Robert Emmet

Citation
Robert Emmet

Material Information

Title:
Robert Emmet a 4 act drama
Creator:
Boucicault, Dion, 1820-1890 ( author )
Language:
English
Physical Description:
143 leaves : illustrations : ; 25 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nineteenth century English drama ( lcsh )
Promptbooks -- Manuscripts -- 19th century ( lcsh )
Genre:
fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Scope and Content:
A promptbook for the play "Robert Emmet" including extensive notes.
General Note:
Promptbook including extensive notes.
General Note:
"A faithful history of a young Irish gentleman who sought the fate to bear upward and onward the banner with the strange device."
General Note:
"A drama in four acts, entitled Robert Emmet."
General Note:
Pages of "Robert Emmet" pasted onton leaves.
General Note:
Includes cast list of performers.
General Note:
Acts 2 and 3 included in accompanying material.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida Library
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
Open for public research.
Resource Identifier:
033804857 ( ALEPH )
926116483 ( OCLC )
B16-037 ( USFLDC DOI )
b16.37 ( USFLDC Handle )

Postcard Information

Format:
Book

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Full Text

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1 Robert Emmet by Dion Boucicault, 1884. A Drama in Four Acts Entitled Robert Emmet A faithful history of a young Irish gentleman who sought the fat of those enthusiasts destined to bear upward and onward the banner with the strange device. The first appearance of Robert Emmet before the world was on July 23rd, in the year 1803. He lived for 69 days. His career was completed within that period. He died on September 20th, aged 26. We possess records of what took place during those sixty nine days. His private correspondences, his adventures, his speeches, his conversations with friends, have been preserved. I have read them all. This play is simply composed of the incidents that occurred during this brief but eventual period, nothing added, but what is necessary to shape the matter into a perspicuous and dramatic form. The characters are untouched photographs of the originals. The language, especially that of Emmet, has been as far as possible preserved, and the sentiments put into his mouth are ascribed to him by those who know him well. It all happened so recently that we seem to reach him with our lives. My father, S. Boucicault, of Bachelors Walk, Dublin, was one of his associates, and the house in which twenty years after wards I was born, was amongst many others, searched for the fugitive rebel. The severest judges of Robert Emmet, those who condemned his objects and abhorred his political aims and principles, have testified freely to the purity of his motives and to the heroic romance of his character. His life, as a piece of rhetoric, is the noblest utterance of the breath of God through Man. The Irish poet his companion and friend, has pleaded that we should not breathe his name, but let it rest in the shade. It has not rested there. We were asked by the dying youth himself to wait until other times and other men can do justice to his character. It is a privilege we live in those other times to find myself amidst those other men, and to place as I do now an humble tribute upon the uninscribed tomb of Irelands best loved child. DION BOUCICAULT ACT I RATHFARNAM near Dublin. SCENE I A garden; night; on the RH is a house; the windows are lighted. A low wall; across stage at back A door in it L. of C. Shrubs RH ; up stage; spades, a scythe and garden tools; R against wall. MUSIC Enter from the house, coming from the back; ANNE DEVLIN ; she looks round with caution; then crosses to door on wall; listens; then recrosses to C towards house; calls : ANN. Miss Sarah! ( Enter SARAH CURRAN from the house.) Spake low. SARA. Is he there? ( Crosses to door L.C.)

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2 ANN. I don't know rightly! I hear two voices whispering outside. ( at door ) SAR. He always brings some trusted follower with him to stand on guard during our meeting. It may be Dwyer, or Quigley. ANNE: No; it is a strange voice. ( Two knocks at door.) Whist h! that is not his signal. Go inside awhile until I see who is in it ? (SARAH runs back into the house; Anne opens the door.) MUSIC ceases. Enter Major Sirr; his scarlet uniform is covered in a long cloak; his face is shaded by his hat. ANN. ( backing) What do you want? SIRR. I want a word with your master. ANN. He is engaged entertaining a party of friends at dinner. SIRR. His friends must excuse him. I bring this summons from the castle. ( Hands her a letter .) ANN. ( Taking it, reads superscriptions by the light from the hall .) "To the Right Honorable John Philpot Curran, on his majesty's service." SIRR. That business brooks no delay. See that it reaches him quickly. ( Exit ANN into house. SIRR watches her out, goes rapidly to door in wall. QUIGLEY and three men enter. SIRR goes up to them .) You three fellow s pass round to the porch of the house; don't show yourselves until you are called to act. (Exeunt the three officers behind the shrubs and off R.L.E .) You are certain the man we seek will present himself here tonight? QUIGLEY. Never fear. Shure he's afth er sendin' me ahead of himself to see the road is clear. He is hidin' now sumwhere widin' cast of my voice. He won't show up until he gets the offis from Miss Curran. Her maid, Anne Devlin, raps three times agin that dure in the wall. He will answer wid one rap; and she opens it. SIRRS. ( Xs R.) And lets our bird into the trap? Return to your post outside. QUIG LEY More power, Major. ( Exit door in wall. Looking away, Enter CURRAN from the house, with the letter opened in his hand; he is in full court dress .) CURRAN You are the bearer of this letter from the Lord Justices Be good enough to precede me to them. I follow you at once. Tell their Lordships I am at your heels. It is mighty provoking to be called away at such an hour. ( Re enter ANN ; with his coat and hat; CURRAN takes them from her. To ANN) Where is my daughter? ANN. In her room, sir. ( He takes his hat and coat .) CURRAN. Explain to her the motive of my departure. She will see my guests cared for during my absence. MUSIC ( Exit into house, followed by ANN.

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3 SIRR. Your daughter, Mr. Curran, will entertain a guest here tonight that I'll take care of! (He disappears behind the shrubs C.) ( Re enter ANN from house .) ANN. ( Looking round.) He is gone. (She crosses to door, then knocks three times; a pause; one knock is heard; she opens it.) Who is there? QUIG. ( Appearing. Looks round furtively .) Meself. ANN. Quigley! Did you see a strange man lavin' this dure awhile ago? QUIG. I did. Shure I was houlding his horse f or him while he was in here. Who was he? (down L.) ANN. A messenger from the castle! ( Re enter SARAH.) SARAH: Has he come? ( Enter ROBERT EMMET; he wears a long blue coat ) ROBT. Sara! SARAH. Robert! ( Embrace and pass up to back R.C .) ANN. ( To QUIGLEY.) Stand aside. ( Exit QUIGLEY, by door in wall. She locks the door after him. Robert and Sarah down C. behind them.) I'll wait in the hall beyant, and watch over yez. I'm not aisy in me mind tonight. ( Exit behind them .) ROBT. You tremble in my arms. You should fear nothing when so sheltered! Or is it the chill night air? Let me protect my treasure. ( wraps his cloak around her ) So! It folds may retain the sweet warmth of your form. ( Places her in chair L.C. and kneels beside her .) Sit there let me hear you r voice and look into your eyes. There are tears in them. SARAH. They are for my father whom I deceive. They are for my love, that I hide away as if it were a shame! During your long absence in France, he constantly urged me to receive the addresses of lo vers ( rises and turns away ) to whom I could offer no objection, excepting that there was another here in my heart; ( turning to her and taking her hands ) my old, old playfellow to whom I had given my life long, long ago. You came back at last, but in secret concealing ( Robert Xs R.) from everyone your presence in Ireland. What is this enterprise in which you are engaged? ROBT. It is one in which the fortunes and lives of others associated with me are involved, all we possess is staked on an event which wi ll be assured within the next few days. ( Xs to Sara) Till then be patient, dear one!

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4 SARAH. ( Sarah and Robert walking R .) Be it as you will! But I feel it is all so gloomy around us. Oh! for the honest daylight when I can show the love of which I am so proud; you have placed a crown of jewels on my head ---the emblem of a girl's nobility, ( leaving him and walking L .) but I may not wear it openly! ROBT. Oh, my love! what if we fail? What if I become broken in fortune? a fugitive from my home? an exile from my country? SARAH. You have no fortune but my love; you cannot be bankrupt there; you have no home, but my heart; no country but my arms; how can you be a fugitive or an exile? ( They embrace.) ( Re enter ANNE.) ANNE. Get him away quick for his life! Major Sirr with his following are searching the house. ROBT. ( rising. Robert crosses L. Sarah faces Anne ) Major Sirr! here! ANNE. 'Twas himself was in it a while ago! away wid ye! The three men at back appear, ANNE seizes the scythe and as t hey try to intercept ROBERTS escape by the door in the wall, she sweeps it round as if mowing at their legs Stand back! or I'll make twins of any one of ye. They retreat. SARAH runs to the door and vainly tries to turn the key SARAH: It's rusted in the lock. I cannot turn it. ( Enter Major Sirr, R. at house, R.H. standing on step; he points a pistol at ROBERT. SIRR. Robert Emmet. In the King's name I arrest you. ( Emmet retreats to L.) SARAH runs between SIRR and EMMET, and taking off the cloak holds it out so as to hide her lover .) SARAH. Unlock the door. I can't. SIRR. Stand aside, girl ( as he advances, she advances to meet him. He tries to pass her, but she swiftly throws the cloak over him and the pistol, while ROBERT succeeds in escaping by the door; SIRR disengages his arms, and replaces the pistol in his belt. SIRR advances on her. SARAH backs to door .) The man you have aided to escape is the leader of a rebel movement that threatens this city with bloodshed and plunder. His confederates are w atching his signal on the Wicklow Hills. The woods and bogs of Kildare are alive with them. You will have to answer for the blood that will flow from the streets of Dublin into the Liffey this night. SARAH. Let there be oceans of it, rather than one drop of his. ( Sirr Xs L .) (Enter NORMAN CLAVERHOUSE his sword is drawn R .) NORM: I was seeking for you, Miss Curran! nae sooner your gude father had excused himself and left us, than a posse of black devils, savin' your respect, raided the hoose wi' whingers and pistols searchin' everywhere. Even your ain rooms wor no sacred from their conseedrations. ( Down R .) SIRR. ( Xs C .) My men have their warrant, Captain Claverhouse, for what they did.

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5 NORM. (Sarah descends L .) And I had mine, for dhrivin' them before me from the premises. SIRR. I shall report your interference in this matter to the authorities at the Castle. (Beckons to his men. Men creep out and resume their positions 123. ) We tracked a leader of the rebel movement to this house, to whi ch he comes nightly, and in secret. ( SIRR crosses to her .) We found him at the feet of that lady. By her assistance he escaped. But within ninety days he will be at the foot of the gallows. (SIRR dismisses the 3 men, who pass fearfully behind Anne and exit) Goodnight. (At goodnight the three men go out slowl y 2 first 3 following 1 last) ANN. Bad night to you, you prowlin' kite! SIRR. ( In doorway .) Never fear, Ann Devlin. I'll get you in my clutches some day, and then I'll make it hot for you, my beauty! Exeunt officers at door ANN. Never fear, Henry Sirr, the devil will get yer in his clutches some day, and then he will make it hotter for you, my dandy. ( Exit Sirr; he carries Robert's cloak on his arm. Anne locks the door after him. Goes R.C and picks up chair.) SARA. ( Xing to chair .) Leave us, Ann. ( Exit Ann .) NORM. ( Advances to Sarah.) Miss Curran, I have made no disguise of my feelings toward yourself; and your father encouraged me to hope that, one day, I might persuade you to share my name; for I have loved you vera vera dearly! SARAH. I I know it. NORM. Was it true what that man said about you? SARAH. Yes! NORM. ( Up C. back .)You love this other one? SARAH. Ever since I k new how to love. I am sorry for you, Norman. I tried very hard to care for you, as my father wished me to do, but this other one returned and then I knew I had no heart to give you. NORM. You could na help it more than I can help loving you. ( Going to her and taking her hand.) If I canno' reap the harvest of your life, I can assist in bringing it home. I can ha' some share in your happiness. ( Xs R.) It seems your lover that meets you here is implicated in this rebellion? SARAH. He told me that he was en gaged in some secret enterprise, but until now I did not suspect its nature. NORM. Before to morrow it will be known in Dublin that, concealed in the house of the Right Honorable John Philpot Curran, His Majestys A ttorney G eneral and member of the Privy Council, the police discovered the rebel leader. SARAH. (Rises and Xs L. C.) My father is innocent. He had no knowledge, no suspicion of his presence here. I --

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6 NORM. ( Up to chair .) To prove his innocence he must plead your guilt. Will he pr otect his honor behind his daughter's shame? SARAH. What can I do? Oh, Norman! help me to shield him from the consequence of my guilty folly! NORM. ( Xs to her .) It is a cruel task you put upon me, Sarah. There is no way but one. You maun gae to this lover tonight. You must fly from your home. Seek him out. SARAH. Go to him? to Robert? to Mr. Emmet? NORM. Aye, if that be his name. Bribe him wi' yerself to abandon this cause. Take him away beyond the seas. Your flight will clear your father from any suspeecion and will explain the presence of Mr. Emmet in the house! 'Tis hard on me to say the words; it is vera bitter, dear. Before this night is past you must bear my rival's name. (Xs R.C.) SARAH. ( Goes to him .) Oh, Norman, Norman! You deserve a better woman than I am. ( Calls ) Ann, Ann my hat and shawl! (up to porch) She will accompany and protect me. NORM. ( X s up to her .) No; I will! I will never quit your side until you are Robert Emmet's wife. (Enter ANNE .) NORM. Where does he lodge? ANNE. In my father's cabin Butterfield Lane. I'll meet you there, and bring with me what things she will need. NORM. Come! ( Takes Sarahs hand and leads her out .) ANNE. ( Looking after them as they go out at garden door.) Scene 2 --( A street in Dublin. Enter QUIGLEY L. Looks back then Xs R .) QUIGLEY. ( Calls. ) Finerty Pat. Finerty Pat, ye divil, are ye there? (Enter Finerty R .) FINER. Is it yerself, Mike? Well, what luck? QUIG. ( Turning.) Is he here? Has he come ba ck? FINER. Who? QUIG. Emmet. FINER. Come back! D'ye mane to tell me he was not tuk? QUIG. No; bad luck to it! he escaped. ( Crosses R .)

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7 FIN: Did he show fight? QUIG: No; but he showed two pair of heels. The thrap was all right, and baited wid the girl The Major's following ten blackguards, not including him nor meself, wer in an' around the house when I led him along fair and aisy into the middle of them. FINER. How did he escape from thim all? QUIG. Divil a know, I know! for, shure I could not shew in it. I was outside in the lane, houlding the Major's horse, stooping down wid my ear close agin the dure, when I heard Sirr's voice calling on him to surrender. The dure flew open. I felt a fut on me back, and before I could rise a cry Emmet was in the saddle, and out of sight. ( Xs L .) FINER. ( Xs R.) Bad cess to the chance! Won't we lose the reward for his capture a hundred pounds that the Major promised should be paid to us tonight at the Castle? QUIG. Why not? We led thim to the bird; we gave thim a fair shot; if they missed it we are not to blame. Whist! may I never but is not this himself? (looking off left. ) ( Enter EMMET) ROB. Quigley, you saved my life! That horse you held ready for me at t he door was a G od send! (QUIGLEY and FINERTY exchange glances.) Without it, the men stationed in the lane to intercept me would have made me prisoner. How did you escape? QUIG. While they were afther yer honor I made off, aisy enough. Robert. I rode str aight to our depot at the Bull Inn where I left the animal in charge of Andy Devlin.( Go to C.) (Enter ANDY. L. ) ANDY. More power, sir. I've got him safe in the stables. Your honor was wantin' a purty baste to carry himself (Looking off L .) ROB. What news of Michael Dwyer? Where is he? ANDY. The Divil knows. He dar not shew his mug in Dublin where a reward of 500 is offered for it to stick on Newgate spikes. So he comes down from the hills in any shape but his own. ROB. He comes to visit his sweetheart, your sister Anne. ANDY. He comes to watch over yourself, sir! You are never out of his sight. Maybe that watchman there, asleep in his box, is Dwyer himself. Last night, while you were at the Bull In n, I bought a pint of cockles from an ould fisherwoman that stood outside the dure. Be japers, Im sure twas Dwyer himself inside that ould petticoat. QUIG. Youre mistaken. I left him last night at Glendalough waiting orders to march his men to the S calp.

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8 ANDY. I was dodgin off widout payin for the cockles when that ould hag caught me by the scruff of the neck. D id ye ever feel Dwyers grip? QUIG. No, but Ive heard of it. ANDY. Its not the fist of a man, its the paws of a bull dog. ROB He must meet us tonight at the camp where we hold a council of war to decide on our plan of action. I have prepared the papers to submit to the staff, the manifesto to the people, the list of our forces and place of action. ( Xs R back to C .) Surely, I placed them in my breast. I cannot have lost no, no. Where can I have placed them? If lost, and they should fall into the hands of Ah! my cloak! (QUIGLEY and FINERTY turn.) They were in a breast pocket. I left it with Miss Curran. Run, Andy quick to Rathfarnham for your life, find your sister Ann; get from her the cloak; bring it to Butterfield Lane, where you will find me. ANDY. Will I take the Major's horse sir? ROBT: No; the manner of my escape is known, and search is, doubtless, being made for the brute. He will be looked for and recogni zed. ANDY: Owow! I left him wid Larry Fox and a pail of white paint. By this time the baste wud not know himself, for he's got three stockins and a bald face on him. Whoo, yer sowl! The Major will want another mount. I'll sell him this one to morrow if ye r honor's afraid to back him. ROB. Be off, you imp, and be careful of the papers. ( Exit Andy ROB. ( Xs C.) This thoughtless act of mine might undo us all. He who undertakes the business of a people should have none of his own. Quigley Finerty you will be present tonight at the camp. The hours are pregnant with our cause. We cannot tell at what moment it ma y spring into life. (Exit QUIG: ( Looking after him .) Pat, yer sowl! Our fortune is made! It is not one hundred pounds, but a thousand pounds, I am goin' to claim for this night's work. FINER. A thousand pounds, Mike? What for? QUIG: For th e list of our forces; for the plans of attack; for all the purtiklars of the whole business. FINER. I see. You mane we should follow Andy Devlin and seize the papers on him? QUIG. No. The cloak was tuk away by Major Sirr. He has it now! But we never dhramed what a prize lies hid in the pocket of it. Tare alive, Pat! is not a thousand too little to ax for all this? The lists, Pat! ( Xs R.) and all the names in Emmet's own hand writin' ho, ho, big names! men o' quality that no one suspec ts. ( Back to C .) Put them down at ten pounds a head! tottle them up like onions on a sthring. Then the plans! ( X s L .) FINER. It's little enough, indeed, to pay min like ourselves; for, afther all, when you think of it? sure it is the counthry itself that we have for sale.

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9 QUIG. ( Quigley Xs in front of Finerty .) Be jabers, Pat, it is not everybody that has got a counthry to sell! (Exeunt R.) Scene 3 A Room in Dublin Castle. LORD NORBURY and LORD KILWARDEN seated at table, R.H., examining papers. (TINEY WOLFE looks in at door on flat at back .) TINEY. May I come in? KIL. Yes, if you will not stop very long. NOR. I must overrule the objection. Stop as long as you please. TINEY. ( To back of table .) Lord Norbury, you deserve a kiss for that. NOR. Offering bribes to the Bench is an awful offense! TINEY. You know, papa, we promised to call at the Vice Regal lodge to night. Shall you be detained here very long? KIL. No, Tiney. We have some important business to transact with Mr. Curran, we expect at any moment. NOR. I think, Kilwarden, you may leave this matter to me to settle. Your daughter is weary. TINEY. You are very kind to consider me. NOR. Who would fail to consider you? Had I so sweet a loving and child beside me I should be, perhaps, as good a man as your father is, my dear. (Enter CURRAN L. U. E .) TINEY. ( Running to him .) Oh, Mr. Curran, I am so glad you have come! How is Sarah? CUR. Complaining, Tiney. Complaining very badly, indeed. TINEY. Oh, I am so sorry! What is her complaint? CUR. That she sees so little of you. TINEY. ( Curran puts down hat and cloak on table L. C .) There is very little to see. Papa, dear, (Crosses to Kilwarden) may I spend the evening tomorrow with Miss Curran? KIL. Yes, dear; I'll lend you for a few hours. TINEY. What will you charge for the loan?

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10 KIL. A dozen big kisses which you will bring me back. Keep them fresh on your lips. There, run into the next room and amuse yourself while we despatch our business. ( Curran Xs to fireplace.) TINEY. ( To Curran as she goes out.) Don't keep him very long. ( Exit .) CUR. ( Back to fireplace.) The summons to attend your lordships found me at dinner with some friends. What has happened? Has a French expedition landed in Kerry? Has the British fleet broken into another mutiny? KIL. The danger is much nearer home. LORD NOR. These depositions sworn this afternoon contain disclosures of an alarming condition of affairs in the adjoining counties of Wicklow and Kildare. KIL. Dublin is threatened; two thousand men are now under arms, and are marching on the city. CURRAN. ( Back of table C .) Two thousand jackasses! I don't believe a word of it. These government spies are purveyors of mares' nests, and make a market of your fears! (Crosses down L .) My Lords, the Revolutionary spirit of Ireland was broken in '98, and was buried three years ago, when the Act of Union swept our leading men cross the channel and into the British parliament. It was a crafty measure for it left the body of the people without a head. I have just passed through the streets, the city is asleep and not dreaming of disturbance. LORD NOR. But these affidavits are very precise. CURRAN. ( Walking back to fireplace .) If the government supports a host of spi es, the rogues are bound to encourage your fears, and keep them alive! Whom do they pretend is at the head of this new insurrection. KIL. Robert Emmet. CURRAN. What? Robert? the son of my old friend, the doctor? Why, the boy is in France, and has been there for months past. Had he been in this country mine is the first house he would have visited. ( Crosses to C .) ( Enter MAJOR SIRR L .) SIRR. He is here in Dublin. It is strange you should profess ignorance of his whereabouts, when he is a dai ly visitor at your house, where I found him in your daughter's company an hour ago. CUR. You found him in my house? SIRR. By virtue of a search warrant issued by the Privy Council! While you were entertaining your friends at dinner, she was entertaining her lover --KIL. Silence, sir! You forget you are speaking to a father. SIRR. When treasonfelony is abroad, I forget everything but my duty. CUR. What evidence do you bring to sustain this infamous charge?

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11 SIRR. (Turning and beckoning.) Come forward, Mr. Quigley. Step this way, Mr. Finerty. ( Crosses to fireplace, leaves hat and whip on mantelpiece .) (Enter QUIGLEY followed by FINERTY who carries ROBERTS cloak. ) ( Going to table .) This man ( points to QUIGLEY) is associated with Emmet, and is his tr usted follower. QUIG. 'Twas meself guided him to Mr. Curran's house awhile ago. CURRAN. ( Xs to Q uig.) May I ask what office you hold besides that of traitor? QUIG. ( Going down L .) I'm Colonel in the army of the Irish Republic. KIL. Your face is familia r to me. Were you not on your trial for murder before me last year? QUIG. It was my brother, my lord you hanged that time. It wasn't me. CURRAN. And on no better evidence than the croak of this jailbird. Y ou violated my house? ( Curran X s L .) QUIG. (turning around L and up t o table) Never fear, if it is evidence you want, I hould a crop as fine as you ever handled. Here is Emmet's cloak ( Sirr starts and crosses rapidly to Quig.) that he left behind him in your garden, and in the pocket we find these papers. Wait now! ( He takes some packets of paper from the pockets of the cloak, and hands them to SIRR.) SIRR. ( Examining it .) Lists of the commanding officers and of the insurgent force in Kildare. ( Hands papers to NORBURY.) QUIG. You'll find my name among the first on the list. (SIRR passes the paper to NORBURY; he and KILWARDEN examine it .) Here's another one. (SIRR takes it.) SIRR. Plan of attack! Points of check. Lines of defense. ( Xs back of table .)This seems to be a well digested con spiracy to seize the city of Dublin. ( passes the paper .) QUIG. Divil a less! And it's short work we would make of you, Major, to begin with. You're the titbit our pikes are hungry for. CURRAN. I must have some proof better than this to satisfy me that the son of my old friend and schoolmate, Dr. Emmet, is associated with these ruffians. FIN. May be this bit o' writing will open your eyes. (hands a letter to Curran who reads it silently, walking down C .) (Enter TINEY at back. She stops and listens .) CURRAN. My God! it is true! QUIG. Aha!

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12 CURRAN. This letter is written by my unhappy child to Mr. Emmet, and it confirms all you have stated. ( As Curran turns Tiney exits .) SIRR: ( Taking the letter from CURRAN. Curran Xs L. C .) It will form an interesting episode in the case let us see what she says. ( Behind table .) KIL. ( putting his hand upon the paper ) Major S IRR have you a daughter? SIRR. I have. KIL. ( He tears the paper .) So have I. ( Sirr walks to mantelpiece .) CURRAN. ( X s up to table R .) I ask your lordships to acquit me of all complicity in a knowledge of this business. NOR. Be assured, we do so heartily. KIL. We are convinced of your ignorance in the matter. SIRR. ( Turning at mantelpiece .) 'Tis more than I am. CURRAN. I am glad to have secur ed your evil estimation, sir, it entitles any gentleman to the respect of this community. ( Crosses to table L. and takes up hat.) SIRR. I hold his Majesty's commission. CURRAN. So does the hangman! Goodnight, my L ords! (Norbury and Kilwarden rise and bow.) (Exit L ) KIL. ( Xs L) There can be no doubt that we stand in presence of a formidable conspiracy. NOR. The country is in danger. QUIG. And no lie in it. NOR. What do these wretched men propose to do, to accomplish? SIRR. (Crosses to C then to L then C) They propose to seize this Castle of Dublin where a guard of 17 men forms at present its sole defense to carry off the Lord Lieutenant to their camp on the mountains, there to hold the person of His Excellency as a hostage and proc laim the Irish Republic. QUIG. One and indivisible. NOR. What is to be done. ( Tiney reappears ) SIRR. ( Pointing to Quigley and Finerty ) These men hold offices of trust and command under Emmet they are in our pay. The military must be called out promptly and secretly posted where their fire can sweep the streets of Dublin. Then Quigley and Finerty will give the people

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13 Emmet's signal to rise, and before he can arrive with his troops to control the mob, the regulars will make short work of the crowd. ( Tiney Xs to fireplace, leans against it back to audience .) KIL. You cannot proceed to use force until the people commit some breach of the peace. QUIG. Oho! be aisy. We'll get the pikes to work. Maybe I'd redden one o' them myself in the blood of some man a big one whose death would rise a howl. KIL. This is horrible! NOR. Egad, Kilwarden, such means were successfully employed five years ago, in '98. SIRR. ( Xs C .) We must bring rebellion to a head. QUIG. And save your own? FIN ER : Thrue for ye, Mike! ---and we'd like to know the price of heads now. QUIG: Yes. What's to be our reward for the crop we bring? SIRR: What do you claim? (Ris es and crosses C) QUIG: That's the chat! We want a thousand pounds for Emmet's and fifty a piece for each other head we bring to the dock. FIN: An' we'd like to see a little ready money down on account. SIRR: ( Throwing them a roll of notes .) Count that. (FINERTY and QUIGLEY eagerly bending over table. L.H. Counting money .) NOR: You expect the insurgents when they find the first outbreak is defeated will become discouraged, will desert and regain their homes? SIRR: No! They will come here ha! ha! 'Twill be a race among such men as those. ( P oints to FINERTY and QUIGLEY ) who will get here first to betray their leaders. QUIG: Thirty two thirty three! Divil a doubt about that. Thirty five hi! hi! NORB. ( Commencing to write at table. R.H .) Lord Kilwarden is now on his road to the Vice Regal Lodge. He will submit to His Excellency the measures you propose to precipitate the outbreak by the help of our agents amongst the mob. I will draft your plan, Major, if you will repeat the particulars (MISS WOLFE advances and stands beside LORD KILWARDEN.) SIRR. ( Turns and sees her .) Miss Wolfe! KIL. Tiney!

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14 QUIG. ( Counting.) Fifty eight, fifty nine! TINEY. Go on; don't mind me. NOR. ( Nor and Sirr exchange glances .) Affairs of state cannot be discus sed before you. TINEY. I see that you hesitate and look at each other as though the affairs of S tate were guilty things to which a father could not listen in the presence of his child. You dare not unfold your thoughts before me. Is it not so? NOR. You a re not old enough to judge TINEY. My father is, and he said it was horrible. You see, papa, I overheard what those men proposed. Forgive me if my heart comes to your side and pleads to stand by yours. You taught me how to be worthy of your name and of your race. I was nursed on your breast. Let her now give you back the teachings of your love. Have no share in this infamy. Set your honest face against it. SIRR. ( X s to fireplace, takes hat and whip then down C.) Are we come to this? that the Chief Justice of Ireland cannot share our councils without an appeal to a schoolgirl. (Signal.) KIL. ( During Tineys speech Kilwarden rises, Xs to fireplace and then back to table R.C.) My daughter is right, my lord. I will take charge of these papers They will explain, if they do not justify, my resignation of the office I hold under the crown. Come, Tiney, let us go. ( He embraces her .) ACT DROP FALLS. Act 2nd SCENE The Cottage at Butterfield Lane. Enter ANNE DEVLIN. She carries a small valise; she looks around, advances, and feels for the table, on which she places the valise; then returns to the door. ANNE: Come in, Miss. Enter SARA and NORMAN. ( Behind table .)Wait till I fetch a light from the kitchen; may be I'd find a sod o' turf a live in the fire there. ( Going out L .) I must feel my way in the dark. SARA. ( Hand on chair .) So am I, Norman, feeling my way in the dark! in doubt and in fear. NORM. ( X s R .) There's no doubt between right and wrong no fear where there is love. SARA. Can you not see the position in which I place him? NORM. I can. I wish I were in his place.

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15 Re enter ANNE with light. Puts it on table ANNE. I heard him moving overhead in his room. He is there. ( Behind table.) My brother Andy will soon be here wid the outside car, to take the masther to the mountains; for the camp is moved to the Scalp, and the boys are hungry for himself. (S ARA sits at table .) NORM. The Scalp! Why, that pass is within sight of Dublin. Is rebellion so close to us? ANNE. ( Up to window. Shuts it .) Close! It looks up out of every cellar and down from every garret windy in the city. It runs in the gutters, and sweeps like the blast through the alleys and the lanes! ( shuts door .) You are breathing it and you don't know it, nor feel it. Whist! I hear the masther comin'. ( Down to Sara.)Will I send for the priest, Miss, and bring him here? SARA. No! ( Rises quickly.) Is it not enough that I present myself in so unmaidenly a manner? What will he take me for? ANNE. ( Sara s R.C .) For betther or for worse! The sooner the betther; the later, the worse for you both. There's Father Donnelly lives at Cabinteely, convaniant to the road from this to the Scalp. You can stop there an' wake him up. The business is short and sweet, and no del ay. When it is over the masther must hurry to the boys in the mountains; he is expected there by midnight. NORM. By that time he must be on the seas. Oh, that I were at the bottom of them, while you and he were passing over me to a happy life! ANNE. He is here! (Enter EMMET. Sara turns to meet him. He is dressed in the Irish uniform ) ROBT: Sara in this place! Who what brought you here? NORM: ( X s C. to Robert .) I did, Mr. Emmet. Permit me to present myself, that I may spare Miss Curran some embarrassment. I am Norman Claverhouse, Captain in His Majesty's Ninety third Highlanders. I was a guest in Mr. Curran's house tonight, when Major Sirr arrived with a search warrant. (Taking SARA s hand. Robert during speech in front of table .) In the absence of our host her father I took the liberty of driving the Major and his posse from the place; and as her rejected lover I now bring her to the only man who can repair the injury this night's business may do to the name of a lady to whom we are equ ally devoted. ROBT: Are you aware, sir, to whom you have rendered this service? NORM: (Dropping her hand.) I have rendered this service to her who owns my life. ROBT: Do you know I am one whose name men whisper fearfully; an outlaw, whom to see and not to betray is a crime; a rebel, whom to serve is a capital offense? NORM: ( Back to audience .) I only know that she loves you---that makes me at once your foe and your accomplice! ROBT: Martyrs have died in the flames who had not in their breasts so brave a heart; for they

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16 fell assured of paradise, while you suffer, renouncing your hopes of heaven. Let me feel your hand in mine; the other on my shoulder s So; I had rather be thus ennobled than feel the sword of a king there. (Norman X s up to window back to audience .) ANNE. ( Aside. ) Well! 'Tis mighty hard on women that one girl should have two such lovers, and waste one o' them like that. SARA. ( Robert X s to her .) He brought me to your side; he bade me seek the refuge of your arms it is all the home I have now. Hide me from myself, for I am ashamed of what I do. ROBT. ( Takes her in his arms. Place s her in chair. Standing beside her .) We shall be married tonight; and if forthwith this gentleman will further extend his good offices, he will conduct you to my mother's house, where you will find the home I dare not enter. NORM. Why not? ROBT. Because I would not bring over it the cloud that now obscures my life! Becaus e I would not make those I love the sharers of my fate! NORM. (Down R .) You must quit that life for her sake. Tonight after your marriage, you will leave Ireland and take her with you. SARA. Not for my sake, but for your mother's for your own. ROBT. (After a pause .) You ask me to abandon the cause into which my voice has drawn thousands of my fellow countrymen; to desert them in the field on the brink of battle; to play the executioner, and leave them headless. Oh, it could be done so easily, for the ir trust in Robert Emmet is so blind! Bribed with your person, he can leave the fools in the fell trap baited with his lies to perish (Crosses to Norman .) as you know, sir, they will perish like helpless dogs flung into the lion's den. Eternal scorn would point its finger at the deed! and say the hand that Emmet gave to Curran's daughter was full of Ireland's blood; in the breast on which she rested was the heart of a renegade; and the name she shared was blasted with dishonor! ( Back to Sara who th rows her arms around him.) NORM. You are so occupied with the peril in which your honor stands that you overlook hers. What matters it if her name be scathed with shame, if yours shall live unblemished? You say that you would not make those you love share rs of your fate; yet you would make her so! You would not bring the cloud that obscures your life over theirs ; yet you would have her live in its shadow! (Norman up R. Sara rises towards Norman, then turns and kneels by Robert s side, in the chair.) ROBT. God, who knows my heart, have mercy on me, and direct me what to do! SARA. ( At his feet.) And you who know my heart, have mercy on me and on us both! Have mercy on my love, that now pleads for itself at your feet. Oh! I am helpless to persuade him; I ask him to spare his life that is my own my own all I have in this world. ROBT. Sir, have you no council to offer us? NORM. ( Up and down R. to door.)Yes; marry her! Follow your mad career; stop here, and I'll find myself within three months heir to your widow!

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17 ANNE. ( Aside. ) O h Michael Dwyer! If it wasn't for your ugly mug, that I'm so fond of, that fellow might make me a Scotchwoman any day that was plazin' to him. God bless him! ( Knocking heard. Norman down R. Sara rises. Ann X s to door unbars it Enter ANDY.) AND. Where s the masther? ROBT. Here! ANNE. What makes you so pale, dear. AND. Bad news. I put the Major's horse into a car; for it is not between shafts they would be on the look for him. ( Pointing to Norman) Who's that? ROBT. Never mind him. ANDY: 'Tis the coat on him that bothers me. ANNE: I'll go bail for what's behind it; go on, alanna! AND. ( X s to Sarah.) Divil a sowl was in your house, miss, when I got there; so I turned back. As I drove past Portobello Barracks, t wo men came out and hailed me, axed me to take them quick to Island Bridge. Be jabers! me heart stud still as they climbed outside the car, for one o' thim was Major Sorr himself jauntin' behind his own horse. ROBT: ( X s to Andy .) You heard what they sa id? ANDY: Maybe I didn't cock my ear! "We've got him now," ses he; "he's pounded! The papers the whole bag of insurgent thricks is in my hand. There's the list of their members; the names of their leaders; the plans of attack all in Emmet's own writin '," ses he, "not to spake of his man and pestol," ses he. ANNE. His what? AND. 'Tis what he said his man and pestol to the people. ROBT. Manifesto! AND. It's all the same to me! ROBT. But these papers were in the cloak I left with you. SARA. Sirr carried it away with him. ROBT: Betrayed! Betrayed! ANDY: That's what the Major said. Tomorrow them papers will be published in the Morning Journal, and the news that Emmet has betrayed his followin' and sowld out o' the business. The Government has his own handwritin' to show for it. That news will put down the risin' quicker

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18 than all the horse, foot and artillery in the country could do it, ses he. NORM: Fortune stands your friend. By this mischance your cause is lost. ROBT: ( X s Stage .) Aye! Is it so! so! so! I'm trapped and caught! Now, by Saint Patrick, they shall find my foot upon their necks, choking the lie in their throats, befor e their black hearts have time to give it flight. ( Up to Andy then down stage R .) To morrow, you said, they begin their work; tonight I shall begin mine. Before the sun rises on Dublin a thousand men, now camped at the Scalp, shall descend upon the city a nd seize the Castle. Our drums will call the people to arms, and then at their head I'll meet this calumny. SARA. Robert, I beseech you ROBT. It is too late, Sara too late! I have no choice but to vindicate my life; ask him. ( X s to Norman.) NORM. ( As Robert X s R. Norman X s L .) He is right. ROBT. Andy Devlin! AND. That's me. ROBT. What men have we within call? AND. Three, your honor, in the loft outside, and one howldin' the horse. ROBT: Give them the signal. (ANDY goes out to the door and whistles .) I must ask you, sir, to pledge your honor that what has passed here in your presence will be held sacred by you. NORM. When I leave this I shall make my way straight to the Castle, and report to his Excellency every word of it. ROBT. ( Back to audience .) I knew you would. ( Four men appear at the door.) Reilly, you will stand guard with your men over this house until sunrise. Then, and not till then, you will liberate this gentleman. He is your prisoner for the night. NORM. What a release! I am obliged to you. ROBT. Anne Devlin, you will take Miss Curran to my mother's house in Stephen's Green; your brother Andy will drive you there. Farewell, my own one. I will bring you back a name you will be proud to wear (he holds her in his arms), or leave you a memory worthy of your love. ( Close in. He embraces her. Exit .)

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19 SARA. ( Falls on her knees as ROBERT leaves. ) God bless and guard my love! ( Scene closes in ) Scene 2. A gorge in the mountains near the Sc alp. Enter QUIGLEY meeting BRANGAN; both in uniform. QUIGLEY. Well, how are things workin' in the camp? BRANG. Finely; the boys are getting wild as muzzled dogs! There's no howldin' them. QUI G The sight of Dublin lyin' asleep beyond there is mate and dhrink to fellows starvin' for a fight! What news of Dwyer? BRANG. He is lying still in the Devil's Glen, waitin' till he gets the offer to join us wid four hundred Wexford men. QUIG. You must cross the hills tonight. Tell him that Emmet has sold us all, body and bones, to the Castle. They are goin' to make him a lord, an' rise him to a big place at coort tell him. BRANG. Stop that enough! When I get as far as that in the lie, Dwyer will shut my mouth forever. QUIG. There's no lie in it; look at th em sheets; they are fresh and wet wid the ink from the Castle press. Rade them! (He hands him a small handbill.) There's our s a cret plans, the roll call of our leading min, and the divil an' all, printed from papers in Emmet's own handwritin', on show in Major Sirr's office. BRANG. Have you seen them? QUIG. Sure, any one can see them. They will be cried for a hapenny tomorrow at every corner in the city, from Ring's End to Kilmainham. He has turned approver agin us. BRANG. Tare alive! I did not think he would go do a thing like that! taking the very bread out of our mouths. He's as bad as one of ourselves. The boys will go wild when they hear this. O wurra! is it for this we have been drillin' and marchin' and starvin' for weeks past! 'Tis mighty hard upon us, entirely so it is! QUIG. Go amongst them; tell them so! Tell them the Bank of Ireland must pay for it. It is full wid the poor man's money the rints he has paid to the landlords! Then there's the city itself. Let us have a hack at it. Them Dublin tradesmen are castlefed pigs, rowlin' in goold. BRANG. A bowld dash at them would fill our sacks, an' we could be off to the hills and bogs before them redcoats could fall in, or them dhragoons could saddle up. QUIG. That's the work! Go you among the men; scatter them bills among them; I'll get a howlt of the officers. We will court martial Emmet break him. What do we want, anyhow, wid a general? Cock him up, and here's the end of it. Let aich county folly its own leaders, and divi l take the hindmost!

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20 BRANG: I'm wid ye, Quigley. I was light porther for awile at Goggins', the jewellers, in Dame Street; I know the place in the shop where a handful of diamonds is kept that would buy a barony in Roscommon. QUIG. To work! Brangan to work! (Exeunt. ) Scene 3 The camp at the Scalp. Shed or ruined cabin R.H., which serves as headquarters; rude hovels are scattered over the hill side; watch fires, around which figures are lying and pikes are piled; Dublin and the B ay are seen below, in the distance; night; the city is sparkling with lights. FINERTY, DUGGAN, and MAHAFFEY are in this cabin; groups of men in green stuffs uniform are drinking, smoking, etc.; laughter. CHORUS Enter FINERTY from shed. Stands R. FIN. Or dher in the camp. QUIG. I have come from Dublin where the people are lookin' out for ye. ( Exeunt FINERTY, MAHA, DUGG into shed. They bring out sundry articles.) ALL. Hurroo for Dublin! QUIG. Aisy, boys! Youll be there soon enough; Ill go bail. Here is a list of the officers of the C rown, the ministers, and all the big men. They will be on our hands. What's to be done wid them? FIN. A few executions, to begin wid, might have a fine effect. QUIG: It would make our cause respectable. ( Enter a cro wd of men, with BRANGAN; some of the men have the bills in their hands. BRANGAN hands papers to the officers and to QUIGLEY) BRANG: News from Dublin! Emmet has turned his green coat. It was lined with red all the while. He has sowld us. ALL: Oo! ( Takes the papers from BRANGAN.) QUIG: The proofs are plain enough. Robert Emmet is a traitor, or why is he not here? EMMET enters ROBT. He is here! Why do you turn your faces from me? Speak, men! Who accuses me? FINERTY. That print.

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21 ROBT. ( After looking at them ) I scorn to fight with lies. That they are so needs no words, for I am here. Quigley was with me when the thieves robbed me of those papers, and now they charge me with selling to them what they stole. QUIG. 'Tis all one how t hey got the information; we are betrayed. Now they are ready to meet and to crush us. ROBT. ( Xs L. then back to C .) No, the documents they stole shall serve to deceive them; they shall fall into the trap they set for me. To night, before their troops can be moved, we shall swoop down upon Dublin. ( 8 of the men advance a little to R.C. at back .) QUIG. To night? ROBT. Relying on this information, they will be unprepared. QUIG. What can we do with a handful of men? ROBT. ( Xs R.) With a handful of men Bonapa rte put an end to the Reign of Terror and released France; with a handful of men Cortes conquered Mexico; with a corporal's guard Cromwell cleared the House of Commons, and founded the first English republic. ( Back to audience C .) What would these men ha ve? Let those amongst ye that are of this mind assemble round him yonder, so let me count how many honest men there be here who will stand by our cause and by their country. ( The men go to the R.H., and stand behind QUIGLEY FINERTY and BRANGAN. The 8 men rejoin Quigley .) ROBT. ( After burying his face in his hands.) God forgive me for having done this thing! I have been self deceived by my love for this helpless people children of misery by my blind devotion they have been brought to this infamous extremity. Let the penalty be mine alone; let no blood but mine be shed; accept my young life in expiation of my foolish faith. My friends my countrymen! I go hence to Dublin alone, and in this uniform the badge of treason; I carry with m e that flag the emblem of rebellion; I go with my life to redeem yours; to offer my hands to the chains, my head to the executioner! (Some of the men cross to EMMETS side .) There is yet time to retrieve your errors, and to make your submission. Put off those uniforms; bury them out of sight; and seek your homes quietly by unfrequented paths and by night! ALL. ( Murmuring) No! No! We'll stand by your honor to the death. ( Some more men join EMMETS side .) ROBT. If you stand by me you must march as childre n of Erin, as united Irishmen, whose one hope is freedom; not as banditti, whose sole object is plunder. The green flag that led our countrymen at Fontenoy under Sarsfield has never been dishonored, and it shall not be so under Robert Emmet, so help me God! (The rest of the men, uttering loud cries, join the crowd around him, some kneeling at his feet .) QUIG. This is mighty fine, but it comes too late; two hundred boys from Kildare left for Dublin an hour ago. The divil himself could not stop them now. RO BT. No, but Michael Dwyer could! His men, five hundred strong, are posted at the foot of this hill, with orders to shut the road.

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22 QUIG. Michael Dwyer is at Glendalagh! DWY: You lie, Quigley! He is here. (DWY striding across to R .) ALL: Hurroo! ROBT. Hold, Dwyer! I'll have no fighting amongst you. DWY. Divil a fear o' that! Is there, Quigley? Give me your hand. ( He takes QUIGLEYS hand.) By this and by that, by signs on your face that I never mistook yet, and by the pulse in our hearts that spake to one another in this grip, I know that I will die by your hand, or you will die by mine. ( Shakes his hand.) Now, masther dear, I'm ready for your orders. ROBT. Lead three hundred of your men by Enniskery and Rathmines; enter the city on the south by Harcour t Street; your point is Stephen's Green; be there by two o'clock. Who commands under you? DWY. Phil. Maguire; he is howldin' the Kildare boys below there. QUIG. Maguire! the man is dumb. DWY. Thrue fur ye, so he can not turn informer. But he is mighty t alkative wid his hands; don't get into any argument wid him. ROBT. Let Maguire unite the Kildare men with the rest of your Wexford boys, and sweep around, entering the city by James's Gate; rouse the liberties, and occupy Thomas Street by St Patrick's. QUIG. The Kildare troops are under my command; they will not march without their officers. DWY. Oh, be asy! You will be there at their head beside Maguire; he'll take care of you. ROBT. My men will march by Slellorgan and Brunswick Street; ou r point is College Green. Thus our forces, eleven hundred strong, penetrating the city on three sides, will meet at the Castle. Before sunrise Dublin will be ours; the citizens will awake to find Ireland a republic, and our people numbered among the nations of the world. ALL. Hurroo! To Dublin! ROBT. Fall in! (Repeat of the chorus, while the men fall into rank ; the scene closes in as they march off .) Scene 4 A room in the house of MRS. EMMET. (Enter CURRAN and LORD NORBURY, preceded by a servant L.) CURR. Be good enough to inform Miss Curran that her father is here and desires to see her. I believe she is in this house. (Enter ANNE DEVLIN R. Exit servant. )

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23 ANNE. She is here, sir; sitting by the bedside of Mrs. Emmet. CUR. You were the companion of her flight. ANNE. No; she had a guard of honor all the way, and with him she left her home. CUR. Your master, doubtless? ANNE. No; betther still. It was the lover you gave her Captain Claverhouse. NORB. ( Xs to ANNE.) My nephew! I can not believe it! Whe re is he? ANNE. I left him asleep by the fireside of Robert Emmet, where he is passing the night. Your honors look surprised to find young people have hearts, and hearts will have their own way. Two years ago you gave your daughter to young Emmet. Then you took her from him, to give her to young Claverhouse. You see she knew her own mind, if you didn't know yours, and that's the way of it. ( Up to window C .) ( Enter SARA.) CUR. Are you aware what you have done? SARA. Yes, father. I have become the bride of a rebel, and to rescue and protect your house from any suspicion I left it, when my presence there became a reproach. NORB. ( Xs to Sarah.) My dear child, the man for whom you have made this useless sacrifice, betrayed by his own followers, is already doomed to an inevitable and ignominious death. SARAH. He knows it, and will face it if it comes to that. CUR. Is it my gentle Sara, my daughter that speaks. SARA. ( Xs to Curran.) No, father, it is the outlaw's wife; forgive me if I have been true to myself. When your nephew, my Lord, discovered how it was with me, he told me how I should vindicate my fa i ling honor and my own heart; he stood by my side while I obeyed his counsel. Do not mistake my misfortune for my fault, and believe me, it was for your dear sake I was moved, not for my own. ANNE. ( Who has been looking from the window ) There is a carriage at the door. NORB. ( Into R. corner .) It is mine; it brought us here. ANNE. There's a mighty big crowd gathering round it; I'll go see what they w ant. ( Exit .) NORB. ( Sarah up to window .)The rogues want six months in Kilmainham, or a visit to Botany Bay. SARA. Be advised, my Lord, and escape to your country house at Cloncilla. Emmet knows that Major Sirr has possession of the plans of the insurrect ion, and already he has changed them. ( Xs t o Norbury. Cries outside .)

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24 NORB. ( Running to the window .) The square below is full of the mob. What do they want? SARA. Hark! ( Cries of NORBURY!" NORBURY!") Do you hear? They want you. ( Advancing to Norbury .) (Re enter ANNE R .) ANNE. Bar the door; make fast the shutters on the ground floor; let loose Master Robert's wolf hound and load the two blunderbusses in the hall. CUR. What is the matter? What brings the people here? ANNE. All Dublin is awake to night, and on foot. The air is full of growl and the rumbling of a storm. It wanted little to make it burst. They saw your liveries standing at this dure, and that invited the lightning. (Norbury Xs L Blows heard below, and cr ies; smashing of glass .) CUR. ( Advances to window .) They are attacking the house. ANNE. Divil a doubt of it! NORB. What do they want? ANNE. Your life no less. CUR: Are they mad? ANNE. Aye! wid joy; for they say Emmet is entering Dublin from King's End and Rathmines while Michael Dwyer, wid five hundred men, is at James's Gate. ( Enter servant, who whispers to ANNE .) NORB. Before help can arrive they will wreck the house, and we shall perish. ANNE. The girl says they have brought up a load of straw that they are piling agin the dures and windies below; there's no fightin' agin fire. SARA. Leave me to defend you. ( She goes to the window; cries and shots; she advances on to the balcony, and raises her hand; silence .) Men of Dublin my name is Sara Cu rran, and I am the bride of Robert Emmet. ALL. Hurroo! Long life to ye! God bless ye both! SARA. This is my husband's house, his mother lies sick beside me; take that straw and lay it down carefully on the road, that her sleep may not be broken by the noises of the street. My father, John Philpot Curran, is here; he came in that carriage to see me; he will return home in it. CRY. Three cheers for Curran! SARA. No! Be silent, and respect the rest of Emmet's mother. Good night to you all. Begone! ( She c loses the window .) You are safe, my L ord. Anne and I will escort you by the back premises

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25 and the stable lane to Dawson Street, where we shall find a car. Meanwhile my father will enter your carriage, in the presence of the crowd, and drive home. Come! ( Ex it Curran, preceded by a servant, R. ANNE, SARAH and NORBURY L .) SCENE changes to COLLEGE GREEN and the HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT Crowds of people; sellers of fruit, ballads, etc.; college lads; coal porters; a blind fiddler. Here's yer hot pitaties! Cherries ripe, all ripe, a hapenny the stick! (Enter Andy ) A ND. Here's the last new song, AND: (Sings.) "The Duke of York was a damned bad soldier, From Dunkerque he ran away!" Here comes Counsellor Flood and Hussey de Burgh. Three cheers, boys, for them that stood up for the people! ( Enter two gentlemen .) ALL: Long life to de Burgh. Hoo! Hurra! ( The gentlemen bow and pass out .) ANDY: Here's Sirr. Three groans for the Major the drum major. ( Enter Sirr .) I wish I had the drumm in' of him. ALL: Yah! oo! AND: ( Sings .) Now Major Sirr He is a cur, And his kennel is the Castle, etc. ALL: Ha! ha! ha! ( Exit Sirr .) ANDY: A groan for the Castle hack. ALL: Yah! ( Song, Andy .) ANDY: Now, now heres for sale a rare collection of unredeemed pledges, going to be disposed of for what theyre worth widout resarve. Lot No. 1 is the pledge of the British Parliament to maintain the independence of Ireland nearly new never used only 21 years old wid the signature of King George the third quite fresh a fine example. What shall we say for it? A crown who bids five shillings? For a crown, do I hear it -a shillin sixpence a penny a royal word goin for a penny dye man e to say its not worth a rap goin for a penny, it must go, for

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26 the owner swears he wont kape it at any price. ALL: Whoo! Ha! Ha! Ha! (Andy song. Imitation of a Dublin street ballad 1803. air The night before Larry was stretched ) When ould Esau c ame home tired and hot, And for somethin to ate he was lookin He caught a sweet smell from the pot, That Jacob, his brother, was cookin. Im dyin wid hunger, he cried No strength is left in me nor courage, How much will ye take to divide, Wid your br other a bowlful of porridge? And give him a share of your prog? To this stirabout here that you see Ill add some sweet milk & fresh butther, Now will ye hand over to me Your birthright for half of my supper. So the birthright of Ireland was sould By the Parliament men of the nation Whose hunger for titles and goold, Could not stand agin Jacobs temptation So theyve gone to live over the way! Lot 2: Is mighty curious. heres a piece of Henry Grattans mind given by him to Lord Castlereagh in the House of Lords, and in the same lot, heres Sir Jonah Barringtons pledge to kape sober for one consecutive day and Dick Martins to pay his dibts. ALL: Ha! ha! ha! Whoo! ( Enter QUIGLEY FINERTY and BRANGAN.) QUIG We gave Maguire the slip in Patrick Street. How many of our boys followed you? FIN ERTY A score maybe. They are close by. QUIG. That's enough! ( He addresses the crowd .) You, Brangan, go by Grafton Street and raise the cry "To arms!" You, Finerty, by Dame Street; call on the people to turn out. Never fear; there's two regiments under arms, wid four pieces of artillery in the Castle yard, so look out for yourselves when you hear the rumbling of the guns. ( To the crowd.) Min of Dublin, the hour has come! The boys from Wicklow, Wexford, and Kildare are amongst ye, well armed and ready to sthrike for Ireland! Down with the red flag, up wid the green! ALL. Hurroo! hurroo! ( An attack is made on the shops, which are broken open. The carriage of Lord Kilwarden, in which Kilwarden and Miss Wolfe are seen, is driven on, preceded by link boys and running footmen. The crowd surround it. Kilwarden is forced by them to descend.) LORD KIL. My good friends, you do not know me. I am Kilwarden, chief justice of the King's

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27 bench. QUIG: Then you are the man I want ( Thrusts a pike into Kilwarden). That's for my brother that you hung! ( TINEY utters a cry and tries to intercept the blow.) (Enter EMMET and DWYER.) FINERTY. Let the cub go wid the wolf. AND. ( Wrenching the pike from FINERTY.) Would you kill a girl? ROBT. Who has done this? ( Raising TINEY who has fallen on her father's body .) DWY. ( Seizing FINERTY .) I have him. ROBT. Tie him to the College rails, and let him be shot. KIL. ( Raising himself .) N o, let no one suffer death, excepting by due process of the law. Where is my child my child? TIN. Oh, papa! my dear papa! ( He drops dead out of her arms; ROBERT holds her sobbing to his breast .) ROBT. The coward who struck this good man planted his ste el in the bosom of his country. Ireland was murdered by that blow! Slow Curtain. End of Act. ACT III. SCENE I. A room in the Vice Regal lodge, Phoenix Park A large opening, C. curtained; large lattice window at back, C; the inner room is a bedroom toilet R., bed L.; in front room door R.H. of opening; door L.H.IE.; Candles burning on toilet table; small lamp on table next bed; Tiney in bed L.C.; music heard in distance; LADY KATHERINE YORKE enters door R.H., creeps toward bed; she is in ball dress. TINEY. I am not asleep, Katie. LADY K. You naughty girl; the doctor said that sleep was the only medicine to restore your health. TINEY. I have been listening to the music from the ballroom. Come sit by me and tell me all about it ; who were there? with whom did you dance? LADY K. ( Sitting on bed .) Oh, if the Earl knew I steal in here every night to keep you awake

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28 with my chatter. TINEY. Tell your papa you are trying to make me forget mine. Oh, Katie, you have brothers, sisters, m other, father but he, my darling, was all I had in the world. LADY K. Is there no one who could teach you to forget him better than I can? TINEY. What do you mean? LADY K. You speak as you sleep; I can hear you from m y bedroom, yonder. There is one name constantly on your lips. TINEY. What name? LADY K. Let me whisper it "Robert." TINEY. I don't know anyone of that name. LADY K. Are you sure? TINEY. Quite sure. ( After a pause ) Oh, yes; I forgot. LADY K. Aha! TINEY. Our under coachman! It was he that drove the carriage on that horrid night. LADY K. A coachman! Oh, you cruel Tiney, to crush all my hopes of a secret romance. (Goes to toilet and begins to take flowers from her hair.) Oh! here is my bouquet! Let the flowers be your bedfellows! TINEY. How sweet they are! Here is sweet briar, and here are violets. Oh, they bring the green fields and hedge rows to my bedside; who gave you this? LADY K. Our new under secretary Sir Barry Clinton. TINEY. Is he handsome? LADY K. Very. TINEY. How nice? LADY K. Very! and so clever! He has only been here a week, and he has already made his mark. TINEY. On your heart, Katie? LADY K: Nonsense; papa says he will be a distinguished man. TINEY. How often did he dance with you? LADY K. Well, he undertook to teach me the new German dance that is becoming quite the rage in London---it is called the waltz.

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29 TINEY. Is it as a dancing master that he has made his mark? LADY K. No! it was while we were waltzing that Barry told me TINEY. It has come to "Barry" already, has it? and he has only been here a week ---oh! Katie! LADY K. Don't interrupt me. TINEY. Go on; I'm shocked! LADY K. It seems that my Barry has succeeded in a great affair in which the police and Major Sirr have failed. Everybody beli eved that the dreadful young man Emmet had escaped to France. Barry has discovered that he has never left Dublin; he has been here all the while, concealed in a cottage in Butterfield Lane. ( Tiney sits up in bed.) TINEY. Is is he taken? LADY K. Not yet ; they will arrest him to night. What have you done with the hairpins? oh, here they are! It seems that Barry was out fishing this morning at Dunleary; the boatman he employed, a fellow named Rafferty, tempted by the reward of offered for the captur e of the rebel, told him where Mr. Emmet lay in hiding, and that his boat had been hired to take the fugitive across the c hannel to France. Rather shabby of Mr. Rafferty, but it will make my Barry's fortune. There now I'll slip on my dressing gown, and come back to bid you goodnight. (Exit.) TINEY. To night! She said "tonight he will be taken." They will kill him, and I am helpless to save him. Oh, what can I do? He would have saved papa he would have killed the man who murdered my darli ng and I can do nothing! ( wrings her hands in despair ) nothing! Oh, how tenderly he spoke to me. I felt the tears on my neck as he held me to his heart, and the eyes that shed them will be closed forever. His sweet face is ever present there there above mine. Oh, I know now whose name I spoke in my sleep. ( Re enter LADY KATHERINE dressed in a wrapper .) LADY K. There, I come to bid you goodnight. I will put out the lights. ( She extinguishes the candles. The moonlight falls through the window on the girl and over the bed.) I declare, she is asleep already. Oh, what a weight off my conscience that is. Good night, sweet angel! ( She takes the lamp, and draws the curtain so as to close in the recess, then goes out quietly; L.H. door; stage dark; afte r a pause, the face of Tiney appears between the curtains; she enters; she is dressed in a long peignoir; she tries to walk, but falls, kneeling near door R.H. in F .) Oh, Merciful Father in Heaven, bear up my poor weak limbs! inspire my failing body with y our will! grant me strength to reach him who saved my life! take it now, and let me die at his feet! ( She raises herself feebly, feels her way by the wall to the door ---opens it ---listens, and then creeps out.) ( Scene changes .) SCENE 2 Ann Devlin's Cot tage in Butterfield Lane; Robert seated at table C.; Ann asleep by fireside; Andy lies across the door.

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30 ROBT. Betrayed by knaves! deserted by cowards! tracked and hounded like a wild beast! It is the inexorable fate of all the saviors of the people! Oh, y e spirits! you immortal band of heroes who suffered for your faith! Body guard of Him who died for the human race! Accept into your ranks the humble life of one, who, loving his native land not wisely, but too well, followed in your footsteps upward to the Throne where sit the Eternal Trinity of Truth, Light, and Freedom! (He rises.) Men will call me visionary, a rash fool, and dupe. Ah! had those on whom Bonaparte relied failed him in the pinch! Had Washington misplaced his trust amongst traitors, thes e monarchs of men might have stood as I do now! An outcast! down fallen the scoff of the world! The wood of which Fortune shapes a throne, is ready at need to build a gallows! My dearest I have received your letter. God bless your faithful heart that kee ps me worthy of such trustful love. Tonight at eleven I will be at Glenmalure at Father Donnel l ys where we shall meet to part no more. ( Two knocks at door in F., followed by a whistle; then a third knock .) It is the signal! ( He opens the door .) ( Enter DWYER who steps over Andy .) DWY. Is that the way he kapes watch over yur honour while I am away? Wait till I wake him up ( Raises his whip.) ROBT ( Staying him .) Don't be hard on the boy. For three nights, while they hunted us from garret to cellar, h e has had no rest. Let him sleep! What news? ( Down R.C .) DWY. Wexford is ready and willing. Kildare, Carlow, Waterford and Kilkenny are waiting your word. ROBT. Ay! So they told Lord Edward in '98! but what followed? treachery in his camp disconcerted plans mutiny amongst the leaders confusion drunkenness and plunder amongst the men havoc, panic, and despair. I will not give the signal for bloodshed! DWY. It is for your honor to say. ( He puts a shawl over Ann.) ROBT. ( Going to him .) Why should you continue the fight? DWY. Maybe because it's all I am good for! Sure I'm only a dog at your heel, to watch for your bidding, and do it without axin' why. ROBT. My brave Dwyer, had I only five hundred men like yourself, I'd bid the worl d stand by to see our people made a nation! But our enterprise is beset with pitfalls we are walking on a bog ( in to R. corner .) the ground under our feet is rotten. DWY. Then save yourself. If you go on hanging 'round this place, you will lave your li fe here. ( Sits and lights his pipe .) ROBT. I will leave Ireland to morrow. DWY. Why not tonight? Joe Rafferty's hooker is lying in Dunleary she will fly wid your honor to the French coast like a saygull.

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31 ROBT. Are you sure of Rafferty? DWY. ( At table .) Am I sure of my own sisther's son? ROBT: Miss Curran has written appointing me to meet her to night at Father Donnellys at Glenmalure. After the marriage which will then be celebrated, you will bring the boat to Bray. ANDY. ( Who has risen, and listens at the door .) Whist! there's a strange foot fall in the lane! it stops at the gate! ( Dwyer puts down his pipe, brings out a pistol and a short iron bludgeon.) ANN. ( Waking .) Did your honor call me? DWY. Hould your prate. ANDY. 'Tis mighty queer. I believe it is only a dog, for it has got no footsteps at all. ( Looks through keyhole .) Hould your breath! It is here, close agin the dure. DWY. Thro it wide. ( ANDY throws open the door. TINEY is leaning against the post .) ROBT. Miss Wolf e! ( Runs to her and brings her down. Ann goes to her X s with Robert helps her to chair .) ANNE. Here at this hour. She is perished with cold. We heard you were lying ill at the Lodge. TINEY. So I was. 'Twas there, an hour ago, I learned that you were hiding here. They know it. They will come here to night to arrest you. ROBT. Who could have betrayed us? TINEY. A man named Rafferty, whose boat you are to take at Dunleary. DWY. Blood alive! My sisther's son my own flesh. ANNE. ( To Dwyer then back to Tiney.) Michael! For the Lord's sake, don't look so white. DWY. 'Tis Joe's winding sheet you see in my face. ROBT. ( Going to her .) And you rose from your bed to come here? TINEY. Yes. ANNE. Not on foot? ( Kneels beside her. Slightly lifts her dress. Tiney r ises .) TINEY: I dared not take a car. Look at my dress I must look like a banshee. The carman would have driven me to Swift's hospital for the insane. ( She laughs .) ANNY. Without shoes on her feet.

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32 TINEY: It is so. ANNE. See how they bleed. TINEY. I did not feel it. ( She faints. Robert and Ann catch her and place her in chair .) ROBT. She has fainted. ANDY. ( At the door .) A crowd of men have stopped at the fut of the lane. One is on horseback. DWY. ( Blowing out the light.) If they are on the sarch, a light in the house at this hour will guide them. ( Goes to the door. Looks out .) It is the Major. ROBT: ( Xs L .) Sirr? (ANDY runs to L.H. door. Looks out .) DWY. Quick, sir; you have ten minutes before they can reach us. ANDY. I see lights on this side. They are all around us. ROBT. Is there no escape? ANNE. Yes; the ould well by the shed outside. Hide yourselves in it. Down with yez, all three. There's not a fut of wather there. They will only find me here, and this poor sick child. Never min d us. DWY. She is right. Come, sir. ( Exit ROBERT with DWYER. ) ANNE. Don't lave that coat there. ( Points to Robert's overcoat .) ANDY. (Taking it up.) The Major will get his horse back afther all. Bad luck to the baste he'll tell on us, for he's stabled i n the shed. Whoo! Wait a bit. (Puts on the coat .) I'll back him an' take a flier through the crowd o' them. I may as well be shot as hung. So here goes for which. ( Exit L.H. door .) ANNE. Poor child. This night will kill her. ( Two blows on the door .) SIRR. ( Outside .) In the King's name open this door. ANNE. ( Turning.) In the devil's name pull down the latch. ( Enter SIRR followed by SERGEANT and soldiers ) SIRR. Who is the owner of this house? ANNE. I am, for want of a fetther.

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33 SIRR. A man calling himself Ellis lodges here. ANNE. He does. SIRR. ( Xs L .) Where is he? ANNE. There is his room help yourself. SIRR. ( Up to Serg. then to table.) Go search the place. ( Exit SERGEANT and two soldiers .) I told you that some day you would fall into my hands, and here you are. ANNE: Here I am, sure enough. SIRR. What girl is that? Stand aside! Miss Wolfe! ( Starting back .) What brings her here? ANNE. She brought a sportin' message that the hounds would meet here early in the mornin', and here you are. ( Re enter SERGEANT and soldiers SIRR advances to Serg Whispers then turns to table and sees letter. ) SIRR. Not there what is this a letter in the handwriting of the man we want. The ink is still wet on the pen. He has been here within the last ten minutes. Will you tell us where your lodger is? ANNE. How would I know? It is no business of mine where he goes. ( Sirr goes up to the door .) SIRR. ( Pauses up behind Anne to door .) We'll sharpen your wits. Prepare a rope there. ( Speaks off a t the door.) Tilt back that car, with the shafts in the air. Hould it so, some of yez. That will sarve for an elegant gallows to suit this woman. ( She struggles with the soldiers who would s ie ze her; they present their bayonets so as to keep her prisoner against the wall .) Will you confess now? I'll give you two minutes. ANNE. You are not the priest. I have nothing to confess. ( They s ie ze her .) You may murder me, you cowards, but not one word about him will you get out of Ann Devlin. Now do your worst. TI NEY. ( Recovering ) Ann! Where are you? ANNE. Good bye, Miss. Merciful Lord! have mercy on my soul. ( Falls on her knees .) TINEY. ( Xs to Anne. Turn to Sirr. Advances on him then faints across table .) Release that woman! If you hurt a hair of her head, I will denounce the infamous plot you planned in Dublin Castle in my presence. It was by the hands of your accomplices my father fell. Assassin! Assassin! ( Cries outside; shots; SIRR runs to the door .) SIRR: My horse! Stop him! Cut him down! 'Tis Emmet. s hoot. ( Runs out followed by the soldiers, who release Ann.) ( Enter EMMET and DWYER. ) ( Scene closes in .)

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34 Scene 3. ( GLENNMALURE. Enter QUIGLEY L .) QUIG. Mind how you step across that single bit of road. This way, Miss. ( Enter SARA L. ) SARA. Are we near to Father Donnelly's? QUIG. You may see his chapel there beyant SARAH. ( Xs R. ) You are sure Mr. Emmet received my letter? QUIG. Never fear, Miss. SARA. Then I will ask you to leave me here, and return to the car at the foot of the hil l, where we shall join you. QUIG. More power, Miss! ( Exit L.) SARA. There was no way but this to save him. ( Exit R .) ( QUIGLEY returns .) QUIG. There she goes straight into the thrap! ( Enter SIRR .) He! he! There will be a gay weddin' tonight at Father Donnelly's! SIRR. Go to the Enniskerry road. See the men are posted there, so as to close his escape that way. I'll take with me twenty rank and file to surround the house. QUIG: ( Going R .) More power! be jabers we'll put the net securely over him this time. Whist! look t here! d'ye see them two shadows creepin' down the side o' the hill? SIRR. They are cattle, maybe! QUIG. Cattle on two legs, Major! they are makin' straight for the pries t's house SIRR. They must be two of our fellows that got astray. QUIG. Divil a man you had that could foot the hillside like them two. Look now! the big one is in the moonlight! 'Tis Michael Dwyer! and his follower is Andy Devlin! Whoo! yer sowl! we'll ba g the whole covey! SIRR. Hark! I hear the hoofs of a horse! QUIG. And so does Dwyer! Ye see he stops to listen! SIRR.( Xs R.) Yonder comes a man riding a piebald! QUIG. 'Tis your own baste, Major! and Emmet himself is across him! 'Tis yourself is in luck, sir, this night

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35 SIRR. You are right; the two fellows have joined the horseman, and they are going together towards the house. (CLAVERHOUSE outside, sings verse of Bonnie Dundee .) QUIG. What is that! SIRR. ( Quig crosses L .) The offic er in command of the detachment sent to assist me in this capture. Confound the fool, he will betray our presence. QUIG. And scare the game. ( Enter CLAVERHOUSE.) SIRR. Do you always sing, sir, when you are in sight of danger? CLAV: No; sometimes I smoke. SIRR. You are betraying our presence to the foe we are in pursuit of. CLAV. British troops always betray their presence. D'ye want us to skulk? SIRR. Captain Claverhouse, you see those three men yonder, standing before that house? CLAV. I see two m en and a half. SIRR. Then you see Robert Emmet and Michael Dwyer. QUIG. And the half is Andy Devlin; but he's a half that can tackle a whole one as big as yourself. SIRR. You see your duty before you? it is to place your men so as to surround and command those premises, and to make prisoners of all we find there. Are you prepared, sir, to perform that duty? CLAV. Needs must, sir, when the devil drives. SIRR. Do you mean that for a joke, or an insult? CLAV. Both; and I hope you mean to resent it. This is a convenient spot, and there's no time like the present. Are you agreeable? SIRR. Duty before pleasure, captain. After we have lodged our prisoners in Kilmainham, I'll take a walk with you in the Phaynix, if you are so minded. (Claverhouse aside as he goe s out) CLAV. How can I warn him of his danger? ( Exit L .) SIRR. Follow me! ( Exit R .)

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36 QUIG. ( Looks around) There will be hot work when they try to tackle Dwyer. Where will I find a safe hidin' place convanient to see it all? There's a clu mp of bushes that looks well out of harm's way. ( Goes R.; recoils .) It is movin'! 'tare an 'ouns! there's somebody inside! maybe he's got his gun fixed on me! ( creeps off L.H .) (Enter FINERTY very pale.) FIN. Stop! QUIG. Don't shoot! FIN. 'Tis meself Finerty. QUIG. I thought it was one of Dwyer's men; what brings you here? FIN. I'm nearly dead. I dare not show in the streets of Dublin. I'd be killed. The people say I sould the life of Emmet. So I was hidin' here when Dwyer's men caught sight o me, and have been huntin' me like a rat. I believe I know every hole in these hills. QUIG. Are Dwyer's men about here? FIN. An hour ago they were here as thick as flies, but they vanished over the hill towards Dernamuck. QUIG. They were scared by the redcoats; but now himself is here there will be wigs on the green before sunrise. Pat, this is no place for us. I've got the car below here. I'll take ye back to Dublin where you will get safe lodgin' in Kilmainham, until we get the reward, and then we'll show I reland our heels. FIN: The sooner the betther. ( Going) After we pocket our pay, I'll go to America and take some other name. QUIG. Be jabers, Pat, but that will be mighty hard on the man whose name you take. ( Exeunt .) Scene 4. The interior of Fathe r Donnelly's a small chapel is seen L.H. through an arch in the wall, facing audience; a large bay window R.H.; door R.H.; fireplace L.H.; candles are lighted in the altar in chapel; door L.H.3E. at entrance to chapel. SARA. ( At bay window .) I thought I heard the sound of a horse in the road. FATHER D. You are listening with your heart. SARA. Oh, Father! I can hear nothing else! Fear and hope possess me that my being feels like one great pulse! Now, do you hear! my ears do not deceive me (Enter Robert ) Thank Heaven! ROBT. Do so, with all your heart on which I come to rest! for mine is well nigh sped! I have none for further struggle! I have slighted your love for a wanton infatuation! My other love has betrayed and deserted me; I come to you for forgiveness, for comfort, and for peace! ( Enter DWYER through window .)

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37 DWY. Get to work, your reverence! there's something wrong! for I tould Maguire to meet me at Stony Cr oss beyant, but the hillside was as bare as a bog not a sign of one of my people to the fore. (Exit FATHER DONNELLY.) SARA. What do you fear? DWY. There's somebody in the mountains tonight besides ourselves and the grouse; as I came over Glenmalure I did not hear a cock crow, nor a plover cry. ( Enter ANDY with gun.) A NDY. I found your gun in furze bush as you said, and this beside it ( shows a pike broken in two pieces .) ROBT. What is it? DWY. A letter to me from Phil. Maguire. Did you mind how them pieces lay? ANDY. I did. DWY. Which way did pike end point? ANDY. To Tallaght. DWY. There are readcoats there, and in power o' them, or Phil would not have shown his heels. How did the shaft lay? ANDY. Pointing to Dernamuck. DWY: He has gone there to join two hundred men in the Glen of Emall. How will I let on to him t hat I am here? ANDY. I lighted the furze bush before I left. DWY. Andy, me bouchal, asthure ye were you are worth your weight in one pound notes. Bar the dure! ( Andy looks out before closing the door ) How did you get here, Miss? SARA. On an outside car. DWY. Who drove ye? SARA. Quigley. DWY. Ah! Did he know your business here, and that his honor was to meet you? SARAH: Yes.

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38 DWY. We are trapped! You guided the redcoats! You little knew you had their escort behind you all the way from Dublin. ROBT. I cannot believe Quigley capable of such dastardly treason. ( A shot is fired outside .) ANDY. Ah! ( pulls to the door ) Quick, Mike! help me to pull down the bar! ( Dwyer runs up and bars the door.) DWY. ( Aside to hear .) Were you hit? ANDY. It is nothing. DWY: ( To Robert ) Do you believe it now? ( Re enter Father Donnelly in his vestments ) Get into the chapel, your reverence, and take the lady; the walls are thick you'll be snug then! Oh! if we can only hould out for an hour! ROBT. We cannot hold it for a quarter. They will soon break in the door. DWY. Not while I stand here ( three shots.) Andy, blow out the light there! it guides their fire! ( Andy blows out the light; Robert draws Sara into the chapel .) Now, Andy, we'll take a ha nd in the game! Let us see how it lies there's a crack in them shutters! ( Andy and Dwyer enter the bay window behind the curtains.) ( The scene changes ) The R.H. flat revolves and comes down oblique, enclosing L.H. side of stage, showing a yard enclosed by a low stone wall; the R.H. flat serves as exterior of house with porch; the wall is lined with soldiers; Sirr amongst them. ( Enter CLAVERHOUSE .) CLAV. Stop firing! Who gave the order? SIRR. I did. CLAV. Mind your business, and don't presume to take my command. ( To drummer beside him ) -Roll! ( Drummer gives a sharp roll on drum .) Father Donnelly we are under orders to search your house, where we have information Mr. Emmet is concealed. CLAV. We call on you in the King's name to open your doors that we may do our duty! if you refuse, we must employ force! and if resisted, our directions are to destroy your house and chapel and bring y ou prisoners to Dublin! ( The door opens: Father Donnelly appears in it, dressed in his vestments .) FATHER D. Strangers came to my door and claimed my ministry; I led them to the foot of the altar. God forbids I should violate that sanctuary as you would have me do! You will do your duty to your Master, as I shall do mine to Him whose commission I bear. ( He retires and closes the door .) SIRR. Now, captain, as we have no time to lose, pour a couple of volleys into the rat trap, and

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39 set fire to the stable be yant that will fetch them out. CLAV. There is a lady there. SIRR. We do not regard the sex of a viper when we crush it so with rebels. DWY. Oh, Phil. Maguire! why arn't you widin call? ANDY. Maybe he is, but is waitin' for your ordhers. ROBT. Sara I cannot sacrifice this noble old man. I cannot wreck his house and consign him to prison. I will surrender. SARA. No! no! death here, with us together! --( clings to him .) ANDY. ( Aside to Dwyer ) --Michael, listen hither, my arm is broke; that first shot d id it. 'Tis no good. If we are tuk, it is a dog's death by the rope on the next tree. DWY. That's it. ANDY. Stand by me, while I show you o' thrick to draw their fire; and when they have emptied their guns, make a dash over the wall and through their line gain the hills, and before they are through wid ourselves, you will be back wid Maguire and his men. DWY. What are you going to do? ANDY. Lave me alone. Kiss me, Mike, for Ann. Lend me your gun be ready now for the rush! ( He throws open the door ---entering the yard) Hurrah! Ireland forever! ( he fires .) Come on boys! ( A volley is fired at him; he staggers forward crying) Now, Mike, now! ( f alls ) tare alive! off wid ye, before they can load agin! DWY. Andy! Andy me boy! what have you done? SIRR. Down with him! 'Tis Michael Dwyer! ROBT. ( Entering) Hold! I surrender! ANDY: No! no! ---no surrender! I hear the thramp of the Wixford boys! ( Dwyer whistles from behind every rock, and up the valley appear crowds of insurgents. Dwyer and Robert raise Andy .) Ha! they are comin'! (Enter Sara and Father Donnelly.) Ha! ha! ha! the redcoats fell into the trap! I laid for them! I emptied their barrels, and the masther is safe! Sure, it is not for me you are crying, Miss? God bless you, I'm good for nothing. Don't waste a prayer over me, your riverence; I'm not worth it. I ax your pardon for dyin' like this, and thrubblin' you all. Kiss me, Mike! I believe I am goin' now! 'Tis asier than I thought! (he dies.) ( Tableau curtains .) (Very slow curtain) ACT IV.

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40 SCENE .--The Court House; Green Street; the Trial of Emmet; Norbury on the Bench; J ury; B arristers; Jailors; Officers; Public LORD N. Prisoner at the Bar! You have heard the evidence brought against you by the Crown. You have been found guilty of a treasonable conspiracy to betray your country into the power of our common foe, the French. With this infamous object you provoke an insurrection, and became an accomplice in the most brutal murder of Lord Kilwarden, C hief J ustice of the King's Bench. To these and divers other capital charges you have offered no defense. It is needless for me to impress on a man of your high attainments and position the baseness and infamy of such crimes. What have you now to say why judgment of death and execution should not be awarded against you? ROBT. ( After a pause. ) My Lord; why judgment and execution should not be passed upon me, I have nothing t o say. If I were condemned to suffer death only, I should bow in silence to my fate. A man dies but his memory lives. Your sentence that delivers my body to the executioner shall not deliver my soul to the contempt of generations to come. You charge me w ith being the emissary of France. It is false! I would accept from France, for my country, the same assistance in our struggle for independence that Franklin obtained for America. But were the French, or any other foreign nation to come here as invaders, I would meet them on the shore, and if compelled to retire before superior discipline, I would dispute every inch of Irish soil, every blade of grass, and my last entrenchment should be my grave! ( Murmurs .) I did not seek to free Ireland from the tyranny of one foreign power Great Britain to deliver her unto the bonds of another. Had I done so, I would have earned the execration of the country which gave me birth, and to which I would have given freedom.

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41 LORD N. Mr. Emmet, you must confine yourself to showing cause why judgment should not pass upon you. Instead of doing so you are broaching treason the most abominable. EMMET. I am showing cause, my lord, why the judgment of the world should not condemn me to a more shameful ignominy than the scaffold; why the calumnies you have uttered should not rest upon my name. If I stand at the bar of this court and am forbidden t o vindicate my motives, what a farce is your justice! If I stand at this bar before you, and dare not vindicate my character, how dare you assail it? ( Murmurs .) Does the sentence of death condemn my tongue to silence, when it would defend that immortal par t of me which must survive; and is the only thing God help me! I can leave to those I honor and love, and to the people for whose sake I am proud to suffer? You have charged me with the murder of Lord Kilwarden; I would he were sitting there to judge m e now, to sweeten death as he deplored the sentence he was bound by law to pronounce. If I call on God to witness that I had no share in that foul deed it is because I have no other witness to testify in my defense. ( TINEY rises, crosse s over to the dock and gives him her hand.) My sweet child, do you absolve me? would I had died in your father's place! LORD N. He who lets loose the storm is responsible for the havoc in its path. ROBT. My enterprise failed; had it been otherwise, your lordship might have occupied my place here at this moment, and I, yours! ( Murmurs .) NOR. Have you done, sir? ROBT. You are impatient for the sacrifice, my L ord! bear with me awhile, I have but few more words to say, and these, not to you but to my people. See! For your sake I am parting with all that is dear to me in this life family friends but most of all with her (SARA rises with a cry. ) the woman I have loved. ( She goes to him .) My Love Oh! My Love! It was not thus I had thought t o have requited your affection! ( He kisses her. ) Farewell! ( Curran receives her as she faints ) Farewell! I pass away into the grave. I ask of the world only one favor at my departure Let no man write my epitaph, for as no man who knows my motives dares now to vindicate them, let not prejudice or ignorance asperse them; let my tomb be uninscribed until other men and other times can do justice to my character! When my country shall take her place amongst the nations of the earth then and not till then, let my epitaph be written! I have done. ( Murmurs in the Court .) THE CRIER: Silence in the Court while his Lordship the judge passes sentence of death upon the prisoner at the bar. ( As NORBURY assumes the black cap, the scene closes in.) Scene 2. A PRISON. Enter FINERTY followed by QUIGLEY. QUIG. It is done at last. He is condemned. FIN. When is he to die? QUIG. To morrow mornin'.

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42 FIN. That's a short day. QUIG. Long enough for Dwyer and his boys to pull down Newgate, to get him out. FIN. It will be a hard nut to crack. QUIG: And they will find it a blind one. They will draw it blank, for Emmet will lodge here tonight. FIN. Here? in Kilmainham? Are you sure of the jailors here? One of them gave me the offer awhile ago. He is one of Dwyer's men the place is full of them. QUIG. Kilmainham will be held to night by a company of redcoats; meanwhile, a special warden has been appointed to watch the prisoner and sleep with him in his cell. FIN. I hope they have picked a sure man? Q UIG. They have. One I recommended. Yourself. FIN. Me? QUIG: That's to be your duty this night. FIN. But sure I can't stay here. The vessel that was to take you and me across the says to America will sail at daybreak. QUIG. You axed the government to put you in here for purtection. You could only be admitted as a prisoner, and a warrant for your release must be sent from the Castle before they can let you out. Be asy; I'll take care of you. FIN. And they money the reward it is due. QUIG. And will be paid to night. FIN. To you? QUIG. To me! Who else? FIN. Where will it be paid? Will Sirr bring it here? QUIG. No; he will meet me at Brangan's wharf at Ring's End. FIN. Furninst the spot where the ship lies moored and ready to sail! Quigley, you wouldn't go back on me ? You would not lave me here, and run off wid my share of the reward? QUIG. Pat, I'm sorry for you; but the polis have found out that you tuk a hand in the killin' of Crawford. FIN. You were there, and helped. QUIG. Th en they say you were the man that murthered Kilwarden.

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43 FIN. 'Twas yourself! QUIG. They dar not let you go. FIN. Not let me out? Do you main they are going to keep me here a prisoner? QUIG. Until the next batch is transported to the penal settlement in B otany bay. You are in for life, Pat. FIN. Quigley, you are jokin'. QUIG. 'Tis a sorry joke. I brought the ordher from the Castle, and left it at the gate as I came in. FIN. The ordher to kape me here? I won't believe it. QUIG: You see that dure? I am goin' out of it, just try to lave this place along wid me, and you will believe it, maybe; good bye, Pat. (As he goes out he meets a jailer to whom he points out Finerty who is following him. The jailer enter s turns and locks the door.) FIN: It is true! ( Finding himself stopped he advances .) Oh, the villain! the the traitor! and to think while I am caged here, he will be sailin' away wid my money in his pocket, and a grin on his mug. (He turns up stage and stops recognizing jailer .) Oh! no! no! not so fast misther Quigley. Aha! two can play at your game. ( To the jailor ) --Come here; give me your hand. You know this Wexford grip? I am one of yourselves dont be afeared mind me now. I'll give you a bit o writin it is fo r Michael Dwyer, and must reach himself, say widin an hour. I cant lave this because I am the warden appointed to kape watch tonight in the condemned cell. Th eres my ticket ( Gives paper to jailer ) While you are radin that lend me your back to write a li ne. ( He takes a pencil and note book from his pocket and writes : ) "Quigley will meet Major Sirr to night at Brangan's wharf, Ring's End there to receive the price of Robert Emmet's head. PATRICK FINERTY." Sure this is the fellow who gave me the offis a while ago. Ho! Ho! Theres ratsbane for you Michael Quigley! ( As Finerty writes his paper, resting his book on the jailers back the jailer, stooping reads the order, then removes the disguise from his face. It is Dwyer .) So, may I trust

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44 y ou ( closing the letter ) that this letter will reach Dwyer? ( Dwyer turns and receives the letter facing Finerty who stands paralyzed with fear.) The lord purtect me. DWY. Amin! For you see the stone walls of Kilmainham could not do it if your death was pla zin to me dye know it? Spake low FIN. I do. DWY. I am here to release the masther. FIN. ( Pointing to a file of soldiers that pass at back .) A company of redcoats will guard Kilmainham to night. DWY: God help them not one of them will lave it alive. Whist. ( Enter CLAVERHOUSE L.C .) NOR. Which of you is the warden charged with the care of Mr. Emmet? DWYER ( R .) I am. ( Shows ticket .) NORM. I am the officer in command of the men detailed to protect the jail. They are preparing the cell in which he will pass the night he will remain here until it is ready. ( Enter Robert in chains ). NORM. Remove those chains. ( Dwyer hands Finerty a key) If these walls are not responsible for the prisoner's safeguard I will be so. ( Fin erty, coerced by Dwyer, kneels beside Robert, removes his chains, then sneaks out.) See! They have cut into his wrists; they bleed. ROBT. It is nothing! ( He binds his wrists with a handkerchief.) Are you on duty here? NORM. Yes. ROBT. ( Xs to Norman a nd shaking his hand.) So am I. We are prisoners both! You to watch and to guard; I to await my release. Yours is the more painful office. NORM. Robert, can I do nothing to help to comfort you? ROBT. Yes, remain with me to the last. NORM. ( Turning to Dwyer ) Mr. Emmet will not occupy his cell under your charge. He gives me his word he will not attempt to take advantage of the freedom he will enjoy in my quarters to night. ROBT. I pledge my honor! DWY. Thorro mon diaoul! But I wont take his word. ROBT. Do you doubt my keeping it?

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45 DWY. N o! Thats the divil of it. ROB. ( Recognizing him ) Dwyer! DWY. Whist! Holy F ly! The walls will close upon me if they hear that name. ROBT. My faithful friend what brings you here? DWY. To save youBe asy! We ho w ld Kilmainham inside an out. Ive only to blow down the pipe of this kay, and in the turn of your hand 800 prisoners will be free and armed. My men under Phil Maguire are outside, and achin for the offer. NOR. And what do you suppose my fe llows will do? DWY. Die! As they would have done at Glencullen, but the masther there stud between mine and yours. NOR. He is right! You must live for Saras sake. ( To Dwyer ) Go on sir give your signal and (drawing his sword) defend yourself. ( Dwyer pu lls out his iron bludgeon and pistol.) R OB You forget I am his prisoner on parole. Ten thousand men could not release me from that pledge. DWY. Not if I kill him? ROBT. Would you have me buy my life with his? NORM. Yes! ROB. You have heard me, Dwyer? DWY. Ay. Then you wont go wid me? ROBT: No! DWY. Thats enough. Ill stop then, and Ill go wid you. ROB. ( embracing him ) No! Ireland wants you l ive, live for her sake and for mine. Live for the people for whose sake I die. Purge traitors from your councils ; that is your work. Mine is done. God bless you, and bear my blessing to those who would have given their lives for mine. My death will serve my country as my life has never done. Farewell! DWY. Ill do your will. RO B. My bravest one my truest.

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46 DWY: ( Looking up in his face ) If you see Quigley tomorrow beyant there you will know Ive begun my work! ( Robert and Norman exit together. Dwyer, seeing the handkerchief Robert has dropped, picks it up ki sses it and puts it to his breast. Exit .) SCENE 3 --The Bull Inn, a low class public house of the period. It occupies a cellar, approached by a short flight of steps, R.H. in F., door leading to street. Doors R. and L. Secret door, L.H. in F. Tables R. and L., at which men are drinking, smoking clay pipes, and two are playing at cards. Two women & a man are making cartridges at table L.U .E. two bowls one with powder and the other with bullets. They are filling them with clay pipes. ( Enter DWYER He goes to secret door, opens it, enter crowd.) DWYER. Boys! attention! There is brave work to be done this night; listen to this! ( Reads paper .) "At eleven o'clock Quigley will be at Brangan's wharf, Rings End, to receive from Major Sirr the reward agreed wid t he Government as the price of Robert Emmet's head s igned Patrick Finerty." What d'ye say should be this black traitor's reward? ALL. Death! DWYER : (Down C.) That's enough. Lave the payment of the debt to me. ( Enter ANNE DEVLIN from door on stairs .) ANNE. Dwyer, are you there? DWYER. Is it yourself, Anne? Did you see the Major? ANNE. ( Coming down to R. C .) Yes; and I followed your bidding. But oh, Mike, 'tis a terrible thing you axed me to do. DWYER. What did he say? ANNE. He is close behind me, wid a guard of soldiers at his heels. ALL. ( Anne in to R. corner .) Redcoats! comin' here? ( Tumult.) DWYER. Order! fall in! If there's any one of yez dares not thrust his life in the hands of Michael Dwyer let him fall out! ( Up to foot of stairs .) The dure is open to him; the road is clear. This woman wid a man's heart in her breast, is worth a boat load of your cowardly carcasses. Hark! I hear the thramp of the soldiers; they are comin' here to this place! There's time to escape by that dure to the house in Ma rshalsea Lane that backs on this; you can save your dirty skins that way! Be off still! Be quick! When a man has no heart left, and he loses his head, he takes to his legs. ( R. C .) ANNE. ( Up to stage C .) Don't be so hard upon them, Mike. They mane to stand by you. ALL. Ay! Ay! never fear DWYER. ( Xs to L. sits on keg facing Ann.) Rowl me out here a couple of those kegs of

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47 gunpowder lave them handy there. ( Enter MAJOR SIRR.) SIRR. ( Coming down R .) This is the Bull Inn? ( To Anne .) Beware, woma n, how you trifle with us. You have laid information that this place is a depot of concealed arms, and the resort of rebels. ANNE. Yes. SIRR. The Bull Inn, though poor, bears a good name. ANNE. ( With her eyes fixed on Dwyer .)The pikes and guns are store d in the house in Marshalsea Lane that backs on this. There's a secret passage between the two. D'ye see that row of pegs? pull the third one. ( Points back to the secret panel ) Pull it down. ( Sirr starts back A sergeant approaches the row of pegs, and pul ls it down; the secret door opens .) SIRR. ( Advances to Serg. then to R. C .) Sergeant, take your file of men in there and report what you find! ( Exit Sergeant with soldiers .) So far good! Now you promise d to deliver into my hands the person of a leader of the insurrection, for whose capture the g overnment has already offered a reward of five hundred pounds; there are only three rebels worth that sum. I am here by your agreement to put the head of this man in my hands to whom do you refer? w here is he? ANNE. Where is he? ( She struggles with her emotion.) No! no! I I can't do it Oh Mike! it is more than my heart can bear! ( Anne falls into chair .) SIRR. ( Passing down into R. corner .) You said "Mike" you cannot mean Michael Dwyer? DWYER That's what she does mane! and I am he! ( Advances and faces Sirr .) SIRR. You Michael Dwyer? DWYER Himself SIRR. If you are he, we met at Vinegue Hill when I put a bullet in your throat. DWYER I believe the compliment was returned at Bally Ellis, when I put a pike in your ribs. SIRR. We are quits. (Offers his hand.) (Re enter the SERGEANT with two men. SIRR up to SERGEANT. .)

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48 SIRR. Lads, have you found the arms? SERG. We have, sir; the place is full of them. SIRR. ( Above Anne R. C. Xs to Anne .) And this woman has betrayed you? DWYER : This woman is my wife that was to be, and she obeyed me; I wanted to sell my life; she made the bargain. It was this 500 and pardon for all my men now lying in jail and protection for the rest to seek their home s in peace. Was that not so? SIRR. Ay. DWYER. Have you the money there? (Xs R.C.) SIRR. Here it is. ( Offers it to ANNE.) ANNE. (Repelling it.) No! No! (X s table to L .) DWYER. Give it to me. ( Sirr down R. Dwyer up C He receives the money from Sirr .) There, boys, divide that between yez. 'Tis what the Castle says Michael Dwyer is worth. They came here wid me to rescue Emmet. ( Down to Sirr .) Those are keys to every gate in Kilmainham. You seventy redcoats there wouldn' be a mouthful amongst two thousand undher my command. The turnkeys are united Irishmen. There are eight hundred prisoners, like wild bastes, behind your bars, hungry for liberty and your death. SIRR. Then why did you not attempt this release? DWYER. Captain Claverhouse ordhered the irons off him and shared wid him his own quarters in the prison, taking only his word not to escape, and Emmet will kape it. That's why we failed. These arms are no good now. (Taking pistols and throwing them on table R .) I give them up and sell my life on condition no other shall be taken. ( Xs to C. then to Anne comforting her.) SIRR. (Beckons to Sergeant who advances and takes the keys and then steps back .) And if I refuse your terms? DWYER. (Sit ting on keg.) You won't do that. SIRR. Why not you are in my power. (Up R.C.) DWYER. I'll show you why not! I am setting on a hundred weight of gunpowder. ( He strikes in the bung of the cask; the powder flows out.) Patsey, lend me your pipe. ( The soldiers make a move for the steps. Som e of the soldiers fly out. ) SIRR. (Runs up stairs .) No, stop.

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49 DWYER. We are not afraid of death, and this way will save law costs. SIRR. I accept your terms the men can go. DWYER. You give your word not one of them will come to harm? SIRR. ( Coming down R .) Will you rely on it? DWYER. ( Xs to Sirr. )Yes. I know a man when I've fought wid him! You will kape your word. ( T urning to men.) Go home boys, paceable, and tell the rest outside there's nothin' more to be done this time. Good bye, God bliss you. ( sits on table R .) ( Exeunt the men .) SIRR. (Up C .) Sergeant, march your men back to the castle. You can leave me here. (DWYER leans over ANNE who has been seated L., crying. Takes out papers throws them on table with his purse ) Michael Dw yer, here are two passes to America by the vessel that lies off the north wall and sails to morrow at daybreak. Take Anne Devlin with you. You are free. ANNE. ( Rises goes down L. and turns .) Oh, Major, do you main it? Mike, d'ye hear what he says? DWYE R. I do, Anne, but I want more than that, or nothing. Read that paper. (SIRR reads it apart, handed to him by DWYER.) SIRR. It is true we meet there in an hour. DWYER. (Rises and Xs to Sirr .) The money will be paid in gold? SIRR. Gold and silver. DWYER. 'Twill be quite a weight. SIRR. Yes, I'll take it on a car. DWY. I'll dhrive yer honor. ( Takes papers from Anne .) 'Twill be quite convanient for me and Anne to get aboard the ship, and I've a trifle to pay Quigley before I go. So when your business is done you can lave me wid him. SIRR. I understand. ( Proceed to stairs .) Bring the car to the c astle yard at once, I will be there to meet you. ( Exit .) ANNE. Michael, what are you going to do to Quigley?

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50 DWY. As sure as God made us both, one of us will go to render his life account up there tonight. Come. ( Scene closes in. Exeunt ) TABLEAU --Brangan's wharf, Rings End, near Dublin; a rude shed; a flight of steps, L.H.; a door, L.C. in F lat, looking out on the river; a boat appears at door; Quigley looks around strikes a light, and lights lamp on table, L.C.; Chair and keg QUIG. St. Patrick's is after strikin' eleven. It is time for the Major to come. This boat will save me to get aboard the ship! There she lies! 'Tis time I go t away out o' this country. That's too hot to hould me. Whist! I heard the wheels of a car! Ay! it stops! ( Goes to door L.H Stumbling up stairs.) It is mighty dark; there comes a lanthorn! 'Tis himself! ( Retires to R., and closes door in flat. Enter SIRR with lantern, followed by DWYER carrying bag. DWYER has a huge carman's coat; a beard conceals his face.) I thought you would come alone. SIRR. And carry half a hundred weight of coin? Lave the bag the n, my man, and go mind your horse. ( Exit D WYER with lantern .) Now, sir, count out your money. ( QUIGLEY seizes the bag. Sits at table and counts. Sirr sits L. of table .) QUIG. ( Counting.) He! he! oh, but there's nothing in life so sweet as that sound of coin. ( As he counts .) Your honor promised me two free passages for myself and Finerty to New York. SIRR. You will get them when you are done your count there, never fear. QUIG. I knew you would be as good as your word, sir. There's three hundred how they shine! ( Opens his vest, takes from his waist a belt MAJOR SIRR rises and after walking up and down. E xit by door L.; QUIGLEY continues .) QUIG. There's two hundred more! Ho! ho! I'm in luck! ( He puts the money into the belt. Enter DWYER without his beard or coat; he takes the seat recently occupied by MAJOR SIRR.) Fifty seventy eighty a hundred six hundred and I see there's two hundred more! (He sweeps it all into the belt, and buckles it around his waist.) There's no knowin' what kind of a crew I will find aboard that ship; and if they kn ew what cargo I had in my hold, it is a poor chance I'd have to land it. So (buttons his coat ), 'tis a heavy load; but it gives a lightness to my heart. Now for the passes, and goodbye Major! (DWYER advances his hand as he takes QUIGLEYS hand, QUIGLEY lo oks up; their faces meet; the candle between ) Mother o' mercy! It is a ghost! DWYER. I tould you Quigley that some day I would die by your hand, or you would die by mine; that day has come. QUIG. Would you murdher me, and rob me afther? DW YER. It would be no murdher to kill a rat! It is not your money I want, it is your life! Keep the price of blood! There are the passes, and there ( throws two knives on the table before QUIGLE Y choose one of these ---they are alike! ( QUIGLEY takes the knives and examines them by the candle; suddenly he blows the candle out, and springs on DWYER who, leaping to one side, avoids him .)

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51 DWYER. Egorra! I forgot the blackguard I was dalin' wid! ( As he dodges around the table, he meets the chair in which DWYER had been seated; he seizes it, and holds DWYER at bay; he calls :) Anne Anne avourneen! come! ( Anne appears at door L.H. with lantern.) ANNE. What's the matter? DWYER. All right stand there and give us a light! ANNE. Kill him Mike! kill him! DWYER. Never fear! ( Holds the light above her head.) ANNE. Will I help you? DWYER. No; I'll be iqual to the dirty work. Come on, Quigley! Are ye afeerd of an unarmed man? Don't be bashful! why a rat would make a better fight. ( As QUIGLEY makes a rush at him, he claps the chair over his head, which appears through the legs and rails, while his arms are pini oned to the back legs and side rails ) The rat is in the trap! ( He pins him against the wall; holding him then with one hand, he seizes his throat by the other ) D'ye remember the grip? QUIG. Mer mercy! DWY: I don't hear what you are saying! Spake up, man! (QUIGLEY drops the knives .) That's right, be asy now; you are goin' into the liffey, where the price of blood will take you to the bottom. So, he's gone to where he will meet Masther Robert tomorrow to where I must answer one day for what I have done tonight. ( Quig falls into wheelbarrow. Anne descends and leans over table, lantern in hand. She opens the door at back; he throws QUI GLEY out; they get into the boat and disappear; the shed is drawn off; the river appears; they are in the boat; a vessel with lights burning is seen about a quarter of a mile away ) ( End of tableau. Scene closes in.) Scene 6 A corridor in Kilmainham jail. Enter Sergeant and four men with drum Then Norman. NORM. Has the time com e ? SERG. It is time, sir. NORM. And no reprieve. Have the supplications of Miss Wolf e and of Miss Curran failed to move his excellency? Ah, there is Mr. Curran. Wel l, sir, what news. CUR. The best. His worship will order the execution to be suspendedand send a reprievein incurring Emmets humble supplication to the Crown for a commutation of his sentence. ( Enter ROBERT.) SERG. He is here. ROBT. Yes, here, sir. Oh, sir! I know I have done you a very severe injury greater than I can atone for with my life. Let my love for your daughter plead for me. Do not turn away. Do not let

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52 a man with the coldness of death upon him feel any other coldness. CUR. Robert, my poor boy, I would hide my weakness from you. God forbid I should turn away from the son of my old friend the child who has played about my knees! NORM. We have no time for bletherin'. Why don't you tell the lad what has been done for his sake. CUR. Miss Wolfe and my daughter have been with the lordlieutenant pleading for a commutation of your sentence. I urged my own claim on the Government for many and valuable services. His E xcellency was much moved by their prayers, and, at last, in consideration of your youth and your distraction, he yielded so far as to receive your petition to the crown for its mercy, to be forwarded to London. (Hands Robert a paper .) NORM. I have seen my uncle, Norbury. He will back the prayer. CUR. Meanwhile execution will be stayed. ROBT. ( Reading to himself .) "To the King's Most Excellent Majesty. The humble petition of Robert Emmet, a prisoner lying under sentence of death." ( Reads the rest in silenc e .) Oh, sir! This is a beggar's petition for life! for life at any price What shall I say? What answer can I make to those angels of love and pity. I see their pleading faces, their sweet eyes blinded with tears, lifted to mine. I see the sweet, childish mouth of Tiney trembling with her tender supplication! Yet between my kisses I would say I cannot crawl to the foot of the throne and sue for pardon. My country is my accomplice! Shall I indict her by confessing my penitence? Ah, sir, you may call me ma d. It may be so. Call me rash. The fool of vain hopes. Tell his E xcellency I am sensible of his goodness, but I cannot accept a few dishonorable years as the price of my life to come. ( Norman up back to door R.C.) CUR. You refuse the royal clemency? ROBT No! I will accept so much of it as H is M ajesty may grant to one so poor as I am. I ask to face the death of a soldier. Let me stand before a platoon of brave fellows, and wearing the uniform of my country let me fall like a man, and not die by the rope l ike a dog. NORM: ( Comes doen and shakes Roberts hand not looking at him.) Thankee, sir; thankee! I'm proud o' ye! 'Tis a shame to waste a mon like yersel'. CUR. Must I take back this answer to his excellency? ROBT. I have staked my life, and have lost the game. It is a debt of honor, and as such must be paid within twenty four hours. ( Smiling, as he offers Curran his hand.) You see, sir, it takes all I have in the world to meet the claim. CUR. Give me some ground to plead upon. Will you not promise to forsake the cause that has betrayed you? ROBT. Ask me to forsake your daughter, and be foresworn to my love. Bear with me, sir and let me live out my life what is left of it is full of her. Her dear image is before me. I have no other care no other thought this is the eve of my weddingnight. I lie down in my grave to

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53 dream of her until I wake to meet my bride at the altar of heaven. Tell her I wait her there. CUR. Farewell, Robert, my son. ROBT. God bless you, sir; for that word. Do not be cast down, my friend. If I had fallen in the strife of battle, it would not have been a more glorious ending. I sought no other. You promised me to see my mother this morning, and bring to me her blessing. Have you seen her? NORM. No, Robert, f or you will receive your blessing from herself. ROBT. She is coming to see me? NORM. No; you are going to see her. ROBT: She she is dead? NORM: She died last night. ROBT: My sentence killed her! God forgive me! Well, I go to seek her pardon! (A bell tolls) Is that the signal? Ay, I see it is. THE YARD AT KILMAINHAM Muffled drums are heard. Enter SERGEANT with a file of men, followed by NORMAN CLAVERHOUSE and EMMET. R. Norman Xs L. ROBT. ( To Norman.) You promised to stand by me to end! Well! Let it come! Is this the place? Where shall I stand? SERG. There! ( Points to L.H.) ROBT. ( Takes off his coat and cravat .) Sergeant, accept this watch; let it remind you of this hour. ( Takes out his purse .) You brave fellows will accept these few pieces they are useless to me now. ( Gives purse to SERGEANT. ) Let me be buried in my uniform, and with this portrait, that has lain for years upon my heart; tell her it was pressed to my lips when I blessed her name with my last breath; tell her to be happy. ( Bell tolls; Norman falls in his arms weeping) Come, come, do not let your tears unman me. Men! you have your duty to perform do it bravely, as I have done mine! This death is a boon, not a penalty! It is an honor to fall before you! and I receive your salute ove r my grave! I am ready! ( Turns up stage) SERG. Right wheel, March! ( The file of men wheel round and exeunt R .) ( The SERGEANT re enters and stands R. Robert embraces NORMAN tenderly) This for Sara, and this for Tiney. ( Kisses him twice farewell. He goes up L.C. to the wall of the prison; stands a moment as if in prayer, then pressing the medallion to his lips, he extends his left arm in which he holds his cravat .) God bless my country ( He drops the cravat; a volley is heard; he falls on his knees, his face on his heart; the shots strike the wall, and show where they have scarred the masonry. Small clouds of dust fall to the ground. The black flag is raised. Bell tolls. Stage dark. NORMAN stands with his head averted. The wall behind EMMET slowly opens. A vista of pale blue clouds appears. The figure of Ireland clothed in palest green

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54 and with a coronet of shamrocks in her hair descends slowly; and bending forward when she reaches the spot behind EMMET. She kneels. Two children at her feet, R. and L., draw slowly back the body of EMMET until his head lies looking up into her face. Tableau.) THE END



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ENTITLED ROBERT EMMET. A faithful his tory of a youn g Irish gentl e m a n who s ou g h t t n e fa t e o f those e nthu s i asts d e stin e d to bear u pw a rd a nd o nw ard "the banne r with the stra n g e d ev i c e The fir s t appear a n ce of R o b ert Emme t be for e t h e w orld w a s o n July 23d in the year 1 8 03. H e lived for 69 days. His car ee r was comple t e d within tha t p e riod. H e di e d o n S epte mb e r 2 0th, age d 26. W e p ossess r ecords o f wh a t took pl ace during those s ixty-nine d ays. His priva t e corresponde n ce, his a dven tures, his s p eec h es his co nversations w i t h fri ends, have b ee n prese r ved. I have r e a d t h e m a ll. Thi s play i s s imply compo e d o f t h e inc id e nts tha t occurre d during this brief but e v e n t ful p erio d n othing a dd e d but wha t i s n ecessa r y t o s h a p e the m atte r into a p e r s pi c uou s and dra m atic form. The c h a racter s a r e untouc h e d pho t og r aphs o f the origiua l s Th e l a n g u age es p ecia ll y tha t of Emme t, bas b ee n as far as p oss ibl e p r ese r ve d and the se n t im ents put into his m o u t h a r e a c r i b d to him b y t h ose who kno w him w e ll. It a ll h a p pe n e d so re cently tha t w e seem to r eac h him with our lives. M y fathe r S. B ou c icault, o f Bach e l o r 's W alk. Dublin was o n e o f his asso i a te. and the h o u s in whic h twenty year s aft erwards I w a b orn, w as. a m o n gs t many othe rs, sea r c h e d for the fugitive r e b el. Th e seve r es t judges of R o b ert Emme t those wh o condemne d his o bj ec t s and abhorre d his p o litical a irn R and princ ipl es, have tes tifi e d free l y t o t h e purity of his moti ves and to the h e r o i c r o m a n ce of his c h a rac t e r His li fe, as a pi ce o f rhetoric i s t h e n o bl est u t t e r a n ce o f the breath o f G o d thro u g h Ma n. The Irish poet -his companio n and friend, has plead ed tha t w e s h ould n o t breathe hi s n a me, but l e t i t r est in the s h a d e It has n o t r es t e d the re. W e w e r e ask e d b y the d y in g y outh himself to wait until othe r times and othe r m e n can d o justice to his c h a racter ... It i s a priv il ege w e live in those othe r times .. t o fin d m yself amid t those othe r m e n ," a n d to pl ace as I d o n ow a n humb l e t r ibute upo n the "unin scribe d t omb'' o f Ire l and's b es t l o v e d c hild.

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. ____,-/f., --, -..___, ---.......

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I RATHF ARNHAM-near Dublin. SOENE 1.-A gmden; night; on the R His a house; the windows me lighted. A low wall; across stage at back. A door in it; L of C. Shrubs R H; up stage; spades, a scythe and garden tools; R against wall. Mus10.-Enter from the house, coming fmm the back; ANNE DEVLIN ; she looks mund with caution ; then crosses to door on wall; listens; then recrosses to C towards house ; calls : ANN. Miss Sarah! (Enter SARAH CURRAN from the house.) Spake low. SARA. Is he there? (Crosses to door LC.) ANN. I don't know-rightly! I hear two voices whispering outside. SAR. He always brings some trusted follower with him to stand on guard during our meeting. It may be Dwyer, or Quigley ANN. No; it is a strange voice. (Two knocks at door.) that .is. his signal. Go/Mtside /""'"' awhile until I see who is m it? I (SARAH runs back into the house; ANN opens the door.) MUSIC CEASES.-Enter Major his scarlet uniform is cove1ed in a long cloak ; his face is shaded by his hat. ANN. What do you want ? SIRR. I want a word with your master. ANN. He is engaged entertaining a party of friends at dinner. i I I 1 I II

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I 2 = bL I I I hk,/ f i I i I I i I If f I l I I i I I tk I I 1 I

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5 SrnR. His friends must excuse him. I bring this summons from the castle. (Hands her a letter.) ANN. (Taking it, reads S?.,lperscriptions by the light Jd.,u from the hall.) "To the Right Honorable/\Pbilpot,,r Curran, on his Majesty's service." SIRR. That business brooks no d e lay. See that it wa..fc/.u reaches him quickly. (Exit ANN into hoiise SrnRcgOeS -t-[iM-qoe,J tAf rapidly to door in wall. QUIGLEY and three m en enter.) _.. f--""' You three fellows pass round to the porch of the house ; don't show yourselves until you are called to act. i-s I [Exeun t the three officers behind the shrubs and off. R. L. E.] You are certain the man we seek will present himself here to-night? QUIGLEY. Never fear. Shure h e's afther sendin' me ahead of himself to see the road is clear. He is hidin' now sum where widin' cast of my voice H e won't show up until he gets the offis from Miss Curran. Her maid, Ann Devlin, raps three times agin that dure in the wall. H e will answer wid one rap; and she opens it. / SmRs. And lets our bird into the trap ? Return to your post outside. QUIGLEY. More power Major. [Exit, door in wall. J (En t er CURRAN from the house, with the letter opened in his hand; he is infutl coMrt dress.) --CURRAN. You are the bearer of this letter from the ft /.: Lord Justices. Be good enough to preced e me to them. I follow you at once. Tell their Lordships I am at your h eels. It is mighty provoking to be called away r;;:,.6.,, at such an hour. (Re-ente1 ANN; with his coat and hat; to ANN.) Where is my daughter? ANN. In her room, sir. (He takes his hat and coat.) CURRAN. Explain to her the motive of my depart-ure. She will see my guests cared for during my absence. I\ 3 1 l

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6 Musro.-[Exit into house, followed "lYy ANN. SIRR. Your daughter, Mr. Curran, will entertain guest here, to night that I'll take care of! (He dis appears behind shrubs. C.) (Re-enter ANN from ho1fse.) ANN. (Looking round. ) He is gone. (She crosses to door, then knocks three tirrws ; a pause; one knoc k is heard; she opens it.) Who is there? / Qum. (Appeming.) Meself. ANN. Quigley! Did you see astrange man lavin' this
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7 "'lovers to whom I could offer no objection, except ,.{,. :.__, ing that there was another here in my heart ; my old old play-fellow to whom I had given my life long, long ago. You came back at last, but in secret, concealing ./ from everyone your presence in Ireland. What is this enterprise in which your are engaged? ROBT. It is one in which the fortunes and lives of others, 11ssociated with me are involved, all we possess is staked on an event which will be assured within the next few days. then be patient, dear one! SARAH. Be it as you will! But I feel it is all so around us. Oh! for the honest daylight when I can show the love of which I am so proud; you have placed a crown of jewels on my head-the emblem of a girl's nobility, but I may not wear it openly I ROBT. Oh, my love! what if we fail? What if I become broken in fortune? a fugitive from my home, an exile from my country ? SARAH. You have no fortune but my love ; you cannot be bankrupt there; you have no home, but my heart ; no country but my arms ; how can you be a fugitive or an exile? ANNE.) ANNE. Get him away quick for his life! Major '11,.1 L. Jtl/<.a.J... f Sirr with his following are *'arching the house. ROBT. (rising). Major Sirr I here! ANNE. 'Twas himself was in it a while ago I away wid ye! The tluee men at back appea1-, ANNE seizes the scythe and as they try to intercept ROBERT'S escape by the door in the She sweeps it round as if mowing at their legs. Stand back! or I'll make twins of any one of ye. They retreat. SARAH runs to the door and vainly trietio turn the key. 00

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8 SARAH. It's rusted in the lock. I cannot turn it. (Enter Major Sirr; R. at house; R. H. standing on step; he points a pistol at ROBERT. SJRR. Robert Emmet. In the King's name I arrest you. (EMMET 1etreats to L.) SARAH runs between SIRR and EMMET, and taking off the cloak holds it out so as to hide her lover. SARAH. Unlock the door. I can't. SIRR. Stand aside girl (as he advances she advances to meet him. He tries to pass her, but she swiftly throws the cloak over him and the pistol, while ROBERT a. az.. succeeds in escaping by the doo1; SJRR disengages hitt .(""' a a..... arms, and replaces the pistol in his belt.)
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10 1. /;/_,._ IJ I I j l3 --/-2-/ I I !/-?l x _M-, I ./ ntr:;-i : f};;u /' ef --d. I t sf#7/ /I, v_ I II I 1 I -' I I I I

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' rnen.) We tracked a leader of the rebel movement to thi's house, to which he comes nightly, and in secret. / We found him at the feet of that lady. By her f ance he escaped. But within ninety days h wilfbe at the foot 'of the gallows.:t; Good-night. ANN. Bad-night to you, proWTin kite! ,,,,-SrnR. Never fear, Ann Devlin. I'll get you in my clutches some day, and then I'll make it hot for you, my beauty! [Exeunt officers at door. ANN. Never fear, Henry Sirr, the devil will get yer in his clutches some day, and then he will make it hotter for you, my dandy. [Exit Si?-1; he carries Rob-1 'c.f<.t e?"t's 'Cloak on his aim. Ann locks the door afte1 him. olc_ / SARAH. Leave us, Ann. [Exit Ann. ''f-cf.,,,,_., NORM. Miss Curran, I have made no disguise of r-f"'1 /i my feelings toward yourself; and your father encour ..-----ki_O:'..J.. aged me to hope that, one day, I might persuade you to share my name; for I have loved you vera-vera dearly! SARAH. I-I know it. NORM. Was it true what that man said about you? SARAH. Yes! __.,,.--NORM. You love this-other one? ,, L ( /d,.c.K. SARAH. Ever since I knew how to love. I am sorry "1' for you, Norman. I tried very hard to care for you, as my father wished me to do, but this other one re turned-and then I knew I had no heart to give you. &.t ..... NoR111. You could na help it more than I can help f If I canno' reap the harvest of your life, I can assist in bringing it home. I can ha' some share R in your happiness. seems your lover that meets .i __!!--.' you here is implicated in this rebellion? SARAH. He told me that he was engaged in some secret enterprise, but until now I did not suspect its nature. 11 0 l

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I r 10 NORM. Before to-morrow it will be known in Dublin that, concealed in the house of the Right Hon orable John Philpot Curran, His Majestys Attorney General and member of the Privy Counci l the police discovered the rebel leader -.u.d. y.: j.C_,.---SARAH. My father is innocent. He had no knowl edge, no suspicion of his presence here. I-NORM.,,.. Will he protect his honor behind his /----daughter's shame? SARAH. What can I do ? Oh, Norman! help me to shield him from the consequence of my guilty folly -NoR111. It is a cruel task you put upon me, Sarah. There is no way but one. You maun gae to this lover to-night. You Ilfst fly from your home. Seek him out. SARAH. Go to him?-to Robert?-to Mr. Emmet? NORM. Aye, if that be his name. Bribe him wi' yerself to abandon this cause. Take him away beyond the seas. Your flight will clear your father from any suspeecion and will exp lain the prei:;ence of Mr. Emmet in the house I 'Tis hard on me to say the words; it is vera bitter, dear. Before this night is past you must bear my rival's name. -1.: .. E: / SARAH. Oh, Norman, Norman! You deserve a bet' L k jtr1-cl., ter woman than I am. (Calls)-Ann, Ann-my and shawl! She will accompany and protect me. / NORM. No; I will! I will never quit your side until you are Robert Emmet' s wife. (Enter ANNE.) NORM. Where does he lodge? ANNE. In my father's cabin-Butterfield Lane. I'll meet you there, and bring with me what things she will need. ,( '-a<'. (,u,d,., .{q,,_ o-J NORM. Come -fr;::b., J;,.. a ....... ANNE. (Looking after them as they go out at garden door.) Every upon .his 1 3 I

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f 11 I and he lets her do it. If Dwyer found I was fond of ny other boy he'd squeeze the life out o' my and I'd 1 .Ve nim a ll the betther for killin' me! i) I'd die happy. ) ( A street in Dublin-Enter QUIGLEY.),_. lac.ft. -/,{i;,. y_r QUIGLEY. (Calls.) Finerty-Pat. Finerty-Pat., ye divil, are ye there? (Enter Fine'l'ty. ) :R FINER. Is it yerself, Mike. Well, what luck? / Qum. Is he here? Has he come back? FINER. Who? Qum. Emmet. FINER. Come back! D'ye mane to tell me he was not tuk? Qum. No; bad luck to it !-he escaped. R FINER. Did he show fight? Qum. No; but he showed two pair of heels. The thrap was all right, and baited wid the girl. The Major's following ten blackguards, not including him nor meself, wer in an' around the house when I led him a lon g fair and aisy into the middle of them. FINER. How did he escape from thim all? Qum. Divil a know, I know! for, shure I could not shew in it. I was outside in the lane, houlding the Major's horse, stooping down wid my ear close agin the dure, when I heard Sirr's voice calling on him to surrender. Th e dure flew open. I felt a fut on me back, and befor e I could rise a cry Emme t was in the saddle, and out of sight. / FINER. Bad cess to the chance! Won't we lose the y._S' _!5: reward for his capture-a hundred pounds-that the ,...-Major proniised should ,be paid to us to-night at the Castle ? Qum. Why not? We led thim to the bird; we gave thim a fair shot; if they niissed it we are not to blam!='. ,,.-4 Whist! may I never-but is not this himself? :.-: !:.. 15

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A-Id l<.t.w-f' 1 /Ju 'cfi.o..J Q5 ? h k..,_ c:, iL : ,f.ar,.rf ./le cfa... utrf .Jfu.u fu d-;f-_p/
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1 2 (Enter EMMET.) RoB. Quig l ey, you saved my life I That horse you held ready for me at the door was a God send out it, the men stationed in the lane to intercept me would have made me prisoner. How did you escape? Qum. While they were afther yer honor I made off, I rode straight to our depot at the -----Bull Inn where I left the animal in charge of Andy =-Devlin. (go to C.) (Enter ANDY.) L ANDY. More power, sir. I've got him safe in the stables. Your honor was wantin' a purty baste to carry himself $.. ifar tbw b?pil H O Ollf!Olitir' you. Jk. 6 JU.J w o R t llo there by We hold a I /tii council of war to decide on our plan of action. I have /)a./-4' prepared thewfto submit to the staff, the manifesto to r the people, the list of our forces and place of Surely, i placed them in my breast. I cannot have ___. / lost-no, no. Where can I have placed them ? If lost, and they should fall into the hands ofAh! my > I. ., -:r;;,J;; !"0:::/ cloak I They were in a breast pocket. I left it with Miss Curran. .Run, Andy-quick to Rathfarnhamfor your life, find yoyr sister Ann; get from her' the cloak; bring it to Butterfield Lane, where you w ill r j r find me. ANDY. will I take the Major's horse sir ? ROB. No; the manner of my escape is known, and search is, doubtless, being made for the brute. He will be looked for and recognized. ANDY. Owow I left him wid Larry Fox and a pail of white paint. By this time the baste wud not know himself, for he's got three stockins and a bald face on him. Whoo, yer sowl The Major will want another mount. I'll sell him this one to morrow if yer honor's afraid to back him. 17

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13 RoB. Be off, you imp, and be careful of the papers. [Exit Andy. ( / ROB. This thoughtless act of mine might undo us all. He who undertakes the business of a p eo ple should have none of his own. Quigley-Finerty-you will b e present to-night at the camp. The hours are pregnant with our cause. W e cannot tell at what_/ moment it may spring into life [ Exit T b Qum. Pat, yer sowl 1 Our fortune is made! It is not one hundred p ounds, but a thousand pounds. I am goin' to claim for this night's work. FINER. A thousand pounds, Mike? What for ? Qum. For the list of our forces ; for the plans of attack; for all the purtiklars of the whole business. FINER. I see. You mane we should follow Andy Devlin and seize the papers on him ? Qum. No. The cloak was tuk away by Major Sirr. He has it now! But we never dhrame d what a prize li es hid in the pocket of it. Tare alive, Pat !-is not A:J a thousand too little to ax for all this? The lists, Pat! X } : 7 and all the names in Emmet's own hand writin'-ho, ho, bi g names !-men o' quality-that no one suspects. Put them down at ten pounds a head !-tottle the m up like onions on a sthring. Then the plans ';f ,'If f1111 >'/_:if?-1 FINER. It's little, enough, indeed, to pay min like ourselves; for, afther all, when you think of it ? Sure it is the counthry itse lf that we have for sale. Qum. Be jabers, P a t, it is not everybody that has ";? got a counthry to sell! [Exeunt, '_L A Room in n:blin Castle. LORD NORBURY and-::L ;o R D_"'--KILW ARDEN seated at table. R H examining papers. (TINEY WOLFE looks in at door ) TINEY. May I come in? 19 t + r

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14 KIL. Yes; if you will not stop very long NoR. I must overrule the objection. Stop as long as you please 1--/.b..ckdt (i1!!-.__,,,. TINEY. Lord Norbury, you deserve a kiss for that. NoR. Offering bribes to the Bench is an awful of fenc e! TINEY. You know, papa, we promised to call at the Vice-Regal Lodge to-night. Shall you be detained here very long? KIL. No, Tiney. We have some important busi n ess to transact with Mr. Curran, we expect at any moment. NoR. I think, Kilwarde n you may leave this mat t e r to m e to settle. Your daughte r is weary. TINEY. You are very kind to consider me. NOR. Who could fail to consider you 1 Had I so sweet and loving a child b eside me I should be, per haps, as good a man as your father is my dear. (Enter CURRAN.) TINEY. (Rimning to him.) Oh Mr. Curran, I am so g lad you have come! How is Sarah? CUR. Complaining, Tiney Complaining very badly, indeed. I dowu., /r.a.1:-o<.e/n..k. TINEY. Oh I am so sorry! What is her complaint? C '-----CUR. That she sees so little of you. ;(' It dCA. rz.. fa:Hl I.: -TINEY. There is very little to see. Papa, dear, may ')( % {)Jr1-'r. I spend the evenin g to-morrow with Miss Curran 1 KIL. Yes, dear; I'll l end you for a few hours. TINEY. What will you charge for the loan 1 KIL. A dozen big kisses which you will bring me back. Keep them fresh on your lip s. There, run into the next room and amuse yourself while we despatch our business. TINEY. ( To Curran as she goes out.) Don't k eep r -him very l ong. [Exit.

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r 15 ......._ CURRAN. The summons to attend your lordships found me at dinner with some friends. What has happened? Has a French expedition landed in Kerry? Has the British fleet broken into another mutiny? KIL. The danger is much nearer home. LORD NOR. These d e positions sworn this afternoo n contain disc losures of an alarming condition of affai r s in the adjoining counties of Wicklow and Kildare. KIL. Dublin is threatened, two thousand men are now under arms, and are marching on the city. _.,,,.-CURRAN. Two thousand jackasses! I don't believe a word of it. These government spies are purveyors of mares' nests, and make a market of your fears! )( My Lords, the Revolutionary spirit of Ireland was broke n in '98, and was buried three years ago, when the Act of Union swept our leading men across the channel and into the British parliament. It was a crafty measure for it left the body of the peop l e with out a head. I have just passed through the streets, the city i s asleep and not dreaming of disturbance '.. /,.,,,..K k LORD NoR. But these affidavits are very precise. CURRAN. If the government supports a host of spies, the rogues are bound to encourage your fears, and keep them a live I Whom do they pretend is at the he a d of this new insurrection. KIL. Robert Emmet. CURRAN. What? Robert? the so n of my old fri end the doctor? Why, the boy is in France, and has been there for months past. Had he been in this ...---country mine is the first house he would have visited. (Entm MAJOR SrnR.) / .. : SrnR. He is here in Dublin. It is strange you should p1:ofess ignorance of his whereabouts, when he is a daily visitor at your house, where I found him in your daughte r 's company an hour ago. CURRAN. You found him in my house ?

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16 SrnR. By virtue of a search warrant issued by the Privy Council! While you were entertaining your friends at dinner, she was entertaining her lover-KIL. Silence, sir! You forget you are speaking to a father. SIRR. When treason-felony is abroad, I forget everything but my duty. CURRAN. What evidence do you bring to sustain this infamous charge? -......._ SIRR. Come forward, Mr. Quigley. Step this way, f.a;tMr. Finerty. cf. L (Enter QUIGLEY, followed by FINERTY, who carries ROBERT'S cloak.) This man (points to QUIGLEY) is associated with Emmet, and is his trusted follower. Qum. 'Twas meself guided him to Mr. Curran's house awhile ago. / CURRAN. May I ask what office you hold besides that of traitor? Qum. I'm Colonel in the army of the Irish Re / public. KIL. Your face is familiar to me. Were you not on your trial for murder before me last year? Qum. It was my brother, my lord you hanged that time. It wasn't me. 1 / CURRAN. And on no better evidence than the croak Cu "' of this jailbird. You violated my house? Qum. Never fear, if it is evidence you want, I ,,..
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17 Qum. You'll find my name among the first on the list. (SIRR passes the paper to NORBURY, he and KILWARDEN examine it.) Here's another one. SIRR takes it.) SIRR. Plan of attack! Points of check. Lines of 'jfif.a.ck.ffaHt defence. This seems to be a well-digested conspiracy to seize the city of Dublin (passes the paper.) Qum. Divil a less! And it's short work we would make of you, Major, to begin with. You're the titbit our pikes are hungry for. CURRAN. I must have some proof better than this, to satisfy me that the son of my old friend and schoolmate, Dr. Emmet, is associated with these ruffians. FIN. May be this bit o' writing will open your eyes (hands a letter to CURRAN who reads it silently.) L
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18 CURRAN. I am glad to have secured your evil esti mation, sir, it entitles any gentleman to the respect of this community. i:/' t.. "'-&l:u f lr.a.f: SIRR. I hold his Majesty's commission. "1d kw CURRAN. So does the hangman! Good-night, my fl. ""-
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19 SIRR." We must bring rebellion to a head. Qurn. And save your own 1 FINER. Thrue for ye, Mike I-and we'd like to know the price of heads now. Qurn. Yes. What's to be our reward for the crop we bring? SrnR. What do you claim? Qurn. That's the chat! We want a thousand pounds for Emmet's and fifty a piece for each other head we bring to the dock. ('ilnl!rr le8Jt%tJ MtJOjJi:eg her face in he1 ltantJ:s a9aa"m1t i1M evall. FINER. An' we'd like to see a little ready money down on account. SrnR. (flsruiiiiMJ them a 1oll of notes ) Count that. 7M (FINERTY eagerly bending ovet table. L. H. Counting money. NOR. You expect the insurgents when they find the first outbreak is defeated will become discour aged, will desert and regain their homes ? SrnR. No! They will come here-ha! ha! 'Twil l be a race among such men as those. (Points to FINERTY and QUIGLEY) who will get here first to betray their leaders. QuIG. Thirty-two-thirty-three! Divil a doubt about that. Thirty-five-hi! hi! NoRB. (Commencing to write at table. R. H.) Lord Kilwarden is now on his road to the Vice-Regal Lodge. He will submit to His Excellency the measures you propose to precipitate the outbreak by the help of our agents amongst the mob. I will draft your plan, Major, if you will repeat the particulars. (MISS w OLFE advances and stands beside LORD KILW ARDEN.) 31

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20 SIRR. (Tums and sees h er.) Miss Wolfe! KIL. Tiney! Qum. (Coimting.) Fifty-eight, fifty-nin e! TINEY. Go on; don't mind me. NOR. Affairs of State cannot b e dis c ussed befor e you. TINEY. I see that you hesitate and look at each other as though the affairs of State were guilty things to which a father could not liste n in the presence of his c hild. You dare not unfold your thoughts b efo r e htJl-. Is it not so? NOR. You are not old enough t o judge--TINEY. My father is, and h e said it was h orrible. You see, papa, I overheard what those m e n pro posed. Forgive m e if my heart comes to your sid e and pleads to stand by yours. You /JWZ, wothonksm 1itVii !!mlcl how to b e worthy of your name and of your race. M was nurse d on your breast. Let h e r now give you back the t eachings of your l ove. Have no share in this infamy. S e t your hones t face .d 1;rf.,,,; t/ao against it. ('. __-SIRR. Are we come to this? that the Chief Justice of Ireland share our councils without an appeal to a schoolgirl. Q Ti>('i:Y ean 1:8 lll'ilf!i911 SB: litte Be118li eve1 kia1s for coJ?Spi111H1y 1111t9 8Bl' here ctntl e1uo th& l:JJ hie eo1nplisue ')(' ;;-,t A KIL)./ j1 d J>T ijJJfa 'Yi!i\ I will take charge of the e -0 papers. They will expl ain, if they do not justify, o( /i;;, kck 1i"' my r esignation of the office I hold unde r the Crown. Come, Tiney; let us go. (He embraces he1.) Qu ; m. (Coii1fri,g mone y as KILWARDEN and Miss WoLl'E go oiit. Ninetyfive ninetysix. The r e's four poundosl\ort in his pile_J -' ACT DROP F ... i.\..LLS. 33

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SCENE. -The Cottage at Buttujield Lane. Enter ANNE DEVLIN. She carries a small valise; size looks around, advances, and feels for the table, on wlziclz she places the vali'se ; then returns to the door. ANNE. Come in, Miss. Enter SARA and NORMAN. Wait till I fetch a light from the kitchen; may be I'd find a sod o' turf alive in the fire there. (Going out L.) I must feel my way in the dark. / SARA. So am I, Norman, feeling my way in the dark !-in doubt and in fear. / NORM. There's no doubt between right and wrongno fear where there is love. SARA. Can you not see the position in which I place him? NORM. I can. I wish I were in his place. Re-enter ANNE with liglzt. jut:r tftrZt.. r;:Ni ANNE. I heard him moving overhead in his room. He is there. My brother Andy will soon be here /el,,,,'L wii the outside car, to take the masther to the moun-tains; for the camp is moved to the Scalp, and the boys are hungry for himself. (SARA sits at table.) NORM. The Scalp !-Why, that pass is in sight of Dublin. Is rebellion so close to us ? J..
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ANNE. For betther or for worse! The sooner the betther; the later the worse for you both. There's Father Donnelly lives at Cabinteely, convaniant to the road from this to the Scalp. You can stop there an' wake him up. The business is short and sweet, and no delay. When it is over the masther must hurry to the boys in the mountains; he is expected there by mid night. NoRM. By that time he must be on the seas. Oh, that I were at the bottom of them, while you and he were passing over me to a happy life! ANNE. He is here! /iffeu..t (Enter EMMET. He is dressed in the Irish uniform.) RoBT. Sara-in thii; place! Who-what-brought you here? NORM. I did, Mr. Emmet. Permit me to present myself, that I may spare Miss Curran some embarrass ment. I am Norman Claverhouse, Captain in His Majesty's Ninety-third Highlanders. I was a guest in Mr. Curran's house to-night, when Major Sirr arrived with a search-warrant (taking SARA'S hand.) In the absence of our host-her father-I took the liberty of driving the Major and his posse from the place; and as her rejected lover I now bring her to the only man who can repair the injury this night's business may do to the ... name -of a lady to whom we are equally devoted. ROBT. Are you aware, sir, to whom you have ren dered this service? I have rendered this service to her who owns my life. ROBT. Do you know I am one whose name men whisper fearfully; an outlaw, whom to see and not to betray is a crime; a rebel, whom to serve is a capital offense?

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I ti ti I 1-1 t-i I 1 I

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NORM. I only know that she loves you-that makes me at once your foe and your accomplice! ROBT. Martyrs have died in the flames who had not in their breasts so brave a heart; for they fell assured of paradise, while you suffer, renouncing your hopes of heaven. Let me feel your hand in mine; the other on my shoulders. So; I had rather be thus ennobled than feel the sword of a ANNE. (Aside.) Well! 'Tis mighty hard on women that one girl should have two such lovers, and waste one o' them like that. SARA. He brought me to your side; he bade me ,-?l seek the refuge of your arms-it is all the home I have J now. Hide me from myself, for I am ashamed of what ,; I do. tf.. ,:tA.t.LL4-kt = ROBT. We shall be married to-night; and if forth /t:li:'.v 1!'' tu. U.<1 k,_. with this gentleman will further extend his good offices he will conduct you to my mother's house, where you will find the home I dare not enter. NORM. Why not? ROBT. Because I would not hring over it the cloud that now obscures my life Because I would not make those I love the sharers of my fate! / NORM. You must quit that life for her sake. Tonight, after your marriage, you will leave Ireland and take her with you. SARA. Not for my sake, but for your mother'sfor your own ROBT. You ask me to abandon the cause into which my voice has drawn thousands of my fellow-country men; to desert them in the field, on the brink of bat tle; to play the executioner, and leave them headless. Oh, it could be done so easily; for their trust in Rob ert Emmet is so blind! Bribed with your person, he can leave the fools in the fell-trap baited with his lies-

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to perish-as you know, sir, they will perish-.-like help less dogs flung into the lion's den. Eternal scorn point its finger at the deed !-and say hand ttf.lt Emmet gave to Curran's daughter was full of Ireland's blood; in the breast on which she rested was the heart of a renegade; and the name she shared was blasted with dishonor! NoRM. You are so occupied with the peril in which your honor stands that you overlook hers. What matters it if her name be scathed with shame, if yours shall ._fua. !1W. live unblemished? You say you would not make .W -<.ii._....:_ those you love sharers of your fate; yet you would ol + -make her so! You would not bring the cloud that obscures your life over theirs; yet you would have her live in its shadow! ROBT. God, who knows my heart, have mercy on me, and direct me what to do! SARA. (At his feel.) And you, who know my heart, have mercy on me /-and on us both! Have mercy on my love, that now pleads for itself at your feet. Oh I am helpless to persuade him; I ask him to spare his life that is my own-my own-all I have in this world. ROBT. Sir, have you no counsel to offer us? Yes; marry her! Follow your mad career; T-stop here, and I'll find myself within three months heir to your widow ANNE. (Aside.) Oh Michael Dwyer! If it wasn't for your ugly mug, that I'm so fond of, that fellow might make me a Scotchwoman any day that was plazin' to him. God bless him! !\'. (Enter ANDY.) J_ /':.:... .v_ I / AND. Where's the masther? ,..... ;v-ac ROBT. Here! ANNE. What makes you so pale, dear.

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I -t2 AND. Bad news. I put the Major's horse into a car; for it is not between shafts they would be on the look for him : (Pointing to Norman.) Who's that? ROBT. Never mind aim. AND. 'Tis the coat on him that bothers me. ANNE. I 'll go bail for what's behind it; go on, alanna! AND. Divil a sowl was in your house, miss, when I got there; so I turned back. As I drove past Porto bello Barracks, two men came out and hailed me, axed me to take them quick to Island Bridge. Be jabers! me heart stud still as they climbed outside the car, for one o' thim was Major Sorr himself-jauntin' behind his own horse. 'f' fo 0:!:/ ROBT. You heard what they said? --AND. Maybe I didn't cock my ear! "We've got him now," ses he ; "he's pounded! The papers-the whole bag of insurgent thricks is in my hand. There's the lists of their members; the names of their leaders; the plans of attack-all in Emmet's own writin '," ses he, '' not to spake of his man and pesto I,'' ses he. ANNE. His what? AND. 'Tis what he said-his man and pesto! to the people. R OBT. Manifesto! AND. It's all the same to me! ROBT. But these papers were m the cloak I left with you. SARA. Sirr carried it away with him. RoBT. Betrayed! Betrayed! AND. That's what the Major said. To.morrow them papers will be published in the Morning Journal, and the news that Emmet has betrayed his followin' and sowld out o' the business. e Government has his own handwritin' to show for i That news will

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put down the risin' quicker than all the horse, foot, and artillery in the country could do it, ses he. NoRM. Fortune stands your friend. By this mis chance your cause is lost. ROBT Aye Is it so!-so!-so! I'm trapped and caught! Now, by Saint Patrick, they shall find my foot upon their necks, choking the lie in their throats, 1.--a.1,1.,., before their black hearts have time to give it flight To-morrow, you said, they begin their work; to...-night I shall begin mine. Before the sun rises on Dub lin a thousand men, now camped at the Scalp, shall descend upon the city and seize the Castle. Our drums will call the people to arms, and then at their head I'll meet this calumny. SARA. Robert, I beseech you-RoBT. It is too late, Sara-too late! I have no choice but to vindicate my life; ask him. y ... f y:_r .R.. NORM. He is right. tU I< ------ROBT. Andy Devlin! 'I! i AND. That's me. -RoBT. What men have we within call? AND. Three, your honor, in the loft outside, and one howldin' the horse. C ROBT. Give them the signal. (J\.NDY goes out lo the dotJr and whistles.) I must ask you, sir, to pleage your honor that what has passed here in your presence will be held sacred by you. NORM. When I leave this I shall make my way straight to the Castle, and report to his Excellency every word of it. kd
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this house until sunrise. Then, and not till then, you will. liberate this gentleman. He is your prisoner for the night. NORM. What a release! I am obliged to you. ROBT. Anne Devlin, you wlil take Miss Curran to my mother's house in Stephen s Green ; your brother Andy will drive you there. Farewell, my own one. I will bring you back a name you will be proud to wear (ke holds lur in his arms), or leave you a memory worthy of your love. Prar &er Me1 I It ill net my ai11; hM-GJ:>d's, 'Rat parts 111 AO"[ Earprell (He embraces lur. E x it.) SARA. (Falls on her knees as ROBERT leaves.) God bless and guard my love (Scene closes in.) SCENE. 'l.. A gorge in tlu mountains n ear the Scalp. Enter Quwu:v, meeting BRANGAN; both in uniform. QUIGLEY. Well, how are things workin' in the camp? BRANG Finely ; the boys are getting wild as muzzled dogs There s no howldin them. Quw. The sight of Dublin lyin asleep beyond there is mate and dhrink to fellows starvin' (or a fight What news of D'wyer ? BRANG. He is, lying still in the Devil's Glen, waitin' till he gets the join us wid four hundred Wex ford men. Quw. You must cross the hills to-night. Tell him that Emmet has sold us all, body and bones, to the Castle. They are goin' to make him a lord, an' rise him to a big place at coort-tell him. BRANG. Stop that,-enough When I get as far as that in the lie, Dwyer will shut my mouth forever. Quw. There's no lie in it ; look at them sheets;

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t I they are fresh and wet wid the ink from the Castle press. Rade them.! (He hands him a small hand-bill.) There's our sacret plans, the roll-call of our leading min, and the divil all, printed from papers in Em met's own handwritin', on show in Major Sirr's office. BRANG.-Have yciu seen them? Qu1c. Sure, any one can see them. They will be cried for a hapenny to-morrow at every corner in the city, from Ring's End to Kilmainham. He has turned approver agin us. BRANG. Tare alive! I did not think he would go do a thing like that!-taking the very bread out of our mouths. He's as bad as one of ourselves. The boys will go wild when they hear this. 0 wurra! is it for this we have been drillin' and marchin' and starvin' for weeks past! Tis mighty hard upon us, entirely so it is! Qu!G. Go amongst them; tell them so! Tell them the Bank of Irela nd must pay for it. It is full wid the poor man's money-the rints he has paid to the land lords! Then there's the city itself. Let us have a hack at it. Them Dublin tradesmen are castle-fed pigs, rowlin' in goold. BRANG. A bowld dash at them would fill our sacks, an' we could be off to the hills and bogs before them redcoats could fall in, or them dhragoons could saddle up. Qum. Thatr s the work! Go you among the men; scatter them bills among them; I'll get a howlt of the officers. We will court-martial Emmet-break him. What do we want, anyhow, wid a general? Cock him up, and here's the end of it. Let aich county folly its own leaders, and divil take the hindmost! BRANG. I'm wid ye, Quigley. I was light porther for awile at Goggins', the jewelers, in Dame Street;

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3 I know the place in the shop where a handful of J1ia monds is kept, that would buy a barony in Roscommon. QuIG. To work! Brangan-to work! (Exeunt.) z,. ScENE.-Tlte camp at the Scalp. Shed or ruined cabin R H, wht'cli serves as headquarters ; rude hovels are scattered over tlie hill-side; watch-fires, around 'ltflmk figures are lying and pikes are piled; Dublin and Ike Bay are seen belO'w, in tlte distance ; mgl1t; the ci'ty ts sparkling with lights. FINERTY, DUGGAN, and MAHAFFEY are in cabin ; groups of men in green stuffs uniform are drinking, smoking, etc.; laughter. CHORUS. Ente r .FINERTY. .f FINERTY. Ordher in the camp. '"'-HoWcan the Council of War know what it is talking about if you black guards don't hould your prate. }ALL. Thrue for ye, Pat. We '11 be as quiet as oysthers. Three cheers for the Council of War. MOTHER MAGAN. I wish there were less council an1 more war Enter QUIGLEY. .. tJ. { p_uIG. You shall have your wishes. Your officers will debate wid open
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I FINERTY and /he of!icers have brought oul of the shed-a barrel ; on which they place the hatch door of the cabin, so as lo form a table; two buckets, a basket, and a lhrtt-kgged stool. The ojjicers sit. Fi NERTY. Colonel Quigley will take the chair. (Of-fenng him a stool, with only one leg.) Qu!G I'll wait till I take one in Dublin Castle. ALL. Hurroo! Qu1G. Ordher! Men of Kildare, your time has come! Boys of Wicklow, you have waited long enough! Dublin is waitin' for you like a bride, and widin two days from this she whill be in your arrums. You men from the County Meath will howld the Phcenix and the Lodge. James Hope, with eight hundred men from the County Down, is on his way from Drogheda, and will seize the Custom House. So much for the North. The Kildare boys will take the Castle. ALL. We will! Down wid the red and up wid the green! Qu1G. Finerty, wid a guard of honor, will bring the Lord Lieutenant on an outside car, and lodge His Excellency in our camp here. Wicklow boys, you will take the ank of Ireland Hurroo! J MAG. gel'l'a Widtlaw...lias .. thebest of it. QuIG. Here is a list of the officers of the Crown, the ministers, and all the big men. They will be on our hands. What's tO be done wid them? FINERTY. A few executions, to begin wid, might have a fine effect. Quw. It would make our cause respectable. A._.,,....._c., There's ould-'.Norbury-! .Pd like his1 mug in the dock. QuIG. And a jury of convicts drawn from Ki ham in the box. 53

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ft ; FINE TV And before me on the bench! ALL. Whoo! (Tumuli outside.) QuJG. What's goi11g on there? Mol'HER MAG. May be 'tis only a fight. Quw. Can't they fight peaceably, without making a row. ( Enkr a crowd ef men, with BRANGAN; some ef the mm hav the bills in their hands. BRANGAN hands papers lo the o.ffeers and to QUIGLEY.) BRANG. News from Dublin Emmet has turned his green coat. It was lined with red all the while He has sowld us. ALL. Oo! M. MAG. Emmet a thraitor (Takes thepapersfrom BRANGAN.) .Quw. The proofs are plain enough. M MAG. Tis a black lie, and you know it Qum. If you weren't a woman, I'd make ye put down them words on paper and ate them. M. MAG. Where did you get these bills ? BRANG. Where ?-I-I did-I got them M. MAG. You haven't a lie ready. St;e they stick together ; for t)le ink is wet. You got them at the printer's; what took you there? You knew what dirty scheme was at work in the Government office Spake up. (Se iz in g BRANGAN.) BRANG. (Fallin g on his knees.) Oh! Oh! I know this grip. M. MAG. Would you whist. (Aloud ) Is this all the proofs you have agin him ? Quw. i ll/Robert Emmet is not a traitor, why is he not here? EMMET enters. ROBT. He is here I (Rekases BRANGAN, ,.., I"'.'. /! (/. ,,.. I .t I It t.. Ji I. ,..., I u.

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who crawls away amazed. All the men skwly retire to R, behind QUIGLEY and FINERTY, leaving EMMET alune with MOTHER MAG. L H.) Ronr. Why do you turn your faces from me? Speak, men! AG. They have heard you have turned approver to save your skin and fill your pockets. RoBT. Who accuses me? FINERTY. That print. RonT. (After looking a/them ) I scorn to fight with lies. That they are so needs no words, for I am here. Quigley was with me when the thieves robbed me of those papers, and now they charge me with selling to them what they stole. Qurn. 'Tis all one how they got the information; we are betrayed. Now they are "ready to meet and to crush us. ROBT. No, the documents they stole shall serve to fD.C deceive them; they shall fall into the trap they set for .:..:-me. To-night, before their troops can be moved, we shall swoop down upon Dublin. Qurn. To-night? RonT Relying on this information, they will be unprepared. Qu1G. What can we do with a handful of men? ROBT. With a handful of men Bonaparte put an end t0 the Reign of Terror, and released France; with a handful of men Cortes conquered with a corporal's guard Cromwell cleared the House of Com mons, and founded the first English republic. M. MAG. Thrue fur ye; but they were men-not jail-birds, like Quigley and his gang of thieves. Mother Magan, you will ma e me forget C your sex! ROBT. What would these men have?

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4 ,M. MAG. They want six hours' free quarters in Dublin for pillage and for plundher, then afther pikin' a few grandees they would skip. CJ.fc;BT. Let those amongst ye that are of this mind assemble round him yonder, so let me count how many honest men there be here who will stand by our cause and by their country. ( go to the R H, and stand belzind QuJGLEY, FINERTY, and BRANGAN.) 1\L..,MAG. ere s only one honesi; man m the crowd, and, be jabers, that's a woman! ROBT. (After burying lzis face in lzz's lzands.) God forgive me fur having done this thing! I have been self-deceived by my love for thi$ helpless peoplechildren of misery-by my .. blind devotion they have been rushed to this infamous extremity. Let the pen alty be mine alone; let no blood but mine be shed; accept my young life in expiation of my foolish faith. My friends-my countrymen I go hence-to Dublin -alone, and in this uniform the badge of treason; I carry with me that flag-the emblem of rebellion ; I go with my life to redeem yours; to offer my hands to the chains, my head to the executioner! (Some of tlze men cross to EMMET'S side.) There is yet time to retrieve your errors, an d to make your submission. Put off those uniforms; bury them out of sight; and seek your homes quietly by unfrequented paths and by night! ALL. (Mim11urin g.) No! No We'll stand by your honor to the death. (Some more mm join EMMET'S side.) ROBT. If you stand by me you must march as children of Erin, as united Irishmen, whose one hope is freedom; not as banditti, whose sole object is plun der. The green flag that led our countrymen at Fonte noy under Sarsfield h s never be dishonored, and it shall not be so under bert so 'fielp me God! I I ( of the men, tierin g Jo1fd join the crowd "-r-----.u..rllt/i.d Aim, some kneeli "'at hi}Jeet. IJ

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l Qu1c;. This is mighty fine, but it comes too late; two hundr e d boys from Kild a re left for Dublin an hour ago. The di vii himself could not stop th e m now. M MAG. No, but Michael Dwyer co uld His men, five hundred strong, the body-guard of Emmet, are posted at the foot of this hill, wid orders to shut the road. Qu1G. Michael Dwyer is at Glendalagh MAG.. You l ie, Quigley! He is h ere (He removes his bonnet and wig.) ALL. Hurroo Dwv. (Striding across to R.) Now I am ready to are. the words Mother M aga n spoke to ago. ROBT. Hold, Dwyer! I'll have no fighting a mongst you. Dwv. Divil a fear o' that! Is there, Quigley? Give me your hand. (He takes QurGLEY's hand.) By this and by that, by signs on your face th a t I never mistook yet and by th e pulse in our hearts that spake to one another in this g rip, I kno w that I will die by your hand, or you will die by: mine. (Shakes !tis hand.) Now, m as th e r dea r I m ready for your ordhers ROBT. Lead three hundre d of your men by Ennis kery and Rathmines; enter the city on the south by Harcourt Street; your point is Stephens' Green; be there by two o'clock. Who comniands under you? Dwv. Phil. Maguire; he is howldin the I<.ildare boys below there. Quic. Maguire !-the man is dumb. Dwv. Thnte fur ye, so he can not turn informer. But he i s mighty talkative wid his h a nds ; don t get into any argument wid him ROBT. Let Maguire unite the Kildare men with the rest of you r Wexford boys, and sweep round, entering the city by J ames's Gate; rouse the liberties1 and oc cupy Thomas Street by St. Patrick 's

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QuJG. The Kildare troop are under my command; they will not march without their officers. Dwv. Oh, be asy You will be there at their head beside Maguire; he'll take care of you. ROBT. My men will march by Slellorgan and Bru nswick Street; our point is College Green. Thus our forces, eleven hundred strong, penetrating the city on three sides, will meet at the Castle. Before sunrise Dublin will be ours; the citizens will a wake to find Ireland a republic, and our people numbered among the nations of the world. ALL. Hurroo! To Dublin. iJ ROBT. Fall in! (Repeat of tlze chorus, whic-h the men fall into nfJ'ttl; tl1e scene closes in.) 1 ScENE.'fA room in the l1ouse of MRS. EMMET. (Enter CURRAN and LORD NORBURY, preceded by a ser-L vant.) CURR. Be good enough to inform Miss Curran that her father is here and desires to see her. l believe she is in this house. (Enter ANNE DEVLIN. A' Exii' servant.) ANNE. She is here, sir; sitting by the bedside of Mrs. Emmet. CuR. You were the companion of her flight. ANNE. No; she had a guard of honor all the way, and with him she left her home. CuR. Your master, doubtless? ANNE. No; betther still. It was the lover you gave her-Captain Claverhouse. NORE. My nephew! I can not believe it! Where is he? ANNE. I left him asleep by the fireside of Rob ert Emmet, where he is passrng the night. Your honors

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look surprised to find young people have hearts, and I( hearts will have their owi way. Two years ago you gave your daughter to young Emmet. Then you took her from him, to give her to young Claverhouse. You see she knew her own mind, if you didn't know yours, ij (and that's the way of it. (Enier SARA.) CuR. Are you aware what you have done? SARA. Yes, father. I have become the bride of a rebel, and to rescue and protect your house from any suspicion I left it, when my presence there became a reproach. ''I-! Hll/La.J... NoRB. My dear child, the man for whom you have made this useless sacrifice, betrayed by his own follow ers, is already doomed to an inevitable and ignominious death. SARA. He knows it, and will face it if it comes to that. CuR. Is it my gentle Sara, my daughter that speaks .r SARA. No, father, it is the outlaw's wife; forgive me if I have been true to myself. When your nephew, my Lord, how it was with me, he told me /. how I should vindicate my fafting honor and my own/< heart; he stood by my side wtile I obeyed his counsel. Do not mistake my misfortune for my fault, and believe me, it was for your dear sake I was moved, not for my own. ANNE. (Who has been looking from tl1e window.) There is a carriage at the door. NoRB. It is mine; it brought us here. ANNE. There's a mighty big crowd gathering round it; I'll go see what they want. (Exit.) N ORB. The rogues want six months in Kilmainham, uf ;t-a visit to Botany Bay.

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-ULtlL f' d.p--H" 'ii-' k.tauti -Utt.JLJf, --2/ 6> J"ar r d-.. 1 ""' i7 ;r (1 I --d__ a_ a. /a"Y -,H
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5 SARA. Be advised, my Lord, and escape to your country house at Cloncilla. Emmet knows that Major Sirr has possession of the plans of the insurrection, and already he has changed them. ( Cnes outside.) NoRB. (Running to t/1e window.) The square below is full of the mob. What do they want SARA. Hark,! ( Cnes of "NoRBURY "NOR-BURY!") Do you hear? They want you. (Re-ent er ANNE.) ANNE. Bar the door ; make fast the on the ground floor ; let loose Masther Robert's wolf hound, and load the two blunderbusses in the hall. CuR. What is the matter? What brings the people here? ANNE. All -Dublin is awake to-night, and on foot. The air is full of growl and the rumbling of a storm It wanted litt l e to m a ke it burst. They saw your liv eries standing at this dure, and that invited the light (Blows /1eard be!O'lo, and cnes; smas!ting of gl;ss.) J. c,t,.t141 CuR. They are attacking the house. 41/A.ttM ANNE. Divi1 a doubt of it! NoRB. What do th ey want? ANNE. Your life-no less. CuR. Are they mad ? ANNE. Aye! wid joy; for they say Emmet is entering Dublin from King's End .and Rathmines, while Michael Dwyer, wid five hundred men, is at James's Gate. (Enter servant, who wltispers to ANNE.) N ORB. Before help can arrive they will wreck the hou se, and we shall perish. ANNE. The girl says they h ave brought up a load of straw, that pilin'g agin the
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l J''/f_ o..6f-nuLI<. 6<_ p:-fud lff1/l -;tt-U
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and raises her hand; silence.) Men of Dublin-my name is Sara Curran, and I am the bride of Robert Emmet. ALL. Hurroo! Long life to ye! God bless ye both! SARA. This is my husband's house, his mother lies sick beside me; take that straw and lay it down care fully on the road, that her sleep may not be broken by the noises of the street. My father, John Philpot Curran, is here; he came in that carriage to see me; he will return home in it. CRY. Three cheers for Curran! SARA. No! Be silent, and respect the rest of Em met's mother. Good night to you all. Begone! (She closes the window.) You are safe, my Lord. Anne and I will escort you by the back premises and the stable lane to Dawson Street, where we shall find a car. Meanwhile my father will enter your carriage, in the presence of the crowd, and drive home. Come! (Exit CuRRAN,preceded by servant, R. ANNE, SARA, and NORBURY L.) SCENE clzanges to COLLEGE GREEN and tlte HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT. Crowds of people; sellers of fruit, ballads, etc. ; colle/{e lads; coal porters; a blind fiddler Here's yer bot pitaties Cher ries ripe, all ripe, a hapenny the stick (Enter ANDY.) AND. Here's tlv" last new 1.a,ny-w:rs-strett" '"' r "rwlr was a damned bad soldier." ALL. Ha ha ha AND. (Sings.) "The Duke of York was a damned bad soldier, From Dunkerque he ran a}Vay !" Here comes Counsellor Flood and Hussey de Burgh.

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Three cheers, boys, for them that stood up for the people! (Enter two gentlemen.) ALL. Long life to de Burgh. Hoo! Hurra ( Tlte ge1itlemen bow and pass out.) AND. Here's Sirr. Three groans for the Majorthe drum major. (Enter SIRR.) I wish I had the drum min' of H ALL. Yah oo AND. (Szi1gs.) He is a cur, And his kennel is the Castle, et ALL. Ha ha ha (Exit SIRR.) AND. A groan for the Castle hack. ALL. Yah (Song, ANDY.) (Enter QUIGLEY, FINERTY, and BRANGAN.) Qu1G. We gave Maguire the slip in Patrick Street. How many of our boys followed you? FINERTY. A score maybe. They are close by. QurG. That's enough! (He addresses tlze (rowd.) You, Brangan, go by Grafton Street and raise the cry "To arms!" Finerty, by Dame Street; call on the people to turn out. Never fear; there's two regiments under arms, wid four pieces of artillery in the Castle yard, so look out for yourselves when you hear the rum bling of the guns. (To the crowd.) Min of Dublin, the hour has come The boys from Wicklow, Wexford, and Kildare are a mongst ye, well armed and ready to sthrike for Ireland Down with the red flag, up wid the green! ALL. Hurroo hurroo shops, w lu'ch are broken open. warden, t1z which Ki/warden ( A1t. attcuk i made on tlze Tlte carriq,,"e of Lord Kiland Miss' Wolf are seen, is {

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.f' I dnven on, preceded.by an d footmen. The crrnCJd surround it. Kztwarden is }orced by them to descmd.) LORD KIL. My good friends, you do not know me. I am Kil warden, Chief Justi ce of the King's Bench. Qu1c. Then you are. the m a n I want ( !/trusts a pike into Ki/warden). That's for my brother that you hung! (TINEY utters a cry and Ines to intercept th e blow.) (Enter EMMET and DWYER.) FINERTY. Let the cub go wid the wolf. AND. (Wrenching the pike ji-om FINERTY.) Would you kill a girl? ROBT. Who h as done this? (Raising TINEY, who has fallen on her fatlier' s body.) Dwv. (Seizing FINERTY.) I have him. ROBT. Tie him to the College rails, and let him be shot. KIL. (Raising himself.) No, let no one suffer death, except ing by due process of the law. Where is my child-my c hild? TIN. Oh, papa! my dear papa. (He drops dead out of her arms; R OBERT holds her sobbing to his breast.) ROBT. The coward who struck this good man planted his steel in the bosom of his country. Ireland was murdered by that blow! (End of Act.)

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ACT III. SCENE J.-A room in the Vice-regal Lodge, Pham i x Park-A large opening, 0, curtained; l arge lattice window at back, C; the inner 1oom is a bed1oom-toile t R., bed L.; in front room-door R. H. of opening; door L. H. 1 E.; C andles bU?ning on toilet table; 111nall lamp on table next bed,Tiney in bed L. C.,-music heard in dutanpe,-, LADY KATHERINE YORKE enters do01 R. H. creqis toward bed; she iq in ball dress. TINEY. I am not as leep, Katie. LADY K. You naughty girl; the doctor said that s l eep was th e only medicine to re sto re your he a lth TINEY. I have been liste ning to the :nus i c from the bal I room. Come s i t by me and tell me all abo u t it; who w ere there? with whom did you dance? LADY K. (Sitting on bed.) Oh, if the Earl knew I steHI in h e r e e v e ry night to keep you awake with my chatter. TINEY. Tell your papa you are tryin g t o make me forget mi ne. Oh, Katie, you have brothers, s i ste rs, mother, fatherbut he, my darling, was all I ha
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LADY K. Are you sure ? TINEY. Quite sure. (Afte1 a pause)'-Oh, yea; I forgot. LADYK. Ahal TINEY. Our under coachman I It was he that drove the carriage on that horrid night. LADY K. A coachman I Oh you cruel Tiney, to cru sh all my hopes of a secret rom ance. ( Goes w wuet and begim w take /lowers from her hair.) Oh I h ere is my bouquet I Let the flower a be your bed-fellows I fINEY. How sweet they are I Here is sweet briar, and here are violets. Oh they bring the green fields and hedge row s to my bedside; who gave you this? LADY K. Our new under secretary-Sir B a rry Clinton. TINEY. ls he h an dsome? LADY K. Very. TINEY. How l!ice? LADY K. Very I and so clever I He has only been here a week, and he has already made his mark. TlNEY. On your h e art, Katie? LADY K. Non sense; papa says he will be a distinguished man TINEY. How often did he dance with you ? LADY K. Well he undertook to teach me the new German dance that is becoming quite the rage in London-it is called the waltz. TINEY. I s it as a dancing master that he made his mark ? LADY K. No I it was while we were waltzing that Barry told meTINEY. It has come to Barry" already has it? and he has only been here a week-oh l Katie I LADY K. Don't interrupt me. TINEY. Go on; 'I'm shocked l

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3 LADY K. It s eem s that my Br..rr y ha s succe e ded in a great affair in which thepoliceand \.ajorSirr have failed. Everybody believed that the dre a dful young man Emmet had e s caped to France. Barry h as dis cov e r e d he has never left Dublin; he has been here all the while, c o ncealed in a cottage in Butterfield Lane. (Tiney up i n b e d.) TINEY. I s-is h e taken ? L.ADY K. Not y et; the y will arre s t him t o -night. What have you done with t he h airp in s ?-oh, h e re they a re I It s eems that Barry was out fishing this morning at Dunleary; the boatman he employed, a fellow n a m e d Ra.fferty, te mp t ed by th e reward of for the cap t ur e o f th e rebel told him where Mr. Emmet Jay in hiding, a nd that hi s b oa t had bee n hired to take the fugitive across the ch a nnel to France. Rather shabby of Mr. Raffferty, but, it will mak e my Barry's fortune. There-now I'll slip on U:Y dres s ing-gown and come ba c k t o bid you good-night. (.Exit.) TINEY. Te-night! She sa id "to-night he will be taken." They will kill him, and I am helples3 to s ave him. Oh, what can I do ? He would h ave sa v e d papa -he would have killed the man who murdere d my darling-and I can do nothing!(wring s h e r h a nds in dispair)-nothiag I Oh, how tenderly he spoke to me. 1 f elt his t ers on my ne c k as he held me to hi s heart, aad the eye s that s hed them will be clo s ed forever. Hi8 sweet face i s ever prese n t there-there-abo ve mine. Oh, 1 know now who s e name I spoke in my s le ep. [Re -enter LADY KATHERINE, dressed in a wmppe r.] LADY K. There, I come to bid you good-night. I will put out the light s (She extingu is hes t h e candles. The m o onl i ght falls through th e widow on th e girl and ove r th e bed.) I declare, she is asleep already. Oh, what a weight off my that is

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. 80

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( 4 Good-night, swee t angel! ( She talces the lamp, rind the curtain so as t o close in t h e recess, then goe s out quietly; L. H. door; 1tag e dnrk; ajte:r a pause; the fac e of Tiney appears between the cur tains; s h e ente:rs; she is dressed in a long peignoir; she tries to walk, b ut falls, knee/,i ng nea1 door R. H. in F.) Oh, Merciful Father in Heaven, bear up my poor w eak limb s I ins pire my failing body with your will I grant me stre n gt h to reach him who sa ved my lifE: l take it now, and let me die at his ( Sh e raises h e rsdf f eebly, feels he:r way by the w all to the door--opens it-lis t e n s and then croops out}. [Scene changes.] SCENE 2.-Ann De:vlin!s Cottage in Butte:rfidd Lane; Robert seated at table O; Ann asloop by fireside; 'Andy lies across the door.) ROBT. Betray ed by kn aves I de serte d by coward s I tracked and hounded lik e a wild beast! l tis the in exora ble fate of all the Saviou r s of the people I Oh ye sp irit s you immortal band of heroe s who s uffered for your faith I Bodyguard of Him who died for the hum a n race! Accept into your ranks the humble life o f one, who, loving his native land not wisely, but too well, followed in your footst eps upward to the Thrl)n e where s it the Eternal Trinity of Truth, Light, and Freedom! (He rises.) Men will call me, vis ionary, a rash fool an d dupe. Ah! had those on whom Bonaparte r elie d failed him in the pinch! Had Washing ton misplaced hi s tru s t among sttraitors, these monarchs of men might have stood as I do now! An down-fallen the scoff of tile world I The wood of which Fortune s hapea a Thrnne, is ready at need to build a gallow s !r{1'wo knocks at door i n F., followed by a whistle; a thir d knock.) It is the signal! ( He opens the door.) [Einte:r DwYER, who steps over Andy.] 81. .,_

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' \",. .) :. "I".

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5 DwY Is that the way k:apes watch over yur honour while I am away? Wait till I wake him up -(rais e s his w h ip.) RonT. ( Staying hini)-Don't be hard ou th e boy For three nights, while they hunted us from garret to cellar, he ha s had no re st Let him s leep! What news? d'tTUM-R-C DwY Wexford is ready and willing. oilo sl lflble. ) Kildare, Carlow, and Kilken ny are wai ti ng your word. ROB'r. ( 111 le.) Ay I So they told Lord Ed ward in '98 but wha't followed ? treachery in his camp-dis concerted plans -mutiny amongst the leader s-confusicn-drunkenness and plunder amongst the men-havoc, panic, and de s pair. I will not give the s ignal for blood shed l DwY. It iR for your honor to say (He puts a s hawl over Ann.) /i)t._,...;,. '-RonT. Why" should you continue the fig nt ? DwY. Maybe b ecause it' s all I am good for! Sure I'm only a dog at your heel, to watch for your bidding, and do it withou t axin' why. ROB'l'. My brave Dwyer, had I on ly five hundred men like your se lf, I'd bid the world s tand hy to see our pe o ple made a nation I But our enterpri s e is beset with pitfall s-we a r e walking td k-'RCb-1"'-"
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84 I

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6 d:hqst to P1auo..,. t h e B o s we 8Q.. ANDY. (Who has risen, and listens at the door.) Whist I there's a strange foot-fall in the l ane I it stops at the gate I (Dwyer puts down his pipe, brings out a pistol and a short iron blitdgeon.) ANN. ( Waking)-Did your honor ca ll me? DwY. Hould your prate. ANDY. 'Tis migh1y queer. [ believe i;, is onl v a dog, for it has got no foot teps at a ll. (Looks thro' keyhole). Hould your breath I It is here, clo e agin the dare. DwY. Throw it wide. I [ANDY tlwows open the door. TINEY is leaning against the post.] ..r hf., o( /VU,..., ROBT. Miss Wolfe! ( I uns to h e r and brings hi!#' down ) '1""-" < AN.NE. H ere at t h i s hour. She iR pe.ished with cold. We /?tTle<-cA.ctfa htard you were lying ill at the Lodge. TrnEY. So I was. 'Twas there, an hour ago, I learned that you were hiding here. They know it. They will come here tonight to arrest you. ROBT. Who could have betrayed us? TINEY. A man named Rafferty, whose boat you re 1 0 take at, Dunhary. DWY. Blood Alive! My sisther's son-my own flesh. Michael I For the Lord's sake, don't look so white. DWY. 'Tis Joe's winding sheet you see in my face. ROBT. And you r o se frJm your bed t c u me here? !du./ TINEY. Yes. k T. r ANNE. Notonfoot? dw.M-"'7 TINEY. I dared not take a oar. Look at my dress-I must l ook like a The Cllrman wou1d have driven me to SwifL' s ho sp ital for 1 h in sane (She laughs.) ANNY. Without shoes on her feet 85 r

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l I 7 T1NEY It is so. ANNF:. See how they bleed. r. ,(p jl'cr.cil TrnEY. I did not feel it. (Shefainlll ) thw.. catct.. <-o<., R OBT She fainted. k t;,_ ANDY. (At the door.) A crowd of men have st opped at the fut of t he l a ne. One is on horseback. WY. (Blowing out the tight.) If they are on the sa rch, a light in th e home, at this hour, will gui d e t'1em. (Goes to the door. Looks out.) It is 'he Major. ROBT. Si1r ? (ANDY runs to L. H door. Looks out ) DwY. Quick, sir; you have t e n before they can reach ua. ANDY. I see lights on this s ide. hey are a ll around us. ROBT. Id there no escape? ANNE. Y es; the oulol. well by the shed outs ide. Hide your se l ves in it. Down with yez, all tb.ree. There's not a fut of wath er They will only find me here, and this poor sick c hild. Never mind u s DwY. She is right. Come, s ir. [Exit HOBERT with DWYER.] ANNN. Don t lave that coat th ere. (Points o JJ,obe;rt's over coat.) ANDY. ( Taking it up,) The Major will get hi s horae b ack afther all. Bad luck to the baste he'll tell on us, for he's stableO. i n tb.e shed. Whoo! Wait a bit. (PuliJ on the coat.) L'll back him an' take a Hier through the cro;vd o' th em. I may as well b e sho t a s hung. So here goes for which. [Exit L. H. do01] ANNE. Poor child This night will kill her. [Two blows on the door.]

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8 SIRR. (Outside.) In th e King 's nam e ope"-1 hi s loor. ANNE. ( Turning. ) -'In the devil's name-pull down the latch [Ent e r SIRR,jollowed by SERGEANT and soldiers.] SIRR Who i s th e owner of this house? bNE. I am, for wan t of a r e tth er. SIRR. A man callir1g him e l f E ll is lod g e s here. ANNE. He does. SrnR Where i s he ? ANNE. There i s his room-help yourself uf IJ-f>fY: -SrnR. Go starch the (Exit SERGEANT and two soldiers.) %z I told you that some day you w o uld fall int0 my hand s and here you are. ANNE. Here I am, s ure enou g h /' SIRR. What gir l i s that? Stand 11side W o l fe! Wht. b er here ? ANNE. She brought a sp or t in' m essag e that the h o unds would meet here eat!y in the mornin', and here you are { W\, /;rf [Re enter SERGEANT and toldiers.] (i/i4<1 SJRR, Not there-wha.t i s this-a l etter in the band-writing of t he man we want. The ink is st ill wet on th" pen. He be e n here within the last ten minutes. Will you tell us where your lod ger is ? ANNE. How would I knQ w ? It is no business of mine where he goe ( Sirr goes u p to the door.) t.J Srnn. W e'll s harpen your wits. Prepare a rope there. (Speaks off at the door.) Tilt back car, with thti s h afts in thP. air. Hould it so, some of yez. That wil l sarve for an e legant ga.llows to euit this w oman (She struggles with the soldiers who would sieze her; they present their bwyonets so a e l o kee p her prisoner against the wcill. Will you confei s n ow? I'll give you two minutes.

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9 ANNE. You are not the priest.' I have nothi n ; 1o confess. (They sieze her.) You may murder me, you c ow a rds, but notone w o rd about him will you get out of Ann Devlin. Now do your worst. TINEY. (Recovering.) Ann I W he re a:e yo u ? I / A NNE. Good bye, Misq. Lb"l
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I 1 0 QuIG T here s h e goe s stra i ght in t o the thra p ( Ente:r SrnR.) H e I he I The re will be a g a y weddin to-ni ght a t Father Donnelly' s! SmR G o t o t he E nni s kerry road. Se e th e me n are po s t ed th e re, s o as t o clos e h is e scape that w ay I'll take with m e twe nty r ank and :fil e t o s u rround the hou a e QuIG. (Go ing R .)-mo re power I b e jabers we' ll put the n et securely o v e r h im this t i me. Whis t I lo o k th e r e d'ye see t hem two sha d o w s c r eepin' d own th e s id e o' the hill ? SmR '!'h e y a r e cattle, maybe QuIG. Ca ttle on t w o legs, Major I thPy a r e ma kin st r aigh1 for t h e priest 's h ouse SmR They mu st b e two of our fellow s th a t got astray Q ulG D ivil a man you h a d that c o u l d foo t t h e hill s i de like th e m two Look no w th e bi g on e i s in th e moon li g h t I 'Tis M i cha e l D w yer! a n d bis foll ower i s Andy Devlin l W h o o yer sow! we'll ba g the wh o l e cov e y l Srna H ark I h e a r t h e hoofs of a hors e I QuIG And so does D wyer I Ye see-he s top s to li s ten SmR. Y o nd er com e s a man riding a pieba l d I Qum. 'Tis yom own b as t e Major! a n d Emmet himself i s ac r o s s him! 'Tis yours elf is in luck, s ir, thie n ight l SmR. You are righ t ; the tw, o fellow s have jo in ed t h e horsem a n a n d t hey are goin g t ogethe r toward s t h e hou s e [ CLA.VERHOUS E o utside, sings verse of Bonnie Dundee.] QUI
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I 11 BIRR. D o you a l ways s i n g s ir, when you a r e in s i ght o f dange r ? OLAV. No; someti mes I s moke. SIR&. Yo u are betraying our prese o ce to the foe we are in pursu i t of. OLA V British alway s betray their presence D'y e wan t u s to s k u lk? S mn. Capta i n C l averhouse, you i;ee tho se three m e n yonde r standing b efore that house? CLAY. I s ee two men and a h a lf. SIRR. Then you see Robert Emme t and icha e l D w yer. Q o m. And the half I s Andy D ev lin; but he R a hal f that ca n tackl e a whole one b ig as your.;e]f. SIRR. You ste your duty befor e you ? it i s to p l ace your me n s o as to surround and co. mmand tho se premises, and t o ma k e p r i so n ers of all we Vind th ere. A r e you pre p a red sir, to pe rfor m that duty? OLAV Needs must, s i r, when the devil drives. Srnn. D o you mean that for a joke, or an in sult? Cr,Av. Bot h ; and I h o pe you m ea n to rese n t it. This is a conve ni e n t spot, and there's no time like the present. Are yo u agre eab lt? SrnR. Duty plea s ure, captain. After we have l odged our prison e r s in R;i!maiahaw, l 'll take a wa l k w ith you in t he Phay ni x, if you a r e so ru' ind ed. ( Claiw h ouse a side a s h e goes out ) CLAY. ( A s ide)-How can I warn him of hi s danger? ( E x itL.) B IRR. Follow me! (Exit R. ) Q uw. arnund)-There will be hot work w h e n t h e y y t o tackl e D wyer Where will I find a saf e bidin' p lac e con n i ent t o see i t a ll 'l There's a clump o f b u s lHs t hat l ook8 w ell o f h arm's way (Goes R.; reeoils) It is m ov in 'ta re an 95 I

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1 2 'o un s t h e r e s someb o dy in s ide! maybe h e s got hi s gun fixed o n me 1 ( c reepR off L H. ) [ Enter FINERTY very pale ] FIN S top! QuIG. D o n t s hoot Fm. 'Tis m e s e lf, Finerty QoIG. I t hought i t w as one o f Dwy e r 's m e n ; what b rin gs yo u here ? Fm. I m nearly d ea d J d are n ot s ho w i n th e s t r eets o f D ub l in. I'd b e kill e d The people s ay I sould the life o f Emmet. So I w as hidin h e r e whe n Dwye r s men ca llgh t sig h t o' me, and hav e be e n h unt in g me l ike a rat. l be li eve I kno w ev e r y hole in these hills Qom Ar e Dwyer' s m e n about h e re? Fm. An h our a g o th ey w e re here as t h i c k as but they vani s h e d ove r th e hill tow a rd s D e rn a mu c k Q u m Th ey w e r e sca r e d by th e redcoat s ; bu t n o w him selfi8 here th e r e will be wigs o n the g r e en befor e s u n r ise. Pat, t h i s i s n o p l ace J o r u s -Pve got t h e c a r b e l o w h er e I'll ta k e y e b a c k t o Dublin where you will ge t sa f e lodgm' i n Kil ma inh am until we ge t th!!' re ward a nd th e n we' 11 s how I re l and o u r h ee ls. Fm. Th e soo n e r the b e tth e r. ( Going)-A.fte r w e p o cket o ur pay, I'll g o to Am erica a nd t a k e some other n a me. Q uIG. Be jab e rs, P a t, but t h a t wi !I b e m i ghty h a rd on th e m a n whose n a m e you t a k e ( Exeunt.) lf-. T h e i nterior of Father D o n n elly' s -A small chapel i s s e e n L. H. throug h a n arch in the wall, facing 1 udience; a l a i g e br1y w indow R H. ; door R. H. ; fireplace L. H ; c andles are l ighted in t h e alt ar in chapel; doO'I L H. 3 E at enlr a n c e t o chapel.

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13 SARA. (At baywinclow)-1 t ho ught I heard the sound of a hor se i n t h e road. FATHER D. You are l istening w i th your heart. SARA. Oh, Father! I can hear nothing else! Fear and hope poRsess me, that my being feels like one great pulse! do yo u hear! my earH did not deceive me! (Enter Robert)-Thank h ea v en! RoBT. Do AO, with all your heart, on which f cou1e to rest! for m ine iH well nigh Hped 1 have none for further struggle! I h a v e slig hted your l ove for a wanton infatuation! My other love ha s betrayed and dePerted me; I come to you for forgiveness, for com fort, and for peace! [Enter DwYJm. ] ArW.ckw-DwY. Get to work, your reverence! there's >omething wrong! for l t o n I d Maguire to meet me at Stony beyant, but the hill R id e was bare as a bog-not a Rigo of one ot my prnple to the f o r e [Exit FATHER DONNELLY.] 8ARA. What do you fear ? D\\'Y. There's somebody in the mountains to-night besides ourselves and the grouse; as I came over Glenmalure I did not h ea r a cock crow, nor a plover cry. [ Entei ANDY with gun.] A N DY I found your gun in furze bush as you said, and this besi de it ( shows a pike broken in two pieces.) R oB'l'. W hat is it? DwY. A letter to me from Phil. Maguite. Did. you mind h o w t h e m p ieceR lay? ANDY. J c licl. DwY. Which wav die! pike l'nd point 't ANDY. T o T allaght. 99

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14 bwY. Th ere are readcoalR there, and i n pow e r o' them o r Phil. w ould not have hi s heel. H ow did 1he 8 haJt lay? ANDY. Pointing to DernauHu-k. DwY H e has go n e there to join two hundred men in the G l e n of Email. How will I let on to him that I am h e r e ? ANDY. I lighted the furze bnh bef.,re 1 lefl DwY. Andy, m e bou c hal ye w e re-you are worth your weight in o n e -pound note'. Bar the
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15 the lig h t t h ere I it guides their fLre (Andy b/uw.; 011/ the light ; & bert draws Sam into the chapel ) Now, Andy, we'll tak e a h a m i n t h e game I Let nR see how it lies-there's a crack in th e m shutters I (Andy and Dwyer enter th e bay-window behind it., cortains.) [The .scene changes. J Th r R. H. }lat re11olves cvnd comes clciwn oblique, enclosi ng L. H. s ide q/ showin,g a yard enclosed by a low stone wall ; th e R. H. flat .serves as ei;terioi of hoiaie w ith porch; the wall is lined with soldieis; Sfrr arnongst the'rn. [Enter 0LAVERHOUSE.] OLAV. Stop firing I Who gave the order? SARA I did. OLAV. Mind your bnRiness, and don't presume to ta k e my com mand. (To drummer besid e him)-Roll I (Drummer gives a s h arp roll on drum.) Father Donnelly-we are under o rd e r R to sea r c h you r house, where we have information M r Em m et con cea l e d S A'B 'Tis N orman I CLAY. W e call on you in the King' s name to open your door s t hat we may do onr duty I if you refuse, we mu s t emp loy force I a n d if resi s ted, our direction s are lo destroy your ho118e and cha pe l and bring yon prisoner s to Dublin! (The door opens: Fcithe r Donnelly appea1s in it, dressed in vestment ... ) FATHER D. Strangers came .to my door and c l a i me d m y m inistry; l J ed thtm to th e foot of the altar. God forbid s I s houl d vio l ate that sanct uary as you wottlcl have me do! You will do your duty to your Master, as l shall do m ine t o Him whoRe cummissio n I bear. (He r e tires and closes the door.) SIRR Now, captain, as we have no time to Jose, po u r a cou p l e oi voll eys into t h e l'at-trap, and set fire to tlie stable beyant-that will fetch t h e m out. 103 t

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16 C1, A v There i s a lady there. SIRR. We do n o t l'egard the sex of a v i p e r w h en we c ru R h itso wit h rebel R DwY. 0h, .Phil. l\laguire why arn't you w i d i n call ? ANDY. Maybe b e is, but i s waitin' for your ordhe rs. RoBT. Sarn-I cannot sacrific e thi s nob l e o l d ma11 I ca nnot wreck his hou s e and him to pri son. I will surre n der. SARA. N o! no!
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A C T IV. SCENE.The Cott'! t Hoiuie; Green Street; The Trial of Emmet; Norbury on the Bench; Ju1y; Barristers; Jailors; Officers; P u blic. Lorm N. Prisoner at the Bar! You have heard the evidence b roug h t against yon by the Crown. You have been found guilty of a treasonable conspiracy to betray your country into the pow e r of our common foe, the French. With this infamous you provoked an ins11rrecti<:! for us to impress on a man of yonr hip;h attainments and po s ition the baseness and in famy of such crimPR. What have you now to say why judg m ent of and execution should not be awarded against you? RonT [Ajttr a pause.] My Lord; why jurlgment and exe c u tio n should not be passed upon me, I have nothing to say. If I w e r e condemned to suffer death only, I s hould bow in silence to my fate A man dies-but his memory lives. Your sentence t hat d elivers my body to the executioner shall not deliver my soul t o t h e contempt of generations to come. You charge me w it h bein g the emissary of France. It is I would accept from 1' r anee, for my country, the same asistance in our strugg l e for i ndependence that Franklin obtained for America. But were th e F r e n ch, or any other foreip;n nation to come here as invade rs, I w ould meet them on the shore, and if compelled to retire before s uperior discip l ine, I would dispute every inch of JriRh s01l. ev e r y bla de of g rasP, a n d my last sl1oul d be_ Tf!Y 107

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r !). .... v IN\.. 2 grave I I did not seek to free Ireland from the tyranny of one for
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t3 lordship might have occupied my place here at this moment, and I, yours : l NoR. H ave you done sir? ROBT. You are impatient for the sa crifice My Lord I -bear with me awhile, I have but few more words to s ay, and not to you but to my people. See! For your sake I am partin g with a ll that is d ear to me in this life-family-bat most of all with h er-[SA.RA rises with a cry ] the woman l h ave loved. [She goes to hi?n.] My Love-Oh I My Lov e! It was not thus 1 thought to have requitt:d your [He kisses her.] Farewell I [CmmAN receives her a s s h e faints] Farewe ll I I pass away into the grave. I of the worl d only one favour at my departure. Let no man write my epita ph, for a s ,no mau who knows my motives dares now to vindicate them, Jet not prejudice or i gno rance as perse them; l et my tomb be un inscribed until othe r men and other times cirn"'do justice to my character I When my c ountr y shall take h er place a mongst t h e nation s of th e earth-then-and not till then, l et my e pit ap h b e written I have done. [Murm ers in the Court.] THE CRIER. Si lenc e in the Court-while his Lordship the Judge passes senten c e of death upon the p risoner a t the b ar. [As NORBURY assumes the black cap, t h e scene closes in.] JOUt.12-.2.. A PRISON.-Enter FINERT Y-followed by QUIGLEY. QuIG It i s done at last. He is condemned. Fm. When is he to die ? Qum. To-morrow mornin' FIN. That's a short day. QuiG. Lon g eno ugh for Dwyer a nd hi s boy s to pull down N ewgate, to get him out. FIN. It will be a h ard nut to c rack 111

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4 Qum. And they will find it a blind one. They will draw it blank for Emmet will l odge h ere to-night. Frn. Here ? in Kilmainham? e polic e ay there' roayi. turnk,! in Ne.,,{a te)nat is to be sled. e uld iyow ope{the _ors to thepe FIN. 6e you s ure of the jailor s here ? One of them g a v e m e the offer awhile ago. He is one of Dwyer's m en-the place i s full of them Quro Kilmainham will be h e ld toni 2ht by a company of r edcoats; meanwhile, a spec i a l warde l has been a ppointed l o w atch the and sleep with him in hi s cell. FIN. I hop e they have picked a sure man? Qum. They have. One I recommended. Yours elf. Fm. Me? Quwh-:rhat's to be your duly this night. 0 F!N. But sure I can't stay here. The vessel that w as to tak e you and me acro ss the says to Ame rica wiU sa il at daybreak. Quw. You axed the government to put you in here for purt ect i on. You could only be adm i tted as a pri s oner, and a war rant for your releaAe must be from the Cast le befor e t hey ca n l et you ou t. Be asy ; I'll tak e care of you. Fm-,_ And they money-the reward--it i s due Qurn. And will b e paid to-night. FIN. To you? Qom. To me I Who else? Frn. Where will it be paid? Will Sirr b ring it here? QuIG. No; he will meet me at Brangan's wharf at RingH End. FIN. Furninst th e spot where the sh ip lie s moored and r ea dy t o sail I Q u igley, you wouldn't go back on me ? Y o u would not lav e me here and run off wid my sh.re o f th e r ewa:rd? 113

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l !j Qum. Pat, I'm for you; bnt the poliA ha\e found out that you tuk a hand in the killin' of Cnwford F:rN. You were there, and helped. QmG. Then they say you were the man that mnrdhered Kil warden. FIN. 'TwaA yourself! Qum. They clar not let yon go. FIN. Not let me ont? Do you main they '1.re going to keep me here a prisoner? QurG. Until the next batch transporteci to tht pemd settle ment in Botany bay. Yon are in for life, Pat. FIN. Quigley, yon arejokin' Qum. 'TiA a sorry joke. I brought the ordher from the Ca.qtJe, and left it at the gate aR I c .. me L'l FIN. The ordher to kape me here? I won't believe it. Qum. You Hee that dnre? lam goin' out of it, juRt try to lave this place along wid mt-, and you will believe it, may be; good... 6 Fittlill!!Jlt j 'Ii! 4i2 .,'a+ ]JI. and s'Qf!I 'iw;, Fm. It is the villian the-the traitor! and to think while I am caged here, he will be 'ailin' away wid my money in his pocket, and a grin on mug /'.Oh! no! 110 I I.. J..R-i.f not so fast Quigley. Aha! two C
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ea ka:e hov d, AR9 J&tt kao;; 11hat'e iR iLJ t!ou' t dcJ&y ft [Qi H 9 11tnt Ho nsts. Eitid jm'loa: Bls eiNj Els0r kc1tirag Ha J o I oa, I 1tavs act the elcg h atd tlao t' oh 4..l...CI. i CLAVEHOUSE [..<::_. Non. J ca the warden charged with t h e care o f Mr Emmet? c / liii21. is I am b44tld :7euu.. Uc-Aft NORM. I am the officer in comma n d of the men detaile d to prote ct t h e j a i l. ifa: I kne ) ewi lteno2 aeH. d They are preparing the c e ll i n which will palli! t h e uufil d-u nigh t ua11 11001 w2H1 in ihe tGititlM<. 1 t.vzLl ? IULl..
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NORM. prayer. CUR. ROBT. 7 [Enter CuRRAN.J have done you a very seve r e atone for with my life. Let ter plead for me. Do not turn away. e coldness of death upon him feel He will back th e ie humble petition et, a p ri sone r lying un r sentence of death. [Rends the re.st in ilence. ] Oh, Air! Tl s is a beggar's petition for life! for life a any pr!ce e y es, bl' lded "l"ith tears, lifcetl to mine. l see the sweet, c hi is h outh of Tiney trembling with her tender supplicatio n t tween my kisses I would ay I cannot crawl t(l the foot of t h rone and sue for pardon. My country is my accomplic e

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120 Jt-'-. -CAA. CI(} t,;-A_u; ') f"--.,,,...;.. ,,,;,,r ,... r.-A!>. !,,_,,t: I i-===-_J = kZlWrJ-Uj /;1. kb-t" tH".C.uj p /,U(&bA_,, --======= !fffvt k IUL fu WtJ-?d .h_ u_d-tLltff"yf' "f IM. AIL wiLL. U:. N-f Jf;:.M.f ,u: jW_ :J fato/c, hu/ k-uff.lA. ( c/Mtnd. -' 13u.t-ra4 to-tn.rt.. "" fb'
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use the royal clemency? L ROBT. No! I '11 accept so much of it as His Maj ty may ant to one so po as I am. I ask to face the eat h of a s Idler. Let me stan before a platoon of brave ellows ana earing the uniform o mycountry let me fall ke a ma n d d not die by the rope Ii a dog. Thankee, sir! t nkee. I'm pron r ame to waste a mon like yer l'. CuR. Must I take back this a wer to ..... --] ROBT. I have staked my life, an h e lost the game Jt i debt of honor, and as such, must b paid within ours. [Smiling, as h e offe r s Curran i s nd.] You see sir, it akes all I have in the world to m et the c m. A.li_,,__ CuR. Give me some groun to plead u n. Will you not promise to forsake the cause t at has betrayed ROBT. Ask me to forsak your daughter, and oresworn to my love. Bear with me r-and let me live out my 'fe-wJ.at is left of it is full of he Her dear imnge is before me. I have no other care-no ot er thought-this is the eve of my we 'n night. I lie dow my grave to dream of her until T wak me!t my bride t the altar of heaven. Tell her I wait h there.

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9 THE Bur,L TNN--A low clal'S publlc ILOUJJe of the period. It occupies a Of.liar, approaclted by a hott jligltt of steps. R. II. in F.door leading to sttcet R. and L. Secret door, L.B. 1"n F. Tab/,es R. and L., at which men aie clrinki11y, clay pipes, and two are playing at cards. A [Enter iJ @8e1ej alo&1, DWYER.) L-C. drff, DWYER. BoyR attention! There is brave work to be done .__> this ni ,ht; liste n to [Reads pape;-.] At eleven o'clock d. Quigley will b e at Brangan's Wharf, Rings End, to receive from Major Sirr th e reward agreed wi
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II i o ii man has no heart left and h e loses his head, he takes to hi legs. ANNE. Don't be so hard upon them, Mike. They mane to Rtand b y you. ALL. .A.y I Ay never fear SIRR. This is t .he Bull Inn? [To Anne.] Beware, woman how you trifle with You have laid information that this p l ace is a depot of concell.led arms, and the resort of rebels. ANNE. Yes. SrRR. The Bull Inn, though poor, bears a good name. Lt.ff ANNE;. The and guus are slored in the house i n SZJ Mar aha lsea L ane that backs on this. There's a secret passage between the two. Dye see thatrow ot pull the third one .(' .,.,:_ s!Ji,J,; [Poi nt s b ack to the hard aecret panel.] Pull it down. \ \ appioaches thtJ row of pegs, and pulls it down; the secret door 11.dvaucr" ,1-/ W : SIRR. "'8eitgea nt, take your filt of in \here and report I what yo u find I [&it Sergeant /lW. ;trR (. mnain--on-gual'd.] So far good! Now you into my hand s the person of a lea 1er of the insurrection, for whos e capture the government has already offered a reward.. o( five hundred pounds; there are three rebels worth that s um. I a m h ere by your agreement to put. the bead of this man in my hands-to whom do you refer ? v, here is he? AN1'E. Where is he? [She struggles with her emotipn ] No! no! I-I can't
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1i DWYER. That'swhatshedoes mane! and Iam he! [ Advanctl.'l and faces Sirr.J SrnR You-Michael Dwyer ? DWYER. Himself! SJRR. If you are he, we met at Vinegue Hill when I p u t a bull et in your throat. nwYER. I believe the compliment returned at B a ll y Ell is, whe n I put a pike in your ribs. Srnu. We are quits. [Off11rs l
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12 his word not to e s cape, and Emmet wil_I_ k_a..::.p_e_i t ____ _,_ we failed. These arms are no good now I g iv e t hem up a nd /u.(. 1'4-U:-,1---s e ll my life on condition no other shall he ta k e n [Sits o n a k eg.] / d I .J 7J,.. ,-;. lu71.o S rnR. And if I refuse your terms? t-k..., !Ni" .rtr,&,., //!.R'K / DwYER. You won't do that? #;d / 8IRR. Why not-you are in my POifer. J<.CDWYER. I'll show you why not! I am setti n g o n a hundred w e i g h t of gunpowder. [He strikes in the b ung of the cask; t h e powde1 flows out.] Patsey, lend ine your pipe. [The rnakc a move for the .qtem. ] S()"l.<&. d// flL-fly t1u.T ---v-af S fiiM,. ----SIRR. No, stop. DwYER Vv e are not afraid of death, an d t h is way will s ave Jaw cotl<. 8rnx f accept your terms-the men can go. DWYER. You give your word not one of t h e m will come to harm. Cc-tu. tKf duw-"- SIRR. Will you rely on it? I / DwYER. Yes. I know a man when I'v e fough t wid him I You will kape your word. Go h@me boys, pace a ble and te ll th e rest out side ther e's !!Othin' more to be done-thi s time. Goodb ye, God bliss you. S'di" tu 'fLiU R [ .E.unnt the men.) Sm&. Sergeant, march your men Ii wk to t h e cast l e Yo n ca n l eave me here. [DWYER leans over ANNE, wlio lias beell seated (,2,6,,, L crying.] Michael Dwyer, here are two passes t o America b v J7L4r1i,,;f g;-,,,_ lfu,_ the vessel that lies off the North wall and sai l s to m orrow a t (jLUL tvlit;:, d ayb r eak. Take A.nne Devlin with you. You a r e free. ANNE. Oh, Ma.jor, do you main it? Mike, d'ye h ear what he says? DWYER. l do, Anne, but I want more tha n that, or n t h i n g Re a d that pap er. [SIRR ieadsit apar t hande d to M m by DWYER.) 129

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13 Srn R It is true-we meet there in an hour. 'l;J-Cl
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i4 with lantern.] Now Air, count out your money. [QUIGLEY the bag.] sd{ar (LI&. o('. Cbuu fd. sd; ,( "f aw& QuIG. [Counting.] H e I he! oh, but tbere'R notl i11 in life sweet as that sou nd of coin. [As he counts.] Your honor promised m e two free p!l.llsageR for myelf and Finerty to New York SIRR. You will g e t them when you are uone your count there, never fear. Quw. I kn e w yo u would be as good as yonr '"ord, "ir There' s thrf'e hundred-how they hine! [ OpenN rr.<11 t.alces. from h is waist a b elt, MA.TOR i::irnR and after ?oalkin!I up and doicn. Exit by door L .; QUIGLEY co11 tinues ] Quw. There's two hundred more! Ho! ho I l'm in luck [ He puts money into tlie belt. Enter DWYER, wilho11t his beard o r coat; h e takes the seat recently occupied by MAJOR SIRR.] Fifty -seventy-eighty-a hundred--six bundred-an
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r i5 thr, knii es and examinea thern by th e candlP; h e blow1 tl.e candle out, and springs on D W YER, w.io, leaping to one s ide, woid.s him.] DWYER. Egorra I forgot t h e blackguard I wa s dal in' wid [As h e around th e table, he me.ei' the char in which h ttd hem seated; he 8eizes it, and holrl.s DWYER at b1Ly; h e rail':] ANNE-ANN.II: avour n een come! [ANsF. app ear.sat do01 L. H. with lantem.] ANNE. What's the matter? DWYER. All right-stand there and givens a li ght! ANNE. Kill him Mike I kill hi1n DwYER'. N ever fear I [Holds the ligh t above her hra!l ] A:KNE. Will I help you? No; I'll be iqual to the dirty w o rk. (i.,me on Q11ig l ey Are ye afee r d of a n unarmed ma n ? Don't be ba"h ful I why a m t woul d make a bettl'.er fight. [A8 QUIGLEY a 1"1UJ!i. at him, he claps the chair over his head, which a ppem s through th e legs and rails, w hile his arms are pinioned to the back legH mul sid e r-i ils.] The rat i s in t h e trap [ H e pin. him agciinst the 'trail; h olding him then with one h and, he tl11oat b y the othe r.] D'ye remembex the grip 1 Qura. M er-mercy I DwYER. I don't hear what you are saying I Spaktl up, man! o3 "1-P [(-t,UJGLEY d rops the kn1:ves. ] Tha t'R ri g ht. be asy now; you ,.. /; i:oin' into the l iffey, where the price of blood will take yon to ...:, the bot tom. So, h e's gon e to where h e will m eet Masther9R obert to-morrow -to wh ere I muAt answe r one day for what have done to-n ight: Now .1012 Cail h e lp m e AiUl-tt.-poti!O'IT=ere /Mr/ 41,;; j.ide.. [She o penll the doo1 at back; he qurGJ,F.Y ont; th e y A4ttlf g e t int o th e boat nnd the shed i s dm.wn ojj; the 1fret appea1s th e y are in Ifie boat; a veaNel wi t h light buming is seen aboit? a q uart e r of a 11iile away.] [End of tableau.] 135

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136 ==-'---I -kd. cl 4 H-c .. UJ Jiu. -.1. fut_, /"" Jt L._ 7 -

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t THE Ya.RD AT K11,MAINRAM.--Jlfo./Jlerl arf hea1d. Ente1 SERGEANT with cijile of ?II.en, followed by NORMAN CLAVER MM:zm11 Mcn:r Iiglzted ft b righter one I Do not be cast down my friend. If [ had fa in the strife of battle, il would not have been a more gloriouR ending. I Rought no other. You promised me to sPe my mother thiA morning, and bring to me :her blessing Have you seen her? No1ur. No, Rohert, for you will receive your : blessing from RonT. She ie coming to see me? NoRl\L No; you are going to see her .RonT. Sh she is dead? NORM. She died last night. ROBT. My Rentence killed her I God forgive me! W e ll ; I go to seek her pardon I [A bell to/18 M U1t!i fl y 010 !' e jl&y 111111 ] JR that the s i ... _......, Ay I see it is [Tr1kcs off his coat and cravat.] :::>ergeant, accept this 1ntch; l et it remind you of this hour. [Takes out hu pnrse.] Your brave follows will accept these few pieces-they a r e u seless to me now. [Gives pwse lo SARGEANT.] Let me b e buried in my uniform, and with this portrait, that has lain for years upon my heart; tell h er it was to my lips when thy blessed her name with my last breath; teach her to b e happy. [Bell tolls; NORMAN fa/18 in hi,s arms weeping.] Come, come, do not let yonr tears unman me. Men! you have your duty to perform-do it bravely, as I have done uiine I ThiR death is a boon, not a penalty I It is an h onor to fall befor e you and I receivll your salute over my grave! I am ready I ""J'izt -. Yv n 1 .' l, r 137

PAGE 142

138

PAGE 143

17 SERGT. Right wheel, March. [The file of men wheel round and exeunt R. [The SERGEANT reenters and stands R. RollERT embraces NOR MAN t enderly.] This for Sara, and this for Tiney. [Kisses him twice farewell. He goes up L. 0. to the wall of the prison; stands a moment as if in pi-ayer, then pressing the medallion to his lips he extends his left arm in which he holds his cravat.] God bless my country. [He drops the cravat; a volley is heaid, he falls on his k:nees. his face on l;is henrt; the shots strike the wall, and show where they have starred the masonry. Small clouds of dust fall to the g1ound. The blaclc flag is mised. Bell tolls. Stage d

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datafield 035 ind1 ind2
subfield code a (OCoLC)926116483
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FHM
b eng
e rda
dacs
c FHM
049
FHMM
099 9
B16-16
100 1
Boucicault, Dion,
d 1820-1890,
author.
245 0
Robert Emmet :
a 4 act drama.
264
[location not identified] :
[producer not identified] ,
[1884]
300
143 leaves ;
illustrations :
25 cm
+ 1 volume (unnumbered leaves ; 23 cm)
336
text
txt
2 rdacontent
337
unmediated
n
rdamedia
338
volume
nc
rdacarrier
500
Promptbook including extensive notes.
"A faithful history of a young Irish gentleman who sought the fate to bear upward and onward the banner with the strange device."
"A drama in four acts, entitled Robert Emmet."
Pages of "Robert Emmet" pasted onton leaves.
Includes cast list of performers.
Acts 2 and 3 included in accompanying material.
506
Open for public research.
520
A promptbook for the play "Robert Emmet" including extensive notes.
555
Finding aid
available in repository and online.
580
Forms part of the Dion Boucicault theatre collection.
600
Boucicault, Dion,
1820-1890.
t Robert Emmet
x Manuscripts.
650
Promptbooks
y 19th century
Manuscripts.
630
Nineteenth century English drama.
830
Dion Boucicault Theatre Collection, 1843-1847.
5 FTS
856 4
3 Finding Aid
u http://digital.lib.usf.edu/?u29.27-b16-ead


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