Accent on Learning

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Accent on Learning

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Title:
Accent on Learning
Added title page title:
USF undergraduate catalog
Added title page title:
Undergraduate catalog
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University of South Florida catalog
General catalog
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University of South Florida
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Tampa, FL
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University of South Florida
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English
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1 online resources ( 127 pages)

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University and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs ( lcsh )

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None published in 1960. Volume for 1975-76 issued in 2 parts: part 1. General information -- part 2. Curricula and courses. Supplement for 1961 entitled: Summer sessions, 1961. Continued in part by University of South Florida. Graduate School programs, [1985/86]- Continued by the CD-ROM publication: USF academic information.

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University of South Florida
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University of South Florida
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024905859 ( ALEPH )
29205298 ( OCLC )
A52-00013 ( USF DOI )
a52.13 ( USFLDC Handle )

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USF Catalogs (Accent on Learning)

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Accent on Learning GENERAL CATALOG of the UNIVERs1:;rv OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1972-73 The announcements informati on, policies rules regulations and procedures set forth in th i s catalog are for information only and are subject to continual review and change without notice Vol. 14, No. 3 USF BULLETIN March, 1972 Published quarterly by the University of South Florida, 4202 Fowler Avenue, Tampa, Florida 33620. S econ d class postage paid at Tampa, Florida. No person shall, on the basis of race color, or national origin be excluded from participation in be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity at the University of South Florida. The U ni versity is an affirmative action Equal Opportunity Employer. /

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VISITING THE UNIVERSITY Pro spec ti ve stud e nt s are mvit e d t o visit th e Univ e rsity w h e n e v e r poss ible. Many ofHces, including the Admi ss ion s Offi c e r eceiv e v i sito r s only from 9:3 0 a m .. to 4: 00 p m Monday through Friday. Given a d vance notice, th e Admissions Oflic e w ill a rr a ng e tour guide s for visiting groups. The University i s locat e d o n Fowl e r Av e nu e ( Stat e R oute 582 ) appr ox imate l y t wo mil es e as t of Inte r s t a t e 75 and N ebras k a Avenue ( U .S. Route -11) and sev e n mil e s n o rth of Int ers t a t e 4 CORRESPONDENCE Corre sponde n ce r ega rding v arious ph ases of the University program should b e dire c ted as follows: Application and admission information Office of Admission s Coriferences and workshops (non credit) C enter for Continuing Education Courses and programs for freshmen Director, Divi s ion of University Studies Courses and programs for upperclassm e n and graduates Office of the Dean of the appropria t e co llege Financial assistance Director of Financia l Aid s Graduate study Offi ce of th e D ea n of th e appropriate college or Director of Graduate Studies Gifts and bequests Univ e rsity of South Florida Foundation Facilities for handicapped students VicP Pres id ent for Student Affairs Housing assistance Hous ing Offi ce, Auxiliar y S e rvi ces Placement and employment Career Pl anning & Pl ace m e nt Service Transcripts and records Office of R ecords & Registration General Information Office of Inform a tion S e rvi ces Registration Information Offic e of R ecords & Regi stra tion University of South Florida Tampa, Florida 33 620 Univ e r s ity T e l e phone: 974-2011 (Area Code 813) University of South Florid a at St. P e t ersburg 830 Firs t Street South St P e t ersburg, Florida 33701 Phone: ( 813 ) 898-7411 65M 125 5

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CONTENTS Acad e mic Calendar ................ ................. . G e n e ral Information 4 9 Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Registr a tion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fees ............................................... 23 Student Welfare .................................... 28 A ca d e mic Polici es and Proc edures . . . . . . . . . . 4 1 Graduate Stud y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Aca demic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 College of Bu siness Administr a ti on . . . . . . . 73 Coll ege of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Coll ege of Engineering .......................... 106 Coll e ge of Fin e Arts ......................... ... 1 2 1 College of Languag e and Literatur e ............... 127 Colleg e of Nat u ra l Scienc es ........... .......... 142 College of Social and B e havioral Scienc es . . ..... 161 College of M e dicin e .......... ................... 173 Coll ege of ursing .......... .... ................ 176 Cours e D e scriptions ................ . ........ ....... 179 Glossary ................................... . ........ 338 Univ e rsity Administration ............................ 33 9 Academic Staff .......... ............. .............. 34 6 Index ................................... . ......... 3 69 The Univer si ty of S outh Florida r ese rv es the r ight to withdraw o r c han ge th e a111w1rnce m ents and information included in this Bull e tin w ith out noti ce. j

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ACADEMIC QUARTER IV 1971-72 NOTE: Dates apply t o full 9-wee k t erm. S ee quarte rly S c h edule o f Class es f o r appro priat e date s f o r 3-and 6-wee k sessions. M ay 12 Friday June 12, Monday June 13 Tuesday June 19 M onday June 19 M onday June 19, M onday June 27 Tuesday June 2 7 Tu esday Jul y 3, M onday July 4 Tu esday July 14 Friday Jul y 21 Friday Au g u s t 11, Friday Au g u s t 1 8 Friday Sept embe r 1 3 14 15 W e d., Thurs., Fri. S eptembe r 1 9 Tu esday S eptembe r 25 Monday Septembe r 25, Monday Sept embe r 25 Monday O c t o b e r 3 Tue sday O c tob e r )l. Tuesday O c t o b e r 9 M onday O c tob e r 30 M onday Novembe r 9, Thursday No v embe r 23 24 Thurs., F r i D ecembe r 6 W ednesday Last day to appl y for admission Regi s trati o n b y app ointment Classes begin L as t d ay to add courses L as t day to withdraw and/o r drop and r e c e iv e full r e -fund o f regi s tr a ti o n fees L as t day for l a t e r egistration (see l ate r egistra tion fee ) L as t day to registe r for C ontinuing Education course s Last day for C ontinuing Education course r efund L as t day t o appl y for a degree to b e earned at the end o f Quarte r IV 1971-72 Independe nce Day H oliday L as t day t o drop courses without p e n alty L as t d ay t o withdraw without p enalty End o f Quarte r IV QUARTER I 1972-73 Last day to apply for admission Regi s trati o n b y appointment C lasses beg in L as t d ay t o withdraw and/or dro p and r e c e iv e full r e fund o f r e g i s trati o n fees Las t d ay t o add courses L as t d ay for lat e r egistration ( see l at e registration fe e ) L as t d ay to regist e r for Continuing Education courses L as t day for Continuing Education course refund L as t d ay t o apply for degree to b e earne d at th e end ot Qua rt e r I Hl727 3 Las t day t o drop courses without p enalty L a st day t o withdraw without p e n alty Tha nk sg i v in g day H oliday End o f Quarte r I 4

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CALENDAR December. 4, Monday January 2, 3, Tu es., W e d January 4, Thursday January 10, W e dn es day J anuary 10, W e dnesday January 10, W e dnesday January 18, Thur sda y January 18 Thursday J anuary 24 Wednesday F ebruary 5 Monday February 14 Wednes day February 23, Friday March 22, Thursday February 26 Monday March 26 27, Mon., Tues. March 28 Wedn e sday April 3, Tu es day April 3, Tu esday April 3 Tu es day April 11, W ednes day April 11, W e dnesday April 17 Tu es day May 8, Tu esday May 10 Thur sday June 6, W e dn es day June 10 Sunday QUARTER II 1972-73 Last day to apply for admission Registrati on by appointment C l asses begin Last day t o withdraw a nd / o r drop and receive full refund of regi stration fees Last day t o add co urs es Last day for l a t e registration (see l a t e registration fee) L as t day to r eg i s ter for Continuing Educati o n cou r ses L as t day for Continuing Education course refimd Last day t o appl y for a degree to be earned at the end of Quarter II, 1 972-73 Gasparilla Day Holiday Last d ay t o drop courses w ithout penalty Last day t o withdraw without penalty End of Quarter II QUARTER Ill 1972-73 Las t day to apply for admission Registration by appointment C l asses beg in L as t d ay t o withdraw and/or drop and receive full r e fund of registration fees L as t day t o add courses L as t day for l ate registration (see l ate registration fee ) Last day to register for Conti nu in g Education co urs es L as t day for Continu in g Educa ti on course r efun d L as t d ay to appl y for d egree to be earned a t the e nd of Quarter III, 1972-73 Last day t o drop co urs es w ith out penalty Last day t o withdraw without penalty End of Qua rt e r III Commencement Convocation 5 /.

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QUARTER IV 1 972-73 Not e : Dat e s apply to full 9 week t erm. See quart e rly Schedule of Class e s for ap propriat e dates for 3 -and 6 week sessions. May 11, Friday June 7 8, Thurs., Fri. June 11, Monday June 15, Friday June 15, Friday June 15, Friday June 25 Monday June 25, Monday June 29, Friday July 4 5, 6, 7 Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. July 14 Saturday July 20, Friday August 11, Saturday Last day to apply for admission Registration by appointment Classes begin Last day to withdraw and/or drop and receive full r e fund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration (see late registration fee ) Last day to register for Continuing Education courses Last day for Continuing Education Course refund Last day to apply for a degree to be earned at the end of Quarter IV, 197273 Independence day Holiday and Mid-Quarter break Last day to drop courses without penalty Last day to withdraw without penalty End of Quarter IV COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Academic Calendar 1972-73 July 7 Friday July 10, Monday September 4, Monday September 15, Friday September 15 Friday September 18 Monday November 23 24 Thurs., Fri. November 27 Monday December 22 Friday January 8 Monday F ebruary 5, Monday March 30 Friday April 2 Monday June 15 Friday SUMMER QUARTER 1972 Registration (First-year students) Classes begin Labor Day Holiday End of Summer Quarter FALL QUARTER 1972 Registration (Second-year students) Classes begin Thanksgiving Day Holiday Classes resume End of Fall Quarter (Christmas Vacation ) WINTER QUARTER 1973 Classes resume Casparilla Day Holiday End of W inter Quarter SPRING QUARTER 1973 Classes resume End of Spring Quarter 6

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..... .. G \ UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1 John & Grace Allen Admi n istration Building 2 Library 3 University Center 4 Uni vers ity Theatre 5 Theatre Center 6 F ine Arts Bu ilding 7 L i fe Sciences Bu ilding 8 Chemistry Bu ilding 9 Scienct! Center 10 Engineer i ng Building 11 Physic s Building 1 2 Planetarium 13 Education Building 14 Business Administration Building 15 Social Science Bu ilding 16 Phys ica l Education Building 17 Argos Center 18 Andros Center 19 Andros Office C lassroom Building 20 Alpha 21 Beta 22 Gamma 23 Delta 24 Epsilon 25 Zeta 26 Eta 27 Theta 28 Iota 29 Kappa 30 Lambda 31 Mu 32 Operations & Maintenance Admi n istration Building 33 Maintenance & Utility Bldgs 34 Central Receiving Bu i ld ing 35 Eng i neering Resear c h Bldg 36 Univ. Foundation Apartments 37 Observatory 38 Faculty Office Building 39 Golf Shop 40 Security Bu ildi ng 41 Language-Literature Buildin!;l 42 Campus Information Center 43 Medicine 'Surge' Building 44 Textbook Center

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GENERAL INFORMATION The University of South Florida is many things-more than 20 000 studen ts, faculty and staff members, over 100 academic programs and a 65 million dollar physical plant of 40 major buildings. On th e following pages a r e ca t a l oge d in formation about the people, programs and facilities compri s ing th e University. We hope that you find here the answers to your ques tion s about th ese and other important aspect s of the University. If yo u do n o t fee l free t o contact the appropriate office(s) by mail or in p e rson for the inform a tion yo u n eed. History The Univer sity of South Florida was founded o n D ecembe r 18 1956 but th e first stude nts did not arriv e until a l most four years l ater. Whe n USF was o p e n e d to a c hart e r class of 1 997 freshm e n on S epte mb e r 26, 1960 it became th e first major state univers it y in the country pl anne d a nd built entire l y in this century. In addition USF became th e first state uni ve r sity in F lorida lo ca ted pu1pos e l y in a major m e tropolitan cen t e r and repr esented th e first s t e p in a broad and compreh e nsive e xpansion of the state univ e r s i ty system. The State Univ e rsit y System direct e d b y the Bo a rd of R e gents, co n s ists of nin e public univ e rsiti es and includes th e Unive r sity of W e st Florida ( P e n saco l a), The F lorid a State Univ e rsity (Tallahassee) the University of F l orida (Ga in esville) Florida Technological University ( Orlando), Florida Atlantic Univ ers ity ( Boca Raton), the University of South Florida (Tampa), and two uni vers iti es now unde r d e v e lopm ent: the University of orth Florida (Jacksonvill e) and Florida International University ( Miami). Together with some 27 public junior and community co ll eges and a number of vocational-technical centers located throughout the state, these unive rsities compris e th e publi c institution s of higher learning in Florida. USF was fully accredited in 1965 by th e Southern Association of Colleges and Schools th e officia l acc r e diting agency for educa ti ona l institutions in th e South. A self-study o f the University's programs and purpos es, p e ii odically r equired for continued accr e ditation is curr e ntl y in progre ss. In it s bri e f hi story, th e Univ e rsity of South Florid a has had only two pre sid e nts. The found e r and chief architect of the n e w univ ersi t y was Dr. John Alle n an astronomer and e ducator, who s e rv e d as USF's first presid ent from 1956-1970 Dr. C e ci l Mack ey, e conomist and l awye r became th e U ni ve rsi t y's second pres id ent on F ebruary 1 1 97 1 and is p r ese ntl y leading the University in its second decade of d e ve lopment. Now in it s e l eventh year of e xist ence, the University h as graduate d mor e than 15 000 students-eighty p e r cent of whom r es id e in Florida. Enrollment in th e fall of 1971 r eache d 18 ,4 96 and proj ec tions indi ca t e that USF ma y well be th e l argest s tate university in Florid a b y th e end of this decade. 9

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10 GENERAL INFORMATION Because of its location and the composition of its student body, it is obvious that USF is inextricably a part of the modem urban environment-and both affects and is affected by th e communities surrounding and supporting it. USF: Part of the Urban Environment ACCESSIBILITY The main campus of the University is located on a 1672-acre tract 10 miles northeast of downtown Tampa, a city of over a quarter of a million people. The campus is midway between U.S. 41 and 301 on State Highway 582, two miles east ofl-75. The St. Petersburg campus of USF is located on an e l even-acre tract in downtown St. Petersburg, a city of a third of a million people. Together with Clearwater, Tampa and St. Petersburg form anchor points of an urban spraw l rapidly becoming a megalopolis along the shores of Tampa Bay. Within commuting distance of the University live more than one and a half million people-nearly a quarter of the State's population. USF i s the only public university easily accessib l e to most of them. THE CHALLENGE The megalopolis emerging on Florida's West Coast presents a major chal lenge to higher education in the State-the challenge of the unsolved problems inherent in modern urban development. In a real sense, an urban sprawl is a laboratory-a laboratory in which are studied first-hand many of these problems Air and water pollution, traffic snarls, crime in the streets and sub-standard housing are visible symptoms of some of the complex ills affecting our urban society A university located in such a laboratory i s in an advantageous position to study and eventually to help solve these problems. MISSION As the State's first urban university, a prototype of the university of the future, the University of South Florida from its beginning has sought to appl y the talents of its sc holars and students to the peculiar ill s besetting modem man. In this way, USF has sought to accomplish the specia l mission in the State University System set out in the Comprehensive Development Plan (Code) of the State University System of Florida (1969): The creation and development of programs "oriented toward the solution of problems peculiar to the modern urban environment." Achieving the Mission: Measures of Success Students Served Since opening our doors in September of 1960, the University of South Florida has been dedicated to accomplishing this special mission in the urban environ ment. One measure of our success is reflected in the composition of our student body:

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GENERAL INFORMATION 11 Mo r e than 90 percent of our students are Floridians and over 80 per cent of our graduates r es ide in the State. More than two-thirds of our students commute to class from th e ir homes. Over one-third of our student body are part -time students, and forty p e r cent are empl oyed from one to forty hours per week. Mor e than two-thirds of all USF stud e nts are 21 or older and about one-third of our students are married Almost sixty percent of USF's more than 15, 000 graduates r es id e in th e Greater Tamp a Bay Area. Programs Offered A measur e of success in accomplishing our mission mor e significant than m ere statistics is the nature of our academic programs Through the m we have sought to serve an incre as ingl y urban Stat e a nd nation. These programs are in the Acad e mic Affairs division of th e Univ e rsity and, for th e most part, are housed in on e of our nine colleges: Busin ess Administration, Education, Engi neering Fine Arts La nguages & Literature, Medicine Natura l Sciences, Nursing, and Socia l & B ehaviora l Sciences. In this B ulletin are discuss e d the major a cademic programs in th e Univer sity. With th e m we serve the p eo pl e of Florida through the instruction of s tu d e nts th e advancement of knowl edge, and community service. D eg r ees are off e red in ov e r 100 academic areas by th e Unive r sity s colleges. Gradua t e d egrees are offered in mor e tha n 80 of these areas The University s first Ph. D. program, in Biology with e mphasi s on Marine Biology, was e stablished in 1 968. Ph. D. programs in Chemi stry and Educa tion b e gan in 1 969, and programs in Engl ish, Mathematics and Psy cholog y w e r e a uthoriz e d in 1971. The first Ph. D ( in M a rin e Biology ) was awarded in Jun e o f 1971. The University s t eac hing and r esea rch faculty numbe ring mor e th a n 950 represents all major areas of high e r l ea rning and n early 60 p e r cent hold doctoral degr ees. Academic Programs at the St. Petersburg Campus Academ i c progr ams a t t h e S t. Peters burg cam p us are restric ted to s elected c ourses designed to serve student s of junior senior and graduate standing. Students may e nroll as full-tim e students on th e St. P e t e rsburg ca mpus or th ey may e l ec t to e nroll on both the St. P e tersburg and th e Tampa campuses simul t a n eo usl y. Dual e nrollm e n t s on both campuses ma y provid e students with a class schedule which is both fle xibl e and convenient. A program of sp e cia l not e at th e St. P e t e rsburg campus is th e Marin e Science Institut e of th e University of South Florida. It is a n int e rdisciplin a r y venture involving faculty m e mb ers of seve ral d epartme nts in a numbe r of colleges in additi on to th e full-time facu l ty m e mbers at th e St. P e t e r sburg campus who are concerned with p l anning, a dministr a tion r esea r c h and t eachiI'1g. Probably no other oc ea nographic institution has ever b een es tablish e d w ith such excellent faci l i t i es as t hos e prov i d e d by t h e St. Petersburg campus for teaching, r e s ea rch, and the docking and maint e nanc e of oceanographic vessels. The location of th e Institut e, a t the center of th e edge of th e great continental shelf of th e F l orida Gu l f Coast and in th e midst of th e m e tropolitan a rea of the

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12 GENERAL INFORMATION Sun Coast is another of its unique advantages. It would seem destined to de v e lop into on e of th e nation s l eading oceanographic centers. The Institute off ers a program leading to the master of arts degre e in marin e s c i e nc e During the summe r quarte r th e Institute offers one of the most compre h e nsiv e array s of m a rin e sci e nce cours e s to b e found at any univer sit y in th e n a tion. Most of th e s e c ours e s a r e open to both undergraduate and graduate stude nts and most of th e m are off e r e d a l so during other quarters of th e acade mic y e ar. Stude nts int e r e st e d in the marin e sci ence program should visit the St. P e t ersburg campus fac iliti e s and di sc uss their intere sts with the director of th e Marin e Sci e nce Institute. Continuing Education In addition to th e a cade mi c programs off e r e d on the Tampa and St. Petersburg campuses, a numbe r of courses and programs are operate d by th e Univer sit y' s C ente r for Continuing Educ ation in 12 west c e ntral Florida counties. In this a r ea, th e Florida Board of R e g e nts has d e signat e d the University of South Fl o rid a to b e r e sponsibl e for all high e r education requirements beyond those suppli e d b y th e State Community and Junior College System. The C ente r for Continuing Education maintains a branch office at 1015 S Tamiami Trail in S a rasota and operate s a century-old mansion-Chinsegut Hill near Brooksville-as a n educa tional r etreat for seminars and meetings. P e rsons int e r e st e d in the Continuing Education off e rings should contact th e director o f th e program on th e T ampa campus. Special Programs A numbe r of sp e ci a l prog ram s o ff e r USF students flexibility and relevance. They include th e Off-Campus T e rm Program, Bach e lor of Independent Studies (Adult D egree Program ) and Coop e rative Education Program. Each is des c rib e d elsewhe r e in the Bull e tin Organization For a dministrativ e pu1pos es th e Univ e rsity is organize d into the three broad are as of a cade mic affairs student a ffairs and administrative affairs. The vice pre sid e nts who h ead the s e three units s erve with the President as the principal poli cy m aking officials of th e Unive rsit y In addition to the vice presidents, advic e and a ssistanc e to th e Pre sid ent in the determination of policy is given by a numbe r of a dvisory bodi es, including the University Senate, comprising e l ecte d r epresentative s from all a reas of th e Univ e rsity community. The President is responsible to the Florida Board of Regents for internal policy and the proc edures of th e Univ e rsity. Physical Plant The phys ical plant of th e Univ e rsit y, now including more than 40 major buildings i s curre ntl y v a lu e d at mor e than $65 million. The buildings are of similar mod e rn a rchitectural d e sign and all are compl e t e ly air condition e d. Major buildings now in us e includ e : John & Grac e Alle n Adminis trat i on Building: USF' s first building, housing

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GENERAL INFORMATION 13 administrative and busin ess offices and a numbe r of special service units of the University; Library: a five-story structure housing more than 325,000 volumes in open stacks; University Center: the hub of student activities, with student and faculty offices, m eeting rooms, r ec reati o n a r eas and cl ass rooms as w ell as a cafe teri a, and the University Bo o kstor e; Theatre: the l a rg es t auditorium on campus, seating 550 p ersons for c ultural events and a lso serv ing as a lecture and teaching auditorium; Theatr e C en t er : a facility with rehearsal rooms for dance, drama and opera, costume and prop shops, offices, and a Centre Stag e for production preparation; Chemistry Buildin g : a cl assroo m and laborato1y facility with offices for faculty; Life Scienc es Building: housing the University 's programs in biological sciences; Fin e Arts-Humanities Building: a rambling structure with separate wings for humanities, art and musi c; Phy sics Building: housing physics, as tronom y, and mathe matics; Plan e tarium : adjacent to the Physics Building, it is one of the few college facilities of its typ e in the South, and regular progra ms are presente d under its 3 0-foot dome; Argos and Andros residence halls and activities cen t ers : two separate living areas housing 2 ,800 students and providin g ce ntral dining recreation a l and service facilities in 14 separate but coordinated buildings; Bus iness Administration Bu i lding : an imposing structure housing the dean and faculty of the College of Bu s in ess Administration, cl assrooms, and a 430-seat teaching auditorium; Engineering Building : housing th e dean and faculty of the College o f Engineering classrooms laboratori es, and a 250-seat a uditorium; Phy sica l Education Building : a facility housing the direc tor and faculty of the Division of Physical Education, c;lassrooms gymnasium, activiti es area, an d an indoor swimming po o l ; Education Bu i lding: a three-stor y building housing the dean and faculty of the College of Educa tion clas sroo ms, a n a uditorium seating 200, and an Instructional Materials Center; Astronomy Ob serva tory : locat e d on the north campus adjacent t o th e University golf course, it hous es a $1,000,000 photot e l e scope and several s m alle r t e l esco p es; S cience Center: co mpl e t e d in 1968, it houses laboratori es and research facilities for graduate stude nts and faculty, the USF Computer Research Center and t emporary qua rt e rs for the College of Medicine; Social S cience Building : completed in 1968 it can accommodate 1 000 students in cl asses and labo ra tor y work at the same tim e. The building includes 120 faculty offices, cl assroo ms, seminar rooms clinical and ex p er im e ntal re search labs weathe r and climatolog y labs and a co mpl e t e weather station; Facu lty Office Bu i ld ing: primaril y a faculty office building, with facilities for faculty and student conferences. Languag e-Litera tur e Building : th e newest facility on ca mpus (com pl e ted in Sept embe r 1971), it houses the College of Language & Literature and includes 45 classrooms, seminar rooms, faculty offices, and a 500-seat a uditorium. Construction will soon b egin on Phase I of the new USF Medical C ente r a new classroom-library complex, and other needed facilities which will inc r ease the value o f the University's physica l plant b y two-thirds in th e next few years.

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14 GENERAL INF ORMA T ION Admi n istrati on Build ing Major Goals of the University As a university, USF is an institution of higher learning consisting of several schools or colleges and offering programs in the liberal arts as well as in a number of professional areas. How ever, it is more than thi s; it is a place where new knowl edge is sought, and old knowledge is synthesized in new ways through r esea rch and scholarship for th e benefit of mankind. How eve r the univ ers it y should not be confused with a trade school where the d e tailed techniques of a trad e can be learned by practice. The universityeven th e urban univ e rsit y-deals with professional a reas more in theory than in practic e, providing the broad background and unders tanding necessary to the d eve lopment of specific skills. In this way it develops th e int ellec tual judgments nec e ssary to deal with th e constantly changing probl ems of a given pro fession. A university, moreover should not b e r ega rded simply as a place to prepare for a profession, important as that goal may be. On e of its most important functions is providing all its students with a better unde rstanding of life in a rapidly changing world. Man is surrounded by a natural environment and confronted by rapidly incr eas ing knowl edge of th a t e nvironm ent. These are matters of human affairs which h e needs to know about as an educa ted citizen and as a professional p e rson H ence, a university h as an imp ortan t obligation to provid e in its educational program for all students thos e common e l e m e nts which mak e for mor e r es ponsibl e and responsive living.

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GENERAL INFORMATION 15 A univ e r s it y i s also a servant of th e society which supports it and at th e same tim e it i s one of th e l ea d ers of that socie ty. It is the medium through whi c h th e g reat es t wisdom of th e past an d the living spir i t of th e present are passed on to new generations of young peopl e to be used by t hem as leaders i n the further advances of socie t y toward goafs of b ette r and finer livin g. In th e classroom subj ec ts a r e dealt with o bjectiv e l y, critically, anal y ti cally and co n struc tiv e l y, as well as inspiration a lly and c r ea tiv e l y. Th e student is e xpect e d to l ea rn to be anal y tical as well as cr ea tiv e in his own approac h and to unde rstand th a t suc h act iviti es, to be constmc tiv e, must b e ca rried out with a minimum of e motional bias and prejudice. H e must l ea rn to unde r s t an d th a t in a d e mocracy points of view will differ and th ere may b e no wholly right or wrong answers to many ques ti ons, o nl y better o r worse answers from th e vi ewpoint of socie t y o r the individu al. H e must b e prepare d to e x a min e object i ve l y his ow n position on such matters and d e v e lop for hims e lf a t e n a bl e position or philosophy with which h e ca n co ntinu e t o liv e. The Universi t y of South Florida in try ing to attain thi s c h arac t er, has se t up for it self th e primary goa l o f pl aci n g "Accen t on Learning as its most impo1tant r eason for b e in g. Toward th a t en d th e University h as th ese specific objec ti ves: T o provid e th e citizens of Florida with an outstandin g public inst itu tion of high er l e arning, giving l e ad e rship and serv i ce in th e int ellec tual, cu ltural ec onomic and sci en tific int eres t s of th e state. To create a com munity of sc h olars d e dicat e d to te amwork in t h e sea r ch for truth, the e xchang e of id eas and the est abli s hm e nt of high stan dard s of int ellec tual inquiry and cr e ativ e act ivit y Th e facu lt y h as bee n ca r efully c hos en for its training competence and abilit y t o teach. In a n unusual sense it is a t eam. The faculty has m any tim es shown it s outs tandin g a bility to carry on c reativ e work and s ignificant r esea r c h and to provide opportuniti es for abl e students to l ea rn th e m ea ning of, and ass ist in s u c h work as p a rt o f the process o f e ducation. T o provid e opportunity for th e d eve l op m e nt and training of th e mind which promotes maturity, obj ec tivity and c r eativit y Degree programs of the University are designed to promote th e follow i n g general aims for all students: ( 1 ) the necessary skills in writing, speaking reading and listening; ( 2 ) se l f-reliance through the ability to think clearly; (3) unde rstanding of ones elf and one's r e la t ion s hip to others; ( 4 ) growing co n v ictions based on th e sea rch for truth; ( 5 ) unde rstandin g and appreciation of our cultural, socia l scien tific and spiritual h e ritage ; ( 6 ) int e lligent approach to l oca l nati o n a l and world probl e ms l ea din g t o goo d citizenship and lead e rship in life; (7) some practi ca l unde rstanding of a n othe r l ang u age; ( 8 ) pro fess ion a l com p e t e nc e b ase d on high e thic a l standards; and ( 9 ) healthful developm ent of th e body. To provide a broad cu ltural and basic e ducati onal patt ern for all students, tog e th e r with programs of l i b era l pr e -prof e ssional and pro f essional st udi es, and to supp l e m ent these with o pportunities for ind e p e nd e nt d eve l opment and work exper i e nce. R ecent studies indicat e a strong trend in Ame rican lib e ra l arts colleges toward th e inclu s i on of m ore profession a l pre paration in th e ir programs a nd, co nvers e l y, for th e professiona l colleges to include more general and liberal studies in th e irs. Thus, th e professional and th e lib era l aits colleges are com -

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16 GENERAL INFORMATION ing closer together in the effor t to provide a continuum of studies which in cludes the general, the liberal and the professional in the same program. The University of South Florida i s attempting this in a way that provides greater unity of knowledge for the student. For each student the educational program at USF combines preparation in basic studies with work in the liberal arts and the sciences and with pro fessiona l studies. Idea ll y, a student's p rogram will be devoted about one-third to basic studies, one-third to professional studies and one-third to e lective and related choices. A Look at the Future The Univers it y of South Florida's location in the larg e and expanding Tampa Bay metropo l itan area, cou pled with the broad growth and development of Florida in th e space age, suggests a futur e of rapid change and ex pansion for the Univers it y. In every respect, th e University of South Florida is a vital part of the state's inevitab l e growth, and i s continuing on its course toward b ecom ing a distinguished university. Fine Arts-Humanities Building

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ADMISSION The University of South Fl orida requires definite a bilit y and competence on th e part of students. Thos e having thes e abilities and skills and who are seriously interested in ea rning an ed uc atio n ca n exp ec t to succeed in college. The Dir ec tor of Admissions will admit students who m ee t th e formal r e quirements of th e University for admiss ion and can be expec t ed to do successful academic work. H e will suggest oth e r possibiliti es to thos e who do not. The University may r efuse admissio n to a student whose r ecord shows prev ious misconduct not in th e best int e r es t of citiz e ns of th e University community. In accepting students for adm ission th e University do es not discrimin a t e on th e basis of race sex color or n a tional origin. How to Apply You should request an application indicating whether you need Freshman ( no previous college), Transfer, or Graduate application papers. Make your request to: Office of Admissions University of South Florida Tampa, Florida 33620 Students interested in applying for admission to the College of Medicine should obtain application forms from the Office of Student Affairs College of Medicine. You are advised to mak e your r eques t for papers early. Application and all credentials may b e submitted as early as 12 months prior to anticipated e nrollm ent, but must be rec e ived prior to the deadlin e in the academic cal e ndar. Applications for which all credentials are not r ecei ved b y th e d ea dlin e will not be conside red for that term. Pleas e note: All applicants must ente r their Social S ec urity number on th e application. All application forms will b e return e d to the applicant if th ey do not includ e Social Security numbe r and the $15 .00 nonrefundable application fee. All academic records must be mailed to the Office of Admissions Univer sity of South Florida, directly from the appropriate institution (i.e., high school record from high school attended; college record from each college a ttended; G E.D. test scores and high schoo l equivalency diploma from appropriate high schoo l or State Department of Education; U.S. A.F.I. scores from Madison Wisconsin; S. A T. scores from high school or Educational Testing Service 17

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18 ADM ( SSIONS Princeton, N.J.) The student has the responsibility of requesting the records to be mailed to the University from each school attended. A student who is accepted and does not enroll must notify us in writing within 30 days after the original planned date of entry if he wishes his appli cation changed to a future date of entry. Otherwise, new application forms must be completed and the application foe paid again. Requirements for Admission FRESHMAN Gradua t e o f F lorida Secondary Schools 1. Official transcript sent directly from secondary school indicating graduation. 2. Favorable recommendation from secondary school. 3. An overall "C" average in academic subjects. 4. A minimum score of 300 on the Florida Twelfth Grade Test. FRESHMAN-Graduate o f Outof -State Seconda r y Schools 1. Official transcripts sent directly from secondary school indicating graduation. 2. Favorable recommendation from secondary school. 3. Grades placing them in upper 40 per cent of their graduating class. 4. A minimum total score of 900 on the Scholastic Aptitude Test with no less than 450 the Verbal portion or score of21 on the A.C T. TRANSFER 1. Official transcript from each institution previously attended. 2. An overall academic average of "C" on all work attempted. 3. Eligible to re-enter institution last attended. 4. Applicant must hav e completed Stud ent Infom1ation Form sent from the last institutiqn attended directly to the Office of Admissions at th e University of South Florida. 5. A satisfactory secondary school record and test scores are required for those students who have attempted less than 54 quarter or 36 semester hours of college work See page 19, EVALUATION OF TRA S FERRED CREDITS (undergraduate). TRANSIENT A transient student is one who is permitted to enro ll at the University of South Florida for only one t erm before returning to his parent institution. 1. Statement indicating good standing from th e parent institution and their approval of course or courses to be taken 2. Applicant must have a completed Student Information Form sent from the last institution attended directly to the Office of Admissions at the of South Florida. Transfer students should also refer to the section on Community Col l ege Relations, page 20. SPECIAL STUDENT-Nondegree To serve th e academic n eeds of the Tampa Bay Area, the University has estab lished the Sp ecia l Student classification Former USF students are e ligi-

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ADMISSIONS 19 ble on l y if they hav e completed and earn e d a d egree in th e degr ee program for which they were previously e nroll e d Form e r Non-degree seeking students a r e e li gible on l y if they wish to remain in th e on-degree status. Special Students do not make a pplication to th e University. Admissions and registration i s by means of a Sp ecia l Student Enrollment Fo1m ava i labl e from th e Offic e of R eco rds and Regi s tration Special Stude nts e nroll th e first 5 class days of the t e rm Cours e pre r equisite s must b e met and e nrollm e nt is on a space availab l e basis No mor e th an 20 quarter hours with grades of C or b ette r earn e d in th e Special Student ca t e gory ma y be a ppli e d t oward a n undergradua t e degr ee and no more th an 12 quart e r hours with grades of "B'' or bette r in th e Sp e cial Studen t category ma y b e a ppli e d t owa rd a g radu a t e degr ee Enrollm ent as a Sp e cial Student do es not constitute continuing a dmission t o th e Universi t y. The Special Student Enrollm ent Form must be completed for eac h t e1m of e nrollm e nt. GRADUATE-See Graduate Section Page 65. READMISSION 1. Any student who has not been e nroll e d a t the University for two quarters imm ediate l y preceding th e qua rt e r for which h e wish es to r e-e nter will need to secure a sp e ci a l a ppli ca tion for students in this category from th e Offic e of R e cords & R egistra ti on ( ADM 264 ) Earl y submission of this form is r eques t e d. 2. Stude nts who were not in attendance the past two t erms preceding regis tration should follow registration instructions in the Universi t y Cl ass Sch e dul e for Former Studen t s R e turning. 3. How eve r all former unde r g raduat e stude nts who h ave completed th ei r baccalaurea t e d egree; all students who have ea rn e d a b acca laur ea t e degree s in ce l ast in attendance a t USF; all students wh o h ave on l y e nrolle d for off-cam pus Continuing Education co urs es, Sp ecia l Summ e r S e ssions, as a Transient Student, or as a Specia l S tudent and wish t o enter the graduate school for th e first tim e as degree see k ers must file Graduat e Ap plicati ons pri o r to th e deadlin e list e d i n this catalog. An a pplication fee is r equire d for all stude nts who h a v e e nroll e d on)y for off-campus co urs es and for th ose w h o e nroll e d as Sp e cial Stude nts. All students who h ave comp l e t e d th e ir baccalaurea t e degree and wish t o re turn t o th e University to comp l e t e ano th e r unde rgradu a t e major must file a n Under g raduate Application No appli ca tion fee is r equire d. 4. All Di squa lifi e d Stude nts must p e tition th e Academic Standards Committee for p e rmission to r e-e nroll at th e University of South Florida. EVENING CLASSES The admission requirements and ach ievment l evels in the day and evening courses are the same. Any student acce pted t o the Univ e rsi t y may enroll in courses offered in the evening which are a p propria t e to his program. EVALUAT I ON OF TRANSFERRED CREDITS {Undergraduate) 1. Course evaluations a r e prepare d after an appl ication for admission is submitte d official tra n sc ripts a r e received, and applicant is cleared for admissio n 2 Effective January, 1971 work in which a student has earned a grade of D'' or b etter may be transferred

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20 ADMISSIONS 3. A transfer student from a junior college may satisfy the General Education r equire ments of the University of South Florida by comp l e ting (before transfer ) the general education program prescribed by that institution. Transcripts must certify graduation and the general e ducation require ments as completed. 4 . A maximum of 90 quarter hours of junior college work will transfer. Any prior work tal
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ADMISSIONS 21 tions of the College Level Examination Program if the student scores at or above the 50th percentile of the national norm See 7, above. 1. A student may not receive both transfer credit and CLEP cr e dit in the same area. 2. The maximum of hours for which a student can obtain cre dit from extension, correspondence, and USAF! courses combined with the CLEP, is 45 quarter hours. .. 3. The student cannot receive credit by way of CLEP if he has already taken courses at an institution of higher learning covering the area of concern FOREIGN STUDENTS For all foreign students, undergraduate and graduate, the following items are required: 1. Completed application must be received by the University of South F lorida at least 6 months prior to expected date of enrollment. 2 A $15 nonrefundable fee must be included with the application. 3. A certificate of financial ability. 4. Two personal l etters of recommendat i on. 5. Satisfactory scores on the Test of Engl ish as a Foreign Language. The student should request that Educational Testing Service send their scores directly to the Office of Admissions. Foreign applicants must request all colleges attended to submit directly to the Office of Admissions at the Un i versity of South Florida transcripts of all work attempted, certified and t rans lated in English. For undergraduat e s the high schoo l record must be included, certifying graduation and date and indicating an average of "C" or bett er. Graduate applicants must comply, in addition to the above, with requirements listed in the Graduate Section. FLORIDA RESIDENCY Qual ifications for F l or ida residency are listed on page 24, under Fees."

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REGISTRATIO N UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA STUDENTS Registration will be completed in person by appointment during th e regular scheduled registration period. Each quarter, this registration p eriod will conform to the established University calendar publish e d quarterly in th e University Class Schedule. Changes of class registration will be accepted only during th e tim e and day(s) announced in the University Class Schedule. Any regular University student wishing to simultaneously e nroll in evening classes shall register and pay fees in the mann e r presc ribed for regular students attending campus daytime classes. Payment of Fees. Registration fees are due, by mail or in p erson by the clos e of busin ess on the last day of registration prior to th e first day of class in any quarter. Any fees paid after that date must b e accompanied by an additional tw e nty-five dollar ($25 .00) penal t y payment. Late Payment of fees, including the penalty payment will only be accepted during the first five ( 5 ) regular class days of any quarter. Fee pay m e nts may be made in advance of final complete r e gistration. A student is e ligibl e for a full or partial refund of f ees upon withdrawa l from th e Un iv ersi t y only within the first fiv e ( 5 ) r egular class days in any qua1ter. No l ate payment of fees, with or without penalty paymen t will be accepted, and no refund of fees will be made to any student afte r th e clos e of business on the fifth regu lar class day in a quarter. Regis t ration will be ca n celled for any student who has not paid his f ees in full by the close of business on the fifth regu lar class days in a quarter. S ee FEES, next page. CONTINUING EDUCATION STUDENTS Those non degree seeking students registering only for courses offcampus: 1. Application, registra t ion and payment of fees must be postmarked no later than the deadline announced in the University Class Sch e dul e. 2. Students whose fees are paid by school boards or state or federal grants must individually forward their application by the deadline published in the University C l ass Schedule. County contact p e rsons should contact the Office of Records and Registration for further procedures. Regular students who wish to schedule on-campus and continuing education courses simultaneously should follow normal procedures to register for on-campus courses and then us e the special Continuing Education Form to schedule off-campus courses. 22

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FEES The following fee schedule applies to all University of South Florida students with the exception of those in the Bach e lor of Independent Studies, Adult Degree Program. For information on the Adult Degree Program fees, see Academic Programs All fees are sub j ec t to change by action of the State L eg islature, without prior notic e. The University will make every effort to advertise any such changes if they occur. A Initial Application Fee (each application-not refundable) ........ .. $15.00 B The following fees must b e paid in full for each academic quarte r at the tim e of registration: 1. R egist ration F ee and Tuition: A. For students registering for l ess than nine quarter hours (c r ed it or non-credit) 0Graduate (per quarter hour) 0Undergraduate ( p e r quarter hour) B For students r eg istering for nine or more quarter hours (cr edi t or nonc redit ) 0Graduate 0 Undergraduate Florida R esi dent+ $20.00 $16.00 $24 0.00 $ 190 00 2. Late R eg istration Fee (c h argeab l e to a n y student who fails to r egis ter and I or pay within the formal r eg istration period. This fee is also charged when th e c h ec k is sub mitt e d within the tim e limit but is returned b y the bank for any reason.) 3. Audit F ees (sa m e rate as if r egis tered for credit.) 4. Cooperative Educati on Program (for train ing quarter) Non-Florida R esi d ent+ $47.00 $43.00 $590.00 $ 540.00 Other F ees tt $25.00 $40.00 C. R oom rent to be paid in accordance with information in Housing Contract. 0 0 23

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24 FEES P er Quarter 1. Room rent Quarters I II, III ........................ $ 160.00 2. Room rent Quarter IV ............................. $125.00 D. The following food service plan options are available to all students. 0 0 1. Saga Food Service P er Quarter 20 meal plan-Monday through Sunday $202.11 15 meal plan-Monday through F1iday $183.80 12 meal plan-Monday through Sunda y $186.06 10 meal plan-Monday through Friday $173.40 2 Eastern Food Service 20 meal book in 25 cent denominations at $18.95 per book. E. College of Medicine A Florida student enrolled in M.D. program in the College of Medicine will pay a fee of $1,050 per year in installments of $350.00 each to be paid in September, January, and March. A non-Florida student e nrolled in the M.D. program in the College of Medicine shall pay a fee of $2,250 a year in install ments of $750.00 each to be paid September, January, and March. 0 In addition, a service fee of $3.00 per credit hour must be paid for each hour in all courses taken in the Continuing Education Program. (These courses are designated by the "700 series" section number.) 0 0 The prices list e d are for the academic year 197172 and are subject to change for the academic year 1972-73. t Tuition is paid by non-Flo1ida resid e nts in addition to the registration fee. Florida residents pay only the registration fee. tt Items 2 through 4 applicable to both Florida residents and non-Florida residents. State Sales and Use Tax included FLORIDA RESIDENCY A Florida resident, for purposes of admission, expenses and other Uni versity classification needs, is one whose parent or guardian (or the applicant if over 21) is a citizen of the United States, or a resid en t alien, and has resided permanently in the state of Florida for at least 12 months immediately pre ceding registration at the University. No applicant can claim Florida residence only by virtue of the fact that he or she has attended any school, college, or university in the state for the 12-month period immediately preceding regis tration. The owning of property in Florida while being physically located in another state does not qualify a person to claim Florida residence. REFUND OF FEES Students who find it necessary to withdraw from the University may be p er mitted to hav e a r efund of fees upon pres e ntation to th e University Busin ess Of fice of a n a uthorization issueci by the Offic e of the R egis trar. The issuance of th ese refunds will be detained for a two-w ee k period immedi a t e l y following eac h

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FEES 25 official Univ e rsity r egistration, and the refunds will be made under the following conditions. l. A full refund will be made for a full-time or pa1t-time student making a complete withdrawal from the University during the "Drop and Add" period in any quaiter. There will be a full refund less proper charges per hour for each hour continued by students changing from full-time to part-time dming the "Drop and Add" period in any qua1ter. 2. No fees will be refunded after the end of the "Drop and "Add" period in any quarter except in the following cases : a A student involuntarily called back to duty with the armed forces will be entitl e d to a refund in the amount of the registration fee less $43.00 for a full-time student. A part-time student will be entitled to a refund in the amount of his registration fees less $2.08 per hour for an undergraduate student and $2.60 per hour for a graduate student. b. The death of a student during the term for which enrolled would permit a refund in the amount of the registration fee less $43 00 for a full-time student. A part-time student will be entitled t o a refund in the amount of his registration fees less $2 .08 per hour for an undergraduate student and $2 .60 per hour for a graduate student. c. Incapacitating illn ess of such duration and seve1ity as to preclude success ful compl e tion of the academic program for the term for which enrolled would also permit a r e fund in the amount of the registration fee less $43.00 for a full-time student A part-time student will be entitled to a refund in the amount of his registration fees less $2.08 per hour for an undergraduate student and $2.60 per hour for a graduate student. d. Canc e llations would b e considered a separate category where the student is considered not registered because of the Univ e rsity's actions, usually r e sulting from some pre -existing University regulations. 3 No r e fund will b e made under this policy except upon proper ;:tpplication for th e r e fund through the Office of the Registrar. 4. No pa1t of the student activity fee will be refunded if the student fails to surrender his 01iginal (current quarter) "Ce1tification of Fee Payment" card. 5. D e ductions from authorized refunds will be made for unpaid accounts due the University. 6 A full r e fund of out-of-stat e f e es will be made if withdrawal is effected during the "Drop and Add" period in any qua1ter. PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS DUE THE UNIVERSITY Charges against students for loss or breakage of University equipment, books, fines, and other charges will be required to be paid within ten (10) days of notifica tion. Failure to comply may result in cancellation of the student's registration and I or the privilege to re-register. CHECK CASHING SERVICE The University will accept personal checks for accoun t s due the Unive,rsity. Each student is urged to make his own financial arrangement s through his choice of commercial banks. The University Cashier and the Bo0kstore will cash per sonal checks not exceeding $50.00. A service charge of 10 cents is made for each check cashed. All checks returned by the bank must be cleared w ithin 7 days of date of notification to the student Failure to comply may result in cancellation of the student's registration.

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26 FEES VETERANS ADMINISTRATION BENEFITS The University of South Florida is approved by th e V e t e rans Administration for th e education and training o f veterans, servicemen, and d e p ende nts o f disabled and deceas e d veterans. Stude nts who ex p ec t to receive benefits a t the University should contact the n ea r es t VA Regional Offic e or the office at P.O Box 1437 St. P e t e rsburg Florid a 33731 for info1m a tion concerning e ligibilit y, counse lin g, and ben e fits New students must submit th e C e rtifi ca te of Eligibilit y to th e Offic e of Records & Registration b e for e th e ir enrollment m ay b e certified. Stude nts e ligibl e for VA b e nefits are r es ponsibl e to pay th e ir own tuition and fees, with th e exception of disabl e d v e terans unde r Vocational R e habilitation. You should anticipate a delay of one to two months for the monthl y checks to begin Hours required for full-time benefits for undergraduate students vary each quarter. Degree-s eeking graduate students must enroll for 9 quarter hours to receive full-time benefits, with the exception of the summer term. You should consult th e class schedule publi s h e d qua rt e rly for changes in hours r equire d and certific ation procedures Co-op students must m a intain full-tim e status while in classroom to avoid termination of benefits unl ess student has r equested th e optional plan of receiving no b e n e fits whil e on training periods The University and student are responsibl e t o notif y th e VA of any change in status which affects his rate of pay. The BIS Program administer e d by the Cente r for Continuing Education, has also been approved by the Veterans Administration. Non-credit courses offered through the C enter are approve d each time offered on a se lected basis. SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM College students who were enrolled full-tim e in th e 1970-71 academic year will remain e ligibl e for student d efe rments if they continue to e nroll full-tim e and mak e satisfactor y progress in th e ir programs of study. Stude nts beginning their freshman year of s tud y in Jun e, 1971 or afte r will not b e co nsid e re d for student d efe rm e nts. The University assists the student by submitting a Student C e rtificat e a t the tim e he is first enrolled full-tim e and at th e beginning of each of his aca demic years th ereafter, to local draft boa rds for e v e ry mal e student who h a s requested reports be sent All continuing USF students may verify that they are in the Selective Servic e R eport File correctly by checking the Fil e Listing in the Office of Records & R e gistration. New transfer students who a r e e ligibl e for student d efe rments must comp l e t e a USF S e lectiv e S e rvic e Information R e ques t c ard form at Registration or in th e Offic e of R ec ords & Registration within 10 days from th e first day of class es. The University is also required to r e port to local boards all students in th e S e l ec tiv e S e rvice R eport Fil e, when h e is no long e r enrolled ( for two consecutive quarters) and when h e graduates. Both undergraduate and graduate students will h a ve induction postpon e d until the end of term if enrolled full-tim e at the tim e Induction Notice is r e ceived An undergraduate student enrolled in his l ast year of study may have induction postponed until the end of his academic year or until h e graduates. Undergraduate students must e nroll for at l east 12 quarter hours to be con sidered full-time. The S e l e ctiv e S e rvic e Syst e m also r equires th e s ucc ess ful completion of an a v erage o f 45 qua rt e r h ours eac h aca d e mi c year.

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FEES 2 7 SOCIAL SECURITY BENEF I TS The S o ci a l Security Admini s tration r equires th e Univ e rsi t y to v e rif y full-tim e enro llm ent for students b etween the a g e s of 18 and 22 r e c e iving educational b e n e fit s unde r th e Social S ecurity A c t Stude nts who e xp ect to receiv e b e n e fit s a t this U ni ve r s it y should contac t th e ir l o cal So c i a l S ecurity office, r eque st i n g th a t form SSA 1 3 72A b e forw arde d t o the Offic e of R e cords & R e gi stratio n Studen t s' full-tim e enro llm ent will b e certifi e d on this form. Unde r graduate stude nts must e nro ll and remain enrolled for a minimum of 1 2 quarte r hours to b e considere d fu ll -time. Graduat e stude n t s must maintain a min imum o f 9 quarte r hours t o b e c onsid e r e d full-tim e. B e n e fits cea s e wh e n student drops b e l o w full tim e or fai l s to continue full-tim e a t the b eginning of a new t e rm. Furthe r que stions r egarding Social S ecurity benefi t s shoul d b e directe d t o student's local Socia l Security offi ce. RAILROAD RETIREMENT ANNUITY AWARD Unde rgradua t e students elig ibl e for the Railroad R e tir e m e n t Annuity Award mus t r e main enro ll e d for a minimum of 1 2 quarte r hours to b e consid e r e d full t i m e G radua t e students must r e main e nroll e d for a minimum of 9 quarte r h ours t o b e c on s id e r e d full-tim e The Unive rsity no t ifi e s the R a i lroad R e tire m ent Board w h e n the student ceas e s to b e full-tim e Uni vers ity Center

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STUDENT WELFARE The University of South Florida is dedicated to the intellectual social, and moral development of student s in order to provide responsible leaders who can work effective l y in a democratic society. The university h as a concern for the total life of the student as well as for his classroom performance. Div ersity of opinion, c riti cism, and dissent a r e essen ti a l in discharging these responsibili ties and this has been se t forth and safeguarded in the Board of Regents' Op erating '.\1anual. As a condition for admiss ion t o one of the State Universities of Florid a, students agree to abide by the policies of the Board of Regents and by the rules and regulations of the institution. The University h as the right and re sponsibility to determine who shall be admitted to the institution ; the con duct or behavior acceptabl e to the institution; and under what condi ti ons one may continue as a student. Administrative due process and the right of review in all disciplinary hearings are provided by the University. Academic freedom and free inquiry in the State Universities can be prese rved only if protected from outside manipulation and subversion. The universities must be protected from those persons who would disregard nor mal channels by which gri evances may be aired and who would create disturbances on campuses in such a way as to impede interfere with the e ducational or orderly operation of the uni versity. University officials and particularly the Vic e Pres id ent for Student Affairs and his staff are charged with the responsibility of int erpreting the po l icies of the Board of Regents to students and others in th e university communities, and with d eve loping positive student p e rsonnel programs which further th e intellectual social, and mora l development of students. Office of Student Affairs The Vic e President for Student Affairs, and the staff m embers in that area of admini stration, provide l eadership and professional services n ecessa ry to main tain a campus environment conducive to l earning. First, they offer service e nabling students to cope e ff ec tiv e l y with fac t ors of p e rsonal and socia l li ving tha t affec t academic work: financial aid, health service individual and group co unseling, caree r planning and plac e m e nt, standards of conduct and performanc e, due process in disciplinary action, procedures for redr ess ing gri e vanc es, and advice and ass istanc e in tim e of troubl e. Second, they pro vide programs enabling students to participate effectively in the corporat e life of th e University: orientation equa l opportunity programs r es id e nc e halls student government, student publications organizations activities and events, e xpressing a variety of special int e r es ts 28

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STUDENT WELFARE 29 Financial Aids The student financial ai d s p rogra m at the University of South Florida is intended t o assist qualifi e d students to obtain a universi t y educat ion w hen they might oth e 1wi se lack financi a l r esources. assistance with the ex ce ption o f S e 1 v ice Awards i s g rant e d on the basis of financia l need. academic promis e or atta inm e nt and charac ter. Scholarships a r e avai l a b l e s uit e d to student financi a l need and academic promis e Regi s tration-Fee Work Scholarships are awarded, which wou l d require about four hours of wo rk on campus per wee k University of Sou t h Florida Foundation Grant-in Aid S c holarships and Servic e Awards are availabl e, if th e student m a k es tim e l y a pplic a tion and is qualified for the award. In format ion on these and other sc hol a rships is in the Financial Aids Offic e. Scholarship a pplic a tions a r e accepte d only once each year, and must be filed no l a t e r than February 1 for sc h o lar s hips which will b eg in with the fall quarter. Na ti ona l D e f e ns e Student Lo a n applications for the entire academic year and I or fir s t quarter must b e file d not l a t e r than March 1. App l ications for o th e r qua1t ers m ay b e filed a t a ny tim e; however avai l abi l ity of funds w ill be the controllin g factor in granting loans after the origina l deadlin e date. Na ti o n a l D e fens e Educa ti o n Act Stud ent Loans permit ente1ing freshmen, transfe r stude nts and continuing stude nts to borrow up to S5 ,000, with a maximum of $22 p e r quaite r h our ca rli e d each quarter. R e p ay m e nts begin nin e months aft e r the borrowe r ceases to b e a full-time student, at which tim e the l oan draws int e r es t of three p e rc e nt. Pa y m ent must b e mad e within t e n vears. P a rt o r all of this l oa n mav b e ca n celle d if a student teach es in a pubiic e l e m entary o r seconda r y sc hool co llege o r univ e rsity after graduation, o r b y ac ti ve duty in the Arm e d S e r v i ces of the United States aft e r rec e ipt of the l oan Payment i s d eferre d if the stude nt enters the P eace Corps or Vista U .S. Cuban Education Loans are available to Cuban Nationa l s on th e basis of financial need, and who have not attained p e rman ent r es id e ncy in a n y s t a t e Thi s pro g ram parall e l s th e Nationa l D e f e ns e Education Act S t udent Loan qualifications and the a m ount which may b e borrow e d Florida Stat e Educa ti on L oans p e rmit any undergraduate student who has been a r es id ent of Flo rid a for a minimum of two years, and whos e p a rents h ave an adjus t e d in co m e of unde r $ 15 ,000, to borrow a n amount, not to e xceed $ 1 ,200 p e r aca d e mic year o n th e basis of the fina nci a l n ee d a nal ysis of the stude nt. R e paym ents begin s i x m o nths a ft e r the borrower c eases to b e a full tim e student, at w hich tim e the lo a n begins drawing four p ercent interes t. R e p ay m ent of the l oan mus t b e com pl e t e d within five years The Law Enforc e m ent Education Program ( L.EEP ) has been establ ish e d unde r the Omnibus Crim e Contro l and Saf e Streets Act of 1 968 It is admi nis t e red b y th e Ju s tic e D epaitment for the purpose of providing financia l as sistanc e t o allow inse rvice law e nforc e m ent officers to continu e their education at the college and univ e rsit y l eve l and to provid e fund s to encourage young m e n and wom e n to c riminal jus tic e careers after they have achieved col lege degr ees. Ass i s tan ce is autho1ize d in the form of grants and loans up to a maximum of $ 1 ,800 for the academic year. Additional l o n g -t e rm lo a n s ma y b e granted, subject to the avai l ability of funds from the followin g programs: USF Student Loans, USF Sp ec ial Opportunity Loans the H enry & J. Edwa rd R ose nzvaig Memorial Fund o f th e Na ti ona l Council of Jewish W o m e n the Shan e Fund, the Marty Starns

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30 STUDENT WELFARE morial Loan Fund, Se1toma Club of Tampa Loan Fund, Jam es J. Love \lemo rial Scho l a r ship Loan Fund, Selby Foundation Scholarship Loans, Pan-Ameri can Women's C lub Loans, and B nai-B rith Women of Tampa Loan Fund. Long-term loans may be avai labl e from hom etown participating banks and Savings and Loan Associat i ons through the Federally Insured Student Loan Program. Loans are not payable until the s tudent graduates, or l eaves the university. More information on this Program is available in the Office of Financial Aids. Short-term l oans are availab l e from the Louise Ramev Fund and the American Institute of Mining, M e tallurgical and P e troleum Engineers Inc. Junior-Senior Short-Term Loan Fund. Short-term loans are made avai labl e to for eign students through the Ann and H e nry Jander Memorial Loan Fund. A ppli cations for scho l arships and I or student loans s houl d b e made to the Dir ector of Financial Aids. Student Employment unde r the College Work-Study Program ad ministered by the Office of Education, Department of H ealth, Education and Welfar e, is avai labl e for students from fami l ies meeting the income r equire ment for eligiblity. Ce1tification for e ligibilit y must be received from the Offic e of Financial Aids Students w ith a minimum of twenty-four quaiter hours of academic cred it and a grade point average of 2.0 or better may apply for a Cooperative Ed ucation Team Fmther info1mation on the Cooperative Education Pro gram i s given on page 57. Graduate assistantships scholarships, and fellowships : Students shou ld inquire direct l y to the head of the depa1tment in which they intend to major. Children of Deceased Veterans should apply to: Mr. \1 e lvin T. Dix on, Florida D epartme nt of Veteran Affairs P. 0. B ox 1-137, St. P e t ersburg, Fla. :33731. The Florida Counci l for th e Blind P 0. Box 1229, Tampa, Florida 33601 provides financial help for blind students. For the Nationa l Scholars hip Se1vic e and Fund for Negro Students, appli cations shou l d be made directlv to this Fund: Address 6 East 82nd St. New York New York 10028. The Vocationa l Rehabilitation Di vision State Depa1tm ent of Education, Tallahassee Florida, provides limited assistanc e to students who are handicapped. Additional inform ation on financial aid is available in the Office of Financial Aids. In the award of financial assistance bv the Uni versitv no student is discriminated agai n st because of race, color or' national origin Student Health Service Compre hensiv e health care is provide d for full-tim e students through the Univ ersi t y Student Health S e rvic e. A 14-bed infirmary is availab l e for students with illn esses precluding class attendance A walk-in clinic and medical laboratory are maintained for outpatient treatment. University physicians have office hours by appointment, except week ends. Regi s tered nurses are on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a week in the

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STUDE N T WELFARE 31 Health Center and emergency care is available continuously, including nights and weekends. Counseling Center for Human Development The Couns e ling C enter, loc a t e d in the Andros Classroom Building, provides services for students desiring professional assistance in the areas of r e adingstudy skills, vocational guidance, personal counseling, psychiatric consulta tion tutoring, speech and h ea ring, and Vocational R e habilitation Thes e services are available to assist students in ev:aluating and r e m e dying probl e ms which int erfe r e with e ffici ent l earning and satisfying participation in campus lif e. The R eading-Study Skills S e rvic e provide s diagnosis and eva luation of r eading skills and study habi ts Two approaches are offered: ( 1 ) non-cre dit classroom courses are offered which includ e e xt e nsive instruction and practice in word attack vocabulary, and comprehension s kills; ( 2 ) an Ind ependent Study non-cr edit course is avai labl e with t h e e mphasis on the unique individual need R eading-Study Skills Laboratory Servic e is available for all students e nroll e d in e ith e r the classroom or ind ependent study sections. Regular r eg istration procedures will b e follow e d for either of the above co urses. Visua l screening is also available. The Speech and H ea rin g S e 1vic e locat e d in the Social Science Building, offers diagnostic, evaluative and th e r a p eutic sessions for stude nts whose speech and hearing inte rfer es with effec tiv e co mmunication, or may not m ee t lat e r academic o r vocational require m e nts. Speech and hearing screening is r equire d for all n e w ente ring students. Individua l therap y is available for students who a r e r e f erre d or feel a need for specific speech improv e m ent. Counseling S e rvic es are avai l a bl e in the Center t o a n y student who wants p e rsonal or career counseling. P e rson a l counseling is aimed a t h e lping p eo pl e unde rstand the ms e lv es and achieve p e rson a l pot e ntia ls. Career counseling utiliz es inte rvi e ws diagnostic t es ts, an d a ca reer library to h e lp th e student reach his academic and career goa l s Stud e nts d es iring special assistance in the i r courses ma y apply to the Couns e ling C enter for tutoring prov i d e d by othe r students in various subj ec ts and courses. F ees are charged by the tutors according to standard rates es t a blish e d b y th e Couns e ling Center staff. Ps ychiatric Services a id th e student when m e di ca tion hospitalization o r psychiatric evaluation is ne eded. Evaluations by t he Couns e ling or Psychiatric Services in conjunction with administrative decisions of Student Affairs H ousing and Food Services, academic colleges or d e p a rtm e nts and individual faculty will b e rendered only at the r eques t of th e student and with a writt e n R e l ease for Recommend a tion s i g ned by the student. Vocational R e habilitation i s a Stat e of Florida service locat e d in the Counseling C ente r to fac ilitat e the Unive rsity studen ts utilization of aid available. Application for any of thes e services of the Coun se ling Center may b e made b y any student at any time and as often as desir e d C e nt e r s t a ff and faculty limit a tions will restrict se rvi c ing of new applications to e m e rgenci e s du1' in g peak p e riods

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32 S T UDENT WE L FARE Career Planning and Placement Center The purpos e of the Career Planning and Plac e m ent Center division of Student Aff a ir s is to assist students and a lumni in realizing th e ir career objectives. This office, tog ether with th e Cooperativ e Education Program and th e Financial Aids Offic e, attempts to insur e that eco nomic considerations will not impede th e progress of any student who is serious l y in pursuit of a coll ege education. Eve ry effort is made to insur e pa1t-tim e plac e m ent for undergraduate and graduate students who express a n ee d for e mplo y m en t. Stude nts may r eg ister for part-time placement both on and off campus, as well as for career and/or non-career r e lat e d seasonal e mploym e nt. Up-to-date job listings are main t ained during th e yea r to assist th e student seeking part-tim e e mplo y m e nt. On e of the recog niz e d goals of a college educa tion is to m ax imize career sa tisfaction and th e Career Planning and Plac e m ent Center ex ists to facilitat e th e ac hievem ent of this e nd. The Career Planning Library provid es th e stu d ent with mate rials on vocational guidance, career opportunities, and emplo y e r s In addition, info1mation ori graduate schools is maintained. Graduating students are e ncourag e d to regist e r with Career Planning and Plac e m e nt C ente r early in the ir graduating year. This e nables the m to interview on campus with r ec ruit ers from e ducational systems, busin esses, industries and governmenta l agenci es throughout th e country. Eve ry registrant receives 25 copi es of his p e rson a l resum e. The above se1vices are a l so avai l ab l e to a lumni d es iring career r e l ocations. Housing The housing program of the University is part cif the total educational plan. Functional, pl easant living conditions contribute to a student's sc holarship habits and attitudes. The residence hall program emphasizes attractive sur roundings, opportunity for group activity, self-government, and counseling services of professional people. Provision of adequate living conditions is a responsibility shared by students, parents, and the University. Regularly enro lled students paying the registration fee for full-time attendance are eligib l e to live in University residence halls. An application for a room in Univ e rsity Residenc e Halls is sent with the OHicial Acceptance notification. Housing assignments are made without discrimination as to race, color or national origin. RESIDENCE HALLS Accommodations for students are available in the University's modern residence halls. Residences are completely air conditioned and provide for the living, educational, social, and personal needs of students. In general, rooms are furnished with beds, dressers, mirrors, desks, lamps, drapes, and chairs. Linen service is provided In each living unit, composed of between 40 and 50 students, a Resident Assistant i s available to assis t students. A Resident Instructor for each hall is available for personal and academic counse ling The University s residence halls are grouped in units called complexes. The first comple ted complex-Argos-includes three r e sidence halls grouped around Argos Center, which serves as the living and dining rooms of these halls In addition to the loung es and cafet e ria Argos has a recreation room

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STUDENT WELFARE 33 and conference rooms. The students residing in these halls live in study-sleep ing rooms. An outdoor swimming pool in this compl ex is a lso availab l e for student use. Andros Complex--<:onsisting of nine residence halls-provides a different type of living arrangement for students. Suites are designed to accommodate eight students-two students sharing a bedroom, four students sharing a study room, and eight students sharing a bath. In addition, each living unit has its own lounge. Andros Center is also considered the living and dining rooms of the students residing in this complex, and has most of the same facilities as the Argos Center. OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING The Housing Offic e maintains a list of off-campus housing. Listings are accepted only from household ers and landlords that do not discriminate beca us e of ra ce, color, or national origin R e ntal arrangements may best be made aft e r p e rson a l inspection o f facilities and conference with the hous eholder befor e the University opens. Fall quarter arrangements may b e made during the summer. FOOD SERVICE A variety of food plans are offered through two food service contractors. Several s mall dining rooms may be r ese rved b y committees or special groups wishing to take their trays to a priva t e place for luncheon or dinner meetings. University Center The University Center serves as the hub of campus life outside of the classroom It provides faciliti es, services, and programs to enhance the social cultural and recr ea tional lif e of the University. The information se1vice desk serves as the coordinating cente r for the num e rous and varied seivices and activities of the University Center and outof-class student lif e. It is here that student organizations schedule facilities and r equest seivices for their various activities. The master sch e dul e of all student activities is maintained at this location. \1an y o f the University Center' s facilities and services provid e for per sonal and socia l needs. It has co nference and activity areas, lounges, a cafe teria dining rooms a snac k bar, student o r ga nization offices, craft and photog raphy areas a ballroom, book lock ers, loung es and t e l evis ion list e ning billiards tabl e t e nnis, table games, the University Campus Shop and Book store, Stud ent H ealth Servic es, a magazin e browsing library campus lost and found, and various other services. Food S e rvice Bookstore and Health Service operations are coordinated through the ir respective Universi t y administra tiv e a r eas, while the other facilities and seivices are coordinated by the Universi t y Center Director' s office. In addition to providin g servic e s and facilities, the University Center also functions as a program. The Univ e rsity Center Program Council is co m pris e d of the c hairm en of 9 student committees and four e l ect e d officers. The Pro gram Council provides a social, c ultural and recr ea tional program unde r the guidance o f pro fess ion] staff advi se r s to make l e isur e tim e activities mor e meaningful. The overall pro g r am i s designed to supply additional ex p e ri ence

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3 4 STUDENT WELFARE by providing opp' ortunities for self-directed activities and the attainment of social skills and knowledge. The Center's program contributes to achievement of the educational goals of the University by providing a laboratory for experience in citizenship a community center where all may have a part in the direction of community e nterprises Academic and non-academic interests are related so that student s' development may be well-rounded and comp l ete. Enhancement of social skills and emotional development of the individual are a l so goals of the program. The University Cente r Program Council has as its objective to provide a balanced program of activities reflecting the special social and recreationa l needs of all students' outof-class interests. All activities are p lanned, arranged, and directed by student committees. A student may volunteer to serve on such committees as dance, coffee house, feature entertainment, festival, inter-comm, intra-servic e, personnel, podium and visual arts committees. Bookstores TEXTBOOK CENTER Textbooks are located in the T ex tbook C enter adjacent to Central Re ceiving Building. Eve ry attempt is made to have all required and recommended texts available the first day of registration. U SF BOOKSTORE AND CAMPUS SHOP The USF Bookstore and Campus Shop, located in the University Cente r, serves the University community by providing numerous goods and servic es. The Art and Engineering Department contains all course supplies for art, e ngine e ring and science classes, as well as many hobby and general purpose items. Oil or wate r bas e paint, brushes, art paper, s lide rules graph paper, drafting supplies, dissecting kits and lab notebooks are among the many i t ems in this d epartme nt. The Supply Department stocks all basic school supplies and courserequired supplies necessary to fulfill ,course needs-not eboo ks, notebook paper, p e ns pencils e tc The R ecord and Headshop area is d evoted to LP record albums tapes, and cassettes, as well as scented candles, inc e ns e, and many other novelty items. The Lobby Shop stocks a larg e assortment of items which include candy, cigarettes, tobacco products, h ea lth and beauty aids, and a complete H ealth Food Store. The Social Expression Department contains a complete se lection of tradi tional and contemporary greeting cards and stationery. The G e neral Book Department is locat e d in the bas ement of the Bookstor e an d stocks approximately 13,000 differ ent tit l es, including the very latest in fiction non-fiction, r e f e r ence, study aids, and chi ldren's books. Many h e lpful services are provide d by the Bookstore. Among these are typing service film d e v e loping special order service, check cashing ($50.00 limit), airline youth fare cards, fresh flower gift service, and magazine sub scriptions at student rates.

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STUDEN T WELFARE 35 Vehicles AUTOMOBILES Stude nts ma y us e automobil e s on campus Parking faciliti es are provid e d for r e sid ent and commut e r stude nts All a utomohil e s us e d on campus must b e r e gist e r e d with the S ecmity D epartment and the Traffic R e gulations adhered to The r e is a nominal ch a rg e for v e hicl e r e gistrations. BICYCLES Stude nts m ay u se bic y cl e s o n campus. Parking blocks, bic ycle racks and d e signated areas in parking lots are a vailable to park bicycles. All bicycles u secf o n c ampus mu s t b e r e gi s t e r e d with th e S e curit y D e p a rtm ent and the Tra ffic R e gulations adhe r e d t o. Clubs and Other Organizations Students have formed clubs organizations and councils in almost every field of interest. New groups are being formed and will continue to deve l op Groups presently organized cover the most fr equently desired kinds of activities. DANCE MUSIC AND DRAMA CLUBS The e x ce ll ent program in th e Fin e Art s and the faciliti e s of th e Fin e ArtsHuma niti es Building and th e Thea tr e and the Theatre C ente r h a v e attracte d student s to v a rious student int e rest gro ups These stud ent organizations-USF Dance Club for thos e int e r es t e d in dance, B ay Pla ye r s for thos e int e r e st e d in Thea tr e, and Phi Mu Alpha Sigma Alph a Iot a, and SMEN C for thos e int ere st e d in music-we lcom e all stude nts to p a rticipate Stud ents a r e also welcom e to join such acad e mic units as the Univ e rsit y Orchestr a, the Uni ve rsit y Concert B and, and th e Univ e rsit y C ommunity Cho ru s (see Music cour se d esc riptions); and Theatre USF and Exp e rim enta l Theatre ( s ee Theatre Arts cours e d es cription s) CULTURAL EVENTS M a n y of toda y' s outst anding v isu a l and p e 1forming artist s a r e brou ght to th e Univ e r s it y of South Florida campus e ach ye ar. The A1tis t S eries provid e s un usual opportuniti e s for h e aring th e b es t mu sic p e 1form e d The Exhibition S e ries pro v id e s unusu a l opportuniti e s to vie w m a n y va1ie d and sig nificant e xhibitions annually in the Univ e rsity' s three gall eries. These and oth e r program s conducted b y th e Florida C ente r for th e Art s s ignificantl y c ontribut e t o the e ducation o f stude nts and the g e n e ral vit a lit y o f th e ca mpus.' In a ddition the Divi s ion o f Fin e A1ts a rrang e s a full s ch e dul e o f c onc eits, pla ys, l ectures, films and work s h o ps which feature stud e nts, fac ulty and v i s iting a 1tists. The e v e nt s are pre s e nt e d both during the day and in th e eve ning. Many a r e fr ee of ch a rg e. Most e v e nts a r e op e n to th e gen e r a l public. Th e U ni ve r s it y publish e s a C a l enda r o f Events which is avail able upo n r eq u e st t o the C oo rdin a t o r of Eve nts, Florid a C ente r for the A1ts, USF.

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36 STUDE NT WELFARE STUDENT PUBLICATIONS The University has encourage d and is d eveloping a growing program of campus communication through various publications. The s e publications are all University in approach and coverage. They are staffed by stud<;>nts under t h e g e n e ral supervision of the Offic e of Campus Publications. An 8-column campus n ewspape r Th e is publ ish e d week l y during the s c hool year. Containing 8 to lo pages in e ach issue, it provide s pro f e ssiona l for thos e students int e r ested in journalism. Any student int e r e st e d in w ork ing on the n ewspape r in any capacity is not only encourage d but urged to participate. A U niv e rsity yearbook Th e Aegean is produce d e ach spring. All students are e l igibl e to work on this public ation
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STUDENT WELFARE 3 7 ary), Themis (freshman and sophomore honorary), University Community Legal Aid, University Volunteer Serv i ces Coordinating Committee provide associa t ions for leadership and University service experience. SPECIAL INTEREST ORGANIZATIONS Students have organized and continue to organize clubs covering a broad range of special and academic interests. Membership is usually ope n to anyone having an interest in the club's activities Clubs active at present includ e A.I.E.S.E.C. of USF, Afro American Society. USF Amateur Radio Club, Cam pus Coalition, Campus Independent Alliance, Chess Club, Classical League, Computer C l ub, Cycle Riders Union, Environment 70, Farmworkers Friends Committee, Film Forum, German Band, Iranian Club, Pacifist Action Council USF Parapsychology Club, Political Union, Radical Action Coalition, Social ist Union, Sociocybemeering, Students Inte rnational Meditation Society Stu dents for McGovern, Student Mobilization Committee, Veterans Club, Whol e Earth Cul t You t h International Party, Young Democrats, Young Republicans Young Socia l ists for Jenness and Pully and Zero Population Growth. Academic Organizations Anthropology Club, Adv e rtising Association of Mass Communications Association for Childhood Education, Bay Players, USF Chemical Society, Florida Engineering Society Forensics Club, French Club, G e ology Club, German Club, Gerontology Club, Italian C lub, Library Education Audio-Visual Organization, Marine Biology Club, Graduate Busin ess Association Pre M e di cal Society Philosophy Club, Press Club, Public Relations Student Soci e ty Read e rs Theatre Guild, Russian Club, Senior Accounting Organization Student Florida Education Association Student Guidance Organization, Student Music Educators Nationa l (SMENC), University Film Associ a tion Sports Clubs Barbenders Club, Bicycle C lub, Flying Club, Karat e Club, Yoga Club, Judo Club, Sports Car Club, Wate r Ski Club, Windjammers Club, Wres tling Club. COUNCIL AND SPECIAL SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS In addition to the organizations mentioned above, a numbe r of groups provide programs, information, and governmental experience for the students at the University. These include the A e g e an ( yearbook); College of Education Council Cooperative Education Student Council; Fine Arts College Council; Language-Literature College Council; Management Student Advisory Council ; Natural Science College Council ; Off-Campus Term Student Advisory Coun cil; Interfrat ernity Council ; Th e Oracl e (campus newspape r); Panhe llenic Council; Residence Hall Centers; Senior C l ass; Social College Council; Sports Club Council; Student Advisory Board College of Busin ess; Student Association; Student Council for Exceptional Children; University Center Program Council; University Religious Council; World Affairs Council ; and the Management Student Advisory Council. PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITIES American Society of Personnel Administrators Busin ess Wom e n D e lta

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38 STUDENT WELFARE Sigma Pi, Phi Beta Lambda (business), Phi Mu Alpha Pi Sigma Epsilon (marketing), Sigma Alpha Iota (music). R ecre a tiona l Sports The University of South Florida provides a variety of physical and recreational activiti e s designed to me e t th e needs and int e rests of stude nts. Believing that a sound and compl e te education includes a proper balance of work and study with physical activity, th e Univ e rsity program includes Intramural Sports com p e tition for men and wom e n Sports Clubs and oth e r recr e ation activiti e s in addition to basic instructional programs in physical education. The activities repre sent abroad selection of sports ranging fiom those of a highly competitive nature to those of a non-competitive type and include individual dual team and aquatic sports. Through participation, students, faculty and staff will increase physical fitness, augment leisure tim e skills and dev e lop a wholesome attitude toward physical activity. The Intramural Sports Program emphasizes activities that are especially suited to the Florida climate. Competition is scheduled in such individual sports as swimming tennis, track, golf cross country, table tennis bowling and arch e ry as well as the team sports of touch football basketball soccer volleyball, and softball. Competition is scheduled through fraternal societies residence halls and ind ependent divisions Team and individual awards are presented. The Sports Club Program includes groups of students, faculty and staff who have a special interest in a particular sports activity. They are organized for the purpose of increasing skills and augmenting knowledge through a contin uing in-service training and competitiv e program. Each sports club is assisted by the coordinator of sports clubs in the selection of a faculty adviser and the initial organization of the club is governed by University regulations Students with special sports abilities or interests are encouraged to make them known so that when sufficient need and interest warrant, new sports clubs may be formed Present clubs include : fencing gymnastics, judo, karate, sailing sports car water skiing and weight tifting The Sp e cial Events Program is geared to provide the University communi ty with a variety of informal recreational activities Some of the activities are: open tournaments, trips to special athletic events splash parties, picnics camp ing, boating, coed activities and other special project activities related to the dev e lopment of campus recreation. I nter c olleg iate Athletics The University of South Florida fields intercollegiate teams in baseball basket ball, golf soccer swimming and tennis. South Florida is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and has sent several teams each year to the national tournaments. Schedules are arranged to include quality compe tition which reflects the high standards of the University. Women' s athletics are encouraged and held to the same rules that apply to men s athletics.

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STUD E NT WELFARE 39 Student Government All regu l arly e nroll e d students carrying seven credits or more per t e rm are voting members of the Student Government of the University of South Florida. They e lect the college councils, the Stud ent Gov e rnm ent officers and Legis lature, and the student r epresentatives to th e University S e n a t e. Student Government is the agency representing student interests in plans programs polici es and procedures at the University, and securing student representation in Un i v e rsi t y governance. The Student Gov e rnm ent office also h e l ps students deal with special problems in areas such as off-campus housing draft status, veterans services, and referral for legal assistance Orientation and Enrollment Program At the beginning of each quarter, prior to the beginning of class es, all new s tuden ts are ex pected to participate in the Orientat ion and Enrollment program. of the Univers i ty. This program is designed to help new students becom e acquainted with the univer sity procedures and regu l ations and to learn o f the Universi t y's expec t ations of i t s stude n ts. Thos e sessions which are i nforma t iongathering are necessary for enrollment, and those that are information giving are considered the orientation aspect of the program. Standards an d Discip line Just as the Univ e rsit y tri e s t o maintain high standards of academic p e rfor.nanc e, i ts members try to support high standards of individu a l conduct a nd human r e lations R es ponsibility for one' s own conduct and r es pect for the rights of others are e ss e ntia l conditions of academic and p e rsona l freedom in th e Un i vers it y Lang ua ge-Literat ure Bu i ld i ng

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40 STUDENT W E LFAR E The Univ e rsity may d e ny admission or r e fus e continue d e nrollm ent to stude nts whose a ctions a r e contra ry to the purpose s of the Univ e rsit y or impair the w e lfar e and freedoms of othe r m embe rs of th e Univ e rsity Standards o f p e rson a l conduc t are publishe d in a s eparate handbook provide d to students at th e b eginning of each t e rm Disciplin a ry procedure s follow e d wh e n a student fails t o e x e rcis e his r e sponsibilit y adequa t e l y or com mits som e off e ns e aga inst Univ e rsit y standards, lo c al st a t e o r f e d e ral l a w provide the safeguards of clue process customaril y e njoy e d by Ame rican citi ze ns. The s e includ e a writte n d e scription of th e off e ns e, participa tion in dis cussion of the matte r and presenta tion of information in one's own b ehalf, the right to seek couns e l in on e s own b e st int e r est, and the right of appe al. The s e procedure s are a lso d e scrib e d in th e handbook. S e lf-disciplin e and s e nsitivity to th e rights and int e r e sts of others are the principal e l e m e nts of Univ e rsity disciplin e. Stude nts are e ntitl e d to seek advic e on any matte r of judgme nt, conduc t or human relations that m a y conce rn them, and to participate in the d e v elopment of standards of conduct suppo1ting their int e r est in the purpose s of the Univ e rsity. Many stude nts have ask e d for a dvic e on standa rds of dress and personal appearance Campus dress is e xpect e d to b e appropriate to the activity in which th e individual is engage d The Coop erative Educ ation Program provide s for its m embers a more d e tail e d s e t of standards of dress and p e rsonal appearance r eflecting the int e r e sts of off c ampus e mploy ers. Grievance Procedure In orde r to assure to stude nts th e r ight to r edress ot gri evances, the Ottice of Student Affairs is r e sponsibl e for a gr; evance procedure An y student may file a que stion, complaint, or state m ent of gri evance, in the Offic e of Student Affairs in p e rson or in writing. A cours e of action or other answe r will b e given by a membe r of the staff of th e Offic e of Student Affairs within the week. Stude nts who do not wish to id e ntify themse lv e s or to provide local addre s s will find th e r eply publish e d in the e arli est possibl e e dition of Th e Oracl e

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The University is concerned that each student m a k e reasonable progress toward his e ducational goal, and will aid each student through guid ance and faculty advising. Whenever this progress is hindered, blocked or rupted, the University will, through additional guidance, special counseling or re strictions on the student's activities, aid the student to resume satisfactory advancement. He may be required to leave the University for a period sufficent to gain adequate maturity and motivation. To be in satisfactory academic standing at the University a student must be properly admitted and be matriculated for a degree or have qualified as a special student and normally' hold a cumulative grade point ratio of 2.0. The precise averages for good standing are described below Falling below these points should suggest to the student that he must change his pattern of work to restor e himself to a satisfactory status. Any student is not in good standing whenever his cumulative grade point ratio falls below 1.5 and his attempted hours are less than 45 or below 1.7 when his attempted hours are between 45 and 89, or below 2.0 when he has attempted more than 89 credit hours Whenever a student falls into this category he will be placed on Academic Warning status and a notification to this effect will be sent to him and his permanent record will be posted accordingly. For a complete description of the academic warning rules see next page. The student will be re quired to meet with his faculty adviser for additional assistance in identifying and correcting his difficulties. A transfer student who was not in good standing at his prior institution but who for special reasons has been admitted to the University will be placed immediatel y on Academic Warning status for a tlial period Students entering th e University immediat e ly after earning th e A.A. degree from a community college are admitted academic r eco rd clear. All students who do not raise their grade point ratio to a l eve l of good stand ing within the quarter in residence after being placed on Academic Warning shall be placed on Final Academic Warning. Whenever a student is placed on Final Academic Warning, a notification of this will be sent to the student's pare nts or guardian unless the student is 21 years of age or older and is living independently of his parent or guardian. The stt,1dent is required to meet with his faculty adviser for additional ass istanc e, and must forego holding any executive or committee office in any student or campus organization and forego participation in any student activity or organization which represents the University The permanent academic r eco rd of the stu dent's progress will show that he was placed on Final Academic Warning; and he must earn at l eas t a 2.0 average, r ega rdl ess of credit hours attempted, during the next quarter in residence. Failure to do so impli es that th e student has disqualified 41

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42 ACADEMIC POLICIE S AND PROCEDURES himself from continuous attendance at the University and that he must wait at ieast one full quarter before becoming eligible to be considered by the Academic Standards Committe e for readmission to the University. Any student who with draws from the University while on Final Academic Warning petition and secure approval of the Academic Standards Committ ee to re-enter the Univer sity. The Academic Standards Committee meets regularly to review petitions submitted by students to waive certain academic regulations. Stud e nts must petition and secure approval of the Committee to return to the University after having been disqualified from further immediate attendance or for reasons per t a ining to admission, registration or other academic policies and procedures. A CADE M IC WARN I NG STATUS-DISQUALIFICATION AND READMISSION An und e rgraduat e student is not in good standing whenever his cumulative Grade Point R a tio falls-B e low 1 500 and his attempted quart e r hours are less than 45; B e low 1. 700 and his attempted quarter hours are betwe e n 45 and 89. Whenever a student falls into one of the above categories he will be placed on Academic Warning. All students on Academic Warning who do not raise their cumulative Grade Point Ratio to a l eve l of good standing, as indicated above, within the term enrolled a fter being placed on Academic Warning will be placed on Final Academic Warning. B e low 2.000 and his att empte d quart e r hours are mor e than 89. Whenever a student falls into the above category he will be placed on Final Academic Warning. A student on Final Academic Warning must earn at least a 2.000 average on the next 12 quarter hours of enrollment. Failure to do so will disqualify th e student from continued attendance a t the University of South Florida. If a student withdraws while on Fi' nal Academic Warning, he must petition and secur e approval of the Academic Standards Committe e for re-entry. B e low 2.000 and his attempted quart er hours are more than 135 A student who fails to have a 2.000 cumulative Grade Point Ratio after attempting 135 quartet hours is automatically disqualified. A disqualifi e d student must petition and secure approval of the Academic Standards Committee before r ead mission. This rule overrides all others. Normally, one full quarter must pass before such a p e tition will be considered. However, readmission should not be r:onsid ere d automatic. In rare and exceptional cases a disqualified student may petition the Academic Standards Committee for earlier r ea dmission when it can be clearly demonstrat e d that circumstances b eyond the student's control account ed for his academic probl ems. Any student who is readmitted directly to the University following Dis qualification will be plac e d imm edia t e ly on a Final Acad e mi c Warning status. A disqualified student seeking to gain readmission must apply to the Aca demic Standards Committee through the Office of the Registrar. If th e student atte nds another oollege or universit y during this intervening period h e will be classified as a transfer student and his admission will be based on his total e ducational r ecord. Information for graduate students is shown on page 68. GRADES The Unive rsit y of South Florida maintains a five-letter g rading svstem. While

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ACADEM I C POLIC IES AND PROCEDUR E S 43 plus es and minus es may b e us e d for computation of grades or other purpos es, n o pluses or minus es will b e recorded on students' p e 1man en t r eco rds. The five l e tt ers are: A-Superior p e rformanc e B-Excelle nt p e 1formanc e C-A verage p e 1formanc e D-Below average p e rfo1manc e, but passing F-Failure In addition, th e following grades are given as explain ed b e low : S-Satisfactorv U-Unsatisfactorv W-Withdrawal from course without p e nalt y X-Incomplete X-An X grade may b e use d for any authvrized failure to meet the requirements of a course. Until removed, the "X" is computed in the grade point ratio as F" for students For graduate students there is no computation for an "X grade. The tim e limi.t for removing the "X" grade is set by the instructor in conjunction with th e University Registrar. W-A "W" grade indicates administrative approved withdrawal without penalty from the course or courses. S-U GRADE SYSTEM Certain courses have been designated by the University as S-U courses. The "S" and "U" grades are used to indicate the student's final grade. These S U courses are identified each quarter in the University Class Schedule. No grading system op t ion is availab l e to students or facu lty in these courses. Beginning Quarter I, 1970, the university initiated on a trial basis a Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory grading system that would allow students to enroll in many other courses utilizing the S-U grading system Participation in this sys tem is at the discret i on of the college, department or individual (stu dent or faculty). It is the responsibility of the college to notify students during the first class session if the course may be taken on an S-U basis. It is the responsibility of the student to secure approval from the instructor to take the course on an S-U basis. A student may elect to take one course per term with the maximum num ber of total hours no t to exceed 15 quarter hours on the optional S-U basis The S-U courses required for graduation are not part of this quota. S-U grades do not affect the student's Grade Point Ratio since no grade points are assigned to either an "S" or "U" grade. However, the student will receive quarter hours credit for the course toward his degree if an "S" grade is attained. GRADE POINT RATIO The University has a system of grade points used in computing grade point ratios. (A=-! grade P?ints, B=:3, C=2, D=l, F=O. ) Grad e pointratios are computed by multiplying the number of credits assigned to each course by the point value of the grade given. The total of the credit points for all courses taken divided by the totaf number of qua1ter hours attempted equals th e grade point ratio. For example, a student attempting five three-cr e dit courses who earned two A's, two B's, and one F, would have a grade point ratio of 2.800.

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44 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES If a student rep eats a course for any reason his grade point ratio will includ e e ach grade receiv e d. For exa mple, if a three-hour course is rep eated, it is computed as six quarter hours attempted. PENDING STATUS A student may be p laced on "Pending" by failing to meet obl igations to t h e Universi t y. When a student is on Pending, he may not be allowed to register, graduate, nor receive a transcript. Se ttlement of financia l accounts must be made at the Univers it y Cashier's Office. The applicat ion of Academic Warning s t a t us, Final Acade m ic Warn ing status, academic disquali fication and Pending i s t h e responsibili t y of the D irector of Records & Registra t ion. He w ill wur k close l y with o ther Univer sity officials and faculty advisers in these matters. Students having questions or problems about these matters sho ul d go to e ith e r the ir adviser the Offic e of Records & Registration or the dean of the college in which they are enrolled. Each student p laced on Pending shoul d determine from the Office of Rec ords & R eg istration which offic e p laced him on Pending and clear the pending obligation with that office. ADDS After a student has comp leted his regi stration on th e date assigned to him he may add courses without a fee during the time designated as the "change period" at registration. The adding of courses after the "change period" is not permitted. AUDITS If a student wishes to audit a course, he must obtai n written p e rmission from the instructo r of the course and section in which he wis h es to enroll. Audit forms must b e obtained from the Registrar's Office and comp leted prior to regis t ration The student mus t a l so contact and consu lt w ith the instructor concerning just what i s expected of an audit in hi s class. If permiss i on is granted, the a udit forms must be presented to the Registration Approval C lerk after a regular class and section card has been obtained. This w ill insure the student a p l ace in the class e v e n though no credit will be given. The student must pay the regular regis t ration fee for audit courses. REGISTRATION CANCELLATION BEFORE FIRST CLASS DAY If, after completing his registration a s tudent wishes to cancel it, h e may do so by completing a Withdrawal Form in the Registrar's Office, and will receive a complete refund of registration fees. These forms, if mai l ed, must be postmarked befor e midnight of the day b e fore class es start or delivered to the Registrar s Office in person by the same deadl ine. DROPS For the first six weeks of any term a student may drop a course or courses without penalty (he will rec e ive a grade of "W") by comp leting and turning i n a "DROP" form at the Offic e of R e cords & R e gistration. Any co urs e drop after the first six weeks of classes wi ll r es ult in a grade of "F" WITHDRAWALS Until four weeks b efo r e the last day of the term any student may withdraw from the University without p e na lty. Aft e r that date grades of "F" will auto matically be assigned for all course work. If the student is on Conditional Regis-

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ACADEMIC POLICIE S AND PROCEDURES 45 tration or Final Academic Warning and withdraws from the University, it will be necessary for him t o pet ition and secure the approval of the Academic Stand ards Committee before being readmitted. Fo ll owing a second withdrawal from the University within four consecutive quarters, there will be posted on the student's record "disqualified-two withdrawal s ." CLASS STANDING A student's class is determined by the number of credits he has earned without re l ation to his grade point ratio: 0 Specia l Student /Unclassified 1 Freshman 0 through 44 quarter hours passea 2 Sophomore 45 through 89 quarter hours passed 3 Junior 90 through 134 quarter hours passed 4 Senior 135 or more quarter hours passed, however no bacca-laureate degree earned here or elsewhere 5 Bacca laureate degree holder working on a second unde.rgraduate major or taking courses for enrichment or certification. 6 Graduate student admitted to Mast e r s Degree Program. 7 Graduate s tudent admitted to Specialist Degre e Program. 8 Graduate student admitted to a Doctora l Degre e Program. DOUBLE MAJOR Students may e l ect to graduate with two majors. In that event, the student must meet all requirements of each major separate l y. He must appl y i ndependently and be assigned an adviser in each discipline. He must be certified for graduation by the appropriat e deans. CHANGE OF MAJOR Any student in one of the Degree granting Colleg e s who wishes to change his major must obtain the Change of Major form in th e R e gis t rar s Offic e This form must be signed by the student's adviser, th e dean of the former major and the dean of the new major. of th e compl e t e d Change of Major form must be returne d to the Office of Records & R e gistration. APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION Each student -who plans to complete his graduation requirements by the end of a term mus t complete the Application for Graduation within fifteen class days of the beginning of t h e term he graduating in. The applicat i on is avail ab l e at, and after comp l e t ion must be returned to, the Office of Records & Regis t ration. Graduation Requirements Baccalaureate Degree While each college sets specific requirements for graduation, the basic University requireme nts must be met by e very student upon whom a degre e is conferred. These basic requirements specify that a student obtain at least 180 quarter hours of credit with at l e ast a "C" av e rage for all Univ e rsity of South Florida cours e s attempted in orde r to be e ligibl e for graduation '1 he hours for a course which has b ee n r e p eate d ma y b e counted only once toward

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46 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES this minimum 180 quarter hours of credit. At least 60 of his quarter hours must be for upper division level work (courses numbered 300 or above). In addition to specific requirements of their major and College, candidates for Graduation must also pass The Senior Seminar (CBS 401) and satisfy the University General Education Requirements (see page 47). Candidates must be recommended for graduation by the dean of the College granting their degree and must have completed at least the last 45 hours of their under graduate credit in on-campus courses after having been admitted to the degree granting College. Approved exchange program students may take courses off-campus which will be considered as on-campus courses. Cooperative Education students while on t heir training periods, will have any work taken at other institutions (ap prova l having been given by USF advisers) counted as residence work. If changes are made in major or graduation requirements during the time .a student is enrolled in the University, the student has the choice of graduating under either the old or the new requirements. While every effort will be made to give each student appropriate ad vice in meeting major and graduation requirements the final responsibility for meeting these rests with the student. He should study the catalog care fully and seek advice when in doubt. In any case, he should check with his dean when he has reached 135 quarter hours to make sure that his program plans are complete. Specific requirements of the several colleges are listed under their re spective sections. SECOND UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR Once a student receives a specific undergraduate degree at the University of South Florida, he cannot receive a second one. However, he may apply for a second major. After acceptance by the appropriate college or division and proof of completion his "permanent academic record" will be posted ac cordingly. A student applying for a second undergraduate major must do so within the same deadline set for applying for a degree. GRADUATION WITH HONORS Each 5tudent graduating with a baccalaureate degree from University with a grade point ratio earned at USF of 3.5 or higher will receive a specia l notation on his dip l oma indicating that he has been graduated with honors. In addition to the above, transfer students must have a grade point ratio when combined with previously attempted college work of 3.5 or above. The Associate of Arts Degree Students who reach 90 quarter hours while in residence at the University of South Florida with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 based on work at tempted here and who have the General Education requirements of the University may apply for the Associate of A1ts degree. In order to qualify, a student must complete a minimum of 30 hours in residence at the University immediately prior to the attainment of 90 hours and must apply before he accumulates 135 credits.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 4 7 Application for the A.A. degree is obtained in th e Registrar s office and must be completed prior to the degree a pplication deadline date. The awarding of the Associate of Arts degree does not alter the calculation of grade point average nor does it interrupt in any way the accumula ti on of th e student record. General Education Requirements The University of South Florid a provides that a part of a formal university edu cation should be common to all graduates. The G e neral Education requirements at the University are es tablished by the General Education Council and courses for general e ducation are offered b y the several colleges. General Education requirements may be satisfied by the comp letion of six out .of the following eight areas over the four-year period: % ;.J..J :.: <( <( (.; 0 0 t--.-:..J :r.O a:(.; a: "l ;r.;.;i ..Jc-.. a: :.r;c:c: :.J E5 -<( a: "l O::::;, <( 0 :::i "l :::>Lt. a: C:,Lt.. :::i;.i Oa::::..J -%'-l <( (.;Q % a: ""-"' Freshman E nglish CBS 101 102 ( Required of all students) 2 8 yes Behavorial Science CBS 201, 202, 203 3 9 yes Functional Math CBS 109,110 2 10 yes :'\1ode rn Languages See Page 288 2 7, 8, 9 or 10 yes Biological Scienc e CBS 205, 255, 206. 256,207,257 3 9 no Physical Scienc e CBS 208, 209, 210 3 9 yes 0 American Idea CBS 301, 302 2 9 yes 0Humanities CBS 308 and 3 15, 3 16 ,317 2 9 or 10 no 0Note : Fres hman English mus t be completed b efore these areas are tak en. Som e major areas require the completion of particular General Education courses. Engin eering, Busin ess and Elementary Educa tion are three suc h areas. Students shou l d the r efo r e check the catalog for th e ir own areas of int eres t to determine what is required in their own situations. In Mod e m Languages the student has a se lection from more than one language (a year of Latin o r Ancient Greek may be substituted for a functional modem l anguage course); but only one language can be used to satisfy basic studies requirements. Community College Transfer students with the A.A. degree whos e institu tions have certified G e n era l Education requirements met are cons id e red t o have satisfied the General Education requirements of the Univ e rsity. Ordina rily a student would seek to complete his General Educi;ltion courses by the clos e of the junior year. It i s recommended th a t th e "300" l eve l General Education co urs es, American Idea and Humanities, be scheduled in the junior year. All students must r egis ter for CBS 401, Senior Seminar, during their senior year.

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Course Fres hm a n English B e h avo ria l S c i e nce Biolo g i c a l Sci e nce Phy sica l S c i e n ce Functi o n a l M a th e m a ti cs Mod e rn L a ngu ages American Idea (Not ava ilabl e to Freshme n ) Humaniti es ( Not availab l e to Freshme n ) REQUIREMENTS FOR WAIVING COURSES Prefix and Number CBS 101 102 CBS 201-202 203 BS 205-206-207 CBS 208-209 210 CBS 109-110 See cou r se d esc ription s CBS 3 01 -3 02 On Basis of Past Experience No Waiv e r Evidence of com p e tence a cqu ir e d e l se wh e re. See co urs e chairman. M i nimum of 3 y ea r s i n hi g h sc hool in cluding Biolo gy, Chemistry and one ad ditional unit other th a n G e neral S c i e nce. Minimum o f 3 year s in hi g h sc h oo l including Chemistry, Phy sics, and one a d dition a l unit other th a n G e n e ra l Sci e nce. NOTE: Th e same hi g h school courses ma y not b e us e d to waiv e both the Biologica l and Phy sic al Scie n ce Minimum of 3 year s in hi g h sc hoo l including 2 year s of Alg e bra, on e semes t e r each of Tri gono metr y an d G eo m e try M inimum of 3 years of one for e i gn language. On Basis of Other Courses to be Taken at USF No W aive r No W aive r P ass Biology 201, 202 and 203 w ith a minimum "C" a v e rag e P ass an y 2 of th e following 4 sequenc es with a minimum "C" average: Chemistry 211 212-21 3 Phys i cs 301-3 02303-30 4-305-3 06 or 201-202-20 3204-205-206 G e o l ogy 201-301 Ast ronomy 3 01-302 P ass any on e of the following 3 sequences with a minimum C average: Mathe m a tics 302-303-304 M a th e m a ti cs 211 212 -2i3 Math e m a ti cs 33 133 2333 Two quarte r s appropri a t e l e v e l of one langu age. Minimum o f 4 y e ars of hi g h sc hoo l S oNo W aive r c i al Studi es, includin g o n e year e ach of World and Ame ri ca n Hi s tory CBS 3 15-316-3173 0 8 Evidence of compet e nc e acqu ir e d e l se-No W aive r where. See course c h a irm a n .,,. CD )> () )> 0 m s:: 0 "'O 0 r Q m CJ) )> z 0 "'O ::IJ 0 () m 0 c ::IJ m CJ)

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ACADEM I C POLICIES AND PROC E DUR E S 49 Waiver Some entering students have already achieved competence in one or more areas of Gen era l Education. These students may request waiver of one or more of the General Education require m e nts Howev er, a specific high school unit may not be applied toward a wai ver of more than one General Educ. ation area. For example, high school chemistry may not be us e d toward th e waiv e r of both biolog i cal and physical science. Applications for a routine waiver must be completed in the Admissions Office during the first quarter the student is in attendance at the University. Routin e approval will be granted when appli cants meet the following condit i ons: (1) a score of 425 or higher on the F l orida Stat e-Wide Twelfth Grade T es ts, 24 on the ACT, or 1075 on the CEEB; (2) a grade of "C" or higher in each of three or four years of r e levant high school work. A course which has been waived may not subsequently be taken for credit. Requireme nts specific to the area in which the waiv e r is r eques t e d are shown in the chart on the opposite page. G e neral Education requirements may be satisfied by independent study or credit by examina t ion, according to the procedures described on page 51 of this catalog. Students who have completed more than two college in the field of study concerned may not e arn credit by exam ination They may, however tak e th e exa min a t i on and secure a waiver by scoring a "C" or higher. Placement of Students in Language Classes Generally, if a student has had four years of high schoo l l anguage, h e should e nroll in e ith e r 20:3 or :301. Three years high school would put him in the Int ermediate 11 co urse, and two years' high school in the Int e rm ediate I course. If the r e is unce rtainty as to prope r placement, th e student shou l d be referr ed direct l y to the D epartment of \ l odern Language s Academic Advising At the University of South Florida, academic advising is the province of the teaching facu l ty. It is thus an extension of the t eaching function-a conscious concern for the academic and e ducational questions that most students have about the importance of the ir studies, the proper direction of their educational developm en t and the practical values of the ir e ducational objective. It is the r es ponsibility of the Division of Univ e rsity Studies to provid e an advising program for Freshman students during their first year of study, and for other students who are undecide d on a degree major. Such students should contact the Coordinator of Student Advising in the Division of University Studies for an adviser assignment. A selected corps of advisers serves students who are r eg ist e red in the Division of University Studies. Faculty members par ticipating in the program r epresent all of the colleg e s of the Univers it y and are c hos e n b eca us e of the ir int e rest and e xp erience in c urri cu lar advising. The advising of students entering the degree-granting Colleges is the r e sponsibility of the Colleges. The new student en t ering with 45 credits or more, who has selected a major should contact the college of his choice for assignment of an adviser.

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50 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES A student usually meets oncf; eac h term with his adviser for purposes of program planning. However, h e is encouraged to vis it his adviser whenever he feels in need of help with academic or personal problems Although the adviser is esse ntially a resourc e p e rson for assistance with academic and curricu lar matters, he can often refer the student to a source of specia liz e d help when the problem is one with which he is not qualified to deal. Although it i s not necessary for a student to h ave a s p ecific educational goa l in mind at the time he enters the University, he should discuss with his adviser any general educational objec t ive he might have a t their first m eet ing. Some courses of study require enro llment in key courses during the first year if the student is not to lose tim e in his work toward a degree. Both en gineering and th e medical sciences are curricula which illustrat e this point. Provisions are made to permit a change of adviser w hen i t appears to be in the best inte res ts of the student. A change of e ducational objective is the most common r eas on for reassignment but reassignment may be made at any time the student or adviser believes a change is desirable. While the University provides advising services to assist students wi th academic planning th e responsibility for seeing that all requir e m ents are met rests with th e student. Admission to a Degree Granting College Fres hman students and transfer students with less than 45 credit hours are assigned to th e Division of University Studi e s for pu1pos es of advi sing. Students with 45 hours or mor e, but fewer th an 135 hours who are undecided on a major or who do not meet the require m e nts for admission to one of the degree granting colleges may rem a in assigned to the Division of Universi t y Studies. In all cases students must complete the last 45 credits of their undergraduate work in the degree granting college from which they are to graduate. Gen e rally a student e nrolled in the Division of Unive rsity Studies will be e ligible for admission to a degree granting college when he has comp leted at l eas t 45 hours credit with a 2.0 average and meets th e criteria specified by the college to which he wishes to be admitted. Each college has specified in this catal og its requir ements for admiss i on Transfer students with 45 hours or more may be admitted directly to a degree granting college if th ey meet the r equireme nts specified for that college. Availability of Courses and Programs Th e Unive rsity does not commit its elf to offer all of the courses programs and majors listed in this catalog unless there is sufficient demand to justify them. Some courses, for exa mpl e, may be offered only in alternate quarters or years, or even l ess frequently if the r e is little demand. Some of the less popula r ma j ors may not become availab l e until later in the University's d evel opment. Students wishing such majors may take what is offered here and major in some closely related field or transfer to an institution which offers the d e sired program.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 5 1 Notice of Change Notifications regarding c h ange of address, c h ange of name, change in marital status change in residency, and change of citizenship should be filed promptly with the Office of Records & Registration. SPECIAL ACADEMIC FEATURES The University of South Florida seeks to achieve its objectives not only through its formally organized colleges and courses but also through certain special servic e s Thes e are programs or activities which clearly are designed to enhance the education of students but do so through means other than ortho dox courses and classes. Many of these do not offer academic credit, a l though some may be means by which students do earn credits. Regardless of whether or not these activities count toward the definite graduation requiremen ts, they can be tremendously significant in the lives of students who participate in them. CREDIT BY EXAMINATION Students may apply to take certain lower level courses by Credit by Examination If the application is approved by the college concerned and pre sented at registration, they take the final examination near the end of the term. Those making "B or higher on the examination will receive college credit for the course. Those making "C" are still eligible for waiver but without credit. Those making "D" or lower lose the waiver privilege and must take the course in class to satisfy the course requirement. Students who have completed more than two college courses in the field of study concerned may not earn credit by examination; however, they may take the examination and secure a waiver by scoring a "C" or higher. Note: The regular "incomp l e t e grade" regulations and free structure apply to all courses scheduled through the credit by examination procedure. INDEPENDENT STUDY Graduate or undergraduate students wishing to take a course by independent study must contact the instructor of the course and complete a written contract. This contract specifies the requirements to be comp leted by the student including tests, periodic class attendance term papers etc ot all courses in the University can be taken by independent study. The respective colleges have jurisdiction in the determination of wh i ch courses may be taken in this manner. The regular grading system applies to all independent study students. Grades earned by independent study have the same status as those acquired through regular class attendance Students taking a course by independent study must register for the course in the regular manner and for a specific section. ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT PROGRAM The University of South Florida pa1ticipates in the Advanced Placement Program conducted by the College Entrance Examination Board, which pro -

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52 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES vides 13 college-level advanced placement examinations in American history biology, chemistry, English, European history, Fre nch, interm e diat e German advanced Germ an, Latin IV, Latin V mathematics physics and Spanish, Examinations in Russian are being added. Examination papers are graded by se lected committees on a five-point sca le: 5 high honors 4-honors, 3-good, 2-cre dit 1-no c r e dit The University allows automatic advanced plac e m ent c r e dit for scores of 3, 4 and 5, and allows advanced plac e ment with or without credit for scores of 2 upon r e commendation of the program concerned. Participation in this advanced p l acement prog1 ; am do es not affect the University's regu l ations concerning waiver, credit by exa min a tion ind e p enden t study, or ot her provisions for the advanced plac e m ent of qualifi e d students. ADVANCED PLACEMENT NON-CREDIT PROGRAM Freque ntly a superior student, particularly in the fie lds of science and mathematics is allowed to enter advanced courses in thos e subjects. It is pos sib l e for students well train e d in mathema tics to enter calculus as fr es hm en. It is a l so possib l e for well train e d students to ent e r physics or c hemistry without having o ther colle g e l e v e l science. B efo r e permission is granted to do so, students are required to t a k e a science and mathematics exam ination to de termine whether or not they actually have th e knowl edge and competency to succeed in th ese advanced courses. This same procedure is applied to other subjects EXTRA LOADS The normal load for full tim e students ranges from 12 to 18 quarter hours each term. For most stude nts seriously invo l ved in study this is ample. For some students, how eve r a n overload is th e b es t way for th e m to gain maxi mally from their college education Registration for more than 18 credits requires approval of the dean of the student's college or the director of the Division of University Studies, for students registered there. A first-quart e r freshman is only rarely permitted to undertake more than 18 credits. Thereaft e r permission may be granted if the student's grade point is 3.0 or higher. DEANS LIST Fulltime undergraduate students who d emo nstrat e superior academic achievement, by attaining a 3.5 grade point average in 12 or more hours at tempted during one qua rt e r will b e honored by qualifying for the Dean 's List. The Dean of the College in which th e student is majoring will award a certificate in recognition of this academic honor. Each degree-seeking unde rgraduate student will be recogniz e d and honore d after each quarter in which he demonstrat es superior academic achievement. The Phi Kappa Phi honor society r ecogn izes outstanding seniors. College Level Examination Program ( CLEP ) Students who have a strong background in general e ducation may earn up to 4:5 hours of credit at USF tnrough the CLEP program. The CLEP program consists of five t es ts taking six hours to complete at a cost of $25.00. Arrangements for the tests may be made through the Office of Eval uation Services It is not n ecessa ry for a student to tak e the entir e set.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 53 The cost for any one t est is $15.00; for two or more t ests, the $25.00 fee applies. Successful comp l etion of any of the t es ts means performanc e at or above th e 50th p e rcentil e, sophomor e norms Cre dits assigned for successful com pl e tion of th e tests are as follows : T es t English Humanitie s Social Sci e nc e Math e m a tics Sci e nc e0 CBS Cr e dit 8 hours for CBS 101-2 5 hours (the r emainder of the requirement may be m e t with any one of CBS 308, 315, 316 0r 317). 9 hours for CBS 301-2 El ec tiv e Cr e dit 1 hour 4 hours 9 hours 9 hours 0 If the physical sci ence subscore e quals or exceeds the 50th percentil e, the student can tak e 6 hours credit for CBS 208-9 and 3 hours e lective credit. In this case, h e needs to t a k e CBS 210 to complete th e physical science sequence. The following r es trictions will appl y 1 ) A student may not r ece iv e both transfe r credit and CLEP credit in the same a r ea. Normally, whatever occurred a t the earli es t point in tim e is what should appear on the student's p e rm a n e nt r eco rd. 2 ) The m aximum numbe r of hours for which a student can obtain credit from e xt e nsion correspond e nce and USAF! courses, combined with the CLEP, is 45 hours. 3) The student cannot receive credit by w ay of the CLEP if he has a lready taken courses at a n instution of higher learning covering the area of conc e rn Evening Courses Even ing courses a t th e Umversity of South Florida a r e considered to b e a p a rt of the regula r acad e mic program that a r e offered at tim es that are particul arly co nv e ni ent t o p eo pl e within commuting distanc e who wish t o continu e th e ir e ducation while occupi e d during the day with other r es ponsibilities. Requirem e nts for e v ening courses a re tho se for the regular academic progra m. Eve ning students who wish to seek degr ees must apply to th e University and must present all m a t e ri a l r equire d a ,nd d esc rib e d unde r Admission to the University. Eve ning students may be ass ign e d to an adviser after a dmission and should con t act th e Divi s ion o f University Studi es for adviser ass ignm e nt. As a general rul e part tim e stude nts attending night classes a re encouraged to tak e no mor e th a n two courses. Stude nts who wish to tak e co urses for e nrichm ent but who do not wish to pursue degr ee progra ms m ay enroll in courses on a space available b asis using Special Student e nrollment proce dures. See pages 18-19.

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54 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Summer Session The Summer Session (Quarter IV) constitutes an integral part of the academic program of the University of South Florida. Summer cours e s are identical to those offered at other times during the academic year and are taught by the regular University instructional staff and by visiting teachers In a ddition to regular courses, there are various credit and non-credit work-shops institut es and conferences conducted by specialists While the Summer Session serves as a continuation of study, as the fourth quarter of the academic year for regular students, attempts are made to mak e the schedules of many courses and programs attractiv e to in-s e rvic e t e ach ers, junior college transfer students and beginning freshmen just graduate d from high school. Continuing Education LOCATIONS Programs described below are available in many geographical areas but coordination of these programs is handled through the C ente r for Continuing Education located on the Tampa campus the St. Petersburg campus and th e Sarasota Office for Continuing Education Individuals d e siring mor e informa tion may contact any of th e s e offic es. CREDIT COURSES The University of South Florida serves the in-service and continuing edu cational needs of its ever-expanding professional and occupational communi ty which encompasses 12 counties: Charlotte, DeSoto Hardee, Hernando Highlands Hillsborough, Lee, Manatee, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, and Sarasota. Both degree and non-degree seekers may participate in the University's Continuing Education Credit Program. A part of an individual's master's de gree credit may be earned by taking off-campus credit courses. This individual however is encouraged to apply for graduate status at an earl y date so that these courses may be considered for inclusion in his planned and approved grad uate program of studies. Acceptance for enrollment in a course does not itself constitute acceptance to the University. To assure quality of instruction, the continuing educa tion credit cours e s for the most part are taught by the regular faculty of the University When this is not possible, outstanding instructional personnel are recruited from neighbor ing accredited institutions. In addition, the University System Extension Library makes availab le for each continuing education course the latest in reference and audio-visua l instructional materials. The academic calendar for courses scheduled off campus is essentially the same as for the University s on-campus credit program Classes are generally scheduled once a week Although some continuing education credit courses are g enerated by the University itself most originate through requests which are initiated by individ uals or interested groups. Requests for continuing education courses in the are a of education should be submitted to the County Extension Coordinator designated by the county superintendent of schools. Requests for continuing education courses in all other areas should be transmitted by individmtls groups compan-

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 55 i es, agencies etc., directl y to the Coordinator of Off-campus Credit Courses, Center for Continuing Education, Uni versi t y of South Florida. NON-CREDIT PROGRAMS A variety of non-credit educati onal programs (co nferences, workshops short courses, certificate programs etc.) of varying lengths are scheduled throughout the year, making it possible for the Univers it y t o se1ve greater numbers of adult s with riche r and more diversified pro grams. The programs vary in length from one day t o ten weeks, and th e subject matter is co ncentrated as needed for the group being se r ved. The Center for Continuing Education develops pro grams for business and industry, government professional civ i c and seivice grou ps. A variety of instructional methods are used t o assure maximum participa ti on in the educa tional programs. Distinguished faculty members from the seve ral colleges of the University facu lt y from other institutions of higher educati on as well as national and international resource persons, serve as consu ltants, instructors and lecturers for the programs. Professional program coordinators are availab l e t o provide technical as s i s tance in program planning, budget preparation and eva lu a tion and to ass ist organiz a ti ons in developing programs cons i s tent with the needs of the group and the overall edu ca ti ona l objectives of the Un iv e rsit y. The Center a l so offe r s a number of non-credit certificate programs and courses design e d to meet various e ducational ne e ds of individuals Emphasis i s placed upon quality class es for professional advancement, personal improvement and cultural enrichment. Registrati o n in these classes is open to
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56 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Bachelor of Independent Studies Adult Degree Program The BIS Program is an adult oriented, exte rnal degree program for individual whos e life styles preclude attendance at regular class es. The BIS student pro ceeds at his own pace and, for the most part, in his own setting. The exce ption is the seminars which r equire minim a l resid e nc e. The curriculum consists of int e rdisciplinar y studi es which are divided into four areas: the Humanities Natural Sciences Social Sciences and Interarea Studies The BIS D egree candidate pursues each of the four a r eas of study through two approaches. The first phase of w o rk for eac h a rea co nsi s t s o f guided inde p endent study The student procee ds unde r the guidance of a faculty a dvis e r who furnish e s dir e ctions relative to r eading ass ignm e nts m e thods of r eporting and other study proj e cts. Whe n the student and his a dvis e r feel tha t h e has at tain e d a d equate competence in the area of study, the studen t is invit e d t o t a k e an Area Compre h e nsiv e Examin a tion. The second and final phase of work for each a rea co n s ist s of an area seminar The seminar r eprese nts a p e riod of int e nsiv e residentia l l ea rning unde r the dir e ction of a t ea m o f USF faculty m embers. R equire d r es id ence associat e d with the se minars tot als thirtee n weeks. The se min a rs for the first three areas a r e three w eeks in l ength. The fourth a rea se min a r r equires four we eks in r es id e n ce. Thos e s eeking admission to the BIS Program must qualify for admis sion to th e Univ e rsity of South Florida and for a dmi s sion to the BIS Adult Degree Program. The USF Dir ecto r of Admissions rul es o n th e admission o f an a ppli cant to the U niv e rsit y. The BIS Council rul es o n admission of an applicant t o the BIS Program. Applicants must b e at l eas t 25 years old. An individual unde r twe nty-fiv e whos e occupation precludes attendance a t regul a r cl asses is eligible to apply for a waiv e r of the minimum age requirement. On successfu l completi o n of the four study are as and on recommendation of the BIS Council the Director of the BIS Program certifies the candidate to the Vice Pres id ent for A ca d e mic Affair s who m a kes the final recommendation tha t the d e g ree be conferred. BIS degr ees a r e conferr e d at regul ar gradua tion ce r e moni es a t the Univ e rsit y. Fees for the BIS Degree Progr a m a r e as follows: Application Fee . .............................. Pre -Enrollment Proc e dures 1st Area Enrollment Independent Study ......................... Seminar ................................ . . 2nd Area Enrollment . ............... ....... .... 3rd Area Enrollm ent ............... . .......... . Inter-Area Enrollment Independent study ... . .... . . . ........... S e minar ..................... ............. TOTAL0 ............ ................ $ 15.00 50.00 250.00 250.00 500.00 500.00 250.00 300.00 $2ll5.00 0 Pleas e not e that the fees li sted do not includ e s u c h additi onal ex p e n se s as books trave l and living ex p enses during seminars. Stude nts may not transfer c r edits into o r ou t of th e BIS Program. Program

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 57 policy, however, does a llow for assessment and recognition of prior l e arning which may have been achieved through co llege l e v e l course work l eisure tim e reading, life or work ex p erience, or a co mbination of thes e. App li cants who can d emons t ra t e sufficient competence may waive up t o a maximum of two areas of guid e d independent study. Applications for waiver are processe d as a part of the pre -enrollment procedures The concept of advanced p lacement i s ava ilabl e to applicants who have suffic i ent com p e t ence in some but not a ll of the disciplin es in a study area. This concept i s appli e d after a student enrolls. The student's area facu lt y advise r in other words designs an individualiz e d reading program in keeping with the individual student's background and n ee ds. The BIS Program is administered through th e Center for Continuing Educa ti on. It is academically responsible t o th e co-operating co ll eges (Natura l Sciences, Social & Behavioral Scitmces, Language & Literature, and Fine Arts) and the Vice Pres id ent for Academic Affairs through the BIS Council. Program brochures are availabl e on reques t Write: Director BIS Pro gram, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. Cooperative Education Program The Cooperative Education Program is an academic program open to majors in a ll disciplin es offered a t the Universi t y. The program's objec ti ve is a bal anced educa tion where occupat iona l ex peri e nc e is an integral part of formal e ducation, and theo ry is b l ended with practice. In addition to regu lar classroom and laboratory exercises, it acquaints the student with the world of work and a profession a l environm e nt. The ultimate obj ec tiv es of the program are to pro vide r e levance in the edu ca tional process, dir ec ti on in career planning, and bringing bus in ess, industry, and governmental agencies close t o the e ducational program of th e University and have the graduates absorbed into p ermanent e mploym ent of the l eading employe rs. The Cooperative Education Program is particularly d es ign e d for r ecen t high schoo l graduates rather than o ld er, more mature students with con siderab l e work or professional e xperi ence. It a lso requir es studen t s of demonstrated academic ability. A student must have a minimum of 24 quarte r hour s of academic work comp l e t e d with a grade point average of 2.0 or b etter before b e ing assigned to an e mploy er. The program is open t o all students regardless of major, undergraduate and graduate as well. Students transferring 24 or more hours of credit from another schoo l are e li gible immediat e l y to en t e r this progra m All University of South F l orida cooperative programs are app roximate l y four years in length except in the field of e ngin eeling, which is approxima t e l y a five-year program. Following two or more quarters on campus the student i s ass igned to a t eam and alternates between qua rters of training (paid e mployment) and quarters of study. The Univers it y will assign students to training programs re l evant t o the ir educational and professional goa!S. Usually students are first place d on assign ment s whe r e they can learn the fundamentals. They ma y the n advance in the type of ass ignment from training p e riod to t raining period. Many types of en terpris es have joine d th e Un i versity as coopera tiv e em ployers. Thos e currentl y havin g coopera ti ve programs and acceptin g Univers it y of South Florida students in these training programs include: public utiliti es, financial institutions, chemical plants, departm ent s t ores, schoo l sys t e ms air-

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58 ACADEM I C POLICI E S AND P R OCEDURES craft and a utomobil e manufa cturers, insuran ce firms ch e mic a l biological and nuclear laboratories and many gov e rnm e ntal ag e nci es Students are e ncourag e d to m a k e a pplic a tion for pl a c e m ent in th e pro g r a m during their first quarte r on campus e v e n though th ey mu s t compl e t e at l e ast 24 hours of acad e mic work b e for e b e ing assign e d t o a n e mployer. Stud e nts s igning an agre em ent cov e ring tra ining p e riod s are o blig a t e d t o fulfill th e ir agree m e nt. Stud e nts who fai l to r e port for a training p e riod a fter signing a n agree m ent, who fail to k ee p the ir agr ee m ent to r e main with an e mpl oye r to th e e nd of a giv e n training assignm e nt or who fail to r e main in the program as pro gramm e d, will not b e permitt e d to r egis t e r as full-tim e stude nts during th e ir n e xt quarte r on c a mpus Cooperative Educ a ti o n s tud ents a r e e ncour a g e d t o tak e on e course during e ach training p e r i od. Thi s m ay b e a r e gul a r c ours e t a k e n b y class atte ndanc e, by ind ependent stud y, or c r e dit b y exa min a tion a t th e Univ e rsity of South Florida or an y other accr e dit e d coll e g e or univ e r s ity a c our se b y home stud y or corre spond e nc e, or a sp e ci a l probl ems c ours e in a n a r ea a ppropri a t e to the stud e nt' s major int e r e sts Most of these s p e cial probl e m s c ourses a t th e Univer sit y of South Florid a c a n y a titl e o f indi v idual r esea rch and a co ur se numbe r at the 4 00 l ev el. They ma y b e r e p ea t e d and c r e dit ma y v a r y from on e to five hour s p e r quarte r for Coop e rativ e Educati o n stude nts th e a mount to b e d e t ermin e d at th e time of a d v is ing A s p e cia l cour se is a v aila bl e for C o op e r a tiv e Education stude nts CBS 400. Coop e rative Educa tion R e p o rt ( l 5 cr e dit s). Thi s course is d e sign e d sp e cifi c all y for C oo p e rati ve Educa tion students in whi c h th e student purs u e s a s ubj ec t d ea ling with hi s t raini n g assi g nm ent an d/ o r hi s m a j o r a r ea o f profes s ional int e rest The C o op e rativ e Educatio n student i s a s s ign e d to a profe s sor in hi s m a j o r fie ld a nd will confer regul arly with him o n th e s ubject structure and cont ent of th e proj e ct Th e findings o f this proj ec t w o uld b e e mb o di e d in a writt e n r eport. Thi s cours e m ay b e u se d with prefixes o th e r than CBS if ap prov e d b y the d ea n and d e p a rtm ent h ea d of th e college and a r ea conc e rn e d Furth e r informati o n ma y b e obtain e d in the Offi ce of C oo p e r a tiv e Educ ation. The regis t ration fee for the training period is $40 .00 and, in general, covers th e fee for six cr e dit hour s ( see Coop e rativ e Educa tion H a ndbook for e xcep tions), stud ent public a tions, u se of th e Librar y, Stud ent H ea lth S e rvic e, and all privil e ges enjoye d b y oth e r full-tim e students including the u se of r ecrea tional fac iliti es Tra n sfe r students a r e we lc o m e to se l e ct th e pro g ram and s hou l d m a k e a pplicati o n during th e ir fir s t qua rt e r a t th e Uni ve r s ity. National Student Exchange Th e Univ e rsity is affilia t e d with the Na tion a l Stud ent E x ch a ng e which p e rmits stud e nts to study for up t o o n e yea r in a noth e r public univ e r s it y as part of th e ir program a t t h e Univ e r s it y of South Florid a Th ese ex ch a n ges c a n o c c ur o nl y a t univ e rsiti e s which a r e p a rt o f th e Na ti o n a l Stud ent E xc h a ng e. B y 1972 it is a nticip a t e d a pproxim a t e l y 3 0 univ e r s ities in the Unit e d St a tes will b e m e mb e r s In a ddition t o th e U niv e r s it y o f S o uth Florid a o th e r uni ve r s ities involv e d a r e : M o rg a n Stat e ( Md .), Illin o i s St a t e, C o lorad o St a te, M onta n a St a t e, Willi a m P a t e rson Coll e g e (N.J.) P o rtl and St a t e (Ore ) T o ws o n St a t e ( M d .), and th e U ni vers iti e s of Ala b a ma, H a w aii, Ida h o, M o ntan a eva d a ( R e n o), M assac hu setts, Or e gon and Wi sco n sin ( Gr ee n B ay). Und e r th e N SE p ro g ra m U ni ve r s it y o f South Fl o rid a s tud ents a ppl y for

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 59 exchange status at the ir home campus. To qualify, a student must be in his sophomore or junior year while at th e exchange school, and have a 2.5 grade average He p ays in-state fees at th e host campus and his credits and grades transfer back to the University of South Florida upon comp l etion of the exchange. Students must apply for exc hange at least five months before th e anticipated t e rm or t e rms off campus a t the e xchange school. The NSE program is coordinated by the Off-Campus T e rm Program. The OCT Program maintains a library of materials about the program and the m e mber institutions involved in the NSE Program. Interes ted students should contact the Dire ctor of the Off Campus Term Program for information and application. Florida College Exchange Through an exchange agreement, students of the University of South Florida, with the approval of the ir advisers, may elect courses in Greek, Hebrew, Bibl e, or religious education at nearby Florida College. Credit for accept able work may be transferred to the University and counted as elective credit toward graduation. Students from Florida College have a similar transfer arrangement. Costs for students under these dual enrollmen t plans are based on credit hours of work taken and payment is made to the appropriate institution in accordance with its per-hour fee rate. The Traveling Scholar Program Th e University System of the State of Florida has a Traveling Scholar program which will enable a graduate student to take advantage of s pecial resources available on another campus but not available on his own campus: special course offerings, research opportunities, unique laboratories, and library collections. For procedures and conditions, see the section on Graduate Study University of Florida Correspondence Courses B eca us e the University of Florida has been designated as the only institu tion in the State University System to offer correspondence courses, the University of South Florida will consider such courses as resident creditwith the grades not transferable. Off-Campus Term Program The Off-Campus T erm Pro gra m offers a program of e xperience-study whereby all students are encouraged to spend at l eas t one quarter engaged in individua l e ducational pursu it s away from the University campus. Students are offered a wide variety of o pportunities for self-designed and self-implemented ex p er-

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60 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES i ences for academic credit. For example, students may become involved in social action projects internationa l trave l or study, independent research-study, work or internship proj e cts and many other p e rson a liz e d projects a ll off campus and all for academic credit. A major option r e lating to outside agencies is th e OCT Social Action program. The s e projects are much lik e VISTA programs in nature. Students work as paid volunteers for non-profit agencies working for social change or improvement of the poor and dis advantage d or serving the community in other ways The s e agencies ex p ect student vo lunteers a ll 4 quarte rs of the year and need 40 or 50 students eac h t e rm in order to achieve thei r goals. Acad e mic credit is earn e d b y students while engage d i n off-campus activi ties through the OCT Program. The numbe r of hours of credit varies according to student inte r es t and propose d a ctiviti es Students may e nroll and pay fees for variabl e hours of credit from 1 to 15 Academic credit activiti es a r e d es ign e d around the basic o ff-campus e xp eriences for th e most part and projects r esulting in academic credit are d es ign e d by the student and supervised by appropriate faculty. Cre dits may b e earn e d which appl y towards general educa tion general e l e ctiv e, and major fie ld credit require m e nts. The Community Inte raction Course is specifically d esigne d for off -campus purposes. This is a basic and broa d range environmental study where the stu d ent learns of his environment through guided and inte ntional interaction with it. The full r esources of the University are availab l e to assist the student in his planning and impl e m entation of his off-campus ex p e ri e n ce. The OCT Program operates throughout the entire year and students are urge d to pl a n their off campus e xp e ri e n ces during the fall throug h spring quarters t o avoid the tradition a l rush common to the summe r term. Educational Resources Th e Division of Educational R esources offers the following se r v i ces : AumovISUAL SERVICES. Audiovisual Services make a variety of equipment and instructional materials availabl e for the classroom Universi t y e vents and other functions. Such equipment includes public address systems, tape r ecorders, and projectors of all kinds. V a rious types of audiovisual equipm ent can also be rented. PRoDucnoN SERV ICES. Graphic, i ces for us e in the classro o m as well produced h e r e. pho t o and c in e matography se rvas the ove rall University prog ram a r e BROADCASTING SERV ICES. Radio and t e levi sio n are a part of the Broad cas tin g S e r vices. Radio v VUSF is a n stereo shltion operating on 89.7 mhz. WUSF-TV, Channel 16 UHF, is a nonco mm e rcial t e l ev ision station serving th e U ni ve rsit y and th e co mmuniti es of th e nin e surrounding co unti es. These facilities a r e us e d as a laboratorv for students e nroll e d in the broadcasting curricu lum. INSTRUCTIONAL CENTER. The Center maintains a col lection of r eco rds filmstrip s filmloops, t
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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 61 to support instru c tion. Prev i ew, booking sch eduling and show i ng of films i s o ff e r ed. Films not a part of th e University Film L ibrary will b e reque sted from other sour ces throug h this agency LEA R N ING LABORATO RY. A t e l ephone dial-acc es s a u diovisua l l ab oratory is available for instructional plllpos es. Ove r 190 diff e r e nt audio pro g rams are accessible at one tim e A switchboard handl e s outside calls for audio prog rams Video tapes, 16mm films slides, and t e levision programs make up the 12 v id eo sources available in the laborato 1y. Thes e programs may also be channe led to on-campus classrooms via the clos e d circuit capabiliti es of th e Leaming Laboratorv. STUUENT Pmmuc:T10N CENTER The center offers both g raphic and photo facilities for staff and student us e. Evaluation Services This office conducts testing programs, t es t scoring and ins t itutiona l r ese a r c h Testing services consist' of those for admission to colleges and s p ecial programs graduate and profess i onal school admission such as the Graduate Record Examination foreign language proficiency and many othe r sp ecia l p ro grams T es t scoring, statistica l analysis of t e sts and advisory serv i c e in tes t construction are provide d to facult y and othe r agencies. Eva lu a ti on Services i s a part of the Offic e of A ca d e mic S e 1vic es, which serves as a r esearch unit within the Academic Affairs area. The Library It is important that a library should take into account not on l y the boo k s on its shelves but also the p e ople it serves. This point of view is central i n the philosophy of the University of South Florida Library. A library is good, no t because of the volumes it has but becaus e it is used by peopl e w h o deri ve personal benefit from its us e and who produce something as a resu lt of i t s us e that will be of benefit to our society The Library staff wants students to regard books as a way of life a n d use the Library r e gularly. One of the reasons for providing a library co ll ec tion is to encourage students to buy, read and discuss books and fee l bereft when deprived of books. The Univ e rsity expects stude nts t o become thoroughl y familiar with the University Library book coll ec tion, to master the tech niques of using it andb e for e graduation-to achieve a familiarity with books which will c a rry over int o later life The University Library has approximately 3 25,000 volumes and seating for 725 readers. The Circulation desk, R e s e rv e reading room, Special Collections, a port ion of the circulating book collection, and r ec reational reading books are on the first floor. Special Collections includ e the Florida collection, rare books, University archives and the Florid a Histori ca l Soci ety Library The Referenc e collection and current periodicals are on the second floor. The Referenc e s taff assists students in the use of Library materials and of the card catalog which is in the R e ference department. In addition to more than 3,000 periodicals, the Library subscribes to

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62 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES newspapers from Florida, major cities in the United States, and many foreign countries. The balance of the circulating book collection and part of the bound per iodical collection are on the third floor The rest of the bound periodicals and U.S. government documents are on the fourth floor. The Library is a depository for U.S. government publications. All books, with the exce ption of reserve materials and. Special Collections, are in open stacks. All students have the opportunity to become familiar with the Library holdings b y browsing in the stacks. Division of Sponsored Research Research is an important aspect of the educa tion programs a t the University of South Florida F ac ulty members are encouraged to pursue research ac tivities and m any students participate in research and training projects sup ported by funds awarded to the University by public and private granting agencies. Research is integrated with th e instructional program. The Division of Sponsored Research is the central coordinating unit for research and other sponsored educational activities on the campus. It provides information about granting agencies and serves as a consultation center for faculty who desire help in processing research proposals Although the Division of Sponsored Research operates primarily for the benefit of the faculty, students who have an appropriate interest in re search are welcome to visit the office. Computer Research Center The University maintains centralized, high-speed e l ectronic computer facilities for use in teaching, research and administra tion This Center has a Systems Pl anning D epa rtment which assists University administrative offices, a Faculty Consulting D epartment responsible for facilitating the use of computers in relation to classroom teaching and research conducted by faculty and students and an education unit which sponsors non-credit seminars in computer lan guages such as FORTRA COBOL, and other subjects relative to the use of computers. Finally, a central corps of programmers service the University computer needs as express e d through the systems and consulting departments. Computer facilities include an IBM 360/65 system As demand increases, remote batch processing terminals and other on-line terminals will be added and will use the centralized computer. In addition to computer facilities, th e Computer Research Center main tains keypunch, sorter, and electronic calculator devices in "open use" areas on a 24-hour basis to assist s tud ents and faculty in preparation proces$ing and checking of their data.

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GRADUATE STUDY The graduate pro g rams of th e University of South Florida a re administered by the academic colleges through the Colleg e D ea ns. Each of th e colleges is represented on th e University-wide Graduate Council which is advisory to th e Vice Pr es id ent for Acad e mic Affair s on policy and curricu lum p e rt a ining to graduate study The Graduate Council is charged with maintaining the excellence of all graduate programs. The Director of Graduate Studi es for th e University se rv es as Chairman of the Graduate Council and is a m e mb e r of the s taff of the Vic e Pr esident for Academic Affairs. The Graduate Council Chairman acts as the coordinating official for Graduate Study for the University. The Gradua t e Council acts as a curriculum committee for courses that are normally tak e n b y graduate students ( i .e. thos e bearing course numbers 500 or above) and r e vi e ws proposals for the n e w programs at th e graduate l e v e l prior to ac ti on by th e Vic e Pres id e nt. The Council a l so establishes University-wide entrance and degree r equire m e nts for graduate programs and s it s as a d e lib era tive body on p e titi o ns to consider waiver of a n y graduate progr a m r equire m e nts or in cases of jurisdictional disput es. The Director of Graduate Studi es conducts r e vi e ws t o d e t e rmin e that Uni versity r equire m en ts for a dvance degr ees and for graduate a dmissions a r e being m e t Master's Degree Programs Offered COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Master of Business Admini s trati on Master of Accountancv \faster of Science deg.ree in Management Master of Arts degre e in Economi c s Master of Busin ess Administration with Sp e cialization in Marketing COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Mast e r of Arts degr ee programs in : Art Education Elementarv Educati o n English Education Foreign Language French German Spanish Guidance Humanities Education 63 Librar v and Audio-Visual Math e matics Education \1usic Education Phvsical Education Education S c hool P sycho l ogy Science Education Social Science Education Speech Education

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64 GRADUATE STUDY Special Education with specialization in: Emoti o nally Disturbed Varying Exc e ption a liti es Gift e d Speech Patholog y ( 5yea r progralll ) M en tal R e tardation Vocational and Adu lt Education with specialization in: Adult Education Busin ess and Office Education Distributive Education Industrial-Technical Education Juni or College Teaching Astronomy Biolog y B usiness Chem i stry Engin ee ring English COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Master of Engine e ring French Geograph y Geo fogy Histor y Math e matics Physics Political Sci ence Psycholo gy Sociology Spanish Speech Master of Science in Engineering (pos t-ba cca l aureate, or 5-year BSE I MSE programs ) COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS Master of Fin e Arts degr ee in V i sua l Arts Mas t e r of M u s i c COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE & LITERATURE Master of A rt s degree programs in : English Philosophy Fre nch Spanish Linguistics Speech COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES Master of Arts degree programs in: Astronomy Biolog y ( i ncluding Bact e riology Botan y, Z oo l ogy) G eo l ogy Maste r of Science degr ee in Chem i stry Math e matics Marine Sci e n ce Physics COLLEGE OF SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Master of Arts degr ee programs in: G eography Psycho l ogy G e rontology R e habilit a tiv e Counseling History School P syc holo gy Political Science Sociology Mas t e r of Science degree p rogra m : C lini ca l Speech Patholog y and Audio l ogy (5 year program )

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GRADUATE STUDY 65 Intermediate Programs Offered COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Education Specialis t (Ed.S.) in Elementary Edu ca ti on w ith concen t ra ti on i n: Early Childhood Education Rea di ng and L anguage A rts Mathmatics Educat ion S p ecia l Educa t ion Ph. D. Programs Offered COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Doctor of Phi l osophy degree i,n Education Specialization in E l ementary Educati on w ith concentra t ion in Earl y Child hood Education Mathema t ics Edu cation, Read i ng a n d La n g u age A r t s and Specia l Education COLLEGE OF SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Do c tor of Philosophy degree program in: Psychology with specialization in Clinica l Experim e nta l and Industrial-Organiza t iona l COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE & LITERATURE Doctor of Philosophy degree program in: English COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES Doctor of Philosophy degree programs in: Biology Chemistry including Bioch e mistr y and Environm e nta l Chemis t ry Mathematics Procedures For Applying Specific instructions on the procedures for appl ying are given on page 17. Graduate students are advised to app l y early. A $ 1 5 non-refundab l e a p plica t ion fee must accompany th e appl ica ti on un l ess a s tudent has been prev i o u s l y enrolled and has paid the fee at th e University Two officia l transcr ipt s from every college attended must be submitted direct l y to the Office of Adm i ssions a l ong with officia l scor e s of the Verbal and Quantitative portion of the Gradua t e R eco rd Examination. Requirements for Admission to Graduate Study Th e r equireme nnts for admission to graduate s t anding include: 1. A baccalaureate degr ee or its e quiva l ent from an approved college or un i -

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66 GRADUATE STUDY versity. This requirement may be waived for students accepted into certain approved programs which lead directly to graduate degrees 2. A "B'' average or better in all work attempted during the last two years of undergraduate work (Junior and Senior years) or a tot a l Quantitative-Verbal Graduate Record Examination score of 1000 or higher. Applicants from the College of Business (except Economics) must submit a score of 450 or higher on the ATGSB examination in place of the GRE. All applicants are required to submit these exa mination scores and examina tions must have been taken within five years preceding application for admission The official report of scores must be submitted directly to the Office of Admissions by the Testing Service. 3. Two official transcripts from all institutions of higher learning attended submitted to the Office of Admissions 4 A completed Confidential Personal Student Questionnaire sent from the last institution attended directly to the Office of Admissions at the University of South Florida 5 Acceptance by the Colleg e and program for which the student is applying including satisfaction of any additional requirements specified by them in this Bull etin. 6 Foreign students are required to present satisfactory scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Foreign students must comply with requirements listed on page 21. A student's acceptance to graduate standing is granted for the Quarter specified in the official acceptance notification. In the event that a student wishes to change the date of entrance, he must notify the Office of Admissions of his intentions to do so. Failur e to enroll during the specified Quarter without noti fying the Admissions Office will result in the cancellation of the admission and will necessitate re-application A student's acceptance to graduate standing will remain active for up to five years while he is in the Armed Services. A student should notify the Office of the Registrar six weeks prior to re-registration in order to have his enrollment reactivated. If, on completion of one graduate degree, a student wishes begin work on another advanced degree at USF, he must reapply at the Office of Admissions SPECIAL STUDENTS Students who are qualified to enroll in specific graduate courses but who either do not desire to enroll as graduate students or do not meet the admission requirements for graduate standing, may enroll as special students Special students may enter classes on a space available basis during the first week of each Quarter by obtaining consent of the course instructor. Special students must meet all the stated prerequisites of courses in which they wish to enroll. Certain classes are available only to degree seeking majors and may not be availab le for special students. No more than 12 hours of credit earned as a special student may be applied to satisfy gra duate degree requirements. Any applica tion of such credit must be approved b y the degree granting college and it must be appropriate to the program Those interested in enrolling as special students are urged to contact the Coordinator of Graduate Studies in the College offering the courses concerned for a description of requirements and procedures THE TRAVELING SCHOLAR PROGRAM The University System of the State of Florida has a Traveling Scholar

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GRADUATE STUDY 67 program which will enable a graduate student to take advantage of special re sources available on another campus but not available on his own campus. Procedure A Traveling scholar is a graduate student, who, by mutual agreement of the appropriate academic authorities in both the sponsoring and hosting insti tutions receives a waiver of admission requirements and the application fee of the host institution and a guarantee of acceptance of earned credits by the sponsoring institution A traveling scholar must be recommended by his own graduate adviser, who will initiate a visiting arrangement with the appropriate faculty member at the host institution. After agreement by the Director of Graduate Studies at the University of South Florida and the student's adviser and the faculty member at the host institution, Deans at the other institution will be fully informed by the adviser and have authority to approve or disapprove the academic arrangement The student registers at the host institution and pays tuition and registra tion fees according to fee schedules established at that institution. Conditions Each university retains its full right to accept or reject any s tudent who wishes to study under its auspices. Traveling scholars will normally be limited to one Quarter on the campus of the host university and are not entitled to displacement allowance mileage, or per diem payments. The sponsoring institution, however, may at its own option, contribute to the financial support of the traveling scholar in the form of fellowships or graduate assistantships. GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS The University provides a number of graduate teaching and research assistantships as well as certain fellowship programs. Students should inquire directly to the Head of the Department in which they plan to major for informa tion on financial aids available to graduate students. Regulations Governing Graduate Study Master s Degree Major Professor An adviser or major professor will be appointed for the student in his first term of work and will be designated by the chairman of the department or area in which the degree is sought upon a mutual recommendation from the student and professor concerned. Superv isor y Comm i ttee Students working toward a thesis degree will have the benefit of a super visory committee. The committee, consisting of the major professor and at least two other members of the department or area in which the degree is sought, will be appointed by the appropriate chairman upon recommendation

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68 GRADUATE STUDY from the stude nt and his m ajor professor. The committee will approve the course of study for the student, supervise his r esearch, and accept hi s thesis. Program of Study and Course Requirements During the first t e rm o f study, in cons ultation with hi s adviser, the student should plan a program of work to b e compl e ted for satisfac tion of degree r equire ments A copy of this program s ign e d by th e student and adviser should b e maintain e d in th e stude nt's d epartment file. A minimum of 45 qua rt e r hours is r equired for a master 's degree a t least 24 hours of which must b e a t th e 600 l e v el. At l eas t 3 0 hours must be in formal r e gularly sc h e dul e d course w o rk 15 of which must b e a t the 600 level. Courses at th e 500 level a r e acceptabl e for credit towards th e mast e r's degree when t a k e n as a p a rt of a planned degree pro gram. A major professor or adviser ma y approve up to 8 hours of 400 level courses if tak e n as part of a planned d egree program. Additional graduat e credit may b e earn e d in 400-level courses only if sp e cifically approved by th e appropriate d e an and b y th e G raduate Council Stude nts enro ll e d in undergradu a t e courses as a part of the ir planne d d egree program w ill b e expected to d e mon stra t e a su p erior l eve l of p e rform a n ce. Quality of Work Graduate students must attain an overall average of 3. 0 ( B ) in a ll cours es. No grade b e low C will be accepte d toward a graduate degr ee, but all grades w ill be counte d in computing th e ove rall average. Any graduate student who at the end of a quarte r i s not in good standing unde r the requirements for his degree as publishe d s hall b e cons id e r e d to b e on probati onary status. Such a student may b e droppe d from degree seeking status afte r one qua rt e r of proba tion by the dean of his co ll e g e No tific a tion of probati on shall b e made t o the student i n writing b y his major adviser, with a copy t o the colle g e dean At th e end of the probationary quarte r the m ajor advi se r s h all r ecommend to the co llege d e an in writing one of three a lt e rna tiv es : ( 1 ) removal of probationary status ; (2) continued\ probation; or (3) drop from degree program. Eve r y e ffort will b e made during the probationary period to a id th e student in r ees tablis hin g hi s standing. Appeals Graduate students may appeal actions regarding their academic status: 1. In actions bas e d on departmental requirements, the student may appeal first to hi s department through his major adviser, then to the co llege dean or his repres e ntative and then to the Graduate Council, if neces sary. 2 In actions based on the University mm1mum requirements, appeal s hall b e made dir ectl y to the Graduate Council. R e ports of actions a nd appeals will b e m a intain e d in th e student's p e rmanent d e p artme ntal file. Load A student taking nine or m o r e hours of graduate work in a full quarter w ill b e classifi e d as a full-tim e student. The normal graduate load i s 12 credit hours.

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GRADUATE STUDY 69 Transfer Credit Transfer of credit from ano ther recognized graduate school is limit e d to nine quarter hours. All transferred .credit must (1) b e evaluated as graduate credit by the Director of Admissions (2) be approved by th e program or college concerned, and (3) have been completed wi t h grades of"B" or better. Transfer credits must be posted to the student's p e rmanent record no later than one full term prior to his graduation It is the student's responsibi l ity to make certain that the official who is to certify him for graduation prope rly notifies the Offic e of the Registrar regarding transfer credits Time Limit All work applicable to the master's degree requirements must be completed w ithin the seven years immediately preceding the awarding of th e d eg r ee. Application for Degree Each student who plans to qomplete his graduation r equire m ents by the end of a term must complete the Application for Graduation within 15 days after the beginning of the term in which he will graduate. The application is available at, and after completion must be returned to th e Registrar s Offic e. Final Comprehensive Examination Prior to clearance for the degree, th e candidate must perform satisfac torily on a comprehensive exa mination in his major fie ld. Thesis When a thesis is require d, an original and one copy of th e approved thesis must be submitted to the Director of Graduate Studi es before th e end of the quarter in which the student is to receiv e his degree. Onl y after the th esis and the copy have been approved for filing in the University Libra1y can the student be certified for his degree. The thesis should conform to th e guidelines in the Handbook of Graduat e Theses and Diss erta tions available in the Univer sity Bookstore Second Master s Degree A second master's degree may be granted so l ong as the r e is no duplication of credit. If there is any duplication of credit, the request must be considered by the Graduate Council. S-U Grades In The Graduate Programs No graduate student may tak e a cours e in his major on an S-U basis except for certain courses such as seminars, theses, r esea rch proj ec ts practicum, and internship that are specifically approved b y th e Graduate Council to b e given on this basis The student may apply a maximum of 6 hours of such credit in his major (excluding Research, Design, Practicum, or Internship ) toward a master s degree. A graduat e student can take courses outside his major on an S-U basis even though the courses are in fulfillment of the degree requirements. To do so, he must have prior approval of both the professor of the course, his adviser, and the Dean of the College that will approve his degree.

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70 GRADUATE STUD Y Exclusions M embe rs or form e r m embers of the faculty who hold or h a v e h eld the rank ot Assistant Professor A s soci a t e Profe ssor or Professor a r e not eligible to b e grante d gradua t e d egree s from the Unive rsity of South Florid a e x cept upon prior a uthorizati o n o f the Graduate Council and approva l of the Vic e Pre sid ent for Ac a d e mi c Aff a irs. In c ase s whe r e the -immediate famil y o f the facult y a r e e nroll e d in graduate d egree p ro grams the facult y m embe r may n o t s e rv e on a n y a dvisory or e xami nation committee nor b e involv e d i n a n y d e t e rmination of aca d e mic or financial st a tus of tha t individu al. Ph. D. Degree The d egree of Do ctor of Philosophy is grante d in r e cogniti o n of high attain m ent in a sp e cific fie ld of knowl edge. It is a r esearch d egree and is not conferr e d sol e ly upon the earning o f cre dits and comple tion of cours e s or b y the acquiring of a numbe r of t e rm s of r e sid e nc y. The amount of r e sid ence and the r equire m e nts sugg este d b e low a r e a minimum. The d egree shall b e grante d on evid e n ce of profi c i e nc y and distin c tiv e a chi e v e m ent in a sp e cifi e d fie ld, b y the d e monstration o f the a bilit y t o do original ind e p endent inv e stig a tion and the pre s enting of these finding s with a high d egree of lit erary skill in a diss e rtation SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE A stude nt workin g t oward th e Ph. D. d egree must e lect t o do the ma jorit y of hi s work in a s p e cificall y approve d are a or d epartment, and th e r emainde r o f hi s wo rk in r e lat e d fie ld s A s so o n as p o ssibl e norm ally during th e first t e1m o f r e sid e ncy and upon r ecomme ndations from the student and his major professor, a supe1vis or y committee shall b e appointed for th e student b y the chairman of the d epartment or are a in which th e d egree is sou ght. Thi s c ommittee s hall approve th e cours e of study to b e followed by the student, conduct hi s qualify ing e xaminations supe 1vis e his r e s earch, and conduct his final o ra l e xaminati o n s The major profe ssor shall se1v e as chairman of the committee up to the fina l oral e xamination. Thi s c ommittee shall c e rtif y to th e D e an of it s c ollege whe n all r equire m e nts have b ee n m e t The supe rvisor y c o mmittee s hall c onsist o f at l e a s t five m embe rs at l e ast three of whic h must com e from the are a in which the major work for the degr ee will h e done LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT B e fore a student is e ligible to take the comprehensive qualifying examina tion, he must have compl eted a reading knowledge of two foreign languages. Spe c ial work done outsid e the student's field of concentration and related subjects may b e substitute d for on e language, provided this excep t ion is recommended by th e stude nt' s advis o r y c ommittee and i s approve d b y the Graduate Council. The total of transfer ( se e Transfer Credit, page 18 ) and off -cameus work tog ethe r should not e xc ee d on e half of the planne d program and neith e r is finall y < l ccepte d until s u c h work h as b ee n a ccepte d as appropr iat e b y the stude nt's supe rvis o r y c ommittee. Any que stion of the appropriate n ess of transfe r and offca mpus co urs es will b e r e s o l ve d b y the G ra duate Co uncil. RESIDENCY The minimum r equire m ent sh a ll b e three a c a d e m i c years of work beyond

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GRADUATE STUDY 71 the bachelor s degree. At least one academic: year of residence must he on the campus at the University of South Florida An
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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS The University of South Florida currently conduc ts academic programs through nin e colleges: The Coll e ge of Bu siness Administration the College of Education, the College of Engineering the College of Fin e Arts the College of L anguage & Literature, the College of atural S c i ences, the College of Social and B e havioral Sci ences, the College of M e dicin e and the College of Nurs ing. Each of these C o lleg es has its own require m e nts and s t andards, the descriptions of whic h appear on the following pages. Each Coll e ge h as pre p a r e d its course off e ring s with strong undergraduate and graduate programs in mind Each Colleg e acce pts the idea that a co llege educa tion b e gins w ith a broad bas e of general cours es an d procee ds t o a more sp eciali ze d work and e nds w ith a formal e ffort to bring t ogethe r the many se p ara t e thread s of a n educa ti on int o a s i g nific ant patte rn. Bus i n ess Adm inist r ati o n B uilding 72

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College of BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION The College of Busin ess Administration offers courses o f study leading to bo t h undergraduate and graduate degrees. These programs are design e d to prepar e individuals for busin ess and government careers and graduat e edu cation It is the p h i l osophy of the College of Business Admin i stration to d evote its r esources to the corrt'inue d growth of high qual it y undergraduate and graduate programs The undergraduate c urricu lum l eads to a Bach e lor of Arts in o n e of the following fiv e major fie lds : A cco unting Economics, Finance, Managem ent, and M a rk e ting The unde rgraduate programs are structured to acco mplish the following objectives: l. To give th e student a broad foundati o n in general and liberal educa tion a thoroug h grounding in basic business co urs es, and some sp ecific compe t e nc e in a t l eas t one significant functi o n a l a rea of business 2. To strengthen students' powe r s o f imag inativ e thinking creative ind e p ende n t a na l ysis, and sensi t iv e n ess to social and e thi ca l va l u es 3 To inst ill in each student a d es i r e for l ea rning tha t w ill continue after h e has graduated and tak e n hi s place in the community. 4. To convey t o each student th e s pirit o f pio n eering, risk t a k i n g and prog r ess which are essential to the continued developm ent of the free e nt e rprise system. The graduate programs are structured t o accomplish the following ob j ecti ves: l. T o make profession a l e ducati o n availab l e to thos e qualified ind i v idu a l s who h ave se l ec t e d specific career o bj ecti ves in fields of business government or edu ca tion 2 T o support adequatel y the r esea r c h act ivity so v itally n ecessa r y to maintain a quality graduate faculty and pro gram. 3. T o foster ind e pendent inn ova tiv e thinkin g and actio n as a profe ss iona l individu al. UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS A program of edu ca ti o n for business leadership must b e based on a foundation 73

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74 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION I of comprehensive general education; consequently, most of this basic work must be taken prior to admission to the college. It should be further noted that approximately one-half of the work leading to the bachelor s degree in business is required from academic areas outside of business. Upon application, students who have fulfilled the following requirements will be admitted to the College of Business Administration : 1. Total of 90 quarter hours of credit with a grade point ratio of 2.0 or better. 2. Those holding an A.A. degree from a junior college or university in a parallel program. Transfer Students From Junior Colleges: Junior college students should complete the program of general education as required by the junior college. Certification to this effect will be accepted as fulfilling the general education requirements of the University of South Florida Furthermore, the student should follow the business parallel program indicated in his junior college catalog, to assure graduation from the University of South Florida in minimum time. Should the junior college catalog not speci(v pre-business courses, we recommend the student take two semesters of mathematics two semesters of economics, two semesters of accounting, and one semester of statistics while s till at the junior college Business is requiring more and more analytical functions of its manage ment-level personnel each year. One of the most basic analytical tools is mathematics and more and more higher mathematics is being required as prerequisite for business courses. The student is therefore encouraged to complete more than the minimum requirements of mathematics and add begin ning calculus to his curricu lum at the junior college. All transfer students, particularly those not pursuing the parallel pro gram should note that a maximum of nine quarter hours will be allowed for courses taken during the first two years of junior college study which are available only as 300 and 400 level cours es in the College of Bu siness Ad ministration at the University of South Florida. However, of these nine hours no more than five quarter hours may be transferred for credits in the student's major field From Non-Junior Colleges: Students attending a four year college who wish to transfer should follow a program in general education similar to that required at the University of South Florida. The prerequisite courses in business sub jects of accounting principles, economics principles, and mathematics should also be included in the first two years of study. Transfer credit will be allowed for all of the above courses. Any remaining courses after fulfilling the general education requirements and business prerequisites should be taken in such areas as mathematics, the natural sciences the social sciences, and the humanities. BUSINESS PRELAW Those students intending to go on to law school after obtaining a B.A degree in a business major should so indicate on th ei r Application to Upper Level. Special counseling will be provided. Unless a specific degree in Accounting, etc. is desired, an ex plicit Pre-Law inter-disciplinary set of existing courses will be arranged under the Finance major.

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COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 75 Requirements for Graduation Graduation requirement is 180 academic hours Of the 180 hours the Bu s'iness course credits may vary from 87 minimum to 100 m;iximum. Consequently, non-business courses may vary from 93 to 80. This variance depends upon the major field chosen and differences in mix of General Electives and Business Electiv es. If the student enters USF as a freshman his requirements for graduation are: (1) 57 hours of Basic Studies, including CBS 401; (2) 23-36 hours of General Electives; (3) 53 hours of Busin ess Core, which ipcludes 9 hours of Accounting (ACC 201, 202, 305); 8 hours of Economics (ECN 201 202); 5 hours ot intermediate Price The01y (ECN -:31H); 8 hours of Statistics (ECN 231, 331); 5 hours of Finance (FIN 301); 5 hours of Management ( MAN 301); 5 hours of Marketing ( MKT 301); 5 hours of Law (GBA 301); 3 hours of Computer Applic a tion ( GBA 333); (4) 20-27 hours in the major area as stipulated under each major with a 2 0 CPR in these courses See curricula nand programs following; (5) 14-20 hours of Business Electives. Students transferring with General Education Requirements met need not adhere to the Basic Studies hours but rather need total non business courses within the range of 80-93 hours. Business course requirements are the same as those (or an ent ering freshman Students transferring in e xcess of six quarter hours of Elem entary Accounting mu s t still complete ACC 305 in the Business Core. The extra homs of Elementary Accounting transferred will apply toward the Business Electives requirements. Those bringing Elementary Statistics will receive credit for ECN 231. Extra hours of Elementary Statistics will apply toward Business Electives requirements. These students, however, must take ECN 331 unless the equiva lent has bee n taken at a senior institution. CURRICULA AND PROGRAMS 1. ACCOUNTING Major R e quir e m e nts : 27 hours in Accounting including ACC 301, 302 411, 421, 423 and two of the following : ACC 401 402, 405, 412 424 425. Business Electives: 14-20 hours of courses in College of Busin ess Administration (other than accounting). It is strongly recommended that all accounting students take either GBA 371, Business Communication or ENG 325, Advanced Expository Writing. 2. ECONOMICS The Economics Department is committed to preparing the student, both major and non-major with a strong background in the science of Economics. Proper investigation of any science entails a universal presentation of the analytical and factual material of the subject matter. With this thought in mind, the subject matter is taught emphasizing a the oretical framework which will allow the individual student to identify and solve e conomic problems. Major R equirements: ECN 323, 401, and 17 hours of other Economic courses.

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76 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Busin ess El ec tives: 14-20 hours in the College of Busin ess Administration other th an Economics. 3. FINANCE Major R e quir ements: FIN 321 411, 421 and 8 to 15 additional hours of upper l eve l financ e cou r ses Business Electives: A minimum of 1 4 hours and a maximum of20 hours of College of Busin ess Administration courses outside of the Finance department. G e n e ral El ec tives: MTH 211 212 213 are strong l y r ecommended 4. MANAGEMENT Major R e quir e m e nts: All majors tak e 15 specified hours : MA 311, 321, 331, 42 1 431. Each major th e n s e l e cts 12 additional hours from th e following : MAN 34 1 45 1 453, 461, 463, 465, 471 472 473, 489. Bu siness El ec tives: 14-20 hours .of co urs es in th e College of Busin ess Adminis tration (other than MAN prefix ) to be selected in consultation with adviser: GBA 35 1 GBA 37 1 and GBA 499 are strongly recomm e nded. Othe r recom mendations are : FIN 411 421, 351; MKT 413, 312, 403, 409, ECN 431, 311 313 341, 343, 351, 371, 401 405, 411, 437; ACC 421 423, 425. G e n eral El ec tiv es : For thos e who choose e ith e r Behavioral or Industri a l Rela ti ons e l ec tiv es within th e major, se l ec tions which best complement the program should be chosen, with the assistance of an adviser primarily from Sociology, P o litical Science Psychology and Speech. For those who choose Quantitative e lectives within the major, se l ections absolutely should include MTH 211, 212 213 in addition to certain other Engineering courses selec ted with the assistance of an adviser. 5. MARKETING Major R e quir e m e nts: Marketing majors are required to t a ke th e following 5 courses ( 18 hours ) : MKT 312 3 15 411, 413, and 419; and an additional 9 hour s (3 cours es) sel ected from MKT 311; 3 16 401 403, 405, 407, 409 414, 417 489 in consultation with th e ir major adviser. Any substituti ons for th e e lectiv e co urs es must b e approved in writing by th e adviser and the chair man of th e Marketing D epartme nt. Busin ess El ec tiv es : 14 to 20 hours of courses in the College of Busin ess Administration (other than mark e ting ) to be selected in consultation with major adviser. Suggest e d s e l ec tions from: GBA 351 371, 362 ; MAN 311, 32 1 34 1 ; FIN 411, 421; ACC 3 05 421 422; ECN 341 351 431 437. G e n eral El ec tives: It is r ecommended that marketing students select from cour ses in Psycholog y, Sociology, Sp eec h English Engineering Mass Communi ca tions and Mathematics in cons ultation with th e ir mark e ting adviser. Strong l y reco mm ended are MTH 211 212, 213. GRADUATE ADMISSION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Cours es are offer e d in th e Coll e g e of Bu s in ess Administration leading to on e of five Mast e r's degrees-the Mast e r of Accountancy th e Mast e r of Arts in Eco nomics, th e Mast e r of Busin ess Administration, the Master of Busin ess Admin i s tration with specia l ization in Marketing and th e Master of Scienc e in Manage-

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COL L EGE O F BUSINESS ADM I NIS T RATION 77 ment. Applicants must mee t the University minimum r equire m en ts listed on pages 65-69. However, for programs in this College except the M.A. in Eco nomics a score of at least 450 on the Admission Test for Graduate Schools of Business must be substituted for a score of .at least 1 000 on the Graduat e Record Examination. The prerequisites are the following courses, or their equivalent : ACC 501, 502; ECN 501 502 231 and 503; FIN 501; MA 501; and MKT 50 1. Courses i n this College numbered 501-509 are ineligible for credit in the graduat e programs of this Co ll ege. All gracfuate programs are to be completed with an ov e rall B ave rage (3.0 grade point averag e), and the student must give a sa tisfactor y p e rformanc e in a comprehensive e xamin a tion aft e r compl e tion of all coursework. Master of Business Administration The \1.B.A. program r equires that a student satisfactorilv co mpl e te a total of -18 quarte r hours b eyond th e pre r e quisites listed abow for graduate < Id mission. These -18 hours inc lude ACC 601, 602; EC:'\ 60.S. 601; Fl:'\ 601. 60:2; GBA 60:3, 605 615 ; \ I AN 601. 602 ; \IKT 601. 602 ; < llld 9 e kctiY e credits in th e i r coursework s e l e ct e d with th e advis e r 's approval. Master of Accountancy It is contemplated that stude nts applving for admission to this program will have a haccalurea t e in Busin e ss Administration which includ e s a minimum of :36 quarte r hours credit in accounting. Stude nts for admission \\ ho do not meet these pre requisit es will h e r equire d to tak e additional cours e s The numb e r of addition<11 cours es deem e d n eces sary will d e p end on th e academic background of th e individual stude nts and may vary fro m 21 quarte r hours for a non-accounting busin ess major to 61 quarter hours for a 11011husin esss major. The program r equires that th e student satisfactorih-a total of -18 hours including: GBA 60:3. 605 ; EC:\ 605. 601 ; \IA:'\ 60:2: Fl:'\ 601; Accounting Concentration includin g ACC 605. 606. 601. 611. 6:21. 6:2:3; and 12 quarte r hours of e l e ctiv es to be selected by th e student in co n s ultation with his adviser. No m o r e than six h o urs of th e e l e ctives mav h e Uken in th e accounting area. The Master of Arts in Economics The applicant's undergraduate training should reflect a strong background in economic th eo ry supplemented with mathe matics and. statistics. An unde r graduate major in economics i s not r equired. S e rious b ac k g r ound d e fici e n c i es may r equire additional course work. The student in the M.A. in Econom ics program must compl e t e a minimum of 45 quart e r hours, including both coursewo rk and th esis. Th e curriculum of 45 credit hours has four p a rt s compris e d of core courses, eco n om ics e lectiv es, general e lectiv es, and a th esis. The core co urs es, r equire d of all stude nts include the following 14 credit h ou rs: ECN 602 60 3, 605, and 607 The econom-

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78 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADM I N I STRATION ics e l ectives involve a minimum of 15 credit hours for which the student must se l ect one of th e following five credit hour courses: EC 561, 623 or 625; and in addi t ion t e n hours from th e following list: EC 531, 561, 601 604 610, 623, 625. To satisfy th e general elective r equire m ent the student, with his adviser's approval, should ea rn a maximum of ten hours of e l ective credit in coursework outside of the area of eco nomics. D epending upon the degree of difficulty or comp l exity involved, th esis credit may range from six to nin e quarter hours Master of Science in Management The Master of Science program builds specialized skills in characterizing and solving problems of administrative decision and action. Its foundations are behavioral science and quantitative analysis. While admission standards coin cide with those of the M.B.A. program, the curriculum is distinct. Courses reveal the motivational and logical structures which underlie the various functional con t exts in which managerial behavior evolves. Additionally, courses are de signed to foster facility rigor, and independence in applied research Super vised selection and syst e matic investigation of a significant problem is an integral part of the curriculum T .he program r equires completion of not less than 48 quarter hours course work and satisfaction, by enrollment or waiver, of the following : ( 1 ) six graduate courses in administrative studies outside the fie l d of Management equivalent to ACC 601, ECN 607 or ECN 605, FIN 601 GBA 603 GBA 605 and MKT 601, and. ( 2 ) ten graduate courses in Management consisting of MAN 601, MAN 602 MA 603, MAN 607 MAN 615 MAN 699 ( 6 hours), plus four management electives. On the basis of their academic backgrounds students may apply for waivers to the Director of Graduate Studi es of the College of Business Administration. MBA with Specialization in Marketing This specialized master's degree program provid e s the opportunity for students to develop knowledge and profici e ncy in the field of marketing while acquiring a useful understanding of the other major functional areas of busin ess, the environment within which the firm operates, and the tools of analysis essential for making sound marketing d e cisions. This program allows students to have specific objectives and to broade n their employment opportunities in marketing and other business fie l ds. Students desiring a marketing e mphasis should e nroll in the M B A program The degree with s p ecia lization requires the completion of a minimum of 48 hours of graduate level courses including 15 hours of marketing courses. Students are required to take MKT 601 and 602, and select their elective courses ( 9 hours ) in consultation with a m a rketing adviser from the following: MKT 603 605 607 609 611, 683.

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College of EDUCATION The College of Education places an emph asis on each student learning what is relevant for the world of today and on his getting deeply involved in his own educational process. Thus, the emphasis is on the student learning to do his own thinking abou t himself and his universe. The College of Education is committed to a cont inu ous and syst ematic examina t ion of the professional program of teacher educat ion. Promising pro grams are examined experimentally under controlled conditions, which make possible an objective appraisa l of effects in terms of learning outcomes. The University of South Florida follows a University-wide approac h to teacher education. Its programs for the preparation of teachers represent co operative effort in planning and practice by faculties of all academ ic areas coordinated through the University Council on Teacher Education C o urs es needed by teacher candidates but designed also for other studen t s are offered outside the College of Education Courses in the University which a re primar ily designed for teacher candidates are taught by the College of Education In the total teacher education program there is a special concern for de ve l oping in the student a deep interest in intellectual inquiry and th e abili t y to inspire this interest in others. It is the task of the College of Education to give l eadership to the instruction in subject matter and process which means the total teacher education program BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE PROGRAM The undergraduate teacher education program leads to the B ache l or of Arts degree. It is an upper division program. Admission Requirements While each student admitted to the University is e xpected to have the quali fications to graduate, this does not necessarily mean that he has th e qualifica tions to becom e a teacher. The College of Education a dministers the a dmission policies to all teacher e ducation programs of the University, as well as those for the College itself All students who plan to teach must apply for admission to a teacher education program through the Central Advising Office of the College of Education. Prospective secondary and K-12 teachers are e nrolled in t eacher educa79

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80 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION tion programs involving both the College of Education and various other col l eges of the liberal arts areas. Students who have completed successfully the two-year Associate of Arts Program at a junior college and other transfer students who have earned a t le as t 75 quarter hours should apply for officia l admission to teacher education programs during their first quarter in residence. Admission to the uppe r level teacher educati on program is contingent upon meeting the following minimum requirements: 1. Compl etion of a College of Educa tion upper level appli cation form 0 2. Completion of the General Education required of Education majors. Provi siona l admission may be granted if no more than three individual CBS courses remain to b e tak en, provid e d CBS 101and102 h ave been completed. 3. Completion of a minimum of75 quarte r hours (excluding P E.B. hours) 4. An overall grade point ratio (CPR) of2.0. 5. Additional cri teri a at the discretion of the admissions and selections commit t ee (i.e. medical cent er, student affairs, speech and hearing clinic, e t c.). Handicapped StudentsApplication w ill be reviewed by th e admissions committee. Acceptance of the application of the student wilJ be determined by the following: 1. The judgment of the committee tha t the student will be abl e to carry out the duties of a teacher. 2. An assurance from the public schoo l s that an internship contract will b e offered. 0Deadlin e: The student shou l d initiate his applic a tion with the Colleg e of Education Central Advising Offic e (EDU 112 ) no l a t e r than the second week of the quarter in which h e is e ligibl e for admission. Admission to Supervised Teaching Experience The supervi sed teaching experi ence is a minimum of 12 credits of obser va tion and supervised teaching in e lementary or secondary schools. Time and sequence of the ex p e ri e n ce may vary among programs. (Refe r to the specific program. ) Speci a l requirements for enro llment in the supervised teaching and s e minar courses are: 1. Admission to the College of Education. 2 Completion of an a pplic a tion for supervised teaching. 3. Compl e tion of the professional education sequence and at l eas t two-thirds of teachin g specialization with a minimum 2.0 grade point ratio in each. 4. An overall 2.0 grade point ratio Application for student teaching should be made two quar t e rs prior to term in which experience is desired and may be obtained in the Student Teach ing Office. Quarte r I appli ca ti ons are du e by l ast week of Quarter III of the previous sc h oo l year. Quarte r II a pplications are due by last week of Quarter IV of the previous school year. NOTE: Quarter I and Quarter II appl ica ti ons may be filed dming Quarter III of previous year. Quart e r III appli cations are due by l as t week of Quarter I of the same school year. Quarter IV a pplic a t ions are restricted to students who are completing

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COL LEGE OF EDUCAT ION 8 1 their master's degree and to those wh9 hold a valid bachelor's degree and are seeking certification. Students in this category should file applications during the first 14 days of Quarter III of t h e same schoo l year. College Requirements for Graduation A student to be c e 1tified by the College of Education as having completed its requirements must have earned 180 credit hours with a minimum overall grade poin t rat i o of 2. 0 An average of 2 .0 or be tter a lso must be made in t h e student's professional educat ion sequence and in his teaching specia l ization cours es. Satisfactory comp l etion of supervised t eaching is require d. A student must a lso have completed the major requirements in an approved teaching program (whi ch includes general preparati on t eaching spec i alization and professiona l preparat ion) and passed t h e Sen ior Seminar (CBS 401). A minimum of 1 2 credits in professiona l courses in addition to internship and 18 credits in specialization courses must have been earned in residence. The student must com pl e t e a minimum of 45 h ours after admittance to an upper l evel program. SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS A minimum of 180 quarter hours including: General Pre paration .......... ........ ..... ....... 58 or 59 hours Professional Education Core ....................... 3 6 quarter h o urs T eaching Specia l ization .. ..................... 41 to 7 3 quarter h o urs Degree Validation and Certification Programs VALIDATION Baccalaureate and master's degree s rec e ived from non-accr edite d schools which are list e d in the Education Directory of the U S Department of Health Education, and Welfar e may be va l idated. Before b eg inning cours e work for validation, the degree holder must submit a planned program to the Certific a tion Advising Office in the Co llege of Education. The program will con s ist of a minimum of 18 quarter hours. To va lidate a baccalaureat e degree the 1 8 credits must be in upper division and/ or graduate work with no grade b e low "C". To validate a mast e r 's degree the 18 cre dits must b e in 600-l eve l cours es with no grade b e low "B''. CERTIFICATION A person who has previous l y ea rn e d a bache lor s degree and has a d es ir e to satisfy teaching r equireme nts may e nroll in courses in which h e has m e t th e course prerequisite. A ho lder of a bache lor s degree wishing to enroll in EDC 498 and 499 should file an intent to student teach with the College o f Education Certific a t ion Advising Office. Approva l of the appl ication by th e Selections Committee of the College of Education and satisfactory completion of ce1tification requir ements in area of specializati on incl uding 1 2 hours of course work in residence as a non-degree seeker are prere quisit e to registration in EDC 498 and 499.

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82 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION College of Education Student Organizations and Activities The College of Education Association is the parent organization or um brella for all student Education organizatiQ.!1S. The student ac t ivities s p o n sor and the College of Education Association (CEA) officers make an annual budget and the approved monies are funded by t h e State. St udent organiza ti ons Office is in EDU 309. The CEA is responsible for helping organize new College of Education organizations approved by the Student Affairs Committee. They also aid th e organizations financia ll y, provide l eadershi f and dis tribut e infor mation for projec ts. The College of Education Co u nci is com p osed of C E A officers, three e lementary representatives, four seconda r y represen t atives, t wo specia l educa t ion represen t atives and the P residents of the other E d ucation organizations. The Council meets regularly to coordinate and p l an for the year. STUDENT FLORIDA EDUCATION ASSOCIATION The Studen t Florida Education Association is the professio n a l o r ga niz a tion that represents all the prospective teachers on the USF campus As a mem b e r of SFEA, yo u also become a member of the F l orida Edu cation Association and th e ational Education Association. These organizations comprise the largest such group in the world Many benefits are available to you through th e organization and, in addition, you are with a club dealing with your main in t eres t-edu ca tion. All students in the hel d of Educat ion, including fres h men, are encouraged to join this professional organization. ASSOC I ATION FOR CHILDHOOD EDUCATION INTERNATIONAL The Association for Chi l dhood Education Internationa l is a non-profi t professional organization concerned with the education and well-being of children two to twelve years of age. Members are located throughout the United Stat es and other countries. The USF chapter works directly with children through observation, pro j ec ts and programs. In addition, it provid es opportunity for students to attend study conferences throughout the state of Florida which allows th e s tudent a n opportunity for professional growth and exchange of professional ideas. Membership is open to all students, including fres h men, concerne d with c hild r en two to twelve. STUDENT COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN Th e Stude nt Council for Exceptiona l Children is an organ izati on of those members of th e University interest e d in the e ducation of the exceptional diff e rent "-child. Various exceptionalities included are Gifted Emo ti onally Disturbed, Physically Handicapped, Mentally R e tarded, and Culturally feren t. Activities of th e USF Chapter includ e field t rips to various specia l education facilities, promin ent speakers, seminars, s tate and na t iona l conventions, and social e vents. The specific ac t iviti es are det ennined by the members and the exce ption a lities in which they are inter es t e d All interested students are invited to j o in.

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 83 STUDENT MUSIC EDUCATORS NATIONAL CONFERENCE Student Music Educators National Conferenc e is an affiliate of the Music Educators National Confer ence and the Florida Music Educators Association It is devoted to the furtherance of knowledge and understanding of music education on all levels. Membership is open to any student in the University of South Florida who is interested in the t eaching of music. LIBRARY EDUCATION AUDIO-VISUAL ORGANIZATION The Library Education Audio-Visua l Organization is a professional organ ization for those members of the University community interested in Library education. The USF group meets once a month and provides programs or guest speakers of interes t to the campus community. In addition, LEA VO publishes a monthly n ewsletter for its members. Membership is open to all int erested in Library education. PHI BETA LAMBDA Phi Beta Lambda is a business fraternity open to all students, including freshmen expressing a n interest in Bu siness Education and who are enrolled in a Bu siness course KAPPA DELTA Pl Kappa D e lta Pi is a national co-educational honor society in Educa tion. The society was founded to recognize and encourage excellence in scholar ship, high p ersona l standards, improvement in teacher preparation and dis tinction in achievement. Teacher Education Curricula and Programs There a r e three distinc:t areas in the teac:h e r education program, and all teacher candidates must meet cert ain minimum requirements in eac h The three areas and their requirements are as follows: 1. GENERAL PREPARATION (58 or 59 quarter hours) Six areas of General Education are required (by course work or waiver ) plus the physical education requir ements. The six areas of G e neral Education shall be: For students in Mental R etardation or any e l e m e ntary program : 1. English 2. B ehaviora l Science 3. American Idea 4 Humanities 5. Bio logic a l Science or Physical Science 6. Mathematics

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84 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION For students in programs other than the above: 1. English 2 Behavioral Science 3. American Idea 4. Humanities 5. B iological Science or Physical Science 6. Mathematics or Foreign Language or a second science sequence. 2. PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION CORE The required courses in the professional education core are E D F 305, EDF 307, EDC 401, EDC 498, EDC 499 or the appropriate intern course de scribed in the Catalog, plus the Methods course(s) appropriate to the student's specialization and an additional four quarter hours of approved education credits. Some of the areas in which the student might profitably elect courses are: Foundations Library Reading, and Special Education. 3. TEACHING SPECIALIZATION PREPARATION (up to 73 credits) Course requirements in the area of teaching specialization vary according to subject. The different specialization requirements are listed on the fol lowing pages. A. Elementary Education Elementary Education Majors are prepared to teach in grades one through six. Currently there a re two options for completing the elementary coursework and internship require ments. Students may pursue a program by taking required education courses during their junior and senior year with practical field experiences during their senior year. These experiences include pre-internship as a part of EDC 401 and EDE 440 and a full quarter internship assignment in a selected elementary school. Stude nts may pursue a program of e l ementa ry teache r preparation which provides continuous daily laboratory ex p erie nc es in local schools. Students e l ecting this program must arrange to spend a minimum of two hours daily working in a variety of classroom situations. Pre-internship and internship credit is earn e d during this fie ld exp erie nc e which ex t e nds over a period of fiv e quarters. Stud e nts en t e ring an e lementary education program must be e ligible for admission to the College of Education (see admission r equirements ) and maintain a 2 0 average. ( 1 ) E L E M ENT ARY SPECIALIZATION The major consists of an e l ementary specialization sequence. The 41 hours of elementary specialization courses includ e EDE 409, 411, 413,415,417,419,421,423,424,425. Students are encouraged to choose a co nc e ntration in a subject taught in

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COLLEGE OF EDUCAT ION 8 5 the e lementary school. With carefu l p lanning, a student may r ece iv e dual certification in elementary education and a secondary education field. (2) ELEMENTARY-EARLY CHILDHOOD Students intereste d in early childhood teaching, which includ es children ages 3 8, should pursue a program leading to certification both in early c hildhoqd and elementary education. This program includes 46 hours of course work as follows: EDE 409, 413, 415 417, 419, 425, 426, 431, 433, 529, and 5 31. Stude nts who desir e to add early childhood speci a liz a tion to an e xistin g major in e l e m entary education ma y complete a plann e d progra m in consulta tion with their adviser and with permission of and consultation with the early chi ldhood education d epartme nt. (3) LIBRARY AUDIOVISUAL-ELEMENTARY Inform a tion on course work l eading to dual certification in e l e m en t a r y and library education-audiovisual education is given in Section B-3 B. Kindergarten through Twelfth Grade Candidates meet t eaching r equire ments for all grade levels from kind erga rt e n through the senior year of high school. (1) ART EDUCATION The Art Education student may e lect to emphas iz e p a inting sculpture, graphics, ceramics, or photography/cine m atography b y selecting the appropriate cours es The following courses constitute a program of study: Ar t Educat ion: E D A 377, 379, 44 1 and a to t a l of 6 credits in field work (EDA498). Studio Art : ART 201, 202, 301, 20 credits from any 400-level studios, 12 credits from any 500-level studios plus nine credits of studio electives. Art History: ART 476 plus 4 credits of art history electives. Fine Arts : FNA 543, plus nine credits from FNA 543 or any course in Music Theatre, or Dance. At the tim e of appl ic a tion to uppe r l eve l eac h Art Education student must submit slides or portfolio to H ea d of D epartment. To ass ist transfer s tu d e nts in selection of courses, they must submit work prior to o r during regi s tra tion (2) PHYSICAL EDUCATION A two-year program is offered at the junior and senior yea r level which provides a d aily inte rnship ex p erience in the loca l schools for prosp ec tiv e phys ical education teach e rs. Becaus e e nrollm ent in this pro gra m i s limit ed, a ll students must participate in a S e l ec tiv e Admissions procedure which includes an on-campus conference in order to b e considered for admission. Students may ente r this program only during Quarte r I of each year a nd should be pre pared to spend a minimum of two hours p er d ay in a phys i ca l edu ca tion t eac h ing situation during each of the six quarte rs in addition to th e ir on-campus study. The continuous field experience is in lieu of the usual quarte r of full-

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86 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION day internship and the teacher aid assignments Those requirements (see ad mission to supervised teaching experience ) which are necessary for admission to supervised teaching experience must be met before a student will b e a llowed to register in EDP 331 EDP 421 and EDP 431. After applying for admission to the University all students must apply directly to the D epartment on or before April 1. No student will b e admitted to the program unl ess a ppli cation has been made prior to this date. Direct requests to : Coordinator Professional Physical Education Program College of Education Th e following a re the required courses in the phys ical e ducation program of study: EDP 255, 311, 321 331, 312 314 32 2, 332, 365, 411, 421, 431, 412, 422 and 432. (3) LIBRARY-AUDIOVISUAL EDUCATION (MULTIMEDIA) Dual certification in Library-Audiovisual Education and Elementary Education requirements includ e th e Education professional core, th e Elemen tary Education Program and a total of 36 quarte r hours in Library-Audiovisual courses. Th e required EDL courses meet Rank III certification in Library-a udio visua l services, grades K-12 Th ese courses are EDE 413, EDL 411 4 12 419, 513, 515 519, and choice of one of th e following EDL e lectiv es: 514 523, or 524 Field work is arranged a t th e need of th e individual student. (4) SPECIAL EDUCATION Mental Retardation A student may enter the Mental Retardation Program to prepare as a teach er of th e Mentally Retarded. This planned program provides for six quarters of course work in the major area of specialization and in th e required elementary area as indicated below. Upon completion of this planned program, the student will be certifi e d in the area of Intellectual Disabilities (K-12) Junior Year: Quarter I EDS 311, EDF 305, and two courses chosen from 0Required Elementary Courses. Quarter II EDS 329, 322, EDF 3 07, and one course to be chosen from 0R equired Elementary Courses. Quart er III -EDF 303 EDS 312, and two courses to be chosen from 0 Required Elementary Cours es. Senior Year: Quarter I-EDS 423 I & II, EDC 401 and one course to be chosen from 0 Required Elementary Courses or 0 0Suggested Electives. Quarter II and Quarter III Courses below to be taken in Blocks only as indicated. Blocks "A"and B are interchangeabl e in Quarte r II and Quarter III. Blo c k A" -CBS 401 EDC 498 EDC 499 Block "B" -EDE 531, EDS 531 and two courses of 0 0Suggest e d Electives. Speech Pathology Pr e pares professionals to work with speech, language and hearing im paired children and adults. A five-year program terminating in an M .A. degree in Sp e cial Education : Speech Pathology. Required Elementary Courses: EDE 409, 415, 421, 425, 433. sugges t e d Elec tives: EDS 511, EDS 561 EDE 515.

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 87 The following courses, or their equivalents, constitute the course of study-EDS 311, 322, 611, 699 and I or 579 479 531, or PSY 431. SAi 301, 302, 311, 312, 313, 511, 513 571, 572 573, 574 575, 576, 577, 578, 579, or 675, 580, 589, 683; EDF 305, 307; EDC 401, 498 EDE 531; SSI 301; PSY 335; and the Process Core for the M.A. in Education. Supervised clinical work in school environments is done in EDS 479 and 579. Completion of requirements for the master's degree is required prior to certification for employment in the schools. (5) MUSIC EDUCATION Instrumental music students must take MUS 201, 202, 203,3 01 302 303, 401 402, 403; eight minor instruments outside the family of the student's major instrument ; 33 credits of P e rformanc e {MUS 204 304 404 504), a minimum of 4 credits of MUS 504; three credits each in theatre arts, visual arts, and dance courses; FNA 543, 553; EDM 431, 432, 433. Vocal music students must take MUS 201, 202 203 301, 302, 303, 401 402, 403; piano ; 33 credits in Performance ( MUS 204, 3 04, 404 504), with a minimum of 4 credits of MUS 504; three credits each in theatre arts, visual arts, and dance courses; FNA 543, 553; EDM 435, 437, 439. All students seeking a degree in music e ducation are required to t a k e a placement examination in music theory-histor y and to pass a n audition in th e ir respective performance area Stude nts must obtain th e dates for th e se e xamin ations from the music office (FAH 204) ; completion of the examinations is required before registration in music courses can b e permitte d. Special requirements for all music education majors : successful comple tion of the piano profiei e ncy r equire ment as defin e d by th e musi c and music education faculties before admittance to upper level; e nrollment in a reading ensemble for 3 quarters (to b e tak e n concurrently with th e methods cours e), participation in a performing e nsemble eac h quarter th e student is e nroll e d in applied music; and the presentation of a one-half hour recital in th e major performing medium during the s e nior year. Students are encouraged to attend on-campus musical eve nts {i.e. student recitals Music Forum events faculty recitals and A1tist Series concerts ) C. Secondary Education Candidates are required to meet specialization require ments in broad subject fields or in subject combinations. It is also possible for prospectiv e secondary school teachers to add elementary school ce1tification by following an approved program The secondary school specialization requirements can be sat i sfied in more than 15 subject areas in eight broad fields. (1) CLASSICS AND ANC I ENT STUDIES Latin English Education CLS 301, 302. 303, 401 402, 403, 411. 412. 413 517 571 and EDX 4 65 ; ENG 201, 203, 307, 312, or 305 or 306, 321or325, 411 517 or 585 ( Theory of Fiction) SPE 201, and EDT 447. Latin-Modern Foreign Language Educa t ion CLS 301, 302, 303, 371 401 402 403, 411, 413, 517 571 and

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88 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION EDX 465. In the modern for e ign language a minimum of 26 quarter hours above the basic CBS courses are required. The required courses are: 203, 301 303, 401 403, 405, 406 ( prefix d e termined by language selected), and EDX 449 (2) ENGLISH AND ENGLISH RELATED PROGRAMS English Education ENG 201 203, 3 07, 411 517 585 (Theory of Fiction), SPE 201 and 321. One from each of the following groups : ENG 305, 306, or 312; ENG 313, 335, 33 6 or CLS 351; ENG 321 or 325; LIN 540 or COM 301; COM 300 or 351, one 400 or 500 l evel English elective and one e l ective from English, Speech, Mass Communication Theatre Arts, Language Literature Interdisciplinary Philosophy Classics and Anci ent Studi es, Education, Ame rican Studies and one of th e following: EDR 509, EDT 531, or EDL 518. (Note: The internship is ordinari l y a three-quarter continuous experience.) English Education-Mass Communication Com 300, 301, 330 351, 491; one of the following : Com 321, 500, 530, 550, or a Communications broadcasting course; Eng 201, 203, 3 07 411 517, 585 (Theory of Fiction); one of the following: 312, 305, or 306; one of the follow ing: 313, 335, 336, or CLS 351; SPE 201, 321. (Note: The internship is ordin a rily a three-quarter continuous e xperienc e ) (3) FOREIGN LANGUAGES Foreign Language-English Education ENG 201, 203 3 12 or 305 or 306 313 or 335 or 336 or CLS 351, 321 or 3 25, 411 517 and SPE 201. If an e lective is needed, SPE 321 is recom m ende d A minimum of 36 quarte r hours in a modem foreign language above the basic CBS courses is r e quired. The required courses are 203 3 01 303, 401 403, 405 and 406 (prefix dete rmined by language selected), plus a mini mum of 10 additional selected hours of advanced courses in th e modem foreign l anguage ( ROM 517 and ROM 518 may be used in the se lected hours) plus EDX 449 and EDT 447 Two Foreign Languages Requires basic studies language r equireme nts ( or their equiv a lent) In th e major language (French, German, Italian, Russian, or Spanish ) the student must earn 35 uppe r l eve l credit hours and in th e second language 26 upper l e v e l cre dit h o urs Th e required language cours e s are 203, :301, :303 401 40:3, -105, and 406 (prefix d e t e rmin e d by language se l ec t e d ) plus a minimum of 10 additional s e lect e d hours of advanced courses in the major language. Single Foreign Language Aft e r cons ult ation with a dviser th e D e an may give permission for a student to e lect a singl e foreign language major. A minimum of 45 quarter hours must b e earned in the language b eyond the basic studies require ments Among th e 45 quarte r hours must be th e following: Fre nch : FRE 203 : 301 3 0 3, 305, 401 403, 405 406 and 516. G e rman: GER 203 301, 303 305, 401 405, 406, and 516. Italian : ITA 203, 301, 303 305, 401, 405, and 406.

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATIO N 8 9 Russian: RUS 203 301, 303, 305, 401, 405 and 406. Spanish: SPA 203, 301 303, 305, 401, 403, 405, 406, 516, and 561or562. A native s p ea ker must substitute a literature or a romance linguistics course for the firs t conversation course (20 3 ) Yloreover in cases w h e r e a native speak e r h as received his secondary and I or advanced education in his native country, h e mus t substitute a literature or a romance lingui s tics course for the first composi tion course (301). (4) LIBRARY-AUDIOVISUAL EDUCATION WITH A SPECIALIZATION IN ENGLISH EDUCATION Candidates meet Rank III LibraryAudiov isual r equire ments which ce rtifies K 12 in school librari es. Candidat es also meet the :36 hours required in th e secondary Englis h program. Required Libra1y-Audi ovis u a l cours e s are EDL -Ill. -112, -119, 51 3 51-1, 515, 519, an d EDC 481-Field Work in School Libraries. E l e ctiv e s may be chosen with consen t of the adviser Required English cours e s are ENG 201 20:3, 307, :312 or : 3 05 or :306 31:3 o r :3:35 or :336 or CLS 351, 321 o r :325, -Ill, 517 or 5:35 and SPE 201. (5) MATHEMATICS The t y pical program for prospective mathematics t e achers consists of a minimum of -17 qua1ter hours in mathematics above the 100 l ev el. The require d courses are MTH :30 2, : 3 0 3 :304, 305, :309, 32 :3, -123, and 424. MTH 3-15 and 420 are strongly recomm ended. The student has the option of comp leting a Natural Science major with a co ncentration in mathematics. This require s a min imum of 36 quarter hours in mathematics and a minimum of 24 quarter hours in the College of Natural Sciences outsid e of mathematics. These latter 24 hours must be approved by the student's adviser and must includ e a minimum of three quarter hours at the 300 level or above. (6) SCIENCE A student planning to teach scienc e at the s econdary lev e l should com pl e t e the departmental major in the corresponding science area. Require m e nts for these programs a r e li s ted in the ca t a log under the scienc e departments of the College of Natural Sciences EDN 427 is recommended for biology teache r s EDN 425 is recommended for physical science teache rs. An alternate program i s availab l e in _which the prosp e ctiv e t e ach e r must meet the minimum requirements of the major in the Natural Scienc e s This requires 36 quarte r h ours in the discipline of major concentration and 24 quarter hours within the Natural Sciences and outside the co n ce ntration area. These latte r 24 hours must be approved by the student's advise r and includ e at l eas t one 300 level course. (Tota l program 60 h ou r s minimum. ) Concentra tion s are availabl e in biology, physics, and chemistry. A t ypica l program for a biology concentration includes BIO 201, 202, 203, 331 351 and 421 or 510. Additional selections from BOT 302 or 3 11 ZOO 311 or313. Courses outside biology would normally include CHM 211, 212, 213, 331-2 333-4. Courses in Mathematics, Physics and Geology are a l so r e com m ende d (7) SPEECH-ENGLISH EDUCATION Speech 201, 203, 321 361 or 365, 491 and 492. two 5-hour upper divi-

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90 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION sion Spe ec h Electives TAR 303, ENG 201, 203, 307, 312 or 305 or 306, 313 or 33 5 or 336 or CLS 351 321or325, 411 517 or 535 and EDC 515. (8) SOCIAL SCIENCE T o teach a t the seconda ry l eve l the mm1mum r equire ment s of a Social Sci e nc e Education major must be m e t. All programs in th e Soci a l Sci ence Educa tion major specify 64 c r e dits or more in the Social Sci ences A teaching emphasis r equire s a minimum of 20 credits in on e discipline within an approved program which w ill lead to certifi ca tion in the broad area of social s ci e n ces. However a student m ay concentra t e hi s studies in one of th e separa t e s u b ject a re as Each program con tains both r equired and e lective courses which eac h student in co n su lt a ti on with his a dviso r will se l e ct. D. Vocational and Adult Education Candidat es planning to teach in county-wide adult and secondary e ducation programs junior college associat e of a1ts and area vocational schoo l s, continuing e ducation centers, mod e l cities programs, and other vocational, adult and tech n i ca l schoo l s may pursu e on e o r mor e of the following specializations : (1) ADULT EDUCATION o f A1ts degr ee program on l y (2) BUSINESS AND OFFICE EDUCATION To comp lete program r equire m e nts leading to Rank III certific a tion in the broad fie ld of Bu siness Education, students must tak e 73 hours of co urs e work in th e bus in ess admini stra ti on and busin es s education a r eas and 37 hours of profess ional e ducation cours es. R equire m ents include ACC 201 202, 305, ECN 201 202, GBA 361 371, EDY 141 1 43, 251, 252, 351, 353, 361 and 461. E D Y 141 and 251 may b e r eplaced with specia l permission by suggested e l ec tiv es in education or busin ess admini stra ti on. Two special methods a r e includ e d in th e p rofessiona l education sequence. (3) DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION Di stributive Education i s a program for thos e interested in b eco ming a t eac h e r of marketing and distribution in schools and programs as list e d above ( D ) To qualify to teach in the a r e a of Distributiv e Educa tion students must t a k e 62 h ours of cours e work. They must tak e 32 hours of business adminis tration co urs es including ACC 201-202-305; ECN 201-202; an d MKT 3013 11-315 The remaining 3 0 hours will be in Di s tributiv e Education and ap roved e l ec tiv es, and must include EDF 3 03 o r ECN 331 SSI 3 01 MTH 345; EDG 401; and EDY 506, 507. In addition, they mu s t fulfill the state requirement of two years of distributiv e on-thejob work ex p erience or complete 2100 hours of acceptab l e t raining. EDY 431 Sup erv i sed Fie ld Exp e ri ence: Distri butiv e Education and Coopera ti ve Educa tion training e xperi e nce a r e offer e d as s u gges t e d avenues t o m ee t thi s r equirement. (Accepta bilit y of work e xper i e nc e will b e d e t e rmin e d by th e Adult and Vocational staff at the University of South Florida. )

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 91 (4) INDUSTRIAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION Enrollment in the area of Industrial-Technical Education is restricted to persons with employment experience qualifying them to teach in the field. Special provision is made for students who have completed their Associate of Science Certificates in a technological specialty from one of the programs of the State System of junior colleges. Students may validate up to 45 quarter hours through an Occupational Competency Examination. In a ddition to the professional core they must take 29 quarter hours in Industrial-Technical Education, including EDV 407, EDV 445, EDV 443, EDV 480, EDV 507, EDV 503 and EDV 511, plus meet general education requirements of 63 quarter hours. (Acceptability of work experience will be determined by the Adult and Vocational staff at the University of South Florida). Master of Arts Degree Program ADMISSION Candidates for admission to graduate study must present satisfactory evidence of: l)" Undergraduate grade-point-ratio on the last half of the B.A of 3.0 (B) minimum; or GRE aptitude score-1000 minimum. 2) Any additional requirements specified by the program. 3 ) Receive favorable recommendation from program chairman. FILING OF PROGRAM During the first term of graduate study the candidate for the Master s degree must file a planned program of studies. This report of Graduate Advisory Conference is to be completed in consultation with the advisor. The completed report should be filed with the Coordinator of Graduate Studies. QUALITY OF WORK Candidates for the master s degree must maintain a 3 0 CPR. At any time the student's CPR falls below the minimum the student will be placed on pro bation. During the probationary status the student's academic progress will be reviewed to determine; 1 ) removal from probation, 2 ) continuation on pro bation, 3 ) drop from graduate program. RESIDENCY The candidate for the master s degree will be required to meet the r esidency requirement established by each program area. Consult the appropriate program area for details. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION During the last term of enrollment prior to completion of degree require ments, the candidate must pe1form satisfactorily on a comprehensive exam ination. PROCESS CORE EXAMINATION Graduate students with sufficient undergraduate background may take the Process Core Examinations after consultation with their advisors. Successful

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92 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION performamce on the exa mination e nables a student to waive the cours e r e quirement, but h e must tak e e lective courses in li e u of the hours r equired. The Pro cess Core Examinations are in the Foundations of M easurement, Ps y c h o l og i ca l Foundations and Socia l Founda tions of Education. Graduate students on a Plan II Master's Program are not e ligible to take the Proc ess Core Ex am inations unl ess they have a co mparabl e course at the undergraduate level. Plan I A program of graduate studies d esigned for those with appropriate certification w h o desire to incr ease their competence in a subject specia liz ation or receiv e profess ional preparation in one of the service areas of educa ti on. Plan II A progra m of graduate studies d esigned for the holder of a non-education baccalaureate who desires to meet initial certifica ti on requireme nts as p a rt of a plann e d program leading to the master of arts degr ee. ( This program is not available in the area of e l ementary e ducation. ) Qualifi e d p e rsons may pursue graduat e study in the following majors: Art Education El e m entary Education English Education Fore ign Language Guidance Humanities Education Library and Audiovisual Mathematics Education Special Education with programs in: Emotionall y Disturbed Gifted Mental R e tardation Vocationa l Education with progra m s in: Adult Distributiv e Juni o r College Teaching: Astronomy Biology Business Chemistry Engineering 0 English French Geography Geology History Mathematics Engineering bachelor' s degree r equi r e d Music Education Physical Education R eading Education Schoo l Psychology Sci ence Education Social Sci ence Educa tion Speech Education Varying Exceptiona liti es Speech P a thology Busin ess and Offic e Industria l -Technical Physics Political Science Psychology Sociology Sp anis h Speech

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 93 Additional programs for Junior College teachers may be added to those listed as other instructional divisions of th e University are a pproved to offer the mast er's degree. General University rul es for graduate study may be found in the Graduate study section of the catalog. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Master of arts degree programs consist of a minimum of 45 qua1ter hours 24 hours of which must be at the 600 l evel. Most specialization areas includ e th e option of a thesis of three to six credit h o urs Plan I A. PROCESS CORE (16 hours) Students will take a minimum of one process core course prior to the 12-hour level. All students will be required to take EDF 607 Foundations of Educa tional Research as pa1t of their graduate program. Competencies indicated by undergraduate background will determine waiver of, or enrollment in: a) EDF 605 Foundations of Measurement b) EDF 611, Psychologic a l Foundations of Education; or EDF 613 Principles of Leaming c) EDF 621 Socio-Economic Foundations of Education; or EDF 623 Historical Founda tions of American Education; or EDF 625, Philosophical Foundations of American Education. B. CURRENT TRENDS COURSE IN TEACHING SPECIALIZATION (4 hours) C. SPECIALIZATION (27 hours minimum) The following areas of specialization are suggested programs of study. Individual programs will va1y depending on background, ex peri ence, and specific interes t (1) Art Education In consultation with a graduate advisor, a student may deve l op a pro gram in art education with a specialization in one of three areas : a) Studio I n ew m e di a b ) Art Administration Supe1vision & Curriculum Innovation c ) R esea rch Methods for A1t Education A po1tfolio or slides of iecent creative work must be submitted prior to ad mission into th e program. The depa1tmental requiremen ts for all degree seeking candidates are: A1t Education 12 credits (EDA 660, 661 682 ) Art Studio 12 c r e dits (min imum ) Art Hi s t ory 3 credits (mi nimum ) The remainder of th e credits, tot a ling a minimum of 54, may re late to one of the three areas of specialization An innovative master s paper or project

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94 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION dev e loped unde r the guidance of a faculty committee is required before graduation. (2) Elementary Education This program requires full certification as an elementary education teacher for admission. Students pursuing the master s degree in elementary education are r equire d to present credit in the following courses: EDE 603, 609, and 613. The student will choose from one of the following areas of.Emphasis: ( a ) Elementary Ci.1rriculum Emphasis: At least three courses must be sel ected from EDE 611 615 617 619 and 621. Additional work is available through consent of the adviser as pa1t of a planned program. ( b ) Reading Emphasis: Three courses from EDR 530, EDE 611, EDR 631 EDR 632 and EDL 518 or EDL 605 are required. ( c ) Supervision Emphasis: EDC 661, 671, and EDE 641 are required. ( d ) Early Childhood: Individually planned program to include EDE 527, 529 531 539 (e) Elementary School Mathematics: Individually planned program to to include four courses from the following: EDE 515, 516, 615; EDN 515, 616, 617, 618, 621 622. Additional work in related areas may be planned with the advisor. (3) Elementary-Early Childhood Education This program requires full certification in early childhood education for a dmission and recommendation of the department. Requirements in specializa tion and related courses total 32 credits and include EDE 519, EDE 527, EDE 539, EDE 609 EDE 629, and EDE 639. (4) English Education Candidates must score a t least 500 on the Verbal Aptitude section of the GRE or 550 on the Advanced Literature test of the GRE. PLAN I-Required for admission: A Bachelor's degree in English Education from a r e cognized institution or Rank III certification in Secondary English from the State of Florida or other equivalent certifi cation. Students holding a Bachelor s degree and qualified for Rank III Secondary English certification exc ept for the r equired Education courses may enroll as Special students and compl e te c e rtification requirements. After obtaining certification, they may apply for degree-seeking status and apply up to 12 quarter hours of relevant work in Education on this degree. Plan I requires at least 32 hours of English as sp e cified below l'LAN II -Required for admission : A Bachelor s degre e in English from a r ec ogniz e d Liberal Arts institution of higher l e arning. Requires at least 28 hours of English as outlined below Cours e Sequ e nc e for both plans: Process Core ( 16 hours), EDT 631, ENG 585 (The ory of Fiction ) ENG' 58 : 3 ( Advanced Composit i on for Teachers), On e advanc e d course in linguistics, depth preparation in two English are as ( minimum of two cours e s in each ) from among the follo wing: 1 ) Old English \lidcll e English (to 1500 ) ; 2 ) R e naissance (1500-1660); 3) Restoration-Eight eenth C enturv (1660-1780); 4 ) Nin eteenth C enturv British ( 1780-1890 ) ; 5 ) Ameri c an Lit e ratu; e ( to 1920 ) ; 6 ) Twe ntieth C entury British ( after 1890 ) ; 7 ) Styl isti cs.

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 95 (5) Foreign Language Education (Fre nch, Ge r man S panis h) Candidates for the M.A. degree in foreign language educati on must present satisfactory evidence of: 1. Undergraduate grade point ratio of 3.0 or b ette r on the last half of th e B.A 2. GRE aptitude score of 1000, or GRE advanced foreign language scor e in upper third, or equivalent. 3. Baccalaureate degree in chosen foreign language, or in foreign language education from an accredited institution of higher learning. 4. Favorable recommendation from program chairman. Each candidate will be assigned his major adviser in the College of Education and, to facilitate selection of appropriate foreign language courses a co adviser in the foreign language department of the College of Language and Literature. Sinc e identical lists of foreign language courses are not prescribed for each candidate, and since each candidate's program is designed to satisfy the individual's needs, the specific foreign language co urses are selected in con su lt ation with the advisers. Candidates should meet with both advisers befor e registering for each Quarter. The M A in foreign language education requires a minimum of 27 quarte r hours in foreign language courses of the 500 and 600 levels. Foreign language requirements, however, are not the same for all and may go as high as 36 hours, depending upon the individu a l candidate's background and strengths. Un l ess otherwise approved by adviser, a t l eas t 21 hours in French should be on the 600 l evel; in German at l eas t 15 hours should b e on the 600 lev e l ; in Span ish at least 18 hours should be on the 600 lev e l. (6) Guidance The guidance program typically requires seventeen credits from the P rocess Core including EDF 605. EDF 607, EDF 613 and one of the following: EDF 621 623 or 625. Additional course requirements depend upon the major emphasis in either e lem entary school guidanc e or in secondary sc hool g uid ance. Elementary School Guidance Emphasis : Requir e ments in sp e cialization and related courses total 38 credits and include EDG 581, 60 3 609 613 617 62 1 625 633, and PSY 433. Secondary School Guidance Emphasis: R equiremen ts in specialization and related courses total 39 credits and includ e EDG 581 60 3, 609 619 623 627 633 PSY 433, and a n approved e l ectiv e. Plan II is availab l e in both emphas es and r equire s EDC 501 and EDC 691 in addition to minimum require m en ts. The Guidance Program has no full-tim e r esidency requirement. Students who are gainfully e mployed on a full-time basis are limited t o one course per quarter. Exc e pti o ns are made only with p ermissio n of the Guidance Program Committee. (7) Humanities Education A teaching certificate in fin e arts, language, literature musi c or in special cases in a re lated subject is required for admission. The program in Humanities consists of 27--15 quarte r hours selected from th e following with the advice of the adviser in the field of specialization: H U:\1 535, 536 5 :37, 539 5-10, 5-11, 5-12, 5-13, 5-15, 581, 611 623 681 68 .3. Up to nin e h ours ma y be substituted for the above from courses outside of Huma nities with the con sent of the adviser in Humanities.

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96 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION (8) Library-Audiovisual (Media) Education Basic courses are r equired for all students with a choice of specialization for work in one of the following programs: School Library-Audiovisual ( ,\1edia); Public Library; Academic Library; Sp e cial Library. The School Library-Audiovisual program also meets R.rnk II certification requirements for the Stat e of Florida. The minimum nt1mb e r of graduate course work hours required in all programs is -15. In extre me cases the maximum may range to 75. The sis hours, when elect e d (-1-6), are in addition to course work. This maximum is only for those people with no course work in Education or in Library-Audiovisual Education at th e time they are admitted to the graduate prog ram. Require d courses for stude nts in all Library programs are EDL 600; EDL 601 ; EDL 513; EDL 515 (or their equivalents as determine d b y th e Library Audiovisual advisor ) and one audiovisual course. If EDL 513, 515, 615 and the audiovisual course w e r e taken. at an undergraduate level with the consent of the adviser, alternative courses may be chosen as substitutes. Administration courses r ecommended for each spe cialization are: EDL 612 (fo r School Libraries) ; EDL 621 ( for District or system School Media Cent ers); EDL 640 ( for Public Librarie s ); EDL 650 ( for Acad e mic Libraries) S c hool Library-Audiovisual C e rtification r equire s courses in mate rials for childre n and in m a t e rials for young adults. Electiv es ma y b e chosen from any of the othe r Library-Audiovisual courses. Schoo l Library-Audiovisual stude nts are subject to the same core Education require m ents and I or waive rs as all oth e r graduate education students. Public, Academic and Special Library stude nts are exempte d from the Education core. Among r ecommende d courses for the m in li e u of the Educa tion core are: EDF 502-Adol esce n ce (Education) ; EDH 651-The junior Col l ege iri.Am e i'ican Higher Education (Education); SSI 503 Contemporary Ameri can C ultur e ( Lib e ral Arts). With the consent of his adviser any student may choose one or more cog n ates fro m courses offer e d outside of the department. Criteria for admission are thos e specifie d by the Colleg e of Education. All students must tak e a comprehensive examinati on administered b y th e Library-Audiovisual D epartment b e for e graduation. A Thesis or a Mast e r's Essay may b e c h o sen with the consent of and unde r the guidance of the graduate advis er. The se are subject to the criteria determined by the Unive rsity. (9) Mathematics Education This program r equires a minimum of 51 quarte r hours. B e fore the 12-hour level th e student must demonstrate that h e has the competence in mathe m a tics to undertake the prog ram YlTH -105, -106 and any MTH course from the 500 and 600 l eve l an d above may b e include d in the planned program. (10) Music Education Programs in both instrumep t a l and voca l music are offered. At l eas t 27 hours are taken in one o f these areas. A placement e xamination is r equire d of all new registrants in musical s tyl es Each candidate must meet the unde rgraduate level of pi a no profici ency b e for e the quarter in which h e e xpects to graduate. Partic ipation in e nsembles is r equire d for at least three quarters. Three plans a r e availab l e to the candidate: -18 hours plus the sis 51 hours plus recital, o r 5-1 hours without thesis or r ec ital. Vocal Majors: 7 t o 14 credits in musi c educ ation including EDM 601, 635,

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 97 an d 61-1,; -1 to 8 cre dits in music lit erature, including '.\!US 60:3; a t least -1 cre dits in music theory; and at l e ast -1 credits in appli e d music Instrumental Majors: 7 to 1-1 credits in music education including ED'.\! 601 60:3, 617, 6:3:3; -1 to 8 c r e dits in music literature including '.\!US 601 ; at l east -1 c r e dits in music theo ry; and at l e ast four cr e dits in appli e d music (11) Physical Education Ar e as within the prog ram in which a stude nt mav focus studv are El e m entarv Phvsical Education, Secondary Physical or Physical Education for tl; e Handicappe d. Enrollm e nt in EDP 600, Profess i o nal Assessment is r equire d of all stu d e nts Pre f e rably this course will be compl e t e d during th e first quarte r of Study in the prog ram and not lat e r than the compl e tion of e ight quart e r hours of c r edit in th e phys ical education curriculum a r ea. (12) Reading Education Sp e cialization in R e adin g Education shall includ e a minimum of :36 hollls se lt>ct e d from EDE 609 or EDR 509, EDR 6:31. 6:32, 6:3:3, 6:3-1, 6:35. EDF 605 617 and EDL 51 8. (Candidates who hav e had a childre n s lit erature course a t e ith e r g raduatt' or unde r graduate l eve l may tak e an e lect ive in lie u of EDL 518 .) Suggested e lectiv es art> E.'.\/C 517, EDE 611 EDE 5:31, EDS 571. EDS 57-1. EDS 676, EDC 661 PSY 61:3. (13) School Psychology The School P syc holog y program is offer e d jointl y wi th the D epartment of Psycholo gy in the College of Social Sci e nces. Plan I Cours e R equire m ents-except whe r e e quival ent courses a r e transferre d into the program, th e student must co mpl e t e th e following minimum quarte r h ours: 8 hrs in Statistic s and R e s ea rch D es i gn; 26 hrs. in Educational and Psychologic a l Founda tions ; 9 hrs. in Assessment Techniques; 4 hrs in Consu l tation T echniques; 4 hrs. in Fi e ld Experie nce. Specific co urs es m ay b e obta in e d from the School P syc holog y program. R ese arch Comp etency-Each student must show competency through th e pl anning, executi on and write-up of a pi e c e of res e arch r e su ltin g in e ith e r a thes i s or colloquium paper. Int ernship-A full-tim e int e rn ship of two academic quarte rs i s r equire d. Plan II Students without ed u ca tion a l certification a r e r equire d to tak e EDC 501. For the School Ps yc h o l ogy program, the int e rnship r equire m ent for Pl a n II i s the same as tha t for Plan I. (14) Science Education Concentrations in Biolog y, Ch e mi stry Marin e Sc i ence, or Ph ys ics are availabl e in a coo p erative program with th e Colle g e of Natural Science. In each i ns tance b e for e admission to the d egree program the student must satisfy the Biolog y, Marin e Sci ence, Phys i cs, or Chemistry adviser that h e has the compe tence to unde rtak e the program. Specialization shall co nsist of a t l e ast

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98 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 27 quarter hours approved by the adviser in the disciplin e. Satisfa ctory co m p l e tion of the program must be certified b y both th e College o f N
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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 99 The r e is also an in ex p erienced teach e r-training program which is d es igned to prepare Liberal Arts majors or non-certified education majors to wo r k with classrooms of gifted children. Emphasis is on th e d eve lopm ent of subject matte r specialization and specific skills to: 1. id e ntify the gifted, 2. mak e an individual diagnosis of cognitive and affective strengths and weaknesses and 3. modify the educational program to devel op the gifted chi l d's poten tial. Plan I Through a Plan I t y p e of program an expe ri e nced certified teach e r can anticipate preparing for teach e r-consultant roles in the area of th e gifted in four qua rters. A minimum of 28 credit hours in the area o f specialization is r equire d Included among the co urs es required are EDS 550, 551 559, 611 653-654 and EDC 552. An individually tailor e d liberal arts sequence of 14 quarter hours is also a r equire m ent of the program. Plan II An individual with a Lib e ral Arts undergraduate major may prepare as a teach e r-consultant of the gifted through Plan II. The student will be ex pected to tak e a minimum of 28 quarter hours in the area of specialization. In consultation with his adviser, h e will choose from th e following: EDS 550, 551, 559, 611 653-654 and EDC 552. An individual may meet initial certification through Plan II by taking EDC 501, an appropriate methods co urs e and completion of an int e rnship in a liberal arts area. Mental Retardation The course of study is d e sign e d to prepare th e student to b ec:i m e a more effectiv e t eac h e r or supervi sor of t e achers for th e r etarde d. It is highly recommended by the D epartment of :'d e ntal that any student who is about to apply for Graduate work in th e area of '.\le nta l R etardation contact that office for advising purposes b efo r e any courses are tak e n or application made for admission Plan I Through a Plan I Program, a certified teacher may satisfy the require ments for graduation within four quarters. Process Core R equirements ( 16 hours) At least 3 0 hou r s are allocated to the area of speciali za tion with an e mphasis on \ l e ntal R eta rdation Require d: EDS 620, 621 622, ( 12 hours ) and Written Comprehensive Exquired: EDE 409. EDS :322, EDS 42:3 I. EDS 423 I mav h e counted for \laste r Credit.

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100 C OLLEGE O F EDUCATI O N ( 2 ) Proct>ss Cort> Ht>quirt'd (16 hours ) (3) Required Courses in Mental Retardation: (38 hours) EDC 501, EDC 691, EDS 610, 620, 621, 622 676, 529. (4) Electives: ( Select eight hours ) EDS 611, 613, 531, 541 550, 560, 561, 562. (5) Written Comprehensive Examination. Varying Exception a lities An interr elated course of study is planned for advanced training to prepare teach ers and supervisors of t eac h ers of varying exce ptionalities. Plan I A minimum of 30 quarter hours in th e area of specialization is requisite to successful completion of the Plan I program for teach ers of Varying Exc e ption alities. Individualized program will include courses to be taken from the follow ing: EDS 531 541, 550, 551 610, 612 620, 6 32, 649, 660, 662 676, and PSY 613. Additional courses, including e l ec tiv es, are plann e d jointly by the student and his advisor. Plan II Individual with a non-edu ca tion baccalaureate can prepare for the teach ing of Varying Exc e ptionalities through P l an II. Ordinarily it will tak e mor e than one academic year to complete the Program Individuall y d esigned cours e of study will includ e a minimum of 61 credit hours to include 45 credit hours se lected from special education courses with an e mphasis on Varying Excep tionalities. Speech Pathology :\ program tt>rminating in an :\I.A. in Special Education : Speech Pathology is available to undergraduate studt>nts. Se e Under graduatt:' St>ction. Studt>nts who already hav e a baccalaurt>at e degree in Spt>t>ch Pathology or a r e lated area ( such ;ts Speech, English Psycho l ogy Education :\ursing and others ) are encourage d to e nt e r tht> graduate pro gram in Spet>ch Pathology. They must tak e th e rt>quir e ments of the fifth year of tht> Spet>ch Patholo gy sequt>nct>. The prt>requisit e s to the courses in the fifth may be \nliwd by demonstration of proficiency or by electing suitahlt> substitutes. Requir e m e nts of the fifth yea r a r e; EDS 531 or PSY 431, EDS 611 SA! 681 or EDC 699, SAi 576, 577, 578, 580, a minimum of tljree 600-level SA! courses and the Process Core for the M.A. in education. In addition, six hours must b e taken in SAi 698 : Practicum in Speech Pathology. Planning of such a graduate program must b e approved by a speech pathology adviser. (17) Speech Educa t ion Admission requir es a score of at l eas t 500 on th e Verbal aptitude section of the GRE; a bache lor' s degree from a recogniz e d institl,1tion ; and approval of th e Sp eec h Education faculty. Course require m en ts range from 53 to 61 hours : Plan I proc ess core r e quire m ents; 10 hours in spe ec h e ducation; and 35 hours in speech divided as

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 101 follows: 15 in rhetoric and public address, 10 hours in oral int e 1pr e tation of literature, 5 hours in speech science, and 5 hours of graduate seminar in s p eech. Each candidate for the M.A. in Speech Education must successfu lly complete a written and oral comprehensive exa mination. (18) Vocational Education Adult Education 1 ) In consultation with the graduate adviser, a program will be p lanned which will include a minimum of -15 quarter hours. Specialization r equire ments of 27 quarter hours in Adult Education are d es igned to provid e com p e t e nci es in org
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102 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION R e lated e l ec tives ( 0-16 quarte r hours). See areas of specialization list e d above. The Plan II program in \'ocational and Adult Education is d es ign e d primari l y for non-certificat e d t eac h ers. The candidate i s require d to complete additiona l professiona l education courses-usually EDC 501 and EDC 691 which are in e xc ess of th e normal Process Core requir e ments. A student will b e advised of other courses which h e must compl e t e. \laste r"s Degree candidates wishing to b e certified must meet the state's minimum certification require m e nts in the area of specialization. Plan II The program outlined below is designed for the p e rson who has completed a hach e lor"s degree with littl e or no work in profess ional education and who desires to earn a master"s degree and meet certification requir e m ents for secondary school teaching. Compl e tion of an undergraduate major o r it s equival e nt, in the int ended teaching fie l d is assum ed. A. PROCESS CORE (21 Hours) EDC 501 Curriculum, and Instruc tion: Secondar y EDF 605 Foundations of \leasure m e nt EDF 607 Foundations of Educational R esea rch EDF 611, Psycho l ogical Foundations of Education EDF 621 Socio-Economic Foundations of Education; or EDF 623 Historical Foundations of American Education; or EDF 625 Philosophical Foundations of American Educa tion. B. CURRENT TRENDS COURSE IN TEACHING SPECIALIZATION (4 hours) C. SPECIALIZATION (minimum 27 hours) An individuall y planned graduate major in the College of Lib e ral Arts in th e t eaching field or in an approp1iate College of Education program for K-12 speci alists. See Specialization section unde r Plan I, above, for descrip tion of major r equire m e nts. D. INTERNSHIP (9 hours) Enrollment will be in EDC 691 which involv es planne d obse1vation and supervision b y a m embe r of the University faculty and a secondary school staff member. In-s e rvic e teach ers are required to complete this assignment over two quarters. Junior College Program The Un iv e rsit y of South Florida has developed a program for junior college teachers which leads to the master of arts degree and Florida State Department of Education certification at this level. The College of Education, in close coo peration with the other colleges on the campus, has formulated the program. The Junior College program includes :

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CO L LEGE OF EDUCATION 103 Astronomy Biology Business Chemistry Engineering0 English Engineeri ng bachelor's degre e required A. ADMISSION AND ADVISING French Geography G e ology History Math e matics Physics Politica l Scienc e Psychology Socio l ogy Spanish Speech Because of the unique character of the Junior College Program which integrally involves two colleges of the University, the re are admission and advisory r e gulations which go beyond those listed in the section deal ing with Graduate Study. Application for admission to th e program is mad e in the Office of Admis sions. Action on all applications is th e joint r es ponsibility of the two colleges Admission to the program r equires a minimum score of 1000 on th e combined verbal and quantitive aptitude t es ts of the Graduate Record Examination. Duplicate sets of the stude nt's complete record will be on file in both offices, with th e College of Education charged with th e r es ponsibility of making official r eco mm e ndations for the granting of the degree to th e Vice Pres ident for Aca demic Affairs and to the R e gistrar. B. THE PROGRAM Consists of a minimum of -45 quarter hou rs. plus an intl:'rnship of (0-9) hou r s if clee nwcl necpssarv. 1 Spec i alization (36 hours) Typically, the student's program will include 36 quarter hours of graduat e work in a fie l d of specialization The specialization sequence to be completed will be worked out in consu l tation with a designated major field adviser. This "typi cal" program is based on the assumption that the student has an undergraduate background in his specialization area which is roughly equivalent to the patt e rn of the appropriate Unive rsity of South Florida major. Students admitted without such preparation may be required to correct deficiencies. By the same token, the unusually well prepared s tudent may be permitted to take fewer courses in his specialization area, substituting approved e lecti ves from other fields of study. 2. Professional Education (9-18 hours) l a ) Courses in Higlwr 1 9 hours ) EDH 6.'51. Thi:' Junior Co l lege in American Higher Education (-4) EDH 6 .5:3, SPminar in CollPge Teaching ( 5 ) ( h ) EDC 691 Internship ( 0-9 h ours ) Thos e students who have not m e t th e internship r equire m ent for certification (up to nine hours credit in Junior College int e rnship or two years or more of success ful full-tim e teaching ex peri ence ) must complete EDC 691, Inte rnship. Typically the internship will consist of full-time supervised t each ing for two quarte rs. At least one-half of th e internship must be in th e junior college, the other hal f b e ing left to th e discret i on of th e student' s committee. Those students who havl:' m e t an internship r l'quinmf:'nt or \\"ho h
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104 COLLEGE OF EDUCAT ION t wo years or more of successful full-time teaching e xperi ence prior to ad m i ssion to the program will not normally h e required to take EDC 691, Int e rn ship This does not preclude th e possibilitv of an int e rnship for l ess than 9 quarter hours if the advis ers deem it to he desirable. Ed. S. Program The Education Specialist ( Ed.S. ) program has been d eve loped to provide for state-approved Rank 1-A certification. T his course of study offers specialization in Elementary Education. It is not i n tended t o be a research degree. The Ed.S. degree is designed to complement an existing competence in a teaching field or service area of education The program is not intended t o pro v ide initial exposure to any fie ld of study. The applicant to the program will be expected to have certification, ex p erience, or post-b acca l aurea t e study in the specialization. Inquiries about this program should be directed to the Coordinator of Graduate Admission and Advising, College of Education, University of South F l orida. Ph.D. Program The Doctor of Philosophy degree is available in Education with specialization in E lementary Education. The general admission and degree requirements for the Ph.D. uppear e lsewhere in this Bull e tin. All general requirements must be met as well as special requirements within divisions of the College of Education. Suc h requirements for full admission to doctoral study include, among other t hings, evidence of high scholastic achievement both at the baccalaureate and m as t er's level adequate professional experience appropriate to the student's fie l d of in t erest, a satisfactory measure of verbal ability as indicated by the Miller Ana l ogies Test and a satisfactory grade on an essay examination over the candidat e's major field for the master's degree. A student's specific program is planned with his advisory committee. Mor e d e tail e d information regarding specific fie l ds of int e r es t and graduate fe ll owships may be obtained by writing the Coordinator of Graduate Admis sions and Advising College of Education, University of South Florid a. Special Funded Programs A number of programs a r e supported by contracts or grants by federal agencies or by foundatior.s. These programs generally provide an innovativ e approach to existing or developing College programs and usually provide assistantship or schola r ships for studen ts. Some programs presen tly in operation are: TTT (Training of Teacher Trainers) Supporte d by USOE. Provi d es special study of probl e ms of the disadvantaged to improve e ffectiv e n ess of public schoo l supervisors or administrators or college instructors who work with teacher train ers. May lead to advanced graduate degr ees in Special Education or E lementary Education upon a dmission to approved programs.

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 105 Teacher Corps-Peace Corps. Support e d jointly by T eac h e r Corps in USOE and by P eace Corps. Two programs aimed toward preparing mathematics and science teachers for midd l e schools in int e rcultural areas. The co mbined T eac h e r Co1ps-Peace Corps proj ec t includ es int e rnships in inner city sc h oo l s of th e Tampa Bay area and in Ghana. May l ea d to Master' s degr ee and cert ifica tion Special Education Training Programs Supported by Bureau of the Handi capped, USOE. This program provid es grants to improv e and expand th e nation s r esources for educating handicappe d chi l d r e n. The funds are used t o prepare t eac h ers and other profess ional p e rsonn e l in special e ducation for th e handic apped. Stip e nds are provid e d to t eac h ers for such areas as Emotionally Handi capped, M e ntally R e tarded, Sp eec h impair ed, etc. Potentially Handicapped. Supported by Bur ea u of Education Professions D eve lopm en t USOE. Prepares t eac h ers of disadvantaged young children whose background indicat es high i"isk for e m e rging handicaps L ea ds to Mast e r s degree and ce1tification in El e m e ntary Education and /or Varying Except i on alities. COP (Career Opportunity Program). Supported by USOE. Coo p era ti ve pro gram with Hillsborough County Schoo l s and Hillsborough Commun it y College for assisting Teacher Aides to comple t e s t udies for undergraduate d egree in Education and certification a t Rank III level. Technical Assi stance for Foreign Educators. Supported by Tec h nica l Assis tance Branch USOE and Agency for International Development, U.S. D e partment of State. Graduate and Undergraduate programs are provided for edu ca tional leaders of foreign countries. Programs are planned to meet special needs of educators in underdeveloped areas of the world. Supplementary Headstart Training. Supported by USOE. Provides undergraduate and graduate training in Early Childhood Educat ion for t eachers of the disadvantaged. Upward Bound. Supported by U.S. Office of Education Pre-college p rogram for secondary school students with academic potential from economically deprived backgrounds. Purpose is to assist students in developing goals and skills necessary to obtain entrance and achieve success in post-secondary t raining programs or institutions of higher education. Leadership Training Institut e. Supported by the U.S. Office of Educat ion. The L TI acts as liaison between the USOE and federally funded project s in the fie ld dedicated to the reform of teacher education "' r n ......... -=_> ___;,..,_ ..

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College of ENGINEERING General Information Our modem technological society has placed many demands on both the engineer and the engineering profession. The engineer has always had the respon sibility and obligation to use knowledge in his field for the benefit of mankind. The more recent impact of science and technology on our life style and even our existence has placed a new sense of responsibility on both those who are providing engineering education and those who are being educated. The College of Engineering takes a modern approach to the education of tomorrow's engineers and those programs under its direction which are vital to our tech nological progress by providing for individual development both in technical competency and human values. The College of Engineering offers a number of programs designed to meet the diverse requirements of our technological society. The degrees or services associated with these programs are as follows: Eng i neering Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Professional Program) Master of Science in Engineering (Thesis or Project) Master of Engineering (Non-Thesis) Applied Science and Technology Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science Master of Science in Engineering Science Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering Science (Florida State University Transfer) Bachelor of Engineering Technology Computer Science Service Courses (Undergraduate and Graduate Minor ) The above spectrum of program offerings provides the prospective stu-dent with a choice of avenues depending upon his own interests and capabili ties for a significant technological contribution. These programs are described in more detail under their respective catalog headings. Students interested in particular programs offered by the College of Engi neering shou l d address their inquiries to the College marked attention of the following: 1 06

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Area of Interest Engineering (Professional Program) Engineering Science Engine e ring Techno l ogy Teachers Engineering Concepts Computer Science Service Courses COLLEGE O F E NGIN E ERIN G 10 7 Contact Specific Department or Offi ce of D ea n Coordinator for Engineering Science Coordinator for Engineering Technology Regional Center-Engineering Concepts Curriculum Project Department of Industrial Systems Engineering The Engineering programs of the College have been developed with an em phasis in three broad groupings of engineering activity-design, research and the operation of complex technological systems. Students who are interested in advanced design or research should pursue the FiveYear Program leading to Master of Science in Engineering. Otner students interested more in operational responsibilities may wish to complete their initial engineering education at the baccalaureate level. For this purpose a Bachelor of Science in Engineering is offered which provides the student a broad education with sufficient technical background to effectively contribute in many phases of Engineering not requir ing the depth of knowledge needed for advanced design or research While the baccalaureate degree is considered the minimum educational experience for participating in the Engineering Profession, students are strongly encouraged to pursue advanced work beyond the baccalaureate either at this or other institutions. It is becoming increasingly evident that a large segment of today 's Engineering Profession is involved in some form of post baccalaureate study. Engineers are earning advanced degrees in ever increasing numbers in order to obtain the information and training necessary to meet tomorrow's technological challenges. All are faced with the continuous problem of re furbishing and updating their information and skills and most are obtaining advanced information by means of seminars special institutes and other such systems designed for this purpose. The Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program requires 201 quarter hours and the five year program leading to the Master of Science in Engineering degree is an integrated program of 246 quarter hours. Both pro grams have as their foundation a 152 quarter hour core of subject material encompassing Humanities, Social Science, Mathematics, Science, and Engi neering which is required of all students In addition to the core subject mate rial each student will complete a specialization option under the direction of one of the administrative departments of the College. Those options which are avai l able and the administrative unit responsible for the options are as follows: Option G e n e ral Chemical Electrical Mechanical Industrial Structures Materials & Fluids D e partment All Departments Energy Conversion & Mechanical D es ign Electrical & Electronic Syst ems Energy Conversion & M ec hanical Design Industrial Systems Structures Materials & Fluids

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108 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Preparation for Engineering The high school student anticipating a career in engineering should elect the strongest academic program that is available whil e in high school. Four years each of English, mathematics and science, as well as full programs in the social sciences and humanities are most important to success in any engineering col lege A foreign language, while not a necessity provides a desirable background for students, many of whom will continue for advanced study. Junior college students planning to transfer to the University of South F l orida"s engineering program at the junior level shoul d plan to graduate from their respective junior colleges. thus completing their general education requirenwnts and as much of the m
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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 109 departments are responsible for the professional program in e ngineering with the coordinators responsible for thos e special programs in Engineering Scienc e Engineering Technology, and Enginee ring Concepts. Each d epartment is responsible for programs, fac ulty laboratori es and students ass igned to it. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS The programs of this d epartment provide undergraduate and graduate study in all areas fundamental to Electrical Engineering and the e lectri ca l sci e n ces; circuit analysis and d es ign e lectronics comm uni ca tions, e lectromag netics, control solid sta t e, system anal ysis e lectronic computer design, etc. ENERGY CONVERSION AND MECHANICAL DESIGN This department offers undergradua t e an d graduate instruction pertinent to the anal ysis and d es ign of machines and sys t ems need e d b y our mod e rn society. In addition to courses dealing with th e classical Mechanical and Chemical Engineering subjects of lubrication, vibrati on and fatigue analysis, machine design, thermodynamics, heat transfer, environmental con trol transport phe nomena and reactor dynamics it provides instruction in other fields of increase d importance to the engineers of the future. Some of these fie ld s are computer simulation instrumentation automatic control powe r utilization acous ti cs, and nuclear processes. INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS Undergraduate and graduate programs a r e provide d b y this d e pa1tment relative to the design evaluation, and operation of a variety of industrial sys t e ms ranging from manufacturing pl a nts to service industri es. Such t opics as plant facili ti es d es ign production control, measurement and methods d es ign economic evalu a tion e tc. are studied a lon g with computers, operati on rese a rch and statistical techniques. Industria l Engineering programs are avai labl e as w ell as advanced work sys t e ms a nalysi s and Engineering Administration. STRUCTURES, MATERIALS AND FLUIDS Contemporary problems in e ngineering t end to b e multidisciplinary r e quiring understanding and skillful applic ation of the principl es of structures, engineering materials, fluids, and solid mechanics. These subjects a r e unified in one department-Structures, M a t e rials Fluids (SMF). Course work r e lated to Civil Engineering, Engineering Mechanics, and M a t e rials Science curricu lar e l ements are offered to students in both undergraduate and graduate programs. Topics included are structural a n a lysis and d es ign stresse d-surface structures, structural s t ability, corrosion, polymers fracture mechanics, water resources, aerodynamics, vibrations continuum mechani cs soi l mechanics x-ray diffrac tion hydrospace e ngineering gas dynamics wave propagation, numerical methods. Engineering Core and Specialization Both the four-year and the fiv e-yea r c urri cu l a of the Co ll ege of Engineering are found e d on a common co r e of course work which i s r equired of a ll stu d ents and provides for a broa d educa tion as well as a foundation for the work

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110 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING in the several areas of specialization. Course work identified as 400 or high e r is considered as profession a l l eve l work and students enro lling for this work must have either been admitted to the professional program or have r ece ived permission from th e Offic e of the D ea n to attempt this work. The core and specialization r equiremen ts for both the master's degree and th e baccalaur ea te program a r e as follows: 1. Core Requirements (152 quarter hours minimum) Basic Studies Core Requi r ements (35 quarter hours minimum) Prospective engineering majors must tak e CBS 101-102 301-302, any two of CBS 308-315-316 317, and nin e quarter hours of B e havioral Science CBS 201 202 203. Freshmen and sophomores will normall y fulfill th e addi tional b as ic studies requirements in Ph ys ical Science and Func tional Math e matics by completing the mathematics and science core course work requir e d in the engineering program. Mathematics and Sc i ence Core Requirements (49 quarter hours minimum) The student must take MTH 302, 303, 304; CHM 211 212 213 ; PHY 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306. Stude nts must also take MTH 305, 401, and PHY 323 or appropriate individual substitutions as approved by their College of Engin ee ring adviser. Eng i neering Core Requ ir ements (56 quarte r hou r s m in imum) Th e prosp ec tive e ngin ee ring major must take EGB 101 102, 203, 231 232,311,312,313,321,322,325,337,340,341,342,343. Humanities or Social Science Core Requirements (12 quarter hours minimum) The Student must take nin e quarter hours of approved electives at the 200 level or above from thes e areas, and he must also tak e th e S e nior Semi nar (CBS 401) r equire d of all degree candidates. 2 FOUR YEAR PROGRAM (Baccalaureate Degree) Th e program consists of a minimum of 152 quarter hours of core course material plus 49 quarter hours of specialization. The degree, Bachelor of Science in Engin eeri ng is awarded upon successful completion of th e program with options designat e d in th e respective area of specialization. a General Option All professional departm e nts may offer the g e neral option which consists of 49 quarte r hours of course work individually arranged by th e student with the approval of his adviser. This option is us e d where a student wishes to deviat e from a presc rib ed disciplinary option utilizing course work from several diff e r e nt disciplin es both within and without th e College of Engin eer ing b Option i n Chem i cal EGR 315 H ea t Trans I CHM 333 Org Chem II 4 ., ..)

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 111 CHM 334 EGR : 348 EGR 350 EGR 411 EGR 450 EGR 471 EGR 472 EGR 473 EGR 474 EGR 576 EGR 577 Approved Org Chem Lab Eng Meas I E C Lab I Thermo IV E C Lab II Chem Proc Ca l e Transport Phenom Chem Proc Prin I Chem Proc Prn II Reactor Dynam Design Case Prob Technica l E l ectives c Option in Electrical EGE 310 EGE 410 EGE 411 EGE 320 EGE 420 EGE 421 EGE 330 EGE 430 EGE 499 EGE 301 EGE 302 EGE 303 EGE 404 EGE 405 EGE 406 EGE 440 EGE 441 EGE 460 EGE 461 Network Analysis & Design I Network Analysis & Design II Linear Systems Analysis Electronics I Electronics II Communications Circuits Fields & Waves I Fields & Waves II Design Project Lab No. 1 ( Cir. I ) Lab No. 2 (Electronics I) Lab No. 3 (Circuits II) Lab No. 4 (Electronics II) Lab No. 5 (Electronics III ) Lab No. 6 (F & W ) Linear Control Systems Control Lab Electromechanics I E l ectromechanics Lab I Approved Technical Electives d. Option in Mechanica l EGR 311 Thermodynamics III EGR 315 Heat Transfer I EGR 326 Dynamics of Mechanical Systems EGR 348 Engineering Measurements I EGR 350 Energy Conversion Lab I EGR 413 Fluid Machinery EGR 428 Machine Analysis & Design EGR 429 Mechanical Design I EGR 441 Analog Computers I EGR 450 Energy Conversion Lab II EGR 453 Measurements & Control Approved Technical Electives 2 3 2 3 2 3 4 3 3 5 3 9 49 Qtr. Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 3 1 8 49 Qtr. Hours 3 4 3 3 2 4 3 3 3 2 3 16 49 Q tr. Hours

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112 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERIN G e. Option in Industrial EGS 401 Indust S ys t ems EGS 4 02 Indust. Proc ess EGS 4 03 Prod. D e sign I EGS 404 Prod D e sign II EGS 405 Prod Control I EGS 406 Prod. Control II EGS 407 Engr. Val. II EGS 409 Plant Design I EGS 441 ORI EGS 442 OR II EGS 461 Statis t ics I EGS 462 Statis t ics II EGS 565 S Q C Approv e d T e chnica l El e cti ves f. Option in Structures Materials & Fluids D e partm e nta l Cor e EGX 401 S t ructur e s I EGX 402 Mat e ria l s II EGX 409 S e nior R e s e arch/D e sign Proj e ct I EGX 503 Fluid M e chanics II EGX 504 Exp e riment a l SMF I EGX 505 Solid Mechanics III EGX 509 S e nior R e s e ar c h/D e sign Proj ec t 1. Area of Concentration (Structures) EGX 411 Concepts of Struc t ura l D e sign EGX 420 Conc e pts of Mat e ria ls Engineering EGX 410 S tructure s II EGX 511 Structur e s III Approv e d T e chnical El e ctiv e s 2. Area of Concentration (Materials) EGX 420 Conc e pts of Mat e rials Engine e r ing EGX 421 Proc e sse s in Mat e ria ls Engi neering EGX 520 Engin ee ring M a t e rials III EGX 521 Engin e ering Polym ers EGX 522 Corrosion Approv e d T e chnic a l El ec tiv e s 3. Area of Concentration (Fluids) EGX 530 F l uid M e chanic s III EGX 538 Aerod y n a mics 49 24 25 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 9 Qtr. Hours 5 4 1 4 4 3 3 Qtr. Hours 4 3 4 5 9 Q tr. Ho urs 4 3 4 3 3 8 25 Qtr. Hours 4 3

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COL LEGE OF ENGINEERING 1 1 3 EGX 535 Wate r R esources I EGX 536 Water Resourc es II Ap proved Technical E l ectives 3. FIVE YEAR PROGRAM (Master s Degree) 4 4 10 25 Qtr. Hours 49 Qtr. Hours This program consists of a minimum of 152 qua1t e r hours of core course mat e 1ial plus 9-! quarter hours of specialization including
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114 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING d ents e vid e n c in g a d e fici e n cy will b e r equired t o initat e th e n ecessary co rrecti ve prog rams with th e assist a nce o f th eir advi se rs. Co rr ectio n o f a n y d eficie nc y must b e e ff ec t e d prior t o r eco mm e ndati o n o f the student for graduati o n b y th e faculty o f the C oll ege. MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT Stude nts who are pursuin g a n e n gineerin g prog ram are e xpect e d to ac quire a facility for the rapid and accura t e so lution of probl e ms r equiring the u se o f m a th e matics. This r equire m e nt include s th e abilit y t o trans lat e phy si cal situations into math e mati c al models. Stude nts evid e n cing a la c k o f m a n\ pul ative a bilit y or the abilit y t o a ppl y m a th e m a tics will h e r equire d to t a k e r e m e dial co urs e \\ ork in e n g ineering an a l y sis th a t is ove r ana above the ir regula r degree r equire m e nts. o f th e C ollege who e n co unter stude nts who are d e fici ent in the ir mathe m atical ahilitv \\'ill r e f e r su c h c a se s t o the Offic e of th e D e an CONTINUATION REQUIREMENTS All undergraduate stude nts regist e r e d in the C ollege o f Eng ineerin g are e xp e ct e d to maintain th e minimum of 2 0 ave ra ge ( C a ve ra ge) for all \\'Ork att empte d whil e r eg ist e r e d in th e College. Stude nts wh o do n o t mainta in this r equire m e nt will b e d ec lar e d inelig ibl e for furth e r r eg istrati o n for c ours e w o rk and d eg r ee prog ram s in the College unl ess indi v i d u ally d esig ned continua tion pro g rams have been prepare d b y th e stude nt's a dviser and approve d b y th e academic committee o f the College. REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION In a dditi o n t o th e c o mpl etio n o f th e co urs e w ork and I or proj ect r e quire m e nts o f the r es p e cti ve prog rams of th e College. student s must h e r e c omm ende d for the ir degrees b y th e facult v of th e C oll ege. It is e xpect e d that stude nts compl e tin g th e ir mast e r s prog ram would ha ve co mpl e t e d th e ir a dvanced w ork with a minimum av e ra ge of :3.0 or "B''. The awarding o f a baccalaure at e d eg ree r equire s a minimum av<' ra ge o f 2 0 or "C' for all w ork attempte d whil e regi s t e r e d in the Coll ege. Students attempting but n o t co m pl e tin g th eir profe s s i o n a l m as t e r 's r e qui re m ents m ay e lect t o r eques t the awarding o f th e b a ch e l o r degr ee. Engineering Master's Degree Programs The C o lleg e of Engineering off e r s three professionally ori ente d prog rams l eading to a d egree at the m a st e r's l e v el. The s e are the post-baccalaureate Mast e r o f S c i e nce in Engineering program, Ma s t e r of Eng ineerin g Pro g r a m and the Engineerin g Five Y ear M as t e r o f S c i e nce Program. E ac h profess i o n a l d epartm ent m ay e lect to awa rd o n e o f th ese degr ees d e p e ndin g upo n pri o r arrange m e nts with th e student. Admi ssio n t o the M as t e r 's p rog ram i s d e p endent upo n a favora bl e e valu a tion b y the d e p artment c on cerne d Applicants a r e e xpect e d t o meet th e minimum r equire m ents o utlin e d b e l o w and in a d d iti o n a n y speci a l r e quire m e nts specified b y the d epartme nts and r e p orte d t o the Dean o f t h e C o l l e g e. Othe r r equire m e nts m ay b e co n s id e r e d

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 115 Post-Baccalaureate Master of Science in Engineering This graduate program of the College is d esig ned for those students wishing advanced study which is rese
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116 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Master of Engineering Program This program is designed primaril y t o meet the needs of engineers actively engaged in the profession who wish to pursue graduate study at the masters l evel. ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS Entrance requirements for the Master of Engineering program are the same as t hose for the post-baccalaureate Mast e r of Science in Engineering program. It is usually expected that those applying to this program will be experienced or acti ve l y engaged in the engi neering profession PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 1. A min imum of 45 credits of approved course work is r equired. 2. S tudents must main t ain overall grade point average of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0. No grade below "C" will be accepted in a graduate program. In the event that a student's average falls below 3.0 h e will be placed on probationary status and must obtain a directed program from his advisor and approved by the D ea n prior to continuing furth e r course work toward th e degree. :3. All students are r equired to pass a final compre h e nsiv e examination which may b e written or oral prior to awarding the degree. These e xamina tions are a rranged and administere d b y th e student's d epartment. -1. Stude nts in this program must regist e r for :3 c redits of course 698 with th e appropriate departmental prefix during the qua1ter in which they apply for the degree. This will be used as preparation for and administration of the fina l exa mination. This credit may not b e us e d as part of the course work r equire m e nt. The Engineering Five-Year Master s Degree Program This program consists of a minimum of 2-16 credits of co urs e work and r es ults in concurrent awards of the Bach elor of Science and \faste r of Scienc e in Engineering degr ees. Unlike traditional mast e r's programs following the bacca laurea t e d eg r ee, in this program both the fourth and fifth years are ope n to graduate level study and additional calendar tim e is available for research or design projects. ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 1. Students who have sen ior standing ( 135 credits) with at l eas t 2-1 credits completed at the University of South Florida in th e e n g ineering curriculum may appl y for admission to the Fiv e-Year Program. 2. A minimum total score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination is e xpect e d :3. Abov e -av erage p e rformanc e in th e e ngineering program is e xp ec ted. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 1. A minimum of 246 credits of approve d course work must b e compiled. Of this total 152 c r e dits must comprise th e e ngineering central core with an additional 9-1 c r e dits of specialization. A maximum o f 18 credits mav b e al lowed for d es ign and r esea r c h

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COLLEGE OF ENGI NEERING 117 2. Students admitted to the fiv e-yea r program are e xpect e d to maintain a superio r level of academic p e rformanc e. A :3.0 out of a possibl e 1.0 grade point average is e xp e ct e d on the courses in the student's graduate course of s tudy. In the event that a student in the Fiv eY ear Program fails to maint ain. th e r e quired acade mic standards, h e will b e pla ce d on probation. Failur e to comply with th e t e rms of th e probation will result in the student b e ing dropped from th e program. :3. Stud e nts in thi s program must comp l e t e a design or r e s e arch project for which up to 9 credits of course 699 and up to 9 cr e dits of course 599, with th e appropriate departmental prefix, may be us e d to fulfill th e ir d eg r ee require m e nts -1. If a thesis is submitted it must b e in accordance with th e H andboo k for Graduate Theses and Diss e rt a tions Unive rsity Graduate Cotmcil. F o r design projects a comprehensive report must b e file d with th e office of th e D ea n o f Engineering, following whe r!' practica l the g uid e lines of the handbook. 5. All students are r equired to p ass a final compre h e nsi ve e xaminati o n which may b e written or oral p r ior to awarding the degree Thes e e xamina tions a r e arrange d and administered by the student's graduate committee. Applied Science and Technology Several degree programs and a series of co u rses are offered by t h e College of Engineering which are d e signed for s tudent s who do not wish to pursue pro fessionally oriented degree programs in engineering but who wish to obtain a technical background coupled wi t h othe r interests Engineering Science Undergraduate Degree Program The College of Engi neering offe r s a curr ic ulum leading t o the Bache l or of Science in Engineering Science which s t resses the scien t ific rathe r than the professional aspects of engi neering. The curricul u m is a four year program with a minimum r equirement of 180 quarter hours, providing the student with an unusual depth of study in mathematics, science and engineering without limiting the opportunities to broade n his education in humanities and social sciences. The exac t composition of the curricul um followed by a given student is determined by the student with the advice and cons ent of his academic adviser. Engineering Science presents an attract ive option t o students who seek to prepare t hemse l ves for work in areas which have not yet crystalliz e d into general recognition as engineering discip li nes. These may i nvo l ve biologica l socia l or psychol ogical science as well as the usual chemical and physica l com ponents. Many professiona l s in fie lds other than engineering a l so see the program in Engineering Scienc e as a rigorous course of study in liberal science" that is highly desirab l e as a background for graduate study in law m e dicin e or business. This program was initiated at the University of South Florida as a r es ult of the closing of the School of Engineering Science at The Florida State Uni versity. In addition to broadening the educat iona l obj e ctives of the Univer s ity of South Florida, it lik e wise provides an avenue for those students unabl e to co mpl e t e the ir d egree require ments a t The Florida State Univ e rsit y. Stude nts

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118 COLLEGE OF ENGINEER ING transferring to the. University of South F l orida from FSU can graduate unde r the catalog in which they entered that institution. Graduate Degree Programs The College of ,Engineering offers a program of study leading to the Master of Science in Engineering Science Degree ( thesis required). The University of South Florida is also authorized to offer the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Engineering Science to those students presently pursuing their doctoral work at The F l orida State University who transfer to the Univer sity of South F l orida. Five-Vear Baccalaureate/Master s Integrated Program Students who at the beginning of their senior year are clearly interested in graduate s tudy are inv ited t o pursue a five-year program of study leading simu l taneous l y to the Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in Enginee r i ng Science The keys to this program are : 1 ) A two-year r esearch project extending through the fourth and fifth years. 2 ) The opportunity of taking graduate courses during the fourth year and deferr ing the taking of senior courses to their fifth year. The r equire ments for t he combined degree do not differ from those for the two de grees pursued separately Minor Program of Study Students majoring in other departments of the University may earn a minor in Engineering S c ience by the compl etion of 15 quarter hours of approved e n gineering courses and their mathematics and physics pre requisites BACCALAUREATE REQUIREMENTS (Minimum 180 Quarter Hours) Qtr. Hours 1. Engl ish, Humanities & Socia l Science o r USF General Education Requirement P l us Electives 42 2 Scienc e Requirement s (Usua ll y Physi cs & Chemis t ry ) 28 3. Mat hematics (Ca lcul us & Other) 21 4 Engineering Core (EGB Course Work) 41 5. Technical or O ther Elec t ives (Consent of Adviser ) 48 (There may be minor variations from these numbers in special cases result ing from the FSU transfer.) 180 MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE REQUIREMENTS (Minimum 45 Quarter Hours) The program requirements for t his degree are essentially the same as thos e itemized for the Master of Science in Engineering excep t that a research thesis not an engineering project, is required and students mus t have pursued an undergraduate program in Engineering Science.

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CO L LEGE OF ENG I NEERIN G 119 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN ENGINEERING SC I ENCE REQUIREMENTS Doctoral stude nts pre s e ntl y e nroll e d at The Florida State Univ e rsity may compl e t e the ir degr ee program a t the Univ e rs it y of S outh Florid a unde r the cata log r equire m e nts in e ff ect a t the tim e of th e ir gradua t e admis s ion at The F l orida State Univ e rsity (or a s r e vis e d). Engineering Technology The Co ll e g e of Enginee ring in orde r to help s e rv e the e ducationa l n ee ds in engin e ering-re late d are as off e r s a program leading to the degree, Ba c h e lor of Engi n eering Technology T h i s program provid e s for two ye ars ( 90 quarte r hours ) of study for stude nts who have comp l e t e d an Associa t e of Sci e n ce d egree program i n a n enginee ring technology sp e cialt y, usually from on e of the pro grams of t h e St a t e S y st e m of Community Coll e g es. The 90-quarte r-hour univ e rsity program r elie s upon the course work and t echnica l comp etency of the c ommw1it y c oll e g es to provide the basic inform a ti on r equire d in the stude nt's a r e a of sp e ci a lization It i s th e primary purpos e of this program to prov id e a broa d educa tiona l bas e in the unde rstanding of techno l og y, m a n a g e m ent, lib e ral a rts and soci a l sci e n ces and the ir in t erre l a t ionships rathe r than to d e v e lop a highe r d egree of sp e ci a lization. A portion of e a c h stude nt's progra m may b e us e d for on e of the a r ea s o f conc e n t ra t ion l i s t e d b e low. Indust ria l Eng in ee rin g T ec hnolo g y M anagem ent Eng ineerin g Technol o g y Compute r S yste ms Technolog y Air Conditionin g Engineering T ec hnolo gy E l ectri c a l Powe r Enginee rin g T e chn o l o gy T h e s e a r e as are d es ign e d to c ompl e m ent the t ec hni ca l work r e c eive d a t the communit y colleges and wou l d usually not b e in th e sa m e fie ld in which the A S d egree is a w a rd e d It should b e note d b y prosp ec tiv e students tha t thi s program i s not in t ende d to b e a n engi neerin g degree pro g r a m R athe r i t s fun c tion i s to bridge the gap b etween the desi g n or r esea r c h e n gi n ee r the t ec hni c i a n and m a n age m e nt. Students ente ring thi s p rog r am will h a v e th e ir tran sc ript a nn o t a t e d as t o the insti tutio n fr o m which the ir t echnica l trainin g w a s r ece i ve d a s w ell as th e ir t ec hnical sp e ci a lization as d es i g n a t e d b y tha t instituti o n 1. ADMISSION In g e n e ral stude nts are ex pected to have su cce ssfull y co mpl e t e d an A sso ci a t e of S c i ence d egree in Eng ineering Techno l ogy a t a community co llege o r t o have a c compl i s h e d equi va l ent work. Normall y the student should h a v e compl e t e d a minimum of mathe matics through appli e d int egra l calculus and a nonc al c ulu s phys i cs s eque nc e. If the student's p e rform a n ce in his community c olle g e pro g ram indi ca t es a r ea sonabl e proba bility of s u ccess in t h e Ba c h e l o r of Engineerin g T e chnolo gy prog ram h e w ill the n b e admitte d to USF whe r e h e wi ll b e r equire d t o compl e t e a minimum of 90 a dditional quarte r hours t o r e c e iv e the B a ch e lor of Enginee rin g T echnol og y d egree B e cause t his e v a l u a tio n proc edure is unique to the Bach e l or of Eng ineering Technology program, the a pplication for admission should clearl y indi ca t e t h e d e s i r e d m a j o r fie ld

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120 COLLEG E OF ENGI NE E RIN G as "Engineering Technology." This application should be filed through the Office of Admissions Further information is available from: Coordinator of Engineering and Technology USF St. Petersburg Campus 830 First Street, South St. Petersburg, Florida 33701 2. LOCATION The course work for this program is offered on both the Tampa campus and the St. Petersburg campus. On occasion, it may be necessary for a student at the St. Petersburg campus to go to the Tampa campus for a specific course, or vice versa. It should be no ted that the St. Petersburg campus does not have dormi t ory faci li ties and s tudent s must arrange t o live off campus. The Center Adminis trator of the St. Petersburg campus will assist whe re possible in locating housing Computer Service Courses Recognizing that the general purpose digital computer has made significant contributions to the advancement of all elements of the acade mic communitv and that it will have an even greater impact in the future, the College of Eri g ineering offe r s several l evels of c redit course work, undergraduate and gradu ate, t o serve students of all colleges in order that they may be prepare d to meet the computer challenge. Comput er-o riented courses are oflered in two broad categories: ( 1 ) those cou r ses which are concerned with the operation, organization and programming of comput ers and computer svstems from th e viewpoint of examining the fundament a l principl es involved in computer usage; and ( 2) those courses which a r e concerned with computer applications to a variety of different disciplines, by means of user-orientedl angu<1ges such as FORTRAN, PL/ 1 and COBOL. In order that the students mav d e rive maximum b e nefit from the courses, according to t h eir interests, th e are further divided into two groups: (1) those courses of general in t erest to a wide variety of and ( 2 ) those courses of particular int e r es t to students in engineering and th e physical scienc e s The se r vic e courses available for the non-engineering students includ e ESC :301, :302, :30:3, :30-!, :310, :311, : 312, 501, .502 and 50:3. The courses de signed for the engineering and physical science students include EGB 2:31, 2:32, EGS -!2.3, -124, -125, -127, 5:3:3, 620, 621 and 622. Engineering Building

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College of FINE ARTS The College of Fin e Arts serves the three-fold purpos e of providing programs of study, theatres of prac tic e, and programs of events for the University family the surrounding community, and the citizens of the State of Florida. Its prime objectives are: ( 1 ) to provide a broad but thorough education d edicated to the developm ent of profe ss ional ex cell ence in thos e who are highly talent e d in the fin e arts, ( 2 ) to foster this feeling and comm itm en t to aesthe ti c e xcell ence in thos e preparing for teaching, and (3) to provid e curricu lar studies and extrac urri c ular activities designed to e nrich the lives of the general Univer sit y student and contribute to the overall human environment of the University community. In a ddition to offering degree programs in th e departments of Art, D ance, Music, and Theatre Arts the co llege is the hom e of the Florida Cente r for the Arts and GRAPHICSTUDIO. Programs in art e ducation and music education are off e red jointly by the College of Fine Arts and the College of Educa tion Studio and history courses in art, vocal and in strumental music for these programs a r e offered by the Coll e g e of F ine Arts. ( See programs unde r the College of Education.) FLORIDA CENTER FOR THE ARTS In 1968, the University of South Florida created the Florida Center for the Arts as a unit within the College o f Fin e Arts. The various p e rsonnel and extracurricul a r fine arts programs on campus were conso lidated in to one adminis tra tive structure to more efficiently concentrate on a ll three areas of the university 's r es ponsibilit y -education research, an d community service. The function s of the Florid a Center for the Ar t s a r e as follows : 1. To initi a t e and conduc t programs which will studen ts and the general public into contact with the hi ghes t level of professional ac tivity in all the arts. 2 To offer opportunities for student s and public to have direct contact with professional artists. 3. To conduct programs which will a llow opportunity for specialized pro fessional study or training in a r eas not covered by the regular academic structure of the University. 4. To d eve lop programs which can r e late the public sc hool system to professional cultural activity. 5. To sponsor r esea rch and d eve lop r esearch facilities relative to the devel opment of the arts. 6 To create ex hibition and performanc e programs availabl e for u se on campus and throughout the state. 7. To pla n and deve lop physical facilities for the Florida Center. 121

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122 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 8. To conduct conferences, seminars and symposiums in the a rts for g e neral public ex posur e. 9. To mak e avai l able professional consultant services. The Florida C ente r is a service unit to the aca d e mi c departments of the College and, also, suppl e ments their e ducation a l functions with imported pro fess ion a l activity of the high es t quality The C en t e r spon sors the p e rforming art i s t series, the film art series, ex hibit io ns in three galleries, and r es id encies of pro fess i o nal dance companies. In conjunction with the academic d e pa1tments, it co-sponsors v i s it s of performing and v isual artists to the GRAPHICSTUDIO and o th e r programs The activit i es of the C ente r a llow p erso nal e xposure of students to important creative talents and offer the serious Fin e Arts major an in va luabl e e ducational opportunity. GRAPHICSTUDIO GRAPHICSTUDIO was establi s h e d in January, 1969 as a cooperative progra m b e tw een the D e partment of Visua l Arts and the F lorida C enter for th e Arts at th e University of South Florid a. The d eve l opmen t of th e studio has been substantially a ided b y contribu tions from The Nationa l Endowment for th e Arts Washington, D .C.; The Syra cuse Chin a Co1por a tion ew York ; from students and l ocal p a trons. GRAPHICSTUDIO at the University of South Florida was es tablish e d to facilitate the production of prints i n a n atmosphere in w hi c h the arti st i s freed from th e pressures of a commercia l a t elier. Arti s ts are invited to p a rticip a t e for a p e riod totaling approximate l y six weeks for proofing and e ditioning of the ir work. The workshop is d evo ted t o t ec hnical exc e ll e n ce and ex p e rim e ntation with in a framework flexibl e to th e n eeds of th e a rti s t It is a non-profit studio which pride s its e l f on the multiplicit y of activ iti es tha t it se r ves. B es id es b e ing a r esource to th e a rtist it se rv es as a vehicle through which student s and the commu nit y can have the opportunity t o communicat e with some of the most innovativ e a1tis t s on the current scene The dia logu e growing ou t of such a situation serves as an educational t oo l of prim e quality. In addition, prints r e tain e d by the University are mounted in ex hibitions for us e on campus and a r e loaned withou t charge to othe r institutions GRAPHICSTUDIO i s d evo ted t o th e c reativ e act and to affecting students and public through contact with artists and the eloquence of the ir art. Admission to the College Provisional admission t o the Colleg e of Fin e Arts is p os sibl e with four of the e i ght areas of Gen e ral Education comp l e t e d or waived, with a minimum of 8 1 credits. Unqualifi e d admiss ion requires compl e tion of six of th e eight areas of General Education ( including English ) and a total of 90 credi t s or more ( A grade point ratio of 2.0 is expec ted in b oth in stances.) Occas ionall y students may be admitte d without the 2.0 average but they will a utomatically be on warning status Transfer students, and those admitted provisionally to the college, must meet appropriate portfolio or audition r equire m e nts b efo r e r e ce iving unqualifi e d admission to the co llege and advanced s tatus in a ny one of the severa l departmental programs Upon a dmis sion by appli cation to the college offic e, the student w ill d e clare his major and w ill b e counseled in his se l ec tion of cou r ses b y an a dvis e r from the m ajor fie ld. He will th e n plan the remaind e r of his college progra m to

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COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 123 fulfill his educa tional needs and satisfy requireme nts for the bache lor of arts degr ee. The D ea n will generall y supervise his progress and ultimate l y c e rtify the student for the degree. Any student of the University may tak e courses in the Colleg e of Fine Arts even though. not officially admitted. Fre shm e n and sophomores may wish to t ake Fine Arts courses in addition to th e ir basi c studies program. Simi l a rl y stude nts in other colleges or adults in the community will e l ec t Fin e Arts co urs es of particular interest. Graduation Requirements The College of Fin e Arts currently o ff ers on e undergraduate d egree : Bac h e lor of Arts. These r equire m e nts are r eferre d to on page 45 of this cata log but are briefly summarized h e r e : l. 180 c redits with at l eas t a "C" average (2.0) in work done at the University of South Florid a. At l eas t 60 of the 180 credit s must be in courses numbe r e d 300 or above. 2. G e n e ral Education requirement s of at least six areas (or t ransferred e quiva l e nts), including CBS 101 -102 (Freshman English), plus CBS 401 (the Senior S eminar). 3. Comple tion of a major in a subject or an integrated major involving severa l s ubjects. There must b e at l eas t a 2 0 average in thi s major for all USF work. To insur e breadth of experience and to preclude undue specia li zation, a student must earn (or show competence in ) a minimum of 120 academic c r e dits outside his discipline of concentration, including at l east 24 cred it s in courses of study outside the college of the major In meeting this 24 credit requirement, work must b e distribute d with no more than 8 counting from a s ingl e departm ent. 4. Work transferr e d from other schools will not b e includ e d in the grade point average computed for graduation. (However, graduation with honors r e quires a 3.5 a verage in USF work and a l so in any pre vious co llege work.) 5. A student must earn the l ast 45 credits in residence a t the Univers it y of South Florida. 6. Completion of a senior apprai sa l is require d This is administered free to graduating seniors each quarter. Curricula and Programs ART Requirements for the B A Degree: The visual arts c urri culum is d esigned t o deve lop the stude nt's conscious n ess of aesthetic and id eo lo gica l aspec t s of art and its relationship to life and to ass ist students in the r ea lization of p e rsonal ideas and im agery. Most B.A. r e cipients interested in college teaching museum or gallery work, fine or comme rci a l studio work pursue the ex t ended disciplin e and ex perience offered at the graduate lev el. Although the program a ll ows many possibl e courses of study, most students will selec t one or two areas of e mphasis c ho sen from the offerings in studio ( p a inting sculpture, graphics, ceramics, photography, cinematography, draw ing), history or theory.

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124 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS The University reserves the right to retain selected student work done while registered at the University Transfer credit will be given on the basis of portfolio and tran script eva luation. The requirements for the bachelor's degree in Art Education are listed under th e College of Education. Studio Concentration The following are the requirements for a studio major: 1. ART 201, ART 202, and ART 301. 2. Minimum of 12 hours of 400 level studio courses. ART 201 is a pre requisite to all two-dimensional media courses ; ART 202 is prerequisite to all three-dimensional courses; ART 301 is prerequisite to all 400 level studio courses. 3. Minimum of 12 hours of 500 level studio courses and/or techniques seminars. PR: 400 level equival ent, ART 201 ART 202, and ART 301. 4. Minimum of 12 hours in Idea Seminars and/or art history courses. Basic Seminar, ART 301 is a prerequisite to the Idea Seminars (ART 491). Art history has no prerequisites. 5. Additional art courses for a total of 60 credit hours. Art History Concentration Requirements are as follows: 1. ART 201, ART 202, and ART 301. 2. Minimum of 20 hours of 400 lev e l art history courses. 3. Seminar in Art Historical Literature (offered under ART 570).PR: 12 hours in art history. 4 Minimum of 16 hours of ART 491 and/or ART 570. 5. Additional art courses to total 60 credit hours. 6. Proficiency in at l east one foreign l anguage. FNA Requirements for All Art Majors 1. Fifteen credits are required consist ing of: 3 credits each in Dance, Music and Theatre and 3 credits each ofFNA 543 and F A 553. 2. Three to 6 credits of FNA 443 and/ o r 3, 6, or 9 credits of FNA 453 may be substituted for the Fine Arts departmental 9 credit requirement. Waiver for credit of up to 18 course hours is possible by demonstration of competence Review is by Faculty Committee. 1'lease refer to page 123 for general graduation requireme nts. Requirements for the M.F.A Degree : General requirements for graduat e admission are given on page 65. Applicants to th e Master of Fine Arts Degree program are also required t o submit s lides of their work for approval by a faculty committee. Students accepted initially are given "degree seeking" s t a tus for up to three quarters. At that time, but not before the comp l e tion of 12 credit hours, student s must sub mit their work for admission to "degree candid acy" sta tus. At candidacy, the student will se lect a committee of three faculty members who will assist in his progress toward the degree. The M.F.A. D egree requires a minimum of72 hours. With the exception of ART 682 (which must be t a k en a t l east twice) ART 683 ART 684 and ART 699, which are required the specific course structure of any student's grad-

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COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 125 uate program will b e determined by Faculty Graduate Committee appraisal of the student's interes ts capacities and background during his first quarter of resid e ncy It should be noted that unde r normal circumstances, students will be encouraged to take a broad range of courses rather than mov e toward a specialization. To meet his thesis requirement, the student must formally present a body of his graduate work in the quarter prior to graduation. The student must be registered as a fulltime graduate student for at least two quarters of his residency. The requirements for the M.A. Degree in Art Education are listed under the College of Education. DANCE The d ance curriculum is designed for students int e r es t e d in dance as an art form. Their objectives may b e to continue thei r education in graduate school, to teach in a college o r a private school, or to pursue a career as a p e r former and I or choreographer. Dance majors are required to tak e DAN 201, 202, 203, 3 01 (six credits), 302 (si x credits), 303, :311 (three credits), 313, 401 ( nin e credits), 403, 413, 501 ( nin e credits), 503, 513, for a total of60 hours. Senior dance majors are r equired to choreograph and p erfo rm jn a senio r dance program. For advanced placement, prospective students must contact th e dance office (TAR 233) to arrange for an audition prior to registr a tion Additionally, 15 credits are required consisting of: 9 credits in Art, Music and Theatr e and 3 credits each of FNA 543 and FNA 553. Three to six credits of FNA 443 and/or 3, 6 and 9 c redits of FNA 453 may be substituted for th e Fine Arts departmental 9-credit requir emen t Please r efe r to page 12 3 for addition a l requirements. MUSIC The music curriculum is designed for those students gifted in the p erformance and/or composition of music Candidates for a major in music are require d to pass an entrance exa mination in th eir r es pectiv e performance and/ or composition areas. All new registrants are also require d to take a placement exa mination in music theo ry and literature. Students may obtain dates and times for these examinations from the Music department office (FAH 204). Completion of thes e exam in a tions is required befor e registration in music courses can b e permitt ed. Requirements for the B .A. Degree: All students seeking a degree in music are require d to ( 1) compl ete suc cessfully th e secondary piano requirements as defin e d by the music faculty (2) present a partial public r e cital during the ir junior year, (3) present a com pl ete public recital during their senior year. (Co mposition majors must submit a portfolio of thei r compositions and arrange for a public performanc e of their works during their senior year). These r equirements are in addition to the actual course requirements list e d b e low A total of 60 quarte r hours is require d distributed as follows : 24 hours in Music Theory-Literature and 36 hours in applied music or 36 hours in Compo sition for composition majors (a minimum of three quarters at the 500 l eve l is r equired). Students e nrolled for applied musi c must e nroll for a minimum of one

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126 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS performing ensemble each quarter (ensemble(s ) to b e determined by the student's studio teacher). The above are basic music requirements. The Department of Music r ese rves the right to require additional remedial courses. Requirements for the M M Degree : General requireme nts for graduate work are given on page 67. In addi tion the applicant will need to satisfy the following requirements in music be fore initial registration: ( 1 ) performance audition, (2) placement examinations in music theory-literature and piano and (3) completion of the Graduate R ec ords Examination Advanced Test in Music. The specific program for each student will vary according to his and interests. Each program must be approved by the student's advisor in con formance with the guidelines established by the Graduate Music Committee. A minimum of 54 quarter hours is require d and a student must be registered as a full-time student for a minimum of one quarter. THEATRE All students will take TAR 203 211 221 252, 339, 443, 471, 501 and 502, plus any two of the Theatre Literature courses. Depending upon choice of concen tration addition al require ments are-performance majors: TAR 212, 311, 313, 411, 413, 511 515, plus 6 hours elected in the discipline; technical majors : TAR 322, 421 423, 425, 429, 529, choice of one of TAR 422, 424, 426, plus 6 hours e lected in the discipline; playwriting majors: TAR 212, 444, 515, 543, 544 plus one additional Theatre Literature course and one beginning design course, with 6 hours elected in the discipline-for a total of 60 hours. Theory majors: TAR 311, 313, one beginning design course, four remaining Theatre Literature courses; for a total of 54 hours plus an additional 12 hours of English electives selected from ENG 411, 426, 503, 519, 520, 559. Additionally 15 credits are required consisting of: 3 c redits each in Dance, Music and Visual Arts and 3 credits each of FNA 543 and FNA 553. Three to six credi t s of FNA 443 and/or 3, 6 or 9 credits of FNA 453 may b e substituted for the Fine Arts departmental 9-credit requirement. Pl ease refer to page 123 for graduation requirements. HUMANITIES MAJOR A major in the Humanities is offered as an interdisciplinary program ad ministered through the office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The c urriculum for the Humanities major comprises interdisciplinary courses in the verbal, visual, and musical arts of specified periods and cultures. Students interested in the Humanities major should consult the Chairman of the Humanities Program, LAN 360. The requirements for a major in Humanities are 45 credits of upper level Humanities courses (400 and 500 lev e l ) including HUM 591 plus nine credits in the creative or performing arts. A graduate program leading to a Master of Arts in Humanities Education is avai l able. For requirements see the College of Education.

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College of LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE The College of Language and Literature offers general and liberal education. Students may explore vocational interests and develop in this College breadth of knowledge and precision of intellect necessary for responsible leadership in our society. More specifically, the College seeks: l. To help students continue the exploration of new subjects affording fresh id eas and taJents enriching to life. 2. To enable students to try out several fields as a means of determining the wisest vocational choice. 3. To give sufficient development within the chosen vocational field that the student will be prepared to obtain a job upon graduation or move success fully into a graduate or professional school. 4. To collaborate wi th the other co ll eges of the University in providing liberal courses to reinforce required training in those professional schools. 5. To cultivate independent thinking, creative imagination and value commitment in order that students may become constructive l eaders in their chosen activities The College is concerned with language and literature in both the broad and specialized meanings of the terms. Whether the language be native or foreign new or old expressed or implied, students in this College are asked to explore it in the context of the beauty and utility it holds for man's permanent thought. Literature is studied in the context of continuing tradition, as the ex pression of what is universally significant for man. Admission to the College Admission to the College of Language and Literature is possible with a minimum of 30 credits. Unqualified admission requires six of the eight areas of General Education (including English ) and a total of 90 credits or more. ( A grade point ratio of 2.0 is expected in both instances.) Occasionally students may be admitted without the 2.0 average, but they will automatically be on warning status. Upon admission the student will declare his major and will be counse led in his selection of courses by an adviser from the major fie ld He will then plan the remainder of his college program to fulfill his educational needs and satisfy requirements for the bachelor of arts degree. The Dean of the College will gen erally supervise his progress and ultimately certify the student for the degree. Any student of the University may take courses in the College of Language and Literature even though not officially admitted. Freshmen and sophomores 127

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128 COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE may wish t o take lib eral arts courses in addition to their general education program. Similarly students in other colleges or adults in the communit y may e lect liberal arts courses of particular interest. General Requirements The College of Language and Literature currently offers one undergraduate degree: Bachelor of Arts. These requirements are referred to on page 45 of this catalo g but are briefly summarized here: 1. 180 credits with at least a "C" average ( 2.0) in work done at the Universi t y of South Florida. At least 60 of the 180 credits must be in courses numbered 300 or above. 2 General education requirements of at least six areas including Freshman English plus CBS 401 (the Senior Seminar). 3. Compl etion of a major in a subject or an integrated major involving several subjects There must be at least a 2.0 average in this major for all USF work. To in sure breadth of experience and to preclude undue specialization, a student must earn (or show competence in) a minimum of 120 academic credits outside his discipline of concentration. including at least 24 Liberal Arts (Fine Arts, Natural Sciences, and Social & Behavioral Sciences) credits outside the College of Language and Literature. In meeting this 24 credit requirement, work must be distributed with no more than 8 counting from a single department. 4. Work transferred from other schools will not be included in the grade point average computed for graduation. (However, graduation with honors requires a 3.5 average in USF work and a l so in any previous co llege work.) 5 A student must earn the l ast 45 credits in residence at the University of South Florida. 6. Completion of a senior appraisal is required. This is administered free to graduating sen iors each quarter. HONORS PROGRAM The College of Language and Literature offers a special program for superior students which wi ll enable them to participate in speci al seminars empha sizing independent work and creativity. Students participating in the honors program are expected to take honors seminars offered by the College and in addition to the honors courses designated by their major department. Students may volunteer or be nominated by facu lt y members, after which a screening committee will select those to partici pate. Further information is available from the office of the Dean of the College of Language and Literature. Curricula and Programs The College of Language and Literature offers majors in 10 fields as described in the following pages. The student must fulfill all the requirements indicated or receive written permission from the department chairman for any substitution or exemption.

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COLLE G E OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 129 LIBERAL STUDIES MAJOR The College offers a Liberal Arts major for students who wish a broad pro gram tailor e d to their particular interests and not falling naturally into one of the d epartments or divisions. The major may have a pre-professiona l p u rpose or it may simply serve a student's desire to become better acquainted with h im self and the world Persons interested in the Liberal Studi es ma jor shou l d see t h e Coo rdinator of Advising of the College for admission and assignment t o an adviser, and they should write out for approval a statement of the purposes underlying t h eir p ro posed program and the combination of courses they deem most relevan t This should be done as early as possible and at least before earning 135 credi ts. All the College rules for the B.A. degree appl y likewise to this major: 180 credits with a t l eas t a C average. Gen e ral Education requirements fu l filled at l eas t 60 credits at the upper level (300 and above ) and 24 Liberal Arts cred i ts outside the area of greatest concentration. There must be at l east 20 credits with a C average in one department to assure some anchorage in on e field. AMERICAN STUDIES The American Studies major is d e signed for those students interested in studying the r e lationships among the important e l ements which shape American civilization. The American id ea sequence, CBS 301, 302, 303 and 304 (or the counterpart in transfer work ) is a pre requisite (or can be taken concurren tl y) for admission to the major. To complete requirements for a major a student must take ( 1 ) the following courses in American Studies: AMS 301 AMS 311-312-313, and AMS 491492 493; (2) three courses, 12 hours, and not more than one course from each department selected from the following: AFA 261-262, COM 301, ENG 305-306 307, HTY 411-412, HTY 421-422 HUM 535-536-537, PHI 4 1 3; a n d (3) twe nty-on e hours of r elated elective courses, no more than nin e hours in any one area chosen in consu l tation with and approved by h i s major adviser from among th e following: AF A (any pr courses not used to satisfy catego r y two a bove), AMS 383, AMS 481, AMS 483, ANT 441 ECN, 371, ENG :.m5-306-307 (any course or courses not used to satisfy category two above), ENG 312, ENG 415, ENG 416, E G 425, E G 426, ENG 517, EDF 575, HTY 3 01 HTY 302, HTY 311, HTY 312, HTY 315, HTY 316, HTY 3 1 9 H T Y 320, HTY 409, HTY 410, HTY 411-412 (either course not used to satisfy ca t e gory two above), HTY 421-422 (either course not used to satisfy category two above), HUM 535-536-537 (any course or courses not used to satisfy ca t egory two above), PHI 413 (if not used to satisfy category two above) P O L 201, POL 338, POL 341, POL 347, POL 431-432, POL 441, POL 453, POL 454 POL 455, POL 463, REL 329, SOC 201, SOC 261 SOC 341, SOC 371 SOC 5 6 3, SPE 360 and SSI 503. Descriptions of these courses may be found under the appropriate departmental course descriptions. Each student's program must b e planned with th e American Studies ad viser, who may make appropriate substituti ons w hen new related courses are added to present University offerings and he dee ms such substitutions educa tionall y advisable. CLASSICS AND ANCIENT STUDIES The D e pa1tm ent offers a major in Classics and Anci e nt Stud i es. Requi r e m e nts for the B. A. degree in Classics and Anci e nt Studies are: -18 quarter c r ed its consisting of a core sequence of 22 credits p l us one of three a l ternatives o f

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130 COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 26 credits providing a choice of emphasis. The core sequence consists of CLS 301, 302, 303, 411, 412 413, a nd 529. The alternative sequences are: (a) ---mphasis on Latin : CLS 321, 371, 401, 402 403, 517 and 571 ; ( b ) ---mphasis on Latin and Greek : CLS :321, :3:31, :332 : 333, :371 527, 571 ; (c)-broad scope with Latin Greek, and H ebrew: CLS, :331, :3:32, :33:3, 341, 342, 343, 527, and 583 (Biblica l Civilization). Individual adapt ations within the 26 variable credits to m ee t special student needs are possible with the consent of the Department Chairman Electives ( where applicable) are: CLS 401-402-403 ; 331-332-333; 321, 371, 517, 527 571 ; ART 470, 471; HUM 431-432; PHI 333, 415; REL 351. For a combination major of Latin with a mod e rn foreign l anguage see page 133 under combined majors, MODER LANGUAGES ENGLISH Requirements for the B.A. Degree : A major in English requires a sequence of courses in British and American lit erature. Advanc e d courses focus on th e works of paiticular authors, genres, or groups of related authors. All English courses attempt to t eac h students how to think criticallv about lit e rature and to fit the work s studied into the eco nomic social, political scientific, and r e ligious contexts. To accumulate the required 48 credits, all English majors must tak e th e following seven courses: ENG 201, ENG 202 ENG 203, ENG 305, ENG 306, ENG 307, and ENG 411. In addition they must e lect one of the following: ENG 319, ENG 321, ENG 325 ENG 335, ENG 336, ENG 337, ENG 437 ENG 459, and ENG 511 ; two of the following: ENG 429, E G 500 E G 501 E G 502 ENG 503 ENG 504, ENG 505 ENG 506, ENG 507 E G 508, ENG 515 ENG 519 ENG 520 ENG 521, and ENG 559 (a student cannot use both ENG 519 and ENG 520 in this group); and two of the following: ENG 415, ENG 416, ENG 425, ENG 426, ENG 430, ENG 513 ENG 517 ENG 518 ENG 523 ENG 527, ENG 528, and ENG 531. Persons wishing to tak e English courses not on this list or mor e than th e specified numb e r of coi.!rses in the above a r eas, may include the m in th e 12 hours allowed und e r th e 60-hour maximum p e rmitted in one department. For the d esc ription of th e com bined major in Engli s h and Lingui s tics r efe r to th e Linguistics section of th e catalog on p age 135 Requirements for the M.A. Degree : Req11ire m e nts for Admission. In addition to th e general r eq uir e m en ts of the Unive rsity an applicant must h ave an academic average o f B in all English courses above freshman English, a minimum of 28 hours o f literature in English above th e fres hman l e v e l and a score of at l eas t 600 on th e Verbal Aptitude Test of th e Graduate R eco rd Examination and a t o tal GRE score of at least 1000 All a ppli ca tions must b e approved b y th e Graduate Committee of th e D e partm en t o f English Co11rse Work. A mast e r o f arts degree in English requires 45 hours of course work from th e following lis t of English courses: ENG 691 ; two ENG 68:3 courses ; E'.\!G 62 : 3 ( or th e bibliography test); ENG 531 ( unless the stu dent ha s t a k e n a lit e rar y c riticism course as an unde r grad uat e ) ; and any one of the following courses-ENG 515 ENG 517 E NG 518 E G 535 LI 540, o r LIN 541 ( unless th e student ha s t a k e n a lin g ui stics or English langu age course as an und ergrad uat e). All co urs es to b e counted for the M .A. must be at th e 600 lev e l excep t ENG 531 a nd a 500-level linguistics or language

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COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 131 co urs e Each student is required to write a directed critica l or analytical paper C
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132 COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE American Literature to 1920 (includes relevant European backgrounds and parallel developments on the Continent) Twentieth-Century Literature (British 1890 to the present and American 1920 to the present; includes relevant parallel developments on the Con tinent) Language, Linguistics and Style The first fifty hours of the program will be given over to general study of American and British language, literature literary history and literary criticism and to study of the teaching of freshman English and lower-level college literature courses, with each student advised by one senior member of the faculty. At the end of fifty graduate quarter hours each student will be re quired to take a Ph.D. Qualifying Examination (five hours, written and oral). This will help determine whether or not he will be admitted to candidacy As a candidate he will pursue his three areas of specialty (44 hours) and further study of college teaching and research ( in ENG 703). He is guided in this work by his advising committee composed of one senior member from each of his areas of concentration. The advising committee sets specific course requirements for the candidate s three areas of specialty, suggests study beyond the minimum requirements or allows the candidate in special cases to take fewer than the minimum hours in his areas of concentration, and advises him generally on the preparation for his Ph.D. Preliminary Examination. Usually a candidate will have completed an approximately equal number of course hours in each of his areas, though knowledge of an area however gained is the student's real goal. The Ph.D. Preliminary Examination (fourteen hours, written and oral) will determine his knowledge of the three areas. To pass the Ph.D. Preliminary Ex amination the candidate must demonstrate that he has gained control of the materials in his chosen areas, has mastered the methods of advanced study ap propriate to those areas, and is carable of doing significant independent re search in them. If he passes, he wil then be permitted to write his dissertation under the guidance of a director and three r e aders, one of whom will be a senior professor from another department closely allied to the discipline of English. The dissertation must be satisfactory to the director and e very reader. There will be no examination on the dissertation. A Master of Arts degree is not necessary in this program, though it is strongly recommended that every student take the M.A. en route to the doctorate. Students entering the Ph.D. program with M .A. degrees already completed will be required to pass the Ph.D. Qualifying Examination as soon as possible after coming to the campus so that they may transfer their graduate credit (up to a maximum of 52 hours) into the U.S.F. Ph.D. program; it will also be necessary for those students to pass ENG 601 and ENG 602 before being admitted to candidacy. All transfer students must pass forty-four hours of graduate course work at U S.F unless some of these hours are waived by an advis ing committee under special circumstances Admission to the program for all beginning graduate students will be the same as that in effect for all who request entranc e into the M.A program in English. Beyond the general admission requirements of the University these include a GRE General Aptitude Test total score of at least 1000 and a score of at least 600 on the verbal part of that test, an average of at least B in all English courses taken above the freshman level, and completion of at least twenty-eight quarter hours in literature written in English. Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. will be granted by the Graduate Committee of the Department after re ports from the Ph.D. Qualifying Examination Committee course instructors,

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COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 133 and thesis adviser have been evaluated. The Department reserves the right to deny a student continuance in the Ph.D. program if he does not maintain a B average, if he is given a second grade below B in his first fifty hours of graduate work, if he does not perform adequately on his qualifying or preliminary exami nation, or if he violates departmental regulations regarding graduate study. The aim of the program is to produce teacher-scholars who have a good general knowledge of English and special knowledge of a distinct part of their major. It is strongly recommended that all candidates choose as one of their areas of concentration Language, Linguistics, and Style And since the program r equires knowledge of backgrounds to and developments in literature not written in English all students are encouraged to take courses in other depart ments such as Classics, Modern Languages, and Humanities. They are en couraged, too, to take courses in American Studies, history, philosophy, and speech. Sixteen graduate credit hours in subjects closely allied to English may be applied to the Ph.D. in English The following courses are required for all students in the program: ENG 601 602, 683 (twice ) 690, 691, 703, 791 799. In the first fifty hours each student must pass a test of his knowledge of basic bibliographical tools for research in English. He must also pass (with a grade of B or A ) a course, at the senior l e v e l or higher, in the literature of a foreign language. MODERN LANGUAGES Instrnction is provided in French, G erman, Italian, Portuguese Romance Philology Russian and Spanish. Instruction in l ess commonly-taught languages (such as Modern Arabic, Modern Greek Contemporary Hebrew, Hindi Urdu, Japanese Polish) and linguistics, language strncture and development, is also available The s e programs are d e sign e d to mee t the needs of students who desire comp e t e ncy in a language and an expanded unde rstanding of its culture and lit erature The y are of particular int e r e st to students who wish to teach language s tho se who plan to furth e r th e ir studi e s in graduate school, and those who seek careers in various t y p e s of for e ign e mploym e nt Major programs are off e r e d in French, German, Italian Latin Russian, and Spanish and in combinations of any two of th e se Requirements for the B.A. Degree : Mod ern l a ngu a g e majors must complete at l e ast 45 credits in the chos e n language b eyond th e int e rm e diat e langu a g e cours e s Among these 45 cre dits mu s t b e th e following : FRENCH: FRE 301 : 303 305 4 01 403, 405 406, and 516. GERMAN: GER 301 303 : 305 401 405 406 and 516 ITALIAN: ITA 301 303 305, 401 405 and 406 RUSSIAN : RUS 301 303, 305, 401, 405 and 406 SPANISH : SPA 301 303, 305. 401 403 405 406 516, and 561 or 562 Combined Majors Combin e d majors are off e r e d in an y two mod e rn languages or in Latin and a mod e rn language, or in langu a g e s and linguistics For a major in two mod e rn languages, a student must tak e the cours e s require d for the major in his first language and :301 303 : 305 and 401 in his s econd language. Stu d e nts majoring in Latin and a mod e rn language must take CLS :301, : 302 :30:3, 3 71, 401-402-40 3, 517 and 571 ; and cours e s numbe r e d : 301 :30:3, : 305 -101,

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134 COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 405 and 406 in the modern language. For a desc1iption of the combined major in Foreign Languages and Lin guistics refer to page 135. Requirements for the M .A. Degree in French: General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 67-69. For admission to the M.A. program in French, a student must have previously taken the following French courses or their equi valent: FRE 303, 401 403, 405, and 406. The student must also have a 3.0 GP A over the last two years of undergraduate work attempted. For a master's degree in French, the followin g a r e required: 1) 45 credit hours in French courses, or: 31-35 hours in French courses plus 10 -14 hours grnduate-l e v e l work in a s econd field approved by the student's supe1visory committee. Of the r e quired work in French, FRE 601 and 689 and at l east 12 additional hours must b e at the 600 l e vel. 2 ) R eading knowledge of a second foreign language approved by the stude nt's supe1visory committee. 3 ) A written compr ehensiv e e xamination based upon a reading list provide d by the depaitment, on French language and literature. A po1tion of the comprehensive examination must he written in French. 4) A thesis or thesis-type paper, written under the direction of an adviser assigned by the d epartme ntal chairman, and approved by the stude nt's supe rviso1y committee. Requirements for the M.A. Degree in Spanish : General r equirements for graduate work are given on page s 67-69. For admission to the M A program in Spanish, a student must have previous l y taken the following Spanish courses or their equivalent : SPA 303 401 4 0 3, 405 and 406. The student must a l so have a 3.0 GP A over the l as t two years of undergraduate work attempted. For a master' s degree in Spanish the following are r equire d: 1 ) 45 cre dit hours in Spanish cours e s o r : 31-35 hours in Spanish courses, plus 10-14 hours graduate l e v e l work in a s econd fie l d approved by the student's supervis01y committee Of th e r e quire d work in Spanish, SPA 601 and 689 and a t l e ast 1 2 additional hours must b e at the 600 level. 2 ) R eading knowl edge of a s econd for e i gn language approve d by th e stude nt's supe rvisor y committee. 3) A writte n compre h ensiv e e xamination based upon a r eading list provide d by the d e pa1tm ent, on Span i sh and Spanish Am e rican language and lit e rature. A p01tion of the comprehe nsive e xamination must b e writte n in Span ish 4 ) A th e sis or the sis-type paper, written un
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COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 135 Students interested in Linguistics are urged to acquire a broad languag e background in their undergraduate programs especially if they intend graduate s tudy. A classical language ( Latin Greek Hebrew) or a non-Western l anguage are strongly recommended in addition to any modem European languag es the student may have studied. Also, prospective graduate students are advised to obtain good foundations in Mathematics (MTH 309 and PHI 509 are es p ecia lly r ecom mended), in computer progr a mming, statistics, and ex p erimen tal design and methodology All programs for any of the three majors below must be approved by an adviser from both of the disciplines concerned. Requirements for B .A. Degrees: l. Anthropology-Linguistics Major. This sequence is designed for students who are particularly interested in th e role of lan guage in hum an behavior and cultural development. It requires the following eight courses in Anthropology: ANT 201 ANT 311, ANT 321, ANT 331, ANT 401, A T 46 1 ANT 491 and ANT 431 or ANT 441. It reguires the following six linguistics co urses : LIN 301 LIN 530 LIN 551, and SPE 503 and any two COl!!Ses from the following group: LIN 511, LIN 540, LIN 541, LIN 543, CLS 571, ENG 518 PHI 531, PSY 441 or SSI 311. 2. English-Linguistics Major. This sequence is d esig n ed for students who are especially int eres ted in the role of linguistic studies in probl e m s of English grammar, composition, and literary structure and style. It requires six cou r ses from the following literatur e group, of which ENG 201 and E G 501 are required: ENG 201 ENG 202, ENG 203, ENG 306, and E G 307, ENG 411 ENG 501, and E G 507 ; four language courses: ENG 321 ENG 515 E G 517, and ENG 518 ; and four of tfi e following, of which LIN 540 and LIN 551 are r equi red: LIN 511 LIN 530, LI 540, LIN 541 LIN 543 LIN 551 CLS 571 PHI 531 SPE 311 SPE 503 and SPE 511 3. For e ign Languag e -Lingui stics Major This sequence is designed for students who are especially interested in the role of linguistic studies in pro blem s of grammar, composition, and liter ary structure and style. Th e s tud en t must elect one of the following language sequences: FRENCH: FRE 301, 303, 305, 401, 403, 405, 406, and 516. GERMAN : GER 301, 303 305, 401, 405, 406, 513 and 516 ITALIAN : ITA 301, 303 305, 401, 405, and 406. RUSSIA : RUS 301 303, 305, 401 405, 406 515 and 516 SPANISH: SPA 301, 303, 305, 401 403, 405, 406 and 516 French, Italian and Spanish students must also take either ROM 517 or CLS 517 In the Linguistics sequence of the major, students must tak e LIN 301 LIN 551 CLS 571 and any two of the following: LIN 511, LIN 530, LIN 540, LIN 541, LIN 543 ENG 518 PHI 531, SPE 311, SPE 503, and SPE 511. Stud e nts wishing to combine two modern foreign languages and linguistics must take one of the above sequences as the first languag e and the sequence 301, 303, 401 403 ( prefix determined by languag e plus any phonetic s, stylistics, or history of the language courses offered for th a t l ang uag e Students who intend to do graduate work are strongly urged to consider Latin or Classical Greek as a second language. Sequen ces for these l anguages are li sted under Classics and Ancient Studies. Stud e nts may also elect a non Western as a second language ; six quarters satisfies the r eq uir emen t s for one of thes e. The Linguistics course requirements remain the same as for a single foreign language.

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136 COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Requirem e nts for Admission. Undergraduate majors generally regarded as appropriate foundations for graduate study in linguistics are: anthropol ogy, English a foreign language, linguistics and speec h; however, a student with a baccalaureat e degree in any disciplin e is eligible. In addition to the general r equire m e nts of the University, an applicant must have an academic average of B in all of his major courses and a combined score of 1000 on the aptitude sec tion of the Graduate R ecord Examination (a minimum of 500 of the total must be earned on the verbal portion). I f a student's undergraduate pre paration has not includ e d suitable introductory courses in general or descriptive linguis tics and phon e tics he will be require d to r e m e dy the defici e ncies by taking LIN 301 and SPE 50:3 ( credit for the form e r mav no.t be counted toward the degree require ments ) The undergraduate study' of one or more foreign lan guages, es p e cially a non-West e rn language, is strong l y e ncouraged. Cours e Work. An M.A. degree in linguistics requires a minimum of 48 hours of course work of which LIN 551 LIN 600, LIN 601, LIN 602, LIN 611 LIN 612 and 2 to 8 hours of the thesis course LIN 699 are r equired. The remainder of the course work may b e taken in linguistics courses (or closely related courses) in other departments, notably Anthropology, Classics and Ancient Studi es, Education, En_glish, Modern Languages, Philosophy Psy c holog y, Sociology, and Speech. The student may elect to take all of these remaining courses in one such department, or he may take them in severa l departments, but each program must be planned with and approved by the Linguistics adviser, who may make appropriate subs titution s when he deems thes e e ducationall y advisable. Foreign Lan gu aae R e quir e m e nt. The foreign language r equire ment is r e garded as an integna part of th e M.A. Program in Linguistics and students must d e monstrat e a profici e ncy in one foreign language for the degree. How e v e r students who intend to co ncentrat e in historicalcomparative lin guist ics will be e xp ect e d to brin g to th e program an e xt e nsiv e undergraduate background in for e ign l anguages, or else to r e m e dy the d e fici e nc y aft e r admission. Stude nts who intend to co nc entrate th ei r work in general-descriptive linguis tics or other sub-specialties will have wide latitude in thei r choice of a foreign language to s atis(v the r equiremen t and the study of a non-Wes t e rn language is strongly e n courage d. The c hoic e of a language and the method for satisfying th e profici e n cy requir e m ent ( e g course work, exa mination etc. ) will b e d e termined on an individual basis by the stude nt and his thesis committee. Othe r R e quir e ments. The student will present an acceptabl e thesis in the field of linguistic studies (fro m 2 to 8 hours credit a re granted for this project through r e gistration for LIN 699; see a bove under course work require ments ) In addition, the student must pass a comprehensive examination in linguistics, both oral and writte n. If a student has e lected to tak e as many as eight hours of course work in a department other than Linguistics in his pro gram, then his examination will cover mate rial from thos e courses also. The following co urs es taught in other departments are a ls o linguistics courses, or are clos ely r elated to linguistics : ANT 401, CLS 371, CLS 517, CLS 571, EDT 531 EDT 631 EDX 649, ENG 515, ENG 517, ENG 518, ENG 616, ENG 686 ENG 687 FRE 403, FRE 601 GER 513, GER 601 PHI 531, PSY 441, ROM 517, ROM 518, RUS 515, RUS 516, SPA 403, SPA 601, SPE 311, SPE 503, SPE 511 SPE 603 SPE 611, SPE 612, SAi 580, SAi 623 and SSI 3 11. D esc riptions of th ese courses may b e found unde r the appropriate d epartme ntal headings

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COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 137 MASS COMMUNICATIONS Mass Communications (journalism) offers a number of courses with a general liberal arts approach, from which any student may e lect those suited to his interests or needs. Majors in Mass Communications will find in addition more specialized courses in advertising, broadcasting film magazine news editorial, and public relations areas. The following general courses are designed to introduce students to a broad perspective and understanding of the pro cesses of communication and its effects upon society and the individual: COM 300 Introduction to Mass Communications(3) COM 301 The Popular Arts in America (4) COM 351 Literature and the Film (3) COM 400 International Communication (4) COM 403 History and Principles of Communications Law (4) COM 451-452 Social History of the Film (4, 4) COM 453 The Documentary Film (4) COM 500 Theory of Mass Communicati0n (4) Majors seeking careers in the mass media will be directed to the vario us daily and weekly newspapers, radio and television stations, advertising agen cies, magazines and public relations firms with which the department main tains close contact. Summer internships and part-time work in the media are available to qualified students. Requirements for the B .A. Degree: The necessary techniques that a major in Mass Communications will rec e iv e are based on a knowledge of certain kinds of human behavior especia lly as it relates to theory, principles and practice of mass communications. Required courses and recommended e l ectives offer students the widest possible freedom to exp lor e their own areas of interest within a broad framework of the liberal arts. Majors will choose about 60 credits of electives outside the deparL ment. Required are 22 credits in a Mass Communications "core," 13 credits in supporting courses and 23 or 24 credits in a sequence, as follows: R e quired Cor e Courses: (22 q.h.) COM 300 Introduction to Mass Com munications (3) COM 330 Beginning Reporting (4) COM 351 Literature & the Film (3) (Film Sequence majors will take COM 353 in place of COM 351) COM 403 History and Principles of Communications Law (4) COM 491 Senior Seminar: Inter communications COM 500 Theory of Mass Communi ca tion (4) R equired Supporting Cours es (13 q.h.) POL 201 American Nationa l Gov't (4) POL 203 State & Local Government (4) SPE 241 Introduction to Broadcasting (5) ONE OF THE FOLLOWING FIVE SEQUENCES : Advertising (23 q.h.): MKT 301 Basic Marketing (5) MKT 312 Principles of Advertising & Sales Promotion (3) COM 313 Advertising Copywriting and Layout (4) COM 341 Principles of Public Rela tions (4) COM 375 Typography I (4) MKT 413 Consumer Behavior (3) Film (28 q.h.) COM 353 Introduction to Film Writ ing (4) (in place of COM 351 )

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138 COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE COM 354-355-356 The Film as Mass Communications I, II, III ( 12 ) COM 451-452 Social History of Film (8) COM 453 The Docum en tary Film ( 4 ) OT COM 454 Film Criticism Magazine (24 q.h.) COM 321 Magazine Article & Fea ture Writing (4) ENG 321 Narrative and Description (4) OT ENG 325 Advanced Expository Writing (4 ) COM 325 Magazine Editing (4) COM 371 Photojournalism I (4) COM 375 Typography I (4) COM 425 Magazine Planning and Pro duction (4) N e ws-Editorial (24 q.h.) COM 3 .31 Advanced Reporting (4) COM 338 Newspaper Management (2) COM 371 Photojournalism I (4) COM 375 Typography I (4) COM 433-434 News Editing I, II (8) COM 539 Seminar: News-Editorial Problems (2) Public R elations (24 q.h.) COM 341 Principles of Public Rela tions (4) COM 441 Public Rel ations Writing (4) COM 541 Public Information (4) 12 hours of approved related electives SECONDARY EDUCATION MAJORS English-Education majors, or those who wish certification in Journalism under the English-Mass Communica tions-Education program, are referred to the College of Education sec tion of this Catalog. J?escriptions of these courses may be found under the appropria t e depart mental course descriptions. Each student' s program must be planned with his Mass Communications Sequence coordinator, who may mak e appropriate substitutions when h e deems it educationally advisab l e. PHILOSOPHY The philosophy program includes five major areas of study: (1) logic and scientific method (2) history of philosophy (3) theor y of knowl edge, (4) theory of reality, and (5) theory of va lue. Majors in philosophy must complete at l east 45 credit hours in the program, with the following courses required: (1) PHI 303; (2) PHI 333, 334 and 335. In addition to (1) and (2) we urge all majors who are going to graduate school in philosophy to take at l east one course in all areas. At l east nine cred its must be taken above th e 500 l eve l including two seminars. No more than two of PHI 301 311, 317 will be counted toward the major. Credit toward a major in philosophy will be extended for LLI 306 or 315. Students may substitute PHI 583 (se l ec ted topics) for any requirement above, with approva l of the D epartmen t Chairman. The Department of Philosophy offers the philosophy major the oppor tunity of participating in the Philosophy Department Honors Progr am. A student may graduate with departmental honors if he: (1) is accepted by the Department as an honors candidate, (2) comp l etes 4 honors courses with a grade point average of 3.5 or better, and (3) completes the courses necessary for a philosophy major with a grade point average of 3.2 or better. The 4 honors courses will consist of 3 upper-level courses in which the student attends regular class sessions but makes arrangements with the instructor for additional work. The student will receive additiona l credit for honors work by enrolling for one hour of directed study for each course taken as an honors cours e The

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COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 139 fourth honors course will be a research project, and the student will enroll for the project under PHI 583-03. Requirements for the M A Degree For admission the stuQ.ent must have a B average in philosophy as an undergraduate and a score of at least 1000 on the GRE; the student must have completed the equivalent of PHI 303, 333, 334 and 335. General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 67-69 Reading knowledge of a foreign language approved by the student's adviser. A written comprehension examination. A thesis or thesis-type paper, written under the direction of an adviser assigned by the departmental chairman and approved by the student's supervisory committee RELIGIOUS STUDIES The Program of Religious Studies at the University of South Florida makes available to students a variously-dimensioned field of study which hopefully facilitates an educated man's understanding of himself, an understanding of his presuppositions on the meaning of life, the nature of the religious-social milieu in which he lives, and the religious dynamic in human history. It also aims towards a larger understanding of the religious thought and life-styles of people possessing religious heritages other than the Judaeo-Christian heritages More specifically stated, the Program offers an opportunity for students to examine religion as a persistent and determinative aspect in human life by asking, (1) Why do men do religion? What is it about man that makes him the religious animal? And (2) what do men do when they do religion? What are the various ways (theologies, rituals, ethical demands) that men practice religion? It also offers an opportunity for students to examine and discover the various aesthetic (especially literary) and moral values possessed in and pro claimed by the great religious traditions of the world-both East and West. It makes available for personal enjoyment and personal valu e the great religious literature of the world And it can serve as basis for advanced professional study in the field, on the master and doctoral level, or as a valuable background for professional work in religion; e.g., teaching in public schools, junior colleges, the religious education departments of churchs and synagogues; religious journalism and other forms of mass communication; social service. Requirements for a Major in Religious Studies: A total of 49 quarter hours are required for a major, divided as follows: I. Basic Documents and the Analysis of Religious Thought (33 hours required) REL 300, REL 310, REL 315, REL 325, REL 327, REL 328, REL 329, REL 350, REL 351, REL 360, REL 370, REL 383 REL 385, REL 481 REL 483 REL 491, REL 583, PHI 411 SOC 373 ANT 471 II. Interdisciplinary Religious Courses (17 hours required) ENG 319, ENG 507 ENG 511, ENG 583, (Religious Literature ) CLS 321, CLS 341, 342, 343, LLI 301, 302, PHI 321, PHI 333 PHI 521, ART 472, HUM 427, HUM 428, HUM 541, HUM 542, HUM 543 HTY 425, HTY 426 HTY 432, HTY 591 (Religious History). Descriptions of these courses may be found under the appropriate depart mental course descriptions. Each student's program must be planned with the Religious Studies

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140 COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE adviser, who may make appropriat e substitutions when he deems it education ally advisable SPEECH Th e Speech curriculum provides cou r ses for all students interested in in creasing th e ir understanding and s kills of ora l communication,
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141 COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE Plan B-Proof of a wo rkin g know l edge of a computer lan g uag e ( Cobol or Fortran ) and ability to design
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College of NATURAL SCIENCE S The College of Natural Sciences offers courses in astronomy (AST), biology (BIO), botany (BOT), chemistry (CHM), geology (CLY), marine science (OGY), mathematics (MTH), microbiology (BOT), physics ( PHY), and zoology (ZOO). The courses are designed for students planning scientific careers or those t echnical careers having a considerable component of science, such as engi neering or medicine. These students will typically major in one of the sciences or in a combination of sciences as preparation for employment transfer to professional schools or admission to graduate school. Those seeking to transfer to another university to complete a course in agriculture, home economics, pharmacy, or one of the medical professions may begin their science work here before transferring. Students seeking a general understanding of science but not technical competence will normally wish to tak e the general education courses offered by the College and augment their understanding by adding appropriate courses in the college designed for non-scientists. Undergraduate Programs The College offers the Bachelor of Arts degre e with majors in Astronomy, B otany B otany-Microbiology, Chemistry, Geology Mathematics, Microbio l ogy Ph ysics, Zoo l ogy, and interdisciplinary natural sciences. T.he College offers the B ache l or of Science degree with majors in Clinical Chemistry Clinical Tech no l ogy, and Physics Upon admission to the Coll ege, students preparing for a science or mathematics career must plan their courses from th e ir freshman year because of the sequential nature of the science curricula. Graduation Requirements The University requir ements for graduation are found on page 45 of this catalog. The College requirements for graduation are as follows: 1. 180 credits wi t h at least a "C" average (2.0 ) in work done at th e University of South Florida 2 Completion of a major in a subject or an integrated major involving several subjects. There must be at l eas t a 2 0 average in this major for all USF work. 142

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COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 143 3. Completion of courses related to or supporting a major in a subject. Items two and three should constitute approximately one-ha l f of the student's total program. 4. Completion of a broad spectrum of general education courses distributed over several fields of human knowledge. These must include un i versity general educati on requirement s and any additional requi rements of a particular major. 5. Completion of e lect ive courses. 6. Work transferred from other schools will not be included in the grade point average computed for graduation. (However, graduation with h onors requires a 3.5 average in USF work and also in any previous college work.) 7. A student must earn the last 45 credits in residence at the University of South Florida For a more detailed description of the above requirements, consult the appropriate Depart mental Requirements. Upon admission to the College the student will declare his major and will be counseled in his selection of courses by an adviser from the major field He will then p l an the remainder of his college program to fulfill his educati ona l needs and satisfy the requirements for the undergraduate degree. The Dean of the College will generally supervise his progress and u lt imately certify the student for the degree. Any student of the University may take courses in the College of Natura l Sciences. Advanced Placement and Waiver of Requirements Attention is called to the possibility of waiving requirements by students who enter th e University well prepared from high school. (See page 48) Waiving of a course does not give credit but increases the free e l ectives avai labl e to the students. In addition, by means of an examination, the student may waive certain courses or receive credit for advance p l acement. During the trans i tion period of the reorganization of the university, requiremen t s may be waived by the substitution of equivalent courses upon the recommendation of the appropriat e Dean. INTERDISCIPLINARY NATURAL SCIENCE MAJOR The bachelor of arts in a natural science major is designed to serve students desiring a broad background, such as science teachers pre-medical students, and other pre-professional students. Major requiremen t s in the College of Natural Sciences are a minimum of 36 credi t s in the discipline of major con centration and a minimum of 24 credits in the College outside that discipline. These 24 credits mus t be approved by the s t udent's advisor and must include a minimum of three at the 3 0 0 l eve l or above. Prospec t ive t eachers should a lso consult the College of Educat ion section of this cat a l og for information about certification requirements in the fields of science or mathematics teaching. Pre-medica l and pre-dental students should contact the chairman of the Pre Medical Advisory Committ ee. The natural science major is not necessarily an adequate preparation for entrance into a graduate program in the natural sciences. To strengthen the preparation, additiona l science and mathematics electives beyond the minimum requirements may be recommended by the faculty adviser. By the proper ad-

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144 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES dition of science and mathematics e l ectives beyond the minimum requirements th e na tural science major can serve as a strong preparation adapted for graduate work in a wide range of interdisciplinary fields such as bioch e mistry, microbio l ogy, biophysics, space sciences, oceanography, g eoc h e mistry geo physics and others PRE-MEDICAL PROGRAM The pre-medical program provides a compl e t e array of courses and educational experiences necessary for preparing on eself for admission to medical school. Pre-medical students should major in a disciplin e which is of the greatest appeal to them, whethe r it be in th e sciences or non-sciences, and fulfill all requirements in that major for graduation The following science courses are the minimum requirements for admission to v irtu ally every accredited medica l school: One year of Biology: BIO 201 202, 203. Two years of Chemistry: CHM 211 212, 213, 331 332, 333-334, 335-336. One year of Physics : PHY 201-202, 203-204, 205-206. Additional science requirements vary according t o the m e dical school to which the student will b e applying. Part of th ese additional requirements may be fulfilled by the following courses: Chemistry: CHM 321, 305 351. Mathematics: MTH 211, 212, 213 (or MTH 101 302, 303, 304) Biology : ZOO 3 11 421 422; BIO 33 1. B eyond the science course requirements, it is essen tial that students acquire an inventory of courses developing a sense of understanding of cul tural and mora l values, and basic social problems. It is unde rstood that th e quality of academic p erformance should be of the high est level. It may be noted that well-prepared students with exceptiona l qualifica tions may be admitted to m edica l school as early as the comp l e tion of the junior year of pre-medical work. Graduate Programs Programs of graduate s t udy a1,' available in every department of the College. The Council on Graduate Study for the College is advisory to th e Dean on policies and curricu lar matters The specific duties of the Council are: ( 1 ) t o develop and recommend policies concerning graduat e study in th e Col lege (2) to exam ine and screen proposals on graduate programs in th e severa l departments (3) to study the need for interdisciplinary graduate programs (4) t o serve as a curriculum committee for screening proposed graduate courses (5) to monitor the admission of marginal students and make recom mendations if the situati on warrants such ( 6) to serve as a reference body on matters involving any excep ti ons to the existing regulations (7) to offer ad vice and counsel upon such other matters of concern or interest to the Col lege or its constituent Departments as are brought to the attention of the Council. MASTER S DEGREE PROGRAMS The College of Natural Sci ences offers graduate programs leading to th e Master of Arts degree in the fie lds of Astronomy, Botan y, Geology Marin e Science, Mathematics, Microbiology Physics, and Zoology and a Master of Science in Che mistry.

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COL L EGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 145 Students apply for graduate work through the College of Natural Sciences and are recommended for admission by the depart men t in which they i n tend to concentrate. A departmental committee is appointed which super vises and guides the program of the candidate. The general University requireme nts for graduate work at th e mast e r's level are given on page 67 69. The specific r equirements for each department are listed under that depart men t below. Further information regarding admission and availabl e fellowships and assistantships may be obtained by wri t ing to the proper depart mental chai rman DOCTOR S DEGREE PROGRAM The Coll ege of Natural Sci e nc es offers three programs l eading t o the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Biology-This program leads to the Ph.D. in Biology, including the fie l ds of Marine Biology Syst e matics B e havior, Ecology and Physiology Chemistry-This program leads to the Ph.D. in Chemistry, including the fields of Analytical, Biochemistry Inorganic Organic and Physica l Chemistry. Math e mati cs-This progra m l ea ds to the Ph.D. in Pure and Applied Math e matics The University r e gulations governing graduate s tudy a t the doc t ora l l eve l are given on page 70. The specific departme ntal require men t s are g i ven on page 1 48 for Biology page 152 for Chemistry and page 156 for Mathematics Departmental Requirements ASTRONOMY R e quirements for th e B .A. D egree: I ASTRONOMY REQUIREMENTS The astronomy major must comple t e at leas t 35 hours of upper l evel astronomy courses including: Astronomy Courses Hours AST 301-302 10 AST 413 4 AST 443 5 AST 521 or AST 522 or 12-15 AST 5 33 or AST 536 or AST 58 3 AST 361 or AST 481 AST 491 3 -6 1-2 T ota l Hours 35-42

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146 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES II SUPPORTING COURSES Required: Hours MTH 302-305 and MTH 421 21 PHY 201-206 and PHY 315 18 or PHY 301-306 12 At lea st three of the following Physics courses: (9-12 hours) PHY 307 3 PHY 309 4 PHY 323 4 PHY 331 4 PHY 405 3 PHY 407 3 PHY 437 3 PHY 541 4 At l east one of the following Mathematics courses: (35 hours) MTH 323 4 MTH 345 5 MTH 431 3 MTH 44 5 3 MTH 447 4 Total hours 45-56 III. LIBERAL EDUCATION COURSES The Astronomy major must satisfy the General Education Requirements of th e University (38-40 hours, assuming implied waivers). He must a lso include (or show competence in) one of the following sequences: CBS 111-11 2 ( 5 5) CBS 114-115 (5, 5) CBS 117-118 ( 5, 5 ) Functional French Functional German Functional Russian He must complete 24 hours with no more than 12 hours from any one depart ment approved by the chairman of the Astronomy department from the follow ing colleges: College of Fin e Arts College of Language & Literature College of Social & Behavioral Sci ences Total hours 62-64 IV. FREE ELECTIVES Total hours 18-38 The student is expected to familiarize himself with the technique of program ming electronic computers before th e end of the sixth quarter. SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS FOR B A. DEGREE: Astronomy 35-42 Supporting Courses 45-56 Courses Outside College of Natura l Sci e nces Free Electiv es 62-64 18-38 Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Gen e ral r e quirem en ts for graduate work are given on pages 67-69

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COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 147 A minimum of 45 credits must include at least 24 for courses numbered 600 or higher and at least 18 for structured astronomy courses numbered 500 or higher. It will be assumed that the student knows enough mathematics and physics to follow any as tronom y courses required in his curricu lum No credit is available for courses numbered 499 or lower which the student takes in order to make up for his initial deficiencies in this respect. Since candidat es for the graduate degrees in astronomy may have a variety of backgrounds including majors in astronomy, mathematics, or physics, th e required course of studies may vary considerably among students. A thesis is required, which must be based on original work. The student must also demonstrate, before the degree is granted, his ability to translate in'to English the pertinent scientific literature in at lea st one of the foreign l an guages : G!"rman French or Russian. BIOLOGY Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Although there are specific course requirements for majors in the various subdisciplines of biology, all require study in certain basic areas of the bio logical and physical sciences. Modem biology is characterized by a marked interdisciplinary trend so that only students well grounded in ancillary fields like chemistry, mathematics and physics will be competitive for jobs and further study after completion of their baccalaureate degree. Four specific curricula are available for the student interested in Biolog y. All curricula prepare the student for further graduate work, or for a terminal degree in the biological science. For convenience, a tabulation comparing the various options available to the student interested in a major in biology is shown below. Although the options differ in detail there is considerable communality in the require ments. For example, all curricula require BIO 201-203, BIO 331, at least one course in mathematics, one year of general physics (PHY 201-206) and two years ofchemistry (CHM 211-213, CHM 331-334, 335-336 or 351). BOTANY MICROBIOLOGY BOTANY-ZOOLOGY I. Biology courses: MICROBIOLOGY BIO 201-203 12 BIO 331 5 BOT 351 5 BOT 302 5 BOT491 l BOT electives 12 ZOO-BIO electives 5 45 BIO 201-203 BIO 331 BOT351 BOT552 BOT491 BIO, BOT, ZOO 12 5 5 4 1 electives 18 45 BIO 201-203 12 BI0331 5 BOT351 5 BOT302 5 BOT491 1 BIO-BOT electives 17 45 II. Other College of Natural Sciences Courses: MTH 101 or MTH 101 or 211 5 MTH 211 4 211 5 CHM 211-213 12 CHM 211-213 12 CHM 211-213 12 CHM 331-334 10 CHM-331-334 1-0 CHM 331-336 15 CHM 335-336 CHM 335-336 Electives from or CHM 351 4-5 or CHM 351 4-5 non-biological PHY201-206 15 PHY 201-206 15 areas 8 4647 45-46 40 BIO 201-203 12 Z00321 5 BIO 331 5 Z00421 5 Z00422 5 BI0445 4 ZOO-BIO e l ec tiv es 9 45 MTH211-213 12 PHY 201-206 15, CHM 211-213 12 CHM 331-334 10 CHM 335-336 or CHM 351 4-5 53-54

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148 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES III. Liberal Education Courses University General Education requirements (ass uming impli e d w a iv ers): 39-41 39-4I 48 -50 29-31 24 hours with no more than 12 hours from any one department, approved by !h e chairman of the Bi ology department from th e following colleges: College of Fin e Arts College of Language & Literature College of Social & Beh avioral Sciences IV. Free Ele c ti ves: 23-26 24-27 21-2 1 26-29 The sequencing of courses is especially important for cognates as well as the area of emphasis : BIO 331 builds on the subject matter of BIO 201-203 and CHM 211-213; BOT 351 assumes a knowledge of th e sub ject matter of BIO 201-203 BIO 331 and CHM 331-334; and ZOO 421 shou ld not be taken before comp letion of CHM 335-336. Physics should be comp l e ted no later than the end of the junior year. Reading knowledge of a mod e m foreign languag e (Ge rm an, French or Russian) is strongly recommended es pecially for those who intend to enter graduate school. An und ergradua t e major in one of th e subdisciplines of biology prepares a student for a career in teaching agricu lture medicine, dentistry, t echno log y or further (pos t-graduate ) study in biology. A sugges ted plan of study in each of the major options available may be obtained from faculty advisers Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirem e nts for graduate work are given on pages 67-6\1. Major in Botany or in Microbiology: Students llre admitted for graduate work in Botan y or in Microbiolog y if th ey presen t th e r e quisit e background in the biological sciences. The bachelor of ar t s or bach e l or of science d eg r ee with a major in botan y, zoology microbiology, biology, or th e ph ysica l sciences i s r ec omm ended in addition to a satisfactory grade on th e Graduate R eco rd Examination, a lthough students from other areas of science are welcom e. For a mast e r's d eg r ee in Botan y or in Microbio l ogy a minimum num b e r of 45 c r edits i s r equire d of which: ( 1 ) a minimum of 24 credits in course8 numbere d 600 or above, (BOT, BIO or ZOO prefix) no mor e than 9 of which ma y be g iv en for research ( BOT 681 ) graduate seminar (BOT 691 ) or thesis ( BOT 699 ) ; a nd ( 2) th e r e maining credits must be t a k e n in courses numbere d 400 500 or above to m ee t the r e quir e m e nts of a minimum of 45 cred its. Other r equire ments are: (3) completion of a mast e r's th esis approved b y the stude nt's commi tt ee or an e quivalent amount of course work approved by the stude nt's major advis e r, and (4) satisfactory p e r formance on a final ora l e xamination administered by th e student's committee within th e d e part ment Major in Z oology : A minimum of 45 credits must includ e 22 in biology co urs es ( BIO, BOT, or ZOO prefix es) numbe red 600 or above, not mor e th a n nine of which may be for th e thesis. Oth e r requirem e nts are comp l etion of a Master's thesis approved by the student's committee a nd satisfactory p e rformance on a final ora l examination given b y th e Departm e nt. R ead ing knowl e d ge of one foreign lan guagt: .. may b e requir e d by th e student's committee. Requirements for the Ph.D Degree : D octorate in Biology: The Ph D in Biology is oflered in th e fie lds of Marine Biology Systematics. B e havior Ecology and Physiolo gy. It is a cooper-

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COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 149 ative efT01t involving many disciplines. The department chairman is respon sible for advising the student to (a) work tow;m] his \LA. first or (b) work directlv toward his Ph.D. Students advised to work toward the Ph.D. will have a superviso ry committee appointed as soon as possible and including at least one member from a discipline outside the student's field of concentration. The committee shall approve the course of study to be followed by the student, supe1vise his research, conduct his and final oral examina tions and approve his doctoral dissertation. The student's major professor will serve as chai1man of his committee until the final oral examination. The Admission to Candidacy will be issued by the Dean of the College upon receipt of a statement from the supervisory committee through the department chairman indicating that the student h;ls successfully completed his language and qualifying examinations. In order to gain the experience that comes from teaching, satisfactory se1vice as a teaching assistant for one academic year is required (un l ess a specific exemption is recommended by th e supervisory committee). The student is expected to complete all course work stipulated by his committee with at least a B (:3.00) overall average. In general, the final oral examination will be a defense of the dissertation; however, other areas of the student's work may also be included. After all the above requirements are completed, the Chairman of Biology will ce1tify to the Dean of the College that the candidat e is e li gib l e for the degree. Marine Biology The field of marine biology is especially important in Florida and there is a good demand for trained personnel. Several faculty members in the department teach courses conduct research in this area. Summer courses are given at the St. Petersburg campus and include ZOO 546-5-17-\farine Invertebrate Zoology, BOT 5-1:3-Phycology, ZOO 519-Ichthyology, ZOO 62:3-Physiology of Marine Animals, ZOO 6:3:3-Physiology of Fishes and ZOO 615-Plankton Svstematics. Interested students should see the chairman of the Biology department for further advice. See also the offering in the Program of Marine Science. CHEMISTRY Requirements for the B .A. Degree : I. Chemistry Courses CHM 211-213 CHM 321 CHM 331-336 CHM 441-443 CHM 445-447 CHM 491 Total hours in Chemistry Hours 12 5 15 12 11 2 57 II. Other College of Natural Sciences Courses MTH 302-304 13 PHY 201-206 (or 301-306) 12-15 III. L iberal Education Courses General Education requirements of University (assuming implied 25-28 Waivers) 38-40

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150 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 24 hours, with no more than 12 hours from any one department, approved by the chairman of the Chemistry department from the following colleges: College of Fine Arts College of Language & Literature College of Social & Behavioral Sciences 24 IV. Free Electives Summary of Requirements for B .A. D egree Chemistry Other Sciences Liberal Education Free Electives 62-64 31 -36 57 25-28 62-64 31-36 180 Students should keep in mind that CBS 208-209-210 and CBS 109-110 can be waived by taking the required courses listed above. The required se quence should be started immediately in the freshman year and the student should not register for any CBS course that can be waived. The student should plan to complete the mathematics and physics requirements before the junior ye;ir so the CHM 441 can be taken at that time. The above courses constitute a minimum curriculum for the B.A. in Chemistry. It is recommended that this program be strengthened with addi tional courses to be se l ected by the student in consultation with his faculty adviser. ACS Approved Program The following program is int e nd ed primaril y for the student who plans to mak e chemistry his profession. The program open t o all c h emistry majors. Students who complete this program will be ce rtified to th e American Chemical Societ:-r as havin g met th e minimum requir e ments for a professional d eg ree. The program consists of satisfactory completion of th e abov e chemistry, mathematics. and physics co urses plus the following courses: MTH 305 CHM 511, another 400 or 500-level course in chemistry, and a reading knowledge of one modern foreign language. Othe r advanced chemistry physics, mathematics, or biology courses should be taken if the student anticipates pursuing graduate work in chemistry. Requirements for the B.S Degree in Clinical Chemistry A new program leading t o a B.S. degree in clin'ical chemistry is being offered by the Department of Chemistry. This program one of only three available in the country will train chemists for a new and growing field serv ing the medical profession. This program is built upon a strong background of chemistry, biology, and related sciences Graduates of this program could go on to graduate school in clinical chemistry, biochemistry or e ven m edica l school. Interested students s hould see the Chairman of the Chemistry depart ment for further advice A B.S. degree in clinical chemistry must include the following courses:

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COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 151 Freshman year: CHM 211, 212, 213; MTH 302, 303, 304; BIO 201, 202, 203. Sophomore year: CHM 331, 332, 333 334 335 336; CHM 321; PHY 301 302 303, 304 305, 306; BIO 315. Junior year: CHM 441, 443 ; CHM 523; CHM 351 ; BIO 321; BIO 351. Senior year: CHM 521; CHM 483; EGB 231, 232; Bioch emistry Lab oratory, Clinical Chemistry Methods, and Clinical Practices. 0 New courses in these areas will be instituted during the 1972-73 academic year. Requirements for the S.S Degree in Clinical Technology A B.S degree program in clinical technology is also availab l e in the Department of Chemistry and is designed primarily for the student who does not plan to continue his graduate training but who will be very useful a t the technologist level. There is a definite need for graduates of thi s type of program A B S degree in clinical technology must include the following courses : Freshman year: CHM 211, 212, 213; MTH 211, 212, 213 ; BIO 201 202 203. Sophomore year: CHM 303; CHM 321; PHY 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206; BIO 315. Junior year: CHM 305; CHM 523; CHM 351 ; BIO 321; BIO 351. Senior year: CHM 521 ; CHM 483 ; EGB 231, 232 ; Bioch emistry Lab oratory Clinical Chemistry Methods and Clinical Practices. 0 New courses in these areas will be instituted during the 1972-73 academic year Requirements for the M.S. Degree: General r equirements for graduate work are given on pages 67-69 All entering graduate students who have no advanced work beyond a B.A. or B.S. will b e require d to tak e the core course in eac h of the fiv e areas : analytical, biochemistry inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. This r equire m e nt can be waived by recomm e ndation of th e advising committee on th e basis of past work p e 1formance on a diagnostic t es t or substitution of mor e comprehensive and advanc e d courses. The required core courses are CHM 621 CHM 511, CHM 551 CH:-.t 5:32, 542. B eyond th e required core courses th e c urri cu lum for a ch e mistr y major will va r y with th e area of his thesis The specific course requirements will be d e termin e d by his advisory committee and his propos e d r esea rch in con sonance with th e r eg ulations given on page 152. Compr e h e nsiv e Examination Each student must pass th e written com prehensive examina tions in three of the five areas: analytical biochemistry in organic, organic, and physical chemistry Each examination will be prepared by th e faculty of that are a and will be from one to three hours duration. Each e xamination will be graded independently by members of the respectiv e a r eas eac h arriving at a fai l-p ass-high pass verdict. A student may repeat any or all of the examina ti ons provided that he has pa ssed three by the time six quarters hav e e lapsed from his admission as e ither a degree-see king or a nondegree seeking full-time graduate student. Normally, th e exam inations will be given during the period preceding Qua1ters I and III and afl:er th e preceding quarters hav e e nded. Whil e it is anticipated that th e core courses will bridge the gap b etween undergraduate and graduate courses, and will therefor e help students prepare

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152 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES for the qualifying examinations, it should be understood that the qualifying examinations are general examinations in their respective fields and not merely final examinations in the core courses. Final Th esis D e fense Upon completion of the thesis research and pre liminary approval of the thesis by the supervisory committee, the M S candidate will be. required to pas an oral examination conducted by the super visory committee on his research. Final approval of the examination and of the thesis will require approval by th e entire committee. Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 7071. The Ph.D. in Chemistry does not require a specific number or distribution of course credits. The candidate, with the help of his adviser and the approval of his advisory committee, will design a program of study and research that will re sult in a mature and creative grasp of chemical science. Approval of the candi date's program will rest with his advisory committee. While there are no specific course requirements for the Ph.D. degree beginning graduate students who. plan to circumvent the M .S. degree are advised to take the core courses or their equivalent before attempting the Qualifying Examinations. Qualifying Examinations. The Qualifying Examinations requirement for the Ph.D. degree will be the same as the comprehensive examination for the M .S. degree except that the Ph.D. candidate must not only pass the exam inations in three out of five areas, but he must also pass two of these examinations (one of which is in his major area) "with distinction". In other words, the Ph.D. candidate must demonstrate his very real grasp of the principles in his major area and one other area (probably related to his major area, but not nec essa rily so). As in the case of the M.S. requirements a student may repeat any or all examinations, provided that he has passed three, two with high pass by the time six quarters have elapsed from his admission as either a degree-seeking or non degree seeking full-time graduate student. The Qualifying Examinations shall be given in the form of one to three hour examinations in each of the five areas-analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical. While it is anticipated that the core courses will bridge the gap between undergraduate and graduate courses, and will therefor e help students prepare for the qualifying examinations, it should be understood that the qualify ing examinations are general examinations in their respective fie lds and not merely final examinations in the core courses. wnguage Examinations. Before a student is eligible to qualify for candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, he must demonstrate a r eading knowledge of the chemical literature in any two of the languages -German, Russian and French (or any other language approved as appropriate by the supervisory committee); or he must demonstrate reading knowledge in one of these languages and demonstrate proficiency in a skill or specialization outside the discipline of chemistry The latt e r could include ( 1 ) profici e ncy in computer programming; ( 2 ) advanced specialization in mathematics physics biology geology, or any other appropriate area pertinent to scholarly work in chemistry; (3) any othe r field of advanced study of proficiency deem e d appro priate by the supe1viso1y committee. The language requirement must be m e t by one of the following: ( 1 ) read ing knowledge in two foreign languages as demonstrated by a t es t to be specified; (2) reading knowledge in one foreign language and some other proficiency such as computer programming; (3) in -depth knowledg e of

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COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 153 one foreign language (sp eak:ing and reading knowledge); (4) three quarters of a foreign language at the co llege level with a minimum of C grade in each quarter may be used to waive one language, or, if two foreign languages are taken, the langu age requirement is fulfilled; (5) periodic translati ons to be administered by the student's supervisory committee. The language requirement must be met one year before graduati on. Major Comprehensive Examination. A comprehensive major examination will be required of Ph.D. candidates sometime after satisfactory compl etion of the qualifying examination. This examination must be taken one year before graduation. Advancement to Candidacy. Completion of all the foregoing requirements admits the student to candidacy for the Ph.D. Final Thesis Defense. Upon completion of the dissertation research and approval of the dissertation by the supe1visory committee, the Ph.D. candidate will give a public oral presentation of his research. This presentation can be scheduled only after all members of the supervisory committee have approved and signed the final form of the dissertation The oral presentation will be chaire d by a member of the faculty outside of the Department of Chemistry appointed by the Dean of the College. The candidate may expect questions concerning the details and significance of his research after the oral presentation. Final approval of the candid ate's degree will require approval by a majority of the supervisory committee, which shall include the chairman of the oral presentation. GEOLOGY Requirements for the B .A. Degree: I. Geology Courses CLY 201 CLY 301 CLY 302 CLY 303 CLY 311 CLY 361 CLY 412 CLY 503 or 504 CLY 513 CLY 531 CLY Electives Total Hours in Geology Hours 5 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 5 4 7 50 II. Other College of Natura l Sciences Courses MTH 101 or 211 or 302 5 PHY 201-206 or PHY 301-306 12-15 CHM 211 212 213 12 Biol ogy Electives Note, 371 sequence courses will not be accept ed. Total 12 44

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154 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES III. Liberal Education Courses University General Education equirements (39-41 hours, assuming im plied waivers). 24 hours with no more than 12 hours from any one department, approved by th e chairman of the Geology department from the following colleges: College of Fine Arts College of Language & Literature College of Social & B ehaviora l Sciences Total IV. Free Electives 63-65 21-26 SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS FOR B.A. DEGREE Geology courses required Other College of Natural Sciences Requirement s Liberal Education courses Free Electives TOTAL 50 41-44 63-65 21-26 180 The student will choose in consultation with his geology adviser, such courses in the College of Na tural Sciences that support his major interest with in the field of Geology. Selection of a foreign language preferably French, German, or Russi an, is s trongl y recommended, especially for those students who intend to en ter graduate school. An entering student anticipatin g a major in geology is advised to enroll in CLY 201, 301, and CHM 211, 212, 213 in the freshman year and to seek curriculum counseling with a Geology adviser. All courses required for th e major in geo lo gy (except CLY 481) must carry letter grades oth e r than Sor U. Marine Geology: On e of the major divisions of marin e study, marine geo l ogy, is a pa1t of th e program of the Geology D e pa1tm e nt. Cours es and research in marin e geo science are conducted in the d epartme nt or in nearby marin e e nvironm e nts A geology major may, as a part of his program and with the guidance of his adviser, select e l e ctives from among CLY 411 Marin e G eo l ogy, CLY 521 G eo physics CLY 583 Sel ected Topics, and oth ers that prepare him for graduat e work. A major interes ted in maiine geology shou ld contact the chair man of the departm e nt for further details Requirements for the M.A. Degree : General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 67-69 Students are admitted for graduate work in Geology if they present the r e quisite background in geology and supportmg sciences. The bachelor of arts or science degree with major in geology, mathematics or major in other n a tural science with s trong supporting program in the geosciences is recommended. In addition, a supervised summer field course is very strongly r ecommended. The curricu lum for a .. geology major will vary with the area of his th esis. A minimum numbe r of 45 cre dits is r equired for the master's d egree of which:

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COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 155 a mm1mum of 24 credits in courses numbered 600 or above (CLY prefix); e ither a written thesis in a field of specialization in geology approved by the adviso1y committee or an equivalent amount of course work in geology approved in advance by the committee; and additiona l graduate credits in geology approved as part of a planned degree program to make a minimum of 45 credits b eyo nd the bachelor's degree and exclusive of prerequisites. Satis factory performance on a comprehensive examination is also required. All required courses applicable to the master's degree (excep t CLY 681, 691 699 ) must carry letter grades other than Sor U. Other requirements for the degree may be found on pages 67-69. Teacher Education: For bachelor of arts degree secondary school t eachers desiring to teach science at the secondary level shou ld include basic courses in Geology and Earth Science as part of their curriculum. Some courses also give grad uat e credit. For teachers in Junior College the M.A. degree in Geology is recommen ded. For an alternate degree, see pages 102-103. MATHEMATICS Requirements for the B .A. Degree : I. Mathematics R e quir ements: Majors must complete at least 47 credits in mathematics courses above the 100 level including MTH 302, 303, 304, 305, 309, and 323. In addi tion except for majors in mathematics for teaching at l east one of the following sequences is required: MTH 405, 406; MTH 503, 514; or MTH 513, 406. Majors in mathematics for t eac hing must have MTH 423-424 II. Mathematics R e lat e d Courses: (21-26 hours) Majors must take PHY 301-302, 303-304, and 305-306 and one of the following sequences: 1. AST 301, 302 and one of AST 413 443, 521 522, 533 or 536. 2. BIO 201, 202, 203. 3. CHM 211 212 213. 4. CLY 201, 301 and one of CLY 302, 311, 361or412. 5 ECN 201 202 and one of ECN 301 or 323. 6. EGB 311, 312, 313. 7. EGB 321, 322 and one ofEGR 311or315. 8. EGB 340, 341. 9. PSY 201, 311, 312, and one of PSY 402, 403 404, or 405. Majors will not receive credit toward graduation for the following courses: AST 371, PHY 371, ECN 231, ECN 331, ECN 431, SSI 301. Majors wishing to take a course which requires a knowledge of statistics s hould take MTH 345. III. Liberal Education Courses ( 63 -73 hours) Majors must satisfy the General Education Requirements of the University (39-49 hours assu ming implied waivers), and in addition must in clude (or show competence in ) one of the following s e quences : CBS 111, 112; CBS 114, 115; or CBS 117, 118 24 hours, with no more than 12 hours from any one department, approved by the chairman of the Mathematics department from th e following colleges: Coll e ge of Fine Arts

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156 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES College of Language & Literature College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Courses taken by a student to satisfy the Group II (Mathematics Related ) Re quirements may not also be used toward this 24 credits. Courses in other depart ments may be substituted for courses in the above departments with the written permission of the Chairman of the Department of Mathematics. (34-49 hours ) IV Free Electives Suggested upper level courses for a major in mathematics and for a major in mathematics for teaching in secondary school are as follows : Majors in Mathematics: MTH 401, 511 520 523, 531 and electives. Majors in Mathematics for Teaching : MTH 345 405 420, 445, and 531. Variation in course selection for special needs is to be done in consultation with the appointed adviser. The following is suggested course program for the first two academic years: I MTH 101 MTH 304, 323 Freshman II MTH302 Sophomore MTH305 III MTH 303 309 MTH elective ( 2 ) Students with a strong background in high school mathematics may waive MTH 101 with the consent of the chairman. Requirements for the M.A. Degree General requirements for graduate work are given on pages 67-69. A thesis is optional. The thesis program requires a minimum of 45 credits of course work, of which the thesis may carry three to nine credits. The non thesis program requires 45 credits of course work. In e ither case 24 hours of the course work must be taken in courses numbered 600 or above and the program must total at least 45 credits. For each of the above programs one of the following three 8-hour courses is required : MTH 614-615, 624-625, 632-633 and eight hours in each of disci ciplines analysis, algebra, and topology. MTH 691 or MTH 681 is required each quarter, and may be omitted or taken more than six times only with the permission of the chairman A reading knowledge of either French German or Russian is requir e d. A comprehensive examination will be given to candidates before recom mending that the degree be granted For bachelor of arts degree secondary teachers in mathematics, see page 89. For master of arts degree for teachers in mathematics, see page 96. For an alternative degree for teachers in junior college see pages 102-103. Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree In addition to the general University requirements for the Ph.D. degree, on pages 70-71, the Mathematics department requir e s the following: (1) The two languages required must be chosen from French German, and Russian.

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COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 157 (2) Written preliminary examinations, usually taken during the second year, must be passed in four of th e five following subjects: Algebra, Complex Analysis, Differential Equations, Real Analysis, and Topology. (3) Specific numbers or distributions of course credits are not required. It is assumed this level the candidate, with the help of his adviser, and the approval of his advisory committee will design a program of study and research that will result in a mature and creat ive grasp of mathematics Approval of the student's program will rest with his advisory committee. Requirements for the B .A. Degree : I. PHYSICS COURSES PHY 201-202, 203-204, 205-206 ( 5-5-5) and PHY 315 (3) or PHY 301-302, 303-304, 305-306 (4-4-4) HOURS 18 12 In addition, 33 credits of structured courses comprised of the following: PHY 307-407-507 (3-33) 9 PHY 309-409-509 (4-3-3) 10 PHY 341, 442 (2-2) 4 PHY Electives 10 Total credits in Physics II. SUPPORTING COURSES CHM 211-212-213 (4-4-4) MTH 101 MTH 302-303-304-305 (5-4-4-4) MTH 401 Total science (non-physics) III. LIBERAL EDUCATION COURSES University General Education Requirements : (assuming implied waivers) Twenty-four hours with no more than 12 hours from any one department, approved by the chairman of the Physics department from the following colleges : College of Fine Arts College of Language Literature College of Social Science Total credits outside science IV. FREE ELECTIVES 45-51 12 5 17 4 38 38-40 24 62-64 27-35 A maximum of 108 credits in College of Natural Sciences courses may be applied to meet degree requirements (either BIO 201 or CLY 201, 301 may be considered e xceptions to this requirement with written approval of the Chairman of the Physics department).

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158 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES Selection of foreign language preferably French German or Russian is also strongly recommended Credit will not be given for both general physics sequences ( PHY 201-206 and 301-306 ) Requirements for the B S Degree: I. PHYSICS COURSES PHY 201:202, 203-204, 205-206 ( 5-5-5) and PHY 315 ( 3 ) or PHY 301-302, 303-304, 305-306 ( 4-4-4) Plus the following : PHY 307 407, 507 (3-3 3) PHY 3 09 409, 509 (4-3-3) PHY 341, 441 (2-2) PHY 323, 331, 405 437 (4-4-3-3) Either PHY 421 517 or 523 (4-4-4 ) Either PHY 415, 501 or 541 ( 4-4-4) Total credits in Physics II. SUPPORTING COURSES CHM 211-212-213 (4-4-4 ) MTH 101 MTH 302-303 304-305 (5-4-4-4) MTH 401 Total science ( non-physics ) credits III. Liberal Education Courses : University General Education requirements (ass uming implied waivers) Twenty-four hours, with no more than 12 hours from any one department, approved by the c h airman of the Physics department from the following colleges : College of Fine Arts College of Language Literature College of Social Science Total credits outside science IV FREE ELECTIVES HOURS 18 12 9 10 4 14 4 4 57 6 3 12 5 17 4 38 38 4 0 24 62 64 15-23 A maximum of 108 credits in College of Natural Sciences courses may be applied to meet degree requirements (e ither BIO 201 or CLY 201 301 may be considered exceptions to this requirement with written approval of the Chairman of the Physics department).

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COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 159 Selection of fore i gn language, preferably French, German, or Russian, is also strongly recommended. Credit will not be given for both general physics sequences (PHY 201-206 and 301-306). Requirements for the M A Degree In addition to a thesis, a minimum of 45 credits is required, not more than nine of which may be for thesis research and writing. Of these 45 credits, 24 must be in courses numbered 600 or above. The mathematics proficiency test is also required. When a student is admitted to the graduate program in physics he will consult with the Graduate Physics Adviser, who will be his course adviser and will a lso keep a close check on the progress of the student in his work. After the student has made a decision as to his thesis field the duties of the Graduate Advisor will be assumed by an Advisory Committee appointed by the depart ment chairman. The Committee Chairman will usually be the thesis supervisor. The Advisory Committee will hav e the right to add any special requirement to meet any deficiency in background and will administer a comprehensive exam ination to the student before recommending that a degree be gran t ed. Programs for Teacher Education : For a B.A. degree for the secondary school teacher of physics, see page 89. For M.A. degree for teachers in physics see pag e 97. For t eachers in junior college, the M.A. degree in physics is recommended plus PHY 688 and PHY689. MARINE SCIENCE PROGRAM The Marine Science Program of the University of South Florida has its head quarters at the St. Petersburg Campus a former U.S. Maritime Base. There are excellen t dockside and laboratory facilities and its l ocation in a metropolitan area in the central part of the State combine to offer a unique opportunity for develop ment of a center of exce llence in graduate teaching and r esearc h in oceanography. Requirements for the M A Degree in Marine Science : General requirements are given on pages 67-69. A minimum of 45 credits must include OGY 521 531, 541, and 551 unless the student, as determined by his graduate committee, has had the equivalent of one or more of these courses. The student may emphasize biological chemical, geological, or physical oceanography through his thesis research and course work. A thesis is required but a foreign language is not. Courses taken in addition to those required are determined by the area of specia lty in consultation with the student's graduate committee. Normally, a student entering this program spends one or two quarters in residence at the Tampa campus taking courses in those departments most closely related to his specialty. Following course work at the Tampa campus, the student may move to St. Petersburg to complete his course work and his thesis research. PHYSICAL SCIENCE PROGRAM The College of Natural Sciences offers an interdisciplinary course in th e physical sciences containing concepts and ideas from astronomy, chemistry, geology and physics. It is designed to provide for the non-scientist a unified

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160 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES picture of the physical univers e its laws and principles, as well as to give an understanding of the methodo l ogy and history of th e sciences. CBS 208-209 consists of a structured sequence whereas CBS 210 pro vides a number of a lt ernatives depending upon th e int e r es t of th e student. The course is staffed by faculty members of the departments of astronomy c h emistry, geology and physics. Chemistry Building

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College of SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES The social and behavioral sciences are concerned with man, his deve l opment, problems and institutions. They help the student to understand the world around him and to become an informed citizen. In addition, the social and be havioral sciences prepare a student for employment in business, government and social s e rvice professions, either upon graduation or upon completion of additional graduate study Admission to the College Provisional admission to the College of Socia l and Behaviora l Sciences is possi ble with 90 cr e dits and a 2 0 av e rage Unqualified admission requires six of eight general education areas ( CBS ) including English, a total of 90 credits or mor e and a 2 0 grade point ratio. Upon admission by applic a tion to th e coll e ge office the student will declare his major and will b e counseled in his s e lection of courses by an adviser from the major field. He will then plan the remainder of his college program to fulfill his educational needs and satisfy requirements for the bachelor of arts degree The academic adviser for the student will generally supervise his prog ress. The stud ent assumes the responsibility for meeting all University require ments. Any student of the University may take courses in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Freshmen and sophomores may wish to take social and behavioral science courses as part of their gen era! education and as elec tives. Students in other colleges or adults in the community may elect social and behavioral sci e nce courses of particular interest. Gradu ati on Requirements The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences current l y offers one under graduate degree: bachelor of arts Thes e requirements are referred to on page 45 of this catalog but are summ a riz e d here : 1. 180 credits with at least a "C" average (2.0) in work done at t h e Univer sity of South Florida. At least 60 of the 180 credits must be in courses numbered 300 or abov e 2 General education requirements of at least six areas fulfilled (or transferred equivalents), including CBS 101 and CBS 102 (Freshman English) plus CBS 401 (the CBS Senior Seminar ) 3. Completion of a major in a subject or an integrated major involving 161

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162 4. 5. COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES several subjects. There must be at least a 2.0 average in this major for all USF work. To insure breadth of experience and to preclude undue special ization, a student must earn (or show competence in) a minimum of 120 academic credits outside his discipline of concentration, including at least 90 credits outside the college of the major Work transferred from other schools will not be included in the grade point average computed for graduation. (However, graduation with honors requires a 3.5 average in USF work and also in any previous col l ege work.) A student must earn the last 45 credits in residence at the University of South Florida. Organization and Special Features The college is concerned with the broad development of students knowledge. Thus it offers interdisciplinary programs and limits work in any one field. The college emphas ize s individual projects in many courses laboratories, field studies and the opportunity to earn credit through independent study and exam ination. It is important that the student develop basic skills for research and crea tive scholarship; hence the provision of senior seminars and special courses on research methodology. These skills are important for the critical appraisal of scholarly work even though the student might not go on to graduate study Th ere is opportunity from time to time for students to collaborate with their professors on research projects and to render services to the community. Curricula and Programs The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers a major in 13 fields as described in the following pages. The student must fulfill all the requirements or receive written permission from the department chairman for any substitution or exemption. In add ition to the departmental majors interdisciplinary majors are fered in Interdisciplinary Social Science (which includes a concentration in Police Administration), International Studies, and special areas such as Social Science Education described in the College of Education section of this catalog The College of Social and B ehavioral Sciences offers majors in Afro-Ameri can Studies, Aging Studies, Anthropology, Geography, History Political Science, .Psychology, Rehabilitation Studies, Sociology, and Speech Pathology and Aud10logy. Economics offers two majors, one in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and the other in the College of Busines s Administration. Leisure Studies and Social Problems Studies also provide research and addi tional opportunities in these fields. Most of the social science majors require statistics. The student should take e lem entary college mathematics courses to prepare him for statistics Al_! social and behavioral sciences require clarity and accuracy of English expres sion. Graduate lev e l courses are now offered in most social and behavioral science areas and the master of arts degree is offered in Aging Studies, Geog-

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COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 163 raphy, History, Political Science, Psychology, Rehabilitation Studies, Sociology, and Speech Pathology and Audiology A master of science degree is also offered in Speech Pathology and Audiology. The doctor of philosophy degree is offered in Psychology. AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES The major consists of 56 hours, 28 of which must come from the cor e (AF A 130 261, 262, 3 02 410, 481 ) and the remainder from the other three areas of the program: African studies political and social issues, and humanistic studies A close contact with the Black community of Tampa is an integral part of the pro gram and each student is expected to participate fully in community activi ties. It is required that each student pursuing thi s major will devote at least four hours to AFA 481 (Research and Field Studies ) and present a senior paper to the faculty of Afro-American Studies on this work. AGING STUDIES PROGRAM Requirements for the M.A. in Gerontology: Students from a wide variety of undergraduate backgrounds are admitted for graduate work in gerontology. P1io1ities for admission and stipends are based on work exp e rience, Graduate Record Examination scores, and grade point ratio The M.A in Gerontology r equires a minimum of 54 qua1ter hour s in approved couses including 12 hours of field placement. Of the 54 h ours 47 h ours must be in courses labeled "AGE. R equired courses for the M.A degree include AGE 501 502, 503 507 603 606 610, 691, 692, 693 694, and 695 Majors are a l so required to take a minimum of6 hours from the following: AGE 504 509, 605 608 611, 612 and 585 Electives from ot her departments must be approved by the stude nt's adviser. There are no language or thesis requirements. ANTHROPOLOGY The major in Anthropology consists of a minimum of 44 quarter hours in the field. Students may take mere than this minimum if they desire. The major must include ANT 201 which is prerequisite to all subsequen t courses. AN T 311, 321 331 and LIN 301 are required as intermediate l evel training in the main sub divisions of the field and ANT 461 and ANT 491 complete the specific course requirements. Majors may not include more than two each of any of the 40 0 l evel courses in the total of the 44 quarter hours required. Anthropology majors are strongly urged to take Social Science Statistics (SSI 301 ) or the equivalen t and to become compet ent in the use of a foreign language Exceptions to course pre requisites require the consent of the instructor. Anthropology-Lingui stics Major This sequence is designed for students who are particularly interested in the role of language in human behavior and cultural development, It requires the foll owing eight courses in Anthropo l ogy. ANT 201, ANT 311, ANT 321 ANT 331 ANT 401 ANT 461, ANT 491 and A T 431 or ANT 441. It requires the following six linguistics courses : LIN 301, LIN 530 LIN 551 and SPE 503, and any two courses from the following group: LIN 511, LIN 540, LIN 541, LI N 543 CLS 571, ENG 518 PHI 531, PSY 441 or SSI 311.

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164 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES ECONOMICS The social and behavioral science major in economics requires 57 credi ts in economics, including ECN 201-202, 231, 301, 323, 331, 4 01 ACC 201-2 02305, and 17 hours of upper level electives in Economics GEOGRAPHY Requirements for the B.A. Degree : A major in geography consisfs of 50 quarter hours in geography courses, in cluding GPY-301-302-303; 403 (Me teorology) and one additional 4 0 3 course; two 405 courses; 371or407; 409 ( Cartography ) and one addi ti onal 409 course. Requirements for the M A Degree : G e n era l requirements for graduate work are given on pages 67-69 All students must comp let e -15 credit hours in grad uat e geography courses. following one of the two plans outlined below. A written and oral comp r ehens i ve e xaminati on cove rin g the ge n eral field of geog raph y is r eq uired before graduation, and the student must demonstrate his ability to translate into Engl ish the pertinent scientific lit erat ur e from one modem foreign lan g uag e For e ign students whose mother tongue is not English, ma y use English as their for eign language A computer language (such as FORTRAN ) may be used to meet the l anguage requirement. Thesis Program: The -15 credit hours in geography must include: GPY .SOL .so: 3 . so.s .. SOI. 60:3. 60.S. 607. and 699 U p to 8 cred its outside the depa r tment may b e e l ected with the approval of the student's committee and major pro fessor. An ora l d efense of the thesis is required. Non-T h esis Program: The -15 credit hours in geograp h y must includ e: GPY 501, 503, 505. 507. 601, 603. (:!05. 607, and 689 Up to -1 credits outside the department mav be e l ected with the approva l of the student's committee and major prof essor. HISTORY Requirements for the B.A. Degree: The undergraduate curricu lum in history is composed of the introductory course HTY 100 the advanced courses HTY 485, 587 591 592, and the follow ing fields : Field I Ancient History consisting of courses HTY 201, 202 32 1 322, 325, 326, 401, & 402; CLS 321, CLS 527 CLS 529; FIELD II, Medieval History consisting of courses HTY 221, 222 324, 327, 328, 329, 365, 3 66 423; Field III European History, consisting of courses HTY 231, 232, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337,338,340, 341, 342, 345,346 347,425,426,427,428,429,430, 431, 432, 455; Field IV, American History cons i s tin g of courses HTY 211 212, 301, 302, 304, 311 312, 319,320, 347,409 410,411,412, 421, 422; Field V, Latin American History consisting of courses HTY 251, 252, 353, 355, 451, 453; and Field VI, Comparative History consisting of courses HTY 327, 328, 345, 346, 425, 426, 427, 428, 429, 430, 461, 464, & 4 65 A minimum of 48 quarter hours is required for a major. From Part I HTY 100 and any o th er two of the following seq u ences a r e required : HTY 201 202; HTY 221 222; HTY 231, 232; or HTY 251, 252 With the consent of a departmental adviser, cross-selection may be permitted. From Parts II and III, a minimum of sixteen hours is required in 300 or above l evel courses

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COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 165 Of these sixteen hours twelve must be taken within one of the six fields. From Part III, at least one HTY 591 (Pro-Seminar), HTY 587 and HTY 592 are required (HTY 587 and 592 should be taken during the senior year). CLS 321, 527 and 529 will be accepted toward satisfying the requirements in the field of Ancient History History majors, in addition, should take SPE 201 ( Fundamentals of Speech) ENG 325 (Advanced Expository Writing ) and at least 27 quarter hours drawn from the following disciplines : Anthropology Economics, Geo g(aphy, Political Science Psychology, Philosophy, Literature the Humanities and the Fihe Arts. Majors intending to pursue graduate work should take a minimum of two years of classical or modern foreign language. Majors, whether intending graduate work or not, should have at least two courses from the Inter disciplinary Social Science Program. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: The graduate curriculum in History is com posed of a core program, a thesis and course work in the following fie lds : Fi e ld I American History to 1865 ; Fi e ld II American Historv since 1865; Field III, Earlv :\1oclern European History; Field IV, Modern European History; Field V, and Medieval History; Field VI, Latin American History ; and Field VII, Com parative History. In addition to th e ge neral requirements o f the University, a candidate is r equired to complete a total of 52 quarter hours e ight of which shall comprise a thesis At least :30 quarter hours must be in formal regularlv scheduled course work, 24 of which must be at the 600 level. Credit for any course work at the 400 level must be approved by the Dean of the Divisfon and reported to the USF Graduate Council and the Dean of Academic Affairs. Students applying for acceptance of work at this level must be given additional work not expected of regular students in these courses and the completed work must demonstrate a superior level of performance Courses at the 500 level are acceptable for credit toward the master's degree without prior approval when taken as part of a planned degree program The core courses, HTY 600, 601 are required of all candidates. A reading proficiency il1 one toreign must be demonstrated. A sat isfactory preparation in the core pro gram, two h.elds, the complet10n of a compre hensive e xamination, and a thesis an required for graduation. INTERDISCIPLINARY SOCIAL SCIENCES The Department of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences is responsible for of'.ering two types of courses: (1) a series of courses0 which provide the social science facet of that part of a formal university education which should be common to all graduates of the University of South Florida ; and (2) courses designed to deal with cross-disciplinary problems in the social sciences by using the "convergence" concept of interdisciplinary treatment. Its courses are pro vided as a service to all interested departments of the University. Certain of the courses offered by the department are either require .cl or recommended by a number of departments in other colleges within the University and by several interdisciplinary degree programs The department coordinates an interdisciplinary Soci a l Science college major which is designed to provide broad training for superior students whose interests or vocational objectives cross disciplinary lin es. ( Students who have difficulty maintaining a B average or students with restricted interests should

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166 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES not attempt it. ) It requires 64 credits in the college, with at least 20 credits in one discipline to be selected with the consent of the major adviser. A minimum of three courses in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (prefix "SSI"), including SSI 301, is required At least 40 of the 64 hours required must be upper level. Students who wish to may concentrate their college major to constitute an emphasis on law enforcement. Students wishing this concentration must com plete the following specific courses: SOC 201, 301, 331, 371, 561 563; PSY 201, 355; POL 3 51 432 and either 453 or 454; SSI 301, and 415. Additional requirements are three Social Science electives, 2 of which must be SSI courses. A different kind of interdisciplinary major for prospective teachers of social studies is described under the College of Education requirements. 'Thestt courses consist of ine former College of Basic Studies offerings in the areas of Behavioral Science (CBS 201, 202, 203, 405, 406 and 407) CBS 201, 202 and 203 constitute part of the Un i ver sity's present general education requirement. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES Thre e programs are currently offered in International Studies : International Relations Non-Western Studies, and Latin American Studies The core curriculum common to the three includes four courses: ANT 201, ECN 201-202 GPY 371. Eighteen credits of an appropriate foreign language above the 100 level (or equiva l en t proficiency ) are r e quired Each student's program must be planned with the international studies ad viser, who is e mpowered to make appropriate substitutions when educationally justified. All three majors are encouraged to take ENG 325 (4) and SPE 201 (5) or 363 ( 5 ) Additional special requirements in the three programs follow. Up to nine credits may be substituted for these requirements by successfully passing CBS 395, Overseas Study. International Relations International R e lations majors must select 11 courses from the list below from at least three departments and including a minimum of 6 cours es of Inter national Relations content ( indicated by asterisks): ANT 331, 441 (any foreign region), ECN 351, 405; GPY 405 ( political ) 407 (any foreign region); HTY 251 252 ,333,334,337,338,340,341,342,345,346,347,409,410,429, 430, 461, 464, POL 311 331 333, 338, 405, 410, 415, 421, 425, 428, 436, 438, 550, 561; SOC 371, 541, 571; SSI 311, 315, 339, 341, 343, 345, 347, 361, 449, 450, 481, 485, 491, 505 583 (international topic) Non-Western Studies Non-Western Studies majors must select 11 courses from the list below, from at least three departments and including a minimum of 6 courses of Non-Western content ( indicated by asterisks): ANT 331, 441 (Asia or Africa), ECN 351, 405: GPY 405 ( political), 407 (Asia or Africa); HTY 409, 410, 461 HUM 539 540 541 542 543; POL 331, 338, 410, 421, 428, 438, 561; SOC 371, 541 571 ; SSI 343, 345, 347, 361, 449, 450, 481, 485, 491 505 58 3. Latin American Studies Latin American Studies majors must select 11 courses from the list below, from at lea s t three departments, and including a minimum of 6 courses of

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COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 167 Latin American content (indicated by asterisks): ANT 331, 441 ( Latin America), ECN 351, 405 451 461; GPY 405 ( political), 407 ( Latin America); HTY 251, 252, 353, 355, 4 09 410, 451, 453, 461, 591 ( Latin America); HUM 545; POL 331, 425, 561; SOC 371, 541, 571; SSI 311, 315, 341, 361,449,450,481,485,491,505,583. American Idea (CBS 301, 302) meeting general education requirements are provided through this program LEISURE STUDIES PROGRAM The Leisure Studies Progr am is perhaps the only university agency in America devoted entirely to the subject of leisure in the broadest sense: a concern with the total pattern of work and nonwork trends of the post industrial society related to cybernation increases in bulk time flexible work patterns, urbanization changing values, public policy, expenditures for recreation, and new demands on education and other social institutions. This is done through conferences, consultations, field research, lectures, writings and newsletters, workshops and seminars Its quarterly Newsletter is widely distributed; Technology, Human Values and Leisure (Abingdon Press, 1971 ) results from one of its conferences. The USF Program represents the United Stat es in a research team including France, West Germany, Canada, Sweden, Switzerland, Poland, Bulgaria and Czechoslovakia. Students in the intro ductory and advanced seminars p articipate in field studies, such as family interviews questionnaire surveys and observations of activities. Courses staffed by Leisure Studies and offered through the Interdisciplinary Social Science Department: SSI 413 Leisure in Society SSI 581 Special Topics in Leisure POLITICAL SCIENCE Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Th e undergraduate curriculum in political science is composed of POL 199 or 201 or 203 and SSI 301 as core courses and the following fields Fie ld I, American Gov ernment, consisting of courses POL 338 341 345, 347, 431, 432, 434, 441, 443, 455, 463 530; Fie ld II, Public Administration and State and Local Government, consisting of courses POL 351, 453, 454, 455 457 520, 527; Field Ill, Political Theory and Philosophy, consisting of courses POL 343 431, 443 461 462, 463, 464; and Field IV, Comparativ e Politics and International Relations consisting of courses POL 311, 331, 333, 338, 405, 410, 415,421,425,428,436,438,550, 561. A minimum of 44 quarter hours is required for a major. The core cur riculum consists of 8 quarter hours and, in addition, the student must take at least one course each from three of the four fields with a tot al of nine courses and 36 quarter hours While some courses may be li sted under two fields a course may be used only once to fill a field requirement. Requirements for the M .A. Degree: General requirements for graduate study are given on pages The student must complete a minimum of -15 qua1ter hours of graduate level courses At least 24 hours must be at the 600 l evt'l. The minimum of : 30 quarte r hours must be taken in formal regularly scheduled classes, 1.5 hours of which must be at the 600 lev el. Courses at the 500 l eve l are accept<1b l e

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168 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES for credit towards the master s degree when taken as part of a planned degree program, approve d by both th e student's adviser and the Department of Political Sci ence. The following courses are require d of all graduate students in this program: POL 600 or POL 6 -1:3 or both. A minimum of 28 qua1ter hours must be taken in politital science; 8 quarter hours of approved e l ectives outside the D e pa1tment and 9 quarter hours of thesis credits. A comprehensive written exa mination will follo w the compl e tion of the course work Stude nts who do not have an undergraduate major in political science or its equi va l ent, may b e admitted to candidacy in the program upon consent of the Department. Such students may he require d to take additional courses beyond the minimum r e quirements. A minimum of one-ha l f of th e mast e r s degree program must be comple ted on campus. The student must be regist e red as a full-tim e graduat e student for one quarte r or two summe r sess i ons. REQUIREMENTS FOR PRE-LAW Prelaw (preparation for the successfu l study of law) is not a prescribed p rogram of study. No specific co llege major i s required for admission to law school. Those stude nts intending to pursue the study of law must obtain a bache lor of a rts in an area of his person a l c h oice The American Association of Law Schools suggests that student s preparing for l aw school must acquire basic skills in: ( 1 ) Rapid reading and compre h e nsion and (2) the English language. Mas tery of the English language, both written and oral, and ability to read rapidly and com preh ensive l y are positively essen tial for successful performance in the study of l aw. As there is no prescribed pre legal program, any courses that help develop clear and sys temati c thinking, logic, command of the English language, and a broad understanding of our society would constitute sound preparation. A good lawyer must have knowl edge of an understanding of the econom ic and socia l contex t within w hich legal problems arise Prior to admission to a law school, a student must take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). This t est is given by the Educational Testing Service at Princeton New J ersey. The Law School Adm ission T e st is given simultan e ous l y severa l tim es e ach year at St e tson Law School and a t num e rous oth e r t es t ce nt ers through out the nation. Students should plan to tak e th e t es t not l a t e r than February of th e yea r in which th ey mak e applicat ion to a law school. Info1m a ti on pamphl ets and application blanks for the T e st are obtainabl e from the Politi ca l Science D e pa1tm ent, SOC :352, University of South Floiida, or from Law Sch oo l Admission T e st Educational T e sting S e rvic e, Box 9-1-1, Prince ton New J ersey 085-10, o r from the t e st c e nters Stude nts wishin g additional information shou ld consu lt wit h the pre law adviser PSYCHOLOGY Requirements for the B .A. Degree: ,\1ajors must comp l e t e at l east :38 qua1ter hours in th e fie ld. All majors must comp l e t e PSY 201, SSl :301 PSY :311-:312 and s e l e ct three of the follow in g courses: PSY -102, -10:3, 40-1, -105. In addition 12 e lectiv e credi t s in Psychology courses must b e comp l e t e d. PSY 411 i s strong l y r ecommended for all majors and r equire d of students planning graduat e training. Functi onal

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COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 169 mathematics and biological science are recomm ended. Otherwise, students majoring in psychology are encouraged to comple t e a varied undergraduate program. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General r equirements for graduate work a re given on p ages 67-69. The student must complete 56 credit hours of graduate psychology courses. All students must take at l east two of the three methods courses, PSY 6 3 1 6 32, and 633 In additi on, the student must complete a minimum of four of the following six: PSY (6 12 or 614), 634, 635, 636, 638, and 639. The se l ection of th ese courses will be made upon the mutual agreement of th e s tud en t and hi s advisory committee. Students ,with prior work in these areas mav waiv e anv of these b y successfully passing a specia l examination given by the p_syc hology de p artment. Successful waiver does not reduce the ov erall credit hours r e quirem e nt. A research thesis, PSY 699 is r equired and the student must successfully pass an oral examination on th e th esis as well as mainta i ning a B average in his course work, exclus iv e of thesis and res ea rch courses In addition to the M.A. degree in psychology th e Psychology D epartmen t and the Department of Educational Psychology in the Coll ege of Education jointly grant the M A degree in School Psychology. The program requires 8 hrs in Statistics and Research D esign; 26 hrs in Educational and Psychologi cal Foundations ; 9 hrs in Assessment Techniques ; 4 hrs. in Consultation Techniques ; and 4 hrs in field experience. In addition eac h student is required to demonstrat e compet ency in research and to serve a full-tim e, two-quart e r, supervised internship. Requirements for the Ph D Degree: The Ph.D in Psychology is offered in th e fie ld s of Clinical, G e n era l Experimental and Industrial-Or ganizat ional Psychology. Sp ec ific r e quirem e nts are dete rmined by the student and his supe rvis ory committee. Assuming that the student has completed an M.A. degree in psychology or its equivalent, the psychology department requires th e following in addition to the general University require ments for th e Ph.D. degree, on page 70: ( 1 ) supervised undergraduate psychology teaching exper i ence for a t l eas t one academic year. (2) a one-year internship in an approved clinical facil ity for Ph.D. studen t s in the Clinical Psychology progr am. (3) a six-month int erns hip in an approved industry or communi t y agency for Ph D students in the Industrial-Organizational Psycholog y program REHABILITATION STUDIES PROGRAM The Master of Arts degree in Rehabilitation Counseling is offered by th e Rehabilitation Studies Program This is a five-year master's degree sequence requir in g a minimum of 60 quarter hours. A student may enter th e program during his senior yea r rather than after the baccalaur ea t e degree has b ee n granted. The following courses are considered basic to th e rehabilitation coun seling professi on and constitute a required core for th e mast e r's program: REH 501, REH 503 REH 507 REH 610, and REH 620. In addition to th ese core courses, other offerings in rehabilitation counseling includ e REH 502 REH 504, REH 505, REH 506, REH 604, REH 605 REH 606 REH 607 and REH 621. Twenty-six quarter hours of the student's course work may be e lect e d from these additional rehabilitation offerings or from related graduate programs.

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170 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Through individual counseling, vocational testing and evaluation, coordi nation of rehabilitation services and a variety of related skills and techniques, the rehabilitation counselor works with other members of the rehabilitation team in assisting individuals to achieve maximum self-realization and optimal psychological, vocational, and social adjustment. The rehabilitation counselor may work in a variety of settings including state vocational rehabilitation agencies, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, sheltered workshops, vocational counseling centers, correctional institutions, schools for the mentally retarded or mentally ill and other similar facilities. PROGRAM FOR THE STUDY OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS The Program for the Study of Social Problems (formerly INSTITUTE III: Exceptional Children and Adults), as a separate unit within the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, serves four major functions. First, the Program staff plan and execute projects of theoretical and practical significance for a broad range of current social problem areas, such as the early education and training of normal and handicapped young children the treatment of incarcer ated delinquent youth, and the development of highway safety programs as they relate to drinking and driving. Second, the activities carried out within the Program are interdisciplinary in nature and serve to bring together individuals from a broad spectrum of professional backgrounds. Third, the Program serves as a focal point for research and evaluation activities of local agencies outside the University community. And fourth the Program provides practicum settings within which students can gain experience participating in on-going field re search. SOCIOLOGY Requirements for the B .A. Degree : The major consists of a minimum of 40 quarter hours which must include SOC 201 315 321 and SSI 301; at least one course from SOC 331, 533 535; and at least one from SOC 341 345, 543. Th e follo\\'ing cours e s not h e courited in th e -!0-hour minimum for the major hut may h e e l ecte d as additi
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COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 171 e l ect to pursue a program of specialization in the areas of speech pathology, clinical audiology, or habilitative audiology. Undergraduate students enroll in a five-year program t erminating in the Master of Science degree in Speech Pathology or Audiology. Students may apply for acceptance into the M .S. degree program upon attaining Junior Class standing comp l etion of the SAi 300-level course sequence, and taking the Graduate Record Examination. Programs are planned through the Master's degree at the time of acceptance. A terminal program designed to train Speech and Hearing Technologists is also offered. The 6-month curriculum prepares junior college graduates (or students who have successfully comp leted 90 quarter hours of academic credit or the equivalent ) to work under the supervision of speech pathologists or audiologists in rehabilitative settings P reparation of students in this pro gram involves two University quarters or approximately 32 quarter hours of academic credit. The l atter quarter consis t s of supervised work experienc e in a l aboratory field setting Requirements for the M.S. Degree in Speech Pathology : General requirements for graduate work are to be found in the section of this bulletin titled "Graduate Study. A minimum of 45 credits is required as well as completion of sufficient course work and practicum to meet the American Speech and Hearing Association s requirement for clinical certifica tion in speech. The student with an existing Bac h e l o r 's degree and appropriate prerequisites may plan his degree program from among the tollowing courses: SAi 513 571, 572, 576 577 578 579, 580 583 620 621 622 623 675, 680, 683, 68 4 685 698, 699/681. Requirements for the Comb i ned Undergraduate/Graduate M S Degree in Speech Pathology : A minimum total of 225 credits is required for the combined under graduate /gradu a t e M.S. program. In a ddition to General Education require ments the following courses will b e required for all programs : SAi 301, 302, 311 312, 313, 498, 51 3 571 574 576, 577, 578, 580, 598 620 621, 622 680 684, 685, 698, 699/681. In add ition sufficien t and appropriate course work (approved by a speech pathology adviser) will be included to meet the preparation requirements of the American Speech and H earing Association for the certification of clinical competency Requirements for the M .S. Degree in Audiology: General requirements for graduate work are to be found in this bull e tin under the section titled "Grad u a t e Study." A minimum of 45 credits is required as well as sufficient course work and practicum to meet th e American Speech and Hearing Association s requirement for clinical certifica ti on in audiology The student with an existing B achelor s degree and appropriate prerequisites may plan a program t rom among the tollowin g courses : SAi 571 572 573 574, 579 580, 598 673 674 675, 676, 677, 680, 684 685, 698 699/681. Requirements for the Combined Undergraduate/Graduate M S Degree in Audiology : A minimum of 225 credits is required for the combined program. In addi-

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172 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES tion to the General Education requirements the following courses must be includPd in all programs. SAi 301, 302, 311, 312, 313 498, 512, 513, 572, 573, 579, 580, 598 673,674,675,676,677,680,684,685,698,699/681. In addition sufficient and appropriate course work (approved by an audiology adviser) must be included to meet the preparation requirements of the American Speech and Hearing Association for the certification of clinical competency in audiology. Social Science Building

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College of MEDICINE The major objectives of the College of Medicine are first to create and main t ain an academic environment in which m e dical education, the produc tion of new knowledge, and community service may b e continued in a quality manner. The second objective is to int egrate the College of Medicin e into the main stream of the community and to participate in and lead in the up-grading and improvement of the health care standards of the community in which the Col lege is located. The third objective is to function within the fram e work of the total University as an integral and valued part of the University community. The philosophy of the educational program at thi s in s titution i s to pro vid e a s t rong academic basis for lif e tim e scholarship in m e dicin e and growth in profe ssional stature for our stude nts ; to la y th e foundation for the d eve l o p m ent of ever increasing technica l an d profess ional competency and proficie ncy in the arts and sciences of medicine for each of the stude nts ; to in still in our stude nts compassion and a sense of devotion to duty to the ir pro f ess ion and to thei r patien t s; to provide relevance and co nt i nuit y in in s truc tion amon g the various disciplin es r e l a t e d to m e dicin e; to maintain and in c r ea s e our students' m o tivation for community and human service in the practic e of the ir profess ion ; to stimulate th e students to accept major r espon sibilities in learning; to orient teaching acti v iti es around the stude nt and hi s d es ir e and ability to learn. With these concepts in mind, a c urri culum has been develop e d w hi c h w e b elieve will achieve an e ff ec tiv e co rr e lation b etween th e pre-clinical and clinica l instructional areas. This cu rr icu l um is d es ign e d to e mphasiz e conceptual l y oriented teaching, thus affording th e students a c h allenging and int e l lectual ex p erience as opposed t o a routine and the superficial presen tation o f a larg e volume of facts. R e levance t o medicine will b e e mphasi ze d in all areas of instruction in a way recogniza bl e and unde r standa bl e by the student of m e dicin e Increase d correl ation on an int e rdi sc iplinai y basis will b e institute d providing r e inforce m ent b etween the va rious fie lds of study. The cur ricu lum will also provide a clos e and ongoing ex pe1i e nc e for th e student in the da yto-day and continuing health care d e liv e 1 y system within th e community hospitals and in ambulatory care faciliti es It is anticipated th e program will produce graduating phys icians who understand and desir e the practice of medicin e as a fruitful and m e aningful choice for a lifetime career of service to th e ir patie nts and the community. It is recogniz e d that the prog ram does place h eavy demands upon the student. H e will b e ex pect e d to utiliz e all r esources provided b y th e Coll ege to maint a in a co n s istent level o f academic achievement, and t o dem onstrnte ev idence of initi a tiv e and dedication to hi s chosen profess ion. 17 3

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174 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Admissions Students admitted to the College of Medicine are on the basis of what appear by present standards to be the best suited for the successful study and practice of medicine The selection is made by the Admissions Committee composed of members of Pre-Clinical, Clinical and Volunteer faculty. Each applicant is considered individually and is judged strictly on his or her own merits. Characteristics evaluated include motivation, integrity, character and general fitness These are judged by recommendations of the applicant's Pre Medical Advisory Committee as well as other letters of recommendation. The academic record and Medical College Admission Test furnished an estimate of academic achievement and intellectual competence Interviews are arranged for all applicants whose qualifications appear to warrant complete exploration. All inquiries concerning admission should be directed to the Office for Student Affairs, College of Medicine University of South Florida Tampa, Florida 33620. Requirements for Admission A minimum of three years of college or university work is required with some preference given to those applicants who present a bachelor's degree from a liberal arts college approved by one of the national accrediting agencies. The minimum requirement is three years of college work (90 semester hour s or 135 quarter hours, exclusive of Physical Education and R.O. T.C.) Regardless of the number of years involved in Pre-Medical training, the college credits submitted by the applicant must include the following: One Year General Chemistry, including l aboratory One Year Organic Chemistry, including laboratory One Year Physics including l aboratory One Year Biology including laboratory One Year Mathematics All applicants must arrange to take the Medical College Admission Test. Requirements For Graduation The awarding of the degree Doctor of Medicine will follow successful completion of the entire required course of study. Grading of performance in academic subjects will be on a pass fail, honors grading system, and the stu dent must have achieved a grade of at least pass in all subjects in the curri culum. Medical Technology Program The University of South Florida offers a four-year program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology A stud e nt electing to major in Medical Technology will spend the first three years of the program on the campus of the University of South Florida; the fourth year ( 12 months ) will be spent in one of the affiliated hospitals or clinical laboratories. During the first three years the medical technology student will complete the liberal arts and basic science requirements for entrance into the fourth year of the program for clinical training. To be eligible for entranc e into the pro gram s fourth year, the student must have completed not l ess than 135 quarter

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COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 175 hours of work (excluding physical education courses). This work must have included the following: l. Biological Sciences A minimum of 24 hours is required and at least one course in micro biology must have been included in this requirement. 2. Chemistry A minimum of 24 hours is required and organic chemistry must be included in this requirement. 3. Physics A minimum of 12 hours (one full-year course) is required. These courses must have solid academic content and may not include survey courses. 4. Mathematics One course in mathemcatics is required. 5. General Education Requirements Courses satisfying the general education requirements of the Univer sity of South Florida 6. Senior Seminar: Freedom and Resonsibility R equired of all seniors as prerequisite for graduation. The medical technology student must complete this course during his third year. 7. Courses in non-science fields to insure a broad background Upon successfu l completion of this curriculum recommendation of the College of Medicine, and acceptance by one of the affiliated hospitals or clinical l aboratories the student will comple t e 12 continuous months of training at that hospital or laboratory. This training period begins on September 1 of each year. During this p e riod he will continue to be registered as a full time student of the University and will receive a total of 45 c r edit hours of work in principles and practice of medical technology clinical microscopy, clinical bacteriology, instrumental analytic techniques, hef!latology, and clinical chemistry. These courses will be taught at the hospital. Becaus e they are open only to those students formally admitted to the program, they are not listed in this catalog. Students successfully completing this program will be granted a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology. Medicine "Surge" Building

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College of NURSING The College of Nursing program leads to a Bac h e lor of Science Degree with a major in nursing. The program is d esigned so that students w ith preparation equivalent to two full years of appropriate college study can begin courses in nursing and complete th e requireme nts for th e degree in four years of study. Progression in learning is planne d to help students attain th e follow in g objec tives: 1. Ability to communicate; communication meant in th e broade st terms: verbal, non-verbal written and mathematical. 2. Ability to m a k e decisions based on relevant judgments. 3 Appreciation of human behavior and needs. 4. Comprehension of sciences basi c to developing nursin g theory and practice 5 Competence in th e t e chnical skills of nursing ca re. 6. Ability to plan and p e rform nursing care. 7. Ability to direct care given b y associa ted nursing personnel. 8. Ability to contribute to the health team as an effec ti ve professional. 9. Concern for the health of fam ili es and the welfare of th e community. 10. D esire for continuous professional and p ersona l development. 11. Inte rest in r es ponsible citiz enship. Upon receiving the degree, the graduate is prepared to practice nursing in all basic fields and is e ligible to write the licensing examina ti on for registered nurs e. This program will provid e a b asis for graduate study. The College of Nursing is accredited by th e Florida State Boa rd of Nursing and has rece ived Reasonable Assuranc e o f A ccreditation by the Na ti onal League for Nursing. HOW TO APPLY Request an application indicating whether y ou need freshman (no previous college ) or transfer a ppli ca tion papers. Make your requ es t t o and return co mpleted applications to : Office of Admissions University of South Florid a Tampa, Florida 33620. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Freshman 1. Offici a l transcript sent dir ec tl y t o the Office of Admissions from secondary 176

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COLLEGE OF NURSING 177 school verifying graduation in an academic program whic h included the follow ing units: English-4 units Science-2 units ( 1 of bio l ogy, 1 of c hemistry ) In addition physics is strongly r ecommende d. Mathematics--3 units (2 of a l gebra, 1 of geometry). 2. Favorabl e recommendation from secondary school. 3. Minimum score of 300 on th e F l orida Twelfth Grade Test, or mm1mum total score of 900 o n the Scholastic Apt it ude T es t with no l ess than 450 on th e ve rb a l portion, or score of21 on the A C.T. 4. Interview. 5 United Sta t es citizenship or verification of D ecla ration of Intention ( R e quirem ent to wri t e th e licensing exam in a tion and to practic e nursing in Florida. Chapt e r 464, Florida Statutes). Transfer 1. Official transcript sen t direct l y to th e Offic e of Admissions from eac h insti tution previously attended. 2. Overall average of"C" on all work attempte d 3. Eli g ibilit y t o r e-ente r last institution attended. 4 90 quarter hours or 60 semester hours of work in th e following con t e nt areas: English Humanities Ch emistiy Biology Physics COURSES IN NURSING Mathematics Sociology Psychology History Political Sci e nc e To b e e ligibl e to tak e courses in nursing all prere quisites of the freshman and sophomore years must b e ful filled wi th a n overall average of "C" or better. Nursing courses will be concentrated in the junior and se nior years. The various subjects to be studied are Basic Nursing, Mental Health Nursing, Maternal and Newborn Nursing, Nursing of Chilare n Medical and Surgical ursing, Public Health Nursing and a concentration in a sp eci fic area of nursing. Each nursing course will includ e a substantia l amoun t of clinical experience in h ealt h agencies in the immediate and surrounding comm uniti es Nursing students will be responsibl e for transportation to and from th e age ncies. Courses in nursing will not be offe red until Quarter I 197 3. St Petersburg Campus

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178 COLLEGE OF NURSING PHYSICAL EDUCATION ELECTIVE Elective Physical Educa ti on offerings are designed t o provide the student with opportunities for deve lopin g desired s kills an d gaining in s i ght int o the role physical activity plays in his life. Laborat ory ex p erie nc e in recognized sports activities allow the student to select and develop profici e n cy appropriate for l eisure pursuit and/or p e r sona l developm e nt. Human movement behavior and response courses exp and p e r sona l awaren ess of the e ff ec t of phys ical activit y through examination of the interacti on between the n eeds and abi liti es of the person and the requisit es and u ses of the activit y Special compet ency courses prepare the interested studen t wi th skill s and techniques applicabl e for conducting or dir ecting communi t y ac tivities related t o sp o rt and movement. Science Center

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS All courses offered for credit bv the Universitv of South Florida are listed on the following pages in alphabeticaf order accordi1;g to subject are a The first line of each description includes the prefix and course numbe r titl e, and number of credits. Credits separated by a colon indicat e concurrent l ecture and laboratory courses taught as a unit: PHY 201-202. GENERAL PHYSICS (4:1) Credits separat e d b y co mmas indic a t e unifi e d courses offered in differ ent quarte rs HTY 211, 212, AMERICAN HISTORY (4,4) Credits se p ara t e d by a hyphen indicat e variable credit: EDR 633, PRACTICUM IN READING (3-6) Th e following abbreviations are utilized in various course descriptions: PR Pre requisit e CI With the consent of the instructor CC With the consent of the chairman of the department o r program CR Corequisite lee-lab. Lecture and laboratory Course descriptions are listed unde r the following h eadings (prefix in parentheses): Accounting (ACC) Curriculum (EDC) Afro-American Studies ( AFA ) Elem entary Education (EDE) American Studi es (AMS) English Education (EDT) Anthropology ( ANT ) Foreign Language Education (EDX) Art (AR T ) Foundations (EDF) Astronomy ( AST ) Guidance (EDG) Biology (BIO) Humanities Education ( EDY ) Botan v (BOT Junior College Education (EDH) Chem.i s try (CHM) Library -Audiovisual Educa tion (EDL) Classics and Anci en t Studi es (CLS) Music Education (EDM) Cooperative Education (COE) Natural Sci e nce-Mathematics Education D ance (DAN) (EDN) Developm e ntal Courses: Physical Education for Teachers (EDP) D eve lopm ental Reading (DRE) \leasure m e nt-Research-Evaluation Developm e ntal Mathematics (DMA) (E.DQ) D eve lopmental Study Skills ( DRS ) Readmg Education (EDR) Economics (ECN) Social Studies Education (EDW) Educa tion : Special Education (EDS) Art Educa tion (EDA) Vocational and Adult Education (EDV) 179

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180 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES Engineering: Basic Engineering ( EGB ) Electrical and Electronic Svstems (EGE) Energy Conversion and '.\1echanica l D esign (EGR) Indust ri a l Svstems ( EGS ) Structures, '.\latt>rials & Fluids ( EGX ) Computer Servic: e Courses (ESC) Engineering Tec:hnology (ETK) English (ENG) Environment (ENV) Finance (FI ) Fine Arts lntradivisional (FNA) G e neral Business Adm nistration ( GBA ) General Education ( CBS) G eography ( GPY ) G eo l ogy (CLY) G e rontology (AGE) Histor y ( HTY ) Honors (HON) Humanities (HUM) Int erdisciplinary Language-Literature (LLI) Linguistics (LIN) Management ( MAN ) Marine Sci e nce ( OGY ) Marketing (MKT) '.\1ass Communications (C0\1) \1athe matics (\ITH) \1edicin e (\1ED) '.\lodern Languages : Gen e ral Mod e rn Language ( LAN ) Fre nch (FRE) German (GER) Italian (IT A ) Portugese (POR) HonMnc:e (RO\I ) Russian ( R U S ) Spanish ( SPA ) Music Art s ('.\1US) Off-Campu s T e rm (OCT) Philosoph y (PHI) Physical Education, Electiv e (PEB) Phvsic s ( PHY ) Political Science (POL) Ps y cholog y ( PSY ) R e habilitation (REH) R e ligiou s Studies (REL) Social Sciences Int erdisciplinary ( SSI) Sociology (SOC) Speech (SPE) Speech P at hology & Audiology (SAi) Theatre Arts (TAR) Zoolog y (ZOO) Note : Courses numbering 500 through 599 are open only to upper division and grad uate students Courses numbering 600 and above are open to graduate students only Some courses are graded on an "S U" ( pas s-fail) basis and are so identified in the quarterly course s chedules. GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES (Also listed under appropriate departments) CBS 100. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE-COMPOSITION (3) Practice an d drill in b asic Engli s h sen t ence patterns ; e mphasis is on writ ing, punctuation, vocabulary, a nd idiom. CBS 101 ,' 102 FRESHMAN ENGLISH (4, 4) Instruction an d practice in the skill s of wri tin g an d reading CBS 101 is prerequi sit e t o CBS 102. CBS 109 110 FUNCTIONAL MATHEMATICS ( 5 5) D esigne d as a terminal course for genera l cul tural purposes, as a foundation for further study of mathematics an d science, and as a preparatory course for prospec tive e l emen t ary sc hool teach ers. CBS 111-124 (5, 5 ), CBS 211-224 (4, 4) BEGINNING AND INTERMEDIATE MODERN LANGUAGES FIRST YEAR CBS 111112 FRENCH SECOND YEAR CBS 211 212

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GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES 181 FIRST YEAR CBS 114-115 CBS 117-118 CBS 120 121 CBS 123-124 GERMAN RUSSIAN SPANISH ITALIAN SECOND YEAR CBS 214-215 CBS 217-218 CBS 220-221 CBS 223-224 Note: CLS 101-102-103 (Elementary Latin) may be substituted for first-year Beginning Modern Language; CLS 201 plus two out of CLS 202, 203, 301, 302, 303, for second-year Intermediate Modern Langm1ge Portugese 326-327 or Language 383--!83 may be substituted for second-year Intermediate Modern Language. CBS 111to124. BEGINNING MODERN LANGUAGES I & II (5,5) Initiate development of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing of the modern foreign language at the elementary level. CBS 211to224. INTERMEDIATE MODERN LANGUAGES I & II (4 4) Continue develorment of skills at the intermediate level, including the grammatical framework o the language. CBS 201 202, 203. BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (3, 3 3) Draws on information from behavioral sciences (human biology, ps)'chology, anthropology, sociology and philosof.hy) to demonstrate how human behavior develops and means by which persona social, and ethical problems are dealt with. The third quarter will deal with special topics selected for study in depth by the student. CBS 205, 255, 206, 256, 207, 257. PROBLEMS IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE (3,3,3) The application of basic biological principles to relevant problems and topics such as: 205-Foods, drugs and medicine 255-Sex, reproduction and population, 206-Genes and people, 256 Evolution, 207-Environment, 257-Contemporary books. Elect any three of the 3-credit hour options. CBS 208-209-210. EXPLORATIONS IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE (3, 3,3) The development of great scientific ideas, their historical and contemporary significance. Selected topics of astronomy, chemistry, earth science, physics, and philosophy of science-approached via textbook and popular readings. lec lab-disc. CBS 301-302. THE AMERICAN IDEA (5,4) Uses history, political science, sociology and economics to focus on major ideas characterizing American society on our relations with other nations, and on contemporary, domestic and international problems. CBS 315-316-317-308. THE HUMANITIES (5, 5, 5, 4) PR: CBS 101-102 and sophomore standing. Analysis of works in the visual arts, music, theatre, film, literature, and philosophy Workshops for creative experience. CBS 311-312-313. HUMANITIES AND HUMANE VALUES (5,5,5) PR: CBS requirement in humanities or CI. Masterpieces of music, visual arts, theatre, literature, and philosophy in varying cultural and historical situations CBS 395. OVERSEAS STUDY (1-9) A program of individual or group research in a foreign country. Selection of the student, his preparation for the study, and subsequent evaluation to be super vised by a faculty committee. CBS 401. SENIOR SEMINAR: FREEDOM AND RESPONSIBILITY (:3) Required of all seniors. Contemporary issues affecting social and personal values Visiting lecturers, readings and discussions interrelating the behavioral natural and social sciences and the humanities. Designed to focus the university educa tion upon contemporary problems. CBS 403-404. THE UNIVERSE OF MAN (3,3) A search for the universals of human life today; the nature of man, the world community human needs and values available instruments of science and tech nology, and the limiting facts and forces. CBS 405 -40 6-407. BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (:3,:J,:3) A compreh e nsive analysis and evaluation of man "s behavior. Emphasis on un-

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182 ACCOUNTING d e rst a ndin g of m e ch a ni s ms i n vol ve d in indi v idu a l a n d socia l b e havior a l ong w i th co nsid e ration of s o cial and e thical probl e ms rela t e d to m e ans for controlli n g b e havior. Laboratory e xp e ri e n ce will b e provid e d o n specia l r esea r c h top i cs CBS 409-410. SCIENCE AND HUMAN LIFE ( 5 5 ) The rol e of s ci e nc e i n s oc i e ty; th e manne r in w h ic h scienc e is organized h ow it o p e rat e s and its harmo nious a nd c onflicting r e l a ti o n s h ips with o ther fiel ds of knowl e dge. ACCOUNTING Faculty : Jurgen se n, c hairm a n; Antonio D ey o H a rris, Hubbard, K eith, Lasse t e r McClung, Merriam, Moon Rob e r s on Rouadi J.L. Smith St ephe ns, Wes t ACC 201. ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING ( 3) Study of basic a c countin g principl es including the r eco rdi ng a n d r e p o rtin g of financial a c tivity. The preparation and interpre t a tion of fin a n cia l s t a t e m ents ACC 202. ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING (3) PR: ACC 201. Accounting th e ory and practices for v a riou s equity structures. ACC 301. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING (5) PR: ACC 305 or Con current Reg i stra ti o n in ACC 3 05 Measuremen t th eo r y and methodology unde rlying in c om e m easure m ent and r eporting o f fin a n c i a l pos iti on. The study of working capita l including cas h, recei va bl es, in ven tori es and current liabiliti e s ACC 302. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING ( 5 ) PR : ACC 301. Continua ti o n o f theo ry and princ ipl es un d erlying f i na n c i a l s t a t e m ents, time v a lu e a naly s i s, lon gt e rm li a biliti es, pl ant and equi p m e n t i nvest ment s int a ngibles, owner's equity tax a llo ca tio n, and fund s flow anal ysis. ACC 305. ACCOUNTING FOR MANAGEMENT CONTROL ( 3 ) PR : ACC 202. Study of accounting from u se r 's point of v i ew. Include s measu r e m en t th e ory us e of fin a ncial s t a t ements, and accounting m easure ment in plannin g and c ontrol. ACC 401. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (3) PR: ACC 3 0 2 ; MTH 211 2 12 Qu antita ti ve a pplicati o n in accounting, p a rtn e r s hips, go v e rnm enta l a c counting and price l e v e l c h a n ges ACC 402. CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ( 3 ) PR : ACC 302. Acc ountin g for hom e offi c e and bra n c h o perati ons and b us i ness c ombinations. ACC 405. ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS ( 3 ) PR: ACC 302. G enera l sy s t e m s the ory tot a l s y s t e m s co n cept, int e rn a l con t ro l p ro bl e ms, and compute r b ase d accounting s y s t e ms. ACC 411. FEDERAL TAXES (3 ) PR: ACC 202. An introduc tion to th e fed e ral in c om e t ax s t ructure. Use o f tax se rvic es and the concept of t axa bl e in c om e as a ppli es t o corporati ons ACC 412. FEDERAL TAXES (3) PR : ACC 411. Continue d study of th e fe d e ral in c om e t ax struc tu re. Speci a l t o pi cs and the concept of t a xabl e incom e as a ppli e d to corpo r a ti ons. ACC 413. FEDERAL TAXES (3) PR: ACC 411. The con cept of t a x able incom e as a ppli e d t o partn ersh ips and fiduci a ri e s Introduc tion to es t a t e, g ift and soc i a l sec uri ty t axes ACC 421. COST ACCOUNTING AND CONTROL ( 5 ) PR: FIN. 401 ; ECN 33 1 ; MTH 2 11 212 D ea l s w ith r e l evan t cos t for d e c i s i o n maki ng; ca p i t a l budge tin g; in vento r y pl anni n g and contro l ; s tand a rd job o r d e r, and p rocess cos ting ACC 423. AUDITING (3) PR: ACC 302 and ECN 331. Prin ci pl es and p roce d u r es of internal and publi c a uditing. The e thi cs, r es pon s ibiliti es, s t andards, and r e port s of profess ional auditing.

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ACCOUNTING 183 ACC 424. ADVANCED AUDITING (3) PR: ACC 423. Continuation of ACC 423. Emphasis directed towards the applica tion of auditing standards and techniques in achieving audit objectives. Relation ship of professional auditing to regulatory authorities. ACC 425. BUDGETING (3) PR: ACC 421. The development of budgets and their relation to expense and cost control, including the use of standard cost as a budgetary tool. ACC 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN ACC OUNTING (1-5) PR: CI. The course content will depend on student demand and instructor's interest. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRA D UATE S T UDE NTS ACC 501. ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS AND METHODOLOGY (3) A study of basic accounting principles including the recording of transactions and the preparation and interpretation of financial statements. ACC 502. ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS AND METHODOLOGY (3) PR: ACC 501. A continuation of ACC 501. Consideration is given to budgeting and cost accounting. Emphasis is placed upon the analysis of financial condition and business operations through an understanding of accounting statements and reports. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ACC 601. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING AND CONTR OL. (3) PR: Business Core or equivalent. A study of the relevancy and limitations of accounting measurement as a basis for business decision-making. Includes a review of fundamental accounting measurement theory and related tax implications. ACC 602. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING AND CONTROL (3) l>R: ACC 601. The relevancy and limitation of cost information in business decision making. Emphasis is oriented towards the role of cost accounting measurements in : (1) planning and controlling current operations; (2) special decisions and long range planning; and (3) inventory valuation and income determination. ACC 6 0 5. DEVELOPMENT OF ACCOUNTING THOUGHT (3) PR: ?4 quarter hours in accounting or CI. A study and evaluation of the develop ment and evolution of current account theory and measurement concepts The definition of accounting objectives and goals and the development of measurement models. ACC 606 CONTEMPORARY ACCOUNTING THOUGHT (3) PR : ACC 605 or CI. Concentrated study of current problems areas in the field of accountancy. ACC 607. SYSTEMS THEORY AND QUANTITATIVE APPLICATIONS (3) PR: ACC 602 or equivalent, GBA 333 or equivalent. The design and operation of contemporary accounting systems including the relevance of data processing and statistfCal methods to the system of financial information and control. ACC 611. FEDERAL TAX RESEARCH AND PLANNING (3) PR: ACC 411 or CI. A study of the development of tax law and its implication in business decisions. Tax planning and tax research are emphasized. ACC 621. MANAGEMENT COST ANALYSIS AND CONTROL (3) PR: 24 quarter hours in accounting or CI. Measurement, interpretation, planning, and control of costs by means of predetermined standards and variance analysis. Use of accounting and statistical information in preparing budgets and controlling operations. ACC 623. ETHICS AND RESPONSIBILITIES IN PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANCY (3) PR: ACC 423 or equivalent The study of elements of public accounting practice, professional conduct, auditing principles and reporting standards The relation ship of the field of public accounting to federal and state agencies

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184 AMERICAN STUDIES ACC 681. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (1-6 ) PR: CI: Directed studies along lin es of student's research AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES Faculty : J Dudley, director; M cDonald, Scott, Som e rs. AFA 1:10. INTRODUCTION TO AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES (4) Fundamental /erspectiv es on th e nature and meaning of the Afro-American experience an the role of Afro-American Studies in articulating major problems in American and world society AFA 261-262. AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY (4 4 ) PR: AF A i:30 or CC. A survey of the Afro -American histor y in Western Hemis phe re. Emphasis on the experie nc e in North America ( AFA 261: 1-19: 3-1863; AFA : 3 62: 186 3 to present ) AFA : J02. SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND THE GHETTO(-!) PH : AFA DO or CC. A study of social institutions as they relate to the American Black ghetto, with emphasis on social systems operating within and on the ghetto. AFA :no BLACK Al\IERICANS I N THE ECONOMIC PROCESS (-1) PR: AF A 1 3 0 or CC. Bri e f economic history of Black America emphasizing the impact of racial discrimination and evaluating proposals for improvement as they apply to Black Americans and other minority groups. AFA 410. CONTEMPORARY BLACK PHILOSOPHY (4) PR: AF A i:3 or CC. Major themes and participants in th e Black liberation mov ement since 1950 AFA 481. RESEARCH AND FIELD STUDIES (l-4) PR: AFA no or CC. Required of all senior majors. A co urs e linking th e study pursued by the student with research and work projects in the Tampa Black community. AFA 483. DIRECTED READINGS (l-4) PR: AFA 130 or CC. Independent r e adings in a particular area of Afro-American Studies, s elected by student and instructor. AFA 491. SENIOR SEMINAR (4) PR: AFA 130 or CC. In -depth study of a particular topic in the area of Afro American Studies Individual r esearch by students required. AMERICAN STUDIES Faculty: H.M. Robertson, chairman; Conway, D. Harkness, K ashdin, Moore, W Morgan, O 'Hara, E. Stanton, Warner. AMS 301. INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (5) Integration of major asp e cts of American life between 1898 and 191-1. Should be taken the first term a student becomes an American Studies major Elec tive for non-majors. AMS 311. THE COLONIAL PERIOD (5) Puritan heritage: The pattern of American culture as revealed through an examination of selected writings and pertinent slides and recordings dealing with the art, architecture and music of the period. Electiv e for non-majors AMS :312. THE AGRARIAN MYTH (5) Frontier h e ritage: The pattern of American culture as reveal e d through an examination of selected writings and other pertinent material s dealing with American faith and the American frontier environment (the land, city, machine). Electiv e for nonmajors.



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ANTHROPOLOGY 185 AMS 313. REGIONALISM, NATIONALISM, INTERNATIONALISM (5) Sel ected writing and o ther pertinent material are used t o examine the relation s hip s between nationalism and internationalism with a v iew toward understanding America's development toward political and c ultural maturity. Elective for non-majors. AMS 383. SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (4) Off e rings to includ e The American Environment; Emin ent Ameicans ; The American City : Past Presen t and Future; The American Dream: R ea lit y and Myth AMS 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH ( 1-5) The content of the course will be goverened by student demand and instructor 's interest Instruct or's approval required prior to registration. AMS 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (4) Off erings to include Cultural Darwinism ; Eminent Americans ; The American City: Past, Present and Future; The Ame rican Dream: Reality and Myth AMS 491 492. SENIOR SEMINARS I N AMERICAN STUDIES (4, 4) Int ensive study of masterpieces r e presentative of several aspects of American culture. AMS 493. VIOLENCE I N THE U.S.A FROM THE REVOLUTION TO THE PRESENT (4) ANTHROPOLOGY Faculty: Kushn e r chairman; Frazie r, Gra n ge, K ess l er, J J Smith J.R. Will i ams. ANT 201. INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (4) A genera l survey of physical anthropology, archeo l ogy, linguistics and cu ltur a l anthropology Not recomm ende d for fr eshme n ANT 311. PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR : ANT 201. The com parative study of human physical variations and origins. ANT 321. ARCHEOLOGY (4) PR : ANT 201. The com parative study of past cultures and societ i es. ANT 331. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR : ANT 201. The comparative study of cultures and socie ti es. ANT 371. THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE (4) Anthropological concepts relevant to contemporary life Designed for non-social science majors of at least junior standing. May not b e countea for credit toward an anthropology major. ANT 401. SELECTED TOPICS IN LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3 -6 ) PR : LIN 301. A detailed study of current iss u es suc h as th e r e lationship of language and culture, ethnographi c sematics, or paralinguisti c phenom e na. May be repeated as topi cs vary. ANT 411. SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3-6) PR : ANT 311. A detailed study of current issues such as paleo-pathology, human races o r social biology May be repeated as topics vary ANT 421. SELECTED TOPICS IN ARCHEOLOGY (3-6) PR : ANT 321. A detailed study of current i ssues such as the d eve lopment of civilization, regional c hronologi es, or hi s tori ca l archeology. May be repeated as topics vary. ANT 431. SELECTED TOPICS IN CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3-6) PR : ANT 331. A detailed study of current issues such as socio-cultura l change, ethn opsychology, or socia l structure. May be repeated as topics vary. ANT 441. REGIONA L ANTHROPOLOGY (3 -6 ) PR : ANT 331. A survey of cultures and socie ties in a limited area or region May be repeated as topics vary. ( 1 ) Indians of North America (2) Cultur es of Africa (3) Cultures of the Pacific (4) Cultures of Mesoamerica (5) Specifie d areas such as Asia Southeastern U.S or Florida d epending on current inte rest and s t aff

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186 ART ANT 461. HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY (4) PR: LIN 301, ANT 311-321-331, or CI. Survey and analys i s of the development of theory and method. ANT 471. METHODS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3-6) PR: CI. Study and a ppli cation of a se le c ted field or laboratory method in anthro pology Prerequi sites will d e pend on area of study and will be determined by consultation with instructor in advance of regi s tration May be repeated as topi cs vary. ( 1 ) Archeological Field Methods (2) Labora tory Methods in Arche ology (3) Laboratory Methods in Physical Anthropology (4) Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology ( 5 ) Etc., as s p ecified ANT 491. SENIOR SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR : Senior standing with major in anthropology or equivalent. A seminar ap proach to the integration of the fields of anthropology D esigned to help the student refocus and come to a better understanding of the nature of an thropology FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ANT 571. SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3-6) PR: CI. Topics to be c ho sen by s tud en t s and in s tructor. ANT 581. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (3-6) PR: CI. Individu a l guidance in a se lected research proj ect. ANT 585. DIRECTED READING (1-6) PR: CI. Individu al guidance in concentrated reading on a se lected topic in anthropology. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY ANT 601. ANTHROPOLOGY TODAY (4) PR: CI. A graduate l eve l survey of con tempor ary anthropology primarily intend ed for graduate students in Social Science Education. A seminar approach to the integration of the fields of anthropology. Designe d to help th e student refocus and come to a better understanding of the nature of anthropology ART Faculty: Cox, acting chairman; B ailey, C atterall Clinton, H. Covington, L. Dietrich, A. Eaker, Fage r G e lin as, C Goodman, Houk, Juri sto, Kronsnoble, Lyl e, Marsh, M. Miller, McCracken, Nickels, Ringne ss, Robin son, D Saff, Strawn, Wujcik. ART 201. VISUAL CONCEPTS I (4) Studio problems supplemented by reading and di scussion. Consideration of spatial organization of the two dim ensiona l surface. ART 202. VISUAL CONCEPTS II (4) Studio programs supplemented by reading an d discussion Consideration of three-dimensional organization of space and mass ART 301. BASIC SEMINAR (2) Philosophical dimens ions of art. Di sc u ssion of purposes of art and the relationship of art to life. ART 310. INTRODUCTION TO ART (3) An introductory course for the student who does not intend to major in art.

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ART 401. DRAWING I (4 ) PR : ART 2 01 and ART 3 01. ART 411. PAINTING I ( 4 ) PR: ART 201 and ART 3 01. ART 421. SCULPTURE I (4) PR : ART 202 and ART 3 01. ART 431. CERAMICS I (4 ) PR : ART 202 and ART 3 01. ART 441. LITHOGRAPHY I (4) PR : ART 201 and ART 3 01. ART 442. INTAGLIO I (4) PR : ART 201 and ART 3 01. ART 443. SILKSCREEN I ( 4 ) PR : ART 201 and ART 301. ART 451. SPECIAL STUDIES IN MATERIALS AND CRAFTS (4) PR : ART 2 02 and ART 3 01. ART 461. PHOTOGRAPHY I (4) ART 187 PR: ART 201 a nd ART 301. Consid e ration of basic technical and aesthetic factor s inv o l ve d in u s ing bl ac k and white still photography as a vehicl e for visual a rti s ti c express i o n ART 462. PHOTOGRAPHY II (4) PR : ART 461. Study of adva n ce d techni ca l and a e sthetic factors involv e d in using photography and r e l a t e d m edia for vi s ual and artistic expr e ssion ART 465. CINEMATOGRAPHY I (4) PR : ART 2 01 and ART 3 01. Consid e ration of basic t e chnic a l and a e sthetic factor s invol ve d in u s in g black and white silent motion pictures as a v e hicle for visual a rti s ti c express ion ART 466. CINEMATOGRAPHY II (4) PR : ART 465. Con s ider a tion of bas i c technical and a e s thetic factors involved in u s in g co l o r and sound motion pi ctures a s a vehicl e for visual artistic e xpr e ssion. ART 470 PREHISTORIC AND ANCIENT ART (4) A compre h e n s i ve study of Pal e olithic N e olithi c Egyptian, Assyrian and M e sopot a m i a n p a intin g, sculpture and a r chitecture. ART 471. GREEK AND ROMAN ART (4) A compre h e n s i ve study o f A egean, Mycena e an, Etruscan, Greek and Roman paintin g, sculpture and a r chitecture ART 472. MEDIEVAL ART (4 ) A compre h e n s i ve study of early Chris tian, Byzantine and M e dieval painting, sculptur e, architecture and m anuscript illumination. ART 473. RENAISSANCE ART (4) A compre h e n s i ve study of R e n aissa nce and M a nn e rist painting, sculpture and a r c hitecture in Ita l y and North e rn Europe ART 474. BAROQUE AND ROCOCO ART (4) A compre h e n sive study of th e painting, s culpture and architecture in France, Ita l y Sp a in and th e N e th erlands in th e se v enteenth and early eighte enth c e nturi e s ART 475. NINETEENTH CENTURY ART (4) A compre h e n s iv e study o f nin e teenth c entury p a inting, sculpture and archit ecture in France and Eng l and. ART 476. TWENTIETH CENTURY ART (4) A compre h e n s i ve study of p a inting sculpture and architecture from C ezanne to th e present in E uro p e and th e Unit e d St a t es ART 477. ORIENTAL ART (4) An introduc ti o n t o c oncepts o f th e a rt s of China, Japan and other F a r Eastern countr i es ART 481. DIRECTED STUDY ( 1-6 ) PR : CC. Inde p endent studies in the various are as of Visual Arts Course of s tud y and c r edits mu s t b e assign e d prior to r e gistration. May b e r e peated.

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188 ART ART 491. IDEA SEMINAR (2) PR: ART 301. Readings, discussion. Subjects will change each quarter, determined by mutual student and faculty interests. May be repeated. ART 501. DRAWING (4) PR: ART 401. Advanced problems in various drawing techniques. Emphasis on individual creative expression May be repeated. ART 511. PAINTING (4) PR: ART 411. Advanced problems in the various painting techniques. Emphasis on individual creative expression. May be repeated. ART 521. SCULPTURE (4) PR: ART 421. Advanced problems in the various techniques of sculpture. Emphasis on individual creative expression. May be repeated. ART 531. CERAMICS (4) PR: ART 431. Advanced problems in the various ceramic techniques, including throwing and glaze calculation. May be repeated. ART 541. LITHOGRAPHY (4) PR: ART 441. Advanced problems in various lithographic techniques. Emphasis on individual creative expression. May be repeated. ART 542. INTAGLIO (4) PR: ART 442. Investigations into more complex intaglio processes including photoengraving and color printing procedures. Emphasis on personal con ceptual development in graphic media. ART 543. SILKSCREEN (4) PR: ART 443. Advanced problems in the various silkscreen techniques. Emphasis on individual creative expression. May be repeated. ART 561. PHOTOGRAPHY (4) PR: ART 462. Advanced work in photography and related media leading to develop ment of personal/expressive statements. May be repeated. ART 565. CINEMATOGRAPHY (4) PR: ART 466. Advanced studio work using black and white, color and sound as technical and aesthetic factors in visual, artistic productions. May be repeated. ART 569. PURE CINEMA AS AUTONOMOUS VISUAL EXPRESSION (4) PR: ART 461 or CI. Consideration of historical development in cinematography emphasizing uses of special technical and visual possibilities unique to the aesthetics of the film art. ART 570. CRITICAL STUDIES IN ART HISTORY (4) PR: CI. Specialized intensive studies in art history. Specific subject matter varies. To be announced at each course offering. May be repeated. ART 573. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF ART HISTORY (4) PR: Four courses in Art History at the 400 level. An examination of the origins of Art History as a discipline and the changing nature of Art History from Vasari to the present. ART 581. RESEARCH (1-6) PR: CC. May be repeated. ART 591. TECHNIQUES SEMINAR (2) PR: ART 201, ART 202, ART 301 and CI. Concentration in specialized technical data and process. May be repeated. ART 611. PAINTING (4) PR: CI. May be repeated. GRADUATE CURRICULUM ART 621. SCULPTURE (4) PR: CI. May be repeated. ART 631. CERAMICS (4) PR: CI. May be repeated. ART 641. LITHOGRAPHY (4) PR: CI. May be repeated.

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ART 642. INTAGLIO (4) PR: CI. May be repeated. ART 643 SILKSCREEN (4) PR : CI. May be repeated. ART 661. PHOTOGRAPHY (4) PR: CI. May be repeated. ART 665: CINEMATOGRAPHY (4) PR : CI. May be repeated. ART 670 ART HISTORY (4) PR: CI. May be repeated. ART 681. RESEARCH (1-5) PR: CI. May b e r e peat ed. ART 682. GRADUATE SEMINAR (2) ASTRONOMY 189 PR: CI. Advanced course in the theoretical and conceptual foundations of the visual arts. The specific structure and content to be determined by the instructor. Mu s t be r epeate d for a minimum of four hours. ART 683. GRADUATE SEMINAR: DIRECTED TEACHING (2) PR: CI. Students will collaborate with faculty, teaching in areas of their con centration. ART 684. GRADUATE SEMINAR: DOCUMENTATION (2) PR : CI. An advanced seminar focused on the problems of documenting in verbal form the development of a body of work in the visual arts. ART 699. THESIS: PRESENTATION OF WORK (1) PR: Consent of Graduate Committee. The final formal presentation of a body of works completed during the student's program. ASTRONOMY Faculty: Eichhorn-von Wurmb, chairman; Devinney, J. Hunter, Sofia C. A Wil liams R. E. Wilson AST 203. DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY I (5) Aspects of the sky, th e so lar system. A nonmathematical course for those who are mainly interested in a qualitative treatment of the ideas about the physical universe. No credits for Astronomy majors. AST 204. DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY II (5) The stars, th e universe A nonmathe matical course for those who are mainly interested in a qualitative treatment of the ideas about the physical No credit for Astronomy majors. AST 301. INTRODUCTORY ASTRONOMY (5) PR : MTH 101. Aspects of the sky, the earth's motion and time-k ee ping th e moon eclipses, astronomical instruments motions and physical features of plan e ts, comets and satellites. AST 302. INTRODUCTORY ASTRONOMY (5) PR: AST 301 or CI. The starts, stellar atmosphere and interiors interstellar matter, the local and exter ior galaxies, cosmology AST 351. HISTORY OF THE SCIENCE OF ASTRONOMY (5) To familiarize seriously interested students with the history of Astronomy and the influence of this discipline of the development of human knowled)!;e

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190 ASTRONOMY AST 361. ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVING AND MEASURING ( 1-3 ) PR : AST 301 and 302 or CI. Actual measurements at th e telescope and in the laboratory ; evaluation of th e data. May b e repeated up to three c redit hours. AST 371. CONTEMPORARY THINKING IN ASTRONOMY ( for non-specialists) (5) PR: Junior or senior standing or CI. Current concepts of astronomy and space science of interes ts ; background facts; artificial sa t e llit es, s pac e prob es; surface conditions of plan e t s and evo lution of the stars; cosmology AST 413. GEOMETRY AND KINEMATICS OF THE UNIVERSE (4) PR : AST 302 and MTH 30-1. Astronomical. coordinate systems and their mutual relationships, navigation time AST 443. STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS (5) PR: AST 302 or CI, MTH 3 03. The physical characteristics of stars, th ei r mea surement, and their distribution. Analysis of stellar radiation. Doubl e stars, associations, clusters, galaxies. AST 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH ( 1-6) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and CI. Participation in profess ional re sea rch with a view to publication of r es ults ( S / U grade only.) AST 491. ASTRONOMY SEMINAR ( 1) PR: S e nior or advanced junior May be r epeated twice. ( S / U grade only.) FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS AST 521. INTRODUCTION TO CELESTIAL MECHANICS (5) PR : AST 302, MTH 3 05 and some knowledge of differential equations or CI. Th e two-body problem artificial satellites, elements of perturbation th eo ry AST 522. BINARY STARS (4) PR: AST 3 02 or CI, MTH 305. Principles used to find th e properties of astro metric eclipsing, spectroscopic and visual binaries AST 533. STELLAR CONSTITUTION AND EVOLUTION (4) PR : AST -!-13 or CI, PHY -105. CR: MTH -105. Internal constitution of stars, physics of gas spheres, energy generation in stars, theo ries of stellar evolution. AST 536. INTRODUCTION TO RADIO ASTRONOMY (4) PR: AST 302 or CI, MTH 303. Radio telescopes : principles and applications. Main results in plan e tary, solar, galactic and extra-galactic radio-astronomy. Radio-galaxies and quasars AST 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN ASTRONOMY (l-6) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing or CI. Intensive coverage of special topics to suit needs of advanced s tudents FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY AST 611. POSITIONAL ASTRONOMY (6) PR: AST -113 or CI. The accurate d e t e rmination of r e lative and absolute star positions and related problems AST 621. CELESTIAL MECHANICS ( 6) PR: AST 521 or CI. Dynamics of the planetary system, space flight theory of artificial satellites. AST 631. STELLAR ATMOSPHERES (4) PR : AST 4-13 & MTH -106 or CI. Basic observational data. Thermodynamics of th e gaseous state. El e m e nts of spectroscopy. The transfer equation (continuum and lines ) The problem of calculation of atmospheres. AST 661. PHOTOMETRY (4) PR : AST 302 or CI. MTH 3 05. Theoretical observational and instrumental co ncepts required in astronomical photometry. AST 663. STATISTICAL REDUCTION OF OBSERVATIONS (6) PR : MTH 323, 445, or equivalents or CI. The theory of statistical a djustments (least squares) and applications.

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AST 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-15) PR:CI. AST 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN ASTRONOMY (1-6) PR:CI. BIOLOGY 191 AST 688. RECENT ADVANCES IN ASTRONOMY WITH EMPHASIS ON THEIR IMPACT ON COLLEGE-LEVEL COURSES (3-6) Not applicabl e toward thesis degree requirements. A course designed to co nsider and study the recent devel opments of Astronomy especia lly those d eve lopm ents that have an effec t on a l tering the basic concepts and ideas of the fie ld a nd imply a cha n ge in the presentation of introductory material in th e field. (S/U grade only.) AST 689. DIRECTED TEACHING (3 9) Not applicab l e toward thesis d eg ree requirements. A formalized, s tru ctured activ ity wh e r ein a facu lt y membe r by discussion and assignmen ts, considers the princip l es, rationale and modus operandi of e lementary co ll ege courses. D es i gne d to train teach ing assistants and to provide h e lp and training to those graduat e stu dents who plan to follow a college teaching profession. ( S I U grade only.) AST 691. GRADUATE S -EMfNAR (2) PR:Cl. AST 699. MASTER'S THESIS (1-9) PR : Cl. ( S / U Grade on ly.) BIOLOGY (See also Botany and Zoology) Faculty: Ray, acting chairman; Alvarez, Bachmann, B e tz Brigg s Brown, Burch Cowell, Dawes Eilers Friedl, Krivanek Lawrence, Linton, Long, Manse ll Mc Clung, McDiarmid, M eye rriecks, Michealides Nelson, Robinson, Silver Si mon, Snyder, Summer, Swihart, Tipton, Wagner-Merner, Woolfenden, Ad jun ct: Binford Hartwig, Humm, Layne. CBS 205, 255, 206, 256 207, 257. PROBLEMS IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE. (3,3,3) The appli cation of basic biological principles to relevant problems and t opics such as: 205-Foods, drugs and medicine, 255-Sex reproduction and population 206-Genes and people 256-Evo luti on 207-Environment, 257-Contemporary books Elect any three of the 3 -credit hour options. BIO 201. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I (4) A phylogenetic survey of th e major a nimal groups accompan i e d by diss ec tion of se l ec t e d typ es l ee -lab. Qtr. I. BIO 202. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY 11 (4) An introduction to plant science; fondamenta l s of plant biology. lee-lab. Qtr. II. BIO 203. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY III (4) Origin and early evo lution of life ; Mendelian and population genetics; e l emen t ary eco l ogy. l ee Qtr. Ill. BIO 3 15 MICROTECHNIQUE (5) PR: BIO 201-203. Theo r y a:1d practice of tissu e fixation imbedding, sec tioning, and sta ining ; c hromosom a l squash pre parations; nuclear i solat ion techniques; photomi c rography. l eelab (form e rly BOT 315) BIO 331. GENERAL GENETICS (5) PR: BIO 201-203. Introduction to genetics including aspects of M .endelian mole cular, and popul ation concepts. l eel ab. Qtr. I III, IV BIO 345. MAN S BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT (4) PR: BIO 201-203. A biological cons i deration of man 's deterio ratin g relationship with his e nvironm ent. Emphasis on pollution pesticid es, and population. Qtr. II.

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192 BOTANY BIO 351. INTODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 201-203. Introdu c tion to th e biology of microorganisms; structu re' and physiology of bacteria, a l gae, viruses, rickettsiae and protozoa; basic l a b meth ods in microbiology l eel ab. Qtr. I II III, and IV (formerly BOT 351) 1110 445. PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 201-203 or CBS 205-207. An introduction to the basic principles and concepts of eco logy at the ecosystem, community, and population level of or ganiza tion. l ee-d i sc. Qtr. I and IV BIO 465. ORGANIC EVOLUTION (4) PR: BIO 331, or CI. An introduction to modern evolutionary theory Lectures on population genetics, adaptations, specia tion theory phylogeny, human evolu tion, and relat e d areas. Qtr. I (eve n -numbered years). BIO 485. RESEARCH METHODS IN BIOLOGY I (2) PR : CI. A l aboratory course for advanced studen ts to become acquainted with contemporary biological resea rch instrumentation and t echniques. BIO 486. RESEARCH METHODS IN BIOLOGY II (2l PR: CI. See BIO 485. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS BIO 522 NEUROPHYSIOLOGY (4) PR: ZOO 421. A comparative analysis of the physiochemical bas is, and evo luti on of nervous sys t ems and sensory mechanisms. l eel ab. Qtr I. BIO 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY (1-4) PR: CI. Each topic is a c ours e in direct e d s tudy under supe rvi sio n of a faculty member. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY BIO 601. HISTORY OF BIOLOGY (3) PR: CI. Th e hi storical d eve lopm en t of biology with emphasis on the origin of important theori es and principl es. BIO 612. CHROMOSOME STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY (4) PR: BIO 510, BIO 512. Introduc tion to the molecular organization of th e Eukar yo ti c chromosom e BIO 645. MAN VERSUS HIS ENVIRONMENT (4) PR : CI. Current and fi.ttur e biological problems facing mankind. Topi<:s include pollution biocides, th e population explosion eugenics, and food for the future. BIO 665 ADVANCED ORGANIC EVOLUTION (:3) PR: BIO 331; BIO -!65 or equiva l ent, and CI. Advances in organ i c evolution with emphasis on speciation th eory, phylogeny behavior, and human evo l ution. BIO 781. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-15) PR: CI. Dir ected r esea rch on selected topics. May be repeated. BIO 799. PH.D. DISSERTATION (1-12) PR: CI. May be rep ea t e d to a maximum of 12 c redits. BOTANY (See also Biology and Zoology) BOT 302. EVOLUTIONARY SURVEY OF THE PLANT KINGDOM ( 5) PR: BIO 201-203. Th e major plant divisions, includin g th e algae, fungi mosses, liverworts, ferns and fern a lli es, and seed plants considered from an evolutionary perspective. l ee-lab . BOT311. SYSTEMATIC BOTANY (5) PR: BIO 201 203 or CI. Id e ntification and classification of the more int erest ing

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BOTANY 193 vascular plants of Florida; angiosperm evo lution ; principles of taxonomy. Con ducted largely in the field. BOT 313. HORTICULTURAL BOTANY (3) PR: Course in botany, biology or CI. Application of principles of botany to give an understanding of basic horticultural operations; seed sowing, dormancy, growth requirements, vegetative propagation, pruning, and r e lated problems. lecIab. BOT 314. FIELD BOTANY (3) PR : BIO 201-203 or CI. Identifi cation and classification of native and naturalized flowering plants of Florida including hi storical, climatic and floristic aspects of plant communiti es. \..onducted larg e l y in the field lee-lab. BOT 371. PLANTS AND MAN (3) (for non-specialist s) PR : Junior or Senior Standing or CI. The relation of plants to human history and contemporary life Botanical and economic aspects of plants used as sources of foods, drugs, and other products of importanc e in eve ryday life. Origins of cultivated pl an ts BOT 372. MAN, MOCROBE AND MOLECULE (3) (for non-specialists ) PR : None. Origin of life control of diseases e nvironmental qua lity and the use of microorganisms as tools in searching for mole c ular explanations of living phenomena. Qtr. II and IV BOT 412. INTRODUCTION TO TROPICAL BOTANY (3) PR : BIO 201 203. Natural history of plants in the tropics with illu strations of broad principles of their evolut ion, taxonomy, ecology, and functional morpholo gy. l eelab. BOT 417. MYCOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 201-203. A survey of the fungi with emphasis on their ta xonomy, morphology physiology, and econom ic imp ortance. l ee-lab. BOT 419. PLANT ANATOMY (5) PR: BIO 201-203. Comparative studies of tissue and organ systems of fossil and present-day vascu lar plants. Functional and phylogenetic aspects s tressed. l eel ab. BOT 421. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (5) PR : BIO 201 -2 03, CHM 331-336 or CHM 303, or CI. Fundamental of plants; absorption, translocation, transpiration, metabolism growth, and r e lated phenomena. l eel ab. BOT 451. APPLIED BACTERIOLOGY (5) PR : BOT 351. A study of the applica tion s of microbiology to industry agricul ture, medicine, and sanitary engineering. l eel ab. Qtr. IV BOT 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH ( 1-6 ) PR: Senior standing and CI. I ndividual inv estiga tions with faculty supervision. ( S / U Grade onl y) BOT 491. SEMINAR IN BOTANY ( 1 ) PR : Senior or advanced junior standing and CI. May be repeat e d once. ( S / U Grade only ) FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS BOT 510. CYTOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 201 203 Survey of the structure and function of cytoplasmic and nu clear components of plant and animal cells. lee-lab. BUT 511. TAXONOMY OF FLOWER! G PLANTS (4) PR : BOT 3 11 or CI. A phylog e n etic study of Angiosperms; r e l a tionship of th e principal orders and families, problems of nomenclature, identification of speci m e ns, compari sons of recent sys t ems of classification, dissection of repres e ntativ e flower types. Field trips and lab work. lee lab BOT 515. SUBCELLULAR CYTOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 201-203. A review of biophysica l techniques used in biology to includ e an introduction of X-ray diffraction, bright field, phas e, ultraviolet. interfer-

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194 BOTANY ence, and electron microscopy. The course will consis t of three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab for demonstration of techniques. lee-lab. BOT 517. PHYSIOLOGY OF THE FUNGI (5) PR: BOT 417, BIO 510 or CI. The metabolism, morphogenesis, and genetics of the fungi. lee-lab. BOT 518. MEDICAL MYCOLOGY (5) PR: BOT 351 or CI. A survey of the yeasts, molds and actinomycetes most likely to be encou 'ntered by the bacteriologists with special emphasis on the forms pathogenic for man. lee-lab. Qtr. I BOT 521. PHYSIOLOGY OF PLANT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (3) PR: BOT 421, BIO 201-203 and CI. A study of plant development with em phasis of the role of light and growth hormones on the process of flowering, fruit set ripening, and senescence BOT 532. MOLECULAR GENETICS (4) PR: BIO 331. Detailed examination of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis; the ef fects of mutations on proteins; cellular control; selected aspects of viral, bac terial, and fungal genetics lee-lab Qtr. II BOT 543. PHYCOLOGY (5) PR: BOT 447 or equivalent. A detailed survey of the algae emphasizing both taxonomy and morphology of fresh and marine water forms; field and laboratory investigations including individual projects lee-lab. BOT 546. PLANT ECOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 201 203, BIO 445 or CI. Distribution and nature of vegetation in rela tion to climatic, physiographic edaphic and biotic factors; field investigations of subtropical Florida plant communities. lee-lab. BOT 547. MARINE BOTANY (5) PR: BIO 201-203, BIO 445 or CI. A field course in marine plants with emphasis on ecology and functional morphology. Field work will stress the ecological as pects of plants in a subtropical marine environment in Florida. lee-lab. BOT 552. ADVANCED BACTERIOLOGY (5) PR: BOT 351. Ultrastructure, growth, metabolism, genetics and ecology of the bacteria and related procaryotes. lee-lab Qtr. III BOT 553. DETERMINATIVE BACTERIOLOGY (5) PR: BOT 351 or equivalent; CHM 331-336 or equivalent. Survey of bacterial clas sification; detailed examinations of bacteria important to man in agriculture, in industry and as pathogens. lee-lab. Qtr. II BOT 557 VIROLOGY (5) PR: BOT 351 or e quivalent and CI. The biology of viruses associated with plants animals, and bacteria will be considered; the nature of viruses, mechanisms of viral pathogenesis, and interactions with host cells Qtr. I lee-lab. BOT 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN BOTANY (1-4) PR: CC. Each topic is a course in directed study under supervision of a faculty member. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY BOT 610. CYTOCHEMISTRY (4) PR: BIO 201-203 BIO 315 and CI. The ory and practice of microscopic and quantitativ e cyto-histochemistry. Intracellular localization methods for total proteins, nucleic a cids, in s oluble polys a c charides and e nzymes Discussion and demonstr a tions of optical quantitative methods based on polarizing and interference microscopy, and microspectrophotometry 3 hours lee and 3 hours lab. BOT 611. BIOSYSTEMATICS (4) PR: BOT 311 or equival e nt. Application of cytology ecology genetics, biochem istry, and morphological analyses to the study of e volution and classification of species of higher plants. BOT 612. BIOLOGY OF TROPICAL PLANTS (3) PR: BOT 412 Special topic s in the systematics morphology, physiology, genetics

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CHEMISTRY 195 and ecology of tropical plants with consideration of hal;>itat diversity that leads to rich floras. lee. BOT 613. LABORATORY IN TROPICAL PLANTS (2) PR: Must be taken concurrently with BOT 612. Extended field trip to some area of the New World Tropics to examine major types of vegetation and gain familiarity with field techniques; research problem development. lab. BOT 615. ULTRASTRUCTURE TECHNIQUES IN ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (6) PR: BIO 201-203, BOT or CI. Discussion of theory and techniques in electron microscopy Emphasis on preparation of biological specimens, electron mic roscopic optics and use of the electron microscope. lee-lab. BOT 621. PLANT METABOLISM LECTURE (3) PR: BOT 421, CHM 336 or CI. A study of plant with emphasis on the biosynthetic pathways anq their regulation. lJOT 622. PLANT METABOLISM LABORATORY (4) PR: BOT 421, CHM 336 or CI. An intensive exposure to the methods used in experimenting with plant material. BOT 652. BACTERIAL PHYSIOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 351 or equivalent, CHM 331-336, or CI. Bacterial structure, growth death, metabolism, and genetic systems Laboratory emphasis on quanti tative and chemical methods for study of bacteria. lee-lab BOT 654. BACTERIAL GENETICS (3) PR: BIO 331, BIO 351, BIO 652 or CI. A survey of the recombinational systems found among the bacteria and bacterial viruses with emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of gene transfer, replication and expression and on the sign ificance of these systems for our understanding of cellular functions lee 3 hrs. per week. BOT 655. IMMUNOLOGY (5) PR : BIO 351 or equivalent, CHM 331-336 or equivalent. Discussion of the basic immune reaction, nature of antigenicity; basic immunological techniques and their use in research and the medical sciences. BOT 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH ( 1-9) PR : CI. (SI U Grade only.) BOT 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN BOTANY (1-4 ) PR : CC. (S/ U Grade only.) BOT 688. RECENT ADVANCES IN BOTANY WITH EMPHASIS ON THEIR IMPACT ON COLLEGE-LEVEL COURSES (3-6) Credit not applicable toward thesis degree requirements. PR: Graduate Standing. A course designed to consider and study the recent de velopments of a given field, especially those developments that have an effect on altering the basic concepts and ideas of the field and imply a change in the presentation of introductory material in the field. ( S I U Grade only.) BOT 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) (S/ U Grade only.) BOT 699 MASTER'S THESES 0-15) PR: CI ( S / U Grade only ) BOT 781. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-9 ) PR: CI. ( S / U Grade only ) BOT 783 SELECTED TOPICS IN BOTANY (1-4) PR: CC. ( S / U Grade only ) CHEMISTRY Faculty: Maybury, chairman; Akins, Ashford, Binford, Birke, Braman, Cory, J Davis, Dudley, Fernandez, Fernelius, Howell, Jurch, D. Martin, Olsen, T Owen, Raber Schneller, Solomons, Stevens, Wenzinger, Whitaker, Wong, Worrell. Adjunct: R Davis, Engebretson, Mansell Monley.

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196 CHEMISTRY CHM 101. FOUNDATIONS OF UNIVERSITY CHEMISTRY (5) Design e d as a terminal course to survey modern chemistry, particularly for the student who has had no previous chemistry courses; and as preparation for CHM 211-213. L ee. Qtr. I, III, IV. CHM 211. GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (4) While there is no prerequisite, CHM 211 students are expected to have performed well in high school chemistry or to have satisfactorily completed CHM 101. Fundamentals of chemistry; mass and energy relationships in chemical changes, equilibrium, chemical kin e tics, atomic and molecular structure, descriptive chemistry of selected elements. Lee-lab and discussion Qtr. I, 11, IV CHM 212. GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (4) PR: CHM 211 or e quivalent. Continuation of General Chemistry, lee-lab and d1scusswn. Qtr. I, II III. CHM 213. GENERAL CHEMISTRY III (4) PR: CHM 212 or e quival ent. Continuation of General Chemistry, lee-lab and discussion. Qtr. L III, IV. CHM 303. ELEMENTARY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 213 or equivalent. Fundamental organic chemistry principles. One quarter course for non-chemistry majors. lee-lab CHM 305. ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (5) PR: CHM 213, 321. Fundamental physical chemi stry principles. One-quarter course for non-chemistry majors l eelab. Qtr. III, IV. CHM 311. INTERMEDIATE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (5) PR: CHM 213. Fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry. leel ab. Qtr. II, IV. CHM 321. ELEMENTARY ANALYTICAL CHEMISTR (5) PR: CHM 212, CR: CHM 213. Fundamentals of gravimetri c volumetric, and spectrophotometric analysis. lee-lab Qtr. I, III, IV. CHM 331-332 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (3:2) PR: CHM 213. Fundamental principles of organic chemistry and lab. Lectur e and lab must be taken concurrently. I II. CHM 333-334. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (3:2) PR: CHM 331-332 or equivalent. Continuation of Organic Chemistry and lab. L ecture and lab must b e taken concurrently. Qtr. II, III. CHM 335-336. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY III (3:2) PR: CHM 333-334 or equival e nt. Continuation of Organic Chemistry and lab. L ecture and lab must be t a ken concurrently. Qtr. I, III, IV CHM 351. INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 333. lntrodui::tion to the chemistry and intermediary metabolism of biologically important substances. Lecture. Qtr. III, IV. CHM 371. MODERN CHEMICAL SCIENCE (4) An introduction to some of th e major problems in chemistry, its relation to other sc i ences, and its relevance to contemporary culture. Designed for nonscience majors. (May not be counted for credit toward a chemistry major.) Qtr. I. II, III. IV. CHM 441. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (4) PR: CHM 321 and MTH 304 CR: PHY 205 or 305. Thermodynamics, the states of matter, solutions. Lecture. Qtr. I, II. CHM 442. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (4) PR: CHM 441. Introduction to quantum mechanics and molecular spetr oscopy. L ecture. Qtr. II, III. CHM 443. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY III (4) PR: CHM 442. Electrochemistry, kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics, surface and nucle a r chemistry. Lecture. Qtr. I III, IV CHM 445 METHODS OF CHEMICAL INVESTIGATION I ANALYTICAL -PHYSICAL (4) PR: CHM 321, 335-6. CR: CHM 441. Theory and applications of instrumental m e thods in chemical research with e mphasis on electrochemical techniques, lec I ab. Qtr. I, II.

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CHEMISTRY 197 CHEM 446. METHODS OF CHEMICAL INVESTIGATION II. ANALYTICAL PHYSICAL (4) PR : CHM 445. Continuation of CHM 445. Emphasis on spectroscopic tech niques. lee-lab. Qtr. II, III. CHM 447. METHODS OF CHEMICAL INVESTIGATION III. CHEMICAL SYSTEMS (3) PR : CHM 446. Continuation of CHM 446. Emphasis on s tudi es of chemical systems using a variety of techniques. lee-lab Qtr. III, IV CHM 471. HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES IN CHEMISTRY (4) PR : CHM 213; or sen ior standing, and CI. A study in depth of the hi s tori ca l and philosophical aspects of outstanding chemical discov e ri es and theories. L ec Disc. Qtr. II. CHM 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-6) (S / U grade only.) PR: CI. Qtr. I IV CHM 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (1 -6 ) PR : CI. The course content will depend on the interest of faculty m e mbers and student demand. CHM 491. CHEMISTRY SEMINAR (2) (S/ U grade only.) PR : S enio r standing. Qtr. I IV FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS CHM 511. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR : CHM 441 or CI. An advanced theoretical treatment of inorganic com pounds. Lecture. Qtr. II. CHM 521. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (4) PR : CHM 446. Theory and practic e of instrumental m e thods. l ee. lab Qtr. I. CHM 523. RADIOCHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 321. Theory and applications of natural and induc e d radioactivity. Empha sis on the production, properties mea s urement and u ses of radioactive tracers Lee-lab. Qtr. III. CHM 531. ADVANCED SYNTHETIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 333. A study of synthetic techniques from both the practical and the thearetical points of view. lee-lab. CHM 532. INTERMEDIATE ORGANIC CH.EMlSTRY (4) PR : CHM 335, 336 or equivalent. A study of s t ereoc hemistry, spectroscopy. Th eories of bonding, acid-base chemistry and thei r application to the under standing of organic r eac tions Lecture. CHM 541. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS (4) PR : CHM 443 or CI. The applications of thermodynamic theory to the study of chemical systems with emphasis on the energetics of reactions and chemical equilibria. Lecture. CHM 542. APPLICATIONS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 443. Application s of chemical theory to chemical systems with empha sis on the thermodynami cs of real systems, molecular spectroscopy, and the chem ical kinetics of comp l ex systems. lee-disc Qtr. I. CHM 551. BIOCHEMISTRY I (4) PR : CHM 335, 6. The chemistry and intennediary mPtabolism of biologically important substances, including carbohydrates, protems e nzym es, vitamins, and metabolic interm e diates. R eco mm e nd e d for chemistry and biology majors. L ee. Qtr. -1. CHM 552. BIOCHEMISTRY II (4) PR : CHM 551. Continuation of Biochemistry I. Lee. Qtr. II. CHM 553. BIOCHEMISTRY III (4) PR: CHM 552. Continuation of Bioch e mistry. L ee Qtr. III. CHM 554. TECHNIQUES IN BIOCHEMISTRY (2) PR: CHM 551. Biochemistry laboratory with e mphasis on modern t e chniques for use in biochemical r e search. Qtr. III.

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198 CHEMISTRY CHM 583. SELECTED TOPIC-SIN CHEMISTRY (1-6) PR: CC, The following courses are representatives of those that are taught under this title : Natural Products, St e reochemi s try Reactive interm ediates, Photo c hem istry, ins trumental Electronics, Advanced Lab T echniques, Heterocyclic Chem istry, etc. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY CHM 611. STRUCTURAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 511 or CI. Modem theories of bonding and structure of inorganic compounds, including coordination theory, stereochemistry, solution equilibria, kinetics mechanisms of reactions, and use of physical and chemical m e thods Lecture. Qtr. III. CHM 613. CHEMISTRY OF THE LESS FAMILIAR ELEMENTS (4) PR: CI. An integrated treatment of the conceptual and factual ;j.spects of the tra ditionally less familiar elements, including noble -gas elements, unfamiliar non metals, alkali and alkaline-earth metals, and the transition elements. Lee. Qtr. II. CHM 621. ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (4) PR : CI. A study of complete analytical process, including sa mpl e handling, separations, the analysis step, and statistical interpretation of data. Emphasi s placed on se parations and statistics. Lecture. Qtr. II. CHM 623. ELECTROCHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 521. Introduction to the theo ry of ionic so lution s and e l ectrode processes. Theory and applications of electrochemical measurem e nts. Lecture. Qtr. III. CHM 625. ADVANCED ANALYTICAL TOPICS (4) PR: CI. Selected topics in analytical chemistry. Offerings include radiochemistry (emphasizing radiotracers in re sea rch and analysis), chemical spectroscopy, ( in cluding both emission and absorption), and quantitative organic analysis. ( Lec ture; some topics may have lab) CHM 631. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I. NATURAL PRODUCTS (4) PR: CHM 532 or CI. A study of any of several of the following topics: terpenes, steroids, vitamins, alka loids, porphyrins purine, and antibiotics. Qtr. II. CHM 632. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II. PHYSICAL-ORGANIC (4) PR: CHM 532 A study of organic reaction mechanisms emphasizing the inter pretation of experimental data. Lecture. Qtr. III. CHM 633. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Ill. SYNTHESIS (4) CR: CHM 532. Detailed consideration of modern synt heti c methods L ecture. Qtr. III. CHM 634. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY IV. (4) PR: CHM 532 The emphasis will vary from year to year. CHM 641. STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS (4) PR: CI. Applicatfon of statistical mechanic s to thermodynamics, the relation of mol ec ular structure to thermodynamic prop e rties Lecture. Qtr. IV. CHM 643. QUANTUM CHEMISTRY I (4) PR : CI. Introduction to elementary quantum m ec hanics Atomic structure and spectra. Lecture. Qtr. III. CHM 645. QUANTUM CHEMISTHY ll (4) PR: CHM 643. Applications of quantum mechanic s to probl e m s in c h e mistry ; molecular structure and spectra. Lecture. Qtr. I. CH:\1647. CHEMICAL KINETICS (4) PR: CI. Theory and methods for the study of reaction rates and the e lu cidation of r eac tion mechanisms. L ec ture. Qtr. II. CHM 651. ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY I. ENZYMES (4) PR: CHM 55.3 or CI. A study of biochemical systems with emphasis on enzymes. L ec tur e Qtr. I. CHM 652. ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY U. P.ROTEIN AND NUCLEIC ACIDS (4 ) PR: CHM 553 or CI. A study of biochemical systems with emp h asis on proteins and nucleic acids. Le ctu re. Qtr. II.

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CLASSICS & ANCIENT STUDIES 199 CHM 653. ADVANCED-BIOCHEMISTRY III. BIOORGANIC MECHANISMS ( 4) PR : CHM 55.3 o r CI. A study of biochemical systems with emphasis on mechanisms of biological reaction. L ecture. Qtr. III. CHM 654. ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY IV. BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM. 553 or CI. A study of biochemical systems with emphasis on physical m e thods of experimentation and interpretation. L ecture. CHM 661. MARINE CHEMISTRY (4) PR : OGY. 521 or CI. C h emica l and phys.ical properties of_ sea water e nergy flow m a marme ecosys t em, development of the concepts of biogeoch e mical cycles and master variab l es, thermodynamics of the carbon dioxid e-seawate r syst em, other related topics CHM 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-15) PR : CC. Directed study a lon g lines of the student's research, including participation in r egu lar seminars. May be repeated. ( S I U gra d e on l y.) CHM 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (1-6) PR : CC. The following titles are representative of those that are taught under this titl e: S ym m e try an d Group Theory, Photochemical Kin etics, Quantum Mechanical Calculations Advanced Chemical Thermodynamics R eaction Mechanisms Ad vanced Instrumentation Separations and Characterizations Spectroscopy, etc CHM 688. RECENT ADVANCES IN CHEMISTRY WITH EMPHASIS ON THEIR IMPACT ON BEGINNING COURSES (3 -6 ) PR : Graduate St anding. S-U grading on ly. A course designed t o consider and study the r ecen t developments of a given field especially those developments that have an effect on a lterinJ:?; the basic concepts and ideas of the field and imply a change in th e presentation of introductory material in the field Qtr. I IV (S / U grade only.l CHM 689 DIRECTED TEACHING (3 -9 ) PR : Graduate Standing. A formalized structured activity wherein a facu lt y memb e r by discussion and assignments, considers the principles, rationale, and modus operandi of e lementary co ll ege courses. D esigned to train teaching assis t ants and to provide help and trainin g to those graduate students who plan to follow a college-teac hin g p rofession (S/U grade only.) Qtr. I -IV. CHM 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY (2) Otr. I IV ( S / U grade only. ) CHM 699. MASTER'S THESIS (1-15) Qtr. I-IV. ( S / U grade only.) CHM 781. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-15) Qtr. I IV ( S / U gra de only.) CHM 783 SELECTED TOPICS (1-5) The course con tent will depend on the interest of faculty members and student demand. CHM 799. PH.D. DISSERTATION ( 1-15) PR: CI. Qtr. I-IV ( S / U grade only.) CLASSICS AND ANCIENT STUDIES Faculty : Ges sma n c h a irm an; J B Camp, Henley J Nelson, Zb ar. CLS 101-102-103. ELEMENTARY LATIN (3,3,3) Elements of grammar, practice in translation from and into Latin, reading of se l ectio n s from simp l e L atin texts. CLS 201. INTERMEDIATE LATIN I (3) PR: CLS 103 or equiv.; CR: two-hour per week grammar workshop ( no credit) Selections from Cicero 's speeches an d systematic exercises in intermediate gram m ar. CLS 202. INTERMEDIATE LATIN II (3) PR: CLS 201 or equiv. Selections from the l e tt ers of Cicero and Pliny the Young er. ( Alternate years.)

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200 CLASSICS & ANCIENT STUDIES CLS 203. INTERMEDIATE LATIN III (3) PR: CLS 201 or equiv. Selections from Ovid read in Latin and interpreted. Study of the M e tamorphos es in English tran s lation and of Graeco-Roni a n mythology (Alterna te years.) CLS 301. LATIN HISTORIANS (3) PR: CLS 201 or equiv. R eading and int e rpretation of selected passages from the works of Sallust, Livy Tacitus and Suetonius in the original and of portions of th eir works in English translation (Alternate years.) CLS 302. LATIN LYRICS (3) PR: CLS 201 or equiv. Reading and interpretation of se lected po e ms by Roman l yricists, especially Catull and Horace. Introduction to Latin m e trics. ( Alt ernate years.) CLS 303. LATIN EPIC (3) PR: CLS 201 or equiv. Reading and interpretation of selected passages from V e rgil's Aen e id in the original and of the entire work in English translation. Comparison with the Greek e pic ( Alternate years.) CLS 321. ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS (5) Study of the character, ideas and cultural achievements of th e peoples of the Ancient Near East and Mediterranean and their relevance for modern W estern civili zation, with specia l emphasis on the Hebrews, Greeks and R omans. CLS 331-332-333 BASIC GREEK (3,3,3) PR: Junior or sen ior standin g o r a minimum of two years of Latin or another highly inflected language (e.g., G e rman Russian, Modern Greek) or CI. Accelerated course in the Ancient Gree k ( Attic ) language and introduction to original Greek literature. ( Alternat e years.) CLS 341-342-343. BASIC HEBREW (3,3,3) Designed to give students a working knowledge of Class ical ( Biblical ) Hebrew and to introduce th em to the Biblical literat .ure in the origina l l anguage. ( Alt ernate years.) CLS 351. CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY (4) Study of the more important myths of the Greeks a nd Rom a ns as laid down in classi ca l literature and of th e impact that Classical mythology made on mode rn W es tern and, in particular, Englis h literature. CLS 354. GREEK LITERATURE IN IRANSLATION I: POETRY AND PROSE (4) An introduction to th e mast e rworks of Gree k po e try and prose including the epic, l yric poetry and history This course is an e lectiv e for stude nts who do not have a reading knowl edge of Greek, and does not count toward th e Classic s and Anci e nt Studies major. CLS 355. GREEK LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION II. DRAMATIC LITERATURE. ( 4) An introduction to the mast e rworks of Greek drama in th e ir cultural context. The course concentrates on th e Attic comedy and tragedy of th e fifth century B.C. An e l ective for students who do not have a reading knowl edge of Greek this cou r se does not cour t toward the Classics and Anci ent Studi es major CLS 356. ROMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. (4) An introdu ct i on to th e po e try and pro se of the Republi can Ag e, th e Augustan Ag e, and the Silv e r Age. This course is an e l ec tiv e for students who do not have a reading kn ow l edge of Latin and do es not count toward the C l ass i cs and Ancient Studies major CLS 359. CLASSICAL WORD ROOTS IN SCIENCE (2) A course in the Greek and L a tin word stock used in all sciences ( including medicine ) technology and l aw. Students' needs determine s p ecific content of the course CLS 371. FOUNDATIONS OF LANGUAGE (4) Introduction t o sync hroni c linguistics basic concepts, general features of l anguage. Dia lects, kinship groups, language types, writing systems. Methods or structural anal ysis with emphasis on the Trubetzkoy-Jakobson approach ( Alternate years )

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COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 201 CLS 383. SELECTED TOPICS (2-5) Course co nt ents depend on student d emand and instructor's int e r es t and may range over the field of L a tin l a nguage, literature, or civilization. CLS 401-402-403 ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION (3, 3 3) PR : CLS 2 01 plu s any two of CLS 202, 2 0 3, 301 30'2, 303, or 4 yea r s hi g h sc hoool L a tin Diffi c ult p arts of morphological a nd syn tactic structure. Ex e rci ses in a dvan ce d trans l a tion and com po s ition Theory of lit e r ature: genres s t y l es, figures o f s p eec h, principl es of oratory and ve r s ifi c;ation. ( Alt ernate years.) CLS 411 ,4 12 ,413. LATIN LITERATURE AND ( 3 3 3 ) PR: Same as for C LS 401. F ast survey of Gree k literatur e, di sc ussion of R o m a n d ependence on Greek lit e r a r y t o pi cs, concepts and forms. Surv ey of Latin literature fr o m Ennius to Augustine Study and int erpre t a tion of sa mple t e xts b y authors not read ea rli e r ( Alt e rn a t e yea rs.) CLS 483 SELECTED TOPICS ( 2-5 ) Course co nt e nt s d e p en d o n student d emand and in struc t o r 's int e r es t and may range over the whole fie ld of An c ient l a ngu ages, lit e r atures, and civilizations, in particul a r Latin, Greek and H ebrew. Enrollm ent can b e r e peat e d for diffe r ent topi cs. CLS 485. DIRECTED READING ( 2-5 ) R ea din gs in specia l t o p ics c h osen by the student in coop e ration w ith the in struc tor. R eading of lit erature a l so possible in English trans lation. Arrangem ent with d epartment chairman before r egis tration necessary. FOR UPPER LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS CLS 517 LATINO-ROMANCE LINGUISTICS (4) PR : Background in L a tin o r a Romance l a n g u age. Case s tud y of linguis tic d eve l opmen t of 4,000 years from Proto-Aryan th roug h Latin t o m o dern R omance l ang u ages. ( Alternate years.) CLS 527. GREEK CIVILIZATION (4) PR : CLS 32 1 o r a course in Greek hi s tory or CI. D e t aile d st udy o f the A egea n and H ellenic civilizations from their b egi nnings in C r e t e to th e R o man p e ri o d. Greek di scove ri es, explor a ti ons, and co l oniza tion. ( Alternat e years.) CLS 529. ROMAN CIVILIZATION ( 4 ) PR: CLS 32 1 or 527 or a course in Roman hi sto ry ; or L a tin m a j o r ; or CI. Pre hi sto ri c Italy a nd the Etrusca n civilization. Hi s t o r y of the civilization o f Rom e and the Empire with emphas i s on th e Greek, Carthaginian, and Orie ntal in flu e n ces. ( Alternate years. ) CLS 571. LANGUAGE IN CHANGE (4) Prin ci pl es of diachronic ( hi s t o ric a l ) and mmparative lin gu i s ti cs C a u ses and docu mentation o f c h ange, r esea rch m ethods Hi s t o r y of wri tin g Genealogy of lan guages, g l o tto go ni c the ori es. Ethno lin guis ti cs. ( Alternate yea r s.) CLS 581. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (2 -5 ) PR: CI. Specializ e d individu a l work in p a rticular areas of stude nt's interests CLS 583 SELECTED TOPICS ( 2-5 ) For d esc ripti o n see CLS 483 CLS 585. DIRECTED READING ( 2-5 ) For d esc ripti on see CLS 48 5 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION C oor dina ting Staff: G Mill e r director; L en tz ass i s tant director ; C a rd G. McClung Minor, Rodri guez. COE 171. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, lST TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: 24 hours of academic c r e dit, acc eptance in Cooperative Education Program. COE 172 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 2nd TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 171.

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202 DANCE COE 271. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 3RD TRAINING PERIOD ( 0 ) PR: COE 172. COE 272. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 4TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE271. COE 371. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 5TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE272. COE 372. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 6TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE371. COE 471. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 7TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE372. COE 472. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, STH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR COE 471. COE 571. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 9TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE472. COE 572. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, lOTH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 571. DANCE Faculty: Hug, chairman; Coates, Gutierrez, Hovinga, Robinson, Turoff. DAN 201. MODERN DANCE I (3) Study of basic principles of modern dance technique, for those without previous training. Practical work in beginning exercises and movement phrases, utilizing changing rhythms and dynamics. May be repeated. (S/U optional.) DAN 202. BALLET I (3) Study of basic positions, barre and fundamental steps using the ballet vocabulary. For those without previous ballet training. Practical work in class. May be re peated. (S/U optional.) DAN 203. CHOREOGRAPHY I (3) Study and execution of basic principles of improvising. Preparation of studies in theme and variations, breath phrases and metric phrases DAN 301. MODERN DANCE II (3) PR: DAN 201 or CI. Continuation of DAN 201. Further emphasis on style and phrasing Work in projecting mood and quality by dancing and rehearsing in more advanced student choreography, leading to performance Rehearsal hours to be arranged. May be repeated. DAN 302. BALLET II (3) PR: DAN 202 or CI. Continuation of DAN 202, progressing into adagio and allegro. Application of phrasing and style. May be repeated. DAN 303. CHOREOGRAPHY II(3) PR: DAN 203 or CI. Preparation of studies in rhythm, dynamics, form and motivation, culminating in a solo. DAN 304. JAZZ DANCE (2) PR: DAN 301 or DAN 302 or CI. A technique class with an emphasis on highly stylized, percussive movement on a strong rhythmic base. Required is the per formance of a short dance sequence encompassing these skills DAN 311. REPERTORY (1) The development and performance of solo and/or group dances. Open to all University students by audition May be repeated. DAN 313. WORLD HISTORY OF DANCE (3) Study of the development of dance from its inception through the Middle Ages. Reading, lecture. DAN 370. INTRODUCTION TO DANCE (3) For non-dance majors a study of art of dance Lecture and activities including Modern, Ball et, Jazz, Ethnic and Tap. DAN 370 fulfills the FNA requirements for majors in Theatre Arts, Visual Arts and Music Arts

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DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES 203 DAN 371. HATHA YOGA (2) A course to experience and practice the basic asanas (bodily postures), pranayoma (breath control), and deep relaxation of body and mind. Also, by seeking full awareness of the body and mind, Hatha Yoga prepares the student for dance movement. DAN 401. MODERN DANCE III (3) PR : DAN 301 or DAN 302 or CI. Continuation of DAN 301 on an advanced l evel. Work in improvisation and individual invention creating an awareness of many possibilities of movement. Dancing in student choreograph y leading to performance. Rehearsal hours to be arranged. May be repeated. DAN 402. BALLET III (3) PR: D .\N 302 or DAN 301 or CI. Continuation of DAN 302 Introducing pointe work. Each class member will dance in student choreography. Rehearsal hours to be arranged. May be repeated. DAN 403. CHOREOGRAPHY III (3) PR: DAN 303 or CI. Work directed toward duets and group dances. The students will submit choreographic ideas for instructor's appro val, then proceed with re hearsals. The best dances will be performed and fully produced under supervis i on of student choreograph ers. Reading, lecture, laboratory. DAN 413. HISTORY OF 20TH CENTURY BALLET (3) A stu d y of the development of 20th Century ballet in Europe and America. Emphasis on concepts, choreographers and artists. Reading, film, lecture. DAN 481. DIRECTED STUDY (1-6) PR: CC. May be repeated. Independent studies in the various areas of Dance. Course of study and credits must be assigned prior to registration. DAN 501. MODERN DANCE IV (3) PR: DAN 401 or CI. Continuation of DAN 401. Intensive work on the growth of personal performance style as a means to communication. Equal emph asis will be given to training the body in the development of technical excellence. D anc ing in student c h o r eogra phy l ea d ing to performance R e hear sa l hours to be arranged. May be repeated. DAN 502. BALLET IV (3) DAN 402 or CI. Continuation of DAN 402. Great emph asis to final shaping of the body into excellent execution and projection of Ballet technique. D ance in student choreog raph y leading to performance. R e hear sa l h ours to be arranged. May be repeated. DAN 503 PRODUCTION (3) Admission by auditi on. Open to all university students and required of dance majors for two quarters. The rehearsal and stage performance of new choreogra phy. Actual production work in which members of the class assist the choreog ra pher in costumes, taping and props. May be repeated. DAN 513. HISTORY OF MODERN DANCE (3) Study of the development of modern dance in the 20th Century in America; the different techniques, concepts in choreography and leading a rti sts of our tim e. Reading, film, and l ecture. DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES DRE 001. DEVELOPMENTAL REt\.DING ( 0 ) Designed to help students develop maximum reading efficiency. Includ es exten sive instruction and lab orato r y practice in the improvement of adequate rates of reading, vocabu lar y and comprehension skills. An independent study approach is also availab l e for student s w ho prefer to assume responsibility for their own progress. OMA 001. BASIC CONCEPTS OF ALGEBR A ( 0 ) A programmed learning course in Algebra from a modern point of view for the conven ience of persons without adequate knowledge of simp l e a l gebraic manipu lations and for persons without adequate preparation for MTH 101.

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204 ECONOMICS DMA 002. ANALYTICAL TRIGONOMETRY (0) A programmed learning course in the study of the trigonometric functions as functions of real numbers and their application to triangles. DRS 001. DEVELOPMENT AL STUDY SKILLS (0) Designed to help students develop efficient learning methods needed for college success. Includ es instruction and practice in effective study techniques, ranging from developing proper attitude toward studying, listening and taking notes to preparing for and taking exams. ECONOMICS Faculty: Murphy, acting chairman, Blair, Burton Cloninger, J. Cooke, Davey, Ford, Hanni, Herman, James, Kauder, Kennedy, McElhattan, Mellish, Pasternak, R.F. Shannon, Shows, L. Small, Swanson, F. Whartenby. ECN 100. CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC PROBLEMS (5) Problem of scarcity, role of ethical values, economic processes, specific economic problems, alternative solutions, and evaluating economic performance. ECN 201. ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES I (4) Economics as a social science; theoretical analysis of price determination of the product and factor markets. ECN 202. ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES II (4) Accounting, analytical and policy aspects of national income with emphasis on the theory of income determination; analysis of money and banking system; and survey of international trade theory and policies. ECN 231. BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC STATISTICS I (3) PR: MTH 211 or equivalent. Frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and deviation, an introduction to rrobability, random variables, the normal distribution, and introduction to statistica inference. ECN 301. INTERMEDIATE PRICE THEORY (5) PR: ECN 201-202. Advanced analysis of supply and demand as related to com petition and monopoly; application of economic theory to product pricing and resource pricing ECN 311. LABOR ECONOMICS (4) PR: ECN 201-202 or Cl. History of the trade union movement; economic analysis of trade union philosophies and practices; examination of basic influences affect ing labor force, real wages and employment; collective bargaining and labor law. ECN 313. COLLECTIVE BARGAINING (5) PR: ECN 311. The administration of labor-management arguments, mediation and arbitration of industrial disputes and governmental role in collective bargaining. ECN 323. INTERMEDIATE INCOME AND MONETARY ANALYSIS (5) PR: ECN 201-202. Advanced analysis of national income and monetary theory with emphasis on the modern theory of income determination and the functioning of the monetary system. ECN 331. BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC STATISTICS II (5) PR: ECN 213 and MTH 211 or equivalent. Statistical inference, simple and multiple regression analysis, time series analysis, and Bayesian statistics. ECN 341. ECONOMICS OF TRANSPORTATION (4) PR: ECN 201-202. Functions of transportation agencies, rate structure of trans portation companies, problems of state and federal regulations and coordination of transportation facilities. ECN 343. ECONOMICS OF PUBLIC UTILITIES (4) PR: ECN 201-202. The economic charact eristics of natural monopolies and the economic problems of regulation and public ownership. ECN 351. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (4) PR: ECN 201-202 The principles and mechanisms of trade, exchange, balance

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ECONOMICS 205 of payments, comparative costs, effects of trade restrictions and economic growth of underdeveloped areas. ECN 361. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS (4) PR: CBS 109-110, ECN 201-202, and 331. The principal mathematical tools and techniques used in economic analysis and economic research. ECN 371. AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY (4) PR: ECN 201-202. The growth and evolution of American economic institutions from Colonial times to the present. ECN 373. ECONOMICS OF THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT (5) PR: ECN 201-202 or C.I. Economic analysis of urban problems including: land use, transportation, Urban Labor Markets, and the local public sector. ECN 401. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (5) PR: ECN 201-202. A historical survey of the development of economic theory and the main streams of economic thought, including philosophical and value aspects of economic thought. ECN 405. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (4) PR : ECN 201-202. An emphasis on the theoretical and practical differences between economic systems such as capitalism, socialism, and communism. ECN 411. LABOR RELATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY (4) PR: ECN 311. Problems resulting from legislative and judicial interpretation of the rights, duties and responsibilities of labor unions and employers; public policy in labor-management negotiations; survey of legislation designed to pro tect workers. ECN 423. PUBLIC FINANCE (5) PR: ECN 301 and 323. An examination of the public sector and its contricution to economic welfare. The theoretical case for government intervention in the market place and alternative avenues of government action are examined in rela tion to their impact on resource allocation, income distribution, stability, and economic growth. ECN 425_ MONETARY THEORY (5) PR: ECN 301 and 323. An examination of the public sector and its contribu!ion real economic magnitudes. The course approaches its subject matter through the theory of capital and portfolio adjustments with emphasis upon the con tributions of Pigou, Heynes, Tobin, Gurley, and Shaw ECN 431. BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC STATISTICS III (4) PR: ECN 331, MTH 212 or CI. Theory and use of statistical inference in prediction and decision. Jointly distributed random variables, loss functions, linear models of stationary stochastic processes, small sample theory tests for precision and significance in estimation. Extensions to econometric investigation of time series data and to Bayesian formulation of optimal decision rules. ECN 437. BUSINESS-GOVERNMENT RELATIONSHIPS (4) PR: ECN 201-202. Patterns of regulations such as control of competitive enter prise, cartels and monopolies by the government. Government regulations and economic planning applied to politically determined economic goals ECN 451. INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL POLICIES (4) PR: ECN 351. Geographic, social, political and related factors influencing com mercial trade policies. Special emphasis on economic consequences of alternative courses of action. ECN 461. THEORY OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (4) PR: ECN 323 or CI. Problems, policies, and dynamics of economic growth in emerging nations The benefits and relevance of the theory of economic develop ment is examined within the context of the social and political milieu of today 's underdeveloped areas. ECN 471. THEORY OF ECONOMIC DYNAMICS (4) PR: ECN 323. Economic theories of the business cycle and growth processes. Empirical studies, models for forecasting and problems of policy are also considered ECN 489. SEMINAR IN SELECTED ECONOMIC TOPICS (3 -5 ) PR: Senior Standing and CI. Topics to b e selected by the in structor or in structors on pertinent economic issues.

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206 ECONOMICS FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ECN 501. ECONOMIC PRICE THEORY (3) Analytical and policy aspects of micro-economics. ECN 502. ECONOMIC NATIONAL INCOME THEORY (3) PR: ECN qOl. Analytical and policy aspects of macro -ec onomics ECN 503. STATISTICS OF BUSINESS (3) PR : ECN 231 MTH 211 or equivalent. The analysis and interpretation of quantitative data pertinent to the solutions of economic problems. ECN 531. ACTIVITY ANALYSIS (5) PR: MTH 213, ECN 331, and CI. Selected topics in economic theory are analyzed with the aid of linear programming, input-output analysis, game theory, etc. Quantitative and mathematical techniques useful in analyzing economic decision-making including mathematical programming, queueing theory and simulation methods are applied to economic contro l systems. ECN 561. ECONOMETRICS (5) PR: ETK 301 or CI, and ECN 301, 323, 331, 361. An advanced discussion of sim ple and multiple regression and correlation analy sis, miscellaneous regression problems, and applications in statistical demand functions and produc tion and cost analysis Simultaneous equation models in macro-economics. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY ECN 601. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (3) PR: ECN 311 or 503 or equivalent An investigation of research concepts, ob jectives, and methods including an introduction to linear programming, game theory, and end-use analysis. ECN 602 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (5) PR: ECN 605 and ECN 607. An intense analysis of the main currents of mode rn economic thought during the last one hundred years. ECN 603. MANAGERIAL STATISTICS I (3) PR: ECN 331 or 503, or equivalent. The use of economic and business data in man ageria l con trol and analysi s with an introduction to forecasting Collection and presentation of data, tables, charts index numbers, linear and nonlinear secular trends, constant and changing periodic movements, and es timating cyclical fluctuations. ECN 604. MANAGERIAL STATISTICS II (3) PR: ECN 331 or 503 or equivalent. Simple and multiple correlation and regres sion analysis with applications in es timating and forecasting and an introduction to the use of s tatistical inference in managerial decisions. ECN 605. MICRO-ECONOMICS (3) PR: ECN 201-202 or 501-502, or equiva l ent. An investigation of the concepts, tool s and methods of advance d micro-economic analysis. ECN 607. AGGREGATE ECONOMICS (3) PR: ECN 201 202 or 501-502. An anal ysis of monetary and fiscal policy measures d esigned to moderate economic fluctuations. The theory of national income determination. ECN 608 APPLIED ECONOMIC ANALYSIS (3) PR: ECN 605-607 The a pplication of micro and macro principles to business decision-making. ECN 610. MANPOWER ECONOMICS SEMINAR (5) PR: ECN 201-202, 501 -502, or CI. This course is designed to provid e the student with a background in labor force statistics, labor institutions, and problems of employment and unemployment. This background then allows for further study of th e causes and remedies for unemoloyment and underemployment. ECN 623. PUBLIC FINANCE (5) PR : ECN 201-202, or 501 -502 or equiva l ent. An examination of the role of the public sector and its contribution to economic welf a re. Tax and expenditure policies are examined in relation to their effects on resource allocation, income distribution stability and economic growth

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EDUCATION 207 ECN 625. MONETARY THEORY (5) PR : ECN 605, 607. An advanced discus s ion of th e impa c t of th e financial sec tor upon real economic magnitudes. The course e mphasiz es th eo r e tical an d e mpiric a l contributions found in the current literature as an ex ten s ion of earlier work don e in the field on monetary theory ECN 699. THESIS (6-9) PR: CC. EDUCATION Faculty: Agens, Celia Anderson, Christian Anderson, Louis Anderson, Auleta, Austin Bacon Barfield, Barkholz Battle, Bob B eas l ey, Wayne B eas ley Bedics, Belohlavek, Benjamin Bondi Bostow, Bott Bowers Boyd, Brady, Brantl ey, Breit, Virginia Bridges, Winston Bridges, Bruce Bryant, Bullock, Burl ey, Rebekah Carlson, Zo e Ann Carlson, Carroll, Chambers, Cleary, Coker, Collier Cotton, Craig, Crickenberger, Dan enburg, Dickinson, Drapel a, DuBois Durso, Robert Dwyer, Roy Dwyer, Engel, Ferguson Follman Freijo Freshour, Gates, Geiger, Glover Goforth, Gordon Grea bell Grossman, Gu e tzloe, Gunte r Hall, Haven Hearn, Hill Hir shorn, Hoffman, Holland, Howell, Hunnicutt, ]eager, Jaeschke J e ffers, Joh anningmeier, Frank Johnson Rog e r Johnson Russ e ll Johnson Karl Karns Kaufmann, Kee ler K ee n e, K eiter, Kelly Kimmel, Kincaid Kleg Klesius, Kuehn Kuffel bang, Lantz Lav e ly Lax, L e ri c he, Lewellen, Lichtenberg, Linder, Long, Loveless Lowe, MacCambridge, Manker, Marin, Mazur McClellan, McClendon, McCray, Merica, Merriam, Merriman, Michael, Monley, Mumme, Muntyan Musgrove, Newcomb,. Newcombe, Newton, Ober, Olson, Orlosky, Palmer, Panther, Pappas, Patte rson Patouillet P ea rcey, P e t erson, Pfost Phillips Plunkett, Pop e, Prid e, Princ e, Puglisi, Purdom, Radloff, Reese, Roach, Roberts Schwartz, S e llers, S e lman, Sexton, Shannon, Silverman, Singh Sisco Sisk Alice Smith, B O Smith Charles Smith Smitzes, Stanl ey, Steiner, St ewart, Stone, Story, Jack Stovall, Jean Stovall, Tanner, Thompson Tocco Toothman, Towery, Troutman, Turney, Unruh, Upr i chard, Vanover, Van Engen, Villeme Ward, Wee ks Weinberg, W e ingartn er, West, Whitney, Wildy Wiley, Wilson, Withers, Wong, Wunderlich. Associate Faculty: Ruth All e n, Allten, Brightw e ll, Boddy Bolton Brost Bulthuis, Caler, Colby, Cole F erre ira, Gillis, Glusm a n, J e ff erso n, Joost, Kins ey, Lightfoot, Lima, Nesman, Paulus Regist er, Rob e rtson Royston S c hmidt, Schramm, Betsy Stevens, Kar e n Stevens, Thorstenber&, Tidwell Tivnan, Young. Art Education EDA 377. THEORETICAL BASE S IN ART EDUCATION (3) PR: Admission to College of Education. A study of the philosophical psycholo g ical and historical bases upon which contemporary art education practice is d eve loped. EDA 379. ART IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3) PR: Admission to College of Educa tion & EDA 37 7 Art expressio ns appropriate for e lementary school pupils at eac h grade l e vel. EDA. 498 to be tak e n co ncurrently. EDA 411. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL ART (4) PR: Admission to College of Education & EDA 377. T echniques and materials of instruction in art, on the secondary level. EDA_ 498 to be taken co ncurrently EDA 498. FIELD WORK IN ART EDUCATION (2-6) PR : Admis s ion to Colleg e of Education. Supervised rartic ipation in activities related to art education in community centers non-schoo youth programs, planne d workshops and r esea rch

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208 EDUCATION FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDA 521: ART MEDIA FOR CHILDREN (5) PR: EDE 421 or EDA 377. An indepth study of arts and craft media for children. Emphasis will be placed on innovative use of new materials. EDA 531: EXPERIMENTAL FILMMAKING FOR CHILDREN (5) PR: EDA 377 or EDE. 421 or EDE 431 (suggested: COM 550). A study of basic expe rim en t al film techniques and laboratory experiences with children in the pub lic schoo ls, community centers and non-school arts programs. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDA 660. HISTORICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF ART EDUCATION (4) Past and contemporary philosophies and practices in art education. EUA 661. ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF ART EDUCATION (4) Principles of administration and supervision of art programs in the school. EDA 682. RESEARCH SEMINAR IN ART PROGRAM (4) PR: EDA 660 or CI. Literature and research in art education Various approaches to problem solving and evaluation with emphasis on individual research. EDA 698: FIELD WORK IN ART EDUCATION (2-6) For students with degree seeking status. Supervised participation in activiti es related to art education in community centers, non-school arts programs, planned workshop and research. Curriculum EDC 101. INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING (4) PR: Freshman on l y or CI. The people wit h whom teachers work, the types of tasks they perform and the challenges they can anticipate. Observation of teach ing at several grade l eve ls. EDC 401. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (5) PR: EDF 305 and 307, and admission to a t eacher education program. Structure and purposes of curriculum organizaton with special emphasis on the quality of curriculum Students enrolled in EDC 401 are required to spend six hours a week in public schoo l s as pre-interns in addition to regular class hours. EDC 480 DIRECTED STUDY (1-4) PR: Senior Standing. To extend competency in teaching field. Offered only as a scheduled class. EDC 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (l-4) PR: Senior standing and consent of program coordinator. EDC 485. DIRECTED READINGS ( 1-4) PR: Senior standing and consent of program coordinator. May be repeated for a total of 4 quarter hours. EDC 498. SENIOR SEMINAR IN EDUCATION (3) PR: Senior stan ding. Synthesis of teacher candidate's courses in hi s complete college program Required concurrently with student teaching. EDC 499. SUPERVISED TEACHING ( 1-12) One full quarter of student teaching in a public or private school. Student teacher takes Senior Seminar in Education concurrently. In specia l programs where the intern exper i ence is distributed over two or more quarters, studen t s will be registered for credit which accumulates to 12 quarter hours. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDC 501. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION: ELEMENTARY OR SECONDARY) (5) Curriculum scope, sequence, and interrelationships, with a cri tic al eva luation of current trends.

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EDUCATION 209 EDC 510. HEALTH PROBLEMS IN CHILDREN (4) H ea lth problems preva lent in the c ulturally di sa dv antage d child and the t eac h e r 's rol e in r efe rral o r e ducational a dapt at ion in classroom activiti es EDC 515. DIRECTING SPEECH ACTIVITIES IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (4) PR: 15 hours of Speech. Coac hi ng and directing co-c urri cular activiti es i n di scuss i on, debate, oratory oral interpretati on, an d extempo r aneous spea king Pl a nnin g and sup ervision of for ens i c tournaments and s peech co nt es ts. EDC 585. EDUCATION WORKSHOP: ( 1-5 ) Pro fess i o n a l in -se rvice workshop in various a r eas o f education. May b e re peat e d w h e n s ubj ec t s diff e r. Not n o rm a ll y used in d eg ree programs. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDC 601. THEORETICAL ISSUES IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (4) PR : 8 quarter h ours a t the g r a du a t e l eve l in the F oundation a r eas. Open only to d egree-seeking gradua t e studen ts. Adv a nced study of bas ic concepts and thei r practi ca l a pplicati o n P e rsi s t ent i ss u es and probl e m s and d eve lopm ent of r a tion a l e for th e ir exa min a ti o n EDC 661. PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISION ( 4) PR: Courses in gener a l curricu lum Instruction a l leade r ship with emphas i s o n organization for c urri c ulum improve m ent and in -se r v ice growth for profes s ional sc ho o l personnel. EDC 671. PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION ( 4 ) Educ-ational administration as a profess ion Consideration i s give n t o organization control, and support of th e educa ti o nal system. EDC 673. SCHOOL LAW ( 4) Basic esse ntial s of school law a r ev iew of court d e cisions a ff e cting Ame ric a n e ducation with emphasis upon th e study of Florida Stat e Statute s as th ey p e rtain t o the question o f Florida public sc hools. EDC 681. DIRECTED STUDY: (Subject) ( 1-4 ) Ext e n sio n o f com p e t e ncy in teaching field EDC 685 SCHOOL CURRICULUM IMPROVEMENT (4) Work s hop for the improv e m ent of the curriculum of an elementary or secondary school. Open on l y to t e a c h ers in s e rvic e. Complete faculty participation r equire d. EDC 689. SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION PLA NN ING: SECONDARY (4) Indi v iduall y pl a nn e d course in a secondary schoo l subject area for in-se rvice t eac h ers. EDC 691. INTERNSHIP (4 -9 ) Open t o g radu a t e d egree candida t es only PR : CI Sup e rvi se
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210 EDUCATION EDE 409. READING FOR THE CHILD ( 5 ) PR: Admi ssion to College of Educa tion Readin ess, wo rd r ecogn ition, ( phonic, visual and contextu a l ana lysis) d eve lopm ent of word m eanings, basic s tudy s kills compre h e n s i o n a bilities an d r ea din g int e r es ts. EDE 441. LANGUAGE ARTS FOR THE CHILD (4) PR : Admission to Coll ege of Educa tion Sp ea king w riting, reading an d li steni ng experienc es of children and ways these s kill s a r e d eve l o p ed for individual creative exp r ess ion EDE 413. LITERATURE FOR THE CHILD (4) PR: Admission to Coll ege of Educa ti on. Hi s t ory an d d eve l opment of children's lit erature. Study of bibfiographi c sources, c rit e ri a and t echniques for se l ec tion an d u se. EDE 415. ARITHMETIC FOR THE CHILD ( 5 ) PR: Admission to College of Education & CBS 109-110 B as ic s tructure of a rith m e tic, prin cip les underlying number co nc epts. EDE 417. SCIENCE FOR THE CHILD ( 5) PR : Admission to College of Educa tion & CBS 205, 2 06 207 or 208, 209, 210. Sci ence as inquiry EDE 419. SOCIAL STUDIES FOR THE CHILD ( 5 ) PR: Admission to College of Educa tion & CBS 301, 3 02 Signifi can t concepts in th e subj ec t s conce rn e d with huma n r e l a tion s hips. Emphas i s upon t eac hin g pupil s to solv e r a th er than b e e n gu lf ed b y socia l problems. EDE 421. ART FOR THE CHILD (4) PR : Admission to College of Educa ti o n Art and the i n t ellec tu a l c r ea ti ve, emo tion a l an d esth e ti c gro wth of children. EDE 423 MUSIC FOR THE CHILD: SKILLS ( 2 ) PR: Admission to Colleg e of Educa tion Voice produc ti on, mu s i c reading, creativ e co mp os ition an d some instrumental exp erie n ce S c h oo l song m a t e ri als used to support thi s work. EDE 424. MUSIC FOR THE CHILD: METHODS ( 3 ) PR: Admis s ion t o College of Education & EDE 423. Music Literature and t eac h ing aids for c hildr en including s in g ing rhythmic ; c r ea tiv e, instrum e ntal and li s ten ing e xperi e nces and the ir prese nt a tion EDE 425. HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE CHILD ( 4) PR: Admission to College of Educa tion Motivating fac t o r s of play; knowl edge an d s kill in b as i c rhythmic ac tiviti es; games and stunts; h ea lth in s truction for th e the c hild EDE 426 CREATIVE ARTS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ( 3) PR: Admission to College of Education The d eve lopm en t of th e c hild 's c reativ e expression through art mu sic, dance, pl ay, and drama; included are the m a t eria ls, content, and t eac hin g t echniques. EDE 431. ART FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD (3) PR: Admission to Coll ege of Educa tion. Art presen tin g the principl es, practices and m a teri a l s to b e used in r e l a tion to th e c haract e ri stics of the young child ages 3-8 EDE 433 MUSIC FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD ( 3 ) PR: Admis s ion to Coll ege of Educa tion Singing rhythmi c, creative, instrum enta l an d list e ning exp e rience r e l evant t o early-c hildhood EDE 440. TEACHING METHODS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ( 4) PR : Admission to Colleg e of Education. Su gges t e d Co-requisite : EDC 4 01. P rocess of t eac hin g e l ementary sc hool su bj ec ts. To b e t a k e n quarter prior t o internship. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDE 515. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF LEARNING DISABILITIES IN SCHOOL MATHEMATICS ( 4) PR: EDE 415 or equivalent. Stud y of the symptoms, e tiologi es and consequences

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EDUCATION 211 of children's learning disabilities in mathematics; study andguided application of theoretical models used in diagnosis and treatment group and individual. EDE 516. PRACTICUM IN DIAGNOISIS AND TREATMENT OF CHILDREN'S LEARNING DISABILITIES IN MATHEMATICS (4) PR: EDE 515: Supervised conduct of a case study with a child experiencing l ea rning difficulties in mathematics. Procedures used and reporting practice employed developed in EDE 515 reviewed and extended EDE 5 19. SOCIAL GROWTH IN CHILDHOOD (4) PR : Admission to College of Education. A study of the principal factors which influence the social development of young children with particular emphasis upon thos e cultural influences which affect both child development and the educa tional programs for the young child. EDE 527. DEVELOPMENTAI: PROCESSES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD (4) PR : Admission to College of Education The normal processes of development among children ages 3-8, the relation between these characteristics and the curriculum: child study through observation required. EDE 529. PROGRAMS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (5) PR: Admission to College of Education. A study of school programs for nursery kindergart en, and primary education. Analysis and evaluation of thes e progr ams in the light of the most effective current classroom practices. Obs erva tion and p a rtici pation included. EDE 531. LANGUAGE AND LEARNING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD (4) PR : Admission to College of Education. The study of the acquisition of language in young children and the development of bas ic communications skills in the Language Arts Curriculum, infancy through age 8 years. EDE 539 WORKSHOP IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (4) PR : Admission to College of Education Individual problems and innovations related to methods and materials of instruction in the ea rly childhood grades. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDE 603. SEMINAR IN CURRICULUM RESEARCH (1-5) PR: EDF 607. Critical eva luation of current research and curriculum literature, design and analysis of individual research topics leading to satisfaction of re search requirem e nts EDE 609. TRENDS IN READING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (4) PR: EDE 409 or equivalent Extensive study of recent tr ends in materials, approaches and procedures in t eac hing reading in the e lementary schools. EDE 611. TRENDS IN LANGUAGE ARTS INSTRUCTION (4) PR : EDE 411 and 413. Advanced materials and processes of instruction in e le mentary school language arts programs. EDE 613 CREATIVE ARTS INSTRUCTION (4) Creative processes in the teaching of visual arts, music dance, and drama to elementary school pupils. EDE 615. TRENDS IN MATHEMATICS INSTRUCTION (4) PR: EDE 415 or equivalent. Philosophy, content and process of qualita tive in struction in modern mathematics in elementary school programs. EDE 617. TRENDS IN SCIENCE INSTRUCTION (4) PR: EDE 417. Topics in the biological and physical sciences appropriate for teaching in excellent elementary school programs Analysis of modern curriculum materials used in presenting science as a process of inquiry. EDE 619. TRENDS IN SOCIAL STUDIES INSTRUCTION (4) PR: EDE 419. Crucial concepts drawn from the social sciences. Analysis of the problems approach. Students will select an area of inaependent study on an advanced lev el. EDE 621. ART FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER (4) Exploration of various materials and techniques in relationship to cu rr en t theories about art and the intellectual, creative, emotional and esthetic growth of children.

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212 EDUCATION EDE 629. ADVANCED PROGRAMS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (41 A s tudy of innovative curriculum designs in Early Childhood Education with emphasis given to related research Opportunity for practicum experiences included. EDE 631. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE IN THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM (4) PR:EDE 413 C.I. A study of significant concepts, emerging trends and classroom techniques for implementation and utilization of children's literature in all areas of the curriculum. EDE 639 HOME-SCHOOL-COMMUNITY INTERACTION IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (4) An intensive study of the roles of parents, teacher aides, and community agencies involved in the education of the young child. Field work is included with parents an d children in the hom e, day care cen t ers and clinics. EDE 641. PROBLEMS IN SUPERVISION (4) PR: EDF 607 or equivalent an d EDC 661. Probl ems in supervising for curriculum improvement within the e lementary school. EDE 651. THEORIES AND PATTERNS OF ADVANCED LANGUAGE ARTS INSTRUCTION (4) PR: EDE 611 or equiva l ent. This course is organized to presen t new r esea rch findings and theories relating to l anguage patterns and contempora ry programs designed for teaching the l ang uage arts. EDE 652. APPLICATIONS OF THEORIES TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF LANGUAGE ARTS PROGRAMS (4) PR : EDE 611 or equiva l ent, EDE 651. This course is designed to apply resea r c h findings an d theories for developing and organizing instructional improvement of the language arts EDE 687. SUBJECT SPECIALIZATON PLANNING: ELEMENTARY (4) Individually planned course in an e lementary sch oo l subject area for in-service teachers Foundations EDF 303. INTRODUCTION TO MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION (4) PR : Upper l evel standing. El ementary concepts basi c to a general understanding of m easu r emen t and eva lu a tion procedures EDF 305. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING (4) PR: CBS 201 203 or General Psyc holo gy; and admission to College of Education or CC. Application of respondent and operant l ea rning princ ipl es to classroom l earning, teaching models for different instructional goals, a naly sis of teach e r beh av ior micro-teaching. Credit cannot be earned for both EDF 3 05 and EDF 377. EDF 307. SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (4) PR: Admission to College of Education. Social, econo mi c an d political 'conte xt within which sc hool s function and the values which provide direc tion for our schoo ls; the culture as a motivating influence in instru c tion Should not b e taken concurren tly with EDF 305. EDF 309. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION (4) PR: Upper l eve l standing. A critical ana ly sis of selected philosophi es of education in t erms of th e ir beliefs about the nature of man and society and th ei r re lated assumptions about th e nature of reality, knowledge, and value. EDF 31l. COMPARATIVE EDUCATION (4) PR: Upper l eve l standi ng A comparison of contemporary e ducation a l systems of selected countries with that of the United States EDF 377. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: Upper Level s tanding. The applicati on of b e havioral principles to human behavior in educati ona l institutions home and community se ttings Credit ca nnot be earned for both EDF 305 and EDF 377.

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EDUCATION 213 FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDF 502. ADOLESCENCE (4) A study of the e ducational, int ellec tu a l personality, phy sical, socia l and voca tional factors in adolescence. EDF 575 AMERICAN DEMOCRACY AND PUBLIC EDUCATION (4) Interdependence of the public school and democracy in the United States and the r espons ibility of the school in fostering and strengthening basic democratic principles. EDF 585 PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION AND TEACHING MACHINES (4) Principl es for programmin g in the several academic subjects. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDF 605. FOUNDATIONS OF MEASUREMENT (4) Fundamental d escr iptiv e statistics, basic measur e ment concepts, role of measure ment in e ducation constru<:tion of teacher-made tests and interpretation of standardized t es ts. EDF 607. FOlJ DA TIONS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (4) PR: EDF 605 Major typ es of e ducational research with emphasis upon under standing the ex p e rimental method. EDF 611 PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (4) Sel ected topics in psychology of human dev e lopment and learning. EDF 612. CHILD DEVELOPMENT (4) PR: EDF 611 or CI. Educational, emotiona l hereditary, intelle<:tual, socia l and physical fa<:tors influ encing chi ld growth and development. EDF 61:3. PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING (5) A consideration of several th eo ries of learning and related r esearch studies in r ega rd to classroom applicati on. EDF 615. BIOLOGICAL BASES FOR LEARNING AND BEHAVIOR (5) PR: One course in Educational Psychology. A study of human biological develop m en t an its influence upon learning and behavior. EDF 617. MEASUREMENT OF INDIVIDUAL INTELLIGENCE (5) PR: EDF 3 05 or 611 or eq uival ent and a course in educational measurement or statistics. Administration and int e rpretatiion of individual measures of int elligence. Students may not receiv e credit for both EDF 617 and PSY 617, Individual Intellig e nc e T es ting EDF 621. SOCIO-ECONOMIC FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION (4) Significant socio-economic fa<:tors as they relate to major problems facing Ameri can e ducation. EDF 623. HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION (4) Historical and comparati ve problems in American education which are relevant to contemporary issu es. EDF 625. PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION (4) Major philosophi es of education which are relevant to an unde rstanding of con t emporary e ducational issues EDF 627. PROSEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE EDUCATION (4) Contemporary polici es and practices in education in selected (.'()Un tri es of the world Methodology in Comparative Education. Consideration will be g iven to needs and interes ts of individual students. EDF 631 THEORIES OF PERSONALITY FOR SCHOOL PERSONNEL (4) A comparative and integrated study of p e rsonality development according to major psychological theo ri es Application of the theoretical constructs to education and guidance. EDF 635: BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION IN THE CLASSROOM (4) PR: EDF 61 3 or C.I. Theo retical and practical application of behavior modification. Will cover: Introduction into experimental methods e.g., independent, dependent variab l es; and internal validity; principles of positive reinforcement ; shaping and successive approx im ations; application of reinforcement (parameters); operant

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214 EDUCATION behavior under extinction; operant methods in .behavior and development; readings in behavior modific a tion--<:ritical analysis; field work. EDF 671. SELECTED TOPICS (2-4) PR: CJ. Exploration and demonstration of knowledge in an area of specia l interest to the student and/or in an area for which th e student needs to demonstrate a high e r l eve l of competence. Defin e d to fit the needs of each student. EDF 675. FIELD EXPERIENCE. (1-5) PR: CJ. Demonstrate skills in th e prac ti ce of the student's specialty Specific objectives will be defined according to the needs of th e individual student EDF 755. INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEMS IN EDUCATION. (4) PR : EDF 635 or CJ. Examination of the systems approach for planning, guiding, and evaluating learning and related outgrowths reaching toward individualized instruction; a survey of theory and practical application of systems, programmed instruction, programmed texts, teaching machin es and computer-aided-instruction. Practical exercises will include analysis of instruction and programming of instruc tion in branching and linear formats. EDF 775. FIELD EXPERIENCE. (1-5) Demonstrate skills in the practice of th e student's specialty Specific objectives will be defined according to the needs of the individual student. Guidance FOR UPPER LEVEL UNDERGRADUATES EDG 401. INTRODUCTION TO GUIDANCE (5) PR: Upper level standing. An introduction to the role and function of guidance, school psychology social work and other pupil personnel services from kindergarten through junior college FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDG 601. PRINCIPLES OF GUIDANCE (4) Guidance as a profession; philosophic framework of the guidance program, its scope and place in the total educational context. EDG 603. THE INFORMATIONAL SERVICE IN GUIDANCE (4) PR: EDG 581. Occupational structure in th e Unite? States; sources. and use.s of educational, occupational, social and personal mformation; collectmg, classi fying and communicating such information. EDG 609. THE APPRAISAL PROCEDURES IN GUIDANCE (5) PR: EDF 605 EDG 601. A study of test and non-test techniques of apprai sa l with emphasis on the use of standardized test data in guidance programs and th e use of the individual case study approach. EDG 613 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF GUIDANCE SERVICES IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (3) PR: EDG 581. Organization of a guidance program in the e lementary school its relation to instruction and administration. Guidance roles and relationships of members of the school staff. EDG 615. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF GUIDANCE SERVICES IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS (3) PR: EDG 581. Organi za tion of a guidance program affd its place in the total educational program; responsibilities of various staff members and their relation ships to each other. EDG 617 GROUP PROCEDURES IN GUIDANCE IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (3) PR: EOC 581 and EDG 621. Counterpart of EDG 619 for prospective secondary school counselors. Use of groups in the couns e ling and guidance of children and in working with parents and teachers.

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EDUCATION 215 EOG 619. GROUP PROCEDURES IN GUIDANCE IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS (3) PR : EOG 581 and EOG 623 Group interaction and values of group activity for gu id ance purposes. Methods and techniqu es for working with groups. EDG 621. THE COUNSELING SERVICE IN GUIDANCE IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (5) PR : EOG 581. Counterpart of EOG 623 for prospective secondary sc hool coun se l ors. Counseling viewed as comm unication s throu g h media appropri ate to child ren. EDG 623. THE COUNSELI NG SERVICE I N GUIDANCE IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS (5) PR: EDG 581. Nature of the counseling process w ith emph asis on some theoreti ca l approaches and prac tical techniques. EDG 625 PRACTICUM IN ELEMENTARY GUIDANCE COUNSELING AND CONSUL TING (6) This course is the counterpart of EOG 627 for prospectiv e secondary schoo l counse lors; enro llm e nt by permission of program c h airman on l y Counseling w ith c hildre n in groups as well as individually; consu lt ations with parents, t eachers, adminis t rators, and fellow professionals regarding th e children b e ing counseled. ( S-U grade on ly) EDG 627. PRACTICUM I N SECONDARY SCHOOL GUIDANCE COUNSELING (6) Final course in guidance program; enro llment by p e rmission of progra m chairman only. Supervised practice in working with individuals in counse lin g relationship. ( S-U grade on ly) EOG 629. COMPARATIVE GUIDANCE (4) PR: EOG 581 (o r equivalent) or CI. Guidance theory and practice in foreign co un tries; for examp l e, guidance theory and practice in the Sovi e t block countries, Marxist ethics, socia li s t characte r formation, th e role of id eo l ogy, collec tivist life sty le, l eadership requirements, hierarchy of individu al and societal goa l s Orthodox theory versus r efo rmist currents. Evaluation of Marxist guidance through critica l ana l ysis of primary source materials. EOG 633. SEMINAR IN GUIDANCE (1) PR o r CR : EOG 581. Signific a nt issu es in th e fie ld of guidance; topics for di s cussion will vary according to needs and interests of students. (S-U grade on l y) EOG 681. INDIVIDUAL STUDY ( 1-5 ) PR : C.I. Independent study, r esea rch and e xperi e nces r e l ating to gu idance and pupil personnel services under th e supervision of a membe r of th e Guidance Pro gram facu lty ( Note: May be repeate d for maximum total of 5 hours ). Junior College FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDH 651. THE J UNIOR COLLEGE I N AMERICAN HIGHER EDUCATION ( 4 ) Hi s t ory of higher education, philosophical and cu ltural base s for definition of its role, and contemporary issu es, such as contro l finan c ing and c urri cular patterns. The plac e and problems of th e community junior college w ill be central co n ce rns of this course. EDH 653. SEMINAR IN COLLEGE TEACHING (5) Implications of learnin g theory and student c haract eristics for teaching at th e college l evel. Types of t eac hin g procedures inn ova ti on, eva luati on, student freedom and responsibility for l earning. Library Audiovisual EDL 411. SCHOOL LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION AND SERVICE (5) PR : Adm i ssion to College of Education. Devel opment, philosophy, objectives

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216 EDUCATION standards and current trends in school libraries Introduction to library operations, programs and services in the school and the community. EDL 412. ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL LIBRARY AS A MATERIALS CENTER (5) PR: Admission to College of Education. Media quarters ( materials center), facilities and equipment. The application of the principles of library organization and service to the administration and service of all media in the school. EDL 419. AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS OF INSTRUCTION (4) PR : Admission to College of Education. Selection, utilization and care of audio visual materials and equipment. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDL 508. TV UTILIZATION IN AND FOR THE SCHOOL (4) Utilization of open and closed circuit broadcasting in the instructional process. EDL 513. GENERAL REFERENCE SOURCES (4) Basic reference tools: dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks, indexes serials, biblio graphies, biographical sources, atlases and gazetteers; e mphasis on school library refer e nce materials EDL 514. SELECTION AND ACQUISITION OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LIBRARY MATERIALS (4) Selection and ordering of books and audiovisual materials for children, grades K-6. EDL 515. TECHNICAL SERVICES IN LIBRARIES (5) Principles and practic e in the classification cataloging and processing of books for the sc hool library EDL 519. BOOKS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE (5) Examination and evaluation of books and related materials for young. people in terms of basic principles of selection and utilization. Identification and use of bibliographic sources, aid.s and tools essential in the se l ection process EDL 523. PREPARATION AND PRODUCTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS (4) Basic techniques for th e pre paration of a variety of audiovisual instrnctional mate rials. EDL 524. STORYTELLING FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN (4) Review of the literature of storytelling; criteria in se l ection of storytelling mate ri als; practice in using the arts and skills of oral communication in transmitting the literary heritage to young children. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDL 600. FOUNDATIONS OF LIBRARIANSHIP ( 5) PR: EDL 411 or its equivalent. Overview of and introduction to the study of library service; history; organization; specialized literature; outstanding leaders; current tre nds issu es and problems Place of th e library in society with its contributions to that society. EDL 601. BIBLIOGRAPHY AND BOOK SELECTlON ( 5) PR: EDL 517, 518. Bibliographic a l sources, evaluative criteria for books and principles of book selection for libraries. EDL 602.f HISTORY OF LIBRARIES (4) D e velopment of libraries as found from the earliest r ecords to the great libraries of modern times and the library as a social institution EDL 603. t HISTORY OF BOOKS AND PRINTING ( 4) PR: EDL 600 or consent of the instructor. The making of books from earliest times to th e beginning of the Twe ntieth Century, including the manuscript book the inven tion and spread of printing, type design, methods and styles of illustration. EDL 604.t CONTEMPORARY PUBLISHING AND PRINTING (4) PR: EDL 601. A survey of book publishing as it is carried on today primarily in the United States Emphasis on structure of th e industry, eco nomic conditions technolo-t Only two out of sequence EDL 602 603 604 may be taken for any one program

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EDUCATION 217 gical d eve lopm e nts soc ial functions of book publishing and dis tribution Complemen tary relation b e tween librari es and publishing. EDL 605 HISTORY OF CHILDREN' S LITERATURE (5) Historical bibliographical survey of imaginativ e and informational literature for c hildre n. EDL 607. THE CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY (5) Eff ec tiv e utili za tion of instructional mat e rials as th ey r e lat e to s p eci fic a r e as of th e curriculum in e l e m entary and hi g h school programs. EDL 609. SUPERVISED FIELD WORK IN SCHOOL LIBRARIES (4) PR: Consent of major advis er. EDL 610 BOOKS AND RELATED MA TERlALS OF LA TIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE (4) Bibliographic sources, aids and tools for th e selection and utili za tion of Lat in Am er ican books and r e lat e d mate rials suitable for children and young people.Examina tion of r epresenta tiv e mate rials in t e rms o f th e basic prin c ipl es and crit e ria of selection for librari es. EDL 611. ADVANCED SUBJECT REFERENCE AND BIBLIOGRAPHY (4 ) PR: EDL S 13. Lit erature of th e humanities, socia l sciences, science, and t ec hnolo gy EDL 612. THE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF THE SCHOOL MEDIA CENTER (5) PR: EDL 600 or it s equivalent. M edia quarters, faciliti es and equipme nt. Basic prin ciples of organi za tion and administration of m e di a progra m s in e l e m e nt ary and secondary schools EDL 615. CLASSIFICATION AND CATALOGING OF NON-BOOK MATERIALS (3) Prin c ipl es and practic e in the cata loging of non-book m a terials for th e m e dia cent er. EDL 616. ADVANCED CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION (TECHNICAL PROCESSES) (4) PR : EDL 515 or consent ol the instructor. An ex m a in a tion of changing polici es and proc edures in the administration of acquisitions cataloging b inding, photo g raphic r eproduction and r e lat e d area. Analysis of r esea rch in the field. EDL 619. DOCUMENTS AND SERIALS (4) The nature of docume nt s and serials, th e ir r efere n ce and r esea rch value; t echniques of acquisition, cataloging, organization, conservation and reference use. EDL 621. AUDIOVISIUAL ADMINISTRATION (5) PR: EDL 523 and 607 Audiovisual a dministrativ e practices in school sys t ems and junior colleges. EDL 622. PROBLEMS I N AUDIOVISUAL UTILIZATION FOR NON-SCHOOL LIBRARIANS ( 4) Ex a min a tion of non -print media and it s utilization in non schoo l lib rar i es Char ac t e ri s ti cs of m e di a equipment and paradi gms of u se. EDL 623. ADVANCED PREPARATION AND PRODUCTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS (4) By permission of in struc tor. D es ign e d for th e m e di a s peci alist. Advanc e d tech niqu es for th e prepara ti o n of audi ov i sua l materials of in s tru c ti on. EDL 625. READING GUIDANCE PROGRAMS IN LIBRARIES AND CLASSROOMS (4) Th e factors and forces th a t influ e nc e reading inte r es ts and habits o f youth; programs for teaching the investigative and library skills; th e mat e rials and methods for the guidance of r eading, grades 1 12. EDL 629. RADIO AND TELEVISION TECHNIQUES FOR EDUCATORS (4) Utiliz a tion and broadcasting techniques for educators. Str ess will be plac e d on local school production, micro-teaching, and studio broadcasting. EDL 630. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE HUMANITIES (4) PR : EDL 513 and EDL 611 or co ns e nt of th e ins tructor. D e tail e d co nsid era tion of th e bibliographical and r efe rence mate rials in th e humaniti es with trainin g an d prac tic e in th e ir use for solving probl e m s ari s ing in the r e f e renc e service. Emphasis upon th e importance of creative literature in all libraries, illustrated by specific r eadings.

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218 EDUCATION EDL 631. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE SOCI SCIENCES ( 4 ) PR: EDL 51 3 an d EDL 611 or c on se nt o f th e in s truc t or. Characteris tic s o f the socia l sc i e n ce di s ciplin es and s tructure, c on cepts, metho d s of inv estig ation Und e r s t a ndin g of soc i a l scie n ce r efe re n ce to o l s as mean s of bibli og r a phi c con trol and as v ehicl es o f r esea rch EDL 632. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGIES ( 4 ) PR: EDL 51 3 and EDL 611 or con sent of the in s truc tor. Stud y of r epresenta tiv e r e f e r e n ce sources in pure and appli e d s ci e nce s with e qual atte ntion g iv e n to typical problem s e n co unt e re d in s cientifi c and t ec hnologic a l re f e r e nc e se rvic e. EDL 640. ADMINISTRATION AND PERSONNEL SERVICES IN THE PUBLIC LIBRARY ( 5 ) Id e ntifi ca tio n o f f robl e m s and c riti c al ex aminati o n o f m etho ds in admini strati v e a r ea s o f t ec hni ca and public se rvi ces fiscal and l eg al re spon s ibiliti e s staff or g ani za ti o n and supe rvi s ion in public librari es EDL 650. ADMINISTRATION AND PERSONNEL SERVICES IN THE ACADEMIC LIBRARY ( 5 ) Id e ntifi ca tion o f probl e m s and c riti ca l e xamination of m e thods in a dministrative a reas o f t ec hnical, stude nt, and t e a c hing s taff se rvi ces, fis cal and l ega l r es ponsi biliti es, s t a ff o r ga ni za tion and supervi s ion in ac a d e mi c librari es EDL 681. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY ( 1-5 ) PR: 2 0 h ours earne d in program and c o n se nt of a dv iser. Music Education 0EDM 431. INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (5 ) 0EDM 432. INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL (5 ) 0EDM 433. INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL ( 5) 0EDM 435 VOCAL MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ( 5 ) 0EDM 437. VOCAL MUSIC IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ( 5 ) 0EDM 439 VOCAL MUSIC IN THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL ( 5 ) FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDM 601. TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH IN MUSIC EDUCATION ( 4 ) P ro f ess i o n a l bibli og raph y and individu a l r esea r c h proj ects EDM 603. MUSIC SUPERVISION AND ADMINISTRATION (3) Th e mu s ic c urri c ulum in relation to the total s chool program; s taff and budgetary need s EDM 605 THE TEACHING OF MUSIC LITERATURE (3 ) Mu s i c lit erature appropriate for grade s K-12 and m ethods of presenta ti o n to develop mu s i c c onc epts and s e n s itivity EDM 614 VOCAL MATERIALS AND CONDUCTING (4) A study of mat eria l s a ppropriate for u se in vocal groups Emphasis i s given to vocal m a t eria l s a ppropri a t e for us e in sec ondary sc hools. EDM 617. INSTRUMENTAL MATERIALS AND CONDUCTING (4) A study o f m a t e rial s appropriat e for u se in in stmme ntal groups. Emphasis is giv e n to m s trumental mat e r i als appropriate for u se in se condary s chools. EDM 633. CURRENT TRENDS IN SCHOOL INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC (3) N e w m a t e rials, equipme nt, techniques of tea c hing and recent hi s toric a l trends in in s trum e ntal mu s ic. EDM 635. CURRENT TRENDS IN SCHOOL VOCAL MUSIC (3) N e w m a t eria ls, e quipm ent, techniques of teaching and re c ent hi s tori ca l trends in v oc al mu s ic Each class meets as a performing group Score reading conducting organizational procedures historical rela t i onships and methods at the appropriate grade levels. Teach i ng techniques concerning the presentation of elements of theory general music and literature

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EDUCATION 219 Natural Science Mathematics EDN 425. NEW TRENDS IN TEACHING THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES (4) Physical Science Study C'..ommittee Physics, Chemical Education Materials Study and other new approaches to the teaching of the physical sciences. Recommended for teachers of Phvsics, Chemistry and Earth Sciences. EDN 427 NEW TRENDS IN TEACHING BIOLOGY (4) Recent developments in curricul um materials and in s trategie s for teaching biolo gical sciences, grades 7 -12 Recommended for pre-service teachers of secondary school biology. EDN 451. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-MATHE-MATICS (4) PR: EDC 401 or concurrent registration in EDC 401 and a dmission to teacher education program in mathematics. Techniques and materials of instruction in mathematics. EDN 459. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-SCIENCES (4) PR : EDC 401 or concurrent registration in EDC 401. Techniques and materials of instruction in secondary schools sciences. EDN 515. THE UTILIZATION OF LABORATORY TECHNIQUES IN THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS (4) PR: 18 quarter hours of mathematics or Cl. In this course students will make an examination of a variety of sample laboratory le ssons along with methods for creat ing and eva luatin g such lessons. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDN 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION (1-5) May be repeated when topics are not duplicated. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDN 616. TEACHING OF PRE-SECONDARY SCHOOL . MATHEMATICS I (5) PR : 18 quarter hours of mathematics or Cl. Development of s trategi es and ma terials for teaching mathematical concepts and skills appropriate to presecondary school years. EDN 617. TEACHING OF PRE-SECONDARY SCHOOL MATHEMATICS II (5) PR : EDN 616 Continuation of EDN 616. EDN 618. TEACHING OF PRE-SECONDARY SCHOOL MATHEMATICS III (5) PR: EDN 617 Continuation of EDN 616-617. EDN 621. TEACHING OF HIGH SCHOOL ALGEBRA (4) PR: B A in mathematics or certification in secondary mathematics Philosophy, content, new trends and methods of teaching beginning, intermediate, and advanced high school algebra. EDN 622 TEACHING OF HIGH SCHOOL GEOMETRY (4) PR : B .A. in mathematics or certificat ion in secon dary mathematics. Philosophy, content, new trends, and methods of teaching high school geometry. EDN 637. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY MATHEMATICS EDUCATION (4) Curricular patterns and instmctional practices in secon dary mathematics. EDN 639. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCIENCE EDUCATION (4) PR: EDN -125 or 427 Curricular patterns and instructional practices in secondary science EDN 641. CASE STUDIES IN SCIENCE (4) Case studies from the Natural Sciences with implications for science teaching. EDN 651. TEACHING SECONDARY SCHOOL BIOLOGY (4) PR: Cl. Effective use and production of instructional materials in the biological sciences Interrelation of philosophy materials and classroom practices.

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220 EDUCATION EDN 653. TEACHING SECONDARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL & EARTH SCIENCES (4) PR: CI. Effective use and production of instructional material s in the physical and earth sciences. Interrelation of philosophy, materials, and classroom practices. Physical Education 0EDP 255. FIRST AID (3) Meets American Red Cros s certification r equirements in standard and advanced first aid. 0EDP 311. SEMINAR AND FIELD EXPERIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (5) Approximately two hours per day a re spent teaching in an e lementary school which provides a variety of experiences designed to le a d students to an understanding of children and how they learn in the elementary school. 0EDP 312 HUMAN KINETICS I ( 6) The development and integration of the n euromuscular and the associated se nsory sys tems as they affect motor and perceptual-motor p erformance. The physiology of muscular contraction, the accompanying immediate changes in the cardiorespiratory systems, and the permanent physiological changes resulting from exe rci se. 0EDP 314. INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT (2) A perso nal evaluation of various factors related to the effect iv e teaching of physi cal education. An individual profil e that can b e used for counselin g purposes will be the final product of this course. 0EDP 321. SEMINAR AND FIELD EXPERIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (5) Elementary school physic a l educa tion teaching ex p e ri e n ces a r e provided for students. Seminars emphasiz e planning and teaching methodology. Health and recreation as they r elate to elementary school children are studie d 0EDP 322 HUMAN KINETICS II (6) The structure and function of the n e rvous skeletal, and muscular sys t e m s of the human body as they contribute to e ffici ent mov e m ent; devi a tion s in eithe r structure or function in thes e sys t e m s and the role of e x e r cise in r ehabilitation. 0EDP 331. SEMINAR AND INTERNSHIP IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (5) Physica l education teaching ex p erience i s provide d a t various grade levels. S em in a r s are concerne d with organization, evaluation, and extra-class activiti es In dividual teaching i s analyzed and programme d. 0EDP 332. HUMAN KINETICS III (6) The mechanical laws of phys ic s as they relate to movement w ithin and of the human body and the projection of obj ects in throwing, hitting and kicking. Efficiency of huma n movement through sound body mechanics. 0EDP 365. AQUATICS (: 3 ) Includes analyzation and methodol ogy of teaching swimming s kills, conducting class activities, and the organization and conducting of aquatic programs in the school and the community. 0EDP 411. SEMINAR AND FIELD EXPERIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (5) Students spend approximate l y two hours a day at e ither th e junior o r s enior hi g h sc hool lev e l working in team teaching s itu a ti o ns Emphasis i s placed o n understanding the secondary l e vel student and how teaching b ehavior can ailed th e learn er. 0EDP 412, 422 432. APPLIED H UMAN KINETICS (4 each) A three course sequence which stresses the biomechanical anal ysis, motoric learnin g the t eaching techniques of dance, and the s kill s and strategies commun t o a numbe r o f individual and team sports. 0EDP 421. SEMINAR AND INTERNSHIP IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION ( 5 ) Students rev e r se teachin g level s from EDP -Ill so that they will have e xp erience a t both junior and senior high school l evels. Team teaching prevails however a transi -

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EDUCATION 221 tion is made t o teaching larger numbers of students. Seminars emphasize individuali zation techniques. 0EDP 431. SEMINAR AND INTERNSHIP IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (5) Students have an option of teaching at the elementary, junior or senior high school level as well as teaching mentally rl?tarded students. Students will teach for a full day for a period of from one to three weeks. Enrollment in these courses requires admission to the Physical Education Program. EDP 459. ATHLETIC TRAINING (:1) PR : CI. Principles and techniques of conditioning athletes for competition; pre vention and care of injuries in physical e ducation and athletic activities. EDP 460 HEALTH EDUCATION PROJECT (5) PR : CI. A practicum in h ea lth education through field experiences with official and voluntary health agencies. EDP 468. COACHING OF SWIMMING (:3) Methods of organizing and coaching a competitive swimming team. EDP 469. COACHING OF FOOTBALL (5) Theory and practice of th e fundamental techniques organizational problems and strategy involved in coaching football. EDP 478. COACHING OF WRESTLING (4) Theory and practice of th e fundamental techniques organizational probl e ms and strategy involved in coaching wrestling. EDP 479. COACHING OF SOCCER (3) Theory and practice of the fundamental techniques, organizational problems and strategy involved in coaching soccer. EDP 486. COMMUNITY RECREATION (4) Introduction to r ec reational outl ets in the community and the administrative prob lems confronting recreational playground leaders and directors of community recrea tional programs. EDP 488. COACHING OF TRACK AND FIELD (4) Theory and practice of th e fundam e ntal t ec hniques organizational problems and strategy involved in coaching track EDP 489. COACHING OF BASKETBALL (:3) Theory and practice of the fundam e ntal t ec hniques organizational problems and strategy involved in coaching bask e tball. EDP 499. COACHING OF BASEBALL (3) Th eo ry and practic e of th e fundamental techniques organizational problems and strategy involved in coaching bas e ball. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDP 556. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION {:3-6) EDP 558. SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF COACHING (5) The appli cation of principles from exe rcise physiology kin esio logy, a nd psychol ogy to co mp e titiv e athletics EDP 566. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED (4) An analysis of th e n e uromuscular and perc e ptual motor development of children in regard to the special problems of the mentallr retarded child and a study of activities designed to improv e his motor skills, physica fitness, and social development FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDP 600 PROFESSIONAL ASSESSMENT (4) Selected readings of curre nt trends in physical education; discussion of philosophies of t eaching; and individual a pprais a l of knowl edge, values, attitudes, and professional competencies. EDP 610. BIO-KINETICS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT (4) Int egra tion of basic kin es iological foundations appli e d to teaching physical educa tion Specific topi cs include: physical growth and neuro-muscular development role

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222 EDUCATION of neuromuscular inechanis!l'ls in motor performance, physical principles of human movement and the effects of exercise on the muscular and cardio-respiratory systems. EDP 611. SPECIALIZED STUDY IN BIO-KINETICS OF Ht:MAN MOVEMENT: (1-4) Will provide in-depth study in specific areas related to neurological, physiological, and mechanical principles of hurpan movement. EDP 620. SOCIO-fSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT (4) Involves the psychqlogi<;al and sociological implications of movement to historical and contelT)pqrary man Emphasis on psycho-motor learning, movement behavior physi1:al self-concept, rqle of movement in society and values and attitudes held to ward movement, EpP 6 21. SPE,Pi\l-JZED STUDY JN SOCIO-PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS (lf l{UMAN (1-4) Wi I proviqe siudy in specific areas related to sociological and psycholo gical prinCiples of ljUIJ.,l piovei;nent . El)P !)30, l)fiRIC(JJ,UM JONAJ.. ff{OCF;SS IN (4) Application of theoJY 11nd education ionovations, study of structure of sub ject matter and styles of teaching and im, estigation of the nature of the learner as these relate to teaching physical education. Fieldwork may be a requirment of this course EDP 631. SPECIALIZED STUDY IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION: (SUBJECT) (1 -5 ) Will provide in-depth study in specific areas related to the teaching-learning process of physical education. EDP 640-641. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE HANDICAPPED I & II (5,5) This sequential course is concerned with the motor performance and physical fitness of neurologically handicapped individuals and the unique problems of motor skill learning found in children and youth with visual, auditory, speech, or orthopedic handicaps. Study includes field experiences which apply knowledge related to psycho educational characteristics; planning, conducting, and evalua ting individualized pro grams of special physical education; and review of relevant literature. EDP 650. RESEARCH IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (4) Emphasis will be directed toward planning, conducting, and interpreting research in physical education. The function of research in improving programs as well as the technical aspects of research designs appropriate to physical education are included for study. EDP 651. RESEARCH IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1-6) In-depth research study of selected topics concerning human movement. Topics will vary according to needs and interests of students. May be repeated for credit. EDP 699. RESEARCH THESIS ( 1-9) Measurement evaluation FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDQ 601. ADVANCED MEASUREMENT-COGNITIVE AREA (4) Measur e ment, assessment theory and procedures appropriate to the "('.,()gnitive Domain", i.e., intellectual abilities, aptitudes. achievements skills. EDQ 603. ADVANCED MEASUREMENT-AFFECTIVE AREA (4) Measurement, assessment theory and procedures appropriate to the affective domain, i e., feelings, attitudes, interests personal cha_ racteristics. EDQ 604. CRITICAL ISSUES IN EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION (4) A consideration of major issues relevant to the theory and application of measurement and evaluation Topics include such issues as culture fair testing, accountability,

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EDUCATION 223 assessment of change, decision theory, nature of human abilities, normative vs. criterion measures, and current socio-political issues in measurement and evaluation. EDQ 605. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH I (4) Application of statistical techniques to the study of education problems: Tests of significance and confidence intervals, analysis of variance (one-way and factorial} correlation and linear regression EDQ 607. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH II (4) Application of statistical techniques to the study of educational problems: Multiple correlation and regression, Introductory Factor Analysis and selected non-para metric techniques. EDQ 608. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH III (4) Application of statistical techniques to the study of educational problems : Trend analysis, analysis of variance models and expectation of mean squares; Analysis of covariance; Method ofleast squares; Bayesian statistics (introduction). EDQ 609. DESIGN OF EXPERIMENT-PRODUCT RESEARCH IN EDUCATION (4) Basic Experimental research design theory and models appropriate for education EDQ 611. DESIGN OF DESCRIPTIVE-PROCESS RESEARCH (4) Theory and procedures for conducting descriptive research in education EDQ 612. ANALYSIS OF DEMOGRAPHIC DATA FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH Fundamental procedures for the study and use of demographic data relevant to educational decisions. EDQ 613. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH Computer Solution of Educational Research and Administrative related Problems using FORTRAN as a programming language EDQ 620 PLANNING EVALUATION AND DEVELOPMENT IN EDUCATION (4) The major theories, models and issues related to planning evaluation and development will be studied, discussed and evaluated. Practical experience will be gained in preparing planning proposals and evaluative reports. Emphasis will be placed on applied aspects related to conducting planning, evaluation and development activities in operational settings. EDQ 621. SYSTEMS APPROACHES TO EDUCATIONAL PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT (4) The course will involve a study of primary materials presenting the basic theoretical formulations of systems approaches. The transition from theory to practice will be made by involving students in specific exercises and experiences involving systems procedures Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to apply systems approaches to educational problems. Reading Education FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDR 509. CURRENT TRENDS IN READING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 14) Developmental reading for the upper grade level junior high school pupils and all grade level senior high school pupils. EDR 530. CORRECTIVE READING FOR CLASSROOM TEACHERS (4) PR: EDE 409 or EDR 509 or equivalent. Procedures and materials for individual and group corrective reading in the classroom FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDR 631. DIAGNOSIS OF READING DISABILITIES (4) PR: EDF 605 and EDE 609 or EDR 509. Research concerning causes of reading dis-

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224 EDUCATION ability; diagnostic procedures; techniques and materials in diagnosis of reading pro blems. EDR 632. TECHNIQUES OF CORRECTIVE AND REMEDIAL READING (4) PR: EDE 609 or EDR 509, and EDR 631. Materials and methods in remediation of moderate to severe reading disability cases. EDR 633. PRACTICUM IN READING (3-6) PR: EDE 609 or EDR 509, EDR 631 and EDR 632 and CI. Clinical diagnosis of severe reading disability cases, tutoring of individuals and small groups, interview techniqu es, preparation of case reports. EDR 634. CURRICULUM AND SUPERVISION PROBLEMS IN READING (4) PR: EDE 609 or EDR 509. Planning and administering programs and preparation as consultants in reading. Intensive work on individual project required. EDR 635. SURVEY OF READING RESEARCH (4) PR: EDF 605, EDF 607 EDR 509 or EDE 609 and C.I. Critic a l analysis "of current reading resear c h; individual r eport or pape r r equire d. Special Education EDS 311. EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN IN THE SCHOOLS (4) PR: EDF 305 or CI. Characteristics and needs of the Culturally Disadvantaged, Emotionally Disturbed & Socially Maladjusted, Gifted, Hearing Impaired, Mentally Retarded, Physically Handicapped, Speech Impaired, & Visually Limited. EDS 312. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS IN THE CLASSROOM (4) Aiding the child with a speech, hearing, or language disorder in a classroom setting. EDS 322. INTRODUCTION TO MENTAL RETARDATION (4) PR: EDF 305, EDS 311, or CI. Classification, diagnosis, characteristics, and treatment of the mentally retarded. EDS 329. UNDERGRADUATE SUPERVISED PRACTICUM IN MENTAL RE TARDATION (6) Supervised Practicum experiences in the educational, social and vocational planning of mentally retarded individuals. EDS 359. FIELD WORK WITH GIFTED CHILDREN (1-6) Organized, supervised experiences with gifted children. Specific experiences may be eitl'ler a combination of observation and assistance with gifted children or indivi dualized projects. EDS 423 I & II. EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE EDUCABLE MENTALLY RETARDED (4,4) PR: EDS 322, EDC 401 or CI. Special class organization, curriculum adjustments, methods and techniques of teaching the educable retarded. EDS 424. EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE TRAI N ABLE MENTALLY RETARDED ( 4 ) PR : EDS 3 22 or CI. Sp ec:ial c:lass org ani zatio n c:urric:ulum a djustm e nts, m e th o ds and t e chniqu es of t e ac:hin g th e trainable r etarded. EDS 479. SCHOOL PRACTICUM IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY (1-14) Sup e rvisf'd prac:tic:um in Spe ec:h Pathology & Audiology in th e sc:hool set ting. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDS 511. THE SLOW LEARNER IN THE SCHOOL ( 4 ) Charac:t e ristic:s needs and e duc:ational planning for th e s lo w l e arnin g c:hild Appro priat e for spec:ial c:las s t e ac:hers and regular c:lass t e ac:h ers. EDS 529. GRADUATE SUPERVISED PRACTICUM IN MENTAL RETARDATION (1-14 ) Sup e rvised graduate prac:tic:um enc:omp a s s ing t e ac:hing a n d sup e 1 v isin g e xp erienc:e s in public: sc:hool c:lasses for the m e ntally r etarde d. EDS 531. BEHAVIOR DISORDERS IN THE SCHOOLS ( 4 ) PR: EDF 3 05 or EDF .377 or PSY 201 or CI. Surv ey of e m o tional and soc:ial dis -

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EDUCATION 225 or d ers in childre n and th e implications for educatiomil programs. Students may not r e c eive credit for both EDS 5 :31 and PSY 61:3, Behavioral Disorders of Children EDS 541. THE CULTURALLY DISADVANTAGED AND THE SCHOOLS (4 ) C haract e ristics and needs of th e culturally disadvantaged and their implications for e du c ation a l pro g ramming. EDS 550. NATURE AND NEEDS OF THE GIFTED ( 4) Ch aracteristics and e ducational n e eds of gift e d children and youth EDS 551. EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE GIFTED (4) PR : EDS 550 or Cl. Curri c ulum adjustments, m ethods and t e chniques classroom org a ni z ation n e c e ssary for t eaching th e gift e d. EDS 552 CREATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING FOR THE GIFTED (4) Exploration of th e c o nc ept of creativity its factors m e asurem ent and appli c ation to e du c ation Oppo rtuniti e s are giv e n to work with children in a laboratory setting and to pre p a r e m a t e rials to be use d with small groups of childre n EDS 559 FIELD WORK FOR THE GIFTED (1-14 ) Plann e d supe rvis e d participation in activiti e s reiat e d to specific are as of th e gifted EDS 561. EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS OF THE PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED (4) PR : EDS 311 o r C l. Introduction to th e e ducational psychological and social probl e ms of th e ph ys icall y disabl e d child in the publi c s c hools EDS 579. SCHOOL PRACTICUM IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY (1-14) Super v i se d practicum in Spe ech Patholog y & Audiology in th e school s e tting FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDS 610. SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (4 ) A critical survey o f the lit erature relat e d to th e psychol og ical sociological, and edu c a tion probl e m s of e x ce pti o n a l c hildren. EDS 611. PSYCHO-EDUCATIONAL APPRAISAL OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN ( 4) PR: EDF 3 0 3 605 or CI. Educational planning for e x c eptional c hildren bas e d on dia g no s t ic informati o n EDS 612. SUPERVISION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILD PROGRAMS (4) PR: CI. Pri ncipl es o f su p e r v i s ion and th e ir appli c ation to e xceptional child educa ti o n EDS 613 ADMINISTRATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILD PROGRAMS (4) PR : CI. P rocedure whi c h lo c al state, and national administrators ma y use to imple m ent se rvi ces for e xceptio n a l c hildr e n EDS 620 BIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF MENTAL RETARDATION ( 4 ) PR : EDS 322 and EDF 607, or CI. Evalu a tion of r e levant lit erature. EDS 62i. SOCIOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL ASPECTS OF MENTAL RETARDATION ( 4 ) Ev a l uatio n o f r e l eva nt literature. EDS 622 ADVA NCED EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED ( 4-8 ) PR : EDS -123 e xperi e nce in t e a ching th e retarded, identification of a problem prior t o r eg istrati o n, or CI. Sp ec ific curriculum and m e thodological probl ems in teaching th e r e t a rd e d EDS 632 EDUCATION AL PROGRAMMING FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN I ( 4 ) PR : EDS 53 1 and CI. P e rson a lit y d y namics and r e s e arch findiiigs as r elated to th e int e rpr e tati o n of d istrube d b e h av ior ; t echniques for th e managem e nt o f indiviudal, sm all g roup and cla s s room b e h avior. EDS 6 :33. EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN II ( 4 ) PR: EDS 5 3 1 6 3 2 o r CI. Personalit y d y namics and l earning theory as related to th e fac ilit a tion o f learnin g and co mmunicati o n ; t echnique s for te a chin g both indivi duals and g roups w ith emphasis on improv e d int e rpersonal rel a tions acade mic learn i ng, and C'Ommunication s kills.

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226 EDUCATION EDS 639. FIELD WORK IN EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED (1-14) PR : EDS 531 (may be taken com: urrently ) and CI. Supervised graduate practicum experiences with emotionally disturbed children. EDS 649. FIELD WORK WITH POTENTIALLY HANDICAPPED (CULTURALLY DISADVANTAGED): 0-9) Teaching and participation in a<.:tivities related to teaching disadvantaged young children (N-3) EDS 660. THE VISUALLY HANDICAPPED IN THE CLASSROOM (4) PR : EDS 311 or CI. A survey of modern techniques to assist teachers in a broader understanding of th e recognition of visual problems. Hygiene, stru<.:ture and educa tional implications. EDS 662. EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS OF THE PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED (4) PR: EDS 311 or CI. Introduction to the educational psychological and social pro bl ems of th e pysically disabled child in the public schools EDS 676. SPEECH & LANGUAGE DISORDERS (4) Group management procedures for amelioration of speech and language problems The nature of disorders of communication and managem en t of verbal behavior. English EDT 447. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-ENGLISH (4) PR: EDC -101 or concurrent registration in EDC -101. T ec hniques and materials of instruction in English Education EDT 463. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL JOURNALISM (4) PR: EDC -101 or concurrent registration in EDC -101. T ec hniques and materials of instru ction in journa lism FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDT 531. CURRENT TEACHING OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (4) Application of r ecen t techniqu es of l anguage study, induding stmctural and trans formational grammar, to dassroom teaching of Engli s h, especially in relation to current textbooks (For gradua te credit : PR : ENG 517 or ENG 535 and certification in English. ) FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDT 621 CURRENT TRENDS IN TEACHING SPEECH COMMUNICATIONS (5) PR-Cl: Curricular patterns; instru<.:tional mat e rials, facilities and practices used in teaching speec h co mmuni ca tions. EDT 622. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION IN EDUCATION (5) PR-CI: Studies in selected sources, critical writings, and resea rch which have contri buted to the development of speech communication as an acarlcmic discipline EDT 631. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION (4) Curricular patterns and instructional practices in secondary English. Vocational and Adult Education EDV 141. INTRODUCTORY TYPEWRITING (3) Basic skills of typewriting for personal use, common types of business letters, manu scripts, reports and tabulate d materials EDV 143. ADVANCED TYPEWRITING (3) Development of speed and accuracy, and a continuation of skill building procedures in production tvpewriting e mphasizing mailable transcripts.

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EDUCATION 227 EDV 207. THE TEACHER IN A WORLD OF WORK (4) A study of educational efforts in preparing people 1or work, the relationship of a job to man's life style, and the concept of education as a lifelong process. EDV 251. INTRODUCTORY SHORTHAND (S) PR: EDV 141 or equivalent. Introduction to basic skills and vocabulary in the Diamond Jubilee series of Gregg Shorthand. EDV 252. INTERMEDIATE SHORTHAND (4) PR: EDV 143, 251 or equivalent of each. Review of basic skills and vocabulary and emphasis on dictation speeds. EDV 351. ADVANCED SHORTHAND DICTATION AND TRANSCRIPTION (4) PR: EDV 143 and 252 or equivalent of each. Emphasis on advanced dictation speeds and transcription of mailable business commutiications. EDV 353. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE MANAGEMENT (5) Functions of the business office to include systems and procedures, communications, records management, office employee behavior, controlling the work of the office, and principles of office organization. Also includes the methodology necessary for teaching these areas in either separate courses or integrated block programs. EDV 361. BUSINESS AND OFFICE MACHINES (5) PR: EDV 141 or equivalent. Instruction and practice on selected business and office machines to acquaint students with capabilities and limitations of the machines. Instruction and reading on teaching methodology for business and office 0EDV 431, SUPERVISED FIELD EXPERIENCE: (S pecialization ) (4-8) PR: CI. Planned supervised functions in the area of specialization and co-ordinated with selected schools, government, offices, social agencies, businesses and industries on site 0EDV 443. SPECIAL TEACHING METHODS: (Specialization) (5) Methods, techniques, and materials for skill development. 0EDV 445. METHODS OF TEACHING: (Specialization) (4) Methods, techniques, and materials for instruction. EDV 461. OFFICE OCCUPATIONS PROCEDURES (5) PR: EDV 143 351, 361, and Senior standing. This course is designed to integrate learnings from preceding business and office education courses Appli cations involve actual and simulated oflic e situations, problems, and evaluation. Emphasis is placed on the qualifications needed for efficient business office operations. 0EDV 480. FACILITY DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT: (Specia lization ) (4) Design and d e velop instructional facility tloor plans consistent with modern and etll cient methods of instruction as well as evaluate existing classrooms, laboratories, and s hops. Selection and location of equipment. Review and prepare operational plans for the management of equipment, furniture, tools, and as they relate to effective student learning. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 0EDV 503. LEARNING AND CURRICULUM CONSTRUCTION: (Specialization) ( 4) Planning and organizing an instructional program for the purpose of developing an occupational competency. 504. PREPARATION AND DEVELOPMENT FOR TEACHING: (Specialization) (4) The development of selected instructional materials use of new educational media, performance evaluation instruments, and counseling techniques. 0EDV 506. PROGRAM MANAGEMENT: (Specialization) (4) Organization, co-ordination, and budgeting of adult, co-operative, and special programs. Areas of specialization i n these courses are : Adult Education Business Educat ion. Distributive Education. and Industrial-Technical Education.

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228 EDUCATION EDV 507. PRINCIPLES OF ADULT AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (4) An overview of current policies and principles to include their historical, sociological and philosophical bases out of which principles of adult and vocational education have been accepted and implemented. EDV 511. SCHOOL-COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (4) An approach to identifying and analyzing, developing and maintaining working re lationships between appropriate school and community institutions, their channels of communication for the purpose of cooperative program involvement FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDV 605. ADULT BASIC EDUCATION (4) An overview of adult basic education with emp,hasis on current issues and problems of curriculum and instruction in program development for culturally different adults. 0EDV 621. INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION: (Specialization) (4) Attention is given to individualized instruction to include the special needs student, the slow learner, and the more capable student. 0EDV 631. CURRENT TRENDS: (Specialization) (4) Historical information issues current trends, new dimensions and problems in the area of specialization. 0EDV 641. STAFF DEVELOPMENT: (Specialization) (4) Implementation of new procedures addressed to discreet developmental needs of the staff as identified by an educational agency. 0EDV 651. PRACTICUM: (Specialization) (4-8) A problem-centered field study in the local community, school government, office, social agency busin ess or industry. EDV 661. SUPERVISION OF LOCAL PROGRAMS: ADULT OR VOCATIONAL (4) PR: CI. A study of the factors involved in the supervision of instruction including plans for teacher education, improvement of instruction coordination of activities, and personnel relations EDV 671. ADMINISTRATION OF LOCAL PROGRAMS: ADULT OR VOCATIONAL (4) A study of the organization selection of personnel assignment of duties and res ponsibilities, and establishment of policies and procedures to accomplish the objec tives of the local program within the federal, state, and local requirements. 0EDV 687. SEMINAR: (Specialization) (4) PR: EDF 605 & 607. Applied research techniques and investigation of important current issues or theses in the area of specialization Areas of specializati o n in these courses are: Adult Education. Business Education. Distributive Education and Education. Social Studies EDW 461. TEACHING METHODS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL-SOCIAL STUDIES (4) PR: EDC -101 or concurrent registration in EDC 401. Techniques and materials of instruction in social studies FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDW 643. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY SOCIAL STUDIES (4) Curricular patterns and instructional practices in secondary social studies.

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ENGINEERING 229 Foreign Languages EDX 449. TEACHING METHODS I N THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-FOREIGN LANGUAGE (4) PR : EDC -!01 or concurrent registration in EDC -!01. T echn i ques and mat e rials of instruction in foreign l anguages. To be taken in the quarter prior to internship. EDX 465. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-LATIN (4) PR: EDC -!01 or concurrent registration in EDC -!01. Techniques and materials of instruction in Latin. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDX 649. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY FOREIGN L ANGUAGE EDUCATION (4) PR: Consultation with instructor,.plus foreign l anguage fluency. Curricular patterns and instructional practices in the teaching of secondary foreign languages Humanities FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDY 633. CURRENT TRENDS IN THE TEACHING OF HUMANITIES (4) Curricular patterns mat e rials, and instructional practices in th e teaching of humanities. ENGINEERING Facu lty : Abb ey, Anderson, Bean J Bowers Burdick, Burgett Busot, Chen, Cowell, D ev in e, Donaldson, Doty Downey, Ellis Filipowsky Fraze, Friebel e, Garcia, Garrett, Glass, J. Gonzalez, Griffith Henning, H e nry Hill ey, How e ll, Jain Kopp, Krane, Kraus, Lane, Llewellyn, Naehring, Nienhaus Oline, Packer Parr, Payne Ratliff Rhodes Rimbey, B. Ross, Sergent, Scott, N. Small, N. Smith, Wilma Smith, Wm. Smith, Sortor Thompson, Twigg Weaver, Wimmert, Zobrist Basic Engineering Course Work EGB 101. GRAPHIC ANALYSIS I (4) Th e th eory and application of projective syst e ms and related topics Basic problems in descriptiv e geometry. (lee-lab) EGB 102. GRAPHIC ANALYSIS II ( :3) PR : EG 101. Princifles of graphic and num eric analysis Applied problems in graphic statistics emperica data, proj e ctiv e geometry graphic calculus, and other graphic techniques for the solution of engineering probl e ms EGB 103. GRAPHIC ANALYS I S III (:3) CR : EGB 101. An e lective course designt>d for students with limitt>d background in pre-calculus mathemati cs nt>cessary for graphical proc esses. Emphasis on graphical concepts of a lgebraic and trigonometric r e l ationships. EGB 104 GRAPHIC ANALYSIS IV (:3) CR: EGB 102 Continuation of EGB 10:3. EGB 201. ENGINEERING PROBLEMS I (2) CR: MTH 20:3. Elective course for engineering majors. Applied problems paral l e ling mathematics sequence. EGB 20:3. ENGINEERI NG MEASUREMENTS (:3) PR: EGB 102. An introduction to th e concepts of a systems approach and various t echniques of measurement in engineering systems, both discrete and cont in uous. (lee l ab)

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230 ENGINEERING EGB 208. INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING I (3) PR: None. To present an overview of Engineering its role and its concepts. (Experimental program; see adviser.) EGB 209. INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING II (3) PR: EGB 208. Continuation of EGB 208. (Experimental program ) EGB 231. PROGRAMMING I-INTRODUCTION (1) Basic computer operation, programming a computer using machine language assembly languages and FORTRAN. EGB 232. PROGRAMMING II-FORTRAN (2) PR: EGB 231. Continuation of EGB 231. EGB 301. ENGINEERING PROBLEMS II (2) CR: MTH 303. Continuation of EGB 201. EGB 302. ENGINEERING PROBLEMS III (2) CR : MTH 304. \,ontinuation of EGB 301. EGB 303. ENGINEERING PROBLEMS IV (2) t CR: MTH 305. \,ontinuation of EGB 302 EGB 311. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS I (3) PR : PHY 305-306, MTH 304. A course sequence in linear passive circuits, electronic circuits and electromechanical devices Physical principle s and modes. Transient and steadystate analysis. System consideration. EGB 312. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS II (3) PR: EGB 311. Continuation of EGB 311 EGB 313. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS III (3) PR: EGB 311. Continuation of EGB 311 or EGB 312. EGB 321. THERMODYNAMICS I (3) PR: PHY 303. Introduction to Thermodynamics ; Thermodynamic co ncepts of srtem control volume, proce ss, cycle, property and state The Zeroth Law of Thermodyna mics and temperature scales. Properties of ideal and pure substances. Concepts of Work and Heat. The First Law of Thermodynamics EGB 322 THERMODYNAMICS II (3) PR: EGB 321. \,ontinuation of EGB 321. The Second Law and its consequences. Entropy. The Carnot and h ea t engine cycles. Mixtur es of ideal gases and psychro metry Approximations to behavior of "real" gases. Concepts of reversiblity, avail ability and efficiency. EGB 325. DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS I (4) PR: EGB 340, MTH 303. Linear dynamic analysis of electrical, mechanical pneumatic, hydraulic and thermal sys tem s Introduction to analog computers; LaPlace transformation Block diagram representation, transient and frequency respon se (lee-lab) EGB 337. ENGINEERING VALUATION I (3) PR: EGB 231, MTH 303. A study in analyzing the economic limitation s imposed on engineering activities using bas ic models which consider the time value of money EGB 340. SOLID MECHANICS I (5) CR: PHY 221. Principles of statics, equilibrium of rigid bodies e lestostatics of simple s tructural elements (lee-problem ) EGB 341 SOLID MECHANICS II (4) PR: EGB 340. Dyanamics of discrete particle s and distributed mass bodies; spatial kin ematics and kinetics. (lee-problem) EGB 342. ENGINEERING MATERIALS I (6) PR: CHM 213, EGB 340. An introduction to the structure and properties of engineer ing materials. (lee-lab) EGB 343 FLUIDS I (6) PR: EGB 341. Fundamental and expe rimental concepts in id ea l and viscous fluid theory; mom entum and engergy considerations; compressible flow ; boundary layer, Navier-Stokes equation. (lee-lab) EGB 401. ENGINEERING ANALYSIS I ( 4) PR: MTH 304. Application of differential equations.

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ENGINEERING 231 EGB 501, 502, 503, 504, 505 ENGINEERING ANALYSIS II, 111, IV V, VI (3 each) PR: CC or MTH. 401. Ordinary diff e rential equ a tions with e mphasi s on nume rical methods and series solutions; boundary valu e problems; orthogonal functions; vector a naly sis; partial differenti a l equa tion s ; the LaPlac e tran s form ; fun c tion s of a c ompl e x variabl e EGB 601. ENGINEERING ANALYSIS VII (3) PR: CC. Applications of applied mathematics to the study of linearized dynamic systems and networks; state space ; stability theory ; extensions to discrete and non linear systems. Electrical and Electronic Systems EGE 301. LABORATORY 1(1) PR: EGB 311. EGE 302. LABORATORY 2 (1) PR: EGB 3 12. EGE 303. LABORATORY 3 (1) PR : EGE 3 01. EGE 404. LABORATORY 4 (1) PR: EGE 302 ; CR: EGE 420 EGE 405. LABORATORY 5 (1) PR : EGE 3 02 ; CR: EGE 4 21. EGE 406. LABORATORY 6 (1) PR: EGE 3 02 ; CR: EGE 430 EGE 310, 410. NETWORK ANALYSIS AND DESIGN I, II (3 each) PR: EGB 311. A second course in linear circuit analysis and design Transient and steady-state responses of passive R-L-C networks to various forcing functions EGE 320, 420. ELECTRONICS I II (3 each) PR: EGB 312. A second course in the physical principles of ele c tronic devices with emphasis on semi-conductor electronics Includes the analysis and design of ampli fiers and switching circuits EGE 330, 430. FIELDS AND WAVES I. II ( 3 each) PR: PHY 305 3 06, EGB 401. A basic introduc tion to ele c troma g n e ti c fie ld th e ory including s t a ti c and dyn a mi c e l ec tromagneti c fie ld s EGE 404, 405, 406, SEE EGE 301 EGE 410. SEE EGE 310. EGE 411. LINEAR SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (3) PR: EGE 410. Provides further study in the analysis of linear networks and systems. Includes time and frequency domain points of view LaPlace, Fourier and Super position integrals. EGE 420. SEE EGE 320 EGE 421. COMMUNICATION CIRCUITS (3) PR: EGE 420. Provides further study in electronic circuits. Includes oscillator modu lator, and detector analysis and design. EGE 425. COMMUNICATION ENGINEERING (3) PR: EGE 421. System considerations of electronic circuits; radio propagation ; antennas ; transmitters and receivers EGE 430. SEE EGE 330. EGE 432. DISTRIBUTED NETWORKS (3) PR: EGE 330, EGE 410. Transmission lines standing waves impedance, wave guides EGE 440. LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGB 325. Introduction to analysis and design of linear feedback control systems. Covers block diagrams, flow charts Bode Nyquist and Root Locus techniques. EGE 441. CONTROL LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE440.

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232 ENGINEERING EGE 444, LOGIC DESIGN (3) PR: EGB 312. Binary number system; truth functions; Boolean algebra; canonical forms; minimization of combinational logic circuits; logic circuits in computers. EGE 445 LOGIC LABORATORY ( 1) CR: EGE444. EGE 45 0 MICROELECTRONICS ENGINEERING (3) PR: PHY 323, EGE 410, 420, 330. Principles of microminiaturization of electrical circuits Fabrication techniques, component realization, component isolation, para sitics. EGE 451. MICROELECTRONICS LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 450. EGE 460, 462, 464. ELECTROMECHANICS I, II, Ill (3 each) PR: ECB 313. Theory of e l ec trom ec h an i ca l energy conve rsion. Characteristics and contro l of rotating electrical machines, tran sformers, e l ectromagnets, loud spea k e rs, microphones, transducers. EGE 461, 463 465. ELECTROMECHANICS LAB 1 2, 3 ( 1 each) CR: EGE 460, 4 62 464 respectively. EGE 474, 476, 478. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS I II, III (5 each) PR: CC. A course series to permit non-electrical majors to tak e advanced course work in th e e l ectrica l area. EGE 475, 477 479. SYSTEMS LABORATORIES 1, 2 3 ( 1 each) CR: EGE 474, 476, 478 respective ly. EGE 480, 481, 482. SPECIAL ELECTRICAL TOPICS I II, III (l-4 each) PR:CC. EGE 499. DESIGN PROJECT ( 3 ) PR : S e nior Standing An individu a l or t eam project involvin g th e design of an e l e ctri cal component or system. Required of all e l ectrica l sen iors. EGE 520. PULSE CIRCUIT PRINCIPLES (3) PR: EGE 411 421. An introdu ction to the analysis and design of pulse and timing c ircuits with applicati ons. EGE 530 UHF PRINCIPLES (3) PR: EGE 411, 42 1 430. A study of tub es, devices and c ir cui t s peculiar to systems which operate a t ultra high and super high frequenci es. EGE 531. UHF LABORATORY ( 1 ) CR: EGE 530. EGE 540 NONLINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) PR : EGE 440. Principles of sta t e variables phase-plane and d escr ibing fun c tions EGE 541. CONTROL LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 540. EGE 542 SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS (3) PR: EGE 444. The design of switching circuits with inputs that are fun c tion s of time is carried from a word description through a minimum state r ea lization using flip flops, logi c gates and delay e l e ments. EGE 544. DIGITAL COMPUTERS (3) PR : EGE 444. Digit a l a rithm etic; computer subsys t ems arithmetic units ; con trol units; memory units; general purpose computers EGE 545. DIGITAL LABORATORY ( 1 ) CR: EGE544. EGE 547. DISCRETE STRUCTURES FOR DIGITAL SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGE 444. Set a l gebra basic a l gebraic st ru ctu r es in compu t ers, boolean algebra, propositi ona l lo g i c and graphs. Applications to computers EGE 548. ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS (2) PR: EGE 411. Techniques and principles of e l ectron ic measurement. EGE 549. MEASUREMENTS LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE548. EGE 560. POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (3) PR: CC. Analysis tec hniques for AC power systems. EGE 562. COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF POWER SYSTEMS (3) PR: CC. R eview of Fort ran programming, matrix a l gebra, network formulation,

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ENGINEERING 233 short circuit studies, simulation of algebraic equations, load flow studies, numerical solution of differ e ntial equ a tions tran sien t stab ility studies. Strong emphasis on techniques a d aptable to digital computer s t ud i es, program s will b e written and run on th e IBM 3 60/65. EGE 580, 581, 582 SPECIAL ELECTRICAL TOPICS I, II, III ( 1-3 each) PR:CC EGE 585. ENGINEERING SEMINAR (1) PR: CC EGE 599. RESEARCH OR DESIGN (1-9) PR: CC EGE 610, 611. ADVANCED CIRCUIT THEORY I, II (3 each) PR: CC. Network fundame ntals; n e twork characterization; frequency analysis; super position integral s; signal-flow techniques; s tability probl e ms; real-and-imaginary re lations. EGE 612 NONLINEAR CIRCUITS (3) PR: CC. Analytical and topological approaches to nonlinear circuits; nonlinear re sonance; relaxation oscillations EGE 614, 615, 616. NETWORK SYNTHESIS I, II, III (3 each) PR: CC. Network functions ; physical realizability ; two-terminal network synthesis methods; frequency transformation ; pote ntial analogy; a pproximation probl e ms ; insertion-loss and transfer function sy nthesi s EGE 620. INFORMATION THEORY ( J ) PR: CC. Concepts o f information, information c hannels, channel capaci ty, informa tion sources and Shann o n's fundam en tal th eorem. EGE 622. NOISE THEORY (3) PR: CC. Electric a l noise and signals through linear filt ers and e lectronic systems. EGE 623. CODING THEORY I (3) PR : CC. Error-co rr ec tin g co d es a lgebrai c block codes, linear codes and feedback shift registers; BCH co d es and decoding methods. EGE 624 CODING THEORY II (3) PR: EGE 62 3. Convolutional codes: threshold decoding and sequen tial decoding. Burst e rror codes. Arithm e tic co d es. EGE 626, 627 628. THEORY OF COJ\11\IUNICATION I II III (3 each) PR: CC. Physic a l b as i s and sta tisti ca l representation of e lectri ca l noise; filt e ring modulation, and d em o dul at i on of signals corrupted by noise ; corre lation techn iq u es and linear prediction ; s tati s ti ca l es tim a ti on of signal parameter; optimum filt ers and rec eivers; ambiguity functi o n s and inv e r se probability. Quantitative measure o f in formation sources, noise channe l s and c h a nnel capacity; an int ro ducti on t o errorcorrecting codes EGE 630, 631 632. ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND WAVES I. II, III (3 each) PR : CC. Electromagne ti c theory from th e eng ineering point of view, propagation and refl ec tion of waves, guide d waves, r esonant cavi ti es, antennas& radiation. EGE 635. MICROWAVE GENERATION AND AMPLIFICATION ( 3 ) PR: CC. A study of e l ec tromagne tic wave genera tion and amplification. Magnetrons, kly s trons solid-state mi crowave oscillators and related devices. EGE 636. ELECTRICAL LABORATORY (I) CR: EGE635. EGE 637. MICROWAVE COMPONENTS (3) PR : CC. A study of directional coupl ers junctions, cav iti es and ot h e r passive micro wave compon e nt s including micro wave integrated circuits. EGE 638. MICROWAVE NETWORKS (3) PR : CC. Scatt e ring and transfe r repr esen t a ti ons of n-port s Odd and even mod e theory Wav e filt ers. EGE 640. DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGE -HO or CC. Sample-data and digital co ntrol processes EGE 641. RANDOM PROCESSES IN CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) PR : EGE -!-!O or CC. Sample-data and digit a l co ntrol processes.

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234 ENGINEERING EGE 641. RANDOM PROCESSES IN CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) PR : EGE -4-10 or CC. Analysis and design of control systems subject to ran dom inputs and disturbances EGE 642. MODERN CONTROL THEORY (3) PR: EGE 140 540, 640, 641 or CC. A study of modern control techniques includ ing optimum and adaptive control. EGE 644. AUTOMATA THEORY I (3) PR: EGE 5-!7. Review of mathematical foundations, decomposition and intercon nection of digital machines, measurement and control of finite-state sequential cir cuits, machine ide ntification regular expressions and finite-state machines. EGE 645. AUTOMATA THEORY II (3) PR. EGE 64-!. Vector spaces over finite fields linear sequential circuits, pseudo random sequences, turing machines, recursive function computability EGE 646. AUTOMATA THEORY III (3) PR: EGE 6-!5 Artificial languages phase-strncture grammars operations on lan guages decision problems, discrete value random processes, Markov processes, probabilistic sequential machines non-determininistic sequential machines. EGE 647. SIMULATION TECHNIQUES FOR ELECTRICALS (3) PR: CC. Theory of simulation of systems characterized by lumped and distributed parameters. EGE 648. ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS (2) PR: CC. Advanced techniques and principles of electronic measurement. EGE 649. MEASUREMENTS LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 6-!8. EGE 650, 651 652. SOLID STATE ELECTRONICS I, II, III (3 each) PR: CC. Theory of operation and application of circuits and devices. EGE 653, 654. PRINCIPLES OF SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE MODELING I, II (3 each) PRE: EGE 411, 4 3 0. A course s equence which emphasizes systematic methods for obtaining models which relate device physics to terminal behavior and which provide appropriate compromises betwe en accuracy and simplicity. EGE 655. COMPUTER DESIGN LANGUAGES (3) PR: CC or EGE 544. Simulation languages for digital computer systems; APL, CDL and others. Simulation of elements, operations, sequences and of a complete Digit a l computer. EGE 656. DIGITAL ARITHMETIC METHODS (3) PR: CC or EGE 544. Study of the number systems and the algorithms used for digital arithmetic computation with emphasis in their implementation, speed and refiability considerations EGE 657. COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE (3) PR: CC or EGE 655 or EGE 656. The macro-structure of computers is considered in this course, ranging from the orthodox von Neumann designs to multiprocessors, stack processors, pipe-line systems and associative computers. EGE 660 661, 662. ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS (II, III (3 each) PR: CC. Steady-state and transient ana l ysis of intermnnected power systems; power circuit protection; transient characteristics of apparatus. EGE 670. PULSE COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS (3) PR: CC. Sampling theory-pulse waveform generation and modulation, PAM, PWM, PPM related multiplex systems telemetry applications. EGE 671. DATA TRANSMISSION I ( : J) PR: EGE 670. Quantization theory-binary coding systems, ideal binary trans mission, on-off keying FSK PSK PCM, applications. EGE 672. DAT A TRANSMISSION II (:J) PR: EGE 671. M-ary systems-MASK, MFSK, MPSK, o rth ogonal systems multi level and multistate coding s impl ex codes, orthogonal and biorthogonal codes, polysignal syst ems, synchronization methods. EGE 680. SPECIAL ELECTRICAL PROBLEMS I (l-3 each) PR: CC.

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EGE 681. SELECTED ELECTRICAL TOPICS (1-3) PR: CC EGE 698. ADVANCED ENGINEERING SEMINAR (1-3) PR : CC. EGE 699. RESEARCH OR DESIGN (1-18) PR: CC. EGE 799. DOCTORAL DISSERTATION (1-15) PR: CC. ENGINEERING 235 Energy Conversion and Mechanical Design EGR 3ll. THERMODYNAMICS III (3) PR:EGB 322. The study of energy conversion processes and cycles as modi fied for optimization of capacity and efficiency. Applications include pumps, com pressors, turbines, internal combustion engines, power and refrigeration cycles EGR 315. HEAT TRANSFER I (4) PR: EGB 322. The basic laws of conduction, convection and radiation; anal ysis of the effect on heat transfer of thermal conductivity, emissivity, fluid trans port properties and Reynold's number. (lee lab) EGR 326. DYNAMICS OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS (3) PR: PHY 301, MTH 303. Plane and angular motion; velocity and acceleration curves, velocities and accelerations in mechanisms, static and dynamic force analysis Rolling and sliding contact pairs, cams, gear tooth action. ( lee-lab) EGR 348. PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS I (3) PR : EGB 311. Basic Electrical Measurements, Oscilloscopes, Record ers, Temper ature Measurement, Displacement Measurement Pressure Measurement Flow Measur ement. (lee-lab) EGR 350. ENERGY CONVERSION LABORATORY I (2) CR: EGB 322. Introduction to engineering laboratory measurements with em phasis on the writing of technical reports. Experiments in the measurement of concentrations, temperature, pressure flow of fluids; determination of density, viscosity diffusivities, analysis of combustion products (leelab) EGR 411. THERMODYNAMICS IV (3) PR: EGR 311. Introduction to mathematical thermodynamics, the Maxwell rela tions, real gas behavior, ideal mixtures and solutions, introduction to phase and chemical equilibrium. EGR 413. FLUID MACHINERY I (4) PR: EGB 343. Performance characteristics of pumps and fans; energy conver sion in fluid machines; design of piping and duct systems; proper selection of pumps and fans for given fluid systems; analysis of system efficiency parameters; correlation of d es ign predictions with ex perim e ntal data. EGR 417. FUELS AND COMBUSTION (3) PR: EGB 322 A study of the combustion characteristics of gaseous, solid and liquid fuels and equipment needed to safely and economically control combus tion processes (lee-lab) EGR 419. POWER PLANT ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3) PR: EGR 311 EGR 315. Parameters affecting utility power production; daily load curves; estimation of future loads; economics of power generation; system efficiency as affected by the thermodynamic cycle, multiunit scheduling, and load variation; heat transfer regions in the steam generator; water treatment methods. EGR 421. INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR ENGINEERING I (3) PR: PHY 323. Neutron density and thermalization parameters; criticality calcula tions; transient flux parameters; reactor operation; control instrumentation. EGR 424. REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING (3) PR: EGR 311, EGR 315. Application of thermodynamics, heat transfer and fluid flow to the design of systems for controlling our environment; heating and cooling load calculations; psychrometrics of air conditioning processes.

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236 ENGINEERING EGR 428. MACHINE ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3) PR: EGB 3-10. Stress analysis stress strain relations, deflection analysis, shock and impact, selection of materials, strength of materials. Principles of design. (lee-lab). EGR 429. MECHANICAL DESIGN I (3) PR: EGR 326, EGR 428. Application of the principles of engineering mechan ics, materials and manufacturing to the analysis and design of mechanical ele ments. (lee-lab). EGR 441. ANALOG COMPUTERS I (3) PR: EGB 325, EGR 348 or CI. The study of linear and nonlinear engineering systems using analog computers Magnitude and time scaling. (lee-lab). EGR 445. DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS II (3) PR: EGB 325. Analysis of response of dynamic systems with emphasis on the inter-disciplinary nature of such response. A continuation of Dynamic Response I, EGB 325. EGR 450. ENERGY CONVERSION LABORATORY II (1) PR: EGR 350. Continuation of EGR 350 with emphasis on measurement tech niques, energy balances of operating systems and technieal report writing. (lee-lab). EGR 453. MECHANICAL CONTROL (3) PR: EGB 311, 325. Analysis of devkes for measurement and control. Transmitters, error detectors, controllers and final control elements. Block diagram representation. (lee-lab). EGR 454 CONTROLS LABORATORY (1) PR: EGB 325, CR: EGR 453. Familiarization with and performance t esting of automatic control systems. EGR 471. CHEMICAL PROCESS CALCULATIONS (3) PR: CHM 213, MTH 304, PHY 215. Mathematical formulation of industrial chemi cal process problems, including graphical and numerical methods. Principles of Stoichiometry. EGR 472. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA (4) PR: EGB 321, EGR -171. An introduction to momentum transfer, energy transfer, and mass transfer as applied to industrial chemical process problems. EGR 473, 474. CHEMICAL PROCESS PRINCIPLES I, II (4 each) PR: CHM -142, EGB 3-13, EGR 471. Application of transport concepts to the solution of problems concerned with the design, economics and operation of chemical process equipment; fluid flow, heat transfer, absorption, drying, evapo ration, crystallization, extraction, and distillation EGR 475. INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY (3) PR: CHM 332, EGR 47-1. A critical study of selected chemical process indus tries in order to give the student a better understanding of the direct application of basic chemical process principles. EGR 481. SPECIAL 'IOPICS ENERGY CONVERSION I (1-4) PR:CC EGR 482. SPECIAL TOPICS ENERGY CONVERSION II (1-4) PR: C:C EGR 501. INDUSTRIAL AIR POLLUTION CONTROL (4) PR: EGB 321, EGB 322. A basic course in the elements of large source air pollu tion and control as presented from the engineering viewpoint. Major units to b e studies: Sources, Atmospheric Meteorology, Diffusion Local Influences, Control Measures, Emergencies, Protection. (lee-lab). EGR 511. STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS (3) PR: CI. The statistical and microscopic approach to molecular transport/henom ena. Boltzman and quantum statistics; entropy and probability; the thir law of thermodynamics; evaluation of partition functions. EGR 513. FLUID MACHINERY II (3) PR: 413. Performance characteristics of compressors and exhausters, vacuum pumps. and gas turbines; internal energy exchange and fluid flow paths;

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ENGINEERING 237 piping and ducting considerations; economic selection of proper equipment to match fluid and power system requirements; evaluation of off-design conditions. EGR 515. HEAT TRANSFER II (4) PR: EGR 315. A continuation of EGR 315. Analysis of non-steady heat trans fer by mathematical and graphical means Radiation from and through flames De sign of heat transfer equipment. (lee-lab). EGR 522. ACOUSTICS AND NOISE CONTROL (3) PR: CC. Fundamentals of sound propagation; sound power and intensity; psycho acoustics, industrial noise sources, methods of nois e attenuation; community noise ordinances; instrumentation for noise measurement. (lee-lab). EGR 523. MECHANICAL UTILITIES SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGR 413, EGR 424. Analysis and design of a building's mechanical sys tems for fire and lightning protection air conditioning, water supply, waste, and storm drains EGR 526. ANALYSIS METHODS FOR MECHANICAL DESIGN (3) PR: EGR 428. Treatment of stress, strain and strength aspects of Machine D e sign. Application of failure th eo ri es, residual stresses and energy principles to machine e lements EGR 527. ADVANCED DYNAMICS OF MACHINERY (3) PR : EGR 326. A continuation of the undergraduate course and devoted to a more detailed study of velocities, accel e rations and forces in machine parts having reciprocating, rotating and combined motions A complete force analysis will b e made of an internal combustion engine. EGR 528 MECHANICAL DESIGN II (3) PR: EGR 429. A continuation of EGR 429. (lee-lab). EGR 529. PROJECT DESIGN (3) PR: EGR 429. Correlation of previously acquired m ec hanical d es ign experi ences with a creative d es ign project. (lee-lab). EGR 533 MECHANICAL VIBRATION AND BALANCING (3) PR : EGB 341, 401. Transient and steady state vibration analysis of mechanical systems with lumped parameters. Dynamic balancing, vibration isolation and simulation of systems. EGR 535. LUBRICATION I (3) PR :EGB 343, 401. The theor e tical basis of lubri ca tion and hydrodynamic bearing theory. The study of lubrication requirements of diff e rent typ es of m llec-lab). EGR 560. POWER UTILIZATION SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGB 312. Standard electrical voltages, NEMA standards, motor parameters motor control, control sys tem e lements int erlocks, conductors, raceways, Na tional Electrical Code. Protectiv e devices. EGR 576. REACTOR DYNAMICS ( 5) PR: EGR 474. Lecture: (3 contact hours ) Introduc tion to d es ign and control of chemical reactors with particular em phasi s on th e roles of mixing and heat transfer. Laboratory: (6 contact hours). The student in this laboratory will be responsible for the safe and efHcient manufacture of a "ch em ical in the plan ned Chemical Proces s Laborato1y. EGR 577. DESIGN AND CASE PROBLEMS ( :l ) PR: EGR -17-1. DESIGN: This part of the course exposes th e c hemi ca l student to the desi g n of a chemical plant or a major part of a process. The annual A. I. Ch. E student contest design probl ems and typical design problems sup-

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238 ENGINEERING plied by local industries will be used 1.-:ASE PROBLEMS: This part of the course stresses engineering "art" The word "case" connotates a specific engineering problem situation actually experienced by someone in the past or pres ent. The student must generate his own individual approach to problem solving, benefitting from those of others in the class EGR 581. SPECIAL TOPICS ENERGY CONVERSION III (1-4) PR:CC. EGR 582. SPECIAL TOPICS ENERGY CONVERSION IV (l-4) PR : CC. EGR 611. THERMODYNAMICS OF FLUID FLOW (:J) PR: CC. Interrelationship of the equations of fluid motion and of thermody namics for ideal gases; subsonic and supersonic gas flows ; flow s with friction and with heat transfer; supersonic nozzle design; parameters of fluid thurst. EGR 612. ADVANCED THERMODYNAMICS (3) PR: CC. Advanced treatment of the general equations of thermodynamics, principal equations of chemical reaction; the chemical potential and equilib rium; analysis of metastable states. Irreversibility and steady flow EGR 615. HEAT TRANSFER III (3) PR: CC. Advanced treatment of basic heat transfer phenomena. Radiation absorbing and non-absorbing media; radiation from gases and plasmas; "grey body calculations. Analysis of convective heat transfer by boundary layer theory and equations of fluid motion. EGR 617. ENERGY TRANSFORMATION AND STORAGE (3) PR: CC. Analysis of direct energy conversion systems; photoelectric ce lls thennocouples, foe! cells, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devic es, solar energy cells, rectifiers, inverters energy storage devices. EGR 621. INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR ENGINEERING II (3) PR: CC. Continuation of EGR 421. Heat Transfer fluid flow and energy re moval in reactors Reactor materi a ls and fuels. Radiation protection and shield ing, preliminary reactor design. EGR 622. ACOUSTICS AND NOISE CONTROL II (3) PR : EGR. 522. Continuation of EGR 522, Acoustics and Noise Control I EGR 624. AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS (:J) PR: EGR .U3, EGR -l2-l. Analysis and' design of air conditioning systems; cri teria for selection of central systems, unit air conditioners, or self-contained units; performance characteristics of single zone systems, with and without reheat, multizone systems, double duct and variable volume systems. EGR 629 ADVANCED MECHANICAL DESIGN (3) PR: CC. A technical application course involving the problem of d eve lop ing machines to perform specified functions The machine to be designed will be designated by the in stmctor. The analysis will include evaluating all parts for stress, vibration, wear and proper consideration of manufacturing processes involved. (lee lab) EGR 630. APPLIED ENGINEERING ASPECTS OF FATIGUE (3) PR: EGR 526. Evaluation of strength of machine m embers under fatigue loadings. Stress concentrations, residual stress effects surface coatings, environ mental effects. Statistical treatment in fatigue analysis. EGR 633. VIBRATION ANALYSIS (3) PR: EGR 533. Application of generalized coordinates, LaGrnnge 's equation, ma trix iteration, and other specialized methods to discrete multimass systems. EGR 635. LUBRICATION II (3) PR: EGR 535. A continuation of EGR 535 with emphasis on hydrodynamic squeeze film theory and gas lubricated bearings EGR 640. DIGITAL TECHNIQUES IN ENERGY TRANSFER SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGB 3.33, EGR 441 or CI. Application of both general purpose and spe cialized programs to the solution of problems in the design of control sys tems, kinematic mechanisms and e nergy transfer systems. Som e languages and

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ENGINEERING 239 program:; to be used are FORTRAN, tbe Continuous System Modeling Program and the Mechanism Design Program. EGR 642. DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS AND MODEL THEORY I (3) PR: CC. Theory of dimensional analysis, similitude, and design of mode IS'. EGR 643. DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS AND MODEL THEORY II ( 3) PR: EGR 642. Continuation of EGR 6-12. Including model testing and corela tion of tests with fractional analysis EGR 648. DIRECT DIGITAL CONTROL (3) PR: EGB 503, EGR 553 656 or CI. Application of digital computers to con trol of engineering processes. Includes study of digital filtering, Z-transforms, su pervisory control, A I D and D I A conversion. EGR 651. PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS II (3) PR: EGR :3-18, -1-11, -150 or CI. The technique s and theory for measuring tem perature, pressure displacement, speed, acceleration, force, power, and psychro metric properties with particular attention to dynamic measurement. (lee lab ). EGR 656. NUMERICAL MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL (3) PR: CC. Incremental and absolute control systems. Number systems used in nu merical control. Digital to analog and analog to digital conversion. Applicatiions. EGR 657. FLUID AMPLIFIERS AND CIRCUITS (3) PR: CC. Analysis and design of fluid devices for use as amplifiers, logic de vices and memory elements in instrumentation and control systems EGR 659. ADVANCED MECHANICAL CONTROL (3) PR: EGR 445, EGB 502, EGE 540 or CI. Application of state space techniqu e s to anal ysis and design of energy transfer control systems Includes study of opti mal control and adaptive control. EGR 681. SPECIAL PROBLEMS I (1-4) PR: CC. EGR 682. SPECIAL PROBLEMS II (1-4) PR: CC. EGR 698. ADVANCED SEMINAR ( I-3) PR: CC. EGR 699. RESEARCH OR DESIGN ( I-9) PR: CC. Industrial Systems EGS 401. INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS (3) Introduction to organizational, planning and control functions in industrial systems EGS 402. INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES (3) PR: EGB 337. Introduction to basic industrial processes emphasizing interdependency and similarities among industries. Students research specific industries and visit local industrial plants. (lee lab ). EGS 403, 404. PRODUCTION DESIGN I, II (3 each) PR: EGS 402, 461. Methods study, predetermined time systems, wage administr a tion work measurement techniques including stop-watch time study work sam pling, standard data and production studies. (lee-lab). EGS 405. PRODUCTION CONTROL SYSTEMS I (3) PR: EGS 404. Principles and techniques of industrial planning and control systems design. Cost analysis forecasting and controlling production activities. EGS 406. PRODUCTION CONTROL SYSTEMS II (3) PR: EGS 405, 441. Advanced topics in industrial planning and contro l systems design including the use ofCPM, PERT and LOB EGS 407. ENGINEERING VALUATION II (3) PR: EGB 337 or equivalent. Analysis of economic limitations on engineering pro jects. Income tax considerations, replacement models, MAPI and obsolescence. EGS 409. PLANT FACiLITIES DESIGN I (4) PR: EGS 405. Design and modification of plant facilities including design of a complete manufacturing operation. Problems in plant locations, layout, material handling, and equipment selection.

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240 ENGINEERING EGS 421. HYBRID COMPUTERS (3) PR: EGB 232, EGS 425. The use of hybrid computers for th e so luti on of problems in sys t ems a nalysis. ( l eelab). EGS 423. COMPUTER SYSTEMS I (3) PR: MTH 3 05, EGB 232 or equiva l en t Algorithms and computing. Computer organization and operating systems. Data managem ent procedures Stru cture and application of programming languag es. EGS 424. COMPUTER SYSTEMS II (3) PR: EGS 423. Introduc tion to computer hardwa re. P e ripheral subsystems. Transfer of information and con trol within a com plete operating sys t em. Executiv e sy st e ms and control monitors. EGS 425. COMPUTER SYSTEMS III (3) PR: EGS -!2-!. A continuation of EGS -!2-! stressing detail e d applications of machine and assembly language to computer operating syst e ms. EGS 427. FORTRAN APPLICATIONS I (3) PR: EGB 232, MTH 305. Solution of engineering probl e ms using di g it a l com puters. Numerical methods u s ing FORTRAN. EGS 429. COMPUTER PROJECTS (3) PR: CC. Special projec:ts involving th e use of and operation of digital I ana log computers. EGS 441, 442. OPERATIONS RESEARCH I, II (3 each) PR : EGS -!61. An introduction to the basic operations r esea rch techniques linear programming dynamic programming, simulation and queueing. EGS 461, 462. ENGINEERING STATISTICS I, II (3 each) PR: MTH 303 An introduction to th e basic concepts of statistical ana lysis. Prob ability, distribution functions est imating and t es ting procedures, regression and correlation analysis. EGS 472. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3) PR: EGB 232, EGS 405, 442. Th e definition and analysis of systems. The so lution of industrial systems probl ems using dynamic programming, s imulation que u e ing linear and nonlinear programming. EGS 503. HUMAN FACTORS (3) PR : CC. Problems in the d es ign analysis and evaluation of man machin e sys tems from the viewpoint of physical m e ntal and psychological characteristics and limitations encountered. EGS 505. INVENTORY CONTROL (3) PR: EGS 406 or equivalent. Prop e rties of inventory systems and th e fundamen tals of deterministic and probabilistic inventory mode ls. EGS 507. ENGINEERING VALUATION STUDIES (3) PR: CC. The analysis of economic considerations affecting engineering deci sion making. Not open to students who hav e had EGS 407. EGS 521 522. COMPUTER SIMULATION I, II (3 each) PR : CC. Use of digital, analog and hybrid computers in s imulating phy sica l and industrial systems. EGS 533. FORTRAN APPLICATIONS II (3) PR: EGS 427 or equivalent. Advanced nume ri ca l methods u sing FORTRAN, ap plied to higher level problems in the individual student's field of engineering mathe matics or applied science. EGS 540. OPERATIONS RESEARCH (3) PR : CC. Linear programming, game theoretic models, e conomic optimization. Not open to students who have had EGS 442. EGS 541, 542. NUMERICAL METHODS OF SYSTEMS ENGINEERING I II (3 each) PR. MTH -!01. The study and application of matrix algebra, diff e r e ntial equations, calculus of finite differences operation and transform methods, and stochastic processes EGS 560. INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS (3) PR : CC. Industrial applications of probability t es ting of hypoth eses, regres-

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ENGINEERING 241 sion techniques and analysis of varianc e Not open to students who have had EGS -162. EGS 561, 562 DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS I, II (3 each) PR: EGS 462 or equival e nt. D e velopment of the basic experimental designs. R a ndomized block latin squa res and factorial designs EGS 563. ENGINEERING STATISTICS III (3) PR : EGS 462 or equival ent. Application of non-parametric statistics, sequen tial analysi s orthogonal polynomials and other optimization techniques to in dustrial problems. EGS 565. STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL (3) PR: EGS 461 or equivalent. Af plic a tion of statistical techniques to the control of industrial processes. Contro charts and acceptance procedures. Sequential sampling. EGS 566. RELIABILITY ENGINEERING (3) PR: EGS 462 or equivalent. Fundamental concepts of reliability control. Es timation of reliability of systems and components Measures of availability, main tainability and reliability. EGS 580, 581, 582. SPECIAL INDUSTRIAL PROJECTS I, II, III (1-3 each) PR : CC. EGS 603. MAN I MACHINE SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGS 503 Principles of work measurement, process analysis, value anal ysis and human factors and their application to industrial situations EGS 605. PRODUCTION CONTROL SYSTEMS III (3) PR : EGS 406 or equivalent. Forecasting procedures, development of produc tion plans, scheduling techniques and inventory models Application of EDP to pro duction control systems EGS 607. ADVANCED ENGINEERING VALUATION (3) PR: EGS 407 or equvalent. Statistical models for analyzing engineering alter natives from an economic viewpoint The us e of advanced engineering economy con cepts in solving industrial problems. EGS 609. PLANT FACILITIES DESIGN II (3) PR: EGS 409 or CC. Advanc e d tec hniques for evaluation of alternative plans for plant arrangement, including equipment location and material handling sys tems EGS 620. COMPUTER THEORY I (3) PR: CC. Advan ce d c on cepts in compute r or ga ni z ation Combinatorial logic, data representa ti o n and tran sfe r con t ro l fun c ti o ns, s t o r a g e and a c c e ssing. Input/output fac iliti es M o d u l a r pro gra mmi ng r-on cepts. EGS 621. COMPUTER THEORY II (3) PR: EGS 620. Advanced con c epts in programming languages The interrela tion between machine, assembly and procedure oriented languages. Introduction to the design of monitors, assemblers compilers. EGS 622. COMPUTER THEORY III (3) PR : EGS 621. Continuation and extension of EGS 621 emphasizing detailed de sign principles used in the constru c tion of monitors, assemblers and compilers. EGS 641. LINEAR PROGRAMMING (3) PR: EGS 442 or equivalent. The simplex method, degeneracy duality theory; applications of linear programming to industrial problems. EGS 642. NONLINEAR AND DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING (3) PR: EGS 641. Optimization procedure s u s ing nonlinear and dynamic programming. Analy sis of multi stag e syst e ms. EGS 644. QUEUEING THEORY (3) PR: EGS 442, 462 Deterministic and probabilistic queueing models. Poisson queues and special non-Poisson queue s with exponential and non-exponential services. Single and multiple channel que ues. EGS 646. MUL TIV ARIABLE OPTIMIZATION (3) PR: EGS 562, Optimum seeking search methods, response surfaces, ridge analysis and stocha s ti c approximations.

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242 ENGINEERING EGS 647 648. STOCHASTIC PROCESSES I II ( 3 each) PR : EGS 562. Theory and application of s to c h as ti c process es as models for e mpiri ca l phenomena, with e mph as i s on the following pro cesses: P oisso n stationary nor m a l counting, r enewa l Markov birth and d ea th Spectral r epresen t a tions, time seri es, s moothing and filt e ring EGS 661 662. THEORY OF INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS I II (3 each) PR: EGS 4 62 or equivalent. Theor e ti ca l di stributions, continuous and di screte expecta tion and es tim a tion prope rti es sa mpling and sampling distributions. EGS 663, 664. STATISTICAL DESIGN MODELS I II (3 each) PR : EGS 66 2 or e quival ent. D es ign of ex perim ent m athe matical mod e ls a ppli ca tion of advance d analysis of variable techniques as applied to industrial probl e ms. EGS 665. STATISTICAL ASSURANCE PLANS ( 3) PR: EGS 560 or equivalent. Advanced techniques in sequential quality control sys t e m s and accepta nce sa mplin g pl ans. EGS 666. THEORY OF RELIABILITY (:3) PR : EGS -t62 or equiva l en t T o pic s in s t a ti s tic a l m e th odo l ogy w hi ch h ave a ppli ca ti o n s in th e fie ld of reliability Di sc r e t e and co ntinu o u s distribution models r e li a bili ty es timation re liabilit y stmcture an d growth m o dels, and statistical d es ign for reliability EGS 668. SPECIAL TOPICS IN STATISTICS (3) PR: CC. Special topic s in s tatistics relat e d to resea rch i n e n g ineering. EGS 680 681 682 SPECIAL INDUSTRIAL TOPICS I II III (l-:J each) PR : CC. EGS 687 688. INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS DESIGN I II (:J each ) PR: EGS 521. D es i g n of integrated syste m s using statistical and o perati ons r e searc h mod e ls. Simul a ti on of integrated sys t e m s using digital, analog a nd hybrid computers EGS 698. ADVANCED ENGINEERING SEMINAR (l-3) PR : CC. EGS 699 RESEARCH OR DESIGN ( l-12) Structures, Materials, Fluids EGX 401. STRUCTURES I (5) PR: EGB 2 32, 3-tO. Elastic -p la s ti c b ehav ior of structura l members Introduction to e n ergy concepts in structural ana l ys is; introducti on t o th e theo ry of elas ticity (lee-lab ) EGX 402 ENGINEERING MATERIALS II (4) PR: EGB 3-U EGB : 321. Th e rmodynamic s of S o lid Mat eria ls. Entropy and fre e e n e rgy concepts applied t o equilibrium and rate processes in m e t a lli c, ceramic and polymer sys t ems. Metallography. (lee l a b.) EGX409. SENIOR RESEARCH/DESIGN PROJECT I (l) PR: Completion of 150 hours. Presenta tion of current and future probl e m-oriented r esea r ch/des ign topics for engineers. Orga nization o f student-fac ulty inve s tigativ e tea m s for se nior in EGX 509 or EGX 599. EGX 410 STRUCTURES II ( 4 ) PR: EGX -tOl. Introduction t o th e behavior of composite s tructural members: lamin ates sandwich pan e ls, reinforced concrete, timb e r and structures. (leelab ) EGX 4ll. CONCEPTS OF STRUCTURAL DESIGN ( 4 ) PR: EGX -tOl. Appli ca tion s of solid mechanics materials science and stmctural a nalysi s to th e d es i g n of building, bridge, ai rcraft and s hip s tructu res. Critical r ev iew o f current codes and specifica ti o ns. (lee-la b ) EGX 420. CONCEPTS OF MATERIALS E NGINEERING ( 3 ) PR: EGX -t0-2. Appli ca tion and se lecti on of m e tals, ceramics and p o l y m ers in e ngin ee rin g probl e ms. Materials t ec hn o l ogy and failure a n a lysis. (lee) EGX 421. PROCESSES IN MATERIALS ENGINEERING (3) PR : EGX -t02 or CI. Int ro ducti on t o th e b as i c metal ex tra ction and r efin ing op e r a ti o ns, di sc ussion of the va ri ous techniques of weldin g and joining materials and dis c ussi o n of th e prim ary m e th o d s o f s h aping forming m a t e ri a ls.

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ENGINEERING 243 EGX 481. TRANSPORTATION I (4/ PR: EGB 203, CI. Introduction to Transportation Engineering. (lee) EGX 485 SOIL MECHANICS I (4) PR: EGB 3-H Fundamental and experimental concepts in soil mechanic:s with emphasis on soil properties, soil moisture, soil structure and shearing strength. (lee) EGX 503 FLUID MECHANICS II (4) PR : EGB 343. Fundamental and applied aspects of compressible flow free sur face flow and unsteady flow. Flow of Compressible Gases, Free Surfac e Flow, Un steady Flow. EGX 504 EXPERIMENTAL SMF I (4) PR: EGB 343. An introduction to the e xperimental m e thods used in the study of structures, m a t e rials, fluids (lee-lab) EGX 505. SOLID MECHANICS III (3) PR: EGB 341. Dynamics of discrete and distributed mass, spatial kinematics, and kinetics inertia tensor, Eule r equations. (lee) EGB 509. SENIOR RESEARCH/DESIGN PROJECT II (3) PR: EGX 409. Problem-solving experience and training for seniors in research I d es ign projects Oral and written final reports are required. EGX 510. STRESSED-SURFACE STRUCTURES I (5) PR: EGX 410 and 511 or 576. Elastic and in elastic behavior of plate and s h ell structures; smooth and ribbe d surfaces Use of finite element techniques. (lee-lab) EGX 511. STRUCTURES III (5) PR: EGX 401. Elastic and plastic analysis of determinate and indeterminate frames and trusses Emphasis on matrix-compute r techniques (lee-lab) EGX 513. PRESTRESSED STRUCTURES (5) PR: EGX 410. Analysis and design of prestressed structural systems. Emphasis on prestressed concrete. ( l eelab) EGX 514. STRUCTURAL CONNECTIONS (3) PR: EGX -Hl. Use of th eo retical and experimental data in the analysis and de sign of structural connections in metal, wood, concrete and plastic (lee-lab ) EGX 515. STRUCTURES IV (5) PR: EGX 511. Analysis of suspension structures, towers and tall buildings by both approximate and exact methods. (lee-lab) EGX 516 STRUCTURAL DESIGN IN METALS (4) PR: EGX 411 511. Design of ductile metallic structural elements and systems. (lee-lab ) EGX 520. ENGINEERING MATERIALS III (4) PR: EGB 342. The Structure of Solid Materials Crystalline and glassy states in m e tal s and ceramics. Diffraction methods in Materials Science.Electron mi croscopy (lee-lab) EGX 521. ENGINEERING POLYMERS (3) PR: CC. Structure and bulk properties of polymers. High elasticity, topics in visco e lasticity the glass transition irreversible deformation. Technology of plastics, fi b e rs and e lastom e rs. (lee ) EGX 522. CORROSION (3) PR: EGX 402 or CI. C,orrosion principles and forms of corrosion. Testing, fail ure analysis and protection. Emphasis on application to engineering problems Intro duction to electro-chemical kinetics. (lee) EGX 523. DIFFUSION (3) PR: EGX 402. Theor e tical and practical analysis of diffusion in solids includ ing th e physical meaning and implications of the concepts which influence and apply to diffusion in crystalline solids (lee ) EGX 524 FRACTURE MECHANICS (3) PR: CI. Introduction to mechanics of fracture. Design and t es ting for fracture toughness; microscopic plastic deformation crack propagation, fatigue, ductile brittle transition. (lee-lab) EGX 525. STRENGTHENING PROCESSES IN MATERIALS (3) PR: EGX 402. Introduction to the separate and combined e ffects of the primary

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244 ENGINEERING strengthening mechanisms in materi afs. Application to th e real material sys t ems such as s teels titanium berylium nick e l and r efractory metal alloys; and com po s it es. EGX 530. FLUID MECHANICS III (4) PR : EGB :).t:J. M a th e matical hydrodynamics inviscid flow (le elab) EGX 535. WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING I (4) PR: EGB :3. 4 3. A study of th e e n gineering principl e s involved in the sus t a ining and managing of th e quality and quantity of water available for hu man activities with particular emphas i s on hydrolo gy and hydraulics.(lec ) EGX 536. WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING II (4) PR : EGB :34.3. A study of th e engineering principles invo l ved in the susta inin g an d managin g of the quality and quantity of water available for human ac tiviti es with particular emphasis on water us es, engi neering eco n omy, and r e gi
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ENGINEERING 245 EGX 610. STRESSED SURFACE STRUCTURES (5) PR: EGX 4 01. Elastic and plastic behavior of plate and shell structures, s mooth and ribbe d surfaces (lee-lab) EGX 611. STRUCTURAL STABILITY I (5) PR:' EGX 511. El astic and in e lastic stability of trusses and frames, local buck lin g of structural members and plates. EGX 612. STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS I (4) PR: EGX 511. B ehavior of structural components and systems when subjected to periodic dyna mic loads. Introduction to random dynamic loads. EGX 613 STRUCTURAL OPTIMIZATION (5) PR : EGX 411 511. Use of optimization techniques in th e d esig n of structures including use of the digita l compute r as a design aid. ( l ee-lab) EGX 615. STRUCTURAL STABILITY II (4) PR : EGX 610, 612. Elastic and inel astic stability of shells and l atticed structures. EGX 616. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DESIGN 15) PR: EGX 511 514 A study of design of more complicated structural systems such as curved bridges orthotropic bridges, tall buildings, towers,suspension structures. EGX 620. ENGINEERING MATERIALS IV (4) PR: CC. Electronics processes in materials. Conductors and semi-conductors. Mag netic and Die lectric properties of so lids, Quantum and statistical models (lee-lab) EGX 621. ENGINEERING MA TE RIALS V ( 4) PR: CC. Mechanical B ehavior of Mate rials. Dislocation mechanics, plasticity frac ture Mechanical failure mechanisms Str engthening of solids. Elastic and anelastic b ehavior ( lee-la b ) EGX 622. MICROMECHANICS (3) PR: CC. The disc rete and continuum concepts in crystalline, poly-crystalline and composite materials. Siz e e ffect and the continuum limit. (lee ) EGX 623. ADVANCED X-RAY METHODS (4) PR: Cl. X-Ray diffraction analytical and experimental studies of d efocts, tex ture r esidual stress, c rystal and polycrystalline aggregates. (lee-lab ) EGX 630. FLUID MECHANICS IV (4) PR: CC. Flow of Newtonian and Non-Newtonian viscous fluids (lee-lab ) EGX 631. GAS DYNAMICS ( 3) PR: Cl. Fundame ntals of compress ible flow Wave and shock motion in un steady and steady flow. Subs onic and supersonic speeds. (lee ) EGX 640. EXPERIMENTAL SMF III (4) PR: EGX 504. Moire and photoe lastic ex p erimental techniques. (lee-lab ) EGX 641. EXPERIMENTAL SMF IV (4) PR: EGX 504. Theory and application of photoe lasticity (lee-lab ) EGX 642. EXPERIMENTAL SMF V (4) PR : EGX 504. Three dime nsional stress analysis m ethods. (lee-lab) EGX 643. EXPERIMENTAL SMF VI (4) PR: EGX 504 Theory and application of holography and optical image ry. (lee-lab ) EGX 650. SOLID MECHANICS V (3) PR: EGX 505. El astic and plastic str ess wave propagation in so lids experim ental and theoretical treatm ent, method of characteristics. (l ee) EGX 651. NONLINEAR DYNAMICS (3) PR: EGX 505. Non-linear r es torin g forc e, v iscous friction Duffing and Van d e r Pol's equations, perturbation methods. (lee) EGX 660, 661 662. HYDROSPACE ENGINEERING I, II, III, (3 each) PR: CC. Advanc e d analysis of structural, m a terial and fluid syst e ms for ma rin e environment including underwater acousti c s (lee) EGX 670. CONTINUUM MECHANICS III (3) PR: CC. Theor y of Plas ticity. Initial and subsequent yield surfaces incre-

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246 ENGINEERING mental and deformation theories, flow theo ries; problems in idea l plasticity strain hardening and slip line fields. ( lee ) EGX 671. CONTINUUM MECHANICS IV (3) PR: CC. Theory of thermoelastic and viscoelastic behavior in con tinuous me dia. Basic laws of irre versibl e th e rmodynamics and e l as ticity and application to one, two and three dimensional problems. Inelastic thermal stress Viscoelastic e lastic analogy, lin ea r viscoelastic theory and applications (lee) 1 EGX 672. NUMERICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING ANALYSIS (3) PR: CI. Application of computational and mathematical techniqu es and prin ciples to advanced engineering problems concerning structur es, materials, fluids (lee) EGX 673 ADVANCED ELASTIC ANALYSIS (3) PR: CI. Contemporary elasticity theory and applications. (lee) EGX 674. APPLIED TENSOR ANALYSIS (3) PR: CI. Tensor analysis applied to structures, materials, fluids (lee) EGX 675 WATER RESOURCE SYSTEMS (5) PR: EGX 536. The planning, design and operation of water r eso urc e systems by the use of systems analysis and operations research t ec hniqu es. (lee ) EGX 680. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SMF (1-4) PR: CC. EGX 698. ADVANCED ENGINEERING SEMINAR (1-3) PR: CC. EGX 699 RESEARCH IN SMF (1-9) PR:CC. EGX 798. RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-9) PR: CC. Supervised independent res ea rch. EGX 799. RESEARCH AND DISSERTATION (1-12) PR: CC. Supervised independent resea rch Computer Courses ESC 301. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS I (3) Basic principles of computer operation program stmcture, machine and as sembly language. ESC 302. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING-FORTRAN (3) PR: ESC 301. Programming of scie ntifically oriented problems using FORTRAN Introduction to the use of the systems library. ESC 303 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING-COBOL I (3) PR: ESC 301. Introduction of computer sys t e ms and commercially o ri ented languages Analysis of COBOL language e lements and divisions Develop m ent of file structures and application of th e COBOL languag e. ESC 304. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING-COBOL II (:3) PR : ESC :30.3. Advanced applications of COBOL. Development of matrix struc tures subscripting and data manipulating t ech niqu es as us ed in comprehensive data processing problems. ESC 310. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS II ( 3) PR: ESC 301. Component parts of a computer system. Internal represe ntation and manipulation of data and program instructions. Algorithm s and flow c harting. Programming languages and systems ( no credit for e ngin ee rin g m a jors ) ESC 311. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS III (3) PR: ESC 310. Continuation of the material in ESC 3 10 (No c redit for engi neering majors ) ESC 312. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS IV (3) PR: ESC 311. Continuation of the materia l in ESC 3 11. ( no credit for en gineering majors ) ESC 501. COMPUTER SYSTEMS (3) PR: ESC 302 or e quivalent. Study of computer sys t ems components, 1 / 0 de-

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ENGLISH 247 vices m e m o r y d ev ic es, theory of computer operation. ( Not available to students who h ave t a k e n ESC .310 .311 and .312) ESC 502 503 COMPUTER LANGUAGES AND COMPUTATION 1 II ( 3 each) PR: ESC 501. Study of prin c ipl es of machine assembly and com piled lan guages Programming applications. ESC 510 COMPUTER OPERATION ( 4 ) PR : Graduate e ngineering or s<:ie nc e status EGB 2-32 or equivalent, and CC, A comprehensive study of computer operating systems for mature students who h ave limit e d prior computer experience. Course covers material nec essary to pre par e the student for entry into th e EGS 620, 621 622 seq uence. Engineering Technology ETK 421. PRINCIPLES OF INDUSTRIAL OPERATIONS I ( 3 ) PR: ETK classification or CC. T echniques of work measurement and methods de s ign ETK 422. PRINCIPLES OF INDUSTRIAL OPERATIONS II (3) PR : ETK. 421. Techniques of produc tion co ntrol and job evaluation ETK 423. PRINCIPLES OF INDUSTRIAL OPERATIONS III (3) PR : ETK. 422. T echniques of plant loc a tion and layout ETK 480. SPECIAL TOPICS IN TECHNOLOGY I (3) PR : CC ETK 481. SPECIAL TOPICS IN TECHNOLOGY II ( 3) PR :CC ETK 482. SPECIAL TOPICS IN TECHNOLOGY III (3) PR :CC ETK 601. SPECIAL TECHNICAL TOPICS I (1-4) PR :CC ETK 602. SPECIAL TECHNICAL TOPICS II (1-4) PR :CC ETK 603. SPECIAL TECHNICAL TOPICS III (1-4) PR :CC ENGLISH Faculty: P a rri sh c h a irm a n ; H e im director of freshma n Engli sh; Morris, director of g r a du a t e prog r a m ; B e ntley, Broer Caflisch, R Carr, Ceconi, Chisnell, Cole, Collins, C. Cooper, W. D av is, S Dea ts, I. D ee r R. Di e tri c h J Di e tz, Fabry, Figg, Fi o re, G a u se, G owen, H all, Harmon, Hartl ey, Hatc h e r H en le y, Hir shbe rg Iorio, Kauf man, K ay, Kiefer, MacKay, Ma so n Moore, Och shom, O 'Hara, P a lm e r P a rk e r H Popovi c h Reader, Ross Rubin, Rut en b e r g, Sanders, S c heuerl e, E. Smith, Val entine Walther, W y ly, Zbar, Zetl er. CBS 100 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE-COMPOSITION (3) Pra c tice and drill in basi c Engli s h sen t e nce patte rns ; emphasis i s o n writing, punc tu a tion vocabulary, and idiom. CBS 101 102 FRESHMAN ENGLISH (4,4) In str u c tion and practice in the skills o f writing and r ea din g CBS 101 is pre r e quisite t o CBS 102. ENG 131. READING ACCELERATION ( 2 ) D esig ned to change th e reading habits and patterns of students ( Also see D eve l op mental Reading.) E N G 201. MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS TO 1660 ( 4 ) PR : CBS 102 An introduction to the poetry prose and drama o f Englis h literature fro m its beginn in g throug h the Metaphysical poets E N G 202. MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS, 1660-1780 (4) PR : CBS 102. English literature from Milton through th e pre R oman ti cs.

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248 ENGLISH ENG 203. MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS, 1780-1912 (4) PR: CBS 102 English literature from the Romantics through the la fe Victorians. ENG 301. CURRENT NOVELS (3) An examination of significant novels written since 1960. Recommended for nonma jors; will not be counted toward the major. ENG 302. CURRENT DRAMA (3) An examination of significant drama written since 1950. Recomm ended for nonmajors; will not be counted to wa rd th e m ajo r ENG 303. CURRENT SHORT FICTION (3) A study of current short stories and novellas in t e rms of themes of current interest (conflict, ordeal, alienation, death, escape, lov e, faith, e t c.) and in terms of experimenta l finctional techniques. R ecommended for non-majors; will not be counted toward th e major. ENG 305. MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS TO 1865 (4) PR : CBS 102. A study of th e major writers of.the Colonial, Federal, and Romantic periods. These indude Edwards, Taylor, Hawthorne, Poe Em e rson Thoreau, and Melville. ENG 306. MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS, 1865-1912 (4) PR: CBS 102 A study of the major r ea lists and ea rl y naturalists These indude Whitman, Twain, James Crane, Dickinson, Dreiser, and Robin son. ENG 307. MODERN BRITISH AND AMERICAN WRITERS, 1912-1945 (4) PR: CBS 102. Works by such Ame rican and British writers as Eliot Pound, Yeats, Thomas Shaw, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkn er, Huxley, Woolf Joyc e, Lawrence, and others. ENG 311. MASTERPIECES OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (5) Examination of represe ntative writers of Engli sh literature. R ecommende d for non majors; will not b e counted toward th e major. ENG 312. MASTERPIECES OF AMERICAN LITERATURE (5) Examination of representative writers of American literature. Recommend e d for nonmajors; will not be counted toward the major in Langu ageLit e r a ture. ENG 313. MASTERPIECES OF WORLD LITERATURE (5) Examination of representative writers (exclusive of English and American) from the classical and medieval periods, the Renaissance and the Enlightenment, and the mod e rn period. Will not be counted toward the major in Language-Literature. ENG 314. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE: GENERAL (4) This course develops in the student the abili t y to read with understanding and interpret the genres of fiction, drama, and poetry. It is concerned with analysis rather than with historical periods. Recommended for nonmajors; will not be counted toward the major. ENG 315. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE: FICTION (3) An examination of the short story and the novel as a form Recommended for nonma jors, it will not be tied to any historical period. Will not be counted toward the major. ENG 316. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE: POETRY (3) An examination of the poem as form. Recommended for nonmajors, it is not tied to any historical period. Will not be counted toward the major ENG 317. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE: DRAMA (3) An introduction to drama as literature t o be read rather than as literature to be performed. Recommended for nonmajors, it will not be tied to any historical period. Will not be counted toward inajor ENG 319. THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE (4) PR: CBS 102. Major emphasis on literary types, literary personalities of the Old and New Testaments, and Biblical : archetypes of British and American literary classics. ENG 321. NARRATION AND DESCRIPTION (4) PR: CBS 102. Emphasis upon excellence in the techniques of description and narra tion. Practice in the personal essay, and narrative sketch. ENG 325. ADV AN CED EXPOSITORY WRITING ( 4) PR: CBS 102. Composition techniques in exposition, methods and styles of writing the article and the report

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ENGLISH 249 ENG 335. WORLD LITERATURE (4) PR : CBS 102 Mast e rpie ces of the western world, in transl a tion, including ancient, m e di eva l and Renai ssa nce literature. ENG 336 WORLD LITERATURE (4) PR : CBS 102 Trans l a t e d masterpi eces of the Neoclassi cal, Romanti c, Reali s tic and Naturalistic, S y mboli s t and Modern periods. ENG 337. FOLKLORE AND POPULAR LITERATURE (4) PR : CBS 102 Fairyt a l es folk t a l es, and ballads, from Sir Patric Sp ens to Bob Dylan and contemporary min s trel po e ts. ENG 338. LITERATURE AND THE OCCULT (4) An introduc tion to the occult tradition as a m ajor ingredient in Engli sh Contin e nt a l an d American lit erature; analy sis of th e ori g ins, classifications, an d a r eas of th e var iou s black ," or magic a rts, includin g astrol ogy, necromancy, s p ells, c h a rms, occu lt practi ces, esote ri c rit es, from classical tim es through th e presen t. ENG 383. SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (1-4 ) PR : Sophomore s t andi ng This cou r se will examine in depth a r ecu rring lit e r a ry th e m e or th e wo rk of a small group of wri t e rs. T o pi cs offere d to date includ e science fic ti on, th e lit erature of th e American Indi an and spec i a l courses in writing. ENG 411. PLAYS OF SHAKESPEARE (4) PR : ENG 201 and 12 hours of lit erature. A study of t e n represe ntati ve pl ays by Sha k es pear e. ENG 415. BLACK FICTION. (4) PR: CBS 10 2 Studies in th e developm ent of Black Fiction. Writers t o b e studied includ e Wright, B a ldwin Elli so n and othe rs. ENG 416 BLACK POETRY AND DRAMA ( 4 ) PR : CBS 102. Ex a min a tion of represen t a tiv e black po e t s and dra m a ti s ts, including Hugh es, J ones, C ull e n, Bro o k s; H a nsberry Davis, Bald w in a nd Jon es ENG 421. IMAGINATIVE WRITING-POETRY. (4) PR : CBS 102 Studi es and exe r cises in prosody and i m age r y; written assignments in tra dition a l and con tempor ary forms; eva lu a tion of student work in individual co nfer e n ces; se lect e d reading. M ay b e t a k e n twice for credit. Whe n th e cou r se i s offered tw ic e in th e same aca d emic year, th e se cond offering is o p e n on l y t o s tu d en t s w h o took the c ourse in the prev i o u s quarter. ENG 423. IMAGINATIVE WRITING-FICTION (4) PR: ENG 321. Study and wri tin g of th e sh ort s tor y and sec tion s o f the nov el. Eva lua tio n o f stude nt work in conferen ces se lect e d r eadings May b e tak e n twic e for credit. When the course i s offe r e d t w i ce in th e sa m e aca d emic year, th e secon d o ff e rin g i s open o nl y t o studen t s w h o t oo k the course in th e previous quarter. ENG 425. THE AMERICAN NOVEL ( 4 ) PR : 16 h o urs o f literature. S e lecti ons from th e n ove l s of Charles Br ockde n Brown Cooper, Hawthorne, Melvill T wain, Stephen Cran e, Frank Norris, Edith Whart o n Henry James, and Theodor e Dre i se r ENG 426. THE AMERICAN DRAMA (4) PR : 16 hours o f literature. Am erican dramatic lit erature fro m th e beginnings to the prese nt ENG 429. EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH NOVEL ( 4 ) PR: 16 hours of lit erature The hi s torical developm ent o f th e Briti s h n ove l ; pre cursors of th e nov e l ; Richard son, Fie lding, Smoll ett, St erne, and th e Gothi c n ovelis ts. ENG 430. NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH NOVEL (4) PR : 16 h ours o f lit erature A con tinu a ti on of th e d eve l opme nt of the Briti s h nov e l ; Aust e n S cott, Thac keray Dic k e ns, T ro llop e, th e Bront es, Eliot, Meredith, Hard y, and Butl er. ENG 437. CONTINENTAL NOVEL (4) PR : CBS 102. Major European nov e l s fr om th e Eighteenth Century to th e presen t. Emphas i s upon French and Russian nov e l s of th e Nin e t eenth Centu ry

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250 ENGLISH ENG 459. DRAMA AND THE MODERN LITERARY TEMPER (4) PR: 12 hours of literature A study of the major literary problems faced by modern dramatists since Ibsen and the rise of realism ENG 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-5) PR: 12 hours of literature Directed study in special projects. Special permission of chairman required. NG 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (1-4) PR: Sophomore standing. The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor interest. It will examine in depth a recurring literary theme or the work of a small group of writers Special courses in writing may also be offered under this title ENG 500. OLD ENGLISH LITERATURE (4) PR: 20 hours of literature. Old English literature (to 1100 ) in modern transla tion ENG 501. CHAUCER (4) PR: 20 hours of literature. An introduction to the language through the "Prologue" to The Canterbury Tales. Study of the Book of Duchess, a selected number of Tales, the House of Fame, and Troilus and Criseyde ENG 502 THE LITERATURE OF MEDIEVAL ENGLAND (4) PR: 20 hours of literature An examination of the historical and social back grounds of medieval literature and representative works of the period ENG 503. ENGLISH DRAMA FROM THE BEGINNINGS THROUGH MARLOWE (4) PR: 20 hours of literature Readings in representative tropes, cycle plays, ality plays, interludes and school plays; and in early Elizabethan dramatists: Lyfy, Peele, Greene, Kyd, with an empha sis on Marlowe. ENG 504. ENGLISH DRAMA FROM BEN JONSON TO 1642 (4) PR: 20 hours of literature Chapman, Marston Dekker, Middleton Tourneur, Beaumont and Fletcher, Shirley; with emphasis upon Jonson Webster, and Ford. ENG 505. SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY POETRY (4) PR: 20 hours of literature. Emphasis upon leading Metaphysical and \...avalier poets: Donne, Herbert, Jonson Herrick, Marvell, and others. ENG 506. SIXTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH POETRY (4) PR: 20 hours of literature. Raleigh, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare and others. ENG 507. MILTON (4) PR: 20 hours of literature An examination of Paradise Lost Paradise Regained Comus, th e shorter poems and selected prose works. -ENG 508. ENGLISH RENAISSANCE PROSE (4) PR: 20 hours of literature English fiction and nonfiction 1500-1660; Lyly, Sid ney, Nashe, Bacon, Donne, Browne, Hobbes, Milton ENG 511. RELIGIOUS AND EXISTENTIAL THEMES IN MODERN LITERA TURE (4) Theological and philosophical ideas allusions, and symbols in the writings of Dostoevski Nietzsche, Mann, Joyc e, Eliot Camus, Sartre, and others ENG 513. THE ROMANTIC WRITERS (4) PR: 20 hours of lit erature. The poetry and poetics of Blake Wordsworth, Cole ridge Byron Shelley, K ea ts; with attention to lesser figures. ENG 515. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (4) PR: 24 hours of literature. The evolution of the language from Anglo-Saxon through Middle English to Modern English. Changes in pronunciation and syntax; discussion of the forces which influenced them. ENG 517. STRUCTURE OF AMERICAN ENGLISH (4) PR: CBS 102. An introductory survey, comparison, and contrast of traditional, structural, and generative-transformational grammars and their techniques for the analysis and d esc ription of linguistic structure in general, and contemporary American English in particular.

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ENGLISH 251 ENG 518. LINGUISTICS AND LITERATURE (4) PR: ENG 517 or LIN 301. The analysis and interpretation of British and American literature, poetry, prose, and drama, using relevant materials from the field of descriptive and comparative linguistics ENG 519. SHAKESPEARE'S COMEDIES AND HISTORIES (4) PR : ENG 411. An intensive study of Shakespeare's major comedies and histories. ENG 520. SHAKESPEARE' S TRAGEDIES (4) PR: ENG 411. An intensive study of Shakespeare's major tragedies. ENG 521. RESTORATION AND 18TH CENTURY LITERATURE (4) (exclusive of the drama and novel ) PR : 20 hours of lit erature. Concentration upon se lected figures of th e period : Dryden Pope, Swift, Johnson and others. ENG 523. NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE ( 4) Essays of \..arlyle, Newman Mill, Ruskin Arnold, P.ater; poetry of Tennyson Browning, Swinburne; novels of Dickens, Meredith ; plays of Wilde, Shaw ENG 527. MODERN BRITISH AND AMERICAN POETRY (4) PR: 20 hours of literature. Selected poets from Hopkins to the present, with at tention to modern poetic theory. ENG 528. CONTEMPORARY BRITISH & AMERICAN FICTION (4) A critical study of British and American fiction since World War II. Works by Mailer Beckett, Bellow, Ellison Nabokov, and others. ENG 531. LITERARY CRITICISM (4) PR: 24 hours of literature. Emphasis on either the great critics and the principles of criticism or on applied criticism of fiction, poetry and drama. ENG 559. DRAMA (4) PR : 20 hours of literature. Dryden, Congreve, Sheridan, Goldsmith and others. ENG 581. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-5) PR: 20 hours of literature. Directed study in special projects. Special permission of chairman required. ENG 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (1-4) PR: 20 hours of literature. The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor interest. It will examine in depth a recurring literary theme or the work of a small group of writers. ENG 585. DIRECTED READING (4) Readings in special topics. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY ENG 601. PROBLEMS IN COLLEGE ENGLISH INSTRUCTION: COMPOSITION (3) PR : Graduate s t anding. An examination of the objectives of freshman English and an investigation of current tec hniques for achieving those objectives, emphasizing the problems of developing critical reading and the techniques of expository writ ing at the college level. ENG 602. PROBLEMS IN COLLEGE ENGLISH INSTRUCTION: LITERATURE (3) PR : Graduate standing. A course that will allow the prospective college English teacher to experiment with teaching techniques that will determine the most effective ways to teach literature and that will teach college English teachers the variety and importance of literary techniques and their relevance to subject matter. ENG 610 STUDIES IN OLD ENGLISH (4-16) PR : Graduate standing. A study of Old English language, prose style, poetry May be retaken with different subject matter three times. ENG 616. STUDIES IN MIDDLE ENGLISH (4-16) PR : Graduate standing. Selected focused studies in language and in various authors and writings 1100-1500: Chaucer, the Pearl poet, Everyman, ballads, drama. May be retaken with different subject matter three times.

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252 ENGLISH ENG 620. STUDIES IN SIXTEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE (4 -16 ) PR : Graduate standing. Selected focused studies in 16th Century British litera ture: Shakespeare Sidney, Spen ser, Marlowe, and others. May be retaken with different subject matter three times ENG 625 S 'fUDIES IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE (4-16) PR: Graduate standing. Selected focused s tudi es in British literature, 1600-1660; Bacon, Donne, Jon so n, Herbert, Milton, and others. May be retaken with different subjec t matter three times. ENG 630. STUDIES IN RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE (4-16) PR: Graduate standing. S e lected focused studies in Restoration-Eighteenth Century British literature : Dryden, Defo e, Pope, Swift, Fielding, Sheridan, John son, Boswell, and others. May b e retaken with different subjec t matter three times. ENG 640. STUDIES OF THE ENGLISH ROMANTIC PERIOD (4-16) PR: Graduate standing. A study of pre-Romantic and Rom antic prose fiction, nonfiction, and po etry. May be retaken with diff e rent sub j ect matter three times. ENG 645. STUDIES IN VICTORIAN LITERATURE (4-16) PR: Graduate s tanding. A study of Victorian poetry, Victorian fiction, Victorian non-fictional prose, and Victorian drama. May be r etaken with different subject matter three tim es. ENG 650. STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1860 (4-16) PR: Graduate s tanding. S e lected focused studi es in American literature before 1860: the Puritans, Franklin, Cooper, Irving, Po e, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, and others. May be retaken with different su bje c t matter three times. ENG 660 STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE 1860-1920 (4-16) PR: Graduate standing. Selected focused s tudies in American literature: Whitman, Twain, Howells, James, Crane, Dreiser, and others. May be r etaken with different sub j ec t matter thr ee tim es. ENG 670. STUDIES IN MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE (4-16 ) PR: Graduate stan ding A study of Irish and English drama, the modern novel, poetry, c riticism and the short story. May be retaken with different subject matter three times. ENG 672 STUDIES IN MODERN AMERICAN LITERATURE (4-16) PR: Graduate standing. Modern American drama, poetry, fiction, and literary criticism; authors include Faulkner, Hemin gway, Fitzgerald, O Neill, Anderson, Wolfe, Cummings, Frost, and Eliot. May b e retaken with different subject matter three tim es. ENG 675 STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE (4-16) PR: Graduate standing. Drama, poetry, fiction, and literary criticism ; authors to be st udied include Ione sco, Thomas, Miller, T. Williams, Beckett, Camus, and Burgess May be retaken with different subject matter three times. ENG 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-5) PR: CI and Graduate standing. Directed study in specia l projects. Special per mission of chairman required. ENG 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (1-8) PR: Graduate standing. Current topics offered on a rotating basis include The Nature of Tragedy; The Nature of Comedy and Satire; The Nature of Romanticism and Classicism; and The Nature of Myth, Allegory, and Symbolism. Other topics will be added in accordance with student demand and instructor interest ENG 684. STUDIES IN CONTINENTAL LITERATURE (4-16) PR: Graduate s tanding. General areas include th e Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the Novel in Europe, the Romantic Movement on the Continent, and Classi ca l comedy May b e retaken with differ ent subject matter three times. ENG 686. STUDIES IN STYLE (4-16) PR: Graduate s tanding. Poetics, rhetoric, dramatic style, prose style, short fiction, the novel, and the essay. May be retaken with different subject matter three times. ENG 687. STUDIES IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS (4) PR: ENG 515 and ENG 517, or Cl. An advanced study of the orig in historical

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development, and contemporary socia l and cultural milieu, with analysis and description FINANCE 253 structure of British and American English in its emphasi s upon modern teci)niq_ues for linguistic ENG 690. SCHOLARSHIP AND CRITICISM (4-8) PR: Graduate standing. Selected focused stu dy of tesea_rch iipproaches tq May be retaken with different subject matter once. . : ENG 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN ENGLISH (4) PR: Consent of graduate advisor. ENG 693. BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR ENGLISH STUDIES (I) PR: Graduate standing. Detailed study of bibliographies of c ultural milieus, genres, periods and authors. ENG 703. PROBLEMS IN ADVANCED ENGLISH INSTRUCTION AND SCHOLARLY RESEARCH (3) PR: Ph.D. Candidacy. This course i s to provide closely supervised training in upper-level college English instruction and experie nce with professional research. Experience in the l ecture, seminar discussion, examining, evaluation, conferences, directing undergraduate research, course development, use of secon dary materials, publication procedure, and co llation ENG 791. DOCTORAL SEMINAR (8) PR: PhD. Candidacy. This seminar will provide intensive small-group discu ssio n as well as shared and individual guided research in a student's area of doctoral special ty over two consecu tiv e academic quarters. ENG 799. DISSERTATION (4-12) PR: Consent of Department. The supervised writing of a doctoral dissertation ENVIRONMENT ENV 301. DIALOGUE IN ENVIRONMENTAL SURVIVAL (4) A multidisciplinary course dealing with environmental problems. ( Pass / Fail ) FINANCE Fac ulty: Longstre et, chairman; Brunhild, Close, Deaux, Deiter, Faggion, D.A J o hn son, Kares Landry, Mey e r Modrow, Power, Rappold C.T. Smith. FIN 201. PERSONAL FINANCE (5) Survey of the problems and techniques of family financial planning. Includes con sumer credit, insurance, home ownership and personal inv es ting with attention given to current econom ic and l ega l constraints. Not available for credit to upper fevel students who have been admitted to the College of Busin ess FIN 202. PERSONAL INVESTMENTS (4) PR: FIN 201. Designed for non business administration stu4ent-s who hav e not taken accounting or corporation finance, it emphasizes the operat. ions of the secur ity markets in the U.S. and the risks and returns of alternative investment media. Not available for credit to upper l eve l students who have been admitted to the Col leg e of Busin e ss FIN 301. PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE (5) PR: ACC 305 and ECN 201. Fundamental tools and techniques applicable to fi nancial planning of incorporated and unincorporated business, emphasi zing the problems of acquisition, supervision, and allocation of FIN 303. PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE (5) Analysis of insurable risks of both businesses and individuals. An exa mination of th e characteristcs of those areas of risk and uncertainty where the mechanisms of in s urance are e ff e ctive alternatives. The concept, contracts and institutions involved in in surance are examined in relationship to the socio-economic environment

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254 FINANCE FIN 305. PRINCIPLES OF REAL ESTATE (5) Economics of urban land utilization and the nature of property rights. Problems of urban development and the valuation of real property in terms of the structure and operations of the real estate market. FIN 321. MONEY AND BANKING (4) PR: ECN 202. Examines the structure and operations of our monetary system, com mercial banking, l."entral banking, money and capital markets, and provides an introduction to monetary theory and policy FIN 351. INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (5) PR: ECN 202 or CI. Principles of the acquisition, supervision and allocation of funds for multi-national firms. FIN 411. ADVANCED CORPORATION FINANCE (4) PR: FIN 301. An examination of the financial policies of publicly-owned corpora tions, with special reference to dividend policy, financial structure, capital expendi tures, acquisitions, mergers and reorganization. FIN 421. PRINCIPLES OF INVESTMENT (4) PR: FIN 301 and ECN 202. Survey of the risks and returns of investment media in relation to the investment objective of individual and institutional investors. Includes an examination of the capital markets, information flows and analytical techniques in terms of their impact upon the valuation process. -FIN 431. FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS (4) PR: FIN 321. A study of financial intermediaries and the capital markets and their interaction in the capital formation process. FIN 451. FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND MONETARY POLICY (4) PR: ECN 323 or FIN 321. An analysis of the structure of the Federal Reserve Sys tem and monetary policy within the framework of monetary theories FIN 461. FINANCIAL POLICIES AND STRATEGIES (3) PR: FIN 411. Senior seminar for majors in finance Quantitative and qualitative analysis of financial policies based on independent readings and empirical research. FIN 471. PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (3) PR: FIN 421. Study of advanced investment methods with special emphasis on quantitative, timing, and diversification techniques of individual and i11stitutional investors FIN 489 SPECIAL STUDIES IN FINANCE (1-5) PR: CI. Independent study program under the guidance of departmental staff Includes an examination of professional literature and empirical research FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY FIN 501. BUSINESS FINANCE (3) PR: ACC 501 and ECN 501 or its equivalent. Accelerated introduction to funda mentals of business finance. Emphasis is placed on the formal presentation of fi nancial models for decision making The institutional features of the financial environment are also covered. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY FIN 601. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3) PR: ECN 503, FIN 501 or their equivalent. An examination of financial practice at the level of the individual firm with emphasis on quantitative analysis of the vari ables affecting solvency and profitability. FIN 602. CAPITAL MARKETS (3) PR: ECN 501 and 502 or their equivalent An investigation of the capital markets and their relationship to the external financing of firms FIN 621. INVESTMENTS (3) PR: FIN 501 or equivalent, CI. An examination of the risks and returns of alternative investment media within the framework of various valuation models. Special attention is given to the investment process and the criteria for investment decisions.

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GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 255 FINE ARTS (lntracollege) Faculty: Hug, G. Johnson, O'Sullivan, Strawn. FNA 443. FINE ARTS FORUM (I) PR: CC. To aid Fine Arts students in undi;rstanding and appraising the various arts through systematic attendance at performances and other aesthetically signifi cant events. Critical evaluation sessions will be held. FNA453. FINE ARTS SEMINAR FOR OFF-CAMPUS TERM (1-9) PR : CC. To facilitate an intensive study of the fine arts through primary exper iences with creative activities which are uniquely available in major artistic centers. FNA 543. COMPARATIVE ARTS/ISSUES IN CREATIVITY (3) PR: Two history courses, theory or literature courses in major area or CC. An anal ysis of various theories of art and the intellectual implication of ditlerine: orooosi tions about aesthetics. FNA 553. FINE ARTS SENIOR SEMINAR (3) PR: FNA 543 or CC. To aid majors to understand, appraise and perfect their own art and technique through critical and aesthetic judgements of their l."Olleagues. Discussion and critical evaluation. Section OCH is reserved for Music and Music Education students. Section 002 is reserved for Theatre Arts students. Section 003 is reserved for Visual Arts and Art Education students. Section 004 is reserved for Dance students. FRENCH See Modern Languages GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Faculty : Allen Biggs, Birkin, Grant, Kahn, C. Kayser, Knippen, Richardson, Rogier, Stirling, Steinike, Van Voorhis, Walsh, Welker. GBA 333. COMPUTERS IN BUSINESS I (3) An introductory interdisciplinary examination of basic computer application s in business organizations. Problems are reduced to schematic logic, then focus is placed on decision making through computer output. Computer hardware and software systems will be introduced. GBA 351. COMPUTERS IN BUSINESS II (5) PR : GBA 333. An advanced interdisciplinary examination of the computer' s im pact on the business enterprise. Concepts of data collection and information theory are developed. In addition, model manipulation techniques are introduced in the areas of extremuum finding and search. GBA 361. BUSINESS LAW I (5) The nature of legal institutions essentials of a binding contract, remedies granted in event of breach of contract and rights acquired by assignment of contracts. GBA 362. BUSINESS LAW II (5) PR: GBA 361. Legal problems in marketing of goods, nature of property, sales of personal property, securing of credit granted, nature and use of negotiable instru ments. GBA 363. THE LAW OF BUSINESS AS SOCIA TIO NS ( 5) PR: GBA 361. A study of the law of c orporations, the law of partnerships, and the law of agency.

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256 GEOGRAPHY GBA 371. BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (4) Analy s i s and application of the principles of persuasion in business c:ommunica ti on; composition and eva lu a tion of functional business l etters; exa mination of effective orga nization strategy, t ex t, tabular and graphic presentation in forma l business report. GBA 489. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-2) Individua l resear c h in the students major area supervised by an appropriate fac ulty m ember. GBA 499. SENIOR SEMINAR IN ADMINISTRATION (3) PR: Senior St anding. The course i s intended to provid e a unifying, i ntegrating, and coordinating opportunity to ti e togeth e r concep ts, principl es, and s kill s learned separately in other, more specia li zed courses i n Busin ess Administration. GBA 501. CBS WORKSHOP (1-6) Profes s ional applications workshop in various a r eas of finance, marketing, eco nomics, accounting, management. May b e repeated when subjects diff er. Not appli cable to d egree program s in College of Busin ess Adm i nistration. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY GBA 601. LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF B US I NESS (3) A study of the governmental regul a ti on of busines s e mphasizing the constitu tional limitation s on the powers of the federa l government, the administration of the fed eral antitrust law s and administrative law. GBA 603 QUANTITATIVE METHODS I (3) PR: MTH 211, or equ iva lent Math e matical techniques for administrative prob lems, including linear programming, game theory, and optim izati on models and procedures u s ing calc ulu s and matrix a l gebra. GBA 605. QUANTITATIVE METHODS II (3) PR: MTH 211, ECN 43 1 or equiva l ents. Probability and sampling Bay es ian de ci s ion theory, and the d es ign of expe riments, as applied to administrative problems. GBA 615. INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR (3) PR: CI. The integra tion of analysis and poli cy for the dec i s ion -ma king process in administration. This cou rs e sh ou ld be taken at the end of a student's program. GBA 699. THESIS 16) GEOGRAPHY Faculty : Fuson, c h a irm an; Limog es, Neuberger, P a lm e r Rothw e ll S chae lman, Stafford, Stow e rs. GPY 301. SYSTEMATIC GEOGRAPHY (5) Principles and concepts of the discipline ; maps earth -sun relations weat her, cli mate. GPY 302. SYSTEMATIC GEOGRAPHY (5) PR: GPY 301. Landforms and conservation of resourc es. Latte r part of course deals with man's use of the n atura l environm ent. GPY 303. HUMAN GEOGRAPHY (5) PR: GPY 3 01-302 Sys t e m a ti c treatment of man s activ iti es on earth: population, settlement, agriculture, industry, trade, transportation, and pol itical aspec t s are among thos e c onsid e r e d. GPY 371. GENERAL GEOGRAPHY (5) Vari e d topics in regional and. topical geography. May b e repea ted as topi cs va ry but the same topic may not b e repeat e d for credit. Op e n to anyone in th e Univel'Si ty GPY 403. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY ( 5 ) PR: 301-302. Courses include: meteoro l ogy, climatology, physiography biogeo-

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GEOGRAPHY 257 graphy, so ils water bodies. May be rep eated as courses vary, but the same course may not b e repeat e d for c r e dit. GPY 405 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY (5) PR : GPY 3 013 02-30 3 \_,ourses include: economic, political, urban, historical geo graphy; population se ttl e m en t, conservation. May be repeated as courses vary, but th e same co urs e may not b e r e p eated for credit. GPY 407. REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (5) PR : GPY 301-30 2 Synthesis and analysis of the physical and cultural elements in a selected geographic region. May be repeated as regions vary but the same regions m ay not be repeated for c r e dit. GPY 409. GEOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES AND METHODOLOGY (5) PR: 30 1 -302-303. Courses include: ca rtography graphics, map design and analy sis, a ir phot o interpretation, field m e thods, quantitative analysis, seminar. May be repeated as cou r ses vary, but th e same course m ay not b e repeated for c redit FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND G R ADUATE S T UDENTS GPY 501. GEOGRAPHIC LITERATURE AND HISTORY (4) PR: Senior o r graduate s tanding in geography, or CI. The origins and d e velop m en t of the di sc iplin e as revealed through an examination of the prin c ipal written sources. Special a tt en tion paid to leading personaliti es and modern periodicals GPY 503. METHODOLOGY I : QUANTITATIVE (4) PR: Senior or graduat e s tanding in geography, and a course in s tati s ti cs, or CI. The applic a tion of quantitative t echniques to geographic problems ; factor, sensitivity, and s p a tial analysis. GPY 505. METHODOLOGY II: CARTOGRAPHIC (4) PR: S en ior or gradua t e s t an ding in geography, GPY 409 ( Cartography), or CI. Ap plication of various t echniques for presen ting graphic illustration s as resea rch tools. GPY 507. METHODOLOGY III: FIELD WORK (4) PR: Senior or graduate standing in geograp hy, GPY 50 3 or 505. D ata collection in a field situation, including observation, classification, interpre t a tion, and prese nta tion of the data. GPY 581. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-5) PR: 30 h ours in geography and CI, or graduate standing in geography. Arrange ment must b e made with c h a irm a n prior to r e gistration. May b e repeate d GPY 585 DIRECTED READING ( 1-5) PR : 3 0 hours in geography and CI, or graduate standing in geography. Arrange ment must be made with chai rman prior to registration May b e r e peat e d FOR GRADUA TE ST UDE N TS ON LY GPY 601. METHODOLOGY IV: ACADEMIC (4) PR: Gradu a t e s tanding in geography. Current trends in coll e ge geography, with th e emphas i s on the junior college program Not available to thesis students. GPY 603. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (4) PR: Graduate s t anding in geography. Analytic study of a problem selected from one or more aspects of th e atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, or lithosph e re. May b e repe a ted once for credit, but topic m ay not be repeated. GPY 605 SEMINAR IN ADV AN CED CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY ( 4) PR: Graduate s t an din g in geography. Analytic study of a problem selected from one or more aspects of the c ultural landscap e (urban, political, e conomic, population, se ttl e m en t). May be repeated once for credit. GPY 607. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (4) PR : Graduate standing in geography. Analytic study of a selected region of the world. May be repeated once for credit, but region may not be repeated. GPY 609. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED TECHNIQUES & METHODOLOGY (4) PR: Graduate s t anding in geography. Analytic study of a selected geographic tech nique (suc h as remote sensing, graphics, photo interpretatfon, or computer appli-

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258 GEOLOGY cations) or an investigation into an aspect of methodology. May be repeated once for credit, but topic may not be repeated. GPY 689. DIRECTED TEACHING ( 1-9) GPY 699. THESIS (1-9) GEOLOGY Faculty: Ragan, chairman; Bates, Boulware, Huang, Keller, O'Donnell, Spangler, R.G. Stevenson. GLY 201. INTRODUCTION TO GEOLOGY (5) Open to all students; no prerequisites. Study of earth materials and the processes responsible for changing the face of the earth. Examination of minerals and rock specimens, topographic and geologic maps and aerial photographs. Occasional field trip studies. Required lee-lab. GLY 301. INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL GEOLOGY (4) Open to all students; no prerequisites. Study of the record of past life and interpretation of the major/hysical events in the history of the earth. Occasional field trip studies lee-lab, fie! trips. GLY 302. INTRODUCTION TO PALEONTOLOGY I (4) PR: CLY 301 or CI. Paleontology and stratigraphic occurrence of most important invertebrate fossils of the geologic record lec-fab, field trips. GLY 303. INTRODUCTION TO PALEONTOLOGY II (4) The second half of CLY 302. GLY 311. MINERALOGY (4) PR : CLY 201 and CHM 211, 212, 213, or equivalent; or CI. Origin, occurrence, and chemistry of mineral groups. Identification of common minerals by physical and chemical properties lee lab. GLY 351. INTRODUCTION TO HYDROGEOLOGY (5) PR: GLY 201 301 and CC. Occurrence, circulation, and distribution of subsurface water, its chemical and physical properties, relation to the geologic environment, exploration and development, lee-field lab CLY 361. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY (5) PR: GLY 201 and one year of physics. Application of basic principles of geology, mathematics, and in solving relationships of strata and interpreting struc tural features in the earth's crust. lee-lab, field trips. GLY 371. GEOLOGY OF OUR NATION'S PARKS (4) Representative parks used to illustrate current concepts in Geology of general inter est. Designed for the student not majoring in science (May not be counted for credit toward a Geology or Interdisciplinary Natural Science major in Geology). GLY 401. FIELD AND SUBSURFACE METHODS (5) PR: 34 hours of geology courses, CC. Fundamentals of geology in the field and ma rine laboratory; compass and plane table mapping, mapping of aerial photos, recon naissance surveys ; interpretation of geologic structures. lee-lab field trips. GLY 411. MARINE GEOLOGY (4) PR: CLY 201, 301. Fundamentals of marine geology, including the collection, anal ysis, and geologic interpretation of marine waters sediments, and environments Occasional marine trips lee-lab, field trips. GLY 412. OPTICAL MINERALOGY (4) PR: CLY 311 (Non-majors from other departments, CC). Theory and use of the polarizing microscope Techniques for identification and analysis of minerals using the polarizing microscope, with emphasis on rock-forming minerals lee-lab GLY 441. ECONOMIC MINERAL DEPOSITS (4) PR: or CR: CLY 412 Principles involved in the origin occurrence, recovery, and us e of mineral resources. lee-lab, field trips GLY 471. GEOLOGY OF SOILS (5)' PR: General Chemistry or equivalent The origin, geologic development forma tion and nature of soils Fundamentals of soil science, including the physical chem-

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GEOLOGY 259 ical, and biological factors affecting soil fertility with special application to the soils an d eco logy of Florida, lee lab field trips GLY 473. CONCEPTS IN EARTH SCIENCE (5) Earth's environment in space, including a selected study of its materials processes climate, oceans, soils and history l ee -disc, field trips (No credit for geology or natural science geology majors) GLY 475. HYDROGEOLOGY AND HUMAN AFFAIRS (5) PR: Open to all junior and senior level students. Geologic analyses of the present critical and urgent problems of water resources, pollution control, water supply, flood control, and underground waste disposal as they relate to economic, legal and other social aspects of modem society. Field trips. No credit for Geology majors. GLY 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (l-6) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and written permission of department chairman prior to registration. Individual experimental investigations with faculty supervision. ( S/U grade only.) FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS GLY 503. SEDIMENTATION I (4) .PR: GLY 303 and GL Y 412. Geologic factors governing physical, and biological interactions and deposition of elastic sediments. lee-lab field trips. GLY 504. SEDIMENTATION II (4) PR: GL Y 303 and GL Y 412. Carbonate sediment factors and deposition GLY 512. MARINE GEOLOGY (4) PR: Senior or graduate standing in a natural science a nd CC Geological interpreta tion of marine processes and products Seminar and field studies. lee-lab, field trips. GLY 513 PETROGRAPHY ( 5 ) PR: GLY 311 and 112 Systematic study of ign eous and metamorphic complexes using modem methods of rock s tudy em phasizing use of the pol a rizing p e tro graphic microscope for thin -sec tion analys is. l eelab GLY 521. PRINCIPLES OF APPLIED GEOPHYSICS (4) PR: Senior or advanced Junior standing, one year of Physics, or CI. Elementary treatment of gravimetric magn e tic e lectric and seismic geophysical techniques as applied to sit e investigations and mineral deposits l eelab, field trips. GLY 531. PRINCIPLES OF STRATIGRAPHY ( 4 \ PR: GLY 361 or CI. Environmental and pal eogeogra phic reconstruction of sedi mentary basins. Seminar. lee lab, field trips. GLY 532. ADVANCED STRATIGRAPHY ( 5) PR: GLY 531 or CI. Study of th e s tratigraphy and paleotectonic dev e lopment of North America and Europe GLY 533. GEOMORPHOLOGY (4) PR : Senior or advance d junior standing and CC. Origin, evolution and distribu tion of land forms GLY 534. QUANTITATIVE GEOMORPHOLOGY (4) PR : CLY 533 or CI. Quantitative methods and their application to geomorphic problems; review and concep t s of recent theorie s and literature. l eelab GLY 541. GEOPHOTO INTERPRETATION ( 5) PR : Senior s tanding or CI. Geo-analysis of a ir photos and earth data, including some acquired by remote sensi ng techniques. Analysis of c hemical ana physical sa mpl e d ata. lee-l a b . GLY 553. ADVANCED HYDROGEOLOGY (5) PR: CLY 351, MTH 213 or 303, PHY 215-216, or CI. Aquif e r eva luation and quan titative d e t e rmin a ti on o f the hydraulic charac teristics of hydrog eo logic systems, lee-field-lab. GLY 561. X-RAY ANALYSIS (2) PR : GLY -H2 or CI. (No n-majors from other areas, CI. ) The use of X-rays for the identification of crys tallin e materials.

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260 GEOLOGY GLY 571. GEOCHEMISTRY I: Origin and Chemistry of the Earth (4) PR: CHM 211, 212, 213 or equivalent; GLY 513. Age, formation, heat balance, and evolution of the earth and the solar system. Application of basic chemical concepts and processes that govern the distribution of the elements in geologic environments. GLY 572. GEOCHEMISTRY II: Low Temperature Solution Geochemistry (5) PR: CHM 213, GLY 513, or Cl. Application of the fundamentals of solution c;hem istry and equilibrium of aqueous species in multi -component systems to the na tural environments such as ores, weathering, diagenesis, rivers, lakes, oc;ean and other aqueous environments GLY 573. GEOCHEMISTRY III: Analytical Geochemistry (41 PR : CHM 213, GL Y 513, or Cl. Experimental tec;hniques by c;hemic;a) and modem methods to determine major and trac;e elements in minerals, roc;ks, meteorites, and natural water; statistical and mathematical modeling to the solution of geochem ical problems also discussed. GLY 575. GEOTECHNICS (4) PR: Senior or advanced Junior standing or Cl. Concept of soil and rock mec;hanics, and their relationship to geological conditions influenc;ing the location, design, construction and maintenance of engineering projects lee field-lab. GLY 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOLOCY (1-6) PR: Senior or advanc.-ed junior standing and CC. Each topic is a course in directed study under supervision of a fac;ulty member Courses include : Introductory Geo logic;a) Oc;eanography Advanc;ed Stratigraphic Paleontology Palynology, Sedi mentary Processes, Sedimentary Techniques, Universal Stage, Seismology, Marine Geophysics, Exploration Geophysics, Ground Water Problems, Environmental Geology, Neutron Activation Analysis, Nonmetallic Deposits, Organized Geology Field Trip Studies, and Field Geology. Department permission prior to registration required. GLY 591. GEOLOGY SEMINAR (1) PR : Senior or advanc;ed junior standing and CC. May be repeated once. (S / U grade only ) FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY GLY 603. RECENT NERITIC SEDIMENTATION (5) PR: GLY 504 or CC. Environmental / tec;tonic; fac;tors and resulting sediment types in shallow marine env ir onments. Applic;ation to problems in stratigraphy and petroleum studies. lee-lab, field trips. GLY 604. RECENT FLUVIAL AND TRANSITIONAL SEDIMENTATION (4) PR: GLY 504 or CI. Environmental factors and resulting sedimen t types ac;cum ulated in fluvial and transitional environments. lec;-lab GLY 605. OCEANIC SEDIMENTATION (5) PR: GLY 504 or Cl. Struc;tural development, sedimentation proc;esses, and sedi ments of shoreline, continental slope, c;ontinental rise, and abyssal plain environ ments )ec;Jab GLY 607. CARBONATE PETROLOGY I (4) PR: GLY 503 or CC. Genesis of rec;ent carbonate sediments and the interpretation of anc;ient carbonate rocks by the use of conc;eptual models. Field-lab-seminar GLY 608. CARBONATE PETROLOGY II (4) The sec;ond half of G LY 607 GLY 611. ADVANCED IGNEOUS PETROGENESIS (4) PR: CI. Detailed study of igneous rocks and their origin. GLY 612 ADVANCED METAMORPHIC PETROGENESIS (4) PR: CI. Detailed study and interpretation of metamorphism and the origin of meta morphic; rock c;omplexes, utilizing thin section mic;rosc;opy, X ray diffraction, and chemical analyses. GLY 621. MARINE MICROPALEONTOLOGY (6) PR : GLY 301, 303 or equivalents and CC. Principal groups of microfossils in ma rin e sediments and cores. Paleoec;ology, corre l ation, and application to petroleum and pal e omarine problems. lee-lab, field trips

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GERONTOLOGY 261 CLY 631. CENOZOIC STRATIGRAPHY (3) PR: CLY 531 or Cl. Structural elements, raleogeography stratigraph y, and eco nomic resources of the Gulf of Mexico coasta plain. l ec-lab. CLY 652. DEVELOPMEN T OF GROUND-WATER RESOURCES (5) PR: CLY 553 o r CC. Analysis of cause-effect r e l a ti onships between ocean, strea ms, l akes and aquife rs; planning and d es ign of hydrogeology resource s investigations, l eel ab, field trips. CLY 661. CLAY PETROLOGY (4) PR: CLY 513, 561 or CC. Composition, structures, ori gin, and diagenesis of clay mineral s Ide ntification of clay minerals by x-ray diffraction techniques. CLY 673. HISTORY OF GEOLOGY (2) PR : CC. Historical development of geo l ogic thought. l ec. Alternate years. CLY 675. GEOLOGY OF FLORIDA (5) PR: 24 h ours of earth science credits or Cl. D esig n e d for t eachers of earth science. Mineral ogy, structure, stratigraphy, pal eon tology, geomorphol ogy, tectonics, and petrology of Florida and contiguous a r eas. l ec-fiefd-lab. Alternate years CLY 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH Gr:.OLOGY (1-15 ) PR: CC. (S/ U grade only). CLY 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN MARINE GEOLOGY ( 1-6) PR: CC. Sedimentary Petrology, Shor e lin e and Marine Physiography, Advanced Sedimentology, Shoreline Geology, Geology of Coasta l Plain and Shelf G eochron ology Geochemistry of th e Ocean. Structure of Ocea n Floor and Continental Mar gins, Geological Oceanography of Gulf of Mexico, Advanced Paleontology, Pal eo eco logy Foraminiferal Ecology Pleistocene Geology Cenozoic Geology, Petro leum Geology, Mineral R esources, Gravimetry G eo physics, Geotectonics, Geo magnetism and Terrestrial Heat Flow, Paleomagneti sm, Advanced Geophysics Advanced X-Ray, Hydrogeol ogy of Carbonate T e r rains, computer applications, Environmental Geology, and Fie ld Geology. l eelab fie l d trips. CLY 688 RECENT ADVANCES I N GEOLOGY WITH EMPHASIS ON THEIR IMP ACT ON COLLEGE-LEVEL COURSES. (3 -6 ) PR: Graduate Standing. R ecent developments in geo l ogy that effect presentation of introductory material. (Credit not applicable toward thesis degree requirements.) ( S / U grade only.) CLY 689. DIRECTED TEACHING. (3 -9 ) PR: Graduate Standing. Supervised teaching of g raduat e teaching assistants in elementary and/or laboratory courses. (Credit not appl icab l e toward thes i s degree requirements. ) ( S / U grade only.) CLY 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (2) PR: CC. (S/ U grade only.) CLY 699. THESIS (1-9) PR: CC (SI U grade only.) GERMAN See Modern Languages GERONTOLOGY Faculty: A Wilson, director; Palmer, Saxon. Adjuncts: Clonige r Coppingf'.r, Davis, G eis, Guest, Krivanek, Lawton, Rich Lawton, Rich. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS AGE 501. PHYSIOLOGY OF AGING (3) L ec tures and discussion concerned with the biological bases of the agi n g phenom enon as it occurs on the l evels of th e cells organs, tissu es and organism

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262 GERONTOLOGY AGE 502. PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING (3) Consideration of basic psychological processes as related to the aging process, changes in functioning and perceptual motor and cognitive areas from the develop mental perspective. AGE 503. SOCIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF AGING (3) Examines within a sociological frame of reference, the inter-relationships between the aged (or aging) and the structure and function of the social system and its major institutionalized subsystems. AGE 504. AGING AND PERSONALITY (2) An introduction to personality theory and concepts of adjustment with an over view of counseling techniques and rehabilitative efforts with the aged. AGE 507. ECONOMICS AND AGING (3) A study of the basic processes of macroeconomic thought in the modern mixed economy and what influences these processes have on the subject of aging The course will include discussions on economic issues pertinent to aging such as in come maintenance, problems, theories of consumption and income and labor force problems. AGE 509. LEISURE FOR THE AGING (2) This seminar consists of general data and observations on trends and research in the leisure field, directed theoretical analysis of these studies as they pertain to the elderly and contact with progress by visits, interviews, and reports AGE 585. DIRECTED READINGS (13) PR: CI. A reading program with topics in gerontology conducted under the su pervision of a faculty member. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY AGE 603 SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS APPLIED TO GERONTOLOGY (3) Systematic study of the methods and techniques employed in social psychological, and health studies of population groups. Directed toward the consumers of research findings-persons whose positions call for the ability to interpret, evaluate and apply the findings produced by others. AGE 605. INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS PRACTICUM (4) A practicum involving students in group and individual settings in interaction with older persons. Content will include implications from interviewing, counseling and current conceptions of personality in the aged. AGE 606. INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION (3) This course deals with the management problems and practices in the administra tion of institutions in the field of aging. Consideration is given to the economics of aging, federal and state legislation, the management of people, and fiscal manage ment. AGE 608. HUMAN RELATIONS IN ORGANIZATIONS (3) An analytical view of the modem human relations movement with stress on develop ment since the 1930 's. Incorporates the philosophy of the behavioral sciences and alternative theories and relates them to the management process. AGE 610. ADMINISTRATIVE APPLICATIONS OF DEMOGRAPHY (3) Acquaints the student with various sources of demographic data and its use. Em phasis is placed upon applicability in program planning and student experience in locating, tabulating and interpreting data from selected publications. AGE 611. PROJECTS IN AGING I ( 1-6) In depth study of special topics with the objective of identifying problems for re search and developing research proposals. AGE 612. PROJECTS IN AGING II ( 1-6) PR: AGE 611. A continuation of AGE 611. AGE 691, 692, 693 694. SEMINAR IN SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY (2) Designed to give the graduate student an opportunity to integrate concepts within the field of gerontology and relate these to other fields of study. Guest lec turers from a variety of disciplines participate in the seminar.

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HISTORY 263 AGE 695. FIELD PLACEMENT ( 12 ) Int e rn ship in a n agenc y or se ttin g. An ass i gnmen t to a n age n cy o r o r ga niz a ti o n e n gaged in pl anning or admini s t e rin g prog ram s for o ld e r p eo pl e or in providing direc t se rvi ces to olde r p e ople. HISTOR Y Faculty: Dilk e s chairman; B e lohlavek, Billin gs l e y Burk e, Carr, Curre y D ella Grott e, Dillon, Jorda n, Kleine M ayer, Park e r Pere z Rollins, Silb e rt, Silv e r Sw a n s on Tipps, Tsangadas Van Nest e, Wrong. Part I HTY 100 THE IDEA OF HISTORY (4) R equire d of all hi s tory m a jors The course deal s with hi s tory co n ce i ve d as a m o d e of inquiry, emphasiziii g the acqui s iti o n o f th e co nceptua l t oo l s r e quire d for sy s t e m a tic, c ritic a l th ought a b out huma n probl e m s in the hi s t o ric a l p e r s p ec tiv e. May b e w a iv e d in th e case of tran sfe r students. HTY 201, 202. ANCIENT HISTORY (4, 4 ) PR : HTY 100 o r CI. A s urv ey s tudy o f th e a n c i e nt c ivili za ti o n s 201 trea t s Near E astern and Greek hi s t ory to th e b eg i n nin g o f th e ca r ee r of Alexa nder the Grea t ; 2 02 treat s th e ca reer o f Alexande r, th e H elle ni s t ic W o rld and Rom e to the death of Con s t antine. Att e ntion is d rawn to th e corre l a tiv e work in CLS 3 21 Anci ent Civili zations HTY 211, 212 AMERICAN HISTORY ( 4 4 ) PR: HTY 100 or CI. A hi s tory of th e Unit e d St a t es with a tt en ti o n give n t o r e l e v ant d e v e lopm e nts in the W es t ern H e mi sphe r e 211: Europe a n ori g in s t o 1865; 212 : 1865 to prese nt. HTY 221 222 MEDIEVAL HISTORY ( 4 4 ) PR: HTY 100 o r CI. A the m a ti c s urv ey o f th e Middl e A ges 22 1 deal s w ith th e n ascent, Chri s ti a n civ ili z ation o f Europe, c ir ca 3 00 1050 A D.; 2 22 trea t s th e mature m e di e v a l civili zation of Europe c ir ca 1050-1500 HTY 231 232. MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY ( 4 4 ) PR: HTY 100 or CI. A the m a tic s urvey of Europe i n th e mod e rn age 23 1 treat s the p e riod fr o m the R e n a i ssa n ce t o th e Fre n c h R e voluti o n ; 23 2 from the Fre nch R e v o lution to th e prese nt. HTY 251 252 LA TIN AMERICAN HISTORY (4,4) PR : HTY 100 o r CI. A th e m a ti c s urv e y of the Ib e ri a n Indi a n civilizati on i n the N e w World from th e 15th through the 20th C e nturi es 2 51 treat s th e p e ri o d from di s cov e ry to the inde p ende n ce m o v e m ents o f the 1 9th C e ntury ; 2 52, the Ib e ro Am e rican s t a t e s from th e W a r s of Ind e p ende n ce to the prese nt. Part II HTY 301, 302 A HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN COLONIAL PERIOD ( 4 4 ) PR : HTY 100, 211, 2 12 o r CI. A study o f E u ropean int e r es t and inv o l ve m ent in Ame ri ca fro m the Age o f R ec on a i ssa nce to 1789 with emphas i s o n in s titutional d e v e lopm ent and the e stabli s hm ent of the Ame ri can nati o n a l sy s t e m HTY 303, 304. AGE OF EXPANSION AND CONTINENTAL DEVELOPMENT ( 4,4 ) PR: HTY 100, 211 2 1 2, o r Cl. A study o f the form a t io n o f th e America n n a tion a l state and it s continenta l e xp a n s i o n 3 0 3 co v e r s th e p e riod from 178 3 to 1815 ; 3 04 focu ses o n the yea r s t o th e \,Qmpromi se o f 1850.

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264 HISTORY HTY 311 312 THE AMERICAN SOUTH ( 4 4 ) PR: HTY 100, 2 11, 212 or CI. A c hronologi ca l study o f the South in it s r e l a tion t o the r es t of th e U nit e d St a t e s 3 11 treat s the o ri g in s and growth o f southe rn in stitutio n s a nd th ought; 3 12 the S outh and th e n a ti o n HTY 315, 316. THE CIVIL WAR AND ITS AFTERMATH ( 4 4 ) PR: HTY 100 211 2 1 2, o r CI. A study o f the ca u ses of th e C i vil War and th e fac t o rs, for ces, and a tm os ph e r e whi c h produce d th e r eco n struc ti o n poli c y foll o win g th e war. HTY 317. HISTORY OF FLORIDA ( 4 ) A hi s t ory o f Flori da and the Ca ribbean Fl o rid a as a n area o f di scovery, co l o ni z ation and imp e ri a l co nfli c t ; the e m e r ge n ce o f Florida w ithin it s regi o n a l se tting. HTY 319 3 20 THE EMERGENCE AND GROWTH OF MODERN AMERICA ( 4 4 ) PR : HTY 100 211 21 2, o r CI. A study o f the tra n s iti o n o f Ame r ica n socie t y from th e end o f R eco n s tu c ti o n to th e present. 3 1 9 t rea t s th e era fr o m 1 8 77 to World W a r I ; 32 0 foc u ses o n th e p e riod from W o rld War I t o the p rese nt. HTY 321 322. ANCIENT GREECE ( 4 4 ) PR : HTY 100, 2 01 2 02, o r CI. A study o f G reece in th e a n c i ent p erio d 32 1 off e r s in struc ti o n in th e preH elle ni c and H elle ni c p erio ds, t o the d eath o f Philip II o f M ace d o n ; 322 treat s th e career o f Ale x ande r th e Great and th e H elle ni s ti c p erio d Att e nti o n i s d rawn t o the co rr e l a ti ve wor k in CLS 527 Greek Ci v ili za tion HTY 324. MEDIEVAL SPAIN AND PORTUGAL (4) PR: HTY 100 221 2 22 o r CI. A study o f th e p eoples o f th e Ib e ri a n P e nin s ul a in th e M iddl e A ges. HTY 325 326 ANCIENT ROME (4 4) PR: HTY 100 2 01, 2 02, o r C I A study o f Rom e in the a n c ient p e riod 3 25 trea t s th e d eve l opme nt o f R o m e t o th e end o f the R e publi c, 2 7 B C. ; 32 6 o ff e r s in s tru c ti o n in th e d eve l o pm ent o f the R o m a n Empire fr o m 27 B C. to the d eath o f Cons t a ntine, A D 337. Att entio n i s d raw n t o the corre l a tiv e work in CLS 5 29, R o m a n C i v ili za ti o n HTY 327 3 2 8 MEDIEVAL INSTITUTIONAL HISTORY ( 4 4 ) PR: HTY 100 22 1 222, o r CI. A s t u dy o f th e m a j o r in s tituti o n s o f feuda l Europe. 3 2 7 trea t s the hi s t ory o f th e Empire and P a p acy; 328 deal s w ith th e hi s t ory of th e W es t e rn mon a r c hi es. HTY 329 MEDIEVAL ENGLISH HISTORY ( 4 ) PR: HTY 100 22 1 222 or CI. A s t u d y o f the m a j o r d eve l o pm ents in Eng l a nd fr o m the An gloSaxon p e ri o d t o the 15th C e ntu ry. HTY 333 334. FRENCH HISTORY ( 4 ,4) PR: HTY 100 2 3 1 232, o r CI. A study of th e maj o r d e v e lopm ents of Fre nch hi s t ory in th e m o d e rn p e riod 333 d ea l s w ith th e p e ri o d fr o m the R e n a i ssa n ce t o th e Fre n c h R e v o luti o n ; 334, fr o m th e R e v o luti o n t o the prese nt. HTY 335 336 GERMAN HISTORY ( 4 4) PR: HTY 100 23 1 2 32, o r C I A study o f the m a j o r devel opments o f G e rm a n hi s tory 33 5 dP-al s w ith the p e ri o d fr o m the R e form a tion t o the Fre n c h R e vo lution ; 33 6 fr o m th e R evo lution t o th e prese nt HTY 337, 338. RUSSIAN HISTORY (4 4) PR : HTY 100 231 232, o r CI. A study o f th e f rim ary soc i a l econ o mi c, and cultura l for ces w hi c h h ave s h a p e d the hi s t orica d eve l o pm e nt o f Russia. 33 7 treat s th e p e riod t o 1 8 55 ; 338, 1855 t o prese nt. HTY 340. HISTORY OF MODERN ITALY 1861 TO PRESEN T (4) PR : HTY 100 2 3 1 23 2 o r CI. A c ritical th e m a ti c approac h with t'mphasis on a s o c i o-psyc h o logi ca l e x a min a ti o n o f b ourgeo ise liberalis m and n a ti o n i s m th e cris i s o f liberafis m the ri se of th e It a li a n soc i alis t m o v e m ent, W o rld W a r I and th e F as ci s t synthes is. HTY 341 342 BRITISH HISTORY (4, 4) PR: HTY 100 23 1 232, o r C I. A study o f the m a j o r devel opments o f B r iti s h hi s tory 34 1 trea t s th e p e ri o d from th e R e for ma ti o n t o 1715 ; 342, fr o m 1715 to prese nt

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HISTORY 265 HTY :345, :346. BRITISH EMPIRE AND COMMONWEAL TH ( 4 ,4) PR : HTY 100 231, 2.32, or Cl. A study of the old and new empires with em phasis upon the evolution of the Commonwealth HTY : 347. HISTORY OF CANADA (4) PR : HTY 100 or Cl. A study of the major themes in the politic:al and soc:ial development of Canada, with partic:ular emphasis on the origins and develop ment of Frenc:h -Canadia n nationalism, c:ontinentalism, and dominion -p rovinc:ial relations. HTY 353. HISTORY OF MEXICO (4) PR: HTY 100, 251, 252, or CI. A study of Mexic:an history from disc:overy to the present, with e mphasis on th e empire and republic:an periods. HTY 355. HISTORY OF BRAZIL (4) PR: HTY 100, 251, 252, or Cl. A study of Brazilian history from disc:overy to the present with emphasis on the e mpire and republic:an periods. HTY 365, 366. BYZANTINE HISTORY (4,4) PR: HTY 201 202, or HTY 221-222, or Cl. A the matic: treatment of the history of th e Byza ntin e Empire, inc:luding soc:ial, ec:onomic:, reli g ious politic:al military ec:c:les iastic:al developments, together with c:onsideration of liter ature, learning, and th e arts. HTY 365 deals with the p eriod from 32-! A D. to 867; HTY 36 6 deals with the period of Imperial Byzantium inc:luding its dec:line and fall: 867-1-!53 A.D. Part Ill HTY 401, 402. SOCIAL & INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT WORLD (4,4) PR: HTY 100 and 201-202 and 32 1 -322 or 325-32 6 or Cl. Selec:ted topic:s in th e soc:ial and intellec:tual history of th e anc:ient worid. 401 treats the period of anc:ient Greec:e; 402 treats th e period of anc:ient Rome. HTY 409, 410. A HISTORY OF AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS (4,4) PR : HTY 100 211, 212, or Cl. The development of Americ:an foreign relations from the R evo lution to th e present HTY -!09 deals with earlier p e riod to 1877; HTY -!IO, with the period from 1877 to present. HTY 411, 412. AMERICAN SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 211, 212, or Cl. A study of th e major religious and philosoph ical ideas of the Americ:an p eo pl e in relation to the nation 's soc ial environment -! 11 d eals with the earlier period to 1865; 412, from 1865 to presen t HTY 421 422. A HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMIC PROCESS (4, 4) PR : HTY 100, 211, 212, ECN 201, 202, or CI. The d eve lopment of Americ:an ec:onomic: thm!ght and policies from the c:olonial period to the present, em phasizing the int e r-relationship of ec:onomic dev e lopment with the major political, ideological and institutional currents of Americ:an history A student may not receive credit for both HTY 421, 422, and ECN 371. HTY 423. MEDIEVAL THOUGHT AND CULTURE (4) PR : HTY 100 221, 222 or Cl. A study of the culture and th e major intel lec:tu a l d eve lopments of the medieval world. HTY 425, 426. A HISTORY OF THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION PERIODS (4,4) PR: HTY 100 231, 232, or CI. HTY 425 deals with th e European Renaissanc: e; HTY 426 with the major developments of Reformation Europe. HTY 427, 428. EUROPE IN THE BAROQUE AND ENLIGHTENMENT PERIODS (4,4) PR: HTY 100 231, and any two of courses 333, 335 33 7 and 341 or CI. A study with emphasis on comparative developments 427 deals with major topics of the Baroque period; 42 8 with the Enlightenment.

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266 HISTORY HTY 429, 430. EUROPE IN THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH CENTURIES (4,4) PR: HTY 100, 231, 232, or Cl. A study with emphasis on comparative devel opments. 429 treats the Nineteenth Century; 430, the Twentieth Century. HTY 431, 432. EUROPEAN SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (4, 4) PR: HTY 100, 231, 232, or Cl. Selected topic s in the soc ial and intellectual hi story of modern Europe. 431 treats the early modern period; 4 32, the Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries HTY 451. A HISTORY OF INTER-AMERICAN RELATIONS (4) PR: HTY 100, 251, 252, or Cl. An examination of the mutual problems of the American nations since independence with e mphasis upon the development of Pan Americanism and the Organization of American States HTY 453. SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA (4) PR: HTY 100, 251, 252, or CI. A study of the origins and development of major intellectual and socia l trends affecting the historie s of the Latin American peopl e. HTY 455. STUDIES IN TUDOR-STUART ENGLAND (4) PR: HTY 100, 231, 232 or CI. Selected topics in the history of Sixteenth and Seventeenth C".-entury England. HTY 461. REVOLUTION IN THE MODERN WORLD (4) PR : HTY 100 231, 232 or CI. An analytical and comparative study of the nature of r evo lution in modern history leading to a developm ent of a para digm of the revolutionary proce ss. HTY 464. FASCIST AND OTHER TOTALITARIAN SYSTEMS (4) PR : HTY 100 231, 232, or CI. A critical and comparative study of the growth of Fascist and other bureaucratic totalit arian movements in the 19th ana 20th century western world : a soc io p syc hological analysis. HTY 465. SCIENCE AND CIVILIZATION (4) PR: HTY 100, 231, 232 or Cl. A comparative s urv e y of th e impac t of science on Weste rn c ivili zat ion from the a nci ent Egyptians to the prese nt, e mphasizing th e r e lati onship of sc ience t o the s ocio-economic political, and int e ll ec tu a l devel opment. HTY 485. DIRECTED READING (1-4) PR: Arrangement with in structor prior to registration Reading s in specia l topics FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS HTY 587 THEORY OF HISTORY (4) PR: to be taken during the senior year. An investigation of the philosophi cal problem s of history, with emphasis on th e evolution of the di sci pline HTY 591. PRO-SEMINAR IN HISTORY (4) Advanced topics in the fields emphasizing readings, di scussion, r esearc h, and writing One pro-seminar i s require d of all hi s tory majors. Non-majors may enroll with the consent of the instructor. Topic s vary within each field. HTY 592. SENIOR SEMINAR IN HISTORY (4) Introduction to the methods of historic a l research and writing, bibliography, and directed r esearc h in s pecial topics d esigned to meet the particular needs and interests of individual students. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY HTY 600. ANALYSIS OF HISTORICAL KNOWLEDGE (4) A study of history as a form of knowledge with e mphasi s on epistemological cons iderations of the e xplanation d evices and models of the di sci pline. HTY 601. THEORY AND INTERPRETATION (4) A systematic exa min a tion and evaluation of various schools of historical interpretation. HTY 602. HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (4) An examination of the conceptual modes and methodology of the othe r disciplines with emphasis upon their application to hi s torical research

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HUMANITIES 267 HTY 680. COLLOQUIUM IN HISTORY (4) Reading and discus sio n of se le cted topic s within the fields. Subject and sco pe to be determined by the instructor May be r e peated for credit. HTY 685. READINGS IN HISTORY (l-4) Arrangement with instructor prior to registration and CC. Individual r eading and dis c us s ion of selected problems May be repeated for credit. HTY 691. SEMINAR IN HISTORY (4) Re sea rch in selected problem s within the fields Subject and sco pe to be d e t ermined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit. The master's candidate is required to satisfactorily complete work in at l eas t one graduate seminar to fulfill the requirement for the Master 's Degree in History HTY 699 THESIS IN HISTORY (1-8) Required of a ll candidates for the Master' s Degree in Hi s tory HUMANITIES Faculty: Rut enbe rg c hairm an; Bentley, T Burns, Conway, C. Cooper Deats, Gow e n, Hoffman Iorio, Ju e rgensen Kashdin Ko e ni g, MacKay McR ae, Moor e, J W P a rk er, Reader, Spillan e, W a tkins, W yly, Zyl stra. CBS 315-316-317 308. THE HUMANITIES ( 5 5 5 4 ) PR: CBS 101 10 2 and sophomore s t a nding. Ana ly s i s of works in th e v i s u a l arts, mu s ic, theatre, film literature, and philosophy. W o rk s hop s for c r ea tiv e expe ri e n ce. HUM 311, 312, 313. HUMANITIES AND HUMANE VALUES (5,5,5) PR: CBS requirement in humanities or CI. Masterpieces of music visual arts theater, literature, and philosophy in varying cultural and historical situations. HUM 411, 412. TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARTS AND LETTERS (5,5) PR: CBS requirement in humanities or CI. Case studies in the arts and letters of the twentieth century. HUM 415, 416. ARTS AND LETTERS OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD (4,4) PR: CBS requirement in humanities or CI. Case studies in the arts and letters of the romantic period. HUM 417, 418. NINETEEN'fH-CENTURY ARTS AND LETTERS (4,4) PR : CBS require ment in humanities or CI. Case s tudi es in th e arts and l e tt e r s o f th e nin e teenth century. HUM 419, 420. THE ENLIGHTENMENT (4,4) PR: CBS require m ent i n humanities or CI. Case studi es i n th e arts and l e tt ers of th e Enlightenment. HUM 423 424. RENAISSANCE ARTS AND LETTERS (4 4) PR : CBS r equire m ent in humanities or CI. Case studies in the arts and l ette r s of th e R e n aissa n ce. HUM 427, 428 MEDIEVAL ARTS AND LETTERS (4,4) PR : CBS r equire m ent in humanities or CI. Ca se studies in the a rts and l ette r s of th e middl e ages. HUM 431, 432 CLASSICAL ARTS AND LETTERS (4,4) PR: CBS require m ent in humaniti es or CI. Case studies in the a rt s and l ette rs of th e anci ent world. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS HUM 535 536 537. HUMANITIES IN AMERICA (4,4,4) PR : CBS r equire m ent in humanities or CI. Cas e s tudi es in th e a rt s and l ette r s of the Unit e d St a t es HUM 539, 540. SELECTED NON-WESTERN HUMANITIES ( 4,4 ) PR: CBS r equirement in humanities or CI. M a t eria l s chosen from th e arts and l etters of Asi a, Afric a Oceania and th e Middle E as t. M ay b e r e peat e d for c r e dit

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268 LANGUAGE LITERATURE (Interdisciplinary) HUM 541. HUMANITIES IN THE ORIENT: INDIA ( 4 ) PR : CBS r equire m ent in humanities or Cl. Ex a mpl e s from th e arts and l e tt ers of India and the r e l a tion ship of th ese a rt s t o the Hindu and Buddhis t philosophyr e ligions. HUM 542 HUMANITIES IN THE ORIENT: CHINA (4 ) PR : CBS r equire m ent in huma niti es or Cl. Ex a mpl es fr o m th e a rt:; and l e tt e r s of China; th eir r e lation s hip t o T a oi s m \..onfu c i a ni s m and o th e r C hi nese philosophi es ; W es t e rn influ e nces on 20thc entury Chin e s e a rts and l e tt e r s HUM 543 HUMANITIES IN THE ORIENT: JAPAN ( 4 ) PR : CBS require m ent in huma niti es or CI. Ex a mpl es from th e a rt s and l e tt ers of Japa n, th e ir r e lation s hip to Z e n Buddhis m and oth e r J a p a n e s e phil oso phy religions; W estern influ e n ces on 20th-century J a p a n ese a rt s and l ette rs. HUM 545. LATIN AMERICAN ARTS AND LETTERS (4 ) PR : CBS r equire m ent in humaniti es o r CI. An a lysi s o f se l ec t e d L a tin Am e r ican work s of a rt in the ir cultura l conte xt. HUM 581. DIRECTED STUDY (1-5) PR: CBS r equire m ent in humaniti es and Cl. S pec i alize d indi v idu a l study d e termin e d by th e stude nt' s need s and int e r est. HUM 591. SELECTED PROBLEMS IN HUMANITIES (3 ) PR: S e nior classific a tion and CI. Probl e m s in th e int e rr e l a ti o n s hip s a m o n g the fin e arts and th e n atural, s o c i a l and b e h avio ral s ci e n c es. A senior essay for humaniti es m a jors FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY HUM 611. STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY ARTS AND LETTERS (4 ) Concentration on m ajor arti s t s and recent trends. HUM 623. STUDIES IN THE RENAISSANCE (4) Masterpi e c es and major a rtist s of th e R e n a i ssa nce in Euro p e and Eng l and. HUM 681. DIRECTED STUDY ( 1-4) Specialized independe nt study d e t e rmine d by th e stude nt' s need s and int e r es ts. HUM 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN HUMANITIES ( 1-4 ) Each topic i s a cours e of s tudy in a s ubj ec t n o t c ov e r e d b y a r egu l a r cours e ITALIAN See MODERN LANGUAGES LANGUAGE-LITERATURE (Interdisciplinary) Faculty : Bentl e y, J B C a mp C a rr R W C ole, Deer, J.A G o uld O Hara, H Rob e rt s on E. St a nt o n. LLI 301 302 MAIN CURRENTS OF WESTERN THOUGHT I & II ( 3 3 ) A study of th e princip a l forc es th a t h ave sh a p e d W e s t e rn th o u g ht. The se include huma ni sm, Prot es t a ntism ra tionalis m rom a nti c i s m co mm unis m a nd natu ralism Amon g th e authors includ e d in th e course are Machi ave lli S w ift New m a n Freud, Dre i se r a nd C a mus. 3 01: t o 1600 ; 3 0 2 : 1600 -present. LLI 305. THE IDEA OF PROGRESS ( 4) A study of th e w ays in w hi c h th e idea o f prog r ess has a ffected phil oso phi ca l soc i a l politi ca l and literary th e o ry since the R e n a i ssa n ce. Amo n g the a u th ors co n s id e r e d a r e : Bacon D es c a rt es, Pasc a l L oc k e Co nd o r ce t M a lthus, and Ada m Smith

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LINGUISTICS 269 LLI 306. THE IDEA OF UTOPIA (4) A study of the relationshil between the idea of progress and the growth of modern ideologies. Emphasis wil be placed on the development of liberalism, Utopian socialism, social Darwinism and conservatism by the study of such authors as: Burke, T. Paine, J.S. Mill, R. Owen, T. Huxley, G. Orwell, and A. Malraux. LLI 315. THE IDEA OF FREEDOM (3) An analysis of the idea of freedom, both in general and in particular. Various philosophical, literary, and journalistics aspects will be analyzed: metaphysical, ethical, political, social, religious and economic. LLI 321. LITERATURE AND THE OCCULT (4) An introduction to the occult tradition as a major ingredient in English, Continental, and American literature; analysis of the origins, classifications, and areas of the various "black," or magic arts, including astrology, necromancy, spells, charms, occult practices, esoteric rites, from classical times through the present. LLI 383. SELECTED TOPICS (3-5) Course contents depend on students' need and instructor's interest. Agreement with instructor required prior to registration. LLI 401. THREE CENTRAL IDEAS IN WESTERN CULTURE: HIERARCHY, MECHANISM AND ORGANISM (4) A humanistic study of the structure and function of the three seminal ideas of hierarchy, mechanism and organism, with the main emphasis upon their significant influence in art, science and letters to 1900. LLI 402. DOMINANT IDEAS IN THE 20TH CENTURY (4) The impact of major scientific hypothesis on the various forms of cultural expression. LLI 411. THE ROMANTIC IDEA OF THE SELF (4) An investigation of the Romantic idea of the self as revealed in the works of major writers, pliilosophers, and psychologists of the 19th Century, with emphasis on the impact of this idea on contemporary thought. LLI 483. SELECTED TOPICS (2-5) PR: CI. Junior standing. Course contents depend on students' need and instructor's interest. Agreement with instructor required prior to registration. LLI 583. SELECTED TOPICS (2 -5 ) PR: CI. Course contents depend on students' need and instructor's interest. Agreement with instructor required prior to registration. LINGUISTICS Faculty: R. W. Cole, chairman; Caflisch, Gessman, O'.Hara, Ritterman, Silverman, Smith. LIN 3-01. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS (4) Introduction to the basic principles of linguistic science: phonological and gram matical analysis and description; language change and genetic relationships. LIN 321. LANGUAGE AND MEANING (4) A survey introduction for non-specialists to the basic principles of semantics and the way language conveys ideas. LIN 401. DESCRIPTIVE LINGUISTICS (4) PR: LIN 301 ENG 517, or CI. Introduction to the basic techniques of form a l izing linguistic descriptions through elementary phonological, morphological, and syntactic data solution problems drawn from a variety of languages. Both taxonomic and generative analyses and descriptions will be developed and com pared. LIN 483. SELECTED TOPICS (3-5) PR : CI. Course content depends upon students needs and instructor s interest and may range over the entire field of linguistics

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270 LINGUISTICS FOR UPPER LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS LIN 511. HISTORY OF LINGUISTIC THOUGHT (4) Survey of the developmt>nt of languagt> study in tht> Wt>st from Antiq1iity to the prest>nt: Classical and medit>val tht>orit>s of language; origins of traditional grammar; rationalist linguistic tht>ory and philosophical grammar, and an examination of tht> origin of contemporary lin guistic controvt>rsit>s LIN 530. FIELD METHODS (4) PR: LIN :301 and SPE 50:3. An introduction to th e techniques of gathering language data in the field and to making an analysis of such data. Native informants are brought on campus to replicate tht> field t>xperience : students will become familiar with t>quipment and tools used by linguists in the field. LIN 540. THE SOCIAL STRUCTURE OF LANGUAGE (4) PR: LIN 301 or ENG 517. An analysis of the interrelation of a langu age and the structure of the society using it. The linguistic behavior patterns characteristic of particular social, political, economic, educational and racial groups Problems in communication between strata. LIN 541. PSYCHOLINGUISTICS (4) PR: CI. The nature oflinguistic structure and its correlates in behavior and perception. Examination of the hypotheses of Whorf, Chomsky, and others. LIN 543. KINESICS (4) PR: CI. Introduction to kinesics and paralinguistics: the language of gesture, sem iotics, religious ritual, and otht>r significant areas of non-verbal com munication. LIN 545. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLINGUISTICS (4) PR: LIN 301, ENG 517, or CI. A survey of current research and theory in the processes of normal l anguage acquisition and development. LIN 551. STUDIES IN COMPARATIVE STRUCTURE (5) PR: CI. An introduction to linguistic typology consisting in ,1 systematic comparison of characteristic reprt>sentatives of the various language types, such as Vietnamese, Malay, Hungarian, Swahili, Sanskrit, Hebrew, and others. No knowledge of any of thest' languages on the part of the student is presumed. LIN 581. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (3 -5 ) PR: CI. Specialized individual work in area of student's interest. LIN 583. SELECTED TOPICS (3-5) PR: CI. C'...ourse content depends upon students' needs and instrnctor s interest and may range over the entire field of linguistics Study of languagi::s not otherwise offered, such as Japanese and Hindi. Enrollment can be repeated. LIN 585. DIRECTED READING (4) PR: CI. Readings in special topics. Must bt> arranged prior to registration. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY LIN 600. INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE STUDY IN LINGUISTICS (2) Required of a ll M.A. candidates. An introduction to the aims and methodology of linguistics as a graduate discipline: the field of linguistics and its relationship to adjacent art s and sciences; bibliographical resources; methods of research ; and, a brief survey of the hi storica l development of linguistics and current issues in the field LIN 601. SYNTACTIC DESCRIPTION (4) Analysis of syntactic descriptions of various languages through data-solution pro blems in co-occurrence relations, agreement,permutation, conjoining, and embedding. Feature grammars and other models are discussed. LIN 602. PHONOLOGICAL DESCRIPTION (4) Analysis of the phonological component of a grammar, its role and formal structures. The generative model is wmpared to taxonomic descriptions Theory and data solution problems

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MANAGEMENT 271 LIN 611. HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS (4) An advanced survey of the principles and methodology of historical linguistics. LIN 612. COMPARATIVE LINGUISTICS (4) The principles and methodology of comparative linguistics. focusing upon a major lndo-European subfamily, such as Romance, Germanit', or Balto Slavic. LIN 621. STUDIES IN SEMANTICS (4) Selected problems in the area meaning and the relationship between linguistic structure and cognition. :\fappings of presupposition, kinship fields emotive con cepts, and other problems are surveyed. Theories such as Fodor-Katz-Chomsky, Ross-Lakoff-McCawley, and others are contrasted. LIN 631. FORMAL STYLISTICS (4) Studies in the relationship between the development of language study and literary criticism; developments in modern linguistic theory and their application to prob lems of aesthetics literary structure, and style. LIN 641. PRINCIPLES OF ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (4) Analysis of the phonological morphological, and syntactic features of English as a basis for linguistic application to problems of English language acquisition by non -native speakers. LIN 661 TOPICS IN THEORETICAL LINGUISTICS (4) Offerings will include current issues in any area oflinguistic theory. LIN 671. TOPICS IN APPLIED LINGUISTICS (4) Oflerings may include topics in such fields as sociolinguistics psycholinguistics and stylistics LIN 683. SELECTED TOPICS (3-5) Content will depend upon in structor's interests and students needs. Such topics as computational and mathematical linguistics, biolinguistics dialectology and lin quistic geography, and pidgins and creoles may be treated, as well as the study of the structures of languages not ordinarily taught. LIN 685. DIRECTED READING (3-5) Readings in special topics and specialized individual work. Must be arranged prior to registration. LIN 699. RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-8) Required of all candidates for the M.A. degree in Linguistics. Registration may be repeated, but accumulated credit may not exceed eight hours For a list of courses outside the core that may count toward the major in Linguistics, see the program requirements on 134-135. MANAGEMENT Faculty : Bartlett, chairman; Allen, Birkin, Dutton, English, Harlow, C. Kayser T Kayser, Kenerson, Knippen, Lefferts Miner, Mitchell Richardson Rogier, Rose J Sherman R Sherman, Steinike, Stirling, Van Voorhis, Walsh, White Young. MAN 301. PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (5) Organized system of concepts running the gamut from the behavioral to the quantitative sciences which provide broad overview of science of management. MAN 311. MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3) PR: MAN 301 GBA 33.3, ECN 331. Study of interface between environment and open systems. Analysis and design of computer and noncomputer systems as tools in management planning and control. MAN 321. BEHAVIORAL FACTORS IN ORGANIZATIONS (3) PR: MAN 301 or Cl. Integrates concepts learned in CBS Behavioral Area (or equivalent) into managerial framework. Includes theories of communication delegation, discipline, group, motivation, needs, perception and rules

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272 MANAGEMENT MAN 331. INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (3) PR: MAN 301 or Cl. Impact of unionization on management flexibility in decision making Emphasis on theories and models that when applied bear upon how best to manage in union organized workplace in both public and private sectors. MAN 341. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (3) PR: MAN 301 or Cl. Systematic analysis of multitude of functions in personnel; recruiting, selection, job evaluation, p e rformance appraisal, wage and salary, incentives, tra ining & development, etc., utilizing case approach. MAN 421 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3) PR: MAN 311, GBA 351, ECN 331. Develop s conceptual framework and princi ples applicabl e for any managerial decision proce ss including prope r utilization by line of staff ex pertise Integrates prev iou s courses into planning & control model. MAN 431. ORGANIZATIONAL ANALYSIS (3) PR: MAN 321 and Senior Standing. Theory and re sea rch findings from all previo us management co urses integrated by means of a rigorou s conceptua l model. MAN 451. INTERPERSONAL DYNAMICS LABORATORY (3) PR : MAN 321 or CI. More structured, content-oriented t -group mode l to pro vide, through task accomplishment, better awareness of application to modem manage m ent theory of concepts and tools from social sciences. MAN 453. CHANGING ORGANIZATIONS (3) PR: MAN 321 or Cl. Central unifying concept is th e Change Agent. Student ex posed to tot a l range of theory r elate d to resistance to c h ange and introduc tion of change including whether locus should b e in or out of organization. MAN 461. LEGAL CONSTRAINTS AND MANAGEMENT DECISION MAKING (3) PR : MAN 331 or CI. Case analysis of legal constraints on m anage rial d ecis ion making : FLSA ; Workm e n's Compensation; Anti-di scr imin a tion laws; Lie D etec tors and Psy c hological Testing; NLRB rulings cou rt d ecis ions statutes. MAN 463. SEMINAR IN MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND SETTLEMENT (3) PR: MAN 331 or CI. Case exercises to t es t application of tool s and theories pertaining to I.R. and other management functions involving conflicting interest groups that mu s t integrate or co -ex ist int erac t and cooperate. MAN 465. LABORATORY IN THE RESOLUTION OF CONFLICT (3) PR: MAN 321 or CI. In -depth exposure to panorama of int e rdis c iplinary th eor i es having relationship to dispute se ttl e m e nt in any con t ext. Controlled l abora tory testing of said th eo ri es through cases and/or management game. MAN 471. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE I (3) PR: MAN 421 or Cl. H eavy e mphasi s upon population of calculus, matrix algebra, boolean algebra, set theory, probability and ga m e theories, and other operations research techniques to manage m ent problem analysis. MAN 472. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE II (3) PR : MAN 471 or CI. Ex a mination of Linear Programming, dynamic programming, queuing, stochastic inventory models, markov chain analysis for applications to problem analysis and decision making unde r uncerta inity MAN 473. QUANTITATIVE METHODS OF OPERATION: PLANNING AND CONTROL (3) PR: MAN 472 or Cl. R e view of a ll conceptual tools, methods and techniqu es available to modem scientific manager including d epth integration of how and why of quantitative decision process a t policy l evel. MAN 489. GUIDED RESEARCH IN MANAGEMENT (3) PR: Graduating Quarter and CC. Student engages in integrating field project, or other re sea rch in which all of his other course work can b e utili zed. Only most general departmental supeivision i s exercised; management is by result s

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MANAGEMENT 273 FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS MAN 501. SURVEY OF MANAGEMENT (3) An analysis of th e theory and practice o f management, includin g a s t udy of the d e t e rmin a tion of goals and means, th e functions o f management, decision-making an d the a dministrative process in general. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY MAN 601. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ( 3 ) Inv estigates some of the complex factors important for a basic unde r stan din g of huma n beha vior in formal organizations. Within a sys t ems framework (the variables considered are mutually depen d ent) and u s ing th e case m ethod a pproa c h, di sc ussion topics include motiv a tion al aspec ts of indi v idu a l inter and intr a -group behavior. MAN 602. ADMINISTRATIVE DECISION PROCESSES ( 3 ) PR : GBA 603, GBA 605, (both m ay b e concurrent ). An a ly s i s of th e rationa l components of executive deci s ion and action: objective functions, co n stra ints, a dmissibl e courses of action sea rch sequenti a l learning and deci sion revision Student s build models of characteristic s y s t e m s a nd u se optimization techniques and heuri s tic simulation to investigate mode l prope rti es. MAN 603. ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATIONS (3) Analysis, organization, and pres e ntation of r esea r c h findings Students learn through individu a l efforts and clas s di sc u ssio n how t o d efine a topic, d e t e rmin e appropri a t e re sea r c h design collect and organize d a t a r e l evan tl y, and pres ent w ritt e n materia l in forms accepta ble to industry and th e acade mic co mmunity Each s tudent i s expecte d to complete at least one re searc h pro ject and contribute to th e e fforts of hi s colleagues through group interaction in wee kl y "work shop" sessions whi c h typify the class meetings MAN 606. ADVANCED MANAGEMENT SCIENCE (3) PR: GBA 603. Study of current operations r esea r c h techniques including d y namic: ( non linear ) programmin g M arkov c hain ana lysi s as they a ppl y t o prob l ems in the business tirm MAN 607 SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (3) An in-depth study and analysis of critical and / or current probl e m s in indu s tri a l r e lations MAN 608. SEMINAR IN OPERATIONS ANALYSIS (3) PR : GBA 603 Analytical study of pl a nnin g and co ntrol w ith p a rticular stress on operational probfems and d ecis ion-maki ng. The use of s imul a tion will b e tr eated. MAN 609. ADVANCED INTERPERSONAL DYNAMICS (3) PR : MAN 601 or equivalent. The study of p e r so n a l and int e rp erso n a l behavior through experiencing the inform a tion via experim e nts, as well as a s tudy o f th e r e l e v a nt lit erature MAN 610 SEMINAR IN QUANTITATIVE METHODS I (3) PR : GBA 603 GBA 605, MAN 606, MAN 608 Operation a l a n a ly s i s of man age m e nt m easurements including: valu e a n a lysis, cost-benefit a naly s i s payoff tre es and tables, PERT /CPM, the computer as a tool in manage ri a l decisions Str esses the functional use of quantitative m e thodology. MAN 611. SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATION THEORY ( 3) PR: MAN 601. The study of the structure, functions, and dynamics of mod e rn organizations. Stre ss is given to the contributions of b e ha v ior a l sc i ence to ana lysi s of formal and informal organizations. MAN 613. SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (3) PR : MAN 601. The study of organiz a tion a l c hange wi th spec i a l stress on adaptati on of th e firm or sub-strata of the firm to environmental a lterati on. Intra-firm ana l y s is, a nd se n si tivity tra ining are also covered. MAN 615 SEMINAR IN ADMINISTRATIVE POLICY (3) PR: Final quarter of M .S. degree program or CC. A course d es i g ned t o presen t

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274 MARKETING an organiz e d and integrated a pproach to the manag e rial d e ci s ion making pro cess Thi s course s h o uld b e t a k e n in th e final qua rt e r o f the p rog r am. MAN 621. THE MANAGEMENT PROCE.SS ( 4 ) PR: Post mast e r s t a tu s and CC. Sci e ntifi c t oo l s for efficient o r gan i za ti o n di rec tion and e v a luation o f admi ni s trativ e sys t e m s and p ro j ec ts. T o pi cs includ e goa l s p ec ifi ca tion sea r c h procedures, sys t e m s d es i g n prog r a m budget i n g, p e rform a n ce m easure m e nt and a d a pti ve co ntrol. MAN 622 MANAGEMENT OF PROFESSIONALS ( 4) PR: P os t ma s t e r l e v e l b as i c found a ti o n s in P syc h o lo gy and S oci ol ogy and CC. Pr oble ms ol v ing to e mph asize c on cepts and the ori es ex pl a inin g o r gan i z ation a l b e h av i o r o f p rofessi o n a l e mploy ees. MAN 699 FIELD RESEARCH OR THESIS ( 6 ) PR: Con s e n t of Chai rm a n. MARINE SCIENCE Faculty: Baird, B e tz e r C arde r, Hopkins, Humm, P y le. OGY 311. INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (3 ) T opics in biologi ca l c h e mi ca l ge ologi ca l and phys i ca l o cea n og r aphy presented in l ectures b y a numbe r of s p ecia li s t s i n th ese fie ld s FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS OGY 521. CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY ( 4) PR: CHM 2 13 and CI. The o cean as a ch e mic a l s y s t e m including composition phy s i ca lc h e mical asp ec ts, rol e of nutrients, trace meta l s inte raction between bottom and o verlying w a t e r mod e m methods of a n a ly s i s in routin e u s e in o c eanography lee-lab OGY 531 GEOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (4) PR: Graduate s tandinir or CI. An introdu c tion to the physic al, historical s edi mentary and s tructural g eology of the ocean bas in s and th eir borders lee lab OGY 541. PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (4) PR: Graduate standing or CI, PHY 225 The world oc e an including its mor phology physical properti e s curre nts waves tides, h ea t budge t, and related t o pi cs. lee-l a b. OGY 551. BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY ( 4) PR: Gradua t e s t anding or CI, BIO 201-203 The study of life in the s e a with s pecial reference to di s tribution reprodu c tion adapta tion c ompetition and popul a tions. lee lab. For stude nts who have not major e d in a biologi ca l sci e nce. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY OGY 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-9) PR: CI. Directed research on non thesi s topics May be repe a t e d. OGY 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN OCEANOGRAPHY (1) PR: Graduate standing. May be r epeated. OGY 699 M.A THESIS (1-9) PR: CI. May be repe ated to a m a ximum of9 credits. MARKETING F acu lty : Sleep e r c h a irm a n ; R. And e rson Carmi c hael Cunni ng h a m D e B ord, Futhey, H ea th N ess, Nich o l as, O esc h e r St eve ns, Swee n ey, T owe ry Wallace.

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MARKETING 275 MKT 301. BASIC MARKETING (5) PR: ECN 201-202 or CI. Survey of the marketing of goods and services within the economy The integration of functional, commodity, and institutional approaches from the consumer and managerial viewpoints. MKT 311. PRINCIPLES OF SALESMANSHIP AND SALES MANAGEMENT (3) PR : MKT 301. Personal seltiog and sales management as basic elements in the marketing strategy of firms. Includes the scientific management of resources and the dynamics of interpersonal and small group behavior and decision processes. MKT 312. PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING AND SALES PROMOTION (3) PR: MKT 301. A comprehensive coverage of advertising, stressing purposes techniques, organization, research, and media selection including relationships with other marketing mix components. Consideration given to economic and social aspects of advertising and total promotional strategies MKT 315 MARKETING INSTITUTIONS AND CHANNELS (4) PR: MKT 301. A detailed study of marketing channels as a functional area of marketing management responsibility and as a part of marketing strategy Attention given to wholesaling and retailing and their structural dynamic interrelationships including distribution logistics. MKT 316. MARKETING MODELS AND MARKETING SYSTEMS (3) PR : ECN 331 MKT 315, and GBA 333. An investigation of the utility of formal, logical, math e matical, and other quantitative methods and models as these might be applied to marketing management. MKT 401. MARKETING LOGISTICS (3) PR: MKT 315 ECN 331 GBA 333, or CI. Analysis of the logistics of marketing systems for firms engaged in the marketing of goods and services. C'..omponent parts of each system are studied and analytical tools are presented for selecting those alternatives which will attain the goals of the firm MKT 403. PUBLIC RELATIONS AND THE MARKETING PROCESS (3) PR: MKT 312 or CI. Principles, practices and problems in public relations as an integrated part of and supplement to marketing management responsibilities and decisions. MKT 405. INDUSTRIAL MARKETING (3) PR: MKT 315 Problems of marketing industrial goods Characteristics of markets, channels, industrial sales, promotional practices research and marketing policies MKT 407. MANAGEMENT OF ADVERTISING A.ND SALES PROMOTION (3) PR: MKT 312, MKT 315. Discussion and analysis of cases bearing on managerial aspects of advertising and sales promotion including research budget determina tion, strategy, tactics and evaluation of results. MKT 409. INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3) PR: MKT 312, MKT 315, or CI. A study of the procedures and problems asso ciated with establishing marketing operations in foreign countries. The institu tions, principles and methods involved in the solution of these business problems will be treated as well as effects of national differences on business practices. MKT 411. MARKETING RESEARCH (4) PR: MKT 312, MKT 315, ECN 331 or MTH 345 ; or CI. A study of research methods applicable to problem-solving in the field of marketing. MKT 413. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3) PR: MKT 301 or CI. An investigation and application of the behavioral factors affecting consumer demand. f'..o)'lsideration given to industrial, governmental, and ultimate consumers MKT 414. SEMINAR IN MARKETING AND CONSUMER BEHAVIOR RESEARCH (3) PR: MKT 312, MKT 315, MKT 411, MKT 413. lndepth discussion formulation application, and evaluation of advanced research techniques and practices as cur rently applied to facilitate marketing decisions. MKT 417 RETAILING MANAGEMENT (3) PR: MKT 301 MKT 315, MKT 413 A comprehensive analysis of the retailing

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276 MARKETING structure, institutions and environment. To include pertinent management theories and practices of organizi ng, planning and contro llin g retail operations. MKT 419. MARKETING MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS (4) PR. MKT 411. MKT 413, and 3 other MKT courses, or CI. The integration of marketing knowl edge applied to deci sion roles in managing the tota l marketing effort of firms, and coordination with other major functional areas on s p ecific pro blems. MKT 489. SPECIAL STUDIES IN MARKETING (1-3) PR: MKT major and CI. Intensive independent research in marketin g under th e direction of a major profe ssor; progress and final analysis reported in se min a r FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS MKt 501. SURVEY OF MARKETING (3) PR: ECN 501.A critical ana ly sis of the field of m a rketing including as p ec ts of marketing policies, institutions, research and tr ends. Special e mph asis given to product d eve lopm ent, pricing strategy, channel selection, and promotion as a basi s for marketing management decisions. Ass igned readings, discussions, and reports. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY MKT 601. ADV AN CED MARKETING PROBLEMS (3) PR: MKT 301 or 501, ECN 605 or C.I. A study of the mark e ting probl e m s of th e firm approached from a management point of view. Emphasis is plac e d upon the development of the student's ability to analyze marketing s ituations, identify problefns determine solu tions, implement co rr ec tiv e action, and pl an marketing strategy. MKT 602. ANALYSIS FOR MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3) PR: MKT 601 GBA 603, ECN 605, or CI. The use of quantita tive t ec hniques and analy tical concepts in marketing d ecis ion making; mark e ting r esea r c h mod e l building and sim ulation ; se lected statistical d ec i s ion t echniques and computer applications. MKT 603. SEMINAR IN MARKETING (3) PR: MKT 301 or 501; ECN 601 605 The study of con t emporary marketing thou ght, advanced marketing co nc epts, and rec ent d eve lopm e nt s in th e field of mark e ting. R eadings, di scussio ns, and individual inv es tigation. MKT 605. BEHAVIORAL CONCEPTS IN MARKETING DECISION MAKING (3) PR: MKT 601 or CI. The application and t ec hniqu es of th e b e havioral scie n ces to the unders tanding and improv ement of th e mark e tin g process and d ecisio n making concerning_ consumer behavior. MTK 607 SEMINAR IN PROMOTIONAL POLICY AND STRATEGY (3) PH: MKT 605 or CI. An analy s i s of th eo rie s and practic es of advertising, se llin g and sales management, and sa l es promotion as .th ey rel a t e to th e tot a l marketing program of firms. Emphasis upon the coordination o f promoti ona l policy an d stra t egy MKT 609 MARKETING CHANNELS AND PHYSICAL DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT (3) PR: MKT 602, MKT 605 or CI. An analysis of th e d eve lopment of int egrate d dis tribution s ystems. Channel a lt ernatives includin g the insti tuti o ns involved and physical flow as a part of marketing strategy. MKT 611 MARKETING RESEARCH AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS (:3) PR: MKT 602 GBA 60 3, GBA 605 or CI. A study of th e m a rk e tin g r esearc h proce ss, methods and techniques and th e n ee d and applicability of inform a ti on sys tems. MKT 683. DIRECTED RESEARCH IN MARKETING (l-6) PR: MKT 601 MKT 602, and CI. Int ensive advanc e d inde p e nd en t resea rch in mar keting guided by a marketing profe ssor.

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MASS COMMUNICATIONS 277 MASS COMMUNICATIONS Facu lty: Sande rson chairman; Baldwin, Bishop R.S. Carr, Daugherty, Griscti Horsman, K e rns Lucoff, Moyse, O 'Hara, Parker, Ross, Stalnaker Yates. CBS 101. FRESHMAN ENGLISH (4) One section each fall quarter is reserved for journalism-interest students. COM 300. INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATIONS (3) The functions of agencies of mass communication and their impact upon society; critical analyses of press performance in relation to current events; evalua tion of the press through a study of its history (Formerly JNM 341.) COM 301. THE POPULAR ARTS IN AMERICA (4) A survey of the growth of the popular arts (motion pictures, radio, television, art, best sellers, jazz and other forms of music, the comics, etc.) as mirrors, transmitters and transformers of American cultural values. MKT 312. PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING AND SALES PROMOTION (3) For course d esc ription, refer to Department of Marketing section. COM 313. ADVERTISING COPYWRITING AND LAYOUT (4) PR: MKT 312, or CI. Application of persuasive writing techniques and principles of design and graphic arts to mass media advertising, including copy, visualization, layout typography, print production, TV storyboards, radio commercials, film, etc. COM 321. MAGAZINE ARTICLE AND FEATURE WRITING (4) PR: CBS 102. Planning, researching, writing and marketing article s for general and special int e rest magazin es and newspaper magazine supplements; experience in d eve loping article ideas ; inductive analysis of con temporary magazine articles. ( Formerly JNM 349.) COM 325. MAGAZINE EDITING (4) PR: COM 330. Comparative study of types of magazines and businesspapers as to objectives and content; planning to meet magazine objectives and reader interest; article and photograph selection and preparating for printing; use of research methods in planning and evaluation; ethical and legal problems of the editor. COM 330. BEGINNING REPOHTING (4) PR : CBS 102. Basic instruction in news judgment, sources of news, newsgather ing and newswriting techniques. Typing ability is required. (Formerly JNM 342.) COM 331. ADVANCED REPORTING (4) PR: COM 330. G e tting information and writing the more complex and specialized story; techniques of investigative and analytical reporting, including ethical and l ega l considerations. (Formerly JNM 343.) COM 335. BROADCAST NEWS (4) PR: COM 330, SPE 241. Gathering, writing, filming and editing the news for radio and television. COM 337 REPORTING PRACTICUM (2) PR: COM 331 an d CI. For selected News-Editorial Sequence majors. Practical experi e nce outside the classroom in a live newspaper reporting situation where the student works for academic credit under the tutelage of a professional practitioner. COM 338. NEWSPAPER MANAGEMENT (2) PR : COM 331 or CI. A pro-seminar to discuss advertising, business circulation, m ec hanical, p e rsonnel, promotional, and news-editorial operations of the press with editors and manage rs of leading daily and weekly newspapers. COM 341. PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC RELATIONS (4) PR : Junior standing or CI. The functions of rublic relations with{n corporate and institutional structures; ethical standards o practice, and relationships of the practic e to the public m edia and othe r modes of contemporary communication. COM 351. LITERATURE AND THE FILM (3) PR: CBS 102. A study of what happens when a novel is adapted for the movies; of th e insights of modern writers and literary critics into the motion picture as an art form analogous to, yet distinct from, literature and of the impact of literature on film-making. (Forme rly LLI 311.)

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278 MASS COMMUNICATIONS COM 352. PHILOSOPHY AND THE FILM (3) PR : Junior standing. A s tudy of the philosophi ca l implication s of the motion picture as a n art form; es th e ti cs in general versus film es th e ti cs; the connections between th e world views of suc h modern philosophers as B e rg son, Whitehead, and Brad ley and the world view exp r esse d through th e motion picture; the connections between "pure id eas," th e id eas in th e documentary film, and the id eas in the fic tion a l film (Forme rly LLI 3 12. ) COM 353. INTRODUCTION TO FILM WRITING (4) PR : COM 354 or CI. An introduction to the techniques of writing for the film with special emphasis on adaptations from fiction an d examinations of sc ript s as models and as subjects for c ritical ana ly s is. (Forme rly LLI 3 1 3.) COM 354. THE FILM AS MASS COMMUNICATION I: SYNTAX (4) PR : Junior standing or CI. The language, conventions, e lements and patterns of the film m edium as r e lat e d to current models of effec ti ve mass communica tion an d n ew theories of non-verbal communica tion. Concurrent labor a t o r y experi ences in con trol of light and line. COM 355. THE FILM AS MASS COMMUNICATION II: RHETORIC AND STYLISTICS (4) PR : COM 354 or CI. A continuation of COM 354 to include th e effec ti ve arrange ments of scenes and sequences in motion picture and television films. Concurrent laboratory e xperiences in sound and editing. COM 356. THE FILM AS MASS COMMUNICATION III: WORKSHOP (4) PR : COM 355 or CI. Practic a l exercises, d e monstration s and experiences in a pply. ing mat e rial covered in COM 354 and 355. COM 357. CLASSICS OF THE SILENT FILM {4) Examples of the silent film s tudi e d from social, int e llectual hi stor i ca l and a rti s tic points of view. COM 358. CLASSICS OF THE SOUND FILM ( 4) Exampl es of the sound film s tudi e d from social, intellectual, historical, and a rti s ti c points of view. COM 371. PHOTOJOURNALISM I (4) PR: CBS 102. Camera operation, darkroom techniques, pi cture composi tion ; editing, ethics, history and laws in connection with photojournali sm. COM 372. PHOTOJOURNALISM II (4) PR: COM 371 or CI. Exten sive study and use of color in photografhy and news p a p e r production, including the theory and actual photomechani ca color separa tion; study will be given to certa in law s of science as th ey relate in photography to light, optics, film c hemicals, and color. COM 375 TYPOGRAPHY I (4) PR : CBS 102. The history and d es ign of typ e, m ajor classifications of type faces, typographic nomencl ature, printer's measurements and th e science of type d esign and id e ntification. Laboratory work. COM 376. TYPOGRAPHY II (4) PR: COM 375 or CI. A study of th e hi s tory of typesetting, the e m e rgence of compute r s and coldtype co mposition ; ex t e n s ive study an d u se of copyfitting m e th o d s for body type, displ ay and headlin es; principle s of typo g raphy and photocomposi tion including readability and legibility Laboratory work. COM 383. SELECTED TOPICS IN MASS COMMUNICATION STUDIES (1-4) Courses designed to meet curren t or s p eci fic topi cs of inte r es t t o the in structor and students. COM 400. INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION ( 4) Mass communica tion s as internal and interna tion a l sys t ems; flow of th e news; international n ews co mmuni ca tion s networks; sa t e ll i t e communicat ion; overseas activiti es of American m edia inte r es t s; int e rnation a l propaganda; communication and n a tion a l deve lopm ent; internation a l m e di a organizations and their activ iti es. COM 403. HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNICATIONS LAW (4) PR: Junior standing. Hi s toric and Constitutional back gro u nds of freedom and con trol of exp r ess ion s t atutory enactments, major Supre m e Court cases, cou rt decisions an d administrative ruling s which h ave shape d l ega l contro l of communicati ons.

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MASS COMMUNICATIONS 279 COM 405. GOVERNMEN T A N D THE MEDIA ( 4 ) PR : COM 403. The r e l a ti onships b e tween go v e rnm ent and th e m e d ia, w ith e mph as i s on current a ctiviti es o f s uch regul a tory age n cies a s th e F edera l C o mmuni ca ti o n s C o mmission th e F e d e ral Tra d e Commissi o n and oth e r c ommission s ; th e courts, th e C on g r ess and th e E xecutive; e x a min a ti o n o f m e di a and indu s try codes a nd s t andards. COM 417. ADVERTISING PRACTICUM (2) PR : S e nior standing and CI. F o r se lect e d Ad ve rti s in g S eque n ce majors. Practic a l expe ri e nce outs id e th e cl ass ro o m in a liv e a dv e rti s in g s itu a ti o n w h e r e th e student w ork s for aca d e mi c c r edit unde r th e tute l age of a profess i o n a l practition er. COM 425 MAGAZINE PLANNING AND PRODUCTION (4) PR: C OM 3 25, 3 71, 3 75. R esea r c h in n ew magaz ine d es i g n and produc tion t ec h niqu es; t ra inin g in the c r ea ti ve u se of typo graphy, photography, art w o rk t ex t in th e "a r ea c oncept"; l etterpress and off se t produc ti o n ; fin a n cia l m a n a g e m ent o f ma ga zin es; pre p a ration o f a d e t aile d dummy for a mode l m agaz in e. COM 427. MAGAZINE PRACTICUM (2 ) PR: S enior s t a ndin g and CI. F o r se lect e d M agazin e S eque nce m ajors. Pra ctic a l exp e ri e nce outs id e th e cl assroo m in a li ve m aga zin e o r indu s tri a l p u bli ca ti o n s itu a ti o n w h e r e the student wo rk s for aca d e mi c c r edit unde r th e tute lage of a profession a l practiti o n e r. COM 433. NEWS EDITING I (4) PR: COM 331. Ev a lu a tin g n e w s and it s di s pl ay; e ditin g and r e writin g co p y for th e m ass m e di a, w ith emphas i s on the d aily n ews p a p e r ; n ews judg m ent, head lin es, m a k eup; ethica l proble ms. COM 434. NEWS EDITING II (4 ) PR : COM. 4 33. Continuation o f COM. 433, with m o r e int e n s i ve prac ti ce on th e c op y d es k in e v a lu a ting pro cess i n g editing and headlinin g liv e wire co p y and loc a l co p y; e xp e rim enta l m a k eup; m a nagin g th e co p y d es k. Current eve nt s and a n a l yses o f se lect e d d a ily n ews p a p e rs. COM 437 EDITING PRACTICUM (2) PR : S e nior s t a ndin g, COM 434, and CI. For se lect e d N e w sEditori a l Sequ e nce m a jors. Practical ex p e ri e nce outs id e th e cl ass room o n a d aily n e w s p a p e r copy desk w h e r e th e student w ork s for acad e mi c c r edit unde r th e tute l age o f a profession a l news edito r COM 441. WRITING FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS (4) PR: COM 33 0 341. P e r s u as iv e writing techniques uniqu e t o th e p rac ti ce o f public r e l a tion s; a ppli ca ti o n of princ ipl es and e thi c al practi ces to probl e m -so l ving s itu a tion s d raw n from cas e studies; writin g fo rm a t s used in pro m o ti o nal and publi c it y lit e rature. COM 447 PUBLIC RELATIONS PRACTICUM ( 2 ) PR : S e ni o r s t a ndin g and CI. For se l ec t e d Publi c R e l a ti o n s S eque nce m a j o rs. Pr ac ti ca l ex p e rience outsid e th e cl ass ro o m in a pro fess ion a l publi c r e l a ti o n s s itu a tion w h e r e the student w ork s for aca d e mi c credit unde r the tute l age o f a profession a l practition er. COM 451. SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE FILM TO 1945 (4 ) PR : Junior s t a nding. The indus tri a l tech no lo g i cal, philo s ophi ca l and s ocial facto r s b ea rin g o n th e ri se and d e v e lopm e nt o f th e m o ti o n pi cture as a p o pul a r a rt. Inten sive study of a se ri es of film s through sc reen i ng s and re adings. COM 452. SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE FILM, 1945 TO THE PRESENT (4) PR: Juni o r s t anding. A continua t i on of COM 451 cove rin g th e d e v e l opment of th e film from 1945 to th e present. (COM 451 i s not a pre r equis it e.) COM 453. THE DOCUMENTARY FILM (4) PR: S ophomore standing. The d e v e lopm ent of th e doc um e nt a ry m o v e m e nt: ea rli es t n e w s reel s ; Fl a h e rty, Gri e r s on and th e GPO Un i t U S G o v e rnm ents p on s or e d films, th e Can a di a n Film Boa rd Cin e m a V e rit e'; s tud y of a b o ut 60 fac tfilms from some 20 countri es. COM 454 FILM CRITICISM (4) PR: Junior s t a ndin g and COM 354, 355 and 451 o r 452 ; or C I The film as a m ass m e d i um compa rin g and contrasting it s m ass c ommuni c ati o n as pect w ith o th e r

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280 MATHEMATICS important aspects. Critical ana ly ses of se lected film s and inte nsive readings in th e theory of film Literary socia l drama ti c, philo sop hi c and historic approach es to film criticism. COM 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH IN MASS COMMUNICATION (1-4 ) PR : CC and Cl. The course provides means for a student t o do independent s tudy in an area not covered by a numbered course. COM 482. MEDIA CRITICISM: BROADCASTING (4) PR: SPE ?41. The critical study of con t e mpor ary broa d cas t con t en t. Methods of broadcas t criticism; realism in t e l evis ion fiction; t e l ev i s ion as a c reati ve envi ronm ent; television and culture. COM 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN MASS COMMUNICATION STUDIES (1-4 ) PR: Junior s tanding. Courses d es igned to meet current or specific topics of interest to th e instructor and students. COM 485. DIRECTED READINGS IN MASS COMMUNICATION STUDIES ( 1-4 ) PR: Junior standing, CC an d CI. Readin g and directed study in s p ec i a l topi cs. COM 491. SENIOR SEMINAR: INTERCOMMUNICATION-THE MASS MEDIA IN PERSPECTIVE (4) PR: Senior s t anding and 12 hours of COM The inter-rel a ti onships among the mass m e dia and institutions; th e ir e ffect upon each other and upon contemporary soc i e ty COM 500. THEORY OF MASS COMMUNICATION (4) PR: Senior standing. The n ature of the m ass communication proc ess, it s effec t s on individuals and groups; th e moral ethica l s o c i a l an d politi ca l implications in in flu e ncing and direc ting b e h av ior Analyses of theori es of mass communication primarily thos e of McLuhan, Schramm, L aza r sfe ld S e ld es, R eisman, and Katz. COM 530. JOURNALISM STUDIES (4) PR : S e nior s t anding. Not o p en for c r edit to COM majors. An int ens ive review of ma ss communica tion theory and practice as they r e late to content in secondary school journali s m courses, with some emphasis a l so on supervision of sc h oo l publica tions. COM 539. SEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN NEWS-EDITORIAL JOURNALISM ( 2 ) PR: Senior standing and COM 433 or COM 491 or Cl. A study of the role of th e fr ee press in a d e mocrati c socie ty an d it s efforts to fulfill it s soc i al and e thic a l obligations by analyses and di sc u ss ion s of th e problems which face th e reporte r, the editor, and the publi sh er. COM 541. PUBLIC INFORMATION (4) PR: Senior standing and COM or CI. The n ature of gove rnm ent public in formation organiz a tion prac tic es and c ritici s m s th ereof; the role o f inform a tion specialists in r eporting gove rnm ent a t all levels to the public; conceptu a l differences in approac h and techniques between governmental and private sec tor public rela tion s COM 550. FILM STUDIES ( 4) PR: S e nior s tanding. Not o p en for c r edit t o COM majors. An i n t ens i ve r eview of film theory and rracti ce as th ey r e l a t e to content in seco nd ary sc h oo l su bject s s u c h as Engli s h, s ocia studies, hi s tory or journalism. L abora t o r y wo rk. COM 581. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH IN MASS COMMUNICATION ( 1-4 ) PR: Senior standing, CC and Cl. The course provides means for a stu d ent to do independent study in an a r ea not covered by a numbe r e d co ur se. COM 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN MASS COMMUNICATION STUDIES ( 1-4) PR: Senior standing. Courses, including summe r workshops designed to meet current or s pecific topics of inte r es t to th e instructor and students. COM 585 DIRECTED READINGS IN MASS COMMUNICATION ( 1-4 ) PR : S enior s tanding, CC and Cl. Reading and direct e d study in specia l topics. MATHEMATICS Faculty : Ratti, chairman; B Br a un, Britton W. Clark, C l eaver, D e Groot Gard, A Goodman H art, I saak, Kart satos, Lieberman Li ang, S. Lin, Y. Lin Lucken-

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MATHEMATICS 281 bach, Manougian, McWaters, G. Michaelides, Mukherjea A Price, Pothoven, J.C. Re ed, J.H. Reed, D.C. Rose, E Saff, Shershin, Snider, Soniat, Thieleker, Tserpes, W. Williams, Zerla CBS 109, llO. FUNCTIONAL MATHEMATICS (5,5) Designed as a terminal course for general cultural purposes, as a foundation for further study of mathematics and science, and as a preparatory course for prospec tive elementary school teachers. MTH 101. FOUNDATIONS OF UNIVERSITY MATHEMATICS (5) PR: Two years of secondary school algebra, one year of plane geometry. Real numb ers and their properties; introduction to analytic trigonometry and geometry. (No student who has previously earned a "C" or better in MTH 2ll or MTH 302 or their equivalents will receive credit for MTH 101.) MTH 211. ELEMENTARY CALCULUS I (4) PR: Two years of secondary school algebra, one year of plane geometry or CC. Real numbers exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. The sequence MTH 211-212-213 is primarily for students from Biological Sciences, Social Sciences and Business. (No credit for math majors or students with credit in MTH 101.) MTH 212. ELEMENTARY CALCULUS II (4) PR: MTH 211 or CC. Rules for differentiation, applications of the derivative, definite integral, fundamental theore m of calcu lus, integration. (No credit for students with c redit in MTH 302 ) MTH 213. ELEMENTARY CALCULUS III (4) PR: MTH 212. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, introduction to infinite series. (No credit for students with credit in MTH 302 ) MTH 302. CALCULUS I (5) PR: MTH 101 with a grade of "C" or better or CC. Limits derivatives applica tions definite integral. MTH 303. CALCULUS II (4) PR: MTH 302 with a grade of "C" or better or CC. Antiderivatives, the definite integral, applications, log, exponential, and trig functions. MTH 304. CALCULUS III (4) PR: MTH 303 with a grade of "C" or better or CC. Integration, polar coordinates, conic sections, vectors, indeterminate forms and improper integrals. MTH 305. CALCULUS IV (4) PR: MTH 304 with a grade of "C" or better or CC. Vectors in 3-space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, infinite series. MTH 309. SET THEORY (3) PR: MTH 302 or CC. Relations, functions, order, cardinal numbers. MTH 310. ELEMENTARY PROBABILITY (3) PR: None. Permutation co mbinations the binomial and multinomial theorem, probability B e rnoulli trials and the D e Moivre Laplace limit theorem. MTH 311. MATRICES AND APPLICATIONS (4) PR: CBS 109-110 or MTH 310 or CC. Vectors, matrices together with their a pplic a tions to linear programing, theory of games, graph theory, and selected topics in psychology and eco nomics MTH 323. LINEAR ALGEBRA (4) PR: MTH 302 or CC. Vectors matrices systems of linear equations, linear transform a tion s MTH 331. NUMBER SYSTEMS (5) PR: Non e. The counting numbers, th e ir properties and operations. The integers, their proP.erti es and operations. Prime numbers, modular arithmetic. Rational numb ers, th e ir properties and operations. (No credit for Mathematics majors.) MTH 332. BASIC ALGEBRAIC CONCEPTS (4) PR: MTH 331. Equations, systems of equations and inequalities The real numbers as a compl e t e ordered fie ld. Complex numbers. (No credit for Mathematics majors. ) MTH 333. INFORMAL GEOMETRY (4) PR: None Concepts of length, congruence, similarity, transformations in the plane.

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282 MATHEMATICS Ruler and compass constructions, impossible constructions coordinate systems, graphs lines and curves. (No credit for Mathematics majors.) MTH 345. INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS I (5) Hypothesis testing, estimation; normal, Chi-square, t, F, binomial, multinomial, distributions; ANOV, CR, RCB designs; single df, regression, correlation, contin gency tables Students who successfully complete this course may not also receive credit for either ECN 331-431 Business and Economic Statistics or SSI 301 Social Science Statistics. MTH 346. INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS II (5) PR: MTH 345 or CC. Factorials, ANCOV; multiple curvilinear regression; response surfaces; Latin square, Split Plots, incomplete blocks designs; distribution free methods. MTH 401. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (4) PR: MTH 305. First order linear and nonlinear differential equations, higher order linear equations, applications. MTH 405. ADVANCED CALCULUS I (4) PR: MTH 305 with a grade of "C" or better. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, implicit-function theorems, transformations. MTH 406. ADVANCED CALCULUS II (4) PR: MTH 405. Continuation of MTH 405. MTH 420. ELEMENTARY ABSTRACT ALGEBRA (3) PR: MTH 309 or CC. Groups, rings integral domain, fields, integers, the rational, real and complex number systems. MTH 423. GEOMETRY I (3) PR: MTH 302. Emphasis on axiomatics, advanced Euclidean geometry, elements of projective geometry, non-Euclidean geometries. MTH 424. GEOMETRY II (3) PR: MTH 423. Continuation of MTH 423. MTH 431. VECTOR ANALYSIS (3) PR: MTH 305. The algebra and calculus of vectors, applications, general coordi nates, introduction to tensor analysis. MTH 433. ELEMENTARY COMPLEX ANALYSIS AND APPLICATIONS (4) PR: MTH 305 Complex numbers, analytic and harmonic functions, power series, contour integrals, residues and poles, with emphasis on applications. MTH 445. INTRODUCTORY PROBABILITY THEORY I (3) PR: MTH 305 and MTH 309 or CC. Probability spaces, discrete and continuous probability distributions expectations. MTH 446. INTRODUCTORY PROBABILITY THEORY II (3) PR: MTH 445 Joint distributions, sums of random variables, weak and strong laws oflarge numbers, limit theorems. MTH 447 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS I (4) PR: MTH_ 401. Interpolation and quadrature, finite differences, numerical solution of algebraic and transcendental equations, numerical of differential equa tions, computer techniques MTH 448. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS II (4) PR: MTH 447 Continuation of MTH 447. MTH 471. THE SCOPE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF MATHEMATICS (3) (For non-science majors) PR: Senior or junior standing. Students having completed MTH 302 are not eligible to enter this course. The development of mathematical thought and its application to the physical world, the social sciences, and the fine arts, emphasizing the importance and meaning of mathematics in comtemporary culture. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS MTH 501. ADVANCED DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS ( 4) PR: MTH 401 or CC. Series solutions of second order linear equations, boundary value probiems, existence theorems and Fourier series.

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MATHEMATICS 283 MTH 510. ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICAL LOGIC (3) PR: CC. Truth tables, tautologies, quantifiers, rules of inference, informal proofs in mathematics. MTH 5ll. ADVANCED LINEAR ALGEBRA (4) PR: MTH 309, 323 or CC. Vector spaces, linear independence, dimension, matrices, linear transformations. MTH 513. REAL ANALYSIS I ( 4) PR: MTH 305 and 309. Continuity, differentiation and derivatives, sequences and series of functions, convergence. MTH 514. REAL ANALYSIS II (4) PR: MTH 513. Continuation of MTH 513. MTH 515. CALCULUS ON MANIFOLDS (4) PR: MTH 5ll and 514. Calculus of several variables. MTH 520. COMPLEX ANALYSIS I (4) PR: MTH. 405." Complex numbers, analytic functions and mappings, integrals. MTH 521. COMPLEX ANALYSIS II (4) PR: MTH 520. Power series, residues and poles, conformal mapping. MTH 523. ALGEBRA I (4) PR: MTH 305, 309, 511. Semi-groups and groups. Rings and ideals; homomorphisms. MTH 524. ALGEBRA II (4) PR: MTH 523. Polynomial rings, integral domains; factorization. Fields and field extensions; reducibility. MTH 531. TOPOLOGY I (4) PR: MTH 305 and MTH 309. Metric and topological spaces, continuity, hemeo morphisms, connectedness, fundamental group, compact spaces, separation axioms, product spaces. MTH 532. TOPOLOGY II (4) PR: MTH 531. Continuation of MTH 531. MTH 535. TENSOR ANALYSIS (3) PR: MTH 431 or CC. The calculus of tensors, applications to differential geometry and physics. MTH 537. SPECIAL FUNCTIONS (3) PR: MTH 401. Orthogonal functions, the gamma functions, Bessel functions, applications. MTH 539. OPERATIONAL METHODS (3) PR: MTH 406 or 514. Fourier and Laplace transforms, other integral transforms, applications. MTH 541. APPLIED MATHEMATICS I (4) PR: MTH. 401 or CC. Elements of complex analysis, Laplace transforms, Fourier series, and Fourier transforms. Mathematical techniques for scientists and engineers Equivalent to PHY 541. MTH 542. APPLIED MATHEMATICS II (4) PR: MTH 401 or CC. Series solutions of differential equations, Strum-Liouville Theory, Green's functions, integral equations, special functions, eigenvalue pro blems and diagnolization of matrices. Mathematical techniques for scientists and engineers Equivalent to PHY 542. MTH 543. INTEGRAL TRANSFORMS I (4) PR: MTH 401, 405, or CC. Introduction to integral transforms with special emphasis on the Laplace and Fourier transforms, applications to differential equations. MTH 544. INTEGRAL TRANSFORMS II (4) PR: MTH 543 Continuation of MTH 543. MTH 545. STATISTICAL METHODS IN RESEARCH I (4) Primarily for graduate students with research problems. Distribution of sample statistics estimation, tests of hypotheses. MTH 546. STATISTICAL METHODS IN RESEARCH II (4) PR: MTH 545 or CC. Randomized blocks, Latin squares, factorials, regression, correlation, split plots. MTH 548. INTRODUCTORY THEORETICAL STATISTICS (5) PR: MTH 305 and either MTH 345 or equivalent. Frequency, sampling, limiting

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284 MATHEMATICS distributions and th e ir moments; th eory of point and interval es timation hypothesis testing, ANOV MTH 549. INTRODUCTORY THEORY OF LEAST SQUARES (5) PR : MTH 305 and either MTH 548 or CC. The genera l lin ea r hypothesis, l eas t squares for experimental d esig n mod e ls, co mpon en t s of variance. Applications. MTH 551. NUMBER THEORY (4) PR: CC. Congruences, quadratic resi du es, se l ec ted topics. MTH 553. INTRODUCTION TO GRAPH THEORY (3) PR: CC. Brief introdu c tion to cla ssicia l graph theory _(4 co lor co nj ec tu re, e tc.), dire cted graphs conn ec t e d digraphs, condensa tions, incid e n ce m a tric es, Polya's Theorem networks. MTH 555. MATRIX COMP UT A TIO NS (3) PR : MTH 3 23, ESC 3 02. Algo rithm s for so l v in g lin ea r inequ a lities and eq u a liti es. Di ago nalization and tridi agonaliza tion of m a tric es Computing c h a r ac teristic roots and vectors. MTH 557. MATHEMATICAL OPTIMIZATION THEORY I (3) PR: MTH 323. Review of matrix algebra. Theory of lin ea r inequ a liti es, polyhedra l co n vex se t s and duality Th eory of linear programming Simplex method. Var i ants of the simplex method Par ame tric programming. Applications MTH 558. MATHEMATICAL OPTIMIZATION THEORY II (3) PR: MTH 557 or CC. Th e ory of nonlin ea r programming Convexity du a lity, an d optimality c rit eria conve r ge n ce of so l u ti on a l gor ithms. Unconstrained optimiza tion and sea rch techniqu es. MTH 560. ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS I (4) PR : MTH_ 448 or CC. Mathematical Th eory associat e d with algorithms for computer inform a tion process ing; expec ted time and space r eq uir e m en t s of a lgorithms, co mp arison of alogrithms cons tru c tion of potion a l a lgorithms, th eory, unde rlying parti cu lar a lgorithms. MTH 561. ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS II (4) PR : MTH 560. Continuation of MTH 560. MTH 563. ANALYSIS OF NUMERICAL METHODS I (4) PR: MTH 323, MTH 4 01 EC 231 or CC. Corequisite : MTH 4 05. Numerica l matrix t echniques, Iter a tiv e so luti ons of e quations, polynomi a l a pproximations, num erica l diff e r e ntiation and integration, solution of ordinary a nd p a rtial differ e n ti a l eq uations acc uracy and round-off erro r conve r gence. MTH 564. ANALYSIS OF NUMERICAL METHODS II (4) PR : MTH 563 Continuation of MTH 563. MTH 571. GEOMETRY FROM AN ADVANCED STANDPOINT (3) PR : A b ac h e lor' s d eg ree or CC. Axiomatic deve lopm en t of geometries, with emphasis on Euclide an geometry for teachers and oth ers. MTH 573. SET THEORY AND ALGEBRA FROM AN ADVANCED ST ANDPOINT ( 3) PR : A b ac helor' s de gree or CC. B asic concep t s of th e l a ngu age of mathematics, including a study of r e lations, functions a lgebrai c s tru ctures, for t eac h ers and others. MTH 583. SELECTED TOPICS (1-6) PR: S en ior or junior s t a ndin g and CC. E ac h topic is a course of s tud y. 01-His t ory of Mathematics, 03 Logi c and Foundati ons, 05-Numbe r Th eory, 07-Top ics in Algebra, 09M a th ema tics for Phy sics, 11Topi cs i n Pr obability and St a tisti cs, 1 3Topics in Analy s is, 15Topics in Topology FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY MTH 601. PRO-SEMINAR I (3) PR: Gradu a t e St a nding Selected topics suitab l e for semina r treatm ent, suc h as transfinit e arithmetic, axiom o f c h oice, in ve r se limit spaces. MTH 602. PRO-SEMINAR II (3) PR : MTH 601. Continuation of MTH 601.

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MATl:iEMATICS 285 MTH 603. THEORY OF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATI6NS I (4) PR: MTH 501 o r C C E x i s t e n ce theo r e ms, topics in oscillation theory, asymptotic b e havior s t a bility and boundedness of s olution s of differential equations MTH 604 THEORY OF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL II (4) PR: MTH 603. Continua tion of MTH 603 MTH 605. MEASURE AND INTEGRATION i (3) PR: MTH 515. Abstr ac t mea s ure and integration in sigma ; to Euclid ea n spaces, Fubini' s Theore m Radon Nikodym Theoreqi, Lp spaces. MTH 606 MEASURE AND INTGRATION II (3) PR: MTH 605 Continua tion of MTH 605 MTH 607. MEASURE AND INTEGRATION III (3) PR: MTH 606. Continu a tion of MTH 606 MTH 611 COMPLEX ANALYSIS I ( 3 ) PR: MTH 521. Theo ry of univ a l ent and mulitivalent function s Entire fun c tions Rie m a nn s urfa ces Appro xima tion Theory in the Complex domain. MTH 612. COMPLEX ANALYSIS II (3) PR: MTH 611 Continu a tion of MTH 611. MTH 613. COMPLEX ANALYSIS III (3) PR: MTH 612. Continu a tion o f MTH 612 MTH 614. MODERN ANALYSIS I (4) PR: CC. M e tri c and B a n ac h s p aces, integration and measure in locally compact s p aces fun c tion s p aces MTH 615. MODERN ANALYSIS II (4) PR: MTH 61 4. Continu a tion of MTH 614 MTH 617. BANACH SPACES AND ALGEBRAS I (4) PR: MTH 607 Topol og i c al v ec tor spa ces, normed spac es, dual spaces with various topolo g i es, Lp s p aces, B a na c h alg ebras. MTH 618. BANACH SPACES AND ALGEBRAS II (4) PR: MTH 617 Continu a tion of MTH 617 MTH 624. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I (4) PR: CC. Structure th eo ry of fie lds; ideal s and module s MTH 625. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA II ( 4 ) PR: MTH 6 24 No etheria n rin gs; idea l the ory MTH 627 HOMOLOGICAL ALGE BRA (3) PR: MTH 625 C a t eg ori es and functors, homology of complexes c ohomol o gy s p ec tr a l seq u e nc es. MTH 629 LIE GROUPS (3) PR: MTH 615 625 or 6 33 and CC. Topolo g ical groups, repre senta tion of c ompact Lie g r o ups, a l gebra i c g roups. MTH 632. ADVANCED TOPOLOGY I ( 4 ) PR: MTH 5 32 and CC. Func ti o n s p aces, co mp ac tifi ca tions, covering spac es, other t opics. MTH 633. ADVANCED TOPOLOGY II (4) PR: MTH 632. Continu a tion of MTH 632 MTH 635. ALGEBRAIC TOPOLOGY (3) PR: MTH 6 33 or CC. Homotopy homology groups, lo ca l homology group s MTH 636. TOPOLOGICAL ALGEBRA I (4) PR: MTH 6 33 and CC. Topologic a l se migroups topolqgical groups topological rings and fie ld s H aa r measur e MTH 637 TOPOLOGICAL ALGEBRA II ( 4 ) PR: MTH 6 36. Continu a tion of MTH 636. MTH 639 DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY (3) PR: CC L oca l diff e renti a l geom e try curvature, evolutes an!;l involutes c al c ulus o f varia ti o n s MTH 641. TOPICS IN NUMBER THEORY I (3 ) PR: MTH 5 24 o r CC. O ; mtinu e d fra c tions, approximation of irra tional numbe rs, l a tti ces, ge om e tri c theo ry a l gebra i c numbers d e n s ity of sequ e n ce s of inte g ers, a n a l y ti c numbe r th eory th e prim e numbe r th eore m

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286 MATHEMATICS MTH 642. TOPICS IN NUMBER THEORY II (3) PR: MTH 641. Continuation ofMTH 641. MTH 643. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS I (4) PR : MTH 501 and CC Classification of second order equations, Cauchy problems, Dirichlet and Neumann problems, mixed problems, properties of solutions. MTH 644. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS II (4) PR: MTH 643. Continuation of MTH 643. MTH 645. PROBABILITY THEORY (4) PR: MTH 514 or CC. Distribution functions, Random variables, Expectations, Independence, Concepts for convergence of sequences of random variables, Law of large numbers, Central limit theorem. MTH 651. LOGIC AND FOUNDATIONS I (4) PR: CC. Propositional calculus, Post's theorem, first order and equality calculi, models, completeness and consistency theorems Godel's theore m, recursive functions MTH 652. LOGIC AND FOUNDATIONS II (4) PR: MTH 651. Continuation of MTH 651. MTH 655. TRIGONOMETRIC SERIES I (3) PR MTH 514. Selected Topics in Fourier Series and summability, orthogonal polynomials, almost periodic functions, completeness of sets of functions MTH 656 TRIGOMETRIC SERIES II (3) PR: MTH 655. Continuation of MTH 655. MTH 657. CALCULUS OF VARIATIONS (4) PR: MTH and CC. Maxima and minima of functionals, problems of Lagrange, Bolza and Mayer and other topics. MTH 659. ALGEBRAIC NUMBER THEORY (4) PR: MTH 524 or CC. Algebraic number fields, algebraic integers, basis and dis criminant of algebraic number fields, Ideals, decomposition of ideals, Theorem of Minkowski, Applications of Galois Theory to the Theory of ideals, Units MTH 671. MATHEMATICAL OPTIMIZATION THEORY III (3) PR: MTH 558 or CC, MTH 615 Linear programming in abstract spaces; integer programming; stochastic programming. Recent rese a rch in mathematical pro gramming and related areas. MTH 673. PARTIAL DIFFERENCE EQUATIONS (4) PR: MTH 644 and either MTH 564 or MTH 561. Review of partial diff e r e ntial equations. Finite-differ ence approximations. Convergence, stability, and accuracy. Acceleration of convergence for elliptical equations. Techniques for hyperbolic equations. Schocks. Applications MTH 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-15) PR: CC. ( S/U grade only.) MTH 683. SELECTED TOPICS (1-6) PR: CC. 01-Topology, 02-Analysis, 03-Algebra, 04-Appli e d Mathematics, 05Graph Theory 06-Number Theory MTH 688. RECENT ADVANCES IN MATHEMATICS WITH EMPHASIS ON THEIR IMPACT ON COLLEGE-LEVEL COURSES (3-6) A course designed to consider and study the recent developments of mathematics especially those developments that have an effect on altering the basic concepts and ideas of mathematics and imply a change in the presentation of introductory material in the field (Credit not applicable toward thesis degree requirements.) (SIU Grade only.) MTH 689. DIRECTED RESEARCH (3-9) Supervision of the teaching of graduate teaching assistants in e lementary and/or laboratory courses. (Credit not applicable toward thesis degree requirements. ) ( S/U Grade only ) MTH 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (1-6) Direction of thi s seminar is by a faculty member. Students are required to present research papers from the literature. (S/U Grade only.)

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MEDICINE 287 MTH 699. MASTER THESIS (1-9) May be taken more than once, but not more than a total of nine hours credit will be allowed. ( S/U Grade only.) MTH799. PH.D. DISSERTATION (1-9) May be taken more than once. MEDICINE MED 600. GROSS ANATOMY (7) PR: Admission to C,ollege of Medicine A study of the gross struct ure of the human body Lee-lab and discussion. MED 601. DEVELOPMENTAL ANATOMY (EMBRYOLOGY) (2) PR: Admission to College of Medicine Studies of the human embryo and fetus with emphasis on teratology Lee lab and discussion. MED 602. MICROSCOPIC ANATOMY (4) PR: Admission to College of Medicine. A study of the microscopic structure of normal tissues and organs with emphasis on human material. Lee lab and discussion. MED 603. NEUROANATOMY (4) PR: Admission to College of Medicine A study of the gross and microscopic structure and the functions of the human nervous system. Lee-lab and discussion MED 604. ANATOMY SEMINAR ( 0 ) PR: C,onsent of Chairman, Department of Anatomy A weekly discussion of anatomical topics of special interest. Lee and discussion. MED 605. BIOCHEMISTRY (9) PR: Admission to College of Medicine. A study of the chemistry and metabolism of biologically important compounds Interrelationship of various metabolic pathways will be discussed with emphasis on the biochemical aspects of human diseases Lee-lab and discussion MED 606. BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR (0) PR: Consent of in s tructor. Current literature dealing with the biochemical basis of human disease will be discussed Lee and discus si on. MED 607. MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY (9) PR: Admission to C,ollege of Medicine A study of the_ role of bacteria, viruses, mycological agents, and parasites as they are related to disease production. Host response to these agents is also an important aspect particularly as related to immune proces ses. Leelab and discussion. MED 608. MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY SEMINAR (0) PR: Consent of Chairman, Department of Medical Microbiology Presentation and discussion of current topics of interest in medical research Lee and discussion MED 609. PHARMACOLOGY (9) PR: Admission to College of Medicine. Studies of pharmacodynamics of drugs including mechanisms of action, side effects, and toxicities. Lee-lab and discus s ion. MED 610. PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR ( 0 ) PR: Consent of Chairman, Department of Pharmacology Presentation of current research inve s tigations as related to medical problems Lee and dis cussion MED 611. MEDICAL PHYSIOLOGY (9) PR: Admis s ion to College of Medicine A study of the functional aspects of components of the bocfy and its organ systems and their integration into operational units The physiology of homeostasis and the central nervous system will be included. Leelab and discussion MED 612. PHYSIOLOGY SEMINM\ (0) PR: Consent of Chairman, Department of Physiology Seminars in which

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288 MODERN LANGUAGES current research areas of inte rest as related to medicine are discussed. Lee and di sc ussion MED 613 HUMAN BIOLOGY (2) PR: Admission to Colleg e of Medicine An interdisciplinary course emphasizing the re l e vance of pre-clinical science and the contributions of recent research information to the practice of medicine Lee and discussion. MED 614. BIOSTATISTICS (1) PR: Admission to Coll ege of Medicine. Presentation of methods of collection, tabulation, graphic illustration, and analysis of numerical data encountered in m e dical research a reas Lecture. MED 615 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHIATRY (3) PR: Admi ssi on to College of Medicin e. Principles of human behavioral science will b e pres ente d from the s tandpoint of the developing organism reacting to it s e nvironm e nt. L ee, patient contact, and discussion MED 616 PSYCHIATRY SEMINAR (0) PR: Consent of Chairman, Department of Psychiatry. Current research surveys in Psy c hiatry L ee and disc us s ion. MED 617 PATHOLOGY (18) PR: Admission to College of Medicine A correlated study of gross and micro sco pic materi a l illustrating s tructural and functional changes in cells, tissues, and organs during disease proce sses. Lee-lab and discussion. MED 618. PATHOLOGY SEMINAR (0) PR: Cons ent of Chairman, Department of P athology. Presentation and dis cuss ion of current topics of medical importance in general area of pathology. L ee and discussion MED 619. INTRODUCTION TO MEDICINE (5) PR: Admis s ion to Coll ege of Medicine. A course designed to provide the student with a comprehensive frame of reference for viewing health and disease as an inte rpl ay of biolo g i cal, so cial and psychological factors. Lee, patient contac t and discussion. MED 620. LABORATORY MEDICINE (9) PR : Admis s ion to College of M e dicin e. Presentation and evaluation of clinical pathologic correlation b e tw ee n labor a tory findings and disease processes. Lee l a h, pati en t contact, an d di sc ussion MED 621. PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS (7) PR: Admission t o College of Medicine The basic techniques of clinical evaluation are pr esen t!(d e mphasizing history taking and the demonstration of normal and abnormal phy s ical findings Lee, patient contact, and discussion. MED 622. BASIC SCIENCE REVIEW (11) PR: Admis s ion to C ollege of Medicine An interdisciplinary course in which ba sic concepts of each sc ien ce will be reviewed and additional work involving m o re adwnced and so phi s ti ca t e d concepts will be presented. Lee-lab and discussion. MED 623. TUTORIAL CLERKSHIP ( 9) PR: Admission to \,olle ge of M e dicine. The primary objective is to provide for the extension and perfection of work in both physical diagnosis and l abo ratory medicine. L ee, patient contact, and discussion MODERN LANGUAGES Faculty: Capsas, c h airma n ; Al-tikriti, Artzybushev, M. Braun, C a no, Cherry, D ejongh, M. D evinney, Fukomoto, Gl e nisson Grothmann, P. Gulati Hamblin, Hampton, Ierado, J oc him e k H Jue rg ensen, K aza n, Lopes McLea n, da la Men a r d iere, Milani, R. Nagosky, Neugaard, Pagagounos Price Punto, B Pytlinski Rubin Sokolsky, Sp a rks, Stelzmann, T a tum Wall Whartenby.

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MODERN LANGUAGES 289 General Modern Languages Modern Arabic. Chin ese ( M andarin), Modern Greek, Modern Hebrew, Hindi Urdu, J a pan ese and a t tim es oth e r l ess c ommonly t aught l a ngu a g es, s uch as B e ngali Dutc h, Polish and Sw a hili are off e r e d unde r thi s ge n e r a f listing. LAN 383. General Modern Language I (1-4) LAN 483. General Modern Language II (1-4) LAN 585 Directed Study French CBS 111. BEGINNING FRENCH I (5) CBS 112. BEGINNING FRENCH II (5) CBS 211. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I (4 ) PR: CBS 112 CBS 212. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II ( 4 ) PR: CBS 211. FRE 203. BEGINNING CONVERSATION (3) PR : CBS 112. FRE 301. CONTROLLED COMPOSITION (4) PR : CBS 212 FRE 303. ADVANCED CONVERSATION ( 3) PR : FRE 20 3. Free c onv e r s ati o n b ased upon th e c;urr ent Frenc:h idiom FRE 305. INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE (4) PR: CBS 212 FRE 310. FRENCH CLASSICS IN TRANSLATION (4) PR: Non e. S o n g o f Roland Volt ai re, Hugo St endhal, Flaube1t and oth ers. FRE 311. CONTEMPORARY FRENCH LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (4) PR: Non e. P ro u s t Gide, M o nth erla nt S a rtr e, Camus, Anouilh B ec:ke tt and others FRE 321. FRENCH FOR NON-LI N GUISTS ( 3 ) PR: None. Provid es the n o n lin g ui s t w ith a limit e d active voca bul a ry in Fre n c h as well as a m as t e ry of the lin g ui s ti c s tru c tu res n ecessa ry t o p ass a r ea ding exa min a tion in Fre n c h. FRE 401. EXPOSITORY WRITING ( 4 ) PR : FRE301 FRE 403. PHONETICS AND DICTION ( 4 ) PR : FRE :30:3. FRE 405. SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE ( 4 ) PR : FRE 3 05 Earli es t monum ents thro ugh 18th C e ntury Enlight e nm ent. FRE 406. SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE ( 4) PR: 3 05 Romantic:i s m t o pre s e nt FRE 410. FRENCH CIVILIZATION (4) France's c ontribution to world culture a nd c ivilization p a rticularly a s s u c h mold e d and mold s the tw e nti e th ce ntury (In En g li s h ) FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS !'RE 501. EARLY RENAISSANCE LITERATURE ( 4) PR: FRE 405 Emphas i s o n R a b e l ais and his c:onte mporaries. FRE 502. LATER RENAISSANCE LITERATURE ( 4 ) PR : FRE 405. Emphasi s on Mont a i g n e and the Pl e iad e. FRE 516. STYLISTICS (4) PR : FRE 401. FRE 521. CLASSICAL PROSE AND POETRY (4) PR : FRE 405 Emphasis on Malh erbe La Fontain e, Boil e au De s cartes and Pas cal. FRE 522 CLASSICAL DRAMA (4) PR: FRE 405 \,orn e ille. M o ili e re, and Ra c ine.

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290 MODERN LANGUAGES FRE 531. THE ENCYCLOPEDISTS ( 4 ) PR: F RE 4 05. The Cl ass i ca l tra dition and th e new currents o f tho u ght 1715 -50. FRE 532. ROUSSEA U AND PRE-ROMANTICISM ( 4 ) PR: FRE 4 05. FRE 541. ROMANTICISM ( 4 ) PR: FRE 4 06. FRE 542 19TH CENTURY REALISM AND PARNASSIANISM ( 4 ) PR: FRE406. FRE 543. LATE 19TH CENTURY LITERATURE ( 4 ) PR : FRE 4 06. Emphas i s o n N a turali s m and S y mb olis m FRE 551. 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE TO 1939 ( 4 ) PR : FRE4 06 FRE 552 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE 1939-PRE SENT (4) PR: FRE406. FRE 58 3 SELECTED TOPICS 1-4 ) PR: Seni o r or gr adua t e s t a nding Cl. FRE 585. DIRECTED STUDY ( 1-3 ) PR : Se ni o r o r g radu a t e s t a nding. Cl. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY FRE 601. OLD FRENCH ( 4) PR : FRE -t0.3. NOTE: R e q u ir e d of all M A Candidates. FRE 612 MONTAIGNE ( 4 ) PR : Gradua t e s t a ndin g FRE 622. SEMINAR ON CLASSICAL DRAMA ( 4 ) PR : G radua t e s t anding. A study of the wo rk s o f C'.,Qrn e ill e and R aci n e o r the worl..s o f Moli ere FRE 689 BIBLIOGRAPHY ( 2) PR : Gradua t e s t a ndin g. R esea r c h m etho ds. Incl u d es familiari ty w ith m a j o r j our na l s and biblio gra phi es, and a prac ti c um NOTE: R equired o f a ll M A Candid a t es. FRE 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR ( 4 ) German C B S 114 BEGI NN ING GERMA N I ( 5 ) CB S 115. BEGI NN I N G GERMAN II ( 5 ) C B S 2 14. I NTERMEDIATE GERMAN I ( 4 ) PR: C B S 1 15 C B S 215. I NTERMEDIATE GERMAN II ( 4 ) PR: CBS 214 G E R 20 3 BEGINNING CON VERSATION ( 3 ) P R : CBS 11.5. GER 301. CONTROLLED COMPOSITION ( 4) PR: CBS 2 1 5 GER 303 ADVA NCED CONVERSATION ( 3 ) PR : GER 2 0 3 Free c onv e r sa tion b ase d 1.Jpon the curre nt G e rm a n idi o m GER 3 05. I NTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE ( 4 ) PR: CBS 215. GER 310. GERMAN CLASSICS IN TRANSLATION ( 4 ) PR : No ne. G oe th e, S c hill e r K a nt S c h o p enha u er. Buc hner N ovalis and o th e rs. GER 311. CONTEMPORARY GERMA N LITERATU RE I N TRA NSLATION ( 4 ) PR: None. M a nn H esse, K afka, Grass, B oll, Br ec ht W e iss and o th e rs. GER 321. GERMAN FOR NON-LINGUISTS ( 3 ) PR: Non e. Pro v ides th e no n lingui s t with a limit e d ac ti ve vocabula ry in G e rman as well as a m as t e ry of t h e lin g ui s ti c s tru ctures n ecessa ry to p ass a r ea din g e x a m i na tion in G e rm a n

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GER 401. EXPOSITORY WRITING (4) PR: GER301 MODERN LANGUAGES 291 GER 405. SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE (4) PR : GER 305. Earliest monuments to Classicism GER 406. SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE (4) PR : GER 305. Romanticism to the pre s ent. GER 410. GERMAN CIVILIZATION (4) G e rmany' s contribution to world culture and civilization, particularly as such molded and molds the twentieth century. ( In English) FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS GER 513. HISTORY OF THE GERMAN LANGUAGE (4) PR : GER401. GER 516. STYLISTICS (4) PR: GER 401. GER 521. FAUST I (4) PR : GER4 05. GER 531. GOETHE (4) PR: GER405. GER 532. SCHILLER (4) PR : GER 405. GER 535 THE ENLIGHTENMENT (4) PR : GER405. GER 543. ROMANTICISM (4) PR : GER 406. GER 544 REALISM (4) PR: GER406. GER 552. 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE TO 1945 (4) PR : GER406. GER 553. 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE 1945-PRESENT (4) PR: GER 406. GER 583 SELECTED TOPICS (1-4 ) PR: S e nior or graduate standing. CI. GER 585. DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) PR : S e nior or.graduat e standing. CI. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY GER 601. MIDDLE HIGH GERMAN (4) PR : GER 513 GER 631. FAUST II (4) PR: GER 5 2 1 GER 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (4) Italian CBS 123. BEGINNING ITALIAN I (5) CBS 124 ITALIAN II (5) CBS 223. INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I (4) PR: CBS 124. ITA 203 BEGINNING CONVERSATION (3) PH: CBS 124 ITA 301. CONTROLLED COMPOSITION (4) PR: CBS 223. ITA303. ADVANCED CONVERSATION (3) PR: IT A 203'. Free conversation based upon th e current Itali an idiom ITA 305 INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN LITERATURE (4) PR: CBS 2 23.

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292 MODERN LANGUAGES ITA 310. ITALIAN CLASSICS IN TRANSLATION (4) PR: None Dante, Petrarcha Manzoni, Carducci Poliziano, C...astiglione and others. ITA 311. CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (4) PR: None Fogazzaro Vittorini Silone, Pavese, Lampedusa, Levi, Quasimodo, Ungaretti, Pirandello, Moravia and others ITA 321. ITALIAN FOR NON-LINGUISTS (3) PR: None. Provides the non-linguist with a limited active vocabulary in Italian, as well as a mastery of the linguistic structures necessary to pass a reading examina tion in Italian. ITA 401. EXPOSITORY WRITING (4) PR: ITA 301. ITA 405. SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE (4) PR: IT A 305. Earliest monuments to 18th century Classicism. ITA 406. SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE (4) PR: IT A 305. Romanticism to present. ITA 410. ITALIAN CIVILIZATION (4) Italy 's contdbution to world culture and civilization, particularly as such molded and molds the twentieth century. (In English ) FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ITA 512. DIVINE COMEDY I (4) PR: ITA405 ITA 513 DIVINE COMEDY II (4) PR: ITA405 ITA 541. ROMANTICISM (4) PR: ITA 406 ITA 542. REALISM (4) PR: ITA 406 ITA 551. 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE TO 1939 (4) PR: ITA 406 ITA 552. 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE 1939-PRESENT (4) PR: ITA 406 IT A 583 SELECTED TOPICS ( 1-4) PR: S enior o r graduate standing. Cl. ITA 585. DIRECTED STUDY (1-3 ) PR: S e nior or graduate standing. Cl. Portuguese POR 313. BRAZILIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (4) PR: None. Machado de Assis, Graca Aranha, Da Cunha, Monteiro Lobato, Lins do R ego, Ramos Amado Guimara es Rosa and others. POR 326. BEGINNING ACCELERATED PORTUGUESE (4) PR: Two years of another Romance Language or Latin. POR 327 INTERMEDIATE ACCELERATED PORTUGUESE (4) PR: POR 326. POR 401. EXPOSITORY WRITING (4) PR: POR327. POR 405. SURVEY OF PORTUGUESE LITERATURE (4) PR: POR327. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS POR 585. DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) PR: POR 327. Cl.

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MODERN LANGUAGES 293 Romance FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ROM 517. ROMANCE PHILOLOGY (4) PR: Senior or graduate standing ROM 518. MEDIEVAL AND EARLY ROMANCE LITERATURE (4) PR: ROM 517 Russian CBS 117. BEGINNING RUSSIAN I (5) CBS 118. BEGINNING RUSSIAN II (5) CBS 217. INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I (4) PR: CBS 118 CBS 218 INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II (4) PR : CBS 217 RUS 203. BEGINNING CONVERSATION (3) PR : CBS 118 RUS 301. CONTROLLED COMPOSITION (4) PR : CBS 218. RUS 303. ADVANCED CONVERSATION (3) PR: RUS 203. Free conversation based upon the current Russian idiom RUS 305. INTRODUCTION TO RUSSIAN LITERATURE (4) PR : CBS 218. RUS 310. RUSSIAN CLASSICS IN TRANSLATION (4) PR: None Pushkin Turgenev, Tolstoy, D ostoyevsky, and others. RUS 311. SOVIET LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (4) PR : None. Gorky, Chekhov, Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, and others RUS 321. RUSSIAN FOR NON-LINGUISTS (3) PR: None. Provides the non linguist with a limited active vocabulary in Ru ssian, as well as a mastery of the linguistic structures necessary to pass a reading exa min a tion in Russian RUS 401. EXPOSITORY WRITING (4) PR: RUS 301. RUS 405 SURVEY OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE (4) PR: RUS 305. Earliest monuments to Classicism. RUS 406. SURVEY OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE (4) PR : RUS 305. Romanticism to present. RUS 410. SLAVIC CIVILIZATION (4) Slavic co ntribution to world culture and civilization, particularly as such molded and molds the twentieth century. ( In English ) FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS RUS 515 HISTORY OF THE RUSSIAN LANGUAGE I (4) PR : RUS -Wl. RUS 516. HISTORY OF THE RUSSIAN LANGUAGE II (4) PR : RUS 515. RUS 541. 19TH CENTURY DRAMA (4) PR: RUS 405 RUS 552. TOLSTOY (4) PR : RUS 405. RUS 553. DOSTOYEVSKY (4) PR : RUS 405. RUS 561. CHEKHOV AND GORKY (4) PR : RUS406. RUS 563. SOVIET LITERATURE (4) PR : RUS 406.

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294 MODERN LANGUAGES RUS 583 SELECTED TOPICS (14) PR: Senior or gradu a t e standing CI RUS 585. DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) PR: Senior or graduate standing. Cl. Spanish CBS 120. BEGINNING SPANISH I (5) CBS 121. BEGINNING SPANISH II (5) CBS 220 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I (4) PR: CBS 121. CBS 221. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II (4) PR: CBS220. SPA 203. BEGINNING CONVERSATION (3) PR: CBS 121. SPA 301. CONTROLLED COMPOSITION (4) PR : CBS 221. SPA 303. ADVANCED CONVERSATION (3) PR: SP A 203. Free conv e r s ation bas e d upon the current Spani s h idiom SPA 305. INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC LITERATURE (4) PR: CBS 221. SPA 310. SPANISH CLASSICS IN TRANSLATION (4 ) PR: None. The Cid, The Celestina, Lope d e V e ga C e rvant es, Que v edo, P e rez Galdos, and others SPA 311. CONTEMPORARY SPANISH LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION ( 4 ) PR: None. Pio B a roj a, Un amuno, V a ll eIncl a n S ende r Jim e n e z and othe rs. SPA 313 SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (4) PR: Non e D a rio Mi stral, Giiirald es, Azu e la Bor g es, A s turi as, and others. SPA 321. SPANISH FOR NON-LINGUISTS ( 3) PR: None. Provides the non linguist with a limit e d activ e vo cabulary in Sp a nish as we ll as a ma s t e ry of the lingui s ti c structu res n ecess a ry to p ass a r ea d i n g ex am in a tion in Sp a ni s h SPA 401. EXPOSITORY WRITING (4) PR: SPA 301. SPA 403. PHONETICS AND PHON OLOGY ( 4 ) PR: SPA 3 0 3. SPA 405. S U RVEY OF SPA NISH LITERATURE ( 4 ) PR : SP A 3 05 Earli es t mon um en t s t o 1 8 th C entury Neo C l ass i c i sm. SPA 406 SURVE Y OF SPA N ISH LITERATURE (4) PR: S PA 3 05 R o m a nti c i s m t o th e prese nt. SPA 410 HISPA N IC CIVILIZATION ( 4 ) Sp ain s co ntributi o n t o w o rld c ultu re an d ci v ili za t ion, parti c ul a rl y as s u c h m o ld e d and m olds th e t we nti eth century (In Eng li s h ) FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS SPA 516. STYLISTIC S ( 4 ) PR : SPA -101. SPA 524. GOLDEN AGE DRAMA ( 4 ) PR: SP A -105 L o p e d e V ega, A l a r co n Tirso, Calderon and othe r s SPA 525 GOLDEN AGE N O N -DRAMATIC LITERATURE ( 4 ) PR: SP A -105 Emphas i s o n lyri c p oe t ry and th e mysti cs. SPA 526 THE Q UIXOTE ( 4 ) PR: SP A -105. SPA 540. ROMA NTICISM ( 4 ) PR: SPA-106 SPA 542 19TH CENTURY REALISM ( 4 ) PR : SPA 406.

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SPA 546. THE GENERATION OF 1898 (4) PR: SPA 406. SPA 552. 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE 1936-PRESENT (4) PR: SPA 406 SPA 561. SURVEY OF SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE I (4) PR: SPA406. SPA 562. SURVEY OF SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE II (4) PR: SPA 406. SPA 570. MEXICAN LITERATURE ( 4 ) PR: SP A 561 562 SPA 575. RIVER PLATE LITERATURE (4) PR: SPA 561 562 SPA 583. SELECTED TOPICS ( 1-4 ) PR: Senior or graduate standing. CI. SPA 585. DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) PR: Senior or graduate s tanding CI. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY SPA 601. OLD SPANISH (4) PR : SPA 403 Note: Require d ot all M A candidates. SPA 624. SEMINAR ON GOLDEN AGE DRAMA (4) PR : SPA 524 SPA 625. THE PICARESQUE NOVEL ( 4 ) PR : SPA525. SPA 689. BIBLIOGRAPHY (2) MUSIC 295 PR: Graduate standing. Research Includes familiarity with major journals and bibliographi es, and a practicum NOTE: Required of all M .A. Candida tes SPA 691. GP.ADU ATE SEMINAR (4) MUSIC Faculty : Reynolds, acting chairman; Abram, E.S And e rson, F. Black, N. Cooke, K. Covington, A Dick ey, Eubank, Fearn, L. Golding, A. H aw kins H enning, T. Hoffman, Jennings G Johnson H Jon es, K e i s t er, Kneeburg, Kosmala L ewis, Lockwood, Marzuki J P Nagosky, W Owen Preodor, Rearick, Shackson, St en berg, N Stevens Sperry H. Taylor Watkins, Wolf, Woodhams, Wrancher. MUS 101. RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC (3) Open only to non music majors; deve lopm en t of s kill s in hearing and p erform in g music and in bas ic notation. MUS 102. MUSIC THEORY-LITERATURE SUPPLEMENT (2) PR: CI. May be required of music majors upon exam ination for supp lemental study coo rdin
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296 MUSIC Sec. 011 1"rumpet 012 Trorr;bone/Baritone 013 Tuba 014 Percussion MUS 205. COMPOSITION (3) Sec. 015-021 Voice 022-025 Piano 026 Harp PR: CI. Required of music majors with an area emphasis of Composition ; class instruction in original composition; may be repeated for credit. MUS 206. CLASS PIANO (2) PR: CI. Class in elementary p'iano and music fundamentals designed for students with limited keyboard experience. Primary emphasis is placed on sight-reading, accompanying, transposition, harmonization basic technique, and appropriate literature Sec. 001 non-music majors Sec. 006 non-music major level II 002 non-music majors 007 music major proficiency level n1 003 music major level I 008 music major profici ency level III 004 music major level II 009 non-musk major level III 005 music major level II 010 music major level IV MUS 207. SECONDARY APPLIED MUSIC (1) PR: CI. One half-hour private lesson or one hour class per week for music stu dents wishing to gain proficiency in an area other than their applied performance major and for a limited number of non-music majors who have had prior musical training. Course is open by audition only. Sec. 001 Violin 002 Viola 003 Violoncello 004 Double Bass 005 Flute 006 Oboe 007 Clarinet 008 Saxophone 009 Bassoon Sec 010 French Horn Oll Trumpet 012 Trombone/Baritone 013 Tuba 014 Percussion 015-021 Voice 022-025 Piano 026 Harp MUS 301, 302, 303. MUSIC THEORY-LITERATURE (3,3,3) PR: MUS 203. Required of music majors; continuation of MUS 201-203. MUS 304, APPLIED MUSIC (3) PR: Necessary competency at MUS 204 level determined by faculty jury examina tion. Required of all applied music majors. Private and class in s truction in string, woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments, voice and piano. May be repeated for credit four quarters only. Sec. 001 Violin 002 Viol a 003 Violoncello 004 Double Bass 005 Flute 006 Oboe 007 Clarinet 008 Saxophone 009 Bassoon MUS 305. COMPOSITION (3) S ec. 010 French Horn 001 Trumpe t 012 Trombone/Baritone 013 Tuba 014 Percussion 015-021 Voice 022-025 Piano 026 Harp PR: Necessary competency at MUS 205 l eve l determined by faculty jury examina tion. Required of music majors with a n area emphasis of Composition; class instruction in original composition; may be repeated for credit four quarters only. MUS 306, 307, 308. CONTEMPORARY TECHNIQUES OF COMPOSITION (3,3,3) PR: CI. Instruction in the us e of major Twentieth-Cen tury compositional techniques; tonal, unordered set, and serial composition an d the use of indeterminancy in composition and performance MUS 371. ISSUES IN MUSIC (2) Open only to non-music majors; lectures and live performances by artist faculty of significant works from the lit e rature for the piano; analysis and illustration in

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MUSIC 297 performance of the abstract and aesthetic elements in music which vitally concern the artist performer; credit awarded on a pass-fail basis MUS 372-373. THE ENJOYMENT OF MUSIC (3 3) Open only to non-music majors; a study in the art of music and its materials, designed to develop an understanding of basic principles of music and a technique for listening to music; Section 001 of MUS 372 is for students who are majoring in dance, theatre arts, and visual arts MUS 374. MAJOR PERFORMING ORGANIZATIONS (1) PR: Cl. Open to all university students with the necessary proficiency in their performing media; study and performance of music for large combinations of voices, string, woodwind, brass or percussion instruments; may be repeated for credit; credit awarded on pass-fail basis. Sec. 001 Concert Band I 002 Concert Band II 003 Reading Band 004 University Choir Sec 005 University Community Chorus 006 Opera Workshop 007 Symphony Orchestra MUS 375 CHAMBER MUSIC ENSEMBLES ( 1) PR: CI. Open to all university students with the necessary proficiency in their performance media; study and performance of music for small combinations of voices, string, woodwind, brass, or percussion instruments and piano; may be repeated for credit; credit awarded on pass-fail basis. Sec. 001 Chamber Singers Sec. 009 Clarin e t Choir 002 Jazz Laboratory Band 010 Percussion Ensemble 003 Brass Choir 011 Marimba Ensemble 004 Brass Quintet 012 Flute Choir 005 Woodwind Quintet 013 New Music Ensemble 006 Piano Ensemble 014 Madrigal Singers 007 String Quartet 015 Gospel Choir 008 Horn Quartet 016 Electronic Arts Ensemble MUS 376. ROCK MUSIC SURVEY (2) Open to non-music majors only Survey class covering all aspects of rock music with emphasis on its function as folk expression. May not be repeated for credit. MUS 401, 402, 403. MUSIC HISTORY-LITERATURE (2,2,2) PR: CI. Required of music majors; a survey of the historical development of musical styles and of the music representative of those styles. MUS 404. APPLIED MUSIC (3) PR: Necessary competency at MUS 304 level determined by faculty jury examina tion. Required of all applied music majors. Private and class instruction in string, woodwind, brass and percussion instruments, voice, and piano. May be repeated for credit four quarters only. Sec. 001 Violin Sec 010 French horn 002 Viola 011 003 Violoncello 012 004 Double Bass 013 005 Flute 014 006 Obo e 015-021 007 Clarinet 022-025 008 Saxophone 026 009 Bassoon MUS 405. COMPOSITION (3) Trumpet Trombone/Baritone Tuba Percussion Voice Piano Harp PR: Nec es sary competency at MUS 305 level determined by faculty jury examina tion. Required of music majors with an area emphasis of Composition; private instruction in original comp
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298 MUSIC MUS 481. DIRECTED STUDY (1-6) PR: CC. Independent studies in the various areas of music; course of study and credi t s must be assigned prior to registration; may be repeated. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS MUS 504. APPLIED MUSIC (3) PR: Necessary competency at MUS 404 level determined by faculty jury examina tion. Required of all applied music majors. Private and class instruction in string, woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments, voice and piano May be repeated for credit. Sec. 001 Violin 002 Viola 003 Violoncello 004 Double Bass 005 Flute 005 Flute 006 Oboe 007 Clarinet 008 Saxophone MUS 505. COMPOSITION (3) Sec. 009 010 011 012 013 014 015-021 022-025 026 Bassoon French Hom Trumpet Trombone/Baritone Tuba Percussion Voice Piano Harp PR: Necessary competency at MUS 405 l evel determined by faculty jury exam in a tion. Required of music majors with an area emphasis of Composition; private instruction in original composition; may be repeated for credit. MUS 506 STUDIO TEACHING (3) PR: CI. May be elected by undergraduate music majors; emphasis on the business management of the music studio, the musical responsibilities of the studio teacher, the techniques of private instruction. May be repeated for credit. Sec. 001 Strings Sec. 003 Voice 002 Winds & Percussion 004 Piano MUS 507-508. ORCHESTRATION (3,3) PR: CI. Intensive study and practice in scoring music for various comb in ations of instruments including symphony orchestra, band, and sma ller ensembl es of string, woodwind, brass and percussion instruments. MUS 561. MASTER CLASSES (2) PR : CI. Study and performance of selected literature with special emphasis on sty le form and techniques; especially designed for teachers, piano majors, and talented secondary school students. Sec 001 Piano Sec 002 Voice MUS 562. MUSIC WORKSHOPS (2) PR: CI. Intensive study in the specialized areas indicated below; open to teachers, University students, and secondary students; credit available to qualified students. Sec. 001 Band Sec. 004 Orchestra 002 Chamber Music 005 String 003 Chorus MUS 581. DIRECTED STUDY (1-6) PR: CC. Independent s tudi es in the various areas of music; course of study and credits must be ass igned prior to registration; may be repeated. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY MUS 601, 602, 603 EVOLUTION OF MUSICAL STYLES (3,3,3) Required of music theory majors; study of the development of musical styles in western civilization from Antiquity to the present; includes ana lysi s and performance of representative works

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MUSIC 299 MUS 604. APPLIED MUSIC (2-4) PR: Necessary competency determined by faculty jury audition. Required of all applied music majors. Private and class instruction. Sec. 012 Strings Sec. 042 Percussion 014 Strings 044 Percussion 022 Woodwinds 052 Voice 024 Woodwinds 054 Voice 032 Brass 062 Piano 034 Brass 064 Piano MUS 605. COMPOSITION (4) PR: CI. Required of music majors with an area emphasis of Composition; private instruction in original composition; may be repeated for credit. MUS 606. ELECTRONIC MUSIC SEMINAR (3) CI. Emphasis on the proper use of electronic instruments construction of simpler instruments, study of the literature and music of the field. MUS 607, 608. MUSICAL ACOUSTICS (4,4) Required of music theory majors; study of the nature and transmission of sound, the hearing process, tuning and temperament; includes principles of electronic sound reproducers and basic concepts of architectural acoustics. MUS 609. MASTERWORKS OF CHORAL LITERATURE (5) A chronological study of the development of choral music; analysis and study of major works from a stylistic and biographical perspective. MUS 610, 611, 612. KEYBOARD LITERATURE (3,3,3) A chronological study of the development of music for the keyboard instruments; analysis and study of major works from a stylistic and biographical perspective. MUS 613, 614, 615. SONG LITERATURE (3,3,3) Solo song literature from the 17th century through the contemporary with emphasis on German lieder, French songs, and contemporary English and American songs; special emphasis on performance. MUS 616. SYMPHONIC LITERATURE (5) A chronological study of the development of orchestral music; analysis and study of major works from a stylistic and biographical perspesetive MUS 617,'618. OPERA LITERATURE (4,4) A chronological study of the development of opera from 1600 to the present; emphasis on the technical, stylistic, and performance aspects of opera. MUS 619. TWENTIETH CENTURY MUSIC LITERATURE (5) PR : CI. A study of the compositional techniques of composers from Debussy to the present; emphasis on counterpoint, harmonic structure, tonality, atonality, polytonality texture, and serial technique. MUS 620, 621, 622. CHORAL LITERATURE AND CONDUCTING (6,6,6) Combination of seminar, classroom and laboratory types of experiences designed to provide depth in stylistic study of choral music literature and performance. MUS 623, 624. INSTRUMENTAL CONDUCTING (3,3) PR: CI. Intensive study of instrumental conducting techniques with emphasis on interpretation of musical scores and application in laboratory sessions. MUS 625, 626, 627. TEACHING OF MUSIC THEORY (4,4,4) Comparative study of teaching techniques, procedures, and materials used in music theory curricula MUS 628. STUDIO TEACHING SEMINAR (3) PR: Graduate standing in performance and CI; emphasis on techniques used in teaching the individual student in performance. MUS 629. Ensemble Performance (1) PR: CI. Study and performance of music for various combinations of string, wood wind, brass and percussion instruments, voice, and piano; may be repeated four times for credit. MUS 681. DIRECTED STUDY (1-9) PR: CC. Independent graduate studies in the various areas of music; course of study and credits must be assigned prior to registration; may be repeated

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300 PHILOSOPHY MUS 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (2) PR: CC. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. MUS 698. GRADUATE RECITAL (3) PR: CC. MUS 699 GRADUATE THESIS PR: CC. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits. OFF-CAMPUS TERM Faculty: Lupton, director; and staff. OCT 401. COMMUNITY INTERACTION (5) A field course for students in the OCT Program utilizing the community as a learning laboratory to d e v e lop se nsitivity to the probl e ms of our s o c i e ty OCT 410. OFF CAMPUS TERM SOCIAL ACTION PROJECT (1or2) OCT 411. OFF CAMPUS TERM INDEPENDENT STUDY (1or2) OCT 412. OFF CAMPUS TERM INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM (1 or 2) OCT 414. OFF CAMPUS TERM SPECIAL PROJECT (1or2) The above cours es are provid e d for students admitted in th e Off Campus T e rm Program to work on one of the types of projects indicated above PHILOSOPHY Faculty: J. Gould, chairman ; Carpente r Chen, Halfter, Krimsky, R Taylor Truitt, B. Silver. PHI 111. GREAT PHILOSOPHERS OF THE WESTERN WORLD (2) Lectures and discussions of the great philosophers since Plato, focusing on particular problems. PHI 112. PHILOSOPHIC CONTROVERSIES (2)" PR: None. A discussion of central controversies in philosophy such as the nature oflove, violence, freedom, truth, morality, etc. PHI 301. BASIC PHILOSOPHY I: GOD AND REALITY (4) An introduction to the major philosophical problems in religion, metaphysics, and the philosophy of mind. PHI 303. LOGIC (5) Language analysis and classical and modern formal logic, including the logic of classes and propositions, and discussion of philosophical issues. PHI 304. SCIENTIFIC METHOD (4) Probability, inductive inference the hypothetico-deductive method, experimen tation, and selected topics in the philosophy of science. PHI 311. BASIC PHILOSOPHY II: VALUE AND SOCIETY (4) PR: None. An introduction to the major philosophical problems in ethics aesthetics, and social political philosophy PHI 317. BASIC PHILOSOPHY III. KNOWLEDGE AND SCIENCE (4) PR: None An introduction to the major philosophical problems in methodology, epistemology and the philosophy of science. PHI 321. ETHICS (4) An examination of the writing of the philosophers : Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Sartre, etc. about moral problems and principles. PHI 333. ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY (4) A survey of philosophy from Thales through the medieval writers.

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PHI 334. RENAISSANCE AND MODERN-PHILOSOPHY (4) A survey of philosophy from the R enaissance through Kant. PHI 335. RECENT PHILOSOPHY (4) PHILOSOPHY 301 A survey of philosophy from Kant through 19th century philosophy PHI 377. SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY (4) An analy sis of riv a l theories of socia l order and their philosophical foundations. PHI 381. DIRECTED STUDY ( 1-5) PR: CI. Individu a l study directed by a facu lty member. Approval s lip from in structor required. PHI 383. SELECTED TOPICS (1-5 ) PR : CI. Selected topics according to the ne e ds of the student. Approval s lip from instructor required. PHI 405. CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY (4) PR : 12 hours or CI. Selected schoo l s of 20th century thought such as id ea lism positivism, pragmatism, realism, and existentialism. PHI 406. ANALYTICAL PHILOSOPHY (4) PR: 12 hours, PHI 303. A study of th e method devot e d to clarifying philosophic a l problems through analy sis of the l anguage in wh i ch these probl ems are stated. PHI 407. EXISTENTIALISM (4) PR: 12 hours or CI. A study of the religio us and atheistic e xistentialists and th e bearing of their views on r e ligion, e thics, metaphysics, and theory of knowledge PHI 408. CURRENT PHILOSOPHICAL MATERIALISM ( 4) PR : CI. A cri ti ca l study of historical dialectical, and scientific materialism and its importance in physical science, social sci e nce, theory of history th eo ry of knowledge, and metaphysics. PHI 409. CLASSICAL CHINESE PHILOSOPHY (4) PR: PHI 301 or 311 or 317 or C.I. Examinati on of th e major classical Chines e philosophers from the Sixth Century through the Third Century B .C. PHI 410 CONTEMPORARY CHINESE PHILOSOPHY ( 4) PR: PHI 301 or 311 or 317 or CI. A critical examina tion of the ideas of Lin Piao, Hu-Shih Mao T se-Tung, Sun Yet-Sen Chiang Kai-Shek, Lin Yu-Tang and other selected mate rials PHI 411. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (4) Analysis of religious experience and ac tivity and examination of principal religious ideas in light of modern philosophy. PHI 413. AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY (4) Major tradition s in American thought-Puritanism, the Englight enment, Trans cen dentali sm, Idealism, Pragmatism, an d Analytic Philosophy-in relation to American culture. PHI 415. PLATO (4) PR : 8 hours or CI. The examination of Plato will include the dialogues Protagoras, Gorgias M eno, R e publi c, etc. PHI 416 ARISTOTLE (4) PR: 8 hours or CI. Study of Aristotle's philo sophy PHI 425. KANT (4) PR: 8 hours or CI. Lectures and discussions of Kant's philosophy especially The Critique of Pure Reason. PHI 453. THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (4) PR: 8 hours, PHI 301, or CI. An exa mination of human knowl edge, its scope and limits, and an evaluation of ev idence, criteria of truth, the nature of belief, condi tions for meaningfulness theorie s of rerception an d a study of memory and sense p erce ption in the four major fields o nature, history, personal experience and the a priori. PHI 461. ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3) A s urvey of political philosophy from 6 B.C. until 1600 A.D., including an exam ination of the e thical metaphysical, and epistemo l ogica l bases of th ese philosophies. PHI 463. MODERN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3) A survey of political philosophy from 1600 A D until 1900 A D., including an

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302 PHILOSOPHY examination of the ethical, metaphysical and e pistemolo g ical bases of tbese philosophies. PHI 465. CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3) A survey of political philosophy in the 20th century, including an exam inati on of the ethical, metaphysical, and epistemological bas es of these philosophi es. PHI 481. DIRECTED STUDY (1-5) PR: CI. Individual study directed by a faculty m e mb er. Approval slip from instructor required. PHI 483. SELECTED TOPICS ( 1-5) PR: CI. Selected topics according to the needs of the se nior students. Approval slip from instructor r eq uired. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS PHI 507 PHILOSOPHY OF NATURAL SCIENCE (4) PR : 8 hours or CI. The function of the course is to investigate (I) problems in th e methodology of natural science such as the constructing and t es ting of hypoth eses, confirmation and falsification of theories, explanations and the role of laws and models. (II) philosophical implications of the theori es of natural science especially in the areas of space, time and matter. PHI 508. PHILOSOPHY OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (4) PR: 8 hours or CI. Philosophic issues arising in the social sciences: value assump tions laws and theories, models, etc. PHI 509. SYMBOLIC LOGIC (4) PR: PHI 303 or CI. Mathematical treatment of formal logic, including methods of proof, quantification, the logic of relations, and a n introduction to properties of deductive systems. PHI 511. PHILOSOPHY OF LAW (4) PR: 8 hours or CI. The nature and function of law rel a tions b e tween law morality and metaphysics, logic of legal reasoning, analysis of fundamental con cepts and institutions PHI 521. CONTEMPORARY CONTROVERSIES IN PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (4) PR: PHI. 411 or CI. A survey of contemporary philosophical problems in r e ligion such as demythologizing, falsification and the meaning and jus tification of k ey concepts, e. g. God, immortality faith, e t c PHI 522 AESTHETICS (4) Consideration of the traditional problems of aes thetics from mor e con t e mporary perspectives including structural analysis, problem s in histori ca l analysis, th e sociology of art and the psychology of art. Stud en ts are urged to a ls o take FNA 543 Comparative Arts/Issues in Creativity as an elective. PHI 531. PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE (4) PR: 8 hours of/hilos ophy, major in linguistics or CI. An examination of seman ti ca l syntactical an functional theories of languag e with special attention given to the problems of meaning, linguistic refer e nce, syntactical form and the relation between scientific language s and ordinary linguisti c usag e PHI 543. PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY (4) PR: 8 hours of philosophy, major in history or CI. A systematic study of hi s toric a l theories and of the methods of historical explanation. An exa mination of classical theories from Vico through Herder, Hegel, Marx down to Spengler and Toynbee, etc. PHI 571. SEMINAR IN THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (3) PR: Major in philosophy or psychology and CI. PHI 572. SEMINAR IN PHILOSOPHY OF MIND (3) PR: Major in philosophy or social science and CI. PHI 573. SEMINAR IN METAPHYSICAL SYSTEMS (3) PR: Major in philosophy or CI. Cosmology.

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PHILOSOPHY 303 PHI 574. SEMINAR IN METAPHYSICS: THEORY OF REALITY (3) PR: Major in philosophy or CI. A consideration of the theory of reality. PHI 575. SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY ETHICS (3) PR: CI. A study of th e centra l figures and doctrines in Contemporary Ethics. PHI 581. DIRECTED STUDY ( 1 -5) PR: CI. Individual s tudy directed by a facu lty member. Approval slip from in s tru ctor required. PHI 583 SELECTED TOPICS (1-5) PR: CI. Selected topics accor ding to the needs of the student. Approval s lip from instructor required. PHI 585. RESEARCH ( 1-5 ) PR: CI. Individual r esearc h supervised by a faculty member. Approval slip from instructor required. PHI 591. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY (3) PR: CI. A s tud y of one or more of the central figures or movements in th e History of Philosophy. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY PHI 607. STUDIES IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE ( 3 ) PR: Graduate Standing or CI. A s tudy of the nature and s t a tu s of physical theories, some basic problems associated w ith scientific methodology, and the philosophical implications of modern science. PHI 609. STUDIES IN LOGIC (3) PR: Graduate Standing or CI. Foundations and basic problems of logic. PHI 611. STUDIES IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF LAW (3) PR : Graduate Standing or CI. A study of the metaphysical, ethical and epistemo logical bases of law. PHI 615. STUDIES IN MAJOR PHILOSOPHICAL SYSTEMS (3) PR : Graduate Standing or C I A detailed s tudy of a metaphysical movement. PHI 621 STUDIES IN PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (3) PR: Graduate Standing or CI. An anal ysis of fundamental religious concepts in t erms of contemporary philo sophy. PHI 622 STUDIES IN AESTHETICS (3) PR : Graduate Standing or CI. An advanced inquiry into th e spec i a l problems of aesthetics: value, perception, co mmuni ca tion t echnique, con t ext. PHI 631. STUDIES I N THE THEORY OF MEANING (3) PR: Graduate Standing or CI. Theory of meaning in r e l a tion t o theory of truth, reference, modality, and anal yticity; with bearings on problems in epistemology, metaphysics, and va lue. PHI 643. STUDIES IN PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY (3) PR: Graduate Standing or CI. The anal y s i s of l anguage and logic of historical exp l anation, hi storica l idealism, historical materialism positivism, and historical socio l ogy. PHI 677 STUDIES IN THE THEORY OF VALUE (3) PR: Graduate Standing or CI. An analysis and critique of traditional and contem porary theories of value, emphasiz in g those sys t ems which deal with aesthe tic, mor a l socia l econom i c and politi ca l values. PHI 679. STUDIES I N POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3) PR: Graduate Standing or CI. An examina tion of the main politi cal philosophies PHI 681). STUDIES IN SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY (3) PR: Graduate Standing or CI. A detailed s tudy of th e philosophical theories of socie ty class soc i e ti es (Cap itali sm) advanced technocracy (all types). PHI 681. DIRECTED STUDY ( 1-5 ) PR: Graduate Standing and CI. Individual study directed by a faculty memb e r Approval s lip from instructor required. PHI 683. SELECTED TOPICS (1-5) PR : Graduate Standing and Cl. Selected topics according to th e needs of th e stu dent. Approval slip from instructor required

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304 PHYSICAL EDUCATION PHI 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR ( 3 ) PR: Gradua t e Standing. A se min a r in th e hi s tor y o f philosophy. The instruc tor will d e t ermine the s ubject m atter. PHI 699. THESIS (3 ) PR: Gradua t e Standing Sup e rvi s i o n o f th e writing of the M A th es is. PHYSICAL EDUCATION Elective Faculty: B e rn e r R Bow e r s, K Butl e r C heath a m, Grindey, H eesc h e n H ertz, Hol comb, H onke r Jon a1tis, Prathe r Shi ve r S. T ay l o r Trice, D Willi a m s, Wright, J.E. Youn g. Electi ve Ph ys ical Educa ti o n courses a r e o ff e r e d on a n S-U grading bas is. PEB 101-102. FUNCTIONAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION ( 1 1 ) These two courses combine lecture and l aboratory ex peri e n ces w h ic h present th e need for and e as e of r e gul a r phys i ca l a c ti v ity Eac h course counts o n e ( 1 ) credit hour and i s include d in th e student's GPR. PEB 111. SOFTBALL AND VOLLEYBALL ( 1) PEB 131. WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTION (1) PEB 236 Examina tion of th e v a riou s swimming s trok es leading t o identification of appropria t e m ethods and techniques for in s tru c tin g o th e rs. ABC certificati on off e r e d PEB 133. CANOEING AND SAILING ( 1) PEB 2 3 0 or equiva l ent. D evelopment and applicati on of th e s kill s n ecessa ry for e njo y in g sa iling and ca noein g. Funda m enta l s kill s, safe t y techni q u es, rul es and trips. PEB 151. ARCHERY ( 1 ) An introduc tion to the esse nti a l s kill s and in fo rm a ti o n n ecessa ry fo r e nj o yin g th e sport of Ar c h e ry PEB 153 BADMINTON (1) Introduc tory ex p e ri e n ces in B adminto n Fun d a m enta l s kill s, stra t egy, i n form a tion, and participa tion PEB 161. FOLK AND SQUARE DANCING (1) An opportunity for th e d e v e l opment of fu n d a m enta l s kill s and kno wl e d ges n eces sa ry for e njoym ent of F o lk and Squar e D a n c in g. PEB 163. SOCIAL DANCE ( 1) PEB 171. FENCING (1) Introduc tory e xp erie n ces in the s p ort of F oil Fencing. Fundamenta l s kill s, stra t egy, inform a ti o n and p a rticip a ti o n PEB 173. GOLF (1 ) Introductory e xp e ri e n ces i n th e s p ort of Golf. Funda ment a l s kills, stra t egy, infor m a tion and p a rti c ip a tion PEB 175 GYMNASTICS ( 1 ) Introduc tory e xp e ri ences in the va riou s gymnas ti cs e v e nts. Opportunities t o s p e cializ e in a r eas of p e r s on a l inte r es t PEB 179 TENNIS. (1) Introductory ex p e ri e n ces in th e s p ort of t ennis. Funda m enta l s kills, stra t egy, in formation and p a rticip a tion PEB 200. SPECIAL CONDITIONIN G. ( 1 ) PEB 210. BASKETBALL AND VOLLEY BALL ( 1 ) R ev iew of fund a m enta l s kill s, presen t a ti o n an d p rac t ice of th e va ri ous o ff e n s ive and d efe n s i ve stra t eg i es. PEB 212. FIELD HOCKEY AND TRACK AND FIELD ( 1 ) PEB 214. SOCCER AND SPEEDBALL ( 1 ) PEB 230. SWIMMING ( 1 ) An introduc tion to th e esse nti a l s kill s and inform a ti on necessary for enj oyi n g sw imming Emphasis on p e r s on a l safety.

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PHYSICS 305 PEB 232. SWIMMING II ( 1) PR : PEB 23 0. Continua tion of PEB 2 3 0 Sp e cial empha si s on development of endura nce and effic i ent s troking PEB 234 ADVANCED SWIMMING (1 ) PR: Cl. PEB 235 LIFE SAVING (1) PR: PEB 2 3 2 o r equiva l ent. Kno w l edges and s kills n e c e ssary for s a ving ones' self or oth e r s in the event o f aqua t ic e m e rgen cy ABC c e rtifi c ation included. PEB 238 SKIN & SCUBA DIVING (1 ) PR : PEB 2 3 2 or equiva l ent. An introduction to th e essential skills and informa tion ne cess ary for e njo y in g th e sport of Skin & S cuba Diving. Correct utilization and ca r e of equipme nt; emphasis on p e rson a l s afety PEB 240. SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING (1) Introductory e xp e ri e n ces in syn chronize d swimming Emphasi s on basic skills ; mu sic interpre t a tion ; and chore ography. PEB 250. HANDBALL-PADDLEBALL ( 1) An introduc ti o n t o the s kill s and strategi es o f H andba ll P addleball with opportunity for c omp e tition and tourna m ent play PEB 252. WEIGHT TRAINING (1 ) Introduc tion to th e kno w l edges and technique s n e c es s a ry for increasing muscle fun c tion. Asse ssm ent of s t a tu s and d e v e lopm ent of a p e r s on a l program. PEB 254. WRESTLING (1) Introduc tory e xperi e n ces in th e s p o rt o f Wre stling Fundamental skills strategy; i n formation and p a rti c ip a ti o n. PHYSICAL SCIENCE Faculty: Kru schwitz, actin g c h a irman; B e rkl e y Boulw a r e, J. Carr, F Dudley CBS 208-209-210 EXPLORATIONS IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE (3,3,3,) Th e development of g reat s ci e ntifi c ide as the ir historical and contemporary s i gn i fica nce. S e lect e d t o pi cs of as tronomy c hemistry earth science, physics, and phil osophy o f s ci e n ceapproach e d vi a t e xtbook and popular readings lec-lab di sc PHYSICS Facu lty: Ol es on chairma n ; Aub e l B e rkl e y Bloch Brooker, Deans, Flynn, F o rm a n Gilmor e, Jon es, K enda ll Kru sc hwitz, R Mitch e ll Turbeville. PHY 201-202. GENERAL PHYSICS AND LABORATORY (4 : 1) Firs t quarte r of 3 -qu arte r s eque nce of gen e ral physics (mechanics heat, electricity, w av e motion, opti cs a tomi c and nuclear phys i cs) and laboratory for science stu d ents Mu s t b e tak e n concurrently. Qtr. I IL III. IV PHY 203-204. GENERAL PHYSICS AND LABORATORY (4:ll PR : PHY 201-202. S econd quarte r of g e n e r a l ph y sics and lab for science students. Mu s t b e t a k e n concurre ntly. Qtr. I, II, III. PHY 205-206. GENERAL PHYSICS AND LABORATORY (4:1) PR : PHY 201-202 Third quarte r of gen e r a l phy s ic s and lab for science students Mu s t b e t a k e n c on curre ntly Qtr. I II, III, IV PHY 301-302. GENERAL PHYSICS AND LABORATORY (3:1) CR : MTH 3 02 Firs t quarte r o f 3 -qu arte r seque n ce of gene r a l physic s (mechanics, wave motion, s ound, the rm odyna mi cs, g e om e tric a l and physical optics, ele c tricity and m agne ti s m ) and l abora tory for phys i cs m a jors and e ngin e ering students Must b e t a k e n concurrently Qtr. I II, III, IV.

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306 PHYSICS PHY 303-304. GENERAL PHYSICS AND LABORATORY (3:1) PR : PHY 301-302; CR: MTH 303. Second quarter of geneml physics and labor a t ory for physics majors and enginee ring st ud e nts Must be t a k en concu rr en tly. Qtr. I II, III. PHY 305-306. GENERAL PHYSICS AND LABORATORY (3:1) PR: PHY 301-302; CR: MTH 303. Third quarter of general physics for physics m ajo r s an d eng ineering students. Must b e taken concurrently. I II, III, IV. PHY 307. MECHANICS I (3) CR : MTH 305 and either PR: PHY 301 or CR: PHY 315. First quarter of 3 quarter sequence. Review of vector alegbra and vector calculus Single particle dynamics, rotating coordinate systems, planetary motion, linear and nonlinear oscillators. Qtr. I. PHY 309. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM I (4) PR: MTH 305. Electromagnetic circuits; resistance, capacitance, inductance, direc t -and alternating-current circuits, thennoelectricity and instrumentation. Lab ora tory. First quarter of seq u ence PHY 309 -409-509. Qtr. II. PHY 315. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF PROBLEMS IN MECHANICS AND ELECTRICITY (3) PR: One year of non-calculus g e neral phy s ics CR : MTH 3o.5. Designed for students who have not had the general physics sequence using calculus Review of mechanics and electricity emphasizing problems which involve the use of cal c ulus Qtr. I, III. PHY 323 MODERN PHYSICS (4) PR : PHY 305 or CR: PHY 315. CR : MTH 305. Special theory of relativity. Inter action and duality of particles and radiation. Atomic and x-ray spectra and vector model of atom. Exclusion principle and introduction to quantum theory Intro duction of nuclear physics. Qtr. I II, III, IV. PHY 331. OPTICS (4) PR : PHY 305 or PHY 315. CR: MTH 304. Reflection, refraction, dispersion inter ference diffraction pol a rization and l a boratory. Qtr. II. PHY 341. INTERMEDIATE LABORATORY (2) CR: PHY 205 or 3 05 or equ ival en t Exp er im e nts in moder.n physics including th e area of atomic, nuclear, solid state and wave phenomena. Qtr. I III. PHY 371. CONTEMPORARY PHYSICS (5) PR: Junior Standing. A qualitative, non-mathematical investigation of physics, emp h as izing its influ e nc e on life tod ay. (No t for physi cs majors ) Qtr. I II, III, IV. PHY 405. STATISTICAL PHYSICS I (3) PR: MTH 305 and either PR: PHY 305 or CR: PHY 315. Statistical approach to thermodynamics and kinetic theory and introduction to statistical mechanics First quarter of the sequence PHY 405-505. Qtr. I. PHY 407. MECHANICS II (3) PR: PHY 307 and MTH 401. Continuation of PHY 307 Motion of a group of particles, coupled oscillators, normal modes, dynamics of rigid bodies Lagrange' s and H ami lton s equations, principl e of l eas t action. Qtr. II PHY 409. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM II (3) PR: PHY 309 or CI. CR: MTH 401. Electrostatic fields, magnetic fields of steady currents, dielectrics and magnetic materials, Maxwell's equations. Second quarter of sequence PHY 309-409-509. Qtr. III. PHY 415. FUNDAMENTAL ACOUSTICS (4) PR: PHY 307 or Cl. Vibrations of elastic media, sound generation and prop agation Acoustical e l ec tri ca l a nd mechanical energy conversion. Underwater acoustics. Qtr. IV PHY 421. SOLID STATE PHYSICS I (4) PR: PHY 323 and MTH 401. Crystal structure, x-ray and electron diffraction mechanical and thermal properties of solids, electrical and magnetic pro perties of metals band theory of metals insulators and semiconductors. First quarter of seque n ce PHY 421-521. Qtr. I.

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PHYSICS 307 PHY 437. QUANTUM MECHANICS I (3) PR: PHY 407, MTH 402 or CI. Wave-particle duality, uncertainty principle, Schrodinger's equation, postulates, angular momentum, and central forces. First quarter of sequence PHY 437 -537. Qtr. II. PHY 441. ADVANCED LABORATORY (2) PR : PHY 341. Experimental work primarily related to nuclear phy sics. Emphasis on modern phy sica l experimental t echniques employing some of the new types of equipment. Qtr. I III. PHY 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-6) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and CC. Individual experimental work under superv ision of instructor. ( S/U grade only.) Qtr. I, II, III, IV. PHY 491. PHYSICS SEMINAR (1) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing or CC. May be repeated once. (S/U grade only.) Qtr. I, II, III, lV. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS PHY 501. NUCLEAR PHYSICS (4) PR: PHY 437 or CI. Systematics of stable nuclides, nuclear forces, nuclear models reactions, radiation, an d nuclear instrumentation. Qtr. I. PHY 505. STATISTICAL PHYSICS II (3) PR: PHY 405. Continuation of the sequence PHY 405-505. Qtr. II. PHY 507 MECHANICS III (3) PR : PHY 407. Continuation of PHY 407. Elastic media, the wave equation, transverse and longitudinal wave motion. the diffusion equation. boundary value problems and Fourier series, Fourier integral fluid dynamics. Qtr. III. PHY 509. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM III (3) PR : PHY 409. Method of images, Laplaces equation, radiation, transmission, reflection and refraction of electromagnetic waves, guided waves. Third quarter of sequence PHY 309:409509. Qtr. I. PHY 5f7. INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA PHYSICS (4) PR: PHY 509 or CI. Introduction to Boltzmann magnetohydrodynamic and orbit approaches to plasmas Longitudinal and electromagnetic waves in plasmas. Collisions and radiation Instabilities. Qtr. IV PHY 521. SOLID STATE PHYSICS II (3) PR: PHY 421. Optical electrical and magnetic properties of insulators, super conductivity imperfections in solids. Second quarter of sequence PHY 421-521. Qtr II. PHY 523. ELECTRONICS (4) PR : PHY 409 and PHY 341. Vacuum and gas-discharge tubes semiconductors, transistors, e l ectronic circuit analy sis and l aboratory. Qtr. lll. PHY 537. QUANTUM MECHANICS II (3) PR : PHY 437 or c1. Matrix mechani cs, approximation methods, transformations, scattering and identical particles. Qtr. III. PHY 541. METHODS OF THEORETICAL PHYSICS I (4) PR : MTH 401 or CI. Elements of complex analysis, Laplace transforms, Fourier series, and Fourier transforms Mathematical techniques for scie nti s ts and engineers to MTH 541. Qtr. I. PHY 542 METHODS OF THEORETICAL PHYSICS II (4) PR : MTH 401 or CI. Series solutions of differential equations Sturm Liouville theory Green's functions, integral equations, special functions, eigenvalue problems and diagonalization of matrices. Mathematical techniques for scientists and engineers Equivalent to MTH 542. Qtr. II. PHY 583 : SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICS (1-6) PR : S enior or advanced standing and CC. Each topic is a course in directed study under the supe rvision of a faculty member. Among the courses co ntem plated are Physics of Waves, Space Physics Elementary Particle Physics, Rela tivity Nucl ea r Structure TBA.

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308 PHYSICS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY PHY 601. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SPECTRA (4) PR: PHY 437 or CI. Quantitative study of atomic and molecular structure and spectra. Qtr. IV PHY 605. STATISTICAL MECHANICS (4) PR: PHY 505 or CI. Kinetic theory configuration and phase space, Boltzmann theorem Liouville theorem, ensemble theo ry quantum s t a ti s tic s Qtr. III. PHY 607. CLASSICAL MECHANICS I (3) PR: PHY 507 or CI. Dynamics of particles and systems of particles variational techniques Lagrange' s equations, central forces First quarter of sequence PHY 607 608-609 Qtr. II. PHY 608 CLASSICAL MECHANICS II (3) PR: PHY 607 or CI. Rigid body dynamics tensors and dyadics, special relativity, Lorentz transformation, covariance, Hamilton 's equations least action principle. Sec .ond quarter of sequence PHY 607 -608-609. Qtr. III. PHY 609. CLASSICAL MECHANICS III (3) PR: PHY 608 \..anonical transformations, Lagrange and Poisson brackets Liou ville's theorem, Hamilton-Jac.'Obi theory, connection between classical and quantum mechanics, small oscillation theory Hamiltonian and Lagrangian formulations for fields. Qtr. I. PHY 631. ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY I (3) PR: PHY 509 or CI. Electrostatics magnetostatic : s, potential and boundary value problems Maxwell's equations. First quarter of seq uence PHY 631-632 633. Qtr. I. PHY 632. ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY II (3) PR: PHY 631 or CI. Ele<.trornagnetic waves, wave guides and r esonant cavities, diffraction relativistic-particle kinematic s and dynamics plasmas and magneto hydrodynamics. Qtr. II. PHY 633. ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY III( 3) PR: PHY 632 of CI. Scattering, radiation multipole fields, radiation damping, and self-fields Qtr. III. PHY 637. QUANTUM MECHANICS III (3) PR: PHY 537 or CI. Dirac equation, quantized fields, <.'Ollision theory, symmetry and invariance. Qtr. I. PHY 641. EXPERIMENT AL PHYSICS (2) PR: Graduate standing. Laboratory techniques frequently required in experi mental research. Includes manipulation of glass, production and mea surement of vacua, production and measurement of thin films and use of various machine to o l s Qtr. I. PHY 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-15) PR: CC. ( S/U grade only.) Qtr. I II, III, IV. PHY 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICS (1-15) PR: CC. Each topic is a course in directed study under the supervision of a faculty member. TBA. PHY 688. RECENT ADVANCES IN PHYSICS WITH EMPHASIS ON THEIR IMPACT ON COLLEGE-LEVEL COURSES ( 3-6 ) Qtr. IV. PR: Graduate Standing. A course designed to consider and study the recent developments in the field of physics especia lly those developments that have an effect on a ltering the basic concepts and ideas of the field and imply a change in the presentation of introductory material in physics. ( S / U grade only). (Credit not applicable toward thesis degree requireme nts). PHY 689. DIRECTED TEACHING (3-9) PR: Graduate Standing. Supervi sion of the teaching of graduate teaching assistants in elementary and I or l aboratory <.'Ourses. ( S I U grade only ) (Credit not applicabl e toward thesis d eg r ee requirements). Qtr. II PHY 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (1) ( S/U grade only.) Qtr. I II, III, IV PHY 699. MASTER'S THESIS (1-9) PR: PHY fl41. ( S/U grade only.) Qtr I II, III, IV

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POLITICAL SCIENCE 309 POLITICAL SCIENCE Faculty : M O'Donnell, chairman ; Barber, E Black, Horrigan, Jreisat, A. Kelley, Laughlin, L e vy, Rosner Sidor, Snook, Stoudinger POL 199. INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE(4) A survey of the basic concepts in government and politics, theories and methods of political science and the American political system as well as materials. POL 201. AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT (4) Basic principles and procedures of the American governmental system with em phasis on current issues and trends. POL 203. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (4) Analysis of the structure and function of state and local governments, of the social and political influences that shape them, and of the dynamics of their ad ministrative processes POL 311. COMPARATIVE POLITICS (4) Analysis of political systems using the concepts and methods of comparative politics. Studies of selected countries will be included. POL 331. INTERNATIONAL BELA TIO NS ( 4) Contemporary international affairs, including analysis of politics among nations; control of national foreign policies, sovereignty, nationalism and diplomacy; technology, public opinion and war in international relations. POL 333. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION (4) The problems of achieving peace through existing international structures both within and outside the United Nations. The background, achievement and organi zational problems of these agencies. POL. 338. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY (4) Analysis of the development and scope of United States foreign policy focusing upon our aims decision-making, application of policies ana alternatives for s pecified problem areas in foreign affairs POL 341. POLITICAL PARTIES (4) PR : POL 201 or CI. The development, structure, operation and significance of political parties in the American system of government. POL 343. EMPIRICAL POLITICAL ANALYSIS (4) An introduction to the conduct of empirical political inquiry and to research methods Techniques of data generation, collection, and analysis will be emphasized. Laboratory exercises required. POL 345. PRIVATE GROUPS AND PUBLIC POLICY ( 4) Role of nonparty groups in the American society and their impact on public policy; growth of interest groups internal politics, and formation of public policy. POL 347. CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN POLITICS (4) Comparative study of selected political patterns and trends in the eleven southern states since 1950. Analysis of such topics as massive resistance, the civil rights movement black political participation, factional divi sion within the Demo crati c Party and the growth of presidential and gubernatorial Republicanism. POL 351. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (4) PR: Upper level standing. An examination of the administrative principles and processes by which public policies are implemented in a democratic society POL 405 POLITICS OF THE SOVIET UNION (4) Development of the Soviet political system since the Revolution Theory and practice of Communism in the contemporary Soviet Union. POL 410. POLITICAL SYSTEMS OF SOUTHEAST ASIA (4) PR : Upper level standing. Comparative analysis of political systems and practice s in Southeast Asian countries with emphasis on the nature of nationalism, political development and revolutionary processes in the region POL 415. MILITARY POWER IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS (4) PR : POL 331, Upper Level Standing or CI. A study of the role of military power aff e cting war and peace in modem international politics Among the issues

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310 POLITICAL SCIENCE covered are, limited war, nuclear deterrence, b a lanc e of power, convention a l war, guerrilla warfare, disarmament and nuclear proliferation POL 421. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF THE FAR EAST (4) Development of politic a l ideas and institutions in Japan and China with emphasis on 20th century issues. POL 425. POLITICS OF LATIN AMERICA ( 4) Comparative analysis of political sys tem s of Latin America, with emph asis on modernization the role of the military, revolutionary processes, and inter Am e rican relations. POL 428. POLITICS OF AFRICA (4) Developmt>nt and growth of emerging politic:al systems and their relations with eac:h other and with states outside of Afric:a. POL 431-432. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (4,4) The developme nt of the United States government through judicial interpretation of the Constitut10n. Case study method of analysis POL 434. JUDICIAL POLITICS (4) Consideration of se l ec:ted theories of judic:ial dec:ision-making. Examination and applic:ation of social sc:ienc:e methodology to the study of c:ourt systems PR : POL !31 or POL-02. POL 436. INTERNATIONAL LAW AND DIPLOMACY (4) Contemporary international norms, agreements and negotiations Their influence on, and response to a changing international system POL 438. COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY (4) Comparative study of foreign polic:y behavior of nations. Analysis of formulation and objec:tives of foreign polides. POL 441. THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY (4) The presidenc:y as an institution of Americ:an democ:rac:y; c:onstitu ti onal status and powers, adminis trativ e respons ibilitie s legislative and politic:al leader ship decision-making proc:ess. POL 443. POLITICAL BEHAVIOR (4) PR: Upper level standing or Cl. Ec:onomic: psyc:hologic:al and social dimensions of politic:al behavior; politic:al participation leadership and elites ; politic:a l atti tudes ; voting behavior and dt>cision-making proc:esses POL 453. URHAN GOVERNMENT (4) An introdu c:tion to the theory of urbanism, formal and informal stmc:tures that govern urban areas new patterns and polic:y emphasis of urban government. POL 454 U RBAN POLITICS (4) PR: Uf per level standing. POL 20. 3 or equiva l ent. An examination of the politic:a processes and systems in urban and suburban c:ommunities in Americ:a. POL 455. THE AMERICAN LEGISLATIVE PROCESS (4) Int ens iv e analysis of the nature of the legi s lativ e process in the United Statt>s; organization, p1 ocedure, leadership, relation with other governmenta l agencies, group tactics decision-making process in the formation of policy. POL 457. PROBLEMS OF PUBLIC FISCAL ADMINISTRATION (4) PR: POL 35 1 or CI. Analysis of problems in the growth and development of public budgets with emphasis on principal techniques and theories of fiscal ad ministration. POL 461. CLASSICAL POLITICAL IDEAS (4) PR: POL 199 or CI. B asic political ideas from the work s of Plato, Aristotle, Cicero St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas and o ther leading Greek, Roman, and Medieval-Christian political philosophers. POL 462. CLASSICAL POLITICAL IDEAS (4) PR: POL 199 or Cl. Basic political ideas from th e works of Machiavelli, Bodin Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rouss eau, Burke, Benthem and other leading modern political philosophers. POL 463. AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT (4) PR : Upper l eve l standing. American political thought from the Colonial period to the pres e nt with emphasis on recent contributions

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PHYSICS 311 POL 464. MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT (4) PR : Upper level standing. Basic political ideas from the works of 19th and 20th century political philosopners. POL 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-8) PR: 3.0 average in Political Science and CC. Investigation of some aspect of politi cal science culminating in the preparation of an original research paper. POL 491. SENIOR SEMINAR (4) PR : Senior standing. Designed to give the student an opportunity to examine and apply various concepts and methods in the field of political science to some inte grated problem area. FOR S ENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS POL 520. ADMINISTRATION OF URBAN AFFAIRS (4) An analysis of the role of the administrator at the municipal level stressing the division of functions policy formation, alternative governmental structures and th e ir effect on administrative processes. POL 525. PROBLEMS OF PUBLIC PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION (4) An analysis of recruitment, testing, training, employee and human relations in the public service. POL 527. COMPARATIVE PUBLIC ADM INISTR ATION (4) Comparison of certain aspects of public administrative systems of various govern ments emphasizing such writers as SifHn, Hadari, Appleby Hu, Simon and Riggs. POL 530. LEGAL AND REGULATORY PROCESSES (4) Systematic study of the political judicial factors in the regulatory process of administrative agencies. POL 550 METHODOLOGICAL AND CONCEPTUAL PROBLEMS IN COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICS (4) Examination of problems and concepts in the study of comparative and inter national politics emphasizing theoretical and empirical relations and relative advantages of different levels and units of analysis. May be repeated for credit POL 561. POLITICS OF THE DEVELOPING AREAS (4) An analysis of the ideologies, governmental structures, and political processes of nations of the non-Western world. POL 571. FIELD WORK (4) PR: 3.0 average in Political Science and CI. Application of research models now employed m governmental agencies; including developing a structured research proposal. Designed to give the student practical experience in th e administrative and political processes. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY POL 600. SCOPE AND METHODS OF POLITICAL SCIENCE ( 4) Advanced study of the scope and methodologies of political science, including their applications to different research areas. POL 620. UR B AN POLICY ANALYSIS (4) Systematic examination of the organizational and administrative characteristics of planning, program development and reporting acti vities conducted at local levels by various state, regional and federal agencies POL 623. URBAN FINANCIAL A DMINISTRATION (4) Examination of organizational structure and administrative processes of urban fiscal agencies, sources of revenue, expenditures and indebtedness, and current problems in budgeting. POL 625. P ROBLEMS IN U R BAN POLITICS (4) in depth of pressure group behavior and its role in municipal policy formulation including the study of community power approaches advanced by Rossi Sofon, Kammarer, Martin and others

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312 PSYCHOLOGY POL 627. ADMINISTRATIVE BEHAVIOR AND PUBLIC POLICY FORMATION (4) Analysis of the formal, informal and societal characteristics of public bureaucracies and th e ir impact on publi c policy POL 640. POLITICAL SOCIALIZATION (4) Seminar in se lected phases of the political socialization process POL 643. CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL IDEAS AND BEHAVIOR (4) Study of certain phas es of political philosophy and theories of modem political analysis. POL 645. SEMINAR IN STATE POLITICS (4) Analysis of selected topics in American state politics. May be repeated for credit as topics vary POL 650 SEMINAR IN POLITICAL REVOLUTION AND CHANGE (4) An a lysi s of selected contemporary problems relating to political revolution and change. POL 662. SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS (4) Comparative ana ly sis of political systems in terms of processes institutions, and b e havior. May be repeated for credit. POL 665 SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION (4) Analysis of various phases of international organizations and the ir administrativ e systems. POL 667. SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (4) Investigation of selected phases of international relations in world politics May be repeated for credit as topi cs vary. POL 670 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (4) Analysis of se le cted current problems in American government and politic s May be r epeated for credit as topi cs vary. POL 675 SEMINAR IN URBAN PROBLEMS (4) Systematic analysis and evaluatiop of various problem areas of contemporary urban governments. POL 677. SEMINAR IN ADMINISTRATIVE PROCESS (4) Analysis of various administrative processes emphasizing policy formulation, implementation, programming, new concepts of management in a public service environ ment. POL 680 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (4) Study in depth of a special problem in political science. POL 690. MASTER'S THESIS (1-9) PORTUGUESE See MODERN LANGUAGES PSYCHOLOGY Faculty: Kimmel, chairman; Achenbach Bitterman Clement, Coh e n Dertke, Fow ler, H Hawkins B Kapl an, Kramer LaBarba Mourer, C. N e lson, D. Nelson Penner, Rahn, Rundus, Sandler, Sidow ski, Sistrunk, Stein, Strong, Toth, Woodard. PSY 201. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (5) A survey of major topics in psychology (learning perception, thinking, intelligence e tc .), and an introduction to methods used in psychological investigation. Lecture and discussion, t aken concurrently. PSY 311-312. RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (4: 1 ) PR : PSY 201 and SSI 301. Sci entific r esearch methods and their applications

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PSYCHOLOGY 313 for psychology. Topics include experimental planning, control procedures, and interpretative principles. Lecture plus lab Must be taken concurrently. PSY 313. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR : PSY 201 or CI. The application of psychological principles and the functions of psychologi s t s in education, government, industry, and clinical pra ctice NOT FOR MAJOR CREDIT. PSY 335. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT (4) PR: PSY 201 or CI. Genetic, organic and learned factors involved in the pro cesses of personal adjustment; applications of mental health principles to every day living. NOT FOR MAJOR CREDIT. PSY 341. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 201 or CI. Developmental and p syc hosocial aspects of childhood, in cluding hereditary, matura tional, psychological and socia l determinants of c hild behavior. NOT FOR MAJOR CREDIT. PSY 401. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: standing. Designed to give the advanced undergraduate non-major an opportunity to acquire concepts within th e field of psychology and relate th e se to other areas of study. NOT FOR MAJOR CREDIT. PSY 402. PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING (4) PR: PSY 201, SSI 301 PSY 311 312 Survey of methods, empirica l findings and theoretical interpretations in conditioning instrumental learning and ver bal l earning. lee-lab. PSY 403. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 201 SSI 301, PSY 311. 312 Survey of empirical findings and theoretical interpre tations in the study of human and animal development. lee-lab PSY 404. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR : PSY 201, SSI 301 PSY 311-312 B e havior of the individual human being as affected by the soc i al and cultural influences of society. le elab PSY 405. NEUROPSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 201 SSI 301, PSY 311 312 Gross neural and physiological components of behavior. Structure and hmction of the central nervous syste m as related to emotion, motivation learnin g and theory of brain functions l eel ab. PSY 411. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS (4) PR: PSY 201, SSI 301, PSY 311 3 12. D e tailed coverage of those research designs and statistica l techniques having the greates t utility for research prob lems in psychology Emphasis on topics from analysis of variance. PSY 415 SYSTEMATIC PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR : PSY 201, SSI 301 PSY 311-312. The historical roots of modern psycho logical theories investigation of the various sc hool s of psychology such as behaviorism Gestalt psychology, psychoanalysis and phenomenolo gica l psychology PSY 421. MOTIVATION (4) PR : PSY 201, SSI 301 PSY 3ll312 402, 405. An examination of human and animal motivation s for both physiological and psychological viewpoints. Emphasis will be given to current r e searc h PSY 425. COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 201, SSI 301, PSY 3ll312, 402, 405. The study of th e evo lution of behavior, similarities and differences in capaci ti es for e nvironmental a djust ment and for b ehavioral organization among the important type s of living beings from plants and unicellular organis m s t o the primates including man. PSY 432. INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) PSY 201, SSI 3 01, PSY 311 312 404. Application of psychological to industry. Topics consid e r e d: Man-machine systems, d eve lopment of ski lls, training empl oyee attitudes, worker motivation, accident prevention, fatigu e and monotony. PSY 436. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT (4) PR: PSY 201, SSI 301, PSY 3ll-312, 403. A consideration of the instruments for int ellectual achi e vement, and personality assessment including their appli ca-

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314 PSYCHOLOGY tions, development, and potential abuses. Students may not receive credit for both PSY 436 and EDF 303, Introduction to Measurement and Evaluation. PSY 441. VERBAL BEHAVIOR (4) PR: PSY 201, SSI 301, PSY 311-312, 402. Survey methods, e mpirical findings and theoretical interpretations of verbal learning and retention concept learn ing and information processing. PSY 445. PERCEPTlON (4) PR: PSY 20.1, SSI 301, PSY 311-312, 405. How man rerceives his environm e nt. Topics include sensory bases of perception physica correlates of perceptual phenomena, and the effects of individual and social factors on perce ption Primary emphasis on vision and audition. lee-lab PSY 452. PERSONALITY (4) PR: PSY 201, SSI 301, PSY 311-312, 402, 403. Methods and findings of per sonality theories and an evaluation of constitutional, biosocial and psychological determinants of personality lee-lab PSY 455. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 201, SSI 301, PSY 311-312, 402, 403. A study of the classifications of variant behavior and some of the hypotheses used to explain such behavior. PSY 481. SELECTED TOPICS: RESEARCH (1-4 ) PR : Upper division standing and CI. The student plans and conducts an in dividual research project under the supervision of a psychology faculty member May b e repeated with a maximum of eight hours credit. PSY 485 SELECTED TOPICS: READING (1-4) PR: Upper division standing and CI. A reading program of topics in psychology is conducted with the supervision of a psychology faci1lty member. May be repeated with a maximum of e ight hours credit. PSY 491. SELECTED TOPCS: SEMINAR (4-8) PR: Upper division standing and CI. Graduate-type seminar designed to pro vide th e advanced undergraduate student with the opportunity to interact with th e faculty and other students for the purpose of developing an in-depth understanding of a selected sub-area within psychology. May be repeated with a maximum of eight hours credit. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY PSY 608. EXPERIMENTAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) PR: CI. Analysis and laboratory experience in research methods of social psy chology, with particular consideration of attitude measurement, systematic ob servational methods. sociometrics, stimulation of social behavior, interviewing and content analysis. PSY 609. MOTIVATION AND MOTION (5) PR: CI. A detailed examination of human motivation and e motion from both the physiological and psychological viewpoints. Emphasis will be given to current research. PSY 610. OPERANT BEHAVIOR (5) PR: CI. Review of the basic literature of operant conditioning and major areas of r esea rch and application. Supervised laboratory experience in pro gramming basic schedules of reinforcement. PSY 612. PERSONALITY (5) PR: Admission to M .A. program in psychology or CI. Analysis of traditional and current theory and research in the area of personality Required for M.A. degree unless waived by examination or by student's advisory committee. PSY 613. BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS OF CHILDREN (5) PR: CI. Causative factors in behavior deviations common to children and adoles cents. Thorough study of selected childhood mental disorders and a survey of ameliorative techniques for treating childhood behavior difficulti es Students may not receive credit for both PSY 613 and EDS 531, Behavior Disorders in the Schools. PSY 614. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (5) PR: Admission to M A program in psychology or CI. Exploration of current

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PSYCHOLOGY 315 approaches to the understanding of pathological behavior and implications for theories of personality. A survey of treatment methods is included. Required for M.A. degree unless waived by examination or by student's advisory committee. PSY 615. PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT (5) PR: PSY 617. Interview, case history, objectives and projective tests are surveyed together with a critical review of the history and theory of assessment Special c'Onsideration is given to study of interrelations between research, diagnostic data, and personality theory PSY 617. INDIVIDUAL INTELLIGENCE TESTING (5) PR: Cl. History and obj e ctives of intelligence testing. Methods used in the con struction of individual intelligence tests Intensive experience in the administra tion and interpretation of the Wechsler tests, Stanford-Binet, and Grace Arthur tests. Students may not receive credit for both PSY 617 and EDF 617, Measure ment of Individual Intelligence. PSY 619. INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY (5) PR: Cl. Examination of theory and practices in counseling and psychotherpay. The role of the counselor and the nature of the therapeutic relationship is em phasiz e d. Professional and ethical issues are considered. PSY 620. SUPERVISED RESEARCH (1-5) PR: Cl. May b e r e p eated for credit. The student works in close collaboration with a faculty memb e r in designing conducting and interpreting experiments. PSY 621. APPLICATIONS OF LEARNING PRINCIPLES & PROCEDURES (5) PR : Prior course in learning, or CI. Application of various learning principles and procedures to problems in specialized settings. C'.,o-listed with the R ehabilita tion Institute (REH 621) PSY 631, 632, 633. RESEARCH METHODS AND MEASUREMENT I 11, & III (5,5,5) PR: Admission to M.A. program in psychology or CI. Three-quarter sequence designed to cover research methods and s trategi es and their application to psychology. Topics include logic and purpose of experimentation in psychology measurement theory, design and analysis of exferiments probability, stat istical inference, analysis of variance, correlationa methods, interpretation of experimental findings Required for M.A. degree except by waiver by the student's advisory committee PSY 634. PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) PR: Admission to M A program in psychology or CI. Neural and physiological foundations of behavior. Structure and fonction of the central nervous system and autonomic nervous system Physiological basis of learning, motivation in sub-humans and humans. Required for M A degree unl ess waived by examination or by student's advisory committee. PSY 635. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) PR : Admission to M .A. program in psychology or CI. Detailed study of the_ development of human and animal behavior aimed toward an understanding of ontogenetic contributions to later behaviors. Effects of early experience on later behavior Required for M A degree unless waived by examination or by student's advisory committee. PSY 636. LEARNING AND MOTIVATION (5) PR: Admission to M A program in psychology or CI. Habituation, sensitization, classical and instrumental conditioning, generalization, discrimination, trial and error learning, problem solving. Required for M.A !iegree unless waived by e xamination or by student's advisory committee. PSY 637 PERSONALITY AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (5) PR: Admission to M.A program in psychology or CI. Analysis of traditional and current theories of personality and psychopathology with applications to etiolo gy and treatment of behavior disorders Required for M.A degree unless waived by examination or by student's advisory committee.

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316 PSYCHOLOGY PSY 638. COGNITION AND PERCEPTION (5) PR: Admission to M.A. program in psychology or CI. Current data and theory of perceptual an d thought processes. Consideration of physiological and psychological variables in perception and cognition and applications of information and signal detection theory Required for M.A degree unless waived by examination or by student's a dvisory committee. PSY 639. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY(5) PR: Admission to M.A program in psychology or CI. Overview of theo ry and re searc h in socia l psychology Attitudes, values, group proc esses, leadership, conformity, socia l learning and motivation Requir ed for M.A. degree unless waived by examination or by stu d ent's advisory committee PSY 650. ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL METHODS (5) PR : PSY 634 or CI. the use of electrophysiological m e thods in psycholog1cal research This will involve actual experience in use of oscillo scopes, polygraphs, EEG t ec hniqu es, stereotaxic procedure, s tim ulation and lesion ing techniques, use of microtome, and staining and mounting of tissue sect ions L eelab PSY 660. COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY (5) PR: PSY 612, 614, 639 or CI. Issu es and probl ems in community related aspects of clinical psychology General introduction to theory and practice in clinical field se ttings. PSY 682. PRACTICUM TN PSYCHOLOGY {1-5) PR: CI. Supervised observation and training in various community and uni versity clinic, re searc h and/or industrial se ttings. May be repeated for credit. PSY 687. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (5) May be repeated for credit. PSY 688. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY (5) May b e repeated for credit. PSY 689. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN LEARNING (5) May b e repeated for cred it. PSY 690 GRADUATE SEMINAR IN PERCEPTION (5) May be repeated for credit. PSY 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) May be repeated for credit. PSY 692. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) May be repeated for credit. PSY 693. GRADUATE SEMINAR ON ISSUES I N CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) May be repeated for credit. PSY 694 GRADUATE SEMINAR IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) May be repeated for credit. PSY 695. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN PERSONALITY (5) May be repeated for c redit. PSY 696 GRADUATE SEMINAR IN COGNITIVE PROCESSES (5) May be repeated for credit. PSY 697 GRADUATE SEMINAR IN QUANTITATIVE METHODS ( 5 ) May be repeated for credit. PSY 698. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY (5) May be r epea t e d for credit. PSY 699. THESIS (5) A stu dy in depth of a problem in psychology approved by a the sis committee. Student stands an oral exam ination on the thesis. PSY 701 702 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY I II (5,5) PR: Admission to Ph.D. program in psychology or CI. Examination of theories and developments in the major areas of industrial psychology. PSY 709. FUNDAMENTALS OF CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY (5) PR: Admission to Ph.D. program in psychology, PSY 617, 634 or CI. Current d ata an d theory of organic brain damage-behavioral disorder relationships Human central nervous system pathology.

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REHABILITATION 317 PSY 711. TESTING IN INDUSTRY (5) PR: Admission to Ph D. program in psychology or CI. Construction of tests and methods of testing for industry. Emphasis is upon administration, interpre tation and research eva luation of tests most used in industrial settings, such as te s t s for selection and placement of employees. PSY 712. HUMANISTIC PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHOTHERAPY (5) PR: Admission to Ph.D. program in psychology or CI. Examination of theories and practice s m existential and humanistic psychology. Goals techniques, and ethics ofhumanistically oriented psychotherapy. PSY 713. TRAINING AND PERFORMANCE IN INDUSTRY (5) PR: Admission to Ph.D. program in psychology PSY 701, or CI. Application of learning and moti vation principles to organizational and industrial settings. Empha sis is upon the study of psychological variables influencing training and performance with primary regard to criterion analysis and its relationship to per formance appraisal. PSY 731. HUMAN FACTORS PSYCHOLOGY (5) PR: Admission to Ph D program in psychology, PSY 701, or CI. Basic data and theorie s of human factors psychology. Focuses on the information processing demands associated with manmachine interactions and on equipment design as it pertains to these demands. PSY 743. ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND GROUP PROCESSES (5) PR: Admission to Ph.D. program in psychology PSY 701, or CI. Examination of the social foundations of industrial psychology, and the interactions between organizational structure and individual cognitive and motivational variables. Topic s include deci s ion making and communication in both large and small industrial groups. PSY 764, 765, 766. PSYCHOTHERAPY AND BEHAVIOR CHANGE I, II, III (5,5,5) PR: Admission to Ph.D. program in psychology, PSY 612, or CI. Sequence to cover the theoretical and empirical foundations of various systems of psycho therapy Traditional relationship therapy, client -centered approaches, operant techniques an d other varieties of therapeutic intervention. PSY 790 SEMINAR IN ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL PROBLEMS (5) PR: S econd year in Ph D psychology program or CI. Ethical issu es and pro fessional problems in the practice of p syc hology. REHABILITATION Faculty : Pinkard, director ; Ebra, Gross, Landsman Pasach Turner. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS REH 501. REHABILITATION: CONCEPTS AND THEORETICAL ISSUES (5) A look at th e hi s torical origin, d eve lopm en t and current unde rstanding of the philosoph y of rehabilitation. The rehabilitation process is viewed as an int eg ra tion of C.'Oncept s and procedures from the m e dical s'ocial-psychological, and l ega l di scip lin es. The clinic a l l ega l soc i e tal and self d e finitions of disability are studied tog e th e r with their implications for th e orientation and dimensions of service program s for the handicappe d. REH 502. ISSUES AND PROBLEMS IN REHABILITATION COUNSELING (5) PR : CI. Focus es on t echniques for the effective utilization of one's self in the various coordinating r e lationship s of th e re h a bilitation process. REH 503. MEDICAL ASPECTS OF DISABILITY ( 4 ) Study of m edica l information needed by the counselor in integrating medical services into the total r e habilitation process from r efe rral to placement Examines th e e ff ec t of a client's physical condition on various areas of adjustment. Includes appraisal of physical ca paciti es in terms of fonctional limitations and individual differences.

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318 RELIGIOUS STUDIES REH 504. PSYCHIATRIC ASPECTS OF DISABILITY (4) A survey of modern treatment and diagnostic proc edures used by th e mental health professions to assist the handicapped and disadvantaged to deal with various disabilities. Patt e rns and participation of rehabilitation protessionals in this helping process are analyzed and evaluated. REH 505. SPECIAL PROBLEMS I N REHABILITATION COUNSELING ( 5) PR: PSY 619 or CI. The course will focus on specific counseling prob l ems relating to special disabiliti es that are unique to the r e habilitation proc ess. REH 506. EVALUATION IN THE REHABILITATION PROCESS (5) PR: REH 501 o r CI. Methods and techniques e mployed to assess the mental socia l and vocational problems of h a ndicapped persons Particular attenti on w ill be give n to the contribution of diagnosis of vocational potential in programs aimed at helping disabled individuals reach th ei r high es t possible capacity REH 507. PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF REHABlLIT A TION SERVICES: PRACTICUM I (5) PR: Minimum of 15 hours of REH courses. Procedur es appropriate t o meeting the full range of needs of the handicapped individual as he completes the sequence of rehabilitation services. Supervised experience in observation and participation in counseling services in various rehabilit ation agenc i es. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY REH 604 RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGY IN REHABILITATION (5) PR: Stati s tics, or CI. The a im of this course i s to help students evalua t e and utilize ava ilabl e r<';Search s tudi es as well as to develop their own research skills. An individual r esea r c h project is required. REH 605 SOCIAL FACTORS IN REHABILITATION ( 5 ) Application of a soc.io l ogical frame of reference to physical and mental impair m e nt. Discu ssion of societa l values and norms relative to the partially and totally disabled Analy sis of the role of the di sa bled in the basic institutionalized s ubs ys t ems of society with implication s for th e rehabilitation process REH 606 VOCATIONAL PLACEMENT AND ADJUSTMENT OF THE DISABLED (5) A study of o-::cupations, vocational theories pre-placement counseling, voca tional placement techniques, follow-up procedures, and the psycho-social aspects of work as they pertain to r e h abilitating di sa bled and di sadvan taged persons REH 607. SELECTED TOPICS IN REHABILITATION (2-5) PR: 15 hours of REH graduat e courses or equival ent. Designed to give the graduate studen t an opportunity to stud y in depth some concept, proc edure, or body of data in th e r e habilitation field. Course work w ill consist of directed individual study and a relevant research project or paper. Cours e may be re peated once for credit. REH 610 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF REHABILITATION SERVICES: PRACTICUM II (5) PR : REH 507 and completion of a minimum of 30 hours of REH murses. Super vised practice in the application of knowl edge and skills acqu ired in prev ious courses and in REH 507. E xperience in rendering rehabilitation services to the moderat e l y and severe l y disabled in at l eas t two appropriate communit y facil iti es. REH 620. INTERNSHIP IN REHABILITATION (15) PR: REH 507, REH 610 Student placement in an approved intern se tting for a minimum of 400 h ours supervised experience. REH 621. APPLICATIONS OF LEARNING PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES (5) PR: Pri or course in Learning or CI. Application of various learning principles and proc edures to problems in specialized set tin gs. S ee PSY 621. RELIGIOUS STUDIES Faculty : Tremmel c h ai rm an; Strange, Z y l stra, Burns Gessman DeHainaut, B assuk, Haywood Sherman Sundheim Franze n.

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES 319 REL 300. INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION (4) An examination of the phenomenon of religion, which will include (1) an exam ination of why people do religion; (2) an examination of the character of theology, with special" attention to certain basic theological concepts such as God, sin, salvation, liberation, reincarnation, immortality, theism, atheism; (3) an analysis of the charac ter of religious ritual in its metatechnological, sacramen tal and experimental form; and _(4) an exa mination of th e pla ce and character of moral systems in religion REL 310. OLD TESTAMENT STUDIES ( 4 ) An introduction to the critica l study of th e Hebrew Scriptures against the back. ground of the ancient Near East, with attention to the history and religion of th e Hebrew people. REL 315. NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES (4) An introduction to the criti ca l study of the N ew Testament in con t ext of Christian beginnings in the first century A.D. REL 325. HISTORY OF JUDAISM (4) The historical dev e lopment of Judaism and Jewish concepts from biblical times to th e modern era with e mphasis on the format ive years from the Prophets to the close of the Talmud. REL 327 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY I (4) The hi sto ric a l development of Christianity, it s ideas and institutions, from the Establishment of Constantine to th e Council of Trent. REL 328. HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY 11(4) The historical development of Christianity, its ideas and institutions from the work ofJohn Wycliffto the ri se of"religious modernism" in the 19th cen tury REL 329. RELIGION IN AMERICA (4) To examine the movement from state church to pluralism in American religious institutions; the r eligious resu lt s of non-Protestant immigration; the Jewi s h factor ; the effect of h ome missions and socia l conc e rn programs upon American life ; political entanglements and th e concept of church/ state separation REL 35 0 WORLD RELIGIONS -EASTERN ( 5 ) An introduction t o and a comparison of the ideas, the literature, the in s titution s of the major r e ligi ons of th e Eastern World, especia lly Buddhism (Therevada, Mahayana, Zen), Hinduism J a ini sm, Taoism, Confocianism, Shinto. REL 351. WORLD RELIGIONS-WESTERN ( 5 ) An introduction t o and a comparison of the ideas, the literature, the institution s of th e major religions of the Western (Near E as tern origin) World Judaism Zoroastrianism Christianity, and Islam And a general compari son of Western religious ideas with Eastern r e li gious id e as REL 360. DIALOGUES IN RELIGION (4) A course design e d to place in dialogic encounter various aspec t s of contem p orary r elig i ous b e lie!S and practices for th e purpose of enablin g students to hear and participate in discussions concerning th e claims and procedures of e xisting religions REL 370. CONTEMPORARY RELIGIOUS THOUGHT (4) An exam in at ion of the central id eas of recent theological thinkers ; suc h men as Barth, Brunn e r, Bultm ann, Bonhoeffer Rahn er, Tillich Cox Altiz e r Bub e r Niebuhr. REL 383 SELECTED TOPICS (cre dit s vary) PR: CI. Course contents depend on students' nee ds REL 385. DIRECTED READINGS (cre dits vary) PR: Cl. Individua l guidance in concentrated reading on a selected topic REL 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (c redit s vary) PR: Junior standing and CI. Individu a l inv es tigation s with facu l ty supervis ion

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320 SSI REL 483. SELECTED TOPICS (c redits vary) PR : Junior standing and CI. Course contents depend on students" needs. REL 491. SEMINAR IN RELIGION (4) A course designed for persons, especia lly R e li gious Studies majors, whose prior religious studies have prepared them for a cooperative creative and/ or research effort in the area of religion. REL 583. SELECTED TOPICS (credits vary) PR: Senior standing and CI. Course contents depend on students" needs RUSSIAN See MODERN LANGUAGES SOCIAL SCIENCES (Interdisciplinary) American Idea Faculty: P Adams, Arnade, Bell, D Harkness, Hec hich e, LaGodna, O c hshorn Orr, Palm, Reilly Smith, Warner. CBS 301-302. THE AMERICAN IDEA (5,4) Uses hi s tory, political science sociology and e conomics to foc u s o n major id e a s characterizing Am e rican soc i ety, on our relations with oth e r nations, and on contemporary, domes ti c and international problems. CBS 403-404 THE UNIVERSE OF MAN ( 3,3) A sea rch for the universals of human lif e today ; th e nature of man, th e world community, human needs and valu es, avai labl e instrum e nts of sci e nc e and t e ch nology, and the limiting facts and forc es. Behavioral Science Faculty : Blau Brown Dick ey, Di c km an, Garcia, Geis, Gessner, Guest, Gilmore, Hardy, McCormick Newcomb, Powell, Ri cke r Saxon, Vega, Waterman, Williams. CBS 201, 202 203. BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (3, 3, 3) Draws on information from behavioral scienc e s ( hum a n biology psy c hology anthro pology socio logy and phil osop h y ) to demonstrate how human b e havior develops and mean s by which personal, socia l and ethica l probl e ms a r e dealt with. The third quarter will deal with specia l topics s e lected for study in d epth by th e student. CBS 405-406-407. BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (3 3,3J A comprehensive analysis and e valuation of man s b e havior. Emphasis on un derstanding of mechani sms involved in individual and soc i a l beha v i or, a long with consideration of social and ethica l problems re l at e d to m e ans for controllin g behavior. Labor atory experienc e will b e provided on sp e ci a l r esea rch topic s SSI Faculty : Achenba ck, Allen, Arnade, Bell, Boss e rman, Dilk es, Fuson, Hansen, Hawkins, Hechiche Jreisa t Kapl an, Nelson, Nesman Orr, Se li gsohn Strong, Swanson, Wheeler, Winthrop, Woodard.

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321 SSI SSI 301. SOCIAL SCIENCE STATISTICS (4) Topics selected from the following: measures of central tendency and vari ability probability and the normal curve, correlations, curve fitting, sca l e and index number theory, polling, interview and survey techniques, content analysis. Students who successfully complete this course may not also receive credit for either ECN 231 Business and Economic Statistics I or MTH 345 Introductory Statistics SSI 311. COMMUNICATION (4) Topics selected from the following: th e language of structure, general semantics, communication networks, language and social perception, diffusion of information, communication and social gamesmanship, Aesopian language and Nu-Think in politics, normative language of clinical psychology, communication and pseudoevents, non-ve rbal communication. SSI 315. PUBLIC OPINION AND PRESSURE MECHANISM (4) The content and formation of public opinion, properties of opinions and attitudes, and the principles and mech anisms of thei r formation and change. SSI 321. HUMAN RELATIONS AND PRODUCTIVITY (4) Topics to be selected from the following: the relation of sc i ence, technology, resourc es, energy, and population change to soc i al, economic, cultural and political change; social implications of research findings from the social, be havioral and management sciences. SSI 325. PSYCHOLOGY AND THE SOCIAL ORDER (4) Topics to be selected from the following: the quest for personal in modern mass society, the problems of mass culture and mass education, the problems of alienation and anomie in the 20th century, psycholo gica l factors in political and industrial conflict, man versus the machine in modem li fe. AREA STUDIES The following five courses ( SSI 339, 341, 343, 345 and 3 47), dealing with one or more countries of a given region will select and emphasize subject matte r from the following topics : its history, its peopl e and the ir cultures, its social psychology and national characteris' tics, its resources, its economic and industrial characteristics, its literature, religion and dominant valu es, its political framework and outlook, its socia l structure, and its current probl e ms. Each course may be repeated whe n countries of concentration vary, but the same country may not be repeated for credit. SSI 339. EUROPE (4) SSI 341. LA TIN AMERICA (4) SSI 343. ASIA (4) SSI 345. AFRICA (4) SSI 347. THE MIDDLE EAST (4) SSI 361. COMMUNISM IN THE MODERN WORLD (4) An interdisciplinary approach to the nature of C..ommunism, its philo sophic bases its anti-religious bias, its economic, socia l and political th eo r ies and practices, the arts and sciences under Communist ideology its conduct of foreign affairs and associated programs and techniques Emphasis will b e on Soviet and Chinese Communis m SSI 411. SOCIAL ISSUES OF OUR TIME (4) Topics tu b e selected from the following: automation and cybernation and the social problems they generate; special proble ms of a technological c ivili za tion ; the implications of changing social patterns of W estern culture and opportuniti es for social re -construction. SSI 413. LEISURE IN SOCIETY (4) Facts and trends of changing leisure-time patte rns in the USA and othe r countries; various conceptualizations of l eisure; r e lation ships of non -wo rk tim e to work attitudes, personality, family community, sub-cultures, r e ligion va lu e systems, social class. and the functio ns o f government.

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322 SOCIOLOGY SSI 415. THE CITY AND MAN (4) Topics to be selected from the following: the city and its ills ; proposed new types of community formation; planning and community; the social ecology of the city; conventional versus innovative approaches to the problems of th e community. SSI 449,450. THE EMERGING NATIONS (4,4) PR: Upper division standing or CI. CI required t o take SSI 450 out of sequence. This course examines the proces ses and problems involved when an underdeveloped country seeks to develop a modem industrial civilization SSI 481. DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-4) PR: CI plus upper division standing. May be repeated. To provide advanced s tudents with interdisciplinary research experience in areas of specific interest. SSI 485. DIRECTED READINGS (1-4) PR: CI plus., upper division standing. May b e repeated. To provide advanced students with intensiv e reading of interdisciplinary nature in areas of specific interest. SSI 491. SENIOR SEMINAR PR: Senior standing and CI. To provid e an integrating seminar experience for International Studie s majors. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS SSI 503. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN CULTURE (4) A social analysis of the leading characteristics, ideals, and values of American life. An effort will be made to deal with a variety of contexts in which American cultural themes, standards and practices receive expression SSI 505 SOCIAL VALUES AND SOCIAL ORDER (4) Topics to be selected from the following: the va lu e -patterns of modem socie ties ; social bases for a world order; the aims and functions of social planning; international transformation created by science and technology SSI 583. SELECTED TOPICS (1-4) PR: CI Jlus senior standing or graduate status May be repeated. To provide advance students with interdisciplinary study. of selected topics. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY SSI 601. SOCIAL PATHOLOGY (4) An examination of the variety of social criticism which has been leveled at Western society and of some of the defer:ises which have been made in its behalf. Materials will be c hosen from several of the social SSI 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-4) PR: CI and graduate s tanding. May b e repeated. To provide graduate students with interdisciplinary research experience in areas of specific interest. SSI 685. DIRECTED READINGS (l-4) PR : CI and graduate standing. May be repeated. To provide graduate students with an intensive reading of interdisciplinary nature in areas of spec ifi c intere st SOCIOLOGY Faculty : Wheeler, chairman; Bosserman Brandmeyer, Cameron, Conley Emond, Feinberg, Gagan, B Gunter, Hansen, Holley D P John son, Kutcher, E Nesman Senior R. Smith, Stine SOC 201. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (4) Nature and application of sociological co n cepts, theories and methods ; analysis of societies, associations and groups; social processes and social c han ge

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SOCIOLOGY 323 SOC 251. MARRIAGE (4) Study of pre-marital and marital relations. Social cultural and personal factors related to success and failure in mate selection and marriage. SOC 261. SOCIAL PROBLEMS (4) Descriptive and analytical consideration of major social problems in modem industrial societies with emphasis on American society SOC 301. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WELFARE (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI. The historical and contemporary development of or ganized social services and institutions to meet human needs. SOC 315. FOUNDATIONS OF THEORY (4) PR : SOC 201 or CI. Consideration of selected theories in sociology and pro cedures of systematic theory construction. SOC 321. SOCIAL INVESTIGATION (4) SOC 201, SSI 301. Methods and techniques of social research. Design of sociological studies, collection of data, and interpretation of results. SOC 331. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: PSY 201 or SOC 201. Behavior of the individual human being as affocted by social and cultural influences of modern society. SOC 341. SOCIAL ORGANIZATION (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI. Social organization in the broadest sense, including institutions and associations, as well as variations in role and status SOC 345. SOCIAL STRATIFICATION (4) PR : SOC 201 or CI. Social status and social stratification social class as a factor in behavior, social mobility SOC 351. THE FAMILY (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI. Principles of family o_rgani_ zation, social adjustment and control. Maturation, socialization and stability of the family SOC 371. RACIAL AND ETHNIC RELATIONS (4) PR : SOC 201 or CI. Comparative study of interracial relations, social tensions, attitudes, and modes of adjustment in various areas of the world. SOC 373. SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI. Types, sources, and fi.mctions of religious behavior. Religious behavior in relation to other aspects of personality and culture SOC 447. SOCIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF INDUSTRIALIZATION (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI. Socio-cultural elements which define and accompany the process of industrialization as observed in mature industrial nations SOC 449. POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY (4) PR : SOC 201 o r CI. An examination of the social factors that affect government, politics, and political behavior. SOC 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-4) PR: Four courses in sociology, including SOC 321, upper division standing or CI. Content dependent upon interests and competence of the student. SOC 491. SENIOR SEMINAR (4) For seniors majoring in sociology or other social sciences. Major issues in sociology, stressing theory and research. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS SOC 505. COMMUNITY WELFARE RESOURCES (4) PR: SOC 301 or CI; upper division standing. Emphasis upon voluntary pro grams and their development, planning and coordination. SOC 531. SOCIAL INTERACTION (4) PR: SOC 331 or CI; upper division standing. Interpersonal influence, complex behavior, role, conflict, and social situational factors. SOC 533. COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. Study of the development of group and mass social movements.

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324 SOCIOLOGY SOC 535. SOCIOLOGY OF SMALL GROUPS (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. Theory of small group stmcture, mechanics of interaction observation of small groups. SOC 541. SOCIAL CHANGE (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. Major theories of social and cultural change, and mechani sms of change in various societies. SOC 543. URBAN SOCIOLOGY (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. The social structure of the community in modem industrial societies. Analysis of community change. SOC 553. SOCIOLOGY OF THE ARTS (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. The creation, distribution and use of arts from a sociological perspective; the social roles involved. SOC 561. CRIMINOLOGY (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. Etiology of criminal behavior; law enforcement, crime in the United States; penology and prevention. SOC 563. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. Theories of delinquency, patterns of delinquent behavior, methods of control and treatment. SOC 571. POPULATION (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. Sociological determinants of fertility, mortality and migration; theories of population change. SOC 575 INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY (4) PR: SOC 201 or CI; upper division standing. Interaction, communication and authority in economic organizations; the factory as a social system. SOC 583 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (4) PR: 16 quarter hours in Sociology and prior consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. See class schedule for content. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY SOC 611. CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY (4) PR : Undergraduate course in so c iological theory or CI. Emphasizes logic a l and conceptual. dime nsions of theory and theory constmction. SOC 621. METHODS OF RESEARCH (4) PR: Course in Social Investigation or CI. Logic and practice of res e arch; problems of observation and data collection, data proc ess ing and evaluation. SOC 623. SOCIOLOGICAL STATISTICS (5) PR: SSI 301 or CI. Logic and application of parametric and nonparametric statistical analysis for sociological data. SOC 631. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY SEMINAR(4) PR: Course in Social Psychology or CI. Str esses contemporary developments in social psychological theory and empirical research SOC 641. COMMUNITY ANALYSIS (4) PR: \,Qurse in Urban Sociology or CI. Theori e s of community and community organization Methods of community study; probl e ms of urban are as. SOC 643. COMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS (4) PR: Course in Social Organization or CI. Organi za tional theory, bureaucratic models authority, power legitimation, and types of formal organization SOC 651. FAMILY ANALYSIS (4) PR: Course in Family or CI. Theory of interpersonal relations and interaction in the modem family. Analysis of fimctions and roles. SOC 661. SOCIAL CONTROL (4) PR: \,Qurse in criminology or 3uvenile delinquency or CI. Theories of control and deviance with research application in problem areas. SOC 671. SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY (4) PR: Four courses in social sciences with two in socio logy or CI. Theory of aging Social correlates of aging, retirement, and personality modification SOC 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH ( 1-4) PR: CI. \,Qntent and method dependent upon interest and competence of student.

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SPEECH 325 SOC 691. THESIS AND THESIS SEMINAR (5) PR: Equivalent of 16 quarte r hours in the student's graduate program, SOC 611 623 621. SOC 692. THESIS AND THESIS SEMINAR(5) PR : Equivalent of 16 quarter hours in the student's graduate program, SOC 611 623 621. May be taken co ncurrently with SOC 691. SPANISH See MODERN LANGUAGES SPEECH Faculty: J Popovich, chairman; Bindert, Brady, Downs, Galati, Heck, Jones Lucoff, N ewcombe, Partney, P e r ez, Scheib Schneide r Sisco. SPE 103. SPEECH FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS I (5) A special cours e for students learning English as a second lan guage. Intens ive study and drill in American English and listening comprehension. May be taken in conjuncton with CBS 100-English for Foreign Students. SPE 104. SPEECH FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS II (5) PR: SPE 103 or CI. Intensive study and drill in American Engli s h pronunciation and listening comprehension. Emphasis on diction and speaking slCills. SPE 201. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH (5) Th e nature and basic principl es of speech; emphasis on improving speaking and listening skills common to all forms of oral communication through a variety of experiences in public discourse. SPE 203. SPEECH IMPROVEMENT AND PHONETICS (5) D esigned to improve vocal quality and expressiveness, articulation, and fronunciation and to give instmction and practice in using the Intemationa Phonetic Alphabet for speech improvement. SPE 241. INTRODUCTION TO BROADCASTING (5) PR : SPE 201 or 203. Introduction to the principles, tool s and sk ills involved in radio and tel evis ion broadcasting. SPE 311. INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH SCIENCE (5) PR : SPE 203 or CI. Communication models are broken down and each portion analyzed. Emphasis on quantifiable parameters of effective speaking. SPE 320. ISSUES AND INTERPRETATION (2) The study of literature through analyses of printed textu al materials and of the visual-aural textual performance of them. May be repeated. SPE 321. FUNDAMENTALS OF ORAL READING (5) PR : SPE 201 or 203. Design e d to d eve lop proficiency in the understanding and oral communicaton of literary and other written materials. SPE 322. ORAL INTERPRETATION PERFORMANCE (2) PR : SPE 321 or CI. The study, r e h e arsal, and performance of literature for R ea ders Theatre and Chamber Theatre productions May be r epeated (maximum total 6 hours). SPE 343. BROADCAST SPEECH (5) PR: SPE 203 The development of skills required for effective announcing, acting, newscasting and other s peaking before microphone and camera. SPE 345. BROADCASTING AND SOCIETY (5) The communication process and influence of broadcasting upon soc i ety. SPE 347. RADIO PRODUCTION AND DIRECTION (5) PR: SPE 241. Radio production and direction, laboratory and broadcasting ex perience

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326 SPEECH SPE 348 . RADIO PRACTICUM ( 2 ) PR: SPE 3 4 7 or Cl. The study, r e he a r s al and producti o n o f radio pro g rams. May be repeated once SPE 349. WRITING FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION ( 5 ) PR : SPE 347 The writing of r a dio and t e l e vi s ion s cript s such as documenta ries, childre n 's programs, comm e rcials, drama s talks, and d e mon s trati o ns. SPE 351. INTRODUCTION TO AUDIOLOGY AND SPEECH PATHOLOGY ( 5 ) PR: SPE 203. '.fhe nature, .cause s and principl e s of trea tm ent o f spe ech and h e aring di s orders SPE 360. CURRENT ISSUES AND RHETORIC (2) An analy sis of s ignificant current s peak e r s and issu es. May b e re p ea t e d SPE 361. GROUP DISCUSSION AND CONFERENCE METHODS ( 5 ) PR: SPE 201 or CI. Principl es and m ethods of leadin g and p a rticip a tin g in v a riou s types of group dis cussion and confe re n ce. Emphas i s on reflec t ive thinkin g and g roup dynamics SPE 362 TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION ( 5 ) Inv e stig a tion and a f plic a tion o f m etho dol ogy and e ff ec ti ve t e chni ca l co mmuni ca tion for e ff e ctiv e ora presenta ti o n of t ec hni ca l re ports. SPE 363. PUBLIC SPEAKING (5 ) PR: SPE 201 or CI. Study of se l ec t e d publi c addresses as aids in s p ea kin g ext e mporan e ously and from manu sc ript. The re l a tion s hip b etwee n publi c s p ea kin g and publi c policy formul a ti o n SPE 365. ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE (5) PR: SPE 201. Study of prin ci pl es of a r g um enta ti o n as a ppli e d i n ora l di s c ourse, analys i s of e vid e n ce and modes o f r eas oning. Practi ce in d e b a t e pre paration and d e liv e ry SPE 366. FORENSICS (2 ) PR: SPE 365 or CI. The s t u d y, lib ra ry r esea r c h and i n ves ti ga ti o n and practic e in for e n s ics. Appli ca tion of the principl es o f rh e t oric t o the current d e b a t e an d discussion topi cs. M a y b e re p ea t e d ( maximum of 6 h ours). SPE 367. FORMS OF PUBLIC ADDRESS ( 5 ) PR: SPE 3 63 o r 365. An a d va n ce d course emphas i z in g a rrangem ent an d s t y l e in inform a ti v e, persu as iv e and ce re m o ni a l publi c address. SPE 369. PARLIAMENTARY SPEAKI N G ( 3 ) Principl es of parliament a ry proc edure and p rac ti ce in c onduc tin g and p a rticip a ting in meeting s gov e rn e d by parli a m enta ry rul es. SPE 381. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH ( credits vary) PR: Junior s t a nding and Cl. Indi v idu a l in ves ti ga ti o n s and facu lt y s u pe rvisi o n SPE 383. SELECTED TOPICS ( credits vary) PR: Juni o r s t anding and CI. SPE 385. DIRECTED READINGS ( credits vary ) PR: Juni o r s t a nding and CI. SPE 411 SPEECH BEHAVIOR AND PROCESSES ( 5 ) PR: SPE 20 3 o r Cl. Study of th e t h eories o f the s impl e an d co m p lex aco u stica l ph e n o m e non of s pe ec h; int e n sive analysi s of th e s timulu s-feedbac k varia bl es of s pe ec h SPE 441. TELEVISION PRODUCTION AND DIRECTION ( 5 ) PR: SPE 2-!l. An introductory course i n the t echniques o f p ro ducin g and d i rec tin g t e l e vi s ion progr a m s SPE 442. ADVANCED TELEVISION PRODUCTION A N D DIRECTION ( 5 ) PR : SPE -!41. lnte n s iv e s tudy and pra c ti ce o f th e t echmques o t t e l ev i s i o n pro ductio n and direc tion with e mph as i s o n b o th c r eative an d a dmi n i s t ra ti ve aspe c ts. SPE 443. TELEVISION PRACTICUM ( 2 ) PR : SPE -!-12 or CI. Th e study, re h ea r sa l and produc ti on of t e l evisio n p r og rams. May be repe ated on ce. SPE444. STATION MANAGEMENT 1 5 ) PR: SPE 241. To acqu aint th e student with the e robl e m s of m a n ag in g a r a di o and I o r t e l ev i s ion s tati o n. T o pro v id e the student wit h r ealistic o ppo r tuniti es t o

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SPEECH 327 solve management problems and create programming plans for a broadcast organi zation SPE 445 BROADCAST PRODUCTION CRITICISM ( 5) PR: SPE -1-12. The study of contemporary broadca s t programming techniques and pra c ti ces. Ext ensive listening and v iewing . SPE 447. HISTORY OF BROADCAST PROGRAMMING (5) PR: SPE 3-15. A s tudy of th e hi s tory of radio and television technology, station and network evo lution and programming. SPE 448. PUBLIC BROADCASTING (5) PR : SPE 3-15. The study of public broadcas ting as i nformational cultural, and instructional m e di a with special a tt e ntion on programming. SPE 449. SEMINAR IN BROADCASTING (5) PR: SPE -1-12. Inten s ive examination and di sc ussion of electronic media in th e ir socia l economic, le ga l and political contexts with specific emphasis on programming. SPE 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH ( credits vary) PR: Senior s t an ding and Cl. Individu a l investigations with faculty supervision SPE 483. SELECTED TOPICS (credits vary) PR: Senior s tandin g an d Cl. SPE 485 DIRECTED READINGS (c redits vary) PR: Senior s t anding and CI. SPE 491. SENIOR SEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN ORAL COMMUNICATION (2) PR : Senior Standin g. Exploration of probl ems in all aspect s of speaking and lis t en ing wi th e mphasis upon an overview of th e arts and sciences of oral com munication. SPE 492. SENIOR SEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN ORAL COMMUNICATION ( 3 ) PR: SPE -191. Int ensive analysis of the complexities of scholarly investigation in specia l areas of the arts and sciences of oral communication. FOR UPPER LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS SPE 501. SPEECH BEHAVIOR AND PROCESSES (5) PR : Upperclass s tandin g. Study of th e theorie s of the simple and com plex acousti ca l phenomenon of' s peech; intensive analysis of the s timulus-feed back variables of speec h. SPE 503 APPLIED PHONETIC TRANSCRIPTION (5) PR : SPE 2 0 3 or CI. Int ensifie d training in auditory discrimination of th e sounds of American Englis h. Detailed u se of the International Phonetic Alphabet in rapid transcription of normal and disordered speech. SPE 511. EXPERIMENTAL PHONETICS ( 5 ) PR: SPE 203. Understanding and a pplication of experimental methods in a n a l yz in g spe e c h sounds Emphas i s upon important research findings, instrum e nts and methodologies in the l abora tory study of normal speech Deve lopm e nt of phoneti c s kill s of di scr imin a tion and reproduction of speec h sounds. SPE 521. ORAL INTERPRETATION OF DRAMATIC LITERATURE ( 5 ) PR: SPE 32 1 or CI. Critical appreciation and Oral Interpretation of spec ial textual materials w hi c h a r e inherently drama tic in nature and poetry, narrative prose, drama, biography, and hi s t ory. SPE 522. ORAL INTERPRETATION OF POETRY ( 5) PR : SPE 321 or CI. Critical apprec iation of l yric and narrative po e try and com munication of that appreciation t o an audience Study of po e tic theory and prosodic techniques. SPE 52:3. LITERARY ADAPTATION AND ORAL INTERPRETATION ( 5 ) PR : SPE 521. Practice in composit ion and adaptation of literary materials for oral pre st'ntation ; an investigation of the more advanced problems in oral interpretation as in Chora l Sp e aking and Chamber Theatre SPE 524 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF DRAMATIC LITERATURE,.11 (5) PR : SPE 521. A study of se l ec t e d pre-mode rn dramas with s p ecia l e mphasis on problems of int e rpretation for ora l performanc e. SPE 525. ORAL INTERPRETATION OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (5) P R : SPE 321 or CI. A study o f th e theor i es and practic e in th e ora l interpretation

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328 SPEECH of poetry and narrative fiction for children with specia l emphasis on chissical and modern literature for children. SPE 526. ORAL INTERPRETATION OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE (5) PR: SPE 321 or CI. A critical interpretation and oral presentation of selected Books of the Old and Nt-w Testaments SPE 561. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN SMALL-GROUP COMMUNICATION (5) PR: SPE 361. Advanced study of theories and research in communicative inter action in group discussion and conference. SPE 565. HISTORY AND CRITICISM OF PUBLIC ADDRESS (5) PR: SPE 363 or CI. The principles of rhetorical criticism applied to se lected great speeches of Western Civilization. SPE 567. PERSUASION (5) PR: SPE 365 Advanced study in theories and practice in persuasive speaking and of the extra-logical factors involved in changing beliefs and behavior of audiences. Emphasis on experimenta l literature in persuasive discourse SPE 581. RESEARCH (cre dit s vary) PR: Senior or graduate standing and CI. SPE 583. SELECTED TOPICS (credits vary) PR: Senior or graduate standing and CI. SPE 585. DIRECTED READINGS (credits vary) PR: Senior or graduate standing and CI. SPE 593. LANGUAGE AND SPEECH FOR CHILDREN (5) PR: SPE 203 or CI. A diagnostic study of language development; the analysis of speech behavior and oral language needs of children; techniques of speech improv ement for children FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY SPE 603. ADVANCED PHONETICS (5) PR: SPE 503 or equival ent. Intensified training in close phonetic transcription. Work on dialects, intonation distinctive feature theory and acoustic phonetics SPE 611. COMMUNICATION: ANALYSIS AND MEASUREMENT (5) A study of selected modes of communication. Includes analysis of communication symbology, and presents the theory and application of selected instruments for measuring and producing speech. SPE 612. SEMINAR IN SPEECH SCIENCE (5) PR: SPE 511. To provide graduate students with an opportunit y to interact with faculty and other students for the purpose of developing an in-depth understanding of a selected sub-area of Speech Science. SPE 621. HISTORY AND THEORIES OF ORAL INTERPRETATION (5) A study ,,f the history critica l writings, uses, and d e velopments of the art of oral int e rpretation with analysis of the principles and practices. SPE 661. CLASSICAL RHETORIC (5) Greek and Roman the ory and practice; emphasis on Aristotle, Plato, Cicero, and Quintilian, selected other readings SPE 662. MODERN RHETORICAL THEORY (5) Studies of Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century theorists and the historical and cultural forces influencing them; relationship to contemporary theory and practice. SPE 665. HISTORY AND CRITICIS;\l OF AMERICAN PUBLIC ADDRESS (5) Criticism of selected speeches and speakers of American public address, studied against a background of political, social and intellectual issues. SPE 667. CONTEMPORARY RHETORICAL THEORY (5) Studies in Speech and l anguage; Speech as symbol, theories of meaning, the rela tion of language thought, and action. SPE 668. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH IN ORAL COl\IMUNICATION (5) Critical examination of research design procedures, and reporting of experimenta l studi e s in small group communication and persuasive discourse.

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SPEECH PATHOLOGY & AUDIOLOGY 329 SPE 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH ( 1-5 ) Directed study in special projec:ts. R ecommended only wh en material c:annot be studied in sc:heduled courses. SPE 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN SPEECH ( 1-.5) S PE 685. DIRECTED READINGS ( 1-5) SPE 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN ORAL COMMUNICATION (5) SPE 694. SUPERVISED COLLEGE SPEECH INSTR UCTION (5) PR: Graduate standing and CI. Instmc:tion and experienc:e in teac:hing the University's bask Speec:h c:ourses. Credit not applic:able toward the graduate degree in Speec:h May be repeated. SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY Faculty: Kinde, director; Carlson, Crittenden, Glover Hartka, Kuffel, Mu llin Rit terman, Weigl, Zenner Adjunct: Edwards, Gray, Kasan, L ogue, McClumpha Seamens, Sexton, Shriner, Scheuerle SAi 201. SURVEY OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (3) A general survey course concerning th e nature and prevention of di so rd ers of commun i cation. SAi 301. SPEECH PATHOLOGY ( 6) PR: SAi 201 or CI. Th e scope of speech pathology as a profession and field of study. An introduction to speec h and language disorders (articu l ation, stuttering, voi ce, aphasia, etc.): etio logi es, major treatment approaches, and research findings SAi 302. AUDIOLOGY (6) PR: SAi 201 or CI. The scope of audio logy as a profession and field of study. An introduction to the study of hearing impairments: classifications, etio lo gies, major treatment approaches and research findings SAi 311. THE SCIENCE OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS I ( 6 ) PR: SAi 201 or CI. The neurological and anatomi ca l basis of communication dis orders. Comparisons of normal and pathological organic structures an d their functional dynamics Separate sections concentrating on normal and abnorma l aura l physiology are schedu led for those students wi th a primary emphasis in audio lo gy. SAi 312. THE SCIENCE OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS II ( 6 ) PR: SAi 201 or CI. Perspectives on research in speech pathology and audiology. Introduction t o multivariate design consi d erations as they a pply to r esea rch in speech and hearing l aboratory and clinical settings. Ana l ysis of basic hypothesi s testing. SAi 313. THE SCIENCE OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS III (6) PR : SAi 201 or CI. An examination of phoneme sys t ems and the distinctive features of their alophonic variants wit h p a rti cu lar emphasis upon those superfixes and suprasegmental modifers necessary to the understanding and recording of early developmental and deviant speech patterns. SAi 482. NATURE AND NEEDS OF THE HEARING IMPAIRED (6) PR: SAi 301 302 or CI. A study of the effec t s of auditory disord ers upon the organization and expression of behavioral patterns as they re late to motivation, adjustment and personality. SAi 483. SELECTED READINGS (Topic) (4), (4), (4) PR: CI A reading program of topics in speec h pathology and/or audiology conduct ed under the supervision of a facu lty member. SAi 498. INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY PRACTICUM (1-6) PR: SAi 30 1 or 302. Observation and participation in s peech pathology and audiology practicum in the University clinical l aboratory.

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330 SPEECH PATHOLOGY & AUDIOLOGY SAi 511. INSTRUMENTATION I (6) PR: SAi 301. Calibration, usage and s pecific applications of specialized instruments available in dealing with speech and language disorders. Includes : recording, sonograph, audio-feedback, video equipment, behavior measuring devices. SAi 512. INSTRUMENTATION II (6) PR : SAi 302. Calibration, usage and specific applications of specialized instruments available in dealing with the identification and measurement of hearing disorders. Includes: sound level recorders, audiometers, and the e lectrophysio lo gica l measurement devices . SAi 513. THE SCIENCE OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS ( 6) PR: SAi 301 and 302 or CI. The a pplication of behaviroa l and learning principles to the study and management of speech, language and hearing disorders. SAi 571. EVALUATION OF ORAL COMMUNICATION DISORDERS ( 6) PR: SAi 301 or CI. The administration, eva luation an d reportin g of diagnostic test s and procedures used in the assessment of speech and language disorders. SAi 572. AUDIOLOGY I (6) PR: SAi 302 or CI. Introduction to p sychoacous tical phenomenon as it relates to the measurement of hea ring Overview of principles and methods of identification audiometry with emphasis on neonatal, presc hool and school age popu lations Procedures for dete rmining pure ton e thresholds including the application of masking techniques. Funda mental concepts related to h earing aids and their benefits Management of hearing impaired individuals including cou n se ling. SAi 573 AUDIOLOGY II (6) PR: SAi 572 or CI. Advanced study of p syc hoacou stica l phenomenon as it relates to the measurement of hearing. Instruction emphasiz ing principles and methods of determining hearing acuity through the use of speech stimuli. Management of clients from pertinent case histori es through post-evaluation recommendations. Thorough consideration of hearing a ids with s p ecial attention on techniques of selecting and fitting aids in a clinical setting. SAi 574 METHODS FOR ORAL COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (6) PR: SAi 571 or CI. An in-depth analysis of classic and contemporary methods e mployed in the management of communicatively impaired individuals. Experi mental approaches are reviewed through current medical, psy cho logi cal speech language and hearing journals. SAi 575 MANAGEMENT OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (4) PR: SAi 573, SAi 574 or CI. The planning of programs for individua l s with speec h, language and hearing impairments Includes administration of programs in public schools, clinics, and private practice. SAi 576. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: VOICE (4) PR: SAi 574 or CI. A comprehensive study of th e medical and physical aspects of voice disorders. Primary emphasis i s on therapeutic management. SAi 577. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: ARTICULATION (4) PR: SAi 574 or CI. An exa min a tion of norm a l and deviant articulatory ac quistion and behavior. Presentation of major theoretica l orientations and the therapeutic principles based upon them. SAi 578 COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: STUTTERING (4) PR : SAi 574 or Cl. A comprehensive study of the diagnosis and modification of stuttering based on a two-factor model. Othe r major th eories are considered and evaluated. SAi 579. TECHNIQUES OF AUDITORY TRAINING (4) PR: SAi 574 or CI. An analysis of theories of auditory reception and amplificati on A study of the methods and techniques e mploye d in the development and habilitation of auditory skills for the hea ring impaired. SAi 580. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: LANGUAGE (4) PR: SAi 574 or CI. Examination of research and clinic a l literature presenting major theoretical orientations pertaining to the e tiology eva lu ation, and treatment of those factors that hinder or interrupt normal language acquisition or function.

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SPEECH PATHOLOGY & AUDIOLOGY 331 SAi 581. SUPERVISED RESEARCH (1-12) PR : CI. Individualized programs of student research approved and supervised by a faculty member. SAi 583. SELECTED READINGS (Topic) (4f (4) (4) PR : CI. A reading program of topics in speech pathology and/or audiology conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. SAi 598. SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY i>RACT]COM (1-12) PR: CI. Participation in speech pathology and audiology practicum in the University clinical laboratory and selected field settings. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY SAi 620. CLEFT PALATE (4) PR : CI. An in -depth study of speech language and hearing problems associated with cleft lip and cleft palate. Consideration is given to a multidisciplinary ap proach to therapy and rehabilitation SAI 621. APHASIA (4) PR: CI. A consideration of the neurological and psychological aspects of aphasia as they relate to communication disorders. Specific language therapy approaches are discussed and evaluated SAi 622. CEREBRAL PALSY (4) PR : CI. A study of the medical, physical, occupational speech, language, and hearing problems of the cerebral palsied. Therapy techniques are reviewed and evaluated. SAi 623. DIALECT AS A COMMUNICATION DISORDER (4) PR: CI. Research and clinical literature on dialect as a communication disorder. SAi 673. CHILD AUDIOLOGY (4) PR: SAi 573. Etiologies and manifestations of hearing loss within a pediatric population. Survey of procedures used in early identification and quantified measurement of hearing loss in young and non-communicative children. SAi 674. SPECIAL AUDITORY TESTS (4) PR: SAI 573 or CI. History, development rationale and techniques for administer ing hearing tests to determine site of lesion, including those requiring specia l instrumentation. The detection and clinical management of pseudohypocusis in cluding the use of objective audiometry. SAI 675. TECHNIQUES OF SPEECH READING (4) PR: CI. Speech reading as a language skill for the deaf and hard of hearing child and adult. Analysis of theories, methods, and systems. SAi 676. HEARING DISORDERS (4) PR: SAi 674 or CI. The compilation and interpretation of hearing test data for diagnosing hearing impairment Investigation of medical and surgical techniques for the treatment of hearing loss, coordmating information for planning the treat ment and rehabilitation of the hearing impaired, including the involvement of other professionals. SAi 677. HEARING CONSERVATION (4) PR : SAI 573 or CI. A comprehensive study of all aspects of hearing conserva tion specially those relating to the detection and prevention of hearing loss in both children and adult populations. Special attention is given to problems encountered by industry SAi 680. RESEARCH PROCEDURES IN SPEECH PA THO LOGY AND AUDIOLOGY (4) PR: CI. Advanced research and experimenta l design techniques employed in clinical and laboratory settings in speech pathology and audiology. Introduction to research technologies; review of stylistic considerations in research writing. SAi 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-12) PR: CI. The student plans and conducts an individual research project under the supervision of a speech pathology or audiology faculty member.

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332 THEATRE ARTS SAi 683. SELECTED READINGS (Topic) (4), (4), (4) PR: CI. A reading program of topics in speech pathology and/or audiology conducted under the su p ervision of a faculty member. SAi 684. LANGUAGE FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED (6) PR: SAi 301, 302, 482 or CI. Techniques and materials of teaching language to children with auditory disorders. Evaluation and analysis of contemporary methods SAi 685. COMMUNICATIVE SKILLS FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED (6) PR: SAi 301, 302, 482. Application and evaluation of techniques for teaching symbolic functioning to children with hearing impairments Consideration of developmental remedial aspects of reading SAi 698. PRACTICUM IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY (1-12) PR: CI. P articipation in speech pathology and audiology practicum in th e University clinical laboratory and selected field settings. SAi 699. THESIS (1-9) THEATRE ARTS Facult11: Belt, acting chairman; A Golding, Kase, Lorenzen M echam, O'Sullivan, Phitlips, S chuldt, Whaley, C. H. Williams, Zachary. TAR 203. INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE (3) The nature of theatre as an art form. How does a play mean?" Orientation and identific:aton for the unde rstanding of theatre. Open to all st udents and required of Theatre majors. TAR 211. FUNDAMENTALS OF STAGE PERFORMANCE (3) Elementary principles and m e thods of stage performance with emphasis on inner creativity and physical expression. TAR 212. STAGE MOVEMENT AND SPEECH (3) PR : TAR 211 or Cl. An exercise inv es tigation of the nature and possibilities of movement and speech in the theatre. TAR 221. (3) Basic m a terials and media techniqu es as applied to stage settings. Theoretical and practical exe rci ses in construction, painting, and mounting of scenery, with participation in performance productions TAR 252. STAGE MAKE-UP (1) Elementary theory and practice of make-up for the stage. TAR 303. MODERN THEATRE PRACTICE (5) Initial readings and exercises in theatre; play analysis, performance, and technical theatre for non-theatre majors. TAR 311. ACTING I (3) PR: TAR 212, or CI. Intermediate principles and methods of stage performance with emphasis on scene study. TAR 313. DIRECTING I (3) PR: TAR 411. Staging the play, including script analrsis, composition, movement and rhythm; rehearsal procedures and genera organization. Lec ture laboratory using illu s trati ve exercises and scene work. TAR 322. STAGE PROPERTIES (3) An investigation of hi storic: architecture, d ecor, and fi.irnishings for the theatre des igner and director w ith practical exercises in duplication for the stage. TAR 339. HISTORY OF TRE THEATRE (5) An historical survey of world theatre. TAR 352 PERFORMANCE (1) The s tudy rehearsal, and performance of major theatrical works. Open to all University students by audition on a credit or non-credit basis. May be rep ea t e d.

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THEATRE ARTS 333 TAR 361. INTRODUCTION TO PUPPETRY (3) Principle s and methods of puppetry with an historical survey of major forms and practical problems with lab oratory production. TAR 411. ACTING II (3) PR: TAR 311 and juried audition or Cl. Intermediate exercieses in stage perfor mance with specia l emphasis on problems on genre, sty l e, and int erpre tation. TAR 413. DIRECTING II (3) PR: TAR 313. Problems in directing, script interpretation, composition, and movement for genre and period, coaching the actor, designing the mise en scene. TAR 421. SCENE DESIGN I (3) PR: TAR 221 or C l. Aesthetics ,md theories of stage des ign with an historical study of the development of the physical theatre and scene ry Practical design problems. TAR 422. SCENE DESIGN II (3) PR : TAR 421 and acceptance of juried portfolio or Cl. Continuation of Scene D es ign. TAR 423. COSTUME DESIGN I (3) PR: TAR 221. A history of clothing and stage costume. TAR 424. COSTUME DESIGN II (3) PR: TAR 423 and acceptance of juried portfolio or Cl. Aesthetics, design, and technique of stage costuming. TAR 425. STAGE LIGHTING I (3) PR : TAR 221. Theories and techniques of lighting as they relate to theatrical productions. Emphasis on li ghting, e l ectronics and optics. TAR 426. STAGE LIGHTING II (3) PR: TAR 425 and acceptance of juried portfolio or Cl. Continuation of Stage Lighting I with emph asis on lighting design and theory TAR 429. TECHNICAL DIRECTING (3) PR : TAR 421, 423 425 and one of 422 424 or 426 Mounting the physical pro duction. Lecture lab using se lected readings and practical problems in plan ning, organizing and executing the technical e lements of production. TAR 431. THEATRE LITERATURE OF MYTH AND RITUAL: CLASSIC (3) PR: TAR 339 or Cl. The study of the development of dramatic form out of early r e ligiou s rites and its full flow e ring in the works of Aeschylus, Sophocl es, Euripides, Aristophanes and Menander. TAR 432. THEATRE LITERATURE OF MYTH AND RITUAL: MEDIEVAL (3) PR : TAR ;339 or Cl. The r ebirth of drama in the ancie nt Christian Church and a study of the theatre literature which grew ou t of these ea rly beginnings. Re lated d eve lopm ents in oriental theatre are a l so studied. TAR 433. LITERATURE OF THE RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE THEATRE (3) PR: TAR 339 or CI. Historical study of 16th and 17th Century theatrical liter ature. TAR 435. LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY THEATRE (3) PR: TAR 339 or Cl. A study of English and Continen tal theatre literature of the lat e 17th and 18th century. TAR 436. LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH C ENTURY THEATRE (3) PR : TAR 339 or Cl. A study of theatre literature from Schiller to Chekhov. TAR 437. LITERATURE OF THE MODERN AND C ONTEMPORARY THEATRE (3) PR: TAR 339 or CI. Readings of contemporary American British, and Con tinental drama from Appolonaire to the present. TAR 443. PLAYWRITING I (3) PR: TAR 303 or equivalent, : 3 hours of creative writing, and CI. Basic dramatic writing practices and mnventions. Evaluation of student work in conferences. Study of selected readings May be repeated.

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334 THEATRE ARTS TAR 444. PLAYWRITING 11(3) PR: TAR 443. Continuation of Playwriting I. Writing a one act play or portion of a longer work. May b e repeated. TAR .\54. EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE PERFORMANCE (2) PR: TAR 211, 212, 3 52 or Cl. The study, rehearsal, and l aborato r:r, performance of new and experimental works for the theatre. May b e repeated to a total of 6 credits TAR471. THEATRE MANAGEMENT (3) A study of commer<:ial community, and educationa l theatre operation with spedal emphasis on box office management, production costs, c:ontracts, publi<:ity, and public re l a tions. TAR 473. ADVANCED THEATRE MANAGEMENT (3) PR: TAR 4 71 or Cl. A study of production company organization and operation and of program selection and schedule. TAR 481. DIRECTED STUDIES (1-6) PR: CC. Independent studies in the various areas of Theatre. Course of study and credits must be assigned prior to registration. TAR 483. REPERTORY PERFORMANCE (1-9) PR: CC. Advanced performance theory and practice with practical examination. All course work is by directed study and must relate to Department Productions. FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS TAR 501. DRAMATIC THEORY AND CRITICISM I (3) PR: TAR 339 and any 2 from TAR 431, 432, 433, 435, 436, 437, or Cl. A study of basic critical writings on the theatre from Pl a to and Aristotle to the present. TAR 502. DRAMATIC THEORY AND CRITICISM II (3) PR: TAR 501 or CI. Continuation of Dramatic Theory and Criticism I. TAR 511. STYLES OF ACTING (3) PR: TAR 411 or CI. Exercises in th e stylistic p e rforman ce problems of the actor. The emphasis changes from quarter to quarter. May be repeated for a total of 9 hours TAR 515. PERFORMANCE PRODUCTION (3) PR: TAR 413, majors only, CI. Actual production work in which the student class prepare a play for project p erformance, or other faculty approved project. TAR 529. TECHNICAL PRODUCTION (3) PR: TAR 429, majors only, CI. Actual production work in which the student designs and executes scenery, costumes, properties, and lighting for a performance, or other faculty approved project. TAR 543. ADVANCED PLAYWRITING (3) PR: TAR 444, and CI. Concentration on the writing of the full length play form, with selected readings and analysis of dramatic structure. May be repeated. TAR 544. WRITING FOR THE SCREEN (3) PR: TAR 444, and CI. Planning and writing of the film short and feature film from rough scenario to finished screenplay. Selected reading s and critical analysis of screenplays by Agee, B e rgman, Kurosawa, Hitchcock etc. May b e repea t e d TAR 552. ADVANCED PERFORMANCE (1) PR: TAR 352 or CI. The s tudy, r e h ean;al, and p erfo rmanc e of m ajo r th ea trical works. Admission by audition. May b e repeated. TAR 554. ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE PERFORMANCE (2) PR: TAR 454 or CI. Th e s tudy rehearsal and labora tory p e rforman ce of new and experimental works for the thea tre. Admission by audition. May b e rep ea t e d for a total of 6 houn;. TAR 565. THEATRE FOR CHILDREN (4) PR: CI. Theory of thea tr e for children, its history and obj e ctives. T ec hniques of production from script selection and analysis t o p e rforman ce.

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ZOOLOGY 335 TAR 567. INFORMAL THEATRE WITH CHILDREN (4) PR: CI. Theories and techniques of informal theatre with children. Focus is on the creative development of the child through the process of improvised theatre. TAR 581. DIRECTED STUDIES (1-9) PR: CC. Independent studies in the various areas of Theatre. Course of study and credits must be assigned prior to registration ZOOLOGY (See also Botany and Biology.) ZOO 311. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY (6) PR: BIO 201-203. Anatomy of se lected vertebrate types emphasiz ing evolutionary trends. lee lab Qtr. I, III. ZOO 313. INTRODUCTORY INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 201 203. An introduction to the major invertebrate groups, with emphasis on lo cal forms. Field work will be required. lee-lab Qtr. II. ZOO 321. INTRODUCTORY ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY : 5) PR: BIO 201-203. Functional histology and the primary functions of the organ systems will be stressed and related to the survival of the whole animal. The approach will be comparative and evolutionary and the emphasis will be on the vertebrates. lee lab-disc.: Qtr. III. ZOO 411. HISTOLOGY (4) PR : ZOO :311 and/or BIO 422 Comparntive approach to the study of tissues and th e relation of their structure and function lee lab Qtr. I. ZOO 415. INTRODUCTION TO ENTOMOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 201-203. An introduction to general aspects of insect morphology development, and clas s ification. The identification of local forms will be emphasized. lec.:lab. Qtr. IV ZOO 421. CELL BIOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 331 and CHM :351 or 335. Physico-c.:h emic.:al properties of cells, enzyme function, intermediary metabolism, photos y nthesis fimc.:tion of nerves and mus cles. lee-lab. Qtr. II, III. ZOO 422. DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (5) PR: ZOO 421 or BOT 510. Structural and functional events involved in differen tiation and morphogenesis. lee-lab. Qtr. III, IV. ZOO 460. WILDLIFE AND FISH MANAGEMENT (:JJ PR: BIO 201-203, BIO 445. An introduction to the principles of wildlife and fisheries management. Certain methods and techniques utilized in the management of exp loit e d animal species will be introduced. Designed primarily for students int e re sted in the wildlife and fish management profession Qtr. II (odd numbered years). ZOO 461. ANIMAL SOCIAL BEHAVIOR (5) PR: CI. An introduction to comparative ethology, with emphasis on social behavior and the evolution of behavior. lee-lab Qtr. I (odd numbered years) ZOO 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH ( 1-6) PR: CI. Individual investigation with faculty supervision ( S / U grade only.) ZOO 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN ZOOLOGY (1-6) PR: CI. Each topic is a program in directed study under superv ision of a faculty m embe r. ZOO 491. SEMINAR IN ZOOLOGY (1) PR: Upper division May be repeated once. ( S / U grade only.) FOR SENIOR LEVEL AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ZOO 513. PARASITOLOGY (5) PR : BIO 201-203. Fundamentals of animal parasitology and parasitism; the of selected animal parasites including those of major importance to man. lee-lab. Qtr. II.

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336 ZOOLOGY ZOO 5I4. AQUATIC ENTOMOLOGY (4) PR: ZOO HS. Taxonom y d eve lopm ent, and ecology o f aquatic insects with emphasis o n l oca l forms l ee l ab. Qtr. II (odd numbe r e d years). ZOO 5I5. LIMN OLOGY (5) PR: C l. An introducti on to th e physical, c h e mical and biological nature of fr es h -wa t e r env ironm e nts. l eelab Qtr. Ill. ZOO 5I7. ORNITHOLOGY ( 4 ) PR : BIO 44S ZOO -311, and C l. The bio l ogy of birds. Field trips e mphasize th e l oca l avi fauna. l eelab. Qtr. II. ZOO 5I8 MAMMALOGY ( 5 ) PR: BIO 20I203 and Cl. The biolog y of mammals including systematics, ecology, natura l histor y and geogra phical distribution lee-lab Qtr. I. ZOO 5I9. ICHTHYOLOGY (5) PR: ZOO 3Il. Systematics of fis h es, including major classification, comparative anatomy, e mbryol ogy, and general distribution. lee lab Qtr. IV. ZOO 520. BIOLOGY OF ECHINODERMS (5) PR: ZOO 3 1 : 3 BIO 421. A study o f th e a natom y, ph ys iology and eco l ogy of echinoderms. l eelab Qtr. I ( eve n numbe r e d yea rs). ZOO 521. COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY ( 5) PR: ZOO :32 I BIO 421. Th e evo lution of phy siological mechanisms l eelab. Qtr. I. ZOO 525. BIOLOGY OF THE AMPHIBIA (5) PR : ZOO 311, BIO HS, and C l. Majo r aspects of amphibian biology emphasizing fossil hi story, evo lutionary morpholo gy, sensory physiology life history, and reproductiv e b e havi o r l eel a b Qtr. III (eve n numbere d years). ZOO 526. BIOLOGY OF THE REPTILIA ( 5 ) PR: ZOO .311, BIO HS, and Cl. Maj o r aspects of reptilian biology empha s izing fossil hi story evo lutionary m o rpholo gy, s e nsory physiology life hi story, and r eproductive b e havi or. l eel a b Qtr. III (odd numbered years) ZOO 545. ZOOGEOGRAPHY (3) PR: BIO 44S Zo ogeogra phi c principl es and general patterns of terrestrial and m a rin e di s tributions. Qtr. Ill. ZOO 546. MARINE INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY I (5) PR: BIO 20I and C l. The low e r inv e rt ebrate phyla. Field trips to local intertidal and s ubtidal h a bit a t s r equired. l eelab Qtr. IV Z00547. MARINE INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY Il(5) PR: BIO 20I and C l. The hi g h e r inv ertebrate phyla Field trips to local intertidal and subtidal habitats required. l eelab Qtr. IV ZOO 556. TERRESTRIAL ANIMAL ECOLOGY (4) PR : BIO 445 Fi e ld and labor a tory inves tigations of the bas ic principle s of eco logy as applied to t erres trial animals l eelab Qtr. III. ZOO 557. MARINE ANIMAL ECOLOGY ( 5) PR : BIO 445 and ZOO 3 I3. Inv es tigations of e nergy flow, biogeoche mical cycles and community s tru cture in marin e e nvironm e nts Qtr. III. ZOO 562 MECHANISMS OF ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (5) PR : BIO 201-20 3, CHM 3 3 I333, and Cl. A comparative approach to communi ca tion and orientation in animals including homing b e havior and biological cl ocks. l eel a b Qtr. I. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY ZOO 609. BIOCHEMICAL SYSTEMATICS (4) PR: Cl. A research and oriented cou r se on th e acquisition and use of bioch e mical inform a tion in anim a l sys t e mati cs. l eel a b ZOO 611. EXPERIMENTAL EMBRYOLOGY (4) PR: ZOO 42 1-42 2 an d C l. Lectures laboratori es, readings and dis c u ss ions relat in g t o con t e mporary a d vances in th e area of bioch e mistry of d e v e lopm e nt. Experi mental t echniques will b e studie d ZOO 613. ADVANCED INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (5) PR: ZOO 3 I3. or Cl. An advanced zoological study of s e lected invertebrate

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ZOOLOGY 337 groups with emphasis on regionally significant forms Laboratory and field work r e quired. lee-lab. Z00614. PLANKTON ECOLOGY (4) PR : ZOO 313 or ZOO 546 and 547. The relationships and distributions of plank tonic organisms as affected by their physical chemical, and biological environ ments. lee-lab. ZOO 615. PLANKTON SYSTEMATICS (-1) PR: ZOO 313 or ZOO 5-16 and 5-17. The identification of plankton from different depth zones in the sea and from various oceanic regions lee-lab. ZOO 616. BIOMETRY (4) PR: MTH 211-213 or CI. An introduction to statistical procedures for research in the biological sciences Experimental design analysis of data and presentation of results are emphasized. ZOO 617. SYSTEMATIC ORNITHOLOGY (3) PR: ZOO 517 and Cl. The classification and distribution of the birds of the world. lee-lab. ZOO 618. ADVANCED MAMl\IALOGY (4) PR : ZOO 518 Important literature and developments in mammalogy. Students will undertake individual research problems lee-lab. ZOO 619. ADV AN CED ICHTHYOLOGY ( 5) PR: Cl. Systematic ichthyology with particular reference to the important literature together with a historical introduction. Laboratory devoted to completion of a systematic problem by each student. lee-lab ZOO 620. FIELD ORNITHOLOGY (3) PR : ZOO 517 and Cl. The use of local population in the study of avian biology lee lab ZOO 621. PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY (5) PR: Cl. Effect of environmental factors on animal function at the cellular and organ system level with emphasis on control and mechanisms. lee-lab. ZOO 622 INVERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY (3) PR : Cl. A research -oriented study of select e d topics in invertebrate physiology. Laboratory and field work required. lee-lab. ZOO 623 PHYSIOLOGY OF MARINE ANIMALS (5 ) PR: ZOO. 421. A study of the physiological mechanisms of animals in the marine environment. lee lab. ZOO 624 COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 521 or Cl. An analysis of the similarities and differences between the hormonal mechanisms of mammals, other vertebrates, and invertebrates. lee-lab. ZOO 626. POPULATION ECOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 616 or Cl. Application of new methods of applied mathematics com puter simulation and formulation of models to describe biological populations lee-lab ZOO 630 INVERTEBRATE REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT (5) PR: ZOO 313 and Cl. An analysis of modes of reproduction and patterns of larval development in major invertebrate phyla. Emphasis is on classica l descriptive embryology, modern mariculture techniques and larval ecology lee-lab. ZOO 633. PHYSIOLOGY OF FISHES (4) PR : ZOO 521 or CI. An analysis of the physiological mechanisms of metabolism and integration in fishes with emphasis on marine forms lee-lab ZOO 661. ADVANCED ANIMAL BEHAVIOR(4) PR: ZOO 461 and CI. Recent advances in comparative animal behavior (ethology). lee-lab ZOO 681. GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-9) PR: Cl. Directed research on selected topics. May b e repeated (S/ U grade only) ZOO 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN ZOOLOGY (1 -6 ) PR :Cl. Z00691. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN ZOOLOGY (1) PR: Graduate standing. May be repeated. ( S / U grade only ) ZOO 699. M.A. THESIS (1-9) PR: CI. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. (S I U grade only )

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338 GLOSSARY GLOSSARY An explanation of terms with which the reader may not be familiar. Academic Year: Beginning of Quarter I to end of Quarter IV Admission: Acceptance of a student for enrollment. Class Standing Codes: 0 Unclassified 5 Baccalaureate degree holder 1. Freshman 2. Sophomore 3. Junior 4 Senior 6. Students in a Graduate Program 7. Education Specialists 8. Students in a Doctoral Program 9. Doctoral degree holder College: Unit within the University responsible for providing instruction in a given area of knowledge. Continuing Education Program: Courses taken off-campus not applicable to ward graduation unless approved by the degree certifying areas. Course: A unit of instruction in a p articular subject; usually one quarter in length. Curriculum: A group of courses, forming a major field of study, required for a degree. Elective: Any of a number of courses from which a student is allowed to select. A free elective is one not required in the student's curriculum. Faculty : Persons in t eaching and research; the instructional s taff of the univer sity Former Student R eturning: A student taking seven quarter hours of credit, grad uate, or undergraduate, or enrolled in a "work period" under the Cooperative Education Program. Full-Time Student: A student taking twelve quarter hours of credit as an under graduate; nine hours of credit as a graduate or enrolled on a "work period" under the Cooperative Education program. Grade Point Ratio ( CPR): Ratio of grade points to quarter hours attempted. Graduat e Program: A course of study leading to an advanced degree. GRE: Graduate Record Examination; a nationally administered exam, usually re quired for admission to graduate study. Hour Credit Hour, Quarter Hour: Unit of academic work. The number of quar ter hours specified for a course is usually equal to the number of times the class meets each week. Lower Level: A general term applying to courses and programs offered at the freshman and sophomore levels. Major : Student's academic area of concentration or field specialization. Matribulation: The first registration following admission as a classified student. Prere quisite: Prior study or authoriz atjon required to qualify for enrollment in a course. Quarter : Period of instruction into which the academic year is dividided. Regi st rati on: Process of enrolling for classes. T erm: Period of instruction into which the academic year i s divided ( i.e., Quar ter. Upper Level: A general term applying to courses and programs offered at the junior and senior levels.

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ADMINISTRATION 339 ADMINISTRATION OF STATE UNIVERSITIES "Term Ex pires S T A TE BOAR D OF EDUCATION REuBrN O'D. AsKEw Governor RrcHARD B. STONE Secretary of State ROBERT L. SHEVIN Attorney General THOMAS D. O'MALLEY State Treamrer FRED 0 DICKINSON, JR. Comptr'/Jller DoYLE E. CONNER Commissioner of Agriculture FLOYD T. CHRISTIAN Commissioner of Education STATE BOARD O F REGENTS J. J. DANIEL, Chairman (1980)0 Jacksonville MARSHALL M CRrsER, Vice Chairman (1979) Palm Beach CHESTER H FERGUSON (1974) Tampa JAMES J. GARDENER (1981) Ft Lauaerdale E. w HOPKINS, JR. (1978) Pensacol,a D. BURKE KIBLER, III (1976) Lakeland Lours c. MURRAY (1973) Orlando JULIUS F. PARKER, JR. (1977) Tallahassee MRS. E.D. PEARCE (1975) Miami ROBERT B MAUTZ, Chancellor Tall,ahassee

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340 ADMINISTRATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT President. . . . . . .................................... CECIL MACKEY Executive Assistant to the President .... ............. JAMES C. CLARK Special Assistant to the President ......... . ... ........ JAMES F. VI CKREY General Counsel. ........................ .... LAWRENCE J. ROBINSON UNIVERSITY RELATIONS Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TBA Director, Alumni Services. . .... ............. JOSEPH M. TOMAINO Director, Development Services .... ....... ... .... RoBERT L. BLACK, III Director, Information Services ...... ............ DENNIS E McCLENDON Director, Publications. . . . . . . . . . . ...... FRANK E. SPEAR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Vice President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... CARL D. Rices Assistant Vice President ................................ ROBERT W. ELLIS JR. Assistant Vice President .......... ... : ........... ....... WILLIAM H S cHEUERLE Assistant to the Vice President .... ...................... R usSELL M. CooPER Assistant Dean, Director, St. Petersburg Campus ............. LESTER W. TUTTLE Director, Graduate Studies and Graduate Council Chairman ...... JoHN C BRIGGS Dire.ctor of Research ..... ................................. WILLIAM H. TAFT Director of Community College Relations .............. .... FRANK H. SPAIN, JR. Director of Academic Services ............ . . . ............ EDWIN P. MARTIN Director, Continuing Education and Off-Campus Studies ... J RI CHARD BRIGHTWELL Director, Summer Sessions and Academic Advising ........ RAYMON D A. URBANEK Director, Bachelor of Independent Studies Program ........... KEVIN E. KEARNEY Acting Director, Academic Planning & Analysis ............ T WAYNE KEENE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Dean .................. ........ . ........ . ....... . .... ROBERTS. CLINE Chairmen Accounting and Busin ess Law ................. ... Louis C. JURGENSEN Economics ( A cting) ... ............................ ROBERT J. M URPHY Finance ............. .............. . ......... JAMES R. LoNGSTREET M anage m ent .......................... . ........ ALTON C. BARTLETT Marketing ........................................ DAVID C. SLEEPER Director of Graduate Studies .. ..... . ......... .... ROBERT J M URPHY Coordinators of Advising Lowe r Level ... ..... . ............... ........... .. .. FRED B PowE R Uppe r Level ....... . .......... ................. KENNETH W DAVEY COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Acting Dean ... ...... ..... ............... ................. C. W HUNNICUTT Acting Associate Dean ............. . ... ... ........ CHARLES C. MANKER, JR. Assistant to the Dean ..... . . ............ ........... WILLIAM P. DANENBURG

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ADMINISTRATION 341 Administrative Coordinators Doctoral Program .................................. C. W HUNNICUTT Elementary Education Advising .... ................. ZoE ANN CARLSON Graduate Studies Advising .............. ........ ...... L. ToM KARNS Intern Experiences ..... .............. ............. CALVERT J. CRAIG International Education ....................... E. CHRISTIAN ANDERSON Leadership Training Program (USOE) ........ ...... B. OTHANIEL SMITH Research ............. ..... ........ . ............. JoHN C. FOLLMAN Secondary Education Advising .................... CHARLES A. GoRDON St. Petersburg Campus Programs ................ ...... THOMAS HEARN Student Activities ................ ................. LoREN G. ROBERTS Student Personnel ........................... .... CHARLES A. GoRDON TTT Project .......................... .... ..... WILLIAM F. BENJAMIN Teacher Corps ................................ V MILLER NEWTON, III Upward Bound .................................... RICHARD F. PRIDE Coordinators, Teaching Specialization Areas Administration and Supervision ..................... LYNN P CLEARY Adult and Vocational Education ................. .... REx TOOTHMAN Art Education ..................................... GEORGE PAPPAS Curriculum and Instruction ......................... RusSELL WILEY Early Childhood Education .. ..................... MICHAEL S. AULETA Elementary Education ... .... .... .............. JAMES A. CHAMBERS Foreign Language Education ................ ..... VERNON W. WHITNEY Guidance ................................ ......... WILLIAM K Borr Higher Education ...................... ... ............ L. ToM KARNS Language Arts and Reading .......... ................. H. PHILIP PFOST Language-Literature Education ..................... WILLIAM W. WEST Library-Audio Visual Education. . . . . . . . . . . AL1cE G SMITH Mathematics Education ..................... DONOVAN R. LICHTENBERG Music Education ................................ VIRGINIA A. BRIDGES Physical Education ................................. LoUis E. BOWERS Psychological Foundations. . . . . . . . . . . . DONALD L. LANTZ Research ........................................ DouGLAS E. STONE Science Education ................... .......... LAURENCE E. MoNLEY Speech Education ...... .... .... ....... .. ........... JoHN I. Sisco Social Science Education ........................... ROGER E. JOHNSON Specia l Education ......... .................. ..... ROBERT C. DWYER Social Foundations ................................ BozmAR MUNTYAN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Dean ...................................................... EDGAR W. KOPP Assistant Dean .......................................... RUDOLF E HENNING Chairmen Electrical and Electronics Systems ......... .... . MERLE R. DONALDSON Syste ms Engineering .................... . . ... ROBERT J. WIMMERT Energy Conversion and Mechanical Design ........ c .. LINUS A. ScoTT Structures, Materials and Fluids .................... JoHN E. GRIFFITH Coordinator of Advising .............................. JoHN F Tw1GG COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS Dean .............................................. ...... DONALD J SAFF Assistant to the Dean ............................... WILLARD E. McCRACKEN Coordinator of Advising and Graduate Studies ....... ....... C. WESLEY HouK

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342 ADMINISTRATION Chairmen Art (Acting) .............. ....... . ........... ERNEST L. Cox, III Dance .................. .... ....... ............... WILLIAM G. Hue Music (Acting) ................ ................ JERALD M REYNOLDS Theatre (Acting) ................. ...... ............. JACK W. BELT Director, Florida Center for the Arts .................... ..... JAMES R. CAMP COLLEGE OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE Acting Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WILLIAM E MORRIS Chairmen American Studies .............................. HENRY M !;lOBERTSON Classics and Ancient Studies ...... ............. ALBERT M. GESSMAN English ...................................... JAMES A. PARRISH, JR. Modern Languages ............ .................. CLEON W CAPSAS Interdisciplinary Languages and Literature . . . WILLIAM E MORRIS Linguistics ................... ..................... ROGER W CoLE Mass Communications ....................... ................. TBA Philosophy ..... ..... ................. ......... . JAMES A GouLD Religious Studies ........ . ........ .......... WILLIAM C. TREMMEL Speec h ... .................................... . JAMES E POPOVICH COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES Dean .... . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . THEODORE A. ASHFORD Assistant to the Dean and Director of Advising .......................... WALTER E. WILLIAMS Chairmen Astronomy ...................... HEINRICH K. EICHHORN-VON WURMB Biology (Acting) ............. .................... JAMES D RAY, JR. Chemistry ...................................... P CALVIN MAYBURY Geology ........................ ............ . . WENDELL J. RAGAN Marine Science Program ... ........................ HAROLD J. HuMM Mathematics ........... . ....................... JOGINDAR S. RATTI Physical Science Program (Acting) ........... WALTER H. KRUSCHWITZ Physics ............ ...... ..... . ............. NORMAN L. OLESON Director, Astronomical Observatory ........ .... ....... EDWARD J DEVINNEY Director, Botanical Gardens ................................. DEREK G BuRCH Director, Herbarium .................. ............. . ...... ROBERT W. LoNG Chairmen, College Councils General Education ............ . ... ... .......... JEFFERSO N C. DAVIS Undergraduate ................................. SABATINO S. SoFIA Graduate Studies ............................. W. CoNARD FERNELIUS Chairman, Medical Sciences Advisory Committee ...... . JEROME 0. KRIVANEK COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Dean ........... ........ ............................ .... THOMAS A RICH

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ADMINISTRATION 343 Chairmen Anthropology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GILBERT KusHNER Economics (Acting) ............................... ROBERT J. MURPHY Geography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ROBERT H FusoN History ...................... ................ ... THOMAS P. DILKES Interdisciplinary Social Science ........................ MANUEL VEGA International Studies .................................. MARK T. ORR Political Science .......................... . MAURICE E. O'DoNNELL Psychology ................ .................................. TBA Sociology ............................... ..... RAYMOND H. WHEELER Chairman, Pre-Law Advising Committee .............. ....... ANNE E. KELLEY Directors Afro-American Studies Program .................... JuLius W. DuDLEY Aging Studies Program ...... ......... . ......... ALBERT J E WILSON Leisure Studies Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MAX KAPLAN Rehabilitation Studies Program ................... CALVIN M. PINKARD Criminal Justice Program ............. ........ MITCHELL SILVERMAN Speech Pathology and Audiology ............... STEWART W KINDE MEDICAL CENTER Director DONN L. SMITH Business Manager, Medical Center ............... ..... ........ JoHN MELENDI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Dean .... ....... .... ......... ...................... . .... DONN L. SMITH Associate Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHARLES W. FISHEL Chairmen Anatomy ................. ............ ............. JAMES w. w AFD Medical Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHARLES W FISHEL Obstetrics and Gynecology ........... . ........... JAMES M INGRAM Pharmacology ... ............... ................. ANooR SzENTIV ANYI Pediatri cs ....................................... LEWIS A BARNESS Physiology .................................. .... CARLETON H BAKER Psychiatry ................................ ..... WALTER E. AFIELD COLLEGE OF NURSING Dean ...... ............. ................................. ALICE E KEEFE REGISTRAR University Registrar ................................... .... JAMES E. Luc As Director, Records-Registration ........ .... .... DOUGLAS MAcCuLLOUGH Assistant Director, Records-Registration . . . . . . . ALFRED CREWS Director, Admissions ...... ............... .......... DAVID C. JORDAN Assistant Director, Admissions ...... .................. ROBERT LEVITT Systems Analyst ...... ................. ............ JOHN J. BusHELL Admissions and Records Officer, St. Petersburg Campus ..... ........ ....... EUGENE L. ROBERTS

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344 ADMINISTRATION CENTER FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND OFF-CAMPUS STUDIES Director ...... ......................... .... ....... J RICHARD B R IGHTWELL Assistant Director .... ........ ........... .................. LARR Y G. ROMI G OFF-CAMPUS TERM PROGRAM Director . ............... ....... ...................... ... D K E I T H LUPTON COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM Director . . ............ ............................ .... GEO RGE H M ILLER Assistant Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GLENDA F LENTZ Coordinators Business ........ ................................... ANDREW MINOR CHA RLES F RODRIGUEZ Education .... . . .... .......... . .............. GLENDA F LENTZ Social Sciences ......... .... .... ............ C HARLES F RODRIGUEZ Fine Arts ........................ ........... CHAR LES F RODRIGUEZ L angua ge-Literature ..... ................... C HARLES F. RODRIGUEZ N atura l Sciences ............ ............. ......... GLENDA F. LENTZ ANDREW M INOR Engineering ...... . ....... . . . ............. ...... GEORGE R. CARD St. P e t e r sburg C ampus ........................... GENE E McCLuNG DIVISION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH Director ................................ ......... W ILLIAM H TAFT Assistant Director ............................... ...... Dw1GHT B CARLILE INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES Educational Resources Director, Instructiona l Media ................... G ERHARD C. EICHHOLZ Libraries Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MARY Lou HARKNESS A ss i s t ant Directo r ................ .... ........... DENNI S E ROBISON A cquisition Libraria n ......... ............ WILL IAM L. STEWART, JR. C a t a l o g Librarian .............. ...... .... ...... R oBE R T V. BRADLEY. Documents Libraria n . ........................... DoNNA Y. REECE R eference Libraria n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MAR Y SEPANI K Serials Librarian ..... ................. ......... CLAUDIA J CARTER Special Collections Libra ri a n . . . . . . . . . . . M A R Y JANE KUHL ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS Vice President ........................... .............. ALBER T C. HARTLEY Assistant Vfce President ... .......... ...... ....... .... KENNETH W THOMPSON Budge t Officer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GLENNDON E CLAYTON C ente r Administrator, St. P e t e r sburg C ampus ...... H E RMAN J BRAMES Comptroller ................................... ROBERT E RICHMOND

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ADMINISTRATION 345 Director, Auxili a ry S e r vices ................. ........ TOMMY R. BERRY Director, Unive r sity Computer Sy stems ........... HOWARD R. STEELE Direct or, Facilities Planning and Operation ............ CLYDE B. Hn.L Direct o r Interna l Control . ............... ...... RAYMOND ZuREI C H Director, P e r sonnel S e rvices .................. JoHN P WEICHERDING Director, Phys ical Plant ..... .................... CHARLES W BUTLER Director, Procure m ent ......... .................. C. JOSEPH FORNES Director, Univer sity Administrative Planning ..... DONALD J ANDERSON Coordinator, Space and F acilities ...................... Ln.LIAN YORKS STUDENT AFFAIRS Vice President ................... ... .......... .......... ... JoE A HowELL A ss i s t ants to Vice President ........ ............. DANIEL R. W ALBOLT Directors of Div isions TROY CoLLIER MARGARET FISHER LINDA ERICKSON C ampus Publications .............................. LEO STALNAKER Counselin g Cente r for Huma n Development ....... ... EDMUND E. ALLEN Fina n c i a l Aid s ......................... .... ... GEORGE H. GoLDSMITH H o u sing ( P e rsonne l ) .............................. RAYMOND C. KING. Physical Educatio n R ecreationa l Sports, and Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . RICHARD T BoWERS Placem ent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DONALD S CoLBY Student Health S e rvice ................. ......... ROBERT L. EGOLF Student Organizations ..... ................... PHYLLIS P MARSHALL Univer sity C ente r ....... .......................... DUANE E. LAKE Academic Affair s UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA ST. PETERSBURG CAMPUS A ss istant Dean .............. ....... .... ...... LESTER W TuTTLE JR. A ss i s t ant Director, Admissions and Records ........ EUGENE L. ROBERTS Director, S tudent Affairs ................. ........ WAYNE W HOFFMAN C ente r Administration C ente r Administrator ............... ............. HERMAN J. BRAMES Library, C ampus Libraria n ................. ..... ................... DORIS C. CooK Associa t eLibraria n .............. . . ........... . ..... BETTY FERRIS Library, Extension Direct o r ....................... . ............... OSBORNE L GoMEZ A ss i s t ant Libraria n . . . . . . . . . . . . MARGUERITE s WURSTER

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346 ACADEMIC STAFF ACADEMIC STAFF All members of the University of South Florida's academic staff, including teaching, research, administrative and professional personnel, are listed below in alphabetical order. The listing includes name, highest degree, institution conferring the degree, and current rank and field as of December, 1971. ABBEY, WALTER R., B.S M E (Tri-State College, Indiana) Lecturer, Engineering. ABRAM, JACQUES, Diploma with Distinction (Juilliard School of Music), Professor Music. ACHENBACH, KARL E., Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor Psychology. ACKERMAN, DORIS J., M L .S. (Rutgers), Assistant University Librarian, Libraries. ADAMS, PATRICIA W., M .Ed. (Mississippi), Assistant Professor, American Idea. *ADAMS, SAMUELL., M.A (Minnesota), Assistant Professor, American Idea. AFIELD, WALTER E ., M D. (Johns Hopkins) Chairman and Professor, Psychiatry, Medicine. AGENS, JEANETTE F., M .A. (George Washington) Assistant Professor, Education. AKINS, DANIEL L., Ph.D. (California, Berkeley), Assistant Professor Chemistry. ALLEN, EDMUND E., Ed.D. (Florida), Director, University Counseling Center, Counseling Center for Human Development; Professor, Liberal Arts. ALLEN, ELIZABETH, M.L.S. (Emory ) Assistant University Librarian, Libraries. ALLEN, HAROLD C., Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Management. ALLEN, RUTH S., M.A. (South Florida) Teaching Assistant Education (Part time). ALLTEN, ROBERT E., JR., B.A (Catawba), Lecturer, Education. ALVAREZ, MARVIN R., Ph.D. (Florida), Associate Professor, Biology. ANDERSON, CELIA L., M .S. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Education. ANDERSON, DONALD J., M .A. (South Florida) Assistant Director, University Administrative Planning; Researc h Associate Professor, Computer Research Center. ANDERSON, E. CHRISTIAN, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor, Education. ANDERSON, EVERETT S., M M (Illinois Wesleyan), Professor, Music. ANDERSON, JOHN A., M.A. (Florida) Assistant Professor Economics. ANDERSON, LOUIS V., Ph. D (George Peabody), Associate Professor Education. ANDERSON, MELVIN W., Ph. D (Carnegie-Mellon Inst.), Professor, Engineering. ANDERSON, ROBERT L., Ph.D. (North Texas State University) Assistant Professor Marketing. ANTON, JEAN L ., M .Ed. (Ohio), Counselor to Students and Instructor, Student Affairs ANTONIO, JAMES F., Ph. D (Illinois), Associate Professor, Accounting. ARNADE, CHARLES W., Ph.D. (Florida), Acting Chairman and Professor, American Idea. ARTZYBUSHEV, MILITZA, M A.-equiv. (Univ. Bocconi, Italy), Assistant Professor, French. ASHFORD, THEODORE A., Ph.D. (Chicago), Dean and Professor. Natural Sciences, AUBEL, JOSEPH L., Ph.D. (Michigan State), Assistant Professor Physics AULETA, MICHAELS., Ed. D (New York), Professor, Education. AUSTIN, MARTHA L., Ph. D (Chicago), Associate Professor, Education. BACHMANN, KONRAD, Ph. D (Princeton) Associate Professor, Biology. BACON, CLARE W., Ed. D. (New York University), Assistant Professor, Education. BAILEY, OSCAR W., M.F.A. (Ohio Univ.), Professor Visual Arts BAIRD, RONALD C., Ph.D. (Harvard), Assistant Professor, Marin e Science Program, St. Petersburg Campus. BAKER, CARLETON H., Ph. D (Princeton), Chairman and Professor, Physiology, Medicine. BARBER, SOTIRIOS A., M .A. (Chicago), Instructor, Political Science. BARFIELD, ARTHUR D., JR., Ed. D (Virginia), Associate Profes so r Education.

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ACADEMIC STAFF 347 BARKHOLZ, GERALD R., M.Ed. (Wayne State), Instructor, Education. BARNARD, JAMES W., Ph.D. (Yale), Associate Professor, Special Education. BARNESS, LEWIS A., M.D. (Harvard Medical School), Chai rman and Professor Pediatrics, Medicine. BARTLETT, ALTON C. Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Chairman and Professor, Management. BATTLE, JEAN A., Ed.D. (Florida), Professor Education. BEAN, CHARLES F., M.E., (South Florida) Assistant Profes so r Engineering. BEASLEY, BOB L. Ph.D. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Physica l Education. BEASLEY, W. WAYNE, Ed.D. (Indiana), Associate Professor, Education. BEDICS, RICHARD A., Ed.D. (Alabama), Assistant Professor Education. BEEMAN, JOHN A., M.A.L.S. (South Florida), Assistant Libra rian Medical Center Library. BELL JOHN 0., J.D. (George Washington), Assistant Professor, American Idea. *BELLO, IGNACIO, M.A. (South Florida), Adjunct Instructor, Mathematics (Part time). BELOHLAVEK, JOHN M., Ph.D. (Nebraska), Assistant Professor Academic Affairs, St. Petersburg Campus. BELOHLAVEK, MARCIAL., Ph.D. (Nebraska), Assistant Professor Education. BELSITO, ROSEANNE, B.A. (South Florida) Counselor to Students and Instructor, Student Affairs. BELT JACK W., M.F.A. (Yale), Acting Chairman and Assistant Professor, Theatre. BENJAMIN, WILLIAM F., Ph. D (George Peabody), Professor Education. BENTLEY, JOSEPH G., Ph.D. (Ohio State) Professor, English. BENTON, JOHN A. JR., Ed. D (Florida), Lecturer, Behavioral Science (Part time). BERKLEY, RICHARD J., M.S. (N. Mex. Inst. of Min. and Tec h.), Assistant Professor, Physical Science. BERNER, WESLEY M., M.A. (Stetson), Assistant Professor, Physical Education BERRY, TOMMY R., B.A. (South Florida) Director, Auxiliary Services. BERTOSSI, WALTER G., B.A. (Florida), University Physical Planning Consultant, Physical Plant. BEST, GAIL G. M.S. (Illinois State), Counselor to Students and Instructor, Student Affairs. BETZ JOHN V., Ph.D. (St. Bonav enture Univ.), Associate Professor, Biology BETZER PETER, Ph.D. (Rhode Island), Assistant Professor, Marine Science Program. BILLINGSLEY, EDWARD B., Ph.D. (North Carolina) Associate Professor, History BINDERT, KATHLEEN R., M.A. (Syracuse), Assistant Professor, Speech. BINFORD, JESSE S. JR., Ph.D. (Utah), Associate Professor, Chemistry; Adjunct Associa t e Professor, Biology BIRKE, RONALD L. Ph.D. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.), Assistant Professor Chemistry. BIRKIN, STANLEY J., Ph.D. (Alabama), Assistant Professor Management. BITTERMAN, M.E., Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor Psychology. BLACK, R. EARL, Ph.D. (Harvard), Assistant Professor, Political Science. BLACK, ROBERT L. III, B .S. (Florida), Director, University Development. BLAIR JOHN M., Ph.D. (American Univ .), Distinguished Lecturer in Economics. BLAU, LILI R., M.S. (Pennsylvania State), University Counseling Psychologist, Counseling Center for Human Development; Assistant Professor, Student Affairs. *BLAU, THEODORE H Ph. D (Pennsylvania State), Adjunct Professor Behavioral Science (Part time). BLOCH, SYLVAN C., Ph.D. (Florida State), Professor, Physics BLOUNT, WILLIAM R., Ph. D (George Peabody), Associate Research Professor, Exceptional Children and Adults Institute. *BODDY, EDWARD, M.Ed. (Florida), Adjunct Instructor, Education. BOLER, R. KEITH, Ph.D. (Mississippi), Assistant Professor, Anatomy, Medicine. BOLTON, ELIZABETH B., M.A. (South Florida), Instructor, Education. BONDI, JOSEPH C. JR., Ed.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Education. BOSSERMAN, C. PHILIP Ph.D. (Boston), Professor American Idea.

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348 ACADEMIC STAFF BOSTOW, DARREL E., Ph.D. (Southern Illinois), Assistant Professor, Education. BOTT, WILLIAM K., Ed. D. (Duke), Professor, Education. BOULWARE, JOE W., M.S. (Florida), Lecturer, Physical Science. BOWEN, ADAM., M.S. (Florida Stat e), University Librarian, Medical Center Library. BOWERS, JAMES C., S c. D (Washington Univ.), Associate Professor, Electrical Engi-neering. BOWERS, LOUIS E., Ph.D. (Louisiana State), Associate Professor, Education. BOWERS, RICHARD T., Ed.D. (George Peabody) Director and Professor, Physical Education, Recreational Sports and Athletics BOYD, HERBERT F., Ph. D (Illinois), Profess o r Education. BRADLEY, ROBERT V., M .A. (Florida State), University Catalog Librarian, Libraries. BRADY, HENRY G., Ph.D. (Florida State), Assistant Professor Education. BRADY, WILLIAM M., M.S (Illinois), Instructor, Speech (Part time). BRAMAN, ROBERTS., Ph. D. (Northwestern), Associate Professor, Chemi stry. BRAMES, HERMAN J., M.S (Indiana State), Continuing Education Center Administrator, St. Petersburg Campus. BRANDMEYER, GERARD A., Ph. D. (California, Los Angeles), Associate Professor, Sociology BRANTLEY, BETTY C., Ph. D. (Florida S t ate), Assistant Professor, Education. BRAUN, BEN-AMI, Ph.D. (Purdue), Assis tant Professor, Mathematics. BRAUN, MARILYN, M.A. (Purdue), Instructor, French (Part time). BREIT, FRANK D., Ph.D. (Texas), Assi stant Professor, Education. BRIDGES, VIRGINIA A., Ph. D. (Ohio State), Associate Professor, Education. BRIDGES, WINSTON T JR., M.Ed. (Fl orida), Assistant Professor, Education, St. Petersburg campus. BRIGGS, JOHN C., Ph.D. (Stanford), Director of Graduate Studies, Professor, Biology BRIGHTWELL, J RICHARD, M.A (Ohio Stat e), Director Center for Continuing Edu cation BRIGHTWELL, RUTH G., B .S. (Ohio State) Teaching Assistant, Education (Part time). BRISARD, FRED D III, B.S.E. (South Florida), Systems Coordinat or, Computer Research Cent er. BRITTON, JACK R., Ph.D. (Colorado) Professor, Mathematics. BROER, LAWRENCE R., Ph. D. (Bowling Green), Assistant Professor, English. BROOKER, H. RALPH, Ph. D (Florida), Assistant Professor, Physics. BROST, MARY A., M.S. (South Florida), Instructor, Special Education. BROWN, LARRY N., Ph.D. (Missouri), Associate Professor, Biology BROWN, ROBERTA S., Ed.D. (Indiana), Assistant Professor Behavioral Science. BRUCE, RITA G., Ed.D. (West Virginia Univ.) Assistant Professor Education. BRUNHILD, GORDON, Ph. D. (Southern California), Professor Finance. BRUSCA, DONALD D., M.D. (Medical College of Virginia), University Physician, Student Health Service. BRYANT, FRED D., M.S .L.S. (Emory), Director, Medical Center Library. BRYANT, HAYDEN C. JR., M A (George Peabody), Assistant Professor, Education. BRYDON, GERALD R., Ph.D. (Water l oo), Visiting Assistant Professor, Chemistry; BULLOCK, JOHN T., M.Ed. (Florida), Assistant Professor Education. BULTHUIS, F. JOANN, M A (Ohio Stat e), Instruc tor Music. BURCH, DEREK G ., Ph.D. (Florida) Associate Professor, Biology, Director, Botanical Gardens. BURDICK, GLENN A., Ph.D. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.), Professor, Electrical Engineering. BURGETT, AUGUST L., Ph.D. (M i c hi gan), Assistant Professor Energy Conver sion, Engineering. BURKE, ROBERT J., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor History, St. P etersburg Campus. BURLEY, WILLIAM W., Ph.D. (North Carolina), Associate Professor, Education. BURNS, THOMAS J., M. Th. (Louvain, Belgium), Assistant Professor Language-Litera ture, Interdisciplinary.

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ACADEMIC STAFF 349 BURTON, ROBERT H., Ph.D. (Louisiana State), Associate Professor, Economics. BUSHELL, JOHN J., Director, Computer Planning, Registrar's Office BUSTA, JOSEPH F. JR., B.S. (Auburn), Assistant Dean, Student Affairs. BusoT, J. CARLOS, Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Engineering. BUTLER, CHARLES W., B.A (Lincoln Memorial), Director, Physical Plant. BUTLER, K. NELSON, Ed. D (Tennessee), Assistant Professor, Physical Education. CAFLISCH, JACOB C., III, M A (Indiana), Assistant Professor, Linguistics-English. CALDWELL, EDWARD, Ed.D. (Florida State), Director, Testing and Evaluation; Director-Assistant Professor, Social Sciences. CALER ROSA M., M.A., (Michigan State) Counselor to Students, Student Affairs CAMERON, WM. BRUCE, Ph. D. (Wisconsin), Professor, Sociology. CAMP, ]AMES R., B.A. (Georgia), Assistant Professor, Center for the Arts. CAMP, JOHN B., Ph.D. (Florida State) Associate Professor, Language-Literature. CANO, CARLOS J., M.A. (Indiana), Instructor, Spanish. CAPSAS, CLEON W., Ph.D. ( ew Mexico), Chairman, Modem Languages; Professor Spanish and Portuguese. CARD, GEORGE R., M.A. (South Florida), Coordinator, Cooperative Education. CARDER, KENDALL L., Ph. D (Oregon State), Assistant Professor Marine Science Program, St. Petersburg Campus. CARLILE, DWIGHT B., B.A. (Missouri), Assistant Director, Sponsored Research. CARLSON, REBEKAH L., M S (South Florida), Instructor, Speech Pathology and Audiology Institute. CARLSON, ZOE A., M.S. (South Florida), Assistant Professor, Education. CARLTON, EDWARD 0., M B.A (New York), Systems Coordinator, Computer Research Center. CARMICHAEL, JOHN D., M.B.A. (Georgia State), Assistant Professor, Marketing. CARPENTER, PETER A., Ph.D. (McGill, Canada), Assistant Professor, Philosophy, St. Petersburg Campus. CARR, DAVID R., M.A. ( ebraska), Assistant Professor, History. CARR, JOSEPH A., Associate Curator, Planetarium. CARR, ROBERT S., Interim Lecturer, English. CARROLL, DELOS L. JR., Ed.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor, Education. CARTER, CLAUDIA J., M.L.S (Columbia), Serials University Librarian, Librari es CASHON, }AMES R., M .Ed. (Ohio), Counselor to Students and Instructor, Student Affairs. CATTERALL, JOHN E., M F.A. (Washington Stat e), Assistant Professor Art. CECONI, ISABELLE F., B.A. (Wells), Lecturer; English. CHAMBERS, }AMES A., Ed.D. (Tennessee), Associate Professor Education. CHEATHAM, MARY J., M.S. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Physical Education. CHEN CHUNG HWAN, Ph.D. (Berlin), Professor, Philosophy. CHERRY, R ADRIAN, Ph.D. (Kentucky), Associate Professor, French. * CHESLEY, SANBORN W., M S (Florida), Adjunct Assistant Professor, Mathematics (Part time). CHISNELL, ROBERT E., Ph.D. (Auburn), Assistant Professor, English. CLAPP ROGER W JR., Ph.D. (Virginia), Associate Professor, Physics. CLARK, }AMES C., J D. (Vanderbilt), Professor and Executive Assistant to President. CLARK, WILLIAM E., Ph.D. (Tulane), Professor, Mathematics. CLAYTON, GLENNDON E., B.S. (Indiana), Budget Officer. CLEARY, LYNN P., Ph.D. (Florida State), Assistant Professor, Education. CLEAVER, FRANKL., Ph. D (Tulane), Professor, Mathematics. CLEMENT, DAVID E., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor, Psychology. CLINE, ROBERT S., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Dean and Professor, Business Administration. CLINTON, PAUL A., B.A. (Oregon State), Assistant Professor, Fine Arts CLONINGER, DALE 0., M B.A. (Emory), Assistant Professor, Economics. CLOSE, }AMES A., Ph.D. (Michigan), Distinguishe d Lecture r in Finance. COHEN STEPHEN L., Ph.D. (Tennessee), Assistant Professor, Psychology.

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350 ACADEMIC STAFF COKER, DAN C., M .A. (Abilene Christian College), Assistant Professor, Honduras Project Education. COKER, JOHN W., M.M (College-Conservatory of Music, Cincinnati), Lecturer, Center for the Arts. COLBY, DONALDS. M.S. (Michigan), Director, Student Placement. COLBY, JOAN W., B.S. (Eastern Michigan), Teaching Assistant, Education (Part time) COLE, ROBERT L., Research Assistant, Education (Part time). COLE, ROGER W., Ph.D (Auburn), Chairman and Associate Professor, Linguistics. COLLIER, CLARENCE H., M.E. (Georgia), Assistant Professor Education. COLLIER, TROY, M.A. (Southern Methodist University), Assistant to Vice President for Student Affairs. COLLINS, PASCHAL J., M.A. (Denver), Assistant Professor, English. CONLEY, TERESA J., M .A