Accent on Learning

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Accent on Learning

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Title:
Accent on Learning
Added title page title:
USF undergraduate catalog
Added title page title:
Undergraduate catalog
Abbreviated Title:
University of South Florida catalog
General catalog
Creator:
University of South Florida
Place of Publication:
Tampa, FL
Publisher:
University of South Florida
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Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resources ( 127 pages)

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Subjects / Keywords:
University and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs ( lcsh )

Notes

General Note:
None published in 1960. Volume for 1975-76 issued in 2 parts: part 1. General information -- part 2. Curricula and courses. Supplement for 1961 entitled: Summer sessions, 1961. Continued in part by University of South Florida. Graduate School programs, [1985/86]- Continued by the CD-ROM publication: USF academic information.

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Source Institution:
University of South Florida
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
024905859 ( ALEPH )
29205298 ( OCLC )
A52-00032 ( USF DOI )
a52.32 ( USFLDC Handle )

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Added automatically
USF Catalogs (Accent on Learning)

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Book

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ACCREDITATION USF was fully accredited in 1965 by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the official accrediting agency for educational institutions in the South A self-study of the University's programs and purposes is required periodically to insure a firm foundation for the future growth of the University Accreditation was reaffirmed in December, 1973 and December, 1984. But the University Commu nity continues to reexamine its mission and goals so that it never loses sight of its only reason for existence serving you Undergraduate Degrees Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Engineering Technology Bachelor of Fine Arts Bachelor of Independent Studies Bachelor of Music Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering Bachelor of Sci ence in Com put er Science Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Engineering Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering Bachelor of Science in Information Systems Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineer i ng Bachelor of Social Work Graduate Degrees Master of Accountancy Master of Architecture Master of Arts Master of Business Administration Master of Civil Engineering Master of Education Master of Engineering Master of Fine Arts DEGREES* OFFERED AT THE UNIVERSITY B.A. B.E.T. B .F.A. B.l.S. B M B.S. B S C.H. B .S.C.E. B S CP. B .S.C.S. B.S. E E B.S. E B .S.E.S. B.S.l.E. B S .l.S. B S M E B S.W. Master of Health Administration Master of Liberal Arts Master of Music Master of Public Administration Master of Public Health Master of Science Master of Science in Chemical Engineering Master of Science in Civil Engineering Master of Science in Computer Engineering Master of Science in Computer Science Master of Science in Electrical Engineering Master of Science in Engineering Master of Science in Engineering Management Master of Science in Engineering Science Master of Science in Industrial Engineering Master of Science in Information Systems Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering Master of Science in Medical Sciences Master of Science in Public Health Master of Social Work M Acc. Advanced Graduate Degrees M.Arch .** M A M B A. M.C.E M .Ed. M E M.F A Education Specialist Doctor of Education Doctor of Philosophy Professional Degree Doctor of Medicine See index for individual degree programs in cooperation with FAMU M .H.A. M.L.A. M M M .P.A. M .P.H. M .S. M S C.H M.S.C.E M.S .C.P. M.S .C.S. M.S.E.E. M.S E M S E.M M.S .E.S. M S .l.E. M S .l.S. M S M E M S M.S. M.S.P .H. M.S.W. Ed.S. Ed.D. Ph.D M D The University of South Florida and all colleges, departments, and programs therein establish certain academic requirements which must be met before a degree is granted These requirements concern such things as curricula and courses, majors and minors and academic residence Advisers, directors, department chairs and deans are available to help the student understand and arrange to meet these requirements, but the student is responsible for fulfilling them. At the end of a student's course of study, if requirements for graduation have not been satisfied, the degree will not be granted. For this reason it is important for all students to acquaint themselves with all regulations and to remain currently informed throughout their college careers and to be respons i ble for completing requirements. Courses programs, and requirements described in the Catalog may be suspended, deleted, restricted, supplemented, or changed in any other manner at any time at the sole discretion of the University and the Florida Board of Regents. University Police The University of South Florida Police Department, located at the intersection of Maple Drive and Fletcher Ave nue provides a full range of public safety services to the community 24 hours a day seven days a week. All University police officers are commissioned law enforcement officers of the state of Florida Services provided include car patrol, foot patrol, criminal investigations and prosecution of all misdemeanors and felonies, traffic enforcement and accident investigation, special events management and crime prevention programs The telephone number for on
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ACCENT ON LEARNING UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992-93 Th announcmnts, info,nnation, po/icis, ruls, regulations, and procedu1Ws st forth in this Catalog a,. for information only and a,. subj.ct to continua/ 1Wview and chang without notic. Undergraduate students enrolled in the University are entitled to one copy of each issue of the USF Undergraduate Catalog. Students wanting additional copies may purchase them at the University Bookstore. Prospective students may obtain University information concerning admissions, fMs and degrM pr09rams by requesting either the Undergraduate Viewbook or Graduate Catalog from the Admissions Office, SVC 1036, University of South Florida 33620-6900; telephone: 813-974-3350. Th University of South Florida is committed to the principls of equal lucation and mploymnt opportunities without IW#/.ard to race, color, sx. marital status, sex, 1Wligion, national orifiin, handicap, or age as provided by law and in ilccordanc with th Univrsity's 1Wspt for P9rsonal dignity. Th Univrsity 1s also committed to th mployment and advancement of qualified disabled vtrans and vtrans of th Vitnam ra. Ths principles a,. applied in th conduct of University programs and activitis, P9rsonnel and studnt actions, and th provision of facilities and srvices.

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Visiting The University Prospective students and other interested persons are invited to visit the University campuses. Most University offices receM visitois from 9 :00 a m .-5: 00 p .m., Monday through Friday. Self-guided cassette tours of the Tampa campus are available at the University Center Information Desk. Prospective freshmen are encouraged to attend USF PREVIEW. This held on the Tampa Campus, is designed to acquaint participants with USF admission financial aid, housing, amual costs, academics and s t udent USF PR!VIEW information is available from the Office of Admissions in Tampa. The Tampa Campus of the University is located on fowler Avenue (State Road 582) approximately two miles east of Interstate 275 and Nebraska Avenue (U.S. Route 41) and seven miles north of Interstate 4 off HS. The other campuses of the University are located in the places noted below. Communicating With The University Communications regarding the services and programs listed below should be directed by letter or by phone to the appropriate office on the Tam pa, St. Petersburg, fort Myers, Lakeland, or Sarasota campuses. Maaing addresses and general telephone numbers for the campuses are given at the bot tom of this page. The offices listed below (on the Tampa Campus unless otherwise indicated) may be dialed direct at the telephone numbers shown Ac8detnic Aclvisint (for Undedarecl ncl UncMcidecl Student.) Academic Advising, SVC 2011 Ac8detnic Advlslnt (for u-rd.umen) Arts & Sciences, SOC 11 o Business Admin., BSN 1406 Education, EDU 309 Engineering, ENG 104 fine Arts FAH 120 Nursing, MON 102B Pre-Medical, CHE 112 Ac8detnic s..vlces for Stuclenta with DIMloilitie1 Coordinator SVC 2043 Applicnono ncl AdmiHionl Office of Admissions, SVC 1036 New College Office of Admissions (Sarasota) Athletla (lnt.rcoiletilit.) Director of Athletics PED 214 lllchelor of ,...._,_ncMnt Studies l'rog,.m External Degree Program, HMS 443 C.IMI' Dev.io,-nt Counseling Center for Human Development, SVC 2124 C.IMI' lleooura c.nt.r Alumni Placement Services, SVC 2088 Cooperative Education Program, SVC 2088 Senior Placement Services, SVC 2088 Colet-i..v.I Eumln.tion Prog,.m (a.EP tru) Office of Evaluation and Testing Services, SVC 2054 C:O...-nlty Colet-lle&.tlonl (t..Mfer otuclenb) Office of Community College Relations, SVC 2080 Continuing Edualtion CourMI ncl Conf....,... School of Extended Studies, LLL 012 Division of Confererices and Institutes LLL O 12 I nternational Language Institute. CPR 293 CounMll ... Counseling Center for Human Development, SVC 2124 ,._ncW AuiotlincAI (lld...a.nhipo, '""' .... p1oy .... nt) Office of financial Aid, SVC 1102 Office of Student Employment. SVC 1037 974-2645 974-2503 974-4290 974-3390 974-2684 974-3660 974-2191 974-2674 974-4309 VOICE/TIY 974-3350 35S-2963 974-2125 974-4058 974-2831 or 974-2866 974-2171 974-2171 974-2171 974-2741 974-2506 974-2695 974-2403 974-3433 974-2831 or 974-2866 974-4700 974-2297 Gr ... ...t. Stuclilil Graduate School, FAQ 126 llMlth s.Mce1 (Student) Health Center, SHS 101 H-.. l'rog...., Univertity-wide Office of the Director, CPR 273 Housing: C.mpu1 llelicMncAI H .. 1 Office of Housing and food Service, RAR 223 Housing : Off.c.111pu1 Student Government Office ADM 151 lntarn.tional Student c.nt.r Office of the Advisor, CTR 259 Libniry lleoourao Tampa Campus: Office of the Director of Libraries, LIB 207 fort Myers Campus: ECC/USF Learning Resources Center St. Petersburg Campus: Office of the University Librarian Sarasota Campus: Office of the Librarian Tuition W.Wer For Senior Citiaeno Division of Lifelong Learning, lLl 012 !'o'inority Student Advioi... Center for Academic Advising, SVC 2011 Orilintatlon Office of the Director, SVC 2002 PA a LLL 012 Prlli"I ncl Tr.Hie S.Mc.1 University Police Department UPB 002 P...Aclmluion Advili"I for l'tolpective Frelh..,.n. lntem.tioMI. Mature, Minority, ncl T,.nofer Students Office of Admissions, SVC 1036 lleMi"I Study Skills Counseling Center for Human Development. SVC 2124 llecord1, !1-glot .. tlon Office of the Registrar. SVC 1034 s,..l
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CONTENTS Academic Calendar 4 General Information 7 Admissions and Related Matters 10 Financial Information 17 Student Services and Student Affairs 21 Academic Policies and Procedures 27 Academic Programs and Services 40 College of Arts and Sciences 52 College of Business Administration 81 College of Education 86 College of Engineering 95, College of Fine Arts 110 New College of USF 119 College of Nursing 120 Course Descriptions 124 Organization & Personnel 212 Faculty 218 Index 253 3

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1992 MAY s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 2 1 22 2 3 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 JUNE s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 JULY s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 1 6 17 18 19 20 21 22 2 3 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 AUGUST s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 IE) 25 26 27 2 8 29 30 31 SEPTEMBER s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 608 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 OCTOBER s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 1 5 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 NOVEMBER s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10@12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 2'2 23 24 25 @)@28 29 30 DECEMBER s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 2 1 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 March 2 June 1 June 1 August 24 August 28 August 28 August 28 August 28 Sep tember4 September7 September 18 October 3 October 16 October 23 Novemberl 1 November 26-27 Decembers December 9 12 December 14-15 December 16 Augu s t 3 October 26 October 26 January 7 January 13 January 13 January 13 January 13 January 18 January 22 February 5 February 20 March 10 March 15-19 Apri l 26 Apri l 27 30 May land 3 May4 Mays May6 May7 ACADEMIC CALENDAR FALL SEMESTER, 1992 Monday Monday Monday Monday Friday Friday Friday Fri day Friday Monday Friday Saturday Friday Friday Wednesday Thursday-Friday Tuesday Wed.-Sat. Mon. -Tues. Wednesday Last day for internati onal appl icants to apply for admi ssion and submit all required credentials and support i ng documents Last day for g r aduate and undergradua t e students to apply for admiss i on (except i nternational applicants) Former S tudent Return i ng Application Deadline Classes begin Last day to withdraw/drop and rece i ve full refund of reg i stration fees Last day to add courses Las t day for late reg i stration Las t day to pay fees CLAST Regi stration Dead li ne Labor Day Hol i day Graduation Applicat i on Deadline CLAST Admi n i strati on Day Honors Convocat i on (Classes Cancelled 2 : 00-5 :00 p m ) Last day to drop or w ithdraw from courses without academic penalty Veteran's Day Holiday Thanksgiving Hol i days Classes End F i nal Examinat i ons F i na l Commencement (Tampa) SPRING SEMESTER, 1993 Monday Monday Monday Thursday Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday Monday Friday Friday Saturday Wednesday Monday-Fr iday Monday Tuesday Friday Saturday & Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Fri day 4 Last day for internat i onal appl i cants to apply for admi ssion and submit all requi r ed credentials and support i ng documents Last day for graduate and undergradua t e students to app l y for adm issi on (except international applicants) Former Student Return i ng Applicat i on Deadline C lasses begin Last day to withdraw/drop and rece ive full refund of reg i strat i on fees Last day t o add courses Last day for late reg i stra t ion Las t day to pay fees Marti n Lut her K i ng Hol i day CLAST Regi strat i on Deadl i ne Graduat i on Applicat i on Dead li ne CLAST Admi nistrat i on Day Last day to drop or withdraw from courses w ithout academic penalty Spring Semester Break Classes End Final Examinati ons F i nal Examinati ons Commencement (Tampa) Commencement (St. Petersburg) Commencement (Ft. Myers) Commencement (Sarasota)

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January4 March 8 March 8 May7 May 12 May 18 May 18 May 18 May 18 May31 June 1 June 5 June11 June 22 June23-25 June28-29 January4 March 8 March 8 June 11 June 30 July 5 July 6 July 6 July 6 July 6 July 20 August 10 Januar:y4 March 8 March 8 May7 May12 May18 May18 May18 May18 May31 June 5 June 11 June 22 July 5 July 20 Monday Monday Monday Friday Wednesday Tuesday Tuesday_ Tuesday Tuesday Monday Tuesday Saturday Friday Tuesday Wednesday-Friday Monday-Tuesday Monday Monday Monday Friday Wednesday Monday Tuesday Tuesday Tuesday Tuesday Tuesday Tuesday Monday Monday Monday Friday Wednesday Tuesday Tuesday Tuesday Tuesday Monday Saturday Friday Tuesday Monday Tuesday SUMMER TERM, 1993 SESSION A {First Six-week Session) Last day for international applicants to apply for admission and submit all required credentials and supporting documents Last day for graduate and undergraduate students to apply for admission (except.for international applicants) Former Student Returning Application Deadline CLAST Registration Deadline Classes l;>egin Last day to withdraw/drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration Last day to pay fees Memorial Day Holiday Last day to drop or withdraw from courses without academic penalty CLAST Administration Day Graduation Application Deadline Last day of classes Summer Break between Session A and Session B Summer Break between Session A and Session B SESSION B {Second Six-week Session) Last day for international applicants to apply for admission and submit all required credentials and supporting documents Last day for graduate undergraduate students to apply for admission (except for international applicants) Former Student Returning Deadline Graduation Application Deadline Classes begio Independence Day Holiday Last day to withdraw/drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration Last day to pay fees Last day to drop or withdraw from courses without academic penalty Last day of classes SESSION C {Ten-week Session) Last day for international applicants to apply for admission and submit all required credentials and supporting documents Last day for graduate and undergraduate students to apply for admission (except for international applicants) Former Student Returning Application Deadline CLAST Registration Deadline Classes begin Last day to withdraw/drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late regi stration Last day to pay fees Memorial Day Holiday CLAST Administration Day Graduation Application Deadline Last day to drop or withdraw from courses without academic penalty lndepe .ndence Day Holiday Last day of classes 5 1993 JANUARY s M T W T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6[TI 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 11@ 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 FEBRUARY s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 H 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 MARCH s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14@@@20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 APRIL s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 fill 27 28 29 30 MAY s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 fill 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30@ JUNE s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 fill 23 25 26 27 28 29 fill JULY s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4@ 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 '31 AUGUST s M T w T F s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 l!Q) 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

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USF -A COMPREHENSIVE RESEARCH UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1!192/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The University of South Florida broke with tradition when it was founded in 1956. Unlike Florida's three older public universities, USF was located in a large metropolitan community-the Tampa Bay area. This comprehensive research university was the first of its kind in Florida purposely located within convenient commuting dis tance of a large segment of the state's burgeoning population, making higher education opportunities available to the largest num ber of people possible. This was an idea whose time had come. WHAT IS USF? The University of South Florida is a thriving comprehensive research university that makes the most of today's educational experience with a sharp eye on tomorrow. USF is people of many talents: a community of more than 40,000 teacher-scholars, students, and staff Its principal purpose is teach ing: Teaching grounded in research and related to the needs of its students and society. USF is pleasant surroundings: spacious palm-and-oak shaded campuses; libraries with countless collections and reference resources; laboratories where students and scientists seek and test knowledge; and facilities designed to foster creative and recrea tional activities. USF is popular programs: accomplishments that have earned na tional recognition in the marine sciences, fine arts, and medical -research. USF is public service: an important social and cultural force in the communities surrounding and supporting it. A source of major economic influence on Florida's West Coast, it is dedicated to the application of knowledge to improve the human condition USF is all of this . and more It is an intellectual and information center where people can find practical solutions to perplexing problems and share their expertise with others. It is a university which welcomes the fresh ideas and energies of each student, staff and faculty member. ACHIEVING THE UNIVERSITY'S MISSION Mission As Florida's first public university to be located in a metropolitan area, a prototype of the university of the future, the University of South Florida has sought from its beginning to apply the talents of its scholars and students to the problems facing modern society. The University's stated mission is 'to achieve preeminence as a general purpose university of academic excellence Its role as a five campus comprehensive research university places particular em phasis upon the instructional, research, and service needs of a major metropolitan region and an increasingly urbanized state and nation In addition, USF has mounted a major campaign to achieve national recognition as an innovative educational center for intellec tual, economic and cultural development that enriches the quality of life for all. The University of South Florida is committed to the goal of becoming one of the top 25 state-assisted universities in the United States by the year 2001. Offered A measure of success in accomplishing the University's mission, which is more significant than statistics alone, is the nature of its academic programs Through them USF seeks to serve an increas ingly diverse state and nation. These degree programs are in the University's Division of Aca demic Affairs and are administered in one of 10 schools and colleges: Architecture, Arts & Sciences, Business, Education, Engineering, Fine Arts, Medicine, Nursing, Public Health, and an honors college, New College of USF on the Sarasota Campus Specialized credit and non-credit programs are administered by the School of Ex-. tended Studies. This publication discusses the major undergraduate academic programs in the University which serve the people of Florida through the instruction of students, the advancement of knowl edge, and community service. Undergraduate degrees are offered in 93 academic areas and graduate degrees are offered in 103 areas. . The University's first doctoral program, a Ph.D. in Biology with emphasis on Marine Biology, was established in 1968. Since then, Ph.D. programs have been established in Accounting, Applied An thropology, Business Administration, Chemical Engineering, Chem istry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Education, Electrical Engineering, English, Engineering Science, Industrial Engineering, Marine Science, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Medical Sciences, Psychology, and most recently in Public Health. USF also offers the Ed.D. in Education, a Master's in Architecture (in coopera tion with Florida A&M University), and a Doctor of Medicine. The University's teaching and research faculty, numbering more than 1,800, represents all major areas of higher learning; more than 87 percent hold doctoral degrees. USF AT TAMPA, FORT MYERS, SARASOTA, ST. PETERSBURG, LAKELAND University of South Florida campuses form a string of anchors for the rapidly growing metropolitan west coast of Florida. Five campuses are within reach of more than three million people roughly one quarter of the state's population in a 15
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8 GENERAL INFORMATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG As a commuter campus USF at Fort Myers has a varied student population The campus draws from many age groups, ranging from transfer students who finish their first two years of college immediately after high school to working professionals seeking ad vanced degrees and "non-
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ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS UNIVERSfTY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1992 93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The Office of Admiss i ons administers the application and admis sions processes for undergraduate and graduate students and assists prosfective students in securing i nformation about the University o South Florida Admission to the University of South Florida requires evidence of ability to handle academic work, capacity to think creatively, and strong motivation. The minimum admissions requirements are designed to help identify applicants whose academic work and background indicate potential for success at the University of South Florida. However, satisfaction of minimum admissions require ments does not guarantee acceptance. The admission of new students at all levels is on a selective basis within curricular, space and fiscal limitations The selection process may include such factors as grades, test scores, pattern of courses completed, class rank educational objectives, past conduct, school recommendations, personal recommendations, and personal records Preference for admission in any term will be given to those applicants whose credentials indicate the greatest promise of academic success. The University encourages applications from qualified applicants of both sexes and from all cultural, racial, religious, ethnic, and age groups. In the admission process there is no discrimination on the basis of these factors or on the basis of handicap Appl i cants who are racial and ethnic minorities, disabled, Vietnam-era veterans or above traditional college age and who do not meet minimum admissions requirements will be considered for admission when there is sufficient evidence to suggest ability to do satisfactory work at USF. These/olicies are further described under "Applying for Admission" an 'Requirements for Admission The University supports equal educational opportunity for mi nority and disadvantaged students Requests for waiver of the $20.00 application fee are considered by the Director of Admissions if payment of this fee creates severe financial hardship and serves as a deterrent to application. Students are admitted to the University of South Florida in accor dance with the miss i ons and goals of the University and with enrollment limitations established by the Board of Regents and the Florida Legislature The University's enrollment plan establishes the priorities for admission. In order, these priorities are : (1) transfer students with A.A. degrees from Florida community/junior colleges or from other SUS institutions who have not attended another institution after earning the A.A. degree; (2) graduate students; (3) freshman students; (4) other transfer students with 60 or more hours; (5) transfer students with fewer than 60 hours. With i n the categories above, Florida residents have first priority, followed by non-Florida residents, and then international students living outside of the United States. Exceptions to these established priorities may be made for applicants whose addition to the student body helps the University's aims and commitment to equal opportunity/af firmative action goals, academic excellence, and other special needs Applying for Admission Obtaining an Application As part of the State University System (SUS) of Florida, USF uses the common SUS Application Form for Applicants who are attending Florida high schools or Florida community/junior colleges may obtain the SUS Application Form in school guidance offices. The USF International Student Application for Admission, as well as the SUS Application, may be requested from the Office of Admissions, SVC 1036, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 3362().6900 All of the application forms are also available on USF campuses in St. Petersburg, Sarasota, Fort Myers, and Lakeland (When requesting an application, please indicate applicant category-freshman, undergraduate transfer, or student.) When to Apply Applications for admission are accepted as early as 12 months before the requested entry date. Applications for admission and the $20.00 non-refundable application fee must be by the published University application deadline (see academic calendar) for the requested entry date or by the application deadline for the requested degree program (see specific program in this catalog), whichever is earlier The University application deadline is normalfy about ten weeks prior to the first day of classes in each term Applications for admission and application fees from international citizens (non-resident aliens) must be received at least five months prior to the requested entry date ,The application for admission and the application fee may be returned to the sender when the application is received after the published closing date or after any enrollment limit or program limit is reached for the requested term of entry (see Changing Requested Term of Entry, below). For freshman and undergraduate transfer applicants, the dead line for receipt of the credentials is two weeks after the governing application deadline. For all international and graduate applicants, the deadline for receipt of credentials is the same as the governing application deadline. Who Should Apply An application for admission must be submitted by all students who have not Men admitted to and enrolled in a University of South Florida degree program withi n the last three terms. Former or continuing USF degree-seeking students must file another applica tion for admission when applying for a second degree program, another level of study or readmission (see Readmission) Anyone who has previously been admitted and enrolled as a degree-seeking student and has paid an application fee w ill not be required to pay another fee The Director of Admissions may waive payment of the applica tion fee for minority and disadvantaged applicants if the fee serves as a deterrent to application In case of confirmed f i nancial hard ship the Director of Admissions will authorize Finance and Account ing to pay the fee for the applicants. Changing Requested Term of Entry Applicants may request considerat i on of admission for other terms that begin within 12 months of the originally requested term of entry without submitting a new application and fee. All requests for changes of entry dates must specify any college(s) attended or college work attempted that was not reflected on the original application and must be rece i ved by the appropriate published application deadline for the new term of entry or degree program specified, whichever is earlier. A new application and fee must be submitted when applicants wish to be considered for admission for a term that begins more than 12 months after the originally requested entry date An applicant who requests a new entry date must meet the ad missions requirements in effect for the new term requested. Entry dates for some programs are limited to specified terms General Admission Policies All official transcripts, test scores, and any other required credentials must be received directly from the issuing agencies It is the applicant's responsibility to initiate the request for credentials to the i ssuing agencies and to assure their receipt by the USF Office of Admiss i ons in Tampa However, SAT and ACT scores re flected on the high school transcript are considered official. All credentials and documents submitted become the property of the University of South Florida. The originals or copies of the originals will not be returned to the applicant or forwarded to another institution, agency, or person SAT/ACT scores of undergraduate applicants anticipating a major in teacher education may be no more than five years old An applicant admitted on a provisional basis must submit the requested missing credentials such as official final transcripts or test scores which must substant i ate eligibility for admission before a second registration will be permitted An undergraduate applicant who is denied admission may be eligible to appeal and will be advised of applicable appeal procedures by the Office of Admissions. An application for admission or residency affidavit submitted by or on behalf of a student which contains false, fraudulent, or in complete statements may result in denial of admission, further registration and/or degrees awarded.

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ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS 11 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH LORIDA 1992(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The University may refuse admission to a student whose record Communications, Social Work, and the B A./M.A. Program in shows previous misconduct not in the best interest of citizens of Mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences; all degree the University community programs in the College of Business Administration; al/ degree All students entering the University with fewer than 60 semester programs in the College of Education; all degree programs in the hours of college level academic work are required to earn at least College of Engineering; all degree programs in the College of 9 semester hours during one or more summer terms prior to Nursing and New College The admissions requirements for these graduation (see Summer enrollment requirements) degree programs may be found with other program information in All undergraduate, transfer students admitted to USF must earn appropriate sections of this catalog passing scores on all four sections of the College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) prior to receiving an A.A. or Baccalaureate degree from the University. Transfer students entering USF with fewer than 55 transferable semester hours must take CLAST during the term in which 55 semester hours will be completed Transfer students entering USF with 55 or more transferable semester hours must take CLAST the first term it is offered after initial enrollment. Prior to beginning classes, all new undergraduate students and former students returning are required to participate in an Ori entation/ Academic Advising/Registration program on the USF campus where they will take all or the majority of courses in their first semester at USF. These programs are designed to help new students become acquainted with the University, choose courses, register for classes, and complete all other necessary proce dures New students receive Orientation/ Academic Advising/ Registration information after admission. Students enrolling for Fall Semester (August) at USF in Tampa are encouraged to participate in the summer Orientation/ Academic Advising/ Registration program for new undergraduates and parents The Orientation packet will automatically be mailed to admitted students beginning in April. Former students returning are required to participate in the college advising 19ortion of this program prior to registering for courses . NOTE: Prior to registration for classes which meet on campus all students less than 40 years of age must submit acceptable proof of immunity to rubella to the Student Health Service. Students born after December 31, 1956 must also submit proof of immunity to measles See Immunization Policy Performance in courses taken as a non-
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12 ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-199213 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG REQUIRED TEST SCORE awarding institution receives full regional accreditation. for an 1::1.S.....G.eA 2.9 2 8 2 7 2 6 2 5 2 4 2 3 2 2 2.1 SAI Acr applicant applying from a norHegionally accredited school, the 860 870 880 890 900 930 960 990 1020 20 20 20 21 21 21 22 23 24 2 0 1050 25 c A GED diploma with an overall percentile score of at least 60 for all five tests and a percentile score of at least 50 on each of the five tests and an SAT verbal and quantitative combined score of 900 or an ACT composite score of 21; d Appropriate alternative evidence of academic achievement, ability, motivation and responsibility that indicates potential for successful academic work at USF. 4. A applicant whose native language is not English must present a minimum score of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The TOEFL may be waived on an individual basis when appropriate alterna tive evidence of English language proficiency is presented in writing. If otherwise qualified, applicants who present TOEFL scores between 500 and 550 may be considered for admission with the condition that they must take a specified sequence of English courses. International citizens (nonresident aliens) must also comply with all requirements for admission of international applicants (next page) 5. applicants seeking admission at the fresh man level to a limited access degree program in Engineering must meet additional requirements specified by the program. Early Admission Applicants (Freshmen) The University of South Florida provides an early admission program to meet the needs of highly capable, mature high school students Under the early admission program these students may enter the university as regularly enrolled, students prior to graduation from high school. To be considered for early admission, an applicant must submit an SUS Application for Admis sion, a non-refundable application fee of $20 00, an official high school transcript, SAT or ACT scores, and a TOEFL score if appli cable. The Supplemental Information for Early Admission Form (available from the Office of Admissions in Tampa), !Ind a personal letter outlining reasons for seeking early admission are also quired. While early admission applicants are evaluated on an indi vidual basis, those admitted generally present at least a 3.5 high school grade point average (as computed by USF) and a combined score of at least 1150 on the SAT or a composite score of at least 27 on the ACT. In addition, early admission applicants should be enrolled in a strong curriculum while in h i gh school. Undergraduate Transfer Applicants Applicants with fewer than sixty transferable semester credits are considered lower-level transfers Upper-level transfers are those with 60 or more transferable semester credits The requirements for admission for both categories of transfer students are described below. Regardless of category, grade point averages for of admission will be computed based only on !lrades earned in courses that are acceptable for transfer credit. The University of South Florida accepts transfer credits only from institutions that are accredited by one of the regional accrediting agencies/commissions recognized by USF at the time the credits are earned (See Evaluation of Transfer Credit) All credits earned during the period of time a regionally accredited institution was in a 'can didacy' status for accreditation are considered for transfer credit. Credits earned at an institution that is currently in 'candidacy' status will not be considered for transfer credit unti l such time as the admissions decision will be based on prior work at a regionally accredited institution. The University of South Florida reserves the right to evaluate specific courses and deny transfer credit. USF does not accept from two year institutions transfer credit for courses that are determined to be occupational or vocational in nature Lower-level Transfer Applicants (with fewer than 60 transferable semester credits) To be considered for admission, transfer applicants with fewer than 60 transferable semester credits must submit an SUS Applica tion for Admission, a non-refundable application fee for $20.00, an official transcript from each previous college attended, an official high school transcript, official GED scores if applicable, official SAT or ACT scores, and a TOEFL score if applicable Lower-Level transfer applicants must meet the following mini mum requirements : 1 Be in good standing and eligible to return to the last regionally accredited institution attended as a student; 2. Have an overall'(' average (2.0 on a 4 0 scale) in all college-level courses acceptable for transfer credit to USF (incomplete grades are computed as failures); 3 Satisfy fully 2!l freshman admissions standards as described in the previous section entitled 'Freshman Applicants.' (Meeting freshman admission standards is a critical requirement for under graduate applicants with fewer than 60 transferable credits. Board of Regents rules and policies do not provide for exceptions to these requirements.) ; 4 Complete (with passing grades) two years of the same foreign language in high school or 8 to 10 semester hours of the same foreign language at the post-secondary level (as required by Florida Statute 240 233); 5 Present a minimum score of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) if the applicant's native language is not English. The TOEFL requirement may be waived on an individual basis when appropriate alternative evidence of English language proficiency is presented in writing. If otherwise quali fied, applicants who present TOEFL scores between 500 and 550 may be considered for admission on the condition that they must take a specified sequence of English courses International citizens [non-resident aliens] must also comply with all ments for international applicants. USF also considers applicants who do not fully meet the mini. mum requirements as stated in #1. and #2 above but who have important attributes, special talents, or unique circumstances that may contribute to a representative and diverse student body These undergraduate transfer applicants are considered for admission by a faculty committee on the basis of other appropriate evidence of ability to do successful academic work at USF. These applicants should also submit appropriate alternative evidence of academic achievement, ability, motivation, and respons i bility that supports potential for academic success at USF. Upper-Level Transfer Applicants (with 60 or more transferable semester credits) To be considered for admission, transfer applicants with 60 or more transferable semester credits must submit an SUS Application for Admission, a non-refundable application fee of $20.00, an official transcript from each previous college attended, and a TOEFL score if applicable. Any transfer student with 90 or more semester hours who designates a desire for admission to a limited access undergraduate program must meet the overall admission GPA criterion of that program in order to be admitted to the University. Applicants with Associate of Arts (A.A.) degrees from Florida public institutions will be admitted as juniors into the within curricular, space and fiscal limitations A.A. degree holders seeking admission to quota/limited access degree programs must also meet all requirements speGified by the desired program The admission of Florida community/junior college A.A. transfer stu dents is governed by the Articulation Agreement between state

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ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS 13 UNIVERSiTY OF SOUTH LORIDA 1992(93 UNDERGRADUAlE CATALOG universities and public community colleges in Florida Undergraduate transfer students who have not earned the A.A. degree from a Florida public institution or who have attended another college after receipt of the A.A. must meet the minimum requirements listed below: 1. Be in good standing and eligible to return to the last regionally accredited institution attended as a degree-seeking student 2. Have an overall'(' average (2. 0 on a 4 0 scale) in all courses acceptable for transfer credit to USF (incomplete grades are computed as failures); 3 Complete (with passing grades) two years of the same foreign language in high school or 8 to 10 semester hours of the same foreign. language at a previous college or university (as required by Florida Statute 240 233) Students who entered a Florida publ i c community/junior college prior to August 1, 1989 and maintain continuous enrollment until the time of their USF entry as degree-seeking students may be admitted without the required foreign language study; 4. Meet the minimum grade point average required by the pro gram if entering a quota/limited access program and transfer ring 90 or more semester hours; 5 Present a minimum score of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign (TOEFL) if applicant's native language is not English The TOEFL requirement may be waived on an individual basis when appropriate alternative evidence of English language proficiency is presented in writing. (The Colleges of Business and Engineering normally require the TOEFL score regardless of pr ior educat i onal background and/or degrees earned ) If otherwise qualified, applicants who present TOEFL scores between 500 and 550 may be considered for admission on the condition that they must take a specified sequence of English courses. International citizens [non-resident aliens) must also comply all req uirements for international applicants. USF also considers applicants who do not fully meet the mini mum requirements as stated i n #1. and #2. above but who have important attributes, special talents or unique circumstances that may contribute to a representative and diverse student body. These undergraduate applicants are considered for admission by a faculty committee on the basis of other appropriate evidence of ability to do successful academic work at USF. These applicants should also submit appropriate alternative evidence of academic achievement, abil i ty, motivation and respons i bility that indicates a potential for academic success at USF. Graduate Applicants Graduate applicants should refer to the USF Graduate Catalog International Applicants (non-resident aliens) To be for international applicants (non resident aliens) must submit a USF International Student Applica tion for Admission, a non-refundable applicat i on fee of $20 00 payable in U S dollars, a TOEFL score if applicable, a Statement of Financial Responsibility, undergraduate or graduate admissions test scores as specified for appropriate applicant category, transcripts showing subjects and grades from the first year of secondary work the t i me of and a Visa Clearance Form (if currently in the U.S.). Transcripts in a language other than English must be ac companied by a certified English translation International credentials must be evaluated by an independent evaluation service, with associated costs to be paid by the student. Information about recommended and approved independent evalu ators is avai lable from the Office of Admissions An international applicant (non-resident alien) must meet all ad missi?n requirements for the appropriate applicant category (fresh man, undergraduate transfer graduate) Other minimum require ments are as follows: 1. An international applicant whose native language is not English must present a minimum score of on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). This requirement may be waived if applicant has an .. from a Florida com munity/ Junior college or SUS instrtut1on (The colleges of Engineering and Business normally require the TOEFL score regardless of prior educational background ) If otherwise qual i fied, applicants who present TOEFL scores between 500 and 550 may be consid ered admission with the condition that they must take a spec1f1ed sequence of English courses. 2 Internationa l applicants must be in good standing at the last in stitution attended. 3 International applicants must submit the USF Financial State ment substantiating availability of financial resources sufficient to cover all educational, maintenance, and personal expenses while attend i ng USF, without financial assistance from the University 4 International applicants seeking adm i ssion to limited access undergraduate degree programs must also meet all require ments specified by the program Transient Applicants An undergraduate transient student is one who <;omes to the University from another regionally accredited institution and wishes to take courses at USF for one term only before returning to the parent institution. Transient students may enroll at USF as non degree seeking studen ts (See Non-Degree Seeking Students.) Honors Program Superior students may avail themselves of Honors opportunities at USF. Honors is for. first-time-in-college fresh men This exciting program 1s grounded in the liberal arts tradition and is intended for superior students regardless of intended major. prim arx goal.s of Honors are the development of critical thinking skills, an apprec1at1on of the liberal arts tradition and the of creative, independent thought. Students in this prog .rarr: take eight Honors courses that include : the philosophical inquiry of kn owledge, ethics, interdisclipli nary studies in the sciences social sciences, arts and humanities a student-designed and a Senior Thesis or (see Course Descriptions) University Honors students complete six semester hours of English, s i x semester hours of Mathematics and tou r to eight h ours of foreign language Honors students' may sat!sfy English and Math requirements through AP or CLEP. University students satisfy the General Distribution Require ment by the core Honors courses and the English, math and foreign language requirement. Enrolling in University Honors does not increase academic work-load or the number of credits needed to graduate. P otential University Honors students are actively recruited, but any who feels. that he/she may be qualified may request adm1ss1on. Students typically have 3.50 high school GPAs and 1200 SAT or 28 ACT scores Some scholarships are available for outstanding University Honors students Departme ntal Honors Programs are available in selected depart work for superior students maJOring 1n their d1sc.1plines. Requirements vary according to depart rr:ent, b 1Jt re. quire the c?mplet i on of a Thesis or Project Admis sion to. University Ho!'ors rs determined by the University Honors Comm i ttee and the Director of Honors; admission to Departmental Honors is determined by the individual department. Students who satisfactorily complete University Honors and graduate with at least an overall GPA of 3 30 and a USF GPA of 3 30 shall be identified as Honors Graduates at Commencement as well as on their diplomas and transcripts Premedical Honors The USF College of Medicine i s particularly interested in admit ting students who have participated in the University Honors Students may follow a special program which allows for completion of a B A degree and an M D degree in seven years or they plan on an eight year program, o_l:itaining a B.A. or B.S. degree 1n four years and an M D degree in four years. Students in the seven year program complete all medical school adm ission requirements in the first two years and take the Medical College Admission Test in the spring of the second year. In the second semester of the junior year, qualified students enroll in the Biochem i stry course at the College of Medicine while completing

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14 ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1!192(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG additional undergraduate courses. During the fourth year students respective guidance counselor), ind i viduals desirous of taking courses are enrolled full time in the College of Medicine and, upon complefor self enrichment, and senior citizens are examples of those t i on of that year receive a B.A. degree in Interdisciplinary Natural eligible to utilize this enrollment method Former USF Sciences. Students are then accepted into the second year of study seeking students may only enroll as non-degree seeking students if in the College of Medicine Students in the eight year program purthey have completed their previous degree program or earned an sue a degree in the area of their interest. Eight year students equivalent degree at another institution. Should the latter be the complete all medical school admission in the first case, an official transcript (reflecting the degree) from that instituthree years and take the Medical College Admission Test in the fall tion must be sent to the USF Registrar's Office (Attention: Past or spring of the junior year. Application to medical school is made Records Area) prior to registration during the senior year. Individuals enrolling as non-degree-seeking students who plan University Honors students are provided special opportunities to to make formal application to the University may not apply more obtain research and/or clinical experience with College of Medicine than 14 semester hours toward an undergraduate degree faculty.Interested students should consult with the Director of UniApplicants denied admission to the University of South Florida as versity Honors degree-seeking undergraduates may not enroll as non-degreeOther General Information Evening Courses The admission requirements and achievement levels in the day and evening courses are the same. Any student accepted to the University may enroll in any appropriate courses offered in the evening Opportunities for Accelerated Progress Toward Undergraduate Degrees The University of South Florida provides several options by which students may accelerate their progress toward complet i ng the bac calaureate degree These options recogn ize knowledge which has been acquired prior to or during attendance at USF and provide the opportunity to earn University credit Options which may be used include the following : 1 Recognition of satisfactory performance on tests offered through the College Level Examination Program (see CLEP). 2 Recognit i on of satisfactory performance on tests offered through Advanced Placement Programs of the College Entrance Exami nation Board (see Advanced Placement Credit Programs) 3 Dual enrollment as a non-degree seeking student at USF prior to graduation from high school or a community college (see Dual Enrollment (High School), and USF Florida Public Community College Dual Enrollment) 4. Early admission for high school students (see Early Admission Freshmen) 5 Open University (O U ) courses by television Credits may be earned through a comb i nation of the above options. Students should contact their college advisers for further information concerning the application of this credit toward their degree requirements Internal devices (such as auditions, portfolio reviews, and place ment tests) utilized in the various departments for the sole purpose of determin i ng a student's most appropriate area, level, or section placement in a program of study are not to be construed as examining mechanisms for the granting of credit. Florida Community College System High school graduates planning to start their college educat i on at a Florida community college should confer with the community college counselor and ask that their academic program be planned with the assistance of the Community College Counseling Manual which is available in all counseling offices This manual, prepared and distributed by the USF Office of Community College Relations, explicitly describes the undergraduate program requirements that should be followed to ensure maximum ease of transfer into the students' upper-level programs on a par with their native USF counterparts Non-Degree-Seeking Student Non-degree-seeking student enrollment is on a space available basis and has been established for those individuals who, while not desirous of earning a degree, would like to enroll i n all levels of university courses Teachers need i ng to take courses for certifica tion purposes, high school students (with the permission of their seeking students Performance in courses taken in this category will not qualify an applicant for admission as a degree-seeking student. A non-Oegree-seeking student who has been dismissed from USF is not eligible for admission to USF as a degree-seek i ng student at the undergraduate level. If extenuating circumstances contrib uted to the academic dismissal and the student meets other admissions requirements, a request for waiver of this rule may be submitted to the Faculty Committee on Student Admissions This rule does not apply to a student who has earned a degree from a regionally accredited institut i on subsequent to academic dismissal. Non-degree-seek ing students are subject to the same academic policies as undergraduate degree-seeking students and must ad here to deadline dates published in the University Class Schedule Non-degree-seeking students are not elig i ble to receive University honors or participate in the USF/Florida Public Community College cross registration program Non-Oegree seeking students also are not eligible to live in University housing nor to receive financial aid Non-degree-seeking students are subject to the academic probation and dismissal policy listed in this catalog. Non-degree-seeking students who are academically dismissed from the University may appeal to the Academic Regulations Committee (ARC) through the ARC representative for Undergraduate Studies/Center for Aca. demic Advising to return Potential non-degree-seeking students should also refer to the section of the catalog of the college(s) offering the course(s) of interest to them to determine whether any special college requirements exist which must be met prior to enroll ing. NOTE : Prior to registration for classes which meet on campus, all students less than 40 years of age must submit acceptable proof of immunity to rubella to the Student Health Service Students born after December 31, 1956 must also submit proof of immunity .to measles See Immunization Policy. *Senior Citizen Tuition Waiver Florida residents who are 60 years of age or older by the first day of a respective semester/term may enroll in certain undergraduate or graduate courses on a space-available basis, without paying tuition Academic cred i t is not awarded examinations are not requ i red and grades are not given. An orientation-registration session is held at the beginning of each semester for the Senior Citizen Tuition Waiver program. Information, registration forms and advising for senior citizens are available at these sessions or by contact i ng the Division of Lifelong Learning for further details See Florida residency requirements in this catalog Dual Enrollment (High School) Dual enrollment in USF classes is open to academically qualified students currently enrolled in high school who are recommended by the i r guidance counselor or principal. (An applicant should secure the Dual Enrollment Recommendation Form from the Office of Admissions in Tampa ) High school students seeking dual enroll ment status are preadvised by and obtain the Non-Degree Seeking Registration Form from the Center for Academic Advising in the Undergraduate Studies Office on the Tampa Campus. Dual enrollees register as non-Oegree-seeking students and are admitted to USF classes on a space-available basis during the first week of every semester Up to 14 semester hours of college credits earned at USF

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ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS 15 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH LORIDA 1!191/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG through dual enrollment may be applied toward a student's USF undergraduate degree upon admission and enrollment as a degreeseeking student after high school graduation. .. NOTE: Prior to registration for classes which meet on campus, all students less than 40 years of age must submit acceptable proof of immunity to rubella to the Student Health Service. Students born after December 31, 1956 must also submit proof of immunity to measles. See Immunization Policy. Readmission (Former Students Returning) A former student returning (FSR) is any degree-seeking under graduate student who has not earned his/her degree, who has not been enrolled at USF in any of the last three terms, and who wishes to re-enroll in the University. Former students returning must be readmitted to the University. In order to be considered for readmis sion, a former student should file a new Application for Admission with the Office of Admissions by the deadline indicated in the Academic Calendar for the term of requested reentry. A new application fee is not required. (Former College of Education majors must contact the College of Education Advising Office for additional readmission requirements ) To be readmitted, a student must meet the following require ments: 1. Be eligible to return to the University of South Florida; 2. Be in good standing and eligible to return to the last institution attended as a degree-seeking student; and 3. Have achieved a grade-point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale on all college-level academic courses attempted at institution(s) attended since last enrolled at USF. Students who have attended one or more institutions since their last enrollment must request official transcripts of all work at tempted at the other institution(s) be sent to the USF Office of Admissions. Acceptability of transfer credits toward completion of USF programs will be determined by the college of the students major. Prior to registering for classes, former students returning who have been readmitted are required to participate in an academic advising program on the USF campus where they will take all or the majority of their courses. Former students returning will receive aca demic advising information after readmission. Transient students and non-Oegree-seeking students are not considered former students returning. These students who wish to enter as degree-seeking students must file an application with the Office of Admissions prior to the deadline listed in the Academic Calendar for the requested term of entry Former USF students who have earned the baccalaureate degree at USF or at another institution and who now wish to return to USF to earn another undergraduate degree must file an Undergraduate Application for Admission with the Office of Admissions. No application fee is required A student may not work on a second undergraduate degree if he/she has been accepted into a graduate program. NOTE: Prior to registration for classes which meet on campus, all students less than 40 years of age must submit acceptable proof of immunity to rubella to the Student Health Service. Students born after December 31, 1956 must also submit proof of immu nity to measles. See Immunization Policy. Evaluation of Transfer Credit 1. The receipt and evaluation of transfer credit is the responsibil ity of the Office of Admissions The Office of Admissions will evaluate the acceptability of total credits transferable to the University. The college of the student's major will assign equivalent courses in determining which courses are applicable toward a specific degree at the University. In some instances, exact course equivalents will also be determined by other colleges which offer the same or similar courses as part of their programs of study. Transfer students should be prepared with personal copies of their transcripts of all past course work to discuss advisement and placement with the appropriate aca demic adviser and should contact the college of their major soon after registration so that an official evaluation may be completed 2 : University of South Florida will accept credits only from those in stitutions accredited by one of the regional accrediting agen cies/ commissions* at the time the credits are earned. (See below for agencies recognized by USF). All credits earned the period of time a regionally accredited institution was in a candidacy" status for accreditation are considered for transfer credit. Credits earned at an institution that is currently in "candidacy" status will not be considered for transfer credit until such time as the awarding institution receives full accredi tation. 3. USF reserves the right to deny credit for specific courses. USF does not accept from two year institutions transfer credit for courses that are determined to be occupational or vocational in nature. 4. Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree holders from Florida public ac credited institutions will be considered as having met USF General Distribution requirements and are automatically awarded 60 semester hours of credit A course by course transfer credit evaluation will be done for all out-of-state and private in-state A .A. degree holders. 5. Effective .Fall Quarter 1976, all courses from a Florida Commu nity College/University bearing the same State Common Course prefix and last three numbers as a USF course, are automatically transferred and transfer students may not be required to repeat these courses, unless a college age-of-record policy is involved. Excluded are graduate courses, studio courses in art, intern ships, practicums, and performing arts courses dance, acting, vocal, and instrumental music. 6 At least 60 semester hours must be earned from a baccalaure ate-granting institution regardless of credit hours transferred from a community/junior college unless the student has re ceived prior approval for waiver of this policy from the college of his or her intended major This policy does not affect approved articulated programs based on the A.S. degree. For information regarding such programs consult the Office of Community College Relations. 7 Credit will not be awarded for GED tests. 8. Service school courses will be evaluated with reference to the recommendation of the American Council of Education when official credentials have been presented. Such recommenda tion, however, is not binding upon the University. 9. The maximum credit for ROTC and military science courses will vary with each college Students must confer with his/her college adviser to determine the acceptability for his/her major. This was effective Fall Quarter, 1975 ROTC and military science taken prior to Fall, 1975, are not acceptable for transfer credit. 10. A maximum of 45 semester hours of College Level Examination Program (subject and general examinations) credits can be ac cepted for transfer credit. 11. A maximum of 30 semester hours of extension, correspon dence, military service education credits can be applied toward a degree. 12. Grades earned in transferred courses are not computed in the student's USF grade point average except for the purfoses of admission to limited access programs, the awarding o Honors at Graduation, and class ranking of baccalaureate students. 13. International credentials must be evaluated by an independent evaluation service, with associated costs to be paid by the student. 14. A USF degree-seeking student must obtain prior written approval from the college of the student's major in order for courses taken at other regionally-accredited institu tions to be applied to the USF degree prooram. Accrediting AgencieS/Commissions: New England Association of and Colleges, Commis sion on Institutions of Higher Middle States Association of Colleges and SKondary Schools. Commission on Higher Education; North Central Association of Colleges and Schools; Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges; Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges; Western Association of Schools and Colleges, Accrediting Commission f0< Colleges and Accrediting Commission f0< Junior Colleges. Articulation Agreement An articulation agreement, in effect since April 13, 1971 and later adopted by the legislature in statute form as Florida law, governs an effective and orderly transfer of Florida community college students into the State University System.

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16 ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1'92a3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The agreement defines and establishes the associate in arts 5. As participants in the statewide Course Numbering System, degree from a Florida public community/junior college as the basis receiving institutions must accept all courses taken at the trans.for all articulation rights. Among these guarantees, the following fer institution if the same course with the same number is are central to the transfer process: offered at the receiving institution. Program Requirements Admission into the State University System 6 The university catalog in effect the year the AA degree student 1 AA graduates will be granted admission to a university within the first enrolled at the community college will remain in effect for State University System, but not necessarily to the university or the student's entire program, provided the student maintains program of choice. continuous enrollment as defined in that catalog. 2 AA graduates will have the same opportunity to enroll in a 7 Once a student has completed the general education core and university limited access program as the native university stu-this fact is noted on the transcript, regardless of whether or not dent. an AA degree is awarded, no other state university or commu-Transfer of Credit nity college to which the student may transfer can require 3 Upon transferring to a state university, AA graduates will be additional courses to the general education core. awarded at least 60 credit hours towards the baccalaureate degree, exclusive of occupational courses and basic required physical education courses. 4 Credits that are part of the AA degree earned through articu lated acceleration mechanisms, such as dual enrollment, Inter national Baccalaureate, early admission, advanced placement and credit by exam, will be transferable to the state university Included in these transfer guarantees is the right of appeal. Students may appeal to the university and to the statewide Articu lation Coordinating Committee Students who have questions or want more information about the articulation agreement should contact the Office of Community College Relations.

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FINANCIAL INFORMATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Florida Residency For Tuition Purposes This notice summarizes the provisions of 240 1201 Florida Statutes, BOR rule 6C-7.05 and University Policy/Procedure con cerning Florida Residency for tuition purposes In determining residency classification, students fall into one of two categories. They are either independent students (students not claimed on parent's or legal guardian's federal income tax statement or whose parents do not provide 50% or more of their support) or dependent students (students, regardless of age, who are claimed as dependents by parent or legal guardian on federal income tax statement or whose parents provide 50% or more of their support) The law basically requires that a U S citizen/permanent resident alien/independent student's or a dependent student's parent/legal guardian has established and maintained a LEGAL Florida residence for at least twelve (12) months before the first day of classes of the term for which Florida status is sought The University of South Florida is required to obtain documenta tion of 12 months' legal residence before a student is classified as a Florida resident for tuition purposes A student is required to request Florida residency in writing and submit supporting docu ments no later than the fifth day of classes in the term for which classification is sought. The following is acceptable, nonconclusive evidence of the es tablishment of a legal residence in Florida At least one such document must be dated/issued at least 1 2 months before the first day of classes of the term for which Flor i da resi dency is sought. 1. Proof of purchase of permanent home in Florida. 2. Declaration of Domicile 3 Florida's driver s license 4 Florida voter's registration 5 Florida vehicle registration 6 Florida title. 7 Professional/occupational license in Florida 8 Florida incorporation or other evidence of legal residence in Florida. 9 Full-time, non-temporary employment in Florida. PLEASE NOTE: Rent receipts, leases, employment records, tax returns, school/college records are NOT evidence of establishing a legal Florida residence Students who are dependent on out-Of state parents or who come to Florida for educational purposes are generally ineligible for reclassification to Florida status In rare cases, the law allows some students (e. g military, public school teachers, etc ) who do not meet the basic requirements to be classified as Florida residents for tuition purposes For more in formation about exceptional categories, contact the Admissions Office, the Office of the Registrar, or the Office of the General Counsel. Fees The levels of the Activity and Service Fee, the Health Fee, and the Athletic fee are determined on each campus by a student fee committee appointed by the President of the University and the Student Government President The committee includes USF faculty and students with the majority of the committee being students The fees may be reviewed on a yearly basis. The following fee schedule applies to all University of South Florida students with the exception of those in the Bachelor of In dependent Studies, External Degree Program. For information on the BIS Program fees see paragraph 2b below Registration fees are assessed in accordance with Board of Regent rules. All fees are subject to change without prior notice. Th University will make every effort to advertise any such changes if they occur. 1 Initial Application Fee (Each application -not refundable) $20 00 2 Registration and Tuition Fee Students will rece ive a schedule and fee statement at the time they register and each time they drop or add during the drop/add period This fee statement must be presented when payment is made. The student is responsible for paying fees in full by the appro p r iate due date stated in the particular semester's "Schedule of Classes. Failure to do so will result in cancellation of the student's registration Fees paid by mail must be postmarked on or before the fifth day of classes. Checks are payable to USF and must be submitted along with the top portion of the final schedule/fee statement. To avoid a $50 00 late payment fee, all fees must be paid or postmarked by the fifth day of classes. A student whose registra tion has been cancelled may request registration reinstatement through the fourth week of classes for tFie academic term. Upon approval for reinstatement, all fees and other debts owed to the University must be paid in full by cash, money order, or cashier's check before reinstatement will be affected a 1991/92 Fee Structure Fees are assessed by course level, not student classification Campus/Course Level Tampa Campus : 0001-4999 Undergraduate 5000-0ver Graduate Resident Non-Resident,. $52 .92/hr $90.54/hr Tampa OU and Alt. Calendar Courses: 0001-4999 Undergraduate $48 .06/hr 5000-0ver Graduate $85 .68/hr St Petersburg Campus : 0001-4999 Undergraduate 5000-0ver Gradua t e $46 .57/hr $84 .19/hr $190 .87/hr $292.95/hr $186.01/hr $288 .09/hr $184.52/hr $286 .60/hr St. Petersburg OU and Alt. Calendar Courses: 0001-4999 Undergraduate $46 07 /hr S 184.02/hr 5000.Qver Graduate $83 .69/hr $286 1 O/hr Sarasota Campus : 0001-4999 Undergraduate 5000-0ver Graduate $46 .47/hr $84.09/hr $184.42/hr $286.50/hr Sarasota : OU and Alt. Calendar Courses/Summer : 0001-4999 Undergraduate $45 47 /hr S 183 .42/hr 5000.Qver $83 .09/hr $285.50/hr Lakeland Campus and Alt. Calendar Courses: 0001-4999 Undergraduate $44.17 /hr S 182 .12/hr 5000.Qver Graduate $81. 79/hr $284.20/hr Fort Myers Campus and Alt 0001-4999 Undergraduate 5000-0ver Graduate *See "Resident Status." above NOTE: Calendar Courses: $45 17 /hr S 183 .12/hr $82 .79/hr $285.20/hr (1) There is no ceiling (maximum) on the amount which a student may be assessed for a single semester. (2) A lab fee of $8 .00 to S 15 .00 is charged on certain courses. Please consult your class schedule to locate the courses that require the fee and the amount of fee that applies to the course (3) Students who only register for a c0-0p assignment must pax a minimum of one ( 1) hour at the level of the c0-0p assignment. (4) Cashier's Office Hours Regular Registration -See regu lar registration dates and times in "Schedule of Classes. Remainder of Semester Monday through Friday, 9:00 a m through 3:00 p .m. (5) Registration fee payment should be mailed to: Division of Finance and Accounting University of South Florida ADM 147 4202 Fowler Avenue Tampa, Florida 33620

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18 FINANCIAL INFORMATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1991(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG (6) l.D. Card Validation Hours Regular Registration See 6. ll'\tern Certificate of Participation regular registration dates and times in "Schedule of Students who present Intern Certificates for payment of their Classes" for appropriate semester. Remainder of Se mes-registration fees will have to pay an estimated $4. 76 per hour ter Monday through Friday, Cashier's Office, ADM 131, charge for all credit hours taken during the semester. By paying 9:00 a.m. through 3:00 p.m.; Cash Collections, ADM the estimated $4. 76 per credit hour charge and presenting an 102, 3 : 00 p.m through 5:00 p.m ; Information Desk, .Intern Certificate, a student will be allowed to register for an unUniversity Center, 5:00 p .m. through 12:00 a .m. limited number of credit hours during a single semester. These b. Estimated Bachelor of Independent Studies Fees students will not be charged a student health fee Resident Non-Resident 7. Staff/State Employee Waivers $20 .00 $20 .00 Career Service employees of any State agency wishing to Application Fee 1st Study Area Independent Study Seminar 2nd Study Area Independent Study Seminar 3rd Study Area Independent Study Seminar 4th or Inter area Study Total* 720 .90 2,790.15 720 90 2,790 15 720 90 2,790 15 720 .90 2,790 15 720.90 2,790 15 720 90 2.790.15 1.441 80 5,580 .30 $5,767.20 $22,321.20 'Fees do not include books. on
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FINANCIAL INFORMATION 19 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA c 1991/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG a. 100% of registration fees and tuition will be refunded when a Other short term loans, not contingent on financial aid, are student withdraws or drops a course due to circumstances deavailable through the Office of Student Financial Services (ADM termined by the University to be exceptional and beyond the 172). These loans are for fees as well as emergencies control of the student, including but not limited to: When a student experiences a financial hardship that makes it ( 1) Illness of a student of such severity or duration, as confirmed impossible to make full payment of assessed registration and tuition in writing by a physician, to preclude completion of the fees by the payment deadline, the student may request approval to course(s), pay the fees in installmfi!nts Approval of this request will require the (2) Death of the student or death in the immediate family payment of at least 50% of the fee liability and the execution of a (parent, spouse, or sibling) as confirmed by documentation promissory note for the remaining fee liability by the end of the indicating the student's relationship to the deceased, drop/add period. The remaining fees shall be paid no later than the (3) Involuntary call to active military duty, beginning of the second half of the academic term/semester. (4) A situation in which the university is in error as confirmed in Students may request approval to pay fees in installments in the writing by an appropriate University official, Cashier's Office (ADM 147) (5) Other documented exceptional circumstances beyond the control of the student which precluded completion of the course(s) accompanied by letter of explanation and appropri ate documentation. b. Students who receive financial aid and subsequently change their enrollment status which results in a refund in accordance with this subsection, may have all or a portion of their refund returned to the University's financial aid programs in accordance with the Financial Aid Policy on Refunds and Repayments Payment of Accounts Due the University Charges against students for loss or breakage of University equipment, books, fines and other charges are due immediately Delinquent accounts may be considered sufficient cause for cancel lation of registration University regulations prohibit registration, or release of transcript, diploma, or grades for any student whose account with the University is delinquent. Payments should be brought into the Cashier's Office in the Administration Building or mailed to Finance and Accounting, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 by the appropriate deadline Financial Aid The University of South Florida makes every effort to ensure that no qualified student is denied access to an education due to inade quate funds There are many financial aid programs, administered or coordinated by the Office of Financial Aid, which provide funds to qualified students. Financial aid counselors are available to answer questions, provide information and assist students in the application process Financial aid is available in the form of scholarships, grants, part time employment, and low interest loans. Temporary deferments of registration fees, and short-term, interest free loans are available to students whose aid is delayed in delivery In addition to providing information and applications for pro grams directly administered by the University, the Office of Financial Aid maintains a Scholarship Library with information and resource materials about other sources of financial aid Students may come to the office and use these resources during regular office hours Financial aid personnel are available to provide assistance. Students apply for most financial aid by submitting the Family Financial Statement (FFS). Since many programs are funded on a limited basis, it is important to apply early Application packets are available in early December each year, for the upcoming academic year, which begins in August. Complete information about financial aid is provided in the Financial Aid Bulletin which is in the packet. Packets are available by contacting the Office of Financial Aid. Students whose financial aid is delayed may qualify for tempo rary deferment of their registration fees Deferment cards are mailed to qualifying students prior to the start of each semester. Cards must be signed and returned no later than the fifth day of classes in order to activate the deferment. Financial Aid Short Term (FAST) Loans are available for books/ supplies to students who have submitted deferment cards. Loans are also available, for both fees and books, to those who have provided complete application information, but have not received an award decision. These loans are available through the fifth day of classes each semester. Academic Scholarships In addition to scholarships offered through the Office of Financial Aid, the University has a number of academic scholarships which recognize excellence. These include, but are not limited to: Black Scholar Awards for entering black freshmen or graduates of Florida community/junior colleges; Freshman Scholar Awards; Alumni Schol arships for new freshmen and undergraduate transfers; Commu nity College Scholarships for graduates of Florida community/junior colleges; Out-of-State Fee Waivers and a number of scholarships available through the individual colleges of the University. Each year, qualified National Merit finalists are awarded four year merit scholarships sponsored by the University of South Florida through the National Merit Corporation. All National Merit finalists, who name USF as the institution of their first choice, are guaranteed a National Merit Scholarship. Information about eligibility requirements, selection criteria and the application process for the various scholarships can be found in the Scholarship Handbook, available from the Office of Financial Aid. A scholarship coordinator is available to answer questions or refer you to the appropriate source. Vehicle Registration and Fees Motor Vehicles Students may use properly registered motor vehicles on any Uni versity campus Parking facilities are provided for resident and commuter students All motor vehicles, motorcycles, and bicycles used on campus must be registered with the campus Parking S .ervices Department, Division of Public Safety This applies to full time or part-time, day or evening students. To register a vehicle a valid staff, student, or employee identification card (which forms the basis for the type of tag to be issued) will be required State vehicle registration, indicating owner of vehicle, must be shown to the clerk of the Parking Services Department on A booklet entitled "USF Traffic Regulations will be issued to each student upon registering a motor vehicle Current registration fees are published annually in the USF Traffic and Parking Regulations Yearly fees for students registering after the first semester will be adjusted proportionally Students may park in remote areas for a lesser fee. All annual decals expire on August 31 of the academic year. Bicycles There is no fee for registering bicycles A booklet entitled "USF Bicycle Traffic and Parking Regulations will be issued to each student registering a bicycle. Disabled All staff/students with physical disabilities which impede walk ing may apply to the Parking Services Department of the local campus for a disabled hangtag Persons will receive vehicle registra tion hangtags free of charge if they are wheelchair-bound, legally blind, hold a current State of Florida Disabled Parking Permit, or have military disability of 50% or greater with V.A. certificate or letter Other disabled registrants will pay the regular fee. Wheel chair-bound registrants are entitled to an exclusively numbered disabled parking space. Other disabled registrants shall share spaces marked Disabled.

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20 FINANCIAL INFORMATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1'92a3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Evening Students Vehicle registration requirements and fees apply to evening students as well as day students. Special Services Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Ben.tits The University of South Florida is approved for the education of veterans, eligible dependents, members of the selected reserve, and active-duty personnel who are eligible for benefits under public laws now in effect All degree programs currently offered at USF are approved by the State Approving Agency Students who may be eligible for benefits are urged to contact Veterans Services for information, procedures, and forms as early as possible. To initiate, change, or renew benefits at USF, a request must be submitted through that office To be eligible for full-time VA benefits at USF, undergraduates and non-degree seeking (special) students must enroll for 12 or more semester hours, and degree seeking graduate students must enroll for 9 or more semester hours each normal academic semes-, ter VA regulations require that students take only courses that are applicable to their degree program or other approved program, attend classes, and make satisfactory progress toward their degree. There are many other VA rules and regulations of which students should be aware, including those regarding the following : Double Major, Double Degree, Major/Minor programs the Bachelor of Independent Study Degree program, students not admitted to specific college majors Cooperative Education program cross enrollment at two institutions, non-degree seeking (special) student enrollment courses/programs offe r ed off campus, graduate stu dent enrolled in undergraduate courses independent study courses, open circuit television courses, courses taken by audit (no benefits), and non-punitive ("W.' "U/IU.' "I" unless removed within a calendar year) It IS the student's responsibility to inquire concern ing all VA rules and regulations and to report any change in status which affects his/her benefits Additionally VA benefits will be terminated for students who are d ismissed for academic or discipli nary reasons and can only be reinstated after counseling and approval by the VA Veterans with a service
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STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS UNIVERSfTY OF SOUTH FLORIDA1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The University of South Florida is committed to the concept of total student development intellectual, social, physical, emotional and moral. The curricular, ccxurricular, and extracurricular pro grams of the University are designed to achieve thi s end and are presented to offer USF students a wide variety of beliefs opinions and ideas in an atmosphere of openness where all v i ews may be aired The programs and activities developed and implemented by the Student Affairs staff at the University of South Florida are intended to improve the quality of life at the Uni vers ity and to meet the University s goal of total student development. The programs of the University are presented according to the guidelines established by the Florida Board of Regents (Section 6-C, Administrative Code of Florida) Students who attend the University of South Florida are adm i t ted to the University under guidelines as well as policies and proce dures of the University. University officials, and in particular the V ice President for Student Affairs and h i s staff, are charged w ith interpreting the policies of the Board of Regents to students their families and others in the University community Division of Student Affairs The Vice President for Student Affairs and the Student Affa irs staff strive to provide a campus environment which is conduc ive to learning and which enhances the quality of life for the students at the University. New students and prospective students receive assis tance in gaining information about the University before they arrive on campus during the adm i ssion process The Student Affairs staff also offers services to students to help them cope more effectively with the many facets of college life which can affect students academic work: financial aid, health service, individual and/or group counseling, alcohol/drug education, career planning, book store, procedures for redressing grievances, standards for students' conduct, due process in the event of disciplinary action, and advice and/or assistance in time of trouble A variety of programs and activities are offered by the Student Affairs staff to provide students opportunit ies to become involved in campus life outs i de the class room: orientation for new students, residence halls student organi zations and Univers i ty Center programs and act i vities, student government, student publications, intramural and recreational sports, student health education/wellness programs and events of special interest. The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs is respons i ble for notifying all involved parties in the event of the death of a student. Standards and Discipline Just as the University maintains high standards of academ i c per formance, the members of the University community support h i gh standards of individual conduct and human relations for one's own conduct and respect for the rights of others are essential conditions for the academ i c and personal freedom within the University community Self-Oiscipline and sensitiv i ty to the rights and interests of others are the principal elements of University discipline The Uni versity reserves the right to deny admission or refuse enrollment to students whose actions are contrary to the purposes of the Univer sity or impair the welfare or freedom of other members of the University community. Disciplinary procedures are followed when a student fails to ex ercise his/her responsibility in an acceptable manner or commits an offense as outlined in the student handbook The University discipli nary procedures afford students the opportunity to participate in discussions of the matter and to present information i n one's own behalf, to seek counsel in one's own best interest and the right of appeal. Students are entitled to participate in the development of standards of conduct supporting the i r interests in the purpose of the University. The University discipline procedures are described in the student handbook Students have often asked for advice on standards of dress and personal appearance The University does not have a formal dress code but campus attire is expected to be appropriate for the activity in which the individual is engaged. Student Government Student Government is made up of three branches : the Execu tive {President, Vice President Cabin'et officers and agencies), Legislative {Student Senate) and Judiciary (Student Supreme Court) in which membership is open to any registered student. Student wide elections occur in April each year Student Government represents all student interests in programs, plans, policies, and procedures of the University and secures student representation to Uni versity governance The SG office oversees the Activity and Service Fee Fund, which is allocated to student organizations and supports several services which SG offers such as S A .F.E. Team, Computer Services, free legal advice, off-campus housing assis tance, Soberride, health and accident insurance, and others. Stu dent Government will assist students with any type of grievance by acting as a l i aison between students and University admin i stration. To find out more information, please contact the Student Govern ment Office in the Uni versity Center, room 203 or call 974-2401 Grievance Procedure In order to assure students the r ight to red ress of grievances, the Office of Student Affairs is responsible for a grievance procedure involving non-academic matters. Any student may file a question, complaint, or statement of grievance in the Office of Student Affairs, in person or in writing A course of action or other answer will be given by a member of the staff of the Office of Student Affairs, withi n the week if possible For academic grievances, the student should see the college dean in which the cause for the grievance occurred Other Campuses Student Affairs offices are also maintained at the St. Petersburg, Fort Myers, Sarasota, and Lakeland campuses For information about the services and programs provided for these students see Academic Programs of USF Regional Campuses Student Health Services The Student Health Service on the Tampa Campus is located adjacent to the Univers i ty Center Bilding The phone number is: 974-2331 The hours are Monday-Friday 8 a m to 5 : 30 p.m when classes are in session. The services offered by Student Health Service to the students are : Walk -In Clinic Dermatology Clinic Referrals Medical Clinic Clinical Laboratory Gynecology Clinic Antigen Clinic Immunization Clinic Health Education Physical Examination Clinic Appointments are not needed in most cases; care is handled on a walk-in basis. A current validated student ID card i s required All records at the Student Health Services are kept strictly confidential. The Student Health Service maintains a day infirmary only There are no dental services available on campus The Health Service does not have x-ray facilities but will assist students in scheduling x-rays at a nearby x ray facility at student's expense The Health Educator offers special programming, informational bulletins and pamphlets as well as group and individual sessions on health related topics Call 974-4936. Psychiatric counseling is funded by the Health Service and avail able at the Counseling Center for Human Development located in SVC 2124 Their phone number is: 974-2831 The cost of most routine medical care is covered by the health fee. Additional charges for the specialty clinics, prescribed medica t i ons, laborator)' tests and other types of services are the student's responsibility A schedule of charges is available for review. A Student Health and Accident Insurance Policy is negotiated by Student Government and is available for a nominal fee. All regis tered students receive insurance information by mail. Students may also pick up information on insurance and an application form from the Student Government Office, CTR 203. It is strongly recommend that all students be covered by health insurance

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I 22 STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1'91/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG SUS Immunization Requirement As of Fall Semester, 1986, as a prerequisite to registration, the State University System requires all students UNDER THE AGE OF 40 to present documented proof of IMMUNITY against RUBELLA (German Measles) In addition, those students born after 1956 are required to present documented proof of IMMUNITY against MEASLES (Rubeola). According to the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services, acceptable proof of immunity is as follows: MEASLES: Students are considered immune to Measles (Rubeola) only if they have documentation as follows : 1 Medical documentation of TWO (2) DOSES received at least 30 days apart of live Measles (Rubeola) vaccine received at 12 months of age or older and administered in 1968 or later or, 2 Copy of laboratory serologic proof of Rubeola immune status (Rubeola Titer) or, 3 A written statement by a physician on his stationery which specifies the date seen and states that the person has had an illness characterized by a generalized rash lasting three (3) or more days, a fever of 10 1 degrees Fahrenheit or greater, a cough, AND conjunctivitis, and, in the physician's opinion is diagnosed to have had the 10 day measles (Rubeola) RUBELLA: As of Fall, 1990, students can be considered immune to Rubella only if they have documentation as follows : 1. Medical documentation (evidence) of the live Rubella (German Measles) vaccination received at 12 months of age or older and administered in 1969 or later or, 2. Copy of laboratory serologic proof of Rubella immune status (Rubella Titer). PLEASE NOTE: ALL FEMALES SHOULD BE AWARETHAT THEY SHOULD NOT BE VACCINATED IF THERE IS ANY POSSIBILITY OF PREGNANCY. Temporary Medical exemptions must be submitted by the attend ing physician and must include reason for exemption and duration of exemption. -For religious exemptions contact, Troy Collier 974-2151 -For off-<:ampus term exemptions, contact Registrar 974-2000 VACCINATIONS AND BLOOD TITERS AVAILABLE AT STUDENT HEAL TH SERVICES. USF Student Health Services, 4202 East Fowler Avenue, SHS 100, Tampa, FL 33620-6750, (813) 974-2331, FAX {813) 974-5888 International Student Services The University welcomes qualified students from other countries to the campus community. This international exchange lends to the enrichment of life, intellectual development, research and under standing, and exposes students, faculty and staff to cultural and national differences in outlook, experience and ideas. The International Student Center, located in the University Center, meets the special needs of international students, and assists each student in achieving his or her educational objectives The staff is available to counsel students on immigration as well as the financial, social, personal and academic aspects of student life As a means of orienting international students to American family life, an active American Family Program is maintained An informal English Conversation Program is available for international stu dents, the spouse, children and other family members or friends. Also, in cooperation with the lntercultural Organization, varied programs are provided to enable the total student body to partici pate more fully in the international dimension of the Uni versity. All non-immigrant degree-seeking international students on all USF campuses, including New College, must demonstrate that they have adequate health insurance coverage for illness and injuries in the United States Services for Students with Disabilities The University of South Florida has facilities for persons with disabilities and encourages their enrollment in the University Due to the mild climate, relatively flat terrain, modern architecture and recent modifications many persons with significant disabilities have been able to function independently and successfully in the Univer sity environment. All academic programs, campus organizations and activities are open to students who are disabled The University attempts to integrate students who are disabled into the University as <;ompletely as possible The Office of Academic Services for Students with Disabilities provides assistance to eligible university students to allow full par ticipation in all academic courses and activities Services such as readers and notetakers and adaptive equipment are prqvided through this office Students are encouraged to contact the office prior to registering for classes to make arrangements for the planning of services Residence Hall Livina The residence hall program at the University oT South Florida is an integral part of the total educational experience offered to USF students Within this residential env i ronment, students become closely involved with the university community through ongoing op portunities for intellectual, social, recreational, emotional, and vocational growth. Students from all over the United States and the world establish friendships and share in cultural exchange as they become neighbors in the residence halls In addition, professional staff members, who help foster academic and personal adjustment, are available to students living in the halls. Whether cons i dering the low-<:ost housing, the convenient loca tion, the availability of resources, or the student-oriented personnel associated with the residence hall p r ogram at USF, campus living has a lot to offer! Every degree-seeking student is eligible to apply for housing; however, on-<:ampus space is limited Therefore, a student desiring to live in the residence halls is encouraged to apply for housing immediately upon receiving his/her official acceptance letter from USF. If you are a Florida Prepaid College Progtam participant with a Prepaid Dormitory Contract, it is a good idea to make note of this and the Prepaid Dormitory Contract number on your Application for Housing Contract. On-Campus Housing Facilities Residence Halls at the University of South Florida, Tampa, are clustered in three centers of community activity-the Argos, Andros, and Village Complexes. Each area provides a core of services for its residents including a central service desk, mail delivery, laundry fa cilities, snack facilities, and swimming pool. Although the com plexes provide the same basic services, they represent different options in campus living The Argos Complex offers traditional student residential living. Gamma houses women and Beta houses men The traditional living arrangement in these halls provides double occupancy room accom modations designed for both sleeping and studying. The 40-50 residents occupying a living unit share common bath facilities which are cleaned on a regular basis by the hall's housekeeping staff Alpha houses both women (First and Third Floor) and men (Second and Fourth Floor) in single occupancy accommodations similar to Gamma and Beta except for the number of occupying each living unit. Each hall also offers a central lounge area, laundry facilities, and snack machines The Andros Complex consists of nine smaller halls with suite ar rangements Delta, Epsi lon, Kappa, and Mu (West Wing) house women while Iota, Mu (East Wing), Theta, Eta, and Zeta house men Lambda Hall houses both men and women and is available exclu sively to those students who have been accepted into the University Honors Program The suites in the Andros complex are designed to accommodate eight residents : two sharing a bedroom, four sharing a study area, and eight sharing bath facilities. The hpusekeeping staff sleans study areas and bath facilities on a regular basis. The five suites on each living unit also share a small kitchenette/lounge and laundry facility. All residence halls in ARGOS and ANDROS are air-<:onditioned. Most rooms are carpeted, and all rooms are furnished with a bed, desk, chair, dresser, closet, and bookshelf for each resident. Food service facilities are conveniently located in each complex. Nearby swimming pools as well as basketball, tennis, and racquetball courts await students seeking leisure-time recreation. In addition, students have the opportunity to become involved in planning activities for their hall by joining residence hall organizations

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STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS 23 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1991(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The Village Complex consists of 30 individual one story buildings, at the apex of Cedar Drive, it is the community center of the Univereach containing 10 double occupancy efficiency apartments These sity, providing a multitude of services and programs. The University facilities are reserved for students who have attained junior, senior, Center seeks to add another dimension to the educational experi or graduate class standing Each fully carpeted apartment has its ence by providing an environment for informal association outside own private entry and is furnished with a bed, desk, wardrobe, and the classroom The University Center was designed with the extra bookcase for each resident. A refrigerator, cooking facilities, bathcurricular life of the student in mind, to provide a sense of central room facilities, ahd individual apartment heating and air
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24 STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1H1a3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Traditional USF activities WOW Week, Week, Greek Council, Student Government, Student Government Productions, Student are directed through Student Government Senate, Student Organizations Advisory Board, this office. The Studerit Organization Advisory Board (S
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STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS 25 UNIVERSTTY OF SOUTH FLORIDA f!l'JZ/'3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Acadmic Academic organizations have grown and will continue to grow as the needs of students studying in each of the academic areas increases These groups are : American Criminal Just ice Association, Association of Computing Machinery, Association of Marketing Students Graduate Business Association, Microbiology Club, Mi nority Organization of Students in Education ,' and Student F i nance Association Rligious The University has encouraged student religious organizations to develop Currently some of the religious groups are members of the Campus Ministry Association (CMA) The members of CMA are : Allen Christian Fellowship Alpha Omega Campus Ministry, Baptist Campus Ministry, B'na i B'rith Hillel Foundation, Cathol i c Center, Christian Science, Episcopal Univers ity Center the Navigators and University Chapel Fellowship In addition to the Campus Ministries, there are diverse student relig i ous organ i zations on campus. The organizations are : Baha'i Club Campus Advance for Christ, Campus Bible Fellowsh ip, Christian Life Community, Chris tian Musicians Fellowsh i p, Friends of Israel Gospel Ministry Intercol legiate Adventist Fellowship and United Muslim Students Srvic/Resourc The many service/resource organizations at USF provide volun teer services and functions for the university and Tampa Bay area The service/resource organizations offer aid and support to further enhance students' needs and special interests. Service and resource organizations are : Ambassadors, Amnesty International BACCHUS, Circle K International, Everywoman's Center, Florida Public Interest Research Group, Fourth Forest Recycling,lnfoquest Services, Paraprofessional -Counseling Service, and SG Insurance. Spcial Inter.st Special-interest organizat i ons cover a wide range of diverse ac tivities Those of the Tampa campus include : Adventurer's Guild, Amhropology Club, Bull Spirits, Classics Society, Gay/Lesbian Coa lition, Geography Club, Gospel Cho ir, Model United Nations Radio and Electronics Club, Readers Theatre Guild, Society for Creative Anachronism, Society for Interdisc i plinary Studies, Student Council for Exceptional Children Student Dance Product i on Board Student Theatre Productions, Students Over Traditional Age, WBUL Radio Station, and Women's Studies. Sports and Recreation Sports and recreational organizations offer students the oppor tunity to enhance their physical well-being as well as their social lives. The Tampa campus has many organizations dedicated to leisure activities. Sports and recreat i onal organizations include : Aerobics Club, Aikido Club, Barbender s Club Bicycle Club, Bowl i ng Club, Chito Ryu Karate, Fencing Club, Go Club, Sailing Club, Scuba Club, Skydiving Club, Sports Officials Association Tae Kwon Do Karate Club, Wado Kai Karate, Water Ski Club and W i ndsurfing Club. University Bookstores The bookstores are owned" and operated by the Universi ty of South Florida and are a self-supporting auxiliary The primary function is to extend services to the students, faculty, and staff of the university as well as alumni and visi tors The University Bookstore and Office Stores are the major stores on the Tampa Campus A Medical Bookstore (MDC 1021) is located in the USF Medical Center Complex and the St. Petersburg Campus Bookstore (Coquina HALL 101) services the Bayboro Campus University Bookstor (BRO 097) The USF University Bookstore is 1ocated off West Holly Drive just West of the USF Water Tower This facility offers a wide variety of merchandise for the USF Community All course required supplies including textbooks are stocked for students in all colleges ; and a complete supply of writing instruments, paper, b i nders, and folders are available. Special discounts are available on calculators and personal computers In addition to these supplies, this store also offers the most recent fashions in collegiate clothing, college jewelry, imprinted souvenirs, gifts, cards, stationery, and novelty items The Textbook Department offers new and used textbooks, study gu i des and workbooks and some reference books This department also provides personnel to assist in ordering CC?Urse textbooks A continuous buyback program offers a source for the selling of used textbooks by students and faculty. The bookstore also features a general book department featur ing study a ids, techn ical and professi onal books, and the latest pa perbacks. Hardback best sellers are offered at a special discount. The latest 'Books in Print Catalogue' is available for special orders Sale and gift books are also obtainable during most times of the year. The USF University Bookstore is open from 9 : 00 a.m. to 5 : 55 p m Monday through Thursday; 9 :00 a.m. to 4 :55 p m on Friday During the beginning of each term the store has extended hours of operat i on. Ample parking is available Visa and Master Cards are accepted Office Stores (BRO 097) Office Stores, located to the North of the University Bookstore parking lot, is the department that provides office supply items to campus offices and student organizations Purchases by campus departments with account numbers are made by completing a Uniform Charge Document form s i gned by the accountable officer These charges are billed monthly through the central billing system A delivery service to campus offices is available Special items not currently in stock may be ordered through office supplies cata logues Medical Bookstore Located in the Medical Center (MDC 1021 ), the Medical Book store offers medkal textbooks, instruments, supplies and reference books. General goods such as notebooks, school supplies, clothing, greeting cards and candy are also provided The Medical Bookstore is open 9:00 a.m .-5: 00 p m Monday-Friday. Visa/MasterCard ac cepted St. Petersburg Campus Bookstor The St. Petersburg Campus Bookstore (Coquina Hall 101) offers textbooks for Petersburg classes, general books, clothing, school supplies and a variety of general merchandise items. This bookstore is open 9 : 00 a.m -6:00 p m Monday-Thursday and 9 : 00 a m .-5: 00 p.m. on Friday w ith extended hours at the beginning of each term Visa/MasterCard accepted . Campus Recreation The Campus Recreation Program is designed to provide oppor tunities for participation in a wide variety of sports and recreational activities for the entire University community through its four components 1 Intramural Sports Intramural competition is scheduled in 23 different sports with considerable interest in participation by residence hall teams, campus organizations and independent students The following intramural sports are scheduled : Semester I -Flag Football, Golf, Softball, Racquetball, Field Goal Kicking, Track Meet, Sports Trivia Bowl, Softball, Ultimate Frisbee, Intramural SK Run, Golf Long Driving Contest, Home Run Derby Semester II -Soccer, Volleyball, Bowling, Swim Meet, Tennis, 3 on 3 Basketball, Basketball, Team Triathlon, Slam Dunk Contest, Wrestling, Basketball 3-Pt. Shootout 2. Outdoor Recreation -The Outdoor Recreation division offers opportunities for students to become involved in outdoor trips, lectures, and workshops, i.e snow skiing, sailing, canoeing

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26 STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1991/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG camping. Students can become involved as participants, group leaders, workshop administrators, Qr may simply rent any of the large inventory of outdoor recreation equipment 3 Sports -The dub op portunities for students with a special interest in twenty different sports, from aikido to weight lifting 4 Informal -Recreation facil i ties-sw!mm i!'g pools, gymnasium, tennis and racquetball courts, playing fields and the USF Riverfront Park-are available for student and staff use during free time, as well as recreation equipment, which may be checked out at the Gym with a validated student 1.D. card A yearly Campus Recreation Handbook is published which details the programs and facilities available, and a schedule for recreation hours is available each semester Intercollegiate Athletics The University of South Florida fields 14 intercollegiate sports for men and women, all at the NCAA Division I level. In men's compe tition, USF has baseball, basketball, soccer, cross country, track golf and tennis On the women's side are basketball, softball, tennis, golf, cross country, track and volleyball . The school became a member of the Metro Conference in 1991 and has been a dominant force in the league South Florida is in contention for the Commissioner's Cup, symbolic of overall sport supremacy within the Conference The athletic facilities at USF are also second to none The Sun Dome, opened for the 1980-81 bas. ketball season, is one of the most unique and dynamic multipurpose fac1ht1es 1n the Southeast. Lighted stadiums for the school's softball, baseball and soccer team provides pleasant conditions for both the athletes and the spectators The school also has an 18-ho l e championship golf course, and varsity tennis courts Student Publications The University has encouraged a program of campus communi cation through two publicat i ons These publications are all-Univer sity in approach and coverage They are staffed by students under the general supervision of the Office of .. A tabloid campus newspaper, 1s published five times weekly Monday through Friday during the fall and spring, and times weekly, Tuesday and Thursday during the summe r ing 16 to 20 pages in each issue, it provides professional experience for those students interested in print journalism Omnibus, a literary magazine, published every semester, con tains prose, poetry, photos and graphics produced by students Interested students are invited to apply for staff positions on both publications Counseling Center for Human Development . The Counseling Center for Human Development provides direct professional services to USF students in career counseling, psychiatric consultation, and skills . Spe cial services are provided by the State D1v1s1on of Vocational Rehabilitation and that agency maintains an office in the Counseling Center. Counseling Center services are designed to assist students in achieving efficient learning habits and in developing a satisfying participation in campus life. . The Career Counseling Service helps students to develop realistic career goals through testing, counseling, use of career information and through the exploration of alternative educational and/or career goals and methods for reaching them Emphasis is placed developing skills for solv i ng educational and career problems in order to make constructive career decisions Computerized career information and guidance systems (CHOICES, SIGl-Plus) and a comprehensive Career Information Library are available for student use. The Personal Counseling Service is a student resource that pro vides a range of services aimed at the early detection and preven tion of student mental health problems and the development of skill-nhancing programs The following direct services are offered to USF students : Intake evaluation, psychiatric consultation, time limited psychotherapy and behavior therapy. group therapy, skill enhancing programs and workshops, anxiety management, paraprofessional programs, a!'ld referral psycholo gists also assist students in career guidance, particularly those who may present identity motivat i onal, and other related personal problems The Psychiatric Service assists students when psychiatric evaluation, medication, or hospitalization are needed The Reading-Study Skills Service provides diagnosis and evalu ation of reading skills and study are c:iffered: (1) Credit classroom courses that include intensive and practice in word attack, vocabulary, and comprehension skills, and, (2) an Independent Study credit course that places emphasis on the development of skills A Reading-Study Skills Laboratory is available for all students enrolled in either the classroom or Independent Study Sections Regular will be for either of the above courses Visual screening 1s also available The Counseling Center Outreach Program offers workshops and structured groups in a variety of career and personal growth areas which are of concern to University students Although most of these programs are regularly scheduled_. th.ey may be the reques f of student or staff organizations. Outreach 1s also instru mental in informing students of services available to then:i and in helping them in making their college years more A newsletter is distributed monthly and articles are often published in the the campus newspaper A Paraprofessional Counseling Service at the Counseling Center offers several programs to USF students These programs are staffed by volunteer students under the leadership of and experienced graduate and undergraduate students Part1c1pants receive training and supervision from the professional staff Application for any of these services may be made by all USF students by calling or themselves at the Counseling Center and requesting assistance Veterans Services Veterans Services are provided at each campus of the University of South Florida Veteran advisors work closely with the staff of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in St. Petersburg to provide special services to all elig i ble veterans, depend ents, active-duty service personnel, and members of the Selective Reserve. The Veterans Services staff actively encourages persons who have a desire to start, continue or resume higher education course work to visit the Veterans Services office Applications for veterans benefits are completed in the Veterans Services Office, processed through the Certifications Section of the University Registrar's Office, and sent directly to the VA Services are available to help solve financial problems experi enced by veteran students as follows : registration and tuition fee deferment advance payment, and part time work opportunities through the VA Work-Study program The VA Tutorial Program allows eligible VA students to be reimbursed for tutorial costs, not to exceed a maximum set by the VA. Developmental course work can be accomplished through cooperative efforts with local commu nity colleges Guidance and referral services are provid.ed with student financial assistance, job placement, student housing, per sonal and family counseling, career planning, academic advising, and military service school . The Uni versity of South Florida 1s a Serv1cemembers Opportunity College (SOC) and active duty personne! to !he University For more information on degree completion and tu1t1on assistance, in-service students should first check with their installa tions' education officer

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1991.(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The Office of the Registrar maintains the official academic Continuously Enrolled Degree-seeking Student records for all students and course registrations for currently The Office of Admissions will determine the acceptability of enrolled students Students are encouraged to contact the Office of transfer credits taken at regionally-accredited institutions while the Registrar about general questions concerning academic policies enrolled at USF as a continuing, degree-seeking student. However, and procedures of their current registration or academic record. PRIOR WRITIEN APPROVAL MUST BE OBTAINED from the college Note: Each student must be aware of the University's academic of the student's major if these credits are to be applicable to the USF policies and procedures insofar as they affect him/her degree program A properly-executed Transient Student Form or Cross Enrollment Form should be used for this purpose. General Academic Regulations and Information Semester System The University of South Florida operates on a semester system Semesters begin in August and January with Summer Sessions beginning in May and June See academic calendar for appropriate dates Academic Load The maximum load of an undergraduate student is 18 hours unless approval is received from the dean or an authorized represen tative of the student's college. Students classified as Undecided must receive approval from the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. In the Fall or Spring Semester 12 hours is the minimum load for a student to be considered as Full-time FULL-TIME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT DEFINITION FOR SUMMER TERM Sessions "A" & "B" (6 weeks) For: Academic purposes For: Financial aid Session "C" (10 weeks) For: Academic purposes For: Financial aid 6 hours or more each session Students must enroll for 12 hours (undergraduate) in any combina tion of Sessions "A." "B" and c. 9 hours or more Students must enroll for 12 hours (undergraduate) in any combina tion of Sessi ons "A.' "B" and c. Students receiving Veterans' Administration benefits should confirm their Summer Term enrollment with the Office of Veterans' Services or Veterans Coordinator Undergraduates may not enroll in 6000-level courses or higher without approval of the college/department in which the course is offered. Availability of Courses The University does not commit itself to offer all the courses, programs, and majors listed in this catalog unless there is sufficient demand to justify them. Some courses, for example, may be offered only in alternate semesters or years, or even less frequently if there is little demand Transfer of Credit To USF The University of South Florida w ill accept credits only from those institutions accredited by one of the accrediting agencies/commis sions recognized by USF. However, USF reserves the right to deny credit for specific courses The receipt and evaluation of total transfer credit are the responsibility of the Of,fice of Admissions The college of the student's major will determine which courses are applicable toward a specific degree and will assign equivalent courses (see Evaluation of Transfer of Credit under Admiss i ons and Related Matters). Former Student Returning The Office of Admissions will evaluate the acceptability of transfer of credits taken at regionally-accredited institut i ons since last enrolled at USF. The college of the student's major will determine which courses are applicable for his/her major In some instances, exact course equivalents will also be determined by other colleges which offer the same or similar course(s) as a part of their programs of study. Registration for Admitted Degree-Seeking Students Continuing degree-seeking students register by appointment for their next semester's courses during the preceding term, either in person or by telephone. Appointment times and instructions for all registration periods are published in the Schedule of Classes for the appropriate semester Prior to initial registration, all newly admitted undergraduate stu dents and readmitted former undergraduate students returning are required to participate in an orientation/academic advising pro gram on the USF campus where they will take all or the majority of courses Newly admitted students and readmitted Former Students Returning Orientation/ Academic Advising/Registration in structions from the USF Office of Orientation. Registered students may make schedule adjustments in the regular registration period during the preceding termor in the drop/ add period during the first week of classes. (Deadline information is available in the Academic Calendar ) Degree-seeking students who do not register prior to the first day of classes may late-register the first week of classes. A $100 00 late registration fee is charged during this week. (See the section on fees for additional information and the appropriate term's Schedule of Classes for dates.) To avoid cancellation of registra tion, fees are due and payable for all reg i stered courses of record on the fifth day of classes (end of drop/add period). (See Academic Calendar for dates ) NOTE: Prior to registration for classes which meet on campus, all students who will be less than 40 years of age at the beginning of the term must submit acceptable proof of immunity to rubella to the Student Health Service. Students born after December 31, 1956 must also submit proof of immunity of measles (See Im munization Policy. ) Academic Advising for Admitted Undergraduate Students The University seeks to provide all students with sufficient guidance and advice to select programs and courses best suited to their personal abilities, educat i onal interests, and career objectives For students who have been admitted to the Uni versity an aca demic advising office is maintained in each of the six colleges offering baccalaureate degrees as well as in the Center for Aca demic Advising, in Undergraduate Studies This latter office serves also as an initial point of contact for non-admitted, prospective, and/or non-
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28 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNIVERSfTY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1!191/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG appropriate college advising office, usually during one of the orien tations required by the University. Students who do not wish to declare a major or who cannot meet the necessary prerequisites of a limited access major are advised by the advising office in Under graduate Studies. Upper-level transfer students (entering the Uni versity with 60 semester hours or more) who meet the admission requirements of a major are assigned to the college of that major for advising. A student must declare a major no later than the end of the junior year {90 semester hours). It is necessary that all students determine their appropriate college and attend the approf riate University-mandated Orienta tion Program. The purpose o this initial contact is to assign an academic advisor and to provide the advising unit with routine information which assists it in collecting and maintaining the necessary records to assure the student's proper progress toward education goals Transfer students should bring an unofficial or student copy of their transcript(s) at the time of orientation All students are encouraged to establish an advising relationship with a college or the advising office in Undergraduate Studies and periodically visit their advisers to keep abreast of any policy, proce dural. or curriculum changes which may affect them In fact, some colleges require adviser approval of student programs each semes ter. While the University provides advising services to assist students with academic planning, the responsibility for seeing that all graduation requirements are met rests with the student. Course Attendance at First Class Meeting This policy has been put into effect so that the University of South Florida may effectively utilize classroom space and to insure that all students have maximum opportunity to enrol! in classes where demand exceeds availability of seats. Students are required to attend the first class meeting of under graduate courses for which they registered RJi2r to the first day of the term. Names of students who register prior to the first day of the term are printed on the first class roll for each section. The first class roll is used by professors to drop students who do not attend the first day of class. Students having extenuating circum stances beyond their control and who are unable to attend the first class meeting must notify the instructor or the department prior to the first class meeting to request waiver of the first class attendance requirement. Students who add courses or late-register during the first week of classes will rurt be on the first class roll and, therefore, will not be dropped for non-attendance by the instructor. To avoid fee liability and academic penalty, the student is responsible for insuring that he/she has dropped or been dropped from all undesired courses by the end of the 5th day of classes. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following catego ries: Bachelor of Independent Studies {BIS), Programs for Adult Credit Education Program {PACE), Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Off-Campus Term {OCT), Cooperative Education Training.and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading, or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practicums, etc ) Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these catego ries by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. Adds After a student has completed his/her registration on the date assigned, he/she may add courses until the add deadline specified in the Academic calendar See the appropriate semester's University Schedule of Classes for detailed instructions and dates. Drops A student may drop a course(s) during the drop/add period (first five days of classes). No entry of the course(s) will appear on any permanent academic records and full refund of fees is due for course(s) dropped within those periods. Effective Fall, 1986 a student may also drop a course(s) between the second and ninth week of-the semester (except for Summer Sessions see Class Schedule for dates), with the following limita tions : From 0-59 cumulative semester hours (classification 111 and 121 ) the student is limited to three drops; from 60 cumulative semester hours (classification and 141 ) to end of the undergradu ate degree a student is limited to three drops. Students classified as are limited to three drops. Non-degree seeking students (special students) are treated as lower-level undergraduate students and are limited to only three drops while they are classified as either non degree or degree-seeking lower-level students Regardless of stu dent classification, courses at the 5000 level or above are not co. unted as part of this drop limitation policy : Additional drops above these numbers will result in an automatic 'F' ("U') grade Registration fees must be paid for all course(s) after the first week, and the academic record will reflect a W grade for the dropped course(s) that are within the limitations of this policy Courses dropped after the nine week deadline (see Academic Calendar for date) will result in an automatic 'F" grade. Appeals for additional drops will be made to the Academic Regulations Committee representative in the appropriate college or Undergraduate Studies Further appeal is to the Academic Regula tions Committee Total withdrawals from the University are not counted as part of the drop limitation policy. Auditing Privilege A student who wishes to sit in on a class to review the course material may do so; however, the student is not allowed to take exams nor will any grades or credit be given. The student's status for that class is an audit and his/her presence in the classroom is as a listener. A student must register to audit courses during the late registration period. (No audit registrations are processed during the regular registration periods ) Fees for audit are the same as for full enrollment for credit except out of state tuition is not charged. See University Schedule of Classes for detailed instructions and dates. Cancellation Before First Class Day Students may cancel their registration by notifying the Office of the Registrar in writing prior to the first day of classes. If fees have already been paid, the student may request a full refund of fees from the Office of Finance & Accounting Withdrawal A student may withdraw from the University without academic penalty durin9 the first nine weeks of any term (except for Summer Sessions). He/she must submit a completed Withdrawal Form to the Office of the Registrar No entry is made on the academic record for withdrawals submitted during the first week of the term. All subsequent withdrawals (through the ninth week of classes in the Fall and Spring Semesters) are posted to the academic record with w grades assigned to the courses. Withdrawal deadlines for the Summer sessions are listed in the Academic Calendar and are published in the Schedule of Classes for the Summer Term. Students who withdraw during the Drop/Add period as stated in the Academic Calendar may receive a full refund of fees. All refu .nds must be requested in writing from the Office of Finance and Accounting. No refunp is allowe'd after this period except for specified reasons See 'Refund of Fees under Financial Information for complete details Transcrif>t Information Transcripts of a students USF academic record may be requested by the student through the Office of the Registrar. A student's academic record can only be released upon authorization of the student. Students requesting transcripts may do so in person or by writing to the Office of the Registrar Include in the request the full name, social security number, and date of birth, and indicate name(s) and address(es) to whom the transcript(s) is(are) to be sent. If grades for the current term are needed, clearly indicate that the transcript request is to be held for grades

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 29 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1991/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG College Level Academic Skills Program {Anthropology) The College Level Academ i c Skills Test {CLAST) 1s a part of ANT 4153 North American Archaeology Florida s system of educational accountabil i ty. CLAST is a stateANT 4172 Historical Archaeology mandated achievement test whi ch measures attainment of com muANT 4226 Anthropology of Art nication and mathematics skills expected of students completing ANT 4231 Folklore their sophomore year in college.These skills were identified by the ANT 4241 Magic and,jeligi on faculties of community colleges and state un i versities and adopted ANT 4324 Mexico and" Central America by the State Board of Education A student must pass the CLAST to ANT 4340 The Caribbean receive an Associate in Arts or a baccalaureate degree from any ANT 4432 The Individual and Culture Florida pub l ic institution ANT 4620 language and Culture Students who have already earned a baccalaureate degree from ANT 4750 Language and Social Interaction a institut i on are exempt from the CLAST ANT 4935 Rethinking Anthropology requirement at USF. {Classics) The State Board of Education has established m i nimum CLAST CLA 4103 Greek Civili zation score standards for the award i ng of the Associate in Arts degree CLA 4123 Roman Civilization and for the Bachelor s degree from October 1, 1992 as follows : CL T 3101 Greek literature in Translation Readi ng 295 ; English Language Skills 295; Mathematics 295 ; and Cl T 3102 Roman literature in Translation Essay, 6 (English) CLAST may be taken by undergraduate, degree-seeking stu-CRW 2100 Narration and Descript i on dents who have earned 18 semester hours or the equ i valent and CRW 3111 Form and Technique of Fiction who apply to take the test on or before the deadl i ne established for CRW 3112 Fiction I registration. Students at USF are required to take the CLAST by the CRW 3121 Fiction 11 time they complete 55 semester hours Firstt i me-in
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30 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG (Women's Studies) WST 3210 Women in Western Civilization I 3 EDUCATION (Psychological & Social Foundations) IDS 3115 Values and Choice 3 FINE ARTS (Art) ARH 4796 Critical Studies in Art History 4 ART 3001 Introduction to Art (excluding OU sections) 4 FIL 3001 Film: The Language of Vision 4 (Dance) DAN 2100 Introduction to Dance 3 DAN 4111 Survey History of Dance 3 (Music) MUL 2111 Introduction to Music Literature 3 (Theatre) THE 3090C Modern Theatre Practice 4 All the abOve courses will require 6,000 written words per course. IDH courses will fulfill the writing requirement for all-University Honor students only. Computation (6 semester hours) At least 6 hours must be at the level of college algebra or above, with at least 3 hours from the Mathematics Department. Any course offered by the Mathematics Department may be used. Three hours may be taken from outside the Mathematics Department but must be taken from the following list of courses. Cours Number and Title Semester Hours ST A 3122 Social Sciences Statistics QMB 2150 Business and Economics Statistics I PHI 2100 Introduction to Formal Logic ST A 3023 Introduction to Statistics CGS 3060 Introduction to Computers and 3 3 3 4 Programming in Basic 3 CGS 2000 Computers in Business I (3 semester hours) may also count toward fulfilling the computation requirement but will not count toward Area Ill of General Distribution Requirements CLEP general/subject examinations in mathematics, calculus, college al9ebra, college algebra-trigonometry, and trigonometry may satisfy only three semester hours of mathematics required (college algebra or above) CLEP general examinations in mathematics or the above men tioned subject examinations and high school transcripts indicating a grade of "C" or above in higher mathematics coursework (college algebra, trigonometry, and calculus) may satisfy all six SE1mester hours of the mathematics requirement. Grades, Scholarship Requirements, and Review Procedures The University is interested in each student making reasonable progress towards his or her educational goals and will aid each student through guidance and faculty advising To make students aware of their academic progress, the University has enacted a system of grading and policies of Academic Probation and Aca demic Dismissal which indicates whether or not a student is showing sufficient progress towards meeting degree requirements Nota tions of Grades, Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal are posted to the student's academic record When a student is academically dismissed from the University and is ineligible to re-nroll, it may be in his or her best interest to re-valuate his/her educational goals with an academic adviser in his/her college. If the student's poor academic performance has resulted from extenuating circumstances or if after a period of time the student feels he or she has gained adequate maturity and motivation, he/she may petition the Academic Regulations Commit tee for permission to re-nroll. See "Academic Regulations Commit tee." for information on petitioning Grading System A student's measure of academic achievement is recorded on the academic record based on the following grading system: A Superior performance B Excellent performance C Average performance D Below average performance, but passing F Failure FF Failure/academic dishonesty I Incomplete IF Incomplete grade changed to Failure IU Incomplete grade changed to Unsatisfactory 1\11 No grade submitted by instructor MF Missing grade change to Failure MU Missing grade changed to Unsatisfactory N Audit R Repeated course S .Satisfactory T Course repeated, not included in GPA U Unsatisfactory W Withdrawal from course without penalty Z Indicates continuing registration in Thesis/Dissertation courses. Grade-Point Average The University has a four-point system of grading used in computing grade-point averages (A -4 quality points, B 3, C 2, D 1 F 0) The grade-point average (abbreviated GPA throughout this catalog) is computed by dividing the total number of quality points by the total hours attempted at the University of South Florida The total quality points are figured by multiplying the number of credits assigned to each course by the quality point value of the grade given Credit hours for courses with grades of M, MU, N, W, S, U, I, IU, Z, and grades which are preceded by a "T" are subtracted from the total hours attempted before the GPA is calculated "I" Grade Policy An "I' grade indicates incomplete course work and may be awarded to graduate and undergraduate students (Undergradu ate rules apply to non-degree-seeking students.) It may be awarded to an undergraduate student only when a small portion of the student's work is incomplete and only when the student is other wise earning a passing grade Until removed, the is not computed in the grade point average for either undergraduate or graduate students. The time limit for removing the is to be set by the instructor of the course. For undergraduate students, this time limit may not exceed one academic semester, whether or not the student is in residence, and/or graduation, whichever comes first. grades not removed by the end of the time limit will be changed to "IF" or "IU," whichever is appropriate Whether or not the student is in residence, any change to "IF" grades will be calculated in the cumulative GPA and, if applicable, the student will be placeQ on appropriate probation or academically dismissed. Students are not1equired to re-register for courses in which they are only corripleting previous course requirements to change an grade. However, if a student wants to audit a course for review in order to complete course requirements, full fees must be paid. "M" Grade Policy An "M" is automatically assigned as a default grade when the instructor does not submit any grade for an undergraduate student. (Undergraduate rules also apply to non-degree-seekin9 students.) Until removed, the "M" is not computed in the grade point average. The time limit for removing the "M" may not exceed one academic semester (whether or not the student is enrolled) and/or gradu ation, whichever comes first "M" grades that are not removed by the end of the next semester/term will be changed to "MF" or "MU." whichever is appropriate. Whether or not the student is enrolled, any change to "MF" will be computed in the cumulative

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 31 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992/'3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG grade point average, and, if applicable, the student will be p laced on appropriate probation or academically dismissed. S/U Grade System No-option Courses. Certain courses have been designated as S/U courses The s and u grades are used to indicate the student's final grade These S/U only courses are identified with (S/ U only) after the course definition in this catalog. No grading system option is available to students or faculty in these courses Oetion Courses. Any undergraduate course may be taken on an S/U basis by a student under the following conditions and restrictions: 1. Required courses in the major may not be taken on an S/U basis. 2. Specifically designated required courses in the distribution re quirements of the student's college may not be taken on an S/U basis. 3 Courses to satisfy 6A-10 .30 (Gordon Rule) may not be taken on S/U basis. 4. Courses to satisfy USF's B.A. foreign language requirement may not be taken on an S/U basis . 5. All elective courses for the major and all elective courses in the distribution requirements, and all other free elect ive courses may be taken on an S/U basis except where: a. The certifying college restricts the number of courses which may be taken on an S/U basis in any one or all of the above areas or restricts the total number of S/U courses which can be accepted for all of the above areas b. The certifying college specifies that certain courses may not be taken on an S/U basis c The instructor of a course refuses to allow the course to be taken on an S/U basis Mechanism for Assignin_g S/U Grades. The method by which a student receives an s or 'U grade in an option course will consist of the following: 1 A written agreement signed by both instructor and student shall be filed with such offices as may be designated by the College The college shall set the deadline (no later than the last day of classes for the term) for the student to decide if he wishes to take the course on an S/U basis. 2. The instructor shall assign final letter grades A, B, C, D, F, or I, but will transmit to the Registrar Sor U consistent with the following : a. Letter grade, A, B, or C, shall be equivalent to a letter grade of s. b Letter grades Dor F shall be equivalent to a letter grade of 'U. s and u grades are not computed in the student's grade point average Grade Forgiveness Policy The University of South FIOrida forgiveness policy permits an undergraduate to repeat a course and have the repeated grade computed in his/her GPA in place of the original grade, providing the repeat grade is 'D' or higher (exception -see Honors at Graduation) A course which is repeated and the repeat grade is 'F' will have both grades calculated into the GPA Normally, grade forgiveness may only be applied to a specific course that a student chooses to repeat. No course taken on the S/U grade basis may have the grade forgiveness applied Under unusual circumstances, a different but similar course may be used if the substitute course has been previously approved by the college dean and is on file in the Office of the Registrar. Any undergraduate or non-Oegree seeking student who wishes to implement grade forgiveness must: 1. Complete a 'Grade Forgiveness Request Form' (available in the Office of the Registrar) for each course to be repeated 2 Adhere to the following conditions : a. A limitation of applying grade forgiveness to three USF courses with no more than one repeat per course ; b. With prior approval of the college dean, a course different from a course on the approved list may be substituted in the following cases: (1) The substitute course is a change in prefix, number, hours, or title, but not a substantive change in content from the original course (2) The substitute course replaces a course no longer offered by the institution. c. repeated course must be taken under the standard grading system (A-F) and the latest grade must be D or higher (grades of S/U are not permitted) d. All grades remain on the transcript. The original course grade will be annotated with 'T' to indicate that the course has subsequently been repeated and the original grade is not computed in the grade-roint average. The repeated course will be anno tated with 'R to indicate repeat course. e. Individual colleges may have further restrictions; therefore, the student should consult with his/her college. This policy is applicable to undergraduate and non-Oegree seeking students only, and applies to 1 OOO-to-5000-level courses. Once students have been awarded a bachelor's degree from USF, they may not repeat a course and be forgiven the original grade, taken prior to graduation. The policy applies only to courses taken originally at USF and repeated at USF. Good Standing USF students will be considered in Good Standing if they are currently enrolled or eligible to return to the University of South Florida Academic Record The student's academic record shall not be changed after the student has graduated Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal for Undergraduate Students The first time the academic record of an undergraduate or non degree-seeking student falls below a cumulative 2.0 grade-point av erage (GPA) (USF grades only) after any term, he/she will be placed on Academic Probation (AP) (see notes below) If the cumulative USF GPA is not raised to 2 0 or higher at the end of the next semester of attendance, that student will be automatically dismissed for one semester (TAD). No petition will be required in order for the student to return to school after one semester out, but in order to be processed for registration, the student must have the approval of an academic program representative, college coordinator of advising, or the designee A student may utilize the temporary academic dismissal (TAD) policy only once Upon returning to school, a student has two terms to raise the cum\jlative USF GPA up to 2.0 but must make .at least a 2 0 GPA the first term after returning A student academically dismissed a second time is permanently dismissed from the University (PAD) NOTE: 1 Students admitted on probationary status must accumulate 30 semester credits and maintain a minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA each term enrolled with no sin!ille term GPA below a 1.0 GPA before the probationary status 1s removed. Advising is manda tory prior to registration. Undergraduate Studies shall monitor credent ials of students in this status and assist advisors with appropriate information when needed Not meeting these con ditions would result in the student's being permanently dis missed from the University. 2. Any undergraduate or non-Oegree-seeking student whose cv mulative GPA falls below 1.0 after completing an accumulat twelve or more USF semester"9raded (A-F) hours will be pe nently dismissed for academic reasons at the end of the ser in which it occurs . Students are strongly encouraged t with their academic advisors to explore ways of academic performance Any student who withdraws after the fifth day o' on Academic Probation or who has been placed on r istration by the Academic Regulations Committe' i cally Dismissed g Any student who receives only I, S, o 1al Academic Probation will be Academically Dis1. ms student who is on work training or Cooperativt I

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32 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1"12/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG have his/her academic status changed providing he/she is not enrolled in any academic course that term. The determination and notification of probationary status or academic dismissal will be made by the Registrar's Office on the student's semester grade report and academic record. A student who attends another college or university during aca demic dismissal will be classified as a transfer student and readmis sion will be based on the total record accumulated from all colleges and universities attended If a student who has accumulated fewer than 60 semester hours is academically dismissed from the University of South Florida or falls below a 2.0 GPA and subsequently achieves an AA or an articulated AS from a Florida public community/junior college (or other SUS institution), that student, when returning to the University, will be automatically credited with a maximum of 60 semester hours and have his/her academic record cleared and the USF GPA will begin again. Once a student has had her/her record cleared in this manner, the Temporary Academic Dismissal (TAD) category does not apply. The student may receive credit for hours beyond 60 which were earned previously at USF or another four-year institution only with the endorsement from the Dean of the college of the student's major and the approval by the Academic Regulations Committee. If a student who has accumulated 60 or mo re semester hours is academically dismissed from the University of South Florida or falls below a 2.0 GPA and subsequently receives an AA or an articulated AS from a Florida public community/junior college (or other SUS institution), that student, when returning to the University, will not automatically have his/her record cleared The student must consult with his/her Academic Regulations Committee representative and must either: a. Request that his/her academic record be cleared. If the student chooses this option, the Academic Regulations Committee will approve the salvage and the student will be cr'edited with a maximum of 60 semester hours and the USF GPA will begin again Once a student has had his/her record cleared in this manner, the Temporary Academic Dismissal (TAD) category does not apply; or . b. Request that the USF hours and GPA be retained and receive specific stipulations from the Academic Regulations Committee to clear the academic record. In either case, the decision must be made in the term of USF enrollment following the receipt of the AA degree and is considered to be a binding decision If a student is academically di .smissed or falls below a 2.0 GPA from the University of South Florida and subsequently receives a BA/BS from another four-year institution, that student when ac cepted to the University with the post-baccalaureate status will have his/her academic record cleared. If a student has earned credit at the University of South Florida and has a 2.0 or better GPA at USF and subsequently receives an AA from a Community College, the posting of the AA shall not remove the previous grade-point average generated at USF. College Policies For Academic Progress Colleges may determine and implement standards of academic progress for undergraduate students (majors in the college) in addition to those established by the University Students who do not meet the academic standards of progress set by their colleges will be placed on probation and may be disenrolled. The college dean is responsible for implementing standards of academic progress and for notifying students of their probationary or disenrollment status Colleges may restrict the course selections and the number of hours a student may take which do not apply toward completion of degree requirements. Students who exceed this limit may have part or all of their registration cancelled. Colleges are responsible for publicizing and students are re sponsible for knowing their college's policies for academic prog ress. Class Standing A student's class is determined by the number of credits he/she has earned without relation to his/her grade point average OC Unclassified Non-degree-seeking students 1 F Freshman 0 through 29 semester hours passed 2S Sophomore 30 through 59 semester hours passed 3J Junior 60 through 89 semester hours passed 4R Senior 90 or more semester hours passed; however, no baccalaureate degree earned here or elsewhere SB Baccalaureate degree-holder working on a second undergradu ate program or degree 6M Graduate student admitted to Master's Degree Program 6A Graduate student admitted to Specialist Degree Program 6D Graduate student admitted to a Doctoral Degree Program 7AProfessional Program (M.D.) or Post-Doctoral Status Admission to a College All newly admitted students must initially be advised by an aca demic advisor. All undecided students are assigned to Undergradu ate Studies for purposes of advising until a choice of major is made At that time, he/she may enter the college containing the major department. Undecided students may remain in this classification until a maximum of 90 semester hours are earned After that time, a major must be selected. New transfer students who have com pleted 90 or more hours may remain undeclared for a maximum of two terms following initial USF entry. Change of Major All undergraduate students desiring to change their major should consult the Advising Office in the old and new college(s) of their interest. Administrative Holds A student may be placed on administrative hold by failure to meet obligations to the University When a student is on administra tive hold, he/she may not be allowed to register, receive a diploma, or receive a transcript. Settlement of financial accounts must be made at the University Cashier's Office Each student flaced on administrative hold should determine from the Office o the Registrar which office placed him/her in this status and clear the obligation with that respective office. Student Information Changes Notifications regarding changes of address, name, residency, and citizenship should be filed promptly with the Office of the Reg-istrar Final Examination in academic subjects are, for most courses, an integral part of the learning process and one part of a procedure for evaluat ing student performance and determining grades The University of South Florida requ ires certain standards for the examination process in order to protect the academic of courses and the best interests of both the student and the mstruc/ tor. In each academic course, the student is expected to a meaningful testing and evaluation that will reveal the student s in tellectual growth in the subject matter covered or otherwise reflect the achievement of the course objectives The instructor has the responsibility of maintaining a fair and impartial testing and examination procedure, has the right to define and structure the testing process, and shall not be restricted as to form, style or content of the examination It is the policy of the University of South Florida that all students facing an examination (of any type) shall have equal advance notice of the form and content of that examination The Univers i ty regards the routine use of all or part of the same formal examination for successive academic terms as unsound policy except when used with adequate safeguards such as a random selection of questions from a large pool.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 33 I UNIVERSTTY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992a3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Specific days shall be set aside for final examinations, and any or her degree on the basis of personal effort. Consequently, any comprehensive final examination must be given during this desig form of cheating on examinations or plagiarism on assigned papers nated period. The period of two hours shall Qe allotted for each final constitutes unacceptable deceit and dishonesty. Disruption of the examination If a student has a direct conflict of scheduled examiclassroom or teaching environment is also unacceptable This nations or has three or more examinations scheduled on the same cannot be tolerated in the University community and will be day, the student may petition the appropriate instructor to reschedpunishable, according to the seriousness of the offense, in conforule one of the student's examinations. The final examination mity with this rule schedule shall be published in the same manner and place as the Schedule of Classes Honors Convocation The Honors Convocation is desi gned to recognize degree seeking undergraduate students for high academic performance during the previous academic year To be eligible to participate in the Honors Convocation, an under graduate student must during the academic year preceding the Fall Honors Convocation have a University of South Florida grade point average of 3 .5 or above for all completed hours, a minimum of 24 University of South Florida graded (AF) hours, and no incomplete (I) grades Dean's List Full-time undergraduate students who demonstrate superior academic achievement during one semester will be honored on a "Dean's List. To be eligible for the Dean's List, a student must be in a "pool" (defined hereafter) and must complete 12 hours of graded (A-F} USF courses with no incomplete grades during the semester The "pool" consists of all students who have registered for at least 12 hours, of USF courses in a given semester. The Dean's List shall consist of the fewer of: 1) the upper 10% of enrollment of the college or 2) students in the college with a USF 3.5 GPA or above (ties at the 90th percentile will be included in the honors group) The Dean of the College in which the student is majoring or the Dean of Undergraduate Studies for undeclared students will recog nize this academic honor Students who are eligible should contact their College Advising Office for i nformation. Academic Regulations Committee The Academic Regulations Committee (ARC) meets regularly to review petitions submitted by undergraduate students to wa ive Uni versity academic regulations. Students must petition and secure approval of the committee to return to the University after having been academically dismissed or to waive academic deadlines The committee normally meets once a week To petition the committee, a student must secure the appropriate form from the Office of the Registrar and consult with the ARC representative from his/her college prior to submitting the petition form. Completed forms should be returned to the Office of the Registrar by 4 : 00 p m Friday, to be reviewed at the next week's meeting Students will receive notification of the committee's action the following week Student Academic Grievance Procedure Student academic grievance procedures exist at USF to provide students the opportunity for objective review of facts and events pertinent to the cause of academic grievances Such review is accomplished in a collegial non-judicial atmosphere rather than an adversary one and allows the parties involved to participate. An Academic Grievance Committee, composed of an equal number of faculty and student members, exists m each undergradu ate colle!;Je for the general purpose of considering student aca demic grievances and making recommendations based on these considerations to the dean of the college in which the alleged grievance occurred For information, contact the dean of the college in which the cause of the academic grievance occurred. Academic Dishonesty And Disruption Of Academic Process Students attending the University of South Florida are awarded degrees in recognition of successful completion of course work in their chosen fields of study Each individual is expected to earn his Plagiarism Plagiarism .is defined as "literary theft' and consists of the unat tributed quotation of the exact words of a published text, or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a pub lished text. On written papers for which the student employs information from books, articles, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not generally known to the public at large, or the form, structure, or style of a secondary source must be attributed to its author by means of the appropriate citation procedure Only widely knovyn facts and first hand thoughts and observations original to the student do not require citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text. Plagiarism, also, consists of passing off as one's own segments or the total of another person's work. 1 Examples of proper citation (footnote format) are as follows : a 'Plagiarism, for a Latin word meaning 'kidnapping,' ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft. '(Direct quotation] 'Harry Shaw, Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms (McGraw Hill, 1972) pp 209-210 b As Harry Shaw states in his Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms, 'Plagiarism, from a Latin word meaning 'kidnapping,' ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft n '(D i rect quotation w ith an introductory statement citing the source ) '(McGraw-Hill, 1972), pp. 209-210. c. Plagiarism is literary theft. To emphasize that point Harry Shaw states that the root of the word comes from the Latin word meaning 'kidnapping .' 1[Paraphrasing] 1Concise Dic tionary of Literary Terms (McGraw-Hill 1972), pp 209-210 2 Examples of proper citation (in body of text) : .. a Shaw (1972) states that the root of the word comes from the Latin word meaning "kidnapping.' (Paraphrasing; complete information about source will be cited in a section at the close of the text.] b. Shaw (1972) was correct when he stated that "plagiarism from a Latin word meaning kidnapping,' ranges from i nept paraphrasing to outright theft.' [Quotation ; complete infor mation about source will be cited in a section at the close of the text.] 3 The following are examples of plagiarism because sources are not cited and appropriate quotatiqn marks are not used: a Plagiarism from a Latin word meaning "kidnapping," ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft. b. Plagiarism comes from a Latin word meaning 'kidnapping' and ranges from paraphras i ng to theft. c Plagiarism ranges from inept paraphrasing to outright theft. (Footnoting/citation styles will depend upon those used by different academic disciplines. Many disciplines in the Natural Science areas, for example, will cite the sources within the body of the text.] Punishment Guidelines: The student who submitted the subject paper, lab report, etc.. shall receive an "F" with a numerical value of zero on the item submitted, and the "F" shall be used to dete(mine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to fail the student in the course Cheating Cheating is defined as follows : (a) the unauthorized grant ing or receiving of aid during the prescribed period of a course-graded exercise : students may not consult written materials such as notes or books, may not look at the paper of another st1:1dent, nor consult orally with any other student taking the same test ; (b) asking another person to take an examination in his or her place; (c) taking an examination for or in place of another student; (d) stealing visual concepts, such as drawings, sketches, diagrams, musical programs

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34 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG and scores, graphs, maps, etc and presenting them as one's own; {e) stealing, borrowing, buying, or disseminating tests, answer keys or other examihation material except as officially authorized, re search papers, creative papers, speeches, etc. {f) Stealing or copying of computer programs and presenting them as one's own. Such stealing includes the use of another student's program, as obtained from the magnetic media or interactive, terminals or from cards, print-out paper, etc. PUNISHMENT GUIDELINES FOR ACADEMIC DISHONESTY: Punishments for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may include receipt of an 'F' or 'Zero' on the subject paper, lab report, etc an 'F' in the course, suspension or expulsion from the University. The University drop and forgiveness policies shall be revoked for a student accused of academic dishonesty. The internal transcript of a student who is awarded an 'F' for academic dishonesty will read a For observation of or exchanging test information with other stu dents during the course of a classroom test, the students who receive or give such information may receive an 'F' with a nu merical value of zero on the test, and the 'F' shall be used to determine the final course grade It is the option of the instructor to fail the student in the course b. For the use of any prohibited device, such as a cheat sheet, recording, calculator if forbidden on exam, etc., during the course of a classroom test to assist the student or other students, the student using such prohibited device may receive an 'F' in the course. c For the use of another student, a stand-in, to take an examina tion for the enrolled student, it is suggested that the enrolled student receive an 'F' in the course and be suspended from school for one year and that the stand-in, if a University student, be suspended from school for one year. d. For stealing, borrowing, or buying of research papers, creative works, speeches or tests and other exam materials, or the dis semination of such materials, or the manipulation of recorded grades in a grade book or other class records, the student, if enrolled in the course, may receive an 'F' in the course and may be expelled from the University e It is suggested that students who receive or give stolen computer programs receive an 'F' with a numerical value of zero on the program or programs, and the 'F' be used to determine the final course grade It is the option of the instructor to fail the student in the course Disruption of Academic Process Disruption of academic process is defined as the act or words of a student in a classroom or teaching environment which in the reasonable estimation of a facult}' member: {a) directs attention from the academic matters at hand, such as noisy distractions; persistent, disrespectful or abusive interruptions of lecture, exam or academic discussions, or {b) presents a danger to the health, safety or well being of the faculty member or students Punishment Guidelines for Disruption of Academic Process: Punishments for disruption of academic process will depend on the seriousness of the disruption and will range from a private verbal reprimand to dismissal from class with a final grade of 'W,' if the student is passing the course, shown on the student record. If the student is not passing, a grade of 'F' will be shown on the student record. Procedures for Handling Student Violations Involving Alleged Academic Dishonesty/ And Disruption Of Academic Process Alleged violations of academic dishonesty or alleged disruptions of academic process will be handled initially by the instructor, who will discuss the incident with the student. It must be noted that the Faculty Senate considers the traditional relationship between stu dent and faculty member as the primary means of settling disputes that may arise. If the instructor observes the alleged dishonesty occurring during an examination, he/she should, with discretion, notify the student of the fact before the student leaves the examination In all cases, the instructor must attempt to schedule a meeting with the student to discuss the alleged dishonesty or disruptions After the discussion, if the student and instructor have reached a mutual agreement as to the solution, the instructor shall file a statement with the chairperson of the department or equivalent, e.g. Campus Dean, responsible for the course outlining the facts of the incident and the agreed-upon solution signed by both .the instructor and student. A copy of this statement shall be given to the student. If no solution is reached, the matter should be referred to the Chairperson of the department or the equivalent, e.g Campus Dean, for attempt at resolution If no resolution is reached, the matter should be referred to the Dean of the College for attempt at resolution If no solution is reached, the dean shall appoint a student/faculty committee consisting of an equal number of stu dents and faculty to hear the two sides of the incident and to advise the dean regarding the disposition of the case. Academic Committee Pre-Hearing Procedure. Within a reason able time following the failure of the student/instructor/dean meetings to bring about a solution, and in no event later than three (3) months after such failure, the dean shall cause formal charges to be filed with the appointed academic committee The charged student shall be provided a written notice of charges, in sufficient detail to prepare for the hearing, no less than three (3) days before the hearing, except in cases of emergency as specified below. Hearings Emergency Hearings. An expedited emergency hearing may be held before an academic administrator appointed by the dean or by the appointed academic committee in cases which involve the safety, health or welfare of any student or staff member. Non-Emergency Hearing before the Academic Committee General Principles Burden of Proof. The burden of proof shall be on the complain ant. The standard of proof for decision shall be 'substantial evi dence,' that is, whether it is reasonable to conclude from the evidence submitted that the student did commit the violations for which he/she has been charged and shall not be the strict criminal law standard of proof beyond a reasonable doubt . Record The proceedings of all hearings shall be recorded. Inspection of Evidence. The student may inspect the evidence which will be presented against him/her. Present Evidence The student may present evidence on his/her own behalf Question Witnesses The student may hear and question ad verse witnesses Self-Incrimination. The student shall not be forced to present tes timony which would be self-incriminating. Advisor The student may have an advisor of his/her choice present; however, the role of such a person is as an advisor to the student only The advisor may speak to and consult with the student but may not serve as the student's advocate, question witnesses or otherwise participate in the proceedings Decision Based on Evidence The decision of the academic com mittee or appointed academic administrator shall be based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing. Decision in Writing. The decision of the academic committee or appointed academic administrator, including findings of fact and a determination of penalty or sanction if any, shall be presented to the student in writing within a reasonable period of time following the hearing. Enrollment Status The student's enrollment status will remain unchanged pending final decision, except in cases of emergency, as described above If the issue remains open at the end of the semester, the instructor shall give the student an 'I' grade in the course until all issues are resolved Closed Hearings All hearings shall be closed unless specifically requested otherwise in writing by the charged student prior to the hearing Failure to Appear. If a student against whom charges have been made fails to appear, the academic committee or academic admin istrator may proceed in his/her absence.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 35 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 19'1a3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Hearing on Appeal. The charged may appeal . decision of the academic committee or appointed academic ad mma Specialization: Those courses required tog"" the student academoc nd bacuh D f laureate such as Mathematics, Accounting, Psychology, etc. istrator within thirty (30) working days of decision to t e o b. Supporting' Related: Thew courses may be prerequisites to the specialization !hey Undergraduate Studies or the Dean of the G ra. d. uate Sc.hool, whichmay support specialized courses 1iy giving preparatoon Of breadth to the area of specoalozatoon. I h b These courses are often referred to as college or program core courses. ever is appropriate The record of the earing may e c ProgramElectives : Thewareusuallyabroadbandofcoursesofferedbythecollegeofferongthe considered on appeal and the student 1s entitled to access the maJOf to further enrich the student in the general academic field of the major. record when appealing. The decision of the Undergraduate Studies or the Dean of the Graduate School is final. Freshman English Requirement General Distribution Requirements All A.A. degree holders from in-state institu tions and Florida College, Temple Terrace, will be considered as having met USF General Distribution Requirements, and 60 semes ter hours of work will be transferred. Line-by-line course evaluation will be conducted for out-of-state and in-state private institution A.A. degree holders The determination of the prerequisites for a given academic w ill the prerogative of the college in which the student 1s maioring A wide distribution of academic areas should be a part of a formal university education. For that reason, the distribu tion requirements must be satisfied over the four-year period by completion of 40 semester hours with at least 6 semester hours in each of these five areas: Area I-English Composition Freshman English (ENC 1101 and ENC 1102) Area II-Fine Arts and Humanities Any course offered by American Studies; Art; Classics; Commu nication; Dance; English ENC 1101 11 1105); Foreign Languages; Humanities; Liberal Studies; Lmgu1st1cs (only LIN 3010, 3801 ); Music; Philosophy (excluding PHI 2100); Reli gious Studies/Ancient Studies; Theatre. [See Rule 6A-10.30] Area Ill-Mathematics and Quantitative Methods Any course offered by the Department of Mathematics and/or any Engineering Computer Service cou .rse any of the following courses: Business and Economic Stat1st1cs, QMB 2150, 3200; Logic, PHI 2100; Social Science Statistics, STA 3122 [See Rule 6A-10.30] Area IV-Natural Sciences Any course offered by : Biology botany, microbiology and zoology); Chemistry; Geol'?gy; and/or Introduction to Oceanography, OCE 3001; B1olog1cal Anthropol ogy 3511 Area V-Social and Behavioral Sciences Any course offered by the Departments (or Programs) .of: African and Afro-American Studies; Anthropology (excluding ANT 3511 ); Criminology; Economics (excluding 2111, 3121 ); Geography; Gerontology (including History'. Polit!cal Science; Psychology; Sociology; lnterd1sc1plinary Social Sci ences (excluding STA 3122); Women's Studies; and/or any of the following courses: Educational Psychology, EDF 3210; Sur vey of Mass Communications, MMC 3000; Introduction to Public Administration, PAD 3003; Public Financial Administration, PAD 4202. Acceptable in the total of 40 semester hours but not part of any of the five areas: *The Teacher in a World of Work, EVT 3060; *Use of the Library, LIS 2001. . Since each college may recommend spec1f1c f.or sat isfaction of each area, students should consult the d1stribut1on re quirements as listed in each college section of the catalog Courses required for a student's major program** will not counted in the total of 40 hours, although areas of the general dis tribution requirements may be waived where appropriate No more than 8 hours in a single department (or program) may be counted toward distribution requirements for any area A student may appeal to the of or her college for exceptions to these courses prior to reg1strat1on in such courses. A student must check with his/her college to be.sure is meeting general distribution requirements special cert1f1cat1on or accreditation requirements where appropriate Note: Education majors must take courses in at least two d1Uerent departments under Areas II and of Engineering is unable to accept these courses as a part of its engineering accredited pro-All first-time-in-college students are required to take Freshman English (a sequential two-semester course of study) in accordance with the following conditions: 1. First-time-enrolled students (a) who do not intend to take the CLEP Freshman English Test or (b) who have been notified of failing CLEP prior to registration and who do not intend to attempt the exam a second time must take ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 sequentially. If a st.udent fails the first course, must repeat it before proceeding to the next Freshman English course. Students should normally take these courses during their fresh man year, but these courses are high demand and it is possible that registration space will not always be available. 2. First-time-enrolled students (a) who have not taken CLEP prior to their arrival on campus or (b) who have failed but wish to repeat the test must attempt CLEP during their first nine (9) weeks. During this semester, they not enroll in ENC 11 qi. l_f a student either fails or doesn t attempt the CLEP examination during his/her first nine (9) weeks, the student normally should take ENC 1101 in the following semester. In this case, the student will normally complete the sequence by the first semes ter of his/her sophomore year . These policies do not apply to first-time-enrolled students who can meet the Freshman English requirement with credit transferred from another institution or those with appropriate AP English credit. Credit by Examination A student who feels he/she has already acquired the basic content of a course on his/her approved schedule should inquire about credit-by-xamination : Some exams are offered through the College level Examination Program {CLEP) and others be offered within departments. Interested students should obtain additional information from their advisers or the Office of Evaluation and Testing. Graduation Requirements Baccalaureate Degree University University minimum requirements for graduation consist of the following : earn a minimum of 120 semester hours with at a 'C' average (2.0 GPA) on all courses attempted at USF; a transfer student must have a GPA of 2 0 or higher when combined with all work attempted at other institutions; satisfactorily complete CLAST and the writing and computation course requirements of 6A-10.30; earn a minimum of 40 semester hours of upper-level work (courses numbered 3000 and above); complete Gerieral Distribution require ments; complete residency requirement; complete program re quirements as determined by the college; .and be recommended !or graduation by the Dean of the appropriate college. The require ments must be met by every student upon whom a degree is conferred. No grades may be changed following graduation. In addition, at least 60 semester hours must be earned from a baccalaureate granting institution regardless of credit hours trans ferred from a Community/Junior College unless the student has received prior approval for waiver of this policy from the Regulations Committee This policy does not articu lation programs based on the A.S. For regard ing such programs consult the Office of Community College Relations . All students entering the University of South Florida with fewer than 60 semester hours of credit are required to earn at least 9 semester hours of credit prior to graduation by attendance during one or more summer semesters The University may waive the

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36 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEQURES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1'91/'3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG application of this rule in cases of unusual hardship to the individual. for or receive credit for a lower level course in that specific language. (See Summer Enrollment Requirement below.) Students to whom this regulation applies should inquire of the Division of Language for the placement examination Summer Enrollment Requirement As stated above, effective September 1, 1976, all students entering the University of South Florida with fewer than 60 semes ter hours of credit are required to earn at least 9 semester hours of credit prior to graduation by attendance during one or more summer semesters. The University may waive the application of this rule in cases of unusual hardship A student who wishes to have the rule waived must complete a 'Request for Waiver of Mandatory Summer Enrollment Form' available in the Registrar's Office. After submission of the form to the Registrar's Office, the student will be notified by mail of the action taken. The requirement may be fulfilled only by attending one of the universities in the State University System. They are: University of South Florida, Tampa; Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Univer sity, Tallahassee; Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; Florida International University, Miami; Florida State University, Tallahas see; University of Central Florida Orlando; University of Florida, Gainesville; University of North Florida, Jacksonville; and University of West Florida, Pensacola Th Board of Regents suspended this policy for all students who will g;aduat Summer Term, 1992, Fall Semester, 1992, or Spring Semester, 1993. Th Board of Regents will make a determination in July, 1992 of the necessity of maintaining th suspnsion or of tw-instating th summr session atten danc ,.qui,.mnt for all other students. Foreign Language Graduation Requirement All students applying for a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of South Florida must demonstrate competency in a foreign language. To demonstrate this competency ; students may take either two semesters of a beginning collegEHevel foreign language or one semester of a higher level course and earn a letter grade of 'C' (no 'S' 9rades) or above in the appropriate level course or demonstrate equivalent competency by passing an examination. Languages should be selected from among the ones listed below: Classical Languages Greek (t>.ncient) Hebrew (Classical) Greek (New Testament) Latin Modern Arabic Greek (Modern) Polish Chinese Hebrew (Modern) Portuguese French Italian Russian German Japanese Spanish Other Modern Foreign Languages Approval needed by the Director of the Division of Language American Si9n Langua9e Approval needed by the students program/department major. Students electing to take the examination in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, or Spanish should apply to the Director of the Division of Language. Students taking the examination in Ancient or Modern Greek or in Latin should apply to the Chairperson of Classics. Students taking the examination in New Testament Greek or in Hebrew should apply to the Chairperson of Religious Studies Students utilizing American SigR Language should apply to the Chairperson of Communication Sciences and Disorders . Foreign Language Placement Students with two or more years of study in a foreign language in high school, or with postsecondary course(s) in foreign language, or with experiential learning of a foreign language may not enroll for credit in courses in that language without first taking a place ment examination administered by the Division of Language Should the placement examination indicate that remedial work is required ( 1120-1121 ). the student will be allowed to enroll with the understanding that the grade eventually earned will be either an 'S' or 'U.' Under no circumstances will a student who places above the first year level or who passes a higher level course be allowed to register Academic Residence Candidates for graduation must have completed at least 30 hours of the last 60 hours of their undergraduate credit in USF courses. The approval of the dean of the college granting their degree must be secured for any transfer credits offered for any part of these last 60 hours. Exceptions to the above rules are students who are enrolled at other universities on approved exchange programs, cooperative education students enrolled in other institutions (prior approval having been secured from their USF advisers) while on their training periods, and students taking correspondence work from the Univer sity of Florida. Major Fields of Study The University of South Florida offers curricula leadin9 to the bac calaureate degree in the following fields The degree is indicated in parentheses after each college, the major code after each major College of Arts and Sciences: African and Afro-American Studies (AFA) (B.A.) American Studies (AMS) (B.A.) Anthropology (ANT) (B.A.) Biology (BIO) (B.S.) Biology (Biotechnology) (BTK) (B.S. ) Botany (Bot) (B.S.) Botany (Environmental Science) (BES) (B.S.) Chemistry (CHM) (B.A.) Chemistry (CHS) (B.S.) Chemistry (5-Year Program) (CBM) (B.A.) Classics Classics) (!CL) (B.A.) Classics Latin) (CLL) (B.A.) Classics Latin-Greek) (CLS) (B.A.) Clinical Chemistry (CHC) (B.S. ) Communication {SPE) (B.A.) Criminology (CCJ) (B.A.) Economics (ECN) (B.A.) English (B.A.) Literature (ENG) (B.A.) Creative Writing-Fiction (CWF) (B.A.) Creative Writing-Poetry (CWP) (B.A.) Professional-Technical Writing (CWT) (B.A.) French (FRE) (B.A.) Geography (GPY) (B.A.) Geology (GLY) (B.A.) Geology (GLS) (B. S ) German (GER) (B.A.) Gerontology (GEY) (B.A.) Gerontology (GES) (B. S ) History (HTY) (B.A.) Humanities (HUM) (B.A.) Interdisciplinary Social Science (!SS) (B.A.) American Sign Language (ISA) Speech/Language/Hearing Science (!SH) Urban Studies (ISU) Interpretor Training (ISi) Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS) (B.l.S. ) International Studies (INT) (B.A.) Italian (IT A) (B.A.) Liberal Studies (ALA) (B.A.) Mass Commun i cations (B.A.) Advertising (ADV) Broadcasting News (NWS) Broadcasting Program & Production (PGM) Film (FIL) Journalism Magazine (MAG) Journalism News Editorial (JOU) Public Relations (PUR) Visual Communications (VIC) Mathematics (MTH) (B.A.) Medical Technology (MET) (B.S. )

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A(AQEM!C AND PROCEQURES 37 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1'9123 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Microbiology (MIC) (B.S.) Natural Sciences Interdisciplinary (B.A.) Biology (INB) Chemistry (INC) Geology (ING) Mathematics (INM) Physics (INP) Philosophy (PHI) (B.A.) Physics (PHY) (B.A.) Physics (PHS) (B. S ) Political Science (POL) (B.A.) Psychology (PSY) (B.A.) Religious Studies (REL) (B.A.) Russian (RUS) (B.A.) Social Work (SOK) (B.S.W.) Sociology (SOC) (B.A.) Spanish (SPA) (B.A.) Women's Studies (WST) (B.A.) Zoology (ZOO) (B.S.) Zoology (Environmental Sciences (ZES) (B. S ) College of Business Administration (B.4./B.S.option): Accounting (ACC) Economics (ECN) Finance (FIN) General Business Administration (GBA) Management Information Systems (ISM) Management (MAN) Marketing (MKT) College of Education (B.A./B.S. option): Art Education (ARE) Botany Education (BOE) Business and Office Education (BTE) Chemistry Education (CHE) Distributive Education (DEC) Elementary-Early Childhood (EEC) Elementary Education (EDE) English Education (ENE) Special Education Behavior Disorders (EED) Mental Retardation (EMR) Specific Learning Disabilities (ELD) Foreign Language Education (FLS) (B.A.) French (FLF) German (FLG) Italian (FU) Russian (FLR) Spanish (FLA) Industrial-Technical Education (EVT) Mathematics Education (MAE) Music Education General (MEG) Instrumental (MEI) Vocal (MEV) Physical Education Elementary (PTE) Secondary (PTS) Wellness (PTW) Physics Education (PHE) Science Education Biology (NSB) Chemistry (NSC) Physics (NSP) Social Science Education (SSE) Speech Communication -English Education (SED) Zoology Education (ZOE) College of Engineering: Chemical Engineering (ECH) (B.S.C.H. ) Civil Engineering (ECE) (B. S .C.E. ) Computer Engineering (ECP) (B. S .C.P.) Computer Science (ECC) (B.S.C.S. ) Electrical Engineering (EEL) (B.S.E.E.) Engineering (EGU) (B.S.E. ) Engineering Science (EGC) (B.S.E.S.) Engineering Technologx (ETK) (B.E.T.) Industrial Engineering (EIE) (B. S .l.E.) Information Systems (EIF) (B.S.l.S.) Mechanical Engineering (EME) (B.S. M .E.) College of Fine Arts (B.A.) (B.F.A.) (B.M.): Art (ART) (B.A.) Art History (ARH) (B.A.) Dance (DAN) (B.A.) Music (MUS) (B. M.) Theatre (TAR) (B. A./B .F.A.) College of Nursing (B.S.): Nursing (NUR) Nursing (NRN) Academic Minor In addition to major programs, many departments offer an academic minor that requires approximately one half the upper level credits required for a major. Students interested in a particular minor should obtain the specific requirements from the appropriate department. The department may require the same admission or retention standards as required for the major. Each academic minor conforms to the University requirements: 1 A minimum of 8 semester hours of credit used to satisfy the re quirements of a minor must be from University of South Florida courses. 2 A student desiring a minor must have a major in a different program option. 3 University of South Florida course work for a minor must have a grade point average of at least 2.0. 4 Only an undergraduate degree-seeking student at the University of South Florida is eligible for a minor 5. A minor can be applied for and received only in conjunction with applying for and receiving a baccalaureate degree except for students who have already received a baccalaureate degree from USF who may earn certification of a minor by taking additional undergraduate course work at the University and applying for the certification. Minor Fields of Study The UniversitY of South Florida offers curricula leading to an aca demic minor in the following fields: College of Arts and Sciences: African and Afro-American Studies Option I or II African Studies American Studies Anthropology Asian Studies Communication Criminology Economics English: English and American Literature English: Professional-Technical Writing English: Creative Writing French Geography Geology German Greek History Humanities Human Services Interdisciplinary Classics International Studies Italian Latin Linguistics Manual Communications

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38 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992/fJJ UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Mathematics Philosophy Political Science Psychology Religious Studies Russian Sociology Spanish Women's Studies College of Business Administration: Economics Management Management Information Systems College of Fine Arts: Art Dance Music Theatre Student's Choice of Catalog In order to graduate from the University of Soutfi Florida, each degree-seeking student must meet all of the graduation require ments specified in the USF catalog of his/her choice A degree,. seeking student may choose any USF catalog published during his/ her continuous enrollment. Students who have transferred from one Florida public institution to another are affected by the follow ing Board of Regents policy: Graduation requirements in effect at the receiving SUS insti tution at the time a student enrolls at a Florida public institution of higher learning shall apply to that st\Jdent in the same manner that graduation requirements apply to its native students provided the student has had continuous enrollment as defined in the SUS institution s catalog At the University of South Florida, 'continuous enrollment' is de fined as completing a minimum of two semesters (Fall, Spring, Sum mer) as a degree-seeking student per year at USF, inclusive of receipt of grades for courses, (excluding W's) through time of graduation. Therefore, students cannot choose a USF catalog prio; to or during an academic year in which they did not maintain continuous enrollment. Each catalog is considered to be published during the academic year printed on the title page If the student cannot meet all of the graduation requirements specified in the catalog of his/her choice due to decisions and changes by the University in policy matter, course offering, etc., appropriate substitutions will be determined by the chairperson of the department or program of the student's major University policies are subject to change and apply to all students regardless of their choice of catalog. If the student's graduation re quirements are affected by changes in University policies, appropri ate arrangements will be made to preclude penalization of the student. Repeat Course Work The hours for a course which has been repeated may be counted only once toward the minimum 120 sem. ester hours of credit required for graduation. Double Undergraduate Major Students may elect to graduate with two majors In that event, they must apply independently to each college and be assigned an adviser in each discipl i ne The student must meet all requirements of each major separately and must be certified for graduation by the appropriate dean(s) Second Undergraduate Major A student who wishes to worl< for a second major, after receipt of a baccalaureate degree, must apply through the Office of Admis sions and meet the major requirements as determined by the college. (Exceptions to this rule are students who had been previously accepted for a 'Double Undergraduate Major' but graduated with only one major.) After acceptance by the appropriate college and proof of completion, the student's 'permanent academic record' will be posted accordingly *Note that those students who complete the requirements for a second major must be aware that they will not receive a second degree Two Degrees (USF Students} A student at the University of South Florida may receive two baccalaureate degrees provided he/she meets the University's gradu ation requirements; a minimum of 30 semester hours must be earned in on-campus undergraduate courses to be applied to the second degree (These hours are in addition to the minimum of 120 semester hours earned which apply toward the first degree ) The student must also meet the requirements of the college awarding the degree and the residency requirement. Second Baccalaureate Degree (Transfer Students} A student already graduated from an accredited four-year institution must earn a minimum of an additional 30 semester hours of USF undergraduate courses to apply toward his/her second baccalaureate degree Students must also meet the requirements of the college awarding the degree and the residency requirements Availability of a Baccalaureate Degree for Students Enrolled in or Graduated from a Five-year Master's Program A student may enroll in a baccalaureate degree program while enrolled in or after graduation from a five-year master's degree program. In consultation with an adviser in the five-year program and an adviser in the baccalaureate-level program and with the approval of the College Dean(s) offering the programs, the student is required to complete the following : a Satisfy degree requireme nts for the five-year master's program. b Satisfy requirements for 'he baccalaureate-level program B.A. Degree for Medical and Dental Students Students who are admitted to a medical or dental school after completing their junior year at USF may be awarded the B.A. degree in Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences from the College of Arts and Sciences (see College of Arts and Sciences). Application for Graduation In order to graduate, a student must submit an applicat i on for the bachelor's degree, graduate degree or associate in arts certifi cate to the Office of the Registrar This application must be submitted in the term of expected graduation by the deadline noted in the academic calendar If a student applies for graduation and is not approved, a new application for degree must be submitted by the deadline in a new term A student who expects to graduate with a bachelor's degree in the summer term may participate in the spring coml"llencement ceremony. In order to be eligible to participate, these summer graduates must submit the 'Request to Attend the Spring Gradu ation Ceremony' Form by the spring semester graduation applica tion deadline (see Academic Calendar) The application for the bachelor's degree is available from the student's college advising office. The application for a graduate degree is available from the Office of the Registrar or the student's college advising office The application for an associate in arts certificate is available from the Center for Academic Advising in Undergraduate Studies . The application must first be certified (signed or stamped in the section, 'Office Use Only') by the student's college (Center for Aca demic Advising for the A.A. certificate) The college retains one copy, and the student must submit the remaining copies to the Office of the Registrar prior to the graduation application deadline. Inquiries concerning approval or denial of graduation should be

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 39 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH' FLORIDA f'92a3 UNDERGRADUA Tl CATALOG made to the appropriate college or to the Center for Academic attempted at other institutions; and the General Distribution Re Advising in Undergraduate Studies quirements of the University must be satisfied Physical Education It is the student's responsibility to clear all grades (incomand Military Science credits do not count toward the A.A. degree. pletes) in courses required for graduation and .to provide official In addition, the student must present a score (passing score after transcripts of all transferred course work needed for graduation at August, 1984) on the College 'Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) least 3 weeks prior to the end of the term in which he/she and fulfill the writing and computation course requirements of 6A-to graduate. 10.30 prior to receiving an A.A. degree. A student applying for a second undergraduate major must do Application for the Associate in Arts degree is obtained from the so within the same deadline set for applying for a degree Undergraduate Studies Center for Academic Advising prior to the A student applying for a minor must: application deadline The Associate in Arts degree must be awarded 1. File a separate request for certification for the minor in the de-prior to the term that the student becomes eligible for the baccalau-partment of the minor during the semester of graduation; reate degree Detailed instructions to determine the student eligi2. Apply for the minor on the Application for Degree, listing both bility to receive the A.A. degree are included with the application the minor and college responsible for the minor on the applica-The awarding of the Associate in Arts degree does not alter the tion; and calculation of the grade-point average Certification for the A.A. in 3. Have no grade in required courses no way affects what the individual colleges require for the comple tion of the major for a bachelor's degree Honors at Graduation A baccalaureate candidate must first have an overall grade-point average for all work attempted at USF on the standard grad i ng scale of a 3.500 or higher to be considered for honors In addition, transfer students to be eligible for honors must have a grade point average of 3.500 or higher when combined with all work attempted at other institutions The forgiveness policy at USF or other institu tions will not be applicable in computing the grade point average for honors. Candidates with a GPA of 3.500 but below 3 710 shall receive a diploma designation of cum laude (with honor) Candidates with a GPA of 3 710 but below 3.900 shall receive a diploma designation of magna cum /aude (with higher honor) Candidates with a GPA of 3.900 or above shall receive a diploma designation of summa cum laude (with highest honor) In addition, each dean has the option to select on the basis of ex ceptional achievement 1 % of the college's graduates or 1 student per semester for graduating with distinction . Commence.faent Commencement ceremonies at USF (Tampa) are held twice a year: fall and spring. A student who expects to graduate with a bachelor's degree in the summer term may participate in the spring commencement ceremony In order to be eligible to participate, these summer graduates must submit the Request to Attend the Spring Gradu ation Ceremony Form by the spring semester graduation applica tion deadline (see Academic Calendar) All students who have graduated the previous summer term and all candidates for degrees in the fall semester are eligible to participate in the December graduation. Information regarding the ceremony will be mailed to the students during the semester in which they should participate If information is not received the student should contact the Office of the Registrar Graduate students (master's, education specialist, and doctorate) will not participate in commencement exercises until all requirements for such degrees have been fulfilled Certification Requirements Associate in Arts To receive the Associate in Arts degree, a student must complete 60 semester hours of post-secondary credit; at least 20 of the last 30 semester hours must be completed in residence at the University of South Florida ; the minimum grade-point average must be at least 2.0 based on work attempted at USF; in add i tion ; a transfer student must have a GPA of 2.0 or higher when corubined with all work Student Records Policy Pursuant to the provisions of the Family Educational and Privacy Act (FERPA ; 20 USC Par. 1232g) 34 CFR Par. 99 1 et seq, Florida Statutes Sub. Par. 228 093 and 240.237 and USF Rule 6C42 0021, Florida Administrative Code, students have the rights to : 1. Inspect and review their education records 2. Privacy in their education records 3. Challenge the accuracy of their education records 4 Report violations of FERPA to the FERPA Office Department of Education, 400 Madison Avenue, SW, Washington, D .C. 20202 and/or bring actions in Florida Circuit Court for violations of Rule 6C4-2. 001, Florida Administrative Code. Copies of the Uni versity's student records policy, USF Rule 6C42.0021, may be obtained from : University Registrar or SVC 1036 4202 Fowler Avenue Tampa, Florida 33620 USF Agency Clerk Office of the General Counsel ADM 254 4202 Fowler Avenue Tampa, Florida 33620 Release of Student Information Pursuant to requirements of the Family Educational R i ghts and Privacy Act (FERPA), the following types of information, designated by law as directory information,' may be released via official media of the University of South Florida (according to USF policy) : Student name, local and permanent addresses, telephone list ing, major field of study, part i cipation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, fulland part-time status, and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended, and other similar information The University Directory, published annually by the University, contains only the following information, however : student name, local and permanent address, telephone listing, classification, and major field of study The Directory and other listings of 'directory information are circulated in the course of University business and, therefore, are accessi ble to the public as well as to students, faculty, and staff Students must inform the USF Office of the Registrar in writing (forms available for that purpose), if they wish Directory Informa tion to be withheld. Suth requests must be received within the first two weeks of the semester and will remain in effect until the student has not been enrolled at USF for three (3) consecutive terms Notification to the University of refusal to permit release of 'directory informatibn' via the University Directory must be received no later than the end of the first week of classes in the Fall Semester.

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES UNIVERSTTY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992a3 UNDERGRADUA T CATALOG Special Academic Programs Adva nced Placement Credit Program USF/Florida Public Communi _ty College The University of South Florida participates in tlie Advanced Placement Program conducted by the College Entrance ExaminaCross Enrollment tion Board. Some undergraduate students may find it advantageous to cross Examination papers are graded by selected committees on a fiveenroll at a Florida public community college while attending USF. point scale. The University allows advanced placement credit for Procedures to permit this type of registration are available during scores of 3, 4 or 5. No credit is allowed for scores of 1 or 2. specified times printed in the University Class Schedule. Credit hours Additional information is available in the Office of Evaluation and for the course(s) taken at the host institution will apply toward Testing, Undergraduate Studies. graduation only if prior approval was received from the student's USF adviser The grade point average will not transfer to USF. See a USF college adviser for detailed registration instructions and course approval. Transient Students USF degree-seeking students who wish to enroll at another re gionally-accredited institution MUST HAVE PRIOR WRITIEN APPROVAL from their college academic advisor to receive credit for courses taken. The transient student/cross enrollment form should be used for this purpose College Level Examination Program CCLEP) The University grants credit for Distribution Requirements and for a number of specific courses through CLEP General Examina tions and CLEP Subject Examinations. Performance levels necessary to achieve credit are established at a common level for all universi ties and community colleges in the State system Generally the performance levels are based on the average score of students who have already taken the courses. The following policies apply to this program: 1 In order to receive credit for the General Examinations of CLEP, students must take (or retake) the examinations not later than nine weeks after the first enrollment in college level cou .rses. CLEP Subject Examinations, with the exception of the College Composition and Freshman English Subject Examinations, are not affected by this policy. Exceptions to this rule should be petitioned to the Academic Regulations Committee. 2. Although the General Examinations are not equated to specific courses, there are two cases in which the content is sufficiently similar to be considered as duplicate credit. Thus credit may not be received for both in the followi ng: Test Courses English Composition with Essay ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 Mathematics MAC 2102 and MGF 2202 3. Transfer students from SUS or Division of Community College institutions must have scores or CLEP credit posted on their tran scripts to receive CLEP credit at USF. Transfer students from nonSUS or non-Division of Community College institutions must have scores which meet the State Board of Education minimum score standards posted on official transcripts The receiving college will determine, based upon guidelines, the applicability of these credits to the student's (baccalaureate) .degree require ments 4 Credit for CLEP Subject Examinations will be awarded for passing scores only on those examinations which are recognized by USF and do not constitute duplicate course credit. 5. CLEP Examinations (General or Subject) for English do not satisfy the writing requirements for SBE 6A-10.30, although they do provide credit for the appropriate English courses. 6. CLEP General/Subject Examinations in mathematics, calculus, college algebra, trigonometry may satisfy only 3 semester hours of mathematics required (College Algebra or above) for SBE 6A10.30. 7. The appropriate CLEP General Subject Examinations in mathe matics and high school transcripts indicating a grade of 'C or higher in mathematics course work (College Algebra, Trigo nometry, and Calculus) satisfy all 6 semester hours of the mathe matics requirement. Applications for and additional information on CLEP are avail able in the Office of Evaluation and Testing. Independent Study Undergraduate students wishing to take a course by independ ent study must contact the instructor of the course for permission The instructor specifies the requirements to be completed by the student including tests, periodic class attendance, term papers, etc. Not all courses in the University may be taken by independent study. The respective colleges have jurisdiction in the determination of which courses may be taken in this mar : mer The regular grading system applies to all independent study stu dents. Grades earned by independent study have the same status as those acquired through regular class attendance Students taking a course by independent study must register for the specific course section in the regular manner College Reach-Out Program College Reach-Out is an academic program designed for low income and educationally disadvantaged junior and senior high school students, who have the academic potential for success in a postsecondary institution, and plan to pursue an education beyond high school. The focus of the program is to prepare students to meet higher education requirements established for admission to colleges and universities. Tutoring services are provided to enhance students' academic skills A The program is to provide in personal, social, academic, educational, and career opportunities Academic requirements are listed : 1 Family income must meet federal and state guidelines. 2 Students must have completed the 8th grade. 3 Students must have a 2.0 grade average in English, mathematics, history, and science 4. Students must attend schools in Hillsborough County. Applications should be forwarded to the College Reach-Out Program, FAO 100-U, University of South Florida. Enrollment in Evening Courses Evening courses at the University of South Florida are part of the regular academic program; they are offered at times convenient to people within commuting distance who wish to continue their education at night while occupied during the day with other responsibilities. Requirements for day and evening courses are the same See the University Class Schedule for evening registration dates and times State University System, External Degree Program Bachelor of Independent Studies (BIS) The Bachelor of Independent Studies (BIS) Program is available through participating state universities in Florida. The universities currently involved are the Florida State University, the University of Florida, the University of North Florida, and the University of South Florida Founded in 1968, the external degree program is for adults who find it difficult to attend regular university classes because of career or family commitments The BIS student proceeds at his/her own pace and, for the most part, in his/her own setting. The exception is the summer seminars which require periodic, short-term campus residence.

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -199113 UNDERGRADUATf' CATALOG The admin i stration office for the Program is located on USF's Eligibility Tampa Campus For detailed information, see the College of Arts A 2 .5 cumulative GPA is required for all programs and exchange and Sciences. is generally favored during the sophomore and junior years. In any case, students must return to USF for at least one semester prior to graduation if they intend to graduate from USF. Accordingly, seniors are elig i ble if they can meet this requirement State University System of Florida Correspondence Courses The State Univers i ty System of Florida offers over 125 university credit courses by correspondence incorporating courses from aca demic departments at USF, FSU, and UF. The program is centrally administered for Florida's state universities through its offices in Gainesville Registration may occur at any time throughout the year ; students work at their own pace, and may complete any required examinations at USF or other testing sites. Free course catalogs may be obtained by visiting the USF Con tinuing Office writing to the Department of Independent Study by Correspondence {1223 NW 22nd Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32609), or calling toll free 1-800-255 5927 The University of South Florida considers independent study by correspondence as resident credit. Grades are not transferable. Ex ception : grades for courses taken by Cooperat ive Education stu dents while on a training period are transferred and will be used in computing the USF grade point average Upward Bound Upward Bound is a pre-college program for students from low income families who have academic potent ial, but who have inadequate secondary school preparat i on or have not achieved suc cess in school. Its purposes are to assist these students in developing goals and academic skills and to provide the motivation necessary to obtain entrance and achieve success in a college or post secondary pro gram. To qualify, the applicant must meet the following criteria : 1 Family income must meet federal guidelines 2 : Applicant should be a potential first-generation college student. 3 Student must have completed the 9th grade and presently be enrolled in the 10th or 11th grade \ n an accredited high school. 4. Grade point average (GPA) must Be 2 0 ('C') or above in basic pre-college courses 5 Attend weekly scheduled tutorial sessions. 6. Attend sixweeks summer residential component on the USF Tampa Campus Applications should be forwarded to Project Upward Bound University of South Florida Undergraduate Student Exchange (USE) United States and International The University of South Florida maintains cooperating programs for the mutual exchange of undergraduate students w ith various universities in the United Kingdom and Canada (international ex change). These exchange services are provided through the Off Campus Term (OCT) Program only to univers i t ies with which coop erating contractual agreements are in force An updated listing of all such exCHANGE OPTIONS is available from the OCT program. These contractual agreements prov i de a cost savings of over 60% on registration and tuiti on charges normally applicable to trans i ent students Students on financ ial aid continue to receive it from USF while on exchange There is an application charge of $200 .00 for international exchange which is refunded only if we fail to place the applicants meeting the eligibility requirements noted below The International Exchange Programs in the United Kingdom and Canada have a basic charge which covers the registration/ tuition at the host university In some U K programs, board (20meal plan) and room must also be paid to USF, while in others board and room is paid to the U .K. host university In some cases, decisions about charges and what is covered are based on cooperating con tractual agreements. Deviations cannot be permitted because of these agreements Duration of the exchange i s a full year (required) in some instances while in others one semester of exchange is permitted The cooperative contractual agreement determines this In exchange, the following apply : ( 1) courses and grades are accepted and entered into the USF record (transcript), and (2) grades earned on exchange are merged into the USF GPA. The application deadline for exchanges beginning in the fall term is March 1 and the spring (where possible), September 15 How ever, the number of exCHANGE OPTIONS is limited so early appli cation is desirable date of application (as well as year in college, scholastic record, etc.) carries considerable weight in situations where demand exceeds supply The OCT program maintains a library of materials about the univers i ties cooperating with USF. University of Maine Exchange Program The College of tducation operates a student exchange program with the University of Maine, Farmington This program provides opportunit ies for sophomores, juniors and seniors to exchange residence at both campuses The student exchange provides a waiver of out-of-state tuition. University credit earned i s applicable towards graduation Students desiring further information should contact the coordinator of student activities in the College of Education Study Abroad Programs USF students are eligible, i f they meet the specific academic requirements, for enrollment in a wide variety of study abroad programs sponsored by the State University System of Florida as well as by many other U S colleges and universities, national educational organizations, and foreign institutions of higher learn ing Programs offered by the State University System are listed below : Administered by the University of South Florida under the auspices of the International Affairs Center and the Travel-Study Division of PACE are : *One, two, or three-month study in Paris, France. In-class study in the French language in cooperation with the Alliance Francaise. In conjunction with this language study, an intensive program in French culture is offered during the month of July. The latter program consists of reading lectures, and on-site visits in Paris comb i ned with day-long excursions to important historical locatioris in the provinces *A four-week summer program of Italian language and culture located at Perugia, Italy in conjunction with the Ital ian University for Foreigners *A four-week summer program of study of Spanish language and culture located in Madrid, Spain. *A summer program in San Jose, Costa Rica in conjunction with the Forester Internat i onal Institute. This flexible program of study of Spanish offers courses lasting from two weeks to three months *A summer study-travel program to Mexico This program provides the participants with an opportunity to study selected Pre-Colum bian cultures through visits to archeological sites *A summer program in photography or cinematography conducted in Paris, France. (Class alternates each year ) A year-around program conducted in Merida, Venezuela in col laboration with the University of the Andes. The focus is Spanish language and South American culture, but students with advanced linguistic skills in Spanish may take a variety of courses in liberal arts, social sciences and business. A four-week summer program in German language and culture in Berlin. A sixweek summer program in Russian langauge and culture in Moscow New study abroad opportunities are constantly being added Check with the International Affairs Center office in Cooper Hall 292 for details.

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42 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1992('1 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG In addit i on to the programs sponsored by academic depart-Ft. Myers and Polk Community College in Lakeland The System ments, the University of South Florida offers a variety of study-travel provides access to information resources to fulfill the instructional, programs through PACE {Program for Adult Credit Education). research, and artistic needs of students, faculty, and staff of the These are coordinated by the travel-study section of the Division of University of South Fl. orida In addition, the System also has a Special Programs. responsibility to serve the educational, cultural, business, and pro* A three, or four-week summer program at Cambridge fessional information needs of the citizens of USF's service area and University the national academic community A three or six-week summer program in twentieth
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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 43 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA fff2/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Access Services (Circulation, Interlibrary Loan, Reserve, poster size enlargements AV materials, such as microphones, and REC: Regional Exchange Center) The Access Services' Cirpatch cords, projection lamps, overhead transparencies, surge culation and Reserve Departments are located on the first floor The protectors, audio and video cassettes, splicing tapes, and more are Reserve collection, containing books and articles "reserved" at available for purchase faculty request for use of a particular class, is available at the service desk Circulating books that are shelved on the third through fifth floors can .be checked out at the service desk. The library uses an automated circulation system which facilitates easy and quick check out of books All materials must be checked out prior to exiting the library security system in the first floor lobby A statement of the Library's circulation policy is available at the Access Services service desk University Media Center and Lab The University Media Center (UMC) is a resource center for curriculum support media and instructional materials Adult-level and K-12 audiotapes, records, kits, transparencies, slides, and other study and research presenta tion aids are available for loan A production room provides graphics and photography facilities, duplication equipment, typewriters, and a laminator for use. University Media Center Lab (UMC Lab) provides equipment and media on reserve for individual and class use. Various kinds of media are av. ailable for personal and class study aids. Open University and ITFS (Instructional Television Fixed Service) video tapes are available through scheduling Division of Learning Technologies Audiovisual Media Services provides equipment such as 16mm projectors, filmstrip projectors slide projectors, TV receivers/ monitors, video projectors, video equipment computer projection units, etc., for classroom use, University events and other functions Audiovist.1al Services also provides simple and complex public ad dress systems, recording and dubbing services, and maintenance of audio and video equipment. Th Film and Video Distribution's collection contains instruc tional and informational films and videotapes that are available for utilization in scheduled USF courses at no charge; for rental to external agencies or non-academic internal utilization; and for preview in the Film and Video Distr i bution Office located on the Tampa campus. Reference and research for films not in the USF collection are also provided The Graphic Desi9n Department provides a full range of graphic design applications including brochures flyers, transparen cies, charts, graphs, signs, video animation, computer generated slides, and displays Graphic designers provide solutions to meet communication design needs for instructional, informational, and promotional activities of the University. ID's. All students, faculty and staff must have an identification card Legal identification must be shown to obtain an ID. ID service is available throughout registration and special hours during the first week of classes each semester During the balance of the semester, ID's are made Monday and Wednesday from 9-12, 2-5, Tuesday from 10-12, 2-5: 45, and Thursday and Friday 9-12 : 00 There is no charge for the original ID or to replace a damaged ID, providing the original card is presented All other replacements are $5.00. Th Media Productions Department complements the video production and recording needs of the university by providing an in house classroom studio production facility The studios are part of the university's Instructional Television Fixed Service (ITFS} network Courses, teleconferences, and meetings can be recorded or trans mitted live to any designated rece .ive site within a 25-mile radius of the Tampa campus. Media Productions also produces multi-image slide shows and remote/studio instructional, informational and promotional video productions for faculty, staff, and student or ganizations Creative services offered include scriptwriting, photog raphy, visual design, soundtrack production, and all stages leading to the final product. Creative and technical consultation is available for any audio visual communications need The Media Supplies and Services Department provides com prehensive a s sistance in the selection, design, product i on and utilization of a varied range of instructional and presentational materials and tools Services include overhead transparencies, signs, drymounting, matting, laminating, framing punch/bind and Office of Teleconferences The Office of Teleconferences uses one-way video and two-way audio to receive live, satellite-transmitted, interactive programs, conferences and discussions from anywhere in the world As such, USF teleconference facilities allow faculty, staff, students and the business community access to pertinent information presented by renowned experts in their field Viewers, in remote sites who share an educational need, are virtually connected across time and space by electronic technology. The University's satellite receiving dish allows reception of both KU and C band teleconferences, as well as re-tran smission from the Tampa campus to selected receive:sites within the university's five-county transmission area. The Office of Teleconferences also provides full coordination services for uplink capability. Complete teleconference program planning, coordina tion and administrative services, including marketing and promo tion, registration, program materials, fiscal management, and evaluation are available Open University (O.U.) The Open University brings USF credit courses to students via television and radio. Broadcast on WUSF-TV, Channel 16 in the Tampa, St. Petersburg, Sarasota, and Lakeland areas and on WSFPTV, Channel 30 in the Fort Myers area, the Open University is ideal for the working person, a parent with small children, a student who is unable to get into an on
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44 A(ADEMIC PROGRAMS ANp SERV'CES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1'91(93 UNDERGRADUA Tf CATALOG University Services is the focal point for providing computing support services to the USF customer community The professional staff includes consultants who assist students, staff and faculty customers with computing needs. In the administrative support areas, services are provided through project teams com posed of programmer/analyst managers, programmer/analysts and programmers. Additional support consists of data entry, pro duction control, computer operations, communications, network services, and systems programming Computing accounts are es tablished through the UCS Financial Services group. Central site computing equipment located in the Stdent Serv ices Building on the Tampa campus includes an IBM 3090-300E mainframe with a vector facility supporting tape and disk storage subsystems and laser and impact printers.providing MVS, VM and AIX (UNIX) operating system environments IBM RISC (Reduced . Instruction Set Computing) equipment using AIX is also available for instruction and research Remote batch job entry and on-line workstations operate at various locations on campus. In addition, remote access workstations are located at the St. Petersburg, Lakeland, and Fort Myers campuses. Terminals, micro computers, printers, and other associated equipment are also main tained in 'open use' areas to enable students, faculty and staff access to central site processing support These remote open use areas may vary in their scheduled hours of operation but, generally speaking, each provides significant amounts of access, normally seven days a week PUBLIC BROADCASTING WUSF-TV (Channel 16, Tamra} and WSFP-TV (Channel 30, Fort Myers) are non-commercia educational television stations serving the communities of the 18 surrounding counties as an important outreach arm of the University. They provide high quality educational, instructional, informational, cultural, and public affairs television programming and services to viewers in 'the Greater Tampa-St. Petersburg-Sarasota area and the Greater Fort Myers Naples area of Southwest Florida, including USF faculty, staff, stu dents, and other educational agencies. The stations are members of the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), Southern Educational Com munications Association (SECA), and Florida Public Broadcasting Service, Inc {FPBS). WUSF (FM} 89.7MHz and WSFP (FM} 90.1MHz are member supported, non-commercial public radio stations serving the Univer sity, its branch campuses and surrounding communities within an 1 S
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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 45 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1991(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Mental Health and Law and Mental Health. The Institute In preparation for graduate studies, it is that ap-a broad of applied research, training, dissemination plicants show evidence of the completion of the activities relating to the planning, and evalu-1ng. coursework personal health/health sciences, ation of public mental health services. FMHI s training and consulaid, algebra, tation activities are provided for a variety of audiences including mun!cat1on, or expos!tory wn. ting, general mental health and health care professionals, the Florida legislature, b1olog1cal science with lab, advanced b1olog!cal administrators, policy makers, planners, consumers, students, and science, introdu_ctory psychology_. general medical the public anthropology, sociology, educational theory and FMHI provides continuing education opportunities for mental method, and educational psychology health and health professionals. FMHI approved to continuing education credits. for the f<;>ll<;>wing organi" zations: American Psychological Assoc1at1on, Florida Department of Professional Regulation, Florida Board of Nursing ahd the Certi!ica tion Board of Addiction Professionals of Florida. FMHI also provides continuing education credits to su_ch professional groups as cians and attorneys through organizations as the Sontinu ing Medical Education Office and the Florida Bar Assoc1at1on. FMHI offers undergraduate and graduate students field place ments, internships, research volunteer, and par_t time employmeot opportunities. Students may earn academic credit for clinical placements, internships, tutorials, or independent research performed at the Institute in conjunction with USF courses. FMHI faculty teach credit courses in degree granting programs in co-operation with other USF . FMHJ's predoctoral internship pr ogram psychologists 1s approved by the American Psychological Asoc1at1on. Undergradu ate and graduate students participate in FMHl's Mental Health Training Program designed to attract dents into the mental health field. Through a model mult1-d1sc1ph nary clinical training program funded by the National of Mental Health, FMHI trains graduate students to work with children who have serious emotional problems. FMHl's residential, day treatment, and out-patient programs are accredited by the Joint on of Healthc.are Organizations (JCAHO) These direct service as sites for clinical demonstration and research FMHl's clinical research focuses on finding the most effective, least costly, and highest quality means of delivering mental health services. of Public Health Pulllic Health 'Educ. ation The Department of Community and Family Health offers an accelerated entry program which enables qualified students to. enter the Master of Public Health (MPH) degree program with a concen tration in Public Health Education following the completion of 90 semester hours of undergraduate study (usually the end of the junior year). Full-time students are able to graduate degree requirements in 2 to 2-1 \2 years. Interested 1nd1v1duals are encouraged to contact a health education faculty advisor during the term in which they expect to complete 60 undergraduate semester hours. The MPH is a professional, non-thesis degree. The course of study is designed to prepare professional health to develop, implement, manage and evaluate prowa!""s which on health promotion and and P .ubhc health issues encompass the 1nterrelat1onsh1ps of social, behavioral, legal, medical and economic factors Therefore, .the emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach. of developing. strategies for the efficient utilization of health services, the adoption of selfcare practices, and the promotion of healthier opportunities are available in a of work 1ncludin9 hospitals and ambulatory care fac1ht1es, health maintenance organi zations, voluntary health agencies, public and private school tems, colleges and universities, local and agencies, private industry and international health organizations. Students seeking admission to the MPH degree program must have completed 90 undergraduate semester hours, achieved at least a 3.0 GPA, earned a combined verbal and quantitative score of at least 900 on the GRE, and satisfied the CLAST and Rule 6A-10.3 requirements. School of Continuing Education Division of Special Programs The Division of Special Programs is an academic division of the School of Continuing Education. It is comprised of three main pro grams: PACE (Programs for Adult Credit Education), and MERIT (Multilingual Educational Resources, Information and Training) PACE, a delivery system for a non-traditional means of obtainin9 a B.A. degree for working adults, is a cooperative venture of busi nesses, unions, civic organizations, and educational The program is geared toward working adults who desire a degree but find it difficult or impossible to attend regular on-campus "classes. It is also directed toward employees of businesses and industries which provide tuition rebates. Through PACE, students may earn all electives and core require ments for a Social Science Interdisciplinary B.A. (with two cognates or emphases out of the following: psychology, contemporary social issues). PACE also offers all general d1stnbut .1on requirements and all non-major electives for any other B.A. maior; a student pursuing a major other than the ones listed above can complete three years of study with PACE and then pursue the last year on campus. If sufficient interest in a particular major other than the ones listed above exists, PACE can also offer the courses necessary to the target audience requesting that major, subject to faculty availability and department permission. PACE classes are scheduled in a variety of different ways to accomodate the busy 'pace' of working adults: weekly classes, Monday through Thursday evenings, offered at various off
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46 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG tours of a country or region that are preceded by several weeks of 3. Fees for continuing education courses are assessed the same as intensive study. fees for classified and unclassified students Consult the Fees Residential programs of a semester length are sponsored by USF Section for detailed information. in Venezuela and Costa Rica and are made available to USF students 4. Enrollment forms for students whose fees are to be paid by at more than 17 other overseas locations through cooperative school boards or state or federal grants must be forwarded in programs Residential programs in the Summer of less than a full accordance with registration deadlines. Payment of fees or ap-semester are conducted by USF in Cambridge, England; Perugia, propriate purchase orders must be enclosed with enrollment Italy; Madrid, Spain; Berlin, Germany; Moscow, Russia; and Ed-forms. inburgh, Scotland 5 It is the responsibility of the individ1:1al student to ascertain that The typical Travel/Study tour consists of lectures of a specific he or she has met the course prerequisites as published in this academic topic by USF faculty in advance and while overseas. All catalog. tours are led by USF faculty with experience and academic expertise in the country(s) toured Destinations most often toured include Australia, China, Egypt, England, Ireland, Israel, and Russia. All residental tour programs are open to the general public as well as USF students; all programs include an academic course that may be taken on a credit or audit basi s MERIT is a cooperative effort of the Division of Language and the Division of Special Programs to meet the needs of public school boards and their employees for training in working with Limited English Proficient students. A series of graduate credit courses in teaching English as a Second Language is conducted by MERIT through contracts with various local school boards. The Division exists as a means for the University to respond quickly and flexibly to the needs of the USF service area for credit courses that cannot be conducted through the University's usual offerings. Consequently, the Division is receptive to adding new programs to its activities For details on any of the t _hese programs, contact the Division of Special Programs, University of South Florida, 4202 E Fowler Ave., Tampa, Florida 33620-8700. Continuing Education Credit Courses Through its School of Continuing Education, the University of South Florida offers credit courses and programs to serve the in service and continuing education needs of educators in a geo graphical area that encompasses Charlotte, Collier, DeSoto, Glades, Hardee, Hendry, Hernando, Highlands, Hillsborough, Lee, Mana tee, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, and Sarasota counties Both degree and non-degree seekers may participate in the con tinuing education credit program. Students desiring to obtain a degree must, however, apply for admission to the University on a degree seeking basis (see Requirements for Admission) at an early date so that courses taken may be considered for inclusion in a program of studies (see appropriate college programs) To assure quality of instruction, continuing education credit courses, for the most part, are taught by the regular faculty of the University When this is not possible, outstanding instructional per sonnel are recruited from neighboring accredited institutions. The acadernic calendar for courses scheduled off
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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 47 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1991(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Organizations which require only management support during the conference itself, as well as those which require a full comple ment of services, can be accommodated by the Division. Profes sional program coordinators are available to provide assistance with conducting needs assessments, technical program design, program budget development, instructional resources, brochure prepara tion, logistics, registration and recording of Continuing Education Units, on-site program management, program evaluation, and certificates. For details, contact the Division of Conferences and Institutes, Un\versity of South Florida, 4202 E Fowler Avenue, Tampa, Florida 33620 Mature Student Counseling Recognizing that education is a lifelong process, the University of South Florida has developed programs and courses designed spe cifically to meet the needs of students over 25 years of age. Students who are above the traditional college age often have unique educational considerations that require special services. Group pre admission advising and career counseling for mature students are available in the Division of Lifelong Learning . Programs with or without academic credit are available for adults who wish to begin a college program, for those who are seeking to complete their interrupted college education, and for those who have earned a community college degree or undergradu ate degree and now wish to earn a higher degree A wide variety of courses and programs is offered in the daytime, evening, al"}d through independent study for those who wish to update a degree earned in the past or for those who are seeking to enrich their intel lectual and cultural lives Tuition Waiver for Senior Citizens Florida residents who are 60 years of age or older by the first day of a respective semester/term may enroll on a space available basis in certain undergraduate and graduate courses on the Senior C'itizen Tuition Waiver Program Academic credit is not awarded, examinations are not required, and grades are not given. A maximum of three courses per semester/term may be taken. An orientation registration session is held at the beginning of each semester/term Senior citizens are encouraged to attend this program for additional information and ease in registration. For further information, contact the Division of Lifelong Learning, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida Undergraduate Studies Undergraduate Studies contains the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies and the offices of Athletic Advising, Career Resource Center, Center for Academic Advising, Community College Relations, Academic Services for Students with Disabilities, Evaluation and Testing, Great Britain Exchange Program, National Student Exchange, Off-Campus Term, Orientation, Personal Excellente Program (PEP), University-wide Honors Program, Project Thrust, ROTC (Air Force and Army), Student Academic Support Services (SASS), and Student Support Services. Undergraduate Studies is administered by a Dean, who super vises the several units and undergraduate academic programs that are not the purview of a single school or college; administers under graduate student academic appeal processes and waiver policies; allocates undergraduate out-of-state fee waivers; acts on recom mendations from the Undergraduate Council, the Academic Regulations Committee, the Council on Academic Advising, and the Faculty Committee on Student Admissions It is the administrative 'home' for the USF undergraduate student who has not yet declared an academic major. Center for Academic Advising The Center for Academic Advising is dedicated to promoting the successful achievement of students' academic goals through com prehensive advising services. The Center's primary responsibility is to provide academic advising 'to undergraduate studctnts, with a special emphasis on the needs of students entering a university for the first time. The following services are provided to these undergraduate stu dents : advisement regarding academic policies and programs, assistance in the selection of a major, administration of special programs for 'at risk' or 'underprepared' student populations, and special ad visement for minority students. The staff prepares students for entrance into all limited .access majors (e.g Education, Engineering, Business, Nursing, and Mass Communications), and evaluates and certifies all students seeking Associate of Arts degrees Academic Services for Students with Disabilities The Office of Academic Services for Students with Disabilities provides assistance to eligible university students to allow full par ticipation in all academic courses and activities. Services such as readers and notetakers and adaptive equipment are provided through this office. are encouraged to contact the office prior to registering for classes .to make arrangements for the planning of services. Personal Excellence Program The Personal Excellence Program (PEP) is an academic and per sonal support program for all black, first-time-in-college students ad mitted to the University of South Florida and who are not Student Support Services Participants. The program is basically a two tier program The first tier of the program provides specific services to students who might not meet all admission criteria but whose high school records indicate the potential to succeed in college These alternative admit students attend a seven-week Summer program. Students who participate in the Summer program are offered a transitional phase from high school to college The second tier of PEP is the Fall term black Freshman program that provides a comprehensive Fall orientation program, special academic advising sessions, and other cultural programs Project Thrust Project Thrust is a University-wide program designed to assist black undergraduate students at the University of South Florida to complete their education Assigned to four of the undergraduate colleges, this retention program specifically aids those students who have declared majors. The major role of the Project Thrust advisor is to provide students with immediate and long-term assistance necessary to ensure the successful completion of programs within the respective colleges During the year, Project Thrust provides advising and counseling, tutorial services, and workshops to help with test preparation at no charge to the student. Student Support Services Program The Student Support Services Program is a federally funded grant program which provides academic and personal support for selected students who are experiencing academic difficulty, from low income families, who are first generation, or who are physically disabled The program provides an opportunity for students who may not meet all admission criteria but whose high school records and test scores indicate the potential to succeed in college Students who participate in the program receive personal coun seling, tutorial assistance, and special instruction in the areas of English composition, reading, study skills, and mathematics Air Force ROTC (Reserve Officer Training Corps) The Department of Aerospace Studies provides precommission ing education for qualified male and female students who desire to serve as commissioned officers in the A i r Force. The Department offers both a two-year and a four-year commissioning program, each with its own special advantages. The two-year program, estab lished by Congress in 1964, allows junior college transfer students and other students with two academic years remaining (either in undergraduate or graduate status) and who have met required qualifications to obtain an Air Force commission while completing their studies The four-year program provides on-campus study during the freshman through senior years Both programs provide

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48 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVl(ES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1'92(!13 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG an opportunity to compete for full academic scholarships The Monetary Allowances Aerospace Studies curriculum is divided into two phases : 1) the All cadets enrolled in the POC receive a tax exempt monetary General Military Course (GMC) and 2} the Professional Officer allowance of $100 per month. Course (POC). Students are invited to write or visit the Department of Aerospace Studies to obta i n additional information General Military Course (GMC) This program of instruction is open to any full-time student and consists of the first and second year courses for students in the four year AFROTC program. These courses of one ( 1) classroom hour plus one (1) laboratory hour per week per semester deal with the Air Force in the contemporary world and the development of air power They strengthen interest in becoming a profess i onal Air Force officer, develop knowledge of world mil itary forces, and enable the student to understand how the United States Air Force supports national objectives and policies Students on scholarship must successfully complete a course in English composition during these two years Enrollment in the GMC is open to all USF, University of Tampa (UT) St. Leo College, Florida Southern College, Clearwa ter Christian College, St. Petersburg Junior College and community college students The GMC is comprised of the following courses : AFR 1101 and AFR 2001 AFR 2130 and AFR 2001 AFR 1120 and AFR 2001 AFR 2140 and AFR 2001 Professional Officer Course (POC) Aerospace Studies courses offered during the third and fourth years make up this program of instruction which must be completed by all students who seek a commission through AFROTC. Course continuity is designed to prepare selected college students to serve as active duty Air Force officers upon graduation and commissioning The curriculum stresses national secur ity forces in contemporary American society, leadership, management, and professionalism. Special emphasis is placed on developing the cadet's communicative skills A course in mathematical reason i ng must be completed prior to commissioning Students entering this course must be selected in accordance with the prerequ i s ites listed below. Prerequisites For Admission To The POC 1. Be at least seventeen year s of age at time of acceptance 2. Be able to complete the POC and graduate from the University prior to reaching age twenty-six years and six months if entering Flight Training, or before age thirty if entering a non flying category 3 Pass the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) and physical examination 4 For those students enrolled in the four year AFROTC program complete the GMC or have acceptable prior mil itary service Veterans and students with previous ROTC training are invited to write or visit the Department of Aerospace Studies to discuss their status 5 For those students desiring entry into the two-year AFROTC pro gram, contact the Department of Aerospace Studies at the beginning of the Fall Semester one academic year prior to the Fall Semester in which they wish to enroll in the POC. Thi s lead time is required to complete application, testing and physical exami nation and to schedule for a six-week Field Trai n i ng prior to fall enrollment in the POC. 6 Selection by the Professor of Aerospace Studies and acceptance by the Uni versity 7 Execute a written agreement with the government to complete the POC and accept an Air Force comm i ssion. 8 Enlist i n the Air Force Reserve (terminated on rece i ving Air Force officer commiss i on) The following POC courses are required: AFR 3220 and AFR 2001 AFR 3231 and AFR 2001 AFR 4201 and AFR 2001 AFR 4211 and AFR 2001 Leadership Laboratory (AFR 2001) Leadership Laboratory is the formalized phase of leadership training conducted by cadets It is scheduled for one (1) hour each week for both the GMC and the POC. All uniforms and equipment incident to cadet activities are furnished. All ROTC students are required to attend leadersh i p laboratory Air Force ROTC Scholarship Program Financial assistance 1s available in the form of AFROTC scholar ships for selected students Under this program, the Air Force pays for full tuition and fees, and provides an allowance for books, supplies, and equipment. In addition, the student receives a $100 per month allowance Scholarships may be awarded for either two, two and one-half, three, three and one-half, or four years Four year scholarships may be applied for in the calendar year prior to college enrollment as a freshman. Other scholarships may be applied for after enrolling in Aerospace Studies courses Schol arship students must complete, or demonstrate equivalent profi ciency in at least two (2) semesters in a major lndo-European or Asian language Summer Training Students in the two-year program must complete a six week Field Training encampment before they may formally enroll in the POC. Training includes career training, physical conditioning, and the GMC academics Cadets enrolled in the fouryear AFROTC program are req1,1ired to attend a four-week Field Training encampment. Normally, this is prior to enrollment in the POC. Summer Field Training provides a better understanding of the United States Air Force mission, increases the cadet's proficiency in junior officer training areas, and stresses the importance of physical conditioning. All Field Training encampments are conducted at active Air Force bases. Students attending these encampments receive pay for the err campment plus travel allowances. Officer Commissions Cadets who complete the POC are appointed Second Lieuteri ants in the United States Air Force They incur an obligated active duty tour of four (4) years for nori-flyers six (6) years for navigators and eight (8) years for pilots after completion of flight school. Army ROTC (RE!serve Officers' Training Corps) The Department of Military Science for Army Reserve Officers Training was established to select and prepare students to serve as officers in the Regular and Reserve components of the United States Army. The curriculum i s designed to develop the students' leader ship potential, as well as improve the students' planning, organiz ing, and managerial skills Army ROTC training is divided into two phases : The first two years constitute the Basic Course ; the last two, the Advance Course. The Department offers both a four and a two year program, each leading to a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army The four year program requires completion of the Basic Course, a six week field training course, and the Advance Course. The two year course allows academic Juniors to enter the Advanced course and to be commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in two years Students with prior active military serv ice or previous training at military schools may exempt some or all of the Basi c Course Students with quest i ons concerning the various options should contact the Professor of Military Science for more information Army ROTC training i s offered to both men and women students and provides free uniforms and textbooks Enrollment is open to qualified students at all levels, including graduate students. Offer ings are published each semester Scholarships are awarded on a competitive basis in engineering, nursing, physical science business, social science and other fields. The scholarship pays for tuition, books, lab fees, and certain other academic expenses All Advance Course students receive $100.00 per month for sub s i stence This is in addition to the pay of approximately $650 00 which the students receive while attending the s i x week field training course at the summer Advanced Camp Adventure training at the Airborne School, Air Assault School,

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERvlCES 49 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA19'1{93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG and the Northern Warfare School is available to both Basic and must .relearn some of the information regarding Advance Course students during semester breaks Adventure traininst1tut1onal regulations, grade-point computations, financial aid. ing is also available during the academic year. Other training organization r etc. The Office of Community includes survival skills, hand to hand combat, rappelling, escape and Relations stands ready to lend assistance in this important, addievasion, orienteering, etc. tional period of transition. Basic Course The Basic Course consists of four semesters of classroom instruc tion of one hour each week. Students incur no military commitment by participating in the Basic Course. Any prior military service, Reserve or National Guard Basic training, or other ROTC training may qualify for full or partial completion of the Basic Course. Advance Course The Advance Course is designed to prepare the student who desires to be a Professional Army Officer for duty, either Reserve, National Guard, or Active Army. The training consists of four semesters of classroom instruction of three hours each week, lab, field training exercises, and a six week training phase at summer Advanced Camp The newly commissioned officer can be guaranteed Reserve or National Guard duty, or compete for an Active Duty commission. Prior to commissioning the student may request duty as a pilot in the Army Aviation field, or serve in the fields of medical, personnel, ad ministration, law, management, law enforcement engineering, combat arms, or select duty from a list of many more opportunities Requirements for an AROTC Commission Students who desire to earn a commission as a Second Lieuten ant in the United States Army must meet the following require ments; four semesters of the ROTC Advanced Course, successfully complete the Professional Military Education Courses (written communication skills, human behavior, computer literacy, math reasoning, and military history), attend Advanced Camp or an ap propriate substitute, maintain and graduate with a minimum of a 2.0 GPA, pass the Army Physical Readiness Test and meet the height and weight, and other requirements of the United States Army Community College Relations All transfers should refer to other entries about undergraduate transfers in the Admissions Section of this catalog. Community/junior college and other undergraduate, transfer students, who need special assistance, should contact the Office of Community College Relations The Office of Community College Relations assists community/junior and other undergraduate, transfer students (and staff members of those colleges) to und'etstand better the University of South Florida, its philosophy, its programs. and its procedural operations. This office has a responsibility for the interpretation of the community/junior college policies to the Uni versity. ultimate goal of the Office of Community College Relations 1s to ensure equity for the transfer student. One significant contribution toward this goal is the annual preparation and delivery of the updated Community College Counseling Manuals to every Florida community/junior college and to other institutions by re quest. Community College Relations works closely with Florida commu nity/junior college students and staff, as well as with such USF offices as Admissions, Student Affairs, Records and Registration, and the various .colleges and departments, while serving a coordi nating function within the University by working with all areas concerned, in minimizing problems of transfer students coming to the University . The University of South Florida subscribes fully to all of the pro visions of the Statewide Articulation Agreement. It is strongly rec ommended that the student transferring from a community/junior college to the University of South Florida complete the associate in arts degree or, in certain prior-approved areas, the associate in science degree. Special details for students who do not plan to complete the associate degree requirements ate available from the Office of Admissions. It is recognized that enrolling in college is difficult for the freshman. In some respects, it is more difficult for the transfer student. The freshman student experiences only one transition, usually that from high school to college The transfer student, on the Career Resource Center One of the recognized goals of a college education is to maximize career satisfaction. The University has dedicated itself to assisting students in realizing their career objectives through pro grams offered through the Career Resource Center. Prior to utilizing the programs offered through the Center, students may want to seek additional assistance in the areas of personal assessment, values clarification, skills identification, and interest inventories offered through the Counseling Center for Human Development. The Career Resource Center has a well-developed Career and E!"'Pl. oyer lnformati
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50 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES UNIVERSl'rY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Students who fail to report for a training period after sign i ng an credit hour (each) in (1) community studies, (2) intercultuagreement, or who fail to keep their agreement to remain with an ral studies, (3) law and society (4) contemporary health problems, employer to the end of a given training assignment, will receive a (5) volunteers and society, (6) international relations, (7) and threeu grade and will be dropped from the program Cooperative Edu-hour volunteer work project Participation in the OCT Program for cation courses (COE) may not be dropped without perm ission from a total of 9 hours during a summer term or terms satisfies the the Cooperative Education office summer enrollment for those affected by this requirement. Cooperative Education students will be expected to meet deadStudents may participate in the OCT Program anytime beginning lines for registering and for paying registration fees with any with the freshman year through the final semester prior to gradu exceptions brought to the attention of the appropriate admin i stra ation Good standing at the Uni versity and a 2.0 grade average is tor by the Associate Director of Cooperative Education required for acceptance into the Program The OCT Program Senior Placement Services Each year representatives from business and industry, education systems, and governmental agencies throughout the United States will conduct on
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51 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -Utl/93 UNDERG""DUA TE CATALOG Additional information about the Center and its programs may be obtained by writi ng the Profess i onal Development Center, College of Business Administration, University of South Florida Tampa Florida 33620 or by calling {813) 9744264. The Center for Organizational Effectiveness The purpose of the Center for Organizational Effect iveness is to assemble a talented group of faculty, i nternational researchers and organizational leaders to advance our knowledge and expertise in areas such as leadership strategic planning, innovation and creativ ity, organizational design and organ i zat i onal effectiveness. The Center contains three program areas : Research: Center research programs have global involvement through joint projects w ith other i nternational i nstitutions Re search focuses on the ident i ficat i on and measurement of factors which are significantly associ ated with innovat i on change and superior organizational performance such as, factors in the exter nal and internal environment and leadership characteristics Pro-grams of research are also focusing on methods to develop leaders so that they can improve the effectiveness of the ir organizations Education: The Center aims to serve as an educational forum i n which graduate students, professional managers and research scholars from different nations exchange ideas about organiza tional leadership and performance An annual international confer ence is planned in the area. Service: Executive programs are offered through the Center to improve the effectiveness of participating organ i zations through the application of relevant research and methods Such programs now focus on the assessment and development of leadership, the restructuring of organizations to meet the challenges of new competitive environments and improving an organization's capabil ity in strategic planning and innovation. For further information contact the Center for Organizational Ef fectiveness, {813) 9744155, College of Business Adm i nistration, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The College of Arts and Sciences consists of 35 academic departments and programs w i thin the areas of the arts and letters, natural sciences and social and behav i oral sciences. W ithi n the arts and letters, human i stic subjects are studied not merely for the i r utility, but also for their i ntrinsic merit and for what they tell us about what is permanently and universally sign i ficant to humanity Students of the natural sciences are trained in the tools of logical analysis and the modes of experimentation i n the continu i ng attempt to better understand the nature of the physical and biological universe The social and behavioral sci ences are concerned primar ily with human beings, their history, individual behavior, universal institutions, and their problems Undergraduate programs include the traditional disciplines as well as several which feature tra i ning in the application of arts and sciences theory, data, and methods to contemporary life In all its funct i ons the College of Arts and Sciences is ded i cated to foster i ng a spirit of inqu iry and intellectual growth. In keeping w ith the ideal of a liberal arts education, the purposes of the Arts and Sciences baccalaureate curricula are to develop the intellect and provide for a well-rounded and mean i ng ful life by expos i ng the student to a wide range of human inqu iry in addition to the more specialized focus of the major. Every degree program in the College reflects the faculty s continu i ng commitment to the objectives of a liberal arts education : to instill in the graduate the abilit ies to think logically and open mindedly; to approach problems analytically, rationally, and ethically; to read and evaluate critically; and to communicate clearly in speech and writing This commitment is based on the recognition that a com munity of individuals so enlightened is the only means of preserv ing and enhancing the well being of our complex societies ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE Admission to the College of Arts and Sciences is open to students who have been accepted to the Universi ty of South Florida, who are in good academic standing, and who declare a major in a particular field Mass Communications and Social Work are limited access degree programs and have additional require ments listed under Programs and Curricula Undergraduate students must submit a formal application for admission This usually occurs dur i ng Orientation and Advising for New Students This application is also available in the Arts and Sciences' Office of Academ i c Affairs (SOC 110) for continuing students Following admission, students are counseled by an academic adv iser in his/her major field Students preparing for a science or mathematics career must plan their courses carefully because of the sequential nature of the science curricula, and students seeking entrance into a professional school or the medical technology internship program require specialized coun seling Therefore, immed i ate application for admission into the College is strongly recommended Informat i on on admission criteria departments, majors, pro grams, counseling and other services of the College may be obtained from the Office of Academic Affairs (SOC 110), College of Arts and Sciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES The College of Arts and Sciences offers three undergraduate degrees : Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Social Work. A minimum of 120 semester hours credit (124 semester hours for Mass Communications) with an overall aver age of 2 0 or better in all work completed at the UniveFsi ty of South Florida must be attained in order to earn the under.graduate degree. The degree program must include the completion of (1) General Distribution Requirements, (2) a departmental major plus supporting courses (3) elective courses, (4) Ct.p.ST, (5) the wri ting and computation course requirements of 6A-10 .30, (6) Foreign Language Requi rement(s), and (7) Liberal Arts Electives Requirements (for natural sciences majors) 1 General Distribution Requirements Six (6) hours credit in English Composition S i x (6) hours credit in Humanities/Fine Arts Six (6) hours credit in Mathematics and Quant i tative methods (For natural sciences majors this may be waived by credit in at least six hours of Mathematics courses required by the major ) Six (6) hours credit in Natural Sciences (For natural sciences majors this may be waived by credit in at least six hours of natural sciences courses required by the major ) Six (6) hours credit in Social and Behavioral Sciences The remaining ten (10) hours are to be divided among the last four areas at the discretion of the student and adviser No more than eight (8) hours in any department may be counted toward the General Distribution Requirements. See General D i stribution Requirement section for details 2. The Departmental Major A departmental major consists of a concentration of course work in a specific department plus supporting courses in related departments The number of credit hours required for a major will vary from department to department. There must be at least a cumulative grade point average of 2 .0 in the major ; limited access programs, Mass Communications and Social Work, require a 2 5 GPA and a 2.75 GPA, respectively. Natural sciences majors must complete at least 30 hours of letter-graded courses in natural sciences, and at least 12 hours must be applicable to a major In addition, all courses in the major program must be taken for letter grades, A, B, C, except those courses which are graded S/U only. In some of the other departments "D" grades within the major courses are not countable toward the degree; consult departmental listings under' Programs and Curricula. 3 The Departmental Minor In order to help students develop some concentration in elective work taken i n conjunction with their chosen major, the College of Arts and Sci ences offers minors in the following departments/programs : African and Afro-American Studies, Amer ican Studies, Anthropology, Classics, Communication, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Criminology, Econ' om ics, English, Forei gn Languages, Geography, Geology, Geron tology, History Humanities, International Studies, Linguistics, Mathematics, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Reli gious Studies, Sociology, and Women's Studies. In general, these r equire half as many hours as are required for the major There are certain restrictions that apply to students earning a minor : (a) students who major and minor in the social sciences and arts and letters may not use courses in the major for the minor or for general d i str i bution requirements; (b) only degree seeking students may earn a minor ; and (c) ISS majors may not earn a minor in any of the social and behavioral sciences incorporated i n their contracts. In some departments, S/U grades w i thin the minor curriculum are not countable. Specific requirements for the different minors appear under the depart mental summaries listed under Programs and Curricula 4 Elective Courses Of the minimum 120 semester hours required for the degrees (124 semester hours for Mass Communications), forty (40) are normally earned in general elective courses This number varies with the credit requirement for the major and should be treated as an average figure. A maximum of two (2) credits of physical educat i on courses may be counted toward graduat i on requ i rements ; no more than nine (9) credits from ROTC (aerospace studies, military science) may count toward graduation 5 Liberal Arts Electives Requirements Students who major in the natural sciences must complete the Liberal Arts Electives Requirements This is 15 hours of courses from fine arts, social sc. iences, or arts and letters beyond the required University General Distribution Require ments The student may elect any course from any of these three areas prov i ded : (a) no more than nine (9) hours are taken in courses in any one department; (b) the courses are taken with letter grades A B, C D (courses taken to satisfy the

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 53 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1991(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG University General Distribution Requirements may not be used to satisfy this requirement. 6 S/U Grades In the College of Arts and Sciences courses having S/U grading as an option, S/U contracts must be negotiated in writing within the first three (3) weeks of the term A maximum of 20 hours of optional S/U credits may be counted towards the 120 hours ( 124 hours for Mass Commu nications) needed for the degrees None of the 20 credits may be taken in the student's major unless S/U is the only grading option. Freshman English may not be taken S/U. Programs Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree The departments and programs in the College of Arts and Sciences are African and Afro-American Studies, American Stud ies, Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Classics, Communication, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Criminology, Economics, English, Foreign Languages, Geography, Geology, Gerontology, Government & International Affairs, History, Humanities, Interdis ciplinary Social Sciences; International Studies, Mass Communica tions, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Public Administration, Rehabilitation Counseling, Religious Studies, Social Work, and Sociology; Independent Studies (BIS) Program, Medical Technology Program, Women's Studies. The College of Arts and Sciences offers a major in 36 fields as described in the following pages In addition to the departmental majors, interdisciplinary majors are offered. Economics offers two majors, one in the College of Arts and Sciences and the other in the College of Business Administration. Bachelor of Arts African and Afro-American Studies (AFA) American Studies (AMS) Anthropology (ANT) Biology (BOE)* Chemistry (CHM) Classics Latin (CLL) Classics Latin/Greek (CLS) Communication {SPE) Criminology (CCJ) Economics (ECN) English (ENG) French (FRE) Geography (GPY) Geology (GLY) German (GER) Gerontology (GEY) History (HTY) Humanities (HUM) Interdisciplinary Classics (ICL) Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences (INS) Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (ISS) International Studies (INT) Italian (IT A) Liberal Studies (ALA) Mass Communications (COM) Mathematics (MTH, MAE*) Medical Technology (MET) Philosophy (PHI) Physics (PHE*, PHY) Political Science (POL) Psychology (PSY) Religious Studies (REL) Russian (RUS) Science (SCE)* Sociology (SOC) Social Science Education (SSE)* Spanish (SPA) Women's Studies (WST) Bachelor of Science Degree Biology (BIO) Botany (BOT) Chemistry (CHS) Clinical Chemistry (CHC) Geology (GLY) Gerontology (GES) Microbiology (MIC) Physics (PHS) Zoology (ZOO) Bachelor of Social Work Degree (B.S.W.) Social Work (SOK) Bachelor of Independent Studies (B.1.S.) Independent Studies (BIS) *Offered jointly with the College of Education. Honors Programs Faculty and selected students in tne college participate in the University Honors Program. In addition, the College of Arts and Sciences offers undergraduate honors programs in Anthropology, Classics, Communication, English, History, Mathematics, Philoso phy, Political Science, and Psychology Students interested in one of these honors programs should consult the appropriate depart ment for further information. Certificate of Concentration Certificate Programs The Certificate of Concentration is a short-term program for students who are interested in taking a series of courses in a selected area of Arts and Sciences, but are not necessarily inter ested in a degree A minimum of 16 hours of approved course work are required. Students working for a Certificate of Concen tration register as special rather than as degree-seeking students For more information, contact the Coordinators of Advising in the College office Certificate in Latin American Studies The College of Arts and Sciences offers a Certificate in Latin American Studies for students who wish to gain an intensive multi disciplinary understanding of this important area. A minimum of 24 semester hours is required of all students seeking such a certificate. Of these, at least 14 should be planned around the following core courses or their equivalent as deter mined in consultation with the Coordinator: GEA 3400 Geography of Latin America LAH 3200 Modern Latin America CPO 4930 Comparative Government and Politics of Selected Countries or Areas SPN 3520 Spanish American Civilization; or equivalent in original Language The remaining 10 hours must be selected from other specified courses with Latin American content, a list of which is available from the Latin American Studies Coordinator. In addition, students seekin!1 a Certificate in Latin American Studies must have ability in Spanish, Portuguese, or another major lndo-American language or must have completed no fewer than two semesters of study in that language, or its equivalent. It is hoped that the student will develop an even higher level of competency in one language and at least a minimum proficiency in a second language. When the student has completed the above requirements, the Latin American Studies Coordinator will recommend the student for the Certificate, which will be awarded upon the successful completion of all degree requirements for the major Information and advice about the certificate program may be obtained from the Latin American Coordinator. Only degree seeking undergraduate students may earn a Certificate in Latin American Studies The program is open to all majors in all colleges

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54 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199113 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Certificate in Russian Studies sciences because of their interests in the health sciences, and The College of Arts and Sciences offers a Certificate in Russian because of the considerable overlap between the preprofessional 1 Studies for students who wish to gain an intensive multidiscipli curriculum and the degree requirements for majors in the biology nary understanding of this important area. A minimum of 23 to and chemistry departments. The College also offers two-year 26 semester hours is required of all students seeking such a programs leading to the A.A. degree that prepare students for ad-certificate, and will be distributed in the following manner : mission to pharmacy, physical therapy, and physician assistant Language-Linguistics-Literature Twelve hours from the following courses, 8 of which must be in language : LIN 4930 Selected Topics in Linguistics {Russian or another RUS 2200 RUS 2201 RUS 3240 RUS 3500 RUS 4241 RUT 3110 RUT3111 Slavic language {1-3) Russian Ill (4) Russian IV (4) Conversation I (4) Russian Civilization (3) Conversation II (4) Russian Classics in Translation (3) Twentieth Century Russian Literature in Translation (3) History-Political Science-Economics. Six to eight hours from the following courses: CPO 3002 Introduction to Comparative Politics (4) ECO 4323 Marxist Political Economy (3) EUH 3571 Russian History to 1865 (4) EUH 3572 Russian History from 1865 to Present (4) Interdisciplinary Social Sciences-Geography-Philosophy. Six to eight hours from the following courses : EUS 3022 Russia (3) GEA 3554 Geography of the USSR (4) INR 5086 Issues in lpternational Relations (3) ISS 3261 World Ideologies (3) INR 3770 Comparative Military Systems (3) PHP 4788 The Philosophy of Marxism (3) Other courses may be substituted for those listed above upon approval of the Russian Studies coordinator Special Non-Degree Program The HUMAN SERVICES courses are designed for students inter ested in careers in the human sciences and services, and may be taken in conjunction with any major or by special students. These courses are coordinated by the Department of Gerontology, and the courses are listed as: HUS 3001 HUS 4020 sow 4332 HUS 4100 HEAL TH PROFESSIONS The University of South Florida i s an excellent location to prepare for a health profession. The Veterans Administration Hospital, University of South Florida Medical Center, Shriner's Hospital for Crippled Children, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, University of South Florida Mental Health Institute, and University Community Hospital are within walking distance of the campus and offer students excellent opportunities for observation, research, and experience The College of Arts and Sciences offers programs designed to prepare students for adn;iission to professional schools of medi cine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, optometry, pediatric medi cine, and veterinary medic i ne Usually these professions require four years of preprofessional preparation followed by four years of training in a professional school. A few weU prepared students with exceptional qualifications may be admitted to some profes sional schools as early as the completion of the junior year of pre professional work. The preprofessional programs do not meet requirements for a degree. Students should plan to also .complete a degree while at USF because professional schools prefer stu dents with a bachelor's degree, although they do not specify the choice of major Most preprofessional students major in the programs Entrance into all professional schools or programs is competitive, and students should begin establishing a record of excellence with the first semester at USF. Furthermore, it is essential that students pursue courses developing a sense of understanding of cultural and humane values and basic social problems The College of Arts and Sciences provides academic advising in the Health Professions Advising Office. The office maintains a library of current catalogs and books on admission requirements for professional schools and is an important resource center for preprofessional students. Students considering one of the health professions should contact the College of Arts and Sciences during the first semester at USF to declare their interest in a health professions program Students are then assigned to the Health Professions Advising Office for curriculum planning, and each semester the office provides students with updated academic records At the time of application to professional schools, stu dents are provided information about admiss i on tests and the application process, and they are assisted in the process of obtaining faculty evaluations. Predental Premedical Prepodiatry Program This program is designed to prepare students for admission to professional schools of dentistry, medicine, osteopathic medicine, and podiatric medicine. All of these professional schools have in common the following course requirements, which should be completed by the end of the junior year, the usual time of application : Biology: BSC 2011 C (4) Chemistry: CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2045L ( 1) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2046L ( 1) BSC 2010C (4) CHM 3210 (4) CHM 3210L (1) CHM 3211 (4) CHM 3211L (1) Physics : PHY 3053 (3) l [ PHY 3048 (3) PHY 3053L (1) or PHY 3048L (1) PHY 3054 (3) PHY 3049 (3) PHY 3054L (1) PHY 3049L (1) In addition to these requirements it is generally expected that preprofessional students will complete two semesters of English and mathematics appropriate for their degree Some schools require calculus CLEP credit usually is not acceptable to profes sional schools The following courses are recommended by some professional schools : Biology: MCB 3030C (4) PCB 3063 (3) PCB 3023C (4) Chemistry: BCH 3023 (3) CHM 3400 (3) zoo 4693 (4) PCB 4743C (4) PCB 5235C (3) CHM 3401 (3) PCB 4184C (4) zoo 3713C (4) CHM 3120C (4) An early admission program has been established in affiliation with the University of Florida College of Dentistry, which would allow students to be admitted to dental school after three years at the University of South Florida, completing a baccalaureate degree and dental school in a total of seven years In order to be eligible for early admission to the College of Dentistry, a high school student must be accepted by the University of South Florida and must meet the following requirements : overall high school gpa of no less than 3.4, as computed by the University of Florida; total SAT of no less than 1200, or ACT of no less than 28, or EACT of no less than 29; high school science gpa of no less than 3.0 with courses completed in both biology and chemistry; apply during the senior year of high school and be approved for admission by the

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 55 UNIVERSfTY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1991/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG College of Dentistry Admissions Committee following a formal Physics : interview Following admission into the joint program, final PHY 3053 (3) l [ PHY 3048 (3) acceptance to the College of Dentistry is contingent upon the PHY 3053l (1) or PHY 3048L (1) student completing all required courses; earning a gpa of no less PHY 3054 (3) PHY 3049 (3) than 3 2 for all courses attempted and no less than 3 0 for courses PHY 3054L (1) PHY 3049l (1) in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics; and completing It is required tnat students have a minimum of 80 hours the Dental Admissions test with a score of no less than 15 on each including 6 hours of English with one course in composition 6 section of the test. It is also possible for students to apply for early hours of social science, 8 hours of humanities, and 7 hours of admission during the freshman and sophomore years at the animal science courses, which must be completed at the UniverUniversity of South Florida. Addit i onal information is available in sity of Florida Recommended courses are ZOO 3713C (4), ZOO the Health Professions Advising Office 4693 (4), PCB 4743C (4), and MAC 3234 or MAC 3312 (4). Preoptometry Program Optometry schools difler somewhat in requirements, but all optometry schools require at least two years of preoptometry studies, and most schools require the following courses: Biology: SSC 2011C (4) Chemistry: CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046L (1) CHM 3211 (4) Mathematics: MAC 3233 (4) SSC 2010C (4) CHM 2045l (1) CHM 3210 (4) CHM 3211 l ( 1) STA 3023 (4) or STA 3122 (3) Physics: PHY 3053 (3) PHY 3054L (1) PHY 3053L (1) MCB 3030C (4) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 3210l (1) PHY 3054 (3) The following add i tional courses are required by schools that have contracts with the State of Florida : MAC 3234, SCH 3023, PCB 4743C, PSY 2012, a psychology elective, and 8 hours of social sciences. Some schools also recommend or require ZOO 3713C, and one school also requires human anatomy and physiology with lab. A joint program between USF and Southeastern University of the Health Sciences College of Optometry (SEUCO) allows stu dents to complete a baccalaureate degree and doctor of optome try degree in a seven-year program Freshmen may apply for the joint program by applying for admission to USF and also applying for admission to SEUCO. To be eligible for admission, students must meet all admissions requirements for USF, and in addition must have an SAT minimum score of 1100, an ACT minimum of 25 or an EACT minimum of 27; a minimum high school GPA of 3 .3; three years of high school science including biology and chemistry; and high school mathematics through algebra and trigonometry. Once admitted to the program students must earn a minimum GPA of 3 0 each term and satisfactorily complete required courses and the Optometry Admissions Test. Students must be Florida residents by the time they enter SEUCO. Pre-Veterinary Medicine Program .The Pre-Veterinary Medicine program meets admission re quirements of the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, the only veterinary school in the state Admission into veterinary school is highly selective, and to be competitive stu dents should obtain experience working with animals, preferably through employment with a veterinarian Pre-veterinary students should complete a degree in the major of their choice while includ ing the following entrance requirements: Biology: SSC 2011C (4) BSC 2010C (4) PCB 3063(3) Chemistry: CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046L (1) CHM 3211 (4) Mathematics: CHM 2045L (1) CHM 3210 (4) CHM3211L(1) MAC 3233 (4) or MAC 3311 (4) MCB 3030C (4) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 3210l (1) SCH 3023 (3) Prepharmacy Program The College otters a two-year program to prepare students for transfer to regional colleges of pharmacy Prepharmacy students must complete general education requirements and include the following science requirements : Biology: SSC 2011C (4) Chemistry: CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046L (1) CHM 3211 (4) Mathematics: SSC 2010C (4) CHM 2045L (1) CHM.3210 (4) CHM3211L(1) MAC 2102 (3) or MAC 2132 (4) MAC 3233 (4) or MAC 331 l (4) Physics: PHY 3053(3) PHY 3054 (3) PHY 3053L(1) PHY 3054l (1) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 3210l (1) In addition, certain regional schools require 3 or more hours of economics, statistics, and additional hours of electives in speech or communication and social and behavioral sciences. Prephar macy students should take the Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) in the fall of the sophomore year and apply to pharmacy schools at that time Some schools require a letter of recommen dation from a pharmacist; therefore, students should obtain experience in the profession Pre-Physical Therapy Program This two-year program prepares students for entrance into upper-level physical therapy programs at Florida institutions Prephysical therapy students must complete general education re quirements and include the following science requirements : Biology: SSC 2011 C (4) SSC 201 OC (4) Chemistry: CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046l (1) Physics: PHY 3053 (3) PHY 3054 (3) PHY 3053l (1) PHY 3054L (1) In addition, six credit hours of mathematics must be' taken at the level of college algebra or higher. The following courses are required or recommended at specific institutions : ZOO 3713C, APB 3190, STA 3023, AMH 2010 or AMH 2020, PSY 2012, CLP 4143, SYG 2000, and a health or physical education elective. Students should contact universities offering physical therapy programs as early as their freshman year to arrange to attend an advisement session. Observation of physical therapists is re quired, and some programs require the Allied Health Professions Admissions Test. Pre-Physician Assistant Program A two-year program has been designed to prepare students for admission to a physician assistant program Admiss i on is competi tive, and students should have one year of direct patient care experience. Students must complete general education require ments, a total of 64 semester hours of credit, and the following science courses: Biology: BSC 2011C (4) BSC 2010C (4) MCB 3030C (4)

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56 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1992aJ UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Chemistry: CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2045l (1) CHM 2046L (1) To meet specific admission requirements of the University of Florida, students must complete a total of nine semester hours of humanities and nine semester hours of social sciences (including PSY 2012). B.A. Degree for MediCal and Dental Students Students who are admitted to art.approved U.S. medical or dental school after completing their junior year at the of South Florida may be awarded the B.A. degree in Interdiscipli nary Natural Sciences from the College of Arts and Sciences subject to the following conditions : 1. Transfer of a minimum of 30 semester hours in science courses from an approved medical or dental school. 2. Fulfillment of the following minimum requirements in atten dance at the University of South Florida : a : 90 hours with at least a "C" average (2. 000) b. Completion of a minimum of 24 hours in the department of major concentration and a minimum of 16 hours in supporting courses in sciences outside the department of major concentration. The 24 hours in the department of major concentration must be in courses applicable to a major in that department The 16 hours in supporting courses must also be taken in courses applicable to a major in that depart ment and must include a minimum of two courses at the 3000 level or above. At least a "C" must be earned in each course in both major concentration and supporting courses. 3 Credit in the following courses : Biology: BSC 2011C (4) BSC 2010C (4) Chemistry: CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2045l (1) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2046l (1) CHM 3210 (4) CHM 3210l (1) CHM3211(4) CHM3211l(1) Physics: PHY 3053 (3) l [ PHY 3048 (3) PHY 3053L (1) or PHY 3048l (1) PHY 3054 (3) PHY 3049 (3) PHY 3054l (1) PHY 3049l (1) 4 A minimum of 20 credits from the following courses: Biology: PCB 3063 (3) PCB 3023C (4) PCB 4743C (4) Chemistry: BCH 3023 (3) CHM 3400 (3) Mathematics: zoo 4693 (4) zoo 3713C (4) CHM 3120C (4) CHM 3401 (3) MCB 3030C (4) PCB 4184C (4) MAC 3233 (4) 1 [ MAC 2132 (4) MAC 3234 (4) or MAC 3311 (4) STA 3023 (4) MAC 3312 (4) 5 Completion of t e General Distribution requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. 6. At least 30 credit hours with letter earned in natural sciences at the University of South Florida 7. The last 30 credit hours prior to transfer to a medical or qental school in residence at the University of South Florida Applica tion for the baccalaureate degree must be received no later than two years from the date of entrance into the professional school. Students admitted to professional schools of veterinary medi cine, optometry, or podiatric medicine prior to completion of their degree may also be able to transfer courses from the professional school and receive their bachelor's degree. However, approval of the courses to be transferred must be obtained on an individual basis from the College of Arts and Sciences, and in some cases it may be necessary for students to complete more than 90 hours prior to leaving the University of South Florida. TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS The College of Arts and Sciences offers B.A. and M.A. degree programs for secondary school teachers and the M.A. degree for junior college teachers. B.A. Degree Program for Secondary School Teachers The College of Arts and Sciences in cooperation with the Colle9e of Education offers degree programs in Mathematics (MAE) in Biology (BOE), in Chemistry (CHE), in Physics (PHE) and in Science (SCE). Because req_uirements exist in both colleges, a student will have an advisor in each college. At the outset, the planned courses in mathematics and science must be approved by the student's advisor in the College of Arts and Sciences. There are two options available to the student to satisfy the science portion of the program: 1. The student may complete the requirements of the depart menta l major. Departmental majors in Botany and Zoology may be found in this section of the catalog under the heading Biology. The departmental requirements of Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, and Physics are found in this section of this catalog under the re spective headings in Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, and Phys ics. 2. The student may complete requirements of the Interdiscipli nary Natural Sciences major with concentration in Biology, Chem istry, Physics, and Mathematics A complete description of this major is found in the College of Education Section This major is particularly appropriate for Science Education majors (SCE). Prospective students should consult the College of Education portions of this catalog under the heading "Science Education (SCE)" for the required education courses and sample programs. TRANSFER CREDITS Transfer 1:redit for MAT 1033 will only be acceptable towards a bachelor's degree in the College of Arts and Sciences if it was earned as part of an Associate of Arts degree awarded by a public community college in the State of Florida or is part of a Florida public community college transcript which explicitly that general education or general distribution requirements have been met. Students enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences must receive prior approval to take courses at another institution to apply toward a degree at USF. The College of Arts and Sciences does not permit students to count credits earned at another institution toward a degree from USF while on temporary or permanent academic dismissal from USF. PROGRAMS AND CURRICULA AFRICAN AND AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES CAFA) African and Afro-American Studies is a liberal arts program which offers both a major and a minor This program provides all students the opportunity to study the history, culture, and lived experiences of African and African-American peoples. It provides students the opportunity to study the interplay and influence of African and African-American peoples with and on world and U.S. culture, politics, and thought. It also provides students the opportunity to develop needed critical thinking skills to address the often narrow and Eurocentric bias in many of our traditional academic disciplines Finally this program provides students the opportunity to examine their own experiences, prejudices, and possible contributions in a multi-racial, culturally diverse society. In the interest of general education the progr am provides a basic and broad knowledge about Africa and peoples of African descent from prehistoric times to the turbulent present. Part of its mission is to assist African-American and African students to achieve a more dignifying identity and fuller participation in the mainstream of their society and nation It attempts to help them develop a greater awareness of their heritage and to provide

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 57 UNIVERSITY OF SOU.TH FLORIDA -199113 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG educational and research opportunities necessary for the acquisivariety of courses from outside the program and outside the tion and understanding of political and economic realities and college Bachelor's and master's degrees, and a minor are avail-tools that must enable African-American people and other minoriable in American Studies. ties to become effective determinants of the(r own political and economic life. Another part of the mission of this program is to assist white, Latino Asian and Native American students develop a critical of the central and powerful role of race in the U S and select world cultures and an understanding of the unique experience of the African peoples. African-American students will acquire add1t1onal perspectives from which to view, analyze, and deal with contemporary relation. ships, social issues, and political problems Admission to the African and Afro-American Studies major or minor is open to all students who have been duly admitted to the University of South Florida. Requirements for the 8.A. Degree . The major in African and Afro-American Studies consists of a minimum of 36 hours in the field specified as follows : Required Core Courses (15 er hrs.) AFA 2001 (3) AFH 3200 (3) AMH 3572 (3) AFH 3100 (3) AMH 3571 (3) Required Supporting Core Courses (6 er. Hrs.) AFA 4150 (3) PHM 4120 (3) Suggested Elective Courses ( 15 er hrs.) AFA 4331 (3) INR 4254 (3) PUP 3313 (3) HUM 3420 (3) AFA 4900 (2-3) AFA 4931 (1-3) CPO 4204 {3) CPO 4244 {3) Majors must maintain a minimum of 2 0 average and are also re sponsible for fulfilling College and University general education re quirements Requirements for the Minor in African and Afro American Studies African and Afro-American Stud ies Program offers minors in African and Afro-American Studies to meet the interest of stu dents. Each minor consists of eighteen hours, exactly half of the upper-division credits required for a major Requirements for the minors are as follows : African and Afro-American Studies Option 1 (Minimum of 18 hours) : Required Core Courses (9 hours) AFA 2001 {3) AFA 3100 (3) or AFH 3200 (3) AMH 3571 (3) or AMH 3572 (3) Electives (9 hours) selected from : AFA 4150 (3) CPO 4204 (3) AFA 4931 {1-3) PUP 3313{3) HUM 3420 (3) INR 4254 (3) African and Afro-American Studies Option II (Minimum of 18 hours) : Required Core Courses (9 hours) AFA 2001 (3) AMH 3571 (3) Electives (9 hours) selected from : AFA 4150 (3) PHM 4120 {3) AFA 4331 {3) PUP 3313 (3) AFA 4931 (1-3) HUM 3420 (3) AMH 3572 {3) African Studies (Minimum of 18 hours) Required Core Courses (9 hours) AFH 3100 {3) CPO 4204 (3) AFH 3200 (3) INR 4254 {3) Electives (9 hours) selected from : AFA 4150 (3) CPO 4244 {3) AFA 4931 (1-3) HUM 3420 {3) INR 4254 (3) AMERICAN STUDIES (AMS) The American Studies major is designed for those students interested in studying the relat!onships amon g importan t elements which shape and 1dent1fy American C1v1hzat1on. Ameri can Studies is a multidisciplinary department drawing upon a Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Required Core Courses (24 er. hrs.) AMS 3001 (4) AMS 3201 (4) AMS 3230 (4) AMS 3210 (4) AMS 4935 (4) AMS 4936 (4) Students are also required to take related electives from sup-porting departments chosen in consultation with an American Studies adviser {22 er. hrs .). Non-core American Studies courses may be counted toward the electives requirement. Students desiring to major in American Studies are reminded that an interview with the department adviser is mandatory. Requirements for the Minor in American Studies: Total Semester Hours Required (18 er. hrs;) 1 Required Courses { 12 er. hrs ) a AMS 3001 (4) b Any two of the following: AMS 3201 (4) AMS 3210 (4) AMS 3230 (4) 2 Supplemental Courses {6 er. hrs ) These six hours may be taken from courses with an AMS prefix or selected from pertinent courses in related departments. In the latter case courses should be chosen in consultation with an American Studies adviser Students must indicate their intent to minor in American Studies with the department adviser The Declaration of Minor form should be completed during this initial meeting with the adviser ANTHROPOLOGY (ANT\ Anthropology aims at comprehending people as biolog ical social beings It is concerned with all forms of people through time and space. One consequence of this broad-ranging view is the presence within anthropology of four branches : physical anthro pology, archaeology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics. Exposure to anthropological information and the cross-cultural perspective produces heightened sensitiv i ty in the student ta the world about him/her. This helps the student to adopt an intellec tual posture of disciplined skepticism with respect to any scheme which purports to define and account for regularities in human life In 1986 the department instituted an honors program to provide its best students with an opportunity to engage in a significant academic experience seniors partici pate in a year-long course of study and original research 1n an area of their choosing under the guidance of a faculty mentor Students majoring in other fields may find anthropology coursework an exciting and valuable supplement to their primary academic interest. A minor in anthropology has been developed with this purpose in mind The minor program is structured to allow the student maximum flexibility in course selection within a broadly defined progression of anthropological concerns Thus, the student is able to tailor a minor in anthropology to best suit special wants and needs in the context of an overall curriculum The Center for Applied Anthropology is concerned with apply ing anthropological knowledge, theory: method, a_nd perspec tives to problems of contemporary society. Illustrative areas of activity include human services needs assessment, program plan ning and evaluation, social and environmental impact assessment, and public policy analysis. Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Anthropology The major in Anthropology consists of a minimum of 33 credit hours ANT 2000 is prerequisite to all subsequent courses ANT 3100, ANT 3410, ANT 3511 and ANT 3610 are required as intermediate level training in the main subdivisions of the field, and ANT 4034 and ANT 4935 complete the specific requirements. Majors are required to complete a minimum of 12 hours of 4000level elective coursework, including courses from at least three of

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58 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG the four subfield areas shown below ANT 3511 counts in Area IV (Natural Sciences) of the General Distribution Requirements for non-majors. Archaeology ANT 4153 (3) ANT 4180 (4) ANT 4162 (3) ANT 4181 (4) ANT 4172 (3) ANT 4163 (3) Physical Anthropology ANT 4542 (3) ANT 4583 (3) ANT 4552 (3) Anthropological linguistics ANT 4620 (3) ANT 4750 (3) Cultural Anthropology ANT 4226 (3) ANT 4316 (3) ANT 4231 (3) ANT 4324 (3) ANT 4241 (3) ANT 4340 (3) ANT 4302 (3) ANT 4367 (3) ANT 4305 (3) ANT 4432 (3) ANT 4442 (3) ANT 4124 (4) ANT 4158 (4) ANT 4586 (3) ANT 4462 (3) ANT 4495 (3) MUH 4054 (3) ANT 4705 (3) ANT 4312 (3) Anthropology majors are urged to become competent readers and speakers of a relevant foreign language, to acquire commu nicative and quantitative skills appropriate to their interests, and to achieve at least a minimal level of literacy Exceptions to course prerequisites require the consent of the i nstructor. Required Core Courses (21 er. hrs.) ANT 2000 (3) ANT 3511 (3) ANT 4034 (3) ANT 3100 (3) ANT 3610 (3) ANT 4935 (3) ANT 3410 (3) Requirements for the Minor in Anthropology The minor in Anthropology consists of a m i nimum of 18 credit hours with a "C' average (2.0), distributed among three areas. Students will normally progress through these areas in the order listed below, selecting courses prerequisite or otherwise appropri ate to courses desired in subsequent areas. Exceptions to this pattern must be approved by the department's undergraduate advisor Students are urged to consult with the major and minor student advisors to create the most beneficia l specific set of courses. 1 2000-level required core course (3 er. hrs ) ANT 2000 (3) 2 3000-level subfield courses {3-6 er. hrs ) ANT 3100 (3) ANT 3511 (3) ANT 3410 (3) ANT 3610 (3) 3 4000-level elective courses (9-12 er. hrs ) (as described above) Requirements for the Anthropology Honors Program: The purpose of the Honors Program is to provide outstanding Anthropology undergraduates with advanced, indiv i dually tai lored training in areas of anthropology of interest to them The program, operating independently of the major itself, involves a year of coursewo r k and research culminating in the writing of an Honors thesis. Students in the second semester of their Junior year, prior to completion of 90 semester hours may apply to the program, which begins in the Fall semester Admiss i on i s comreti tive, based on the student's overall academic record (minima 3 0 GPA overall, 3.5 GPA for USF anthropology course work) and a letter of recommendation from a member of the Department of Anthropology. Successful completion of the program requires maintenance of a 3 0 overall and a 3 .5 major GPA levels, comple tion of ANT 4932 (4) {Honors Semi nar) with a grade of 'B' or better, completion of ANT 4970 (3) (Honors Thesis) with a grade of s and completion of all other requirements for graduation See the Anthropology Department Undergraduate Advisor for further information and application forms BIOLOGY {BIO(BOT/MIC/ZOO) In addition to a set o basic courses in biology students must have a thorough preparation in other areas of natural sciences to be competitive for jobs or for further study beyond the baccalau reate. A modern biology curriculum is built on a foundation of mathematics chemistry and physics Four specific Bachelor of Science degrees (Biology, Botany, Microbiology, and Zoology) are available for students interested in the biological sciences They are all preparatory for careers in teaching, agriculture, medicine, dentistry, marine biology, biotechnology, or for post-9raduate study in any of the various life sciences The Department attempts to schedule sequences of 5000 level courses which allow seniors in the Biology program to concentrate in such areas as: Ecology, Cell & Molecular Biology, Physiology, and Marine Biology Stu dents should study the requirements listed below and then make maximum use of the vigorous advising program maintained by the Department in structuring their total program. A reading knowl edge of a modern foreign language (German, French, or Russian) is strongly recommended for those who intend to enter graduate schoo e Requirements for the B.S. Degree 1. Department of Biology Courses Biology Major (BIO) m i nimum 40 credit hours a BSC 2010C (4), BSC 2011C (4) b One of the following : BOT 3373 (4), MCB 3030C (4), ZOO 3203C (4) c PCB 3023C (4) d PCB 3063 (3) e PCB 4043C (3) or PCB 4674 (3) f MCB 4404C (5) or PCB 4743C (4) g One of the follow i ng : PCB 4184C (4) ZOO 3713C (4), ZOO 4693 (4) The remaining credits to meet the minimum requirements must come from structured departmental courses that are appli cable to the major. At least eight (8) credits must be at the 4000level or higher Botany Major (BOT) minimum 40 credit hours a BSC 2010C (4), BSC 2011C (4) b. BOT 3373 (4) c. PCB 3023C (4) d PCB 3063 (3) e. PCB 4043C (3) The remaining credits to meet the minimum requirements must come from structured departmental courses that are appli cable to the major. At least eight (8) credits must be at the 4000level or higher Microbiology Major (MIC) min i mum 44 credit horus a BSC 201 OC (4), BSC 2011 C (4) b PCB 3023C (4) c PCB 3063 (3) d PCB 4674 (3) or PCB 4043C (3) e MCB 3030C (4) f MCB4115(5) g MCB 4404C (5) h MCB 4505C (3) i MCB 4934 (1) j MCB 4652C (4) or PCB 5235C (3) k BCH 3023L (2) I. One of the following : BOT 4434C (3), MCB 5265 (3), ZOO 5235C (4) Zoology Major minimum 39 credit hours a BSC 2010C (4, BSC 2011C (4) b PCB 3023C (4 c PCB 3063 (3) d zoo 3203C (4) e PCB 4043C (3) f PCB 4674 (3) g. PCB 4743C (4) h ZOO 3713C (4) or ZOO 4693 (4) i Two additional structured courses from the Zoology section of the catalog (ZOO PCB, ENY) or BSC 3263 Marine Biology, PCB 4253 Developmental Biology, PCB 5415 Behavioral Ecology, PCB 5835C Neurophysiology, or PCB 5845 Neuroscience A maximum of four (4) hours of BSC 4910 (Undergraduate Research) may apply toward Biology electives for any of the degrees offered by the Department.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 59 UNfVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -199113 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2 Supporting Courses in the Natural Sciences (required for all II. Supporting Courses for both Environmental Science Tracks B .S. degrees, 30-34 er. hrs. ) (min 34-38 hrs. ) Chemistry CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2046l {1)CHM 3200 (4) CHM 3210L {1) CHM 2045l {1) CHM 2046l {1) or CHM 3210 (4) CHM 3 .210l (1) plus the following l or the following CHM3211 (4) CHM3211L(1) two courses : four courses: MAC 3233 (4) MAC 3234 (4) CHM 3200 (4) CHM 3210 (4) or MAC 3311 (4) MAC 3312 (4) CHM 3210L (1) CHM 3210L (1) PHY 3053 (3) PHY 3053L (1) PHY 3054 (3) CHM 3211 (4) PHY 3054L (1) BCH 3023 (3) CHM 3211 l (1) Ill., IV., and V General university requirements. and BCH 3023 (3) To ensure a multidisciplinary approach the environmental NOTE: CHM 3210, 3)16L 3211. 3211L are especially recommended'' biology majors science tracks require specific COUrses to meet the general distri -considering graduate' pro f essional schools bution, liberal arts, and free elective requirements These require-Mathematics ments are available from advisers in the Department of Biology MAC 3233 (4) MAC 3234 (4) or the following two courses MAC 3311 (4) MAC 3312 (4) or the following two courses MAC 3281 (3) MAC 3282 (3) Physics PHY 3053 (3) PHY 3054 (3) PHY 3053l (1) PHY 3054L (1) or the follow i ng four courses PHY 3048 (3) PHY 3049 (3) PHY 3048L (1) PHY 3049l (1) 3 General Distribution requirements (required for all B S degrees, 18 e r., assuming waivers of Areas 3 and 4) Each student is required to satisfy the General Distr i bution requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. The selection of courses within the requirements is to be done in conference with Biology Department advisors 4 Liberal Education Electives The student must satisfy 15 hours of liberal education electives as described in item 3 of the graduation requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. 5 Free Electives (including General Distr i bution Waivers) can be taken over and above major requirements and major electives to complete a 120-hour program TECHNlcAL DEGREES WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY The Department of B i ology offers specialized techn ical degrees (tracks) within the General Biology B S degree, emphasizing Environmental Science and Biotechnology . The Environmental Science Tracks are designed to provide both a strong Liberal Arts education in Biology and the techn ical skills for active participation in resource management and conser vation These tracks are more structured than traditional degree programs and will require some additional course wor k (beyond 120 hrs) However, complet i on of the tracks will better prepare students for graduate school in any of the environmental disci plines, or for applied Biology vocations ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE TRACK: B.SJN BOTANY Department of Biology Major requirements (min 33-34 hrs. ) BSC 2010C (4) BSC 2011C (4) BOT 3373 (4) PCB 3063 (3) PCB 3023C (4) PCB 4043C (3) BOT 4503 (4) or approved substitute BOT 4713C (4) BOT 5185C (4) or BOT 4434C (3) or approved substitute ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE TRACK: B.S.IN ZOOLOGY I. Department of Biology Major requirements (min 33 hrs.) BSC 2010C (4) BSC 2011C (4) ZOO 3203C (4) PCB 3063 (3) PCB 3023C (4) PCB 4043C (3) PCB 4743C (4) PCB 4674 (3) PCB 5306C (4) or ZOO 5555C (4) or approved substitute BIOTECHNOLOGY TRACK: B.S. The Biotechnology Track in Biology is designed for students planning to pursue careers in Biotechnology either upon comple t i on of the baccalaureate or after further training at the graduate level. The curriculum provides broad emphasis in Cell Biology, Molecular Biology and M i crob i ology I. Department of Biology Major Requirements min 38 hrs. BSC 2010( (4), BSC 2011C (4) plus PCB 3063 (3) MCB 3030C (4) PCB 3023C (4) PCB 4064 (3) or approved substitute One of the following three courses : PCB 4743C (4) BOT 4503 (4) MCB 4404C (5) Plus three from the following courses plus electives in the department, structured and applicable to the major at the 4000 level or higher to meet minimum requirement: MCB 4652C PCB 5235C, CHS 41 OOC PCB 5525C MCB 4505C II. Support i ng Courses (min 43-48 hrs. ) CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2045l (1) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2046L (1)CHM 3210 (4) CHM 3210l (1) CHM 3211 (4) CHM 3211l (1) BCH 3023 (3) BCH 3023l (2) MAC 3281 (3) ] [ MAC 3311 MAC (3) or MAC 3312 (4 MAC 3283 (3) MAC 3313 (4 PHY 3048-3049l (8) or PHY 3053-3054l (8) plus PHZ 3101(2) COP3170(3) Ill. General D i stribution Requirements (Required for all B.S. De grees, 18 er. assuming waivers of Areas Ill & IV). Each student is required to satisfy the General Distribution requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. The selection of courses within the requirements is to be done in conference with Biology Depart ment advisers. IV. Liberal Education Electives The student must satisfy 15 hours of liberal educat i on electives as described in item 3 of the graduation requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. V Free Electives (including General D i stribution waivers) must be taken over and above university requirements to complete a 120 hour program Teacher Education Programs: For information concerning the degree programs for secon dary school teachers and junior college teachers, see the College of Education in this catalog and the USF Graduate Catalog Marine Biology: The field of marine biology is especially important in Florida, and there is a good demand for trained personnel. Several faculty members in the department teach courses and conduct research in this area. Undergraduates interested in specializing in mar ine biology may do so by taking marine-oriented courses offered within the department. Appropriate courses include :

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60 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG BSC 3263 (Marine Biology) BOT 5185C (Marine Botany) ZOO 3203C (Introductory Invertebrate Zoology} ZOO 5555C (Marine Animal Ecology) The Biology Department offers M.S. degrees and the Ph. D degree which allow specialization in marine biology CHEMISTRY lCHS/CHM/CHC) The Department o7 Chemistry offers three degrees at the bac ca!aureate level . of Arts degree in Chemistry, Bachelor of Sc.1e. nce in Chemistry, and Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry, and two degrees at the graduate level, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy, each with specialization in the areas C?f chemistry, biochemistry, inorganic chemis try, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry In addition, a of Arts degree in Chemistry is offered as part of a carefully integrated accelerated B.A.-M.A. program The chemistry faculty is comprised of 28 full-time faculty members, all of whom hold the Ph. D degree. A comparable number of teaching assistants, graduate students enrolled in the Ph. D program serve as instructors in the laborator ies. The combination of a large and strong with a wide variety of cou .rses and electives provides students with programs of study which can be tailored to fit individual needs while maintaining a sound background in all general aspects of chemistry. The of degree in Chemistry (CHS) is a rigorous program which supplies the foundation in chemistry required for both the student who begins a chemical vocation immediately as well as the one who pursues advanced study in chemistry or related areas In accord with thi s goal the curricu lum . the B.S. meets the requirements for degree cert1f1cat1on by the American Chemical Society. The Bachelor of Science degree in Clinical Chemistry (CHC) offered by the Department of Chemistry, one of only a few such in the country, is specifically designed to train personnel for this new W?Wing field of the medical profession; however, the strong sc1ent1f1c background and specific technical expertise provided by this program also afford the student an excellent for study in clinical chemistry biochem i stry, or m.ed1cine. This degree also meets American Chemical Society requirements. Interested students should see the Coordinator of the Clinical Chemistry Program in the Department of Chemistry for further information. The Bachelor of Arts degree (CHM) provides a course of study designed for the student who does not intend to become a professiona! chemist bu! whose require a thorough of chemistry Inherent in this program is a high degree of flexibility which permits tailoring a course of study to the student's own educational objectives As such it offers consider able to pre-professional students planning careers in and other health-related fields and an excellent pre for and secondary school teachers of chemistry or physical science The B.A. student whose goals change in the d1rect1on of graduate work in chemistry should supplement this curriculum by addition and/or substitution of a selection of advanced courses from the B .S. program. The cc;imbined Bachelor of Arts Master of Arts program is a accelerated course of study and research in "'."h1ch an exceptionally able student can earn both degrees within five years from entry as a freshman or three from entry as a junior transfer Th. e B.A. coursework is augmented, and research 1s undertaken continuously from the junior year onwards so that the student who to exit from the program at the bachelor's level, to enter medical school, for example, can depart with a degree which meets requirements for American Chemical Society certification and with an unusually strong research background For the student who continues into the graduate year, the M A program allows considerable freedom of choice among the che!"flistry courses, so. that the student's own preference within chemistry may be cultivated with unusual intensity Re search without there being no add1t1onal adm1ss1on requirements or diagnostic examinations, and the graduate degree is earned by the end of the summer of !he year. Upon completion of the program, the student 1s exceptionally well placed to continue to professional school or to further graduate work leading to the doctorate degree Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degrees 1 Chemistry Courses* B.A. CHEMISTRY (CHM) (39 er. hrs.) CHM 2041 (3) CHM 3210 (4) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 3210L (1) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 3211 (4) CHM2046L(1) CHM3211L(1) CHM 3610C (4) CHM 3120C (4) CHM 3400 (3) CHM 3401 (3) CHM 3402C (1) Chemistry electives (3000 level or above; may include not more than one hour of CHM 4970) (6) B.S. CHEMISTRY (CHS) (50 er. hrs.) CHM 2041 (3) CHM 3210 (4) CHM 4410 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 3210L (1) CHM 4411 (3) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 3211 (4) CHM 4412 (3) CHM 2046L (1) CHM 3211L (1) CHM 4130C(4) CHM 3120C (4) CHM 4060 (1) CHM 4131C (4) CHM 3610C (4) BCH 3023 (3) CHM 4610 (3) B.S. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY (CHC) (49 er. hrs.) CHM 2041 (3) CHM 3210 (4) CHM 4410 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 3210L (1) CHM 4412 (3) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 3211 (4) CHS 4300 (3) CHM 2046L (1) CHM 3211 L (1) CHS 4301 L (2) CHM 3120C (4) CHS 4100C (3) CHS4302(2-12) BCH 30?3 (3) . BCH 3023L (2) CHS 4310C (4) 2. Supporting Courses in the Natural Sciences B.A. CHEMISTRY (CHMt (22-24 er. hrs ) MAC 3311 ) or MAC 3281 MAC 3312 4 MAC 3282 3 PHY 3053 ( ) PHY 3054 ( ) PHY 3053L (1) PHY 3054r n) Electives (must be acceptable for credit towards a Natural Science College discipline major) (8) B.S. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY (CHC) (37-40 er. hrs.) BSC 2010C (4) MCB 3010C (4) ZOO 2010C (4) PHY 4744C (3) COC 3300 (3) MAC 3281 (3) ) [ MAC 3311 (4) MAC 3282 (3) or MAC 3283 (3) MAC 3312 (4) APB 3190 (5) or PCB 4743C (4) PHY 3053 (3) l [ PHY 3048 (3) PHY 3053L (1) or PHY 3048L (1) PHY 3054 (3) PHY 3049 (3) PHY 3054L ( 1) PHY 3049L ( 1) B.S. CHEMISTRY (CHS[ (20-23 er. hrs ) MAC 3281 (3) ] MAC 3311 (4) MAC 3282 (3) or MAC 3312 (4) MAC 3283 (3) MAC 3313 (4) PHY 3048 (3) PHY 3049 (3) PHY 3048L (1) PHY 3049L (1) Natural Science or Engineering Elective (3000-4000 level ex cept PHY 3020) (3) The required sequence of Chemistry courses should be started in the freshman year and the mathematics and physics requirements should be completed before the junior year so that CHM 3400 (B.A. degree) or CHM 4410 (B. S degree) can be commenced by t i me CHM 4410 is a prerequisite to other advanced courses required for the B S degree in chemistry CHM 4060 also is a prerequisite to several BS degree courses. 3 General Distribution Courses (40 er. hrs excluding waivers) The student is required to complete the General Distribution requirements of the College o.f Arts and Sciences. 4 Liberal Education Electives The s!uden t satisfy 15 hours of liberal education electives as described in item 3 of the graduation requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES -61 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1992(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 5. Free Electives (includin$l General Distribution waivers) B.A. CHEMISTRY (CHM); 24 er. hrs B .S. CHEMISTRY (CHS); 20-23 er. hrs B.S. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY (CHC); 0-3 hrs In choosing elective courses students are urged to consider ad ditional advanced courses in physics and mathematics as well as courses in the closely allied sciences such as biology and geology Additional courses in computer programming, economics, man agement, engineering statistics, writing, and other applied disci plines are strongly recommended to strengthen the degree for subsequent professional employment. Transfer Credit: It is strongly recommended that students transferring from community/junior colleges to the University of South Florida complete whole sequences of chemistry courses, such as general and organic chemistry, before the transfer Even though courses may carry the same common course number, topics may vary sufficiently from school to school to leave the transfer student ill prepared to proceed within a sequence Teacher Education Programs: For information concerning the degree programs for secondary school teachers, see College of Education section this Catalog and junior college teachers, see USF Graduate Catalog. Requirements for the Combined BA-MA Program Admission Regular admission to the program will normally occur towards the end of the sophomore year or early in the junior year or at transfer from jun i or college Students who have completed not less than ten semester credit hours of chemistry courses, and have maintained a 'B' average in chemistry courses and overall, may apply. Applications will be considered individually and applicants may be called for interview Provisional admission may be granted to incoming freshmen whose academic background and perform ance indicate the likelihood of their meeting the regular require ments in due course. It should be noted that, in view of the heavy research component and orientation of the program, and the limitations of facilities and individual faculty time available for research direction, admission to the program is by no means automatic upon meeting minimum requirements Course Requirements Undergraduate : The B.A. coursework curriculum (q. v.) is aug mented as follows : 1. CHM 4410, 4412, and 4130C (or CHS 4310C) replace CHM 3400, 3401 and 3402C. 2 Chemistry coursework hours (excluding research) total 40 rather than 39 3. Natural Sciences supporting coursework hours total 25 rather than 24 Graduate : Not less than 20 credit hours of formal, regularly scheduled chemistry graduate courses, including not less than two of the five core courses (BCH 5065, CHM 5225, CHM 5425, CHM 5621, CHM 6150) At least 10 of the credit hours must be at the 6000 level. The core course requirement may be waived in part or entirely by recommendation of the supervisory committee on the basis of past work,J'erformance on a test, or substitution of more comprehensive an advanced courses. Research and Thesis CHM 4970 (12) CHM 6973 and CHM 6971 (10) To satisfy the research credit hour requirements and to pro duce results suitable for publication in a refereed scientific journal, it will be necessary for the student to be enrolled during the summers of his junior, senior and graduate years. Completion of the program will require the presentation and formal defense of a research thesis for the master's degree Supervision and Promotion A supervisory committee consisting of two faculty members will be appointed for each student admitted to the program A carefully planned individual timetable will be worked out. and progress will be monitored each semester Continuation from the senior year into the graduate year will be contingent upon the maintenance of the 'B' average in chemistry and overall, and upon satisfactory recommendation by the student's research director Diagnostic and qualifying examinations will not be required of students in this program The supervisory committee during the graduate year will col'lsist of three facul ty members, including the research director CLASSICS (CLL, CLS, ICU The major programs in Classics are designed to meet the needs of students who desire competence in Latin and/or Greek and a broad understanding of ancient culture and literature The maj ors are of particular interest to students who wish to teach the an guages, to those who plan graduate study in a humanistic d i scipline, and to those who want an undergraduate major which focuses on the ancient civilizations which are the cornerstone of the Western tradition Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree Major programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree are offered in Classics-Latin, Classics-Latin/Greek, and Interdiscipli nary Classics. Major programs in Classics require a minimum of 36 hours of course-work. The minor is offered in Latin Greek, and Interdisciplinary Classics. The minors consist of a minimum of 22 hours of course-work. Instruction in Modern Greek (GRK 3120, 3121) is available CLASSICS-LATIN (Basic preparation for the Classics-Latin major : a minimum of two years of high school Latin or LAT 1120 and LAT 1121 ). LAT 1120 and LAT 1121 may be used to satisfy general distribution requirements but do not count as credit toward the major Required courses for the Classics-Latin major 24 hours selected from the following : LNW 4363 (4) LNW 4634 (4) LNW 4670 (4) LNW 4381 (4) LNW 4644 (4) LNW 4900 (1-4) LNW 4500 (4) LNW 4654 (4) LNW 4930 (4) LNW 4501 (4) LNW 4660 (4) Supporting courses required for the major 12 hours selected from the following : ARH 4100 (4) CLT 3102 (3) EUH 3402 (4) ARH4170(4) CLT3370(3) EUH3412(4) CLA 4103 (3) EUH 2011 (3) EUH 3413 (4) CLA 4123 (3) EUH 2012 (3) PHP 4000 (3) CLT 3040 (3) EUH 3401 (4) PHP 4010 (3) CLT3101 (3) CLASSICS-LATIN/GREEK Required courses for the Classics-Latin/Greek major 16 hours in advanced Latin (see Classics-Latin major above) and 8 hours in beginning Classical Greek, GRE 1 120, 1121. Supporting courses required for the Classics-Latin/Greek major 12 hours selected from the list of supporting courses given for the Classics-Latin major above. Requirements for the Latin minor 16 hours in advanced Latin (see Classics-Latin major above) Supporting courses required for the Latin minor 8 hours selected from the following : CLT 3102 (3) CLT 3370 (3) EUH 3412 (4) EUH 3413 (4) Requirements for the Greek minor: 16 hours in advanced Greek Supporting courses required for the Greek minor 8 hours selected from the following: ARH 4170 (4) CLA 4103 (3) CLT 3101 (3) CLT 3370 (3) EUH 3401 (4) EUH 3402 (4) PHH 3062 (3) PHP 4000 (3) PHP 4010 (3)

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62 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSTTY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992/93 IJNDERGRADUA TE CATALOG INTERDISCIPLINARY CLASSICS 1. Basic Preparation Beginning Latin or Greek or high school equivalent (no major credit) 2. Required Courses a. Two advanced courses in Latin or Greek. (See Classics-Latin and Classics-Latin/,Greek) b. Prehistoric and Ancient Art (ARH 4100) Greek and Roman Art (ARH 4170) c. History of Philosophy: Ancient & Medieval (PHH 3062) Plato (PHP 4000) or Aristotle (PHP 4010) d. Classical Mythology (CLT 3370) e Two courses from : Ancient History I (EUH 2011) Ancient History II (EUH 2012) Classical Greece (EUH 3401) Age of Alexander (EUH 3402) Roman Republic (EUH 3412) Roman Empire (EUH 3413) f. One course from: Ancient Civilizations (CLA 3000) Greek Civilization (CLA 4103) Roman Civilization (CLA 4123) Egyptian Civilization (CLA 4160) Mesopotamian Civilization (CLA 4171) Greek Literature in Translation (CLT 3101) Roman Literature in Translation (CLT 3102) New Testament Greek I (GRE 3040) New Testament Greek II (GRE 3041) (3) m (4) (3) m (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (38-41 Hours) Requirements for the Interdisciplinary Classics Minor 1. One year of Latin or Greek at the University level. (LAT 1120, LAT 1121, or GRE 1120, GRE 1121) 2. One course in Art History 3. One course in Ancient Philosophy 4. Classical Mythology (8) (4) m 5 One course in Ancient History (3) (21 Hours) HONORS PROGRAM Admissions Criteria 1 Senior status. 2. Completion of the core courses required for a major in the Department with a GPA above 3.5 3. An overall GPA above 3 .0. 4. Two letters of recommendation from Departmental faculty followed by Departmental approval. Dismissal Procedures The student must maintain a Departmental GPA of 3.5; must submit the Honors Thesis on time, and must pass the scheduled Departmental Honors Examination. Otherwise, the candidate receives no Honors Requirements for Completion of Departmental Honors: 1. Completion of requirements for a major in the Department with a GPA above 3.5 and an overall GPA of 3 .0. 2. Acceptance of a Senior Thesis by a committee of faculty members in the Department. 3. Passing the Honors Examination at the end of the senior year COMMUNICATION (SPE) Both a major and a minor are available in Communication. Each option offers the student the opportunity to develop a program consistent with personal and professional goals In addition to requirements, the department encourages students to tailor communication study to meet their own interests Communica tion study focuses on the unity of theory and practice in human communication, and is aimed at helping students apply their knowledge of communication within both their personal and pro fessional lives. Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Communication A major in Communication requires a minimum of 33 credit hours from departmental offerings (excluding SPC 2023, to be completed as part of the general education requirements, and excluding LIS 2001 and ENC 3310). No more than 18 hours of Communication courses completed prior to the declaration of major will be counted toward the major. No more than six hours will be allowed toward the minimum hours for the major from Directed Reading and Undergraduate Research courses com bined Except under unusual circumstances, students achieve a "C' or higher in each core course the first time it is taken; students who earn a 'D' or 'F" in a core course will not be eligible for graduation as a Communication major Students can have only one core course with a grade below 'C' forgiven under the University's Forgiveness Policy. A grade of 'D' as a final grade within a departmental course will not be counted toward a Communication major or minor. Courses may not be taken S/U where a grade option exists The requirements for the Communi cation major are : 1 Prerequisites (to be completed not later than the first semester after declaration of major, or at earliest date offered) SPC 2023 Fundamentals of Human Communication (3 2 ) LIS 2001 Use of the Library ( ) ENC 3310 Expository Writing (3) 2 Core Requirements (to be completed not later than the second semester following declaration of major or at earliest date of fered, unless otherwise indicated) 12 hours SPC 3210 Communication Theory SPC 3230 Rhetorical Theory ORI 3000 Introduction to Communication as Performance (3) SPC 3601 Advanced Public Speaking (3) 3 Electives: Three options are available for completing the addi tional requirements for the major a. Option One-Students will select a minimum of 21 hours of additional coursework from departmental offerings consis tent with individual areas of interest Students are encour aged to work closely with a departmental adviser in select ing these elective hours from among the three departmen tal areas : Communication Studies, Rhetorical Studies, and Performance Studies, to develop individual programs to fulfill the major requirements. b Option Two Option Two is a program based on a thematic plan created by the student in consultation with an adviser, and approved by the Chair of the Department and by the Undergraduate Committee The requirements for a the matic plan proposal are available in the department office At the time the student declares this option, the student must have completed no fewer than 60 total hours, and no more than 12 hours in Communication The student must have and maintain a 3 0 overall and departmental GPA. This option requires a minimum of 24 hours of departmental electives. Students must select a minimum of 15 hours from within one of the three areas of departmental concentra tion In addition, a minimum of six hours of departmental courses from outside the area of concentration is required The student must also complete SPC 4932, Senior Seminar. An additional six hours in approved, related coursework outside the department is also required (normally, this coursework is taken subsequent to the approval of the thematic plan). c. Option Three -The Honors Program provides an opportu nity for a select group of undergraduate majors in Commu nication to engage in an intensive research experience Each Honors student is required to complete and defend an undergraduate Honors Thesis. Application for the program ordinarily will take place during the second semester of the student's junior year or prior to completion of 90 semester credits Admission to the program is competitive and based on the student's overall academic record, performance in communication courses, and recommendations of faculty in the Communication Department. Information regarding admission to the Honors Program (including requirements,

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COLLEG. E OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 63 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1992(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG applications, and procedures) as well as the program com pletion requirements is av11ilable from the Department office Requirements for the Minor in Communication .The minor in Communication is available to supplement majors in a variety of departments and colleges in the University The minor in Communication requires 18 hours of departmental coursework (in addition to SPC 2023) Directed Readings, Under graduate Research, and Internship may not be counted toward the 18-hour requirement. Courses may not be taken S/U The re quirements for a minor in Communication are: 1. Prerequisites: SPC 2023 2 Core Requirements: Same as in Major (2 above) 3. Departmental Electives : 6 hours COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS {ISH, ISA) Undergraduate concentrations in the Communication Sci ences and Disorders are available through the program of Interdis ciplinary Social Sciences (ISS). Concentrations in Speech Language Hearing Science and American Sign Language lead to the B.A. degree The undergraduate concentration in Speech-Language Hearing Science (ISH) provides preprofessional study for Master's level preparation as a Speech-Langua!;le Pathologist or Audiolo gist. The American Sign Language (ISA) concentration focuses on the study of deaf culture through the development of communi cative proficiency in ASL and prepares individuals to work with the deaf in a variety of social service agencies Students interested in these concentrations should contact the department of Commu nication Sciences and Disorders regarding academic advising The department also offers the Master's of Science (M.S.) degree in Speech-Language Pathology and in Audiology, including Deaf Education, as well as a Ph.D. specialization in Speech, Language, or Hearing Science through the department of Psychology (Experi mental The department offers a 5-year M.S. course of study combining undergraduate with graduate courses, how ever, enrollment into this program is currently not available Concentrations in Communication Sciences and Disorders (ISH) A. General Information All undergraduates seeking enrollment in this concentration must be in good academic standing as undergraduate students at the University of South Florida Prior to beginning coursework in the junior year in the concentration, most students should com plete general academic distribution requirements, successfully pass the CLAST, and have achieved 60 semester hours of course work. Students with advising concerns relative to their first 60 semester hours are encouraged to meet with undergraduate departmental advisors since required and recommended courses for admission into the ISH or ISA concentration will also meet other university requirements B. Prerequisites for Admission 1 Required Courses BSC 2011 or ANT 3511 or an equivalent life science; 2 Recommended Courses LIN 3010 or LIN 3801 or CGS 3060 Courses in this category should be completed with a minimum grade of c. C. Other Requirements for the ISH Degree (min. 9 er hrs.) 1 Required Courses (6-7 er. hrs ) STA 3122 (3) or PSY 3213 (4) and ISS 3010 (3) 2. Additional Courses (3 er. hrs ) SYG 2000 or ANT 2000 or equivalent D. Speech-Language-Hearing Concentration (ISH) (min. 3537 er. hrs.) Coursework is sequenced for the ISH concentration in Speech language-Hearing Science All students must complete study in basic knowledge of the communication sciences and in basic knowledge of communication disorders. In the senior year, a student can select a focus area in either Speech Language Pathol ogy or in Hearing Impairment. Upon admission to the concentration, each student will be assigned an advisor in order to provide guidance in academic planning. The course of study is: SPA 3002 (3) SPA 3112 (3) SPA 4363 (3) SPA. 3011 (3) SPA 3310 (3) SPA 4562 (3) SPA 3030 (3) SPA 4050 (3) SPA 4930 (3) SPA 3101 (3) SPA 4201 (3) DEP 4135 (3) (recommended) Speech-Language Pathology Focus SPA 3380 (3) & 3380L (1) (recommended). SPA 4210 (3) SPA4222 (3) Hearing Impairment Focus SPA 3380 (3) & SPA 3380L (1) Students interested in teacher certification in deaf education must complete required education courses in addition to all ISS require ments listed under Sections Band C. Effective July 1989, the academic requirement for employment in the public school system for SpeechLanguage Pathologists is the Master's degree. E. American Sign Language Concentration (ISA) (min. 30 er. hrs.) The ISA concentration seeks to educate students to communi cate with the deaf and to apply this knQwled9e in work settings where knowledge of the deaf culture is essential for the provision of social services This ISA concentration is not intended to prepare interpreters for the deaf although exceptionally proficient stu dents may qualify as interpreters This concentration also does not qualify students for admission into the M .S. programs in Speech Language Pathology or Clinical and RehabilitativeAudiology, in cluding Deaf Education. Those students choosing to become teachers of the deaf must pursue the ISH concentration in Speech Language-Hearing Science and obtain the M .S. degree. General admission requirements, recommended admission re quirements, and ISA requirements are identical to the ISH concen tration in Speech-Language-Hearing Science. The specific course of study for the ISA concentration also assumes that the student has completed an A.A. degree or its equivalency. Upon admission to the concentration, each student will be assigned an advisor for the purpose of academic planning The following courses are all required : SPA 3002 (3) SPA 3030 (3) SPA 3310 (3) SPA 3380 (3) and SPA 3380L(1) SPA 4332 (3) SPA 4930 (3) SPA 4363 (3) SPA 4382 (3) and SPA 4382L (1) SPA 4383 (3) and SPA 4383L (1) other electives (6) Minimum Grade for Majors A student must receive a "C" grade or better in all courses within the major and those that are required prerequisites Any student who receives a grade of "D" or lower in more than tWo USF Communication Sciences and Disorders courses will be automati cally barred from continuing as an undergraduate major in either ISH or ISA. Grade forgiveness may be used for two courses only and may be used only for course work taken in the first year of study. Courses which comprise the second year of the major may not be repeated CRIMINOLOGY (CCJ) The major in crimiqology provides students with an in-depth ex. posure to the total criminal justice system including law enforce ment, detention, the judiciary, corrections, and probation and parole. The program concentrates on achieving balance in the above aspects of the system from the perspective 9f the criminal justice professional, the offender, and society The objective of the undergraduate program in criminology is to develop a sound educational basis either for graduate work or for professional training in one or more of the specialized areas comprising the modern urban Criminal Justice System. Note: No more than five (5) hours of CCJ 4900, CCJ 4910 or any combination of the two will be accepted toward the minimum number of hours of the major. Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree: A minimum of 39 semester hours is required ofall undergradu ate majors in criminology including the following courses or their

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64 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OI SOUTH FLotl/DA ftt2aJ UNDERGRADUA Tf CATALOG equivalents: CCJ 3020 3 CCJ 4501 (3) (CJ 3210 3 (CJ 4360 (3) CCJ 3610 3 or CCJ 3621 (3)* CCJ 3701 3 or CCJ 4700 (3) CCJ 4934 3 C<:J 4110 (3) *Subject to Departmental approval for required credit. In addition to the above, a minimum of 15 hours in criminology must be selected by the student to complete the requirements Transfer students should be aware that by University regula tion they are obligated to establish academic residency by com pleting the equivalent of one academic year (30 semester hours) in 'on-campus courses. All under9.raduate transfer students electing criminology as their major will be required, moreover, to take a minimum of 27 credits in major coursework at the University of South Florida These residence requirements are designed to insure that transfer students who subsequently receive their baccalaureate degree from the University of South Florida with a major in criminology will been exposed to the same body of knowl edge in their major as those students who complete all or a major portion of their coursework at the University of South Florida Any student who receives a grade of 1D1 or lower in more than one USF CCJ course will be automatically barred from continuing as a criminology major. Requirements for a Minor in Crirninology The Department of Criminology offers a minor in Criminology The minor will consist of three required courses (CCJ 3020, 3210, 3610) totalling 9 credit hours, and the selection of two of the following 3 hour courses (CCJ 4110, 4360, 4501, 4604) for a total of 15 hours. Students must receive approval from the Department prior to starting their minor work. Students minoring in Criminol ogy will be subject to the Department's '2 D' Rule. ECONOMICS (ECN) Economics offers a clear, logical way of thinking about compli cated contemporary societal issues such as unemployment, infla tion, pollution, and crime The department offers two major programs. Option I, by offering broad choices, allows students to tailor their programs to provide training for careers in business, teaching, or government service It is also excellent preparation for graduate or professional education in social science, business, or law. Option II, by offering the student continuing concentration in price theory, aggregate economics, mathematical economics, and econometrics prepares students for graduate education in economics. The department also offers a Minor program open to students throughout the University. Students interested in majoring or minoring in economics should contact the undergraduate academic advisor in the Depart ment of Economics for more information about the program. Requirements for the B.A. Degree: A student may earn a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Economics by completin9 satisfactorily 33 credits in Economics in addition to college requirements These 33 credits include : Courses required for both Option I and ( 18 hours) ECO 2013 (3) ECO 2023 (3) ECO 3101 (3) ECO 3203 (3) QMB 2150 (3) QMB 3200 (3) Students must obtain a grade of 'C' or higher in ECO 31O1, Intermediate Price Theory, in order to enroll in any course for which ECO 3101 or ECO 3203 is a prerequisite. No more than 3 hours credit can be applied toward a major from ECO 4905 and/ or ECO 4914. Economics majors working at the regional campuses cannot expect to tu Ifill all economics course requirements at those campuses. Option 1 Additional 15 hours upper-level economics courses (to ensure broad coverage students must include at least one course from each of groups A, B, and C in their programs) At least 9 of the 15 hours of additional upper-level economics courses must be in courses for which either ECO 3101 or ECO 3203 is a prerequisite. These courses are marked with an asterick Group A (at least 3 hours) selected from : ECO 3622, ECP 3413, ECP 3613, ECP 423L, ECS 3013 Group B (at least 3 hours) selected from: ECO 4303*, ECO 4323, ECP 4451 *, ECS 4003 Group C (at least 3 hours) selected from : ECO 3703*, ECO 4504*, ECO 4213*, ECP 3203, ECO 4935 (Selected Topics *Industrial Organization) Option II Required Economics courses ( 12 hours): ECO 4935 Selected Topics-Advanced Price Theory ECO 4935 Selected Topics-Advanced Aggregate Economics ECO 4401 Mathematical Economics ECO 4935 Selected Topics-Introduction to Econometrics Additional upper-level economics course (3 hours) Students majoring in economics are encouraged to supple ment their programs with appropriate courses in other social sciences. Political science, psychology, sociology, and others con tripute to an enriched plan of study. A variety of courses in economics is designed to permit students majoring in other disci plines to acquire the skills and insight provided in economics Requirements for a Minor in Economics Students majoring in Social Sciences, as well as students from other colleges, may minor in economics. Total requirements are: 1 A minor must include these four courses in basic economics: ECO 2013 Economic Principles: Macroeconomics (3 ECO 2023 Economic Principles : Microeconomics ECO 3101 Intermediate Price Theory (3 ECO 3203 Intermediate Income & Monetary Analysis (3) 2. In addition, a minor must include two or more upper level courses taught in the Economics Department (excluding the variable credit courses ECO 4905 and 4914 ), bringing the total credit hours in economics to a minimum of 18. QMB 3200, Business and Economic Statistics II, or its equivalent, is accept able for credit in a minor 3. Before being recognized as a minor in economics, a student must obtain approval by the advisor in the Economics Depart ment of the courses involved in the student's minor program. 4 A grade point average of 2 .0 or better must be achieved in the minor coursework for a student to be certified for graduation with a minor in economics 5 At least 12 of the required 18 credits must be taken in residence at USF. ENGLISH (ENG) Freshman English Requirement All first-time-in-college students are required to take Freshman English (a sequential two-semester course of study) in accor dance with the following conditions: 1 First-time-enrolled students (a) who do not intend to take the CLEP Freshman English Test, or (b) who have been notified of failing CLEP prior to registration and who do F'IOt intend to attempt the exam a second time must take ENC 1 10 l and ENC 1102 sequentially. If a student fails the first course, he/she must repeat it before proceeding to the next Freshman English course Students should normally take these courses during their freshman year, but these courses are in high demand and it is possible that registration space will not always be available 2 First-time-enrolled students (a) who have not taken CLEP prior to their arrival on campus, or (b) who have failed but wish to repeat the test, must attempt CLEP during their first nine (9) weeks During this semester, they should not enroll in ENC 1101. If a student either fails or doesn't attempt the CLEP examination during his/her first nine (9) weeks, the student normally should take ENC 1101 in the following semester In this case, the student will normally complete the sequence by the first semester of his/her sophomore year. These policies do not apply to first-time-enrolled students who can meet the

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 65 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Freshman English requirement with credit transferred from hours and, in some cases, receive compensation for their duties. another institution or with appropriate AP English credit. Students choosing this concentration will also assure them-Requirements for the B.A. Degree The program in English provides options in English and Ameri can literature, creative writing, and professional and technical writing. The literature option covers the major periods of literature in English. The creative-writing option includes training in writing and coverage of English and American literature The professional and technical writing option combines the study of literature with an introduction to writing found in the professional workplace. The English-Education program is described under the section for the College of Education. Major requirements for English majors are listed below. A grade of "D" will not be counted toward fulfilling the major requirements Students may not use more than one Directed Study toward meeting the major requirements Transfer students whose courses do not equate with those at USF will be required to earn approximately the same number of hours as those who take their whole major here. OPTION I: English and American Literature. Eleven courses (33 hrs ) as follows: 1. Both of the following : AML 3031 AML 3032 2 Four of the following: ENL 301 5 ENL 3273 ENL 3230 ENL 3250 ENL 3331 or ENL 3332 or AML 4300 for students with a special interest in American Lit erature 3 Five of the following, at least two of which must be at the 4000 level : AML 3051 AML 3271 AML 4123 AML 4261 ENG 3105 ENG 3114 ENG 4060 ENL 3015 ENL 3250 ENL 3273 ENL 3332 ENL 4122 ENL 4171 ENL 4303 ENL 4338 ENL 4341 LIN 4370 LIT 3022 LIT 3101 LIT 3102 LIT 3374 LIT 3410 LIT 4011 LIT 4930 OPTION II: Creative Writing. AML 4101 AML 4300 ENG 4013 ENL 3230 ENL 3331 ENL 4132 ENL 4311 LIN 4340 LIT 3073 LIT 3144 LIT 3716 This option is designed for aspiring writers of fiction or poetry. In addition to giving credit for writing through a variety of course offerings, it provides information about procedures for publish ing 1 FICTION OPTION (33 hrs.) All of the following : CRW 3111 CRW 3112 CRW 3121 CRW 3311 CRW 4120 Note : for CRW 3311, the courses above must be taken in s..quence. CRW 3311 may be at any tilT .. after CRW 3111 is completed Additional course requirements : The student must select six literature courses from those listed in OPTION I. Two courses must be from group "1 .'two more from group "2.' and one from group "3. At least two of the courses must have either an ENL or LIT prefix 2. POETRY OPTION (33 hrs ) All of the following: CRW 3111 CRW 3311 CRW 3312 CRW 3321 CRW 4320 Note : for CRW 3111 the courses above must be taken in s..quence. CRW 31 1 1 may be at any time after CRW 3311 i s completed. Additional course requirements : Same as for the Fiction Writing option above OPTION Ill: Professional and Technical Writing. This 36-hour program allows undergraduates to concentrate their studies in professional writing, wherein they will master special writing skills demanded by industry, business, govern ment, and the professions Semester-long internships may be arranged by the English Department with local businesses, indus tries, and professional organizations. Interns will earn three credit selves of a core of liberal arts studies since they must take 21 credit hours of literature courses in addition to 15 hours of composition courses 1 Composition requirements : Five of the following : CRW 2100 ENC 4260 ENC 3210 ENC 431 1 ENC 3213 ENC 4931 ENC 3310 2. Literature requirements: The student must select seven literature courses from those listed in OPTION I as follows : Two courses from group "1 .'four courses from group "2.' and one course from group "3. Requirements for the Minor -in English English and American Literature Minor Requirements : Five courses (15 hrs ) as follows: 1 One of the following : AML 3031 2 Two of the following: ENL 3015 ENL 3250 AML 3032 ENL 3230 ENL 3273 ENL 3331 or 3. One course at the 4000 level ENL 3332 4. One additional course with AML, CRW, ENC, ENL or LIT prefix Cr.eative Writing Minor (15 hrs.) 1 Either Form and Technique of Fiction (CRW 3111) and Fiction I, II, and Ill (CRW 3112, 3121, 4120) or Form and Technique of Poetry (CRW 3311) and Poetry I, II, and Ill (CRW 3312, 3321, 4320) 2 One AML or ENL course at the 3000 or 4000 level. Professional and Technical Writing Minor (15 hours) 1 ENC3210 2 ENC 4260 3. One AML or ENL course 4 Two of the following courses : CRW 2100 ENC 3213 ENC 3310 ENC 4311 ENC 4931 English Honors Program The Department of English Honors Program will provide a care fully selected group of seniors with: A Closer contact with faculty tutors than students in the regular majors program; 8 An opportunity to work and exchange ideas in the stimulating environment of a small group of fellow students with similar aims and abilities; C. An opportunity to develop individual initiative and sophisticated critical skills. The English Honors Program will benefit those interested in graduate work, advanced professional study, or those interested in accepting a greater intellectual challenge. Admissions Criteria Sophomores and Juniors applying to the honors program will be encouraged to sign up for a special section of ENC 3310 (Expository Writing). This Gordon Rule course will emphasize the writing of critical and analytical prose and provide an intellectually rigorous introduction to the study and uses of classical and modern rhetoric. Students may apply for the program after completing 80 hours of course work (90 before actual admission) Applicants should have a GPA of 3.5 in the major as well as in other course work and should submit lett .ers from two English faculty supporting their applications In addition they should have completed or be in the process of completing at least four of the six survey courses required for the English Literature major. They should complete all remaining survey courses during their senior year After screening all appli cations, the department's Honors Committee will interview all eligible applicants before selecting no more than twelve to participate in each year's program.

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66 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Requirements for Completion of Departmental Honors 1 The Honors student will complete Parts 1 and 2 of the Literature major as described in the current catalogue. He/she will also take at least two courses from Part 3 2 The student w ill take two (three-hour) Honors seminars during the first semester of his/her senior year. One seminar will intro duce the student to various theories and practices of literary criticism. The other, by examining either a literary genre or a maximum of three authors, will provide the student w ith significant and concentrated study Both courses should help the student in selecting a topic for his/her Honors thesis 3. During the second semester of the senior year, the Hono r s student will enroll for three thesis hours The instructors of the first semester's seminars will serve as instructors of record for the thesis seminar and as readers of all honors theses The student will choose a member of the faculty to serve as the thi rd reader of his thes i s The student must satisfy the following requirements: a. Complete both honors semi nars with a 3 5 GPA; b. Complete all remaining major requirements and remaining academic course work with an overall GPA of 3.5 in both areas; c. Submit an acceptable thesis to the Departmental Honors committee 4 The student who completes all requirements above will gradu ate with honors in English The credit hours completed withi n the program by the student who does not complete all honors requirements will of course count toward the baccalaureate degree The honors comm i ttee will disqualify any student from the program who does not complete the Honors seminars with at least a 3 5 GPA. Honors students failing to complete a thesis w ithi n two years after acceptance into the program will be notified by the Honors Committee of their dismissal from the program FOREIGN LANGUAGES (FRE/GER/ITA/ RUS/SPA) Foreign Language major programs are des i gned to meet the needs of students who desire competency in a language and an expanded understanding of its culture and literature. They are of particular interest to students who w ish to teach languages, those who plan to further their studies in graduate school, and those who seek careers in various types of fore i gn or foreign related em ployment, either in government or business Major programs leading to the bachelor of arts degree are offered in French, German, Italian, Russian, and Spanish All major programs in foreign language require a total of 32 hours of coursework above the intermediate level. The following languages may also be taken as a m i nor : French, German, Italian, Latin (under Classics), Russi an, and Spanish. The minor consists of 16 hours of course work in the chosen language above the second-year level. In order to begin taking courses for the minor, the student will have satisfactorily completed the intermediate level or have equivalent proficiency in the fore i gn language. Instruction in less commonly taught languages may be available upon sufficient demand French (FRE) Required courses for the major (12 er hrs.) FRE 3240 (3) FRE 3420 (3) FRW 4100 (3) FRW 4101 (3) Supporting courses required for the major 20 hours in 3000, 4000, or 5000 level courses planned with the adv i ser Required courses for the minor (6 er hrs.) FRE 3240 (3) FRE 3420 (3) Supporting courses required for the minor Nine hours in 3000, 4000 or 5000 level courses except courses in translation German (GER) Requirements for the major (14 er hrs.) GER 3244 (3) GER 3420 (3) GEW 4100 (4) GEW 4101 (4) Support i ng courses requ i red for the major 18 hours in 3000 4000 or 5000 level courses planned with the adviser . Required courses for the minor (six er hrs ) GER 3244 (3) GER 3420 (3) Support i ng courses required for the m inor 10 hours in 3000, 4000 or 5000 level courses except courses in translation. Italian (IT A) Required courses for the major (15 er hrs.) ITA 3240 (4) ITA 3420 (3) ITW 4100 (4) ITW 4101 (4) Supporting courses required for the major 1 7 hours in 3000 or 4000 level courses planned with the adv iser. Required cour ses for the minor (seven er hrs.) ITA 3240 (4) ITA 3420 (3) Supporting courses required for the minor Nine hours in 3000 or 4000 level courses except courses in translation Russian (RUS) Required courses for the major (74 er hrs ) RUS 3240 (4) RUS 4241 (4) RUT 3110 (3) RUT 3111 (3) Supporting courses requ i red for the major 18 hours in 3000 or 4000 level courses planned with the adviser Required courses for the minor (8 er hrs.) RUS 3240 (4) RUS 4241 (4) Supporting courses requ i red for the minor Eight hours in 3000 or 4000 level courses Spanish (SPA) Required courses for the major (72 er. hrs.) SPN 3300 (3) SPW 4100 (3) SPW 4101 (3) SPW 4131(3) All 3000 level courses may be waived with approval by the Division Director Supporting courses required for the major: Twenty hou r s in 3000, 4000 or 5000 level courses planned with the adviser Required courses for the minor (3 er hrs.) SPN 3300 (3) Supporting courses required for the minor Twelve hours in 3000, 4000 or 5000 level courses except courses in translation GEOGRAPHY (GPY) Geography explains the variable character of the earth's surface The two major divis i ons of geography are physical and cultural (human) Physical geography includes the study of earth sun relationships, weather, climate, and natural features of the landscape, such as landforms soils, vegetation, and hydrology Cultural geography studies people, their various cultures, levels of technology, and economic activities that operate differentially to alter the natural landscape Geography's overriding purpose is to understand the earth as the home of humankind A major concern of geography is the wise use of natural, human and economic resources Therefore, ecological and environmental considerations are central to the study of geography Students are encouraged to take elective credits in a wide variety of d i sciplines because of the cross-disc i plinary approach to geography Geographers typically work as urban and regional planners en vironmental specialists, map and aerial photographic analysts, and resource managers

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 67 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1991/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree 5. Free Electives (including Distribution waivers) (29-35 sem. A major in geography consists of 36 credit hours as follows : hrs. ) Required core courses (7 2 credit hours). GEO 3013 (4) GEO 3014 (4) GEO 4100C (4) One of the following (4 credit hours) GEO 4280C (4) MET 4002 (4) MET 4010C (4) Two of the following (8 credit hours). GEO 3402 (4) GEO 4440 (4) GEO 4470 (4) GEO 4372 (4) GEO 4460 (4) GEO 4502 (4) GEO 4602 (4) One course with a GEA prefix (4 credit hours) Any additional 8 credit hours in geography, excluding GEO 3901 GEO 4900 GEO 4910 GEO 3931C GEO 1930 GEO 4201C Requirements for the Minor A minor in Geography consists of sixteen hours, with a minimum grade-point average of 2 0 The required courses are: GEA 3000 (4) GEO 3013 (4) GEO 3014 (4) One upper level elect ive (GEA, GEO, MET, or URP 3000-5000 level) (4). GEOLOGY {GL Y) The Department of Geology offe r s programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree, and to a Master of Science degree. Geology is one of the broadest of all sciences because of its dependence on fundamentals of biology, chemis try, mathematics, and physics as applied to the study of the earth. As a result, undergraduate students are expected to obtain a broad background in the other sciences as well as a concentration in geology Bachelor of Science degree program is designed to provide the geology major with a broad foundation that will prepare the student for employment in industry or with various governmental agencies, as well as the necessary training to continue study in graduate school. The Bachelor of Arts program is designed primarily for the liberal arts student who has interest in the subject but is not preparing for a career in the field or for the pre professional school student. A student who elects the B.A. pro gram and decides to pursue the geology profession or attend graduate school will need at least physics and field geology in h is/ her program The graduate program in geology allows the student to pursue advanced studies in nearly all areas of geology As a result of faculty interests and geographic location, several geologic subdisciplines are emphasized including coastal geology, hydrogeol ogy, geochemistry, applied geophysics volcanology, and paleontology. Requirements for the B.A. Degree 1. Geology Courses (30 sem. hrs ) GLY 2010 (3) GLY 3200 (3) GLY 4310 (3) GLY 2010L (1) GLY 3220 (3) GLY 4550 (4) GLY 2100 (3) GLY 3400C (4) GLY 2100L (1) GLY 3610 (4) A minimum of 2 sem. hrs. from GLY 4920 (1) 2. Supporting Courses (22-28 sem. hrs. ) a CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046L (1) b. One year of calculus (MAC 3233, 3234 or 3311, 3212, or 3281, 3282) STA 3023 may be substituted for one semes ter of calculus. c Two courses in biology or physics selected from : SSC 2010C (4) BOT 2010C (4) PHY 3053-3053L (4) ) or [ PHY 3048-3048L (4) PHY 3054-3054L (4) PHY 3049-3049L (4) 3. General Distribution Courses (40 sem. hrs. excluding waiv ers. ) The student is required to sat isfy the General D i stribution requirements of Natural Sciences. 4. Liberal Education Electives The student must satisfy 15 hours of liberal educat i on electives as described in item 3 of the graduation requirements of Natural Sciences. Requirements for the B.S. Degree 1. Geology (40-42 sem. hrs.) GLY 2010 (3) GLY 3200 (3) GLY 2010L (1) GLY 3220 (3) GLY 2100 (3) GLY 3400C (4) GLY 2100L (1) GLY 3610 (4) GLY 4310 (3) GLY 4550 (4) GLY-prefixed, structured electives (6) A minimum of 2 sem. hrs. from : GLY 4920 (1) Field Geology requirement : GLY 4791 (3) and GLY 4792 (3). 2. Supporting Courses (22-26 sem. hrs ) CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046 (3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046L (1) MAC 3281 (3) l or [ MAC 3311 (4) MAC 3282 (3) MAC 3312 (4) PHY 3048 (3) HY 3049 (3) PHY 3048L (1) PHY 3049L (1) 3. General Distribution Courses (40 sem. hrs. waiv ers). The student is required to satisfy the General Distribution requirements of Natural 'Sciences. 4. Liberal Education Electives The student is required to complete the liberal education electives of Natural Sciences. 5. Free Electives (Including Distr i bution Waivers) 19-25 sem. hrs. The student will choose, in consultation with his/her Geology adviser, such courses in Natural Sciences that support his/her major interest in the field of Geology Courses in computer pro gramming and additional Mathematics are of particular value Those students who anticipate continuing for a doctorate in graduate school are encouraged to take a foreign language, preferably French, German, or Russian. All geology majors are strongly urged to take a course in technical writing All entering students anticipating a major in Geology are advised to enroll in: GLY 2010 GLY 2100 CHM 2041 CHM 2046 GLY 201 OL GL Y 21 OOL CHM 2045L CHM 2046L in the freshman year and to seek curriculum counseling with a Geology advisor. Requirements for the Minor in Geology A m i nor in geology consists of 16 credit hours and must include GLY 2010, GLY 2010L and GLY 2100, GLY 2100L. Additional courses, approved by the geology advisor, are designed to com plement the student's major program Only those courses which are acceptable toward the major in geology may be used toward the m i nor Teacher Education Programs Prospective elementary and secondary school teachers desir ing to teach science should include basic courses in Geology and related sciences as part of their curriculum GERONTOLOGY {GEY) Gerontology is the study of the process of human aging in all its many aspects: physical, psychological, and social. In the Depart ment of Gerontology particular emphasis is placed upon applied gerontology, with the goal of students who in their professional careers in the field of aging will work to sustain or i mprove the quality of life .of older persons. To this end the Depart ment offers the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Gerontology, Bachelor of Science in Gerontology, and Master of Arts in Geron tology Requirements for the B.A. Degree The Bachelor of Arts Degree in Gerontology entails 37 semes ter hours of required course work In this program the course of study is intended to provide students with a liberal education in gerontology and some exposure to the various career opportuni t ies in the field of aging This degree is especially appropriate for

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68 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FtORIDA 1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG stl!dents who are undecided about the i r eventual career goals in aging or who plan to pursue graduate work in gerontology or some other field. Required Courses: GEY 3000 (3) HUS 4020 (4) HUS 3001 (3) GEY 4327 (3) GEY 3601 (3) GEY 4360 (3) GEY 3625 (3) GEY 4401 (3) GEY 4640 (3) GEY 4935 (3) GEY 4945 (6-8) Requirements for the B.S. Degree The Bachelor of Science Degree in Gerontology is a specialist degree which, in addition to providing students with a basic education in gerontology, is intended to prepare them for entry level in Nursing Home Administration. It is especially appropriate for students who intend to begin working immedi ately following completion of the degree program. Required courses: MAN 3025 (3) GEY 3601 (3) GEY 4328 (3) MAN 3240 (3) GEY 4360 (3) GEY 4329 (3) MAN 3301 (3) GEY 4640 (3) GEY 4945 (6-8) BUl 3112 (3) GEY 4327 (3) Prior to taking the courses required in the major, students must complete the following twelve (12) hours of prerequisites : ACG 2001, ACG 2011, CGS 2000, and GEY 3000 These courses are intended to reflect educational require ments mandated by the State of Florida and specified in Chapter 21 z.11 of the Florida Administrative Code The prerequisite can only be satisfied by a stu dent's having taken GEY 3000 at this university or its equivalent at another institution. The human services prerequisite can be satisfied either by a student's having taken HUS 3001 or an equivalent course at another institution or by having had suitable work experience in the human services. The prerequisites of accounting can be fulfilled by taking ACG 2001 and ACG 2011 at this university or comparable work at another institution Students interested in either the B.A. or the B S option should contact the Department as early as possible in their careers at the University of South Florida. Requirements for the Minor in Human Services A minor in Huma n Services is no longer offered An under graduate minor in Gerontology is, however, now available in the Department of Gerontology Requirements for the Minor in Gerontology An. undergraduate minor in Gerontology is available for stu dents interested in pursuing career-s in fields such as social work communication disorders, health care, mental health care, and re.habilitation counseling This minor may be taken in conjunction with undergraduate major, but it should be particularly benef1cia! to majoring such disciplines as anthropology, communications sciences and disorders, government and interna tional affairs, psychology, rehabilitation counseling, social work, and sociology Requirements for the minor in Gerontology are a total of 16 hours of the following upper-level courses : GEY 3000 (3) GEY 3601 (3) GEY 3625 (3) GEY 4360 (3) HUS 4020 (4) GOVERNMENT AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS (GIA} The Department of Government and International Affairs includes programs in International Studies, Political Science, and the Public Administration Its goal is to provide students the opportunity to study the nature of government and politics at the local, national and levels, as well as the interdiscipli nary nature of the international system. Towards that end it offers students a choice of two undergraduate degrees, one in Interna tional Studies and another in Political Science. The Department of Government and International Affairs provides students with a of courses of study and areas of concentration, including electives offered through the Public Administration program. For more specific details students are advised to consult the descrip tion of each specific program below INTERNATIONAL STUDIES {INT) The major in International Studies enables students to under take of. study emphasize (a) preparation for .in international act1v1.t1es, or (b) the study of particular themes or topics, or (c) the study of particular regions or cultures The program of study is developed by each student in consultation with the International Studies Adviser so as to best serve the education and career goals of the individual. The major consists of a minimum of 37 semester hours At least 18 of these hours (six courses) must be from the International Studies Program offerings The six required courses are : INR 3003 (3) INR 3080 (3) INR 3082 (3) INR 4936 (3) plus one topical and one area studies course chosen from the INT upper division electives The core courses should be taken in the order indicated, beginning with INR 3003. Students may take INR 3080 and l!'J. R 3082 simultaneously The add1t1onal 19 hours may be selected from course offerings of other departments, which are approved by the major adviser as having adequate international or cross-cultural content. Students may also take upper level electives from the International Studies curriculum . With the approval of the major adviser, credits earned in INR 4900 (1-3) and INR 4910 (1-3) may be used to augment or substitute for the foregoing requirements Students are encour aged, but not required to engage in study abroad programs a large number of which have been approved by the USF tional Affairs c enter Credits earned in such programs apply toward graduation and many also apply to the INT major. Required Supporting Courses Students must pass a 2000 !evel foreign language course (that 1s, at least one semester of foreign language study beyond the first year introductory courses), or complete one year of study of a non Western Students who are bilingual or who are already fluent or who can translate with facility from a foreign language text are exempt from the above course require n:ient, but the INT faculty may require demonstration of profi ciency. Students will be provided with academic advice and counsel about other courses offered throughout the university which may support and complement their major program INT majors should plan their programs in conjunction with the adviser who is empowered to make appropriate substitutions when education ally justified Requirements for the Minor in International Studies The minor in Internat i onal Studies is a set of International Studies courses by a that one t)alf of the upper level credits required for a maior. The minor consists of 18 credit hours made up of Si?< courses as follows : INR 3003 (3) INR 3080 (3) INR 3082 (3) and 3 upper level courses chosen from the International Studies Program's offerin9s Each student's program must be planned with the International Studies Program major adviser, who is empowered to approve appropriate substitutions when educa tionally justified POLITICAL SCIENCE {POL) The undergraduate program leading to the B.A. degree in political science offers a general purpose degree, and a number of more These the pre-professional plan in poht1cal The program 1s for students !nterested in and seeking to understand political problems and issues, and the nature of the polit ical process as well as the ph i losophical and legal basis of political structures and processes at local, national, and international levels Satisfying the requirements prepares students for positions in the public private sectors, for law school, for graduate work in political science, international relat i ons, public administration, and related

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 69 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG disciplines, for positions in education, and for applied political 3002 (or INR 3002), POS 2041, and POT 3003 An additional 12 activity. credit hours in regularly scheduled political science courses are Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree Students who earn a B.A. degree in political science should be able to relate knowledge from their major field to other allied disciplines as well as being well-grounded in political science. In fact, it is impossible to understand fully and to explain political events and behavior without some knowledge of history, economics, sociology, and other related fields To aid and encourage political science majors in this endeavor stud ents must a minimum of 18 hours in courses from among history, economics, anthropology, geography, sociology psychology, philosophy, or other approved Social Sciences. Six hours must be in history three in economics, and nine from the remaining fields Six of the eighteen hours must be taken at or above the 3000 level. A minimum of 36 credit hours is required to satisfy the requirements of the major. Students must take the 12 credi t hours of required coursework in political science. No more than six credit hours can be taken from POS 4905, POS 4910, and POS 4941. (A GPA of 3 0 is required to enroll in these courses; special exception may be granted by the Chair for students with a GPA between 2 70 and 2.99). Students transferring cred i t hours toward a major in political science must complete a minimum of 21 credit hours w i thin the Department, regardless of the number of cred its transferred in order to satisfy the requirements of the major The undergraduate curriculum in political science is composed of the following : Required Core Courses (12 er. hrs.) POT 3003 (3) POS 2041 (3) POS 3713 (3) CPO 3002 (3) or INR 3002 (3) Students should complete POT 3003 and POS 3713 by the end of the first semester of their junior year ; students transferring w i th 45 credit hours or more must complete these courses within their first two semesters i n residence at USF. Electives from the seven fields (24 er. hrs. ) with at least one course from Field I, one course from Field II or Ill, and one course from any of Fields IV, V, VI, or VII; no course from a given field or field grouping can be taken until the core course has been completed Field I Political Theory POS 5734 (3) POT 4204 (3) POT 3013 (3) POT 5626 (3) POT 4054 (3) POT 4064 (3) Field II Comparative Government and Politics CPO 4034 (3) CPO 5934 (3) CPO 4930 (3) Field Ill International Relations INR 3102 (3) INR 4403 (3) INR 4035 (3) INR 4502 (3) INR 4334 (3) INR 5086 (3) Field IV American National and State Governments POS 2112 (3) POS 4204 (3) POS 3173 (3) POS 4413 (3) POS 3182 (3) POS 4424 (3) POS 3273 (3) POS 5094 (3) POS 3453 (3) Field V Urban Government and Politics POS3142(3) POS5155(3) PUP 4534 (3) POS 4165 (3) Field VI Public Poli9' INR 3102 (3) PUP 5607 (3) URP 4050 (3) POS 3145 (3) Field VII Law and Politics POS 3145 (3) URP 4050 (3) INR 4334 (3) PUP 4534 (3) INR 4403 (3) POS 4614 (3) POS 3283 (3) POS 4624 (3) POS 3691 (3) POS 4693 (3) The following courses are not included within any of the seven fields, but may still be used as elective hours: PAD 3003 (3) POS 4936 (3) PAD 4204 (3) POS 4941 (3) POS 4905 ( 1-3) POS 4970 (3) POS 4910 (1-3) POS 3931 (3) Requirements for the Minor in Political Science A minor in political science consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours, made up of two courses (6 credit hours) from among CPO requ ired. Students transferring credit hours toward a minor in political science must complete 12 credit hours within the Department regardless of the number of credit hours transferred, in order to be cert i fied for a minor Field Work The Department of Political Science has a field work program which provides students with part time internships state and local government and with political parties at the state and local level. Academic credit is available for such internships. For further information, contact the Department of Government and Interna tional Affairs Honors in Political Science Honors in Political Science is designed for the outstanding undergraduate who seeks an intensive program plus academic rec ognit i on during the senior year Admission to the honors sequence which is available to all undergraduate majors, will be controlled by grade point average, personal interviews and close scrutiny of the student'.s program and record Students admitted will write an honors thesis, POS 4970 (3) Pre-Professional Plan in Political Science This plan is designed for students seeking an intensive under graduate concentration in political science. Typi cally students elect i ng th i s plan w ill be oriented towards graduate work in pol i tical science or other social sciences. A min i mum of36 credit hours is required Students must take s i x credit hours of required courses: POS 2041 (3) POS 3713 (3) Ten additional courses in political science (30 er. hrs.) must be taken, of which at least seven must be above the 3000 level. Con centration within fields will be encouraged Requirements for the Pre-Law Plan in Political Science The area of Political Science offers a pre-law p Lan designed for the undergraduate consider ing a career related to law; Field VII of the undergraduate curriculum (Law and Politics) The courses making up the field are of particular interest to law-oriented students, but may be taken by others as well. Majors are guided to those courses which develop skills and provide information needed for good performance in the study of law Students receive the skills and information needed for entry into a number of lawr elated positions in business and government An integral part of this plan is a high degree of student access to the Political Science's pre-law adviser Prior to admission to law school, a student must take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). This test is given by the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, New Jersey. The Law School Admission Test is given simultaneously several times each year at the University of South Florida and numerous other testing centers throughout the state Students should plan to take the test at least one year prior to planned enrollment in law school. Additional information is available from the Department of Government and International Affairs, University of South Florida. (Pre-law is not a prescribed program of study No specific college major is required for admission to law school. Those students intending to pursue the study of law must obtain a Bachelor of Arts degree in an arena of personal choice It is generally agreed that knowledge and understanding of the political economic and social context within which legal prob lems arise facilitate a career in law ) International Affairs Focus in Political Science The area of Political Science offers a number of courses that p r epare students for graduate study in International Relations and career opportunities in private or public transnational organiza tions.

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70 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FlORIDA 1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Basic courses in the area include : INR 3002 Introduction to International Relations CPO 3002 Introduction to Comparat ive Polit ics INR 3102 American Foreign Policy In addition, Political Science offers the following upper-level courses : CPO 4034 Politics of Developing A reas CPO 4930 Comparative Politics of Selected Areas INR 4334 Defense Policy INR 4035 International Political Economy INR 4403 International Law INR 4502 International Organizations CPO 5934 Selected Topics in Comparative Politics INR 5086 Issues in International Relations Students desiring careers in international affairs or interna tional administration are encouraged to supplement these courses with courses offered in International Studies, Management, Economics, Business Administration Foreign Languages, and Public Administration PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION {PAD) The Public Administration Program offers courses which serve as electives for undergraduate studeAts Completion of these courses will benefit those students preparing for a career in local, state, or federal agencies of government, non-profit organiza tions, and special service districts and/or graduate work in public administration and related fields The courses listed below may be taken for undergraduate credit. Please note that the 5000-level courses listed are availabie to seniors and graduate students only PAD 3003 Introduction to Public Administrat i on PAD 4202 Public Financial Admin i stration PAD 5035 Issues in Public Administration and Public Policy PAD 5333 Concepts and Issues in Public Planning PAD 5605 Administrative law PAD 5612 Administrative Regulation PAD 5700 Research Methods in Public Administration PAD 5807 Administration of Urban Affairs PAD 5836 Comparative Public Administration For further information, please contact the Public Administra tion Program HISTORY (HTY) Requirements for the B.A. Degree A minimum of 32 semester hours is required for a major in history. Twelve hours of 2000 level courses, or their equivalent, constitute the lower level requirements At least 12 hours of course work must be drawn from the 3000-4000 level in addition to HIS 4104 and 4936, which constitute the upper level require ments for the degree It is recommended that history majors take ENC 3310, "Advanced Exposi tory Writing," SPC 2023, "Fundamen tals of Speech Communication," LIS 2001, "Use of the Library, and additional hours drawn from the following disciplines : African and Afro-American Studies, American Studies, Anthropology, Eco nomics, Geography, Poli tical Science, Interdisciplinary Social Sci ences, Psychology, Philosophy, Sociology, literature the Humani ties, and the Fine Arts Majors intending to pursue graduate work should take a minimum of two years of classical or modern foreign language. Requirements for the Honors Program The department's honors program challenges the super i or student to achieve academic excellence through individual research and individualized instruction Admission to t he program will be competitive. A maximum of 15 students per year will be selected. They must meet the following criteria : 20 hours (at least 8 at USF) of history courses {3.5 GPA or better), 75 hours total course work {3.3 GPA or better), and recommendation by a USF history faculty member Honors students will be assigned faculty advisors who will guide their research and the writing of an honors thesis Students will also participate in an Honors Colloquium Students interested in the program should contact the depart mental undergraduate advisor for details of this demanding and rewarding program. Requirements for the Minor The Department of History offers two options for students interested in the minor in History Option one requires four history courses (at least 15 hours) at the 3000 and 4000 levels drawn from a minimum of three of the following fields : a) Ancient; b) Medie val; c) Modern European; d) United States; e) Non-Western; Latin American Asian, African Option two entails a 15-hour program organized and contracted by the student and the department around the specific needs of the student's major program. In both plans, a minimum of 8 hours must be completed at the University of South Florida and the student must maintain a 2 0 GPA in the minor Certification of the minor will be supervised by the depart ment. Students interested in a minor in history are encouraged to see the History department adviser as early in their undergraduate program as possible HUMANITIES (HUM) The Humanities Program i s an interdisciplinary curriculum that deals with the visual arts, music, literature and the culture from which they emerge. Secondary sources are used sparingly; stu dents are encouraged to make a vigorous, personal response to speci fic works of art, literature, and music Requirements for the B.A. Degree: The curriculum for the Humanities major comprises interdisci plinary courses in the verbal, visual and musical arts of specified periods and cultures Course requirements are as follows: 1 28 credits among 4000 level Humanities courses, with the option of substituting two courses (a maximum of eight credits) from 3000 level Humanities courses. 2. Humanities 4931 Seminar in Humanities, four credit hours 3 Two or more classes in the creative or performing arts, either lower or upper level totaling at least four semester Requirements for the Minor in Humanities: The curriculum for the Humanities minor is comparable to that of the program for the B.A. degree, but i t is less comprehensive Course requirements are as follows: 1 Eighteen semester hours of Humanities courses. 2 Not over eight of these eighteen hours may be taken at the 3000 level. No Humanities courses at the 1000 or 2000 level may be used to fulfill the minor requirement. Requirements for the Minor in Asian Studies: The minor in Asian Studies is designed for majors in any field who wish to gain a broad knowledge of a world area that is of unique importance Requirements are as follows : 1 18 semester hours from the courses l i sted below 2 At least two courses must be from Group A and at least two courses must be from Group B (Other relevant courses may be subst i tuted with the approval of the program advisor.) 3 Students must declare their intention to be awarded the minor by notifying the program adv i sor at least one full semester prior to graduation 4 Students who fail to. achieve a cumulative 2 5 GPA or higher in the program will be denied the minor. Courses credited toward the Asian Studies Minor: Group A Art : ARH 4530 (4) ARH 4796 (4) Humanities: HUM 3271 (4) HUM 3273 (4) HUM 4404 (4) HUM 4405 (4) Languages : CHI 1120(4) CHI 1121 (4) JPN 1'121 (4) Religion: REL 3330 (3) REL 4343 (4) REL 4333 (4) REL 4344 (4) HUM 4402 (4) JPN 1120 (4) REL 3350 (3)

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 71 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Group B Geography: GEA 3703 (4) History : ASH 3501 (4) ASH 3404 (4) Int'/ Studies : ASN 3012 (3) ASN 3014 (3) Political Science : CPO 4930 (3) CPO 5934 (3) ISS 3930 (1-4) INR 5086 (3) INTERDISCIPLINARY NATURAL SCIENCES of Arts in the Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences major is designed for majors seeking a broad prog r am in Natural Sciences and for majors in Science Education and Mathematics Educat i on. For i nformat i on on teacher cert ificat i on in sci ence or mathematics, prospective teachers should consult the section entitled Teacher Education Programs and also consult the College of Education section of the catalog The requirements for graduation for this degree are the same as those contained in Natural Science General Requi rements for Degree except that item 1 of the requ i rements is altered as follows: 1 a .For Science Education and Mathematics Education Majors only completion of a major consisting of a minimum of 45 hours in Natural Sciences courses applicable to a major in Natural Sci ences. In these hou r s there must be a min i mum of 24 cred i t hours in a discipline of major concentration and a m i n i mum of 16 credit hours in supporting courses outside the disc i pline of major concentration selected from Natural Science courses At least two of the supporting courses must be at the 3000 level or above The student must earn a grade of 'C' or better in each course in the major concentrat i on and i n each support ing course 1 b For Natural Sciences Majors only completion of a m i nimum of 45 credit hours in Natural Sciences courses appl i cable to a major in Natural Sciences. In these hours there must be a minimum of 24 credit hours in a discipline of major concentra tion and a minimum core of supporting courses comprising a calculus sequence and the i ntroductory science sequence from each of the following departments : BSC 2010C (4) BSC 2011C (4) CHM 2041 (3) CHM 2046(3) CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2046L( 1) MAC 3233(4) (MAC 3311(4) ) [MAC 3281(3) MAC 3234(4) or MAC 3312(4) or MAC 3282 (3) PHY 3053 (3) l [ PHY 3048 (3) PHY 3053L 0) or PHY 3048L 0) PHY 3054 (3) PHY 3049 (3) PHY 3054L (') PHY 3049L (') GLY 2010 (4) GLY 2100 (4) The student must earn a grade of 'C' or better in the maj o r con centration and in each supporting course Unstructured courses are not counted to fulfill the major requirements INTERDISCIPLINARY SOCIAL SCIENCE CISS) f d d d d d 1 this program o stu y 1s es1gne to prov1 e an inter 1sop 1nary focus in the social sciences for students who are interested in a broad educational experience that extends beyond the boundaries of a s i ngle discipl ine and is housed in Women's Studies This major offers a wide cho ice of courses and an opportunity to design a program of study geared toward the student's i ndividual needs and interests Each program of study is designed in such a way that quality and coherence are assured The pr<;>gram of is to be planned by i n co!"sulta tion with the advisor who approves each 1nd1v1dual curriculum contract. Specific requirements for a B.A. degree in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (ISS) include : 1 required core courses for the major are STA 3122, ISS 3010, and ISS 4935 Women's Studies majors take WST 4935 in place of ISS 4935 Communication Sciences & Disorder students take STA 3122 and ISS 3010 The completion of 42 approved hours of course work from the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS), with a minimum of 30 hours at the 3000 or above level. 2 the ISS student chooses between two cognate areas (provided below) and completes twelve hours in each Three special elec-tives are added 3. it is suggested that the student work out a program of study at the onset of the junior year, particularly before too many courses are completed in GAS. No student should assume, under any circumstances ; that courses already completed in CAS will automatically count toward the ISS degree 4. students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 2 0 in ISS to 9raduate 5 students m Communications Sciences and Disorders major in ISS with an emphas i s in (a) Speech and Hearing Science, (b) Interpreter Training for the Deaf, or (c) American Sign Lan-guage 6 other personal curricula may be tailored for those highly moti vated students, with a minimum grade point average of 3.2, developed with the approval of the advisor. This course of study will be directed toward the special educat i onal interests of these students A thesis will be required of students taking this option COGNATE AREAS you must select two areas, and take 12 hours in each. Cognates must be selected from the areas of study l i sted below : AFA ANT, CCJ, ECN, GEY, GIA, GPY, HTY, HUS, INT, LAS, PAD, PSY, SOC, SOW, SPA, and WST. Interdisciplinary Core Courses Two of these courses, one an introductory course and the other a senior seminar, are taught from an interdisciplinary social sci ence perspective These courses are designed to introduce stu dents to the study of humans in social groups, the various concepts theories and methods studied in the social sciences, and apply them to the issues of the day Social Science Statistics is also required for majors in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR IN WOMEN'S STUDIES: A student wishing to minor in Women's Studies will be required to take six courses : WST 3010 or WST 3011 Plus 5 elect ives chosen from the 6 areas of concentration with no more than 2 courses from any one area and with at least 2 courses at the 4000 level and above Students who minor in Women's Studies must be certified by the Undergraduate Advisor. LIBERAL STUDIES (ALA) The Liberal Studies Degree is conceived to fulfill the intent of the traditional Liberal Arts degree and is offered for students who require a broad academic approach for realization of their con ceived academic or pre-professional goals For admission to the program, the students must (1) have a minimum of 20 (to a maximum of 80) semester hours, (2) have a minimum overall ;irade point average of 3.5 at the time of admission and (3) submit a written proposal explaining the student's special academic circumstances and goals for which this major is appropriate. This proposal must be approved by a faculty comm i ttee of three professors (Chair to be selected by the student) to be assembled by the student and the Director m the Dean's Office The student must complete the General Distribution Require ments (and all other university requirements), and a minimum of

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72 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1'92/91 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 4 semesters of one foreign language. Of the remaining 64 hours, 50 semester hours will be devoted to interdisciplinary study in the College of Arts and Sciences. Ideally, the 50 hours will include courses in the sciences, letters, and social and behavioral sciences. In the student's last semester, a senior paper must be approved by the faculty committee. When admitted to the program, the student will formulate, in collaboration with the faculty committee, a program of studies to be pursued toward his/her particular academic goals. For informa tion, contact the Coordinator of Advising in SOC 110. LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE Even though degree-oriented undergraduate study is not of fered in Library and Information Science, the faculty will counsel those undergraduates interested in study in librarianship at USF. The Library and Information Science Master's program is accred ited by the American Library Association, and graduates are prepared for professional positions in all types of libraries and media centers The Library and Information Science program at the University of South Florida meets the Florida State Board of Education requirements for certification as an Educational Media Specialist (grades K-12). The State of Florida certification is accepted on a reciprocity basis in 28 states. Any student who plans to work as a school media specialist in another state should work out a program which w ill meet the requirements of that state LINGUISTICS (LIN/ESL) Linguistics is primarily an upper-level and graduate discipline with strong interdisciplinary concerns Although no baccalaureate degree is offered, the minor in linguistics may provid e a broader educational experience for students majoring in adjacent arts and sciences such as Anthropology, Communication, Communication Sciences and Disorders, English, Foreign Languages, Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology, and others Requirements for the Minor The minor in Linguistics requires a minimum of 18 semester hours as follows: LIN 3010 (3) LIN 4575 (3) plus a minimum of 12 semester hours from the following : ANT 3610 (3) CLA 3801 (2) LIN 4710 (3) SPC 3210 (3) MASS COMMUNICATIONS (COM) The School of Mass Communications, accredited by the Ac crediting Council on Education for Journalism and Mass Commu nications, offers approximately 70 courses varying in content from the hi9hly technical and field-specialized in some cases to an essential liberal arts orientation in others. The program introduces students to the theories, principles, and problems of communica tions, emphasizing the concept of freedom of information as the cornerstone of Constitutional Democracy and preparing students for future leadership roles in communications media Graduates should understand the structure and functions of mass media sys tems as well as the basic processes of communication In addition, students specialize in an area of mass communications (advertis ing, broadcasting, magazines, news.:editorial, public relations or visual communications) to blend a stron9 introduction to profes sional skills with the theoretical orientation Majors seeking careers in the mass media will be directed to the various media with which the department maintains close contact for summer internships, practica and part-time work. A limited number of students will have the opportunity to serve as interns with a mass communications organization and take MMC 4945 for three hours credit. See MMC 4945 in catalog course listings Note: Students may not receive credit for both an internship {MMC 4945) and a practicum (ADV 4940, JOU 3940, JOU 4941, PUR 4700, RTV 3941, RTV 4942, VIC 3943). Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree To be admitted to the core curriculum in Mass Communica tions, students must have completed 45 hours with a 2. 7 mini mum Overall Grade Point Average, and ENC 1101 and 1102 with a minimum grade of 'C' in each. Applicants must establish a minimum score of 60 percent on the Mass Communications Diagnostic Test prior to entering MMC 3100 (Writing for Mass Me dia). Transfer students who have taken a course equivalent to MMC 3100 may waive MMC 3100 by achieving a score of 70 per cent or higher on the Diagnostic Test Both courses in the Mass Communications core curriculum (MMC 3100 and MMC 3602) must be completed with a minimum grade of 'C' before anr other Mass Communications course may be taken Students failing to achieve a minimum grade of 'C' in both MMC 3100 and MMC 3602 will be disallowed as majors in the department. A 2 5 GPA in Mass Communications courses is required for graduation, and no student may graduate with a grade lower than 'C' in any Mass Communications course. Required are six hours in the Mass Communications core cur riculum (MMC 3100 and MMC 3602) and 28 hours of a combina tion of required and selective sequence courses for a total of 34 hours in Mass Communications within the 124-hour degree requirement. Of the 124 hours at least 90 hours must be outside Mass Communications courses, and 65 of those hours must be in the liberal arts Six hours in Mass Communications writing courses (three hours in addition to MMC 3100) are a part of the gradu ation requirement. A maximum of nine semester hours in Mass Communications courses will be accepted from a community college or other lowerlevel program toward a degree in Mass Communications It is suggested that the nine hours include the equivalent of the departmental core curriculum and one sequence introduction course. Approval by an appropriate adviser is required. At least eighteen ( 18) hours of resident departmental courses are required Sign Language may be used as an option by Mass Communi cations majors to fulfill the language requirement. The departmental sequence requirements are: Departmental Core Curriculum MMC 3100 (3) MMC 3602 (3) Sequence Requirements 1. ADVERTISING Requirements ADV 3000 (3) MMC 4203 (3) ADV 3101 (3) ADV 3300 (3) ADV 4800 (3) MMC4420{3) RTV3225(1) or ADV4940(1) Selective Requirements (9 hrs required) ADV 3002 (3) ADV 3103 (3) ADV 3700 (3) ADV 4940 (1) JOU 3100 (3) JOU 4206 (3) MMC 4123 (3) MMC 4200 (3) MMC 4945 (3) PGY 3610 (3) PUR 3000 (3) PUR 4401 (3) RTV 3000 (3) RTV 3225 (1) VIC 3000 (3) Note: The following courses are required outside the department to complete sequence requirements : ACG 2001, ECO 2013, ECO 2023, and MAR 3023 See specific courses for prerequi sites 2 BROADCASTING Requirements News Option MMC 4200 (3) MMC 4420 (3) RTV 3000 (3) RTV 3300 (4) RTV 4301 (3) RTV 4700 (3) Selective Requirements (9 hrs required) FIL 3004 (3) JOU 4104 (3) MMC 4123 (3) MMC 4945 (3) RTV 3941 (1) RTV 3210 (3) RTV 4220 (3) RTV 4942 ( 1) Programming and Production Option RTV 3000 (3) RTV 3300 (4) RTV 3100 (3) RTV 4220 (3) RTV 4500 (3) RTV 4700 (3) MMC 4420 (3) Selective Requirements (6 hrs required) ADV 3000 (3) ADV 3103 (3) FIL 3004 (3) MMC 4123 (3) MMC 4945 (3) RTV 3210 (3) RTV 3230 (3) RTV 3941 (1) RTV 4320 (3) RTV 4301 (3) RTV 4942 (1)

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COLLEGE.OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 73 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Note: For Broadcast News Option majors the prerequisites for emphasizes the broad nature of modern mathematics and its RTV 4700 are RTV 3000, RTV 3300, MMC 4200, and POS 2112 close associations w i th the real world The program is designed to or POS 3142, and Senior Standing For Broadcast Program-prepare students for entry into graduate school or careers in ming and Production Option majors, the prerequisites for RTV industry or secondary education. 4700 are RTV 3000, RlV 4500, and RTV 3100 or RTV 3300, and The Department of Mathematics consists of 32 full-time faculty Senior Standing members, whose areas of interest include algebra, applied matheNote: The following courses are required outside the department matics, applied statistics, approximation theory, celestial mechan-to complete sequence requirements: for Broadcast News: ORI ics, complex analysis, functional analysis, graph theory, harmonic 3000, PHI 1103, POS 2041, POS 2112, or POS 3142 and SPC analysis on Lie groups, log ic, mathematical physics, nonlinear 2023 or SPC 2050. For Broadcast Programming : ENC 3310 or functional analysi s number theory, ordinary differential equa-CRW 2100 See specific courses for prerequisites. tions, partial differential equations, probability theory, real analy3. JOURNALISM Requirements sis, stat istics, theoretical computer science, and topology News-Editorial Option JOU 3100 (3) JOU 4200 \3) JOU 4206 (3) Requirements for the B.A. Degree JOU 3101 (3) MMC 4200 (3) or The courses taken to satisfy the requirements below will JOU 4104 (3) PGY 3610 (3) constitute the major frogram referred to i n the general gradu-Selective Requirements ( 10 hrs. required) ation requi rements o the College of Arts and Sciences. ADV 3000 (3) MMC 4203 (3) PGY 3610 (3) 1. Mathematics Requirement (Min. 46 er. hrs. ) JOU 3300 (3) JOU 4206 (3) PGY 3620 (3) Majors must complete the folloyving core courses: JOU 3306 (3) RTV 3225 (1) JOU 3940 (1) CGS 3422 Computer Applications of Mathematics -6A (3) MMC 4420 (3) VIC 3000 (3) JOU 4941 (1) MAA 4211 Multivariate Calculus -6A (4) MMC 4945 (3) MAA 4212 Intermediate Analysis -9A (4) Magazine Option MAC 3311 Calculus I -6A (4) JOU 3100 (3) JOU 4200 (3) MMC 4200 (3) MAC 3312 Calculus II -6A (4) JOU 3101 (3) MMC 4936 (1-3) MMC 4420 (3) MAC 3313 Calculus Ill -6A (4) JOU 3300 (3) MAP 4302 Differential Equations -6A (3) Selective Requirements (7 hrs. required) MAS 3103 Linear Algeb r a -6A (3) ADV 3000 (3) JOU 4941 (1) PGY 3610 (3) MAS 4301 Elementary Abstract Algebra -6A (3) ADV 3002 (3) JOU 4944 (1) PUR 3000 (3) MAT 4937 Mathematics Majors Seminar-6A (1) JOU 3006 MMC 4203 (3) RTV 3225 (1) STA 4442 Introduction to Probability -6A (3) JOU 3306 (3 MMC 4945 (3) VIC 3000 (3) In addition, majors must complete four (4) courses (includ-JOU 4104 (3 ing one seguence) from the following electives: Note: The following courses are required outside the department COP 421 O (3) MAA 5306-5307 (6) to complete sequence requirements: ECO 2013 or ECO 2023, MAA 5405 (3) MAS 4124-MAD 4401 (3-4) PHI 1103, POS 2041, and POS 3142 or POS 2112 and SYG MAD 5101 (3) MAP 5316-5317 (6) 3010. For Magazine sequence, CRW 2100 is also required. See MAD 5305 (3) MAP 5407-5345 (6) specific courses for prerequisites MAS 5107 (3) MAS 5311-5312 (6) 4. PUBLIC RELATIONS Requirements MAS 5215 (3) MTG 5316-5317 (6) ADV 3000 (3) PUR 3000 (3) PUR 4100 (3) MAT 5932 (1-4) STA 4442-4321 (6) JOU 3100 (3) PUR 4001 (3) PUR 4401 (3) MHF 4102 (3) MMC 4420 (3) MHF 5306 (3) Selective Requirements (7 hrs. required) MTG 4212 (4) ADV 3101 JOU 3300 (3) PUR 4700 (1) Majors in mathematics for teaching sho. uld consult the ADV 3002 3) MMC 4200 (3) RTV 3000 (3) section Mathematics (MAE) on mathematics requirements ADV 3300 3) MMC 4936 (13) MMC 4945 (3) The following is a suggested course program for the .first RTV 3225 (1) JOU 3101 (3) PGY 3610 (3) two academic years: RTV 3300 (4) Semester I Semester II Note: The following courses are required outside the department Freshman Year to complete sequence requirements : ECO 2013, ECO 2023, MAC 3311 MAC 3312 MAN 3025, POS 2041, and POS 2112 or POS 3142 Sophomore Year 5. VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS Requirements MAC 3313 MAP 4302 ADV 3002 (3) FIL 3004 (3) MMC 4200 (3) MAS 4301 MAS 3103 RTV 3225 (1) JOU 3100 (3) PGY 3610 (3) 2. Mathematics-related Courses (6-8 er. hrs.) VIC 3000 (3) MMC 4123 (3) Majors except for majors in mathematics for teaching, Selective Requirements (6 hrs. required) must take two courses with laboratories in the College of Arts ADV 3000 (3) MMC 4420 (3) PUR 3000 (3) and Sciences, outside the Department of Mathematics, that FIL 3200 (3) MMC 4910 (1-3) RTV 3000 (3) are required courses for some major within the college FIL 4207 (3) MMC 4936 (1-3) RTV 3100 (3) Majors will not receive credit toward graduation for the JOU 3101 MMC 4945 (3) RTV 4220 (3) following courses: JOU 3300 (3 PGY 3620 (3) RTV 4301 (1) AST 3033 GEB 3121 STA 3023 STA 3122 JOU 4206 (3 PGY 411 OC (3) VIC 3943 ( 1) PHY 2020 GEB 2111 Note: Most Mass Communicat ions courses have prerequisites Majors wishing to take a course in statistics should take STA They are specified in the course descript i on. Refer to each pre-4321. requisite listed to determine progressive prerequisites for each course. MATHEMATICS lMTH) The Department of Mathematics offers a diversity of courses designed not only to enable the student to pursue a profession in matnematics itself, but also to enhance his competence in the fields of engineering, the physical sciences, the life sciences, and the social sciences. The department offers programs leading to the B.A., M A and Ph. D degrees The undergraduate program Teacher Education Programs For information concerning the degree programs for secon dary school teachers, see the junior college teachers section in the USF Graduate Catalog Requirements for the Minor in Mathematics Although open to all students, the minor in mathematics is de signed particularly for students in science and engineering who wish to enhance their mathematical capabilities to benefit their

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74 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG major. A student wishing to receive a minor in mathematics must take the following courses: Total credit hours required: 29 {minimum) CGS 3422 Computer Applications of Mathematics ..fJA (3) MAA 4211 Multivariate Calculus ..fJA (4) MAA 4212 Intermediate Analysis ..fJA (4) MAC 3311 Calculus I ..fJA (4) MAC 3312 Calculus II ..fJA (4) MAC 3313 Calculus Ill ..fJA (4) MAS 3103 Linear Algebra ..fJA (3) MAS 4301 Elementary Abstract Algebra ..fJA (3) In addition, students wishing to receive a minor must take two courses with laboratories in the College of Arts and Sciences outside the Department of Mathematics, that are required courses for some majors within the college Accelerated BA/MA Program This program is designed for superior students having a solid background in high school mathematics and the ability to handle a fast paced, challenging program leading to a BA and MA degree in.mathematics in four to five years The program meets all the requirements for the BA degree, but requires the students to take those 5000 and 6000 level courses required for the MA degree during his last two years in the program By awarding up to 20 hours of dual credit (undergraduate and graduate), the student also uses these courses to satisfy the requirements for the MA in mathematics. For admission to the program, a student must have completed at least 30 hours of college credit including 8 hours of 3000-level or above mathematics courses; have an overall grade point average of 3.0 or above; and have a grade point average of 3.5 or above in all mathematics courses taken at the 3000-level or above. Further information is available on request from the Mathematics Department (974-2643). Honors Program in Mathematics The program is designed for students who wish to obtain a BA degree that will indicate unusual strength in the field of mathe matics Successful completion of the program will be prominently displayed on the student's diploma and will be recorded on the official U S F transcript of the student's work. Students are eligible for admission to the program when they (a) have completed MAS 3103 (Linear Algebra), MAS 4301 (Elementary Abstract Algebra) and one of the calculus sequences MAC 3281-3283 or MAC 3311-3313, (b) have at least a 3 0 overall average in their college courses, and (c) have at least a 3 5 average in their college mathematics courses. Applications are submitted to the undergraduate committee of the mathematics department. The requirements for a B.A. Degree in Mathematics with Honors are as follows: 1 Successful completion of the requirements for a B.A. Degree in Mathematics 2 Six credits of those graduate level mathematics courses at USF that are prerequisites for qualifying examinations required by mathematics graduate degree programs . 3. At least two credits in MAT 4939, Mathematics Honors Seminar. 4. Successful completion of MAT 4970, Mathematics Senior thesis. 5 An overall 3.0 G P A .. with at least a 3 5 G.P.A. in all mathemat ics courses MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY (MET) Medical Technology is one of the growing professions associ ated with the advances in modern medical science Working in the clinical laboratory, the medical technologist performs chemical, microscopic, bacteriologic, a nd other scientific tests to help track the cause and treatment of disease This talent requires special ized training and a baccalaureate degree is essential preparation for certification as a medical technologist. The University of South Florida offers a four-year program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology A student electing to major in Medical Technology will spend the first three years of the program on the campus of the University of South Florida; the fourth year ( 12 months) will be spent in one of the affiliated hospitals or clinical laboratories Admission to the fourth year is limited' by the number of openings in the affiliated hospitals. Selection of interns is made by the hospitals During the first three years, the medical technology student will complete the liberal arts and basic science requirements for entrance into the fourth year of the program for clinical training. To remain in good standing as a Medical Technology major during this period, a reasonable grade point average, determined by the College of Arts and Sciences, must be maintained. To be eligible for entrance into the program's fourth year, the student must have completed not less than 90 credit hours of work (excluding physical education courses) Ofjthese hours, at least 20 credit hours must be Natural Science courses from the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of South Florida (in courses ap proved by the Director of the Medical Technology Program). The following courses must be included in the three years of work which precedes the fourth year of clinical training. 1 Biological Sciences A minimum of 16 hours is required with at least one course in microbiology and one course in immunology Physiology APB 3190 or PCB 4743C) and Determinative Bacteriology (MCB 4115) are strongly recommended. 2 Chemistry A minimum of 18 hours is required including one semester of Elementary Organic (CHM 3200, CHM 321 OL; CHM 3210 AND 3211 may be substituted for CHM 3200) and one semester of Elementary Analytical Chemistry (CHM 3120C) Biochemistry (BCH 3023) and Clinical Chemistry (CHS 4300) are strongly recommended 3 Physics A minimum of 8 hours (one full year majors-type course) is re-quired 4 Mathematics A minimum of 6 hours including at least one course at the level of College Algebra (MAC 2102) or Elementary Calculus I (MAC 3233) is required. Statistics (STA 3122 or STA 3023) is required 5 General Distribution Requirements Courses satisfying the general distribution requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences 6 Courses in non-science fields to insure a broad background Upon successful completion of this curriculum, recommenda : tion by the College, and acceptance by one of the affiliated hospitals or clinical laboratories, the student will complete 12 continuous months of training at that hospital or laboratory. This training period usually begins in late July or early August of each year, but a few begin in January or February. During this period, one will continue to be registered as a full-time student of the University and will receive a total of 30 credit hours of work in : MLS 3031 MLS 4862 MLS 4865 MLS 4860 MLS 4863 MLS 4866 MLS 4861 MLS 4864 These courses will be taught at the hospital or clinical labora tory Students successfully completing this program will be granted a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology. PHILOSOPHY (PHI) Requirements for the Major in Philosophy Majors in philosophy must complete at least 30 credit hours made up as follows: a PHH 3062 History of Philosophy : Ancient and Medieval PHH 3420 History of Philosophy : Modern b PHI 2100 Introduction to Formal Logic or PHI 5135 Symbol i c Logic c PHI 3600 Ethical Theory d. At least one of the following : PHI 4300 Theory of Knowledge PHI 5225 Philosophy of Language PHI 4320 Philosophy of M i nd PHI 3404 Scientific Method e 6 credit hours of 4000 or 5000 level Philosophy courses f 9 credit hours of Philosophy electives

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 7S UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1991/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Requirements for the Minor in Philosophy A minor in philosophy consists of the completion of at least 18 credit hours which includes the following courses or an approved substitute for one only: PHH 3062 History of Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval PHH 3420 History of Philosophy: Modern PHH 4600 Contemporary Philosophy or PHI 3440 Continental Philosophy PHI 2100 Introduction to Formal Logic No credit taken on an 'S/U' basis may be applied toward the minor. Honors Program The Honors Program in Philosophy allows superior students to pursue philosophical studies at a more advanced level than is customary in undergraduate philosophy programs Students in the Honors Program will be required to do independent research, to participate in an Honors Seminar, and to write and defend an undergraduate thesis. Admission Criteria: (1) Students must complete PHI 2100 Introduction to Formal Logic PHH 3062 History of Philosophy : Ancient and Medieval PHH 3420 History of Philosophy : Modern with a grade point average of 3 6 (2) Students must have an overall grade point average of 3 .0, and their grade point average in Philosophy must be at least 3 5 (3) Students must be nominated for admission into the Philosophy program by a faculty member in Philosophy, and a majority of the faculty who have taught the student must approve the student's admission into the program Program Requirements: Students must complete the requirements for the Philosophy major in accordance with the following provisions : a) students must take either PHH 3440 Continental Philosophy or PHH 4600 Contemporary Philosophy b) students must take one course from each of the following groups: Group 1 PHl3404 PHl4320 PHl4300 PHI 5225 PHP 4784 Group 2 PHl3600 PHl3601 PHl3700 PHl4800 PHM 3021 PHM 3400 Group 3 PHM 3100 PHM 4322 PHM 4331 PHM 4340 PHP 4788 Group 4 Scientific Method Philosophy of Mind Theory of Knowledge Philosophy of Language Analytical Philosophy Ethical Theory Contemporary Moral Issues Philosophy of Religion Aesthetics Philosophies of Love and Sex Introduction .to Philosophy of Law Social Philosophy Ancient and Medieval Political Philosophy Modern Political Philosophy Contemporary Political Philosophy Philosophy of Marxism PHH 4700 American Philosophy PHP 3786 Existentialism PHP 4000 Plato PHP 4010 Aristotle PHP 4410 Kant PHP 4740 Rationalism PHP 4745 Empir icism (c) Students must take an Honors Seminar in their senior year (d) Students must write a senior thesis and undergo an oral exami nation on the thesis before a committee of two faculty members, with the Chair as an ex officio member of every such committee (e) Students cannot receive a grade lower than a 'B' in any Philosophy course, and their grade pont average in Philosophy must be at least a 3.5 to remain, or be graduated from the Philosophy Honors program (f) Students must complete 35 credit hours in Philosophy, includ ing the 3-hour thesis course and the 3-hour Honors Seminar PHYSICS (PHY'f PHS) The Department o Physics offers programs leading to a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree, to a Master of Science degree, and to a Ph. D in Applied Mathematics or Engineering Science. Both thesis and non-thesis programs are available for the M S degree An interdisciplinary arrangement with the Department of Mathematics and with the College of Engineering provides for the Ph. D opportunity Students should consult w i th the Physics Graduate Adviser for details. Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degrees 1 Physics Courses B.A. PHYSICS (PHY) (34 er. hrs ) PHY 30481 (3) PHY 3221 0) PHY 3048L (1) PHY 3323C (4) PHY 3049 (3) PHY 3822L (2) PHY 3049L ( 1) PHY 4222 (3) Physics Electives (6) B S PHYSICS (PHS) (44 er. hrs ) PHY 4324C (4) PHY 4823L (2) PHY 4910 {1-4) PHY 4930 {1) PHY 3048 (3) PHY 3323C (4) PHY 4604 (3) PHY 3048L (1) PHY 34242 (4) PHY 4823L (2) PHY 3049 (3) PH Y 3822L (2) PHY 4910 {1-4) PHY 3049L (1) PHY 4222 (3) PHY 4930 {1) PHY 3101 i3) PHY 4324C (4) PHZ 54052 (3) PHY 3221 3\ PHY 4523 13\ 1The sequence PHZ 3 o{ (2) PHY 20S3 (3) PHY (1 ). PHY 2054 (3) and PHY 2054l (1) may be substituted f or the sequence indic ated 'Substitu tions permitted subject to approval of adviser. 2 Supporting Courses in the Natural Sciences B.A. and B S PHYSICS (20 er. hrs ) CHM 2045 (3) CHM 2046L (1) MAC 33131 (4) CHM 2045L (1) MAC 33111 (4) MAP 4302 (3) CHM 204613) MAC 33121 (4) 'The sequence MAC 3'i81 (3). MAC 3282 (3). and MAC 3283 (3) may be substituted for the sequence indica ted 3 General Distribution Requirements (40 er. hrs excluding waivers) The student is r equired fo complete the general distribution re quirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. Selection of a fore i gn language preferably French, German, or Russian is also strongly recommended. 4 Liberal Education Elective The student must satisfy 16 hours of liberal education electives as described i n item 3 of the graduation requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences . 5 Free Electives (Including general distribution waivers) to complete a 120 hour program Teacher Education Programs For information concerning the degree programs for secon dary school teachers, see Teacher Education Programs this col lege; for junior college teachers, see USF Graduate Catalog PSYCHOLOGY {PSY) Psychology involves the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Because of this focus, psychology is relevant to many other areas of study both inside and outside of the social and behav i oral sciences. The undergraduate program in Psychology offers the student a well rounded liberal arts education In addi tion, the program prov ides excellent training for qualified stu dents who wish to pursue graduate work in such disciplines as Clinical, Experimental or Industrial Psychology, Education, Geron tology Counseling, Management Med i cine, and other human

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76 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG service programs The undergraduate major emphasizes the breadth of psychology while allow i ng the student some electives to pursue in depth a particular aspect of the field The graduate faculty of the Psychology Department are divided i nto three program areas : Clinical Experimental and lndustrialf ti9nal. Each of these program areas offers Ph. D level training as well as introductory instruction at the undergraduate level. Requirements for the B.A. Degree . Majors must at least 34 hou _rs in the field A minimum grade of C' or better must be attained in each course in the major. All ma/ ors must complete : 1. 2000/3000 Leve Requirement (6 semester hours) Successful completion of: PSY 3044 (3 semester hours) and one of the following : INP 3101 PSY 3022 SOP 3742 PSY 2012 2 Methods Course Requirement (7 semester hours) Successful completion of: PSY 3213 and one of the following : CLP 4433 PSY 4205 or another methods course approved by the undergraduate advisor in Psychology 3. 4000 Level Requirement (21 semester hours) Successful completion of 7 additional courses numbered at the 4000 level selected as follows : At least two courses from each of the two groups below : Group I EXP 4204C EXP 4404 PSB 4013C EXP 4304 EXP 4523C Group II CLP 4143 INP 4004 SOP 4004 DEP 4005 PPE 4004 and 3 additional c ourses numbered at the 4000 level. Note: No more than a total of 3 hours of the following course may count toward the major: PSY 4913 Directed Study PSY 4205 (3) is recommended for students planning graduate tra i ning Funct i onal mathematics and biological science are rec ommended Otherwise, students majoring in psychology are encouraged to complete a varied undergraduate program A prerequisite for all 4000 level courses is a grade of 'C' or better in both PSY 3044 and PSY 3213 For students minor i ng in Psychology or those major i ng in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, a grade of 'C' or better in any statistics course will subst i tute for the PSY 3213 requirement. Requirements for the Minor in Psychology A minor in Psychology consists of a minimum of 15 credit hours, comprising PSY 2012, PSY 3044, and any three level psychology courses except PSY 4913 A GPA of 2 .0 or the minor i s required for certification The purpose of the minor 1 s to help students majoring in other disciplines to obtain an appropri ate psychology background that will complement their work in their major. See the Psychology Department Adviser for suggested minor programs for students maionng 1n various f i elds Psychology Honors Program The purpose of the Honors Program is to provide a select group of undergraduate Psychology majors an opportunity to an intens ive individualized research exper i ence The culm1nat1on of the Honors Program is the completion and defense of an honors thesis. Applicat i on for the will take place during the second semester of the students junior year, or prior to comp le tion of 90 semester credits. Admission to the program is competi tive and based on the student's overall academic record perform ance in psychology courses and a letter of recommendation from a member of the Psychology Department faculty. Successful completion of the program requires a GPA of 3 .5 .in major coursework, an overall GPA of 3 25 at USF and completion of 43 hours in Psychology including PSY 4932 (6) and PSY 4970 (6) See the Psychology Department Undergraduate Adv iser for details of the program and application form REHABILITATION COUNSELING {REF} The m issi on of Rehabilitat i on Counseling is to nelp physically, mentally, emotionally, and chemically disabled individuals return to full, rewarding and product ive l ives. Rehabilitat i on Counselors work in a wide variety of settings, but are most commonly employed in public and private rehabilitation programs and facil i ties, mental health treatment settings, and substance abuse treatment settings Some establish their own private rehabilita tion counseling practices Rehabili tation Counseling has roots in both the national reha bilitation movement and professional counseling movement. Training emphasizes psychological, social, medical, and_ vocational aspects of disability; and also the development and refinement of per sonal adjustment counseling skills Graduates with an M.A. deg ree from the USF Department of Rehabilitation Counseling are prepared for careers as both rehabilitation specialists and mental health counselors Special elective concentrations in substance abuse and minority rehabilitation are also offered Other study concentrations can be arranged on an individual basi s The Department of Rehabilitation Counseling offers onlY. the M .A. degree. However, a five-year master's program is available to underg r aduates where an M.A. degree in Rehabilitation Coun seling and a bachelor's degree in another major (if desired) can be earned in a total program of 150 semester hours. Students admitted through the f i ve-year program (REF) must have com pleted 90 semester hours of work, and have satisfied Distribut i on, CLAST, and Rule 6A-10 .30 (Gordon Rule) require ments Minimum admission requirements include a total Verbal Quantitative score of at least 1000 on the GRE or a "B" average in all work beyond 60 semester hours The GRE must be! taken by all applicants whether or not they have a 3 0 grade-point average. A detailed description of the M A program in Rehabilitation Coun seling may be found in the Graduate Catalog Undergraduates i nterested in the five-year program (REF) i deally should contact the department during the i r sophomore graduate program in Rehabilitation Counselin9 is fully ac credited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE), the national accrediting body for rehabilitation counselor training programs Upon completion of the program, graduates are eligible to s i t for the national certification examination of the Commission on Rehabi l i tation Counselor Certification. After pass ing this excvnination the graduate is registered with Commi s sion as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC). With some add i tional course work and three years experience, gradu ates are also eligible to take the examination for state licensure as Mental Health counselors RELIGIOUS STUDIES (REL\ In Reli g i ous Studies students are attOrded a variously dimen s i oned field of study which should facilitate an educated person's understanding of his presuppos i t i ons on the meaning of life, the nature of the reli gious-social milieu in which he lives, and the religious dynamic in human history. It also aims toward an understand i ng of the religious thought and lifestyles of people pos_sessing reli gious heritages other than the Judaeo-Christian heritages. Majors in Reli g i ous Studies will find, in addition, courses designed to give depth in certain areas of religious investigation and supply language tools and critical analysis methods which will prepare them for advanced graduate study Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree A total of 36 credit hours are required for a major chosen from Religious Studies courses. Of the 36 hours required for a major in Religious Studies, nine hours may be selected from related courses in other departments, with the prior approval of a departmental adviser . All Religi ous Studies Majors are required to take : 1 Two courses in the history and/or literature of the major western reli gions : e g Judaism, Christianity, Islam 2 Two courses in the history and/or literature of the major world religions : e g Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 77 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 3. REL 4931, Seminar in Religion, 3 hrs.; REL 4939, Development South Asian Studies Sequence of Religious Studies, 3 hrs With i n the Department of Religious Studies, there is a seA student majoring in Religious Studies may not apply towards quence of courses in South Asian Studies designed for the his major requirements more than n i ne hours of credit from the student who w ishes to pursue interdisciplinary studies in the directed readings course, REL 3900, or the undergraduate re-civilizations of South Asia while rooted in the methodologies of search course, REL 4910. Religious Studies Therefore a core course in South Asian ReligAll transfer students must take a minimum of 24 hours in ions as well as i nterdisciplinary courses in South Asian Studies are Religious Stud ies courses at USF. required Of the required 36 credits required for the B.A. degree, Each student's program must be planned with a faculty adviser 8 form the reli g i ous studies core, and 3 form the South Asian in Religious Studies Religions core Twenty-f ive additional credits are to be elected, all Requirements for the Minor in Religious Studies Eighteen (18) credits in Religious Studies courses, including the following : REL 3003, Introduction to Religi on; one course, in a major Western religion ; one course in a major Eastern relig i on ; REL 4910, Undergraduate Research, 1 hr., a paper on a topic approved by the Department Chai rperson, and supervised by an assigned faculty person It is a department requirement (intended to assist in the fulfilling of the above requirements) that the student declare him self as a minor in the department two semesters prior to gradu ation Only letter grades w ill be counted toward the 18 credit hours necessary for the minor. Ancient Studies Sequence Within the Department of Reli gious Studies there is also a se quence of courses in Anc i ent Studies Thi s sequence prov i de s a program for students interested i n the c i v iliz ations of the Anc i ent Mediterranean and M i ddle East. The sequence in Ancient Studies requires 38 credits (of which 24 credits must be in Religious Studies courses) The prerequis i te is normally two years of high school Lat i n or one year of college Latin (The latter can be taken concurrently w ith other requ i red courses but without credit toward it. It can be waived in special cases with the consent of the coordinator ) The sequence of Ancient Studies courses is to be arranged i n consultation with the coo r dinator of the sequence and approved by the department cha i rperson For related i nterdisciplinary electives, see Classics. Judaic Studies Sequence The department has a sequence of courses in Judai c Studies A student may fulfill the requ i rements of the department for the B.A. degree (36 hrs ) by taking the core courses in the Judaic Studies Sequence and the remainder of his/her courses from the listed electives CORE: REL 3003 REL 3611 REL 3612 REL 3613 REL 4221 REL .4224 TOTAL Introduct i on to Reli g i on H i story of Juda ism I History of Judaism II Modern Judaism Hebrew Bible I/Old Testament Law and History Hebrew Bible II/Prophets and Writings ELECTIVES (select 16 hrs.) ANT 4367 The Middle East HEB 1120 Basic Hebrew I HEB 1121 Basic Hebrew II LIT 3374 The Bible as L i terature LIT 4930 Selected Top ics in English Studies REL 3280 Biblical Archaeology REL 3600 Introduct i on to Judaism REL 3900 Directed Readings REL 4910 Undergraduate Research (3) (3) (3) (2) (4) (4) (19) (3) (4) (4) (3) (1-4) (3) (3) REL 4931 Seminar in Religi on (3) With the approval of the Department Chairperson substitu tions may be made in both the core and elect ive courses where the changes are considered to be in the student's best interest. subject to the approval of the Director of South Asian Studies, with a minimum of two courses taken in the Social Sciences and one course from the Humanities (other than Religious Studies) or Fine Arts. The student must submit a senior thesis which demonstrates a level of scholarship appropriate for an undergraduate degree in South Asian Studies This requirement may be met by submitting an exemplary paper already written for a course in the South Asian Studies sequence or the student may write a new thesis through REL 4910 Undergraduate Research. Sequence requirements are approved by the Director of South Asian Studies and the Chairman of the Department. RELIGIOUS STUDIES CORE (8 hrs) : REL 3921 Colloquium REL 4931 Seminar in Religion or REL 4939 The Development of Religious Studies (3) one course in western reli gion SOUTH ASIAN RELIGIONS CORE (3 hrs) : REL 3330 Religions of India ELECTIVES (Min i mum of 16 hrs ) : (3) REL 4333 Hinduism REL 4343 Buddhism in India Sri Lanka, (4) and Southeast Asia (4) REL 4344 Buddhism in China, Japan, and Tibet (4) REL 3900 Directed Readi ngs (1-4) REL 4910 Undergraduate Research (1-4) and other courses cir study abroad programs as approved by the Director of South Asian Studies. HUMANITIES/ARTS REQUIREMENT (Minimum of 3 hrs ) HUM 4402 Humanities in the Orient : India HUM 3271 Culture East & West I HUM 3273 Culture East & West II ARH 4530 Oriental Art (4) and other courses or study abroad programs as approved by the Director of South Asian Studies SOCIAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT (Minimum of 6 hrs ) GEA 3703 Geography of Asia ASH 3501 History of India CPO 4930 Comparative Government and Politics of Selected Countries or Areas (3) and other courses or study abroad programs as approved by the Director of South Asian Studies SOCIAL WORK {SOK) The Uni vers i ty of South Florida offers a program leading to a Bachelor of Social Work (B. S W ) degree i n the School of Social Work, College of Arts and Sciences. This program has been devel oped in accordance with the guidelines set forth by the Council on Social Work Education, the national accrediting body for social work educat i on programs and in accordance with the recommen dat i ons of the National Association of Social Workers. The B S W program i s fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Educat i on The pr i mary objective of the B S W program is the prepara tion of the graduate for beginning level professional practice as a social work generalist. The secondary objectives of the B S W program are : 1 to provide for the social work human resources needs of the Univers i ty serv ice district (the central Florida west coast area), the State of Florida, and the Southeast Region; 2 to prepare graduates for additional professional at the graduate level i n social work or in related human service pro fessions ;

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78 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1991/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 3 to provide an exposure to social work as a profession and to contemporary issues in the social welfare field. In preparing the B.S. W. graduate for beginning professional practice, the curriculum provides the student with an opportunity to develop a knowledge base and skill base as a "generalist' practitioner The studem will develop an understanding of various interventive methods, and skill in their application to a variety of client systems For example, interventive methods may take the form of individual and group counseling, resource development, consultation, teaching, advocacy, etc. Client systems may be individuals, families, groups, community groups, organizations or social welfare organizations The student will develop an under standing of the dynamics of human behavior in individual, group and organizational contexts and the influences of the sociocultu ral environment upon those behaviors. The student will learn about the development of social welfare systems and institutions and the social, economic, and political processes affecting pol icy development and program implementation The student will develop an understanding of the utilization of basic social research skills particularly related to the processes of problem-solving, plan ning, and evaluation. The student will also become aware of the value base of the profession and engage in a self-examination process as it relates to the development and reflection of ethical and effective profes sional practice. The B.S. W. program, as any professional program, places great emphasis on the development of a professionally responsible graduate in terms of one's obligations to the client system served, the profession itself, the organization in which one works, and to the general public which ultimately provides any profession with legitimacy. Enrollment in the B S W program is limited Unlike many academic programs where the student may declare a major, the B .S.W. program is a limited access program Students may apply for admission to the School for the B .S.W. program after having satisfied the admission criteria described below. However, the completion of the prerequisites does not guaran tee the student's admission to the program Limited state funding places constraints on the size of the social work faculty and in order to maintain a high quality of instruction it is necessary to achieve an appropriate faculty-student ratio. This means that it may be necessary to deny admission to the B.S.W. program solely on the basis of no available space Any student filing intent to seek admission or actually applying for admission to the program should be aware of this possibility Additionally, any student who does not maintain a GPA of at least 2 75 in social work courses while enrolled in the B S W program or who clearly does not exhibit responsible professional behavior, may be subject to dismissal from the program. A social work major receiving a grade of less than "C" in a core course will be required to repeat the course Admission to the B.S. W program is a two-stage process Any student that holds a minimum of Sophomore standing may de clare a pre-social work major. This is done by filing a declaration of major form with the College of Arts and Sciences, Records and Advising Office and a similar form with the School of Social Work All pre-majors will be assigned to an advisor within the School who will assist the student in selecting pre-core courses (see listing of pre-core courses.) Many students will have already taken most of the pre-core courses as part of general distribution at USF or in their course of study at a community college After completing the pre-core courses a student will be ready to apply for admission to the B.S.W. program as a full major It is necessary to be admitted as a major before taking core social work courses. Admission requirements for the Social work major are as follows : 1 A student must have completed a minimum of one semester as a pre-social work major; 2. A student must have completed required pre-core courses (see listing); 3 A student must complete an application for admission and file it with the School of Social Work before the beginning of the semester in which admission is sought; 4 A student may be asked to complete an admission interview with a favorable act i on from the Admissions Committee 5 A student must achieve a grade of "B" or better in SOW 3302, Introduction to Social Work, and SOW 3203, The American Social Welfare System, to be considered for admission 6 A student must have successfully completed CLAST. CLAST may be repeated and the applicant may reapply to the program after successful completion of CLAST. A student must achieve a GPA of 2 75 in all Social Work courses to enroll in field placement and subsequently graduate with the B S W degree Pre-Core Course A student must complete : 1 One course in each of the following cognate areas Human Biology : Food and Drugs Sex, Reproduction and Population Principles of Biology for Non-majors Political Science : American National Government State and Local Government Florida Politics and Government Psychology : Introduction to Contemporary Psychology Contemporary Problems in Psychology General Psychology Sociology : Introduction to Sociology Contemporary Social Problems Social Psychology 2. One of the following cross
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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 79 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG SOC!OLOGY (SOC) The primary purpose of the major in Sociology is to contribute d1rect!Y to the capacity for critical analysis and under standing of social phenomena and the dynamics of social struc tu.re and process. At the same time, it will prepare students for a wide range of careers such as teaching, law enforcement, person nel "'."ork, sales, research, urban planning, etc. It also provides training for advanced work in sociology and social psychology and other applied areas such as gerontology criminal justice, social work, etc Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree The major consists of a minimum of 36 credit hours. The following courses may not be counted in the 36 hour minimum for the major but may be elected as additional courses : SYG 301 O, SYG 2412, SYA 3504. No more than 3 credit hours of Individual (SYA 491 :nay be counted as major elective credit. A minimum grade of C or better must be attained in each course in the major A model program of recommended sequences may be obtained from the Department of Sociology . Transfer should be aware that by University regula tions, the equivalent of one academic year must be taken in on campus courses In Sociology, we requ ire that of the 36 credits needed to make up the major, no more than 9 credits earned else where, including exchange program credits, can count towards the major. The purpose of this rule is to insure that our certification that an who has. majored in soc! ology genuinely reflects our understanding of sociology as a major and that there is no fundamental difference between the transfer student and those whose work was entirely or mostly completed at the University of South Florida. Students are encouraged to complete the core courses as soon as possible after declaring the major The core courses for the major are: STA 3122 (3) SYG 2000 (3) SYA 3010 (3) SYP 3000 (3) SYA 3300 (3) either SYO 3530 (3) or SYO 3500 (3) For students electing a major after hav i ng successfully taken 12 upper level credits had a formal Introductory course, SYO 3500 (Social Organization) may be subst i tuted for SYG 2000 as a requirement. Students making this choice must take 3530 to meet the additional requirement stated above Given the nature of changes in society, students are encour to become computer literate in ways that are appropriate to their career goals Requirements for the Minor in Sociology A minor consists of a total of 15 credits; SYG 2000 Introduc tion to Sociology (or equivalent) plus 12 semester hou; credits at the 3000 level or higher Courses that do not count toward the may not. be used. toward the minor Though we do not require an adv .1ser, feeling students to be capable of making reasonable choices, we recommend the use of an adviser to find the best set of courses fitting one's personal interests. WOMEN'S STUDIES (WST/ISS\ The Department of Women s Studies offers two majors : Women's Studies and Interdisciplinary Social Sciences. A minor in Women's Studies is also available Requirements for the major in Women's Studies are described below. WOMEN'S STUDIES (WST) Requirements for the B.A. Degree The major in Women's Studies provides a well-rounded Liberal Arts edu cation the best n:iost current scholarship on women in many d1sc1phnes. Its subject 1s not only the evolution of historical attitudes, ideologies, and practices concerning women but also an analysis of the current status of different classes, races and groups of women Women's Studies offers excellent undergraduate preparation aswel! for (1 to apply to law school or to graduate study in a variety of fields, e g., Urban or Medical Anthropology, Education, Crimina! Justice, Gerontology, History, Rehab1l1tat1on Counseling, Social Work, Women's Studies ; (2) those "'."ho want to focus on women in specific disciplines or and (3) those whose training would benefit from a close s crutiny of the major issues facing women today Majors must complete 36 hours distributed as follows Required Core Courses (6 hours) WST 3011 WST 4935 and at lea.st 1 course from each of the following 6 areas of concentration (18 hours) and 12 hours of electives 1. MULTICULTURAL ISSUES 2. HISTORY WST 3275 AMH 3561 AFA 4335 AMH 3562 ANT 4302 WST 3210 WST 4260 WST 3220 WST 5266 WST 4309 3 HUMANITIES REL 3145 WST 4335 AMS 3370 5 THEORY/PHILOSOPHY WST 4342 PHl4345 PHM 5125 WST 5001 WST 4310 4 SOCIAL SCIENCES SOP 3742 SYD 4800 WST 4320 WST 4380 6 PUBLIC POLICY POS 4693 POS 4694 PUP 4323 The following courses are not included within the six areas of concentration and may be used as elective hours: WST 3010 WST 4930 WST 3360 WST 5934 WST 4900 STA 3122 WST 4910 Students electing to major in Women's Studies should consult the undergraduate advisor for timely scheduling of classes. Minor in "WOMEN OF COLOR" Women 's Studies offers a specific concentration in the area of Women of Color whose focus will be to examine the relationship women of color and institutions of power. For those in th e difficult task of creating a harmonious multi ethrnc v:vorld, this course of should be personally and socially rewarding as well as academically challenging The for graduate work and/ or professional careers in trad1t1onal and non-traditional areas such as health and education, international relations the creative law! medicine, social work, government and public policy, the social sciences, and community organization The requirements for the minor are 15 hours which are to be selected from the following upper-level courses : AFA 4335 WST 3275 ANT 4302 WST 4260 WST 4930 WST 5266 State University System, External Degree Program BACHELOR OF INDEPENDENT STUDIES (BIS) The Bachelor of Independent Studies (BIS) Program is available through participating state universities in Florida. The universities involved are Florida State University the University of Florida,_ the Urnvers1_tX of f-.!orth and the University of South Florida. The adm1n1strat1ve office for the statewide program is located at USF in Tampa _in. 1968, the external degree program i s for adults who find 1t d1ft1cult to aUend regular university classes because of career or family commitments The BIS student proceeds at his/ her oV"'.n and, for the most part, in his/her own setting. The exception 1s the seminars which require periodic, short term campus residence

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80 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Curriculum The curriculum of Interdisciplinary Studies consists of four study areas: the Humanities, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences and Inter-area Studies. The first three areas of study are completed through guided independent study and a resident seminar. While the seminar is of short duration, the tutorial/independent study for each area requires a longer commitment of time. The student may begin in any of the first three study areas and is encouraged to start in his/her area of strength. Tutorials The tutorial or guided independent study is predominently print intensive, with core and suggested readings drawn from the BIS Guide to Independent Studies In the Humanities tutorial, for example, the student reads across the disciplines of the Humani ties Study Area which include Language, Literature, Philosophy, Art, Drama, and Architecture. Selected works are reviewed within the framework of historical periods Tutorial objectives include knowledge of the basic principles of each of the genres and periods, the ability to visualize relationships between the disci plines, grasp of the nomenclature of the disciplines, and the capacity to apply basic concepts to current issues. The student is responsible for systematic interaction with the faculty mentor who directs the reading process and evaluates the student's progress In the Natural Sciences tutorial. the BIS learner studies about Science Science for the non-scientist. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships of the disciplines of Science. Topics illustrative of this interdisciplinary approach to Sciences include Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Astronomy, Geology, Ecology, His tory, and Philosophy of Science, and the impact of Science on technology. As is the case with other tutorials the learning objectives involve concepts, nomenclature, cross disciplinary in sights, and application of concepts/methods to current issues. In the Social Sciences tutorial, the student reads selected core and supplementary reading and completes written projects in each of the basic disciplines of the Social Science Study Area. These include Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. Tutorial objectives include knowledge of the basic concepts and principles of each discipline, familiarity with major social science research tech niques, understanding of the relationships among the different disciplines, and the ability to apply disciplinary or interdisciplinary concepts or models to current issues. Following the tutorial. the student completes a comprehensive examination in order to demonstrate that a satisfactory level of proficiency has been attained in the independent study compo nent of a particular area. The exam may be taken on or off campus. Seminars Students are invited to attend seminars on the USF campus This process is completed for each of the first three study areas (Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences). Each seminar represents a period of intensive residential learning under the direction of a team of faculty members. Seminar faculty teams identify the subject matter and activities of each seminar Humani ties seminars, for example, are often theme oriented but the focus is on interdisciplinary concerns. A number of historical periods may be approached through discussion of selected genres of the age such as art, music, literature, and architecture In a Natural Sciences seminar, the focus is on an interdisciplinary approach to learning about Science Social Sciences seminar faculty focus on the knowledge gained in the tutorial with an emphasis on synthesis, extension, and application of this learning to selected topics such as energy, patterns of human behavior, and human rights. Seminar activities also vary with the study area A visit to a museum or art gallery goes with a Humanities Seminar In Science, laboratory experiences and field trips are utilized to show students the ways of Science and to allow them to experience the excite ment of discovery Many of the activities described in a Social Sciences seminar syllabus are used in other seminars as well, i.e., lectures by faculty team members or guest lecturers, presenta tions by group members, group discussion, library research, learning journals, and a research paper Students in all seminars may be asked to read materials related to the seminar theme prior to the seminar and to complete written assignments after the completion of the two-week seminar period Seminars meet for two consecutive six-
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COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The College of Business Administration offers courses of study leading to both undergraduate and graduate degrees. These are designed to prepare men and women for careers in business and public service The undergraduate curriculum which leads to a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree is composed of several segments: (1) broad general education in the arts, humanities and sciences; (2) the common body of knowledge for management responsibilities ; (3) specialized areas of concentration in Accounting, Economics, Finance, Management, Marketing, General Business, Management Information Systems; and (4) opportunities for breadth i n both business and nonbusiness subjects. Through flexibility in its require ments, the College is able to satisfy the different interest and career objectives of students with diverse backgrounds Graduate pro grams in the College are described in the USF Graduate Catalog BACCALAUREATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Admission to the College Undergraduate Programs 1. Admission to the CoTlege of Business Administr ation is based upon availability of faculty and space by discipline 2 The College of Business Administration is an upper level limited access college, which means that it has admission requirements in addition to those of the University in general. The criteria to be admitted to the College of Business Admini stration are as follows: a Minimum of 60 semester hours of college credit earned b. Minimum of 2.5 cumulative grade point average on all college-level work and minimum 2 0 on all credit attempted at USF including any prior to salvage c. Completion of these prerequisite college courses (or equivalents): Financial & Managerial Accounting I & II Microeconomics and Macroeconomics Statistics I Computers in Business Elementary Calculus I d. All courses (or their equivalents) listed in c., above must be completed: (1) with at least a C-grade, and (2) with a combined minimum grade point average of 2.25 e In computing entry grade point average all business and eco nomics courses taken for S or U grades will be converted to C or F, respectively. 3 Students working toward meeting the limited access criteria will be permitted to enroll in all foundation courses in Business (listed below) except GEB 4890, prov i ded they have completed 60 semester hours and have met course prerequisites 4. Minimum of 550 on TOEFL when applicable . 5 Students must be admitted to the College of Business Admini stration at least one term before their anticipated graduation date. Academic Dismissal Students who have been dismissed twice from the University for academic reasons will not be readmitted to the College of Business Administration. Transfers from Junior/Community Colleges Junior/community college students should complete the pro gram of general education at the junior/community college. Students pursuing the associate degree in university transfer/ parallel curricula at the junior/community college should take two semesters of mathematics to include a course in elementary calcu lus, two semesters of accounting principles, two semesters of economic principles, one semester of statistics, and one semester of data processing, including computer utilization (See paragraph 2c above.) Students pursuing associate degrees in terminal/career programs must be aware that some courses taken at the junior/ community college may not be acceptable for credit in the bacca laureate programs at USF. Students should avoid taking any Business courses at the junior/ community college which are listed as 3000 and 4000 level courses at USF. Normally courses in finance, marketing, management, and accounting as well as other business administration and economic courses taken at the lower division level which are offered as upper division courses at USF will not be accepted for upper division credit in business admin i stration or economics. Exceptions to this policy will be made only upon proper validation of such courses. Validation consists of CLEP or other written examinations prepared and administered by the College of Business Administration, USF. Transfer Students From Other Colleges and Universities Transfer credits ordinarily will be accepted from accredited insti tutions in the amount earned; however, all hours earned may not always be applied toward graduation. Individual courses will be evaluated and appropriately credited toward requirements in the student's program at the University of South Florida Transfer students are required to complete satisfactorily, at USF a minimum of 21 semester hours of Business Administration courses, of which a least 12 semester hours must be in the major field Independent study and independent research courses do not fulfill this requirement. The univers ity requires that at least 30 of a student's last 60 hours be taken in on
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82 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1991/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Sufficient courses to reach at least 60 hours Total Business Courses 60-66 3. Electives in Business or Non-Business Sufficient electives courses to reach 120 hours Total Hours 120 4. All business students are required to selec:t at least one course that deals with contemporary international topics This course can be included in the business, non-business, or elective cate gory Consult with a business advisor for suggestions on accept able courses "' 5 A grade-point average of 2 0 must be achieved in the major field, as well as in all USF work for students to be certified for graduation Students must have satisfactorily completed CLAST and the writing and computation course requirements of 6A10 30 ('Gordon Rule') For a Bachelor of Arts degree, students must pass the foreign language competency exam 6 All courses in the major or minor field and all foundation courses in business must be taken on a graded basis; the S/U option is not available While the College provides advising services to assist students with academic planning, the responsibility for seeing that all graduation requirements are met ultimately rests solely with the student. Student Advising and Records The Office of Undergraduate Programs provides the following services for of Business Administration students : 1 Academic advising and program information 2. Orientation for undergraduate students applying for admission to the College of Business Administrat i on. Orientation is manda tory prior to being accepted 3. Registration and drop/add for business courses. 4 Evaluation of undergraduate transcripts of transfer students. 5. Maintenance of academic advising records for all admitted stu dents. PROGRAMS AND CURRICULA GENERAL BUSINESS (GBA) The General Business Major is a program of study that will allow the student to take additional upper level course work in several business and in some instances, other disciplines related to the student's plan of study. Currently two tracks are available Requirements for the B.A./B.S. Degree Within the 120 semester hour program as listed in the General Requirement section, students must complete a minimum of 18 hours of upper-level courses beyond the business core require ments Track 1 is the traditional general business track in which the student is required to take one upper level course from each of the following groups : Accounting : ACG 3102 Intermediate Accounting I ACG 3341 Cost Accounting and Control I TAX 4001 Federal Taxes I Economics: Any course offered by the Economics Department numbered 3000 or above Finance: (4) (3) (3) (3) Any course offered by the Finance Department numbered 3000 or above Except FIN 3100 and FIN 3105 (3) Management: MAN 3240 Organizational Behavior Analysis MAN 3401 Industrial Relations ISM 3011 Management Information Systems Marketing: MAR 3823 Marketing Management MAR 3613 Marketing Research Other upper level business electives TOTAL (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (2-9) (18-24) Independent study and independent research courses are not appropriate electives Track 2 is a Real Estate oriented track which requires 24 credit hours of multidisciplinary course work in business and economics as well as in urban planning, architecture, public administration a11d other related fields Students interested in the Real Estate track should see a business advisor to obtain the detailed choices necessary to develop their plan of study ACCOUNTING (ACC) The objectives of the baccalaureate degree program in account ancy are to provide students with accounting and business knowl edge that will serve as a basis for careers in industry, government, non-profit organizations and public accountancy. The baccalaureate program also prepares students for entry into the Master of Accountancy (M Acc ) professional degree program. See CPA requirements in the state of Florida below. Requirements for the B.A./B.S. Degree Within the 120 semester hour program as listed in the General Requirements section, students must complete a min i mum of 20 hours of upper level accounting courses Required Accounting Courses : ACG 3102 Intermediate Accounting I ACG 3112 Intermediate Accounting II ACG 3341 Cost Accounting and Control I ACG 3401 Accounting Information Systems TAX 4001 Federal Taxes I ACG 4632 Auditing I Total Required non-business Courses : One of the following: ENC 3213 Professional Writing ENC 3310 Expository Writing (or other equivalent course) One of the following : (4) m (3) (20) COM 3110 Communications for Business and the Professions SPC 2023 Fundamentals of Speech Communications (or other equivalent course) The student's program must also include coursework taken in behavioral sciences and humanities, such as psychology, anthropol ogy, and sociology, and the political environment of business and society, such as political science, public administration, and ethics. College of Business Administration advisors will recommend courses that will satisfy the program requirements. Students planning to enroll in the M Acc Program should take TAX 4015, Federal Taxes II, as part of their required accounting courses resulting in a 23 hour major. Accounting majors can use the forgiveness policy only once in upper level accounting courses. Accounting courses taken by ac counting majors on an S/U basis will not be counted toward the 120 hour graduation requirement. Independent Research, ACG 4911, will not be accepted as credit toward the minimum degree require ments in the accounting concentration. Accounting majors must earn a 'C' grade in each of the sequential upper-level accounting courses before being allowed to go on to the next course : i.e., ACG 3102, ACG 3341, ACG 4632, TAX 4001. Students desiring to take the Uniform CPA Examination to practice as certified public accountants are required to have com pleted a five-year (150 semester hour) program of study. Any further questions concerning the CPA examination should be directed to the faculty of the School of Accountancy ECONOMICS (ECN) Economics offers a clear, logical way of thinking about compli cated business problems and contemporary social issues such as cont.rolling unemployment, inflation, pollution, and crime The

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COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 83 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1991/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG offers two major progra!"s. Option I, by Fl NANCE (Fl N) choices, allows students to tailor their programs to provide training The Finance program provides a broad"9auged analytical pro-for careers in business, teaching, or government service It is also g r am for students ant i cipating a career in management of both excellent preparation for graduate educat i on in bus iness, law and large and small organizations. Students seeking a financial career in other professsional areas. Option 11, by offering the student continu bus iness, in financial institutions or careers in the fields of insurance, ing concentration in price theory aggregate economics mathereal estate, or financ i a l planning should find the finance major matical economics, and econometrics prepares students for gradu part i cularly valuable In addition, the program in finance is designed ate education in economics. The department offers a minor pro-to provide the flexibility needed by students who seek professional gram open to students throughout the Univers ity. degrees in areas such as law and public administration Students interested in major i ng or minor i ng in economics should The Finance program offers applied and theoret ical courses dicontact the undergraduate academic advisor in the Department of rected to the identificat i on and solution of problems in the acquisiEconomics for more information about the program t i on and allocat i on of funds by organizations in both the private and Requirements for. the B.A./B.S. Degree: Within the 120-semester hour program as listed in the General Requirements section, students must complete a minimum of 18 hours of economics beyond the business core require ments. Students must obtain a grade of c or higher in ECO 3101 Intermediate Price Theory, in order to enroll in any course for which ECO 3101 or ECO 3203 is a prerequisite No more than 3 hours credit can be applied toward a major from ECO 4905 and/or ECO 4914. Option 1 Required Economics Courses : a) ECO 3203 b) 15 hours of upper level economics courses (to ensure broad coverage students must include at least one course from each of groups A, B, and C in the i r programs) At least 9 of the 15 hours of additiona l upper-level economics courses must be courses for which either ECO 3101 or ECO 3203 is a prerequisite These courses are marked with an aster ick. Group A (at least 3 hours) selected from: ECO 3622, ECP 3413, ECP 3613, ECP 4232 ECS 3013 Group B (at least 3 hours) selected from: *ECO 4303 ECO 4323, *ECP 4451, ECS 4003 Group C (at least 3 hours) selected from : *ECO 3703 *ECO 4504, *ECO 4213, *ECP 3203, ECO 4935 (Selected Topics *Industrial Organization Option II Required Economics courses (15 hours) : ECO 3203 Intermediate Income and Monetary Analys i s ECO 4935 Selected Topics-Advanced Price Theory ECO 4935 Selected Topics-Advanced Aggregate Economics ECO 4401 Mathematical Economics ECO 4935 Selected Topics-Introduction of Econometr ics Additional economics course (3 hours) Requirements for a Minor in Economics Students majoring in Business Administration, as well as stu dents from other colleges may minor in Economics The requ ire ments are: 1 ECO 2023 Economic Principles (Microeconomics) (3) ECO 2013 Economic Principles (Macroeconomics) m ECO 3101 Intermediate Price Theory (3) ECO 3203 Intermediate Income and Monetary Analysis (3) Upper level economics electives (6) Total Economics Hours (18) (excluding the1variable credit courses ECO 4905 and 4914) QMB 3200 Business and Economic Statistics II, or its equivalent is acceptable for credit in the minor 2 Before being recognized as a minor in economics, students must obtain approval of the courses involved in their minor program from the advisor in the Economics department. 3. A grade-point average of 2.0 or better be achieved in the minor coursework for a student to be cert1f1ed for graduation with a minor in economics 4. At least 12 of the required 18 credits must be taken in residence at USF. public sectors in both domestic and multinational settings Finance relies on an interdisciplinary approach which draws on economic theory, accounting, information systems, and the quantitative dec i sion framework of stat i stics and mathematics The requ i red courses for finance majors focus on understanding the institut i onal environment and the analytical tools used by decis i on makers Also i ncluded are concepts of capital budgeting, risk analys is, asset and liab i lity management, and an examination of the economic social and regulatory forces affecting the decision making process Requirements for the B.A./B.S. Degree Within the 120 semester hour program as l i sted in the General Requirements sect i on, students must complete a minimum of 18 hours of upper level finan c e courses beyond FIN 3403 Required Finance Courses : FIN 3233 Money and Banking Fl N 4414 Advanced Corporat i on Finance FIN 4504 Principles of Inv estments and either FIN 4443 Financ ial Policies and Strategies or FIN 4514 Advanced Invest ment Analysis and Management AND a m i nimum of 2 additional Finance electives ... from the follow i ng Approved l ist. T otal Approved List: . FIN 3 6 04 International Finance FIN 4303 F i nancial Inst i tutions FIN 4443 Financial Policies and Strategies FIN 4514 Ad v anced Investment Analysis m (3) (3) (3) (6) (18-24) m (3) and Management (3) And other courses approved by the Finance Department Chair INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND DECISION SCIENCES (ISM) The Management Information Systems (MIS) major provides the s kills knowledge and ab i lities necessary for information systems development and information systems management positions both in business and non-business organizations. Requirements for the B.A./B.S. Degree Students will typ i cally enter the program at the beginning of their junior year Within the 120 semester hour program listed in the General Requirements section, students must complete a set of three MIS courses which are required of all majors nine hours of ap proved MIS electives and three additional non-business courses as indicated below Required MIS Courses: ISM 3111 Systems Analysis ISM 3112 Systems Design ISM 4300 Managing the Information System Function m Approved MIS Electives Total Required Non business Courses : one of the following : (18-24) COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions

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84 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1991/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG SPC 2023 ENC 3213 ENC 3310 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Professional Writing Expository Writing (or other equivalent course) plus the following: COP 3120 COBOL Programming I (COBOL I is a prerequisite for most of the required MIS courses and should be completed by the end of the first semester in the junior year ) COP 3121 COBOL Programming II (or other high-level language) Requirements for a Minor in MIS (for Business Majors only) Students majoring in Business Administration may minor in MIS. The requirements are: 1. ISM 3111 Systems Analysis ISM 3112 Systems Design (PR: Cobol) MIS electives approved by department chair (6) Total MIS hours {12) 2 A grade-average of 2.0 or better must be achieved in the minor coursework 3. At least 9 hours of the required 12 credit hours must be taken in residence at USF. MANAGEMENT (MAN) The undergraduate degree in the Department of Management prepares students for entry level positions in Human Resource Man agement, Industrial Relations, and Small Business Management. It also prepares students for entry into graduate programs, such as the Master of Science in Management and the Master of Business Administration Requirements for the B.A./B.S. Degree Within the 120-semester-hour program as listed in the General Requirements section, students must complete 18 hours of man agement beyond MAN 3025. Required Management Courses: MAN 3240 Organizational Behavior Analysis (3) Additional upper-level management courses {15-21) Total {18-24) MAN 4504 and MAN 4507 do not count towards the management major. Non-Business Requirements one of the following: ENC 3213 Professional Writing ENC 3310 Expository Writing (or other equivalent course) Students are encouraged to seek additional curriculum advice from the Management Department. Requirements for a Minor in Management (For Business Majors Only) Students majoring in Business Administration may minor in Man agement The requirements are: 1. MAN 3240 Organizational Behavior Analysis (3) Management electives approved by department chair (9) Total Management hours {12) 2 A grade-average of 2 0 or better must be '!chieved in the minor coursework. 3 At least 9 hours of the required 12 credit hours must be taken in residence at USF. MARKETING (MKT) Marketing is a dynamic field with many dimensions, including product selection and planning, product distribution, pricing and promotion. Marketing poses many challenges and yields generous rewards for those meeting these challenges Marketing operations are carried out domestically and internationally in virtually all business organizations offering a product or service. Many market ing concepts are applicable to the operations of non-profit organi zations such as governmental, educational, and health care institu tions as well as charitable and political campaigns Marketing operations provide the most visible links between the firm or institution and its many publics Marketing in the end deals with people, people who are constantly changing in their needs, wants and desires; and coupled with these changing tastes is a fiercely competitive environment sustained by all the resources of a rapidly evolving technology. These forces lead to much of the challenge to much of the dynamic nature of marketing The marketing program at USF prepares students for initial entry and management positions in many areas of marketing with a cur riculum that is concerned with : 1 Understanding consumer behavior and the broader environ ment within which the firm or institution operates; 2 Collecting, analyzing, and using information about customers, competitors, and the environment for managerial decisions; 3 Distributing products effectively and efficiently from producer to user; 4. Advertising and promoting the offerings of the firm or institution effectively; 5 Creatively and effectively managing a sales force selling indus trial or consumer goods and services; and 6. Managing reta i l and wholesale operations including the concep tualization, implementation and evaluation of the buying, mer chandising, and control functions. Each student is strongly encouraged to set up his own plan of study with the assistance of a Marketing department faculty adviser Such counseling can lead to a better definition of career objectives and will result in a plan of study that is consistent with each student's career objectives Undergraduate students in the College of Business not majoring in Marketing are encouraged to take selected offerings from the Marketing curriculum to broaden their backgrounds and to prepare for marketing-related positions in business or non-profit organiza tions Requirements for the B.A./B.S. Degree: Within the 120-semester hour program as listed in the General Requirements section, students must complete a minimum of 18 hours in marketing beyond MAR 3023 Required Marketing Courses: MAR 3823 Marketing Management {3 3 ) MAR 3613 Marketing Research ( ) MAR 4824 Marketing Management Problems (3) Additional upper-level marketing courses {9-15) Total {18-24) It is strongly recommended that marketing majors include courses in speech, computer science, finite mathematics, social psychology, and mass communications as part of their general elec tives. The following Marketing elective tracks are recommended for students with specific interests Industrial Marketing/Sales Management MAR 4403 Sales Management MAR 4453 Industrial Marketing MAR 4503 Buyer Behavior MAR 3400 Professional Selling Promotion (Industrial and/or Consumer) MAR 4333 Promotion Management MAR 4503 Buyer Behavior MAR 4933 Promotion Campaigns MAR 3400 Professional Selling Logistics and Physical Distribution {Industrial and/or Consumer and/or International) MAR 4203 Channels Management MAR 4213 Logistics and Physical Distribution Management MAR 4453 Industrial Marketing MAR 4231 Retailing Managernent and/or MAR 4156 International Marketing

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85 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA f'92/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Retailing MAR 4231 Retailing Management MAR 4503 Buyer Behavior MAR 4333 Promotion Management and/or MAR 3400 Professional Selling MAR 4213 Logistics and Physical Distribution Management Other Campuses Due to limited enrollment and faculty, only the following majors are regularly offered at the Regional Campuses : St. Petersburg . Accounting, Management, and General Business Administra tion (Track 1 ). Sarasota Accounting and General Business Administration {Track 1 ) Fort Myers . . Accounting and General Business Adm1rnstrat 1on (Track 1 ) Lakeland Only limited courses available Students may declare other business majors while attending these locations, but it inay be necessary to finish their major study requirements at another campus within the University Student Organizations within the College of Business Administration All students are encouraged to participate in extracurricular ac tivities The following organizations provide a means for students to develop both professionally and socially while attending the College of Business Administration. American Society of Personnel Management Student chapter of the American Society for Personnel Adminstration designed for students interested in careers in human resource management. American Student Production and Inventory Control Society An organization which practices the ,art a nd o! prc;>duction and inventory management. ASPICS s primary objective 1s to develop frofessional efficiency through study, research, and applica tion o scientific methods. Professional meetings and publications promote the dissemination of knowledge and information. Association of Marketing Students A collegiate chapter of the American Marketing Association, will help to further the growth of business oriented individuals w ithin the field of Marketing Beta Alpha Psi The national professional accounting fraternity devoted to the promotion of the profession, inspiring professional ideals, and recognizing academic achievement. Beta Gamma Sigma Honorary society which encourages and rewards outstanding scholarship among business students Business Student Council -An organization whose representa tives from each of the major fields advises the Dean of the College and the faculty on student attitudes and goals Also, it acts as a liaison between the Student Government Association and the College of Business Administration Delta Sigma Pi Fosters the study of business and a close asso ciation between students and the business world. Economics Club Provides a forum for discussion of economic issues and actively encourages communication between students and Economics faculty Iota Phi Lambda -A business and professional sorority designed to encourage the development of personalities for afl areas of leadership . Management Systems Society : Student ter of the Data Processing Management Assoc1at1on, career ori ented and interested in all areas of business data management. Minority Students Organization Encourages and supports students in their efforts to achieve success in a demanding academic setting. Phi Chi Theta A career oriented professional organization that encourages the study of business Pi Sigma Epsilon A professional society interested in market ing, sales management, and selling Sigma Iota Epsilon An honorary and professional manage ment society affiliated with the Academy of Management. Student Accounting Organization Promotes accounting both as an academic discipline and as a profession Student Finance Association An organization for finance majors and other business oriented students which provides expo sure to the many facets and opportunities in the field of finance

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1992(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The College of Education places an emphasis on stude.nts learning what is relevant for the world today and on their getting deeply involved in their own thinking about themselves and their universe The College of Education is committed to a continuous and sys tematic examination of the professional program of teacher educa tion Promising programs are examined experimentally under con trolled conditions, which make possible an objective appraisal of effects in terms of learning outcomes The University of South Florida follows a University-wide ap proach to teacher education Its programs for the preparation of teachers represent cooperative effort in planning and practice by faculties of all academic areas Courses needed by teacher candi dates but designed also for other students are offered outside the College of Education. Courses in the University which are primarily desi gned for teacher candidates are taught by the College of Education faculty In the total teacher education program there is a special concern for develop i ng in the student a deep interest in intellectual i nquiry and the ability to inspire this interest in others BACCALAUREATE-LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Admission to the College The College of Education administers the admission policies to all teacher programs of the University All students who plan to teach must apply for admission to a teacher education program through the Student Personnel Office of the College of Education Prospec tive secondary and K-12 teachers are enrolled in teacher education programs involving both the College of Education and various other colleges of the liberal arts areas . Admission to an upper level teache(educat1on program 1s con tingent upon meeting the following minimum college requirements : 1. Complet i on of a College of Education application form. 2. Completion of the General Distribution requirements for Educa tion majors. Provisional adm ission may be granted if no more than three individual General Distribution courses remain to be taken, provided Freshman English has been completed 3 Completion of a minimum of 50 semester hours 4 An overall minimum GPA of 2.5 on all attempted hours plus a min i mum ACT score of 19 (enhanced ACT score of 20 or SAT score of 840) will be required for full admiss i on to the College An overall minimum GPA of 2 25 on all attempted work will be accepted for students with a 21 or higher ACT score ACT score of 22 or SAT score of 940) Students must submit a score from the American College Test (ACT) or Scholastic Aptitude Test {SAT). Admission to programs will be based upon the appllcants' performance on either test. If the numbe_r of applicants exceed the capacity of a program, preference will be given to students with higher scores Students who meet all other requirements but have not achieved minimum test scores or minimum GPA may be considered under Action absolute minimum test scores for this process are prescribed by the College of Education. . . 5 Additional criteria established by each program (See Adm1ss1on to Programs below ) Admission to Programs Admission to some programs is basea on additional selection criteria beyond the College requirements above programs accept a limited number of students. Add1t1onally, certain programs admit students only in a specified semester Students should refer to the specific program descript i ons in this additional admissions information Information regarding admis sion requirements for the program(s) of. your choice may be obtained from the Student Personne l Office, College of Education Time Limitations The College of Education will accept professional education and specialization coursework completed at this University or at other accredited institutions as follows: 1 Courses completed within the last five years will be accepted 2 Courses completed over five years but less than ten years ago: For cqurses taught by College of approval frof!l the appropriate departmental chairperson 1s required before crE'.d1t is granted For courses taught by other than College of Education faculty, approval from the chai rperson of the department that re-quires the course is necessary . 3 Courses completed ten years ago or longer will count as elective credit only Admission to Internship Experience The final internship experience is observing and teaching in ele mentary, secondary or exceptional schools Time, sequence, and location of experience may vary among the programs (Refer to specific program for further informat i on ) Special requirements for enrollment in the final internship and seminar courses are : 1. Adm issi on to the College of Education 2 Completion of General Distribution, "Gordon Rule; and foreign language requirements. 3 Completion of an application for the final internship before desired semester according to schedule below 4. Completion of the professional education sequence except for measurement/special education/computers in education courses a minimum of two thirds of specialization, no course work with less than a c grade, and a minimum of 2.5 grade point average in each area ; or an overall 2.5 grade point average The Elementary/Early childhood programs require a combined grade point average of 2 5 in professional and specialization as well as an overall 2.5, and completion of all teaching specialization except two of the following : ARE 4313, HLP 4722, MUE 4210 5 Acceptance by a school approved by the College of Education and the Florida Department of Education 6 Completion of other requirements prescribed by the applicable program . Application for internship must be made prior to the term. 1 n which experience is desired, except when the program has spec1f1c tracks and dates for applications to be submitted. The applications may be obtained in the Office of Clinic;al Education Applications for Fall Semester are due the preceding January 30. for Spring Semester are due the preceding June 15. Admission to Classes The control of entry to all classes on all campuses will rest with the department chairperson Each department will establish and publish priorities for allowing students to enroll in classes. Students not in attendance at the first class meeting will be dropped from the course College Requirements for Graduation To be certified by the College of Education for graduation, a student must have earned 120 semester hours credit including the last 30 credit hours on campus. A minimum overall USF grade-point average of 2.5 or a min i mum GPA of 2.5 in teaching specialization courses and a minimum GPA of 2 5 in the Professional Education se quence. The Elementary/Early Childhood programs require a com bined grade point average of 2.5 in professional educatio!1 and specialization as well as an overall 2.5 Satisfactory completion of the internship is also required Prior tc:i completion of the the student must pass both the subiect area and the Professional Education sections of the Florida State Teacher Certification Exami nation A student must also have completed the major require ments i n an approved teaching program (which includes preparation, teaching specialization, and professional preparation).

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 87 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1!1f2/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG A minimum of 8 credits in professional courses in addition to internship and 12 credits in specialization courses must have been earned in residence The student must complete a minimum of 30 hours after admittance to an upper level program A student must havedassed all parts of the CLAST examination, and have com plete foreign language, general distribution, "Gordon Rule." and the summer school attendance requirement Specific Requirements A minimum of 120 credit hours including the following : General Distribution 40 credit hours Professional Education Core 32-49 credit hours Teaching Specialization 27-49 credit hours Program requirements : Check individual program descriptions for requirements beyond the college minimum Normally, the college will recommend the granting of a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree To obtain a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree, the student must meet the Foreign Language Competency (see graduation requirements in front of catalog). As part of the 120 credit hours minimum requirement for graduation, students may include elective courses. The courses should be selected in consul tation with a faculty advisor. The College of Education permits students to count, as part of the 120-hour requirements, courses in Elective Physical Education and up to 9 hours of USF Army or Air Force ROTC credits SunCoast Area Teacher Training Program {SCATT} SCA TI i s an award-winning nonors-level teacher training pro gram founded on the premise that prospective teachers are the key to influencing the future of our society. The SCATI program offers two options for College of Education majors to enhance their education, Option 1 : the existing SCA TI Honors Program and Option 2: the SCATI Honors Course Sequence. The existing Program is designed to provide bright and talented pre-service teachers with challenging activities workshops, and seminars to aid and encourage them to become highly qualified, dedicated educators The wide variety of opportunities offered to SCA TI members provides them with an enhanced view of educa tion as a field of study and with experiences which extend "above and beyond" the requirements of the present academic program SCA TI also helps prospective employers identify pre-service teach ers who have demonstrated high levels of academ i c achievement, ability, leadership and a commitment to the profession The SCATI Honors Course Sequence pilot program includes : early field experiences in the schools with SCATI supervising teachers, intensive study in current teaching strategies, exposure to top role models in the field of education, and a support network created to increase options for maximum success. Students who are selected to participate in the SCA TI Course Sequence automati cally become members of the existing SCA TI Honors Program To receive SCATI Honors Course status, the entire three course sequence is required. To be selected for the SCATI Honors Course Sequence, students must apply, meet SCATI Program eligibility requirements, have three semesters remaining prior to their final internship, and participate in an individual interview. Eligibility Requirements for SCA TT. Students who have been admitted to the USF College of Education and who have achieved a minimum score of 21 or 22 (depending on the date of the exam) on the American College Test (ACT) or 1000 or above on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) are eligible. A student is also eligible for membership in SCATI if the student enters the College of Education with a 3.5 or above overall grade point average and submits two letters of recommendation from professors/advisors An interview/orientation must be ar ranged before being admitted to the SCATI Program. This can be arranged by contacting the SCATI program at (813) 974-2061 Florida Department of Education Requirements for Teacher Certification College of Education programs are reviewed by the Florida De partment of Education. Those programs meeting the requirements of Chapter 6A-5, Rules of the State Board of Education of Florida, are given "Approved Program" status. These rules are subject to rapid changes and programs must change accordingly to maintain their "approved" status Program requirements listed in this catalog are needed for graduation To be eligible for a Florida Educator's Certificate, the student must complete all requirements listed on applicable current program checklist, complete the "Beginning Teacher Program" and pass all parts of the State Teacher Certifica tion Examination Programs Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree The College of Education has programs Teading to the Bachelor of Science degree* in the following fields : Program Department Art Education Secondary Education Behavior Disorders Special Education Business and Office Adult & Vocational Education Education Distributive and Adult & Vocational Marketing Education Education Elementary/Early Not currently being Childhood Education offered Elementary Education Childhood/Language Arts/ English Education Foreign Language Education Industrial Technical Education Mathematics Education Mental Retardation Education Music Education Instrumental Vocal General Physical Education Elementary Secondary Wellness Science Education Biology Chemistry Physics .Reading Secondary Education Secondary Education Adult & Vocational Education Secondary Education Special Education Music Education Professional Physical Education Secondary Education Social Science Education Secondary Education Specific Learning Dis-Special Education abilities Education Code (ARE) (EED) (BTE) (DEC) (EEC) (EDE) (ENE) (FLS) (EVT) (MAE) (EMR) (MEI) (MEV) (MEG) (PTE) (PTS) (PTW) (NSB) (NSC) (NSP) (SSE) (ELD) See Departmental Section for specific program requirer:nents. *A B.A. degree may be awarded when competency in a foreign language is demonstrated. Teacher Education Program There are three distinct areas in the teacher education program and all teacher candidates must meet certain minimum require ments in each. The three areas and their requirements are a follows: 1. General Distribution Requirements (40 credit hours) The five areas of General Distribution and the specific requ i ments are as follows : Area I English Composition: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 Area II Fine Arts and Humanities: A minimum of six hours of selectP'' course must include the writing rP'

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88 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1'92/'3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG two of the following departments : American Studies, of Vocational and Adult Education Certification programs leading Art, Classics, Dance, English, Foreign Languages, to the Bachelor of Science (B. S ) degree are : Business and Office Humanities, Music, Philosophy and Theatre Education, Distributive and Marketing Education, lndustrial-Techni-Area Ill Mathematics : cal Education, and Technology Education. A minimum of six hours. MAC 2102/MGF 2202 or more advanced courses offered by the Mathematics Department Logic, Statistics and selected Engineer ing computer courses are acceptable for three hours of the requirement Area IV Natural Sciences : A minimum of six hours of courses offered by the partments of Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Geol ogy, or Physics. Area V Social and Behavioral Sciences: a For EDE amd EEC majors, two American History courses, or one American History and one Ameri can National Government course. One of these must be AMH 2010 or 2020 or the equivalent. b. For all other programs : A minimum of six hours of any of the courses taught in Social and Behavioral Sciences PSY 2012 and SYG 2000 are recom mended. See the University General Distribution Requirements section of the catalog for exceptions and additional approved courses. Courses required for a student's major program will not be counted i n the total 40 hours although areas of general dis tribution requirements may be waived where appropriate. A student will be limited to 8 hours in a singte department toward distribution requirements in any area Students may not elect to take any of the above S/U. 2. Professional Education Core (36-45 credit hours) The required courses in the professional education core are as follows: EDF 3122 Learning and the Developing Child (4) (For Elementary or Early Childhood Majors) or EDF EDF EDF EDG EDF *EME ** EEX 3214 Human Development and Learning (for all other programs) 3604 Social Foundations of Education or 3542 Philosophy of Education 4620 Curriculum and Instruction 4430 Measurement for Teachers 4402 lntr. to Computers in Ed 4070 Exceptional Student Ed Methods Course(s) Internship and Seminar **** Reading Requirement 'Not required in Music Education. "Not required in Special Education. (3) (3) m (2) (4-6) (12)*** (2-3) "Elementary Physical Education, Early Childhood and Special Education i nternships (or practicums) are 18-23 semester hours. ""Not required in Music or Foreign Language Educ ation Read.ing is i n the specialization for EDE, EEC, and Special Education programs 3. Teaching Specialization Preparation (27-49 credit hours) Course requirements in the area of teaching specialization vary according to field of spec i alization. These specialization ments are listed with the programs that follow in the departmental section DEPARTMENTS AND PROGRAMS The College of Education is organized into 11 departments Each department has one or more programs which are listed alphabeti cally in the following departmental section . Department of Adult and Vocational Education The Adult and Vocational Education Department at the Univer sity of South Florida offers degrees through the College of Educa tion designed to prepare teachers and leaders in the various fields BUSINESS AND OFFICE EDUCATION Requirements for the B.S. Degree (BTE): General Distribution and Professional Education requirements are listed under Teacher Education Program In Business Education specific program competencies in the spe cialization must be demonstrated through satisfactory completion of competency examinations Prospective majors should schedule these examinations as early as possible and no later than the first semester of the junior year The competency examinations may be repeated. Two semesters of full-time residency must be planned with an adviser and sequenced in the senior year Special prerequisites are required for BTE 4360 and BTE 4364, which are taken concurrently in the semester immediately prior to the supervised internship. Specialization Requirements (43 er. hrs.): Accounting (2 courses) Business Machines Competencies Economics (2 courses) Principles of Management Typewriting Competencies Office Occupations Procedures (Theory SO CWPM) Introduction to Computers Shorthand Competencies Office Information Processing (Theory 80 WPM) Prin. of Vocational Education Administrative Office Electives (6 er. hrs approved by Management advisor) Business Communications Business Law DISTRIBUTIVE AND MARKETING EDUCATION Requirements for the B.S. Degree (DEC): General Distribution and Professional Education requirements are listed under Teacher Education Program Specialization (42 credit hours): ACG 2001 DEC 4941 MAR 3023 DEC 4161 MAR 4403 MAR 3823 FIN 3100 FIN 3105 MAR 4333 ECO 2013 ECO 2023 EVT 4065 MAR 4231 Distributive and Marketing Education undergraduates are quired to accumulate a total of five (5) hours of credit in DEC 4941 Supervised Field Experience to round out and broaden the voca tional background of the student to properly fulfill certification requirements Students will also be able to receive credit for participation in the professional activities of the Delta Epsilon Chi, chapter of the Distributive Education Clubs of America, which is an integral part of the Distributive and Marketing Education teacher preparation curriculum INDUSTRIAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION Requirements for the B.S. Degree (EVT): General Distribution and Professional Education requirements are listed under Teacher Education Program INDUSTRIAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION TRACK: Enrollment in the Industrial-Technical Education program is stricted to persons with employment experiences qualifying them to teach Industrial, Technical, Health Occupations, or Public Service Special provision is made for students to satisfy four (4) of the required six (6) years of work experience in a specific occupation by completing an Associate in Science degree program in a technologi cal specialty from one of the State Community Colleges or success fully completing an appropriate occupational competency exam. Acceptability of work experience will be determined by the program advisor Students may validate up to 30 semester hours of credit through the Occupational Competency Testing Program, or appropriate licensure or certificate

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 89 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 11192/'3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Required: 38 semester hours. EVT4065 EVT4165 *EIV4210 ADE 4384 EVT 4367 EVT 4365 EVT 4946 EVT 4084C *Another course may be substituted with advisor's approval. EVT 4562 EIV 4360 TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (IND. ARTS) TRACK: Within the EVT program, students can pursue state certification in Technology Education In general, students enrolling into the Technology Education program are expected to have successfully completed, at a community college, most of the technical labora tory courses required for Florida Teacher Certification Teacher cer tification requires students to have 30 semester hours, with three (3) semester hours in each of the following areas : (a) materials and processes, (b) drafting and design, (c) energy, (d) graphics, (e) electronics, (f) construction, and (g) industrial sytems. Students entering this program will have their transcripts evalu ated to determine if all technical course requirements have been met. If the student has not completed the technical course require ments, the deficiencies will be corrected by enrolling into the required course(s) at a community college Since this evaluation procedure is unique to the Technology Education Program, the application for admission should clearly indicate the desired major field as Technology Educcition The program of studies includes both course work and extensive field experience in school settings This is to enable students to integrate theory with teaching practice. Technology Education students must complete the General Dis tribution Requirements of 40 semester hours, the Professional Education Core Requirements of 40-41 semester hours, the Techni .cal Course Requirements of 30 semester hours, and 12 semester hours in Adult and Vocational Education. The requirements in Adult and Vocational Education are as follows: Required: 23 semester hours including: EVT 4065 EIV 4210 EVT 4165 EIA 3192 EIA 4360 EVT 4365 Plus electives selected with advisor approval. Department of Childhood/Language Arts/Reading Education The Childhood/Language Arts/Reading Education department has the responsibility for the development and supervision of programs leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Elementary/ Early Childhood Education and Elementary Education Prerequisites for admission to these programs include two American History courses, or one American History and one Ameri can National Government course One of these must be AMH 2010 or 2020 or the equivalent. These courses may be taken as part of the general distribution requirement. Elementary Education Certification Programs Students may complete a program of studies to be eligible for certification in either Elementary or Elementary-Early Childhood Education. The program of studies includes both coursework and extensive field experiences in a school setting to enable students to integrate theory with teaching practice Upon successful comple tion of the requ i red courses and the associated internships, Elementary majors will be eligible to apply for certification in grades one through six. Elementary-Early Childhood majors will be eligible to apply for certification for kindergarten through 6th grade upon completing the requirements of this program Students electing to pursue either the Elementary or the Elementary-Early Childhood major will be assigned to a specified sequence of courses to be followed throughout the program enrollment. This sequence in cludes two semesters of part-time field experience and one semes ter of full-day internship All part-time internship courses must be successfully completed as a member of an internship team in designated local schools under the supervision of a faculty team 1eader. One of these part-time internships is scheduled to be com pleted in the first semester of the student's enrollment. A second half-day in-school experience occurs during the senior year when the majority of coursework has been completed just prior to enrollment in the full-day internship. Students who withdraw from Level I or Level II Internships, or who make an unsatisfactory grade, must petition the department Professional Standards Committee before they will be allowed to repeat either internship. Elementary and Elementary-Early Childhood majors are required to complete a concentration of 15 hours in one of the following areas : English, Mathematics, Science, Social Science, or Foreign Language Students must have an overall USF GPA of 2.5 and a GPA of 2.5 in the combined Professional Core and Teaching Specialization prior to internship and graduation. Prior to internship, students can have no more than five (5) courses remaining from the following courses, only one ( 1) of which can be taken with the final internship: EDF 4430, EEX 4070, EME 4402, ARE 4313, HLP 4722 and MUE 4210 Part-time students (students to take 9 hours or less per semester) must participate in a modified program schedule and plan to meet internship requirements associated with the pro grams These requirements include being available to participate in the internships during regular school hours as specified in the modified program Internships The Elementary and Elementary-Early Childhood preservice teacher education programs require all students to complete a sequence of internship courses beginning with the student's first semester of program enrollment. The sequence of internships for the Elementary and Elementary-Early Childhood Certification Program is as follows: First Semester EDE 4941-Childhood Education of Program Enrollment Internship Level I Fourth Semester of Enrollment or Consent of Department Chairperson Full-Day Internship (4 semester hours) EDE 4942-Childhood Education Internship Level II (6 semester hours) EDE 4940-lnternship (10 semester hours) EDE 4936-Senior Seminar (2 semester hours) (Total 22 semester hours) ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Requirements for the B.S. Degree (EDE): General distribution and Professional Education requirements are listed under Teacher Education Program The Elementary program also the following methods course in the Professional Education requirements: EDE 4301 The major consists of 32 semester hours of elementary specialization courses as follows : ARE 4313 LAE 4414 MUE 4210 RED 4310 HLP4722 MAE4310 SCE4310 RED4511 LAE 4314 MAE 4326 SSE 4313 Students are advised that the Elementary Education specializa tion will require an enrollment of more than the traditional four semesters of the junior and senior years in order to complete the program specialization courses and the required sequence of internship. ELEMENTARY/EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION* Requirements for the B.S. Degree (EEC): General Distribution and Professional Education requirements are listed under Teacher Education Program. The Elementary/Early Childhood program also includes the following methods course in the Professional Education requirements : EDE 4301 Students interested in early childhood teaching, which includes children ages 3-8, should pursue a program leading to eligib i lity for Florida certification both in early childhood and elementary educa tion (N-6).

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90 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF SOIJ7H FLORIDA 1'1!11/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The major consists of 42 semester hours of Elementary/Child-hood Education specialization courses as follows: ARE 4313 HLP 4722 MUE 4210 RED 4310 EEC 4203 LAE 4414 SCE 4310 RED 4511 EEC 4303 MAE 4310 SSE 4313 EEC 4706 MAE 4326 Students are advised that the Elementary/Early Childhood spe cialization will require an enrollment of more than the traditional four semesters of the junior and senior year in order to complete the program specialization courses and the required sequences of internships *Due to changes in the State s teacher cert i fication requirements, students are not currently be i ng admitted to this program Department of Secondary Education General Distribution and Professional Education requirements are listed under Teacher Education Program. The following programs are housed in the Department of Secondary Education : Art Education English Education Foreign Language Education Mathematics Education Science Education Social Science Education The undergraduate programs are designed to prepare students to meet Florida teacher certification requirements and to become highly competent secondary teachers Specialized courses in the teaching of mathematics, science, and social science are also offered for students majoring in elementary, early childhood, and special education Internship Program The Department of Secondary Education in ternship is offered in the fall and spring terms ART EDUCATION (ARE): Requirements for the B.S. Degree At the time of application to upper level, each Art Education student must submit slides or portfolio to the head of the depart ment. To assist transfer students in selection of courses, they must submit work prior to or during registration After completing studio requirements for state certification each student may elect to emphasize painting, sculpture, graphics, ce ramics, or photography/cinematography for the remaining studio electives In addition to the general distribution and professional educa tion requirements, the following courses constitute a program of study: Art Education (7 5 credit hours) ARE 3044 ARE 4443 ARE 3354 ARE 4440 ARE 4642 In these courses students will have the opportunity to work at the elementary school and high school levels Specialization (36 er. hours) ART 2202C ART 31 10C ART 3510C ART 2203C ART 3701 C ARH 4450 One of the following: ART 3420C or ART 3470C ART Studio Electives approved by adviser ART History Elective Plus the following : Two hours from either Music or Dance curricula or from the Theater Department, and one aesthetics or one art criticism course ENGLISH EDUCATION (ENE): General Distribution and Professional Education requirements are listed under Teacher Education Program 1. ENGLISH: A minimum of 39 semester hours, including : CRW 2100, ENC 3310, and LAE 4464 One of the following: EDG 4320 or MMC 3602 One of the following: ENG 3105 or LIT 3073 One of the following : ENL 3331 or ENL 3332 Qne of the following: LIN 4340 or LIN 4370 One of the following: ORI 3000 or SPC 2023 One of the following : ENL3015, One of the following : LIT 3101, LIT 3102, or LIT 3144 One of the following : LIN 3010, LIN 3801, or ENG 4060/5067 Two of the following : AML 3031, AML 3032, or AML 3051 2. ENGLISH EDUCATION: Nine semester hours in methods of teaching English at the middle and secondary levels : LAE 4325, LAE 4530, and LAE 4642. LAE 4530 must be taken concurrently with one of the other methods courses, the fall or spring immediately preceding internship . FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION (FLS): General Distribution and Professional Education requirements are listed under Teacher Education Program A minimum of 30 credit hours beyond intermediate course requirements must be earned in the foreign language Programs are available for Spanish, French and German. 1 Foreign language {30 credit hours) grammar, conversation, composition 12 literature 6 culture and civilization 6 linguistics 3 language elective 3 2. Foreign Language Education 9 credit hours in methods of teaching a language at the elementary and secondary levels, including a practicum Fall Term : FLE 4314 (elementary) Spring Term : FLE 4333 (secondary) and FLE 4334 (practicum) MATHEMATICS EDUCATION (MAE): Admission Requirements: In addition to the Coilege require ments, students must complete MAC 3311 or an equivalent course. General Distribution and Professional Education requirements are listed under Teacher Education Program 1 Mathematics: 38 semester hours in mathematics above the 2000 level. Required courses are: MAC 3311 MAD 3100 MAC 3312 MAS 3103 MAC 3313 MAS 4301 CGS 3422 MAS 5215 2 Mathematics Education: MHF 5405 MTG 4212 STA 3023 Eleven hours in teaching mathematics at the secondary level. Required courses are: MAE 4320 MAE 4551 MAE 4330 CGS 4010 SCIENCE EDUCATION (NSB, NSC, NSPl: Admission requirements: General Distribution and Profes sional Education requirements are listed under Teacher Education Program. In addition to the College requirements, the minimum requirement for acceptance into a program is the completion of 16 semester hours of required science courses Course Requirements: 1 SCIENCE: A minimum of 32 semester hours in the discipline of major con centration (Biology, Chemistry, or Physics) minimum of 16 semester hours within the natural sciences outside the concentration area



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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 91 UNIVERSITY Of SOUTH FLORIDA 1!192/93 UNDERGRADU,ATE CATALOG 2. SCIENCE EDUCATION: As a minimum, satisfactory completion of the following courses: PHI 3404, SCE 4305, SCE 4320, and SCE 4330 These courses deal with philosophy of science, communication skills and the teaching of science at the middle grades and secondary school levels In addition, a Physics major will need a three credit hour course in computer applications in science. SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION (SSE): General Distribution and Professional Education requirements are listed under Teacher Education Program. Course Requirements: 1. SOCIAL SCIENCE: A minimum of 40 semester hours, including : ECO 2023 GEO 3014 EUH 2030 ECO 2013 AMH 2010 EUH 2031 GEO 3013 AMH 2020 POS 2041 One of the following : AFH 3100 or LAH 3200 One of the following: POS 2112 POS 4165 POS 3142 INR 3002 One of the following: SYG 3010 SYO 3500 SYP 5405 SYP 3000 SYD 4410 2 SOCIAL spENCE EDUCATION: Eight semester hours in methods of teaching and communica tion skills in Social Studies : SSE 4333, SSE 4334, and SSE 4640. Department of Educational Measurement and Research The Department of Educational Measurement and Research pro vides support services for undergraduate programs. Students in all programs are required to take EDF 4430, Measurement for Teachers. This course develops skills and understandings related to test construction, reporting student progress, test score interpretation, measurement characteristics, and measurement as an information resource Department of Music Education MUSIC EDUCATION (MUE): The music education curriculum is designed to serve students who wish to develop a high level of musical expertise and have a commitment to help develop similar musical potential in other people All students seeking a degree in music education are required to pass an audition in their respective performance area and to take a music theory placement test prior to registering for any music theory class. Students who do not pass the diagnostic test will be placed in a music fundamentals course This course does not fulfill a requirement in the music major curriculum All transfer students are required to take a theory placement test and requifed to enter at the appropriate level. Students may obtain the dates for these examinations from the music office Special requirements for all music education majors : successful completion of the piano proficiency requirements as defined by the music and music education faculties; participation in a major per forming ensemble each semester the student is enrolled in applied music; and the presentation of a hour recital in the major performing medium during the last semester of enrollment in applied music Students are to present a record of satisfactory recital atten dance during each of the semesters of study at the University (the specific requirements for satisfactory attendance are set by the music faculty), For other degree requirements see College of Education require ments and the University's General Distribution and graduation re quirements. Note exceptions applicable to this program 1. Instrumental Specialization (72 er. hrs.) Music Education courses (20 hrs.) MUE 2090 (2) MUE 3450 (1)* MUE 4311 (3) MUE 3421 (1) MUE 3451 (1) MUE 4321 (2) -MUE 3422 (1) MUE 3460 (1 )** MUE 4332 (3) MUE 3423 (1) MUE 3461 (1) MUE 4480 (2) One hour courses must be repeated to achieve 20 er. hrs. *Not required of woodwind majors **Not required of brass majors Music Courses (min. 52 er. hrs.) MUT 1111 (3) MUT 2117 (3) MUT 1112 (3) MUT 2246 (1) MUT 1241 (1) MUT 2247 (1) MUT 1242 (1) MUL 2111 (3) MUT 2116 (3) MUH 3300 (2) MUH 3301 (3) MUH 3302 (3) MUG 3101 (2) Applied Music (Principal) 12 er. hrs with a minimum of 4 hours at the 3000 level and concurrent registration in MUS 3001 (Recital Attendance) Music electives (2) Applied Music Secondary (Techniques 3 er. hrs. ) (One each: string, percussion, voice) Major performing ensembles (Minimum of one per semester of applied music -6 er. hrs. ) Graduating recital Piano proficiency requirement Other Fine Arts Requirements Art, Dance, Theatre (min. 3 er. hrs. to be selected from one or more of the other departments in the College of Fine Arts) 2 Vocal Specialization (72 er. hrs ) Music Education courses (16 er. hrs.) MUE 2090 (2) MUE 3421 (1) MUE' 3422 (1) MUE 3423 (1) MUE 3450(1)* or MUE 3451(1)* MUE 3460(1)* or MUE 3461(1)* MUE 4311 (3) MUE 4352 (2) MUE 4331(3)** One hour courses must be repeated to achieve 16 er. hrs. *As determined by audition. Music courses (min. 56 er. hrs.) MUT 1111 (3) MUT 2116 (3) MUT 1112 (3) MUT 2117 (3) MUT 1241 (1) MUT 2246 (1) MUT 1242 (1) MUT 2247 (1) MUL2111 (3) MUH 3300 (2) MUH 3301 (3) MUH 3302 (3) MUG 3101 (2) Applied Music (Pri ncipal) 12 er. hrs. with a minimum of 4 hours at the 3000 level and concurrent registration in MUS 3001 (Re<:ital Attendance) . Applied Music Secondary Techniques (2 er. hrs.) (one each: string, percussion) Major Ensembles (Minimum of one per semester of applied music 6 er. hrs. ) Music Electives (7) Piano proficiency requirement Graduating recital Other Fine Arts Requirement Art, Dance, Theatre (min 3 er. hrs to be selected from one or more of the other departments in the College of Fine Arts) 3. General Music Specialization (72 er. hrs. ) Music Education courses (16 er. hrs.) MUE 3460(1)* or MUE 3461(1)* MUE 3450(1)* or MUE 3451(1)* MUE 2090(2) MUE 4352(2) MUE 4321(2) MUE 4311(3) MUE 3422(1) MUE 3423(1) MUE 4330(3) One-hour courses must be repeated. to achieve 16 er. hrs. *As determined by audition Music Courses (min. 56 er. hrs.) MUT 1111(3) MUT 2116(3) MUT 1112(3) MUT 2117(3) MUT 1241 (1) MUT 2246(1) MUT 1242(1) MUT 2247(1) MUG 3101(2) MUL 2111(3) MUH 3300(2) MUH 3301(3) MUH 3302(3) Applied Music (Principal) 12 er: hrs. with a minimum of 4 hours at the 3000 level and concurrent registration in MUS 3001 (Recital

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92 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1"1/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Attendance) Applied Music Secondary Techniques (2 er. hrs.) (one each : string, percussion) Major Ensembles (minimum of one per semester of applied music.Q er. hrs ) Music electives (7) Piano proficiency requirement Graduating recital Other Fine Arts requirements Art, Dance, Theatre (min 3 er. hrs to be selected from one or more of the other departments in the College of Fine Arts) Department of Physical Education The Department of Physical Education teaches a variety of Elec tive Physical Education courses and conducts a Professional Physical Education Teacher Preparation K-8 and 6-12 Programs and a Well ness Leadership Program ELECTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM Elective Physical Education offerings in the College of Educat i on are designed to provide opportunities for all students in the University to develop desired skills and insight into the role physical activity plays i n their lives Laboratory experiences in recognized sports activities allow students to select and develop proficiency appropriate for leisure pursuit and personal development. Human movement courses expand personal awareness of the effect of physical act i vity through examination of the interaction between the needs and abilities of the person and the of the activity Special competency courses prepare interested students with skifls and techn i ques applicable for conducting or direct i ng community activities related to sport and movement. PROFESSIONAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM Students must choose one of the following programs : a) Physical Education Grades K-8 (Florida Teacher Certification); b) Physical Education Grades 6-12 (Florida Teacher Certification); or c) Wellness Leadership (Non-certification) Requirements for the B.S. Degree {PTE/PTS/PTW) The two-year program is offered beginning in the junior year and includes mandatory attendance during the summer session between the junior and senior years In order to be admitted to the Program all students must participate in a selective admissions procedure. Enrollment in the Program is limited and students only enter during Semester I of each year In addit i on to applying to the University, all students must apply directly to the Department before May 1 for pr i ority admission con sideration Students applying after May 1, and before the final deadline of June 1, will be accepted only on a space-available basis. Requests for admission to the Program should be directed to: Chairperson Department of Physical Education College of Education University of South Florida 4202 E Fowler, PED 214 Tampa, Florida 33620-8600 Course Requirements: 1 PROGRAM PREREQUISITES FOR ALL TRACKS: APB 3190 Human Anatomy & Physiology HSC 2400 First Aid 2 CORE COURSES FOR ALL TRACKS: EME4402 Introduction To Computers In Education PEQ 3101 Aquatics PET 3012 Personal/Professional Development Seminar PET 3310 Kinesiology PET 3351 Exercise I PET 3422 Instructional Design & Content: Movement Experiences PET 4622 Care & Prevention of Physical Injuries 3. ADDITIONAL REQUIRED COURSES FOR TRACK: (PTE) EDF 3122 Learning & The Developing Chi ld EDF 4430 Measurement for Teachers EDF 3604 Social Foundat i ons of Education PET 3031 Motor Development & Assessment PET 3421 Curriculum and Instruction in Physical Education PET 3441 Instructional Design & Content : Middle School PET 3640 PET 3799 PET 3943 PET 4141 PET 4401 Physical Education Adapted Physical Education Career Decision Making & Professional Ethics Physical Education Internship : Middle School Trends & Tasks: Elementary Physical Education Organization and Administration of Physical Educa tion Programs PET 4432 Instructional Design & Content : Physical Education Elementary PET 4433 Instructional Design & Content: Physical Education Elementary II PET 4934 Senior Seminar in Elementary Physical Education PET 4942 Physical Education Internship : Elementary PET 4946 Associate Teaching Physical Education : 4 ADDITIONAL REQUIRED COURSES FOR (PTS} EDF 3604 Social Foundations of Education EDF 4430 Measurement for Teachers EDF 4131 Learning and the Developing Adolescent PET 3031 Motor Development & Assessment PET 3421 Curriculum and Instruction in Physical Educati on PET 3441 Instructional Design & Content: Middle School Physical Education PET 3640 Adapted Physical Education PET 3799 Career Decision Making & Professional Ethics PET 3943 Physical Education Internship : Middle School PET 4142 Trends & Tasks: Secondary Physical Education PET 4304 Principles & Issues in Coaching PET 4401 Organization & Administration of Physical Educa-tion Programs PET 4442 Instructional Design & Content: Physical Education Secondary PET 4443 Instruction Design & Content: Physical Education Secondary II PET 4933 Senior Seminar in Secondary Physical Education PET 4944 Physical Education Internship : Secondary PET 4947 Associate Teaching Physical Education : Secondary 5 ADDITIONAL COURSES REQUIRED FOR WELLNESS LEADER SHIP TRACK: (PTW) ADE 4384 Working with the Adult Learner GEY 3601 Behavior Change in Later Life HUN3201 Nutrition PEP 3940 Practicum in Health Promotion/Wellness PEP 3951 Communication Skills for Wellness Leaders PEP 4941 Wellness Internship PEQ 3170 Aquatic Exercise PET 3080 Survey of Wellness Programs PET 4404 Organ i zation & Administration of Wellness Pro-grams PET 4353 Exercise Physiology II PET 4384 Health Fitness Appraisal & Exercise Prescription In addition to the above courses, students in the Wellness Lead ership Track are required to take a minimum of eight hours (or 4 courses) of the following elective courses which are activity courses related specifically to those found in Wellness Programs These courses can be taken any time during the two years PEL 1341 Tennis I PEL 2441 Racketball PEM 2131 Weight Training PEM 2441 Karate PEM 2930 Jogg i ng PEM 2930 Advanced Jogging PEM 2930 Aerobic Dance

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 93 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1!1'J2/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Cycling Str & Aer Dev Swim Aerobics Triathlon Aquat i c Fitness Swimming I Life Saving Swi mming II PEM2930 PEM 2930 PEM2930 PEM2930 PEM2930 PEN 1121 PEN 2113 PEN 2172 PET 3931 Teaching Aerobic Dance/Exercise Department of Psychological and Social Foundations of Education The Department of Psychological and Social Foundations of Edu cation provides courses for all students majoring in the wide array of undergraduate programs available in the College of Education These courses contribute to the students' understanding of the general education enterpfises and are considered foundational to later professional specialization EDF 3122 EDF 3604 EDF 4909 IDS 3115 EDF 3214 EDF 3810 EDF 5136 EDF 3228 EDF 4131 EDF 5285 EDF 3542 EDF 4905 EDF 5672 Department of Special Education The Department of Special Education prepares teachers to work with child ren who have emotional and behavioral disabilit ies, mental retardation, and speci fic learning disabilities The under graduate program is a State-approved program that leads to certif i cat i on in one of the three areas. Students are required to meet University and College of Educa tion entrance requirements prior to enrollment in the Department. Upon admission, students affiliate w i th the campus on which they wish to take their program of studies. Students may not register for courses on other campuses without permission. On the Tampa Campus, students are assigned to teams and a faculty advisor All courses are taken with the assi gned team Since no teams start in the summer there are no summer admissions Thi s sequence includes three semesters of part-time field experience and one semester of full-day internship. All part time field experiences must be successfully completed as a member of a team concurrently with specified course in designated local schools under the supervision of a faculty member Field exper iences beg i n during the second semester of a student's enrollment. Students are responsible for providing transportation to the i r experience sites In some instances students may pursue a part-time pro\:!ram (9 hours or less a semester) This requires that students be available to participate in field experiences and concurrent classes during regular school hours Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities (EH Certification) Students seeking the B S degree with certification in EH are required to take the following courses : EED 4011 EEX 4221 EED 4941 EEX 4232 EEX 3010 EEX 4232 One of the following : ARE 4313 MUE 4210 SSE 4313 Two of the following : EEC 4706 LAE 4314 RED 4511 SPA 4000 EEX 4604 MAE 4310 RED 4310 SCE 4310 LAE 4414 Mental Retardation (MR Certification) Students seeking the B S degree with certification in MR are required to. take the following courses : EEX 3010 EEX 4243 EEX 4221 EEX 4604 EEX 4232 EMR 4011 One of the following : ARE 4313 MUE 4210 SSE 4313 EMR 4941 MAE 4310 RED 4310 SCE 4310 Two of the following : EEC 4706 LAE 4314 LAE 4414 RED 4511 SPA 4000 Specific Leamin9 Disabilities (LO Certification) Students seeking the B. S. cfegree with certification in LD are required to take the following courses: EEX 3010 EEX 4243 EEX 4221 EEX 4604 EEX 4232 ELD 4011 One of the following: ARE 4313 MUE 4210 SSE 4313 Two of the following : EEC 4706 LAE 4314 RED 4511 SPA 4000 .ii. ELD 4941 MAE 4310 RED 4310 SCE 4310 LAE 4414 Student Organizations and Activities College of Education Student Council The College of Education Student Council represents the inter ests of education majors in regard to policies and needs of the college The <;:ouncil leadership team consists of five officers (Presi dent, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Historian) and nine Student Government Senators. Elections are held annually in No vember and all education majors are eligible to vote for all officers C.E.S.C. activities enhance members' professional skills, commu nication skills and organization skills. Any student majoring in education with a minimum GPA of 2.0, is eligible to participate in C.E.S.C. Childhood Education Organization The Association for Childhood Education is a non-profit profes sional organization concerned with the education and well-being of children two to twelve years of age Members are located through out the United States The USF chapter works directly with children through observa tion, projects, and programs In addition, it provides opportunity for students to attend study conferences throughout the state of Florida which allows the student an opportunity for professional growth and exchange of professional ideas. Membership is open to all students, including freshmen, concerned with children two to twelve years old. Student Council for Exceptional Children The Student Council for Exceptional Children is an organization of those members of the University interested in the education of the exceptional child. Various exceptionalities included are Gifted, Emotionally Disturbed, Physically Handicapped, Mentally Retarded, and Culturally Different. Activities of the USF Chapter include field trips to various special educational facilities, prominent speakers, state and national conventions, and social events The specific activities are determined by the members and the exceptionalities in which they are interested. All interested students are invited to join. Student Music Educators National Conference Student Music Educators Conference is an affiliate of the Music Educators National Conference and the Florida Music Educators As sociation It is devoted to the furtherance of knowledge and understanding of music education on all levels Membership is open to any student in the Univers i ty of South Florida who is interested in the teaching of music National Education Association Student Program The National Education Association student program is desi9ned to provide professional growth opportunities, leadership training and membership benefits that are available to other members of the National Education Association, including S 1 million liability insur ance coverage while engaged in student teaching internship. Membership is open to all students

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 94 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 199213 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Phi Beta lambda Phi Beta Lambda is a business fraternity open to all students including freshmen, expressing an interest in Business. The empha sis is on promoting free enterprise and instilling leadership qualities Kappa Delta Pi Kappa Delta Pi_ is an international honor society in Education. The society was founded to recognize and encourage excellence in scholarship, high personal standards, improvement in teacher preparation, and distinction in achievement. Physical Education Association (PEA) The Physical Education Association .(PEA) is open to all students enrolled in the Physical Education Program. Social and professional meetings are conducted throughout the year to promote interac tion within the organization Mathematics Education Club The role of this organization shall be to provide an informative and supportive environment for all members, encourage scholar ship, and provide a helpful atmosphere for students progressing through the Mathematics Education program Membership shall be available to any student in good standing who expresses interest in the Mathematics Education program at the University of South Florida. Association for library and Information Students This is a professional organization associated with the Library Media, and Information Studies Department and ls open to all members of the university community interested in librarianship The USF group provides programs and guest speakers of interest to the campus community and publishes a newsletter for its members It is the official voice of students in the department and members of the association are included on faculty-student commit tees within the department. Delta Epsilon Chi of America (DECA) The College Chapter of DECA is an integral part of the Distribu tive and Marketing Education and Marketing Teacher Preparation Program at the University of South.Florida and provides Distributive Education majors with leadership opportunities, social experience, learning activities and professional involvement The participation in the activities of Collegiate DECA is required of undergraduate majors and is encouraged for graduate students. Minority Organization of Students in Education The Minority Organization of Students in Education is organized to provide students with experiences that will facilitate the educa tional and professional growth of its members. This is achieved by enriching the students' experiences, informing them of various opportunities and involving them in activities. Guest speakers are invited to meetings to discuss topics which are of interest to the members Resource people are used to inform students of employ ment and graduate school opportunities Members of M.O S E sponsor and participate in community service programs. Science Education Association {SEA) The Science Education Association provides a supportive envi ronment for students majoring in science education, although m embership is open to anyone interested in science. SEA plans field tnps, guest speakers, and the compiling of a classroom science activities file for education majors

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY Of SOUTH R.ORIDA 1992(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG The College of Engineering offers undergraduate and graduate design or research. However, while the baccalaureate degree is programs to prepare students for a broad spectrum of professional considered the minimum educational experience for participating in careers in engineering The undergraduate programs of the College the Engineering profession, and as such is the first professional are designed to provide students with a sense of human values and degree, students interested in design and research are strongly the scientific/technical foundation necessary for a lifetime of continencouraged to pursue advanced work beyond the baccalaureate ued learning. either at this or other institutions It is becoming increasingly evident The programs offered by the College of Engineering to meet the that a large segment of today's engineering professionals are diverse requirements of the future cover three areas: Professional involved in some form of post baccalaureate study Engineers are Engineering, Applied Science, and Technology The specific deearning advanced degrees to obtain the information and training grees and services offered are as follows necessary to meet effectively tomorrow's technological challenges. Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering (B. S .Ch.E.) All are faced w ith the continuing problem of refurbishing and Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering (B. S .C.E.) updating their information skills and most are obtaining advanced Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering (B.S.Cp.E.) information by means of formal graduate study, seminars, special Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (B.S. E .E.) institutes and other such systems designed for this purpose. Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B. S E ) The Bachelor of Science degree program (in a designated engi(various options available including General Engineering) neering field requires 136 semester hours) and the Master of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering (B.S.l.E. ) Science degree in the same field may be pursued simultaneously in Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (B.S. M E ) a program of 166 semester hours called the 5-Year Program These Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (B.S.C.S. ) programs are specifically designed to prepare an individual for a Bachelor of Science in Information Systems (B. S .l.S. ) professional career as an engineer These programs have as their Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science (B. S E S ) foundation a core of subject material encompassing Humanities, (various options available) Social Science, Mathematics, Science, and Engineering which is Bachelor of Engineering Technology (B.E.T. ) required of all students In addition to the core subject material, [Discontinued August 1994) each student will complete specialization studies in a designated The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. field under the direction of one of the administrative departments (ABET), formerly the Engineers' Council for Professional Developof the College ment, has inspected and accredited the curricula of the College of The engineering programs of the College have been developed Engineering defined by the Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineer-with an emphasis on three broad aspects of engineering activity : ing, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Engidesign, research, and the operation of complex technological neering and Mechanical Engineering The Bachelor of Science systems. Students who are interested in advanced design or program in Computer Science is accredited by the Computer research should pursue the 5-Year Program leading to a Master of Science Accreditation Commission (CSAC) of the Computing Sci-Science in Engineering degree Other students interested more in ences Accreditation Board (CSAB), a specialized accreditin$J body operational responsibilities may wish to terminate their initial recognized by the Council on Post-secondary Accreditation (COPA) engineering education at the baccalaureate level. and the U S Department of Education The above spectrum of program offerings provides the prospec tive student with a choice of avenues depending upon individual interests, career objectives, and capabilities for a significant techno logical contribution These programs are described in more detail under their respective catalog headings Laboratory experience as well as real-world participation in techproblem-solving is a key aspect of a professional engi neers college education The College of Engineering, in implement ing this need, augments its own modern laboratory and research facilities by close contact with the professional societies and the many industries in the metropolitan Tampa Bay area Students interested in particular programs offered by the College of Engineering should direct their inquiries to the College of Engineering marked for the attention of the following : Area of Interest Contact Engineering Professional Programs, Specific Department or Engineering Science, Computer Advising Office Science, Information Systems Engineering Technology Computer Service Courses Advising Office Department of Computer Science & Engineering PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING The College of Engineering recognizes that modern engineering sblutions draw on knowledge of several branches of engineering It also recognizes that future technological and societal develop ments will lead to shifting of the relative emphasis on various branches of engineering, triggered by new needs or a reassessment of national goals For this reason the College's programs include a strong engineering foundation (core) portion, designed to equip the prospective engineer with a broad base of fundamental technical knowledge To this foundation is added the student's specializa tion (option) of suffi<:ient depth to prepare him/her to successfully embark on a professional career The Bachelor of Science degrees offered in various engineering fields provide the student a broad education with sufficient technical background to effectively contribute in many phases of engi neering not requiring the depth of knowledge needed for advanced Preparation for Engineering Students planning to attend USF's Colrege of Engineering should familiarize themselves thoroughly w ith the College's admissions standards and requirements, which are more stringent than the University s minimum entrance requirements. The high school student anticipating a career in engineering should elect the strongest academic program that is available while in high school. Four years each of English, mathematics and science (preferably including Chemistry and Physics), as well as full pro grams in the social sciences and humanities, are most important to success in any engineering college Prospective students cons i dering engineering at the University of South Florida who lack certain preparation in high school must elect to follow a program to overcome their deficiencies. One alter native might be that such a student take some remedial work and a less accelerated program as a Pre-Engineering student. As another alternative, students may wish to avail themselves of the State's system of junior/community colleges which offer a wide range of remedial coursework, and many of which also offer full programs in pre-engineering (first two years' coursework) The University of South Florida generally offers most required pre-engineering courses every semester Junior/community college students planning to transfer to the University of South Florida's engineering program at the junior level from a State of Florida operated college or university should follow a pre-engineering program leading to an A.A. degree. All transfer students should complete as much of the mathematics, science and engineering core coursework as is available to them. Transfer students should be aware that the College expects them to meet its admission requirements listed in this section under college regula tions for graduation just as it expects its own students to meet these requirements Junior/community college transfer students should note that in addition to freshman and sophomore level courses, required junior level courses are given each semester thus permit ting full continuity in studies for the student Junior/community college students intending to pursue an engineering program at USF should contact the adviser at their institution and request a course equivalency list.

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96 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING UNIVEllSll'Y Of SOUTH FLORIDA 1"2a3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG it is not mandatory, the College strongly recommends acqu1s1t1on or personal access to a personal computer. For further deta .ils, contact the Associate Dean of Engineering Computing Services. The S:ollege of can assist students yvho are planning to obtain an Engineering degree from the University of South Florida and who have started their studies elsewhere in formulating a sound total program. Interested students should contact the College's Advising Office (813/974-2684) furnishing sufficient details to permit meaningful response Undergraduate Admission to the College Students may apply to the College of Engineering upon initial entry to the University by declaring Engineering as their intended major. A USF student may apply through the Advising Office in the College of Engineering. To be considered for admission to the College of Engineering, an applicant must be by the University as a degree-seeking student and be academically in good standing. Admission proce dures and requirements are listed below Procedures for Applying to the College 1 S tudents complete and submit an Engineering Admis sions Application to the College of Engineering, Advising Office. a. Freshmen and Sophomores must submit copies of high school transcripts, SAT or ACT test scores to the College of Engineering, Advising Office This is in addition to records re quested by the University's Admissions Office. b Transfer must furnish transcripts from previously the Colleg.e of Engineering, Advising Office. This 1s in add1t1on to transcripts sent to the University's Admissions Office. c. whose native language is other than English must submit TOEFL scores to the College of Engineering. The mini mum TOEFL score must be 550 2. Credentials must be received in the Engineering Advising Office 30 prior to of_ applica ble term. Failure to comply will in the application being denied by the College of Engineer ing 3 will be held one year. If application is not updated within that year, credentials must be re-submitted Engineering Admission Requirements 1. Freshmen : a. Test Scores: SAT-composite of 1050 minimum with a minimum quantita tive of 550 ACT-composite of 25 minimum and mathematics of 25 mini mum. b High School Mathematics : Should include sufficient algebra and trigonometry to enter Engineering Calculus I. Math Placement Test must be passed to enter Calculus I. c. High School Grade Point Average of 2.5/4. 0 2 Transfer Students: Transfer students must have completed the equivalent U S .F. Engineering Calculus sequence with a 2.5 GPA; must have com pleted one year of equivalent U S .F. General Physics and Chem istry courses with a minimum of 2 5 GPA; must have an overall GPA of 2.5 or better Grades of o in these courses are not ac-cepted by the College of Engineering Admission to Programs in Engineering Once a student has been admitted to the College of Engineering, he/she must then seek admission into one of the specific depart ments are two methods by which a student may be admitted to a particular der;>artment: (1) Regular Depa rtmental Admission (RDA), and (2) Direct Departmental Adm1ss1on (ODA). Each is described below Admission to the College of Engineering does not imply that the has been accepted as a de9ree-seeking student by a specific Engineering department. Due to limited facilities and resources it is necessary for students to apply formally for acceptance by a specific Engineering department. for acceptance by the departments admin1sterin9 the Engin eering programs in Chemical, Civil, Com puter, Industrial and Mechanical Engineering are: 1 Completion of English, Calculus, Differential Equations, Physics and Chemistry requirements with a grade of 'C' or better in each required course. 2. Satisfact?ry completion of EGN 1002 Engineering Orientation. 3
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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 97 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA fll!l2al UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG nated adviser in the College of Engineer i ng New students must attend the University's Orientation program. They are assigned an engineering adviser during this program and receive advisement for their first semester at that time The student and adviser jointly work out a plan of study which meets both the student's career object ives and the College of Engineering's degree requirements The advisers maintain the College of Engineering's student records While the College provides advising services to assist students with academic planning, the responsibility for seeing that all graduation requtrements are met rests with the students A copy of the Student Academic Support System (SASS) report may be had upon request. *The Col"'9e of Enginttri"ll requ i res all undergraduates to apply for graduation the semester p nor to the antocipated graduation term Necessary forms and inst ructions can be obtained in the Advising Office Departments & Programs The supervision of the academic programs for the College is the function of the six administrative departments together with several coordinators. The departments are responsible for the professional programs in engineering and engineering science. Each depart ment is responsible for programs, faculty laborator ies and students assigned to i t Chemical Engineering This department offers coursework and study in all areas funda mental to Chemical Engineering Top ics included are thermodynam ics, fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, separation processes, chemical reactors, instrumentation and process control, economics optimi zation, computer methods, computer aided design t!ech niques, and process plant design These courses, together with mathematics, physics, chemistry, other interdisciplinary engineer ing fundamentals, Engl ish, and l i beral arts courses, provide the basis for long range professional progress Because of the many profes sional areas available for employment to the chemical eng i neer, the students are also required to take a number of electives from areas such as b i otechnology, materials, and environmental engineering. These electives are designed to broaden the experience, and, therefore, the employment possibilities of our graduates The department administers the Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engi neering (B. S .Ch.E.), the Master of Science in Chemical Engineering (M.S .Ch.E.), the Master of Engi neering (M. E .), and the Doctor of Philosophy in Chemical Engineering (Ph. D ) degrees The Chem i cal Engineering Department also offers a sequence of courses in biotechnology and biomedical en9ineering B i otechnol ogy is largely involved in the utilization of living organisms to prod\JCe or eliminate a variety of products (e g pharmaceuticals, food, and fertilizers) Biotechnology And Biomedical Engineering A sequence of courses in the engineering aspects of biotechnol ogy is currently available within the Chemical Engineering program Topics include applied microbiology, fermentation, enzyme tech nology, and pharmaceutical engineer i ng Biomedical Engineering is a highly interdiscipl i nary program, drawing from all engineering disciplines, biology, physical sciences, biomedical and clinical sciences. An undergraduate Certificate in Biomedical Engineering is available to students in all areas of engineering This Certificate is designed w ith two main obl ectives: 1) to prepare interested students for admission into medica school, and 2) to prepare students for graduate work in either Biomedical Engineering, other engineering d i scipl i nes, or the Biomedical Sci ences Opportunities for students to gain research experience exist within the College of Engineering and the Health Sciences Center Please contact the Chemical Engineering Department for more information on these programs. Civil Engineering and Mechanics This department offers coursework and study pertinent to Civil Engineering, Engineering Mechanics, Materials Science, and Environmental Engineering. Topics included are structural analysis, design and optimization; metals, polymers, ceramics; solid and fluid mechanics, stress analysis, vibrations, continuum mechanics, finite techni9ues, methods; geotechnical engineer ing; transportation engineering; water resources engineering, envi ronmental engineering, and coastal engineering. The department administers the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering (B.S.C.E.) and has a policy of mandatory academic advising of students for each 5chool term. It also administers the Master of Science in Civil Engineering (M. S .C.E. ) program, and a design oriented professional engineering Master of Civ i l Engineering (M.C.E. ) program. These Master's programs can be completed with all evening coursework As applicable, the department administers the M.S .C.E., M .S.E., M .C.E., M.E., M S E .S. and the Ph.D. in Civil Engineering programs. 'The Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics has a policy of mandatory academic advising of students for each school term. Computer Science and Engineering This department offers coursework and study in all areas funda mental to Computer Science, Computer Engineering, and Informa tion Systems Topics dealt with are computer architecture and hardware design, software engineering, computer system organi zation, operating systems, algorithms and data structures com puter graphics, user interface, database systems, theory of tation and artificial intelligence The Department administers the baccalaureate degree pro grams in Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Informa tion Systems; the Master of Science degree programs in Computer Science and in Computer Engineering; and Ph.D. program in Computer Science and Engineering. Our research areas of faculty concentration are 1) computer architecture and VLSI design/ testing, 2) artificial intelligence and expert systems, 3) software en gineering, and 4) graphics/image processing/computer vision Computing facilities available to students in the Department include several microprocessors and design laboratories for hard ware-oriented studies, several personal computer laboratories for general use in programming assignments, and a substantial num ber of graphics-oriented personal computers. The Department also runs a research-or i ented network c;onsisting of Intel Hypercube, Tl Explorer, a number of AT&T 3B2 machines a number of SUN work and special purpose image and graphics processors In add1t1on, the Department has access to a large IBM mainframe facility run by the University Computing Center. Electrical Engineering Thi s department offers study in all areas fundamental to Electrical Engineering and the electrical circuit analysis and design, electronics, communications, electromagnetics, controls, solid state, systems analysis, digital circuit design, etc. Basic con cepts are augmented with laboratories in networks, electronics digital systems, electromechanics, microwave tech niques and communications In addition, a general purpose com puter facility, a microprocessor laboratory and a microelectronics fabrication laboratory are available to undergraduate and graduate The department administers the Electrical Engineering option (program) of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B. S E ) degree program, the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (B. S E E ) degree program, as well as the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (M. S E E ) program which is also available to evening and offeration a variety of industria 1 systems, ranging from the analysis of public systems to the operation of manufacturing plants Topics include production planning and control, production and plant design, applied statistics, operations research, human factors and productivity, manufacturing, and automation The department has excellent laboratory facilities which support class projects and research in microcomputer applications, computer-aided manufac turing automation, and applications of robotics. The department administers the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering (B.S.l.E.) degree program, as well as the Master of Science in Industrial Engineering (M.S .l.E.), and Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering Evening

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98 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA H9la3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG and off
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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 99 UNIVERSffY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1n2qJ UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG available on request from the responsible department, or from the College's Advising Office Programs are offered in the following disciplines of Engineering : 1. General All departments of the College of Engineering offer the general option of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree This program consists of the basic engineering core of approximately 100 semester hours plus additional credits to produce a total of 136, in a designated field of specialization. This program is tailored to meet needs of students who have very specific goals and wish to deviate from a prescribed disciplinary program. Since the program is tailored for individual students a curriculum cannot be published and, therefore, it cannot be accredited Because of this it is not rec ommended for most students. Nevertheless, it can be a valuable program for students with special needs. Pre-medical students may elect this option. It accommodates up to 32 hrs of special pre-med coursework (Bi ology, Organic Chem istry, etc.) selected by student and adviser to meet normal admis sions requirements of medical schools Pre-law students find this option permits a strong technical and legal' undergraduate academic preparation. 2. Chemical Engineering Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineer ing take coursework in advanced chemistry, thermodynamics, fluids, heat, and mass transfer, separation processes, reacting systems, instrumentation, and control. Students must also satisfac torily complete a design and/ or case study as part of their program. Students in the biotechnology/biomedical option are also required to take additional courses in general biology, microbiology, and biochemistry. Special characteristics of the Chemical Engineering curriculum make it imperative that the students retain close contact with their adviser Students completing this program normally initiate their careers in process/manufacturing industries Chemical engineers are found in admin i strative, technical, and research positions in these indus tries. Main products of these industries are petrochemicals, poly mers, fibers, natural and synthetic fuels, electronic materials, fertil izers, pharmaceuticals, etc. Modern societal problems and technol ogy have required the Chemical Engineering 'know-how' to be applied in the biotechnology/biomedical and environmental areas These fields depend on the chemical engineer, among others, for solutions Chemical Engineering students are expected to have access to an IBM compatible personal computer during their last two years of study Those who do not own one will be severely disadvantaged . The schedule which follows indicates how a serious student who can devote full time to coursework can satisfy requirements in four academic years Students without a solid foundation and those who cannot devote full time to academics should plan a slower pace Bachelor's Curriculum Chemical Engineering Semester I ENC 1101 Freshman English I MAC 3281 Engineering Calculus 1 CHM 2041 General Chem. I EGN 1002 Engineering Orientation Social & Behav. Science Elective Humanities Elective Semester II ENC 1102 Freshman English II MAC 3282 Engineering Calculus II CHM 2046 General Chem II CHM 2045L Gen Chem I Lab PHY 3048 General Physics I PHY 3048L Gen Physics Lab I Humanities Elective 3 3 3 0 3 3 15 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 17 MAC 3283 MAP4302 CHM 2046L PHY 3049 PHY 3049L Suggested Summer Term Engineering Calculus Ill Differential Equations Gen Chem II Lab Gen. Physics II Gen. Physics Lab II Semester Ill EGN 3313 Statics EGN 3373 Electrical Systems I EGN 2210 FORTRAN EGN 3343 Thermodynamics I EGN 3443 Statistics Social Science Elective Semester IV EGN 4450 Intro. to Linear Systems EGN 3365 Materials EML 3303 Mee Eng Lab I ECH 3702 Instrument Systems I ECH 3023 Intro. to Process Eng Social Science Elective ECH 3264 ECH 3264 ECH 4123 CHM 3210 CHM 3210L CHM 4412 Semester V Transport Processes I Transport Processes I Lab Phase & Chemical Equilibria Organic Chemistry I Organic Chemistry I Lab Physical Chemistry Ill Semester VI ECH 4265 Transport Processes II ECH 4265 Transport Processes II Lab CHM 3211 Organic II ECH 4605C Process Eco & Opt Technical Elective Liberal Arts Elective Semester VII EMC 4314 Automatic Controls I ECH 441 5 Reacting Systems ECH 441 5 Reacting Systems Lab I EMC 4522L Chem. & Mech Lab II Technical Elective Chemistry Elective Semester VIII ECH 4615 Plant Design and Economics Technical Electives Liberal Arts Elective 3. Civil Engineering 3 3 1 3 1 11 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 2 3 3 4 3 3 18 3 0 3 4 1 3 14 3 0 4 3 3 3 16 3 3 0 2 3 4 15 3 7 2 12 Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering program take designated traditional civil engineering and engineer ing mechanics coursework in solid mechanics, stress analysis, structures, materials, hydraulics, geotechnical, transportation, and engineering analysis. This coursework is supplemented by courses in one of the following areas of concentration, plus electives. a Environmental/Water Resources courses in water treatment, waste water treatment, air pollution control and water re sources b. Geotechnical/Transportation courses in soil mechanics, foun dations, transportation, and surveying. c Materials courses in engineering materials, polymers, corrosion control and materials processes.

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100 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSfTY Of SOUTH FLORIDA 1'92a3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG d. Structural Engineering-courses in structural analysis and design, ENV 3001 Environmental Engineering composite structures, using matrix and computer techniques EGN 4420 Num Mthds of Analysis 3 2 2 Students completing this option enter careers as engineers in the EGN 4450 Intro to Linear Systems civil, structural, geotechnical, transportation and water resources, environmental, hydraulics, materials, disciplines. All of these fields share the need for knowledge in the areas of engineering mechanics, civil engineering, and materia l s science Through choice of the proper area of concentration the student has the opportunity to channel academic studies specifically towards his/her career cho ice. Civil Engineering students commence their engineering careers in either industry, in engineering consulting firms, or in public service at the federal. state or local level. Initial assignments include planning, design and implementation of water resources, transpor tation and housing systems; regional planning, design and manage ment for abatement of air, water, and solid waste pollution prob lems; design of bridges, single and multistory structures; and super vision of construct i on projects The schedule which follows indicates how a serious, well pre pared student who can devote full time to coursework can satisfy degree requirements in four academic years. Students without a solid foundation and those who cannot devote full time to academ ics should plan on a slower pace. Additional graduation requirements are 1) graduating seniors must take the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination and 2) students are allowed to graduate with one 'D' grade in Engineering courses. Bachelor's Curricula dvil Engineering Option Semester I ENC 1101 Freshman English I MAC 3281 Engr Calculus I CHM 2041 General Chemistry I EGN 1002 Engr. Orientation EGS 1113 Intro Design Graphics Approved Social Science Elective Semester II ENC 1102 Freshman English II MAC 3282 Engr. Calculus II CHM 2046 General Chemistry II CHM 2045L Gen Chemistry I Lab PHY 3048 General Physics I PHY 3048L Gen. Physics I Lab Approved Social Science Elective Semester Ill PHY 3049 General Physics II PHY 3049L Gen Physics II Lab MAC 3283 Engr Calculus Ill EGN 2210 FORTRAN for Engineers EGN 3313 Statics Approved Humanities Elective Approved Social Science Elective Semester IV MAP 4302 Differ Equations EGN 3365L Materials Engr. I EGN 3373 Intro to Elec. Sys. I EGN 3343 Thermodynamics I EGN 3443 Engr. Statistics I Approved Humanities/Social Science Elective EGN 3353C EGN 3321 EGN 3331 EGN 3331 L Semester V Basic Fluid Mech Dynamics Mechanics of Materials Mech of Materials Lab 3 3 3 0 3 3 15 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 17 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 19 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 3 3 3 1 CES 3102 CWR4202 TIE 4004 CEG 4011 CEG 4211 GLY 3830 EGN 3613 CES 4605 CES 4702 ENC 3210 Semester VI Structures I Hydraul ics Transportation Engr. I Soil Mechanics I Geotech Lab Geology for Engrs. Semester VII Engineering Economy Concepts of Steel Design Concepts of Concrete Design Technical Writing OR ENC 3213 Professional Writing C.E. Design Requirement C.E. Concentration Requirement Semester VIII CGN 3021 L C.E. Lab COM 4110 Speech for Professionals CGN 4122C Engr Contracts Specs. & Ethics C.E. Design Requirement C.E. Concentration Requirement C.E. Concentration Requirement Approved Humanities or Soc. Sci. Elective Civil Engineering Concentration Requirements 17 3 3 3 3 1 3 16 3 3 3 3 2 3 17 1 3 3 2 3 3 3 18 (A student must complete a minimum of 9 hours, with at least 2 courses from one group ) Water Resources ENV 4502 Environmental Unit Operations 3 ENV 4101 Air Pollution Control 3 CWR 4103 Water Resources Engineering 3 Geotechn i cal/Transportation CEG 4012 Soil Mechanics II TIE 4005 Transportation Engineering II SUR 3140C Engineering Land Surveying Materials EGN 4366 EMA 4324 EMA 4703 Structural CES 4141 CES 4820 Materials Engineering II Corrosion of Engineering Materials Failure Analysis & Prevention Matrix Structural Analysis Timber & Masonry Design Civil Engineering Design Requirements 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 {A student must complete a minimum of 4 hours with at least 1 course from the same area of concentration selected for 2 concen tration requirements ) Environmental/Water Resources CWR 4810 Hydraulic Design ENV 4432 Water Systems Design CGN 4914 Senior Project Geotechnical/Transportation CEG 4801 Geotechnical Design TIE 4821 Transportation Systems Design CGN 4914 Senior Project 2 2 2 2 2 2

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 101 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA f!J92/t3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Materials CGN 4851 EMA 4704 CGN 4914 Structural CES 4618 CES 4704 CGN 4914 Cement and Concrete Desi gn Selection and Applicat i on of Materials Senior Project Structural Design -Steel Structural Design-Concrete Senior Project Environmental Engineering Concentration Within Civil Engineering Semester I ENC 1101 Freshman English I MAC 3281 Engr. Calculus I CHM 2041 General Chemistry I EGS 1113 Intro to Des. Graph ics EGN 1002 Engr Orientation Approved Humanities Elect Approved Social Science Elect. Semester II ENC 1102 Freshman English II MAC 3282 Engr Calculus II CHM 2046 General Chemistry II CHM 2045L General Chemistry I Lab PHY 3048 General Physics I PHY 3048L General Physics I Lab Approved Humanities Elect MAC 3283 PHY 3049 PHY 3049L EGN 2210 EGN 3313 CHM 3200 Semester Ill Engr Calculus Ill General Physics II General Physics II Lab FORTRAN for Engineers Statics Organic Chemistry Semester IV MAP 4302 Diff Equations EGN 3343 Thermodynamics I EGN 3373 Intro to Elect. Sys. I EGN 3443 Engr Statistics I EGN 3365L Materials Engr. I Approved Human/Soc ial Science Elec. EGN 3321 EGN 3331 EGN 3331L EGN 3353C ENV 3001 PAD 3003 CES 3102 CWR 4202 ENV 4502 CEG 4011 ECH 3023 ENV 4004 CEG 4211 Semester V Dynamics Mechanics of Mater ials Mech. of Matis Lab Basic Fluid Mechan ics Environmental Engr Int ro Pub Admin Semester VI Str uctures I Hydraulics Environmental Unit Operation Soi l Mechanics I Intro to Process Engr. Env. Engr. Laboratory Geotech. Laboratory 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 0 3 2 17 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 17 3 3 1 3 3 4 17 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 3 3 1 3 3 3 16 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 17 EGN 3613 CES 4605 CES 4702 ENC 3213 ENC 3210 ENV 4552 ENV 4503 ENV 4432 Semester VII Engr Economy I Concepts of Steel Design Concepts of Concrete Design Professional Writing or Technical Writing Unit Ops. & Processes Lab Env. Unit Processes Water Systems Design Semester VIII 3 3 3 3 1 3 2 18 COM 3110 CGN 4122C ENV 4101 TIE 4004 ENV 4531 Communication for Business & the Professions 3 Engr. Contracts Specs. and Ethics 3 Air Pollution Control 3 Transportation Engr. I 3 Wastewater Systems Design 2 17 4. Computer Science and Engineering Two undergraduate prog rams are offered within Computer Sci ence and Engineering They are : the Computer Engineering pro gram (leading to a Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering) and the Computer Science program (leading to a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science) The Computer Engineering program emphasizes the design and utilization of computers and has a core of engineering and basic science courses like those of other engineering programs outside the Department of Computer Science and Engineering The Com puter Science program deals with the fundamental and formal aspects of computation Graduates from these programs follow fruitful careers in either scientific or business application of computers, as well as in the design of computer systems They are often involved in the systems level definition of information processing complexes for both manufacturers of computers and for users. A wide and expanding variety of design and applications opportunities characterize this field The rapid growth and continual change within this field makes it essential for students to acquire a broad foundation in applied mathematics and the physical sciences, and also to develop commu nications abilities and clear perceptions in the social sciences and the humanities Research and development opportunities as a com puter scientist and engineer, often following graduate education, are present in the areas of computer architecture and VSLI design, artificial software engineering, digital data communi cations, robotics, fault tolerant computing and testing, computer graphics, image processing and computer vision, and simulation. The schedules which follow indicate how a serious, well pre pared student who can devote full time to coursework can satisfy degree requirements in four academic years. Students without a solid foundation and those who cannot devote full time to academ ics should plan on a slower pace Bachelor of Science in Computer Science Curriculum Semester I EGN 1002 Engr. Orientation MAC 3281 Engr. Calculus I Science Elective ENC 1101 Freshman English I Social Science/Hum Semester II MAC 3282 Engr. Calculus II PHY 3048 Physics I PHY 3048L Physics I Lab Science Elective ENC 1102 Freshman English II Social Science/Hum 0 3 3 3 6 15 3 3 1 3 3 3 16

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102 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1!192/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Semester Ill (Summer) CHM 2046 General Chem i stry II PHY 3049 Physics II 3 Social Science/Hum 3 3 16 PHY 3049l Physics II Lab 1 MAC 3283 Engr Calculus Ill 3 Social Science/Hum 3 EGN 3373 COT 3100 ENC 3210 EGN 3613 MAP4302 Science Elective Semester IV Elect Sys. I Intro to Discrete Structures Tech. Writing Engr. Economy Diff. Equations Semester V ST A 4442 Intro to Probability MAS 3103 Linear Algebra COP 3002 Intro to Computer Science COP 3000l Intro to Computer Science Lab Social Science/Hum Semester VI EEL 4851 C Data Structures EEL 47.05 Logic Design EEL 4705l Logic Design Lab COP 3010 Programming Concepts Technical Electives Social Science/Hum Semester VI I 10 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 3 3 3 1 3 16 3 3 1 3 3 3 16 CDA 4100 COP 4400 COT 4210 Free Elective Computer Organization and Architecture 3 Computer Systems 3 Intro to Automata Theory & Formal Languages 3 Computer Science Elective Semester VIII EEL 4757 Microprocessor Principles & Applications EEL 4743l Microprocessor Lab COP 4600 Intro. to Sys. Prog. COT 4400 Analysis of Algorithms Computer Science Elective Free Elective Semester IX CIS XXXX Software Engr T echniCal Elective Computer Science Electives XXX XXXX Computer Ethics Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering Curriculum Semester I EGN 1002 Engr. Orientation MAC 3281 Engr Calculus I CHM 2041 General Chemistry I CHM 2045L General Chemistry I Lab ENC 1101 Freshman English I Social Science/Hum MAC 3282 PHY 3048 PHY 3048L ENC 1102 Semester II Engr Calculus II General Physics I General Physics I Lab Freshman English II 3 3 15 3 1 3 3 3 2 15 3 3 9 1 16 0 3 3 1 3 6 16 3 3 1 3 Semester Ill PHY 3049 General Physics II PHY 3049L Gene ral Physics II Lab MAC 3283 Engr Calculus Ill Social Science/Hum EGN 3373 COT 3100 MAP 4302 EGN 3343 EGN 3313 ENC 3210 EEL 3302 EGN 3321 COP 3002 COP 3000l EGN 4450 EGN 3443 EGN 3365L EEL 4851C EGN 3613 EEL 4705 EEL 4705l EEL 4305 Semester IV Elect. Sys. I Intro to Discrete Structures Diff Equations Thermo I Statics Tech. Writing Semester V Electronics I Dynamics Intro to Computer Science Intro to Computer Science Lab Intro to Linear Systems Engr Statistics I Semester VI Materials Engr I Data Structures Engr Economy I Logic Desi gn Logic Design Lab Electronics II Semester VII 3 1 3 3 10 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 3 3 3 1 2 3 15 3 3 3 3 1 3 16 CDA 4100 Computer Organization & Architecture 3 COP 4400 Computer Systems 3 COP 4210 Intro to Automata Theory & Formal Languages 3 Social Science/Hum 3 Computer Engineering Elective 3 Semester VIII EEL 4757 Microprocessor Principles and Applications EEL 4743L Microprocessor Lab COP 4600 Intro to Sys. Pr6g. Social Science/Hum Computer Engineering Elective EEL 4748 Semester IX Microprocessor Based System Desi gn and Application CDA 4203 Comp Sys. Design CIS 4910 Comp Engr Project Computer Engineering Elective XXX XXXX Computer Ethics Bachelor of Science in Information Systems Curriculum Semester I ENC 1101 Freshman English I MAC 3233 or 3281 Calculus I ACG 2001 Elem. Accounting I Science Elective Humanities/Social Science Elective 15 3 1 3 3 6 16 3 3 2 5 1 14 3 3 3 3 3 15

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 103 UNIVERSIJY OF SOUTH FLORIDA. rttzgJ UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Semester II ENC 1102 Freshman English II MAC 3234 or 3282 Calculus II PHY 3053 or 3048 Physics I PHY 3053L or 3048L Physics I Lab ACG 2011 Elem. Accounting II Humanities/Social Science Elective Semester Ill (Summer) PHY 3054 or 3049 General Physics II PHY 3049L or 3054L Physics II Lab EGN 2210 FORTRAN for Engr Science Elective Semester IV COT 3100 Intro to Discrete Structures COP 3120 COBOL Programmin9 I ECO 2023 Economic Principles (Microeconomics) STA 3023 Intro. to Statistics Humanities/Social Science Elective Semester V COP 3002 Intro to Computer Science COP 3000L Intro to Computer Science Lab MAS 3103 Linear Algebra ECO 2013 Economic Principles (Macroeconomics) Humanities/Social Science Elective EEL 4851C EEL 4705 MAN 3025 CIS 4611 COP 3010 Semester VI Data Structures Logic Design Principles of Mgmt Software Engr Programming Concepts Semester VII COP 4400 Computer Systems EEL 4852C Data Base Systems ENC 3210 Technical Writing XXX 0000 Software Engr. II Business Elective Semester VIII COP 4600 Systems Programming ESI 4312 Operations Rsch. I EEL 4781C Dist. Proc. & Computer Networks XXX 0000 Fourth Generation Lang XXX 0000 SW Tools & Metrics Humanities/Social Science Elective Semester IX CIS 4910 Computer Science Project XXX 0000 Computer Simulation XXX XXXX Computer Ethics Business Elective Information Systems Elective 3 3 3 1 3 3 16 3 1 2 3 9 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 1 3 3 6 16 Students completing this program normally pursue industrial ca reers in the power, electrical, electronic, or information industries or in related governmental. laboratories and public service agencies The electrical graduate may apply his/her knowledge to such diverse areas as television, communications, remote guidance, sensing (of people, vehicles, weather, crops, etc .), automation, computer and information systems, electric power generation and transmission, electrically propelled transportation, etc. The gradu ate may do this by performing needed engineering functions related to research and development (often requires an advanced degree), design, production, operation, sales, or management of these products/services. The schedule which follows indicates how a serious, well pre pared student who can devote full time to coursework can satisfy dE!_9ree requirements in four academic years. Students without a sohd foundation and those who cannot devote full time to academ ics should plan on a slower pace. A minimum departmental GPA of 2 0 is required for graduation. Bachelor's Curriculum Electrical Engineering Semester I ENC 1101 Freshman Engli5h I CHM 2041
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104 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA19'2a3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG ELR 3301 L Lab I 1 PHY 3048L Gen Physics I Lab 1 3 17 EGN 3365L Materials Engineering I 3 EGN 2210 FORTRAN for Engineers Upper-level Comm Course 3 16 Semester Ill Semester VII PHY 3049 General Physics II EEL 4512 Intro. to Communication Systems 3 PHY 3049L Physics II Lab 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 EEL 4305 Electronics II 3 MAC 3283 Engr. Calculus Ill EEL 4705 Logic Design 3 EGN 3365L Materials Engineering I EEL 4705L Logic Lab 1 EGN 3313 Statics ELR 3302L Lab II 1 EGN 3443 Eng. Statistics I EEL 4163 Computer Aided Design & Analysis 2 Approve<;! Communication Course Approved Non-technical Elective 4 17 Semester VIII EEL 4757 Microprocessor Principles & Applications 3 EEL 4743L Microprocessor Lab 1 EEL 4657 Lin. Control Sys. 3 EEL 4906 Design Project 2 ELR 4306L Lab IV 1 Technical Elective 3 Technical Elective 3 16 6. Industrial Engineering Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineer ing degree program take designated, specialized coursework in industrial processes, work analysis, production control, facilities design, operations research, human factors, computer s i mulation, quality control. and robotics and automation This coursework is supplemented by engineering electives and comprehensive indus trial engineering design projects. Students completing this program are prepared for graduate study or for careers in a broad range of industries, business, and public service areas The strength of industrial engineering lies, in part, in its breadth and the applicability of its common body of knowled!i)e in a wide variety of enterprises. Students may be involved in traditional areas of manufacturing and production, or state-of-the-art functions in automation and robotics. The same engineering principles are also applied to business organizations, service delivery systems, and governmental administration. The current departmental policy is to allow only one 'D' in each of the following categories : non-technical core, mathematics-sci ence core, and engineering core No 'D' grades .are allowed for any of the upper divis i on Industrial Engineering courses (prefix EIN and ESI). The schedule which follows indicates how a serious, well pre pared student who can devote full time to coursework can satisfy de9ree requirements i n four academ i c years. Students without a solid foundation and those who cannot devote full time to academ ics should plan on a slower pace Bachelor's Curriculum Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Semester I ENC 1101 Freshman English I 3 MAC 3281 Engr. Calculus I 3 CHM 2041 General Chemistry I 3 EGN 1002 Engr. Orientation 0 EGS 1113 Intro. to Design Graphics 3 Humanities 3 Social Science 3 18 Semester II ENC 1102 Freshman English II 3 MAC 3282 Engr. Calculus II 3 CHM 2046 General Chemistry II 3 CHM 2045L Gen Chemistry I Lab 1 PHY 3048 General Physics I 3 Semester IV MAP 4302 Differ Equations EGN 3373 Intro to Electrical Systems I EGN 3613 Engineering Economy I EGN 3321 Dynamics EGN 3343 Thermodynamics I Approved Non-technical Elective EGN 4450 EIN4312L EGN 3375 EIN 4411 L ACG 3074 ESl4224 Semester V Intro to Linear Systems Work Analysis Intro to Electrical Systems Ill Manufacturing Processes Managerial Acct for Engineers Design of Experiments Semester VI ESI 4312 Determin i stic O.R. ESI 4313 Probabil i st i c O.R. ESI 4221 Industrial Statistics & Quality Control EIN 4364L Plant Facilities Design I EGN 3353C Basic Flui d Mechanics Science Elective Semester VII ESI 4911 Senior Project EIN 4333 Production Control EIN 4313L Human Factors ESI 4523 Ind. Syst. Stimulation Approved Humanities Semester VIII EIN 4601 Automation and Robotics ESI 4523 Ind Syst. Simulation EIN 4365L Facility Design II Technical Elective Approved Non-Technical Elect ive 7. Mechanical Engineering 19 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 2 3 3 3 3 3 17 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 2 3 3 3 3 14 3 3 3 3 3 15 Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engi neering program take coursework in thermodynamics and heat transfer; instrumentation and measurements, energy conversion systems, solid and fluid mechanics, dynamics, machine analysis and design, mechanical design, controls, and fluid machinery This is supplemented by elective coursework in such areas as power plant analysis, refrigeration and air conditioning mechanical design, ad vanced mechanics, heat transfer, robotics, propulsion, vibrations, computer-aided design, manufacturing, composite materials, and aerodynamics .. Students completing thi s option normally enter careers in a wide range of industries which either produce mechanical products or rely on machines, mechanical devices and systems to produce electricity petroleum products, foods, textiles, building materials, etc Mechanical Engineering graduates may follow careers in such

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 105 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1''213 UNDERGRAOOATE CATAiOG fields as transportat!on, power manufacturi!"g, EML 4551 C Project Design I mentation, automatic control, machine design, construction, refngApproved Techanical Elective 3 3 3 2 eration, heating and air condition i ng, aerospace! defense and all Approved Technical Elective the process industries (foods, textiles, pharmaceuHumanities/Soc Sci Elective ticals, There are m th.is w!de range of industries because mechanical equipment 1s required m all aspects of industrial production. Bachelor's Curriculum Mechanical Engineering Semester I ENC 1101 Freshman English I MAC 3281 Engineering Calculus I CHM 2041 General Chemistry I EGS 1113 Intro. to Design Graphics Social & Behav Science Elect i ve Semester II ENC 1102 Freshman English II MAC 3282 Engineering Calculus II CHM 2046 General Chemistry II CHM 2045L General Chemistry I Lab PHY 3048 General Physics I PHY 3048L General Physics I Lab Humanities Elective MAC 3283 CHM 2046L PHY 3049 PHY 3049L EGN 2210 EGN 3313 EGN 3443 MAP 4302 EGN 3343 EGN 1002 EGN 3373 Required Summer Term Engineering Calculus Ill General Chemistry II Lab General Physics II General Physics II Lab FORTRAN for Engineers Semester Ill Statics Engr Statics I Differential Equations Thermodynamics I Engineering Orientation Intro. to Electrical Systems I Semester IV EGN 4450 Intro to Linear Systems EGN 3321 Dynamics EML 4106 Thermal Systems and Economics EGN 3365L Materials Engr. I EGN 3375 Intro Electrical Systems Ill Social & Behav Science Elective Semester V EGN 3433 System Dynamics EML 4041 Computer Simulation I EML 3264 Kinematics and Dynamics of Machinery EML 3500 Mach Anal. and Des. I Humanities/Social Science Elective Semester VI ECH 3702 Instrument Systems I EML 4503 Mach Anal. and Des. II EML 3701 Fluid Systems Technical Writing Elective Humanities Elective EML 4142 EML 3303 Semester VII Heat Transfer I Mechanical Engineering Lab I 3 3 3 3 3 15 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 17 3 1 3 1 3 11 3 3 3 3 0 3 15 2 3 3 3 7 3 18 3 3 3 3 3 15 4 3 3 3 3 17 3 3 Semester VIII EML 4302 Mechanical Engineering Lab II EML 4312 Mechanical Controls Approved Design Elective Approved Technical Elective Approved Technical Elective College Regulations 1. Humanities and Social Science Requirements 17 3 3 3 3 1 13 While the Engineering undergraduate student is expected to complete certain requirements during the first two years of study which are directed toward the humanities and social sciences, and which are fulfilled by the completion of the Distribution require ments of the Un i versity (or General Education requirements at other institutions), the College of Engineering expects more of its prospec tive engineering graduates than this minimum. The engineer must not only be a technically competent individual, but must also be a person who can understand, adjust and contribute to the social environment. Students who transfer from a State of Florida community college with an Associate of Arts degree and who have met that college's General Education Requirement will normally find that their General Education coursework satisfies the major portion but not all -of the Social Science and Humanities Core Requirements. 2. English Requirement Students who have been admitted to the College of Engineering may be required to take an examination i n order to evaluate their preparedness in the use and understanding of the English lan guage The examination will be administered by the faculty of the University's English program Students evidencing an English deficiency will be required to initiate the necessary corrective programs, with the assistance of their advisers It is recognized that such deficiencies can exist even though a student has met the Univers i ty's minimum English require ments. Correction of any deficiency must commence the term after a student has been notified and must be completed prior to recom mendation of the student for graduation by the faculty of the College See Continuation and Graduation Requirements below for mini mum grade requirements 3. Mathematics Requirement Students who are pursuing an engineering program are ex pected to acquire a facility for the rapid and accurate of problems requiring the use of mathematics This i ncludes the ability to translate physical situations into mathematical models Students evidencing a lack of manipulative ability or of ability to apply mathematics will be required to take remedial coursework in engineering analysis and problem solving that is over and above their regular degree requirements. F1tculty of the College who encounter students who are deficient in their mathematical ability will refer such cases to the Advising Office. 4. Continuation and Graduation Requirements The curricula for the programs offered by various departments of the College of Engineering may '?e into four a) General or b) Sci ence (1.e., Math, Physics); c) Engineer ing Science Requirements; d) Spec1ahzat1on Requirements All undergraduate students in the College of Engineering are expected to maintain the minimum grade-point average (GPA) for each cate gory specified by the department responsible for the program pur sued In no case will the minimum GPA for a category be less than 2 0 Note that key courses, includ i ng but not limited to Freshman English, Calculus, Physics, Engineering, and Science courses in the

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106 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OI' SOUTH FLORIDA 1'!12al UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG student's areas of specialization, must be passed with a grade of 'C' 2 The opportunity of taking graduate courses during the fourth or better The awarding of a baccalaureate degree also requires a year and deferring the taking of senior courses to the fifth year minimum average of 2 0 or 'C' for all engineering coursework of The requirements of the combined degrees do not differ from 3000-level or above attempted while registered in the College those for the two degrees pursued separately. Some programs may have higher requirements for certain categoStudents apply for admission to this through their ries. It is the student's responsibility to make sure she/he meets all adviser, who should be consulted when additional information is departmental requirements. In addition to the complet i on of the needed. General requirements include: coursework and/or project requirements of the respective program 1 Senior standing (90 credits) with at least 16 upper level engineer-of the College, students must be recommended for their degrees by ing credits completed at the University of South Florida with a 3.0 the faculty of the College. GPA. Students who do not maintain the required minimums 9f the 2 A minimum score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative program pursued in each category are i neligible for further registraportions of the Graduate Records Examination is expected. tion in the College unless individually designed continuation pro3 performance in the chosen Engineering program grams are recommended by the student's academic adviser and is expected. approved t;>y the department chairperson and the Engineerin9 Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. All students who are academi cally dismissed from the University will be denied readmission to the College of Engineering unless they meet admission requirements in effect at the time readmission is sought and are recommended for readmission by the department and the Associate Dean for Aca demic Affairs. Students who register for a course three times without receiving a grade 'C' or better (i.e., receive grades of W, D, or F)will be denied further enrollment in the College of Engineer i ng unless written per mission is obtained from the department chairperson and the College Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Students pursuing College of Engineering de9ree programs are expected to take their courses on a graded basis (ABCDF). Excep tions require written approval of the department adviser prior to registration. The College of Engineering requires that a student complete the Basic Science, Engineering Science and Specialization Requirements for the baccalaureate degree within seven years prior to the date of graduation Any exceptions require approval of the department and Dean's Office Each engineering student is required to complete the Applica tion for Graduation Check List and submit it to the College of Engineering Advising Office by the drop date of the term prior to the semester in which graduation is sought. Complet i on of this form is a requirement for graduation. Effective fall of 1987 all incoming students pursuing Bachelor of Science degree programs in Civil or Mechanical Engineering will be required to take the Engineering Intern Exam of the State Board of Professional Regulation at least one term prior to the term of anticipated graduation. Engineering students in other disciplines are strongly encouraged to do the same. (See the College Advising Office for applications and information.) 5. Transfer Credit Transfer credit will be allowed by the USF College of Engineering when appropriate if the transferred course has been passed with a grade of 'C' or better and when the first USF course following in sequence is also passed with a 'C' grade or better In some cases credit for a course may be granted, but the hours accepted may be less than the hours earned at another school. While credit for work at other institutions may be granted subject to the conditions of the previous paragraph, a minimum of thirty semester hours of engineering coursework specified by the degree granting department is required for a baccalaureate degree FIVE-YEAR PROGRAMLEADING TO BACHELORS AND MASTERS DEGREES Students who, at the beginning of their senior year, are clearly interested in graduate study are invited to pursue a Five-Year Program of study leading simultaneously to the Bachelor of Science in Engineering or Engineering Science and Master of Science in Engineering or Engineering Science degrees The keys to this program are: 1. A two-year research program extending through the fourth and fifth year ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (Discontinued effective Aug., 1994) The Engineering Technology Program is being phased out over the next three years with the last courses scheduled for August, 1994 The programs described below are applicable to students who are currently enrolled BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Upon completion of their full four years of study leading to the award of the Bachelor of Engineering Technology degree, students will have gained a well-rounded background concentrated in the following areas : Engineering Technology, Mathematics and Sci ence, Liberal Arts and Social Science, and Management and the area of Computers A student who has completed this program should be adequately prepared to assume career responsibilities in technical technical supervisory, or technical executive positions. Prospect ive students should note, however, that this program is not intended to be an engineering program. Rather, its function is to bridge the gap between design or research engineers, and manage ment. It is for this reason that the program consists of a balance of coursework in technical management, and Liberal Arts and Social Science areas A typical student pursues the bulk of the Engineering Technol ogy coursework together with much of the mathematics and sci ence coursework, within the framework of a junior college Associate of Science degree Engineering Technology program. Most of the liberal arts and social science coursework, management and computer-Oriented studies, and some additional engineering technology coursework is taken by the student at USF during the junior and senior year The typical four years of study thus exhibit approximately the following coursework distribution (in credit hours) : Engineering Technology Management & related studies Liberal Arts Social Science and electives Mathematics and Science 53 20 32 15. Total 120 Specific students pro9rams may deviate from this balance to some extent due to the differences in the students' first two years' program contents At USF a portion of each student's program may be used for one of the areas of concentration listed below Computer Systems Technology Management Engineering Technology These areas are designed to complement the technical work re ceived at the community college and need not necessarily be in the same field in which the A.S. degree is awarded. Also avai lable is a four-year degree in Computer Systems Tech-nology which is mainly software applications Admission In general, students are expected to have successfully com pleted an Associate of Science degree in Engineering Technology at a community college or to have accomplished equivalent work. The

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1'92/'3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG student must have completed a minimum of mathematics through ETG 4931 Special Topics in Technology I applied integral calculus, a non
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108 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1''2aJ UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Semester VIII ETI 4661 Prine. of Ind. Oper II CGS 3464 SC SIMSCRIPT Simulation COP 3130 SC PL/I Programming Humanities/Social Science 3 3 3 3 12 Approved listings of general studies. Humanities, Social Sciences and Communication courses are available in the Engineering Advising Office (ENG 104). Students who are currently following a program other than that of an Associate of Science degree in Engineering Technology at a community college and who are interested in pursuit of studies in this field should contact the College of Engineering for further guidance Further information is available from : or Director of Engineering Technology USF St. Petersburg Campus 140 Seventh Avenue, South St. Petersburg, Florida 33701 Director of Engineering Technology College of Engineering University of South Florida Tampa, Florida 33620 Certificate Programs Certificate in Biomedical Engineering The Certificate in Biomedical Engineering provides students an opportunity to get an introduction to a rapidly developing field of study and to receive recognition for their endeavors. Students in the program must fulfill the requirements for an undergraduate de gree, such as Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering, and also meet the additional requirements of the Certificate program (10 hours min ) BSC 2010 Bio 0gy II Cellular Processes* BCH 3023 Biochemistry** One of the following Organic Chemistry sequences: CHM 3210 Organic Chemistry I* CHM 3211 Organic Chemistry II* CHM 3200 Organic Chemistry*** Other 'human sciences' (6 hrs min ) PSY 3044 Experimental Psychology** One of the following: PET 3310 Kinesiology PET 3351 Exercise Physiology I EXP 4104 Sensory Processes PSB 4013C Neuropsychology (or approved substitute) (9 hrs min .****) EEL 493 Special Electrical Topics ECH 5746 Intro to Biomedical Engineering One or more of the following (to achieve 9 hrs. min. in area): EIN 4313L Human Factors EIN 5245 Work Physiology & Biomechanics ECH 5747 Selected Topics in Chemical Engineering Biotechnology ECH 5748 Selected Topics in Biomedical Engineering (or other approved Engineering courses) *These courses are typically required for Medical School admission. Note that there may be other required courses, such as a course in Human Genetics and the Organic Chemistry laboratories **These courses are not normally required for Medical School ad mission, but are often 'highly recommended'. ***This is a single semester course in Organic Chemistry. This course does not normally satisfy the admission requirements of most medical schools It also does not count towards the Chemical Engineering degree (students must take the full year sequence). ****It is important to note that these engineering courses are above and beyond the courses necessary to satisfy the 136 hour requirement That is, these courses will not also be countable as engineering electives towards the B S requirements for any of the departmental degree programs. Certificate of Enhancement The Certificate of Enhancement in (designated discipline) pro vides students an opportunity to gain an enhanced experience in their chosen f i eld while pursuing an engineering degree and to permit them to receive recognition for the same requirements Requirements: 1 Enrolled in a Bachelor of Science degree program in a specified discipline. 2. A minimum of 15 hours of additional elective courses, not included as a part of the B. S degree, from an approved list. Courses must be taken on a letter-9rade basis and a minimum of 9 hours must be in engineering courses 3. A G P A of 2 0 or greater for the 15 (plus) hours. 4 The student must receive the engineering degree to receive the Certificate of Enhancement. Please contact the appropriate department chairperson to be ac cepted in the program Computer Service Courses These courses marked SC are specifically designed for the non engineering student Recognizing that the general purpose digital computer has made significant contributions to the advancement of all elements of the academic community and that it will have an ever greater impact in the future, the College of Engineering offers several levels of credit coursework, undergraduate and graduate, to serve stu dents of all colleges in order that they may be prepared to meet the computer challenge Computer-oriented courses are offered in two broad categories: ( 1) those courses which are concerned with the operation, organi zation and programming of computers and computer systems from the viewpoint of examining the fundamental principles involved in computer usage; and (2) those courses which are concerned with computer applications to a variety of different disciplines, by means of user-oriented-languages such as FORTRAN, PL/I, COBOL, PASCAL, BASIC, 'C' and ADA. Students in engineering, the physical sciences, and mathematics must consult their adviser for suitable computer courses, since these courses are not acceptable to a number of degree programs. College Facilities Each of the departments has several modern well-equipped labo ratories that are used for undergraduate teaching. Some examples of specialized equipment available are a scanning electron micro scope, a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, a 250,000 lb material testing machine, several microprocessor base control systems, industrial robots, a low turbulence subsonic wind tunnel, computer numerical controlled machinery, metal organic chemical vapor deposition systems, and integrated circuits design worksta tions. College Computing Facilities The College of Engineering Computing Facilities are used to provide support for specialized engineering calculations above and beyond those which are available at the IBM based Central Florida Regional Data Center (CFRDC). The College of Engineering operates a cluster of file and computer servers for students and faculty within the College These consist of SUN servers and four Ardent multiprocessors mini supercomputers The networks provide access from offices and laboratories, computer rooms and dial-in facilities All machines are configured for E-mail, and access to Internet. Conventional ascyn chronous links to the campus central facility will shortly be supple mented with an Ethernet link. In addition to the network facilities, the College operates open access P .C. labs Two are available for undergraduate engineering students; a third smaller lab is reserved for graduate students and

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 109 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1'9213 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG faculty. Another open access P .C. lab is operated in conjunction In this way American companies, especially small firms, are able to with the Technology program capitalize rapidly on the results of scientific research and technologiThe network facilities provide access either via Ethernet or the cal innovation and realize the increased productivity necessary to ISDN. Connections to offices, laboratories and classrooms are compete in the global marketplace available on request, subject to budget priorities. The FEEDS studies ST AC teams with researchers, inventors, entrepreneurs, start-up are also networked to provide demonstrations for remote classes. companies and established firms in solving their business problems The College facilities run most of the standard engineering soft and overcoming their technical hurdles STAC's team brings diverse ware. Languages include Fortran, Basic, Pascal, C. Ada, several professional experience to bear on client projectsincluding Electri varieties of LISP and Prolog Applications software includes mathe:. cal and Mechanical Engineering, Fluid Mechanics, Computer Techmatical libraries suites of programs for VLSI design, chemical nology, Marine Chemistry Oceanography, Medicine and Dentistry, process design, civil and mechanical engineering design, robotics Biomedical Engineering, Laser Optics, Information Science, Transsimulation, and circuit simulation and analysis There are h i gh portat i on, Anthropology, Manufacturing Management, Systems resolution color terminals for use in conjunction with these activiAnalysis Marketing and Strategic Planning, International Trade and ties, and for mechanical design there are four multiple display workEconomic Development Other experts located in universities, stations with joysticks and digitizing pads Similar arrangements are government agencies and the 300+ federal labs nationwide are used for VLSI design frequently brought in to complement STAC's in-house expertise Additionally, the Computer Science and En9ineering Depart-Services offered on a cost reimbursable basis include Feasibility ment within the College runs other facilities consisting of the three Studies, Market Analysis Team Building Proposal Writing, Compu VAX machines, an Ethernet with SUN and AT&T 3B2 machines, and terized Searching, Inventor Counseling, and Project Management. extensive microcomputer laboratories The cornerstone of STAC's technology transfer capabilities is its Cooperative Education Program A wide variety of industries and government agencies have established cooperative programs for engineering students to provide them the opportunity to become familiar with the practical aspects of industrial operations and engineering careers Students in the Career Resource Center's Cooperative Education (C0-0p) program alternate periods of paid employment i n their major field with like periods of study Students following the C0-0p program usually encounter no problems in scheduling their program, since required Social Science and Humanities Mathematics and Science, and Engineering Core courses are offered every semester Students normally apply for participation in this program during their sopho more year and pursue actual Co-op employment during their sopho more and junior years The senior year is generally pursued on a full time study basis, since many specialization courses are not offered every, semester The students receive a Cooperative Education Certificate upon successful completion of a min i mum of two work assignments. Florida Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station (USF) The Florida Engineering and Industrial Experiment.Station devel oped from early research activities of the engineering faculty at the University of Florida and was officially established in 1941 by the Legislature Its mandate is to "organize and promote the prosecu tion of research to such of these problems as are important to the industries of Florida In 1977, the University of Florida extended the provisions of the Engineering and Industrial Experiment to the Engineering College of the University of South Florida and two other State engineering colleges The Legislature continues to support this extension with appropriations. The four colleges of engineering now work together in a joint effort through EIES to assist industry with special problems that can be appropriately solved by engineer ing colleges. During the year 1990.91 a sponsored research volume of approximately 12 million dollars passed through EIES (USF). All departments, faculty as well as students, contribute to this research at the University of South Florida. This program i s administered by the Engineering Associate Dean for Research. The direct exposure of students to real research needs of the State adds extra meaning and depth to the engineering education offered by the College NASA STAC {Southern Technology Applications Center} ST AC is a multi-state technology transfer organization headquar tered in Florida with offices in the College of Engineering at the University of South Flor ida, and five other SUS universities STAC's primary mission is to identify promising technologies developed by and researchers in un i versity and federal labs, and to facilitate their commercialization through private sector businesses. Information Research Center (IRC). IRC searchers have logged over 200,000 hours of connect time in STAC's international array of more than 1 500 on-line databases that reference a half billion published articles, stud ies, patents, books and reports They have assembled an extensive i n-house library of journals news bulletins and periodicals published by leading trade associations and special interest groups which prov i de data, statistics and news items that are often not distributed publicly These research capabilities combined with rapid retrieval of documents enables ST AC to locate efficiently critical technologies, marketing and business data, ex perts, facilities, and equipment to complete successfully project tasks As one of nine NASA Industrial Applications Centers, STAC also. promotes the business benefits of the Space Program, from the or dinary procurement needs of the Agency to Small Business Innova tion Research Grants (SBIR) for high tech research to microgravity experiments leading eventually to manufacturing in space. izi ng on our nation's most valuable renewable resource STAC promotes the pursuit of science and engineering careers through outreach seminars to K-12 students who will eventually l ive and work in space. Army & Air Force R.O.T.C. For Engineering Students The Engineering curriculum, coupled with involvement in the Army or Air Force R.O.T.C. program, requires a minimum of five (5) years to complete the degree requirements Army and Air Force R O T .C. cadets must take 16 additional hours in e i ther military science or aerospace studies Additionally, Air Forct>-sponsored summer training camp is scheduled between the sophomore and junior year for Air Force cadets and Army cadets attend an Army sponsored summer training program between the junior and senior years Bi-County Center for Engineering The Bi-<:ounty Center for Engineering was established on the USF at Sarasota campus in 1984 It serves the Manatee and Sarasota County area by providing local access to the College of Engineering program Selected courses from all departments are offered in response to student needs The professional programs in Electrical and Computer Engineering are areas of special emphasis Students who begin as freshmen at Manatee Community College and complete the A.A. in Prt>-Engineering are able to transfer directly into USF and continue toward the Bachelor's degree. Other transfer students will be evaluated on an individual basis. All courStL work taken at USF as part of a planned degree program is applicable to that program without any campus distinction Students may move freely between the main campus in Tampa and the regional campus in Sarasota. For information, contact the Engineering Advising Office in Tampa or the Bi-<:ounty Center Office in Sarasota.

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COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992(!3 UNDERGRADUATE CA TALDG The College of Fine Arts exists in the atmosphere of a com preTransfer students and students from other units within USF with hensive University. It provides opportunities for students to develop previous college or university fine arts course credits (art, dance, their interests and talents to the highest level possible and encourmusic, theatre) must have such credits evaluated and meet appro ages them to do so whether they wish to commit to a life in the arts priate portfolio or audition requirements when seeking admission or, as a general interest, to develop appreciation and involvement to the College of Fine Arts These students are urged to make early in the arts For these purposes, the College educates in the practice arrangements for any necessary portfolio reviews or auditions, as of creating, performing, presenting and understanding theatre, well as appointments for advising, since these must take place prior music, dance and the visual arts. Our mission is three-fold: to course scheduling and registration Further, students are re1. Teaching the disciplines for creating, performing, presenting quired to provide copies of their transcripts showing all previous and understanding the arts. This is done by providing the full college or university coursework for advising, portfolio review and/ range of educating experiences that prepare students to: or audition appointments. Additional information may be obtained a. Practice an art as a full time life commitment; and appointments may be made by telephoning or writing the b. Practice an art as an important element of the individual's life College's advising office or the office of the department of particucommitment; lar interest. c. Appreciate the arts as important life enrichers 2 Creating and researching the arts : a To expand horizons and explore new dimensions in the arts; b. To contribute to the expansion of general knowledge and in formation about the arts; c. To improve the teacher's own effectiveness with students. 3. Serving the public by providing cultural enrichment and exper tise. In recognition of its academic and artistic achievements the College of Fine Arts has been given program of emphasis status by the Board of Regents of the State University System. The college offers degree programs and courses in art, dance, music and theatre. In addit i on, it also offers courses in music education and art education in cooperation with the College of Education. Fine Arts Events The College of Fine Arts, recognizing the importance of main taining an arts-filled environment as an integral part of the total learning experience it offers to the students within the college and to the community at large, is critically aware that a truly comprehen sive university performing arts program must include performances and related activities by internationally recognized artists and en sembles. The list of prestigious artists who have been presented over the years by the College of Fine Arts is impressive and a sampling includes John Cage, the Guarneri String Quartet, Lazar Berman, the New York Pro-Musica, Alvin Ailey, Martha Graham, Marcel Mar ceau, and the Polish Mime Ballet Theatre. (More extensive lists of visiting artists and performing organizations appear in this catalog under the sections of the specific academic units in the college in which research, demonstration, teaching, and other educational activities have directly benefited students.) BACCALAUREATE-LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Programs Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree The College of Fine Arts offers programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in the fields of Art, Dance, and Theatre, a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Theatre, a Bachelor of Music degree in Music, and a Bachelor of Science in Music Education Admission to the College A freshman student may elect to enter the College of Fine Arts as a major in one of the four departments as early as his/her initial entry into the University provided he/she has successfully com pleted an audition or portfolio review in the appropriate depart ment. At that time, the new freshman should file a Declaration of Major or Change of Curriculum code form indicating the choice of degree program within the College of Fine Arts However, any continuing student in the University in good standing, upon accep tance by the department, can apply to change from another major to a major in the College of Fine Arts. The student desiring to make this change must initiate a Change of Major form in the college of the present major and transfer his/ her current academic records to the College of Fine Arts' advising office Advising in the College The College of Fine Arts operates a central advising office located in the Fine Arts Building. It maintains the records of all major students in the College (art, dance, music, theatre) and provides on going academic advising, referral services and assistance to all present and potential students Academic advisers are provided for each of the departments in the College Any student in the University, regardless of major, may enroll in courses offered by the College of Fine Arts when prerequisites are met and space is available. Where applicable, these courses may be used to satisfy elective or General Distribution Requirements. In all cases, the responsibility for meeting all graduation require ments rests entirely upon the student. Graduation Requirements The College of Fine Arts currently offers three undergraduate de grees, the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), attainable in the Departments of Art, Dance, and Theatre, the Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) in Theatre and the Bachelor of Music (B. M ) in Music. The University require ments are presented in detail elsewhere in this catalog, but are briefly summarized here along with the college and departmental requirements : 1. 120-124 credits for the B.A., 124-126 credits for the B.M and 154 credits for the B F .A. with at least a "C' average (2.0) in work done at the University of South Florida and in the major At least 40 credits must be in courses numbered 3000 or above. Since 15 hours is considered a normal, full-time load, students are re minded that programs requiring more than 120 credit hours may require additional semesters for completion of the pr09ram. 2 General Distribution Requirements may be satisfied by (1) com pleting the University's General Distribution Requirements as ex plained in this catalog, (2) completing the A.A. degree from a Florida Junior or Community College, or (3) completing the general education requirements from another Florida state university General education courses transferred from other accredited institutions will be evaluated based on USF General Distribution equivalencies The A.A. degree is in no way a requirement for acceptance into the of Fine Arts (or into any one of its upper-level degree programs), or a requirement for graduation from the University 3 Students admitted to the College of Fine Arts with transfer credits dating ten or more years prior to admission (or readmis sion) will have those credits reviewed by the College and Department and may be required to take specified competency tests in their major area. 4 Special Fine Arts College Requirement: All majors in the College of Fine Arts must take at least 6 credit hours in one or more of the other departments of the College. 5 A maximum number of ROTC credits totaling no more than the maximum allowed in the Free Elective Area for each major may be counted towards the B.A., B.M .. or B .F.A. degree. 6 With departmental approval, a maximum of 4 credit hours of elective Physical Education credits taken at USF may be counted as general elective credit toward the B.A. ; B M or B F A Qegree in the College of Fine Arts 7 Satisfactorily complete the College Level Academic Skills Test CLAST and the writing and computation course requirement of 6A-10.30 (Gordon Rule).

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COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 111 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA f"2a3 UNDERGRADUTATE CATALOG 8 Students applying for a B.A. degree must demonstrate compe tency in a foreign language as described under Foreign Language Competency Policy of this catalog 9 Department Requirements: Art Requirements: Completion of a minimum of 46 credit hours in the major, 19 credit hours of Free Electives (of which 16 hours in art may apply), and 9 hours of non-major credits which may be distributed at the discretion of the Art Department. Dance Requirements: Completion of a minimum of 44 credit hours in the major, 21 credit hours of Free Electives (of which 17 hours in dance may apply), and 9 hours of non-major credits which may be distributed at the discretion of the Dance Depart ment. Music Requirements: Complet i on of a minimum of 84-86 hours in the major. Music Education Requirements: For Instrumental Specializa tion, the completion of a minimum of 19 credit hours of Music Education courses and 52 credit hours of Music courses. For Vocal Specialization, the completion of a minimum of 15 credit hours of Music Education courses and 56 credit hours of Music courses. Theatre Requirements: For the B.A., the completion of a minimum of 54-55 credit hours in the major with 24 credit hours of Free Electives of which a maximum of 1011 credit hours may be in theatre. For the B F A the completion of a minimum of 75 credit hours in the major with 29-30 credit hours of Free Electives of which a maximum of 10. 11 credit hours may be in theatre 10. Residency Requirements : A minimum of 20 credit hours in the major department must be earned in residence This require ment, however, may be waived by the department based on examination (e. g., portfolio review, audition, etc ) Also, a student must earn 30 of the last 60 hours of credits in residence at the University of South Florida However, any course work to be taken and any credits to be earned outside of the University must have prior approval from the appropriate department and the college in order to apply these credits toward graduation Waiver of prerequisite course work totaling no more than 12 credit hours in the major or Fine Arts College requirements is possible by demonstration of competence. Unless credit is awarded by approved official tests, i.e A.P., CLEP, the credit hours must be made up according to departmental or college recommendations The review for waiver is by faculty committee Specific questions concerning program requirements for the B.A., B M and B F A degrees in the College or other related problems, should be directed to the Coordinator of Advising, College of Fine Arts, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. The responsibility for seeing that all graduation requirements are met rests with the student. Courses for General Distribution Requirements: Courses in the College of Fine Arts in the departments of Art, Dance, Music and Theatre fall within Area II of the University's General Distribution Requirements (See General Distribution Re quirements and special r,olicies for AA degree holders and other transfer students with General Education Requirements' met ) However, a major in any one of the four departments in the College of Fine Arts may utilize only those courses in the other three departments of the College for Area II General Distribution Require ments. College Policy for Academic Progress The following criteria will serve as the basis for disenrollment from a major in the College of Fine Arts: 1. Grade-point average below 2.0 in the major 2 Recommendation by major applied (studio) art, dance, music or theatre faculty with approval of respective department chairper son, or art education coordinator 3 The department may recommend probationary status (rather than disenrollment) for one semester when academic progress is not maintained Contracts and Permission Procedures Directed Studies Contracts: All Directed Studies and other variable credit courses in the College of Fine Arts require contracts between students and instructors describing the work to be undertaken by the student and specifying the credit hours. These contracts are to be completed in quadruplicate and appropriately signed. It is the student's respon sibility to obtain the necessary signatures and make the required distribution of all copies Important : the student must have his/her signed copy of a contract at the time of registration S/U Grade Contracts: The College of Fine Arts requires that any S/U grading agree ment entered into between student and instructor be formalized by a contract in quadruplicate signed by the student and the instructor and distributed according to instructions. Grade Contracts: lncompletes must be contracted for by mutual agreement between student and instruqor, with the contract describing specifically the amount and nature of the w9rk to be completed for the removal of the incomplete grade This contract additionally clearly specifies the date that the work will be due (within legal limits) for grading Both the student and the instructor must sign this contract and the four copies rriust be distributed according to instructions. A student must not register for a course again to remove an 'I' grade. Permission Procedures: Admission into some courses is possible only by consent of instructor (Cl), consent of chairperson (CC), consent of adviser, or by audition or portfolio review When such special permission is required, it will be the student's responsibility to obtain any required permission prior to registration. S/U Grading in the College 1 Non-majors enrolled in courses in the College of Fine Arts may undertake such courses on an S/U basis with instructor approval. See Contracts and Permission Procedures for information con cerning S/U Grade Contracts. 2 Credits earned by a non-major student with an 'S' grade will not count toward the student's minimum major course graduation requirement should that student ultimately decide to become a major student in one of the four departments in the College. Instead, such credits earned with an 'S' grade will be assigned to the student's Free Elective category (with the exception of music which will become non-countable). 3 Although Fine Arts majors may take coursework in their major as Free Electives, they are not entitled to the S/U grading option for these courses taken in their major subject area, even when specifically used or intended to be used as Free Electives. 4 In the College of Fine Arts, the only S/U graded courses available to a major student in his major subject area are those curriculum allowable courses designated S/U (that is, S/U only). 5 With the exception of such courses as may be specifically required under the College's 'Special Requirements' regulation, a maximum of 9 credit hours of S/U credits in non-major courses may apply towards a degree in the College of Fine Arts Please refer to Academic Policies section for more information concerning the University's S/U Grading policy Dean's List Honors See Academic Policies and Procedures, Programs and Services. Interdisciplinary Study In spite of the fact that an undergraduate interdisciplinary degree program is not formally offered in the College of Fine Arts, it is possible for a student to pursue such a program of study in the College by utilizing free electives allowed in the major program A student may also choose a double undergraduate major in two departments within the College of Fine Arts as a means of interdis ciplinary study See the major adviser in the programs of particular interest

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112 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1"2a3 UNDERGRADUA 1f: CATALOG Minors Program Requirements for a Minor in Art The College of Fine Arts offers minor programs in Art, Dance, (20 semester hours minimum) Music, Theatre Majors in the College of Fine Arts may pursue a 1. Studio Concentration : minor in any certified minors program at USF except within the same ART 2202C (4) ART 2203C (4) ART 3001 (4) department as the major. The requirements for these programs are Plus: Two 4 semester hour classes from 3000 studio level (8) located under the departmental academic program descriptions. 2. Art History Concentration: For University Minor Policy, consult that section in Catalog. ART 2202C (4) ART 2203C (4) ART 3001 (4) Plus: Two 4 semester hour classes from any of the following: PROGRAMS AND CURRICULA ART (ART) Departmental Requirements for the B.A. Degree The art curriculum is c;lesigned to develop the student's consciousness of aesthetic and ideological aspects of art and its relationship to life and to assist students in the realization of personal ideas and imagery. Most B.A. recipients interested in college teaching, museum or gallery work, fine or commercial studio work pursue the extended discipline and experience offered at the graduate level. Although the Art program allows many possible courses of study, most art major students will select one area of emphasis chosen from the course offerings listed The major concentrations, or areas of emphasis, available to undergraduate (B.A. seeking) art students are: Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Ceramics, Computer Images, Graphics (Lithography and/or Intaglio), Photography, Cinematography (Film), Art History and Theory. Art majors must receive a grade of 'C' or better in all art courses. Transfer studio credit will be accepted on the basis of portfolio and transcript evaluation For additional requirements see Graduation Requirements, College of Fine Arts The requirements for the bachelor's degree in Art Education are listed under the College of Education. Art Studio Concentration (46 semester hours minimum) 1. Visual Concepts I, II and Introduction to Art, 12 credit hours 2. Minimum of 12 credit hours of 3000 level studio courses (exclusive of Technique Seminars ) 3 Minimum of 8 credit hours of 4000 and/or 5000 level studio courses exclusive of Technique Seminars with an emphasis in one area 4 Minimum of 12 credit hours in art history courses from the following: Twentieth Century art is required of all majors ARH 4100 ARH 4350 ARH 4530 ARH 4170 ARH 4430 ARH 4796 ARH 4200 ARH 4450 ARH 4937 ARH 4301 5 Art Senior Seminar, 2 credit hours 6 Maximum of 16 semester hours of art electives. Art History Concentration (46 semester hours minimum) 1 Visual Concepts I, II and Introduction to Art, 12 credit hours 2 Minimum of 16 credit hours of 4000 level art history courses including Twentieth Century art history 3 Seminar in the History of Art History, 4 credit hours. 4. A minimum of 12 credit hours in Directed Readings (1 to 4 semester hours each) and/or Critical Studies in Art History (4 semester hours each). 5. Art Senior Seminar, 2 credit hours. 6. Must demonstrate competency in French or German as de scribed under Foreign Language Competency Policy of this catalog. 7 ; A maximum of 16 semester hours of art electives. For more specific information concerning this requirement, the student should consult with the art adviser or the faculty of the art history area of the art department. ARH 4100 ARH 4301 ARH 4450 ARH 4170 (4 ARH 4350 4) (Required) (4) ARH 4200 (4 ARH 4430 4) ARH 4530 (4) Visiting Artists and Artist-In-Residence The art department is widely known for the consistent level of excellence of its programs Aside from the contributions of its permanent staff, and to insure the continuing expansion of learning opportunities available to students, the art department has brought to the campus internationally known a11ists and lecturers such as Alice Aycock, Linda Benglis, Jack Burnham, James Casebere, Robert Colescott, Michael Dvorak, Edward Fry, Adam Gopnik, The Gorilla Girls, Nancy Holt, Barbara Kuger, Donald Kusp1t, Alfred Leslie, Komart Melamid, Maslon Riggs, Miriam Shapiro, Patterson Sims, Robert Stackhouse, Sidney Tillum, Martha Wilson, Robert Zakanowich, and Ellen Zimmerman. ART MUSEUM The USF Contemporary Art Museum presents a schedule of changing contemporary exhibitions in the Museum (FAM), in the Teaching Gallery in the Fine Arts building (FAH), and in the lobbies of Theatres I and II. The Art Museum has two triangular exhibition galleries and an open access collection storage area. The art collection of the University of South Florida is composed of original graphics, drawings, photographs, and African and PreColumbian artifacts. Many of the prints and sculpture multiples in the collection were produced at USF's internationally recognized Graphicstudio established in 1968. Selections from this collection are loaned through the Art Bank program to museums and institu tions throughout the United States. The exhibition program focuses on contemporary American and European art and also showcases the work of faculty, students and alumni. The exhibitions and art collection serve as an integral part of the studio and art history curriculum of the Art Department and serve the students, staff and faculty of the university and Tampa Bay communities Brochures and catalogues of major exhibitions are published by the Art Museum and includes scholarly critical essays by leading curators and scholars Lectures, seminars, workshops and symposia on comtemporary issues are presented regularly DANCE (DAN) The dance curriculum is designed for students interested in dance as an art form Their objectives may be to pursue a career as a performer and/or choreographer, continue their education ip graduate school. or to teach in a college. public or a private school. Concerts are presented each semester as well as workshop per formances. Noted professional dancers and companies perform on campus and in the community providing students with the oppor tunity to study w ith visiting artists Requirements for the B.A. Degree Performance Concentration MODERN CONCENTRATION (44 semester hours minimum) DAA 2204 Ballet II DAA 3700 Choreography I DAA 3105 Modern Dance Ill DAA 3205 DAA 3701 DAA 3480 (Repeat for 6 er. hrs ) Ballet Ill Choreography II Performance (Repeat for 2 er. hrs.) 3 2 3 3 2 1

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COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 113 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1'91/93 UNDERGRADUTA T CATALOG DAA 4106 DAA 4702 DAA 4703 DAA 4790 DAN 2611 DAN 3590 DAN 4111 DAN 4112 DAN 4170 DAN 4906 Modern Dance IV (Repeat for 8 er. hrs.) Choreography Ill Choreography IV Senior Project Music for Dance II Practicum in Dance Prod I (Repeat for 2 er hrs ) Survey H i story of Dance 19 & 20th Century Dance History Dance Senior Seminar Directed Study BALLET CONCENTRATION (44 semester hours minimum) DAA 2104 Modern Dance II DAA 3700 Choreography I DAA 3105 Modern Dance Ill DAA 3205 Ballet Ill (Repeat for 6 er. hrs ) DAA 3220 Ballet Variations (Repeat 2 times) DAA 3480 Performance (Repeat for 2 er. hrs.) DAA 3701 Choreography II DAA 4702 Ill DAA 4206 Ballet IV (Repeat for 8 er hrs ) DAA 4790 Senior Project DAN 2611 Music for Dance II DAN 3590 Practicum in Dance Prod. I (Repeat for 2 er hrs ) DAN 4111 Survey of History of Dance DAN 4112 19 & 20th Century Dance History DAN 4170 Dance Senior Seminar DAN 4906 Directed Study Dance Minor Program 4 2 2 1 2 1 3 3 2 1 3 2 3 3 2 2 4 1 2 1 3 3 2 1 A minimum of 20 hours is required for a dance minor. Five hours must be in DAN courses. Ten of the 20 hours must be upper level (3000 and 4000) courses. Studio Dance courses can be repeated only once toward minor degree Courses for lower level Select from: Theatre Dance Styles DAA 2000 (2) Introduction to Dance -6A DAN 2100 (3) Fundamentals of Modern Dance I DAA 2100 (2) Modern Dance II DAA 2104 (3) Fundamentals of Ballet I DAA 2200 (2) Ballet II DAA 2204 (3) Fundamentals of Jazz Dance DAA 2500 (2) Music for Dance I DAN 2610 (2) Music for Dance II DAN 2611 (2) Dance Improvisation DAA 2704 (2) Courses for Upper Level (minimum of 10 hours required) Select from: Movement Theory & Body Alignment Modern Dance Ill Ballet Ill Ballet Variations 1 Pointe Class 2 Men's Class 3 Character Dance Performance Jazz Dance Jazz Theatre Dance Practicum in Dance Production Choreography I Choreography II Survey History of Dance -6A 19th & 20th Century Dance Modern Dance IV Ballet IV DAA 3800 (2) DAA 3105 (3) DAA 3205 (3) DAA 3220 (1) DAA 3480 (1) DAA 3502 (2) DAA 3503 (3) DAN 3590 (1) DAA 3700 (2) DAA 3701 (2) DAN 4111 (3) DAN 4112 (3) DAA 4106 (4) DAA 4206 (4) The Teaching of Dance : Theory & Practice Choreography Ill Choreography IV Selected Topics in Dance 1 Massage for Dance 2 Movement Lab DAE 4300 (1) DAA 4702 (2) DAA 4703 (2) DAN 4930 (1) Department Policy For Academic Progress A maximum of 17 credit hours of Dance electives may apply toward the dance degree. TPA 2200 or 2223 Theatre Crafts : Lighting, or Costume (3) is required of all dance majors and may apply toward Area II of the General Distribution Requirements, or non-major electives, or the 6 hour Special College Requirement. Dance majors must enroll for a minimum of 2 credit hours (1 per semester) in DAN 3590 Practicum in Dance Production. By doing technical preparation and working backstage in a minimum of two major concerts, the student will have a better grasp of production problems and their solutions. The major student is expected to earn 2 credits in DAA 3480 Performance performing in at least two faculty directed concerts in their junior or senior year. Junior dance majors are required to complete a junior research project through directed studies (DAN 4906) and senior dance majors are required to choreograph a group work and perform a solo as a senior project Entrance to all major technique courses is by faculty audition Until the student is accepted into Modern Dance Ill or Ballet Ill he/ she will be considered as a probationary dance major. DAA 2104 or DAA 2204 may be repeated only once for credit toward degree re quirements. Prospective majors are urged to contact the dance department to arrange for an audition prior to registration Critiques 1. All students will be evaluated periodically at faculty sessions as well as critiqued each semester, majors will be advised accordingly. d d f h' h 2 If the faculty feels that a stu ent 1s e 1c1ent m some area w 1c necessitates a probationary action, the student in question will be advised and asked to sign a probation form. This form is kept on file with the student's advisor. 3 Failure to make satisfactory progress after being placed on probation the following semester shall constitute grounds for Departmental recommendation to drop and discontinue the major Minimum Grade for Dance Courses A student must receive a 'C' grade or better in required major courses Should a student fail to do so, the course(s) in which the student received a 'D' or 'F' must be repeated and a 'C' grade or better earned. Additional Standards In addition to meeting the specific requirements and standards discussed above, the student and adviser will periodically evaluate the student's general progress A less-than-satisfactory rating in one or more of the following areas could place the student on probation. A student on probation i s given a specific amount of time to achieve a satisfactory rating before being dropped from the major program. The criteria are: 1 Adequate technical skill and adaptability. 2 Evidence of creative potential. 3 'B' average in major studio classes. 4 Good health which includes adequate control of body weight. Class probation and department probation require review and final determination at the end of the subsequent semester. Stu dents will be notified of the results of final faculty review, i.e., reinstatement in good standing or recommendation to drop major A dance major is expected to keep his/her weight at a level that is aesthetically acceptable to the dance faculty for classroom training and all performances. For other non-major requirements see both Fine Arts College re quirements and the University's General Distribution and gradu ation requirements

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114 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS IJNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLOlflOA-1912& U#OERGllADUATE CATALOG Visiting Artists Artists-in-Res idence undergraduate students enrolled in applied music for 4 or 2 By its excellent oi:igoing regular staff-instructed credit hours are required to be enrolled concurrently in a major en dance ot.her made available appropriate to their performing medium through the V1s1ting and Art1st-1n-Res1dence programs, the Music Electives Dance department provides for dance students an overall dynamic Performance Concentration 10 hours 4 hours 10 hours program for practice, study and learning Piano Pedagogy Concentration Composition Concentration MUSIC (MUS) The B.M. Degree (Performance. Piano Pedagogy Composition and Jazz Studies): The music curriculum f?r stude!'lts gifted in the perand/or compos1t1on of music. Candidates for a major in music are required to pass an entrance audition in their respective area Composition candidates are required to submit appropriate scores and/or tapes of their compositions for faculty appraisal. All students admitted to the degree program must take a music theory diagnostic examination prior to scheduling music theory classes. Freshmen must pass this examination or enroll in a music which does not fulfill a requirement in th4: IT_lUSIC maior curriculum. Transfer students are required to take a s1m1lar test and enter at the appropriate level. Students rnay obtain dates and times for these examinations from the music department office. Academic offered of Music degree with concentration in Performance (voice, Jazz, piano, harp, guitar and instruments), Composition, Piano Pedagogy, and Jazz Compos1t1on. General Requirements: All students seeking a Bachelor of Music degree are required to ( complete successf!-'llY the piano proficiency and music theory requirements; .(2) present a partial recital during the JUnior year_(except compos1t1on majors); (3) present a full recital during the senic:>r year (except music education majors); (4) present a record of satisfactory recital attendance through registration .in MUS (see the specific requirements for MUS 2010 as set by the !'11us1c. faculty). Students must be enrolled in applied music studio during the semester of the recital. Exceptions to all depart mental procedures must be authorized through the Director of the School of Music. Promot i on to the next higher level in applied music is made only upon the recommendation of a performance jury conducted by that concentration's faculty. Where appropriate for the degree, the student is required to complete a minimum of two semesters but no n:iore three semesters at the 2000 or 3000 level of applied music. Failure to complete these levels within the three semester maximum brings automatic dismissal from the program. Students may repeat the 4000 level as necessary to fulfill the total credit hour (3000 level for composition or music education). Credit for only 2 semesters of applied music at the 1000 2000 or 3000, levels will be applied toward the degree ' Core Requirements for ail Performance. Pedagogy. and Composition Concentrations {48-52 semester hours minimum): Music Theory (22) MUT 1111 !3) MUT 2116 (3) MUT 4571 (3) MUT 1112 3) MUT 2117 (3) MUT 4411 (3) MUT 1241 1) MUT 2246 (1) or MUT 1242 1) MUT 2247 (1) MUT 4421 (3) Vocal Performance (2) MUS 3201 (2) Music Literature (3) MUL 2111 (3) Music History (8) MUH 3300 (2) MUH 3301 (3) MUH 3302 (3) Senior Seminar (1) MUS 4935 (1) A:fajor Ensemble Performance and Pedagogy Majors (8), Composition (4) Core Requirements for Jazz Studies Performance and Jazz Studies Composition Concentrations semester hours minimum): Music Theory (26) MUT 1111 (3) MUT 1112 MUT 1241 1) MUT 1242 1) Music Literature (3) MUL2111 (3) Music History (11) MUH 3300 (2) MUH 4801 (3) Senior Seminar (1) MUT 2116 (3) MUT 2117 MUT 2246 (1 MUT 2247 (1 MUH 3301 (3) MUS 4935 (1) MUT 3641 (2) MUT 3642 MUT 3353 3 MUT 3354 3 MUH 3302 (3) Elec:Jive Hours in Music (9) Major Ensemble : Performance (8), Composition (4) A!I students enrolled in applied music for 4 or 2 hours are required to enroll concurrently in a major ensemble appropriate to their performing medium Additional Requirements for Specific Concentrations: Performance Concentration of 32 credit hours of applied music major is required with a minimum of 8 hours to be completed at the 4000 level and concurrent registration in MUS 2010 (Recital Attendance) Piano Pedagogy Concentration (86 semester hours minimum): The requirements for the piano pedagogy concentrat10!'1 are in add1t1on to the above performance concentration re quirements: Piano Pedagogy (8) MV!< 4640 (4) . 4641 (4) Junior and senior recital requirements may be fulfilled in one of the following ways; (1) lecture/recital, (2) ensemble performance (3) full recital with music Jazz Studies-Performance Concentration .The following courses are required in addition to the core re quirements: MUT 3663 (f) MUT 3664 (2) Applied music (maior) through the 3000 level (min of 24 hours). In addition to the major instrument, Jazz Bass and Jazz Guitar majors are required to en. roll for in the corresponding double bass or classical guitar applied music lessons in addition to the major applied studies Jazz piano proficiency Jazz Studies
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COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 115 I UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -19'223 UNDERGRADUTATE CATALOG Composition Concentration (72 semester hours minimum) All students seeking a degree in music with a composition con centration are required to fulfill the senior composition require ments (with the approval of the entire composition faculty) in one of the following ways; (a) a cornplete public performance of works by the student composer, (b) the public performance of several compositions in various concerts throughout the composer's senior year, (c) the formal presentation to the composition faculty of an extensive portfolio of compositions plus the public performance of at least one of these works during the senior year, or (d) in other ways designated by the composition faculty Major Ensemble (4) All undergraduate students enrolled in applied music for 2 credit hours are required to be enrolled concurrently in a major ensemble appropriate to their performing medium. Applied Music (Principal) (8) A minimum of 8 credit hours of applied music is required with a minimum of 4 credit hours at the 2000 level and concurrent registration in MUS 2010 (recital attendance). Composition Courses (30) Undergraduates concentrating in composition must complete a minimum of 24 credit hours from the following sequence of courses including MUC 3402, and at least one semester of MUC 4204, satisfying all necessary prerequisites for all courses: MUC 2221 (3,3) MUC 3401 (3) MUT 4311 (2) MUC 3231 (3,3) MUC 3402 (3) MUT 4312 (2) MUC 4241 (3) and a minimum of 5 hours selected from: MUC 2301 (2) MUC 3601 (3) MUC 4404 (3) MUC 3442 (3) MUC 4403 (3) MUT 3353 (3) For other degree requirements for all the above concentrations, see Fine Arts College requirements and the University's General Dis tribution and graduation requirements MUSIC EDUCATION Requirements for the B.S. Degree (MUE): The music education curriculum is designed to serve students who wish to develop a high level of musical expertise and have a commitment to help develop similar musical potential in other people. All students seeking a degree in music education are required to pass an audition in their respective performance area and to take a music theory placement test prior to registering for any music theory class. Students who do not pass the diagnostic test will be placed in a music fundamentals course which does not fulfill a requirement in the music major curriculum All transfer students are required to take a theory placement test and enter at the appropri ate level of study. Students may obtain the dates for these exami nations from the music office. Special requirements for all music education majors; successful completion of the piano proficiency requirements as defined by the music and music education faculties; participation in a major per forming ensemble each semester the student is enrolled in applied music; and the presentation of a one-half hour recital in the major performing medium during the last semester of enrollment in applied music. Students are to present a record of satisfactory recital atten dance through registration in MUS 2010 (see the specific require ments for MUS 2010 as set by the music faculty) For other degree requirements see College qf Education require ments and the University's General Distribution and graduation re quirements. Note exceptions applicable to th i s program. 1. Instrumental Specialization (72 er. hrs.) Music Education courses (20 er. hrs ) MUE 2090 (2) MUE 3450 (1}* MUE 4311 (3) MUE 3421 (1) MUE 3451 (1) MUE 4321 (2) MUE 3422 (1,1} MUE 3460 (1)** MUE 4332 (3) MUE3423(1,1) MUE3461 (1) MUE4480(2) Not required of WoodWind majors Not required of b
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116 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS UNIVERSITY Of SOUTH FLORIDA 1'9la3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Other Fine Arts requirement Art, Dance, Theatre (min 3 er. hrs. to be selected from one or more of the other departments of the College of Fine Arts) Requirements for a Minor in Music (19-23 semester hour minimum) Students seeking a minor in music may choose from three concen trations: (1) History-Theory-Literature, (2) Applied Medium and (3) Composition Each of the concentrations will include the same core curriculum consisting of 11 hours. 1 Core Curriculum: Music Theory Introduction to Music Literature or Music History 2. Optional Concentrations: 11 hours \3) (3) a. History-Theory-Literature 9-10 hours Music History and/or Theory and/or Literature (7-8) b. Applied Music (Principal) 8-12 hours Performance Studio courses which may include up to 2 semester hours of class-studio (6-8) Music Ensembles (2-4) MUS 2010 Recital Attendance concurrent with applied music (principal) registration Faculty jury recommendations for sophomore-level studio study (minimum) c. Composition9 hours Introduction to Electronic Music Composition Studio courses which may include (2) one course of orchestration (6) Music Ensemble (1) 3. Admission to all studio applied music courses is by audition and/ or permission of the instructor Studio courses may be repeated for credit as stipulated in the catalog The Faculty: USF's superior music faculty has been carefully chosen for its training, performing ability, and ability to teach. It is in every sense a team This achievement has been demonstrated by such fine musical ensembles as the Faculty Metropolitan Arts Trio, the Ars Nova (faculty) Wind Quintet and the Faculty Jazz Quartet. USF music graduates are found teaching successfully in public schools and universities around the country and performing in a variety of concert settings. Student Organizations: Sigma Alpha Iota, national professional music fraternity for women, and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, a professional music fraternity for men, are dedicated to serve the cause of music in America. College Music Educators National Conference is an affiliate of the Music Educators National Conference and is open to all interested students A student chapter of the International Association of Jazz Educators is active on campus. Financial Aid: The University has made available to highly qualified under graduate students a number of music service awards. Awards are made following open auditions held in January, February and March The award is made for the following year for two semesters Out-of-state tuition waiver is also possible. Also available are scholarships awarded in specified areas including Dawn Randall Zimmerman Flute Scholarship, Mary Corey Bogdonas Scholarship, Steve Penovich Scholarship, Marjorie Roe Cello Scholarship, the Zbar Piano Award, and the V. A Bridges Music E-Oucation Scholar ship Additionally, loans, grants and work programs are available to qualified University of South Florida students Financial aid is granted on need, academic promise and talent. Unique Learning Opportunities: The School of Music at the University of South Florida offers the student the opportunity to study with a distinguished faculty, work with the newest in creative equipment, and to be in the company of other superior music students for an extensive, exciting and exacting period of study. In addition to the already established programs in the music education, choral, orchestral and wind ensemble areas opportunities are available in jazz with perform ances with the jazz ensemble and chamber ensembles, a full range of jazz courses, and professional playing opportunities in the area. Visiting Artists and Artists-in-Residence The School of Music utilizes guest composers, conductors, and performing musicians to enhance its offeri ngs in terms of teaching faculty, forum appearances, and the conducting of musical pro grams, symposia and clinics. Some prominent musicians who have appeared in the past are : Norman Delio Joio, Olly Wilson, Randall Thompson, Guarneri String Quartet, Virgil Thompson, Beaux Arts Trio, Walter Trampler, Boris Goldovsky, Fred Hemke, Gregg Smith, Lukas Foss, Norman Luboff, Maurice Andre, Phil Woods, Jean Pierre Rampal, David Baker, Adele Adison, John Cage, Byron Janis, Karel Husa, Louis Bellson, Leslie Bassett, David Samuels, Samuel Adler, Julius Baker, Gunther Schuller, Ransom Wilson, Robert Merrill, T. J Anderson Doc Severinsen, Hale Smith, Bethany Beardslee, George Russell, Robert Shaw, Art Blakey, Toshiko Akiyoshi, Andre Watts, Christopher Hegwood THEATRE (TAR) The Department Major: Through its curriculum and production program, the Depart ment of Theatre offers seriously interested students the opportunity to prepare themselves for a professional career in the Theatre or to continue their studies at the graduate level. In addition, students from other departments and colleges have the opportunity to study and participate in the work of the department, thereby allowing them to gain insight into the creative experience of theatre. After a thorough orientation to all facets 9f the art gained in the basic courses the theatre major pursuing the Bachelor of Arts degree selects one of the following areas of study : Performance, Design, Theatre Arts, or Theatre Education To allow for greater preparation in design, a Bachelors of Fine Arts degree in Design is offered The department also offers a minor in Theatre For advanced upper level students a Theatre Honors Program of specialized courses is offered, often involving guest artist residencies. Through the production program, which includes a variety of performances for the university community and the general public the student is encouraged to participate in all aspects of theatre practice. The Department also offers opportunities to the advanced student to work with visiting professional companies. Visiting Artists and Artists-in-Residence: TheatreUSF actively promotes guest artists on campus. A partial list of the internationally known artists and the theatres with which they are affiliated includes : Edward Albee, Marge Barstow, Joseph Chaikin, Daniel Chumley, Martin Esslin, H D Flowers, Christopher Fry, John and Lisel Gale, Patrick Garland, Miriam Goldina, Boris Gold ovsky, Henry Hewes, Jeff Jones, Bob Kelly, Mesrop Kesdekian, Michael Kirby, Arthur Lithgow, Marcel Marceau, Siobhan McK enna, Sam Mendes, Bob Moody, Eric Overmyer, Estelle Parsons, Olga Petrovna, Ben Piazza, Sergei Ponomarov, Alan Schneider, Doug Watson, and Able and Gordon. These and others have helped the department develo,P relationships with: London's West End, The Actors' Studio, Dublin s Abbey Theatre, Broadway, Washington's Arena Stage, San Francisco Mime Troupe, The Stratford Ontario Shakespeare Festival, The Welsh National Theatre, the BBC, the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art, the Working Theatre, Coventry's Belgrade Theatre, The Deutsches Theatre, Free Theatre of Munich, The Polish Theatre, The Chichester Festival, The Edinburgh Festival and The Spoleto Requirements for the B.A. Degree with a major in Theatre Of the total 124 credit hours needed for graduation in the Performance, Design, or Theatre Arts areas, the student following a

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COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 117 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1ttl/93 UNDERGRADUTATE CATALOG Performance area must take a m i n i mum of 54 credit hours, and the Fourth Year (9 hours) student following the Design area or Theatre Arts area must take TPP 4140 Styles of Acting a minimum of 55 credit hours within the Department of Theatre In TPP 4180 Advanced Scene Study addition, a maximum of 11 credit hours (Performance) and a TPP 4920 Seni or Workshop for Actors maximum of 10 credit hours (Desi gn or Theatre Arts) may apply to the theatre electives area. Of the 137 140 total credit hours needed for 9raduation in the Theatre Education area, the student must take a minimum of 54 credit hours withi n the Department of Theatre and a minimum of 37-40 credit hours within the College of Education The student may choose one of four areas for the B.A. degree : Performance Desi9n, Theatre Arts or Theatre Education Common to all is the following core : Core Curriculum (35 hours) First Year (11 credit hours) THE 2020 Theatre Fundamentals TPA 2200 Theatre Crafts : Stagecraft TPP 2110 Voice-Body-Improvisation Choice of one : TPA 2223 Theatre Crafts : Light i ng TPA 2232 Theatre Crafts : Costume Second Year (10 credit hours) THE 3100 Theatre History TPA 3004 Means of Visual Expression TPP 3111 Workshop for Text Analysis Third Year (8 credit hours ) Cho ice of two: THE 4320 Theatre of Myth and R i tual THE 4330 Shakespeare for the Theatre THE 4360 19th Century Theatre Revolution THE 4401 O'Neill and After THE 4442 Comedy of the Classic and Nee-Classic Stage THE 4480 Drama -Special Topics plus 2 cred i ts of THE 3925 for Pl* Fourth Year (6 hours) Choice of one : THE 4180 Theatre Origins THE 4562 Senior Colloquium plus 2 credits of THE 4927 for Pl* *Theatre Crafts Lab: TPA 2200 Theat r e Crafts Stagecraft, TPA 2223 Theatre Crafts Lighting, TPA 2232 Theatre Crafts Costume has a laboratory (LAB) in addition to the regularly scheduled class sessions. LAB guidelines are available in the Theatre Office. *Production Involvements: All Theatre Majors must complete 4 Pl's (Production Involvements) as part of their graduation require ments. Pl's must be taken under THE 3925 Production Involve ment and/or THE 4927 Advanced Production Involvement for a total of 4 Pl's. Students may register for Pl credit beginning in the second semester of the Sophomore year and are expected to register each consecutive semester until completion of the four involvements Pl assignments are made by faculty committee following the student's completi
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COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 118 UNIVERSITY Of SOUTH FLORIDA 1!191(93 UNDERGRADUTATE CATALOG TPP 2110 Voice-Body-Improvisation THE 3925 Production Involvement THE 4927 Advanced Production Involvement Choice of one : TPA 2223 Theatre Crafts : Lighting TPA 2232 Theatre Crafts: Costume The remaining 10 hours are to be selected by the student with the advice of the theatre adv isor. At least 9 hours must be upper level courses. The Theatre Advisor w ill be available to assist the student in developing a course of study that will meet the needs of the individual student. Students desiring admittance into the Scene Study sequence must audition and those entering the upper level Design sequence must have a portfolio review All Theatre Minors must complete 2 Pl's {Production Involve ment) as part of their graduation requirements Pl's must be taken under : THE 3925Performance 1 credit and/or THE 4927-Advanced Performance 1 credit hour for a total of two (2) hours Students may register for Pl credit in the second semester of the Sophomore year and are expected to register each consecutive semester until completion of two involvements Requirements for the B.F.A. Degree in Design: The student should submit a letter of application as early as the second semester of the Junior year This should be accompanied by a transcript and a detailed description of production involvement. Admission to the B.F.A. pr.ogram is by portfolio presentation and acceptance by the Design faculty committee As soon as the B .F.A. candidate has been accepted into the program, the Chairman of the Theat r e Curriculum Committee in conference with the student and with the approval of the depart ment chairman will select the student's Advisory Committee. The Advisory Committee will be composed of three members of the Theatre fatuity. This committee has the responsibility to develop a curriculum de signed to meet the specific needs of the student and will decide if the following requirements have been met and appropriate stan dards maintained: a II Completion of the appropriate Department of Theatre B.A. re quirements Development and execution of a creative project Participation in one summer session. A minimum of 30 credit hours above the B.A. including 6 credits of non-theatre electives {Theatre courses taken prior to the appoint ment of the B F A Advisory Committee and without the advice of the Committee cannot be considered part of the B.F. A program ) Design Concentration 7 hours in Creative Project and Execution: THE 4905 or THE 5909 Directed Studies (Research & Desi gn Creative Project) 7 hours in completion of third area of design and its prerequisite. 9 hours in the following : TPP 4310 Directing I THE 4900 Directed Reading Choice of one of the following: TPP 4150 Scene Study I TPP 4230 Lab Workshop in Performance 7 hours of additional electives of which 6 must be outside the Department of Theatre Honors Program The Honors Program is available to upper level majors who have a 3 0 overall GPA in the major, and who have achieved a comparably high level of artistic and/or scholarly achievement. A 6-8 credit one year sequence of courses is offered to students accepted into the Honors Program THE 4593 2 credit hours THE 4594 3 credit hours THE 4595 1-3 credit hours

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NEW COLLEGE OF USF UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1!191(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG New College of the University of South Florida, located on USF's Sarasota campus, is a distinguished residential college that serves as the honors college of the State University System It offers a nationally recognized liberal arts education at regular state tuiti on rates The New College student/faculty ratio is approximately 11: 1 ninety-four percent of the faculty hold earned doctorates work closely with faculty members in small classes, tutorials and on individual projects. Admission criteria are highly selective New College looks for stu who have above average ability academic mot1vat1on and self-d1sc1pline. About half the students are from Florida College offers to students a level of faculty support and fac1lit1es for study generally found only at very expensive private colleges This is possible because the gap between public funding and the actual New College education is closed by annual grants to the University from the New College Foundation The Foundation also raises substantial scholarship funds for meritorious students. Educational Program The New College degree is awarded for intensive, individualized study in the liberal arts and sciences Classes, tutorials and inde pendent study projects are tools the student, with faculty guidance uses to discover and pursue intellectual and career interests. Study at New College culminates in a senior thesis and baccalaureate examination in the student's chosen area 'of concentration New College offers excellent academic facilities A $6 1 million library opened on the campus in 1986, housing a collection pres ently numbered at over 200,000 volumes. The library is linked through inter-library loan to the USF system of over one million volumes, and to a network of thousands of other libraries. It also subscribes to computerized data bases that extend its reach beyond the region The New College Natural Sciences laboratories, open to students around the clock, feature many research-<]rade instruincluding a The has special access to s1gnif1cant b1olog1cal field research sites in the Sarasota area Computer facilities available to students range from "user friendly" Macintoshes to an IBM main frame Campus-based studies can be supplemented by off-campus field research and internships, and by study abroad. New College partici pates in the Florida State University Study Centers in London and Florence, as well as in other programs, and has an exchange program with the University of Glasgow. Areas of Study All studies at New College lead to the Bachelor of Arts. Students may concentrate in a specific discipline or they may design, with faculty approval, an interdisciplina ry concentration The faculty the ar_eas of study : Anthropc:ilogy, Art History, Biology, Chemistry, Child Development, Classics, Computer Sci ence, Economics, Environmental Studies, Fine Arts, History, Interna tional Relations, Languages, Literature, Mathematics Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Public Policy, Religion, Sociology, Urban Studies Elementary through advanced studies in French, German Rus sian, Spanish, Latin and Greek language and literature are avaiiable Study at New College leads to a wide range of careers Gradu ates from New College go to medical, dental and law school. A large number do graduate work in the arts and sciences, leading to research and careers i n government and industry Others obtain advanced degrees in business, education, relig i on and archi tecture. Those not going on for advanced degrees have launched successful careers in journalism, fine arts, retailing, management, finances, environmental planning and a host of other fields Quite a few have become entrepreneurs, founding businesses of their own based on skills acquired while students The Academic Calendar and Residence Requirements The New College calendar consists of two 15-week semesters and a four-week independent study period in January. Fall semester begins in Augus t and en9s just before Christmas. Spring semester begins the first week in February and ends in late May Enrollment at New College is full-time. Students may complete the degree in seven semesters (three and one-half years) as a result of New College's longer academic year and the advanced nature of the program Three Independent Study Projects are carried out during January and/or the summer recess. Students may register for up to two additional semesters if their academic programs require it; they may also take up to two se_ mesters of academic le.ave during their ter:iure a! New College without loss of scholarship support By special pet1t1on and with summer study, exceptionally qualified students may complete the deg_ree req uirements in three years. All students must complete a senior thesis and pass a baccalaureate examination based upon the senior thesis. Transfer students may have the number of semesters required for graduation reduced through the awarding of transfer credit for college-level work done elsewhere. The maximum allowable trans fer credit is equivalent to three semesters and one independent study project. Admissions Requirements New College actively seeks those students who will benefit most from the demanding academic program and flexible curriculum The looks for evidence of intellectual potential, strong academic preparation, self-motivation and initiative tenacity curiosity and concern for others ' Applicants must submit a State Universi!)' System application, College supplementary application, official high school tranSAT or ACT .. a graded research paper from an English or history class, teacher s recommendation, and counselor recorn An interview is required for all applicants within a 1 OOm1le radius of Sarasota and encouraged for all candidates Transfer applicants must also submit transcripts from all colleges or univers1t1es they have attended New College welcomes transfer appli cants A growing number of students come to New College from Florida's two-year community colleges New College tuition is the same as for other institutions within the State University System. Both need-based financial aid and achievement-based scholar ships are available to New College students, and about 67% of the students receive some type of direct financial assistance Students must apply for need-based aid and for USF scholarships. Achieve ment scholarships from the New College Foundation are awarded by !he College Admissions Office to those students the college believes ':"''II make an outstanding contribution to the New College community. The New College Admissions Office processes applications on a rollin9 basis, with decisions beginning about January 15 Students applying for need-based financial aid and USF scholarships must by February the fall semester Applicat i on forms and literature can be obtained from the New College Office of Admis sions, 5700 N. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, Florida 34243. Phone (813) 3594269. Student Life New College is a residential college, with the majority of its students living on campus or in adjacent neighborhoods All stu dents full time. Stud ents are _challenged to accept major respons1b1lit1es for the d1rect1on of their own affairs, including their social and extra-curricular activities The Student Affairs Office, its professio!"al staff, is responsible for personal counseling, housing, health services, and other support services All first year students live on campus and participate in the com munity dining plan Upper-class students may choose college or non-college housing. A medical plan g ives students access to a physician.

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COLLEGE OF NURSING UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1"2a3 UNDERGRADUA1 CATALOG The College of Nursing is committed to the improvement of influenced by cultural, social, economic, genetic, political factors as nursing and health care services through its educational programs well as value systems and religious beliefs Human beings have the community service, and research activities. In order to carry out its right to quality health care, the obligation to engage in health commitment in nursing education, the college offers an upper practices and the freedom to make informed decisions about their division program that leads to a Bachelor of Science degree with a health, health pract ices, and health care. major in nursing. Nursing care is an integral component of health care delivery There are two sequences in the undergraduate program, one for Professional nurses assume var ious roles which involve independqualified students with no previous preparation in nursing (basic ent, collaborative, interdependent, and dependent functions. students), and one for registered nurses, who are graduates of Professional nurses provide health services in a variety of complex diploma or associate degree nursing programs The basi c sequence systems and are accountable for these professional services based is designed so that students who have completed the prerequis:te/ on (1) a body of which is continuously being refined and support courses can enroll in the nursing major and complete reexpanded through nursing research; (2) a Code of Ethics; (3) quirements for the degree in four semesters and a summer session standards of practice as determ i ned by the profession; and (4) the of full-time study on the Tampa campus The registered nurse seNurse Pract ice Act Professional nurses provide leadership through quence is designed so that registered nurses can enroll in the participation in professional and community organizations. As nursing major on a full-time basis on the Tampa campus, or on responsible citizens, nurses contribute to the promotion of quality specific university campuses Registered nurses who ertroll as fullhealth care by participation as knowledgeable members of society time students may complete requirements for the bachelor's dein activities that influence the health of individuals, families, groups gree in three semesters If they enroll as part-time students, the and communities degr.ee requirements can be completed in five to six semesters The discipline of nursing is an integral part of the system of The program is accredited by the National League for Nursing higher education and is responsible for the development and disand approved by the Florida State Board of Nursing Graduates of semination of knowledge The discipl i ne is also responsible for the basic sequence are eligible to write the qualifying examination promoting and preserving the historical and philosophical founda-for licensure as a registered nurse by the State of Florida Board of tion of the profession Knowledge is developed through identificaNursing. Graduates also may apply for licensure i n other states tion of models for systematic thought; constructing and testing Graduates of the undergraduate program have the educational theories for nursing; and conducting research The discipline background necessary for graduate study in nursing. disseminates knowledge for nursing through scholarly publications The College of Nursing encourages applications from qualified and presentations; and through curriculums that prepare for entry appl i cants of both sexes and from all cultural, racial religious, into professional pract i ce and for entry into areas of special ized ethnic, and age groups The College of Nursing uses selective practice and research In these curriculums the teaching-learning criteria for the admission of students Limitations on enrollments process is a cooperative enterprise in which learners have the are determined on the basis of availability of sufficient qualified freedom to learn and teachers have the freedom to teach Learning faculty, laboratory and classroom facilities, and clinical teaching is viewed as a lifelong process of social, psychological, and intellecresources. Florida residents are given priority tual growth essential for performing the funct i ons of professional nursing Professional Nursing Philosophy Nursing is a profession and a discipline sanctioned by society Its essential goal is health which is expressed within the context of per sonal, interpersonal and social systems The focus for professi onal nursing is human beings interacting in a variety of environments for the purpose of pursuing health or a dignified death. Nursing is a transactional process which establishes mutually set goals with individuals, groups, families and communities for the purpose of providing health activities and care of the sick, injured, and dying The complex processes used by nursing are perce i ving, thinking, relating,/"udging acting and interacting These processes require the use o a scientific body of knowledge to assess, plan, implement, and evaluate nursing care Concepts which are the central focus for the practice of profes sional nursing are human beings, society environment and health Human beings are unique and holistic, and are characterized by open systems of transaction with their environment. They are per ceptual; purposeful; action, time and goal oriented. Human beings communicate through their use of language and other symbols .that reflect individual, group, and societal differences Society encompasses individual, group, family and community values, norms and expectations. The United States is a pluralistic, democratic, dynamic society in continuous change as exemplified by increased technological advances However, the freedom of in dividuals and groups is protected by the laws and the behavioral norms of this social system. Environment is comprised of ecosystems which support the interactive process of the personal, interpersonal, and social sys tems. Nursing systems strive to promote, provide, and support healthy environments as an integral aspect of professional nursing practice Health is viewed within the context of dynamic life experiences of individuals, groups, families, and communities Health implies continuous adjustment to stressors and challenges in the internal and external environment through use of resources in order to achieve maximum potential for optimum functioning Health is UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM TERMINAL OBJECTIVES UPON GRADUATION, GRADUATES WILL: 1. Use the nursing process as the basis for nursing practice in primary, secondary and terti ary care settings to assist individual clients, famil ies or groups of clients of all cultures and ages in the promotion and maintenance of health, prevention of illness, coping with actual and perceived threats to health, restoration of health, habilitation and rehabilitation 2 Participate cooperatively with other health care professionals and community leaders i m assessing community health needs and planning and providing essential services 3 Practice within the legal/ethical parameters of professional nurs ing 4 Utilize knowledge of concepts, principles, theories, and models underlying nursing practice to guide clinical decision making. 5 Utilize appropriate principles of leadership in providing leader ship w i thin the health system of the profession. 6. Exercise clinical judgment needed to apply clinical data and re search findings from nursing and related fields in nursing parctice Undergraduate Education In Nursing Qualified students with no previous preparation in nursing, and registered nurses who are graduates of associate degree or hospital programs are eligible for admission The undergraduate program in nursing is an upper division major at the University of South Florida. The University's general education distribution requirements and College of Nursing prerequisite/support courses can be completed on the Tampa campus or at any local community college, university or college that offers the general education distribution. These can be completed prior to transfer to USF for the nursing major

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COLLEGE OF NURSING 121 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1'91/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Students who enroll at USF in the lower division are admitted to Undergraduate Studies They must meet the requirements for ad mission to the University, and should follow the procedures for admission to the University in thi s Catalog . Applications for admission to the University may be obtained by contacting the Office of Admissions, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. College graduates and transfer students from other undergraduate nursing programs are also eligible for admission to the major on a space available basis. Transfer students may not be admitted to the College of Nursing unless they are eligible for admission to the University Official transcripts certifying completion of all requirements for admission must be available to the College of Nursing before admission is confirmed and enroll ment perm i tted Basic students are admitted in the Fall semester of each year The deadline for University application is January 4 of the year in which the student plans to enroll. ARplications are available from: Office of Admissions, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. In addition, a separate application must be submitted directly to the College of Nursing by February 1, prior to the Fall semester College applications are available from : College of Nurs ing, Office of Student Affairs, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612. Registered nurse students are admitted to the College on a more flexible basis contingent upon completion of admission require ments, and the availability of the appropriate sequence of nursing courses on the campus to which they are seeking to pursue coursework. The deadline for receipt of an application from regis tered nurse students is the University deadline date for the semester in which they intend to enroll For more specific information, contact the College of Nursing Office of Student Affairs HONORS PROGRAM An Honors Program in Nursing is available for highly qualified students. Emphasis is on individual research and creative scholar ship and each student is required to complete and defend orally an undergraduate thesis. OVERALL REQUIREMENTS 1 Completion of 60 semester hours of college-level work with a cumulative grade-point average of 2 5 Credit received on the basis of CLEP or Advanced Placement examinations or other appropri ate procedures may be included to meet some of these require ments 2 Completion of the University of South Florida general education d i stribution requirements as part of the above These require. ments may be satisfied by the completion of 40 semester hours in the following areas with not less than 6 semester hours in each area : a English Composition b. Humanities/Fine Arts c Mathematics/Quantitative Methods* d. Natural Sciences* e. Social Sciences* 3 Students with an A.A. degree (other than in nursing) will be con sidered to have met all of the USF General Education Distribution requirements but also must meet specific college requirements in the areas marked.* 4. Students are required to meet the University requirement for foreign language Admission Requirements In order to be considered for fulf admission to the college, the applicant must : 1 Submit an application to USF by the appropriate deadline 2 Submit an application and all supporting materials, including transcripts, to the College of Nursing by the appropriate dead line. 3. Maintain a minimum grade point ratio of 2.5 with a grade of "C' or better in each general education support course 4 Complete prior to enrollment in the major all those general edu cation and specific general education support courses required for admission to the major. 5 Complete all general education support courses with not more than two (2) repeated courses and not more than one (1) repeat of any given course. 6 Complete the College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) and the writing and computation course requirements of 6A-10 30. 7 Complete an approved cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BCLS) course prior to enrollment. 8 Provide evidence of computer literacy. 9. Provide evidence of current licensure in Florida if enrolling in the program as a registered nurse 10 Provide evidence of recent work in nursing if enrolling in the program as a registered nurse. In addition to the minimum requirements listed above, appli cants will be evaluated on factors which are relevant to program completion and professional nursing practice: cumulative grade point average, performance in specific courses, and ability to com municate verbally and in writing All applicants who appear to be eligible for admission may be interviewed Those applicants with the highest total rankings are accepted in order until the quota is filled. As vacancies occur prior to the enrollment date, those next on the list are accepted to fill them. Enrollment of all students is contingent upon verification through official transcripts of satisfactory completion of all requirements for admissions. Conditional Admission Policy for Registered Nurses RN students who have not completed their general education re quirements may be adm itted conditionally to the College of Nurs ing. Students may enroll in selected nursing courses while complet ing these requirements Nursing courses may be selected from the following: NUR 3117 Introduction to Professional Nursing NUR 3007 Nursing Process NUR 3066C Client Assessment I NUR 3706 Nursing Concepts in Secondary Care NUR 3706L Nursing Practicum I NUR 3829 Ethical/Legal Aspects i n Nursing and Health Care NUR 4165 Introduction to Research Electives The following courses are restricted to fully admitted students: NUR4707, NUR4707L, NUR4827C, and NUR4943L. Students who are admitted conditionally must satisfy written contract require ments Specific Course Requirements The College of Nursing requires certain courses within the general education distribution for the natural, social and behavioral sciences, and mathematics. These requirements are outlined below Suggested courses are also included The student must : 1) earn a grade of "C' or better in each course, 2) repeat no course more than once, 3) repeat no more than two (2) courses. Courses taken at another institution will be evaluated individually on the basis of content. Students in Florida community colleges can obtain infor mation about equivalent courses from their counselors or by con tacting the College of Nursing Office of Student Affairs (813-9742191 ) 1 Mathematics/Quantitative Methods: completion of at least one course in mathematics that meets the Gordon Rule requirement and one course in statistics a Mathematics -one course in college level algel:h must be completed with a grade of "C' or better. CLEP subject exams are acceptable b Statistics -one course in statistics must be completed with a grade of "C' or better. ST A 3122 2. Natural Sciences: minimum of 14 semester credits (excluding anatomy, physiology and microbiology). Each course taken to-

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122 COLLEGE OF NURSING UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1H2/t3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG ward meeting this requirement must have completed with 1 College of Nursing Nutrition Challenge Examinations: a total of a grade of "C' or better At least one course must include a 3 semester credits can be earned by any undergraduate student laboratory or have a corequ i site laboratory course. At least 6 to meet the course requirement in nutrition Information about semester credits must have been completed by the admissions the College examination in nutrition may be obtained by contact-application deadline ing the Colle!,Je of Nursing Office of Student Affairs, University a Biology-min i mum of 6 semester credits Courses should in-of South Florida elude content in 1) cell theory, 2) biolog ical transport, 3) ge2 Registered nurses who are graduates of diploma may netics 4) evolution, 5) phylogenetic survey of plant and receive 23 semester general elective lower level credits through animal kingdoms, 6) ecology, etc. successful completion of the ACT/PEP examinations in nursing. BSC 2010, and BSC 2011. CLEP is acceptable These credits do not apply toward meeting the University reb Chmistry A minimum of 6 semester credits. Courses quirement of 40 upper level credits, or toward meeting the should include content in 1) principles of chemistry, 2) requirements of the upper level nursing major. The credits structure of matter, 3) atomic and molecular structure, 4) earned by passing the ACT/PEP examinations in nursing apply states of matter, 5) chemical formulas and nomenclature, 6) only to the B .S. degree with a major in nursing offered by the solutions, 7) chemical kinetics and equil i brium, 8) theory and College of Nursing Additional information about the ACT/PEP practice of quantitative analysis, 9) organic chemistry examinations may be obtained from the Office of Evaluation and CHM 2041, 2046 or *CHM 2030, 2031 can be part i ally met Testing, University of South Florida with CLEP. 3. Registered nurses who are graduates of associate degree pro*Chemistry sequence for non-science majors grams may receive up to 23 semester general elective lower level c Othr the remaining credits can be earned by coi:npleting credits for their previous nursing education additional courses in biology and chemistry, or in genetics, 4 Both basic and registered nurse students may earn up to 6 physics, physical science, etc. (A course in non-quant i tative semester credits and fulfill the college's prerequisite require-physics is rec ommended but nQ1 required ) ment in anatomy and physiology through successful completion 3 Social Sciencescompletion of each of the following with a grade of the ACT /PEP examination in anatomy and physiology, and up of "C' or better i n each course to 3 credits in microbiology through successful completion ofthe a. American Govrnmnt one course iri modern American ACT/PEP examinat i on in microbiology. government or state and local government. CLEP is accept able POS 2041, POS 2112, PAD 3003, POT 4204, POS 4424 b Individual and Social Community Behavior: compltion of at IHst thr .. coursH with at IHst on cours in psychology and on cours in sociology and one addi tional course in psychology sociology anthropology geron tology or human sexual behavior CLEP is acceptable 4 Supporting Sciences: All courses must be completed prior to full adm ission to the nursing major w i th a grade of "C' or better i n each course a. Microbiology one course CLEP is not acceptable APB 3110 or MCB 3030C. The ACT/PEP examination in microbi ology is acceptable. b Anatomy and Physiology one course. A combined course in anatomy and physiology which is equivalent to APB 3190 is acceptable or ind i vidual courses. The ACT/PEP examina tion in anatomy and physiology is acceptable. c Nutrition one course College of Nursing Challenge Exami nation or University of Florida correspondence course are ac ceptable HUN 2201 d Human Growth and Dv.lopmnt (Lif Span) Must include b i rth through aging process to death HUS 4020 or DEP 3103 and GEY 3000 or DEP 4005 and GEY 3000 N.B. Each of the above courses are not offered every semester ; therefore, the student shoul<;J plan his or her enrollment schedule with care. CLEP is not acceptable CLEP Examinations In accordance with University policies College Level Examination Program (CLEP) general and subject exami nations may be taken in several areas. CLEP examinations must be taken according to the University or community college policies related to CLEP. The CLEP general examinations apply toward the distribution requirements at USF, and successful performance results in cred i t for any one or all five of the requ ired areas. In addit i on credit may be earned for a number of College of Nursing support courses, including : American Government POS 2041; English Composition ENC 1101, 1102; Biology BSC 2010 BSC 2011; General Chemistry CHM 2041, CHM 2046; and Statistics STA 3122. Additional information may be ob tained from the Office of Evaluation and Testing, University of South Florida. ACT /PEP and College of Nursing Examinations Successful completion of the following examination(s) can be used to fulfill course requ i rements as designated below: Degree Requirements Students will be certified for the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in nursing upon completion of a minimum of 126 semester hours composed of general educat i on requirements, science sup port courses (phys ical, biological, social and behavioral), upper level and nursing elect ives, and required nursing courses A minimum grade of "C' or better must be attained in each course in the major and cumulative grade point ratio of 2 0 or better must be maintained throughout the program At least 40 semester hours must be upper level work (courses numbered 3000 or above). At least 60 semester hours must be earned from a baccalaureate degree-granting institution regardless of credit hours transferred from a Commun i ty/Junior College unless prior written approval has been received from the college of the student's intended major Nursing Courses Basic Baccalaureate Sequence Jun ior Year (2 semesters) NUR 3117 Introduction to Professional Nursing (3) NUR 3615 Nursing Process I (3) NUR 3615L Nursing Intervention I (2) NUR 3066C Client Assessment I (2) NUR 3829 Ethical-Legal Aspects in Nursing and Health Care (2) NUR 3456 Nursing Process II (2) NUR 3456L Nursing Intervention II (3) NUR 3536 Nursing Process Ill (2) NUR 3536L Nursing Intervention Ill (2) NUR 3067C Introduction to Community Health Nursing (2) Senior Year (3 semesters) NUR 4165 Introduction to Research (2) NUR 4285C Nursing Process IV (1) NUR 4256 Nursing Process V (2) NUR 4256L Nursing Intervention IV (4) NUR 3835 Leadership-Management Aspects in Community NUR 4257 NUR 4257L NUR 4258 NUR 4265 NUR 4837 NUR 4946L Health Nursing (2) Nursing Process VI (2) Nursing Intervention V (6) Nursi ng Process VII (2) Nursing Process VIII (2) Leadership/Management and Role Transition (3) Preceptorsh i p (6) In addition to the requ i rements listed above, a minimum of 10 credits in upper level electives will be required for graduation: at least six (6) cred i ts in upper level courses in general education

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123 COLLEGE OF NURSING UNIVERSfTY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -rn2/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG (courses in arts, humanities, natural or behavioral sciences, economNUR 4165 Introduction to Research (2) ics, business or management, education, etc., are acceptable) and NUR 4707 Nursing Concepts in Primary Care (4) at least four (4) credits in nursing electives (NUR 4935, Selected NUR 4707L Nursing Practicum II (3) Topics in Nursing, and/or NUR 4905C, Independent Study in NUR 4827C Leadership/Management Concepts for Nursing Nursing, are currently used for this purpose). Practice (4) NUR 4943L Nursing Practicum Ill (4) Nursing Courses Registered Nurse Sequence (3 semesters) NUR 3007 Nursing Process (2) NUR 3829 Ethical-Legal Aspects of Nursing and Health Care (2) NUR 3117 Introduction to Professional Nursing (3) NUR 3066C Client Assessment I (2) NUR 3706 Nursing Concepts in Secondary Care (4) NUR 3706L Nursing Practicum I (2) In addition to the requirements listed, a minimum of 1 O credits in upper level electives is required for graduation: at least six (6) credits in upper level courses in general education (courses in arts, humanities, natural or behavioral sciences, economics, business or management, education, etc., are acceptable) and at least four (4) credits in nursing electives {NUR 4935, Selected Topics in Nursing and/or NUR 4905C, Independent Study in Nursing are currently used for this purpose).

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -flltlal UNDERGRA.DUA TE CATALOG Courses offered for credit by the University of South Florida are Cooperative Education listed on the following pages in alphabetical order by college and Content Specializations subject area. Counselor Education The first line of each description includes the State Common Criminology Course prefix and number (see below), title of the course, and Curriculum and Instruction number of credits Dance Credits separated by a colon indicate concurrent lecture and Distributive and Marketing Education laboratory courses taught as a unit: Economics PHY 3040, 3041L GENERAL PHYSICS & LABORATORY (3:1} Electrical Engineering Credits separated by commas indicate unified courses offered in Elementary Education different semesters: Engineering Technology AMH 2010, 2020 AMERICAN HISTORY I, II (4,4) English Credits separated by a hyphen indicate variable credit: English Education HUM 4905 DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-5} Finance The abbreviation #var. also indicates variable credit: Foreign Language Education MAT 7912 DIRECTED RESEARCH (var. ) Foundation Courses in The following abbreviations are utilized in various course de-Business (Graduate) scriptions : Foundations Education PR Prerequ i site French (Language) C l With the consent of the instructor General Business Administration CC With the consent of the chairperson of General Foreign Languages the department or program Geography CR Corequisite Geology Lee. Lecture Gerontology Lab. Laboratory German (Language) Dem. Demonstration Government & International Affa irs Pro. Problem Greek (Classics) Dis. Discussion Hebrew (Language) 6A Courses to satisfy Rule 6A-10 30 (Gordon Rule) Higher Education The University reserves the ri11ht to substitute, not offer, or History add courses that are listed in this catalog. Honors Program Humanities Humanities Education Alphabetical Listing of Departments and Programs Course descriptions are listed by college under the follow ing department and program headings: Department/Program Accounting Administration/Supervision Adult Education African and Afro-American Studies Air Force ROTC American Studies Ancient Studies (Religious Studies) Anthropology Arabic (Language) Army ROTC Art Art Education Astronomy Basic and Interdisciplinary Engineering Biology Botany (Biology) Business and Office Education Chemistry Chemical Engineering Chinese Civil Engineering and Mechanics Classics Common Body of Knowledge Communication Communication Science and Disorders Computers in Education Computer Science and Engineering Computer Service Courses College Business Administration Education Education Arts and Sciences Uni versitywide Courses Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences University-wide Courses Fine Arts Education Arts and Sciences Engineering Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Education Arts and Sciences Engineeri ng Arts and Sciences Engineering Arts and Sciences Business Administration Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Education Engineering Engineering Human Services Industrial and Management Systems Industrial/Technical Education Informat i on Systems and Decision Sciences Interdisciplinary Studies International Studies Italian (Language) Japanese (Language) Language Latin (Classics) Liberal Studies Library, Media and Information Studies Linguistics Management Marine Science Marketing Mass Communications Mathematics Mathematics Education Measurement and Research Mechanical Engineering Medical Technology Microbiology (Biology) Military Science Music Music Education Nursing Off-Campus Term Philosophy Physical Education Elective Physical Education for Teachers Physics Polish (Langauge) Political Science Portuguese (Language) Psychology Public Administration University-wide Courses Education Education Arts and Sciences Education Fine Arts Education Business Administration Engineering Education Engineering Arts and Sciences Education Business Administration Education Business Administration Education Arts and Sciences Business Administration Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Education Arts and Sciences University-wide Courses Arts and Sciences Education Arts and Sciences Engineering Education Business Administration Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Business Administration Arts and Sciences Business Administration Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Education Education Engineering Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences University-wide Courses Fine Arts Education, Fine Arts Nursing University-wide Courses Arts and Sciences Education Education Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 125 UNIVERSITY Of SOUTH FLOlllOA-fHZ/tJ UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Public and Community Health Education Reading Education Public Health Education Rehabilitation Counseling Religious Studies Romance Russian (Language) Social Science Education Social Sciences, Interdisciplinary Social Work Sociology Spanish (Language) Special Education Theatre Women's Studies Yoruba Zoology (Biology) Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Education Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Education Fine Arts Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences Cross-Listing of Departments and Programs Alphabetically by College, Department/Program College/Department/Program University-wide Courses Air Force ROTC Cooperative Education Honors Program Military Science (Army ROTC) Off-Campus Term College of Arts and Sciences African and Afro-American American Studies Anthropology Biology Biotechnology Botany Chemistry Classics Greek Latin Clinical Chemistry Communication Criminology Ecolllomics English Common Course Prefixes AFR COE IDH MIS OCT AFA AMS ANT BIO, BOE BOT CHM, CHS CLT GRE, GRK, GRW LAT, LNW CHC SPE CCJ ECN AML, CRW, ENC, ENG, ENL, LAE, LIN, LIT, REA General Biology BSC Geography GPY Geology GLY Gerontology GES, GEY Government and International Affairs GIA International Studies INT Political Science POL Public Administration PAD History HTY Humanities HUM Natural Sciences INS Interdisciplinary Social Sciences ISS Language General Foreign Languages Arabic Chinese French German Hebrew Italian Japanese FOL ARA CHI FLE, FRE, FRW GER, GEW HBR ITA, ITW JPN Polish POL Portuguese POR, POW Romance FOW Russian RUS, RUT, RUW Spanish SPN, SPW Yoruba YOR Liberal Studies IDS Library, Media, & Information Studies COP, LIS Linguistics ESL, LIN, PHI, TSL Mass Communications ADV, FIL, JOU, MMC, PGY, Mathematics Medical Technology Microbiology Philosophy Physics Psychology Religious Studies Ancient Studies Science Sociology Social Science Education Women's Stud ies Zoology College of Business Administration PUR, RTV, VIC MAE, MTH MET MIC PHH, PHI, PHM, PHP PHE,PHS, PHY PSY GRE, REL CLA, HEB SCE* soc SSE* WST zoo Accounting ACG, TAX Common Body of Knowledge (Graduate) Economics Finance General Business Administration Information Systems & Decision Sciences Management Marketing College of Education Administration/ Supervision Adult Education Art Education Business and Office Education Computers in Education Content Specializations Counselor Education Curriculum and Instruction Distributive & Marketing Education Physical Education Elective Elementary Education English Education Foreign Language Education Foundations Education Higher Education Humanities Education lndustrial/T echnical Education Measurement-Research Music Education Physical Education for Teachers Reading Education Science Education Social Science Educat ion Special Education GEB ECO, ECP, ECS, GEB FIN, REE, RMI BUL, CGS, COC, GEB, MAN COC, CGS, GEB, QMB MAN, QMB MAR EDA, EDS ADE, PEP, PET ARE, EOG BTE CAP, CGS, EDF, EME ARE, ENE, FLE, MAE, MCE, SCE, SEO, SSE EGC, SLS EDE, EOG, EDM, ESE, LAE, THE DEC DAA, PEL, PEM, PEN, J>EQ, PET ARE, EDE, EOG, EDS, EEC, HLP, LAE, MAE, MUE, RED, SCE, SSE LAE FLE EDF, SPS EDH HUM ETA, EVI, EVT EDF MUE HES, LEI, PEQ, PET RED SCE SSE EOG, EEO, EEX, EGI, ELD, EMR, EPH, EVI

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126 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA f'92/'3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG College of Enginffring Basic and Interdisciplinary Engi neering Chemical Engineering Civi l Engineering and Mechanics Computer Science and Engineering Computer Service Courses Electrical Engineering Engineering Technology Industrial and Management Systems Mechan i cal Engineering College of Fine Arts Art Dance Music Music Education Theatre College of Nursing Nursing College of Pubic Health Public Health EGN ECH, EMC CEG, CES, CGN, CWR, EES, EMA, ENV, TIE CAP, CDA CGS, CIS, COC, COP, COT, EEL, ESI CAP, CDA, COC, COP EEL, ELR ETE, ETG, ETI, CGS EIN, ESI EAS, EMC, EML, ENU ARH, ART DAA, DAN MUC, MUG, MUH, MUL MUN MUO, MUS MUT, MVB, MVK, MV.P, MVS, MW, MVW MUE THE, TPA, TPP HUN, NUR HSC, PHC Cross-Listing Departments/Programs Alphabetically by Prefix Common Course Prefix Department/Programs ACG Accounting ADE Adult Education ADV Mass Communications AFA African & Afro-American Studies, Women's Studies AFH African & Afro-American Studies, History AFR Air Force ROTC AFS African & Afro-American Stud ies, International Studies Program AMH African & Afro-American Stud ies, History AML English AMS American Studies, Women's Studies ANT Anthropol ogy, Women's Studies APB Biology Microbiology (Biology) ARA Arabic (Language) ARE Art Education, Content Specializations, Elementary Education ARH Art ART Art ASH History ASN International Studies Program AST Astronomy sec Medicine SCH Chemistry BMS Medicine, Medical Sciences BOT Biology, Botany (Biology) SSC Biology STE Business & Office Education SUL General Business Administration CAP Computer Service Courses, Computer Science and Engineering, Mathematics Education Computers in Education, Content Specializations CBH CCJ CDA CES CGN CGS CHM CHS CIS CJT CLA CLP CLT coc COE COM COP COT CPO CRW CWR DAA DAN DEC DEP EAS ECH ECI ECO ECP ECS EDA EDE EDF EDG EDH EDM EDS EEC EED EEL EES EEX EGC EGI EGM EGN EIA EIN EIV ELD ELR EMA EMC EML EMR ENC ENE ENG ENL ENU ENV ENY EPH Psychology Criminal Justice Computer Service Courses Computer Science and Engineering Civil Engineering & Mechanics Civil Engineering & Mechan ics Engineering Technology Chemistry Chemistry Computer Science & Engi neering Criminology Ancient Studies (Religious Studies), Classics Psychology Classics Computer Service Courses, Computer Science & Engi neering, General Business Administration, Information Systems & Decision Sci ences Cooperative Education Communication Computer Service Courses, Computer Science & Engi neering, Library, Media & Information Studies, Mathematics Computer Science & Engineering African & Afro-American Studies, Political Science English Civil Engineering & Mechanics Dance, Physical Education Elective Dance Distributive & Marketing Education Psychology Civil Engineering & Mechanics Chemical and Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering and Mechanics Economics African & Afro-American Studies Economics Economics Administration/Supervision Curriculum, Elementary Education Foundations, Measurement-Research, Computers in Education Art Education Curriculum, Communication-Speech Communicat i on, Elementary Education, Special Education Higher Education Curriculum Elementary Education Administration/Supervision Elementary Education Special Education Computer Science & Engineering, Electrical Engineering Civil Engineering & Mechanics Special Education Counselor Education Rehabilitation Counseling Special Education Civil Engineering & Mechanics Basic & Interdisciplinary Engineering Industrial & Technical Education Industrial & Management Systems Engineering Industr i al & Technical Education Special Education Electrical Engineer i ng Civil Engineering & Mechanics Chemical & Mechanical Engineering Chemical & Mechanical Engineering Special Education English Computers in Education, Content Speci alizations English English Chemical & Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering and Mechanics Zoology (Biology) Special Education

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 127 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA H!ll/93 llNDERGRADUATE CATALOG ESE Curriculum MAN Foundation Courses in Business (Graduate), General BusiESI Industrial & Management Systems Engineering, Computer ness Administration, Management Science Engineering MAP Mathematics ESL Linguistics MAR Marketing ETE Engineering Technology MAS Mathematics ETG Engineering Technology MAT Mathematics ETI Engineering Technology MCB Microbiology (Biology) EUH History MEL Medicine EUS International Studies Program MET Geography EVI Special Education MGF Mathematics EVT lndustrial/T echnical Education MHF Mathematics EXP Psychology MIS Military Science FIL Mass Communications MLS Medical Technology FIN Finance MMC Mass Communications FLE Content Specializations Foreign Language Education, French MTG Mathematics (Language) MUC Music FOL General Foreign MUE Elementary Education, Music Education FOW Romance (Language MUG Music FRE French MUH Anthropology, Music FRW French Language MUL Music GEA Geography MUN Music GEB Common Body of Knowledge, Economics, General BusiMUO Music ness Administration Information Systems & Decision MUS Music Sciences MUT Music GEO Geography MVB Music GER German (Language) MVK Music GEW German (Language) MVP Music GEY Gerontology MVS Music GIA Government & International Affairs MW Music GLY Geologr MVW Music GMS Medica Sciences, Medicine NGR Nursing GRE Greek (Classics), Religious Studies NUR Nursing GRK Greek OCB Marine Science GRW Greek Classics occ Marine Science HBR Hebrew (Language) OCE Geology, Marine Science HEB Ancient Studies (Religious Studies) OCG Marine Science HES Content Specialization, Physical Education for Teachers, OCP Marine Science Public Health ORI Communication HIS History PAD Public Administration HLP Elementary Education PCB Marine Science, Microbiology (Biology), Zoology HSC Public Health (B1oogy) HUM African & Afro-American Studies, Humanit ies, Humanities PEL Physical Education Elective Education PEM Physical Education Elective HUN Nursing PEN P'Xiical Education Elective HUS Human Services PEP A ult Education IDH Honors Program PEQ Physical Education Elective, Education for Teachers IDS Honors Program, Liberal Studies, Off-Campus Term PET Physical Education Elective, P ysical Education for TeachINP Psfr'hology ers, Adult Education INR A rican & Afro-American Studies, International Studies Pro-PGY Mass Communications, Art gram, Political Science PHH Philosophy ISM Information Systems & Decision Sciences PHI Linguistics, Philosophy ISS African & Afro-American Studies, International Studies ProPHM African & Afro-American Studies, Philosophy gram, Social Sciences Interdisciplinary PHP Philosophy ITA Italian PHS Physics ITW Italian Language PHY Physics JPN Japanese (Language) POR Portuguese (Language) JOU Mass Communications POS Political Science, Women's Studies LAE Curriculum, Elementary Education, English, English EducaPOT Political Science ti on POW Portuguese (Language) LAH History PPE Psychology LAS International Studies Program PSB Psychology LAT Latin (LanJiuage) PSY Psfrchology LEI Physical E ucation for Teachers, Sociology PUP A rican & Afro-American Studies, Political Science LIN Communication, English, Linguistics PUR Mass Communications LIS Med i a and Information Studies QMB Informat ion Systems & Decision Sciences Management LIT Englis Women's Studies REA English LNW Latin (passics) RED Elementary Education, Reading Education MAA Mathematics REE Finance MAC Mathematics REL Religious Studies, Women's Studies MAD Mathematics RMI Finance MAE Content Specializations, Elementary Education, Mathemat-RTV Mass Communications ics, Mathematics Education RUS Russian (Language)

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128 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA fft:?/fJ UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG RUT RUW SCE SED SLS SOP sow SPA SPC SPN SPS SPW SSE STA SUR SYA SYD SYG SYO SYP Russian (Language) Russian (Language) Content Specializations, Elementary Education, Science Education Communication, Communication-Speech Communication, Speech Communication-English EducatLon Content Specializations Counselor Education Psychology, Women's Studies Human Services, Social Work Communication Science & Disorders Communication Spanish (Language) Foundations Spanish (Language) Content Specialization, Elementary Education, Social Science Education Mathematics, Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Civil Engineering and Mechanics Sociology Sociology Sociology Sociology Sociology TAX THE TPA TPP TSL TIE URP VIC WOH WST YOR zoo Lower Level Upper Level Accounting Theatre Theatre Theatre Linguistics Civil Engineering & Mechanics Geography, Political Sciences, Public Administration Mass Communications History History, International Studies Program, Women's Studies Yoruba (Lan9uage) Biology, Manne Science, Zoology (Biology) COURSE LEVEL DEFINITION 0000. 1999 Freshman Level 2000-2999 Sophomore Level 3000-3999 Junior Level 4000-4999 Senior Level Graduate Level 5000-5999 Senior/Graduate Level 6000.Up Graduate Level

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UNIVERSITY-WIDE COURSES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1!191/93UNDERGRADUA TE CATALOG COOPERATIVE EDUCATION Associate Director : Ray Easterlin, Assistant Director : TBA. AEROSPACE STUDIES Professor : Lt Col Clemens E Uptmor; Assistant Professors : Capt James J Chambers, Capt Darryl E. Rogers, Capt Jeffrey M Plate. HONORS PROGRAM Director : Stuart Silverman (Instructors for the Honors courses are re cruited from among the University's outstanding teacher-scholars). MILITARY SCIENCE Professor : LTC Howard M Abney, Jr. ; Assistant Professors : MAJ Elton L. Fowler, MAJ J A Fraley, Jr., CPT Michael-S. O'Neil, CPT Peter T Owen OFF-CAMPUS TERM Director: D Keith Lupton COOPERATIVE EDUCATION COE 1940 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 1 ST TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: 30 hours of academic credit, acceptance in Cooperative Education Program (S/U only ) COE 1941 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 2ND TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 1940 (S/U only ) COE 2942 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 3RD TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 1941. (S/U only ) COE 2943 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 4TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 2942 (S/U only ) COE 3944 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 5TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 2943 (S/U only.) COE 3945 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 6TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 3944. (S/U only ) COE 4946 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 7TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 3945. (S/U only ) COE 4947 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 8TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 4946. (S/U only ) COE 4948 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 9TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 4947 (S/U only ) COE 4949 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 10TH TRAINING EDUCATION (0) PR: COE 4948. (S/U only.) AEROSPACE STUDIES AFR 1101 THE AIR FORCE TODAY : ORGANIZATION AND DOCTRINE (1) Introduction to the Air Force in the contemporary world through a study of its total force structure and mission AFR 1120 THE AIR FORCE TODAY: STRUCTURE AND ROLES (1) A study of the strategic offensive and defensive forces, general purpose forces, and aerospace support forces that make up the Air Force of today AFR 2001 LEADERSHIP LABORATORY (0) Leadership Laboratory is required for each of the Aerospace Studies courses It meets one hour per week Instruction is conducted within the framework of an organized cadet corps with a of experiences designed to develop each students leadership potential. Leadership Laboratory involves a study of Air Force customs and courtesies; drill and ceremonies; career opportunities in the Air Force; and the life and work of an A ir Force junior officer Students develop their leadership poten tial in a practical laboratory, which typically includes field trips to Air Force installations. AFR 2130 U.S. AIR POWER: ASCENSION TO PROMINENCE(1) A study of air power from balloons and dirigibles through the jet age Emphasis is on the employment of air power in WWI and WWII and how it affected the evolution of air power concepts and doctrine AFR 2140 U.S. AIR POWER: KEY TO DETERRENCE (1) A historical review of air power employment in military and nonmilitary operations in support of national objectives Empha sis is on the period from post WWII to present. AFR 2150 FIELD TRAINING (0) Field Trai ning is offered during the summer months at selected Air Force bases throughout the United States. Students in the four-year program participate in four weeks of Field Training, usually between their sophomore and junior years Students applying for entry into the two-year program must successfully complete six weeks of Field Training prior to enrollment in the Professional Officer Course (POC). The major areas of study in the Field Training program include junior offi cer training, aircraft and aircrew orientation, career orientation, survival training, base functions and Air Force environment and physical training. AFR 3220 AIR FORCE LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT-I (3) An integrated management course emphasizing the indiv i dual as a manager in an Air Force milieu. The individual motivational and behavioral processes, leadership, communication, and group dynamics are covered to provide a foundation for the develop ment of the junior officer s professional skills as an Air Force officer (officership) The basic managerial processes involving decision making, utilization of analytic aids in planning, organ izing, and controlling in a changing environment are empha sized as necessary professional concepts AFR 3231 AIR FORCE LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT-11(3) A continuat i on of the study of Air Force advancement and lead' ership. Concentration is on organ i zational and personal values, management of forces in change, organizational power, poli tics, and managerial strategy and tactics are discussed within the context of the military organization Actual Air Force cases are used to enhance the learning and communication processes AFR 4201 NATIONAL SECURITY FORCES IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN SOCIETY I (3) A study of the Armed Forces as an integral element of society, with an emphasis on American civil-military relations and context in which U S defense policy is formulated and implemented Special themes include : societal attitudes toward the military and the role of the professional military leader-manager in a democratic society Students will be expected to prepare individ ual and group presentations for the class, write reports and otherwise participate in group discussions, seminars, and confer ences AFR 4211 NATIONAL SECURITY FORCES IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN SOCIETY II (3) A continuation of the study of the Armed Forces in contempo rary American society Concentration is on the requisites for maintaining adequate national security forces; political, eco nomic, and social constraints on the national defense structure; the impact of technological and international developments on strategic preparedness; the variables involved in the formulation and implementation of national security policy; and military justice and its relationship to civilian law. Students will be expected to prepare individual and group presentations for the class, write reports and otherwise participate in group discus.. sions, seminars, and conferences Proficiency in communicative skills must be demonstrated

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130 UNIVERSITY-WIDE COURSES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA fff2/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG OFF-CAMPUS TERM IDS 4900 DIRECTED READINGS (1-4) PR: OCT Program approval. Open to all students approved for OCT Program Provides students with community related read ings May be repeated up to 8 credit hours IDS 4910 DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-4) PR: OCT Program approval. To provide students with community related research experience in areas of specific interest. May be repeated up to 8 credit hours IDS 4942 OFF-CAMPUS TERM SOCIAL ACTION PROJECT (1-4) PR: OCT Program approval. May be repeated up to 4 credit hours (S/U only ) MIS 1400 FUNDAMENTALS OF LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT (1) Basic leadership techniques and principles, professional ethics, senior-subordinate relationships, leadership problems, basic coun seling and management techniques MIS 2601 MILITARY TRAINING MANAGEMENT AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNIQUES (1) Develops an understanding of the fundamental concepts in volved with methods of instruction, training management and curriculum development in the military. Actual student prepara tion and presentation of instruction will be an integral part of the course. IDS 4943 OFF-CAMPUS TERM SPECIAL PROJECT PR: OCT Program approval. (S/U only.) IDS 4955 OFF-CAMPUS TERM INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM MIS 2610 LEADERSHIP ASSESSMENT (1) (1-2) Course will include an introduction to interpersonal skills re quired for effective leadership and diagnostic leadership assess ment exercises. Topics will also include immediate first aid and (1-2) injury prevention. PR: OCT Program approval. (S/U only ) HONORS PROGRAM University Honors Students must take all of the following including 2 semesters of either Thesi s or Project (but not both) IDH 2010 ACQUISITION OF KNOWLEDGE (3) PR: Admission into the Honors Program. An appreciation of the problems of how human understanding proceeds through op erations such as perception, classification, and inference, among others, as well as the open philosophic questions behind these operations. IDH 3100 ARTS/HUMANITIES HONORS (3) PR: IDH 2010 An introduction to western arts and letters from the perspectives of three period's terms (classicism, romanti cism, and modernism), the relationship of ideas to art, the similarities among the arts of a given period, and important differences between periods. IDH 3350 NATURAL SCIENCES HONORS (3) PR: IDH 2010. An exploration of current knowledge concernin9 fundamental principles in the Sciences, their potential for appli cation and attendant ethical and philosophical questions. IDH 3400 SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES HONORS (3) PR: IDH 2010 Introduction to the concerns of the Social and Behavioral Sciences, methods of inquiry, discovery, and valida tion of knowledge A survey of the way various disciplines examine the question of how society is organized IDH 3600 SEMINAR IN APPLIED.ETHICS (3) PR: IDH 2010. This course explores ethical issues related to selected torics such as Ethics of Technology, Ethics in Business, BicrMedica Ethics, Personal Ethics Development. IDH 4000 HONORS PROGRAM SEMINAR (3) PR: IDH 2010 A course designed to prepare students for inde pendent research The class will be responsible for determining course content and requirements under the supervision of a faculty mentor This course is taken for 2 semesters. IDH 4950 HONORS PROJECT (3) PR: Senior Honors Standing The development of and public presentation of a special project such as an original musical com position, dramatic piece, etc under the direction of a mentor. Course is taken for 2 semesters IDH 4970 HONORS THESIS (3) PR. Senior Honors Standing The developement and public pres entation of a senior thesis under the direction of a mentor Course is taken for 2 semesters MILITARY SCIENCE Students not attending on an Army Scholarship may take the 1000 and 2000 level courses with no obligation to the Army Army Scholarships and Service obligation options are discussed in class. MIS 1000 ORGANIZATION OF THE ARMY AND ROTC (1) Introduction, purpose, and obligation of the Army and ROTC. In troduction to military customs and traditions; rank structure and the role of an Army officer MIS 3302 SMALL UNIT OPERATIONS (3) PR: Permission of Department Provides training required by junior officer to direct and c?ordinate indivi duals in the execution of offensive and defensive tactical m1ss1ons. Also provides exposure to military weapons and communica tions systems found at this level. MIS 3404 LEADERSHIP FUNDAMENTALS TACTICS AND CAMP PREPARATION (3) PR: Permission of Department Improves cadet proficiency in those military subjects necessary to '!'eet miniml!m standards.of technical competence and self
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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY Of SOOTH FLOlll/lA-7H26'3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG AFRICAN AND AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES Interim Director: N C. James; Associate Professor: K R Glover; Visiting Faculty: B. Anthony-Davis; Other Faculty : F U Ohaegbu lam, P. Taylor. AMERICAN STUDIES Chairperson: J. B. Moore; Professors: J B. Moore, R. E Snyder; Associate Professor : R A Banes; Assistant Professor: P. J Brewer; Other Faculty: S A. Zylstra. ANTHROPOLOGY Chairperson : S D. Greenbaum; Professors: M V. Angrosino, R T Grange, Jr. G Kushner, A Shiloh, C. W Wienker, J. R Williams, A W. Wolfe; Associate Professors: R D Baer, S. D Greenbaum, J J Smith, P. Waterman, N M White, L. M Whiteford; Assistant Professors: S. B Burkhalter, L. Madrigal; Courtesy Faculty : C. Bryant, A. Chairetakis, J. Coreil, N Henderson, T Purcell, J D Uzzell, M D Vesperi. ASTRONOMY Director: C. A. Williams; Professor: C. A. Williams (Mathematics Department), Visiting Professor: G Hammond. BACHELOR OF INDEPENDENT STUDIES Director: K. E. Kearney; Area Coordinators : J Bell (BIS Humanities), H Mushinsky (BIS Natural Sciences), P. Waterman (BIS Social and Behavioral Sciences). BIOLOGY Chairperson : M R. Alvarez ; Professors: M R. Alvarez, S S Bell, B C. Cowell, C. J Dawes, F. E. Friedl, G W Hinsch, J M Lawrence, D V. Lim, R. L. Mansell, E. D. McCoy, J C. Ogden, R. Richmond, C. Riggs, G. G Robinson, J. T Romeo, J L. Simon, S L. Swihart, D. Testrake, G E Woolfenden, R. P. Wunderlin; Professors Emeriti : N McClung, G. E Nelson, W. S. Silver; Associate Professors: G. W. Arendash, J. V. Betz, B. J. Cochrane, M L. Dao, F. I. Eilers, F. B. Essig, H R Mushinsky, M. J Saunders, G J. Stewart; Assistant Professors: D D Dunigan, S. Edwards, P Motta, P Stiling, A. Wells; Lecturers: C. Hendry, A A. Latina CHEMISTRY Chairperson : S W Schneller; Distinguished Research Professors: R M Castle, B Stevens; Professors: J S Binford, Jr. R S Braman, J C. Davis, Jr., J E Fernandez, G R Jurch, Jr. L. Mandell, D. F Martin, P. C. Maybury, G Meisels, G R. Newkome, E D Olsen, T. C. Owen, S W. Schneller, T W G Solomons, R. D Whitaker, E Wickstrom, J. H. Worrell; Associate Professors: S. H. Grossman, M D Johnston, Jr., R. M. O'Malley, J A. Stanko, J E Weinzierl, G R Wenzinger ; Assistant Professors: A T. D' Agostino, R L. Potter ; Adjunct Faculty : J. A. Barltrop, R Benson; Courtesy Faculty : M. Ben, D P Borris, R Conan, B. B Martin, W. Menyhert, J. W Palmer, L. H Garcia-Rubio, W. E Swartz, Jr. CLASSICS Chairperson: A L. Motto; Professor: A. L. Motto; Associate Professor: J. D Noonan; Assistant Professor: J . S Campbell; Courtesy Professor : A Starr; Other Faculty: J R Clark, W M Murray, J F. Strange, G K Tipps COMMUNICATION Chairperson: T. L. Albrecht; Professors: T L. Albrecht, A P Bochner, K. N Cissna, P. J. Newcombe, L.S. Pettegrew, R J Schneider; Associate Professors: B F. Downs, C. J Jablonski, N .C. James, A D Payne, M L. Vanderford ; Assistant Professors: M G Garko M Neumann; Other Faculty: D H Smith COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS Chairperson : A. M Guilford; Professors: A M. Guilford, S. I. Ritterman, J. F Scheuerle, D C. Shepherd, E R. Silliman, W. Strange; Associate Professors: J. B. Crittenden; Assistant Professors: T Hnath-Chisolm, L. Mack; Instructors : N Diss, C. Fernandez, M. Witkind; Visiting Instructor : S Diehl; Distinguished Professor: S 0 Richardson; Other Faculty : W. T Collins, K Hollahan, B Loeding, N. Mahecha. CRIMINOLOGY Chairperson : W. R Blount; Professors: W R. Blount, R. Dembo, I. J Silverman, M Silverman, L Territo; Associate Professors: J B Halsted, K M Heide, T. Mieczkowski, J. T Reilly, M Vega; Assistant Professors: C. Greek, C. Sellers, L. Smith, R M Stanford; Courtesy Appointment : C. Wienker; Academic Administrator: M. Johnson. ENGLISH Chairperson : W. T Ross; Professors: J P. W Rogers (DeBartolo Chair in the Liberal Arts), L. R Broer, J R Clark, S M Deats, H. A Deer, I. Deer, R F Dietrich, F J Fi!bry, S R Fiore, W Garrett, J. S. Hatcher, E. F. Henley, J P Hinz, E W Hirshberg (Emeritus), J J. Iorio, D L. Kaufmann, J. B. Moore, W E Morris, R S. Pawlowski, W D Reader, W T Ross, S J Rubin, W. H. Scheuerle, E. E Smith, D A. Wells; Associate Professors: A.G Bryant, R. E Chisnell, R M Figg Ill, R E Hall, M C. Harmon, W. J. Heim, J W Holman, E. A. Metzger, J .M Moxley, G. A. Olson, P J Sipiora, N J Tyson, R. D Wyly, Jr. Assistant Professors: R M. Baum, P. J Collins, R. L. Hewitt, E. A. Hirsh, F T. Mason, F J. Zbar; Lecturers: l.F. Ceconi (Emerita), V. W. Valentine (Emerita). GEOGRAPHY Chairperson: R T. Aangeenbrug; Professors: R. T. Aangeenbrug, D M Stowers; Professor Emeritus : R. H Fuson; Associate Professors: H. J Schaleman, J W Stafford; Assistant Professors: K. Archer, R Brinkmann, J E. Garcia, M B Lindberg; Lecturer: R C. Holmes. GEOLOGY Chairperson: M T Stewart; Professors: R A. Davis, Jr. M T. Stewart, S. B Upchurch; Associate Professors: M. J Defant, H L. Vacher; Assistant Professors: W. D. Allmon, L. L. Robbins; Courtesy Faculty : Professor: R B Halley, A. Rosenzweig, A. H Sallenger, T. M Scott; Research Associates : P E Desautels, B W Leyden, G Schwartzman, R Stewart; Assistant Curators : B R Marcin, E J Marcin. GERONTOLOGY Chairperson : L. C. Mullins; Professors: J. I. Kosberg, L. C. Mullins, T. A. Rich, S V Saxon, H. Sheppard; Associate Professors: J L. Garcia, W P Mangum; Assistant Professor: K Sohn; Adjunct Professors: C. Barresi, K Bates, B. Burton, D Burr, M Etten, J. Freeman. HISTORY Chairpersort: R P Ingalls; Distinguished Research Professor: L. A Perez, Jr.; Professors: R 0 Arsenault, J. M. Belohlavek, C. B. Currey, R P Ingalls, S F Lawson, G H Mayer, G R Mormino; Associate Professors: D R Carr, N A Hewitt, G. H. Kleine, W M. Murray, K A Parker, E. M Silbert, J. M. Swanson; Assistant Professors: G. Benadusi, F Ottanelli, G K Tipps, R J. Van Neste; Other Faculty : C. W. Arnade HUMAN SERVICES Coordinator : L. C. Mullins; Professors: J. I. Kosberg, T A Rich, T J Northcutt, Jr. S V Saxon; Associate Professors: J L. Garcia, W P Mangum.

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132 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERS/rf OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1991(93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG HUMANITIES Chairperson : A J. Sparks; Professors: C. B Cooper, S L. T B. Hoffman (Emeritus), H. Juergensen G S Kashdin (Ementa), E. M MacKay (Emerita), D Rutenberg, A. J. Sparks, S A Assistant Professor: J. D'Emilio ; Courtesy Professor: Laszlo J Heteny1. INTERDISCIPLINARY SOCIAL SCIENCES Director : J B Snook; Professor : S M D. Stamps, Jr.; Associate Professor: J. B. Snook ; lecturer: R Gagan INTERNATIONAL STUDIES Director : M.M. Amen; Professors: C. W. Arnade, H W Nelsen, M T Orr; Associate Professors: M M Amen, R Barylski, A. Hechiche S S Northcutt, D Slider ; Assistant Professors: E Conteh-Morgan, P. Ruffin ; Assistant Professor Emeritus : J W. Palm; Joint Appointments : Professors F J Ohaegbulam, S D H Vanden; Associate Professor: K. R Glove r R Khator; Assistant Professor. M Milani. LANGUAGE Directo; : R W Cole ; Professors: G A. Brulotte, C. W. Capsas, R.W Cole, D lerardo, E J. Neugaard, V E Peppard R A Preto-Rodas, R A Stelzmann, C. E. Scruggs; Associate Professors: C. J. Cano, R A Cherry, Jr.,M. Esformes, W H Grothmann, W. R Hampton C. M Probes J C. Tatum LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE Interim Director : F C. pfister ; Professors: J A McCrossan F C. pfister, A. Prentice; Professor Emeritus : J. K. Gates, A.G Smith ; Associate Professors: B El-Hadidy J. M Knego H M. Smith T C. Wilson; Courtesy Associate Professor: Y. L. Ralston; Assi stant Professor: V Gregory LINGUISTICS Professors: C. J. Cargill, R W : Cole, R. C. O'Hara ; Associate Professor: J. C. Caflisch MARINE SCIENCE Chairperson : P R Betzer; Professors: N J Blake, R H Byrne, K. L. Carder, L. J Doyle, K. A. Fanning, G. R Gust P Hallock-Muller, A C. Hine T L. Hopkins, J H. Paul. W M Sackett, J J. Torres, E S Van Vleet, J J. Walsh, R H. Weisberg; Professors Emeriti: J C. Briggs, H J Humm ; Associ ate Professors: B M E Luther G A. Vargo; Assistant Professors: J. S Compton F Muller Karger D F Naar, R R Wilson Jr.; Courtesy Professors: R A. Davis, B Halley, C. W. Holmes, G. Litman, W R Parker, A Sallenger, S Schott, A C. Smith, Y Tardy; R. Wollast; Courtesy Associate Professors: R C. Baird S. B Gallagher G E. Rodr i ck, K A Steidinger ; Courtesy Assistant Professor: A B Meylan, R G Muller E C. Peters J. E Reynolds; Courtesy lecturers: R A. Davis, S Gallagher S Schott MASS COMMUNICATIONS Director : D L. Dickerson; Professors: R Dardenne R L. Kerns G M Killenberg, M Lucoff; Associate Professors: D S Bag)ey I ll, T Counts D L. Dickerson, W G. Fudge N C. H Regis; Assist(fnt Professors: K F Brown, L. Z Leslie, R M i ller, B K Petersen, G Werner, R. Wilber; lecturers : S Laurion W. F Moyse, D. Togie Jr; Professors Emeriti: A. M Sanderson; Courtesy Professors: W M Brady, R. B Brown, R. J Haiman, P A Kemp W A Morse, D. B. Rochelle, K D. Stanton D R. Walbolt J E Young MATHEMATICS Chairperson : K L. Pothoven ; Distinguished Service Professor: A W Goodman; Distinguished Research Professor: E B Saff ; Professors: W E Clark, M Ismail, A G Kartsatos,.,J. J. Liang Y F Lin, M N Manougian, A Mukherjea, R K Nagle, A N V Rao, J S V Totik, C. P Tsokos, C. A Williams ; Professors Emeritus : J R Britton D C. Rose; Associate Professors: R W R Darling S Isaak S Y Lin, M M Mcwaters, M E . Parrott, K. L. Pothoven, J. H. Reed, B Shekhtman W R Stark, E A. Thi eleker F J Zerla ; Assistant Professors: G L. McColm, R W Oberste-Vorth, J. F Pedersen, K M Ramachandran, W E Williams Y You MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY Director : E D Olsen ; Professors: F E. Friedl, E D Olsen; Associate Professor : S H. Grossman D T TeStrake ; Assistant Professors: D D Dunigan R L. Potter; Courtesy Professors: K. W. Barwi ck (Bapt i st Medical Center) I. L. Hospital) W Memorial Regional Center) L. J Davis, (Bayfront Medical Center), N M. Hardy (University Medical Center/Jacksonville) R F Holcomb Hospital), F : C : Holland (Baptist Medical Center), R Popp1t1., Jr. (N)ount Sinai Medical Center) ; Courtesy lecturers : G. Atz (Baptist Medical Center), S. Carreiro (Mount Sinai Medical Cente r), L. General Hospital) A. Pla9ge (Tallahassee Memorial Med ical Center), P (Flo ri da Hospital) J Schurig (Baytront Medical Center) J Sigler (University Medical Center PHILOSOPHY Chairperson : J A Bell; Professors: J P Anton, J A Gould : L. L. McAlister, K B S il ver, W H Tru itt, R C. Weatherford, K. W1redu; Distinguished Research Professors: K S Shrader Frechette, S P Turner ; Associate Professors: J A. Bell, R N Taylor, J B Vfaugh ; Courtesy Associ ate Professor : M Mye r son ; Courtesy Professor: D. J Fas ching. PHYSICS Chairperson : S Sundaram ; Professors: S. C. Bloch, S R Deans, N. Djeu R W Flynn, N. C. Halder, L. Jastrzebski w,. D Jones, D K K i llinger, J Lagowski, S Sundaram; Professor Ementus: Guy Forman ; Associate Professors: J L. Aubel, H R Brooker R S F Chang, R W Clapp, L. Clarke; Assistant Professors: Prit ish Mukherjee, S Witanachchi; lecturer : D D Spurgin. POLITICAL SCIENCE Chairperson : S MacManus ; P r ofessors : R. A. Factor, S. MacManus, F U Ohaegbulam H E Vanden ; Assoc i ate Professors: J E Benton, M T Gibbons, K R Glover, W. E H u lbary A. E Kelley, R M Khator, A B Levy, D. G Paulson P N Rigos, J B snook; Assistant Professors: M M Milani L. W Morehouse PSYCHOLOGY Chairperson : L.A. Penner; Distinguished Research Professors: J J. J enkins, C. D. Spielberger ; Professors: J. M Anker, W C. Borman, J L. Brown R Fowler, E L. Gesten M S Goldman, M W. Hardy, B N. Kinder, R C. LaBarba, E L. Levi ne, C. E Nelson, D L. Nelson, L.A.' Penner, R W. Powell J Sandler J. B Sidowski, F Sistrunk, P. E. Spector, D. E Stenmark P N Strong ; Professor Emeritus : H. H Meyer; Associate Professors: J A Becker, T M. Brannick, J'. M. Clingman M D Coovert, M A. Finkelstein D McGuinness, W P. Sacco, J. K. T hompson; Assistant Professors: C.R Cimino, V Phares, T Sanocki S Schne i der-Wr ight, T Shi mizu ; Courtesy, Adjunct, and Joint Appo i ntments : K E Achenbach H P Bahrick,H B Clark, M. E Clar k M T Dickey, M G Dow, J A. Eison, G Greeley K. Jenkins Hall N R Hall, W L. Hartman E B K i mmel, M D Knox W E Lee Ill, C. L. McEvoy, D McK i nstry K McNelis, J Robyak E Salas, L. Schonfeld W P Schultz, D V. Sheehan, 0 Skalkos, A A. Smith, L. Smi t h, T F Stokes, R Vanderploeg, S Wa l fish .1. R. Weiner, H. C. West, G L. Wood, S Zheutlin PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION Director : W J Pammer, Jr.; Professors: J E Jreisat S A MacManus, D C. Menzel ; Associate Professor : W J Pammer, Jr.; Assistant Professors: J L. Daly M Y : Mongkuo, D Rahm. REHABILITATION COUNSELING Chairperson : C. M P i nkard ; Professors: J. F Dickman, W. G Emener J. D Rasch; Assoc i ate Professors: P. Gross, M. J Landsman, C. M Pinkard T J Wright.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND. SCIENCES 133 UNIVERSITY Of SOUTH FLORIDA H92/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG RELIGIOUS STUDIES Chairperson: J. F Strange; D J Fasching, N Katz, J. F Strange, W C. Tremmel; D1stmgwshed Research Professor: J Neusner Associate Professors: D Jorgensen, S. Mandell, M G Mitchell;' Other Faculty: J S Hatcher, E E Smith. SOCIAL WORK Chairperson: B. L. Yegidis; Professor : T J. Northcutt, Associate Professors: J. A. Giordano, T. U. Hancock, W S. Hutchison, Jr., P. R. Newcomb, A. A Smith, P L Smith, R J Wilk, B L. Yegidis; Assist'!nt Professors: P. A d'Oronzio, C. S. Roberts, K. Sohn, A. L. Strozier; Courtesy Faculty. Professor: J. I. Kosberg; Associate Professor. M. L. Coulter. SOCIOLOGY Chairperson : D. Harper; Professors: R G. Francis, E G. Nesman, D Harper, ,R. H Wheeler; Associate Professors: G. A. Brandmeyer, C. S. Ellis, B. G Gunter, R A. Hansen, M B Kleiman, H A Moore, M Orru; Assistant Professors: J Friedman, L. W Kutcher WOMEN'S STUDIES Chairperson: J. B Snook; Professors: L. L. McAlis!er J. Ochshorn; Associate Professors: M Myerson, J Snook; Assistant Professors: J E Borchert, K Vaz; Courtesy Associate Professors: R A. Banes, N Norvell, L. M. Whiteford; Other Faculty : E. B Breit. AFRICAN AND AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES AFA 2001 INTRODUCTION TO THE BLACK EXPERIENCE (IN AFRICA AND ITS DIASPORA) -6A (3) Fundamental perspectives on the nature and signific?r:ice ?f the Black Experience in Africa and the black communities in the Americas. AFA 4150 AFRICA AND THE UNITED STATES (3) An examination of the historical and current political, economic, and cultural relations between the United States and Africa. (Also listed under International Studies ) AFA 4331 SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND THE AFRO-AMERICAN COMMUNITY (3) A study of social institutions as they relate to the African American Community, with emphasis on social systerns operat. ing within and on the African-American community. AFA 4335 BLACK WOMEN IN AMERICA (3) An interdisciplinary survey of the contemporary experience ol black women in America, including the African roots myths and realities surrounding that experience. (Also listed under Women's Studies ) AFA 4900 DIRECTED READINGS (2-3) Independent readings in a particular area o! African and Afro American Studies, selected by student and instructor AFA 4931 SELECTED TOPICS IN AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES (1-3) Topics offered are selected to reflect student needs and faculty interests In depth study in such areas as Black and the American Educational Process; the Black Experience in the Americas; European Expansion in Africa to 19th century; Con temporary Economic Problems in Africa. AFH 3100 AFRICAN HISTORY TO 1850 (3) An outline survey of pre-colonial African history including a prefatory introduction to the use of primary sources (such as .ar chaeology, oral tradition, cultural ar:ithropology, comparative linguistics, documents) in reconstructing the African past. (Also listed under History.) AFH 3200 AFRICAN HISTORY SINCE 1850 (3) Survey of the colonial and post
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134 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1992/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG gravestones, toys, automobiles, and the material subcultures of ANT 3410 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) women, African-Americans and communal societies. PR: ANT 2000 or Cl. Discussion of major methods of and orienAMS 3370 SOUTHERN WOMEN: MYTH AND REALITY (3) tations to the crosscultural study of the world's peoples Repre-An analysis of the myths surrounding Southern Women, this sentative case studies are used to demonstrate variations in course will identify these myths, discern their sources and human adaptations and to encourage an appreciation of diverse and contrast thern with history (Also offered under values and lifestyles. Women's Studies. ) ANT 3511 BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) AMS 3700 RACISM IN AMERICAN SOCIETY (3) PR: ANT 2000 or Cl. Non-human primates, the fossil record and An introduction into the causes and effects of racism in Amerithe biology of races are surveyed in order to understand the can history, literature, art, the media, and folklore Related human animal as a product of biosocial phenomena. Anatomy, concepts of ethnocentrism and class conflict will also be studied . genetics, culture and evolution are emphasized. (Also offered under African and Afro-Amer.ican Studies.) ANT 3610 ANTHROPOLOGICAL LINGUISTICS (3) AMS 3930 SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (1-4) PR: ANT 2000 or Cl. The comparative study of language in its Offerings include Cultural Darwinism in America, America cultural context, especially emphasizing the role of language in Through Foreign Eyes, and The Female Hero in American the cultural interpretation of physical and social reality. Culture. ANT 4034 THEORIES OF CULTURE (3) AMS 4152 FILM IN AMERICAN CULTURE (3) PR: Senior standing with major in anthropology or equivalent. Surveys the contributions to American Culture of major films, The major concepts that form the anthropological view of studios, directors, stars, theaters, and controversies from the humanity are viewed in historical perspective Basic ideas of the perspectives of genres and styles, critical methodologies and western philosophical tradition are analyzed from the Greeks to theories. Variable topics such as: series on a region, director, per-the 19th century when they became incorporated into the new former, subject, or period of time discipline of anthropology 20th century anthropological devel-AMS 4910 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-4) opments on these themes are considered. The content of the course will be governed by student demand ANT 4124 ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD METHODS (4) and instructor interest. Instructor approval required prior to reg-PR: ANT 3100 or Cl. Normally offered as part of a Summer Field istration Session. Students also take Florida Archaeology and Laboratory AMS 4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (1-4) Methods in Archaeology. Emphasis on appropriate methods of Offerings include American Painting: its social implications, archaeological excavation and recovery and recording of data. Technology in Twentieth Century America, American Environ-ANT 4153 NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY -6A (3) mental Problems, Popular Culture in America, American Military PR: ANT 3100 or Cl. An examination of the evidence regarding Experience, and Labor in America .PR: Senior in American Studies the human settlement of North America from its beginnings or Cl. through the development of aboriginal culture to the period of AMS 4935 SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES (4) European conquest. Emphasis on the comparative study of PR: Senior in American Studies or Cl. material culture at selected sites from all time periods No field AMS 4936 SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES (4) work is involved PR: AMS 4935 or Cl. ANT 4158 FLORIDA ARCHAEOLOGY (4) PGY 3000 PHOTOGRAPHY IN AMERICAN CULTURE (3) PR: ANT 3100 or Cl. The content of prehistoric cultures such as A survey of photography as an art and a craft in America since Paleolndian, Weeden Island, and Safety Harbor are reviewed the mid-nineteenth century Attention devoted to technological and examined in terms of their temporal and spatial relationships innovations, leading personalities, major movements, and to each other and the Eastern U.S. Normally offered as part of memorable icons. Open to majors and non-majors. a Summer Field Session. Students also take Field Methods in Ar ANCIENT STUDIES See Religious Studies ANTHROPOLOGY ANT 1001 THE HUMAN ADVENTURE (2) This course examines the anthropological evidence relevant to controversial questions concerning human origins, social prac tices, human and animal communication, and ancient societies Not for major credit. ANT 2000 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3) The crosscultural study of the hurnan species in biological and social perspective. Surveys the four major branches of anthropol ogy : physical anthropology (human biology), archaeology (the analysis of the prehistoric and historic remains of human cul tures), anthropological linguistics (the analysis of language in its cultural context), and cultural anthropology (the crosscultural study of peoples living in the world today, be they in tribal, peasant, or urban societies) ANT 3005 THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE (3) For non-anthropology majors only Presents the basic concepts of anthropology as they are relevant to contemporary life. Aims at enabling the student to understand the anthropologist's crosscultural view of the human species as adapting through biosocial means to life on this planet. May not be counted for credit toward an anthropology major. ANT 3100 ARCHAEOLOGY (3) PR: ANT 2000 or Cl. The crosscultural study of humankind from its beginnings up to and including the historic period through the recovery, description, and analysis of the remains of past cul tures and societies. chaeology and Laboratory Methods in Archaeology. ANT 4162 SOUTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) PR: ANT 3100 or Cl. Describes and analyzes the sequence of cultural development in prehistoric South America. Cultures such as the Inca, Chavin, Mochica, Wari, Chimu are included. Emphasis on the environmental setting ahd the relationship between cultural ecology and the growth of civilization ANT 4163 MESOAMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) PR: ANT 3100 or Cl. The chronological sequence from its begin nings through Protohistoric development is described and analyzed. Cultures such as the Maya, Aztec, Mixtec, Zapotec, Olmec, and Toltec are included, with emphasis on the environ mental setting and the relationship between cultural ecology and the growth of civilization. ANT 4172 HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 6A (3) PR: ANT 3100 or Cl. A survey and analysis of archaeology focused on the historic period. Laboratory research with data recovered from historic sites in addition to classwork. ANT 4180 LABORATORY METHODS IN ARCHAEOLOGY (4) PR: ANT 3100 or Cl. Normally offered as part of a Summer Field Session. Students also enroll in Florida Archaeology and Field Methods in Archaeology. Data recovered in excavation are cleaned, catalogued, identified, and analyzed in the laboratory ANT 4181 MUSEUM METHODS (4) PR: ANT 3100 and Cl. Design, preparation and installation ol exhibits in the Department of Anthropology Teaching Exhibit Gallery Emphasis on theory, research, design, and construction Discussion of museum-related issues such as administration and cu ration.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 135 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -'"2/tl UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG ANT 4226 ANTHROPOLOGY OF ART -6A (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. An examination of the relationship between the visual arts (sculpture, painting masks, carving, etc ) and culture in non-Western societies. Emphasis on formal symbolic and functional comparative analysis of specific art styles based on crosscultural materials Consideration of diffusion and change of art forms, commercial and ethnic arts, and role of the artist. ANT 4231 FOLKLORE -6A (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. Focuses on crosscultural methods and tech niques regard i ng the collection, classification, and analysis of such materials as myths, jokes, games, and items of mater ial culture African (or African-derived), Oceanic and Native Ameri can societies are surveyed ANT 4241 MAGIC AND RELIGION -6A (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. The crosscultural study of the social and cultural aspects of religion Religious activities i n traditional and modern societ ies will be discussed Ritual behavior religious practitioners and symbols of belief will be considered in light of their impact on the social. political or economic aspects of peoples' lives ANT 4302 SEX ROLES IN CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. Focuses on various theories, models and beliefs about male-female behavio r s and interactions in human cultures throughout history and in various societ ies in the world today (Also offered under Women s Studies ) ANT 4305 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. The use of photographic techniques for the crosscultural recording and analysis of human act i vities The study of ethnographic photography as both art and sci ence, and the production of an anthropological study that expresses the goal of 'visual literacy Review and evaluation of the uses of visual techniques and the evidence they provide to the social scientist ANT 4312 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. An exam i nation of the evidence for the origin and antiquity of human beings in North America and -of patterns of regional development until the period of contact with European colon ists. Emphasis on varieties of ecological adaptation, social political and religious systems, enculturation and worldview, folklore and visual art. ANT 4316 THE UNITED STATES (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. Special concerns include the American com munity, change and continu ity in American values and lifestyles, and the historical background and recent manifestations of human problems in the United States ANT 4324 MEXICO AND CENTRAL AMERICA -6A (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. Focuses on the history, contemporary values and interpersonal relationships, and patterns of rural and urban life in Mesoamerica Guatemala and Mexico are emphasized. ANT 4340 THE CARIBBEAN -6A (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. Main themes include: the depopulation of the aboriginal populat i on and the resettlement of the area via slavery, indenture and migrat i on ; contemporary ethnic hetero geneity; economic problems of Third World microstates; devel opment of a modern soc ial and political consciousness. Reli gious diversity, music, the graphic arts, and the literature of the contemporary Caribbean will also be surveyed ANT 4367 THE MIDDLE EAST (3) PR: ANT 341 O or Cl. Delineates the environment and cultural ecology of the Middle East and analyzes how they have influ enced the variety of subcultures of the region The rise and fall of the 'little tradition' of the enduring folk cultures will be analyzed Contemporary culture change will be analyzed in a temporal perspective ANT 4432 THE INDIVIDUAL AND CULTURE6A (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. The relationsh i p between the individual and society is studied crossculturally Main themes include child rearing practices psychosomatic illness and curing Discussion 'of theories and models of personality development with special reference to the i r applicab i lity to the emerging field of crosscultural mental health plann i ng ANT 4442 URBAN LIFE AND CULTURE (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. The crosscultural study of urbanization, ur banism and human problems associated with metropolitan en vironments Emphasis on the ethnographf of city l i fe and its relationship to the practical applications o urban research. ANT 4462 HEALTH, ILLNESS, AND CULTURE (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. The study of health and human behavior in crosscultural perspective Main themes include: the impact of disease on the development of human culture; comparative studies of curing practices; medical systems in their relationship to ideology Emphas i s on understanding the role of medicine, and the behavior of both practitioners and patients in modern societies ANT 4495 METHODS IN CULTURAL RESEARCH (3) PR: Cl. The stages in the development and execution of ethno logical research are discussed and practiced Literature search, hypothesis formation selection of data collection techniques, elicitation of information, data analys is, and report presentation are stressed Research design models from the case literature are studied and supervised research in the local community is designed and carried out. ANT 4542 CULTURE AND HUMAN EVOLUTION (3) PR: ANT 3511 or Cl. A survey of the many ways in which behavior and technology influence the biology of prehistoric and modern human populations Phenomena such as mating practices, ur banization, and dietary habits are related to humans as animals Behavior genetics and sociobiology are covered ANT 4552 EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OF THE PRIMATES (3) PR: ANT 3511 or Cl. A survey of non-human primates focusing on biological and evolutionary patterns Anatomy, genetics and evolution are stressed; major primate types are surveyed for their biological adaptation. Primate sociobiology is discussed. ANT 4583 tl_UMAN VARIATION (3) PR: ANT 3511 or Cl. An overview of evolution and biological variations of human races. Anatomical, morphological, and physiological patterns are surveyed geographically. Cultural influences on racial biology are explored ANT 4586 PREHISTORIC. HUMAN EVOLUTION (3) PR: ANT 351 1 or Cl. A survey of the fossil record from the early primates through the ascent of Homo sapiens sapiens, focusing on the human lineage Biosocial patterns and cultures of the past are also covered. ANT 4620 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE -6A (3) PR: ANT 3610 or Cl. Examines the relationships between lan guage and culture in crosscultural perspective. Explores the extent to which languages shape the world views of their speakers. Emphasis on the nature and degree of fit between linguistics and other cultural systems of knowledge ANT 4705 APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. A review of approaches applying the anthro pological perspective to contemporary human problems Particular emphasis placed on public policy issues in United States society D i scussion of the historical development of applied anthropology, problems of economic development of the Third World, and the ethics of applied research and intervention. ANT 4750 LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL INTERACTION 6A (3) PR: ANT 3610 or Cl. Examines the role of language and other modes of communication in the social settings of speech com munities. Student field projects focus on the crosscultural de scription and analysis of patterns of communication in ethno graphic contexts ANT 4901 DIRECTED READING (1-4) PR: Cl. Ind i vidual guidance i n concentrated reading on a selected topic in anthropology Contract required prior to registration ANT 4907 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (2-4) PR: Cl. Individual guidance in a selected research project. Con tract required prior to registration ANT 4930 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3) PR: Cl. Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special interests to be ex plored. May be repeated as topics vary.

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136 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA rn2q3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG ANT 4932 HONORS SEMINAR (4) AST 3652 NAVIGATION (3) PR: Admission to the honors program in anthropology and Cl. PR: Some knowledge of geometry, algebra and trigonometry Seminar designed to provide the hono r s student with an opporTimekeeping, use of sextant, constellations, celestial navigation tunity to present, discuss and defend his/her own research and with minimum equipment, spherical astronomy. to explore in-depth topics in several areas of anthropology AST 3930 SELECTED TOPICS IN ASTRONOMY (1-4) ANT 4935 RETHINKING ANTHROPOLOGY -6A (3) PR: Cl. Course content will depend upon the interest of the PR: Senior standing with major in anthropology, or equivalent faculty member and student demand May be repeated up to 8 Through discussion of readings and student papers, students re-credit hours think and reevaluate anthropology as a discipline and the inte-AST 5506 INTRODUCTION TO CELESTIAL MECHANICS (3) gration of its branches and specialty fields. Students develop and PR: MAC 3313 or MAC 3283 and some knowledge of differential articulate their current images of anthropology equations, or Cl. The two-body problem, introduct i on to HamilANT 4970 HONORS THESIS {3) tonian systems and canonical variables, equilibrium solutions PR: Adm issi on to the honors program, completion of the honors and stability, elements of perturbation theory seminar and Cl. The student under the supervision of a faculty AST 5932 SELECTED TOP1c;:s IN ASTRONOMY (1-5) member will formal ize, conduct analyze, and report in writing PR: Senior or advanced junior standing or Cl. Intensive coverage a research project in anthropology (S/U only ) of special topics to suit needs of advanced students ANT 5904 DIRECTED READING (1-4) PR: Cl. Individual guidance in concentrated reading on a selected topic in anthropology. Contract required prior to registration ANT 5915 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (2-4) PR: Cl. Individual guidance in a selected research project Con tract required prior to registration ANT 5937 SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY (2-4) PR: Graduate standing Topics to be chosen by students and instructor MUH 4054 FOLK MUSIC (3) PR: ANT 3410 or Cl. Examines ethnic musics in America, empha sizing the functions of folk music in rural and urban settings Materials drawn crossculturally are studied i n both relig i ous and secular forms When feas i ble, classwork i s supplemented by l ive performances Technical knowledge of music is not required (May not be counted for credit toward an Anthropology major.) ASTRONOMY AST 2005 ASTRONOMY OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM (4) Introduct i on to the Astronomy of the Solar System. No Physics background assumed. Topics covered include properties of light, stellar coord i nates, timekeeping, eclipses, formation and dy namics of the solar system, propert ies of the sun and planets, space exploration of planets and the moon, life on other worlds. This course is complementary to but independent of AST 2006. Either may be taken before the other or taken by itself AST 2006 STELLAR ASTRONOMY AND COSMOLOGY (4) An introduction to Astrophysics and the structure of the uni verse. No Physics background assumed Topics covered include properties of light stellar coordinates measurement of the physical properties of stars format i on structure and evolution of stars, normal and pecul i ar galax ies, cosmology This course i s complementary to but independent of AST 2005 Either may be taken before the other or taken by itself AST 2032C ILLUSTRATIVE ASTRONOMY (3) Constellations, use of small telescopes, etc apparent moti ons of celestial object's, comets and meteors seasons, weather. Current events in the space program Planetarium and open sky demonstrations Lec. -lab AST 3033 CONTEMPORARY THINKING IN ASTRONOMY (3) PR: Junior or Senior Standing or Cl. Seminar designed to assi st the layman, with no scientific background, in comprehending contemporary developments in Astrohomy Necessary back ground material is provided by the instructor and a text. Topics covered in recent years include the space program, pulsars, x-ray astronomy, black holes, extra terrestrial life, interacting galaxies, cosmology AST 3044C ARCHAEOASTRONOMY (3) PR: Jr. or Sr. Standing or Cl. Astronomical concepts and observa tional techniques used by prehistoric/ ancient peoples for detect ing change of seasons, constructing calendars, predicting eclipses, etc Particular attention is given to Stonehenge, and to works of NA Indians the Maya and Aztecs and the Egyptians Lec.-lab. BIOLOGY APB 1150 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY FOR NON-MAJORS (3) Lectures and demonstrations of selected biological principles, usually taught by television For non-majors only No credit for Bi ology Majors. APB 2130 ENVIRONMENT (3) The application of basic principles of ecology to relevant prob lems and topics relating to man's environmental interaction through consideration of scientific and popular l i terature For non-majors. May be taken by majors for free elective credit. APB 2140 FOOD AND DRUGS (3) The application of basic biological principles to relevant prob lems and topics in nutrition and drugs through the consideration of scientific and popular literature. For non-majors May be taken by majors for free elective credit. APB 2250 SEX, REPRODUCTION AND POPULATION (3) The application of basic biological principles from subject areas to relevant problems and topics through the consideration of scientific and popular literature For non-majors May be taken by majors for free elective credit. APB 3110 MAN, MICROBE AND MOLECULE (3) PR: APB 1150 Or i gin of life, control of disease, environmental quality and the use of microorgan isms as tools in searching for molecular explanations of living phenomena For non-majors No credit for Biology majors BOT 2010C FUNDAMENTALS OF BOTANY (4) PR: BSC 2010 Cell division, genetics, reproduction and develop ment, physiology Lec. -lab. BSC 2010C BIOLOGY 11-CELLULAR PROCESSES (4) PR: CHM 2041 An analysis of biological systems at the cellular and subcellular levels : cell structure and function, respiration, photosynthesis, mitosis and meiosis, genetics, gene expression, and evolution The course is designed for majors and has a laboratory associated with the lecture BSC 2011C BIOLOGY I BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY (4) An analysis of bi ological systems at the organismal and supraor ganismal levels: unity and diversity of life, organismal structure and function, and ecology The course is recommended to be taken before Biology II (BSC 2010). This course is restricted to majors and has a laboratory associated with the lecture. BSC 2932 SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY May be repeated. (1-4) BSC 3263 MARINE BIOLOGY (3) PR: 1 year major s Biology A survey of the marine environment, the types of organisms found inhabiting a variety of marine habitats, and the adaptations of the organisms to those habitats Emphasis is placed on shallow water Florida environments. BSC 4905 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3) PR: Cl and CC. Special ized independent study determined by the student's needs and interests The written contract required by the Department of Biology specifies the regulations governing independent study. May be repeated (S/U only )

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 137 UNIVERSITY Of SOUTH FLORIDA -1'92/'3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG BSC 4910 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PR: Cl and CC. Individual investigation with faculty supervision. (S/U only ) BSC 4930 SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY (1) Senior or advanced junior standing May be repeated once. {S/ U only ) BSC 4933 SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOG:V (1-3) BSC 5931 SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (1-3) Each topic is a course in directed study under supervision of faculty member PCB 3023C CELL BIOLOGY (4) PR: CHM 3211, CHM 3211 Land PCB 3063 A discussion of tne concept and significance of the cell to biology; biological mole cules and metabolic processes within the cell; cellular energy conversion systems; and control of cellular metabolism. Lec.-lab PCB 3063 GENERAL GENETICS (3) PR: 1 year major's Biology Introduction to genetics including tne fundamental concepts of Mendelian, molecular and population genetics Lec.-dis. PCB 4043C PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY (3) PR: 1 year major's Biology An introduction to the basic principles and concepts of ecology at the ecosystem, community, and population level of organization. Lec.-dis. PCB 4064 EXPERIMENTAL GENETICS (3) PR: PCB 3063. Experimental analysis of genetic systems, Lec.-lab PCB 4253 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (3) PR: PCB 3023C. Topics in modern developmental biology to be covered' in lecture and through readings so as to gain a working knowledge and understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cell differentiation in both plants and animals. PCB 4674 ORGANIC EVOLUTION (3) PR: PCB 3063. An introduction to modern evolutionary theory. Lecture onpopulation genetics, adaptations, speciation theory, phylogeny, human evolution and related areas Lec. -dis PCB 5115C CYTOGENETICS (3) PR: PCB 3023C. Survey of the structure and function of cytoplasmic and nuclear components of plant and animal cells. Lec.-lab PCB 5235C PRINCIPLES OF IMMUNOLOGY (3) PR: PCB 3023C or MCB 3030C. Course will emphasize tne biological principles involved i n the vertebrate immune re sponse. It will present the homeostatic, defense, and detrimen tal aspects of the immune system in terms of basic cellular and molecular mechanisms Techniques will be described to familiar ize the student with the types of immunological tools available to the cellular and molecular biolog i st. PCB 5415 BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY (3) PR: ZOO 3203C, PCB 4043C. An emphasis on the evolutionary mechanisms that influence an organisms behavioral responses to environmental events The theoretical framework is pre sented and analyzed. Intended for majors PCB 5525C MOLECULAR GENETICS (3) PR: PCB 3063. Detailed examination of DNA, RNA and protein synthesis; the effects of mutations on proteins, cellular control; selected aspects of viral, bacterial, and fungal genetics PCB 5615 EVOLUTIONARY GENETICS (3) PR: PCB 3063. Examination of factors such as mutation, migra tion, natural selection, and genetic drift which modify the genetic structure of populations. PCB 5835C NEUROPHYSIOLOGY (3) PR: PCB 3023C. A comparative analysis of the physiochemical basis and evolution of nervous systems and sensory mecha nisms. PCB 5845 PRINCIPLES OF NEUROSCIENCE (3) PR: PCB 4743C. Study of the mammalian brain's structure and function, with an emphasis on the neuroanatomy, neurophar macology, and neurophysiology of the human brain Botany BOT 3373 VASCULAR PLANTS: FORM AND FUNCTION (4) PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2011 Introduction to the morphology, adaption and evolution of vascular plants, integrating form and function to understand diversity BOT 3823C HORTICULTURAL BOTANY (2) PR: Course in botany or biology Application of principles botany to give an understanding of basic horticultural opera tions; seed sowing, dormancy growth requirements, vegetative propagation, pruning, and related problems Lec.-lab BOT 4143C FIELD BOTANY (3) PR: BOT 3373 Identification and classification of native and naturalized flowering plants of Florida including historical, cli matic and floristic aspects of plant communities Conducted largely in the field. Lec. -lab {Summer). BOT 4223C PLANT ANATOMY (3) PR: BOT 3373 Comparative studies of tissue and organ systems of fossil and present-day vascular plants. Functional and phylo genetic aspects stressed. Lec. -lab {Fall semester, even years) BOT 4434C MYCOLOGY (3) PR: BOT 3373 or MCB 3030C. A survey of the fungi with emphasis on their taxonomy, morphology, physiology and eco nomic importance. Lec.-lab {Summer) BOT 4503 PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (4) PR: PCB 3023C. Fundamental activities of plants; absorption, translocation, transpiration, metabolism, growth, and related phenomena Lec.-lab BOT 4713C PLANT TAXONOMY (4) PR: BOT 3373 Identification and classification of the more inter esting vascular plants of Florida; angiosperm evolution; prin ciples of taxonomy Conducted largely in the field Lec.-lab {Fall semester, odd years) BOT 4810 ECONOMIC BOTANY (3) PR: BOT 3373 Study of the uses of plants by man for food, chemicals, fibers, and medicines. BOT 4850 MEDICAL BOTANY (3) PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2011, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, Junior standing Study of agents that are produced by plants and that are toxic or psychoactive in human beings or are useful as remedies. BOT 5185C MARINE BOTANY (4) PR: BOT 3373, PCB 4043C. A field course in marine plants with emphasis on ecology and functional morphology. Field work will stress the ecological aspects of plants in a subtropical marine environment in Florida. Lec.-lab. BOT 5938 SELECTED TOPICS IN BOTANY (1-3) Each topic is a course in directed study under supervision of a faculty member. Microbiology MCB 3030C GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY (4) PR: BSC 2010 and 1 year College Chemistry. Organic chemistry and a course in genetics is recommended. Introduction to the biology of microorganisms: structure, physiology, and ecology of bacteria, algae, viruses, protozoa and lower fungi. The laboratory involves preparation of culture media, staining, pure culture methodology, isolation of microbes from-nature, enu meration techniques, resistance to infectious disease. Lee-lab. MCB 4115 DETERMINATIVE BACTERIOLOGY (5) PR: MCB 3030C. Survey of bacterial classification; detailed ex aminations of bacteria important to man in agriculture, in industry and as pathogens. Lee-lab. MCB 4404C MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY AND GENETICS (5} PR: MCB 3030C, PCB 3023C, PCB 3063,JKH 3023 A study of the physiological, metabolic, and genetic phenomena pertinent to understanding the growth, development, ecology, regula tion, and reproduction of microorganisms. The course empha sizes the interdependence of physiological and genetic ap proaches to microbiology. Lee-Lab. MCB 4486 EXPERIMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY (2) PR: MCB 4505C. This course is designed to develop practical laboratory skills and the concepts of experimental analysis in virology, and microbial genetics for microbiology students MCB 4505C VIROLOGY (3) PR: MCB 3030C. The biology of viruses associated with plants, animals, and bacteria will be considered; the nature of viruses, mechanisms of viral pathogeneses, and interactions with host cells

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138 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY Of SOUTH FLORIDA -199laJ UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG MCB 4652C APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL sensory physiology, life history and reproductive behavior Lee. MICROBIOLOGY (4) lab Field trip PR: MCB 3030C A study of the applications of microbiology in ZOO 5475C ORNITHOLOGY (4) industry, agriculture, the biomedical sciences, engineering, and PR: Senior standing i n B i ology The biology of birds Field tnps environmental science. emphasize local avifauna. Lec.-lab MCB 4934 SEMINAR IN MICROBIOLOGY (1) ZOO 5555C MARINE ANIMAL ECOLOGY (4) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing May be repeated (S/U PR: PCB 4043C and ZOO 3203C.lnvestigation of energy flow, only.) biogeochemical cycles, and community structure in marine enviMCB 5206 PUBLIC HEALTH AND PATHOGENIC ronments Lec.-lab. MICROBIOLOGY (3) PR: MCB 3030C. A comprehensive survey of pathogenic mi crobes responsible for disease in man and other _animals and the impact of these infectious agents on the public health. These pathogens will be studied with to their morpholog_v, cultivation, mechanisms of pathogernc1ty, laboratory d1agnos1s, and epidemiology. MCB 5265 MEDICAL MYCOLOGY (3) PR: MCB 3030C. A survey of the yeasts, molds, and actinomy cetes most likely to be encountered by bacteriologists, with special emphasis on the forms pathogenic for man. MCB 5606 SYMBIOLOGY (3) PR: A course in microbiology, cell biology or biochemistry and advanced standing Consideration of mutualistic and parasitic symbioses between microbes vari<;>us animal plant and microbic hosts from cellular, b1ochem1cal, evolutionary and ecological perspectives Zoology APB 3190 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (5) PR: BSC 201 O and BSC 2011. Lectures and discussions on the structure and function of the human body For non-majors May be taken by majors for free elective by S/U only ENY 4004 INTRODUCTION TO ENTOMOLOGY (3) PR: ZOO 3203C. An introduction to general aspects of insect morphology, development, and classification The identification of local forms will be emphasized Lec. -lab ENY 5505 AQUATIC ENTOMOLOGY (3) PR: ENY 4004. Taxonomy, development, and ecology of aquatic insects with emphasis on local forms Lec.-lab PCB 4184C HISTOLOGY (4) PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2011, PCB 3023C, PCB 3063 Comparative approach to the study of tissues and the relation of their structure and function. Lec.-lab. PCB 4743C ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY (4) PR: PCB 3023C. Advanced presentation of mechanisms em ployed by animals interact with their env i ronment and to maintain their organization. Lec.-lab PCB 5306C LIMNOLOGY (4) PR: Cl. An introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological nature of fresh-water environments Lec.-lab ZOO 3203C INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (4) PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2011 An introduction to the major inverte brate groups, with emphasis on local forms Field work will be required. Lec. -lab ZOO 3713C COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY (4) PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2011 Anatomy of selected vertebrate types emphasizing evolutionary trends ZOO 4503C ANIMAL SOCIAL BEHAVIOR (3) PR: BSC 2010, BSS: 2011, or senior standing An introduction to comparative animal behavior (Ethology), emphasis on com munication, social use of space, and behavioral evolution ZOO 4693 ANIMAL EMBRYOLOGY (4) PR: PCB 3023C. Structural and functional events involved in dif ferentiation and morphogenesis Lec.-lab. ZOO 5235C PARASITOLOGY (4) PR: ZOO 3203C. Fundamentals of animal parasitology and para. sitism, the biology of selected animal parasites, including those of major importance to man. Lec. -lab ZOO 5425C HERPETOLOGY (4) PR: ZOO 3713C, Cl. Major aspects of amphibian and reptilian biology emphasizing fossil history, evolutionary morphology, CHEMISTRY BCH 3023 INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY (3) PR: CHM 3200orCHM 3211 and BSC2010C. lntroductiontothe chemistry and intermediary metabolism of biologically impor tant substances. Lee. BCH 3023L BASIC BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY (2) CR: BCH 3023 Practical work in determination and characteriza tion of important biomolecules Lec.-lab BCH 4034 ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY (3) PR: BCH 3023 An advanced undergraduate course emphasizing such topics as metabolic DN_A and RNA struct ure and function, receptors, channels, ant1bod1es, and contraction BCH 5045 BIOCHEMISTRY CORE COURSE (3) PR: Either CHM 3211 CHM 321 1 L, and CHM 3400 or CHM 4410 or graduate standing A in biochem istry for graduate students 1!1 chemistry, and other appropriate fields and for particularly well-qualified undergradu ates. Lee. CHM 2020 CURRENT ISSUES IN CHEMISTRY (3) A survey of the important current issues in which chemistry affects our lives; e g environment, drugs, cancer, warfare, etc. No credit for chemistry majors CHM 2021 CHEMISTRY FOR TODAY (3) A one semester terminal course designed to survey some of the important concepts and technologies of modern chemistry No credit for science majors CHM 2030 INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL, ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY I (3) First half of a two-semester sequence Fundamental concepts of general, organic, and biological chemistry. No credit for science majors CHM 2031 INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL, ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY II {3) PR: CHM 2030. Second half of general, biological and organic chemistry. No credit for science majors CHM 2040 INTRODUCTORY GENERAL CHEMISTRY (3) PR: High school chemistry and two years of high school rryathe matics including algebra are recommended An introduction to the principles and applications of modern chemistry including the properties of matter quantitative relations in chemical reactions, technological aspects and societal impact. CHM 2041 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (3) PR: Satisfactory score on placement e .xar:n: or, of CHM 2040 with grade of C or better Pnnc1ples and of chemistry including properties of substances and react1<;ms, thermochemistry, atomic-molecular structure and bonding, periodic properties of elements and compounds CHM 2045L GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY (1) CR: CHM 2041 Laboratory portion of General Chemistry I. Intro duction to laboratory techniques; study of properties of ele ments and compounds; synthesis and analysis of natural and commercial materials CHM 2046 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (3) PR: CHM 2041 or CHM 2045 or equivalent Continuation ol General Chemistry. Lec.-dis . CHM 2046L GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY '(1) PR: CHM 2045L. Laboratory portion of General Chemistry II. Con tinuation of chemistry laboratory CHM 2932 SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (3) Topics of interest to students relating to chemistry and other sci ences

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 139 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1"2/'3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG CHM 3120C ELEMENTARY ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 2046, CHM 2046L. Fundamentals of gravimetric, vo1umetric, spectrophotometric analysis Lec.-lab. CHM 3200 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 2046 or equivalent. Fundamental organic chemistry principles. Structure, nomenclature, properties, preparation, reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, phenols, ethers, sulfur analogs and other compounds. A one-semester course. CHM 3210 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (4) PR: CHM 2046, CHM 2046L. Fundamental principles of organic chemistry. Lecture. CHM 3210L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I (1) CR: CHM 3200 or CHM 3210. Laboratory portion of Organic Chemistry I. Introduction of organic laboratory principles and techniques CHM 3211 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (4) PR: CHM 3210 or equivalent. Continuation of organic chemistry Lecture. CHM 3211L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II (1) PR: CHM 321 OL, CR: 3211. Continuation of organic chemistry laboratory. CHM 3400 ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (3) PR: CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, MAC 3281 or MAC 3311, PHY 3054, PHY 3054L. Introduction to thermodynamics Properties of solutions with emphasis on biological applications. CHM 3401 ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (3) PR: CHM 3400. Reaction kinetics, enzyme kinetics, macromof ecular systems, radiochemistry, molecular spectroscopy, and chemical bonding CHM 3402L ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABO RATORY (1) PR: CHM 3120C. CR: CHM 3400 and/or CHM 3401. A physical chemistry laboratory with emphasis on modern techniques and instruments. Lab. CHM 3610C INTERMEDIATE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 2046, CHM 2046L. Fundamental principles of inor ganic chemistry including atomic structure, bonding theories and structural consequences, transition metal chemistry and illustrative laboratory work. Lec.-lab. CHM 4060 USE OF THE CHEMICAL LITERATURE (1) Discussions and assignments using abstracts, bibliographies, in dices, encyclopedias, journals, patent files, electronic databases, and other information sources to obtain chemical and technical material and including written and oral presentations. Career in formation and opportunities also discussed CHfJI 4070 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES IN CHEMISTRY (3) PR: One year of college chemistry; or senior standing, and Cl. A study in,depth of the historical and philosophical aspects of out standing chemical discoveries and theories Lec.-
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140 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES s UNIVERSITY Of SOUTH FLORIDA 199213 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG CLA 4123 ROMAN CIVILIZATION -6A (3) Study of Ancient Roman Civilization with emphasis on social cus toms, political institutions, and daily life. Courses in Translation CL T 3040 CLASSICAL WORD ROOTS IN SCIENCE (3) A course in the Greek and Latin word elements used in science and technology. CLT 3101 GREEK LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION -6A (3) Reading and discussion of major works in Greek literature. Special emphasis on the Iliad, the dramatists Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes Some attention is 9iven to the social and political background of the works. All readings are in English CLT 3102 ROMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION -6A (3) Reading and discussion of major works in Roman literature Special emphasis is placed on the Aeneid, comedy and satire Some attention is given to the political background of the works All readings are in English. CLT 3370 CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY (3) Study of Greek and Roman myths embodied in classical literature and of their impact on Western civilization All readings are in English Greek GRE 1120 BEGINNING CLASSICAL GREEK I (4) An introductory course in classical Greek grammar with appro priate readings GRE 1121 BEGINNING CLASSICAL GREEK II (4) PR: GRE 1120 or equivalent An introductory course in classical Greek grammar with appropriate readings. GRK 1120 BEGINNING MODERN GREEK I (4) An intensive study of basic skills; pronunciation, listening com prehension speaking and some composition GRK 1121 BEGINNING MODERN GREEK II (4) PR: GRK 1120 or its equivalent. A continuation of GRK 3120 GRW 4905 DIRECTED READING (1-4) Departmental approval required GRW 5905 DIRECTED READING Departmental approval required. (1-4) GRW 5934 SELECTED TOPICS (4) Study of an author, movement or theme. May be repeated up to 12 credit hours Latin LAT 1120 BEGINNING LATIN I (4) An introductory course in Latin grammar with appropriate readings. LAT 1121 BEGINNING LATIN II (4) PR: LAT 1120 or equivalent. An introductory course in Latin grammar with appropriate readings LNW 4363 MARTIAL (4) PR: LAT 1121 or equivalent. Readings in the Epigrams of Mart1ar. Study of the tradition, techniques, and artistry of the Roman epi gram Available to majors and non-majors. LNW 4381 LIVY (4) PR: Basic knowledge of Latin Readings in the ideas and artistry of this Roman historian LNW 4500 CICERO AND ROMAN PHILOSOPHY (4) PR: Basic knowledge of Latin. Readings in the philosophic writings of Cicero, together with a consideration of eclectic thought. LNW 4501 SENECA AND ROMAN PHILOSOPHY (4) PR: Basic knowledge of Latin Readings in the philosophic writings of Lucius Annaeus Seneca, together with an examina tion of Stoic, Epicurean, and Eclectic thought. LNW 4634 CATULLUS (4) PR: Basic knowledge of Latin Readings in Catullus Study of techniques and tradition in Roman lyric poetry. LNW 4644 CICERO (4) PR: Basic knowledge of Latin Readings in the epistles of Cicero LNW 4654 HORACE (4) PR: Basic knowledge -of Latin. Readings in the Odes and Epodes of Horace; study of the Ode's tradition. LNW 4660 VERGIL (4) PR: LAT 1121 or equivalent Readin!iJS in Vergil's AeneJd. Study of the tradition, techniques, and artistry of Roman epic poetry. Available to majors and non-majors LNW 4670 OVID (4) PR: LAT 1121 or equivalent Readings in Ovid's Metamorphoses Study of Ovid's technique, style, and artistry. Available to majors and non-majors LNW 4900 DIRECTED READING Departmental approval required. LNW 4930 SELECTED TOPICS Study of an author, movement, or theme LNW 5900 DIRECTED READING Departmental approval required (S/U only ) (1-4} (4) (1-4) LNW 5934 SELECTED TOPICS (4) Study of an author, movement or theme. May be repeated up to 12 credit hours. COMMUNICATION COM 3003 DIMENSIONS OF COMMUNICATION (3) PR: SPC 2023 An introductory survey of the various perspectives for the study of human communication An exploration of the as sumptions, constructs and explanatory paradigms associated with the study of communication in its symbolic, aesthetic, historical, critical, and pragmatic dimensions COM 3110 COMMUNICATION FOR BUSINESS AND THE PROFESSIONS (3) Identification of communication s i tuations specific to business and the professions Analysis of variables related to communica tion objectives and preparation of oral presentations in the form of informational reports, conference management persuasive communications, interviews, and public hearing COM 3120 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION THEORY IN ORGANIZATIONS (3) PR: majors, COM 3003 or Cl; non-majors, COM 3122 or COM 3110 or Cl. A survey of communication concepts which impact upon organizational effectiveness COM 3122 INTERVIEW COMMUNICATION (3) A study of communication theory relative to interview situations with emphasis on the employment interview, appraisal inter view, and persuasive interview. Students must sign up for a one-hour lab and the mass lecture. COM 3122L INTERVIEW COMMUNICATION LAB (0) Interview laboratory for practice and individual consultation. Students must take this course in conjunction with the mass lecture COM 3122 Open to majors and non-majors Not repeatable COM 4942 COMMUNiCATION INTERN SEMINAR (3) PR: Communication major, minimum GPA 3 0, 75 hours com pleted, 15 hours of core requirements and 9 elective hours com pleted, and Cl. Seminar provides students with an opportunity to put into practice concepts and skills acquired in their study of communication Weekly seminar sessions augment intern expe rience Application for seminar must be submitted one semester prior to seminar offering COM 5123 COMMUNICATION ASSESSMENT IN ORGANIZATIONS (3) PR: for undergraduates, COM 3120 or Cl; graduates, Cl. A study of the means by which the communication specialist intervenes in organizational behavior. An emphasis is placed on gathering and analyzing organizational communication data ORI 3000 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION AS PERFORMANCE (3) Designed to develop proficiency in the understandi.ng and oral communication of literary and other written materials. ORI 3950 COMMUNICATION AS PERFORMANCE LAB (1-3) PR: ORI 3000 or Cl. The study rehearsal, and performance ol literature for Readers Theatre and Chamber Theatre produc tions May be repeated (maximum total four hours)

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 141 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA ffJ92/t3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG ORI 4120 PERFORMANCE OF POETRY (3) PR: ORI 3000 or Cl. Critical appreciation of lyric and narrative poetry and communicat i on of that appreciation to audience. Study of poetic theory and prosodic techniques ORI 4140 PERFORMANCE OF DRAMA (3) PR: ORI 3000 or Cl. Critical appreciation and oral interpretation of special textual materials which are inherently dramatic in nature and poetry, narrative prose, drama, biography, and history. ORI 4310 GROUP PERFORMANCE OF LITERATURE (3) PR: ORI 3000 or Cl. Designed to introduce the student to and give experience in various forms of group approaches to per formance SPC 2023 FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN COMMUNICATION (3) The nature and basic principles of human communication; emphasis on improving speaking and listening skills common to all forms of oral commun i cation through a variety of experience in public discourse. SPC 20SO SPEECH IMPROVEMENT AND PHONETICS 13) Designed to improve vocal quality and expressiveness, articula tion, and pronunciation and to give instruction and practice in using the International Phonetic Alphabet for speech improve ment. SPC 3059 SPEECH IMPROVEMENT AND PHONETICS II (3) PR: SP<; 2050 or Cl. A continuation of SPC 2050 Emphasis wiO be upon applying listening and transcription skills to the improve ment of vocal quality and effective expressions. SPC 3210 COMMUNICATION THEORY (3) PR: Junior standing or Cl. The study of source, message and receiver variables in human communication; communicat i on set tings; descriptive and predictive models of communication; com munication as a process SPC 3230 RHETORICAL THEORY (3) This course surveys the foundations and historical evolution of major concepts, theorists and approaches to the study of rhetoric from Plato to recent contemporary theorists SPC 3301 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (3) PR: Junior stand i ng or Cl. A study of interpersonal communica tion in informally structured settings with emphasis on the understanding, description, and analysis of human communica tion. SPC 3441 GROUP COMMUNICATION (3) PR: Junior standing or Cl. A survey of theory and research in group communication Group discussions and communication exercises to increase awareness of the dynam ics of human communication in small group settings SPC 3513 ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE (3) PR: Junior standing or Cl. Study of princ iples of argumentation as applied in oral discourse, analysis of evidence and modes of reasoning. Practice in debate preparation and delivery SPC 3601 ADVANCED PUBLIC SPEAKING (3) PR: SPC 2023 or Cl. Study and application of communication strategies in speaking extemporaneously and from manuscript. The course includes study of selected public addresses as aids to increased understanding of speaking skills SPC 3633 RHETORIC OF CONFRONTATION (3) PR: Junior stand i ng or Cl. The study of rhetorical strategies and tactics of agitation and control in confrontation situations SPC 3653 POPULAR FORMS OF PUBLIC COMMUNICATION (3) PR: Junior standing or Cl. Analysis of public commun i cation w ith emphasis on various presentational forms SPC 3681 RHETORICAL ANALYSIS (3) This course introduces students to fundamentals of message analysis Student examines persuasive and language in oral and written discourse {not repeatable) SPC 4632 RHETORIC OF SOCIAL CHANGE (3) PR: SPC 3230 or SPC 3681 This course examines how social change is symbolized and motivated in the rhetorics of institu tions, campaigns, social movements and individuals Open to majors and non-majors SPC 4680 HISTORY AND CRITICISM OF PUBLIC ADDRESS (3) PR: SPC 3601 or Cl. The principles of rhetorical criticism applied to selected great speeches of Western Civilization. SPC 4683 RHETORICAL ANALYSIS OF MASS MEDIA (3) PR: SPC 3230 or SPC 3681 ; Open to non-majors with Cl. An introduction to the criticism of media forms and effects. Con. temporary perspectives of the aesthetic and persuasive dimen sions of mass media are examined Students will engage in critical study of media artifacts. SPC 4900 DIRECTED READINGS {1-3) PR: Senior standing minimum GPA 2.5, 15 hours of core require ments and 9 elective hours completed, and Cl. Maximum 6 hours. SPC 4905 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH {1-3) PR: Senior standing, minimum GPA 2 .5, 15 hours of core require ments and 9 elective hours completed, and Cl. Maximum 6 hours Individual investigations with faculty supervision SPC 4930 SELECTED TOPICS {1-3) PR: Senior standing minimum GPA 2 .5, 15 hours of core require ments and 9 elective hours completed, and Cl. May be repeated. SPC 4932 SENIOR SEMINAR IN COMMUNICATION (3) PR: Senior standing, minimum GPA 3 .0, 1S hours of core require ments and 9 elective hours completed, and Cl. Communication major Exploration of selected topics of current significance to the several areas of communicat i on through group discussion and research SPC 5335 NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION (3) PR: Senior standing and Cl. A survey of scientific and pragmatic research in nonverbal behavior relating to communication SPC 5912 RESEARCH {1-4) PR: Senior or graduate standing and Cl. SPC 5933 SELECTED TOPICS (1-4) PR: Senior or graduate standing. Undergraduates must have minimum GPA 3 0, 15 hours of core requirements and 9 elective hours completed, and Cl. COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS SPA 3002 INTRODUCTION TO DISORDERS OF. SPEECH AND LANGUAGE (3) The scope of speech-language pathology as a profession and a field of study. An introduction to speech and language disorders, etiologies major treatment approaches, and research findings SPA 3011 INTRODUCTION TO. SPEECH SCIENCE (3) Concentrated study of the acoustic, physiological and percep tual aspects of sound as related to normal and pathological speech commu.nication. Introduction to instrumentation and measurement procedures SPA 3030 INTRODUCTION TO HEARING SCIENCE (3) PR: Cl. I ntroduction to the field of hearing including: physics of sound, auditory anatomy and physiology, and psychophysics of hearing. SPA 3101 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF THE SPEECH AND HEARING MECHANISM (3) The neurological and anatomical basis of communication disor Comparisons of normal and pathological organic struc tures and their functional dynamics . SPA 3112 APPLIED PHONETICS IN COMMUNICATION (3) PR: Cl. Introduction to phonetic analysis of normal and disor dered speech, including extensive training in transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet. SPA 3310 INTRODUCTION TO DISORDERS OF HEARING (3) PR: SPA 3030. The etiology, pathology, and management of dis orders of the outer ear middle ear, inner ear, retrocochlear, and central auditory systems SPA 3380 BASIC AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (3) Introduction to American Sign Language {ASL) as used in the deaf community General discussion of ASL structure and intro duction to various manual communication systems and philoso phies Emphasis on building a basic vocabulary One hour

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142 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -1'92a3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG laboratory course (SPA 3380L) to be taken concurrently. Open cou.rsework through video and audio tapes To be taken concur-to all majors. rently with Advanced American Sign Language (SPA 4383) SPA 3380L BASIC AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE SPA 4562 COUNSELING OF COMMUNICATIVELY LABORATORY (1) HANDICAPPED AND FAMILY (3) A laboratory designed to offer additional practice in sign IanDiscussion of role of counseling in the treatment of communicaguage by means of videotapes Concurrent enrollment at each tion disorders Based on exploration of theoretical constructs, level of sign language is required There are no prerequisites this course demonstrates application of therapeutic methodoloMay be repeated up to 2 credit hours gies to reduction of communication handicaps SPA 4000 COMMUNICATION DISORDERS IN THE SPA 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (3) PUBLIC SCHOOLS (3) PR: Cl. Intensive study of topics in Speech-Language Pathology, PR: Cl. An examination of the speech, language and hearing Audiology, and/or Aural Rehabilitation conducted under the problems affecting school-age children and the classroom supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for a total of teacher's role in the detection, prevention and amelioration of 9 credit hour's. communication disorders. (Non-major course only). SPA 5132 AUDIOLOGY INSTRUMENTATION (2) SPA 4050 INTRODUCTION TO THE CLINICAL PROCESS (3) PR: Cl. Calibration, usage and specific applications of specialized Observation and participati'c>n in speech-language pathology instruments available in dealing with the identification and and audiology practicum in the University clinical laboratory. measurement of hearing disorders SPA 4201 PHONOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT AND SPA 5150 ADVANCED SPEECH SCIENCE (3) DISORDERS (3) PR: SPA 3011 or equivalent. Advanced study of the acoustics, PR: Cl. An examination of normal and deviant articulatory acqu1production and perception of normal and disordered speech. sition and behavior Presentation of major theoretical orientaSPA 5150L SPEECH SCIENCE INSTRUMENTATION (2) tions and the therapeutic principles based upon them. PR: Cl or SPA 3011 or equivalent. This course offers experience SPA 4210 VOCAL DISORDERS (3) in the use of speech recording, monitoring and analyzing PR: Cl. A comprehensive study of the medical and physical equipment for the evaluation of normal and disordered voice aspects of voice disorders Primary emphasis is on therapeutic and speech characteristics management. SPA 5303 ADVANCED HEARING SCIENCE (3) SPA 4222 FLUENCY DISORDERS (3) The study of the physiological acoustics of the auditory periph-PR: Cl. A comprehensive study of disfluent speech behavior Difery; the neuroanatomy and electrophysiology of the central ferential diagnosis, principles of therapeutic intervention, proceauditory system; and psychoacoustic principles as they relate to dures for children and adults will be studied Major theories and clinical audiologic measurement paradigms models of the development and origin of stuttering are also SPA 5312 PERIPHERAL AND CENTRAL AUDITORY TESTS (4) presented PR: Cl. The study of behavioral and electrophysiologic clinical SPA 4331 FUNDAMENTALS OF FINGERSPELLING (2) tests designed to assess the function of the peripheral and the PR: Cl. A concentrated study of technique in fingerspelling emcentral auditory system. Tests which incorporate nonspeech phasizing clarity and rhythm in expression as well as receptive stimuli and those which utilize speech stimuli will be included. understanding. SPA 5328 AURAL REHABILITATION: ADULTS (3) SPA 4332 STRUCTURE OF SIGN LANGUAGE (3) This course is designed to provide information about and PR: Cl. Semiotic and linguistic consideration of American Sign strategies for aural rehabilitation intervention with hearingLanguage (ASL). Includes aspects of phonology, syntax, semanimpaired adults Topics covered include : speechreading, auditics, and discourse in ASL. tory training, hearing and assistive listening devices. SPA 4335 SIGN LANGUAGE CODES (3) SPA 5401 LANGUAGE LEARNING PR: Cl. A review of the sign systems (SEE I, SEE II, L.O. V E and IN THE SCHOOL-AGE YEARS (3) Signed English) used to code messages through the use of sign. PR: Psych Lang Develop or equiv; Pl. Metalinguistic and meta-The student will have the opportunity to practice one of the sign cognitive development are linked to the interactional demands systems. of classroom and clinical discourse; observational tools are SPA 4363 NATURE AND NEEDS OF HEARING IMPAIRED (3) applied to evaluation and intervention planning A study of the effects of auditory disorders upon the organizaSPA 5403 COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: LANGUAGE (3) tion and expression of behavioral patterns as they relate to PR: Cl. Examination of research and clinical literature presenting motivation, adjustment and personality. major theoretical orientations pertaining to the etiology, evalu-SPA 4382 INTERMEDIATE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (3) ations, and treatment of those factors that hinder or interrupt PR: SPA 33801 SPA 3380L and Cl. A continuation of the basic normal language acquisition or function course which expands the student's signing skills and introduces SPA 5506 SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY AND American Sign Language (ASL) idioms Provides a greater opporAUDIOLOGY PRACTICUM (1-8) tunity for skill development in ASL structure and idiomatic usage. PR: Cl. Participation in speech-language pathology and One hour laboratory course (SPA 4382L) to be taken concur ogy practicum in the University Communication Disorders Cenrently ter and selected field settings SPA 4382L INTERMEDIATE AMERICAN SIGN SPA 5552 DIAGNOSTIC PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES (2) LANGUAGE LABORATORY (1) PR: Admission to program; Cl. The evaluation, interpretation PR: SPA 3380 and SPA 3380L. A laboratory designed to ofter and reporting of diagnostic tools and their results in the assess-additional practice in sign language by means of videotapes ment of speech and language disorqers Concurrent enrollment in SPA 4382 of sign language May be repeated up to 2 credit hours. SPA 4383 ADVANCED AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (3) PR: SPA 4382, SPA 4382L, and Cl. A continuation of the study of American Sign Language (ASL) at the advanced skill level. Added emphasis on idioms, body language, and facial expres sion as an integral part of ASL. A one hour laboratory course (SPA 4383L) is to be taken concurrently. Open to all majors. SPA 4383L ADVANCED AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE LABORATORY (1) PR: Cl. An advanced laboratory course designed to offer stu dents added practice with the material presented in the ASL CRIMINOLOGY CCJ 3003 CRIME AND JUSTICE IN AMERICA (4) A non-technical survey of the nature of crime in the United States and the ways in which our sodety seeks to deal with criminal offenders and victims of crime May be taken by both majors and non-majors for credit, subject to departmental approval for declared majors CCJ 3020 SURVEY OF THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3) PR: PSY 2012, SOC 2000, or equivalent, or Cl. An introduction to the structure and operation of law enforcement, prosecution, the courts, and corrections Also includes brief coverage of major reported crimes

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 143 UNIVERSITY Of SOUTH FLORIOA-1ttl/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG CCJ 3210 CRIMINAL LAW I (3) PR: CCJ 3020, POS 2041 or Cl. Examines the historical basis of the American criminal law system, the substantive elements of the crime, and court procedures. CCJ 3610 THEORIES OF CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR (3) PR: CCJ 3020. Provides a basic understanding of the complex factors related to crime, with concentration on principaltheoretical approaches to the explanation of crime. CCJ 3621 PATTERNS OF CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR (3) Reviews the nature and extent of the crime problem. The course will concentrate on major patterns of offender behavior includ ing crimes against the person, property crimes, violent crimes, economic/white collar offense, syndicated (organized) crimes, consensual crimes, female crime, political crime, and will exam ine criminal career data. CCJ 3701 RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE I (3) PR: Junior standing and CCJ 3020 or Cl. Introduces the student to some of the fundamentals of knowledge-generating proc esses in criminal justice. CCJ 4110 AMERICAN LAW ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS (3) Provides a comprehensive examination of the American law en forcement system at the federal, state, and local levels and an assessment of career opportunities within the community CCJ 4230 CRIMINAL LAW II (3) Emphasizes the Constitutional issues and rules that are applied and enforced by the courts while processing criminal cases. CCJ 4331 ALTERNATIVES TO INCARCERATION (3) PR: Junior standing plus CCJ 4360 or Cl. This course explores a variety of alternatives to imprisoning the offender, including pro bation, parole, diversion, and other community-based interven tion and treatment approaches CCJ 4340 INTERVENTION TECHNIQUES AND STRATEGIES (3) PR: Senior standing or Cl. Introduces the student to theories and methods underlying treatment modalities currently employed in corrections. CCJ 4360 AMERICAN CORRECTIONAL SYSTEMS (3) PR: Junior standing plus CCJ 3610 or Cl. Analysis of the different treatment philosophies and techniques currently in use in the field, with special attention to experimental and demonstration programs CCJ 4450 CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION (3) This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of both the practical and theoretical aspects of the administration of criminal justice agencies The major focus will be on law enforcement and correctional agencies CCJ 4501 JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM (3) PR: CCJ 3020 or Cl. Provides coverage of the juvenile and family courts, their clientele and the complex of human services agencies and facilities that contribute to efforts at juvenile correctional intervention. CCJ 4604 ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR AND CRIMINALITY (3) PR: CCJ 3610, or Cl. A systematic introduction to the relationship between mental illness and criminality, with focus on psychiatric labeling of deviant behavior and its implications for the handling of the criminal offender. CCJ 4700 STATISTICAL RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE II (3) PR: Junior standing or Cl. Beginning with the scientific method, the tools commonly used to analyze criminal justice data will be emphasized. Recommended for students who intend to con tinue their education beyond the B.A. Required of students attending the MA program in CCJ at USF. This course may not be taken for credit if the student has already successfully completed STA 3122 or GEB 3121. *CCJ 4900 DIRECTED READINGS (1-3) PR: Cl. This course is specifically designed to enable advanced students the opportunity to do in-depth independent work in the area of criminal justice Each student will be under the close supervision of a faculty member of the program No more than five hours of CCJ 4900, CCJ 4910 or any combination of the two will be accepted toward the minimum number of hours required for the major *CCJ 4910 DIRECTED RESEARCH(1-3) PR: Cl. This course is designed to provide students with a research experience in which they will work closely with faculty on the development and implementation of research projects in the area of criminal justice. No more than five hours of CCJ 4910, CCJ 4900 or any combination of the two will be accepted toward the minimum number of hours of the major *NOTE: CCJ 4900 & CCJ 4910. (a) Students wishing to enroll must make arrangements with a facutty member during the semester prior to actually taking the course, (b) a minimum of four (4) CCJ courses must have been completed satisfactorily prior to enrollment, (c) first consideration will be given to Criminology majors, and (d) individual faculty members may add additional requirements at their discretion. CCJ 4934 SEMINAR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3) PR: Senior standing and Cl. This variable topic seminar wirl consider the various changes occurring in the field of criminal justice with added emphasis on career responsibilities in the field CCJ 4940 INTERNSHIP FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJORS (3) PR: Senior standing The internship will consist of placement with one or more of the agencies comprising the criminal justice system This course will enable the students to gain meaningful field experience related to their future careers The three-hour block of credit will require 'a minimum of ten hours of work per week within the host agencies in addition to any written work or reading assignments. See requirements for the B.A. degree in Criminology for the number of hours required. (S/U only.) CJT 4100 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION (3) Covers the major components of criminal investigation, with special attention to the scientific aspects of criminal investiga tion and the management of major cases. CJT 4820 PRIVATE SECURITY SYSTEMS (3) PR: Junior standing plus CCJ 4110 or Cl. Examines some of the principal methods and techniques currently used to reduce or prevent losses due to theft and casualty. ENGLISH AML 3031 AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM THE BEGINNINGS TO 1860 (3) A study of representative works from the period of early settlement through American Romanticism, with emphasis on such writers as Cooper, Irving, Bryant, Hawthorne, Emerson, Melville, Thoreau, and Poe, among others. AML 3032 AMERICAN llTERATURE FROM 1860TO1912 (3) A study of representative works of selected American Realists and early Naturalists, among them Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Howells, Crane, Dreiser, Wharton, Robinson, Dunbar, and Johnson. AML 3051 AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1912-1945 (3) A study of poetry, drama, and fiction by such writers as Pound, Stein, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Porter, Toomer, Cum mings, Williams, Anderson, Steinbeck, Wright, West, Stevens, Henry Miller, and others. AML 3271 BLACK LITERATURE (3) A study of Black American literature from the nineteenth century to the present, including the works of such writers as W .E.B. Dubois, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, LeRoi Jones, and Nikki Giovanni. AML 4101 NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN NOVEL (3) A study of the American novel from its beginnings through 1900, including such novelists as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, James, Twain, Crane, and Dreiser, among others AML 4123 TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN NOVEL (3) A study of major trends and influences in American prose fiction from 1900 to the present. Includes works by such writers as Hemingway, London, Wharton, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, West, Mailer, Bellow, Ellison, Donleavy, Updike, Vonnegut, and others. AML 4261 LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH (3} A study of the major writers of the "Southern Renaissance, including writers such as faulkner, Wolfe, Caldwell, Hellman, Mccullers, O'Connor, Warren, Styron, Tate, Davidson, and Dickey.

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144 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA fll92/ll3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG AML 4300 SELECTED AMERICAN AUTHORS (3) including correspondence and reports most often found in busi-The study of two or three related major authors in American lit-ness, technical, and scientific communities erature focusing on several major figures ; the course may ENC 3310 EXPOSITORY WRITING -6A (3) include such writers as Melville and Hawthorne, Hemingway and A course teaching the techniques for writing effective prose, exFaulkner, James and Twain, Pound and Eliot, Stevens and Lowell, eluding fiction, in which student essays are extensively criticized, etc Specific topics will vary. May be repeated twice for credit edited, and discussed in i ndividual sessions with the instructor with different topics ENC 4260 ADVANCED TECHNICAL WRITING (3) CRW 2100 NARRATION AND DESCRIPTION -6A (3) PR: ENC 3210, or ENC 3310 or GEB 3211, or Cl. Advanced A study of narrative and descriptive techniques in prose. By Technical Writing is a course designed to develop writing skills making the student sensitive to laf"\guage usage, it is designed of a high order : technical exposition ; technical narration, descripto bridge the gap between expository wri ting and imaginative t i on, and argumentation; graphics; proposals ; progress reports; writing physical research reports; and feasibility reports. CRW 3111 FORM AND TECHNIQUE OF FICTION-6A (3) ENC 4311 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (3) A study of short narrative forms such as the anecdote, tale, PR: ENC 3310 or Cl. Instruction and practice in writing effective, character sketch, incident, monologue, epistolary story, and lucid, and compelling prose, with special emphasis on style, short story as they have been used in the development of fiction logical argumentation, and critical thinking and as they exist today ENC 4931 SELECTED TOPICS IN PROFESSIONAL AND CRW 3112 FICTION I -6A (3) TECHNICAL WRITING (3) PR: CRW 3111. An introduction to fict i on writing, beginning w i th PR: ENC 3213 ENC 3210, or ENC 3310 or Cl. Focus of the course a practical study of the various elements of fiction and proceedwill be determined by student demand and instructor interest. ing through the many processes of revision to arrive at a Topics to be covered may include legal writing, the conventions completed work of art of business writing, and writing for the social sciences. CRW 3121 FICTION II -6A (3) ENG 3105 MODERN LITERATURE, FILM, AND THE PR: CRW 3111, CRW 3112. A fiction workshop which provides POPULAR ARTS (3) individual and peer guidance and direction for student writing A study of particular films and novels that shows us how such and which also attempts to encourage the development of popular arts as the detective story, westerns, science fiction, spy critical skills. stories, and musical comedy have changed The course also CRW 3311 FORM AND TECHNIQUE OF POETRY (3) explores why important changes took place.and considers how An examination of the techniques employed in fixed forms from and why many serious writers and filmmakers today use techthe couplet through the sonnet to such various forms as the niques, ideas and situations drawn from the popular arts. Ronde!. ballad, villanelle, sestina, etc. Principles in the narrative, ENG 3114 MODERN DRAMA (3) dramatic, and lyric modes are a lso explored A study of such modern and contemporary dramatists as Ibsen, CRW 3312 POETRY I (3) Strindberg, Chekhov, Pirandello, Shaw, O'Neill, Pinter, StopPR: CRW 3311. An introduction to poetry writing utilizing writing pa rd, Brecht Beckett, and Ionesco. exercises employing poetic language and devices; the exercises ENG 4013 LITERARY CRITICISM (3) progress to the writing of both rhymed and unrhymed metrical A study of the works of major literary cri tics from Aristotle to the and non-metrical forms. present, with emphasis on their meaning, their implied world CRW 3321 POETRY II (3) view, and their s i gnificance for our own time and literature. PR: CRW 3311, CRW 3312. A poetry workshop which provides ENG 4060 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3) individual and peer guidance and direct i on for the student's The evolution of language from Anglo-Saxon through Middle wri ting and which also attempts to encourage the development English to Modern English. Development of the English lexicon of critical skills. Changes in the pronunciation, syntactic, and semantic systems; CRW 4120 FICTION Ill (3) discussion of the forms which influenced them PR: CRW 3111, CRW 3112, CRW 3121. An advanced fiction ENG 4906 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-4) workshop wherein works may be carried over from CRW 3121 Directed study in special projects Special permission of chairperor longer forms such as the novel may be begun May be taken son required twice for credit. ENG 4907 DIRECTED READING (3) CRW 4320 POETRY Ill (3) Readings in special topics PR: CRW 3311, CRW 3312, CRW 3321. An advanced poetry ENG 4935 HONORS SEMINAR I (3) workshop wherein students are expected to create works PR: Admission to English Honors Program (should be taken con-exhibiting a firm knowledge of the principles explored in the currently with ENG 4936) A study of two or three major preceding courses. May be taken twice for credit. American or British writers Students will be expected to particiCRW 4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING (1-4) pate in class discussi on, make formal presentations, and corn-PR: 12 hours of CRW courses or Cl. The focus of the course wifl plete a major research pro j ect be governed by student demand and instructor interest. Topics ENG 4936 HONORS SEMINAR II (3) to be covered may include writing the literary essay, writing in PR: Admission to English Honors Program (should be taken con-mixed genres, and utilizing popular conventions in serious currently with ENG 4935). A study of critical theory from works May be repeated up to 8 credit hours Aristotle to the present. Students will be expected to participate ENC 1101, 1102 FRESHMAN ENGLISH -6A (3,3) in class discussi on, make formal presentations, and complete a Instruction and practice in the skills of writing and reading major research project Courses must be taken in numerical sequence. ENG 4970 HONORS THESIS SEMINAR (3) ENC 1121 FRESHMAN ENGLISH: HONORS (3) PR: ENG 4935 and ENG 4936 For students writing honors Honors Section of ENC 1101. Reserved for students in the Umtheses. Class time will be devoted to exchange of research versity's Honors Program. findings, instructor and peer critique of method, structure, and ENC 1122 FRESHMAN ENGLISH II: HONORS (3) rhetoric of individual projects . PR: ENC 1121. Honors Section of ENC 1102. Reserved for ENG 5067 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3) students in the University's Honors Program. PR: Senior or Graduate standing The course will trace the history ENC 3210 TECHNICAL WRITING -6A (3) of the English language from its beginnings in Continental Effective presentation of technical and semi-technical informa -Europe, through the Anglo-Saxon and Middle English periods tion the Renaissance, and the Nineteenth Century, to the present day ENC 3213 PROFESSIONAL WRITING -6A (3) with emphasis on both the structural development of the Introduction to the techniques and types of professional writing, language and the political, social, and intellectual forces that

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 145 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 71192/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG determined this development. ENL 3015 BRITISH LITERATURE TO 1616 (3) A survey of representative prose, poetry, and drama from its be ginnings through the Renaissance, including such poems and figures as Beowulf, Chaucer, Malory, More, Hooker, Skelton, Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Jonson ENL 3230 BRITISH LITERATURE 1616-1780 (3) A survey of 17th Century and Neoclassical Literature, including such figures as Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, Vaughan, Marvell, Milton, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Boswell, and Goldsmith. ENL 3250 BRITISH LITERATURE 1780-1900 (3) The poetry and poetics of the Romantic figures, with attention to the continuing importance of romantic thinking in contempo rary affairs and letters; a survey of representative figures of the Victorian and Edwardian periods, including poetry, prose, and drama. ENL 3273 BRITISH LITERATURE 1900-1945 (3) Survey of poetry, drama, and fiction of such writers as Eliot, Yeats, Thomas, Conrad, Shaw, Joyce, Lawrence, Huxley, Woolf, Forster, Waugh, Owen, Auden, O 'Casey, and others. ENL 3331 EARLY SHAKESPEARE (3) A study of from six to eight of Shakespeare's comedies, histories, and early tragedies, ending with Hamlet. Special attention to de veloping the student's ability to read and interpret the text. ENL 3332 LATE SHAKESPEARE (3) A study of from six to eight of Shakespeare's problem plays, major tragedies, and late romances Special attention to devel oping the student's ability to read and interpret the text. ENL 4122 BRITISH NOVEL THROUGH HARDY (3) A study of early and later British novels such as Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, Austen, Scott, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy, among others. ENL 4132 BRITISH NOVEL: CONRAD TO THE PRESENT (3) A critical study of British fiction from 1900 to the present, with emphasis on such writers as Conrad, Lawrence Joyce, Woolf, Huxley, Orwell, Burgess, Murdoch, Golding, and others ENL 4171 HISTORY OF BRITISH DRAMA TO 1912 (3) A study of the history of British Drama from its liturgical origins to the beginning of the twentieth century, exclusive of Shakespeare Included are the mystery and morality plays, and representative works by Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton, Dryden, Congreve, Sheridan, and Wilde, and others ENL 4303 SELECTED AUTHORS (3) The study of two or three related major figures in English, American, or World Literature The course may include such writers as Fielding and Austen, Keats and Yeats, Joyce and Flaubert, etc Specific topics will vary. May be taken twice for credit with different topics ENL 4311 CHAUCER (3) An intensive study of The Canterbury Tales and major critical concerns. ENL 4338 ADVANCED STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE (3) PR: ENL 3331 or ENL 3332, or Cl. Intensive study of selected plays of Shakespeare, with special attentiqn to significant critical issues and to the Elizabethan and Jacobean cultural setting. ENL 4341 MILTON (3) Study of the poetry and major prose of John Milton, with special emphasis on Paradise Lost. LIN 2340 ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND USAGE (3) A course in the basics of traditional English grammar designed as a complement to our composition and creative writing courses, as a review for those students who will take preprofes sional exams, and as a basic course for students interested in improving their knowledge of English LIN 4340 TRADITIONAL ENGLISH GRAMMAR (3) A course primarily using the sentence diagram to present a detailed analysis of the parts of speech, verb tenses, sentence functions, and other basic grammatical classifications of tradi tional English grammar. LIN 4370 STRUCTURE OF AMERICAN ENGLISH (3) An introductory survey of traditional, structural, and generative transformational grammars and their techniques for the analysis and description of linguistic structure in general, and contempo rary American English, in particular. LIT 2010 INTRODUCTION TO FICTION -6A (3) A study of the short story and novel as literary forms; not restricted to any historical period. Will not be counted toward the English major LIT 2021 CURRENT SHORT FICTION (3) Traditional and experimental short stories of this generation : such writers as Updike, Malamud, O'Connor, Roth, Barth, Ionesco, and Barthelme Will not be counted toward the English major LIT 2030 INTRODUCTION TO POETRY -6A (3) A study of the poem as literary form; not restricted to any historical period. Will not be counted toward the English major. LIT 2040 INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA -6A (3) A study of the major forms of drama as literature; not restricted to any historical period. Will not be counted toward the English major. LIT 2091 CURRENT NOVELS (3) A study of major British and American novels since WW II; attention will be given to the cultural influences and recent literary trends. Will not be counted toward the English major LIT 2092 DRAMA: TEXTS AND FILMS (3) A study of the great works of drama, with emphasis on recent forms and themes Films will demonstrate the possibilities of visualization. Will not be counted toward the English major. LIT 2931 SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (1-4) Varying from semester to semester, the course examines in depth a predominant literary theme or the work of a select group of writers LIT 3000 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE -6A (3) The nature and significance of literature in its various forms : fiction, drama, poetry; emphasis on the techniques of reading literature for informed enjoyment. Will not be counted toward the English major LIT 3022 MODERN SHORT NOVEL (3) A study of the novella from the nineteenth century to the present. Writers include : James, Dostoevsky, Camus, Styron, Nabokov, Gardner, Roth, Vonnegut, among others. LIT 3073 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE (3) An introduction to the fiction, poetry, and drama written .since 1945-American, British, Continental. Focus may be on one, two, or all three genres or on works from any combination of nationalities LIT 3101 LITERATURE OF THE WESTERN WORLD THROUGH THE RENAISSANCE -6A (3) A study in English of the great works of Western Literature from its beginnings through the Renaissance, including the Bible, Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Euripides, Virgil, Cicero, Dante, Petrarch, Machiavelli, and Rabelais, among others. LIT 3102 LITERATURE OF THE WESTERN WORLD SINCE THE RENAISSANCE -6A (3) A study in English of the great works of Western Literature from the Neoclassic to the Modern Period, including such writers as Moliere, Racine, Voltaire, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Ibsen, Kafka, Gide, Sartre, and Camus, among others LIT 3144 MODERN EUROPEAN NOVEL (3) A study of the Modern European novel in translation as it developed from the nineteenth century to the present, including such writers as Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Kafka, Hesse, Camus, and Solzhenitsyn LIT 3304 TWENTIETH-CENTURY BEST SELLERS (3) A study of representative best-selling novels in twentieth century America; including such popular works as Peyton Place, Lady Chatterly's Lover, Exodus, and Catcher in the Rye, which have sold in excess of 5,000,000 copies and have served to portray our changing society and to reveal our changing literary taste LIT 3310 FANTASY AND SCtENCE FICTION (3) A survey of fantasy and science fiction in England and America from Mary Shelley to the present; includes such writers as Poe, Melville, Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke, among others. LIT 3374 THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE (3) Major emphasis on literary types, literary personalities of the Old and New Testaments, and Biblical archetypes of British and American literary classics. Fall Semester, Old Testament; Spring

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146 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA f!l'J2/9J UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Semester, New Testament. Course may be repeated for credit GEA 3554 GEOGRAPHY OF THE USSR 14! with change of content; may be counted only once toward the GEA 3600 GEOGRAPHY OF AFRICA 4 English major GEA 3703 GEOGRAPHY OF ASIA 4 LIT 3383 THE IMAGE OF WOMEN IN LITERATURE (3) GEO 1930 GEOGRAPHY OF CURRENT EVENTS 4 A survey of feminism, antifeminism, sexual identity, the feminine Application of basic ge<>$1raphic principles of the analysis of conmystique, stereotyped and liberated female images from Sap-temporary events in various parts of the world. photo the present, with special emphasis on women writers and GEO 3013 SYSTEMATIC GEOGRAPHY (4) on the emergence of the women's movement (Also offered Principles and concepts of the discipline; maps, earth-sun relaunder Women's Studies.) tions, weather, and climate LIT 3410 RELIGIOUS AND EXISTENTIAL THEMES (3) GEO 3014 SYSTEMATIC GEOGRAPHY (4) Theological and philosophical ideas, allusions, and symbols in PR: GEO 3013 Continuation of GEO 3013; soil, water, rodes, the writings of Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Mann, Joyce, Eliot, Camus, minerals, and landforms. Sartre, among others. GEO 3402 HUMAN GEOGRAPHY (4) LIT 3451 LITERATURE AND THE OCCULT (3) Systematic treatment of man's activities on earth; population, An introduction to the occult tradition as a major ingredient in settlement, agriculture, industry, trade, transpbrtation, and English, Continental, and American literature; analysis of the ori political aspects are among those considered. gins, classifications, and areas of the various magic arts from GEO 3901 ELEMENTS OF GEOGRAPHY (1) classical times through the present. Independent study; various topics in physical and cultural geogLIT 3716 SURVEY OF POETRY (3) raphy (S/U only.) A chronological sampling of the major poems written in English GEO 3931C WEATHER AND MAN (4) from the Middle Ages to the present. Recommended as the first The interrelationship between the atmospheric environment course in the poetry option and man. LIT 4011 THEORY OF FICTION (3) GEO 4040C MAP INTERPRETATION (4) Intensive study of the genres and varieties of fiction to ascertain PR: GEO 3014 Analysis and synthesis of various types of maps the theoretical and technical problems involved in the work of and map projections. fiction. GEO 4100C CARTOGRAPHY (4) LIT 4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (1-4) PR: GEO 3014 Map compilation and graphic presentation. The content of the course will be governed by student demand GEO 4114C GEOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES AND and instructor interest. It will examine in depth a recurring METHODOLOGY (4) literary theme or the work of a small group of writers. Special PR: GEO 3014 Selected topics in various geographic techniques courses in writing may also be offered under this title. May be and methodologies and their application repeated with different topics. GEO 4124C AIR PHOTO INTERPRETATION (4) REA 1105 ADVANCED READING (3) PR: GEO 3014 Detection, identification, and analysis of objects Designed to help students develop maximum reading efficiency. on the earth's surface Techniques other than photographic are The course includes extensive instruction and laboratory practice also considered in the improvement of adequate rates of reading, vocabulary, GEO 4164C QUANTITATIVE METHODS (4) and comprehensive skills. An independent study approach is also PR: GEO 3014 Statistical analysis in geographic research. available for students who prefer to assume responsibility for GEO 4201C PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (4) their own progress. PR: GEO 3014 Intensive study of a topic selected from physical REA 1602 LEARNING STRATEGIES WITHIN geography. ACADEMIC DISCIPLINES (2) GEO 4210 PROCESS GEOMORPHOLOGY (4) To provide within any academic discipline the necessary learning PR: GEO 3014 Origin, evolution, and distribution of the land. strategies needed for success related to academic coursework forms of North America Practice of learning strategies will be within the framework of GEO 4280C HYDROLOGY (4) the student's coursework, providing direct transfer to academic PR: GEO 3014 Hydrologic cycle; precipitation, evapotranspira-area material. tion, water budget streamflow, and probability analysis. REA 2405 SPEED READING DEVELOPMENT (2) GEO 4340 MAN AND NATURAL HAZARDS (4) A course designed to develop speed reading techniques on The impact of hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, sink holes, variou s levels of difficulty Emphasis is placed on comprehension tidal waves, fire, freezes and droughts on people; attempts to via numerous practice drills Will not be counted toward the overcome or avoid these hazards English major (S/U only ) GEO 4372 CONSERVATION (4) REA 2505 VOCABULARY (3) The distribution, exploitation, and conservation of physical and A practical course in rapid vocabulary improvement for students human resources, in all areas. Stress is on words in context. Will not be counted GEO 4390 WATER RESOURCES (4) toward the English major A general overview of the hydrologic cycle and the impact ol GEOGRAPHY GEA 3000 WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (4) Comparative and analytical analysis of representative regions of the world with emphasis on cultural, political, economic, and physical diversity GEA 3009 GENERAL GEOGRAPHY (4) Selected topics in regional and topical offered as survey courses. Open to all students GEA 3194 REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (4) Variable title course to systematically study and compare special regions identified by the instructor GEA 3202 GEOGRAPHY OF ANGLO-AMERICA GEA 3300 GEOGRAPHY OF MIDDLE AMERICA GEA 3400 GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA GEA 3500 GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE cultural development of its various components May also include a survey of regional water problems. GEO 4421 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY (4) PR: GEO 3014 The interrelationships of culture and nature, from pre-historic times to the present. GEO 4440 POPULATION GEOGRAPHY (4) An analysis of contemporary patterns in world and regional dis tributions of people and geographical factors underlying these patterns and their changes. GEO 4460 HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY (4) Survey of evolving landscapes through time; analysis is made by means of systematic and regional methods in order to recon struct the changing culture-nature equation. GEO 4470 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY . (4) PR: GEO 3014. The geographic factors underlying political deci sions and influencing their outcome; the geographic conse quences of these decisions; geopolitics

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 147 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1"2/'3 IJNDERGllADUATE CATALOG GEO 4502 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY (4) PR: GEO 3014 The spatial organization of economic production, consumption, and exchange systems GEO 4602 URBAN GEOGRAPHY (4) PR: GEO 3014. Spatial analysis of urban areas; growth, location, spacing, and size. Development, site situation internal struc ture, and hinterland are considered. GEO 4700 TRANSPORTATION GEOGRAPHY (4) PR: GEO 3014. Interrelationships between freight and passen ger transportation and land use, in terms of site, traffic genera tion, and circulation. GEO 4900 DIRECTED READING (1-i) PR: 20 hours in geography and CC prior to registration May be repeated GEO 4910 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-i) PR: 20 hours in geography and CC prior to registration May be repeated GEO 5058 GEOGRAPHIC LITERATURE AND HISTORY (3) PR: Senior or graduate in geography, or Cl. The origins and development of the discipline as revealed through an exami nation of the principal written sources Special attention paid to leading personalities and modern periodicals MET 4002 CLIMATOLOGY (4) PR: GEO 3013 or Cl. An introductory course which includes an examination of climatic classification systems, problem climates, and the application of climate to selected topics such as world vegetation patterns, agriculture, housing and health. MET 4010C METEOROLOGY (4) PR: GEO 3013 or Cl. The earth's atmosphere and its processes; weather forecasting and analysis ; instrumentation. URP 4052 URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (4) The geographic foundati ons of the modern city, metropolitan development, and the trend toward megalopolis Examined are the political problems of conflicting jurisdictions at the local, county, state, national, and international levels GEOLOGY GLY 2010 DYNAMIC EARTH: INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL GEOLOGY (3) Study of minerals, rocks, and processes of the earth's crust In troduction to origin and classification of earth's materials and landforms. GLY 2010L DYNAMIC EARTH LABORATORY (1) PR: GLY 2010 or concurrent registration. Laboratory study ol earth materials, landforms, geologic structures topographic and geologic maps Lee-lab-field trips Required for Geology majors; open to non-majors. GLY 2030 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY (3) A first course in geology emphasiz i ng environmental aspects of the earth's crust, such as earthquakes, depletion of the earth's resources, water supply problems, and geologic land use and planning No credit for geology majors GL Y 2050 SCIENCE, EARTH AND LIFE (3) The nature, history and philosophy of science intended primar i ly for non-science majors Considerat i on of science as a way of knowing through examples taken primarily from historical and biology (e g., extinction of the dinosaurs, continen tal dnft, evolution) but also from physics and astronomy Consideration of the social relevance of science Does not count toward geology major GLY 2100 HISTORY OF THE EARTH AND LIFE (3) PR: A course in geology. Study of the physical and biological history of the earth including evolution of the major groups of organisms, continental drift, and interpretation of ancient envi ronments. GLY 2100L EARTH HISTORY LABORATORY (1) Laboratory study of the history of the earth and life Required for Geology majors; open to non-majors GL Y 2930 SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOLOGY (1-3) Topical courses in geology of general interest. Does not count toward the geology major GL Y 3200 MINERALOGY (3) PR: GLY 2010, one year of chemistry, or Cl. Principles of crysta1 chemistry, crystallography and mineralogy with emphasis on common rock-forming minerals Lec.-lab GL Y 3220 OPTICAL MINERALOGY (3) PR: GLY 2010, one year of chemistry, or Cl. Principles and theory of the behavior of light within minerals and the identification of minerals using the polarizing microscope. Lec.-lab. Restricted to majors and minors in geology GLY 3400C STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY (4) PR: 12 hours of geology, MAC 2132 or equivalent or Cl. Study of the origin and development of structural features of the earth's crust. Applications of principles of geology, physics, and mathematics to understanding relationships of strata and inter preting structural features Study of regional tectonics and major structural provinces Lec. -lab GLY 3610 INTRODUCTION TO INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY (4) PR: GL Y 2100. BSC 201 QC or equivalent srongly encouraged as background. Lectures cover principles and applications of pale ontology, including biostr'atigraphy, taphonomy, paleoecology, and microand macroevolutionary patterns and processes. Labs survey the invertebrate phyla comprising the bulk of the fossil record GL Y 3830 GEOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS (3) PR: Junior standing in College of Engineering or Cl. An examina tion of geologic materials and processes designed for engineer ing students; classification and properties of earth materials, surface processes site investigation techniques, applications of geology to the solut i on of engineering problems. (No credit toward the geology major, or for those with credit for GLY 2010.) GLY 4310 PETROLOGY (3) PR: GLY 3200, GLY 3220, Cl. The formation of igneous and metamorphic rocks in varying tectonic environments Emphasis is placed on identification of igneous and metamorphic rocks in hand specimens and thin sections Lec. -lab GLY 4511 STRATIGRAPHY AND PETROLEUM GEOLOGY (4) PR: GLY 4550. Emphasis on classical principles of lithoand biostratigraphy, bas i n analysis, geophysical well logging, origin and occurrence of petroleum Exploration methods are empha sized Lec.-lab GLY 4550 DEPOSITIONAL SYSTEMS (4) PR: GLY 3200, GLY 3220, or concurrent registration. Study of modern sedimentary environments and their relationships to one another in order to understand environments preserved in the rock record Physical, chemical and biological aspects ot terrestrial, transitional and marine sedimentary environments will be examined in light of their eventual preservation in rocks. Laboratory experience will include textural mineralogical analy sis of sediments and sedimentary rocks as well as exercises involving sequences of sedimentary strata GLY 4555C SEDIMENTOLOGY (4) PR: GLY 4220, GLY 4550 or Cl. Analysis of sedimentary rocks and sedimentary structures as related to their environments of depo sition. Textural and mineralogical study of sediments and statis tical applications to sediment analysis Lec.-lab.-field trips GLY 4700 GEOMORPHOLOGY (4) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and Cl. Origin, evolution and distribution of land forms and soils Dynamics of the earth's surface Lec.-lab-field trips. GL Y 4730 MARINE GEOLOGY (3) PR: 12 hours of geology or Cl. General survey of the geology ol the ocean floor from beaches to ocean trenches including sediments processes, tectonics and history. GLY 4791 FIELD CAMP PART I FIELD METHODS (3) PR: Cl. Senior standing. Linked with Field Camp II. Basic field methods; use of pocket transits, techniques of field location, pace and compass traversing, techniques for lithological and structural data collection, fundamentals of geological data presentation and map making Field camp is located in northern New Mexico Requires camping and vigorous physical activity. Lec. -field work.

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148 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOuTH FLORIDA fftlaJ UNDERGllADUA TE CATALOG GL Y 4792 FIELD CAMP PART II FIELD GEOLOGY (3) PR: Cl. Senior standing. Linked with Field Camp I. Fundamentals of regional field geology; mappi!"g metamc:irphic and igneous rocks on topographic maps; of depositional environments; interpretation of deformational and metamorphic histories. Requires camping and vigorous physical activity. Lec.-field work. GLY 4822 INTRODUCTION TO HYDROGEOLOGY (4) PR: GLY 2010, advanced junior or senior standing, one year each physics and calculus or Cl. Ground water flow systems, ground water geology, introduction to numerical and analytical models of ground water flow. Lec.-lab.-field trips. GLY 4905 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3) PR: Cl. Specialized independent study determined by the stu dent's needs and interests. May be repeated (S.U only) GLY 4915 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-3) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and written permission of department prior to registration. Individual experimental in vestigations with faculty supervision. (S.U only) GLY 4920 GEOLOGY COLLOQUIUM (1) PR: Senior standing in GeolO!;JY Weekly topical lectures by faculty, graduate students and invited speakers. Required of a .II senior !1eology majors, to be repeated for a total of two credit hours. (S.U only) GLY 4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOLOGY (1-4) Each topic is a course under the direction of a faculty member with the content depending on the interests of the students and faculty involved. All areas of geology included. Departmental permission required prior to registration GLY 4970 UNDERGRADUATE HONORS THESIS (3) Open to seniors admitted to the Geol ogy undergraduate program. Students will complete an independent research proj ect under supervision of a faculty member, and present results in a senior thesis and a public presentation GLY 5246 GENERAL GEOCHEMISTRY (3) PR: One year college chemistry, GLY_ 4200 or Cl. of basic chemical concepts are used to investigate and explain geo logical processes, the age and formation of the earth, and envi ronmental conditions GLY 5285C ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES IN GEOLOGY (4) PR: One year college chemistry, GL Y 4220 or Cl. Use and appli cation of modern analytical methods including X-ray, atomic ab sorption, and other geochemical techniques Interpretation and statistical analysis of data acquired Lec.-lab GLY 5315C IGNEOUS AND METAMORPHIC PETROLOGY (4) PR: GL Y 4220 Systematic study of igneous and metamorphic rocks and complexes, including origin, composition, and classi fication. Use of the polarizing microscope for thin-section analy sis will be emphasized, and other modern methods of study will be employed Lec. -lab GLY 5475C PRINCIPLES OF APPLIED GEOPHYSICS (4) PR: Senior standing, one year of college physics and calculus, or Cl. Survey of modern exploration geophysics, including gravi metric, magnetic, electric, and seismic methods as. applied to resource exploration and site investigations Lec. -lab -field trips. GLY 5752 GEOLOGICAL FIELD EXCURSION (2) PR: GLY 3400, GLY 4550, and GLY 4750 Lectures and 2-3 week field excursion to study regional geology, structure and litho genesis of geologically complex terra in. a nd techniques of trip varies. Trip requires camping and vigorous physical act1v1ty. Lee. field trip. GLY 5827C ADVANCED HYDROGEOLOGY (4) PR: GLY 4822, MAC 3282 or MAC 3312 or Cl. Flow systems, analytical and numerical solutions to ground water flow prob lems. Emphasis on the theoretical aspects of ground water flow systems and their interaction with the geologic framework Lee. GLY 5865 STATISTICAL MODELS IN GEOLOGY (3) PR: STA 3023 or equivalent or Cl. Application of statistical methods to geological problems. Emphasis on sampling plans, nature of geologic distributions, and application of analyses of variance to solving geological problems Lee. GLY 5932 SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOLOGY (1--4) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and CC. Each topic is a course in directed study under supervision of a faculty member. All areas of geology included Departmental permission required prior to registration. OCE 3001 INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (3) Overview of biological, chemical, geological, and physical ocean ography. Does not count as a Geology elective (Also listed under Marine Science ) GERONTOLOGY GEY 3000 INTRODUCTION TO GERONTOLOGY (3) This course is designed to be an introduction tb the study of aging. The aging process is viewed from a perspective including the biological, psychological, and socio logical aspects of aging GEY 3601 BEHAVIOR CHANGES IN LATER LIFE (3) PR: GEY 3000, or Cl. A survey of physical and psychological aspects of aging from middle age through older age. Course emphasis will be on basic age-related changes and their implica tions for behavior in older age GEY 3625 SOCIOCULTURAL ASPECTS OF AGING (3) PR: GEY 3000 or Cl. Consideration of human aging in a broad sociocultural context. Course emphasis will be on historical, philosophic, and demographic aspects of aging, theories of social gerontology attitudes toward and the aged, cross.cultural perspectives on aging, the sociology of retirement, and aging and the community GEY 4327 LONG-TERM CARE ADMINISTRATION I (3) PR: GEY 3000, ACG 2011 A survey of Long Term Care (LTC) environments Explored are such issues as definitions of L TC, physiological conditions of L TC uses, the institutional setting, the sociopsychological context, and methods of evaluation and intervention GEY 4328 LONG-TERM CARE ADMINISTRATION II (3) PR: GEY 4327 Administration of long-term care institutions from a group dynamics perspective Emphasis on informed problem solving and decision-making via analysis of the psychosocial and sociocultural environment i n the nursing home community Course objective is to create efficient and humane living and working conditions in nursing homes. GEY 4329 LONG-TERM CARE ADMINISTRATION Ill (3) PR: GEY 4328 This course will familiarize the student with the basic aspects of nursing home administration through the practical application of management theory and concepts GEY 4360 GERONTOLOGICAL COUNSELING (3) PR: Cl. An introduction to the study of the major mental health problems of the elderly Current approaches to counseling the elderly i n community and institutional settings are discussed GEY 4401 RESEARCH METHODS IN GERONTOLOGY (3) PR: ST A 3122 or equivalent. Restricted to Gerontology majors, others by departmental permission Methods and techniques of social research in gerontology Design of gerontological studies, collection and analysis of data, interpretation of results, and preparation of reports GEY 4640 DEATH AND DYING (3) PR: GEY 3000 or Cl. A broad overview of the basic concepts and psychosocial issues relating to. the meaning of loss and death, the process of death, and the experience of grieving. Health care practices are considered along with community resources GEY 4900 DIRECTED READINGS (1-3) PR: Cl. A reading program with topics in gerontology conducted under the supervision of a faculty member GEY 4930 SENIOR SEMINAR (2) PR: Cl. Thi s course will provide upper level students with a seminar experience in discussing topics of interest and social relevance in the field of aging Each student will be required to prepare a seminar paper and present it. GEY 4935 SPECIAL TOPICS IN GERONTOLOGY (3) Courses on topics such as preretirement mental health, human services organization, nursing home administration, the older woman, and elder abuse will be offered May be repeated up to 6 credit hours.

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 149 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIOA f9t2/93 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG GEY 4945 FIELD PLACEMENT {6-8) PR: Cl. Internship in an agency or community setting A full-time assignment to an agency or organization, engaged in planning or administering programs for older people if in the BA program, or to a nursing home if in the BS program. GEY 5620 SOCIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF AGING (3) PR: Cl. Examines, within a sociological frame of reference, the interrelationships between the aged (or aging) and the structure and function of the social systems and its major institutionalized subsystems GEY 5630 ECONOMICS AND AGING (3) PR: Cl. Examines basic economic systems as they impact tne aged. Emphasis is on applied aspects of economic planning, pensions, insurance, social security, and other support systems. GEY 5642 PERSPECTIVES ON DEATH AND DYING (3) PR; SL Study of the various psychological, medical, legal, and rehg1ous problems caused by dying and death, and of how indi viduals and groups have responded in the past and present. HISTORY AFH 3100 AFRICAN HISTORY TO 1850 (3) An outline survey of pre-colonial African history including a prefatory introduction to the use of primary sources (such as ar chaeology, oral tradition, cultural anthropology, comparative linguistics, documents) in reconstructing the African past. (Also offered under Afro-American Studies.) AFH 3200 AFRICAN HISTORY SINCE 1850 (3) Survey of the Colonial and post
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150 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERStrf OF SOUTH FLORIDA J!J9l/t3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG EUH 2011, 2012 ANCIENT HISTORY I, II (3,3) 337. Emphasized is Rome's government of a vast Mediterranean An introductory survey of ancient history EUH 2011 treats the empire including much of the near East and Europe. ancient Near East and Greece from the origins of civilization to EUH 3461 GERMAN HISTORY TO 1870 (4) the full development of the Hellenistic kingdoms prior to conflict A political, social, and cultural approach to the history of the Ger-with EUH 2012 deals with Rome through the manies from 1500 through 1870, with emphasis on the ProtesRepublican, and Imperial periods, from the beginnings of c1vilitant Reformation, the rise of Brandenburg-Prussian, and the unization in Italy to the division of the Roman Empire, A D 395. fication under Bismarck. EUH 2021, 2022 MEDIEVAL HISTORY I, II (3,3) EUH 3462 GERMAN HISTORY 1870 TO PRESENT (4) A thematic survey of the Middle Ages. EUH 2021 deals with the A political. social, and cultural approach to the history of the nascent, Christian civilization of European, circa 3001050 A.D. ; German Empire from 1870 through the 1970's. The nation's two EUH 2022 treats the mature medieval civilization of Europe, circa attempts to try for world power status are highlighted, as well 10501 500 as the Weimar Republic, prototype of the embattled democracy. EUH 2030, 2031 MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY I, II (3,3) EUH 3501 BRITISH HISTORY TO 1688 (4) A thematic survey of Europe in the modern age. EUH 2030 treats A study of major developments in British history from the 1 Sth the period from the Renaissance to the French Revolution; EUH century to 1688. 2031, from the French Revolution to the present. EUH 3502 BRITISH HISTORY 1688 TO PRESENT (4) EUH 3142 RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION (4l A study of the major themes of British history since the Glorious A history of Europe from the Renaissance to the Thirty Years Revolution, including social, political, and economic developWar ( 14001618). The cultural, social, and economic characterments leading to the creation of the modern demographic istics will provide the framework for artistic, philosophical, welfare state. religious and political developments. EUH 3530 BRITISH EMPIRE AND COMMONWEALTH (4) EUH 3181 MEDIEVAL CULTURE (4) A study of the development of the British Empire from the age A survey of thought culture and art in the Middle Ages. of initial expansion overseas to the creation of the multinational Medieval attitudes as manifested in literature, art, philosophy, commonwealth. Included are examinations of theory and myth education, and religion; with emphasis upon Med ieval man's of colonialism as well as the literature of imperialism. changing perception of himself and his world EUH 3571 RUSSIAN HISTORY TO 1865 (4) EUH 3185 VIKING HISTORY (4) A survey of the social, political. economic, and cultural developThe role of the Vikings in the shaping of Western history A com-ment of Russia from the year 800 to 1865. Topics include the prehensive survey of their institutions, outlook and daily life personality of Russian rulers, the origins of Russian Socialism, Viking expansion into Europe and North America and Russia's relationship to the West. EUH 3188 MEDIEVAL SOCIETY (4) EUH 3572 RUSSIAN HISTORY 1865 TO PRESENT (4) A study of the daily life and attitudes of the medieval nobleman, An analysis of the tradition from late imperial society to the con-peasant, townsmen, and the agrarian-urban economy and temporary Soviet system. Emphasis will be placed on continuity society which affected their lives. and change in the economic, political, and cultural aspects of. EUH 3189 MEDIEVAL POLITICS (4) Russia from 1865 to present An inquiry into the nature, distribution and use of political HIS 2931 SPECIAL TOPICS (3) power during the Middle Ages, in such institutions as feudalism, This course emphasizes a selected historical problem or issue. A. monarchy, cities, and the church variety of instructional approaches will be taken, and topics may EUH 3202 HISTORY OF 17TH AND 18TH CENTURY vary EUROPE (4) HIS 3474 SCIENCE AND CIVILIZATION -6A (4) A history of Europe from the beginning of the Thirty Years' War A thematic study of the interrelationship of science and society to the outbreak of the French Revolution. Political and intellecin modern history emphasizing the institutional forms, value tual developments will be assessed in the light of society and the structures, and social relations in science as they have developed economy. from the scientific revolution to the present. EUH 3205 HISTORY OF NINETEENTH CENTURY EUROPE (4) HIS 3930 SPECIAL TOPICS (3"') A comparative study of economic, political, social, and intellecThis course is designed to emphasize a selected historical tual qevelopments in nineteenth century Europe. problem or issue that is meaningful and challenging to the EUH 3206 HISTORY OF TWENTIETH CENTURY EUROPE (4) student. A variety of instructional approaches will be taken to A comparative study of economic political. social, and intellecthe material. Topics will be changed each semester. tual developments in twentieth century Europe. HIS 4104 THEORY OF HISTORY (4) EUH 3300 BYZANTINE HISTORY (4) Recommended to be taken during the senior year. Required ol. A survey of the Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Empire from its founall history majors An analysis of the foundations of historical dation in A D 330 to its collapse in 1453 Emphasis on the knowledge and historical methodology Includes a survey of relationship between the Byzantine Empire and the course of historical thinking and writing from ancient times to the present. European history and on the cultural heritage of this Empire. HIS 4900 DIRECTED READING (1..C) EUH 3401 CLASSICAL GREECE (4) q with instructor prior to registration. Reac:f:. A study of ancient Greece focusing on the brilliant period ings in special topics. following the Persian Wars, but embracing as well the formative HIS 4920 COLLOQUIUM IN HISTORY (2..C) Bronze, Middle and Archaic ages, and the decline culminating in Reading and discussion of selected topics in the various fields ol the conquest of Greece by Philip II of Macedon in 338 B .C. history. The subject and scope of inquiry will be determined by EUH 3402 AGE OF ALEXANDER (4) the instructor for each section May be repeated for credit. AstudyfocusingonthecareerofAlexandertheGreatandonthe HIS 4936 PRO-SEMINAR IN HISTORY (4) Greek and Macedonian conquest of Imperial Persia. Also treated PR: Cl. Advanced topics in the various fields of history Emphasis are the great hellenistic kingdoms prior to Rome's conquest of on discussion of assigned readings and on research and writing the eastern Mediterranean. of a major paper. Required of all history majors May be repeated EUH 3412 ROMAN REPUBLIC (4) up to 12 credit hours. A study of the Roman Republic from 509 B .C. to the assassinaHIS 5215 HISTORICAL WRITING (2) tion of Julius Caesar in 44 B C., with a prelude treating Rome's A course for graduate and advanced undergraduates to comearly development under royal rule Poli tical growth and change bine library archival and research skills with an examination of provide the framework for the treatment various writing styles. Analytic and synthetic skills are stressed in EUH 3413 ROMAN EMPIRE (4) writing articles, reviews and essays. A study of Imperial Roman from the assassination of Julius LAH 3130 COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA (4) Caesar in 44 B.C. to the death of the emperor Constantine in A.D. A study of the Spanish and Portuguese Colonial empires in the

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 151 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA-1!19l/t3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG New World from 1492-1830. LAH 3200 MODERN LATIN AMERICA (4) A study of the emergenG:e of the Latin American states. The course will examine developments in Latin America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries Special attention is given to the Third World character of the region LAH 3430 H.ISTORY OF MEXICO (4) Mexican history from pre-Columbian cultures to the twentieth century Emphasis falls on the colonial political economy, social development, the wars of independence, development of the 19th century Mexican state and the Mexican revolution LAH 3470 HISTORY OF THE CARIBBEAN (4) A thematic study of the circum-Caribbean from pre-Columbian cultures to the twentieth century, emphasizing the development of the Caribbean political economy with emphasis on monocul ture, plantation society, and colonialfneo-colonial relationships. LAH 3480 HISTORY OF CUBA (4) Cuban history from pre-Columbian cultures to the Cuban Revolution Emphasis on colonization, the sugar economy, the struggles for independence, the political economy of the Republic, and the 20th century revolutionary process WST 3210 WOMEN IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION I -6A (3) Survey of women in the ancient Near East, ancient Greece, ancient Rome, early Middle Ages Origins of Western attitudes toward sex roles, female sexuality, relation of power to gender (May also be taken .for credit in Women's Studies.) WST 3220 WOMEN IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION II (3) Survey of European women from the late Middle Ages to the twentieth century : differing consequences of historical change for women and men (May also be taken for credit in Women's Studies.) WST 4309 THE FEMALE EXPERIENCE IN AMERICA (4) PR: WST 2010, or WST 3011, or Cl. The female experience in America, in historical context, viewed through the writings of various classes, races, ethnic groups. Current research on American women by feminist historians (May also be taken for credit in Women's Studies ) WST 4310 FEMINISM IN AMERICA (4) PR: WST 2010, or WST 3011, or Cl. Emergence of the women's movement in 19th century America : origins, theoretical and practical issues, relation to European feminism. Sources, issues, implications of 20th century feminism. (May also be taken for credit in Women's Studies ) HUMAN SERVICES HUS 3001 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES (3) An introduction to the field of human services. Study of the pro fessions and agencies involved in prov i ding human services. Analysis of the values and ethics of various professional associa tions HUS 4020 THE LIFE CYCLE (4) An examination of individuals and the physiological and psycho social changes which occur during infancy, childhood, adoles cence, young adulthood, middle age and old age HUS 4100 INTERVIEWING (3) PR: HUS 3001 or Cl. The principles and techniques of interview ing Use of interviewing in information gathering, research and helping relationships and developing skills in communication across cultural, social and age barriers. SOW 4332 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION AND DEVELOPMENT (3) PR: HUS 3001 or Cl. An interdisciplinary approach to community organization and 9evelopment. A synthesis of social, cultural, psychological, economic, and political information concerning community structure and change HUMANITIES HUM 2930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-4) An introductory course dealing with a recurrent theme in the arts or focusing on a particular artistic center (a nation or city at a particular time). May be repeated for credit with change of content. May be repeated up to 8 credit hours. HUM 3024 THE ARTS (3) Analyses of selected works of film, literature, music, and visual arts, including a variety of periods, nationalities and art forms, emphasizing artistic diversity. Especially recommended for stu dents intending to take 4000-level Humanities courses at a future date HUM 3214 STUDIES IN CULTURE: THE CLASSICAL AND MEDIEVAL PERIODS (3) Analyses of selected works of classical and medieval architec ture, drama, sculpture, intellectual prose, and other art forms Typical course focus is on architecture, drama, and intellectual prose HUM 3243 STUDIES IN CULTURE: THE RENAISSANCE AND THE NINETEENTH CENTURY (3) Analyses of selected fiction, drama, painting, architecture, music and other art forms. HUM 3251 STUDIES IN CULTURE: THE TWENTIETH 00 Analyses of selected works of twentieth century art, primarily emphasizing film, with secondary emphasis on painting and fiction HUM 3271 THE CULTURE OF THE EAST AND WEST I (4) Masterpieces of music, visual arts, theatre, literature, and phi losophy in varying cultural and historical situations HUM 3273 THE CULTURE OF THE EAST AND WEST II (4) Masterpieces of music, visual arts, theatre, literature, and ph1-losophy in varying cultural and historical situations HUM 4402 HUMANITIES IN THE ORIENT: INDIA (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Examples from the arts and letters of India and the relationship of these arts to the Hindu and Buddhist philosophy-religions. HUM 4404 HUMANITIES IN THE ORIENT: CHINA (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Examples from the arts and letters of China; their relationship to Taoism, Confucianism and other Chinese philosophies; Western influences on twentieth century Chinese arts and letters HUM 4405 HUMANITIES IN THE ORIENT: JAPAN (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Examples from the arts and letters of Japan, their relationship to Zen Buddhism and other Japanese philosophy-religions; Western influences on twentieth century Japanese arts and letters. HUM 4433 CLASSICAL ARTS AND LETTERS I (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. A study of the poetry, drama, philosophy, historical writing, painting, sculpture and architec ture of ancient Greece, including such authors as Homer, Sophocles, and Plato, and monuments such as the Parthenon. HUM 4434 CLASSICAL ARTS AND LETTERS II (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. A study of the poetry, drama, philosophy, historical writing, painting, sculpture and architec ture of ancient Rome, including such authors as Virgil, Livy, and Cicero, the monuments of Rome, Pompeii, and Herculaneum. HUM 4435 MEDIEVAL ARTS AND LETTERS I (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. A study of the culture of Europe and the Mediterranean world from the 4th to 11th centuries through readings of early Medieval historians, poets, and theo logians, as well as the study of illuminated manuscripts, mosaics, paint i ng, and architecture. HUM 4436 MEDIEVAL ARTS AND LETTERS II (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. A study of the culture of Western Europe from the 9th to 14th centuries. Readings will include poetry and religious works; examples of painting, architecture, sculpture and music will be studied. HUM 4437 RENAISSANCE ARTS AND LETTERS I (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. A study of the Italian Renais sance, 1300-1580, emphasizing Humanism, painting, architec ture, literature, music and sculpture. Special study will be done of Petrarch, Giotto, DaVinci, and Michelangelo HUM 4438 RENAISSANCE ARTS AND LETTERS II (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. A study of the Northern Renais sance, 1400-1580, as exemplified in Germany, France, the Neth erlands, England, and Spain. The course includes painting, architecture, literature and music, with special study of Durer, Van Eyck, El Greco, and Bosch.

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152 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES IJNIVEllSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1'91a3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG HUM 4440 ARTS AND LETTERS IN THE 17TH AND ISS 4162 THE CITY AND URBANIZATION (3) 1 BTH CENTURIES (4) An interdisciplinary perspective will be used to analyze the emer-PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. This course includes the arts, gence of the city and the urban revolution Urban planning and literature, and music of the Baroque, Rococo, and Neo-Classical governance will be examined in looking at how urban areas deal periods with special study of Rubens, Rembrandt, Bach, Haydn, with social and physical problem. and Mozart ISS 4164 URBAN SOCIAL ISSUES: AN HUM 4442 ARTS AND LETTERS OF THE ROMANTIC INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH (3) PERIOD (4) This course is designed to examine current social issues from an PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Continental masterworks of interdisciplinary perspective Topic selection will be within the fiction, painting, and music in the context of European cultural broad framework of technological changes, economic condihistory from the French Revolution to the Revolutions of 1848 tions, political ideologies, and their impact on changing social HUM 4444 NINETEENTH CENTURY ARTS AND _LETTERS (4) patterns PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. A study of continental literary, ISS 4900 DIRECTED READINGS (1-3) musical. and artistic masterworks from the Revolutions of 1848 PR: Cl. A supervised program of intensive reading of interc::lisct-until the outbreak of World War I. plinary materials in areas of specific interest. May be repeated HUM 4445 TWENTIETH CENTURY ARTS AND LETTERS I (4) ISS 4910 DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-3) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Analysis of selected works of PR: Cl. A supervised program of interdisciplinary research in twentieth century art The course will focus on a particular phase areas of specific interest. May be repeated in the development of modernism, a set of themes, or certain ISS 4935 SEMINAR IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (3) stylistic aspects of the various arts of the twentieth century. PR: Senior standing and ISS 3010 A capstone course designed HUM 4446 TWENTIETH CENTURY ARTS AND LETTERS II (4) to provide an in-depth study of topical areas related to the social PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Analysis of selected works sciences Course may be taken by non-majors twentieth century art. The course will focus on a particular phase ISS 5934 SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) in the development of modernism, a set of themes, or certain PR: Cl plus senior standing or graduate status lnterdisciphnary stylistic aspects of various arts of the twentieth century studies with course content dependent on student demand and HUM 4452 HUMANITIES IN AMERICA I (4) instructor's interest May be repeated as topics vary. PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Study of selected works of art, STA 3122 SOCIAL SCIENCE STATISTICS -6A (3) tracing the course of westward expansion in civilization, and the This course is designed to introduce concepts, theories, and as-interaction between the arts and the sciences in American ways sumptions that underlie specific techniques used in the social of life and work, 1790-1890 sciences Emphasis is placed on selection of appropriate techHUM 4453 HUMANITIES IN AMERICA II (4) niques given the research desig n to be utilized PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Study of selected works, tracing the course of expansion in the production and enjoyment of works of art, and interaction between the idealistic and prag matic concerns for development of the arts in the 20th century HUM 4462 LATIN AMERICAN ARTS AND LETTERS I (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Analysis of selected Latin Ameri can works of art in their cultural context, with emphasis on major art forms selected from the Pre-Columbian period HUM 4464 LATIN AMERICAN ARTS AND LETTERS II (4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. Analysis of selected Latin Ameri can works of art in their cultural context, with emphasis on major art forms selected from the colonial through contemporary periods. HUM 4905 DIRECTED STUDY (1-4) PR: Cl. Specialized individual study determined by the student's needs and interests HUM 4930 SELECTED TOPICS IN HUMANITIES (1-4) PR: Sophomore standing or Cl. This course will deal with a recurrent theme in the arts as, for example, love or death, or will focus on artistic centers such as Renaissance Florence or Paris in the 1920s Topics will vary; course may be repeated for credit with change of content. HUM 4931 SEMINAR IN HUMANITIES (4) PR: Humanities major or Cl; Senior standing Discussion of inter disciplinary humanities Includes essay. {Fall term only ) HUM 4941 STUDY ON LOCATION (1-4) Prerequisites : None. The art of a culture will be examined during travel in groups, led by an instructor, to important cities or sites Monuments, museums, architecture, plays, and/or concerts will be studied Reading assignments and lectures INTERDISCIPLINARY SOCIAL SCIENCES ISS 3010 INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (3) An introduction to the fields within the social sciences. Emphasis is placed on the concepts, theories methodologies and applica tions used in the social sciences Course may be taken by non majors ISS 3930 SELECTED TOPICS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (1-4) Interdisciplinary studies with course content dependent on student demand and instructor's interest. May be repeated as topics vary. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AREA STUDIES Area study courses are multi-disciplinary in nature and deal with one or more countries of a region Each course combines some measure of political, economic, historical, religious, geographic, anthropological, and sociological analysis in dealing with salient features and current problems The same course may be re peated, but only when the countries of concentration differ The regularly offered area study courses are : ASN 3030 THE MIDDLE EAST 3 EUS 3000 EUROPE 3 LAS 3002 LATIN AMERICA 3 AFA 4150 AFRICA AND THE UNITED STATES 3 ASN 3012 JAPAN TODAY 3 ASN 3014 CHINA TODAY 3 EUS 3022 RUSSIA 3 INR 1211 WORLD PERSPECTIVE 3 An interdisciplinary study of the international system, maior world regions and problems. INR 2085 WORLD TENSIONS (2) A study of the major causes and consequences of critical tensions which lead to serious social disturbances among and withi n the independent states of the world INR 2930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-4) Interdisciplinary studies with course content dependent on stu dent demand and instructor's interest. For non-majors only. May be repeated as topics vary INR 3003 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (3) An interdisciplinary study which stresses methods and analysis. A major port i on will focus on the roles which different disciplines play in interpreting the international scene INR 3038 INTERNATIONAL WEALTH AND POWER (3) Introduction to the relationship between politics and economics, empl-iasizing the analysis of government policies in response to both domestic and international economic problems INR 3080 ACTORS IN THE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM (3) An examination of the subnat i onal, national, and transnational institutions to include ethnic groups, insurgents, nation-states, nationalism, multinational corporations, international organiza tions and major religions

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 153 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA fllt2/fl UNDERGRADUATE CA TALDG INR 3082 ISSUES IN THE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM (3) A study which emphasizes the problems and processes of inter nat i onal actors Focuses on issues related to war and peace, political economy, and social welfare topics INR 3141 INTERNATIONAL NUCLEAR POLICY (3) A study of nuclear issues (such as system development, prolifera tion, control, strategic policy and war) as they relate to contem porary international politics INR 3242 INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM (3) A study of contemporary internat i onal terrorism and its causes, ranging from national liberation movements to networks of philosophical anarchists. INR 3261 WORLD IDEOLOGIES (3) A course which details and examines the ideologies of today's independent countries; analyzing them in their political, social, cultural and historical context. INR 3336 INTELLIGENCE AND U.S. FOREIGN POLICY (3) An examination of the role of intelligence and the intelligence community in U S foreign policy with emphasis on the period since Worfd War II. INR 3770 COMPARATIVE MILITARY SYSTEMS (3) A comparative study of ways in which the military institutions of various nations are organized and interact with politics, societies and economies. INR 3955 OVERSEAS STUDY A program of individual or group research in a foreign country INR 4250 THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE SOUTHERN NATIONS (3) A multidisciplinary study of the efforts of the nations i n the South (Africa, Asia Latin America and the Middle East) to improve their status through political and economic development INR 4900 DIRECTED READINGS (1-3) PR: Cl. A supervised program of intensive reading of interdisci plinary materials in areas of specific interest. May be repeated INR 4910 DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-3) PR: Cl. A supervised program of interdisciplinary research in areas of specific interest. May be repeated INR 4931 SELECTED TOPICS (1-4) Interdisciplinary studies with course content dependent on student demand and instructor's interest. May be repeated as topics vary INR 4936 SENIOR SEMINAR (3) PR: International Stud ies major and senior standing A variable topics seminar integrating concepts and analyses relating to _the academic background of INT majors. Should be taken in the stu dent's final semester. WST 3275 WOMEN IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD (3) A comparative study of woman's status in various developing nations with that in various industrialized states (Also offered under Women's Studies Program ) LANGUAGE General Foreign Languages FOL 3100 GENER,AL FOREIGN LANGUAGE I (1-4) A general purpose course that may Pe used for transfer of credit, credit by examination, and similar matters; may also be used for formal courses in less commonly taught languages or in profes sional translation. FOL 4101 GENERAL FOREIGN LANGUAGE II (1-3) A general purpose course that may be used for transfer of credit, credit by examination, and similar matters ; may also be used for formal courses in less commonly taught languages or for workshops in professional interpreting FOL 4905 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) Departmental approval required. FOL 5906 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) PR: FOL 4101 or equivalent. Arabic ARA 1120 MODERN ARABIC I (4) An intensive study of basic skills : pronunciation, listening com prehension, speaking and some composition ARA 1121 MODERN ARABIC II (4) PR: ARA 1120 or its equivalent. A continuation of ARA 1120 More sophisticated oralf aural skills are attained. Basic reading skills are acquired Chinese CHI 1120 MODERN CHINESE I (4) Mandarin. An intensive study of basic skills : pronunciation, lis tening, comprehension, speaking, and some composition CHI 1121 MODERN CHINESE II (4) Mandarin PR: CHI 1120 or equivalent. A continuation of CHI 1120. More sophisticated oral/ aural skills are attained. Basic reading skills are acquired. French FRE 1040 FRENCH FOR READING (3) Designed to provide a reading ability in French that will support research in other disciplines Primarily for graduate students FRE 1120 BEGINNING FRENCH I (4) The first course in the study of elementary French Emphasis on the development of basic skills in comprehension, speaking and reading. FRE 1121 BEGINNING FRENCH II (4) PR: FRE 1120 or equivalent. A continuation of FRE 1120 FRE 1170 OVERSEAS STUDY-ELEM. FRENCH (4) Elementary-level French taught in France. In lieu of FRE. 1120 and FRE 1121 No credit toward a major or minor in French May be repeated up to 8 credit hours FRE 2200 FRENCH Ill (3) PR: FRE 1121 or equivalent. A review of the basic structure of French May be taken concurrently with FRE 2201 FRE 2201 FRENCH IV (3) PR: FRE 1121 or equivalent. Readings in French on the interme diate level. May be taken concurrently with FRE 2200 FRE 2241 CONVERSATION I (3) PR: FRE 1121 For development of basic conversational skills FRE 2270 OVERSEAS STUDY-INTR. FRENCH Two semesters of university-level French or equivalent profi ciency. At USF this equates to FRE 1120 (4 credits} plus FRE 1121 (4 credits) or FRE 1 i70. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours FRE 3230 READING IN FRENCH LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3) PR: FRE 2201 or equivalent. This course is designed to build reading skills in French while giv i ng students a broad back ground in culture which will serve them in all subsequent courses. FRE 3240 CONVERSATION II (3) PR: FRE 2241 or equivalent proficiency Conversation practice with concentration on current idiomatic usage FRE 3420 COMPOSITION I (3) A fundamental composition course for students who have com pleted FRE 2200 or FRE 2201 FRE 3440 FRENCH FOR BUSINESS (3) PR: FRE 1121 or equivalent. An introduction to the French language in ordinary business transactions FRE 3470 OVERSEAS STUDY An intensive study-travel project in France Prior approval and early registration required. May be repeated up to 12 credit hours FRE 3500 FRENCH CIVILIZATION (3) Readings and discussion on the cultural history of France. FRE 4421 COMPOSITION II (3) Continuation of French composition This course is designed to follow FRE 3420 FRE 4470 ADVANCED OVERSEAS STUDY PR: FRE 3470 or Cl. Intensive language study in France Depart mental approval required FRE 4700 FRENCH LINGUISTICS (3) PR: LIN 3010 and FRE 2201 or eqivalent. An introduction to the phonological, morphological and stactic structure of French FRE 4905 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) Departmental approval required

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154 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNNERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA -199213 UNDERGRADUA 1 CATALOG FRE. 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) GER 2201 GERMAN IV (3) PR: GER 1121 or equivalent. Readings in German on the interme diate level. May be taken concurrently with GER 2200. Study of an author, movement or theme FRE 5425 ADVANCED WRITTEN EXPRESSION (3) PR: FRE 4421, or equivalent. Course is designed to give advanced training in free composition in French. FRE 5566 CONTEMPORARY FRANCE (3) PR: FRE 3500 or equivalent or graduate standing An advanced course in French civilization and culture including a study of recent social, artistic and political trends as well as various current intellectual movements. Text and discussions in French FRW 4100 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH NOVEL (3) A study of the history of the novel from its early appearance to present times with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Authors to be studied include Chretien de Troyes. Rabelais, Balzac, Flaubert, Proust, Camus, Sartre, Robbe-Grillet, and others. Specific content may vary from year to year FRW 4101 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH DRAMA AND POETRY (3) A study of the history of drama and poetry. Will include medieval drama, Racine, Corneille, Moliere, Anouilh, Sartre, Ionesco and others. Will also include Villon, Ronsard, DuBellay, Lamartine, Hugo, Vigny. Musset, Baudelaire, Mallarme, Rimbaud, Valery, Peguy, Eluard, Apollinaire, Char, and others Course content may vary from year to year. FRW 4310 CLASSICAL DRAMA PR: FRW 4101 Corneille, Moliere, and Racine (3) FRW 5222 CLASSICAL PROSE AND POETRY (3) PR: FRW 4101. Emphasis on Malherbe, La Fontaine, Boileau, Descartes, and Pascal. FRW 5226 20TH CENTURY POETRY AND THEATRE (3) PR: FRW 4101 Valery, Claude!, Anouilh, Montherland, Sartre, Ionesco. FRW 5286 THE 20TH CENTURY NOVEL (3) PR: FRW 4100. Proust Gide, Mauriac, Malraux, Camus, Robbe Grillet. FRW 5415 LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE AGES (3) PR: FRW 4100 or 4101 Major genres, including epics, Arthurian romances, drama and lyric poetry Reading in modern French translation FRW 5425 LITERATURE OF THE RENAISSANCE (3) PR: FRW 4100 or 4101. A study of Renaissance French humanism including Rabelais, Montaigne, and Pleiade poets FRW 5445 18TH CENTURY LITERATURE (3) PR: FRW 4100. The classical tradition and the new currents of thought in the Age of Enlightenment. FRW 5528 PRE-ROMANTICISM (3) PR: FRW 4100 or 4101 The precursors of romanticism Emphasis on Rousseau, Bernardin de St. Pierre, Chenier, and Chateaubri and FRW 5535 ROMANTICISM (3) PR: FRW 4101 A study of the romantic and early realistic move ments with emphasis on Lamartine Vigny, Musset, Hugo and Balzac FRW 5556 REALISM AND NATURALISM (3) PR: FRW 4100 or 4101. A detailed study of realism and naturaf ism with emphasis on Flaubert, Zola, les Goncourt, Maupassant, and Daudet. FRW 5934 SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) PR: Upper-level or graduate standing. Study of an author, move mentor theme German GER 1120 BEGINNING GERMAN I (4) Development of basic skills in listening and reading comprehen sion, speaking and writing of German GER 1121 BEGINNING GERMAN II (4) PR: GER 1120 or equivalent. Continued development of basic skills in listening and reading comprehension, speaking and writing German GER 2200 GERMAN Ill (3) PR: GER 1121 or equivalent. A review of the basic structure ol spoken and written German May be taken concurrently with GER 2201. GER 3244 CONVERSATION I (3) PR: GER 1121. For deve lopment of basic conversational skills. GER 3420 COMPOSITION I (3) A fundamental course for students who have completed GER 2200 or GER 2201 GER 3500 GERMAN CIVILIZATION (3) PR: GER 2200 or GER 2201 Readings in German on the cultural history of Germany. GER 4410 CONVERSATION II (3) Free conversation based on the current German idiom GER 4421 COMPOSITION II (3) Practical training in modern German usage and differences of style. GER 5845 HISTORY OF THE GERMAN LANGUAGE (3) A diachronic approach to the study of the German language The course traces the history and development of the language from lndoEuropean through Germanic, Old, Middle, and New High German GEW 4100 SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE I (4) Old High German and Middle High German literature in mode ( n German translation ; the literature of Humanism and Baroque, the classical period GEW 4101 SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE II The romantic period 19th and 20th centuries GEW 4900 DIRECTED STUDY Departmental approval required GEW 4930 SELECTED TOPICS Study of an author movement or theme. (4) (1-3) (1-3) GEW 5475 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE TO 1945 (3) A study of major styles in German literature from 1900 to WW II with emphasis on Hauptmann, Schnitzler Hofmannsthal, George Rilke, Kaiser Heym, Trakl, Thomas Mann, Hesse, Kafka, Benn, Brecht GEW 5489 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE: 1945 TO PRESENT (3) Study of major trends i n German literature since WWII with emphasis on Borchert, Frisch, Durrenmatt, Boll, Uwe. Johnson, Grass, Aichinger Eich Enzensberger, Bachmann GEW 5515 THE ENLIGHTENMENT (3) Selected dramas and critical writings by Lessing, Wieland, Kant. GEW 5545 ROMANTICISM (3) Jenaer circle and Heidelberger circle ; the late romantic period; the writers between Classicism and Romanticism GEW 5555 REALISM (3) Selected works by Grillparzer, Grabbe, Buchner, Hebbel, Heine, Immerman, Sti fter, Keller, Meyer, Storm, Raabe, Hulshoff, and Morike. GEW 5605 GOETHE (3) Selected novels, poems: Werther, Wahlverwandtschaften, helm Mei ster, Westostlicher Divan GEW 5606 FAUST (3) Sources form, content and literary significance of Urfaust and Faust. GEW 5615 SCHILLER (3) Selected dramas, philosophical and aesthetical writings. GEW 5934 SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) PR: Upper-level or graduate standing Study of an author, move mentor theme Hebrew HBR 1120 MODERN HEBREW I (4) An intensive study of basic skills : pronunciation, listening com prehension, speaking, and some composition HBR 1121 MODERN HEBREW II (4) PR: HBR 1120 or equivalent. A continuation of HBR 1120 More sophisticated oral/aural skills are attained Basic reading skills are acquired

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 155 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLOllJOA f"2/tl UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG ltalin ITA 1120 BEGINNING ITALIAN I (4) The first course in the study of elementary Italian. Emphasis is on the development of basic skills in comprehension, speaking, and reading. ITA 1121 BEGINNING ITALIAN II (4) The second course in the study of elementary Italian. Emphasis is on the development of basic skills in comprehension, speaking and reading. ITA 2200 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I {3) PR: ITA 1121 or equivalent. Readings in Italian on the elementary level. A review of the basic structure of spoken and written Italian ITA 3240 ITALIAN CONVERSATION I (4) To develop fluency and correctness in spoken Italian. Intensive study for conversational skill based particularly upon the current Italian idiom. Syntax is intensified and the vocabulary and idiomatic expressions expanded. ITA 3420 COMPOSITION (3) A fundamental composition course for students who have com pleted ITA 2200 and ITA 2201. ITA 3470 OVERSEAS STUDY {1-6) An intensive study-travel project in Italy. Prior approval and early registration required. May be repeated up to 12 credit hours ITA 4241 ITALIAN CONVERSATION II (4) To assist students who have already made a start in speaking Italian, who have not had the advantages of travel or who have non-Italian speaking parents, to improve their skill in speaking Italian Current events; literary discussions; free conversation ; prepared speeches Differences of media, syntactical signal. rrw 4100 SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE I (4) A survey of Italian literature from the earliest monuments through the classicism of the 18th century ITW 4101 SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE II (4) A survey of Italian literature beginning with the Classicism of the 18th century and continuing to present rrw 4905 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) Departmental approval required JPN 1120 MODERN JAPANESE I (4) An intensive study of basic skills: pronunciation, listening com prehension, speaking, and some composition JPN 1121 MODERN JAPANESE II (4) PR: JPN 1120 or equivalent. A continuation of JPN 1120. More sophisticated oral/aural skills are attained Basic reading skills are acquired. JPN 22QO MODERN JAPANESE Ill (3) PR: JPN 1121 or equivalent Continuing study to attain basic pr()ficiency in Japanese. JPN 2201 MODERN JAPANESE IV (3) PR: JPN 2200 or equivalent Continuation of JPN 2200. Practice of writing, speaking, and listening skills to attain basic profi ciency JPN 4905 DIRECTED STUDY {1-5) Permits study options in Japanese not available in regularly scheduled curriculum at departmental discretion approval required May be repeated up to 10 credit hours. JPN SELECTED TOPICS {1-5) Course permits study options in Japanese not available in the regularly scheduled curriculum at departmental discretion Departmental approval required. May be repeated up to 10 credit hours Polish POL 1120 BEGINNING POLISH I (4) This course features all four major skills : listening, reading, speaking, and Grammar exercises, dictation, readings and vocabulary-building are central in this first course Knowl edge of Russian can help. S/U available. POL 1121 BEGINNING POLISH II (4) PR: POL 1120 or equivalent by examination This course continues the four basic skills of POL 1120, with continued emphasis on structures, dialogues, readings, dictation, and vocabulary-building Knowledge of Russian can help. S/U available. Portuguese POR 1120 BEGINNING PORTUGUESE I (4) Development of basic skills in listening and reading comprehen sion, speaking and writing of Brazilian Portuguese. POR 1121 BEGINNING PORTUGUESE II (4) PR: POR 1120 or equivalent. Continued development of basi c skills in and reading comprehension, speaking and writing of Brazilian Portuguese POR 2200 INTERMEDIATE PORTUGUESE I (3) POR 2200 builds upon the four language skill s (speaking, com prehension, reading, and writing) introduced in POR 1120 and POR 1121 It is available to all foreign language students and includes lab attendance of at least two hours per week. May not be repeated for credit. POR 2201 INTERMEDIATE PORTUGUESE II {3) For language students who intend to attain basic proficiency There is a two-hour lab each week which can be taken in smaller segments May not be repeated for extra credit. Russian RUS 1120 BEGINNING RUSSIAN I (4) The first course in the study of elementary Russian. Emphasis on the development of basic skills in comprehension, speaking and reading RUS 1121 BEGINNING RUSSIAN II (4) PR: RUS 1120 or Cl. The second course in the study of elementary Russian. Emphasis on the development of basic skills in compre hension, speaking and reading RUS 2200 RUSSIAN Ill (4) PR: First year Russian or equivalent Review and development of basic skills in conversation, composition, and reading. RUS 2201 RUSSIAN IV (4). PR: RUS 4200 or equivalent. Review and development of basic skills in conversation composition, and reading RUS 2270 OVERSEAS STUDY (3) Intensive study of the Russian language in Russia i nvolving at least 20 hours per week of classroom instruction and cultural excursions conducted in Russian around Moscow and other parts of Russia. May be repeated up to 12 credit hours RUS 3240 CONVERSATION I (4) PR: Second year Russian or equivalent. Development of basic conversational skills RUS 3500 RUSSIAN CIVILIZATION -6A (3) A survey of the cultural history of Russia. RUS 4241 CONVERSATION II (4) PR: Previous course in series or equivalent Development of con versational skills RUS 4402 ADVANCED RUSSIAN CONVERSATION & COMPOSITION I (4) PR: RUS 4241 or <;:I. Third year Russian. RUS 4403 ADVANCED RUSSIAN CONVERSATION & COMPOSITION II (4) PR: RUS 4241 or Cl. Third year Russian. RUS 4700 RUSSIAN LINGUISTICS (3) PR LIN 3010 or equivalent or Cl. An introduction to Russian Lin guistics content: Phonology, Morphology, Word-formation, Syntax RUS 4900 SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) Study of an author, movement or theme RUS 4905 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) De. partmental approval required RUT 3110 RUSSIAN CLASSICS IN TRANSLATION -6A (3) Masterpieces of 19th century Russian literature in English. The major works of Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov Elective for all students in all de partments RUT 3111 RUSSIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION -6A (3) Masterpieces of 20th century Soviet literature in English. The

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156 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1n2gJ UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG major works of Bely, Olesha, Babel, Zamyatin, Bulgakov, PasterSPW 4101 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE 11 (3) nak, and Solzhenitzyn. Elective for all students in all depart-PR: SPW 3030 or equivalent. A study of the later periods ol ments Spanish literature Spanish SPN 1120 BEGINNING SPANISH I (4) Development of basic skills in listening and reading comprehen sion, speaking and writing of Spanish. SPN 1121 (BEGINNING SPANISH II (4) PR: SPN 1120 or equivalent. Continued development of basic skills in listening and reading comprehension, speaking and writing of Spanish. SPN 1130 ACCELERATED SPANISH FOR NEAR-NATIVE SPEAKERS AND OTHERS (1-6) PR: Cl. Accelerated course for near-native speakers and others with some knowledge of Spanish capable of making rapid progress SPN 2200 SPANISH Ill (3) PR: SPN 1121 or equivalent. A review of the basic structure of spoken and written Spanish May be taken concurrently w ith SPN 2201 SPN 2201 SPANISH IV (3) PR: SPN 1121 or equivalent. Readings in Spanish on the interme diate level. May be taken concurrently with SPN 2200 SPN 2240 CONVERSATION I (3) PR: SPN 1121. For development of basic conversational skills SPN 2241 CONVERSATION It (3) PR: SPN 2240 or equivalent. To improve fluency in spoken Spanish. SPN 2440 SPANISH FOR BUSINESS (3) PR: SPN 2201 or equivalent. An introduction to the Spanish lan guage as used in undertaking ordinary business transactions SPN 3300 COMPOSITION (3) PR: SPN 2200-2201. A study of syntax, grammar and writing. SPN 3470 OVERSEAS STUDY (1-6) PR: SPN 1121 An intensive study-travel program fn a Spanish speaking country Prior departmental approval and early regis tration are required. SPN 3500 SPANISH CIVILIZATION PR: SPN 1121 The culture and civilization of Spain. (3) SPN 3520 SPANISH AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (3) Readings and discussions on the culture and c i vilization of Spanish America. For majors and non-majors SPN 4301 EXPOSITORY WRITING (3) PR: SPN 3300 Pract ical training in contemporary Spanish struc ture, usage and stylistic devices SPN 4410 ADVANCED CONVERSATION (3) PR: SPN 3241 or equivalent. Intensive practice in the formulation and expression of ideas in standard Spanish. SPN 4470 ADVANCED OVERSEAS STUDY (1-6) PR: SPN 3470 Intensive language study in Spain. Departmental approval required. SPN 4700 SPANISH LINGUISTICS (3) PR: LIN 3010 or equivalent (may be taken concurrent l y with Cl) and SPN 2201 or equivalent. An introduction to Hispanic linguistics: Phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicography . SPN 5525 MODERN SPANISH AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (3) PR: SPN 3520 or equivalent or graduate standing Advanced readings and discussions dealing with Spanish American civ i liza tion and culture, including a study of social, artisitic and political trends, from Colonial Times to the present. Texts and discussions in Spanish. SPN 5567 MODERN SPANISH CIVILIZATION (3) PR: SPN 3500 or equivalent or graduate standing. Advanced readings and discussions dealing with contemporary Spanish civilization and culture, including a study of recent social, artistic and political trends Texts and discussions in Spanish. SPW 3030 INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC LITERATURE (3) PR: SPN 2201 or equivalent Prose f i ction, drama poetry, and essay; techniques of literary analysis SPW 4100 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE I (3) PR: SPW 3030 or equivalent. A study of Spanish literature from its origins through the 17th century. SPW 4131 SURVEY OF SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) PR: SPW 3030 or equivalent An introduction to the study ol Spanish-American literature from the Modernism period to the present. Emphasis on modern writers since Dario SPW 4900 DIRECTED STUDY Departmental approval required SPW 4930 SELECTED TOPICS Study of an author, movement or theme (1-3) (1-3) SPW 5135 COLONIAL SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE (3) PR: SPW 4131 An introduct i on to Colonial Spanish American Literature from the Discovery through the Romantic Period. SPW 5355 SPANISH AMERICAN DRAMA & POETRY (3) PR: SPW 4131 Major writers of all genres Emphasis on modern writers SPW 5387 SPANISH AMERICAN PROSE (3) PR: SPW 4131 Emphasis on the gaucho theme and contempo rary prose fiction SPW 5388 GOLDEN AGE POETRY AND DRAMA (3) PR: SPW 4100 Lope de Vega, Alarcon, Tirso, Calderon, and others SPW 5405 MEDIEVAL LITERATURE (3) PR: SPW 4100 or equivalent. Course gives an in-depth study ol principal works and authors of the period such as El Poema de Mio Cid, Libro de Buen Amor and La Celestina SPW 546519TH CENTURY LITERATURE (3) PR: SPW 4101 Poetry and drama of the first half of the 19th century SPW 5605 CERVANTES Cervantes' masterpiece Don Quijote de la Mancha. (3) SPW 5725 GENERATION OF 1898 (3) PR: SPW 4101. The major figures of the period and their main followers SPW 5726 VANGUARD LITERATURE OF 1918 AND 1936 (3) PR: SPW 4101 A study of vanguard literature in Spain between 1918 and 1936 SPW 5934 SELECTED TOPICS (3) PR: Upper-level or graduate standing Study of an author, movement or theme. Yoruba YOR 1120 YORUBA I (4) This course is designed to familiarize students with modern or thography and to develop skills in reading, writing, speaking, and understanding spoken Yoruba Pronunciation in Yoruba and achieving basic communicative competence in the language are among the skills to be attained in the course. YOR 1121 YORUBA II (4) A continuation of Yoruba 1120, this course delves further into the structure of Yoruba and its grammatical functions Also covered is practice in reading elementary texts with emphasis on grammar, vocabulary, and an appreciation for style. Also included is composition and drills in oral work. May be repeated up to 8 credit hours LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE LIS 2001 USE OF THE LIBRARY (2) An introduction to the resources of the University of South Florida Library Emphasis will be placed on library materials germane to the course work of the undergraduate (S/U only.) LIS 4302 PRODUCING AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS (2) PR: Upper level standing or Cl. Basic skills in designing and prepar i ng audiovisual materials for w i de variety of instructional and communicative purposes LIS 5315 INSTRUCTIONAL GRAPHICS (3) PR: Cl. Theoretical aspects, planning and production of instruc tional graphic material. The Theory of graphic communications Interpreting needs for instructional materials appropriate for given behavioral objectives

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 157 UNIVEllSITY OF SOUTH FLOlllDA ft!12/f3 UNDEllGllADUATE CATALOG LIS 5333 TV IN SCHOOL AND LIBRARIES (3) Small format video tape recordings and the utilization of open and closed broadcasts in schools and libraries LIS 5404 FOUNDATIONS OF LIBRARIANSHIP (3) Overview of the introduction to the study of library service ; history; organization; specialized literature; outstanding lead ers; current trends, issues, and problems Place of the library in society w ith its contributions to that society LIS 5434 COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARIANSHIP (3) Introduction to the community college concept examination of the basic elements, functions, purposes, directions, programs._ etc inherent in both the community college and the library resources center which serves it. LIS 5937 SELECTED TOPICS IN LIBRARY STUDIES (1-4) PR: Cl. Covers a variety of topics in such areas as collection development, reference services, technical services, and admini stration LINGUISTICS ENS 1483 ENGLISH FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS I (3) A special course for students learning English as a second lan guage Intensive study and drill in American English pronuncia tion and listening comprehension. ENS 1484 ENGLISH FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS II (3) PR: ENS 1483 or Cl. A continuat i on of ENS 1483 Emphasis on reading and composition LIN 3010 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS (3) Introduction to the basic principles of linguistic science ; phonof ogical and grammatical analysis and description; language change and genetic relationships LIN 3801 LANGUAGE AND MEANING (3) A survey introduction for non-specialists to the basic principles of semantics and the way language conveys ideas This course is also available on WUSF/TV Channel 16 by the O .U. Program LIN 4040 DESCRIPTIVE LINGUISTICS (3) PR: LIN 3010 or Cl. Introduction to the basic techniques of for malizing linguistic descriptions through elementary phonologi cal, morphological, and syntactic data solution-problems from a variety of languages. Both taxonomic and generative analysis and descriptions will be developed and compared LIN 4371 METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING ENGLISH OVERSEAS (3) PR: Upper-level standing Designed to introduce and prepare the enrollee in the various facets of teaching English as a Foreign Language in the overseas setting It will include aspects of teaching verbal skills and comprehension as well as writing It involves a practicum at the International Language Institute on campus LIN 4575 LANGUAGE TYPES OF THE WORLD (3) An introduction to linguistic typology consisting in a systematic comparison of characteristic representatives of the various lan guage types, such as Vietnamese, Malay, Hungarian, Swahili, Sanskrit, Hebrew and others No knowledge of any of these lan guages on the part of the student is presumed LIN 4600 LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (3) PR: LIN 3010 An analysis of the interrelation of a language and the structure of the society using it. The linguistic behavior patterns characteristic of particular social political, economic, educational. and racial groups Problems in communication between strata LIN 4710 LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION: ACQUISITION AND DEVELOPMENT (3) PR: LIN 3010 A survey of current research and theory in the processes of normal acquisition and development of language and communication in children. The acquisition and develop ment of phonology syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and nonver bal communication and the role of language in general cognitive development. LIN 4903 DIRECTED READING (1-3) PR: Cl. Readi ngs in special topics Must be arranged prior to registration LIN 4930 SELECTED TOPICS (1-3) PR: Cl. Course content depends upon students' needs and instructor's interest and may range over the entire field of linguistics. LIN 5421 CROSS CULTURAL ISSUES IN ESL (3) PR: LIN 5700 This is a lecture course on cultural issues in Teaching English as a second/foreign language. May not be repeated for additional credit hours. LIN 5700 APPLIED LINGUISTICS (3) Analysis of the phonological, morphonological, and syntactic features of English as a basis for linguistic application to prob lems of English language acquisition by non-native speakers. LIN 5741 LANGUAGE TESTING (3) PR: TSL 5371. This is a lecture course on the methodology ot testing English as a second/foreign language May not be repeated for additional credit hours TSL 5321 ESOL STRATEGIES FOR CONTENT AREA TEACHERS (3) This course is designed for public school teachers working with limited English proficient (foreign) students in the classroom The new ESOL requirements specify that this course be offered to content area teachers and to ESOL teachers May not be repeated for additional credit hours. TSL 5371 METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (3) Analysis of the methods of teaching English pronunciation and structure to speakers of other languages TSL 5372 ESOL CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (3) Analysis of the methods of teaching English pronunciation and structure to speakers of other languages. MARINE SCIENCE OCB 5050 BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (3) PR: Graduate standing or Cl. The study of life in the ocean, its rates and processes, and its interaction with the physical and chemical environment. OCC 5050 CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (3) PR; CHM 2046 and Cl. The ocean as a chemical system, including composition, physical
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158 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA Jlltlal UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG storyboard preparation time buying and selling techniques, au-for crit ical thinking and editorial writi rlg ; evaluation of editorial dience research methods and basic production concepts pages of leading newspapers Study of journalistic techniques ADV 3300 ADVERTISING MEli>IA STRATEGY (3) invo lved in personal columns PR: ACG 2001, ADV 3000, ECO 2023 and ECO 2013. Problems, JOU 3940 REPORTING PRACTICUM (1) techniques, strategy of media research, planning, budgeting PR: JOU 3101 and Cl. For selected News-Editorial Sequence ma-and effective utilization in advertising jors Practical experience outside the classroom in a live newspa-ADV 3700 RETAIL ADVERTISING PLANNING AND per reporting situation where the student works for academic EXECUTION (3) credit under the tutelage of a professional practitioner. (S/U PR: ADV 3000 and ADV 3101. A study of retail advertising, only.) including management decisions, processes, procedures, media JOU 4104 PUBLIC AFFAIRS REPORTING (3) planning, production techniques, and problems affecting the PR: JOU 3101, POS 2041 and POS 3142 Covering city council development of advertising to fulfill retail objectives. meetings, courthouse, city hall, courts, society, and other special ADV 4800 ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS (3) assignments Emphasis is on coverage of major governmental PR: ACG 2001, ADV 3101, ADV 3300, MMC 4420, ECO 2013, units of all levels of government, including examination and ECO 2023, and MAR 3023. Advanced advertising course requirinterpretation of public documents and records ing planning and production of complete general advertising JOU 4200 NEWS EDITING I (3) campaign, including research, production methods, budgeting, PR: ECO 2013, JOU 3100, and SYG 3010. Evaluating news and and media schedules. its display ; editing and rewriting copy for the mass media, with ADV 4940 ADVERTISING PRACTICUM (1) emphasis on the daily newspaper; news judgment, headlines, PR: Cl. For selected advertising sequence majors Practical expemakeup; ethical problems. rience outside the classroom in a live advertising situation where JOU 4206 NEWSPAPER DESIGN AND TYPOGRAPHY (3) the student works for academic credit under the tutelage of a PR: JOU 4200 or Cl. Theoretical and practical applications ol professional practitioner. (S/U only.) newspaper design ; problems in newspaper layout; the research FIL 3004 THE FILM AS MASS COMMUNICATION I: of newspaper typography and design and its application; rede-SYNTAX (3) sign of contemporary newspapers. PR: MMC3100and MMC 3602 The language, conventions, ele-JOU 4941 EDITING PRACTICUM (1) ments and patterns of the film medium as related to current PR: Senior standing, JOU 4200 and Cl. For selected Newsmodels of effective mass communication and new theories of Edi torial Sequence majors Practical experience outside the nonverbal communication. Concurrent laboratory experiences classroom at a daily newspaper copydesk, where the student in control of light and line works for academic credit under the tutelage of a professional FIL 3200 THE FILM AS MASS COMMUNICATION II: news editor (S/U only ) RHETORIC AND STYLISTICS (3) JOU 4944 MAGAZINE PRACTICUM (1) PR: FIL 3004. A continuation of FIL 3004 to include the effective PR: Senior standing and Cl. For selected Magazine Sequence arrangements of scenes and sequences in motion picture and majors. Practical experience outside the classroom in a live magatelevision films Concurrent laboratory exper iences in sound and zine or industrial publication situation where the student works editing for academic credit under the tu,elage of a profess i onal practiFIL 4206 ADVANCED FILM LIGHTING (3) t i oner (S/U only ) PR: Fil 4205 Advanced lighting of studio and location sets MMC 3100 WRITING FOR THE MASS MEDIA (3) stressing profess i onal procedures and standards from prepro. PR: Sophomore standing; 2 7 GPR; grade of 'C" in ENC 1101, duction to post production ENC 1102, typing proficiency, and passing score on English FIL 4207 SENSITOMETRY AND PHOTOMETRIC$ (3) D i agnostic Test. An introduction to the basic skills of writing for PR: FIL 3004 The materials and processes of cinema photo; rethe mass media with practice in library research, persuasive sponse of materials to development and exposure writing, and informational writing. FIL 4404 SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE FILM, 1945 TO MMC 3602 MASS COMMUNICATIONS AND SOCIETY (3) THE PRESENT . (3) PR: Sophomore stand i ng. A survey of the history, theory proc-PR: MMC 3100 and MMC 3602. The development of the f ilm esses, and philosqphy of mass communicat ions and the mass from 1945 to the present. media in the United States, and their relationship to the other JOU 3006 MAGAZINES IN SOCIETY (3) major institutions of American society PR: MMC 3100 and MMC 3602 A study of the development ol MMC 4123 MEDIA SCRIPT WRITING (3) various types of magazines in America and a critical analysi s of PR: MMC 3100 and MMC 3602 An introduction to the techcurrent problems and performances of periodicals along with niques of writing scripts for photographic and multi-media changes indicated for the future. presentation electronic media, and industrial and documentary JOU 3100 BEGINNING REPORTING (3) film. PR: MMC 3100 and MMC 3602 Basic instruct i on in news MMC 4200 HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF judgment, sources of news, newsgather ing, and newswriting COMMUNICATIONS LAW (3) techniques. Typing ability is required PR: MMC 3100 and MMC 3602 Historic and Constitutional JOU 3101 ADVANCED REPORTING (3) backgrounds of freedom and control of expression, statutory enPR: POS 2041, JOU 3100, or RTV 3300 (RTV majors only) JOU actments, major Supreme Court cases, court decisions and ad4200 (may be taken concurrently), and PHI 1103. Getting infor ministrative rulings which have shaped legal control of commumation and writing the more complex and specialized story nicat ions. techniques of investigative and analytical reporting including MMC 4203 COMMUNICATION ETHICS (3) ethical and legal considerations PR: MMC 3602 and MMC 3100 or Cl. A study of the JOU 3300 MAGAZINE ARTICLE AND FEATURE WRITING (3) fundamental principles and philosophies of ethics and their PR: CRW 2100, JOU 3100 Planning, researching, writing, and application to the decision-making process in the various profesmarketing art icles for general and special interest magazines sions of mass communications and newspaper magazine supplements; experiences in developMMC 4420 RESEARCH METHODS IN MASS ing article idea; inductive analysis of contemporary magazine COMMUNICATIONS (3) articles PR: MMC 3100 MMC 3602. An introduction to the theory and JOU 3306 CRlllCAL WRITING: EDITORIALS, practice of quantitative and historical research methods as appli-REVIEWS, COLUMNS (3) cable to the study of media and mass communications Empha-PR: JOU 3101, JOU 4200 Interpretive and opinion writing for the s i s on survey research, evaluation of data, and report writing. mass media. Analysis and discussion of current events as a basis

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 159 UNIVERSITY OI SOUTH FLORIDA -1ftl/93 CATALOG MMC 4900 DIRECTED READING IN MASS COMMUNICATIONS (1-3) PR: Junior standing, CC and Cl. Reading and directed study in special topics. MMC 4910 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH IN MASS COMMUNICATIONS (1-3) PR: CC and Cl. The course provides means for a student to do independent study i n an area not covered by a numbered course MMC 4936 SELECTED TOPICS IN MASS COMMUNICATIONS STUDIES (1-3) PR: Junior standing Courses designed to meet current or specific topics of interest to instructors and students MMC 4945 MEDIA INTERNSHIP-SEMINAR (3) PR: Cl and 15 hours in Mass Com courses and complet i on of an 8-12 wee k media internship with newspaper, broadcast station or other media-related agency approved by the department and paid by the spons