Accent on Learning

Citation
Accent on Learning

Material Information

Title:
Accent on Learning
Added title page title:
USF undergraduate catalog
Added title page title:
Undergraduate catalog
Abbreviated Title:
University of South Florida catalog
General catalog
Creator:
University of South Florida
Place of Publication:
Tampa, FL
Publisher:
University of South Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resources ( 290 pages)

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
University and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs ( lcsh )

Notes

General Note:
None published in 1960. Volume for 1975-76 issued in 2 parts: part 1. General information -- part 2. Curricula and courses. Supplement for 1961 entitled: Summer sessions, 1961. Continued in part by University of South Florida. Graduate School programs, [1985/86]- Continued by the CD-ROM publication: USF academic information.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
024905859 ( ALEPH )
29205298 ( OCLC )
A52-00010 ( USF DOI )
a52.10 ( USFLDC Handle )

USFLDC Membership

Aggregations:
Added automatically
USF Catalogs (Accent on Learning)

Postcard Information

Format:
Book

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA A-.CCENT 1969-70

PAGE 2

Accent on Learning GENERAL CATALOG OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1969-70 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA Volume 11, Number 4 May, 1969 Published four times per year by the University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. Second-class mail privilege authorized at Tampa, Florida, October 1, 1959. Statement, in accordance with Postal Manual Section 132.6, of the Bulletin of the University of South Florida, published quarterly, for May, 1969. The publisher is the University of South Florida, Tampa; the editor is the Assistant Editor, University of South Florida The publication is owned by the University of South Florida, a non-profit educational institution governed by the Board of Regents of the State of Florida The average number of copies distributed is 9,400.

PAGE 3

VISITING THE UNIVERSITY Prospective s tud ents are invited t o v i sit the University whenever possible. Many offices, including the Admissions Office, receive visitors only from 9:30 a.m to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Given .advance notice, the Admissions Office will arrange tour guides for v isitin g groups. The Univer sity is located on Fowl e r A venue (State Route 582) approximately two miles east of Interstate 75 and Nebraska Avenue (U.S. Route 41) and sev e n miles north of Interstate 4. CORRESPONDENCE Correspondence regarding various phases of the Univer s ity program should be directed as follows : Application and admission Information Director of Admissions Conference and workshop& Center for Continuing Education Courses and program& for freshmen Office of the Dean, College of Basic Studies Courses and program& for upperclassmen and graduate& Office of the Dean of the appropriate college Evening Clase Center for Continuing Education Financial a&i&tance Director of Financial Aids Graduate study Office of the Dean of the appropriate college Gif ta and bequest University of South Florida Foundation Facilities /or handicapped student& Dean of Student Affairs Housing a&&iatance Housing Office, Auxiliary Services Placement and employment Division of Personnel Services Transcripts and records Registrar's Office General lnf ormation Office of Information Services University of South Florida Tampa, Florida 33620 University Telephone : 988-4131 (Area Code 813) St Petersburg Campus 830 1st Street South St Petersburg, Florida 33701 Phone: 898-7411 (Area Code 813) The University of South Florida reserves the right to withdraw or change the announcements included in this Bulletin, without notice. 40M-939

PAGE 4

CONTENTS Acad e mic C a lendar . . . . . . . . . 4 General Information . . . . . . . . . 9 Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Acadmic Policies and Procedures . . . . 22 Student Welfare . . . . . . . . . . 44 Academic Programs . . . . . . . . . 58 College of Basic Studies . . . . . 63 College of Business Administration . 67 College of Education . . . . . . 73 College of Engineering . . . . . 94 College of Liberal Arts . . . . . . 103 Graduate Study Course Descriptions 130 136 Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259 University Administration . . . . . . . 260 Academic Staff . . . . . . . . . . . 267 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285

PAGE 5

ACADEMIC CALENDAR FOURTH QUARTER, 1968-69 May 27, Tuesday June 16, Monda11 June 16, Monda11 June 17, Tuesday June 19, Thursda11 July 4, Friday July 7, Monday July 7, Monday July 14, Monday July 18, Friday August 15, Friday Last day to apply for admission or re-admission Registration by appointment Last day to cancel and receive full refund of regis tration fees (see section on "REFUNDS") Classes begin Last day to withdraw and/ or drop and receive partial refund of registration fees (see section on "REFUNDS") Independence Day Holiday Last day to remove an "X" grade. Official form must be in Registrar's Office by this date Last day to apply for a degree to be earned at the end of Quarter IV, 1968-1969 Last day to drop courses without penalty Last day to withdraw without penalty End of Quarter IV FIRST QUARTER, 1969-70 August 6, Wednesday September 21, Sunday September 23,24,25, Tue-Thu September 28, Sunday September 29, Monday October 1, Wednesday October 17, Friday October 17, Friday October 24, Friday November 14, Friday November 27,28, Thu-Fri December 12, Frida11 Last day to apply for admission or re-admission First day of orientation Registration by appointment Last day to cancel and receive full refund of regis tration fees (see section on "REFUNDS") Classes begin Last day to withdraw and/ or drop and receive par tial refund of registration fees (see section on "REFUNDS") Last day to remove an "X" grade. Official forms must be in Registrar's Office by this date Last day to apply for degree to be earned at the end of Quarter I, 1969-1970 Last day to drop courses without penalty Last day to withdraw without penalty Thanksgiving Holiday End of Quarter I SECOND QUARTER, 1969-70 November 26, Wednesday January 2, 3, Fri and Sat January 5, Monday January 6, Tuesday January 8, Thursday January 26, Monday Last day to apply for admission or re-admission Registration by appointment Last day to cancel and receive full refund of regis tration fees (see section on "REFUNDS") Classes begin Last day to withdraw and/ or drop and receive par tial refund of registration fees (see section on "REFUNDS") Last day to remove an "X" grade. Official forms must be in Registrar's Office by this date 4

PAGE 6

January 26, Monday February 2, Monday February 9, Monday February 20, Friday March 20, Friday February 18 Wednesday March 30, 31, Mon-Tue March 31, Tuesday April 1, Wednesday April 3, Friday April 21, Tuesday April 21, Tuesday April 28, Tuesday May 15, Friday June 5, Friday June 12, Friday June 14, Sunday May 13 Wednesday June 15, Monday June 15, Monday June 16, Tuesday June 18, Thursday July 3, Friday July 6, Monday July 6, Monday July 13, Monday July 17, Friday August 14, Friday ACADEMIC CALENDAR 5 Last day to apply for a degree to be earned at the end of Quarter II, 1969-1970 Last day to drop courses without penalty Gasparilla Day Holiday Last day to withdraw without penalty End of Quarter II THIRD QUARTER, 1969-70 Last day to apply for admission or re-admission Registration by appointment Last day to cancel and receive full refund of regis tration fees (see section on "REFUNDS") Classes begin Last day to withdraw and/or drop and receive par tial refund of registration fees (see section on "REFUNDS") Last day to remove an "X" grade. Official forms must be in Registrar's Office by this date Last day to apply for a degree to be earned at the end of Quarter III, 1969-1970 Last day to drop courses without penalty Last day to withdraw without penalty Deadline to have Graduating Student's final grades in at the Registrar's Office End of Quarter III Commencement Convocation FOURTH QUARTER, 1969-70 Last day to apply for admission or re-admission Registration by appointment Last day to cancel and receive full refund of regis tration fees (see section on "REFUNDS") Classes begin Last day to withdraw and/or drop and receive par tial refund of registration fees (see section on "REFUNDS") Independence Day Holiday Last day to remove an "X" grade Official forms must be in the Registrar's Office by this date Last day to apply for a degree to be earned at the end of Quarter IV, 1969-1970 Last day to drop courses without penalty Last day to withdraw without penalty End of Quarter IV

PAGE 7

6 ACADEMIC CALENDAR FIRST QUARTER, 1970-71 August 5, Wednesday September 20, Sunday September 22,23,24, Tue-Thu September 28, Monday December 11, Friday Last day to apply for admission or re-admission First day of orientation Registration by appointment Classes begin End of Quarter I SECOND QUARTER, 1970-71 November 25, Wednesday January 4, 5, Mon-Tue Janu ary 6, Wednesday March 19, Friday February 17, Wednesda11 April l, 2, Thu-Fri April 5, Monday June 11, Friday June 13, Sunday Last day to apply for admission or re-admission Registration by appointment Classes begin End of Quarter II THIRD QUARTER, 1970-71 Last day to apply for admission or re-admission Registration by appointment Classes begin End of Quarter III Commencement Convocation FOURTH QUARTER, 1970-71 May 12, Wednesday June 14, Monday June 15, Tuesday August 13, Friday Last day to apply for admission or re-admission Registration by appointment Classes begin End of Quarter IV

PAGE 8

I.HOLLY .... \ \ OA \ UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA FOWLER AVE KEY TO CAMPUS MAP l Administration Bldg. 9 Science Center 17 Argos Center 23 Delta 31 Mu 36 Fontana Hall !private 2 Library 10 Engineering Bldg. 18 Andros Center 24 Epsilon residence hall) 3 University Center 11 Physics Bldg. 19 Faculty Office B ldg. 25 Zeta 32 Operations & Main. 37 DeSoto Hall !private 4 University Theatre 12 Planetarium 26 Eta Adm. B ldg. residence halll 5 Theatre Arts Bldg. 13 Education Bldg. RES I DENCE HALLS 27 Theta 33 Main. & U t ili t y B ldgs. 38 Univ. Foundation Apts. 6 fine Arts Bldg. 14 Business Adm. B ldg. 20 Alpha 28 Iota 34 Central Rec. Bldg. 39 Observatory 7 Life Sciences Bldg. 15 Social Science Bldg. 2 1 Beta 29 Kappa 35 Engineering Research 40 Social Science Bldg. 8 Chemistry Bldg. 16 Physical Ed. Bldg. 22 Gamma JO Lambda Bldg. Phase 11

PAGE 10

GENERAL INFORMATION The Univer s ity of South Florida was founded December 18 1956 by the State Board of Education, following more than two years of preparatory study by the State Legislature, the Board of Education, and the State Board of Con trol (now the Board of Regents). When it was opened to a charter class of 2,000 freshmen on September 26, 1960, it became the first state university in the United States to be totally planned and initiated in this century. It also represented the first step in a broad and comprehensive expansion of the State University System of Florida. This system of public universities now includes the University of Florida in Gainesville Florida State University and Florida A & M University in Talla hassee, the University of South Florida, Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, the University of West Florida near Pensacola, and Florida Techno logical University near Orlando. In addition, there are 25 public junior colleges in population centers throughout the state. More than 6,000 students had graduated from the University of South Florida by the end of 1968. Enrollment for the fall of 1969 is expected to reach 15,000. The University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the official accrediting agency for all educational institutions in the South. Tampa Campus On a 1,672-acre campus eight air miles northeast of downtown Tampa the University is ideally located for steady growth and development in the heart of an expanding metropolitan area having nearly a million people within a 30-mile radius. The campus is midway between U.S. Highway 41 and 301 on State Highway 582 Interstate 75 passes two miles to the west. The physical plant of the University, now including 31 major academic and residence buildings, is currently valued at more than $50 million. The buildings are of similar, modern architectural design and all are completely air conditioned. Major buildings now in use are: Administration Building, housing administrative and business offices and a number of special service units of the institution; Library, a five-story structure designed for 250 000 volumes in open stacks; University Center, with student and faculty offices, meeting rooms, recre ation areas and classrooms as well as a cafeteria, and the University Bookstore; Theatr e seating 550 persons for cultural events and also serving as a lec ture and teaching auditorium; Theatre C e ntre, with rehearsal rooms for dance drama, and opera costume and prop shops, offices and a Centre Stage for production preparation; Chemistry Building, with classrooms and laboratories for chemistry and offices for faculty; Life Sciences Building, housing the University's programs in biological sciences; 9

PAGE 11

10 GENERAL INFORMATION Fine Arts-Humanities Building, with separate wings for humanities, art and music; Physics Building, housing physics, astronomy, and mathematics; Plan e tarium, adjacent to Physics Building, with regular programs pre sented under the 30-foot dome; Argos and Andros residence halls and activities centers, housing 2,800 students and providing central dining, recreational and service facilities in 14 separate but coordinated buildings; College of Business Administration Building, housing the dean and faculty of the college, classrooms and a 430-seat teaching a uditorium ; College of Engin ee ring Building, housing the dean and faculty of the college, classrooms, laboratories, and a 250-seat auditorium; Physical Education Classroom Building, housing the director and faculty of the Division of Physical Education, classrooms, gymnasium, activities area, and an indoor swimming pool; College of Education Building, housing the dean and faculty of the college, classrooms, an auditorium seating 200, and an Instructional Materials Center; Astronomy Observatory, on the north campus adjacent to University golf course, housing a $100,000 photo-telescope and several smaller telescopes; Sci e nce Center, completed in 1968, housing laboratories and research facilities for graduate students and faculty plus the USF Computer Research Center. The four-story research facility contains no classrooms. Besides re search facilities it contains graduate student study cubicles and a combination science-mathema tics-engin eering reading room; and Social Science Building, completed in 1968, can accommodate 1,000 stu dents in classes and laboratory work at the same time. The building includes 120 faculty offices, classrooms, seminar rooms clinical and experimental research labs, weather and climatology labs, and a complete weather station. Other building construction on this all-air-conditioned campus continues toward a goal of around $50 million in additional buildings to house and instruct the 26 to 27 thousand students expected at the University by 1975. Many additional programs are operated by the University's Center for Continuing Education in twelve central Florida Counties stretching from the Gulf of Mexico to the Atlantic Ocean. In this area, the Florida Board of Regents has designated the University of South Florida to be responsible for all higher education requirements above that supplied by the State Junior College System The Center also operates a century-old mansion, Chinsegut Hill near Brooksville, Florida, as an education retreat for seminars and meetings. St. Petersburg Campus The St. Petersburg Campus of the University of South Florida opened in September, 1965, and provides an opportunity for university students who are residents of Pinellas County to complete all or a portion of their course work in selected areas without leaving the county. Enrollment in the St Petersburg Campus courses is not restricted to Pinellas County residents Located on Bayboro Harbor adjacent to downtown St. Petersburg, the

PAGE 12

GENERAL INFORMATION 11 campus is within easy walking distance of many of the cultural and recrea tional facilities of Florida's "Sunshine City." Resident faculty members provide personal and social, as well as scho lastic, counseling. This core of resident faculty is supplemented by professors commuting from the Tampa Campus to provide aaditional scope to the academic program. The academic program at the St Petersburg Campus is restricted to courses designed to serve students of junior, senior, and graduate standing. Selected courses and programs are offered by the Colleges of Basic Studies, Business Administration, Education, Engineering, and Liberal Arts. Students may enroll as full time students on the St. Petersburg Campus or they may elect to enroll on both the St. Petersburg and the Tampa campuses simul taneously. Dual enrollments on both campuses may provide students with a class schedule which is both flexible and convenient. In addition to providing academic programs from the university's five colleges, the St. Petersburg Campus houses a Marine Science Research and Training Center. The Marine Science Institute of the University of South Florida, with headquarters at the St. Petersburg Campus, is an interdisciplinary venture involving faculty members of seven different departments in three colleges in addition to three full-time faculty members at the St Petersburg Campus who are concerned with planning, administration, research, and teaching. Probably no other oceanographic institution has ever been established with such excellent facilities as those provided by the St. Petersburg Campus for teaching, research, and the docking and maintenance of oceanographic vessels. The location of the Institute, at the center of the edge of the great continental shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast and in the midst of the metro-Administration Building, St. Petersburg Campus

PAGE 13

12 GENERAL INFORMATION politan area of the Sun Coast, is another of its unique advantages. It would seem destined to develop into one of the nation's leading oceanographic centers. Even though an undergraduate major in the marine sciences is not offered, a proposal for offering the master's degree in the Department of Marine Science is currently being considered. During the summer quarter, the Institute offers one of the most comprehensive arrays of marine science courses to be found at any university in the nation. Most of these courses are open to both undergraduate and graduate students, and most of them are offered also during other quarters of the academic year. Students interested in the marine science program should visit the St. Petersburg Campus facilities and discuss their interests with the director of the Marine Science Institute. While offering many of the characteristics of a small college, the St. Petersburg Campus still has the advantages of all the resources of a major university. Its development is expected to keep pace with the continuing expansion of the Tampa Bay area. Internal Organization The University is organized internally in five colleges, with supporting services designed for this basic pattern. The five colleges are: Basic Studies, in which all freshmen and sophomores enroll and from which a minimum of six courses must be taken during the first two or three years; Business Adminis tration, which offers majors in such fields as economics, accounting, manage ment, marketing, and office administration; Education, which provides teacher training in all major teaching fields; Engineering, organized around systems design, research, and operation; and Liberal Arts, which offers programs in the areas of fine arts, natural sciences, social sciences, and languages and literature. Colleges of Medicine and Nursing have been authorized for the University. Detailed planning is now under way. Bachelor's degrees are offered in many fields by all the University's colleges. Master's degrees are offered in several areas of business, education, engineering, and liberal arts. The University's first Ph.D. program, in Biology with emphasis on Marine Biology, began operation during 1968. It is being conducted cooperatively by the Departments of Zoology and Botany and the Marine Sciences Institute. The University's teaching faculty, numbering more than 700, represent11 all major areas of higher learning, and nearly 60 per cent hold doctoral degrees. For administrative purposes, the University is organized into the three broad areas of academic affairs, student affairs, and administration and busi ness affairs. The administrative officers who head these three units serve with the President in the Executive Committee, the principal policymaking and advisory body of the University. The President is responsible to the Board of Regents for internal policy and procedure of the University. In addition to the Executive Committee, advise and assistance to the President in the determina tion of policy is given by the University Senate, comprising elected representa tives from all areas of the University community, including the student body.

PAGE 14

GENERAL INFORMATI O N 13 The Foundation The University of South Florida Foundation is a non-profit corporation func tioning solely to provide supplemental funds for the University. These contri butions are used for student aid, cultural events, library, research, guest lecturers and other areas needing support All gifts and bequests to the Univer sity should be made through the Foundation Membership in the Foundation is open to all friends parents, and students interested in the dynamic growth of the University of South Florida. Contact the Foundation office or the Director of Development if con sidering membership or a gift. The Foundation is headquarters of the Alumni Association, which was organized in December, 1963, upon graduation of the first class. Purposes and Goals A university is defined as an institution of higher learning consisting of several schools or colleges and offering programs in the liberal arts as well as in a number of professional areas. It is, however, more than this; it is a place where new knowledge is sought, and old knowledge is synthesized in new ways through research and scholarship for the benefit of mankind. It is not, however, a trade school where the detailed techniques of a trade can be learned by practice. It deals with professional areas more in theory than in practice, providing the broad background and understanding neces sary to the development of specific skills In this way it develops the intellec tual judgments necessary to deal with constantly changing problems of a profession. A university should not be regarded simply as a place to prepare for a profession, important as this may be. One of the most important functions is to provide all its students with a better understanding of life in a rapidly chang ing world. Man is surrounded by a natural environment and confronted by rapidly increasing knowledge of that environment. These are matters of human affairs which he needs to know about as an educated citizen and as a profes sional person. Hence, a university has an important obligation to provide in its educational program for all students those common elements which make for more responsible and responsive living. A university is also a servant of the society which supports it, and at the same time it is one of the leaders of that society It is the medium through which the greatest wisdom of the past and the living spirit of the present are passed on to new generations of young people to be used by them as leaders in the further advances of society toward goals of better and finer living. In the classroom, subjects are dealt with objectively, critically analyti cally and constructively, as well as inspirationally and creatively. The student is expected to learn to be analytical as well as creative in his own approach and to understand that such activities, to be constructive, must be carried out with a minimum of emotional bias and prejudice. He must learn to understand that in a democracy points of view will differ and there may be no wholly right or wrong answers to many questions only better or worse answers from the viewpoint of society or the individual. He must be prepared to examine

PAGE 15

14 GENERAL INFORMATION objectively his own position on such matters and develop for himself a tenable position or philosoph y with which he can continue to live. The University of South Florida in trying to attain this cha racter has set up for itself the primary goal of placing Accent on Learning" as its most important reason for being. Toward that end the University has these specific objectives: I To provide th e citiz ens of Florida with an out s tanding public institu tion of high e r l e arning, giv ing leadership and s ervic e in th e intel lectual, cultural, e conomic and scie ntific int e r e sts of th e state. II. To create a community of s cholars d e dicat e d to t eamwork in the search for truth, the exchang e of id eas and the establishment of high standards of intellectual inquiry and creative activity The faculty has been carefully chosen for its training competence and ability to teach. In an unusual sense it is a team. The faculty has many times shown its outstanding ability to carry on creative work and significant re search and to provide opportunities for able students to learn the meaning of, and assist in such work as part of the process of education. Ill. To provide opportunity for the development and training of the mind which promotes maturity, ob;ectivity and creativity All degree programs of the University are designed to promote the following general aims for all students: (I) the necessary skills in writing, speaking, reading and listening; (2) self-reliance through the ability to think clearly; ( 3) understanding of oneself and one's relationship to others; ( 4) growing convictions based on the search for truth; (5) understanding and appreciation of our cultural, social, scientific and spiritual heritage; ( 6) in telligent approach to local, national and world problems leading to good citizenship and leadership in life; ( 7) some practical understanding of an other language; ( 8) professional competence based on high ethical standards; and ( 9) healthful development of the body. N. To provide a broad cultural and basic educational patt ern for all stud e nts, tog e ther with programs of liberal, pre-professional and professional studies, and to supplement these with opportunities for independent development and work experience Recent studies indicate a strong trend in American liberal arts colleges toward the inclusion of more professional preparation in their programs and, conversely for the professional colleges to include more general and liberal studies in theirs Thus the professional and the liberal arts colleges are com ing closer together in the effort to provide a continuum of studies which in cludes the general, the liberal and the professional in the same program. The University of South Florida is attempting this in a way that provides greater unity of knowledge for the student. For each student the educational program combines preparation in basic studies with work in the liberal arts and the sciences and with professional studies Ideally a student's program will be devoted about one-third to basic studies, one-third to professional studies and one-third to elective and related choices.

PAGE 16

GENERAL INFORMATION 15 A LOOK AT THE FUTURE The University of South F l orida's location in the l arge and expanding Tampa Bay metropolitan area coupled with the broad growth and development of Florida in the space age, suggests a future of rapi d change and expansion for the University. It is estimated that enrollment in University of South Florida courses will increase approximately 10 to 15 percent each year through 1975. Construction will continue at a rapid pace each year for several years to come. The phys ic al plant of the University is valued above $50 million, and the major portion of the campus is still unused New faculty are joining the University staff at a steady rate. In every re spect, the Uni versity of South Florida is a vita l part of the state's inevitable growth, and it is destined to become a lar ge, multi-purp ose university. Social Science Building

PAGE 17

ADMISSION The University of South Florida requires definite ability and competency on the part of students Those having these abilities and skills and who are seriously interested in earning an education can expect to succeed in college Students who lack them are almost sure to encounter serious difficulty. Until such students have corrected some of their academic deficiencies by private study, review work in high school, or perhaps study in a junior college, they may not be accepted. Whether or not students have a reasonable possibility of being admitted to and succeeding in the University will be appraised by the Director of Admissions. He will admit students who meet the formal requirements of the University for admission. He will suggest other possibilities to those who do not. He will refer borderline decisions to the University Committee on Aca demic Standards This committee's decisions will be final. The University requires a medical examination from each full-fee paying student to be filed with the Student Health Service. Fullfee students must also have had recent immunizations against smallpox tetanus and polio. The University may refuse admission to a student whose record shows previous misconduct not in the best interest of citizens of the University community. A student from a non-accredited or disaccredited Florida secondary school may be admitted provided he meets all of the requirements for students from accredited Florida secondary schools and, in the judgment of the Aca demic Standards Committee, can be expected to do successful academic work. APPLICATION, REGISTRATION, AND PAYMENT OF FEES A. Regular Students : those taking one or more courses. 1. The University of South Florida reserves the right to review all creden tials of any student before he becomes a degree candidate. 2. The deadline for r e c ei ving applications for admission or re-admission to any quarter is listed in the Academic Calendar. 3. R e gistration will be completed in person by appointment during the regular scheduled registration per iod. Each quarter, this registration period will conform to the established university calendar and will consist of a period of at least two ( 2) days. Late r e gistrations are not accepted except in most unus ual circum stances. These exceptions must be on waivers submitted by the Dean 16

PAGE 18

ADMISSION 17 of the appropriate college and approved by the Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs. Changes of class registration will be accepted only during the time and day ( s) announced in the individual quarter term schedule. Any regular University student wishing to simultaneously enroll in offcampus or evening classes shall register and pay fees in the manner prescribed for regular students attending campus daytime classes. Payment of F e es Registration fees are due, by mail or in person, by the close of business on the last day of registration prior to the first day of class in any quarter Any fees paid after that date must be accompanied by an additional twenty-five dollar ($25.00) penalty payme nt. Late payment of f e es, including the penalty payment, will only be accepted during the first three ( 3) regular class days of any quarter. Fee paym e nts may be made in advance of final eomplete registration A student has eligibility for a partial r e fund of fees upon withdrawal from the University only during the first three ( 3) regular class days in any quarter No late payment of fees with or without penalty payment, will be accepted and no refund of fees will be made to any student after the close of business on the third regular class day in a quarter R e gistration will be canc e lled for any student who has not paid his fees in full by the close of business on the third regular class day in a quarter. B. Continuing Education Students: Those non-degree seeking students regis tering only for courses off-campus 1. Application, registration, and payment of fees must be postmarked no later than four calendar days after the first day of on-campus classes. Procedures for Applying Application papers may be requested as early as 12 months prior to anticipated enrollment. Most of the secondary schools in Florida have application forms Public school teachers wishing courses for certificate extension and other non-degree seeking students who feel that they fall into a special cate gory should indicate the category in their initial inquiry There are definite advantages in applying early. Housing priority is explained elsewhere in the catalog. Each quarter has its own application deadline, usually at least three weeks prior to the first d:o/ of registration. The application will be acknowledged and qualified students will be accepted Final decisions will be made upon receipt of test scores and evidence of completion of high school work or upon the arrival of the final college transcript. The candidate will be notified if he was not previously apprised of a tentative decision or if the tentative decision must be reversed. All academic records must be mailed to the Director of Admissions, University of South Florida, directly from the appropriate institution (i.e high school record from high school attended; college record from each college attended; G.E.D. test scores from appropriate high school or State Department of Education; U S.A.F.I. scores from Madison, Wisconsin; S.A.T.

PAGE 19

18 ADMISSION scores from high school or central office). The student has the responsibility of getting the records mailed to the University from each school attended. A student who applies and does not enroll must notify us during the month of the original planned date of entry if he wishes his application changed to a future date of entry. Otherwise, new application fo1ms must be completed and the application fee paid again. All applicants must enter their social security number on the application. All applications will be returned to the applicant unless the student includes his social security number ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY FRESHMEN It is recommended that all prospective freshmen who wish to be ad mitted to the University of South Florida earn at least 14 high school units in the areas of English, mathematics, foreign languages, social studies, and natural sciences. Freshmen enter the University from four principal sources, and special qualifications are established for each. Borderline students are urged to begin in June rather than waiting until September. The four sources are: 1. Graduates of Florida high schools, who must have a favorable character recommendation from officials of their high school, must have an overall average of "C" or better in all academic subjects and must earn a minimum score of 300 on the Florida State-Wide Twelfth Grade Tests 2. Graduates of high schools outside Florida, who must have a favorable character recommendation from officials of their high school, must have grades placing them in the upper 40 per cent of their graduating class and must have acceptable test scores (examples: 900 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test-450 or higher on the verbal portion). 3. High school graduates by Armed Forces Tests of General Education De velopment ( G.E.D ) must have an acceptable high school record for the portion attended and must have a minimum individual score (percentile) of 50 and a minimum average of 60 on the G.E.D. test. University Center

PAGE 20

ADMISSION 19 4. Early applicants who wish to enroll prior to high school graduation, must have outstanding high school records (minimum average of 3.5 or B+ ), must show high performance on tests such as the College Qualification Test and must score a minimum of 425 on the Florida State-Wide Twelfth Grade Tests. Early applicants are interviewed by a number of University officials and are comprehensively tested before their applications are ap proved. TRANSFER STUDENTS Degree-seeking students wishing to transfer to the University must have a minimum average of "C" for all college work previously attempted and must be eligible to to the last institution in which they were enrolled. Those with less than 90 quarter hours of transferable college credit must also meet the University's freshmen entrance requirements. Out-of-state students must have a Confidential Personal Student Questionnaire completed before admis sion to the University. After a prospective transfer student has applied to the University and all official records are received directly from each institution involved, his records are evaluated to determine how many of his credits are transferable. Only work in which the student has earned a grade of "C" or better may be trans ferred. Credit will not be awarded for college level G.E.D. tests, for basic R.0. T C., military science, nor for courses given credit without a grade such as "Orientation." Final applicability of transferred credits toward graduation requirements will be determined by the college in which the student majors. The final 90 quarter hours of work taken for the bachelor's degree must be earned in a senior institution. A maximum of 45 quarter hours of extension and correspondence courses, Armed Forces credit and the college level exami nation program credits can be applied toward a degree. Service school courses will be evaluated with reference to the recom mendation of the American Council on Education wheri official credentials have been presented Such recommendation, however, is not binding upon the University. The applicant must apply for service school credit during his first term in residence at the University. A transfer student from a state-operated junior college or university may satisfy the basic studies requirements of the University of South Florida by completing (before transfer) the general education program prescribed by that junior college or university. Graduation for those attending a junior col lege is recommended. Students' general education programs in private colleges and out-of-state schools, and students with incomplete general education programs from state institutions will be evaluated on an individual basis Graduates of accredited junior colleges are not required to take addi tional work in physical education. Students already graduated from accredited four-year institutions who apply for admission to work toward another undergraduate degree must meet the University's regular graduation requirements. A minimum of 45 quarter hours must be earned fu on-campus courses and the student must meet the requirements for liberal education and for major concentration as specified by his departmental adviser and dean

PAGE 21

20 ADMISSION TRANSIENT STUDENTS A student interested in enrolling at the University of South Florida for a summer session or for one term only before returning to his parent institu tion should request transi ent application papers A statement of good standing and of the acceptability of credits is required from the parent institution Out-of-state students mtist have a Confidential Personal Student Q uestion naire completed before admission to the University. MATURE (NON-DEGREE) STUDENT Mature persons (21 or older) may, by providing evidence (a. an ac ceptable high school record; or b. acceptable test scores; or c. an acceptable recommendation) that they are qualified to d o the proposed work, enroll as non-degree students-in day classes or in the evening sessions-without meet ing the requirements established for degree programs They may transfer t o degree programs later if their work as non-degree students indicates the likeli hood of success Work taken for credit as a non-degree student may later be counted toward a degree program if such work is applicable and of satis factory grade Persons under 21 years of age wishing to enter as non-degree students must meet the same admission requirements as degreeseeking stu dents Mature students are not required to take Physical Education. CHANGE OF DEGREE STATUS Non-degree seeking students who wish to change to a degree-seeking status must first meet the degree -seeking admission requirements or earn a minimum of 15 quarter hours with a minimum average of 2.0 ( C). EVENING SESSION STUDENTS While serving degree-seeking and non-degree seeking students, the Eve ning Sessions of the University of South Florida offer only courses for full academic credit. Any student accepted as a candidate for a degree may en roll in courses offered in the evening which are appropri ate to his program The admissions requirements and achievement levels in the day courses and in the evening sessions are the same SPECIAL CONSIDERATION Freshmen or transfers with above average a b ility who do not meet all the aforementioned requirements may apply for special consideration. The application, accompanied by a full letter of explanation and supporting infor mation, should be mailed to the Academic Standards Committee. It should be noted, however, that the regular guidelines are regarded as sound for the student and for the institution Few exceptions are made. Whenever a student is admitted after special consideration, he will usu ally be placed on Academic Warning or Final Academ i c Warning; therefore, he should be familiar with the meaning of these terms which are described on page 23

PAGE 22

ADMISSION 21 GRADUATE STUDENTS Admission requirements for graduate students are given in the section entitled Graduate Study, page 130. Graduate applicants should also refer to descriptions of the master's degree programs for specific admission require ments. REAPPLICATION All students not restricted for future registrations because of academic or social problems will have registration appointments and materials prepared for them for the two subsequent quarters which immediately follow their last enrollment here. If a student wishes to re-enroll in USF after having missed two ( 2) or more consecutive quarters, the registration status of that student will be Former Student Returning which means he must submit application papers for re-admission, observing the application deadline. All students who withdraw while on "Final Academic Warning" must secure the approval of the Academic Standards Committee before they can register for a subsequent quarter. Also, any student who withdraws twice from the University after January 1, 1966, must petition the Academic Stand ards Committee before he can reapply. Orientation and Enrollment Program At the beginning of each quarter, prior to the beginning of classes, all new students are expected to participate in the Orientation and Enrollment program of the University. This program is designed to help new students become acquainted with the university procedures and regulations and to learn of the University's expectations of its students Those sessions which are information gathering are necessary for enrollment, and those that are information-giving are considered the orientation aspect of the program. Chemistry Building

PAGE 23

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The University is concerned that each student make reasonable progress toward his educational goal, and will aid each student through guidance and faculty advising. Whenever this progress is hindered, blocked or interrupted the University will through additional guidance special counseling or re strictions on the student's activities, aid the student to resume satisfactory advancement. He m ay be required to leave the University for a period sufficient to gain adequa te maturity and motivation. To be in satisfactory academic standing at the University a student must be properly admitted and be matriculated for a degree or have qualified as a special student and normally hold a cumulative grade point ratio of 2 0 The precise averages for good standing are described below. Falling below these points should suggest to the student that he must change his pattern of work to restore himself to a satisfactory status. Any student is not in good standing whenever his cumulative grade point ratio falls below 1.5 and his attempted hours are less than 45, or below 1.7 when his attempted hours are between 45 and 89, or below 2.0 when he has attempted more than 89 credit hours. Such a situation occurs generally because the student lacks the maturity, diligence, or motivation to realize the necessity for adequate scholarly effort. Whenever a student falls into this status, he will be placed on Probation and a notification to this effect will be sent to him and his permanent record will be posted accordingly. For a com plete description of the probation rules, see next page. The student will be required to meet with his faculty adviser for additional assistance in identify ing and correcting his difficulties. A transfer student who was not in good standing at his prior institution but who for special reasons has been admitted to the University will be placed immediately on Probation for a trial period. All students who do not raise their grade point ratio to a level of good standing within the quarter in residence after being placed on Academic Warning shall be placed on Final Academic Warning. Whenever a student is placed on Final Academic Warning a notification of this will be sent to the student's parents or guardian unless the student is 21 years of age or older and is living independently of his parent or guardian The student will be required to meet with his faculty adviser for additional assistance, and must forego holding any executive or committee office in any 22

PAGE 24

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 23 student or campus organization, and forego participation in any student activity or organization which represents the University. The permanent academic record of the student's progress will show that he was placed on Final Aca demic Warning; and he must earn at least a 2.0 average, regardless of credit hours attempted, during the next quarter in residence. Failure to do so implies that the student has disqualified himself from continuous attendance at the University and that he must wait at least one full quarter before bec oming eli gible to be considered by the Academic Standards Committee for readmission to the University. Any student who withdraws from the University while on Final Academic Warning must petition and secure approval of the Academic Standards Committee to re-enter the University The Academic Standards Committee meets regularly to review petitions submitted by students to waive certain academic regulations. Students must petition and secure approval of the Committee to return to the University after having been disqualified from further immediate attendance or for reasons pertaining to admission, registration or other academic policies and procedures. PROBATION-DISQUALIFICATION AND READMISSION A student is not in good standing whenever his cumulative Grade Point Ratio fallsBeww 1.500 and his attempted quarter hours are less than 45; Beww 1 700 and his attempted quarter hours are between 45 and 89. Whenever a student falls into one of the above categories he will be placed on Acad e mic Warning. All students on Academic Warning who do not raise their cumulative Grade Point Ratio to a level of good standing, as indicated above, within the term enrolled after being placed on Academic Warning will be placed on Final Academic Warning. Beww 2.000 and his attempted quarter hours are more than 89. Whenever a student falls into the above category he will be placed on Final Academic Warning. A student on Final Academic Warning must earn at least a 2.000 average during the next term enrolled Failure to do so will disqualify the student from continued attendance at the University of South Florida. If a student withdraws while on Final Academic Warning he must petition and secure approval of the Academic Standards Committee for re-entry. Bel,ow 2.000 and his attempted quarter hours are more than 135. Whenever a student falls into the above category he will be automatically disqualified. A student who fails to have a 2.000 cumulative Grade Point Ratio after attempting 135 quarter hours is automatically disqualified. A disqualified student must petition and secure approval of the Academic Standards Com mittee before readmission. Normally, one full quarter must pass before such a petition will be considered. This rule overrides all others. Any student who is readmitted to the University following Disqualifica tion will be placed immediately on a Final Academic Warning status. This does not apply to a student who has received a degree in a college parallel program from a Florida state junior college. A disqualified student seeking to gain readmission must apply to the Academic Standards Committee through the Office of the Registrar

PAGE 25

24 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES H the student attends another college or university during this interven ing period, he will be classified a s a transfer student and his admission will be based on his total educ a tion a l record In rare and exceptional case s a dis qualified student may petition the Academic Standards Committee for earlier readmission when it can be cle a rly demonstrat e d that circumstances beyond the student's control accounted for his academic problems. PENDING A student may be placed on "Pending" by failing to meet obligations to the University. When a student is on Pending, he may not be allowed to register, graduate, receive a final grade report, nor request a transcript. Settle ment of financial acco unts must be made at the University Cashier's Office. The administration of the system of Academic Warning status Final Academic Warning status, academic disqualification and pending is the re sponsibility of the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs. He will work closely with other University officials and faculty advisers in these matters. Students having questions or problems about these matters should go either to their adviser the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs or the dean of the college in which they are enrolled. Each student placed on Pending should determine from the Registrar's Office which office placed him on Pending and cle a r the pending obligation with that office. ADDS After a student has completed his registration on the date assigned to him, he may add courses only during the time and day(s) announced in the individual quarter term schedule. AUDITS If a student wishes to audit a course, he must obtain written permission from the instructor of the course and section in which he wishes to enroll. Audit forms must be obtained from the Registrar's Office and completed prior to registration The s tud ent must a lso cont a ct and con s ult with the instructor concerning just what is expected of an audit in his class. If permission is granted the audit forms must be presented to the Registration Approval Clerk after a regular class and section card has been obtained This will insure the student a place in the class even though no credit will be given The student must pay the regular regi s tration fee for audit courses. WITHDRAWALS (Prior to first day of classes) If, after completing his registration, a student wishes to cancel it, he may do so by completing a Withdrawal Form in the Registrar's Office, and will receive a complete r e fund of registration fees Students desiring to withdraw from USF prior to, during or after the first day of classes begin by consulting with their advisers. COURSE WAIVERS See information under College of Basic Studies.

PAGE 26

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 25 DROPS For the first four weeks of any term a student may drop a course or courses without penalty (he will receive a grade of "W")-and without any consultation with the instructor-only by completing and turning in a "Drop" slip at the Registrar's Office. Any course drop after the first four weeks of classes will result in a grade of "F." WITHDRAWALS Until four weeks before the last day of the term any student may with draw from the University without penalty. After that date grades of "F" will automatically be assigned for all course work. If the student is on Conditional Registration or Final Academic Warning and withdraws from the University, it will be necessary for him to petition and secure the approval of the Aca demic Standards Committee before being readmitted. Following a second withdrawal from the University there will be posted on the student's record "ineligible to return, must petition the Academic Standards Committee for readmission This does not affect existing regulations concerning withdrawal while on Final Academic Warning. CLASS STANDING A student's class is determined by the number of credits he has earned without relation to his grade point ratio: 0 Non-degree holder and non-degree seeking 1 Freshman Through 44 credit hours 2 Sophomore 45 through 89 credit hours 3 Junior 90 through 134 credit hours 4 Senior 135 or more credit hours 5 Degree holder who filed undergraduate application papers 6 Graduate students, degree and non-degree seeking 7 Graduate students admitted to candidacy for Master's degree 8 Graduate students with a Master's degree 9 Graduate students admitted to candidacy for doctoral degree The classification of Non-Degree Student is given to those who are not enrolled in a program leading to a degree Non-Degree Students who accu mulate 45 or more hours are advised to enroll for a degree program. ADMISSION TO THE UPPER LEVEL Qualified transfer students will be admitted to an upper level college by the Admissions Office. Courses and programs offered at the junior and senior levels are gen erally considered to be "upper level." Generally, a student enrolled in the College of Basic Studies will be eligible for admission to an upper level college when he has completed the lower division requirements of the College of Basic Studies, taken a compre hensive examination some time during his sophomore year, satisfied the physi cal education requirements, and completed at least 90 quarter hours with at least a 2.0 ratio. A student with 81 hours and a ratio of 2.0 or better may be admitted with special permission of the dean of the college involved. Quali-

PAGE 27

26 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES fled students will be identified and referred to an upper level program by a member of the College of Basic Studies advising corps. In addition, students must meet the specific admission requirements of the college to which they are applying. These requirements are shown else where in this catalog and should be verified with the college before appli cation is made. Students transferring into upper level college programs from other insti tutions must meet the same standards and requirements as those whose first two years were taken at the University of South Florida. All students must complete at least the last 45 hours of their under graduate credit in on-campus courses (after having been accepted to an upper level program) to qualify for a University of South Florida degree. DOUBLE MAJOR Students may elect to graduate with two majors in disciplines within the same division, the same college, or in more than one division or college. In that event, the student should meet all requirements of each major separately. He must apply independently and be assigned an adviser in each discipline. He must be certified for graduation by the appropriate dean or divisional director for each major. CHANGE OF MAJOR Any student in the upper level who wishes to change his major must obtain the Change of Major form in the Registrar's Office. This form must be signed by the student's adviser, the dean or director of the former major, and the dean or director of the new major. A copy of the completed Change of Major form must be returned to the Registrar's Office. APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION Each student who plans to complete his graduation requirements by the end of a term must pay the $10 graduation fee and complete the Application for Graduation no later than the first day of the fourth week of that term The application is available at, and after completion must be returned to, the Registrar's Office. Graduation Requirements While each college sets specific requirements for graduation, the general University requirements must be met by every student upon whom a degree is conferred. These general requirements specify that a student must attempt and pass at least 180 quarter hours of credit with at least a "C" average for all Uni versity of South Florida courses attempted in order to be eligible for gradua tion. At least 60 of his quarter hours must be for upper division level work (courses numbered 300 or above). The hours for a course which has been repeated may be counted only one time toward this minimum requirement of 180 quarter hours of credit.

PAGE 28

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 27 In addition to specific requirements of their major and of the college in which they are enroll e d candidates for graduation must also pass the senior seminar offered by the College of Basic Studies and be recommended for graduation by the dean of their college. All students must complete at least the last 45 hours of their under graduate credit in on-campus courses after having been admitted to an upper level college to qualify for a University of South Florida baccalaureate de gree. Approved exchange program students may take courses off-campus which will be c onsidered as on-campus courses. Also, Cooperative Education students, while on their training periods, will have any work taken at other institutions (approval having been given by USF advisers and other appropriate personnel) counted as residence work. H changes are made in major or graduation requirements during the time a student is enrolled in the University, the student has the choice of being graduated under either the old or the new requirements. While every effort will be made to give each student appropriate advice in meeting major and graduation requirements, the final responsibility for meeting these rests with the student. He should study the catalog carefully and seek advice when in doubt. In any case he should check with his dean or divisional office when he has reached 135 quarter hours to make sure that his program plans are complete. Specific requirements of the several colleges are listed under their respec tive sections. GRADUATION WITH HONORS Each student graduating with a baccalaureate degree from the University with a grade point ratio earned at USF of 3.5 or higher will receive a special notation on his diploma indicating that he has been graduated with honors In addition to the above, transfer students must have a grade point ratio when combined with previously attempted college work of 3.5 or above. Availability of Courses and Programs The University does not commit itself to offer all of the courses programs and majors listed in this catalog unless there is sufficient demand to justify them. Some courses for example, may be offered only in alternate quarters or years or even less frequently if there is little demand. Some of the less popular majors may not become av a ilable until later in the University's de velopment. Students wishing such majors may take what is offered here and m a jor in some closely related field or transfer to an institution which offers the desired program. Notice of Change Notifications regarding change of address can be made only at the time of registration. Other changes : change of name change in marital status change in residency, and ch a nge of citizenship should be filed promptly with the Registrar s Office.

PAGE 29

28 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Florida College Exchange Through an exchange agreement, students of the University of South Florida, with the approval of their advisers, may elect courses in Greek, Hebrew, Bible or religious education at nearby Florida College Credit for acceptable work may be transferred to the University and counted as elective credit toward graduation Students from Florida College have a similar transfer arrangement. Costs for students under these dual enrollment plans are based on credit hours of work taken, and payment is made to the appropriate institution in accordance with its per-hour fee rate. The Traveling Scholar Program The University System of the State of Florida has a Traveling Scholar program which will enable a graduate student to take advantage of special resources available on another campus but not available on his own campus: special course offerings, research opportunities, unique laboratories, and library collections. PROCEDURE A traveling scholar is a graduate student who, by mutual agreement of the appropriate academic authorities in both the sponsoring and hosting institutions, receives a waiver of admission requirements and the application fee of the host institution and a guarantee of acceptance of earned resident credits by the sponsoring institution. A traveling scholar must be recommended by his own graduate adviser, who will initiate a visiting arrangement with the appropriate faculty member at the host institution. After agreement by the student's adviser and the faculty member at the host institution, graduate deans at both institutions will be fully informed by the adviser and have the authority to approve or disapprove the academic arrangement. A student will register at the host institution and will pay tuition and/or registration fees according to fee schedules established at that institution. CONDITIONS Each university retains its full right to accept or reject any student who wishes to study under its auspices. Traveling scholars will normally be limited to one term (semester, tri mester, quarter, etc.) on the campus of the host university. Traveling scholars are not entitled to displacement allowance, mileage, or per diem payments The sponsoring institution, however, may, at its option, continue its financial support of the traveling scholar in the form of fellow ships or graduate assistantships, with any work obligation to be discharged either at the sponsoring or host institution.

PAGE 30

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 29 Intra-American Exchange Program Through a recipro c al exchange agreement, University of South Florida stu dents may study for one academic year at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Mass a chusetts. Exchange students are selected in the spring (third) quarter preceding the exchange year. Acceptable grades are trans ferred to the University of South Florida and counted as credit toward gradu ation. University of Massachusetts students enjoy the same exchange oppor tunity. Student costs remain essentially the same, but students must pay trans portation costs to and from the exchange institution. Further information may be obtained from the Office of the Dean, College of Education, University of South Florida. Future plans call for expanding the program to include institutions throughout the United States. Selective Service The Selective Service System requires the University to submit, for each male student who has a selective service number on tile at the University, an Enrollment Certificate to local draft boards for every full-time male under graduate and graduate student at the time he is first enrolled and yearly thereafter. This report is required on all undergraduate male students between the ages of 18 and 25. Note: Undergraduate students must enroll for at least 12 quarter hours to be considered full-time. The Selective Service System requires the com pletion of 45 quarter hours each academic year. Graduate students must enroll for 9 quarter hours to be considered full time. Students desiring further info1mation or needing additional Selective Service certification should request this from the Registrar's Office. Veterans Administration The University of South Florida is approved by the Veterans Adminis tration for the education and training of G.I. Bill beneficiaries. As of December 1 1968 the beneficiaries were greatly expanded to include widows of servicemen, and in some cases persons receive benefits from more than one grant. Even though the Registrar's Office is the certifying office for these beneficiaries, all students eligible for benefits should contact their nearest Veterans Administration Regional Office for information and counseling. En rolled students may contact the Veterans Administration Regional Office, P. 0. Box 1437, St. Petersburg, Florida 33731, even though they do not come under this Region Note: To be considered a full-time student by the Veterans Adminis tration an undergraduate student must schedule a minimum of 14 quarter hours each term and a graduate student must schedule a minimum of 9 quarter hours.

PAGE 31

30 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Social Security The Social Security Administration requires the University to submit an enrollment certificate for students between the ages of 18 and 22 receiv ing educational benefits under the Social Security Act. Students receiving these benefits must be and remain full-time students. Students must enroll for 12 quarter hours to receive full-time benefits. Inquiries relating to Social Security benefits should be addressed to the student's local Social Security office. Academic Advising At the University of South Florida, academic advising is the province of the teaching faculty. It is thus an extension of the teaching function-a con scious concern for the academic and educational questions that most students have about the importance of their studies, the proper direction of their educational development, and the practical values of their educational ob jective. Since the beginning student generally is in greater need of advice and guidance, a selected corps of advisers serves students who are registered in the College of Basic Studies. Members of the advising corps are faculty mem bers who are relieved of some teaching responsibility in order to devote rela tively more time to student advising. Faculty members participating in the program represent all of the colleges and divisions of the University and are chosen because of their interest and experience in curricular advising. The advising program in the College of Basic Studies is designed to provide stu dents during their first two years with whatever assistance is necessary in order to move them toward their educational goals in a timely fashion. Coordination of the advising program for students enrolled in the College of Basic Studies is the responsibility of the Coordinator of Student Advising under the dean of that college. Students entering the upper level programs, usually at the beginning of the junior year, are assigned to an adviser in their major field. Curricular ad vising in the upper level programs is the responsibility of the associate deans in the College of Liberal Arts and of the coordinators designated by the respective deans in the Colleges of Business Administration, Education, and Engineering. All degree-seeking students entering the University are urged to participate in a two-day orientation conference, at which time they meet with an adviser in their proposed field of study to prepare a schedule of courses. Prior to this meeting, advisers are provided with pertinent information, such as ad mission data and test scores, concerning each student. During the orientation conference, or shortly after the beginning of classes, the new student is as signed to a specific adviser in accordance with his stated educational objective. A student is expected to meet at least once each term with his adviser for purposes of program planning. However, he is encouraged to visit his adviser whenever he feels in need of help with academic or personal prob lems Although the adviser is essentially a resource person for assistance with

PAGE 32

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 31 academic and curricular matters, he can often refer the student to a source of specialized help when the problem is one with which he is not qualified to deal. Although it is not necessary for a student to have a specific educational goal in mind at the time he enters the University, he should discuss with his adviser any general educational objective he might have at their first meet ing. Some courses of study require enrollment in key courses during the first year if the student is not to lose time in his work toward a degree. Both en gineering and the medical sciences are curricula which illustrate this point. Provisions are made to permit a change of adviser when it appears to be in the best educational interests of the student. A change of educational objective is the most common reason for reassignment, but reassignment may be made at any time the student or adviser believes a change is desirable. While the University provides advising services to assist students with academic planning, the responsibility for seeing that all requirements are met rests with the student. SPECIAL ACADEMIC FEATURES The University of South Florida seeks to achieve its objectives not only through its formally organized colleges and courses but also through certain special services. These are programs or activities which clearly are designed to enhance the education of students but do so through means other than orthodox courses and classes. Many of these do not even offer academic credit although some may be means by which students do earn credits. Regardless of whether or not these activities count toward the definite graduation re quirements, they can be tremendously significant in the lives of students who participate in them. One of the special programs within the academic area of the University is the Cooperative Education Program whereby students may blend the theory of the classroom with experience in the outside world, the world of reality. (See section on Cooperative Education Program) CREDIT BY EXAMINATION Students may apply to take lower division basic studies courses by Credit by Examination. If the application is approved and presented at registration, they take the final examination near the end of the term. Those making "B" or higher on the examination will receive college credit for the course. Those making "C" are still eligible for waiver but without credit. Those making "D" or lower lose the waiver privilege and must take the course in class or use the course as one of the two authorized omissions Students who have completed more than two college courses in the field of study concerned may not earn credit by examination; however, they may take the examina tion and secure a waiver by scoring a "C" or higher. Note: The regular "in complete grade" regulations apply to all courses scheduled through the credit by examination procedure.

PAGE 33

32 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES INDEPENDENT STUDY Students wishing to take a course by independent study must contact the instructor of the course and complete a written contract. This contract specifies the requirements to be completed by the student including tests, periodic class attendance, term papers etc. If the course is in the College of Basic Studies, approval for independent study may be given by the course chairman. A copy of the contract is to be sent to the Coordinator of Independent Study. Not all courses in the University can be taken by independent study. The respective colleges have jurisdiction in the d etermination of which courses may be taken in this manner. The regular grading system applies to all independent study students. Grades earned by independent study have the same status as those acquired through regular class attendance. Students taking a course by independent study must register for the course in the regular manner and for a specific section. ADVANCED PLACEMENT-CREDIT PROGRAM The University of South Florida participates in the Advanced Placement Program conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, which pro vides 13 college-level advanced placement examinations in American history, biology, chemistry, English, European history, French, intermediate German, advanced German, Latin IV, Latin V, mathematics, physics, and Spanish. Examinations in Russian are being added. Examination papers are graded by selected committees on a five-point scale: 5-high honors, 4-honors, 3-good, 2-credit, I-no credit. The University allows automatic advanced placement credit for scores of 3, 4 and 5, and allows advanced placement with or without credit for scores of 2, upon recommendation of the program concerned. Credit may be applie d to basic studies courses where appropriate, or to comparable liberal arts courses as best fits the needs of the student. Participation in this advanced placement program does not affect the University's regulations concerning waiver, credit by examination, independent study, or other provisions for the advanced placement of qualified students. ADVANCED PLACEMENT-NON-CREDIT PROGRAM Frequently a superior student, particularly in the fields of science and mathematics, is allowed to enter advanced courses in those subjects. It is pos sible for students well trained in mathematics to enter calculus as freshmen. It is also possible for well trained students to enter physics or chemistry without having other college level science. Before permission is granted to do so, students are required to take a science and mathematics examination to de termine whether or not they actually have the knowledge and competency to succeed in these advanced courses. This same procedure is applied to other subjects. EXTRA LOADS The normal load for full-time students ranges from 12 to 18 quarter hours each term. For most students seriously involved in study this is ample.

PAGE 34

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 33 For some students, however, an overload is the best way for them to gain maximally from their college education. Registration for more than 18 credits requires approval of the dean or division director of the student's college. A first-quarter freshman is only rarely permitted to undertake more than 18 credits. Thereafter, permission may be granted if the student's grade point is 3.0 or higher. Freshmen and sophomores who wish to carry more than 18 credits should be referred to the Dean of the College of Basic Studies or to the Coordinator of Advising. HONORS The University of South Florida, emphasizing as it does solid academic achievement, is developing ways of recognizing distinguished student achieve ment. An Honors Convocation is held each fall quarter to recognize those students who have maintained a grade point ratio of 3.5 or better in 12 or more quarter hours attempted at USF in each of the three quarters of attend ance within the academic year immediately preceding the Convocation. Co operative Education students may substitute one training quarter for one of the three on-campus quarters. The Gold Key honor society recognizes outstanding students. DEANS LIST Full-time undergraduate students who demonstrate superior academic achievement will be honored by qualifying for the "Deans List." The Dean of the College in which the student is majoring will award a certificate in recognition of this academic honor. Each degree-seeking undergraduate student will be recognized and honored after each quarter in which he demon strates superior academic achievement. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM The Cooperative Education Program has as its objective a balanced education where occupational experience is an integral part of formal edu cation, and theory is blended with practice. In addition to regular classroom and laboratory exercises, it acquaints the student with the world of work and a professional environment. Students become acquainted with professional skills while obtaining their academic training. The ultimate objective of the program is to bring business, industry and governmental agencies close to the educational program of the University and have the graduates absorbed into permanent employment of the Southeast's leading employers. The Cooperative Education Program is particularly designed for recent high school graduates rather than older, more mature students with con siderable work or professional experience. It also requires students of demon strated academic ability. A student must have a minimum of 24 quarter hours of academic work completed with a grade point average of 2.0 or better be fore being assigned to an employer. The program is open to all students regardless of major, undergraduate and graduate as well. Students transferring 24 or more hours of credit from another school are eligible immediately to enter this program. All University of South Florida cooperative programs are approximately four years in length except in the field of engineerin& which is approximately

PAGE 35

34 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES a five-year program. Following two or more quarters on campus the student is assigned to a team and alternates between quarters of training (paid em ployment) and quarters of study until he reaches the senior level, when he returns to the campus to complete his academic requirements. The University will assign students to training programs relevant to their educational and professional goals. Usually students are first placed on assign ments where they can learn the fundamentals. They may then advance in the type of assignment from training period to training period. Many types of enterprises have joined the University as cooperative em ployers. Those currently having cooperative programs and accepting Uni versity of South Florida students in these training programs include: public utilities, financial institutions, chemical plants, department stores, school sys tems, aircraft and automobile manufacturers, insurance firms, chemical, bio logical, and nuclear laboratories, and many governmental agencies including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Six of NASA's centers currently have University of South Florida students in their training programs. Students are encouraged to make application for placement in the pro gram during thei,r first quarter on campus even though they must complete at least 24 hours of academic work before being assigned to an employer. Once a student is accepted into the program, the training assignments become a part of his academic program leading to a degree. The student must remain on the alternating pattern of training and study until he reaches senior level or is released from the Cooperative Education Program by the director. Students signing an agreement covering training periods are obligated to fulfill their agreement. Students who fail to report for a training period after signing an agree ment, who fail to keep their agreement to remain with an employer to the end of a given training assignment, or who fail to remain in the program until they reach senior level, will not be permitted to register as full-time students during their next quarter on campus. Cooperative Education students are encouraged to take one course during each training period. This may be a regular course taken by class attendance, by independent study, or credit by examination, at the University of South Florida or any other accredited college or university, a course by home study or correspondence, or a special problems course in an area appropriate to the student's major interests. Most of these special problems courses at the University of South Florida carry a title of individual research and a course number of 400. They may be repeated and credit may vary from one to five hours per quarter for Cooperative Education students, the amount to be determined at the time of advising. A special course is available for Cooperative Education students-CBS 400, Cooperative Education Research Report 1-5 credits. This course is de signed specifically for Cooperative Education students in which the student pursues a research subject dealing with his training assignment and/or his major area of professional interest. The Cooperative Education student is assigned to a professor in his major field and will confer regularly with him on the subject, structure and content of the written research project. The findings of this project would be embodied in a written report. This course

PAGE 36

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 35 may be used with designators other than CBS if approved by the dean and department head of the college and area concerned. Further information may be obtained in the Office of Cooperative Education. The registration fee for the training period is $40.00 and, in general, covers the fee for one course up to five hours in value (see Cooperative Edu cation Handbook for exceptions), student publications, use of the Library, Student Health Service, and all privileges enjoyed by other full-time students including the use of recreational facilities; golf course, etc. Transfer students are welcome to select the program and should make application during their first quarter at the University. Employers who have working agreements with the University of South Florida and who have served as cooperative employers during the past year in the University s Cooperative Education Program include: AETNA Life Insurance Co. Tampa AETNA Surety & Casualty Co., Tampa Alton Box Board Co., J acksonville Argonne National Laboratories, Argonn e Ill Babcock & Wilcox Co., St. Petersburg The Boeing Co., Cocoa Beach, Fla. Bonwit-Teller, New York, N Y. Bramlett Mfg Corp., St. Petersburg Britt's Dept. Store, Ft. Lauderdale Svend A. Canariis Corp., Tampa Chrysler Corp., New Orleans Clerk of the Circuit Court, Tampa Continental Baking Co Tampa E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co Aiken S. C., and Florence, S. C Electronic Communications, Inc., St. Petersburg Encephalitis R esearch Center, Tampa Fairfield Hills Hospital, Newton, Conn. First Federal Savings & Loan Assoc., St. Petersburg Florida Power Corp., St. Petersburg Florida Society for the Prevention of Blindness, Tampa Florida State Road Dept. St. Petersburg FMC Corp Lakeland Ford Motor Co., Atlanta, Ga. and Dearborn, Mich. General Cable Corp., Tampa General Electric Co., CaJ?e Kennedy, St. Petersburg, Tampa and Rome, Ga. Congressman Sam Gibbon's Office Washington, D. C. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Akron, Ohio Gulf Life Insuranc e Co., Jacksonville Hillsborough Co. Dept of Health, Tampa City of Hollywood, Hollywood, Fla. Honeywell, St. Peterburg Hospital & Welfare Board, Tampa International Business Machines, Inc. Cocoa Beach, Fla. and Huntsville, Ala. International Minerals & Chemical Corp., Bartow Fla. International Nickel Co., Huntington, W.Va. Juv e nile & Domestic Relations Court, Tampa S H. Kress Tampa Lo c kheed-Georgia Co., Marietta, Ga. Manatee National Bank, Bradenton Marine Data Center, Tampa Marineland Research L aboratory, St. Augustine Martin-Marietta Corp., Orlando May-Cohens Department Store Jacksonville Miam i Herald, Miami Montanari Residential Treatment Center & Clinical Sch., Hialeah, Fla. M. A Montenegro & Co., Tampa Carl H. Nelson, Inc., Tampa New England Oyster House, Tampa Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, West Palm Beach Princeton-Pennsylvania Accelerator, Princeton, N.J. Sarasota Memorial Hosp., Sarasota Smith, Braley & Johnson Tampa Smith-Douglass Division Borden Chemical Co., Plant City Fla. Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Co., Jacksonville Standard Oil of Kentucky, Tampa Supermarkets General Corp., Cranford N J. City of Tampa Civil Service Comm Tampa City of Tampa, Comptroller's Office, Tampa Tampa Electric Co., Tampa Tampa General Hospital, Tampa Tampa Ship Repair & Dry Dock, Inc Tampa The Tampa Times, Tampa The Tampa Tribune, Tampa Texas Instruments, Inc., New Orleans, La. Tsegi Trading Post, Tonalia, Arizona

PAGE 37

36 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES U. S. Phosphoric Prod., Tampa Union Carbide Corp., Oak Ridge, Tenn. Jim Walter Research Corp St. Petersburg Dr. Oswald Werner, Evanston, Ill. Westinghouse Corp, Tampa U. S. FEDERAL AGENCIES Air Force Eastern Test Range, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, Pasca goula, Miss. St. Petersburg Bch., Fla., and Miami, Fla. Central Intelligency Agency, Washington, D. C. Corps of Engineers U. S. Dept. of the Army, Jacksonvilfe, Fla., Tampa, Fla. and Atlanta, Ga. Defense Personnel Support Center, Philadelphia, Pa. Food & Drug Adm., Atlanta, Ga., Washington, D. C. and St. Louis, Mo General Services Adm., Atlanta, Ga. and Washington, D. C. Internal Revenue Service, Tampa, Fla., Jacksonville, Fla., Miami, Fla. and Washington, D. C. National Aeronautics & Space Adminis tration, Hampton, .Ya., Greenbelt, Md., Cape Kennedy, Fla., Houston Texas, Huntsville, Ala and Wallops Island, Va. National Archives & Records Service, Washington, D. C. National Park Service, New York, N. Y. and Washington, D. C. Naval Air Rework Facility, Jacksonville Naval Ordance Station, Indian Head, Md Naval Ship Research & Development Center, Washington, D. C. U. S. Dept. of the State, Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, N. J. Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, Tenn Army Missile Command, Huntsville, Ala. Coast Guard, Alexandria, Va., and Washington, D. C. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville Naval Training Devices Center, Orlando Office of Education, Washington, D. C. GRADES The University of South Florida maintains a five-letter grading system. While pluses and minuses may be used for computation of grades or other purposes, no pluses or minuses will be recorded on students' permanent records. The five letters are: A-Superior performance B-Excellent performance C-Average performance D-Below average performance, but passing F-Failure In addition, the following grades are given as explained below: R-Course repeated to remove "X" "R" counts as failure S-Satisfactory 1 U-Unsatisfactory [ Only m Senate approved courses W-Administrative withdrawal from course without penalty X-Incomplete Y-Automatic failure In CBS 401 and EDC 499, "S" and "U" grades are used to indicate the student's final grade in the course. These grades do not affect the student's Grade Point Ratio since no grade points are assigned to either an "S" or "U" grade. However, the student will receive quarter hours credit for the course toward his degree if an "S" grade is attained. For illustration, if a student has received a grade of "S" in one three hour course and has attempted and passed 180 quarter hours of work, his cumulative Grade Point Ratio will be based upon the 177 hours of work for which he received grade points.

PAGE 38

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 37 If a student received a grade of "U" in the same illustration, his cumula tive Grade Point Ratio would still be based upon the grade points for 177 hours of work, his attempted hours would be still 180 hours, but the passing hours would, however, be only 177 hours. X-An "X" grade may be used for any authorized failure to meet the re quirements of a course. An "X" grade resulting from any cause other than a 100 or 200 level Basic Studies machine-scored final must be removed within three weeks of the next quarter the student is enrolled. Permission to remove an "X" resulting from a Basic Studies machine-scored final must be secured from the Dean of Basic Studies within the first three weeks of the next en rollment, provided the course is offered, and the exam completed at the end of the quarter for which permission is granted. Until removed, the "X" is computed in the grade point ratio as "F." Y-A "Y" grade is only used in the College of Basic Studies and is a failing grade. It may be given by the instructor when he believes that regardless of the grade a student earns on a final examination, he should fail the course. It may also be given on a College of Basic Studies final examination. In either "Y" grade insures this failure. It is viewed as final and is re corded as F. W-A "W" grade indicates administrative withdrawal without penalty from the course. The University has a system of grade points used in computing grade point ratios. (A= 4 grade points, B = 3, C = 2, D = 1, F = 0.) Grade point ratios are computed by multiplying the number of credits assigned to each course by the point value of the grade given. The total of the credit points for all courses taken divided by the total number of quarter hours attempted equals the grade point ratio For example, a student attempting five three-credit courses who earned two A's, two B's, and one F, would have a grade point ratio of 2.800. If a student repeats a course for any reason, his grade point ratio will include each grade received. For example, if a three-hour course is repeated, it is computed as six quarter hours attempted. If the grade in the course being repeated is an "X," the "X" is changed to an "R'' (Repeat) and is computed as an "F." ACADEMIC SERVICES Computer Research Center The University maintains centralized highspeed electronic computer facilities for use in teaching, research, and administration. This Center has a Systems Planning Department which assists University Administrative Of fices, a Faculty Consulting Department responsible for facilitating the use of computers in relation to classroom teaching and research conducted by faculty and students, and an education unit which sponsors non-credit semi nars in computer languages such as FORTRAN and COBOL, as well as other subjects relative to the use of computers. Finally, a central corps of programmers service the University computer needs as expressed through the systems and consulting departments.

PAGE 39

38 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 1'. ff I Scienc e Center At present, the University computer facilities include an IBM 1410 and auxiliary equipment. This equipment as well as the staff of the Computer Research Center are housed in the new Science Building. In 1969, electronic computer facilities on the campus will be expanded considerably with the introduction of an on-line, time-sharing computer system. Input-output stations as well as relevant auxiliary equipment are anticipated to be ultimately located in major University buildings in order to facilitate the use of the centralized computers. Educational Resources The Division of Educational Resources offers the following services. Aumo-VISUAL SERVICES. Audio-Visual Services make a variety of equip ment and instructional materials available for the classroom, University events, an d other functions. Such equipment includes public address systems, tape recorders, and projectors of all kinds. P RODUCTION CENTER. Both graphic and photography services for use in the classroom as well as the overall University program are produced here. BROADCASTING SERVICES. Radio and television are a part of the Broad casting Services. Radio WUSF is an FM ra dio station operating on 89.7 me. WUSF-TV, Channel 16, UHF, is an educational television station serving the University and the communities of the seven surrounding counties. Closed circuit television is also provided to most classrooms These facilities are used as a l aboratory for students enrolled in the broadcasting curriculum. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER. The center maintains a library of instructional materials including a curriculum laboratory, films, filmstrips, tapes, records, maps, and slides These materials are available to the faculty and staff for academic purposes. Certain records, filmstrips, and other ma teria l s are loaned to faculty, staff, an d students for independent study and recreational purposes. FILM LIBRARY. A complete film service is available Films not a part of the University Film Library will be requested from other sources through this service

PAGE 40

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 39 LEARNING LABORATORY. A telephone dial access audio-visual laboratory is available for instructional purposes. This laboratory allows telephone access to over 180 different audio sources. Up to 12 video sources are available, but restricted to viewing within the laboratory itself. The Library It is important that a library should take into account not only the books on its shelves but also the people it serves. This point of view is central in the philosophy of the University of South Florida Library. A library is good, not because of the volumes it has, but because it is used by people who derive personal benefit from its use and who produce something as a result of its use that will be of benefit to our society. The Library staff wants students to regard books as a way of life and use the Library regularly. One of the reasons for providing a library collection is to encourage students to buy, read and discuss books and feel bereft when deprived of books. The University expects students to become thoroughly familiar with the University Library book collection, to master the techniques of using it and-before graduation-to achieve a familiarity with books which will carry over into later life The University Library has approximately 225,000 volumes and seating for 800 readers The Reserve reading room, Special Collections, and recreational reading books are on the first floor Special Collections include the Florida collection, rare books, University archives, and the Florida Historical Society Library. The Reference collection and current periodicals are on the second floor. The Reference staff assists students in the use of Library materials and of the card catalog which is in the Reference department. In addition to more than 3,000 periodicals, the Library subscribes to newspapers from Florida major cities in the United States, and many foreign countries. The circulating book collection is on the third floor and bound periodicals and U. S. governm e nt documents a re on the fourth floor. The Library is a de-University Library

PAGE 41

40 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES pository for U S government publications. All books, with the exception of reserve materials and Special Collections are in open stacks All students have the opportunity to become familiar with the Library holdings by browsing in the stacks. Sponsored Research Research is an important aspect of the education program at the University of South Florida. Faculty members are encouraged to pursue research activi ties, and many students participate in research and training projects supported by funds given to the University by public and private granting agencies. Research is integrated with the instructional program in a very real sense. The Office of Sponsored Research is the central coordinating unit for research and other sponsored educational activities on the campus. It pro vides information about granting agencies and serves as a consultation center for faculty who desire help in processing research proposals. Although the Office of Sponsored Research operates primarily for the benefit of the faculty, students who have an appropriate interest in research are welcome to visit the office. Center for Research and Development In the Spring of 1966, The University of South Florida Center for Re search and Development was established to house multi-disciplinary sponsored projects such as the Aging, Marine Science, Exceptional Children and Adults, and Speech Pathology and Audiology. The USF Center is structured within the Vice President of Academic Affairs Office and is directed by an Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs. Faculty research positions are used to supply continuity for research and demonstration projects and to initiate new programs of benefit to the University and the State of Florida FEES The following fee schedule applies to all University of South Florida students with the exception of those in the Bachelor of Independent Studies, Adult Degree Program For information on the Adult Degree Program fees, see Academic Programs All fees are subject to change by action of the State Legislature, without prior notice The University will make every effort to advertise any such changes if they occur.

PAGE 42

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 41 A. Initial Application Fee (ea ch application-not refundable) $10.00 B The following fees must be paid in full at the time of registration: R egis tration F ee Tuition 1. Registration Fee and Tuition: Undergraduate or Graduate students registering for less than seven quarter hours (credit or noncredit) per quarter hour .................... $ 10.00 $ 14 00 Students registering for seven or more quarter hours (credit or non-credit) . . . . . . . . 125.00 2. Registration fee and tuition for off-campus students. Undergraduate or gradu a te students per quarter hour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.00 3 Applied Music Fees ....................... 4. Late Registration Fee ..................... 5. Audit Fees (same rate as if registered for credit) 6. Cooperative Education Program (for training quarter) ............................... 7. Student Deposit (for full-time students) ..... 8. Breakage Fee (Fees may be paid after registration for courses requiring b.-eakage fee). 9. Course Drop and Add Fee (Per Transaction) . 200 00 14.00 25.00 25 00 40.00 15.00 10.00 C. Room and board to be paid in accordance with information in the Housing and Food Service Contract. Per Quarter! 1. Room and Board (students living on campus) Plan A-21 meals per week ....................... Plan B-15 meals per week ........................ 2. Food Service Plan (students living off-campus) Plan A-21 meals per week ....................... Plan B-15 meals per week .................... ... Commuter's Food Plan (five meals per week) ........ $298.62 275.96 158 .62 135 96 45.00 Tuition is paid by non-Florida residents in addition to the registration fee. Florida residents pay only the registration fee. ** Items 2 through 7 applicable to both Florida residents and non-Florida residents. t State Sales and Use Tax included

PAGE 43

42 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FLORIDA RESIDENCY A Florida resident, for purposes of admission, expenses and other Uni versity classification needs, is one whose parent or guardian (or the applicant if over 21) is a citizen of the United States, or a resident alien, and has resided permanently in the state of Florida for at least 12 months immediately pre ceding registration at the University. No applicant can claim Florida residence only by virtue of the fact that he or she has attended any school, college, or university in the state for the 12-month period immediately preceding regis tration The owning of property in Florida while being physically located in another state does not qualify a person to claim Florida residence. REFUND OF FEES Students who find it necessary to withdraw from the University may be permitted to have a refund of fees upon presentation to the University Busi ness Office of an authorization issued by the Registrar's Office. These refunds will be made under the following conditions. 1. No part of the student activity fee will be refunded if the student fails to surrender his original (current quarter) "Certificate of Fee Payment" card; 2. Deductions from authorized refunds will be made for unpaid accounts due the University; 3 No fees will be refunded after the third regular class day in any quarter except in the following cases: a. A student involuntarily called back to duty with the armed forces will be entitled to a refund in the amount of the registration fee less $30.00 for a full-time student and $3.00 per hour for a part-time student. b. The death of a student or an incapacitating illness of such duration and severity as to preclude successful completion of the academic program for the term for which enrolled would also permit a refund in the amount of the registration fee less $30.00 for a full-time student and $3 00 per hour for a part-time student. c. Cancellations would be considered a separate category where the student is considered not to be registered because of the University's ac tions, usually resulting from some pre-existing University regulations 4. Refunds for a full quarter for undergraduates and graduates : a. A full refund will be made if withdrawal is effected before the first day on which classes begin for the quarter. b. A full refund less a $30.00 charge will be made for a full-time student making a complete withdrawal from the University on or before the third regular class day in any quarter. c. A full refund less a $30.00 charge and the proper charges per hour for each hour continued by students changing from full-time to part-time on or before the third regular class day in any quarter. d Part-time students will receive a full refund less a charge of $3.00 for each hour dropped on or before the third regular class day in any quarter. 5 A full refund of music fees and out-of-state fees will be made if with draw al is effected on or before the third regular class day in any quarter.

PAGE 44

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 43 STUDENT DEPOSIT FEES AND CHECK CASHING SERVICE At the student's first registration every full-time student is required to pay a refundable deposit of $15.00 to cover cost of replacement due to any loss or breakage of University equipment, fines and other charges. The stu dent will be required to maintain his deposit at a minimum of $5.00 and will not be billed during the enrollment period except when the deposit falls below this amount. If the deposit falls below the minimum before the end of attendance at the University, the student will be notified by the University Cashier to bring his deposit up to $15.00. Failure to comply will deny the student the privilege to re-register. If the student changes from fullto part-time, or withdraws from the University, he may apply to the Cashier's Office for a refund of the deposit. All deposits will be refunded by check within 30 days after application has been made. If the student has registered on a full-time basis, the deposit will be extended for that period. The University will accept personal checks for accounts due the Uni versity. Each student is urged to make his own financial arrangements through his choice of commercial banks. The University Cashier and the Bookstore will cash personal checks not exceeding $50.00. A nominal service charge will be made for checks returned for insufficient funds or other reasons. University Theatre

PAGE 45

STUDENT VVELFARE The University of South Florida is dedicated to the intellectual, social, and moral development of students in order to provide responsible leaders who can work effectively in a democratic society The university has a concern for the total life of the student as well as for his classroom performance. Diversity of opinion, criticism, and dissent are essential in discharging these responsibilities, and this has been set forth and safeguarded in the Board of Regents' Operating Manual. As a condition for admission to one of the State Universities of Florida, students agree to abide by the policies of the Board of Regents and by the rules and regulations of the institution. The University has the right and responsibility to determine who shall be admitted to the institution; the con duct or behavior acceptable to the institution; and under what conditions one may continue as a student. Administrative due process and the right of review in all disciplinary hearings are provided by the University. Academic freedom and free inquiry in the State Universities can be preserved only if protected from outside manipulation and subversion The universities must be protected from those persons who would disregard normal channels by which grievances may be aired and who would create disturb ances on campuses in such a way as to impede or interfere with the educa tional or orderly operation of the university. University officials and particularly the Dean of Students and his staff are charged with the responsibility of interpreting the policies of the Board of Regents to students and others in the university communities, and with devel oping positive student personnel programs which further the intellectual, social, and moral development of students. Student Affairs Implementation of the personnel service program for students is the concern of the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs. Orientation of new students, residence hall programs, University Center programs scholarships, financial aid, student health, student activities, student organizations, class attendance, disciplinary action, personal counseling, physical education, recreation, inter collegiate athletics, and student publications are programs of Student Affairs. The University provides the leadership and professional services for main taining the educational philosophy of this program The Office of Dean of Women is available to help women students. Per sonal counsel and advice about student women's organizations are provided 44

PAGE 46

STUDENT WELFARE 45 by this office. Attendance in classes, academic difficulties, social standards, and advisement to the Council on Religious Activities are also concerns of the Dean of Women. The Office of Dean of Men is available to help men students. Personal counsel, advice about organizations, social standards, and orientation of new students are concerns of the Dean of Men. This office also serves in an ad visory capacity for foreign students and fraternities. Experiences which develop in students a firm and enlightened belief in democracy, an understanding of its methods, and a sense of personal responsi bility are essential for a free society. The social experiences of working in extra-curricular activities provide valuable personal understanding, emotional maturity, recreation, and social skills. Out-of-class activities of the University are related to these ends. Student activities, clubs and organizations are in corporated in the University's total educational program through the staff of Student Affairs and faculty advisers. The Director of Student Organizations, Dean of Women, Dean of Men, and the University Center and residence halls are particularly concerned with this co-curricular area of student life. Information and advice about student organizations are provided by the Office of Director of Student Organizations. The office assists in the organiza tion of new groups and serves as an advisory center for programs of activities, membership requirements, names of student leaders, financial advice, and as sistance for advisers. Active participation in student organizations is a valuable part of a student's total education, and develops desirable qualities and traits of leadership, personality, and character Student Conduct, Dress, and Discipline Social standards governing activities of student groups have been developed jointly by students, faculty, and the Student Affairs staff. Social standards boards review violations of these codes. Self-discipline and awareness of social obligations are the objectives of the program. Students attending the University of South Florida are considered to be responsible young adults studying with their faculty colleagues in search of knowledge Rigid regulation of personal conduct should not be necessary. Freedom must be balanced by individual responsibility and respect for the rights and freedom of others Students will, therefore, be considered re sponsible for their own decisions and actions both on or off campus. Failure to assume this responsibility or actions which jeopardize the rights, freedoms and safety of others and the integrity of the University will result in discip linary review. Just as the University expects high standards of academic performance, so does it expect high standards of individual conduct. Similarly, it expects dress to be appropriate to the activities in which the individuals are engaged. Noticeable or gross departures from expected standards of conduct or dress on the p art of students will first be considered errors in judgment. Ad visers or other officers of the institution will discuss such lapses with the student concerned. Persistent violations of expected standards or established reg ulations will involve appropriate disciplinary action. The University may deny admission or continued attendance to those whose decisions and actions are contrary to the purposes and procedures of the University.

PAGE 47

46 STUDENT WELFARE Students participating in the University's Cooperative Education Program will be expected to dress appropriately in accordance with the Cooperative Education Policy pertaining to dress and personal appearance. Automobiles Students may use automobiles on campus. Parking facilities are provided for resident and commuter students. All automobiles used on campus must be registered with the Security Department and the Traffic Regulations ad hered to. There is a nominal charge for vehicle registrations. Student Government The Student Government includes all regularly enrolled students of the University. Each student carrying seven or more credit hours per quarter is a voting member of the University of South Florida Student Government. Through its councils and elected officers, the government directs many student activities. Elections for membership on college councils and for Student Government offices are held annually. Representation in the Student Government Legislature is based on pro portional representation from the colleges, residence areas and commuters. The Student Government is the medium through which students participate in the program of University life. In addition, the Student Government elects student representatives to the University Senate. Insurance TRAVEL INSURANCE Students may obtain accident insurance for a nominal charge at the U.S.F Bookstore in the University Center for field trips and personal travel. PERSONAL PROPERTY INSURANCE Students living in the residence halls may obtain insurance on personal property at the rate of $5 for personal property valued up to $500. Applica tions are available in the Housing Office and payment is made to the Cashier in the Finance and Accounting Office. Housing The housing program of the University is part of the total educational plan. Functional, pleasant living conditions contribute to a student's scholarship, habits, and attitudes. Provision of adequate living conditions is a responsibility shared by students, parents and the University. Students apply for housing when applying for admission to the University. Contracts for housing assignment will be sent after admission has been approved. Those students who reside within a 20-mile radius of the University are generally expected to commute. All Tampa students are considered to be within the 20-mile radius.

PAGE 48

STUDENT WELFARE 47 Other regularly enrolled students paying the registration fee for full time attendance are expected to live in University residence halls or in approved off-campus residence halls which meet University regulations pertaining to operation and staffing Students will be permitted to live in University-approved off-campus ac commodations if they are at least 21 years of age by September 1 of the first quarter, January 1 of the second quarter, March 1 of the third quarter, and June 1 of the fourth quarter. Those students who become 21 years of age while in residence must complete their current housing contract. Students will be permitted to live in other than University-approved ac commodations if they meet one of the following qualifications: (a) married student living with spouse; (b) living with parents, legal guardians, or (with the approval of parent or guardian) other adult relatives; ( c) paying part tirne fees. Applications for exceptions are to be directed to the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women. RESIDENCE HALLS Accommodations for students are available in the University's modern res idence halls. Residences are completely air conditioned and provide for the living, educational, social, and personal needs of students. In general rooms, are furnished with beds, dressers, mirrors, desks lamps, drapes, and chairs. Linen service is provided In each living unit, com posed of between 40 and 50 students, a Resident Assistant is available to assist students. A Resident Instructor for each hall is available for personal and aca demic counseling. The University's residence halls are grouped in units called complexes. The first completed complex-Argos-includes three residence halls grouped around Argos Center, which serves as the living and dining rooms of these halls. In addition to the lounges and cafeteria, Argos Center has a snack bar, Andros Residence Complex

PAGE 49

48 STUDENT WELFARE TV room, conference rooms barber shop, beauty shop, and Argos Shop (an annex of the University Campus Shop and Bookstore). The students residing in these halls live in study-sleeping rooms. An outdoor swimming pool in this complex is also available for student use. Andros Complex-consisting of nine residence halls-provides a different type of living arrangement for students Suites are designed to accommodate eight students-two students sharing a bedroom, four students sharing a study room and eight students sharing a bath. In addition, each living unit has its own lounge. Andros Center is also considered the living and dining room of the students residing in this complex and has most of the same facilities as in Argos Center. The residence hall program emphasizes gracious living, attractive sur roundings opportunity for group activity, sett-government, and counseling services of professional people. OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING The University has approved certain off-campus residence halls which have met University regulations pertaining to operation and staffing. Informa tion regarding these facilities is available through the Housing Office Students who meet the University requirements for off-campus living must live in housing acceptable to their parents and the University. The Housing Office maintains a list of approved off-campus housing. Rental arrangements may best be made after personal inspection of facilities and conference with the householder before the University opens. Fall quarter arrangements may be made during the summer. Food Service All students in residence halls on the campus receive three meals a day in the cafeterias. The cost is included in the total charge for room and board. A food service boarding plan is available to those living off campus Snack bars, open during the day and evening, provide sandwiches and fountain service. Several small dining rooms may be reserved by committees or special groups wishing to take their trays to a private place for luncheon or dinner meetings. Student Health Service Comprehensive health care is provided for full-time students through the Uni versity Student Health Service A medical examination must be filed by each full-time student prior to registration, including certification of recent immunizations against smallpox, tetanus, and polio The required form for the examination is provided by the Registrar's Office An outpatient clinic, with laboratory and physiotherapy facilities, is maintained Infirmary care is available for students with illnesses precluding attendance at classes. University physicians have daily office hours except weekends ; and emergency care in the Health Center is available continuously, including nights and weekends. Consultation with medical specialists and hospital emergency room care

PAGE 50

STUDENT WELFARE 49 may be provided by the Student Health Service, as well as payment of the first $100 of hospitalization expenses, when approved by the Director of the Health Service. Other types of off-campus medical care remain the responsi bility of the individual student. A voluntary health insurance program is available through the University. A medical history and record of physical examination and innocula tions must be filed in the Student Health Service as a requirement of ad mission. Developmental Center The Developmental Center provides services for students desiring pro fessional assistance in the areas of reading, vocational guidance, personal counseling, tutoring, speech and hearing These services are available to assist students in evaluating and remedying problems which interfere with efficient learning and satisfying participation in campus life. The Reading Service provides diagnosis and evaluation of reading skills and habits Visual screening is also available. Two approaches are offered to meet the needs of students referred for help in reading Non-credit courses in developmental reading are offered which include extensive instruction and practice in word attack, comprehension and in different ways and purposes of reading An independent study non-credit course is available for students who prefer to assume responsibility for their own improvement with the emphasis on the individual need Re a ding laboratory service is available for all reading students enrolled in either the classes or independent study sections. Regular registration procedures will be followed for specific courses such as Develop mental Reading. Staff and facility limitations will restrict servicing of new applications to emergencies during peak periods. The Speech and Hearing Service offers diagnostic and therapeutic sessions for students whose speech or hearing interferes with effective com munication. Speech and hearing screening is required for all new entering students Therapy is available for students who are referred or feel a need for speech improvement. Counseling Services are available for students requesting help in career planning and in dealing with personal problems. Through testing and inter view the counselors assist any student to evaluate his personal aptitudes for his educational and career goals Any student may ask for help in the Center when he feels that increased understanding of himself and of his relations with others would lead to more confident and satisfactory living and learning. Students desiring special assistance in their courses may apply to the De velopmental Center for tutoring provided by other students in various subjects and courses. Fees are charged by the tutors according to standard rates estab lished by the Developmental Center staff. Application for any of these services of the Developmental Center may be made by any student at any time and a s often as desired. Psychiatric Services aid the student when medication, hospitalization or psychiatric evaluation is needed. Vocational Reh a bilitation is a State of Florida service located in the Developmental Center to facilitate the University students' utilization of aid available.

PAGE 51

50 STUDENT WELFARE Financial Aids The student financial aids program at the University of South Florida is intended to assist qualified students to obtain a university education when they might otherwise lack financial resources Financial assistance, with the excep tion of Service Awards is granted on the basis of financial need, academic promise or attafument, and character. Scholarships are available, suited to student financial need and academic promise. Registration-Fee Work-Scholarships are awarded which require about four hours of work on campus per week. University of South Florida Foundation Grant-in-Aid Scholarships and Service Awards are available if the student makes timely application and is qualified for the award. Scholarship applications are accepted only once each year and must be filed no later than February 1 for scholarships which will begin with the fall quarter. National Defense Student Loan applications for the entire academic year and/or first quarter must be filed not later than March 1. Applications for other quarters may be filed at any time; however, availability of funds will be the controlling factor in granting loans after the original deadline date. National Defense Education Act Student Loans permit entering freshmen, transfer students, and continuing students to borrow up to $5,000, with a maximum of $22 per quarter hour carried each quarter. Repayments begin nine months after the borrower ceases to be a full-time student, at which time the loan draws interest of three per cent. Payment must be made within ten years. Part of the loan may be canceled if the student teaches in an elementary or secondary school, college or university. Payment is deferred if the student enters the armed service or Peace Corps. Florida State Education Loans permit any student who has been a resident of Florida for a maximum of three years to borrow an amount predicated on financial need but usually limited to the registration fee. Repayments begin approximately one year after the borrower ceases to be a full-time student, at which time the loan begins drawing four per cent interest. Repayment of the loan must be completed within five years Additional long-term loans may be granted, subject to the availibility of funds, from the following programs: Sertoma Memorial Loan Fund for resi dents of Hillsborough County (number and amount of loans vary); the James J. Love Memorial Scholarship Loan Fund, preference to Gadsden County residents (number and amount of loans vary); Pan-American Univer sity Women's Club of Tampa Scholarship Loan Fund for a Tampa high school graduate of Latin descent; Credit Women of Tampa Scholarship Loan Fund; Vallie H. Perry Chapter of United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarship Loan Fund for a student whose ancestor served in the Confederate Army or Navy; Henry & J Edward Rosenzvaig Memorial Fund with prefer ence given to Hillsborough County students majoring in science or engineer ing; Memorial Junior High School Loan Fund for students who have attended Tampa Memorial Junior High School ; Ruby S. Friedberg Student Loan Fund of the B'nai B'rith Women of Tampa; Selby Foundation for brilliant and de serving science students preferably Sarasota County or West Coast area; Tampa Jr. Chamber of Commerce Student Scholarship Loan Fund for re sidents of Hillsborough County; Florida Philatelic Society Student Scholarship Loan Fund; Gloria Davis Haston Memorial Loan Fund for graduates of Hills-

PAGE 52

STUDENT WELFARE 51 borough High S c hool; Mrs Nylah Bell Memorial Loan Fund for graduates of Hillsborough High School; Richard Martin ( Marty ) Starns III, Memorial Engineering Stude n t Loan Fund for students pursuing an engineering educa tion; and the United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarship Loan Fund for descendents of those who served in the Confederate Army or Navy. Long term loans may be available from home town participating banks through the Federally Insured Student Loan Program. Loans are not payable until the student graduates, or leaves the University. More information on this program is available in the Office of Financial Aids. Short term loans are available from the Louise Ramey Fund and the American Institute of Mining Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers, Inc Junior-Senior short-term loan fund. Short-term loans are made available to foreign students through the Ann and Henry Jander Memorial Loan Fund. Applications for scholarships and/or student loans should be made to the Director of Financial Aids. The following scholarships, with their minimum value given in paren theses are curr e ntly available to qualified students: American Business Women's Assn Scholarship ( Suncoast Chapter) (one, amount varies); American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (Florida West Coast Chapter) (one $250); John Stewart Bryan Memorial Award (one, amount varies) : Pauline Bush Scholarship (one, amount varies); Elizabeth Cone Book Scholarship (one, $50); East Hillsboro Opti-Mrs. Club Scholarship (one, amount varies) ; Florida Accountants Assn. Scholarship (Gulf Co a st Chapter) (one, $250) ; Florida State Regents Scholarship (number and amount varies; application should be made to the student's school principal or guidance counselor) ; Fontana Hall Scholarship (one, $1,000); Food Fair Stores Scholarship (two, $200 each); General Telephone Scholarship (two, $375 each); Patrick Gordon Estate Scholarship (two, amount varies): Gulf Life Insurance Company Scholarship (one, $1,000); Knight and Wall Scholarship (one, $451.50); Maas Brothers Scholarship (one, $525); North Tampa Business and Professional Women's Club (one, $150); Personnel Administration Associ a tion of Central Florida Scholarship (one, $300); Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity Scholarship (one, amount varies); Reader's Digest Foundation Scholarship (number and amount varies); T. R. Robinson PTA Scholarship (one, $500); State Teachers Scholarship (number varies, $600 ea ch-application should be made to the student's County Superintendent of Public Schools prior to October); Tampa Lakes Women's Club Scholarship (one, $50) ; Teachers of the Mentally Retarded Scholarship (number and amount vary) ; USF Work Scholarship (approximately 125, $375 each); Winn-Dixie Stores Found a tion Junior-Senior Scholarship (one to three $200 to $ 600) ; Winn-Dixie Stores Foundation Scholarship (number varies, $375 each ; recipient chose by Winn-Dixie Stores Foundation Jack sonville Florida). For the National Scholar s hip Service and Fund for Negro Students, applications should be made directly to this Fund: Address -6 East 82nd Street, New York, New York 10028. The Vocational Rehabilitation Division State Department of Education, Tallahassee Florid a, provides limited assistance to students who are handi capped.

PAGE 53

52 STUDENT WELFARE The Florida Council for the Blind, P. 0. Box 1229, Tampa, Florida 33601, provides financial help for blind students. Students with a minimum of 24 hours of academic credit and a grade point average of 2.0 or better may apply for a Cooperative Education team Further information on the Cooperative Education Program is given on page 33 Student employment under the College-Work-Study Program, admin istered by the Office of Education, Department of Health, Education and Welfare, is available for students from families meeting the income requirement for eligibility. Certification for eligibility must be received from the Office of Financial Aids Additional information on scholarships is available in the Office of Fi nancial Aids. Placement Services The purpose of the Placement Services Division of Administrative Services is to assist students and alumni in realizing their career objectives. This office, together with the Cooperative Education Program and the Financial Aids Office attempts to insure that economic considerations will not impede the progress of any student who is seriously in pursuit of a college education. Every effort is made to insure part-time placement for undergraduate and graduate students who express a need for employment. Students may register for part-time placement both on and off campus, as well as for seasonal employment throughout the world. Up-to-date job listings are maintained during the year to assist the student seeking part-time employment. One of the recognized goals of a college education is to maximize career satisfaction, and Placement Services exists to facilitate the achievement of this end. The Career Planning Center provides the student with materials on vocational guidance, career opportunities and employers. It is maintained in Placement Services as an adjunct to the Graduate Placement Service, the Cooperative Education Program and the Developmental Center, for the benefit of all students. Placement Services also serves as a central source of information on graduate schools and programs and maintains a variety of material on financial assistance available to graduate students. In addition to graduate school cata logs and information on individual college and university stipends, material and applications are maintained on such national and international awards as Fulbright and Rhodes Scholarships, National Science Foundation Fellowships, and many others. All students with an interest in attending graduate school are encouraged to begin their investigation of opportunities in this office Students register with Placement Services early in their graduating year. This enables them to interview on campus with recruiters from educational systems businesses, industries, and governmental agencies throughout the country Every registrant receives 25 free copies of his personal resume In addition these credentials may be used when applying to graduate school. The above services are also available to alumni desiring career relocations.

PAGE 54

STUDENT WELFARE 53 University Center The University Center serves as the hub of campus life outside of the class room. It provides facilities, services, and programs to enhance the social, cultural, and recreational life of the University. The information service desk serves as the coordinating center for the numerous and varied services and activities of the University Center and out-of-class student life. It is here that student organizations schedule facilities and request services for their various activities. The master schedule of all student activities is maintained at this location. Many of the University Center's facilities and services provide for per sonal and social needs. It has conference and activity areas, lounges, a cafe teria, dining rooms, a snack bar, student organization offices, craft and photography areas, a ballroom, book lockers, lounges and television listening, billiards, table tennis, table games, the University Campus Shop and Book store, Student Health Services, a magazine browsing library, campus lost and found, and various other services. Food Service, Bookstore and Health Service operations are coordinated through their respective University administrative areas, while the other facilities and services are coordinated by tne University Center Director's office. In addition to providing services and facilities, the University Center also functions as a program. The University Center Program Council is com prised of the chairmen of IO student committees and three elected officers The Program Council provides a social, cultural and recreational program under the guidance of professional staff advisers to make leisure time activities more meaningful. The overall program is designed to supply additional expe rience by providing opportunities for self-directed activities and the attainment of social skills and knowledge. The Center's program contributes to achievement of the educational goals of the University by providing a laboratory for experience in citizenship-a community center where all may have a part in the direction of com munity enterprises. Academic and non-academic interests are related so that students' development may be well-rounded and complete. Enhancement of social skills and emotional development of the individual are also goals of the program The University Center Program Council has as its objective to provide a balanced program of activities reflecting the special social and recreational needs of all students' out-of-class interests. All activities are planned, arranged, and directed by student committees. A student may volunteer to serve on such committees as dance, hospitality, fashion, music, special events, arts and exhibits, movies, recreation, personnel, public relations and publicity com mittees. USF Bookstore and Campus Shops The USF Bookstore is located in the University Center Building. The Book Department, on the ground floor, carries all required textbooks, a large selection of trade books and over 8,000 paperback titles. Special orders are taken for any book which is in print. The Merchandise Department, on the

PAGE 55

54 STUDENT WELFARE first floor, carries required course supplies, general supplies and items such as art prints, USF monogrammed clothing and jewelry, sundries, records and greeting cards. Special orders are taken for many other items. There are copying, film development, personalized stationery, class rings and cap and gown ordering services. Student's personal checks up to $50.00 are cashed, providing cash is available. Argos Shop, located in the Argos Complex, and Andros Shop, in the Andros Complex, are branch stores carrying a large selection of non-required reading material plus a full line of personal toiletries. Andros Shop also specializes in monogrammed sorority and fraternity items. The Bookstore for the St. Petersburg Campus is located in that campus' Administration Building and carries required textbooks and supplies only The shop at the USF Golf Course carries a wide selection of golf clubs, bags, supplies and accessories for students, faculty, staff, and members of the USF Foundation. Clubs and Other Organi.zations Students have formed clubs, organizations, and councils in almost every field of interest. New groups are being formed and will continue to develop. Groups presently organized cover the most frequently desired kinds of activ ities. DANCE, MUSIC AND DRAMA CLUBS The excellent program in the Fine Arts and the facilities of the Fine Arts-Humanities Building and the Theatre and the Theatre Center have attracted students to various student interest groups. These student organiza tions-USF Dance Theatre for those interested in dance, Bay Players for those interested in theatre, and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Sigma Alpha Iota and Ripieno Club for those interested in music-welcome all students to participate. Students are also welcome to join such academic units as the University-Community Orchestra, the University Concert Band, and the Fine Arts Chorale. (See Music course descriptions) CULTURAL EVENTS Many of today's outstanding visual and performing artists are brought to the University of South Florida campus each year. The Artist Series pro vides unusual opportunities for hearing the best music performed. The Exhibition Series provides unusual opportunities to view over thirty exhibitions annually in the University's three galleries. These and other programs con ducted by the Florida Center for the Arts significantly contribute to the education of students and the general vitality of the campus. In addition the Division of Fine Arts arranges a full schedule of concerts, plays, lectures, films and workshops which feature students, faculty and visit ing artists The events are presented both during the day and in the evening. Many are free of charge. Most events are open to the general public. The University publishes a Calendar of Events which is available upon request to the Coordinator of Events, U S.F. Theatre.

PAGE 56

STUDENT WELFARE 55 PUBLICATIONS The University has encouraged and is developing a growing program of campus communication through various publications. These publications are all-University in approach and coverage. They are staffed by students under the general supervision of the Office of Campus Publications. An 8-column campus newspaper, The Oracle, is published each Wednes day of the school year. Containing 10 to 14 pages in each issue, it provides professional experience for those students interested in journalism. Laboratory sessions of journalism classes in newswriting, news editing, makeup and adver tising are used to produce major sections of the newspaper. Any student interested in working on the newspaper in any capacity is not only encouraged but urged to participate. About one-third of the staff each quarter is not enrolled in journalism classes. A University yearbook, The A ege an, is produced once a year. All stu dents are eligible to work on this publication and much valuable experience in photography, layout editing, and business techniques is received by these students A campus literary magazine, South Florida Review, is produced periodi cally. While the magazine is sponsored by the Office of Campus Publications, anyone at the University may submit manuscripts for consideration. This publication is devoted primarily to essays, poetry, and literary criticism. Interested students are invited to join the staff of any campus publication. FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES There are currently thirteen national fraternities and one local and seven national sororities functioning on campus. They carry out a program of social, educational, service, and recreational activities for their members. Member ship in these organizations is open to student, by invitation only, once the student has completed 12 credit hours with a 2 0 ("C") average or better. Their programs are coordinated through the lnterfraternity Council and the Panhellenic Council with the advice of faculty and staff members RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS The University has encouraged student religious organizations to develop associations and centers. Denomin a tions have built centers in a reserved area on campus. The Episcopal Center was dedicated in the fall of 1962 and the Baptist Center in the spring of 1964. The University Chapel Fellowship followed in 1966 (This center is an ecumenical campus ministry of the folowing denominations : Methodist, Presbyterian, and United Church of Christ). The Roman Catholic Center joined the others in the fall of 1967. Student religious organizations active on campus include the Baha'i Club, Baptist Student Union, Campus Crusade for Christ, Catholic Student Organization, Christian Science Organization, Hillel of the University of South Florida, Lutheran Student Organization, Student Vestry of the Episcopal Church, and the University Religious Council. SERVICE AND HONORARY Alpha Mu Omega (men's music honorary), Alpha Phi Omega (men's national service fraternity), Circle K, Collegiate Civinettes (women's service

PAGE 57

56 STUDENT WELFARE organization), Athenaeum (women s honorary), Gamma Theta Upsilon (geog raphy honorary), Omicron Beta Kappa (men's leadership honorary), Gold Key Honor Society, Pi Mu Epsilon (mathematics honorary), Sigma Alpha Iota (women's music honorary), Psi Chi (psychology honorary), Sigma Pi Sigma (physics honorary), and Tau Beta Phi (engineering honorary), pro vide associations for leadership and University service experience. SPECIAL AND ACADEMIC INTEREST ORGANIZATIONS Students have organized and continue to organize clubs covering a broad range of special and academic interests. Membership is usually open to anyone having an interest in the club's activities. Clubs active at present include the Archery Club, Basketweavers, Bay Players, Dance Club, Economics Club, Engineering Belles, English Club, Fencing Club, Florida Engineering Society, Forensics Club, Judo Club, Karate Club, Le Cercle Francais, Library Education Audio Visual Organization, Marine Biology Club, Motley Crew, One to One, Parachute Club, Politically Active Conservative Council, Political Union, Radio Club, Readers Theatre Guild, Ripieno, Russian Language and Culture Club, Senior Accounting Club, Speech Pathology Club, Sports Car Club, Student Council for Exceptional Children, Students for Responsible Government, T.C.C. (Judo), University Riding Club, USF Pre-Medical So ciety, Veterans Club, Water Ski Club, Windjammers, Women Here and There (WHAT), Women's Karate Club, Young Democrats, Young Republi cans, and Your Opinion Unoppressed (YOU). COUNCIL AND SPECIAL SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS In addition to the organizations mentioned above, a number of groups provide programs, information and governmental experience for the students at the University These include the Aegean (yearbook); College of Basic Studies College Council; Student Advisory Board, College of Business ; College of Education Council; Cooperative Education Student Council; Engi neering College Association; Liberal Arts Dean's Student Advisory Board; Interfraternity Council; Inter Residence Hall Council; The Oracle (campus newspaper); Panhellenic Council; Residence Hall Centers; Senior Class; Stu dent Government Association; University Center Program Council; University Religious Council; and the World Affairs Council. Recreational Sports The University of South Florida provides a variety of physical and recreational activities designed to meet the needs and interests of students. Believing that a sound and complete education includes a proper balance of work and study with physical activity, the University program includes Intramural Sports competition for men and women, Sports Clubs, and All U niversity event days in addition to basic instructional programs in physical education The activities represent a broad selection of sports ranging from those of a highly competitive nature to those of a non-competitive type and include individual, dual, team and aquatic sports. Through participation, students faculty and staff will increase physical fitness, augment leisure time skills and develop a wholesome attitude toward physical activity

PAGE 58

STUDENT WELFARE 57 The Intramural Sports Program emphasizes activities that are especially suited to the Florida climate. Competition is scheduled in such individual sports as swimming, tennis, track, golf, cross country, table tennis, bowling and archery, as well as the team sports of touch football, basketball, soccer, volleyball and softball. Competition is scheduled through fraternal societies, residence halls, and independent divisions. Team and individual awards are presented. The Sports Club Program includes groups of students, faculty, and staff who have a special interest in a particular sports activity. They are organized for the purpose of increasing skills and augmenting knowledge through a con tinuing in-service training and competitive program. Each sports club is as sisted by the coordinator of sports clubs in the selection of a faculty adviser and the initial organization of the club is governed by University regulations. Students with special sports abilities or interests are encouraged to make them known so that when sufficient need and interest warrant, new sports clubs may be formed. Present clubs include: fencing, golf, gymnastics, judo, karate, sailing, sports car, tennis, water skiing, and weight lifting. The Special Events Program is geared to provide the University commu nity with a variety of informal recreational activities. Some of the activities are: open tournaments, trips to special athletic events, splash parties, picnics, camping, boating, bowling, bike racing and other special project activities related to the development of campus recreation. Intercollegiate Athletics The University of South Florida fields teams in such intercollegiate sports as baseball, golf, soccer, swimming, tennis, track, and cross-country. It is not anticipated that such activities as football and basketball will be initiated. Schedules are arranged with quality and reasonable competition which reflect the high standards of the University. Women's athletics are encouraged and held to the same rules that apply to men's athletics.

PAGE 59

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS The University of South Florida programs are currently conducted through five colleges. The College of Basic Studies provides the basic general education needed by all students The College of Business Administration offers profes sional courses leading to the bachelor of arts and master of business adminis tration degrees The College of Education offers professional courses leading to the bachelor and master of arts degrees for teachers. The College of Engi neering offers programs leading to the bachelor and master of science in engi neering. The College of Liberal Arts offers courses in the arts and sciences, including a variety of professional and preprofessional programs, on the bac calaureate and master's levels, and offers the Ph.D. degree in biology Each of these colleges has its own requirements and standards. However, all share University-wide emphases and certain common requirements for graduation. Each college has prepared its course offerings with strong undergradu ate programs clearly in mind. Students are urged to make their college edu cation a broad one, reserving intensive specialization until they are on a job or have gone on to graduate or professional school. Each college accepts the idea that a college education begins with a broad base of general courses, proceeds to more specialized work and ends with a formal effort to bring together the many separate threads of an educa tion into a significant pattern. Thus, all students enroll first in basic studies courses, then in courses in the college where they wish to concentrate, and finally in a senior integrating seminar. It is hoped that students will constantly attempt to synthesize their education as they move along and that they will have had considerable experience by the time they reach their senior seminar Summer Session The Summer Session (4th Quarter) constitutes an integral part of the aca demic program of the University of South Florida. Summer courses are identi cal with those offered at other times during the academic year and are taught by the regular University instructional staff or by outstanding visiting teachers. In addition to these regular courses, there are various credit and non-credit workshops, institutes and conferences conducted by specialists. While the Summer Session may serve as a continuation of study, as the fourth quarter of the academic year for regular students, attempts are made to make the schedules of these courses and programs attractive to in-service teachers and for beginning freshmen just graduated from high school. 58

PAGE 60

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 59 The Evening Sessions The Evening Sessions of the University of South Florida are des igned to meet educational needs of people within commuting distance The admission requirements, the deadlines and other University regula tions for the Evening Sessions are the same as those for other students Evening students must complete an application for admission to the Univer sity of South Florida and present all material required and described under Admi s sion to the University. Degree seeking students are assigned an adviser shortly after admission to the Universit y and continue w ith the a ssign e d adviser unles s the student o r a dvis e r reque sts a change Ad vise r s are a s s igned on the basis of the educational objective of the student. The Center for Continuing Education is open each evening classes are in session and non-degree seeking students are free to consult with that office on any problems or questions that might arise. Students admitted to the Evening Sessions may select courses to fit their needs with the a dviser's approval and with the consent of the instructor. However students who do waive these requirements must possess sufficient background and experience to compensate for them The student and his adviser should determine the need for prerequisites and the level of courses in which he will enroll. (Registration for courses in the evening is held during the same period as registration for day sessions.) The courses of the Evening Sessions contain the same material and requirements as the equivalents offered during the day. Each student will be expected to meet the same standards of perform ance and pass the same examinations full time day students are required to complete. Grades and progress will be based on the same system applicable to full-time students. Students may enroll in courses offered by any of the colleges of the University As a general rule part-time students attending night classes are encouraged to take no more than two courses. No evening student may enroll in more than three courses in any one quarter Students seeking degrees through the Evening Sessions must meet the same degree requirements as day students These requirements are set forth under the curricula of the various colleges. Life Science Building

PAGE 61

60 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Continuing Education LOCATIONS Programs as described below are available in many geographical areas but co-ordination of these programs is handled through the Continuing Education office located at the Tampa campus and offices of Continuing Education located at St. Petersburg and Sarasota. The Center for Continuing Education also includes the use of the residential conference center at Chinsegut Hill at Brooksville. Individuals desiring more information about these programs can contact any of these offices. CREDIT COURSES The University of South Florida serves the in-service and continuing educational needs of its ever-expanding professional and occupational com munity which encompasses 12 counties: (Charlotte, DeSoto, Hardee, Her nando, Highlands, Hillsborough, Lee, Manatee, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, and Sarasota). Both degree and non-degree seekers may participate in the University's Continuing Education Credit Program A part of an individual's master's degree credit may be earned by taking off-campus credit courses. This indi vidual, however, is encouraged to apply for graduate status at an early date so that these courses may be considered for inclusion in his planned and approved graduate program of studies. Acceptance for enrollment in a course does not itself constitute acceptance to the University. To assure quality of instruction, the continuing credit courses for the most part are taught by the regular faculty of the University When this is not possible, outstanding instructional personnel are recruited from neighboring accredited institutions In addition, the University System Exten sion Library makes available for each continuing education course the latest in reference and audio-visual instructional materials. The academic calendar for courses scheduled off campus is essentially the same as for the University's on-campus credit program. Classes are gen erally scheduled once a week, although a few do meet twice a week. Although some continuing education credit courses are generated by the University itself, most originate through requests which are initiated by individuals or interested groups. Requests for continuing education courses in the area of education should be submitted to the County Extension Coor dinator designated by the county superintendent of schools. Requests for continuing education courses in all other areas should be transmitted by individuals, groups, companies, agencies, etc., directly to the Coordinator of Off-campus Credit Courses, Center for Continuing Education, University of South Florida NON-CREDIT PROGRAMS A variety of non-credit educational programs (conferences, workshops, short courses, certificate programs, etc.) of varying lengths are scheduled throughout the year, making it possible for the University to serve greater numbers of adults with richer and more diversified programs The programs

PAGE 62

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 61 Administration Building vary in length from one day to ten weeks, and the subject matter is concen trated as needed by the group being served. The Center for Continuing Education develops programs for business and industry, government, professional, civic and service groups. A variety of instructional methods are used to assure maximum participation in the edu cational programs. Distinguished faculty members from the several colleges of the University, faculty from other institutions of higher education as well as national and international resource persons, serve as instructors and l e c turers for the programs. A staff of professional program advisers is available to provide technical assistance in program planning, budget preparation and evaluation, an d to assist organizations in developing programs consistent with the nee d s of the group and the overall educational objectives of the University. P rograms are offered in the following areas : business, education, engineering, liberal arts, public administration health occupations, and science. The Center also offers a number of non-credit certificate programs and courses designed to meet various educational needs of individuals. Emphasis is placed upon quality classes for progressional advancement, personal im provement and cultural enrichment. Registration in these classes is open to all adults with a d esire for knowledge and interest in the subject matter. Instructors of non-credit classes are chosen from the faculty of the University, or are outstanding local resource persons. Bachelor of Independent Studies Degree Program The Bachelor of Independent Studies Degree Program is designed espe cially for adults over twenty five who are unable to dedicate a block of time as a resident to complete a regular degree program. The BIS Curriculum consists of study in four areas: The Humanities, Natural Sciences, S ocial Sciences and Inter-area Studies.

PAGE 63

62 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS The BIS Adult Degree Program does not involve specific courses, credit hours or letter grades The student's work is rated as satisfactory or unsatis factory. The Program is administered through the USF Center for Continuing Education and is academically responsible to the College of Liberal Arts. The BIS Degree candidate pursues each of the four areas of study through two approaches. The first phase of work for each area consists of guid e d independent study. The student proceeds under the guidance of a faculty adviser who furnishes directions relative to reading assignments, methods of reporting and other study projects When the student and his adviser feel that he has attained adequate competence in the area of study, the student is invited to take an Area Comprehensive Examination. The second and final phase of work for each area consists of an area seminar An area seminar represents a period of intensive residential learning under the direction of a team of USF faculty members. Required residence associated with the seminars totals thirteen weeks The seminars for the first three areas are three weeks in length. The fourth area seminar requires four weeks in residence. Those seeking admission to the BIS Program must qualify for admission to the University uf South Florida and for admission to the BIS Adult Degree Program. The USF Director of Admissions rules on the admission of an applicant to the University. The BIS Advisory Council rules on admission of an applicant to the BIS Degree Program. On successful completion of the four study areas and on recommendation of the BIS Advisory Council, the Dir ec tor of the BIS Program certifies the candidate to the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, who makes the final recommendation that the degree be conferred. BIS Degrees are conferred at regular graduation ceremonies at the University. Fees for the BIS Degree Program are as follows: Fees Application ........................................... $ 10.00 Diagno stic Testing & Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.00 1st Area Enrollment Independent-study ................................ Seminar ....................................... . 2nd Area Enrollment ................................. 3rd Area Enrollment .... ............................. . Inter-Area Enrollment 250.00 250.00 500.00 500.00 Independent-study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250.00 Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300.00 TOTAL" ............................................ $2110.00 Please note that the fees listed do not include such additional expenses as books, travel, and living expenses during seminars. Students may not transfer credits (from the University of South Florida or any other institution) either in or out of the BIS Program.

PAGE 64

College of BASIC STUDIES The Coll e ge of Basic Studies provides that p art of a formal university educa tion which should be common to all graduates of the University of South Florida. All students enter the college as freshmen and must complete its requirements before entering one of the other colleges of the University. Lower division courses are offered by the college in eight areas (see list under Waiver, below) Completion of six of these eight areas, including Func tional English, satisfies the lower division basic studies requirement. In Foreign Languages the student may choose from more than one course (a year of Latin or Ancient Greek may be substituted for a functional modem language course); only one course from an area can be used to satisfy basic studies requirements. However, in the science area, the student may take both Bio logical Science and Physical Science. The lower division Humanities offering is available in five three-credit courses. The student may meet the Humanities requirement by completing any three of these courses. Ordinarily a student would seek to complete his basic studies courses by the close of the sophomore year In certain majors, owing to the prescription of required courses it may not be possible to complete the six lower division basic studies courses within the first two years. In these cases, it is recom mended that the "300" level basic studies courses, American Idea and Human ities, be scheduled in the junior year. Waiver Some entering students have already achieved competence in one or more areas of the basic studies. These students may request a waiver of one or more of the basic studies requirements However a specific high school unit may not be applied toward a waiver of more than one basic studies area. For example, high school chemistry may not be used toward the waiver of both biological and physical science Applications for waiver must be completed in the Registrar's Office during the first quarter the student is in attendance at the University. Routine approval will be granted when appli cants meet the following conditions: ( 1) a score of 425 or higher on the Florida State-Wide Twelfth Grade Tests, 24 on the ACT, or 1075 on the CEEB; (2) a grade of "C" or higher in each of three or four years of relevant 6 3

PAGE 65

64 COLLEGE OF BASIC STUDIES high school work A course which has been waived may not subsequently be taken for credit. Requirements specific to the area in which waiver is requested are as follows: Functional English: Behavioral Science : Biological Science: Physical Science: Functional Mathematics: Functional Foreign Languages : American Idea : Humanities: No waiver available. Evidence of competence acquired else where Three or more years of high school science including biology, chemistry, and one additional unit other than general science. (A student passing BIO 201, BIO 202 and BIO 203 with an average grade of "C" or higher in the three courses may waive CBS 205-206-207 ) Three or more years of high school science including chemistry, physics, and one additional unit other than general science. (A student passing any two first year sequences in the Physical Sciences, i.e., CHM 211-212-213; PHY 211-212, PHY 213-214, PHY 215-216 or PHY 221-222, PHY 223-224, PHY 225-226; CLY 201, CLY 301 AST 201, AST 202, with an average grade of "C" or higher in the sequence may waive CBS 208-209-210.) Three or more years of high school mathematics including two years of alge-bra and one semester each of geometry and trigonometry with "C" or better. (A student passing mathematics courses MTH 203 303 and 304 with an aver age of "C" or higher for the sequence may waive CBS 109-110 ) Three or more y ears of one foreign language Four or more years of high school social studies, including one year of world his tory and one year of American history. Evidence of competence acquired else where. Lower division basic studies requirements may be satisfied by independent study or credit by examination, ac c ording to the procedures described on pages 30-31 of this catalog Students who have completed more than two college courses in the field of study conc e rned may not earn credit b y examin a tion. The y m ay however take the examination and secure a waiver by scoring a C" or higher.

PAGE 66

COLLEGE OF BASIC STUDIES 65 Placement of Students in Language Classes The appropriate placement of students in language classes is often a difficult matter calling for consultation with a member of the language staff. Generally, if a student has had four years of high school language he should enroll in the first quarter of the third year of language; three years would put him in the second quarter of the second year; two years in the first quarter of second year; and one year in the second quarter of the first year. If a student's background is inadequate, he may be allowed to drop back one quarter with the permission of a member of the language staff. If a student has had two years or less of a foreign language in high school five or more years previous to enrollment in a language at the University of South Florida, he may disregard the high school language courses and register in a beginning course Advanced Basic Studies Maior An Advanced Basic Studies Major consists of CBS 311-312-313, CBS 403-404, CBS 405-406-407, and CBS 409-410-411, plus a concentration of 18 quarter units in an upper level program approved by the adviser Not more than 36 credits from a single program can be counted toward a basic studies degree unless the student is completing a double major. Students seeking a double major may petition to the dean's office to waive the 36-credit limit Students interested in an Advanced Basic Studies major are urged to inquire at the Basic Studies College office. Humanities Maior Requirements for a major in humanities are 45 credits of upper level humani ties courses (400and 500-level), including HUM 591, and 9 credits in the creative or performing arts. A grr.duate program leading to a Master of Arts in Humanities Education is available; for requirements, see College of Educa tion. 1"'sic Physical Education The required program in Basic Physical Education is planned to build on the prior knowledge and experience of students. Those who have already obtained the necessary knowledge and all or part of the skills required may meet these requirements by proficiency examination or evidence of adequate prior expe rience. For others not so prepared, appropriate courses are offered. The Basic Physical Education requirement applies to all students under age 21 at first full-time U.S F. enrollment and consists of four courses These should include: ( 1) Functional Physical Education, (2) one aquatic activity, ( 3) one individual or dual activity, and ( 4) a fourth course elected from any activity area. Transfer students should contact the Division of Physical Education for program evaluation. Prior military service is not a substitute for the Physical Education requirement. Functional Physical Education (PEB 101) is a prerequisite to all courses except Beginning Swimming and must be taken through regular class enroll-

PAGE 67

66 COLLEGE OF BASIC STUDIES ment. This course may be taken during the first or second quarter of the freshman year, but must be taken during that year. Normally a student will register for one course during each of his first four quarters. Three of the requirements must be completed before a student can be admitted to an upper level college and the fourth before he attains senior status. Physical education proficiencies and enrollment in appropriate physical education courses will be determined individually for handicapped students by a joint decision of the student, Adaptives Coordinator, and the Director of the Student Health Center. The three required courses other than PEB 101 may be met by which ever of the following methods are deemed most suitable to the students and staff: 1. By proficiency examination Proficiency examinations may be attempted during the quarter a student takes PEB 101. There is no penalty for failing an examination. Examinations are not available for every activity listed in the curriculum. There are two parts to the proficiency examination: ( 1) a written test covering rules, history, strategy and basic fundamentals, and (2) a skill test in the chosen activity administered only to those who have successfully passed the written portion. The level of competency needed for successful completion of the written and skill tests is basically that of a student who has taken the course and received a grade of "B" or better. 2. By presenting evidence of adequate prior experience. If evidence presented indicates a high degree of skill in a designated area, the student is not re quired to take a proficiency examination. Current life saving certificates, membership on swimming teams, district, state or national ratings, estab lished handicaps, two high school or college varsity awards are examples of evidence necessary to meet a Basic Physical Education requirement by prior experience. 3. By enrolling in one aquatics activity, one individual or dual sport and one activity elected from any area and subsequently receiving a passing grade. No credit points are given for Basic Physical Education. For programs in Professional Physical Education, see the College of Education. Physical Education Building

PAGE 68

College of BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION The College of Business Administration offers courses of study leading to both undergraduate and graduate degrees. These programs are designed to prepare individuals for business and government careers, and graduate education. It is the philosophy of the College of Business Administration to devote its resources to the continued growth of high quality undergraduate and graduate programs The undergraduate curriculum leads to a Bachelor of Arts in one of the following five major fields: Accounting, Economics, Finance, Management, and Marketing. The undergraduate programs are structured to accomplish the following objectives: 1. To give the student a broad foundation in general and liberal education a thorough grounding in basic business courses, and some specific compe tence in at least one significant functional area of business. 2 To strengthen students' powers of imaginative thinking, creative independent analysis, and sensitiveness to social and ethical values. 3. To instill in each student a desire for learning that will continue after he has graduated and taken his place in the community 4. To convey to each student the spirit of pioneering risk taking and prog ress which are essential to the continued development of the free enterprise system. The graduate programs are structured to accomplish the following ob jectives: 1. To make professional education available to those qualified individuals who have selected specific career objectives in fields of business government or education 2. To support adequately the research activity so vitally necessary to maintain a quality graduate faculty and program. 3. To foster independent, innovative thinking and action as a professional individual. 67

PAGE 69

68 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Business Administration Building UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS A program of education for business leadership must be based on a foundation of comprehensive general education; consequently, most of this basic work must be taken prior to admission to the college. It should be further noted that approximately one half of the work leading to the bachelor's degree in business is required from academic areas outside of business. Upon application, students who have fulfilled the following requirements will be admitted to the College of Business Administration: 1. Successful completion of at least four of the eight lower level courses in the College of Basic Studies. 2. Satisfactory completion of the four required physical education compe tencies. 3 Completion of 81 or more credit hours with a grade point ratio of 2.0 or higher. 4 Satisfactory completion of the foundation courses Elementary Accounting (ACC 201-202-203) and Economic Principles (ECN 201-202). 5. Minimum of nine quarter hours of college mathematics. MTH 211, 212 213 (or equivalents) are strongly recommended. 6. Provisional admission is possible in some instances.

PAGE 70

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 69 Transfer Students From Junior Colleges: Junior college students should complete the program of general education as required by the junior college. Certification to this effect will be accepted as fufilling the general education requirements of the University of South Florida While completing the program of general educa tion students should also be aware of the upper level requirements of the College of Business Administration. Note tha t these requirements include two quarters of college mathematics and completion of courses in accounting and economics principles. Two semesters of each of the above courses should be included in the junior college parallel program to satisfy upper level require ments at this institution If scheduling permits, the student should also in clude a course in basic statistics. All transfer students, particularly those not pursuing the parallel program should note that a maximum of nine quarter hours will be allowed for courses taken during the first two years of junior college study which are available only as 300 and 400 level courses in the College of Business Administration at the University of South Florida. However, no more than five quarter hours may be transferred for credit in the student's major area. From Non-Junior Colleges: Students attending a four year college who wish to transfer after two years should follow a program in general education similar to that required at the University of South Florida. The prerequisite courses in business subjects of accounting principles, economics principles, and mathe matics should also be included in the first two years of study. Transfer credit will be allowed for all of the above courses. Any remaining courses after fulfilling the general education requirements and business prerequisites should be taken in such areas as mathematics, the natural sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities. Requirements for Graduation Gradu ation requirements are 180 quarter hours The breakdown of these 180 hours are 95 within the College of Business Administration and 85 hours outside the College of Business Administration further divided as follows: ( 1) 57 hours of Basic Studies. (2) 28 hours of general electives outside the College of Business. (3) 50 hours of Business Core which includes ACC 201-202-203; ECN 201-202, 301, 331; GBA 361; 499; FIN 301; MGT 301; MKT 301. ( 4) 27 hours in the major subject with a 2.0 grade point average in the major. (Accounting students also wishing to qualify as C.P.A.'s need additional courses; see under curricula and pro gram, Accounting). ( 5) 18 hours of Business Electives not in the student's major field.

PAGE 71

70 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CURRICULA AND PROGRAMS 1. ACCOUNTING Major Requirements: ACC 301 302, 303, 411, 421, 423 and three of the fol lowing: ACC 323, 401 402, 412, 422, 424, 425, 431. Students intending to take the C.P.A. Examination in Florida will need to take two courses in addition to those required for the major. Business Electives: GBA 362, 371 and 9 hours of other business courses. General Electives: These 28 hours must be taken outside the College of Busi ness Administration. It is strongly recommended that all accounting students take SPE 201. 2. ECONOMICS The Economics Department is committed to preparing the student, both major and non-major, with a strong background in the science of Economics. Proper investigation of any science entails a universal presentation of the analytical and factual material of the subject matter With this thought in mind, the subject matter is taught emphasizing a theoretical framework which will allow the individual student to identify and solve economic problems. Major Requir e ments: ECN 323, 401, and 17 hours of other Economics courses. Business Electives : 18 hours in the College of Business Administration. International Trade majors are required to take FIN 351 and 13 hours of other business courses. G eneral Electives: These 28 hours must be taken outside the College of Busi ness Administration. 3. FINANCE Major Requirements : FIN 321, 411, 421, and 15 hours of upper level finance courses to be selected in consultation with major adviser. With the written permission of the major adviser, a maximum of 8 hours of upper level courses in related fields in the College of Business Administration may be substituted in satisfaction of finance electives Business Electives: Eighteen hours in the College of Business Administration, which must include ECN 323. 4. MANAGEMENT Major R eq uirem ents: All majors take 18 common hours MGT 311, 321, 331, 341, 421, 431. Each major elects 9 additional hours from one of three options: Behavioral Science-MGT, 451, 453, 489. Industrial Relations-MGT 461, 463, 465. Management Science-MGT 471, 472, 473 Business El ectives: 18 hours of courses in College of Business Administration to be selected in consultation with assigned major adviser. Strongly recom mended is GBA 351. Other recommendations, depending upon option, are: FIN 411, 421; ACC 421, 422, 305, 425; MKT 413, 315, 411; GBA 371; ECN 431, 311, 313, 411.

PAGE 72

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 71 Gen eral Elec t iv es: 28 hours outside the College of Business Administration Strongly recommended are MTH 211, 212, 213. It is recommended that other selections be made from Psychology, Sociology, Speech, Political Sci ence, Engineering in consultation with major adviser. 5. MARKETING Ma;or R e quir e m ents : 27 hours MKT 312 315, 411, 413, 415, 419 and 3 other marketing courses as selected in consultation with major adviser from MKT 311, 316, 403, 405, 407 409, 414, and 489. Busi nes s Electiv es: 18 hours of courses in the College of Business Adminis tration to be selected in consultation with major adviser. Suggested selec tions from: GBA 351, 371, 362; MGT 311 321, 341 ; FIN 411, 421; ACC 421, 422, 305; ECN 351, 431, 437. General Electiv es : 28 hours outside the College of Business Administration It is recommended that marketing students select from courses in: Psy chology, Sociology Speech English, Engineering in consultation with their marketing adviser Strongl y recommended are MTH 211, 212, 213. Courses of study will continue to be offered in Office to satisfy require ments of those students previously admitted to the Office Administration program and those majoring in Business Teacher Education GRADUATE ADMISSION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Courses are offered in the College of Business Administration leading to the degree of Master of Business Administration and Master of Business Adminis tration with specializ a tion in accounting. Students should consult the graduate study section of this catalog for information on the requirements for admission to graduate study The College of Business Administration will generally follow the same standards. There is no requirement for a full time registration on campus for these degrees, but the student should consult the gradu a te adviser before registering for graduate courses. The Master of Business Administration Program Students applying for admission will have diverse backgrounds Students with undergraduate majors other than business administration can be accepted into the M.B.A. program by taking certain business foundation courses which prepare them for graduate level courses. These 24 quarter-hours include the following courses: Accounting 501 502; Economics 501, 502 503; Finance 501; Marketing 501 ; and Management 501. 500 level courses may not be included in the 54 hour requirement leading to the M.B.A The program requires that the student satisfactorily complete a total of 54 quarter hours including : Accounting 601, 602; Economics 601 603, 604, 605, 607, 608; Finance 601, 602; Marketing 601, 603 ; Management 601, 603 615; and General Business Administration 601, 699. The 54 quarter hour program is to be completed with an overall "B"

PAGE 73

72 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION average ( 3.0 grade point ratio). In addition, a written and oral examination will be given near the end of the last quarter of work, on which the student must give a satisfactory performance. In addition, a comprehensive written and oral examination will be given after the course work has been completed. The student must give a satis factory performance on this examination The Master of Business Administration Program with Specialization in Accounting It is contemplated that students applying for admission to this program will have a baccalaureate in Business Administration which includes a minimum of 36 quarter hours credit in Accounting. Students applying for admission who do not meet these prerequisites will be required to take additional courses. The number of additional courses deemed necessary will depend on the academic background of the individual students, and may vary from 27 quarter hours for a non-accounting business major to 61 quarter hours for a non-business major. The program requires that the student satisfactorily complete a total of 48 hours including: ECN 601 603, 605, 607; FIN 601 ; GEA 601; account ing concentration including ACC 605, 607, 609, 611, 621, 623; one senior level accounting course; and, nine quarter hours of electives to be selected by the student in consultation with his adviser. The 48 quarter hour program is to be completed with an overall "B'' average ( 3.0 grade point ratio). In addition, a written and oral examination will be given near the end of the last quarter of work on which the student must give a satisfactory performance. In addition, a comprehensive written and oral examination will be given after the course work has been completed. The student must give a satis factory performance on this examination. Physics Building

PAGE 74

College of EDUCATION The College of Education places an emphasis on each student learning what is relevant for the world of today and on his getting deeply involved in his own educational process. Thus, the emphasis is on the student learning to do his own thinking about himself and his universe. The College of Education is committed to a continuous and systematic examination of the professional program of teacher education. Promising pro grams are examined experimentally under controlled conditions, which make possible an objective appraisal of effects in terms of learning outcomes The University of South Florida follows a University-wide approach to teacher education. Its programs for the preparation of teachers represent co operative effort in planning and practice by faculties of all academic areas, coordinated through the University Council on Teacher Education. Courses needed by teacher candidates but designed also for other students are offered outside the College of Education. Courses in the University which are primar ily designed for teacher candidates are taught by the College of Education. In the total teacher education program there is a special concern for de veloping in the student a deep interest in intellectual inquiry and the ability to inspire this interest in others. It is the task of the College of Education to give leadership to the instruction in subject matter and process, which means the total teacher education program. BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE PROGRAM The undergraduate teacher education program leads to the Bachelor of Arts Degree. It is an upper division program Admission Requirements While each student admitted to the University is expected to have the quali fications to graduate, this does not necessarily mean that he has the qualifica tions to become a teacher. Prospective secondary and K-12 teachers are enrolled in teacher edu cation programs involving both the College of Education and the College of Liberal Arts. 73

PAGE 75

7 4 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Admission to the upper level teacher education program is contingent upon meeting the followmg minimum requirements: 1. Completion of the majority of Basic Studies 2. Completion of 7 5 quarter hours 3. An overall grade point ratio of 2.0 4. Additional criteria at the discretion of the admissions and selections committee (i.e. medical center, student affairs, speech and hearing clinic, etc.) The student should initiate his application with the College of Education Central Advising Office (EDU 112) at the latest by the second week of the quarter in which he is eligible to be admitted. Acceptance and retention in the program is an on-going and cumulative process which continues through the supervised teaching experience Admission to Supervised Teaching Experience One full quarter of observation and supervised teaching in elementary or secondary schools is required. In certain specialized subject areas (i.e., Business Education, Special Education, Distributive Education) the student teaching-seminar experience may vary Special requirements for enrollment in the supervised teaching and seminar courses are: 1. Admission to the teacher education program. 2. Completion of an application for supervised teaching 3 An overall 2.0 grade point ratio 4. a 2.0 grade point average in the professional education sequence, 5. completion of at least two-thirds of teaching specialization with a mini mum of 2.0 grade point ratio. Application for student teaching should be made two quarters prior to term in which experience is desired. Forms may be obtained in student teaching office Students planning to enroll in the Cooperative Elementary Teacher Preparation Program should refer to statements on internship included under Teacher Education Curricula and Programs on page 76. College of Educotion Building

PAGE 76

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 75 College Requirements for Graduation A student to be certified by the College of Education as having com pleted its requirements must have earned 180 credit hours with a minimum overall grade point ratio of 2 0 An average of 2.0 or better also must be made in the student's professional education sequence and in his teaching specialization courses. Satisfactory completion of supervised teaching is required. A student must also have completed the major requirements in an approved teaching program (which includes general preparation, teaching specialization, and professional preparation) and passed the senior seminar in the College of Basic Studies. A minimum of 12 credits in professional courses and 18 credits in specialization courses must have been earned in residence. The student must complete a minimum of 45 hours after admittance to an upper level program. SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS A minimum of 180 quarter hours including : General Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . 56 or 57 quarter hours Professional Education Core . . . . . . . . . . 36 quarter hours Teaching Specialization . . . . . . . . . 46 to 73 quarter hours Recommendation for Florida Certification The dean of the College of Education has the responsibility of recommending for Florida state teacher certification any applicant who graduates from the University of South Florida. The decision on whether to make the recommen dation will be on the basis of the applicant's character academic proficiency, commitment to teaching emotional stability personal and social qualities, and his demonstrated teaching ability during the internship period. Before recommending teacher certfication, the dean will consult with various faculty members who have taught the student at the University. NON-DEGREE STUDENTS SEEKING CERTIFICATION A person who has previously earned a bachelor's degree and has a desire to satisfy teaching requirements may enroll in courses in which he has met the course prerequisite. A holder of a bachelor's degree wishing to enroll in EDC 498 and 499 should file an intent to student teach with the College of Education Central Advising Office Approval of the application by the Selections Committee of the College of Education and satisfactory completion of 12 quarter hours of course work in residence are prerequisite to registration in EDC 498 and 499 by students in this non-degree seeking category. All students who have a total of 135 hours or above should register with Placement Services.

PAGE 77

76 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION TEACHER EDUCATION CURRICULA AND PROGRAMS There are three distinct areas in the teacher education program, and all teacher candidates must meet certain minimum requirements in each. The three areas and their requirements are as follows: 1. General Preparation (56 or 57 quarter hours) Students majoring in Elementary Education, Elementary-Early Childhood, Elementary-Library Audio / Visual, or Mental Retardation must take CBS 101-102, CBS 201-202-203, CBS 109-110; CBS 301-302-303-304, any three of CBS 305-306-307-308, CBS 401, and either CBS 205-206-207 or CBS 208-209-210. They must also take PEB 101 and three additional quarter hours in Physical Education, at least one of which is to be in aquatic sports, (PEB 130-149). H substitutions are made, they must be part of a planned program Stu dents in Education programs other than those listed above have the same general preparation requirements, except they have the option of sub stituting nine quarter hours of a foreign language or a second CBS Science sequence, for CBS 109-110 2. Professional Education Core The required courses in the professional education core are EDF 305 EDF 307, EDC 401 EDC 498, EDC 499 or the appropriate intern course described in the catalog, plus the Methods course ( s), appropriate to the student's specialization and an additional four quarter hours of approved edu cation credits. Some of the areas in which they might profitabily elect courses are: Guidance, Special Education, Tests and Measurements, Princi ples of Leaming, Philosophy of Education, and Comparative Education 3. Teaching Specialization Preparation (up to 73 credits) Course requirements in the area of teaching specialization vary according to subject The different specialization requirements are listed on -the fol lowing pages. A. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Students may pursue a program of elementary teacher preparation which provides continuous daily laboratory experiences in the local schools. Students electing this program must arrange to spend a minimum of two hours daily working in a variety of classroom situations with the local school instructional personnel. Internship credit is earned for this field experience which extends over a period of five quarters. The continuous field experience is in lieu of the full quarter of internship and related laboratory aide assignments.

PAGE 78

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 77 (1) Elementary Specialization The major consists of an elementary specialization sequence and a subject concentration sequence. The 45 hours of elementary specialization courses include EDE 409, 411, 413, 415, 417, 419, 421, 423, 424, 425 440. A teaching concentration is chosen by elementary education specialist with the assistance of an adviser. This should include a minimum of 27 credit hours in a subject taught in the elementary school. With careful planning, the student may receive dua l certification in elementary education or a secondary education field (2) Elementary-Early Childhood Student interested in early-childhood teaching which includes pre-school and grades 1-3 should pursue a program leading to certification both in early childhood and elementary education. This program includes 46 hours of course work as follows: EDE 409, 413, 415, 417, 419, 425, 426, 431, 433, 529, 531. Students who desire to add early-childhood specialization to an existing major in elementary education may complete a planned program in consul tation with their adviser. (3) Elementary-Library-Audio Visual Information on course work leading to dual certification in elementary and library education-audio visual education is given in Section B-3. B. KINDERGARTEN THROUGH TWELFTH GRADE Candidates meet teaching requirements for all grade levels from kinder garten through the senior year of high school. (1) Art Education Required courses are ART 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, 411 421, 431, 441, 451, 476; EDA 377, 379, 441, and 498; FNA 543, 553. Six hours of music, theatre, or dance Six hours of electives in Art History, and nine hours of electives in Art Studio. (2) Physical Education A two year program is offered at the junior and senior year level for prospective physical educators. Students may only enter this program in the first quarter of each school year. All interested students should request a detailed description of this program to avoid complicating de"lays in their educational plans Direct requests to: Coordinator Professional Physical Education Program College of Education The following courses constitute the program of study: EDP 255, 311, 321, 331, 312, 322, 332, 314, 365, 411, 421, 431, 412, 422, and 432. An elective concentration of courses in the coaching of athletics is open

PAGE 79

78 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION to students from all areas of study, including physical education Required courses in this concentration are EDP 558 and 459 Electives may be selected from the following: EDP 469 479 489 468, 478 and 488. (3) Library and Audio-Visual Education (Learning Resources) Dual certification in Elementary Education and in Library Education. Requirements include the professional core, the Element a ry Education Pro gram and a total of 36 quarter hours in Library Education / Audio-Visual courses. The required EDL courses meet Rank III certification in library and audio-visual service These courses are EDE 413, EDL 411, 412, 419 513, 514, 515, 517, 518 and 524 Electives may be chosen with the consent of the adviser (4) Special Education MENTAL RETARDATION Students are prepared to become teachers of the mentally retarded. Thirty-two credit hours are required in the major area of specialization -either EDS 211 or 311, 312, 322 423 I & II or 424 529, 531, and EDF 303 In addition 37 hours are required in the area of Special Preparation for Elementary Teachers-Aesthetic and Recreational Learnings ( 13 hours), Communication Arts ( 9 hours), and Environmental Concepts and Under standings ( 15 hours). SPEECH PATHOLOGY Prepares professionals to work with speech, language and hearing im paired children and adults. A five-year program terminating in an M.A. degree in Special Education : Speech Pathology The following courses, or their equivalents constitute the course of study-EDS 311, 322, 611, 699 and / or 579 479, 531 or PSY 431. SAi 371, 471 571, 572, 573 574 575, 576, 577, 578, 579 or 675, 580 598, 683; SPE 411, 503 611; EDF 305, 307 ; EDC 401, 498; EDE 531: SSI 301; PSY 335; and the Process Core for the M .A. in Education. Supervised clinical work in school environments is done in EDS 479 and 579. Completion of requirements for the master's degree is required prior to certification for employment in the schools (5) Music Education Programs in both instrumental and vocal music are offered. It is strongly advised that students elect a core in other relevant areas such as humanities. theatre arts, and art. Instrumental music students must take MUS 212-213-214, 312-313-314, 412-413-414, two each of the following outside the family of the student's major instrument : MUS 215 245 255 265; 18 credits ( 12 intermediate level 6 advanced level) of study on the major instrument and ensemble

PAGE 80

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 79 Three credits each in theatre arts, visual arts, and dance courses and FNA 543 553 ; and ensemble. Vocal music students must take MUS 212-213-214, 312-313-314, 412413-414, 225, 335, 535; three credits each in theatre arts, visual arts, and dance courses and FNA 543, 553; EDM 435, 437, 439; and ensemble Special requirements: Placement examinatiqns are required of all new registrants in musical styles (theory and history), and for admission to 300-level courses in applied music, (completion of the examinations is re quired before registration in music courses can be permitted); successful completion of the piano proficiency requirement as defined by the music faculty before admittance to upper level; participation in ensemble, excluding only the internship quarter; the presentation of a one-half recital in the major performing medium during the senior year; attendance at required recitals as scheduled. Electives are to be taken outside Music and College of Education. C. SECONDARY EDUCATION Candidates are required to meet specialization requirements in broad subject fields or in subject combinations. It is also possible for prospective secondary school teachers to add -elementary school certification by following an approved program. The secondary school specialization requirements can be satisfied in more than 15 subject areas in six broad fields. (1} English and English Related Programs ENGLISH EDUCATION ENG 201, 202, 203, 305, 306 307, 321, 411 517, ENG 335 or CLS 351, SPE 201 and 321, JNM 341 and 342, and 12 hours chosen from JNM 347, TAR 303, or any 500 English course and EDR 509, EDT 531 or EDL 518. ENGLISH EDUCATION-SPEECH ENG 201, 203, 305 or 306 307, 335, 411 517 321, and SPE 201, 203, 321 361 or 365, 491 492, TAR 303 and 2 upper division Speech courses, and EDC 515. ENGLISH EDUCATION-JOURNALISM ENG 201, 202 203, 305 or 306 307, 335, 411 517, a 500 English elective, SPE 201 and 321 and JNM 341, 342, 343 or 349, and 347 and EDT 463. ENGLISH EDUCATION-FOREIGN LANGUAGE ENG 201, 203, 305 or 306 307 321, 335, 411 517 and SPE 201 and 36 hours in a language above the basic courses and including 301, 303, 305, 307 19 hours of advanced work in that language, and EDX 449 SPE 321 is a recommended elective.

PAGE 81

-..... 80 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION ENGLISH EDUCATION-LIBRARY ENG 201, 203, 305 or 306, 307, 321 335, 411, 517 SPE 201, and EDL 411, 412, 419, 513, 515, 517, 518, and one elective in Library Science and EDE 413. ENGLISH EDUCATION-LATIN ENG 201, 202, 203, 305, or 306, 307, 321, 411, 517 and SPE 201 and CLS 301, 302, 303, 401, 402, 403, 411, 412, 413, 517, 571 and EDX 465. (2) Foreign Languages TWO FOREIGN LANGUAGES Requires basic studies language requirements or their equivalent. In the major language (French German, Italian, Russian, or Spanish), the student must earn an additional 35 credit hours, and in the second language an additional 26 credit hours. The required courses are numbered 301, 303, 305, 306, and 307 (prefix determined by the particular language involved), plus 18 credit hours of advanced work in the major language and f) credit hours work in the second language in courses selected with the adviser. With permission of the Dean and after consultation with the adviser, a student may elect a single foreign language major Forty-seven hours must be earned in the language beyond the basic studies requirements. Among these 47 credit hours must be the following : FRENCH: FRE 301, 303, 305, 306, 307, 521, 522, and 523. GERMAN : GER 301, 303, 305, 306, 307 513 or 514, and 521. SPANISH: SPA 301, 303, 305, 306 307, 561, 562 or 563, 523, 526 542, and 543. In addition, 12 credit hours of work must be completed in language courses selected with the adviser. LATIN-MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGE Requires 39 credit hours in Latin above the 200 level, and 27 credit hours in the modem foreign language The Latin requirements are: CLS 301, 302, 303, 371, 401-402-403, 411-412-413, 517 571. The modem foreign language requirements are the courses numbered 301, 303, 305, 306, and 307 (Prefix to be determined by language selected), plus 10 credit hours of work in the modem foreign language in courses selected with language adviser. In order to be certified to teach both Latin and the modem foreign language, the student must take both EDX 449 and EDX 465. (3) Mathematics or Science To teach at the secondary level the minimum requirements of the divisional major must be met. Major requirements in the Division of Natural Sciences are a minimum of 36 quarter hours in the discipline of major concentration and a minimum of 24 quarter hours in the division outside that discipline. These latter 24 hours must be approved by the student's

PAGE 82

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 81 adviser and must include a minimum of three quarter hours at the 300 level or above. (Total program: 60 hours ) Concentrations are possible in biology, chemistry, mathematics or physics. A major in biology, chemistry, mathe matics or physics will be accepted in lieu of the divisional major. MTH 423 and 424 are required of all prospective mathematics teachers. EDN 425 is recommended for all prospective physical science teachers, and EDN 427 is recommended for prospective biology teachers. (4) Social Science To teach at the secondary level the minimum requirements of a Social Science divisional major must be met. The Social Science divisional major requires 64 credits in the division with at least 40 credits being upper level. A teaching major requires 24 credits in one discipline within an ap proved program that includes courses in at least four disciplines. Teaching majors are offered in History, Geography and Political Science. With special permission individual teaching majors may be planned in Anthropology Economics Geography, History, Political Science and Sociology The student must meet the subject-area requirements of the major in the College of Liberal Arts in addition to the Florida Teacher Certification requirements. (5) Individual Majors With special permission of the dean of the College of Education, indi vidual teaching majors may be planned in one or more teaching subjects to satisfy the specialization requirements When this permission has been granted, the student must meet the subject-area requirements of the major in the College of Liberal Arts in addition to the Florida Teacher Certification requirements. D. VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION Candidates planning to teach in county-wide adult and secondary education programs, junior college associate of arts and area vocational schools continuing education centers, model cities programs, and other vocational, adult and technical schools may pursue one or more of the following specializations: (1) Adult Education Master of Arts degree program only (2) Business Education Requirements include ACC 201, 202, 203 ECN 201, 202 GBA 361 and 371. Also OAD 141, 142, 143, 251, 252, 253 351, 361, and 461. OAD 251 and 253 may be replaced with special permission by electives in general education or liberal arts (e.g., Speech, Introduction to Teaching). A second special methods course is also required in the professional edu cation sequence.

PAGE 83

82 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION (3) Distributive Education To qualify to teach in the area of Distributive Education, students must take 62 hours of course work. They must take 32 hours of business administration courses including ACC 201-202-203; ECN 201-202; and MKT 301. The remaining 30 hours will be in Distributive Education and approved selectives, and must include EDY 407, EDY 506, and EDF 303 or ECN 331. In addition, they must fulfill the state requirement of two years of distributive on-the-job work experience or complete 2100 hours of acceptable training EDY 431 Supervised Field Experience: Distributive Education and Cooperative Education training experience are offered as suggested avenues to meet this requirement. (Acceptability of work experience will be determined by the Adult and Vocational staff at the University of South Florida). (4) Industrial Education-(TBA) (5) Technical Education-(TBA) Master of Arts Degree Program Plan I A program of graduate studies designed for those with appropriate certification who desire to increase their competence in a subject speciaHza tion or secure training in one of the special service areas of education. Plan II A program of graduate studies designed for the holder of a non education baccalaureate who desires to meet initial certification requirements as part of a planned program leading to the master of arts degree (This program is not available in the area of elementary education.) Qualified persons may pursue graduate study in the following majors: Art Education Library and Audio Visual Distributive Education Mathematics Education Elementary Education Music Education English Education Reading Education French Education Science Education Guidance Socia'! Science Education Humanities Education Spanish Education Special Education with programs Emotionally Disturbed Gifted Mental Retardation in: Potentially Handicapped-N-3 Speech and Hearing

PAGE 84

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 83 Junior College Teaching Astronomy Biology Chemistry English French Geography Geology Humanities Mathematics Music Physics Psychology Sociology Spanish Speech Visual Arts Additional programs for Junior College teachers will be added to those listed as other instructional division of the University are approved to offer the master's degree. General University rules for graduate study may be found in the Graduate Study section of the catalog. Vocational and Adult Education Adult Distributive Technical Business Industrial Program Description Master of arts degree programs consist of a minimum of 45 quarter hours, at least half of the program must be at the 600 level. Most specializa tion areas include the option of a thesis of three to six credit hours. During the last term of enrollment, prior to completion of degree re quirements, the candidate must perform satisfactorily on a comprehensive examination. Elementary Education This program is a 45 quarter hour sequence, at m1mmum, requiring full certification as an elementary teacher for admission. There are four components of the program: 1. PROCESS CORE (16 hours) Students will take a minimum of one process core course prior to the 12-hour level. All students will be required to take EDF 607, Foundations of Educational Research, as part of their graduate program. Competencies indicated by undergraduate background and qualification tests prior to ad mission will determine waiver of, or enrollment in: (a) EDF 605, Foundations of Measurement (b) EDF 611, Psychological Foundations of Education; or EDF 613 Principles of Leaming (c) EDF 621, Socio-Economic Foundations of Education; or EDF 623, History of Education; or EDF 625 Philosophy of Education 2. EDE 603, SEMINAR IN CURRICULUM RESEARCH (4 hours) 3. LIBERAL STUDIES (0-9 hours) For the purpose of broadening and enriching the total education experience of the student, selected courses may be taken outside the process core and the specialization area

PAGE 85

84 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 4. SPECIALIZATION (27 hours minimum) Students pursuing the master's degree in elementary education are required to present credit in the following courses: EDE 603 609, and 613. (a) Elementary Curriculum Emphasis: Course work should be selected from EDE 6U, 615 617, 619 and 621 Additional work is avail able through consent of the adviser as part of a planned program (b) Reading Emphasis: Three courses from EDR 530, EDE 611, EDR 631, EDR 632, and EDL 518 or EDL 605 are required. (c) Supervision Emphasis: EDC 661 671 and EDE 641 are required. (d) Early Childhood: Individually planned program to include EDE 527, 529, 531, 539. Secondary and K-12 Program-Plan (for the teacher fully certified in an appropriate field ) 1. PROCESS CORE (16 hours) Students will take a minimum of one process core course prior to the 12-hour level. All students will be required to take EDF 607 Foundations of Educational Research, as part of their graduate program Competencies indicated by their undergraduate background and qualification tests prior to admission will determine waiver of, or enrollment in : (a) EDF 605, Foundations of Measurement (b) EDF 611, Psychological Foundations of Education; or EDF 613, Principles of Leaming (c) EDF 621, Socio-Economic Foundations of Education ; or EDF 623, History of Education; or EDF 625 Philosophy of Education 2. CURRENT TRENDS COURSE IN TEACHING SPECIALIZATION (4 hours) 3. SPECIALIZATION (27 hours minimum) A. Secondary Fields (1) ENGLISH EDUCATION This program is a 52 hour program; the first exemption qualified for in the Process Core (above) may reduce the number of required hours to 48 The students must score at least 500 on the Verbal Aptitude sec tion of the GRE or 550 on the Advanced Literature test of the GRE. PLAN I-Required for admission : A Bachelor's degree in English Education from a recognized institution, or Rank III certification in English from the State of Florida or its equivalent Students who hold a Bachelor's degree and meet the minimum standards for Rank III certification in English but not in Education may enroll in the program as a non-degree seeking Graduate student complete requirements for certification and subsequently use not more than 12 quarter hours of relevant work toward completing the Education requirements for this degree. Requires at least 32 hours of English as outlined below

PAGE 86

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 85 PLAN II-Required for admission: A Bachelor's degree in English from a recognized Liberal Arts institution of higher learning. Requires at least 28 hours of English as outlined below. Course Sequence: Required of all students: ENG. 623 (to be taken within the first 12 hours of English work) 1 course in ENG 683 and ENG 515, 517 and 531 (unless an equivalent undergraduate course is offered for admission) Remaining courses must be equally divided between the two groups below, with at least half the work done at the 600 level. Group 1-ENG 518 or 535, 501, 502, 503, 505, 507, 519, 520, 521, 559, 655, 657 and 659. Group II-ENG 513, 523, 527, 528, 667, 695, 615, and 687. (2) HUMANITIES EDUCATION A teaching certificate in fine arts, language, literature, music, or in special cases in a related subject is required for admission. The program in Humanities consists of 27-45 quarter hours selected from the following with the advice of the adviser in the field of specialization: HUM 535, 536, 537, 539, 540, 541, 542, 543, 545, 581, 611, 623, 681, 683, 691. The last is required. Up to nine hours may be substituted for the above from courses outside of Humanities with the consent of the adviser in Humanities. (3) MATHEMATICS EDUCATION Before the 12-hour level the student must demonstrate to the chair man of the Mathematics Department that he has the competence in Mathe matics to undertake the program. A maximum of nine quarter hours may be taken from MTH 405, 406, 407, 409, 421, and 422. Any 500-level MTH courses and any other 600-level MTH courses may be included in the planned program. (4) SCIENCE EDUCATION Biology-Before admission to the degree program, the student must have had the equivalent of the following undergraduate courses: BIO 201, 202, 203, and 331-332, twelve additional quarter hours in biology, and CHM 211, 212, 303, and 321. A minimum of 27 quarter hours will be taken from the following: ZOO 313 or 516, BOT 311, BOT 421, ZOO 311 or 312, l}IO 415 or 351, BIO 445 or 565. CHM 551 may be substituted for any of these areas. Chemistry-Before admission to the degree program, the student must demonstrate to the Chemistry Department that he has the competence to undertake the program. Before a degree is conferred a student must pass an examination given by the chemistry staff in inorganic, organic, analytical, and physical chemistry Specialization in chemistry shall consist of at least 27 quarter hours. Physics-Before admission to the degree program the student must satisfy the chairman of the Physics Department that he has the competence in physics to undertake the proposed program. He will take 27 or more credits approved by his adviser from the following courses, not more than

PAGE 87

86 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 13 credits of which may be from courses numbered below 500. Students who can satisfy the chairman by transcript or examination that they have had 42 or more credits from the courses listed below may take a minimum of 18 credits in physics and devote the remaining nine or more to other fields. PHY 305, 307, 309, 331, 341, 405, 407, 421, 437, 481, 501, 507, 509, 523 and 551. Any 600-level course in physics may be substituted for any course above. (5) SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION Each program is individually designed in consultation with the adviser. Not more than one-half of the specialization (exclusive of thesis credit) may be in any one social science discipline or program. 8. K-12 Certification Areas (1) ART EDUCATION (a) Art Education: a minimum of eight credit hours from EDA 660, 661, and 682. (b) Art Studio: a minimum of 12 credit hours. (c) Art History: A minimum of three credit hours (2) GUIDANCE The guidance program typically requires twelve credits from the Process Core including EDF 605, EDF 607, and one of the following: EDF 621, 623, or 625. Additional course requirements depend upon the major concentration in either elementary school guidance or in secondary school guidance. Elementary School Guidance Specialization requirements total 34 credits and include EDG 581, 603, 607, 611, 613, 617, 621, 625, 633. Requirements in related fields total 32-33 credits and include PSY 433, EDE 527, EDF 613, SOC 535, SOC 651, either SOC 543 or 641, EDE 609, and EDS 610. Secondary School Guidance Requirements in Specialization and related courses total 34 credits and include EDG 581, 603, 607, 611, 619, 623, 627, 633, PSY 433, EDF 613, and an approved elective. Plan II is available in both specializations and requires EDC 501 and EDG 691 in addition to minimum requirements. (3) LIBRARY/ AUDIO-VISUAL EDUCATION In consultation with the graduate adviser, a program will be planned which may include a minimum of 45 hours of undergraduate and graduate credit in library and audio-visual service which meets Rank II state certification requirements. The individual who has no background in the field normally will need to take one or more prerequisite courses which may not apply to the MA degree program. Required courses for all students

PAGE 88

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 87 are EDL 513, 515, 517, 518, 523, 600, 601, and 612. EDL 600 and 612 are foundations and administration courses which should be taken at the beginning of the program Library specialists should also take 611. EDL 605 is required of all students who have not had EDE 413 within the past ten years. Additional courses for audio-visual specialists are EDL 508, 607, 621, 623 and 629. Electives for all students may be chosen from the five audio-visual courses listed in the preceding sentences as well as from EDL 514, 524, 603, 605, 609, 615, 625 and 681. (4) MUSIC EDUCATION Programs in both instrumental and vocal music are offered. At least 27 hours are taken in one of these areas. A placement examination is re quired of all new registrants in musical styles. Each candidate must meet the undergraduate level of piano proficien cy before the quarter in which he expects to graduate. Participation in ensembles is required for at least three quarters. Two plans are available to the candidate: 45 hours plus thesis or recital, or 54 hours without thesis or recital. Vocal Ma;ors: 7 to 14 credits in music education, including EDM 601, 635, and 614; 4 to 8 credits in music literature, including MUS 603; at least 4 credits in music theory; and at least 4 credits in applied music: Instrum e ntal Ma;ors: 7 to 14 credits in music education including EDM 601, 617 and 633; 4 to 8 credits in music literature, including MUS 601; at least 4 credits in music theory; and at least four credits in applied music. (5) READING EDUCATION The Reading Education program requires 8-16 hours from the Process Core. Candidate must have teaching certificate and three years teaching experience in classroom or reading clinic. Specialization in Reading Education shall include a minimum of 36 hours, including EDE 609 or EDR 509, EDR 631, 632 633, 634, 635, EDF 605, 617 and EDL 518 (candidates who have had a children's literature course at either graduate or undergraduate level may take an elective in lieu of EDL 518). Electives may be chosen from the following courses: ENG 517, EDE 611 EDE 531, EDS 571, EDS 574, EDS 676, EDC 661, PSY 613. (6) SPECIAL EDUCATION The Emotionally Disturbed The basic intent of the program is to train educators for emotionally disturbed children. This training prepares teacher-consultants who can func tion in public private or residential schools. Necessary conditions for admission beyond the requirements of the College of Education are that students must have a teaching certificate and have successfully taught a minimum of one year. Of the 48 credit hours needed for graduation, a minimum of 30 credit hours are allocated to the area of specialization The equivalent of EDS 531 610, 611 632, 633 and 639 are required of all students. Additional courses and electives are jointly planned by the student and his adviser.

PAGE 89

88 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION The Gifted The gifted child program includes both one year and two year graduate level programs. The purpose is to train an individual to identify and pre scribe curricular adaptation for gifted children. The course of study provides the student with basic information concerning gifted children, their psy chology and needs, as well as builds an area of liberal arts competence in one or two areas. Plan I Through a Plan I type of program an experienced, certified teacher can anticipate preparing for teacher-consultant roles in the area of the gifted in four quarters. A minimum of 28 credit hours in the area of specialization is required. Included among the courses usually required are EDS 531, 541, 550, 551, 559, 610, 611. An individually tailored, Liberal Arts sequence of from 14 to 28 quarter hours is also a requirement of the program. Plan II An individual with a Liberal Arts undergraduate major may prepare as a teacher-consultant of the gifted through Plan II. The student will be expected to take a minimum of 28 quarter hours in the area of specialization. In consultation with his adviser, he will choose from the following: EDS 531, 541, 550, 551, 559, 611, 610; EDR 631, 632; EDT 631; EDN 637, 639, 641; EDE 611, 613, 615, 617, 619; EDW 643. An individually tailored Liberal Arts sequence of from eight to 24 hours is also a requirement of the program. Mental Retardation Advance preparation for the purpose of becoming a better teacher of the mentally retarded or for becoming a supervisor of teachers of the re tarded is provided in the course of study. A minimum of 30 credit hours is selected from Special Education courses with an emphasis on mental retardation-EDS 529, 541, 611, 612, 613, 620, 621, 622, 631, 699. EDS 620, 621, and 622 are required of all students in the program. The Potentially Handicapped: Grades N-3 Plan I The courses of study is designed to prepare experienced teachers to teach young children who seem likely candidates for future Special Edu cation services. (This program was formerly titled "Varying Exceptionalities".) Early attention by these professionals to the prevention and the amelioration of handicapping conditions permit many children to later perform satis factorily in regular educational programs. Those children who need special services immediately can be identified and provided such services earlier than otherwise.

PAGE 90

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 89 A minimum of 28 quarter hours in the area of specialization is requisite to suc c essful c ompletion of the Pl an I program for teachers of the Potentially Handicapped The individualized program will indude courses to be taken from the following: EDS 541 610, 611, 622, 632 649 675; EDE 527, 529, 530, 531, 609 ; EDR 530 ; EDC 510 Plan II Individuals with a non-education baccalaureate can prepare for the teaching of Potentially Handicapped children through Plan II. Ordinarily, it will take more than one academic year to complete the program The individually tailored program will consist of a minimum of 28 quarter hours in the area of specialization-EDS 541, 610, 611, 622, 632, 649, 676 ; EDE 413, 415 426, 527, 529, 530, 531, 609; 617, 619; EDC 510 ; EDR 530 Speech Pathology A five-year program terminating in an M .A. in Special Education: Speech Pathology is available to undergraduate students. It is described on page 78. Students who already have a baccalaureate degree in Speech Pathology or a related area (such as Speech, English, Psychology, Education, Nursing, and others) are encouraged to enter the graduate program in Speech Pathology. They must take the requirements of the fifth year of the Speech Pathology sequence. The prerequisites to the courses in the fifth year may be waived by demonstration of proficiency or by electing suitable substitutes Requirements of the fifth year are EDS 531 or PSY 431 ; EDS 611, 699 or 579; SAI 576, 577, 578, 579, 580 and the Process Core for the M.A. in education In addition, three to six hours must be taken in SAI 698 : Practicum in Speech Pathology Planning of such a graduate program must be approved by a speech pathology adviser. C. Vocational and Adult This program consists of a 48 hours sequence with four components for teachers (non-teachers or teachers from other than Adult and Vocational areas must follow Plan II, taking EDC 501 and an internship of 8-15 hours). 1. PROCESS CORE (4-16 hours) Students will take a minimum of one process core course prior to the 12-hour level. All students will be required to take EDF 607, Foundations of Educational Research as part of their graduate program. Competencies indicated by their undergraduate background and qualification tests prior to admission will determine waiver of or enrollment in : (a) EDF 605, Foundations of Measurement (b) EDF 611, Psychological Foundations of Education; or EDF 613, Principles of Learning ( c) EDF 621, Socio-Economic Foundations of Education; or EDF 623, History of Education; or EDF 625, Philosophy of Education.

PAGE 91

90 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 2. CURRENT TRENDS IN TEACHING SPECIALIZATION (4 hours) 3. SPECIALIZATION (25 hours minimum, and may be as much as 48 hours) 4. RELATED ELECTIVES (0-16 hours) A. Adult Education In consultation with the graduate advisor, a program will be planned which will include a minimum of 45 hours of undergraduate and graduate credit in a basic teaching specialization, thereby meeting the State certification requirements for that field Found required courses will be determined with all students from: EDU 445, 507, 511, 621, 631, 687. The process core of twelve credits or exemption by examination is common to all Vocational and Adult master's candidate programs Requirements in a related area may include a concentration of courses in one of : psychology, sociology, guidance, administration, complementary basic or a vocational field. Plan II is available il_1 this specialization and requirements include an internship and a curriculum course. 8. Business Education ( 1) Appropriate College of Business Administration courses in Accounting, Economics, Finance, Management, Marketing and Office Administration ( 22 quarter hours maximum) (2) Business Education-minimum of 12 hours from EDV 506B or 503B EDV 507, and EDV 687B. (3) Selective courses from which to choose in Vocational and Adult Education-EDY 407, EDV 511 EDV 431B, EDV 445B, EDV 480B, EDV 503B, EDV 504B, EDV 621B EDV 641B, EDV 651B, EDV 661B, EDV 671B. ( 4) Selected courses in a related area such as Guidance Special Education, Business Administration MBA courses, Junior Col lege, Administration and Supervision ( 4-12 hours). C. Distributive Education ( 1) Appropriate College of Business Administration courses in Accounting, Economics Finance, Management, Marketing, and Office Administration. ( 22 hours maximum) (2) Distributive Education-minimum of 12 hours from EDV 507, 506, 445, 511, 671, 661, 431, 651, 480 621, 641, 504, 503 (3) EDV 687, Seminar in Distributive Education Research ( 4) Selected courses in a related area such as Guidance Special Education, Business Administration MA courses, Junior College, Administration and Supervision (4-12 hours)

PAGE 92

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 91 D. Industrial Education Before admission to a degree program, a student must have met cer tifiable vocational or industrial work qualifications. In addition to the Process Core requirements EDV 631, 651, 661, 671 and 687 are Specialization requirements. Other courses totaling a minimum of 48 quarter hours will be a part of the student's program which he will plan with the graduate advisor for industrial education. E. Technical Education (TBA) Secondary and K-12 Program-Plan II (for the liberal arts graduate seeking initial certification) The program outlined below is designed for the person who has completed liberal arts bachelor's degree requirements with little or no work in pro fessional education and who desires to earn a master's degree and meet certification requirements for secondary school teaching. Completion of an undergraduate major, or its equivalent, in the intended teaching field is assumed. The components of the program are: 1. PROCESS CORE (20 hours) EDC 501, Curriculum, and Instruction: Secondary EDF 605, Foundations of Measurement EDF 607, Foundations of Educational Research EDF 611, Psychological Foundations of Education EDF 621, Socio-Economic Foundations of Education; or EDF 623 History of Education; or EDF 625, Philosophy of Education Any process core course, except EDF 607, may be waived by examina tion if the student has had an appropriate undergraduate course. A minimum of one process core course must be taken prior to the 12-hour level. 2. CURRENT TRENDS COURSE IN TEACHING SPECIALIZATION (4 hours) 3. SPECIALIZATION (minimum of 27 hours) An individually planned graduate major in the College of Liberal Arts in the teaching field or in an appropriate College of Education program for K-12 specialists. See Specialization section under Plan I, above, for description of major requirements. 4. INTERNSHIP (9-15 hours) A regular full quarter internship and seminar block, EDC 498 and 499, for 15 hours credit. In the case of an in-service teacher or the student who is placed in a full-time paid internship, enrollment will be in EDC 691 for eight hours credit. Both types of internship involve planned observation and supervision by a member of the University faculty and a secondary school staff member.

PAGE 93

92 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Junior College Program The University of South Florida has developed a program for junior college teachers which leads to the master of arts degree and Florida State Department of Education certification at this level. The College of Education in close cooperation with the College of Liberal Arts has formulated the program. It is now being expanded to include the substantive disciplines of other colleges of the University and will continue to expand as masters degree programs are approved in new fields which are appropriate for junior college teaching Information regarding programs not listed below should be directed to the Office of the Dean of the College of Education. The Junior College programs approved as of January 1 1969 are: Astronomy Geology Psychology Biology Humanities Sociology Chemistry Mathematics Spanish English Music Speech French Physics Visual Arts A. ADMISSION AND ADVISING Because of the unique character of the Junior College Program which integrally involves two colleges of the University, there are admission and advisory regulations which go beyond those listed in the section dealing with Graduate Study. While application for admission to the program may be made in either the office of the Dean of the College of Education or in the divisional office of the student's field of specialization, action on all applications is the minimum scores of 600 of the National Teachers Examination or 800 on the combined verbal and quantitive aptitude tests of the Graduate Record Examination. Duplicate sets of the student's complete record will be on file in both offices, with the College of Education charged with the responsibility of making official recommendations for certification to the State Department of Education and for the granting of the degree to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and to the Registrar. Students in this program will have two advisers, one in the College of Education and one in the area of the student's major field. The education advisor is the chairman of the Junior College Program or one assigned by him; the major field advisor will be assigned by the departmental chairman of the student's substantive field. The two will constitute the student's inter college committee which supervises the student's individual progress, plans his program and recommends him to the deans of the two colleges, or their representatives, for admission to candidacy and for graduation. They also submit to the Dean of the College of Education their recommendation for Junior College Certification in his major field by the Florida St ate Depart ment of Education. B. THE PROGRAM Consists of a minimum of 45 quarter hours, plus an internship of (0-9) hours if deemed necessary.

PAGE 94

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 93 1. Specialization (36 hours) Typically, the student's program will include 36 quarter hours of graduate work in a field of specialization The specialization sequence to be completed will be worked out in consultation with a designated major field advisor. This "typical program is based on the assumption that the student has an undergraduate background in his specialization area which is roughly equivalent to the pattern of the appropriate University of South Florida major. Students admitted without such preparation may be required to correct deficiences. By the same token, the unusually well prepared student may be permitted to take fewer courses in his specialization area, substituting approved electives from other fields of study. 2. Professional Education (9-18 hours) (a) Courses in Higher Education (9 hours) EDH 651, The Junior College in American Higher Education (4) EDH 653 Seminar in College Teaching (5) (b) EDC 691, Internship (0-9 hours) Those students who have not met the internship requirement for certification (up to nine hours credit in internship or two years or more of suc cessful full-time te a ching experience) must complete EDC 691, Internship. Typically, the internship will consist of full-time supervised teaching for one quarter or part-time teaching for two quarters At least one-half of the internship must be in a junior college, the other half being left to the discretion of the student's committee. Internship is a function of the College of Education and supervision of the internship is the responsibility of the Education advisor, but the major field advisor should be involved. In some cases students may be placed in salaried internship positions. Those students who have met an internship requirement or who have had two years or more of successful full-time teaching experience prior to admission to the program will not normally be required to take EDC 691, Internship This does not preclude the possibility of an internship for less than 9 quarter hours if the advisors deem it to be desirable.

PAGE 95

College of ENGINEERING Program Information The College of Engineering takes a modern approach to the education of tomorrow s engineers which provides for individual development both in technical competency and in human values As our society has become more complex so has the array of problems to be solved by the engineer Even now, research engineers are working on such projects as nuclear spin gyro s copes to provide guidance for spacecraft, and on the development of instru mentation for explor a tion deep in the oceans Others are engaged in developing artificial body organs such as he a rts and kidneys while some are designing bridges and highways. Still others have become manufacturers and sales engineers. Many have assumed top managerial responsibilities in almost all fields of endeavor. The College has developed it5 programs with an emphasis in three broad groupings of engineering activity-design, research and the operation of com plex technological systems. Students who are interested in advanced design or research should pursue the Five Year Program leading to a Master of Science in Engineering. Other students interested more in operational respon sibilities may wish to complete their initial engineering education at the baccalaureate level. For this purpose a Bachelor of Science in Engineering is offered which provides the student a broad education with sufficient tech nical background to effectively contribute in many phases of Engineering not requiring the depth of knowledge needed for advanced design or research. While the baccalaureate degree is considered the minimum educational experience for participating in the Engineering Profession, students are strongly encouraged to pursue advanced work beyond the baccalaureate either at this or other institutions. It is becoming increasingly evident that a large segment of today's Engineering Profession is involved in some form of post baccalaureate study. Engineers are e a rning advanced degrees in ever increasing numbers in order to obtain the inform a tion and training necessary to meet tomorrow's technological challenges. All are faced with the continuous problem of refurbishing and updating their information and skills and most are obtaining advanced information by means of s e minars sp e cial institutes and other such systems designed for this purpose Because of the broad range to today's engineering activity and the increase in scientific knowl e dge with its man y int e r-relation s hips, it has 94

PAGE 96

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 95 become increasingly difficult to maintain the traditional identification of engi neering effort such as electrical mechanical, and so forth. Many users of engineers have abandoned such descriptions of engineering work in favor of more functional descriptions of their activities. The College has therefore organized its programs on a somewhat different arrangement than those providing traditional degrees and awards degrees with a unified designation, M.S. in Engineering and B.S. in Engineering. Both the Master of Science and Bachelor of Science programs have as their foundation a core of subject material encompassing Humanities, Social Science, Mathematics, Science and Engineering which is required of all stu dents. In addition to the core subject material, each student will complete a program of specialization that has been approved by his upper level advisor. Students wishing to pursue course work commonly associated with such traditional degree programs as aerospace engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, industrial engineering, mechanical engineering, etc. can do so within the framework of the program; however, each department of the College has program flexibility. Students wishing to arrange individual programs of an inter-departmental or inter-College nature can do so with the approval of his upper level advisor. For the student following the Five Year Program leading to the Master of Science degree, a design or research project is completed during the senior and fifth year which enables the student to focus attention on an Engineering problem of major interest. The problem selected may relate to any topic of engineering endeavor (space, the oceans, nuclear power urban transportation, micro electronics etc .) for which there is sufficient faculty experience to guide the project. The program leading to the Master of Science in Engineering degree is an integrated program of 246 quarter hours and the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program requires 201 quarter hours. Both programs include the common course work core of 152 quarter hours. General Requirements The College of Engineering is organized as a professional upper division and graduate college within the University. Students will normally be admitted to the college upon successful completion of a minimum of two years of college level work, and following the completion of their third year (junior level) requirements will elect, with the advice and approval of an engineering faculty committee, to pursue either a professional program in engineering leading to the master's degree or to terminate their programs with a bacca laureate degree. The high school student anticipating a career in engineering should elect the strongest academic program that is available while in high school. Four years each of English, mathematics and science, as well as full programs in the social sciences and humanities, are most important to success in any engineer ing college A foreign language, while not a necessity, provides a desirable background for students, many of whom will continue for advanced study. Junior college students planning to tranfer to the University of South Florida's engineering program at the junior level should plan to graduate from

PAGE 97

96 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING College of Engineering Building their respective junior colleges, thus completing their general education re quirements and as much of the mathematics, science and engineering core course work as is available to them. The University's College of Engineering is available to assist junior colleges in the development of course material and in the training of staff for their offering of applicable core pre-engineering course work. All students admitted to the College should immediately ensure that they are assigned an upper level adviser. As specialization programs are established only with the approval of the upper level adviser, this initial step is most important. Upper level students will be assigned an adviser based upon their indicated interests Students may change advisers providing the proposed new adviser is willing to accept the student and the change is approved by the Office of the Dean. Students should report to the Office of the Dean to con firm their adviser assignments Some prospective students who are considering pre-engineering at the University of South Florida may lack certain preparation in high school and may elect to follow several programs which will assist them in overcoming their deficiencies. One alternative might be that such a student would select a summer program at the University of South Florida to update himself in math ematics and the physical sciences. Another alternative might be for the pro spective engineering student to take some remedial work and a less accelerated program at the University of South Florida. For financial or other reasons, stu dents may wish to avail themselves of the state's system of junior colleges which offer a wide range of course work and many of which offer full pro grams in pre-engineering (first two years course work).

PAGE 98

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 97 Departments The supervision of the academic program for the College is the function of five organizational units, each having a chairman responsible for the programs, faculty, laboratories and students assigne d to the unit. Pre Engineering This unit will assist the student prior to his a dmission to upper division engineering. This same unit may also assist students who have been ad mitted to upper division but who lack lower level prerequisite course work, as in the case of a student holding a degree but seeking a second degree in engineering. Junior College transfers who have not completed pre requisite material will also be advised by the faculty of this unit. Electrical and Electronic Systems The programs of this department provide upper level and graduate study in all areas fundamental to Electrical Engineering and the electrical sciences; circuit analysis and design electronics, communication, electro magnetics, control, solid state, systems analysis, electronic computer design etc. Energy Conversion This department provides upper level and graduate instruction relative to the conversion, utilization, control and measurement of energy and the design of machines and d evices necessary in our modem society. It offers a program in Mechanical Engineering as well as more specialized offerings in thermodynamics, heat transfer, environmental control, machine design, ana log simulation, instrumentation and contro l nuclear power, etc Industrial Systems Upper level and graduate programs are provided by this department relative to the design, evaluation and operation of a variety of industrial systems ranging from chemical plants to service industries. Such topics as plant facilities design, production control, measurement and methods design, unit operation, chemical proc ess calculations economic eva lu ation, etc are studied along with computers, operation research and statistical techniques Industrial and Chemical Engineering programs are available as well as advanced work systems analysis and Engineering Administration. Structures, Materials & Fluids Contemporary problems in engineering tend to be interdisciplinary in nature and frequently require the understanding and effective application of the principles of structures engineering materials fluid and solid mechanics. In the formation of the College, these subjects have been collected and unified into one department-Structures, Materials and Fluids ( SMF). In addition to traditional Civil Engineering Engineering Mechanics, and Materials Science disciplines, the department offers curricu l ar elements to serve the Aerospace and Hydrospace technical fields.

PAGE 99

98 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Upper Division Admission Requirements Students may be admitted to the College of Engineering upon completion of a minimum of 90 quarter hours of college level course work with an average of 2.0 on a 4 0 system ( "C average). All admissions are subject to the regula tions of the University and the approval of the academic committee of the College It is expected that students seeking upper level college admission will have completed their basic studies core requirements (general education re quirements for transfer students) and will have made substantial progress in fulfilling their lower division mathematics, science and pre-engineering course work requirements in order to complete their professional program or bac calaureate in minimum time. Engineering Core and Specialiiation Both the five year and four year curricula of the College of Engineering are founded on a common core of course work which is required of all students and provides for a broad education as well as a foundation for the work in the several areas of specialization. Students who meet the requirements for upper level admission but who have a deficit in the lower level material may complete this work while registered in the College and will be assigned to a special adviser who will assist them in problems that may exist in arranging their programs and courses. Course work identified as 400 or higher is con sidered as professional level work and students enrolling for this work must have either been admitted to the upper level or have received permission from the Office of the Dean to attempt this work. The core and specialization requirements for both the master's degree and the baccalaureate program are as follows: 1. CORE REQUIREMENTS (152 quarter hours minimum) BASIC STUDIES CORE REQUIREMENTS (35 quarter hours minimum) Prospective engineering majors must take CBS 101-102, 301-302-303-304, any three of CBS 305-306-307-308 and nine quarter hours of Behavioral Science, Biological Science, or a foreign language. Freshmen and sophomores will normally fulfill the additional basic studies requirements in Physical Sci ence and Functional Mathematics by completing the mathematics and science core course work required in the engineering program with a grade of "C" or higher in each. Those not meeting these conditions will be expected to complete CBS 208-210 and 109-110 either by examination or by enrolling in these courses. MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE CORE REQUIREMENTS (49 quarter hours minimum) The student must take MTH 302, 303 304; CHM 211, 212, 213 ; PHY 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226. Students must also take MTH 305, 401, and PHY 323 or appropriate individual substitutions as approved by their upper level advisor.

PAGE 100

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 99 ENGINEERING CORE REQUIREMENTS (56 quarter hours minimum) The prospective engineering major must take EGB 101, 102, 201, 203, 231, 232, 233, 311, 312, 313 321, 322, 325, 337, 340, 341, 342, 343. HUMANITIES OR SOCIAL SCIENCE CORE REQUIREMENTS (12 quarter hours minimum) The Student must take nine quarter hours of approved electives at the 200 level or above from these areas, and he must also take the Senior Seminar (CBS 401) required of all degree candidates. 2. FOUR YEAR PROGRAM (Baccalaureate Degree) The program consists of a minimum of 152 quarter hours of core course material plus 49 quarter hours of specialization approved by the student's upper level adviser. The degree, of Science in Engineering, is awarded upon successful completion of the program. 3. FIVE YEAR PROGRAM (master's Degree) This program consists of a minimum of 152 quarter hours of core course material plus 94 quarter hours of specialization including a maximum of 18 hours of design or research project. Students are admitted to this program early in the beginning of their fourth year of study based on an evaluation by the faculty of their department. Unlike the traditional Master's Degree which is attempted as a fifth year after completion of the bacca laureate degree, in this program both the fourth and fifth years are open to graduate level course work and additional calendar time is available for design or research projects. The program leads concurrently to both the Master of Science in Engineering and the Bachelor of Science in Engineering with the specializa tion phase of the program being individually arranged and involving course work, design, research and / or operational experience. Should the student be unable to complete his full five years, the baccalaureate can be awarded. Either an engineering report or a research thesis is required. Other Requirements HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENTS While the engineering undergraduate student is expected to complete certain requirements during his first two years of study which are directed toward the humanities and social sciences, and which are fulfilled by the completion of his basic studies requirements at the University (or general education requirements at other institutions), the University of South Florida expects more of its prospective engineering graduates than this minimum. The engineer must not only be a technically competent individual, he must also be a person who can understand, adjust and contribute to his social environment. The undergraduate engineering program at the University requires, in addition to the general education program, twelve credit hours of study in the humanities and social sciences during the engineering stu-

PAGE 101

100 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING dent's junior and senior years Students are encouraged to complete two courses in this subject material area each academic year of his upper level program. ENGLISH REQUIREMENT Students who have been admitted to the College of Engineering may be required to take an examination in order to evaluate their preparedness in the use and understanding of the English language This examination will be administered by the faculty of the University's English program and students evidencing a deficiency will be required to initiate the necessary corrective programs, with the assistance of their advisers. Correction of any deficiency must be effected prior to recommendation of the student for graduation by the faculty of the College. MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT Students who are pursuing an engineering program are expected to ac quire a facility for the rapid and accurate solution of problems requiring the use of mathematics. This requirement includes the ability to translate physical situations into mathematical models. Students evidencing a lack of manipula tive ability or the ability to apply mathematics will be required to take re medial course work in engineering analysis that is over and above their reg ular degree requirements. Faculty of the College who encounter students who are deficient in their mathematical a bility will refer such cases to the Office of the Dean. CONTINUATION REQUIREMENTS All undergraduate students registered in the College of Engineering are expected to maintain the minimum of 2.0 average ("C" average) for all work attempted while registered in the College Students who do not maintain this requirement will be declared ineligible for further registration for course work and degree programs in the College unless individually designed continuation programs have been prepared by the student's adviser and approved by the academic committee of the College. REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION In addition to the completion of the course work and / or project require ments of the respective progr ams of the College, students must be recom mended for their degrees by the faculty of the College It is expected that students completing their master's program would have completed their ad vanced work with a minimum average of 3.0 or "B''. The awarding of a bac calaureate degree requires a minimum average of 2.0 or "C" for all work attempted while registered in the College. Students attempting but not com pleting their professional master 's requirements ma y elect to request the awarding of the bachelor degree. I

PAGE 102

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 101 Post Baccalaureate Program The College of Engineering offers two post baccalaureate programs leading to a degree at the Master's level. One is the Master of Science in Engineering which is design or research oriented requiring an individual project or thesis. The other is the Master of Engineering which does not require a thesis or project. Each upper level department of the College may elect to award either degree depending upon prior arrangement by the student. Admission to either program is dependent upon a favorable evaluation by the depart ment concerned Applicants are expected to meet the requirements outlined below, but others may be considered under speci a l circumstances 1. Entrance Requirements A. A baccalaureate degree in engineering from an approved engineering college is required for admission to either of the Master's degree programs. Degrees in Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry may be accepted on an individual basis for entrance into the program, depending upon the appli cant's background and experience In such cases it is most probable that addi tional engineering course work will be required. B. A minimum grade point average of 3 0 out of a possible 4.0 for all work attempted during the last two academic years of undergraduate work. C. A minimum total score of 1000 on the verbal and quantative por tions of the graduate record examination is expected. D. Students who do not meet regular entrance requirements may be permitted to attempt trial programs with the recommendation of the de partment and approval of the Dean of the College These programs may contain up to 15 hours of specified advanced course work and will contain a performance criteria. 2. Progr a m Requirements A. A minimum of 45 quarter hours of approved graduate level course work will be required. B. An overall grade point average of 3 0 will be required for all courses attempted in the program. In the event a student's grade point average falls below the required 3.0, the student will be placed on proba tion. All students in such a probationary status must obtain a directed pro gram from his academic advisor approved by the Dean prior to continuing any further course work. C. All students are required to pass a comprehensive examination which may be both written and oral prior to the awarding of the degree. This should be arranged by the student with this department. D. Students working toward the Master of Science in Engineering de gree must complete either a design or research project of which a maxi mum of 9 quarter hours may be used to fulfill his degree requirements. The course, 699 (variable 1-9 credit) Design or Research with appropriate de partmental prefix, is to be used for this purpose.

PAGE 103

102 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING When a student has completed 9 quarter hours of design or research but has not completed his requirements and where University facilities are being used, the student must register for a minimum of 3 credits of course 698 each quarter that he is using the facilities. In any event, he must register for a minimum of 3 credits of course 698 or 699 during the quarter in which he applies for his degree Thesis for research projects are to be prepared in accordance with the "Handbook for Graduate Thesis and Dissertation", The Graduate Council, Uni versity of South Florida Copies are available in the Office of the Dean. Computer Science Programs Recognizing that the general purpose digital computers has made significant contributions to the advancement of all elements of the academic community and that it will have an even greater impact in the future, the College of Engineering offers several levels of credit course work, undergraduate and graduate, to serve students of all disciplines in order that they may be pre pared to meet the computer challenge. General FORTRAN IV Programming, ETK 301, 302 (2 each), and COBOL Programming ETK 303 ( 3) are offered every quarter at times compatible to other course work offerings New computer languages will be offered for credit as they approach operational status. Other computer oriented credit course work is also available for undergraduates. Senior and Graduate A group of course work is available at the more advanced level which provides the student 9 to 15 credits of computer sciences for seniors or gradu ate students. These offerings are open to all fields but do require prior knowl edge of FORTRAN and COBOL Programming. See Course Series ETK 501 through ETK 506.

PAGE 104

College of LIBERAL ARTS The College of Liberal Arts, as one of the five colleges of the University, con tinues the general and liberal education begun in the College of Basic Studies. Here the student may explore further his vocational interests and develop a breadth of knowledge and precision of intellect necessary for responsible lead ership in our society. More specifically, the College seeks: 1. To help students continue the exploration of new subjects affording fresh ideas and talents enriching to life. 2. To enable students to try out several fields as a means of determining the wisest vocational choice. 3 To give sufficient development within the chosen vocational field that the student will be prepared to obtain a job upon graduation or move success fully into a graduate or professional school. 4. To collaborate with the other colleges of the University in providing liberal courses to reinforce required training in those professional schools 5. To cultivate independent thinking creative imagination and value commitment in order that students may become constructive leaders in th e ir chosen activities. Admission to the College Provisional admission to the College of Liberal Arts is possible with four of the eight areas of Basic Studies completed or waived, and three of the four Physical Education courses completed, with a minimum of 81 quarter hours Unqualified admission requires six of the eight areas of Basic Studies (in cluding English), four Physical Education courses completed, and a tot a l of 90 quarter hours or more. (A grade point ratio of 2.0 is expected in both instances .) Occasionally students may be admitted without the 2 0 average and they will automatically be on warning status. Upon admission (by application to the appropriate division a l office in the instance of a departmental major or the Dean's office when the major is interdivisional) the student will declare his major and will be counseled in his selection of courses by an adviser from the major field. He will then plan the remainder of his college program to fulfill his educational needs and satisfy requirements for the bachelor of arts degree The Associate Dean of the division will generally supervise his progress and ultimately certify the student for the degree. 103

PAGE 105

104 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Any student of the University may take courses in the College of Liberal Arts even though not officially admitted Freshmen and sophomores may wish to t a ke liberal arts c ourses in a ddition to their b asic s tudies pro g r a m Simil a rl y students in other colleges or adults in the community will elect liberal arts courses of particular interest. Graduation Requirements The College of Liberal Arts currently offers one undergraduate degree: Bache lor of Arts These requirements a re r e ferred to on page 26 of this c atalog but are briefly summarized here: 1. 180 quarter credits with at least a C" average (2.0) in work done at the University of South Florida. At least 60 of the 180 credits must be in courses numbered 300 or above. 2 General education requirements of at least seven courses fulfilled in the College of Basic Studies, including CBS 101-102, and CBS 401 (the Basic Studies Functional English course and Basic Studies Senior Seminar), or transferred equivalents. Proficiency must also be shown in four physical education areas. 3. Completion of a major in a subject or a n integrated major involving several subjects. There must be at least a 2.0 average in this major for all USF work. To insure breadth of experience and to preclude undue specialization a student must earn (or show competence in) a minimum of 120 credits outside his discipline of c oncentration 90 of which must be outside the division of his major. 4. Work transferred from other schools will not be included in the grade point average computed for graduation. (However graduation with honors requires a 3 5 average in USF work and also in the total hours applied toward graduation ) 5 A student must earn the last 45 credits in residence at the University of South Florida. 6 Completion of a senior achievement test. This is a dministered free by the Office of Evaluation Services to graduating seniors each quarter b y applica tion to that office. Organization and Special Features The College of Liberal Arts is organized into four divisions for the adminis tration of staff, courses, and student records. They are: Fine Arts (FAH llO), Language-Literature (FAH 239) Natural S c iences and Mathematics ( fourth floor, Science Center), and Social Sciences (first floor Social Build ing) Each division is headed by an Associate Dean who is responsible for each student's admission to a major, application of regulations, maintenance of student records (including the signing of all official forms) and ultimate certification for the degree The College, like the total University is concerned with the broad de velopment of students' knowledge. Thus it offers several integrated courses and limits work in any one field At the s ame time, the student must learn to work independently. The College emphasizes individual projects in many

PAGE 106

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS l 05 courses, laboratories, field studies, and the opportunity to earn credit through independent study and examination. It is important that the student develop basic skills for research and crea tive scholarship; hence the provision of senior seminars and special courses on research methodology These skills are important for the critical appraisal of scholarly work even though the student might not go on to graduate study. There is opportunity from time to time for students to collaborate with their professors on research projects and to render essential intellectual services to the community. A special junior year experience program is offered to Liberal Arts majors through the Cooperative Education Program. CURRICULA AND PROGRAMS Opportunities for Con centration The Liberal Arts College offers a major in twenty-three fields as described in the following pages. The student must fulfill all the requirements indicated or receive written permission from the Department Chairman for any sub stitution or exemption. In addition to these departmental majors, there are interdisciplinary majors available in several divisions. These includA the progr a ms in American Studies, Pre-Law, International Studies the Social Science Divisional pro gram, the Natural Science Divisional program and the Bachelor of Independent Studies program A general Liberal Arts major is available for student s whose plans require still wider training, cutting across divisional lines Such s tudents, (presemin a ry and others) should see the Dea n of the College for assignment to an advisor and be prepared to write out for approval a statement of the purposes under lying their program and the combination of courses they deem most relevant. An interdisciplinary degree is also possible through the College of Basic Studies and (for teachers) through the College of Education Bachelor of Independent Studies The College offers a BIS Degree to adults over 25 ye a rs of age who are seek ing a liberal education but who are unable to spend much time on campus. The program is offered in collaboration with the Office of Continuing Educa tion and is describe d in detail under Acad e mic Programs. Through this program, it is possible to explore the most significant ave nues of thought in the Natural Sciences the Social Sciences, and the Humani ties Each stu dent does extensive reading under the guidance of a faculty adviso r and reports to the campus periodically for short seminars and examina tions. Division of Fine Arts The Division of Fine Arts serves the three-fold purpose of providing courses of study, theatres of practice, and programs of events for the University family the surrounding community and the citizens of the state of Florida

PAGE 107

l 06 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Fine Arts-Humanities Building Its prime objectives are: ( 1) to provide a broad but thorough tr. aining for those highly talented in the fine arts, (2) to offer guidance and training for those preparing for teaching, and ( 3) to provide curricular studies and extracurricular activities for general University students. The division offers courses in art, dance, music and theatre. Special pro grams designed for the preparation of public school teachers include ( 1) art, grades 1-12; (2) general vocal music, grades 1-12; and (3) general-instru mental music, grades 1-12. DANCE All dance majors will take DAN 303, 403, 503 (six credits), 313, 413, 513; three credits each in music arts, theatre arts, and visual arts; FNA 543, 553; TAR 221. Depending upon choice of concentration a dditional requirements are: Modem dance sequence: DAN 201 301 (six credits), 302, 402 (six credits), 501 (eighteen credits); ballet majors: DAN 202, 302 (six credits), 301, 401 (six credits), 502 (eighteen credits)-for a total of 75 hours A mini mum of 90 hours (including Basic Studies courses) must be taken outside the Division of Fine Arts. MUSIC ARTS The music arts curriculum is designed for those gifted in performance on an approved instrument or in voice as preparation for graduate study to qualify as performing artist, college or studio-teacher. Requirements for the B .A. Degree: Requirements for a major in piano are listed here : those seeking majors in another instrument or in voice should substitute the appropriately num b e red applied music courses. Piano students: MUS 212, 213, 214, 312, 313, 314, 325 (applied music 12 credits) 412 413, 414 512 513 514, 525 (applied music 12 credits); 571 (required only of those whose objective is studio-teaching); three credits each in dance theatre arts and visual arts courses and FNA .543, 55 .'3 for a

PAGE 108

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 107 total of 75 credits. A minimum of 90 credits (including Basic Studies courses) must be taken outside the Division of Fine Arts. Placement examinations are required of all new registrants in musical styles (theory and history), and for admission to 300-level courses in applied music. Students must obtain the dates for these examinations from the Music Office ( F AH 204); completion of the examinations is required before registra tion in music courses can be permitted. All students seeking a major in music are required before admission to the College of Liberal Arts ( 1) to complete successfully the piano proficiency requirement defined by the music faculty and (2) to perform satisfactorily on his major instrument or voice for the music faculty. Students registered for applied music courses must ( 1) perform in a major ensemble each quarter, ( 2) attend required recitals as scheduled, and ( 3) present a faculty-approved public recital before graduation. Requirements for the M. M. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 130-135. In addition, the applicant will need to satisfy the following requirements in music before initial registration: ( 1) Applied music audition and ( 2) placement examinations in musical styles (theory and history) and piano. The specific program for each student will vary according to his needs and interests. Each program must be approved by the student's advisor in conformance with the guidelines established by the Graduate and Honors Committee made up of music arts and music education faculty members. A minimum of 54 credits is required, one-half or more of which must be completed on campus The student must be registered as a full-time graduate student for a minimum of one quarter. The typical program for the applied music inajor consists of 27 credits in 600-level applied music ( 4credit courses) and related performance courses, 18 credits in musical styles (theory and history), and a total of 9 credits in research documents, thesis and/ or a faculty-approved recital. Programs for Teacher Education: For the bachelor of arts degree for public school music teachers, see Education. For the master of arts degree for public school music teachers, see page 87. THEATRE ARTS All students will take TAR 203, 211, 221, 252, 339, 443, 471, 501, 502, plus any two of the Threatre Literature courses, and 3 credits each in Dance, Music Arts and Visual Arts courses, FNA 543, 553. Depending upon choice of concentration, additional requirements are-performance majors: TAR 212, 311, 313, 411, 413, 511, 515, plus 6 hours elected in the discipline; technical majors: TAR 321, 322, 421, 422, 423, 424, 425, 426, 529; playwriting majors: TAR 212, 444 515, 543, 544, plus one additional Theatre Literature course and one beginning design course, with 6 hours elected in the discipline-for a total of 75 hours A minimum of 90 hours (including Basic Studies courses) must be taken outside the Division of Fine Arts.

PAGE 109

108 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS VISUAL ARTS Requirements for the B.A. Degree: The Visual Arts curriculum is designed for students interested in con tinuing their education in graduate or technical schools with the objective of college teaching, gallery or museum work, fine or commercial studio work. The Visual Arts student may elect to emphasize painting, sculpture, graphics, ceramics, cinematography or art history by selecting the appropriate sequence of courses. A typical sequence would be: ART 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, 411, 421, 431, 441, 461; FNA 543, 553 and 3 credits each from the following departments: Dance, Music and Theatre; 12 credits in art history; 15 credits of the area to be emphasized (painting, sculpture, graphics, ceramics,_ cine matography or art history) for a total of 75 hours. A minimum of 90 hours (including Basic Studies courses) must be taken outside the Division of Fine Arts. All Art majors are required to present a portfolio of their work prior to entrance into upper level. The University reserves the right to retain selected student work done while registered at the University The requirements for the bachelor's degree in Art Education are listed under the College of Education. Requirements for the M. F. A. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on p ages 130-135. It is additionally required that applicants submit examples of their work to the Department of Visual Arts before admission to the program. A minimum of 72 credits is required. The typical program consists of 18 hours in one of the studio areas of painting, sculpture, graphics, ceramics or cinematography, 15 in one or more of the remaining areas, 12 in the history of art and 9 each in research thesis and a minor As part of the thesis requirement, the student must prepare and stage an exhibition of his thesis work in the last quarter prior to graduation. The student must be registered as a full time graduate student for two quarters. The requirements for the M. A Degree in Art Education are listed under the College of Education Division of Language and Literature The Division of Languages and Literature offers courses in American Studies (AMS), Classics and Ancient Studies ( CLS) English (ENG), Foreign Lan guages (FRE, GER, ITA, RUS, and SPA), Journalism (JNM), Linguistics (LIN), Philosophy (PHI), Religious Studies (REL), Romance Languages (ROM) Speech ( SPE) and Interdisciplinary Language-Literature subjects (LLI). Majors are available in American Studies. Classics and Ancient Studies, English French, German Italian Russian Spanish Philosophy, Religious Studies and Speech. Four Master of Arts programs are also ava ilable: English French Span ish and Speech.

PAGE 110

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 109 AMERICAN STUDIES The American Studies major is designed for those students interested in studying the relationships among the important elements which shape Ameri can civilization. The American idea sequence, CBS 301, 302, and 303, is a prerequisite (or can be taken concurrently) for admission to the major. To complete requirements for a major, a student must take (1) the following courses in American Studies: AMS 301, AMS 311-312-313, and AMS 491-492-493, (2) three courses from the following: HTY 411, ENG 305, HUM 535 or PHI 413 and HTY 421; and (3) twenty one hours of related elective courses, no more than nine hours in any one area, chosen in consultation with and approved by his major adviser from among the following list of courses: HTY 301, HTY 315, HTY 409, HTY 461, ENG 306, ENG 307, ENG 426, ENG 517, ENG 525, ENG 527, ENG 528, HUM 536, HUM 537, SPE 345, SPE 565, ANT 303, EDF 575, PHI 413, POL 201, POL 431, POL 341, POL 345, POL 432, POL 441, POL 463, SOC 261, SOC 341, SOC 371 and SSI 503. Each student's program must be planned with the American Studies ad viser, who may make appropriate substitutions when new related courses are added to present University offerings and he deems such substitutions educa tionally advisable. CLASSICS AND ANCIENT STUDIES The Department offers a major in Classics and Ancient Studies. Require ments for the B.A. degree in Classics and Ancient Studies are: 48 quarter credits consisting of a core sequence of 22 credits plus one of three alterna tives of 26 credits providing a choice of emphasis. The core sequence consists of CLS 301, 302, 303, 411, 412, 413, and 529. The alternative sequences are : (a)-emphasis on Latin: CLS 321, 371, 401, 402, 403, 517, and 571; (b)-emphasis on Latin and Greek: CLS 321, 331, 332, 333, 371, 527, 571; ( c)-broad scope with Latin, Greek, and Hebrew: CLS 331, 332, 333, 341, 342, 343, 527, and 583 (Biblical Civilization). Individual adaptations within the 26 variable credits to meet special stu dent needs are possible with the consent of the Department Chairman. Electives (where applicable) are: CLS 401-402-403; 331-332-333; 321, 371, 517, 527, 571; ART 313, 323; HUM 423-424; PHI 333, 415; REL 350 For a combination major of Latin with a modern foreign language see page 111 under combined majors, FOREIGN LANGUAGES. ENGLISH Requirements for the B.A Degree: A major in English requires a sequence of courses in British and Ameri can literature Advanced courses focus on the works of particular authors, genres, or groups of related authors. All English courses attempt to teach stu dents how to think critically about literature and to fit the works studied into the economic, social, political, scientific, and religious contexts. To accumulate the required 48 credits, all English majors must take the

PAGE 111

110 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS following seven courses: ENG 201, ENG 202, ENG 203, ENG 305, ENG 306, ENG 307, and ENG 411. In addition they must elect one of the follow ing: ENG 319, ENG 321, ENG 335, ENG 336, ENG 337, ENG 437, ENG 459, and ENG 5ll; two of the following: ENG 429, ENG 501, ENG 502, ENG 503, ENG 505, ENG 507, ENG 515, ENG 519, ENG 520, ENG 521, and ENG 559 (a student cannot use both ENG 519 and ENG 520 in this group); and two of the following: ENG 425, ENG 426, ENG 430, ENG 513, ENG 517, ENG 518, ENG 523, ENG 527, ENG 528, ENG 531, and ENG 535. Persons wishing to take English courses not on this list, or more than the specified number of courses in the above areas, may include them in the 12 hours allowed under the 60-hour maximum permitted in one department. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Requirements for Admission. In addition to the general requirements of the University, an applicant must have an academic average of B in all English courses above freshman English, a minimum of twenty-eight hours of literature in English above the freshman level, and a score of 500 on the Verbal Aptitude or the Advanced English Test of the Graduate Record Exami nation All applications must be approved by the Graduate Committee of the Department of English. Course Work. A master of arts degree in English requires 48 hours of course work from the following list of English courses: ENG 623; ENG 691; ENG 515 and ENG 531 (if these courses already have been taken, English 500-'level courses may be substituted); one to three other 500-level courses; two courses from ENG 683, Selected Topics; three to five courses from ENG 615, ENG 655, ENG 657, ENG 659, ENG 667, ENG 687, and ENG 695. Students may substitute eight hours of courses acceptable for graduate credit in related areas, subject to approval by the Graduate Committee of the De partment of English. Foreign Language Requirement All candidates for a master's degree will be required to demonstrate reading proficiency in one of the following foreign languages: Latin, Greek, French, German, Spanish, Italian, or Rus sian. Other Requirements. Each student is required to write an extended criti cal or analytical paper in the field of English studies. In addition, he must also pass a comprehensive examination, both oral and written. Specific information about these requirements is available from the Graduate Committee of the Department of English. Requirements for the M.A. Degree in Junior-College Teaching: Requirements for Admission. See M.A. program above. Course Work A joint program, with the College of Education, designed to provide competence in those areas of English studies most often needed by the junior-college teacher: composition, language, literature in English, and world literature in translation. Courses in English: ENG 623; ENG 515; ENG 585, Modem Grammar (structural and transformational); one course in Eng lish literature 1500-1600; one course in English literature 1660-1798; one course in English literature 1798-1920; one course in American literature; one course in English-American literature after 1920; ENG 583, Advanced

PAGE 112

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 111 Composition for Teachers ; ENG 683, World Backgrounds of Lit era ture in English. Courses in the College of Education: EDH 651, EDH 653, and EDC 691 (internship if required). For e ign Languag e R e quir e m en t None. Other R e quirem e nts. Each student must pass a comprehensive examina tion, oral and written. Specific information about these requirements is avail able from the Graduate Committee of the Department of English. FOREIGN LANGUAGES Language studies in the College of Liberal Arts fall into two general groupings: ( 1) Modern foreign languages and literature providing instruction in French, German, Italian, Russian, and Spanish; and (2) classical languages and literature, providing instruction in Latin Greek and Hebrew Instruction in linguistics, language structure and development, is also available. These programs are designed to meet the needs of students who desire competency in a language and an expanded understanding of foreign culture and literature. They are of particular interest to students who wish to teach languages, those who plan to further their studies in graduate school, and those who seek careers in various types of foreign employment. Major programs are offered in French, Geiman, Italian, Latin Russian, and Spanish, and in combinations of any two of these Requirements for the B.A. Degree : Modern language majors must complete at least 45 credits in the chosen language beyond the functional language courses Among these 45 credits must be the following: FRENCH: FRE 301, 303 305, 306 307, 521 522, and 523. GERMAN: GER 301, 303, 305, 306, 307, 513, and 521. ITALIAN: ITA 301, 303, 305, 306, 307, 511, 512, and 513. RUSSIAN: RUS 301, 303, 305, 306, 307 551, 552, and 553. SPANISH: SPA 301 303, 305 306, 307 523, 526, 542, 543, 561, 562 or 563. A native speaker must substitu t e a literature course for the advanced con versation course ( 303). Moreover, in cases where a native speaker has re ceived advanced education abroad, he will not be allowed to take the ad vanced composition course ( 301) to fulfill his major requirements. Combined Majors Combined majors are offered in any two modem languages or in Latin and a modern l anguage. For a major in two modem languages, a student must take the courses numbered 301 303 305, 306, and 307 in each of two lan guages and an additional 19 credits in his first language and an additional 10 credits in his second language. Students majoring in Latin and a modem lan guage must take CLS 301, 302, 303, 371, 401-402-4-03, 411-412-413, 517 and 571; and courses numbered 301, 303, 305, 306, and 307 in the mod ern language, plus 10 additional hours of literature in the modern language. A student majoring in any one of the Romance languages may count ROM 517 toward his major requirements.

PAGE 113

112 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 130 135. All students admitted to the M.A program in foreign languages must have a B.A degree in their major or they must have completed 18 hours of courses on the 500 level in the language of their major with an average of B ( 3.00), allowing only one C The 300 level survey courses are a pre requisite for any 500 level course. However, they can be taken simultaneously with 500 level courses. Six of the student's 18 hours may be counted toward the M .A. degree unless they were taken to fulfill the requirements of the B.A. degree or its equivalent. A satisfactory grade on the Graduate Record Ex amination is required for admission to the M.A. program. For a master's degree in French or Spanish the following are required: 1) A minimum of 45 credit hours. 2) A thesis to be written under the direction of an adviser assigned by the chairman of the department. 3) A comprehensive two-hour examination, based on the student's course work and the reading list, to be taken after the first six weeks of the term following the one in which the student completed his course work. 4) The M.A. candidate must have a reading knowledge of a foreign language other than the one he is studying for his degree. All languages taught by the department of foreign languages or Latin are acceptable. However, Portuguese is excluded for Spanish majors. The student must pass the Graduate School Foreign Language Test, prepared by the Educational Testing Service, within a norm set by the faculty. He cannot take the comprehensive final examination before this requirement is satisfied. Of the 45 hours required of the student no more than 18 may be on the 500 level and the remaining 27 must be on the 600 level. A student may transfer a maximum of nine hours credit of graduate work from another in stitution toward his M .A. degree from the University of South Florida. INTERDISCIPLINARY LANGUAGE-LITERATURE While some departments give credit toward a major for some interdis ciplinary language literature courses, all LLI courses are designed as electives for students wishing to extend their understanding of a particular field in the Division and of its relationships to other fields. The courses are generally of two types: I. those in the history of ideas LLI 301, 302 Main Currents of Western Thought I & II LLI 305, 306 The Idea of Progress I & II LLI 313 The Idea of Freedom and II. those relating a field outside the Division to work in it LLI 311 Literature and the Film LLI 312 Philosophy and the Film LLI 313 Introduction to Film Writing LLI 540 The Social Structure of Language LLI 541 Psycho-linguistics The courses in group one combine literature, philosophy and criticism

PAGE 114

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 11 ;3 to provide broad perspectives. Those in group two are more specialized, but still combine ideas in at least two specific fields JOURNALISM PROGRAM Students interested in Journalism must major in another field. They may, however choose journalism electives from among four basic courses, supplemented by practical laboratory work on campus publications. Those seeking careers in the m ass media after graduation will be directed to the various daily and weekly newspapers, r a dio and television news de partments, advertising agencies m a g a z;nes, and public rel a tions firms with which the Journalism Program maintains close contact. Such students may elect to become journalism a dvisees and should schedule their courses pre ferably in this order: CBS 101 (Functional English-Journalism section) CBS 102 (Func tional English: Mass Medi a ), JNM 341-342, 343 347 and 349, along with related electives after consultation with the Journalism Program chairman. Students in the Secondary Education program with a major in English journalism are referred to the College of Education section in this Catalog under the English-journalism heading LINGUISTICS PROGRAM There are a number of linguistics courses offered both under the Lin guistics Program and under a number of other dep a rtments, but there is no lingui s tic s major a t present In additi o n to thos e courses offer e d under the Linguistics Program LIN 411 LIN 412 LIN 4 8 3 LIN 520 LIN 530 LIN 581, LIN 583 and LIN 585, the depa rtments of Anthropology, Classics and Ancient Studies, English, Foreign Language s and Speech offer a number of linguistics courses. Students interested in linguistics electives should also refer to the course offerings of these departments. PHILOSOPHY The philosophy program includes five areas of study : logic and scientific method history of philosophy, theory of knowledge theory of reality and theory of values. Majors in philosophy must complete at least 45 credit hours in the program, including PHI 303, 333, 334, 335 and at least nine credits above the 570 level. Credit toward a major in philosophy will be extended for LLI 315 RELIGIOUS STUDIES The major in religious studies is offered to those students who are inter ested in the vital role of religious thought in shaping the cultural patterns of historical peoples and in its relationship to the merging patterns of con temporary life. Such a major might be elected out of personal interest in religious thought, as the undergraduate preliminary for a master's and doc toral program of religious studies, or as a valuable background for semi professional or professional work in religious institutions : public schools, junior colleges, universities, the religious education departments of local churches etc. (The student who is planning to enter a divinity school or

PAGE 115

114 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS theologic a l s e minary should write to the institution of his choice to get s p ecific und er g radu a t e requirem ents for entran ce.) The program is as simple and pra c tic a l a s pos s ible giving the student a substantial background for futher study in the field, while at the s a me time allowing considerable fr e edom for out s ide electiv es. There are three m a jor divisions to the progr a m e ach of whi c h answers on e of the following que s tions: ( 1) What is religious thought? ( 2) How can we analyze it? ( 3) What are its applications? A total of 49 quarter hours are required for the major divided as follows: I. The Basic Documents Und e rlying R e ligiou s Thought ( 17 quarter hours required) : REL 310 REL 315 REL 325 or 327, and REL 350. II. Ana lysis of R e ligiou s Thought ( 17 qua rt e r hour s required): PHI 411 and two of the following three courses: SOC 373, ANT 471, or psychology of religion III. Applications of Religiou s Thought ( 20 quarter hours required no more than 9 in any one dep a rtment) : ENG 319, ENG 507, ENG 511, ENG 583 (Myth and Literature), CLS 321, CLS 341, 342 343, LLI 301, LLI 302, PHI 321, PHI 333, PHI 521, ART 472 HUM 427 HUM 428, HTY 426 HTY 432, HTY 591. Each student's program must be planned with the Religious Studies ad viser, who may make a ppropriate substitutions when he deems these educa tionally advisable SPEECH The Speech curriculum provides courses for all students interested in in creasing their understanding and skills of oral communication and offers ma jor programs in general speech rhetoric and public address, and broadcasting In addition, two combination major programs are available: an English Speech program, designed primarily though not exclusively for those prepar ing to teach in the secondary schools; and a Speech-Theatre Arts program offered jointly by the Language-Literature and Fine Arts Divisions A major in Speech requires a minimum of 45 credits; the combination English-Speech program requires 67 credits in English and Speech, and five credits in Theatre Arts ; and the joint Speech-Theatre Arts program requires 61 credits Speech 201, 203 491, and 492 are required of all majors. General Speech se qu e nce: SPE 201, 203, 321, 363, 491, 492, and 20 credits of Speech electives. Rhetoric and Public Address sequence: SPE 201 203, 363, 491, 492, 565, and 20 credits of Speech electives, 15 of which must be in rhetoric and public address and discussion. Broadcasting sequ e nce: SPE 201, 203, 241 321, 491 492, and 20 cred it s of Speech electives, 15 of which must be in broadcasting. English-Speech se quence: SPE 201, 203, 321, either 361 or 365, 491, 492, and ten credits of Speech electives; ENG 201 202 and 203; either 305 or 306; 307, 321, 411 and 517 ; and TAR 303. Speech-Theatre Arts s e qu e nc e : SPE 201, 203, 321 491 492, 521 and one 300 400 or 500 elective in Speech; TAR 211 221 303, 311, 313, 411 and any two courses chosen from 431 432 433, 4:-35, 436, and 437.

PAGE 116

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 115 Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Requirements f01' Admission. In addition to the general requirements of the University, an applicant must have an academic average of Bin all Speech courses, a minimum of 18 quarter hours in Speech, and a score of 500 or higher on the verbal aptitude section of the Graduate Record Examination. All applications must be approved by the Department of Speech. Course W01'k. A Master of arts degree in Speech requires 45 quarter hours of course work distributed in the following manner: 15 hours in Rhetoric and Public Address (to be selected from SPE 661, 662, 665, 667), 10 hours in Oral Interpretation of Literature (to be selected from SPE 521, 522, 523, 621), 5 hours of Speech Science (to be selected from SPE 501, 503, 511, 611), 5 hours in Speech Seminar (SPE 691) and 10 hours in graduate Speech electives. For graduate Speech electives, students may substitute two courses ac ceptable for graduate credit in related areas, subject to approval by the Department of Speech. Examinations. Each student is required to pass a comprehensive examina tion, both oral and written. Other Requirements Each student will select one of the plans listed below: Plan A-An extended critical or analytical paper (thesis) in the field of Speech studies. Plan B-Proof of a working knowledge of a computer language (Cobol or Fortran) and ability to design a research program. Plan C-Two courses ( 8 credits) in linguistics and one course ( 4 credits) in the structure of American English. Plan D-Three courses (or 12 credits) in statistics Plan E-Three courses (or 12 credits) in Speech and / or other academic discip'lines if part of an approved planned sequence. Plan F-At least 12 credits in a foreign language above Basic College level. Division of Natural Sciences The Division of Natural Sciences offers courses in astronomy (AST), bacte riology (BOT), botany (BOT), chemistry (CHM), geology (GLY), mathe matics ( MTH), physics (PHY), zoology (ZOO), interdisciplinary courses in botany and zoology (BIO) and oceanography ( OGY). The courses are designed for students planning scientific careers or those technical careers having a considerable component of science, such as engi neering or medicine These students will typically major in one of the sciences or in a combination of sciences as preparation for employment, transfer to pro fessional schools or admission to graduate school. Those seeking to transfer to another university to complete a course in agriculture, home economics, phar macy, or one of the medical professions may begin their science work here before transferring Students seeking a general understanding of science but not technical competence will normally wish to take the basic studies courses in biological

PAGE 117

116 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS science, physical science, and functional mathematics, and augment their un derstanding by adding upper level courses in the Division designed for non scientists. THE B.A. DEGREE PROGRAMS The division offers the bachelor of arts degree in the following departments: Astronomy, Botany and Bacteriology, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Phys ics, and Zoology. Candidates for the bachelor's degree must be admitted to the upper level as early as possible upon completion of their basic studies requirements and before the end of their junior year. Even before admission to the division, students preparing for a science or mathematics career must plan their courses from their freshman year because of the sequential nature of the science curriculum. H students enter the University well prepared from high school, they may qualify for waiver in the basic sciences and/ or mathematics courses as de scribed in the section on the College of Basic Studies. To qualify for the basic studies Natural Science or Mathematics waiver, students must have a grade of 425 or higher on the Twelfth Grade Placement Test and three years in high school science or mathematics respectively with a grade of "C" or higher. Students who do not qualify for a waiver but have good preparation in science and/or mathematics on the basis of the proficiency test and other evi dence, are advised to begin their liberal arts science and mathematics courses early and postpone basic studies science and mathematics to be waived later either by examination or as provided below. A student passing liberal arts mathematics courses through MTH 304 with a grade of "C" or higher in each course can receive an automatic waiver of CBS 109-110. A student passing two eight-hour liberal arts sequences in separate phys ical science disciplines with a grade of "C" or higher in each course can receive an automatic waiver of CBS 208-209-210. A student passing BIO 201-203 with a grade of "C" or higher in each course can receive an automatic waiver of CBS 205-207. A student admitted to the upper level will be assigned an adviser in his field who will guide the student in planning his program and meeting the re quirements for the degree. MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAMS The Natural Sciences Division operate graduate programs leading to the Mas ter of Arts Degree in the fields of Astronomy, Bacteriology, Botany, Geology, Mathematics, Physics and Zoology and a Master of Science in Chemistry. Students apply for graduate work through the Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division and are recommended for admission by the department in which they intend to concentrate. A departmental committee is appointed which supervises and guides the program of the candidate. The general ad mission requirements for graduate work are given on page 131. The specific requirements for each department are listed under that department below.

PAGE 118

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 117 Further information regarding admission and available fellowships and assist antships may be obtained by writing to the proper departmental chairman. DOCTOR'S DEGREE PROGRAM There is a program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in the field of Biology The initial emphasis is in the area of Marine Biology. The doctorate is offered as a cooperative effort by the Departments of Zoology and Botany. Biologists on the faculty of the Marine Science Institute also participate in the program. University regulations governing graduate study at the doctoral level are given on page 133. Specific requirements for the Ph.D. in Biology are given on page 119 MAJOR REQUIREMENTS ASTRONOMY Requirements for the B.A. Degree: A major in astronomy will normally consist of a minimum of 37 credits in the discipline, including AST 201, 202, 413 and 443; a selection of three courses from AST 521, 522, 533, 536, and at least three credit hours of AST 361 or at least three credits in AST 481. In addition, the student will take PHY 221 through 226; or PHY 211 through 216, PHY 315 and a total of at least nine credit hours in Physics above the 200 level in consultation with the adviser The total number of physics credits must in any case be at least 21. The student will also take MTH 203, 303, 304, 305 and at least nine credits in mathematics at least on the 400 level, preferably MTH 405, 406 and 407. The student is expected to familiarize himself with the technique of pro gramming electronic computers before the end of the sixth quarter. Additional courses will be selected in consultation with the adviser. Selec tion of at least one foreign language (German, French or Russian) is strongly recommended, especially for those students who intend to enter graduate school. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 130-135. A minimum of 45 credits must include at least 23 for courses numbered 600 or higher and at least 18 for structured astronomy courses numbered 500 or higher. It will be assumed that the student knows enough mathematics and physics to follow any astronomy courses required in his curriculum. No credit is available for courses numbered 499 or lower which the student takes in order to make up for initial deficiencies in this respect. Since candidates for the graduate degrees in astronomy may have a variety of backgrounds, includ ing majors in astronomy, mathematics, physics the required course of studies may vary considerably among students. A thesis is required, which must be based on original work. The student must also demonstrate, before the degree is granted, his ability to translate into English the pertinent scientific literature in at least one of the foreign lan guages, German, French or Russian.

PAGE 119

118 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES-BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY; ZOOLOGY The Department of Botany and Bacteriology and the Department of Zool ogy offer programs leading to the bachelor of arts an d master of arts degrees Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Ma;or in Botany: A botany major must include the following courses: BIO 201-203, BIO 331-332, BOT 311, BOT 419, BOT 421, BOT 446 or 447, BOT 491. In addition at least 3 elective, structured courses in BOT or BIO are required Also required are CHM 211-213 and CHM 331-336. Elec tives in physics, mathematics, geology and a foreign language (preferably German, French, or Russian) are strongly recommended. In addition to serv ing as a terminal degree, the B .A. in botany provides good preparation for training in conservation, forestry and agriculture, as well as graduate work in the plant sciences. Students are advised to enroll in BIO 201 and CHM 211 during their freshman year and to seek completion of basic studies science requirements by obtaining an automatic waiver of CBS 205-207 by taking BIO 201-203. Pro spective majors must seek early curriculum counseling from the department chairman. Ma;or in Bacteriology : A bacteriology major must include the following courses: BIO 201-203 BIO 331-332, BIO 351, BIO 421-422, BOT 417 or 418, and BOT 551 or 557. Also required are CHM 211-213, CHM 331-336 and MTH 101. In selecting courses in conference with the advisee, the ad viser will consider the student's individual interests and professional goals. Students wishing to major in bacteriology are strongly advised to enroll in BIO 201, CHM 211 and MTH 101 during their freshm an year and to seek the advice of the department chairman as soon as the student has made a de cision to major in bacteriology. Prospective majors should obtain an automatic waiver in CBS 105-107 by taking BIO 201-203. Ma;or in Zoology: A zoology major must include the following courses: BIO 201-203, ZOO 311 or 312 BIO 331-332 or BIO 421-422. In addition, five elective, structured courses in biology (BIO, BOT, or ZOO prefixes) are required. Also required are CHM 211-213, and CHM 331-334. Electives in physics, mathematics, and a foreign langu age (preferably German, French, or Russian) are strongly recommended It is imperative that freshman complete the BIO 201-203 and the CHM 211-213 series during their first three quarters. In addition to serving as a terminal degree, the B.A. in Zoology provides a good preparation for advanced training in Medicine and Dentistry, as well as graduate work in Zoology. General requirements for graduate work at th e Master's Degree level are given on pages 132-133 Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Ma;or in Botany or in Bact e riology : Students are admitted for graduate work in Botany or in Bacteriology if they present th e requisite background in the biological sciences. The bachelor of arts or bac h e lor of science degree with a major in botany, zoology or biology is recommended in addition to a satis factory gr a de on the Graduate Record Examination.

PAGE 120

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 119 For a Masters degree in Botany or in Bacteriology, a minimum num ber of 45 credits is required of which: (1) a minimum of 24 credits in courses numbered 600 or above, (BOT, BIO or ZOO prefix) no more than 9 of which may be given for research (BOT 681) graduate seminar (BOT 691) or thesis (BOT 699); and ( 2) the remaining credits must be taken in courses numbered 400, 500 or above to meet the requirement of a minimum of 45 credits. Other requirements are : (3) completion of a Master's thesis approved by the student's committee or an equivalent amount of course work approved by the student's major advisor, and (4) satisfactory performance on a final oral examination administered by the student's committee within the depart ment. Ma;or in Zoology: A minimum of 45 credits must include 22 in biology courses (BIO, BOT, or ZOO prefixes) numbered 600 or above, not more than nine of which may be for the thesis. Other requirements are completion of a Master's thesis approved by the student's committee and satisfactory per formance on a final oral examination given by the Depa rtment Reading knowledge of one foreign language may be required by the student's committee. Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree: Ma;or in Biology: The Ph.D. in biology will be a cooperative effort in volving both the Zoology and Botany Departments. Each doctoral committee will include at least one faculty member from each department. Students may be admitted to the graduate program by either department The depart ment concerned would also be responsible for advising the student to (a) work toward the M.A. first or (b) work directly toward the Ph.D. Students advised to work toward the Ph.D. will have a supervisory com mittee appointed as soon as possible. The committee shall approve the course of study to be followed by the student, supervise his research conduct his qualifying and final oral examinations, and approve his doctoral dissertation. The student's major professor will serve as chairman of his committee until the final oral examination. The Admission to Candidacy will be issued by the Dean of the College upon receipt of a statement from the supervisory committee indicating that the student has successfully completed his language and qualifying ex aminations. In order to gain the experience that comes from teaching, satis factory service as a teaching assistant for one academic year is required (unless a specific exemption is recommended by the supervisory committee). The student is expected to complete all course work stipulated by his com mittee with at least a B ( 3.00) overall average. In general, the final oral examination will be a defense of the dissertation; however, other areas of the student's work may also be included. After all the above requirements are completed, the chairman of both departments will certify to the Dean of the College that the candidate is eligible for the de gree. MARINE BIOLOGY The field of marine biology is especially important in Florida and there is a good demand for trained personnel. Faculty members in both the Zoology and Botany Departments teach courses and conduct research in this area

PAGE 121

120 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Summer courses are given at the St. Petersburg Campus and include ZOO 546-547-Marine Invertebrate Zoology, BOT 543-Phycology, ZOO 519-Ichthyology, ZOO 523-Physiology of Marine Animals, ZOO 533-Physiology of Fishes, and ZOO 615-Plankton Systematics. Interested students should elect to major in either Zoology or Botany and, in addition to taking the major requirements, need to complete OGY 311-Introduction to Oceanog raphy, ZOO 546-547, and BOT 447-Marine Botany. This curriculum will pro vide a good foundation for graduate work in marine biology or oceanography. Programs for Teacher Education: For bachelor of arts degree secondary school teachers in biology, see page 80 For teachers in Junior College the M A degrees in Botany and Zoology are recommended For an alternative degree see page 92. CHEMISTRY Requirements for the B.A. Degree: A chemistry major must include the following chemistry courses: CHM 211, 212, 213, 321, 322, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 441, 442 443, 444 and 491. Other required courses include MTH 203, 303, 304, 305, and either PHY 221-222, 223-224, 225-226, or PHY 211-212, 213-214, 215-216, and 315. Two years of college level German, Russian, or French is strongly rec ommended The above courses constitute a minimum curriculum for a major in chemistry. It is recommended that this program be strengthened with additional courses to be selected by the student in consultation with his chemistry faculty adviser. To qualify for admission to graduate schools, a student should take additional courses which will emphasize his major in terest. Two programs for this purpose are as follows: Emphasis in Organic Chemistry: CHM 431, 433 511 Emphasis in Physical Chemistry: CHM 511, 521 MTH 401 or 405, and advanced physics elective. Requirements for the M.S. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 130-135 The curriculum for a chemistry major will vary with the area of his' thesis. The thesis will carry not less than four nor more than nine credits. A minimum of 45 credits including the thesis is required and one-half of these credits must be in chemistry courses numbered 600. No more than 15 credits in research and thesis may be counted toward the 45 credits required for the degree. The specific course requirements will be determined by his advisory committee on the basis of his diagnostic examination results and his proposed research. In addition to the course requirement, each student will present an oral defense of his thesis for approval of his advisory committee. Programs for Teacher Education: For bachelor of arts degree secondary school teachers in chemistr y see page 80. For master of arts degree for secondary school teachers in chemis try, see page 85

PAGE 122

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 121 For teachers in Junior College the M.S. degree in Chemistry is recom mended. For an alternative degree see pages 92-93. DIVISIONAL MAJOR The bachelor of arts divisional major is designed to serve students de siring a broad background such as science teachers, pre-medical students, and other pre-professional students. Major requirements in the Division of Natural Sciences are a minimum of 36 credits in the discipline of major concentration and a minimum of 24 credits in the division outside that discipline. These 24 credits must be approved by the student's advisor and must include a minimum of three at the 300 level or above. Prospective teachers should also consult the College of Education section of this catalog for information about certification requirements in the science field Pre medical and pre-dental students should contact the chairman of the Pre Medical Advisory Committee. The divisional major is not necessarily an adequate preparation for en trance into a graduate program in the natural sciences To strengthen the preparation, additional science and mathematics electives beyond the mini mum requirements may be recommended by the faculty adviser. By the proper addition of science and m a thematics electives beyond the minimum requirements, the divisional major can serve as a strong preparation adapted for graduate work in a wide range of interdisciplinary fields such as bio chemistry, microbiology biophysics, bacteriology space sciences, oceanog raphy, geochemistry, and geophysics. GEOLOGY Requirements for the B.A. Degree: A major in geology will normally indude CLY 201, 301, 302, 303, 311, 312, 313, 361, 503, 504, and seven elective credits in Geology In addition, the program must include CHM 211, 212, 213 ; PHY 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, and MTH 101. The student will choose, in consultation with his geology adviser, such additional courses in the Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics that support his major interest within the field of Geology. Se lection of a foreign language, preferably French, German, or Russian, is strongly recommended, especially for those students who intend to enter graduate school. An entering student anticipating a major in geology is advised to en roll in CLY 201 301, and CHM 211, 212, 213 in the freshman year and to seek curriculum counseling with a Geology adviser early in his college career. Requirements for the M.A Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 130-135. Students are admitted for graduate work in Geology if they present the requisite background in geology and supporting sciences. The bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree with major in geology, or major in other natural science with strong supporting program in the geosciences is recommended in addition to a satisfactory grade on the Graduate R ecord Examination.

PAGE 123

122 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS The curriculum for a geology major will vary with the area of his thesis but will include the following: a minimum of 23 credits in courses numbered 600 or above, no more than nine of which may be given for the thesis; either a written thesis in a field or specialization approved by the advisory committee ( 2-9 credits) and an examination based on the results of an original study, or an equal number of credits of graduate level courses in geology; and additional credits in geology from the upper level may be scheduled to make a minimum of 45 credits beyond the bachelor's degree and exclusive of prerequisites. Teacher Education: For bachelor of arts degree secondary school teachers desiring to teach science at the secondary level should include basic courses in Geology and Earth Scienc e as part of their curriculum. Some courses also give graduate credit. For teachers in Junior College the M .A. degree in Geology is recom mended. For an a lternative d egree, see pages 92-93. Marine Geology One of the major divisions of marine study, marine geology, is a part of the program of the Geology Department Courses and research in marine geoscience are conducted in the department, or in nearby marine environ ments A geology major may, as a part of his program and with the guidance of his adviser, select electives from among CLY 411 Marine Geology, CLY 521 Geophysics, CLY 583 Selected Topics, and others that prepare him for graduate work in m arine geological environments or for some phases of profess iona l wo rk. A major interested in marine geology should contact the chairman of the department for further d e tails. OCEANOGRAPHY PROGRAM The program in Oceanograph y offers one undergraduate course ( OGY 311) and four graduate courses ( OGY 521, 531, 541, 551). There are plans to offer a ddition a l courses at the graduate level an d eventually, a master's degree in Oceanography Undergraduates with an interest in oceanography a re urged to major in a field of their choice (Zoo l ogy, Botany Geology, Chemistry, Physic s or Engineering ) After receiving th e bachelor's degree, th e student should seek a broad training in oceanography at the graduate lev el. MATHEMATICS Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Majors must h ave 47 cred it s in mathematics, including MTH 101, 302, 303 304, 305, 309 and 323. (MTH 101 is not required of tho se who begin with MTH 302. MTH 423 and MTH 424 are required for a major in mathematics for teaching .) Suggested upper l eve l courses for a major in mathematics and for a major in m athe matics for tea c hing in secondary school are as follows: Majors in Mathematics: MTH 405 40 6 511 513 514 515, 523, 524 .531, and 532

PAGE 124

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 123 Majors in Mathematics for Teaching: MTH 345, 405, 420, 445, and 531. Variation in course selection for special needs is to be done in con sultation with the appointed adviser. The following is suggested course program for the first two academic years : I MTH 101 MTH 304, 323 Freshman II MTH 302 Sophomore MTH 305 Requirements for the M.A. Degree: III MTH 303, 309 MTH elective ( 2) General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 130-135 A thesis is optional. The thesis program requires a minimum of 36 credits of course work, plus the thesis carrying three to nine credits. The non-thesis program requires 45 credits of course work. In either case one-half of the course work must be taken in courses numbered 600 or above and the pro gram must total at least 45 credits. For each of the above programs, one of the following three 8-hour courses is required: MTH 614-615, 624-625, 632-633, and eight hours in each of disciplines-analysis algebra, and topology. MTH 691 is required each quarter, and may be omitted or taken more than six times only with the permission of the chairman. A reading knowledge of either French, German or Russian is required A comprehensive examination will be given to candidates before recommending that the degree be granted For bachelor of arts degree secondary teachers in mathematics, see page 80. For master of arts degree for teachers in mathematics, see page 85. For an alternative degree, for Teacher's in Junior College see pages 92-93 PHYSICS Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Majors must have one year of general physics (consisting of either PHY 2ll through 216 and 315, or PHY 221 through 226), PHY 307, 341, 407, 409, 507, 509, plus one advanced laboratory Additional physics courses sufficient to total 42 credits are required ; 30 of these credits must be in courses numbered 300 or above. The student will also take MTH 401 and CHM 213 Student s registering for a physics course which has an associated labora tory must also register for the laboratory or obtain written permission from the chairman of the Physics Department to register for the course only. Selection of a foreign language, preferably French, German, or Russian, is also strongly recommended. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 130-135 A minimum of 45 credits, not more than nine of which may be for thesis research and writing. Of these 45 credits, 24 must be in courses num bered 600 or above. The mathematics proficiency test is also required.

PAGE 125

124 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS When a student is admitted to the graduate program in physics, an advisory committee will be appointed by the chairman for each student. This committee will serve in the capacity of an advisor and will also keep close check on the progress of the student in his work. The committee will have the right to add any special requirement to meet any deficiency in background and will administer a comprehensive examination to the student before recommending that a degree be granted. Programs for Teacher Education: For a B.A degree second a ry school teacher in physics see page 80. For M A degree for te a cher in phy sics, see page 85. For tea chers in Junior Coll e ge, the M A degree in phy sics is recommended For an alternative degree see pages 92-93. Division of Social Sciences The social sciences a re concerned with man his development problems and institutions. They help the student to understand the world around him and to become a more informed citizen. In addition the social sciences can prepare a student for employment in business, government and social service professions either upon graduation or upon completion of additional graduate Students in the Social Science Division take majors in the departments of Anthropology, Geography, History Political Science, Psychology and Sociology. Economics offers two majors, one in Liberal Arts and the other in the College of Business In addition to these departmental majors, there are several kinds of interdisciplinary majors such as International S t udies and the social studies major for high school teachers. Most social science majors require statistics. The s tudent would do well to take elementary college mathematics courses to prepare him for statistics. All social sciences require clarity and a ccuracy of English expression. The student should take such English, speech and journalism courses as might contribute to this skill Typing is not essential but is a useful skill and should be cultivated The specific requirements of each major are outlined below A few graduate level courses are now offered in several social science departments and the Master of Arts degree is offered in Psychology and Sociology. ANTHROPOLOGY The major in Anthropology consists of a minimum of 44 quarter hours in the field. This must include ANT 201, 202, and 203 which are pre requisite to all subsequent anthropology courses. ANT 302, 311 313, and 325 are required as intermediate level training in the main sub-divisions of the field and ANT 491, the Senior Seminar, completes the specific course re quirements. The remaining 12 hours may be elective ANT courses determined by interest and availability. Exceptions to course prerequisites require the consent of the chairman

PAGE 126

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 125 ECONOMICS The liberal arts major in economics requires 54 credits in economics, in cluding ECN 201-202, 301, 323, 331, 401, ACC 201-202-203, and 17 hours of upper level electives in Economics. GEOGRAPHY A major in geography consists of a mmrmum of 45 quarter h9urs in geography courses, including GPY 201, 301-302, and nine hours in each of the following : GPY 403, 405, 409. The latter three courses are to be planned and coordinated with the adviser, inasmuch as several different courses are included under each number. In addition, majors are required to take CLY 473 or 533, and a course in statistics (SSI 301 or MTR 345 or ECN 331). Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 130-135. All students must complete 45 credit hours in graduate geography courses, following one of the two plans outlined below. A written and oral comprehensive examination covering the general field of geography is required before graduation. And the student must demonstrate his ability to translate into English the pertinent scientific literature from one modem foreign language. Foreign students, whose mother tongue is not English, may use English as their foreign language. Thesis Program: The 45 credit hours in geography must include: GPY 501, 503, 505, 507, 603, 605, 607 and 699. Up to 8 credits outside the department may be elected with the approval of the student's committee and major professor. An oral defense of the thesis is required. Non-Thesis Program: The 45 credit hours in geography must include: GPY 501, 503, 505, 507, 601, 603, 605, and 607. Up to 4 credits outside the department may be elected with the approval of the student's committee and major professor Nine additional credit hours will be in supervised teach ing at the university level. GERONTOLOGY Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Students from a wide variety of undergraduate backgrounds are admitted for graduate work in gerontology. The Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Sciences degree in the biological sciences, the social sciences, and business are illustrative. Admission is based on work experience, graduate record exami nation scores, and grade point ratio. The curriculum for a gerontology major includes four quarters of multi disciplinary courses in the Institute on Aging and a one-quarter field placement in the service agency. Including field placement 56 quarter hours are offered in the field of specialization Appropriate undergraduate preparation or other graduate courses may be substituted for these courses.

PAGE 127

126 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS HISTORY Requirements for the B.A. Degree: The undergraduate curriculum in history is composed of the introductory course HTY 100, the advanced courses HTY 485, 587 591 592 and the following fields: Field I Ancient History consisting of courses HTY 201, 202, 321, 322, 325, 326 CLS 321, CLS 527, CLS 529; Field II Medieval History, consisting of courses HTY 221, 222, 324, 327, 328, 329, 423; Field III European History, consisting of courses HTY 231, 232, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338, 341, 342, 345, 346, 347, 425, 426, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 455; Field IV American History consisting of courses HTY 211, 212, 301, 302, 315, 316, 317, 319, 320, 347, 409, 410, 411, 412, 421, 422; Field V Latin American History, consisting of courses HTY, 251, 252, 331, 353, 355, 451, 453; and Field VI Comparative History, consisting of courses HTY 327, 328, 331, 345 346, 425, 426 427, 428, 429, 430, 461, 465. A minimum of 48 quarter hours is required for a major. From Part I HTY 100 and any other two of the following sequences are required: HTY 201, 202; HTY 221, 222; HTY 231, 232; or HTY 251, 252 With the consent of a departmental advisor, cross-selection may be permitted From Parts II and Ill, a minimum of sixteen hours is required in 300 or above level courses Of these sixteen hours, twelve must be taken within one of the six fields. From Part III, at least one HTY 591 (Pro-Seminar), HTY 587, and HTY 592 are required ( HTY 587 and 592 should be taken during the senior year). CLS 321, 527, and 529 will be accepted toward satisfying the requirements in the field of Ancient History History majors, in addition, should take SPE 201 (Fundamentals of Speech), ENG 325 (Advanced Expository Writing) and at least 27 quarter hours drawn from the following disciplines: Anthropology Economics Geography, Political Science, Psychology, Philosophy, Literature, the Humanities, and the Fine Arts. Majors intending to pursue graduate work should take a minimum of two years of classical or modem foreign language. Majors, whether intending graduate work or not should have at least two courses from the Interdisciplinary Social Science Program. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: The graduate curriculum in History is composed of a core program a thesis and course work in the following fields: Field I American History to 1865; Field II American History since 1865; Field III Early Modern European History; Field IV Modem European History; Field V Medieval History; Field VI Latin American History; and Field VII Comparative History. In addition to the general requirements of the University, a candidate is required to complete a total of 52 quarter hours, 8 of which shall comprise a thesis. At least 30 quarter hours must be in fo1mal regularly scheduled course work, 24 of which must be at the 600 level. Credit for any coursework at the 300 or 400 level must be approved by the Dean of the Division and reported to the USF Graduate Council and the Dean of Academic Affairs. Students applying for acceptance of work at this level must be given additional work not expected of regular students in these courses and the completed work must demonstrate a superior level of performance. Courses at the 500

PAGE 128

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 127 level are acceptable for credit toward the Master's Degree without prior approval when taken as part of a pl anne d degree program. The core courses, HTY 600, 601, 602 are required of all candidates. A reading proficiency in one foreign language must be demonstrated. A satisfactory preparation in the core program, two fields and the thesis is required in a comprehensive examination for graduation. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES Three programs are currently offered in the International Studies Pro gram: International Relations Non-Western Studies, and Latin American Studies. The core curriculum common to the three includes five courses: ANT 201-203, ECN 201-202, GPY 201. Eighteen credits of an appropriate foreign language above the 100 level (or equivalent proficiency) are required. Each student's program must be planned with the international studies adviser, who is empowered to make appropriate substitutions when educa tionally justified All three majors are encouraged to take ENG 325 ( 4) and SPE 201 (5) or 363 (5). Additional special requirements in the three programs follow. Up to nine credits may be substituted for these requirements by successfully passing CBS 395, Overseas Study. International Relations Program International Relations majors must select 10 courses from the list below, from at least three departments, and including a minimum of 6 courses of International Relations content (indicated by asterisks): ANT 302, 303 (any foreign region) 415, 461; ECN 351, 405; GPY 301, 302, 407 (any foreign region); HTY 251, 252, 333, 334, 337, 338, 341, 342, 345, 346, 347, 409, 410, 429, 430, 461; POL 311, 331, 333, 410, 411, 415, 421, 445, 561, 573; SOC 371, 541, 571; SSI 311, 315, 341, 343, 345, 347, 361, 449, 505 Non-Western Studies Program Non-Western Studies majors must select 10 courses from the list below, from at least three departments, and including a minimum of 6 courses of Non-Western content (indicated by asterisks): ANT 302, 303 (Asia or Africa), 415, 461; ECN 351, 405; GPY 301, 302, 407 (Asia or Africa); HTY 409, 410, 461 ; HUM 539, 541, 542, 543, POL 331, 410, 411, 421, 445, 561 573; SOC 371, 541 571; SSI 343, 345, 347, 361, 449, 505. Latin American Studies Program Latin American studies majors must select 10 courses from the list below, from at least three departments, and including a minimum of 6 courses of Latin American content (indicated by asterisks) : ANT 302, 303 (Latin America), 415, 461; ECN 351, 405, 451, 461; GPY 301, 302, 407 (Latin America); HTY 251, 252, 353, 355, 409, 410, 451, 453, 461 591 (Latin America); HUM 545; POL 331, 561; SOC 371, 541, 571; SSI 311, 315, 341'!, 361, 449, 505.

PAGE 129

128 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS POLITICAL SCIENCE Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Majors must have at least 44 credits in the field. Each major must pursue a core program, including POL 199, 201, 203 or 453 431 or 432, 461 or 462 or 463, 311 or 331, 351, 491, and SSI 301. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate study are given on pages 130-135. The student must complete a minimum of 45 quarter hours of graduate political science courses At least 24 hours must be at the 600 level. The minimum of 30 quarter hours must be taken in formal, regularly scheduled classes, 15 hours of which must be at the 600 level. Courses at the 500 level are acceptable for credit towards the masters degree when taken as part of a planned degree program, approved by both the student's adviser and the Department of Political Science. The following courses are required of all graduate students in this program: POL 600 or POL 643 or both. A minimum of 28 quarter hours must be taken in political science; 8 quarter hours of approved electives outside the Department, and 9 quarter hours of thesis credits. A comprehensive written examination will follow the completion of the course work toward the degree. Students who do not have an undergraduate major in political science, or its equivalent, may be admitted to candidacy in the program upon consent of the Department. Such students may be required to take additional courses beyond the minimum requirements A minimum of one-half of the masters degree program must be com pleted on campus. The student must be registered as a full-time graduate student for one quarter or two summer sessions. PRE-LAW The American Association of Law Schools suggests that students pre paring for law school should acquire the following basic skills: ( 1) effective expression, both written and oral, in English language; ( 2) critical practice in the use of creative and analytical reasoning in a variety of problem solving situations. Students wishing to major in pre-legal studies should consult with the pre-law advisor. PSYCHOLOGY Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Majors must complete at least 40 credits in the field. All majors must complete PSY 201, 311, 411, SSI 301 and select three of the following courses: PSY 323, 331, 433, 501, and either 505 or 506. In addition, 12 elective credits in Psychology courses must be completed. Functional mathe matics and biological science in the College of Basic Studies are recommended Otherwise students majoring in psychology are encouraged to complete a varied undergraduate program.

PAGE 130

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 129 Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate study are given on pages 130-135. The student must complete 45 credit hours of graduate psychology courses. Approval of undergraduate courses for college credit must be given by both the student's adviser and department chairman. The following courses are required of all graduate students in this program: PSY 601, 602. The student also selects three of the following courses: either PSY 501 or 507; either 505 or 506; 603, 605, either 606 or 608. The remaining credits will be selected from available psychology courses at the graduate level. A thesis is required and the student must successfully complete an oral exami nation on the thesis and courses which he has completed in the program. SOCIAL SCIENCE DIVISIONAL MAJOR This major is designed to provide broad training for superior students whose interests or vocational objectives cross disciplinary lines. (Students who have difficulty maintaining a B average or students with restricted interests should not attempt it.) It requires 64 credits in the division, with at least 20 credits in one discipline, to be selected with the consent of the major adviser At least three courses are required in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (Pre fix "SSI"), one of which shall be SSt 301. At least 40 hours must be upper level. A different kind of divisional major for prospective teachers of social studies is described under the College of Education requirements. SOCIOLOGY Requirements for the B.A. Degree: The major consists of a minimum of 40 quarter hours which must include SOC 201, 321, 491, 515 and SS! 301; at least one course from SOC 331, 533, 535; and at least one from SOC 341, 345, 543. The following courses may not be counted in the 40 hour minimum for the major but may be elected as additional courses: SOC 251, 261, 481, and 505. A model program of recommended sequences may be obtained from the Sociology Department. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Minimum of 45 credits including SOC 611, 621, 623, 691 and 692, and a thesis. Admission to the M.A. Program: Satisfactory score on the Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude); two letters of reference from previous instructors; four courses in Sociology including Statistics and Methods of Research (SSI 301 and SOC 321) or equivalent. Documents are sent to the Registrar. Instructions for applicants are available from the Sociology Depart ment. General requirements for graduate study are given on pages 130-135.

PAGE 131

GRADUATE STUDY Master' s Degree Programs Offered COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Master of Business Administration. COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Master of Arts degree programs Elementary Education (with em p hasis on Curriculum, Supervision or Reading) Secondary Teaching Fields: Distributive Education English E d ucation English/Humanities Education French Education Mathematics Education Science Education {Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Physics) Social Science Education Spanish Education K-12 Certification Areas: Art Education Guidance Library and Audio Visua l Music Education Reading Education Specia l Education: Emotionally Disturbed Children, Gifted Children and Youth, Mental Retardation or Speech Pathology, Varying Exceptionalities Junior College Teaching: Astronomy Biology Chemistry English French Geography Geology Mathematics Music Physics Psychology Socio l ogy Spanish Speech Visual Arts 130

PAGE 132

GRADUATE STUDY 131 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING A Mas ter o f Engineering (Electrical) and a Master of Engineering (Ad ministrati on), Master of Science in Engineering COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Master of Arts degree programs. Astronomy Bacteriology Botany English French Geology Mathematics Physics P sychology Sociology Spanish Speech Zoology Master of Fine Arts degree in Visual Arts Master of Science degree in Chemistry M a ster of Arts d e gree in Gerontology. Ph.D. Programs Offered COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Ph.D degree in Biology. Requirements for Admission to Graduate Study 1. DEGREE SEEKING GRADUATE STUDENTS Admission requirements for a degree-seeking graduate student s hall in clude: (a) A Baccalaureate degree or its equivalent from an approved colle ge o r university with an academ i c average of "B" in the last half of all credits earned as an undergraduate prior to receiving a de g r ee o r other acceptable evidence of ability to perform at the B lev e l in his graduate program. (b) Scores on the Graduate R ecord Examination aptitude test sati s factory to the program or department in which students will do their work. A student may be provisionall y admitt e d b y presenting satisfactor y scores on s uch examinations as the Nati o nal Teacher Examination or Business A d ministration Examination, with the un d erstan d ing t hat the GRE will be t aken during the first term of e nrollment. These examinations must have been taken within five years preceding application for admission. ( c) Approval by an official of the program for whic h the student is applying. (d) Any additional requirements which are specified .by his program. ( e) Foreign students a re required to present satisfactory scores on t he Test of English a s a Foreign L anguage. () Accept a nce into an approv e d program leading directly to a gra d uate d egre e

PAGE 133

132 GRADUATE STUDY 2. NON-DEGREE SEEKING GRADUATE STUDENTS Students who are qualified to enroll in specific graduate course.5 but who either do not desire to enroll in a degree program, or do not meet all admission requirements for a degree program, or who are awaiting admission processing may be admitted as "non-degree graduate students." Up to 12 hours of credit earned while in this status may be applied to graduate require ments under the following conditions: (a) At the time of enrollment in the course, the student must have a Baccalaureate degree, or he must complete degree requirements during that term and the course must be beyond those req]lirements. (b) The course must be of such level and relevance as to be included in the degree program approved for this student should he seek admission to degree seeking status. Regulations Governing Graduate Study Master's Degree MAJOR PROFESSOR OR ADVISOR A major professor or adviser will be named for the student in his first term of work. The major professor is named by the division or department concerned, with the agreement of both student and professor. PROGRAM OF STUDY AND COURSE REQUIREMENTS During the first term of study, in consultation with his adviser, the student should plan a program of work to be completed for satisfaction of degree requirements. A minimum of 45 quarter hours is required for a Master's degree, at least 24 hours of which must be at the 600 level. At least 30 hours must be in formal, regularly scheduled course work, 15 of which must be at the 600 level. Courses at the 500 level are acceptable for credit towards the Master's degree when taken as a part of a planned degree program. (For five year programs, refer directly to the statement under the program.) A major professor adviser may approve up to 6 hours of 400 level courses if taken as part of a planned degree program. Additional graduate credit may be earned in 300 or 400 level courses only if specifically approved by the appropriate dean and by the Graduate Council. Students enrolled in undergraduate courses as a part of their planned degree program will be expected to demonstrate a superior level of performance. QUALITY OF WORK Graduate students must attain an overall average of 3.0 ( B) in all courses. No grade below "C" will be accepted toward a graduate degree, but all grades will be counted in computing the overall average (GPA). LOAD A student taking nine or more hours of graduate work in afull quarter

PAGE 134

GRADUATE STUDY 133 will be classified as a full-time student. The normal maximum load is 13 hours in a full quarter. RESIDENCY Each college specifies residency requirement as an integral its statement about the Master's degrees it offers. (See the residency requirement for the program in which you wish to enroll.) part of Transfer of credit from another recognized graduate school is limited to nine quarter hours. All transfered credit must (1) be evaluated as graduate credit by the Director of Admissions (2) be approved by the program or college concerned, and (3) have been completed with grades of "B" or better. TIME LIMIT All work applicable to the Master's degree requirements mu st be com pleted witJ:lln the seven years immediately preceding the awarding of the degree. AP.P.l..1CATION FOR DEGREE ; By the end of the third of the quarter in which he expects to receive a degree, the student must file an application for a diploma with the Office of the Registrar. FINAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION Prior to clearance for the d egr ee, the candidate mu st perform satisfactorily on examination in his major field. THESIS Wpen a thesis is required, two copies, an original and one other l egib l e copy, of the approved thesis must be submitted t o the Vice President of A ca demic Affairs before the studen t may be certified for his degree. These copies will serve for appropriate filing in the Library of the University. Ph.D. Degree The d egree of D octor of Philosophy is granted in recognition of high attainment in a specific field of knowledge. It is a research degr ee and sho uld not be conferred solely on the comp letion of credits and a sequence of courses or b y the acquiring of a number of terms of residency. The amount of residence and the requirements suggested below are a minimum. The degree shall be granted on evidence of proficiency and distinctive achieve ment in a specified field, by the demonstration of the ability to do original independent investigation and the presenting of these findings with a high degree of literary skill in a dissertation. SUPERVISORY COMMITTE'E A student working for his Ph.D degree must elect to do the majority

PAGE 135

134 GRADUATE STUDY of his work in a specifically approved area or department, and the remainder of his work in related fields. As soon as possible after starting work -leading toward a Ph.D. degree, a supervisory committee shall be appointed for the student by the Dean of his college on recommendation of the chairman of the department or area in which the degree is sought. This committee shall ap prove the outline of the course of study to be followed by the student, conduct qualifying examinations for the student, supervise the research of the student and conduct final oral examinations for the student. The director of the research shall serve as chairman of the committee up to the final oral exami nation. This committee shall certify to the Dean of its college when all requirements have been met and the degree is to be granted. The super visory committee shall consist of at least five members, at least three of which must come from the area in which the major work for the degree will be done. LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT Before a student is eligible to take the qualifying examination, he must have completed a reading knowledge of two foreign languages (except for substitutions noted below.) Special work done outside the student's field of concentration and related subjects may be substituted for one language, provided this exception is recommended by the student's advisory and is approved by the Dean of Academic Affairs. RESIDENCE The minimum requirement shall be three academic years of work above the Bachelor's degree. At least one academic year of residence must be on the campus at the University of South Florida. An academic year's residency shall be defined as carrying a minimum of nine hours of graduate work per term or be certified by the chairman of the advisory committee that the student is doing full time research or a combination of these two. Whenever a student wishes to be considered as in full time residence, he must pay the full registration fee. Any graduate work counted toward the fulfillment of the requirement of the Ph.D. degree after admission to candidacy must be done within a seven calendar year period. QUALIFYING EXAMINATION At least one academic year before the degree may be granted, the student must pass a written qualifying examination over the subject matter of his major and related fields. An oral examination may also be required by his committee. The completion of the qualifying examination before mid-term will allow that term to be counted in full toward the academic year required. If the degree is not conferred within five calendar years of the qualifying examination, the qualifying examination must be taken again. ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY A graduate student does not become a candidate for the Ph.D. degree until he is formally admitted to candidacy. This admission may not be granted until a certified statement from his advisory committee to the Dean of his

PAGE 136

GRADUATE STUDY 135 college is submitted stating that he has successfully completed his qualifying examinations and in the opinion of his advisory committee he has demon strated the qualifications necessary to successfully complete his requirements for the degree. The certificate of admission shall be issued by the Dean of his college, and the degree shall not be granted in less than one academic year after formal admission to candidacy (a school term shall be considered as part of this academic year, provided the admission is before mid-term). DISSERTATION At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, a candidate must submit to the Dean of his college, for approval of mechanical form and content, a typewritten copy of a completed dissertation and abs tract signed by the committee. The dissertation must be the candidate's own work and must result from research done primarily _by the candidate. The research from this dissert;ation must be original and worthy of publication in a scholarly journal or book. FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION The final oral examination in general should be a defense of the student's dissertation; however other areas of the student's work may also be included as part of this examination. It should be conducted by his advisory com mittee, but shall be chaired by a person, appointed by the Dean of his college, from a field outside of the student's major or related fields. FINAL FILING OF DISSERTATION Two copies, an original and one other legible copy of the approved dissertation must be submitted to the D ean of Academic Affairs before the student can be certified for his degree These copies will serve for appropriate filing in the Library of the University.

PAGE 137

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS All courses offered for credit by the University of South Florida are listed on the following pages in alphabetical order according to subject are a. The first line of each description includes the prefix and course numb e r title, and number of credits. Credits separated by a colon indicate con c urr ent lecture and laboratory .. __ taught as a unit: PHY 211-212. GENERAL PHYSICS (3:1) Credits separated by commas indicate unified cour'Ses offered in different quarters: HTY 211, 212. AMERICAN HISTORY (3,3) Credits separated by a hyphen indicate variable credit: CBS 395. OVERSEAS STUDY (1-9) The following abbreviations are utilized in various course descriptions: PR Prerequisite CI With the consent of the instructor CC With the consent of the chairman of the department or program CR Corequisite lee-lab. Lecture and laboratory Course descriptions are listed under the following headings (prefix in parentheses): Accounting (ACC) Engineering: American Studies (AMS) Basic Engineering (EGB) Anthropology (ANT) Electrical and Electronic Systems tEGE) Art (ART) Energy Conversion (EGR) Astronomy (AST) Industrial Systems (EGS) Basic Studies (CBS) Structural Materials and Fluids (EGX) Biology, Interdisciplinary (BIO) Technical Service Course Work (ETK) Botany and Bacteriology (J30T) English (ENG) Chemistry (CHM) Finance (FIN) Classics and Ancient Studies (CLS) Fine Arts, lntradivisional (FNA) Cooperative Education (COE) French (FRE) Dance (DAN) General Business Administration (GBA) Developmental Mathematics (DMA) Geography (GPY) Economics (ECN) Geology (GLY) Education: German (GER) Art Education (EDA) Gerontology (AGE) Business Education (EDB) History (HTY) Curriculum (EDC) Humanities (HUM) Distributive Education (EDD) Interdisciplinary Language-Literature Elementary Education (EDE) (LLI) English Education (EDT) Italian (IT A) Foreign Language Education (EDX) Journalism (JNM) Foundations (EDF) Linguistics (LIN) Guidance (EDG) Management (MGT) Humanities Education (EDY) Marketing (MKT) Junior College Education (EDH) Mathematics (MTH) Library-Audio Visual Education (EDL) Music (MUS) Music Education (EDM) Oceanography, Interdisciplinary (OGY) Natural Science-Mathematics Education Office Administration (OAD) (EDN) Philosophy (PHI) Physical Education for Teachers (EDP) Physical Education, Basic (PED) Reading Education (EDR) Physics (PHY) Social Studies Education (EDW) Political Science (POL) Special Education (EDS) Psychology (PSY) 136

PAGE 138

Spanish (SPA) Speech (SPE) ACCOUNTING 137 Religious Studies (REL) Romance Languages (ROM) Russian (RUS) Social Sciences, Interdisciplinary (SSI) Sociology (SOC) Speech Pathology and Audiology (SAi) Theatre Arts (TAR) Zoology (ZOO) NOTE: Courses numbering 500 through 599 are open only to upper division and graduate students. Courses numbering 600 and above are open to graduate students only. ACCOUNTING Faculty: L. C. Jurgensen, chairman; Causey, Deyo, Hurd, McClung, McCormick, Merriam, Merritt, Lasseter, Roberson, West, Zelechowski. ACC 201. ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING (3) Study of basic accoi:inting principles including the recording and reporting of financial activity. The preparation and interpretation of financial statements. ACC 202. ELEMENT ARY ACCOUNTING (3) Pr: ACC 201. Accounting theory and practices for '(_!U"ious equity structures. ACC 203. ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING (3) PR: ACC 202. Financial statements, reports, and other analytical tools used by management. ACC 301. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (3) PR: ACC 203. Principles underlying financial statements; current assets; current liabilities. ACC 302. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (3) PR: ACC 301. Continuation of principles underlying financial statements; present values; long-term investments; plant and equipment; intangibles; long-term li a bilities. ACC 303. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING ID (3) PR: ACC 302. Continuation of principles underlying finan cia l statements; capital structure; ana ly sis and interpretation of accounting data; funds How analysis. ACC 305. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3) PR: ACC 203 and ECN 201. The use of acco unting data in planning and con trolling business operations. Special emp h asis is placed on budgetary controls, cost-volume-profit analysis, long-range p l anning, and tax considerations. ACC 323. GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING (3) PR: ACC 203. Study of the application of fund accounting principles to govern mental units and agencies including preparation, administration, and interpreta tion of budgets and financial statements. ACC 401. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (3) PR: ACC 303. The study of special probl ems in a ccounting rel ate d to partner ships, sales procedures, fiduci aries, and insolvencies. ACC 402. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (3) PR: ACC 303. Special topics including consolidations and foreign operations. ACC 411. FEDERAL TAXES (3) PR: ACC 203. An introduction to the federal income tax structure Use of tax services and the concept of taxable income as applies to individuals. ACC 412. FEDERAL TAXES (3) PR: ACC 411. Continued study of the federal income tax structure. Special topics and the concept of taxable income as applied to corporations. ACC 413. FEDERAL TAXES (3) PR: ACC 411. The concept of taxable income as applied to partnerships and fiduciaries. Introduction to estate, gift and social security taxes.

PAGE 139

138 ACCOUNTING ACC 421. COST ACCOUNTING I (3) PR: ACC 203. Deals with the identification of costs relevant for decision-making and the accounting techniques used in determining, analyzing, and allocating these costs. ACC 422. COST ACCOUNTING Il (3) PR: ACC 421. A continuation of accounting for, and analysis of, costs as re lated to dep artments, products, or issues for management decisions. ACC 423. AUDITING (3) PR: ACC 303 and 421. Principles and procedures of internal and public audit ing. The ethics, responsibilities, standards, and reports of professional auditing. ACC 424. ADVANCED AUDITING (3) PR : ACC 423. Continuation of ACC 423. Emphasis directed towards the appli cation of auditing standards and techniques in achieving audit objectives. Rela tionship of professional auditing to regulatory authorites. ACC 425 BUDGETING (3) PR: ACC 421. The development of budgets and their relation to expense and cost control, including the use of standard cost as a budgetary tool ACC 431. CONTROLLERSIDP (3) PR : CI. The problems of financial officers of business organizations and the theory and techniques used in solving these problems. ACC 433. C.P.A. REVIBW (3) PR: CI. A review of the various areas of accounting, including concepts; co s t governmental, asset, liability, and equity accounting; consolidations; financial statements; and budgeting. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ACC 501. ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS AND METIIODOLOGY I (3) A study of basic accounting principles including the recording of transactions and the preparation and interpretation of financial statements. ACC 502. ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS AND METIIODOLOGY Il (3) PR: ACC 501. A continuation of ACC 501. Consideration is given to budgetin g and cost accounting. Emphasis is placed upon the analysis of financial condition and business operations through an understanding of accounting statements and reports. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY ACC 601. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING AND CONTROL (3) A study of the relevancy and limitations of accounting measurement as a b as i s for business decision-making. Includes a review of fundamental a c countin g measurement theory and related tax implications ACC 602. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING AND CONTROL (3) PR: ACC 601. The relevancy and limitation of cost information in business decision-making. Emphasis is oriented towards the role of cost accounting m e a s urements in: (1) planning and controlling curr ent op e rations ; (2) special d e cisions and long-range planning; and (3) inventory valuation and income dete r mination. ACC 605. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING THEORY (3) A study and evaluation of the development and evolution of current accounting theory and measurement concepts. The definition of accounting objectives and goals and the development of measur e ment models ACC 607. SYSTEMS DESIGN AND DATA PROCESSING (3) The design and operation of contemporary accounting systems including the

PAGE 140

AMERICAN STUDIES 139 relevance of data processing and statistical methods to the system of financial information and control. ACC 609. CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS IN ACCOUNTANCY (3) PR: ACC 605 or CI. Concentrated study of current problem areas in the fie ld of accountancy. ACC 611. RESEARCH IN FEDERAL TAXATION (3) A study of the development of tax law and its implications in business d ecisions. Tax planning and tax research are emphasized. ACC 621. MANAGERIAL COST ANALYSIS (3) Measurement, interpretation, planning and control of costs by m eans of prede t ermined standards and variance analysis. Use of accounting and statistical in formation in preparing budgets and controlling operations. ACC 623. CASE PROBLEMS IN PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANCY (3) The s tudy of elements of public accounting practice, prof essio nal con duct a udit ing principles and reporting standards. The relationship of the field of public accountin g to federal and state agencies. AMERICAN STUDIES Faculty: Harkness, Moore, O'Hara, Robertson, Stanton, Warner. AMS 301. INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (4) Integr a tion of major aspects of American life between 1898 and 1914. Should be taken the first term a student becomes an American Studies major. Elec tive for non-majors. AMS 311. THE COLONIAL PERIOD (4) Puritan heritage: The pattern of American culture as reveal e d through an examination of selected writings and pertinent slides and r eco rding s d ea lin g with the art, architecture and music of the period. Elective for non-majors. AMS 312. THE AGRARIAN MYTH (4) Frontier heritage: The pattern of American culture as revealed through an examination of selected writings and other pertinent materials d e aling with American faith and the American frontier environment (the land, city, machine) Elective for non-majors. AMS 313. REGIONALISM, NATIONALISM, INTERNATIONALISM (4) Select e d writing and other pertinent materials are used to examine the r e lation ships between nationalism and internationalism with a view toward understandin g Ame rica's development toward political and cultural maturity. Elective for non-majors. AMS 383. SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (4) Off ering s to include The Negro American; Eminent Americans ; The American C ity: Past, Present and Future; The American Dream: R eality and M y th. AMS 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (4) Off erings to include The Negro American; Eminent Americans ; The Ame ri can City: Past, Present and Future; The American Dream: Reality and Myth. AMS 491, 492. SENIOR SEMINARS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (4, 4) Intens ive study of masterpieces representative of several aspects of American culture. AMS 493. VIOLENCE IN THE U.S.A FROM THE REVOLUTION TO THE PRESENT (4) ENG. 305. MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS TO 1865 (4) See course description under ENGLISH. HTY 411. AMERICAN SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (4) S ee course description und e r HISTORY

PAGE 141

140 ANTHROPOLOGY HTY 421. THE AMERICAN ECONOMIC PROGRESS (4) See course description unde r HISTORY HUM 535. HUMANITIBS IN AMERICA (3) S e e cour s e description unde r HUMANITIES. PHI 413. AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY (4) See cour s e d es cription unde r PHILOSOPHY. ANTHROPOLOGY F ac ulty: Gran ge chairman; Bonney, Kessler, Waterman, Orona ANT 201. INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (4) A ge n e ral survey of anthropology emphasizing basic concepts, outlining th e dev e lopment of the field and illustrating current problems and applic a tions. ANT 202. HUMAN ORIGINS (4) PR: ANT 201. A study of human biological and cultural origins with emph a si s on human evolution and paleolithic archaeology. ANT 203. SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR: ANT 201. A study of the elements of functioning cultures, including kin s hip s y stems patterns of marriage, social and political structure and economic organization. ANT 302. ETHNOLOGY (4) PR: ANT 201-202-200. A survey of cultures of the world using the culture area concept and/or comparative analysis to illustrate cultural distributions and levels of socio-cultural complexity. ANT 303. REGIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3-6) PR: ANT 201-202-203. A survey of cultures and anthropological problems in a limited area or region. May be repeated as topics vary. (1) Indians of North America (2) Cultures of Africa (3) Cultures of the Pacific (4) Indians of Latin Ame rica (5) Specified areas such as Asia, Southwestern U.S. or Florida depe nding or. current interest and staff. ANT 3ll. PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR: 201-202-203. An advanced course in the scope and methods of physical a nthropology with emphasis on current research topics. ANT 313. LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (4) PR: ANT 201-202-203. A review of the scope and methods of anthropolo gic al li n guistics and the role of language in human behavior and cultural d e v e lopment. ANT 325. ARCHAEOLOGY AND CIVILIZATION (4) PR : ANT 201-202-203. An examination of the archaeological and ethnologi c al data and theory concerning the development of food producing cultures and compl e x societies. ANT 403. HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY (4) PR: ANT 201-202-203. Intensive reading of classics in the development of anthropological thought, and periodic seminar discussion and analysis. ANT 4ll. .METHODS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3-6) PR: ANT 201-202-203; and CI. Study and application of a selected field or laboratory method in anthropology. Prerequisites beyond ANT 201-202-203 will depend on area of study and will be determined by consultation with instru c tor in advance of registration. May be repeated as topics vary. (1) Archaeologic a l Field Methods (2) Laboratory Methods in Archaeology (3) Laboratory Methods in Physical Anthropology (4) Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology (5) Etc. a s specified. ANT 415. ACCULTURATION AND CHANGE (4) PR: ANT 201-202-203. A study of the ories of culture change and a considera tion of the role of anthropol o gist in a ppli e d or action anthropology.

PAGE 142

ART 141 ANT 423. PROBLEMS IN NEW WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY (3-5) PR: ANT 201-202-203. A general review of new world archaeology or d e tailed consideration of the archaeology of a specified area or time period in North or South America. May be repeated as topics vary. ANT 4.61. THE COMMUNITY IN ANTiffiOPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE (4) PR: ANT 201-202-203. The anthropological approach to the analysis and study of modem communities and peasant societies. ANT 471. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (2-6) PR: ANT 201-202-203. A detailed study of current knowledge and problems in an area of topical interest such as ethnomusicology, primitive religion, or cul tural ecology. May be repeated as topics vary. ANT 491; SENIOR SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR: Senior Standing with Major in Anthropology, or equivalent. A seminar approach to the integration of the fields of anthropology. D es ignoc to help the s tudent refocus and come to a better understanding of the n a ture of anthro pology. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ANT 501. CULTURE AND PERSONALITY (4) PR: ANT 201-202-203 or CI. An intensive examination of the development of psychological anthropology and consideration of various theories concerning the relationship between personality and culture. ANT 581. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (3-6) PR: 24 hours in Anthropology O CI. Individual guidance in a selected research project. ANT 585. DIRECTED READINGS (1-6) PR: 24 hours in Anthropology or CI. Individual guidance in concentrated reading on a selected topic in anthropology. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY ANT 601. ANTimOPOLOGY TODAY (4) PR: CI. A graduate level survey of contemporary anthropology primarily intended for graduate students in Social Science Education. ART Faculty: Saff, chairman; Aydelott, J. R. Camp, Covington, Cox, Dietrich, Fager, Gelinas, Houk, Kowalek, Kronsnoble, Larsen, Manley, McCracken, Pappas, Rampolla, Stoeveken. ART 201. VISUAL FUNDAMENTALS-DRAWING I (3) Introduction to problems in drawing techniques and media ART 202. VISUAL FUNDAMENTALS-DESIGN I (3) Introduction to problems primarily in two-dimensional design. ART 301. VISUAL FUNDAMENTALS-DRAWING II (3) PR: ART 201. Further exploration of drawing techniques and media. ART 302. VISUAL FUNDAMENTALS-DESIGN II (3) PR: ART 202 Further exploration of two and three-dimensional design, in cluding letter forms as design elements. ART 310. INTRODUCTION TO ART (3) An introductory course for the student who does not intend to major in art.

PAGE 143

142 ART ART 401. VISUAL FUNDAMENTALS-DRAWING III (3) PR: ART 301. Continuation of ART 301. May be repeated. ART 402. VISUAL FUNDAMENTALS-DESIGN III (3) PR: ART 302. Continuation of ART 302. May be repeated. ART 4ll. PAINTING TECHNIQUES (3) PR: ART 401 and ART 402. ART 421. SCULPTURE TECHNIQUES (3) PR: ART 401 and ART 402. ART 431. CERAMIC TECHNIQUES (3) PR: ART 401 and ART 402. ART 441. GRAPHIC TECHNIQUES (3) PR: ART 401 and ART 402. Sec 001 Intaglio; Sec 002 Lithography; Sec 003 Silkscreen. ART 451. JEWELRY AND CRAFTS (3) PR: ART 401 and ART 402 Introductory course In the design and execution of jewelry and craft objects. ART 461. PHOTOGRAPHY I (3) PR: ART 401 and ART 402, or CI. Consideration of basic technical and aesthetic factors involved in using black and white still photography as a vehicle for visual, artistic expression. ART 462 PHOTOGRAPHY II (3) PR: ART 461. Consideration of basic technical and aesthetic factors involved in using color still photography as a vehicle for visual, artistic expression. ART 465. CINEMATOGRAPHY I (3) PR: ART 462 Consideration of basic technical and aesth e tic factors involved in using black and white silent motion pictures as a vehicle for visual, artistic expression. ART 466. CINEMATOGRAPHY II (3) PR: ART 465. Consideration of basic technical and aesthetic factors invol ve d in using color and sound motion pictures as a vehicle for visual, artistic expression. ART 470. PREHISTORIC AND ANCIENT ART (3) A comprehensive study of Paleolithic, Neolithic, Egyptian, Assyrian and Meso potamian painting, sculpture and architecture. ART 471. GREEK AND ROMAN ART (3) A comprehensive study of Aegean, Mycenaean, Etruscan, Greek and Roman painting, sculpture and architecture. ART 472. MEDIEVAL ART (3) A comprehensive study of early Christian, Byzantine and Medi eval painting, sculpture, architecture and manuscript illumination. ART 473. RENAISSANCE ART (3) A comprehensive study of Renaissance and Mannerist painting, sculpture and ar c hitecture in Italy and Northern Europe. ART 474. BAROQUE AND ROCOCO ART (3) A comprehensive study of the painting, sculpture and architecture in France, Ita ly, Spain and the Netherlands in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. ART 475. NINETEENTH CENTURY ART (3) A comprehensive study of nineteenth century painting. sculpture and architecture in France and England. ART 476. TWENTIETH CENTURY ART (3) A comprehensive study of painting, sculpture and architecture from Cezanne to the present in Europe and the United States. ART 477. ORIENTAL ART (3) An introduction to the history of the arts of China, Japan and other non-Western countries.

PAGE 144

ART 143 ART 481. DIRECTED STUDY (1-6) PR: CC. May be repeated. Independent studies in the various areas uf Vis u a l Arts. Course of study and credits must be assigned prior to registration. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ART 511. PAINTING (3) PR: ART 411. May be repeated. Advanced problems in the various painting t ec hniques. Emphasis on individual creative expression. ART 513. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ART HISTORY (3) l'R: CI. An intensive study of a particular period or problem in art his tory.' May be repeated. ART 521. SCULPTURE (3) PR: ART 421. May be repeated Advanced problems in the various technique s of sculpture. Emphasis on individual creative expression. ART 531. CEIMICS (3) PR: ART 431. May be repeated. Advanced problems in the various ceramic techniques, including throwing and glaze calculation. ART 541. GRAPIDCS (3) PR: ART 441. May be repeated. Advanced problems in the various graphic techniques. Emphasis on individual creative expression. Sec 001 Intaglio; Sec 002 Lithography; Sec 003 Silkscreen. ART 56L PHOTOGRAPHY ID (3) PR: ART 462. Advanced work in color and black and white photography cul minating in development of personal photographic artistic statement. ART 5.65. CINEMATOGRAPHY ID (3) PR: ART 466. Advanced studio work using black and white, color and sound as technical and aesthetic factors in visual, artistic productions. ART 569. PURE CINEMA AS AUTONOMOUS VISUAL EXPRESSION (3) PR: ART 461 or CI. Consideration of historical developments in cinematography emphasizing uses of special technical and visual possibilities unique to the aesthetics of the film art. ART 570 CRITICAL STUDIES IN ART IDSTORY (3) PR: CI. Specialized intensive studies in art history. Specific subject matter varies. To be announced at each course offering May be repeated. ART 581. RESEARCH (1-6) PR: CC. May be repeated. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY ART 611. PAINTING (3) PR: CI. May be r e p eate d. ART 621. SCULPTURE (3) PR: CI. May be repeated ART 631. CERAMICS (3) PR: CI. May be repeated. ART 641. GRAPHICS (3) PR: CI. May be repeated. Sec 001 Intaglio ; Sec 002 Lithography ; Sec 003 Silkscreen ART 665. CINEMATOGRAPHY (3) PR: CI. Advanced dev e lopment of t ech nical and aesthetic factors in the visual, artistic production of films. May be rep ea ted. ART 670. ART IDSTORY (3) PR: CI. Special intensive studies in assigned areas. May be repeated.

PAGE 145

144 ASTRONOMY ART 681. RESEARCH (1-6 ) PR : CI. M ay be r e p ea ted. ART 699. THESIS (1-6) PR: CI. M a y b e r e p ea ted ASTRONOM Y Faculty : Ei c hhorn-von Wurmb, chainnan; Devinney, Sofia, C. A. Williams, Wilson AST 201. INTRODUCTORY ASTRONOMY (5) Asp ec ts of the sky the e ar th's motion and time-keeping, the moon, eclipses, astronomical instrum e nts, motions and physical features of planets, comets and s a tellit es. AST 202. INTRODUCTORY ASTRONOMY (5) PR : AST 201 or CI. The stars, st e llar atmospheres and interiors, interstellar matter, the lo c al and e x t e ri o r g a l axies, cos molo gy. AST 361. ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVING AND MEASURING (1-3) PR: AST 201 and 202 or CI. A c tual m e asurements at the telescope and in the labor a tory ; evalu a tion of the data May be repeated up to three credit hours AST 371. CONTEMPORARY THINKING IN ASTRONOMY (for non-specialists) (5) PR: Junior or senior s tanding or CI. Current conc e pts of astronomy and space s ci en c e of general interests; background facts; artificial satellites, space probes; surface conditions of planets and e v olution of the stars; co s mology. AST 413. GEOMETRY AND KINEMATICS OF THE UNIVERSE (4) PR: AST 202 CR: MTH 303. Astronomical coordin a te systems and their mutual r e l a tionships navigation, time, motion of the pla n e ts. AST 443. STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS (5) PR : AST 202 or C I., MTH 303. The physical chara c teristics of stars the ir measurement, and their distribution. Analysis of stellar radiation. Double stars, asso ci a tions, clusters, galaxies. AST 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-6) PR : Senior or advanced junior standing and CI. Participation in professional re search with a view to publication of results. AST 491. ASTRONOMY SEMINAR (1) PR: Senior or adv anced junior standing and CI. M a y be repeated twice. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS AST 521. INTRODUCTION TO CELESTIAL MECHANICS (5) PR : MTH 305 and s ome knowledge of differenti a l equation s or Cl. The two body problem, artificial sat e llites, elements of p erturba tion theory. AST 522. BINARY STARS (4) PR : AST 202 or C.I., MTH 305. Principles us e d to find the properties of astrometric eclipsing, spectroscopic and visual binaries. AST 533. STELLAR CONSTITUTION AND EVOLUTION (4) PR: PHY 405. CR: MTH 405. Internal constitution of stars, physics of ga s spheres, energy g e neration in star s theories on stellar evolution. AST 53.6. INTRODUCTION TO RADIO ASTRONOMY (4) PR : AST 202 or C.I., MTH 303 Radio telescopes: principles and applications. Main res ults in planeta ry, solar, g a lactic and extra-gal ac tic radio-astronomy. Radk>galaxies and quasars AST 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN ASTRONOMY (1-6) PR : S e nior or adv a n ced junior standing and CC. Intensive coverage of special topics t o s uit n e e d s o f a d va n ce d s tudents.

PAGE 146

BASIC STUDIES 145 FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY AST 611. POSITIONAL ASTRONOMY (6) PR: AST 413 and CC. The accurate determination of relative and absolute star positions and related problems. AST 621. CELESTIAL MECHANICS (6) PR: AST 521 and CC. Dynamics of the planetary system, space flight, theory of artificial satellites. AST 631. STELLAR ATMOSPHERES (4) PR: AST 443 & MTH 406 or C.I. Basic observational data. Thermodynamics of the gaseous state. Elements of spectroscopy The transfer equation (continuum and lines). The problem of calculation of atmospheres. AST 661. PHOTOMETRY (4) PR: AST 202 or C.I., MTH 305. Theoretical, observational and instrumental concepts required in astronomical photometry AST 663. STATISTICAL REDUCTION OF OBSERVATIONS (6) PR: MTH 323, 445, or equivalents and CC. The theory of statistical adjustments (least squares) and applications. AST 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-9) PR: and CC. AST 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN ASTRONOMY (1-6) PR: and CC. AST 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (2) and CC. AST 699. MASTER'S THESIS (I-9) and CC. BASIC STUDIES Faculty : American Idea: Warner, chairman; P. Adams, Arnade, Bosserman, Obermeyer, Reilly, Robertson, W. A. Smith, Stevenson. Behavioral Science: Rich, chairman; Bayne, Benton, Blau, Brown, Burg, Dickey, J L Garcia, Gessner, Gilmore, Grubb, Guest, Hardy, Hopkins, Jenkins, McCor mick, Mitchell, N e wcomb, Norton, Pinkard, Powell, Ricker, Reed, Riese, Saxon, Vega, Villa, Waterman, Whitney, J. Williams, Wilson Biological Science: Ray, chairman; Latina, Maw, Nelson, G. Robinson, Sumner Tipton, Wagner. Functional English: Parrish, chairman; Beauchamp, Bentley, L. Broer, Chisnell, W. F. Davis, R Dietrich, Fabry, Figg, W. Garrett, S. Hall, Harmon, Hartley, Hatcher, Henley, Hirshberg, Holland, Iorio, Kaufmann, Mitchell, Moore, Morris Ochshorn, O'Hara, Palmer, Parker, H. Popovich, Reader, Sanders, Sanderson, Scheuerle, Shaffer, E. Smith, Valentine, Walther, Wyly, Zbar, Zetler. Functional Foreign Languages: W. Hunter, chairman; Artzybushev, de la Me nardiere, Gleaves, Glenisson, Grothman, Milani, Neugaard, Payas, Price, Tatum, Wall, Weiss. Functional Mathematics: Rose, chairman; Bello, Britton, Cleaver, Hart, S-Y. Lin, Luckenbach, McWaters, J. G. Reed, Shershin, Soniat, W. Williams. Humanities: Kiefer, chairman; E. Brown, J. B. Camp, Frantz, Gowen, Guinagh, Hey, Hoffman, Juergensen, Kashdin, Koenig, MacKay, Peizer, Rutenberg, Shack son, W. Smith, Spillane, Watkins. Physical Science: J. H. Robinson, chairman; F. Agens, Berkley, J. Carr. Boulware, C. Clark, Dudley. CBS 100. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE-COMPOSITION (3) Practice and drill in basic English sentence patterns; emphasis is on writing, punctuation, vocabulary, and idiom.

PAGE 147

146 BASIC STUDIES CBS 101-102.-FUNCTIONAL ENGLISH (4,4) Instruction and practice in the skills of writing, reading, and listening. CBS 101 is prerequisite to CBS 102. CBS 109-110. FUNCTIONAL MATHEMATICS (5,5) Designed as a terminal course for general cultural purposes, as a foundation for further study of mathematics and science, and as a preparatory course for prospective element;iry school teachers. CBS 111-128, CBS 211-225. FUNCTIONAL FOREIGN LANGUAGES (3,3,3) FIRST YEAR (I) SECOND YEAR (II) CBS 111-112-113 FRENCH CBS 211-212-213 CBS 114-115-116 GERMAN CBS 214-215-216 CBS 117-118-119 RUSSIAN CBS 217-218-219 CBS 120-121-122 SPANISH CBS 220-221-222 CBS 123-124-125 ITALIAN CBS 223-224-225 CBS 126-127-128 PORTUGUESE CBS 111 to 128. FUNCTIONAL FOREIGN LANGUAGES I (3,3,3) Initiate development of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing of the foreign language at the elementary level together with a study of the foreign culture. CBS 211 to 225. FUNCTIONAL FOREIGN LANGUAGES II (3,3,3) Continue development of language skills at the intermediate level, including grammatical framework of the language and a comprehensive study of the foreign culture. CBS 201-202-203. BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (3,3,3) Draws on information from behavioral sciences (human biology, psychology, anthropology, sociology, and philosophy) to demonstrate how human behavior develops and means by which personal, social, and ethical problems are dealt with. The third quarter will deal with special topics selected for study in depth by the student. CBS 205-206-207. PROBLEMS IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE (3,3,3) The use of information and principles from botany, zoology and physiology to teach students the basic operations of biological systems and the application of critical thinking to scientific problems. CBS 208-209-210. EXPLORATIONS IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE (3,3,3) The development of great scientific ideas, their historical and contemporary significance. Selected topics of astronomy, chemistry, earth science, physics, and philosophy of science-approached via textbook and popular readings. lee-lab-disc. CBS 2 83. SELECTED TOPICS IN BASIC STUDIES (1-5) PR: CI. The subject matt& covered in each topic will depend upon the interest of the faculty member. Some may be experimental courses in Basic Studies ; others may be offered under the direction of a visiting faculty member. CBS 301-302-303-304. THE AMERICAN IDEA (3,3,2,1) Uses history, political science, sociology and economics to focus on major ideas characterizing American society, on our relations with other nations, and on contemporary, domestic and international problems. CBS 305-306-307-308. THE HUMANITIES (3,3,3,3) PR: CBS 101-102 and sophomore standing. Analysis of works in the visual arts, music, theatre, film, literature, and philosophy. Workshops for creative exp e rience. CBS 311-312-313. HUMANITIES AND HUMANE VALUES (3,3,3) PR: CBS requirement in humanities or CI. Masterpieces of music, visual arts, theatre, literature, and philosophy in varying cultural and historical situations. CBS 395. OVERSEAS STUDY (1-9) A program of individual or group research in a foreign country. Selection of the student, his preparation for the study, and subsequent evaluation to be super vised by a faculty committee.

PAGE 148

BIOLOGY 147 CBS 400. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION RESEARCH REPORT (1-5) PR: COE 171. A course designed specifically for Cooperative Education students in which the student pursues a research project dealing with his Cooperative Education assignment and his major area of professional interest. (This course may be used with any other 3-letter prefix if approved by the chairman and dean concerned.) CBS 401. SENIOR SEMINAR: FREEDOM AND RESPONSIBILITY (3) Required of all seniors. Contemporary issues affecting social and personal values. Visiting lecturers, readings and discussions interrelating the behavioral natural and social sciences and the humanities, Designed to focus the university education upon contemporary problems. CBS 403-404. THE UNIVERSE OF MAN (3,3) A search for the universals of human life today ; the nature of man, the world community, human needs and values, available instruments of science and tech nology, and the limiting facts and forces. CBS 405-406,407. BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (3,3,3) A comprehensive analysis and evaluation of man's behavior. Emphasis on under standing of mechanisms involved in individual and social behavior, along with consideration of social and ethical problems related to means for controlling behavior. Laboratory experience will be provided on special research topics. CBS 409-410-411. SCIENCE AND HUMAN LIFE (3,3,3) The three phases of the course will involve the role of science in society; the quantitative factors operating within science; and the conflicting factors operating between science and other fields of knowledge. CBS 460. CLASSICS OF THE SILENT FILM (4) Examples of the silent film studied from social, intellectual, historical, and artistic points of view. CBS 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN BASIC STUDIES (1-5) PR: CI. The subject matter co vere d in each topic will d epend upon the interest of the faculty member. Some may be experimental courses in Basic Studies; others may be offered under the direction of a visiting faculty member. BIOLOGY (Interdisciplinary) (See also Botany and Zoology) Offered by the Departments of Botany & Bacteriology and Zoology. For faculty and additional offerings see respective departments. BIO 201. 0 FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I (4) A phylogenetic survey of the major animal groups and organ systems accom pani e d by dissection of selected types. lec--lab. BIO 202. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY II (4) An introduction to plant science; survey of plant groups; fundamentals of plant biol ogy lee-lab. BIO 203. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY Ill (4) Emphasis on fundamental properties of both plant and animal life. l eelab. BIO 315. 0 MICROTECHNIQUE (3) PR: BIO 201-203. Theory and practice of tissue fixation imbedding, sectioning and staining; chromosomal squash preparations; nucl ear isolation te ch niques photomicrography. lee-lab BIO 331. GENERAL GENETICS I (3) PR: BIO 201-203. Principle15 of Mendelian "transmission" and evolutionary genet ics. lee-lab. The purchase of a coupon book to cover breakage is required for the5e courses

PAGE 149

148 BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY BIO 332. GENERAL GENETICS II (3) PR: BIO 331. Introduction to the study of gene action. lee-lab. BIO 345. MAN'S BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT (4) PR: BIO 201-203. A biological consideration of man's deteriorating relationship with his environment. Emphasis on pollution. pesticides, and population. BIO 351 INUlODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 201-203. Introduction to the biology of microorganisms; structure and physiology of bacteria, algae, viruses, rickettsiae and protozoa; basic lab; methods in bacteriology. lee-lab. BIO 421. CELL BIOLOGY I (4) PR: BIO 201-203, CHM 331-333 or equivalent. An integrated approach to the structure and function of the cell. Biochemistry of cell constituents, relation of the cell to its environment, cellular energy conversion systems. lee-lab. BIO 422. CELL BIOLOGY II (4) PR : BIO 421. A continuation of BIO 421. Fine structure of cell organelles, membrane transport, irritability and contraction, cytogenetics and control mech anisms. lee-lab. BIO 445. PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY (3) PR: BIO 201-203. Organisms and their relationship to the environment, bio geography. BIO 485. RESEARCH METHODS IN BIOLOGY I (2) PR: CI. A laboratory course for advanced students to become acquainted with contemporary biological research instrumentation and techniques. BIO 486. RESEARCH METHODS IN BIOLOGY II (2) PR: CI. See Bio 485. FOR SENJOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS BIO 565. ORGANIC EVOLUTION (4) PR: BIO 331 or CI. An introduction to modem evolutionary theory. Lectures on population genetics, adaptations, speciation theory, phylogeny, human evolution, and related areas. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY BIO 601. HISTORY OF BIOLOGY (3) PR: CI. The historical development of biology with emphasis on the origin of important theories and principles. BIO 645. MAN VERSUS HIS ENVIRONMENT (4) PR: CI. Current and future biological problems facing mankind. Topics include pollution, biocides, the population explosion, eugenics, and food for the future. BIO 799. PH.D. DISSERTATION (1-12) PR: CI. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY (See also Interdisciplinary Biology) Faculty: Long, chamnan; Alvarez, Betz, Dawes, Eilers, Lakela, Mansell, McClung Humm (adj.), Wagner (adj.). BOT 311. SYSTEMATIC BOTANY (5) PR: BIO 201-203 or CI. Identification and classification of the more interesting The purchase of a coupon book to cover expendable items is required for these courses.

PAGE 150

BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY 149 vascular plants of Florida; angiosperm evolution; principles of taxonomy. Conducted largely in the field. BOT 314. FIELD BOTANY (3) PR: BIO 201-203 or CI. Identification and classification of native and naturaliz e d flowering plants of Florida including historical, climatic and floristic aspects of plant communities. Conducted largely in the field. lee-lab. BOT 371. ECONOMIC BOTANY (3) for non-specialists) PR: Junior or Senior standing or CI. The relation of plants to human history and contemporary life. Botanical and economic aspects of plants used as sources of foods, drugs, and other products of importance in everyday life. Origins of cultivated plants. BOT 417.0 MYCOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 201-203. Taxonomy, morphology, and physiology of fungi with spe cial emphasis on yeasts and molds; antibiosis; industrial fermentations. lee-lab. BOT 419. PLANT ANATOMY (5) PR: BIO 201-203. Comparative studies of tissue and organ systems of fossil and present-day vascular plants. Functional and phylogenetic aspects stressed. lee-lab. BOT 421. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 201-203, CHM 331-336 or CHM 303, or CI. Fundamental activities of plants; absorption, translocation, transpiration, metabolism, growth, and related phenomena. lee-lab. BOT 446. TERRESTRIAL PLANT ECOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 201-203, BIO 445 or CI. Distribution and nature of vegetation in rela tion to climatic, physiographic, edaphic and biotic factors; field investigations of subtropical Florida plant communities. lee-lab. BOT 447. MARINE BOTANY (5) PR: BIO 201-203, BIO 445 or CI. A field course in marine plants with emphasis on ecology and functional morphology. Field work will stress the ecological aspects of plants in a subtropical marine environment in Florida. lee-lab. BOT 451. APPLIED BACTERIOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 351. Bacteria, rickettsia, and viruses most important to man. Pathogenic bacteria; introduction to sanitary, industrial, soil and agricultural bacteriology. BOT 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-6) PR: Senior standing and CI. Individual investigations with faculty supervision. BOT 491. SEMINAR IN BOTANY (1) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and CI. May be repeated once. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS BOT 511. TAXONOMY OF FLOWERING PLANTS (4) PR: BOT 311 or CI. A phylogenetic study of Angiosperms; relationship of the principal orders and families, problems of nomenclature, identification of speci mens, comparisons of recent systems of classification, dissection of representative flower types. Field trips and lab work. lee-lab. BOT 515. SUBCELLULAR CYTOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 422 or CI. Theory and fine structure of cells based on the informa tion available from X-ray diffraction, bright field, phase birefringence light microscopy as well as electron diffraction and electron microscopy. The course will consist of three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab which will include demonstrations. lee-lab. BOT 517. PHYSIOLOGY OF THE FUNGI (5) PR: BOT 417, BIO 422 or CI. Differentiation, development, and genetics the fungi. lee-lab. The purchase of a coupon book to cover breakage is required for these courses.

PAGE 151

150 BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY BOT 518.0 MEDICAL MYCOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 351 or CI. A survey of the yeasts, molds and actinomycetes most likely to be encountered by the bacteriologists, with special emphasis on the forms pathogenic for man. lee-lab. BOT 521. PHYSIOLOGY OF PLANT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (3) PR: BOT 421, BIO 422 and CI. Morphogenesis and embryogenesis of higher plants Emphasis on experimental approach to investigations of plant development. lee BOT 543. PHYCOLOGY (5) PR: BOT 447 or equivalent. A detailed survey of the algae emphasizing both taxonomy and morphology of fresh and marine water forms; field and laboratory investigations including individual projects. lee-lab. BOT 551. BACTERIAL PHYSIOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 351 or equivalent, CHM 331-336, or CI. Bacterial structure, growth, death, metabolism, and genetic systems. Laboratory emphasis on quantit ative and chemical methods for study of bacteria. lee-lab. BOT 553.0 DETERMINATIVE BACTERIOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 351 or equivalenl CHM 331-336 or equivalent. Survey of bacterial classification; detailed examination of bacteria important to man in agriculture, in industry, and as pathogens. lee-lab. BOT 557. 0 VffiOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 351 or equivalent and CI. The biology of viruses associated with plants, animals, and bacteria will be considered; the nature of viruses, mecha nisms of viral pathogenesis, and interactions with host cells. lee-lab BOT 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY (1-4) PR: CC. Each. topic is a course in directed study under supervision of a faculty member. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY BOT 610. CYTOCHEMISTRY (4) PR: BIO 421, BIO 315 and CI. Theory and practice of microscopic and quantita tive cyto-histochemistry. Intracellular localization methods for tota l proteins, nu cleic acids, insoluble polysaccharides and enzymes Discussions and demonstra tions of optical quantitative methods based on polarizing and interference micro scopy, and microspectrophotometry. 3 hours lee and 3 hours lab. lee-lab. BOT 6ll. BIOSYSTEMATICS (4) PR: BOT 311 or equivalent. Application of cytology, ecology, genetics, bio chemistry, and morphological analyses to the study of evolution and classification of species of higher plants. BOT 615.0 ULTRASTRUCTURE TECHNIQUES IN ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (6) PR: BIO 201-203, BOT 515 or CI. Discussion of theory and techniques in elec tron microscopy. Emphasis on preparation techniques, optics, and use of the electron microscope. lee-lab. BOT 643. ADV AN CED PHYCOLOGY (4) PR: BOT 543 or CI. A review of contemporary studies in the ecology, physio l ogy, cytology, and morphology of algae The course will consist of three hours of lecture and one laboratory. Lecture will be a review of the recent phycological literature with a laboratory for individual student projects. Field work will b e required. lee-lab. BOT 651. PLANT METABOLISM (3:2) PR: BIO 351, BIO 422, BOT 421, CHE 336 or CI. A study of plant m e t a b o lism during germination and d eve lopment with emphasis on r espira tion, photosynthesis protein synthesis, pigments, and enzymes. l eel a b. The purchase of a coupon book to cover breakage is required for these cou rses.

PAGE 152

CHEMISTRY 151 BOT 654. BACTERIAL GENETICS (3) PR: BIO 351, BIO 332, BOT 551 or CI. A survey of the recombinational sys tems found among the bacteria and bacterial viruses with emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of gene transfer, replication and expression and on the significance of these systems for our understanding of cellular functions.' lec-3 hrs per week. BOT 655. 0 IMMUNOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 351 or equivalent, CHM 331-336 or equivalent. Discussion of the basic immune reaction, nature of antigenicity; basic immunological techniques and their use in biological research and the medical sciences. BOT 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-9) PR:CI. BOT 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN BOTANY AND IN BACTERIOLOGY (1-4) PR: CC. BOT 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) BOT 699. MASTER'S THESIS (4-9) PR:CI. CHEMISTRY Faculty: Maybury, chairman; Ashford, Binford, Braman, Cau ghey, Cory, J. Davis R. D avis ). Fernandez, Jurch, D. Martin, McCoy, Monley, Olse n, T. Owen Solomons, Stevens, Wenzinger, Whitaker, Worrell. CHM 2ll. 0 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (4) Fundamentals of chemistry; gas laws, mass and energy relationships in chemi ca l changes, chemical equilibrium, atomic and molecular structure, lee-lab and disc uss ion. CHM 212.0 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (4) PR: CHM 211 or equivalent. Continuation of General Chemistry, lee-lab and discus s ion. CHM 213.0 GENERAL CHEMISTRY III (4) PR: CHM 212 or equivalent. Continuation of General Chemistry, lee-lab and discussion. CHM 301.0 ELEMENTARY INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR : CHM 213 or equivalent. Fundamental inorganic chemistry principles. Onequarter course for non-chemistry majors lee-lab. CHM 305. 0 ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (5) PR: CHM 213, 321. Fundamental physical chemistry principles. One-quarter course for non-chemistry majors. lee-lab. CHM 321. 0 ELEMENTARY ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 213. Fundamentals of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. lee-lab. CHM 322. 0 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 321. Potentiometry, spectrophotometry, chromatography, and ion ex change. lee-lab. CHM 331-332.0 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (3:1) PR: CHM 213. Fundame ntal principles of organic chemistry and lab. Mu s t be taken concurrently. CHM 333-334.0 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (3:1) PR: CHM 331-332 or equivalent. Continuation of Organic Ch emis try. Lecture and lab must be taken concurrently. CHM 335-33.fl.0 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY III (3:1) PR: CHM 233334 or equivalent. Continuation of Organi c Chemistry. Lecture and lab must be t a k en concurrently. The purchase of a coupon book to cover breakage is required for these courses.

PAGE 153

152 CHEMISTRY: CHM 351. INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 333. Introduction to the chemistry and intermediary metabolism of biologically important substances. Lecture. CHM 371. MODERN CHEMICAL SCIENCE (4) PR: Jr. or Sr. standing. And CI. An introduction to some of th e major probl ems in chemistry, its relation to other sciences, and its relevance to contemporary cul ture. Not open to chemistry majors. CHM 433.0 QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS (4) PR: CHM 333. Identification of organic compounds by fun ctio nal group reaction s and physical properties. lee-lab. CHM 441. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (4) PR: CHM 321 and MTH 304. CR. MTH 305, PH 223 or 207. The rmodynamics, the states of matter, solutions. Lecture CHM 442. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (4) PR: CHM 322, 441. Electrochemistry, kinetic theory of gases chemical kinetics, surface and nuclear chemistry. Lecture CHM 443. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY ill (4) PR: CHM 442. Introduction to quantum mechanics and statistical thermody namics. Lecture. CHM 444.0 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (3) PR : One term of physical chemistry CR: The second term of physical chemistry. 1 hour of lecture 8 hours of lab weekly. CHM 481.0 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (I-6) PR: CI. CHM 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I-6) PR: Cl The course content will depend on the interest of faculty members a nd student demand. CHM 491. CHEMISTRY SEMINAR (2) PR: Senior standing FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS CHM 511. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) ' PR: CHM 441 or CI. An advanced theoretical treatment of inorganic compounds. Lecture. CHM 521.0 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (4) PR: CHM 322, 442. Theory and practice of instrumental methods. lee-lab. CHM 531.0 ADVANCED SYNTHETIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 333. A study of synthetic techniques from both the practi c al and the th e oretical points of view. lee-lab. CHM 551. BIOCHEMISTRY I (4) PR: CHM 335, 6. The chemistry and intermediary metabolism of biologically im portant substances, including carbohydrates, proteins. enzymes, vitamins, and metabolic intennediates. Recommended for chemistry and biology majors. L e cture. CHM 552. BIOCHEMISTRY II (4) PR: CHM 551. Continuation of Biochemistry. Lecture. CHM 553. BIOCHEMISTRY ill (4) PR: CHM 552. Continu ation of Biochemistry lecture. CHM TECHNIQUES IN BIOCHEMISTRY (2) PR: CHM 551. Bio che mi s try lab o ratory with emphasis on modem techniques for use in bioch em i ca l r esearch. CHM 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I-6) PR: CC. The following courses are representatives of those that are taught The purchase of a coupon book to cover breakage is required for these courses.

PAGE 154

CHEMISTRY 153 under this title: Natural Products, Stereochemistry, Reactive Intermediates, Photo chemistry, Instrumental Electronics, Thermodynamics, Advanced Lab Techniques, Heterocycilic Chemistry, etc . -FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY CHM 611. STRUCTURAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 511 or Cl. Modren theories of bonding and structure of inorganic cbm pounds, including coordination theory, stereochemistry, solution equilibria, kinetics, mechanisms of reaction s, and use of physical and chemical methods. Lecture. CHM 613. CHEMISTRY OF THE LESS FAMILIAR ELEMENTS (4) PR: CI. An integrated treatment of the conceptual and factual aspects of the traditionally less familiar elements, including noble-gas elements, unfamiliar non-metals, alkali and alkaline-earth metals, and the transition elements. Lecture. CHM 621. ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CI. A study of complete analytical process, including sample handling, separations, the analysis step, asd statistical interpretation of data. Emphasis placed on separations and statistics. Lecture. CHM 623. (4) PR: CHM 521. Theory and applications of modem electrochemical techniques, including polargraphy, amperometry, potentiometry, coulometry, and conductom etry. Lecture. CHM 625. ADV AN CED ANALYTICAL TOPICS (4) PR: CI. Selected topics in analytical chemistry. Offerings include radio chemistry (emphasizing radiotracers in research and analysis), chemical spectro scopy, (including both emission and absorption), and quantitative organic analy sis. (Lecture; some topics may have lab.) CHM 631. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (3) PR: CI. A survey of theoretical and synthetic organic chemi stry. Problems of structure and reactivity will be considered. L ec ture. CHM. 632. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (3) PR: CHM 631. Continuation of CHM 631. Lecture. CHM IJ:l3. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY III (3) CR: CHM ; 632. A study of organic reaction mechanisms emphasizing the interpretation of experimental data. Lecture CHM 634. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY IV (3) CR: CHM' 632. A study of organic reactions as exemplified in synthesis, deg radatil:in and structure proof. The emphasis will vary from year to year Lecture. CHM 641. STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS (4) PR: Cl. Application of statistical mechanics to th e rmodynamics, the relation of molecular structure to thermodynamic properties. Lecture CHM 643. 'QUANTUM CHEMISTRY I (4) PR: Cl. Introduction to elementary quantum mechanics. Atomic structure and Spectra. Lecture. CHM 645. QUANTUM CHEMISTRY II (4) PR: 'CHM 643 Applications of quantum mechanics to proble ms in chem(stry; molecular structure and spectra Lecture. CHM 651. ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY I ENZYMES (4) PR: : CHM :552. A sttidy of biochemi ca l systems with emphasis on enzymes. lee. CHM 652 : ADVANCED' BIOCHEMISTRY IL PROTEiN AND NUCLEIC : A'CIDS (4) PR: CHM 552. A study of bio c h emica l sy ,ste ms with emphasis on proteins and nucleic acids, lee CHM 653. ADV AN CED BIOCHEMISTRY Ill. BIOORGANIC MECHANISMS f4)

PAGE 155

154 CLASSICS AND ANCIENT STUDIES PR: CHM 552. A study of biochemical systems with emphasis on mechanisms of biological reactions. lee. CHM 654. ADV AN CED BIOCHEMISTRY IV. BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 552. A study of biochemical systems with emphasis on physical methods of experimentation and interpretation. lee. CHM 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-9) PR: CC. Directed study along lines of the student's research, inclding participa tion in regular May be repeated CHM 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTR Y (1-6) , PR: CC. The following titles are representative of those that are taught under this title: Symmetry and Group Theory, Photochemical Kinetics, Quantum Me chanical Calculations, Advanced Chemical Thermodynamics, Reaction M ec hanisms, Advanced Instrumentation, Separations ... and Characterization, Spectroscopy, etc. CHM 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY (2) CHM 699. THESIS (1-9) CLASSICS AND ANCIENT STUDIES Faculty: Gessman, chairman; Henley. CLS 101-102-103. ELEMENTARY LATIN (3,3,3) Elements of grammar, practice in translation from and into Latin, reading of selections from simple Latin texts. CLS 201. INTERMEDIATE LATIN I (3) PR: CLS 103 or equiv.; CR: two-hour p e r week grammar workshop (no credit). Selections from Cicero's speeches and systematic exercises in intemiediate gram mar. CLS 202. INTERMEDIATE LATIN II (3) PR: CLS 201 or equiv. Selections from the letters of Cicero and Pliny the Younger. (Alternate years.) CLS 203. INTERMEDIATE LATIN III (3) PR: CLS 201 or equiv. Selections from Ovid read and interpreted. (Alternate years.) CLS 301. LATIN IDSTORIANS (3) PR: CLS 201 or equiv. Reading and interpretation of selected passages from th e works of Sallust, Livy, and Tacitus in the original and of portions of their works in English translation. (Alternate years.) CLS 302. LATIN LYRICS (3) PR: CLS 201 or equiv. Reading and interpretation of selected poems by Roman lyricists, especially Catull and Horace. Introduction into Latin metrics. (Alter nate years.) CLS 303. LATIN EPIC (3) PR: CLS 201 or equiv. Reading and interpretation of selected passag es from Vergil's Aeneid in the original and of the entire work in English translation. Comparison with Greek epic. (Alternate years.) CLS 321. ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS (5) Study, in a thematic historical framework, of the character, ideas and cultural achievements of the peoples of the Anci ent Near East and Mediterranean and their relevance for modem W es tern civilization, with special emphasis on the Hebrews, Greeks and Romans. CLS 331-332-333. BASIC GREEK (3; 3, 3) PR: Junior or senior standing or a minimum of two years of Latin or another highly illllected langliage (e.g., German, Russian, Modern Greek) or CI. Ac-



PAGE 1

CLASSICS AND ANCIENT STUDIES 155 celerated course in the Ancient Greek (Attic) language and introduction to original Greek literature. (Alternate years.) CLS 341-342-343. BASIC HEBREW (3, 3, 3) Designed to give students a working knowledge of Classical (Biblical) Hebrew and to introduce them to the Biblical literature in the original language. CLS 351. CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY (4) Study of the more important myths of the Greeks and Romans as laid down in classical literature and of the impact that Classical mythology made on modem Western and, in particular, English literature. CLS 359. CLASSICAL WORD ROOTS IN SCIENCE (2) A course in the Greek and Latin word stock used in all sciences (including medicine), technology, and law. Students' needs determine specific content of the course. CLS 371. FOUNDATIONS OF LANGUAGE (4) Introduction to synchronic linguistics, basic concepts, general features of language. Dialects, kinship groups, language types, writing systems. Methods or structural analysis with emphasis on the Trubetzkoy-Jacobson approach. (Alternate years.) CLS 383. SELECTED TOPICS (2-5) Course contents depend on student demand and instructor's interest and may range over the field of Latin language, literature, or civilization. CLS 401-402-403. ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION (3, 3, 3) PR: CLS 201 plus any two of CLS 202, 203, 301, 302, 303, or 4 years high School Latin. Difficult parts of morphological and syntactic structure. Exercises in advanced translation and composition. Theory of literature: genres, styles, figures of speech, principles of oratory and versification. (Alternate years.) CLS 411-412-413. LATIN LITERATURE AND BACKGROUNDS (3, 3, 3) PR: Same as for CLS 401. Fast survey of Greek literature, discussion of Roman dependence on Greek literary topics, concepts and forms. Survey of Latin literature from Ennius to Augustine. Study and interpretation of sample texts by authors not read earlier. (Alternate years.) CLS 483. SELECTED TOPICS (2-5) Course contents depend on student demand and instructor's interest and may range over the whole field of Ancient languages, literatures, and civilizations, in particular Latin, Greek, and Hebrew. Enrollment can be repeated for different topics. CLS 485. DIRECTED READING (2-5) Readings in special topics chosen by the student in cooperation with the instructor. Reading of literature also possible in English translation. Arrangement with department chairman before registration necessary. FOR UPPER LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS CLS 517. LATINO-ROMANCE LINGUISTICS (4) PR: Background in Latin or a Romance language. Case study of linguistic development of 4,000 years from Proto-Aryan through Latin to modem Romance languages. CLS 527. GREEK CIVILIZATION (4) PR: CLS 321 or a course in Greek history or CI. Detailed study of the Aegean and Hellenic civilizations from their beginnings in Crete to the Roman period. Greek discoveries, explorations, and colonization. (Alternate years.) CLS 529. ROMAN CIVILIZATION (4) PR: CLS 321 or 527 or a course in Roman history; or Latin major; or CI. Pre historic Italy and the Etruscan civilization. History of the civilization of Rome

PAGE 2

156 DANCE and the Empire with emphasis on the Greek, Carthaginian, and Oriental in fluences. (Alternate years.) CLS 571. LANGUAGE IN CHANGE (4) Principles of diachronic (historical) and comparative linguistics. Causes and documentation of change, research methods. History of writing. Genealogy of languages, glottogonic theories. Ethnolinguistics. (Alternate years.) CLS 581. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (2-5) PR: CI. Specialized individual work in particular areas of student's interests. CLS 583. SELECTED TOPICS (2-5) For description see CLS 483. CLS 585. DIRECTED READING (2-5). For description see CLS 485. COOPERA1'1VE EDUCATION Coordinating Staff: G. Miller, director; K. Lupton, assistant direetor; M. 'Fager, G. Lentz, G. McClung, W. Smith, J. Westberry COE 071. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION ORIENTATION (0) Course content covers career planning via the Cooper ative Education Program and explores values of cooperative education, blending of theory and COE I71. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, lST TRAINING PERIOD (O) PR: 24 hours of academic credit, acceptance in Cooperative Education Program. COE 172. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 22ND TRAINING PERIOD (()) PR: COE 171. COE 271. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 3RD TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 172. COE 272. COOPERATIVE EDUCATIOt'-/, 4TH TRAINING PERIOD (O) PR: COE 271. . COE 371. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 5TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 272. COE 372. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 6TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 371. I ,. COE 400. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION RESEARCH REPORT (1-5) PR: COE CY71. COE 471. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 7TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 372. COE 472. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 8TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 471. COE 571. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 9TH TRAINING PERIOD (O) PR: COE 472. COE 572. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, lOTH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 571. COE 671. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, TRAINING PERIOD (0) COE 672. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, TRAINING PERIOD (0) COE 771. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, TRAINING PERIOD (0) COE 772. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, TRAINING PERIOD (0) COE 871. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, TRAINING PERIOD (0) COE 872. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, TRAINING PERIOD (0) DANCE Faculty : Chifra Holt DAN 201. MODERN ID AN CE I (3) Study of basic principles of modem dance technique, for those without previous

PAGE 3

DANCE 157 training. Practical work in beginning exercises and movement phrases utilizing changing rhythms and dynamics. DAN 202. BALLET I (3) Study of basic positions, barre and fundamental steps using the ballet vocabulary. For those without previous ballet training. Practical work in class. DAN 301. MODERN DANCE II (3) PR: DAN 201 or CI. Continuation of DAN 201. Further emphasis on style and phrasing. Work in projecting mood and quality by dancing and rehear s ing in more advanced student choreography, leading to performance. Rehearsal hours to be arranged. May be repeated. DAN 302. BALLET II (3) PR: DAN 202 or CI. Continuation of DAN 202, progressing into adagio and allegro. Application of phrasing and style. May be repeated. DAN 303. CHO.REOGRAPHY I (3) An introduction to shaping the materials of dance. Preparation of.. studies in rhythm, dynamics, form and motivation, culminating in a solo. Successful dance com positipns will be given a full production and performed with accompaniment, light and costuming t 0 be arranged by the student. Reading, lecture, laboratory. DAN 313. HISTORY OF DANCE TO THE 20TH CENTURY (3) Study of the development of dance from its inception through the nineteenth century. Reading, lecture. DAN 401. MODERN DANCE ill (3) PR: DAN 301 or DAN 302 or CI. Continuation of DAN 301 on an advanced level. Work in and individual invention creating an awareness of many possibilities of movement. Dancing in student choreography leading to performance. Rehearsal hours to be arranged. May be repeated. DAN 402. BALLET ill (3) PihDAN 302 or DAN 301 or CI. Continuation of DAN 302 Introducin g pointe work. Each class member will dance in student choreography. Rehears al hours to be arranged. May be repeated: DAN 403. CHOREOGRAPHY II (3) PR: DAN 303 or CI. Continuation of DAN 303. Work directed toward duets and group dances. The students will submit choreographic ideas for instructor 's approval, then proceed with rehearsals. The best dances will be performed and fully produced under supervision of student choreographers. Reading, lecture laboratory. DAN 413. HISTORY OF 20TH CENTURY BALLET (3) A study of the development of 20th Century ballet in Europe and America. Emphasis on: concepts, choreographers and artists. Reading, film, lecture. DAN 481. DIRECTED STUDY (1-6) PR: CC. May be repeated. Independent studies in the various areas of Dance Course of study and credits must be assigned prior to registration. DAN 501. MODERN DANCE IV (3) PR: DAN 401 or DAN 402 or CI. Continuation of DAN 401. Intensive work on the growth of personal performance style as a means to' communication. Equal will be given to training the body in the dev jl lopment of techni c al exce llence. Dancing in student choreography leading to performance. R e h earsal hours to be arranged May be repeated; DAN 502. BALLET IV (3) ' PR: DAN 402 or pAN 40,1 or CI. Continati .Qn. of Dan. 402. Great emphasis to final shaping of the body into excellent exe c ution and projection of Ballet technique : Dance in choreograpny leading to performance. Rehearsal hours to be iifranged May be repeate& 503. PRODUCTION (3) Admission by audition : Open to a ll univ e r s ity students and r e quired of dance

PAGE 4

158 ECONOMICS majors for two quarters. The rehearsal and stage performance of new choreogra phy. Actual production work in which members of the class assist the choreographer in costumes, taping and props. May be repeated. DAN 513. IIlSTORY OF MODERN DANCE (3) Study of the development of modem dance in the 20th Century in America ; the different techniques, concepts in choreography and leading artists of our time. Reading, film, and lecture. ' DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS DMA 001. BASIC CONCEPTS OF ALGEBRA (0) A programmed learning course in algebra from a modem point of view for th e convenience of persons without adequate knowledge of simple algebraic manipu lations and for persons without adequate preparation for MTH 101. DMA 002. ANALYTICAL TRIGONOMETRY (0) A programmed learning course in the study of the trigonometric functions a s functions of real numbers and their application to triangles. ECONOMICS Faculty: Pasternak, chairman; J. A. Anderson, R. H. Burton, J P. Cooke, Davey Forbes, Herman, Hotson, JameG, Kauder Kennedy, Kozelka, McElhattan, Melli s h Murphy, R. F. Shannon, Shows, Small, Whartenby ECN 201. ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES I (4) Economics as a social science; theoretical analy sis of price determination of th e product and factor markets. ECN 202. ECONOMICS PRINCIPLES II (4) Accounting, analytical and policy aspects of national inc ome with emphasis on the theory of income determination; analysis of money and banking system; and survey of international trade theory and policies. ECN 301. INTERMEDIATE PRICE THEORY (5) PR : ECN 201-202. Advanced analysis of supply and d emand as related to competition and monopoly; application of economic the ory to product pricing and recourse pricing. ECN 31l. LABOR ECONOMICS (4) PR: ECN 201-202 or CI. History of the trade union movement; economic analysis of trade union philosophies and practices; examination of basic influence s affecting laboc force, real wages and employment; collective bari::aining and labor law. ECN 313. COLLECI'IVE BARGAINING (5) PR: ECN 311. The administration of labor-managment arguments, mediation and arbitration of industrial disputes and governmental role in collective bargaining. ECN 323. INTERMEDIATE INCOME AND MONETARY ANALYSIS (5) PR: ECN 201-202. Advanced analysis of national income and monetary theory with emphasis on the modern theory of income determination and the function ing of the monetary system. ECN 331. BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC STATISTICS I (5) PR: Proficiency test in algebra, or consent of instructor. The collection, presenta tion, analysis, and interpretation of quantitative data as they pertain to economic and business problems. This course should be taken, at th e latest, in the junior year. Students who successfully complete one or both of these courses may not

PAGE 5

ECONOMICS 159 also receive credit for either SSI 301 Social Science Statistics or MTH 345 Introductory Stati s tics ECN 341. ECONOMICS OF TRANSPORTATION (4) PR: ECN 201-202. Functions of transportation ag e nci e s rate stru c ture of trans p o rtation companies, problems of state and federal regul atio ns and coordination of tran s portation facilities. ECN 343. ECONOMICS OF PUBLIC UTILITIES (4) PR : ECN 201-202. Tbe economic char acte ri s tics of n a tural mon o poli e s and the economic problems of regulation and public ownership. ECN 35I. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (4) PR: ECN 201-202. Tbe principle s and mechani s m s of trade, exchange balance of p a yments comparative co s ts, effects of trade res trictions and economic growth of underdeveloped area s ECN 3.61. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS (4) PR: CBS lOg..:110, ECN 201-202 and 331. The principal mathem a tical tools and te c hniques used in economic analysi s and economic res e arch ECN 371. AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY (4) PR : ECN 201-202. The growth and evolution of American economic institutions from Colonial times to the present. ECN 401. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (5) PR: ECN 201-202 A histori c al survey of the developm ent of economic theory and the main streams of economic thought, including philo s ophical and value aspects of economic thought. ECN 405 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (4) PR : ECN 201-202. An emph a sis on the theoretical and practical differences b etwee n economic systems such as capitalism, socialism: and. communism. ECN 411. LABOR RELATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY (4) PR: ECN 311. Problems resulting from legislative and judicial interpretation of the rights, duties and res ponsibilities of laboc unions and employers ; public policy in labor-management negotiations; survey of legislation designed to prot ec t workers ; ECN 423. PUBLIC FINANCE (5) PR: ECN 323. Economic analysis of government expenditures, taxation, public d e bt, and fisc al policy. ECN. 431 BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC STATISTICS II (4) PR: ECN 831. Basic probability distributions, theory of statistical estimation, tests of hypotheses, design of experiments. Introduction to non-parametric sta ti s tics. ECN 437. RELATIONSHIPS (4) PR: ECN 201-202. Patterns of regulations such as control of competitive enter prise, cartels and monopolies by the government. Government r e gulations ''and ec onomic planning applied to politically determined economic goals. ECN 451. INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL POLICIES (4) PR: ECN 351. Geographic, social, political and r e lated factors influencing com mercial trade policies. Special empha sis on economic consequences of tive courses of action. ECN 461. THEORY OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (4) PR: ECN 323 or CI. Problems, polici es, and dynamics of economic growth in emerging nations. Tbe benefits and relevan c e of the the ory of economic development is examined within the conte x t of the social and political mili e u of today's underdeveloped areas. ECN 471. THEORY OF ECONOMIC DYNAMICS (4) PR: ECN 323. Economic the ories of the bus in ess c y cl e and g rowth proce sses Empiri c al studies, models for forecasting and problem s of policy are al s o c o n s id e red.

PAGE 6

160 EDUCATION ECN 489. SEMINAR IN SELECTED ECONOMIC TOPICS (Variable 3-5 hours) PR: Senior Standing and CI. Topics to be selected by the instructor or instructors on pertinent economic issues. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ECN 501. ECONOMIC PRICE THEORY (3) Theoretical analysis of micro-economics. ECN 502. ECONOMIC NATIONAL INCOME THEORY (3) PR: ECN 501. Analytical and policy aspec t s of macroeconomic theory. ECN 503. STATISTICS OF BUSINESS (3) The analysis and interpretation of quantitative data pertinent to the solution of economic problems. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY !1 \ I ECN 601. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (3) PR: ECN 331 or 503 or equivalent. An investigation of research concepts, objectives, and methods including an introduction to linear .. programming, game theory, and end-use analysis. ' ECN 603. MANAGERIAL STATISTICS I (3) ,,, PR: ECN 331 or 503, or equivalent. The use of economic and busin ess data in managerial control and analysis with an introduction to forecasting. Gollection and presentation of data, tables charts, index numbers, linear 'and nonlinear secular trends, constant and changing periodic movements, 'and: estimating cycical fluctuations. _-; 'i ECN 604. MANAGERML STATISTICS II (3) r "" 1 PR: ECN 331 or 503, or equivalent. Simple and multiple correlation and regression analysis with applications in estimating and forecasting and an in troduction to the:1Use of statistical inference in managerial decisions'. ECN 605. MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3) PR: ECN 201 and 202 or equivalent. An investigation of the concepts, tools and methods of micro-economics analysis. ECN 607 AGGREGATE ECONOMICS (3) PR: ECN 605. An analysis of monetary and fiscal policy measures designed to moderate economac fluctuations. The theory of national income determination. ECN 608. APPLIED ECONOMIC;ANALYSIS (3) .6PR: ECN 605-607 .The'. application of micro and macro principles to business decision-making. EDUCATION Faculty: Agens, Allen, Celia Anderson, Christian Anderson, Anderson, Auleta, Austin, Barfield, Barkholz; Battle, BOJ,l.di, Bott, Bowers, Boyd Brantley, Br eit, Bridges, Briggs, Bryant, Bullock; Burley; Carlson, Casteel, Chambers, Cleary, Coker, Collier, Craig, Crick enberger, Danenburg Drapela, DuBois, Robert Dwyer, Roy Dwyer, Engel, Follman, Francis, Freijo, French, Gates, Glover, Goforth, Gordon, Hall, Hearn, Higgins, Hill, Hirsbom, Hoffman, Holland, Hunnicutt, Jackson, Ja eschke, Joh anningi.neier, Johnson, Karns, Keiter, Kimmel, Kincaid, Kinde, Kruschwitz, Lantz, Lawson, Levy, Lichtenberg, Loveless, Lowe, LuCoff, Manker, McCambridge, McClellan, Mc-

PAGE 7

EDUCATION 161 Cray, Merica, Michael Miller, Monley, Mumme, Muntyan, Musgrove Neel, Pappas, Patouillet, Peterson, Ffost, Pope, Prescott, Purdom, Reynolds, Roberts, Robertson, Russell, Schultz, Sellers, Shannon, Singh, Sisco, Sisk, Alice Smith, Charles Smith, Smitzes, Sorenson, Sparks Stone, Story, Stovall, Tanofsky, Unruh, Urban, Urbanek, Vanover, Weatherford, Webb, Whitney, Wiley, Wilson, Witty. Art Education EDA 377. THEORETICAL BASES IN ART EDUCATION (3) A study of the philosophical, psychological and historical bases upon which contemporary art education practice is developed. EDA 379. ART IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3) PR: EDA 377. Art expressions appropriate for elementary school pupils at each grade level. EDA 498 to be taken concurrently. EDA 441. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL ART (4) PR: EDA 377. Techniques and materials of instruction in art, on the secondary level. EDA 498 to be taken concurrently. EDA 498. FIELD WORK IN ART EDUCATION (2-6) PR: CI. Supervised participation in activities related to art education in community centers, non-school youth programs, planned workshops and research. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDA 660. HISTORICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF ART EDUCATION (4) Past and contemporary philosophies and practices in art education EDA 661. ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF ART EDUCATION (4) Principles of administration and supervision of art programs in the school. EDA 682. RESEARCH SEMINAR IN ART PROGRAM (4) PR: EDA 660 or CI. Literature and research in art education. Various approaches to problem solving and evaluation with emphasis on individual research. Curriculum EDC 101. INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING (4) The people with whom teachers work, the types of tasks they perform and the chall e nges they can anticipate. Observ a tion of teaching at several grade levels. EDC 401. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (5) PR: EDF 305 and 307, and admission to a teacher education program. Structure and purposes of curriculum organization with special emphasis on the quality of curriculum. EDC 480. DIRECTED STUDY (1-4) Extension of competency in teaching field. EDF 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-4) PR: Senior standing and consent of program coordinator EDC 485. DIRECTED READINGS (I-4) PR: Senior standing and consent of program coordinator. EDC 498. SENIOR SEMINAR IN EDUCATION (3) PR: Senior standing. Synthesis of teacher candidate's courses in his complete college program. Required concurrently with student teaching. EDC 499. SUPERVISED TEACHING (1-12) One full quarter of student teaching in a public or private school. Student teacher takes Senior Seminar in Education concurrently. In special programs

PAGE 8

162 EDUCATION where the intern experience is distributed over two or more quarters, students will be registered for credit which accumulates to 12 quarter hours. EDC 501. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION: (ELEMENTARY OR SEC ONDARY) (5) Curriculum scope, sequence, and interrelationships, with a critical evaluation of current trends. EDC 510. HEALTH PROBLEMS IN CHil..DREN (4) Health problem prevalent in the culturally disadvantaged child and the teacher's role in referral or educational adaptation in classroom activities. EDC 511. ORGANIZATION OF COURSE CONTENT FOR INDUSTRIAL EDU CATION TEACHERS (4) Preparation for instruction to include occupational analysis, organization of content, lesson planning and basic procedures of pedagogy. EDC 515. DIRECTING SPEECH ACTIVITIES IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (4) Coaching and directing co-curricular activities in discussion, debate, oratory, oral interpr etatio n, and extemporaneous speaking. Planning and supervision of forensic tournaments and speech contests. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDC 661. PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISION (4) PR: Course in general curriculum. Instructional leadership with emphasis on organization for curriculum improvement and in-service growth for professional school personnel. EDC 671. PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION (4) Educational administration as a profession. Consideration is given to organization control, and support of the educational system. EDC 681. DIRECTED STUDY: (Subject) (1-4) Extension of competency in teaching field. EDC 685. SCHOOL CURRICULUM IMPROVEMENT (4) Workshop for the improvement of the curriculum of an elementary or secondary school. Open only to teachers in service. Compl e te faculty participation required. EDC 689. SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION PLANNING: SECONDARY (4) Individually planned course in a secondary school subject area for in-service teachers. EDC 691. INTERNSHIP (4-9) PR: CI. Supervised teaching at the secondary or junior college level as ap propriate. EDC 699. THESIS (1-9) Elementary Education EDE 409. READING FOR THE CHil..D (5) PR: CBS 101-102. Readiness, word recognition, (phonic, visual and conte xtua l analysis) development of word meanings, basic stud y skills, comprehension abili ti es and reading interests. EDE 411. LANGUAGE ARTS FOR THE CHil..D (4) PR: CBS 101-102. Speaking, writing, reading and list eni ng exp erie nces of children and ways these skills are develop e d for individual creative expression. EDE 413. LITERATURE FOR THE CHILD (4) PR: CBS 101-102 History and development of children's literature. study of bibliographic sources, criteria and techniques for selection and use.

PAGE 9

EDUCATION 163 EDE 415. ARITHMETIC FOR THE CHILD (5) PR: CBS 109-110. Basic structure of arithmetic, principles unde rlying number concepts. EDE 417.0 SCIBNCE FOR THE CHILD (5) PR: CBS 205, 206, 207 or 208 209, 210. Science as inquiry. EDE 419. SOCIAL STUDIBS FOR THE CHILD (5) PR: CBS 301, 302, 303. Significant conc e pts in the subj ects concern e d with human rel a tionships. Emphasis upon teaching pupils to solve rather than be engulfed by social problems. EDE 421. 0 ART FOR THE CHILD (4) PR: Any three CBS Humanities courses. Art and the intellectual, creative, emotional, and esthetic growth of children. EDE 423. MUSIC FOR THE CHILD: SKILLS (2) Voice production, music reading, creative composition and some instrum enta l experience. School song materials used to support this work. EDE 424. MUSIC FOR THE CHILD: METHODS (3) PR: Any three CBS Humanities courses, EDE 423. Music literature and tea c hing aids for children including singing, rhythmic, creative, instrumental and list e ning experience and their presentation. EDE 425. HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE CHILD (4) Motivating factors of play; knowledge and skill in basic rhythmic activities; games and stunts; health instruction for the child. EDE 426. CREATIVE ARTS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (3) The development of the child's creative expression through art, music, dance, pla y, and drama: included are the materials, contest, and teaching techniques. EDE 431. ART FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD (3) Art, presenting the principles, practices and materials to be used in relation to the charac teristics of the young child ages 3-8. EDE 433. MUSIC FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD {3) Singing, rhythmic, creative, instrumental and listening experience relevant to early-childhood EDE 440. TEACHING METHODS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (4) Suggested Co-requisite: EDC 401. Process of teaching elementary school subjects. To be taken quarter prior to internship. EDE 519. SOCIAL GROWTH IN CHILDHOOD (4) A study of the principle factors which influence the social dev e lopment of young children with particular emphasis upon those cultural influences which affect both child development and the educational programs for the young child. EDE 527. DEVELOPMENTAL PROCESSES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD (4) The normal processes of development among children ages 3-8, the relation between these characteristics and the curriculum: child study through ob s ervation required. EDE 529. PROGRAMS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (5) A study of school programs for nursery, kindergarten, and primary education. Analysis and evaluation of these programs in the light of the most effective current classroom practices. EDE 531. LANGUAGE AND LEARNING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD (4) A study of the successive stages of development in language and learning during the child's formative years. Theories of le arn ing and of language development. EDE 539. WORKSHOP IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (4) Individual probl ems and inno v ations r e lated to methods and materials of instruc tion in the ea rl y c hildhood grades. The purchase of a coupon book lo cover expendable items may be required for these courses

PAGE 10

164 EDUCATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDE 603. SEMINAR IN CURRICULUM RESEARCH (1-5) PR: EDF 607. Critical evaluation of current research and curriculum literature, design and analysis of individual research topics leading to satisfaction of re search requirem e nt. EDE 609. TRENDS IN READING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (4) PR: EDE 409 or equivalent. Extensive study of recent trends in materials, approaches and procedures in teaching reading in the elementary schools. EDE 611. TRENDS IN LANGUAGE ARTS INSTRUCTION (4) PR: EDE 411 and 413. Advanced materials and processes of instruction in ele mentary school language arts programs. EDE 613. CREATIVE ARTS INSTRUCTION (4) Creative processes in the teaching of visual arts, music, dance, and drama to elementary school pupils. EDE 615. TRENDS IN MATHEMATICS INSTRUCTION (4) PR: EDE 415 or equivalent. Philosophy, content and process of qualitative in struction in In-Odem mathematics in elementary school programs. EDE 617.0 TRENDS IN SCIENCE INSTRUCTION (4) PR: EDE 417. Topics in the biological and physical sciences appropriate for teaching in excellent elementary school programs. Analysis of modem curriculum materials used in presenting science as a process of inquiry. EDE 619. 0 TRENDS IN SOCIAL STUDIES INSTRUCTION (4) Crucial concepts drawn from the social sciences. Analysis of the problems approach. Students will select an area of independent study on an advanced level. EDE 621.0 ART FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER (4) Exploration of various materials and techniques in relationship to current theories about art and the intellectual, creative, emotional and esthetic growth of children. EDE 641. PROBLEMS IN SUPERVISION (4) PR: EDF 607 or equivalent and EDC 661. Problems in supervising for curriculum improvement within the elementary school. EDE 687. SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION PLANNING: ELEMENTARY (4) Individually planned course in an elementary school subject area for in-service teachers. Foundations EDF 303. INTRODUCTION TO MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION (4) Elementary concepts basic to a general understanding of measurement and evalu ation procedures. Students may not receive credit for both EDF 303 and PSY 413 Tests and Measurement in Psychology. EDF 305. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING (4) PR: CBS 201, 203 and 75 hours completed. Physiological and psychological growth patterns; learning theories, personality adjustment, and appraisal of the various forces affecting learning and personality. Credit cannot be earned for both EDF 305 and EDF 377. Should not be taken concurrently with EDF 307. EDF 307. SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (4) PR: 75 hours completed. Social, economic and political context within which schools function and the values which provide direction for our schools ; the The purchase af a coupon book to cover expendable items may be required for these courses.

PAGE 11

EDUCATION 165 culture as a motivating influence in instruction. Should not be taken con currently with EDF 305. EDF 309. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION (4) A critical analysis of selected philosophies of education in terms of their belief s about the nature of man and society and their related assumptions about the nature of reality, knowledge, and value. EDF 3ll. COMPARATIVE EDUCATION (4) PR: Upper level Standing. A comparison of contemporary educational systems of selected countries with that of the United States. EDF 377. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) The nature of learning and the application of learning principles to educational procedures. Credit cannot be earned for both EDF 305 and EDF 377. EDF 575. AMERICAN DEMOCRACY AND PUBLIC EDUCATION (4) Interdependence of the public school and democracy in the United States and the responsibility of the school in fostering and strengthening basic d e mocratic principles. EDF 585. PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION AND TEACHING MACHINES (4) Principles for programming in the several academic subjects. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDF 603. STATISTICS FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (4) PR: EDF 607 or course in elementary statistics. Inferential statistical techniques applied to the experimental study of educational problems. EDF 605. FOUNDATIONS OF MEASUREMENT (4) Fundamental descriptive statistics, basic measurement concepts, role of measure ment in education, construction of teacher-made tests and interpretation of standardized tests. EDF 607. FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (4) PR: EDF 605. Major types of educational research, with emphasis upon under standing the experimental method. EDF 611. PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (4) Selected topics in psychology of human development and learning. EDF 613. PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING (5) A consideration of several theories of learning and related research studies in regard to classroom application. EDF 615. BIOLOGICAL BASES FOR LEARNING AND BEHAVIOR (5) PR: One course in Educational Psychology. A study of human biological develop ment and its influence upon learning and behavior. EDF 617. MEASUREMENT OF INDIVIDUAL INTELLIGENCE (5) PR: EDF 305 or 611 or equivalent and a course in educational measurement or statistics. Administration and interpretation of individual measures of intelligenc e. Students may not receive credit for both EDF 617 and PSY 617 Individual Intelligence Testing. EDF 621. SOCIO-ECONOMIC FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION (4) Significant socio-economic factors as they relate to major problems facing Ameri can education. EDF 623. HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION (4) Historical and comparative problems in American education which are relevant to contemporary issues. EDF 625. PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION (4) Major philosophies of education which are relevant to an und e rstanding of contemporary educational issues.

PAGE 12

166 EDUCATION EDF 627. PROSEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE EDUCATION (4) Contemporary policies and practic es in education in select e d countries of the world. Methodology in Comparative Education. Consideration will be given to needs and interests of individual students. Guidance EDG 581. PRINCIPLES OF GUIDANCE (4) Guidance as a profession; philosophic framework of the guidance program, its scope and place in the total educational context. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDG 603. THE INFORMATIONAL SERVICE IN GUIDANCE (4) PR: EDG 581. Occupational structure in the United States ; sources and uses of educational, occupational social and personal information; collecting classi fying and communicating such information. EDG 607. THE INDIVIDUAL INVENTORY SERVICE IN GUIDANCE (3) PR: EDG 581. Case study approach to the analysis of the individual with emphasis on collecting and using information for purposes of better understanding individuals. EDG 611. THE TESTING SERVICE IN GUIDANCE (4) PR: EDF 605 or equivalent and EDG 581. Measurement in guidance; adminis tration of tests, interpretation and use of results. EDG 613. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF GUIDANCE SERVICES IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (3) PR: EDG 581. Organization of a guidance program in the elementary school its rel atio n to instruction and administration. Guidance roles and relationships of members of the school staff. EDG 615. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF GUIDANCE SERV-ICES IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS (3) PR: EDG 581. Organization of a guidance program and its place in the total educational program; responsibilities of various staff members and their relation ships to each other. EDG 617. GROUP PROCEDURES IN GUIDANCE IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (3) PR: EDG 581 and EDG 621. Counterpart of EDG 619 for prospective secondary s c hool counselors, use of groups in the counseling and guidance of children and in working with parents and teachers EDG 619. GROUP PROCEDURES IN GUIDANCE IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS (3) PR: EDG 581 and EDG 623. Group interaction and values of group activity for guidance purposes. Methods and tec hniques for working with groups. EDG 621. THE COUNSELING SERVICE IN GUIDANCE IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (5) PR: EDG 581. Counterpart of EDG 623 for prospective secondary school counselors. Counseling viewed as communication through media appropriate to children EDG 623. THE COUNSELING SERVICE IN GUIDANCE IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS (5) PR: EDG 581. Nature of the counseling process with emphasis on some theoreti ca l approaches and practical techniques. EDG 625. PRACTICUM IN ELEMENTARY GUIDANCE COUNSELING AND CONSULTING (6) This course is the counterpart of EDG 627 for prospective secondary school

PAGE 13

EDUCATION 167 counselors; enrollment by permission of program chairman only. Counseling with children in groups as well as individually; consultations with parents, teachers, administrators, and fellow professionals regarding the children being counseled. EDG 627. PRACTICUM IN SECONDARY SCHOOL GUIDANCE COUNSELING (6) Final course in guidance program; enrollment by permission of program chairman only. Supervised practice in working with individuals in counseling relationship EDG 633. SEMINAR IN GUIDANCE (1) PR OR CR: EDG 581. Significant issues in the eld of guidance; topics for discussion will vary according to needs and interests of students. Junior College FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDH 651. THE JUNIOR COLLEGE IN AMERICAN IDGHER EDUCATION (4) History of higher education, philosophical and cultural bases for d e finition of its role, and contemporary issues, such as control, nancing, and curricular patterns. The place and problems of the community junior college will be central concerns of this course. EDH 653. SEMINAR IN COLLEGE TEACHING (5) Implications of learning theory and student characteristics for teaching at the college level. Types of teaching procedures, innovation, evaluation, stud en t freedom and responsibility for learning. Library-Audio-Visual EDL 411. SCHOOL LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION AND SERVICE (5) Developments, philosophy, objectives, standards, and current trends in school libraries; library processes, programs and services in the school. EDL 412. ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL LIBRARY AS A MATERIALS CENTER (5) Library quarters, facilities, and equipment. The acquisition, maintenan ce, and circul a tion of book and non-book library materials, and the organization of library programs in the schools. EDL 419. AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS OF INSTRUCTION (4) Selection, utilization and care of audio-visual materials and equipment. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDL 508. TV UTILIZATION IN AND FOR THE SCHOOL (4) Techniques in utilization, evaluation, and preparation of instructional program ming for media specialists and teachers. EDL 513. GENERAL REFERENCE SOURCES (4) Basic reference tools : dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks, index es, serials, bibliographies, biographical sources, atlases and gazetteers; emphasis on school library reference materials. EDL 514. SELECTION AND ACQUISffiON OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LIBRARY MATERIALS (2) Election and ordering books and audio-visual materials for children, grades K-6 EDL 515. TECHNICAL SERVICES IN LIBRARIES (4) Principles and practice in the classification, cataloging, and proce ssing of books and other informational materials in the school's library.

PAGE 14

168 EDUCATION EDL 517. BOOKS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE-Part I (3) Literature for adolescents: bibliographic sources, aids, and tools for the selection and utilization of books and related multi-sensory materials. EDL 518. BOOKS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR YOUNG PEOPLEPart 11 (3) PR: EDL 517. Examination of books and related materials for young people in terms of basic principles of selection and utilization. EDL 523. PREPARATION AND PRODUCTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL MA TERIALS (4) Basic techniques for the preparation of a variety of audio-visual instructional materials. EDL 524. STORYTELLING FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LIBRARIAN (2) History of storytelling; practice in selection and utilization of materials necessary for storytelling in the elementary school library. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDL 600. FOUNDATIONS OF LIBRARIANSHIP (5) PR: EDL 411 or its equivalent Overview of and introduction to the study of library service: history; organization; specialized literature; outstanding leaders; current trends, issues and problems. Place of the library in society with its contributions to that society. EDL 601. BIBLIOGRAPHY AND BOOK SELECTION (5) PR: EDL 517, 518. Bibliographical sources, evaluative criteria for books and principles of book selection for libraries. EDL 603. HISTORY OF BOOKS AND LIBRARIES (4) Development of books and libraries from the earliest records to the great libraries of modern times and the library as a social institution. EDL 605. HISTORY OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (5) Historical bibliographical survey of imaginative and informational literature for children. EDL 607. THE CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY (5) Instructional materials as they relate to specific areas of the curriculum in elementary and high school programs. EDL 609. SUPERVISED FIELD WORK IN SCHOOL LIBRARIES (4) Consent of major adviser. EDL 611. ADV AN CED SUBJECT REFERENCE AND BIBLIOGRAPHY (4) PR: EDL 513. Literature of the humanities, social sciences, science, and technology. EDL 612. THE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF THE SCHOOL MEDIA CENTER (5) PR: EDL 600 or its equivalent Media quarters, facilities and equipment. Basic principles of organization and administration of media programs in elementary and secondary schools. EDL 615. CLASSIFICATION AND CATALOGING OF NON-BOOK MATERI ALS (3) Principles of classification and cataloging of non-book materials for the media center. EDL 621. AUDIO-VISUAL ADMINISTRATION (5) PR: EDL 523 and 6fY7. Designed for the high school specialist. The preparation of transparencies, film strips, and other newer media of instruction. EDL 623. ADVANCED PREPARATION AND PRODUCTION OF INSTRUC TIONAL MATERIALS (4)

PAGE 15

EDUCATION 169 PR: EDL 523 and 607. Designed for the high school specialist. The preparation of transparencies, film strips, and other newer media of instruction EDL 625. READING GUIDANCE PROGRAMS IN LIBRARIBS AND CLASS ROOMS (4) Reading interests of youth, programs for teaching the library and learning skills, theory and practice in reading guidance techniques. EDL 629. RADIO AND TELEVISION TECHNIQUES FOR EDUCATORS (4) Utilization and broadcasting techniques for educators. Stress will be placed on local school production, micro-teaching, and studio broadcasting. EDL 681. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-5) PR: 20 hours earned in program and consent of adviser. Music Education 0EDM 431. INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (4) 0EDM 432. INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN THE JUNIOR IDGH SCHOOL (4) 0EDM 433. INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN THE SENIOR IDGH SCHOOL (4) 0EDM 435. VOCAL MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (5) 0EDM 437. VOCAL MUSIC IN THE JUNIOR IDGH SCHOOL (5) 0EDM 439. PR: EDM 437. VOCAL MUSIC IN THE SENIOR IDGH SCHOOL (5) EDM 453. TEACIDNG METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-MUSIC INSTRUMENTAL (K-12) (4) PR: EDC 401 or concurrent registration in EDC 401, Techniques and materials of instruction in instrumental music (K-12). EDM 455. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-MUSIC VOCAL (K-12) (4) PR: .EDC 401 or concurrent registration in EDC 401. Techniques and material s of instruction in vocal music (K-12). FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDM 601. TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH IN MUSIC EDUCATION (4) Professional bibliography and individual research projects. EDM 603. MUSIC AND ADMINISTRATION (3) The music curriculum in relation to the total school program; staff and budgetary needs. EDM 614. VOCAL MATERIALS AND CONDUCTING (4) A study of materials appropriate for use in vocal groups. Emphasis is given to vocal materials. EDM 617. INSTRUMENTAL MATERIALS AND CONDUCTING (4) A study of materials appropriate for use in instrumental groups. Emphasis is given to instrumental materials. EDM 633. CURRENT TRENDS IN SCHOOL INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC (3) New materials, equipment, techniques of teaching and recent historical trends in instrumental music. EDM 635. CURRENT TRENDS IN SCHOOL VOCAL MUSIC (3) New materials, equipment, techniques of teaching and recent historical trends in vocal music. Each class meets as a performing group. Score reading, conducting, organizational pro cedures, historical relationships, and methods at the appraprlote grade levels Teaching techniques concerning the presentation of elements af theory, general music, and literature.

PAGE 16

170 EDUCATION Natural Science-Mathematics EDN 425. NEW TRENDS IN TEACHING THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES (4) Physical Science Study Committee Physics, Chemical Education Materials Study and other new approaches to the teaching of the physical sciences. Directed individual study. Recommended to be taken prior to EDN 459. EDN 427. NEW TRENDS IN TEACHING BIOLOGY (4) Cellular version of Biological Science Curriculum Study. For secondary school teachers. Recommended to be taken prior to EDN 459. EDN 451. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-MATH EMATICS (4) PR: EDC 4-01 or concurrent registration in EDC 4-01. Techniques and materials of instruction in mathematics. EDN 459. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-SCIENCES (4) PR: EDC 4-01 or concurrent registration in EDG 401. Techniques and materials of instruction in secondary schools sciences. EDN 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION (3) FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDN 637. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY MATHEMATICS EDUCATION (4) Curricular patterns and instructional practices in secondary mathematics. EDN 639. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCIENCE EDUCATION (4) PR: EDN 425 or 427. Curricular patterns and instructional practices in secondary science. EDN 641. CASE STUDIES IN SCIENCE (4) Case studies from the Natural Sciences with implications for science teaching. Physical Education EDP 255. FIRST AID (3) Meets American Red Cross certification requirements in standard and advanced first aid. EDP 311, 321, 331, 411, 421, 431. SEMINAR AND FIELD EXPERIENCE SEQUENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (5 each) A six course sequence providing teaching experiences on the elementary, junior and senior high school levels. Seminars are held in conjunction with these experiences where the following areas will be studied and discussed: analysis of the instructional process, child growth and development, social correlates of physical education, curriculum, organization and administration, health, commu nity recreation, philosophy and evaluation. EDP 312. HUMAN KINETICS I (6) The development and integration of the neuromuscular and the associated sensory systems as they effect motor and perceptual motor performance. The physiology of muscular contraction, the accompanying immediate changes in the cardio-respiratory systems, and the permanent physiological changes resulting from exercise. EDP 314. INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT (2) A personal evaluation of various factors related to the effective teaching of physi cal education. An individual profile that can be used for counseling purpos e s will be the final product of this course. EDP 322. HUMAN KINETICS II (6) The structure and function of the nervous, skeletal, and muscular systems of the

PAGE 17

EDUCATION 171 human body as they contribute to efficient movement ; deviations in either structure or function in these systems and the role of exercise in reh a bilitation EDP 332. HUMAN KINETICS ill (6) The mechanical law s of physics as they relate to mov e ment within and of the human body and the proj e ction of objects in throwing hitting and ki c kin g Efficiency of human movement through sound body mechanics. EDP 365 AQUATICS (3) Methods of organizing and conducting aqua tic programs in the s c hool and com munity. EDP 366. THEORY AND TEACHING OF MODERN DANCE (3) Designed to acquaint students with methods and resources for use in t eac hin g dance. Practical experiences in presentation of dance techniques and compo s iti o n work to classes EDP 412, 422, 432. APPLIED KINESIOLOGY (4 each) A three course sequence provid ing exp e ri e nc e s in a number of sports. Emphas i s will be placed on the learning and tea ching probl e ms with the s e a c tiviti es. EDP 457. TEACHING INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL ACTIVITIES (3) PR: PED 150, 152, 160 and 168. M e thod s of teaching tennis, golf, badminton, bowling, h a ndball, archery and recreational a ctivities. EDP 459. ATHLETIC TRAINING (3) Principles and techniques of conditioning athletes for competition; prevention and care of injuries in physical education and athletic activities. EDP 460. HEALTH EDUCATION PROJECT (5) A pra cticum in h e alth education through field experienc e s with official and volun tary health ag e ncies. EDP 466. THEORY AND TEACHING OF TEAMS SPORTS (5) Theory and methods of tea c hing rules, progressions. Strategy and tactics in tea m gam es. EDP 468. COACHING OF SWIMMING (3) Methods of org a nizing and co a ching a comp e titive swimming t e am. EDP 469. COACHING OF FOOTBALL (5) Theory and pra ctice of the fundamental techniqu es, organizational probl ems and s tr a tegy in v olved in coaching football. EDP 478. COACHING OF WRESTLING (4) Theory and practice of the fundamental techniques, organizational problems and strategy involved in coaching wre s tling. EDP 479. COACHING OF SOCCER (3) Theory and practice of the fundam e ntal techniques, organizational problems and strategy involved in coaching soccer. EDP 486. COMMUNITY RECREATION (4) Introduction to recreational outlets in the community and the administrative prob lems confronting recreational playground leaders and directors of community recreational programs EDP 488. COACHING OF TRACK AND FIELD (4) Theory and practice of the fundamental techniques, organizational problems and s trategy involved in coaching track. EDP 489. COACHING OF BASKETBALL (3) Theory and practice of the fundamental techniques, organizational problems and strategy involved in coaching basketball. EDP 499. COACHING OF BASEBALL (3) The ory and pra ctice of the fundam e ntal t ec hniques, organizational problems and str a t e gy involved in coaching baseball FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDP 556. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3-6)

PAGE 18

172 EDUCATION EDP 558. SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF COACHING (5) The application of principles from exercise physiology, kinesiology and psychology to competitive athletics. EDP 566. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED (4) An Analysis of the neuromuscular and perceptual motor development of children in regard to the special problems of the mentally retarded child and a study of activities designed to improve his motor skills, physical fitness, and social de velopment. Reading Education FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDR 509. CURRENT TRENDS IN READING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (4) Developmental reading for the upper grade level junior high school pupils and all grade level senior high school pupils. EDR 530. CORRECTIVE READING FOR CLASSROOM TEACHERS (4) PR : EDE 409 or EDR 509 or equivalent. Procedures and materials for individual and group corrective reading in the classroom. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDR 631. DIAGNOSIS OF READING DISABILITIES (4) PR: EDF 605 and EDE 609 or EDR 509. Research concerning causes of reading disability; diagnostic procedures; techniques and materials in diagnosis of reading problems. EDR 632. TECHNIQUES OF CORRECTIVE AND REMEDIAL READING (4) PR: EDE 609 or EDR 509, and EDR 631. Materials and methods in rem e diation of moderate to severe reading disability cases. EDR 633. PRACTICUM IN READING (3-6) PR: EDE 609 or EDR 509, EDR 631 and EDR 632 and CI. Clinical diagnosis of severe reading disability cases, tutoring of individuals and small groups, inter view techniques, preparation of case reports. EDR 634. CURRICULUM AND SUPERVISION PROBLEMS IN READING (4) PR: EDE 609 or EDR 509. Planning and administering programs and preparation as consultants in reading. Intensive work on individual projects required. EDR 635. SURVEY OF READING RESEARCH (4) PR: EDF 601, EDE 609 or EDR 509. Critical analysis of current reading research; individual report or paper required. Special Education EDS 211. INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION (3) Characteristics of exceptional children and professional opportunities available in Special Education. EDS 311. EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN IN THE SCHOOLS (4) PR: EDF 305, PSY 201, or CI. Characteristics and needs of the Culturally Dis advantaged, Emotionally Disturbed & Socially M a ladjusted, Gifted, Hearing Im paired, Mentally Retarded, Physically Handicapped, Speech Impaired, & Visually Limited. EDS 312. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS IN THE CLASSROOM (4) Aiding the child with a speec h, hearing or language disorder in a classroom setting.

PAGE 19

EDUCATION 173 EDS 322. INTRODUCTION TO MENTAL RETARDATION (4) PR: EDF 305, PSY 201, or CI. Classification, diagnosis, characteristics, and treatment of the mentally retarded EDS 329. UNDERGRADUATE SUPERVISED PRACTICUM IN MENTAL RETARDATION (1-14) Supervised Practicum experiences in the educational, social and vocational plan ning of mentally retarded individuals. EDS 423 I & II. EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE EDUCABLE MENTALLY RETARDED (4,4) PR: EDS 322 and concurrent emollment in EDC 401, or CI. Special class organization, curriculum adjustments, methods and techniques of teaching the educable retarded. EDS 424. EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE TRAINABLE MENTALLY RETARDED (4) PR: Eds 322 or CI. Special class organization, curriculum adjustments, methods and techniques of teaching the trainable retarded. EDS 479. SCHOOL PRACTICUM IN SPEECH PATIIOLOGY (1-14) Supervised practicum in Speech Pathology & Audiology in the school setting. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDS 529. GRADUATE SUPERVISED PRACTICUM IN MENTAL RETARDA TION (1-14) Supervised graduate practicum encompassing teaching and supervising experiences in public school classes for the mentally retarded. EDS 531. BEHAVIOR DISORDERS IN THE SCHOOLS (4) PR: EDF 305 or EDF 377 or PSY 201 or CI. Survey of emotional and social disorders in children and the implications for educational programs. Students may not receive credit for both EDS 513 and PSY 613 Behavioral Disorders of Children. EDS 541. THE CULTURALLY DISADVANTAGED AND THE SCHOOLS (4) Characteristics and needs of the culturally disadvantaged and their implications for educational programming. EDS 550. NATURE AND NEEDS OF THE GIFTED (4) Characteristics and educational needs of gifted children and youth. EDS 551. EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE GIFTED (4) PR: EDS 550 or CI. Curriculum adjustm e nts, methods and techniques, classroom organization necessary for teaching the gift e d. EDS 559. FIELD WORK FOR THE GIFTED (1-14) Planned supervised participation in activities related to specific areas of the gifted. EDS 579. SCHOOL PRACTICUM IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY (1-14) Supervised practicum in Speech Pathology & Audiology in the school setting. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDS 610. SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (4) A critical survey of the literature related to the psychological, sociological, and education problems of exceptional children. EDS 611. PSYCHO-EDUCATIONAL APPRAISAL OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (4) PR: EDF 303, 605 or CI. Special diagnostic procedures for exceptional children EDS 612. SUPERVISION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILD PROGRAMS (4) PR: CI. Principles of supervision and their application to exceptional child education.

PAGE 20

174 EDUCATION EDS 613. ADMINISTRATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHil.D PROGRAMS (4) PR: CI. Procedures which local, state, and national administrators may use to implement services for exceptional children. EDS 620. BIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF MENTAL RETARDATION (4) PR: EDS 322 and EDF 607, or CI. Evaluation of relevant literature. EDS 621. SOCIOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL ASPECTS OF MENTAL RETARDATION (4) Evaluation of relevant literature. EDS 622. ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED (4-8) PR: EDS 423, experience in teaching the retarded, identilication of a problem prior to registration, or CI. Specific curriculum and methodological problems in teaching the retarded. EDS 632. EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN I (4) PR: CI. Personality dynamics and research findings as related to the interpretation of disturbed behavior; techniques for the management of individual, small group, and classroom behavior. EDS 633. EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHil.DREN II (4) PR: CI. Personality dynamics and learning theory as related to the facilitation of learning and communication; techniques for teaching both individuals and groups with emphasis on improved interpersonal relations, academic learning, and com munication skills. EDS 639. FIELD WORK IN EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN (1-14) Field work and practicum experiences with several kinds of emotionally disturbed children in a variety of selected situations. EDS 649. FIELD WORK WITH POTENTIALLY HANDICAPPED (CULTURALLY DISADVANTAGED): (1-9) Teaching and participation in activities related to teaching disadvantaged young children (N-3). EDS 676. SPEECH & LANGUAGE DISORDERS (4) Group management procedures for amelioration of speech and language problems. The nature of disorders of communication and management of verbal behavior. EDS 699. THESIS (1-6) English EDT 447. TEACHING MEmODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOLENGLISH (4) PR: EDC 401 or concurrent registration in EDC 401. Techniques and materials of instruction in English Education. EDT 463. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-JOURNALISM (4) PR: EDC 4-01 or concurrent registration in EDC 4-01. Techniques and materials of instruction in journalism. EDT 531. CURRENT TEACHING OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (4) Application of recent techniques of language study, including structural and transformational grammar, to classroom teaching of English, especially in relation to current textbooks. (For graduate credit: PR-ENG 517 and certilication in English.)

PAGE 21

EDUCATION 175 FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDT 631. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION (4) Curricular patterns and instructional practices in secondary English. Vocational and Adult Education EDV 407. FOUNDATIONS AND HISTORY OF ADULT AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (4) A historical review of vocational and adult education developments, the forces affecting the movement and their relationships to the total program of education. EDV 431 I, II, III, IV, V. SUPERVISED FIELD EXPERIENCE: (4-8) Planned supervised function in the area of specialization and co-ordinated with selected businesses and industries on site. I. Adult Education. II. Business and Office Education. Ill. Industrial Education. IV. Distributive Education. V. Techni cal Education. EDV 445 I, Il, III, IV, V. METHODS OF TEACHING SPECIALIZATION SUBJECTS (4) Improvement of instruction in the area of specialization. I. Adult Education. II. Business and Office Education. III. Industrial Education. IV. Distributive Educa tion. V. Technical Education. EDV 480 I, Il, III, IV, V. FACILITY DESIGN AND LABORATORY MANAGEMENT (4) Design and devolop floor plans consistent with modem and efficient methods of instruction as well as evaluate existing physical facilities. Selection and location of equipment. Review and prepare operational plans for the management of equipment, furniture, tools, and supplies as they relate to effective student learn ing. I. Adult Education. II. Business and Office Education. III. Industrial Educa tion. IV. Distributive Education. V. Technical Education. EDV 503 I, II, III, IV, V. CURRICULUM CONSTRUCTION (4) To plan and organize an instructional program and budgeting for the purpose of developing an occupational competency for initial employment. I. Adult Education. II. Business and Office Education. III. Industrial Education. IV. Dis tributive Education. V. Technical Education. EDV 504 I, II, III, IV, V. PREPARATION AND DEVELOPMENT (4-8) I. Instructional Media and Materials II. Performance Evaluation Credit for in-service programs may be given when approved by the faculty advisor in the area of specialization and when co-ordinated through the University and / or the local board of education. I. Adult Education. II. Business and Office Educa tion. III. Industrial Education. IV. Distributive Education. V. Technical Educa tion. EDV 506 I, Il, III, IV, V. PROGRAM MANAGEMENT (4, 4, 4, 4, 4) Organization, co-ordination and administration of co-operative programs. I. Adult Education. II. Business and Office Education. III. Industrial Education. IV. Dis tributive Education. V. Technical Education EDV 507. CURRENT POLICIES AND PRINCIPLES OF ADULT AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (4) An overview of current trends and practices, their historical, sociological and philosophical base out of which principles of adult and vocational education have been accepted and implemented. EDV 511. SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS FOR ADULT AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (4) An approach to identifying and analyzing, developing and maintaining working

PAGE 22

176 EDUCATION relationships between appropriate school and community institutions, their chan nels of communication for the purpose of cooperative program involvement. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDV 621 I, Il, ID, IV, V. INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION: (4) Attention is given to individualized instruction to include the special needs student, the slow learner, and the more capable student. I. Adult Education. II. Business and Office Education. III. Industrial Education. IV. Distributive Education. V. Technical Education. EDV 631 I, Il, Ill, IV, V. CURRENT TRENDS (4) The development of vocational education which includes historical information, issues, current trends, new dimensions and problems in the area of specialization. I. Adult Education. II. Business and Office Education. III. Industrial Education. IV. Distributive Education. V. Technical Education. EDV 641 I, Il, Ill, IV, V. STAFF DEVELOPMENT (Workshop) (4) Participation in one 4-credit hour workshop may be given when approved by the faculty advisor in the area of specilization. I. Adult Education. II. Business and Office Education. III. Industrial Education. IV. Distributive Education. V. Technical Education. EDV 651 I, Il, Ill, IV, V. VOCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PRACTICUM (4-8) Field study in the local business community. I. Adult Education. II. Business and Office Education. III. Industrial Education. IV. Distributive Education. V. Technical Education. EDV 6,61 I, Il, Ill, IV, V. SUPERVISION OF VOCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS (4) Supervisory responsibilities at the state, area, and local levels to include improve ment of instruction, co--0rdination of activities, and human and personnel relations. I. Adult Education. II. Business and Office Education. III. Industrial Education. IV. Distributive Education. V. Technical Education. EDV 671 I, Il, Ill, IV, V. ADMINISTRATION OF VOCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (4) The duties and responsibilities of the administrative manager to include the areas of planning, organizing, controlling, budgeting, and staffing. I. Adult Education. II. Business and Office Education. Ill. Industrial Education. IV. Distributive Education. V. Technical Education. EDV 687 I, Il, Ill, IV, V. SEMINAR: (4) PR: EDF 605 & 607. Applied research techniques and investigation of an im portant current problem in area of specialization. A requirement for satisfactorily completing the courses will be a written document such as a research proposal or a magazine article for publication. I. Adult Education. II. Business and Office Education III. Industrial Education. IV. Distributive Education. V. Technical Education. Social Studies EDW 461. TEACHING METHODS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL SOCIAL STUDIBS (4) PR: EDC 401 or concurrent registration in EDC 401. Techniques and materials of instruction in social studies. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDW 643. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY SOCIAL STUDIBS (4) Curricular patterns and instructional practices in secondary social studies.

PAGE 23

ENGINEERING 177 Foreign Languages EDX 449. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-FOREIGN LANGUAGE (4) PR: EDC 401 or concurrent registration in EDC 401. Techniques and materials of instruction in Foreign Language. EDX 465. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-LATIN (4) PR: EDC 401 or concurrent registration in EDC 401. Techniques and materials of instruction in Latin. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDX 649. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION (4) Curricular patterns and instructional practices in teaching secondary foreign languages. Humanities FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDY 633. CURRENT TRENDS IN THE TEACHING OF HUMANITIBS (4) Curricular patterns, materials, and instructional practices in the teaching of humanities. ENGINEERING Faculty: Abbey, L. Allen. Bean, J. Bowers, Burdick, Burgett, Cowell, Devine, Donaldson, Downey, Ellis, Fraze, Friebele, Garrett, J. Gonzalez, Griffith, Hays, Henry, Hilley, Kopp, Lane. Lindgren, Nienhaus, Oline, Payne, Rashad, D. Rogers Rhodes, Rimbey, B. Ross, Scott, N. Smith, J. Smith, Wilma Smith, Wm. Smith, Sortor, Twigg, Weaver, Williams, Wimmert. Basic Engineering Course Work EGB 101. GRAPIDC ANALYSIS I (4) The theory and application of projective systems and related topics. Basic prob lems in descriptive geometry. (lee-lab) EGB 102. GRAPIDC ANALYSIS II (3) PR: EGB 101. Principles of graphic and numeric anal ysis. Appli e d problems in graphic statistics, emperical data, projective geom e try, gr a phic calculus, and other graphic techniques for the solution of engineering problems. EGB 103. GRAPIDC ANALYSIS ill (3) CR: EGB 101. An elective course designed for stud e nts with limited background in pre-calculus mathematics necessary for graphical processes Emphasis on graphical concepts of algebraic and trigonometric relationships. EGB 104. GRAPIDC ANALYSIS IV (3) CR: EGB 102. Continuation of EGB 103. EGB 201. ENGINEERING PROBLEMS I (2) CR: MTH 203. Elective course for engineering majors. Applied problems paral leling mathematics sequence.

PAGE 24

178 ENGINEERING EGB 203. ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS (3) PR: EGB 102. An introduction to the concepts of a systems approach and various techniques of measurement in engineering systems, both discrete and continuous. (lee-lab) EGB 301. ENGINEERING PROBLEMS II (2) CR: MTH 303. Continuation of EGB 201. EGB 302. ENGINEERING PROBLEMS ill (2) CR: MTH 304. Continuation of EGB 301. EGB 303. ENGINEERING PROBLEMS IV (2) CR: MTH 305. Continuation of EGB 302. EGB 3ll. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS I (3) PR: PHY 225-226, MTH 304. A course sequence in linear passive circuits, elec tronic circnits and electromechanical devices. Physical principles and mod els. Transient and steadystate analysis. System considerations. EGB 312. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS II (3) PR: EGB 311. Continuation of EGB 311. EGB 313. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS ill (3) PR: EGB 311. Continuation of EGB 311 or EGB 312. EGB 321. THERMODYNAMICS I (3) PR: MTH 304, PHY 222. Introduction to Thermodynamics; Thermodynamic concepts of system, control volume, process, cycle, property, and state. The Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics and temperature scales. Properties of ideal and pure sub stances. Concepts of Work and Heat. The First Law of Thermodynamics. EGB 322. THERMODYNAMICS II (3) PR: EGB 321. Continuation of EGB 321. The second law of Thermodynamics ; concepts of Reversibility, Carnot Cycle, entropy and its calculation, basic engi neering cycles, psychlometry; ideal gas nrixtures, combustion. Thermodynamics of fluid How through simple nozzles and metering devices. EGB 325. DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS (4) PR: EGB 340. Linear dynamic analysis of electrical, mechanical, pneumatic, hydraulic and thermal systems. Introduction to analog computers; LaPlace trans formation. Block diagram representation, transient and frequency response. ( leclab) EGB 231. FORTRAN PROGRAMMING I (I) Basic computer operation, programming a computer using machine language, assembly languages and FORTRAN. (lab) EGB 232. FORTRAN PROGRAMMING II (I) PR: EGB 231. Continuation of EGB 231. (lab) EGB 333. FORTRAN PROGRAMMING ill (I) PR: EGB 232. Solution of engineering problems using digital computers. Numeri cal methods using FORTRAN. (lab) EGB 337. ENGINEERING VALUATION I (3) PR: EGB 231, MTH 303. A study in analyzing the economic limitations imposed on engineering activities using basic models which consider the tim e value of money. EGB 340. SOLID MECHANICS I (5) CR: PHY 221. Principles of statics, equilibrium of rigid bodies, elestostatics of simple structural elements. (lee-problem) EGB 341. SOLID MECHANICS II (4) PR: EGB 340. Dynamics of discrete particles and distributed mass bodies ; spa tial kinematics and kinetics. (lee-problem) EGB 342. ENGINEERING MATERIALS I (6) PR: CHM 213, EGB 340. An introduction to the structure and prop erties of engineering materials. (lee-lab)

PAGE 25

ENGINEERING 179 EGB 343. FLUIDS I (6) PR: EGB 341. Fundamental and experimental conc e pts in ideal and vis c ous fluid theory; momentum and energy consid e rations; compressible flow; bound a ry layer, Na vier-Stokes equation. (lee-lab) EGB 401. ENGINEERING ANALYSIS I (4) PR: MTH 304. Application of diff e r e ntial equations. EGB 501, 502, 503, 504, 505. ENGINEERING ANALYSIS II, Ill, IV, V, VI (3 each) PR: CC or MTH 401. Ordinary differential equations with emphasis on numerical methods and series solutions; boundary value problems; orthogonal functions ; vector analysis; partial differential equations; the LaPlace transform; functions of a complex variable. EGB 601. ENGINEERING ANALYSIS VII (3) PR: CC. Applications of applied math e m a tics to the study of linearized dynamic systems and networks; state space; stability theory; extensions to discrete and nonlinear systems. Electrical and Electronic Systems EGE 301, 302, 303, 404, 405, 406. LABORATORIES 1 through 6 (1 each) PR: EGB 311, 312; CR: EGE 410, 420, 421, 430, respectively. EGE 310, 410. NETWORK ANALYSIS AND DESIGN I, II (3 each) PR: EGB 311. A second course in linear circuit analysis and design. Transi ent and steady-state responses of passive R-L-C networks to various forcing functions. EGE 320, 420. ELECTRONICS I, II (3 each) PR: EGB 312. A second course in the physical principles of electronic devices with emphasis on simi-conductor electronics. Includes the analysis and design of amplifiers and switching circuits. EGE 330, 430. FIELDS AND WAVES I, II (3 each) PR: PHY 225-226. A basic introduction to electromagnetic field theory, including static and dynamic electromagnetic fields. EGE 404, 405, 406. SEE EGE 301 EGE 410. SEE EGE 310. EGE 411. LINEAR SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (3) PR: EGE 310; CR: EGE 410. Provides further study in the analysis of linear networks and systems. Includes time and frequency domain points of view. LaPlace, Fourier and Super-position integrals. EGE 420. SEE EGE 320. EGE 421. COMMUNICATION CIBCUITS (3) PR: EGE 420. Provides further study in electronic circuits. Includes oscillator, modulator, and detector analysis and design. EGE 425. COMMUNICATION ENGINEERING (3) PR: EGE 421. System considerations of electronic circuits; radio propagation; antennas; transmitters and receivers. EGE 430. SEE EGE 330. EGE 432. DISTRIBUTED NETWORKS (3) PR: EGE 430. Transmission lines, standing waves, imped a nce, wav e guides. EGE 440. LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGB 325. Introduction to analysis and design of lin ear fe edba ck control systems. Covers block diagrams, flow charts, Bode, Nyquist and Root Locus techniques. EGE 441. CONTROL LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 440. EGE 444. LOGIC DESIGN (3) PR: EGE 420. Binary number system; Boolean functions; cannonical forms;

PAGE 26

180 ENGINEERING Boolean Algebra; minimization of combinational logic circuits; digital switching circuits; switching matrices logic circuits in computers. EGE 445. LOGIC LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 444. EGE 450. MICROELECTRONICS ENGINEERING (3) PR: PHY 323, EGE 410, 420, 330. Principles of microminiturization of electrical circuits. Fabrication techniques, compon ent realization, component isolation, par asitics. EGE 451. MICROELECTRONICS LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 450 EGE 460, 462, 464. ELECTROMECHANICS I, Il, ill (3 each) PR: EGB 312. Theory of electromechanical energy conversion. Characteristics and control of rotating electrical machines, transformers, electromagnets, loud speakers, microphones, transducers. EGE 461, 463, 4,65. ELECTROMECHANICS LAB 1, 2, 3 (1 each) CR: EGE 460, 462, 464 respectively. EGE 474, 476, 478. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS I, Il, ill (5 each) PR: CC. A course series to permit non-electrical majors to take advanced course work in the electrical area. EGE 475, 477, 479. SYSTEMS LABORATORIES 1, 2, 3 (1 each) CR: EGE 474, 476, 478 respectively. EGE 480, 481, 482. SPECIAL ELECTRICAL TOPICS I, Il, ill (1-4 each) PR: CC. An individual or team project involving the design of an electrical com ponent or system. Required of all electrical seniors. EGE 499. DESIGN PROJECT (3) PR: Senior Standing. An individual or team project involving the design of an electrical component or system. Required of all electrical seniors. EGE 520. PULSE cmcuIT PRINCIPLES (3) PR: EGE 411, 421. An introduction to the analysis and design of pulse and timing circuits with applications. EGE 530. UHF PRINCIPLES (3) PR: EGE 411, 421, 430. A study of tubes, devices and circuits peculiar to systems which operate at ultra high and super high frequencies. EGE 531. UHF LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 530. EGE 540. NONLINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGE 440. Principles of state-variables, phase-plane and describing functions. EGE 541. CONTROL LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 540. EGE 544. DIGITAL COMPUTERS (3) PR: EGE 444. Digital arithmetic; computer subsystems, arithmetic units; control units; memory units; general purpose computers. EGE 545. DIGITAL LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 544. EGE 548. ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS (2) PR: EGE 411. Techniques and principles of electronic measurement. EGE 549. MEASUREMENTS LABORATORY (I) CR: EGE 548. EGE 560. POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (3) PR: CC. Analysis techniques for AC power systems. EGE 580, 581, 582. SPECIAL ELECTRICAL TOPICS I, II, ill (1-3 each) PR: CC EGE 585. ENGINEERING SEMINAR (1) PR: CC

PAGE 27

EGE 599. RESEARCH OR DESIGN (1-9) P R : CC ENGINEERING 181 EGE 610, 611. ADVANCED CIRCUIT THEORY I, II (3 each) PR : CC. Network fund a mentals ; network characterization ; frequency analysis; sup e r-position int e grals; signal-flow techniques; stability probl e ms; real-and im a ginary rel a tions. EGE 612. NONLINEAR CIRCUITS (3) PR: CC. Analytical and topological approaches to nonlinear circuits; nonlinear resonance; relaxation oscill a tions. EGE 614, 615, 616. NETWORK SYNTHESIS I, II, ill (3 each) PR: CC. Network functions; physical realizability; two-terminal network synthe sis methods; frequency transformation; potential analogy; approximation problem s ; insertion-loss and transfer function synthesis. EGE 622. NOISE THEORY (3) PR: CC. Electrical noise and signals through linear filters and electronic systems. EGE 626, 627, 628. THEORY OF COMMUNICATION I, II, ill (3 each) PR: CC. Physical basis and statistical r e presentation of electrical noi s e; filtering, modulation, and de-modulation of signals corrupted by noise ; correl a tion tech niques and linear prediction; statistical estimation of signal parameters; optimum filters and receivers; ambiguity functions and inverse probability. Quantitative m eas ure of information sourc es, noise channels and channel capacity; an intro duction to error-correcting cod es. EGE 630, 631, 632. ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND WAVES I, II, m (3 each) PR: CC. Electromagnetic theory from the engineering point of view, prop a gation and refl e ction of waves, guided waves, resonant activiti es, antennas and radiation. EGE 635. MICROWAVE THEORY (3) PR: CC. A study of microwave circuits devices and techniques. EGE 636. ELECTRICAL LABORATORY (I) CR: EGE 635 EGE 640. DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGE 440 or CC. Sample-data and digital control proce s ses. EGE 641. RANDOM PROCESSES IN CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGE 440 or CC. Analysis and design of control systems subject to ra ndom inputs and disturbances. EGE 642. MODERN CONTROL THEORY (3) PR: EGE 440, 540, 640 641 or CC. A study of modem control techniqu e s in cluding optimum and adaptive control. EGE 644. DIGITAL MACHINES I (3) PR: EGE 444. Mathematical Foundation; minimization, design of sequential logic circuits, state diagrams. EGE 654. DIGITAL MACHINES II (3) PR: EGE 644. Digital arithmetic; binary codes in computers ; design of special purpose computers; introduction to sequential machine theory; examples of sequential machines. EGE 647. SIMULATION TECHNIQUES FOR ELECTRICALS (3) PR: CC. Theory of simulation of systems characterized by lump e d and di s trib uted parameters. EGE 648. ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS (2) PR: CC. Advanced technique s a nd principles of electronic me as ur e m e nt. EGE 649. MEASUREMENTS LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 648 EGE 650, 651, 652. SOLID STATE ELECTRONICS I II, ill (3 each) PR: CC. Theory of operatio n a nd a ppli ca tion of circ uits a nd d evi ces.

PAGE 28

182 ENGINEERING EGE 660, 661, 662. ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS I II, III (3 each) PR: CC. Steady-state and transi en t ana lysis of interconnected power systems; power circuit protection; transient characteristics of apparatus. EGE 680. SPECIAL ELECTRICAL PROBLEMS I (1-3 each) PR: CC. EGE 690. ADVANCED ENGINEERING SEMINAR (1) PR: CC. EGE 699. RESEARCH OR DESIGN (1-18) PR: CC. Energy Conversion EGR 311. THERMODYNAMICS III (3) PR: EGB 322. The study of energy conversion processes and cycles as modied for optimization of capacity and efficiency. Applications include pumps, com pressors, turbines, internal combustion engines, power and refrigeration cycles. EGR IU5. HEAT TRANSFER I (4) PR: EGB 322. The basic laws of conduction, convection and radiation; analysis of the effect on heat transfer of thermal conductivity, emissivity, fluid transport properties and Reynold's number. Lee-Lab. EGR 326. DYNAMICS OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGB 340 .. Plane and angular motion; velocity and acceleration curves, ve locities and accelerations in mechanisms, static and dynamic force analysis. Rolling and sliding contact pairs, cams, gear tooth action. Lee-Lab. EGR 350. ENERGY CONVERSION LABORATORY I (2) CR: EGB 322. Introduction to engineering laboratory measurements with em phasis on the writing of technical reports. Experiments in the measurement of t em pe ra ture, pressure, flow of fluids; determination of density, viscosity, analysis of combustion products. Lee-Lab. EGR 411. THERMODYNAMICS IV (3) PR: EGR 311. Introduction to mathematical thermodynamics, the Maxwell rela tions, real gas behavior, ideal mixtures and solutions, introduction to phase and chemical equilibrium. EGR 413. FLUID MACHINERY (4) PR: EGB 342. Analytic and experimental determination of the performance characteristics of fluid handling devices; proper selection of pumps and fans for known pipe and duct systems. Analysis of system efficiency parameters; techniques for noise control. Lee-Lab EGR 417. FUELS AND COMBUSTION (3) PR: EGB 322. A study of the combustion characteristics of gaseous, solid and liquid fuels and equipment needed to safely and economically control combustion processes. Lee-Lab EGR 419. POWER PLANT ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3) PR: EGR 315. Daily load curves, and estimation of future loads; economics of power generation. Plant efficiency as affected by the thermodynamic cycle and load variations. EGR 421. INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR ENGINEERING I (3) PR: PHY 323 Neutron d ens ity and thermalization parameters; criticality calculations; transient flux parameters ; r eac tor operation; control instrument atio n. EGR 424. REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING (3) PR: EGR 315. Application of the principle s of thermodynamics, heat transfer and fluid flow to the design of systems for the control environment. EGR 428. MACHINE ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3) PR: EGB 341. Stress analysis, stress strain relations, deflection analysis, shock

PAGE 29

ENGINEERING 183 and impact, selection of materials, strength of materi a ls. Principles of d es ign. Lee-Lab. EGR 429. :MECHANICAL DESIGN I (3) PR: EGR 428. Application of the principles of en g ineering mechanics mate ri a l s and manufacturing to the analysis and design of m ec hanical elements. Lee-L a b EGR 441. ANALOG COMPUTERS I (3) PR: EGB 325 or CI. The study of linear and nonlinear engineering systems using analog computers. Magnitude and time scaling. Lee-Lab. EGR 450. ENERGY CONVERSION LABORATORY II (1) PR: EGR 350. Continuation of EGR 350 with emphasis on measurement tech niques, energy balances of operating systems and technical report writing. Lee-Lab EGR 453. :MECHANICAL MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL (3) PR: EGB 211, 325. Analysis of devices for measurement and control Transmitter s error detectors, controllers and final control elements. Block diagram represen tation. Lee-Lab. EGR 481. SPECIAL TOPICS ENERGY CONVERSION I (1-4) PR: CC. EGR 482. SPECIAL TOPICS ENERGY CONVERSION II (1-4) PR: CC. EGR 515. HEAT TRANSFER II (4) PR: EGR 315. A continuation of EGR 315. Analysis of non-steady state heat transfer by mathematical and graphical means. Radiation from and through Hames. Design of heat transfer equipment. Lee-Lab. EGR 511. STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS (3) PR: EGR 311. The statistical and microscopic approach to molecular transport phenomena. Boltzman and quantum statistics; entropy and probability; the third law of thermodynamics; evaluation of partition functions. EGR 517. ENERGY TRANSFORMATION AND STORAGE (3) PR: EGR 311. Analysis of direct energy conversion systems; photoelectric cell s thermocouples, fuel cells, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices solar energy cells, rectifiers, inverters, energy storage devices. EGR 521. INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR ENGINEERING II (3) PR: EGR 421. Continuation of EGR 420. Heat Transfer, fluid How and energy removal in reactors. Reactor materials and fuels. Radiation protection and shielding, preliminary reactor design. EGR 522. ACOUSTICS AND NOISE CONTROL (3) PR: CC. Fundamentals of sound propagation; sound power and intensity ; psychoacoustics, industrial noise sources, methods of noise attenuation; community noise ordinances; instrumentation for noise m e asur e ment. Lee-Lab. EGR 526. ANALYSIS METHODS FOR MECHANICAL DESIGN (3) PR: CC. Treatment of stress, strain and strength aspects of Machine Design Application of failure theories, residual stresses and energy principles to machin e elements. EGR 528. MECHANICAL DESIGN II (3) PR: EGR 429. A continuation of EGR 429. Lee-Lab. EGR 529. PROJECT DESIGN (3) PR: CC. Correlation of previously acquired mechanical des ign experience w i th a creative design project. Lee-La b. EGR 533. :MECHANICAL VIBRATION AND BALANCING (3) PR: CC. Transient and steady state vib ra tion an a ly s i s of mechanical systems w i th lumped parameters. Dynamic balancing, vibr a tion isolation and simulation of syst e ms. EGR 535. LUBRICATION (3) PR: CC The theoretical basis of lubri c ation and hydrodynamic bearing th e ory. The study of lubrication requirem ents of diff e r ent typ e s of ma c hines.

PAGE 30

184 ENGINEERING EGR 541. ANALOG COMPUTERS II (3) PR: EGR 440. A continuation of EGR 440. Logical mode control, constrained mech a nical system s parnmeter identification techniques. Lee-Lab. EGR 551. PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS (3) PR: CC. The techniques and theory for measuring temper a ture, pressure, dis placement, speed, acceleration, force, power, and psychrometric properties with particular attention to dynamic measurement Lee-Lab. EGR 554. PNEUMATIC AND HYDRAULIC CONTROL (3) PR: CC. A study of pneumatic and hydraulic control sy s tem components and their effect on closed loop system performance. Lee-Lab. EGR 556. NUMERICAL MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL (3) PR: CC. Incremental and absolute control systems. Number systems used in numerical control Digital to analog and analog to digital conversion. Applications. EGR 560. POWER UTILIZATION SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGB 312. Standard electrical voltages, NEMA standards, motor parameters, motor control, control system elements, complex control systems and sequencing, conductors, raceways, National Electrical Code. Protective devices. EGR 581. SPECIAL TOPICS ENERGY CONVERSION ill (1-4) PR. CC. EGR 582. SPECIAL TOPICS ENERGY CONVERSION IV (1-4) PR. CC. EGR 611. THERMODYNAMICS OF FLUID FLOW .(3) PR: CC. Interrelationship of the equations of motion and of thermodynamics. The study of ideal and real fluids in motion. EGR 612. ADV AN CED THERMODYNAMICS (3) PR: CC. Advanced treatment of the general equations of thermodynamics, principal equations of chemical recation; the chemical potential and equilibrium constant; analysis of metastable states. Irreversibility and steady flow. EGR 615. HEAT TRANSFER ill (3) PR: CC. Advanced treatment of basic heat transfer phenomena. Radiation through absorbing and non-absorbing media; radiation from gases and plasmas; "grey" body calculations. Analysis of convective heat tranfer by boundary layer theory and equations of fluid motion. EGR 629. ADV AN CED MECHANICAL DESIGN (3) PR: CC. A technical application course involving the problem of developing machines to perform specified functions. The machine to be designed will be designated by the instructor. The analysis will include evaluating all parts for stress, vibration, wear and proper consideration of manufacturing processes in volved. Lee-Lab. EGR 630. APPLIED ENGINEERING ASPECTS OF FATIGUE (3) PR: CC. Evalu a tion of strength of machine members under fatigue loadings. Stress concentrations, residual stress effects, surface coatings, environmental effects. Statistical treatment in fatigue analysis. EGR 633. VIBRATIONS ANALYSIS (3) PR: EGR 533. Application of generalized coordinates, LaGranges's equation, matrix iteration, and other specialized methods to discrete multimass systems. Lateral vibrations of uniform machine elements. EGR 642. DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS AND MODEL THEORY I (3) PR: CC. Theory of dimensional analysis, similitude, and design of models. EGR 643. DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS AND MODEL THEORY II (3) PR: EGR 643. Continuation of EGR 643 including model testing and correlation of tests with fractional analysis. EGR 657. FLUID AMPLIFIBRS AND CIRCUITS (3) PR: CC. Analysis and design of fluid devices for use as amplifiers, logic devices and memory elements in instrumentation and control systems.

PAGE 31

EGR 681. SPECIAL PROBLEMS I (1-4) PR:CC. EGR 682. SPECIAL PROBLEMS II (1-4) PR:CC. EGR 698. ADVANCED SEMINAR (1-3) PR:CC. EGR 699. RESEARCH OR DESIGN (1-9) PR:CC. Industrial Systems EGS 401. INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS (3) ENGINEERING 185 Introduction to organizational, planning and control functions in industrial systems. EGS 402. INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES (3) PR: EGB 337. Introduction to basic industrial processes emphasizing inter dependency and similarities among industries. Students research specific industries and visit local industrial plants. Lee-Lab. EGS 403, 404. PRODUCTION DESIGN I, II (3 each) PR: EGS 402, 461. Methods study, predetermined time systems, wage adminis tration, work measurement techniques including stop-watch time study, work sampling, standard data and production studies. Lee-Lab. EGS 405, 406. PRODUCTION CONTROL SYSTEMS I, II (3 each) PR: EGS 404, 441. Principles and techniques of industrial planning and con trol systems design. Cost analysis, forecasting and controlling production activities, including the use of CPM, PERT and LOB. EGS 407. ENGINEERING VALUATION II (3) PR: EGB 337 or equivalent Analysis of economic limitations on engineering projects. Income tax considerations, replacement models, MAPI and obsolescence. EGS 409. PLANT FACILITIES DESIGN I (4) PR: EGS 405. Design and modification of plant facilities, including design of a complete manufacturing operation. Problems in plant location, layout, material handling and equipment selection. EGS 421. HYBRID COMPUTERS (3) PR: EGB 333, EGB 325. The use of hybrid computers for the solution of problems in systems analysis. Lee-Lab. EGS 429. COMPUTER PROJECTS (3) PR: CC. Special projects involving the use of and operation of digital/ analog computers. EGS 441, 442. OPERATIONS RESEARCH I, II (3 each) PR: EGS 461. An introduction to the basic operations research techniqueslinear programming, dynamic programming, simulation and queueing. EGS 461, 462. ENGINEERING STATISTICS I, II (3 each) PR: MTH 303. An introduction to the basic concepts of statistical analysis. Probability, distribution functions, estimating and testing procedures, regression and correlation analysis. EGS 471. CHEMICAL PROCESS CALCULATIONS (3) PR:CHM 213, MTH 304, PHY 215. Mathematical formulation of industrial chemical process problems, including graphical and numerical methods. Principles of Stoichiometry. EGS 472. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA (4) PR: EGB 321, EGS 471. An introduction to momentum transfer, energy transfer, and mass transfer as applied to industrial chemical process problems. EGS 473, 474. CHEMICAL PROCESS PRINCIPLES I, II (4 each) PR: CHM 442, EGB 343, EGS 472. Application of transport concepts to the solution of problems concerned with the design, economics and operation of

PAGE 32

186 ENGINEERING chemical process equipment; fluid How, heat transfer, absorption, drying, evapora tion, crystallization, extraction, and distillation. EGS 475. INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY (3) PR: CHM 332, EGS 474. A critical study of selected chemical process industries in order to give the student a better understanding of the direct application of basic chemical process principles. EGS 503. HUMAN FACTORS (3) PR: CC. Problems in the design, analysis and evaluation of man-machine systems from the viewpoint of physical, mental and psychological characteristics and limitations encountered. EGS 505. INVENTORY CONTROL (3) PR: EGS 406 or equivalent. Properties of inventory systems and the fundamentals of deterministic and probabilistic inventory models. EGS 507. ENGINEERING VALUATION STUDIES (3) PR: CC. The analysis of economic considerations affecting engineering decision making. Not open to students who have had EGS 407. EGS 521, 522. COMPUTER SIMULATION I, II (3 each) PR: CC. Use of digital, analog and hybrid computers in simulating physical and industrial systems. EGS 540. OPERATIONS RESEARCH (3) PR: CC. Linear programming, game theoretic models, economic optimization. Not open to students who have had EGS 442. EGS 541, 542. NUMERICAL METHODS OF SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 1, II (3 each) PR: MTH 401. The study and application of matrix algebra, differ e ntial equations, calculus of finite differences, operation and transform methods, and stochastic processes. EGS 560. INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS (3) PR: CC. Industrial applications of probability, testing of hypotheses, regression techniques and analysis of variance. Not open to students who have had EGS 462. EGS 561, 562. DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS I, II (3 each) PR: EGS 462 or equivalent. Development of the basic experimental designs. Randomized block, latin squares and factorial designs. EGS 563. ENGINEERING STATISTICS ill (3) PR: EGS 462 or equivalent. Application of non-parametric statistics, sequential analysis, orthogonal polynomials and other optimization techniques to industrial problems. EGS 565. STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL (3) PR: EGS 461 or equivalent. Application of statistical techniques to the control of industrial processes. Control charts and acceptance procedures. Sequential sampling. EGS 566. RELIABILITY ENGINEERING (3) PR: EGS 462 or equivalent. Fundamental concepts of reliability control. Estima tion of reliability of systems and components. Measures of availability, main tainability and reliability. EGS 580, 581, 582. SPECIAL INDUSTRIAL PROJECTS I, II, ill (1-3 each) PR: CC. EGS 603. MAN/MACHINE SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGS 503. Principles of work measurement, process analysis, value analysis, and human factors and their application to industrial situations. EGS 605. PRODUCTION CONTROL SYSTEMS ill (3) PR: EGS 406 or equivalent. Forecasting procedures, development of production plans, scheduling techniques and inventory models. Application of EDP to production control systems.

PAGE 33

ENGINEERING 187 EGS 607. ADVANCED ENGINEERING VALUATION (3) PR: EGS 407 or equivalent. Statistical models for analyzing engineering alterna tives from an economic viewpoint. The use of advanced engineering economy concepts in solving industrial problems. EGS 609. PLANT FACILITIES DESIGN II (3) PR: EGS 409 or CC. Advanced techniques for evaluation of alternative plans for plant arrangement, including equipment location and material handling systems. EGS 641. LINEAR PROGRAMMING (3) PR: EGS 442 or equivalent. The simplex method. degeneracy, duality theory; applications of linear programming to industrial problems. EGS 642. NONLINEAR AND DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING (3) PR: EGS 641. Optimization procedures using nonlinear and dynamic programming. Analysis of multi-stage systems. EGS 644. QUEUEING THEORY (3) PR: EGS 442, 462. Deterministic and probabilistic queueing models. Poisson queues and special non-Poisson queues with exponential and non-exponential services. Single and multiple channel queues. EGS 646. MULTIV ARIABLE OPTIMIZATION (3) PR: EGS 562, 563. Optimum seeking methods: search methods, response surfaces, ridge analysis and stochastic approximations. EGS 647, 648. STOCHASTIC PROCESSES I, II (3 each) PR: EGS 662. Theory and application of stochastic processes as models for empirical phenomena, with emphasis on the following processes: Poisson, stationary, normal, counting, renewal, Markov, birth and death. Spectral repre sentations, time series, smoothing and filtering. EGS 666. THEORY OF RELIABILITY (3) PR: EGS 462 or equivalent. Topics in statistical methodology which have ap plications in the field of reliability. Discrete and continuous distribution models, reliability estimation, reliability structure and growth models, and statistical design for reliability. EGS 668. SPECIAL TOPICS IN STATISTICS (3) PR: CC. Special topics in statistics related to research in engineering. EGS 680, 681, 682. SPECIAL INDUSTRIAL TOPICS I, II, III (1-3 each) PR: CC. EGS 687, 688. INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS DESIGN I, II (3 each) PR: EGS 521. Design of integrated systems using statistical and operations research models. Simulation of integrated systems using digital, analog and hybrid computers. EGS 698. ADV AN CED ENGINEERING SEMINAR (1-3) PR: CC. EGS 699. RESEARCH OR DESIGN (1-12) PR: CC. Structure, Materials and Fluids EGX 401. STRUCTURES I (5) PR: EGB 340. Elastic analysis of structural members, concepts of variational energy principles including virtual work, minimum potential energy, and com plementary energy, elastic and inelastic stability. EGX 402. ENGINEERING MATERIALS II (4) PR: EGB 342, EGB 321. Thermodynamics of Solid Materials Entropy and free energy concepts applied to equilibrium and rate processes in metallic, ceramic and polymer systems. Metallography. (lee-lab.)

PAGE 34

188 ENGINEERING EGX 410. CONCEPTS OF STRUCTURAL DESIGN (4) CR: EGX 401. Applic a tions of s olid mechanics materials science, and structural analysis; local effects and connections, critical review of current code and design practices. EGX 420. CONCEPTS OF MATERIALS ENGINEERING (3) PR: EGX 402. Application and selection of metals, ceramics and polymers in engineering problems. Materials t e chnology an failure analysis. (lee.) EGX 503. FLUID MECHANICS II (4) PR: EGB 343. Fundamentals of gas dynamics, open channel analogy to com pressible fluids, two dimensional hydrodynamic flows with application to airfoil theory, three dimensional flow fields (lee-lab) EGX 504. EXPERIMENT AL SMF I (4) PR: EGB 343 An introduction to the experimental methods used in the study of structures materials fluids. EGX 505. SOLID MECHANICS ill (3) PR: EGB 341. Dynamics of discrete and distributed mass, spatial kinematics, and kinetics inertia tensor, Euler equations. EGX 510. STRUCTURES II (4) PR: EGX 401. Elastic and inelastic structures of composites and structural laminates, and matrix media; prestressed structural systems. EGX SU. STRUCTURES ill (5) PR: EGX 401. Determination of stress and displacement fields in statically determinate and indeterminate trusses and frames, influence lines and co efficients, plastic analysis of single and multi-story structures. EGX 520. ENGINEERING MATERIALS ID (4) PR: EGB 342. The Structure of Solid Materials. Crystalline and glassy states in metals and ceramics. Diffraction methods in Materials Science. Electron micro scopy. (lee-lab) EGX 521. ENGINEERING POLYMERS (3) PR: CC. Structure and bulk properties of polymers. High elasticity, topics in viscoelasticity, the glass transition, irreversible deformation. Technology of plastics, fibers and elastomers. EGX 522. CORROSION (3) PR: EGX 402 or CI. Corrosion principles and forms of corrosion Testing, failure analysis and protection. Emphasis on application to engineering problems. Introduction to electro-chemical kinetics. EGX 523. DIFFUSION (3) PR: EGX 402. Theoretical and practical analysis of diffusion in solids including the phyiscal meaning and implications of the concepts which influence and apply to diffusion in crystalline solids. EGX 530. FLUID MECHANICS ID (4) PR: EGB 343. Mathematical hydrodynamics, inviscid flow. (Lee-lab) EGX 540. EXPERIMENTAL SMF II (-0 PR: CC. Review of elasticity, boundary value probl e ms, finite element solu tions; static and dynamic applications, circuitry; grid, brittle coating methods. EGX 550. SOLID MECHANICS IV (3) PR: EGB 341. Dynamics of Elastic Systems, Vibration of rods, plates, \ shells, structures; Energy and approximate solution techniques, transform techniques. EGX 551. VIBRATIONS (3) PR: EGX 505. Wave motion in solids and fluids, thermal and mechanical shock, wave transmission and attenuation; blast loading, Phase-plane analysis. EGX 570. INTRODUCTION TO CONTINUUM (4) PR: CC. Developm ent of techniques of applied mathematics to SMF problems; partial differential equations, complex vari a ble, vector and tensor analysis.

PAGE 35

ENGINEERING 189 EGX 571. CONTINUUM I (3) PR: CC. Development of fundamental problems in solids and fluids from a unified viewpoint; application to ideal media; elastic, plastic, viscoelastic, and fluids. EGX 572. CONTINUUM Il (3) PR: EGX 571. Mathematical Theory of elasticity. Two dimensional probl e m s in plane stress and plane strain using cartesion and curvilin ear coordinates; three dimensional applications to torsion, bending and semi infinite solids. EGX 580. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SMF (1-4) PR: CC. EGX 598. RESEARCH IN SMF (1-4) PR:CC. EGX 599. RESEARCH IN SMF (1-4) PR: CC. EGX 610. STRESSED SURFACE STRUCTURES (5) PR: EGX 401. Elastic and plast i c beha v ior of plate and sh e ll structures, smooth and ribbed surfaces. (lee-lab.) EGX 6U. STRUCTURAL STABILITY (5) PR: EGX 401. Elastic and pla s tic stability of trusses and frames local buckling of structural members, local and g e neralized buckling of shell and plate structures. EGX 612. STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS (4) PR: EGX 401. Behavior of structural components and systems when subjected to periodic and random dynamic lo a ds. EGX 620. ENGINEERING MATERIALS IV (4) PR: CC. Electronics processes in materials. Conductors and semi-conductors. Magnetic and Dielectric properties of solids, Quantum and statistical models. (lee-lab.) EGX 621. ENGINEERING MATERIALS V (4) PR: CC. Mechanical Beh a vi6r of Materials. Dislocation mechanics plasticity fracture. Mechanical failure mechanisms. Strengthening of solids. Elastic and anelastic behavior. (lee-lab ) EGX 622. MICROMECHANICS (3) PR: CC. The dicrete and continuum concepts in crystalline, polycrystalline and composite materials. Size effect and the continuum limit. Gee.) EGX 630. FLUID MECHANICS IV (4) PR: CC. Flow of Newtonian and Non-Newtonian viscous fluids (lee-lab) EGX 640. EXPERIMENTAL SMF ill (4) PR: EGX 504. Moire and pho to e lastic experimental techniques. (lee-l a b.) EGX 641. EXPERIMENTAL SMF IV (4) PR: EGX 504. The ory and application of photoelasticity (lec -lab.) EGX 642. EXPERIMENTAL SMF V (4) PR: EGX 504. Three dimentional stress analysis methods. (lee lab ) EGX 643. EXPERIMENTAL SMF VI (4) PR: EGX 504. Theory and application of holography and optical imagery. EGX 650. SOLID MECHANICS V (3) PR: EGX 505. Elastic and plastic stress wave propagation in solids, experimental and theoretical treatment, method of characteristics. EGX 651. NONLINEAR DYNAMICS (3) PR: EGX 505. Non-linear restoring force, viscous friction, Duffing and Vander Pol's equations, perturbation methods. EGX 6,60, 661, 662. HYDROSPACE ENGINEERING I, Il, III, (3 each) PR: CC. Advanced analysis of structural, material and fluid systems for marine environment, including underwater acousti c s

PAGE 36

190 ENGLISH EGX 670. CONTINUUM MECHANICS III (3) PR: CC. Theory of Plasticity. Initial and subsequent yield surfaces, increment a l and deformation theories, flow theories; problems in ideal plasticity, strain h a rd ening and slip line fields EGX 671. CONTINUUM MECHANICS IV (3) PR: CC. Theory of thermoelastic and viscoelastic behavior of continuous medi a Basic laws of irrevisable thermodynamics and elasticity an d application to one, two and three dimensional problems. Inelastic thermal stress. Viscoelestic-elestic analogy, linear vi,scoelastic theory and application. EGX 680. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SMF (1-4) PR: CC. EGX 698. ADVANCED ENGINEERING SEMINAR (1-3) PR: CC. EGX 699. RESEARCH IN SMF (1-9) PR: CC. Technical Service Course Work ETK 301, 302. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING I, II (2 each) Basic principles of computer operation, machine language, assembly language, and FORTRAN language programming principles. ETK 303. COBOL PROGRAMMING (3) PR: ETK 302 or equivalent. Computer programming using COBOL. ETK 501. COMPUTER SYSTEMS (3) PR: ETK 302 or equivalent. Study of computer systems components, 1 / 0 devices, memory devices, theory of computer op e ration. ETK 502, 503. COMPUTER LANGUAGES AND COMPUTATION I, II (3 each) PR: ETK 501. Study of principles of machine, assembly and compiled languages Programming applications. ETK 505, 506. THEORY OF DATA PROCESSING I, II (3 each) PR: ETK 501. Structure and automatic proc essing of data flies, data classification information theory and information retri eval. ETK 601. SPECIAL TECHNICAL TOPICS I (1-4) PR: CC. ETK 602. SPECIAL TECHNICAL TOPICS II (1-4) PR: CC. ETK 603. SPECIAL TECHNICAL TOPICS III (1-4) PR: CC. ENGLISH Faculty: Parrish, chairman; Beauchamp, Bentley, Briggs, L. Broer, R. Carr, Chisnell W. F. Davis, R. Dietrich, Fabry, Figg, W. Garrett, S. Hall, Harmon Hartley, Hatcher, Henley, Hirshberg, Iorio, Kaufmann, Mitchell, Moore (leave of absence), Morris, Ochshom, O'Hara, Palmer, Parker, H. Popovich, Reader, Sanders, Sander son, Scheuerle, ShaHer, E. Smith, Valentine, Walther, Wyly, Zbar, Zetler. ENG 131. READING ACCELERATION (2) Designed to change the reading habits and patterns of students from left-to-right progression to down-the-page progression. (Also see Developmental Reading.) ENG 201. MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS TO 1640 (4) PR: CBS 102. An introduction to the poetry, prose, and drama of English litera ture from its beginning to Milton. ENG 202. MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS, 1640-1780 (4) PR: CBS 102. English literature from the Restoration to the pre-Romantics. ENG 203. MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS, 1780-1912 (4) PR: CBS 102. English literature from the Romantics throu gh th e late Victorians.

PAGE 37

ENGLISH 191 ENG 301. CURRENT LITERATURE (2) An examination of significant fiction dra ma and po e try written since World War II. ENG 305. MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS TO 1865 (4) PR : CBS 102. A study of the m a jor writ ers of the Colonial Fede ral and Rom a nt i c periods. These include Edwards, Taylor, Hawthorne, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, and Melville. ENG 306. MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS, 1865-1912 (4) PR: CBS 102. A study of the major reali s ts and ea rly n a turalists. These in cl ude Whitman, Twain, James, Crane, Dickinson, Dreiser and Robinson. ENG 307. MODERN BRITISH AND AMERICAN WRITERS, 1912-1945 (4) PR: CBS 102. Works by such American and British writers as Eliot, Po un d Yeats, Thomas, Shaw, O'Neill, Hemingway, Faulkner, Huxley, Woolf, Joyce Lawre nce, and others. ENG 319. THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE (4) PR : CBS 102. Major emphasis on literary types, literary per s onalities of the Old and New Testaments, and Biblical archetypes of British and American literary classics. ENG 321. ADV AN CED WRITING (4) PR: CBS 102. Emphasis upon excellence in the techniques of description and narration. Practice in the personal es s ay, critical review and narrative sketch. ENG 325. ADVANCED EXPOSITORY WRITING (4) PR : CBS 102. Composition techniques in exposition, methods and styles of writing the article and the report. ENG 335. WORLD LITERATURE (4) PR: CBS 102 Masterpieces of the western world, in translation, including ancient medi e val, and Renais s ance lit e rature. ENG 336. WORLD LITERATURE (4) Transl ated m as terpieces of the Neoclassical, Romantic, Realistic and Naturalistic Symb o lic and Modem periods. ENG 337. FOLK LITERATURE (4) PR: CBS 102. Legends and m yths fairytale s and folktales; the imaginative s ource for much of our great literature thought, and culture. JNM 341-49. JOURNALISTIC WRITING (2-5) For courses in writing for mass communic a tions, see Journalism Program. ENG 383. SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (1-4) PR: Sophomore standing. It will examine in depth a recurring literary the me or the work of a small group of writ e rs. Special courses in writing m a y also be offered under this title. ENG 4ll. PLAYS OF SHAKESPEARE (4) PR : ENG 201 and 12 hours of literature A stud y of ten representati ve plays by Shakespeare. ENG 421. IMAGINATIVE WRITING-POETRY (4) Studies and exercises in prosody and imag e ry; written assignments in tra dition a l and contemporary forms; evaluation of student work in individual confer e nc e s ; selected reading. May be taken twice for cr e dit. ENG 423. IMAGINATIVE WRITING-FICTION (4) PR: ENG 321. Study and writing of the short story a nd s ec tions of the nov e l. Evaluation of student work in conferences, selected readings. May b e taken twice for credit. ENG 425. THE AMERICAN NOVEL (4) PR : 16 hours of literature. Sele c tion s fr o m the nov els of Ch arle s Bro c kd e n Brown Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twai n St ephe n Cr a n e Frank Norris, Edith Wha rton Henry J a mes, and Theodore Dreiser. ENG 426. THE AMERICAN DRAMA (4) Ameri c an dra m a tic lit erature fro m th e beginn i ngs t o th e prese nt.

PAGE 38

192 ENGLISH ENG 429. EIGHTEENTH CENTURY BRITISH NOVEL (4) PR: 16 hours of literature. The historical development of the British novel; precursors of the novel; Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, and the Gothic novelists. ENG 430. NINETEENTH CENTURY BRITISH NOVEL (4) PR: 16 hours of literature. A continuation of the development of the British novel; Austen, Scott, Thackeray, Dickens, Trollope, the Brontes, Eliot, Meredith, Hardy, and Butler. ENG 437. CONTINENTAL NOVEL (4) PR: 12 hours of literature. Major European novels from the Eighteenth Century to the present. Emphasis upon French and Russian novels of the Nineteenth Century. ENG 459. DRAMA AND THE MODERN LITERARY TEMPER (4) PR: 12 hours of literature. A study of the major literary problems faced by modem dramatists since Ibsen and the rise of realism. ENG 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (credits vary) PR: 12 hours of literature. Directed study in special projects. Special permission of chairman required. ENG 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (1-4) PR: Sophomore standing. The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor interest. It will examine in depth a recurring literary theme or the work of a small group of writers. Special courses in writing may also be offered under this title. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ENG 501. CHAUCER (4) PR: 20 hours of literature. An introduction to the language through the "Prologue" to The Canterbury Tales. Study of the Book of the Duchess, a selected number of Tales, the House of Fame, and Troilus and Criseyde. ENG 502. THE LITERATURE OF MEDIEVAL ENGLAND (4) PR: 20 hours of literature. An examination of the historical and social back grounds of medieval literature and representative works of the period. ENG 503. ENGLISH DRAMATIC LITERATURE TO 1642 (4) (Exclusive of Shakespeare) PR: 20 hours of literature. English drama from the liturgical plays to the closing of the theatres in 1642. Representative plays of Lyly, Kyd, Dekker, Beaumont and Fletcher, Ford, Marlowe, and Jonson. ENG 505. SEVENTEENTH CENTURY POETRY (4) PR: 20 hours of literature. Emphasis upon leading metaphysical and Cavalier poets and upon prose writers from 1588-1660, with a brief study of major influences and figures from 1500-1588. ENG 507. MILTON (4) PR: 20 hours of literature. An examination of Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Comus, the shorter poems, and selected prose works. ENG 511. RELIGIOUS AND EXISTENTIAL THEMES IN MODERN LITERA TURE (4) Theological and philosophic idea, allusion, and symbol in the writings of Dosto evski, Nietzsche, Mann, Joyce, Eliot, Camus, Sartre, and others. ENG 513. THE ROMANTIC WRITERS (4) PR: 20 hours of literature. The poetry and poetics of Blake, Wordsworth, Cole ridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats; with attention to lesser figures. ENG 515. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (4) PR: 24 hours of literature. The evolution of the language from Anglo-Saxon through Middle English to Modem English. Changes in pronunciation and syntax; discussion of the forces which influenced them.

PAGE 39

ENGLISH 193 ENG 517. STRUCTURE OF AMERICAN ENGLISH (4) PR: 20 hours of literature. The phonetics, phonology, and morphology of American English. Structural grammar; the application of linguistics to the teaching of English. ENG 518. LINGUISTICS AND LITERATURE (4) PR: ENG 517 or equivalent or CI. The analysis and interpretation of British and American literature, poetry, prose, and drama using relevant materials from the field of descriptive and comparative linguistics. ENG 519. SHAKESPEARE'S COMEDIES AND IDSTORIES (4) PR: ENG 411. An intensive study of Shakespeare's major comedies and histories. ENG 520. SHAKESPEARE'S TRAGEDIES (4) PR: ENG 411. An intensive study of Shakespeare's major tragedies. ENG 521. RESTORATION AND 18TH CENTURY LITERATURE (4) (exclusive of the drama and novel) PR: 20 hours of literature. Concentration upon selected figures of the period with emphasis on their satirical works. ENG 523. NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE Essays of Carlyle, Newman, Mill, Ruskin, Arnold, Pater; poetry of Tennyson, Browning, Swinburne; novels of Dickens, Meredith; plays of Wilde, Shaw. ENG 527. MODERN BRITISH AND AMERICAN POETRY (4) PR: 20 hours of literature. Selected poets from Hopkins to the present, with attention to modem poetic theory. ENG 528. CONTEMPORARY BRITISH & AMERICAN FICTION (4) A critical study of British and American fiction since World War II. Works by Mailer, Beckett, Bellow, Ellison, Nabokov, and others. ENG 531. LITERARY CRITICISM (4) PR: 24 hours of literature. Emphasis on either the great critics and the principles of criticism or on applied criticism of fiction, poetry and drama. ENG 535. TRANSFORMATIONAL GRAMMAR (4) PR: 90 hours oc CI. A study of the terminology, principles, and methodology of transformational grammar. ENG 559. RESTORATION DRAMA (4) PR: 20 hours of literature. Congreve, Wycherly, Sheridan, and others. ENG 581. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (credits vary) PR: 20 hours of literature. Directed study in special projects. Special permission of chairman required. ENG 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (1-4) PR: 20 hours of literature. The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor interest. It will examine in depth a recurring literary theme or the work of a small group of writers. ENG 585. DIRECTED READING (4) Readings in special topics. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY ENG 615. MAJOR TRENDS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE (4) PR: 24 hours of literature in English. An intensive study of selected ideas and movements affecting American letters; for example, Puritanism, Transc e ndentalism, Regionalism, Pragmatism, lmagism. ENG 623. LITERARY SCHOLARSHIP AND METHODS OF RESEARCH (4) PR: 24 hours of literature in English. Introduction of aims and methods of literary scholarship. Detailed studies of bibliographies of cultural milieus genres, periods, and authors. Brief attention to thesis style and form. ENG 655. STUDIES IN SIXTEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE (4) PR: 24 hours of literature in English. Sidney, Spenser, and others.

PAGE 40

194 FINANCE ENG 657. BRITISH RENAISSANCE PROSE (4) PR: 24 hours of literature in English. A study of the thematic, generic, and rhetorical development of prose in England from 1500 to 1660. Lyly, Greene, Bacon, Donne, Browne, Hobbes, Milton, and others. ENG 659. STUDIES IN EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE (4) PR: 24 hours of literature in English. Concentration on selected works, authors or movements b e tween 1660 and 1800 ENG 667. STUDIES IN THE LATER BRITISH NOVEL (4) PR: 24 hours of literature in English. Dickens, Thackeray, Eliot, and others. ENG 681. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (credits vary) PR: CI and 24 hours of literature in English. Directed study in special projects. Special permission of chairman required ENG 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (1-4) PR: 24 hours of literature in English. Current topics offered on a rotating basis include The Nature of Tragedy; The Nature of Comedy and Satire; The Nature of Romanticism and Classicism; The Nature of Realism and Naturalism; The Nature of Myth, Allegory, and Symbolism; and The Figure of the Hero. Other topics will be added in accordance with student demand and instructor interest. ENG 685. DIRECTED READINGS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (credits vary} PR: CI and 24 hours of literature in English ENG 687. STUDIES IN LATE 19TH CENTURY AMERICAN FICTION (4) PR: 24 hours of literature in English. Twain, James, Crane, or others. ENG 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN ENGLISH (4) PR: Consent of graduate advisor. ENG 695. STUDIES IN MODERN DRAMA (4) PR: 24 hours of literature in English. Ibsen, Shaw, Chekhov, Strindberg, and others. FINANCE Faculty: Longstreet, chairman; Brunhild, Deaux, Deiter, Kares, Modrow, Power, Tucker. FIN 201. PERSONAL FINANCE (5) Survey of the problems and techniques of family financial planning. Includes consumer credit, insurance, home ownership and personal investing subject to current economic and legal constraints. Not available for credit to upper level students who have been admitted to the College of Business. FIN 202. INTRODUCTION TO INVESTMENTS (3) Designed for non-business administration students who have not taken accounting or corporation finance, it emphasizes the operations of the security markets in the U. S and the risks and returns of alternative investment media. Not available for credit to upper level students who have been admitted to the College of Business. FIN 301. PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE (5) PR: ACC 203 and ECN 201. Fundamental tools and techniques applicable to financial planning of incorporated and unincorporated business, emphasizing the problems of acquisition, supervision, and allocation of resources. FIN 303. PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE (5) The management of insurable risks by business firms and individuals. Insurance concepts, contracts and institutions including problems of underwriting, loss pre vention and settlement. FIN 305. PRINCIPLES OF REAL ESTATE (5) Economics of urban land utilization and the nature of property rights. Problems of urban development and the valuation of real property in terms of the structure and operations of the real estate market.

PAGE 41

FINE ARTS 195 FIN 321. MONEY AND BANKING (4) PR: ECN 202. Examines the structure and operations of our monetary system, commercial banking, central banking, money and capital markets, and pro vides an introduction to monetary theory and policy. FIN 351. INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (5) PR: ECN 201 and 202 or CI. Principles of foreign exchange and methods of financing business operations in foreign countries. FIN 411. ADVANCED CORPORATION FINANCE (4) PR: FIN 301. An examination of the financial policies of publicly-owned corpora tions, with special reference to dividend policy, financial structure, capital ex penditures, acquisitions, mergers and reorganization. FIN 421. PRINCIPLES OF INVESTMENT (4) PR: FIN 301 and ECN 202. Survey of the risks and returns of investment media in relation to the investm en t objective of individual and institution investors. Includes an examination of the capital markets, information flows and analytical techniques in terms of their impact upon the valuation process. FIN 431. FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS (4) PR: FIN 321. A study of financial intermediaries and the capital mark ets and their interaction in the capital formatio:i pro cess. FIN 451. FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND MONETARY POLICY (4) PR: ECN 323 or FIN 321. An analysis of the str ucture of the Federal Reserve System and monetary poli cy within the fram ewor k of monetary theories. FlN 4.131. POLICY AND STRATEGY IN CORPORATION FINANCE ( 3) PR: FIN 411. Senior seminar for majors in finance. Quantit ative and qualitative analysis of financial policies based on independent readings and empirical research. FIN 471. PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (3) PR: FIN 421. Study of principles underlying security sel ectio ns, timing, and diversification to achieve the optimum balance for various types of investors. FIN 489. SPECIAL STUDIES IN FINANCE (3) PR: Cl. Independen t study program under the guidance of d e partm enta l staff. Includes an examination of profe ssio nal literature and empirical research. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY FIN 501. BUSINESS FINANCE (3) PR: ACC 501 and ECN 501 or its equivalent. Accelerated introduction to funda mentals of business finance. Emphasis is on planning and evaluating sources and use of funds. Open only to graduate stud ents or seniors outside the Coll ege of Business. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY FIN 601. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3) PR: FIN 501 or its equivalent. An examination of financial practice at the l eve l of the individual firm with emphasis on quantitative analysis of the variables affecting solvency and profit ab ility FIN 602. ADVANCED FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3) PR: FIN 601. Inte gra tion of the financial policies of corporations with the capital markets under various economic conditions. FINE ARTS (lntradivisional) Faculty: G. Johnson W. McCrack e n O'Sullivan, Saff. FNA 543. COMPARATIVE ARTS / ISSUES IN CREATIVITY (3) PR: Two history courses, theory or literature courses in major area or CC. An

PAGE 42

196 FRENCH analysis of various theories of art and the intellectual implication of differing propositions about aesthetics. FNA 553. SENIOR SEMINAR (3) PR: FNA 543 or CC. To aid majors to understand, appraise and perfect their own art and technique through critical and aesthetic judgements of their col leagues. Discussion and critical evaluation. Section 001 is reserved for Music and Music Education students. Section 002 is reserved for Theatre students. Section 003 is reserved for Visual Art and Art Education students. Section 004 is reserved for Dance students. FRENCH Faculty: Artzybushev, Cherry, Dejongh, Glenisson, de la Menardiere, Suchovy, Wall, Whartenby. Basic courses listed under Basic Studies. Also see Romance Languages. FRE 221. FRENCH FOR READING PROFICIENCY (O) A rapid coverage of basic grammar and the acquisition of vocabulary nec essary for passing the French Reading Knowledge Test. FRE 301. ADV AN CED COMPOSITION (4) To d eve lop the student's ease in and command of written French and to increase his vocabulary and familiarity with the idiom in free and fixed composition FRE 303. ADVANCED CONVERSATION AND PRONUNCIATION (4) Designed to develop ease "in speaking correct French with attention given to aural comprehension, pronunciation and intonation. FRE 305. SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE (3) Middle Ages and Renaissance. FRE 306. SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE (3) Seventeenth and Eighteenth centuries. FRE 307. SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE (3) Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries. FRE 310. HIGHLIGHTS OF FRENCH LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3) A study in English of the most important writers since the French Revolution. Elective for students in all departments (except French majors). FRE 383. SELECTED TOPICS (varied) Course content depends upon student demand and instructor's intere s t. FRE 403. FRENCH PHONETICS AND DICTION (2) French phonology with emphasis on phonic groupings; the International Phonetic Alphabet. Correction of the individual student's errors in diction. FRE 483. SELECTED TOPICS (varied) PR: CI. Junior standing. Course content depends upon student d eman d and instructor's interest. FRE 491. SENIOR SEMINAR (3) Study in depth of a specillc writer or lit e rary movement as chosen by the in litructor. Individual research required of students. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS PR: FRE 305, 306, 307 FRE 501. RENAISSANCE (3) Early French Renaissance literature with emphasis on Rabel ais and Calvin.

PAGE 43

FRENCH 197 FRE 502. RENAISSANCE (3) Renaissance literature with emphasis on Montaigne and the Pleiade. FRE 516. FRENCH STYLISTICS (3) PR: Graduate standing or by special permission A s tudy of advanced grammar and composition based on an analysis of various styles of writing FRE 521. LITERATURE OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY (3) Preclassical prose and poetry. Malherbe, Voiture, Guez de Balz a c, D escartes and Pascal. FRE 522. LITERATURE OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY (3) Classical prose and poetry. Boileau, La Fontaine, Bossuet, Madame de La Fayette, Madame de Sevigne, La Rochefoucauld, and La Bruyere FRE 523. LITERATURE OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY (3) The Classical theater. Corneille, Moliere and Racine. FRE 531. LITERATURE OF THE 18TH CENTURY (3) The Classical tradition and the new currents of thought 1715-50. FRE 532. LITERATURE OF THE 18TH CENTURY (3) Classical decadence and victory of the philosophes 1750-70. FRE 533. LITERATURE OF THE 18TH CENTURY (3) The philosophes and Preromantics 1770-89 FRE 541. LITERATURE OF THE 19TH CENTURY (3) The Romantic movement in France. FRE 542. LITERATURE OF THE 19TH CENTURY (3) Realism, with emphasis on the novels of Balzac. FRE 543. LITERATURE OF THE 19TH CENTURY (3) Naturalism and the Pamassian and Symbolist schools. FRE 551. LITERATURE OF THE 20TH CENTURY (3) Proust Gide, Claude!, Valery, Romains and Mauriac. FRE 552. LITERATURE OF THE 20TH CENTURY (3) Cocteau, Giraudoux, Anouilh and Montherlant. FRE 553. LITERATURE OF THE 20TH CENTURY (3) Sartre, Camus, Malraux, Robbe-Grillet, Ionesco and Beckett. FRE 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN FRENCH STUDIES (3) The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor interest. It will examine in depth a recurring literary theme or the work of a small group of writers. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY FRE 601. OLD FRENCH (3) A study of Old French morphology, phonetics and syntax with an introduction to the reading of Old French texts. FRE 602. MEDIEVAL FRENCH LITERATURE (3) A study of French literature in the Middle Ages. FRE 611. RABELAIS. (3) A detailed study of the works of the author with emphasis on his role as a humanist of the Renaissance. FRE 612. MONTAIGNE (3) A study of the complete works of Montaigne. FRE 613. LA PLEIADE (3) A study in depth of the writers of the Pleiade. FRE 621. RACINE (3) A study of the complete works of Racine. FRE 622. MOLIERE (3) A study of the complete works of Moliere FRE 623. PROSE WRITINGS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY (3) A study of the prose writings of the seventeenth century.

PAGE 44

198 GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION FRE 631. VOLTAIRE (3) A study in depth of the works of Voltaire. FRE 632. ROUSSEAU (3) A study in depth of the works of Rousse au. FRE 641. BALZAC AND THE NOVEL (3) A study of Balzac's novels and their influence on the French novel. FRE 642. ROMANTIC DRAMA AND POETRY (3) A study in depth of the poetry and drama of the three major poets, Vigny, Musset and Hugo FRE 643. THE SYMBOLIST POETS (3) A study in depth of Rimbaud, Verlaine, Baudelaire and Mallarme, including their influence on poetry of the twentieth century. FRE 653. EXISTENTIAL NOVEL AND DRAMA (3) A study in depth of the works of Sartre and Camus. FRE 654. DRAMA BETWEEN THE TWO WORLD WARS (3) A study of drama which was revised after World War I and ended with the formation of new schools at the beginning of World War II. FRE 655. SAINT EXUPERY AND THE NOVEL OF ACTION (3) A study of the literature of action by men of action, with emphasis on Saint Exupery, also J Kessel, A Malraux, H. de 'Montherlant, H. de Monfreid. FRE 656. F. MAURIAC AND THE NOVEL OF THE UNCONSCIOUS (3) A study of the novel of Mauriac from the point of view of the contribution of the unconscious mind to French literature and its place in the contemporary novel. FRE 661. MINOR WRITERS IN FRENCH LITERATURE (3) A study of the minor writers who were important as precursors of developing literary schools. FRE 689. FRENCH BIBLIOGRAPHY (0) Training in use of library materials for graduate research and study. Lectures by library staff on general use of research material and by specialists on sp ec ific areas of French literature. Required of all candidates for the MA in French. FRE 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (3) Study of an author or authors or a literary movement. Extensive research, class discussion and p a pers required. Subject chosen to be announced one quarter in advance. GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Faculty: Grant, Kenerson, Reynolds, Welker. GBA 351. DATA PROCESSING PRINCIPLES (5) Punched-card data processing (equipment, techniques, and application), elec tronic data processing (hardware, software, and sequential vs. real-time process ing), and preparation of business system programs in COBOL. GBA 361. BUSINESS LAW I (5) The n a ture of legal institutions, essentials of a binding contract remedies granted in event of breach of contract and rights acquired by assignment of contracts. GBA 362. BUSINESS LAW II (5) PR: GBA 361. Legal problems in marketing of goods, nature of property, sales of personal property, securing of credit granted, nature and use of negotiable in s trum e nts. GBA 363. THE LAW OF BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS (5) PR: GBA 361. A study of the law of corporations, the law of partnerships, and the law of agency. GBA 371. BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (4) Analy s i s and application of the principle s of persuasion in business communica tion ; composi tion and evaluation of functional business lett e rs ; examination of effective text, tabular and graphic presentation in formal business reports.

PAGE 45

GEOGRAPHY 199 GBA 489. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-2) Individual research in the students major area supervised by an appropriate faculty member. GBA 499. SENIOR SEMINAR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (3) PR: Graduating senior Students draw upon materials from their complete college program and apply them to case studies, research projects and class discussion. Topics include business policy, operations, and the environment of business. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY GBA 601. LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS (3) A study of the governmental regulation of business emphasizing the constitutional limitations on the powers of the federal government, the administration of the fed eral antitrust laws, and administrative law. GBA 699. THESIS (6) GEOGRAPHY Faculty: Fuson, chairman; Hartshorn, Limoges, Rothwell, Stowers. GPY 201. INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY (4) Nature, method, principles, and concepts of the discipline; maps and their prop erties; earth-sun relations, weather elements, place names. Prerequisite to all undergraduate courses in geography. GPY 301-302. SYSTEMATIC GEOGRAPHY (4-4) PR: GPY 201. General description and analysis of the major physical and cultural elements and resources of the geographic landscape. Prerequisite to all higher undergraduate courses in geography. GPY 403. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (2-5) PR : GPY 201, 301-302, and CI. Courses include: meteorology, climatology, physiography, biogeography, soils, water bodies. May be repeated as courses vary, but the same course may not be repeated for credit. GPY 405. CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY (2-5) PR: GPY 201, 301-302. Courses include: economic, political, urban, historical geography; population, settlem e nt, conservation. May be rep ea ted as courses vary, but the same course may not be repeated for credit. GPY 407. REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (2-5) PR: GPY 201, 301-302. Synthesis and analysis of the physical and cultural ele ments in a selected geographic region. May be repeated as regions vary, but the same region may not be repeated for credit. GPY 409. GEOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES AND METHODOLOGY (2-5) PR: GPY 201, 301-302, and CI. Courses include: cartography, graphics, map design and analysis, air photo interpretation, field methods, quantitative analysis, seminar. May be repeated as courses vary, but the same course may not be repeated for credit. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS GPY 501. GEOGRAPHIC LITERATURE AND HISTORY (4) PR: Senior or graduate standing in geography, or CI. The origins and development of the discipline as revealed through an examination of the principal written sources. Special attention paid to leading p e rsonalities and modem periodicals. GPY 503. METHODOLOGY I: QUANTITATIVE (4) PR: Senior or graduate standing in geography, and a course in statistics, or CI. The application of quantitative techniques to g e ographic problems; factor, sensi tivity, and spatial analysis.

PAGE 46

200 GEOLOGY GPY 505. METHODOLOGY II: CARTOGRAPIIlC (4) PR: Senior or graduate standing in geography, GPY 409 (Cartography), or CI. Application of various techniques for pres enting graphic illustrations as re search tools. GPY 507. ME'{HODOLOGY ill: FIELD WORK (4) PR: Senior or graduate standing in geography, GPY 503, 505. D ata collection in a field situation, including observation, classification, interpretation; and pres enta tion of the data. GPY 581. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-5} PR: 30 hours in geography and CI, or graduate standing in geography. Arrange ment must be made with chairman prior to registration. May be repeated. GPY 585. DIBECTED READING (1-5) PR: 30 hours in geography and CI, or graduate standing in geogr aphy. Arrange ment must be made with chairman prior to registration May be repeated. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY GPY 601. METHODOLOGY IV: ACADEMIC (4) PR: Graduate standing in geography. Current trends in college geography, with the emphasis on the junior college program. Not available to thesis students. GPY 603. SEMINAR IN ADV AN CED PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (4) PR: Graduate standing in geography. Analytic study of a problem selected from one or more aspects of the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, or litho s phere. May be repeated once for credit, but topic may not be repeated. GPY 605. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED CULTURAL GEQ(;RAPHY (4) PR: Graduate standing in geography. Analytic study of a problem selected from one or more aspects of the cultural landscape (urban, political, economic, popu lation, settlement). May be repeated once for credit GPY 607. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (4) GR: Graduate standing in geography. Analytic study of a selected region of the world. May be repeated once for credit, but region may not be repeated. GPY 609. SEMINAR IN ADV AN CED TECHNIQUES & METHODOLOGY (4) PR: Graduate standing in geography. Analytic study of a selected geographic technique (such as remote sensing, graphics, photo interpretation, or computer applications) or an investigation into an a s pect of methodology. May be repeated once for credit, but topic may not be repeated. GPY 699. THESIS (9) GEOLOGY Faculty: Ragan, chairman; Boulware, Griffin, O'Donnell, Sommers, Stevenson. GLY 201. INTRODUCTION TO GEOLOGY (5) Study of earth materials and the processes responsible for changing the face of the earth. Examination of minerals and rock specimens, topographic and geologic maps and aerial photographs. Historical geology ( GLY 301) continues the study. Occa s ional field trip studies. lee-lab. GLY 301. INTRODUCTION TO IIlSTORICAL GEOLOGY (4) Study of the record of past life and interpretation of the major physical events in the history of the earth. Occasional field trip studies. l ee -lab. GLY 302. INTRODUCTION TO PALEONTOLOGY I (4) PR: GLY 301 or CI. Paleontology and stratigraphic occurrence of most important inv e rtebrate fossils of the geologic record. lee-lab. GLY 303. INTRODUCTION TO PALEONTOLOGY II (4). The second half of GLY 302.

PAGE 47

GEOLOGY 201 GLY 311. MINERALOGY I (4) PR: GLY 201 and CHM 211-212-213, or equivalent. Origin, occurrence, and chemistry of mineral groups. Identification of co=on minerals by physical and chemical properties. lee-lab. GLY 312. MINERALOGY II (4) PR: GLY 311. (Non-majors from other d epa rtments, CC.) Introduction to crystal lography and the petrographic microscope. Identification of minerals by means o f optical properties. GLY 313. PETROLOGY (4) PR: GLY 312. Systematic study of rock groups, including composition, origin, and classification using modem methods of rock study. lee-lab. GLY 351. INTRODUCTION TO HYDROGEOLOGY (5) PR: GLY 201, 301 and CC. Occurrence, circulation, and distribution of sub s urfac e water, its chemical and physical properties, relation to the geologic environment, exploration and development. lee-field-lab. GLY 352. INTRODUCTION TO HYDROGEOLOGY II (5) The second half of GLY 351. GLY 361. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY (5) PR: GLY 201 or equivalent. Application of basic principles of geology, mathe matics, and physics in solving relationships of strata and interpr eting structural features in the earth's crust. GLY 401; FIELD AND SUBSURFACE METHODS (5) PR: 12 hours of geology courses, CC. Fundamentals of geology in the field and marine laboratory; compass and plane table mapping, mapping of aerial photos, reconn!Qssance surveys, interpretation of geologic structures. lee-lab. GLY 411. MARINE GEOLOGY (4) PR: GLY 201, 301. Fundamentals of marine geology, including the collection, analysis, and geologic interpretation of marine waters, sediments, and environ ments Occasional marine trips lee-lab. GLY 441. ECONOMIC MINERAL DEPOSITS (4) PR: or CR: GLY 311. Principles involved in the origin, occurrence, recovery, and use of mineral resources. lee-lab. GLY 471. GEOLOGY OF SOILS (5) PR: General Chemistry or equivalent. The origin, geologic development, forma tion, and nature of soils. Fundamentals of soil science, including the physical, chemical, and biological factors affecting soil fertility with special application to the soils and ecology of Florida. lee-lab. GLY 473. CONCEPTS IN EARTH SCIENCE (5) Earth's environment in space, including a selected study of its materials, proc esses climate, oceans, soils and history. (No credit for geology majors) GLY 475. HYDROGEOLOGY AND HUMAN AFFAIRS (5) PR: Open to all junior and senior level students. Geologic analyses of the present critical and urgent problems of water resources, pollution control, water supply, flood control, and underground waste disposal as they relate to economic, legal and other social aspects of modem society. No credit for majors. GLY 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-6) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and CI. Individual experimental investi gations with faculty supervision. Limit of six credits. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS GLY 500. SEDIMENTATION I (4) PR: GLY 303 and 312. Geologic factors governing chemical, physical, and bio logical iliteractions and deposition of sediments. lee-lab.

PAGE 48

202 GEOLOGY GLY 504. SEDIMENTATION II (4). The second half of GLY 503. GLY 512. MARINE GEOLOGY (4) PR: S e n i or o r graduate standing in a n a tur a l scien ce and CC. Geologi c al interpr etation of m a rin e processes and produ c ts. S e minar and field studies. lee-lab. GLY 521. GENERAL GEOPHYSICS (4) PR : S e n i or or advanced Junior standing, one y e a r of Physics, or CI. Earth's m a gn e ti c fie lds, gravity, electrical properties, sei s mic wave paths and velocities, radi oac tivity a nd h eat flow. l e e lab GLY 531. PRINCIPLES OF STRATIGRAPHY (4) PR : GLY 504 E nv ironmental and paleog e ographic reconstruction of sedimentary basins. S e min a r. le e -l a b. GLY 532. ADVANCED STRATIGRAPHY (5) PR : GLY 531 or Cl. Stud y of the str a tigraphy and paleotectonic development of North Ame ric a and Europe. GLY 533. GEOMORPHOLOGY (4) PR: CC Origin evolution and distribution of land forms. GLY 541. GEOPHOTO INTERPRETATION (5) PR : S e nior standing GPY 409 and/ or CI. Geo-an a lysis of air photos and earth data, including some acquired by remote sensing techniques. Analysis of chemical and physical sample data. lee-lab. GLY 561. X-RAY ANALYSIS (2) PR: GLY 312 or CI. (Non-majors from other areas, CI.) The use of X-rays for the identification of crystalline materials. GLY 571. GEOCHEMISTRY (4) PR : CHM 211, 212, 213, or equivalent, GLY 201, GLY 313. Application of the laws of chemical equilibrium and resultant chemical reactions to natural earth systems. lee. GLY 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOLOGY (1-6) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and CC Each topic is a course in directed study under supervision of a faculty member. Courses include: Introductory Geological Oceanography, Advanced Stratigraphic Paleontology, Palynology, Sedimentary Processes, Sedimentary Techniques, Universal Stage, Marine Geo phy s ics, Exploration Geophysics, and Seismology. GLY 591. GEOLOGY SEMINAR (I) PR: Seniors or advanced junior standing and CC. May be repeated once. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY GLY 604. RECENT FLUVIAL, TRANSITIONAL, AND CONTINENTAL SHELF SEDIMENTATION (4) PR: GLY 504 or CI. Environment a l fa c tor s and resulting sedim ent typ e s accu mulated in fluv ial, tran s itional and contin e ntal shelf environments lee-lab. GLY ,605. OCEANIC SEDIMENTATION (3) PR: GLY 504 or CI. Structural dev e lopm ent, sedim e ntation process es, and sedi me nts of shoreline, continental slope, continental rise, and abyssal plain environ m e nts. lee-lab. GLY 607. CARBONATE PETROLOGY I (4) PR: GLY 504 or CC. Gen e si s of recent carbonate sedim e nts and the int e rpretation of ancient carbonate rocks by the use of conc eptual mod e ls. Field-lab-s e minar Alternate years. GLY 608. CARBONATE PETROLOGY II. (4) The second half of GLY 607. GLY 611. ADV AN CED IGNEOUS PETROGENESIS (4) PR : CI. Detailed study of ign e ous rocks and the ir origin GLY 612. ADVANCED METAMORPHIC PETROGENESIS (4) PR: CI. Detailed study and int e rp re t a tion of metamorphi s m and the origin of

PAGE 49

GERMAN 203 metamorphic rock complexes, utilizing thin section microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and chemical analyses. GLY 621. MARINE MICROPALEONTOLOGY (6) PR: GLY 301, 303 or equivalents and CC. Principal groups of microfossils in marine sediments and cores. Paleoecology, correlation, and applications to petro leum and paleomarine problems. GLY 631. CENOZOIC STRATIGRAPHY (3) PR: GLY 531 or CI. Structural e lements, paleogeography, stratigraphy, and eco nomic resources of the Gulf of Mexico coastal plain. lee-lab. GLY 651. HYDROGEOLOGY OF CARBONATE TERRANES (5) PR: GLY 351, 352, Mth 211, 212, 213 and/or CC. Hydrogeology of carbonate terranes occurring under humid, semi-arid and arid conditions with special em phasis on problems relat e d to development of these terranes for human use. lec field-lab. GLY 661. CLAY PETROLOGY (4) PR: GLY 313, 561, or CC. Composition, structures, origin, and diagenesis of clay minerals. Identification of clay minerals by x-ray diffraction techniques. GLY 673. HISTORY OF GEOLOGY (2) PR: CC. Historical development of geologic thought from standpoint of theory and principle with developing areas. lee. Alternate years. GLY 675. GEOLOGY OF FLORIDA (5) PR: 24 hours of earth science credits or CI. Designed for teachers of earth science Mineralogy, structure, stratigraphy, paleon tology geomorphology, tectonics, and petrology of Florida and contiguous areas. lee-fi e ld-lab. GLY 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-9 ) PR: CC. GLY 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN MARINE GEOLOGY (1-6) PR: CC. Sedimentary Petrology Shoreline and Marine Physiography, Advanced sedimentology, Shoreline Geology Geology of Coastal Plain and Shelf, Geo chronology, Geochemistry of the Ocean, Structure of Ocean Floor and Continental Margins, Geological Oceanography of Gulf of Mexico, Adv a nced Paleontology, Paleocology, Foraminiferal Ecology, Pleistocene Geology, Cenozoic Geology, Pe troleum Geology, Gravimentary Geophysics, Geotectonics, Geomagnetism and Terres trial Heat Flow, Paleomagnetism, Advanced Geophysics, and computer applications. GLY 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (2) PR: CC GLY 699. THESIS (2-9) PR: CC. GERMAN Faculty: Grothmann, Price, Stelzmann. Basic courses listed under Ba sic Studies GER 221. GERMAN FOR READING PROFICIENCY (0) A rapid cov erage of basic grammar and the acquisition of vocabulary necessary for passing the German Re ading Knowledge Test. GER 301-303. ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION (4,4) Intens ive study of writing and conversa tion skills based on reading in German cultural history and drama. D escrip tiv e grammar and syntax. GER 305. SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE (3) Old High German and Middle High German Literature in modem translations ; the lit era ture of Humanism and Barock. GER 30.6. SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE (3) Literature of the Enlightenment; the Classical period.

PAGE 50

204 GERMAN GER 307. SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE (3) The Romantic period; the literature of the nineteenth and twenti e th c e nturies. GER 310. HIGHLIGHTS OF GERMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3) A study in English of the most significant works of Luther, Grimmelshausen, Lesssing, Goethe, Schiller, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Buchner, Mann, Heidegger, Kafka, Mus.ii, Freud, Scheler. Elective for students in all departments (except German majors}. GER 383. SELECTED TOPICS (varied) Course content depends upon student demand and instructor's interest. GER 483. SELECTED TOPICS (varied) PR: CI. Junior standing. Course content depends upon student demand and instructor's interest. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS PR: GER 305, 306, 807 GER 513. HISTORY OF GERMAN LANGUAGE (3) Development of the language from the Indo-European family: Gothic, Old High German to Middle High German. GER 514. HISTORY OF / GERMAN LANGUAGE (3) The development of Modem High German. GER 516. GERMAN STYLISTICS (3) PR: Completion of GER 300 requirements. A study of syntax, grammar, and stylistic devices of the language based on an analysis of various styles of writing. GER 521. GOETHE'S FAUST (3) Sources, form, content, and literary significance of Urfaust and Faust I. GER 531. CLASSICAL PERIOD (3) Goethe: novels, novelle and autobiographical writings; lyric poems and epics; dramas (except Faust). GER 532. CLASSICAL PERIOD (3) Schiller: ph.ilosophical writings, drama and poetry. GER 533. ROMANTIC PERIOD (3) Jenaer circle and Heidelberger circle. GER 534. ROMANTIC PERIOD (3) The late Romantic period, the writers between Classicism and Romanticism. GER 541. LITERATURE OF THE 19TH CENTURY (3) Dramatists: Grillparzer, Crabbe, Buchner and Hebbel. Critics: Heine, Laube and Immermann. GER 542. LITERATURE OF THE 19TH CENTURY (3) Prose writers: Gotthelf, Stifter, Keller, Meyer, Storm and Raabe. Poets: Droste Hiilshoff and Morike. GER 551. LITERATURE OF THE 20TH CENTURY (3) Dramatists and novelists: Hauptmann, Mann, Jiinger, von Hofrnannsthal, Hesse, Carossa, Wedel, Kafka, Musil and Brecht. GER 552. LITERATURE OF THE 20TH CENTURY (3) Poets: Rilke, Schroeder, Loehrke, Heyen. Trakle, Lasker-Schiller, Benn and Aichinger. GER 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN GERMAN STUDIES (var.) The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor interest. It will examine in depth a recurring literary theme or the work of a small group of writers. GER 553. CONTEMPORARY GERMAN LITERATURE (3) PR: Completion of GER 300 requirements. A study of Post World War II writers.

PAGE 51

GERONTOLOGY 205 GER 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN GERMANIC STUDIES (var ) T he content of the course will be governed by student demand and instru c tor i n t e rest It will examine in depth a recurring literary theme or the work of a small g roup of writ e rs. GERONTOLOGY Faculty: Rich, Direc tor ; Gilmore, Kaplan, Krivanek, Lawton, Morell, Saxon Wilson, D avis FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS AGE 501. SURVEY OF MANAGEMENT (3) S e e MGT 501. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY AGE 601. BIOLOGY OF AGING (3) Lectures and discussions concerned with the biological bases of the aging phenomenon as it occurs on the levels of the cell, the tissue, the organ, and the organism. AGE 602. PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING (3) Consideration of basic psychological processes as relat e d to the aging proc ess. Changes in functioning in perceptual, motor and cognitive areas from a d e v e lop mental perspective. AGE 603. SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS APPLIED TO GERONTOLOGY (4) Systematic study of the methods and techniques employed in social, psycho logical, and health studies of population groups. It is directed toward the consumers of research findings-persons whose positions call for the ability to interpret, evaluate, and apply the findings produced by others. AGE 604. AGING AND PERSONALITY (3) Personality theory and concepts of adjustments are studied with an introduction to counseling techniqu e s and rehabilitative efforts with the aged. AGE 606. INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION (3) This course deals with the management problems and practices in the adminis tration of institutions in the field of aging. Consideration will be given to the economics of aging, federal and state legislation, the management of people, and fiscal manag ement. AGE 607. SOCIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF AGING IN THE UNITED STATES (4) Ex a mines, within a sociological frame of reference, the interrelationship b e tween the a ged (or aging) and the structure and function of the social sys t e m and its major institutionalized subsystems. AGE 608. HUMAN RELATIONS IN ORGANIZATIONS (3) An analytical view of the modem human relations movement with stress on development since the 1930's Incorporates the philosophy of the behavioral sciences and alternative theories and relates them to the management process in g e rontology. AGE 609. LEISURE FOR THE AGING (3) The seminar will consist of general data and observations on trends and re search in the leisure field, directed theoretical analysis of these studies as they p e rtain to the elderly and contact with programs by visits, interviews and r e ports. AGE 610. ADMINISTRATIVE APPLICATIONS OF DEMOGRAPHY (3) Acquaints the student with various sources of demographic data and its u s e.

PAGE 52

206 HISTORY Emphasis is placed upon applicability in program planning and student ex perience in locating, tabulating, and interpreting data from selected publications. AGE 691. SEMINAR IN SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY (3) Designed to give the graduate student an opportunity to integrate concepts within the field of gerontology and relate these to other fields of study. Guest lecturers from a variety of disciplines participate in the seminar. AGE 692. SEMINAR IN SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY (3) See above. AGE 693. SEMINAR IN SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY (3) See above. AGE 694. SEMINAR IN SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY (3) See above. AGE 695. FIELD PLACEMENT (12) HISTORY Faculty: Abbott, Chairman; Amade, Billingsley, Burke, Currey, DellaGrotte, Hilliard, Jacob J., Jacob M., Jordan, Kleine, Leonard, Mayer, Parker, Rollins, Silbert, Swanson. PART I HTY 100. THE IDEA OF HISTORY (4) Required of all history majors. The course deals with history conceived as a mode of inquiry, emphasizing the acquisition of the conceptual tools required for systematic, critical thought about human problems in the historical per spective. May be waived in the case of transfer students. HTY 201, 202. ANCIENT HISTORY (4,4) PR: HTY 100 or CI. A thematic survey of the ancient civilizations. 201 offers instruction in the early civilizations, including the Sumerian, Egyptian, Hebrew, and Persian; 202 treats the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome. Attention is drawn to the correlative work in CLS 321 Ancient civilization. HTY 211, 212. AMERICAN HISTORY (4,4) PR: HTY 100 or CI. A history of the United States with attention given to relevant developments in the Western Hemisphere. 211: European origins to 1865; 212: 1865 to present HTY 221, 222. MEDIEVAL HISTORY (4,4) PR: HTY 100 or CI. A thematic survey of the Middle Ages. 221 deals with the nascent, Christian civilization of Europe, circa 300-1050 A.D.; 222 treats the mature medieval civilization of Europe, circa 1050-1500. HTY 231, 232. MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY (4,4) PR: HTY 100 or CI. A thematic survey of Europe in the modem age. 231 treats the period from the Renaissance to the French Revolution; 232, from the French Revolution to the present. HTY 251, 252. LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (4,4) PR: HTY 100 or CI. A thematic survey of the Iberian-Indian civilization in the New World from the 15th through the 20th Centuries. 251 treats the period from discovery to the independence movements of the 19th Century; 252, the Ibero-American states from the Wars of Independence to the present. PART II HTY 301, 302. A HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN COLONIAL PERIOD (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 211, 212, or CI. A study of European interest and involvement

PAGE 53

HISTORY 207 in America from the Age of R eco naissance to 1789 with emphasis on institutional development and the establishment of the American national system. HTY 315, 316. THE CIVIL WAR AND ITS AFTERMATH (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 211, 212 or Cl. A study of th e causes of th e Civil War and the factors, forces and atmosphere which produced the re cons truction policy follow ing the war. HTY 317. HISTORY OF FLORIDA (4) A history of Florida and the Caribbean. F1orida as an area of discovery coloniza tion and imperial conflict; the emergenc e of Florida within its r egiona l setting. HTY 319, 320. THE EMERGENCE AND GROWTH OF MODERN AMERICA (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 211, 212, or CI. A study of the transition of American society from the end of Reconstruction to the present. 319 treats the era from 1877 to World War I; 320 focuses on the period from World War I to the present. HTY 321, 322. ANCIENT GREECE (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 201, 202, or CI. A study of Greece in the ancient period. 321 offers instruction in the pre-Hellenic and Hellenic periods; 322 treats develop ments in the Hellenistic period. Attention is drawn to the correlative work in CLS 527 Greek Civilization HTY 324. MEDIEVAL SPAIN AND PORTUGAL (4) PR: HTY 100, 221, 222, or CI. A study of the peoples of the Iberian Peninsula in the Middle Ages. HTY 325, 326. ANCIENT ROME (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 201, 202, or Cl. A study of Rome in the ancient period. 325 offers instruction in the history of the Roman Republic; 326 treats the development of the Roman Empire. Attention is drawn to the correlative work in CLS 529 Roman Civilization. HTY 327, 328. MEDIEVAL INSTITUTIONAL HISTORY (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 221, 222, or CI. A study of the major institutions of feudal Europe. 327 treats the history of the Empire and Papacy; 328 deals with the history of the Western monarchies. HTY 329 MEDIEVAL ENGLISH HISTORY (4) PR: HTY 100 221, 222, or Cl. A study of the major developments in England from the Anglo-Saxon period to the 15th Century. HTY 333, 334. FRENCH HISTORY (4,4) PR : HTY 100, 231, 232, or Cl. A study in the major developments of French history in the modem p e riod. 333 deals with the period from the Renaissance to the French Revolution; 334, from the Revolution to the present. HTY 335, 33.6. GERMAN HISTORY (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 231, 232, or Cl. A study of the major developments of German history 335 deals with the period from the Reformation to the French Revolution; 336, from the Revolution to th e present. HTY 337, 338. RUSSIAN HISTORY (4,4) PR. HTY 100, 231 232, or Cl. A study of the primary social, economic, and cultural forces which have shaped the historical development of Russia. 337 trea ts the p eri od to 1855; 338, 1855 to present. HTY 341, 342. BRITISH HISTORY (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 231, 232, or Cl. A study of the major developments of Briti s h history. 341 treats the p e riod from the Reformation to 1715 ; 342, from 1715 to present. HTY 345, 346. BRITISH EMPIBE AND COMMONWEALTH (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 231, 232, or CI. A study of the old and new empires with em phasis upon the evaluation of the Commonwealth. HTY 347. HISTORY OF CANADA (4) PR: HTY 100 or Cl. A study of the major themes in the political and social

PAGE 54

208 HISTORY development of Canada, with particular emphasis on the ongms and development of French-Canadian nationalism, continentalism, and dominion-provincial relations. HTY 353. HISTORY OF MEXICO (4) PR: HTY 100, 251, 252, or CI. A study of Mexican history from discovery to the present, with emphasis on the empire and republican periods. HTY 355. HISTORY OF BRAZIL (4) PR: HTY 100, 251, 252, or CI. A study of Brazilian history from discovery to the present with emphasis on the empire and republican periods. PART Ill HTY 409, 410. A HISTORY OF AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 211, 212, or CI. The development of American foreign relations from the Revolution to the present. HTY 409 deals with earlier period to 1877; HTY 410, with the period from 1877 to present. HTY 4ll, 412. AMERICAN SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 211, 212, or CI. A study of the major religions and philosophical ideas of the American people in relation to the nation's social environment. 411 deals with the earlier period to 1865; 412, from 1865 to present. HTY 421, 422. A HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMIC PROCESS (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 211, 212, ECN 201, 202, or CI. The development of American economic thought and policies from the colonial period to the present, em phasizing the inter-relationship of economic development with the major political, ideological, and institutional currents of American history. A student may not receive credit for both HTY 421, 422, and ECN 371. HTY 423. MEDIEVAL THOUGHT AND CULTURE (4) PR: HTY 100, 221, 222, or CI. A study of the culture and the major intellectual developments of the medieval period. HTY 425, 426. A HISTORY OF THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION PERIODS (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 231, 232, or CI. HTY 425 deals with the European Renaissance; HTY 426 with the major developments of Reformation Europe. HTY 427, 428. EUROPE IN THE BAROQUE AND ENLIGHTENMENT PERIODS (4) PR: HTY 100, 231, and any two of courses 333, 335, 337 and 341 or CI. A study with emphasis on comparative developments. 427 deals with major topics of the Baroque period; 428, with the Enlightenment. HTY 429, 430. EUROPE IN THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH CENTURIES (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 231, 232, or CI. A study with emphasis on comparative develop ments. 429 treats the Nineteenth Century; 430, the Twentieth Century. HTY 431, 432. EUROPEAN SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 231, 232, or CI. Selected topics in the social and intellectual history of modem Europe. 431 treats the early modem period; 432, the Nine teenth and Twentieth Centurie:;, HTY 451. A HISTORY OF RELATIONS (4) PR: HTY 100, 251, 252, or CI. An examination of the mutual problems of the American nations since independence with emphasis upon the development of Pan Americanism and the Organization of American States. HTY 453. SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA (4) PR: HTY 100, 251, 252, or CI. A study of the origins and development of major intellectual and social trends affecting the histories of the Latin American people. HTY 455. STUDIES IN TUDOR-STUART ENGLAND (4) PR: HTY 100, 231, 232, or CI. Selected topics in the history of Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century England.

PAGE 55

HUMANITIES 209 HTY 461. REVOLUTION IN THE MODERN WORLD (4) PR: HTY 100, 231, 232, or Cl. An analytical and comparative study of the nature of revolution in modem history leading to a development of a paradigm of the revolutionary process. HTY 465. SCIENCE AND CIVILIZATION (4) PR: HTY 100, 231, 232, or CI. A comparative survey of the impact of science on Western civilization from the ancient Egyptians to the present, em phasizing the relationship of science to the socio-economic, political, and intellectual development. HTY 485. DIRECTED READING (1-4) PR: Arrangement with instructor prior to registration. Readings in special topics FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS HTY 587. THEORY OF HISTORY (4) PR : To be taken during the senior year. An investigation of the philosophical problems of history, with emphasis on the evolution of the discipline. HTY 591. PRO-SEMINAR IN HISTORY (4) Advanced top ics in the fields emphasizing readings and discussions of research and writing. One pro-seminar is required of all history majors. Non-majors may enroll with the consent of the instructor. Topics vary within each field. HTY 592. SENIOR SEMINAR IN HISTORY (4) Introduction to the methods of historical research and writing, bibliography, and directed research in special topics designed to meet the particular needs and interests of individual students. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY HTY 600. ANALYSIS OF HISTORICAL KNOWLEDGE (4) A study of history as a form of knowledge with emphasis on epistemological considerations of the explanation devices and models of the discipline. HTY 601. THEORY AND INTERPRETATION (4) A systematic examination and evaluation of various schools of historical inter pretation. HTY 602. HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (4) An examination of the conceptual modes and methodology of the other disciplines with emphasis upon their application to historical research. HTY 680. COLLOQUIUM IN HISTORY (4) Reading and discussion of selected topics within the fields. Subj ect and scope to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit. HTY 685. READINGS IN HISTORY (I-4) Arrangement with instructor prior to registration and CC. Individual reading and discussion of selected problems. May be repeated for credit. HTY 691. SEMINAR IN HISTORY (4) Research in selected problems within the fields. Subject and scope to be de t er mined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit. The master's candidate is required to satisfactorily complete work in at least one graduate seminar to fulll the requirement for the Master's Degree in History. HTY 699. THESIS IN HISTORY (1-8) Required of all candidates for the Master's Degree in History. HUMANITIES Faculty: Kiefer, chairman; E. Brown, J B. Camp, Frantz, Gowen, Guinagh, Hey, Hoffman, Juerg ense n, Kashdin, Koenig, MacKay, Peizer, Rut e nberg, Shackson, W. Smith, Spillane, Watkins.

PAGE 56

210 HUMANITIES HUM 311, 312, 313. HUMANITIES AND HUMANE VALUES (3,3,3) PR: CBS requirement in humanities or CI. Masterpieces of music, visual arts, theater, literatur e, and philosophy in varying cultural and historical situations. HUM 411, 412. TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARTS AND LETTERS (5,5) PR: CBS requirement in humanities or Cl. Case studies in the arts and letters of the twentieth century. HUM 415 416. ARTS AND LETTERS OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD (3,3) PR: CBS requirement in humanities or CI. Case studies in the arts and lett ers of the romantic period. HUM 417, 418. NINETEENTH-CENTURY ARTS AND LETTERS (3,3) PR: CBS re quiremen t in humanities or CI. Case studies in the arts and letters of the nineteenth century. HUM 419, 420. THE ENLIGHTENMENT (3,3) PR: CBS requirement in humanities or CI. Case studies in the arts and letters of the Enlightenment. HUM 423, 424. RENAISSANCE ARTS AND LETTERS (3,3) PR: CBS requirement in humanities or CI. Case studies in the arts and letters of the Renaissance. HUM 427, 428. MEDIEVAL ARTS AND LETTERS (3,3) PR: CBS requirement in humanities or CI. Case studies in the arts and l etters of the middle ages. HUM 431, 432. CLASSICAL ARTS AND LETTERS (3,3) PR: CBS requirement in humanities or CI. Case studies in the arts and l etters of the ancient world. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS HUM 535, 536, 537. HUMANITIES IN AMERICA (4,4,4) PR: CBS requir ement in humanities or CI. Case studies in the arts and letters of the United States. HUM 539, 540. SELECTED NON-WESTERN HUMANITIES (4,4) PR: CBS requirement in humanitie s or CI. Materials chosen from the arts and letters of Southe as t Asia and Northeast Asia. HUM 541. HUMANITIES IN THE ORIENT: INDIA (4) PR: CBS requirement in humaniti es or CI. Examples from the arts and letter s of India and the relationship of these arts to the Hindu and Buddhist philosophy religion s HUM 542. HUMANITIES IN THE ORIENT: CHINA (4) PR: CBS requir emen t in humanities or Cl. Examples from the arts and letters of China ; their relationsrup to Taoism, Confucianism and other Chinese philosophies; Western influences on 20th-century Chin ese arts and l e tters. HUM 543. HUMANITIES IN THE ORIENT: JAPAN (4) PR: CBS requirem ent in humanities or CI. Examples from the arts and lett ers of J apan, their relationship to Zen Buddhi sm and other Japan ese philosophy-religions ; Western influences on 20th-century Jap a n ese arts and l e tt e rs. HUM 545. LATIN AMERICAN ARTS AND LETTERS (3) PR : CBS requirement in humanities or CI. Analysis of selected Latin American works of art in th e ir c ultur a l context. HUM 581. DIRECTED STUDY (1-5) PR: CBS r equiremen t in humanities and CI. Specia liz e d individual study de termined by the student's needs and interest. HUM 591. SELECTED PROBLEMS IN HUMANITIES (3) PR: S e nior classification a nd C I. Problems in th e int erre l ations hips among the fine arts and the natural, socia l and behavioral sciences. A senior essay for humanities 111ajors.

PAGE 57

ITALIAN 211 FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY HUM 6ll. STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY ARTS AND LETTERS (3) Con ce ntration on major artists and r ecent t rends. HUM 623. STUDIES IN THE RENAISSANCE (3) Masterpieces and major artists of the R e naissance in Europe and Engl an d. HUM 681. DIRECTED STUDY (1-4) Specialized independent study dete rmin e d by the student's needs and interests. HUM 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN HUMANITIES (3) Each topic is a c ourse of study in a sub ject not covered by a regular course. HUM ,691. MASTER S ESSAYS (5) Required of graduate students in humanities. ITALIAN Faculty: Artzybushev, Milani. Basic courses list e d under Basic Studies. History of Romance Languages listed under Romance Languages. ITA 301. ADVANCED ITALIAN COMPOSITION (4) To improve the s tudent's ability in writing Italian, to increase his ability in com prehension and use of the grammatical elements. Practice in both free and fixed composition. ITA 303. ADVANCED ITALIAN CONVERSATION (4) To develop fluency and correctness in spoken Italian. ITA 305. SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE (3) Ori gins of Italia n literature and Medieval Italian literature. ITA 306. SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE (3) G e neral a spe cts of the literature of the Renaissance and the literature through the Eighteenth century. ITA 307. SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE (3) The major movements of the Ninet eenth and Twentieth centuries. ITA 310. HIGHLIGHTS OF ITALIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3) A study in English of the most important writers since the Fourte enth C en tury. Elective for students in all departments (except Italian majors). ITA 383. SELECTED TOPICS (varied) Course content depends upon student demand and instructor's interest. ITA 483. SELECTED TOPICS (varied) PR: CI. Junior standing. Course content depends upon student demand and in s tructor's interest. ITA 491. SENIOR SEMINAR (3) Study in depth of a specific writer or literary movement, as chosen by the in structor. Individual research required of students. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS PR: IT A 305, 306, 307 ITA 511. DANTE (3) Emphasis on historical period; Dante's life and minor works. ITA 512. DANTE (3) Divine Com edy: Inferno. ITA 513. DANTE (3) Divine Comedy: Purgatorio and Paradiso

PAGE 58

212 LANGUAGE-LITERATURE IT A 541. NINETEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE (3) Romanticism in I ta ly. ITA 542 NINETEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE (3) Realism and Naturalism in Italy. ITA 551. TWENTIETH CENTURY ITALIAN LITERATURE (3) A comprehensive study of the major writ ers through the "Decadentismo." Special emphasis on D' Annunzio. ITA 552. TWENTIETH CENTURY ITALIAN LITERATURE (3) A comprehensive study of the major writer s from the "Ideal ismo filosofico" up to the present time, with special emphasis on Pirandello. ITA 583. SELECTED TOPICS (var.) The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor interest. It will examine in depth a recurring literary theme or the work of a small group of writers. JOURNALISM Faculty: Sand erso n, program chairman; Griscti, Stalnaker, Yates. (Four basic courses are offered; students interested in journ a lism will major in another fie ld.) JNM 341-342. BASIC JOURNALISTIC WRITING (5) JNM 341 (2 q.h.). Open to freshmen. Introduction to mass communic a tions; rights and responsibilities of the press; critical analyses of press performanc e. JNM 342 ( 3 q.h.) PR: CBS 102. Basic news writing, interviewing, use of n ews sources. Students may enter either quarter first. JNM 343. ADV AN CED JOURNALISTIC WRITING (4) PR: JNM 342. News and feature writing for newspapers with emphasis on in d epth writing techniques and reportorial coverage of meetings, speeches, police, crime, courts, politics, elections and governm ent. Laboratory experience on The Oracle. JNM 347. NEWS EDITING (4) PR: JNM 342. Evaluating news and display; editing and rewriting news for the mass media; editing techniques; newspaper typography and makeup; ethica l problems and communications law. Laboratory experience on The Oracle. JNM 349. MAGAZINE AND FEATURE WRITING (4) PR: CBS 102. A study of writing and marketing articles for general circul a tion magazines and feature sections. Preparation of articles for submission to pro fessional publications. ENG 483. SELECTED TOPICS: PERSUASIVE WRITING (4) PR: Sophomore standing. Copywriting; the role and scope of p ersuas ion in our society and in the mass media; principles of advertising. LANGUAGE-LITERATURE (Interdisciplinary) Faculty: Bentley, Carr, Deer, Gould, M. Jacob, O'Hara, Stanton. LLI 301 302. MAIN CURRENTS OF WESTERN THOUGHT I & II (3,3) A study of the principal forces tha t have shaped Western thought since 1500. These include humanism, Protestantism, rationalism, romantici sm, communism, and naturalism. Among the authors included in the course are Machiavelli, Swift, N ewman, Freud, Dre iser, and C am us. 301: 1500-1720; 302: 1 720-presen t. LLI 305. THE IDEA OF PROGRESS I (3)

PAGE 59

LINGUISTICS 213 A study of the ways in which the idea of progress has affected philosophical, social, political and literary theory since the Renaissance to the French revolution. Among the authors considered are: Bacon, Descartes, Pascal, Locke, Condorcet, Malthus, and Adam Smith. LLI 306. THE IDEA OF PROGRESS II (3) A study of the relationship between the idea of progress and the growth of modem ideologies. Emphasis will be placed on the development of liberalism, Utopian socialism, social Darwinism, and conservatism by the study of such authors as: Burke, T. Paine, J. S. Mill, R. Owen, T Huxley, G. Orwell, and A. Malraux. LLI 311. LITERATU::::E AND THE FILM (3) A study of what happens when a novel is adapted for the movies; of the in sights of modem writers and literary critics into the motion picture as an art form analagous to, yet distinct from, literature and of the impact of literature on film-making. LLI 312. PHILOSOPHY AND THE FILM (3) A study of the philosophical implications of the motion picture as an art form: aesthetics in general versus film aesthetics, the connections between the world views of such modem philosophers as Bergson, Whitehead and Bradley and the world view expressed through the motion picture, the connections between "pure ideas,n the ideas in the documentary film, and the ideas in the fictional film. LLI 313. INTRODUCTION TO FILM WRITING (4) PR: CBS 102. CI. An introduction to the techniques of writing for the film with special emphasis on adaptations from fiction and examinations of scripts as models and as subjects for critical analysis. LLI 315. THE IDEA OF FREEDOM (3) An analysis of the idea of freedom, both in general and in particular. Various philosophical, literary, and journalistics aspects will be analyzed: metaphysical, ethical, political, social, religious and economic. LLI 383. SELECTED TOPICS (3-5) Course contents depend on students' need and instructor'5 interest. LLI 483. SELECTED TOPICS (2-5) PR: CI. Junior standing. Course contents depend on students' need and in structor's interest. LLI 540. THE SOCIAL STRUCTURE OF LANGUAGE (4) PR: SOC 345 or ANT 313 and ENG 517 or ENG 535. An analysis of the interrelation of a language and the structure of the society using it. The lin guistic behavior and patterns characteristic of particular social, economic, political, educational, and racial groups. Problems in communication between strata. LLI 541. PSYCHOLINGUISTICS (4) PR: PSY 331, or ANT 313, and ENG 515 or ENG 517. The nature of grammar and its psychological implications; linguistic structures and their correlates in behavior and perception. Problems in verbal learning, verbal conditioning, and word usage. Examination of the hypotheses of Whorl, Chom sky and others. LLI 583. SELECTED TOPICS (2-5) PR: CI. Course contents depend on students' need and instructor's interest. LINGUISTICS Faculty: Cole, chairman; O'Hara. LIN 411-412. DESCRIPTIVE LINGUISTICS (4,4) Introdu ction to the IP A and the Harris-Smith-Trager approach to phonemic,

PAGE 60

214 MANAGEMENT morphemic and syntacti c a n a lysis with its application to Am e rican English an d othe r analytic l a nguages LIN 483. SELECTED TOPICS (3-5) PR: CI. Course contents depend on studen t s' need and instructor's interest and may range over the whole field of ling uistics FOR UPPER LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS LIN 520. WRITING MODERN GRAMMARS (4) This course will acquaint students with various int e r es ting grammatical features from among a larg e numbe r of modem langua ges, t each them how to construct grammars and to describe these and evaluate altemate grammars. LIN 530. FIELD METHODS (4) An introduction to the techniques of gathering language data in the field and making a preliminary analysi s of such d a ta LIN 581. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (3-5) PR: CI. Specializ e d individual work in areas of student's inter es t. LIN 583. SELECTED TOPICS (3-5) PR: CI. Cour se contents dep e nd on students' need and instructor's interest and may range over the whole field of linguistics. Study of l anguages not otherwise offered is possible Enrollment can be repeated. LIN 585. DIRECTED READING (4) Readings in special topics. Arrangement with instructor b e fore registration. MANAGEMENT Faculty: A. C Bartlett, chairman ; Allen B erry, Birkin Bu e hl, Dutton, Edwards, Kennerson, Mill e r, Morell, R eb hun, Ric hardson, Sherman, Walsh, White. MGT 301. PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (5) Organized system of conc e pts runn i ng th e gamut from quantitative to be h avo ri a l sciences which provide broa d overv i ew of science of managemen t. MGT 311. MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3) PR: MGT 301, GBA 351, ECN 331. Study of int e rface between environment and open systems. Analysis and desi gn of computer and noncomputer systems as tools in management plannin g and control. MGT 321. BEHAVIORAL FACTORS IN ORGANIZATIONS (3) PR: MGT 301 or CI. Integra t es con ce pts l earned in CBS Behavioral Area (or equivalent) into manag e rial fram e work. Includes theories of communica tion, delegation, dis c ipline, groups, motivati on, needs, perc e ption and rul es MGT 331. INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (3) PR: MGT 301 or CI. Impact of unioni zat i on on management flexibility in de cision making. Emphasis on th eo ries and mod els that when applied bear upon how best to manage in union organized workplace. MGT 341. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (3) PR: MGT 301 or CI. Systematic ana l ysis of multitude of functions in person nel: recruiting, selection, job eva lu ation, p e rform ance appraisa l wage and salary, incentives, training & developm e nt, e t c., utilizing case approach. MGT 421. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3) PR: MGT 301, GBA 351, ECN 331 or CI. Dev e lops con ce ptual fram e work and principles applicable for any manag e rial d ecision proc ess including prope r utilization by line of staff exp e rtise. Integra tes previous cours e s into planning & control model.

PAGE 61

MANAGEMENT 215 MGT 431. ORGANIZATION THEORY (3) PR: MGT 301 or CI. E xa min es o r ganiza ti ons fr o m soci a l sy st e m s approa c h but r e t a in s and intersp erse s tra dition a l form a l or g ani z ation theory with recent em p i ri ca l evidence of Behavioral and Qua ntit a tiv e Sci e nces. MGT 451. INTERPERSONAL DYNAMICS LABORATORY (3) PR: MGT 321 or CI. more cont ent orient e d t-group mod e l to pro vid e through task accomplishment b ette r awarene s s of a ppli c ation to m o d e m man a g e m ent theo ry of conc epts and t o ol s from social sciences. MGT 453. CHANGING ORGANIZATIONS (3) PR : MGT 3 2 1 or CI. C e ntral uni fying conc ept is the Change Agent. Stud ent ex p ose d to t o t a l ra n g e of theory r e l a t e d to resi s tance to change and introduc tion of cha n ge includin g whe th e r loc us should be in or out of or g anization MGT 461. LEGAL CONSTRAINTS AND MANAGEMENT DECISION MAKING (3) PR: MGT 331, GBA 3 61 or CI. Cas e a nalysis of legal constraints on manag e rial dec ision-making : FLSA ; Workmen s Comp e n sa tion; Anti-discrimination laws ; Lie D e t ec tors & Ps yc holo g i ca l Testing ; NLRB rulings court decisions, statutes. MGT 463 SEMINAR IN MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND SETTLEMENT (3) PR : MGT 3 3 1 or CI. C a se exerci ses t o test application of tools and theories p e rt a ining to LR and oth e r m a n age m ent functions involving conflicting interest group s tha t mu s t i n t eg r a t e or coex i s t, intera c t and cooperate MGT 465. LABORATORY IN THE RESOLUTION OF CONFLICT (3) PR: MGT 3 21 o r CI. In d epth exposure to pano ra ma of interdisciplinary theories ha ving r e l a ti o n s hip to di spute settl e ment in any context. Controlled laboratory te s tin g of s aid th eori e s through cas e s an d / or man a gement game. MGT 471. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE I (3) PR : M G T 421 or CI. Heavy empha sis upon population of cal c ulus, m a trix al gebra bo o l e an a l gebra, se t theory probability and game theories, and oth e r op era tions r esea r c h t echniques to mana g e m ent problem analy s is. MGT 472. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE II (3) PR : MGT 471 or CI. E xa min a tion of Line a r Programming, dynamic programming que uing, sto c ha s tic inve n tory mod e ls, m a rkov chain ana lysis for applications to probl e m an a lysis a nd d e cision m a kin g unde r uncertainty. MGT 473. QUANTITATIVE METHODS OF OPERATION: PLANNING AND CONTROL (3) PR: MGT 472 or CI. R ev i e w of all conc eptual tools, methods and techniques avail a ble to mod e m s cie ntific m a n a g e r including depth integration of how and why of qua ntit a ti v e d ecis ion proce s s at poli c y l e vel. MGT 489. GUIDED RESEARCH IN MANAGEMENT (3) PR: Gradu a tin g Qu arte r or CC. Student enga g es in integrating field proj e ct, or other r ese arch, where a ll of his course work can be utilized Only most gen e ral d e p a rtm enta l s up e rvision is exe rcis e d : man a g e ment is by re s ults. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS MGT 501. SURVEY OF MANAGEMENT (3) An ana ly sis of the th eo ry and pra ctic e of manage ment including a study o f the dete rmin a tion of go als a nd mean s th e fun c tions of man a g e m e nt, decision-m a king and the administr a tive proces s in ge neral. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY MGT 601. HUMAN RELATIONS IN ORGANIZATIONS (3) An analytical vi e w of the modem hwna n rel a tions movem ent with stress of

PAGE 62

216 MARKETING development since the 1930 's Incorporates the philo s ophy of the b ehav ioral sciences and relates it to the mana ge ment process. MGT 603. COMMUNICATIONS THEORY IN INDUSTRY (3) PR: MGT 301 or 501. Investigation of the communication pro ces s through ana lysi s of the available literature Pr ag matic business writing, general semantics, r eada bil ity s tudies, cybernetic theory, and network analysis will be among the topics cov e red. MGT 606. ADVANCED MANAGEMENT SCIENCE (3) PR: MGT 471 or equivalent. Study of current operations resear c h techniques including dynamic (non-linear) programming, Markov ch ai n analysis as they apply to problems in the bus iness firm MGT 607. SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (3) An in-d epth study and analysis of critical and/or current probl e ms in industrial r e lations. MGT 608. SEMINAR IN OPERATIONS ANALYSIS (3) PR: MGT 606. Analytical study of planning and control with particular str ess on operational problems and decision-making. The use of simul a tion will be treated. MGT 609. ADVANCED INTERPERSONAL DYNAMICS (3) PR: MGT 601 or equivalent. The study of personal and int e rp erso nal b e h avio r through experiencing the information via experiments, as w e ll as a study of the r elevant literature. MGT 610. SEMINAR IN QUANTITATIVE METHODS I (3) PR: MGT 606, 608. Oper ational analysis of management measurements includ ing: value analysis, cost-benefit analysis, payoff-trees and t a bles, PERT/CPM, the computer as a tool in managerial decisions. Stresses the functional use of quantitative methodology. MGT 61I. SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATION THEORY (3) PR: MGT 601. The study of the structure, functions and dynamics of mod e rn organizations. Stress is given to the contributions of b e havioral science to analysis of formal and informal organizations. MGT 6I3. SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (3) PR: MGT 601, 609, 611. The study of organizational change with special stress on adaptation of the firm, or sub-strata of the firm, to environmental alteration. Intra-firm analysis, and sensitivity training are also covered. MGT 615. SEMINAR IN ADMINISTRATIVE POLICY (3) A course designed to present an organized an d int eg rated approach to the managerial decision-making process. This course should be taken in the -final qu a rter of the progr am MGT 699. THESIS (6) MARKETING Faculty: D. C Sleeper, chairman; Carmichael, Futhey, Hadaway, O es cher, Schein kopf, Stevens, Williams. MKT 301. BASIC MARKETING (5) PR: ECN 201-202. Survey of the marketing of goods and services within the economy. The integration of functional, commodity, and institutional approaches from the consumer and managerial viewpoints. MKT 311. PRINCIPLES OF SALESMANSHIP AND SALES MANAGEMENT (3) PR: MKT 301. Personal selling and sales management as basic elements in the

PAGE 63

MARKETING 217 marketing strategy of firms. Includes the scientific management of resources and the dynamics of interpersonal and small group behavior and decision processes. MKT 312. PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING AND SALES PROMOTION (3) PR: MKT 301. A comprehensive coverage of advertising, stressing purposes, techniques, organization, research, and media selection including relationships with other marketing mix components. Consideration given to economic and social aspects of advertising and total promotional strategies. MKT 315. MARKETING INSTITUTIONS AND CHANNELS (3) PR: MKT 301. A deta iled study of marketing channels as a functional area of marketing management responsibility and as a part of marketing strategy. Atten t ion given to wholesaling and retailing and their structural, dynamic interrela t ionshi ps including distribution logi s tics. MKT 316. MARKETING MODELS AND MARKETING SYSTEMS (3) PR: MKT 312, MKT 315, and GBA 351. An investigation of the utility of formal, logical, mathemati ca l, and other quantitative methods and models as thes e might be applied to marketing management. MKT 403. PUBLIC RELATIONS AND THE MARKETING PROCESS (3) PR: MKT 312 or CI. Principles, practices, and problems in public relation s as an integrated part of and supplement to marketing management responsibilities and decisions. MKT 405. INDUSTRIAL MARKETING (3) PR: MKT 315. Problems of marketing industrial goods. Characteristics of markets, channels, indus trial sales, promotional practices, research and marketing polici es. MKT 407. MANAGEMENT OF ADVERTISING AND SALES PROMOTION (3) PR: MKT 312, MKT 315. Discus s ion and analysis of cases bearing on managerial aspects of advertising and sales promotion including research, budget determi nation, strategy, tactics and evaluation of results. MKT 409. INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3) PR: MKT 312, MKT 315, or Cl. A study of the procedures and problems associated with establishing mark eting operations in foreign countries. The insti tutions, principles and methods involved in the solution of these business prob lems will be trea t ed as well as effects of national differences on business practices. MKT 411. MARKETING RESEARCH (3) PR: MKT 312, MKT 315, ECN 331 or MTH 345; or Cl. A study of research methods applicable to problem-solving in the field of marketing. MKT 413. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3) PR: MKT 301 or Cl. An investigation and application of the behavioral factors affecting consumer demand. Consideration given to industrial, governmental, and ultimate consumers. MKT 414. SEMINAR IN MARKETING AND CONSUMER BEHAVIOR RESEARCH (3) PR: MKT 312, MKT 315, MKT 411, MKT 413. In depth discussion, formulation, application, and evaluation of advanced research techniques and practices as currently applied to facilitate marketing d ecisions MKT 415. MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3) PR: MKT 312, MKT 3 15, MKT 411, MKT 413, and 3 other MKT courses or CI. Management of the marketing function of firms: objectives, planning, or ga nization, controlling of the tot a l marketing effort, and co-ordination with other major functional areas. MKT 419. MARKETING PROBLEMS (3) MKT 489. SPECIAL STUDIES IN MARKETING (3) PR: MKT 415 or CI. The integration of marketing knowledge in solving sp ecific marketing problem s Selected readings and case analyses. PR: MKT major and Cl. Intensive independent res earc h in marketing under the direction of a major professor; pro gress and fina l analysis reported in seminar

PAGE 64

218 MATHEMATICS FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS MKT 501. SURVEY OF MARKETING (3) PR: ECN 501. A critical analysis of the field of marketing including aspects of marketing policies, institutions, research, and trends. Special emphasis given t o product development, pricing strategy, channel se lection, and promotion as a basis for marketing management decisions. Assigned readings, discussions, and reports. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY MKT 601. ADVANCED MARKETING PROBLEMS (3) PR: MKT 301 or 501, ECN 605. A study of the marketing problems of the firm approached from a managem ent point of view. Emphasis is placed upon the development of the student 's ability to analyze marketing situations, identify problems, determine solutions, impl e ment corrective action, and plan marketing strategy. MKT 603. SEMINAR IN MARKETING (3) PR: 'MKT 301 or 501; ECN 601, 605. The study of contemporary mark e ting thought, advanced marketing concepts, and recent developments in the field of marketing. Readings, discussions, and individual investigation. MATHEMATICS Faculty: Ratti, chairman; Ches ley, Cornett, Ghosh, Goodman, I ssak, Kelley, Y-F Lin, Manougian, Shannon, Tserpes, Twomey, Welch, Zerla. MTH 101. FOUNDATIONS OF UNIVERSITY MATHEMATICS (5) PR: Two years of secondary school a l gebra, one year of plane geometry. R ea l numbers and their properties; introduction to analytic trigonometry and geom e try. MTH 211. ELEMENTARY CALCULUS I (4) PR: Two years of secondary s c hool algebra, one year of plane geometry or CC. Real numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonom e tric functions, rates of change, derivatives. The sequence MTH 211-212-213 i s primarily for students from Biological Sciences, Social Sci e nces and Business. (No credit for math majors or students with credit in MTH 101.) MTH 212. ELEMENTARY CALCULUS II (4) PR: MTH 211 or CC. Rules for differ e nti atio n applications of the derivativ e, definite integral, fundamental theorem of calculus, integration. (No credit for students with credit in MTH 302 ) MTH 213. ELEMENTARY CALCULUS III (4) PR: MTH 212 Functions of several variables, p a rtial derivatives, introduction to infinite series (No credit for students with credit in 302.) MTH 302. CALCULUS I (5) PR: MTH 101 with a grade of "C" or better or CC. Limits derivatives appli cations, definite integral. MTH 303. CALCULUS II (4) PR: MTH 302 with a grade of "C" or bette r or CC. Antiderivatives, the d e finite integral, applicat i ons, log, exponential, and trig functions. MTH 304. CALCULUS III (4) PR: MTH 303 with a grade of "C" or b e tter or CC Integra tion, pol a r co ordin ates, conic sections v ec tors, indeterminate forms and improper int egra ls. MTH 305. CALCULUS IV (4) PR: MTH 304 with a grade of "C" or b e tter or CC. Vectors in 3s pace, partial d erivatives, multiple int egra l s infinit e series.

PAGE 65

MATHEMATICS 219 MTH 309. SET THEORY (3) PR: MTH 3 02 or CC. R e lations, functions, order, cardinal numbers, MTH 323. LINEAR ALGEBRA (4) PR: MTH 302 or CC. V ec tors, m a trices, sys tems of linear equations. MTH 345. INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS I (5) Hypoth esis t es ting estimation; normal, Chi-square, t, F, binomial, multinomi a l, di s tributions ; ANOV, CR, RCB d esig ns; single df, regression, correlation, contin gency tables Students who suc cess fully complete this course may not also receive credit for either ECN 331-431 Business and Economic Statistics or SSI 301 Social Science Statisti cs MTH 346. INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS II (5) PR: MTH 345 or CC. Factorials, ANCOV; multiple curvilin ear regression; re sponse s urfac e s; L a tin square, Split Plots, in c omplete blocks d es igns; distribution free methods. MTH 401. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (4) PR : MTH 305. First ord e r linear and nonlinear differenti a l equations, higher ord e r linear equ a tions a pplications. MTH 405. ADVANCED CALCULUS I (4) PR: MTH 305 with a grade of "C" or b e tter Func tions of several variables, p ar tial d e rivatives, impli c it-fun c tion theorems, transform a tions, vector fields. MTH 406. ADV AN CED CALCULUS II (4) PR: MTH 405. Continuation of MTH 405. MTH 420. ELEMENTARY ABSTRACT ALGEBRA (3) PR : MTH 302 or CC. Groups, rings inte g ral domain, field s int ege rs, the rational, r ea l and compl ex number systems. MTH 423. GEOMETRY I (3) PR : MTH 302. Emphasis on axiomatics, adva nced Euc lidean geometry, elements of projective geometry, no n -Euclidean geometries. MTH 424. GEOMETRY II (3) PR: MTH 423. Continuation of MTH 423. MTH 431. VECTOR ANALYSIS (3) PR: MTH 305 The algebra and calculus of vectors, applications, g e n e ral coordi n a t es, introduction to tenso r analysis. MTH 445. INTRODUCTORY PROBABILITY THEORY I (3) PR : MTH 305 and MTH 309 or CC. Probability spaces, discrete and continuous probability distributions, exp ec t ation. MTH 446. INTRODUCTORY PROBABILITY THEORY II (3) PR: MTH 445. Joint distributions sums of random variables, weak and strong laws of larg e numbers, limit the or ems. MTH 447. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (4) PR: MTH 401. Interpo lation and quadrature, finit e diff e renc es, num e rical solution of a l ge braic and tran scenden t a l equations, numeri c al solution of diff e rential e qua tio ns, computer t echniques. MTH 471. THE SCOPE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF MATHEMATICS (3) (For non-science m a jors ) PR: Senior or junior standing. Stud e nts having complet e d MTH 203 are not eli g ibl e to ente r this course. The d eve l opment of math e m a tical thou gh t and its appli ca ti o n to the phys i ca l world, the socia l sciences, and the fine arts, emphasizing the importance an d meaning of mathematics in contemporary culture. F OR S E N I OR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS MTH 501. ADVANCED DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (4) PR : MTH 401 or CC. S eries soluti ons of second order linear equations, boundary valu e probl ems, exist e n ce theorems and Fourier series.

PAGE 66

220 MATHEMATICS MTH 511. ADVANCED LINEAR ALGEBRA (4) PR: MTH 309, 323 or CC. Vector spaces, lin ear independence, dimension, matrices, linear transformations. MTH 513. REAL ANALYSIS I (4) PR: MTH 305 and 309. Continuity, differentiation and derivatives, sequ ences and series of functions, convergence MTH 514. REAL ANALYSIS II (4) PR: MTH 513. Continuation of MTH 513. MTH 515. CALCULUS ON MANIFOLDS (4) PR: MTH 511 and 514. Calculus of several variables. MTH 520. COMPLEX ANALYSIS I (4) PR: MTH 405 Complex numbers, analytic functions and mappin gs, int egr als. MTH 521. COMPLEX ANALYSIS II (4) PR: MTH 520. Power series, residues and poles. MTH 523. ALGEBRA I (4) PR: MTH 305 and 309. Semi-groups and groups. Rings and ideals; homomorphisms. MTH 524. ALGEBRA II (4) PR: MTH 523. Polynomials rings, integral domains; factorization. Fields and field extensions; reducibility MTH 531. TOPOLOGY I (4) PR: MTH 305 and MTH 309. Topological spaces, product topology, compact spaces, normal spaces. MTH 532. TOPOLOGY II (4) PR: MTH 531. Continua, homeomorphisms, metric spaces, Moore-Smith con vergence. MTH 541. APPLIED MATHEMATICS I (4) PR: MTH 401. Technique and applications of series solutions of differential equations, study of Bassell and other special functions important in the phy s ical sciences, eigenvalue problems. Emphasis on applied problems. MTH 542. APPLIED MATHEMATICS II (4) P8: MTH 541 or CC. M a trices, determinants and lin ear systems Topics from vector analysis and functions of several variables MTH 545. STATISTICAL METHODS IN RESEARCH I (4) Primarily for graduate students with research problems. Distribution of sampl e statistics estimation, tests of hypotheses. MTH 546. STATISTICAL METHODS IN RESEARCH II (4) PR: MTH 545 or CC. Randomized blocks, Latin squares, factorials, regression, correlation, split plots. MTH 548. INTRODUCTORY THEORETICAL STATISTICS (5) PR: MTH 305 and either MTH 345 or equivalent. Frequ ency, sampling, l imiting distributions and their moments; theory of point and int erv al estimation, hypo thesis testing, ANOV. MTH 549. INTRODUCTORY THEORY OF LEAST SQUARES (5) PR: MTH 305 and either MTH 548 or CC. The general lin ear hypoth esis, l east squares for experimental design models, components of variance Appli cations. MTH 571. GEOMETRY FROM AN ADVANCED STANDPOINT (3) PR: A bachelor's degree or CC. Axiomatic dev e lopment of geometries, with emphasis on Euclidean geometry, for t eac h ers and oth ers. MTH 573. SET THEORY AND ALGEBRA FROM AN ADVANCED STANDPOINT (3) PR: A bac h e lor's d egree or CC. Basic conc e pts of the language of mathematics, inclu ding a study of relations, functions, algebraic structures, for teach ers and others. MTH 583. SELECTED TOPICS (1-6) PR: Senior or junior standing and CC. Eac h topic is a course of study. 01-Hi story

PAGE 67

MATHEMATICS 221 of Mathematics, 03-Logic and Foundations, 05-Number Theory, 07 -Topics in Al gebra, 09-Mathematics for Physics, 11-Topics in Probability and Statistics, 13Topics in Analysis, 15-Topics in Topology. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY MTH 614. MODERN ANALYSIS I (4) PR: CC. Metric and Banach spaces, integration and measure in locally compact spaces, function spaces. MTH 615. MODERN ANALYSIS II (4) PR: MTH 614. Continuation of MTH 614. MTH 617. BANACH SPACES AND ALGEBRAS I (4) PR: MTH 616. Topological vecto r spaces, normed spaces, dual spaces with various topolo gies, Lp spaces, Banach algebras. MTH 618. BANACH SPACES AND ALGEBRAS II (4) PR: MTH 617. Continuation of MTH 617. MTH 624. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I (4) PR : CC. Stru cture theory of fields; ideals and modules. MTH 625. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA II (4) PR: MTH 624. Noetherian rings; ideal theory. MTH 627. HOMOLOGICAL ALGEBRA (3) PR: MTH 625. Cat egories and functors, homology of complexes, cohomology, spectral sequences. MTH 629. LIE GROUPS (3) PR: MTH 615, 625 or 633 and CC. Topological groups, r epresenta tion of c ompact Lie groups, algebraic groups. MTH 632. ADV AN CED TOPOLOGY I (4) PR: MTH 5 32 and CC. Continua, Hausdorff metric, decomposition spaces, char acterizations of E", homogeneous spaces MTH 633. ADVANCED TOPOLOGY II (4) PR: MTH 632. Continuous curves, function spaces, arewise connected spaces, homotopic and isotopic mappings, uniform spaces MTH 635. ALGEBRAIC TOPOLOGY (3) PR: MTH 633 or CC. Homotopy, homology groups, local homology groups. MTH 636. TOPOLOGICAL ALGEBRA I (4) PR: MTH 633 and CC. Topological semi-groups, topologic al groups, topological rings and fields, Haar measure. MTH 637. TOPOLOGICAL ALGEBRA II (4) PR: MTH 636. Continuation of MTH 636. MTH 639. DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY (3) PR: CC. Local differential geometry, curvature, evolutes and involutes, cal culus of variations. MTH 643. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS I (4) PR : MTH 401 and CC. Classification of second order equations, Cauchy problem, Dirichlet and Neumann problems, mixed problems, properties of solutions. MTH 644. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS II (4) PR: MTH 643. Coiitinuation of MTH 643. MTH 651. LOGIC AND FOUNDATIONS I (4) PR: CC. Propositional calculus, Post's theorem, first order and equality calculi, models, completeness and consistency theorems, Godel's theorem, recursive functions. MTH 652. LOGIC AND FOUNDATIONS II (4) PR: MTH 651. Continuation of MTH 651. MTH 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-9) PR: CC.

PAGE 68

222 MUSIC MTH 683. SELECTED TOPICS (1-6) PR: CC: 01-Topology, 02-Analysis 03-Algebra, 04-Applied Mathe matics, 05-Graph Theory, 06-Number Theory. MTH .691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (1-6) Direction of this seminar is by a faculty member. Students are r equired to present research papers from the literature. MTH 699. THESIS (1-9) May be taken more than once, but not more than a total of nine hours credit will be allowed. MUSIC Faculty: Sp e rry, chairman; Abram, E. S. Anderson, Apple, Bridg es, Enix, L. E. Erickson, Eubank, F earn, L. Golding, Henning, T. A. Hoffman, Jennings, G. A. Johnson, Kaplan, Kneeburg, Lockwood McCray, Nagosky, W. D. Owe n, Preo dor, Prescott, Rearick, J.M. Reynolds, Stenberg, Watkins, Wolf, Woodhams, Wrancher. MUS 112. RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC (3) Preparatory course for music arts and music education majors who do not qualify for MUS 212. Develops skills in hearing and performing music and in basic notation. MUS 212-213-214. MUSICAL STYLES (3,3,3) Required of music arts and mus ic education m a jors Aural and visu a l analysis of musical styles from Antiquity to 1600, stylistic composition for voic es, coun ter point, form; includes development of related skills of music reading and k eyboar d facility. APPLIED MUSIC (Courses marked with an asterisk (0 ) are a pplie d mus ic courses). Vocal and instrum e ntal instruction for students at all levels of profi cie ncy. Stude nts are auditioned and clas si fied according to te c hni ca l ability and musical background. Each week the student receives one private lesson devoted to individu a l tec hnical and musical problems Stud e nts also meet in a cl ass each week, in the pattern of a master class, in order to hear each other perform, and to learn to analyze and discuss t ec hnique, interpretation, and style. Courses marked with a n asterisk require a $25 app lied music fee. ENSEMBLE REQUIREMENT: All applied vocal and instrumental students who are qualified are required to emoll in a m a jor ensemb l e Piano s tudents are required to emoll in MUS 305-006 (Chamber Music Ensemble). May be r e p ea ted for credit. MUS 215. 0BEGINNING STRING INSTRUMENTS (I) Sec 001 Cello ; Sec 002 String Bass; S ec 003 Violin-Viola MUS 225. 0BEGINNING PIANO (I) Sections 001 and 002 are Level I ; Sections 00 3 and 004 ar L eve l II; Sections 005 and 006 are Proficiency Requirement L eve l; Sections 007 and 008 are Level IV. MUS 235. 0BEGINNING VOICE (I) MUS 245. 0BEGINNING WOODWIND INSTRUMENTS (I) Sec 001 Clarin e t-Saxoph one ; Sec 00 2 Flute; S ec 003 Oboe; S ec 004 Ba ssoo n. MUS 255. 0BEGINNIN G BRASS INSTRUMENTS ( I) Sec 001 French Horn; S ec 002 Low Brass; Sec 003 Trumpet. MUS 265. 0BEGINNING PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS (l) MUS 275. 0BEGINNING ORGAN (I)

PAGE 69

MUSIC 223 MUS 301. ISSUES IN MUSIC (2) Artist Teach e r -performers will le cture and p e rform significant works from the lit erature for the piano. The aesthetic and abstract elements in music which vitally concern the artist-performer will be analysed and illustrated in perform ance. MUS 303. IBE ENJOYMENT OF MUSIC (3) For non-music majors. A study of the art of music and its materials, designe d to develop an understanding of basic principles of music and a technique for li s tening to music. Section 001 is for students who are dance, theatre arts and visual arts majors; Section 002 is for other non-music majors. MUS 305. CHAMBER MUSIC ENSEMBLE (1) Op e n to students with the necessary proficiency in their performance media. Study and perform a nce of literature for small combinations of string, woodwind, br ass or percussion instruments voice, and piano. May be repeated for credit. S ec tion 001 Chamber Singers ; Se c tion 002 Jazz Laboratory Band; Section 003 Brass Choir; Section 004 Brass Quintet; Section 005 Woodwind Quintet; Section 006 Piano Ensemble; Section 007 String Quartet; Section 008 French Hom Quartet; Section 009 Clarinet Choir; Section 010 Percussion Ensemble. MUS 312-313-314. MUSICAL STYLES (3,3,3) PR: MUS 214. Required of music arts and music education majors. Continu ation of MUS 212-214. Musical styles from 1600 to 1827; includes harmony, instru m en tation, form, sty l istic composition for various media; continued development of related skills. MUS 315. 0INTERMEDIATE STRING INSTRUMENTS (2) S ec 001 C e llo; Sec 002 String Bass; Sec 003 Violin-Viola. MUS 325. 0INTERMEDIATE PIANO (2) MUS 335. "INTERMEDIATE VOICE (2) MUS 345. "INTERMEDIATE WOODWIND INSTRUMENTS (2) S ec 001 Clarinet-Saxophone ; Sec 002 Flute; Sec 003 Oboe; Sec 004 Bassoon. MUS 355. 0INTERMEDIATE BRASS INSTRUMENTS (2) S ec 001 French Horn; Sec 002 Low Brass; Sec 003 Trumpet. MUS 365. 0INTERMEDIATE PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS (2) MUS 375 "INTERMEDIATE ORGAN (2) MUS 385. UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA (1) PR: CI. Study, rehear sa l, and performance of major musical works. M e mb e rship op e n to all University students by audition on a credit or non-credit basis May be r e p eated for credit. MUS 387. UNIVERSITY BANDS (1) PR: Cl. Description under MUS 385 Section 001 is Concert Band Ensemble, S ec tion 002 is Reading Band. MUS 389. UNIVERSITY CHORUSES (1) PR: Cl. Description under MUS 385 Section 001 is Fine Arts Chorale, Section 002 is Reading Chorus Section 901 is University-Community Chorus. MUS 391. OPERA WORKSHOP (1) PR: CI. D escr iption under MUS 385. MUS 412-413-414. MUSICAL STYLES (2,2 ,2) PR: MUS 314. Required of mu s ic arts and music education majors Continu a tion of MUS 212-314 Musical Style s from 1828 to the present. MUS 477. STRING WORKSHOP (2) PR: CI. To prepare music te ac hers for inaugurating a string instrum e nt a l pro gram. Methods, techniques, and materials for the org an ization and execution of heteroge neous s tring cla sses will be studied, pedormed, and evaluated MUS 481. DIRECTED STUDY (1-6) PR : CC. Independent studies in the various areas of Musi c Art s Course of study and credits must be assigned prior to r eg i stra ti o n. May be repeated.

PAGE 70

224 MUSIC FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS MUS 503. COMPOSITION (3) PR: CI. Creative writing for various in s trumental and vocal media, solo and ensemble. Emphasis on composition in contemporary idioms. Includ e s class performance, critical discussion of compositions by students and instru c tor. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. MUS 507-508. ORCHESTRATION (3,3) PR: CI. Intensive study and practice in scoring music for the full symphony orchestra and various combinations of instruments including symphonic band and smaller ensembles of woodwind, brass and/or string instruments. MUS 512-513-514. MUSICAL STYLES (3,3,3) PR: 414. Required of undergraduate music arts majors. Advanced probl e ms in analysis of music of various styles; emphasis on individual research by stud e nts. MUS 515. 0 ADV AN CED STRING INSTRUMENTS (2) Sec 001 Cello; Sec 002 String Bass; Sec 003 Violin-Viola. MUS 521. PIANO MASTER CLASS (2) PR: CI. Study and performance of selected piano literature with spe cial emphasis on style, form, and technique. Especially designed for teachers, piano majors, and talented secondary school students. Credit and non-credit students must attend all scheduled class sessions, private lessons, and concerts. MUS 525. 0 ADV AN CED PIANO (2) MUS 531. VOICE MASTER CLASS (2) PR: Cl. Study and performance of selected voice literature with special em phasis on style, form, and technique. Especially designed for tea c hers, voice majors, and talented secondary school students. Credit and non-credit students must attend all scheduled class sessions, private lessons, and concert. MUS 535. 0 ADV AN CED VOICE (2) MUS 545. 0 ADV AN CED WOODWIND INSTRUMENTS (2) Sec 001 Clarinet-Saxophone; Sec 002 Flute; Sec 003 Oboe; Sec 004 Bassoon. MUS 555. 0 ADV AN CED BRASS INSTRUMENTS (2) Sec 001 French Hom; Sec 002 Low Brass; Sec 003 Trumpet. MUS 565. 0 ADVANCED PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS (2) MUS 571. STUDIO TEACHING (3) PR: CI. Required of advanced instrumentalists or vocalists who plan a career in studio teaching. Emphasis on the organiz<1tion of materials, literature, and techniques. Section 001 is piano, Section 002 is voice, Section 003 is winds, Section 004 is strings. MUS 575. 0 ADVANCED ORGAN (2) MUS 593. ORCHESTRA WORKSHOP (2) PR: CI. The study, rehearsal, and performance of ensemble literature. Member ship open to University students, teachers, and secondary school students. Those eligible may register for credit. Non-credit members receive no grade but are required to participate in all scheduled classes and concerts. MUS 595. BAND WORKSHOP (2) PR: CI. Description under MUS 593. MUS 597. CHORUS WORKSHOP (2) PR: CI. Description under MUS 593. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY MUS 601. SYMPHONIC LITERATURE (5) A cronological study of the development of orchestral music. Works will be analyzed and studied from a stylistic and biographical perspective.

PAGE 71

MUSIC 225 MUS 603. MASTERWORKS OF CHORAL LITERATURE (5) A chronological study of the development of choral music. Works will be analyzed and studied from a stylistic and biographical perspective. MUS 607-608. INSTRUMENTAL CONDUCTING (3,3) PR: CI. Intensive study of instrumental conducting techniques with emphasis on interpretation of musical scores and application in laboratory sessions. MUS 609. COMPOSITION (4) PR: CI. Original composition in varied forms. Emphasis on analysis and applica tion of contemporary techniques and styles. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve credits. MUS 611. TWENTIETH CENTURY MUSIC (5) PR: CI. A study of the compositional techniques of composers from Debussy to the present. Emphasis on counterpoint, harmonic structure, tonality, atonality, polytonality, texture, and serial technique. MUS 612-613-614. CHORAL LITERATURE AND CONDUCTING (fl,6,6) Combination of seminar, classroom, and laboratory type of experiences designed to provide depth in stylistic study of choral music literature and performance. GRADUATE APPLIED MUSIC (Courses marked with an asterisk (") are applied music courses). Vocal and instrumental instruction for graduate students only. Performance majors must qualify by audition to enroll at this level for four credits. Candi dates for the master of arts degree may be permitted to enroll for two credits at a lower level of proficiency in order to study performance tech niques on their major instrument or one of secondary importance. Courses marked with an asterisk require a $25 applied music fee. MUS 615. "STRING INSTRUMENTS (2-4) PR: CC. Sec 002, 004 Cello; Sec 102, 104 Bass; Sec 202, 204 Violin-Viola. MUS 618-619. GRADUATE REVIEW IN MUSICAL STYLES (2,2) Aural and visual analysis of music from Gregorian chant through contemporary musical styles. Adapted to the needs of the individual student as determined by graduate entrance examination in musical styles. MUS 622-623-624. TEACHING OF MUSIC THEORY (3,3,3) Comparative study of teaching techniques, procedures, and materials used in music theory curricula. MUS 625. 0PIANO (2-4) PR: CC. MUS 626-627-628. KEYBOARD LITERATURE (3,3,3) Chronological study of the development of music for the keyboard instruments. Works will be analyzed and studied from a stylistic and biographical perspective. MUS 629-630-631. SONG LITERATURE (3,3,3) Study of solo song literature from the 17th century through the contemporary with emphasis on German lieder, oratorio, and opera. Works will be studied with emphasis on performance. MUS 632-633-634. EVOLUTION OF MUSICAL STYLES (3,3,3) Required of music theory majors. Study of the development of musical styles in Western civilization from Antiquity to the present. Includes analysis and performance of representative works. MUS 635. 0VOICE (2-4) PR: CC. MUS 639-640. OPERA LITERATURE (4,4) A chronological study of the development and performance of opera from 1600

PAGE 72

226 OCEANOGRAPHY to the present time. Special emphasis will be placed on the technical, stylistic, and performance aspects of opera. MUS 645. 0WOODWIND INSTRUMENTS (2-4) PR: CC. Sec 002, 004 Clarinet-Saxophone; S e c 102, 104 Flute; Sec 202, 204 Oboe; Sec 302, 304 Bassoon. MUS 646-647. ACOUSTICS (3,3) Required of music theory majors. Study of the nature and transmis s ion of sound, the hearing process, tuning, and t e mp e rament. Includ e s principl e s of electronic sound reproducers and basic concepts of architectural acoustics. MUS 655. 0BRASS INSTRUMENTS (2-4) PR: CC. Sec 002, 004 French Hom; Sec 102, 104 Low Brass; Sec 202, 204 Trumpet. MUS 665. 0PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS (2-4) PR: CC. MUS 671. STUDIO TEACHING SEMINAR (3) PR: Graduate standing in applied music and CI. Emphasis on techniques used in teaching the individual student in applied mus ic. MUS 675. 00RGAN (2-4) PR: CC. MUS 681. DIRECTED STUDY (1-9) PR: CC. Independent graduate studies in the various areas of music arts. Course of study and credits must be assigned prior to registration. May be repeat e d for credit. MUS 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (2) PR: CC. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits MUS 698. M. M. RECITAL (3) PR: CC. MUS 699. M. M. THESIS (3) PR: CC. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. OCEANOGRAPHY (Interdisciplinary) Faculty: Briggs, chairman; Betz, Bloch, Dawes, DeWitt, Flynn, Fri e dl, Griffin, Hopkins, Humm, Lawr e nce, D. Martin, Ross, Simon, Taft, Wag n e r. OGY 3ll. INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (3) A survey of modem oceanography and its methods, i ncluding the import a nt features of physical, chemical biological, and geological oceano g raphy. OGY 521. CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (4) PR: CHM 213 and CI. The ocean as a chemical syst e m, including compo s ition physical-chemical aspects, role of nutrients, trace metals, interaction betw ee n bottom and overlying water, modem methods of analysis in routine use in oceanography. lee-lab. OGY 531. GEOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (4) PR: Graduate standing or CI. An introduction to the physical, historical sedi mentary, and structural geology of the ocean basins and their borders. lee-lab. OGY 541. PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (4) PR: Graduate standing or CI, Phy 225. The world ocean including its mor phology, physical properties, currents, waves, tides, heat budget, and relat e d topics. lee-lab. OGY 551. BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (4) PR: Graduate standing or CI, BIO 201-203. The study of life in the sea with special reference to distribution, reproduction, adaptation, competition, and populations. lee-lab.

PAGE 73

PHILOSOPHY 227 During 4th quarter (1969) at the St. Petersburg Campus of the University, the following marine field courses will be offered: ZOO 519, 523, 533, 546, 547, 614; BOT 543; and OGY 521, 531, 541 (course descriptions are given under Zoology, Botany, Geology, and Oceanography). OFFICE ADMINISTRATION Faculty: D. C. Sleeper, chairman; C. Vanover, F. Chappel OAD 141. INTRODUCTORY TYPEWRITING (2) For students with no previous instruction in typewriting Basic skills of type writing for personal use, common types of business letters, manuscripts, reports and tabulated materials. OAD 142. INTERMEDIATE TYPEWRITING (2) PR: OAD 141 or equivalent. Development of speed and accur a cy; introduces skill-building procedures in production typewriting. OAD 143. ADVANCED TYPEWRITING (2) PR: OAD 141, 142 or equivalent. Expands typewriting skills and applications and production of mailable transcripts. OAD 251. INTRODUCTORY SHORTHAND (4) Introduction to basic skills and vocabulary in Gregg Shorthand. OAD 252. INTERMEDIATE SHORTHAND (3) PR: OAD 251, and 141, 142, or equivalent of each. Review of basic skill and vocabulary and emphasis on dictation speeds. OAD 253. ADV AN CED SHORTHAND AND DICTATION (3) PR: OAD 252 and 142 143, or equivalent. Continued development of basic skills and vocabulary and emphasis on dictation speeds. OAD 351. ADVANCED SHORTHAND TRANSCRIPTION (3) PR: OAD 253 and 143, or equivalent of each. Increased dictation speed and transcription of mailable business communications. OAD 353 OFFICE ADMINISTRATION (3) Function of the business office, including planning for office equipment and supplies, actuating office employees, controlling the work of the office and principles of office organization. OAD 361. BUSINESS MACHINES (4) PR: OAD 141 or equivalent. Instruction and practice in the use and functions of calculating and secretarial machines in today's business office. OAD 461. SECRETARIAL PROCEDURES (4) PR: Senior standing. Development of executive secretarial concepts, instruction and practice in various office duties such as records, control, handling mail, arranging itineraries and telephone techniques. PHILOSOPHY Faculty: Gould, chairman; Carrier, Chen, Miller, Morris (visiting), Truitt. PHI 111. GREAT PHILOSOPHERS OF THE WESTERN WORLD (2) Lectures and discussions of the great philosoph ers since Plato, focusing on particular ) problems. PHI 301. PROBLEMS OF PHILOSOPHY (4) An introduction to the major philosophical problems in methodology, philosophy of science, philosophy of r e ligion and epistemo logy as seen in the writings of Plato, Des ca rtes, B e rkeley, Hum e James, etc.

PAGE 74

228 PHILOSOPHY PHI 303. LOGIC (5) Language analysis and classical and modern formal logic, including the logic of classes and propositions, and discussion of philo sop hical issues. PHI 304. SCIENTIFIC METHOD (4) Probability, inductive inference, the hypoth e tico-deductive method, experimenta tion, and selected topics in the philosophy of science. PHI 311. FOUNDATIONS OF PHILOSOPHY (4) An introduction to the major philosophical problems in ethics, political and social theory, aesthetics, and metaphysics as seen in the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Mill, Sarte, Kant, Kierkegaard, etc. PHI 321. ETHICS (4) An examination of the writing of the philosoph e rs: Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Sartre, etc. about moral problems and principles. PHI 333. ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY (4) A survey of philosophy from Thales through the medieval writ e rs. PHI 334. RENAISSANCE AND MODERN PHILOSOPHY (4) A survey of philosophy from the Renaissance through Kant. PHI 335. RECENT PHILOSOPHY (4) A survey of philosophy from Kant through 19th century philosophy. PHI 377. SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY (4) An analysis of rival theories of social order and the ir philosophical foundations. PHI 381. DIRECTED STUDY (1-5) PR: CI. Individual study directed by a faculty m ember. Approval slip from instructor required. PHI 383. SELECTED TOPICS (1-5) PR: CI. Selected topics according to the needs of the student. Approval slip from instructor required. PHI 405. CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY (4) PR: 12 hours or CI. Selected schools of 20th century thought such as idea lism, positivism, pragmatism, realism, and existentialism. PHI 411. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (4) Analysis of religious experience and activity and examination of principal religious ideas in light of modem philosophy. PHI 413. AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY (4) Major traditions in American thought-Puritanism, the Enlightenment, Trans cendentalism, Idealism, Pragmatism, and Analytic Philosophy-in r e lation to Amer ican culture. PHI 415. PLATO AND ARISTOTLE (4) PR: 8 hours or CI. A study of the two great Greek philosophers. The examina tion of Plato will include the dialogues Protagoras, Gorgias, Meno, R epu bli c; while the readings in Aristotle will be taken from the Nicornachean Ethics and the Politics. PHI 425. KANT (4) PR: 8 hours or CI. Lectures and discussions of Kant's philosophy, especially The Critique of Pure Reason. PHI 453. EPISTEMOLOGY (4) PR: PHI 301. An examination of human knowledge, its scope and limits, and an evaluation of evidence, criteria of truth, the nature of belief, conditions for meaningfulness, theories of perception and a study of memory and sens e perception in the four major fields of nature, history, personal experience and the a priori. PHI 461. ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3) A survey of political philosophy from 6 B.C. until 1600 A.D., including a n examination of the ethical, metaphysical, and epistemological bases of these philosophies.

PAGE 75

PHILOSOPHY 229 PHI 463. MODERN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3) A survey of political philosophy from 1600 A.D. until 1900 A.D., including an examination of the ethical, metaphysical, and epistemological bases of these philosophies. PHI 4.65. CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3) A survey of political philosophy in the 20th century, including an examination of the ethical, metaphysical and epistemological bases of these philosophies. PHI 481. DIRECTED STUDY (1-5) PR: CI. Individual study directed by a faculty member. Approval slip from instructor required. PHI 483. SELECTED TOPICS (1-5) PR: CI. S e lected topics according to the needs of the senior students. Approval slip from instructor requir e d. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS PHI 507. PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (4) PR: 8 hours or CI. The n ature and functions of science; the logic of scientific method; clarification of such concepts as cause, law, theory, probability, determin i sm, simplicity, technology. PHI 509. SYMBOLIC LOGIC (4) PR: PHI 303 or CI. Mathematical treatment of formal logic, including methods of proof, quantification, the logic of relations, and an introduction to properties of deductive systems. PHI 511. PHILOSOPHY OF LAW (4) PR: 8 hours or CI. The nature and function of law, relations between law, morality and metaphysics, logic of legal reasoning, analysis of fundam en tal concepts and institutions. PHI 521. CONTEMPORARY CONTROVERSIES IN PHILOSOPHY OF RELI-GION (4) PR: PHI 411 or CI. A survey of contemporary philosophical probl ems in religion such as demythologizing, falsification, and the meaning and justifi ca tion of key concepts, e.g. God, immortality, faith, etc. PHI 522. AESTHETICS (4) Consideration of the traditional problems of aesthetics from more contemporary perspectives including structural analysis, problems in hi sto ri ca l analysis, the sociology of art and the psychology of art. Students are urged to also take FNA 543 Comparative Art s / Issu es in Creativity as an elective. The combination of these two courses is a de sira bl e approa ch to knowledge PHI 531. PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE (4) PR: 8 hours of philosophy, major in linguistics or CI. An exa mination of semanti cal, syntactical and functional th eories of language with special at t en tion given to the problems of meaning, linguistic reference, syntactical fonn and the r e la tion between scientific lan guages and ordinary linguistic usage. PHI 543. PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY (4) PR : 8 hours of philosophy, major in history or CI. A systematic study of historical th eo ries and of the methods of historical explanation. An examination of clas s ical th eo ries from Vico through Herder, Hegel, Marx down to Sp e ngler and Toynb ee etc. PHI 571. SEMINAR IN EPISTEMOLOGY I (3) PR: Major in phil osop hy or ps ycho lo gy an d Ci. PHI 572. SEMINAR IN EPISTEMOLOGY II (3) PR: Major in philosophy, or social science and CI.

PAGE 76

230 PHYSICAL EDUCATION PHI 573. SEMINAR IN METAPHYSICS (3) PR : Major in philosophy or CI. A consid e rati o n of th e the ory of r e ality. PHI 574. SEMINAR IN METAPHYSICS II (3) PR: Major in philosophy or CI. Cosmolo gy PHI 575. SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY ETHICS (3) A study of the central figues and doctrines in Cont e mporary Ethics. PHI 581. DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) PR : CI. Individual study directed by a faculty mamb e r. Appro v al slip from instructor required. PHI 583. SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) PR: CI. Selected topics according to the needs of the stud e nt. Appro v al s lip from instructor required. PHI 585. RESEARCH (1-3) PR: CI. Individual research supervised by a faculty member. Approval sli p fr o m instructor required. PHI 591. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY (3) A study of one or more of the central figures or movements in the Hi st or y o f Philosophy. PHYSICAL EDUCATION-Basic Fac ulty: W Bemer, R. Bowers, N Butl e r M. J. Chea th a m, R Grin dey, R. Heesch e n, G H e rtz, D Holcomb, A. Jonaitis, P Ortw e in, S. Prath er, S. T ay l o r H. Wright, J. Young. Abbreviations: (C) coeducational; (M) m e n; (W) wom e n. PEB 101. FUNCTIONAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION (O) Prere quisite to all courses exc ept B egi nning Swimmin g Str esse s import a n c e of optimum fitn ess for daily living and provid es e xpe ri e n ces dir e ct e d toward a better unde r s tanding of physical activity and its rel a tionship to the indi v idual. Evalu a tion of physical fitness. PEB 102-129. TEAM SPORTS, CONDITIONING, DANCE, RECREATION (0) Funda mental exp e rien c es in team and g roup a c tivities. P h ysic al conditionin g and self-e xpression through team competition, rhythmic acti v iti e s and r e cr e ati o n a l skills. 102 BASKETBALL AND VOLLEYBALL (M) (W) 106 FIELD HOCKEY AND TRACK & FIELD (W) 112 SOFTBALL AND VOLLEYBALL (M) (W) 113 SOCCER AND SPEEDBALL (M) (W) 116 SPECIAL CONDITIONING (M) (W) Req uir e d of those falling b e low th e 25th p e rc e ntil e on mot o r fitn ess. 119 FOLK AND SQUARE DANCE (C) R ec omm e nd e d for elem enta ry edu ca tion m a jors. 122 SOCIAL DANCE (C) 126 "BEGINNING RIDING (C) 129 PROFICIENCY (content to be certified by Ph y sical Education Divi s ion) PEB 130-149. AQUATIC SPORTS (O) Essential aquati c skills and knowledge s v it a l to individual and gro up s urviv a l, safety and r ec re a ti o n. 130 BEGINNING SWIMMING (C) 132 INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING (C) Additional fe e is r e quir e d for these cour ses

PAGE 77

134 ADV AN CED SWIMMING (C) 136 LIFE SAVING (C) 138 SCUBA DIVING (C) 140 WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTION (C) 142 SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING (C) 144 CANOEING AND SAILING (C) PHYSICS 231 149 PROFICIENCY (content to b e certified by Phy sical Education Division) PEB 150-180. INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL ACTIVITIES (0) Basic instruction in recreational sports, fundam e ntal sport skills individual d e velopment and acquisition of d a nce techniques and skills Developm ent of desirable levels of strength, endurance, agility, balance and poise. 150 ARCHERY (C) 152 BADMINTON (C) 156 BOWLING (C)0 158 FENCING (C) 160 GOLF (C) 164 HANDBALL AND PADDLEBALL (C) 168 TENNIS (C) 169 WRESTLING (M) 170 GYMNASTICS (C) 178 WEIGHT TRAINING (M) 179 PROFICIENCY (content to be certified by Physical Education Division) PHYSICS Fac ulty: Ol e son, ch a irm a n; Aubel, Bloch, Brooker, Clapp, Deans, Flynn, Forman Kendall, Krus c hwitz, R. Mitchell, Turbeville. PHY 211-212. GENERAL PHYSICS (3:1) First quarter of g e neral physics and lab for science students. Must be taken concurrently. PHY 213-214. GENERAL PHYSICS (3:1) PR : PHY 211-212 S e cond qua rter of general physics and lab for science stud e nts. Must be taken c oncurr e ntly. PHY 215-216. GENERAL PHYSICS (3:1) PR: PHY 211-212. Third quarter of general physics and lab for science students. Must be t a ke n c on c urrently. PHY 221-222. GENERAL PHYSICS (3:1) PR: MTH 203. Firs t quarter of ge neral phy s ics and lab for physics majors and e ngin ee ring stude nts. Mu s t b e t a ken concurrently. PHY 223-224. GENERAL PHYSICS (3:1) PR: PHY 221 2 2 2 CR: MTH 303. Second quarter of general physics and lab for p hysics ma j o r s an d e ngine e ring s tud e nts. Mu s t be tak e n concurrently. PHY 225-226. G E NERAL PHYSICS (3:1) P R : PHY 2 2 1-2 22 CR: MTH 303. Third quarter of general phy s ics and l a b for physic s m ajo r s and e n g in e erin g s tudents. Mu s t be taken concurrently. PHY 305. THERMODYNAMICS (3) PR: MTH 305 and e ith e r pre r e qui s ite PHY 225 or corequisite PHY 315. H ea t th e kin e tic th eory o f gase s th e l a w s of th e rmodyn a mics and introdu c tion to s t atist i cal m e c h anics. Firs t qua rter of the se quence PHY 305-405. PHY 307 M ECHAN ICS I (3) C R : MTH 305 a nd ei th e r pre r eq ui s it e PHY 225 or cor e q uisi t e PHY 315. Kine0 Ad ditiona l fee is r e quir e d for th ese cour ses

PAGE 78

232 PHYSICS matics and dynamics of a particle, of a system of particles an d of a solid b ody. First quarte r of the sequen ce PHY 307-407-507. PHY 309. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM I (4) PR: MTH 305, PHY 341. Direct and alternating circuits, th e rmo e lectricity, in stru mentation, electrostatics, electrokinetics and l a boratory. First quarter of the seq uence PHY 309-409-509. PHY 315. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF PROBLEMS IN MECHANICS AND ELECTRICITY (3) PR: One year of non-calculus general physics. CR: MTH 305. A course designed for physics majors and engineering students who have t aken a non -ca l c ulus general physics course. Not open to students who take PHY 221 through 226 or equivalent. PHY 323. MODERN PHYSICS (4) PR: PHY 225 or CR PHY 315. CR: MTH 305. A cour se in modem physics for engineering students and suggested for physics majors. PHY 331. OPTICS (4) PR: CR: MTH 304. Reflection, refraction, disp e rsion, interference, diffraction, polarization and laboratory. PHY 341. INTERMEDIATE LABORATORY-GENERAL (1) CR: Physics course of 300 level or above. Experiments related to various areas of physics. PHY 371. CONTEMPORARY PHYSICS (3) PR: Junior standing. A qualitative investigation of physics, emphasizing its influ ence on life today. (No credit for physics majors.) PHY 405. KINETIC THEORY AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS (3) PR: PHY 305. Continuation of the sequence PHY 305-405. PHY 407. MECHANICS II (3) PR: PHY 307 and MTH 401. Continuation of the sequence PHY 307-407-507. PHY 409. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM II (3) PR: PHY 309 or CC. CR : MTH 401. Continuation of the sequ ence PHY 309409-509. PHY 421. SOLID STATE PHYSICS I (3) PR: PHY 323 and MTH 401. Molecular binding energy bands in solids, elec trical, thermal and m ag netic properties of solids, semi-conductors. PHY 437. QUANTUM MECHANICS I (3) PR: PHY 407, MTH 401 or CC. S c hrodinger's equation, one-dimensional po t e ntials, and the hydrogen atom First quarter of sequence PHY 437-537. PHY 441. ADVANCED LABORATORY (1) PR: PHY 341. Experim e nts related to nuclear physics. PHY 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-.6) PR: S e nior or advanced junior standing and CC. Individual experimental work under supervision of instructor. PHY 491. PHYSICS SEMINAR (1) PR: S e nior or advanced junior standing or CC. May be repe ate d once. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS PHY 501. NUCLEAR PHYSICS (3) PR: PHY 323 and MTH 401. Stable nuclei and isotopes, radioactivity, nuclear reactions, binding energies, fission and fu sio n. PHY 507. MECHANICS III (3) PR: PHY 407. Continuation of th e seq uen ce PHY 307-407-507. PHY 509. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM III (3) PR: PHY 409. Continuation of the sequence PHY 309-409-509. PHY 521. SOLID STATE PHYSICS II (3) PR: PHY 421. Continuation of the s e quence PHY 421-521.

PAGE 79

POLITICAL SCIENCE 233 PHY 523. ELECTRONICS (4) PR: PHY 409 and PHY 341. Vacuum and gas-discharge tubes and associate d circuits, electron dynamics, thermionic emission, space charge phenomena, el e c tronic circuit analysis and laboratory. PHY 537. QUANTUM MECHANICS II (3) PR: PHY 437. Continuation of the sequence PHY 437-537. PHY 551. MODERN PHYSICS (3) PR: PHY 215 or 225. Electron dynamics, X-rays, Bohr-Sommerfi e ld atom and photoelectricity (No credit for physics majors.). PHY 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICS (1-6) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and CC. Each topic is a course in directed study under the supervision of a faculty member. The following cours e s are contemplated: plasma physics, relativity and atomic and molecular structure, theoretical physics. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY PHY 601. ATOMIC SPECTRA (3) PR: PHY 437 or CC. Quantitative study of molecular, atomic, and nuclear struc ture and spectra. PHY 607. CLASSICAL MECHANICS I (3) PR: PHY 407 or CC. Review of vectors, tensors, and matrices; dynamics of particles and systems of particles; the equa tions of Hamilton and Lagrange; fluid mechanics. First quarter of the sequence PHY 607-608-609. PHY 608. CLASSICAL MECHANICS II (3) PR: PHY 607 or CC. Continuation of PHY 607-608-609. PHY 609. CLASSICAL MECHANICS ill (3) PR: PHY 608. Continuation of 607-608-609. PHY 631. ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY I (3) PR: PHY 409 or CC. Electrostatics and magnetostatics; potential and boundary value problems; Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves. First quarter of the sequence PHY 631-632-633. PHY 632. ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY II (3) PR: PHY 631 or CC. Continuation of PHY 631-632-633. PHY 633. ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY ill (3) PR: PHY 632. Continuation of PHY 631-632-633 PHY 637. QUANTUM MECHANICS ill (3) PR: PHY 437 or CC. The theory of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. PHY 641. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS (1) PR: Graduate standing. The practice of laboratory techniqu es. PHY 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-9) PR: CC. PHY 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICS (1-6) PR: CC. Each topic is a course in directed study under the supervision of a faculty m e mber. PHY 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (I) PHY 699. MASTER S THESIS (1-9) PR: PHY 641. POLITICAL SCIENCE Fac ulty: M. O'Donn e ll, chairman; S. Barber; E. Black; F. Horrigan ; R. Johnston; J. Jreisat; A. K e lley; D. Knab ; R. Nichols; M. Nwanze; J. Snook; W. Young.

PAGE 80

234 POLITICAL SCIENCE POL 199. INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE (4) A survey of the basic concepts in government and politics, theories and methods of political science and the American political syst e m as well as materials. POL 201. AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT (4) Basic principles and procedures of the Ame rican governmental system with em phasis on current issues and trends. POL 203. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (4) Analysis of the structure and function of state and l oca l gov e rnments, of the social and political influences that shape them, and of the dynamics of their administrative processes. POL 311. COMPARATIVE POLITICS (4) Analysis of p olitica l systems u sing the concepts and methods of comparative politics. Studies of selected countries will b e included. POL 331. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (4) Contemporary international affairs, including analysis of politics among nations; control of national foreign polici es, sovereignty, nationalism and diplomacy; technology, public opinion and war in international relations. POL 333. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION (4) The probl em of achieving peace through existing international structures, both within and outside the United Nations. The background, achievement and organi zational problems of these agencies. POL 341. POLITICAL PARTIES (4) PR: POL 201 or CI. The d eve lopment, structure, operation and significance of political parties in the American system of government POL 345. PRIVATE GROUPS AND PUBLIC POLICY (4) Role of non-party groups in the American society and their impact on public policy ; growth of interest groups, internal politics, and formation of public policy. POL 351. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (4) PR : Upper level standing. An examination of th e administrative principles and pro cesses by which public policies are implemented in a democratic society. POL 410. POLITICAL SYSTEMS OF SOUTHEAST ASIA (4) PR: Upper Level Standing. Comparative analysis of political systems and prac tic es in Southeast Asian countries with emphasis on the nature of nationali s m, political development and revolutionary process es in the region. POL 411. SOUTHEAST AND SOUTH ASIA IN WORLD POLITICS (4) Survey of international politics of Southeast and South Asia POL 415. MILITARY POWER IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS (4) PR: POL 331, Upper Level Standing or Cl. A study of the role of military power affecting war and peace in modem international politics Among the issues cover e d are, limit e d war, nuclear deterrence, balance of power, conventional war, guer rilla warfare, disarmament and nuclear proliferation POL 421. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF THE FAR EAST (4) D eve lopment of political ideas and institutions in J apan and China with emphasis on 20th century issues. POL 431-432. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (4, 4) The development of the United Stat es government through judicial interpretation of the Con s titution. Case study m etho d of analysis. POL 441. THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY (4) The presidency as an institution of American d e mocracy; constitutional status and pow e rs, administrative responsibiliti es, legi s l ative and political lead ership, decision-making process. POL 443. POLITICAL BEHAVIOR (4) PR: Upper l eve l s tanding and SSI 301 or Cl. Economic p syc h o lo gica l and social dim ensions of political behavior; political participation, l eadership and elites; political attit udes; voting b e havior and decision-making processes.

PAGE 81

POLITICAL SCIENCE 235 POL 445. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY (4) Analysis of the development and scope of United States foreign policy, focusing upon our aims, decision-making, application of policies, and alternatives for speci fied problem areas in foreign affairs. POL 453. URBAN GOVERNMENT (4) An introduction to the theory of urbanism, formal and informal structures that govern urban areas, new patterns and policy emphases of urban government. POL 454. URBAN POLITICS (4) PR: Upper level standing, POL 203 or equivalent. An examination of the political processes and systems in urban and suburban communities in America. POL 455. THE AMERICAN LEGISLATIVE PROCESS (4) Intensive analysis of the nature of the legislative process in the United States ; organization, procedure, leadership, relation with other governmental agencies, group tactics, decision-making process in the formation of policy. POL 457. PROBLEMS OF PUBLIC FISCAL ADMINISTRATION (4) PR: POL 351 or CI. Analysis of problems in the growth and development of public budgets with emphasis on principal techniques and theories of fiscal administration. POL 4.61. CLASSICAL POLITICAL IDEAS (4) PR: POL 199 or CI. Basic political ideas from the works of Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas and other leading Greek, Roman, and Medieval-Christian political philosophers. POL 462. CLASSICAL POLITICAL IDEAS (4) PR: POL 199 or CI. Basic political ideas from the works of Machiavelli, Bodin, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Burke, Benthem and other leading modem political philosophers. POL 463. AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT (4) PR: Upper level standing. American political thought from the Colonial period to the present with emphasis on recent contributions. POL 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-4) PR: 3.0 average in Political Science and CC. Investigation of some aspect of political science culminating in the preparation of an original research paper. POL 491. SENIOR SEMINAR (4) PR: Senior Standing and completion of all preceding core program in Political Science. Designed to give the student an opportunity to examine and apply various concepts and methods in the field of political science to some integrated problem area. A partial requirement for this course is the successful completion of a comprehensive examination over the core program. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS POL 520. ADMINISTRATION OF URBAN AFFAIRS (4) An analysis of the role of the administrator at the municipal level stressing the division of functions, policy formation, alternative governmental structures and their effect on administrative processes. POL 525. PROBLEMS OF PUBLIC PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION (4) An analysis of recruitment, testing, training, employee and human relations in the public service. POL 527. COMPARATIVE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (4) Comparison of certain aspects of public administrative systems of various govern ments, emphasizing such writers as Siffin, Hadari, Appleby, Hu, Simon and Riggs. POL 530. LEGAL AND REGULATORY PROCESSES (4) Systematic study of the political-judicial factors in the regulatory process of administrative agencies.

PAGE 82

236 POLITICAL SCIENCE POL 540. THE CHANGING SOUTH (4) The study of various phases of political systems in the southern states. POL 550. METHODOLOGICAL AND CONCEPTUAL PROBLEMS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS (4) Examination of problems and conc e pts in the study of comparative politics em phasizing theoretical and empirical relations, and relative advantages of diff erent l evels and units of comparative analysis POL 561. POLITICS OF THE DEVELOPING AREAS (4) An analysis of the ideologies, governm e ntal structures, and political processes of selected nations of the non-Western world. POL 571. FIELD WORK (4) PR: 3.0 average in Political Science and CI. Application of r e s e arch models now emp l oyed in governmental agencies; including d e veloping a structured research proposal, preparing a network program comprising the elements making up the proposal and a research p aper Designed to give the student practical experience in the administrative and political processes. POL 573. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF CONTEMPORARY AFRICA (4) PR: POL 311 or CI. D eve lo pmen t and growth of eme r ging African political systems and their relations with each other and with states outside of Africa. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY POL 600. SCOPE AND METHODS OF POLITICAL SCIENCE (4) Advanced study of the scope and methodologies of politi c al science, including their applications to different re searc h areas. POL 620. URBAN POLICY ANALYSIS (4) Systematic examination of the organizational and administrative characteristics of planning, program dev e lopment and reporting activities conducted a t lo ca l l eve ls by various state, regional, and federal agencies. POL 623. URBAN FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION (4) Examination of organization a l structure and administrative processes of urban fiscal agencies, sources of revenue, expenditur es and indebt e dness, and current problems in budgeting. POL 625. PROBLEMS IN URBAN POLITICS (4) Analysis in depth of pres sure group behavior and its role in municipal policy formulation, including the s tudy of community power approa c hes advanced by Rossi, S ofen, Karnmarer, Martin and others. POL 627. ADMINISTRATIVE BEHAVIOR AND PUBLIC POLICY FORMA TION (4) Analysis of the formal, informal and societal characteristics of public bureaucracies and their impact on public policy. POL 640. POLITICAL SOCIALIZATION (4) Seminar in se lect e d phases of the political socialization process. POL 643. CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL IDEAS AN BEHAVIOR (4) Study of certain phases of political phil osophy and theories of modem political analysis. POL 650. SEMINAR IN POLITICAL REVOLUTION AND CHANGE (4) Analysis of selected contemporary problems relating to political revolution and change. POL 660. SEMINAR IN DEMOCRATIC GOVERNMENTS AND POLITICS (4) Research into various phases of democratic governments and th e ir p o litical syst e ms. POL 661. SEMINAR IN TOTALITARIAN OR DICTATORIAL GOVERNMENTS AND POLITICS (4) Resear c h into various phases of totalitarian or dictatorial governmen ts and their political systems.

PAGE 83

PSYCHOLOGY 237 POL 6.65. SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND ADMINIS TRATION (4) Analysis of various phases of international organizations and their administrative systems. POL 667. SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (4) Investigation of selected phases of international r e lations in world politics. POL 670. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (4) Analysis of selected current problems in American government and politics. POL 675. SEMINAR IN URBAN PROBLEMS (4) Systematic analysis and evaluation of various problem areas of contemporary urban governments. POL 677. SEMINAR IN ADMINISTRATIVE PROCESS Analysis of various administrative processes emphasizing policy formulation / im plementation, programming, new concepts of management in a public service environment. POL 680. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (4) Study in depth of a special problem in political science approved by a thesis committee. POL 690. MASTER'S THESIS (1, 9) PSYCHOLOGY Faculty: Kimmel, chairman; Achenbach, Ball, Barnard, Clement, Dertke, Edwards, Hawkins, Hite, LaBarba, McKitrick, Merin, Mourer, Nelson, Schmidt, Sistrunk, Strong, Toth. PSY 201. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (4) A survey of major topics in psychology (learning, perception, thinking, intelligence, etc.), and an introduction to methods used in psychological investigation. PSY 213. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: CBS 201 or PSY 201. The application of psychological principles and th e functions of psychologists in education, government, industry, and clinical practic e PSY 311. RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 201 and SSI 301. Scientific research methods and their application to psychology, Topics include experimental planning, control procedures, and int e r pre tative principles. PSY 323. PERCEPTION (4) PR: PSY 201 and SSI 301. How man perceives his environment. Topics include s e nsory bases of perception, physical correlates of perceptual phenomena, and the effects of individual and social factors on perception. Primary emphasis on vision and audition. lee-lab. PSY 325. INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: SSI 301. Application of psychological principles to industry. Topics con sidered: Man-m a chine systems, development of skills, training, employee attitud es, worker motivation, accident prevention, fatigue and monotony, PSY 331. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 201. Behavior of the individual human being as affected by the social and c ultural influ e nces of s oc iety. lee-lab PSY 335. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT (4) PR : PSY 201. G e netic, org a nic and learned factors involved in the processes of pers onal adjustment; applications of m e ntal health principles to everyday living. PSY 341. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 201 or EDF 305. Developm e ntal and psychosocial aspects of childhood,

PAGE 84

238 PSYCHOLOGY including hereditary, maturational, p syc hologi ca l, and socia l d eterminants of child behavior. PSY 411. EXPERThlENTAL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS (4) PR: SSI 301 and PSY 3ll. Detailed coverage of those r esea r c h d esigns and statistica l techniques having the greatest utility for re searc h problems in psychol ogy. Emphasis upon topics from analysis of variance PSY 413. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING (4) PR: SSI 301. A consideration of the instruments for intellectual, achievement, and personality assessment including their applications, dev e lopm en t and potential abuses. Students may not receive credit for both PSY 413 and EDF 303 Intro duction to Measurement and Evaluation. PSY 431. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 433 or 335. A study of the classifications of variant behavior and some of the hypotheses used to explain such behavior. PSY 433. PERSONALITY (4) PR: 8 hours in PSY courses. M e thods and findings of personality theories and an evaluation of constitutional, biosocial, and psychological determinants of of personality. le e-lab. PSY 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-4) PR: Uupper division standing and CI. The student plans and conducts an individual research project under the supervisio n of a staff m embe r. May be repeated with a maximum of eight hours credit. PSY 485. DIRECTED READING (1-4) PR: Upper division standing and CI. A reading program of topics in psychology is conducted with the supervision of a psychology staff member. May be repeated with a maximum of eight hours credit. PSY 491. SENIOR SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: Senior standing and completion of the core program in psychology. Designed to give the advanced undergraduate student an opportunity to integrate con cepts within the field of psychology and relate these to other areas of study. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS PSY 501. PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 311 or CI. Gross neural and physiological components of behavior. Structure and function of the central nervous system as related to emotion, motivation, learning, and theory of brain functions. lee-lab. PSY 503. HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 311 plus three other upper l evel PSY cours es. The historical roots of modem psychological theories, investigation of the various schools of p syc hology such as behaviorism, Gestalt psychology, psychoanalysis, and phenom enologica l psychology. PSY 505. CONDITIONING AND INSTRUMENTAL LEARNING (4) PR: PSY 311. Survey of methods, empirical findings and theoretical interpre tation s in conditioning and instrumental l earning. lee-l ab. PSY 506. VERBAL LEARNING AND INFORMATION PROCESSING (4) PR: PSY 311. Survey of methods, empirical findings and theoretical interpreta tions of verbal le arning and retention, concept learning and information process ing. lee-lab. PSY 507. SENSORY PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 201. The structure and function of the sensory systems and attendant peripheral nervou s system with regard to their d etermination of the behavioral capacity of organisms. PSY 508. AUDITION (4) PR: CI. Theories of h ea ring Theoretical principles and developments relating to hearing and its disorders.

PAGE 85

PSYCHOLOGY 239 PSY 509. COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 201. The study of the evolution of behavior, similarities and differences in capacities for environmental adjustment and for behavioral organization among the important types of living beings, from plants and unicellular organisms to the primates including man. PSY 523. ADV AN CED INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY I (4) PR: PSY 325 or CI. Application of psychological principles, r esea rch, and re search methods to the problem of business and industry; work methods, fatigue, job analysis, selection and trainin g, p erfo rmance me a surement. PSY 524. ADV AN CED INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY Il (4) PR: PSY 523 or CI. Application of psychological principles, research and re search methods to the problem of business and industry: leadership, motivation and morale, communication, job environment, interviewing. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY PSY 601, 602. RESEARCH METHODS I & Il (5, 5) Two-quarter sequence designed to cover research methods and strategies and thei r application to psychology. Topics include theory of measurement de sig n and analysis of experiments, inference. PSY 603. PERCEPTION (5) Consideration of the physiological and psychological variables in perception. Review of the effect of motivataion and other factors on perception. Study of perception theories. PSY 605. PERSONALITY THEORY (5) R ev iew of approaches to the development of p e rsonality theories and con side ration in depth of Freudian psychology and other personality theories in fluencing modem psy c hological thought. PSY 606. ADV AN CED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) PR: CI. Review and evaluation of the content and theory of social psychology, emphasizing the integration of diverse content within the major theoretical systems. PSY 608. EXPERIMENTAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) PR: CI. Analysis and laboratory experience in research methods of social psychology, with particular consideration of attitude measurement, systematic observational methods, sociometrics, stimulation of social behavior, interviewing, and content analysis. l ee -lab. PSY 609. MOTIVATION AND EMOTION (5) A detailed examination of human moti va tion and emotion from both the phy s io logical and psychological viewpoints. Emphasis will be given to current resear c h. PSY 610. OPERANT BEHAVIOR (5) PR: CI. Review of the basic literature of operant conditioning and major areas of research and application. Supervised laboratory experience in pro gramming basic schedules of reinforcement. PSY 611. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (5) Exploration of current approaches to the understanding of pathological behavior and implications for theories of personality. A survey of treatment methods is includ e d. PSY 613. BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS OF CHILDREN (5) C a usative factors in b e havior deviations common to children and adolescents. Thorough study of selected childhood mental disorders and a survey of ameliora tive techniques for treating childhood behavi or difficulties. Stude nts may not receive credit for both PSY 613 and EDS 513 Behavior Disorders in the Schools PSY 615. PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT (5) PR: PSY 617. Interview, case hi s tory, obj ec ti ve and proj ec tive tests are surveyed

PAGE 86

240 RELIGIOUS STUDIES together with a critical review of the history and th e ory of as sess m ent. Special consideration is given to study of interrelations between res ea r c h, diagnostic data, and personality theory. PSY 617. INDIVIDUAL INTELLIGENCE TESTING (5) History and objectives of intelligence testing. Methods used in the construction of individual intelligence tests. Intensive experience in the admini s t ra tion and interpretation of the Wechsler tests, Stanford-Binet, and Grace Arthur te sts. Students may not receive credit for both PSY 617 and EDF 617 M ea surement Individual Intelligence. PSY 619. INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY (5) Examination of theory and practices in counseling and psychotherapy. The role of the counselor and the nature of the therapeutic relationship is emph a sized. Professional and ethical issues are considered. PSY 620. SUPERVISED RESEARCH (1-5) Consent of instructor and department chairman May be repeated for cr e dit. The student works in close collaboration with a faculty member in designing, conducting and interpreting experiments. PSY 650. ELECIROPHYSIOLOGICAL METHODS (5) PR: PSY 501 or 507. Introduction to the use of electrophysiological methods in phychological research. This will involve actual experience in use of oscillo scopes, polygraphs, EEG techniques, sterotaxic procedure, stimulation and lesioning techniques, use of microtome, and staining and mounting of tissue sections. lee-lab. PSY 682. PRACTICUM IN PHYCHOLOGY (5) Supervised observation and training in various community and university clinic, research and / or industrial settings. PSY 689. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN LEARNING (5) May be repeated for credit. PSY 690. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN PERCEPTION (5) May be repeated for credit. PSY 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) May be repeated for credit. PSY 692. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) May be repeated for cr e dit. PSY 693. GRADUATE SEMINAR ON ISSUES IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) May be repeated for credit. PSY 694. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) May be repeated for credit. PSY 695. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN PERSONALITY (5) May be repeated for credit. PSY 696. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN COGNITIVE PROCESSES (5) May be repeated for credit PSY 697. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN QUANTITATIVE METHODS (5) May be repeated for cr e dit. PSY 698. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) May be rep e ated for cr e dit. PSY 699. THESIS A study in depth of a problem in psychology approved by a th esis committee. Student stands an oral examination on the thesis. RELIGIOUS STUDIES Faculty: Deer, a c ting chainnan ; G es sman, Gould, Smith. REL 310. OLD TESTAMENT STUDIES (4) An introduction to the critical study of the Old Testament against the bac kgrounds

PAGE 87

RUSSIAN 241 of the ancient Near East, emphasizing the history and religion of the Hebrew people. REL 315. NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES (4) An introduction to the critical study of the New Testament in the context of the first century A.D. Stress is placed upon the Gospel accounts of the life and teachings of Jesus, Paul's interpretations of faith and problems faced by the early Christian movement. REL 325. HISTORY OF JUDAISM (4) The historical development of Judaism and its ideas from Biblical time to the 20th century with emphasis on its formative years from the Great Prophets to the close of the Talmud. REL 327. HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY (4) The historical development of Christianity, its ideas and institutions, from New Testament time to the present REL 350. WORLD RELIGIONS (5) An introduction to the ideas and institutions of some of the major religions of the world, such as Hinduism, Janaism, Buddhism, Islam, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto. REL 383. SELECTED TOPICS (credits vary) PR: CI. Course contents depend on students' need and instructor's interesl REL 385. DIRECTED READINGS (credits vary) PR: CI. Individual guidance in concentrated reading on a selected topic. REL 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (credits vary) PR: Junior standing and CI. Individual investigations and faculty supervision. REL 483. SELECTED TOPICS (credits vary) PR: Junior standing and CI. Course contents depend on students' need and instructor's interest. REL 583. SELECTED TOPICS (credits vary) PR: Senior standing and CI. Course contents depend on students' need and instructor's interest. ROMANCE LANGUAGES Faculty: Milani, Neugaard. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ROM 517. ROMANCE PHILOLOGY (3) The phonological-lexical development of the Romance languages from Vulgar Latin to modem times, with special emphasis on French, Italian and Spanish. ROM 518. ROMANCE PHILOLOGY (3) PR: ROM 517. The morphological-syntactical changes of the Romance languages, with special attention to French, Italian and Spanish. ROM 583. SELECTED TOPICS (2-5) PR: Senior standing and CI. Course contents depend on students' need a nd instructor's interest. RUSSIAN Faculty: Artzybushev, Sokolsky, Suchovy. Basic courses listed under Basic Studies. BUS 221. SCIENTIFIC RUSSIAN (4) Primarily for students majoring in science or those desiring help in learning to read texts and research material in a specialized field.

PAGE 88

242 RUSSIAN RUS 301. ADVANCED COMPOSITION (4) To improve the student's ability in reading and writing Russian; practice in free and fixed composition. RUS 303. ADVANCED CONVERSATION AND PRONUNCIATION (4) To de velo p fluency and correctness in spoken Russian. RUS 305. SURVEY OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE (3) D evelopment of Russian lit erature from the Elev enth century to the Eighteenth century. RUS. 306. SURVEY OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE (3) From the Eighteenth century to N. V. Gogol. RUS 307. SURVEY OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE (3) From N. V Gogol to present. RUS 383. SELECTED TOPICS (varied) Course content d epends upon student demand and instructor's int e rest. RUS 483. SELECTED TOPICS (varied) PR: CI. Junior standing. Course content depends upon student demand and instructor's interest. RUS 491. SENIOR SEMINAR (3) Study in depth of a specific writer or literary movement as chosen by the instructor. Individual research required of students. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS PR: Rus 305, 306, 307 RUS 515. HISTORY OF THE RUSSIAN LANGUAGE (3) Changes in Rus sia n morphology, syntax, phonetics and style. RUS 516. HISTORY OF THE RUSSIAN LANGUAGE (3) PR: RUS 515. Continuation of RUS 515. RUS 541. RUSSIAN DRAMA OF THE 19TH CENTURY (3) Griboyedor, Pushkin, Ostrovsky, Tolstoy, Turgenev and Chekhov. RUS 542. RUSSIAN POETRY OF THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURY (3) Clas sical Russian poetry of the 19th century and n e w po e tic movements of the 20th ce ntury (symbolism, acmeism, futuri sm). RUS 551. RUSSIAN NOVEL OF THE 19TH CENTURY (3) Study of the works of Gogol, Turgenev and Goncharov. RUS 552. RUSSIAN NOVEL OF THE 19TH CENTURY (3) Life an d works of Leo N. Tolstoy. RUS 553. RUSSIAN NOVEL OF THE 19TH CENTURY (3) Life and major nov els of F. M. Dostoyevsky. RUS 561. RUSSIAN LITERATURE 1880-1917 (3) Lectures, reading and analysis of the works of A. P. Chekhov and Maxim Gorky. RUS 562. RUSSIAN LITERATURE 1880-1917 (3) Lectur es, reading and analysis of the works of A. I. Kuprin, L. N. Andreyev, D. S. Merezhkovsky and I. A. Bunin RUS 563 RUSSIAN SOVIET LITERATURE (3) Revolutionary and post-revolutionary Soviet lit era ture including V V. May ankovsky, A. N. Tolstoy, A. Serafimovich, A A. Fadeev, N. A. Ostrovsky and L. M. L eo nov. RUS 564. RUSSIAN SOVIET LITERATURE (3) Literary works of M. M. Zoschenko, M. A. Sholokhov, B. L. Pasternak, A. Sol zhenitsyn and oth ers. RUS 583. SELECTED TOPICS (var.) The content of the course will be gove rned by student d emand and instruc tor intere s t It will examine in depth a recurring literary theme or the work of a small group of writers.

PAGE 89

SOCIAL SCIENCES 243 SOCIAL SCIENCES (Interdisciplinary) Faculty: Orr, Chairman; E. Allen, Amade, Bosserman, Dertke, Fenelon, Frantz, Fuson, Jreisat, M. Kaplan, Kutcher, Nelson, N esman Nwanze, Rothwell, Selig sohn, R. Stevenson, Strong, Swanson, Wheeler, Winthrop. SSI 301. SOCIAL SCIENCE STATISTICS (4) Topics selected from the following: measures of central tendency and vari ability probability and the normal curve, correlations, curve fitting, scale and index number theory, polling, interview and survey techniques, content analysis. Students who successfully complete this course may not also receive credit for either ECN 331 Business and Economic Statistics or MTH 345 Introductory Statistics. SSI 3ll. COMMUNICATION (4) The theories, modes and process e s of communi ca tion, its history as an instrument of social change and its role in human behavior. SSI 315. PUBLIC OPINION AND PRESSURE MECHANISM (4) The content and formation of public opinion, properti e s of opnnons and attitudes, and the principles and mechanisms of their formation and change. SSI 321. HUMAN RELATIONS AND PRODUCTIVITY (4) Topics to be selected from the following: the relation of science, technology, resources, energy and population change to social, economic, cultural and political change; social implications of research findings from the social, behavioral and management sciences. SSI 325. PSYCHOLOGY AND THE SOCIAL ORDER (4) Topics to be selected from the following: the quest for personal identity in modem mass society, the problems of mass culture and mass education, the probl e ms of alienation and anomie in the 20th century, psychological factors in political and industrial conflict, man versus the machine in modem life. AREA STUDIES The following four courses (SSI 341, 343, 345 and 347), dealing with one or more countries of a given region, will select and emphasize subject matter from the following topics: its history, its people and their cultures, its social psychology and national charact e ri s tics, its resources, its economic and industrial characteristics, its literature, religion and dominant values, its political framework and ciutlook, its social structure, and its current problems. Each course may be r epeated once when countries of concentration vary, but the same country may not be repeated for credit. SSI 341. LATIN AMERICA (4) SSI 343. ASIA (4) SSI 345. AFRICA (4) SSI 347. THE MIDDLE EAST (4) SSI 361. COMMUNISM IN THE MODERN WORLD (4) An interdisciplinary approach to the n a tur e of Communism, its philosophic bases, its anti-religious bias, its economic, social and political th eo ries and practices, the arts and sciences under Communi s t ideology, its conduct of foreign affairs and associated programs and techniques. Emphasis will be on Soviet and Chinese Communism. SSI 4ll. SOCIAL ISSUES OF OUR TIME (4) Topics to be selected from the following: automation and cybernation and the social problems they generate; special problems of a technological civilization; the implications of changing social patterns of Western culture and oppor tunities for social r e -con s truc tion.

PAGE 90

244 SOCIOLOGY SSI 413. LEISURE IN SOCIETY (4) Facts and trends of changing leisure-tim e patterns in the USA and other countries; various conceptualizations of l e i sure; r elationships of non-work time to work attitudes, personality, family, community, sub -cultur es, religion, value systems, social class, and the functions of government. SSI 415. COMMUNITY PLANNING (4) Topics to be selected from the following: varied concepts of community; enviromental, social, psychological, economic and medi ca l problems accom panying large-scale urbanization; objectives, methods and technologies for com munity pl a nning. SSI 449. THE EMERGING NATIONS (4) This cour se examines the processes and problems involved wh e n an under developed country seeks to d eve lop a modem indu stria l civilization. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS SSI 503. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN CULTURE (4) A social analysis of the leading characteristics, id ea ls, and values of American life An effor t will be made to deal with a variety of co nt exts in which American cultural themes, standards and practices re ce ive expression. SSI 505. SOCIAL VALUES AND SOCIAL ORDER (4) Topics to be se l ected from th e following: the va lu epatterns of modem socie ti es; social bases for a world order; the aims and functions of so c ial planning; international transformation created by science and technology. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY SSI 601. SOCIAL PATHOLOGY (4) An examination of the variety of social criticism which has been l eve led at Western society and of some of the defenses whi c h have be e n made in its b ehalf Materials will b e chosen from several of the socia l sciences SOCIOLOGY Faculty: R. Wheeler, chairman; R. Burton, G. F einberg, W. F e n e lon, R Gagan, B. Gunter, L. Kutcher, E. Nesman, T. Stine, J. Williams. SOC 201. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (4) Nature and application of sociological concepts, th eo rie s and m e thods; ana l ysis of societies, associations and groups; social proc esses and social change. SOC 251. MARRIAGE (4) Study of pre-marital and marital relation s Social cu ltural and personal factors related to success and failure in mate sel ectio n and marriage. SOC 261. SOCIAL PROBLEMS (4) Descriptive and analytical consideration of major social probl e ms in modern industrial societies, with emphasis on American society. SOC 301. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WELFARE (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI. The historical and contemporary development of or ganized social services and institutions to m ee t human needs. SOC 321. SOCIAL INVESTIGATION (4) PR: SOC 201, SSl 301. Methods and techniques of social r esea rch. D es ign of sociological studies, collection of d a ta, and interpretation of results. SOC 331. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 201 or SOC 201. B ehavior of the individual human being as affected by social and cultural influences of modem society

PAGE 91

SOCIOLOGY 245 SOC 341. SOCIAL ORGANIZATION (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI. Social organization in the broad e st sen s e, includin g institutions and associations, as w e ll a s variations in role and status. SOC 345. SOCIAL STRATIFICATION (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI. Social status and social stratification, social class as a fa c tor in behavior, social mobility. SOC 351. THE FAMILY (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI. Principles of family organization, socia l adjustment and control. Maturation, socialization and stability of the family. SOC 371. RACIAL AND ETHNIC RELATIONS (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI. Comparative study of interracial relations, social tensi o ns, attitudes, and modes of adjustment in various areas of the world. SOC 373. SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI. Types, sources and functions of religious b e ha v ior Religious behavior of individuals and groups in relation to other asp ects of personality and culture. SOC 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-4) PR: Four courses in sociology, including SOC 321, upper division standing or CI. Content and method dependent upon interests and competence of the student. SOC 491. SENIOR SEMINAR (4) For seniors majoring in sociology or other social sciences. Major issu e s in sociology, stressing theory and research. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS SOC 505. COMMUNITY WELFARE RESOURCES (4) PR: SOC 301 or CI; upper division standing Emphasis upon voluntary pro grams and their development, planning and coordination. SOC 515. FOUNDATIONS OF THEORY (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. Consideration of selected theories of sociology and procedures of systematic theory construction. SOC 531. SOCIAL INTERACTION (4) PR : SOC 331, or PSY 331, or CI; upper division standing Theory and research, including interpersonal influence, complex behavior, role, conflict, and social situ ational factors. SOC 533. COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. Study of the development of group and mass behavior-crowds, social movements. SOC 535. SOCIOLOGY OF SMALL GROUPS (4) PR: SOC 201 or Cl; upper division standing. Theory of small group structure, mechanics of int e raction, observation of small groups. SOC 541. SOCIAL CHANGE (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. Major theories of social and cultural change, and mechanisms of change in various societies. SOC 543. URBAN SOCIOLOGY (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. The social structure of the community in modem industrial societies. Analysis of selected aspects of community c hange SOC 553. SOCIOLOGY OF THE ARTS (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. The creation distribution and use of arts from a sociological perspective; the social roles involved. SOC 561. CRIMINOLOGY (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; uppe r division standing. Etiology of criminal behavior; law enforcement, crime in the Unted States; penology and prevention.

PAGE 92

246 SPANISH SOC 563. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing Theories of d e linquency as a social product, individual factors, p a tterns of delinqu ent behav ior, methods of control and treatment. SOC 571. POPULATION (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. Sociologic a l dete rminants of fertility, mortality, and migration; theories of population change. SOC 575. INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper divi s ion standin g Interactio n communication and authority in economic organizations; the factory as a social system. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY SOC 611. CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY (4) PR: Undergraduate course in sociological theory or Cl. Emphasizes l ogica l and conceptual dimensions of theory and theory construction. SOC 621. METHODS OF RESEARCH (4) PR: Course in Social Investig a tion or CI. Logic and practice of research; problems of observation and data coll ec tion, data proces s ing, and evaluation SOC 623. SOClOLOGICAL STATISTICS (5) PR: SSI 301 or CI. Logic and application of parametric and nonparametric statistical analysis for sociological d ata. SOC 631. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY SEMINAR (4) PR: Course in Social Psychology or CI. Stres ses contemporary development s in social psychological theory and empirical res e ar c h. SOC 641. COMMUNITY ANALYSIS (4) PR: Course in Urban Sociology or CI. Theories of community and community organization. Methods of community study; problems of urban areas. SOC 643. COMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS (4) PR: Course in Social Organization or CI. Organizational theory, bureaucratic models, authority, power, legitimation, and types of formal organization. SOC 651. FAMILY ANALYSIS (4) PR: Course in Family or CI. Theory of interpersonal relations and interaction in the modem family. Analysis of functions and roles. SOC 661. SOCIAL CONTROL (4) PR: Course in criminology or juvenile delinquency or CI. Theories of control and deviance with research application in problem areas. SOC 671. SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY (4) PR: Four courses in social sciences with two in sociology or CI. Theory of aging. Social corr e lates of aging, retirement, and p ers onality modification. SOC 681. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-4) PR: CI. Content and method d ependent upon interest and competence of student. SOC 691. THESIS AND THESIS SEMINAR (5) PR: Degree candidate. Equivalent of 16 quarter hours in the student's graduate program, SOC 623, 621. SOC 692. THESIS AND THESIS SEMINAR (5) PR: Degree candidate. Equivalent of 16 quarter hours in the student's graduate program, SOC 623, 621. May be taken concurrently with SOC 691. SPANISH Faculty : Hunter, McLean, Milani, Neugaard, Payas, Sparks, Tatum. Basic course listed under Basic Studies. History of Romance Languages listed under Romance Languages.

PAGE 93

SPANISH 247 SP A 301. ADV AN CED SPANISH COMPOSITION (4) To impro ve stud e nt's ability in writing Sp a ni s h, to inc rease hi s accuracy in co mpreh e nsi o n and u s e of the grammatical elements; pra ctice in both free and fixed composition. SPA 303. ADVANCED SPANISH CONVERSATION (4) To d eve lop flue n c y and co rre c tnes s in s poken Sp a ni s h for non-native sp ea kers. SPA 305. SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE (3) Sp a ni s h lite rature fr o m the Twe lfth Century throu g h the Sixteenth Century. SPA 300. SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE (3) Sp anis h lit e ratur e of the S e v e nte e nth and Eight eenth C e nturie s SPA 307 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE (3) Spani s h liter ature of the Nin e t eenth and Twe nti eth C e nturi es. SPA 310. HIGHLIGHTS OF HISPANIC LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION A study in Eng lish of the most outst a nding literary work s of Spain and Sp a nish Am e rica. Elec ti ve for stu dents in a ll d e p a rtments (ex c ept Spanish majors). SP A 383. SELECTED TOPICS (varied) Cour se cont ent d e p e nds upon stud ent d emand and instructor's interest. SPA 403. SPANISH PHONETICS & DICTION (2) Spanish pho nolo gy with emphasis on phonic groupings; correction of the in dividual s tud ent' s error s in diction SPA 483. SELECTED TOPICS. (vari ed) PR: Cl. Junior standing. Course cont ent depe nds upon student dem and and instru c tor 's in t e rest. SPA 491. SENIOR SEMINAR (3) Study in d epth of a s p e cific writ e r or literary movement as cho se n b y the instructor. Individual res e arch requir e d of students. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS Prer e quisite: SP A 305, 306, 307 SPA 516. STYLISTICS (3) A study of s yntax, grammar and styli s tic devices of the Spanish language bas e d on analy s is of literary styl e SPA 523. GOLDEN AGE LITERATURE (3) Lope de Vega and his contemporaries. SPA 524. GOLDEN AGE LITERATURE (3) Dramatists of the latter part of the Golden Age. SPA 525. GOLDEN AGE LITERATURE (3) Lyric poetry, the mystics, the picaresque and idealistic novel of the Golden Age. SPA 526. CERVANTES (3) A study of the life and works of Cervantes, with sp e cial emph asis on the Quijote SPA 540. SPANISH ROMANTICISM (3) A study of Spanish drama and poetry of the first part of the Ninet eenth Century. SPA 541. REALISTIC DRAMA AND POETRY OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY (3) A study of the drama and poetry of the latter part of the Ninet eenth Century. SPA 542. NINETEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE (3) Costumbrismo and the early Realists : Alar c on, Valera and Per e da. SPA 543. NINETEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE (3) The later R e alists: Galdo s Palacio Valdes and Naturalism. SPA 546. GENERATION OF 1898 (3) Novel of Generation of 1898.

PAGE 94

248 SPANISH SPA 551. MODERN SPANISH POETRY (3) A study of Spani s h verse of the Twenti e th Century from the Gen e ration of 1898 to th e pres e nt. SPA 552. TWENTIETH CENTURY SPANISH LITERATURE (3) Pro se since the Generation of 1898. SPA 561. SURVEY OF SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) Modem Spanish-American poetry. Main currents of po e try since the Romantic period with brief introduction to the major poets of the Colonial period. SPA 562. SURVEY OF SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) Modem Spanish-American novel. Main currents of the novel since the Inde pendence period, with brief discussion of origins of the novel in Spanish America SPA 563. SURVEY OF SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) Modern Spanish-Americ a n short s tory. Main currents of the short story of th e last 100 years, with brief discussion of the origins of the genre in Sp a nish America. SPA 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN HISPANIC STUDIES (varied) The content of the course will be governed by student d emand and instructor interest. It will examine in depth a recurring lit e rary theme or the work of a small group of writers. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY SPA 601. OLD SPANISH (3) An analysis of the development of Spanish from Vulgar Latin to th e R e nai ssance. SPA 602. MEDIEVAL SPANISH LITERATURE (3) PR: SPA 601. A study of Spanish literature of the Middle Ages, with special emphasis on the Poema de Mio Cid, Berceo, Juan Ruiz, Alfonso el Sabio and the ballads. SPA 603. RENAISSANCE (3) A study of Spanish literature of the late Fifteenth and the Sixt eenth C en turi es; from the Celestina through the immediate precursors of Lope de V ega. SPA 624. CALDERON (3) A seminar on representative plays by Calderon. Critical, analytical and r esearch papers required. SP A 643. GALDOS (3) A seminar in representati ve nov e l s and plays of Perez Galdos. SPA 645. GENERATION OF 1898 (3) A study of the philosophical writings of Ganivet, Un amu no, Ort ega y Gas se t, Azorin, and some of the minor writers. SPA 647. NATURALISMO (3) A study of the Naturalistic movem ent in Spain. Emphasis on Pardo B aza n. SPA 651. GARCIA LORCA AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES (3) A study of the Vanguard movement and the n e w schools of tho u gh t: ultraismo and creacionismo SP A 652. TREMENDISMO (3) A study of the post war novelists with special emphasis on Jo se C e la. SPA 661. MODERNISMO (3) A study of the writing of Rub e n Dario and other writers of Modernismo. SPA 662. PROBLEMS IN THE SPANISH-AMERICAN NOVEL (3) In-depth studies of selected themes, t ec hniques, or hi storica l periods in the Spanish-American novel. SP A 663. MEXICAN LITERATURE (3) A study of the lit erature of Mexico from the colonial period to the present. SPA 689. SPANISH BIBLIOGRAPHY (0) Training in use of library materials for graduate research and study. L ect ures

PAGE 95

SPEECH 249 by horary staff on general u s e of research material and by speciali s t s on specific areas of Spanish literature. Requir e d of all candidates for the M.A. in Spanish. SPA 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (3) Study of an author or authors or a literary movem e nt. Exten s i ve re se arch, class discussion and papers required. Subject chosen to be announced one quarter in advance. SPEECH F ac ulty: J. Popovich, chairman; Brady, Galati, Kelly, Lucoff, S a rett, S c h e ib Schneider, Sisco, Steck, Stelzner, Webb, Weinfeld. SPE 103. SPEECH FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS (5) A special course for students learning English as a second language. Intensive study and drill in American English pronunciation and listening compr e hensi o n. May be taken in conjunction with CBS 100-English for Foreign Students. SPE 201. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH (5) The nature and basic principles of speech; empha sis on improving s p e aking and listening skills common to all forms of oral communication through a vari e ty of experiences in public discourse. SPE 203. SPEECH IMPROVEMENT AND PHONETICS (5) D esigned to improve vocal quality and expressiveness, articulation, and pronuncia tion, and to give instruction and practice in using the Intern a tion a l Ph o n e tic Alphabet for speech improvement. SPE 241. INTRODUCTION TO BROADCASTING (5) PR: SPE 201 or 203. Introduction to the principl es, tools and skills involved in radio and television broadcasting SPE 320. ISSUES AND INTERPRETATION (2) The study of literature through analyses of print e d textual material s and of the visual-aural textual performance of them. May be repeated. SPE 321. FUNDAMENTALS OF ORAL READING (5) PR: SPE 201 or 203. Designed to develop proficiency in the understanding and oral communication of literary and other written materials. SPE 322. ORAL INTERPRETATION PERFORMANCE (2) PR: SPE 321 or CI. The study, rehe arsa l, and p e rformance of literature for Readers Theatre and Chamber Theatre productions. May be repeated (maximum total of 6 hours}. SPE 343. BROADCAST SPEECH (5) PR: SPE 203. The development of skills required for effective announcing, acting, newscasting and other speaking before mi c rophone and cam e ra. SPE 345. THE MASS MEDIA AND SOCIETY (5) The mass communication process and influ e nce of the mass media upon society. SPE 347. RADIO PRODUCTION AND DIRECTION (5) PR: SPE 241. Radio production and direction, laboratory and broa d ca stin g ex perience. SPE 351. INTRODUCTION TO AUDIOLOGY AND SPEECH PATHOLOGY (5) PR: SPE 203. The nature, causes and principles of treatment of speech and hearing disorders. SPE 360. CURRENT ISSUES AND RHETORIC (2) An analysis of significant current s peak ers and issu es. May be repeated. SPE 361. GROUP DISCUSSION AND CONFERENCE METHODS (5) PR : SPE 201 or CI. Principles and methods of l eading and parti c ipating in various types of group discussion and confer ence Emphasis on r e flective thinking and group dyn a mics.

PAGE 96

250 SPEECH SPE 362. TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (5) Investigation and application of methodology and effective technical communica tion for effective oral presentation of technical reports. SPE 363. PUBLIC SPEAKING (5) PR: SPE 201 or CI. Study of selected public addresses as aids in speaking ex temporaneously and from manuscript. The relationship between public speaking and public policy formulation. SPE 365. PUBLIC DISCUSSION: ARGUMENTATION AND PERSUASION (5) PR: SPE 201. Advanced study of factors involved in changing beliefs and behavior of audiences. Rhetorical analysis of public addresses; the study of effective organization and presentation of public que s tions through pane l discussions, sym posia, forums and debate. SPE 366. FORENSICS (2) PR : SPE 365 or CI. The study, library rese arch and investigation, and practice in forensics. Application of the principles of rhetoric to the current d e bate and dis cussion topics. May be repeated (maximum of 6 hours). SPE 367. FORMS OF PUBLIC ADDRESS (5) PR: SPE 363 or 365. An advanced course emphasizing arrangement and style in informative, persuasive and ceremonial public address. SPE 369. PARLIAMENTARY SPEAKING (3) Principles of parliam entary procedure and practice in conducting and participating in meetings governed by parliamentary rules. SPE 381. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (credits vary) PR: Junior standing and CI. Individual investi ga tions and faculty supervision. SPE 383. SELECTED TOPICS (credits vary) PR: Junior standing and CI. SPE 385. DIRECTED READINGS (credits vary) PR: Junior standing and CI. SPE 411. SPEECH BEHAVIOR AND PROCESSES (5) PR: SPE 203 or CI. Study of the theories of the simple and complex acoustical phenomenon of speech; intensive analy sis of the stimulus-feedback variables of speech. SPE 441. TELEVISION PRODUCTION AND DIRECTION (5) PR: SPE 241. An introductory course in the techniques of producing and directing television programs. SPE 442. ADV AN CED TELEVISION PRODUCTION AND DIRECTION (5) PR: SPE 441. Intensive study and practice of the techniqu es of television pro duction and direction with emphasis on both creative and administrative aspects. SPE 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (credits vary) PR: Senior standing and CI. Individual investigations with faculty supervision. SPE 483. SELECTED TOPICS (credits vary) PR: Senior standing and CI. SPE 485. DIRECTED READINGS (credits vary) PR: Senior standing and CI. SPE 491. SENIOR SEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN ORAL COMMUNICATION (2) PR: Senior Standing. Explor a tion of problems in all aspects of speaking and listening with emphasis upon an overview of the arts and sciences of oral com munication. SPE 492. SENIOR SEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN ORAL COMMUNICATION (3) PR: SPE 491. Inten sive analysis of the complexities of scholarly investigation in special areas of th e arts and sciences of oral communication. FOR UPPER LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS SPE 501. SPEECH BEHAVIOR AND PROCESSES (5) PR: Upperclass standing. Study of the theories of the simple and complex acousti-

PAGE 97

SPEECH 251 cal phenomenon of speech; intensive analysis of the stimulus-feed back variables of speech. SPE 503. APPLIED PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION (5) PR: SPE 203 or CI. Intensified training in auditory discrimination of the sounds of American English. Detailed use of the International Phonetic Alphabet in rapid transcription of normal and disordered speech. SPE 511. EXPERIMENTAL PHONETICS (5) PR: SPE 203. Understanding and application of experimental methods in analyzing speech sounds. Emphasis upon important research findings, in strume nts and methodologies in the laboratory study of normal speech. Development of phonetic skills of discrimin ati on and reproduction of speech sounds. SPE 521. ORAL INTERPRETATION OF DRAMATIC LITERATURE (5) PR: SPE 321 or CI. Critical appreciation and Oral Inte rpretation of special textual materials which are inherently dramatic in nature and po e try, narrative prose, drama, biography, an d history. SPE 522 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF POETRY (5) PR: SPE 321 or CI. Critical appreciation of lyric and narrative poetry and com munication of that appreciation to an audience. Study of poetic th eory and prosodic techniqu es. SPE 523. LITERARY ADAPTATION AND ORAL INTERPRETATION (5) PR: SPE 521. Practice in composition and adaptation of literary materials for oral prese ntation; an investigation of the more advanced problems in oral interpretation as in Choral Sp ea king and Chamber Theatre. SPE 565. HISTORY AND CRITICISM OF PUBLIC ADDRESS (5) PR: SPE 363 or CI. The prin c iples of rhetoric a l criticism applied to se l e cted great speeches of Western civilization. SPE 581. RESEARCH (credits vary) PR: Senior or graduate standing and CI. SPE 583. SELECTED TOPICS (credits vary) PR: Senior or graduate standing an d CI. SPE 585. DIRECTED READINGS (credits vary) PR: Senior or graduate standing and CI. SPE 593. LANGUAGE AND SPEECH FOR CHILDREN (5) PR: SPE 203 or CI. A diagnostic study of language development; the analysis of speech behavior and ora l language n ee ds of children; techniques of speech improvement for c hildren. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY SPE 621. HISTORY AND THEORIES OF ORAL INTERPRETATION (5) A study of the hi s tory, critical writings, uses, and development of the art of oral interpretation, with analysis of th e principles and practices SPE 6ll. COMMUNICATION: ANALYSIS AND MEASUREMENT (5) A study of selected modes of communication. Includes analysis of communication symbology, and pres en ts the th eo ry and appli1iation of selected instruments for measuring and producing speech. SPE 661. CLASSICAL RHETORIC (5) Greek and Roman theory and prac tic e; emphasis on Aristotle, Plato, Cicero, and Quintilian, selected other r eadi ng s SPE 662. MODERN RHETORICAL THEORY (5) Studies of Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century theorists and the historical and cultural forces influencing th em; relationship t o contemporary th eo ry and practice. SPE 665. HISTORY AND CRITICISM OF AMERICAN PUBLIC ADDRESS (5) Criticism of selected speeches and speakers of American public address, studied against a background of political, social, and intellectual issues

PAGE 98

252 SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY SPE 667. CONTEMPORARY RHETORICAL THEORY (5) Studies in Speech and language; Speech as symbol, theories of meaning, the rela tion of l anguage, thought, and action SPE 668. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH IN ORAL COMMUNICATION (5) Critical examination of research design, procedures, and reporting of experimental studies in small group communication and persuasive discours e. SPE 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-5) Directed study in special projects. Recommended only when m a terial cannot be studied in scheduled courses. SPE 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN SPEECH (1-5) SPE 685. DIRECTED READINGS (1-5) SPE 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN ORAL COMMUNICATION (5) SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY Faculty: Webb, Director; Edwards, Francis, Gray, Glover, Holloway, Husband, Kasan, Kinde, J ackson, MacPherson, York. SAi 371. INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (4) Survey of etiologies, nature and prevention. Professional settings for the management of communication disorders. SAi 471. INSTRUMENTATION FOR COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (4) PR: SAi 371 or CI. Operation, maintenance, principl es in use of el ec tronic and mechanical equipment associated with management and diagnosis of communica tion disorders. SAi 571. EVALUATION OF ORAL COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (4) PR: SAi 371 or CI. Articulation, voice, language, and stuttering disord e rs. Re porting, case management, referral, and professional relationships SAi 572. EVALUATION OF AUDITORY COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (4) PR: SAi 371 or CI. Auditory and visual communication skills of the h ea rin g impaired. Hearing aid consultation, nonorganic h ea ring loss t es ting and r e portin g of h earing evaluation. SAi 573. METHODS FOR AUDITORY COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (4) PR: SAI 572 or CI. Speech reading, auditory training, electronic aids, and acou s tic environment modification for the hearing impaired. SAi 574. METHODS FOR ORAL COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (4) PR: SAI 571 or CI. Cla ssic and experimental approaches to and systems of evaluation of therapy in the management of speech impaired individuals. SAi 575. MANAGEMENT OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (4) PR: SAi 573 or SAI 57 4 or CI. Coordination, planning, and structuring of pro grams for individuals with communication disord ers. SAi 576. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: VOICE (4) PR: CI. Research and clinical literature on voice and voice disorders. SAi 577. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: ARTICULATION (4) PR: CI. Research and clinical literature on articulation and articulation disorders. SAi 578. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: STUTTERING (4) PR: CI. Research and clinica l literature on stuttering and r e l ate d disorders. SAi 579. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: HEARING (4) PR : CI. R esearch and clinical lit erature on hearing disorders. SAi 580. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: LANGUAGE (4) PR: CI. R ese arch and clini ca l lit erature on language di sorders SAi 598. INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH PATHOLOGY PRACTICUM (I-12) PR: CI. Introductory Practi cum for clinical Spee c h Pathology and Audiology.

PAGE 99

THEATRE ARTS 253 SAi 673. PEDIATRIC AUDIOLOGY (4) PR: CI. Survey of available procedures for the early identilication of hearing loss with a pediatric population. SAi 674. DIFFERENTIAL AUDIOMETRY (4) PR: CI. Knowledge and skills regarding speech reception, malingering, CSR and EDG systems of hearing testing. SAi 675. TECHNIQUES OF SPEECH READING (4) PR: CI. Knowledge and skill regarding methods of teaching lip reading to h a rd of-hearing and deaf individuals. SAi 676. DIAGNOSIS OF HEARING PROBLEMS (4) PR: CI. The use, coordination and interpretation of hearing test data as r eg ards diagnosis of hearing problems. SAi 677. HEARING CONSERVATION (4) PR: CI. Information regarding prevention of hearing loss in children and adults in industry, schools, and other settings. SAi 683. SELECTED READINGS (Topic) (4), (4), (4). PR: CI. Attention to specific diagnostic categories such as cleft palate, aphasia, cerebral palsy and other diagnostic categories. SAi 698. PRACTICUM IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY (1-12) PR: CI. Field experience in Speech Pathology and Audiology practicum. Conducted in community facilities for speech, hearing and language impaired indi viduals. SAi 699. THESIS (1-9) THEATRE ARTS Faculty: Whaley, chairman; Belt, A. Golding, Lorenzen, Mecham, O'Sullivan, Zachary. TAR 203. INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE (3) The nature of theatre as an art form. "How does a play mean?" Orientation and identification for the understanding of theatre. Open to all students and required of Theatre Arts majors. TAR 211. FUNDAMENTALS OF STAGE PERFORMANCE (3) Elementary principles and methods of stage performance with emphasis on inner creativity and physical expression. TAR 212. STAGE MOVEMENT AND SPEECH (3) PR: TAR 211 or CI. An exercise investigation of the nature and possibilities of human movement and sound in the theatre. TAR 221. STAGECRAFT (3) Basic design practice, color and drafting as applied to stage and television settings. Practical exercises in construction, painting, and mounting of scenery, with par ticipation in performance productions. TAR 252. STAGE MAKE-UP (1) History, theory, and practice of make-up for the stage. TAR 303. MODERN THEATRE PRACTICE (5) Initial readings and exercises in theatre; play analysis, performance, and technical theatre. For non-theatre majors. TAR 311. ACTING I (3) PR: TAR 211, 212, or CI. Intermediate principles and methods of stage perform ance: mime, improvisation, speech, deportment, and characterization. TAR 313. DIRECTING I (3) PR: TAR 411. Staging the play, including script analysis, business, compo s ition, movement and rhythm; rehearsal procedures and general organization. Lectme laboratory using illustrative exercises and scene work.

PAGE 100

254 THEATRE ARTS TAR 321. TECHNICAL DIRECTING (3) PR: TAR 221. Mounting the physical production. Lecture-l a b using select e d read ings and practical problems in planning and producing the technical aspects of production. TAR 322. STAGE PROPERTIES (3) An investigation of hi s toric architecture, d ec or, and furnishings for the theatre designer and dir ecto r with practical ex e rcises in duplication for the stage. TAR 339. HISTORY OF THE THEATRE (5) A survey of the chronological development of world the a tre. TAR 352. PERFORMANCE (1) The study, rehearsal, and performance of major theatrical works. Open to all University students by audition on a credit or non -c redit basis. Credit members subject to critical examination. May b e repeated. TAR 361. INTRODUCTION TO PUPPETRY (3) Principles and methods of puppe try with an historical survey of major forms and practical problems with l aboratory production. TAR 411. ACTING II (3) PR: TAR 311 or CI. Intermediate exercises in stage performance with special emphasis on problems of genre, style, and interpr e tation. TAR 413". DIRECTING II (3) PR: TAR 313. Problems in directing. Script interpretation, composition and movement for genre and period, coaching the actor, designing the mise en scene TAR 421. SCENE DESIGN I (3) PR: TAR 321.or CI. Aesthetic s and theo ries of stage design with an hi s torical study of the development of the physical theatre and scenery. Practical design problems. TAR 422. SCENE DESIGN II (3) PR: TAR 421. Continuation of Scene Design. TAR 423. COSTUME DESIGN I (3) Aesthetics, design, and techniques of stage costuming. A survey of fashion of the Western World and its interpretation as costume for the stage. TAR 424. COSTUME DESIGN II (3) PR: TAR 423. Continuation of Costume Design. TAR 425. STAGE LIGHTING I (3) PR: TAR 321. Theories and techniques of lighting as they relate to play produc tion and theatre architecture. TAR 426. STAGE LIGHTING II (3) PR: TAR 425. Continuation of Stage Li g hting, with emphasis on lighting design. TAR 431. THEATRE LITERATURE OF MYTH AND RITUAL: CLASSIC (3) A study of the dev e lopment of dramatic form out of early reli gio us rites and its full flowering in the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophan es, Menander, Plautus, and T e rrence. TAR 432. THEATRE LITERATURE OF MYTH AND RITUAL: MEDIEVAL (3) The r e birth of drama in the ancient Christian Chur c h and a study of the theatre lit erature which grew out of these early beginnings. TAR 433. LITERATURE OF THE RENAISSANCE THEATRE (3) Histori ca l study of Renaissance drama ; r eadings from th e plays of Machiavelli Goldoni, Lope de V ega, Cald e ron, Marlowe, Jonson, Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. TAR 435. LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY THEATRE (3) A study of English an d Continental theatre liter ature from the restoration of the English monarchy to the fall of Napoleon. TAR 436. LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY THEATRE (3) A study of th eatre lit erature from the late Romanti c ism of Hugo to the "Free Theatre movement of the continent.

PAGE 101

THEATRE ARTS 255 TAR 437. LITERATURE OF THE MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY THEA TRE (3) Readings of contemporary American, British, and Contin e ntal drama from Ap polonaire to Alb ee TAR 443. PLAYWRITING I (3) PR: TAR 303 or equivalent, 3 hours of creative writing, and CI. B asic dramatic writing practices and conventions. Evaluation of student work in conferences. Study of selected r eadings. May be repeated. TAR 444. PLAYWRITING II (3) PR: TAR 443. C o ntinu atio n of Playwriting. May be rep eated TAR 454. EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE PERFORMANCE (2) PR: TAR 211, 212, 352, or Cl. The study, r e hearsal, and laboratory performance of new and experimental works for the theatre. May be repeated to a total of 6 credits. TAR 471. THEATRE MANAGEMENT (3) A study of commercial, community, an d educa tional theatre operation with special e mph asis on box office manag ement, production costs, contracts, publicity, and public relations. TAR 473. ADVANCED THEATRE MANAGEMENT (3) PR: TAR 471 or CI. A study of production company organization and operation and of program sel ec tion and schedule. TAR 481. DIRECTED STUDIES (1-6) PR: CC. Independent studies in the various areas of Theatre Arts. Course of study and credits must b e assigned prior to registr a tion. TAR 483. REPERTORY PERFORMANCE (1-9) PR: CC. Advanced p e rformance, theory, and practice, with practical examination. All course work is by directed study and must relate to Department Productions. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS TAR 501. DRAMATIC CRITICISM I (3) A study of basic critical writings on th e theatre from Aristotle to the present. TAR 502. DRAMATIC CRITICISM II (3) PR : TAR 501. Continuation of Dramatic Criticism. TAR 511. STYLES OF ACTING (3) PR: TAR 411 or CI. Exercises in the performance problems of the actor in pre modem plays. May be r epeated for a total of 9 hours. TAR 515. PERFORMANCE PRODUCTION (3) PR: TAR 413, majors only, Cl. Actual production work in which members of the class prepare a play for project performance, t eame d with design e rs fr om TAR 529. TAR 529. TECHNICAL PRODUCTION (3) PR: TAR 421-422 423-424, 425-426, m a jor s only, Cl. Actual production work in which students d es i gn and execute scenery, cos tum es, properties, and li g hting for project performance, teamed with playwrights and/or dire c tors from TAR 515. TAR 543. ADVANCED PLAYWRITING (3) PR: TAR 443, 444, and Cl. Concentration on the writing of the full l ength play form, with selected readings and analysis of dramati c structure. M ay be repe a t e d TAR 544. WRITING FOR THE SCREEN (3) PR: TAR 443, 444, and Cl. Planning and writing of the Im short and feature Im from rough scenario to finished screenplay. Selected readings and critical analysis of screenplays by Agee, B ergman, Kurosawa, Hitchcock, etc. May be r e p ea t e d. TAR 552. ADVANCED PERFORMANCE (1) PR: TAR 352 or CI. The study r e hearsal and performance of major theatrical works. Admission by audition May be repeated.

PAGE 102

256 ZOOLOGY TAR 554. ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE PERFORMANCE (2) PR: TAR 454 or Cl. The study, r ehearsal, and laboratory performance of new and experimental works for the theatre. Admission by audition. May be repeat ed for a total of 6 hours. TAR 581. DIRECTED STUDIES (1-9) PR: CC. Independent studies in the various areas of Theatre Arts. Course of study and credits must be assigned prior to r eg i s tration. ZOOLOGY See also Inter-disciplinary Biology. Faculty: Briggs, chairman; Brown, Burns, Cowell, D eWitt Friedl, Hopkins, Krivanek, Lawrence, Layne, Linton, Meyerriecks, Simon, Snyder, Woolfenden. ZOO 311. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY (6) PR: BIO 201-3. Anatomy of selected vertebrate types emphasizing evolutionary trends. lee-lab. ZOO 312. COMPARATIVE EMBRYOLOGY (6) PR: BIO 201-3. A comparative study of developm e ntal processes among select e d invertebrates and vertebrates with emphasis on expe rim en tal approaches, l ee -l ab. ZOO 313. 0INTRODUCTORY INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 201-3. An introduction to the major invertebrate gro ups, with emphasis on local marine forms. Field work will be r eq uir ed. l ee -lab ZOO 319. FISH AND GAME MANAGEMENT (3) PR: BIO 201-203. An introduction to the prin c iples of fish and game manag emen t and conservation. zoo 411. 0HISTOLOGY (4) PR: ZOO 311 and/or ZOO 312. Compar a tiv e approach to the study of ti ssues and the relation of their structure and function. l ee-lab. ZOO 416. AQUATIC ENTOMOLOGY (4) PR: ZOO 415. Taxonomy, development, and ecology of aquatic insects with emphasis on local forms. lee-lab. ZOO 446. TERRESTRIAL ANIMAL ECOLOGY (3) PR: BIO 445. Field and laboratory inve st igation s of th e basic principles of eco l ogy as applied to terrestrial animals. lee lab ZOO 447. MARINE ANIMAL ECOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 445 and ZOO 313. Investigations of community structure in lo ca l marine habitats. Field work is required. lee-lab. ZOO 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-6) PR: CI. Individual investigation with faculty supervision. ZOO 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN ZOOLOGY (1-6) PR: CI. Each topic is a program in directed study under supervision of a faculty member. ZOO 491. SEMINAR IN ZOOLOGY (1) PR: Upper division. May be repeated once. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ZOO 513. 00PARASITOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 201-3. Fundamen tals of animal parasitology and parasitism; the biol ogy of select e d animal parasit es including those of major imp or tanc e to man. lee-lab. The purchase of a coupon b ook to cover breakage is required for these courses.

PAGE 103

ZOOLOGY 257 ZOO 514. INTRODUCTION TO ENTOMOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 201-3. An introdu ctio n to general aspects of insect morphology, d eve l op ment an d classification. The identification of local forms will be emphasized. l eel ab ZOO 515. LThfNOLOGY (4) PR: CI. An introdu c tion to the phy s ic a l, chemical, and bi o lo gica l n a ture o f freshwater environments. leel ab. ZOO 516. HERPETOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 201-3. The biolo gy of amphibians and r epti l es with emp h asis on tax onomy. lee-lab. ZOO 517. ORNITHOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 445 or CI. The biology of birds with emphasis on the local avifauna. ZOO 518. MAMMALOGY (4) PR: ZOO 311 or 312. The biology of mammals, including systemati cs, ecology, natural history, and geographical distribution. ZOO 519. ICHTHYOLOGY (5) PR ZOO 311. Systematics of fish es, including major cl assifica ti on, comparative anatomy, embryology, and general distribution. lee-lab. ZOO 521. COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY (5) PR: CI. The evolution of physiologic a l mechanisms. lee -l a b. ZOO 523. PHYSIOLOGY OF MARINE ANIMALS (5) PR: BIO 421-2. A study of the physiological me c hanisms of animals in the marine enviro nment. lee-l ab. ZOO 524. COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY (5) PR: ZOO 521 or CI. An analysis of the similarities and differences b e tween th e hormonal me c h a ni sms of mammals, other vertebrates, and inv ertebrates. l ee-lab. ZOO 533. PHYSIOLOGY OF FISHES (4) PR : ZOO 521 or CI. An ana lysis of the physiological m ec hanisms of metabolism and integration in fishes with emphasis on marine forms. l ee -l ab ZOO 545. ZOOGEOGRAPHY (3) PR: BIO 445. Zoogeographic principles and general patterns of terre s trial and marine distributions. ZOO 546. MARINE INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY I (5) PR: BIO 201 and CI. The lower in ve rt ebra t e phy la. Field trips to local int ertid a l and subtidal h ab it ats r eq uired. l ee-lab. ZOO 547. MARINE INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY II (5) PR: BIO 201 and CI. The higher invertebrate phyla. Field trip s to loc a l int ertid a l an d subtidal habitat s requir ed. l ee .l ab. ZOO 561. ANIMAL SOCIAL BEHAVIOR (5) PR: CI. An introduction to comparative etho logy with emphasis on social be h av ior and the evolution of behavior. l ee-lab ZOO 562. MECHANISMS OF ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (5) PR: BIO 201-3, CHM 331-333 and CI. A com parative approach to communication and orientation in animals including homing beh av ior and biol og ical clocks. l eel ab. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY ZOO 609. BIOCHEMICAL SYSTEMATICS (4) PH: CI. A research oriented course on the acquisition and use of bio chemica l infor m a tion in animal systematics. lee l ab. ZOO 611. EXPERIMENTAL EMBRYOLOGY (5) PR: ZOO 312, BIO 421-2 and CI. Lectures, l abora tori es, r eadings, and discussions relating to con t empo rar y advances in the area of bio c hemi s try of d eve l opment. Expe rimental techniqu es will be studied. l ee-lab.

PAGE 104

258 ZOOLOGY ZOO 613. ADVANCED INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (3) PR: ZOO 313 or CI. An advanced zoological s tudy of selected invertebrate groups with emphasis on regionally significant forms. Laboratory and field work required. lee-lab. ZOO 614. PLANKTON ECOLOGY (4) PR: ZOO 313 or ZOO 546 and ZOO 547. The rel at ion sh ips and distribution of planktonic organisms as affected by their phys ical, chemical, and biological en vironments. lee-lab. ZOO 615. PLANKTON SYSTEMATICS (4) PR: ZOO 313 or ZOO 546 and ZOO 547. The id entifica tion of plankton from different depth zones in the sea and from various oceanic regions lee-lab. ZOO 616. BIOMETRY (4) PR: MTH 101 or CI. An introduction to statistical pro cedures for resea r c h in the biological sciences. Experimental design, analysis of data, and presentation of results are emphasized ZOO 617. SYSTEMATIC ORNITHOLOGY (3) PR: ZOO 517 and CI. The classification and distribution of the birds of the world lee-lab. ZOO 618. ADVANCED MAMMALOGY (4) PR: ZOO 518. Important literature and developm ents in mammalogy. Stud e nts will undertake individual research problems. lee-lab. ZOO 619. ADV AN CED ICHTHYOLOGY (5) PR: CI. Systematic ichthyology with particular refer e nce to the important litera ture together with a historical introduction. Laboratory devoted to completion of a systematic problem by each student. lee-lab. ZOO 620. FIELD ORNITHOLOGY (3) PR: ZOO 517 and CI. The use of local population s in the study of avian biology. lee-lab ZOO 621. PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY (5) PR: CI. Effect of environmental factors on animal function at the cellular and organ system level with emphasis on control mechanisms. lee-lab. ZOO 622. INVERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY (3) PR: CI. A research-oriented study of selected topics in invertebrate phy sio lo gy Laboratory and field work required. ZOO 631. ADV AN CED GENETICS (5) PR: BIO 332 and CI. A course in contemporary ge netics, with special refer ence to molecular genetics, genetic fine structure analysis, and control of protein synthesis. lee-lab ZOO 661. ADVANCED ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (4) PR: ZOO 561 and Cl. Rec en t advances in comparative animal behavior (ethology). lee-lab. ZOO 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-9) PR: Cl. Dir ecte d research on non-thesi s topics. May b e repeated. ZOO 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN ZOOLOGY (1-6) PR: CI. ZOO 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN ZOOLOGY (1) PR: Graduat e standing. May be rep eate d. ZOO 699. M.A. THESIS (1-9) PR: Cl. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits.

PAGE 105

GLOSSARY An explanation af terms with which the reader may not be familiar. Academic Year: Beginning of First Quarter to end of Fourth Quarter; usually considered as September 1 to August 31. Admission: Acceptance of a student for enrollment. Class Standing Codes: 1. Freshman 2. Sophomore 3. Junior 4. Senior 5. BA or BS degree holder 6. Student enrolled in master's program 7. Student accepted to candidacy in master's program 8. Master's degree holder 9. Student enrolled in doctoral program College: Unit within the University responsible for providing instruction in a given area of knowledge. Course: A unit of instruction in a particular subject; usually one quarter in length. Curriculum: A group of courses, forming a major field of study, required for a degree. Elective: Any of a number of courses from which a student is allowed to select. A free elective is one not required in the student's curriculum. Faculty: Persons in teaching and research; the instructional staff of the University. Grade Point Ratio ( GPR): Ratio of grade points to quarter hours attempted. Graduate Program: A course of study leading to an advanced degree. Hour, Credit Hour, Quarter Hour: Unit of academic work. The number of quarter hours specified for a course is usually equal to the number of times the class meets each week. Lower Level: A general term applying to courses and programs offered at the freshman and sophomore levels. Major: Student's academic area of concentration or field specialization. Matriculation: The first registration following admission as a classified student. Prerequisite: Prior study or authorization required to qualify for enrollment in a course. Quarter: Period of instruction into which the academic year is divided. Registration: Process of enrolling for classes. Term: Period of instruction into which the academic year is divided (i.e., Quarter). Upper Level: A general term applying to courses and programs offered at the junior and senior levels. 259

PAGE 106

ADMINISTRATION OF STATE UNIVERSITIES Term Expires THE BOARD OF EDUCATION STATE OF FLORIDA CLAUDE R. KIRK, JR. Governor ToM AnAMs Secretary of State EARL FAIRCLOTH Attorney General BROWARD WILLIAMS State Treasurer FLOYD T. CHRISTIAN, Secretary Commissioner of Education THE BOARD OF REGENTS STATE OF FLORIDA D. BURKE KIBLER, III, Chairman ( 1976)" Lakeland JoHN C, BEHRINGER (1972) Fort Laud erd ale CHESTER H FERGUSON ( 197 4) Tampa HENRY KRAMER (1971) Jack sonv ille CLARENCE L. MENSER ( 1970) Vero Beach Loms C. MURRAY ( 1973) Orlando PAT DODSON ( 1978) Pensacola JULIUS F. PARKER, JR. (1977) Tallahassee MRS. E. D. PEARCE ( 1975) Miami ROBERT B. MAUTZ, Chance llor Tallah assee 260

PAGE 107

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA PRESIDENT JOHN S. Ar.LEN ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Vice President and Dean _____ HARRIS W. DEAN Associate Dean -----------------ALFRED H. LAWTON Assistant Dean __ FRANK H. SPAIN Assistant Dean -----------------------WILLIAM H. TAFT Assistant Dean, St. Petersburg Campus -----LESTER w. TUITLE, JR. COLLEGE OF BASIC STUDIES Dean Chairmen EDWIN P. MARTIN The American Idea ROBERT A. WARNER B e havioral Science ---------------THOMAS A. RICH Biological Science __ JAMES D. RAY Functional English _ _ JAMES A. PARRISH Functional Foreign Languages WILLIAM A. HUNTER Functional M a thematics DONALD C. RosE The Humanities H. CHRISTIAN KIEFER Physical Science JACK H. ROBINSON Coordinator of Advishg DONALD R. HARKNESS Evaluation Services Director EDWARD CALDWELL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Dean ---------ROBERT s. CLINE Chai.Im en Accounting and Business Law Loms C. JURGENSEN Economics-------RICHARD E. PASTERNAK Finance }AMES R. LONGSTREET Management Ar.TON C. BARTLETT Marketing ----------------DAVID C. SLEEPER Director of Graduate Studies --------------RrcHARD L. KozELKA Coordinators of Advising Lower Level _ -------------Upper Level COLLEGE OF EDUCATION -FRED B. POWER KENNETH W. DAVEY Dean ---------------------------------------JEAN A. BArrLE Assistant Dean, Graduate Study and Research CHARLES C. MANKER, JR. Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Instruction and the St. Petersburg Campus -------HOBERT L. SHANNON Assistant Dean, Student Personnel RAYMOND A. URBANEK 261

PAGE 108

262 ADMINISTRATION Student Activities ----------LOREN G. ROBERTS ZOE ANN CARLSON CHARLES A. GORDON Elementary Education Advising Secondary Education Advising Graduate Studies Advising Administrative Coordinators LEE T. !CARNS Interdisciplinary Teams ------------LEADORE D. DuBors Intern Experiences CALVERT J. CRAIG Research _____ DONALD L. LANTZ Coordinator, St. Petersburg Campus Programs WILLIAM F. BENJAMIN Coordinator, Honduras Project E CHRISTIAN ANDERSON Coordinator, Doctoral Programs CLARENCE W. HUNNICUT!' Coordinators, Teaching Specialization Areas Adult and Vocational Education --------DONALD P. JAESCHKE Art Education HAYDEN C. BRYANT, JR. AND GEORGE PAPPAS Curri culum and Instruction -----------LESLIE McCLELLAN Elementary Education-General }AMES A. CHAMBERS Foreign Language s VERNON W WHITNEY Guidance ___ WILLIAM K. BoTT Higher Education SIDNEY J. FRENCH Instruc tional Resources ALICE G. SMITH Language Arts and Reading PHILIP H. PFOST Language-Literature F. ALLEN BRIGGS Mathematics DONOVAN R. LICHTENBERG Music ---------VIRGINIA A. BRIDGES Physical Education JACK C. STOVALL Pre-School _______ MICHAEL S. AULETA Ps ycho lo g ical Foundations WM. WADE BURLEY R esea rch _ __ DouGLAS E. STONE School Psychology WALTER J. MusGROvE Science LAURENCE E. MONLEY Speech ___ _______ JoHN I. Sisco Social Science __ }AMES D. CASTEEL Special Education RoBERT C. DWYER Social Foundations BozIDAR MuNTYAN Program Committee Chairmen Pre-School---------------------MICHAELS. AVLETA Elementary S choo l }AMES A. CHAMBERS Se condary School RUSSELL w. vVILEY Higher Education SIDNEY J. FRENCH Dean Chairmen COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING EDGAR W. KOPP Electrical and Electronics Syst ems MERLE R. DONALDSON Industria l Systems ----------RoBERT J. WIMMERT Energy Conversion Syst ems Lrnus A. ScoTT Pre-Engineering -------------------------JoHN F. TWIGG Structures, Materials, and Fluid Systems .JOHN E. GRIFFITH

PAGE 109

ADMINISTRATION 263 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Dean ------RUSSELL M COOPER Bachelor of Independent Studies Director ------------------------KEVIN E. KEARNEY Division of Fine Arts Associate Dean _____ ----HARRISON w. COVINGTON Chairmen Visual Arts -------------------DoNALD J. SAFF Musi c Arts ------------------------------------GALE L. SPERRY Theatre Arts __ RusSELL G. WHALEY Chairman, Florida Center for the Arts JAMES R. CAMP Division of Languages and Literature Associate Dean ----------IRVING DEER Chairmen American Studies EDGAR E STANTON Cl a ssi c s and Ancient Studies __ ALBERT M GEsSMAN Englis h ---------------JAMES A. p ARRISH Foreign Languages WILLIAM A. HUNTER Interdisciplinary Languages and Literature ---------------IRVING D EER Journalism ARTHUR M. SANDERSON Linguistics DouGLAS K. SHAFFER Philosophy-----------------]AMES A GOULD Speech ____ JAMES E. POPOVICH Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics Associate Dean-----------------THEODORE A. ASHFORD Chairmen Astronomy ----------------HEI NRICH K. EI CHHORN-VON WURMB Botany and Bacte ri ology -----------------------------------ROBERT W. LONG Che mi stry --------------------------------------P. CALVIN MAYBURY Geology _____ -----------------------WE N D ELL J RAGAN Mathematics ------------------------------------JOHN E. KELLEY Physi c s ----------------GuY FORMAN Zoology ___ Jmrn C. BRIGGS Chairmen, Advising Committees O c e anography ----------_ _ ___ JoHN C. BRIGGS Pre-Dental and PreMedical ---------JEROME 0 KRIVANEK Division of Social Sciences Associate Dean ----------------WM. BRUCE CAMERON

PAGE 110

264 ADMINISTRATION Chairmen Anthropology ROGER T. GRANGE Geography ROBERT H. FusoN History MARTIN L. .ABBOT Political Science MAURICE E. O'DONNELL Psychology-----------------HERBERT D. KrMl\IEL Interdisciplinary Social Sciences -------____ MARK T. ORR Sociology RAYMOND H. WHEEL:i,.-n Chairman, Pre-Law Advising Committee ----------ANNE E. KELLEY Coordinator, International Studies and Programs --------MARK T. ORR COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Dean -----------------ALFRED H LAWTON To Be Appointed Associate Dean -------------------COLLEGE OF NURSING Dean ALICE E. KEEFE INTERINSTITUTIONAL ARTICULATION Assistant Dean FRANK H. SPAIN Systems Coordinator ------------CECIL C. BROOKS Coordinator, Summer Sessions DAVID C. JORDAN Registrar ____ ]AMES E. LucAs Director, Admissions EUGENE L ROBERTS CENTER FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION Director ___ -------J. RICHARD BRIGHTWELL COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM Director -------------------------------------GEORGE H. MILLER Coordinator-Business Ar eas ----------D KEITH LuPTON Coordin a t or-Education Areas ___ GLENDA F LENTZ Coordinator-Engineering Areas ---------C. ]ACK WESTBElU1Y AND 'WILMA A. SlvHTH Coordinator-Liberal Arts Areas _________ MARILYN K. FAGER GRADUATE PROGRAM Chairman, Council on Graduate Study ----------ALFRED H LAWTON OFFICE OF SPONSORED RESEARCH Director WILLIAM H TAFT

PAGE 111

ADMINISTRATION 265 CENTER FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Director --------------------WIT.LIAM H. TAFT Directors of Institutes Aging ---THOMAS A. RICH Exceptional Children and Adults MARVIN J. GoLD Leisure _______ MAX KAPLAN Marine S c ien ce------------------HAROLD J. HUMM Speech Pathology and Audiology Cl.AR.ENCE E. WEBB ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS Vice President and Dean ------------ELLIOTT HARDAWAY Di.rector, Inte rn a l Control ----------To Be Appointed Director, Pl a nning and Analysis T. WAYNE KEENE C e nter Administrator, St. Petersburg Campus HERMAN J. BRAMES ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Assistant Dean --------------------JACK A. CHAMBERS Director, Computer Research Center JACK A. CHAMBERS Director (Actin g ), Personnel Services JoHN P. WEICHERDING Director, Pl ac em ent S e rvices ----------___ DONALD S. COLBY Coordinator, Research and Records DoNALD J. ANDERSON OFFICE OF THE BUSINESS MANAGER Business Manager ANDREW C. RODGERS Budget Officer-------------GLE:NNDON E. CLAYTON Comptroll e r -----------RoBERT E. RICHMOND Di.rector, Auxiliary Services ----------------To Be Appointed Di.rector, Housing and Food Service RAYMOND C. KING Director, Procurement JoHN C. MELENDI INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES Dean -----------------------H. THEODORE RYBERG Educational Resources Director ---------------GERHARD c. EICHHOLZ Libraries Director MARY Lou HARKNESS Ass istant Di rec tor ________ ______ GERARD B McCABE Acquisiti o n Lib ra rian _________ WILLIAM L. STEWART, JR. Catalo g Librari a n ____ -------ROBERT V. BRADLEY Docum ents Librari a n ------------____ DONNA Y. REECE Referenc e Libraria n DENNIS E. ROBISON

PAGE 112

266 ADMINISTRATION Serials Librarian ----------------------CLAUDIA J. CARTER Spec ial Collections Libraria n MARGARET L. CHAPMAN FACILITIES PLANNING AND OPERATION Assistant Dean CLYDE B. H1u.. Director, Physical Plant -----------CHARLEs vv. BUTLER STUDENT AFFAIRS Vice President and Dean HERBERT J. WUNDERLICH Directors of Divisions Campus Publications ----------ARTHUR M. SANDERSON Dean of Men CHARLES H. WILDY Dean of Women MARGARET B. FISHER Developmental Center ----------------EDMUND E ALLEN Financial Aids KERMIT J. SILVERWOOD Housing (Personnel) RAYMOND C. KING Physical Education, Recreational Sports, and Athletics Student Health Service Student Organi za tions University Center RICHARD T BOWERS --ROBERT L. EGOLF PHYLLIS P. MARSHALL DUANE E. LAKE UNIVERSITY RELATIONS Dean_ ----------------WILLIAM s. CHAMBERS, JR. Director, Alumni Affairs To be Appointed Directo r D evelopment -------------ROBERT L. BLACK, III Director, Information S e rvi ces DENNIS E McCLENOON UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-ST. PETERSBURG CAMPUS Academic Affairs Assistant Dean Center Administration Center Administrator Library, Campus Assistant Reference Librarian Library, Exte nsion --LESTER w. TUTTLE, JR. HERMAN J. BRAMES -----DORIS A. COOK Director ------------------OsBoR E L. GOMEZ Assistant Librarian ---------------MARGUERITE s. vVURSTER Marine Science Institute Director HAROLD J HUMM

PAGE 113

ACADEMIC STAFF All members of the University of South Florida's academic staff, including teach ing, research, administrative and professional personnel, are listed below in alphabetical order. The listing includes name, highest degree, institution conferring the degree, and current rank and field as of December 1968. ABBEY, WALTER R., B.S.M.E. (Tri-State College, Indiana), Lecturer, Engineering. ABBOTT, MARTIN L., Ph.D. (Emory), Chairman and Professor, History. ABRAM, JACQUES, Diploma with Distinction (Juilliard School of Music), Professor, Music. ACHENBACH, KARL E., Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Psychology. ADAMS, PATRICIA W., M.Ed. (Mississippi), Instructor, American Idea AGENS, FREDERIC F., M.S. (California, Berkeley), Lecturer, Physical Science. AcENS, JEANETTE F., M.A. (George Washington), Assistant Professor, Education. ALLEN, EDMUND E., Ed.D. (Florida), Director, D evelopmental C enter; Associate Professor. ALLEN, HAROLD C., M.B.A. (Georgia St ate), Assistant Professor, Management. ALLEN, ]AMES L., Ph.D. (Georgia Tech.), Associate Professor, Electrical En-gineering ALLEN, JoHN S., Ph.D. (New York), LL.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), President. ALVAREZ, MARVIN R., Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Botany. ANDERSON, CELIA L., M.S. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Education. ANDEHSON, DONALD J ., B.S. (Marquette), Systems Coordinator, Computer Research Center. ANDERSON, E. CHRISTIAN, Ph.D. (Michigan), Associate Professor, Education. 0ANDERSON, EVERETT S., M .M. (Illinois Wesleyan), Professor, Music. ANDERSON, JmIN A., M.A (Florida), Instructor, Economics. ANDEHSON, Lours V., Ph.D. (George Peabody), Associate Professor, Education. APPLE, BONNIE Jo, M.M. (Texas T ech.), Assistant Professor, Music. AnNADE, CHARLES W., Ph.D. (Florida), Professor, American Idea. AnTI:YBUSHEV, MILr=A, M.A.-equiv (Univ. Bocconi, Italy), Assist ant Professor, Functional Foreign Languages. ASHFORD, THEODOHE A., Ph.D. (Chicago), Associate Dean, Liberal Arts; Professor, Natural Sciences. AUBEL, JosEPH L., Ph.D. (Mic hi ga n State), Assistant Professor, Physics. AuLETA, MICHAEL S., Ed.D. (New York) Profe sso r, Education. AusTIN, MARTHA L., Ph.D. (Chicago), Associat e Professor, Education. AYDELOTT, DEAN M., M.F.A. (Nebraska), Assistant Professor, Art. BALL, ESPY D., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State), Assistant Professor, Psychology. BARBER, SOTIRios A., M.A. (Chicago), In s tructor, Political Science. BARFIELD, AnTHUR D., Jr. Ed.D. (Virginia), Associate Professor, Education. BARKHOLZ, GERALD R., M Ed. (Wayne State), Instructor, Education. BARNARD, }AMES W., Ph.D. (Yale), Resea rch Associate Professor, Exceptional Childr e n and Adults Institute. BARTLETT, ALTON C., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Chairman and Associate Profe ssor, Management. BATTLE, }EAN A., Ed.D. (Florida), D ea n and Professor, Education. BEAN, CHARLES F., M.E., (South Florida), Assistant Professor, Engin ee ring. BEAUCHAMP, GEORGE E., Ph.D. (Northwestern), Associate Professor, Functional English ( Part time). BELLO, lcNACIO, M.A., (South Florida), Instructor, Functional Mathematics. BELSITO, RosEANNE, B.A. (South Florida), Residence Couns elor Student Affairs; Instructor, Basic Studies 267

PAGE 114

268 ACADEMIC STAFF BELT, JACK W., M.F.A. (Yale), Assistant Professor, Theatre Arts. BENJAMIN, WILLIAM F., Ph.D (George Peabody), Professor, Education. BENTLEY, JosEPH G., Ph. D. (Ohio State), Associate Professor, English. BENTON, HELEN D., Ed.D. (Florida), Lectur er, Education (Part time). BERKLEY, fuCHARD J., M.S. (N. Mex. Inst. of Min. and Tech.), Assistant Professor, Physical Science. BERNER, WESLEY M., M.A. (Stetson), Assist ant Professor, Physical Education. 0BERRY, L. A., Ph.D. (Texa s ), Associate Pro fess or, Education. BETZ, JoHN V., Ph. D. (St. Bonaventure Univ.), Assistant Professor, Botany and Bact e riology. BILLINGSLEY, EDWARD B., Ph. D. (North Carolina), Assistant Pro fess or, History "BINFORD, JESSE S. JR., Ph. D. (Utah), Associat e Professor, Chemis try. BLACK, R. EARL, Ph.D. (Harvard), Assistant Professor, Political Science. BLACK, ROBERT L. III, B .S. (Florida), Dir ec tor, D eve lopm en t Services. BLAU, LILI R., M.S. (Pennsylvania Stat e ), Couns e ling Psychologist, Dev e lopm e ntal Cent e r (Part time). BLAu, THEODORE H., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State), Adjunct Professor, Behavioral Sci ence (Part time). BLOCH, SYLVAN C., Ph.D. (Florida St ate), Associate Professor, Physics. BLOUNT, WILLIAM R., M.A. (Northe rn Illinois), Research A ssis tant Professor, Ex cep tional Children and Adults Institute. BONDI, JosEPH C. JR., Ed.D. (Florida), Assist an t Professor, Educatio n. BONNEY, RAcHEL A., M.A. (Minnesota), Instructor, Anthrop o lo gy B ossERMAN, C. PHILIP, Ph. D. (Boston), Associate Professor, Am e rican Idea. Borr, WILLIAM K., Ed. D. (Duke), Professor, Education. BOULWARE, Jo E W., M.S. (Florida), Lecturer, Phys ica l Sci e nce. BOWEN, AnA M M.S.L.S. (Florida State), Assistant Reference Librarian, Librari e s BowERS, }AMES C., Sc.D. (Washington Univ.), Ass oci ate Professor, Electrical Engineering. BOWERS, Lours E., Ph.D. (Louisi ana State), Assis t an t Profes sor, Education. BOWERS, fucHARD T., Ed.D. (George Pe abody), Dir ec tor and Associate Professor, Physical Education, Recreational Sports and Athletics. BOYD, HERBERT F., Ph.D. (Illinois), Associate Professor, Education. BRADLEY, RoBERT V., M.A. (Florida State ), Catalog Librari a n, Libraries. BRADY, WILLIAM M., M S. (Illinois), Lecturer, Speech (Part tim e ). BRAMAN, ROBERT S., Ph.D. (Northwestern), Associa te Professor, Chemistry BRAMES, HERMAN J., M.S. (Indiana State), Continuing Education C e nter Administrator, St. Petersburg Campus. BRANTI.EY, BETTY C., M.Ed. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Education. BREIT, FRANK D., Ph.D. (Texas), Assistant Professor, Education. BRIDGES, VIRGINIA A., Ph.D. (Ohio State), Ass oci a t e Pro fessor Education BRIGGS, F. ALLEN, Ph.D. (Indiana), Professor, Educa tion and English. BRIGGS, JOHN C., Ph.D. (Stanford), Chairman and Professor, Zoolo gy BRIGHTWELL, J. fuCHARD, M.A. (Ohio State), Dire ctor, Cent e r for Continuing Education. BrurroN, }ACK R., Ph.D. (Colorado), Professor, Functional M athema tics. BRoER, CARMEN M., M.A. (Florida State), Instru c tor, Func tional English (Pa rt time). BROER, LAWRENCE R., Ph.D. (Bowling Gre en), Assist an t Professor, English. BROOKER, H. RALPH, Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Physics. BROOKS, CECIL C., M.S. (North Carolina State), Systems Coordin a tor, Office of the Registrar; Assistant Professor, Academic Affairs, St P e t e rsburg Ca mpus. BROWN, ERIC D., M.A. (Pennsylvania Stat e ), Ins tru c tor Humanities. BROWN, LARRY N., Ph.D. (Mis souri), Associate Pro fess or, Zoology. BROWN, ROBERTA S., Ed.D. (Indiana), Assistant Pro fesso r, Behavioral Scienc e.

PAGE 115

ACADEMIC STAFF 269 BRUNlilLD, Goruxm, Ph. D (Southern California), Professor, Finance. BRuscA, DoNALD D., M .D. (Medical Coll ege of Virgina ) Physician, Student Health Service. BRYANT, HAYDEN C. JR., M.A (George Peabody) Assistant Profe ssor Education BULLOCK, JoHN T., M .Ed. (Florida), Assistant Professo r, Education. BURDICK, GLENN A., Ph.D. (Mas sac husetts Inst. of Tech.), Professor, Electrical Engineering. BURGE'IT, AUGUST L., Ph.D. (Michigan), Assistant Professor, Energy Conversion, Engineering BURKE, ROBERT J., M.A (Loyola), Instruc tor, History. BURLEY, WILLIAM W ., M.Ed. (North Carolina), Assistant Professor, Education. BURTON, ROBERT H., Ph.D. (Louisiana State), Assistant Professor, Economics BURTON, RONALD, M .A. (Michi gan), Assistant Professor, Sociology. BuscH, EDGAR T., M.B.A. (Denver), Assistant Professor, Managemen t. BUSHELL, JoHN J., Systems Coordinator, Admissions and Records. BUTLER, CHARLES W ., B.A. (Lincoln Memorial), D irector, Physical Plant. BUTLER, K. NELSON, Ed.D. (Tennessee), Assistant Professor, Physical Educatio n CALDWELL, EDwARD, Ed.D. (Florida State), Direc tor, Evaluation Services; A ssistant Professor, Social Sciences. CAMERON, RICHARD R., M Ed. (Pennsy l vana 'State), Residence Counselor, Student Affairs; Instructor, Basic Studies. CAMERON, WM BRUCE, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Dean, Lib eral Arts; Prof esso r, Social Sciences. CAMP, }AMES R., B.A., (Georgia ), Assistant Professor, Fine Arts. CAMP, JoHN B Ph.D. (Florida S t a te), Assistant Professor, Hwnanities. CARLILE, DwrGHT B., B.A. (Mis souri), Assistant Director and L ecturer Sponsored Research. CARLSON, ZoE A., M.S. (South Florida), Instruc tor, Education CARLTON, EDWARD 0., M.B .A. (New York), Computer Re search Specialist, Com-puter Research Center CARMICHAEL, JoHN D., M.B .A. (Georgia State), Assistant Professor, Marketing. CARR, JosEPH A., Associate Curator, Planetariwn CARR, ROBERT S., L ecturer, L anguage -Liter ature (Part time). CARTER, CLAUDIA J., M.L.S (Columbia), Serials Librarian, Libraries. CARY, FREEMAN H., M.D. (Emory), Clinical Professor, Medical Education, Medicine. CASTEEL, }AMES D., Ph.D. (George Peabody), Associate Professor, Education. CAUGHEY, WINSLOW S., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor, Chemistry CAUSEY, DENZIL Y. JR., M.B.A (Emory), Assistant Professor, Accounting. CECONI, ISABELLE F., B.A. (We lls), Instructor Functional English. CHAMBERS, }ACK A., Ph. D. (Michigan State), Assistant D ean, Administrative Servic es; Directo r and Research Professor, Computer Research Center. CHAMBERS, }AMES A., Ed.D. (Tennessee), Associate Professor, Education. CHAMBERS, WILLIAM S. JR., B.A. (Florida), D ean, Uni versity Relations CHAPMAN, MARGARET L., M.A. (North Carolina), Special Coll ections Librarian, Librari es CHAPPEL, FRANCES R., M.Ed. (Florida), Instructor, Office Admini s tration. CHEATHAM, MARY J., M .S. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Physical Education. CHEN, CHUNG HwAN, Ph.D. (Berlin), Profes so r Philosophy. CHERRY, R. ADRIAN, Ph. D (Kentucky ), Associate Professor, Foreig n L anguages CHESLEY, SANBORN W., M.S. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Mathematics. CmsNELL, ROBERT E., M.S (Stetson), Assi s t an t Professo r English. CLAPP, ROGER W JR., Ph.D. (Vir ginia), Associate Professor, Physics.

PAGE 116

270 ACADEMIC STAFF CLARK, CLARENCE C., Ph.D. (New York), Professor Emeritus, Physical Science ( Part time). CLAYTON, GLENNDON E., B. S. (Indiana), Budget Officer CLEARY, FLORENCE D., M.A. (Wayne Stat e ), Lecturer, Education (Part time). CLEAVER, FRANK L., Ph D (Tulane), Professor, Functional M a th ema tics. CLEMENT, DAVID E., Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins), Associate Professor, Psychology. CLINE, ROBERT S., Ph.D. (Pennsylvani a ), Dean and Professor, Business Administration CoKER, DAN C., M.A. (Abilene Christi a n College), Assi stant Professor, Honduras Project, Education. COLBY, DONALD S., M.S. (Michigan), Direc tor, Student Placement, Placement Services. COLLIER, CLARENCE H., M E., (Georgia ), Assistant Professor, Education (Part time) CONNAR, RICHARD G., M .D. (Duke), Adjunct Professor, Sur gery, M edici ne. CooK, DoRis C., M.S. (Florida State), Assistant R efe rence Librarian, Libraries, St. Petersburg Campus. CooKE, JoHN P., Ph.D. (Colorado), Assistant Professor, E co nomics. CooPER, RussELL M., Ph.D. (Columbia), LL.D. (Hon.), D ea n and Professor, Liberal Arts CORNETT, ELEANOR K., Ph. D (Notre Dame), Lecturer, Mathematics. CoRY, JosEPH G., Ph. D. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Ch emis try. COVINGTON, HARRISON W., M F.A. (Florida), Associate Dean, Liberal Arts; Professor, Art. COWELL, BRUCE C., Ph.D. (Cornell), Assistant Professor, Zoology CowELL, GEORGE J., Ph. D (Western Reserve), Associate Professor, Pre-Engineering. Cox, ERNEST L. III, M.F.A. (Cranbrook Academy), A ssocia te Professor, Art. CRAIG, CALVERT J., M.S. (Illinois), Associate Professor, Education CRICKENBERGER, MARGAREI' E., M.S ., (Louisiana State), Associate Professor, Edu-cation. CULP, CONSTANCE M., B.A., (South Florida), Instructor, Physica l Education. CURREY, CECIL B., Ph. D (Kansas), Associate Professor, History. CURTIS, SHIRLEY A ., B.A ( South F lorida), Residence Coun se lor, Student Affairs; Ins tructor, Basic Studies DANENBURG, WILLIAM P., M.Ed. (North Carolina), Assistant D ea n for Administration and Associate Professor, Education DAVEY, KENNETH W., M.A. (St. Mary's), Assistant Professor, Economics; Co ordinator of Advising, Upper Level, Business Administration. DAVIS, JEFFERSON C JR. Ph.D. (California, Berkeley), Associate Professor, Ch emis try. DAVIS, WESLEY F., M.A (Arkansas), Associate Professor, English. DAWES, CLINTON J., Ph.D. (California, Los Ange les), Asso c iate Professor, Botany and Bacteriology DEAN, HARRIS W Ed.D (Illinois), Vice President and D ea n, Academic Affairs. DEANS, STANLEY R., Ph.D. (Vanderbilt), Assistant Profe ssor, Physics. DEAux, CLYDE E. JR. M.B.A. (Tulane Univ.), Assistant Professor, Finance. DEER, HARRIBT H., B.A. (Wooster), Assistant Professor, A cadem ic Affairs, S t Petersburg Campus DEER, IRVING, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Assoc iate Dean, Lib e ral Arts; Professor, Lan-guages-Literature. DEITER, JOHN C Ph.D. (Western Reserve), Associa t e Professor, Finance. D EJONGH, WILLIAM F. J., Ph.D. (Harvard), Visiting Lecturer, French. DELLA GROTTE, JosEPH A., Ph D. (Syracuse), Assistant Professor, History. DERTKE, MAX C Ph.D. (Miami, Florida), Assistant Professor, Psychology.

PAGE 117

ACADEMIC STAFF 271 DEVINE, JAMES F., M.S. (Illinois), Assistant Professor Pre-Engin eeri ng DEVINNEY, EDWARD J. JR., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Assistant Professor, Astronomy. DEW, WILLIAM A., M.A. (South Florida), Research Assistant, D eve lopm e ntal Center (Part time). DEWrrr, HUGH H., Ph.D. (Stanford), Assistant Professor, Marine Science, Research and Development Center. DEYO, WILLIAM J. Jn., M.B.A. (Harvard), Assistant Professor, Accounting. DIETRICH, LINNEA S., M .A. (Delaware), Lecturer, Art. DIETRICH, RICHARD F., Ph.D. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, English. DOMINICK, JOHN F., M.D. (George Washington), Clinical Professor, Medical Education, Medicine. DoNALDSON, MERLE R., Ph.D. (Georgia Inst. of Tech.), Chairman and Professor, Electrical and Electronic Systems. DONOVAN, PAUL T., M.S. (Florida State), Assistant Reference Librarian, Libraries; Systems Coordinator, Computer Research Center. DowNEY, PAUL M., Ph.D. (Florida), Professor, Engineering. DRAPELA, VICTOR J., Ph.D. (North Dakota), Assistant Professor, Education. DRUM, RALPH E., B.A. ( Mian1i, Ohio), Coordinator, Non-Credit Activities, Educationa l and Professional Service. Du Bors, LEADORE D., M.S. (Northwestern), Associate Professor, Education. DUDLEY, FRANK M., Ph.D. (Ohio State), Assistant Professor, Physical Science. DurroN, RICHARD E., Ph.D. (Louisiana State), Associate Professor, Management. DwYEn, ROBERT C., Ed.D. (George Peabody), Associate Professor, Education. DWYER, Roy E., Ed.D. (Florida), Associate Professor, Education EBERSPAECHER, HEIDI I., B.S.-equiv. (School of Chemistry, Germany), Research Associate, Chemistry. EDWARDS, HAROLD E., Ph.D. (Tennessee), Counseling Psychologist, Developmental Center; Associate Professor, Social Sciences. EDWARDS, THOMAS M., M.D. (Ohio State), Adjunct Professor, Sp eec h Pathology and Audiology Institute. EGOLF, ROBERT L., M.D. (Temple), Director, Student Health Service. EICHHOLZ, GERHARD C., Ph.D. (Ohio State), Director, Instru ctional Media, Educational Resources. EICHHORN-VON WURMB, HEINRICH K., Ph.D. (Vienna), Chairman and Professor, Physics. EILERS, FREDERICK I., Ph.D. (Michigan), Assistant Professor, Botany. ELLIS, ROBERT W., Ph.D. (Virginia Poly. Inst.), Associate Professor, Structures, Materials and Fluids. ENGEL, CHARLES W., Ed.D. (Wayne State), Assistant Professor, Education. ENIX, MARGERY A., M.M. (Indiana), Associate Professor, Music. EPSTEIN, RHEDA, M.L.S. (Drexel Inst. of Tech.), Assistant Catalog Librarian, Libraries. ERICKSON, LINDA E., M.A. (Syracuse), Assistant Dean of Women, Student AHairs; Adjunct Assistant Professor, Basic Studies. EUBANK, LEE E., M.M. (Indiana), Assistant Professor, Music. FABRY, FRANCIS J ., Ph.D. (Texas), Assistant Professor, English. FAGER, CHARLES J., M.F.A. (Kansas), Associate Professor, Art. FAGER, MARILYN K., B.S. (Kansas State), Coordinator and Instructor, Coop erative Education, (Part time). FEARN, WARD 0., Performance Certificate, Curtis Institute of Music, Associate Professor, Music. FEINBERG, GARY, M.A. (Brooklyn), Instructor, Sociology. FELLOWS, DAVID B., B.A. (Maryland), Coordinator, Non-Credit Activities, Con tinuing Education. FENELON, WILLIAM T., M.A. (South Florida), Instructor, Sociology.

PAGE 118

272 ACADEMIC STAFF FERNANDEZ, }ACK E., Ph.D. (Florida), Associate Professor, Chemistry. FIGG, RoBERT M. III, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Assistant Professor, Functional English. FISHER, MARGARET B., Ph.D. (Columbia), Dean of Women, Student Affairs; Associate Professor, Basic Studies. FLYNN, ROBERT W., Sc.D. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.), Assistant Professor, Physics. FOLLMAN, JoHN C., Ph.D. (Indiana), Assistant Professor, Education. FORBES, STUART C., M.A. (Florida), Instructor, Economics. FoRMAN, GUY, Ph.D. (Kentucky), Chairman and Professor, Physics. FoUTz, LUCILLE C., Ph.D. (Iowa), Counseling Psychologist, Developmental Cen ter. FRANCIS, WaLIAM C., M.A. (Central Michigan), Instructor, Education. FRANTZ, DoNALD H. JR., Ph.D. (Southern California), Associate Professor, Hu-manities. FRE1JO, ToM D., M.Ed. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Education. FRENCH, FLORENCE F., M.A. (Wisconsin), Lecturer, English (Part time). FRENCH, SIDNEY J., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), D.Hum. (Hon.), Dean Emeritus and Professor, Education (Part time). FRIEDL, FRANK E., Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Professor, Zoology. "FusARo, BERNARD A., Ph.D. (Maryland), Assistant Professor, Mathematics. FusoN, ROBERT H., Ph.D. (Louisiana State), Chairman and Professor, Geography. GAGAN, fucHARD J., M.S. (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor, Sociology. GARCIA, JoRGE, M.Ed. (Florida), Counseling Psychologist, Developmental Center. GARCIA, JUANITA L., M.A. (Ohio State), Assistant Professor, Institute on Aging. GARRETT, SAMUEL J., Sc.D. (Pittsburgh), Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering. GARRETT, WaLIAM, Ph.D. (Florida), Associate Professor, Functional English. GATES, JEAN K., M.S.L.S. (Catholic Univ. of America), Assistant Professor, Education. GAUSE, NoRMA N., B.A. (South Florida), Instructor, Functional English. GEIS, THOMAS S., M.A. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Behavioral Science (Part time). GELINAS, ROBERT W., M.A. (Alabama), Assistant Professor, Art. GESSMAN, ALBERT M., Ph.D. (Vienna), Chairman and Profe s sor, Cl a ssi cs. GESSNER, ALAN, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State), Associate Professor, Behavioral Sci e nce ( Part time). GaMORE, ALDEN S., M.A. (Florida State), Assistant Professor B e havioral Sci e nce. GIRGENTI, .ANTHONY J., M.S. (South Florida), Resea rch Associ a t e Che mistry. GLEAVES, ROBERT M., Ph.D. (Vanderbilt), Assistant Professor, Sp a ni s h. GLENISSON, EMaE G., Ph.D. (Illinois), Associate Professor, Fre nch. GOFORTH, FRANCES S., Ed.D. (Indiana), Assistant Professor, Education. GOLD, MARVIN J., Ph.D. (George Peabody), Associate Professor, Sp e cial Education. GOLDING, ALFRED S., Ph.D. (Columbia), Associate Professor, Thea tr e Art s GOLDING, LOIS A., L.M. (McGill Univ., Canada), Associat e Profess o r, Music. GOMEZ, OSBORNE L., M.A. (Florida), Librarian, Libraries, St. Pete rsburg Campus. GONZALEZ, Juan 0., M.S. (Virginia Poly. Inst.), Associate Professor, Energy Conversion Systems. GOODMAN, AnoLPH W., Ph.D. (Columbia), Distinguished Professor, Mathematics. GoRDON, CHARLES A., M.S. (Ka nsas State), Assistant Professor, Education. GOULD, }AMES A., Ph. D. (Michigan), Chairman and Professor, Philosophy. GoWEN, HowARD B., Ph.D. (Florida State), Associate Professor, Humanities. GRANGE, ROGER T. JR., Ph.D. (Arizona), Chairman and Associate Professor, Anthropolo gy.

PAGE 119

ACADEMIC STAFF 273 GRANT, JOHN A. JR., J.D., (Stetson), Assistant Professor, Business Law. GnEER, JACK F., M.A. (South Florida), Research Associate, Special Education. GRIFFIN, GEORGE M., Ph.D. (Rice), Associate Professor, Geology. GRIFFITH, JoHN E., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State), Chairman and Professor, Structures, Materials and Fluids Systems. GRINDEY, ROBERT J ., M.S. (New Mexico), Assistant Professor, Physical Education. GRiscrr, WALTER E., M.A. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Journalism. GROTHMANN, Wn.HELM H., Ph.D. (Kansas), Assistant Professor, German. GUEST, LESTER P., Ph.D. (Maryland), Lecturer, Behavioral Science (Part time). GuETZLOE, ELEANOR C., M.A. (South Florida), Research Associate, Education (Part time) GuINOGH, KEVIN J., Ph.D. (Pittsburgh), Lecturer, Humanities. GUNTER, Brr.LY G., Ph.D (Tennessee), Assistan t Professor, Sociology. HADAWAY, FARRAND J., M.B.A. (Memphis State), Instructor, Marketing. HALL, SALLIB J., M.A. (Pennsylvania State), Assistant Professor, Functional English. HARDAWAY, ELLIOTT, M.S. (Illinois), Vice President and Dean, Administrative Affairs. HARDY, Mn.ES W., Ph.D. (Florida State), Associate Professor, Behavioral Science. HARKNESS, DoNALD R., Ph.D. (Minnesota), Coordinator of Student Advising; Associate Professor, American Idea. HARKNEss, MARY Lou, M.S. (Columbia), D irector, Libraries. HARMON, MARYHELEN C., M.A.T. (Florida), Instructor, Functional English. HARrusoN, Wn.LIAM F., M.A.L.S. (George Peabody), Assistant Catalog Librarian, Libraries. HART, CARLTON N., M.S. (Miami, Florida), Instructor, Functional Mathematics. HARTLEY, JACQUEITA W., M.A. (Florida), Instructor, Functional English. HARTSHORN, TRUMAN A., Ph.D. (Iowa), Assistant Professor, Geography. HATCHER, JOHN S., Ph.D. (Georgia), Assistant Professor, Functional Engli s h. HAWKINS, HAROLD L., Ph.D. (Oregon ), Assistant Professor, Psychology. HEARN, THOMAS K., Ed.D. (Al abama) Assistant Professor, Education. HEESCHEN, RrcHARD E., M.S. (Florida State), Assistant Director and Associate Professor, Physical Education. HENLEY, ELTON F., Ph.D. (Florida State), Associate Professor, English. HERMAN, WALTER J., Ph.D. (Florida), Associate Professor, Economics. HERTZ, Gn.MAN W., P.E.D. (Indiana), Professor, Physical Education. HEY, KENNETH R., M.A. (Florida State), Instructor, Basic Studies (Part time). HIGGINS, JoHN M., Ed.D. (Toronto, Canada), Associate Professor, Education. Hn.L, CLYDE B., B.S.C.E. (Kentucky), Assistant Dean for Facilities Planning and Operations. HILL, WALTER G., B.A. (Milligan College), L ec turer, Education. Hn.LEY, MICHAEL E., M.S.M.E. (Clemson College), Assistant Professor, En-gineering Hn.LIARD, ROBERT B., Ph.D. (Iowa), Associate Professor, History. HIRSHBERG, EDGAR W., Ph.D (Yale), Professor, English. HOFFMAN, HUBERT A., M.Ed. (Missouri), Assistant Professor, Education. HOFFMAN, THEODORE B., Ph.D. (Univ. of the Pacilic), Professor, Humanities. HOLCOMB, DAN L., M.S. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Physical Education HOLLAND, MARGARET S., M.A.T. (Duke), Instructor, Education. HOPKINS, JoHN C., M .S. (East Texas State), Residence Couns e lor, Student Affairs, Instructor, Basic Studies. HOPKINS, THOMAS L., Ph.D. (Florida State), Assistant Profe ssor, Marine Science Institute, St. Petersburg Campus. HORRIGAN, FREDERICK J., Ph.D. (Indiana), Associate Professor, Political Science. HOSTETTER, JoHN D., M.S.L.S. (Florida State), Assistan t Serials Librarian, Libraries.

PAGE 120

274 ACADEMIC STAFF HoTSON, JOHN H., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Associate Professor, Economics. Home, C. WESLEY, M.F.A. (Iowa) Ass ociate Professor, Art. 0HuBBARD, CoNRAD E., M.B.A. (Kentucky), Assistant Professor, Accounting HUMM, HAROLD J., Ph. D. (Duke), Professor, Marine Science Institute, St. Petersburg Campus. HUNNICUTT, CLARENCE ,V., Ed.D. (Stanford), Professor, Education. HUNTER, WIT.LIAM A., Ph.D (Tulane), Chairman and Professor, Modern Foreign Languages. HuRD, ROBERT L., M.B.A. (South Florida), Instru ctor, Accounting. HusBAND, ARTHUR K., M.D. (McGill Medical, Canada), Speech Pathology and Audiology In stitute. Ioruo, JoHN J ., M.A. (Columbia), Associate Professor, Functional Eng lish. IsAAK, SAMUEL, M., Ph.D. (Indiana), Associate Professor, Mathematics JACKSON, BERNARD R., Ph.D. (Ohio State), Associate Professor, Education. JACOB, JAMES R., Ph.D. (Cornell), Assistant Professor, History. JACOB, MARGARET C., Ph.D. (Cornell), Lecturer, Interdisciplinary Languages and Literature. JAESCHKE, DONALD P., M.A. (Florida State), Associate Professor, Education. }AMES, RosELLA, M.B.A. (Temple), Assistant Professor, Economics. JENKINS, GEORGE L., M.S. (Florida State), Residence Counselor, Student Affairs; In structo r, Basic Studies. JENNINGS, VANCE S., M.Ed. (Mississippi), Assistant Professor, Music. JoHANNINGMEIER, ERWIN G Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Professor, Education. JOHNSON, GORDON A., Ph.D. (Michigan State), Professor, Music. JOHNSON, ROGER E., Ph.D. (Minnesota), Assistant Professor, Education. JOHNSTON, ROBERT E., Ph.D. (California, Los Angeles), Assistant Professor, Political Science. JoNAITIS, ANTHONY J JR., M.S. (Springfi e ld College), Assistant Professor, Physical Education. JORDAN, DAVID C., M.A. (South Florida), Dire ctor, Summer School Program; Assistan t Professor, Academic Affairs. }REISAT, JAMIL E Ph.D. (Pittsburgh), Assistant Professor, Political Science JUERGENSEN, HANS, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor, Humanities. }URCH, GEORGE R. JR., Ph.D. (California, San Die go), Assistant Professor, Chemistry. JURGENSEN, L ours C., Ph.D. (Iowa), Chairman and Professor, Accounting and Business Law. KAPLAN, MAX, Ph.D. (Illinois), Professor, Office of Sponsored Research. KARNS, LEE T., Ed. D. (Oklahoma), Assistant Professor, Education. KAsAN, E. LEE, M.A. (Florida), Speech and Hearing Clinician, Dev e l opmental Center; Assistant Professor, B asic Studies. KASHDIN, GLADYS S., Ph.D. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Humanities. KAUDER, EMIL, Ph.D. (Berlin), Distinguished Lecturer, Economics. KAUFMANN, DONALD L., Ph.D. (Iowa), Assistant Professor, English. KEARNEY, KEvIN E., Ph.D. (Florida), Director and Associate Professor, Bachelor of Independent Studies. KEEFE, ALICE E., Ph.D. (New York ), R.N ., Dean, College of Nursing KE&'IE, T WAYNE, Ed.D. (Florida), Director, Administrative Planning and Analysis; Research Associate Professor, Computer H.ese arch Cente r. KEETH, JoHN E., B.A. (Louisiana State), Assistant Acquisition Librarian, Libraries. KEITER, FRONSIE B., Ph.D. (Iowa), Assistant Professor, Education. KELLEY, ANNE E., Ph.D. (Florida State), Associate Professor, Poli ti ca l Science. KELLEY, JoHN E., Ph.D. (Michigan), Chairman and Associate Profe ssor, Mathematics. KELLY, KAY M., M.A.T. (Notre Dame), Assistant Professor, Spe ec h. KENDALL, HARRY W., Ph.D. (Florida), Professor, Physics. KENERSON, DAVID R., M.C.S. (Dartmouth), Assistant Professor, Management.

PAGE 121

ACADEMIC STAFF 275 KENNEDY, JAY B., Ph.D. (Indiana), Associate Professor Econom ics. KESSLER, EVELYN S., M.A. (Columbia), Assistant Profes s or, Anthropo l ogy. KIEFER, H CI-IBISTIAN, Ph.D. (Columbia), Chairman and Professor, Humanities. KIMMEL, HERBERT D., Ph.D. (Southern California), Chairman and Professo r, Psychology KINCAID, GEORGE H., Ed.D. (Florida), Assistan t Professor, Education. KINDE, STEWART W., M.A. (Central Michigan), Assistan t Professor, Speech Path ology and Audiology Institute KING, RAYMOND C., M.A. (Columbia), Dire c tor, Hous ing and Food Service. KLEINE, GEORG-HELMUT, Ph.D (Univ. Erl angen -Nurnberg), Assistant Professor, History. KNAB, DENNIS E., M.A. (Johns Hopkins), Assistant Professor, Political S cie n ce KNEEBURG, DoN W M.M. (Indiana), Assistant Profe sso r, Music. KoBASKY, MICHAEL G., M.S. (Florida State), Coordinator, Non-Cr edi t A c tivities, Continuing Education. KOPP, EDGAR W., M.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech.), De a n and Professor Engineering KowALEK, JoN W., M.F.A (Cranbrook Academy), Assistant Professor, Art. KozELKA, RICHARD L ., Ph.D. (Minnesota), Director of Graduate Stud i es and Professor of Economics. KRIVANEK, JEROME 0., Ph. D. (Florida), Associa t e Professor, Zoology. KRONSNOBLE, JEFFREY M., M.F.A. (Michig an), Assist ant P ro fessor, Art. KRuSCHWITZ, WALTER H., Ph.D. (Michigan), Associa t e Professor, Physics Kum.., MARY JANE, M.S.L.S. (North Carolina), Assistant Special Coll ec tions Librari a n, Libraries. KU'I'CHER, Loms W. JR., M .A. (Rhode Island), Assis tant Professor, Sociology. LA BARBA, RrcHARD C., Ph. D (Tennessee), Assis t an t Pro fessor, Psycho l ogy. LAKE, DuANE E., B.A. (Minnesota), Director, University C e nt e r. LAKELA, OLGA, Ph.D. (Minnesota) Res earc h Associa t e, Bot a ny and B acte riology (Part tim e ). LANE, JAMES H., Ph.D. (North Carolina State), Associate Professor, Engineering. LANTZ, DONALD L., Ph.D. (Minnesota), Professor, Education. LARSEN, MERNET R., M.F.A. (Indiana), Assi s t an t Professor, Art. LASSETER, JAMES JR., M.B.A. (Chicago), C.P.A., Assistant Professor, Accounting. LATINA, ALBERT A., M.S. (Florida State), In struc tor, Biological Science. LAWRENCE, JoHN M., Ph.D. (Stanford), Assistant Professor Zoology. LAWSON, JoHN R Ed.D. (Nebraska), Associate Professor, Education. LA\VTON, ALFRED H., M.D., Ph.D. (Northwestern), Sc.D. (Hon. ), D ean of Medi cine; Associa t e Dean, Academic Affairs. LAYNE, }AMES N., Ph.D. (Cornell), Adjunct Professor, Zoo l ogy LENTZ, GLENDA F., B.A. (South Florida), Coordinator Instructor, Cooperative Education LEONARD, DAvm P., Ph.D. (Michigan), Associate Professor, History. LEVY, IRWIN S., Ph.D. (North Carolina), Assistant Professor, Edu ca tion. LICHTENBERG, DONOVAN R., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Professor, Education. LIMOGES, LANCE D ., M.A. (Miami, Ohio), Instructor, Geography. LIN, SHwu-YENG T., Ph.D. (Florida), Adjunct Assistant Professor, Functional Mathe matics LIN, You-FENG, Ph.D. (Florida), Associate Profes sor, Mathematics LINDGREN, THEODORE D., Ph.D. (Georgia Inst. of Tech.), Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering. LINTON, JoE R., Ph.D. (Missouri), Associa t e Professor, Zoology. LocKWooD, PHILIP S., M.M (Colorado), Assistant Professor, Music. LONG, ROBERT W., Ph.D. (Indiana), Chairman and Professor, Bot a ny and Bac t erio l ogy LONGSTREET, JAMES R., Ph. D. (Northwestern), Ch airman and Professor Finance.

PAGE 122

276 ACADEMIC STAFF LORENZEN, Wn.LIAM A. III, M.F.A. (Tulane), Assistant Professor, Thea tre Arts. LOVELESS, fucHARD L., M. Ed. (Pennsylvania State), Assist ant Prof esso r, Education. LoWE, ALVIN J., Ed.D. (Virginia), Assistant Professor, Education. LucAs, JAMES E., B.A. (South Florida), Registrar. 0Lucrro, LEONAlill J., Ed.D. (Illinois), Professor, Education. LUCKENBACH, LEON R., Ed.D. (Florida), Associate Professor, Functional Mathematics. LucoFF, MANNY, M.A. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Education. LUPO, JosEPH, M.D. (Tulane), Psychiatrist, Student He alth Service (Part time) LUPTON, D. KEITH, M.A. (Dartmouth), Assistant Professor, Cooperative Education Program. MAcCAMBRIDGE, SHEn.A Y., M.Ed. (Illinois), Instructor, Education. MACKAY, E. MAXINE, Ph.D. (Emory), Associate Professor, Humanities. MACPHERSON, ROBERT H., Ph.D. (Syracuse), Adjunct Assistant Professor, Speech Pathology and Audiology Institute. MANKER, CHARLES C. JR., Ph.D. (Kentucky), Assistant D ea n and Professor, Educatio n. MANLEY, BRYN J., Associate (Royal College of Art, London), Assistant Professor, Art. MANoucIAN, MANouc N., Ph.D. (Texas), Assistant Professor, Math ema tics. MANSELL, RICHARD L., Ph.D. (Indiana), Assistant Professor, Botany. MARSHALL, PHYLLIS P., M.A. (Marshall College ), Director, Student Organizations. MARTIN, DEAN F., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State), Associate Professor, Chemi s try. MARTIN, EDWlN P., Ph.D. (Kansas), Dean and Profe ssor B as ic Studies. MAW, ARTHUR J. G., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor, Biological Sci ence MAYBURY, P. CALVIN, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Chairman and Professor, Chemi stry 0MAYER, GEORGE H., Ph.D. (Minnesota), Prof esso r, His tory. McCABE, GERAJID B., M.A. (Michigan State), Assistant Director, Libraries. McCLELLAN, LESLIE, Ed.D. (Missouri), Associate Professor, Education. McCLENDON, D ENNIS E., B.S. (Houston), Di rec tor, Information Services. McCLUNG, GENE E., M.S. (Hardin-Simmons), C.P.A., Associate Professor, Accounting. McCLUNG, NoRVEL M., Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor, Botany and B ac teriolo gy McCORMICK, EUGENE, M.S. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Accounting. McCORMICK, MARIJO K., M.Ed. (Florida), Assist ant Professor, B ehav ioral Science. McCoY, SUE, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Assistant Professor, Chem istry. McCRACKEN, Wn.LAIID E. JR., M.A. (Columbia), Assoc i a te Professor, Art. McCRAY, JAMES E., M.M. (Southern Illinois), Assistant Professor, Education McEwAN, SusAN, M.L.S. (Emory), Assistant C a talog Librari an, Libraries. McINTYRE, KENNETH E., M.D. (Wayne), Clinical Professor, Medical Education. McKrrrucK, KEITH G., Ph.D. (Cincinnati), Counseling Psychologist, Developm enta l C enter; Associate Professor, Social Science. McLEAN, EDWAlill F., Ph.D. (Duke), Associate Professor, Foreign L anguages MCNAIR, A. JEANENE, M.A.L.S. (Indiana), Assistant Reference Lib rarian Libraries. MCWATERS, MARCUS M. JR., Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Functional Mathematics. MECHAM, ELDON J., M.F.A. (Texas), Instructor, Theatr e Art s MELENDI, JoHN C., B.S. (Florida Southern), Director, Procurement. MELLISH, G. HARTLEY, Ph.D. (Vir ginia), Associate Professor, Economics. MENAIIDIERE, CHRISTIAN DE LA, Ph.D. (Sorbonne), Associate Profe ssor, Functional Foreign L anguages. MERICA, JoHN A., M .S. (Syracuse), Adjunct Ass istant Professor, Education. MERRIAM, KEMPER W., Ph.D. (Texas), Professor, Accounting. MERRITI', WYLIE' C. JR., M.A. (Oklahoma), C.P.A., Assistant Professor, Accounting. MEYERRIECKS, ANDREW J., Ph.D. (Ha rvard), Associate Professor, Zoology. MICHAEL, LoIS I., Ed.D. (Auburn), Assistant Professor, Education

PAGE 123

ACADEMIC STAFF 277 MICHAELIDES, GEORGE J., M.A. (Virginia Poly. Inst.), Assistant Professor, Mathe matics. MILANI, VrnGn. I., Ph. D. (Catholic Univ. of America), Associate Professor, Functional Foreign Languages. MILLER, GEORGE H., M.S.J. (Illinois), Director, Cooperative Education Program. MILLER, JoHN F. III, M.A. (Maryland), Instructor, Philosophy. MILLER, ROBERT D., M.A. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Management. MILLER, WILLIAM G., Ph.D. (Iowa), Assist ant Director and Research Assistant Professor, Computer Re searc h Center and College of Education. MITCHELL, RICHARD W., Ph.D. (Texas A & M), Associa te Professor, Physics. MITCHELL, TuoMAs B., M.A. (George Peabody), Assistant Professor, Functional English. MoDRow, WILLIAM G., M.S. (Texas A & M), Assistant Professor, Finance. MOLER, ARTHUR R., M.D. (Cincinnati), Physician, Student H ealth Service. MoNLEY, LAURENCE E., Ph.D. (Florida), Professor, Education. "MooRE, }ACK B., Ph.D. (North Carolina), Associate Professor, English. MORELL, ROBERT W., Ph.D. (St. Louis), Professor, Management. MoRRis, WILLIAM E., Ph.D. (North Carolina), Associate Professor, Englis h. MoURER, STEPHEN A., Ph.D. (Southern Illinois), Assistant Professor, Psychology. MUMME, RoY I., M.Ed. (North Carolina), Assistant Professor, Education. MUNTYAN, BozmAR, M.A. (Illinois), Associate Professor, Education. MURPHY, RoBERT J., Ph.D. (Fordham), Associate Professor, Economics. MusGROVE, WALTER J., Ed. D. (Maryland), Associate Professor, Education. NAGOSKY, JoHN JR., Ph.D. (Indiana), Associate Professor, Music. NEEL, JOHN H ., M A. (Florida), Instructor, Educa tion. NELSON, DouGLAS L., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor, Psychology. NELsoN, Gm E. JR., Ph.D. (Florida), Professor, Biological Science. NEsMAN, EDGAR G., M.S. (Michigan St ate), Assis tant Professor, Sociology. NEUGAARD, EDWARD J., Ph.D. (North Carolina), Associate Professor, Spanish. NEWCOMB, JoAN I ., M.A. (Ohio State), Residence Couns e lor, Student Affairs; Instructor, Basic Studies. NICHOLS, ROGER M., Ph.D (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Political Sci e nce. NIENHAUS, HARRY A., M.S. (St. Louis), Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering. NORTON, JANET H., M.A. (Michigan State), Resid e nce Coun se lor, Student Affairs; Instru cto r Basic Studies. NwANZE, MICHAEL C., Ph.D. (Univ. of Leeds, England), Visiting Assistant Pro fessor, Political Science. OBERMEYER, CHARLES, Ph.D. (Univ. of London), Lecturer, American Idea (Part time). OcHSHORN, MYRON G., Ph.D. (New Mexico), Associ a te Professor, English. O'DONNELL, EDWARD, Ph. D. (Cincinnati), Assistant Profess or Geology. O'DONNELL, MAURICE E., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Chairman and Associate Professor, Political Science. 0ESCHER, JAcK W., M.A. (South Florida), Instructor, Marketing. O'HARA, ROBERT C., M.A. (Louisville), Associate Professor, Functional Engli s h. O'HARE, LEo, M.A (Woodstock), Instructor, Functional English (Part time). OLINE, LARRY W., Ph.D. (Georgia Inst. of Tech.), Assistant Professor, Engineering OLSEN, EuGENE D., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Professor, Chemistry. ORONA, ANGELO R., Ph.D. (Ca lifornia, Los Angeles), Assistant Professor, Anthro pology. ORR, MARK T., Ph.D. (North Carolina), Chairman and Associate Professor, Inter disciplinary Soci a l Sci e nces. 0RSENO, BETTY A., M.A. (Ohio), Residenc e Counsel or, Stud en t Affairs; Instructor, B as ic Studies. ORTWEIN, PHILLIP G ., M.S. (Indiana), Assistant Professor, Physical Education.

PAGE 124

278 ACADEMIC STAFF O'SULLIVAN, PETER B., M.A. (North Carolina), Assist ant Pro fesso r, Theatre Arts. OWEN, TERENCE C Ph.D. (Univ. of Manchester, England), Associate Professor, Chemistry. OWEN, WILLIAM D M.M. (North T exas State), Associate Professor, Music. PALMER, JAMES N., M.A. (North C arolina), Assi s t an t Professor, Functional Englis h PAPPAS, GEORGE, Ed.D. (Pennsylvania), Associate Prof esso r, Art. PARKER, JoHN W. JR., Ed.D. (Kentucky), A ssocia t e Professor, Func tion a l Englis h. PARKER, K EITH A., Ph.D. (Maryland), Assistant Professor, History. PARKER, N. DANIEL, M.B.A. (Fl orida St a te), Instruc tor, Managemen t. PARRINO, DONNA A., M .A. (Flori da State ), Assis tant Refer e nce Lib rarian, Libraries. PARRISH, JAMES A., Ph.D. (Florida State), Chairman and Professor, Functional English. PASTERNAK, fucHARD E., Ph.D. (Alabama), Ch airma n and A ssocia t e Professo r Economi cs. PATOUILLET, RAYMOND A., Ed.D. (Columbia), Professor, Education. PAYAS, ARMANDO, M.A. (Florida State), In s tru ctor, Funct ional Foreign Languages. PAYNE, CHARLES E., M.S. (Florida), Assist an t Professor, Industrial Engineering PEIZER, RAOUL N., Ph. D. (Stanford), A ssistan t Professor, Human iti es. PETERSON, DONOVAN D., M.A. (Los An ge l es State), Associa t e Professor, Honduras Proj e ct, Education. PFOST, HowARD P., Ed.D. (George Peabody), Assistant Professor, Education. PINKARD, CALVIN M., Ph. D. (Florida), Associate Prof essor, R e habilitation Ins titute. POPE, JAMES S., M A (South Florida), Assistant Professor, Education. POPOVICH, HELEN H., Ph.D. (Kansas), Assistant Professor, English. POPOVICH, JAMES E., Ph.D. (Northwestern), C hairman and Professor, Spe ech. POWELL, ROBERT W., Ph.D. (Florida St a te), Ass istant Professor, Behavioral Science. PowER, FRED B., M.Ed. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Finance PRATHER, SAM W M.S. (Florida State), Associate Professo r Phy sica l Education. PREODOR, EDWARD, M.M. (Eastman S c hool of Music), Professor, Music. PRESCOTT, GERALD R., M.A. (Iowa), Associate Professor, Educa tion PmcE, WILLIAM 0 M.A. (Rutgers), Assistan t Professor, G e rman. PRIDE, Ev A L., M.A. (Columbia), Reading C linician, D eve l opmen t al Center ; Assistant Professor Basic Studies. I'uRDOM, DANIEL M., Ed.D. (Ca liforni a, Los An ge l es), Associate Professor Educa tion. RADLOFF, JoHN E., B.A. (South Florida), In s tructor Education RAGAN, WENDELL J ., Ph.D. (Missouri), Chairman and Professor, Geo l ogy RAMPOLLA, FRANK A., B.F.A. (Boston), Assi stant Professor, Art. RASHAD, ABDEL RAzZAK M Ph.D. (Cairo Univ., E gypt), A ssoc i a t e Professor. Electric a l Engineering. RArn, JoGINDAR S., Ph. D (Wayne State), Associate Professor, Mathemati cs. RAY, JAMES D JR., Ph. D (Illinois), Chairman and Professor, Biolo g i ca l Science. READER, WIT.LIB D., P h D. (Florida), Assistant P rofesso r, Functiona l Englis h. REARICK, MARTHA N M.M. (Michigan), Assistant Professor, Music. REBHUN, HERBERT F., M.L. (Pittsburgh), Research Assi stan t Professor, Computer Research Center; Assistant Professor, Education REECE, DONNA Y., M S L.S. (Florida State ), Docum ents Librarian, Libraries. REED, CozB!E A., M.S. (East Texas State), Instructor, Basic Studies (Part time). REED, JAMES H M.A. (Maryland), Assistant Professor, Mathematics REILLY, J. TIM, J.D. (Stetson), Assistant Professor, American Idea. REYNOLDS, HAYWARD D., J .D. (Indiana), Assistant Professor, Busin ess Law. REYNOLDS, JERALD M., M M. (Oregon), Assistant Professor, Music 0REYNOLDS, RICHARD C., M.S L .S. (Syracuse), Ass i s t an t Professo r, Education. R1CH, THOMAS A., Ph.D. (Florid a ), Chairman and Professor, Behavioral Science. RICHEY, JOYCE A., B.S. (Kentucky), Research Associate, Computer Re search Center.

PAGE 125

ACADEMIC STAFF 27 9 RICHMOND, RoBERT E., B.S (Missis sipp i Southern), Comptroller RICKER, LAWRENCE H., Ph.D. (Florida), Associa te Professor, Behavioral Science. RIESE, NARDA J ., M.A. (Michi ga n State), Instructor, Basic Studies (Part time). RIMBEY, DONALD H., Ph.D. (Illinois), Associate Professor, Engineering. ROBERSON, BRUCE W., M B.A. (Texas), C.P.A Assistant Professor, Accounting. ROBERTS, EUGENE L., M.Ed. (Mississippi), Director of Admissions. ROBERTS, LOREN G., M S (Emporia State), Assi6tant Professor, Educat ion. ROBERTSON, HENRY M., Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Professor, American Idea. ROBINSON, GERALD G., Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Professor, Biologi ca l Science. ROBINSON, ]ACK H., Ed.D. (Harvard), Ch a irman and Professor, Physical Science. ROBISON, DENNIS E., M .S.L .S. (Florida State), Reference Librar i an, Libraries. RODGERS, ANDREW C., B.A (Florida), Business Manager, Administrative Affa irs. RODRIGUEZ, CHARLES F., B.S. (Florida State), Coordinator, Non-Credit Ac t ivities, Continuing Educa tion. Ror.r..INs, }oHN W., M.S. (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor, History ROMIG, LARRY G. B.S. (Susquehanna), Assistant Professor and Program Advisor, Educationa l and Professional Servi ce RosE, DoNALD C., Ph.D. (Kentucky), Chairman and Professor, Functional Mathematics Ross, BERNARD E., Ph.D. (Florida), Professor, Structures, Materials and F l uids. 0Ross, }ACK C., Ph.D. (Minnesota), Assistant Profes so r Socio l ogy. ROTHWELL, STUART C., Ph. D. (Syracuse), Associae Professor Geography. RussELL, RuTH S., M.A. (South Florida), Instructor, Education. RUTENBERG, DANIEL, Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Profe s sor, Humanities RYBERG, H. THEODORE, M.S L.S (Western Reserve), Dean, Instructional Services SAFF, DONALD J., Ed.D. ( Cohunbia), Chairman and Associate Professor, Art. SANDERS, THOMAS E., M.A. (Denver), Assistant Professor, English. SANDERSON, ARTHUR M Ph. D (Iowa), Chairman and Profe sso r, Journalism; D irootor Campus Publications. SARETT, ALMA J., Ph.D. (Northwestern), Professor, Speech. SAXON, SuE V Ph. D. (Florida State), Associate Professor, B e haviora l Science. SCHEIB, MARLIN E., Ph.D. (Kansas), Associate Professor, Speech; Research Associate Professor, Computer R esea rch Center. SCHEINKOPF, HAROLD P., M.A (New York), Assistant Profes s or, Marketing. ScHEUERLE, WILLIAM H., Ph.D. (Syracuse), Associate Professor, English SCHIER, HowARD G., B.S. (Fairleigh Dickinson), Coordinator, Non-Credit Activities, Continuing Education. SCHNEIDER, RAYMOND J., Ph.D. (Michigan), Associate Professor, Speech. ScHULTZ, RONALD J., M.A. (South Florida), Instructor, Education SCHWARTZ, }UI..IA L., M.S.L .S. (Western Reserve), Associate Catalog Librarian, Libraries. Scorr, Lmus A., Ph.D. (Case Inst. of Tech.), Chairman and Professor, Energy Conversion Sy s tems. SEL1GsoHN, HARRIET C., B.S. (Pittsburgh), Instructor, Evaluation Services. SELLERS, E. GUY }R., M .E d. (Florida), Associate Professor, Education. SHACKSON, L. LEE, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Associate Professor, Humanities. SHAFFER, DouGLAS K., Ph.D. (Texas), Assistan t Professor, English and Linguistics. SHANNON, ROBERT F Ph.D. (Illinois), Associate Professor, Economics. SHANNON, RoBERT L., Ed. D. (Florida Sta te), Professor, Education. SHERMAN, }AMES J Ph.D. (State Univ. of New York, Buffalo), Associate Professor, Management. SHERSHIN, ANTHONY C Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor Functional Mathe matics. SHOWS, E WARREN, Ph.D. (Georgia State), Assistant Professor, Economics. SILBERT, EDWARD M., Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor, History.

PAGE 126

280 ACADEMIC STAFF SILVERMAN, MITCHELL, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Research Assistant Professor, In stitute for Exceptional Childr e n and Adults. SILVERWOOD, KERMIT J., M.S. (Oregon), Director, Student Financial Aid SIMON, JosEPH L., Ph.D. (New Hampshire), Assistant Profe ssor, Zoology. Sisco, JoHN I., Ph.D. (Minn esota), Associate Professor, Education SISK, DOROTHY D., Ed.D. (California, Los Angeles), Assistant Professor, Education. SISTRUNK, FRANc1s, Ph.D. (Miami, Florida), Associate Professor, Psychology. SLEEPER, DAVID C., Ph.D. (Ohio State), Chairman and Associate Professor, Marketing. SMALL, LESLm W., M.A. (Indiana), Assistant Professor, Finance SMITH, ALICE G., Ed.D. (Wayne State), Associate Professor, Educa tion. SMITH, CHARLES D., Ed.D. (Temple), Assistant Professor, Education. SMITH, CHARLES T., M.B.A. (State Univ. of New York, Buffalo), Assistant Professor, Finance. SMITH, ELTON E., Ph.D. (Syracuse), D D. (Hon.), Professor, English. SMITH, JAMES M., M.M.E. (Rensselaer Poly. Inst.), Lecturer, Engineering. SMITH, MICHAEL A., M.A. (Eastman School of Music), Coordinator of Events, Florida Center for the Arts; Lecturer, Fine Arts. SMITH, NORMAN V., M.S.E. (Michigan), Lecturer, Engineering. SMITH, RICHARD B., M.D. (Indiana), Associate Dean and Prof esso r, Medicine. SMITH, WILLIAM A., M .A. (South Dakota), Assistant Professor, American Idea SMITH, WILLIAM A., Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Engin eering. SMITH, WILMA A., B.I.E. (Florida), Lecturer, Engineering; Instructor, Cooperative Education. SMITZES, MELPOMENE, M.A. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Education. SMYTHE, GEORGE A., Ph.D. (New South Wales), Resear ch Associate, Chemistry. SNOOK, JANICE B., Ph.D. (Maryland), Assistant Profe ssor, Political Science. SNYDER, NoEL F.R., Ph.D. (Cornell), Assi stant Professor, Zoology. SOFIA, SABATINO, Ph.D. (Yale), Associate Professor, Astronomy. SOKOLSKY, ANATOLE A., LL.D. (Univ. Vitautis the Gr ea t, Lithuania), Associate Professor, Foreign L anguages SOLOMONS, T. W. GRAHAM, Ph.D. (Duke), Associate Professor, Chem istry. SoMMERS, DAVID A., Ph.D. (Mas sachusetts), Assistant Professor, Geology SoNIAT, LEONARD E., Ph.D. (Duke), Associate Professor, Functional Mathematics. SORENSON, HERBERT F., Ph.D. (Minnesota), Professor, Education. SORTOR, MARVIN E., M.S. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Engin eering SPAIN, FRANK H., Ed. D. (Florida), Assistant Dean and Associate Professor, Academic Affairs for Interin s titutional Articulation. SPARKS, AMY J., Ph.D. (Louisiana State), Associate Professor, Spanish. SPARKS, EDITHGENE B., M.Ed. (Emory), Assistant Professor, Education. SPERRY, GALE L., Ph.D. (Minnesota), Chairman and Profe ssor, Music SPILLANE, JAMEs R., M.A. (Iowa), Assistant Professor, Humanities. SPOTO, PETER J., M.D. (Tulane), Psychiatrist, Student H ealth Service (Part time). SPREHE, DELORES M., M.S.W. (Tulane), Lectur er, D evelopmental Center, Student Affairs. STANTON, EDGAR E. JR., Ph.D. (Florida State), Professor, Humaniti es. STELZMANN, RAINULF A., Ph.D. (Univ. of Freiburg, Germany), Associate Professor, Foreign Languages. STELZNER, HERMANN G., Ph.D. (Illinois), Associate Professor, Speech. STELZNER, SARA L., M.A. (Illinois), Instructor, English (Part time). STENBERG, PATRICIA J., M.M. (Michigan), Assistant Professor, Music. STEVENS, BRIAN, Ph.D. (Oxford Univ., England), Professor, Chemistry STEVENS, WILLIAM D., Ph.D. (Harvard), Associate Professor, Mark e ting. STEVENSON, RALPH G. JR., Ph.D. (Indiana), Assistant Professor, Geology. STEVENSON, ROBERT M., LL.B. (Harvard), Assistant Professor, American Idea.

PAGE 127

ACADEMIC STAFF 281 STEWART, Wu.LIAM L. }R., M.S.L.S. (North Carolina), Acquisition Librarian, Libraries. STOEVEKEN, ANTHONY C., M.S. (Wisconsin), Lecturer, Art (Part time). STONE, DouGLAS E., Ph.D. (Chicago), Associate Professor, Education. STONE, ROBERT D., M.A. (Michigan State), Residence Counselor, Student AHairs; Instructor, Basic Studies. STORY, COLEEN M., M.S. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Education. STOVALL, }ACK C., M.A. (Michigan), Associate Professor, Education. STOWERS, DEWEY M. }R., Ed.D. (Duke), Assistant Professor, Geography. STRONG, PASCHAL N., Ph.D. (Tennessee), Professor, Psychology. SucHOVY, TATIANA, M.A. (Illinois), Instructor, Foreign Languages. SULLOWAY, ALExANDER, M.A. (New Hampshire), Coordinator, Non-Credit Activi ties, Continuing Education. SWANSON, }AMES M., Ph.D. (Columbia), Assistant Professor, History. TAFT, WILLIAM H., Ph.D. (Stanford), Assistant Dean, Academic AHairs; Director, Sponsored Research. TALLENT, LAGREITA, M.S. (Florida State), Residence Counselor, Student AHairs; Instructor, Basic Studies. TANOFSKY, Mn.oRED B., M.A. (South Florida), Instructor, Education. TATUM, }IMC., Ph.D. (Tulane), Assistant Professor, Functional Foreign Languages. TAYLOR, MERRn.Y E., M.S.L.S. (Florida State), Assistant Reference Librarian, Libraries. TAYLOR, SPAFFORD C., M.A. (Peabody), Assistant Professor, Physical Education. THOMES, DELBERT C., M.B.A. (Rollins), Computer Research Specialist, Computer Research Center. TIPTON, HENRY C., Ph.D. (Mississippi State), Assistant Professor, Biological Science. ToTH, JoHN C., Ph.D. (Michigan State), Assistant Professor, Psychology. TRUITT, WILLIS H., M.A. (Boston), Assistant Professor, Philosophy. TsERPES, NICHOLAS A., M.A. (Wayne State), Assistant Professor. Mathemati cs. TucKER, ROBERT D., Ph.D. (California, Los Angeles), Associate Professor, Finance. TUTTLE, LESTER W. }R., Ed.D. (Florida), Assistant Dean and Professor, Academic AHairs, St. Petersburg Campus. TWIGG, JoHN F., M.A. (Boston), Chairman and Associate Professor, Pre-Engin e ering. TWOMEY, J. BRIAN, Ph.D. (Univ. of London, England), Assistant Professor, Mathematics. UNRUH, ANrrA, M.A. (Illinois), Assistant Professor, Education. U RBAN, WAYNE J., Ph.D. (Ohio State), Assistant Professor, Education. URBANEK, RAYMOND A., Ed.D. (Kansas), Assistant Dean, Student Advisin g and Professor, Education. VALENTINE, VIRGINIA W., M.A. (Southern Methodist), Lecturer, English. VANOVER, CAROLYN M., M.S. (Indiana), Lecturer, Office Administration. VANOVER, GEORGE W., M.S. (Indiana), Assistant Professor, Education. VEGA, MANUEL, Ph.D. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Behavioral Sci e nce. WAGNER, DIANE T., Ph.D. (Duke), Assistant Professor, Biological Science. WALL, EDMOND L., M.A. (Louisiana State), Instructor, Functional Foreign Langua g es. WALTHER, JoHN D., M.A. (South Carolina), Instructor, English. WARNER, ROBERT A., Ph.D. (Yale), Chairman and Professor, American Idea. WATERMAN, PATRICIA P., M.A. (California, Berkeley), Assistant Profes s or, Behavioral Science. WATERMAN, fucHARD A., Ph.D. (Northwestern), Professor, Anthropology. WATKINS, ARMIN J., Mus D. (Indiana), Associate Professor, Humanities. WEATHERFORD, ROBERT R., Ph.D. (Ohio State), Associate Professor, Educ a tion. WEAVER, LEE A., M.S, (Florida), Assistant Professor, Engineering.

PAGE 128

282 ACADEMIC STAFF WEBB, CLARENCE E., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State), Associ a te Professor, Sp eec h Pathology an d Audiology Institute. WEICHERDING, JOHN P., B.S. (Creighton), Acting Directo r, Personnel Services. WEINFELD, SAMUEL L., M.A. (Indiana), Instructor, Speech. WELKER, RoBERT F., J D (Indiana), Assistant Profe sso r, Business Law. WENZINGER, GEORGE R., Ph.D. (Rochester), Assistant Professor, Chemistry. 'WEST, ROBERT J., M.S. (Florida State), C.P.A., Associate Professor, Accounting. WESTBEHRY, CARLTON J., M.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech.), Assistant Profe ssor Cooperative Education. WHALEY, Russ ELL G., B.A. (Emerson), Chairman and Pro fess or, Theatre Arts. WHARTENBY, FRANKLEE G., Ph.D. (North Carolina), Lecturer, Economics. W!-IAHTENBY, H. ALLEN, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Asso cia te Professor, Foreign Lan guages WHEELER, RAYMOND H., Ph.D. (Michigan), Chairman and A ssociate Professor, Soci o logy. WHITAKER, ROBERT D., Ph.D. (Florida), Associate Professor, Ch emis try. WHITE, M1C1-IAEL J., M B.A. (Michigan State), Instru ct or Management. WHITNEY, fuc!-IARD R., M S (Indiana State), Assistant Dean of Men, Stu d ent Affairs WHITNEY, VERNON W., Ed. D. (Columbia), Associa t e Profe sso r, Education. WILDY, C!-IARLES H., Ed.D. (Indiana) Dean of M e n, Student Affairs; Associate Professor, Basic Studies. WILEY, RussELL W., Ed.D. (Syracuse), Prof ess or, Education. WILLIAMS, BILL M., Ph.D. (Oklahoma), Associate Professor, Marketing. WILLIAMS, CARL H., B.A. (North Carolina), Lecturer, Theatre Arts. WILLIAMS, CAROL A., Ph.D. (Yale), Assistant Professor, Astronomy. WILLIAMS, JAC K H., M .A. (Northern Illinois), Assis t ant Professor, Sociology. WILLIAMS, JUANITA H. Ph.D. (Temple), Assistant Professor, Beh avioral Science. WILLIAMS, PATRICIA A., M.A.L.S. (Michigan), Assistant Librarian, Educati ona l R esources. WILLIAMS, WALTER E., M.A (Miami, Ohio), Assistant Professor, Functional Mathematic s WILSON, ALBERT J. III, Ph.D. (Florida ), Assistant Professor, Behavioral S cience WILSON, ROBERT E., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania) Associate Professor, Astronomy. Wn.soN, THOMAS C., M.A. (Wayne State), Assistant Professor Education. WIMMERT, ROBERT J., Ph.D. (Purdue), Chairman and Professor, Industri a l Systems. WINTHROP, HENRY, Ph.D. (New School for Social Research, New York), Profe ssor Interdisciplinary Social Scien ce WOLF, J. GARY, D .M.A. (Eastman Schoo l of Music), Ass ociate Professor Music WooDHAMS, THOMAS D., Artist's Diploma (Curtis Inst. of Music), Ass i stant Professor, Music. WooLFENDEN, GLEN E., Ph. D. (Florida), Asso c iate Professor, Zoology. WORRELL, JAY H., Ph.D. (Ohio State), Assi stant Professor, Chemi stry. WRANCHER, ELIZABETH A., B .M. (Indiana), Assistant Professor, Music. WRIGHT, HUBERT G., M.S. (North Carolina), Assistant Professor, Physical Education. "WRIGHT, PETER C., Ed.D. (Columbia), Associ a te Professor, American I dea. WUNDERLICH, HERBERT J., Ed.D. (Stanford), Vice President and Dean, Student Affairs. WunsTER, MARGUERITE S., B.A. (Florida), Assistant Librarian, Extension Library, St. Petersburg Campus. WYLY, R. DoNALD JR., Ph.D. (Ohio State), Assistant Professor, Functional English. YATES, EnwIN S., M.A. (Alabama), Assistant Professor, Journalism. YOUNG, JoANNE E., M.Ed. (North Carolina), Assoc iat e Professo r Physical Education YOUNG, WILLIAM W., Ph.D. (Pittsbur gh), Associate Professor, Politi cal Sci e nce.

PAGE 129

ACADEMIC STAFF 283 ZACHARY, SAUL, M.A. (Smith College), Assistant Professor, Theatre Arts. ZBAR, FLORA J., M.A. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Functional English. ZELECHOWSKI, HuBERT, M.B .A. (Indiana), C.P.A., Assistant Professor, Accounting. ZERLA, FREDRIC J., Ph. D (Florida State), Assistan t Professor, Mathematics ZETLER, ROBERT L., Ph.D. (Pittsburgh), Professor, Languages and Literature. leave of Absence 1968-1969

PAGE 131

INDEX Ma;or curricula and programs are listed in italics Academic advising, 30 Academic calendar, 4-6 Academic policies and procedures, 22 Acad emic programs, 58 Academic services, 37 Academic staff, 267 Academic standing, 22 Academic warning, 22 Accounting, 70 graduate, 72 courses, 137 Accreditation, 9 Adding courses, 24 Administration, University, 12, 261 State Boards, 260 Admi ssion, 16 of freshmen, 18 of graduate students, 131 of transfer students, 19 Admission to: College of Business Administration, 68, 71 Coll ege of Education, 73 College of Engineering, 98 College of Liberal Arts, 103 Evening Sessions, 59 Graduate Study, 131 Junior college teaching, 92 University, 16 Upper l eve l, 25 Adult Education: continuing education, 60 graduate program, 90 courses 175 Advanced plac emen t, 32 Advising, academic, 30 Aids, financial, 50 Alumni Association, 13 American Studi es, 109 cour ses, 139 Anthropology, 124 courses, 140 Application: for admission, 16 for graduation, 26 for graduate degree, 133 procedures, 17 Art, 108 courses, 141 Art Education: undergraduate, 77 graduate, 86 courses, 161 Artist S eries 54 Astronomy, 117 courses, 144 Athletics, intercollegiate, 57 Audio-Visual Education; see LibraryAudio-Visual Education Audio-Visual Services, 38 Audiology, courses, 252 Auditing courses, 24 Automobiles, 46 Availability of courses, 27 Bach elor of Ind ependent Studies, 61, 105 Bacteriology, 118 courses, 148 Basic physical education, 65 courses, 230 Basic Studies, 63, 65 courses, 145 Basic Studies, College of, 63 Biological Scienc es, lib eral arts, 118 Biology, interdisciplinary courses, 147 Biolo gy, s eco ndary education: undergraduate, 80 graduate, 85 Board of Regents, 260 Bookstore, 53 Botany, 118 courses, 148 Broadcasting, 114 Broadcasting services, 38 Buildings, University, 9 Business Administration: undergraduate, 70 gradu a te, 71-72 courses, see specific subj ec t Business Administration, College of, 67 admission r eq uirements, 68 graduation requirements, 69 Business Education: und e rgraduate, 81 graduate, 90 courses, 17 5 285

PAGE 132

286 INDEX Calendar, academic, 4-6 Campuses, 9, 10 Canc e llation of registration, 24 Center for Continuing Education, 60 Center for Research and Development, 40 Certification, of t eac hers, 75 Change, notice of, 27 Change of major, 25 Check cashing, 43 Chemistry: liberal arts, 120 secondary education, 80 undergraduate, 80 graduate, 85 courses, 151 Class standing, 25 Classics and Ancient Studies, 109 cour ses 154 Clubs and organizations, 54 Colleges: Basic Studies, 63 Business Administration, 67 Education, 73 Engineering, 94 Lib e ral Arts, 103 Computer Research Center, 37 Conduct, student, 45 Continuing Education, 60 Cooperative Education Program, 33, 36 courses, 156 Correspondence directory, 2 Counseling, student, 49 Course audits, 24 Course descriptions, 136 Course drops, 25 Course prefixes, 136 Course waivers, 63 Credit by examination, 31 Cultural events, 54 Dance, 106 courses, 156 D a ta processing, 37 Dean's list, 33 Degree applications: und ergr aduate, 26 graduate, 133 Degree status, change of, 20 Degree s offered: B ache l or of Arts ; see major field Bachelor of Science in Engineering, 99 Master of Arts; see major field Master of Business Administration, 71, 72 Master of Engineering, 101 Master of Fine Arts, 108 Master of Science, Chemis try, 120 Master of Science in Engineering, 99 Doctor of Philosophy in Biology, 119 Deposit fee, 43 Description of courses, 136; see also specific subject Developmental Center, 49 Developmental m athema tics, 158 Discipline, student, 45 Disqualification, 23 Dissertation, 135 Distributive Education: undergraduate, 82 graduate, 90 courses, 1 75 Divisions, Coll ege of Liberal Arts: Fine Arts, 105 Language and Lit era ture, 105 Natural Science and Mathematics, 115 Social Sciences, 124 Doctora l programs, see Ph.D pro grams D ormitories, 46, 47 Doubl e major, 26 Drama, see Theatre Arts Dress, student, 45 Droppin g courses, 25 Early Childhood Education: undergraduate, 77 graduate, 84 Economics: business, 70 lib era l arts, 1 25 courses, 158 Education: undergraduate, 76 graduate, 82 co ur ses, 160 see also specialized majors Education, College of, 73 admissio n requirements, 73 graduation requirements, 75 Educational Resources, 38 Elementary Education: undergraduate, 76 graduate, 83 courses, 162 Engineering, 98 courses, 177 Engineering, College of, 94 admission requirements, 98 d egree requir eme nts, 99

PAGE 133

English: lib era l arts, 109 secondary education, und e rgraduate, 79 gradua t e, 84 courses, education, 174 libera l arts, 190 Enrollment program, 21 Entrance requir e m ents; see adm ission Evening Sessions, 20, 59 Events, c ultural, 54 Examinatio n credit by, 31 Exc h ange programs, 28 -29 Expenses 40-41 Extra credit l oads, 32 Faculty 267 Fees, 40-41; payment of, 1 6; r efund, 42 Film library, 38 Final academic warning, 22 Finance, 70 cour ses, 1 94 Financial aids, 50 Fine Arts Divi sio n of, 10 5; intradivisional courses, 195 Florida certifica ti on for t eachers 75 F l orida College exc h ange program, 28 F l orida residency, 42 Food Service, 4 8 Foreig n Langua ges: li beral ar t s, 111 secondary education, 80 cour ses, basic stu di es, 1 45 education, 177 see also sp ec ific lan guages Foundation, Univ e rsity, 1 3 Foundations, courses, 1 64 Frate rniti es, 55 Fre nch Ill co u rses, 1 96 Func ti o nal course s (Basic Studies), 146 Gener a l Business Administr a tion cours es, 19 8 Genera l inform a tion, 9 Geography, 125 cour ses, 199 Geology, 1 2 1 cou r ses, 200 German, 111 courses, 203 Gerontology, 125 courses, 205 Gifts and bequests ; see Foundation Glossary of t erms, 259 INDEX 287 Goals, University, 13 Government, student 46 Grade point average, 37 Grades, 36 Grading system, 36 Graduate programs, 130 s ee also specific programs Gradu a te study, 130 r egu lations, 132 Graduation, application for, 26 Graduation requirements, 26 Coll eg e of Business Administ ra tion 69 Coll ege of Education, 75 College of Engineering, 10 C ollege of Liberal Arts, 104 Gradu a tion with honors, 27 Gra phic services, 38 Gr ee k ; see Classics and Anc i ent Studies Guidanc e, 86 courses, 166 Health Service, 48 Hi s tory, 126 courses, 206 His tory of the University, 9 H onors: convoca tion, 33 graduation with 26 Housing, 46, 48 Humanities: basic studies, 65 e du ca tion, 85 courses, basic studies, 209 ; educa tion 177 Independent Studies D eg r ee, 61-62 Ind e p enden t study, 32 Industri a l Education, g r aduate, 91 Industrial M ana geme nt, 10 In struc ti ona l Materials C enter, 38 Insuranc e 46 Int ercolleg iate athl etics, 57 Int erdisc i plinary Langua ge Literatur e 112 I nt e rnational R e lati o ns, 127 Int e rnationa l Studi es, 127 lntemationa l Trade, 7 0 Intra-Am e rican Exchange P rogram, 29 Intramural s ports 57 Ital ian, Ill courses, 211 J o urnali s m, 113 cours es, 2 12

PAGE 134

288 INDEX Junior Col lege Teaching, 92 courses, 167 K-12 (Kindergarten throu g h 12th grade) tea che r requirements, undergraduates, 77 gradu ate, Plan I, 84 Plan II, 91 Labor and Industrial Relations 70 Language curricula; see foreign lan guages and/ or English Lan guage Education, 79 Language and Literature, Division of, 108 courses, Interdisciplinary, 212 Langua g e placement, 65 Latin, 80, 111 cour ses; see Classic and Ancient Studies LatinAmerica n Studi es, 127 Law; see Pre-Law Leaming Laboratory, 39 Liberal Arts, College of, 103 admission requirem e nts, 103 graduation requirements, 104 Library, 39 Library-Audio Visual Education: unde rgr ad uat e, 78 secondary education, 80 graduat e, 86 courses 167 Linguistics, 113 cours es, 213 Literary magazine, 55 Loans, 50 Major, change of, 25; double, 25 Management, 70 cours es, 214 Marin e Biology, 119 Marin e Geology, 122 Marketing, 71 courses, 216 Master's d e gree, 132; see also specific pro grams Math ematics: liberal arts, 122 secondary education, undergrad uate, 80 graduate, 85 cour ses, 218 Mature s tud ent, 20 Medical examina tion, 16 Medicine; see Pre-Medicine Mentally retarded, teaching; see special education Mu sic 106 courses, 222 Mu s ic Education: undergraduate, 78 graduate, 87 courses, 169 Natural Sciences, divisional major, 121 education courses, 170 Natural Sciences, Division of, 115 Newspaper, campus, 55 Non-degree stud en t, 20 certification, 75 graduate, 132 Non-West ern Studies, 127 Notice of change, 27 Oceanography, 122 courses, 226 Off-campus credit courses, 60 non-credit programs, 60 Off-campus housing, 48 Office Administration, 81 courses, 227 Organization, University, 12, 261 Organizations, student, 54, 56 Orientation, 21 Payment of fees, 16 Pending status, 24 P ers onal property insurance, 46 Personnel Management, 70 Petition for readmission, 23 Ph.D. degree, 131 requirem en ts, 133-135 Philosophy, 113 courses, 227 Photographic services, 38 Physical education, basic requirements 65 b a sic courses, 230 educa tion major, see b e low Physical Education for Tea ch e rs, 77 courses, 170 Physics: liberal arts, 123 seconda ry educa tion, undergraduate, 80 graduate, 85 cour ses, 231 Placement of l ang uage stud en ts 65 Placement services, 52

PAGE 135

Political Science, 128 courses, 233 Practice teaching, 74 Prefixes, of courses, 136 Pre-Law, 128 Pre-Medicine 121 Probation, 23, 24 Production Center, 38 Psychology 128 courses, 237 Publications, student, 55 Purposes and goals, University, 13 R a dio station, WUSFFM, 38 Reading Education, 87 courses, 172 Reading Service, 49 Readmission, 23 R ea pplication, 21 Recreational sports, 56 Refund of fees, 42 R egis tration, 16 R egis tration Fee, 41 R e ligious organizations, 55 R e ligious studies, 113, courses, 240 R esidence halls, 47 R es id e ncy, Florida, 42 Rheto ric and Public Address, 114 Romance Language, general courses, 241 Room and board, costs, 41 Ru ssi an, 111 courses, 241 St. Petersburg Campus, 10 Scholarships, 50 Science Education, undergraduate, 80 graduate, 85 Secondary Education: undergraduate, 79 graduate, Plan I, 84 Plan II, 91 Selective Service certification, 29 Service clubs, 55 Social fraternities, 55 Social Science, divisional major, 129 interdisciplinary courses, 243 Social Science secondary education, undergraduate, 81 graduate, 86 courses, 176 Social Science, Division of, 124 Social Security certifi ca tion, 30 Soc iology, 129 courses, 244 Sororities, social 55 Spanish, 111 courses, 246 INDEX 289 Special Consideration, 20 Special Education, undergraduate, 78 graduate, 87 courses, 172 Speech, 114 courses, 249 Sp eec h and Hearing Service, 49 Spe ec h Pathology: undergra duate, 78 graduate, 89 cour ses, 252 Sponsored Research, 40 Sp o rts, intercollegiate, 57 r ec reational, 56 Staff, academic, 267 Standing, academic, 23; class, 25 Stud ent Affairs, 44 Student conduct, 45 -governmen t, 46 -hea lth, 48 -orga nizations, 46 -we lfare, 44 Summer Session, 58 Tampa Campus, 9 Teacher certific a tion 75 Teacher education curricula, 76 Teaching internship, 74 Technica l Education, Graduate, 91 Television services, 38 Television station, WUSFTV, 38 The atre Arts, 107 courses, 253 Thesis, 133 Transfer Credit, undergraduate, 19 graduate, 133 Transfer students, 19, 69 Transien t studen ts, 20 Travel insurance, 46 Traveling Scholar Program, 28 Tuition, 41 Tutoring, 49 University C e nter, 53 University of South Florida Foundation, 13 Upper level, admission to, 25 Veterans certification, 29 Visiting the University, 2 Visual Arts, 108 courses, 141

PAGE 136

290 INDEX Vocational Education: unde rgraduate, 81 graduate, 89 cours es, 175 Waiver, Basic Studies courses, 63 Warning, academic, 22 Withdrawal, class, 24 University, 25 WUSF-FM, WUSF-TV, 38 Yearbook, student, 55 Zoology, 118 courses, 256


printinsert_linkshareget_appmore_horiz

Download Options

close
Choose Size
Choose file type
Cite this item close

APA

Cras ut cursus ante, a fringilla nunc. Mauris lorem nunc, cursus sit amet enim ac, vehicula vestibulum mi. Mauris viverra nisl vel enim faucibus porta. Praesent sit amet ornare diam, non finibus nulla.

MLA

Cras efficitur magna et sapien varius, luctus ullamcorper dolor convallis. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Fusce sit amet justo ut erat laoreet congue sed a ante.

CHICAGO

Phasellus ornare in augue eu imperdiet. Donec malesuada sapien ante, at vehicula orci tempor molestie. Proin vitae urna elit. Pellentesque vitae nisi et diam euismod malesuada aliquet non erat.

WIKIPEDIA

Nunc fringilla dolor ut dictum placerat. Proin ac neque rutrum, consectetur ligula id, laoreet ligula. Nulla lorem massa, consectetur vitae consequat in, lobortis at dolor. Nunc sed leo odio.