......... 2 0 975 A Dark l\Ia rriage Morn ........ 20 978 Her Second Love.. ... 20 982 The Duke's Secret ............. 20 985 On Her \Vedding Morn, and The M.rstery o f the H olly-Tree ;)() 988 The Shattered Idol, and L etty ....................... 20 990 The Earl' s Error, and A1,.old's Promise ................... 20 995 An Unnatural Bondage, and That Beautiflll Lncly ....... 20 1006 His Wife's J11dg11Je11t .......... 20 1008 A Thorn in Her Heart. ....... 20 1010 Gold e n Gates . . . . ... 20 101:.! A Nan1P.less Sin .............. 20 1014 A Mad Lnve. . . . . .. .. 20 1031 Irene's Vow ................. 20 J052 Signa's Sweetheart ............ :!O 1091 A Modern Cinderella .......... 10 Chal'lotte Ill'ontc's \.Vorks. 1 5 Jane E.rre........ ... . . . .. 20 57 Shirley.... . . . ... . ... .. . 20 944 The Professor.. . . . .. .. . llhodu Il1ghton's \Vorks. 86 l3eliuda ......................... 20 IOI Second Thoughts .............. 20 2'27 Nancy. .. ................... 2 0 645 Mrs. Smith of L ongmains ..... JO 758 "Goodby e, SweetheartJ1' ...... 20 765 Not Wisely, But Too Well ...... 20 767 Joan.. ....................... 20 768 Red as a Rose is She ........... 20 769 Cometh Up as a Flower....... 20 862 Hett.r's Visions ................. 10 894 Doctor Cupid.... ............. 20 !Uary E Bryan's Works. 731 The Bayo n Bride .............. 20 857 Kildee: or, The Sphinx of the Red H ouse. 1st half. ........ 20 857 Kildee; or. '!'he Sphinx of the Red House. 2d half .......... 20

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2 Robert Buchnnan's Works 145 "Storm-Beaten:" God and The 1\laa ........................... 20 154 Annan Water ..... ............. 20 181 The New Abelar d ...... ...... 10 398 ;11att: A Tale of a Caravan . 10 646 The Master of the M ine ....... 892 That \Viuter N i g ht; o r Loves Victor y .......... . 10 1074 Stormy Water s . ...... 20 1104 The Heir of Linne ...... . ... 20 Captain Fre d Unrunby's Worh:s 3'i5 A Ride Lo Kli iva ............... 20 384 On Horseback T h i ough Asia Min o r ....... .................. 20 E F 'nfrfax llynne' s \Vorks 52 1 Entan g led . . ................. 2 0 538 A Fair Country Maid ....... 20 Hnll Caine's Works 445 Tb., Sha dow of a Crime . ... 20 520 S he's All t.h e Worl d to Me.. JO 1Urs H. I .o\'Cll Cnmc1011's \Vorlu!I. 595 A North Co11ntry Maid.... 20 796 In a Grass Cou1 11ry ........... 20 891 Vera Ne, ill; or, Poor \\"i s d o rn's C h a nce... ............. 20 9 1 2 Pure Gold. 1st h a l f. ......... 20 912 P11re Gold. 2d half. ...... .... 20 963 Worth Win11ing ............... 20 10-25 Daisy's Dilemma ...... ...... 20 1008 A Devo11t Lover; o r A Wast e d Love ........... ... . 20 1070 A Life' s n listake .. . . 20 Rosa '."nn chette Carey's \Vorks. 215 Not Like Other Gi rl s .. 20 396 Robert O r d s A tonement ..... 20 55 1 Barbara Heathcote's Trial. 1st half. .......................... 20 55 1 Barbara Heathcote's T r ial. 2d hal f. .......................... 20 608 F o r Lilias. 1st half .......... 20 608 F o r Lil ias. 2d balf .......... 20 9''10 Uncle i\Iax. 1st half. .......... 20 930 Uncle i\Iax. 2d half. ........ . 20 Quet->n! e:s \V hi_m. I1st, h a l f ..... 20 Qu eeme s \ I h1111. cd half. .... 20 934 W o,,ed a11d Marr ied. 1st half. 20 934 Wooe d a11d Marr ied. 2d half. 20 936 J\elli e"s M e m o ries. 1st half ... 20 93ti N e lli e's Memuries. 2d half. .. 20 961 Wee \Vifie .................... 20 103:J Esther: A Storr for Girls ..... 20 1064 0111.r the G o e 1.-ness... ....... 20 l.c n i!S \Vorks 462 Alice1sAdvent11res iu 'Vonder-lancl. lllustrated by John 'l't>nniel ..................... 20 789 Through the LookingGlass, and 'Vhat A.lice Found There. Illustrated by John Ten11i el. 20 \ Vilkic Collins's \Vo1ks 52 The New )lagdalen ............ lO 102 The :Jl o ouston e . ......... 20 1G7 Hear t and Science ............. 20 168 :Ko By Dickens and Collins ................... 10 175 L o ve's Random Shot, and Other Storie s ................. 10 233 I Say N o;" or, The Love-Let ter ................ 20 508 The Girl at the Gate ........... 10 591 The Q11ee11 of Hearts .......... 20 613 The Ubost s To11cl.J, and P ercy and the Prophet ........ ..... 10 623 ill; I ,ad.r's Mon e_v ............. 10 701 T h e \\" oma.11 iu White. 1st half 20 101 The \Vom: rn in 1.Vhit e 2d half 20 ;o2 i\Ian and Wife 1st half. :.!O 70:?. l\lan and \Vife. 2Ll half.... 20 764 The E"il G enius ............... 20 896 The Guilty River ............ 20 946 The D ead S ecret.. . 20 977 The Haunte:1011sc D audet's \ Vorks 534 Jack ........................... 20 574 The Nabob: A Story of Parisian L ife and Manner s . .......... 20 ('hnrlcs Uic J,enJOt'S \ V o1J, s JO The Old Curiosity Shop ........ 20 22 Davi d Copperfie ld. Vol. I. .... 20 22 Dav i d C opperfield. Vol. II... 20 24 Pi ckwick Jiaper s. Vol. I.... 20 2-l Pickwick Papers. V ol. II ...... 20 37 Nicholas Nickleby. 1st hal f ... 20 37 Ni cholas Niekleby. 2d half. ... 20 41 Oliver Twi!::t ................... 20 77 A Tale of Two Cities ........... 20 84 Hard Time s .... ............... 10 91 Barnaby R11dge. 1st ha! r ...... 20 9 1 BarnalH" Rudge. half ...... 20 94 Little Dorr it. 1st hal f .......... 20 U4 Littl e Dorri t. 2d half.... 20 J06 Bleak House. 1st half... .... 20 J06 Rleak House 2d half .......... ))() 107 Do 111be y and Son. !st balf .... 20 107 Dom bey a11d Son. 2 c l half .. ... 20 108 The Cricket on the Hearth, and Doctor ;\Jarigold ...... ........ JO 0111 Mutual Friend. 1st hair. 20 131 Our Munrnl Frieud. 2d half. 132 Master Humph re.r s Clock .... JO 152 'l'h e Uuco111mercial Trave le r ... 20 168 No 'l'h o10 11g-hfar e By Dickens a11d C o llin s...... ...... 10 169 The Haunted Man .............. JO 4;17 Life and Adveuture s of l\lartin Cl111zzle wit. 1st half. ........ 20 437 LifP-a11cl Adventures o f :Hartin Chuzz\t>\\ 'it. 2d half .... ..... 20 439 Gren.r Expectations .... . .... 20 440 )Im. Lirripe1"s Lodgi11 g s ....... 10 447 A111eric:an K o L es. .. . .. .. .. 20 44S Pict11 r e 8 From Italy, and The )J 11d fog Pa 1 w r8. &:c .......... 20 454 The Mysc e r.r o f Eel win Drood .. 20 45G Ske t eh, s li.r B oz. I1111strati_ve o f Eve ry -day Life aud Every-dn) Pople. 20 676 A Child's Histo l'.r o f England. J>ondncy's \ Vo1 lts. 338 The Fa111ily Diffi c11lt_r. JO 679 Where Two Ways )[eet. 10 F. On UobgolJey's \ Y o r k s 8 2 R e al;.d Lips. . . . . 20 104 The Coral Pi11. 1st half.... 2 0 104 The Coral Pin. 2d half. . 20 '2ti4 Piedo1a:lle a Freuch lJ e L ective. IO 828 Bahio l e the Pretty illiner. First . . . . . 20 328 13abi o l e the Pretty Milline r S eeoncl half ................... 20 453 The Lottery 'l1icket ............ 20 475 Tile Prima D onuas Husband .. 20 522 Zig-Zag, the Clo\\'n; or1 '!'he S tet>I Gauntlets ............. .. 20 523 The of a Duel. A Parisian Roma.nee ........... 20 648 The A11g el of til e Bells ........ 20 697 The Pretty Jaile 1-. 1st half. .. 20 6U7 The Pref t\" .Jailer. 2d half . . 20 699 'fl: e Sc11lptor s Daug-bte r lst half ... ..................... 20 699 The Sculpto1"s Daughter. 2d 20 7 8"! Tile Clo < ecl Door. 1st half . . 20 7 8 2 T h e C l osed Door. 2d half.. :.!O 851 The Cry of Bl ood. 1 t half. . 20 S.'>1 The Cry of Blo o d 2d half .... 20 918 The Red Band. s t half. ..... 2 0 918 The H eel I3:1nc l. 2d half 20 9 .1! l!nsh n11 D elivt>ry... ... . . . 2 0 o f an Omnihus. 2 0 108 0 Ber1h,l's S ecret. Jst half. 20 1080 Bertha' S ecre t 2d half. 20 The Hevered Hanrl. lst half. 20 J082 The Severed I-laud. 2d half. 20 1085 The Matapan Affair. 1st hal f 20 1085 The Mat11pau Affair. 2d hal f 20 1 088 The Old Age of Mousieur L e-coq. 1st bal f ...... . ....... 20 1088 The Old Age of Monsi e u r Le coq. 2d hal f. ........... ... 20 "'l'he Duc h el!1S"1S'' t Yorus 2 MollyBaw n .................... 20 6 Portia ................. ...... 20 14 A iry Fair y L ili a n . .... ...... JO 16 P h y lli s ......................... 20 25 ill r s. Geoffrey. ( L a rge type edition ) . ............ ......... 20 950 Mrs. Geoffrey . . . . . ...... . JO 29 Beauty' s Dau g hter s . ... ... . JO 30 Faith a n d Unfaith ... .......... 20 1 rn L?J>S. L o r d B erresfor6 Ada111 B ede. 1st h n lf. . 20 30 .-lda111 B ede. 2d hal f. ..... 20 42 R.orn ola ....................... 20 69:J Fe! ix J-T ol t. the Rad ital. . . . 20 707 Si Ins l'llarnt't': The \ V eaver of Rn ...................... 1 0 728 Janet' s R epentance ..... ... ... 10 762 lmpressions of Theophrastus Such ......... ....... 10 ll. L Farjeon's \ V 01 l R O !"t'J'\ F olk.,'. 10 55R Pov ... rty Co r11P1 . . . . 20 587 'I'll .... Pa.n::\on 01 Durnford ........ :tO 609 The Dark House ......... ..... J O O ctave Feuille t's \Vorks. 66 T h e Romance of a Poor Young Man ........................... 10 386 Led Astray: or, "La .Comt.esse 11 . 10 li'o1 rcster' .'!i \Vorl{S 80 Juue ........................... 280 0111ui a Vauitas. A Tale of Society.. . .. . . . . . 1 0 484 Although He Was a Lord, and Otb e r Tales .............. ..... 10 715 I Have Lived aud 20 721 Dolores ....................... . 20 724 My L o r d a11cl lily Lady . 20 726 My Hero ........................ 20 727 Fai r Wom e u . ...... ............ 20 729 Miguon..... . . . . . . . . . 20 7a2 F r o 111 Olymp u s to Hades. 20 734 Viva...... . . . . . . 20 736 Ro)' a n d V i o la... . 20 740 Rho n a .................... .... :!() 744 D i a n a Carew ; or, For a Wom a ns Sake..... ....... ...... 20 883 O nce Again.. . .... 20 Jessie Fotbeigill's \Vork, 314 P eril. . ................... 20 572 Healey................ . . . 20 905 Borderland ..................... 20 1099 T h e Lasses o f Lever house . ... 20 U.. E. J ?raucillou'e \.Yorks 135 A Great Heiress: A Fortune in Seven Checks .............. 10 3 1 9 Face to Face: A Fact iu t;e,eu Fables........ 10 360 Ropes of Sand 20 656 The Gokle11 F lood. Bv K. E Fnu1cil11 )11 a11d 'Vm. Senio1. 10 911 Golden Bel ls... ... 20 E111il e Gaboria n's V o r k s 7 Fil e No. 113...... .. . 20 12 Other People's Mone_ v .. ....... 20 20 With in an Inc h of His Life. 20 26 Monsi eur Leco q. Vol I.... 20 26 Monsieur Leco q. \"ol. II. 20 33 The Clique of Gold.... 20 38 The Wido w Ler011l!e. ....... 20 43 The Mrsten of Oi'chal.... 20 144 PromiSes o f 1\larriage. ...... JO 979 The Count's !-'ec r et. Par t I ... 20 979 Tile Count' s S ecret. Part II. 20 1 002 l\larnage at, H Ve11111re .... ... 20 1015 A Tho m;;and Fra.11ls Heward. 20 1045 T h e 13th Hus,ar, .............. 20 1 078 T h e Slaves of Parie. lst half 20 J078 The Slaves o f Pa1ie. :!d half. 20 J083 The Little Old )Ian of the Bat ig-nolles. 10 C hn.rles G ilJIJ o u '!; \VorJ{s. 64 A l\lai dt-11 F111I' .................. 10 3 1 7 By M ead aod Stream. 20 James Gtant's 'Vol'lui:. 566 T h e Royal H i ghlanders : or, The Black W a t c h in Eg-ypt ... 20 781 The Secret D ispatch. 10 lUiss Grant's \ Vorks 222 The Sun-Maid...... 555 Cara R oma.... 20 Arthn1 flriflilhs"i!' \ Vol'l{Jil, 614 99............... 10 680 Fast a11cl Loose.. 20 1-L Uide r lln::n!nrd'!'I \ Vorh:s. 4 3 2 rl'he \\litc h'Jil llcncl :.!O 753 King Sol o111011:-; 20 910 She: A H 1 st o 1y o f Adnnture 20 941 .Jess. 2 0 959 Daw11. .. . ..... . .. 20 989 Allan Q11:1 l PrnuP11 ........... 20 10..J!) :\ T 1dt .. of 'fliree L ion:..;. :!li d O n G o in g Back.... . 20 1100 Mr. Meesnn; \\"ill. 20 1105 Maiwas H v e,,ge. JO 'l,ho mn!!i \\-orks. 139 The R o ma11tic Ad\ e1Hnl't:'S n l\lill\111aid.. . 10 530 A Pair uf Bl11 Eyes. 20 G\JO Fnr Fro111 !lit> C r O\\d. :20 791 The l\Jay o1 o r ( 'asterbridg-t>. 20 9 Tl1e Tr1111qw t-M a j or. 20 957 The \ Voodla11d er:::;. :!O John ll. Ilarwootl's \Vork s 143 O n e False H ot.It Fair. 20 ;i58 '\Vithin the Cla)'o;p. 20 Mary Cecil Hay's \Vorl SLe1"::' 8f'cret. 2 0 678 D orot.ln"s . 20 7Hi Yictor Ynnouis h e d. 2 0 8 A \\"icke d Girl.." 987 Brenda Y orkl'. 20 10-26 A Dark Inheritauce. l Urs. ('aish e J ... lloey's \\'01 1,s. 313 The L o t'r::; C r et: d. :.!O 802 A Stern Cliae. 'l, i g h c \Yorio. 509 N e ll Ha1Te11den. 20 714 1Twixt I.o ,e and D11t ) Fer g u s \V. Hume's \Vories 1075 The 3 fysterv o f e Han"om Cab. 20 11'27 l\1nda1'n M:(Jnp;.. 20 Wor k s b y the A u thor of "Ju d i th Wynne.' 332 J11ditil \\".rnue ......... ... ...... 20 506 LlldY Lovelace .... . . ...... 20

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'rHE SEA SIDE LIBRARY-POU KJ'l B D I' l 'ION 3 WlllinmH. G Kingston's Worlhant's Works. 47 Altiora Peto............ 20 537 Piccadill y ..................... J O !llrs \. Vorks. 45 A Little Pilgrnn ................ 10 177 Salem Chapel. .............. ... 20 205 The l\Iinister' s W i fe ............ 30 321 The Prodigals, and Thei r I nh e ritance ... ................. 10 3:37 M emoirs and Resolutions of Adam Graeme of i\lossgrar, including some Chronicles of the Borough of Fendie ....... 20 345 Madam .............. . ......... 20 351 The House on the llfoo1. ..... 20 357 J o h n ........................... 20 370 Lucy Crofton. ....... ......... JO 371 Margaret l\faitland ............. 20 377 Magdalen Hepburn: A Story of the Scottish R eformation ... 20 402 Lilliesl eaf o r Passages in the L i fe of lllrs Margaret l\Iait-land of Sunnyside ........... 20 410 Old Lady Mar y ................. JO 527 The Da1 s of My Life ........... 20 528 At His Gates ... ............... 20 568 The Perpetual Curate .......... 20 5U9 Harry Muir ... . ............. 20 60.3 Agnes. 1st h a l f . . ........... 20 603 Agnes. 2d half ................ 60 1 Innocen t. 1st hal f ............. 20 604 Innocent. 2d half ............. 20 605 Om b r a .......................... 20 645 Oliver's B ride ................. JO 655 The Open Door, and The Portrait 10 687 A Co untry Gentleman .......... 20 703 A House D ivided Against Itself 20 710 The G reatPst H eiress i n England 20 827 Effie Ogil v i e ......... .......... 20 880 The Son o f His Father. ...... 20 902 A Poor Gentlema n . ........ . 20 "Ouida 's" Wo1ks. 4 Under Two F'lags .............. 20 9 Wancla, Countess von Szalras. 20 116 Moth s ....................... 20 128 Afternoon, and Other Sketches 10 226 Friendship ......... .......... 20 228 Princtlss Napraxine .......... 20 238 Pascarel. ............. .. ....... 20 239 Sigona_._,. .................... ... 20 433 A Rainy J une .............. ... JO Othmar. 1st half . .......... 20 630 Othnrnr. 2d half............. 20 671 Don Gesualdo ................. 10 In rem ma. 1st half. ....... 20 672 In M aremma. 2d half ........ 20 874 A House Party.. . . . ..... 10 974 Strath111orP-; or, Wrought by His Own Hand. 1st h .. lr. .... 20 974 20 9El Granville de Vigne; o r Held i n Bon dag-e. 1st half... . .... 20 981 Granville de V igne; or, Held i n Bondage. 2d half. ......... . 20 996 Idalia. 1st half...... . ..... 20 996 Idalia. 2d half. ..... ...... 20 1000 Pnck. J s t half. .............. 20 1000 Puck. 2d hal f ................ 20 1003 Chandos. Jst half. .......... 20 1003 Chandos. 2d half ............. 20 1017 'fricotri n 1st half. ........... 20 10 17 T r icotrin. 2d half ........... . 20 James Payn's Wo1ks. 48 Thicker Tha n Water ........... 20 186 The Canon's Ward ............. 20 343 The Tal k of the Tow n .......... 20 577 In Peril and P rivat ion . ....... 10 58U The Luck nf t h e Darre ll s ... ... 20 823 The H ei r of t h e Ages. .. .. 20 IUis s Jane Porte r's Worl ,s. 660 The Scottish Chie f s. 1st h a l f . 20 660 The Scottish Chief s. 2d half.. 20 696 Thaddeus of W a r saw .......... 20 Cecil Power's W orks. 336 Philistia ...................... .. 20 611 Babyl o n ................ ..... .. 20 !lll's, Campbell l'rned' Works. 428 Ze10: A Story of l\lonte-Carlo. JO 477 Affin i t ies ....................... 1 0 811 The Head Station..... 20 Eleanor C. Pric e 'l!f \Vo1ks. 173 The Foreigners ....... . ........ 20 33 1 Gerald ......................... 20 Charles Reade's \Vorks. 46 Very Har d Cash ... ............ 20 98 A Woman-Hater ............... 20 206 The Pictur e, and Jack of All Trades ........................ 1 0 210 Readiana: Comm ents on Cur rent Events .... .............. 1 0 213 A Terribl e Temptation .... 20 214 Put Yourself in His Place ...... 20 216 Foul Play ..................... 20 231 Griffith Gaunt; or, Jealousy ... 20 232 Love and l\ioney; or, A Perilous Secret . ..................... JO 235 u I t is Nevel' Too Late to Mend." A Matter-of-Fact Ro-mance .................. ...... 20 mrs. J. H. Riddell' s Vorks 71 A Struggl e ror Fame ......... 20 593 J3erna Boyle .................. 20 1007 Miss Gascoigne ................ 20 1077 The Nun's Curse .............. 20 "ltita's" 'Vorks 252 A Sinless Secret. 1 0 446 Dame Durden ................. 20 598 "Cori rm a." A Study . ....... JO 617 Like Dian's Kiss .............. 20 1 125 The Mystery of a Turkish Bath JO F \.V Robinson's V01ks. 157 Mil ly's Hero ................... 20 217 The llian She Cared F o r ...... 20 261 A Fair Maid ................... 20 455 Lazarus in London ............ 20 590 The Courting or Mary Smith .. 20 1005 99 Da1k Street . ............... 20 W. C l ark Russell's \ Vorks, 85 A Sea Qneen ...... ............ 20 109 Little Loo .... .............. .. 20 Ronnd the Galler Fire ... .... JO 209 J ohn Holdsworth. Chief l\late. JO 223 A Sailor's Sweetheart ......... 20 592 A Strange Vo.rnge ............. 20 682 In the l\lidd l e Watch. Sea Stories . ..................... 20 7J3 Jack's Courtshi p. 1st hal f. .. 20 743 Jack's Courtship. 2d half. ... 20 88-1 A Voyage to the Cape .. ... .... 20 9 l e Tile Golden Hope ............. 20 JOH The Frozen Pirate ............. 20 1048 The \Vreck of the "Grosvenor '1 20 112n The Flying Dutchman; or, The Death Ship ................... 20 Adeline Sergeant's \ V o r k s 257 Beyond Recall ................ 1 0 812 No Saint ....................... 20 Sir \. Valte r Scott' s Works. 28 h anhoe ........ ... ... ... ...... 20 201 The M onastery ................ 20 202 The Ah bot. (Sequel to "The l\Ioaastery ") .............. ... 20 353 The Black Dwarf, and A Legend of lll o utrose ....... ... 20 362 The Bride of Lammermoor ... 20 363 T h e Sur:eon's Daughter ..... J O 364 Castle Dangerous ............. JO 391 Tile Heart of Mid-Lothian .... 20 :392 Peveril o f the Peak. . . . . . 20 393 The Pirate ..................... 20 401 Waverley ...................... 20 417 The Fair Maid of Perth; or, St. Val entine's Day ............ 20 418 St. Ronan 's W ell .............. 20 463 Redganntlet. A Tale of the Eighteenth Century .......... 20 507 Chronicles o f the Canongate, and Other Stories ........... 10 J060 The Lady of the Lake.. . . .. J06.3 Kenilwo rth. Jst half. ......... 20 1063 Kenilworth. 2d hal f ......... 20 TI'illin m Silnc s Works. i29 Boulderstone: or, New Men and Old Populations ............. JO 580 The Red Route ................ 20 597 Haco the Dreamer ............. JO 649 Cradle and Spade .............. 20 Hawley Smart's 'Vorks 348 From Post t o Finish. A Racing Romance ......... ........... 20 367 Tie and Trick ..... . .......... 20 550 S truck Down .... ............. J O 847 Bad to Beat .................... JO 925 The O utsider ................... 20 Ftnnk E. Smedley's \ Vorks. 333 Frank Fai rleg-h; o r Scenes from the Life of a l:'rivate Pupil. ...... . .............. 20 562 Lo,wi s Arundel ; o r The Railroad of Life. . . . 2 0 'l' W. Speight's Works, 150 For Himsel f A l o n e ............. JO 653 A Barren Title ....... . ...... 1 0 Robert Louis S t evenson'l!I \Vorks 686 Strange Case of D r Jekyll and M r. Hyde ................... 1 0 704 Prince Otto ...... . . . .... ... J O IJ.32 Kidna pped ... .................. 20 855 The Dy n a miter ................ 20 856 New A rabian Nights .......... 20 888 Treasure Island ............... JO 889 An Inl a n d Voyage . ........... J O 9 4 0 The Merry Men, and Oth e r Tales and Faoles. . . . . . . 20 1051 The l\lisadrnntures o f Joh n N i c h P lson ..................... 10 1110 The S ilverado Squatters ...... 20 Julian Stnrg i s's \-Vo1 k s 405 l\Iy Friends and I. Edited by J u lian Sturgis .............. . JO 694 John Maidmen t . . . . . 20 E1111:en e Sue's \. V orl< s. 270 The Wandering Jew. Part r. .. 30 270 The Wandering Jew. Part II .. 30 271 Tbe Mysteries of Paris. Part I. 30 271 The Mysteries of Paris. Part II. 30 Geol'ge T e1nple s \ Vorh:s 599 Lancelot Ward, lll.P ........... 10 642 Britta.... .. .. . ......... JO Willia m !lI. Thnc lrnray's \. Vorks 27 Vanity Jst lrnlf....... 20 27 Vanity Fair. 2d half .......... 20 165 The Histor y of Heury Esmond. 20 464 The Newcomes. Part L ....... 20 464 The Kewcomes. Part. II. ... 20 670 The Rose and the Ring. Illus-t rated ......................... IU b.r the A u t h o r o f "'rhe 'l' u o lUiss F lcu1 i11r,-s." 637 What' s His O ffence? ........... 20 780 Rare Pale Margaret ............ 20 78 1 The Two 1'1iss ....... ::o 831 Pomegranate Seed.. . . . . . . Annie 'l'hon1as's V o r k s 141 She Loved Him!..... JO 142 Jenifer.. 20 565 No l\ledium............ IO Bertha. Thomns's \ V o r ks. 389 Ictiabod. A Portrait. 10 960 Elizabeth's Fortune. . . 20 Count J ,yof T o lstol's 1066 l\1y Husband and I. .......... 10 1069 Polfkouchka ................. 10 1071 Tile Death of Ivau Iliitch ...... JO 1073 Two Generations .............. 10 1090 The Cossacks.... . ......... 20 1108 Sebastopol . . . . 20 Anthony Trollope's 32 The Land Leaguers ........... 20 93 Anthony Trollope's Autobiog-raphy ............. .... . ... 20 147 Rachel Ray ..................... 20 200 Au Old l\lan s Love ............ JO 531 'fhe Prime Minister. 1st half.. 20 531 The Prime Minister. 2d half . 20 621 'fhe Warden .................. 10 62'2 Harr v Heathcote of Gan go ii .. 10 667 The Golden 1.ion of Granpere. 20 700 Ralph 1he Ifri r. Jst half ..... 20 700 Ralph the Heir. 2d hair. ..... 20 775 The T hree Clerks.. .. .. .. . 20 !ll a r gare t V e l e 1"s WorkM, lliitc h elhurs t P lace .......... 1 0 53G For Percival .............. 20 J ulcs \1 crnc's \Yorks 87 Diek 8and; or, A Captain at 20 100 20,000 Leagues Under the Seas 20 368 The Southern Star; or,the Dia-mond Land. ............... 20 395 T h e Archipelago on Fire .... JO 578 l\Iathias Sandorf. Illustrated. Part I... . . . ... .. . .... 1 0 578 Mathias Sandorf. lllustrated. Par t II ........................ 1 0 578 Mathias Sando rf. Illustrated. Part III ...................... 10 659 rrhe 'Vaif of the" Cynthia 11 751 Gn:::at Voyages and Great Na vi gators. 1st half .... ......... 20 751 Great Voyag-es and G reat Navi-ga1ors. 2d half ............... 20 8.33 Ticket No. "9672." 1st half ... 10 8.3.3 Ticke t No. "9672." 2d half... JO 976 Robur the Conqueror: or. A Trip Round tbe World in a Flying Machi n e ............. 20 1011 T exar's Veng-eance: or, North Versus South. Part I. ....... 20 1011 Texar's V e ug-eance; or, North Versus South. Part II ...... 20 1020 l\lichae l Strogoff; or, The Courier of the Czar .......... 20 1050 The Tour of the World i n 80 Days .......................... 20.

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L.B. Walford's \Vorks. 241 The Baby's Grandmother ..... 10 256 111r. Smith: A Part of His Life 20 258 Cousi as. . . . . . . . . . . . 20 658 The History of a Week ........ JO iHrs. llumphry\Vn\d's \V0tks. 8ti9 Miss Brethertou ............... 10 1116 Robert Elsmere. 1st half ...... 20 1116 Robert Elsmere. 2d half ...... 20 F. \Vnrden's \Vorks. 192 At the World's Mercy.. . . . 10 248 The House on the Marsh ...... 10 286 Deldee: or. The Iroa Hand ... 20 482 A Vagrant Wife ............... 20 556 A Prince of Darkness ......... 20 820 Doriss Fortune ................ 20 1037 Schelwrazad<> : A London Night's Entertainment ....... 20 1087 A Woman's Face; or, A Lake-land Mystery . ...... ...... 20 \Villinm Ware's \V0tks. 709 Zenobia; or. The Fall of Pal-myra. 1st half ........... ... 20 709 Zenobia: o r, The Fall of Pal-1n_rra. :!d half ............... 20 760 Aurelian; or,Rome in the Third Century.. .... . ... ... 20 \Vorks by the A nth or of" \Vedded Hnuds." 628 Wedded Hands ................ 20 968 Blossom and Fruit; or, Madame' s Ward .................. 20 E. \Verner's \Vorks. 327 Raymond's Atonement ....... 20 MO At a High Price ................ 20 1067 Saint illichael. 1st half ....... 20 1067 Saint Michael. 2d half ........ 20 1089 Home Sounds.......... . 20 J. \Vhyte-tUelville's \Vorks. 409 Roy's Wife ..................... 20 451 Market Harborough, and Inside the Bar ............. ......... 20 John Strnuge \Vi111er's \Vorks. 492 Booties' Baby; or, Mignon. Il-lustrated ..................... 10 600 Houp-La. Illustrated ........ 10 638 In Quarters with the 25th (The Black H o r se) Dragoons ...... 10 688 A Maa of H ot1or. lllutrated. 10 746 Ca, alrr Life: or, Sketches and Stnrif.s in Barrncks and Out. 20 813 Army Society. Life in a Gar-rison Town .................... 10 818 Pluck ......................... 10 876 ............. 10 :966 A Siege Baby and Childhood's Memories ..................... 20 1 Garrison Gossip: Gathered in Blankhampton ............... 20 1032 Mignon's Husband ............ 20 1039 Driver Dallas .................. 10 1079 Beautiful Jim: of the Blank-shire Regiment .............. 20 1117 Princess f'arah.... .. ........ 10 1121 Booties' Children .............. 10 !Urs. Beary Wood's \Vorks. .8 East Lynne. 1st half......... 20 8 East Lynne. 2d half .......... 20 "255 The Mystery . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. 20 277 The Surgeon's Daughters ..... 10 508 The Unholy \\'ish ............. 10 513 H e l e n \\'hitney's Wedding, and Other Tales ................. 10 .514 The }lyster y of J essr Page, and Oth t r Tales ............. IO The Storr of Dorothy Grape, and Other Tales.... ....... 10 1001 Lady Adelaide's Oath; or, The Castle" s Heir.... . .. . . .. 20 1021 The Heir to Ashley, and The RedUonrt Fann ........... ... 20 1027 A Life's Secret ................ 20 1042 Lady Grace .................... 20 Charlotte Jll. Youge's Works 247 The Ar111011rers Prentices ..... 10 275 The Three Brides .. ........... 10 -535 H e1Jrietta's 'Vish; or, Domi-neerin g ....................... 10 563 The Two Sides of the Shield .. 20 640 Nuttie's Father ................ 20 665 The Dove in the Eagle's Nest. 20 666 My Y oung Alcides: A Faded Photograph .................. 20 739 The Caged Li o n ............... 20 i42 Love and Lif e ................ 20 '183 Chantry H o use .............. .. 20 790 The C h aplet of Pearls; or, The White and Black Ribaumont. 1st half ....................... 20 '790 The Chaplet of Pearls; or, The White aad lJlack Ribaumont. 2d half ....................... 20 800 Hopes and Fears; or, Scenes from the Life of a Spinster. !st half. ...................... 20 800 Hopes and Fears; or, Scenes from the Life of a Spinster. 2d hnlf.. ...................... 20 887 A Modern Telemachus ........ 20 1024 UndPr the Storm; or, Steadfast's Charge ................. 20 llliscellnueons. 58 The Story of Ida. Francesca .. 10 61 Charlotte Temple. Mrs. Row-son ........................... 10 99 Barbara's History. Amelia B. Edwards ...................... 20 103 Rose Fleming. Dora Russ ell .. 10 105 A Noble Wife. John Saunders 20 111 The Little School-master Mark. J. R. Shol"thouse .............. 10 112 The Waters of Marah. John Hill ........................... 20 THE SEASIDE LIBRARY-POCKET EDITION. 113 Mrs. Carr's Companion. M G. Wightwick ................... 10 114 Some of Our Girls. Mrs. C. J. Eiloart ....................... 20 115 Diamond Cut Diamond. T. Adolphus Trollope ........... 10 120 Tom Brown's School Days at Rugby. Thomas Hughes .... 20 127 Adrian Bright. Mrs. Caddy .... 20 149 The Captain's Daughter. From th e Russian of Pushkin ...... 10 151 The Ducie Diamonds. C. Blath-erwick .............. ......... 10 156 For a Dream' s Sake." Mrs. Herbert Martin. . . . .. . . . 20 158 The Starling. Norman Macleod, D D ..................... 10 160 Her Gentle Dee ds. Sarah Tytler 10 161 The Lltdy of Ly ons. Founded on the Play of that title by Lord Lytton ................. 10 163 Winifred Power. Joyce Dar-rell ........................... 20 170 Great Treason, A. By Mary Hoppus. 1st half. .. .. .. .. .. 20 170 Great Treason A. By Mary Hoppns. 2d half.. .. ........ 20 174 Under a Ban. Mrs Lodge ..... 20 176 An April Day. Philippa Prit-t i e Jephson ................... 10 178 More Leaves from the Journal o f a Life in the Highlands. Queen Vi ctoria ............... 10 182 The ................ 20 185 Dita. Lady Margaret Majendie lJ 187 The Midnight Snn. Fredrika Bremer ...................... 10 198 A Husband's Story............ HI 203 John Bull and His Island. Max O'Rell ........................ 10 \!18 Agnes Sorel. G. P.R. James . 20 219 Lady Clare: or, The Master .,f the Forges. Georges Olmet 10 242 The 'fwo Orphans. D E1rnery. 10 253 The Amazon. Uarl Vosmae r .. 10 266 'fhe Water-Babies. Rev. Chas. Kingsley. . . .. .. . .. . 10 274 Alice, Grand Duchess of H esse, Princess or Great Britain and Ireland. Biographical Sketch aad Letters .................. 10 279 Little Goldie: A Story Gf W o m an 's Love. Mrs. Sumner Hay-den........ .. . ........ 20 285 The Gambler's Wife .. ......... 20 289 John Bull's Neighbor in Her True Light. A Brutal Sax-on" .......................... IO 311 Two Years Before the Mast. R. H. Dana, Jr .................. 20 329 The Polish Jew. (Translated from the French by Caroline A. Merighi.) ErckmannChatrian .......................... 10 330 May Blossom; or, Between Two Loves. Margaret Lee ........ 20 334 A Marriage of Convenience. Harriett Jay ................. 10 335 The White Witch ............... 20 340 Under Which King! Compton Reade ......................... 20 341 Madoliu Rivers; or, The Little B eauty of R e d Oak Seminary. Laura Jean Libbey ........... 20 347 As Avon Flows. Henry Scott Vince ....................... 20 350 Diana of the Crossways. George Meredith ...................... 10 352 At Any Cost. Edward Garrett. 10 354 The Lottery of Life. A Story of New York Twenty Years Ago. John Brougham ...... 20 355 The Princess Dagomar of Poland. Heinrich Felbermann. 10 356 A Good Hate r. Frederick Boyle 20 365 George Christy ; or, The Fort unes o f a J\1iastrel. Tony Pastor ....... .................. 20 866 Th e l\Iysterious Hunter; or, The Man of Death. Capt. L. C. Carleton. ......... 20 374 The Dead l\Ian's Secret. Dr. Jupite r Paeo a ................ 20 381 The Red Cardinal. Frances Elli o t............ ........ 10 382 Three Sisters. Elsa D'Esterre-Keeling ....................... 10 383 Introduced to Society. Hamil-ton Ald a ...................... 10 387 The Secret of the Cliffs. Char l otte Fre n c h . . .. .. .. .. .. 20 403 An English Squire. C. R. Cole-ridge . ...................... 20 406 The Merchant's Clerk. Samuel Warren .............. ......... 10 407 Tylney Hall. Thomas Hood ... 20 426 Venus's D o ves. Ida Ashworth Taylor ....... ................. 20 430 A Bitter Reckoning. Author of By Crooked Paths" .... 10 435 Klytia: A Story of H eidelberg Castle. George Tai Ior ....... 20 436 Stella. Fanny Lewald ......... 20 441 A Sea Change. Flora L. Shaw. 20 442 Ranthorpe. George Henry L 8\\"0S ......................... 20 443 The Bachelor of the Albany ... 10 457 The Russians at the Gates of Herat. Chnrles l\Iarvin ...... 10 458 A Week o f Passion; o r The Dil emma of 111r. Geon?e Bar ton the Younger. Ed \\"ard Jenkins ....................... 20 468 The Fortunes, Good and Bad, of a Sewiug-G irl. Charlotte J\1. Stanley ......... : ..... ..... 10 483 Betwixt My Love and Me. By author o f "A Golden Bar" ... 10 485 Tinted Vapours . J. Maclaren Cobban ....................... 10 491 Society in London. A Foreign Resident. . . . . . .. . . .. 10 493 Colonel Enderhy' s Wife. Lucas Malet ......................... 20 501 Mr Butler' s Ward. F. Mabel Robinson ................ .... 20 504 Curly: An Actor's Story. John Coleman ...................... JO 505 The Society of London. Count Paul Vasili. ... ............... 10 510 A Mad Love. Author of" Lover and Lord ". . . .. . . .. .. .. 10 512 The Waters of Hercules ........ 20 518 The Hidde n Sin ................. 20 519 James Gord0n' s Wife .......... 20 526 Madame De Fresnel. E. Fran-ces Poynter .................. 20 532 Arden Court. Barbara Graham 20 533 Hazel Kirke. Marie Wal s h .... 20 536 Diss o lving Views. 111rs. And rew Lang.... ................. 10 545 Vida's Story. By the author of "Guilty Without Crime" ... 10 546 Mrs. K eith's Crime. A Nove l . JO 571 Paul Crew's Story. Alice Co rny ns Carr.. . . .. . .. .. .. 10 575 The Fiuger of Fate. Captain i\Iayne Reid .................. 20 581 The Betrothed. ( I Promessi Sposi.) Allessandro Manzoni 20 582 Lnc in, Hugh and Another J\1rs. J. H. Need ell .... ............. 20 583 Victory Deane. Cecil Griffith . 20 584 Mix ed M otives .................. 10 599 Lancelot Ward, 111.P. George 'fe n1ple ...................... 10 612 My Wire's Niece. By tlie author of H Dr. Edith Romney ,, ..... 20 624 Primus in Jadis. M J. Colquh oun ........................ 10 634 Tbe Unforeseen. Alice O'Haul o n ............................ 20 641 The Rabbi' s Spell. Stuart C. Cumberland .................. 10 643 The Sketch-Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. Washington Irving ........................ :!O 654 "Us." Au Old-fashioned Story. i\Irs. l\Iolesworth .............. 10 662 The l11ystE1-y of Allan Grale. Isabella Fyvie l\Iayo. .. ...... 20 668 Half-Way. Aa Anglo-French Romance ............ 20 669 The Phil .. sophy of Whist. \Yilliam Pole ................. 20 675 Dymond. Miss Thackeray 20 681 A Singer's Story. May Laffan. 10 683 The Bachelor Vicar of Ne\\"forth. J\1rs. J. Harcourt-Roe. 20 68l Last Days at A pswi c h .......... 10 692 'l'he l\Iikl\do, aud Other Comic Or.eras. Written by W. S G ilb ert. Composed by Arthur Sullivan ............ .......... 20 705 The W oman I Loved, and the Woman Who L oved M e. Isa Blagdeu ...................... JO 706 A Crimson Stain. Annie Bradshaw .......................... 10 712 For Maimie's Sake. Grant Allen ................... . .... 20 718 Unfairly \\'on. Mrs. Po\\"er O'Donoghue. ............. 20 719 Childe Harold's Pilgrimage. L ord Byron ................... 10 7'"3 Manl e'"erer's J\Iillions. T Wemyss Reid. . . .. .. .. . . .. .. 20 725 My Ten Years' Imprisonment. Silvi o Pell ico ................ 10 730 The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin ................. 10 735 Uiftil the Day Emil y Spe nd e r............... .... 20 738 In the Golden Days. Edna Lyall ......................... 20 748 Hurrish: A Study. By the H o n Emily Lawless .......... 20 750 An Old !>tory of 111y Farming Days. Fritz Renter. 1st half 20 750 An Old Story of My Farming Day s. Fritz Renter. 2d half 20 752 J a<:kanapes, and Other Stories. Juliana Horatia Ewing . . . 10 754 How to he Happy Though Mar ried. By a Graduate in the University of Matrimony ..... 20 755 l\1argery Daw. . . . . . . . . 20 756 The Strange Adventures of Cap tain Dangerous. A Narrative in Plain English. Attempted by George Augustus Sala .... 20 757 Love's Martyr. Laurence Alma Tadema ...................... 10 759 In Shallow Waters. Annie Ar-mitt .......................... 20 766 No XIII; or, The Story of the LostVes tal. Emmall1arshall 10 770 The Castle of Otranto. Horace Walpole .................. 10 773 The i\Iark of Cain. Andrew Lang .......................... 10 774 The Life and Travel s of Mungo Park .......................... 10 777 The Vorag-es and Trave ls of Sir J o11n D l a uudevill e Kt ..... 10 778 Society's Verdict. By the au th o r of H :My Marriage ,, ..... 20 786 Ethel J\1ildmay's Follies. By author of .. Pelite'sRomance" 20 793 Vivian Grey. By the Rt. Hon. Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield. 1 s t h alf ... .... 20 793 Vivian Grey. By the Ht. Hoa. Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield. 2d half. ....... 20 801 She Stoops to Conquer, and The Good-NaLUred Maa. Oliver Goldsmith ........ ........ 10 803 Major Frank. A L. G. Bosb omnToussaint .... .......... 20 807 If Love Be LO\ e D. ('ecil Gibbs 20 809 Witness My Hand. By author of" Lady Gw e nd o len's Tryst" 10 810 The Secret of Her Life. Ed ward Jenkins ......... ... 20 816 Rogues and Vagabond;. By George R. Sims, author o f u 'Ostle r Joe,, ... ............. 20 822 A Pass ion Flower. A Novel. . 20 852 Under Five Lakes. M Quad. 20 879 The Touchstone of Peril. A Novel of Anglo-Indian Life With Scenes During the Mutiny. R. E. Forrest. ......... 20 885 Les J\liserables. Victor Hugo. Part I....... . 20 885 Les Miserabl es. Vi.eto1: i:1ugo. Part JI... . .. 20 885 Les 111iserahles. \' icto1 : Part HI. ..................... 20 908 A Willful Young \\'omnn. Alice Price ......................... 20 913 The Silent Shore; o r The i\!ys tery of St. James' Park. By John Blo1111delle-Burton ....... 20 915 That Otl1er p,.r,011. lllrs Alfred Hunt. l s t half........ 20 915 That Other Person. J\1rs. Al-fred Hunt. 2cl half. 20 917 The Case of Rtuben J\lalachi. H Sutherlnnd EdwHds ..... 10 919 Locksley Rall Sixty Years Af ter, etc. By Alfred, L ord T e n-nyson. P.L. D.C L .......... 10 920 A C hild of the R e volution. By the i;ii,1,tho r of 1.1 l\Iad e moiseJle Mon ...................... 20 921 The Late Miss H o llingford. Rosa Mulholland ............. 10 933 A Hidden Terror. Ma1y Albert 20 937 Cashel Byron's Profession. By Georg-e Bernard Shaw.... .. 20 938 Cranford. By 111rs. Gaskell ... 20 954 A Girl's HPart. By the autho1 of" Nobody1s Darling,, ...... 20 956 H e r Johnnie. By Viol e t Whyte 20 964 A Struggle for the Right; or, Tracking the Truth ......... 20 96b Periwinkle. By Arnold Gray. 20 966 R e by the author of King Solomon's i ves ,, ; and A Siege Baby and Childhood's Memories, by J. S Winter ... 20 970 King Solo m o n's "1ives; o r The Phantom Mines. By Hyder Ragged. (Illustrated) ....... 20 9S4 Her O" n S i ster. By E. S. Will-iamson ....................... 20 986 The Great Hesper. By Frank Barrett ......... ............. 20 992 Jllarrying and Giving in riage. By J\1rs. lllolewort.h. 20 994 A Penniless Orphan. By W. Heimburg .................... 20 1028 A Waste d Love. A Novel. .... 20 1030 The Mistress of Ibich tein. By Fr. Henkel. ................. 20 1034 The Silence of Dean lllaitland. By Maxwell Gray ............ 20 1043 Faust. By Goethe... ....... 20 1059 Confessions of aJJ English Qp.um-Euter. By Tl1omas Quincey ................... 20 1061 A Queer Race. By William Westall. ................... .. 1072 On l y a Coral Girl. By Gertrude 20 Forde ........................ 20 1081 Too Curious. By Edward J. Goodman ....... .............. 20 1086 Nora. B) Carl Detlef . ....... 20 1092 A Glorious Gallop. By Mrs. Edward K ennard ............. 20 1107 The from Scotland Yard. By H.F. Wood ....... 20 1120 The Story of an African Farm. By Ralph Iron (O live Schreiner) ........................... 20 The foregoing works are for sale by all newsdealers, or will be sent to any address, postae'.e free, on r eceipt of 12 cents for single num her., and 25 cents for double numbers, by the publisher. Addr ess GEORGE IUUNRO, l"llunl"o's l'ublishiug House, (P. O. Box 3751.) 17 to 27 Vandewater Street, New York. THE SEASIDE LIBRARY IS FOR SALE BY

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THE SEASIDE LIER.ARY -ORDI.NAHY EDITION MUNRO' S PUBLICATIONS. THE SEASIDE LIBRARY----ORDINARY EDITION. ALWAYS UNCHANGED AND UNABRIDGED. The Seaside Library, Ordinary Edition, is Never Out of Print. Persons who w i sh to purchase t h e fo ll ow in g works i n a co m p l ete and unabridged form are cautioned to o r de r and see that they get THE SEASlDE LTBRAUY, Ordina r y Editi o n as wo r ks p u b li shed in othe r li bra r ies arc frequent l y abri dged and i ncomplete Every num!Jer of THE SEASrnE Lr mu HY is unchanged and unabridged. Ne"srlea!Prs wis hing catalogues of T1rn SEASIDE LIBRARY, Ord inary Edition, bearing their imprint, will be s upplied on sending their names addresses, and numbe r r e quired. The following works are for sa l e b y a ll newsdea l ers, or w ill be sent to any address, postage free, on receipt of price, by the publi sher. Address P 0 Hox 37'il, Wol'le Bon gli. Christmas, 1884. (Edite1 by l\f iss M. E. Braddon) ............... 20 1996 Wyllard's Weird .............. 20 2075 One Thing Needful; or, The Penalty of Fate ............... 20 2079 Mohawks . .................... 20 Wo1l


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No. 4 2 OR BONANZA BARDIE; O r THE TREASURE OF THE ROOKIES. U y O L D l 'i r !irt II a lf'. A SERIES OF THE MOST THRILLING DETECTIVE STORIES EVER PUBLISHED. } SINCLE I l NUMBER. f GEORGE lltUNHO, PUBLlSHEH, Nos. 17 to 27 VAND&WATER STREET, N1tw Yon&. 5 PRICE { 10 CENTS.S Old SIP.uth Library. Issued Quarterly.-By SubscripLiou, Fifty Cents per Annum. Copyrighted 1888, bv flpmge Munro.-Entered at the Post Office at New 'York at Second Class Rates.-November 1, 1888. Cooyri"htfld 1888. by Geo rgfl Munro. BONAN.ZA BARD IE; Vol. III. THE TREASURE OF THE ROCKIES. BY OLD F I R S T HAL F NEW YORK: GEOlWE MUNRO, .PUBLISHER, 17 TO 27 VANDEWATER STREET.

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MUNRO'S PUBLICATIONS. O L D SLEUTH LIBRARY. A Series of the Most Thrilling Detective Stories Ever Published! ISSUED QUARTERLY. FE.:CCE 1. 0 E.A.C::S:::. The Follo,ving UooJo; are No'v Ready. NO. 1.-0LD SLEUTH, THE DETECTIVE. NO. 2.-THE KING OF THE DETEO'l'l VES. NO. 3.-0LD SLEUTH'S In two parts-JO cents each. NO. 4.-UNDER A i\IlLLIO DISGUISES. In two parts-10 cents each. NO. 5 NIGHT SCENES IN NEW YORK. NO. 6.-0LD ELECTRICITY, THE LIGH'l'NING D ETEO'l'IVE. NO. 7.-THE SHADOW DETECTIVE. In two parts-10 cents each. NO. 8.-RED LIGHT WILL, THE RIVER DETEO'l'IVE. In two parts-10 cents each. NO. 9.-IRON BURGESS, THE GOVERNMEN'l' DJ!j'l'EOTl VE. In two parts-10 cents each. NO. 10.-'l'HE BRIGANDS OF NEW YORK. In two parts-10 cents each. NO. 11.-TR.AUKED BY A VENTRILOQUIST NO. 12.-THE 'l'WIN SHADOWERS. NO. 13.-'l'E-IE FRE OH DETECTIVE. NO. 14.-BILLY WAYNE, THE S'l'. LOUIS DE 'l'EO'l'IVE. NO. 15.-THE NEW YORK DETECTIVE. 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Address GEORGE MUNRO, MUNRO'S POBLISIUNG HOUSE, P 0 Box 3751. 17 to 27 Vandewater St., N. y,

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BONANZA BARD IE; Or, THE TREASURE OF THE ROCKIES. HJ' 01.D !lil,l:IJ'l'll. First Half". A SERlES OF THE J\IOST THIULLING DETECTIVE STORIES EVER PUBLISHED. No. 4Z j SINGLE I I NUMBER. I GEORGE MUNRO, PVBLlSHEH, Nos. 17 to 'irl V.um&WAT&R STRE&T, Ne:w YoRK. 5 PRICE { l 10 CENTS.S Vol. III. O ld Sleuth Library, Issued Quarterly. -By Subscription, Fifty Cents per Annum. Copyriltftced 1888, ny GAorge Munro.-Entered at the Post Office at New York at Second Class Rates.-November 1 1888. Copyrighted 1888, by George Munro. BONANZA BARD IE; OR, THE TREASURE OF THE ROCKIES. CHAPTER I. "HATJT!" A dark fi!?nre had just issued from a tunnel, through winch the great Prince of Wales Road passes in Ireland, when four other dark figures suddenly leap ed forward, and the one word "Halt!" sounded upon the night air. It was a startling tableau that was presented at that moment under the moonlight in that whil e road, with the mouth of the tunnel as a dark background, and the dist ant. hills lying still further hack, in their rugg ell austerity. The figure that emerged from the tunnel was that of a stalwart young man, and it WllS evi dent from his motions as he stepped out under the broad moonli ght that he was anti cipating pursuit as he moved cautiously, and ever and anon cast furtive gla n ces l :ac kward, as though expecting some f oe to spring upon him; bnt in stead hi s enemies confronted him in the person s of four of the rura l constabulary, and as the command to hult was uttered t\\ o ritles were aimed at the yo un g man's breast, and their glit terin g barrels g leam ed under the rays of the moon. The young man was cool as a encumber, as the sayiu.,. g oes, under the thrilling circum stance s He did not recoil or utter au outcry of alarm, but a c lose observer would have noticed a steady, cl ea r g leam in his eyes, as in a firm voi ce he said, speaking with a rich and melli flu e nt brogue: "Lower yer guns. Would yees shoot a man down in cowld blood?" We know ye, Barclie O 'C onor, and yc'll down on yer knees and up wicl yer hands, or, man. we ll shoot." "Ye call me Bardie O'Conor?" "We do, and we know ye well, although you're gotten up in the garb of the boa tman clown at Bayside.'' "Faith, if yees hev that idea in yer heads it's no use for me to stand here arguing wid yee s so yees can lower yer guns." Will ye surrender?" EY OLD FIRST HALF. "Well, don't yees see I will? What else would I do when yees hev that crowd behind yees there?" As the young man spoke he raised his hands, und sudden ly leaning forward, pointed as thou g h there were others behind the constab les. The l a tter turned and that momentary inattention proved fatal to the ir purpos e for quick as a flas h the m a n whom thev had commanded to h a lt drew a lon g stick wliich he had evidently held concealed a t his side, and with the quick n ess of a practi ced s wordsman he got to work. He leaper! fornarll b e tween th e b a rr e ls of the two rifles and ere the assailed knew what was to occur, both m e n receiv e d a welt upon the head that s tretched them senseless upon the road, and the other two were t ap ped as qui c k ly, ere they had time to rai se their ritles, even to use them as clubs. The assailant proved himself to be not only a man of extraordinary strength, but also one pos sessed of remarkabl e quickness and agility, as within five seconds from the period wh e n h e struck his fir s t foe, he had all four l ying help l ess in the dust, and leaping ove r their prostrate bodi es he started along the road at a running pace so swift as to defy pursuit. The fugitive ran for about a mile, wh e n he came to where the ro a d made a tnru around a rocky bluff. Here he came to a halt, and after waiting a moment he put his fingers to his lip s and ther e issued forth a sh rill whistle and the next instant there came an answe rin g whi s tle, and still a moment l ater there stood before him a grotesque-looking figure. Teddy, i s that you?" Begorrn, Bardic but it's no one else." "And hev ye the jaunting-car at hand '/" "I hev." "Where?" A small bit of a piece down the road. "Well, it's at once we'll flit me lad ; for it's n ot t e n minutes ago I had a tus s l e will th e con s t ab l es." And did they overtake ye Barclie clear ? "No; but they waylaid me, and they had their l('uns ranged on me, ready to blow off the top of me head, when I p a rleyed wid them a moment, and th e n I flung the stick ag'iu their guns, and when they lay down to let m e pass I just l ept over them, and h ere I am "It's a wonder y e are, B a rdi e." "We've no time for compliments, Teddy. Shure they'll be up and afther me or passin' the word along the line th a t Bardie O 'Co nor is flitting thi s way. The two m e n hurried a l ong down the road, and soon came to wher e a jauntin g -car was h a lt e d beside a hed ge. ln a trice the horse was unhit c hed the two men ascend ed to th e seat and away the auimal was put to his speed along the road, and so through the nig ht the hors e was driven at a good gait, until jus t before dawn he ""'.as to a h a lt, and passenger, Bar0 Conor, shook hancts with the driver, and SaJcl : "It's good-mornin' and it' s good -bye Teddy." "And will ye take the train, Bardie? "No; ifs by car I 'll go to Queenstown." "And will ye trav e l in the daylight?" "That will b e as circumstances clircet, my lad. We can never tell what it before i s at such times, but ye ca.n moind this, l'll not be taken alive and I've got in me h ea d b e tt e r than a dream to fix it th ere, that I ll be off safe and sound from me enemies ere Sunday night comin'.'' And we'll h ea r from ye when ye arrive in Am erica?'' ." Ye will h ea r from me some of our friends, Teddy, d ea r; and now 1t s once again goorlmo,nin' and got>cl-bye." "But, m a n clear, ye are givin' yersel' away." "Neve r f ear, Teddr, y e can trust me. I'll b e l ayin' low until nig ht and then I've a m eet iu"wicl some one of our friend s anrl a fth e r that it' s goocl.lJye to old Ireland ; and in a low but full ric h voice, the f ugitiv c s ung: "It may be for years and it may be forever-"

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4 BONANZA BARDIE; OR, He stopped singing suddenly, for steps were heard, and without another word he darted into the bush beside the road and disappeared. The driver of the jaunting-car he11ved a sigh and urged his horse forward at a ')Valk, a pair of constables suddenly confronted him. Halt!" came the command. Let go the horse," called Teddy. The men had halted the horse, and they stPpped beside the driver's seat and fixed their eyes on the owner of the cart demanding: Where did you come?" "Where did I come from, are ye askin'?" "Yes; where did you come?" "Well, it's no secret; shure I came from Kenmare." And who were you talking to a moment ago?" Who was I talkin' to, are ye askin' me?" "Yes." Well that's no secret. Shure I was talki11' to Teddy Farrel." "And who is Teddy?". "I'm Teddy Farrel, at your service, me gay boys in yer fine clothes." mine will come, and, if I live, some day I'll a good ride we'll hev to Cork. I've plenty to come into possession of my own with my name ate and I've plenty to drink." c l eared and my honor fully established, and I "Mike, you're a thoughtful friend, and I'll will some day return to be a friend to my friends never forget r_e.'' and also!\ good friend of old Ireland, my native "Shure. its all yer friends hev shared in the l and which 1 so dearly love, and no new scenes thoughtfulness, and it was at joint expense we will ever tear from my heart a recollection of provided for your journey. We all love ye, either my friends or the land of my birth; and Bardie, and we know ye are the true heir, and again, good friends, you need not fee l sad on that ye were wronged of yer rights, and we'll my account. Sure, l'm glad to go abroad for a all rejoice should the day come when ye will season, and if there is any land on earth whereget possession of yer own." in I'd choose to make a temporary home that A short time later an old man and old woman land i s America, and now, to show yees I'm not were driving along the road, and they jogged sad at heart, bnt full of hope and bright anticiit until morning, and it was then for the first pations, I'll sing yees one song. as when we time they were halted by a coupie of constables were won't to hold our meetings for the fun who encountered them upon the road. and enjoyment we could coin out of them." Here, stop where ye are," came the c om-Bardie O'Conor did sing a brave, merry song mand in restrained tones, but his voice was sweet and The car was brought lo a sudden halt. clear, and when he had concluded one of the And where are yees going?" came the n e xt masked men said: question. Bardie, tell us one more story afore ye go It was the old woman who undertook to be from us?" spokesman, and she said: I will," sa id Bardie, in a merry tone and "Shure it's mane men ye are to stop us this he asked: "Do yees all remember old Loughway." Ian that lived back from Bantry Well? 1 well "Is it now?" remember the time he died, but it is only the It is." CHAPTER II. othe r day I beard the following 8tory told by "But we're stoppin' every one going this TnE constables put Teddy Farrel under a one who was pres ent when he drew his last road." cross-fire of questions, but they learned nothing bre ath. Sure, men, the last moment he said to "Yees are?" from him and in good time the rnau drove on those around his lied: "Yes. to Killarney wh e re he rested hi8 horse and re "'I've no fortune to lave yees, boys; all I "Well, then it's meaner ye are than I thought maine d until late in the afternoon, when he hev is a few shillings, an' it would be of little yees at first to go stoppin every one goin on started on his return to Bantry. l a sting benefit to any one of yees, s o I'll bemindin' their own business and it' s only yerOn th e night following the incidents p r eviousqueath it to be spent in whisky at the toime of sel's rnindin other people' s bu s ine ss.' 1y r e cord e d, a man leaped the hedge surroundme funeral.' "Go on now, and l e t us hear no more of your fog the Iler b e rt Mansion, and made his way past Well, there came a moment's silence, when opinions, said one of the con sln bit s :Muckro s s Abbey ruin to the shores of the lake, one of the friends, with the tears streaming 'fhe two travelers were glad to be ord e r e d where he found a boat which he entered, and down from his eyes, leaned over the dying man on. and in due time they r e a c hed the c ity of :rowed hims e lf over to the famous ruins of In-and asked : Cork, and still later onr hero arriv ecl at Queen s nisfallen. A soon as he had reached the ruin, 'Is it going to the cemetery or coming home town, and for two day s he was comp elle d to lay and passed beneath the ivy-buried arch that that we shall drink the whisky?' Well, boys, low until Sunday, when a freight steamer, comstill remained of the long crurnblinl? walls, he old Loughlan meditated a moment, and then in monly called an oceun tramp, was to beheld a strange and weird sight. 'I here were a merry tone for a dying man said: stay over at the steamer port in order to make a dozen weird-looking figures ga th ered in th e Yees, had better drink the whisky going some repairs to her machinery iuin ; a solitary torch the scene, but to the cemetery, boys, for I won't be wid yee s The latter was the chance for which our hero -cast sufficient light to reveal the fact that the coming back.' had b e en waiting, and through the influ e n ce o f :figures were clad in masks and loug, black Bardie O'Conor was known as a good singer, friends he secured a position as fireman on the gowns, and were it not for the silence preserved a merry man, and a famous story teller, and steamer, and on the follow Monday morning an on-looker would have declared the tFJu t e n his anecdote was received with a roar of laughbid adieu to the land of his birth. as grotesque ter from his friends. We will here state that Bard ell O'Conor w a s The man who had crossed in the boat, and An hour passed, and atlengthBardie O'Conor a remarkable man. He was but five and-tw enty who joined the s trange group, was not d is-said: at the time we first introduce him to our r e ad guised at all, and as the evening was warm he Well, my fri e nds, it's time for me to be e rs. He was a singularly handsome young fel <:arried hi s coat upon his arm. As he stepped going." l ow, well-educated, being a graduate of e;ollege in the midst of the group of masked men, he There followed the l1and-shaking once more, and was an accomplished linguist, he having said: and the exchange of many kind and hopeful been educated in France and Germany "Good ev e ning, my good fri e nds!" words, and the prospective imigrant at length, There was a great myEtery onr And it wa s uoticeable that there was a tot.al a ccompanied by one of the party, returned to hero. He had never known father nor moth er, :absence of the liro g ue in his speech; his prohis boat, and the two entered; and when in the and yet he had been reared in luxury by s o m e 1Uunciation lieing cl e ar and fine, as is charactermiddle of the lake, our hero s companion threw secret friend or relative, but nev e r had one word istic of an educated Iri s h gentleman. off his mask and gown, and stood revealed as been whispered to him as concerned his real "A foine greeting to ye, Bardie," replied one attir e d like an old woman. Wig and all were to id e ntity until the information cam e in a mo s t l()f the men, and th e y all gathered around him, aid in the dis guise. remarkable and unexpected manner, and from and there followed hearty hands hakings and "Well, well, Mike! what does this mean?" a strange source about a year preceding the many kind and en c ouraging words; and after exclaimed Bardie, in surprise. opening of our narrative. ihe greetings one of the men stepped forward "Yer goin' to Cork?" We have stated that Bardie had been reared and said: I am in luxury, and that the supplies had c ome from "Bar dic, we've put together a small snm here Aud from there to Queenstown?" some secret source. Such was the fact, and in this purse, and we're asking you to accept it "I am." never had he stood face to face with his b e ne-from your fri e nds. "And the constables are on yer track?' factor; but he received letters from him and in. There was deep emotion in the tones of Bar" I've good reason to know that." structions as to what he do and about die O'Conor' s voice, as he said: "And that's why ye see me as I am shure! the time our hero r eached th e age of one-and "I am very thankful to you, my good friends, I'm goin wid ye; and it s me own plan I hev twenty he received a very important letter from for this offer of your good will and kindness; to carry ye safe to yer journey's end. And the same mysterious source as his previous let but I am more thankful that I'm not in need of shure I'm yer ould woman now and yet my ters and supplies had come it, as I have a fair supply of money to do me good man, and it s a foine foolin' we'll give the The final letter, for it was a final letter, con until I reach old America; and as I've suc c eedofficers should any of them fall upon us by the tained quite a sum in b anknotes and conveyed ed in escaping the police we have good rea s on way." the information that from the d a te of the receipt for making m erry inste a d of looking a s sol e mn Shure, Mike, your idea is a good one, but I of the letter the young man must look out for as 1 know yees all do under your masks. It' s can improve upon it." himself. He was advi s ed to go to America and dnde e d a dark day and poor times for Ireland, Ye can?" carve out his own fortune, but, at the s ame whe n a man's fri e nds mu s t come hooded and "Yes." time, was informed that it w a s merely a matte r ;gowned at midnight to bid him a God sp e ed ; "How?" of advice, and he was at liberty to follow his but I t ell you brighter days are coming, and I'll "It's ruesel' will be the ould woman, an' ye own heart, and our hero decided to return to t ake this occa s ion to s ay a few words for myshall be my onld man. Ireland. :self I am the true heir of the Bardell est a te s "As ye l oike, Bardie, only that ye m a ke shure Bardie oconor had not alway s been knows all the fa c tory inter e sts thereunto, and the to evade the police, for ye hev no idea how clo s e as Bardie O'Conor. The name by which his sep resent holder of the s ame is no kin to m e nor the w a t c h will b e for ye." cret b e nefa c tor had always addre s sed him in his has he the r e mote s t ri g ht to a foot of th e land or The m e n m a de a change in the boat and many letters was Terence O Conor; and it wa s :any of the buildin gs th e reon; but h e i s in pos :when both had nssumcd their disguise s they not until our hero had m e t with a startling ad a nd b eca u s e he h a s wronged m e and e re fair representatives of a g ood hone s t old ventur e that he a s sumed the name under which robbed me of my rights he has become my bit Iri s hm a n and his wife, and with that they he had ever after been known. t ere s t foe, and it i s he who trumped up th e pulle d for the shore B a rdi e h a d b e en in Ire land about a y e ar, and charges a g ain s t me It was he who h a s "ma de it had made his home in Dublin, when a friend appear that blood is on my hands, and it i s he wanted him to visit the classic ie g ion a round who has caused m e to be hounded all ov e r Ire CHAPTER HI. Bantry Bay and the lakes of Killarney; and it land and who has compelled me at len gth to UPON reaching the shore the two men stule was when, at Glengariff, he was walking along fiee from my nativ e land with a stain upon my across the meadow, and finally struck the road, the road one evening, he met an old cr<>ne The name and not a p e nny, comparatively speaking, when our hero's companion s aid: young man stepped aside to let the old woman Jin my pocket. But, boys, it is his day now; I've a jaunting-car all ready, and shure it's have the best of the path, when suddenly the Entere d according to Act of Congress in the v e a r 1 888, by G EORG E MUNR O in the offi c e of the Lib1a rian of Conare ss, lVashirigton, D. C

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THE TREASURE OF THE ROOKIES 5 old creature approached him, peered in his face with her wild eyes, and she clutched his hand, and, in the most excited manner, demanded: Where did you come from? Has the grave given up its dead?" Bardie was greatly surprised ; and yet there had al ways remained with him a hope that some day there would come a recognition and a reve lation. He was a very smart fellow, and a young man of excellent sense and judgment, and many and many an hour of his leisure time was spent in dreamy contemp l ation of an an swe r to the self-proposed questions : "Whence ca me I? Who am I ? When shall I learn?" We will add that the young man quite ambitious dre a ms as concerned his ongin, and he felt himself without knowing anything to the contrary, second to no man in Ireland, so far as linea ge is concerned. When the old woman utte re d the startling ejaculation, a thrill shot throu g h our hero's heart, and he d ema nded. What do you mean, oulcl mother mine?" We will here also state that for reasons upon certain occa s ions Bardie spoke with a rich brogue, but the broad brogue was assumed, as his usual speech was that of an Irishman of education, and his pronunciation was but slight ly tinged with the brogue, making his speech rich and pleasant to hear. What do I mane?" called back the old crone. "Yes, that's what I'm askin' ye." Ah boy, me eyes are growin' old, an' I nade clear light to sec well, but dimly as I see ye standin' there, I consider me question well put." It's a queer question ye were afther puttin ', ould mother mine." "Do ye think so?" "I do." "Well, it's not the nade of me eyesight that's required now; faith, I'm rep eatin' me question. Has the grave give n up it's dead?" "And why do ye ask that question?" "And why do I ask that question?" ''Yes." I'll tell ye; I'm no fool, but I stood beside the coffin of one who looked once upon a toime as you look now, and what is more his voice was like your voice. Ah, well I remember every tone. Yes, yes; but miud ye, young m an, I change me question, who are ye?" "And what does it concern you who I am?" "Well, it m a y concern ye more than it concerns me; that is true for ye." My name is Terence O'Conor." "Terence O'Conor?" "Yes." A moment the old woman was silent but at length she said: "I've a bit of advice to give ye." "I am always willing to listen to good ad-vice." "Ye are?" "Yes." "Well, moind ye, now, from this time out call yersel' Bardie O'Conor, and see what will come some day." CHAPTER IV. "vVHY should I call myself Bardie O'Conor?" demanded our hero. Why?" ejaculated the old woman. "Yes, why?" It was your father's name, and a nobler man never Ii ved than your father." Is my father dead?" He is; and he was murdered in cold blood. I know it; but the world at large believes he died from natural causes; but I tell ye he was murdered." Will you tell me all the circumstances?" "Faith, and if I should do so it might but get ye in trouble." "You need not fear; but how do you know that Bardie O'Cohor, the man who was mur dered, was my father?" "How do I know it?" "Yes." Do ye moined the manner of me address whirr I first m et ye?" "I do." "What did I say?" "Ye cried out 'Has the grave g iven up its dead?'" "And can ye not moind the m'anin' of the words? Shure they re plain enough!" What do they mean?" That you are the perfect image of your father as he looked at your age-and he was but a few years older, I reckon, when he was mur de red." And who murdered him?" "I'll never tell ye that, lad; but I always thought there was an heir, and the moment I saw ye I reco gnized ye." Come, my good woman, tell me about my parents." A moment the old woman meditated, and then said: "Troth an' I will tell ye all I know! Come sit down beside me there on the b a nk, an' ye sha ll know all that I can make known to ye.'' The old woman made strange, startling, and tragic revelations to our hero, and put him in possession of facts that settled beyond all ques tion the truth as concerned his parentage; and on the strength of the facts, upon the following clay our hero paid a visit to the owner of a large estate in the near vicinity, and at once all the statements of the old wom an were confirmedn o t by any willin g admission, but by an invol untary betrayal; for the lord of th e manor, upon beholding the young man, gave utterance to the same exclamation that had fallen from the lips of the old crone, and immediately after he had sought to conceal the betrayal of hi s own weak ness, and when pre ssed, accounted for his strange ejaculation by telling an entirely diff er ent story from that told by the old woman. But, as has been stated, Bardie O'Conor was no fool, and he sa w that the revelations made to him by that same old woman were correct. We are not prepared at present to reveal to our readers the remarkable tale that was told, but later on, under still more exciting circum st a nces, w e will the tale unfold. From the moment of his meeting with the old crone our h e ro assumed the name of Bardie O'Coaor, and he took up his re s idence near the place where the revelation had been made. Soon s trange stories were told about him, and he was looked upon with great respect and love by the p eop le living around, and soon the young man discovered that he had a bitt e r foe, and his' enemy was the owner of the estate. This foe, thi s secret e n emy, pursued the young man with bitter hatred, and finally managed to make him an outlaw and a fugitive, and the l atter fact a lso went far to confirm the r evelations of the old woman, else why should this great land-owner relentlessly pursue a comparatively unknown and friendless youth? The enemy was s tronger than his victim, and, as has been intim ated, easily succeeded in mak iog the high-spirited youth an outlaw and a fugitive, and forced the young man eventually to flee from his native l and, and it was through these persecutions that he was driven abroad to encounter the thrilling adventures that made him beyond all question the Iris h Monte-Cristo, and it is with these thrilling adventures that we have to deal in our narrative; but later on we will make plain to our read e rs the revel ations poured into his ear by the old woman, and ex plain many other strange and startling and tragic iocidents in his career As stat e d in a preceding chapter, Barclie O'Conor lay around Queenstown for a few days, and then secured passage on an ocean tramp steamer; and in good time he was tossing on the wild waves of the Atlantic, bound for New York. There was but one other passenger on the steamer-a old man, who occupied a part of th e captam's cabin-a man who rarely appeared on deck, and with whom our hero held no converse until the two were brought together under the most exciting circumstances The steamer ran into rough weather when but a few hours out from Queenstown, and upon the fourth day out' the sea was a seething mass of boiling foam, and the vessel, which had been laboring terribly, threatened at every moment to make its last plunge and sink to the bottom. Bardie could be of no assistance, and he sought his berth and slept throu g h a night which must have been one of horror to those who remained awake, and when our hero did awake he crawled upon deck on l y to make the most terrible discovery. The storm had abated, and the s hip was settled deep in the water; in deed at a g lance h e expected h e r to go clown in one minute, and not a soul wa s in s i g ht. The crew had evidently deserted the s hip, leaving the sleeping on board. Possibly they had forgotten him in the excitement, as it did not seem possibl e that his fellow-men could thus have lP.ft him to his fate deliberately. But he had no time to spend in speculation and regrets ; the ship was fast settling; indeed, the decks were a lre ady beginning to burst up, pressed by the gas that formed in compressure as the water filled the hold. Bardie looked around and his eye fell upon a life m ft. It had ev i dently been gotten out and left when some other means of escape had pre sented itself to the man who had gotten it ready The young man had presence of mind enougil to secure some water and provisions that lay near, and which had been provided by the same party who had placed the raft iu readiness. Our hero was a good swimmer. He saw that he had but a moment to spare, and he l aunched his raft and soon got aboard, and was forcing i t away from beside the sinking vessel, when he heard a cry, and upon lookin g back he saw that anothe r man had been l eft on the s inkin g steam er. He recognized the old man, the only other passenger besides himself. The man ran to the s id e of the boat and illl frantic tones called: "Come back! come back!" "To be sure I'll come back," said Bardie and he sought to do so, but one can not handle a raft as he can a boat, and he called: "Can ye swim?" "Yes.'' "Well, plunge over into the sea, and I'll save ye." The passenger made the plunge. CHAPTER V. IT was with some difficulty that our her<> managed to resr.ue the old gentleman, but he finally got him upon the raft, and as the sea was settling down there seemed a bare chance of their final rescue When the old man had recovered somewhat he asked: "What has happened?" "Look there," said our hero. The old man did l ook in the direction indicat ed, and both saw the great ship ingulfed in the sea Down she went bow first, and within ten minute s from the time the old man had plunged over the rail from her deck into the sea "Were you one of the crew?" asked the old man "No, sir; I was a passenger." And where is the capta in and his crew?" "That, sir, I can not tell you; I came forth from my berth and found the ship sinking, and, as I supposed, not a soul on board. Yes, sir, until I saw you I supposed I was the only on e who had been left upon the sinking ship." They must have deserted the ship during the night?" Yes, sir ".And left vou and me to our fate?" "Yes, sir.'r "The cold-blooded assassins." I will not say that, sir " And what othe r term can you apply to them?" Sir, it is possible they expected the ship to go down at any moment, and in the exc itement the! forgot us." But what sort of a captain can he be who will thus desert his passenge rs?" "You must remember, s ir, that that was not a regular passenger vessel, and I can never be lieve th at we were deliberately and thoughtfully l ef t behind. I sha ll a lways hold that in the ex citement of the moment we were really forgot ten." We will not dwell upon our h e ro's exper ience upon the raft, but it was s ixty hours before they were rescued; in deed both men had made UJ> their minds to die, believing that they were out of the track of vessels, when Bardie, just as evening was setting in, espied a ship, and wild ly shouted: "We are saved!" Fortunately for the two men their signals were seen from the ship, which bore down upon them, and an hour after our hero 's first sighting of the vessel he and his companion on the raft were safe l y taken aboard the steamer, which as it proved, was bound for New York. The two rescu ed men were treated with everv kindness by the captain and passengers of th"e ste amer, and it was proposed to make up a purse for them, as it was known that they had lost all their effects when the steamer went down. The old man who had been rescued with Bar die came to him and said: "You must decline anything in the way of money th a t may be offered to you by the pas sengers." Bardie flushed and answered: '' You may rest assured I will, sir, without being told to do so."

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6 I will tak e care of you," sa id the old man, and he turned and walked away. He i s a queer old chap,'' muttered our hero, and he had good reason for the conclu i on, as, until the old man came to speak to him about refus ing the purse, he h ad h ard l y spoken an other word to him s in ce their rescue from the raft. Whe n it was made known to our h e ro that the pass e ngers were making up a purse Bardie told his informant that h e and his compan ion on th e raft were exceedingly gratefu l, but th at neith e r could accept assi s tance, as they would be all right when th e y reach e d New York. The weather h a d become beautiful; the sea after th e r escue was as calm and unruffled as a summer lake, and our h ero delight ed in remain in g on deck und e r the starlight, and one ni g h t while thus e njoying the surroundings h e met with a thrillin g ad venture. Ere was passin g a long by the rail when he saw a female fignre asce nd from the cabin and lo ok about h e r, and Bardie could hardly repress an exclamation of amazement. It was a beautifu l face he b e h e ld, but it was contorted at the mom e n t hy agitation and terror and excitement. Indeed, its owner was so excit ed s he did not obse rv e that she was b eing watch e d, and with a catlik e step s he walked toward the side of the vessel. "Great mercy!" exclaimed our h e ro, as he sprung toward lie r. "She me a ns to plunge into the sea." Bardie cau ght the desperate girl about the waist and drew h e r back just as she was about to take the fatal leap, and as he drew h e r away from the side of the ves se l he reached down, and peering in h e r face, asked: Are you mad?" Yes, I am mad," came the r esponse, i n tones so sad and plaintive that it thrilled O!Jr hero's h ea rt. What could possess you?" he said, to at tempt the plun ge into the sea?" "Do not ask me; and please l et m e go." "Yes, and when no one i s near you will carry a ll this beauty to the fis hes." "No; p l ease l e t me go; I w ill not make a sec ond attempt." I must take you to the ca ptain " Oh plea s e do not do thnt; I know you are a chivalrous man ; you are an Irishman; you will keep my secret?" I will keep your secret?" "Yes.'' But you hav e rev ea l ed no secret to me." "You know what I just attempted to do?" The beautiful gir l spoke in a weary tone, and in a very lo w voice. "Yes, I know what you attempted to do, and it s my duty to see th a t you are not permitted to attempt it again." "I will n ot atte mpt it aga in. " Oh, yo u may promise." I will keep my promise. I swear I will not again at tempt to leap into the sea." The l ove ly gi rl a roused herself, and spoke in tone s of great decision and firmness. I will accept your word and keep you r secret, said our h ero, and after a moment h e added: "There must be some sad reason wh y you should see k to end your life." "Yes, there i s a sad reason why I should seek to end my life, but there i s no good re aso n why I s hou lcl do so. I was very cowardly." "Will you t e ll me why you sought to jump into the sea?" A moment the fair g irl hesitated, and then said: Because I a m a l one and friendl ess in th e world. There i s no oth e r r eason why I should seek to die." "There are circumstances where your reason m i ght se rv e as a n excuse, but where oae i s young and beautifnl like yourself I ca n not see that it is a s ulli c ient excuse." The young man sr,oke in a kindly tone, and re l easing his hold upon the fair g irl stood and watched her as sh e g lid ed away. "vYell, well, he muttered, "she i s alone in t h e world and fri e ndl ess so am I; antl it i s the similitude of our two fates that draws me toward her. I will h ave an eye to th a t g irl. Three clays l ater our hero land e d in New York, and within an hour nfter his arrival was the hero of a thrilling adven ture. CHAPTER VI. WE have intimat ed th a t our hero sometimes spoke with a broad brogue and we will h ere add tha t upon his arrival in New York he re-BONANZA BARDIE; OR, so l ved to adopt the brogue upon all occasions save when some particular ex i ge n cy demanded otherwise. While in Queenstown, previo u s to hi s s a ilin g upon the t r amp steamer, he had r ece iveecl wor d th at very ser i ous charge s had been trumped up against him by his enemy, the wron g ful owner of the estates, which our hero had eve r y reason to b e lieve once b e lon ged to his imm ed iat e ances tors, and wh i c h by right at the very mom e nt should hav e been in hi s own possess i on. The charge s we r e of such a character that hi s di sco very would l ead to extrad ition and b e furthermore had reason to believe t .bat hi s e nemy would offer, through the authorities, a l arge r eward for his ca pture, and the se facts l ed the MonleCristo to r eso lv e to adopt a dual c haract e r. Sometimes h e would be the gentle man and at other tim es the regular Micky Free boy, and h e felt well a s u rnd that under the two rol es h e would be able to batl:le a ll det ectives. As s tated at the clo se of our preced i ng c hap ter, Bardic O Connor met with a sta rtlin g ad venture within an hour after his arrival in New York. The steamer land e d at her cloc k after d a rk, but when it was still ear l y in the evening, and the m a de an immediate rush to get as h ore, as 1t was known that all baggage would have to wait until the followin g mornin g for custom in s pection, save what little hand bag gage mi ght be carried off for imm e diate and necessa r y use. Onr hero b ad no baggage, and he was among the first to pass clown the gang-plank and Janel on the dock, and as b e stood watching t h e other passenge r s clescend hi s eyes fe ll upon theyoung l a dy whom he had prevent ed from l ea ping i nto th e sea. He had see.n but littl e of the my s t e riou s g irl after the i ncide nt alluded to, s h e having r e mained in her state-room, but he k e pt a con stant watch over h e r during the remainder of the vowage, as he had re ac hed the conclusion that s he was the heroin e of some tra g ic event. Indeed it struc::k him that s he lik e himself, was a fugitive and he had become deeply interest e d in h e r fate, and very desirous of l earning her history, and the true cause of h e r attempt to l eap into th e ocean. As s tated, he saw h e r descend to the wharf, and as she moved off toward the street he fol low ed h e r and strange l y enough a moment lat er he saw another man following her, and th e actions of pursuer numbe r two were very strange. The girl reach e d the street; every one was e xcited: backmen w e r e s h outing, and relativ es of the l anded passengers were hurrying h e r e and ther e ; every one was looking out for them selves save our hero and the maa who was evi dent l y upo n the tra c k of the mysterious female passenger. Upon rea c hin g the street th e l atter stood for a moment evident l y und ecide d which way to go. Sevc:ral h ac km en acc o s t ed h e r, but to their offers of a conv eyance sh e made no answer, a nd at l e ngth she crossed the st r eet and w as pro ceeding up the thorou g hfare leadin g fr o m the river, when s udd en ly a carriage drew to the curb. A man alighted, and was joined quickly by the man whom our h ero had seen followin g the girl, and th e latter accosted h er. Barclie O'Conor did not know what to do, and was watching the incident, when suddenly the two m en se ized th e g irl, stifled her cries, and carried her st ruggling to the coac h, into which th ey thrus t her, and away drove the car ri age at a rapid gate For an in stant only Barclie was over come with astonishment, and then, with a muttered e ja c ulation, h e s tart ed to follow the coach, an d h e was compelled to run like a de.er. Fortu natel y he did not encounter any peclestriaas for a couple. of squares, and then th e driver of the coac h slackened th e s peed of his hors es a ad drove at a m or e l e i s urely gai t, thus e n a blin g our h ero to follow with g reater euse, a nd aga in fortunate l y, the coach was not driven a l ong distance before it was brought to a h a lt. Barrlie hncl m ade up his mind how to act while runnin g in pursuit of the coach. The mann e r of the g irl's abduction was sufficient to him to indi ca te that the m e n had no right to thus se iz e her-that on the face of it the ir action was ille ga l and an outrage-and h e determined to re sc u e h e r without stopp ing to ask any ques tions. He was a pow e rful fellow, a pract i ca l a thl e te aad pu g ili s t, and felt him self well able to assail th e two abductors The moment the carriage h a lt ed th e men a lighted and lifted th e g irl from the coach and as sh e offered no res i stance our hero deemed that she had either been drugged or had become insensible through fright. He dashed forward, and in a low firm tone as be. approached, said: "Unhand the l ady, ye villains!" One of the men did unhand the p-irl, and he sprung toward Bardi e and sought to deal our hero a powerfu l blow, but instead received one himself, which sent him reeling to the middle of the street, where he fell, and at once the young Irishman l eaped tow ard villain number two, and as the man let go the g irl, who fell to the walk, he, too, received a blow whi c h sent him under the horses' feet, and the l atter com menced to dan ce and prance over him caus ing him to ye ll with fright. Bardw did not stop to ask any quest i ons, but rai sed the g irl in his arms an _cl darted away with h e r. Turning the first corner and seeing an alley-way he darted in a nd walked back, and had gone but a few steps when he was hailed w ith the ques tion : "Is that yo u Mike ?" The speaker was an Irishm a n and our hero felt re ass ured in hearing th e voice of a country woman, and he said: "No, madame, it's not Mike but it's country man of your own who nades h e lp and r escue "Eh? what's th a t yer sayin'?" "Do ye li ve h ereabouts madame?" asked Bardie. Troth an' I do." "And will ye yer people shelter for a few mom e nts until I can exp l a in to ye why I ask it?'' I can, shure; come thi.s way; and is it a lady ye hev in yer arms there?" It is sbure." "Well, do ye moincl e f yer up to any divil ment I'll send for a cop at onct, but ye can come in and I ll hear what ye hev to say." The woman opened the door of a rear ten e mea t hou se and our hero carried his burden in side aacl l a id her upon a lounge in the room. "Is the lady d ead? demanded the woman. "No, madame, I do not think she's dead but s he' s bee n dru gge d an' it's insensible sh e i s from fright.'' "Well, well, now, what does all thi s m ane? But we ll see can w e bring the l ady back to life." CHAPTER VII. BARDIE and the goodhearted Irish wom an se t to work to revive the insensible girl, and soo n they recognized signs of returnin g con sciousness, an d at th e sa m e instant the Irish woman r e m arked as s h e sn iff ed: Well, well, do ye moind ? "11Ioincl what ? asked Bardie. Do ye not s mell it?" "Smell what?" Faith, it' s plain eno u g h, shure. It's chlor oform. l ca n sme ll it as plain as though it were a cut onion " Yer ri ght," sa id Barclie. ''The girl was c hloroformed as shure as yer live, and who did it; did you, ye villain?" I flicl not," answered Bardie, and if ye will wait a mom e nt till the girl fully revive s I w ill exp l a in it all toyer." "Yer mu s t. "I will." "An' I'll se e that ye do. Shure what a purty creature she is. and so young and inno cent-looking; fa ith it wer' a shame whoever do sed h e r wid th e s l ap ing s tuff." The young lady bad ind eed been chloro formed and in good time the effects wo r e off, and s he look ed wildly about, demanding: wh e r e am I ?" "Shure, darlin', ye are safe enough; ye nacle have no fear now, whatever wer' done to ye aforetime." Bard i e s t e pped into the shadow He did not wish the g irl to see him until sh e had recovered fully from h e r first bew ild erment After a few moments she appeared to fully recover, and she asked : "What bas happ e ned?" Shure, miss, the r e i s no one h e re who can t e ll ye better than this man, and he will g iv e a fair exp l anation, or by the powers I'll tell the police on him." B a rdie s tepped to the front, and at on ce the victim of the outrage recogniz e d him and she e xclaimed: "You here?" "Yes, mi ss, I'm here, and shure it's lucky for vo11. I reckon that I wer' there a minute

PAGE 7

THE TREASURE OF ROOKIES. 7 ago, OT no one knows what might have h a p pened .'" What has happened? " Firs t let me m ake a n explanation to this good woman who gave us shelter for the time being" "Yes, it's an immedi ate explanation ye"ll give me, for I do not understand this at all, I'm tellin' yces that." My good woman, this lady and I were pas sengers on the steamer that just arriv ed an hour or so ago at her dock. I had no particnlar acquaintance with the lady-shure I do not know h e r name now-but when I came ashore I waited on the do c k aw hile to see the passen ge r s land, and I saw this lady descend from th e ship. a nd I saw her walk off the dock, anrl at the same time I saw a fellew wid a wicked face sta l e aft her her, and I didn't like his looks nor his ac tions, and says I to m escl' that feller i s up to some rlivilment, a nd I'll just follow and keep m e eye on him. Well, the lady l e ft the wharf aud re ac h ed the street, and she started to go n p another stre e t leading from the one that runs along wid the riv er, aud whin she h ad crossed there was a carriage druv up and was s topped, a man l ept out, and the other man who had been followin th e girl join e d him, an the two of them seized the girl and run her into the carriage, and away the carriage was driven, and away I sped a fter it, and when it stop ped I wer' at hand and I commanded them to let go the g irl whin they lift e d her from th e coach, and one of thim made a clip at me and I gave it to him and away he went reeling to the street and down he we nt into the mud, and I made for the other one, and he mac:c a lick at me, and I gave him one that sent him under the horses' feet, and th e n I seiz e d the lady, and I brought her here, and that's all I know about it, and \Vhat more th e r e is to tell the lady must spake for herself. t3hure, it's all a mystery to me, and the why and the wherefore, so it is, shure. The victim of the outrage lis ten ed with dilat ed eyes to the statement of our hero, as also
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8 "No, I a m not; I can name the steamer in which you Railed." "Yer can?" "Yes." "Would yer moind doin so?" The man named the very steamer on which B a rdi e had sa iled from Queenstown, hut our hero did not betray any s urprise, as he suid, with a l a ugh : Shure I knew h e had made a mistake "Didn't you sail on that s team e r ?" "I did not; shure I never heanl of such a ship.'' "Nonsense! Why do you say so? Isn't your name Burdie O'Conor?" "No, sir: me name is not Bardie O'Conor, and, do ye moind, I've an ide a \\'hai yer game i s but ye can't play it on me. I've some knowledge of the games ye play in New York, but ye can make no fool of me Shnre I don't believe there is any suc h s hip as th e one ye mentioned, nor do I believe th e r e i s any such person as the one ye name; and, what i s more, I hev n eve r been in Que e n s town in me life. When I sailed for America, a year ago, I started from Glasgow, crossing over from Belfast, do ye moind; and, do ye moind further, I don't want yer to try and come any of yer snap games over me. I'm no s t ranger here, nor am I as g r een as I look." "It's possible I've made a mistake," said th e stra n ger. "Shure ye h ev made a mistake, and ye had better make off wid ye r sel', or begorra I ll hand ye over to the police, so I will. I'm no fool. and I'm up toyer tricks, do ye m o ind, and ye can't fool and rob me. 8hure, as I t o ld ye, I don't believe there i s such a ship as the one ye named, and I'm thinking ye coined the name ye mentioned, and it's now I'm biddin' of ye good-eveni n', and ye may consider ye r se l lucky I don't hand ye over to the police." It's all rig ht, sa id th e man, with a l augh, and h e turned off down the street, while o ur hero walked a lon g in the opposite direction, as he had been proceeding when hailed by the stranger. As Bardic walked along he muttered: Begorra, it i s a ll right, but on me word that wer' a narrow escape, shure. He knew me name well e nou g h and h e nam ed th e s hip in whicil I sailed. Well, well, me enemy h as got word over here a h ead of me, and if I'm not a fool in me that feller was an American detective, and he is on the lookout for one Bardie O 'Co nor, and do ye moind, it's Bardie O'Conor will be on th e lookout for the detectives, and it s smart th ey are if they catch m e asleep; but, be the powers, it s lucky I h ave tile money to work a change in me ap pearance, or they may give me a close hunt all night. We'll see about it, that's all.'' Bardic kept on along Broadway until he reached Twenty-third Street, a nd then h e turned down toward Sixth Avenue and he h ad proceeded but a s hort di s tance when he became aware that there was a man followin9 him. "Be the powers!" he muttered, 'I do not loike that altogether. Shure, there is a man m e s teps." Bard1e walked along until be crossed a g lare of light tha t shot forth from a brilliantly lighted r estaura nt, and then h e s l ackened hi s pace and turned suddenly jnst i:\ time to catch a full view of th e man who was following him. The man, for a momeut, was unde r th e strong light, and our hero had a good, sq u are view of him, and r ecog niz ed the fact th at it was not th e same man who h a iled him on Broad way, and yet it struck him he h ad seen the man b efo re; and as he wa lk ed along sudden l y it flashe d across hi s mind that the fellow follow in g him was one of the m e n from whom he had rescued th e g irl imm ed i ate l y after th e l anding from the s teamer. Well, now, that i s qnare." B arclie We will here sta re aga i n that our hero had resolved to speak wit h a broad brogne at a ll times even when and b e had good r easons for so doing, and his resolve was strength e ned after hi s encounter with the man on Broadway. Upon deciding that the man who was follow in g him was one of the two who h ad sought to abduct the girl, he made up his mind to give the fellow a chance to overtake him, muttering at the same time: "He is not on my track as B a rdie O 'Co nor, and shu r e I may find out somewhat of the game they were playin when they s ought to stale th e girl int o the carriage." Bardie reacher] Sixth Avenue, and finally BONANZA BARDIE; OR, after strolling down that avenue a short dis tance entered a lager beer saloon, saying: "I'll see if the feller will follow me in, and if he does mebbe he'll open his head, and I'll get on to him shure. There's a game of some kind go in on, and it's quare how I've rnn into a series of adventures within an hour after my arrival in New York, but it 's lik e ly I'll meet wid many of them afore I touch foot again on the good old shores of Bantry Bay." Bardie entered the saloon, and see ing a pile of sandw i ches on the bar h e called for a sand wich and a glass of lager, and seating himself at a table mmmenced to A few moments only passed and he saw the man who had been following him enter the rnloon, a nd be a t once fully identified him as one of the men whom he had knocked down in defense of the m ysterious young lady. The man peered around, and finally hi s eyes rested upon our hero, and there came a satisfied and pleased look to his face, and b e stepped across th e room and t ook a seat at the very same table where Bardie had loc ated. He also called for a sandwich and a g la ss of l ager. Bardic was not at a ll disturbed. There was one trait h e possessed to a remarkable degree, and that was nerve and coolness. He was one of the nerviest men in th e world; nothing caused him to lose his head, as th e saying goes; and as he was an advent urer, with nobody but himself in th e world to look out for, as far as he knew, he ca rried hi s life and comfort in his hauda, and was re a dy at a ll times for whatever fortune might open up to him Bardie was also a \ e r y keen obs erver and a good reader of men's faces, and he di sc over e d at a g l a nce that the man who h ad been follow ing him was seekin g to have a few words with him, and he discerned, further, that the man did no. t s uspect that he had been recogniz e d, and our hero gave no sign that h e bad recog nized th e man. Indeed, he wab prepared to play as deep a game as the fellow who was play ing against him. For a few mom ents th e men sat ea ting and drinking their beer without the exchange of a word, but at l e n gth the strange r said: I think I've seen you before." CHAPTER. X. BARDIE was cool as a frozen chicken as he looked the man over, and after a moment. said: Ye think ye hev see n me afore?" "Yes." Well, i s th ere anyt bin g wonderful in that? Shure, mebbe I've see n you afore, but I don't moind that i ver I did." "You've just l anded?" "Wha t is that yer sayin'? "You've just lan ded?" Just l anded, i s it?" ''Yes." "And what do you m a n e by that?" "You h ave just arrived in New York." Do ye think so?" "Yes." "Well, rer off-'way off-there. I've lived in New 'York these five or six years, do ye moind "You have? exclaimed the strange r, in surprise. To ue sure I hev and what difference does it make whether it's so or not, since I dou 't owe you It's pos s ible I may mistake you for another person." Mebbe it is possible, and m ebbe ye did see me afo r e Shure I'm not ce rt a in, wh e n l come t o l ook at ye, that I don't remember seei n' you afore. Who gave you th at thump on th e nose? S hu re it was a good one, by the mark ye h ev there!" It was true, the man's nose and cheek di
PAGE 9

THE T.REASURE OF THE ROOKIES. 9 "'Yes." "How?" "And put me in jail?" I do not desire to do that." Ye don't?" ''No.11 "Faitll an' I belave ye, for ye are more of the jail yersel' than I am, do ye moind." "We will not talk about that now; you may need a friend." Sure we all need friends IJetimes." I may be your friend and do you a good turn." "Yees may?" "Yes." "And what good turn shall! do ye first?" "Tell me how you came to interfere with the arrest of the young lady?" With her arrest?" '!'hat's what I said." And ye want to know how I came to inter fore?" "I do." A moment Bardie meditated. It ran through !his mind that possibly, after all, there might be -some trntll in what tile man said. He did not fancy the man's good nature; under all the cir <:umstances there was something very ominous in the man's abso lut e calm and easy manner, in the presence of a man who had knocked him clown. "See here, mister, I don't know what yer name is, I had good reason for interferin' to save tile gi r 1." "I suppose you had, and will you name your reason?" "Faith and I will," came the answer CHAPTER XI. BARDIE was really a very shrewd fellow and a very rapid thinker, and certain facts began to group themselves in his mind, and he began to feel just a trifle of respect for the man who bore the mark of his fist upon his cheek. Our hero sat a moment in a meditative mood, when the stranger said: Come; you are to tell me why you interfered "I will. ' Do so." Bardie related, fictitiously, how he was a worker on the dock, and then he told, truth fully, how he l.rnd seen the gir l seized upon and yun into the carriage, and how he had followed tile carriage and made the rescue. When he Jiad concluded the man said: I think you have told me the truth." "I h ev, s ir. Shure I've no interest in the girl, save that I tuk her away from yees." "Now, answe r me one more question: Where did you take the girl?" Where did I take her?" ''Yes .'' '' Well do ye mo ind, I found her insensible." "Well? " I tuk her in me arms." Proceed." '' I carried her around the corner. Ye will iremimber it wer' near the corner where I found yees?" ''Yes." "Well, I'd ca rri ed her but a bit when she <>pened her eyes, and says she : 'Let me go.' Well, I had no right with her, and I did let her go; and go she did, and I've not seen her since." The man was thoughtful for a moment, and then asked: Where did you go?" "Where did I go?" "Yes." "Well I wandned off, sir; yes, I did, and that's all.'' "And you know nothing about the g irl?" "Nothing, sir." Where do you live?" See here, now, I've answe r ed your ques tions pretty well, and I think it's none of yer !business where I live." ''I have someth in g to tell you, my friend.'' Faith, I'm always a good listener." I am an officer." "Ye are?" "I am." Well now, that's qua re." I am a detective." Well welll" "That' girl a prisoner." Well well I" "' You a prisoner from the officers." "Well, well!" "And it is my duty to arrest you." "well, well! did ye iver h ea r the loike of that?" ''I must know a ll about you; and if I'm not satisfied that you r statements are true I must arrest you and hold you until the girl is found." "Well, well!" You must tell me where you live " Do ye moind," sa id Bardie, I've no rai son to believe that ye are an officer." "I ao1." "Shurely?" ''Yes.'' "Well, well! Now, luk here; if ye will tell me a good raison for arrestin' tha t girl I may give ye an idea." "An idea?" "Yes; I may put ye on her track, for, do ye moind, I'm uo fool.'' You do not appear like one." I'm not; and, whin that girl ran from me faith I just 'skip ped along and kept me eye on her; and do ye moind, I've an idea I can put me hanc'I on her?" way, when he turned southward and walked clown severa l squares, and, crossing to a parallel street, made a second turn and reached the Bowenr We \viii here remark that every time he made a turn he took tile bearing s ; and, so clear and accurate was his memory, that he could have retr aced hi s steps and have gone straight to the tenement where Mrs. Maguire resided had he so de s ired. As it was, he kept on down the Bowery until he came to one of the rrany cheap louging-hou ses, when he e ntered and re g i s tered, paid his money, and wa s shown to a hom. No questions were asked, as no information was re quired in the place where he sought a night"s refuge. These places are open for all. You pay your money and g o where you are "put," and our hero was soon put," and very soon afterward was sound asleep, caring little for his surroundings aud only anxious to rest. Upon th e following morning Bardie awoke and passed down to the street. He entered a cheap re staurant and settled down to a hearty meal. CHAPTER XII. That is my idea, my friend; I am no more a fool than yourself." "Well, well!" WHILE at his meal Bardie thought over the "You must tell me where I can find the girl situation, and he was compell e d to remark, or I will arrest you." mentally, that h e seemed to have fallen into an "Arrest me ?" odd lot of au ventures s ince hi s departure from "Yes." Ireland, and he pondered more carefully the Well, well! Now, see here; will ye give me words of the detective. a good raison for yer wan tin' to find the girl?" Bardie could not believe the fair g irl whom "I a m not bound to give you a reason." be had r escued was a cr iminal and yet he did "Nathur am I bound to tell ye where ye can believe that she was being pursued on some find the g irl. c rimin a l charge; and he was th e better prepared You do not realize that you are in a pretty to believe in her innocence because of the fact serious scrape." that he, also, was being pursued on a trumped" Am I. now?" up charge, and he was certainly conscious of his You are." own innocence. He was still meditating upon "How?" the previous night's adventures when a lad en We received a cable from the other side to tered the restaurant with the daily papers. Our _rrest that gir l on a very serious charge." hero bought one, and, after reading awhile, wail lndade?" startled to behold his own name in print. There is a large reward offered for her arThere was a full account of the wreck of the rest." tramp steamer on which our hero had been a There is, now? And of what is she acpassenger, and also a narrative of the re scue of <'used?" the two missing passengers, accompanied with "I can not tell you; but it is a very serious the further information that it was suggested crime; and, if you do not tell me where I can that one of the passengers was Bardie O'Conor, find her, I shall he compe lled to arrest. you." a man for whom there was a reward of two Faith, that's what ye will hani.to do. thousand pounds; a nd the acc.,unt contained a Shure l can't tell ye where ye can foiod the description of Brclie, aad intimated further, girl." that the detectives were on the man's track, and I think you can." I that he would soon be captured and returned to "Well, well! You're wrong; yes, sir, ye are Ireland. wrong; but, do ye moind, I'll go with ye and Bardie O'Cooor was a young man of iron show ye where I think she wint. Faith, I've nerve. He read the actount through carefully, no idea of being arrested when I've not done and not a mu s cle quivered; nor did his face wrong.'' change expression; n>r was there the slightest "Will you go with me?" tremor in his hand ; nor did hi s appe tit e s lack en. I will." He finished his breakfast with as much calm" At once ?" ness as he had commenced it, but he kept up "Shurely." considerable thinking. It was plain that his Come." enemy in Ireland had trailed him to Qneeos-The two men settled their score and l eft the town, had discovered how he had left Ireland, beer-shop; and, when once on the street, Bardie had cabled to New York for his arrest, and, be discovered that two other men were following sides, there was evidence that he intended to them. He recognized then that the so-called pursue our hero to the bitter encl. detective had re-enforcements at hand; but he "Well, well, it's all right! I've had a nar was determined to s hake off this new-found row escape, that is certain," muttered Barclie; friend, all the same; when outside the man said: "but I am forewarned now, and I'll be on my There's one thing I wish to tell you: I'm guard. One fact is certain: the first fellow I prepared for you now." met must have been a detective, and he i s the Are ye?" one who i s on my track. The second detective "If you attempt any capers it will be bad for was not seeking for me as Bardie O'Conor; you." but," added the fugitive, after a moment, it "Do ye moind, a ll I've to do i s to give ye is strange the similarity between my fate and what inform ation I can?" that of the beautiful young lady whom I res" That is all." cued, and, by my faith, I'll stand by her yet. The two had reached the cross-street. Bardie I'll make common cause with her against those looked over his shoulder and saw that the two detective hounds, and if they take her theyn otller men were half a block to the r ear, and the take me; but now what must I do?" side-street looked dark and lik e a fair course for Bardie remembered his promise to visit the a fugitive; and, as the man said That i s all," place in Wall Street, as requested by his fellow Bardie sudden ly dealt him a clip behind the ea r passenger upon the raft; and at the same time that sent him reeling, accompanied with the ex-he fully realized his ri s k in keeping his promc l amation: ise. It was a pretty serious thing to have de,, Well, take that first!" tectives on one's track, especially when one is As the man reeled, Barclie started to run lik e an absolute stranger in the city, not practically a deer down the sidestreet, and, indeed, he was knowing one stree t from another, and liable at a good runner. Reaching the avenue, he t urned any moment to arrest. to the north and ran for some distance, when he Bardie was in no hurry to leave the restaurant. doubled on his track, crossing to the opposite He pretended to be reading the paper, but in side of the street, and, making a turn, moved fact he was thinking over the situation. He had along back to the very corner where he downed but little money, and it was necessary that he the detective. should change his appearance. His garb was a "Well," he muttered, "I think I've lost plain" g ive away." He sat thinking over matthern." ters, and mechanically l et his eyes wander Our hero was not at all acquainted in the city, around, and he discovered that the keeper of but he took a straight course and reached Broadthe restaurant was an Irishman, and he saw that

PAGE 10

10 he was an honest, well-meaning and good-heart ed man. Our hero recognized these traits without eve r havin g spoken to the man; and after a time he said, in a low, meditative tone: "In that man's goodness rests my sr.fety." There was one waiter in the place--a young Irish lad-and Bardie beckoned the boy to him and asked him to send his boss to the table. There were no other customers in the place, and its proprietor approached and took a seat at the table oppos.lte to our hero. "From part of Ireland did you come?" asked I came from Dublin." "And how long have you been in America?" "Five years." "And what l ed ye to lave the Ould Dart?" "And what i s that t.o you?" "Well, if it wer' nothing to me I'd not be afther askin' ye." I came here because I chose to come." We have frequently intimat ed during the course of our narrative, that Bardie was a very shrewd and observant man. He was, in fact, a born detective. He r ead men like a book, and he was fully capable of con tractin g hi s observa tions and so grouping them as to reach certain deductions; and he at once reach ed a conclusion from the fact that the proprietor of the little cafe betrayed irritation when asked his reasons for having immigrated from hi s native l and. "Have you forgotten ould Ireland?" de manded Bardie. I niver hev and I niver will," came the an-swer. Do ye iver expect to re turn?" "I do." "Whia?" What is that to you?" It may be much or it may be littl e; but I'm askin' ye the question a ll th e same The re staurant man was a shrewd fellow, and, looking keenly at our hero, he sa id, after a moment: "Ye bev a raison for cross-questioning me?" Shure I hev." And what i s yer raison?" "Well, I'll not attimpt to decaive you. I'm not certain when I sha ll return mesel'." "And what may yer name be?" "Wait now till I luk ye clare in the face before 1 answer ye." "Luk; and it's an honest face, me boy." I believe ye." "Well?" Hev ye read the moraia' papers?" "I hev." "Well?" "Be the powers, but it's Bardie O'Conor ye are!" If ye spake that name loud ye're a mane man and no frind of ould Ireland; faith ye' re a traitor and a villain." The restaurant man, whose name was O'Shayne, reched over and said, in a low tone: "Ye nade not fear m e, my man; but what is it ye are accused of that they're afther ye?" "I'm accused of murderin' a collector." "Ye are?" "Yes." "And what are ye guilty of, me man?" Bein' a patriot and a lover of me race and the traditions of ould Ireland." "Aud why h ev ye made yersel' known to me?" "Can ye not guess?" I can not." "I nade a friad; that's why I've put me fate in yer hands." Shure, man, there's a large reward offered for yer capture and delivery " There is; but that's no temptation to you." "Yer right; I'd lo se me loife before I'd r a ise a hand to put ye in charge." I knew it." "Yer did?" "Yes." "How?" "Faith, I could read yer wer' an honest man in yer face, and it's for th a t raison I gave mesel' away to ye." "And hev ye any friends in America?" "Yes, one." "And wher e is he?" "Here," came the answer. CHAPTER XIII. THERE followed a moment's silence, when O'Shayae said: Shure, ye would make me yer friend by the confid ence ye put in me." BONANZA B.A_RDIE; OR, That's what I was after s hure, and I knew it. t) "And what will ye do? Shure, the d e t ec t ives are on yer track.'' "I know that; didn't I g ive one of thim a to ss l ast night; but I didn't know at the toim e bi s game." Bardie related hi s adventure with the detect i ve, th e one who had ca lled him by nam e. Ye had a narrow escape, so ye did?" I did; but l'm all right now." "And what do yer mane to do? Ye must get out of New York." Sorra a step will I get out of New York." "Ye'll be caught shure; faith the best detect ive s in the wor Id are here." "I don't moind them for me little finger, only I hev one friend who will save me now." "Aud what i s i t ye want?" "I'll t e ll ye; I've one pound, do ye moiad, and I've. me watch. Now it's the money ye can hev and the watch I'll l ave wid ye, only ye will get me a change of clothes, so whin I lave this place th ey' ll not pounce ou me at the first go and unaw a res.'' I'll stand to ye as yer friad, so I will, at all co sts; but do ye moiad, ye must lave here." "I must?" "Yes." "And where will I go?" "West." In good time mebbe I will, but not to-day nor to-morrow.'' Bardie, ye must hev a care." Do ye moind, aiver agen must ye call me Bardie; sbure I thought ye would hev moiaded that yersel'." "Yer right; and what i s yer name?" "Michae l O'Brien I'll ca ll mesel' until the day comes when I can take back the name me father bore." "It's Mike I'll ca ll ye?" Yes; and ca ll it often, so that like a dog wid a new master I'll l earn to wag whin I hear it." "And what are ye goin' to do, Mike?" Make a call." "Yees are?" ''Yes." Upon the mayor?" "Yes; the Mayor of San Francisco I think he is. " And what do ye mane?" I'll tell ye. I h ad a passenger v;id me on the raft-au ould feller, an American-and I saved his l o ife shure." "Ye did?" "I did." "Well?" "He i s a quare man; but he bid me call on him th e first thing this mornia'." ' And it's he manes to give ye over to the police." "Do ye think so?" Yes sure." "Well, I know better. I was not floatin' round on the rnft in mid-ocean wid the man who se loife I had saved not to know his parts. No, s ir, I've no danger to fear from that quar ter." "Ye are sure?" I am, and I'll stake me loife on it." "But ye'll run great risk in goiu' there." I know that." Ye had better wait a day or two." He bid me come to -day, and it' s to-day I ll go; and, if ye will prove the friend to me that ye are, it will be a ll right." "Ye will come wid me," said O'Shayue. The res taurant-keeper called his waiter and gave him certain orders, and then led our hero through a rear door to a side hall, and so up two pairs of stairs to a room ou the top floor, when he pointed to a closet and said: "There; ye will foind all me c lothes the re and, as ye and I are of the same build, faith I think th ey'll fit ye well. I'll return down-stairs, and ye can m ake a change to suit ye and thin come down." How about the lad? " Oh, ye nade not moind him. "He may nade more moindin' than ye think. " I'll answer for him." Remember, it's ten thousand, Amer i can money!" I'll fix the lad. Shure, ye are me cousin just over eh?" "No, that will not do; it's yer cousin from the west I am. " Ob, but I moind that's better; yes, it's that way we'll hev it; an d now ye can to g yersel' out; but it's a great risk yer ruuaiu' all the same, and if ye would tak e my advice ye'd lave the cit7 at onct and go west." We'll talk that over later on, me good fri e nd; but do ye moiarl, th e day may come when I can do as much for you as ye are doia' for me now. "Don't ye ever mintioa tlu:.t aga in an ye'd hev me remain yer friend. Shure, it 's a fugi tive I am mesel', do ve moiad, and now I've g iven confidence for confidence, I'll tell ye more ; shure, there is a reward haagin' over me own head, and I am not bearin' me own father's name at this blessed minute, do ye moiad, s o ye can make yer rnoiad aisy." O'Shayne l eft the room, and Bardie se t to look over a pretty well assorted wardrobe. Shure, he h as good clothes, and be i s a goodlookia' man, so he i s; and it's in luck I am; and it's a long chase I ll be after g i ven them detectives afore they cage me, so I will. Our hero found razor and bru s h, and the first thing he did was to shave off all hi s whiskers and then sefectiag a business suit be amazed him self. And a more complete transformation i s rarely seen As he look ed in the glass he was compelled to remark: Shure I hardly know mesel'." Our hero was fully an hour iu working the transformation, but when he had conc lud ed h e was a fine-looking man, indeed, a remarkably gentee l and h a ndsome-lookin g fellow, and there remained not the appearance of the g r eenhorn about him, nor anything that would suggest a r ecent arrival in New York. In bis changed appearance he wa s like one to the manor borna gen uin e New Yorker as h e stood there; and aga in he muttered: "Well, well; but I'm a fiae-lookin' Yankee after all." Bardie descended the stairs, and being a grea t joker he did not an ter the s tore by the door through which h e had passed with O'Slrnyae but passed out to the street and entered the restaurant through the main door, and going to a tabl e he took a seat, and in good Englis h called for a cup of coffee The l ad serverl the coffee, and the man O'Sbayne look ed at his customer, littl e dreaming of his identity. CHAPTER XIV. h was a s ingular in c ident that O 'S hayn e did not r ecogn iz e our hero, even though the latter wore one of bis own 2uits of clothes. .But iD> New York there are many who wear clothes after the same cut and fashion. Barrlie drank off his coffee and advanced to the pay-counter, and in good English, without any tremor iu his voice, sa id : "Your n ame is O'Shayae?" That is my name." You are the proprietor of thi s place?" "lam." Well, be careful." "Be ca reful, i s it?" ''Yes.' What do you mean?" I am telling you to be careful or you may get into trouble. The Iris h blood of O'Shayne began to boil and he said: Faith, an' if ye don't moind what yer sayin' it's yersel' 'nil! hev to be careful, or I'll toss ye into the s treet sbure. Pay for yer c offee and be off wiu ye. I don't loike yer looks." Our hero leaned over and said in a whisper: It's reported you are a friend of Bardie O'Conor, the man the detectives are lookin g for, and they may keep an eye on your pla ce." "Eh? what's that yer sayia'? Well, now, I don't know who ye are, nor do I care, but who ever tells ye that had betther come here and let out their slander to me face and not be goin' behind me back wid their talk." Our hero laughed, and changing back to th e brogne, exclaimed: "Well, well, ye are a bright man, and ye don't know yer own clothes." O'Shayae's eyes bulged. "Be the powers!" he exclaimed, i s it possi ble?" "Do ye think now I'd better go west?" "Well, well, it bates the divil. Shure, ye are the divil or a play actor. Faith, I never saw anythin' l o ik e it in my loife." "I reck on I'll g ive the detectiv es a chase now." "Will ye? Well, I'll ate me hash if ye ain't the divil himsel'; and how did ye do it?" I let go me whiskers, and I put on a good JI1an's clothe&." And it's a wonderful change. Shure ye

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THE TREA.SU RE OF THE ROOKIES. 1 1 could walk straight into head-quarters wid yer I And did the shadow fall before or behind finger to er nose for all the detectives there are him?'' in New 1' ork, shure." "Behind him." "And I'm givin' you credit, O'Shayne." "Ah! I take it. Yes, yes; I see!" "Ye are?" "There was a strange man in our office this "Yes.'" morning. He was making inquiries. "For what?' "Yes?" "It was good and cool ye tuk it wbin I gave "But I made up my mine! he was a detectye the warnin' about O'Conor." ive." "It wer' testin' yees wer', eh? well, well, "A detective?" but ye bale a play actor. Shure ye are a magi" Yes." cian." "And who was he after?" Well now, do ye moind, will ye tell me 1 think he was lookin g for you." bow I'll get to Wall Street?" "Looking for me?" "Can ye foind it alone?" "Yes.'" "If it's to go straight east or \Yest 1'11 foind Bardie thought a moment and asked: it shure " J\Ir. Kneiss m ade a confidant of you?" '" Weli, it's nayther east nor we s t ye'll go, I He did." but to the south directly. Come here till I show "Told you about me?" ye." "Yes.,, O'Shayne led our hero outside and directed What did he tell you?" him to Wall Street; and any one who knows I "Only what I have repeated. He believed New York well knows it is a lmo st a straight you were a fugitive. rout e from the Bowery. "And be believed me inno ce nt ? Bardie bid llis friend good-morning and sta rt"Yes." ed off, and as lie walked along Ile indulged Ami Ile discovered men following him?" bright hop es He was inspired by th e s how of '' Yes, and Ile thought they were trailing him life and activity around him, and he muttered: in order to find you." Well, if I don't gel as ri ch as Monte-Cristo "And what is your name?" iu this !nod of milk and honey, it's me own "Brush." fault." "Your name is Brush?" Bardic reached Wall Street without much I "Yes." difficulty, but h e spent fully two hours on the "Mr. Brush, you are a gentleman. I will r oute. He knew it was ea rl y, and he was atI r emember this warning, and some day I may tracted by the thousant.l and one s ights to be I make a return." seen by a stranger in New York. In due time, "I feel I have m e rely done my duty in warnbowever, he re i tched the street, and hat.! little ing you." difficulty in finding the number to which be bad You nude not fear; I will Le on me guard, been directed to go. He entered th e office and Mr. Brush, and wllen a detective takes me he presented the card tllat had been g iven to llim. will get up very early in the morning." The clerk who r ece iv ed the card bander! him a "You may be too confident, sir." l a rge enve l ope, without asking him a question "I will moind about that shure." or exchanging oue word; and, as the c lerk sa id "But l ook you!" nothing, our h ero a lmost maintained silence, Well?" anrl upon receiving the envelope stood a mo-The man Brush bad given a sudde n sta rt and ment, looking rather undecided, wllen the clerk I he was glariug toward a man who was standing said: upon the opposite side of the street, and in a low That i s all." tone b e warned: Thank you," was the re sponse of our hero, "There is the man who called!" and he left the office; and, 001.;e outside, h e muttered: Well, but that was short aucl s w eet; but I wonder what I have in here?" Bardie walked along the street for a s hort dis t auce moving s lowly and thoughtfully. He did not break the envelope; and bad go n e seve ral squares when a hand was laid upon his shoul der. Our hero turned and recognized the clerk who had given him the envelope. "You will excuse me," be said," but I could n ot speak to you in th e office." "That is wh a t I thought," answered Bardic, with a twinkl e in bis hantisome eyes. "I thought I'd follow you out and \Yarn you." "Warn me?" ''Yes." Warn me?" repeated Bardie 11 Yes sir" you mean?" "You were a passenger with n!r. Kneiss?" ''I \Ver'." 0 n the raft?" "Oh, did Ile tell yon about that?" "He did." Well?" )fr. Kneiss had a strange suspicion." "He did?" Yes." Well?" ''He is a fine man. "He is a quare man." "You will learn when you open your en velope that Ile is not an u ugrateful man." "Eh, what's tllat?"' "You will find he i s not an ungrnteful man ii be is queer; but I came after you to warn you." "To warn me?" "Yes.,, "Well, let's have it." '' l\Ir. Kneiss thought it possible that you were a fugitive." ''He did, eh?" '' 1,..es,' "Well?" Ile believes you to be an innocent man." "Well, that is good of him." '' He has been dogged ever since he left the ship." Eh, what is that?" He bas been s hadowed." CHAPTER XV. BARDIE glanced in the dire ct ion indic ated and saw a well-dressed, shrew d faced man seemingly lolling around without any s pecial interest in auytbiug that was going on around him. Do not let him see that you are looking at him, whispered the clerk. "All right; I've had my eye on him ; it's all right." "I'm satisfied be is a d e tective. He may fol low you." He will not make anything out of me if he does, but now, do you remember so we'll agree. I shall represent my self as a Scotchman who has been in this country a number of years. I am a broker; do you understand?" "I do; ves." He may come back and question you after I am through with him." I see: anrl I will merely know you as a Scotchman, a broker, with whom I have but a slight acquaintance." That's it. I was merely asking you about a certain line of securities." u I see." "Well, I'll bid ye good-morning in a formal manner, do ye moind ?" "You mus t be careful," said the clerk. "How so? "You may betray yourself in your speech. Sometimes you adopt the brogue and sometimes you drop it." Yes, I am glad you reminded me; I'll look out for that, and now good-morning." The two men separated. Our hero wandered on up-town, anxious to return to his friend, O'Sll ayne, and examine the l e tter he had re ceived from Mr. Knei ss Bardie bad not gone far when a man stepped beside him, and in an off-hand manner sa id: "Good-morning, Mr O'Conor." Our hero was cool as a cucumber, and in most excellent English, but with a Scotch ac ce nt, said: "Beg your pardou, sir, you have made a mi s take. The man, who was the detective who had been pointed out to our hero, looked a little disconc e rted, but said : Is it possible I am mistaken?" In one dire c tion you are most assuredly mistaken. I h ave met you before, but you have made a mistake in the name." Oh, you think we have met before?" '' It is possible. I do not recollect having met you, but one thing is certain, you have made a mistake in the name." Our hero spoke rn coolly and in such a natural m an ner the detective was completely uonplused; but he said: "You were in the office of --this morning?" I just came from there, sir." "You were to call by appointment?" I beg your pardon; my call th e re was but the thought of a moment. I bad some business there and dropped in, sir." "But did you not a package?" "I did; a circular, a descriptive circular concerning some stocks I am inquiring about "I beg your pardon," said the detective, I see I have made a mistake." "You are very excusable, s ir. Good-morning." 'l'he detective disappeared, and our hero pro ceeded on bis way, muttering: Well, I can be thankful that I have a good bead, cool nerv e and a l eve l wit, or that fellow would have had me. H e certainly had good points on me, and must have been watchiug down at the banking office, and it is lucky no words were excllanged there. Bardie did not go straight back to bis friend O'Sbayne's place, but wandered up Broadway and took a very roundabout course. As iR well known, New York is the best city in the world for a strange r to wander around in without any fear of gelling lost, and if a man once gets au id ea as to the lay-ont of the great town be can go fr om place to place l\ith perfect ease; and it was not long before our hero found bis way to O'Shayne's, and, once there, be sat down to a table and opene d his letter. Within the letter was a packet, and upon opening the packet our hero 's eyes opened wide, and he called his friend. See here." sa id he His friend glanced at th e crisp bit& of paper taken from the package, a nd sa id: WbNe dit.l yo u get these?" From her e " The letter?" "Yes. What are they?" 0 'S hayne lauglled and said, as he ran over the bills: It's aJortunc." A fortune." "Yes." "And bow much?" Five thou sand rlollars in American money. These are one thousand dollar bills." And can I change them into sovereigns?" "You can, but ye have no nade for sovereigns in this country. Shure it's now ye can go west." "Do you think so?" ''Yes.'' Well, do ye moind, I'm not lavin a city where fortunes drop into yer bands, rlo ye moind?" What will you do?" I'll make up me mind later on." And what does yer letter say? Shure, the man who gave ye the fortune may bev given ye some ad vice as well Hev ye read the letter ?" "I've not "Read it." Bardie glanced over the letter, which read as follows: "'MY DEAR FRCEND,-lndosed find five thou sand dollars. I give it to you willingly and gladly. But for you I would have been food for the fishes. I am well able to present you the money. I've no advice lo offer, as I believe you to be a smart as well as a bright and pru dent man. But tear up this letter at once, and forget that you ever met me, unless fortune should turn against you, and you should need, at some future time, a friend, whom you will always find in yours, gratefullv, 'JOHN KNEISS.' Well, that's a foine letter," said our hero handing the missive to O'Shayue. The latter read the letter, and said: Indeed it is a foine letter, and now what will you do?" What shall I do?" Put the money in a bank." "And betray mesel'?" No, take the name M O'Brien."

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12 I'll do it, and how will I p ay you for the clothes; faith they fit me well, and I'll uade no oth e r for the present. "We can t a lk that over later on. Come, we'll go to the bank." The two men went to the bank where O'Sbayne knew one of the officers. The de posi tfwas rnacle, and our hero drew some small money for convenience' sake, and after taking a lesson from O'Shayne as to money values he started to visit the home of J\Irs Maguire. Bardie was quick at "catching on," as the term goes, and he was not slow in asking ques tions, and when he started for the home of Mrs. Maguire he felt as though be were as much at home in New York as though he bad lived in that great city all his life. Bardie bad little .di fficulty in finding Mrs. Maguire's borne, but be was very careful about presenting himself until lie had made an exami nation to see if be had been followed. He was satisfied that sharp men were on his track, and he did not mean to be caught napping. Finally satisfied that all was right he walked up the alley-way and presented himself at Mrs. Ma guire's door. CHAPTER XVI. THE door was opened by Mrs. Maguire, who did not recognize in the handsome, clean-shaven young man the rather uncouth-looking immigrant who bad brought to her care the hand some girl the previous night. Good-morning, Mrs. Maguire." "Good-mornin' to ye, and what is it ye want?" Will ye ask me in?" Mebbe I will when I know yer business wid me." "My business i s very important." "Well, stand where ye are and tell me yer business. Shure, ye look loik e a sewing rnacbine man, and may be ye are looking for book subscriptions. Shure, them fellers always 11ev important bu s iness, but I've no toime to badder wid it if it's on them questions ye are here." "No, madame, my business is secret and very important." "It is?" '"Yes.', 1 "Well, come in, but do ye moind, if ye offer a sewing-machine or a book to me I'll just bate ye over the head wid me broom, so I will.'' The good woman flung open her door and our hero walked in. The lady whom he had rescued sat in the room looking pale and wor ried, but the moment our hero eutered she arose and approached him, and sa id, in the sweetest of tones: I am glad to welcome you." "Well, now, I declare!" ejacu l ated Mrs. Maguire, this i s very fine, and it's very de satefnl at that. Did ye not tell me ye had no friends her e in America?" Do you not recognize this gentleman, l\Irs. Maguire?" Shure, I do not; I ne'er set eyes on him afore, I'm shure of that." Our hero was very mu c h pleased. The lady to whom be had perform eel such a signa l service upon two occasions, and who was so charming and beautiful, was the only one who recognized him at a glance. He l eanecl toward her and said, in a low voice: "You recognize me?" "I do.'' It's strange." I would know by your eyes, and I can never forget your voice." Bardie was well pleased, for th e unfortun ate girl was decidedly beautiful and charming, and our hero had an eye for female beauty. Turning to l\Irs. Maguire be said: "You need not fear, Mrs. Maguire; no deceit bas been practiced upon you." '' I'm not sbure about that, shure." "You have seen me before." "I hev?" "Yes." "When?" Last night." "And w\Jo the divil are ye?" "I'm the man who brought thi s young lady here." "You are?" "lam." See here; do you t ake me for a fool because I'm a woman ? Look out, now, or I will g ive ye the broom anyhow, so I will." "It is the gentleman Mrs. Maguire BONANZA. BARDIE; OR, And are you enteriug into the plot ag'in aftber I've given ye c lothin' ?" But it's true, Mrs. Maguire." "It is, eh?" "Yes." '' Aud do you mane to tell me you are the man who brought that lady here l ast night?" "I am the same man, shure." Our hero fell to the brogue, and the widow bent her ears and a s t artled look came to her eyes. "Ye are?" she said. "I am." Where's yer whiskers? " I cut thim off." "Ye did?" '' 1 ... es.'' "And where are the clothes ye wore?" "It's aisy, shure, to change one's c lothes." "But ye tould me ye had no baggage." I found a friend, Mrs Maguire." "Ye did?" "Yes." "And why did ye cut off yer whiskers?" So me frinds would know me and me ene mies wouldn't know me." Well, there may be logic in that "Do ye moind, I knocked over the men who were carrying the "Yes, and now lt comes to me but I do ruiud yer voice.'' "Yes, and I am the same man, Mrs. Ma-guire." And what is yer name? "O'Brien." "It is?" "Yes .' And ye are afeerd of the men ye knocked over?" "I am; they were detectives." Our h ero did not think when he spoke, but he was immediately reminded, as an involuntary cry of distress fell from the lips of the lady. He saw his mistake, and said: Ye nade hev no fear." Come, now," said Mrs. Maguire, what do ye mane when ye say they were detectives? Is trouble ye will be get.tin' me, and I onlr, a lone widow seek in' to earn an honest livin'? "No harm shall come to ye, Mrs. Maguire, and whin I explain all to ye and make a propo sition ye 'll be well satisfied." "I will?" "Sllurely!" "How dove know that, sir?" I know you are a very sensible woman." "Well, well; thank ye for the comp lim ent And no\\-, what is your proposition?" I must talk the matter over with thi s lady first." Ah! it's a scharne yees hev bet ween yees; I see that, sir." ' On my honor, no." Meantime the fair g irl had sat, pale and trembling, with a terrified look upon her face. But it was not 1be look of a guilty person, by any means, so our hero decided, for he had fixed his eyes upon her several times, and read well her lovely face "See here; now, do ye moind," said Mrs. Maguire, "I do not loike this matter at all, au' I'll not let yees get me in trouble. I've a son, an' I'm moindiu' bis reputation, an' if there is evil between yees, go away. The lady is wel come to the night's shelter; sbure I 9ave it from the goodness o' me heart. But I m not harborin' thim as the detectives are lookin for -do yees moiud that?" "You shall have a full explanation, Mrs. Maguire " I sha ll ?" Well, the first I want is how ye spake in one moment wid a brogue, and tbe next wid the most illegant English Will ye explain that, ef ye plaize?" I will." "vVhin?" "As soon as you have permitted me to hold a few moments' private conversation with this lady." "Ye would spake to her in private?" "I would." "Well, well, I'm goin' to tile market; I'll l ave yees here, but ifs make it all plain to me when I come back ye will, or, faith, out yees go, and ye'll not get me in trouble." ''All shall be explained to you, Mrs. Maguire, and I assure you, on my honor, we are hon est people.'' "Ye may be, but it looks mighty quare to me, do ye moind? And you will hev to explain it all or I may turn ag'iu yees to save meself. Faith, it's me own boy I'm lukin' for, just re member that, plaize!" The woman went out, l eaving our hero and tile l ovely girl alone, and for a moment the gazed at each other in sil e nce, but at length Bardie said in a kindly and reassuring voice; '' It is necessary that you should confide fully in me.'' "I will," came the answer. CHAPTER XVII. "MAY I ask your name? said Bardie I told you my name on the steamer." "But have you observed I have never addressed you by that name?" I did not ob s erve the fact." I never have." "Why not?" It is not your real name." "How do you know?" she asked, with a smile, evidently for the moment forgetting her trouble. I so decided the moment you gave me the name, and I reached the conclusion because of the manner in which you gave it." You are very obsening." "I am." '' My real name is Grace Parrish.'' "Thank you." You are satisfied that is my real name?" "Yes." "You recognize it; and now you know how I am at your mercy?" "I do not." "You do not recognize the name? "I do not." And you are from Ireland?" You have not r ead the papers of late? "I hav e not, simply because, like yourself, I am a fugitive." A moment 1he girl was silent, and our hero said: "You need not fear to confide in me. Let me tell you something; I know detectives are on your track." A s hadow passed over the girl's delicate form. "I repeat you need not fear, for I know fur ther, whatever the cha r ge, you are innocent." "Ob. thank you for those words, but do you really mean them?" "I do." "Have you any intima1iou of 1he charge against me?" "I have not." "And yet you have decided that I am inno cent?" '' Yes.'1 Will you explain how you reached that decision?" Did I not tell you I was a fugitive?" "You did." I am innocent, and I can readily see how one can be a fugitive and be innocent." "In your case, ye, but how does your case serve as a parallel to mine?" "Shall I
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THE TREASURE OF THE ROOKIES. 13 he recovered from the first shock of surprise he said: "I still believe in your innocence " Thank you." And now you must tell me all the circum stances." "I will." Proceed, and do not reserve one fact from me; tell me all, and re s t assured that I am your friend, and will so prove myself to be for I can aid you and I will." I am the daughter of an English clergy man; my mother died when I was a mere child; I was educated by my father, who died two years ago, leaving but little of thi s world's goods behind him; I received an appointment, after my father's de at h, as governess to an heir; his guardian was his brother-in law; six months ago the lad, who was about six years of age, began to fail in health; he had previously been a robu st child; bis father had been a wealthy merchant; the bulk of his property was to go to the liLtle son, but in case of bis death the whole property went to his sister the wife of the boy's guardian. "The cause of the lad's sickness was a mys tery; the doctor was baffied antl pronounced it a decline; the l ad died, and after his death a terribl e discovery was made; a post-mortem re vealed the fact that the lad bad been slowly poisoned. I was in the house upon the tluy the inquest was h e ld. The boy's guardian during the in quest came to me. iVe were alone; bis face was ghastly. I shall never forget its ex pression. H e came to me and seized my hand. He trembled like an aspen leaf, and in a husky voice said : The doctors have just made a terrible dis covery. Alfred, my little brother-in-law, was murdered.' I gazed aghast; I had never suspected such a terrible fact; and then, after a moment, and with a wild crl are in his eyes, he said: Grace, I know you are inno cent, but, ahisl circumstances point to you 11s the murderess.' There came a fierce look to our hero's eyes, as he exc l aimed: "The villain: he was himself the assassin." "Hush!" said Grace, "let me piocee d. I declared my innocence, and he said: It is needless for you to proclaim your inno cence to me; I know you a re innocent, but circumstances point to you as the murderess; you must be saved." But,' l declared, I am innocent.' I know that,' he repeated; but you must flee.' !' 'Never!' I cried. "No, no! that would be acknowledging my g uilt.' Listen,' he said. I am on the track of the real assassin. If you will follow my advice you will aid me in proving his guilt; if you do not follow my ad vice you will be accused, and afterward it will be impossible to trail the real assassin.' Aud what would you have me do?' I asked. Merely go into concealment for a few days, and all will be well.' "And did you consent?" demamled Bardie. I did," came the answer. And there you made a fatal mistake," said our hero. CHAPTER XVIII. "YES, I did make a fatal mistake," said Grace, continuing her strange narrative. The man was seeking to cast suspicion upon you .'' ''Yes.'' "By your flight you aided him." "I did, bul li sten He llad always been very kind to me. He was a good-hearted man, and I can sec now that his good-hear tedn ess l ed him into troubl e "It is not good-heartedness to fix upon a n innocent girl a foul crime." "Let me proceed with my narrative. He gave me money, and, indeed, he had everyt hing arranged for my flight, and I felt very to him, for he made me feel that he was doing me a great kindn ess and liftiog me away from a great peril. He presented to me several facts that were, inde e d, unfortunate. The dead boy had been almost entirely under my care, and it did not seem possible that poison could have been admin i stered to him during s ix month s without my connivance." "But what m o tive could you have had?" Ah, there comes the most singular part of it. The boy's father had put a singu lar proviI sion in his will. He knew that his child would upon my mind. When I had the sume dream be placed under the care of a governess or some three nights successively I determined to flee.'' other hireling, and h e provided that said gov"And you made your escape unaided?" erness or whoever might be appointed to watch I did; I assumed a disguise and fled to Ire over his child should at the heir's arriva l at the laud, and from Queenstown I took th e steamer age of sixteen received one thou sa nd pounds, for America, and I am now convinced that the and in case of the heir's death previou s to the course of my flight has been discovered and age of sixteen the money was to be paid to the that I will be captured." governess who should be over him at the time "Never fear for one moment ; you shall not of bis death, provided proof of good and gentle be captured, but it does appear that you h ave treatment of the lad cou ld be ptoduced." been trailed, and that it was a pair of detectives It was a strange provision." who sought to kidnap you." "It would appear rn, bnt really all the pro"Were they English detectives?" visions of th e bequest were s uch as to insure for "I think they were." the lad gentle and good treatment, and faithful "How could they get to this country ahead instruction, and such gentleness and faithful of me?" ness in a teacher were to he rewarded l had They mus t have been in Ameri ca on some been the lad's governess for over two years, and other case and they w e re most likely commu it would be or ha s been made to appear that I nicated with from the other side; but now, poisoned the boy in order to secure the pen sio n mark my word s it was lucky you escaped and of one thousand pounds, which were to be p a id are safe." within three months following the little heir's "Until you come to believe in my guilt.'' death." "I will never believe in your guilt until you "And who benefited by the boy's death?" confess it." "His siste r the most l argely, but in case the "You will some day read the evidence against boy died ten thousand pounds were to go abso-me." lute ly to his brother-in-law." "And if I do?" Well, well, it was a will calculated to en" You will think it convi ncing." courage a fatal illne ss on the part of the heir, "Never; your word is better to me than evi-but go on with your story." deuce, but now see here. I have a strange tale I did flee, and almost immediately dete c t to tell; there is a singular coincidence in our ives were placed upon my track, and the papers fates. I am a fugitive." were filled with the horror of the murder, and "Yes, but you are not accused of murder." they were conveyed to me, and l read how terri-'' I am accused of murder and detectives are ble were th e circumstances that pointed to me on my track, and there is a reward of two thou as the murderess, and had I read the same cirsand pounds for my cepture, and I am as inuo cumstances as concernetl another I certainly cent as yourse lf. should have believed him The fair girl gazed in amazement. "A month passed, and l was securely guarded agaiost a rr est, and th ere were all maouer of rumors connected with my whereabouts; some maintained I bad commit t ed suicide, others pro tested I had fled to France or Italy; but one thing was certain, my flight had fixed the cer tainty of my guilt m the eyes of the whole commun ity." Ah, it was a sad mistake, your flight." "In one sense, yes, but only in one sense, for, had I not fled, I would have been found guilty and have been executed, and a ll would have been over." Our hero stared. What do you mean?" he demanded. I mean that, had I not escaped the evi dence was such that I would have surely been convicted; the real murderer, in order to save himself, would h ave let me go to the gallows." "You are satisfied the brother-in law is the real assassin?" ''lam." "You did not suspect him at first?" l did not." How did you come to discern that he was the murderer?" He came to me at the end of a month, came secretly and in disguise, and he sa id i t was ne cessary for me to flee from the country. I proposed that I should surrender myself and seek to prove my innocence, but be protested, and fioally shocked me by the announcement that lie believed in my guilt, but would aid me to escape all the same, believing a lso that when I committed the crime I was out of my mind, and it was then I first suspected him." '' And did you l et him know of your suspicions?" ''I did." "And di-cl you accuse him." I did not at the first interview, but later on I did. I had come to think the matter over, and many incidents were recalled that con vinced me beyond all possible doubt that he was the cold blooded assassin. He had done for the ten th ousand pounds what I had been accused of doing for the one thousand pounds, for I did not know of the provision in the will until after the boy s death; but, you see, I am a helpless girl, and all the plans had been ar ranged to make it appear that I was the mur deress." And you did accuse him of the murder?" "I did." And what did he say?" He threatened me; he told me I had sacri ficed his sympathy; he said he would not betray me, but l must l ook out for myself." Was that the last time you saw him?" "Yes." And how did you escape?" I had made up my mind to surrender my self when I had a dream mging me to flee to America. The dream made a deep impression CHAPTER XIX. BA RDIE proceeded and related hi s own strange story, and the g irl list ened attentively, and when he had concluded, she said : How strange that you and l should meet as we have!" "Yes, it i s strange; but now see here, fate and circumstances make us brother and sister. You must trust me, and you must permit me to treat you as though you were my sister indeed." I can not consent to any such arr angement." "You can not consent to any such arrangement?" "No." "Why not?" In seek in g to save me you will but betray yourself." "Don't let any s uch id ea enter your head; on the contrary, having you to serve me as a cover I can save myself, a nd a t the same time save you. But there is one thing: we can not make a confidante of ll'.Irs. Maguire, good old sou l that she is." If you will allow me to suggest, I think that we can, and if she cun be convinced of my innocence she can aid us both in concealing ourselves." Bardie thought a moment, and the fair Grace cont inu ed: '' If we can secure the co-operation of :Mrs. Maguire I will start in with hope, otherwise I s hall look for arrest, and indeed there will be no need for me to seek to avoid it.'' "Why?" I can not sta nd the strain." The fair gir l dropped another hint that sent an idea whirling through our hero's head, but h e said: Suppose she should feel it her duty to be tray you?" "We must take that chance. l need not be tray to her your secret; I a lone will run the risk." "I tlo not app rove of your plan." "Leave it to my jurlgmeut; I can so manage it that if she does not become our friend, my chances will not be imperiled more than they are at present." Bardie thought for a long time, and they argued toget her; and finally our hero consented to leave the matter to the lovely girl's judgment. Upon l\lrs. Maguire's return Bardie took his departure, promising to call again after the d in ner-hour. Relying upon his changed appearance, our hero walked around without any fear of reco g nition, although there was a reward of ten thou sand dollars offered for his apprehension, Upon leaving the rooms of Mrs. Maguire he walked around to the squa re where be had made the res c ue, determined to tak e a look at the house into which the detective had sought to

PAGE 14

14 BONANZA BARDIE; OR, take the girl. He discovered that the house was I cerity. Bardie was too well read in human nat an English hotel, or rather an English emigrant ure to be deceived, and he said hoarding-house, and as he passed along he saw "You need not have th e least fear, Mrs. the man whom he had met in the uptown restauMaguire: it's all right." rant the previous night. The man bore the mark "What is all upon his cheek and our hero look ed him The lady is safe straight in the face, but the man did not recog "Ah, it's aisy to say so; but shure thim denize him, and Bardie, as he walked a lon g, muttectives, they're the divil, so they are." tered: "You need have no fear. We will talk mat" Well, I reckon my change in appearance is ters over and make our arrangements, and now, all right when that fellow does not recognize my good Mrs. Maguire, you must enter into my ine." se rvice." One fact our hero had established; it was, in"Enter into your service?" deed a pair of English detectives who had sought Yes.'' to kidnap the girl, and, what is more, their act I can not do that, shure; I must look out was an illegal one and a clear case of abduction for me boy." without warrant of l aw. The men had evident"You can look out for your boy, and what Jy intended to smuggle the fugitive on an outi s more, you can give him that which will de going steamer and return her to England with-light your heart, I know." out going through the regular l ega l require"And what is that?" ments. "A good educat ion." I am glad to get on to that fact," muttered "How can I de. that, and I depindint upon B d me day's wages, goin' out to wash?" ar ie. It may serve well in case the worst I will attend to that part of it; so, see here, comes to the worst, and I will see those fellows Mrs. Maguire; I want you to go uptown, and in good time and I will g iv e them a few hints you will find a nice little house, and vou'll hire that may be of use to them." it." Bardie had really encountered two detectives, "Hire it?" and neither of them bad r ecogn i zed him, and he Yes.,, felt greater confidence. He spent three hours walking abouf the city. He was making him"And how will I pay the rint, shure?" If d d 1 r I will pay the rent, and you shall have se acquarnte with streets an oca it1es, or, money enough to provide .,0u with everything: as he put it," he was becoming a Yorker;" and l y k b 1 d and you shall send your boy to school. and you 1e was qmte a or er w en 1e returne to the shall act as protector to this young lady until home of Mrs. Maguire. such time as her innocence is established. and-" Bardie found Grace awaiting him; but the Bardie came to a halt suddenly. He saw a good mistress of the house was not at home, man advance to the door of Mrs. Maguire's and a shadow fell over his face. rooms, and be sa id, in a startled tone: "Where is lVIrs. J\faguire?" he asked. "Who is that?" She has gone out." "Did you make a confidante of her?" "I did." "And she went out immediately afterward, I suppose?" B Yes." You and I must l eave at once." "No, no; I must wait for lVIrs. lVIaguire's re turn." "How long has she been gone?" About ten minutes." "That is lucky; we will have time to gt!t away." "Get away?" "Yes." "Why should we get away?" She has gone to police head-quarters, you may be sure." To betray me?" "Yes." "Never; I would risk my life in her hands." "Have you told her your story?" "Yes." "All the facts?" ''Yes.'' "And does she believe in your innocence?" She does." She said so possibly." "She is a true and faithful woman; we have nothing to fear from her; she will prove a true friend." ' I wish I could feel so.'' "Wait until you see her and you will be satisfied." If we wait it may be too late." "For what?" "Escape." ""\Ve need not fear her." It is leaving all to the cast of a die." "vVait and see her." Even as Grace spoke Mrs. lVIaguire entered the room. The woman's face wore an expres sion of dr.ep concern, and our hero's heart foll. He mistook that look of concern for treachery. The woman closed her door and looked fur tively around, and after a moment, glancing at our hero, said: Well, well, did ye ever hear the loikes of the story this yonng lady tells? Well, well, but it's terrible! Faith, I'm losin' me sinses, so I am!'' said l\frs. Maguire. "Look me straight in the face, lVIrs. lVIaguire," said our hero. The woman fixed her clear, honest eyes on our hero, when the latter asked, in slow, delib erate tones: "Do you believe in this young l ady's lnno cence?" "Do I belave in her inno cence?'' "Yes.'' I do, as I belave in me own existence at this moment, so I do." There was no doubting the good woman 's sinCHAPTER XX. THERE came a smile to Mrs. lVIaguire's face as she said: Ye nade not fear that man." "Who is he?" My landlord, to be shure! An, faith, he will go away a disappointed man to-day." "He will?" "Yes.'' "How is that?" I've not me rint ready." Here, Mrs. Maguire-you are a friend, and you've found friends-pay the man and let him go, and we'll make our arrangements." Bardie passed over to the good woman money enough to pay her rent, and when she went forth to talk with the owner of the rooms, Grace rose, and approaching our hero, laid her hand upon his arm, and looking up sweetly in his face, said: You must not carry out your plans." What do you mean?" "You must not go to all this expense on my account." Listen: do not l et me hear one word from you from this time forth. You are my sister, you will do as I say; you are under my care and protection." "But I am not your s i ste r, and I have known yon but a few days." Fate has made us brother and sister in ad versity in the most remarkable manner." But you do not know that my story is true; you have no proofs." Why, yes; I have proofs." "You have?" ''Yes.'' "What proof have you?" "The proof is your bonny eyes. Now listen: this protest arises from a sense of pride, but re member the day will come when you can repay me eve r y cent." "Where will I, a fugitive, eve r get money to pay you?" "Your innocence will soon be established, and then in this land, with your talents and ac complishments, yon can earn all the money you need. Now mind, I will keep an account of all I expend on yonr account, and some day you can pay me back." Is that a solemn agreement?" "It is." On those terms I consent." There was a merry gleam in our hero's eyes when she spoke, and it was her inexperience that led him to feel that, under certain circum stances, the day might come when she could earn enough money to repay him. Mrs. Maguire dismissed her landlord and re turned to the room, when Bardie sa id: "Now then, madame, do you understand my plans? You are to find a nice little hou se, you are to buy nice furniture for it and make a home for this young lady, and your boy you shall s1md to school, and he sha ll become a man of education." The mother's eyes brightened. It had been the desire of her heart to g ive her son a good education; but, alas! it was lack of means that compelled her to put him to work instead. Barclie remained a l ong timetalkingover mat ters with lVIrs. Maguire, and finally he took his departure with the understanding that he was to call on the following afternoon to hear her report. Our hero had made up his mind to turn the detectives on a new scent. He was a very kee n fellow and capab l e of carrying out any scheme that might enter his head. He returned to his friend O'Shayne, and in the evening went to the theater, and, indeed, set out to learn New York through and through. When the theater closed Hardie walked up town and entered the bar room of a noted hotel, and there he found assembled a great company of men, and he was highly amused and enter tained, as everything w11s strange and novel to him. Be took a seat, and soon an elderly man took a seat near him, and still later a young man entered the place, glanced around, and finally advanced and took a seat near the e lder ly man. The two were soon engaged in an ani mated conversation. Barclie 'l>as not seeking to overhear what pass ed, but was compelled to do so or change his seat. Feeling it was just as convenient for the two talkers to change if they did not desire to he overheard he maintained his i;:osition, and the result was he fell into the knowledge of a stock deal. The two men were brokers, and one was giv ing the other some sure' points Bardie was up a little in stocks. He had played the game for a short season on the French Bourse, and he was not loath to get a "pointer" for Wall Street. He remembered that he had a pretty big contract on hand, and he knew he would require money; his five thousand would not last always, and, besides, if our hero indulged bis r eal tastes, be was quite an extrava gant liver. He enjoyed the luxuries of life as well as the next man, as the say ing goes, and he was just. that age when men J ove to be reckles s and extravagant in their expenditures. vVhen our hero returned to O'Shayne's place he had made up his mind to risk two thirds of his fortune on a stock deal. He did not betray his intention to his friend, but made up his mind to take the chance. Bright and early upon the following morning be was up and about; and, as it was too early for Wall Street, he took a lon g walk over the c ity, determined to improve every opportunity for making himself acquainted with the great metropolis. His walk took him to the river front, and he spent a long time lookin g at differ ent objects of interest, until, looking at his watch, he found it time to go to Wall Street. Bardie proceeded direct to th e office of the banking-house where he had received the pack age from Mr. Kneiss, and he recognized and went direct to the desk of J\ir. Brush. The lat ter turned pale upon seeing our hero, and warned him, by a signal, to speak low. Bardie paid no attention to the warning, but said : I've made up my mind to run in a margin on a stock that suits my fancy." The clerk understood the remark to be a "blind" merely, aucl said in a whisper: "The place is under surveillance." "Is it?l) "Yes; detectives are watching here every hour of the clay." Well, it's all right." Our hero spoke in a low tone when the sub ject of the conversation changed Why did you come here?" demanded the clerk. "You need have no fear; I am as safe here as anywhere. "Don't you recognize that if I was guilty I would not come here ? " I do not understaud." "Didn't the detective come back here after his interview with me?" "No." "Then you need have no fear; they're look ing for another man." CHAPTER XXL BARDIE went into a full explanation, and made lHr. Brush understand that it was all right:

PAGE 15

THE TREASURE OF THE ROOKIES. 15 t h at he had certainly thrown the detectives of! the track, as far as he was concerned, under his d i sguise as then assumed, and he again made his statement in relation to the stock So you r ea lly wish to invest?" I do?" But you had better hold on to the money you have; Wall Street is a dangerous place." It's win more, or lorn what I've got with me," said Bardie. "You a r e a sort of l\Joute-Cristo?" That is what I a m exactly." If you are bouud to risk your money, do not buy the stock you name." That is just the stock I wish to put my money in as long as I am spending a dollar that way." "I can g ive you a better 'point.' "I am taking the points' I have; and I wish to risk three thousand dollars." "Three thousand dollars on one deal!" ex claimed Brush. ''Yes." "But stock fluctuates; what will you do if you are compellell to corner.' " It's my way it will come." You will lo se eve ry dollar of your money "That's it; you ve named it; it's my money, and I've the ri 9ht to do with it as I choose." "You have. "And that i s the direction in which I wish to ris k it." As you choose, since you are so persistent, but you will be penniless inside of eight-and forty h ours .'' Let h e r go; it's all right." Bardie drew a e;heck for the amount and left the office, but not until he had uttered one caution: Do you mind." be sa id "if you attempt to know more than I do and withhold the purchase for the purpos e of showing me where I would have lost you will do so at your own risk. I wish you to mak e that investment for me, and if yo u are not willing to do so say so now." I am perfectly willing to do as you direct." It's all ri ght then." Two day s passed. Mrs. Maguire had found a nice little hou se far uptown, and our hero went with her to view it, and he bid Mrs. Maguire it for one year. "In me own n ame, shure?" ''Yes.'' "But I ll niver be able to pay the rint." Come with me, Mrs. J\Iagnire." The two went to a savings bauk, and our hero deposited one thousand dollars in the name of l\Irs. Maguire, and upon l eav ing the bank he said: '' There, I think you will be able to pay at least one year's,rent. " Well, well! what does it all mean?" ejacu lated Mrs :Mag-uire. "Sure you're a r eg ular l\fonte-Cristo.'' "I am?" "You are, shurel" "And what do you know about 1\fonte C risto ?" "That wonderful Frenchman?" "Yes." "Well, wasn t me son Mike readin to me all about him? Shure, l\Iike can read loikeaschool master, so he can-and many books has he read to his ould so he has!" "I reckon l\Iike i s a good son?" "He is, shure-there's none belher!" ' You will say nothing to llliss Grace at present." "And whin will I mov e into me new house, Mister Monte-Cristo?'' We will wait a day or two until you have it furnished." "Ah! and will ye furnish it?" I trust so." On the second morning following the deposit of the three thou sand dollars Bardie secured the papers early in the morning, and his eyes fell upon the stoc k report s He ran down the li sts and an exc lamation burst from his lips. "By a ll that's st range and wonderful," he excl aimed, "I've got 'em!" At a seaso n able hour our hero proceeded to Wall Street, aud was greeted cheerfully by Mr. Brush, the latter exclaiming: "It's wonderful!" "Eh what's that? inve stment has doubled!" Has it, now? "Yes; it is one of the most remarkable inci dents of the Street, the jump of that stock " And you were advising me not to buy it!" "I did so adv i se; but where did you get your 'tip'?" Never mind now; but will you sell? Later in the day Bardie called and rec e ived nearly six thousand dollars, a nd as b e s tarted to deposit the check in his bank, he muttered: "This is a wonderful country. Sure, dollars grow upon the bushes." Having made his deposit our hero proceeded to the hom e of Mrs. M ag uire. The two went uptown together. "I've been thinking over about the house," said Bardie. "Well, h ave you changed your moind?" "No; but it's the rent l'm thinking about." Shure, that's paid." "I know; but rent day comes around pre tty regularly, you know, and Mrs Maguire, I'm going to have you buy that house. "Buy it, shure?" "Yes." How can I buy it?" "I will give you the money, and you will buy it in your own name; you are a good, hon est woman "vVell, well, it's a Monte-Cristo you are, shure. Fnith, I'll expect to hear ye spakin' French next, so I will." Our hero wa s a good French scholar, and he r a ttled off a few words in French, and Mrs. Maguire leaped into the air with astonishment. "I knew it she cried I knew it!" "And what is it you "Ye are the real Monte-Cristo himself; yes, ye are, shure! Ten days passed, a nd Mrs. Maguire became the owner of the little hou se, anrl she had it newly furnished; and, when all was settled for, our h e ro counted up his balance and saw that he had about fifteen hundred dollars remaining. Enough for me," he said, since I'll make it fifteen thousand before I am three months older in this land of milk and honey and g old dollars." Mrs Maguire moved into her new house, and a nice room, nicely furnish e d and equipped, h a d been set aside for Grace Parrish Strangely enough, our hero had talk e d but lit t l e with the lovely g irl following the morning when the mutual explanations occurred between them. But two days after the settlement in the n ew hou se our hero called to spend the evening with his friends. He was admitted to the house by Mike, who had been well c l ad and was an attendant at one of the public schools. Grace came down to the little parlor to meet Bardie She closed the door and said: I desire an e xplanation from you, sir." "Is it sir yon say to me? No, no; call m e Bardie. " I can not permit you to provide for me in this manner. I shall go forth and earn my own living." "You will?" "I will." "When?" "At once." "Hol d on, Miss Grace! You will listen to what I have to say before you do anything so foolish CHAPTER XXII. TaERE followed a moment's silence, broken at length by our hero, who said: "l\Iiss Parrish, there is a strange similarity in your fate and mine; indeed, the coincidences are simply marvelou s You are an orphan without a relative in the world." It is possible that I have a rel at ive living here in America. My father had an oluer brother who came to this country many years ago, and for ten years he corresponded with my father; but for twenty years my father had not heard from him. He never received any intimation of his brother s death." The chances are that your un c le i s dead." "Yes; but the possibility exists that he still Ii ves, and I have an idea that I will endeavor to find him." Our hero lau g hed. He had been Jong enough in America to form some ide a of the va s tn ess of the country, and he knew how u se less it was to seek for a person who had been mis s in g for so long a time; but he merely suid: At present it would not be wise for you to inaugurate a sea rch, for you will remember de tectives are on your track. Remember a man who has committed a foul murder has arranged to have you convicted in order to save himself from the penalty of his own crimes." "No, no; that man would not turn against me.'' It is certain that he has turned aga inst you, otherw i se the detectives would qot be upon your tra ck. Now, listen: Mrs. Maguire has betrayed your secret; you have something to live for." The l ovely g irl' s face assumed a crimson hue. l\lrs. Maguire has betrayed my secret?" "Yes; there is one whom you love, on e before whose eyes you would like to he vindicated." The g irl s eyes fell, and the crimson blush was s ucceeded by a deathly pallor It is not necessary for me to say more in that direction. Yes, you have everything to live for; you are young, accompli s hed, and be loved by an honorable man You are now under a cloud, but that cloud will be r e moved. You will be vindicated; the really guilty assas sin will some day make a full and complete confessiou. '' "Never." Oh, yes, he will; leave that to me." "But why should you be my friend ? "Beca use of all men in the world I am in a better position to sympathize with you I am a fugitive and I am innocent ; I a m an orphan, but I have one advantage over you-I am a man. Now li 8 ten: you will find a hom e here with Mr s Maguire, and yon must reconcile yonrself to abso lut e seclusion for some months, and possibly for a year, but in good time you will be vindicated. In the meantime I will sea rch for your uncle. I shall be a wanderer over this broad land; I can not stay in New York. I am assured that the officers are on my track; I am being pursued by a more relentless enemy than you, but I can aid myself, you can not." But you are devoting your money to my maintenance." Do not speak of that. I have plenty of money; indeed, the want of money I do not know." You did not tell me this before." "But you must know I have pl e nty of money for I have bought and paid for this house and presented it to Mrs. Maguire. Just see what a benefit your misfortune has been to her. She bas a good home and a chance to indulge in the great desire of her heart, the educati o n of her son. Mike i s a smart boy. We will hear from him some day. Now not one word from you; here you will ab ide until the cloud that hovers over you clears away. "You are a good and noble man." Do not mention it; you and I met under the most remarkable cir c umstances, and there is a wonderful similarity in our fates. It's all ri g ht; promise me you will remain here until your good name is cleared or you hear from me." "You are going away?" "lam." "When?" "Possibly within a week, possibly within a few hours I do not know. I have told you the dete c tiv es I fear are on my track. I do not de sire to be captured just yet. The day will come when I shall proclaim myself; the day will come when your innocence will be established. Will you promise to abide here as I have asked? " First let me make an explanation to you." "Proceed." "Mrs. Maguire you say has reveal ed my se cret?" Yes; she did it unintentionally, but it is bet ter that she did-bette r for you." There is a man in England who studied with my fathe r. He is th e son of a rich m e rchant. We were thrown much tog ether, and we learned to love each other; but he dared not reveal the truth to his father, as hi s parent hopes, b eca use of his great wealth, to gain for bis son a wife of high soc ial standing. My affianced correspond ed with me up to th e time when this terrible charge was made against me. I have not heard a word from him since." But he did not have your address." "Yes: I wrote to him a letter giving him a full explanation. I received no answer. I wrote to him again, revealing my plans." "You w r ote to him revealing your plans?" "Yes. " Your plans for flight?" "Yes." 'I here came a shadow to the face of the llfonte Cr isto, for our hero had tak e n a fancy to the appella tion and had come to look upon himself as a sort of Irish Monte-Cristo. The shadow was the reflex of a suspicion that had flashed

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16 through his active mind. Bardie was a man possessed of a noble disposition, and he said: "Possibly he did not receive your letters." lt is possible." He really loved yon?" "Yes; I am sure of that; and he taught me to love him, for he loved me first." The girl spoke with sweet simplicity. It's all right, and will come out all right," said Bardie. I tell you that your innocence will be establi s hed; it is only necessary for you to escape arrest for a time and all will be well. You can return to England, only your name will be brighter because of your trials following this false charge against you; and it is possible I may find your uncle. It may be proved after all that you are an heiress." The Monte-Cristo spoke in a joking tone, lit tle dreaming at the moment how prophetic his words might prove. I believe Charles is true to me, and oh, how be must suffer! I would seek once more to communicate with him." "No; you must not. I demand that you promise not to do so until you have permission from me." Our hero spoke in tones of great decision. "You do not think it best?" No; if he loves you, this is but a test of his love. He knows that you love him-have sent him a full explanation. You have declared your innocence in the most solemn manner. If he does not believe your story, he does not love you; you do not desire his love." There came a moment's silence, broken at length by Grace, who said in firm tones: It is true." CHAPTER XXIII. OUR readers will remember that we intimated that our hero had indulged but little conver sation with Grace Parrish, and he had good reasons for his failure in that direction. He possessed a secret, and, incidentally, Mrs. l\'Ia gure bad made to him a revelation. The good woman in a conversation with Grace had asked if she had no friends, and the girl had told to one of her own sex her love tale, and Mrs. Ma guire had, as stated, incident ally repeated the story to our hero, and hence his studied re straint. Bardie held a mGre extended conversation with Grace, and made many pointed inquiries concerning her father's family, and especially did he make inquiries concerning the missing brother of her father. When our hero left the home he had provided for Mrs. Maguire he went to his own lodgings. He bad left the residence of his friend O'Shayne and had made a home of his own for reasons. He had hired furnished rooms and had his own housekeeper. Bardie had intimated that there were reasous why he might be compelled to leave Ner York, and the fact was that he had a intimation that a well-laid plan had been orgamzerl to cap ture him, and his being under constant sur veillance and the necessity for constant watch fulness was becoming irksome. The young man having money in his posses sion had provided himself with many disguises, and he was a sort of Protean genius. He was fully capable of carrying out his several as sumed characters Upon reaching his lod gings he set to work to assume a disguise, and he matle a transforma tion that was simply wonderful. Bardie had traveled much in Engl and, and was well acquainted with men and localities, and he was also well acquainted with the pecu liar patois of the different counties and towns in England, and besides he was an exce llent imita tor as well as a sp l endid linguist. He could speak German like a native, having been P.du cated at a German university, as related in our opening chapters. Having assumed his disguise he issued forth and proceeded direct to the English immigrant boarding-house, where he had seen the detective who was on the track of Grace Parrish. He entered the place, going into the bar room, and sitting down at a table ca ll ed for a glass of ale, speaking in broken English. The bar-tender, a regular cockney, was amused at the Dutchman's calling for ale, and said: It's beer you want." "No, I vos vant ale." "You are a German." '' Ya-a-s.'' "German's drink beer." BON ANZ.A. BARDIE; OR, '' I know dot, but I vos !if a long times in England." Where did you Ii ve in England?" "Vhen I vos first go to England I vent to Lemington, and afterward I vos !if in Birming ham, and den I vos lif in Chester." The conversation was in progress when the very man our bad set to pipe walked in, and he listened to the conversation; and later on, when our hero took a seat at the table, the English detective took a seat near him, and en gaged him in conversation, and he, too, re marked that it was a strange thing to see a German drinking ale. The detective had been in Germany and could speak a little of the lan guage, and he asked Bardie in German what part of Germany he had come from. Our hero answered promptly, speaking in most excellent German, and, as far as the de tective was concerned, the fact was established that he was indeed a geneuine Dutchman, and the conversation proceeued. "You have lived in England?" "Yes." How long cl id you Jive in England?" Six years." "How long have you been in this country?" Two weeks." "Only two weeks?" "Ya-a-s." "How do you like it here?" I vos like it, and 1 vos like it England." "Was there any special news in England when you left?" Veil, most of der English news is learned here dot vos very vonderful. Der bay der pa pers in this country to publish der news, but der vos one t'ing vat vos happen in England dot too make me surprised." "What is that?" "You vos heard about dot murder?" Our hero ment i oned names and incidents, and the detective was all attention at once. "Yes, I have heard about that murder. What do you know about it?" "I vos know dot der detectives in England vos looking up der tree." 'What do you mean? Veil, dot vos shust vot I mean." What do you know about the murder?" I vos know noddings much, but I vos know somedings." The detective eyed the speaker sharply, and at that moment his comrade entered the room and took a seat at the same table. The latter had evidently overheard our hero's first remark. You know something about it?" "Ya-a-s. ,, "'W"hat do you know?" Shust vot I vos tole you; dey vos looking up der wrong tree." "How?" Dey vos not looking for der real murderer." \Vho is the real murderer?" ' It vos strange dot nobody vos suspect the r eal murderer." "And do you know the real murderer?" "I vos supect him." What do you know about the case that leads you to suspect?" "All I know about der case I vos read in der bapers; dot vos all in one vay." All you know in one way?" ' Ya-a-s." What do you know in another way?" I know somedings of dot man Adranfelt." "You know something of Adranfelt?" 0 Ya-as." "He i s the brother in-law of the murdered boy?" 11 Ya-a-s.'' And what do you know about him?" "Veil, I vos know dot oof I vos a detective he vos der man I vould follow. Eh, you vos not read der case?" Yes, I have read all about it." "Veil, who vos you t'ought poisoned der boy?" The girl, his governess." You vos t'ought so, eh?" ''Yes." "Veil, you vos like everybody else; dey all t'ought so, hut dey vos all wrong, I vos t'ink. See, dey vos only search mit de girl, eh? Vy don't deylook up der mans? Now, I vos shust tell you one leetle dings. Dot mans Adranfelt, he vos say noddings until the girl vos get avay -he vaits a long times, eh ?-den all at once he out speaks, eh? Dot vos one leetle t'ing dot vos queer." Bardie proceeded and basing his theory upon the facts really in his possession, he pointed out some singular and remarkable circumstances that were certainly very suspicious as concerned the brother-in-law of the murdered lad, and when he had concluded the two detectives sat silent, looking into each other's faces. They had received food for thought. CHAPTER XXIV. As related, Bardie pre s ented a remarkable .statement of facts, anrl the two English deter.t ives we;e 'l'ery much impressed with what he had said, and we will stute that the same day one of them wrote to another detective in Lou don, presenting as his own ideas the theory that had b een so inp:eniously presented by our hero. In tile meantime the conversation had con tinued, the detectives asking many que stions and our hero making important answers. Bardie at length went forth from the place feeling he had played a good game, and having succeeded so well in one direction he retired to his lodging, and assuming a new disgui s e started out to interview another detective in a matter which more directly concerned himself. He still held to the character of a German, but affected the appearance of a young German student, ancl under the cover named he wan dered up and down Broadway for the whole day and saw nothing of the detective. W 'hen night came Barclie entered a well known hotel for his supper, and later on ad journed to the reading-room to indulge in a cigar. But a few moments passed when the very man he most desired to see entered the room, and the next question presented was how should he get int0 conyersation with the officer. Bardie was reading the paper, and in it there was an account of the rescue of the two men from the raft in mid-ocean, the incident having been revived because of the fact that there had come a report of the rescue of the crew and officers of the ill-fated steamer. There had been a German student aboard the steamer that had rescued our hero, and Bardie had held several conversations with him and had learned not only his name but his d e sti nation, he being determined to go right on to Denver, and it was the same recollection that had suggested to our hero the idea of taking the character of a German, one he was so well fitted to maint&in, and again, by speaking in broken German he was able to conceal the inevitable tinge of brogue characteristic of his talk wheu speaking English. There was a youncr man sitting near our hero, and the stranger addressed a remark to Bardie, and then the latter had a chance to refer to the article he had been reading, and he said: "I was on the vessel that rescued the two men from the raft." Bardie, as intimated, spoke iu broken Ger man, but not as broken as when he had been talking with the other detectives, and the mo ment he made the announcement of the fact that he had been on the rescuing steamer he observed that the eyes of the detective were fixed upon him. The officer did not approach him at once, but Bardie knew that the keen scented human sleuth-hound was on his track, and that sooner or later he would give a signal bark. The two young men continued in conversa tion for awhile, and the detective pretended te> be reading an afternoon paper, but our hero knew that in fact he was listening to every word that was spoken, and one of the talkers spoke just those words !Lat he desired the listening detective to overhear. The young man who had been talking with Bardie at length rose and left the room, and our hero commenced reading a paper, when the de tective crossed over and took a seat beside him. "1 think I heard you say you were on the steamer that rescued the two men from the raft?'' "Yes, I was a passenger." I have been deeply iu that rescue," said the detect.i ve. "It was a verr, pleasant day when they were brought aboard. "Did you have any conversation with them?" Yes, with one of them." Which one?" "The Irishman; the older gentleman did not appear inclined to talk to any one." "You are a German?" "Yes." "Have you come to remain in the United States?" H Yes.'' "Will you remain in New York?"

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THE TREASURE OF THE ROOKIES. 17 No; I will go west." The detective asked our hero a g r eat many quest ions about Germany and about him self and finally asked: Did the young Irishman make any confes sion to you?" "No, be did not make a confession, but he gave me his confidence." "Then yon have seen him s ince you have been in New York?" "No, I have not seen him, but I heard from him once." You heard from him?" "Yes.,, What did you hear?" He was to ca ll upon me. but sen t word that, for rensons 1 would imderstand, he would not ca ll, and that he expected to sa il the next day for Australia." The detective moved uneasily in his chair. He sent you a note, eh?" You seem to be greatly inte re ste d in that yonngman." I a1n." "Ab, I see," said the pretended young German "You see?" ''Yes." The pretended German had spoken fo a very significant tone when be had said "I see." What do you see?" demanded the detective. You h ave been following me." I have been following you?" "Yes." Why should I follow you?" B eca use I was a passenger on the steamer. Yes, I see it all; you are a detective." Our hero had worked matters down just where he wanted to get them. He had played his ga m e well. "You think I am a detective?" "Yes." And you think I have been following you?" "Yes." 'Vhy should I follow you?" I told you way and you came here and spoke lo me. I did not seek you. I think I've met yo u before, and you mu st have been follow ing me." You are mi,staken, young man " If I am mi sta ken why do you ask me so many questions?" I have a reason, but I never saw you until I came into this room. I did not know you had any knowl edge of the matter we have been talking about until I heard you say yourself that you were on that steamer." But you seem to take great interest in the incident." "I do." "Why?" "I will tell you later on. Now, answer me. You sav you received a note from the young Iris hman?'' No, I did not say I received a note." '' I thought you did." I sa id I had received word from him " And what was the word you rec e ived?" He said he was going to Australia." For reasons that you knew '?" "Yes.'' "What were those reasons?" Reasons that he had confided to me." "He expected to be arrested," said the de tective Ah, I told you that you were an officer." "Well, I am an officer, and I e xpect you to tell me a ll you know about this affair CHAPTER XXV. THE pretended student laughed in an amused manner, and sa id: I'd like to know why I must tell you all I know?" '' If you do not I will arrest you _'' "You will arrest me?" "Yes; unde r our American Jaw I can arrest you for havin g g uilty knowledge of a criminal." Bardie knew but little concerning our Ameri can laws, and believed it pos ibl e th a t the de tective told the truth; hut as in fact he really desired to make a confidant of the detective, he pre tended immediately to be considerably fright ened, and he sairl: "I am willing to give you all the information in my po ssess ion on oue condition. I have heard one side of the story." You have beard one side of the story?" "Yes.'' Of what story?" "The story told me by the young man who I was re scued from the raft. " He told you his story?" 1 Yes." "How did he come to tell you bis story?" "Because I had told him my own." "Then you have a hi s tory ? "I hav e." What dirl the yo ting man tell you?" "He told m e first hi s real name." What did he say his real name was, if you plea se?" He sa id bis re a l name was Bardie O'Conor. There was con s iderabl e significance in the question and answer. "And what did he tell you about himself?" Our hero proc eeded and told his own historytold the facts even to his meeting with the old woman, and the occasion of his assuming the name of Bardie, and the incidents th at followed his visit to hi s ancestral estates. The dete c tive was an inte r este d li stener, and when our h ero had concluded the na1 rative the officer said: Quite a romantic story." "Yes." And vou believe it? "I do.r' And you have not seen him since you arrived in New York?" ''No sir'' H e sent you a note? "No, sir; h e merely sent me a scrap of paper." By whom?" "A boy." He knew where you were stopping?" "Where are you stopping?" Bardie was prepared for the question, and had arranged to answer it. He had taken a room in f lodging-house several ni ghts in suc cession, under the di sgu ise of the German student, and und e r an assumed name, and he promptly gave th e add ress. "You have not heard from him since?" "No. " And you really think he has gone to Aus tr a li a? "I do." I am much obliged to you, young man; I see this fellow anticipated arrest." "Certainly; be was a fugitive." The detective did not say any more to our hero, and after sitting a few moments took bis departure. Bardie had prep a red himself and working a change in his appearance, he followed the de tective out, and saw him proceed direct to the address our hero had g iven. '''\Veil, well!" multered the fugitive; "what does that mean? Does be doubt my word, after all?" B a r die stole into the lodging-hou se, satisfied he had assumed a change in appearance that would conceal his identity. He saw the detec tive hold a consultation with the clerk who had charge of the rooms, and be saw him go up stairs to talk with one of the maids. Bardie followed up and got position on the floor above, nnd leaning over the baluster, overheard every word that passed as the cletective and maid held their t alk in the hall below llim. "You have charge of room 92?" said the detec tive. "I hev, sir." '' Have you ever seen anything of the lodger in tllat room? ' "I bev, sir." See here, my good girl, I see you are smart. I am an officer, and you can be of great service to me. I am after a G e r man who committed a forgery in Germany, and I have reason to believe that th e mau who lodges in 92 is the man I am after, and if you will give me any valuable information I will give you a five-doll a r bill." YOU will?" "I will." "And it's a German you're afther?" "Yes." "well, you're chasin' the wrong man when you chase the lodger. "I am?" exclaillled the detective, in a surprised tone ''You are.'' "How do you know?" "I know well enough." "But how do you know ? I'll tell you; the lodger is no German." "He is no German?" "No, sir "How do you know?" He is a Scotchman "A Scotchman?" "Yes." "I reckon I have not got the right room." "Yes, ye llev, if ye mean :Mr. Gu s tav Indig; for that mau lodges in 92." "But you say he is not a German " And n ay tll er is he, s ir; he is a Scotchman, as I tould ye." How do you know?" Faith I've h eerd him talk in' to hims e lf in his room, and I heerd him singing a Scotch tune one mornin', and besid e s that he i s in disguise, for I've seen him wi1... hi s wig off so I have, and h e may be a scamp and a forger, but he is no German." The dete ctive uttered a peculiar exclamation, and said: "You are sure?" "Av coorse I am sure." I'm much obligell." The detective started to go away when the g irl called : Ye h ave forgot, sir." "'\Yhat?" The five dollars There came a shadow to the aetective's face, and it crossed his mind that after all the girl was deceiving him, and had told the story for the money. I would give you the money, but I've no proof that your story is true " I d hev no rasin to tell ye a lie; no, s ir, what I told ye is true." You will solemnly swear it is true?" "I niver swear, but, on my honor, it is true, ivery word of it." ' And why did you not report the circumstances in the office?" "I did." "You did?" "Yes.'' To whom?" ''The night watchman." "You t old him just what you have told me?" "I did." Here is your money, my girl." The det ect ive paid the five dollars and pro ceeded down-stairs, and our h ero from above stairs muttered: "I am in good and had luck-in good luck in having l ea rned of my dan ger, but in bad luck in being thus hounded Hang the girl! She has t a ught me a lesson, howev er, and I will know how to act in th e future; but one thing is certain, that fellow mean s to capture me at all hazards." CHAPTER XXVI. THE detective went down-sta i rs and asked for the;, watchman, but l ea rned the man did not go on duty until night Bardie watched until be saw the officer go away, when he descended and stole out of the house Matters had assumed a very serious as pect, and he made up his mind to leave New York. H e came to the conclusion with a great deal of regret, but the circum s tances were suoh that no other alternative remained to him. Our hero spent the evening at the home of .M:rs. l\iaguire, and he announced the fact that i t was necessary for him to leav e New York. "Are you really determined to go?" asked Grace. "I am really determined to go, and now I've advice to give you. Do not write to a living soul; do not make any attempt to discover your unc le, but remain in seclusion for a year if necessary, and watch tile papers daily, and some day you may read good news." Will you explain?" "I will. I have had an interview with the detectives who are on your track. I have cer tainly diverted them from pursuit at present. 1 know the officers ar e here on another affair, and they will not waste any time searching for you at present, a nd if you just 'lay low where you are you will be all right "And why can not you do the same?" "My ca se is very different; I h ave a relent less enemy pursuing me, and the officers have got on my track; they have a greater incentive than the advertised reward. I know if I re mained I wou l d be discov e red, and before I'd wear a pri son garb and stand trial I'd kill my self No, I must go." There came a sad look lo the face of Grace, and in plaintive tones s he said: "lf you go away I will be alone and friend less in New York." Will ye?" excla i med Mrs. Maguire. Faitb, ye are very comp li mentary to me."

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18 "I do not mean, J\Irs. 1\Iaguire, just as it sounds, lmt yon ca n not advise me as my dear friend can adyise.'' "Well, h e has given ye advice to last you for a year.'' I have nothing to live for," muttered the g irl. You forget Charles," said our h ero. A blush mantled the girrs face. Yes," s h e sa id, that is true.,. Remember, J\Iiss Parrish," sa id our hero further, I a m fully satisfied yonr innocence will be established. and the day will come when you can return to England, and, to tell you the trnth, I do not believ e 1hc day is far removed. Will you act according to my advice?" I will; but we may me e t again some day." "It i s possible: but it will be many years from now, mo st likely. "Why so?" '' I am satisfied I will be hounded over the earth; I am satisfied I ill be traced from place to place." '' But your innocen ce will be established some day." '' IL may, and it may not; I can not tell. One thing is certain : I will have no re s t as long as my enemy live s unless-" The young man s1oppcd o h o rt. "Unless what?" asked th e fair girl. "I ean not tell you now." "wm you leav e me some remembrance of you-some mark which will se rve as an identi fication of each o t h e r s hould it so h appen that we do not m eet until afte r many years?" "You have a riug upon your finger." The g irl removed it in stant ly. It is the old, ol 1 l tric k," sa id Bardie: but we will adopt it," and bet1Yeen bis powerful finge r s he spl it the rin g in half. There," h e said; you take one, I will keep the other." I s hall never forget yon!" Thank you.' And so me clay I may wish to communicate with you." "Well?" "On the first clay of every year I will put my addr ess iu the 'Personal column of the New York Ileralcl. ' A good scheme,'' said Bardic. And how about your address?" "It may not be cnvenient for me to do so, but if circumstances permit it I will commnni Catc with you Little di1l either of these two realize at the moment what a r eal ly delightful reward was to be the outcome of the arrangements they were making at that m olllcnt, and n e ither realized the grand fortunes that awaited them both, n o r did one realize the wonderful ad ventures through which he was to pass, and one of the m 'ms to occur that very night. The conversa tion between them was pro longed. The fair girl did not seem to be willing for BarLlie to go away, and she looked so lovely and seeme d so loving the young man was not at all anxious to depart, and despite the fact that he had schooled his feelings, he could not })reveut the m en tal exclamation, "Hang that rascal, Charles!" At l e ngth I3ardie was compelled to depart, .and when he rose to go the fair girl said: I wiil sec you once again before yon leave Kew York?" "Yes, I will see you once again, if possible, but, r emem\Jcr, you a rc to obey my instructions whether we meet or not.'' "I will obey your in s t ructions to 1be l ette r." "I helieYC a fm1 months will see your innoestablished, and then-" "well'!" "You can return to EoglanYe owe rent; I liave not oue BONANZA BA.RDIE; OR, cent. I have no money to buy them bread. If the rent i s not paid to-morrow, or at least a part of it we will he turoecl into the st reet." What you tell me i s the truth, my good \VOtnan ?" "It is the trnth, sir, as sure as we two stand face to face, a nd as sure as some day we will stan d before the Judgment seat." Bardic drew from his pocket a roll of bills, saying: "Here, my good woman, take i t; you are welcome to it. The woman took the money, and Bardie walked away. H e had gone but a few squares when a voice called to him: Look out ; you are being tracked!" "Well, what do you want here?" "I want Bardie O 'Conor." "Yon do?" ''Yes." "You have come to the wroug pla ce for the man you name.'' "Yon deny your identity?" I deny nothing. Your impertinence does not entil l e you to a denial. " All r ight; but listen to me: I propose to arres t you .. " Arrest me?" ''Yes." What for?" "You know well enough; but you can tell me your story and I will consider it. " Oh, you are very !duel, but I have nothing to tell you." CHAPTER XXVII. Will you go with me quietly?" BAnDIE was taken aback, hut was perfectly "Go where?" cool as he g lanced around and saw the woman "To headquarters." whom he had just aided standing in a door"It is tough to be led out at midnight." way How she had got aronnd ahead of h i m "But you do not want to make a row?" he ditl not kno\\r, but he \vas q_uick, aud said: No.'' I will walk slow. l\Ianage to get ahead of "And you will go quietly?" me Keep wal king, and tell me what you mean, I will if you will give me any good reason so no one "ill know you are talking to me." why I should go." Our hero, while speaking, kept walking along, "You are accused of and his utterance was rapid. "I am?" A few moments later a woman crossed from "You are." an opposile co rn e r and passed on ahead of him, "Who is mv accuser?" and as she walked she managed to say: "You know well enough; it is no use for you "I started to follow you when I saw tbat to deny your identity. I have you down fine." some one else was on your track. I desired to "And you want me to go ith you?" thank you, but when I saw that some one else "Yes." was following I lai1l back and watched and As a prisoner?" made sure. It is possibly a thief who saw you "Yes. g ive me money, and wlio means to rob you. "See here, I will admit I am Barclie O'Conor. I ran around and got ahead of you to warn "You admit your identity?" you." "Yes. ,. "It is all right," said Barclie. "I am much "And you were the young German who obliged, but I ca n take care of myself. Now, talked with me at the New York hotel? you go on to your home and re l ieve your fam"\Vas I?" ily. You are welcome to what I have given "You were." you." Bardic laughed, and said: The woman kept on to the corner, and then Do I look like a German?" disappeared down a cross-street. "No; but you are a v ery smart man." Bardic knew well enough it was no thief. He And you want me to go with you?" made up his mind that a detective was on his "You must." track, and he determi ned to throw liim off if But I may fight." possible. The office r shewed hi s wcapo11, and said: The fugitive kept walking straight ahead for "Make one move and you are a dead man. I several squares, :incl tlicn be made a sudden will take you dead or alive." turn and caught sight of bis pursuer and so tlie This is hard on students." chase continued for fully half an hour, when "You're a student, ell?" Bardie con c l ucled he had thrown the man off Y cs." hi s track, and he started for h i s home, mutterI See here, I will give you a point. I do not desire to be ban.I on you. I do not think you I must get away at once, they are closing can b e returned to Irel and-not if you get a good in on me, and at any moment I may be arrest-l awyer; but l must clo my duty." eel." The young man reacherl his lodgings at I am an innocent m an." length, and wben in his room sat down to think "It is possible you are, but you must go with over the situation He did not disrobe and re-me a ll the same." tire, although it was very late. Probably lialf I will, on
PAGE 19

THE TREASURE OF THE ROCKIES, 19 "I can not give you any more chances than I have already. "You say there is a man here from Ireland?" '' l.es." What sort of a lookin g man?" The de tee ti ve
PAGE 20

20 "By all thnt's unfortunate," muttered Bardic, "I am greatly harassed! There are two of them, and th ey ha vc their eyes on me.'' Our hero did not move or betray any trepida tion; he even fixed his eyes several times direct l y on the officer, and he was as cool as a cucum lier when he saw the detective approaching him, and muttered: Well, well! Now the trial begins, but I am ready." CHAPTER XXX. B.rnmE had discerned correctly. The detect iv e approached him, and asked: What time does the train go?" The fugitive put his hand to his ear with the characteris tic look of helplessne ss of a deaf man, and asked in return: "What did you say?" "What time does the train go?" The old man rose and put hi s face close to the lips of the cletect i ve, and with his hand still to his ear, ancl repeated: "What did you say?" "What time does the train go?" '' Whiclt train?'' demanded the pretended old m a n. The train we take." "What train do you take?" "The twelve o'cloek train," ca m e the answer. That i s the train I take," said the old man. "Where do you go'I" "Eh?" "l'Vhere do you go?" "Albany." Do you live there?" "No." Where do you Jive?" "Albany." The last answer was a cunnin g one. It was really an indication of genuine deafness, and a very characterititic one The pretended old man harl just answered he did not live in A lb any, and when asked where he did Jive, answered, "Albany." "You Jim in Albany?" "No." "Where do you live?" came the quest ion." "Eh?" \
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THE TREA-8URE OF THE ROOKIES. 2 1 ing in di sguis e, l>ut one tbing I know; whoever you arc you will lie glad you aided me to escape when you hear my narrative.'' The conversation l>etwcen the two men had pas sed rnpi otb were eating, and tin ally our h e ro s aid: I urn \\'ith Y O U I will take the chance." "You will ne,er regret it. And now I will re turn to the station. You come a few moments later, and do not notice me or speak to me until we are seated s ide by sid e in the train; and then let m e op e n th e c omersalion, and I can trust you to play your part well. But remember, you must stick to th e d e afness a s a good dodge." "All ri ght; an d you will plea s e remember all I have s aid." I \\'ill." The stran ger returned to the depot, and looked a s demure as could be, and a moment after his return one of the detectives approached him. "You were talking to the old man over in the re staurant?" "I wa s tryin g to talk to him." Tning t o talk to him? "Yes, liut h e i s so deaf. I do not see how he gets I think it is dangerous for him to trave l alone. The dete c tive walked away, and to the cleri cal-lo o kin g man two fa c ts were established on top of the confe s sion he had made to our h e ro. He had not be e n recognized, was not under suspicion, and the pretended d eaf man was still under suspi c ion, and the forme r fact explained why the detcetives had not entered the restau rant. Having no suspicion of the preten r led clergyman, hoped to get what information they need e d from him, as lrnd they been seen in the s aloon th e deaf man, if really a crimin al, would have b een on his guard. A few moment s passed, and our hero entered the saloon, and in a moment he discovered that the information of the stranger wa.s correct in one partic ular; th e detectives were indeed still watc bin g him, noel not quite satisfied as to his real irle utity, and while our hero was revolving the matt e r in his mind the door was opened for passengers to go aboard the train. CHAPTER XXXIL TnE cl e ri cal gentleman made a rush for the train; our hero moved more slowly, l>ut in time got aboard. Ile sa\'> that he ,,as being follo1\ed and watc hed and licgan to realize that if the cleri cal g entleman was not up to a trick that it might prove, after all, a lncky meeting. Bardic moved ou until he came to where the s tranger was seated, "hen he asked if he" conlcl occupy part of th e scat. "Certainly,'' came the ansn er. "Eh?" cried Bardic putting hi.s hand to his ear. You can ;;it here if you want, my friend came the au s wcr, spoken in a tone loud enough to be overheard by every one in the car. Thank you," said Bardic, and he look the seat, and ob eeu too smart for me." '' :F'or you ? '' ''Yes.'' It may be me." "No; but yon need not fear. Remember, even if I am doomed I will not give you away." "What makes yon think there is trouble ? " I caught a glance of that fellow's eye as Le touched bis pa rd on the shoulder." You think they are on to you?" I fear they are." All the passengers around were asleep, or try in$' to, and little attention was paid to what neighbors might be doing, and the two fugitives were enabled to talk without l>eing observed. "What will you do?" demanded Bardic. "I do not know." There are but two of them" said our hero. "Two; one too many for me." ''But I am with you for lJetter or worse.'' "You arc?" ''Tes." "You can do nothing." "But ire can." "No." "Why not?" I will not fight ; I will not harm them. They are doing their duty." "We need not harm them, but we can save ourselves." "You are safe now." "Am I ? "Yes." You are the same." "I an1 ?" "Well, you shall be as safe as am I before I l eave yo u." 'No, leave me to my fate." We shall see. llleantime the two officers had goae to a rear car, and the one ,,-ho had summoned his com panion sa id : We have been barking up the wrong tree. " Eb? On the wrong lay ?" "Yes." And we can not leave the train until we r each Poughkeepsie." That's all right." I do not understand." Our man is on the train." Our man i s on the train?" Yes; but he is not the old deaf man." "Where is our man?" "The fellow in the same seat with the deaf man.'' "Get out!" '' It's true.'' "That is a c lergyman." "Is it?" "Surely." "We have been well fooled, but we're all right now; that man is Tom Gadding." "Nonsease1 "It's true." "Impossible!" \Vhat makes you think so?" '' Tom Gaddiag could never assume that role.,, "You think so?" "l-es." You arc mistaken. I've jus t got all the points. I tell you that is our man and we are in lnck after all." "You a r e sure?" "l-es." But where did you get your clew?" "I had jus t a slight susp i cion : I saw tho s e two go into the restaurant together, and I jus t m ade up my mind to have my eye on them." Yon did not say anythin g to me." "No, I had a point' there." "And are you sure you are right?" I am dead sure. "How about the old fellow?" "He's a pa11 I reckon; bnt don't you notice how nice they rnn together? I'm an old hand, Andy, at this bu s ine ss. I tell you we ve got our man." But the oth e r fellow?" "He's on l y a convoy, that's my idea, a 'cov-er for the other one." Will you nip them both?" ''No; one is all we want.'' "How will you do it?" "We must think it out. \Ve may have to kill him." He is a bad one, eh?" I just thought I'd talk the matter over. That fellow is a dead shot, and possilily armed to the teeth under his clerica l dre s s. If he makes fight one of us goes down unle s s we get on to him so quick he can't 'pull.' " Will you take him in the train?" "No; that will not do, we will not have room, hut I only wish we had 'got on to him' before we left York." We stop at Poughkcet)sie?" ... Yes." "\Vcll, what' s your game?" "\Ve will have to chance i t there, and it's my idea one of us three is a doomed man." CHAP'fER XXXIII. A the two detectives stud i ed each other's face, and possibly the thought was rnn ning through their minds which of them would be the doomed man in caRe the chances were reduced down to an average of two. You will do your work at Ponghkeepsie," said one of the officers. That's my idea." You antic i pate he will leave the train?" "Yes." Why not wait our chance and shoot him down like a a clog while in the act of leaping from the train'/ Why should we take any chances?" No, we can not do that; ia the first place there is a possibility that we are mistaken, and then again we might not be jnstified. You know there will be a hundred witnesses, and they would swear we did not make an attempt to arre s t him, and sympathy always goes with the dead, but know, even a de a d crimin a l and still further, our warrant calls for an arrest, not a murder." "I should a l ways feel I was a murderer if we were to sh0ot that man down in cold blood without having made an attempt to arrest him.'' What is your scheme?" I have thought over several plans .'' Ami have you deci L lcd ?" '' I have a suggestion to make.'' "Go it." "One of us will jump in on him, and the other will stand by with a cocked revolver, aud if he makes fight then shoot, and he will be the d o omed man. " A good scheme." You like that idea for a plan?" "I do." Who will pounce on him?" I rill." And I will stand by with the cocked weapon." Hold on; that won t do." "Well?" "You pounce on him. You may have s c rn ples as to shooting, and may make up your mind when too l ate.'' ''And fear you may fire too soon. " You uccd not fear." '' You will hold your temper ? "I will." All right, then; that is our plan." while the two deteetives were talking Bardic and the clerical looking gentleman sat with ap pre h ens i ve express i ons upon their faces; hut as the time passed, and the detectives did not re tu ru, our hero said: I reckon we were mistaken." How?" They have not marked us." "Don't you run away with that id ea." \Vhy do they not come and attempt an ar rest?" They are arranging their plans. They will not attempt it until we reach Poughkeepsie. They think I will leave the car.'' L et's do i t said Bardie. \Vhy, man, we are running at the rate of

PAGE 22

22 forty.five miles an hour. It wonk! be certain death to leap." "I don't m ean that; we will not l eao, but how long IJefore we rea c h Poughkeepsie ?;, "We ought to be th.ere in alJout thirty minutes." I have an idea. " \\-ell?" You arc a quick man?' "Yes." Go forward to the other car." 'Well?" I will follow you." "B,11J.! They will have us dead sure then." "Not if we can get in the baggage car." \Vhat do you mean?" .. We will make a change; I will take yoLu disguise, you cau take mine." "A good sc heme, if it were practical, but we can not work it, we have not time. It woukl have been all ri;ht if we had worked the game before we left New York." \Ve can work H afterward." "No; I am a doomed man. They arc dead on my track; th ere is no hope for me now. But you take <:are of yourself; I believe you are a good man and I d o not desire to run you inthc same danger as myself." "See h ere my friend; I like you. I have not known you Jong, but I h ave no friends in tl1is country, and I've l)eeu in tight places be fo re. I'll staoLl by you. Now, remember, keep cool, no matter what happens, and I'm your man, and I am \\ith you clean througll. '' I do not reli s h being taken." You sha ll oot be." "You will stand by me?" "To the death." 'Ko, no: we must not come to death deals. I have no blood on my hands now; I never will luwe I can s ni!e r; I can not kill-that i s, with out sufficient provocatiou. As I said thcs c men arc doing th eir duty; I will not harm them." "But you arc willing to escape ?" Then leave the affair to me." All ri ght; I will trust to chance." How did you di sc over their plan?" asked Bardie. They expect I \Vill leave the trnin for refres hm ents at Poughkeepsie." 'And then they will pounce on you?" ,. Yes." "All ri ght, let them pounce; \\"C will be ready for them." Remember, no harm must come to them." That's all right." The train thundered on, and at l ength the shr ill signal whi s tle for a sta ti o n and a stop 5oundcd. The detectives had not re appea red in th e car. Herc i s Poughkeepsie," said the stran ge r. "All ri gb.t Do not mind me. You get o!I the car and go for refre sh ment s, and leave the r est to me If these men do not come near you do not attempt to board tile train again, and after it starts I will be at hand. You just lay arouml and look out for me l fear you mean rr..ischief." "Do you?" "Yes.'' You need not; I am not a murderer." But you may thiak yourself justified." "You need not fear; you do not know me; I have a way for getting men off my tra ck with out killing them." Tell me what you mean to do?" I can in a few \\ords." Do so." I mean to save you from arrest, that's all." "How?" "Oh, yon will see when it is clone. " Yon will force a fight." "Will I ?" "Yes ; you do not know these men; they are old hands, veterans and wllen tb.ey start in they mean business." You know them?" "I do." "That's all ri g ht. I do not care if they are veterans, as you call them; they shall not cap ture you." I haYc your promise there shall be no blood shed at a ll hazards." BON ANZ..1:1. BARD IE; OR, CHAPTER XXXIV. BARIJI E was cool as a cucumber, and that was one of hi s good traits; and it is an excellent and useful characteristic in an emergency. Coolness enables a man to do more at a critical moment th a n any other human attribute. The clerical gentleman rose aud left the car, and a few seconds later our hero left the car. Ile saw the two ofticers. Re was watching for the m. He saw them glide after the clerical looking gentleman, and he saw one of them touch him upon the slloulder. Can I speak to you a moment, sir?" sa id the detective. Onr hero 's late com panion was perfectly cool, as h e repeated : Speak to me?" "Yes.'' '' IV hat do you desire to sa:v to me?'' "You were talking to the deaf man in the car?" 1 I 'vas." Will you step this way. I wish to ask you a few questions?" The clerical gentl e man considered a moment. He saw the game. They desired to get him away from the crowd, and under all the circum slauces he favored the plan hims e lf. If he was to be arrested it was l.Jetler, and if there was to be a c hance for escape it was still bet.ter; but h e did oot acquiesce at once, but said: I do not see why you should question me about that man." "You know him?" "Yes." I wish to ask you some questions." Do so here." I have a reason why I desire you to step beyond the crowd." And I will lose my supper." I will detain you but a moment." The clerical mau steppe d along with the de tective. They walked do1Vn the long platform to the end of tlJC building, and stepped across the track behind a lot of freight-cars. It was a v ery singular proce eding, but, as it clrnucerl, bolll men were agreed as to the plan, although from dilleren t motives. The moment tlley were behind the freight cars tb.e detective s udrlenly grasped hold of tb.e clerica l gentleman by both wrists, and ex cla imed: "Tom Griddiug you are my prisoner!" At the s ame iu sta nt Detective Number two leaped forwarLl, as though appraring from the g ronnd, and he exclaimed, as he aimed a cocked r evolver at the man's head: "Show fight, and you are a rlead man." The words had h ardly left the lip s of Detective Number two when he went sprawling, and as he fell the pistol was kicked from his grasp, and at tile same instant the clerical gentleman broke loo se from his captor, and dealt him a blow that downed him. The wllole episode occurred in a few seconds. Cover your man," said Bardie, and if he speaks s ilence him." Our hero l eaped upon his man, and quick as thought went tllrough his clothes and found a pair of handcuffs, w hich he clapped upon tile man's wists, and, taking the hint, Tom Gadding a l so found a pair of handcuffs and c lapped them on the wri s ts of his man, when suddenly there came a shout, and half a dozen men came rushing to the scene of action. Ah, you villains, we've got you this time," sa id Bardic. Strong men crowded around and asked ques tions and Bardie sail!: "We are a couple of detectives; we've been shadowing these men and we've go t 'em." The two detectives protested, and announced tllemselves as the detectives, but tb.eir protes tations were received with laughs of derision. As the srtyi ng goes, our hero had the bulge oo them-they were handcuffe d, and tile condi tions favored the fugith-es. The two det ectives protested vigorously and Bardic, who h ad rec ove r ed his heariag in a most r e markal.Jle manner, said: That's it, my beauties, protest, but you will have a better c hance when we get you back to York." :Ko." The signal whi stle sounded, the train was I will accept your word." about to start, and the traiu-men and passen, That i s a ll right." gcrs hurried away on. The t rain began to slow up, and soon came to Barrlie said: a halt before the flashing lights of the Pough" Tom, we'll l ead the rascals down the road keepsic sta ti o n, and our hero sa id: a bit amt take them up to the hotel till morn.. Now is your time." in g I reckon we've got 'em good enough." The two dete ct ives sought to protest ao d r e sis,t: when Bartlie wllispercd: If you fellows make any troql.Jle we 'll silence you, do you mind?" The two m en w ere compelled to walk along, and two or.three idle men attempted to follow, when Bardic ordered them back; and, when th e m e n refused to obey the order, he dre w a weapon-the pistol h e had captur ed from the d e t ective-and tile men scattered. The two fugitives hurrie d their m en do,vn the track, and came to a pluce where a lot of boats were moored. Bardie led the way down to the river. One of the boat s had the oars in it, and tile two dctccthcs \\ere tos s ed into th e boat. Our h ero, as our readers kn ow, was a splendid oarsman, and he rlrorn the bortt for ward just a s a man came running down to th e river-bank, shoutiag. Is this your boat called Bardic. Yes; bring it back. "IV"e will in about half a u hour. 'Ye do not want your old boat, and w e will pay you well for the u se of it. "Briug l.Jack my boat!" "Yes, in half an hour," ca lled Bardie, and he pulled more vigorously. What are you rnsc als going to do?" de manded one of the clctccth es. See how you fellows can S\\ im with yonr hands tied," said Bardic, in '.I cold, r e lcntlcs::; tone. "You m ea n to murder us in cold blood. "No; in cold wat e r my friend. "WhaCs that?" suddenly demande d Gad cliag. Tb.e llight was very dark, and the f'Jllash of oars wn s b ea rd "It's the fellow coming after boar. L e t him come; we ll drown him with these other fellows.'' Tb.e l\rn detectives mt side by s ide like a pair of s tatue s east in bru nze A ruoment later and the man in the boat came along after th em, and Bardie cu1seLl ro\Ying and waited for the man to c o me aloogsiLle "'ell, what do yon wautf' "My boat." "And you want ns to get out of it'(' "I waut you to pull back ashore." "And suppos e we refu se" "I will hav e you arrested." YOU WiJI ?" I will, by thunder!" "All right, sonny; call a policeman. Even the detectives were compelled to laugh. '' See here, my friend, you keep boats t0< hire?" "I do." Consider this one hired." "Tb.at won't do. " Pull up here, and I will pay the money. "No; you fellows are lhierns." "You're right, my man," sa id the dctc ctirn. "You pull back ashore and give tb.e alarm. CHAPTER XXXV. "You can't play that on me, said the man; I'm no countryman." lt was Bardie's turn to lau g h am! he did so right heartily. "Come" cried the man; "will you g h e m e my boat 1'' "And do you expect us to walk ashore 1" "No.'1 What will we do ? "Give me my boat." See here, Mi s ter :\fan, you annoy me." "You fellows turn round \Yith that boat ancl pull ba c k to where you came from." There came a sudde n report, aocl a l.Jullet whistled over the boat owner's h ead. The man utte red a shriek, and commenced to pull away like mad, and r esu min g his oars, Bar die pulled toward the oppo s ite s hore, and in due lime he arrived, aarl the two detecti,es were as sisted out of the boat. "Now, my friends," said Bartlie, you are in luck." Who arc you?" asked one of th e detect ive s." I'm a stranger, eh? 11 l'"es." Well, I prefe r to r ema in one. "We will get you so me day; l.Jut I \rill tell you this much, we arc not after you." "Oh, thank yo11!" "And as to Tom Gadding, \\e'll get him some day, and then we wut make him pav for this job. "You fellows are not

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THE TREASURE OF THE ROOKIES. 23 to be. You ought to admire the manner in w!Jich it was doue." We do admire the manner in which it was done-it was well clone; but we'll do our act yet.., Oh, you fellows arc tragedians, I sec; you do the heavy act. \Veil, we are only come dians. \Ye do the farce, you know; aud now you fellows can walk the track to Sing Sing; am! c ross over quick or the countrymen may take you for run a ways." Take these things off, you fellows; will you?" Why should we? They belong to you," said Bardie; and he added: "Now, gentlemen, goodmorning; will soon appear; llut rcmcmller, if you ana I ever n1cct again it will go harder witll you than it has this tim e; good night, sweetheart, good-night." Bardie pulled away from the shore, and headed llis boat up st ream. \\That will you do?" asked Gadding. What will I do?" ''Yes.'' "I will pull up s tr ea m a mile or two and land." Ou this side?" '' l ..... es." "\Yhy?'' "\Veil, those fellows will think we have gone back to the other side." "I reckon you have it right. We have lost our baggage," said Gadding. "Not wuch," sa id Bardie. I have mine here." Ollr hero had ingeniollsly stored all his really valuable baggage abollt bis person, and as be pulled along h e said: "I've a change of clothing for both of us That's lucky." Indeed it i s, for within an hour after day :igh t there will b e telegrams all over the state." "And what will we do'/ We will be hunted 2ike "Will we?" "You just l eave that matter to me, ou one condition. I must know all about you, and if I am sat i stied with your sto ry, you can stick to me, and 1 ill stick to you, and we can defy all the detectives in the laud. Dardic pulled allout three miles up the river an t l then said: W c will land h e re. He ran the boat ashore and both men alight ed. Dardie l ooked at his watch, and sa id: "It is within an hour and a half of dayligbt; >rn can get over a good deal of ground." Whic h way will you go?" '' Do you know the country around here?" "Yes I do I know eve ry foot of it" Cau' we over to the mountains?" "'Ve cau . How long a tramp is it?" l::ieveu or eight hours. " Suppose we find a nook under the river llank here where we can rest until to-morrow night. I do not think it safe to move at present." Tile two fugitives wandered along the bank until the y came to an overhanging clill', and crawling up its face, they found a natural cave, and into the latter they crawled, and under all the circumstances they were very fort.uuate, as a rain set in, and in a few moments they wou l d have b een drenched to the skin. It was lat e in the fall of the year when the in cidents we have narrated occllrred There had been a warm but the rain was a break i n the weather and an intimation of a colder sea oo. It w as a shallow cave, a mere indentation in the face of the rock practically, bllt a she! ving ledge w e ll s hield ed them from the rain as it be:tt at the time, aml they were all right. The two m e n were pretty well tired out, and they st retched them se lves on so me leaves and ri l'er drift that they hall gathered, and were soo n fast asleep. It was well into the day when they awoke, and a cold, drizzling, disagreeable day it was, and yet they were comparatively romfortable, as they were sheltered from the wind and were l.Joth warmly clad. This is comfort," said Gadding. \Veil, yes; a sort of comfort," answered Bardie. 1t is comfort, b eca use for the time being it is safety and freedom," said Gaddin!!'. "You arc right there," confirmed Bardic I tell you it is hard to be hllnted and hollndcd, and to know no peace or security," continued Gadding . It is corroborated," said Bardie. "Then you are a fugitive ?" "lam." And for how long a time have you been a fugitive?" Long enough to get u sed to it," sa id Bar die ; adding decisively, how e\c r: but I am not used to it, and 1 never will be." "Nor am I." "How loiig have you lJeen a fugitive?" asked Bardie. About all my life, I may say." There came a shadow to Ollr hero's face. Ile had hoped his new companion was an innocent man, but his confession intimated the contrary. I mllst hear your sto r y," said our hero. "You shall hear my story; you are a good fellow, and you h ave done me a good se rvi ce; but I can not stand it much longer; I will be taken some day." "You will be taken so me day, ch? "Yes." "Well, that depends; and you say I have done you a good service?" "Yes ." I may do you a greater service yet before we separate; but lJetween you and me, my friend, I am hnngry." Bardi e smiled as he s poke the words. CH APTER X:XXVI. Trrn '.\w my parentage until I was a man grown." Will yoa tell me your s tory?" Bardic proceeded nnd told his storr, and when h e lmd concluclcd Gadding r esumed hi s own narrative, and sa id: From th c nursery I was placed in an orphan asylum, and there I r ece ived pretty fair tea c h ing, bllt at the age of thirteen I was wrongfully accu s ed of c rime The proofs w ere all against me; I protested my inno ce nce, but wa s sent to a reformatory, as the c rime of which I had lJeen accused was a very seriou s 0ne. '' "And you were innot:cnt?" I was as innocent of that crime as you are toclay. Anoth e r lad comm itted the crime and accused me. ' "Did yon never get square with him?" Alas! hi s own s in found him out. Ile died upon the gallows when lJut twenty-thrt:e, poor fellow." "And you sent to a reformatory?" I was, and very badly treated; and, \ratch ing a chance, I ran away, and start ed out in th e world, resolved to be au hone st man and make an honest living. I wand e r ed around the country for a co uple of years, and then secu red, by a c h a n ce, a position in a country sto re But, alas! my llad luck followed me. The s tore was robbed; I was accused of the rollb er.r. and ar. rested. I again protested my inno cence; but they secu r ed my previous record and ou that and the evidence I was convicted and sen t to jail under a sentence for five years I remained one yea r in th e jail, and escaped. Then I went west and in good time got anot h er position on a railroad. Again my lJad luck followed me. The express car was rolJbed one ni ght, and after liome weeks I was arrested as one of the rob bers, and every effor t was made t<> induce me to name my confederates " How did it come about that you were ar rested ?" "Ah! my prcvions r eco rd. Yes. s ir ; a de tecti1e was put upon the case, and h e started out to study up the re co rds of the men on the road, and h e soon mana ged tu find Ollt that I wa s au escaped convict; and my r cconl was my doom, for on that alone I was convicted and sent to jail once more .'' 'And up to that time you had lived au honest life?'' I bad." w e ll, you were in had luck." "Yes, I was wrongfully convicted; indeed, I barely escapee! beiag Jyncherl, as the expr ess m esse n ge r at the time of the robbery was lJadly wounded; indeed for a loug time it was thought be would not recover." And you were sent to jail again?" I was, and I managed to escape once more; but I had a worse reco r d than ever, and I was still au honest man, and I was determined to re ma i n honest. I came cast and went to Penn sylvania, and secured work unde r an assumed name as a common coal miner. I worked bard; but again my bad luck followed me. There was a strike and a riot, and houses were burned and much property de s troyed. I took no band in the affair. I was in court as a spectator at the time of th e trial of several m e n who had been arrested on sus picion, and again I was re cognized by a detective, and at once I was ar re s ted, and soo n it was made to appear that I was a de s perate character, and at the bottom of all the mi sc hief. At any rate, they had a good chance to get rid of me, and I was returned to fini s h a sentence of ten yea rs for the express robbery.'' And you were still an hone st man?" "As I live, I wa s an honest man: but ill luck attended me, and in the end I bccnme desper ate." CHAPTER XXXVII. "I cA_,_..,never approve of a man'!! becoming a criminal under any circumstances," sa id Bardie; but J "ill say it i s not strange that you were forced to the committa l of crime." "l did not voluntarily commit c rime. When I was returned to the jail they treated me with

PAGE 24

24 ___ BONANZA. BARD IE; OR, the utmost harshness because of my former es cape: indeed, mf\ny times I was tempted to take my O\Yn life, lJut, woulLl you lJelieve it? con scientious scrn:':es alone prevented me. I have a lways lJccn a lJeliever in God and future punisliments and rewards, and I diLl not dare take my 01Yn life; lJutI made up my mind to attempt my escape once more, anrl in good time 1 suc ceeded, but I was fired upon an LI wounded, and still 1 kept on anLl reacbeLl the woods, and there I found a horse, and on this I mounted. The horse \Yas saclLll ed a nd l.Jritllcd and the taking of him was my first crime. \\'ouncled as I was, I ro t le for sixteen l1011rs, ancl then from sheer cxlmustion was compelled to dismount and let the h or se go. lt was nl'a r morning, and I strng glcd on to where I saw a light gleaming from a hous'l \\ indow I crept to the the peo ple were moving alJout and I \\as admitted, and I told them I had lJeen hunting anJ. bad "ouncled myself with my own gun. I was taken in, and discovered that the house was occ-upieLl l.Jy a widow and her daughter." Did they suspect who you were?" '.'. L.et me tell yo_u all." 1 es, go ahead, said Barc11e. "The widow would have sent for a doctor, nearly twenty miles lJut I begged her not to do so, and I lhrnk from that moment s h e suspected something wrong, lJut she saicl no m o re about a doctor and trcHtcd me with every att ention alld kindness I remained in h e r houoe six weeks, and in the cnrl fully recov ered, aud when I was alJout able to go away she came to my room one day and said: You arc now fully rec ove red?' I said: I am, thanks to your kind care.' '' I can harbor you no longe r,' she sa id and from her words I knew that she knew, or at lea s t suspected, my identity, alld a moment lat e r she confirmed my suspicion with the remark: "'I do not know as I did ri g ht. You came t o my house a follow-mortal, wounded, in sore distress, and I gave you shelter, and 1 have clone all that 1 can to r estore you to life. I trus t you "ill receive 'vhat has befallen you as a warning am! will sin no more.' 1 said: n!adamc, you think I am a crim illal ?' maoy, m ally miles I crossed with her one state after another, coming eastward, and I traveled to New England." "How did you live by the way?" I begged for what we eat, and we slept where we coul d, anti every night I \\'atched over the child, anrl when we arrived in Jew England I took her to a hous e to board. I said she was my sister, that I "'as a mechanic out of work, and tlrnt as soon as I got work I would co m e for her, and that I would pay good board." what pros pect had you for work?" "Ah I had broken up at la st. I resolved to do for the child of my benefactor that whic h I had nc\er done for myself I determined to b ec ome a crimin a l anti stea l, and I did rob a farm-house. 1 secured one hundred dollars in cash. " You were a thief at last." "Yes; I was a criminal at lflst; but, mark you, I took clown the name of my victim and the exact amount of 1Yhic h I had robbed him." '" Why did you keep the record?" "I have kept the rccordof every crime I have comm i lted." That is strange. " I know the names of every one of my v ic titns. 1 have their addresses and the elate of the robbery, and the amount of which I robbed them." \Vbat was your purpose in keeping the record?" "I always indulged a hope that some day I would be able lo refund all that I had stolen; and now I've a strange statement to make: I have repaid every victim, and I have one cred itor for the ho le amount, and what i s more, I never used one dollar of all my robberies for my own personal benefit." '' That is indeed a strange stalemen t. '' "It is; and I have some s till stranger revela tions to make. Ye;:, my life has been a strange one I can claim I am an odd criminal." "You are; but proceed with your weird story." CHAPTER XXXVIIL "'Yes; I know who you are. You arc Tom CoNTINUI!\G his narratile Gaddin& said: Gadding, tllc wicked man of many crimes; hut "First let me explain bow it is 1 have but cnu for you there i s forgilcness and mercy. one victim." Your life has lJceu spar ed and I trust you "ill Yes do so make a \Jetter me of your opportullilics. "I !Jank of five thousand dollars, "Then I told her my story." and with that amount I repaid every one of my "Did she believe your strange tale?" other victims, and I ha1 e l etters from some of "Yes, she di1l believe my story; for from the them, offering to return the stolen money to me moment 1 told her s h e treated me in a decidedagain." Jy difierent manner. I went away." did you refuse it?" '' Allll have you ever seen her since?" "I did." "Ko." "You say you expect some day to settle with "How long ago did this occur?" your last victim?" "About nil1c )cars ago. I told you she had a There \\as a time "hen 1 hoped to do so, daughter. The girl, at the time I was taken in but now 1 am hope l ess I shall be taken some at the house, was al.Jout nine years of age. One clfly, and my career will end. I shall die in year later the witlow died. Her death was the jail." result of an accident, and her claugl1ter was left "See h ere, my friend; you will do no such helpless in the world. 1 went in the neighborthing." hood in tlisguisc lo learn about them, and l ea rn-"Do you call m e your friend?" eel, as 1 have said, that the widow was deatl, "Yes, I do-on the strength of your story, and I learned further that there was a mortgage I which 1 believe to he true." on the farm, and after h e r death the O\rner of "The talc I have told you is the truth-noth-the mortg:igc fo1eclo sc d am! se iz ed the property, iug but the truth." J ea,illg the cl:tughtcr a beggar. I learned that "And it is a very remarkable story. And the child had been adopted by a farmer, and I were you ever arrested again?" determinctl to go and see her sec retly. when I "Yes, and again I esca ped from prison, a!.ld .approac h ed the h o u se I heard cries and screams, these escapes gained for m e a reputation for am! rushing to the window, beheld the man being the most desperate burglar on the face of lJeating the orphan in the most brutal manner. the earth. _[ rnshed in aml knocked the brute down, and I s your real name Gadding?" seizinothe g irl in my arms ran out with her. "I have no real name." \Ye to the "oods, am! the ch ild told "But v:as that the name under which you me h ow brutally she had lJeen treated, and I were registcrccl in the asylum?" said to her: "Yes." '1 owe my life to you and your mothr; r. I "But it is not your real name?" will take ca re of you, I will become your broth"I am at liberty to adopt any name I choose, er, and see tlutt no harm comes to you. for I a m nameless." "It was but a fair return on your part," sa id "And you have never heard anything to inBarclie. dicate your parentage?" "Yes; bnt 1 had really promised more than I The rolJher for a moment was silent. could perform. I said I would take care of her, "Why do you not answer me?" but I w as a houmlcd fellow, homeless and pen"You would laugh -were I to relate a very niless." singular experi e nce." "But you hail not committed any crime. "No, I would not lau gh." "Up to that time 1 had committed no crime "I think I have see n my mother?" save the stea lin g of a horse, and I learned that "You think you have see n your mother?'' the owner evcotually r ecoverell him, and I a m "Yes." only responsible in that affair for the cost I put "Under what circumstances?" him to in get.l in g back the animal." 'Ah, I dare not tell you." "\'Veil, that i s a fair way of lookin g at it; but "Yes, t e ll me ; do not fear." what diu you do?" "You will laugh?" "I started with the g irl and we walked "Ko, I will not." "I can not h elp it if you do, I.Jut I will tell you the truth; I have seen her in my dreams." Bardie did not laugh, lJut an involuntary look of incredulity did overspread hi;; face "Ah, l thought you would laugh." "I am not laughiug, I.Jul I do uot take much stock in dreams." "Nor I; and I do not really attach any supernatural importance to my own dreams; and I think I can account for them; lJut one thing I will say, they arc pleasant to me, and the angel of my dreams has exerted a great in!iucncc over me; indeed the only incentive to honor has come through this apparition of a dream." Tell me about your dream " When I was in the orphan asylum I heard some of the children who rememi.Jcrcd their parents tell about th e m, and I often wondered that I had no parent to recollect, and I asked one of our teachers or matrons one dtiy about it, and she being a kind, good soul, told me my parents were in H eaven Her statement made a g reat impress ion upon my mind, and al once my itm1gination became excited, and I pictured an angel as my mother, :in(! one night iu a dream there C'amc to me a beautiful woman, and in my s l eep I called her rnamma, aucl she called I.Jack to me 'lily child,' and s he seemed to lay her !Ja11CI on my lJrow, and she talked to me and told me to lJc a good boy, and some day I would come to h e r and lJe her angel son." Bardic 1vas deeply affected ; the story was, indeed, under all the circumstances, a very affecting one. "Have you seen your mother often in your drertms?'' "Often when I was a child, but only rarely s ince I have lJeen a man, and only once s in ce I became a criminal." And does this of your dreams always talk to yon'(' "'Not si n ce I really became a thief; no, she came just once, and then for an instant cast upon me a reproachful glance and disappeared." I think your dream can lJe accountPcl for on natural grounds, but it is a very i:trange inci dent all the same. " It is an incident that has exerted a great in fluence over me, and now I've a still more strange incident to relate; I have a photograph of the apparition." "You have a photograph of the apparition?" "!have. '' The apparition of your dream?" "Yes." Our hero felt a suspi cio n creeping through hi s mind. It came to him that after all he wa s talking to a maniac and li stening to the wild, w eird narrative of a disordered \Jrain. That seems strange to say, Gadding." "It does." And yet is ea ily explained." "I wish you would explain to me how you made a photograph of a fantasy of the lJrain." I will do so." '' Proceed.'' I dreamed often of seeing the apparition, and it was always the same face. and it made a deep impress ion upon my mind and memory; indeed, the features fixed themse lves as a tangi ble portrait on my remembrance, and one clay I had a pencil in my hand and I commenced to draw a face. I diseovered that I was a uat ural artist, and when I had completed the face I r ecognized that T had reproduced the face of the apparition of my dreams. Afterward, when in prison, I secured mate rials through the kind ness of the k eepe r, and carefully reproduced the face, and when I again escapetl from prison I took the ink drawing to one of those photo engravin g companies, and had th e face reprn duced, and it is a splendid picture." "This is a r emarkable story." "Ah! but 1 have a s till more remarkable sequel to r e late. About six weeks ago I pub lis hed the picture i n an illustrated paper, and a week later rece ivcLl a letter askingabout the original of the picture. I answered the Jetter, but never received an ans\\er in r eturn." And you are a natural artist?" "lam.: Why did you not seek to earn an honest living n s au artist?" I did do so, and I became an art student, but a l as! I was lloundcd from place to place. I never dared r eveal my real identity to those with whom I studied, and the d e t ec tives always got on my track, and I was compelled to liec." "vVhy did you not flee to Europe?" I never had the money." "You had the proceeds of your robberies?"

PAGE 25

THE TREAS URE OF THE RO UKIE:S. 25 I never used one cent of those robberies for my own benefit n ever." Anrl for whose benefit have you used them?" "Your question brings me back to the part of my narrative where I tell of my first crime." "Yes, and now t a k e up your story there and tell me in detail." CHAPTER XXXIX. I TOLD yon I stole a hundred dollars; well, I went ba<'k within a week to where I had left the little gi rl my c h a r ge." You ha,'e not told me the girl' s name?" Ile r name i s C l aire." "Iler l ast name?" I will tell you so m e other clay, not now. " 'Vhy n o t?" Well, at l east let me first finish my narrithe. '' All right." I r e tn med and paid one week's board for the littl e g irl and then went away. I sent mon ey for h e r board, and s h e rem ained with the people for three months; at the encl of that time I suc ceccled in ha,'ing a nice warclro!Je prepared for h e r. And I took her to a boarding-school, and the r e s h e h as r e mained ever since. S h e i s a you11g larly now, one of the most beautiful g irl s you eve r saw, and she i s well educated. She i s a tPa c h e r in the schoo l where she was educated. She i s now self.supporting, and since she has been t eac hi11g [ h a,e not taken a dollar that did not rightfully b e long t o me." '' How l ong h as s h e been t eac hing?'' "}""or over a year no,v." Do you ever sec h e r?" I have see n h er; yes, often at the sc hool. They think I am her brother-that I am an artist. They do not dream that the pretended Henr.v Armour i s the notorious c riminal, Tom Gadding.'' "Then the g irl's name i s Armour?" "Yes. I t ook her name so as to carry out the d ecep tion as to being her brother." \ncl do es the girl know who you really are?" Yes." D oes s h e know that you are really a crimiu a l ?'' "She does." Am! s h e respects you still?" She lov es me as though I re ally were h e r own brother.'' Does s h e know that you became a criminal solely on h e r account?" "No; I would not t e ll her that. On the con trary, I\c made her believe that every dollar spent for h e r education has been honestly ea.rued. ' And doe s s h e believe you?" I fear not; but s h e pretends to believe me." 'Vhat docs s h e r eally suspect?" I beJic e in my h ea r t that sbe really s11spects the absolute truth." Say, Tom, let m e be your friend?" You arc my friend." Then tell m e al 1." What s h a ll 1 t ell you?" You love this g irl?" A s a siste r." Bah! yon love her beyond that." "No no'' do." ' I will 11ot permit myself to do so. I am a crimina l.'' \Yell, te chnica ll y you are; morally you are not. You rs ha s l>een a bard lo t; but it s trikes m e that your g reat misfortune b as be e n in not having a fri en d "ith whom t o aclYisc. For what are you being so clo sely pursued now?" "The bank robbery. The officer s of that bank are cletcrminecl to run me clown, and I am sure they will succeed some day." "They never will old man." "They will. Y cs, I know t h ey will." "Tell me about this Cla ire Armour." i s supporting me now with the money she earns." And she loves you?" .As a brother, yes." "Bah! I see through this strange r omance, and now li ste n to me; I am your frie nd; e will pull together. I ha,e a scheme in my mind, and you shall become a partner with me." 'Vhat i s your sc heme?" " e are both fugitives." '\""es.'' "We are both well meaning men. I am inno. cent, and you prefer to l ead an honest life." '' I would be willing to die if permitted to Ii ve five years in peace. "You shall live very many years in peace barring the usual chances of human li{ e "No, no: thos e m e n are on my trac k. They will follow me up, and in the eud they will close in on me, and I will never again at tempt to escape from j a il. " You shall not go to jail, old man. I tell you I lrnvc a scheme." "Anrl what is your scheme?" We will go where there are no jails, judges, juries, or detectives." \Vh e re can we go t o escape them?" "To the far, far west. Yes we will go out and become prospe<:tors, and some day we will strike a mine, and we will both co,e r our iden tity. We will make a fortune, and you can settle with the bank and flee to Europe, and you can take Claire with you, and dwell in peace where no one will know of your pa s t career, and I can also manage to arrange with the wretcbes who are pursuing me." There came a cold smi l e over the face of Tom Gadding as h e said: "I've tried that; your sc h eme i s but a wilcl dream." "You have tri ed it, eh?" "Yes; I s pen t two years in the wilds, and if it had not b een for one thing I should have re mained there as a reclu se, but as true as I sit here I was trail e d even to tbe wiiclerness, and one clay in a ranch l was confronted with my own portrait in an illu strated pape r, anrl I was compe lled to flee. No, there i s no place on earth where I can hide from my pursuers." Bah, man! you a r e in a nervous condition. Diel the parties who confront.eel you with your portrait accuse you of being the man?" No, but tbey knew me a ll th e same." "They did?" "Yes.'' How do you know?" I know they did." "Bah! it wa s all your imagination; you came east again?'' "Yes, I believe I am safer here; there are m ore hiding-places. "Well, speakin g from a certain standpoint, you are right, but now, li sten: you have ac t ed unde r your own volition all th ese years, and you h ave passed from h a r d luck to harde r luck; would it n o t b e well to t a lrn the advice of another?" "What do you propose?" "I propose that you write to Miss C l a ire Armour, and tell her tha t she may not h ea r from you for a year or two; t e ll lier th a t you have found a good friend, and that some clay you will return a free man.'' "Have you really confidence in your scheme?" I have." And you propose that I should write?" "Ye s, and tell me, hav e the detectives got on to this Armour cover?" "No." "Then the r e is no risk iu writing the letter." I think not." You are home l ess and penniless?" "1 am.'' You h ave no sc h e m e of your own? You are prac ti ca lly but a hunted criminal?" "1 un1." Had you been alone las t night you would have !Jeen arres ted.'' "1 would h ave been, sorely." But as there were two of us we escaped?" ''Yes.'' Good; we will try it again together, and see what will come." CHAPTER XL. THE two men eat a good, hearty meal, and our hero produced pen, paper, and envelope, anrl Tom Gadding wrote the letter as clirccteLl, and Bard i e agreeLl to post it. After the l ette r was written 'I'om Gadding sa id: You a r e not well posted in this land?" "No, but I am a man without any nationality at present. I've beeu called a i\Ionte-Cristo. Well, it's a Monte-Cri s to I"ll be some Jay." 'Ve will be tracked before to-morrow ni g ht. These American detective s a r e li ke s leutbhouncl s." Are they?" "They are." well, they will not capture me nor you either, if you follow strictly my advice." "Upon your invitation I have ca s t in my lot with you." And you will never regret it." " T hat i s your scheme?" To go we s t Yes, way west. " But I mean your immed i ate scheme. ti rst gam e will be to throw those detec tive s off our track." You will not succeed unless we sepa rate." That will not be in accordance with my plan." lf we attempt to travel together we will b e overtaken." "Now let u s see. You are acqu ai nt e d with the trail s in those mountains over t o th e west ward?' I am." "My idea i s to go there and hide ourselves for a few weeks un1il the immediate excitement following l ast night's adventur e has settled clown and th e n we will make our way west. "Ah but we will not travel far. "We will travel all th e way. I've some thing to teach you, Tom; I'm quite a poteen artist, I am, and l will work a scheme that will plP.ase yo u and prove a winning game." "You really inspire me wit h co urage." I'll make a man of you, and now don't you forg e t ii, a nd I'll place you in a position from where you can defy a ll your enemies." One moment; I never hall liut one r ea l enemy. The men who are pursuing me look upon me as a de s perate criminal." W ell, you do take a fair view of the situat ion. "I do." "Wh o w as your r ea l enemy?" The lad who first accused me of crime, and to him I owe all m y misfortune. I owe all to a fal se rccorrl, a bad re cord, and it i s that re cord that has pursued me." But your career has its compensation." "l!ow?" "You have been the means of r escu in g a helpl ess orphan, and to h e r you have been a great ben r!factor." '' 'l' hat i s true '' Well, old man, look ahead n ow. I 've got big ide as in my h ead as concern s you and m y self a l so, and I believe all will come ri ght in the encl for both of us. we may h ave a hard tim e to get west, bnt we ll get there all th e same in spite of all the detectives in this broacl land, and we will be winners after we get the re. " You fill my h eart with hope and courage." "And tbat is what I want to do, anrl to nigl1t we make ou r start. But, I say, it \\as a nice game we worked on those detectives." "It was, but they will b e on our track. Yes, you ca n make up your mind that every farmer within t1Yenty miles around h e re i s on the look out for us. There i s a l arge r ewa rd offered for me, you know. I was engaged in but one bank r obbe r y, and I ca rried out the sc b eme all alone but they connect me with several other bank robbe ri es, and tbey believe if they catch m e th e y get the prin c ipal man." How large i s the reward offered for you? "Twenty. five thousand dollars in all." "well, there i s abou t the same amount o!Ier ecl for me. 1-V e would prove a fortune t<> a pair of detectives. "That is so, in case of our idcutification. " They will h ave to catch u s before t hey identify us." l 1hink they will." What h as become of your h ope and courage?" W c are playing against too great odds." \\"ell, now, you trust to me. I am only a po o r Paddy, a s they call u s in thi s land of yours, but I'll s h ow them hat Paddy can doand that's what' Paddy gave the drum!'" The two men r ested Ulltil nigbt. Toward evening the rain ceas e d, and it blew up c l ea r and f"Olcl. It wa s about nine o'clock wi1en Bardic said : Now, w e w ill make a start." The two men h ar l changed their appcarauce in a mo s t remarkable manner. On r h ero had assumed the role of a poor immigrant Dutch m r111, and Gadding was got up in similar style. Their other disg ui ses were pac kccl and bound in a parce l, and they is s ued from th e cave. They were compelled to descend to th e riYcr bank, and th ey walked a l ong until they came to a place wh ere they could climb up to the road, and along the latte r they proceed ed until they came to a place "here a li ght g leam e d, and Barclie said: "It's a German beer s hop. We will go in." No, no, that will not do," said Gadding.

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2G "Why not? a s k e d Barclie. "We will g iv e th e m a c l e w from the very start I've had lots of expe ri e n ce J e t m e t e ll you.'' W e ll it's to throw the m off tha t I go in h e r e D o you mind, it w ill b e kno wn tha t two m e n pass e d alon g h e r e If they do n ot know what so rt o f m e n the y were why w e will b e purs u e d; but if the y do know, our pursue rs will go iu a n other d ir ec ti o n. " The ri s k is too g reat; you h a d b ette r take m y a d vice. ' "And wh a t i s your advic e ? " 'Ve w ill k ee p on our way and dodge a ll houses and a void b e in g see n i f po ss ihl e " .Just t hi s o nce t a k e m y a d v i ce and the n we will act u po n my jndg m e n t un t il w e make o n e mis t ake, a f te r t hat w e w ill a c t upo n yo u rs "It may be t o o l a t e bnt d o as y o u c h oose." I 'll b ring y o u o u t a ll ri g h t D o not h ave a n y fea r fo r m e ; I gen e rall y know what I a m a b o ut. The t w o m e n b o ldl y entered the beer sa l oon, whic h was l oca t e d o n the outskirts of a s m all rive r v ill age, and findin g severa l Germa n s gath e r ed around Bardie sa id in mos t e x ce ll e n t Germa u : Good-eve nin g country m e n." Gaddin g w as snrprisecl a m o m e n t l a t e r t o hear our h e ro t alking Dutc h like a n a tiv e a nd li e co ul d sec fro m the a p proYin g n o d s o f the m e n th a t h e as di s pl ay in g a g r ea t kn o wl edge of l o c alit i e s and in dee d actin g the r u l e of a Germa n to the l etter. T he two m e n h a d se v e ral g l asses o f b ee r and Barcli e pnrc h ase d q ui te a good s t o r e of Dutc h food in t h e way of sa usage, r ye brea d and t h e like, aucl whe n the t w o m e n came out t o t a k e the roacl our h e ro a s k ed: W e ll wha t do you think of it n o w?" CIIAPTEH XLI. T m r GADDC "G expresse d hi s sati sfact1011. I r ec k o n w e a rc c ov e r e d a little," sai d B a rdi e Indee d ''" e a re, m y fri e n d. I d id n o t know you coulil s peak Ge rm a n so w e ll. " Ah. 1 c a n a n d seve ral oth e r l a n g u ages and m y gift w ill se r ve u s w e ll. " l t will." 'An d now, said B a r < li e w e wan t to p os t your letter. I've got the direc ti o n t o the post oflic c, a nd when w e h a v e dropped th e n o t e w e 'll m o v e 011 towar d the mounta in s a n d I r e c k o n we've a h i t o f fo od to la s t u s for a fe w clays 'If we m a k e for the m ounta in s of S ulli van Co unt y w e will find all the game we n eed," sa i d T o m G aclcling. A ll rig h t, th e Iris h n a m e of the county s uit s me,'' r espo nded our h e ro. 'Ve \Yill as k of our r ea d e r s p e rmi s s i o n to d i g r e ss ri g h t h e r e fo r a fe w p a ra grap h s, in o rder t o point o n t an importa n t fac t, one t h a t i t will be we ll to remem be r T o m Gad1lin g t old his remarkable story, and BONANZA BARDIE. showe d how it is pos s ible for an innocent man t o b e purs u e d as a criminal, and the whol e troulrle lay in hi s bad r ec ord. It was this r e cord that purs ued him, it w as this record that fir s t attrac t e d s u s pici o n t o w ard a nd each time l e d to hi s convi c ti o n and imprisonment. It i s a fa c t t h a t the r ecord of a n a ccuse d p er so n a lmost d aily d ec id es his fate in the courts. When the te s timony i s c o nflictin g the judge goes into the m aI.1 's pre vious r ecord: if tha t i s goo d the a ccuse d gets the benefit of it. If it i s bad it w e i g h s in the judge's mind in confirm in g hi s judg m ent as t o g uilt. In other words a good charact e r i s a b out the b est s afe guard a young m a n can thro w around himself. It i s a rare thin g for a p e r s on to r eceive a b a d r ecord throug h accident o r m a l e v o len ce ; but it i s a frequ ent thin g fo r young 11w1 to b e care l es s a b o u t their r ecord, and a b a d r ecord on ce a t t ac h e d to o ne's n a me it i s almos t impos sibl e to c l ea r i t off a nd as s t a t e d, the b es t safeguard a ga in s t poss ibl e fal se a cc u s ati o n s i s a goo d re co r d. The s w o rd that s t a b s unfair s u s pi c i o n i s a goo d pre viou s c h aracte r, and a ll young m e n a nrl wo m e n should b e ca reful throughout their wh o l e liv es to a v o id d o in g anything tha t will aflix t o the ir nam es a bad r ecord. H a r d i e a nd T o m Galldin"' fonnd the post otlk e and droppe d in the l a tt er's l e tt e r, and the u the t'>YO m c u s tarted for the m ountains By mi dnig ht t hey b a d co v e r ecl twelve mil es, a n d sa t down t o r es t a t a s m a ll country place w h e r e had bee n comme n ced a s t a tion for a n e w railr oa d t h a t w as b e in g built throug h tha t sec t i o n o f count r y, an d B a r d i e r e m arked: "I'd lik e t o crawl in h e r e and spend the nio-h t 9 But i t w on't d o," said Gadding. The \\'Ord s h a d h a rdl y left hi s m outh. wh e n the r e s h ot acro ss th e m a gl ea m o f lig ht. On the next in s t ant three m e n carry in g lanterns ap p roac h ed wha t a r e you fe llows doin g there? d e m a nd e d on e o f the m e n. B a r d i e undertoo k to ac t as s p o k es m a n, and he said: Y ot w os dot your piz z in ess? "'Ye ll yo u w ill expl a in who y o u are, or y o u will fin d o u t whet h e r it i s mv bus ines s or not. " I v os o xpl a i n n o dclin gs; h vo s not your pi z zin ess h o I vos." 'Veil, I r ec k o n I kno w who you are: your n a m e i s T o m Gaddin g, a nd tha t fe ll o w m a y be Barcli e O 'Conor. The man spo k e ""it h a flo uri s h a s thoug h h e exp ec t e d to see b oth men b etray co n s i de rable tre pida t i o n ; but in s tead b oth m e r e ly lau g h e d in a quie t m a nner. The tln e e m e n h e ld a fe w moments' consultati on, an d th en started away. It i s t ime for u s t o get," said Gadding ' It i s?'' 'Vhy so'!" Those fell o w s a r e goin g fo r a ss i s t a n ce: t h e y susp ec t u s, a n d it i s as I t old y on it w ould END O F FIRS T IlALF. be, we h a ve bee n advertised throughout twenty counties and w e're going to have a hot time " The n you propose that we run?" lr es." "And those f e llow s will the n c on clude tha t the y a r e ri g ht, and will g et upo n our trail." ''But we will get a few h ours' start." '' This i s a m a tt e r we must c on s id er.' I t e ll y o u the b es t thing for u s t o d o i s t o flit I " It will make it a chas e." "That i s jus t what I have anticipate d W e will b e taken." "You think s o?" I do." W ell, I'm no t the l a d to b e t a k e n 1 Jo,e m y free d o m t o o w e ll ; but I a m settled t o your opinion: w e h a d b ette r tlit. The two men s t arte d to m o v ed r .way, w hen Gadding whi spe r ed: H nllo o see the re!" 'Vlrnt i s it ? "They h a v e l e ft a fellow t o w a t c h us." "Is t h a t so?" "The re h e i s, b ehind that pile o f boards!" We will have to nab tha t fe ll o w!" s ai d B a rdi e W e will have to a c t qnickly." "The re i s a cree k clo wn the re. ' The s neak and the cree k will g o w e ll to gethe r o r rathe r the c r ee k will run fr ee r i ( the fell o w i s run into it. N o w w e will separat e; and b e t wee n o n e or the othe r of u s in the rlar k n ess can <'Om e upon that fe ll o w a n d we'll let him take a swim. Y es it's '>Ye ll t o go with the s witn n o w a d ays Gadding ca u g h t on to B arclie's hint, a n d th e two m e n se p a rat e d and at o n ce they saw th e fel l o w m a k e a move. Our h e ro w as a regular cat in his m o v e m ents, and in l ess than tw o minu t es h e w as o n t o the 'sneak" am! n ul.Jbed him. The m a n w ould h a v e m a d e a n outc r y. hut B a r die h a d h o ld of him by the throa t so q uickl 1 and with s u c h a firm g ra s p th e fellow w as u n abl e to utte r a s in g le sound Jus t as B arclie se i z e d the mau GaLhling ca m e up, and th e t\\ o li f t e d t h eir p ri so n e r fro m hi s fee t a n d rnn him toward a littl e hri clge t hat overhung the c r ee k. The man struggl ed bnt h e '>Yas h e lpl ess in t he hands o f his two p o w erful capto r s, a n d with a o n e two, three they l e t him swing aud over he w ent into the w a t e r with a s pl as h. "Now we'll flit,'" s ai d B a rdi c The two m e n s t a rt e d forward, but h a d gon e but a s h ort di s t a nce wh e n they h eard v o i ces, and the n ext m o m ent the re came a sound m ore s t a rtlin g a nd ominous. "The y r e o n t o u s said Gadding, and a pal l o r ovc r sprcacl his face. "Tha t w as t h e bay of a hound," said Bar die. 11 "'Yell. t hey a re o n our trac k?" "They a r e " L e t tll e m come," w as the q ui e t r e j o in de r Works by Emile Gaboriau Contained in the Seaside Library, Pocket Edition: N O 7 File No. 113. 12 O t h e r Peopl e s 20 'Yit h i n an Inc h of His Life 26 :Jl onsicur L ecoq Y o l. I. '.26 l\Io u s i c m L ecoq V o l. II. 3 8 The Cl i q u e o f Go l d 38 T h e Widow L c ro ugc "1:3 The o f Orc i va l 1 !-i Promis e s of :Marriage PRICE. 20 20 2 0 20 2 0 2 0 2 0 20 10 NO. 9 7 9 The Count's Secr et; o r A T errib l e Life P a r t J. 9 7 9 The Count's Sec r et; o r A T e rri b l e Life. P a r t IL 1 0 0 2 M a rri age at a Y e n turc 1015 A Tho u sa nd Frnncs R e ard 10 45 The 13t h Hussa r s 1078 The S l aves o f Paris. First h alf 1078 The S l aves o f P a ri s Seco n d h a l f 1 083 The Little O l d l\Ian o f the B a ti g n o ll es P R I CE 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 10 T he al.Jove w orks a r e fo r sa l e by a ll n ews d ea lers o r ""ill b e sent by m ail t o a n y address, p os tage pre p a id o n r eceipt o f th e price Address P. 0. Box 3751. GEOR G E l\luKRO, l\I mrno's Pcsu s urN G I-IousE 17 to 27 V ande w a t e r Stree t N e w Y ork

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'rHE SEASIDE LIBRARY-POCKET EDI'l'IOX. The Seaside Library---Pocket Edition. ALWAYS UNCHANGED AND UNABRIDGED. "'"V\Tith ::a:::andsor.ne Lithographed Paper Cover. Persons who wish to purchase the followin(J" works in a complete and unabridged form are cautioned to order and see that they get THE SEASIDE Lrn1tAHY, Pocket Edition, as works 0publ i shed in othe r libraries are freq uently abridged and incompl ete. Every number of TnE S1<:ASlDE LmRARY is unchanged and unabridged. Ncll'sdealers wishing catalogues of THE SEASIDE LIBRARY, Pocke t Edition bearing th e ir imprint, will be s upplied on sending their names, addresses, Rnd numbe r r equ ir ed. Tile work s in THE SEASIDE LIBRARY, Pocket Edition, are printed from l arger type and on better pap e r than any other series publi s hed. The following works a r e for sa l e by all newsdealers, or will be sent to any address, po stage free, on receipt of 12 cents for single numbers, ancl 2.5 cents for double numbers, by the publisher. Address P.O. Hox 37GI. 'Vol'ks by tl1e nntbor of" Addie's lln!'ihnud." 388 Husband; o r, Through Clouds to Suushiue ...... .... 10 50.J i\Ir p,,.,r Wife ................. 10 10-16 Jessie .......................... 20 by I h e author ot "A Fatal l>ower.'' 246 A Fa1:1I Dower ................. 20 m :: :: : ::::::: 829 The Actor's Ward ............. 20 '\VorRs by .. lien 111 hor of 0 A Grent :l l isl 1llcc." 244 A Great Mistake ............... 20 588 C h erry. . ........ ........... 10 1040 Clarissa's Ordeal. 1st half ... 1040 C'larhsas Ordeal. 2d half ... 20 \Vories by the autho1 of "A \Vomnus l.ove-Story." 322 A \Vn111a11's Love-Story ....... 10 '677 Griselda... ............. 20 lll 1"1. :\ ltxnndcr's \Vo1ks. 5 The Adnrirnl's Ward ......... 20 17 The Wooiug: O't ............... 20 The Executor ................. 20 1 89 Valerie' s Fate ................. 10 :2tY MaiLl, Wife, or Widow? .. ... . 10 :2.36 Whi c h Shall it Be? ...... ...... 20 8.39 Mrs. Vereker's Courier Maid .. 10 490 A Stcond Life.. .......... At l3a_r... . ................ 10 794 Beaton1s Barg-ain .... .......... 20 797 Look Bdore Y o u Leap ....... 20 805 The Freres. lst half .......... 20 805 The F'rt:>n-s. 2d half. ........ 20 .S()li H e r Dearest Foe. !st half. ... ;)() SOG HPr Dearest F ne. 2d half .... 20 -SH The Heritage of Langdale ... 20 15 Halph Wilton's Weir44 Cut by the Couuty; or, Grace 1055 Katharine Regina .............. 20 Darnel . . .. .. 10 1065 H err Paulus: His Rise, His 548 The Fatal Marriage. and The Greatness, and His Fall ... 20 Shadow i u the Corner. ..... IO M. Detham0Edwa1ds's 2W Loveandl.\'lirage; o r,TheWaitin g o n an Island ............. 10 579 The Flower of Doom.and Other Storie s ... .......... 1 0 594 Docto r Jacob ................. 20 1023 N ext of Kin->Vanted ......... 20 William Hlnck's Wol'l6 Phantom Fortune .............. 20 74 Aurora Floyd .................. 20 110 U11der the Red Flag ............ 10 153 The Golden Calf. ... ........... 20 204 V ixen ........................... 20 211 The Octoroon.... . 10 2-34 Bar hara: o r Splendid Misery .. 0 263 An lshmaelite .................. 20 315 The Mistletoe Bough. Christ mas, 1884. Edited b.v Miss i\I. E. Brnddon ..... ............. 20 434 \Vyllard's \\'eird ............... 20 478 Diavola; or. Nobody1s Daughter. Par t I..... ....... 20 478 Diavola; o r. Nobody' s Daughter. Par t II........ ..... 20 480 Married in Haste Edited by Miss M. E. Bradd o n ......... 20 487 Put to the Test. Edited by Miss ill. I:. Bradd on ................ 20 488 .Toshua I-laggard's Daui::hter .... 20 489 Hu pert Godwin ................. 20 495 Mount Ro.ml. .................. 20 406 Onll n Womnn. Edited bv l\Iis s M'. E. Brnddn n ......... : ...... 20 497 The Lady's Mile. .... 20 498 Only a Clod. :!O 499 The C loven Foot. . . 20 511 A Strang-e World.... 20 519 Dudley Carl eon: or, The llroth ers Secret, and George Caulfie ld 's Journey ............. 10 Hostages t o Fortune ......... 20 553 Birds of Prey. . . . . . . . 20 551 Charlotte's Inheritance (Se quel t o "Birds o f Prey") .... 20 557 To the Bitter End .... . ....... 20 559 Taken at the Flood ........... 20 560 Asphodel.................... 20 561 Just as I am; or. A Living Lie 20 567 Deat.l M en's Shoes ............. 20 570 John 1\larchmont' s Legacy .... 20 618 The Mistletoe Bough. Christ mas. 1885. Edited hy Miss M. E. Bradd n11 . . . . 20 8.JO One Thing Needful; or, The P enalty of Fate ............... 20 881 Mohawks. l 8 t half. ........... 20 88 1 :td half ..... ..... 20 800 Tli..-Bnug-b. Christ Illas, 1886. Edited l>y Miss 111. E. Bradd on ................... 20 943 ane edition) ......... 20 295 A "'omau's 1Var ............. . 10 952 A W nrnans \Var. (Large type edition) ...................... 20 296 A Rnse in Thorns.. ... IO 297 Folly; er, H e r Marriage Yow ....................... 10 95-3 Hilary' s Folly: or, Her Mar riage Vow. (Large type edi-tion)... ..... 20 299 The Fata l Lilies. and A Bride from the Sea ................. 10 300 A Gilded Sin, nnd A Bridge of Love ........................ 10 303 Ingledew House, and More Bit ter than Dearh....... . . .. 10 304 Iu Cupid's ............... 10 305 A D ead Heart. and Lady Gwen doline's Dream ............... 10 306 A Golden Dawn, and Love for a DaL . ....... 10 307 Two Kisses, a11d Like no Other Love ................... ....... JO 308 Beyond Pardon. ............ 20 3:C2 A \Vornans Love-Story ....... 10 32:J A Willful Maid....... .. .... 20 411 A llitter Atonement . ......... 20 43:l l\Iy Sister Kate..... . . . ... 10 459 A \Voman1s Temptation. (Large type editi o n ) ......... 20 951 A W oman's Temptatio n ....... lO 460 a Shado" ............. 20 465 The Earl's Atonemeut. ........ 20 466 Between Two Loves ........... 20 467 A Struggle for a Hing ........ 20 469 Lady Darner's Secrtt: or, A Guiding Star .......... 20 470 Evelyn1s Foll.r ................. 20 471 Thrown nn the World ......... 20 476 Betwee n Two Sins: or, Married in Haste ..................... 10 516 Put Asunder; or. Lady Castlemai ne's Divorce ............. :20 576 H e r Martyrdom............ 20 626 A Fair Mystery ................ 20 741 The Heiress of Hilldrop; or-, The Romauce of a l o u ng Girl............. ........ 745 For A n otller,s Sin; Qr, A Struggle for Love.... 20 792 Set in Diamonds ............... 20 821 The World Between Them ..... 20 853 A True MaC'daleu. . ... 20 85-.J A \Vomau's lrro1 20 922 Ma1jorie........ .. .. . .. ... 20 924 'Twixt Smile and Tear ......... 20 927 Sweet Cymheline .............. 20 921l The Bellt of Lynn; or, The Mill e r"s Daughter ........... 20 9;31 Lady Diana's Pride ........... ;)() 949 Claribel's Lm e Story; or,Love's Hidde n Depths. . . . . . . 20 958 A Haunted Life ; or, Her Terri .................. 20 969 The My stery o f Colde Fell; or, Not Proven ................. 20 973 The Squire's Darling......... 2 0 975 A Dark l\Ia rriage Morn ........ 20 978 Her Second Love.. ... 20 982 The Duke's Secret ............. 20 985 On Her \Vedding Morn, and The M.rstery o f the H olly-Tree ;)() 988 The Shattered Idol, and L etty ....................... 20 990 The Earl' s Error, and A1,.old's Promise ................... 20 995 An Unnatural Bondage, and That Beautiflll Lncly ....... 20 1006 His Wife's J11dg11Je11t .......... 20 1008 A Thorn in Her Heart. ....... 20 1010 Gold e n Gates . . . . ... 20 101:.! A Nan1P.less Sin .............. 20 1014 A Mad Lnve. . . . . .. .. 20 1031 Irene's Vow ................. 20 J052 Signa's Sweetheart ............ :!O 1091 A Modern Cinderella .......... 10 Chal'lotte Ill'ontc's \.Vorks. 1 5 Jane E.rre........ ... . . . .. 20 57 Shirley.... . . . ... . ... .. . 20 944 The Professor.. . . . .. .. . llhodu Il1ghton's \Vorks. 86 l3eliuda ......................... 20 IOI Second Thoughts .............. 20 2'27 Nancy. .. ................... 2 0 645 Mrs. Smith of L ongmains ..... JO 758 "Goodby e, SweetheartJ1' ...... 20 765 Not Wisely, But Too Well ...... 20 767 Joan.. ....................... 20 768 Red as a Rose is She ........... 20 769 Cometh Up as a Flower....... 20 862 Hett.r's Visions ................. 10 894 Doctor Cupid.... ............. 20 !Uary E Bryan's Works. 731 The Bayo n Bride .............. 20 857 Kildee: or, The Sphinx of the Red H ouse. 1st half. ........ 20 857 Kildee; or. '!'he Sphinx of the Red House. 2d half .......... 20

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2 Robert Buchnnan's Works 145 "Storm-Beaten:" God and The 1\laa ........................... 20 154 Annan Water ..... ............. 20 181 The New Abelar d ...... ...... 10 398 ;11att: A Tale of a Caravan . 10 646 The Master of the M ine ....... 892 That \Viuter N i g ht; o r Loves Victor y .......... . 10 1074 Stormy Water s . ...... 20 1104 The Heir of Linne ...... . ... 20 Captain Fre d Unrunby's Worh:s 3'i5 A Ride Lo Kli iva ............... 20 384 On Horseback T h i ough Asia Min o r ....... .................. 20 E F 'nfrfax llynne' s \Vorks 52 1 Entan g led . . ................. 2 0 538 A Fair Country Maid ....... 20 Hnll Caine's Works 445 Tb., Sha dow of a Crime . ... 20 520 S he's All t.h e Worl d to Me.. JO 1Urs H. I .o\'Cll Cnmc1011's \Vorlu!I. 595 A North Co11ntry Maid.... 20 796 In a Grass Cou1 11ry ........... 20 891 Vera Ne, ill; or, Poor \\"i s d o rn's C h a nce... ............. 20 9 1 2 Pure Gold. 1st h a l f. ......... 20 912 P11re Gold. 2d half. ...... .... 20 963 Worth Win11ing ............... 20 10-25 Daisy's Dilemma ...... ...... 20 1008 A Devo11t Lover; o r A Wast e d Love ........... ... . 20 1070 A Life' s n listake .. . . 20 Rosa '."nn chette Carey's \Vorks. 215 Not Like Other Gi rl s .. 20 396 Robert O r d s A tonement ..... 20 55 1 Barbara Heathcote's Trial. 1st half. .......................... 20 55 1 Barbara Heathcote's T r ial. 2d hal f. .......................... 20 608 F o r Lilias. 1st half .......... 20 608 F o r Lil ias. 2d balf .......... 20 9''10 Uncle i\Iax. 1st half. .......... 20 930 Uncle i\Iax. 2d half. ........ . 20 Quet->n! e:s \V hi_m. I1st, h a l f ..... 20 Qu eeme s \ I h1111. cd half. .... 20 934 W o,,ed a11d Marr ied. 1st half. 20 934 Wooe d a11d Marr ied. 2d half. 20 936 J\elli e"s M e m o ries. 1st half ... 20 93ti N e lli e's Memuries. 2d half. .. 20 961 Wee \Vifie .................... 20 103:J Esther: A Storr for Girls ..... 20 1064 0111.r the G o e 1.-ness... ....... 20 l.c n i!S \Vorks 462 Alice1sAdvent11res iu 'Vonder-lancl. lllustrated by John 'l't>nniel ..................... 20 789 Through the LookingGlass, and 'Vhat A.lice Found There. Illustrated by John Ten11i el. 20 \ Vilkic Collins's \Vo1ks 52 The New )lagdalen ............ lO 102 The :Jl o ouston e . ......... 20 1G7 Hear t and Science ............. 20 168 :Ko By Dickens and Collins ................... 10 175 L o ve's Random Shot, and Other Storie s ................. 10 233 I Say N o;" or, The Love-Let ter ................ 20 508 The Girl at the Gate ........... 10 591 The Q11ee11 of Hearts .......... 20 613 The Ubost s To11cl.J, and P ercy and the Prophet ........ ..... 10 623 ill; I ,ad.r's Mon e_v ............. 10 701 T h e \\" oma.11 iu White. 1st half 20 101 The \Vom: rn in 1.Vhit e 2d half 20 ;o2 i\Ian and Wife 1st half. :.!O 70:?. l\lan and \Vife. 2Ll half.... 20 764 The E"il G enius ............... 20 896 The Guilty River ............ 20 946 The D ead S ecret.. . 20 977 The Haunte:1011sc D audet's \ Vorks 534 Jack ........................... 20 574 The Nabob: A Story of Parisian L ife and Manner s . .......... 20 ('hnrlcs Uic J,enJOt'S \ V o1J, s JO The Old Curiosity Shop ........ 20 22 Davi d Copperfie ld. Vol. I. .... 20 22 Dav i d C opperfield. Vol. II... 20 24 Pi ckwick Jiaper s. Vol. I.... 20 2-l Pickwick Papers. V ol. II ...... 20 37 Nicholas Nickleby. 1st hal f ... 20 37 Ni cholas Niekleby. 2d half. ... 20 41 Oliver Twi!::t ................... 20 77 A Tale of Two Cities ........... 20 84 Hard Time s .... ............... 10 91 Barnaby R11dge. 1st ha! r ...... 20 9 1 BarnalH" Rudge. half ...... 20 94 Little Dorr it. 1st hal f .......... 20 U4 Littl e Dorri t. 2d half.... 20 J06 Bleak House. 1st half... .... 20 J06 Rleak House 2d half .......... ))() 107 Do 111be y and Son. !st balf .... 20 107 Dom bey a11d Son. 2 c l half .. ... 20 108 The Cricket on the Hearth, and Doctor ;\Jarigold ...... ........ JO 0111 Mutual Friend. 1st hair. 20 131 Our Munrnl Frieud. 2d half. 132 Master Humph re.r s Clock .... JO 152 'l'h e Uuco111mercial Trave le r ... 20 168 No 'l'h o10 11g-hfar e By Dickens a11d C o llin s...... ...... 10 169 The Haunted Man .............. JO 4;17 Life and Adveuture s of l\lartin Cl111zzle wit. 1st half. ........ 20 437 LifP-a11cl Adventures o f :Hartin Chuzz\t>\\ 'it. 2d half .... ..... 20 439 Gren.r Expectations .... . .... 20 440 )Im. Lirripe1"s Lodgi11 g s ....... 10 447 A111eric:an K o L es. .. . .. .. .. 20 44S Pict11 r e 8 From Italy, and The )J 11d fog Pa 1 w r8. &:c .......... 20 454 The Mysc e r.r o f Eel win Drood .. 20 45G Ske t eh, s li.r B oz. I1111strati_ve o f Eve ry -day Life aud Every-dn) Pople. 20 676 A Child's Histo l'.r o f England. J>ondncy's \ Vo1 lts. 338 The Fa111ily Diffi c11lt_r. JO 679 Where Two Ways )[eet. 10 F. On UobgolJey's \ Y o r k s 8 2 R e al;.d Lips. . . . . 20 104 The Coral Pi11. 1st half.... 2 0 104 The Coral Pin. 2d half. . 20 '2ti4 Piedo1a:lle a Freuch lJ e L ective. IO 828 Bahio l e the Pretty illiner. First . . . . . 20 328 13abi o l e the Pretty Milline r S eeoncl half ................... 20 453 The Lottery 'l1icket ............ 20 475 Tile Prima D onuas Husband .. 20 522 Zig-Zag, the Clo\\'n; or1 '!'he S tet>I Gauntlets ............. .. 20 523 The of a Duel. A Parisian Roma.nee ........... 20 648 The A11g el of til e Bells ........ 20 697 The Pretty Jaile 1-. 1st half. .. 20 6U7 The Pref t\" .Jailer. 2d half . . 20 699 'fl: e Sc11lptor s Daug-bte r lst half ... ..................... 20 699 The Sculpto1"s Daughter. 2d 20 7 8"! Tile Clo < ecl Door. 1st half . . 20 7 8 2 T h e C l osed Door. 2d half.. :.!O 851 The Cry of Bl ood. 1 t half. . 20 S.'>1 The Cry of Blo o d 2d half .... 20 918 The Red Band. s t half. ..... 2 0 918 The H eel I3:1nc l. 2d half 20 9 .1! l!nsh n11 D elivt>ry... ... . . . 2 0 o f an Omnihus. 2 0 108 0 Ber1h,l's S ecret. Jst half. 20 1080 Bertha' S ecre t 2d half. 20 The Hevered Hanrl. lst half. 20 J082 The Severed I-laud. 2d half. 20 1085 The Matapan Affair. 1st hal f 20 1085 The Mat11pau Affair. 2d hal f 20 1 088 The Old Age of Mousieur L e-coq. 1st bal f ...... . ....... 20 1088 The Old Age of Monsi e u r Le coq. 2d hal f. ........... ... 20 "'l'he Duc h el!1S"1S'' t Yorus 2 MollyBaw n .................... 20 6 Portia ................. ...... 20 14 A iry Fair y L ili a n . .... ...... JO 16 P h y lli s ......................... 20 25 ill r s. Geoffrey. ( L a rge type edition ) . ............ ......... 20 950 Mrs. Geoffrey . . . . . ...... . JO 29 Beauty' s Dau g hter s . ... ... . JO 30 Faith a n d Unfaith ... .......... 20 1 rn L?J>S. L o r d B erresfor6 Ada111 B ede. 1st h n lf. . 20 30 .-lda111 B ede. 2d hal f. ..... 20 42 R.orn ola ....................... 20 69:J Fe! ix J-T ol t. the Rad ital. . . . 20 707 Si Ins l'llarnt't': The \ V eaver of Rn ...................... 1 0 728 Janet' s R epentance ..... ... ... 10 762 lmpressions of Theophrastus Such ......... ....... 10 ll. L Farjeon's \ V 01 l R O !"t'J'\ F olk.,'. 10 55R Pov ... rty Co r11P1 . . . . 20 587 'I'll .... Pa.n::\on 01 Durnford ........ :tO 609 The Dark House ......... ..... J O O ctave Feuille t's \Vorks. 66 T h e Romance of a Poor Young Man ........................... 10 386 Led Astray: or, "La .Comt.esse 11 . 10 li'o1 rcster' .'!i \Vorl{S 80 Juue ........................... 280 0111ui a Vauitas. A Tale of Society.. . .. . . . . . 1 0 484 Although He Was a Lord, and Otb e r Tales .............. ..... 10 715 I Have Lived aud 20 721 Dolores ....................... . 20 724 My L o r d a11cl lily Lady . 20 726 My Hero ........................ 20 727 Fai r Wom e u . ...... ............ 20 729 Miguon..... . . . . . . . . . 20 7a2 F r o 111 Olymp u s to Hades. 20 734 Viva...... . . . . . . 20 736 Ro)' a n d V i o la... . 20 740 Rho n a .................... .... :!() 744 D i a n a Carew ; or, For a Wom a ns Sake..... ....... ...... 20 883 O nce Again.. . .... 20 Jessie Fotbeigill's \Vork, 314 P eril. . ................... 20 572 Healey................ . . . 20 905 Borderland ..................... 20 1099 T h e Lasses o f Lever house . ... 20 U.. E. J ?raucillou'e \.Yorks 135 A Great Heiress: A Fortune in Seven Checks .............. 10 3 1 9 Face to Face: A Fact iu t;e,eu Fables........ 10 360 Ropes of Sand 20 656 The Gokle11 F lood. Bv K. E Fnu1cil11 )11 a11d 'Vm. Senio1. 10 911 Golden Bel ls... ... 20 E111il e Gaboria n's V o r k s 7 Fil e No. 113...... .. . 20 12 Other People's Mone_ v .. ....... 20 20 With in an Inc h of His Life. 20 26 Monsi eur Leco q. Vol I.... 20 26 Monsieur Leco q. \"ol. II. 20 33 The Clique of Gold.... 20 38 The Wido w Ler011l!e. ....... 20 43 The Mrsten of Oi'chal.... 20 144 PromiSes o f 1\larriage. ...... JO 979 The Count's !-'ec r et. Par t I ... 20 979 Tile Count' s S ecret. Part II. 20 1 002 l\larnage at, H Ve11111re .... ... 20 1015 A Tho m;;and Fra.11ls Heward. 20 1045 T h e 13th Hus,ar, .............. 20 1 078 T h e Slaves of Parie. lst half 20 J078 The Slaves o f Pa1ie. :!d half. 20 J083 The Little Old )Ian of the Bat ig-nolles. 10 C hn.rles G ilJIJ o u '!; \VorJ{s. 64 A l\lai dt-11 F111I' .................. 10 3 1 7 By M ead aod Stream. 20 James Gtant's 'Vol'lui:. 566 T h e Royal H i ghlanders : or, The Black W a t c h in Eg-ypt ... 20 781 The Secret D ispatch. 10 lUiss Grant's \ Vorks 222 The Sun-Maid...... 555 Cara R oma.... 20 Arthn1 flriflilhs"i!' \ Vol'l{Jil, 614 99............... 10 680 Fast a11cl Loose.. 20 1-L Uide r lln::n!nrd'!'I \ Vorh:s. 4 3 2 rl'he \\litc h'Jil llcncl :.!O 753 King Sol o111011:-; 20 910 She: A H 1 st o 1y o f Adnnture 20 941 .Jess. 2 0 959 Daw11. .. . ..... . .. 20 989 Allan Q11:1 l PrnuP11 ........... 20 10..J!) :\ T 1dt .. of 'fliree L ion:..;. :!li d O n G o in g Back.... . 20 1100 Mr. Meesnn; \\"ill. 20 1105 Maiwas H v e,,ge. JO 'l,ho mn!!i \\-orks. 139 The R o ma11tic Ad\ e1Hnl't:'S n l\lill\111aid.. . 10 530 A Pair uf Bl11 Eyes. 20 G\JO Fnr Fro111 !lit> C r O\\d. :20 791 The l\Jay o1 o r ( 'asterbridg-t>. 20 9 Tl1e Tr1111qw t-M a j or. 20 957 The \ Voodla11d er:::;. :!O John ll. Ilarwootl's \Vork s 143 O n e False H ot.It Fair. 20 ;i58 '\Vithin the Cla)'o;p. 20 Mary Cecil Hay's \Vorl SLe1"::' 8f'cret. 2 0 678 D orot.ln"s . 20 7Hi Yictor Ynnouis h e d. 2 0 8 A \\"icke d Girl.." 987 Brenda Y orkl'. 20 10-26 A Dark Inheritauce. l Urs. ('aish e J ... lloey's \\'01 1,s. 313 The L o t'r::; C r et: d. :.!O 802 A Stern Cliae. 'l, i g h c \Yorio. 509 N e ll Ha1Te11den. 20 714 1Twixt I.o ,e and D11t ) Fer g u s \V. Hume's \Vories 1075 The 3 fysterv o f e Han"om Cab. 20 11'27 l\1nda1'n M:(Jnp;.. 20 Wor k s b y the A u thor of "Ju d i th Wynne.' 332 J11ditil \\".rnue ......... ... ...... 20 506 LlldY Lovelace .... . . ...... 20

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'rHE SEA SIDE LIBRARY-POU KJ'l B D I' l 'ION 3 WlllinmH. G Kingston's Worlhant's Works. 47 Altiora Peto............ 20 537 Piccadill y ..................... J O !llrs \. Vorks. 45 A Little Pilgrnn ................ 10 177 Salem Chapel. .............. ... 20 205 The l\Iinister' s W i fe ............ 30 321 The Prodigals, and Thei r I nh e ritance ... ................. 10 3:37 M emoirs and Resolutions of Adam Graeme of i\lossgrar, including some Chronicles of the Borough of Fendie ....... 20 345 Madam .............. . ......... 20 351 The House on the llfoo1. ..... 20 357 J o h n ........................... 20 370 Lucy Crofton. ....... ......... JO 371 Margaret l\faitland ............. 20 377 Magdalen Hepburn: A Story of the Scottish R eformation ... 20 402 Lilliesl eaf o r Passages in the L i fe of lllrs Margaret l\Iait-land of Sunnyside ........... 20 410 Old Lady Mar y ................. JO 527 The Da1 s of My Life ........... 20 528 At His Gates ... ............... 20 568 The Perpetual Curate .......... 20 5U9 Harry Muir ... . ............. 20 60.3 Agnes. 1st h a l f . . ........... 20 603 Agnes. 2d half ................ 60 1 Innocen t. 1st hal f ............. 20 604 Innocent. 2d half ............. 20 605 Om b r a .......................... 20 645 Oliver's B ride ................. JO 655 The Open Door, and The Portrait 10 687 A Co untry Gentleman .......... 20 703 A House D ivided Against Itself 20 710 The G reatPst H eiress i n England 20 827 Effie Ogil v i e ......... .......... 20 880 The Son o f His Father. ...... 20 902 A Poor Gentlema n . ........ . 20 "Ouida 's" Wo1ks. 4 Under Two F'lags .............. 20 9 Wancla, Countess von Szalras. 20 116 Moth s ....................... 20 128 Afternoon, and Other Sketches 10 226 Friendship ......... .......... 20 228 Princtlss Napraxine .......... 20 238 Pascarel. ............. .. ....... 20 239 Sigona_._,. .................... ... 20 433 A Rainy J une .............. ... JO Othmar. 1st half . .......... 20 630 Othnrnr. 2d half............. 20 671 Don Gesualdo ................. 10 In rem ma. 1st half. ....... 20 672 In M aremma. 2d half ........ 20 874 A House Party.. . . . ..... 10 974 Strath111orP-; or, Wrought by His Own Hand. 1st h .. lr. .... 20 974 20 9El Granville de Vigne; o r Held i n Bon dag-e. 1st half... . .... 20 981 Granville de V igne; or, Held i n Bondage. 2d half. ......... . 20 996 Idalia. 1st half...... . ..... 20 996 Idalia. 2d half. ..... ...... 20 1000 Pnck. J s t half. .............. 20 1000 Puck. 2d hal f ................ 20 1003 Chandos. Jst half. .......... 20 1003 Chandos. 2d half ............. 20 1017 'fricotri n 1st half. ........... 20 10 17 T r icotrin. 2d half ........... . 20 James Payn's Wo1ks. 48 Thicker Tha n Water ........... 20 186 The Canon's Ward ............. 20 343 The Tal k of the Tow n .......... 20 577 In Peril and P rivat ion . ....... 10 58U The Luck nf t h e Darre ll s ... ... 20 823 The H ei r of t h e Ages. .. .. 20 IUis s Jane Porte r's Worl ,s. 660 The Scottish Chie f s. 1st h a l f . 20 660 The Scottish Chief s. 2d half.. 20 696 Thaddeus of W a r saw .......... 20 Cecil Power's W orks. 336 Philistia ...................... .. 20 611 Babyl o n ................ ..... .. 20 !lll's, Campbell l'rned' Works. 428 Ze10: A Story of l\lonte-Carlo. JO 477 Affin i t ies ....................... 1 0 811 The Head Station..... 20 Eleanor C. Pric e 'l!f \Vo1ks. 173 The Foreigners ....... . ........ 20 33 1 Gerald ......................... 20 Charles Reade's \Vorks. 46 Very Har d Cash ... ............ 20 98 A Woman-Hater ............... 20 206 The Pictur e, and Jack of All Trades ........................ 1 0 210 Readiana: Comm ents on Cur rent Events .... .............. 1 0 213 A Terribl e Temptation .... 20 214 Put Yourself in His Place ...... 20 216 Foul Play ..................... 20 231 Griffith Gaunt; or, Jealousy ... 20 232 Love and l\ioney; or, A Perilous Secret . ..................... JO 235 u I t is Nevel' Too Late to Mend." A Matter-of-Fact Ro-mance .................. ...... 20 mrs. J. H. Riddell' s Vorks 71 A Struggl e ror Fame ......... 20 593 J3erna Boyle .................. 20 1007 Miss Gascoigne ................ 20 1077 The Nun's Curse .............. 20 "ltita's" 'Vorks 252 A Sinless Secret. 1 0 446 Dame Durden ................. 20 598 "Cori rm a." A Study . ....... JO 617 Like Dian's Kiss .............. 20 1 125 The Mystery of a Turkish Bath JO F \.V Robinson's V01ks. 157 Mil ly's Hero ................... 20 217 The llian She Cared F o r ...... 20 261 A Fair Maid ................... 20 455 Lazarus in London ............ 20 590 The Courting or Mary Smith .. 20 1005 99 Da1k Street . ............... 20 W. C l ark Russell's \ Vorks, 85 A Sea Qneen ...... ............ 20 109 Little Loo .... .............. .. 20 Ronnd the Galler Fire ... .... JO 209 J ohn Holdsworth. Chief l\late. JO 223 A Sailor's Sweetheart ......... 20 592 A Strange Vo.rnge ............. 20 682 In the l\lidd l e Watch. Sea Stories . ..................... 20 7J3 Jack's Courtshi p. 1st hal f. .. 20 743 Jack's Courtship. 2d half. ... 20 88-1 A Voyage to the Cape .. ... .... 20 9 l e Tile Golden Hope ............. 20 JOH The Frozen Pirate ............. 20 1048 The \Vreck of the "Grosvenor '1 20 112n The Flying Dutchman; or, The Death Ship ................... 20 Adeline Sergeant's \ V o r k s 257 Beyond Recall ................ 1 0 812 No Saint ....................... 20 Sir \. Valte r Scott' s Works. 28 h anhoe ........ ... ... ... ...... 20 201 The M onastery ................ 20 202 The Ah bot. (Sequel to "The l\Ioaastery ") .............. ... 20 353 The Black Dwarf, and A Legend of lll o utrose ....... ... 20 362 The Bride of Lammermoor ... 20 363 T h e Sur:eon's Daughter ..... J O 364 Castle Dangerous ............. JO 391 Tile Heart of Mid-Lothian .... 20 :392 Peveril o f the Peak. . . . . . 20 393 The Pirate ..................... 20 401 Waverley ...................... 20 417 The Fair Maid of Perth; or, St. Val entine's Day ............ 20 418 St. Ronan 's W ell .............. 20 463 Redganntlet. A Tale of the Eighteenth Century .......... 20 507 Chronicles o f the Canongate, and Other Stories ........... 10 J060 The Lady of the Lake.. . . .. J06.3 Kenilwo rth. Jst half. ......... 20 1063 Kenilworth. 2d hal f ......... 20 TI'illin m Silnc s Works. i29 Boulderstone: or, New Men and Old Populations ............. JO 580 The Red Route ................ 20 597 Haco the Dreamer ............. JO 649 Cradle and Spade .............. 20 Hawley Smart's 'Vorks 348 From Post t o Finish. A Racing Romance ......... ........... 20 367 Tie and Trick ..... . .......... 20 550 S truck Down .... ............. J O 847 Bad to Beat .................... JO 925 The O utsider ................... 20 Ftnnk E. Smedley's \ Vorks. 333 Frank Fai rleg-h; o r Scenes from the Life of a l:'rivate Pupil. ...... . .............. 20 562 Lo,wi s Arundel ; o r The Railroad of Life. . . . 2 0 'l' W. Speight's Works, 150 For Himsel f A l o n e ............. JO 653 A Barren Title ....... . ...... 1 0 Robert Louis S t evenson'l!I \Vorks 686 Strange Case of D r Jekyll and M r. Hyde ................... 1 0 704 Prince Otto ...... . . . .... ... J O IJ.32 Kidna pped ... .................. 20 855 The Dy n a miter ................ 20 856 New A rabian Nights .......... 20 888 Treasure Island ............... JO 889 An Inl a n d Voyage . ........... J O 9 4 0 The Merry Men, and Oth e r Tales and Faoles. . . . . . . 20 1051 The l\lisadrnntures o f Joh n N i c h P lson ..................... 10 1110 The S ilverado Squatters ...... 20 Julian Stnrg i s's \-Vo1 k s 405 l\Iy Friends and I. Edited by J u lian Sturgis .............. . JO 694 John Maidmen t . . . . . 20 E1111:en e Sue's \. V orl< s. 270 The Wandering Jew. Part r. .. 30 270 The Wandering Jew. Part II .. 30 271 Tbe Mysteries of Paris. Part I. 30 271 The Mysteries of Paris. Part II. 30 Geol'ge T e1nple s \ Vorh:s 599 Lancelot Ward, lll.P ........... 10 642 Britta.... .. .. . ......... JO Willia m !lI. Thnc lrnray's \. Vorks 27 Vanity Jst lrnlf....... 20 27 Vanity Fair. 2d half .......... 20 165 The Histor y of Heury Esmond. 20 464 The Newcomes. Part L ....... 20 464 The Kewcomes. Part. II. ... 20 670 The Rose and the Ring. Illus-t rated ......................... IU b.r the A u t h o r o f "'rhe 'l' u o lUiss F lcu1 i11r,-s." 637 What' s His O ffence? ........... 20 780 Rare Pale Margaret ............ 20 78 1 The Two 1'1iss ....... ::o 831 Pomegranate Seed.. . . . . . . Annie 'l'hon1as's V o r k s 141 She Loved Him!..... JO 142 Jenifer.. 20 565 No l\ledium............ IO Bertha. Thomns's \ V o r ks. 389 Ictiabod. A Portrait. 10 960 Elizabeth's Fortune. . . 20 Count J ,yof T o lstol's 1066 l\1y Husband and I. .......... 10 1069 Polfkouchka ................. 10 1071 Tile Death of Ivau Iliitch ...... JO 1073 Two Generations .............. 10 1090 The Cossacks.... . ......... 20 1108 Sebastopol . . . . 20 Anthony Trollope's 32 The Land Leaguers ........... 20 93 Anthony Trollope's Autobiog-raphy ............. .... . ... 20 147 Rachel Ray ..................... 20 200 Au Old l\lan s Love ............ JO 531 'fhe Prime Minister. 1st half.. 20 531 The Prime Minister. 2d half . 20 621 'fhe Warden .................. 10 62'2 Harr v Heathcote of Gan go ii .. 10 667 The Golden 1.ion of Granpere. 20 700 Ralph 1he Ifri r. Jst half ..... 20 700 Ralph the Heir. 2d hair. ..... 20 775 The T hree Clerks.. .. .. .. . 20 !ll a r gare t V e l e 1"s WorkM, lliitc h elhurs t P lace .......... 1 0 53G For Percival .............. 20 J ulcs \1 crnc's \Yorks 87 Diek 8and; or, A Captain at 20 100 20,000 Leagues Under the Seas 20 368 The Southern Star; or,the Dia-mond Land. ............... 20 395 T h e Archipelago on Fire .... JO 578 l\Iathias Sandorf. Illustrated. Part I... . . . ... .. . .... 1 0 578 Mathias Sandorf. lllustrated. Par t II ........................ 1 0 578 Mathias Sando rf. Illustrated. Part III ...................... 10 659 rrhe 'Vaif of the" Cynthia 11 751 Gn:::at Voyages and Great Na vi gators. 1st half .... ......... 20 751 Great Voyag-es and G reat Navi-ga1ors. 2d half ............... 20 8.33 Ticket No. "9672." 1st half ... 10 8.3.3 Ticke t No. "9672." 2d half... JO 976 Robur the Conqueror: or. A Trip Round tbe World in a Flying Machi n e ............. 20 1011 T exar's Veng-eance: or, North Versus South. Part I. ....... 20 1011 Texar's V e ug-eance; or, North Versus South. Part II ...... 20 1020 l\lichae l Strogoff; or, The Courier of the Czar .......... 20 1050 The Tour of the World i n 80 Days .......................... 20.

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L.B. Walford's \Vorks. 241 The Baby's Grandmother ..... 10 256 111r. Smith: A Part of His Life 20 258 Cousi as. . . . . . . . . . . . 20 658 The History of a Week ........ JO iHrs. llumphry\Vn\d's \V0tks. 8ti9 Miss Brethertou ............... 10 1116 Robert Elsmere. 1st half ...... 20 1116 Robert Elsmere. 2d half ...... 20 F. \Vnrden's \Vorks. 192 At the World's Mercy.. . . . 10 248 The House on the Marsh ...... 10 286 Deldee: or. The Iroa Hand ... 20 482 A Vagrant Wife ............... 20 556 A Prince of Darkness ......... 20 820 Doriss Fortune ................ 20 1037 Schelwrazad<> : A London Night's Entertainment ....... 20 1087 A Woman's Face; or, A Lake-land Mystery . ...... ...... 20 \Villinm Ware's \V0tks. 709 Zenobia; or. The Fall of Pal-myra. 1st half ........... ... 20 709 Zenobia: o r, The Fall of Pal-1n_rra. :!d half ............... 20 760 Aurelian; or,Rome in the Third Century.. .... . ... ... 20 \Vorks by the A nth or of" \Vedded Hnuds." 628 Wedded Hands ................ 20 968 Blossom and Fruit; or, Madame' s Ward .................. 20 E. \Verner's \Vorks. 327 Raymond's Atonement ....... 20 MO At a High Price ................ 20 1067 Saint illichael. 1st half ....... 20 1067 Saint Michael. 2d half ........ 20 1089 Home Sounds.......... . 20 J. \Vhyte-tUelville's \Vorks. 409 Roy's Wife ..................... 20 451 Market Harborough, and Inside the Bar ............. ......... 20 John Strnuge \Vi111er's \Vorks. 492 Booties' Baby; or, Mignon. Il-lustrated ..................... 10 600 Houp-La. Illustrated ........ 10 638 In Quarters with the 25th (The Black H o r se) Dragoons ...... 10 688 A Maa of H ot1or. lllutrated. 10 746 Ca, alrr Life: or, Sketches and Stnrif.s in Barrncks and Out. 20 813 Army Society. Life in a Gar-rison Town .................... 10 818 Pluck ......................... 10 876 ............. 10 :966 A Siege Baby and Childhood's Memories ..................... 20 1 Garrison Gossip: Gathered in Blankhampton ............... 20 1032 Mignon's Husband ............ 20 1039 Driver Dallas .................. 10 1079 Beautiful Jim: of the Blank-shire Regiment .............. 20 1117 Princess f'arah.... .. ........ 10 1121 Booties' Children .............. 10 !Urs. Beary Wood's \Vorks. .8 East Lynne. 1st half......... 20 8 East Lynne. 2d half .......... 20 "255 The Mystery . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. 20 277 The Surgeon's Daughters ..... 10 508 The Unholy \\'ish ............. 10 513 H e l e n \\'hitney's Wedding, and Other Tales ................. 10 .514 The }lyster y of J essr Page, and Oth t r Tales ............. IO The Storr of Dorothy Grape, and Other Tales.... ....... 10 1001 Lady Adelaide's Oath; or, The Castle" s Heir.... . .. . . .. 20 1021 The Heir to Ashley, and The RedUonrt Fann ........... ... 20 1027 A Life's Secret ................ 20 1042 Lady Grace .................... 20 Charlotte Jll. Youge's Works 247 The Ar111011rers Prentices ..... 10 275 The Three Brides .. ........... 10 -535 H e1Jrietta's 'Vish; or, Domi-neerin g ....................... 10 563 The Two Sides of the Shield .. 20 640 Nuttie's Father ................ 20 665 The Dove in the Eagle's Nest. 20 666 My Y oung Alcides: A Faded Photograph .................. 20 739 The Caged Li o n ............... 20 i42 Love and Lif e ................ 20 '183 Chantry H o use .............. .. 20 790 The C h aplet of Pearls; or, The White and Black Ribaumont. 1st half ....................... 20 '790 The Chaplet of Pearls; or, The White aad lJlack Ribaumont. 2d half ....................... 20 800 Hopes and Fears; or, Scenes from the Life of a Spinster. !st half. ...................... 20 800 Hopes and Fears; or, Scenes from the Life of a Spinster. 2d hnlf.. ...................... 20 887 A Modern Telemachus ........ 20 1024 UndPr the Storm; or, Steadfast's Charge ................. 20 llliscellnueons. 58 The Story of Ida. Francesca .. 10 61 Charlotte Temple. Mrs. Row-son ........................... 10 99 Barbara's History. Amelia B. Edwards ...................... 20 103 Rose Fleming. Dora Russ ell .. 10 105 A Noble Wife. John Saunders 20 111 The Little School-master Mark. J. R. Shol"thouse .............. 10 112 The Waters of Marah. John Hill ........................... 20 THE SEASIDE LIBRARY-POCKET EDITION. 113 Mrs. Carr's Companion. M G. Wightwick ................... 10 114 Some of Our Girls. Mrs. C. J. Eiloart ....................... 20 115 Diamond Cut Diamond. T. Adolphus Trollope ........... 10 120 Tom Brown's School Days at Rugby. Thomas Hughes .... 20 127 Adrian Bright. Mrs. Caddy .... 20 149 The Captain's Daughter. From th e Russian of Pushkin ...... 10 151 The Ducie Diamonds. C. Blath-erwick .............. ......... 10 156 For a Dream' s Sake." Mrs. Herbert Martin. . . . .. . . . 20 158 The Starling. Norman Macleod, D D ..................... 10 160 Her Gentle Dee ds. Sarah Tytler 10 161 The Lltdy of Ly ons. Founded on the Play of that title by Lord Lytton ................. 10 163 Winifred Power. Joyce Dar-rell ........................... 20 170 Great Treason, A. By Mary Hoppus. 1st half. .. .. .. .. .. 20 170 Great Treason A. By Mary Hoppns. 2d half.. .. ........ 20 174 Under a Ban. Mrs Lodge ..... 20 176 An April Day. Philippa Prit-t i e Jephson ................... 10 178 More Leaves from the Journal o f a Life in the Highlands. Queen Vi ctoria ............... 10 182 The ................ 20 185 Dita. Lady Margaret Majendie lJ 187 The Midnight Snn. Fredrika Bremer ...................... 10 198 A Husband's Story............ HI 203 John Bull and His Island. Max O'Rell ........................ 10 \!18 Agnes Sorel. G. P.R. James . 20 219 Lady Clare: or, The Master .,f the Forges. Georges Olmet 10 242 The 'fwo Orphans. D E1rnery. 10 253 The Amazon. Uarl Vosmae r .. 10 266 'fhe Water-Babies. Rev. Chas. Kingsley. . . .. .. . .. . 10 274 Alice, Grand Duchess of H esse, Princess or Great Britain and Ireland. Biographical Sketch aad Letters .................. 10 279 Little Goldie: A Story Gf W o m an 's Love. Mrs. Sumner Hay-den........ .. . ........ 20 285 The Gambler's Wife .. ......... 20 289 John Bull's Neighbor in Her True Light. A Brutal Sax-on" .......................... IO 311 Two Years Before the Mast. R. H. Dana, Jr .................. 20 329 The Polish Jew. (Translated from the French by Caroline A. Merighi.) ErckmannChatrian .......................... 10 330 May Blossom; or, Between Two Loves. Margaret Lee ........ 20 334 A Marriage of Convenience. Harriett Jay ................. 10 335 The White Witch ............... 20 340 Under Which King! Compton Reade ......................... 20 341 Madoliu Rivers; or, The Little B eauty of R e d Oak Seminary. Laura Jean Libbey ........... 20 347 As Avon Flows. Henry Scott Vince ....................... 20 350 Diana of the Crossways. George Meredith ...................... 10 352 At Any Cost. Edward Garrett. 10 354 The Lottery of Life. A Story of New York Twenty Years Ago. John Brougham ...... 20 355 The Princess Dagomar of Poland. Heinrich Felbermann. 10 356 A Good Hate r. Frederick Boyle 20 365 George Christy ; or, The Fort unes o f a J\1iastrel. Tony Pastor ....... .................. 20 866 Th e l\Iysterious Hunter; or, The Man of Death. Capt. L. C. Carleton. ......... 20 374 The Dead l\Ian's Secret. Dr. Jupite r Paeo a ................ 20 381 The Red Cardinal. Frances Elli o t............ ........ 10 382 Three Sisters. Elsa D'Esterre-Keeling ....................... 10 383 Introduced to Society. Hamil-ton Ald a ...................... 10 387 The Secret of the Cliffs. Char l otte Fre n c h . . .. .. .. .. .. 20 403 An English Squire. C. R. Cole-ridge . ...................... 20 406 The Merchant's Clerk. Samuel Warren .............. ......... 10 407 Tylney Hall. Thomas Hood ... 20 426 Venus's D o ves. Ida Ashworth Taylor ....... ................. 20 430 A Bitter Reckoning. Author of By Crooked Paths" .... 10 435 Klytia: A Story of H eidelberg Castle. George Tai Ior ....... 20 436 Stella. Fanny Lewald ......... 20 441 A Sea Change. Flora L. Shaw. 20 442 Ranthorpe. George Henry L 8\\"0S ......................... 20 443 The Bachelor of the Albany ... 10 457 The Russians at the Gates of Herat. Chnrles l\Iarvin ...... 10 458 A Week o f Passion; o r The Dil emma of 111r. Geon?e Bar ton the Younger. Ed \\"ard Jenkins ....................... 20 468 The Fortunes, Good and Bad, of a Sewiug-G irl. Charlotte J\1. Stanley ......... : ..... ..... 10 483 Betwixt My Love and Me. By author o f "A Golden Bar" ... 10 485 Tinted Vapours . J. Maclaren Cobban ....................... 10 491 Society in London. A Foreign Resident. . . . . . .. . . .. 10 493 Colonel Enderhy' s Wife. Lucas Malet ......................... 20 501 Mr Butler' s Ward. F. Mabel Robinson ................ .... 20 504 Curly: An Actor's Story. John Coleman ...................... JO 505 The Society of London. Count Paul Vasili. ... ............... 10 510 A Mad Love. Author of" Lover and Lord ". . . .. . . .. .. .. 10 512 The Waters of Hercules ........ 20 518 The Hidde n Sin ................. 20 519 James Gord0n' s Wife .......... 20 526 Madame De Fresnel. E. Fran-ces Poynter .................. 20 532 Arden Court. Barbara Graham 20 533 Hazel Kirke. Marie Wal s h .... 20 536 Diss o lving Views. 111rs. And rew Lang.... ................. 10 545 Vida's Story. By the author of "Guilty Without Crime" ... 10 546 Mrs. K eith's Crime. A Nove l . JO 571 Paul Crew's Story. Alice Co rny ns Carr.. . . .. . .. .. .. 10 575 The Fiuger of Fate. Captain i\Iayne Reid .................. 20 581 The Betrothed. ( I Promessi Sposi.) Allessandro Manzoni 20 582 Lnc in, Hugh and Another J\1rs. J. H. Need ell .... ............. 20 583 Victory Deane. Cecil Griffith . 20 584 Mix ed M otives .................. 10 599 Lancelot Ward, 111.P. George 'fe n1ple ...................... 10 612 My Wire's Niece. By tlie author of H Dr. Edith Romney ,, ..... 20 624 Primus in Jadis. M J. Colquh oun ........................ 10 634 Tbe Unforeseen. Alice O'Haul o n ............................ 20 641 The Rabbi' s Spell. Stuart C. Cumberland .................. 10 643 The Sketch-Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. Washington Irving ........................ :!O 654 "Us." Au Old-fashioned Story. i\Irs. l\Iolesworth .............. 10 662 The l11ystE1-y of Allan Grale. Isabella Fyvie l\Iayo. .. ...... 20 668 Half-Way. Aa Anglo-French Romance ............ 20 669 The Phil .. sophy of Whist. \Yilliam Pole ................. 20 675 Dymond. Miss Thackeray 20 681 A Singer's Story. May Laffan. 10 683 The Bachelor Vicar of Ne\\"forth. J\1rs. J. Harcourt-Roe. 20 68l Last Days at A pswi c h .......... 10 692 'l'he l\Iikl\do, aud Other Comic Or.eras. Written by W. S G ilb ert. Composed by Arthur Sullivan ............ .......... 20 705 The W oman I Loved, and the Woman Who L oved M e. Isa Blagdeu ...................... JO 706 A Crimson Stain. Annie Bradshaw .......................... 10 712 For Maimie's Sake. Grant Allen ................... . .... 20 718 Unfairly \\'on. Mrs. Po\\"er O'Donoghue. ............. 20 719 Childe Harold's Pilgrimage. L ord Byron ................... 10 7'"3 Manl e'"erer's J\Iillions. T Wemyss Reid. . . .. .. .. . . .. .. 20 725 My Ten Years' Imprisonment. Silvi o Pell ico ................ 10 730 The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin ................. 10 735 Uiftil the Day Emil y Spe nd e r............... .... 20 738 In the Golden Days. Edna Lyall ......................... 20 748 Hurrish: A Study. By the H o n Emily Lawless .......... 20 750 An Old !>tory of 111y Farming Days. Fritz Renter. 1st half 20 750 An Old Story of My Farming Day s. Fritz Renter. 2d half 20 752 J a<:kanapes, and Other Stories. Juliana Horatia Ewing . . . 10 754 How to he Happy Though Mar ried. By a Graduate in the University of Matrimony ..... 20 755 l\1argery Daw. . . . . . . . . 20 756 The Strange Adventures of Cap tain Dangerous. A Narrative in Plain English. Attempted by George Augustus Sala .... 20 757 Love's Martyr. Laurence Alma Tadema ...................... 10 759 In Shallow Waters. Annie Ar-mitt .......................... 20 766 No XIII; or, The Story of the LostVes tal. Emmall1arshall 10 770 The Castle of Otranto. Horace Walpole .................. 10 773 The i\Iark of Cain. Andrew Lang .......................... 10 774 The Life and Travel s of Mungo Park .......................... 10 777 The Vorag-es and Trave ls of Sir J o11n D l a uudevill e Kt ..... 10 778 Society's Verdict. By the au th o r of H :My Marriage ,, ..... 20 786 Ethel J\1ildmay's Follies. By author of .. Pelite'sRomance" 20 793 Vivian Grey. By the Rt. Hon. Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield. 1 s t h alf ... .... 20 793 Vivian Grey. By the Ht. Hoa. Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield. 2d half. ....... 20 801 She Stoops to Conquer, and The Good-NaLUred Maa. Oliver Goldsmith ........ ........ 10 803 Major Frank. A L. G. Bosb omnToussaint .... .......... 20 807 If Love Be LO\ e D. ('ecil Gibbs 20 809 Witness My Hand. By author of" Lady Gw e nd o len's Tryst" 10 810 The Secret of Her Life. Ed ward Jenkins ......... ... 20 816 Rogues and Vagabond;. By George R. Sims, author o f u 'Ostle r Joe,, ... ............. 20 822 A Pass ion Flower. A Novel. . 20 852 Under Five Lakes. M Quad. 20 879 The Touchstone of Peril. A Novel of Anglo-Indian Life With Scenes During the Mutiny. R. E. Forrest. ......... 20 885 Les J\liserables. Victor Hugo. Part I....... . 20 885 Les Miserabl es. Vi.eto1: i:1ugo. Part JI... . .. 20 885 Les 111iserahles. \' icto1 : Part HI. ..................... 20 908 A Willful Young \\'omnn. Alice Price ......................... 20 913 The Silent Shore; o r The i\!ys tery of St. James' Park. By John Blo1111delle-Burton ....... 20 915 That Otl1er p,.r,011. lllrs Alfred Hunt. l s t half........ 20 915 That Other Person. J\1rs. Al-fred Hunt. 2cl half. 20 917 The Case of Rtuben J\lalachi. H Sutherlnnd EdwHds ..... 10 919 Locksley Rall Sixty Years Af ter, etc. By Alfred, L ord T e n-nyson. P.L. D.C L .......... 10 920 A C hild of the R e volution. By the i;ii,1,tho r of 1.1 l\Iad e moiseJle Mon ...................... 20 921 The Late Miss H o llingford. Rosa Mulholland ............. 10 933 A Hidden Terror. Ma1y Albert 20 937 Cashel Byron's Profession. By Georg-e Bernard Shaw.... .. 20 938 Cranford. By 111rs. Gaskell ... 20 954 A Girl's HPart. By the autho1 of" Nobody1s Darling,, ...... 20 956 H e r Johnnie. By Viol e t Whyte 20 964 A Struggle for the Right; or, Tracking the Truth ......... 20 96b Periwinkle. By Arnold Gray. 20 966 R e by the author of King Solomon's i ves ,, ; and A Siege Baby and Childhood's Memories, by J. S Winter ... 20 970 King Solo m o n's "1ives; o r The Phantom Mines. By Hyder Ragged. (Illustrated) ....... 20 9S4 Her O" n S i ster. By E. S. Will-iamson ....................... 20 986 The Great Hesper. By Frank Barrett ......... ............. 20 992 Jllarrying and Giving in riage. By J\1rs. lllolewort.h. 20 994 A Penniless Orphan. By W. Heimburg .................... 20 1028 A Waste d Love. A Novel. .... 20 1030 The Mistress of Ibich tein. By Fr. Henkel. ................. 20 1034 The Silence of Dean lllaitland. By Maxwell Gray ............ 20 1043 Faust. By Goethe... ....... 20 1059 Confessions of aJJ English Qp.um-Euter. By Tl1omas Quincey ................... 20 1061 A Queer Race. By William Westall. ................... .. 1072 On l y a Coral Girl. By Gertrude 20 Forde ........................ 20 1081 Too Curious. By Edward J. Goodman ....... .............. 20 1086 Nora. B) Carl Detlef . ....... 20 1092 A Glorious Gallop. By Mrs. Edward K ennard ............. 20 1107 The from Scotland Yard. By H.F. Wood ....... 20 1120 The Story of an African Farm. By Ralph Iron (O live Schreiner) ........................... 20 The foregoing works are for sale by all newsdealers, or will be sent to any address, postae'.e free, on r eceipt of 12 cents for single num her., and 25 cents for double numbers, by the publisher. Addr ess GEORGE IUUNRO, l"llunl"o's l'ublishiug House, (P. O. Box 3751.) 17 to 27 Vandewater Street, New York. THE SEASIDE LIBRARY IS FOR SALE BY

PAGE 31

THE SEASIDE LIER.ARY -ORDI.NAHY EDITION MUNRO' S PUBLICATIONS. THE SEASIDE LIBRARY----ORDINARY EDITION. ALWAYS UNCHANGED AND UNABRIDGED. The Seaside Library, Ordinary Edition, is Never Out of Print. Persons who w i sh to purchase t h e fo ll ow in g works i n a co m p l ete and unabridged form are cautioned to o r de r and see that they get THE SEASlDE LTBRAUY, Ordina r y Editi o n as wo r ks p u b li shed in othe r li bra r ies arc frequent l y abri dged and i ncomplete Every num!Jer of THE SEASrnE Lr mu HY is unchanged and unabridged. Ne"srlea!Prs wis hing catalogues of T1rn SEASIDE LIBRARY, Ord inary Edition, bearing their imprint, will be s upplied on sending their names addresses, and numbe r r e quired. The following works are for sa l e b y a ll newsdea l ers, or w ill be sent to any address, postage free, on receipt of price, by the publi sher. Address P 0 Hox 37'il, Wol'le Bon gli. Christmas, 1884. (Edite1 by l\f iss M. E. Braddon) ............... 20 1996 Wyllard's Weird .............. 20 2075 One Thing Needful; or, The Penalty of Fate ............... 20 2079 Mohawks . .................... 20 Wo1l

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