Citation
Accent on Learning

Material Information

Title:
Accent on Learning
Added title page title:
USF undergraduate catalog
Added title page title:
Undergraduate catalog
Abbreviated Title:
University of South Florida catalog
General catalog
Creator:
University of South Florida
Place of Publication:
Tampa, FL
Publisher:
University of South Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resources ( 127 pages)

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
University and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs ( lcsh )

Notes

General Note:
None published in 1960. Volume for 1975-76 issued in 2 parts: part 1. General information -- part 2. Curricula and courses. Supplement for 1961 entitled: Summer sessions, 1961. Continued in part by University of South Florida. Graduate School programs, [1985/86]- Continued by the CD-ROM publication: USF academic information.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of South Florida
Holding Location:
University of South Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
024905859 ( ALEPH )
29205298 ( OCLC )
A52-00018 ( USF DOI )
a52.18 ( USFLDC Handle )

USFLDC Membership

Aggregations:
USF Catalogs (Accent on Learning)

Postcard Information

Format:
Book

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

USF BULLETIN Aprll 1 976 University of South Florida 1976-77 Accent on Learning

PAGE 2

fll ,, FLETCHER AVE .. 1 E HOLLY ... "' 't 4' (\) \\\ \'.\J di)t # t OAK _, ::< -' .. 'I' 0. vi ,,. t:. OAK 3 3 1f" 0. ,f, .. r FOWLER AVE. l "V":i KEY TO TAMPA CAMPUS MAP John & Grac e Allen 16 Arts & Lett e r s Bldg C-2 32 Zeta Hall B-1 Administration Bldg. B -2 1 7 Education Building C 2 33 Eta Hall C-1 2 Student Services Bldg. C -2 18 F aculty Office Building C 2 34 Theta Hall C 1 3 University Cent e r B 1 19 Bu siness Adm in. Bldg. CD-2 35 Iota Hall C-1 4 University Th eatre B 1 20 Soci al S c i ence Building CD-2 36 Kappa Hall C 1 5 Theatre Center B 1 21 Clas s room Bldg. A C 2 37 Lambda Hall C-1 6 Fin e Arts Bldg. A-12 22 Gymna si um D 2 38 Mu Hall C-1 7 Life Science A n n ex A -2 23 Phy sical Education Bldg. D 2 39 University Pol ice Hq C 1 8 Life Science Building A -2 24 Argos Center C 1 40 USF Credit Union B 1 9 Chemistry Building B -2 25 Alpha Hall C 1 41 Operations & Maintenance 10 Science C en t e r B -2 26 Beta Hall C-1 Administration Bldg. B-1 11 Engineering Building B 2 27 G am ma Hall C 1 42 Maintenance & Utility 12 Phy sics Building B -2 28 Andros Office-Classroom Building B-1 13 Planetar ium B -2 Building C-1 43 Textbook Center A 1 14 Campus Information 29 Andros C enter C-1 44 Engine e ring R ese arch C e nter C-3 30 D elta Hall C 1 Building A-1 15 Library C-2 31 Epsil o n Hall BC-1 45 Central Receiving Bldg. A-1 *VISITORS PARKING See other maps inside back cov e r

PAGE 3

ACCENT ON LEARNING GENERAL CATALOG OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA 1976-77 Vol. 18, No. 8 USF BULLETIN April, 1976 Published monthly except July, by the University of South Florida 4202 Fowler Avenue Tampa, Florida 33620. Second class postage paid at Tampa Florida This public document was promulgated at an annual cost of $44,269, or $.443 per copy, including preparation, printing, and distribution, to provide comprehensive information on the University of South Florida. (60123] (Sectio11 283.27, Florida Statut es) Programs, activities, and facilities of the University of South Florida are available to aU on a non-discriminatory basis, without regard to race, color, creed, religion, sex, age, or national origin. The University is an affirmative action Equal Opportunity Employer. The announcements information policies rules, r e gulations, and procedure s set forth in this bulletin are for information onl and are subject to co ntinual review and change without notic

PAGE 4

Visiting the University Prospect ive s tudent s and other interest e d persons are invited to visit the University whenever possible. Most Univer s ity offices receive visitors from 8:00 a.m. to 5 :00 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Tampa Campus of the University is located on Fowler Avenue (State Route 582) a pproxim atey two miles east of Interstate 75 and Nebraska Avenue (U.S. Route 41) and seven miles north of Interstate 4. Tour guides for visitors to the Tampa Campus may be arra1,1ged by calling 813: 974-2635 or by writing University Center, USF, Tampa, Fla. 33620. The other campuses of the University are located in the places noted below and elsewhere in this publication Communicating with the University Communication s regarding the services and programs listed below should be directed by Jetter or by phone to the appropriate office on the Tampa, St. Petersburg, Fort Myers, or Sarasota campuses. Mailing address for the campuses are given at the bottom of the page. St. Petersburg offices may be reached by dialing 813: 898-7411 and asking for the desired office ; Fort Myers Campus offices by dialing 813: 334-378 0 ; Sarasota Campus by dialing 813: 355-2986; Tam pa campus office s by dialing 813: 974-and the exten sio n included below : Academic Advising (for freshmen) Division of University Studies FAO 126 2645 Academic Advising (for upperclassmen and graduate students) Office of the Dean of the appropriate college Admission (and applications) Office of Admissions ADM 180 2987 (Medical students should contact the Dean of the College of Medicine) Athletics (Intercollegiate) Athletic Director PED 214 2125 Bachelor of Independent Studies Program External Degree.Program FAO 105 2403 Career Planning and Placement Division of Cooperative Education & Placement AOC 105 2171 College Level Examination Program (CLEP tests) Office of Testing and Advanced Place ment FAO 201 2741 Community College Relations (for transfer students) Office of Community College R e lations FAO 149 2506 St. Petersburg Campus 830 First Street South St. Petersburg, Florida 33701 Telephone : (813) 898-7411 Continuing Education Courses and Conferences Center for Continuing Education FAO 101 2403 Cooperative Education Program Division of Cooperative Education & Placement AOC 105 2171 Equal Opportunity Program Office of the Equal Opportunity Coor din ator ADM 253 2607 Financia l Assistance (scholarships, loans, and student employment) Office of Financial Aids ADM 172 2621 Food Services Office of Housing and Food Services RAR 229 2761 Graduate Studies Division of Graduate Studies ADM 229 2846 Handicapped Student Program and Facilities Office of Student Organizations CTR 217 2615 Health Services (Student) Health Center CTR 411 2331 High School Relations Office of High School Relations FAO 126 2076 Housing (on campus) Office of Housing and Food Service RAR 229 2761 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA Tampa Campus 4202 Fowler Avenue Tampa, Florida 33620 Telephone: (813) 974-2011 Fort Myers Campus 2266 Second Street Fort Myers, Florida 33901 Telephone: (813) 334-3780 2 Housing (off-campus) Student Government Office CTR 156A 2401 Information Services Office of Information Services ADM 190 2181 Library Resources Office of the Director of Libraries LIB 207 2721 Mature Student Advising Division of University Studie s FAO 126 2645 Orientation ("Focus") Division of University Studies FAO 126 2076 Parking and Traffic Services University Police Department UPB 2628. Records, Registration, Transcripts Office of R ecor d s & R eg i st ration ADM 264 2987 Student Affairs Office of Student Affairs ADM 153 2151 Textbook Facilities Textbook Center CTR 102 2545 Upward Bound Project Upward Bound CBA 343 2802 Veterans Affairs Veterans Affairs Office CTR 166 2291 Sarasota Campus 5700 N. f amiami Trail Sarasota, Florida 33580 Telephone: (813) 355-2986 JOOM-1660

PAGE 5

CONTENTS (\I ) ... ,, .. ,,,.,.'4\: Academic Calendar 4 A Digest of News ................................. : 6 General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Admissions and Related Matters . . . . . . . . 12 Financial Information ......... .'................... 17 Student Services and Student Affairs 22 Academic Policies and Procedures, Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Division of Graduate Studies ......... .... ... .. 43, College of Arts & Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 College of Business Administration . . . . . . 59 College of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 College of Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 College of Fine Arts 92 College of Medicine 102 College of Natural Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . 103 New College .......................................... 115 College of Nursing ............ .,..................... 118 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ..... 122 Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Organization & Personnel .............. _........... 253 Faculty and Administrative Staff . . . . . . . 257 Index ..................... ... : . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281

PAGE 6

1976 S M T WT F S MAY l 2345678 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 JUNE l 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 J6 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 JULY l 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 AUGUST 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 SEPTEMBER l 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 OCTOBER 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 NOVEMBER 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 DECEMBER 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 ACADEMIC CALENDAR Summer Quarter (IV), 1976 NOTE: Dates apply to 10-week term. See quarterly Schedule of Classes for appropriate sessions. May 10-14, Mon., Fri. *May 21, Friday June 17, 18 Thurs Fri June 21, Monday June 25, Friday June 25, Friday June 25, Friday July 2, Friday July 2 Friday July 5, Mondaj July 9, Friday July 30, Friday July 30, Friday August 27, Friday May 24-28 & July 26-30 Mon.-Fri. *July 1, Thursday August 16, Monday September 16-17, Thurs ., Fri September 20, Monday September 24, Friday September 24, Friday September 24, Friday October 1, Friday October 1, Friday October 8, Friday October 29, Fridy October 29, Friday November 11, Thursday November 25-26, Thurs., Fri. December 8, Wednesday October 1, Friday October 25-29, Mon.-Fri December 1, Wednesday January 3-4, Mon &: Tues. January 5, Wednesday January 11, Tuesday January 11, Tuesday January 11, Tuesday January 18, Tuesday January 18, Tuesday January 25, Tuesday February 15, Tuesday February 15, Tuesday March 16, Wednesday Early registration for Quarter IV (continuing and accepted Former Students Returning) (tentative) Last day to apply for admission Registration by appointment (tentative) Classes begin Last day to withdraw or drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration (see late registration fee). Also last day to register as a Special Student Last day to register for Continuing Education courses Last day for Continuing Education course refund Independence Day Holiday Last day to apply for degree to be earned at the end of Quarter IV Last day to drop courses without academic penalty Last day to withdraw without academic penalty End of Summer Quarter (IV) Fall Quarter (I), 1976 Early registration for Quarter I (continuing and accepted Former Students Returning) (tentative) Last day to apply for admission Last day for USF Former Students Returning to make application for readmission. Registration by appointment (tentative) Classes begin Last day to withdraw or drop and receive full refund o'f registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration (see late registration fee). Also last day to register as a Special Student Last day to register for Continuing E9ucation courses Last day for Continuing Education course refund Last day to apply for degree to be earned at the end of Quarter J Last day to drop courses without academic penalty Last day to withdraw without academic penalty Veterans Day Holiday Thanksgiving Holiday End of Fall Quarter (I) Winter Quarter (II), 1977 Last day to apply for admission Early registration for Quarter II (continuing and accepfed Former Students Returning) (tentative) Last day for USF Former S tudents Returning to make application for readmission Registration by appointment (tentative) Classes begin Last day to withdraw or drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration (see late registration fee) Also last day to register as a Special Student Last day to register for Continuing Education courses Last day for Continuing Education course refund Last day to apply for degree to be earned at the end of Quarter II Last day to drop courses without academic penalty Last day to withdraw without academic penalty End of Winter Quarter (II) Earlier deadlines may be required by some graduate programs and the College of Nursing. See appropriate sections for further information 4

PAGE 7

*February 1, Tuesday February 7-11, Mon.-Fri. February 21, Monday March 24-25, Thurs Fri. March 28, Monday April l, Friday April l, Friday April l, Friday April 8, Friday April 8, Friday April 15, Friday May 6, Friday May 6; Friday May 30, Monday June 8, Wednesday June 12, Sunday Spring Quarter (III), 1977 Last day to apply for admis s ion Early regi s tration for Quarter III ( c ontinuing and a ccepted Former Students Returning) (tentative) Last day for USF Former Student s Returning to make application for readmission Registration by appointment (tentati ve) Classes begin Last day to withdraw or drop and recei v e full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration (see late registration fee) Also last day to register as a Special Student Last day to register for Continuing Education courses Last day for Continuing Education course refund Last day to apply for degree to be earned at the end of Quarter III Last. day to drop courses without academic penalty Last day to withdraw without academic penalty Memorial Day Holiday End of Spring Quarter (III) Commencement Con v ocation Summer Quarter (IV), 1977 NOTE: Dates apply to JO-week term. See quarterl y Schedule of Classe s for appropriate sessions. *April I, Friday May 9-13, Monday-Friday May 16, Monday June 16-17, Thursday, Friday June 20, Monday June 24, Friday June 24, Friday June 24, Friday July I, Friday July I, Friday July 4, Monday July 8, Friday July 29, Friday July 29, Friday August 24, Wednesday Last day to apply for admission Early registration for Quarter IV (continuing and accepted Former Students Returning) (tentative) Last day for USF Former Students Returning to make application for readmission Registration by appointment (tentati v e) Classes begin Last day to withdraw or drop and receive full refund of registration fees Last day to add courses Last day for late registration (see late registration fee). Also last day to register a s a Special Student Last day to register for Continuing Education courses Last day for Continuing Education course refund Independence Day Holiday Last day to apply for degree to be earned at the end of Quarter IV Last day t o drop courses without academic penalty Last day to w ithdraw without a cad e mic penalty End of Summer Quarter (IV) Earlier dates may be required by the graduate program s COLLEGE OF MEDICINE First Academic Session, 1976 July 1-2, Thursday-Friday Registration July 3-5**, Saturday-Monday tlndependence Day Holidays July 6-9, Tuesday-Friday Clinical Orientation July 12, Monday Classes begin Sept. 6, Monday tLabor Day Holiday Nov. 25-26, Thursday-Friday tThanksgiving Day Holiday Dec. 10, Friday End of Fir s t Academic Se s sion Second Academic, Session, 1977 Jan. 3, Monday Classe s begin May 13, Friday End of Second Academic Se ss i o n Third Academic Session, 1977 May 23, Monday May 30, Monday July 4, Monday Sept. 5, Monday Sept 16, Friday **July 5-MED I only. Cla sses begin tMemorial Day Holiday tlndependence Da y Holiday tLabor Day Holida y End of Third Academic Session tThcse holidays may be waived for s tudent s se r ving in clinical clerkship s at the disc r etion of the individu a l Chiefs of Service. 5 1977 S MT WT F S JANUARY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 FEBRUARY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13.14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 MARCH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 APRIL 1 2 3456789 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 JUNE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15' 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 JULY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30. 31 AUGUST 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

PAGE 8

A Digest of News of the University of South Florida Architect's model of the new Business Administration Building, now under construction. Only one of the building's three floors will be above ground. An unusually large structure covering one and one-hal f acres, the building utilizes the novel "Berm Concept, in which the building is set in a hole and the excavated dirt placed around the outside, thus creating a low silhouette. A second function of the design is to reduce the weight factor to compens ate for the limestone caverns that honeycomb the campus (as well as most of central Florida). USF Observes 'Bidecennial' USF's year-long celebration of its 20th Anniversary kicked off in mid-January with Homecoming Week. "Nostalgia Night" took place in the Gym with a course in history presented by the men who made it: LeRoy Collins, governor of Florida when the University was founded; Sam Gibbons the state legisla tor who promoted it; John Allen, its first president; and Harris Dean, who succeeded Allen as acting president. No new state university had been built since 1905 when Gibbons and another state legislator conceived the idea of an urban/commuter school in the Tampa Bay area Amid much discussion pro and con about the need for another university, let alone the location for such, the Fowler avenue site was approved by the Florida Cabinet on December 18, 1956 the date accepted as USF's founding. Since that time USF has become a large functioning university with a student enrollment of over 23,000, a faculty and staff of 2,750, and more than 56 buildings on the Tampa campus alone, including a major medical center. Regional campu s es are operating in St Petersburg, Fort Myers, and Sarasota. A major focus at USF during this anniversary year is on the mature student. More than 7 ,500 are currently enrolled, and they come from all walks of life. Some are completing degree work started many years ago while others are attending college for the first time Many are unclassified as to degree plans and are enrolled in areas of specific personal interest. In the fall of 1973, a special pre-admissions adviser was named to counsel mature students NEWS BRIEFS President Cecil Mackey toured Taiwan in February at the invitation of the Ministry of Education. He had visited the People's Republic of China last spring with a delegation from the American Association of State Colleges and Universities History professor James W Silver was one of 12 educators named "Great Professors" in the October 13, 1975, issue of People magazine. Research Adds to the Quality of Life "Resea rch at USF adds to the quality of public life, according to a report in. the February 9 edition of the Tampa Times from which the following excerpts are taken. The University of South Florida has done more than educate 200,000 students, gradua te 27 ,000 alumni, and generate a yearly .$100 million impact in the 14 years since it opened its doors. 6 University scholars and researchers are also involved in projects they hope will further basic knowledge in their fields and also some that will have a direct effect on the quality of human life. Scientists in the College of Engineering are working on projects ranging from nuclear fusion to solar energy to electric cars. The College of Medicine is also a hotbed of research activity, with doctors delving into the mysteries of cancer, cardiovascular disease and genetics. Dr Louis Bowers a professor of education, [developed play learning centers" for preschool and handieapped children], playgrounds without moving parts the children are the ones who move. A project of the [College of Social & Behavioral Sciences] consists of identifying carcinogenic (cancer causing) substances that industrial workers in the Tampa Bay Area are exposed to Dr. Curtis Wienker, assistant professor of anthropology, has been commissioned by the Florida Regional Medical Program to draw up recommendations that would minimize the risk to these workers ... Another professor's work is likely to result in stricter ordinances in the county -at least in the area of sound. Dr. William A Smith, professor of mechanical engineering, helped the state to draft a model ordinance to be given to the counties to keep noises below levels that interfere with speech But the quality of human life isn't restricted to the technological areas ... [Humanities professor S.A.J Zylstra believes that city planners must take architecture a nd its effect on the quality of human life into consideration when they make decisions. For example, '.'Tampa is ... built around the car and buildings are built around parking lots The car has been detrimental in the design of the city it has dictated the design of the city." Highlights of '76 Thirty industrial firms took part in the College of Engineering, Expo '7 6 in January, and over 25,000 persons visited the exhibits Included were a three-trailer exhibit on atomic energy, continuous chemical magic shows, the walking, talking, hand-haking robot, Edgar G Cecil built by students, and a 3-D light image 'holographic" display from a lazer beam. Dedication ceremonies were held at the new USF Library on March 6 with anthropologist Margaret Mead as the principal speak er The six-story building, adjacent to the College of Arts & Letters, has been in use since last fall. Dr Mead quickly dispelled the notion that anthropologists choose their vocation because they prefer the simpler lives of primitive people. "1 haven't the slightest interest in being a primitive," she huffed ''I'd be bored to death." Phase II of the Medical Center was occupied in March. In addition to greatly expanded classroom and laboratory facilities, it includes a comprehensive Ambulatory Care Center. The ACC was designed primarily as a teaching facility but will be open to the public Formal dedication ceremonies are sc heduled for May with Governor Askew to give the major address

PAGE 9

'75-76: A Good Year for 'Basketbull' The Univ ersity of South Florida Golden Brahmans lived up to their theme this year B asketbull and they were bullish The Bulls surprised m any and surpasse d all expectations in winning 19 of their 27 games. The surprise began early an d on the road when USF faced the defending Division II n ational champions and defeated Old Dominion i n Norfolk, 77-76 ; Chip Conner completing his first year as head coach said "Highlights for the year have to include the early season ODU game the impressive near misses Auburn (79-78) and North Carolina (70-64) and the South Carolina win (85-83) which I would say is perhaps our most prestigious victory in the history of the program [this was only the fifth year of varsity basketball] ' Another was the characteristic the team de veloped, the 'comeback,' which started with Georgia State in Atlanta and took us through a five-game win streak. The team converted in clutch situations," ad ded Conner, especially at South Alabama when the Bulls poured in 23 points to come from 13 points down to win, 95-85. There were six virtual se llouts in the area four at Tampa's Curtis Hixon Center and two in the Big Sun Tournament at St. Petersburg's Bayfront Arena. The Br ahman Bull s b roke all attendance records at home thi s year wit h a total of 39,006, for an average of 2 600, an increa se of 450 per game. In the final game -a 95-72 win over th e University of New Orleans the Brahmans manag ed to break three schoo l records and extend another including the alltime single seaso n mark of most points USF scored 2,155 points, 33 more th a n last year's 15-10 team The new Library seen from the old library building, now being renovated to continue service as the Student Services Building Library usage has jumped 28 per cent since the new facility op ened in the fall of 1975. NEWS BRIEFS USF's student newspaper the Oracle, was n a med one of th e top ten college newspaper s in the nation b y the Columbia Schola stic Press Association The Oracle has also received the top "All-American" rating of the Associated Collegiate Press each year since 1967, and earned Sigma Delta Chi's coveted "Mark of Excellence" twice, in 1972 and 1975. USF students received national recognition at the Midwest Model United Nation s Conference in St. Louis in March. Competing against 700 other students, the 10 USF delegates won three top honors, including a specially created award for ' best delegation." 'College Kids' have Changed The following comm entary was aired by Tampa's WTVT-TV, and reprinted by the Oracle, USF's student newspaper. Cartoonist Terry Kirkp at rick was on the Oracle staff. College kids just aren't what they used to be In fact, many of them aren't kids at all. For one thing the lowering of th e age of majority from 21 to 18 has made ju s t about all of them leg ally adults. But beside s that, the average age is up more of them are married, and more have full or part time jobs The University o f South Florida, being in ;i. population center, is especially uncharacteristic of the old-time college campus. There are many of what you might call the typical college kids there, doing the typical college thing s. But for a great many s tudents a college education is serious business More than hal f work at lea st part time, and just about half the male students are completely self-suppor tin g More than a third of the women are financially on their own. More than half are over 21. The mean age is 25. Almost a third of th e st u dents are married some of them to each other, and many have children. While we hear a lot a bout the occasional student hi-jinks, we seldom hear about the 1,500 USF stu dents who volu n teer for such community services as tutoring slow learners in the public schools working as coun s elor s with juvenile offenders and ex convicts, and helping out with all sorts of research projects 7 "Ever feel like you 're getting old?" Sometimes they get academic credit for this sometimes nothing but experience. So, it seems a bout time to ch a nge that stereotyped iriiage of a college student as an immature kid, living off his p arents, irresponsible and carefree He . or she . is more likely an adult making his own way, with family respon s ibilities and a pretty good idea of what life is all about.

PAGE 10

USF-THE METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY. A BREAK WITH TRADITION The University of South Florida broke with tradition when it was founded almost two decades ago. USF was not located in a small, quiet town; USF was placed in one of Florida's-and the nation's-most dynamic metropolitan areas and assigned re sponsibility for providing higher educational services to people of all ages within its 12 county service area. USF was the first State university in Florida located purposely within convenient commuting distance of a large segment of the State's growing population The University of South Florida broke with tradition because it came to the people USF-the metropolitan university ... an idea whose time had come USF AND YOU? USF calls itself Your University." And it is. In a real sense, you are the .'U" in USF because the University was founded and located to meet your higher educational needs How it seeks to do that-the activities, services and programs it offers-are briefly described In this publication. But, for you to feel that USF is your university, you must experience for yourself what it has to offer-what it is that makes it such a special place to so many people. WHATISUSF? The University of South Florida is many things ... many people and programs ... a major force in the communities it serves. USF is primarily people. Within its boundaries, it is a community of more than 25,000 teacher-scholars and students and staff Its principal purpose is teaching-teaching grounded in research and related to the needs of its students and society. USF is also places ... spacious, palm-shaded campuses ... with libraries containing a measurable portion of human knowledge ... with laboratories where scientists and students seek and test old and new knowledge . with theatres and recreational facilities and residence halls and other facilities that make USF more than just another state university. And USF is an important social and cultural service force flowing through the communities surrounding and supporting it ... a major economic force on Florida's West Coast ... and an intellectual and information center where people can find practical solutions to perplexin g problems and share their experiences with USF is all of this-and more USF-the metropolitan university ... an idea whose time has come ... is a university with people who want to help you embody your own idea of what such an institution should be. After all, USF is what you make it and can be affected by you as much as you are affected by it. The faculty and staff are dedicated to ensuring that the Univ.ersity continues to be flexible enough to permit new ideas of itself to infuse new life into itself. That's why you are invited to consider USF. WHEN DID IT ALL BEGIN? Speaking of new ideas and new life ... If you have visited the Tampa Campus or viewed the film "This Is USF," you probably have noticed that all of its buildings appear to be modern and new Well, they are. But then, so is USF. The University of South Florida was founded on December 18, 1956, but the first students did not arrive until almost four years later. When USF was opened to a charter class of 1,997 freshmen on September 26, 1960, it became the first major State university in America planned and built entirely in this century. Moreover, as Florida's first State university located purposely in a major metropolitan center, USF represented the first step in a broad and comprehensive expansion of the State University System. 8 The State University System, directed by the Florida Board of Regents, and administered by a Chancellor and staff of over JOO in Tallahassee, today consists of nine public universities. Together with 28 public junior and community colleges and a number of vocational-technical centers located throughout the State, these universities comprise public higher education in Florida Regional campuses of USF were opened in St. Petersburg in 1965, Fort Myers in 1974, and Sarasota in 1975. In its brief history, the University of South Florida has had only two presidents. The founder and chief architect of the new university was Dr. John Allen, an astronomer and educator, who served as USF' s first president from 1956-1970. (Dr Harris W.

PAGE 11

Dean served as Acting President from July 1970 to February 1971.) Dr Cecil Mackey, economist and lawyer, became the University' s second president on February l, 1971, and is presently leading the University in it s second decad e of development. Now in its twentieth year of existence, the University has graduated more than 32,000 students-eighty percent of whom reside in Florida-and served over 200,000 persons in credit and non-credit courses. Enrollment in the fall of 1975 totaled more than 23,000 and project ions indicate that USF will enroll more than 30, 000 students on perhaps as many as five campuses by the end of this decad e. The University's economic impact on the area is equally signifc;mt: now exceeding $137 million annually. Because of its location and the composition of its student body, USF continues to be inextricably a part of and not apart from the modern metropoliul:n environment-and both affects and is affected by the communities surrounding and supporting it. GENERAL INFORMATION 9 Accreditation USF was fully accredited in 1965 by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the official accredit ing agency for educational institutions in the South A self-study of the University's programs and purposes, periodically required for continued accreditation, was recently completed and provides a firm foundation for the future growth of the University Accreditation was reaffirmed in December 1973. But the University Community continues to reexamine its mission and goals and to ensure that it never loses sight of its only reason for existence: serving you USF: REGIONAL CAMPUSES ... PART OF THE MODERN METROPOLITAN ENVIRONMENT Accessibility University of South Florida campuses form a string of anchor points for a metropolitan area rapidly becoming a megalopolis along the West Coast of Florida. USF campuses are within reach of more than two million people-roughly a quarter of the State's population-in the 12-county area they serve. The Tampa Campus of the University is located on a 1 ,694-acre tract ten miles northeast of downtown Tampa, a city of over a quarter of a million people The campus is midway between U.S 41 and 381 on State Highway 582 (Fowler Avenue), two miles east of I-75. The St. Petersburg Campus is located on Bayboro Harbor in downtown St Petersburg a city of more than 235,000 people The campus serves some 620,000 people living in Pinellas County The Fort Myers Campus is located at the site of the Gwynne Institute Building in downtown Fort Myers and serves the people of Florida's lower West coast. The Sarasota Campus is located on what was formerly the 100-acr e ca mpus of the private New College and adjoins the State-owned Ringling Museums property. Located between the cities of Sarasota and Bradenton, the Sarasota Campus serves a population of approximately 315,000. Mission As the State's first metropolitan uni ve rsity a prototype of the university of the future, the University of Sou th Florida from its beginning h as sought to apply the talents of its scholars and students to the peculiar ills besetting modern society In this way, USF has sought to accomplish the special mission in the State University System set out for it in the Comprehensive Development Plan (CODE) of the State University System of Florida (1969): The creation and development of instructional, research and public service "oriented toward the solution of problems to the modern urban environ ment." ACHIEVING THE UNIVERSITY'S MISSION: MEASURES OF SUCCESS Students Served .Since opening its doors in September of 1960, the University of South Florida has been ded icated tQ accomplishin g this special mission in the modern metropolitan environment One measure of our success reflected in the composition of our student body : More than 90 percent of our students are Floridians and over 80 percent of our gradu ates reside in the State. More than two-thirds of our students commute to class from their homes throughout the Tampa Bay area. Over one-third of our student body are part-time students, and 40 percent are employed from one to 40 hours per week. More than two-thirds of all USF students are 21 or older and almost one -third of our stdents are maff!ed Almost 60 percent of USF's 32,000 graduates reside in the Greater Tampa Bay Area. The majority of upper division students are transfers from other institutions. Programs Offered A measu re of success in accomplishing the University's miss i on -and one more significant than mere statistics-is the nature of our academic programs. Through them we have sought to serve an increasingly urban State and nation These programs are in the Academic Affairs division of the University and, for the most part, are administered in one of our IO colleges: Arts & Le tters Business AdministraJion Education, Engineering, Fine Arts, Medicine, Natural Sciences Nursing, Social & Behavioral Sciences, and an honors-type college, New College of USF on the Sarasota Campus In this publication are discussed the major academic programs in the University Through them we serve the people of Florida through the instruction of students, the advancement of knowledge, and community service

PAGE 12

10 GENERAL INFORMATION Degrees are offered in over JOO academic areas by the University's colleges. Graduate degrees are offered in more than 80 of these areas The University 's fir s t Ph D. program, in Biology with emphasis on Marine Biology was established in 1968. Ph D. prog rams in Chemistry an d Education began in 1969, and progr ams in English, Mathematics and Psychology were authorized in 1971. The first Ph D. (in Marine Biology) was awarded in June of 1971. A Ph.D. in Medical Sciences is also now available. The University's teaching and research faculty, numbering more than 1,000, represents all major areas of highe.r learning, and nearly 60 percent hold doctoral degrees. Academic Programs of USF Regional Campuses The academic programs of the regional campuses are designed to serve students of junior, senior and gradua te standing, and are offered at times chosen to meet the special needs of these students Selected courses and programs are offered by the Colleges of Education, Engineering, Natural Science, Social and Behavioral Science Business Administration and Nursing. You may enroll on a full time basis on any one of the regional campuses or elect to enroll on more than one USF campus simultaneously. Dual enrollment on multiple campuses may provid e you with a schedule both academically flexible and person ally convenient. Resident faculty members an:d Student Affairs s taff provide social, vocational and academic counseling to students enrolled on any of the regional campuses. Moreover, the resident faculty is supplemented by professors and staff commuting from other USF campuses to prov,ide additional scope to the academic programs and university services The Fort Myers Campus of USF opened in the fall of 1974, and, like the St. Petersburg Campus, i s designed to meet the academic n e eds of local residents. course work leading to a degree w ith out the necessity of leaving the county. The Fort Myer s Campus of USF opened in the Fall of 1974, and, like the St. Peter s burg Campus i s designed to meet the academic needs of local re s idents The Sarasota Campus opened in the summer of 1975 and offers to students from Sarasota, Manatee, and neighboring counties the opportunity to take upper division coursework toward the Bachelor's degree an d graduate coursework toward the M as ter's degree in selected areas, and also provides non credit c o ur se offerings to meet the needs of the local communitie s. The Sarasota Campus also is the home of New College of the of South Florida. New College of USF is a liberal arts honors program, residential in nature, and appeals to students who look for the atmosphere of a small college with its accompanying individualized instruction. (For details of New College of US .F, see page 115.) Acquired by the State University System in 1975, the Sarasota Campus has 26 buildings including a student center, classrooms, a library with 100,000 volumes, science laboratories, and recreational facilities. Part of the campus was once the estate of cir cus magnate Charles E. Ringling The campus is located on the shores of Sarasota Bay and is bisected by U.S. 41 which makes it easily accessible to commuting students and to the community. While offering many of the characteristics of a small college, the regional campuses of USF have access to the resources of a major university and their development is expected to keep pace with the continuing growth of Florida's West Coast. The St. Petersburg Campus, located at Bayboro Harbor adjacent to downtown St. Petersburg, is within easy walking distance to many of the cultural and recreational facilities of Florida's "Sunshine City. However, steps to expand the St. Petersburg Campus have already been taken, and it is anticipated that the downtown campus will be supplemented by an additional campus located in the northern section of Pinellas County. In addition to providing academic programs from six of the university's colleges, the St. Petersurg Campus houses a marine science research and training center. The USF Department of Building "A," St. Petersburg Campus

PAGE 13

Marine Science, with headquarters at the St. Petersburg campus, is an interdisciplinary venture involving faculty members from several departments in addition to ten full time faculty members at the St. Petersburg Campus who are concerned with planning, administration, research and teaching. Probably no other marine science program has ever been established with such excellent facilities as those provided by the St. Petersburg Campus for teaching, research, and the docking and maintenance of oceanographic vessels. The location of the campus at the center of the edge of the great continental shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast and in the midst of the metropolitan area of the Sun Coast, is another of its unique advantages. It would GENERAL INFORMATION 11 seem destined to develop into one of the nation's leading oceanographic centers. The Fort Myers Campus is located in the historic Gwynne Institute Building in the heart of downtown Fort Myers. While the Gwynne Institute Building is adequate for supporting the present academic programs of USF it is clearly viewed as an interim facility, and plans are already underway for acquis ition of a permanent site which will accommodate the predicted growth of the Fort Myers Campus. Students interested in attending any of the regional campuses are invited to visit the various campus facilities and discuss their interests with the faculty and staff. Continuing Education In addition to the academic programs offered on the Tampa and regional campuses, a number of courses and programs are operated by the University's Center for Continuing Education in 13 West Coast Florida counties. In this area, the Florida Board of Reg ents has designated the University of South Florida to be responsible for all higher education requirements beyond those supplied by the State Community and Junior College System. Programs------------. A number of special programs offer USF students flexibility and relevance. They include the Off-Campus Term Program, Bachelor of Independent Studies (Adult Degree Program), Cooperative Education Program, and New College of USF. In addition, freshmen students may earn up to one full year of academic credit (45 hours) through the College Level Examination Program tests, high school students may apply for "early admission" or take college courses while still in high school, and any interested person may earn college credit via radio and WUSF-TV's televised course sequence -"Your Open University" (YOU) and local newspapers Each of these programs is described elsewhere in this publication. You are encouraged to explore their potential for helping you attain your educational goals FACILITIES AND ATMOSPHERE ON CAMPUS The facilities of the University, now including more than 40 major buildings, are currently valued at more than $85 million. (See map, inside cover.) The buildings are of similar modern architectural design and all are completely air conditioned. Construction of Phase II of the new USF Medical Center and other needed facilities which, together with the new library complex recently completed, will increase the value of the University s physical plant by two-third s in the next few years and provide you with one of the most attractive and functional settings in the nation {or achieving your educational goals. USF has a wide variety of recreational facilities, including three swimmi ng pools, an excellent gym with weight tra ini ng room, many tennis courts, a beautiful golf course, well-equipped University Center and others. Its academic and residential facilities are unexcelled in Florida:--and all are air-conditioned and easily accessible from every comer of the well-kept campus, called by some "one of the prettiest in the nation." And parking spaces are always available somewhere on campus The atmosphere on campus is one of easy informality. Students-and faculty-dress casually and enjoy an unusually close relationship for a school so large. Some classes are even held outside to take advantage of the extraordinary climate (average annual temperature 72 F) of the area And most buildings have open hallways, which blend colorful interiors with spacious exteriors, symbolically and architecturally sug gesting the casual accessibility that has become a USF trademark ORGANIZED FOR EFFECTIVENESS The University is organized into the four broad areas of academic affairs, student affairs, administrative affairs and finance & planning. The vice presidents who head these four units serve with the President as the principal policymaking officials of the University. In addition to the vice presidents, advice and assistance to the President in the determination of policy is given by a number of advisory bodies including University committees and organizations representing the faculty, staff and student segments of the University Communi ty At USF, your views count; they are solicited and given serious consideration. The President is responsible through the Chancellor to the Florida Board of Regents for internal p olicy and the procedures of the University. More detailed information on these matters is available in the Special Collections Room, USP Library. ...-----------Communications on Campus-----------. USF students have quick and easy access to top University officials. This is made possible through Open Line, a face-to-face discussion between students and administrators; "USF Today," a television program designed to provide in-depth interviews on topics of current interest; and other special program s designed to facilitate campus communications.

PAGE 14

ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS 1. Admission to study at USF generally requires evidence of ability to handle academic work, capacity to think and plan creatively, and intense motivation. Students, regard less of age, who have these abilities and skills and are seriously interested in earning an education are the ones most likely to succeed in college 2. More specifically, as a public university, USF admits students who meet the formal admission requirements of the University (noted below) and who can be expected to do successful academic work. 3. In considering students for admission, the University does not discriminate-indeed, has never discriminatedon the basis of race, sex, color, creed, religion, age, or national origin. 4 The University may refuse admission to a student whose record shows previous misconduct not in the best interest of citizens of the University community. 5 The Office of Admissions, part of the Division of University Studies, administers the application and admissions processes at USF. Applying for Admission As part of the State University System of Florida, USF utilizes the common application form required for admission as an undergraduate to any one of the nine state universities in Florida's system If you are a student attending a Florida high school or a junior/community college you may obtain the form at your school guidance office Otherwise, you may write to the Office of Admissions, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620, indicating whether you will be entering as a first time-in-college freshman, an undergraduate transfer student or a graduate student. Application for admission to the College of Medicine should be requested directly from the Office of Student Affairs, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. Applications for admission are accepted as early as 12 months before the anticipated enrollment date and must be submitted by tfie deadline stated herein (pages 4-5). Applicants are encouraged to apply early. Each applicant is responsible for requesting that the necessary academic records and credentials are sent to the USF Office of Admissions directly from the appropriate institution or agency. These documents could be: the high school records from high schools attended; college transcripts from colleges attended; G E.D test scores and h i gh school equivalency diploma from appropriate high school or State Department of Education; USAF! scores from DANTES, 2318 S Park Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53713; SAT scores 12 from high or Educational Testing service, Princeton, New Jersey, etc. If your credentials are not received in time to process your application prior to registration, you may still attend the University as a Special Student for that term (see page 14) and then update your application for consideration for a future term. Each application must be accompa nied by a $15.00 non refundable fee unless you have previously enrolled at USF as a degree seeking student. You must enter your Social Security Number on the application form. Incomplete application forms will be retu rned. If you are accepted for admission and do not enroll in the term for which you are admitted or if you have not been accepted because of a late application or missing credentials, you must notify the University in writing within 12 months if you wish the application changed to a future date of entry and specify the new enrollment date If a request for change of entry date is not received, a new application and fee must be submitted. Opportunities for Accelerated Progress Toward Undergraduate Degrees The University of South Florida provides several options by which students may accelerate their progress toward completing the baccalaureate degree. These options recognize knowledge which has been acquired prior to or during attendance at USF and provide the opportunity to earn university credit prior to admission to USF Options which may be used include the following: l Recognition of satisfactory performance on tests offered through the College Level Examination Program (see CLEP, page 38). 2. Recognition of satisfactory performance in secondary school Advanced Placement Programs of the College Entrance Examination Board (see Advanced Placement Credit Program, page 38). 3. Dual enrollment at USF prior to graduation from High School or a Community College (see Dual Enrollment page 14, and USF-HCC Cross Enrollment, page 37). 4. Early admission for high school seniors (see Freshman Early Admission on page 13). 5 Your Open University (Y.O.U.) Courses by TV. (See page 38.) Credits may be earned through a combination of the above options and students should contact their college adviser for

PAGE 15

further information concerning the application of this credit toward their degree requirements However, internal devices utilized in the various depart ments for the sole purpose of determining a student's most ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATIERS 13 appropriate area, level or section placement in a program of study (such as auditions, portfolio reviews and placement tests) are not to be construed as being examining mechanisms for exemption or waiver for the granting of credit. Requirements for Admission A high school diploma or its equivalent is ordinarily required for admission of beginning freshman students, as well as the following : Freshman-Graduate of Florida Secondary School 1. Overall "C" average in high school work. 2 Minimum score of 300 on the Florida Twelfth Grade Test. 3. Appropriate recommendation from the secondary school. Freshman-Graduate of Out-of-State Secondary School 1. Overall "C" average in high school work. 2. Class ranking in the upper 40 percent of the class. 3 Minimum total score of 900 on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) with at least 450 on the verbal portion or minimum composite standard score of 21 on the American College Test (ACT). 4. Appropriate recommendation from the secondary school. Freshman-Early Admission USF provides an early admission program for highly capable and mature students to enter the University as regularly enrolled students prior to high school graduation. This program is designed to meet the educational needs of highly qualified students, to help them realize their full potential ad to support the State s commitment to "time-shortened" degree programs Along with the regular application form and $15.00 non refundable application fee, such students must submit a letter outlining reasons for seeking early admission to USF and their future academic plans, as well as a recommendation for early admission from the applicant's high school guidance counselor or principal (a copy of the Early Admission Recommendation form is available from the high school or from the USF Office of Admissions) Undergraduate Transfer Undergraduate transfer requirements are as follows : 1. Overall average of "C" in all college level work attempted and "C" average at the last institution attended. 2. Eligible to re-enter institution last attended. 3. A satisfactory secondary school record and admission test scores must also be submitted for any student who has completed less than 45 quarter or 30 semester hours ...ofwork. If a student has completed more than 45 quarter or 30 semester hours of college work, the University requires only official transcripts of the s tudent's prior college work Evaluation and decision will be made on the basis of the student's performance at the college level. Transfer students should also refer to the section on Community College Relations page 15. Evaluatlon of Transferred Credits I. After registration, the Admissions Office determines the total number of credits that may be transferred into USF and specific course evaluations will be prepared by the college of. the student's major: Therefore, a transfer student should be prepared with a personal copy of his/her transcript of all past course work to discuss advisement and placement with the appropriate academic adviser and should contact the college of his/her major soon after registration so that an official evaluation may be completed. 2. A transfer student from an accredited junior/community college may satisfy the General Distribution Require ments of the University by completing (before transfer) the general education program prescribed by that institution Transcripts must certify that the general education requirements have been completed and, if appropriate, include graduation data. 3. Once students have earned a total of 90 hours of credit from one or more institutions, they may not transfer to USF any additional credit hours earned at lower level institutions. Under special circumstances, students may petition through the Academic Regulations Committee for acceptance of subsequent lower level transfer work above the 90 hours 4 Credit will not be awarded for GED tests. 5. Service school courses will be evaluated with reference to the recommendation of the American Council of Education when official credentials have been presented Such recommendation however, is not binding upon the University 6. A maximum of twelve quarter hours of credit for ROTC and military science courses will be awarded Specific applicability towards a degree will vary with each college. Student must confer with his college adviser to determine the acceptability for his major. This is effective beginning Quarter I (Fall), 1975. ROTC and military science taken prior to Fall 1975 are not acceptable for transfer credit. 7. A maximum of 45 quarter hours of extension, correspon dence, military service education and College Level Examination Program (general examinations) credits can be applied toward a degree. Transient A transient student is one who is permitted to enroll at the University for one quarter only before returning to his/her parent institution The University requires a completed applica tion, the $15.00 non-refundable application fee and a statement from the parent institution, indicating that the applicant is in good standing Undergraduate lnterlnstltutional Transient Registration USF participates in this State University System program to enable students to take advantage of special resources and programs available on another SUS campus but not available at their own institutions An interinstitutional transient student must be recommended by his/her academic dean who will initiate a visiting arrangement with the appropriate dean at the host institution By <;oncurrence and mutual agreement of the appropriate academic authorities in both institutions, the student will receive a waiver of admission requirements and application fee of the host institution. Handicapped Students Because of three inherent factors I) a mild climate, 2) a relatively flat terrain, and 3) modem architecture, as well as

PAGE 16

14 ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS extensive modifications to make the Tampa campus accessible the University of South Florida has accepted increasing numbers of persons with significant physical handicaps as students in recent years. Persons with handicaps may apply to USF with the normal application forms, and will receive additional informa tion about the University upon request Foreign Students Foreign students requesting an application will be sent preliminary information forms Upon receipt of these forms, the Admissions Office will review the information provided and determine if the student meets the minimum requirements for admission to USF in his/her major field If minimum requirements are not met for admission, the applicant will be so advised by the Admissions Office and the application process terminated. If the student does meet the minimum admission requirements, the Admissions Office will forward a formal application with additional instructions and information. A complete admission application should be received by USF at least 6 months prior to the desired entering date, together with the non-refundable $15.00 application fee. Submission of a formal application does not automatically guarantee admission Priority in admissions will be given to applicants whose credentials indicate the greatest likelihood of success in the program requested. For all foreign students the following items are required as a part of the formal application : I Completed application. 2. A $15.00 non-refundable fee submitted with the applica tion. 3 A letter of recommendation from the last institution attended 4 A certificate of financial ability. All foreign applicants must furnish proof of financial resources sufficient to cover travel to and from the United States tuition, fees, room and board, and other expenses for the full academic year 5 Applicants whose native language is not English are required to submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applicants are responsible for making arrangements with the Office of Educational Testing Service to take that examination and to have their scores sent directly from the Educational Testing Service to the Office of Admissions. Entering freshmen should also scores from the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT). 6 Official transcripts must be sent directly from all schools attended to the USF Office. These should be in the native language with copies certified and translated in English. For undergraduates transcripts must include subjects and grades from the first year of secondary school to the time of application Documents submitted will not be returned to the applicant or forwarded to another institution Dual Enrollment-High School Dual enrollment in USF classes is open to academically qualified students currently enrolled in high school who are recommended by their guidance counselor or principal. (An applicant should secure the Dual Enrollment Recommendation form from the Office of New Student Relations ) High School students seeking dual enrollment status are preadvised by and obtain the Special Student Registration form from the Office of Advising, Division of University Studies. Dual enrollees register as special students and are admitted to USF classes on a space available basis during the first week of every quarter. Up to 20 quarter hours of college credits earned through dual enrollment may be applied toward the student's USF degree when he is regularly enrolled after high school graduation Special Student.....;.Non-d egree To serve the academic need s of people in its service area, the University has established the Special Student classification for non-degree seeking students Special Students do not make formal application to the University Enrollment is by means of a Special Student Registration Form available in the Office of Records and Registration and college advising offices Special Students may enroll only during the first five days of each quarter (see Academic Calendar for dates). Course prerequisites must be met a nd enrollment is on a space available basis. No more than 18 hours of credit earned in this status may be applied toward a graduate degree and no more th!ln 20 hours of credit may be applied toward an undergraduate degree Students taking above 18 graduate hours in the Special Student status must obtain approval from the appropriate graduate office and/or Graduate Council to have those hours counted toward their degree requirements. The Special Student form must be completed for each term of enrollment. Former USF students are eligible only if they have completed and earned a degree in the degree program for which they were previously enrolled. Former non-degree seeking students are eligibl e only if they wish to remain in the non-degree status Graduate Students Graduate Students should refer to the s ection on "Division of Graduate Studies," page 43. Readmissions (Former Students Returning) A "Former Student Returning" is any student who has not been in attendance at the University during either of the two quarters immediately preceding the quarter that enrollment is desired. Such students should secure a "Former Student Returning Application from the Office of Records and Registration Former Students Returning must apply prior to the deadline listed in this catalog I. Former undergraduate s tudents who have completed their baccalaureate degree Transient students, and Special Students who wish to enter graduate study for the first time as degree seekers must file a "Graduate Application prior to the listed in this catalog 2. An application fee is required for all students who have enrolled only for Continuing Education (off campus) courses and for those who enrolled as Special Students

PAGE 17

3. All former USF students who have completed their ba ccalaureate degree and wish to return to the University to begin another undergraduate major must file an "Undergraduate Application" with the Office of Ad missions; no fee is required. Former Students Returning should consult the quarterly University Class Schedule for a ny deadline and procedural changes. To be eligible for readmission, a student must meet the following requirements: I Be in good standing and eligible to return to the University of South Florida. 2 If attended another institution since last attending USF: a. Be in good standing and eligible to return to the last institution attended as a degree -s eeking student. b Have achieved a grade point average of at least 2.0 on ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS 15 a 4.0 system on all college level academic courses attempted at institution(s) previously attended and also at the last institution attended. Students who have attended another institution(s) in the interim should request that official transcripts of all work attempted at other institutions be sent to the Office of Records and Registration, Attention: Evaluation Clerk Evening Courses The admission requirements and achievement levels in the day and evening courses are the same Any student accepted to the University may enroll in a ny courses offered in the evening which are appropriate to his/her program A<;ademic Advising for Admitted Undergraduate Students The University seeks to provide all students with sufficient guidance and advice to select programs and courses best suited to their personal abilities, educational interests, and career objectives. To achieve this goal, an academic advising office is maintained in each of the eight colleges offering baccalaureate degrees and in the Division of University Studies. Any student entering the University with fewer than 90 quarter hours and upper level transfer students without an academic major are initially assigned to the Division of University Studies for academic advising. These students may declare a major (in most instances) by completing a form in .the appropriate college advising office. Because of the highly structured nature of some programs, it is important that students check the college section of the catalog for advising or admission requirements (e g., see College of Fine Arts and College of Engineering). Students who do not wish to declare a major are advised by the Division of University Studies A student must declare a major no later than the end of the junior year (135 quarter hours) Students transferring to the University with 90 quarter hours or more with a major are assigned to the college of that major for advising. It is necessary, however, that all students check in with their colleges upon arrival on campus. This can be accomplished during the Orientation Program. The purpose of the initial contact is to assign an academic adviser and to provide the college with routine information which assists the college in collecting and maintaining the necessary records to assure the student's proper progress toward educational goals In a few cases, only a limited number of students can be ad mitted to a particular major Students planning to enter such programs should he aware of this situation and s hould be prepared with alternative plans of action. All students are encouraged to establish an advising relationship with a college or the Division of University Studies and periodically visit their advisers to keep abreast of any policy, procedural, or curriculum changes which may affect them. In fact, some colleges require adviser approval of student programs each quarter. To assure continuity, high quality, and commonality in advising (to the extent possible with widely varying programs) the coordinator of advising of each college and the Division of University Studies, and representatives from the related offices of the Registrar, New Student Relations, and Community College Relations, meet periodically as the Univer sity's Council on Academic Advi sing. This Council is concerned with assuring timely availability of accurate information on University courses, programs, procedures and n:gulations to prospective, new and continuing students. While the University provides advising services to assist students with academic planning, the responsibility for seeing that all graduaton requirements are met rests with th e student. Course Registration for Admitted Students Course registration is conducted in person by appointment during both the Early a nd Regular registration periods each quarter Appointment times and registration instructions are published in the quarterly University Class Schedule. Students are encouraged to register early to allow time for schedule adjustments by the colleges Changes of class registration for students who register during Early Registration can be made during the Early or Regular Drop/Add periods Students registering during Regular Registr ation may make schedule adjustments during the Regular Drop/Add period (Deadline information is available in the Academic Calendar ) Any regular University student wishing to enroll simultane ously in evening classes must register and pay fees in the manner prescribed for regular students attending campus daytime classes. Students who do not register for classes by the close of the Regular Registration period may register during Late Regis tratiuu, the first week of classes. A $25.00 late registration fee charged for this privilege. (See the section on fees for additional information and the quarterly Class Schedule for dates ) Fees must be paid for all courses registered for at the end of the Regular Drop/Add period (see Academic Calendar for dates). Office of Community College Relations Community/junior college and other undergraduate students planning to transfer to the University should contact the Office of Community College Relations (both before and a fter transfer) for needed assistance. The primary concern of the Office of Community College Rel ations is to assist comm uni ty/junior and other college transfer students (and staff members of those colleges) to better understand the University of South Florida; its philosophy; its programs; and its procedural operations. This office, conversely, has a responsibility for the interpretation of the community/junior and other colleges to the University The ultim ate goal of the Office of Community College Relations is to ensure equity for the transfer student. One significant contribu tion toward this goal is the annual delivery of the updated Community College Counseling Manuals to every Florida

PAGE 18

16 ADMISSIONS AND RELATED MATTERS community/junior college-and to other institutions by request. Community College Relations works closely with Florida community/junior college st udent s and staff, as well as with such USF offices as Admissions, Student Affairs, Records and Registration, and the various colleges an d departments, while serving a coordinating function within the University by working with all areas concerned, in minimizing problem s o( transfer students coming to the University The University of South Florida s ubscribes fully to all of the provi si ons of the Statewide Articulation Agreement. It is strongly recommended that students transferring from community/junior colleges to the University of South Florida complete their Associate in Arts degree-or, in certail\ priorapproved areas, the Associate in Science degree Special details for students who do not plan to co mplete the associate degree req uirements are available from the Office of Admissions. It is recognized that enrolling in college is difficult for the fre shman-in some respects, it is more difficult for the transfer st udent The freshman student experiences only one transition, usually-that from high sch ool to college. The college transfer student, on the other hand, unlike the freshman, must relearn some of the information regarding i nstitutional regulations, grade point computations financial aid, ins titutional organiza tion etc. The Office of Community College Relations stands rea dy to lend any possible assistance in this important, additional period of transition. Office of Testing and Advanced Placement The Office of Testing and Advanced Placemen t serves three principal functions: 1. Admissions and Academic Testing : Tests required for admission to colleges, graduate and profe ssi onal schools as well as many other special tests are ad ministered by this office. Examples are the SAT ACT, GRE, Medical College and Law School Admission tests. 2. Test Development and Scoring Services. Analy sis and advisory services are pro vi ded to aid in construction and validation of te sts u sed in and instruments such as s urveys and questionnaires for research purposes. Test sc oring and analysis by machine (IBM 1230) are available to all faculty and authorized personnel. 3 Credit-By Examination (see page 33): The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) is administered through this office as are other examination programs designed to provide alternative means for students to achieve credit. The Committee on Testing and Advanced Placement recommends standards and for conduct of th e credit by-examination program Continuing Education The University of South Florida offers both credit and noncredit educational programs to se rve the in-service and co ntinuing education needs of a geographical area which encompasses Charlotte, Collier DeSoto, Hardee, Hernando, Highland s, Hillsborough, Lee, Manatee, Pasco, Pinellas, P o lk, and Sarasota Countie s Both degree and non-degree seekers may participate in tfie University's Continuing Ed ucation credit program Students desiring to obtain a degree must, however, apply for admission to the University as a degree s eeking student (see Requirements for Admiss ion) at an early date so that courses taken may be considered for inclusion in a program of studies (see appropriate college prog rams). To assure quality of instruction, the Continuing Education credit courses for the most part, are taught by the regular faculty of the University When t hi s is not possible, outstanding instructional personnel are recruited from neighboring ac credited institut ions. In addition, the University System Extension Library makes available for each Continuing Educa tion course the latest in reference materials. The academic calendar.for courses scheduled off-campus is essentially the same as for the University's on-campus credit program. Classes are generally sched uled once a week. Although some Continuing Education credit courses are generated by the University itself, most originate through requests whic h are initiated by individuals or intereste d groups. Reque sts for Continu i ng Education co ur ses in the field of Education should be submitted to County Extension Coordi nators designated by the county superi ntend ents of scho ols. Requests for Continuing Education courses in all other areas s hould be transmitted by individuals, groups, companies, agencies, etc., directly to the Center for Continuing Education, Univer s it y of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. Enrollment in Continuing Education Courses Enrollment in a Continuing Education off-campus credit course is accomplished by mail only. Enrollment forms may be obtained at a Continuing Education office, from the local County Extension Coordinator in county school board offices, or from the course instructor at the first class sessi on 1. The enrollment form and payment of fees must be postmarked no later tha n the deadline announced in the University Cla ss Schedule. 2. On-campus s tudent s enrolling in a Continuing Education co urse must use th e e nrollment by mail procedure 3. Fees for Continuing Education courses are assessed the same as fees for classified and unclassified students. Consult the Fees Section on page 18 for detailed information 4. Enrollment forms for students whose fees are to be paid by school boards or state or federal grants must be forwarded in accordance with registration deadlines. Paymen t of fees or a ppropriate purchase orders must be enclosed with enrollment forms. 5. It is the responsibility of the individual student to ascertain that he or she has met the course prerequisites as published in this Bulletin Mature Student Admission: Education for Adults Recognizing that education is a life-long process relevant to the needs of students over 25 years of age, the University of South Florida has developed programs a nd courses designed s pecifical ly for mature students. The University seeks to promote a better understanding of life in a changing world by means of instruction offered in a variety of ways-with and without academic credit. Programs are available for adults who wish to begin a college program for those who are seeking to complete their interrupted college education, and for those who have earned a community college degree a nd now wish to earn the bachelor's degree. In addition, a wide variety of courses is offered in both the daytime and evening for those who wish to update a degree earned in the past or for those who are seeking to enrich their intellectual and cultural life Students who are above traditional college age (18-24) often have unique educational considerations that require special services One of these services is academic advising in the Division of University Studies. There is also a pre-admission adviser for mature students in the Division of University Studies. (See page 27.)

PAGE 19

FINA N CIAL INFORMATION Financial information pertaining to registration f ees and other charges services and benefit s are consolidated in this section for easy reference All fees are subject to change without prior notice Resident Status-Flo rid a a nd Non Florida Board of Regent s regulation 7.6, Florida Student Definition, reads as follows: For the purpose of assessing regi st ration fees, students shall be cla ss ified as Florida or non-Florida A Florida student is a person who shall ha v e resided and had his domicile in the State of Florida for a t least twelve (12) months immediately preceding the first day of classes of the current term In applying this policy "student shall mean a person admitted to the institution If s uch person is a minor it shall mean parents, p a rent, or legal guardian of his or her person The word minor shall mean a person who has not attained the age of 18 an d whose disabilities of minority have not been removed by reason of marriage or by a court of competent jurisdiction The word domicile" for fee-paying purposes shall denote a person 's true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation It is the place where he intends to remain, and to which he expects to return when he leaves without intending to establish a new domicile elsewhere. The word "parent shall mean a minor's father; or mother; or if one parent has custody of his persop, the parent having custody; or if there i s a guardian or legal custodian of his person, then such guardian or legal custodian. In all applications for admission by students as citizens of Florida the applicant, or if a minor, his parents or legal guardian shall make and file with such application a written statement under oath that s uch applicant i s a bonafide citizen, resident and domiciliary of the State of Florida entitled as such to admission upon the terms and conditions prescribed for citizens, residents, and domiciliaries of the State. A non-Florida student is a person not meeting the requirements of Section A above. A non-Florida student (or if a minor, his parent or parents) after having been a resident and domiciliary of Florida for twelve ( 12) months may apply for and be granted reclassific a tion prior to thefirst day of classes of any subsequent term; provided, however, that those students who are non-resident aliens or who are in the United States on a non immigration visa will not be entitled to reclassification. However for fee-paying purposes, Cuban nationals and Vietnamese refugees will be considered as resident aliens. Such application s h all comply with the provi si ons above. In addition, the application for reclassification must be acc ompanied by a certified copy of a declaration of intention to establish domicile filed with the clerk of the Circuit Court as provided by Section 222.17 Florida Statutes. Unless the contrary appears to the satisfaction of the registering authority of the institution at which a student is registering it shall be presumed that: The spouse of any per so n who is classified or is eligible for classification as in-state s tudent is likewise entitled to classi fication as an in-state student. A minor whose parent is a member of the armed forces and stationed in this State pursuant to military orders is entitled to classification as an in-state student. The student, while in 17 continuous attendance, shall not lose his residence when his parent is thereafter transferred on military orders A member of the armed forces of the United States stationed in this State on military orders shall be entitled to classification as an student while on active duty in this State pursuant to such orders. No person over the age of 18 years shall be deemed to have gained residence while attending any educational institution in this State as a full-time student, as such status is defined by the Board of Regents, in the absence of a clear demonstration that he has established domicile in the State. Any person who remains in this State when his parent having theretofore been domiciled in this State, removes from this State, shall be entitled to classification as a Florida student so long as his attendance at a school or schools in this State shall be deemed "continuous" if the person claiming co ntinuous attendance has been enrolled at a school or schools in this State as a full-time student, as such term is defined by the Board of Regents, for a normal academic year in each calendar year, or the appropriate portion or portions of such years, thereof, since the beginning of the period for which co ntinuous attendance is claimed. Such persons need not attend s ummer sessions o r other such intersession beyond the normal academic year in order to render his attendance "continuous." Appeal from a determination denying Florida status to any student may be initiated by the filing of an action in court in the judicial district in which the institution ls located. Any student granted s tatus as a Florida student which status is based on a sworn statement which is false shall, upon a determination of such falsity, be subject to such disciplina r y sanctions as may be imposed by the president of the university, which sanctions may include permanent expulsion from the State University System or any lesser penalty Special Categories: The following categories shall be treated as Florida residents for tuition purposes : Military personnel of the United States of America on active duty and stationed in Florida, including dependent members of their immediate families Veterans of the United States of America retired with twenty (20) or more years of active military service, including dependent members of their immediate families, who are in Florida at the time of retirement, or who move to Florida within one year following retirement and intend to make Florida their permanent home Full-time elementary, secondary, and junior college faculty members under current teaching contracts in the State of Florida (This is construed to exclude the spouses of such faculty members .) Full-time faculty and career employees of the University System and members of their immediate families.(This is construed to exclude the spouses of students.) If during attendance at the University the residency status changes, the student must obtain a Request for Residency Change" form at the Office of the Registrar, complete and

PAGE 20

18 FINANCIAL INFORMATION return with the required documents to the Re side ncy Clerk in the Office of Record s and Registration The Dire c tor of Admissions is responsible for and will make the residency determination for all new first time entering students and for former students returning at a new level by means of a new application. Decisions may be appealed as designated in University rules to the Vice President of Student Affairs Fees The following fee sc hedule applies to all University of South F lorid a students with the exception of those in the Bachelor of Independent Studies, Adult Degree Program For information on the Adult Degree Program fees, see page 37. All fees are subject to change by action of the State Legislature, without pri o r notice. The University will make every effort to advertise any such changes if they occur. 1. Initial Application Fee (Eac h application-not refundable) $15.00 2. Registration and Tuition Feet Students who pre-register m ay receive a bill through the mail. However, the University is not obligated to send out s uch a bill. The student is re s ponsible for paying fees in full by the appropriate due date stated in the particular quarter' s "Schedule of Classes." Failure to do so will result in the student being assessed the $25 00 late payment fee. A. Fee Structure Fees are assessed by course level-not student c l assificatio n Fees, per Credit Hour Course l evel Resident Non-Resident* Undergraduate Lower level (001-299) $15.00 $38.00 Upper level (300-499) 16.50 51.50 Graduate (500 and over) 22.00 62.00 Thesis and Dissertation 24.00 64.00 NOTE : I. There i s no cei ling (maximum) on the amount which a stude nt may be assessed for a single quarter. 2. In addition to the a bove, each student who enrolls for five or more credit hours on the Tampa Campus will have to pay a $ 10.00 Student Health Fee for the quarter. A s tudent enrolling for four or less credit hour s may voluntarily pay the $10.00 fee which will allow that student to utilize the Health Center services. 3. Students who register for five or more credit hours on the Sarasota Campus will have to pay a $6.00 student health fee for the quarter. A student enrolling for four or less credit hour s may voluntarily p:)y a $6.00 fee which will allow that student to utilize the Sarasota Health Center services 4. Effective Quarter IV (Summer), 1977, the undergraduate fees shown above will be reduced by $6.00 per credit hour for courses taken during Quarter IV. 5 Registration fee payments should be mailed to : Division of Finance and Accounting University of South Florida 4202 Fowler A venue Tampa, F lorid a 33620 B. Off-Campus Courses Students t a king off-campus (Co ntinuing Education) co ur ses will be assessed the same fees as sta ted in "A" above except for the He a lth Fee. Continuing Education courses are designated by the "700 series" section number. The "Schedule of Classes,'.' which is printed each quarter, can be u sed as a reference for updated information. 3. College of Medicine Registration Feest A Florida student enrolled in the M D progr am in the College of Medicine will p a y a fee of $1,756.00 per year in installments of $439.00 each to p aid in Jul)!, October January and April. A non-Florid a student enrolled in the M.D program in the College of Medicine s hall p ay a fee of $4,028.00 per year in installments of $1,007 .00 each to be paid in July, October, January, and April. 4. Late Registration Fee All students who initiate (i. e., those students who have not enrolled for any courses during Early or Regular Registration) their registr a tion during the late registration period will be automatically assessed a $25.00 late registration fee. This is separate from the payment fee. 5. Late Payment Fee All registration fees and all courses which were added during the Drop/ Add period must be paid in full by the payment deadline date specified in the "Schedule of Classes printed each quarter. A $25.00 late payment fee will be assessed against all s tudent s who do not pay their fees in full by the specified date. The University can only charge a maximum of $25 00 in total l a te fees for a single quarter. 6. Cancellation for Non-Payment of Fees Students not on an authorized deferred payment of fees and who have not paid their registration fee s in full by a specified day (per ''Schedule of m ay ha ve their registration for that qu ar ter cancelled. This means specifically that a student will receive no credit for any courses taken during that qu ar ter. Students who are allowed to register in error may have their registration cancelled. Any fees paid by that student will be refunded to the student or credited against other charges due the University. 7. Reinstatement Fee There will be a reinstatement period from the beginning of the sixth week of class through the end of the seventh week of Class. Any student wishin g to be reinstated must apply in writing during that period All fees plus a $25.00 Late Payment Fee and a $25.00 Reinstatement Fee must be paid immediately if the reinstatement is granted. There will be no reinstatement after the seventh week of class for any errors other than administrative errors (errors caused primarily by the University). 8. Intern Certificate of Participationt Students who present Intern Certificates for payment of their regi s tration fees will have to p a y a $3.55 per hour charge for all credit hour s taken during the quarter. By p a ying this $3.55 per credit hour charge a nd presenting an Intern Certificate a student will be allowe d to register for an unlimited number of credit hours during a single quarter. These students will not be charged a student health fee. Students presenting Intern Certjficates dated prior to July 19, 1974, may take up to 8 credit hours free of charge See "Resident Status" t All registration and tuition fees s hown are those approv ed by the Board of Regents to take effect Quarter I (Fa ll), 1976. However they are still subject to approval or change by the Florida Legislature at the time thi s bulletin goes to press.

PAGE 21

9. 60-Day Deferment for VA Students Students receiving VA benefits who have applied in writing no later t han the specified date for t he 60-day deferment of fees from the Office of Veteran s Affairs have until a specified date (See "Schedule of Classes") to pay registration foes in full 10. Room Rent Room rent is paid in acco rdance with information in th e Housing Contract.** Quarter I II, Ill Per Quarter $169.00 140.00 Quarter IV (I 0-week session) 11. Food Service The following food service plan options are available to all students.** Saga Food Serv ice Per Quarter 20 meal plan-Mon. through Sun $239.74 15 mea l plan-Mon. through Fri 211.36 12 meal plan-M on through Sun. 227.68 10 meal plan-Mon. through Fri. 201.36 **Prices listed are for 1975-76, a nd are subject to change for the academic year 1976-77. Food s ervice prices may be revised quarterly, if nece ssary. Refund of Fees Registration fees will be refunded under certain conditions upon presentation at the D ivision of Finance and Accounting of an authorization issued by the Office of the Registrar 1. Issuance The issuance of a registration refu nd will be detained for a two-week period immedi ately following the last day to pay fees without a late fee. 2. Withdrawals A. When officiall y requested by a student, a full refund of registration fees will be made if a s tudent withdraws from the University on or before the final day of the regular Drop-Add" period (First week of classes). B No refund of registration fees will be made if the student withdraws after the final day of the DropAdd" per i od except in the following cases: (I) If a student is involuntarily called back to duty with the armed forces. (2) Death of a student during the term for which enrolled (3) Incapacitating illness of such duration and severity as to preclude successful comple tion of the academic program for the term for which a student is enrolled In the instances stated above, the refund will have a $3. 55 per hour withdrawal fee deducted 3. Cancellations A. A student who at any time has his registration cancelled by the University because he was allowed to register in error is entitled to a full refund of his registration fees. B. A student may be cancelled by the University when registration and tuition fees are not paid in full by the last day of the regular "Drop/Add" period, (first week of classes) except when a deferment is granted by the University 4. Reduction of Class Load A student must officially drop a course within the "Drop/Add" period in order to be eligible for a refund. A "Registration Refund Request" form must be completed and presented to the Division of Finance and Accounting before any refunds will be initiated. The refund will be FINANCIAL INF ORMATION 19 the amount paid less proper charges per hour for each hour continued. 5. Late Fees Late registra tion fees are not refundable. 6. Refund Monies Used to Clear Univers ity Debts Deduction s from authori zed refunds will be made for unp aid accounts due the University. Check Cashing Service The University offers check cas hing services under the following c ond itions: I The University will acce pt personal chec ks for accounts due to the Univer sity. Each s tudent is urged to make his own financial arrangements through his choice of commercial banks 2 The University Bookstore will cash personal checks not exceeding $50.00 3 A service charge of is made for eac h check cashed. 4 Responsibilit y for the check rests with the final endorser. 5 The Universit y will not cash three party checks 6. All checks returned by the bank must be cleared within 5 days from the date of notification to the student Failure to comply will result in cancellation of the student's registration. The re is a $5 charge for each retu rned check Payments of Accounts Due the University Charges against students for l oss or breakage of University equipment, books, fines and other charges will be re quired to be paid upon notification that charges are due Delinquent accounts may be c onsidered sufficient cause for can cellation of regis tration University regulations prohibit registration ,' or release of transcript for any studen t whose account with the University is delinquent Payments should be brought into the Cashier's Office Admin istration Building Payments may be mailed to Finance and Accounting, University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33620. Student SeNlcea Patio \

PAGE 22

20 FINANCIAL INFORMATION Financial Aids The University of South Florida has a n establis hed co m prehensive Financial Aid Program tha t ass ist s qual ified U S students with their educational expenses. Fin a ncial assistance is granted on the basis of financial need, academic promise, an d character Generally speaking, academic merit determines whether aid is given and the financial need determines the amou nt. Financial ass istance includes sch olarships and/or grants, !orig-term loan s and on-campus employment Stu dent s with a 3.0 or above grade point average may apply for scholarships as well as other types of assistance while stu dents with a grade point average below 3 0 will be considered for assistance other than scholarships. Short-term, or emergency loans, are also available to help stu dents in the event of a temporary unexpected s hort-term requirement for educational purposes In order to be considered for financial aid, the student must comp l e te a USF financial aid a ppli ca tion and file either a Parents' Confidential Statement or a Student's Financial Stateme nt with the College Scholarship Service These forms are a vailable at the Office of Financial Aids Priority will be given to s tudents w ho are registered full time, i.e. 12 or more hours as an undergraduate and 9 or more hours as a graduate. The deadline for applying for scholarships is February 1 for the aca demi c year beginning the following September, and priority will b e given to those students who a pply for other types of assis tance prior to March I In awarding financial assistance no stude n t is discr imin ated against be ca u se of rac e, religion, creed, age, sex, color, national origin or marital status Vehicle Regulations and Fees Motor Vehicles Students may use automobiles on campus. Parking faci lities are provided for resident and commuter st udents. All automo biles u sed o n campus must be registered with the Unive rsity Police. Each registrant must present vehicle registra tion cert i{icate or facsimile indicating proof of ownership or authorizat ion to operate ve hicle. A booklet entitled' 'Traffic aqd Parking Regulations' is made available to the student a t the time of registration D ecals for threeand four-wheeled motor vehicles: I. If registered prior to or during Quarter I. ..... ..... $10.00 2. If registered at the beginning or during Quarter II.. ... .... .. ......................................... 8.00 3. If registered at the beginning or during Quarter III....... ..... .. ............. .. .. .... .. ............. 6 .00 4 If regi s tered at the beginnipg or during Quarter IV...... .... ... .................................... 4.00 5. Ve hicle registration for any one quarter or fraction thereof (OPS employees, temporary e mploye es, faculty and students)..................... 4.00 Two-Wheeled Vehicles Students may use two -w heeled vehicles on campus. Parking blo c ks, racks, and designated areas in parking lots are available to park two-wheeled vehicles. All two wheeled vehicles used on campus must be registered with the University Police Decal fee for motorcycles is $2.00. Fee for bicycles is $1.00. Bicycles need only be registered once for the duration of use on campus Special Services Veterans Admin istration Benefits The University of South Florida is approved for the education of veterans, service members, and dependents of veterans eligible for benefits under the GI Bill All stan d ard degree programs currently offered at USF are ap pro ved by the State Approval Age n cy, including the BIS Degr ee program a dmini stere d by the Center for Co n tinuing Education Non-credit courses offered throug h the Center may be app r oved on a selective basis. To initiate change, or renew benefit s, requests should be sub mitted throu g h the Offices of V e terans Affairs Forms are available in tho se offices and should be submitted after being officially cleared for admission, readmission or enrollment as a Special Student Students enrolling in the unclassified (Special Student) s t at us should contact one of the above offices to confirm requirements for being certified for benefits. Early re quests by eligible students will be processed for Advance Payment checks which may be picked up at the school upon registratio n but not more than 30 d a ys prior to the beginning of the term Cer tification may be requested for the entire course of s tudy by degree-seeking students who will be enrolled at least half-time each quarter A minimum of six to eight weeks processing time should be allowed before expecting to receive tl)e first check. T o be eligible for full-time benefit s, undergraduate and unclassified students mus t enroll for 12 or more quarter hours each term degree-seeking graduate students must enroll for 8 or more qu art er hours There are special requirements regarding dual enrollment, the Co-op Program, courses taken by Audit (no ben efi ts) and courses taken by TV It is the student's responsibility to inquire concerning special requirements and to report an y c hange in sta tus which affect s the rate of benefits. Other b e nefits includ e a ddition a l a mount s of Compensation and Pension which may b e payable to eligible veterans and widows of veterans for children betwe e n the ages of 18 and 23, if the children are a ttending at lea s t three class sessions per week The Request for Approval of School Attendance form, obtained from the VA Regional Office must be submitted to the

PAGE 23

school one time only, unless the student s attendance is interrupted prior to graduation. The State of Florida ha s provided deferment for payment of registration fee s and tuition for students eligible for benefits under Chapters 34 and 35 of the GI Bill Students attending under Chapter 31 should clear through the Loans and Scholarships Office. Tutorial Assistance not to exceed $60 per month up to a maximum of $720 is also avai l able to s tudent s who qualify The above services and all other VA st udent services must be requested through the Offices of Veterans Affairs A further service has been provided by the VA b y placing a Veterans Administration Repre se ntative on campus to serve as a liaison for educational assistance problems and to assist students with other type VA benefits. Social Security Benefits Full-time students between the ages of 1 8 and 22 who are eligible FINANCIAL INFORMATION 21 for Social Security checks s hould notify their local Social Security office to request enrollment certification through the Tampa Social Security Office To be considered full-time at USF students must enroll and remain enrolled for a minimum of 12 quarter hour s each term except summer term It is the st udent s responsibility to notify the Social Security Adminis tration when he or s he ceases to be enrolled full-time. Railroad Retirement Annuity Award The University maintains a file of students receiving Railroad Retirement Annuity Award benefits, notifying the Board when a st udent ceases to be enrolled full-time A student ceases to be enrolled full-time when he is enrolled for less than 12 hours as an undergraduate and 8 hours as a graduate To initiate benefits, student should contact the Railroad Retirem e nt Board BOOKSTORES Textbook Center Textbooks are located in the Textbook Center ad j ace nt to the Central Receiving Building Every attempt is mad e to have all required and recommended texts available the first day of registration. USF Bookstore and Campus Shop The USF Bookstore and Campus Shop, located in the Universi t y Center, serves the University community by providing numer ous goods and services. The Art and Engineering Depa rtment contains all course supplies of art, engineering, a nd science classes, as well as many hobby and general purpo se items. Oil or water base paint, brushes, art paper, slide rules electronic calcu l ators graph paper, drafting supplies, dis sec ting kits, and lab notebooks are among the many items in this department. The Supply Department stocks all the basic sc hool sup plie s and course required supplies necessary to fulfill course needsnotebooks, notebook paper pens, pencils etc The Customer Service Department stocks a large assort ment of items which include s candy, cigarettes, tobacco products health and beauty aids This department provides many helpful services-film developing college ring order service fresh flower gift service, magazine subscriptions at student r ates, etc The Social Expression Department contains a complete selection of traditional and contemporary greeting cards and stationery The General Book Department is located in the basement of the Bookstore and features approximately 13, 000 different titles, including the very late s t in fiction non-fiction reference study aids and children s books. A copy center is also located in this area. Check Cashing The Book s tore provides a check cashing facility for students, staff, and faculty. Cash limit is $50.00 Student current 1 fee card and picture ID or current staff card must be presented for identification. University Center and Crescent Hill

PAGE 24

STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS The University of South Florida i s dedicated to the intellectual, social and moral developments of students in order to provide responsible leaders who can work effectively in a democratic society The University has a concern for the total life of the student, both in and out of the classroom Diversity of opinion, criticism, and dissent are essential in discharging these responsibilities, and this has been set forth and safeguarded in the Board of Regents policies (Sec. 6c, Administrative Code of Florida). As a condition for admission to one of the State Universities of Florida, students agree to abide by the policies of the Board of Regents and by the rules and regulations of the institution. The University has the right and responsibility to determine who shall be admitted to the institution; the conduct or behavior acceptable to the institution: and under what conditions one may continue as a student. Administrative due process and the right of review in all disciplinary hearings are provided by the University University officials and particularly the Vice Pre s ident for Student Affairs and his staff are charged with the responsibility of interpreting the policies of the Board of Regents to students and others in the university community, and with developing positive student personnel programs which further the intellec tual, social, and moral development of students. Office of Student Affairs and University Development The Vice President for Student Affair s and University Develop ment, and the staff members in that area of administration, provide leadership and professional services necessary to maintain a campus environment conducive to learning. First, they offer services enabling students to cope effectively with factors of personal and social living that affect academic work: academic advising, financial aid, health service, individual and group counseling, career planning, placement, cooperative education, standards of conduct and performance, due process in disciplinary action, procedures for redressing grievances, and advice and assistance in time of trouble Second, they provide program s enabling students to participate Cffectively in the corporate life of the University: orientation (FOCUS), equal opportunity programs, residence halls, student government, student publications, organizations, activities, and events of special interest. Third, they offer services, programs, and opportunitie s for alumni and friends of the University to assist the University in fulfilling its goals and mission. Standards and Discipline Just as the University tries to maintain high standards of academic performance, its members try to support high standards of individual conduct and human relations. Responsi bility for one's own conduct and respect for the rights of others are essential conditions of academic and personal freedom in the University. The University may deny admission or refuse continued enrollment to students whose actions are contrary to the purposes of the University, or impair the welfare and freedoms of other members of the University. 22 Standards of personal conduct are published in a handbook provided to students at the of each term Disciplinary procedures followed when a student fails to exercise his responsibility adequately or commits some offense against University standards, local, state or federal law provide the safeguards of due process customarily enjoyed by American citizens. These include a written description of the offense, participation in discussion of the matter and presentation of information in one's own behalf, the right to seek counsel in one's own best interest, and the right of appeal. These procedures are also described in the handbook Self-discipline and sensitivity to the rights and interests of others are the principal elements of University discipline. Students are entitled to seek advice on any matter of judgment, conduct or human relations that may concern them, and to participate in the development of standards of conduct supporting their interest in the purposes of the University. Many studen ts have asked for advice on standards of dress and personal appearance. Campus dress is expected to be a ppropria te to the activity in which the individual is engaged. Student Government All regularly enrolled students are voting members of the Student Government of the University of South Florida. They elect the college councils the Student Government officers, and the student representatives to the University Senate Student Government is an agency representing student interests in plans, programs, policies and procedures at the University, and securing student representation in University governance. The Student Government office also helps students deal with special problem s in areas such as off-campus housing, veterans services, and referral for legal assistance. Grievance Procedure In order to assure to students the right to redress of grievances, the Office of Student Affairs is responsible for a grievance procedure. Any student may file a question, complaint, or statement of grievance, in the Office of Student Affairs, in person or in writing A course of action or other answer will be given by a member of the staff of the Office of Student Affairs, within the week if possible. Students who do not wish to identify themselves or to provide local addresses will find the reply published in the earliest possible edition of The Oracle. St. Petersburg Campus A Student Affairs office is also maintained at the St. Petersburg campus. For information about the services and programs provided for these students, see page 10. Financial Aids The student financial aids program at the University of South Florida is a part of the Student Affairs program. For detailed information about financial aids see page 20.

PAGE 25

Student Health Service Comprehensive health care is provided through the University Student Health Service for all students who have paid the Health Fee The Health Center is located on the fourth floor of the University Center building. A 12-bed infirmary is available for students with illnesses precluding class attendance. A walk-in clinic and medical laboratory are maintained for outp atient treatment. University physici a n s hav e office hours by appointment, Monday through Friday. Register ed nurses are on duty 24 hours a day, seven days a week in the He alth Center and emergency care is available continuously, including nights a nd weekends. Counseling Center for Human Development The Counseling Center for Human Development provide s services for student s desiring profe ssional assistance in the areas of reading-study skills, vocational guidance; personal counsel ing, psychiatric consultation, tuto ring. Probation an d Parole and Vocational Rehabilitation These services are available to assist students in evaluating and remedying problems which interfere with efficient learning and satisfying participation in, campus life The Career Counseling and Guidance Service helps s tudent s develop realistic goals through testing, counseling, use of current career information, knowledge of the disappearing job market, and the exploration of a lternati ve education a l and/or career goals and the means of reaching them. Emphasis is: placed on developing skills for solving educational a nd career problems in order to make wise career decision s. A Career Information Library is maintained for student use Professional psychologists from the Personal Counseling Service of the Personal Resource Center will also assist students in Career Guidance parti c ularly tho se who may present identity motivational, and other related personal problems . The Reading-Study Skill s Service provides diagnosis and evaluation of reading skills and study habits Two a pproaches are offered: (I) credit classroom courses ar e offered which include extensive instruction and practice in word attack, vor.abulary and comprehension skills; (2) an Independent Study credit course is available with the emphasi s on the unique individual need Reading-Study Skills Laboratory Service is available for all students enrolled in either the classroom or independent study sections. Regular registration procedures will be followed for either of the above courses. Visual sc reening is also available. The Counseling Service is represented by different pro fessional disciplines including clinical psychologists, counseling psychologists, and social workers. The professional staff members assist students directly with emotional personal, and/or career problems on an individual and/or group basis In addition, this staff will train and supervise student para professionals (mental health workers including drug rehabilita tion leaders) and peer beh avior managers (academic and interpersonal). Students desiring special assistance in their courses, in order to qualify them in basic subjects preliminary to pursuit of an academic major may apply to the Counseling Center for Human Development for tutoring Tutoring on a fee basis can also be arranged in various courses Fees charged by the tutors are set according to standard rates established by the Counseling Center for Human Development staff Special paraprofessional non-fee tutorial services are also available Psychiatric Services aid the student when medication, hospitalization or psychiatric evaluation is needed Evaluations by the Counseling or Psychiatric Service in conjunction with administrative decisions of Student Affairs, Housing and Food Services, academic colleges or departments, and individual faculty will be rendered only at the request of the student and with a written "Release for Recommendation signed by the student. STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS 23 Seven student paraprofessional program s operate under the s upervision and training of Counseling Center profes s ional s. These program s, which are staffed by volunteer st udents under the leadership of part time paid experienced and qualified graduate and undergraduate s tudent s, include Helpline, R ap Cadre, Beh avior Modification C a reer Guid ance, Peer Man agers, Center Specialists, and test anxiety reduction Vocational Rehabilitation is a State of Florida service located in the Counseling Center to facilitate the student's utilization of aid available. Parole and Probation is another State service which provides counseling and supervision for the students involved Application for any of these s ervices of the Counseling Center may be made by any student at any time and as often as desired. Center staff limitation s will restrict servicing of new applications to emergencies during periods Division of Cooperative Education & Placement One of the recognized goals of a college education is to maximize career satisfaction and University of South Florida has dedicated itself to the purpose of assisting st udent s and alumni in realizing their career objective Undergr a du ate students are encouraged to participate in the CEP an d graduating st udents and alumni are urged to take advan tage of the Placement Service Cooperative Education Program The program is open to major s in mos t disciplines offered at the University The program's objective is a balanced education where occupational experience is a n integral part of formal education and theory is blended with pr actice. The ultimate objectives of the program are to provide relevance in the educational proces s, direction in career planning, a nd bringing business and industry and governmental agencies close to the educational program of the University Many type s of organiza, tions have joined the University as cooperative employers. A student must h ave a minimum of 45 quarter hours of academic work completed with a grade p oint a ver a ge of 2.5 or better before being assigned to a n em ployer Transfer stude nt s must meet minimum requirem ents in a ddition to completing two full-time quarters at USF All Univer s ity of South Florida cooperative programs are a pproxim ate l y four years in length except in the field of engineering, which i s ap proxim ately a five year program The University will s tudent s to training programs relevant to their educational and profe ssio n a l goals. Usually students a re firs t placed on ass ignment s where they can learn the fundamentals : They m a y then adva nc e in the type of ass ignment from training period to training period Cooperative Education stude nt s may take course w ork during each training period This may be a regular course taken by class attendance, by independent s tudy or correspondence, or a special problems course in an area appropriate to the stu dent's major interests Students who fail to report for a training period after signing an agreement or who fail to keep their agreement to remain with an employer to the end of a given training assignment, may be dropped from the program Graduating Students and Alumni Each year representatives from busine ss and industry, educational systems, and governmental agencies throughout the United States will conduct on-campu s recruiting interviews for graduating students. In addition, employers will list career employment vacancies throughout the year and request referrals of qualified candidates. Graduating students should register with the office early in their graduating year to insure the

PAGE 26

24 STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS establishment of their placement credentials. These services are available to alumni desiring career relocations. The Occupational and Employer Information Library provides materials on vocational guidance, career opportunities, and employers. In addition, information on graduate schools is maintained The following data concerning the statistical records of some of our 1975 graduates is pro;vided fotyour information. It is hoped that this information will be helpful to you in making decisions for your future academic pursuits. You should be aware that registration with the 'Office of Cooperative Education and Placement (by which this data is compiled) is entirely voluntary on the part of the student, and that the student is not required to provide follow-up information on employment. In large part, this should be considered when examining the different percentages of registered students, the percentages that report employment and the percentages remaining on active files, many of whom may have obtained employment without reporting it. T his survey encompasse s University of South Florida seniors who graduated from August 1974 through June 1975. Only those students who registered with the Cooperative Education and Placement Office were surveyed for the placement and salary information contained in this report. This information was gathered from employer s, students and survey letters. Of 4,494* graduating students, 1,704 or 38% registered with the Cooperativ e Education and Placement Office. Of the 1,704 registered graduating students : 440 -26% -accepted positions 1,264 74% -remain on active file for ref err al The following is a breakdown of the 440 accepted positions: 134 30% -Education 258 -59% -Business and 44 _10% -Government 4 -1% -Non-profit Organizations 35 s tudent s enrolled in Graduate School and 3 students entered the Armed Forces. NOTE: Any questions concerning salary range, contact the Cooperative Education and Placement Office for explanation. *Including graduates from Colleges of Medicine and Nursing who did not register with the Cooperative Education and Placement Office. Arts & Letters e Mt Business Administration B: M : Education B : M : Etlllioeerina B: M: Fine Arts B : M: Natural Sciences B: M: Social & Behavioral Science s B : M : Sub-Total B : M : TOTAL B ac helor s degree t Master's degree I I Ph.D 2 3 Ph.D.'s l I Ph.D. '2 Ph.O.'s s Annual Salary -0 .8 11 E" "I! zo soo S6 661 39 982 542 IS9 34 117 10 333 47 807 140 3,SS9 868 4,427 SUMMARY .,, "C -e e "'"'"' 12S 2 S 91 16 430 6S 18 46 S66 S8 792 IS 117 73 I fl 32 17 IS I 10 96 29 9< 19 208 26 18 13 l ,SS9 44 14S 17 1,704 38% .g >. .8 fi ;;-e:s fr :E "c .. ..:z 3: "'"' 3: 19 IS 64S I II 837 143 33 796 7 39 1 000 109 19 8,()9()S 2S 32 9,ssss 69 S9 1,090 8 73 l,19S 29 69S 100 164 14 IS 674 6 66 944 28 13 690 s 28 870 387 2S S3 36 440 7 26% 4,427 graduates include three Bachelor of Independent Studies degrees and excludes the College s of Medicine and Nursing. 7 440 reporting jobs excludes tho se who reported positions but did not report salary Housing The housing program of the University is part of the total educational plan. Functional, pleasant living conditions con tribute to a student's s cholar ship, habits and attit udes. The residence hall program emphasizes attractive surrou ndings, opportunity for group activity, self-government, and counseling services of professional people. Provision of adequate living conditions is a responsibility shared by s tudent s, parents, and the University. Regularly enrolled students are eligible to live in University residence halls An application for a room in University resid e nce halls is sent with the Official Acceptance notification. Housing assignments are made without discrimination as to race, color, or national origin. Residence Halls Accommodations for students are available in the University's modern residence halls. Residences are completely airconditioned and provid e for the living, educational, social, and personal need s of students In general, rooms are furnished with beds, dressers, mirrors, desks, lamps, drapes and chairs In each living unit, of between 40 and 50 st udent s, a Res ident Assistant is available to as sis t students. A Resident Instructor for each hall is ayailable for personal and academic counseling. The University's residence halls are grouped in units called complexes The first completed complex-Argos-includes three residence hall s grouped around Argos Center, which serves as the living and dining room s of these halls. In addition to the lounges and cafeteria, Argos Cerlter has a recreati on room and conference rooms. The students residing in these halls live in study sleeping rooms. An outdoor swimming pool in this complex is also available for student use.

PAGE 27

Andros Complex-consisting of nine residence hallsprovides a different type of living arrangement for students. Suites are designed to accommodate eight students-two students sharing a bedroom, four students sharing a study room, and eight students sharing a bath In addition, each living unit has its own lounge. Andros Center is also considered the living and dining rooms of the students residing in this complex, and has most of the same facilities as the Argos Center. An outdoor swimming pool in this complex is also available for student use. Off-Campus Housing The Student Government office located in the University Center maintains a list of off-campus housing. Listings are accepted only from householders and landlords that do not discriminate because of race, color, or national origin Rental arrangements may best be made after personal inspection of facilities and conference with the householder before the University opens. Fall quarter arrangements may be made during the summer. Food Serv lce A variety of food plans are offered through a food service contractor. Several small dining rooms may be reserved by committees or special groups wishing to take their trays to a private place for luncheon or dinner meetings. University Center The University Center seeks to facilitate another dimension of the educational experience by providing an environment for informal association outside the classroom. It provides facilities, services, and programs to enhance the social, cultural, and recreational life of the Un i versity. The information service desk serves as the coordinating center for the numero1,1s and varied services and activities of the University Center and out-of-class student life. It is here that student organizations schedule facilities and request services for their various activities. The master schedule of all student activities is maintained at this location. Many of the University center facilities and services provide for personal and social needs The University Center has some fourteen meeting and conference rooms to be used by student organizations, and provide s facilities for the various services offered through the O ffi c e of Student Organizations and the Student Organization Service Center. For social activities, a ballroom is also located on the second floor The first floor of the University Center has four social lounges for relaxation, as well as a gallery lounge to exhibit student art work. Other facilities on this floor are a television lounge, cafeteria and coffee shop, a campus store, and student government offices. Student health services occupy the fourth floor of the University Center The basement level of the University Center is the recreational area. To be foun'd here are billiard tables, table tennis tables table soccer games as well as a table game room equipped with cards, and a variety of table games The crafts area has been expanded to include a large ceramics facility as well as leather work, copper enameling, macrame, candlemak ing, and numerous other small crafts. Photography labs are also located in this area of the University Center. Food Services, the Book Store, and Health Services operations are coordinated through their respective university administrative areas, while the other facilities and services are coordinated by the University Center Director's office. The University Center provides two professional Program mers and support staff to Student Government Productions, which is an agency whose purpose is to provide activities and entertainment to enhance the social and cultural development of the University community. STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS 25 Clubs and Other Organizations Students have formed clubs, organizations, and councils in almost every field of interest. New groups are being formed and will continue to de velop. Groups presently organized cover the most frequently desired kinds of activities. Professional staff members are available to assist individ uals in forming new organizations and also to assist in the advising of currently recognized groups. For further informa tion, please contact the Office of Student Organizations. Dance, Music, and Drama Clubs The excellent program in Fine Arts and its facilities, the Fine Arts Building, the University Theatre and the Theatre Centre, offer many opportunities for involvement of students, both those who major in this area and those from other colleges, in a number of activities and organizations. The Theatre department's production program is open to participation by students both on stage and off. Most of the performing organizations in the Music department welcome student participation and offer opp<>rtunities for instrumentalists and singers through its orchestras, l;iands, and choruses. CuHura Events Many of today's outstanding visual and performing artists are brought to the University of South Florida campus each year. The Artist Series provides unusual opportunities for experiencing the finest professional talents in Music, Dance; and Theatre The Exhibitions Program provides unusual op portunities to view many varied and significant works of art annually in the University's three galleries. These and other programs conducted by the Florida Center for the Arts significantly contribute to the education of students and the general vitality of the campus. In addition, the College of Fine Arts arranges a full schedule of concerts, plays, lectures, films, and workshops which feature students, faculty and visiting artists. The events are presented both during the day and in the evening. Many are free of charge. Most events are open to the general public. The University publishes a Calendar of Events which is available upon request to the Coordinator of Events, Florida Center fo.r the Arts, USF. Fraternities and Sororities There are currently 17 national fraternities and 10 national sororities functioning on campus. They carry out a program of social, education, service, and recreational activities for their members. Membership is open to any student, by invitation only. Their programs are coordinated through'the Interfraternity Council and the Panhellenic Council with the advice of faculty and staff members. The sororities are: Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Epsilon Phi, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Delta Sigma Theta, Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Delta and Zeta Phi Beta. The fraternities are: Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Tau Omega, Delta Tau Delta, Kappa Alpha Psi, Kappa Si11ma. Lambda Chi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Chi Omega; Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau Epsilon Phi, and Tau Kappa Epsilon. Religious Organizations The University has encouraged student religious organiza tions to develop associations and centers. Denominations have built centers in a reserved area on campus. The Episcopal Center was dedicated in the fall of 1962 and the Baptist Center in the spring of 1964. The Chapel followed in 1966. (This center is an

PAGE 28

26 STUQENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS ecumenical campus ministry of the following denominations: United Methodist, Presbyterian, and United Church of Christ). The Roman Catholic Center joined the others in the fall of 1967, in an adjacent location. Student religious organizations active on campus include: Bah a'i Club, Baptist Campus Ministry, Campus Crusade for Christ, Catholic Student Union (Newman Club), Christian Science Organization, Episcopal-Canterbury Club, Jewish Stu dent Union, The Navigators, Student Association of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Lutheran Student Organization The Chapel, and the Way Service and Honorary There are many organizations devoted to serving the University and the Tampa Bay Area. These Organiza tions are: Alpha Phi Omega, CAUSE, Circle K, Ethos, Gamma Sigma Sigma, and Tape Bank Service. Membership to Honorary Organizations is usually by invitation. Honorary Organizations at USF are: Beta Gamma Sigma, Gamma Theta Upsilon, Kappa Delta Pi, Lambda Alpha, Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Mu Epsilon, Phi Sigma, Tau Beta Pi, Themis, Phi Alpha Theta, Sigma Tau Delta, and Sigma Xi. Professional Fraternities Many profession-oriented groups exist at USF. These include: American Society of Personnel Administration, Phi Chi Theta (management), Delta Sigma Pi (business), Phi Beta Lambda (business), Phi Mu Alpha (music) Pi Sigma Epsilon (marketing), Psi Chi (psychology), Sigma Alpha Eta (Speech Pathology and Audiology), Sigma Alpha Iota (music), Sigma Delta Chi Uournalism), and Pi Sigma Alpha (government). Special Interest Organizations Students ha ve organized and continue to organize clubs and organizations covering a broad range of interests Included are Swimming Pool, Argos Center those oriented to academic majors, departments, and colleges; groups providing programs, information, and governmental experience; and associations of students with a common interest in a specific recreational, technical, ideological, or other area of special concern. Complete information is available at the Office of Student Organizations Recreational Sports The University of South Florida provides a variety of physical and recr eationa l activities designed to meet the needs and interests of students. Believing that a sound and complete education includes a proper balance of work and study with physical activity, the University program includes Intramural Sports competition, Sports Clubs, and other recreational activities, in addition to basic instructional programs in physical education. The activities represent a broad selection of sports ranging from those of a highly competiti11.e nature to those of a non competitive type and include individual, dual, team, and aquatic sports. Through participati on, students, faculty, and s taff will increase physical fitness, augment leisure time skills, and develop a wholesome attitude toward physical activity. The Intramural Sports Program emphasizes ac'tivities that are especially suited to the Florida climate. Competition is scheduled in such individual sports as swimming, tennis, track, badminton, golf, cross country, table tennis, bowling, billiards, handball, paddleball, wrestling and archery, as well as the team sports of soccer, touch football, basketball, volleyball, and softball. Competition is sc heduled through fraternal societies, residence halls, and independent divisions. Team awards are presented The Sports Club Program includes groups of students, fjlculty. and staff who have a special interest in a particular sports activity They are organized for the purpose of increasing skills and augmenting knowledge through a continuing in-service training and competitive program. Each sports club is assisted by the coordinator of sports clubs in the selection of a faculty advisor and the initial organization of the club is governed by

PAGE 29

University regulations. Students with special sports abilities or interests are encouraged to make them known so that when sufficient need and interest warrant, new sports clubs may be formed Present clubs include: bicycle bowling, fencing, gymnastics, judo, karate lacrosse, rugby sailing, soccer, sports car scuba, sports parachute, water skiing, weight lifting, and yoga. The Special Events Program is geared to provide the University community with a variety of informal recreational activities. Some of the activities are : open tournaments splash parties, picnics, camping, boating coed activities, and other special project activities related to the development of campus recreation. Intercollegiate Athletics The University of South Florida fields intercollegiate teams in baseball, basketball, golf soccer, swimming, and tennis. The University is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and competes in the University-I level of competi tion. Schedules are arranged to include quality competition which reflects the high standards of the University. Women's athletics are encouraged The University of South Florida is also a member of the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women and competes in quality competition in the following sports: Golf, Basketball, Swimming, Softball, Tennis, and Volleyball Schedules in all competition are arranged with regionally and nationally ranked teams. STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS 27 Student Publications The University has encouraged a program of campus com munication through two publications These publications are all U niversity in approach and coverage. They are staffed by students under the general supervision of the Office of Student Publications A 5-column tabloid campus newspaper, The Oracle, is published four times weekly, Tuesdays through Friday during Quarters I, II, and III, and twice weekly, Tuesday and Thursday, during Quarter IV Containing 16 to 20 pages in each issue, it provides professional experience for those students interested in journalism. Any student interested in working on the newspaper in any capacity is not only encouraged but urged to participate Omnibus, a quarterly magazine, is published during Quarters I, II and III as a supplement to The Oracle. Omnibus 1 is a tabloid magazine containing general interest features and photos produced by students Omnibus 11 (The South Florida Review) is a literary magazine containing prose, poetry, photography, and artwork contributed by students and other members of the University community. Omnibus 111 provides a pictorial review of campus activities and events during the academic year. Interested students are invited to apply for staff positions on either campus publication as well as make contributions to the quarterly Development Alumni The purposes of the University's Development/Alumni Office are as follows : I. To identify private resources to ensure excellence and the continued expansion and de ve lopment of selected new programs at USF for which State resources are either not available or not available in quantities to meet program objectives 2 To identify and effectively relate to the University's various advancement constituencies (Alumni, Parents, President s Council, Friends of the Library University Circle, and Athletic Boosters) through the maintenance of a quality communication program, a variety of social/cultural events, involvement in programs and functions on the University campuses and a variety of fund-raising activities. Division of University Studies The Division of University Studies contains the offices of New Student Reiations, Admissions and Academic Advising The Division is responsible for assisting USF students at the point of initial contact in the community, during the process of admission at the undergraduate or graduate levels and until a choice of academic major is made As an administrative "home" for the USF undergraduate student who has not yet declared an academic major, the Division is a facility where the student receives the information, services, and counsel necessary for effective decision-making in regard to his or her academic and professional future. It is through the offices of this Division that high school students seek early admission, effect dual enrollment between high schools and community colleges and the University, and receive academic advisement until such time as they have chosen a major The Division provides information and special services for minority students and those who are above the traditional college age. Referrals to other student service units are freely made as the Division seeks to insure that all USF undergraduate students will progress toward graduation with optimal use of their time, interests, abilities, and the resources of the University Office of Academic Advising The centralized academic advising office of the Division of University Studies is primarily concerned with the assistance of new lower level students and students who have not selected an academic major. The office also serves as an initial point of contact for prospective students who are unfaniliar with the University structure and who need academic information about this institution Since the decision about a major affects many aspects of a student's present and future life ,'lhe advisers in the Division maintain close liaison with other areas so they will be better equipped to use information from them in. relation to the function of academic advising. Some of these resources are the college advising offices the Counseling Center for Human Development, the Division of Cooperative Education and Placement, and Financial Aids The advising office houses a Special Services Program which is concerned with the implicit as well as the explicit needs of minority students. This program's responsibility is to help these students get whatever assistance they need in addition to their academic advisement This office is also responsible for checking requirements for the Associate of Arts Certificates Office of New Student Relations The Office of New Student Relations assists prospective students, high school guidance counselors parents and the general public in securing information about the University of

PAGE 30

28 STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT AFFAIRS South Florida and its programs. Members of the New Student Relations staff represent USF at high school and college Career Education Programs throughout th e State of Florida. Special programs are initiated to meet the needs and interests of prospective students. Among these activities are pr es entations and preparation of printed information relevant to high sc hool students, mature students, a nd minority students; semi nars for high school counselors; and campus Visitation Days for prospective students. These programs frequently represent a cooperative effort with other University divisions, public school systems, and community colleges in the local area. Invitations from schools, civic organizations and youth groups for information and presentations about the University of South Florida are welcomed This office also serves as an initial point of contact for prospective students who are unfamiliar with the University and who are seeking general information about any aspect of the institution. Services include pre-admission counseling for high school students, minority group members and mature, non traditional college age individuals. New Student Relations in conjunction with the Admissions Office and other University units administers the Early Admission, Dual Enrollment New Student Orientation and FOCUS: YOU AND USF programs New Student Orientation Program At the beginning of each quarter prior to the beginning of classes, all new full-time undergraduate students are expected to participate in the orientation program of the University Normally a one-day program orientation is designed to help new students become acquainted with the University and includes academic advising. Students cleared for Quarter I (September) admission are urged to participate in FOCUS: YOU AND USF a s pecial su mmer orientation-early registration program, in lieu of orientation prior to the beginning of classes. Office of Veterans Affairs An Office of Veterans Affairs is maintained on the Tampa, St. Petersburg, Sarasota, and Ft. Myers campuses This Office directs the Univer sity's PAVE program which stands for Programs to Advance Veterans Education All veterans, veteran dependents, and ac tive duty personnel can utilize the services of the Office. Highlights of the PA VE program include veterans pre -ad missions counseling, and v eterans benefits advising. The VA Certification section of the Registrar's Office processes c;nrollment certifi cations to the Veterans Administration Addi tionally, a VA Representative is on-campus to provide VA benefit assistance a nd so lve VA payment and certification problems Florida s tate law provides for a 60-day deferment of tuition a nd regi s trati o n fees for s tudents utilizing the G .I. Bill. VA stude nt s m ay use the deferment during every quarter of their enrollment. The Vet-to-Vet Tutorial Program affords VA students the opportunity for tutoring in needed subject areas. Under the G l. Bill, students can receive up to $60 per month for a maximum of $720 to pay for a tutor who may also be a veteran. There is the opportunity for developmental course work and GED certification on-campus and through cooperative efforts with the Hillsborough Community College and the Hill s borough County Adult Education programs Active referral i s made for finan cial ass i sta n ce, student job placement, student housing career planning and academic advising As a Servicemen 's Opportunity College, USF encourages active-duty per son nel to participate in PAVE. For information on Bootstrap, Degree Completion, and Tuition Assistance, st udent s s hould fir s t check with their local military education se rvices office Student Services Building

PAGE 31

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS A 'ND SERVICES The Office of Records & Regi stratio n, a dep ar tm ent of the Registrar' s Office, maintains the official academic record s for all students and course registrations for currently enrolled st ud ents. Students are encouraged to contact the Office of Record s and Registration about general questions concerning Ac ademic Policie s a nd Procedures or an inquiry concerning their current. registration or academic record. Note: Each stude nt mus t be aware of the University's Academic Policies and Procedures in so far as they affect him or her. Academic Regulatio ns and Information Quarter System The University of South Florida operate s on a Quarter syste m with the academic year running from September through Augu st. Quarters begin in September January, March and June on the dates indicated on pp 4-5. Academic Load The maximum load for an undergraduate st udent is 18 hours unless approval is received from t he Dean of the student's college or an authorized representative Students classified as undecided must receive approval of the Director of the Division of University Studies The minimum load for a student to be considered academically full-time is 12 hours for an under graduate and 8 hours for a graduate student. Availability of Courses The University does not commit itself to o"ffer all the courses, programs and majors listed in thi s cata log unless there is sufficient demand to justify them. Some courses, for example, may be offered only in alternate quarters or years, or even less frequently if there is little demand Adds After a student has completed his regi s trat i on on the date assigned to him, he may add courses until the Add" deadline as specified in the academic ealendar Add Forms may be picked up and turned in at the College offering the course. Drops A s tudent may drop a cours e or courses b y following the appropriate procedure s below: 1. Early DropiAdd Period (Regular R egis tration ) Onl y students who have participated in Early Regist ra tion may drop courses during this period The appointment time, as published in the Unive rsi ty Class Schedule, must b e followed. Students dropping cour ses during thi s time are entitled to a full refund of fees. No entry of the courses will appear on any records. 2. Regular Drop/Add Period (First week of classes) Coinplete and turn in a drop form at the college offering the course These drops are treated the same as drops processed during the Early Drop/Add Period (Regular Registration) 3. Between the second and sixth week of classes Students should turn in a drop form at the college offering 29 the course. Students w ho drop after the first week of classes must pay reg istration fees for tho se courses. Their records will reflect a "W" grade for the dropped course(s). Courses dropped after the six week deadlin e (see Acade mi c Calendar for date) will result in an automatic "F" grade Auditing Privilege A student may audit a course by following the ap pro priate procedure below I During Early R egis t ra tion Enter th e cou rse informa tion and reference number on the course request form and also on the audit form whic h may be obtained at the Problem Station. Submit both the course request form a nd audit form to your College Advising Office : 2 During Regular Registration Enter the course information and reference number on the registration form and check the ''audit" block. Submit the top copy of the form to the approving clerk 3 During Late Registration (First week of classes) Obtain an audit form from the Office of Records and R egistration and request the instructor to sign the completed form. Submit the form to the Office of Records and Registration or the College Advising Office by the l ast date to add classes (see Academic Calendar for date). Fees are charged at the same rate as credit courses. Cancellation Before First C lass Day Stude n ts may cancel their registration by notifying the Office of R ecords & Registration prior to the first day of classes If fees ha ve a lr eady been paid, the student will receive a full refund of fees. Withdrawal A student may withdraw from the University wit hout penalty for th e first six weeks of any term by submitting a completed Withdrawal form to the Office of Records & Registration After that date, grades of "F" will automatically be assigned for all cour se work Students )Vho withdraw during the add period as stated in th e academic calendar may receive a full refund of fees. No refund is allowed after this period except for s pecified reasons. See 'Refund of Fees" under Financial Information for complete detail s Any s tud e nt who withdraws a second time within four consecutive quarters of attendance must receive approval of the coordinator o f Advising from his college before he is allowed to re-enter the University

PAGE 32

30 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES Transcript Information Transcripts of a student's USF academic record may be requested by the student through the Office of Records & Registration. A student's academic record can only be released upon authorization of the student. Students requesting transcripts may do so in person or by writing to the Office of Records & Registration Include in the request full name, social security number, a nd date of birth, and indicate name and address to whom the transcript is to be sent. If grades for the current term are needed, clearly indicate that the transcript request is to be held for grades. No charge Is made for transcripts Grades, Scholarship Requirements, and Review Procedures The University is interested in each s tudent making reasonable progress towards his or her educational goals and will aid each student through guidanc e and faculty advising To make students aware of their academic progress, the University has enacted a system of grading and policies of Academic Warning and Disqualification which indicates whether or not a student is showing sufficient progress toward s meeting degree require ments Notations of Grades, Academic Warning, and Dis qualification are po sted to the s tudent's permanent record. When a student is disqualified from the University, not eligible to re-enroll, it may be in his or her best interest to re evaluate his educational goals with an academic adviser in his college. If the student's poor academic performance has resulted from extenuating circumstances or if after a period of time the student feels he or she h as gained adequate maturity and motivation, he may petition the Academic Regulations Commit tee for readmission See "Academic Regulations Committee for information on petitioning. Grading System A student's measure of academic achievement i s recorded on hi s permanent record b ased on the following grading system: A-Superior performance 8-Excellent p erformance C-Average performan ce D--8elow average performance, but passing F-Failure S-Satisfactory U-Unsatisfactory W-Withdrawal from course without p1:nalty H-Honors (Medical stu dent s only) I-Incomplete N-Audit Grade Point Average The University has a four-point system of grading used in computing grade point averages (A=4 grade points, 8=3, C=2, D=l, F=-0. ) The grad e point average is com puted by dividing the total number of quality points by the total hours attempted at the University of South Florida. The total qu ali ty points are figured by multiplying the number of credits assigne d to each course by the quality point value of the gra de given. Grades of S, U, I and grades which are follow ed by an R (indicating a repeat) are subtracted from the total hours attempted. S/U Grade System No-option Courses. Certain courses have been designated as S/U courses The "S" a nd "U" grades are used to indicate the student's final grade These S/U only co urse s are identified with (S/U only) after the course definition i n this book. No grading system option is available to students or faculty in these courses. Option Courses Any undergraduate course may be taken on an S/U basis by a student under the following conditions and restrictions : I. Required courses in the m aj or may not be taken on an S/U basis 2. Specifically designated required courses in the Distribution Requirements of the st udent's college may not be taken on an S/U basis. 3. All elective courses for the major and all elective courses in the Distribution Requirements, and all other free elective courses may be taken on an S/U basis except where: a. The certifying college restricts the number of courses which may be taken on an S/U basis in any one or all of the above areas or restricts the total number of S/U courses which can be accepted for all of the above areas. b. The certifying college specifies that certain courses may not be taken on an S/U basis c. The instructor of a course refuses to allow the course to be taken on an S/U basis Mechanism for Assigning SIU Grades The method by which a student receives an "S" or "U" grade in an option course will consist of the following: I A written agreement signed by both instructor and student shall be filed with such offices as may be designated by the College The college shall set the deadline (no later than the last day of classes for the term) for the student to decide if he wishes to take the course on an S/U bas is. 2. The instructor shall assign final letter grades A, 8, C, D, F, or I, but will transmit to the Registrar S or U consistent with the following: a l'.etter grades A 8, or C, shall be equivalent to a letter grade of "S" b Letter grades D or F shall be equivalent to a letter grade of "U". "I" Grading Policy An "I" grade may be awarded only when a small portion of the student's work is incomplete and only when the student is otherwise earning a passing grade. Until removed, the "1" is not computed in the grade point average for either undergraduate or graduate students. Th e time limit for removing the "1" is to be s et by the instructor of the course Normally this would be by the end of the quarter following the one in which the grade is given; for undergraduate students thi s time limit may not exceed three quarters and/or t ime of graduation, whichever comes first. "I" grades not removed by the end of the time limitation will revert to grades of U or "F", whic hever is appropriate. Students do not re-register for cours es in which they are only completing previous course requirements to change an "I" grade If a student wants to audit a course for review in order to complete course requirements, full fees must be paid Forgiveness Policy A' student may repeat a course and have only his latest grade computed into his grade point average. However, this is not an automatic process. The student must complete a "Repeat Course Waiver" form in the Office of Records & Registration for each repeated course and a dhere to the following restric tions: I. The Policy applies even if the latest grade is lower than the first.

PAGE 33

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 31 2 A student may repeat any course once. In order to repeat a course more than once, the student must receive prior approval from the dean of his college or the Director of the Division of University Studies, if appropriate. 3. The policy is applicable to undergraduate students only Once a baccalaureate degree is earned, a student may not repeat an undergraduate course and receive a waiver. 4. In cases where the course prefix, number, hours, or title a re different, the student must receive approval from the college dean verifying equivalence of the course. 5 The repeat course must be taken under the standard grading system (A, B, C, D & F). 6. All grades will remain on the transcript. The original course grade will be annotated with an "R" to indicate that the course has subsequently been repeated and the original grade is not computed in the grade point average. Academic Warning Status and Disqualification An undergraduate student who falls below : 1.500 and the quarter hours attempted are less than 45; or 1. 700 a11d the quarter hours attempted are between 45 and 89 ; will be placed on Academic Warning. All students on Academic Warning who do not raise their cumulative Grade Point Average equal to or above the average in either of the above (whichever is appropriate) within the next term enrolled will be placed on Final Academic Warning. Should the student's Grade Point Average fall below 2.000 while hi s quarter hours attempted are more than 89, he will be placed on Final Academic Warning. A student on Final Academic Warning must earn at least a 2.000 average the next quarter he is enrolled. Failure to do so will disqualify the student from continued attendance at the University. If a student withdraws while on Final Academic Warning, he i s automatically disqualified and must petition and sec ure approval of the Academic Regulations Committee for reentry. A student w h o fails to have a 2.000 cumulative Grade Point Average after attempting 135 quarter hours is automatically disqualified A disqualified student must petition and secure approval of the Academic Regulation s Committee before readmission. This rule ove"ides all others. A disqualified student seeking to gain readmission must apply to the Academic Regulation s Committee through the Office of Records & Regi s tration Any student who is re admitted to the University directly following Disqualification will be placed immedi a tely on a Final Academic Warning status. A student who attends another college or university during this intervening period will be classified as a transfer student and readmission will be based on the total record accumulated from all colleges and universities attended. Graduate students should refer to the section on Graduate Studies for discussion of minimum academic standards. Class Standing A student's class is determined by the number of credits he has earned without relation to his grade point average. 0 Special/Unclassified Non-degree seeking students 1 Freshman 0 through 44 quarter hours passed 2 Sophomore 45 through 89 quarter hours passed 3 Junior 90 through 134 quarter hours passed 4 Senior 135 or more quarter hours passed, however no baccalaureate degree earned here or elsewhere 5 Baccalaureate degreeholder working on a second Under graduate program 6 Graduate student admitted to master's Degree Program 7 Graduate student admitted to Specialist Degree Program 8 Graduate student admitted to a Doctor al Degree Program 9 Profe ss ional Program (M.D ) Admission to a College All new lower lev e l s tudents must be initially advised b y the Division of University Studies. After that time, a st udent may declare a major and move to a degree granting college. (Each college has specified in thiS' catalog its requirements for admission.) All undecided students a re assigned to the Division of University Studies for purpo ses of advising until a choice of major is made. At that time, he/she may enter the college containing the major department. Undecided students may remain in this classification until a maximum of 135 quarter hours are earned After that time, a major must be se l ected. Change of Major Change of Undergraduate Major: Undergraduate students de sir ing to change their major should consult the Advising Office in the old and new college(s) of their interest. Change of Graduate Program: Graduate s tudent s desiring to change their program must complete an "Application for Graduate Change of Program available in the Office of Records and Regist ra tion Students will be notified by the Office of Record s a nd Registration of the college's decision concerning their acceptance into the new progr am. Change of Graduate Degree: Graduate students desirous of changing from one degree level to another (i.e. M A. to Ph.D.) must make application in the Office of Admissions Please refer to page 12 for further details. Pending Status A student may be placed on "Pending" by failing to meet obligation s to the Universit y. When a st udent is on Pending, he may not be allowed to register, receive a diploma, or receive a transcript. Settlement of financial accounts must be made at the University Cashier's Office. Each student placed on Pending s hould determine from the Office of Record s and Regi s tration w hich office placed him in this status and clear the pending obligation with that office. Hamilton Center, Sarasota Campus

PAGE 34

32 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICE S Student Information Changes Notifications regarding change of address, change of naqie, change in marital status, change in residency, and change of should be filed promptly wit h the Office of Records & Registration Final Examination There is no final examination period Examinations in academic subjects are considered to be an integral part of the learning process and are not, therefore, separate from other aspects of the academic experience. Each USF teacher determines the entire grade for students in his or her sections. If the instructor desires to administer a final examination, this must be done only during the regular class period s. Honors Convocation As one way of emphasizing distinguished ac ademic achievement by students, the University of South Florida holds an Honors Convocation each fall quarter to recognize those undergraduate students who have met the following: A. A USF grade point average of 3.5 or above for all completed USF hours; B. A minimum of 16 USF graded (A-F) hours and enrolled in at least two of the preceding 4 quarter s; C. No incomplete grades s hall be eligible for honors co nvocation Dean's List Full-time undergraduate s tudent s who demonstrat e su perior academic ;i.chievement during one quarter will be honored on a "Dean's List". To be eligible for the Dean's list, a student must be in a "pool" ( defined hereafter) and must complete 12 hours of graded (A-F) OSF courses with no incomplete grade s during the quarter. The "pool" consists of all st udents who have regi ste red for at least 12 hours of USF courses in a given quarter. The Dean's lis t shall consist of the fewer of: 1) the upper 10% of the enrollment of the college, or 2) students in the college with a USF 3 5 GPA or above (ties at the 90th percentile will be included io the honor s group ) The Dean of the College in which the student is m ajoring will award a certificate of r ecogn ition of this academic honor. Although DUS is a non-academic unit, students with this classification who meet the above criteria shall be awarded a certificate similar to the college award. Academic Regulations Committee --The Academic Regulations Comm ittee meets regularly to review petition s submitte d by students to waive certain academic regul ations. Students must petition and secure a pproval of the committee to return to th e Unive rsi ty after having been disqualified from further immediate attendance or for reasons p ertaining to admission, registration, withdrawal and deadline policies. The committee normally meet s once a week To petition the committee, a student must secure the appropriate form from the Office of Records & Regis tration. Completed forms s hould be returned to the Office of Records & Registration by 5 :00 p.m., Friday, to b e reviewed at the next we e k's meeting Students will receive notific at ion of the committee's action the following week. If the student wishes a personal intervie w with the committee he should make arrangements with the representative from his c ollege prior to su bmitting hi s petition. Student Academic Grievance Procedure Student academic grievance procedures exist'at USF to provide students the opportunity for objective review of facts and events p e rtinent to the cause of academic grievances. Such review is accomplished in a collegial, non-judicial atmosp here rather than a n adversary one, and allows the parties involved to participate An Academic Grievance Committee, composed of an equal number of faculty and s tu dent members, exists in each college (except the College of Medicine, which has establis hed a separate procedure) for t he general purpose of consider ing student academic grievances a nd making recommenda tions based on thes e consider ations to the dean of the college in which the alleged grievance occurred. Student Violations or Offenses Involving Alleged Academic Dishonesty Violations of academic code s cheating and plagiarism will be handled initially by th e instructor who will discuss the incident with the student. If the instructor decides that further action is warranted he will inform the stude nt of the action that he is recommending to his department chairper son and the dean

PAGE 35

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 33 The instructor will file a confidential statement and recommendation through the department chairperson and with the dean of the college responsible for the course, and will provide the student with a copy of that statement. The student, if dissatisfied with the instructor's recommen dation, may ask for a meeting with the instructor the department chairperson, and the dean indicating his version of the incident. The final disposition of all cases of academic dishonesty rests with the dean Of the college responsible for the course. In reaching a decision, the dean may accept the instructor's recommendation or, if not satisfied after reviewing the statement of the instructor and the student, may request meetings with the student, instructor, and department chairperson individually or jointly The dean may also appoint a student-faculty committee for advice prior to rendering a decision in the case. The student may also request of the dean that such an advisory panel be formed. If the issue remains open at the end of the quarter, the instructor is to give the student an "I" grade in the course until all issues are resolved. Once the dean has made a decision on the case, the student's right of appeal is to the Vice President for Academic General Distribution All standard transfert A.A degree holders (from in-state or out of-state accredited institutions) will be consid ered as having met our General Distribution Requirements and 90 quarter hours of work will be transferred. The determination of the prerequisites for a given academic program will remain the prerogative of the college in which the student is majoring. A wide distribution of academic areas should be a part of a formal university education. For that reason, the following distribution requirements must be satisfied over the four-year period by the completion of 60 hours with at least eight hours in each of these f.ive area: Area IEnglislt Composition Freshtnan English (ENG 098 or IOI and 102, 103) Area 11-' Fine Arts and Humanities American Studies (AMS), Ancient Studies (ANC) Art (ART), Classics* (CLS) Dance (DAN) ; English (ENG -Excluding 098-103), Humanities (HUM) History of Ideas (HII), Any foreign language (ARA, FRE, FOL, GER, GRE, HEB, ITA, LAT, POR, ROM, RUS SPA)*, Introductio11 to Linguistics" (LIN 301), "Language and Meaning" (LIN 321), Music (MUS), Philosophy (PHI-Excluding PHI 303) Religion (REL), Speech (SPE), Theatre (TAR) Area III-Mathematics and Quantitative Methods "Business and Economic Statistics (ECN 231, 331) Computer Service Courses (ESC), Mathematics (MTH), Logic" (PHf 303), "Social Science Statistics" (SSI 30 I) Area IV-Natural Sciences Astronomy (AST) Biology (BIO), Botany (BOT), Chemistry (CHM), Geology (GL Y), Microbialogy '(MIC), "Introduction to Oceanography" (MSC 311), Natural Sciences (NAS), Physical Sciences (PHS), Physics (PHY), Zoology (ZOO) Area V-Social and Behavioral Sciences Afro-American Studies (AFA), Aging Studies (AGE), Anthropology Criminal Justice (CJP), temporary Econonlics Problems" (ECN 100), Eduq1tional Psychology" (EDF 377), Geography (GPY), History (HTY) Politica1 Science (POL), Psychology (PSY), Sociology (SOC) Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (SSI-Excluding SSI 301), Women's Studies (WSP) Acceptable in the total of 60 quarter hours but not part of any of the five areas: Senior Seminar" (CBS 401), a general elective open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors; "The Te a cher in a World of Work" (EDY 207); and "Us e of the Library (LLI 200). Since each college may recommend specific courses for the satisfaction of each area students should consult the distribution requirements as listed in e a ch college section of the catalog Courses required for a student's major program** will not be counted in the total of 60 hours although areas of the general distribut'ion requirements may be waived where appropriate No more than 12 hours in a s ingle department may be counted toward distribution requirements for any area. A student may appeal to the Coerdinator of Advising in his or her college for exceptions to these courses prior to registration in such courses. A student must check with his/her college to be sure he/she is meeting general distribution requirements and specia l certification or requirements where appropriate. Freshman English Requirement in Freshman Year All first-time-in-college students are required to take Freshman English in accordance with the following conditions : I First time enrolled students (a) who do not intend to take the CLEP Freshman English Test or (b) who have been notified of failing CLEP prior to registration and who do not intend to attempt the examination a secortd time, must take ENG 101 the first quarter ENG 102 the second quarter and ENG 103 the third quarter of their freshman year. If one of the courses is failed that course must be repeated the very next quarter and the remaining courses attempted in immediately s ub s equent quarters 2 First-time enrolled s tudents (a) who have not taken CLEP prior to their arrival on campus or (b) who have failed but wish to repeat th e test, must attempt CLEP during their first quarter on campus. During this quarter they should not enroll in ENG IOI. If the e x amination is failed or not attempted during the student's fir s t quarter, he must take ENG IOI during his second quarter and ENG 102 and 103 in the immediately subsequent quarters until the total req u irement is fulfilled In this case, he will complete the sequence by the first quarter of his sophomore These policies do not apply to first time enrolled students who can meet the Fi;.eshman English requirement with credit transferred from another ins titution. Credit by Examination A student who feels he has already acquired the basic content of a course on his approved schedule should inquire about credit by-examination. Some exams are offered through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and ethers may be offered within departments Interested students should obtain additional information from their advisers or the Office of Testing and Advanced Placement. College of Engineering is unable to accept these courses as a part of its engineering accredited program Major Program a Specialization : Those courses required to give the studen t academic concentration and baccalaureate identification such as Mathematics Accounting Psychology, etc b. Supporting or Related : These courses may be prerequisites to the specialization courses or they may support specialized courses by giving preparation or breadth to the area of specialization These courses are often referred to as college or program core courses c Program Electives : These are usually a broad band of courses offered by the college offering the major to further enrich the student in the general academic field of the major. tAs defined in the Florida Statewide Articulation Agreement Note: Education majors must take cours e s in at least two different departments under Areas ll and V.

PAGE 36

34 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES Graduation Requirements-Baccalaureate Degree University Requirements While each college sets specific requirements for graduation, the basic University requirements must be met by every student upon whom a degree is conferred. These basic requirements specify that a student obtain at least 180 quarter hours of credit with at least a "C" average for all University of South Florida courses attempted in order to be eligible for graduation At least 60 of his quarter hours must be for upper division level work (courses numbered 300 or above). In addition to specific requirements of their major and College, candidates for Graduation must also satisfy the University General Distribution Requirements and be recom mended for graduation by the dean of the college granting the degree. Major Fields of Study The University of South Florida offers curricula leading to the baccalaureate degree in the following fields The degree is indicated in parenthesis after each college ; the major code, after each major. College of Arts and Letters: (B.A.) American Studies (AMSi Anthropology-Linguistics (ANL) Classics (Latin or Latin-Greek) (CLS) Classics and Foreign Langaage (CLF) English (ENG) English-Linguistics (ENL) Foreign Language-Linguistics (FLL) Foreign Languages (combination) (FOL) French (FRE) German (GER) Humanities (HUM) Italian (IT A) Liberal Studies (ALA) Mass Communications (COM ) Philosophy (PHI) Religious Studies (REL) Russian (RUS) Spanish (SPA) Speech Communication (SPE) Speech Communication-English (ENS) Speech Communication-Theatre (ST A) College of Business Administration: (B.A.) Accounting (ACC) Economics (ECN) Finance (FIN) General Business Administration (GBA) Management (MAN) Marketing (MKT) College of Education: (B.A.) Art Education (EDA) Botany Education (BOE ) Business and Office Education (VBU) Chemistry Education (CHE) Classics Education (CLE) Distributive Education (VDE) Elementary-Early Childhood (EEC) Elementary Education (EDE) English Education (ENE) Exceptional Child Education Emotionally Disturbed (EMO) Mental Retardation (MRD) Specific Learning Disabilities (SLD) Foreign Language Education (FOE) Health Education (HEN) Humanities Education (HUE) Industrial-Technical Education (VIT) Mass Communications-English Education (MCE) Mathematics Education (MAE) Music Education (EDMJ Physical Education (EDP) Physics Education (PHE) Science Education (SCE) Social Science Education (SSE) Speech Communication-English Education (SEE) Zoology Education (ZOE) College of Engineering Engineering (EGU) (B.S.E.) Engineering Science (EGC) (B.S.E.S.) Engineering Technology (ETK) (B.E.T.) College of Fine Arts: (B.A.) Art (ART ) Dance ( DAN ) Music (MUS) Theatre (TAR) College of Natural Sciences: (B.A., B.S.) Astronomy (AST) Biology (BIO) Botany (BOT) Chemistry (CHM) B.A. Chemistry (CHS) B.S Clinical Chemistry (CHC) Geology (GL Y) Mathematics (MTH) Medical Technology (MET) Microbiology (MIC) Natural Sciences Interdisciplinary (INS) Physics (PHY) B.A. Physics (PHS) B.S Zoology (ZOO) College of Nursing: (B.S.) Nursing (NUR) College of Social and Behavioral Sciences: (B.A., B.S.W.) Afro-American Studies (AFAJ Anthropology (ANT) Criminal Ju stice (CJP) Economics (ECN) Geography (GPY) History (HTY) International Studies (INT) Political Science (POL) Psychology (PSYJ Social Science Interdisciplinary (SSI) Social Work (SOK) (B.S.W.) Sociology (SOC)

PAGE 37

ACADEM,IC AND PROCEDURES PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 35 Students' Choice of Catalog . In order to graduate from the Univer s ity of South Flori d a each student must meet all of the graduatfon requirement s specified in the USF of his/her choice The student may choose any USF c a talog published during his/her continuous enrollment Studen ts who ha v e transferred from one Florida public institution to another a re affe cted by the following Board of Regent s poli c y : Graduation requirements in effect at the receiving SUS institution a t the time a s tudent enrolls at a Flo rida public ins titut i on of higher learning shall apply to that student in the s ame m a nner that graduation require ments a pply to its n a tive students provided the s tudent h as had continuou s enrollment as defined in tlie SUS insti t ution's catalog.' At the Univer s ity of South Florida, continuou s enrollment is defined as c ompleting a minimum of two terms per year at USF inclusive of receipt of grade s for courses, through time of graduation. Therefore students cannot choose a USF catalog published prior to or during a n academic ye a r in which they did not complete at least two terms. Each catalog is con s idered to be publi s hed during the academic ye a r printed on the title page If the s tudent cannot meet all of the gr a duation require ments s pecified in the catalog of his / her choice due to decision s and change s by the University in policy matters course offerings, etc ., approp r iate substitution s will be dete rmined by the chairman of the department or program of the s tudent's major. University policies are subject to change and apply to all students regardless of their choice of catalog If the stud ent's graduation requirements are affected by changes in Uni v ersity policies a ppropriate arrangements will be made to preclude penalization of the student Repeat Course Work The hour s for a course which has been repeated may be counted only once toward the minimum 180 quarter hours of credit requ i red for graduation Two Degrees Two degrees of the same rank, e.g. B.A and B S will not be conferred upon the same individual unless the second degree represents at least 45 credits of additional work with the necessary requirements of the college awarding the degree and the residency requi r ement. Second Baccalaureate (first received at another institution) Student s already graduated from a ccredited four-year institu tions who a pply for admission to work toward another undergraduate degree must meet the University' s regular graduation requirements A minimum of 45 quarter hour s must be earned in on-campus courses to apply toward his degree and the student must meet the requirements of the college a warding the d e gree and the residency requirement. B.A. Degree for Medical and Dental Students Student s who are admitted to a medical or dental school after completing their junior year at USF may be awarded th e B.A degree in Interdisciplinary N a tural Sciences from the College of Natural Sciences (See College of Natural Sciences on 111.) Academic Residence C a ndid a te s mus t b e re comm ende d for g ra duation by the de a n of the college granting their degree and must have completed at lea s t 45 hour s of th e las t 90 hour s of their undergraduate credit in onc ampu s c ourse s. The of the de a n of the college granting their d e gre e mus t be s e c ured for any transfer credits offered for a ny p a rt of th es e l as t 90 hour s Excepti o n s to th e abo v e rule s a re s tudent s who are enrolled a t other uni v er s itie s o n appro v ed exchange programs Coopera tiv e Education s tud e nts e nrolled in other institutions (prior approval having been sec ured from their USF advisers) while on their training periods and s tudent s t a king corre s pondence work from the Uni ve r s ity of Florid a Cand i dates a t the gr a du a t e l e v e l s hould refer to the residency requirements on page 48. Application for Graduation To b e con side red for g ra duation a s tudent must s ubmit an Applic a tion for D e gree" to the Office of Records & Regi s tr a tion within the fir s t 15 cl a ss d a y s of the term in which he expect s to gr a du a t e. The ap plic a tion form i s available in the Office of R e cord s & R egis tration (Inquiries regarding approval or denia l s hould be m a d e to th e c oll e ges ) A student applying for a second und e rgraduate major must do s o within the same d e adlin e s et for a pplying for a degree. Double Undergraduate Major Student s m a y ele ct t o g r adu a te w ith two major s In that event, they mus t appl y ind e pendently to ea ch college and be assigned an advi s er in ea ch dis cip line T h e s tudent must meet all requir e ments of ea ch major s epa ra tel y a nd mus t b e certified for graduation by th e a ppropr ia te de a n( s ) Second Undergraduate Major Once a s tud en t r ece i ves a s pecific under g raduate degree (e.g B.A ., B S ) a t the Univ ersity o f South Florida, he/she cannot recei v e a second identical degr ee . However the student may apply to work for a s econd m a jor through the Admissions Offic e. (Exceptio11 s to thi s rul e are s tudent s who had been a ccepted for a "Do ubl e Undergraduate Major but graduated with only on e m a jor.) A student m a y not work on a second undergradu a t e major if he / she ha s been accepted into a graduate program After ac c eptance by the a ppropriate college and proof of completion the s tudent's pe r mane nt academic record" will be posted acco r dingly Commencement Commencement c e remonie s at USF are held once a year in June following the end of the Spring quarter All students who have graduated the previou s Summer F all, and Winter quarters and candidate s for degree s for the Spring quarter are eligible to partic i p a te Inform a tion for tho se eligible will be mailed to them during the Spring qu a rter If information has not been received by e a rly May th e student should contact the Office of Records & Registr a tion Undergr a duate student s who anticipate gradu ating t he subsequent Summer quart e r may participate but must contact the Offic e of Rec ords & Regi s tration for information Honors at Graduation Any baccal a ureate ca ndid a t e whos e o v erall grade point average at USF i s 3 5 or high e r s hall be c onsider e d for honors In a ddition, tr a nsf e r s tudents to b e eligible for honors must have a

PAGE 38

3 6 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES grade point average of 3.5 or higher when combined with all work attempted at other institutions Candidates with a GPA of 3.5 but below 3.71 shall receive a diploma designation of "cum laude Candidates with a GPA of 3 .71 but below 3.90 shall receive a diploma designation of "magna cum laude Candidates with a GPA of 3.90 or above shall receive a diploma designation of "summ a cum laude." Each Dean has the option to select on the basis of academic performance 1 % of the college's graduates or 1 student per quarter for graduation "cum distinctione Graduation Requirements-Gra4uate Programs For complete discussion of graduate programs and academic policies and procedures, students should refer to the section on "Division of Graduate Studies. Certification Requirements-Associate of Arts Upon the s tudent's successful completion of the minimum requirements for the Associate of Arts an appropriate certificate will be presented To receive the Associate of Arts, a s tudent must complete 90 quarter hours of University credit; the l ast 30 hours must be completed in residence at the University of South Florida ; the minimum grade point average must be 2.0 based on work at tempted at USF; and the General Distribution requirements of the University must be satisfied. Physical Education and Military Science credits do not count toward the A.A Certificate. Application for the Associate of Arts certificate is obtained from the Division of University Studies prior to the ap plic atio n deadline. The certification must be awarded prior to the student's accum ulation of 135 credit hours Detailed instructions to determine the student's eligibility to receive the A .A. certificate a re included with the application form. The awarding of the Associate of Arts certificate does not a lter the calculation of the grade point average Certification for the A.A in no way affects what the individual colleges required for the completion of the major for a bachelor's degree. Limited Access Student Records The following s tud en t records are open for inspection only by the student, or parents of dependent students as defined by the Internal Revenue Service, and suc h members of the professional staff of the institution as have responsibility for working with the student or with the student's records 1 Student Health and Medical Records 2. Student Disciplinary Records 3 Records of Student Personal Non-Academic Counseling 4. Required Student Financial Income Records 5 Student Perm anent Academic Records (from which transcripts are made) 6. Student Placement Records Except as required for use by the president in the discharge of his official responsibilities, the custodians of limited access records may information from such records only upon author ization, in writing, from the student, or upon order.of a court of competent jurisdiction. Administration Building Courtyard

PAGE 39

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 37 ---------Release of Student Pursuant to requirements of the Family Educational Right s and Privacy Act (the "Buckley Amendment"), the following types of information designated by law as directory information," may be relea s ed via official media of the University of South Florida (according to USF policy) : Student name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance degrees and awards received, and the most recent previou s educational agency or institution attended. The University Directory published annually by the University, contains only the following information, however : Student name, local and permanent address, telephone listing, classification, and major field of study. The Dire cto r y and other listings of directory informa tion are circulated in the course of University business and, therefore are accessible to members of the publi c, as well as to other students and members of the faculty and staff. NOTE: General release of the aforementioned types of directory information" is accomplished pursuant to USF policy. USF policy prohibits use of such information for commercial purposes. Students must inform the USF Office of Records and Registration, in writing (on forms available for that purpose), if they refuse to permit the University to release "directory information" about them without specific prior consent Notification to the University of refusal to permit the release of "directory information" will result in the University's refusing to release any of this information to anyone except as provided by law Such a decision may result in a student's name not appearing in lists of honor students, candidates for graduation, athletic programs, news releases and the like Therefore students are ericouraged to give this matter careful consideration before making the decision Once made, the de cision will remain in effect forever-or until notification is received by the Office of Records and Registration, in writing, to the contrary Notification to the University of refusal to permit release of "directory information via the University Directory must be received by Friday, October I, 1976. Special Academic Programs USF/HCC Cross Enrollment Some undergraduate students may find it advantageous to cross enroll at Hillsborough Community College while attending USF. Procedures have been developed to permit USF students to register on the USF campus during USF's early registration periods for HCC courses or on the appropriate HCC campus during HCC's final registration. The grade point average earned at HCC will not transfer to USF, however credit for the courses taken will apply toward graduation if approved by the student's USF advisor. Those USF students desirous of cross enrolling at HCC must contact their USF adviser for detailed registration procedures and course approval. HCC s tudents may cross enroll at USF under similar procedure s but must contact their HCC adviser for additional inform atio n and course a pproval. Bachelor of Independent Studies External Degree Program The Bachelor of Independent Studies (BIS) Program is an adult oriented, external degree program for individuals whose life styles preclude attendance at regular classes The BIS student proceed s at his own pace, and for the most part in his own setting. The exception is the seminars which require periodic, short-term residence The curriculum consists of interdisciplinary studies which are divided into four areas: the Humanities, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences and Inter-area Studies The student approaches the first three areas of study via guided independent study and a seminar. Directed reading or independent study requirements represent long term involve ment as compared with the short term duration of a seminar. The first three study areas are in free standing order. The student is encouraged to start in his area of strength. Studying in absentia and usually on a part time basis, the student engaged in independent study relates with a faculty adviser who furnishes directions regarding reading assignments, methods of reporting, and other study projects The student demonstrates that he has attained the level of proficiency required for completion of independent study in a particular area through the satisfactory completion of an area comprehensive examination. The exam may be taken on or off campus. When certified as eligible for a seminar, the student is in vited to a ttend a three week seminar in conjunction with each of the first three study areas (Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences). Seminar residence requirements, in other words, add up to a total of nine weeks of periodic residence on the USF campus Each seminar represents a period of intensive residential learning under the direction of a team of faculty members. The fourth area of study, or inter-area studies, represents an opportunity to integrate the various insights gained from the first three study areas. Fourth area study is essentially a thesisoriented experience. Applicants must qualify for admission to the University of South Florida and for admission to the External Degree Program. The USF Director of Admissions rules on the admission of an applicant to the University The BIS Committee rules on admission of an applicant to the BIS Program. Fees for the BIS Degree Program are as follows : Application Fee..................................... $ 15.00 Pre-Enrollment Procedures.................... . 60.00 I st Study Area Independent Study ........... .... .. .. .. ... . .. Seminar .... . ... .. ...... .. .... ... .. .. .. ........ 2nd Study Area Independent Study ............................. Seminar .. ...... ... .. .................. .. . ..... 3rd Study Area 300. 00 300.00 300.00 300.00 Independent Study .... .... ...... .............. 300.00 Seminar . .... .......................... ............ 300. 00 Fourth or Inter-area Studies. . .... ............ 650 .00 TOT AL*.. ........................................... 2,525 .00 Students may not transfer credits into or out of the BIS Program Program policy does provide for recognition of prior learning which may have been achieved through formal study, Please note that the fees listed do not include such additional expenses as books, travel and living expenses during seminars.

PAGE 40

38 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES leisure time reading, life or work experience, or a combination of these More specifically, applicants who can demonstrate sufficient competence may waive up to a maximum of two areas of guided independent study. Applications for waiver are processed following completion of the pre-enrollment pro cedures Those who take an area comprehensive exam for waiver will be assessed a fee of $75. 00. Applicants who have sufficient competence in some but not all of the disciplines in a study area receive advanced placement or an abbreviated reading program based on the individual's background and needs The concept of advanced placement is implemented by the study area adviser following the student's enrollment. The BIS Program is academically responsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs through the BIS Committee Brochures are available on request For further information, write : Director, BIS Program University of South Florida Tampa, Florida 33620. Your Open University (Y.O.U.) Y O .U. is a University program by which individuals, regardless of previous educational background, can earn credit through the use of television, radio, and other educational media in their own home. This innovative method for learning is designed to bring the maximum convenience to students and provide learning opportunities for those unable to attend the University under normal circumstances. Y O U courses are broadcast over WUSF(FM)-TV in the late afternoons and evenings Each lesson is repeated Most cable television systems in this area carry Y O U programs. Y 0 U. credit courses are considered the same as other courses offered on campus and fees are the same. Course offerings are published quarterly For further information, interested persons should contact the Y O U administrative office of the University. College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) and College Placement Tests (CPT) The University grants credit for Distribution Requirements and for a number of specific courses through CLEP General Examinations, CLEP Subject Examinations and College Place ment Tests Performance levels necessary to achieve credit are established at a common level for all universities in the State system. Generally the performance levels are based on the average score of students who have already taken the courses. Detailed information concerning the procedures for application and rules governing the programs are available in the Office of Testing and Advanced Placement. Advanced Placement Credit Program The University of South Florida participates in the Advanced Placement Program conducted by the College Entrance Ex amination Board Participation in this advanced placement program does not affect the Univer s ity s regulations concerning waiver, credit by examination independent study, or other provisions for the advanced placement of qualified students For additional information, contact the Offic e of Testing and Advanced Placement. Independent Study Graduate or undergraduate s tudents wishing to take a course by independent s tudy must contact the instructor of the course for permission The ins tructor specifies the requirements to be completed by the student i ncludin g tests, periodic class attendance, term papers, etc. Not all courses in th e University m ay be taken by independent study. The re s pectiv e co lleg es have jurisdiction in the determination of which co ur ses may b e t a ken in this manner. The regular grading sys tem a ppli es to all inde p enden t s tudy students. Grades earned by independent study have the s ame status as tho s e acquired through r egula r class atte ndance. Students taking a course by independent study must register for the specific course se ction in the regul ar manner. New College of USF New College, an honors-typ e educatio nal program on the Sarasota Campus offer s s tud e nt s the o pp ortunity t o work in traditional liberal arts areas within an innovative cu rr i cular structure. Students create their own term-by-t erm educational con tracts with the help of faculty sponsors, p ermitti n g a maximum amount of self-direction and independent study w ork. New College students have the option of comple t ing their work for the bachelor's degree in three years. A residenti a l college with its own admissions and g r ad uation requirements and it s own faculty, New College is partially supported by fund s from th e priv a te New College F oundation (See full description of New College of USF on page 115.) Army ROTC (Reserve Officer Training Corps} Under the terms of an ag re e m en t b e tw ee n th e University of Tampa and USF, male and f e m ale USF s tud e nt s m ay pa r ticipate in the Army ROTC program. Partic ipants who s ucc ess fully complete the ROTC program are c ommi ssio n ed Second Lieuten ants (Regular or Reserve) in the United States Army. Feature s of the program include sc holar ship opportunities, a veterans' program, and a s peci a l two-year cu rriculum for transfer students or other s who did not participate in Basic (Freshman and Sophomore) ROTC. Enrollment is open to qu al ified s tudents at all level s including graduate students. Military Science course off erings are published quarterly. Interested students should contact the Army ROTC Campus Coordinator for enrollment information. Marine Officer Program Qualified students may apply for an officer program l eading to a commission as a Second Li e utenant in the United States Marine Corps Commi ss ion s are off e red in both gro und and av i ati on components. The Platoon Leader s Course (PLC) i s offered to freshmen, sophomores and junior s who attend precommission ing training during the summer. Financial A ssis tanc e and Flight Indoctrination Program s are a vail able. Qualified se nior s attend 12 weeks of training in the Offic er Candid a te Co ur se ( OCC) after graduation. For details, contact the placement office or the Marine Officer Selection Offi ce r when h e is on camp us. University of Florida Correspondence Courses 'fhe University of Florida h as be en de s ign a t ed as the only institution in the State University System to offer corres pon dence courses. Therefore, th e Unive ity of South Florida will consider such courses as resident credit, however grades ea rned are not transferable Exception : Grade s for University of Florida correspondence courses tak en by C o o p erative Education students will be computed in th e ir University of South Florida grade point average

PAGE 41

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 39 .. -' /,! l ... - .: J 't. !\:-;, l p Arts and Letters Building Enrollment in Evening Courses Evening courses at the University of South Florida are considered a part of the regular academic program; they are offered at times convenient to people within commuting distance who wish to continue their education at night wl\ile occupied during the day with other responsibilities Requirements for evening courses are the same as those for the regular academic program. See the University Class Schedule for special evening registration dates and times. Continuing Education The University of South Florida, Center for Continuing Education, serves an ever widening community with a variety of credit and noncredit Public Service programs and special activities designed to meet individual and organizational educational needs. Programs are offered in many locations, but are coordinated from the Center for Continuing Education's Offices located on the Tampa campus, the St. Petersburg campus, and in Sarasota. Credit Courses: For a discussion of the credit course offerings, refer to page 16. Noncredit Programs: A variety of noncredit educational programs (conferences, workshops, seminars, short courses, etc.) of varying lengths are scheduled throughout the year, making it possible for the University to serve greater numbers of adults with richer and more diversified programs. The programs vary in length from one day to ten weeks, and the subject matter is concentrated as needed for the group being served. The Continuing Education Unit (CEU) is recorded for all noncredit programs and special activities conducted by the University. The CEU is awarded to participants in select programs sponsored by Continuing Education and approved by an academic unit. Transcripts indicating awarded CEU's are available on request. The Center for Continuing Education develops programs for business and industry, government, professional, civic, and service groups. A variety of instructional methods are used to assure maximum participation in the educational programs. Distinguished faculty members from the several colleges of the University, faculty from other institutions of higher education, as well as national and international resource persons, serve as consultants, instructors, and lecturers for the programs. Professional program coordinators are available to provide technical assistance in program planning, budget preparation, and evaluation, and to assist organizations in developing programs consistent with the needs of the group and the overall educational objectives of the University. The Center also offers a number of programs and courses designed to meet various educational needs of individuals. Emphasis is placed upon quality classes for professional advancement, personal improvement, and cultural enrichment. Registration in these classes is open to all adults with a desire for knowledge and interest in the subject matter. Special Student Enrollment Individuals wishing to register for courses but not working for a degree may enroll as "Special" students. For detailed informa tion, refer to page 14. Cooperative Education The University of South Florida participates in a Cooperative Education Program in which students can combine their formal education with an occupational experience. For description of the program, refer to page 23. Special Student-Dual Enrollment Dual enrollment in USF classes is open to academically qualified students currently enrolled in high school. For detailed information, r.efer to page 14. Early Admission Early admission is open to qualified high school students who wish to enter the University of South Florida as regularly enrolled students prior to high school graduation. For detailed information refer to page 13. Courses by Newspaper This project, originated by University Extension, San Diego, California, presents a series of articles written by distinguished scholars on various aspects of American concerns. The articles are published weekly in cooperating Bay area newspapers. Persons who enroll for credit purchase a supplementary kit containing further readings, a study guide, and a bibliography. In addition, participants meet with a local academic coordinator in two three-hour sessions of discussion and examinations, at the midpoint of the course and at the end. These meetings will be held in several Bay area locations, and registrants will be notified in advance of the scheduled meetings in the location most convenient to them. For further information, contact the office for American Studies. Upward Bound Upward Bound is a pre-college preparatory program designed for secondary school students with academic potential who are underachievers and desirous of attending college. To qualify, the applicant must meet the following criteria: I. Family income must meet established federal guidelines. 2. Student must have completed the tenth grade and be presently enrolled in the eleventh grade in a high school. 3. Student should have approximate grade point average of c. Applications should be forwarded to Director, Project Upward Bound, University of Florida. Off-Campus Term Program The Off-Campus Term (OCT) Program offers a program of experience-study whereby all students are encouraged to spend

PAGE 42

40 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES PROGRAMS AND SERVICES at least one qu arter engaged in individual educationa l pursuits away from the University campus Students a re offered a wide variety of opportunitie s for self-designed and self-implemented experience for academic credit For examp l e, studen ts may become involved in social action project s, international travel or study, independent research-study, work, or internship projects, and many other personalized projects-all off campu s and all for academic credit While most student activities a re individually designed and implement ed, the OCT Program also provides f0r S')me group projects. Foremost of these a re four to six credit :lour, faculty led short term group projects in Jamaica s everal t ime s annually and Urban Survival projects for 12 to 16 hour s credit in New York City or any other urban area The latter project s involve intense urban interaction a nd living in a n inner-city hote l at most favorable student rate s. Academic credit is ea rned by stu d ents while engaged in off campus activities through the OCT Program. Tl'" : .umber of hours of credit varies according to student interest and propo sed activities Students may enroll in a variety of projects and p a y fees for variable hour s of credit from 1 to 15 in a term. Academic credit activities are designed around the basic off-campu s experiences for the most part and projects resulting in academic credit are designed by the student and supervised by OCT or other appropriate faculty Credits may be earned which a ppl; towards general education and elective requirements Credit may also be earned in the major field of s tudy in many cases The OCT Program has a variety of course projects de s igned specifically for implementation e ntirely off campus using the community and i t s people as the learning resource. Examples of such offerings are 3-5 hour projects each in (I) environmental interactions and (2) inter-cultural interactions, 4-hour project in international interactions 3-hour projects in volunteer, com munity service activit ie s, and others. These courses are the foundation of each student's academic plan su pplemented with a project in the major field of study in many cases Students may participate in the OCT Program anytime beginrting with the freshman year through the final quarter prior to graduation Good standing in the University and a 2.0 grade ave rage is required for acceptance into the Program The OCT Program operates throughout the entire year and students are urged to plan their off-campus experiences during the fall through s pring quarter s to avoid the traditional rush common to the summe,r term. Early action is urged since quota s are placed on the number of participants accepted each term. Elective Physical Education This program provides the student with opportunities for identifying, developing and assessing vari ous forms of vigorous movement which can contribute to his educational experience and personal growth Courses include well-known s ports as well as individual :issessment activities and s p ecial courses to prepare the interested st udent with skills and techniques applicable for conducting or directing community activities related to sport and movement. All Elective Physical Education (PEB) courses are graded S/U Exchange Programs National Student Exchange The University is affiliated with the National Student Exchange (NSE) which permits undergraduate students to s tudy for up to one year in another public university as part of their program at the University of South Florida These exchanges can occur only at universities which are part of the National Student Exchange In addition to the University of South Florida, other universities participating in thi s program are California State College at Bakersfield, Moorhead State College (Minn ), Morgan State College (Md ), Illinois State University, Montana State Uni v ersity, Oregon State Uni v ersity South Dakota State University, Pater son State College (N .J .), Rutger s University, West Chester State College (Pa.), a nd the Universities of Alabama, Hawaii (Hilo and Manoa), Idaho Massachusetts, Maine (Ft. Kent and Portland-Gorham), Montana Nevada (Reno), and Oregon. New entries include Bowling Green State, and the Universities of Alaska, Delaware and Utah. The number of participating schools i n c reases each year so this list must not be co nsidered complete An up-dated listing is maintained by the NSE Office Under the National Student Exchange program, University of South Florida students a ppl y for exchange s tatus at their home campus To qualify, students must be in their sophomore or junior year while at the exchange schoo l and ha ve a 2 5 grade point average. They pay in-state fee s at the host campus and the credits anc;I grades transfer bac k to the University of South Florid a upon c ompletion of the exchange. Application deadlines for September exchange i s March I annually Thereafter, no applications for exchange are processed until September for mid-ye ar exchanges if s uch are possible. Students are urged to apply ear l y as there ar e quotas esta blish ed for pqrticipation in the NSE Program. The NSE Program i s coordinated by the Off-Campus Term Program. The OCT Program maintain s a library of materials about the program and the member institutions involved in the NSE Program. Interested students s hould contact the Director of the Off Campus Term Progr am for information and ap plication University of Maine Exchange Program The College of Education operates a stude nt exc hange program with the University of Maine Farmington T!iis program prov ides opportunities for sophomores, juniors and seniors to exchange residence at both c ampuses. The s tudent exchange provides a waiver of out-of-state tuition. University credit earned is applicable towards graduation Students desiring further information should contact the coordinator of student activities in the College of Educatio n Study Abroad Programs USF students are eligible, if they meet th e specific academic require ments for enrollme nt in a wide variety of study abroad programs sponsored by the Florida State University System as well as by certain other U S. colle ges and universities, national educational organizations, and foreign institutions of higher learning Programs of the Florida State University Systems are listed below. Administered by the University of South Florida ; year abroad prog ram at the Universi ty of Paris Vil, Paris France. Administered by the University of Florida; year abroad l?rogram at the University o f Utrecht in the Netherlands; year abroad program, University of the Andes, Bogota, Colombia. Administered by the Florida State University; two quarter a nd academic year programs at study centers in Florence, Italy and London England; summer program i n Belgrade Yugo slavia. Administered by the Department of Foreig n Languages, University of South F lorid a: one or more quarters each

PAGE 43

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 41 academic year at the National University of Mexico Mexico City. Through USF' s institutional membership in the Institute of International Education, the Council on International Educa tional Exchange, and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, students may participate in study abroad programs fn France, Spain Italy, Mexico, Canada, and other countries Students who prefer independent study abroad, rather than the formal institutional programs, may do so through the Off Campus Term. The Off-Campus Term also offers an intersession program in Jamaica which is conducted three times each calendar year. The programs described in this section are approved exchange programs and will be considered toward on campus credits Students who plan to participate in study abroad programs should consult their departmental advisers well in advance to determine whether the course of study they plan to pursue will be acceptable for meeting other degree requirements. Information about these and other programs, as well as advising on study abroad, may be obtained from the Overseas Information Center in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Florida College Exchange Program Through an exchange agreement, students of the University of South Florida, with the approval of their advisers may elect cours es in Greek Hebrew Bible. or religious education at nearby Florida College Credit for acceptable work may be transferred to the University and counted as elective credit toward graduation Students from Florida College have a similar transfer arrangement. Costs for students under these dual enrollment plans are based on credit hours of work taken, and payment is made to the appropriate institution in accordance with its per-hour fee rate. Traveling Scholar Program The University System of the State of Florida has a Traveling Scholar program which will enable a graduate student to take advantage of special resources available on another campus but not available on his own campus; special course offerings, research opportunities unique laboratories, and library collec tions. For procedures and conditions, refer to page 44. Academic Support and Services University Library It is important that a library take into account not only the books on its shelves but also the people it serves. This point of view is central in the philosophy of the University of South Florida Library The Library staff wants students to regard books as a way of life and use the Libra r y regularly One of the reasons for providing a library collection is to encourage students to buy, read and discuss books The University expects students to become familiar with the University Library book collection, to master the techniques of u s ing it and-before graduation-to achieve a familiarity with books which will carry over into later life University Library

PAGE 44

42 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES The new University Library building was completed in March, 1975; the seven floor building is the largest budgeted non-medical academic facility in Florida This centrally located building, with its open stacks, adjoining study areas and many individual carrels, has been designed to facilitate study, research and reading. When fully occupied, it will provide space for 2,500 readers and will ultimately accommodate over 800,000 volumes. The present library collection consists of about 500,000 volumes and is constantly growing in order to serve the University community's need for materials for instruction and research, as well as for personal knowledge and cultural advancement. All academic areas are served, with the exception of the College of Medicine which has its own library. The card catalog and reference collection are located on the first floor. Reference service is provided at the Reference and Information desks To assist students in learning about the resources of the Library, the Reference staff offers a two-credit course, Use of the Library, LLI 200. The staff also gives orientation lectures on library use and provides individual assistance to students in search strategy and bibliographic form A descriptive guide to the Library and its services is also available. Circulation books are located on the third through fifth floors. Patrons may check out books at the Circulation desk first floor, before exiting through the new library security system in the lobby. The U S Documents collection is on the basement level. The Library is a depository for U.S. Government publications and also receives the microprint edition of the United Nations documents and official records The Document staff is available to assist in using these materials. The Reserve Department containing books and articles "reserved" at faculty request for the use of a particular class is also on the basement level. Adjoining the Reserve desk is the Reserve Reading Room, which serves as one of the Library s quiet study centers. The periodicals collection is on the second floor. In addition to more than 4,000 periodicals, the Library subscribes to newspapers from Florida and major cities in the United States, and from many foreign countries The Microform room, also on the second floor, holds a large collection of material in microtext, including 20,000 reels of film and about 200, 000 items in other microformat. This material provides access to many important sources otherwise inaccessible The fourth floor Special Collections Department, houses the Library s rare books, University Archives and the Florida Historical Society Library. This area contains an extensive collection of books, maps, documents and manuscripts covering historical and contemporary Florida These valuable items are in closed stacks, but the materials and assistance are available at the service desk. Division of Sponsored Research Research is an important aspect of the educational programs of the University of South Florida Faculty members are en couraged to pursue research activities, and many students participate in research and training projects supported by funds awarded to the University by public and private granting agencies. Research is integrated with the instructional program. The Division of Sponsored Research is the central coordinating unit for research and other sponsored educational activities on the campus It provides information about granting agencies and serves as a consultation center for faculty who desire help in drafting research proposals All proposals seeking outside support are transmitted by this office. Although the Division of Sponsored 7 Research operates primarily for the benefit of the faculty, students who have an appropriate interest in research are welcome to visit the office From its beginning, USF faculty and staff have been active in the search for new knowledge and actively concerned about the world in which they live Supported by private and public grants, they have pushed back the frontiers of current knowledge and applied their findings to the solutions of pressing contemporary problems Since 1960, they have attracted over I 400 grants totaling more than $48 million and have generated over 10, 000 separate scholarly and creative contributions to human knowledge and understanding. Many of these projects were basic research; others involved the practical application of new knowledge to improve the quality of life in this area ; still other projects made the special training and knowledge of USF faculty and staff available to elected political leaders, organiza tions work ing for social betterment, religious and educational institutions and businesses l a rge and small. But such "academic" involvement in community affairs pays dividends to the University, too When scientists or social scientists or experts in marketing or business administration share their specialized knowledge in resolving community problems or questions they become better teachers themselves Educational Resources The Division of Educational Re s ources offers the following services for USF faculty staff and students : AudioVisual Services provide equipment a nd instructional material for classroom use, University events and other functions Such equipment include s public address systems, tape recorders, and projectors of all kinds. Various types of audio visual equipment can also be rented Production Services. Graphic photography and cinemato graphy services for use in the cla s sroom ii/l well as the overall University program are produced here WUSF(FM) is a stereo, public radio station operating on 89. 7 mkz and serves the University and surrounding com munities within a 17 county area It is an affiliate of National Public Radio Network. WUSF-TV (Channel 16), is a public, non commercial UHF television station, serving the University and the communities of the nine surrounding counties It is an affi liat e of the Public Broadcasting Service. Computer Research Center The University is the host institution for a large scale digital computer facility which provides administrative, instructional and research computing support for the University of South Florida and for Florida Technological University at Orlando This combined operation has been designated as the Central Florida Regional Data Center within the State University System The Computer Research Center makes computing services available to users through its Office of Services which establishes the required user project identifications, through Instruction and Research consultants and, in the data systems area, through project teams consisting of systems analysts and programmers The staff also includes keypunch and computer operators and systems (software) technical specialists The Center operates as a service facility is centrally funded and makes no charge for normal consulting and processing services Computing equipment includes an IBM 360/75 system, a plotter, remote batch job entry stations and other on-line keyboard terminals at various locations, in addition to tape and disk storage units at the central site Remote access units are also located at the St. Petersburg campus The Center maintains keypunch sorter and electronic calculators in open use areas to enable students a nd faculty to prepare and check their programs and data These areas are accessible in general on a 24-hour basis each day

PAGE 45

DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES The Divi sion of Graduate Studies is administered by a Director who coordinates the admissio n of graduate students to the University, advises on the budgetary request and internal allocation of state funds for the s upport of graduate training, administers graduate scholarships and fellowships, allocates graduate out-0f -s tate waivers, and certifies final approval of all graduate theses and dissertations. Admission to Graduate Study Graduate students are advised to apply early as the University accepts applications one year in advance. Applications for which all credential s are not received by the deadline (see academic calendar, pages 4-5) will not be considered for that term. Some departments have different, earlier deadlines than those listed on pages 4-5. Students should check the requirements for the specific programs in which they are interested. A $IS non refundable application fee must accompany the application unles s the st udent has been previously enrolled and paid the fee at the University The minimum requirements for first-time or transfer admi ssion to graduate studies in the State University System include : 1 A baccalaureate degree or its equivalence from an accredited college or un iversity. This requirement may be waived for students accepte d into certain approved programs which lead directly to graduate degrees. 2. At least a "B" average in all work attempted while registered as an upper division student working for a baccalaureate degree or a total score of 1000 or higher on the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test. Appli cants for the College of Busine ss Administration (except Economics) must submi t a score of 450 or higher on the Graduate Management Admission Test in lieu of the GRE. Test scores are required of all applicants, even though admis s ion may be based on undergraduate grades. The GRE is given si, x times a year at a multitude of centers in the U.S and in many foreign countries Candidates must register for this examination at least four weeks in advance of the test date and should allow six weeks for the receipt of their test scores. Care should be taken not to exceed 18 hours as a Special student because of the limitation of applying hours taken as a Special stu dent to a degree program. 3. Acceptance by the college and the program for which the student is applying inclutling satisfaction of any addi tional requirements listed by the s pecific program. A student's acceptance to graduate standing is granted for the quarter and for the particular program specified in the official accep tan ce notification. In the eve nt that a student wishe s to change the date of entrance, he/she must notify the Office of Admissions of h is/ her intentions to do so. Failure to enroll during the s pecified quarter without notifying the Admissions Office will result in the cance llation of the admission and will necessitate re-application. A graduate student enrolled for work in a program who wishes to change to another program must make formal application through the Office of Records and Registration If, on completion of one graduate degree a student wishes to begin work on another advanced degree at USF, he/ s he must reapply at the Office of Admissions. 43 Procedure for Applying 1. Applicants must submit application and fee prior to the deadline 2. Two official transcripts from every institution of higher learning attended must be submitted directly to the Office of Admissions. 3 a. Admissions test results are required from every applicant. These must be sent directly to Graduate Admissions Office from the testing agency. I. Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test. AU applicants except those applying to Business Admin istration (see below), must submit scores from the GRE aptitude test taken within S years preceding application 2. Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). All applicants to Business Administration, except those applying to Economics, must submit scores from the GMAT Those applying to Economics must submit scores from the GRE aptitude test (see above). b Postponement of Admission Test: If applicant has a grade point average of 3 0 or better in his last two years of undergraduate work but has not taken the GRE or GMAT, he/she may be admitted as a degree seeki ng student subject to receipt of satisfactory admissions test scores. Required test scores must be received before a second registration will be per mitted. Foreign Students Foreign students requesting an application will be sent pre liminary information forms. Upon receipt of these forms, the Admi ssio ns Office will review the pro".ided information and determine whether the student meets the minimum requirements for admission to USF in his/her major field If minimum requirements are not met for admission, the applicant will be advised of this by the Admissions Office, and the application process will be terminated at that point. If the student does meet the minimum admission requirements, the Admissions Office will forward a formal application with additional instructions and information. A complete admissio n application should be received by USF at least 6 months prior to the desired entering date, together with the non-refundable $15.00 application fee. Submission of a formal application does not automatically guarantee admission Priority in admissions will be given to those applicants whose potential indicates the greatest likelihood of success in the program requested.

PAGE 46

44 DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES For all foreign s tudents the following items are required as part of the formal application : a. Completed application b. A $15.00 non-refundable fee s ubmitted with the applica tion. c. Letter s of Recommendation: I. One letter from the la s t institution attended to the Director of Admissions. 2. Three letters of recommendation sent directly to the program to w hich the st udent applied, attesting academic performance a nd capability d. A certificate of financial ability All foreign applicants must furnish proof of financial resources sufficient to cover travel t o a nd from the United State s, tuition, fees, room and board, and other expenses for the full aca demic year. e. All applicants whose native language is not English are required to s ubmit sc ore s from the Tes t of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applicants are responsible for making arrangements with the Office of Educational Testing Service to take that examination and to have their scores sent directly from Educational Testing Service to the Office of Admissions. f. GRE/GMAT Test Score s: All applicants to the graduate school (except those applying to the College of Business Administration) must submit scores on the Graduate Record Ex a mination (GRE). Graduate applicants to the College of Business Administration (with the exception of Economic s) mus t submit scores from the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) Applications for Economics must submit scores from the GRE. g. Application and information for the required tests may be obtained from the addresses listed below. I. For information and to obtain an application for the Graduate Record Examination: Graduate Record Examination Educational Testing Service Box 955 Princeton, New Jersey 08540, U.S .A. 2 For information and to obtain an application for the Test of Engli s h as a Foreign Language : Test of English as a Foreign Language Educational Testing Service Box 899 Princeton, New Jer sey 08540 U .S.A. 3 For information and to obtain an application for the Graduate Management Admission Te s t : Graduate Management Admission Test Educational Testing Service Box 966 Princeton New Jersey 08540, U.S.A. h Foreign applicants must request all schools attended to submit directly to the Office of Admissions, University of South Florida, of all work attempted. These must be in their native language with copies certified and translated in English. For undergraduates, transcript s must include subjects and grades from the first year of secondary school to the time of application. Documents submitted will not be returned to the applicant or forwarded to another institution. Special Students Students who are qualified to enroll in specific graduate courses but who do not intend to work toward a graduate degree may enroll as Special students Special students may enter classes on a space available basis during the first week of each quarter by obtaining consent of the course instructor. Special students must meet all stated prerequisites of courses in which they wish to enroll. Certain classes are available only to degree seeking majors and m ay not be avai lable for Special students No more than 18 hours of credit earned as a Special student m ay be a pplied to satisfy graduate degree requirements Any application of such credit must be approved by the d eg ree granting college a nd must be a ppropriate to the program Those interested in enrolling as Sp ecial st udent s are urg ed to contact the Coordinator of Graduate Studies in the College offering the courses concerned for a description of requirements and procedures The Traveling Scholar Program The University System of the State of Florida has a Traveling Scholar program which will e nable a graduate s tudent to take a dvantage of s pecial resourc es available on anot her campus but not available on his own campus Procedure A Traveling Scholar is a graduate student, who, by mutual agreement of the appropriate academic a uthoritie s in both the s ponsoring and ho s ting inst itution s, receives a waiver of admission requirements and the application fee of the host institution and a: guarantee of acceptance of earned credits by the sponsoring institution A Traveling Scholar must be recommended by his own graduate adviser, who will initiate a visiting arra ng eme nt with the appropriate faculty member at the host institution After agreement by the Director of Gradu ate Studies a t the University of South Florida and the st udent' s adviser and the faculty member at the host institution, Dea n s at the other institution will be fully informed by the adv iser and have authority to approve or disapprove the academic arrangement. The student register s at the host institution and p ays tuition and registration fees according to fee sc h e dule s established a t that institution Conditions Each university retain s its full right to accep t or reject any .student who wishes to study under it s auspices Traveling Scholars will normally b e limited to one Quarter on the campus of the ho st univer s ity and a r e not entitled to displacement allowance, mileage or per diem payments The sponsoring instituion, however m ay, at its own option, contribute to the financial s upport of the Traveling Scholar in the form of fellowships or graduate assista nt s hips.

PAGE 47

Graduate Assistantships and Fellowships (I) To be eligible to obtain a one-half time g raduat e teaching assistantship, a student must be degree-seeking and be regi s tered for a minimum of eight credit hours each quarter toward degree requirements (2) To be eligible to obtain a graduate research asDIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES 45 sistantship, a stude nt may be degree-seeking or a Special student for one quarter of enrollment only and be registered for a mimimum of eight credit hours toward degree requirements . and Research Assistantships are awarded by the md1v1dual programs/departments. The Graduate Council of the University of South Florida awards fellowships for graduate s tudents. Fields of Graduate Study Master's Degree Programs College of Arts & Letters English-M.A. French-M.A. Linguistics-M .A. Philosophy-M.A. Spanish-M.A. Speech Communication-M.A. College of Business Administration Accountancy-M. Acc. Business Administr ation-M.B. A Economics-M.A. Management-M.S. College of Education Administr a tion & Supervision-M.Ed. Art Education-M.A. Curriculum & Instruction-M.Ed. E lem entary Education-M. A Exceptional Child Education :-M.A Emotionally Disturbed Gifted Mental Retardation Specific Learning Disabilitie s English Education-M.A. Foreign L anguage:-M. A French German Spanish Guidance-M.A. Humanities Education-M.A. Junior College Teaching :-M. A Astronomy Biology Bu siness Chemistry Economics Engineering English French Geography Geology History Mathematics Physics Politi ca l Science Psychology Sociology Spanish Speech Communication Library-Audiovisual Education-M.A. Mathematics Education-M.A. Music Education-M. A Physical Education-M. A Reading Ed ucation-M.A. School Psychology-M.A. Science Education-M.A. Socia l Science Education-M.A. Speech Communication Education M.A Vocational & Adult Education:-M.A. Adult Education Busines s & Office Education Distributive Educa tion Industrial-Technical Ed uc at ion College of Engineering of Engineering-M.E. Mas ter of Science in Engineering-M. S E M as ter of Sc i ence in Engineering Science-M.S.E.S. College of Fine Arts Art-M. F A Music-M.M. College of Natural Sciences Astronomy-M.A. Botany-M.A. C hemistry-M S. Geology-M.S. Marine Science-M.S. Mathem a tics-M .A. Microbiology-M.A. Physics-M. A Zoology-M.A. College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Anthropology-M.A. Communicology : Audiology-M. S Aural (Re)Habilitation-M.S Speech Pathology-M.S. Crimina l Ju stice-M.A. Geograp hy-M.A. Gerontology-M .A History-M. A Political Science-M.A. Psychology-M. A Rehabilitation Counseling-M. A Sociology-M.A. Intermediate Program College of Education Education Specialist-Ed. S Professional Program College of Medicine Medicine-M.D.

PAGE 48

46 DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES Doctoral Degree Programs C ollege of Arts 8i Letters English-Ph.D. College of Education Educatiorr-Ph.D. College of Medicine Medical Sciences-Ph.D. Co llege of Natural Sciences Biology-Ph. D Chemistry-Ph.D. Mathematics-Ph.D C o llege of Social & Behavioral Sciences Psychology-Ph. D Regulations Gov-erning <;;raduate Study The development of University policies and principles for graduate work is the responsibility of the Graduate Council. In addition, the Council exercises the right of inquiry and review to insure that high scholarly standards are being maintained. It is responsible for the establishment of University standards and regulations for gradua t e students and faculty. The Council also reviews all new graduate courses and degree programs and modifications to existing courses and programs. The member ship of the Graduate Council includes the chairperson nine faculty members, two graduate students, and three ex-officio members M ajor Professor An adviser or major professor will be a ppointed for the student in his first term of work and will be designated by the chairman of the department or area in which the degree is sought upon a mutual recommendation from the student and professor concerned. Qu ality of Work Graduate students must attain an overall average of 3.0 (B) in all courses. No grade below "C" will be accepted toward a graduate degree, but all grade s will be counted in computing the overall average. Any graduate student who at the end of a quarter is not in good standing shall be considered to be on probationary status. Such a student may be dropped from degree seeking status after one quarter of probation by the dean of his college. Notification of probation shall be made to the student in writing by his major professor, with a copy to the college dean At the end of the probationary quarter, the major professor shall recommend to the college dean, in writing, one of three alternatives : (1) removal of probationary status; (2) continued probation ; or (3) drop from degree program Every effort will be made during the probationary period to aid the s tudent in reestablishing his standing. Appe als Graduate students may a ppeal ac tions regarding their academic status: 1. In actions based on dep a rtmental requirements, the student may appeal first to his department through his major then to the college dean or his representative, and then to the Graduate Council if necessary. 2. In actions based on the University minimum require ments, appeal shall be made directly to the Graduate Council. Reports of actions and appeals will be maintained in the student's permanent file. Enrollment Requirements-Minimum University Regulations A student taking eight or more hours toward his/her degree in a quarter will be classified as a full-time student. The normal graduate load is 12-15 credit hours. Students who have completed their course work and continu e to occupy space and to receive faculty supervision but who have not made a final thesis/dissertation submission shall register for a minimum of three hours of 699 or 799. The exact number of hours is determined by staff and facilities needed to support the student. Graduate students having completed all requirements except for comp r ehensive exams or completion of "I" grades will be allowed use of University Library facilities for one quarter, with approval of department chaig>erson Graduate students who receive financial support from the University, other than fellowship recipients, will hold their appointments for no more than six quarters (excluding summer quarter) while working toward the master's degree (eight quarters for the MF A) and no more than nine additional' quarters while working toward the Ph D degree. Transfer Credit Transfer of credit from another recognized graduate school is limited to nine quarter hours. All transferred credit must (1) be approved by the program or college concerned and (2) have been completed with grades of "B" or better. Transfer (post-baccalaureate, transfer credits from other institutions) and Special student credits* must be evaluated and transferred by the time of formal acceptance and enrollment. The graduate department/program will be responsible for evaluating and initiating the transfer. SIU' Grades in the Graduate Program No graduate student may take a course in his/her major on an S/U basis except for certain courses that are specifically designated in the catalog. A graduate student may take courses outside of his/her major on an S/U basis with prior approval of the professo r of the course, his/her major professor and the Dean of the College who will approve the degree. The student may apply a maximum of six hours of such credit (excluding Directed Research, Thesis/Dissertation, De sign, Practicum, or Internship) toward a master's degree. Courses 681 699, 781, and 799 are designated as Credit Varies and are awarded credit on an S/U basis only Before a student undertakes work under Directed Research (681or781) a written agreement between the student and the professor concerned, setting forth in detail the requirements of the course shall be completed Other procedures involving grades such as drops, withdrawals, audits, etc., are the same as those used for undergraduates. No more than 18 hours of credit earned as a Special student in a non degree seeking status may be applied to satisfy graduate degree requirements.

PAGE 49

Change of Graduate Degree Program A student who wishes to change his advanced degree program must obtain a Graduate Change of Program Application from the Office of Records and Registration. The change of program is completed upon acceptance of the student by his new department. Application for Degree Each student who plans to complete his graduate requirements by the end of a term must complete the Application for Graduation within 15 class days after the beginning of that term. The application is available at, and after completion must be returned to, the Office of Records and Registration Exclusions Members or former members of the faculty who hold or have held the rank of Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, or Professor are not eligible to be granted degrees from the University of South Florida, except upon prior authorization of the Graduate Council, and approval of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. In cases where the immediate family of the faculty are enrolled in graduate degree programs, the faculty member may nor serve on any advisory or examination committee nor be involved in any determination of academic or financial status of that individual. Faculty Eligibility In order to teach a graduate course at the University of South Florida, a person must have a current USF faculty appointment. The director of a thesis or dissertation must be a USF faculty member with an advanced degree, or equivalent professional qualifications, appropriate to the required level of supervision DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES 47. MASTER'S DEGREE Program of Study and Co1,1rse Requirements During the first term of study in consultation with his major professor, the student should plan a program of work to be completed for satisfaction of degree requirements. A copy of this program signed by the student and professor should be maintained in the student's department file A minimum of 45 quarter hours is required for a master's degree, at least 24 hours of whieh must be at the 600 level. At least 30 hours must be in formal, regularly scheduled course work, 15 of which must be at the 600 level. Course s at the 500 level are acceptable for credit toward the master s degree when taken as a part of a planned degree program A major professor may approve up to 8 hours of 400-level courses if taken as part of a planned degree program. Additional graduate credit may be earned in 400-level courses only if specifically approved by the appropriate dean and by the Graduate Council. Students enrolled in undergraduate courses as a part of their planned degree program will be expected to demonstrate a superior level of performance. Supervisory Committee Students working toward a thesis degree will have the benefit of a supervisory committee. The committee, consisting of the major professor and at least two other members of the department or area in which the degree is sought, will be appointed by the appropriate chairman upon recommendation from the student and his major professor Notification of the committee appointment will be sent to the Dean of the College and to the Director of Graduate Studies. The committee will approve the course of study for the student supervise his research and accept his thesis. Time Limit All work applicable to the master s degree requirements must be completed within the seven years immediatel y preceding the awarding of the degree. Final Comprehensive Examination Prior to clearance for the degree the candidate must perform satisfactorily on a comprehensive examin a tion in his major field Thesis When a thesis is required an original and one copy of the approved thesis must be submitted to the Director of Graduate Studies at last three weeks before the end of the qu a rter in which the student is to receive his degree Only after the thesis and the copy have been approved for filing in the University Library can the student be certified for his degree The thesis must conform to the guidelines in the Handbook of Graduate Theses and Dissertations available in the University Bookstore Second Master's Degree A second master's degree may be granted s o long a s there i s no duplication of credit. If there is any duplication of credit the request must be considered by the Graduate Council.

PAGE 50

48 DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES Ph.D. DEGREE The degree of of Philosophy is granted in recognition of high attainment in a specific field of knowledge. It is a research degree and is not conferred solely upon the earning of credit and completion of courses or by the acquiring of a number of terms of residency. The amount of re s idence and the requirements suggested below are a mimimum The degree shall be granted on evidence of proficiency and distinctive achievement in a specified field, by the demonstration of the ability to do original independent investigati on and the presenting of these findings with a high degree of literary skill in a dissertation. Student Committees An advisory Committee shall be appointed by the chairman of the appropriate department or program for each student during his or her first quarter of residency at the University of South Florida This Committee shall advise the student on indicated subject matter deficiencies and provide aid in choice of a major professor and an area of research. As soon as an area of research is determined and a major professor is chosen, a Dissertation Committee shall be appointed for the student by the chairman of the department or program in which the degree is sought. Notice of the appointment of the Dissertation Commit tee shall be sent by the chairman to the Dean of the College and the Director of Graduate Studies immediately after the appointment is made The Dissertation Committee will approve the student's course of study, supervise the research, and the written comprehensive qualifying examination, and conduct the final examination. The Dissertation Committee shall consist of at least five members at least three of whom must come from the academic area in which the major work for the degree will be done Language Requirement Before a student i s eligible to take the comprehensive qualifying examination he mus t normally have completed a reading knowledge of two foreign language s However special work done outside th e s tudent' s field of concentration,, and related subject s may be s ub s tituted for one or both languages, provided thi s e x ception is recommended by the student's dissertation committee and a ppr o ved by his department's Graduate Committee. Residency The minimum requirement s hall be three academic years of work beyond the b a chelor" s degree. At least one academic year Science Center and Chemistry Building of residence must be on a campus of the University of South Florida An academic year's residency shall be defined as a minimum of eight hours of graduate work per term, or the chairman of the student's supervisory committee may certify that the sJudent be considered as in full-time residence Any graduate work counted toward the fulfillment of the requirement of the Ph D degree after admission to candidacy must be done within a seven calendar-year period. C1:>mprehensive Qualifying Examination As soon as a substantial majority of the course work is completed the student must pass a written comprehensive qualifying examination over the subject matter of the major and related fields. This examination may be supplemented by an oral examination. If the degree is not conferred within five calendar years of the comprehensive examination, the examination must be taken agaih. Admission to Candidacy A graduate student does not become a candidate for the Ph.D. degree until he/she is formally admitted to candidacy, and no student may enroll in 799 (Ph.D Dissertation) until he/she has been admitted to candidacy. This admission is granted when the dissertation committee certifies that the student has successfully completed his/her comprehensive qualifying examinat ion and in the opinion of his/her committee he/she has demonstrated the qualifications necessary to successfully complete his/her re quirements for the degree The certificate of admission shall be issued by the dean of his/her college through the Director of Graduate Studies. Dissertation Students in the Ph .D. programs must take an appropriate number of credits for dissertation the exact number to be determined by departmental and/or individual requirements. At least two weeks before the end of the quarter in which the student is to receive his degree, a candidate must submit to the Director of Graduate Studies a typewritten original and one copy of a completed dissertation that has been signed by his committee An abstract is also required Upon approval of the dissertation by the Director the student will be certified for his degree. The two copies of the dissertation will then be deposited in the University Library Each dissertation will be microfilmed with the student being assessed a fee for this service The dissertation must conform to the guidelines in the Handbook of Graduate These,s and Dissertations available in the University Bookstore. Final Oral Examination When the Dis s ertation Committee has inspected the final draft of the dissertation and finds it suitable for presentation, the Committee will complete a form requesting tbe scheduling and announcing of the final oral examination. The request form will be submitted via the appropriate department chairperson to the college dean and the Director of Graduate Studies for approval. The announcement must be received in the Graduate Studies Office at lea s t two weeks prior to the sc heduled oral examination. The final oral examination must be held at least three weeks before the end of the quarter in which the student is to be awarded the degree. The chairper s on of the examination shall be appointed by the dean of the college and shall not be a member of the student's Dissertation Committee or the department or program in which the degree is sought.

PAGE 51

.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS The College of Arts and Letters studies culture in the broade&t meaning of the word. The College offers students a sense of themselves and their world, chiefly through courses and programs involving human expression and communication. Students not only receive a liberal education, but also explore vocational interests, as they develop both the breadth of knowledge and precision of mind necessary for responsible leadership in our society More specifically, the College seeks: I. To help students discuss new subjects, affording fresh .ideas and talents enriching to life. 2. To enable students to work in several fields as a means of determining the best vocational choice. 3. To give sufficient development within the chosen vocational field that the student will be prepared to obtain a job upon graduation or to move successfully into a graduate or professional school. 4. To join with the other colleges of the University in providing liberal arts courses to augment required training in those professional schools. 5. To cultivate independent thinking, creative imagination, and value commitment, that students may become constructive leaders in their chosen activities. Accordingly, the College is concerned with arts and letters, both as instruments and as ends in themselves. Language, literature, philosophy, the forms of communication, in terdisciplinary studies, and other humanistic subjects are studied not merely for their utility, but for their intrinsic merit as well, and for what they tell us about what is permanently and universally significant to mankind. The departments and degree programs of the College are grouped in four divisions: I. Communications a. Mass Communications b. Speech Communication 2. Language a. Foreign Languages b. Linguistics 3. Letters a. American Studies b. Humanities c Liberal Studies d. Philosophy e Religious Studies 4. Literature: English Responsibility for research and innovative teaching in each division is in the hands of an individual coordinator. BACCALAUREATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Admission to the College Admission to the College of Arts and Letters is open to all students who have been accepted to the University of South Florida, who are in good academic standing, and who have declared themselves a major in a particular field within the College. For entrance into the College, each undergraduate student must complete an application in the Office of the Coordinator of Advising. The student will then be assigned te an adviser from the major field and will be counseled in the selection of courses which will fulfill his/her educational needs and satisfy the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Three programs (American Studies, Liberal Studies, and Mass Communications) have additional requirements, listed under Programs and Curricula. General Requirements for Degrees The degree Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those who fulfill the requirements for degrees with majors in the fields of: American Studies (AMS) Anthropology-Linguistics (ANL) Classics (Latin, Latin-Greek) (CLS) Classics & Foreign Language (CLF) English (ENG) English-Linguistics (ENL) Foreign Languages, Combination (FOL) Foreign Language-Linguistics (FLL) French (FRE) German (GER) Humanities (HUM) Italian (IT A) Liberal Studies (ALA) Mass Communications (COM) 49 Philosophy (PHI) Religious (REL) Russian (RUS) Spanish (SPA) Speech Communication (SPE) Speech Communication-English (ENS) Speech Communication-Theatre (ST A) A minimum of 180 quarter hours credit with an overall average of 2.0 or better in all work done at the University of South Florida must be completed in order to earn the Bachelor of Arts degree, except for courses taken by majors in the Mass Communications Department, which requires a 2.5 The degree program must include the completion of (I) General Distribution Requirements, (2) a departmental major, and (3) elective courses : 1. General Distribution Requirements This work comprises a total of sixty (60) quarter credits which (except for English) may be spread over the normal four year ut:gree program. The requirement includes: Eight (8) hours credit in English Composition Eight (8) hours credit in Humanities/Fine Arts Eight (8) hours credit in Mathematics/Quantitative Method Eight (8) hours credit in Natural Sciences Eight (8) hours credit in Social and Behavioral Sciences The remaining twenty (20) hours are to be divided among the last four areas at the discretion of the student and adviser. See page 33 for details. 2. The Departmental Major A departmental major consists of a concentration of course work in a specific department. The number of credit hours required for a major will vary from department to department. There must be at least a cumulative grade point ratio of 2.0 in the

PAGE 52

so COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETIERS major, with the exception of Mass Communications, which requires a 2.5 of its majors in all departmental work At least 120 quarter hours must be earned in courses outside the student's major. 3. Elective Courses Of the minimum of 180 quarter hours required for a bachelor's degree in the College of Arts and Letters sixty (60) are normally earned in general elective courses. This number varies with the credit requirement for the major and should be treated as an average figure Physical Education credit earned before Spring Quarter (III) 1972, will not be counted toward the 180 quarter hours required for the degree. However up to four elective PE credits earned in Quarter III, 1972 or later, may be counted toward the 180 hour requirement. No transfer PE credit will be accepted by the College of Arts and Letters. Work transferred from other schools will not be included in the grade point ratio computed for graduation GRADUATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Master's Degree Programs The College of Arts & Letters offers graduate programs leading to the M as ter of Arts degrees in the fields of: English (ENG) French (FRE) Linguistics (LIN) Philo so phy (PHI) Spanish (SPA) Speech Communication (SPE) The Univ e rsity requirements for graduate work at the master's level are described on page 47. The departmental requirements are listed under the appropriate program descrip tions Doctor of Philosophy The Department of English offers a program leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy The University requirements for work at the doctor's level are given on page 48. Specific requirements for the degree are listed under the Department of English. NON-DEGREE PROGRAMS Certificate of Concentration The Certificate of Concentration is a short-te rm goal program for adults who are interested in taking a series of courses in a selected a r ea of Arts & Letters but are not necessarily interested in a degree. The courses, on an undergraduate level are offered to adults who m ay or may not have a degree. The Certificate of Concentration is awarded when a minimum of 25 hours has been completed in a given area or in a combination of areas. (In a combination of areas, 12 hours must be in one particular area ) It is a program that may be taken on a satisfactory-unsatisfactory or letter grade b asis and may be applied toward an undergraduate degree in Art s & Letters The Certificate of Concentration is designed for registration in the Special Student Category rather than the regular route of admission and registration HISTORY OF IDEAS The program in the History of Ideas offers elective courses in the interdisciplinary study of ideas fundamental in Western cultural history e.g. Progress Utopia. The methods of philosophic and linguistic analysis are employed to the ends: (I) discerning how fundamental unit-ideas grow and develop logically and historically ; and (2) discern ing the scope of influence such ideas once developed, may have in relation to other ideas a nd to action INTERDISCIPLINARY LANGUAGE-LITERATURE Interdisciplinary Language-Literature offers courses of an interdisciplinary nature not housed in a specific department or program within the college The primary objective of the courses is to aid the student in expanding his understanding of the inter relations among the various disciplines PROGRAMS AND CURRICULA AMERICAN STUDIES (AMS) The American Studies major is designed for those students interested in s tudying the relationships among the important elements which shape American civilization American Studies is a multi-disciplinary program drawing upon a variety of courses from outside the program and outside the college. A bachelor s degree is available in American Studies. Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Required Core Courses (32 er. hrs ) AMS 301 (5) AMS 313 AMS 311 (5) AMS 491 AMS 312 (5) AMS 492 Required Supporting Courses (12 er hrs.) (5) AMS 493 (4) (4) (no mor e than one course from each department) (4) AFA 335 ENG 330 HTY 400-or 336 (4) or 331 005 (4) AMS 321 or 332 (5) PHI 413 (4) or 331 (4) HTY 311 POL 411 (4) COM 301 (4) or 312 (4) ENG 308 (5) Related Elective s (21 er. hrs.) (no more than 9 hours from one department) Appropriate courses to be selected from the following departments in consultation with an American Studies adviser : Afro-American Studies Anthropology Dance, Economics, linglish, Geology, Geography, History Philosophy, Political Science Religious Studies Sociology Speech Communication, and Interdisciplinary Social Sciences. Students desiring to m a jor in American Studies are reminded that a n interview with a department adviser is mandatory.

PAGE 53

ENGLISH (ENG) Freshman English in Freshman Year All first-time-in-college students are required to take Freshman English in accordance wit h t he following conditions: I. First-time enrolled students (a) who do not intend to take the CLEP Freshman English Test or (b) who have been notified of failing CLEP prior to registration and who do not intend to attempt the examination a second time, must take ENG IOI the first quarter ENG 102 the second quarter and ENG 103 the third quarter of their freshman year If one of the courses is failed that course must be repeated the very next quarter and the remaining courses attempted in immediately subsequent quarters 2. First-time enrolled students (a) who have not taken CLEP prior to their arrival on campus or (b) who have failed but wish to repeat the test must attempt CLEP during their first quarter on campus. During this quarter they should not enroll in ENG IOI. If the examination is failed or not attempted during the student's first quarter, he must take ENG IOI during his second quarter and ENG 102 and 103 in the immediately subsequent quarters until the total requirement is fulfilled In this case, he will complete the sequence by the first quarter of his sophomore year These policies do not apply to first-time enrolled students who can meet the Freshman English requirement with credit transferred from another institution Requ. lfements for the B.A. Degree: The program in English provides a flexible curriculum that recognizes the individual interests of students and offers a wide variety of professional choices. Designed to provide a logical, balanced, and complete sequence of cours es in English studies, the curriculum gives the student a choice of seven options (exclusive of English-Education sequences, described under the section for the College of Education), as follows: I. English and American Literature, Early to Modern. This option is designed to prepare undergraduates for ad vanced study in the profession It focuses on the literature of England from the earliest period through the nineteenth century and on the "classical" period of American literature The required courses (40 hours) for this option include: ENG 310 (5) ENG 313 (5) ENG 330 (5) ENG 311. (5) ENG 314 (5) ENG 331 (5) ENG 312 (5) ENG 315 (5) Beyond this core requirement". the student will select 10 hours of course s from any of the following: ENG 316 (5) ENG '408 (5) ENG 435 (5) ENG 317 (5) ENG 409 (5) ENG 436 (5) ENG 332 (5) ENG 410 (5) ENG 437 (5) ENG 340 (5) ENG 413 (5) ENG 438 (5) ENG 341 (5) ENG 414 (5) ENG 441 (5) ENG 342 (5) ENG 418 (5) ENG 442 (5) ENG 343 (5) ENG 424 (5) ENG 445 (5) ENG 345 (5) ENG 425 (5) ENG 446 (5) ENG 401 (5) ENG 426 (5) ENG 450 (5) ENG .402 (5) ENG 430 (5) ENG 453 (5) ENG 406 (5) ENG 431 (5) ENG 481 (1-5) ENG 407 (5) ENG 432 (5) Beyond the required 50 hours the major is free to take 10 hours of any courses that the department offc;rs II. English and American Literature, Enlightenment to the Present. Like option I, this option i s designed to prepare undergraduates for a dvanced s tudy in the profession The principal difference is that this option emphasizes more recent literature, beginning at the eighteenth century and coming up to the present. COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS 51 The required courses (40 hours) for this option include: ENG 300 (5) ENG 316 (5) ENG 331 (5) ENG 314 (5) ENG 317 (5) ENG 332 (5) ENG 315 (5) ENG 330 (5) Beyond this core requirement, the student will select I 0 hours from any of the following: ENG 310 (5) ENG 408 (5) ENG 432 (5) ENG 340 (5) ENG 409 (5) ENG 435 (5) ENG 341 (5) ENG 410 (5) ENG 436 (5) ENG 342 (5) ENG 413 (5) ENG 437 (5) ENG 343 (5) ENG 414 (5) ENG 438 (5) ENG 345 (5) ENG 418 (5) ENG 441 (5) ENG 376 (5) ENG 419 (5) ENG 442 (5) ENG 400 (5) ENG 424 (5) ENG 445 (5) ENG 401 (5) ENG 425 (5) ENG 446 (5) ENG 402 (5) ENG 426 (5) ENG 453 (5) ENG 406 (5) ENG 430 (5) ENG 476 (5) ENG 407 (5) ENG 431 (5) ENG 481 (1-5) Beyond the required 50 hours the major is free to take 10 hours of any courses the department offers NOTE: Options I and II may be combined for thorough coverage of the entire Anglo-American literary tradition. In that case the requirement of ENG 300 specified in Option II would be waived. III. World Literature. This option is designed for those students who are interested not only in Anglo-American literature but also in the literature (in translation) of other nations of the Western World The required courses (35 hours) for this option include : ENG 300 (5) ENG 340 (5) ENG 343 (5) ENG 301 (5) ENG 341 (5) ENG 302 (5) ENG 342 (5) Beyond this core requirement the student will select 15 hours from any of the following: ENG 310 (5) ENG 409 (5) ENG 317 (5) ENG 410 (5) ENG 330 (5) ENG 413 (5) ENG 331 (5) ENG 414 (5) ENG 345 (5) ENG 418 (5) ENG 376 (5) ENG 419 (5) ENG 377 (5) ENG 424 (5) ENG 400 (5) ENG 425 (5) ENG 401 (5) ENG 426 (5) ENG 402 (5) ENG 430 (5) ENG 406 (5) ENG 431 (5) ENG 407 (5) ENG 432 (5) ENG 408 <5) ENG 435 (5/ ENG 436 (5) ENG 437 (5) ENG 438 (5) ENG 441 (5) ENG 442 (5) ENG 445 (5) ENG 446 (5) ENG 450 (5) ENG 453 (5) ENG 476 (5) ENG 481 (1-5) Beyond the required 50 hours, the major is free to take 10 hours of any courses the department offers

PAGE 54

52 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS IV. General Literature. This option offers a selection of courses which reflect an interest in the relationship between literature and other aspects of contemporary culture. This is a more culturally oriented approach to literature than traditional studies customarily provide. The re quired courses (30 hours) for this option include: ENG 300 (5) One of the following : ENG 301 (5) EN G 340 (5) ENG 302 (5) E NG 341 (5) ENG 310 (5) ENG 342. (5) ENG 450 (5) Beyond this core requirement, the student will select 20 hours from any of the following: ENG 306 (5) ENG 378 (5) ENG 307 (5) ENO 379 (5) ENG 308 (5) ENG 385 (5) ENG 309 (5) ENG 400 (5) ENG 316 (5) ENG 401 (5) ENG 317 (5) ENG 402 (5) ENG 332 (5) ENG 406 (5) ENG 340 (5) ENG 407 (5) ENG 341 (5) ENG 408 (5) ENG 343 (5) ENG 409 (5) ENG 345 (5) ENG 410 (5) ENG 370 (5) ENG 413 (5) ENG 372 (5) ENG 414 (5) ENG 373 (5) ENG 418 (5) ENG 374 (5) ENG 419 (5) ENG 375 (5) ENG 424 (5) ENG 376 (5) ENG 425 (5) ENG 426 (5) ENG 430 (5) ENG 431 (5) ENG 432 (5) ENG 435 (5) ENG 436 (5) ENG 437 (5) ENG 438 (5) ENG 441 (5) ENG 442 (5) ENG 445 (5) ENG 446 (5) ENG 453 (5) ENG 456 (5) ENG 481 (l-5) Beyond the required 50 hours the major is free to take 10 hour s of any courses the department offers V. American Literature. This option, while offering back ground in the literature of England, focuses on the literature which has been produced in America, and includes such possible selections as the literature of Black Americans and the American Indian. The required courses (35 hours) for this option include : ENG 300 (5) ENG 331 (5) ENG 432. (5) ENG 301 (5) ENG 332 (5) ENG 330 (5) ENG 430 (5) Beyond this core requirement, the s tudent will select 15 hours from any of the following : ENG 306 (5) ENG 402 (5) ENG 307 (5) ENG 406 (5) ENG 310 (5) ENG 407 (5) ENG 317 (5) ENG 408 (5) ENG 340 (5) ENG 409 (5) ENG 341 (5) ENG 410 (5) ENG 342 (5) ENG 413 (5) ENG 343 (5) ENG 414 (5) ENG 345 (5) ENG 418 (5) ENG 370 (5) ENG 419 (5) ENG 372 (5) ENG 424 (5) ENG 373 (5) ENG 425 (5) ENG 400 (5) ENG 426 (5) ENG 401 (5) ENG 431 (5) ENG 435 (5) ENG 436 (5) ENG 437 (5) ENG 438 (5) ENG 441 (5) ENG 442 (5) ENG 445 (5) ENG 446 (5) ENG 450 (5) ENG 453 (5) ENG 476 (5) ENG 481 (1-5) Beyond the required 50 hours, the major is free to take 10 hour s of any courses the department offers. VI. Advisory Option. This option is designed for those students who have the maturity, independence, intellec tual curiosity, and eclectic interests to want to design their own programs. Core requirements are: ENG 300 (5) ENG 301 (5) ENG 302 (5) with electives totaling between 35 and 45 credit hours Students in this option must have prior consent of an Englis h adviser at each stage of planning their programs. VII. Creative Writing Option. This option is designed for aspiring writers of fiction or poetry This program, in addition to giving credit for writing through a variety of course offerings, attempts to provide. information about procedures for becoming published a. The required courses (30 hours) for the fiction option include: ENG 351 (5) ENG 435 or ENG 437 or ENG 353 (5) ENG 436 (5) ENG 438 (5) ENG 450 (5) ENG 451 (5) Beyond this core requirement, the student will select 20 hours from any of the following ENG 300 (5) ENG 342 ENG 301 (5) ENG 343 ENG 302 (5) ENG 345 ENG 310 (5) ENG 400 ENG 3ll (5) ENG 401 ENG 312 (5) ENO 402 ENG 313 (5) ENG 406 ENG 314 (5) ENG 407 ENG 315 (5) ENG 408 ENG 316 (5) ENG 409 ENG 317 (5) ENG 410 ENG 330 (5) ENG 413 ENG 331 (5) ENG 414 ENG 332 (5) ENG 418 ENG 340 (5) ENG 419 ENG 341 (5) ENG 424 (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) ENG 425 (5) ENG 426 (5) ENG 430 (5) ENG 431 (5) ENG 432 (5) ENG 435 (5) ENG 436 (5) ENG 441 (5) ENG 442 (5) ENG 445 (5) ENG 446 (5) ENG 453 (5) ENQ 476 (5) ENG 481 (1-5) Beyond the required 50 hours, the major is free to take 10 hours of any courses the department offers. b. The required courses (30 hours) for the poetry option include : ENG 216 (5) ENG 352 (5) ENG 442 (5) ENG 351 (5) ENG 441 (5) ENG 452 (5) Beyond this core requirement t he student is free to select 20 hours from any of the following: ENG 300 (5) ENG 345 (5) ENG 301 (5) ENG 353 (5) ENG 302 (5) ENG 400 (5) ENG 310 (5) ENG 401 (5) ENG 3ll (5) ENG 402 (5) ENG 312 (5) ENG 406 (5) ENG 313 (5) ENG 407 (5) ENG 314 (5) ENG 408 (5) ENG 315 (5) ENG 409 (5) ENG 316 (5) ENG 410 (5) ENG 317 (5) ENG 413 (5) ENG 330 (5) ENG 414 (5) ENG 331 (5) ENG 418 (5) ENG 332 (5) ENG 419 (5) ENG 340 (5) ENG 424 (5) ENG 341 (5) ENG 425 (5) ENG 342 (5) ENG 426 (5) ENG 430 (5) ENG 431 (5) ENG 432 (5) ENG 435 (5) ENG 436 (5) ENG 437 (5) ENG 438 (5) ENG 442 (5) ENG 445 (5) ENG 446 (5) ENG 450 (5) ENG 451 (5) ENG 453 (5) ENG 476 (5) ENG 481 (1-5) Beyond the required 50 hours the major is free to take 10 hours of any courses the department offers Requirements for the M.A. Degree : The M .A. in English is designed primarily to train college teachers. The program includes study of college teaching, as well as the study of literature Requirements for Admission. An average of B in the ,last two years of undergraduate work (a GRE total score of 1000 may be substituted for this requirement). It may be necessary to require students who have not been English undergraduate majors to take extra undergraduate courses before graduate admission to English. Other exceptions may be made by the Graduate Committee of the Department of English Course Requirements I. ENG 693 (this must be the first course taken) 2. Forty-five credit hours, which must include: a. ENG 681 (this must be taken in the student's first or second term in the program)

PAGE 55

b. One of the following adviser: courses as required by the ENG 453 ENG 601 ENG 602 c One of the s e: ENG 610 ENG 620 ENG 625 ENG 616 d One of these : ENG 630 ENG 640 ENG 645 e One of these : ENG 650 ENG 660 f. ENG 683 Options : It is possible, at student option, to take ENG 699 (thesis) in place of one of the elective courses A student may transfer from another university up to 9 hours of graduate credit. He may take up to 10 hours of credit in another department (the courses to be approved in advance by the Department of English Graduate Committee). Comprehensive Examination. Thi s examination will be based on a list of literary works given to e a ch student as he commences his graduate studies The student will be asked to write for one hour on four of the following five areas : 1 British literature before Shakespeare 2 British literature from Shakespeare to 1740 3. British literature from 1740 to 1900 4. American literature before 1900 5 Twentieth Century American and Briti s h literature Students will be graded I (Excellent), 2 (Good), 3 (Satisfactory), or 4 (Unsatisfactory) The Department will recommend s tudents with a grade of 1 or 2 for admission to the Ph.D program. A grade of 3 will s ati s fy the examination requirement for the M.A . degree; a grade of 4 will not. Public Presen'tation. Each student will be required to present, graduate students and faculty, a discussion of a major work or idea from-the area he has not written upon for the comprehensive examination outlined above. The perfomance will be evaluated by the student's examining committee Th esis. Thesis optional (See Options, above) (I Requirements for the M.A. Degree in Junior College Teaching: Thi ; program is intended for those who plan to teach in jun,ior and community colleges. It emphasizes lower-level college teaching. Requirements for admission. See M .A. program above. Course work. I EDR 409 2 EDH 651 3 EDH 653 4. EUC 691 (Internship if required-waivers must be endorsed by the College of Education) 5. The following English courses : a. ENG 601 or ENG 602 (if the student is an experienced teacher) b. ENG 686 (offering in advanced composition for teachers only) : c One of these: ENG 610 ENG 616 ENG 620 ENG 625 d. One of these: ENG 630 ENG 640 ENG 645 e. One of these : ENG 650 ENG 660 f. Five hours of English elective s Comprehensive Examination This examination will be based on a list of literary work s given each student as he his graduate studies The student will be asked to write for one hour on four of following five areas : I British literature before Shakespeare 2. British literature from Shakespeare to 1740 3. British literature from 1740 to 1900 4. American literature before 1900 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS 53 5 Twentieth Century American and British literature Students will be graded 1 (Excellent), 2 (Good), 3 (Satisfactory), or 4 (Unsatisfactory) The Department will recommen d students with grades of I or 2 for admission to the Ph D program. A grade of 3 will satisfy the examination requirement for the M A .; a grade of 4 will not Public Presentation Each student will be required to pre sent, before graduate students and faculty, a discussion of a major work or idea from the area he has not written upon for the comprehensive examination outlined above The performance will be evaluated by the s tudent s examining committee Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree: Aim of the Program The aim of this doctoral program is to produce teachers cholars who have a good general knowledge of English and a speci a l knowledge in their field of concentration. Each student in the program must take courses in teaching college English and these courses include actual teaching experience . The Ph.D in English involves 50 hours of course work beyond the M A degree, exclusive of credits devoted to the doctoral dissertation In addition, each student must achieve a grade of B or A in a foreign language course number 202 (i. e ., FRE 202, GER 202, LAT 202, RUS 202, SPA 202). A dissert a tion is required Requirements for Admission M A degree and a grade of I or 2 on the Univer s ity o.f. South Florida English M.A. final e x amination Transfer students who h a ve the M.A in English must pre s ent a graduate average of at !east B+. Students who do not have a M A in English will be required to take supplementary gradul!te work before being officially admitted to the program. Course work The following courses are required : ENG 693 or its ENG 702 or ENG 703 ENG 791 ENG 799 Seven other courses in English at the 600 or 700 level. A student may transfer from another university up to 9 hours of graduate credit. He may take up to 10 hours of credit in another department (the course to be approved in advance by the Department of English Graduate Committee). Examinations After five courses beyond the M.A the student must take the writt en doctoral Qualifying Examination in all periods of American and British literature (I. British literature to 1500; 2. British literature 1500-1660; 3 British literature 1660-1780; 4 British literature 1780-1890 ; 5 American literature to 1920; 6 American literature after 1920 and British literature after 1890)-writing for two hours on each period The total exam will require twelve hours of writing Students may take this examination only twice ; a second failure disqualifies them from the Ph. D program Students pa s sing this comprehensive e xamination and the foreign language course are admitted to doctoral candidacy After completion of an approved disserta tion the student will defend his dissertation in a two-hour oral examination and will be examined as well on his major field Thereafter, he is awarded his doctoral degree. FOREIGN LANGUAGES (CLF/CLS/FOL/FRE/GER/ ITA/RUS/SPA) Requirements forthe B.A. Degree: Foreign Language major programs are designed to meet the needs of students who desire competency in a language and an exp a nded understanding of its Culture and literature. They are of particular interest to students who wish to teach languages, those

PAGE 56

54 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS who plan to further their studies in graduate sc hool and those who seek careers in various type s of foreign or foreign-related employment. Major progr ams leading to the B achelor of Arts degrees are offered in Classics (Latin Latin-Greek), French German, Italian, Russian, and Spani s h Combined majors are offered in any two languages For the combined major, a st udent niust take 45 hour s in the course s required for the complete major in one language and the stipulated cour ses in the seco nd language (16-20 hours). Instruction is also provided in Portugue se, Romance Philology, the less-co mmonly taught l ang uage s, such as Chine s e, Dutch Modern Hebrew, Modern Arabic, Modern Greek, Polish and others on occasion. CLASSICS (CLS) Latin and Latin-Greek Option For requirement s for this area, see department adviser FRENCH (FRE) Rtquired C:ourses (16 e r hrs.) FRE 301 (4) FRE 405 (4) FRE 406 (4) FRE 303 (4) Required Supporting Courses : 32 hours in upper-level courses planned with the adviser. GERMAN (GER) Required Courses (16 er hrs.) GER 301 (4) GER 405 (4) GER 406 (4) GER 303 (4) Required Supporting Courses: 32 hour s in upper -level courses planned wit h the a d viser. ITALIAN (IT A) Required Courses (16 er. hrs.) IT A 301 (4) IT A 405 (4) IT A 406 (4) ITA 303 (4) Required Supporting Courses : 32 hour s in upp er level co ur ses planned with the adviser. RUSSIAN (RUS ) Required Courses (16 er. hrs.) RUS 301 (4) RUS 405 (4) RUS 406 (4) RUS 303 (4) Required Supportin g Courses: 32 hours in upper-level courses planned with the adviser SPANISH (SP A) Re.quir_ed Courses (20 er hrs.) SPA 301 (4) SPA 405 (4) SPA 407 (4) SPA 303 (4) SPA 406 (4) Required Supporting Courses : 28 hour s in upper leve l courses planned with the adviser. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Requirements for Admission. General requirem en t s for giaduate work are given on page 43. Students who do not h ave an undergradu ate major in French or Spanish may be required to take additional undergraduate courses before be ing admitted to the M.A. program. The student must h ave a 3.0 grade point ratio over the last two years of undergr a duate work attempted, or a total score of 1000 on the Graduate Record Examination. All applica tions must be approved by the Department of Foreign L an guag es Program Requirements For a master's degree in French or Spanish, the following are required: I. Reading proficiency in a second foreign l anguage. 2. Satisfactory completion of a written comp rehensive examination, based upon a reading list provided by t he department on French l a nguage and liter atu r e or Spanish and Spanisl}-American language and lit erature Portions of the comprehensive examination must be w ritten in the foreign l a ngu age. 3 A thesis written under the direction of an adviser and two add itional profe sso r s, or an additional four (4) hours of course work. 4. Course work following one of the plans listed below: Plan I 45 hours plus thesis; or 49 hours. Plan II 31-35 hour s with 10-14 hours in a second language, plus thesis; or 35-39 hours with 10-14 hours in a second language . HUMANITIES (HUM) The Humanities Program: An interdisciplinary program that deals with the visual arts, music and literature together and how they reflect the culture from which they emerge. Secondary sources are used sparingly; students are encouraged to make a vigorous, personal response to specific works of art, literature, a nd music. Requirements tor the B.A. Degree: The curriculum for the Humanities major comprises inte rdi sci plinary courses in the verbal, visual, and musical arts of specified periods a nd cultures. Specific requirements are as follows: 1. Forty-two to fifty-seven credits in upper level Human ities courses. 2. HUM 491, a se nior essay, three credits. 3. Nine credits i n the creative or performing arts Requirements for the B.A. Degree In Humanities Education: A program designed to prepare se condary sc hool Human ities teachers is available through the College of Education. F9r requirements see the College of Education, page 71. .1g01r, Requirements for the M.A. Degree In Humanities ;.,.,, Education: A graduate program leading to a M.A degree in Humanities Education (HUE) is available. For requirements, see the College of Education page 76. LIBERAL STUDIES (ALA) Requirements for the 8.A. Degree: The offers a Liberal Studies m a jor for students who require a broad academic approach for realization of their conceived academic goals (or pre-professional purposes), goals which could not be Ideally ac hieved through pre-defined curricula. Several basic requirement s have been established for the Liberal Studies major. I. A m inim um GPR of 3.0 at the time of admission, including acceptable transfer credits. 2. Upon ad mis sion to th e program no fewer than 30 or more than 120 quarter hours For appl ication to the program, a written, persuasive propo sa l must be submitted which substantiates the student's s pecial academic circumstances and goal s meriting this major, outlining the areas of desired st udy and indicating the intended utilization of the education. If the proposal is accepted, the stu dent will then formulate, in collaboration with the program director, a program of s tudies to be pursued toward his particular academic goals. Foreign language is required ; the Liberal Studies major must complete at least four quarters work in this a rea.

PAGE 57

LINGUISTICS (ANL/ENL/FLL/LIN) Linguistics is primarily an upper-level and graduate discipline with strong interdisciplinary concerns. Under graduates interested in Linguistics must elect one of the three combined tnajors described below. Graduate students may effect complete specialization in the program leading to the Master of Arts degree in Linguistics. Students interested in Linguistics are urged to acquire a broad language background in their undergraduate programs, especially if they intend graduate study A classical language (Latin, Greek, Hebrew) or a non-Western language is strongly recommended in addition to any modern European language(s) the student may have studied. Also, prospective graduate students are advised that good foundations in Mathematics (MTff309 and PHI 509 are especially recommended), computer programming statistics, and experimental design and method ology may prove valuable. All programs for any of the three majors leading to the baccalaureate degree described below must be approved by an adviser from both of the disciplines concerned Requirements for B.A. Degrees: I. Anthropology-Linguistics Major (ANL). This sequence is designed for students who are particularly interested in the role of language in human behavior and cultural development. Required Core Courses (43 er. hrs. minimum) ANT 201 (4) ANT 401 (3-6) ANT 461 (4) ANT 311 (4) ANT 431 ANT 491 (4) ANT 321 (4) or LIN 301 (4) ANT 331 (4) ANT 441 (3-6) LIN 401 (4) Required Supporting Courses (12 er. hrs. minimum from the following group) LIN 321 (4) SSI 301 (4) PSY 405 LIN 405 (4) HU 302 (4) PSY 441 LIN 431 (4) HU 402 (4) SPE 503 LIN 441 l4) PHI 531 (4) (4) (4) (5) *One section of LIN 301 Is for Anthropology majors and requires ANT 201 as a prerequisite 2. English-Linguistics Major (ENL). This sequence is de sign ed for students who are especially interested in the role of linguistic studies in problems of English grammar composition and literary structure and style Required Core Courses (45 er hrs ) ENG 300 (5) ENG 310 (5) ENG 301 (5) ENG 350 (5) ENG 302 (5) ENG 402 (5) ENG 475 ENG 476 ENG 477 (5) (5) (5) COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS 55 Required Supporting Cour ses (12 er. hrs. minimum from the following group) LIN 321 (4) LIN 441 (4) PHI 531 (5) LIN 401 (4) ANC 373 (2) SPE 503 (5) LIN 405 (4) HU 301 (4) LIN 431 (4) HU 401 (4) 3. Foreign Language-Linguistics Major (FLL). This se quence is designed for students who are especially interested in the role of linguistic studies In problems of grammar, composition, and literary structure and style. Required Core Course s (12 er. hrs.) LIN 301 (4) LIN 401 (4) LIN 405 (4) Required Supporting Courses (8 er. hrs. minimum from the following group) LIN 321 (4) LIN 431 (4) LIN 441 (4) ANC 373 (2) ANT 401 (3-6) ENG 477 '(5) Plus one of the following five sequences: I. French (24 er hr s.) FRE JOI (4) FRE 401 (4) FRE 303 (4) FRE 403 (4) II. German (24 er hrs.) GER 301 (4) GER 401 (4) GER 303 (4) GER 403 (4) Ill. Italian (24 er hrs.) ITA 301 (4) ITA 401 (4) ITA 303 (4) ITA 403 (4) IV. Russian (24 er. hrs ) RUS 301 (4) RVS 401 (4) RVS 303 (4) RVS 403 (4) V Spanish (24 er hrs.) SPA 301 (4) SPA 401 (4) SPA 303 (4) SPA 403 (4) HU 301 PHI 531 SPE 503 FRE 405 FRE 406 GER 405 GER 406 ITA 405 ITA 406 RVS 405 RVS 406 SPA 405 SPA 406 (4) (4) (5) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) Students wishing to combine two foreign languages and linguistics must take one of the above sequences as the first language and the sequence 301, 303, 401, 403 (prefix determined by language selected), plus any phonetics, stylistics, or history of the language courses offered for that language Students who intend to do graduate work are strongly urged to consider Latin or Classical Greek as a second language. Students may also elect a non-Western language as a second language ; six quarters satisfies the requirements for one of these The Linguistics course requirements remain the same as for a single foreign language. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Requirements for Admission Undergraduate majors gener ally regarded as appropriate foundations tor graduate study in linguistics (LIN) are: anthropology, English, a foreign language, linguistics, and speech communication ; however a student with a baccalaureate degree in any discipline is eligible. In addition to the general requirements of the University, an applicant must have an academic average of B in all of his major courses and a combined score of 1000 on the aptitude section of the Graduate Record Examination (a minimum of 500 of the total must be earned on the verbal portion). If a student's unde rgraduate preparation has not included suitable introductory courses in general or descriptive linguistics and phonetics, he will be required to remedy the deficiencies by taking LIN 30 I LIN 40 I, LIN 405, and SPE 503. (A-maximum of 8-credit-ho urs earned in these courses may be applied toward the degree requirements, except that graduate credit will not be given for LIN 301.) The undergraduate study of one or more foreign languages, especially a non-Western language is strongly encouraged. Course Work. An M .A. degree in linguistics requires a minimum of 48 hours of course work. All st udent s must satisfy the core requirements which constitute a minimum of 28 hours

PAGE 58

56 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETIERS The remainder of the course work may be taken in linguistics c our s e s o r closely rel a ted cour s es in other departments notably A nc i ent Studie s, Education, English Foreign Languag es, Philo s ophy P sy chology Sociology and Speech Commun ica t i on The s tudent may elect to take all of these remain ing c o u rs e s in one s uch department or he may take them in s e ve r a l dep a rtments, but eac h program must be planned with and a ppro ved by the Linguistics adviser who may make a ppropriat e s ub s titutions when he deems these educationally advi sa ble Core R e quirements (28 er hrs. minimum) LIN 600 (2) LIN 621 (4) LIN 601 (4) LIN 699 (minimum of 2 units LIN 602 (4) must be earned) LIN 611 (4) Plus on e cour s e from each of the following two groups: Group A Group B LIN 612 (4) LIN 623 (4) ENG 687 (5) LIN 633 (4) For e i g n Lan guag e Requirement The foreign language requirement i s rega rded a s an integral part of the M.A program in L i ngui s t i c s, and s tudent s must demonstrate a proficiency in one for e ign language for the degree. However students who intend to con c entrat e in his torical-comparative linguistics will be expected to bring to the program an extensive undergraduate background in for e ign languages or else to remedy the deficien cy a ft e r a dmi ss ion Students who intend to concentrate their work in general descriptive linguistics or other sub speci a lt i e s will have wide latitude i n their choice of a foreign l a ngu a ge to sa ti s f y the requirement, and the study of a non West e rn l a ngu a ge is s trongly encouraged The choice of a languag e a nd th e method for satisfying the proficiency requ i re ment (e. g co ur s e work, examination, etc ) will be determined on a n i ndividu a l basis by the student and his thesi s comm i tt ee. Oth e r R e quir e ments. The s tudent will present an accep t a ble th es i s in the field of linguistic studies (from 2 to 8 hours credit are gr a n t ed for .thi s project through registration for LIN 699; see abo v e und e r course work requirements) In addition, the stud e nt mus t p ass a c omprehen s ive examination in linguistics both oral and written If a s tudenf has elected to take as many as eight hour s of cour s e work in a department other than Lingui stics in his program then his examination will cover material from tho s e course s also Th e following cour s es taught in other departments are also linguistic s cour s e s or are c l o s ely related to linguistics : ANC 373 ENG 476 GER 513 SPE 503 ANT 401 ENG 477 GER 601 SPE 511 CLY 580 ENG 616 PHI 531 SPE 603 CLY 623 ENG 686 PSY 441 SPE 611 EDT '431 ENG 687 SPA 403 SPE 612 E DT 631 FRE 403 SPA 501 EDX 649 FRE 601 SPA 601 Descriptions of these courses may be found under the a pp r opriate d e p a rtmental heading MASS COMMUNICATIONS (COM) M a s s Communication s offer s a number of courses, essen tially lib e ral arts i n approach which introduce students to the theor i e s principle s, a nd problems of communications, em ph as izing the concept of freedom of information as the corner s t o ne of Con s titutional Democracy and preparing students for futur e lea der s hip rather than yeoman roles in communica tion s medi a G ra duate s s hould understand the structure and function s of m ass media sy s tem s as well as the basic processes of communic a tion In addition, students specialize ih an area of mass co mmunications ( advertising, broadcasting, film, maga zine s, n ews e d i tori a l public relations or visual communica tions) to ble nd a s trong introduction to profe s sional skills with the theor e tic a l o rien ta tion Majors seeking careers i n the m a ss media will be directed to the various media with which the department maintains close contact for summer internship s and parftime work. Requireme n ts for the B.A. Degree: To be admitted to the core curriculum in Mass Communica tions, students must have completed 75 hours with a 2.5 minimum GPA, and English 101, 102 and 103 with a minimum grade of "C" in each. Both course s in the Mass Communications core curriculum (COM 302 and COM 303) must be completed with a minimum grade of "C" before any other COM-prefix course may be taken A 2 5 GPA in Mass Communication courses is required for graduation and no grade lower than "C" in Mass COM prefix courses may be u s ed toward graduation . A required core curriculum, Writing for the Mass Media" (COM 302) and "Mass C ommunication s and Society (COM 303), and a balance between required and recommended courses in the major sequence offer s tudents a guided set of essential courses plus a number of option s of their own choosing. Majors will take approximately 72 hours of elective s outside the department in addition to the 60-hour University distribution requirement. Students will be encouraged to use a substantial number of their electives in courses which support their major Required are 8 hours in the Mass Communications core curriculum (COM 302 and COM 303) a nd 40 hours in a major sequence-20 hours specified and 20 hour s to be selected from a restricted list of option s-for a minimum and maximum of 48 hours in COM-prefix cour s e s within the 180-hour degree requirement. Certified typing ability of 25 words per minute is a prerequisite for admission to the dep a rtment. The departmental sequence requirements are : Departmental Core Currlmlum (8 er. hrs ) COM 302 (4) COM 303 (4) Sequence Requirements Sequence Selections I. Advertising Requirements COM 311 (4) COM 313 (4) COM 312 (4) COM 341 (4) Selective Requirements COM 314 (4) COM 371 (4) COM 330 (4) COM 375 (4) COM 361 (4) COM 376 (4) U. Broadcasting Requirements News Track COM 330 (4) COM 362 (4) COM 361 (4) COM 403 (4) Selective Requirements COM 331 (4) COM 400 (4) COM 334 (4) COM 435 (4) COM 363 (4) tOM 449 (4) Programming and Production Track (20 er hrs.) (20 er. hrs.) COM 414 COM 403 (4) COM 449 (4) COM 500 (4) COM 465 (4) COM 463 (4) COM 500 (4) COM 311 (4) COM 368 (4) COM 468 (4) COM 361 f4l COM 465 (4) Selective Requirements COM 312 (4) COM ,353 (4) COM 371 (4) COM 313 (4) COM 354 (4) COM 461 (4) COM 314 {4) COM 355 (4) COM 462 (4) COM 341 (4) COM 364 (4) Ill. Film Requirements COM 354 (4) COM 452 ( 4 ) COM 457 (4) COM 451 (4) COM 456 (4) Selective Requirement s COM 353 .(4) COM 371 (4) COM 455 (4) COM 355 (4) COM 450 (4) COM 458 (4) COM 356 (4) COM 453 (4) COM 554 (4) IV. Journalism Requirements News-Editorial Track COM 330 ( 4 ) COM 403 (4) COM 435 (4) COM 3 3 1 ( 4 ) COM 433 (4)

PAGE 59

Selective Requirements COM 334 (4) COM 375 (4) COM 439 (4) COM 371 (4) COM 376 (4) COM 500 (4) COM 372 (4) COM 434 (4) Magazine Track COM 320 (4) COM 325 (4) COM 403 (4) COM 321 (4) COM 330 (4) Selective Requirements COM 311 (4) COM 341 (4) COM 425 (4) COM 331 (4) COM 371 (4) COM 435 (4) COM 334 (4) COM 375 (4) COM 439 (4) v. Public Relations COM 330 (4) COM 441 (4) COM 449 (4) COM 341 (4) Selective Requirements COM 311 (4) COM 331 (4) COM 375 (4) COM 312 (4) COM 361 (4) COM 403 (4) COM 313 (4) COM 362 (4) COM 453 (4) COM 321 (4) COM 371 (4) COM 500 (4) VI. Visual Communications Requirements COM 354 (4) COM 371 (4) COM 403 (4) COM 370 (4) COM 375 (4) Selective Requirements COM 311 (4) COM 355 (4) COM 425 (4) COM 321 (4) COM 356 (4) COM 453 (4) COM 330 (4) COM 361 (4) COM 456 (4) C OM 331 (4) COM 368 (4) COM 461 (4) COM 341 (4) COM 372 (4) COM 463 (4) COM 353 (4) COM 376 (4) COM 471 (4) PHILOSOPHY (PHI) Requirements for the B.A. Degree: The philosophy program includes five major areas of study: (1) logic and scientific method (2) history of philosophy, (3) of knowledge, (4} theory of reality, and (5) theory of valhe. Majors in philosophy must comp let e at least 45 credit hours in the program, with the following courses required: from area (1)-PHI 303; from area (2)-PHI 333, 334, and 335. In addition, all majors who are going to graduate school in philosophy are urged to take at least one course in the three remaining major areas of study. All majors must take at least nine credits above the 413 level, including two seminars. No more than two of PHI 301, 311, 317 will be counted toward the major. Credit for a major in philosophy will be extended for HU 315. Honors Program The Department of Philosophy offers the philosophy major the opportunity of participating in the Philosophy Department Honors Program A student may graduate wih departmental honors if he: (I) is accepted by the department as an honors candidate, (2) completes four honors courses with a grade point average of 3.5 or better, and (3) completes the courses necessary for a philo sophy major with a grade point average of 3.2 or better. The four honors courses will consist of three upper-level courses in which the student attends regular class sessions but makes arrangements with the instructor for additional work. The student will receive additional credit for honors work by enrolling for one hour of directed study for each course taken as an honors course. The fourth honors course will be a research project, and the student will enroll for the project under PHI 483. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Requirements for Admission. For admission the student must have a B average in Philosphy at the undergraduate level, COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS 57 have a score of at least 1000 on the GRE, and have completed the equivalent of PHI 303, 333, 334, and 335. No credit towards the M.A. degree will be given for courses outside the Department of Philosophy without the approval of the Graduate Program Director and the Department Chairman. Program Requirements. The following comprise the degree requirements in Philosophy, in addition to the general requirements for graduate work as specified on pages 43-47. I Reading knowledge of a foreign langul!ge approved by the student's adviser. 2. A written comprehensive examination, 3. A thesis or thesis-type paper, written under the direction of an adviser assigned by the Department Chairman, and approved by the student's supervisory committee. RELIGIOUS STUDIES (REL) In Religious Studies, students are afforded a variously dimensioned field of study which hopefully facilitates an educated person's understanding of his presuppositions on the meaning of life, the nature of the religious-social milieu in which he lives, and the religious dynamic in human history. It also aims toward an understanding of the religious thought and life-styles of people possessing religious heritages other than the JudaeoChristian heritages Majors in Religious Studies will find, in addition, courses designed to give depth in certain areas of religious investigation and to supply language tools and critical analysis method s which will prepare them for advanced graduate study Requirements for the B.A. Degree : A total of 49 credit hours are required for a major chosen from Religious Studies courses (REL). Of the 49 hours required for a major in Religious Stud i es, twelve hours may be selected from the following extra departmental courses: ANC 341 (3) ANC 443 (3) PHI 333 (4) ANC 342 (3) AST 371 (5) PHI 341 (4) ANC 343 (3) BIO 256 (4) PHI 409 (4) ANC 441 (3) HTY 361 (4) PHI 521 (4) ANC 442 (3) PHI 301 (4) SOC 373 (4) With departmental approval, students may make other course s ubstitutions for the extra-departmental courses listea above.

PAGE 60

58 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS Each student's program must be planned with a faculty adviser in Religious Studies, who may make appropriate course substitutions when such changes are academically advisable. ANCIENT STUDIES Within the Department of Religious Studies there is also a sequence of courses in Ancient Studies. This sequence provides a program for students interested in the civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean and Middle East. The sequence in Ancient Studies requires 52-54 credits (of which 37 credits mus t be in Religious Studies courses) The prerequisite is normally two years of high school Latin or one year of college Latin. (The latter can be taken concurrently with other required courses but without credit toward it. It can be waived in special cases with the consent of the coordinator.) Recommended courses: Two ancient l a nguages ANC 321 (5) ANC 423 (4) CLS 351 (4) ANC 352 (3) ANC 427 (4) ANC 421 (4) ANC 429 (4) The sequence of Ancient Studies courses is to be arranged in consultation with the coordinator of the sequence and approved by the department chairperson. SPEECH COMMUNICATION (SPE/ENS/ST A) The speech communication curriculum provides courses for all students interested in increasing understanding and skills in human communication. lt offers a major program in Speech Communication (SPE) and two combined major programs : Speech Communication-English (ENS) and Speech Commu nication-Theatre (ST A). Requirements for the B.A. Degree: A major in speech communication requires a minimum of 45 credits in SPE cour s es A combined Speech Communication English major, inten ded primarily for those preparing to teach in secondary schools, requires 65 credits in the combined areas and five credits in theatre A combined Speech Communication Theatre major requires 69 credits in the combined areas The major requirements for all three speech communication sequences are as follows: SPE 201 (5) SPE 321 (5) SPE 491 (5) SPE 203 (5) SPE 363 (5) Speech Communication Sequence (SPE) The major requirements as li"sted above, and 20 hours of speech communication elec tives in 300-level courses or above. (A maximum of 10 elective credits may be taken in any given speech communication area. These areas include: Rhetoric and Communication Theory, Ora l Interpretation and Speech Sci ence. 'fhe rem a ining credits must be taken in one or more of the other speech co mmunication areas .) Within the 20 credits of speech communication electives, no more than a total of six hours may be co unted toward the major from the following two hour courses: SPE 320, 322, 360, and 366. Further st udy in any of the three areas beyond the minimum 45 houis and within the maximum 60 hours is strongly encouraged. Speech Communication-English Sequence (ENS) The major requirements as listed above, and 10 credits of speech communication electives in 300-level courses or above Within the 10 credits of speech communication electives, no more than a total of four credit hours may be counted toward the major from the following two-hour courses: SPE 320, 322, 360, and 366. English requirements as listed below: Two courses from the following : ENG 300 (5) ENG 310 (5) ENG 312 (5) ENG 301 (5) ENG 311 (5) ENG 313 (5) One course from the following: ENG 302 (5) ENG 331 (5) ENG 332 (5) ENG 330 (5) One course from the following: ENG 350 (5) ENG 351 (5) One course from the following : ENG 307 (5) ENG 437 (5) ENG 446 (5) ENG 308 (5) ENG 438 (5) ENG 317 (5) ENG 442 (5) Also required : ENG 475-(5) TAR 303 (5) Speech Communication-Theatre Sequence (ST A): The major requirements as listed above, and 10 credits of speech communication electives in 300-level courses or above. Within the 10 credits of speech communication electives, no more than a total of four credit hours may be counted toward the major from the following two-hour courses: SPE 320, 322, 360, and 366. Theatre requirements as listed below : TAR 201 (2) TAR 212 (4) TAR 213 (4) TAR 211 (4) Eight hours credit from the following : TAR 311 (4) TAR 431 (4) TAR 437 (4) TAR 339 (4) TAR 434 (4) Eight hours credit from the follnwing: TAR 312 (4) TAR 361 (4) TAR 411 (4) TAR314 (4) TAR365 (4) TAR 321 (4) TAR 410 (4) Plus four hours credit from either of the above tracks. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Requirements for Admission. In addition to the general requirements of the University, an applicant must have: (1) a baccalaureate degree in Speech or related fields from an approved college or university; (2) a B average or better in all work attempted during the last two years of undergraduate work or a total quantitative-verbal GRE score of 1000 or higher. All prospective M.A candidates must take the GRE whether or not they have a minimum of B average; (3) review by the Department of Speech Communication graduate committee; (4) approval by the department chairperson. Course Work A Master of Arts degree in Speech Com munication requires 45 credit hours of course work distributec( in the following manner: 15 hours of Rhetoric and Communication Theory, 10 hours in Oral Interpretation of Literature, 5 hours of Speech Science, 5 hours of research and bibliography, and 10 hours of electives. (Electives in related areas must be approved by the candidate's major professor and the departmental graduate committee.) For graduate SPE electives, students may substitute two courses acceptable for graduate credit in related areas, subject to approval by the Department of Speech Communication. Examinations. Each student is required to pass a written comprehensive examination. An oral examination is also required for students selecting the thesis option Other Requirements. Each student will select one of the plans listed below. Successful completion of one of the following plans is in addition to the 45-qm \rter-hour requirement : competency in the selected plan to be determined by the candidate's supervisory committee. Plan A-An extended critical or analytical paper (thesis) in the field of Speech Communication studies, (SPE 699) Plan B-Three courses (or 12 credits) in Speech Com munication and/or other academic disciplines if part of an approved planned sequence If this plan is elected, students are ordinarily expected to follow a sequence of courses that either deepens their competency in a speech communication area or in a related academic dis cipline or in a research tool area such as computer sciences, foreign languages, linguistics, or statistics.

PAGE 61

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ti/ ,...,,,..",t The College of Business Administration offers courses of study leading to both undergraduate and graduate degrees. These programs are designed to prepare individuals for busines s and government careers, and gradua te education. The undergraduate curriculum leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree. Programs in Accounting, Economics, Finance, Management, Marketing and General Business Administration (an interdisciplinary business curriculum) are structured to ac complish the following objectives: 1. Give the student a broad foundation in general and liberal education, a thorough grounding in basic busines s courses, and some specific competence in at least one significant functional area of economics, busines s, cir administration. 2. Strengthen students' powers of creative, independent analysis, and sensitivity to social and ethical values. 3 Instill in students a desire for learning that will continue after they have graduated and taken their place in the community. A general graduate progr a m in Business Administration, and s pecialized graduate programs in the field s of Accounting, Economics, a nd Man age ment seek to : 1. Make high quality professional education avajlab le to those qualified individuals who have selected specific career objectives in fields of business government or education. 2 Support adequately the research activity so vitally nece ssa ry to m a intain a quality graduate faculty and program. 3. Foster independ e nt, innovative thinking and action as a professional individual. BACCALAUREATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS General Requirements for Degrees The general requirement for gradua tion in the College of Business Administration is the satisfactory completion of 180 academic quarter hours, including from 87 hours minimum to 100 hours maximum of business courses, depending upon the major field and electives chosen. 1. General Distribution Courses : 60 hours distributed over five areas as required by the University of South Florida (See p. 33 ) "-','' 2.' General Electives: 20-27 hours to be chosen from courses not listed in the General Distribution areas. 3 Business Ccire: 53 hours which includes 9 hours of Accounting (ACC 201, 202, 300); 8 hours of Economics (ECN 201, 202) ; S hours of Intermediat e Price Theory (ECN 301); 8 hours of Statistics (ECN 231, 331) ; S hours of Finance (FIN 301); S hours of Management (MAN 301); S hours of Marketing (MKT 301); S hours of Law (GBA 361); 3 hours of Computer Application (GBA 333). 4. Major Area: 20-27 hours with a 2.0 GPA in these courses S. Business Electives: 7-20 hours. Note: College Level Examination Program (CLEP) may be substituted for course work in the General Distribution area and some courses in the Business Core. For specific details see page 38. Admission to College Programs Undergraduate Programs New students and students currently enrolled at the University of Sciuth Florida, who are in good academic s tanding at the University of South Florida, may be admitted to the College of Business Administratfon by filing an application to major in an undergraduate business degree program in the College Office of Undergraduate Advising and Records. Transferi from Junior Colleges: Junior college students should co.melete the program o{ general education as required by the junior college. Certification to this effect will be accepted as fl!lfilling the general distribution requirements of the University of Soi,1th Florida. Students should follow the business parallel program indicated in their junior college catalog to assure graduation from the University of South Florida in minimum time. Should the junior college catalog not specify pre-business courses, we recommend that students take two semesters of mathematics; two se mester s of economics; two semesters of acco unting, and one semester of statistics while still at the junior college. Busine ss is requiring more and more analytical functions of its management-level personnel each year. Since one of the most basic analytical tools is mathematics, more higher mathematics is being required as a prerequisite for business courses. The student is therefore encouraged to complete more than the minimum mathematics requirements and to add beginning calculus to his curriculum at the junior college. All transfer students, pa r ticularly those not pursuing the parallel program, should note that a maximum of nine quarter hours of upper level business courses wiil be counted toward fulfillment of parts 3, 4 and S of the general requirements Upper level refers to courses available only as 300 and 400 level courses in the College of ijusines s Administration at the University of South Florida. Of these nine hours, no more than five qarter hours may be transferred for credit in the st udent's major field. 59 Students transferring in more than six quarter hours of Elementary Accounting must still complete ACC 300 in the Busine ss Core. The extra hours of Elementary Accounting transferred will apply toward the Business Electives require ments. Students transferring credit in Elementary Statistics will receive credit for ECN 231. Extra hours of Elementary Statistics will apply toward the Business Electives requirements. These students, however, must take ECN 331. Transfer students from Other Colleges and Universities: Transfer credit will be allowed for general distribution courses similar to those; required at the University of South Florida. The prerequi site courses in business subjects, such as accounting principle s and principles of economics, may also be given transfer credit. Other credit transfer requests will be considered individually on their merit. Student Advising and Counselling in the College The College of Busine ss Administration provides advising and counselling through a central Office of Advising and

PAGE 62

60 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Records and through faculty advisers in individual departments. Central Advising and Records: The Undergraduate Studies Advising and Records Office provides information about I) academic program requirements in the College of Bus iness Administration, 2) services provided to s tudents, and 3) student organizations in the College of Business Administration. It advises students on all undergraduate business program s registration procedures and conducts registration for College of Business Administration courses. It evaluates records of students entering the College of Business Administration and maintains these and subsequent records. Thi s office is the primary source of advice on general distribution requirements, busine ss core requirements and, along with the faculty advisers, on general electives. Departmental Advising and Counselling Services Each depart ment in the co llege provide s advising and counselling services in the individual majors and th e interdisciplinar y bu s ine ss cur riculum. Ttie se faculty advisers may serve as a source of assistance on requirements in the individual majors, and general and business electives. Contact the Office of Advising and Records for further information. GRADUATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS The College of Business Administration at USF offers a number of graduate programs, including the Master of Business Administration, Master of Accountancy, Master of Arts degree in Economics, and Master of Science degree in Management. Evening and day courses are scheduled in such a way as to allow either part time or full time students to complete all program requirements within a reasonable length of time Applicants to graduate programs in the College of Business Administration should apply directly to the University Graduate Admissions Office and must meet the University requirements for admission (see pages 43-44). Applicants are expected to demonstrate the ability to perform successfully in graduate st udies in busine ss. To be admitted, applicants must furnish satisfactory GMA T (GRE for Economics) scores and grade point averages. Three letters of recommendation are also required Student s interested in s pecific programs within the college should contact the appropriate graduate studies a dviser: M.B.A -College Graduate Office ; M.Acc.-Professor Robert J. West; M.A. degree in Economics-Professor Edward Ford; M S. degree in Man .agement-Professor Thomas Johnson. Supporting Programs Two significa nt programs support College academic activities. The Center for Urban Economics and Management Studies (CUEMS) serves as a research and service arm to supplement and expand the academic programs, particularly in relation to the urban thrust of the College. Studies conferences, and other projects are mounted in cooperation with business, government, and other educational units. The Center for Economic Education (CEE) i s sponsored and administered in conjunction w i th the College of Education. The objective is to raise the level of econo mic understanding of Floridians. Working in cooperation with the Joint Council on Economic Education, the Florida Council, other State organiza tions, and regional public sc hool s, programs for K-12, as well as adult education programs h ave been developed as the primary vehicle for this effort. PROGRAMS AND CURRICULA BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BA/MBA) General Business Administration (GBA) Flexible Program Student $ with special objectives and career interests have the opportunity to develop an undergraduate program to meet these needs. Working closely with a faculty adviser, students may design an approved plan of study over and above the undergraduate business core. Essentially, business and non business electives are blended to best meet special needs. This program will contain 34 to 47 hours beyond the business core, and no more than 16 h ours will be in any single business discipline The program shall also contain such non-business e l ectives as will contribute to the academic objectives of the student. The Master of Business Administration The Master of Business Administration degree program is designed to enable persons with diverse backgrounds to develop the skills and insights essential for management personnel in business and not-for-profit organizations. Built into the program is the flexibility to meet the needs of students with backgrounds in engineering, the sciences, and the humanities, as well as those with undergr aduate training in administration. The learning environment blends work in structured sit uation s where students gain command of analytical techni ques, together with work in comprehensive unstructured applications which sharpen st udents resourcefulness of sorting out complex problems and selecting optimal courses of action. Emphasis throughout the program is on problem -s olving skills. Cour ses are sc heduled to accommodate students already employed who are seeking a n opportunity to upgrade and broaden their professional intere sts, as well as students wishing to pursue full-time s tudies. The program is de s igned so that part time students who can attend classes only in the evening can complete the program in a reasonable period. University Center

PAGE 63

Students with a background in business administration complete a total of 48 credit hours of 500 and 600 level courses d esignated by the adviser. Some advanced under graduate courses in special areas are occasionally included. Generally, these 48 hours are drawn from the following subject areas : Accounting Theory and Practice Statistical Theory and Methods Decision Theory Production and Control Financial Management Managerial Econ omics Capital Markets Economic Conditions Analysis and Forecasting Capital Budgeting Marketing Management Personnel, Industrial, Labor, and Human Relations Integrative Seminars and Laboratories Individual or Group Projects in the Ptivate or Public Sector. Typically, the prograra of M B.A. students will include the following core courses. In some instances, other courses may be substituted for one or more of these requirements: ACC 601, 602 ECN 605, 607 FIN 601, 602 OBA 603, 605, 615 MAN 601, 602 MKT 601, 602 St udents with backgrounds other than business adminis tration may be required to take additional foundation courses or otherwise demonstrate competence in relevant subject matter areas, as part of the program, even after appropriate considera tion is given to scores on proficiency examinations and studies at other institutions Undergraduates majoring in other areas such as mass communications, theatre, psychology, and physical sciences, may want to devote some of their elective studies to M.B.A. preparation. The following courses are suggested : ACC 201, 202, 300 ECN 201, 202, 231, 331 FIN 301 MAN 301 MKT 301 Credit Hours (9) (16) (5) (5) (5) Total (40) The M B.A. program permits a student to become a generalist, but those who wish to do so may specialize to a limited extent by electing an emphasis in Finance or in Marketing. These program variations allow the student to concentrate on more specific objectives while still acquiring the broad gauge training the M B .A. program is designed to provide. M.B.A. with Emphasis In Finance Students seeking a graduate education with a concentration in the field of Finance should enroll in the Master of Business Administration program.' All students will complete the core courses in the M.B.A. program and 9 elective hours of courses in finance or in finance combined with other pertinent courses approved by the adviser Elective courses in Finance cover a wide range of subject matter including investments, financial intermediaries, financial policy and strategy for existing firms, and advanced theories of finance. Topics of mutual interest to the student and the faculty may also be covered for variable course credit No thesis is required. M.B.A. with Emphasis In Marketing Students wishing to concentrate their studies in Marketing should enroll in the M B.A. program. The nine credit hou.rs of elective course work can include studies in consumer behavior, physical distribution system and channels, promotion and COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 61 advanced marketing research. Other areas of marketing can be undertaken on an independent study basis. No thesis is required. ACCOUNTING (ACC) The Accounting program offers students the opportunity to enter directly into the fields of professional accounting, private accounting, and governmental accountings. The professional accounting option prepares the student for employment by firms of certified public accountants; the private accounting option prepares the student for employment by individual business organizations such as manufacturers and retailers, and the governmental option prepares the student for employment by the various branches of federal, state, and local government. Departmental advisers will assist student in designing programs to meet specific career objectives. Requirements for the B.A. degree Students admitted to this program must complete 24-36 credits in upper level accounting, 53 credits in the Business Core and 10-23 credits in Business electives It is strongly recom mended that all accounting students take either OBA 371, Business Communications or ENG 350, Advanced Expository Writing Accounting courses taken by accounting majors on an S/U basis will not be counted toward the 180 hour graduation requirement. Required Accounting Courses (24-36 credit hours) ACC 301 (4) ACC 303 (3) ACC 421 (4) ACC 302 (4) Plus 9-21 credits from the following: ACC 401 (3) ACC 411 (4) ACC 423 (4) ACC 402 (3) ACC 412 (3) ACC 425 (3) ACC 405 (4) ACC 422 (3) Accounting majors must e a rn a 'C' grade in each of the sequential upper level accounting courses before being allowed to go on to the next course. Students wishing to qualify to take the CPA examination in the State of Florida must have earned a minimum of 27 credits in upper-level accounting courses Any further questions concerning the CPA examination should be directed to the Chairperson of the Accounting department Requirements for the Master of Accountancy Degree (M.Acc.) The Master of Accountancy Program i s designed to meet the increasing needs of busines s, government, and public accounting for persons who have professional training in accounting as well as background in such areas as qu a ntitative methodology, economic analysis, and management science For the student who has the equivalent of an undergraduate major in accounting, the progra.m consists of approximately 48 quarter hours. A minimum of 18 quarter hour s (and not more than fifty percent) of the progr a m is devoted to the study of professional accounting. Another 18 quarter hours of the program consists of study in the related areas of financial management, economics management s cience, and quantitative decision models The remaining 12 quarter hours of the program course work is elected by the student in con s ultation with his graduate school adviser. Elective courses taken in the area of accounting may not exceed six (6) quarter hours Admission is open to any student who has a baccalaureate degree and meets the University graduate requirements Students who do not have the equivalent of an undergraduate degree in accounting will be required to take additional courses The number of additional courses deemed necessary will depend on the academic background of the individual s tuqent

PAGE 64

62 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS APMINISTRATION Required courses are: Accounting Courses, (18 er. hrs.) ACC 605 Development of Accounting Thought (3) ACC 606 Contemporary Accounting Theory (3) ACC 607 Systems Theory and QuaJ)titative Applications (3) ACC 611 Federal Tax Research and Planning (3) ACC 621 Managerial Cost Analysis and Control (3) ACC 623 Ethics and Responsibility in Professional Accountancy (3) Business Courses (18 er. hrs.) GBA 603 Quantitative Methods I (3) GBA 605 Quantitative Methods II (3) MAN 602 Administrative Decision Processes (3) ECN 607 Aggregate Economics (3) FIN 601 Financial Management (3) 6XX Economics or Finance Elective (3) Electives (At least six quarter hours must be in non-accounting courses) (12) ECONOMICS (ECN) Economics is one of the vital disciplines investigaiing the complex problems and relationships in modern society. Indeed, the very breadth of economics has led to major areas within the discipline, including labor economics, international economics, urban and regional economics, monetary economics, public finance, industrial organization, comparative economic systems, and the like. Students are grounded in economic tlieory and economic statistics to facilitate the investigation of the problems of human behavior, decision-making, and organizational effec tiveness in these problem areas. Students majorllig in economics are encouraged to supplement their programs with courses in other business and social science subjects. Management, finance marketing, accounting, political science, psychology, sociology, and others contribute greatly to an enriched plan of study. A student may plan the best possible program to help him achieve his particular career objectives. Similarly, a variety of courses in economics are designed to permit students majoring in other disciplines to acquire the skills and insights provided in economics. The department of.fers students in other colleges the opportunity to take a minor concentration in economics. The only required courses are ECN 201 and 202 and twelve (12) additional hours of economics courses. Requirements tor the B.A. Degree: A student may earn a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in economics by completing satisfactorily a minimum of 48 credits in economics. Normally, these 48 credits include: ECN 201 (4) ECN 323 (5) ECN 401 (5) ECN 202 (4) ECN 231 (3) ECN 301 (5) ECN 331 (5) In addition to this core, a student is encouraged to select 300 level courses in several of the applied areas during their junior year. The remaining economics electives may be selected from those 300 and 400 level courses that provide the type of program that best suit the student's interests and objectives. A student in the College of Business Administration also must satisfy the other Business Core requirements detailed on page 59. Students interested in majoring in economics are en couraged to contact the departmental advisers for more information about the program In addition, the department maintains a file describing the varied career opportunities for economists in business, government and education. Requirements tor the M.A. Degree: Applicants should submit results of the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test and meet other University require ments specified on pages 43-44. The primary requisites for succes$_ in graduate study are. strong motivation, aptitude, and basic intellectual ability. An undergraduate major in economics is not required but a sound background in economic theory, mathematics, and statistics will permit completion of the master's program in the normal time span of one year The Master of Arts degree in economics permits students to select one of three approaches. The first emphasizes terminal professional training to prepare the student for decision making and problem solving roles in business and other organizations. The second approach prepares the student for doctoral work in economics in other recognized institutions and teaching in secondary and junior college educational institutions. Students in the M.A program may elect to emphasize p4blic sector economics. The primary objective of this emphasis is to provide the skills necessary for the performance of economic analysis and policy formulation in the public sector-particularly at state and local levels The fields of economics stressed are public economics, urban economics and industrial organization. Particular attention is devoted to such topics as plannina programming-budgeting, cost-benefit analysis, public revenue sources, issues in fiscal federalism, techniques of income redistribution, models of urban growth and development, intra urban location patterns, analysis of urban social problems .. anti trust and other forms of government regulation of business. business. All programs involve preparation in economic theory and quantitative methods. The student in the professional programs then supplements these skills with an emphasis on couFses in applied economics. The student who is preparing for doctoral studies normally takes additional courses in economic theory, mathematics and statistics. Research and the writing of a thesis may be incorporated into any program at the option of the student. The natre of the thesis subject indicates his area of specialization and interest. The economics department partici pates in the Junior College Teaching Program jointly with College of Education as outlined on page 80. The student must complete 45 hours of graduate -C:ll.f4it selected in consultation with the adviser in the economics department. At least 35 of these hours must be in economics. Normally, these 35 credits include: m m FINANCE (FIN) Undergraduate program in Finance The Finance program provides broad-gauged analytical training for students anticipating a career in the management of both large and small organizations. students seeking a career with financial institutions in the field of insurance and real estate should find the finance major particularly valuable. In addition, the program is designed to provide the flexibility needed by students who seek professional degrees in areas such as law and public administration. The Finance program offers applied and theoretical courses directed to the identification and solution of such problems as the acquisition of and allocation of scarce funds as employed by economic units under uncertainty in both the private and public sectors. Finance is an interdisciplinary approach which draws on 'economic theory, accounting information systems, and the quantit ative decisiori framework of statistics and mathematics. The r equired courses for finance majors focus on under standing the analytical tools and institutional environment for decision-makers. It includes capital budgeting, the concepis of asset and liability management, and an examination of the social and regulatory impact upon the decision-making process.

PAGE 65

Finance-Pre-Law A minimum of 20 hours of Finance courses with 14-27 hours of Business electives chosen with consent of adviser to specifically meet the needs of the student. R '"1uirements for the B.A. Degree: Students in this program must complete 20-27 credits in upper level Finance, 53 hours of Business Core, and 14-27 hours of Business electives. Required Finance Courses (20-27 er hrs ) FIN 321 (4) FIN 411 (4) FIN 421 (4) Plus 8-15additional credits of upper level Finance courses M.B.A. With Emphasis in Finance Students seeking a graduate education with a concentration in the field of finance should enroll in the Master of Business Administration program. Students take the 39 credit hours of core courses required by the general M B .A. program The 9 elective hours will be taken in the area of finance, or a combination of finance and other approved courses. A maximum of 15 hours of finance is available since students will take FIN 601 and 602 as a part of the graduate core. Although a thesis is not required, graduate research projects are possible under FIN 683. As far as ,Possible candidates for an M.B.A with an emphasis in finance should take their integrative seminar (OBA 615) in the special section designated for their emphasis MANAGEMENT (MAN) The undergraduate program provided by the Management faclllty integrates knowledge in behavioral and social science, industrial relations, a11d quantitative and computer technology in developing an understanding of organizational theory and research The aim is to build competence in the practice of managing groups and organizations. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 63 Business Administration Building To accomplish this goal, the department offers (a) a mix of lectures, management laboratories, independent research, and team activities in many courses, (b) a flexible curriculum which permits students to select a program of courses most suitable to their needs, and (c) option of selecting more advanced courses within each area. To assist students in making realistic course selections, descriptive material for each course is listed in this bulletin. In addition to the catalog descriptions, more specific information is available in the undergraduate advising office, College of Business Administration. Listed descriptions and individual advising describe the background necessary for each course. Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Management students must take 27 credits in upper level Management, 53 credits of Business Core, 7-20 credits of Business electives. It is strongly recommended that sll1dents include courses in Calculus, Speech, Psychology, Sociology, and Political Science in their General electives. Required Management Courses (27 credit hours) Students are required to take: (a) at least one course from each of the four course areas listed below: Area -I-Organizational Behavior : MAN 322, MAN 431, MAN 451, MAN 453. Area 2-Computer and Quantitative Procedures: MAN 312, MAN 421, MAN 471, MAN 472, MAN -473. Area 3-Industrial Relations: MAN 332, MAN 461, MAN 463, MAN 465. Area 4-lntegrative Policy Course: MAN 499 (b) Additional upper level Management courses to meet the requirements for graduation Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Management Students meeting the general admissions standards of the College .of Business Administration including a satisfactory

PAGE 66

64 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION score on the Graduate Management Admission Test may be admitted into the department as candidates for the M.S. degree in Management. The Master of Science degree program in Management builds specialized skills in characterizing and solving problems of administrative decision ancL a:ction. Its foundatio ns are behavioral science and quantitative analysis. While admission standards coincide with those of the M B.A program, the curriculum is distinct Courses reveal the motivational and logical structures which underlie the various functional contexts in which managerial behavior evolves Additionally, courses are designed to foster proficiency, rigor, and independence in applied research The department welcomes me1;1 and women qualified by motivation intellect, personality and experience for future organizational leadership An undergraduate major in man agement or in other business disciplines is not required. Graduate Studies in Management offers concentrations in Behavioral Science and Management Science and includes courses in the following areas: 1. The Management of Organizational Behavior: Managerial Behavior : Organizational Theory ; Management of Or ganizational Change; Organizational Assessment; Plan ning, Control and Humanism in Management. 2. The Management of Information and Decision Systems: Administrative Decision Processes, Simulations of Ad ministrative Systems Quantitative Analysis of Man agement Decisions, the Management of Operations, Compute.rs and Management 3 Manpower Management : Management of Conflict, Labor Relations Law 4 The Management of Organizational Communications Each student must complete a minimum of 48 hours of graduate credit selected in consultation with the departmental Director of Graduate Studies Students, as a part of the 48-hour program will take 12 bouts of courses selected from other disciplines such as Accounting, Educational Administration, Economics, Finance, Industrial Systems, Marketing, Psy chology Public Administration, and Sociology At least 6 of these 12 hours shall be from ACC, ECN, FIN or MKT Supervised selection and systematic investigation of a significant problem is an integral part of the curriculum. Entering students should meet with the clepartmental Director of Graduate Studies to identify and plan remedies for any background deficiencies required for the program of study they propose It is recommended that studies in the department be taken in conjunction with work in some managerial situation. Course content may be tailored to the needs of groups of students with similar professional needs, such as Urban, Corporate, Health and Entrepreneurial Management, and Collective Bargaining The departmental Director of Graduate Stuclies can assist students who desire to intern in such areas while fulfilling the requirements for the degree. MARKETING (MKT) Marketing is a dynamic field with many dimensions, including product selection and planning product distribution, pricing and promotion. Marketing poses many challenges and yields generous reward s for those meeting these challenges Marketing operations are carried out domestically and interna tionally in virtually all business organizations offering a product or service Many marketing concepts are a pplic ab l e to the operations of non-profit organizations such as governmental, educational and health care institutions as well as charitable and political campaigns Marketing operations are the most visible links between the firm or institution and its many publics. Marketing in the end deals with people, people who are constantly changing in their needs wants and desires; and coupled with these changing tastes is a fiercely competitive environment sustained by all the resources of a rapidly evolving technology. These forces lead to much of the challenge-to much of the dynamic nature of marketing. The Marketing Program The Marketing program 'II USP-prepares students for initial entry a nd m anagement positions in many areas of marketing with a curriculum that is concerned with : I. Understanding consumer behavior and the broader environment within which the firm or institutio n oper ates ; 2. Collecting analyzing, and using information about customers, competitors and the environment for man agerial decisions; 3 Distributing products effectively and efficiently from producer to user ; 4. Adverti s ing and promoting the offerings of the firm or institution effecively; 5. Creatively and effecively managing a salesforce selling industrial or consumer goods and services; and 6. Managing retail and wholesale operations including the co nceptualization, implementation and evaluation of the buying, merchandising and control functions. Each student is strongly encouraged to set up his own plan of study with the assista nce of a Marketing department faculty adviser Such counseling can lead to a better definition of career objectives and will result in a plan of study that is consistent with each student's career objectives Undergraduate students not majoring in marke(mg are encouraged to take selected offerings from the marketin& curricul um to broaden their backgrounds and to prepare for marketing-related positions in business or !!On-profit organiza tions A special three course sequence focusing o n retail operations is being offered on an experimental basis during the 1976-77 academic year This seq u ence has no business prere quisites and is open to all majors within the University. Interested students should confer with a Marketing department adviser. Requirements for the B.A. Degree : Majors in Marketing are required to take 27 credi ts in upper level marketing, 53 credits in Business Core, and 7-20 credits in Business electives Student s are encouraged to supplement their business courses by choosing electives in the computer sciences, Mass Communications, Mathematics, Political Science, Psy chology Sociology, or Speech Communication. Required Marketing Courses (18 credit hours) MKT 312 (3) MKT 4ll (4) MKT 419 (4) MKT 315 (4) MKT 413 (3) Plus 9 credits from the following courses: MKT 311 (3) MKT 405 (3) MKT 417 (3) MKT 316 (3) MKT 407 (3) MKT 483 (1-5) MKT 401 (3) MKT 409 (3) MKT 403 (3) MKT 414 (3) Any substitutions for the above courses must be approved in writing by the adviser and the chairman of the Marketing Department. M.B.A. with Emphasis In Marketing Students in the Master of Business Administration Program may concentrate in the area of Marketing by selecting their nine hours of e l ectives in Marketing. Elective course work can include studies in one or more of the areas outlined above in the description of the Marketing program An research project can serve as part of the elective course work in the Marketing emphasis option; however, no thesis is required Students electing the MBA with emphasis in Marketing should meet with the chairman of the marketing department at the beginning of their MBA course work

PAGE 67

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION The College of Education places an emphasis on each student learning what is relevant for the world of today and on his getting deeply involved in his own educational process. Thus, the emphasis is on the student learning to do his own thinking about himself and his universe. The College of Education is committed to a continuous and systematic examination of the professional program of teacher education. Promising programs are examined experimentally under controlled conditions, which make po ssible an objective appraisal of effects in terms of learning outcomes. The University of South Florida follows a University-wide approach to teacher education. Its programs for the preparation of teachers represent cooperative effort in planning and practice by faculties of all academic areas. Courses needed by teacher candidates but designed also for other students are offered outside the College of Education. Courses in the University which are primarily designed for teacher candidates are taught by the College of Education. In the total teacher education program there is a special concern for developing in the student a deep interest in intellectual inquiry and the ability to inspire this interest in others. It is the task of the College of Education to give leadership to the instruction in subject matter and process which means the total teacher education program. BACCALAUREATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS The undergraduate teacher education program leads to the Bachelor of Art& degree. It is an upper division program. Admission to the College While each student admitted to the University is e;itpected to have the qualifications to graduate, this does no.I necessarily mean that he has the qualifications to become a teacher. The College of Education administers the admission policies to all teacher programs of the University, as well as those for the College itself. All students who plan to teach must apply for admission to a teacher education program through the Central Advising Office of .the College of Education. Prospective secondary and K-12 teachers are enrolled in teacher education programs involving both the College of Education and various other colleges of the liberal arts areas. Students who have completed successfully the two-year Associate of Arts program at a junior college and other transfer students who have earned at least 90 quarter hours should apply for official admission to teacher education programs during their first quarter in residence. Admission to the upper level teacher education program is contingent upon meeting the following minimum requirements: 1. Completion of a College of Education upper level application form.* 2. Completion of the Distribution requirements for Education majors. Provisional admis sion may be granted if no more than three individual General Distribution courses remain to be taken, provided Freshman English has been completed 3. Completion of a minimum of 90 quarter hours. 4. An overall grade point ratio (GPR) of 2.0. S. Additional criteria at the discretion of the admissions and selections committee (i.e. medical center, stuqent affairs, speech and hearing clinic, etc.) Handicapped Students: Application will be reviewed by the admission committee. Acceptance of the application of the student will be determined by the following: 1. The judgment of the committee that the student will be able to carry out the duties of a teacher. Deadline : The student should initiate his application with the College of Education Central Advising Office no later than the second week of the quarter in which he is eligible for admission. 65 2. An assurance from the public schools that an internship contract will be offered. Admission to Internship Experience The internship experience is a minimum of 12 credits of observation and internship in elementary secondary schools. Time and sequence of experience may vary among programs. (Refer to the specific program for further information.) Special requirements for enrollm e nt in the internship and seminar courses are: 1. Admission to the College o f Education 2. Completion of an appli ca tion for internship. 3. Completion of the professional education sequence and a minimum of two-thirds of the specializaiion, varying with the program, and a minimum 2 0 grade point ratio. 4. An overall 2.0 grade point ratio. S. Successful completion of proficiency exams Areas of examination vary with programs. See program for specific requirements. Application for internship should be made two quarters prior to term in which experience is desired, and may be obtained in the Internships & Field Experiences Office. Fall Quarter (I) applications are due by last week of the Winter Quarter (II) of the previous school year. Winter Quarter (II) applications are due by last week of the Summer Quarter (IV} of the previous school year. Spring Quarter (III) applications are due by last week of the Fall Quarter (I) of the same scpool year Summer Quarter (IV) applications are due the last week of the Winter Quarter (II) of the same school year. College Requirements for Graduation A student to be certified by the College of Education as having completed its requirements must have earned 180 credit hours with a minimum overall grade point ratio of 2.0. An average of 2.0 or better also must be made in the student's professional education sequence and in his teaching specialization courses. Satisfactory completion of supervised teaching is required. A student must also have comple t ed the major requirements in an approved teaching program (which includes general preparation, teaching specialization, and professional preparation) A min imum of 12 credits in professional courses in addition to

PAGE 68

66 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION internship and 18 credits in specialization courses must have been earned in res ide nce The student must comp let e a minimum of 45 hours after admittance to an upper level program Specific Requirements A minimum of 180 credit hours including the following : General Distribution .................................... 60 credit hours Professional Education Core ..................... 36-44 credit hours Teaching Specialization ........................ 41 to 73 credit hours Programs Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree The College of Education has program s leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in the following fields: Art Education Botany Education Busines s and Office Education Chemistry Education Clas s ics Education* Distributive Education Elementary Early Childhood Education Elementary Education English Education Exceptional Child Education Emotionally Di s turbed Mental Retardation Specific Learning Disabilities Foreign Language Educationt Health Education Humanities Education Indu stria l-Technical Education Mass Communication s-E nglish Education Mathematics Education Mu sic Education Physical Education Physics Education Science Education Social Science Education Speech Communication-English Education Zoology Education (EDA) (BOE) (VBU) (CHE) (CLE) (VOE) (EEC) (EDE) (ENE) (EMO) (MRD) (SLD) (FOE) (HEN) (HUE) (VIT) (MCE) (MAE) (EDM) (EDP) (PHE) (SCE) (SSE) (SEE) (ZOE) College of Education Student Organizations and Activities The College of Education Association is the parent organizati o n or umbrella for all student Education organizations The student activities sponsor and the College of Education A ssoc iation (CEA) officers make an annual budget and the approved monies are funded by the State The CEA is responsible for helping organize new College of Education organizations approved by the Student Affairs Committee They also aid the organizations financially, provide leadership and distribute information for projects The College of Education Council is composed of CEA officers, three elementary representatives, four secondary representatives, two special education repres entatives and the Presidents of the other Education organizations. The Council meets regularly tp coordinate and plan for the year. Student Florida Education Association The Student Florida Education Association is the pro fessional organization that represent s all the prospective teachers on the USF campus. As a member of SFEA, you also Latin-English Education '41r Latin Foreign Language Education. t In a single language two foreign languag es, or Foreign Language English. become a member of the Florida Education Association and the National Education Association. These organizations c omprise the largest such group in the world Many benefits are available to you through the organization a nd in addition, you are working with a club dealing with your main interest-education. All s tudent s in the field of Edu cation, including freshm e n, are encouraged to join this professional organization. Association for Childhood Education International The Association for Childhood Education is a non-profit professional organization concerned with the education and well-being of children two to twelve years of age. Members are located throughout the United States and other countries. The USF chapter works directly with children through observation, projects, and programs. In addition, it provides opportunity for s tudent s to attend study conferences throughout the state of Florida which allows the student an opportunity for profe ss ional growth and exchange of professional ideas Membership is open to all students, including freshmen, concerned with c hild ren two to twelve Studen t Council for Exceptional Children The Student Council for Exceptional Childre n a n organization of those members of the University interested in the education of the exceptional-"different"-child. Various exceptionalities included are Gifted Emotionally Dis turbed, Physically Handicapped, Mentally Retarded, and Culturally Different. Activities of the USF Chapter include field trips to various s pecial education facilities, prominent speakers, seminars state and national conventions, and socia l events. The specific activities are determined by the members and the excep tionalitie s in which theY are interested. All interested students are invited to join Student Music Educators National Conference Student Music Edu cators Conference is a n affiliate of the Music Educators National Conference a nd the Florida Music Educators Association. It is devoted to the furtherance of knowledge and under s tanding of music education o n all levels. Membership is open to any st udent in the University of South Florida who is interested in the teaching of music. Library Education Audio Visual Organization The Library Educa t ion Audio Visual Organization is a prof ess ional organization for those members of the University community intere s ted in Library education. The USF group meets once a month and provides programs or guest speakers of interest to the cam pus community In addition, LEA VO publish es a monthly newsletter for its members MembershiR is open to all interested in Library education Phi Beta Lambda Phi Beta Lambda is a business fraternity open to all students, including freshmen, expressing an interest in Bu s ines s Education and who are enrolled in a Business Course Kappa Delta Pi Kappa Delta Pi is a nationa l co-educational honor society in Education The society was fou nded to recognize a nd encourage excellence in sc holar s hip, high personal s tandard s, improvement in teacher pr epara tion, a nd distinction in achievement.

PAGE 69

Physical Education Association (PEA) The Phy sica l Education Association (PEA) is open to all s tudent s enrolled in the Physical Education Program. Social and prof essio nal meetings are conducted throughout the year to promote interaction within the org a nization. Student Guidance Organization (SGO) Th e Student Guidance Organization is a Guidance Organiza tion for graduate s tudent s presently enrolled in the Guidance Prog ram. Soci a l a nd profe ss ional meetings are conducted throughout the year. Members also participate in annual retreats and attend distric t and sta te meetings. Mathematics Education Clinic The M at hem a ti cs Education Clinic is mis s ion-oriented in a COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 67 b road se nse in that it is primarily concerned with child ren and youth who evidence learning problems in mathematics How ever, an important purpose of the clinic is one of obtaining hypothe ses tha t can be studied to obtain generalizable pro fessional knowledge to impro ve the teaching and learning of mathematics. Clinical, c orelational, normative, and experimental ap proaches are used in the study of the etio logy and symptomat ology of m at hematical learning disabilities. General models and specific teaching s trategies are provided the classroom teacher and the st udent-clin ician for carrying out effective diagnostic and prescriptive programs Close professional relations are maintained between the Mathematics Education faculty and the appropriate faculties in the College of Educatio n whose interests and professional skills are related to the work of the Clinic Teacher Education Programs and Curricula There are t hr ee dis tin c t areas in the teacher e ducation program, and all te ac her candidates must meet certain minimum require ment s i n each. The three areas and their requirements are as follow s: 1. General Distribution Requirements (60 er. hrs.) Th e fiv e a rea s of General Dis tribution and the specific requirements are as follows: Area I English Composition: ENG 101-102-103. Area II Humanities/Fine Arts: A minimum of eight hour s from at least' two of the following prefix es: AMS, ARA ART, CLS, DAN, ENG (excl uding 100, 101-103), FOL, FRE, GER GRE HEB, HII HUM IT A, MUS PHI (excluding 303), POR, REL, ROM, RUS, SPA, SPE, TAR. Area IIIMathematics: MTH 331-332-333 for any pro. gram requiring EDE 415; a minimum of eigh t hours from any ECN 231, ESC, MTH and ECN 331, PHI 303, SSI 301 for all other programs Education Building Area IV Natural Sciences: A minimum of eight hours from the following prefixes: AST, BIO BOT, CHM, GLY, MSC, NAS, PHS PHY ZOO Area V Social and Behavioral Sciences: (A m ini mum of 16 hours i s required in Area V as sp ecified below) I. Behavioral Science a) For all programs PSY 200 and SOC 201 II. Social Science a) For progr a m s requiring EDE 419, HTY 211-212. b) For all ot h er programs a minimum of eight h o urs from the following prefixes: AFA, AGE, ANT CJP, ECN 100, GPY, HTY, POL, PSY (excluding 200), SOC (excluding 201), SSI (excluding 301), WSP Courses required for a student's major program will not be counted in the tot a l 60 hours although areas of the general distribution requirements may be waived where appropriate. A s tudent will be limited to 12 hour s in a single department toward distribution requirements in any area None of the above may be taken S/U 2. Professional Education Core (36-44 credit hosrs) The required courses in the professional education core are as follows: EDC 401 Curriculum & Instruction EDF 305 Human Development and Learning EDF 307 Social Foundations of Education Methods Co u rse(s) Internship & Seminar Reading Requirement (see note below) (5) (4) (4) (4-12) (15) (4) 3. Teaching Specialization Preparation (41-73 credit hours) Course req u irements in the area of teaching s pecialization vary ac cording to subject field of specializatio n. Note: State Board of Education regulation (6A-5.25) revised July 10, 1973, was amended to require that all (elementary and econdary) approved programs of teacher education must include information on teaching reading skills. For elementary major s, additional c ompetencies over and a bove those taught in EDE 409 are required. This applies to all st udents graduating after August, 1974. Plea se check with your a dviser with respect to the ways and mea ns of meeting these competencies.

PAGE 70

68 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION ELEMENTARY EDUCATION CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS Elementary Education majors are prepared to teach in grades one through six. Currently there are two options for completing the elementary coursework and internship requirements Students may pursue a program by taking required education courses during their junior and senior year with practical field experiences during their senior year. These experiences include pre-internship as part of EDC 401 and EDE 440 and a full quarter internship assignment in a selected elementary school. Students may pursue a program of elementary teacher preparation which provides continuous daily laboratory ex periences in local schools. Students electing this program must arrange to spend a minimum of two hours daily working in a variety of classroom situations. Pre -internship and internship credit is earned during this field experience which extends over a period of five quarters Students entering an elementary education program must be eligible for admission to the College of Education (see admission requirements) and maintain a 2.0 average All students accepted in the Elementary Education Program in the College of Education will be required to pass a verbal proficiency examination prior to enrollment in EDC 499-Internship. ELEMENTARY SPECIALIZATION (EDE) The major consists of an elementary specialization se quence. The 41 hours of elementary specialization courses include: EDE 409 EDE 411 EDE 413 EDE 415 (5) EDE 417 (4) EDE 419 (4) EDE 421 (5) EDE 423 (5) (5) (4) (2) EDE 424 EDE 425 (3) (4) Students are encouraged to choose a concentration in a subject taught in the elementary school. With careful planning, a student may receive dual certification in elementary education and a junior high subject area. ELEMENTARY-EARLY CHILDHOOD (EEC) Students interested in early childhood teaching, which includes children ages 3-8, should pursue a program leading to certification both in early childhood and elementary education. This program include 50 hours of course work as follows: EDE 409 (5) EDE 419 (5) EDE 425 (4) EDE 413 (4) EDE 421 (4) EDE 426 (4) EDE 415 (5) EDE 423 (2) EDE 429 (5) EDE 417 (5) EDE 424 (3) EDE 435 (4) ELEMENTARY-MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION For the student with a special interest in youngsters in the middle grades, courses are available which lead to both elementary and middle school certification. The courses are grouped in two segments: (I) Elementary Education-consisting of 42 hours of course work in elementary education, (2) Middle School Teaching-consisting of between 28 and 32 hours of liberal arts and education courses related to one of the following special areas ; Reading, Language arts education, Science education, Social Science education, Mathematics education. Further information can be obtained by contacting advisers in the respective areas. KINDERGARTEN THROUGH TWELFTH GRADE CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS Candidates meet teaching requirements for all grade levels from Kindergarten the senior year of high school. ART EDUCATION (EDA) At the time of application to upper level, each Art Education student must submit slides or portfolio to the head of the department. To assist transfer in selection of courses, they must submit work prior to or during registration. After completing studio requirements for state certification each student may elect to emphasize painting, sculpture, graphics, ceramics, or photography/cinematography for the remaining studio electives. The following courses constitute a program of study : Art Education (25 Credit hours) EDA 308 (4) EDA 408 (2) EDA 310 (5) EDA 410 (5) EDA 412 (5) EDA 450 (4) In these courses students will have the opportunity to work at the elementary school and high school levels. Specialization (52 er. hrs.) ART 201 (4) ART 202 (4) ART 301 (2) 28 er. hrs. from the following courses as approved by the ad viser: ART 304 ART 311 ART321 ART 331 ART 340 ART 361 ART 365 Plus the following: ART 476 ART 401 ART 411 ART 421 ART 431 ART 441 ART 442 ART 443 ART 461 ART 465 ART 501 ART 511 ART 521 ART 531 ART 541 ART (Art History Elective) Six hours from any MUS, DAN, TAR EXCEPTIONAL CHILD EDUCATION ART 542 ART 543 ART 561 ART 565 ART 591 (4) (4) (6) The Exceptional Child Education Baccalaureate Level Degree Program offers students three tracks leading to Rank III Certification in that specific area of emphasis.

PAGE 71

Emotionally Disturbed (EMO) The planned program includes: Specialization Requirements (65-67 er. hrs.) CLY 201 (3) EDE 425 (4) EDE 409 (5) EDS 311 (4) EDE 415 (5) EDE 424 (3) EDE 417 (5) EDS 411 (4) EDE 419 (5) EDS 431 (Variable) EDE 421 (4) EDS 432 (5) EDE 423 (2) EDS 439 (Variable) One of the following : EDE 413 (4) EDL 414 (4) Mental Retardation (MAD) The planned program includes: Specialization Requirements (71 er. hrs.) CLY 201 (3) EDF 379 (4) EDS 423 (4) EDE 409 (5) EDS 311 (4) EDS 424 (4) EDE 415 (5) EDS 322 (4) EDS 425 (4) EDE 435 (4) EDS 329 (6) EDS 431 (4) EDE 445 (4) EDS 411 (4) EDE 425 (4) or EDV 207 (4) One of the following: EDE 413 (4) EDL 414 (4) Spec i f i c Le a r ni ng D isabiliti es (SL D ) The planned program includes: Specialization Requirements (67 er. hrs.) CLY 201 (3) EDE 445 (4) EDS 389 (6) EDE 409 (5) EDF 379 (4) EDS 411 (4) EDE 415 (5) EDS 311 (4) EDS 431 (4) EDE 425 (4) EDS 322 (4) EDS 481 (4) EDE 435 (4) EDS 350 (4) EDS 482 (4) One of the following: EDE 413 (4) EDL 414 (4) H E ALTH E DUCATIO N (HEN) The two-year Health Education program is designed to prepare health educators for the public schools through combined course work and field work/internship in public schools and community health programs each quarter. This program is a competency based curriculum with an S (Satis fatory) /U (Unsatisfactory) grading system. Prerequisites for e n tering the program include admission to the College of Education, a survey course in health science (HEN 201 or equivalent), and an interview for program guidance. The application deadline is on or before April 1 D irect req uest to: Coordinator Health Education Program College of Education The following are courses required in the Health Education Program (61 hours) : EDP 255 (3) HEN 310 (3) HEN 311 (6) HEN 321 (4) HEN 322 (5) HEN 331 (4) HEN 332 (5) HEN 333 (2) HEN 411 (4) HEN 412 (5) HEN 421 (4) HEN 422 (5) HEN 423 (2) HEN 431 (4) HEN 432 (5) COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 69 MUSIC EDUCATION (EDM) All students seeking a degree in music education are required to take a placement examination in music theory history and to pass an audition in their respective performance area. Students must obtain the dates for these examinations fr oin the Music Office; completion of the examinations is req u ired before registration in music courses can be permitted Special requirements for all music education majors: successful completion of the piano preficiency requireme n t as defined by the music and music education faculties; participation in a performing ensemble each quarter the student is enrolle d in applied music; and the presentation of a one-half hour recital in the major performing medium during the senior year Students are encouraged to attend on-campus musical events (i.e., student recitals, Music Forum events, faculty recitals, and Artist Series concerts) A. Ins t rumental Specialization (118 er. hrs.) Music Education courses (22 er. hrs.) EDM 215 (2) EDM 415 (4) EDM 418 (3) EDM 370 (3) EDM 416 (3) EDM 390 (3) EDM 417 (4) Music courses (96 er hrs.) MUS 201, 202, 203 (9) MUS 221, 222, 223, 231, 232, 233 (12) MUS 301, 302, 303 (9) MUS 321, 322, 323 (6) MUS 326 (2) MUS 401, 402, 403 (9) MUS 207 (8) MUS 204, 304, 404, 454* (33) ART, DAN, TAR (8) (to be selected from any 2 prefixes) Performing Ensemble (minimum of one per quarter with applied music) Piano proficiency requirement Graduating recital B. Vocal Specialization (107 er. hrs.) Music Education courses (19 er. hrs .) EDM 215 (2) EDM 415 (4) EDM 417 (4) EDM 380 (3) EDM 416 (3) EDM 419 (3) Music Courses er. hrs.) MUS 201, 202, 203 (9) MUS 221, 222, 223, 231, 232, 233 (12) MUS 301, 302, 303 (9) MUS 321, 322, 323 (6) MUSn6 m MUS 401, 402, 403 (9) MUS 204, 304, 404, 454* (33) ART, DAN, TAR (8) (to be selected from any 2 prefixes) Performing ensemble (minimum of one per quarter of applied music) Piano proficiency requirement Graduating recital PHYSICAL E DUCATIO N A two year program is offered at the junior and senior year level which provides a daily internship experience in the local schools for prospective physical education teachers. Because enrollment in this program is limited, all students must participate in a selective admissions procedure which includes an on-campus conference in order to be considered for admission. Students may enter this program only during Quarter I (Fall) of each year and should be prepared to spend a minimum of two hours per day in a physicar education teaching situation d uring each of the six quarters in addition to their on-campus study. The continuous field experience is in lieu of the usual quarter of full day internship and the teacher aid assignments. Those require ments (see admission to internship experience) which are MUS 454 minimum of 6 hrs

PAGE 72

70 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION necessary for admission to supervised teaching experience must be met before a student will be allowed to register in "Seminar and Internship i n Phy s ical Education After applying for admission to the University all students must apply directly to the Department on or before April 1. No student will be admitted to the program unless application has been made prior to this date Direct requests to: Coordinator Professional Physical Education Program College of Education The following are the required courses in the physical education program of study (71 er hrs .): EDP 255 (3) EDP 322 (4) EDP 311 (5) EDP 323 (3) EDP 312 (4) EDP 331 (5) EDP313 (3) EDP332 (4) EDP 314 (2) EDP 333 (3) EDP 321 (5) EDP 365 (3) EDP 411 EDP 412 EDP 421 EDP 422 EDP 431 EDP 432 (5) (4) (5) (4) (5) (4) Social Science Building SECONDARY EDUCATION CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS Candidates are required to meet specialization requirements in broad subject fields or in subject combinations. It is also possible for prospective secondary school teachers to add elementary school certification by following an approved program. The second a ry school specialization requirements can be satisfied in more than 15 subject areas in eight broad fields. CLASSICS EDUCATION (CLE) Latln-t:ngllsh Education: Specialization Requirements (80 er. hrs.) Latin (40 er. hrs ) Select four cours es from the following five categories. Do not select more than one course from any single category I ANC 321 (5) ANC 427 (4) ANC 429 (4) 2. CLS 310 (4) CLS 311 (4) CLS 312 (4) 3 HTY 201 (4) HTY 322 (4) HTY 381 (4) HTY 202 (4) HTY 325 (4) HTY 321 (4) HTY 326 (4) 4 PHI 415 (4) PHI 416 (4) 5.CLS351* (4) Select six a ddition a l upper level Latin courses (4 qtr. hrs each) in con s ultation with Latin advisers English (40 er hrs.) ENG 302 (5) ENG 475 (5) SPE 201 l-') ENG 310 ( 5 ) One of the following : ENG 300 (5) One of the following: ENG 316 (5) ENG 317 (5) ENG 332 (5) One of the follo wing: ENG 340 (5) ENG 341 (5) One of the followinf( : ENG 350 (:lJ ENG 301 (5) ENG 436 (5) ENG 441 ENG 437 (5) ENG 442 ENG 438 (5) ENG 342 (5) CLS 351* ENG 351 (5) Latin-Modern Foreign Language Education: Specialization Requireml!nts (76 er. hrs ) Latin (40 er. hrs ) (5) (5) (4) Select four courses from the following five categories. Do not select more than one course from any single category. I. ANC 321 (5) ANC 427 (4) ANC 429 (4) 2 CLS 310 (4) CLS 311 (4) CLS 312 (4) 3. HTY 201 (4) HTY 202 (4) HTY 321 (4) 4 PHI 415 (4) 5. CLS 351* (4) HTY 322 HTY 325 HTY 326 PHI 416 (4) (4) (4) (4) HTY 381 (4) Select six additional upper level L a tin course s (4 qtr. hrs. each) in consultation with Latin advisers. Modern foreign language requires 25 credit hours beyond introductory courses Modern foreign languag e course require ments are (36 hrs) : (-) 301 (4) (-) 401 (4) (-) 405 (4) (-) 303 (4) (-) 403 (4) or (-) 406 (4) ROM 517 and 518 may be among the selected courses Two special methods courses (EDX 449 a nd EDX 465) are included in the professional education sequence ENGLISH EDUCATION (ENE) Specialization Requirements (61-64 er hrs.) SPE .201 (5) SPE 321 (5) ENG 475 (5) One of the following: ENG 350 (5) ENG 351 (5) One of the following : ENG 476 (5) LIN 321 (4) LIN 540 (4) ENG 477 (5) One of the following: COM 300 (3) COM 301 (4) COM 351 (3) Two of the following: ENG 300 (5) ENG 311 (5) ENG 314 (5) ENG 30i (5) ENG 312 (5) ENG 315 (5) ENG 310 (5) ENG 313 (5) ENG 316 (5) One of the following: ENG 302 (5) ENG 331 (5) ENG 332 (5) ENG 330 (5) One of the following: ENG 307 (5) ENG 437 (5) ENG 446 (5) ENG 308 (5) ENG 438 (5) ENG 317 (5) ENG 442 (5) Two 300 level or 400 level ENGLISH courses in literature Also, one elective from one of the following areas : English Speech-Communication, Mass Communications, Theatre, Language-Literature Interdisciplinary, Philosophy, Classics, Education, or American Studies : (4). Two special methods courses EDT 447 and EDT 431 are included in the professional education sequence *CLS 351-If CLS 351 taken the hours will count in only one area of requirements (i.e. English/Latin) not in both

PAGE 73

FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION (FOE) Foreign Language-English Educatl'on: Specialization Requirements (7 6 er. hrs.) English (4() er. hrs.) ENG 300 (5) ENG 310 (5) ENG 475 (5) or ENG 350 (5) SPE 201 (5) ENG 301 (5) or ENG 302 (5) ENG 351 (5) One of the following : ENG 317 (5) ENG 435 (5) ENG 436 (5) One of the following : ENG 437 ENG 438 ENG 441 (5) (5) (5) ENG 442 (5) ENG 340 (5) ENG 342 (5) CLS 351 (4) ENG -341 (5) If an elective is needed, SPE 321 is recommended Foreign Language require s a minimum of 36 credit hours beyond intermediate courses. Foreign language course requirements are : (-) 301 (4) (-) 401 (4) (-) 405 (4) (-) 303 (4) (-) 403 (4) or (-) 406 (4) Student and adviser will select the ad ditional foreign language courses to total a minimum of 36 credit hour s in foreign language ROM 517 and 518 may be among the selected courses Two special methods courses (EDT 447 and EDX 449) are included in the professional education sequence. Two Foreign Language Education: Spe ci alization Requirements (61 credit hours) Beginning and intermediate foreign language requirements (or equivalents) mus t be completed In the major language (French, German Italian Russian or Spanish), the student must earn a minimum of 36 credit hour s, and in the minor language 27 credit hours The required upper level foreign language courses for the major language are: (-) 301 (4) (-) 401 (4) (-. ) 405 (4) (-) 303 (4) ( ) 403 (4) (-) 406 (4) Plus a minimum of 11 additional selected hours of upper level courses in the major language: (11) For the minor language the required upper level foreign language courses are: (-) 301 (4) (-) 401 (4) (-) 405 (4) (-) 303 (4) (-) 403 (4) or (-) 406 (4) Plus a minimum of six additional selected hours of upper level courses in the minor language : (6) Single Foreign Language Education: After consultation with a foreign language education adviser, the Dean may give permission for a student to elect a sil)gle foreign language major. A minimum of 45 credit hours beyond intermediate course requirements must be earned in the single foreign language Among the 45 hours must be the following : French (45 credit hours) FRE 301 (4) FRE 401 (4) FRE 405 (4) FRE 303 (4) FRE 403 (4) FRE 406 (4) Plus a minimum of 21 additional selected hour s of upper level courses. (21) German (45 credit hours) GER 301 (4) GER 401 (4) GER 405 (4) GER 303 (4) GER 403 (4) GER 406 (4) Plus a minimum of 21 additional selected hours of upper level courses. (21) COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 71 Italian or Russian (45 credit hours) (-) 301 (4) (-) 401 (4) (-) 405 (4) (-) 303 (4) (-' ) 403 (4) (-) 406 (4) Plus a minimum of 21 additional selected hours of upper level courses (21) Spanish (45 credit hours) SPA 301 (4) SPA 403 (4) SPA 407 (4) SPA 303 (4) SPA 405 (4) SPA 401 (4) SPA 406 (4) Plus a minimum of 17 additional selected hours of upper level courses. (17) ROM 517 and ROM 518 may be used to satisfy selected course requirements in any of the modern foreign languages. HUMANITIES EDUCATION (HUE) Specialization Requirements (3 er. hrs. in HUM 491 Selected Topics in Humanities; and 42 er. hrs. from the following) : HUM 411, 412. Twentieth Century Arts and Letters (5,5) HUM 415, 416. Arts and Letters of the Romantic Period (4,4) HUM 417. 418. Nineteenth-Century Arts and Letters (4,4) HUM 419, 420. The Enlightenment (4,4) HUM 423, 424. Renaissance Arts and Letters (4,4) HUM 427, 428. Medieval Arts and Letters (4,4) HUM 431, 432. Classical Arts and Letters (4,4) HUM 481. Directed Study (1-5) HUM 535, 536, 537. Humanities in America (4,4,4) HUM 539, 540. Selected Non-Western Humanities (4,4) HUM 541. Humanities in the Orient; India (4) HUM 542. Humanities in the Orient; China (4) HUM 543. Humanities in the Orient; Japan (4) HUM 545. Latin American Arts and Letters (4) Also required (a minimum of 9 er. hrs. in the creative or performing arts from the following areas: TAR ART, MUS, DAN, and ENG.) Academic work in these areas taken prior to entering the College of Education will be considered toward the satisfaction of this requirement. MASS COMMUNICATIONSENGLISH EDUCATION (MCE) Specialization Requirements (63 er. hrs ) : Mass Communications (23 er hrs ) COM 300 (3) COM 483 COM 330 (4) (4) COM 301 or (4) ENG 308 (5) Two of the following or one of the following plus a more advanced course in that area COM 311 (4) COM 351 (3) COM 371 (4) COM 320 (4) COM 361 (4) COM 375 (4) COM 341 (4) COM 370 (4) COM 453 (4) Two special methods courses EDT 447 al)d EDT 431 are included in the professional education sequence. English (40 er. hrs ) SPE 201 (5) ENG 475 (5) Two of the following: ENG 300 (5) ENG 301 (5) ENG 310 (5) One of the following: ENG 311 (5) ENG 312 (5) ENG ;m (5) ENG 314 ENG 315 ENG 316 (5) (5) (5) ENG 302 (5) ENG 331 (5) ENG 332 (5) ENG 330 (5) One of the following: ENG 307 (5) ENG 317 (5) Two additional ENG course and SPE 321. ENG 437 (5). ENG 442 (5) ENG 438 (5) ENG 446 (5) courses in literature or one ENG

PAGE 74

72 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION MATHEMATICS (MAE) The typical program for prospective mathematics teachers consists of a minimum of 47 credit hours in mathematics above the 200 level. The specialization requirements are: MTH 302 (5) MTH 305 (4) MTH 423 (3) MTH 303 (4) MTH 309 (3) MTH 424 (3) MTJ-f 304 (4) MTH 323 (4) Upper level mathematics electives (MTH 345 and 420 are strongly recommended) (17) The student has the option of completing a Natural Science major with a concentration in mathematics This requires a minimum of 36 credit hours in mathematics and a minimum of 24 credit hour s in the College of Natural Sciences outside of mathematics. These latter 24 hours must be approved by the student's adviser and must include a minimum of three courses at the 300 level or above SCIENCE Botany (BOE), Chemistry (CHE), Physics (PHE), Zoology (ZOE): A student planning to teach science at the secondary level should complete the departmental major in the corresponding science area (in Botany, Chemistry, Physics, or Zoology). Requirement s for these programs are listed in the catalog under the science departments of the College of Natural Sciences. EDN 427 is recommended for biology teachers, EDN 425 is recommended for physical science (chemistry and physics) teachers. The student must earn 2.0 grade point averages in all attempted course work both in the major concentration and in the supporting courses of the major. Science Education (SCE): An alternate program is available in which the prospective teacher must meet the minimum requirements of the in terdisciplinary major in the Natural Sciences. This requires a minimum of 36 credit hours in the discipline of major concentration a nd a minimum of 24 credit hours within the Natural Science s and outside the concentJ:ation area. These latter 24-32 hours must be approved by the st ud ent s adviser a nd include at I east three 300 level courses. (Total program, 68 credit hours minimum). Conc entrations are available in biology, physic s, and chemistry. A typical program for a biology concentration i ncludes : Minimum credit within concentration (36-44 credit hours) BIO 201 (4) BIO 203 (4) BIO 331 (4) BIO 202 (4) Additional selections from: BIO 401 (5) BIO 445 (4) ZOO 311 (6) or BOT 311 (5) ZOO 313 (5) BIO 510 (4) MIC 351 (4) Minimum credit s outside of concentration (24-32 hours) Course s outside b iology would normally include: CHM 211 ( 3 ) CHM 218 (1) CHM 333 (3) CHM 212 (3) CHM 219 (1) Electives (0-8) CHM 213 (3) CHM 331 (3) CHM 217 (1) CHM 332 (2) Additional courses se l ected from Chemistry, Mathematics, Ph ys ic s, and Geology are recommended. SOCIAL SCIENCE (SSE) The College of Education provides a program of study which enables stu dents to attain a degree in secondary social science education (7-12). To teach at the secondary level the minimum requirements of a social science education major must be met. All programs in the social science education major s pecify 64 credits or more in the social sciences. A teaching emphasis requires a minimum of 24 credits in one discipline within a n ap proved program which will lead to certificafion in the broad area of social sciences However, a student may concentrate his study in one of the separate subject areas (political science, history, geology, American history) Each program contains both required and elective courses which each st uden t in consultation 'fith his adviser will sel ect. SPEECH COMMUNICATION ENGLISH EDUCTION (SEE) Specialization Requirements (70 er. hrs ) SPE 201 (5) SP E 361 (5) SPE 491 SPE 203 (5) or SPE 321 (5) SPE 365 (5) (5) Two 5-hour upper division Sp eech Com. Electives (10) ENG 475 (5) TAR 303 (5) Two of the following : ENG 300 ENG 301 ENG 310 One of the following : ENG 302 ENG 330 One of the following: ENG 307 ENG 308 ENG 317 One of the followinf(: ENG 311 ENG 312 ENG 313 ENG 331 ENG 437 ENG 438 ENG 442 ENG 350 ENG 351 (5) ENG 314 ENG 315 ENG 316 (10) ENG 332 (5) ENG 446 (5) The following special methods courses are i ncluded in the professional education sequence: EDT 447, EDT 423, EDT 424 (2) and EDR 407 (2). Education-Business-Social Science Patio

PAGE 75

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 73 VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS Candidates planning to teach in county-wide adult and secondary education programs, junior college associate of arts and area vocational schools, continuing education centers, model cities programs, and other vocational, adult and technical schools may pursue one or more of the following spei
PAGE 76

74 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION MASTER'S LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Admission Candidates for admission to graduate stud y must present satisfactory evidence of: 1. Undergraduate grade-point-ratio of 3.0 (B) minimum on the last half of the baccalaureate degree; or ORE aptitude score-1000 minimum 2. Any additional requirements specified by the program 3. Receive favorable recommendation from program chair man Rllng of Program During the first term of graduate study the candidate for the master's degree must file a planned program of studies This report of Graduate Advisory Conference is to be completed in consultation with the adviser. The completed report should be filed with the Coordinator of Graduate Studies in the College of Education. Quality of Work Candidates for the master's degree must maintain a 3.0 GPA. If at any time the student's GPA falls below the minimum, the student will be placed on probation. During the probationary status the student's academic progress will be reviewed to determine: 1) removal from probation. 2) continuation on probation, 3) drop from graduate program Residency The candidate for the master s degree will be required to meet the residency requirement established by each program a re a. Consult the appropriate program area for details. Comprehensive Examination During the last term of enrollment, prior to completion of degree requirements, the candidate must perform satisfactorily on a comprehensive examination. Proce8s Core Examination Graduate students with sufficient undergraduate back ground may take the Process Core Examinations after consulta tion with their advisers. Successful perform ance on the examination enables a student to waive the course requirement, but he must take elective courses in lieu of the hours required. The Process Core Examinations are in the Foundations of Measul'ement, Psychological Foundations and Social Founda tions of Education. Graduate students on a Plan II Master's Program (see below) are not eligible to take the Process Core Examinations unless they have had a comparable course at the undergraduate level. Master of Arts Program Qualified person s may pursue graduate study in the following majors : Art Education Elementary Education English Education Exceptional Child Education tracks in: Emotionally Disturbed Gifted Mental Retardation Specific Learning Disabilities Foreign Language* Guidance Humanities Education Library-Audiovisual Education Mathematics Education Music Education Physical Education Reading Education School Psychology Science Educationt Social Science Education Speech Communication Education Vocational Education with tracks in: Adult Education Distributive Education Busine ss and Office Education Industrial-Technical Education (E DA) (EDE) (ENE) (EMO) (GIF) (MRD) (SLD) (FOE) (EOG) (HUE) (EDL) (MAE) (EDM) (E DP ) (EDR) (PSE) (SCE) ( SSE) (SPH) (VAD) (VOE) (VBU) (VIT) Junior Collge Teaching : Astronomy Biology Busine ss Chemistry Economics Engineering:j: English Frenc h Geography Geology History Mathematics Physics Political Science Psychology Sociology Spanish Speech Communication *French, German, or Spanish. tWith co ncentration s in Biolo gy, Chemistry, or Physics tEngineering bachelor's degree required (AS T90) (BI090) (BUS 90) (CHM90) (ECN90) (EGP90) (ENG90) (F RE90) (GPY 90 ) (GLY90) (HTY90) (MTH90) (PHY90) (POL 90) (PSY90) (SOC 90 ) (SPA90) (SPE90) Master of Education Programs Qualified persons may pursue graduate study in the following majors: Administration a nd Supervision Curriculum and Instruction (ESA) (CUR) Program Plans of Study Plan I Plan I is a program of graduate studies designed for those with appropriate certification who desire to increase their com petence in a subject specialization or re ceive profes s ional preparation in one of the service areas of education.

PAGE 77

Education Building A. Process Core (4-16 hours) Students will take a minimum of one Process Core (Foundations) course. Substitution for the remaining COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 75 courses may occur upon the advice of the Degree Program and concurrence of the College Program Policy Committee, Process Core : a EDF 605 Foundations of Meas urement b. EDF 607 Foundation s of Educational Research c. EDF 611 Psychological Foundations of Education or EDF 613 Principles of Learning d EDF 621 Socio-Economic Foundations of American Education or EDF 623 Historical Foundations of American Education or EDF 625 Philosophical Foundations of American Education B. Current Trends Course in Teaching Specialization (4 hours) C. Specialization (27 hours minimum) The areas of specialization beginning below are suggested programs of study. Individual programs will vary with background, experience, and specific interest. Planll Plan II is a program of graduate studies designed for the holder of a non-education baccalaureate degree who desires to meet initial certification requirements as part of a planned program leading to the Master of Arts degree (This program is not available in the area of elementary education.) A. Process Core (21 hours) EDC 501, Curriculum and Instruction : Secondary; EDF 605, Foundations of Measurement; EDF 607, Foundations of Educational Research; EDF 611, Psychological Foundations of Education; and EDF 621, Socio-Economic Foundations of American Education; or EDF 623, Historical Foundations of American Educa tion; or EDF 625, Philosophical Foundations of American Educa tion . B. Current Trends Course In Teaching Specialization (4 hours) C. Specialization (27 hours minlmum) This is an individually planned graduate major in the teaching field or in an appropriate College of Education program for K-12 specialists 1 D. Internship (9 hours) Enrollment will be in EDC 691 which involves planned observation and supervision by a member of the University faculty and a secondary school staff member In-service teachers are required to complete this assign ment over two quarters ELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAMS ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (EDE) This program requires full certification as ari elementary teacher for admission. Students pursuing the master's degree in elementary education are required to present credit in the following courses: EDE 603, 609, and 613. The student will choose from one of the following areas of emphasis : a. Elementary Curriculum Emphasis : At least three courses must be selected from EDE 611, 615, 617, 619, and 621. Additional work is available through consent of the adviser as part of a planned program b Reading Emphasis: Three courses from EDE 611, EDR 630, EDR 631, EDR 632, and EDE 631 or EDL 605 are required.

PAGE 78

76 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION c Supervision Empha s i s : EDC 661, 671, and EDE 641 are required. d. Early Childhood Empha s is: Ind i vidu a lly planned em pha s i s include EDE 429 a nd three c ourses from the following : EDE 435, 527, 5)'9, 629, 639. e Elementary School M a thematic s Emphasis: Individually planned emphasi s to include four courses from the following : EDE 615, 645, 646; EDN 515, 616, 617, 618, 621, 622. Additional work in related area s may be planned with the a dviser. f. Social Studie s Empha s is: EDE 619 a nd any four cour s e s from : EDW 547, 549, 553, 645, 655 659. Elementary-Early Childhood Education This concentration require s recommendation of the program for admission. Requirements in s p e ci a lization and related courses total 32 hours and include : EDE 527 435, 539, 609 629, and 639. Elementary-Early Intervention N-3 This emphasis is designed for regular classroom teachers to become acquainted with the varying forms and degrees of behavioral manifestations and learning performance of young children in a pluralistic society. The course of study includes 1) the developmental theories and their applicability with young children, 2) the environmental factors as they relate to developmental and 3) the developmental psycho-education appraisal of young children An interrelated course of study is planned for advanced training to provide skills and competencies in clinical teaching. It includes methods such as systematic observation, developmen tal assessment, prescriptive teaching and individualized instruc tion for the prevention of learning and behavior problems. SECONDARY EDUCATION PROGRAMS ENGLISH EDUCATION (ENE) Candidates must score at least 500 on the Verbal Aptitude section of the GRE or 550 on the Advanced Literature test of the GRE Plan I-Requirements for admission : A bachelor s d<;gree in English Education from a recognized institution, or Rank II certification in Secondary Engli s h from the State of Florida or other equivalent certification Students holding a bachelor's degree and qualified for Rank III Secondary Engl i sh certif i cation except for the required Education courses may enroll a s Special students and complete c ertification requirements After obtain ing certification, they may a pply for degree-seeking status and apply up to 12 cred i t hours of relevant work in Educa t ion on this degree. One core course s elected under advisement is required although advisers will often s pecify additional core studie s. Course Sequence: Process Core (4-16 hours), English Education (4-16 hours), Engli s h course s (6 courses selected under advisement as preparation for terminal examination over a reading list including s elected works from most periods of English and American literature; student s ma y select one course each in linguistics and advanced compo s ition for teachers), Education Electives (selected under advi s ement to bring the program to a total of 48 hours) Plan II-Requirements for admission : A bachelor s degree in English from a recognized Liberal Arts Institution of higher learning Course Sequence : Proces s Core (21 hours) English Educa tion (4 hours), English courses (28 hours selected as for Plan I, above), Internship (9 hours). FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION (FRENCH, GERMAN, SPANISH) (FOE) Candidates for the M A degree in foreign language education must present satisfact 0 ry evidence of : I. Undergraduate grade point ratio of 3.0 or better on the last half of the B A ., or GRE aptitude score of 1000, or GRE advanced foreign language score in upper third or equivalent 2 B a cc a laureate degree in cho s en foreign language, or in foreign language education from an accredited institution of higher learning or equivalent. 3. Favorable recomm e nd a tion from program chairperson Each candidate will be a ss igned his major adviser in the College of Education and, to facilitate selection of appropriate foreign language courses, a co-adviser in the Foreign Language department of the College af Arts and Letters. Since identical lists of foreign language courses are not prescribed for each candidate, and since each candidate's program is designed to meet the individual's needs, the specific foreign language courses are selected in consultation with the advisers. Can didates should meet with both advisers before registering for each quarter . The M .A. in Foreign Language Education requires 20 to 25 quarter hours in Education courses (See PROGRAM PLANS OF STUDY, Plan I or Plan II). In addition, Plan II requires an internship in the Foreign Language. A minimum of 27 quarter hours are required in the Foreign Language courses on the 500 and 600 levels However, depending upon the candidate's background and strengths, Foreign Language course require ments can go as high as 36 quarter hours. Unless otherwise approved by adviser, at least 21 hours in French should be on the 600 level ; in German at lea s t 15 hours should be on the 600 level; in Spanish at least 18 hours should be on the 600 level. HUMANITIES EDUCATION (HUE) In order to fulfill the degree requirements a graduate student must take a minimum of twenty-seven (27) credit hours in Humanities aside from the required courses in Education. A student should have the fqllowing minimum credit structure: I. At least four courses on the HUM 600 level 16 credit hours 2. HUM 681, Directed Research 3 credit hours 3 The remaining eight credit hour s may be chosen from appropriate courses on either the 500 or 600 level. In exceptional cases, the student may substitute up to four hours in a non-Humanities graduate area: HUM 535 HUM 536 I::IUM 537 HUM 539 HUM 540 HUM 541 HUM 542 HUM 543 HUM 545 HUM 601 8 credit hours HUM 603 HUM 681 HUM 605 HUM 683 HUM 607 HUM 609 HUM611 MATHEMATICS EDUCATION (MAE) This program requires a minimum of 51 quartet hours MTH 405, 406, 407 and any MTH courses from the 500 and 600 levels may be included in } he planned program.

PAGE 79

SCIENCE EDUCATION (SCE) Concentrations in Biology, Chemistry, or Physics are available in a cooperative program with the College of Natural Sciences. In each instance; before admission to the degree program, the student must satisfy the Biology, Physics, or Chemistry adviser that he has the competence to undertake the program. Specialization shall consist of at least 27 credit hours, approved by the adviser in the discipline. Satisfactory comple tion of the program must be certified by both the College of Natural Sciences and the College of Education. SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION (SSE) Advanced training for the purpose of becoming better teachers in grades 7-12. Plan I is for certified teachers, and Plan II for those with a social science baccalaureate degree but not certified to teach. PLAN I-For teachers who are certified to teach general secondary social studies one of the separate subject areas. Each student in consultation with his adviser will select at least seven courses at the 500 or 600 level from courses offered COLLEGE OF EDUCATION n in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Three or more of these courses must !><: at the 600 level. PLAN II-Students will complete all of the Plan I requirements, take EDW 461, EDC 501, and EDC 691, plus any other social science courses which the Social Science Education department deems necessary for fulfilling minimum state certification requirements SPEECH COMMUNICATION EDUCATION (SPH) Admission requires a bachelor's degree from a recognized institution, and approval by the Speech Communication Educa tion faculty. Course Requirements range from 60 to 61 hours and include: 10 hours in speech communication education; 35 hours in speech communication divided as follows: 3 courses in rhetoric and communicat i on, 2 courses in oral interpretation, 1 course in speech science and the introductory graduate seminar in speech communication; EDF 605, Foundations of Measurement; and 3 electives in Education (11-12 hours) approved by the adviser. Each candidate for the M.A. degree in Speech Communica tion Education must complete a written and oral comprehensive examination successfully. KINDERGARTEN THROUGH TWELFfH GRADE PROGRAMS ART EDUCATION (EDA) In consultation with a graduate adviser, a student may develop a program in art education with a specialization in one of three areas: a Studio/new media b. Art Administration, Supervision & Curriculum Innova tion c Research Methods for Art Education A portfolio or slides of recent creative work must be submitted prior to admission into the program The departmental requirements for all degree-seeking candidates are : Art Education (12 credits: EDA 660 661, 682) Art Studio (12 credits minimum) Art History (3 credits minimum) The remainder of the credit hours, totaling a minimum of 54 may relate to one of the three areas of specialization. An innovative master s paper or project developed under the guidance of a faculty committee is required before graduation. EXCEPTIONAL CHILD EDUCATION The Exceptional Child Education offers four tracks at the Master's Degree Program Level. Students must select their area of emphasis Emotionally Disturbed (EMO) The purpose of this program is to train educators for emotionally disturbed children An individualized p rogram is available under both Plan I, for certified and experienced teachers, and Plan II, for those with a non-education bac calaureate degree PLAN I-Through a Plan l program a certified, ex perienced teacher may satisfy the requirements for graduation within four quarters. Of the minimum 45 hours, at least 27 hours are allocated to .. the area of specialization The following or equivalents are required : EDS 531 EDS 611 EDS 633 EDS 639 EDS 610 EDS 632 Additional courses, including electives, are planned jointly by the student and his adviser. PLAN II-The student with a non-education baccalaureate degree may meet initial certification through a Plan II program. The individually designed course of study will include the minimum 27 hours in the area of specialization (as outlined above) plus such other courses which may be necessary to meet certification requirements . Gifted (GIF) The Gifted Child Teacher Training program provides advanced training for experienced teachers to work with gifted and talented children and to work with other teachers on a consultant or teacher-leader basis An inexperienced teacher training program is also provided which is designed to prepare non-certified, liberal arts majors to work with classrooms of gifted children. Emphasis is on the development or' subject matter specialization and specific skills to: 1. identify the gifted, 2. make an individual diagnosis of cognitive and affective strengths and weaknesses, and 3 modify the educational program to develop the gifted child's potential. PLAN I-Through a Plan I type of program an experienced, certified teacher can anticipate preparing for teacher-consultant roles in the area of the gifted in four quarters. A minimum of 28 credit hours in the area of specialization is required. Included among the courses required are courses such as: EDC 522 EDS 551 EDS 611 EDS 653 EDS 550 EDS 559 EDS 643 EDS 654 An individually tailored liberal arts sequence of 14 quarter hours is also provided in the gifted teacher training program PLAN II-An individual with a non-education under graduate major may prepare as a teacher-consultant of the gifted through Plan II. The student will be expected to take a minimum of 28 quarter hours in the area of specialization In consultation with his adviser he will choose from the following: EDC 552 EDS 551 EDS 611 EDS 550 EDS 559 EDS 643 EDS 653 EDS -654 \

PAGE 80

78 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION An individual may meet initial certification through Plan 11 by taking EDC 501. an appropriate methods of teaching course and completion of an internship in a liberal arts area. Mental Retardation (MRD) The course of study is designed to prepare the student to become a more teacher or supervisor of teachers for the retarded. It is highly recommended by the Mental Retardation Program that any student who is about to apply for Graduate work in the area of Mental Retardation contact that office for advising purposes l;>efore any courses are taken or application made for admission. PLAN /-Through a Plan I program, a certified teacher may satisfy the requirements for graduation within four quarters Process Core Requirements (16-17 hours) At least 28 hours are allocated to the area of specialization with an emphasis on Mental Retardation. Basic Course Requirement: EDS 610, or the equivalent. Courses required: CLY 683 EDF 635 EDL 613 or EDE 631 EDS 611 EDS 620 EDS 621 Two electives, chosen from the following (8): EDS 622 EDS 623 EDC 699 (8) EDS 561 (4) EDS 681 (4) EDS 511 (4) EDS 612 (4) EDS 531 (4) EDS 613 (4) PLAN II-Process Core Requirements (16-17 hours) At least 40 hours !lre allocated to the area of specialization with an emphasis on Mental Retardation Prerequisites: EDE 409 EDE 415 EDY 207 or EDP 640 Basic Course Requirements : EDC 501 EDS 610 EDE 631 or or equivalent EDL 613 Courses required: CLY 683 EDS 529 EDC 691 EDS 611 EDF 635 EDS 322 EDS 620 EDS 621 Specific Leaming Disabilities (SLD) EDS 423 or EDS 425 EDS 424 EDS 622 EDS 623 The course of study is designed to prepare the student to become a more effective learning disabilities specialist. PI,.AN /-Process Core Requirements (16-17 hours) At least 40 hours are allocated to the area of specialization with an emphasis on Specific Learning Disabilities Basic Course Requirement: EDS 610, or equivalent. Cnurses required: CLY 683 or EDE 631 or EDL 613 or EDL 625 EDE 646 EDS 531 EDS 611 EDS 682 EDF 635 or EDS 623 EDR 631 EDS 561 EDS 681 EDR 632 PLAN /I-Process Core Requirements (16-17 hours) At least 48 hours are allocated to the area of specialization with an emphasis on Specific Learning Disabilities. Prerequisites: EDE 409. EDE 415, EDS 411 Basic Course Requirements: EDC 501 EDE 631 EDE 645 EDS 610 Courses required: CLY 683 EDC 691 EDE 646 EDF 635 EDR 631 or EDL 613 or EDL 625 EDR 632 EDS 531 or EDS 561 EDS 611 EDS 623 One Elective, chosen from the following : EDE 417 EDE 421 EDE 424 EDE 419 GUIDANCE (EDG) EDS 681 EDS 682 EDE 425 In addition to meeting the University and College require me11ts, applicants to the Guidance program must present three (3) letters of recommendation, a personal statement of pro fessional goals and have personal interviews with at least two (2) members of the Guidance faculty Applications for admission are processed once each quarter. The deadline for all requirements to be met is usually four weeks before the quarter ends Applications are processed in the quarter preceding the one in which the applicant expects to begin the program. The applicant should contact the Guidance program to ascertain the deadline dates for specific quarters and to obtain instructions regarding the transmission of letters of recommendation and the arrangements for the personal interviews. PLAN I-The Guidance program typically requires seven teen (17) credit hours from the Process Core including EDF 605, 607 613 and one of the following: EDF 621, 623, 625 Additional course requirements depend upon the major emphasis of the professional preparation curriculum The following options are available for guidance careers in schools, agencies and other settings: a. Elementary School Guidance Emphasis: Requirements in specialization and related courses total 38 credit hours and include : EOG 601 EOG 613 EOG 625 EDF 631 EOG 603 EOG 617 EOG 633 or EOG 609 EOG 621 PSY 452 b Secondary School and Adult Guidance Emphasis: Re quirements in SP,ecialization and related courses total 39 credit hours and include the following and an approved elective: EOG 601 EOG 619 EOG 627 EDF 631 EOG 603 EOG 623 EOG 633 or EOG 609 PSY 452 PLAN II is available in both emphases and requires EDC 501 and EDC 691 in addition to minimum requirements The Guidance program has no full-time residency require ment Students who are gainfully employed on a full-time basis are limited to 8 hours per quarter. Exceptions are made only with permission of the Guidance Program Committee

PAGE 81

LIBRARY-AUDIOVISUAL (MEDIA) EDUCATION (EDL) Basic courses are required for all students with a choice of specialization for work in one of the following areas: School Media (formerly School Library); Public Library; Academic Library; Special Library The requirements for the School Media specialization include Rank II certification for the State of Florida:. Other requirements prepare the student to assume leadership roles in the profession The number of credits required in this program range from 46 to a possible maximum of 75. The average number of hours totals 60, thirty three of which must be taken after the student is fully accepted into the graduate program The exact number of hours is determined in conference with the student and his assigned program adviser on the basis of the student's needs and the program standards for the specialty areas of study. Thesis hours when elected, EDC 699 (4), are in addition to course work Required courses, or their equivalent, for students in all library specializations are : EDL 500 EDL 606 EDL 614 EDL 615 EDL 601 EDL 608 and one audiovisual or instructional technology course Administration courses recommended for each special ization are : EDL 612 EDL 640 EDL 650 EDL 660 EDL 621 School media certification requires courses in materials for children and in materials for young adults. Electives may be chosen from any of the other Library-Audiovisual courses Students interested in more extensive preparation in the nonprint areas of the school media specialization may expect to take 6-9 hours more of course work or field experiences in this area. Students requiring internship will take Field Work, EDL 609, in one school level media center (e g Elementary) and Internship, EDC 691, in the other school level media center (e.g Secondary) Public, Academic and Special Library students are ex empted from the Education core courses. Among recommended courses for them in lieu of the Education core are: EDF 502 ESC 501 POL 525 SSI 503 EDH 651 MAN 601 POL 527 Each stuaent is urged to take field work, EDL 609, in the area of his specialization. With the consent of his adviser any student may choose one or more cognates from other courses offered outside the department. Criteria for admission arid for graduation are those general criteria specified by the College of Education. The Library Audiovisual program also asks for three letters of recommenda tion to be sent to the director of the program, and an interview with the program director, the program s admission committee or any other individual designated by the director. Graduation requirements include the fulfillment of the student's filed program of studies, application for graduation at the beginning of the quarter in which he intends to graduate, and the successful completion of a final comprehensive examination administered by the Library-Audiovisual faculty MUSIC EDUCATION (EDM) Plans in both instrumental and vocal music are offered A placement examination is required _of all new registrants in musical styles. Each candidate must meet the undergraduate level of piano proficiency before the quarter in which he expects to graduate Participation in ensembles is required for at least three quarters. Three plans are available to the candidate: 48 hours plus thesis, 51 hours plus recital ; or 54 hours without thesis or recital. Vocal Majors: 11 credits in music education, including COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 79 EDM 601, 614, and 635; 12 credits in music theory-literature, and at least 4 credits in applied music. Instrumental Majors: 14 credits in music education, includ ing EDM 601, 603, 617, and 633; 17 credits in music theory literature, including MUS 618; and at least 4 credits in applied music. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (EDP) Areas within the program in which a student may focus study are Elementary Physical Education, Secondary Physical Education, or Physical Education for the Handicapped. Enrollment in EDP 600, Professional Assessment, is required of all students. Preferably this course will be completed during the first quarter of study in the program and not later than the completion of eight quarter hours of credit in the physical education curriculum area READING EDUCATION (EDR) The Master's degree in Reading Education is designed to prepare special reading teachers, reading clinicians, and supervisors-directors-coordinators of reading for school sys tems. Specialization in Reading Education shall include a minimum of 28 credit hours: EDE 609 EDR 631 EDR 633 EDR 635 EDR 610 EDR 632 EDR 634 Students entering the program with an undergraduate major outside elementary education should substitute EDE 409 and EDR 430 for EDE 609. Electives must be chosen by conference with adviser. Residency requirements may be met by enrolling for two courses, at least eight credits, during a quarter when the student is not engaged in full-time work assignment. Selective retention policies require that the student maintain a B average and receive no more than two "C's", only one of which can be in the major area If this criterion is not met the student will be immediately dropped from the program. The student may be reinstated by petitioning the faculty. Reinstate ment will occur when the student retakes one of the courses in which he/she received a "C" and makes an "A" grade in said course SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY (PSE) The School Psychology program is offered jointly with the Department of Psychology in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. PLAN /-Course Requirements-except where equivalent courses are transferred into the program, the student must complete the following minimum quarter hours : 8 hrs. in Stati s tics and Research Design; 26 hrs. in Educational and Psychological Foundations; 9 hrs. in Assessment Techliiques; 4 hrs in Consultation Techniques; 4 hrs. in Field Experience . Specific courses may be obtained from the School Psychology program Research Competency-Each student must show com petency through the planning, execution and write-up of a piece of resear<;h resulting in either a thesis or colloquium paper Internship-A full-time internship of two academic quarters is required PLAN II-Students without educational certification are required to take EDC 501. For the School Psychology program, the internship requirement for Plan II is the same as that for Plan I. *Major area courses are EDE 409, EDE 609 and all EDR co11rses.

PAGE 82

80 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAMS Adult Education (VAD) I. In consultation with the graduate adviser, a program will be planned which will include a minimum of 45 credit hour s. Specialization requirements of 27 credit hours in Adult Education are designed to provide competencies in organization and administration, supervision, adult learn ing characteristics curriculum development, program planning, methods of teaching, and research techniques as each of these relate to adult educatioo programs Generally specialization courses will be selected from the following, depending upon the individual's back ground of experience: EDY 407 EDY 505 EDY 445 EDY 506 EDY 503 EDY 631 EDY 661 EDY 671 EDY 687 2. Requirements in a related area may i nclude a concentra tion of courses in one of the following areas : psychology, sociology, guidance, administration, complementary basic or a vocational field Business and Office Education (VBU) 1. A minimum of 12 credit hours in the specializatio n area of Business and Office Education. Individualized programs will include courses to be taken from the following: EDY 407 EDY 506 EDY 631 EDY 687 EDY 503 EDY 621 Any deficiencies needed for business teacher certification must be included in the Master's candidate's program. 2. Selected course s from which to choose in Vocational and Adult Education: EDY 407 EDY 431 EDY 445 EDY 480 EDY 503 EDY 504 EDY 505 EDY 506 EDY 511 EDY 605 EDY 621 EDY 631 EDY 641 EDY 651 EDY 661 EDY 671 EDY 687 3. Selected courses in one related area such as Guidance Exceptional Child Education Business Administration, Junior College, Administration or Supervision (4-12 credit hours). Distributive Education (VOE) I. Appropriate College of Business Administration courses in marketing, management, econo mics finance, and accounting for Distributive Ed ucation teacher certifica tion (22 credit hour s maximum). 2 Distributive Education (minimum of 12 credit hours) EDY 407 EDY 504 EDY 511 EDY 651 EDY 431 EDY 505 EDY 621 EDY 661 EDY 445 EDY 506 EDY 641 EDY 671 EDY 503 3. EDY 687 Seminar in Distributive Education Research 4. Selected courses in a related area s uch as Business Administration, Administration, Supervision, Guidance, Exceptional Child Education, (4-12 credit hours) Industrial Technical Education (VIT) PLAN I-Before being admitted to the degree program, a prospective student must have met the work experience requirements for certification in Industrial, Technical, or Health occupation s In addition to the process core requirements, specialization requirement s must include EDV 651 and EDV 687 Courses totaling a minimum of 45 credit hours will be a part of the student's program which he will plan with the graduate adviser for industrial' education. Related electives (0-16 credit hours). See areas of special ization listed above. The PLAN II program in Vocational and Adult Education is designed primarily for non-certificated teachers. The candidate is required to complete additional professional education courses -usually EDC 501 and EDC 691, which are in excess o{Jhe normal Process Core requirements A st udent will be advised of other courses which he must complete Master's degree candidates wishing to be certified must meet the state's minimum certif ication requirements in the area of s pecialization. JUNIOR COLLEGE TEACHING PROGRAM PLAN II-The University of South Florida ha s developed a program for junior college teachers which lead s to the Master of Arts degree and Florida State Department of Education certification at this level. The College of Education, in close cooperation with the other co lleges on the campus, has formulated the program. The Junior College program includes : Astronomy History Biology Mathematics Business Physics Chemistry Political Science English Psychology Engineering Sociology Economics Spanish French Speech Geography Communication Geology *Engineering baclielor s degree required Admission and Advising Because of the unique character of the Junior College Progr am which integrally involves two colleges of the Univer sity, there .are admission and advisory regulations which go beyond those listed in the section dealing with G raduate Application for admission to the program 1s made m the Office of Admission s. Action on all applications is the joint responsibility of the two colleges Admission to the program

PAGE 83

requires a minimum s core of 1000 on the combined verbal and quantitative aptitude tests of the Graduate Record E xa mination. Duplicate sets of the student' s complete record will b e on file in both offices, with the College of Edu c ation charged with the responsibility of making official re c ommendation s for the granting of the degree to the Vice Pre s ident for Academic Affairs and to the Registrar. The Program Consist s of a minimum of 45 credit hour s, plu s an internship of 1 9 hours if deemed necessary. 1 Specialization (36-45 hours) Typically, the student s program will include 36-45 credit hours of graduate work in a field of specialization The specialization s equence to be completed will be worked out in consultation with a designated major field adviser This typical program is based on the a ss umption that the s tudent has an undergraduate background in his specialization area which is roughly equi va lent to the p a ttern of the appropriate University of South Florida major Student s admitted without such preparation may be required to correct deficiencies By the same token the unusually well prepared student may be COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 81 permitted to take fewer courses in his specialization area, substituting approved electives from other fields Of study 2. Professional Education (9-18 hours) a Courses in Higher Education (9 hours) EDH 651, The Junior College in American Higher Education (4) EDH 653, Seminar in College Teaching (5) b EDC 691, Internship (1-9 hours) Those students who have not met the internship require ment for certification (up to nine hours credit in Junior College internship or two years or more of successful full. time teaching experience) must complete EDC 691, Internship Typically, the internship will consist of full-time supervised teaching for one quarter or part-time teaching for two quarters. At least one-half of the internship must be in the junior college the other half being left to the discretion of the student's adviser. Those students who have met an internship requirement or who have had two years or more of successful full-time teaching experience prior to admission to the program will not normally be required to take EDC 691, Internship This does not preclude the possibility of an internship for less than 9 credit hours if the advisers deem it to be desirable MASTER OF EDUCATION PROGRAMS ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION This Master of Education (M.Ed. ) degree i s to prepar e administrators and superviso r s with org a nizational, man agement, and instructional leadership s kills Admi s sion require ments include : (1) certification in a teaching field (2) at least two years of successful teaching experience or Rank II certification in an instructional area (3) current U S F graduate admi s sion requirements (4) College of Edu c ation requirements for admission to graduate study Su c c essful completion of the program to both the M Ed degree and Florida Rank II certification in Administration and Sup e rvision CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION This Master of (M. Ed ) degree program is to prepare certified teachers who have at least two years of suc c essful teaching experience and want to improve their teaching skills and/or become team leaders, department heads, program coordinators directors of instruction, and assistant principals of curriculum The degree requires at least 50 quarter hours with 60 percent or more at the 600 level. No s pecific research and thesis is required Successful completion of the program will lead to both the Master of Education degree and Florida Rank II certification ED.S. PROGRAM The Specialist (Ed S.) program has been developed to provide for state approved Rank I-A certification. The program offers specialization in Elementary Education with emphasis on urban education In addition there are tra c ks under the elementary specialization available in (1) E a rly Childhood Education, (2) Exceptional Child Education (3) Mathematics Education, and (4) Reading/Language Arts Education." Candidates for admission to Ed S. study must present satisfactory evidence of: I Undergraduate grade point average of 3 0 (B) m i nimum on the last half of the baccalaureate degree ; or GRE aptitude score-1000 minimum 2 Three letters of recommendation. 3 Favorable recommendation from program chairperson 4 Any additional requirements specified by the program Application deadlines for admission to Ed.S study are May 15 (for Quarters IV and I) and November 15 (for Quarters II and Ill). PH.D. PROGRAM The Doctor of Philosophy degree is available in Education Specialization is in Elementary Education with research emphasis on problems of urban education. In addition the re are t'racks available under the elementary s pecialization in (I) Early Childhood Education, (2) Exceptional Child Education, (3) Mathematics Education and (4) Reading/Language Arts Educa tion Candidates for admission to Ph. D study must present satisfactory evidence of: l. Undergraduate grade point a ver a ge of 3 0 (B) minimum on the last half of the baccalaureate degree ; and GRE aptitude score-'-1000 minimum 2 Three letters of recommendation. 3. Favorable recommendation from program chairperson. 4 Any additional requirements specified by the program Although classroom teaching experience is not required, the candidate must present evidence that would indicate a commit ment or interest in education. Also internships are required of candidates who do not school experien ce Application deadlines for admission to Ph. D study are May 15 (for Quarters IV and I) and November 15 (for Quarters II and Ill).

PAGE 84

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Have you ever felt you would like to be the "somebody" who will do "something about the many problems we face? Our modern s ociety requires new, practical so lutions to its many complex technological problems Spearheading this action will be the engineer and the engineering profession The engineer, as always, will continue to be responsible and obliged to use his/her knowledge for the benefit of mankind The increasingly rapid changes in our life style place an ever s tronger responsibility to society and our future on both those who are providing the engineering education as well as those who are being educated. The College of Engineering recognizes thi s in its approach to the education of tomorrow's engineers as well as in the content of the other programs under its direction which are vita l to the technological progre ss of our society. Its curricula provide for an individual's development in both te c hnical competency and human values. The programs offered by the College of Engineering to meet the diverse requirements of th e future can be broadly divided into two areas : PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING and APPLIED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. The degrees and services as sociated with these areas are as foliows : Professional Engineering Degree Programs Bachelor of S cie nce in Engineering degree (Professional Progr a m)-various options Master of Science in Engineering degree (Thesis or Project) Master of degree (Non Thesis) Applied Science and Technology Degree Programs Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science degree-Computer Science Option Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science degree-other options Master of Science in Engineering Science degree-Computer Science Concentration Master of Science in Engineering Science degree-other concentrations Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering Science degree (Florida State University transfer) Bachelor uf Engineering Technology degree Computer Science Service Courses (Undergrad uate and Graduate) The above spectrum of program offerings provides the prospective student with a choice of avenues depending upon individual interests and capabilities for a significant technolog ical contribution. These programs are described in more detail under their respective catalog headings. Laboratory experience as well as real-world participation in technological problem-solving is a key aspect of a professional engineer's or a technologist's coJ)ege education The College of Engineering, in implementing this need augments its own modern laboratory and research facilities by close contact with the professional societies and the many industries in the metropolitan Tampa Bay area Students interested in particular programs offered by the College of Engineering should address their inquiries tq the College of Engineering marked for the attention of the following: Area of Interest Contact Engineering Professional Specific department or Program Office of the Dean Engineering Science Office of the Dean Computer Science Coordinator for Engineering Technology Teachers-Engineering Concepts Computer Service Courses Computer Science, v. Department of "''" Electrical and Electronic Systems Coordinator for Engineer ing Technology Regional Center-Engi neering Concepts Curriculum Project Department of Industrial Systems .PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING The Engineering programs of the College h ave been developed with an emphasis on three broad aspec t s of engineering activity -design, research, and the operation of com plex technological systems. Students who are interested in advanced design or research should pursue the Five-Year Program leading to the Master of Science in Engineering degree. Other students interested more in operational responsibilities may wish to complete their initial engineering education at the baccalaureate level. For this purpose a Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree .is offered which provides the student a broad education with sufficient technical background to effectively contribute in many pha ses of Engineering not requiring the depth of knowledge needed for advanced design or research The College of Engineering recognizes that modern engineering sol utions draw on knowledge of severa l branches of engineering It als(l recognizes that future technological and societal developments will lead to shifting of the relative 82 emphasis on various branches of engineering, triggered by new needs or a reassessment of national goals. For this reason the College s program includes a strong engineering foundation (core) portion, designed to equip the pro spective engineer with a broad base of fundamental, technical knowledge To this foundation is added the student's specialization (option) of sufficient depth to prepare him/her to successfully embark on a professional career. While the baccalaureate degree is considered the minimum educational experience for participating in the Engineering profession and as such the first professional degree, students are strongly encouraged to pursue advanced work beyond the baccalaureate either at this or other institutions It is becoming increasi ngly evident that a large segment of today s engineering profession is involved in some form of post baccalaureate study. Engineers are earning advanced degrees in ever increasing numbers in order to obtain the information and training

PAGE 85

necessa r y to meet tomorro w s technologi cal c hallenge s. All a re faced with the continuou s problem of r efurbi s hing and updating their information skill s and mos t a re obta i ning advanced information by means of se minar s, s p ecia l ins titut e s and other such systems designed for thi s purpo se. The Bachelor of Science in E ngin e ering d eg ree program, which requires 1201 quart e r hour s, a nd th e fiv e year program leading to the Master of Sci e n ce i n Engineering degr e e which i s an integrated program of 246 quarter hours are the programs specifically designed to prepar e an indi v idual for a professional career as an engineer Both program s h av e as their found a tions a 152 quarter hour core of s ubje c t m a teri a l encompas s ing Humanities, Social Science Mathematic s, Science and Engi neering wh i ch is required of all s tudents. In a ddition to the core subject material each s tudent will compl et e a s pecialization option under the direction of on e of the a dministrativ e departments of the College Tho s e option s w hich a re available and the administrative unit re s pon s ible for the option s are as follows : Option General Chemical Electrical Industrial Mechanical Department All D e partment s Energy Con v ers i on & Mech a nical Design E lectrical & Electronic Sy s tem s Indu s trial S ys tem s E nerg y Conver s ion & Mechanic a l Design Structures Materials & Structures M a terials & Fluids Flu i d s The Engineers' Joint Council for Profe ss ion a l Development has inspected and accredited t he c urri cula of the College of Engineering defined by the Elec;tric a l Indu s trial Mechanical and Structures, Material s & Flu i d s opti o n s. Preparation for Engineering The high' school student anticip a ting a career i n engineering should elect the strongest academic program that i s available while in high school. Four years each of Engli s h mathematics and science (preferably including Chemi s try and Phy s ics), as well as full programs in the social sciences a nd humanities, are most important to succes s in any engineering college. A foreign language, while not a necessity, provides a desirable background for students many of whom will continue for advanced study. Prospective students who are con s idering engineering at the University of South Florida who lack certain prepar a tion in high school should elect to follow a program which will assist them in CbLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 83 overcoming their deficiencies One alternative might be that such a student select a summer program at the University of South Florida to update knowledge in mathematics and the physical sciences. Another alternative might be for the prospective Engineering student to take some remedial work and a less accelerated program at the Univer s ity of South Florida For financial or other reasons, students may wish to avail them s elves of the state' s sy s tem of junior colleges which offer a wide range of remedial course work, and many of which also offer full programs in pre-engineering (first two years' course work). The University of South Florida offers all required pre enginee ring courses every quarter. Therefore every s tudent can s tart the program at that point whe r e his/her prior education terminated, and can proceed frorh that point at a rate commen s urate with the student s capability and time avail ability Junior college students planning to transfer to the Univer sity of South Florida's engineering program at the junior level from a State of Florida operated college or univer s ity should plan to graduate with an A.A degree, thus completing their general education requirements All tran s fer students should also complete as much of the mathematics, science a nd engineering core course work as is available to them. The University's College of Engineering is available to a s sist junior colleges in the development of course material and in the training of staff for their offering of applicable core pre-engineering course work. Junior college transfer student s should note that in addition to freshman and sophomore level courses all required junior level courses are given each quarter, thu s p e rmitting full continuity in studies for the student at all times The College of Engineering can assist students who are planning to obtain an Engineering degree from the Univ e r s ity of South Florida and who have started their studies elsewhere in formulating a sound total program Interested s tudents s hould contact the Dean s Office furnishing sufficient detail to permit meaningful response Admission to the College Freshmen and transfer students may elect to enter the College of Engineering s professional engineering program upon initial entry into the University by declaring the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program as their major If not declared on initial entry, a student can at any time declare his/her intent to pursue the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program by applying in person in the Advising Office of the College. To qualify for admission a student must have been accepted by the University as a degree-seeking student, must be in good Social Science, Engineering and Physics Building

PAGE 86

84 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING academic standing, and mus t be otherwise acceptable to th e College More stringent requirements may be invoked by the college to limit enrollment to a level which is compatible with available re s ources For information on s upplementary ad missions requ i rements contact the Office of the Dean, College of Engineering Potential engineering student s should note that the critical course structure of the engineering program makes it desirable to enter the program as soon as the i nterest in a nd potential ability for engineering is recognized Students should note that the characteristics of the engineering program do not require an identification of the area of engineering s pecialization (option) at the time of declaring engineering a s a major Students need to make this decision no lat i r than their junior year. Engineering coursework identified as 300 levef or higher is con s idered professional level work and students enrolling for thi s work must have been admitted to the college or have received prior permission from the Office of the Dean or the department chairman sponsoring the coursework. Engineering Advising Effective pursuit of engineering s tudies requires careful attention to both the sequence and the type of cour s es taken. The engineering cu r riculum differ s in key respects fro!Il the study plans of other major s-even in the freshman year. It is therefore important, and the college r equires that each student plan a curriculum with and h as it approved by, a faculty adviser in the College of Engineering Student s transferring from other colleges within the Unive rsity must contact the Coordinator of Engineering Advising in the Dean's Offi c e for a faculty adviser assignment prior to acceptance into the college New students must attend the University's Orientation program They are assigned an engineering advi s er during thi s program and receive advi s ement for their first quarter at that time Student s who have made a decision regarding the erigineer ing option they plan to follow are assigned a faculty adviser in the department corresponding to their interest. Students who have decided to follow a program of engineering studies but who are undecided on the specialty are advised in the Dean's Office The s tudent a nd a dviser jo i ntly work out a plan of s tudy which meets both the student's career objective s and the College of Engineer ing' s degree requirements A s tudent may change advi s er s with the concurrence of the new adviser and the Dean's Offic e. The advi s ers maintain the College of Engineering s student records A s tudent transferring within the Univer s ity must declare the desire to change m a jor s i n the adv i sing office of the College where the new m a jor i s housed Students a re a dvi s ed to buy calculator s only after consulta tion with their a dviser Departments & Programs The s upervision of t he academ i c programs for the College is the function of the four administr a tive department s together with se v eral coordinator s The departments are responsible for the professional progr a m in engineering with the coordinators re s pon s ible for the special programs in Engineering Science, Engineering Technology and Engineering Concepts Each department is responsible for program s faculty, laboratories and s tudent s assigned to it. Electrical and Electronic Systems This department offer s s tudy in all areas fundamental to Electrical Engineering and the electrical science s : circuit analysis and design, electronics, communications elec tromagnetics, control solid state, system s analysis, electronic computer design etc. Basic concepts are augmented with wellequipped laboratories in networks, electronics, automatic control, d i gital systems electromechanics, microwave techni ques and communications In addition, a smalt general purpose computer facility and a microelectronics fabrication laboratory are available to undergraduate and graduate students The department administers the Electrical Option of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B. S.E.) degree program, the Master of Engineering (M.E ) degree program in Electrical Engineering, a nd the area of Electrical Engineering for the of Science in Engineering (M. S.E.) degree. This department ji lso admin isters the bachelor' s level Computer Science Option and the master s level Computer Science Concentration in Engineering Science. Energy Conversion and Mechanical Design This department offer s study pertinent to the analysis and design of machines and systems needed by our modern society, through courses dealing with the classical Mechanical and Chemical Engineering subjects of lubrication, vibration and fatigue analysis, machine design, thermodynamics, heat transfer, environmental control, transport phenomena and reactor dynamics : In addition, it provides instruction in othe t fie l ds of increased importance to the engineers of the future. Some of these fields are computer simulation, instrumentation, automatic control, power utilization, acoustics, and nuclear processes and the design and evaluation of innovative systems for energy utilization and pollution control. This department administers th.e Chemical and the Mechanical Options of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B. S.E.) degree program, as well as the area of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering for the Master of Science in Engineering (M S.E.) degree. t; lndustri al Systems This department offers study pertinent to the design, evaluation and operation of a variety of industrial systems r a nging from setvice areas, such as data processing, to manufacturing plants. Topics include production control, inven tory control, data proce s sing systems design, statistics and operation s research models The department administers the Industrial Option of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B. S E.) degree progr a m, the Master of Engineering (M.E.) degree program in Engineering Administration, the area of Industrial Engineering for the Master of Science in Engineering (M. S E ) degree and instructs students in Computer Service courses offered by the University of South Florida. Structures, Materials, and Fluids This department offers course work and study pertinent to Civil Engineering, Engineering Mech a nics, and Materials Sci ence. Topics included are structural analysis, design and optimization ; metals, polymers, ceramics ; solid and fluid mechanics, stress analysis vibrations continuum mechanics, aerodynamics, gas dynamics wave propagation, numerical methods ; water resour c es, waste treatment environmental engineering, and hydrospace engineering. The department admini s ters the Structures, Materials and Fluids option of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B.S.E.) degree program, and offer s several concentrations within this option. It also administers the area of Structures Materials and Fluids for the Master of Science in Engineering (M.S.E ) degree Engineering Core Both the four-year and five-ye a r curricula of the College of Engineering are founded on a common core of course work which is required of all students Thi s course work is designed to give each student a thorough foundation of knowledge on which specialization studies and a profes s ional career can be based.

PAGE 87

Emphasis is placed on three key elements ; a solid foundation in science and mathematics, a basic understanding in all major engineering dis<;iplines and familiarity w i th Social Science and Humanitie s-to develop the whole individual. This coinmon foundation of 152 minimum quarter hours breaks down as follows : Social Science and Humanities Core 47 credit hrs min Mathematics and Science Core 49 credit hrs min Engineering Core 56 credit hrs min Special requirements exist for the Chemical option. Students selecting this field should make sure they familiarize themselves with these. Detailed information can be obtained from the Energy Conversion and Mechanical Design dep a rtment or the College's Advising Office. 1. Social Science ilnd Humanities Core Requirements (47 credit hours minimum) Prospective Engineering majors must take 9 credit hours of Freshman English (ENG 101, 102, 103) An additional 38 credit hours of course work is required in this core area, of which at least 34 hours must be selected from the current "Approved Social Science and Humanities Courses" list for Engineering and Engineering Science students. A minimum of 12 credit hours of this course work must be of 200 level or higher At least 8 credit hours must be taken .in each in Humanities/Fine Arts area and the Behavioral and Social Sciences area (to meet the University's General Distribution Requirements). It is recommended that the student pursue specific subject areas to s ome depth, since this develops areas of knowledge and interests which aid fuller development of the individual and later assist in relating a professional career to non technical environments and situations It is desirable that at least 35 hours of this course work be taken in the first two years. Students are responsible for checking with their advisers to be sure that the specific courses they are taking meet the requirements of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program .. Students who transfer from a State of Florida community college with an Associate of Arts degree and who have met that college's General Education Requirement will normally find that their General Education course work satisfies the major portion -but not the Social Science and Humanities Core requirement. Credit by Examination can be obtained for some of this course work CLEP General Examination credit is accepted for the areas of Epglish Composition, Humanities and Social Science. Credit for CLEP Subject Examinations and CEEB Advanced Placement Tests can be accepted when the subject covered is recognized to be equivalent to USF course(s) on the Approved Social Science and Humanities Courses" list. Questions in this area should be addressed to the Coordinator of Engineering Advising in the Dean's Office. 2. Mathematics and Scien ce Core Requirements (49 credit hours minimum) The student with a satisfactory high school preparation must take 49 credit hours of mathematics and seience course work (Some credit towards this core requirement can be obtained by passing applicable CEEB Advanced Placement Tests or CLEP Subject Examinations ) In mathematics this course work consists of a Calculus for Engineers sequence (or a calculus sequence of equivalent level), equations and six hours of advanced mathematics courses supportive of the student's selected field of special ization (option). In science the course work consists of one year of General Chemistry and one year of Physics (with calculus), and normally one additional advanced science course supportive of the student's area of specialization (option) Chemical option COLLEGE; OF ENGINEERING 85 students should contact their department for special advanced chemistry requirements in this area Students whose high schooi preparation is insufficient to enter the Calculus for Engineers and/or the General Chemistry sequence are required to take s upplementary mathematical (algebra and trigonometry) and/or foundation course work. 3. Engineering Core Requirements (56 credit hours minimum) The prospective engineering majo J must take 56 credit hours of engineering foundation course drawn from the major disciplines. This course work is designed to equip the student with a sound technical foundation for later more advanced specialized course work and the eventual formation of pro fessional judgment. This course work includes introductory studies in such areas as engineering analysis and computation, electrical engineering principles, thermodynamics, statics, dynamics and fluids, and properties of materials All but 10 credit hours of the engineer i ng core are common to all areas of specialization (option) of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering program. The remaining 10 credit hours of course work must be chosen with concurrence of the departmental adviser to fit the option selection of the student Details on this selection are available in the departmental office of the option selected, o r in the College's Advising Office FOUR-YEARPROGRAM BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING DEGREE (EGU) The Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree is awarded upon successful completion of a program consisting of the required three areas of core course work-minimum of 152 credit hours-which is described above, and an additional 49 credit hours of course work in a designated area of specialization (option). Details covering the options are available on request from the resporisible department, or from the College's Advising Office Options are offered in the following disciplines of engineering: 1. General Option (49 credit hours) All professional departments may offer the general option which consists of 49 credit hours of course work individually arranged by the student with the approval of the studenCs adviser This option is used where a student wishes to deviate from a prescribed disciplinary option utilizing course work from several different disciplines both within and without the College of Engineering. Under this option a program in Biomedical Engineering includes course work in Biology (6 to 9 hrs ) Zoology (5 hrs : ), Organic Chemistry (5 to 10 hrs ), Biomedical Systems Engineer ing (9 hrs ), an approved Senior Project in the biomedical area and electives to complete the 49 credit hour.s specialization. Pre-medical students follow a slight modification of this program which permits them to meet normal admissions requirements of medical schools. Pre-law students find this option permits a strong technical and legal academic preparation 2. Option in Chemical (49 credit hours) Students pursuing the Chemical Option take designated specialized course work in advanced chemistry, thermodynamics, energy conversion, separation processes, transport phenomena heat and mass transfer, reacting systems process control systems, as well as approximately 15 .;:redit

PAGE 88

86 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING hours of chemistry and technical electives. Students must also satisfactorily complete a design and/or case study as part of their program. Special characteristics of the chemical option make it imperative that students retain constant close contact with their adviser. Students completing this option normally pursue careers in chemical proces s industries in public service (regulatory, planning and/or environmental), or in consulting or research. Products covered include paper and pulp, petroleum and petrochemicals polymers and fibers, synthetics, pharma ceuticals foods, fertilizers, etc. Such modem societal problems as controlling pollution, handling wastes, advancing medical technology, providing food and energy more efficiently, etc. depend on the chemical among others, for their solutions 3. Option In Electrical (49 credit hours) Students pursuing the Electrical Option take designated, specialized course work in network analysis, electronics, communications, electromagnetic theory. linear system and control system analysis, and microelectronics This course work is supplemented by electives in logic sequential circuits, and digital system design; distributed networks and UHF principles; and/or electromechanics and power system analysis Students must also complete a Design Project prior to graduation. Students completing this option normally pursue industrial careers in the power, electrical, electronic or information industries or in related governmental laboratories and public service agencies. The electrical graduate may apply his/.her knowledge to such diverse areas as television, communications, remote guidance, sensing (of people, vehicles, weather, crops etc.), automation computer and information systems, electric power generation and transmission, electrically propelled transportation, etc. The graduate may do this by performing needed engineering functions related to the research and development (often requires also an advanced degree), design production, operation, sales, or management of these products/services. 4. Option in Industrial (49 credit hours) Students pursuing the Industrial Option take designated, specialized course work in industrial processes and production control; engineering valuation; network modeling, computer simulation and systems analysis ; operations research; design of experiments and engineering statistics. This course work is supplemented by courses in production and facilities design; computer languages, systems and projects; and quality control. Students completing this option enter careers in a broad range of industries, businesses and governmental and public service areas. Their preparation covers activities common to all types of organizations; planning, analysis, implementation and evaluation. In addition to traditional care er opportunities in production and process areas of high-volume industries, the indu s trial graduate nowadays finds challenging careers in hospitals, transportation and service industries, and in munici pal, county state and federal administration 5. Option In Mechanical (49 credit hours) Students pursuing the Mechanical Option take designated, specialized course work in thermodynamics and heat transfer; physical measurements and energy conversion; machine analysis and design; mechanical design and controls; and fluid machin ery This is supplemented by elective coursework in such areas as power plant analysis, nuclear and reactor engineering; refrigeration and air conditioning; acoustics; lubrication; and v i bration and balancing. Students completing this option normally enter careers as design, consulting, research and development, or sales engineers r in a wide range of industries which either tum out mechanical products or rely on mechanical machines, devices and systems for their production. Thus, mechanical graduates follow careers in such industries as vehicles and transportation, energy generation and conversion, instrumentation and automatic control, machinery, and heating and refrigeration. In industries which process their products mechanically (foods, some chemical; paper, waste, etc.) mechanical graduates also have career opportunities as plant or constructi1>n engineers, being responsible for the installation, operation, and maintenance of major mechanical system complexes. 6. Option In Structures, Materials and Fluids (49 credit hours) Students pursuing the Structures, Materials and Fluids Option take designated coursework in solid mechanics, stress analysis, and structures; materials; fluid mechanics; engineering analysis applied to this discipline and a senior research/design project. This course work is supplemented by courses in one of the following areas of concentration, plus electives. "a. Materials concentration-courses in engineering materi als polymers, corrosion, and materials processes. b. Civil Engineering concentration-courses in structural design, transportation, water resources and soil mechan ics c Water Resources concentration (designated by Board of Regents as a "Program of Distinction ")-"Courses in water resources, hydrology, and urban water systems. d. Applied Mechanics concentration-courses in fluid me chanics, vibrations, contihuum, and experimental me chanics Students completing this option enter careers as engineers in the civil, structural, sanitary, environmental, hydraulics, materials> engineering mechanics, aeronautical, etc. disciplines. All of these fields share the need for knowledge in the areas of engineering mechanics, civil engineering, and materials science. Through choice of the proper area of concentration the student has the opportunity to channel his academic studies specifically

PAGE 89

towards his/her career choice. Structures, Mmerials and.Fluids students commence their engineering careers in either industry, with engineering consulting firms, or in public service at the federal, state or lacal le11el. Initial assignments include planning, design and implementation of water resources, transportation and housing systems; regional planning, design and management for abatement of air, water and solid waste pollution problems; research and development of new materials, material processes and testing procedures; design of bridges, single and multistory structures; s pervision of construction projects. FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM-MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING DEGREE (EGG) This program consists of a minimum of 152 credit hours of core course material plus 94 credit hours of specialization including a maximum of 18 hours of research or design project Students are admitted to this program early in the beginning of their fourth year of study based on an evaluation by the faculty of their
PAGE 90

88 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Engineering Master's Degree Programs The College of Engineering offers three professionally oriented programs leading to a degree at the master's level. These are the post-baccalaureate Master of Science in Engineer ing degree program, Master of Engineering degree program and the Five-Year Master of Science in Engineering degree program Each professional department may elect to award one of these degrees depending upon prior arrangements with the student. Admission to the master's program is dependent upon a favorable evaluation by the department concerned Applicants are expected to meet the minimum requirement s of the University and those outlined below and in addition any special requirements specified by the departments and reported to the Dean of the College Other requirements may be considered . POST-BACCALAUREATE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING DEGREE (EGP) This graduate program of the College is designed for those students wishing advanced study which is research or design oriented Entrance Requirements 1. A baccalaureate degree in Engineering from an approved institution is required Degrees in Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and other fields may be accepted on an individual basis to meet this requirement. In s uch cases it is probable that supplemental remedial work in engineer ing will be necessary. 2. A minimum total score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative portion s of the Graduate Record Examina tion and/or a minimum grade point average of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 for all work attempted during the last two years of undergraduate work i s required 3 Tho s e who do not meet the regular entrance requirements may att empt a trial program as a Special (non-degree seeking) Student Up to 18 hours of work attempted on this basis may be accepted into a graduate program upon satisfac tory completion. Before attempting such a trial program the st udent should determine from the de p ar tmental adviser a list of courses and performance criteria for admission. Program Requirements I. A minimum of 45 credits of approved course work is required. 2. An overall grade point average of 3 0 is required for all work attempted in the program. No grade below "C" may be accepted in a graduate program. In the event that a student's average drop s below 3.0 the student will be placed on a probationary status and must obtain a dire cte d program from his/her adviser approved by the Dean, prior to continuing course work toward the degree 3 All s tud ents are required to pass a final comprehensive examination which may be written or oral prior to awarding the degree. These examinations are arranged and ad ministered by the student's graduate committee. 4. Student s in this program must complete a design or research project Qn which up to 9 credits may be used to fulfill degree requirements. In general, the course 681 with the appropriate departmental prefix is to be used for a design project, the course 699 with the appropriate departmental prefix is to be used for a research project. 5. If a thesis is submitted it must be in accordance with the Handbook for Graduate Theses and Dissertations, University Graduate Council. For design projects a comprehensive report must be filed with the Office of the Dean of Engineering following, where p rac tical, the guidelines of the handbook. The students working on design and research projects must register for a minimum of 3 credits of course 681 or 699 as applicable with the appropriate departmental prefix each quarter the staff, facilities and laboratories of the University are used whether or not the student has accumulated the mll.'Jimum credit allowed for research or design toward the degree. All students must register for 3 credits of course 698 or 699 as appropriate with the appropriate departmental prefix during the quarter in which they submit their thesis or project report. MASTER OF ENGINEERING DEGREEPROGRAM(EGM) This non-thesis degree program is designed primarily to meet the needs of engineers actively engaged in the profession who wish to pursue graduate study at the master's level. Entrance Requirements Entrance requirements for the Master of Engineering program are the same as those for the po stbaccalaureate Master of Science in Enginering degree program. It is usually expected that those applying to this program will be experienced or actively engaged in the engineering profession. Program Requirements 1. A minimum of 45 credits of approved course work is required. 2. Students must maintain overall grade point average of 3.0 out of possible 4.0 No grade below "C'" will be accepted in a graduate program. In the event that a student's average falls below 3.0 the student will be placed o on probationary status and must obtain a directed p ro gram from his/her adviser and approved by the Dean prior to continuing further course wor k toward the degree 3. All students are required to pas s a final comprehensive examination which may be written or oral prior to awarding the degree These examinations are arranged and administered by the student's department. 4 Students in this program must register for 3 credits of course 698 with the appropria te departmental prefix during the quarter in which they apply for the degree. This will be used as prepar atio n for and administration of the final examination This credit may not be used as part of the course work requirement. THE ENGINEERING FIVE-YEAR MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAM (EGG) This program consi s t s of a minimum of 246 credits of course work and results in concurrent awards of the Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Engineering degrees Unlike traditional master's progr ams following the baccalaureate in this program both the fourth and fifth years are open to graauate level study and additional calendar time i s a':ailable for research or design projects Entrance Requirements 1. Students who have senior s t anding (135 credits) with at least 24 credits completed at the University of South

PAGE 91

Florida in the engineering curriculum may apply for admission to the Program. 2 A minimum total score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative port i on s of t he Gr a duate Re c ord Examina tion i s expected 3. Above-aver a ge pe r form a nce i n the engineering program is expected. Student s apply for admi s sion to this program through their department. They should consult their adviser when they need addition a l information Program Requirements 1. A minimum of 246 credits of a pproved course work must be comp i led Of th i s tot a l 152 credits must comprise the enginee r ing centr a l core with an a dditional 94 credits of specializ a tion A max i mum of 18 credits may be allowed for design and re s ear c h. 2. Students a dm itted to the five-ye ar program are expected to m a in tai n a sup e rior l e vel of academic performance A 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 gr a de point average is expected in course s in the s tud ent's gradu a te course of study COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 89 A student in the Five Year Program who fails to maintain the required academi(i standards will be placed on probation. Failure to comply with the terms of the probation will result in the student being dropped from the program 3 Students in this progra!lJ must complete a design or research project for which up to 9 credits of course 499 with appropriate departmental prefix and up to 9 credits of course 681 (for a design project) or course 699 (for a research project) with appropriate departmental prefix may be used to fulfill degree requirements. 4. If a thesis is submitted it must be in accordance with the Handbook for Graduate Theses and Dissertations, University Graduate Council For design projects a comprehensive report must be filed with the Office of the Dean of Engineering, following where practical the guidelines of the handbook. 5. All students are required to pas s a final comprehensive examination which may be written or oral prior to awarding the degree. These examinations are arranged and administered by the student's graduate committee. APPLIED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Several degr e e pr og r a m s a nd a se ri es of c ourses a re offered by the College of E ngine e r i ng whi ch a re d e s i gned for s tudents whi;i do not wis h t o pur s ue profe ss ionally ori e nted degree progr ams in engineering but who w ish t o ob ta in a techni c al background coupled with other interests The programs available can be broadly divided into two areas : ENGINEERING SCIENCE and ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY and are dis cussed in more detail below Engineering Science Engineering S ci enc e is a n a ppl i ed science discipline which relat es to n ew a nd i nno va ti ve ar e as o f e ndeavor at the frontiers of technologic a l de ve lopmen t a nd r es e a rch. It rep r esents a marriage betwe e n ba sic sc i e n c e a nd its uti l ization in such varied fields a s computer scienc e, biology, social a nd environmental science s, a pplied m a them at i cs, o c e a n engineering and energetics The c o mmon denomin a t o r t o thi s w ide range of subject s is a strong foun
PAGE 92

90 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING processing. Courses range from studies in software and programming, data structures, operating systems, and 1systems analysis to the analysis of computer architecture and organiza tion, logic design, automata theory, hardware simulation, and reliability considerations. Finally a number of specialized electives allows concentration on applications of computers to a variety of activities such as scientific computation, computer aided de sign, business systems, biomedical research, and pattern recognition. This program is administered through the Coordi nator for Computer Science Program, Department of Electrical a nd Electro n i c Systems. A n option i n Applied Mathematics covers applied analytical techniques to establish a more fundamental understanding of basic physical phenomena leading to engineering applications. Area s of m a thematics considered from an applied viewpoint include modern algebra, theory of algorithms, classical advanced calculus complex variables, probability and statistics numerical procedures, approximation theory, operations research, and applied mathematical programming The u se of computers is emphasized This program provides the student with an opportunity th a t is not available in either a pure mathematics curriculum or in a design-oriented engineering program. An option in Biomedical Systems provides a background for those anticipating a medically oriented career. The simulation and analysis of human systems and the computer processing of biomedical data (such as cardiac, pulmonary, and neural signals) form typical a reas of concern An option in Environmental Science is available for students who desire to develop a broad interdisciplinary background necessary for careers in environmental protection with industry and government. Training is provided in the sociological sciences of politics, government, and social science; the commun i c a tion arts (speaking and writing) ; and the scientific and technological aspects of air, water, and noise pollution Other options are available in such areas as Ocean and En e rgetics Baccalaureate Requirements (minimum 180 credit hours) The B a chelor of Science in Engineering Science degree progr a m requires a strong foundation in mathematics and s c ience, foundation course work in. the humanities, social s c iences, a nd o ther non-technical areas, a basic knowledge of en g ineeri n g fun da mentals, and culminates in approximately one ye a r o f s pe cialized-often interdisciplinary-studies. These basic requirements are further listed below. I H umanit ies, social science, and other non-technical areas req u i re m e nt (42) 2 Mathematics and science requirements (45) 3. Eng i n ee ring Science core requirement (41) 4 Special i z a tion requirement (52) (Ther e m a y be minor variations from these numbers in a def i ned o ption ) Other Requ ir ements for Engineering Science T he En g lish, Mathematics, Continuation, and Graduation requirements for the Engineering degree program are applicable to the Engineering Science degree program. Students with a Computer Science option will not be given credit towards their degree for Computer Service Courses (ESC) taken without prior consent of their adviser. OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREE (EGF) Students who at the beginning of their senior year are clearly interested in graduate study are invited to pursue a five year program of study leading simultaneously to the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science and Master of Science in Engineering Science degrees. The keys to this program are: 1 A two-year research project extending through the fourth and fifth years. 2. The opportunity of taking graduate courses d uring the fourth year and deferring the taking of senior courses to the fifth year. The requirements for the combined degrees do not differ from those for the two degrees pursued separately. Students apply for admission to this program through their adviser, and he should be consulted when additional information is needed. General requirements include: I. Senior standing (135 credits) with at least 24 credits completed at the University of South Florida in the engineering science curriculum. 2. A minimum score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination is ex pected. 3. Above-average performance in the engineering science program is expected. 0 Students following the Computer Science option can obtain through this program the deeper specialization required of those engaged in advanced research and development. POST-BACCALAUREATE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREE (EGC) The admission and program requirements (minimum 45 credit hours) for this degree are essentially the same as those itemized for the Master of Science in Engineering degree page . Students entering the Computer Science concentration of this program without a baccalaureate degree in Computer Science may have to take supplemental remedial coursework. DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE (EGC) Doctoral students previously enrolled at The Florida State University may complete their degree program at the University of South Florida under the catalog requirements in effect at the time of their graduate admission to The Florida State University (or as revised). Engineering Technology The of Engineering offers a program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Engineering Technology to serve educational needs in engineering-related areas. The program normally provides for two years (90 min. credit hours) of study at the University of South Florida following two years (90 credit hours) of successful study in an engineering technology program which has lead to an Associate of Science degree Many programs of the State System of Community Colleges uniquely mate with this program.

PAGE 93

BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (ETK) Upon completion of their full four years of study leading to the award of the Bachelor of Engineering Technology degree students will have gained a well-rounded background concen trated in the following areas: Engineering Technology Mathematics and Science, Liberal Arts and Social Science, and Management and related areas (including Computers). A student who has completed this program should be adequately prepared to assume career responsibilities in technical, technical super visory, or technical executive positions. Prospective students should note, however, that this program is not intended to be an engineering program. Rather, its function is to bridge the gap design or research professional engineers, technicians, and management. It is for this reason that the program consists of a balance of course work in technical, management and Liberal Arts and Social Science areas. A typical student pursues the bulk of the Engineering Technology course work, together with much of the mathematics and science course work within the framework of a junior college Associate of Science degree engineering technology program. Most of the Liberal Arts and Social Science course work, Management and Computer-oriented studies and some additional engineering technology course work is taken by the student at USF during the junior and senior year. The typical four years of study thus exhibit approximately the following course work distribution (in credit hours): Engineering Technology.. .... ..... ......... .. ..... ... .. .. ... 80 Management & related studies................... ... .. ... . .. 30 Liberal Arts, Social Science and Electives..... ..................... .... ... .. ... ........ ... .. 48 Mathematics and Science ............. ......... ... ... . ....... 22 Total. ...... .. : ...................... .................................. 180 Speci,fic students' programs may deviate from this balance to some extent due to the differences in the students' first two years' program contents. At USF a portion of each student's program may be used for of the areas of concentration listed below Air Conditioning Engineering Technology Computer Systems Technology Construction Technology Electrical Power Engineering Technology Electronics Technology Industrial Engineering Technology Management Engineering Technology These areas are designed to complement the technical work received at the community colleges and need not necessarily be in the same field in which the A.S. degree is awarded Students entering this program will have their transcript annotated as to the institution from which their technical training was received as well as their technical specialization as designated by that institution. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 91 Admission In general, students are expected to have successfully completed an Associate of Science degree in Engineering Technology at a community college or to have accomplished equivalent work. Normally, the student should have completed a minimum of mathematics through applied integral calculus and a non-calculus physics sequence If the student's performance in his community college progralt\ indicates a reasonable probabili ty of success in the Bachelor of Engineering Technology program the student will be admitted to USF. Students are required to complete a minimum of 90 additional quarter hours to receive the Bachelor of Engineering Technology degree. Because this evaluation procedure is to the Bachelor of Engineering Technology program, the application for admission should clearly indicate the desired major field as Engineering Technology." This application should be filed through the Office of Admissions Students who are currently following a program other than that of an Associate of Science degree in Engineering Technology at a community college and who are interested in pursuit of studies in this field should contact the College of Engineering for further guidance. Further information is available from: Director of Engineering Technology USF St. Petersburg Campus 830 First Street, South St. Petersburg, Florida 33701 or Dim; tor of Engineering Technology College of Engineering University of South Florida Tampa, Florida 33620 Other Requirements The following supplemental requirements listed on page 87 are applicabl e to this program : English Requirement Mathematics Requirement Continuation Requirement In addition to the completion of the course work of the College, students must be recommended for their degrees by the faculty of the College. The awarding of a baccalaureate degree requires a minimum average of 2.0 or "C" for all engineering course work of 300 level or above attempted while registered in the College : Location The course work for this program is offered on both the Tampa campus and the St. Petersburg campus. On occasion, it may be necessary for a student at the St. Petersburg campus to go to the Tampa campus for a specific course, or vice versa. It should be noted that the St. Petersburg campus dos not have dormitory facilities and students must arrange to live off campus. The Center Administrator of the St. Petersburg campus will assist where possible in locating housing Computer Service Courses Recognizing that the general purpose digital computer has made significant contributions to the advancement of all elements of the academic community and that it will have an even greater impact in the future, the College of Engineering offers several levels of credit course work, undergraduate and graduate to serv students of all colleges in order that they may be prepared to meet the computer challenge. Computer-oriented courses are offered in two broad categories : (l) those courses which are concerned with the operation, organization and programming of computers and computer systems from the viewpoint of examining the fundamental principles involved in computer usage; and (2) those courses which are concerned with computer applications ; o a variety of different disciplines, by means of user-oriented languag es such as FORTRAN, PL/I and COBOL. In order that the students may derive maximum benefit from the courses according to their interests, the courses are further divided into two groups: (I) those courses of general interest to a wide variety of disciplines; and (2) those courses of particular interest to students in engineering and the physical sciences.

PAGE 94

COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS The College o f Fine Arts serves the three-fold purpose of providing programs of study, theatres of practice, and programs of events for the University family, the surrounding community and the citizens of the State of Florida. Its prime objectives are : (1) to provide a broad but thorough education dedicated to the development of professional ex cellence in those who are highly talented in the fine arts, (2) to foster this feeling and commitment to aesthetic excellence in those preparing for teaching and (3) to provide curricular studies and extracurricular activities designed to enrich the life of the general University student and contribute to the overall human environment of the University com munity In addition to offering degree programs in the departments of Art, Dance, Music, and Theatre, the college is the home of the Florida Center for the Arts, and SvcoM. Programs in art education and music education are offered jointly by the College of Fine Arts and the College of Education Studio and history courses in art, vocal and instrumental music for these programs are offered by the College of Fine Arts. (See programs under the College of Education.) Florida Center for the Arts In 1968, the University of South Florida created the Florida Center for the Arts as a unit within the College of Fine Arts The various personnel and fine arts programs on campus were consolidated into one administrative structure to more efficiently concentrate on all three areas of the university's responsibility -education, research, and community service The functions of the Florida Center for the Arts are as follows : 1 To initiate and conduct programs which will bring students and the general public into contact with the highest level of professional activity in all the arts 2 To offer opportunities for students and public to have direct contact with professional artists 3 To conduct programs which will allow opportunity for specialized professional study or training in areas not covered by the regular academic structure of the University 4. To develop programs which can relate the public school system tp professional cultural activity. 5 To sponsor research and develop research facilities relative to the development of the arts 6. To create exhibition and performance programs available for use on campus and throughout the state. 7 To plan and develop physical facilities for the Florida Center 8. To conduct conferences, seminars and symposiums in the arts for general public exposure. 9 To make available professional consultant services 10. To provide a technical and design center for the performance areas in the College of Fine Arts Through its program of exhibitions visiting artists in all performance areas, films and residencies of professionals including companies, ensembles and individuals all of the highest quality available, the Florida Center enhances the quality of the cultural life of the whole University and Civic Communities as well as providing an enriching supplement to the work of the academic departments of the College ln addition the Florida 92 Center provides management and production support to the performance programs generated by the various departments of the College . The activities of the Center allow personal exposure of students to important creative talents and offer the serious Fine Arts major an invaluable educational opportunity. Visiting Artists and Artists-in-Residence Programs: The remarkable extent, the wide diversity, and the superlative quality of the programs initiated and conducted by the Florida Center for the Arts reflects the desire of a major university and its College of Fine Arts to use its resources for the broadest possible educational and cultural advantages. Only a partial listing of individual artists and performing groups of outstanding caliber sponsored by the Florida Center for the Arts includes : John Cage; The Guarneri String Quartet; Lorin Hollander; The Juilliard String Quartet; The New York Pro-Musica ; Elizabeth Schwartzkopf. More extensive lists of professional artists and performing organizations appear in this Bulletin under the sections of the specific units in the College of Fine Arts in which research, demonstration, teaching and other educational activities have directly instructed and otherwise benefited studen\s See Visiting Artists and Artists-in-Residence: under Art on page 96, under Dance on page 96; under Music on page 97; under Theatre on page 98. SY COM The Systems Complex for the Studio and Performing Arts SYCOM-provides staff, courses of study, service and to encourage active participation in ongoing art research by faculty and students in the College members of the University community citizens in the Tampa Bay area and distinguished artists and scientists in residence. The facilities, already equipped and operating in SYCOM, are : Digital Studio-The PDP 11{10 computer provides an advanced, state-of-the art system for innovative teaching an4 research in computer assisted music composition, graphic, spatial, kinetic, and filmic arts. Digital-to-analog as well as analog-to-digital converters interface the computer with various voltage controlled devices. Analog Studio-Two Moog-10 synthesizers, a 100-series Buchla Electronic Music System, multi-channel tape machines and a master console for 16-channel quad-mixing are the heart of the analog system for SYCOM. Each unit is capable of being controlled by the PDP 11/10. Real Time Applications is a small recording studio and workshop for electronic musiC performance experiments. Video Studio, still in the planning stage, proposes the acquisition of a graphic display unit to interface with the PDP 11/10 making possible the synthesis and control of light design on the face of a cathode ray tube Systems Research Lab maintains, coordinates and interfaces the various studies of SYCOM SYCOM serves all areas of the College of Fine Arts, as a meeting place for students faculty artists and scientists, whose interaction stimulates creative research and teaching in art technology The facilities, technical staff, and faculty associated wih SYCOM make possible an array of courses related to various areas of art-technology : Both the Electronic Music Sequence and the Film and Video Sequence offer comprehensive programs of study through the undergraduate years, as well as graduate

PAGE 95

study Future art-tech workshops and expansion of current course offerings, particularly in art theatre and dance, will. enhance the program further In SYCOM, individual or group projects sponsored by SYCOM or by extramural granting agencies a re highly ap propriate. Project results are manifest in public lectures, performances, reports publications, exhibits, or in large theatrical events and special workshops, often in contexts such as Sound Gallery, the Event/Complex Series, SONQGRAPH SYCOM Report, and the summer teaching program Art-Tech Workshop Interdisciplinary Study In spite of the fact that an undergraduate interdisciplinary degree program is not formally offered in the College of Fine Arts, it is nevertheless possible for a student to pur s ue what amounts to an interdisciplinary program of study in the College when the OF FINE ARTS 93 student is able (or when he sees fit) to utilize the 35 hour s of Free Electives allowed him toward that end To suggest an example, an arts-oriented student may be equally (or almost equally) interested in two of the four undergraduate degree disciplines offered by the respective departments in the College of Fine Arts-Art, Dance Music, Theatre (the Bacheldr of Arts degree in each case). To further extend the example, the student might complete the major course requirements in the Art department (and with other requirements met receive the B.A. degree in Art) and at the same time utilize all of his 35 Free Elective hour s for course work in the Music department. A student majoring in Art might also divide his 35 Free Elective hours between the Departments of Music, Theatre, and Dance for an even broader in terdisciplinary approach A student wishing to be involved in more than one area in the College should consult with his major department adviser or with the Coordinator of Advising in the College to determine if an interdisciplinary sequence of study might be tailored to suit his particular needs. BACCALAUREATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Admission to the College A freshman student may elect to enter the Coilege of Fine Arts as a major in one of the four departments as early as his initial entry into the University, provided that he has completed his first advisory period with the Division of University Studies. At that time, the new freshman has to correctly indicate his College and major choice However, any student in the University in good standing, at whatever level, at any time (even in the middle of a quarter) can apply to change from another major or Undecided to a major in the College of Fine Arts irrespective of and without affecting course work in progress. The student desiring to make this change must acquire his advising records from his present adviser and take them to the College of Fine Art's advising office where new records will be initiated and maintained upon acceptance. Transfer students and students from other units of this University with previous college:; or university fine arts course credits (art, dance, music, theatre) must have such courses evaluated by meeting the appropriate portfolio or audition requirements when they seek admission to the College of Fine Arts These students are urged to make early arrangements for any necessary portfolio reviews or auditions, as well as advising appointments, since these must take place prior to course scheduling and registration Further, students are required to take their own copies of their transcripts showing all previous college or university course work to advising, portfolio review and/or audition appointments. Additional information may be obtained and appointments may be made by telephoning or writing the College s advising office or the office of the department of particular interest. Advising in the College The College of Fine Arts operates a central advising office located in the Fine Arts Building staffed full time by the Coordinator,' his assistants, and two secretaries. This central advising facility is open daily from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 1:00 p m to 5 :00 p.m. throughout the University work year. It maintains the records of all major students in the College (art, dance, music, theatre) and provides on-going day-to-day academic advising and assistance to all students who seek it whether they are maj.ors in the College or are potential new students or transfers from outside the University or from within Upon admission to the College of Fine Arts, undergraduate students with a declared major will be counseled in their selection of courses by an adviser from the major field Students will then plan the remainder of their college program to fulfill their educational needs and to satisfy requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Degree-seeking graduate students accepted into the M F .A. program in art or into the M.M. program in music will be counseled on program completion requirements and in their selection of courses by the Graduate Art Adviser or by the Graduate Music Adviser. Any student in the University, regardles s of the student's departmental, college or major affiliation, may take any course in any one of the various programs in any one of the four departments in the College of Fine Arts for elective credit as well as for the General Distribution Requirement when the course is appropriate to the student's level when the student has the established prerequisites for the course, and when there is a vacancy in the course at the time of the student's registration. In all cases, the responsibility for meeting all graduation requirements rests entirely upon the s tudent. Special Assistance to the Student: Student academic problems of an unusual or extraordinary nature, even seemingly unsolvable problem s needing particular attention and personalized clarification and/or resolution, may be directed to the Coordinat9r of Advising and Graduate Studies in the College of Fine Arts Graduation Requirements The College of Fine Arts currently offers one undergraduate degree the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), attainable in the Depart ments of Art, Dance, Music and Theatre These requirements are referred to on page 34 of this catalog, but are briefly summarized here: I. 180 credits with at least a "C" average (2.0) in work done at the University of South Florida At least 60 of the 180 credits must be in courses numbered 300 or above. 2. Departmental Requirements: Completion of a major in a subject or an integrated major involving several subjects with a minimum of 63 credit hours (except for music majors-see item #6) Waiver for credit of up to 18 credit hours is possible by demonstration of competence Review is by Faculty Committee. 3. Free Electives : To allow the s tudent the opportunity to choose between a greater breadth and a greater depth of experience. 35 credit hours of free electives (except for music majors) are permitted, only 28 hours of which may be taken in the department of the student's major

PAGE 96

94 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 4 Special Requirements: Except for students majoring in mus ic, at the discretion of the other departments of the College, students may be required to take up to 22 hours of courses outside the major department which are deemed necessary to meet the particular needs of individual students engaged in special areas of study in that department. All majors must take at least 9 hours in one or more of the other departments of the College 5 General Distribution Requirements: The remaining 60 credits of the student's 180 credit hour degree require ment may be satisfied by completing the University s General Distribution Requirement as explained on page 33 of this catalog. This requirement may also be satisfied by the A.A degree holder from a Florida Junior or Community College or from another State University with General Education requirements met, the General Education requirements being broadly acceptable as the equivalent of the General Distribution requirements (In this case, the College of Fine Arts will accept a total of 90 quarter transfer hours from the A.A. degree holder.) The A.A. degree is in no way a requirement for acceptance into the College of Fine Arts (or into any one of its upper level degree programs), or a requirement for graduation from the University 6 Music Departmental Requirements : Students majoring in music must complete % specified departmental credits, 7 credits of Free Electives, 8 credits in the Special Requirement area, plus 9 credits in one or more of the other departments of the College 7. To be eligible for graduation, a student must earn 45 of the last 90 hours pf credits in residence at the University of South Florida. However, any cour-se work to be taken and any credits to be earned outside of the University to be applied toward graduation from the University must have prior specific approval in writing from the student's academic major adviser, from the Chairman of the student's major' department, from the Coordinator of Advising for the College, and from the Dean of the College 8 Specific questions concerning program requirements for the B .A. degrees in the College, or any other problems needing particular personalized clarification, shou ld be directed to the Coordinator of Advising and Director of Graduate Studies, College of Fine Arts, University of South Florida 33620. 9 The responsibility for seeing that all graduation require ments are met rests with the student. B.A. Degree Requirements In the College of Fine Arts (Art, Dance, Music, Theatre): Briefly summarized here, are the 180 minimum hour requirements for the B.A. degree in the College of Fine Arts : I. In Art and in Dance ; a minimum of 63 hours in the major. 2. In Theatre, a minimum of 64 hours in the major. 3. In Music, a minimum of % hours in the major. 4 For all majors, 60 hours in General Distribution Courses 5 For Art Dance, and Theatre majors, 35 hours of Free Electives (of which 28 hours may be taken in the major). 6. For Music majors, 7 hours of Free Electives ( none of which may be taken in the major). 7 For Art and Dance majors, 22 hours of Special Requirements outside the major department. 8 For Theatre majors, 21 hours of Special Requ irements outside the major department. 9. For Music majors, 17 hours of Special Requ irements outside the major department. Courses for General Distribution Requirements: Courses in the College of Fine Arts with the departmental prefixes ART, DAN, MUS and TAR fall within Area II of the University's General Dis tribution Requirements This means that any student in the University may utilize art, dance, ll)Usic, and theatre courses toward the partial satisfaction of the University's 60-hour General. Distribution Requirements. (See page 33 of the University Bulletin for a complete description of General Distribution Requirements a nd their satisfaction by AA degree holders and other transfer students with "Ge. neral Education Requirements" met.) However, a major in any one of the four departments in the College of Fine Arts may utilize only those courses in the other three departments of the College for Area II General Distribution Requirements. Contracts and Permission Slips All Directed Studies courses in the College and all variable credit courses in the College require contracts between students and instructors describing the work to be undertaken by the students and speci fying the credit hours. These contracts are to be completed with 4 copie s and signed by the student, the instructor and the. Department Chairm a n The student and the instructor each retain a copy, with one copy going to the College Advising Office It is the student's responsibility to obtain the necessary signatures and make the required distribution of all copies. Important : the student must have his/her signed copy of a contract at the time of registration. Permission Slips: Admission into some courses is only by consent of instructor (Cl), consent of chairman (CC), or by audition or portfolio review When such special permission is required, it will be the student's responsibility to obtain any required "Permission Slip" for presentation at registration. Additional Contracts: The College of Fine Arts requires that any SIU grading agreement entered into between student and instructor be formalized by a contract in quadruplicate signed by the student and the instructor. Distribution : one copy by the instructor, one copy for the student, one copy delivered to the department office and one copy delivered to the College Advising Office. I Grades (lncompletes) must be contracted for by mutual agreement between s tudent and instructor, with the cofitract describing specifically the amount and nature of the work to be completed for the removal of the incomplete grade. This contract additionally clearly specifies the date that the work be due (within legal limits) for grading. Both the student and the instructor must sign this contract and the distribution of the four copies will be the same as with S/U contracts. A student must not register for a course again to remove an "I" grade. S/U Grading in the College I. Non-majors enrolled in college major courses may undertake s uch course s on an S/U basis with instructor a pproval. 2. S/U grading agreements between instructors and students must be carried out in the form of written contracts. 3. The timetable for the completion of an S/U contractual agreement between instructor and student in any given Quarter will be determined solely by the instructor 4. Credits earned by a non-major student with an "S" grade will not count toward the student's minimum major course graduation requirement should that student ultimately decide to become a major student in one of the fou r departments in the College Instead : such credits e arn ed with an "S" grade will be assigned to the s tudent's requ ired -for-g ra duation 35 hour Free Elective category (with the exception of' music). 5. Although Fine Arts major s tudents may take up to 28 hour s of course work in their major to be used as Free

PAGE 97

Electives, (with the exception of music majors), Fine Arts students are not entitled to the S/U grading option in courses taken in their major subject area, even when specifically used or intended to be used as Free Electives 6. In the College of Fine Arts, the only SIU graded courses available to a major student in his major subject area are those curriculum allowable courses designated SIU (that is, SIU only) 7. With the exception of such courses as may be specifically required under the College's "Special Requirements" regulations, and such specific courses that may be required in the General Distribution area, there will be no limitation whatsoever placed on student majors in the College as to the number of courses taken S/U outside of his major department, nor upon the number of hours that may be taken S/U outside of the major department, nor upon the number of courses or hours that may be taken COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 95 S/U outside the major department during any given Quarter of study. Dean's List Honors See Academic Policies and Procedures, Programs and Services, page 32. Programs Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree The College of Fine Arts has programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in the following fields: Art Music Dance Theatre Programs and Curricula ART (ART) Departmental Requirements for the B.A. Degree The art curriculum is designed to develop the student's consciousness of aesthetic and ideological aspects of art and its relatioqsbip to life and to assist students in the realization of personal ideas and imagery. Most B .A. recipients interested in college teaching, museum or gallery work, fine or commercial studio work pursue the extended discipline and experience offered at the graduate level. Although the program allows many possible courses of study, most students will select one or two areas of emphasis chosen from the offerings in studio (painting, sculpture, graptiics ceramics, photography, film, video, drawing), history Of'"theory. The listing of courses in the art department (page 140) are in a numerical sequence, by level, and are not topically grouped by subject matter-related areas or sequentially organized by specific disciplines in such a manner as to suggest the various major concentration options available to the art major. Although the Art Program allows many possible courses of study, most art major stude nts will select one or two areas of emphasis chosen from the course offerings listed. The major concentrations, or areas of emphasis, available to undergraduate (B. A. seeking) art students are: DRAWING PAINTING SCULPTURE CERAMICS GRAPHICS (LITHOGRAPHY and/or INTAGLIO and/or SILKSCREEN) PHOTOGRAPHY CINEMATOGRAPHY and VIDEO ART HISTORY and THEORY Most B.A. recipients interested in college teaching, museum or gallery work, fine or commercial studio work pursue the extended discipline and experience offered at the graduate level. (See 500 and 600 level courses leading to the graduate MFA degree following the undergraduate course listing.) Art Studio Concentration The following are the 63 quarter hour minimum require ments for a studio major (each course requiring a grade of "C" or better): I Each of Visual Concepts I (two-dimensional), Visual Concepts II (three-dimensional) and Basic Seminar, each with a grade of "C" or better, for a total of 10 credit hours. 2. Minimum of 12 credit hours of 300-level studio courses exclusive of Technique Seminars (from drawing, paint ing, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking I, photography, cinematography) 3. Minimum of 12 credit hours of 400 and/or 500-level studio courses exclusive of Technique Seminars (from drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, lithography, intaglio, silkscreen, photography, cinematography, video arts). 4. Minimum of 1 2 credit hours in Idea Seminars and/or art history courses. 5. Art Senior Seminar for 3 credit hours 6 Fourteen credit hours of additional art courses (which may include Technique Seminars), for a total of 63 quarter hours in art. Patio, Fine Arts/Humanities Building



PAGE 1

96 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS Art History Concentration The following are the 63 quarter hour minimum require ments for an art history major (each course requiring a grade of "C" or better) : The following are the 63 quarter hour minimum require ments for an art history major: I. Visual Concepts I (two-dimensional), Visual Concepts II (three-dimensional) and Basic Seminar, totaling 10 credit hours. 2 Minimum of 20 credit hours of 400-level art history courses (of this, Twentieth Century art history, 4 credit hours, is required). 3. Seminar in the History of Art History for 4 credit hours 4. A minimum of 16 credit hours in Idea Seminar (2 quarter hours each) and/or Directed Readings (I to 6 quarter hours each) and/or Critical Studies in Art History (4 quarter hours each). 5. Art Senior Seminar, 3 credit hours. 6. Ten additional credit hours of art courses to total a minimum of 63 quarter hours. 7. A proficiency in at least one foreign language, with either French or German being strongly recommended. In lieu of some considerable direct living experience with another language, it is suggested that a minimum of two years of college-level study of a language be undertaken For more specific information as to the satisfaction of this requirement, the student should consult with the faculty of the art history area of the art dep(;lrtment. Special Requirements for All Art Majors At the discretion of the art department, major students may be required to take up to 22 hours of courses outside the art department which are deemed necessary to meet the particular needs of individual students engaged in special areas of study in that department. Of these at least 9 hours must be taken in the other departments of the College of Fine Arts. Transfer credit will be given on the basis of portfolio and transcript evaluation . The requirements for the bachelor s degree in Art Education are listed under the College of Education. Artists and Artists-in-Residence: The art department is widely known for the consistent level of excellence of its programs. Aside from the obvious attribution to the overall excellence of quality of its permanent in-residence artist teaching staff, in order to insure t11e continuing expansion of learning opportunities available to students, the art depart ment regularly brings to the campus' studios established professional working artists as supporting resources for its art teaching activities. Such artists provide a unique supplemental extra-dimension to the arts studies programs of particular value to students. Among those artists who have articulated to students va luable first-hand information about, and who have convincingly on-the-spot demonstrated direct experience with, current developments in the arts: Scott Bartlett, Larry Bell, Friedl Dzubas, Allen Jones, Nicholas Krushenick, Daniel Lang, Paul Sarkisian. DANCE (DAN) The dance curriculum is designed for students interested .in dance as an art form. Their objectives may be to continue their education in graduate school, to teach in a college or a private sch ool or to pursue a career as a performer and/or choreo grapher. Major concerts are given during each quarter as well j!.S workshop performances. Through the Florida Center for the Arts, major dance companies are brought to the campus giving students the opportunity of taking classes with the professional dancers. Requirements for the B.A. Degree: Modern majors are required to take, for a total of 63 hours: DAN 201 (3) DAN 305 (3) DAN 413 (3) DAN 202 (3) DAN 311 (I) DAN 453 (3) DAN 203 (3) (three credits) DAN 463 (3) DAN 301 (4) DAN 313 (3) DAN 464 (3) (eight credits) DAN 401 (5) DAN 302 (4) (15 credits) DAN 303 (3) DAN 403 (3) Ballet majors are required to take. for a total of 63 hours: DAN 201 (3) DAN 303 (3) DAN 313 (3) DAN 202 (3) DAN 305 (3) DAN 402 (5) DAN 203 (3) DAN 311 (I) (15 credits) DAN 301 (4) (three credits) DAN 413 (3) DAN 302 (4) *DAN 312 (I) DAN 453 (3) (eight credits) (six credits) DAN 464 (3) Entrance to all technique courses will be by jury examina tion. Dance majors are also required to take 35 hours of free electives. Of this time, a maximum of 28 hours may be in the dance department. Special requirements for dance majors come to 22 hours. Nine hours must be taken in the other departments of the College of Fine Arts The remaining 13 hours will be assigned to the student based on his individual needs as determined by the department. The University's General Distribution requirement consist ing of 60 hours may be found on page 33. The above requirements total 180 hours. Junior dance majors are required to do a dance project. Senior dance majors are required to choreograph and perform in a senior dance p,rogram. Prospective students must contact the dance departmept to arrange for an audition prior to registration. Beginning courses may only be repeated three times. A student must audition each quarter to stay at his present level or to advance to a higher level. Until students are accepted inlo Intermediate Modern or Intermediate Ballet they will be considered probationary dance majors. Students should refer to page 93 for graduation require ments. Visiting and Artists-In-Residence: By s upplement ing its excellent on-going regular staff instructed dance curriculum with other professional resources made available through the Visiting Artist and Artist-in Residence programs, the dance department provide s for dance students an overall dynamic program for practice, study and learning. An impressively lengthy list of the extraordinary individual dance and dance company participation in one or more programs includes: Murray Louis Dance Co First Chamber Dance <;:o. Claude Kipnis Mime Theatre Louis Falco Dance Co. Nikolais Dance Theatre Kerela Kalamandalam Co. Dance Theatre of Harlem Merce Cunningham Dance Co. Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre Don Redlich Dance Co Lucas Hoving Dance Co. New Caledonia Singers and Dancers Norman Walker Dance Team Ballet Marjo Luis Rivera Co. Utah Repertory Dance Theater Cliff Keuter Dance Co. Kelly Hogan Jose Limon Co. James Cunningham Co. Lar Lubovitch Dance Co. Six quarters of Pointe Technique (women), or six quarters of Partner of Men's classes.

PAGE 2

Polish Mime Ballet Theatre Viola Farber Dance Co. Paul Taylor Dance Co. The Phakavali Dancers of Dena Madole Meredith Monk Luigi Carolyn Brown Susanna Hayman Chaffey Sandra Neels Thailand Betty Jones Royes Fernandez Jacques D'Amboise Barton Mumaw MUSIC The Departmental Major: The music curriculum is designed for those students gifted in the performance and/or composition of music. Candidates for a major in music are required to pass an entrance examination in their respective performance and/or composition areas. All new registrants are also required to take a placement examination in music theory and literature. Students may obtln dates and times for these examinations from the music department office. Completion of those examinations is required before registration in music courses can be permitted Academic Programs Offered Include: Bachelor of Arts degree with areas in Performance (voice piano and orchestral instruments) Composition Requirements for the B.A. Degree: All students se eking a degree in music are rquired to (1) complete successfully the secondary piano requirements as defined by the mus i c faculty, (2) present a partial public recital during their junior year, (3) present a complete public recital during their senior year. These requirements are in addition to the actual course requirements listed below A total of% hours is required as follows: MUSIC THEORY (30) MUS 201 (3) MUS 222 MUS 202 (3) MUS 223 MUS 203 (3) MUS 301 MUS 221 (2) MUS 302 (2) (2) (3) (3) MUS 303' (3) MUS 321 (2) MUS 322 (2) MUS 323 (2) MUSIC LITERATURE (6) MUS 23! (2) MUS 232 (2) MUS 233 (2) MUSIC HISTORY (9) MUS 401 (3) MUS 402 (3) MUS 403 (3) For applied majors, 36 hours of applied music is required: MUS 204 (9) MUS 404 (9) MUS 454 (9) MUS 304 (9) One ensemble per quarter is required in conjunction with applied music enrollment. For Composition Majors: Undergraduates majoring in composition must complete a minimum of 36 credit hours from among the following sequence of courses including MUS 307 and at least one quarter of MUS 458, satisfying all necessary prerequisites for all courses: MUS 205 MUS 208 MUS 305, 306, 307 MUS 308 MUS 309, 310, 311 MUS 405, 406, 407 MUS 408 Introduction to Electronic Music (3) Composition (3) Electronic Music-..Analog Synthesis (3,3,3) Compo sition (3) Contemporary Techniques of Composition (3,3,3) Electronic Music-Digital Synthesis (3,3,3) Composition (3) MUS 455, 456, 457 MUS 458 MUS 459 MUS 410, 411 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 97 Electronic Music-Real-Time Performance (3,j,3) Composition (3) Seminar in New Musical Systems (3) Orchestration (3,3) In consultation with, and with the approval of the entire composition faculty, the senior requirement for composition majors is to be satisfied in any pf the following three ways, or in other ways so designated by the composition faculty: (1) a complete public concert of works by the student composer, (2) the public performance of several compositions in various concerts throughout the composer's senior year, (3) the formal presentation to the compositio n faculty of an extensive portfolio of compositions plus the public performance of at least one of these works during the senior year The Faculty: USF's superior music faculty has been carefully chosen for its training, performing ability, and ability to teach. It is in every sense a team :rhis achievement has been demonstrated by such fine musical ensembles as the Faculty String Quartet, the Faculty Brass Quintet, the Ars Nova (faculty) Woodwind Quintet and the Faculty Chamber Players. Unique Learning Opportunities: The music department at the University of South Florida offers the stude nt the opportunity to s tudy with a distinguished faculty, work with the newest in creative equipment, and to be in the company of other superior music students for an extensive, exciting and exacting period of study SYCOM The Systems Complex for the Studio and Performing Arts offers the student the opportunity to work with an unusually well developed electronic facility for creative research and compositional opportunity Visiting Artists and Artists-Jn-Residence: The Department of Music utilizes guest composers, conductors, and performing mus icians to enhance its offerings in terms of teaching faculty, forum app earance s, and the conduct ing of musical programs, symposia, and clinics. Prominent musici a ns who have appeared in the past are Howard Hanson Norman Delio Joio, R ; mdall Thompson, Virgil Thomson, David Ward-Steinman, Walter Trampler Fred Hemke, Eleazar de Carvahlo, Thomas Nee, Lucas Foss, Maurice Andre, John Haynie, Jean Pierre Rampa!, and Julius Baker Student Organizations: Sigma Alpha Iota, national professional music fraternity for women, and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, a professional music fraternity for men, are dedicated to serve the cause of music in America. Student Music Educators National Conference is an affiliate of the Music Educators National Conference and is open to all interested students Financial Aid: The University has made available to highly qualified undergraduate students a number of music service awards. Usually these awards cover in-state,: tuition fees, and are distributed following open auditions held in January and February. The award is made for the following year for three of the four quarters Available to graduate students who show special potential for creative contribution to the profession are the University Scholar Awards and graduate assistantships and fellowships. Additionally, loans grants and work programs are available to qualified niversity of South Florida students. Financial aid is granted on need academic promise and character.

PAGE 3

98 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS THEATRE (TAR) The Departmental Major: Through its curriculum and production program, the theatre department offers to seriously interested students the opportunity to prepare themselves for the beginning of a professional career in the Theatre or to continue their studies at the graduate level. In addition, students from other departments and colleges have the opportunity to study and participate in the work of the department thereby allowing them to gain insight into the creative experience of Theatre After a thorough orientation to all facets of the art gained in the basic courses, the theatre major may begin to concentrate in either the area of performance or design and technology. Throughout the student's course of study, contact is encouraged by the faculty in the student's chosen area of concentration to help the student realize his/her full potential and to help maintain awareness of progress. To earn a major in theatre, the student must take a minimum of 64 quarter hours in theatre In addition to these, 28 hours of electives in the theatre department may be taken to broaden either the general program or to pursue a particular interest in more depth. Through the production program, which includes various performances for general audiences children and department faculty and students, the student has the opportunity to participate in many different ways, thereby gaining practical experience th a t is essential to his/her development as an artist. II. ft l" . PAaTM . IT --:-;-The DRUNKARD A Moral Drama with Music Adapted by Mr. William H. Smith --= == e = -SI.DO SUD Fne For the more advanced acting student, opportunities sometimes arise for participation with other companies in the area. The Design/Technology area of the Florida Center (see description elsewhere in this section) offers to the advanced Tech and Design student opportunities to work with the professional companies (Dance, Theatre and Music) that come to the campus as a part of the University Artist Series and Dance Residency Program. For all students, a broad involvement in all facets of their field of concentration is encouraged. Visiting Artists and Artists In Residence: Despite the fact that the University is relatively young the theatre department has had in residence artists from many kinds of theatre and many countries including : London's. West End, The Actors Studio, Dublin's Abbey Theatre, Broadway, Washington's Arena Stage, The American Shakespeare Festival, The Welsh National Theatre, the BBC, the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art, Coventry's Belgrade Theatre, Paris, Hollywood, East Berlin s Deutsches Teater, Taiwan, Socialist Republic of Armenia, and Poland. A partial alphabetized list would include Miriam Goldina, Bo ris Goldovsky, Henry Hewes, Mesrop Kesdekian, Marcel Marceau, Paul Massie, Siobhan McKenna, Olga Petrovna, Ben Piazza, Alan Schneider and Doug Watson. Requirements for the 8.A. degree . Total 180 hours TAR MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: (total of 64 hours) All students must take: TAR 201 (2) TAR211 (4) TAR212 (4) TAR 213 (4) TAR311 (4) TAR 321 TAR 339 TAR 403 TAR 453 (4) (4) (6) (4) Plus one from: TAR 430 (4) TAR 431 (4) TAR 434 (4) TAR 437 (4) Depending upon choice of concentratio n, additional requirements are: PERFORMANCE: TAR 410 (4) TAR 414 (4) Plus one from: TAR 411 (4) TAR 415 (4) TAR 438 (4) TAR 412 (4) TAR 439 (4) TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN: TAR 421(2) 422(2), 423(2) Plus any three from: TAR 420 (2) TAR 425 (2) TAR 428 (2) TAR 424 (2) TAR 427 (2) TAR 429 (2) And a choice of either all of TAR 461 (4) TAR 475 (4) TAR 465 (2) TAR 462 (4) TAR 476 (4) TAR 472 (4) TAR 463 (4) or all of TAR 473 (2) or all of TAR 417 (2) TAR 474 (4) TAR 464 (2) Special Requirements: A Courses inside or outside TAR department as suggested by TAR faculty or advisers as necessary for an individual student's progress; or additional Free Electives (see restrictions on page 93) .. .............................. 12 hours B. When the student makes an initial declaration of major, a reading list will be presented The list is comprised of plays, books and articles which the department considers essential to the general knowledge of majors. The student will be expected to read independently from this collection. University and College of Fine Arts Requirements: A General Distribution Requirements (details on page 33) ......... ............................... ............ .. .. .. . .. 60 hours B. Free Electives (up to 28 hours may be taken in TAR courses beyond major requirements) .............. 35 hours C Special Requirements-courses in other departments in College of Fine Arts . ................................... 9 hours

PAGE 4

COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 99 MASTER'S LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS The College of Fine Arts offers two master's level degree progr ams, the Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) in the Art dep artment and the Master of Music (M.M ) in the Music departm ent The general University admissions r eqirements for graduate degre e-s eeking status a nd the regulations of the Un ive rsity governing graduate study are described beginning on page 43 in this bulletin. The general University application p rocedures are explained on page 12. When all of the information required for general acce ptability i n to the Univer sity is received in the Graduate Admissions Office the information gathered by that office will be forwarded to the appropriate dep a rtment in the College of Fine Arts where the applicant's fin a l acceptance or rejection is actua lly determined Master of Fine Arts Degree (Art) The major concentrations, or areas of emp h asis, available to gradua te (M.F A se eking) art student s are: DRAWING PAINTING SCULPTURE CERAMICS GRAPHICS (LITHOGRAPHY and/or INTAGLIO and/or SILKSCREEN) PHOTOGRAPHY CINEMAT OGRAPHY an d VIDEO Procedure for Applying For consideration of acceptance into the Master of Fine Arts degree program, it is re quir ed that th e a pplicant submit a portfolio of his work direct l y to the Director of Graduate Studies in the College of Fine Arts The portfolio usually consists of 35-mm slides for convenience in shipping, h andling and .presenta tion Legitimate exce ption s to this "rule" are naturally acceptable, such as when the applic a nt's work is comprised of film or in such other obvious cases when the nature of the work does not lend itself to slides or when the work can be displayed or presented more conveniently and/or more effectively by delivering it personally (with prior permission), to the Director of Gradua te Studies in the College of Fine Arts or when the work itself and/or additio nal work is requested by the D irec tor to be sent or brought i n The "portfolio" should indicate a competent level of involvement in an area (or areas) of vis ual exploration and when mailed must be posted directly to the Director of G ra duate Studies College of Fine Arts, University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33620, with return postage in s t a mps, (please, no cas h checks or money orders!) in the amoun t deemed necessary for the return of all materials A personal interview with an ap plicant is sometimes (though infrequently) requested by the Art department when it is considered ne cessa ry (and reasonable) in ord er t o arrive at a final decision regarding the applic a nt's acce p tability into the gradu ate program. Travel i n connection with any interview, requested by the art department or by the p plicant, is natur ally at th e applicant's own expense. An applicant who would seek consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies with the Art Gra duate Committee, or with any other member of the art department for whatever reason and for whatever date or tiine would do well to write or telephone for an appointment in advance of hi s/ her arrival on campus if at all possible The following are de a dline s for receipt of all materials (letters of rec omm en d atio n letter of intent, an d portfolio), in the Offi ce of the Director of G raduate Studie s, College of Fine Arts: F e bru ary I (for consideration for admission for Qu arters III IV and I); May 1 (for consideratio n for a dmis si on for Quarters IV and I); November I (for consideration for admissio n for Quart ers II and III). At this same time, the Office of Graduate Admissions m ust have received all transcripts fro m former institutions, the GRE scores and the Application for Admission. It is the applicant's responsibi lit y to see that all required transcripts and GRE scores are rec eived in the Office of Gradu ate Admi ss ion s in time for their pr oces sing only after which we are presented with the record of those crede ntials. With out those credentials in hand we cann ot consider an application The applicant will be advised to allow at least one full quarter in ord er to permit pro cessing within the system. (If applicable, see graduate a dmis si ons requirements on page 43 of this bulletin) Applicants to the Master of F i ne Arts D egree program are also required to submit three letter s of recommendation, a letter of intent, and s l ides of t heir work for approval by a faculty committee These materials must b e submitted dire c tly to the Dire c t or of Graduate Studie s in th e College of Fine Arts Requirements for the M .F.A. Degree: General requirements for gradu ate admission are given on page 43. A student may be accepted into the program with degree seeking status either pro visionally (conditionally) or fully (unconditionally) The provisionally admitted s tudent m ay be req uir e d to be enrolled for one or two consecutive terms for the removal of a deficiency or to provide time to demonstrate a parti c ular competency. At the end o f a provisional period the s tud e nt's work will be reviewed by the art facu lt y, at which time the student will either (I) b e allowed to continue in the program with provisional status removed ; or (2) be terminated from the p rogram; or (3) be a llowed a n additio nal term of provisional s t a tus Students accepted fully into the degree -see king program initially will be given a ca l endar year i n which to ach ieve degree-candidacy by faculty review Neither the first term of a fully accepted degree seeking student's enrollment nor any su mmer term may be used for a candidacy review however. A st udent a dmitted into the degree program provisionally will not be permitted a candidacy review during the first term of h is/ her provisional enrollment. Su ch a stude nt could be given a candidacy review during the se cond term of enrollment if he/she h ad b een removed from th e pro visi onal status at end of the first term or could be reviewed sim ult aneously for both the removal of t he pro visi onal status a nd for can d idacy considera tion during the second term provided tha t he /s he is not required

PAGE 5

100 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS to enroll for a third in th e pro v i s ional s tatu s initially admitted provisionally als o have a c alendar y ear in which to achieve candidacy All degrees eeking s tudent s are with two opportunitie s within th e calendar year to achieve candidacy. If a degree seeking s tudent does not achieve candidacy on the second attempt, the stud e nt will then be terminated from the program. Upon acceptance to candidacy, the student will select a committee of three faculty members who will assist in his progress toward the degree (at least two of the committee members must be studio faculty of the student s primary discipline) There is no foreign language requirement for the M.F. A degree In spite of the seven-year rule generally applicable to the Master s Degcee candidate (see page 47 in this Bulletin) the M.F A. degree candidate is expected to be in planned continuous residence (enrollment for course work only in Summer Quarters not being required), regardless of the number of course credit hours carried in any given term, regardless of whether they be few, several or many, and regardless of any per-term averaging pattern If enrollment is not planned or made for any given term or terms during "continuous residence", the degree-seeking student must request in writing and receive permission from the Director of Graduate Studies in the College of Fine Arts for such absence. Violation of the written terms of a permitted leave of absence could result in termination from the M.F.A. program, at the discretion of the Director of Graduate Studies in the College. Absence from the program (failure to be actively enrolled for any term during "continuous residence'', excluding any summer term) without explicit written consent of the Director of Graduate Studies in the College of Fine Arts could result in immediate dismissal from the program (absence without leave) Any violation of the terms of a provisional or conditional acceptance into the program could result in the termination from the program Any student not meeting the requirements of the program otherwise, explicit or implicit, and who are not terminated by the provisions indicated above, may be placed on "pending" by a written notification to the Records Section in the Office of the Registrar from the Director of Graduate Studies in the College of Fine Arts. The M.F.A degree requires a minimum of 72 quarter hours. With the exception of: (I) ART 682 (Graduate Seminar), which must be taken at least twice; and (2) ART 694 (Graduate Instruction Methods), which must be taken at least once, but which is limited to a cumulative total of 5 credits per student ; and (3) the "Documentation" requirement, the course credits for which may be earned in either ART 681 (Directed Research) with only the appropriate number of credits commensurable to the work undertaken, submitted and approved acceptable toward the degree; or earned in ART 699 (Thesis Masters), under the same conditions; and (4) the "Presentation of Work" requirement, the credits for which are allowed within reasonable limits, according to the committee-imposed and the enoFmity of the other aspects of the task undertaken-all of which above are generally required, the specific course structure of any student's graduate program will be determined by the Director of Graduate Studies in the College of Fine Arts after appraisal of the student's interests capacities and background during his/her first term of residency. Major areas of study include drawing, painting sculpture, ceramics, lithography, intaglio, silkscreen, photography and cinematography. Under normal circumstances, students will not be encouraged to diversify too broadly; nor they be encouraged in specializing too narrowly; but students who plan to prepare themselves for college or university-level teaching will be advised to develon competencies in more than one area in the interest of the sort of flexibility expected to be sought by hiring institutions for the next ten years or more. The graduate student must meet all of the stated prere quisites for any course into which he/she wishes to enroll The responsibility for seeing that all graduation requirements are met rests with the student. Although the Director of Graduate Studies in the College will generally coordinate and supervise the student's registrations and direction in the College in the early stages of the student's program invol v ement, the student's graduate committee will be directly responsible for the student upon the student's achievement of candidacy in all curricu lum matters including the satisfactory completion of all require ments for graduation. The student must be registered as a full time graduate student for at least two quarters of residency The requirements for the M .A. Degree in Art Education are listed under the College of Education M.F.A. Thesis Requirements The thesis required for the M F A degree while primarily a body of creative visual work (as opposed to the traditional written scholarly research document with standardized require ments), has other components and is developed in the following manner : I. Th e production of th e body of visual work for a Thesis Exhibition under the guidance of the student's major professor (who will be the Chairman of the student's graduate committee) and the two remaining faculty members on the student's graduate committee 2 The formally scheduled Thesis Exhibition itself. Although the reservation of desired available space and dates is arranged in advance between the student and the Exhibitions Coordinator the body of thesis work to be presented must receive the final approval of the student's entire graduate committee before there may be a Thesis Exhibition. 3 The Documentation of the The s i s E x hibition, whic h is not be to be confused with the thesis" as described in "Division of Graduate Studies", under "Master s Degree" as being required to conform to the guidelines in the Handbook of Graduate Theses and Dissertations The required Documentation normally consists of two parts: a) A record in 35mm slides of each piece; of work in the Thesis Exhibition when appropriate such, as in the case of paintings, sculptures ceramics etc. (obvious exceptions would be in the case of cinematography, video etc .). Five sets of the documenting slides are normally required by the College for distribution and will be retained the student bearing the expense. b). A logically developed, well organized, clearly articulated, written documentation of the develop ment of the Thesis work Although there is no rigidly prescribed style or format the written documentation should be conceived and designed to reveal rather than to conceal, to communicate rather than to preclude communication and must provide support ing evidence of an aesthetic awareness and of a creative sensibility. I) Thesis Devetopment: Before midterm of the quarter prior to the graduation quartet, student should submit in written form an outline of the ideas, concepts to be dealt with in the thesis document and exhibition to his Graduate Commit .tee. The student's Graduate Committee within a week will in turn: a) meet with the student to discuss their recommendations and reactions to the student's proposal. b) these recommendations and to be submitted to the student in writing It will be the student's responsibility to act on these recommendations and to arrange meetings with the committee to review the development of the work and obtain their written approval for convening of the orals and presentation of the works at least two weeks prior to the opening of the thesis exhibition. Failing this written approval two weeks prior to

PAGE 6

the schedu led opening of the exhibition the exhibition will be postponed. 2) Thesis Orals : Held in conjunction with the exhibition during the first week of the Thesis Exhibition Three faculty questioners will be selected by the student with approval of his committee and the questioners will be given copies of the written documents two weeks prior to the exhibition orals. Student will meet with his Graduate Committee and three questioners in a closed session with the remainder of the faculty members A positive, constructive and careful e x amination of issues in. volved in the thesis/exhibition will take place. Those in attendance will be the candidate committee, questioners and other members of the faculty with the questioners and committee asking questions If any clarifications to the the sis docu ment/exhibition are indicated agreement should be reached at this time as to the necessary revisions. The committee has the responsibility to seek the opinion of the faculty Any questioner or member of the committee can request consultation with the full faculty The COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 101 committee will consider the advice of the faculty when they make their decision. 3) Thesis Exhibition : If at all possible, the thesis exhibition will be held for a period of two weeks during the quarter of intended graduation, but in no case wil.l any exhibhion be held until the third week of the quarter. 4) Open Dialogue/Thesis Exhibition: During the final week of the Thesis Exhibition, a specific time will be esta blished for an open dialogue to take place within the gallery This dialogue will be open to the public and might include undergraduates, graduate students and There should be a free flow of questions, answers and discussion in direct reference to the develop ment of the exhibited work and the student will be responsible for leading the activity The formal aspects of evaluation of the thesis document/thesis exhibition will NOT take place at this time, but will have been resolved earlier within the Thesis Orals The signed original and four signed copies of the finally approved written Documentation, together with slides, must be submitted for permanent retention before the degree approval. 4 The oral defense of the Thesis Exhibition accompanying the oral defense of the written Documentation (as outlined above). Master of Music Degree The major concentrations available to graduate (M.M seeking) music students are: performance composition theory choral conducting Procedure for Applying The applicant seeking acceptance into the Master of Music Degree program must meet the Uniwersity s general admissions requirements and make formal application general University acceptability with the Graduate Admissions Office Concurrent ly, or even before, but certainly not appreciably later, the applicant must arrange to fulfill the specific acceptance requirement s in the Music department (of the College of Fine Arts). Full acceptance can not be given the applicant satisfies : (I) performance audition, (2) placement examinations in music theory-literature and piano. Dates and times for auditions and examinations may be obtained by telephoning or writing the Music department, College of Fine Arts Persons to contact directly are the Chairman of the Music department and the Graduate Music adviser, or the Director of Graduate Etudies (College of Fine Arts) for referral. Requirements for the M.M. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on page 47. In addition, the applicant for the Master of Music degree program will need to satisfy the following requirements in music before initial registration : (I) performance audition, and (2) placement examinations fo music theory-literature . The specific program for each student will vary according to his needs and interests. Each program must be approved by the student's adviser in conformance with the guidelines established by the Graduate Music Committee. A minimum of 54 quarter hours is required The responsibility for seeing that all graduation require ments are met rests with the student

PAGE 7

I I COLLEGE OF MEDICINE The major objectives of the College of Medicine are, first, to create and maintain an academic environment in which medical education, the production of new knowledge, and community service may be continued in a quality manner. The second objective is to integrate the College of Medicine into the mainstream of the community and to participate in and lead in the up-grading and improvement of the health care standards of the community in which the College is located. The thir d objective is to function within the framework of the total University as an integral and valued part of the University community. The philosophy of the educational program at this institution is to provide a strong academic basis for lifetime scholarship in medicine and growth in professional statvre for or students; to lay the foundation for the development of ever increasing technical and professional competency and proficiency in the arts and sciences of medicine for each of the students; to instill in our students compassion and a sense of devotion to duty to their profession and to their patients; to provide relevance and continuity in instruction among the various disciplines related to medicine; to maintain and increase our students : motivation for community and human service in the practice of their profession; to stimulate the students to accept major responsi bilities in learning ; to orient teaching activities around the student and his desire and ability to learn. With these concepts in mind, a curriculum has been developed which we believe will achieve an effective correlation between the pre-clin ical a nd clinical instructional areas. This curriculum is designed to emphasize conceptually oriented teaching, thus affording the students a challenging and intellectual experience as opposed to a routine and the superficial presentation of a large volume of facts. Relevance to medicine will be emphasized in all areas of instruction in a way recognizable and understandable by the student of medicine Increased correlation on an in terdisciplinary basis will be instituted providing reinforcement between the various fields of study. The curriculum will also provide a close and ongoing experience for the student in the day-to-day and continuing health care deliv,ery system within the community hospitals and in ambulatory care facilities. It is anticipated the program will produce graduating physicians who understand and desire the practice of medicine as a fruitful and meaningful choice for a lifetime career of service to their patients and the community. It is recognized that the program does place heavy demands upon the s tudents. They will be expected to utilize all resources provided by the College, to mai ntain a consistent level of academic ac hievement and to demonstrate evidence of initiativ e and dedication to their chosen profession MEDICINE Students admitted to the College of Medicine seeking an M.D degree, are selected mi the basis of what appears by present standards to be the best suited for the successful study and practice of medicine. Tpe selection is made by the Admissions Committee composed of members of Pre Clinical, Clinical and Volunteer faculty. Each applicant is considered individually and is judged strictly on his or her own merits. Characteristics evaluated include motivation integrity character, and general fitness. These are judged by recommendations of the applicant's Pre-Medical Advisory Committee as well as other letters of recommendation The academic record and Medical College Admission Test furnish an estimate of academic achievement and intellectual competence. Interviews are arranged for applicants whose qualifications appear to warrant complete exploration All inquiries concerning admission should be directed to the As s ociate Dean for Admissions, Office for Admissions College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 Requirements for Admission A minimum of three years of college or university work is required with some preference given to those applicants who present a bachelor's degree from a liberal arts college approved by one of the national accrediting agencies. The minimum requirement is three years of college work (90 semester hours or 135 quarter hours, exclusive of Physical Education and ROTC.) Regardless of the number of years involved in Pre-Medical training, the college credits submitted by the applicant must include the following : One Year-General Chemistry including laboratory One Year-Organic Chemistry, including laboratory One Year-Physics, including laboratory One Year-Biology, including laboratory One Year-Mathematics All applicants must arrange to take the Medical College Admission Test. Requirements for Graduation The awarding of the degree Doctor of Medicine will follow successful completion of the entire required course of study. Appropriate arrangements for post graduate training must be made. Grading of performance in academic subjects will be on a pass, fail, honors grading system, and the student must have achieved a grade of at least pass in all subjects in the curriculum Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Medical Sciences A graduate program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Medical Sciences is offered by the Basic Science Departments of the College of Medicine. Information concerning this program may be obtained by contacting the Graduate Coordinator College of Medicine, University of South Florida Tampa, Florida 33620. 102

PAGE 8

COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES Students in the College of Natural Sciences are trained in the tools of logical analysis and the modes of experimentation in the continuing attempt to better understand the nature of man and his relationship to the univer s e In all its functions the College is dedicated to fostering a spirit of inquiry and intellectual In its seven departments, the College of Natural Sciences offers programs in astronomy; biology including botany, microbiology and zoology; chemistry, and biochemistry; geolo gy; marine science ; mathematics and physics These programs arc designed for students planning scientific careers in the science fields or for those planning professional careers having a considerable component of scien c e These students will typically major in one of the sciences or in a combination of sciences as preparation for employment, transfer to professional schools or admission to graduate school. In addition to the majors in science, the college administers the pre-medical sciences advising program and the medical technology advising program These programs combine special ized counseling and curriculum planning to as s ist the student in gaining admission to a profe s sional school or internship program. BACCALAUREATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Admission to the College To be admitted to the College of Natural Sciences a student must make written application and satisfy the admission criteria of the college Upon admission, the stud 'ent will be assigned a faculty adviser for counseling and program planning Students preparing for a science or mathematics career must plan their courses carefully because of the sequential nature of the science curricula and students seeking entrance into a professional school or medical technology internship program require specialized counseling Because of this immediate application for admission into the college is s trongly recommended. Information on admission criteria departments, majors, programs, counseling and other services of the college may be obtained from the office of the Dean or by contacting the Director of Advising College of Natural Sciences University of South Florida Tampa, Florida, 33620. General Requirements for Degrees In addition to the University graduation requirements found on page 34, the requirements for graduation in any undergraduate degree in the college are as folfows : I Completion of a sequence of courses constituting a major program A major program is defined to be courses in a department of concentration plus supporting courses in related departments. All cour s es in the major program must be taken with letter grade except those courses which are graded S/U only. A 2 0 grade point average must be achieved in courses in the department of concentration and a 2 0 grade point average must be achieved in the supporting courses of the major program. For a more detailed description of the major program requirements, consult the appropriate departmental section : Certain courses offered in the college arc l!esigned for the non science major or the non-departmental major. The courses are designated "For non-majors," No credit for (department) major," No credit for science majors," or some similar phrase For these courses the following rules apply : "For non-majors "-For majors in the college, the course 103 will count as credit toward s graduation only as a free elective. No credit for (department) major"-th e course will not count toward graduation for a science major in the s pecified department, but will c ount a s credit towards graduation as a free elective for all t departments. "No credit for science majors the course will not count towards graduation for any major in the college. 2. Satisfaction of the University di s tribution requirement, except : (a) In area III, the minimum requirement of eight hours in Mathematics may be waived by credit in at least eight hours of Mathematics courses required by the major. (b) In area IV, the minimum of eight hours in Natural S c iences may be waived by credit in i at least eight hours of natural s ciences cour s es required by the major 3 Completion of 24 hours of courses from the Colleges of Fine Arts Social and Behavioral Sciences or Arts and Letters The student may elect any course from any of these colleges provided : (a) The courses are approved by the student s adviser (b) No more than 12 hours are taken in courses in any one prefix. Courses taken to satisfy the University Distribution Requirement may not be u s ed to sati sfy this requirement 4 At least 45 credit hours with letter grades must be earned in the College of Natural Sciences 5. At least 45 of the last 90 hours of undergraduate credit must be in residence in courses (with letter grades) at the University of South Florida. The approval of the dean must be secured for any transfer credits offered for any part of these last 90 hours Credits transferred from other sc hool s will not be included in the grade point average computed for graduation. For graduation with honors, see page 35. Natural Science students are permitted to repeat a course only once under the Forgiveness Policy. Grading Systems Typically, courses in the University receive letter grades (A,B,C D F ,I). However, the college recognizes that ed uca-

PAGE 9

104 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES tional competence may be achieved and demonstrated by experiences other than classroom attendance leading to letter grades. The attention of the student is directed to the following: 1. CLEP and other advance placement examinations 2. Waiver by either documentation or examination. 3. Off-Campus Term programs 4. Cooperative Education Program. 5 Independent Study 6 S/U Graded Courses. A. With the exception of courses graded S/U only, all courses required to satisfy the departmental major and all supporting cour ses required by the departmen tal major are considered in the s tudents major program and may not be taken S/U. However, once the requirements of the major program have been satisfied, subsequent courses taken in the major or supporting areas are con s idered free electives and may be taken S/U. All hours required to complete the 24-hour rule must be taken by letter grade.' B With the exception of ENG 101, 102, 103 all courses in Distribution Requirements and all courses in free elect ives may be taken S/U There is no restriction regarding the number of hours to be taken S/U except the graduation requirement that the student must earn at least 45 credit hours with lette r grades in the College of Natural Sciences. C. Students will be permitted to enroll in a course by an S/U on the basi s of a written contract sig ned by the student, and the in struct or of the course. This contract should be completed no later than the third week of the quarter in which the course is offered D. Each instructor for courses in the College of Natural Sciences will provide s tudents with requir e ments necessary to attain an "S" grade Essentially, S should be equal to a "C" or better. E. Students transferring from any other college or division of the University will be s ubject to the above requirements Programs Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree The College offers the Bachelor of Arts degree with majors in Astronomy (AST); Biology (BIO), Botany (Bon, Microbiology (MIC), and Zoology (ZOO); Chemistry (CHM); Geology (GLY) ; Mathematics (MTH); Physic s (PHY); and Interdi sci plinary Natural Sciences (INS) with a concentration in one of the above The College offers the Bachelor of Science degree with majors in Chemistry Clinical Chemistry (CHC), Medical Technology (MET), and Physic s (PHS) For specific require ments, consult appropriate departmental sections of this bulletin PRE-MEDICAL SCIENCES Modern hea.lth care is a spectrum of functions ranging from diagnosis and treatment of disease to basic and applied research. As a result, there is a need for individuals with a divers i ty of educational background s and a wide variety of talents and interests ; and -the student contemplating a career in the health sciences has an opportunity for service in a wide range of health care activities The pre-medical sciences .program at the University of South Florida is administered by the College of Natural Sciences and is designed to assist students seeking entrance into a professional school in medicine, dentistry veteripary medicin e, or optometry Through a combination of curriculum and counseling the program is designed to enhance the student's intellectual, personal and social development Upon entran ce into the p rogram, the student is assigned an adviser for curricuium planning and counseling. While specific requirements may vary, all profes sional schools recognize the need for a well rounded education; therefore, the goal is to develop a perceptive, knowledgeable citizen with a strong foundation in the natural sciences yet broadened and enriched with a solid background in the s ocial sciences and humanities. Upon completion of the basic science requirements, the student is assigned to the Chairman of the Pre-Medical Sciences Commit tee. The function of this committee is to assist the student in all phases of applicat ion to th e professional school of his or her choice Thi s includes letters of eval uation admission applica tions entrance examinations, etc The student remains in the program until he or she is admitted to a professional school or seeks other alternatives, even if this extends beyond the baccalaureate degree. Pre-Medical Sciences Program The pre-medical sciences program provides a complete array of courses and educational experiences necessary for preparing oneself for admission to a professional school. Pre medical science students should major in a discipline which is of the greatest appeal to them, whether it be in the sciences or non scie nces and fulfill all requirements in that major for graduation. The following science course s are the minimum requirements for admission to virtually every accredited profession al school: One year of Biology: BIO 201, 202, 203. Two years of Chemistry : CHM 211, 2 1 2, 213, 217, 218, 219, 331-332, 333-334, 335-336 One year of Phys ics: PHY 201-202, 203-204, 205-206. Additional science requirements vary according to the professional school to which the student will be applying. !>art of these additional requirements may be fulfilled by the following courses: C hem istry: CHM 321, 341, 351 Mathematics: MTH 211,'212, 213, (or MTH 122, 123, 302, 303, 304) Biology: BIO 331, 401, 402, ZOO 311 Beyond the science cour se requirements, .it is essential that students acquire an inventory of courses developing a sense of understanding of cultural and moral values and basic social problems. It is understood that the quality o f academic performance s hould be of the high est level. It may be noted th a t well-prepared students with excep. tional qualifications may be admitted to some professional schools as early as the compl etion of the junior year of premedical work B.A. Degree for and Students Students who are admitted to a medical or dental school after completing their junior year at USF may be awarded the B A . degree in Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences from the College of Natural Sciences subject to the following conditions: l .' Transfer of a minimum of 45 hours in science courses from an approved medical or dental school. i. In attendance -at the University of South Florida, the minimum requirements from the Interdisciplinary Natu ral Sciences major mu st be fulfilled as follows : A. 135 credit hours with at least a C average (2.0) in t hose credit hours completed at the University of South Florida. B Completion of a sequence of courses constituting a major program with courses in a department of concentration an d supporting courses in related departments. There must be a minimum of 36 credit hours in the discipline of m aj or concentration and a minimum of 24 credit hours in supporting courses in the College of Natural Sciences outside the discipline of major concentration The 36 credit hours in the discipline of major concentration must be in courses

PAGE 10

applicable to a major in that department (and the student must earn a 2.0 grade point average in Uiese courses) The 24 credit hours in supporting courses must be taken in courses applicable to a major in that depart(llent and must include a minimum of three courses at the 300 level or above. The student must earn 2.0 grade point averages i n all attempted course work of both major concentration and supporting courses, except for any courses graded S/U only, all courses must be taken by letter grade. 3 Credit in the following courses : BIO 201, 202, 203 CHM 211, 212, 213, 217, 218, 219, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336 PHY 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206 I I COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 105 4. A minimum of 30 credits from the following courses: BIO 331, 401, 402 CHM 321, 341, 351 MTH 211, 212, 213 zoo 311. 5 The General Distribution requirements of. the College of Natural Sciences as approved by the student s adviser 6. At least 45 credit hours with letter grades must be earned in the College of Natural Sciences 7 The last 45 credit hours prior to transfer to a medical or dental school must be in residence at the University of South Florida Application for the baccalaureate degree must be received no later than two years from the date of entrance into the professional school. GRADUATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Programs of graduate study are available in every department of the College of Natural Sciences Students apply for graduate work through the College of Natural Sciences and are recommended for admission by the department in which they intend to concentrate. A departmental committee is appointed which supervises and guides the program of the candidate. The general University requirements for graduate work at the master's level are given on page 47, and for the Ph.D degree on page 48. The specitic requirements for each department are listed under that department below For further information regarding admission and the availability of fellow!lhips and assistantships a candidate should write to the appropriate departmental chairman, University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33620. Master's Degree Programs The College of Natural Sciences offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts degree in the fields of Astronomy (AST), Botany (BOT), Mathematics (MTH), Microbiology (MIC), Physics (PHY), a nd Zoology (ZOO); and a Master of Science degree in Chemistry (CHM), Geology (GL Y), and Marine Science (MSC). Doctor's Degree Programs The College of Natural Sciences offers three programs leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy: Biology (B/0)-This program leads to the Ph.D. in Biology, includi"ng the fields of Marine Biology, Systematics, Behavior Ecology and Physiology Chemistry (CHM)-This program leads Chemistry including the fields Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic Chemistry to the Ph.D in of Analytical, and Physical Mathematics (MTH)-Tl)is program leads to the Ph.D. in Pure and Applied Mathematics. TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS The College of Natural Sciences offer s B.A. and M.A. degree programs for secondary school teachers and the M.A degree for junior college teachers. 8.A. Degree Program for Secondary School Teachers: The College of Natural Science s in cooperation with the College of Education offers degree programs in Mathematics (MAE) in Botany (BOE), in Chemistry (CHE), in Phys ic s (PHE), in Zoology (ZOE), and in Science (SCE). Because requirements exist in both colleges, a student will have an adviser in each college At the out set the planned courses in mathematics and science must be al'proved by the student's adviser in the College of Natural Sciences There are two options available to the student to satisfy the science portion of the program : 1. The student may complete the requirements of the departmental major Departmental majors in Botany and Zoology may be found in this section of the catalog under the heading Biology. The departmental requirements of 'Chemistry, Mathematics, and Phys i cs are found in this section of this catalog under the respective headings in Chemistry, Mathematic s, and Physics 2 Tile student may complete requirements of the In terdisciplinary Natural Sciences major with concentra tion in Biology Chemistry Physics, and Mathematics. A complete description of this major is found on page 111. This major "is particularly appropriate for Science Education majors (SCE). Prospective students should consult the College of Educa tion portions of this bulletin under the heading "Science Education (SCE) for the required education courses and sample programs Science Center

PAGE 11

106 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES M.A. Degree Program for Secondary School Teachers: The College of Natural Sciences in cooperation with the College of Education offers the M .A. degree in Mathematics (MAE) and in Science (SCE). In science, concentrations are available in Biology Chemistry, and Physics Because require ments exist in both colleges the student will have an adviser in each college At the outset the planned courses in mathematics and science must be approved by the student's ad viser in the College of Natural Sciences. The University requirements for the M A degree are found on page 47. Mathematics majors must complete a minimum of 51 quarter hours ; science majors must complete at least 27 quarter hours in the discipline of concentration For requirements in education the student should consult the College of Education portion of this bulletin entitled "Master's Level Degree Programs-Science Education (SCE)." M.A. Degree Program for Junior College Teachers: The M A." degree program for junior college teachers is available in the College of Natural Sciences with specializations in astronomy, biology chemistry, geology, mathematics, or physics. Students seeking certification to teach in the state of Florida may select either of the following options: I. The student may complete the Master of Arts degree program in any department of the College of Natural Sciences and in addition enroll in at least 9 hours of Directed Teaching which is numbered 689 in the appropriate departmental course listing The master's degree program is normally 45 credit hours. University requirements for an M A. degree are found on page 47. The specific departmental requirements are found under the appropriate departmental description of this portion of the bulletin. 2 The student may complete the M A degree in a program offered jointly by the College of Natural Sciences and the College of Education. This program requires 36 hours in mathematics or science specialization courses which must be approved by the student's adviser in the College of Natural Sciences; 9 hours are required in Professional Education courses and 1 9 hours are required in internship depending on the amount of teaching ex perience of the student. .For requirements in education, the student should consult the College of Education portion of the bulletin entitled Junior College Teaching Program CURRICULA ASTRONOMY (AST) The Department of Astronomy offers programs leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Ar-ts and Master of Arts in astronomy. Students who graduate with an undergraduate degree in astronomy are expected to have a good foundation not only in astronomy but also in mathematics and physics, with the emphasis varying with the individual. They are also trained to become competent computer programmers Employment op portunities exi s t at various government agencies, in private industry, and as teachers in public and private schools. Students who receive an undergraduate degree in astronomy will not necessarily continue to become profe ssio nal astronomers. Because of the breadth of their education astronomy majors can take up a variety of post-college careers including graduate study in astronomy, mathematics, or physics The graduate program leading to a master's degree empha s izes specialization in various fields of astrophysics and astronomy Most students continue to work for a master s degree after receiving the bachelor's. Employment opportunities at the master's level exist in the same way as they do on the bachelor's level. In addition the master's degree is regarded at some educational institution s as a terminal degree for teachers on the junior college or so metimes even college level. The Astronomy Department has at this time 6 faculty members all of whom are actively engaged in original research The facilities include a 26-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope with a focal length of 30', as well as several smaller telescopes and auxiliary equipment Faculty and students have access to the IBM 360-65 computer. Requirements for the B.A. Degree: I. Astronomy Courses (34 er. hrs. of upper level courses minimum). AST 301 (4) AST 311 (I) AST 443 (5) AST 302 (4) AST 312 (2) AST 303 (4) AST 413 A minimum of 8 er. hrs fr d m : (4) AST 313 (3) AST 521 (5) AST 536 (4) AST 351 (5) AST 522 (4) AST 583 (1-6) AST 414 (4) AST 533 (4) A minimum of 1 er. hr. from : AST 481 (I) A minimum of 1 er. hr. from : AST 491 (I) II. Supporting Courses in the Natural Sciences (45-46 er. hrs.) MTH 302-305 (17) MTH 401 (4) PHY 201-206, 315 (18) PHY 301-306 (12) At least three of the following Physics courses: PHY 307 (3) PHY 331 (4) PHY 437 (3) PHY 309 (4) PHY 405 (3) PHY 541 (3) PHY 323 (4) PHY 407 (3) At least one of the following Mathematics courses: MTH 311 (4) MTH 345 (5) MTH 447 (4) MTH 323 (4) MTH 445 (3) III. General Distribu tion Requirements (60 er. hrs excluding waivers) The astronomy major must satisfy the General Distribu tion requirements of the College of Natural Sciences (See page 103). IV. Liberal Education Electives The student must satisfy 24 hours of liberal education electives as described in item 3 of the graduation requirements of the College of Natural Sciences (See page 103). V. Free Electives (40 er. hrs maximum) The student is expected to familiarize himself with the techniques of programming electronic computers before the end of his sixth quarter. For students planning to attend graduate school, it is strongly recommended that they enroll in several courses numbered 500 or higher from group I abo v e. They should also achieve a reasonable level of competence in at least one of three languages : French, German, or Russian Teacher Education Programs: For information concerning the M A degree for junior college teachers, sec above Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirement s for graduate work are given on page 47.

PAGE 12

A minimum of 45 credits (excluding AST 694) must include at least 24 for courses numbered 600 or higher and at least 18 for structured astronomy courses numbered 500 or higher. It will be assumed that the student knows enough mathematics and physics to follow any astronomy courses required in his curriculum No credit is available for courses numbered 499 or lower which the student takes in order to make up for his initial deficiencies in this respect. Since candidates for the graduate degrees in astronomy may have a variety of backgrounds including majors in astronomy, mathematics, or physics the required course of studies may :vary considerably among students. A thesis is required and must be based on original work. In lieu of the thesis, however, the student may be permitted to enroll for at least 8 additional hours on a level of 500 or above beyond the present requirements. It will be expected that the student will be assigned to a faculty member and perform research under this faculty member's direction The student must also demonstrate, before the degree is granted, his ability to translate into English the pertinent scientific literature in at least one of the foreign languages: German, French or Russian This last requirement may, in exceptional cases, be replaced by an equivalent one agreeable to the student and the department chairperson. BIOLOGY -In addition to a set of basic courses in biology, students must have a thorough preparation in other areas of natural sciences in order to be competitive for jobs or for further study beyond the baccalaureate. A modern biology curriculum is built on a foundation of mathematics, chemistry and physics. Four specific Bachelor of Arts degrees (Biology, Botany, Microbiology, and Zoology) are available for students interested in the biological sciences. They are all preparatory for careers in teaching agriculture, medicine, dentistry, marine biology, biotechnology, or for post-graduate study in any of the various life sciences. Students should study the requirements listed below and then make maximum use of the vigorous advising program maintained by the Department in structuring their total program .' A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language (German French, or Russian) is strongly recommended for those who intend to enter graduate school. Requirements for the B.A. Degree: I. Department of Biology Courses A. Biology Core Courses (Required for all B A Degrees, 35 or 36 er. ) BIO 201-203 (12) BIO 331 (4) BIO 401-402 (10) BIO 445 (4) Physiology (choice of course-for all programs as indicated: BOT 421, MIC 456 & MIC 402 ZOO 423) B. Individual Degree Requirements BIOLOGY MAJOR (BIO) (25 er. hrs.) (5 or 6) 25 credit hours in BIO,BOT,MIC and ZOO courses in consultation with adviser. BOTANY MAJOR (BOT) (25 er. hrs.) BOT300 (5) BOT 421 (0) BOT 491 (l) BOT 311 (5) BOT 419 (5) Biology Department Electives (9) MICROBIOLOGY MAJOR (MIC) (25c27 er. hrs ) MIC 351 (4) MIC 451 or MIC 456 MIC 352 (2) BIO 558 (5/4) & MIC 401 (3) MIC 457 (4) MIC 402 (0) MIC 453 (4) MIC 491 (I) and One of the following : BOT 417/MIC 518/BOT 513 (3-5) COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 107 NOTE: Every microbiology major should obtain a recom mended course sequence from a member of the microbiology faculty in order to avoid possible scheduling problems. ZOOLOGY MAJOR (ZOO) (15 er. hrs ) zoo 422 (5) zoo 313 (5) zoo 423 (0) and Any one lab course in vertebrate biology (5) II. Supporting Courses in the Natural Sciences (Required for all B A Degrees 42 or 44 1 er.) CHM 211-213; CHM 217-219 (12) or CHM 215-216 (10) CHM 331-334 (10) PHY 201-204 (10) MTH (12) (Three courses in mathematics chosen from the following to attain 12 credits: MTH 211, 212, 213; 302, 303, 304, 305, 310 311, 323, J45) III. General Distribution Requirements (Required for all B A. Deg rees, 60 er.) Each student is required to satisfy the General Distribu tion requirements of the College of Natural Sciences (see page 103) The selection of courses within the require ment is to be done in conference with Biology Department advisers IV Libe ra l Education Electives The student must satisfy 24 hours of liberal education electives as described in item 3 Qf the graduation requirements of the College of Natural Sciences (see page 103). V Free Electives (including General Distribution waivers) can be taken over and above major requirements and major electives to complete a 180 hour program. Teacher Education Programs: For information concerning the degree programs for secondary school teachers and junior colleges, see pages 72, 77, and 80 of this Bulletin. Marine Biology The field of marine biology is especially important in Florida and there is a good demand for trained personnel. Several faculty membe rs in the Department teach courses and conduct research in this area. Undergraduates interested in specializing in marine biology may do so by taking marine-orie nted courses offered within the Department. Appropriate courses include ZOO 313 (Introductory Invertebrate Zoology), ZOO 519 (Ichthyology), ZOO 520 (Echinoderm Biology), ZOO 545 (Zoogeography) ZOO 557 (Marine Animal Ecology), BOT 543 (Phycology), and BOT 547 (Marine Botany). The Biology Department offers M A degrees and the Ph D degree which allows specialization in marine biology Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on page 47. Major programs are offered in Botany, Microbiology or Zoology. The M.A. degree may be obtained by completion of a research thesis or by appropriate substitution of structured courses and an approved paper The satisfactory completion of all g e neral requirements and those specifically stated below are the responsibility of the individual student. The selection of a major professor must occur within the first three quarters after admission. Failure to do so will be cause for termination. The choosing of a major professor includes acceptance of the student by the faculty member. Until selection is accomplished, the departmental graduate coordinator will function as the student's adviser. The three member supervisory committee, as approved by the departmental chairman and

PAGE 13

108 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES college dean, must include one faculty member from outside the student's area of s pecialization For s tudent s enrolled in the thesis program a 45 credit hour minimum is required at the 5Q0-600 level (excluding BIO 694); 2 4 must be at the 600 level or above; 30 of the 45 credit hours must be in formally structured courses of which 22 must be in biology ; 15 of the 22 credit hours must be at the 600 level or above All students in the thesis program must complete the graduate seminar (BIO 691) and may obtain up to 9 hours for thesis credit. For students enrolled in the non-the s i s program a 45 credit hour minimum is required at the 500-600 level; 40 credits must be in formally structured courses. 24 credits mu s t be at the 600 level or above; 22 mus t be in biology A final comprehensive exa mination on basic biology is required for all s tudent s. This exa mination i s open to all departmental faculty and is normally taken after the completion of formal course work and at leas t one quarter before thesis pre se ntation. In so me cases, the ability to tran s late pertinent scientific literature from a foreign l a nguage mus t be demonstrated before taking the comprehensive examination Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree: General requirements are given on page 48. A doctorate program in biology i s offered Areas of spec i alization for the Ph .D. are marine biology, ecology (tropical ecology, population ecology, and phy s iological ecology), physi ology (cellular physiology, micro bial physiology, neu rophysiology), systematics, and beh av ior. On a dmi ss ion to the Department for doctoral study, the student shall select a major professor from the departmental faculty for the direction of his program. Vpon acceptance of the student by the faculty member and before the lap se of three quarters, a five-mt.mber supervisory committee will be named and approved by the Department chairman and College Dean. At l east one member of the committee shall be from beyond the student's area of specialization. This committee shall approve the courses of study, choice of language skills, and the supervision of the student s research and dissertation It is expected that students will have had undergraduate training comparable to that of a USF undergraduate in biology. A departmental requirement of a minimum of 30 credit hour s are required in formally structured graduate level courses from more than one faculty member as well as any additional courses neces sa ry to the needs of the individual's program as determined by the supervisory committee. A maximum of 9 hours of formally structured graduate-level courses may be transferred from other graduate institutions Fifteen hours from the master's degree program at USF may be applied toward meeting the above requirement s with approval of the super visory committee Some time before the end of the s ixth quarter a student must have demonstrated a r i:a ding proficiency in two foreign languages or approved special work Language selection will be by the supervisory committee and testing by either the faculty of biology or foreign languages After the language examination and before the end of the sixth quarter, the written portion of the departmental preliminary examination must be completed. The oral porti on of the preliminary examination rriust be completed during the next academic quarter. After completion of the above requiremen ts, the student may be admitted to candidacy upon approval of the Dean of the College and the Director of Graduate Studies One academic year of satisfactory serviCe as a teaching assistant is recom mended of all candidates. Also, a public seminar presentation of the dissertation during the final quarter's work is required. A final oral examination will be administered and evaluated by the s upervisory committee Emphasis will be upon the dissertation the student's mas tery of his general field of research, and the application of fundamental biological prin ciples to the dissert a tion The examination is conducted by a Chemistry Building neutral and non-voting co nvener and the ca ndidate shall be s ubject to questioning by a ny biology faculty member in a tt e nd ance. Graduate Application Deadlines: Applications must be co mpleted by March 10th for Quarter I applicants who wish to be considered for ass i s tantships All other a pplications must be completed by the fourth week of the qu a rter preceding th e one for wh.ich you are applying. CHEMISTRY (CHS/CHM/CHC) The' Department of Chemistry offers three degrees at the bacc a l a ure ate level Bachelor of Arts degre e in Chemistry, B ac h e lor of S c ience degree in Chemistry and Bachelor of S c ien ce degree in Clinical Chemistry, and two degrees, Master of Science and Doctor of Philo so phy, each with special iz ation in the areas of analytical chemistry, biochemistry, inorganic chemistry organic c hemistry, an d phy s ical chemistry, at the graduate level. The chemistry faculty is comprised of 30 full time sen ior faculty members, all of whom hold the Ph .D. degree. A comparable number of te ac hing ass i sta nt s, generally graduate st udent s e nrolled in the Ph. D progr a m, se r ve as instructors in the laboratorie s. The combination o f a l a rge a nd s trong faculty w ith a w ide va riety of courses and e l ectives pro vides s tudents w ith prog rams of stu dy which can be t a ilored to fit individual need s w hile maintaining a so und b ac kground in all gener a l as p ects of chemistry The Ba c hel o r of S c ien ce d egree in C h emis tr y (CHS) is a rig o r o u s progr a m which supplies th e foundation in chemistry r e quir e d for b o th the s tudent who b egins a c hemical vocation imm ediately upon graduation as well as th e one who pursues advanced s tudy in c hemistry or related a r eas In accord with this goal th e c urriculum for the B S degre e m eets the requirements for degr ee certification by the American Chemical Society The Ba c hel o r of Arts degr ee (CHM) provide s a course of s tudy d es ign ed for the student who do es not intend to become a profe ss i ona l c h emis t but whose caree r goals require a thorough under s tanding of chemistry. Inherent in thi s program is a high

PAGE 14

degree of flexibility which permits tailoring a course of study to the student's own educational objectives. As s uch it offers considerable advantages to pre profe ssio nal students planning careers in medicine and the other health-rel a ted fields and an excellent preparation for primary and secondary school teachers of chemistry or physical science A program leading to a B.S degree in Clinical Chemistry (CHC) is offered by the Department of Chemistry This program one of only a few such programs in the country, is specifically designed to train personnel for this new and growing field of the medical profession; however, the strong scientific background a nd s pecific technic a l expertise provided by this program also afford the student an excellent preparation for graduate study in clinical chemistry, or medicine. Interested students should see the Coordinator of the Clinical Chemistry Program in the Department of Chemistry for further information In graduate work, the excellent physical facilities and very low student-teacher ratio combine to afford unique opportunities for advanced study in chemistry. In addition to the five traditional fields, analytical chemistry, biochemistry inorganic, organic and physical chemistry research opportunities are also available in such interdisciplinary and specia liz ed areas as bio organic and bio-inorganic chemistry clinical chemistry, environ mental chemistry, lasers and photo c hemistry m ari ne chemistry, organometallic chemistry, photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA), polymer chemi s try and medicinal chemistry. Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree: I. Chemistry Courses* B.A. CHEMISTRY (CHM) (54 er. hrs .) CHM 211-213 CHM 311 (5) and 217-219 (12) CHM 321 (5) or CHM 331-336 (15) CHM 215-216 (10) CHM 34 1 -343 (8) CHM electives (300 level or above) (9) B.S. CHEMISTRY (CHS) (65 er. hrs.) CHM 211-213 CHM 331-336 (15) and 217-219 (12) CHM 351 (4) or CHM 441-443 (12) CHM 215-216 (10) CHM 445-44 7 (11) CHM 291 (I) CHM 491 (I) (:HM 321 (5) CHM 411 (4) B.S. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY (CHC) (66 er. hrs.) CHM 211-213 CHM 441, 443 (8) and 217-219 (12) CHM 485 (5) or CHM 421 (4) CHM 215-216 (10) CHM 423 (4) CHM 321 (5) CHM 425 (4) CHM 331-336 (15) CHM 426 (2) CHM 351, 354 (7) *CHM 215-216 (10) can be substituted for CHM 211213 and 217-219 (12) This reduces by 2 the er. hrs of required chemistry courses in each degree program II. Supporting Courses in the Natural Sciences B.A. CHEMISTRY (CHM) (35 er. hrs. ) MTH 212-213 (8) PHY 201-206 (15) Electives (except 370-379, 470-479 series.) (12) B.S. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY (CHC) (54 -61 er. hrs ) MTH 302-304 (13) EGB 204, 304 PHY 301-306 or or 201-206(12-15) ESC 301-302 (3-6) BIO 201-203 (12) PHY 422 MIC 351 (4) or ZOO 423 (5) ETK 522 (4-5) B.S. CHEMISTRY (CHS) (32 er. hrs.) MTH 302-305 (17) PHY 301-306 (12) PHY elective (300-400 level except 371) (3) III. General Distribution Courses (60 er. hrs excluding waivers) The student is required to complete the General COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 199 Distribution requirements of the College of Natural Sciences (see page 103). IV Liberal Education Electives The student must satisfy 24 hours of liberal. education electives as described in item 3 of the graduation requirements of the College of Natural Sciences (See page 103). V Free Electives* (Including General Distribution waivers) B.A CHEMISTRY (CHM); 31 er. hrs B.S. CHEMISTRY (CHS) ; 23 er. hrs. The required sequence of Chemistry courses should be started immediately in the freshman year and the mathematics and physics requirements should be completed befote the junior year so that CHM 341 (B. A degree) or CHM 441 (B.S. degree) can be commenced at that time. *Students taking CHM 215-216 must add 2 more hours of free electives Teacher Education Programs: For information concerning the degree programs for secondary school teachers and junior college teachers, see pages 72, 77, and 80 of this bulletin. Requirements for the M.S. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on page 47. All entering graduate student s who have no advanced work beyond a B.A. or B.S. will be required to take the core courses in each of the five areas: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry. This requirement can be waived by recommendation of the supervisory committee on the basis of past work, performance on a di agnos tic test, or substitution of more comprehensive and advanced courses. The required core courses are CHM 512, CHM 532, CHM 542, CHM 555 and CHM 621. Beyond the required core courses, the curriculum for a c hemi stry major will vary with the area of the thesis The specific course requirements will be determined by the supervisory committee and the proposed research, in con sonance with the regulations of the University. In order to gain the experience that comes from teaching satisfactory service as a teaching assistant for two academic years is required (unless a specific exemption is recommended by the supervisory committee). Comprehensive Examination Each student must pass the written comprehensive ex aminations in three of the five areas: Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry. Each examination will be administered by the faculty of that area and will be from one to three hours duration. Each examination will be graded by the members of the respective areas, each arriving at a fail-pass high pass ven; lict. A student may repeat any or all of the examinations provided that 3 have been passed by the time five quarters have elapsed since enrollment as a graduate student. The exams (each 1-3 hours) are offered four times each year, onct: uc::tween each quarter (except in the summer when the exams will be offered the first week of QTR IV) Note that this requirement is to be completed before the beginning of the sixth quarter. While it is a nticipated that the "core courses will bridge the gap between undergraduate and graduate co,urses, and will therefore help students prepare for the comprehensive examina tions, it should be understood that the comprehensive examina tions are general examinations in their respective fields, and not merely final examinations in the core courses Final Thesis Defense upon completion of the thesis research and preliminary approval of the thesis by the supervisory committee, the M.S.

PAGE 15

1 Hl COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES candidate will be required to pass an oral examination c onducted by the supe rv isory committee on the r esearch Final approval of the examination and of the thesis will require approval by the entire committee Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on page 48. While there are no specific course requirements for the Ph D degree in chemistry, each student must take at least 16 hours of structured 600-level chemistry courses. No more than four hours of Graduate Seminar (CHM 691) may be used to satisfy this requirement. The candidate, with the help of the adviser and the approval of the supervisory committee w ill design a program of study and research that will result in a mature and creative grasp of chemical science. A pproval of the candidate's program will rest with the supervis ory c ommittee While there are no specific course requ i r e ments for the Ph.D degree, beginning graduate students who plan to circumvent the M.S. degree are advised to take the core courses or their equivalent. In order to gain the experience that comes from teaching, satisfactory service as a teaching assistant for two academic years is r e quired (unless a specific exemption is recommended by the supervisory committee). Qualifying Examinations The Qualifying Examination r e quir e ment for the Ph D. degree will be the same as the comprehensive examination for the M S. degree except that the Ph.D. candidate must pass the examinations in four out of five areas and must also pass two of these examinations (one of which is in the major area) "with distinction" In other words, the Ph.D candidate must demonstrate a very real grasp of the principles in the major a rea and one othe r area (probably related to the major area, but not necessarily so). As in the case of the M.S requirements, a student may repeat any or all examinations, provided that four have been passed, two "with distinction by the time five quarters have elapsed from enrollmen t as a graduate student. The exams are offered four times each year once between eacb quarter (except in the summer when the exams will be offered the first week of QTR IV.) Again, it is to be noted that this requirement, as for the M S degree must be completed before the beginning of the sixth quarter. The Qualifying Examination s shall be given in the form of one to three hour examinations in each of the five areas-analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic and physical While it is anticipated that the core courses will bridge the gap between undergraduate and graduate courses, and will' therefore help students prepare for the qualifying examinations, it should be understood that the qualifying examinations are general examinations in their respective fields and not merely final examinations in the core courses Qualifying examinations should be attempted by students as soon as possible. These examinations are intended to test for broad and basic knowledge in each area at the Bachelor of Science le'vel. Lanauaae Examinations Before a student is eligible to qualify for candidacy for the Ph.D degree, a reading knowledge of the chemical literature in any two of the languages-German, Russian and French (or any other language approved as appropriate by the supervisory committee) must be demonstrated; or a reading knowledge in one of these languages and proficiency in a skill or specialization outside the discipline of chemistry must be demonstrated The latter could include (1) proficiency in computer programming; (2) advanced specialization in mathematics, physics biology, geology, or any other appropriate area pe r tinent to scholarly work in chemistry; (3) any other field of advanced study or proficiency deemed appropriate by the supervisory committee The language requirement must be met by orte of the following: (I) reading knowledge in two foreign languages as demonstrated by a test to be specified; (2) reading knowledge in one foreign language and some other proficiency such as computer programming ; (3) in-depth knowledge of one foreign language (speaking and reading knowledge); (4) three quarter s of a foreign language at the college level with a minimum of C grade in each quarter may be used to w aive one languag e, or, if two foreign languages are taken, the language requirement is fulfilled ; (5) periodic translations to be administered by the student's supervisory committee. The language requirement must be met one year before graduation Major Comprehensive Examination A comprehensive major examination will be required of Ph.D. candidates sometime after s atisfactory completion of the qualifying examination. This examination must be taken one year before graduation. Advau c ement of Candidacy Co m pletion of all the for egoing requir e m e nt s admits the student to candidacy for the Ph.D. Final Thesis When the Dissertation Committee has inspected the final draft (final unbound form : typewritten and ready for duplication with the exception of possible minor corrections) of the dissertation and finds it suitable for pre s entation the Chair person will complete a form requesting the scheduling and announcing of the final oral examination The request fo r m will be submitted v,ia the appropriate department chairp e r son to the college dean and the Director of Graduate Studies for approval. The final oral examination must be held at least three weeks before the end of the quarter in which the student is to be a warded the degre e. The required copies of the completed dissertation signed by the Committee must be received by the Director of Graduate Studies at least two weeks before the end of the quarter. The Chairperson of the examination committee shall be appointed by the Dean of the College and shall not be a member of the student s Dissertation Committee or the department or program in which the program is sought. The candidate may expect questions concerning the details and significance of the research afte r the oral pres e ntation w hich is open to the public Final approval of the candidate's degree will require approval by a majority of the supervisory committee, which shall include the Chairperson of the oral presentation. GltOLOGY (GL Y) Geology is one of the broadest of all sciences because of its dependence on fundamentals of biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics as applied to the study of the earth. As a result, undergraduate students are expected to obtain a broad background in the other sciences as well as a concentration in geology. This bachelor's degree program is designed to provide the geology major with a broad foundation that will prepare him for employment in industry or with various governmental agencies as well as the necessary training to continue study in graduate school. The graduate program in geology allows the student to specialize in nearly all of the major areas of concentrat on. Because of the geographic and geologic location of the University in a rapidly expanding urban center of coastal Florida, there are a number of areas of spe'cialization which are being emphasized. These include coastal geology, hydrogeology, low temperature and pollution geochemistry, geology of carbonate rocks and phosphate deposits. All of these are closely related to local problems of the e nvironment. In a ddition to the staff in the Department of Geology, there are a number of geologists on the faculty in the Department of Marine Science located in nearby St. Pete r sburg. Close ties are maintained between the two departments and s tudents interested in marine aspects of geology are encouraged to take advantage of this situation for both course work and research.

PAGE 16

Requirements for the B.A. Degree: I. Geology Courses (49 er. hrs.) GLY 210 (4) GLY 361 (4) GLY211 (4) GLY405 (4) GL Y 212 (4) GLY 410 (4) GLY 302 (5) GLY 411 (4) II Supporting Courses (35-41 er. hrs.) CHM 211-213, 217-219 (12) PHY 201-206 or CHM 215-216 MTH 211 and 212 or or (10) PHY 301-306 (8) MTH 123 and 302 (8) GLY 412 (4) GL Y electives (12) (15) (12) Plus one additional course in mathematics statistics, or comp uter science as approved by the student's adviser. III. General Distribution Courses (60 er hrs excluding waivers) The student is required to satisfy the General Distribution requirements of the College of Natural Sciences. See page 103. IV. Liberal Education Electives The student must satisfy 24 hours of liberal education electives as described in item 3 of the graduation requirements of the College of Natural Sciences (See page 103.) V Free Electives (Including Distribution waivers) (41-47 er. hrs.) The student will choose, in consultation with his Geology adviser, such courses in the College of Natural Sciences that support his major interest within the field of Geology. A foreign language, preferably French, German, or Russian, is strongly recommended especially for those students who anticipate continuing for a doctorate in graduate school. All geology majors are strongly urged to attend a summer field camp. An entering student anticipating a major in Geology is advised to enroll in GL Y 210, 211, 212 and CHM 211, 212, 213, 217, 218, 219, in the freshman year and to seek curriculum counseling with a Geology adviser Teacher Education Programs: Prospective elementary and secondary school teache rs desiring to teach science should include basic courses in Geology and related sciences as part of their curriculum. For information concerning the M A degree program for junior college teachers, see page 80 Requirements for the M S. Degree: Requirement s for admission to the Division of Graduate Studies and general graduate curriculum guidelines are given on pages 43-47 Students are admitted for graduate work in Geology if they present the requisite background in Geology and s uppo rting sciences. The bachelor's degree with a major in Geology or a major in other sciences with strong s upporting program in geoscience s is required. Students who wish to enter the graduate program in Geology without the proper background will be required to take some undergraduate courses without receiving credit toward their master's program In addition, a formal summer field course is strongly recommended. The curriculum for a Geology graduate student will vary depending on the area interest and thesis topic of the individual. A minimum of 45 credit hours (excluding GL Y 694) is required for the master's degree of which a minimum of 24 credits must be in courses numbered 600 or above. All graduate students must take Graduate Seminar (GL Y 691) at least twice Although a written thesis in the student's field of specialization is normally required an equivalent amount of course work i n Geology may be substituted if the program is approved in advance by the COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 111 graduate committee of the Department Satisfactory per formance on a comprehensive examinat .ion covering the student's course work and thesis is also required INTERDISCIPLINARY NATURAL SCIENCES (INS) The Bachelor of Arts in the Interdi sci plinary Natural Sciences major is designed for majors in an interdisciplinary program in the college an d for majors in Science Education and Mathematics Education For information on teacher certifica tion in science or mathematics prospective teachers should consult the section entitled Teacher Education Programs on page 105, and also consult the College of Education section of this bulletin The requirements for graduation for this degree are the same as those contained on page 103 except that item I of the requirement is altered as follows : la. Co mpletion of a major program consisting of a minimum of 68 hours in College of Natural Sciences courses In th ese hour s there must be a minimum of 36 credit hour s in a dis cipline of major concentration and a minimum of 24 credit hours in sup port ing courses in the College of Natural Sciences outside the discipline of major co ncen tration. All co ur ses in the major program mus t be applicable to a major in that department and must have the approval of the student's adviser At least three of the supporting courses must be at the 300 level or above. The student must earn -2.o grade point average in all attempted course work of both major concentration and supporting courses and must complete at least 45 hours after acceptance into the major, all of which must have prior approval of his adviser MARINE SCIENCE (MSC) Some of the most important research currently being carried out in the Gulf of Mexico i s centered at the University s Department of Marine Science There, biologi s ts chemists, physicists and geologists work together to bring greater understanding of not only the Gulf but all the seas of the world. The department offers courses leading to a mas ter's degree in Marine Science Degree candidates study and work with the re sea rchers who h ave made the department s Bayboro St. Petersburg he adq uarter s a major ocean research center. The research interests of the department are widespread and include interdisciplinary studies of estuarine environments, shelf and deep water investigations, hydrodynamic modelling nutrient cyc les benthic ecology, mariculture and marine poli cy l he department has excellent research and classroom facilities on the downtown St. Petersburg waterfront, including a fleet of small vesse l s rangi ng from 16 to 36 feet in l e ngth. Marine sc i e ntist s traditionally specialize in one of four b asic researc h areas : marine biology, marine chemistry, m ar ine geology, or marine phy s ics Thus, while the degree prog ram in Marine Science is at the master's level, students may pr epare for graduate work by obtaining a baccalaureate degree in o ne of these four areas. By a suitable choice of marine oriented e lective courses, a major in Biology, Chemistry Geology, or Physi cs can be a n excellent vehicle for entry into a graduate program Potential marine sciences majors should consult with a n undergraduate adviser concerning these bacc a l a ure ate majors T h e field of Marine Science is destined to grow r api dly in all its subdivisions and offers great opportunities for individual s as our use of the sea expands. Requirements for the M.S. Degree: General requirements are given on page 47. A minimum

PAGE 17

112 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES of 45 credits (excluding MSC 694) must include MSC 521, 531, 541, and 551 unless the student, as determined by this graduate committee has had the equivalent of one or more of these courses. The student may emphasize biological, geological, chemical, or physical oceanography through his thesis research and course work. A thesis is required but a foreign language is not Courses taken in addjtion to those required are determined by the area of specialty in consultation with the student's graduate comm i ttee Normaliy a stude .nt entering this program spends one or two quarters in residence at the Tampa campus taking courses in those departments mos t closely related to his specialty. Following course work at the Tampa campus, the student will usually move to St. Petersburg to complete his course work and thesis research Admissions materials for students entering Qtr. I should reach the department by March 15. For students entering Qtr. II III or IV materials should be in by October 15 for admission sessions in late March and October respectively. MATHEMATICS (MTH) The Department of Mathematics offers a diversity of courses designed not only to enable the s tudent to pur s ue a profession in mathematic s itself but also to enhance his competence in the fields of engineering, the physical sciences, the life sciences, and the s ocial sciences. The Department offers programs leading to the B A M .A. and Ph .D. degrees The undergraduate program emphasizes the broad nature of modern mathematics and its close association with the real world The program is designed to prepare students for entry into graduate school or careers in industry or secondary education. The Department has a flexible Ph .D. program which is designed to encourage students to take an active role in the shaping of their own curricula. This flexibility is coupled with a desire to promote interdi sc iplinary research In cooperation with the Department s of Astronomy, Marine Science and Physics and the Colleges of Engineering a nd Medicine, the Department Offers special Ph.D programs in the applications of mathematics. The Department is composed of four areas of concentra tion These areas are as follows : I Algebra and Topology Number theory algebraic coding theory, general topology topological semigroups. 2. Analysis Abstract harmonic analysis, abstract measure theory, Life Science Building approximatio n s and expansions functional analysis, geometric function theory. 3. Applied Mathematics and Computer Science Asymptotic methods, differential equations, integral equations, numerical analysis. 4. Statistics and Stochastic Systems Biomathematies, theory of probability and statistics, reliability theory, stochastic modeling in the life sciences engineering, stochastic systems and time series. There are 34 faculty members in the Department and about 50 graduate students. The graduate program is young and still in the developmental stage. While prog rams in the more traditional areas of pure mathematic s are offered, the Department is committed to emp h asizing applied mathematics at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. For both undergraduate and graduate work students and faculty have access to the university's computer, an IBM 360/365 Requirements for the B.A. Degree: The courses taken to satisfy the Group I a nd Group II requirements below will constitute the major program referred to in the general graduation requirement of the College of N a tural Sciences I. Mathematics Requirements (47 er. hrs.) Majors must complete at least 47 credits in mathematics courses above the 100 level, including MTH 302 (5), 303 (4), 304 (4), 305 (4), 309 (3), and 323 (4). In addition, except for majors in mathematics for teaching, the following sequence is required: MTH 405 (3), 406 (3), and 40'7 (3). Majors in mathematics for teaching must have MTH 423 (3), and 424 (3). Suggested upper level courses for a major in mathematics a re: MTH 401 (4) MTH 511 (4) MTH 531 (4) MTH 445 (3) MTH 520 (4) MTH 547 (3) MTH 447 (4) MTH 523 (4) Variation in course selection for special needs is to be done in consultation with the appointed adviser. II. Mathematics Related Courses (21-26 er hrs.) Majors, except for majors in mathematics for teaching, must take PHY 301-302, 303-304 and 305-306 and one of the following sequences : I. AST 301, 302, 303. 2. BIO 201, 202, 203. 3 CHM 211, 212, 213, 217, 218, 219 or CHM 215-216 4. GLY 210, 211, 212. 5 ECN 201, 202 and one of ECN 301 or 323. 6 EGB 311, 312, 313. 7. EGB 321, 322, and one of EGR 311or315. 8 EGB 340, 341, 344. 9 PSY 200, 300, 311, 312. Majors will not receive credit toward graduation for the following courses: AST 371, PHY 371, ECN 231, E ,CN 331, ECN 431, SSI 301. Majors wishing to take a course which requires a knowledge of statistics should take MTH 345. III. General Distribution Courses (60 er hrs. exduding waivers) Majors must s atisfy the General Distribution require ments of the College of Natural Sciences, which must include (or show competence in) one of the following sequences: FRE 101, 102, 103 GER 101, 102, 103 RUS 101, 102, 103 IV. Liberal Education Electives The student must satisfy 24 hours of liberal education electives as described in item 3 of the graduation requirements of tlie College of Natural Sciences (See page 103).

PAGE 18

The following is a suggested course program for the first two academic years: Fall Quarter (I) Winter Quarter (II) Freshman Year MTH 302 Sophomore Year MTH 305 Spring Quarter (Ill) MTH 122, 123 MTH 304, 323 MTH 303, 309 Two MTH electives Students with a strong background in high school mathematics may omit either or both MTH 122, 123 with the consent of the chairman. Teacher Education Programs: For information concerning the degree programs for secondary school teachers college teachers, see pages 72, 77, and 80 of this Bulletin. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on page 47. A thesis is optional. The thesis program requires a minimum of 45 credits of course work (excluding MTH 694), of which the thesis may carry three to nine credits. The non-thesis program requires 45 credits of course work In either case, 24 hours of the course work must be taken in courses numbered 600 or above and the program must total at least 45 credits. The course of study is flexible and interdisciplinary work is encouraged The areas of specialization include the following: a. Algebra and Topology b. Analysis c. Applied Mathematics and Computer Science d Statistics and Stochastic Systems Each candidate for the M.A degree is required to pass a written examination in three of the following subjects: a Algebra (MTH 511, 523, 524) b Applied Stati s tical Methods (MTH 525, 526) c Complex Analysis (MTH 520, 521 or MTH 540, 521) d. Differential Equations (MTH 501, 502, or MTH 541, 542) e. Probability Theory (MTH 545, 546) f. Real Analysis (MTH 513, 514) g. Topology (MTH 531, 532) Each examination will cover the prescribed contents of the courses listed above. A reading knowledge of either French, German or Russian is required. Computer Science may be substituted for the language requirement For specific program requirements, the student should consult the Department Chairman. Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree: In addition to the general University requirements for the Ph.D. degree, on page 48, the Mathematics department requrres the following: 1. Qualifying Examinations Each doctoral student must pass at the Ph.D. level a written examination in four of the subjects listed under the Requirements for the M A. degree 2. Foreign Language Requirement Each student must pass an examintion in two of the three languages: French, German or Russian Computer Science may be substituted for one of the languages. 3. Course Requirements The student's program of study must meet the course requirements for the M A degree. Other course require ments will be determined by the student's Supervisory Committee. COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES 113 4. SpeCialization Examination This examination shall be administered by the student's Supervisory Committee after he has passed the qualifying examinations, the language requirements, and has com pleted all course requirements. The composition and scheduling of this examination shall be determined by the Supervisory Committee and may be written and/or oral. 5 For specific program requirements, the student should consult the chairperson of the Department of Mathematics. 6. The student must submit a dissertation to be approved by the Supervisory Committee. MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY (MET) Medical Technology is one of the growing professions associated with the advances in modern medical science. Working in the clinical laboratory the medical technologist performs chemical, microscopic, bacteriologic, and other scientific tests to help "track the cause and treatment of disease This talent requires specialized training and a baccalaureate degree is essential preparation for certification as a medical technologist. The University of South Florida offers a four-year program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology. A student electing to major in Medical Technology will spend the first three years of the program on the campus of the University of South Florida; the fourth year (12 months) will be spent in one of the affiliated hospitals or clinical laboratories. Admission to the fourth year is limited by the number of openings in the affiliated hospitals. Selection of interns is made by the hospitals During the first three years, the medical technology student will complete the liberal arts and basic science requirements for entrance into the fourth year of the program for clinical training. To remain in good standing as a Medical Technology major during this period, a reasonable grade point average determined by the College of Natural Sciences, must be maintained. To be eligible for entrance into the program's fourth year, the must have completed not less than 135 credit hours of work (excluding physical education courses). Of these hours, at least 30 credit hours must be from the College of Natural Science at the University of South Florida (in courses approved by the Director of the Medical Technology Program). The following courses must be included in the three years of work which precedes the fourth year of clinical training: I. Biological Sciences A minimum of 24 hours is required with at least one course in microbiology Physiology (ZOO 371 or 423) is strongly recommended. 2 Chemistry A minimum of 24 hours is required ineluding organic chemistry. Biochemistry (CHM 351) and Elementary Analytical Chemistry (CHM 321) are strongly recom mended. 3 Physics A mfoimum of 12 hours (one full-year majors-type course) is required. 4 Mathematics One course in mathematics (above the level of MTH 110) is required. A year of math or its equivalent is strongly recommended. 5. General Distribution Requirements Courses satisfying the general distribution requirements of the College of Natural Sciences. 6. Courses in non-science fields to insure a broad back ground. Upon successful completion of this curriculum, recommen dations by the College, and acceptance by one of the affiliated hospitals or clinical laboratories the student will complete 12 continuous months of training at that hospital or laboratory

PAGE 19

114 COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES This trammg period usually begins in early August or September of each year. During this period, one will continue to be registered as a full-time student of the University and will receive a total of 45 credit hours of work in MET 311, 431, 432, 442, 451, 453, 454, and 485. These courses will be taught at the hospital or clinical laboratory Students successfully completing this program will be granted a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology. PHYSICS (PHY /PHS) The Department of Physics offers leading to a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree, and to a Master of Arts degree. Both thesis and non-thesis programs are available for the M A degree Undergraquate course offerings of the Department provide a well-balanced program covering virtually every area of physics Special courses may be offered upon sufficient demand. Modern, excellently equipped classrooms and labora tories provide an outstanding environment for students. Op portunities for undergraduate students to participate in research projects with professors and graduate students form an integral part of the undergraduate experience. Undergraduate students have engaged in research efforts to the extent that their work has been published in scientific journals. There is a tradition of close working relationships between professors and students. At the graduate level thesis research areas include theoretical and experimental plasma physics, theoretical and experimental solid state physics experimental gaseous elec tronics, elementary particle theory, and biophrsics. Supporting facilities include an IBM 360/75 computer, an excellently equipped machine shop and electronic shop, a glass blowing shop, an electron microscope, and an x-ray photoelectron spectrometer. Teaching assistantships and financial aid through the College Work-Study Program are often available to qualified students A s upervised study hall is available where students may obtain help with their course work at their convenience throughout each week day. Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree: I. Physics Courses B.A. PHYSICS (PHY) 45-51 er. hrs. PHY 201-2o6", 315 (18) PHY 309 (4) or PHY 409 (3) PHY 301-306 (12) PHY 419** (3) PHY 307 (3) PHY 341 (2) PHY 407 (3) PHY 441 (2) PHY 417** (3) PHY Electives (10) B.S. PHYSICS (PHS) 55-62 er hrs. PHY 201-206, 315 (18) PHY 423 (3) or PHY 331 (4) PHY 301-306 (12) PHY 405 (3) PHY 307 (3) PHY 437 (3) PHY 407 (3) PHY 421 or PHY 417 (3) PHY 517 or PHY 309 (4) PHY 523 (4) PHY 409 (3) PHY 415 (4) PHY 419 (3) or PHY 501 (4) PHY 341 (2) or PHY 541 (3) PHY 441 (2) II Supporting Courses in the Natural Sciences B.A. AND B.S. PHYSICs-(28-33 er. hrs ) CHM 211-213 MTH 302-305 (17) and 217-219 (12) MTH 351-354 (14) CHM 215-216 (10) MTH 401 (4) Credit will not be given for both general physics sequences PHY 201-206 and PHY 301-306 With the consent of the Physics Adviser, either or both of the following substitutions may be made : PHY 437 for PHY 417 and PHY 331 for PHY 419. III. General Distribution Requirements (60 er hrs excluding waivers) The student is required to complete the General Distribution requirements of the College of Natural Sciences (see page 103). Selection of a foreign language, preferably French, German, or Russian is also strongly recommended. IV. Liberal Education Electives The stude nt must satisfy 24 hours of liberal education electives as described in item 3 of the gradu atio n requirements of the College of Natural Sciences (see page 103). V Free Electives (Including General Distribution waivers) B.A. PHYSICS (PHY): 48-57 er. hrs. B.S. PHYSICS (PHS): 37-49 er. hrs Teacher Education Programs: For information concerning the degree programs for secondary school teachers and junior college teachers see pages 72, 77, and 80 of this Bulletin. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements are given on page 47. When a student is admitted to the graduate program in phy sics, he will co n s ult with the Graduate Physics Adviser, who will be his course adviser and will also keep a close check on the progress of the student in his work After a decision has been made concerning the student's academic goals, the duties of the Graduate Adviser will be assumed by a Supervisory Committee appointed by the department chairman. The Supervisory Committee will have the right and the responsibility to add special requirements to meet any deficiency in the student's background. The student desiring the M A. degree with a the sis is required to take a minimum of 45 credits no more than nine of which may be for PHY 681, 691, and 699. Of these 45 credits, 24 must be in courses numbered 600 or above Required courses are PHY 537, 541, 607, 631, and 641. The Supervisory Committee will administer a comprehensive examination before recom mending that a degree be granted The student desiring the M.A. degree without a thesis is required to take a minimum of 45 credits (excluding PHY 694), no more than three of which may be for PHY 681 and 691. Of these 45 credits, 24 must be in courses numbered 600 or above Required courses are PHY 541, 542, 543, 605, 608, 633, 637, and 641. The Supervisory Committee will administer a written and an oral comprehensive examination before recommending that a degree be granted.

PAGE 20

NEW COLLEGE OF USF New College, a former private liberal arts c ollege-, became a part of the Unive rsi ty of South Florida in 1975, retaining it s distinctive academic program and the s tatu s of an honor s college within the g reater University. New College attemp ts to provide an educational environ ment that will allow Students to obtain maximum academic and personal development The curriculum is designed to promote their self-direction and to supply them with the knowledge and skills necessary for their careers New College is both traditional and contemporary in its orientation: dedicated to humane learning, but also purposely seeking the disco v ery, the development, and the creation of ways to equip man for survival in a fluid society. During its 12-year history, Ne w College fostered a constantly evolving program with faculty an d students ever alert for better ways to nourish individual growth Students are encouraged to develop their o wn educational plans-using the educational contract-that will help them reach individual goals. Flexibility individualism, and broad freedom of choice charac terize the program, giving to each student the opportunity to play a major role in the constructing of his or her o wn program. The Academic Calendar and Residence Requirements New College operates on a slightly different academic year than the rest of the University. The College s academic year is divided into three 10-week terms beginning in September and 115 ending in June with a special four-week period intervening in late fall designed specifically to permit students to accomplish independent studies. Since students at New College are selected for their abilitY. to benefit from the special New College program, they are considered, at entrance, to have the ability to begin at an advanced state of preparation. Therefore, New College offers each student the opportunity to earn a bachelor's degree in three academic years, or nine terms, of residence. However, each student also has the option to distribute his educational experience over a four-year period by taking several terms off from study at selected times during those four years Educational Contracts The basic instrument of the New College educational program is the educational contract a written document constructed a t the beginning of a term by each student and expressing that student's plans for the ensuing term. Each contract states the individual stude nt 's educational and personal goals for the term and possibly longer range objectives; a listing of the specific educational activitie s that will help accomplish these ends; and an explanation of how those specific educational activities will be evaluated at the end of the term. Each contract is developed by the individual student as an expression of personal education and career goals but faculty are expected to contribute substantially to help students determine the best ways to shape contracts to reach goals. Residence Halls, Sarasota Campus

PAGE 21

116 NEW COLLEGE OF USF College Hall and South Hall, Sarasota Campus Admissions Requirements New College welcomes applications from all qualified student s without regard to nation a lit y, creed, race, or sex. New College seeks those s tudents who are unusually well-qualified to thrive i n its intellectual and social atmos pher e. The College u ses a variet y of indicators to help each student measure whe th er he or she i s right for participating in this special program The most reliabl e index of this ability remains p ast scholastic perform ance. Student Scholastic Aptitude Te s ts (SAT) combined score s range from 1100 to 1600 with the average falling near 1200. The experience of st udents over the pa s t 11 years h a s demon s trated that those whose combined scores fall anywhere within that 1100 to 1600 range are capable of succeeding a t New College provided they also have the personal characteristics that will allow them to cope effectively with the educational program individual traits, in a ddition to motivation, are initiati v e tenacity maturity curiosity, concern for other s and an excitement about life and learning as essential attributes Residents of the state of Florida may submit results of th e Florida 12th-grade testing progr am, the Scholastic Aptitude Te st from the College Entrance Examination Board or score s received from the American College Testing Program (ACT) to help the Admissions Office ofNew College d ete rmine whether a student should be se lected for any class. Since the program at New College has been deliberatel y designed to fulfill the need s of individual students, it follows that the College will also accept students with va ried academic preparation The College doe s not require that certain courses be completed to gain admittance, but does urge pro s pective students to complete the customary courses within a college preparatory program before enrolling at New College. Particular attention is given to students who have participated in honors courses, advanced placement or enriched and accelerated course s and independent studies. Advanced placement provided at some institutions is not necessary for admission to New College of USF simp l y because admissions procedure s are designed to ass ure that all students will be able to function at an advanced level. The fulfillment of this expectation is facilitated b y the mutual effort of each student and his academic adviser to design a program th a t takes the abilities of the individual student and his previous preparation into consideration Student s are encouraged to begin st udi es at advanced level s if they ha ve adequate background. Application forms and literature may be obtained from the Director of Admissions, New College of USF, 5700 N Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, Florida 33580 Prospective s tudents should note that a supplemental application i s ne e ded for admission to New C ollege. Application Deadlines: Fall Term/Term I : Application s hould be completed before March I and no later than April I. Application for financial assista nce s hould be received before February I. Winter Term/Term II : Application should be completed by November I. Spring Term/Term III : Application should be completed by F ebruary I. Degree Requirements All st udents who are graduated from New College of USF receive a Bachelor of Arts degree. However, students may elect to concentrate in any of a number of areas within the various divisions or to elect an interdisciplinary course of study in fields of their own shaping. Requirements for completion of a course of st udy at New College include satisfactory evaluations on nine educatio nal contr ac ts, on four independent study projects on the senior proj ect, and on the baccalaureate examination Areas of Study New College i s divided into three academic divisions!-lumanities, Social Sciences a nd Natural Sciences-and stu de nts may elect to study primarily in one area, to distribute their s tudies through o ut the entire thre e divi sio n s, or to create special interdisciplinary curricula which span offerings in any of the d i sci pline s. To aid prospective students of New College, each division has indicated broad areas of s tudy which are available in each divisio n Within each area there are, of course, many s ubdiv i sio ns and information abou t th ese may be obtained from t he New College Record s Office Humanities Art History Fine Arts Music Literature Natural Sciences Mathematic s Biology Chemistry Social Science Anthropology Eco n om i cs History Languages Classics Philosophy Religion Physics Experimental Psychology Political Science Sociology Social Psychology Special Programs New College has two special programs which are available to s tudents of New College but which fall outside of the regular divisio n a l or interdisciplinary areas. The Environmental Studies Program is an interdi sc iplinary and interdivisional program th a t is a l so expected to integrate aca demic and "real world" experiences in problem-solving situa tion s. Students who elect the Environmental Studies Program may develop disciplinar y knowl e dge and skills through courses and seminars in the College's three aca demic divisions and then may apply th ei r knowledge and s kills ii"\ research

PAGE 22

projects dealing with practical problems in environmentally related areas. Each year, for three weeks in June, the New College Summer Music Festival is held on campus The Festival brings to the campus a number of nationally and internationally known musicians to teach and to perform public concerts with emphasis on chamber music. Qualified New College students may enroll in Festival classes while Festival concert performances are open to everyone in the college community. Students for the Festival are drawn from all parts of the country and abroad coming to the college to study each year and also to perform in student concerts which are held frequently on campus New College students have the opportunity to audit Festival master classes and rehearsals and also to attend the public concerts Costs Costs for attending New College of USF are the same as those for attending any part of the State University System. Costs are based on a per-credit hour basis (see page 18 for University credit-hour costs). Each term's educational contract is the equivalent of 16 credit hours while the independent study project is equivalent to four credit hours. Since New College offers students the opportunity to have a more individualized type of study than is available in other University programs, it is easily seen that such a program would be more expensive. To help meet this difference in cost, a private organization, the New Coll ege Foundation, has agreed to provide an annual subsidy of private funds to the university system to make up the difference of state funding and the actual cost of the educational program These funds are raised by the New College Foundation and its Board of Trustees from individuals, corporations arid foundations. NEW COLLEGE OF USF 117 Student Life New College is essentially a residential institution with the majority of the students living either on campus or in the surrounding community. Students are challenged to accept major responsibilities for the direction of their own affairs, including their social and extra-curricular activities. A Student Affairs Office is aq essential part of New College and is concerned with almost all phases of student life from orientation of. arriving students to commencement plans .for those ready to depart. Student Affairs, through its professional staff, is responsible for counseling, housing, recreation and health services. Staff also are concerned with helping students assume responsibilities in relation to others on campus and in the outside communities. All first-year students live on campus during their initial academic year Upper-class students may choose College or non-College residency and all students have the option of taking advantage of using the college food service plan or of making independent arrangements for meals. New College offers counseling for students in several different areas. New College provides for students a small health center on campus, staffed while the college is in session. Excellent specialized medical services are r.eadily available in the community with a community hospital only minutes away from campus. Qualified clinical psychologists provide for sludents a broad range of phychological counseling and therapy as well as dealing with students concerned about life goals, academic and career decisions, and study skills. Professional medical and psychiatric counsel is available in the community at the student's expense 1976-77 ACADEMIC CALENDAR NEW COLLEGE OF USF Fall Term (I), 1976 April I, Thurs. Sept. 6, Mon. Sept. 8-11, Wed.-Sun. Sept. 13, Mon. Sept. 17, Fri. Sept. 22, Wed. Sept. 24, Fri. Nov. l, Mon. Nov. 5, Fri. Nov. 11, Thurs. Nov: 19, Fri Nov. 22, Mon. Nov. 26-27, Thurs.-Fri. Dec. 17, Fri. Deadline for applications Labor Day (offices closed) Orientation and Advising Classes begin Last day to withdraw and receive refund of term fees Contracts due Last day for contract submission for Fall Term* Deadline for declaring option or offcampus study for Winter Termt ISP sign-up forms due Veterans Day hol\day End of Fall Term Independent Study Period begins Thanksgiving Day holiday Independent Study Period ends; projects due Winter Term (II), 1977 Nov. l, Mon. Jan. 3-4, Mon.-Tue. Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 7, Fri. Jan. 12, Wed. Jan. 14, t'ri. March l, Tue. March 15, Tue. Deadline for applications Orientation and advising Classes begin Last day to withdraw and receive refund of term fees Contracts due Last day for contract submission for Winter Term* Deadline for declaring option or off campus study for Spring Termt End of Winter Term Spring Term (Ill), 1977 Feb. l, Tue. March 28, Mon April I, Fri. April 6, Wed. May 6, Fri. May 23-27, Mon.-Fri. May 30, Mon. June I, Wed. June 3, Fri. June 6, Mon. June 7, Tue. June 8, Wed. June 11, Sat. Deadline for applications Classes begin Last day to withdraw and receive refund of term fees Last day for contract submission for Spring Term* Senior theses due Baccalaureate examinations Memorial Day hol iday Deadline .for declaring option or off campus study for Fall Termt ISP sign-up forms and contracts due for su mmer End of Spring Term Evaluations due for graduating stu dents Contract certifications due for gradu ating students Faculty review of graduating stu dents Commencement Students who have not submitted contracts to the Office of Records & Registration by noon of this dea dline will be considered as withdrawn by default with no refund or cancellation of fees t Under no circumstances will students be granted option for the following term past this deadline. Off-campus contracts for the following term should be submitted as soon as possible following declaration, but must be submitted prior to the first day of the term of the off-campus work.

PAGE 23

@) COLLEGE OF NURSING ,,,.,, .. 1"' The College of Nursing is committed to the improvement of nursing and health care se rvi ces through its education programs, community service and related research activities The College offers a National League for Nursing accredited upper division program in that leads to a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in nursing. The program provides two curricula: I) Curriculum A for generic students (qualified students witq no previous preparation in nursing) and 2) Curriculum B for registered nurses who are graduates of diploma and associate degree programs Applications from all qualified students are accepted without r egard to age, sex, cultural, racial, religious or ethnic background Qualified students with no previous preparation in nursing and registered nurses who are graduates of associate degree and hospital programs are admitted Student may meet all requirements at the University of South Florjda or they may complete lower division prerequisites elsewhere and transfer to USF for the nursing major. Students who enroll at the first or second year level at USF are admitted to the Division of University Studies. They meet the same requirements as other applicants for admission to the University and should follow the admission procedures outlined elsewhere in the Bulletin College graduates and transfer students from other nursing programs are also eligible for admission to the major. The practice of professional nursing involves problem solving and decision-making based on knowledge from the humanities and the physical, biological, social and behavioral sciences. Shortages of qualified personnel, technological ad. vances and increasing demands for health care services have brought changes in the functions and responsibilities of those in the health care professions As a result, nursing practice has become increasingly complex and demanding in terms of knowledge and skills required to assume added responsibilities and functions. The goal of this program is to provide students with opportunities to develop cognitive, affective and psy chomotor skills basic to general nursing practice in any setting where professional nursing services are provided : acute care hospitals, community health agencies, extended care facilities, industry, physicians' offices, military health services, the American Red Cross, and so on The program also focuses on interpersonal and leadership skills essential to meeting their responsibilities as citizens and as professionals in the health care system. An additional goal is that of assisting students to establish investigative and independent study habits that will persist throughout a lifetime of professional growth and development. The undergraduate program is approved by the Florida State Board of Nursing and graduates of this program are eligible for admission to examinations leading to licensure to practice as professional nurses in the State of Florida or to apply for licensure in other states Graduates also have the educational background necessary for graduate study in nursing to prepare for expanded roles in clinical nursing practice or for teaching, administration, research and other leadership responsibilities Admission to the College The College of Nursing is a quota program in that limitations are set on enrollments on the basis of availability of sufficient qualified faculty, and classroom facilities, and clinical resources for nursing practice experience for students. There fore, admissio n s are upon a selective basis through special application directly to the College of Nursing. Florida residents are given priority. One class is admitted to Curriculum A in the fall quarter of each year. The deadline for acceptance of applications is February first. Applications may be obtained by contacting the Coordinator of Advisement, College of Nursing. 118 Transfer students seeking admission to the College of Nursing follow the procedure outlined for transfer students in the USF Bulletin and the procedure outlined here for admission to the College of Nursing. All transfer students must apply for ad mission to the University and be accepted prior to acceptance by the College of Nursing. Transcripts certifying completion of all requirements for admission must be available to the College of Nursing before admission will be confirmed. Applications for admission to the University may be obtained by contacting the Office of Admissions, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620. Applications can be submitted as much as one full year in advance of intended enrollment. Admission procedures for registered nurses vary from those outlined above. Graduates of associate degree and hospital programs in nursing have widely varied backgrounds. Therefore, the admissions process for them is designed to permit evaluation of records, aca demic advisement and individual program planning early in order to ensure optimum utilization of previous educational ex periences and expedite completion of degree requirements. 1 All registered nurses seeking admission to the College of Nursing sho uld submit an application to the College of Nursing. These applications will be sent upon request. 2 When the completed application and transcripts are received, faculty assess them in terms of the require ments for admiss ion to the major. Applicants who have not met the prerequisites will be advised of their standing and the alternatives available for meeting requirements: a) CLEP examinations if appropriate, b) courses at USF, or c) courses at a junior college or other institution. Applicants who have met the requirements for admission will be advised as to when the}'. can be admitted to take courses in the major and (if not already enrolled in the University) will be provided with a USF application stam ped "RN Applicant" to complete and forward with admission fee to the Office of Admissions. 3 Registered nurse applicants seeking admission to the major who apply first to the Office of Admissions will be referred to the College of Nursing to complete the proce ss outlined above. General Requirements The academic requirements used as a basis for evaluating eligibility of applicants for admission to the upper division major are outlined below. The applicant should rel!.lize that these are minimum requirements and that applicants are rated in addition with regard to a number of factors relevant to completion of the program and to professional nursing practice. A OVERALL REQUIREMENTS (CURRICULUM A) The requirements listed below are not enforceable until 1977 under the Articulation Agreem e nt between the State Universities and Community Colleges in FlOrida. However, these changes were instituted for the students' benefit and allow for maximum flexibility while still

PAGE 24

maintaining accademic standards. Students applying prior to 1977 ma y elect to meet the requirements as listed in the University of South Florida Bulletin under effect at the time the student initially enrolled, provided that enrollment has been on a continuous basis. I. Completion of 90 quarter (60 semester) hours of college level work with a cumulative average of '.C" or better. Credit received on the basis of CLEP examinations or other appropriate procedures may be included as part of these requirements. 2. Completion of the University of South Florida general education distribution requirements as part of the above. These requirements may be satisfied by the completion of 60 quarter (40 semester) hours in the following areas with not less than 8 quarter hours (6 semester hours) in each area: 1) English Composition 2) Humanities 3) Mathematics/Quantitative Methods 4) Natural Sciences 5) Social Sciences Students with an A .A. degree will be considered to have met the above requirements. In the specific course requirements for the nursing major certain courses are required in the natural sciences and in the social and behavioral sciences. These courses will also apply toward meeting the general education distribution in the natural and social sciences In addition, the courses taken in statistics or quantitative methods to meet the specific cotirse requirement of the College of Nursing will apply toward meeting one of the mathematics courses required in the general education distribu tion. Specific Course Requirements I. Chemistry : completion (with a ".C" or better) of the equivalent of two quarters of chemistry with content in inorganic, organic and biochemistry. (USF: CHM 211, 212) Courses taken at another institution will be evaluated individually on the basis of content included. 2. Biology: completion (with a ".C" or better) of at least one year of biology with content including cell structure, genetics and ecology. (USF: BIO 201, 202, 203) Courses taken at another institution will be evaluated individually on the basis of content included Human anatomy, physiology or micro biology do not meet these requirements. 3 : At least one of the above must include laboratory or have a corequisite laboratory course for which the student received credit. 4. Microbiology: completion (with a '.C" or better). (USF : MIC 351 or BIO 372) Courses taken at another institution will be evaluated individually on the basis of content included. 5. Completion with a "C" or better, of at least one of the following: anatomy, nutrition (USF: NUR 302 or satisfactory completion of the correspondence course offered by the University of Florida), human growth and development (USF : HUS 427 or a combination of PSY 341 and AGE 301 or PSY 403 and AGE 301). Courses taken at another institution will be evaluated on an individual basis. 6 . Social and Behavioral Sciences: a) One course in American government (e.g., USF: POL 200, 201, 360, 448, 411) or modern American history (e g USF: HTY 212, 306, 307). Courses taken at another institution will be evaluated individually on the basis of content. _, b) eompletion, with a "C" or better, of at least four courses in the areas of individual and social/community behavior with at least one course in each area. Any courses in psychology and sociology as well as human growth and COLLEGE OF NURSING .119 development, group dynamics, aging studies, cultural issues, etc., are acceptable. Courses with education prefixes which have content in these areas are also acceptable 7 Statistics or Quantitative Methods: completion of at least one course in mathematics and one course in statistics or quantitative methods All applicants whose applications indicate eligibility for admission are required to be interviewed by College faculty prior to a decision regarding accep tability. Factors given consideration in evaluating applicants in clude: cumulative grade point average ; grade point average in the specific course requirements (biology, chemistry, social sci ences, microbiology and the supporting sciences); substantive changes in academic performance in general education and prerequisite sciences; extent to which applicant meets or exceeds minimum requirements; progress toward completion of A.A or higher degree in another field ; extracurricular, civic, military or employment activities; evidence of commitment to the health field; health status; and ability to communicate (assessed by iqterview and short essay required at time of interview). Those applicants with the highest total rankings are accepted in order until the class quota is filled. As vacancies occur prior to the enrollment date, those next on the list are accepted to fill them. Enrollment of all students is contingent upon verification through official transcripts of satisfactory completion of all the minimum rquirements outlined above 8. OVERALL REQUIREMENTS (CURRICULUM 8) I The academic requirements for admission to Cur riculum B, which differ somewhat from those for Curriculum A because consideration is given to previous preparation and experience include the following: a An overall ".C" average for all prior college level work attempted b. Eligibility to return to last institution attended. c Current licensure to practice as a registered nurse. 2. Registered nurses from hospital schools may be admitted to the major after completion of 45 hours in the general education distribution (described under Curriculum A) with no less than 8 quarter hours in each of the five areas. This policy, which differs from that in effect for generic students, has been developed to provide more flexibility for registered nurses in moving through the program on a part-time basis However, admission to the College does not insure enrollment in those courses that have supporting science prerequisites 3. Registered nurses with an Associate of Science or Associate in Arts degree in nursing are eligible for admission to the major providing they have met general education distribution requirements as de scribed above 4 Registered nurses who possess an Associate of Arts degree (other than in nursing) are eligible for admission to the University and will be considered to have met general education distribution requirements of the University. However the College requirements in mathematics, social and behavioral sciences, and physical and biological scien ces must be met prior to gradua tion 5 Registered nurses may receive up to 20 hours of credit for previous nursing education and/or experience or satisfactory performance on proficiency examina tions. These credits will be allocated as elective credits and will not apply toward meeting the University requirement of 60 upper division credits or toward meeting the requirements of the upper division nursing major. 6 Priority for admission is given to Florida residents who are currently engaged in the practice of nursing

PAGE 25

120 COLLEGE OF NURSING in the State or who have practiced during the past five years and plan to return to practice upon graduation. General Education Requirements All regi s tered nurse applicants mu s t have completed 45 quarter (30 s emester) hour s in general education with not less than 8 quarter (6 semester) hours in each of the five areas prior to enrollment in the major. These credits may be obtained by a ny one or any combination of the methods listed below : I Successful completion of the work at an a pproved college or university Students with an A.A degree (other than in nur s ing) will be considered to have met these requirement s. 2 Successful performance in College Level Examina tion Program general tests and appropriate subject examinations College regulations permit up to 67. 5 hour s in advanced standing credit ( including 45 hours of the general distribution requirement) for successful performance on CLEP examinations 3 Successful performanc e qn the Standardized Subject Matter Test (USST), a United States Armed Forces Institute Examination. There are specific course requirements for graduation with a B.S degree with a major in nursing which are also applicable toward the general education distribution While not all of these are required for admission to the major some are prerequisite to courses in the major With careful consideration to program planning the student may meet these major requirements and at the same time meet requirements of the general education distribution The s e requirements are outlined below : I. Mathemati cs-a total of 8 quarter hours, including one course in general mathematics or college algebra and one cour s e in elementary statistics or quantitative methods. 2 Social sciences-a total of 18-24 quarter hours with at least one course in American government or modern American history and a minimum of four courses in individual and s ocial/community behavior (at least one course in e a ch of these areas) All course s must be completed with a grade of "C" or better. Courses in psychology, sociology cultural and medical an thropology gerontology behavioral sciences growth and development and life cycle may apply toward meeting this requirement. (Students may CLEP general psychology, growth and development Ameri can government and American history) 3. Physical and biological sciences-a minimum of 18-20 quarter hours must be earned, but this requirement can be met through many different combinations of basic and/or advan c ed physical and biological science courses All course s taken toward meeting this requirement must have been completed with a "C" or better a Biology-recommend 6-8 quarter hours which may be fulfilled by CLEP or two courses that include content in (I) cell theory, (2) biological transport (3) genetics (4) evolution (5) phylogenetic survey of plant and animal kingdoms and (6) ecology Anatomy or a course that includes the following content areas may be used as one course in this requirement : (I) normal cellular and organ system structure of human body and (2) normal cellular and functional organization of human body. b. Microbiology-recommend 3-6 quarter hours which may be fulfilled by one course that includes content in (I) study of bacteria, virus, fungi, rickettsiae and pathogenic protozoa ; (2) problems of sterilization infection, resistance, and im munization ; and (3) effects of activities of microorganisms on man s environment. c. Chemistry-recommend 6-8 quarter hours which may be met by CLEP or two courses that include content in (I) principles of chemistry (2) structure of matter (3) atomic and molecular structure, (4) states of matter (5) chemical formulas and nomenclature, (6) solution s (7) chemical kinetics and equilibrium ( 8 ) theory and practice of quantitative analysi s and (9 ) organic chemistry concepts. A physics course may be used in lieu of one course in this area. Program Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree The College on Nursing offers one undergraduate program with a major in nursing (NUR) Degree Requirements Students are certified for the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in nursing upon completion of 180 quarter hours of credit distributed among the general education distribution, supporting sciences, minimum requirements of the major and electives. A cumulative grade point ratio of 2 0 or better must be maintained throughout the program At least 60 quarter hours must be upper division level work (courses numbered 300 or above) Overall requirements, which differ for Curriculum A and Curriculum B are outlined below : CURRICULUM A The clinical nursing courses emphasize wellness a s well as illness and focus on prevention of disease and maintenance of health as Medical Center

PAGE 26

well as care and rehabilitation of those with acute and chronic illness The clinical nur sing courses include substantial theory and nursing practice in the care of the physically and chronically ill; in preventive he alt h maintenance and rehabilitative services; and for functioning as member s of nursing and health care teams in highly responsible and complex patient care s ettings The upper division major is built uport the general education and sciences discussed above as prerequisites for admission and is composed of supporting sciences required nursing courses and elective s. The supporting sciences required of all Curriculum A nursing majors include: *NUR 301 Human Anatomy (4) *NUR 302 Nutrition (3) MIC 351 Microbiology (5), or BIO 372 Man, Microbe and Molecule (4) *HUS 427 Life Cycle (5) NUR 304 Human Physiology (5) Nursing Courses Junior Year 3 quarters) NUR 303 (4) NUR 305 (3) NUR 310 (3) NUR 306 (2) NUR 307 (5) NUR 308(5) NUR 309(2) Senior Year (3 quarters) NUR 400(5) NUR 401 (5) NUR 402 (2) NUR 403 (3) NUR 404 (5) NUR 405 (5) NUR 406 (2) NUR 407 (3) NUR 408 (7) NUR 409 (2) **NUR 4J2 (1-5) **NUR 483 (2-12) CURRICULUM B Curriculum B of the upper division major is built upon the general education and supporting science base described above and includes additional s upporting sciences, required nursing courses and electives At least 60 quarter hours at the upper division level with at least 45 quarter hours in nursing courses (not to include human physiology and nutrition) are required for graduation In addition to supporting science requirements outlined in Overall Requirements (Curriculum B), the following are required for graduation These requirements may be met as outlined below: 1. Human Physiology-at least one course that includes content in (I) normal cellular and functional organization of human body and (2) normal function of body systems. This requirement may be me! by NUR 304 at USF or by a comparable transfer course 2 Nutrition-at least one course in nutrition (3 quarter hours) that includes normal and therapeutic nutrition for all age groups and effects of cultural, religious, and socioeconomic factors impacting upon food patterns of individual s and groups This requirement may be met as follows: (I) course credit by transfer or at USF; (2) satisfactory performance on the cha llenge examination offered b y College of Nursing; (3) satisfactory per formance in the University of Florida correspondence course in nutrition At least one of these courses (or its equivalent) is required for admission to the nursing major Electives in nursing. Thes e courses are offered on the basis of student interest to provide an opportunity to investigate some area of interest in depth. All students are expected to undertake a t least two credits of NUR 412 (Independent Study). under the guidance of a faculty member. COLLEGE OF NURSING 121 The required nursing theory and clinical practice courses are as follows : NUR 340 (4) NUR 353 (5) NUR 350 (4) NUR 403 (3) NUR 351 (5) NUR 412 (1-5) NUR 352 (4) NUR 450 (5) NUR 451 (3-5) NUR 458 (5-7) NUR 483(2-12) Nursing courses for both Curriculum A and B include substantial theory and nursing practice in care of the physically and mentally ill, the young and the old the ac utely and chronically ill. They also provide opportunities for learning in health maintenance, preventive and rehabilitative services and for functioning as members of nursing and he a lth care teams in highly responsible and complex patient care settings. Learning experiences in nursing are developed and guided by registered professional nurses with graduate pr e paration in clinical nursing Nursing practice experiences are provided in a variety of institutions and agencies involved in the delivery of nursing servi9es. Electives The number and kinds of electives taken will depend upon the number of credits needed to fulfill the 180 quarter hour requirement for the degree and upon individual interest and goals They may be chosen by the student from language, literature, fine arts, natural science, etc.; from areas relating to nursing roles and relationships-e.g., management, health education, mental retardation, gerontology, urban problems race relations, women s studies, biological or physical sciences, s ocial or behavioral scie nces statistics; or from NUR 483, Special Topics in Nursing Special Requirements for Nursing Majors Tuition and fees for students enrolled in nursing are the same as for other undergraduate students at the University of South Florida. _However, there are s ubst an tial expenses not covered by the basic tuition and fees Textbooks laboratory manuals and standardized tests are essential tools for students enrolled in the nursing major. Texts in nursing are somewhat more expensive than those in general education, and it is estimated these costs run from $35.00-$50.00 per quarter Since texts are used over the two year major, these costs are somewhat higher at the junior level. Uniforms including watch with sweep second head, sc issors, shoes, stethescope, etc are required after the first quarter of the juriior year. Uniform specifications and policies have been developed by students enrolled in the first clas s and costs vary depending upon personal choice. In addition, lab coats or aprons are necessary during the first quarter. Medical care Insurance is required Professional lhiblllty Insurance is highly desirable for all and required for registered nurse students An annual physical examination is required. The first one must be done before enrollment in courses involving patient C(Ontact in Quarter II of the junior year. Transportation to and from community health agencies for clinical nursing experience is a lso the responsibility of the student. Since public transportation in the Tampa area is not usually convenient to the hours of clinical schedules, students must have access to some other means of transportation or form car pools Also, from time to time field trips to an institution or agency at some distance from the campus will be required for an entire class or section of a class In these instances students making the trip share the costs Financial Aid Policies and procedures pertaining to financial aid are the same for students in nursing as for other students. Specific information can be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid, Student Affairs University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620

PAGE 27

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES The social and behavioral s ciences are concerned with human beings and their de v elopment, problems, behavior, and institu tions. The st. udy of man helps the student to understand the world of which he/she is a part, to become a more informed citizen, and to prepare for a role in contemporary society. The social and behavioral sciences provide the student with knowledge, experience, and background for future application in business and industry, government, human service professions, and graduate education. Three progr a ms in the college-Urban Community Psy chology, Gerontology, and Urban Anthropology-have been approved by the Board of Regents as Programs of Distinction. Although the programs are housed respectively in the Depart ment of Psychology, the Aging Studies Program, and the Department of Anthropology, they utilize faculty expertise from many disciplines, Approval has been requested to extend the Program of Distinction to include Communicology, Criminal Justice, Geography, Political Science, Rehabilitation Counsel ing, and Sociology to further emphasize the human sciences and services. Students majoring in these areas receive distinctive educational experiences in both university and community settings. BACCALAUREATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Admission to the College Admission to the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences is open to students who have been accepted to the University of South Florida and who declare a major in a particular field within the college. Undergraduate students must submit a formal application for admission to the college. This application is available in the Office of the Coordinator of Advising. Students will then be counseled by a n academic adviser in his/her major field. Information about majors, departments, programs, advising, and other services of the college may be obtained from the Coordinator of Advising, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, 33620. Any student in the University may take courses in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences Students in other colleges or adults in the community may select social and behavioral science courses of particular interest. General Requirements for Degrees The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences currently offers two undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Social Work Requirements for graduation (referred to on page 34 are summarized as follows: I: 180 credit s with at least a "C" average (2.0) in courses taken at the University of South Florida. At least 60 of these 180 credits must be in courses numbered 300 or above. (A maximum of four credits of physical education courses m ay be counted toward graduation requirements; no credits in physical education are required.) 2. 60 hours of general distribution courses as required by the Univer .sity in the areas of English Composition, Fine Arts and Humanities, Mathematics and Quantitative Methods, Natural Sciences, and Social and Behavioral Sciences. (See General Distribution Requirements, page 33). 3 Completion of a major in a subject or an integrated major with at least a "C" average (2.0). (See following pages for requirements in specific majors offered in the college.) 4. 120 credits outside the major, including 90 credits outside the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. These requirements are designed to insure breadth of academic experience. 122 5 Credits transferred from other institutions will not be included in the computation of the grade point average for graduation. To be eligible for graduation with honors requires at least a 3.5 average in USF work and all previous college work 6. A student must complete at least 45 of the last 90 credits in academic residence at USF. The approval of the dean of the college granting the degree must be secured for any transfer credits offered for any part of these last 90 hours. Students are encouraged to consult with an academic adviser in his/her major. It must be noted, however that the student assumes full responsibility for satisfying all University, college, and departmental requirements for graduation. Programs Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers a major in 14 fields as described in the following pages. In addition to the departmental majors, interdisciplinary majors are offered. (See Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, International Studies, and Social Science Education listed below ) Economics offers two majors, one in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and the other in the College of Business Administration. A Bachelor of Arts Degree is offered in the following: Afro-American Studies (AFA) Anthropology (ANT) Anthropology-Linguistics (AN L)* Criminal Justice (CJP) Economics (ECN) Geography (GPY) History (HTY) Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (SSI) International Studies (INT) Political Science (POL) Psychology (PSY) Sociology (SOC) Social Science Education (SSE)** A Bachelor of Social Work Degree (SOK) is also offered. Offered joinJly with the College of Arts and Letters Offered jointly with the College of Education.

PAGE 28

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 123 GRADUATE LEVEL DEGREE PROGRAMS Master's Degree Programs Graduate level courses are now offered in most social and behavioral science areas. The Master of Arts Degree is offered in the following: Anthropology (ANT) Criminal Justice (CJP) Geography (GPY) Gerontology (AGE)* History (HTY) Political Science (POL) Psychology (PSY) Rehabilitation Counseling (REH) Post-Baccalaureate Rehabilitation Counseling (REF) 5-year program Sociology ( SOC) Offered by the Agi1111 Studies Program In addition to the Master of Arts degree offered from the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, joint degrees are offered wit.h the College of Education in Social Science Education, School Psychology and the Junior College Teachers Program The Department of Communicology (formerly Speech Pathology and Audiology) in the college offers a Master of Science Degree in the following: Audiology (AUD) Post-Baccalaureate Audiology (AUF) 5-year program Aural (Re) Habilitation (ARH) Post-Baccalaureate Aural (Re) Habilitation (ARF) 5-year program Speech Pathology (SPP) Post-Baccalaureate Speech Pathology (SPF) 5-year program Doctor of Philosophy The Department of Psychology offer s a program leading tq the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. SPECIAL NON-DEGREE PROGRAMS The AGING STUDIES undergraduate program consists of a core of courses designed for interested students These courses are AGE 301, 325, 405. Additional information will be found in the Aging Studies Program section of the catalog. The LEISURE STUDIES PROGRAM is concerned with leisure in its broadest sense and provides a core of courses for interested students. This program is presently housed in the Department of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences and the courses are listed under Social Sciences (Interdisciplinary) (SSI) as SSI 413, 421, 522, 523, 525. The OFF-CAMPUS TERM PROGRAM offers a wide variety of opportunities for self-designed supervised educa tional experiences for credit. This program is presently housed in the Department of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, and the courses are listed under Off Campus Term (OCT) The WOMEN'S STUDIES PROGRAM consists of courses designed to deal with historical, anthropological, sociological, and psychological aspects of woman's role and of the female experience. This program is presently housed in the Department of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, and the courses are listed under Women's Studies (WSP). The HUMAN SERVICES COURSES (HUS) are designed for students interested in careers in the human sciences and services, and may be taken in conjunction with any major or by special students These courses are coordinated by the Aging Studies Program, and the courses are listed as HUS 326, 327, 426, 427. 428, 429, 526. PROGRAMS AND CURRICULA AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES Afro-AmeriCan Studies Program provides a quality under graduate education leading to a Ba chelor of Arts degree in Afro American Studies. Essentially it is a service program which provide s opportunities for all students to broaden the bases of their knowledge of the entire human experience and intercultural understanding so essential to living in a multi-racial society and a world that has become a global village. It provides a new horizon in liberal education that seeks reunification of the knowledge of human experience and strikes at the narrowness and ethnocentrism of the traditional disciplines which have contributed much to race prejudice and misunderstanding Part of its mission is to assist its black student clientele to achieve a more dignifying identity and fuller participation in the main stream of American life. It attempts to help them to develop a greater awareness of themselves and their talents and to provide them educational and research opportunities necessary for the acquisition of understanding of political and economic realities and tools that must enable black people and other minorities to become effective determinants of their own political and economic life. Requirements for the B.A. Degree: The major in Afro-American Studies consists of a minimum of 56 hours in the field specified as follows: Required Core Courses (20 er hrs.) AFA 230 (4) AFA 334 (4) AFA 333 (4) AFA 335 (4) Required Supporting Courses (12 er hrs ) AFA 343 (4) AFA 440 (4) AFA 432 (4) AFA 481 (1-4) Suggested Elective Courses (24 er. hrs.) AFA 337 (4) AFA 438 AFA 341 (4) AFA 442 AFA 428 (4) AFA 443 AFA 431 (4) AFA 444 AGING STUDIES Undergraduate Program (4) (4) (4) (4} AFA 336 (4) AFA 484 (4) AFA 491 (4) AFA 483 (1-4) AFA 485 (2-4) AFA 499 (4) Although no baccalaureate degree in gerontology is offered, the Aging Studies Program does provide a core of four courses at the undergraduate level. These c ourses range from AGE 301, Introduction to Gerontology to AGE 405, Seminar in Selected Topics in Social Gerontology, and are designed a s electives for students from a variety of areas, particularly the human s ervice areas More generally the objective of the s equenc e of undergraduate courses is to provide students with a broad educational experience in gerontology.

PAGE 29

124 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES The Human Services Courses The HUMAN SERVICES COURSES are designed for students interested in careers in the human sciences and services, and may be taken in conjunction with any major, or by special students They are closely related to our Urban Community Psychology and Gerontology Program of Distinction and will be taught by qualified faculty from the various discipline s within the college The Human Services sequence is coordinated by the Aging Studies Program. Graduate Program The ptimary objective of the graduate program in aging is to train personnel for leader s hip positions in the planning, development delivery, and evaluation of communit y services for older persons In keeping with this objective, th e program offers a broad range of cross-disciplinary courses. As an important part of the training process, each graduate student spends a s uper v ised intern s hip for one academic quarter in a community agency or facility which provides services for older persons. A Master of Arts degree in Gerontology i s awarded upon satisfactory completion of the requirements Requirements for the M.A. Degree in Gerontology: The M .A. degree requires five quarters of full-time s tudy including one quarter of supervised field experience. Most of the courses required were developed specifically to meet the objectives of the program and are offered under the label "AGE". The M.A. degree in Gerontology requires a minimum of 54 credit hours in approved courses including 12 hours of field placement. Of the 54 hours 48 hours must be in courses labeled "AGE"'. Required courses for the M A degree include: AGE 501 (4) AGE 603 (4) AGE 691 (2) W W W AGE 503 (4) AGE 610 (4) AGE 693 (2) AGE 507 (4) AGE 690 (2) AGE 6% (12) Majors a re also required to take a minimum of 6 hours from the following : AGE 504 AGE 509 AGE 605 (4) (4) (4) AGE 608 (4) AGE 585 (1-3} AGE 611 (1-6) AGE 612 (1-6) Electives from other departments must be approved by the student's adviser. There are no language or thesis requirements. Admission Requirements To be eligible for admission to the M.A. program, the applic a nt must : I. Hold a baccalaureate degree or it s equivalent from an accredited college of univer s ity. 2. Have a minimum score of 1000 on the Graduate Record Examination (total of Quantitative and Verbal Aptitude scores) plus a minimum grade point average of 2 5 (A = 4 0) on the last half of courses taken for the bachelor's degree or Have a minimum score of 900 on the Graduate Record Examination (total of Quantitative and Verbal Aptitude score s) plus a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (A = 4 0) on the last half of courses taken for the bachelor's degree Preference is given to applic a nts who demonstrate commit ment to or experience in programs for older persons'. In addition to the University graduate studies application, a program application is required and should be obtained from the Aging Studies Program. Because of the sequential nature of the graduate courses, entering students are ordinarily admitted only in the Fall Quarter (September) each year. At that time a new cycle of courses begins and runs for five academic quarters. ANTHROPOLOGY (ANT/ANL) Anthropology aims at comprehending man as a biological and soda! being It is concerned with all forms of man through time and space. One consequence of this broad-ranging view is the presence within anthropology of four branches: physical anthropology, archaeology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics. Exposure to a nthropological information and the cross-cultural perspec tive produces heightened sensitivity in the student to the world about him This helps the student to adopt an intellectual posture of di sc iplined skepticism with respect to any scheme which purports to define and account for regularities in human life. The primary objective of the graduate program is to provide both basic education and specialized training in several specific fields of applied anthropology which will enable the graduate to render valuable and substantive service at local state national and international levels in a context of non-academic, non teaching employment. Graduates will be capable of assuming vital positions in the various agencies and institutions charged with understanding acting on the complex problems which beset our society. Because of the sequential nature of the graduate courses, entering students are ordinarily admitted only in the Fall Quarter (September) each year. At that time a new cycle of courses begins Requirements for the B.A". Degree in Anthropology (ANT): The major in Anthropology consists of a minimum of 44 credit hours in the field Students may take more than this minimum if they des ire ANT 201 is prerequisite to all subsequent courses. ANT 311, 321, 331, and LIN 301 are required as intermediate level training in the main subdivisions of th e field and ANT 461 and ANT 491 complete the specific course requirements. Majors may not in c lude more than two each of any of the 400-level courses in the total of the 44 hours required Anthropology majors are required to take Social Science Statistics (SS I 30 I) or the equivalent, and urged to become competent in the use of a foreign language Exceptions to course prerequisites require the consent of the instructor.

PAGE 30

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 125 Required Core Courses (28-cr. hrs ) ANT 201 (4) ANT 321 (4) ANT 491 (4) LIN 301* (4) ANT 331 (4) ANT 311 (4) ANT 461 (4) Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Anthropology Linguistics (ANL): This s equence is designed for stud ents who are particularl y interested in the role of language in hum a n behavior and cultural development. Required Core Courses (43 er hrs. minimum) ANT 201 (4) ANT 461 (4) UN 301* (4) ANT 311 (4) ANT 491 (4) LIN 401 (4) ANT 321 (4) ANT 431 (3-6) ANT 331 (4) or ANT 401 (3-6) ANT 411 (3-6) Required Supporting Courses (12 er hrs. minimum from th e following group LIN 321 (4) HII 401 (4) PSY 441 (4) ANC 373 (2) HII 402 (4) Requirements for the M.A Degree General requirements for graduate work are listed on page 47 and should be studied carefully. The student mu st complete 45 credit hours of graduate course work All students must complete the four core seminar courses then proceed to take minimally, one methods course, one selected topics course, and one regional problem s course in one of the three tracks (medical anthropology, urban an thropology public archaeology) In add ition each student mus t : complete a graduate level statistics course and two graduate level course s outside the department for a minimum of 6 quarter hours, chosen in mutual agreement by the s tudent and his committee; s u ccessfu lly pa ss the comprehensive examinations ; undertake graduate re sea r c h ; and write a thesis The student must m ai ntain a "6" average in all course work. In addition, our program requires a "B" average for all four core semi nar s before the student can proceed to take the comprehensive examinations I. COURSES REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS A Core Courses ANT 601 (3) ANT 621 (3) ANT 631 (3) ANT 611 (3) B Additional Requirement s Two graduate-level courses outside the department; one graduate-level statistics co urse; ANT 681 (1-15) ANT 699 0 -6) II. COURSES IN ONE OF THREE TRACKS A. Medical Anthropology Track ANT 641 (4) ANT 651 (4) ANT 661 (4) B Urban Anthropology Track ANT 644 (4) ANT 654 (4) ANT 664 (4) C. Public Archaeology Track ANT 647 (4) ANT 657 (4) ANT 667 (4) COMMUNICOLOGY (AUD/AUF/ARH/ARF/SPP/SPF) A Master of Science D egree is offered through the Department of Communicology that is st ructured to meet the preparation requirement s of the American Speech and Hearing As sociatio n for the Certificate of Clinical Competence or the national basic certification requirements of the Council on Education of the Deaf. In addition to the core su bject material each s tudent may elect to pursue a progr am of specialization in A section of LIN 301 is for anthrop ology majors and requires ANT 201 as a prerequisite the areas of Speech Pathology Audiology or Aural (Re ) Habilitation Undergraduate s tudents enroll in a five-year program t e rminating in th e Ma s ter of Science degree in Spee .ch Pat h o l ogy, Audiology or Aural (Re)Habilitation Students may ap ply for acce pt a n c e in the M S. degree progr a m upon attaining Juni or Class Standing, completion of the CLY 300-level course se quen ce with a 3 0 grade average, submitting cumulative Graduate Record Examination scores of 850 or greater, and dem o n s tr a ting competency in communication skills as de ter mined by th e Chairperson or hi s delegate Students may not a ppl y for a b acca l a ureate degree Programs are planned through the master's d e gree a t the time of acceptance. Appli ca nt s holding a baccalaureate degree from an ac c redited college or universiiy with appropriate prerequisite coursewor k will be eligible for admi s sion if the following m inim al r e quirem e nt s a re met : I. Submissio n of a cumulative sc ore of 1000 or greater for the GRE apt it ude test s plus a grade point average of 3 0 (A=4.0) for the la s t half of their undergraduate co ur sewo rk 2 Submi ss ion of three satisfactory letter s of recommenda tion for gradu a te s tud y, and 3 D e mon s tration of competen c y in communication skills as d e termined by the Chairper so n or his delegate. Requirements for the M.S. Degree in Speech Pathology-Post-Baccalaureate (SPP): General r eq uir e ments for graduate work are already d e lineate d b y the Uni ve rsity 's Divi s ion of Graduate Studies. A minimu m of 4 5 cre dit s i s r e quired as well as completion of s u f ficien t co u rsewor k a nd practicum to meet the American Speec h a n d He ari ng As soc iation' s requirement for clinical c ertific at ion in s peech The attainm e nt of clinical competency as de t er mined b y a minimum GPA of 3.0 in CLY 698 and the a pproval of a m a jority of the academic staff of the Department o f Comm un ico l ogy i s also required for graduation. The student w ith an ex i s ting b ac h e lor' s degree and appro pri ate prerequisites may pla n his/ h er degre e program from among the following cour s es w ith a pprov a l of the Department Chairper s on or his de l egate : CLY 511 (6) C LY 579 (4) CLY 513 (6) CLY 580 (4) CLY 571 (6) C LY 583 (4) CLY 5 7 2 (6) CLY 598(1-12) C LY 5j4 (6) CLY 620 C LY 575 (4) CLY 621 C LY 576 (4) CLY 622 CLY 577 (4) CLY 623 CLY 578 (4) CLY 675 Requ i rements for the Combined Undergraduate/Graduate (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) M.S. degree in Speech Pathology (SPF): CLY 680 (4) CLY 683 (4) CLY 684 (6) CLY 685 (6) CLY 698 (1-12) CLY 699 (6) or CLY 681 (6) A minimum total of 225 credits is required for the co mbined und e rgr a du a te / gr a duate M S program. In additio n to the General Distribution requirements the following courses will be required for all programs: CLY 301 (6) CLY 302 (6) CLY 311 (6) CLY 312 (6) CLY 313 (6) CLY 482 (6) CLY 498(1 -12) CLY 511 (6) CLY 513 (6) CLY 571 (6) Plus one of the following: CLY 572 (6) CLY 574 (6) CLY 575 (4) CLY 576 (4) CLY 577 (4) CLY 578 (4) CLY 580 (4) CLY 583 (4) CLY 598(1-12) CLY 620 (4) CLY 579 (4) CLY 675 (4) CLY 621 (4) CLY 622 (4) CLY 680 (4) CLY 684 (6) CLY 698(1-12) CLY 699 (6) or CLY 681 (6)

PAGE 31

126 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES In addition, sufficient and appropriate coursework (ap proved by the Chairperson or his delegate) will be included to meet the preparation requirements of the American Speech and Hearing Association for the Certificate of Clinical Competence. The attainment of clinical competence as determined by a minimum GPA of 3.0 in CLY 698 and the approval of a majority of the academic staff of the Department of Communicology is also required for graduation. Requirements for the M.S. Degree In Audiology-Post Baccalaureate (AUD): General requirements for graduate work are already delineated by the University's Division of Graduate Studies. A minimum of 45 credits is required as well as sufficient coursework and practicum to meet the American Speech and Hearing Association s requirement for clinical certification in Audiology. The attainment of clinical competence as determined by a minimum GPA of 3.0 in CLY 698 and the approval of a majority of the academic staff of the Department of Com municology is also required for graduation. The student with an existing bachelor's degree and appropriate prerequisites may plan a program from among the following courses with approval of the Department Chairperson or his delegate: CLY 512 (6) CLY 580 (4) CLY 680 (4) CLY 513 (6) CLY 583 (4) CLY 684 (6) CLY 571 (6) CLY 598(1-12) CLY 685 (6) CLY 572 (6) CLY 673 (4) CLY 698(1-12) CLY 573 (6) CLY 674 (4) CLY 699 (6) CLY 574 (6) CLY 675 (4) or CLY 575 (4) CLY 676 (4) CLY 681 (6) CLY 579 (4) CLY 677 (4) Requirements for the Combined Undergraduate/Graduate M.S. Degree in Audiology (AUF): A minimum of 225 credits is required for the combined program In addition to the General Distribution requirements the following courses will be required for all programs : CLY 301 (6) CLY 571 (6) CLY 675 (4) CLY 302 (6) CLY 572 (6) CLY 676 (4) CLY 311 (6) CLY 573 (6) CLY 677 (4) CLY 312 (6) CLY 575 (4) CLY 680 (4) CLY 313 (6) CLY 579 (4) CLY 684 (6) CLY 482 (6) CLY 580 (4) CLY 698 (1-12) CLY498(1-12) CLY .583 (4) CLY699 (6) CLY 512 (6) CLY 673 (4) or CLY 513 (6) CLY 674 (4) CLY 681 (6) Plus one of the following: CLY 574 (6) CLY 685 (6) In addition, sufficient and appropriate coursework (ap proved by the Department Chairperson or his delegate) must be included to meet the preparation requirements of the American Speech and Hearing Association for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology The attainment of clinical com petence as determined by a minimum GPA of 3.0 in CLY 698 a nd the approval of a majority of i e academic staff Of the Department of Communicology is also required fo r graduation. Requirements for the M S Degree In Aural (Re)Habilltatlon-Post Baccalaureate (ARH): General requirements for graduate are already delineated by the University's Division of l.11.. \ te Studies. A minimum of 45 credits is required as well as sufficient coursework practicum and internship to meet the Florida State Department of Education certification requirements for special ization with the hearing impaired a nd to meet the national basic certification requirements of the Council on Education of the Deaf. The attainment of clinical competence as determined by a minimum GPA of 3.0 in CLY 698 and the approval of a majority of the academic staff of the Department of Communicology is also requir e d for graduation Students may plan programs with emphasis in the a reas of pre s chool sch ool age multiply handicapped and a dult hearing impaired All teachers of the deaf programs will be pla nned from a mong courses offered by the appropriate teacher preparation areas within the College of Education as well as from the following: CLY 482 (6) CLY 598(1-12) CLY 685 (6) CLY 513 (6) CLY 673 (4) CLY 698(1-12) CLY 572 (6) CLY 675 (4) CLY 699 (6) CLY 577 (4) CLY 676 (4) or CLY 580 (4) CLY 680 (4) CLY 68' 1 (6) CLY 583 (4) CLY 684 (6) Requirements for the Combined Undergraduate/ Graduate M .S. Degree in Aural (Re)Habllitatlon (ARF): A minimum of 225 credit s is required for the combined programs as well as sufficient coursework practicum and internship to meet the Florida State Department of Education certification requirements for speci a lization with the hearing impaired and to meet the national basic certification requirements of the Council on Education of the Deaf. The attainment of clinical competence as determined by a minimum GPA of 3.0 in CLY 698 and the approval of a majority of the academic staff of the Department of Communicology is also required for graduation Students may plan programs with emphasis in the a reas of preschool school age multiply h a ndicapped, and adult hearing impaired. In addition to the General Distribution requirements all teacher of the deaf programs will be planned to in d ude coursework from the appropriate te a cher preparation area s within the College of Education as well as from the following: CLY 301 (6) CLY 572 CLY 302 (6) CLY 577 CLY 311 (6) CLY 579 CLY 312 (6) CLY 580 CLY 313 (6) CLY 583 CLY 482 (6) CLY 673 CLY 513 (6) CLY 675 CLY 598(1-12) CLY 676 (6) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJP) CLY 680 (6) CLY 684 (6) CLY 685 (4) CLY 698(1-12) CLY 699 (6) or CLY 681 (6) The major in criminal jtistice provides students with an indepth exposur e to the total criminal justice system including taw enforcement detention the judiciary corrections and probation and p a role The progr a m concentrates on achieving balance in the a bove aspects of the system from the perspective of the criminal justic e professional, the offender, and society. The objective of the graduate program in criminal justice is to develop a sound educational basis for professional training in one or more of the specialized areas comprising the modern urban Criminal Justice System Requirements for the B A. Degree: A minimum of 53 quarter hour s is required of all undergraduate majors in Criminal Justice including the follow ing courses or their equiv a lents : CJP 300 (5) CJP 302 (4) CJP 491 (3) pp 301 (4) CJP 315 (8) CJP 499 (12) In addition to the above a minimum of 17 hours in Criminal Justice se lect ed by the student complete the requirements. In-service students are required to take only 4 hours of CJP 499. th u s r e ducing their rriajor course credits to 45 quarter hours. An y st udent who receives a grade of '.'D" or lower in more than one USF CJP course will be a utomatically barred from continuing as a Criminal Justice major This applies only to students whose first CJP course is tak e n during Fall Quarter (I) 1975 or there a fter.

PAGE 32

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 127 Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Univer s ity requirements for graduate study are given on p a ge 47. Additionally each graduate applicant should submit thr ee l e tt e r s of re c ommend a tion and a letter of intent to the D e p a rtment of Criminal Justice Further information may be ob taine d by c onta c ting the Director of Graduate Studies of the D e p a rtm e nt of Criminal Ju s tice Requirements for graduation for all M A candidates will con s i s t of: I 45 c r e dit s of CJP cour s e work (or approved equivalents) whic h include: CJP 601 (4) CJP 603 (4) CJP 693 (I) CJP 602 (4) 2. C ompletion of a thesis ; CJP 699. All cour s e work counted toward the degree must have the prior a ppro val of the student's major professor and the Director o f Gr a duat e Studie s of the Criminal Ju s tice program ECONOMICS (ECN) Requirements for the B.A. Degree Eco n o m i c s i s one of the vital disciplines investigating the c omplex problem s and relationship s i n modern society Indeed, the ver y breadth of economic s had led to major areas within the disc ipline including labor economic s international economics, urban and regional economic s, monetary economics, public finan c e, indu s trial organization, comparative economic systems, a nd th e like In addition, s tudents are given a sound grounding in ec onomi c theory and economic s tatistics to facilitate the inv es tiga tion of the problems of human behavior decision m a king a nd organ i zational effecti v enes s in the s e problem areas A s tud e nt m ay earn a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Ec on omics by c ompleting s atis factorily 48 credits in E c onomi cs in a ddition to College r e quirements Normally, these 48 c redits includ e: E CN 201 (4) E CN 323 (5) F.CN 331 (5) ECN 202 (4) ECN 231 (3) ECN 405 (4) E CN 301 (5) In a dditi o n to thi s core, s tudent s are encouraged to select 300l eve l cour s e s in s everal of the appl i ed areas during their junior y ear. The remaining econ o mics ele c tives may be selected fr o m tho s e 300 a nd 400 level cour s es that provide the type of p rog r a m th a t be s t s uit the s tudents intere s ts and objectives Student s majoring in economic s are encouraged to s upple m e nt their progr a m s with appropriate cour s es in other social s c i e nces. Political s cience, psychology sociology and others contribut e greatly to an enriched plan of study Similarly, a vari e ty of c our s es in economic s are designed to permit students m a joring in other discipline s to a cquire the skills and insights pro vide d in e c onomic s The Department of Economics offers a conc e ntration area for majors in the other social sciences The con c entration a rea will be de s igned for the individual student's program Thu s s tudent s have the option of broad in terdi s ciplinary program s, a general grounding in many areas of economic s o r a more intensive concentration in one of the areas within ec onomic s Stu dent s intere s ted in majoring in economics or having a con ce ntr a t i on a re a a re e ncouraged to contact the departmental a d v i se r for more information about the program In addition the dep a rtment m a intains a file des cribing the varied career opp o rtunitie s for economist s in busine ss government, and edu ca tion GEOGRAPHY (GPY) Requirements for the B.A. Degree: G e o gr aphy a s a dis ciplin e i s d e signed to account for the var i able c h a r ac t e r of th" ""rth' <11rface. The two major divisions of geography are physical and cultural (human). Physical geography includes the study of earth-sun relationships, weather, climate, and natural features of the landscape such as landforms soils, vegetation, and hydrology Cultural geography s tudies people, their various culture s levels of technology and economic activities which operate differentiall:;. to alter the natural landscape Geography's overriding purpose is to understand the earth as the home of man. A major concern of geography is the wise use of natural, human and economic resources Therefore, ecological and environmental consideration s are centr a l to the study of geography Students are encouraged to take elective credits in a wide variety of disciplines because of the cross-disciplinary approach of geography. Both social and natural sciences are recom mended. Geography majors generally teach or work in various planning, resource management, or consulting agencie s both private and governmental at all level s-local, state, and federal. A major in geography consists of 50 credit hour s a s follows: Required core courses (40 er hrs.) GPY 301 (5) GPY 371 GPY 302 (5) GPY 403 GPY 303 (5) GPY 405 Electives in geography (JO er hrs ) (5) (5) (5) GPY 407 GPY 409 Any JO hours in GPY 400-or-500 level cour s es. Requirements for the M.A. Degree: (5) (5) General requirements for graduate work are given on page 47. All student s must complete 45 credit hours in gr a duate geography courses, following one of the two plan s outlined below A written and oral comprehensive examination covering the general field of geography is required before graduation, and the s tudent must demonstrate his ability to translate into English the pertinent scientific literature from one modern foreign language Foreign students, whose mother tongue i s not English may use Engli s h as the i r foreign language A computer language (such a s Fortran) may be u s ed to meet the langu a ge requirement. Thesis Program : The 45 credit hours in geography mus t include : GPY 501, 503, 507, 603, 605, 607, and 699. Up to eight credits outside the department may be elected with the approval of the s tudent's committee and major professor. An oral defense of the thesis is required Non-Thesis Program : The 45 credit hours in geography mus t include : GPY 501, 503 507, 601, 603, 605, 607, and 689. Up to four credits outside the department may be elected w ith the approval of the student's comm i ttee and major profes s or. HISTORY (HTY) Requirements for the B.A. Degree: A minimum of 48 quarter hours is required for a major in history, 16 hours of 200-level courses, or their equivalent, constitute the l o wer level requirements. HTY 487, 491, and 492 constitute the upper level requirements for the degree At least 20 hours of course work must be drawn from the 300-400 level. With the prior written consent of the student's adviser, majors may take up to eight (8) hours of course work offered by other departments and apply these hours toward meeting th e course requirements in history The course work undertaken out s ide the Department of History mus t complement the student's program in history. It is recommended that history majors take ENG 350, "Advanced Expository Writing," SPE 201, "Fundamentals of Spe e ch Communication," LU 200, Use of the Library," and 27 quarter hour s drawn from the following disciplines: Afro American Studies, Anthropology, Economics, Geography,

PAGE 33

128 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Political Science, Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, Psychology, Philosophy, Sociology, Literature, the Humanities, and the Fine Arts Majors intending to pur s ue graduate work should take a minimum of two years of classical or modern foreign language. Requirements for the M : A. Degree: The graduate curriculum in history is composed of a core program, a thesis, and course work in the following fields: Field I, American history to 1877; Field II, American history since 1877; Field III, Early Modern European history; Field IV, Modern European history ; Field V Ancient and Medieval history; Field VI, Latin American history. In addition to the general requirements of the University, a candidate is required to complete a total of 48 credit hours divided as follows : 8 hours of core courses; 16 hours in a major field; 8 hours in a minor field; 8 hours of thesi s, and 8 hours of electives Of the 48 hours, at least 30 must be in formal regularly scheduled course work, 24 of which must be at the 600 level. Subject to the satisfaction of above requirements, courses at the 500 level a re acceptable as part of a planned degree program and in special circumstances major advisers may approve up to 8 hours at the 400 level with the definite understanding that additional and superior work will be required of the graduate student. The core courses, HTY 600, 601 are required of all candidates. A reading proficiency in one foreign language must be demonstrated A satisfactory preparation in the core program two fields the completion of a comprehensive examination, and a thesis are required for graduation. INTERDISCIPLINARY SOCIAL SCIENCES (SSl/INT) The Department of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences admin isters the College major and the major in International Studies; it offers non-degree programs in Leisure Studies and in Women's Studies ; it administers the Off-Campus Term Program The College Major (SSI): Requirements for the B.A. Degree: The college major offers students whose educational and vocational interests and objectives cross disciplinary lines an opportunity .to undertake a program of study individually designed to serve those interests and objectives That program of study must include 64 credits in courses offered in the college of which 12 must be taken in courses bearing the SSI prefix (Interdisciplinary Social Sciences) and one of these must be SSI 30 I, Social Science Statistics. Within these parameters each s tudent' s program of study is to be evolved in consultation with and must be formally a pproved by the major adviser. The program of study must include an area of concentration of at least 20 credits in one discipline; it will normally be expected to include a second area of concentration with either a disciplinary or multidisciplinary focus The choice of areas of concentration and of courses within them is to be directly related to the educational goals of the student and such as to provide an educational experience of excellent quality International Studies (INT): Requirements for the B.A. Degree: The major in International Studies is designed to enable students to undertake programs of study based upon the course offerings of not less than three departments of the college, which will emphasize (a) preparation for careers in international activities, or (b) the study of particular international themes or topics, or (c) the study of particular regions or cultures The program of study is developed by each st udent in consultation with the m ajor adviser s o as be s t to se rve the individual's educational goals. The program is to include not less than 48 credits. Of these 24 (6 courses) must be in the international studies offerings of the Departm e nt of In terdisciplinary Social Sciences, bearing the prefix SSL Required Core Courses (24 er. hrs.) SSI 300 (4) SSI 449 (4) SSI 491 (4) SSI 361 (4) One of the following : SSI 339 (4) SSI 343 (4) SSI 347 (4) SS! 341 (4) SSI 345 (4) One of the following with international content: SSI 383 (2-5) SSI 481 (1-4) SSI 485 (1-4) The additonal 24 credits (6 courses) required must be selected from course offerings of at least two other departments which have international, regional, or cultural content. Required Supporting Courses 18 er. hrs. (or equi va lent proficiency) of appropriate foreign language. Student s will be provided with advice as to choices of other courses offered throughout the University which will best reenforce and complement their major program. Each stude nt's program must be planned with the international s tudies adviser who is empowered to make appropriate substitutions when educationally justified. 'lJ p to nine credits may be substituted for these requirements by successfully pa ss ing SSI 395 (1-9). Leisure Studies Pr_ ogram The Leisure Studies Program is perhaps the only university agency in America devoted entirely to the s ubject of leisure in the broadest sense : a concern with the total pattern of work and nonwork trends of the po st -industrial society related to cybernation, increase s in bulk time flexible work patterns, urbanization, ch a nging values, public policy expenditures for recreation, a nd new demand s on education and other social institutions. This is done through conferences, consultations, field research, lectures writings and new sl etter s, workshops and seminars. It s quarterly Newsletter is widely distributed : Technology, Human Values and Leisure (Abingdon Press 1971) results from one of its conferences. The USF Program represents the United States in a r esea rch team including France, West Germany Canada Sweden, Switzerland, Poland SOcial Science Building

PAGE 34

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 129 Bulgaria, and Czechoslovakia. Students in the introductory and advanced sem inar s participate in field studies, such as family interviews questionnaire surveys, and observations of ac tivities. Courses staffed by Leisure Studies and offered through the Interdisciplinary Social Science Department : SSI 413 Leisure in Society SSI 421 Sport in Society SSI 522 Leisure Theory SSI 523 Leisure Planning: Community and State SSI 525 Leisure Policy Off-Campus Term The Off-Campus Term Program described more in detail elsewhere in this Bulletin, is a university-wide, interdisciplinary program which urges students to spend part of their time in college in pursuits that are self-designed and implemented in an environment entirely off-campus and out of the classroom. OCT provides for an "education in life" for full academic credit as an alternative to the traditional methods of learning Women's Studies Program The Women's Studies Program offers a concentration of interdisciplinary courses focussing on the role of women in the modem world. Several of its courses are cross-listed with those of other departments, suc h as Anthropology and Psychology. POLITICAL SCIENCE (POL) Requirements for the B.A. Degree The underg raduate program leading to the B.A. in political science offers a general purpose degree, and a number of more specialized alternatives These include the pre-professional plan in political science the pre-law plan in political science and honors in political science. The program is designed for students interested in and seeking to understand political problems and iss ues, the nature of the political proce s s as well as the philosophical and legal bases of political structures and processes at local state, and national levels within the United States and elsewhere Satisfying the degree requirements prepares students for positions in the public and private sectors, for law schoo l for graduate work in political science and related disciplines, for positions in education, and for applied political activity A minimum of 48 credit hours is required to satisfy the requirements of the major. Students mu st take the eight credit hours which make up the core curriculum, and a total of JO courses (40 credit hours) in political science of which at least four courses must be above the 300 level. For instructional purposes, the political science curriculum is divided into seven fields. However there are no field requirements Students are free to s elect courses from any and all fields within the curriculum. The undergraduate curriculum in political science is composed of the following : Required Core Courses (8 er. hrs.) POL 200 (4) POL 315 (4) Electives from the seven fields (40 er hrs.) Field I Political Theory POL 310 (4) POL 311 (4) POL 411 (4) POL 412 POL 413 POL 414 (4) (4) (4) Field II Comparative Government and Politics POL 510 PQL515 POL 516 (4) (4) (4) POL 320 (4) POL 427 (4) POL 520 (4) POL 426 (4) Field III International Relations POL 330 (4) POL 432 (4) POL 433 (4) POL 331 (4) Field IV American National and State Governments POL 200 (4) POL 343 (4) POL 449 (4) POL 201 (4) POL 346 (4) POL 540 (4) POL 341 (4) POL 447 (4) POL 342 (4) POL 448 (4) Field V Urban Government and Politics POL 350 (4) POL 452 (4) POL 550 (4) POL 352 (4) POL 453 (4) POL 551 (4) POL 451 (4) Field VI Public Administration POL 360 l4) POL 561 (4) POL 563 (4) POL 466 (4) POL 562 (4) POL 564 (4) POL 560 (4) Field VU Law and Politics POL 370 (4) POL 374 (4) POL 473 (4) POL 371 (4) POL 471 (4) POL 571 (4) POL 373 (4) POL 472 (4) POL 574 (4) The following courses are not included within any of the seven fields, but may still be used as elective hour s : POL 481 (1-8) -Pot 491 (4) POL 492 (4) POL 482 (4) Pre-professional Plan in Political Science This plan is designed for students seeking an intensive undergraduate concentration in political science. Typically, st udents electing this plan will be oriented towards graduate work in political science or other social sciences A minimum of 52 credit hours is required Students must take eight credit hours of required courses: POL 200 (4) POL 315 (4) Eleven additional courses in political science (44 er. hrs.) must be taken, of which at least seven must be above the 300 level. Concentration within fields will be encouraged. Honors in Political Science Honors in political science is designed for the outstanding undergraduate who seeks an intensive program plus academic recognition during the senior year. Admission to the honors sequence, which is available to all undergraduate majors, will be controlled by grade point average, personal interviews and close scrutiny of the student's program and record Students admitted will participate in an honors seminar, POL 491 (4) and will write an honors thesis, POL 492 (4). Field Work The Department of Political Science has a field work program which provides students with part-time internships with local government in the Tampa Bay area and with political parties at the state and local level. Academic credit is available for such internships For further information, contact the Department of Political Science. Requirements for the Pre-Law Plan in Political Science The Department of Political Science offers a pre-law plan designed for the undergraduate considering a career related to law : Field VII of the undergraduate curriculum (Law an d Politics) The courses making up the Field are of Particular interest to law-oriented students but may be taken by others as well The Department seeks to guide major s to those courses which develop skills and provide information needed for good performance in the study of law. The department also seeks to give students the skills and information needed for entry into a number of law-related positions in business and government. An integral part of this plan is a high degree of student access to the Department s pre-law adviser

PAGE 35

130 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Prior to admission to a law school, a student must t ake the Law School Admi ssi on Test (LSAT). This test is given by the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, New Jersey The Law School Admis s ion Test is given si multaneou s l y several times each year at the University of South Florida and numerous other testing centers throughout the state. Students should plan to take the test no later than February of the yea r in whi c h they make application to a law school. Information pamphlets and application forms for the test are obtainable from the Department of Political Science, University of South Flo r ida (Pre law is not a prescribed program of s tudy No specific college major is required for admission to law school. Those students intending to pursue the study of law mu s t obtain a Bachelor of Arts degree in an area of personal choice It is generally agreed that a good lawyer mu s t have knowledge and understanding of the political economic, and socia l context within which legal problems arise.) Requirements for the M.A. Degree The graduate program leading to the M.A. in politi ca l sc ience is designed to offer advanced general ins truction in political science and public administration on national, state, and local lev els of government. It prepares its graduates for positions of responsibility in the public and pri v ate sectors as well as in research teaching and study at the doctoral level. General requirements for graduate work are iiven on page 47. The student must comp l ete a minimum of 45 credit hours of graduate l evel courses, of which at least 24 hours must be at the 600 level. A minimum of 30 credit hours mu s t be taken in formal, regularly scheduled classes. Courses at the 500 level are accepted for credit towards the degree when taken as part of a planned program with the approval of the student's adviser and the Department of P o litic a l Science. A minimum of 28 credit hours must be taken in politi ca l sc ience ; eight credit hours of approved electives may be t ake n outside the department. All graduate students must write a the s i s ( nine credit hours) or petition for substitution with 12 credit hours of regular courses All students mu s t pass a comprehensive examination in o rd e r to satisfy the degree requirements This examination normally will be give n following the completion of the the sis. Students whose petitions for the non-thesis option have been approved will be permitted to take the examination upon successfu l completion of at l east 40 credit hour s Students who do not have an undergraduate m a jor in p o litical science or its equi va lent may be admitted t o the program upon the co n se nt of the dep ar tment Such students may be asked to take additiona l co urses beyond the minimum requirements Students must be regist e red as full-time graduate s tudents for at least one quarter of s tudy All gradu a te students are required to take the graduate core c urriculum: POL 610 (4) POL 515 o r POL 516 (4) For ins tructional purposes the graduate curriculum in politi ca l science has been divided into seven fields : Field I Political Theory POL 510 (4) POL 610 (4) POL 616 (4) POL 515 (4) POL 614 (4) POL 516 (4) POL 615 (4) F i eld II Com parative Government and Politics POL 52 0 (4) POL 626 (4) POL 627 (4) POL 620 (4) F i eld III International Relations POL 630 (4) POL 631 (4) Field IV American National and State Governments POL 540 (4) POL 641 (4) POL 647 (4) POL 640 (4) POL 646 (4) POL 648 (4) Field V Urban Government and Politics POL 550 (4) POL 650 (4) POL 652 (4) POL 551 (4) POL 651 (4) POL 653 (4) Field YI Public Administration POL 560 (4) POL 564 POL 561 (4) POL 660 POL 562 (4) POL 661 POL 563 (4) POL 666 Field VII Law and Politics (4) (4) (4) (4) POL 667 POL 668 POL 571 (4) POL 670 (4) POL 671 POL 574 (4) (4) (4) (4) The follow ing non field courses m ay b e used as elective hour s : POL 681 (1-8) POL 685 (4) POL 699 (9) POL 683 (4) Plans of Study Students may select one of two course plans: Plan I: General Degree Plan a) 2 core courses (POL 610 and either POL 515 or POL 516) b) 5 courses in o.ne or two major fields c) 2 courses may be elected outside the department d) other courses to be specified on an indi v idual b.asis from '\ny field within the graduate cur nculum Plan II: Public Administration and Urban Affairs Plan a) 2 core courses (POL 610 and either POL 515 or POL 516) b) .POL 660 c) 5 courses in public administration and/or urban affairs d) 2 courses may be elected outside the d e partment e) other courses to be specified on an individual basis from any field within the graduate cur riculum M o re detailed ins tru c tions may be obtained from the Depar t ment of Political Scien ce PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) The undergraduate program in Psych o logy offers the s tud e nt a well rounded Liberal Arts education, together with the opportunity to gain a special acquaintance with issues such as tho se concerning man s role in modern society, tactics of social change, p e rsonal adjustment, and educational goals and strategies In addition, the program provides excellent back ground training for qualified students who wish to pursue graduate work in disc iplines such as clinical experimental, or industri a l psy c h ology, education, aging studies, counseling, women's s tudies, bla c k studies, or co.mmunity relations The faculty of the P syc h ology Department is divided into three broad program are as: Clinical Community Experimental. Physiological and Industrial-Organizational. Each of these program areas offers M A and Ph D level training as well as instruction at the undergradu a te l evel. Members of the Clinical Community faculty offer coursework and training in the areas of abnorma1 psychology developmental psychology, behavior modificatio n psychoth e rapy personality ; and psy c hological assessment. Individual research experience is also available to qualifi e d students Members of the Experimental Physiologi ca l faculty provide coursework and, for qualified students, direct and extensive research experience, in the areas of comparative p syc hology electrophysiology, lea rning and conditioning, hu man memory, perception, and information processing Member s of the lridu sfrialOrganizational faculty offer coursework and special training in areas including se l ec tion training and eva luation of employees, job motivati q n and satisfaction, small group analysis, organizational theory and human factors. Requirements for the B .A. Degree: Majors mus t complete at l east 45 c redit hours in the field All majors mus t complete:

PAGE 36

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 131 PSY 200 (4) SSI 301 (4) PSY 311PSY 300 (4) 312 (4,1) and select four courses as follows : PSY 402 or PSY 441 (4) PSY 405 or PSY 445 (4) PSY 403 or PSY 404 (4) PSY 452 o r PSY 455 (4) In addition, 1 2 elective credits i n psychci lo gy cour ses must be completed. PSY 411 (4) i s strongly recommended for all majors and required of s tudents planning graduate trai ning. Functional mathemat ics and biological sciem;e a re recommended. Other wise, students majoring in psychology are encouraged to complete a varied undergraduate program. Admission to Graduate Study: Application s for admission to the M A. or Ph D degree program are considered only once per year for admission into the program in September of that year The deadline for completed applications is March I. A completed application includes a complete transcript of college work, a copy of scores on the GRE Aptitude Test, and three letters of recommendation (preferably from college instructors). Admission to the program is on a competitive basis Details concerning the program, including a description of the credentials needed to be competitive with other applicants, are available from the Chairman, Graduate Admissions Committee Department of Psychology USF, Tampa, Florid a 33620 Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on page 47. The student must complete 50 credit hours of graduate psychology courses All students must take at least two of the three methods courses each of which must have a different topic, listed under PSY 631. In addition, the student must complete a minimum of five of the following ten courses: PSY 609 (5) PSY 635 (5) PSY 641 (5) PSY 612 (5) PSY 636 (5) PSY 642 (5) PSY 614 (5) PSY 638 (5) PSY 634 (5) PSY 639 (5) The selection of these courses will be made by mutual agreement of the student and his advisory committee. Students with prior work in these areas may waive any of these c ourses by successfully passing a special examiniation given by the Psychology Department. Successful waiver may be used to reduce the overall credit hours requirement, if approved by the Psychology Department A research thesis PSY 699, is required and the student must successfully pass an oral examination of the thesis as well a s maintain a B avera ge in course work, exclusive of thesis and research courses. In addition to the M A. degree in psychology, the Psychology Department in the Department of E ducational P s ychology in the College of Education jointly grant the M A. degree in School Psychology (P$E). (See College of Education page 79. ) Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree: The Ph D in Psychology is offered in the fields of Clinical, General Experimental, and Industrial-Organizational Psy chology Specific requirements are determined by the student and his supervisory committee. Assuming that the student has completed an M.A. degree in Psychology or its equivalent the Psychology Department requires the following in addition to the general University requirements for the -Ph.i:>. degree, on page 48. I Reading Ji:nowledge of two foreign languages, or substitu tion for either or both languages by demonstrated competency in an area or areas approved by the Psychology Department Two substitutive areas current ly approved are computer usage skills and electronics skills. 2 Supervised undergraduate psychology teaching ex perience. 3. A one year internship in an approved clinical facility for Ph D students in the Clinical Psychology program. 4. Six months of internship in approved industries or community agencies as available for Ph.D students in the Industrial-Organizational Psychology program. REHABILITATION COUNSELING (REH/REF) Requirements for the M.A. Degree: General requirements for graduate work are given on page 47

PAGE 37

132 COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES The M.A. program in Rehabilitation Counseling requires a minimum of 60 credit hours and offers the student the flexibility of entering while he is a University senior (REF) or after he has earned a baccalaureate degree (REH). Minimum admission requirements for students electing the five-year approach include completion of 135 quarter hours, a score of at least 1000 on the GRE ot a B average on all work beyond 90 credit hours, and a personal interview. He/she must complete all General Distribution requirements and may not apply for a baccalaureate degree Minimum admission requirements for students entering the program as regular graduate students after they have earned a baccalaureate degree include a score of at least 1000 on the GRE or a B average during the last two years of college work, and a personal interview The GRE must be taken by all students entering the program whether or not they meet the B average requirement. Requiiements for graduation for all studeqts include a mimimum of 60 credit hours in the post-baccalaureate program and a total of no less than 225 for those in the five-year program. The following 50 hour core courses are consistent with national certification standards for rehabilitation counselors and must be taken by all students: REH 501 (5) REH 508 (2) REH 610 (4) REH 611 (2) REH 620 (10) REH 502 (5) REH 602 (5) REH 503 (5) REH 606 (3) REH 507 (4) REH 608 (5) AdditiOnal hours to complete either the minimum of 60 credit hours or the minimum of 225 credit hours may be elected from other REH offerings or from related graduate programs, with the consent of the student's adviser. There are no language or thesis requirements ; however, a comprehensive examination is required involving both writteq and practical work SOCIOLOGY (SOC) As an undergraduate major, sociology provides students with three qifferent kinds of program concentrations One, attractive to the majority of possible students, may be described as "usefill sociology." Many of the courses taken involve skills valuable in employment. For example, in a research methods course, interviewing skills can be used in sales, personnel work, social action careers, management, as well as in research. Similarly careers which involve inter-personal relations can benefit enormously from courses in social psychology or small group analysis. Also, pre-professional training, as in law school, business administration, social work and the like, can rest on courses that have "useful" aspects in them. Another concentra tion can be styled that of "liberal education." In this concentration, the central point is the question of the nature of man, the social being. Experience has shown that the truly liberally educated person is prepared for a variety of life experiences because that person understands how to ask important questions and how to go about getting answers. More importantly, the liberally educated person is equipped to take seriously the matter of being a human being. Sociology courses are aimed largely at problems on the nature of one's social world, the nature of man collectively, and on the individual person-the student as a unique being. Finally, sociology can be a major in the se nse that it represents an intellectual discipline Some students will find that it is interesting in its own right and that they would like to continue educational pursuits beyond the bachelor's degree These different concentrations differ as much in the attitude of the student taking the courses as in the selection of courses making up the individual program of study. They are not logically distinct concentrations: any one course may have elements of all three. For example, a student majoring in sociology as an academic discipline may at tlie same time involve himself in questions of a liberal education and at the same time pick up skills which will lead to satisfying employment. Students should understand that sociology majors are not restricted to social work or even social action types of careers. Any career involving human interaction, and that covers an extremely wide range of careers, actually benefits from sociological training Requirements tor the B.A. Degree: The major consists of a minimum of 40 credit hours. The following courses may not be counted in the 40-hour minimum for the major but may be elected as additional courses: SOC 181, 251, 326, 40 I, 481. A model program ofrecommended sequences may be obtained from the Department of Sociology. Transfer students should be aware that by University regulations, the equivalent of one academic year must be taken in on campus" courses. In Sociology, we require that of the 40 credits needed to make up the major, no more than 10 credits earned elsewhere can count towards the major, and in addition, the I 0 credits offered for the major must reflect courses offered here The purpose of this rule is to insure that our certification that an individual has majored in sociology genuinely reflects our understanding of sociology as a major and and that there is no fundamental difference between the transfer student and those whose work was entirely or mostly completed at the University of South Florida. Required Core Courses (16 er. hrs.) SOC 201 (4) SOC 321 (4) SSI 301 (4) soc 315 (4) Additional Requirements (8 er. hrs.) One course of : soc 331 (4) soc 433 (4) soc 535 (4) One course of : soc 341 (4) soc 345 (4) soc 443 (4) Requirements tor the M.A. Degree: A minimum of 45 credit hours and a thesis Required Courses (23 er. hrs.) soc 611 (4) soc 623 (5) soc 699 (8) soc 621 (4) soc 690 (2) University requirements for graduate study are listed on page 47. Admission to the M.A. Program : Satisfactory score on the Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude); two letters of reference from previous instructors; four courses in sociology, including statistics, theory, and methods of research (SSI 301, SOC 315, and SOC 321, or equivalent) Documents are sent to the Office of Admissions. Instructions for applicants are available from the Department of Sociology SOCIAL WORK (SOK) The Department of Sociology is now offering a program leading to a Bachelor of Social Work degree This program is designed along guidelines and recommendations of the Council on Social Work Education and the National Association of Social Workers, w hich are the accrediting body and the professional organization for social workers The curriculum includes some courses previously and currently offered in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, plus supervised field work experience. Enrollment is limited to insure a quality program. The baccalaureate degree in social work enables students to develop entry level competence for begiiming professional so cial work practice. It prepares students for employment as general in social service agencies and organizations. It also provides a firm foundation for graduate study in social work and other human service professions In addition it educates students for more effective citizenship roles through a broad understanding of social service and welfare programs in their communities As a program for entry into the profession of social work, the program is designed to satisfy a diverse set of expectations. Any such training program must meet obligations to the clients to be served, to the profession itself, to the university community

PAGE 38

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 133 of which it is a part, to the student who is undergoing the training, and to the general public for whom the profession, social service agencies, and the university exist. The sociology department reserves the right t
PAGE 39

COURSE ,..,,, .. ,,1\ ... Courses offered for credit by the University of South Florida are listed on the following page s in alphabetical order according to subject area. The first line of each description includes the prefix and course nuinber, title and number of credits. Credits separated by a colon indicate concurrent lecture and laboratory courses taught as a unit : PHY 201-202. GENERAL PHYSICS (4:1) Credits separated by commas indicate unified courses offered in different quarters : HTY 211, 212. AMERICAN HISTORY (4,4) Credits separated by a hyphen indicate variable credit : EDR 633. PRACTICUM IN READING (3-6) The following abbreviation s are utilized in various course descriptions : GR See SIU Grades in the Graduate Program heading in the Division of Graduate Studies PR Prerequisite CI With the consent of the iRstructor CC With the consent of t he chairperson of the department or program CR Corequisite Lec -lab Lecture and laboratory Lec.-dem ; Lecture and demonstration Lec.-pro. Lecture and problem Course de s criptions are listed under the following department and program headings (prefix in parentheses): Accounting (ACC) Mea s urement-Research-Evaluation Geology (GL Y) Afro-American Studies (AFA) (EDQ) History (HTY) Aging Studies (Gerontology) (AGE) Reading Education (EDR) History of Ideas (HII) American Studies (AMS) Social Science Education (EDW) Human Services (HUS) Ancient Studies (Religious Studies) (ANC) Speech Communication-English Humanities (HUM) Anthropology (ANT) Education (EDT) Interdisciplinary L a nguage-Literature Art (ART) Vocational and Adult Education (EDY) (LLI) Astronomy (AST) Engineering: Linguistics (LIN) Biology (BIO) Basic Engineering (EGB) Management (MAN) Botany (BOT) Electrical and Electronic Systems Marine Science (MSC) Microbiology (MIC) (EGE) Marketing (MKT) Zoology (ZOO) Energy Conversion and Mechanical Mass Communications (COM) Chemistry (CHM) Design (EGR) Mathematic s (MTH) Communicology (CLY) Industrial Systems (EGS) Medical Sciences (MSG) Cooperative Education (COE) Structures, Materi a ls, & Fluids (EGX) Medical Technology (MET) Criminal Justice (CJP) Computer Service Courses (ESC) Medicine (MED) Dance (DAN) Engineering Technology (ETK) Military Science (MIS) Developmental Mathematics (OMA) English (ENG) Music (MUS) Economics (ECN) Environment (ENV) Natural Sciences (NAS) Education : Finance (FIN) Nursing (NUR) Art Education (EDA) Fine Arts (Interdisciplinary) (FNA) Off-Campus Term (OCT) Curriculum (EDC) Foreign Languages : Philosophy (PHI) Elementary Education (EDE) General Foreign Languages (FOL) Physical Education, Elective (PEB) English Education (EDT) Arabic (ARA) Physical Sciences (PHS) Exceptional Child Education (EDS) Classics (CLS) Physics (PHY) Foreign Language Education (EDX) French (FRE) Political Science (POL) Foundations (EDF) German (GER) Psychology (PSY) Guidance (EOG) Greek (GRE) Rehabilitation Counseling (REH) Health Education (HEN) Hebrew (HEB) Religious Studie s (REL) Humanities Education (EDY) Italian (IT A) Ancient Studies (ANC) Junior College Education (EDH) Latin (LAT) Senior Seminar (CBS) Library Audiovisual Educ ati on (EDL) Portuguese (POR) Social Sciences, Interdisciplinary (SSI) Music Education (EDM) Romance (ROM) Social Work (SOK) Science-M at hematics Education Russian (RUS) Sociology (SOC) (EON) Spanish (SPA) Speech Communication (SPE) Physical Education for Teachers (EDP) General Business Administration (GBA) Theatre (TAR) ACC AFA AGE AMS ANC ANT Geography (GPY) Women's Studies (WSP) Cross-Listing of Departments and Programs Alphabetically by Prefix Accounting Afro American Studies Aging Studies (Gerontology) American Studies Ancient Studies (Religious Studies) Anthropology 134 ARA ART AST BIO BOT CBS Arabic (Foreign Languages) Art Astronomy Biology Botany (Biology) Senior Seminar

PAGE 40

CHM CJP CLS CLY COE COM DAN DMA ECN EDA EDC EDE EDF EDG EDH EDL EDM EDN EDP EDQ EDR EDS EDT EDY EDW EDX EDY EGB EGE EGR EGS EGX ENG ENV ESC ETK FIN FNA FOL FRE GBA GER GLY Chemistry Criminal Justice Classics (Foreign Languages) Communicology Cooperative Education Mass Communications Dance Developmental Mathematics Economics Art Education (Education) Curriculum (Education) Elementary Education (Education) Foundations (Education) Guidance (Education) Junior College Education (Education) Library-Audiovisual Education (Education) Music Education (Education) Natural Science-Mathematics Education (Education) Physical Education for Teachers (Education) Measurement Research Evaluation (Education) Reading Education (Education) Exceptional Child Education (Education) English Education and Speech Communication English Education (Education) Vocational & Adult Education (Education) Social Science Educaton (Education) Foreign Language Education (Education) Humanities Education (Education) Basic Engineering (Engineering) Electrical & Electronic Systems (Engineering) Energy Conversion & Mechanical Design (Engineering) Indust,rial Systems (Engineering) Structures, Materials & Fluids (Engineering) English Environment Computer Service Courses (Engineering) Engineering Technology Finance Fine Arts (Interdi s ciplinary) General Foreign Languages French (Foreign Languages) General Business Administration German (Foreign Languages) Geology GPY GRE HEB HEN HII HTY HUM HUS lTA LAT LIN LLI MAN MED MET MIC MIS MKT MSC MSG MTH MUS NAS NUR OCT PEB PHI PHS PHY POL POR PSY REH REL ROM RUS soc SOK SPA SPE SSI TAR WSP zoo COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 135 Geography Greek (Foreign Languages) Hebrew (Foreign Languages) Health Education (Education) History of Ideas History Humanities Human Services Italian (Foreign Languages) Latin (Foreign Languages) Linguistics Interdisciplinary Language Literature Management Medicine Medical Technology Microbiology (Biology) Military Science Marketing Marine Science Medical Sciences Mathematics Music Natural Sciences Nursing Off Campus Term Physical Education Electi v e Philosophy Physical Sciences Physics Political Science Portuguese (Foreign Languages) Psychology Rehabilitat{on Counseling Religious Studies Romance (Foreign Languages) Russian (Foreign Languages) Sociology Social Work Spanish (Foreign Languages) Speech Communication Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Theatre Women s Studies Zoology (Biology) ACCOUNTING (ACC) Chairperson: TBA; Professors : L. C. Jurgensen, G E McClung K W Merriam R J West ; Associate Professors : J F Antonio, B L. Beatty, D M Dennis L. C. Harris, R M. Keith. J E Moon J D. Siebel J L. Smith; Assistant Professors : C E Hubbard J Lasseter, W L. Stephens ; Instructors : S J. Deptula, G. G. Keane, K L. Padgett, S J Pardo, R J Siegelski; Adjuncts: R L. Hurd L. Kogut, J. D Sanders, J. E Watson ; Law: Associate Professors : S C Kahn R. F. Welker ; Assistant Professors: W. M Harris;Lecturers: E. H Dunn A-. W Fisher. LOWER LEVEL COURSES ACC 201. ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING I (3) Study of basic a c counting principles including the recording and reporting of financial activity The preparation and interpretation of financial statements ACC 202. ELEMENT ARY ACCOUNTING II (3) PR: ACC 20"1. Accounting theory and practices for various equity structures UPPER LEVEL COURSES ACC 300. ACCOUNTING FOR MANAGEMENT CONTROL (3) PR : A;CC 202. Study of accounting from user's point of view. Includes measurement theory, use of financial statements and accounting measurement in planning and control. ACC 301. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (4) PR: ACC 300 or concurrent regi s tration in ACC 300 : Measurement theory and methodology underlying income measurement and reporting of financial position. The study of cash, time value analysis receivables and inventories. ACC 302. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (4) PR. ACC 301. Continuation of theory and principles underlying financial statements, current and long term liabilities, plant and equipment investments intangible, leases and pensions and owners equity ACC 303. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III (3) PR ACC 302 Required for Accounting major s. Continuation of theory and principles underlying financial statements, earnings per share income tax allocation, price level changes accounting changes statements from incomplete records statements of change in financial position and contemporary accounting issues ACC 401. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (3) PR : ACC 302; MTH 211 or College Algebra Quantitative application in accounting partnerships governmental accoun ting and price level changes. ACC 402. CONSOUDA TED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (3) PR: ACC 302. Accounting for home office and branch operations and business combinations

PAGE 41

136 AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES ACC 405. ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (4) PR: ACC 302, GBA 333. General systems theory, total systems concept, internal control problems, and computer based accounting systems. ACC 411. FEDERAL TAXES (4) PR: ACC 202. An introduction to the federal income tax structure. Use of tax services and the concept of taxable income primarily applicable to individuals. ACC 412. FEDERAL TAXES (3) PR : ACC 411. Continued s tudy of the federal income tax structure. Special topics and the concept of taxable income as it applies primarily to busine ss enterprises. ACC 421. COST ACCOUNTING AND CONTROL I (4) PR : FIN 301, ECN 331. Deals with relevant costs for decision making; standards and job order costing, flexible budgeting, direct and absorption costing, regression analysis and decisiqn models ACC 422. COST ACCOUNTING AND CONTROL II (3) PR : ACC 421. A continuation of ACC 421. The study of cost allocation, capital budgeting, inventory planning and control, joint products, process costing, performance measurement, and transfer pricing. ACC 423. AUDITING (4) PR: ACC 302 and ECN 331. Principles and procedures of internal and public auditing The ethics, responsibilities, standards and report s of professional auditing ACC 425. BUDGETING (3) PR : ACC 421. The development of budgets and their relation to expense and cost control, including the use of standard cost as a budgetary tool. ACC 481. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH OR DIRECTED READINGS (1-5) PR : CI. individual stdy contract with Instructor and Department Chairman required The content of the course will be mutually determined by the s tudent and Instructor. Course may be repeated up to 10 hour s. ACC 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING (1-5) PR : CI. Tlie course content will depend on student demand and instructor's interest. FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ACC 501. ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS AND METHODOLOGY I (3) A study of basic accounting principles including the recording of transactions and the preparation and interpretation of financial stateme nt s. ACC 502. ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS AND METHODOLOGY II (3) PR : ACC 501. A continuation of ACC 501. Consideration is given to budgeting and cost accounting. Emphasis is placed upon the analysis of financial condition and busine ss operation s through an understanding of accounting statements and reports. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY ACC 601. MANAGE.RIAL ACCOUNTING AND CONTROL (3) PR : Bu s iness Core or e quiv a lent A s tudy of the relevancy and limitations of accounting measurement as a basis for business deci s ion-making Includes a review of fundamental accounting measurement theory and related tax implications. ACC 602. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING AND CONTROL (3) PR: ACC 601. The relevancy and limitation of cost information in bu s iness decision-making Emphasis is oriented towards the role of co s t accounting measurements in: (I) planning and controlling current operations; (2) special decisions and long-range planning ; (3) inventory valuation and income determination. ACC 605. DEVELOPMENT OF ACCOUNTING THOUGHT (3) PR : 24 quarter hours in acc ounting or CI. A study and evaluation of the development and evolution of current account theory and measurement concepts The definition of accounting objectives a nd goals and the development of measurement model s. ACC 606. CONTEMPORARY ACCOUNTING THOUGHT (3) PR : ACC 605 or CI. Concentrated stady of curre nt problems areas in the field of accountancy. ACC 607. SYSTEMS THEORY AND QUANTITATIVE APPLICATIONS (3) PR : ACC 405 or equiv a lent. The design and operation oL contemporary accounting sys tem s including the relevance of data processing and sta ti s tical methods to the system of financial information and control. ACC 611. FEDERAL TAX RESEARCH AND PLANNING (3) PR : ACC 411 or CI. A s tudy of the the development of tax law and its implication in bu s iness de cis ion s. Tax planning and tax research are emphas ized ACC 621. MANAGEMENT COST ANALYSIS AND CONTROL (3) PR : 24 quarter hours of accounting or Cl. Measurement, interpretation, planning, and control of costs by means of predetermined standards a nd variance analysis. Use of accounting and s tatistical information in preparing budgets and controlling operations. ACC 623. ET'IICS AND RESPONSIBILITIES IN PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANCY (3) PR : ACC 423 or equivalent. Th e s tudy of elements of public accounting pract ice, profe ssi onal con duct auditing principles and reporting standards. The relationship of the field of public accounting to federal a nd s t a te agencie s ACC 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH (credit varies) PR : GR Master's level. Repeatable (S/U only ) ACC 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING (l-6) PR : CC The course content will depend on student demand and instructor's interest May b e repeated up to 6 hours. AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES (AFA) Director: F U Ohaegbulam ; Associate Professor: F. U. Ohaegbulam ; Assistant Professors : J W Dudley, S J. Garcia, K. R. Glover LOWER LEVEL COURSES AFA 230 INTRODUCTION TO AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES (4) Fundamental pers pective s on the nature and meaning of the Afro-American experience and the role of Afro-American Studies in articulating major problems in American a nd wor l d society (Formerly AFA 130.) UPPER LEVEL COURSES AFA 333. INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN HISTORY (4) An outlin e survey of precoloni a l African history including a prefatory introduction to the u se of primary sources (such as archaeology oral tradition, c ultural anthropology, com parative linguistic s document s) in reconstructing the African past AFA 334. AFRICAN HISTORY SINCE 1850 (4) Survey of the colonial a nd post-colonial hi s tory of Africa Emphasis on the impact of European and other alien

PAGE 42

influences on the continent, emergence of independent African states and post-independence problems of nation building and economic development. AFA 335-336. AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY (4,4) A survey of the Afro-American history in Western Hemi sphere. Emphasis on the experience in North America (AFA 335; 1493-1865; AFA 336; 1865-to present.) (Formerly AFA 261-262.) AFA 337. BLACKS IN AMERICAN POLITICAL PROCESS (4) An examination of the political experience of blacks in the American political process including their political social ization, and struggle to become effective participants in the American political proce ss. AFA 341. ARTS AND MUSIC OF THE AFRICAN PEOPLE (4) An examination of the visual arts painting, sculpture, architecture and music of African people in the Sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean and the United States. Particular attention io how blacks have expressed the meaning, suffering and triumph of their lives through legitimate theatre, visual arts, and musicals and the role of black artists in the historical struggle for black consciousness and liberation. AFA 343. THE AFRICAN DIASPORA AND PAN-AFRICANISM (4) An examination of the African Diaspora and the influence of African culture and civilization on the growth and develop ment of world cultures Emphasis on the extent to which African culture has enriched the development of mankind, the cultural significiance of African voyages and migrations to Asia, Europe and the Americas, and the hi s torical quest for racial and continental pan-Africanism including Garveyism. AFA 428. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF AFRICA (4) Designed to provide the information and analytical tools necessary to interpret current Sub-Saharan African policies Survey of political organizations in traditional African societies; politics under colonial rule; the s truggle for independence, and post-independence politics, AFA 431, SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND THE GHETTO (4) A study of social institutions as they relate to the American Black ghetto, with emphasis on social systems operating within and on the ghetto. (Formerly AFA 302.) AFA 432 BLACK AMERICANS IN THE AMERICAN ECONOMIC PROCESS (4) Brief economic histo ry of Black America emphasizing the impact of racial discrimination an d e va luating proposal s for improvement as they apply to Black Americans and other minority groups (Formerly AFA 310), AFA 438 AFRICA IN WORLD POLITICS (4) Study of international relations in the new Africa including the relations of the new states with the major world powers and their role in the United N at ion s AGING STUDIES 137 AFA 440. CONTEMPORARY BLACK PHILOSOPHY (4) Major themes and participants in the Black liberation movement since 1900 (Formerly AFA 410). AFA 442. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF WEST AFRICA (4) In depth study of government, political systems and processes in West Africa including political developments, ideologies, problems and prospects of political and economic develop ment and military regimes in the area AFA 443. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS c;>F EAST, CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN AFRICA (4) In depth study of political developments, ideologies and modernization in East, Central and Southern AfriCa including race relations and white minority rule and Portuguese colonialism in Southern Africa AFA 444. EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE AFRICAN WORLD (4) An examination of educational systems and experiences of African peoples' cultural past and needs for their future. In tracing the development of education in the African world, close attention will be paid to changing structures and functions of education as manifestations of governmental needs and desires Similari ties and contrasts of African and Afro-American educational patterns will be explored. AFA 481. RESEARCH AND FIELD STUDIES (1-4) A course linking the study pursued by the student with research and work projects in the Tampa Black community. AFA 483. SELECTED TO PICS IN AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES (1-4) Topics offered are selected to reflect student needs and faculty interests In depth study in such areas as the Black Student and the American Educational Pro c ess; the Black Experience in the Amer icas; European Expansion in Africa to 19th century ; Contemporary Economic Problems in Africa. AFA484. AFRICAANDTHEUNITEDSTATES (4) A consideration of the nature and character of African cultural survivals in America including an examination of the historical and current political, economic, a nd cultural relations between the United States and Africa AFA 485. DIRECTED READINGS (2-4) Independent readings in a particular area of Afro-American Studies, selected by student and instructor AFA 491. SENIOR SEMINAR (4) In-depth study of a particular topic in the area of Afro American Studies. Individual research by students required. AFA 499. SEMINAR IN TEACHING BLACK STUDIES (4) An examination of in s tructional media, resources and approaches relevant to the study and t eac hing of the black experience. AGING STUDIES (GERONTOLOGY) (AGE) Director: T A. Rich ; Professor s : T. A Rich S V. Saxon, W Vasey ; Associate Professors: D. R Kenerson, W. P Mangum. UPPER LEVEL COURSES AGE 301. INTRODUCTION TO GERONTOLOGY (3) This course is designed to be an introduction to the s tud y -of aging. The aging process i s viewed from a multi-disciplinary perspective including the b iological, p sycho logical, and sociological as pects of aging. AGE 315. APPLIED GERONTOLOGY (4) PR : Cl. This course is designed to provide an integration of empirical data in the study of aging with practical experience in working with older people Students will s pend time actually working with older people in an agency or institutional setting and then will use experiences in conjunction with other available data to gain pers pective in this field. AGE 325. CULTURE, SOCIETY ANDAGING (4) r.ourse is designed to allow the student to consider aging within the context of culture and society Emphasis will be given to cultural attitudes toward aging in the U.S. and to implications of cultural attitudes for human behavior. AGE 405. SEMINAR IN SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY (3) PR : CI. This course will provide upper level students with a seminar experience in discussing topics of interest and social relevance in the field of aging. Each student will be required to prepare a seminar paper and present it. AGE 485. DIRECTED READINGS (1-3) PR : Cl. A reading program with topics in gerontology conducted under the supervision of a faculty member.

PAGE 43

138 AMERICAN STUDIES FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE SWDENTS AGE 501. PHYSIOLOGY OF AGING (4) PR: Cl. Lectures arid discussion concerned with the biological bases of the aging phenomenon as it occurs on the levels of the cells, organs, tissues and organism. AGE 502. PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING (4) PR: Cl. Consideration of basic psychological processes as related to the aging process, changes in functioning and perceptual motor 'and cognitive -a rea s from the developmental perspective. AGE 503. SOCIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF AGING (4) PR : Cl. Examines, within a sociological frame of reference, the inter-relationships between the aged (or aging) and the structure and function of the soeial system and its major institutionalized subsystems AGE 504. AGING AND PERSONALITY (4) PR: Cl. An introduction to personality theory and concepts of adjustment with an overview of counseling techniques and rehabilitative efforts with the aged. AGE 507. ECONOMICS AND AGING (4) PR : Cl. A study of the basic processes of macroeconomic thought in the modern mixed economy and what influences these processes have on the subje c t of aging. The course will include discussions on economic issues pertinent to aging such as income maintenance problems, theories of consumption and income, and labor force problems. AGE 509. LEISURE FOR THE AGING (4) PR : Cl. This seminar consists of general data and observations on trends and research in the leisure field, directed theoretical analysis of these studies as they pertain to the elderly and contact with progress by visits, interviews, and reports AGE SSS. DIRECTED READINGS (1-3) PR: Cl. A reading program with topics in gerontology conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY AGE 603. SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS APPLIED TO GERONTOLOGY (4) PR: Cl. Systematic study of the methods and techniques employed in social, psychological, and health studies of population groups. Directed toward the consumers of research findings-persons whose po sitio ns call for the ability to interpret, evaluate and apply the find i ngs produced by others. AGE 605. INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS PRACTICUM (4) PR: Cl. A practicum involving students in group and individual settings in interaction with older persons. Content will include implications from interviewing, counseling, and current conceptions of personality in the aged. AGE 606. INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION (4) PR: Cl. This course deals with the management problems and practices in the administration of institutions in the field of aging. Consideration is given to the economics of aging, federal and state legislation, the management of people, and fiscal management. AGE 608. HUMAN RELATIONS IN ORGANIZATIONS (4) PR: Cl. An analytical view of the modern human relations movement with stress on development since the 1930 s Incorporates the philosophy of the behavioral sciences and alternative theories and relates them to the management process. AGE 610. ADMINISTRATIVE APPLICATIONS OF DEMOGRAPHY (4) PR: Cl. Acquaints the student with various sources of demographic data and its use. Emphasis is placed upon applicability in program planning and student experience in locating, tabulating, and interpreting data from selected publications AGE 611. PROJECTS IN AGING I (l-6) PR: Cl. In-depth study of special topics with the objective of identif ying problems for research and developing research proposals. AGE 612. PROJECTS IN AGING II (1-6) PR: AGE 611 and Cl. A continuation of AGE 611. AGE 690, 691, 692, 693. SEMINAR IN SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY (2) PR: Cl. Designed to give the graduate student an opportunity to integrate concepts within the field of gerontology and relate these to other fields of study. Guest lecturers from a variety of disciplines participate in the seminar. (S / U only ) AGE 696. FIELD PLACEMENT (12) PR: Cl. Internship in an agency or setting. An assignment to an agency or organization engaged in planning or adminis tering programs for older people or in providing direct services to older people. (S/U only.) (formerly AGE 695. ) AMERICAN STUDIES (AMS) Director: H. M. Robertson; Professors: D. R Harkness, G. S. Kashdin, J B. Moore, R. C. O Hara, H M Robertson, E E Stanton Jr.; Associate Professors: R M. Figg III, W. T. Morgan; Assistant Professor: C. E. Conway LOWER LEVEL COURSES AMS 201. ISSUES IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (2) Through lecture and demonstration an e)(amination of such topics as natural environment and the quality of life, Architecture and American society, leisure and technology, jazz music, the role of higher education in America, the American success myth and the status of the arts in America UPPER LEVEL COURSES AMS 301. INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (5) Integration of major aspects of American life between 1898 and 1914. Should be taken the first term a student becomes an American Studies major. Elective for non majors. AMS 311. THE COLONIAL PERIOD (S) Puritan heritage: The pattern of American culture as revealed through an examination of selected writings and pertinent slides and recordings dealing with the art, architecture and music of the period Elective for non-majors. AMS 312. THE AGRARIAN MYTH (S) Frontier heritage : The pattern of American culture as revealed through an examination of selected writings and other pertinent materials dealing with American faith and the American frontier environment (the land, city, machine) Elective for non-majors. AMS 313. AMERICA DURING THE TWENTIES AND THIRTIES (S) Heritage of the nineteen twenties and thirties: selected interdisciplinary materials are used to examine the rela tionships among regionalism, nationalism and internationalism during the twenties and thirties. Emphasis is placed on the measure of cultural nationalism attained by the United States during this period. Elective for non-majors. AMS 321. ARCHITECTURE AND THE i\.MERICAN ENVIRONMENT (4) By means of slides, le c tures and discussion the course examines 350 years of American architectural history Architectural styles, aesthetics and the relation between a building and its social environment are stressed AMS 331. THE AMERICANIZATION OF ENGLISH (4) An overview of American attit udes tow a rd the English language from colonization to the present. Among the topics

PAGE 44

discussed are: the American mania for correctness, the influence of the school marm, place and proper names and language prudery AMS 383. SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (1-5) Offerings include Cultural Darwinism in America, Creative American Women, American Painting: its social implications, American Jazz Music American Utopias and Communes. AMS 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-5) The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor s interest. Instructor's approval required prior to registration. ANTHROPOLOGY 139 AMS 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES (1-5) Offering s include The American Success Myth, The American Counter Culture The American City : Past Present and Future, America as seen by Foreign Travelers. AMS 491. SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES (4) PR: Senior in American Studies or CI. AMS 492. SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES (4) PR: AMS 491 AMS 493. SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES (4) PR: AMS 491, AMS 492 ANCIENT STUDIES Religious Studies ANTHROPOLOGY(ANT) Chairperson : G Kushner ; Professors: R. T Grange, Jr., G Kushner, A. Shiloh, A. W. Wolfe; Associate Professors: E . S. Kessler, J. R. Williams;Assistant Professors: M. V. Angrosino, J. J. Smith, P P Waterman, C W. Wienker;lnstructor: R. M. Wulff LOWER LEVEL COURSES ANT 201. INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLoGY (4) A general survey of physical anthropology, archaeology, linguistics and cultural anthropology. UPPER LEVEL COURSES ANT 31l. PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR: ANT 20'1 or CI. The comparative study of human physical variations and origin s ANT 321. ARCHAEOLOGY (4) PR: ANT 201 or CI. The comparative study of past cultures and societies. ANT 331. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR : ANT 201 or CI. The comparative study of cultures a nd societies. ANT 371. THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE (4) Anthropological concepts relevant to contemporary life Designed for non-anthropology major s. May not be counted for credit toward an anthropology major. ANT 401. SELECTED TOPICS IN LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3-6) PR : LIN 301, ANT 201 or CI. A detailed study of current issues such as the relationship of language and culture, ethnographic semantics, or paralinguistic phenomena. M ay be repeated as topics vary. ANT 411. SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3-6) ANT 201-311 or CI. A detailed study of current issues s uch as paleo-pathology, human races, or social biology. May be repeated as topics vary. ANT 421. SELECTED TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY (3-6) PR: ANT 201-321 or CI. A detailed study of current issues such as the development of civilization, regional chronologies, or historical archaeology. May be repeated as topics vary. ANT 431. SELECTED TOPICS IN CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3-6) PR : ANT 201-331 or CI. A detailed study of current issues such as socio-cultural change, ethnopsychology, or social structure. May be repeated as topics vary ANT 441. REGIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3-6) PR: ANT 201-331 or CI. A survey of cultures and s ocieties in a limited area or region. May be repeated as topic s vary : (I) Indians of North America; (2) Cultures of Africa ; (3) Cultures of the Pacific ; (4) Cultures of Mesoamerica; (5) Cultures of the Middle East; (6) Specified areas such as Asia, Southeastern U S. or Florida depending on current interest and staff. ANT 461. HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAi, THEORY (4) PR : LIN 301, ANT 311-321-331 or CI. Survey and analysis of the development of theory and m ethod. ANT 471. METHODS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3-6) PR : CI. Study and application of a selected field or laboratory method in anthropology. Prerequisites will depend on area of study and will be determined by consultation with instructor in advance of registration. May be repeated as topics vary: (I) Archaeological Field Methods ; (2) Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology; (3) Laboratory Methods in Archaeology; (4) Laboratory Methods in Physical Anthropology; (5) Others as s pecified. ANT 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (3-6) PR: CI. Individual guidance in a selected research project. ANT 485. DIRECTED READING (1-6) PR: CI. Individual guidance in concentrated reading on a selected topic in anthropology. ANT 491. SENIOR SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR: Senior sta nding with major in anthropology, or equiva lent. A seminar approach to the integration of the fields of anthropology. Designed to help the student refocus on and come to a better understanding of the nature of anthropology. FOR SENIORS ANO GRADUATE STUDENTS ANT 571. SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3-6) PR: Cl. Topics to be chosen by students and instructor. ANT 581. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (3-6) PR: CI. Individual guidance in a selected research project. ANT 585. DIRECTED READING (1-6) PR : CI. Individual guidance in concentrated reading on a se l e cted topic in anthropology. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY ANT 601. SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGICAL LINGUISTICS (3) PR: Graduate standing. One of four core courses required of all students A critical survey of anthropological lil)guistics emphasizing contributions to applied anthropology. Open to non -majo rs ANT 611. SEMINAR IN PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3) PR : Graduate standing. One of four core courses required of all students. A critical survey of physical anthropology emphasizing contributions to applied anthropology. Open to non-majors ANT 621. SEMINAR IN ARCHAEOLOGY (3) PR : Graduate standing. One of four core courses required of all stude nt s. A critical s urvey of archaeology emphasizing contributions to applied anthropology. 01'en to non-majors. ANT631. SEMINARINCULTURALANTHROPOLOGY (3) PR: Graduate standing. One of four core courses required Qf

PAGE 45

140 ART all students. A critical survey of cultural anthropology emphasizing contributions to applied anthropology. Open to non-majors. ANT634. ANTHROPOLOGYTODAY (4) PR: CJ. A graduate level s urvey of contemporary anthropology primarily intended for graduate students in Soci a l Science Education. ANT 641. METHODS IN MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR : Three of the core course s, or CJ. Field techniques, methods of collection analysis, and interpretation of data. May be repeated up to 8 credit hours as topics vary. Open to non-majors Lee-lab, field trip s. ANT 644. METHODS IN URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR : Three of the core courses, or CJ. Field technique s, methods of collection, analysi s and interpretation of data. May be repeated up to 8 credit hour s as topics vary. Open to non-majors Lec-la b, field trips. ANT 647. METHODS IN PUBLIC ARCHAEOLOGY (4) PR : Three of the core courses, or Cl. Field techniques, methods of collection, analysis, and interpretation of data May be repeated up to 8 credit hours as topics vary. Open to non-majors Lee-lab, field trips. ANT 651. SELECTED TOPICS IN MEDICAL ANTHROPoLOGY (4) PR: Three of the core courses, or CJ. Current topical is s ue s in medical anthropology. May be repeated up to 8 credit hours as topics vary Open to non-majors ANT 654. SELECTED TOPICS IN URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR : Three of the core course s or Cl. Current topical iss ue s in urb a n a nthropology May be repe a ted up to 8 credit hours as topics v a ry. Open to non-major s. ANT 657. SELECTED TOPICS IN PUBLIC ARCHAEOLOGY (4) PR: Three of the core courses, or CJ. Current topical issues in public a rchaeology. M a y be repeated up to 8 credit hours as topics vary Open to non-major s ANT 661. REGIONAL PROBLEMS IN MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR: Three of the core courses, or CJ. Contemporary problems in medic a l a nthropology in the c ontext of a s pecific region. M ay be repeated up to 8 credit hours as topics vary Open to non majors ANT 664. REGIONAL PROBLEMS IN URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY (4) PR : Three of the core courses, or Cl. Contemporary problems in urban a nthropology in the context of a specific region. May be repe a ted up to 8 credit hour s as topics vary. Open to non major s. ANT 667. REGIONAL PROBLEMS IN PUBLIC ARCHAEOLOGY (4) PR : Three of the core cour s es, or CJ. Contemporary problems in a rch a eology in the context of a s pecific region. May be repeated up to 8 credit hours as topics vary. Open to non m a jor s. ANT 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH (credit varies) PR: GR M as ter's level. Repe a table. (S/U only.) ANT 699. THESIS: MASTER'S (credit varies) Repe a t a ble (S/U only.) ART (ART) Chairperson : G Pappas ; Professors : 0. W Bailey, H. W. Covington, E L. Cox, C. J. Fager, J. M. Kronsnoble, G. Pappa s D J. Saff; Associate Professors: A. B Eaker R. W Gelinas W M Hindle, C W Houk, C P Lyman, B. L. Mar s h, B J Nickels, M L. Larsen ; Assistant Professors : L. S Dietrich,'M A Miller, S H Pevnick, T F. Wujcik ; Instructor : J. Hayakawa. LOWER LEVEL COURSES ART 201. VISUAL CONCEPTS I (4) Studio problems s upplemented by reading and discu ssi on. Con s ideration of spatial organiz a tion of the two-dimensional s urface ART 202. VISUAL CONCEPTS II (4) Studio programs supplemented by reading and discussion. Consideration of three-dimensional organization of space and mass UPPER LEVEL COURSES ART 301. BASIC SEMINAR (2) Philosophical dimension s of a rt. Dis cus s ion of purpo s es of a rt and the relationship of art to life. ART 304. DRAWING I (4) PR : ART 201 and ART 301. Drawing as a means of formal organization Introduction to intermediate drawing method s media. ART 310. INTRODUCTION TO ART (3) An introductory course for the s tudent who does not intend to major in art. (S/U only .) ART 311. PAINTING I (4) PR: ART 201, 301, 304. Intermediate problems in painting with an emphasis on the exploration of methods and media and the development of individual concepts. ART 321. SCULPTURE I (4) PR : ART 202 and ART 301. Intermediate problem s in sculpture with emphasi s on the explor a tion of materi als a nd media and the development of individual c oncepts ART 331. CERAMICS I (4) PR : ART 202 and ART 301. Intermediate problems in ceramics with a n empha sis on the exploration of methods and media and the development of individu a l concepts ART 340. GRAPHICS I (4) PR: ART 201, 301, 304. Introduction to the graphics media: Int a glio, Lithography, Silk s creen. ART 361. PHOTOGRAPHY I (4) PR: ART 201 and ART 301. Intermediate problems in photography with empha sis on the exploration of materials a nd media and the development of individual concepts. ART 365. CINEMATOGRAPHY I (4) PR: ART 201 and ART 301. Intetmediate problems in cinematography with emphasis on the exploration of materials and medi a and development of individual concepts. ART 391. TECHNIQUES SEMINAR: SELECTED TOPICS (2) PR : ART 201, ART 202, ART 301 and CJ. Concentration in s p ec ialized technical data and proce ss. May be repeated for credit for different topics only. ART 401. DRAWING U (4) PR : ART 304. Continued problem s in drawing. May be repeated. ART 411. PAINTING II PR: ART 311. Continued repe a ted ART 421. SCULPTURE II PR : ART 321. Continued repe a ted ART 431. CERAMICS II PR: ART 331. Continued repeated problems in problems in problems in (4) painting. May be (4) sculpture May be (4) ceramics. May be ART 441. LITHOGRAPHY II (4) PR: ART 340 Continued problems in lithography. May be repeated.

PAGE 46

ART 442. INTAGLIO II (4) PR: ART 340. Continued problems in intaglio. May be repeated. ART 443. SILKSCREEN II (4) PR : ART 340. Continued problems in silkscreen May be repeated. ART 453. ART SENIOR SEMINAR (3) PR: Senior Status. To aid major s to understand, appraise and perfect their own art and technique through critical and aesthetic judgments of their colleagues. Discussion and critical evaluation ART 461. PHOTOGRAPHY II (4) PR: ART 361. Continued problems in photography. May be repeated. ART 464. INTRODUCTION TO THE PERSONAL FILM (4) PR : ART 365. Comparison of philosophical and technical distinctions between the personal film and theatrical or commercial release. ART465. CINEMATOGRAPHYII (4) PR: ART 365. Continued problems in cinematography. May be repeated. ART 467. SOUND TECHNIQUES (4) PR : ART 365. The recording and editing of sound for film Collaboration with other departments, particularly Music and Theatre, is encouraged. To be taken concurrently with ART 465 or ART 565 whenever possible. ART 470. PREHISTORIC AND ANCIENT ART (4) A comprehensive study of Paleolithic, Neolithic, Egyptian, Assyrian and Mesopotamian painting, sculpture and architec ture. ART 471. GREEK AND ROMAN ART (4) A comprehensive study of Aegean, Mycenaean, Etruscan, Greek and Roman painting, sculpture and architecture ART 472. MEDIEVAL ART (4) A comprehensive study of early Christian, Byzantine and Medieval painting sculpture, architecture and manuscript illumination. ART 473. R,ENAISSANCE ART (4) A comprehensive study of Renaissance and Mannerist painting, sculpture and architecture in Italy and Northern Europe. ART 474. BAROQUE AND ROCOCO ART (4) A comprehensive study of the painting, sculpture and architecture in France, Italy, Spain and the Netherlands in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. ART 475. NINETEENTH CENTURY ART (4) A comprehensive study of nineteenth century painting, sculpture and architecture in France and England. ART 476. TWENTIETH CENTURY ART (4) A comprehensive study of painting sculpture and architecture from Cezanne to the present in Europe and the United States. Required of all art majors ART 477. ORIENTAL ART (4) An introduction to concepts of the arts of China, Japan and other Far Eastern countries ART 481. DIRECTED STUDY (1-6) PR : CC. Independent studies in the various areas of Visual Arts. Course of study and credits must be assigned prior to registration. May be repeated ART 482. VIDEO ARTS I (4) PR : ART 201 and ART 301 and CI. A course designed to acquaint the student with the use and maintenance of primary portable equip111ent and introduction to the design and realization of creative TV presentation as an art form. ART 483. VIDEO ARTS II (4) PR: ART 482. An elaboration of portable recording techniques for use iii individual art projects ART 141 ART 484. SEMINAR IN VIDEO ARTS (4) PR : ART 201 and ART 301. An examination of various aspects of transmission of visual images as they relate to the concerns of artists. ART 485. DIRECTED READING (1-6) PR : CI and CC. A course of reading and study in an area of special concern governed by student demand, instructor interest, and/or departmental requirements. Selection of study area and materials for the course must be agreed upon and appropriate credit must be assigned prior to registration. A contract with all necessary signatures is required for registration. May be repeated for credit for different study areas only. ART 491. IDEA SEMINAR (2) PR : ART 301. Readings, discussion. Subjects will change each quarter, determined by mutual student and faculty interests. May be repeated. ART 498. CRITICAL STUDIES IN ART HISTORY (4) PR: CI. Specialized intensive studies in art history. Specific subject matter varies. To be announced at each course offering. May be repeated for different topics only. (Formerly ART 570.) ART 499. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF ART HISTORY (4) PR : Four courses in Art History at the 400 level, CI. An examination of the origins of Art History as a discipline and the changing nature of Art History from Vasari to the present. (Formerly ART 573.) FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS Admission to all 500-/evel studio courses by Consent of Instructor. ART 501. DRAWING (4) PR : ART 401. Advanced problems in various drawing techniques. Emphasis on individual creative expression. May be repeated. ART 511. PAINTING (4) PR : ART 411. Advanced problems in the various painting techniques. Emphasis on individual creative expression. May be repeated. ART 521. SCULPTURE (4) PR: ART 421. Advanced problems in the various techniques of sculpture. Emphasis on individual creative expression. May be repeated. ART 531. CERAMICS (4) PR : ART 431. Advanced problems in the various ceramic techniques, including throw and glaze calculation. May be repeated. ART 541. LITHOGRAPHY (4) PR: ART 441. Advanced problems in various lithographic techn i ques. Emphasis on individual creative expression May be repeated ART 542. INTAGLIO (4) PR : ART 442. Investigations into more complex intaglio processes including photoengraving and color printing pro cedures. Emphasis on personal conceptual development in graphic media May be repeated. ART 543. SILKSCREEN (4) PR : ART 443. Advanced problems in the various silkscreen techniques. Emphasis on individual creative ex pression May be repeated. ART 561. PHOTOGRAPHY (4) PR : CI. Advanced work in photography and related media leading to development of personal/expressive statements May be repeated. ART 562. ADVANCED EDITING TECHNIQUES (4) PR : ART 465. Focus on advanced techniques and theory of editing for the film artist. May be repeated

PAGE 47

142 ASTRONOMY ART 563. ADVANCED FILM TECHNIQUES (4) PR : ART 465. Description and demonstration of specal film manipulation techniques for the artist. Optical printing, infrared film, computer filmmaking, polyvision, television manipulated film Students will create original experimental works. May be repeate d. ART 564. ANATOMY OF THE PERSONAL FILM (4) PR : ART 464 and ART 465. Analysis of all aspects of work produced by individual film artists May be repeated. ART 565. CINEMATOGRAPHY (4) PR: ART 465. Advanced studio work using black and white, color and sound as technical and aesthetic factors in visual, artistic productions. May be repeated. ART 566. ANATOMY OF THE COLLABORATIVE FILM (4) PR: ART 465. Analysis of aesthetic and other selected aspects of film produced through collaborative efforts. May be repeated. ART 567. SEMINAR IN THE PERSONAL FILM (4) PR: ART 464, ART 465 and ART 566. Discussion of techniques, approaches and motivations open to and pursued by established film artists. May be repeated. ART 568. SELECTED TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF FILM (4) PR: ART 569. In depth investigation of a selected period, development or school in thtj history of film as art. May be rep eated. 569. PURE CINEMA AS AUTONOMOUS VISUAL EXPRESSION (4) PR: ART 46I or Cl. Consideration of historical development in cinematography emphasizing uses of special technical and visual possibilities un i que to the aesthetics of the film art. May be rep e ated ART 581. RESEARCH (1-6) PR: CC. May be repeated ART 582. VIDEO ARTS lli (4) PR: ART 483. An experimental approach to video-image thinking and the uses of video for the artist, demonstrating advanced special video techniques. May be repeated. ART 591. TECHNIQUES SEMINAR: SELECTED TOPICS (2) PR : ART 201, ART 202, ART 301, the topic-tec hnique-related 300-400 level studio sequence, and Cl. Concentration in specialized technical data and process. May be repeated for credit for different topics only FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY ART 601. DRAWING (4) PR : Cl. May be repeated. ART 611. PAINTING (4) PR: Cl. May be repeated. ART 621. SCULPTURE (4) PR: Cl. May be repeated. ART 631. CERAMICS (4) PR: CI. May be repeated ART 641. LITHOGRAPHY (4) PR: Cl. May be repeated. ART 642. INTAGLIO (4) PR: CI. May be repeated. ART 643. SILKSCREEN (4) PR : Cl. May be repeated. ART 661. PHOTOGRAPHY (4) PR : CI. May be repeated. ART 665. CINEMATOGRAPHY (4) PR : CI. May be repeated. ART 670. ART HISTORY (4) PR: Cl. May be repeated. ART 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH (credit varies) PR: GR Master's level. Repeatable. (S/U onl y .) ART 682. GRADUATE SEMINAR (2) PR: CI Advanced course in the theoretical and conceptual foundations of the visual arts The specific s tructure and content to be determined by the instructor. Must be repeated for a minimum of four hours. ART 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN ART (1-6) PR : Graduate Standing and CI. A variable credit depending upon the scope and magnitude of the work agreed to by the student and the responsible member of the faculty. May be repeated. ART 684. GRADUATE SEMINAR: DOCUMENTATION (2) PR: Cl. An advanced seminar focused on the Problems of documenting in verbal form the developm e n t of a body of work in the visual arts ART 694. GRADUATE INSTR U CTION METHODS (1-5) Special course to be used p ;i marily for the training of graduate teaching assistants Variabl e c redit, repeatable. Limited to a cumul a tive total of 5 credits per student (S/U only ) ART 699. THESIS: MASTER'S (credit varies) Repeatable. (S/U only.) ASTRONOMY (AST) (See also the sections entitled Physical Sciences and Natural Science s ) Chairperson: H K Eichhorn-von Wurmb ; Professors: H K Eichhorn-von Wurmb, J H. Hunter Jr. S Sofia, R. E. Wilson; Associate Professors: E. J. Devinney Jr. C. A. Williams; Assistant Professor (Visiting) : H Smith Jr. ; Instructor: F. W. Fallon; Planetarium Dire ctor: J. A. Carr. LOWER LEVEL COURSES AST 203. DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY I (5) History of astronomy, celestial phenomena timekeeping, astronomical instruments, properties of light, contents and elementary dynamics of the solar system. Descriptive approach with 1 a minimum of mathematics. No credit for astronomy majors. AST 204. DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY II (5) Distances, fundamental properties and evolution of stars; the sun as a star, unusual stars (exploding stars, pulsating stars, etc ); the n'ature of the Galaxy and 0th er galaxies, cosmology. Descriptiv e approach with a minimum of mathematics No credit for astronomy majors. AST 271. ILLUSTRATIVE ASTRONOMY (4) Constellations .. use of small telescopes, etc. apparent motions of celestial objects, comets and meteors, seasons and weather Current events in the space ,program. Planetarium and open sky demonstrations. Lecture-laboratory. No credit for astronomy majors. UPPER LEVEL COURSES AST 301. INTRODUCTORY ASTRONOMY I (4) CR: MTH 2I2 or MTH 302 or CI, AST 311. Aspects of sky, coordinate systems, timekeeping, elementary mechanics of planetary motion, n at ure a nd properties of light, eclipses, instrumentation. A quantitative first cours e for science and math majors. AST 302. INTRODUCTORY ASTRONOMY II (4) CR : MTH 212 or MTH 302. Determination of star positions, distance and motions; solar systems qualitative spectrosco py and spectral classification of stars ; binary stars and clusters, variable stars, photometry, telescopes and instrumentation.

PAGE 48

AST 303. INTRODUCTORY ASTRONOMY III (4) CR: MTH 302 or MTH 212 or Cl. Introduc tion to basic astrophysics and stellar structure and evolution; interstellar medium, nebulae and pulsars; nature and dynamics of the Milky Way and other galaxies, quasars and cosmology. A quantitative introduction to s tellar and galactic astronomy for science and math majors. AST 311. ASTRONOMICAL LABORATORY I (1) CR: AST 301, required of m ajors open to nonmajors. Exercises in connection with AST 301. Use of s mall telescopes, introduction to the use of small calculators. AST 312. ASTRONOMICAL LABORATORY U (2) Required of majors. Introduction to astronomical instruments and observing practice, and actual observations at the telescope. Use of a uxiliary instruments and reduction of observations. AST 313. NAVIGATION (3) PR: Some knowledge of geometry, algebra and t rigonometry. Timekeeping, use of sextant, constellations, navigation with minimum equipment, some s pherical astronomy. AST 351. HISTORY OF THE SCIENCE OF ASTRONOMY (5) T o familiarize seriously interested students with the histo ry of Astronomy and the influence of this discipline o n the development of human knowledge AST 371. CONTEMPORARY THINKING IN ASTRONOMY (5) PR: Junior or senior s tanding or CI. Current 'concepts of astronomy and space science of general interest; background facts; artificial satellites, space probes; surface conditions of planets and evolution of the stars; cosmology. No credit for astronomy majors or mathemati cs majors. AST 413. GEOMETRY AND KINEMATICS OF THE UNIVERSE (4) PR : CI. Astronomical coordinate system s and their mutua l relationships, time. AST 414 ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES IN ASTRONOMY (4) PR: Calculus and analytic geometry, AST 301, AST 302, AST 303. Newton' s and Kepler's laws two body problem, elementary perturbation theory, rigid body d y namics, tides, numerical analysis, pl anetary interiors and atmospheres, solar system cosmogony. AST 443. STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS (5) PR: AST 302 or CJ, MTH 303. The physical characteristics of stars, their measurement, and their di stribution. Analysis of stellar radiation. Double stars, associations, clusters, galaxies. AST 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-6) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and CI. Participation in professio nal research with a view to publication of results. May be repeated. (S/U only.) AST 491. ASTRONOMY SEMINAR (1) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing. May be repeated twice. (S/U only.) FOR SENIOR AND GRADUATE STUDENTS AST 521. INTRODUCTION TO CELESTIAL MECHANICS (S) PR: AST 302 or CI, M T H 302 a nd some knowledge of BIOLOGY 143 differentia l equations, or CI. The two-body problem, artificial satellites, elements of perturba tion theory. AST 522. BINARY STARS (4) PR: AST 302 or CI, MTH 302 or CI. Principles u se d to find the properties of astrometric, eclipsing, spectroscopic and visual binarie s AST 533. STELLAR CONSTJTUTION AND EVOLUTION (4) PR: AST 443 or Cl, PHY 405. CR: MTH 405 Internal constitution of stars, phy' sics of gas spheres, energy g e ner atio n in stars, theories of stellar evolution AST 536. INTRODUCTION TO RADIO ASTRONOMY (4) PR : AST 302 or CJ, MTH 303. Radio tele sc opes: principles and applications. M a in result s in pl anetary, solar, g a lactic and extra-galactic radio astronomy. R a dio galaxies a nd quasars. AST 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN ASTRONOMY (1) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing or CI. Intensive cover age of special topic s to s uit needs of advanced students. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY AST 611. POSITIONAL ASTRONOMY (6) PR: AST 413 or CI. The accurate determination of relative and absolute star position s a nd related problems. AST 621. CELESTIAL MECHANICS (6) PR: AST 521 or CI. Planetary theory, lunar theory, H a miltonian systems, canonical variables, restricted three body problem, artificial satellite theory, equilibrium and resonance. Certain topics will be emphasized according to the needs of the students. AST 631. STELLAR ATMOSPHERES (4) PR: AST 443 and MTH 406 or Cl. B asic observational data. Thermodynamics of the gaseous s tate. Elements or spectroscopy. The transfer equation (continuum and line s). The problem of calculation of atmospheres. AST 661. PHOTOMETRY (4) PR : AST 302 or CI. MTH 305 Theoretical, observational and in s trumental concepts required in astronomical photometry. AST 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH (credit varies) PR : GR. Master's level. Repea table. (S/U only.) AST 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN ASTRONOMY (1) PR: CI. AST 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (2) PR : Cl. May be repeated. (S/U only). AST 694. GRADUATE INSTRUCTION METHODS (l-5) Special course to be u sed primarily for the training of graduate tea c hing assistants. Variable credit, repeatable. Limited to a cumulative total of 5 c redits per student. (S/U only ) AST 695. GRADUATE RESEARCH METHODS (1-5) Special course to be u se d primarily fo'r the trai ning of graduate research assistants. V aria ble credit, repeatable. Limited t o a cumulative total of 5 credits per student. (S/U only ) AST 699. THESIS: MASTER'S (credit varies) Repea table. (S/U only.) BIOLOGY (BIO, BOT, MIC, ZOO) C::hairperson: S. L. Swihart; Profes sors : M. R. Alvarez, J C Brigg s, C. J. Dawes, F. E. Friedl, J M. Lawrence, R W. Long, N M McClung, A. J. Meyerrie c ks, G E. Nelson Jr., J D Ray Jr., C D. Riggs, W S Silver S. L. Swihart, G. E Woolfenden; Associate Professors : J V Betz, L. N. Brown, B. C. Cowell, F. I. Eilers, G W. Hinsch C. E. King, J. R Linton, R L. M a n sell, R W. McDiarmid, D. T. W. Merner, G. G Robinson J. L. Simon; Assistant Professors : G R Babbel F. Essig, S N. Grove, D A. Hessi nger K D. Stuart, H C Tipton, B. Willi a mson ; Lecturers: C. H endry, A A Latina, T. B. Mi c haelide s; Affiliate Faculty: J. S. Binford D F. Martin ; Co urte sy Faculty: D S. Correll, E. C. Hartwig J. N. Layne, L. D Miller, R Schreiber, S. White.

PAGE 49

144 BIOLOGY Biology (BIO) LOWER LEVEL COURSES BIO 201. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I (4) A brief overview of living organisms, respiration, photosyn thesis, cell structure, and specialization. Lec.-Lab Qtr. I, II. BIO 202. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY II (4) Cell division, genetics, reproduction and development, physi ology, Lec .Lab Qtr. II, III BIO 203. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY III (4) Neurophysiology, behavior patterns, genetics, and evolution ; ecology Lee Disc. Qtr. I, III. BIO 205. FOODS AND DRUGS (4) The application of basic biological principles to relevant problems and topics in nutrition and drugs through the consideration of scientific and popular literature. For non majors BIO 206. GENES AND PEOPLE (4) The application of basic biological principles of human heredity to relevant problems and topics through the consideration of scientific and popular literature. For non majors. BIO 207. ENVIRONMENT (4) The application of basic principles of ecology to relevant problems and topics relating to man's environmental interac tions through consideration of scientific and popular liter ature. For non-majors BIO 255. SEX, REPRODUCTION AND POPULATION (4) The application of basic biological principles from subject areas to relevant problems and topics through the considera tion of scientific and popular literature. For non-majors. Qtr. I-IV BIO 256'. EVOLUTION (4) The application of basic principles of evolution with an emphasis upon man through the consideration of scientific and popular literature For non-majors. BIO 271. TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (4) Lectures, individual reading, movies, classroom discussion and evaluation of selected biological topics reflecting biological principles. For non-majors. UPPER LEVEL COURSES BIO 315. HISTOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES (5) PR : BIO 201-203. Theory and practice of tissue fixation, imbedding, sectioning, and staining; chromosomal squash preparations; nuclear isolation techniques; photomicrography. Lec.-Lab BIO 331. GENERAL GENETICS (4) PR : BIO 201-203. Introduction to genetics including the fundamental concepts of Mendelian, molecular and population genetics. Lee Qtr I, II, III BIO 345. MAN'S BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT (4) PR : BIO 201-203. A biological consideration of man's deteriorating relationship with his environment. Emphasis on pollution, pesticides and population BIO 372. MAN, MICROBE AND MOLECULE (4) Origin of life, control of diseases, environmental quality and the use of microorganisms as tools in searching for molecular explanations of living phenomena. For non-majors. BIO 401. CELL BIOLOGY I (5) PR: CHM 333, 334, and BIO 331. A discussion of the concept and significance of the cell to biology; biological molecules and metabolic processes within the cell; cellular energy conversion systems; and control of cellular metabolism Qtr. I, II. BIO 402. CELL BIOLOGY II (5) PR : BIO 401. A continuation of Cell Biology I. The structure and function of cells and their organelles; irritability and contraction; cell differentiation, growth, and integration of cellular activity. Qtr. II, Ill. BIO 412. INTRODUCTION TO TROPICAL BIOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 201-203 or Cl. The tropical environment and its effect on plant and animal communities. Plant and animal interac tions and n:ian's impact on the environment. BIO 431. EXPERIMENTAL GENETICS (4) PR : BIO 331 or Cl. Experimental analysis of genetic systems. Lee-Lab .: 2 hr. lee. ; 2-3 hr l a bs BIO 445. PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 201-203. An introduction to the basic principles and concepts of ecology at the ecosystem, community, and population level of organization Lec.-Disc. BIO 465. ORGANIC EVOLUTION (4) PR: BIO 331 or Cl. An introduction to modern evolutionary theory. Lecture on population genetics, adaptations, s peci ation theory, phylogeny, human evolution and related areas BIO 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-6) PR : Cl. Individual investigation with faculty supervision. (S/U only). BIO 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (1-4) PR : CI. BIO 485. RESEARCH METHODS IN BIOLOGY I (2) PR: CI. A laboratory course for adva nced students to become acquainted with contemporary biological research, instrumen tation and techniques. BIO 486. RESEARCH METHODS IN BIOLOGY II (2) PR: Cl. See BIO 485. BIO 491. SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY (1) PR: Cl. Senior or advanced junior standing. May be repeated once. (S/U only). FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS (BIO) BIO 510. CYTOLOGY (4) PR : BIO 201-203. Survey of the structure and function of cytoplasmic and nuclear components of plant and animal cells. Lee-Lab. BIO 515. SUBCELLULAR CYTOLOGY (4) PR : BIO 201-203. A review of biophysical techniques used in biology to include an introduction of X-ray diffraction bright field, phase, ultra-violet, interference, and electron micro scopy. The course will consist of three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab for demonstration of techniques. Lec.-Lab. BIO 522. NEUROPHYSIOLOGY (4) PR: ZOO 423. A comparative analysis of the physiochemical basis and evolution of nervous systems and sensory mecha nisms. Lec.-Lab. BIO 532. MOLECULAR GENETICS (4) PR : BIO 331. Detailed examination of DNA, RNA and protein synthesis; the effects of mutations on proteins, cellular control; selected aspects of viral, bacterial, and fungal genetics Lec.-Lab. Qtr. II. BIO 535. EVOLUTIONARY GENETICS (4) PR : BIO 331 or Cl. Examination of factors such as mutation, migration, natural selection, and genetic drift which modify the genetic structure of populations. BIO 558. PRINCIPLES OF IMMUNOLOGY (4) PR : BIO 401 or Cl. Course will emphasize the biological principles involved in the vertebrate immune response. It will present the homeostatic, defense, and detrimental aspects of the immune system in terrt1s of ba sic cellular and molecular mechanisms. Techniques will be described to familiarize the student with the types of immunological tools available to the cellular and molecular biologist. BIO 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (1-4) PR: Cl. Each topic is a course in directed study under supervision of a faculty member

PAGE 50

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY BIO 601. HISTORY OF BIOLOGY (3) PR: Cl. The historical development of biology with emphasis on the origin of important theories and principles. BIO 612. CHROMOSOME STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY (4) PR : BIO 510. Introduction to the molecular organization of the Eukaryotic chromosome. BIO 615. ULTRASTRUCTURE TECHNIQUES IN ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (6) PR: BIO 201-203, BIO 515 or Cl. Discussion of theory and techniques in electron micro s copy. Emphasis on preparation of biological specimens, electron microscopic optics and use of the electron microscope Lec.Lab. BIO 616. BIOMETRY (4) PR: MTH 211-213 or Cl. An introduction to statistical procedures for research in the biological sciences Experimen tal design, analysis of data and presentation of results are emphasized. BIO 636. POPULATION BIOLOGY (4) PR : BIO 535 and BIO 616 or Cl. Introduction to the theory of population dynamics with emphasis on the genetic and ecological components of population growth, natural selec tion and competition between species. Lee. BIO 641. TROPICAL ECOLOGY (4) PR : BIO 445. Graduate Standing or Cl. A discussion of a series of related ecological topic s to illustrate the features peculiar to the tropics. BIO 651. MARINE PLANKTON SYSTEMATICS (4) (Also listed as MSC 651, q.v.). BIO 653. MARINE PLANKTON ECOLOGY (4) (Also listed as MSC 653, q v. ). BIO 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH. (credit varies) PR : GR. Master's level. Repeatable. (S/U only.) BIO 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (1-6) PR : Cl. BIO 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY PR : Cl. (S/U only.) (l) BIO 694. GRADUATE INSTRUCTION METHODS (1-5) Special corse to be used primarily for the training of graduate teaching assistants. Variable credit, repeatable. Limited to a cumulative total of 5 credits per student. (S/U only ) BIO 695. GRADUATE RESEARCH METHODS (1-5) Special course to be used primarily for the training of graduate research assistants Variable credit, repeatable. Limited to a cumulative total of 5 credits per student. (S/U only.) BIO 781. DIRECTED RESEARCH (credit varies) PR : GR. Ph.D. level. Repeatable. (S/U only.) BIO 799. DISSERTATION: DOCTORAL (credit varies) PR: Must be admitted to Doctoral Candidacy. Repeatable (S/U only ) Biology-Botany (BOT) UPPER LEVEL COURSES BOT 300. INTRODUCTION TO BOTANY (5) PR : BIO 201-203 or equivalent. Knowledge of basic biological principles will be assumed. A presentation of the fundamen tals of plant life; structure and function of flowering plants; history of agriculture, plants and man ; plant distribution and ecology ; survey of major plant groups, algae, fungi, bryophytes, ferns, gymnosperms, and flowering plants. BOT 311. SYSTEMATIC BOTANY (5) PR : BOT 300. Identification and classification of the more interesting vascular plants of Florida; angiosperm evolution; principles of taxonomy Conducted largely in the field BOT 313. HORTICULTURAL BOTANY (3) PR : Course in botany, biology or Cl. Application of principles BIOLOGY 145 of botany to give an under s tanding of basic horticultural operations; seed sowing, dormancy growth requirements, vegetative propagation, pruning, and related problems. Lee. Lab. BOT 314. FIELD BOT ANY (3) PR : BIO 201-203 or Cl. Identification and classification of native and naturalized flowering plants of Florida including historical, climatic and floristic aspects of plant communities. Conducted largely in the field. Lec.-Lab BOT 371. PLANTS AND MAN (4) PR : Junior or Senior Standing or Cl. The relation of plants to human history and contemporary life Botanical and economic aspects of plants used as sources of foods, drugs, and other products of importance in everyday life. Origin s of cultivated plants For non-majors. BOT 417. MYCOLOGY (5) PR : BOT 300 or Cl. A survey of the fungi with emphasis on their taxonomy, morphology, physiology and economic importance. Lec.-Lab. BOT 419. PLANT ANATOMY (5) PR : BOT 300. Comparative studies of tissue and organ systems of fossil and present-day vascular plants Functional and phylogenetic aspects stressed. Lec.-Lab. BOT 421. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (5) PR : BIO 401; CR : BIO 402. Fundamental activities of plants; absorption, translocation transpiration metabolism, growth, and related phenomena. Lec -Lab BOT 491. SEMINAR IN BOTANY (I) PR: Senior or advanced junior standing and Cl. May be repeated once. (S/U only ) FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS BOT 511. TAXONOMY OF FLOWERING PLANTS (4) PR: BOT 311 or Cl. A phylogenetic study of Angiosperms; relationship of the principal orders and families, problems of nomenclature, identification of specimens, compari s ons of recent systems of classification, dissection of representative flower types. Field trips and lab work Lec -Lab BOT 517. PHYSIOLOGY OF THE FUNGI (5) PR : BOT 417 or Cl. The biochemical, phy s iological and hormonal basis involved in morphogenesis and cellular control in fungi Lec.-Lab. BOT 521. PHYSIOLOGY OF PLANT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (3) PR : BOT 421, BIO 201-203 and Cl. A study of plant development with emphasis of the role of light and growth hormones on the process of flowering, fruit set, ripening, and senescence. BOT 543*. PHYCOLOGY (5) PR : BOT 300 or Cl. A detailed survey of the algae emphasizing both iaxonomy and morphology of fresh and marine water forms; field and laboratory investigations, including individual projects Lec -Lab. BOT 546*. PLANT ECOLOGY (4) PR: BOT 300, BIO 445, or Cl. Distribution a nd n a ture of vegetation in relation to climatic, physiographic, edaphic, and biotic factors ; field investigation s of s ubtropical Florida plant communities. Lec.-Lab BOT 547 MARINE BOT ANY (5) PR : BOT 300, BIO 445, or Cl. A field course in marine plants with emphasis on ecology and functional morphology. Field work will stress the ecological a spects of plants in a subtropical marine environment in Florida Lec.-Lab. BOT 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN BOTANY (l-4) PR: Cl. Each topic is a course in direct study under supervision of a faculty member. Students will be required to pay travel expenses for field trips.

PAGE 51

146 BIOLOGY FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY BOT 611. BIOSYSTEMATICS (4) PR : BOT 311 or equivalent. Application of cytology, ecology, g e n etics, biochemistr y, and morphologic a l a naly s e s to the s tud y of evolution and clas s ification of s pecies of higher pla nt s Lee BOT 612. BIOLOGY OF TROPICAL PLANTS (3) PR: BIO 412 Special topics in the s ystematics rporphology phy s iology, genetics, and ecology of tropical pla nts with c on side r a tion of habitat diversity that leads to rich floras Lee. BOT 613 LABORATORY IN TROPICAL PLANTS (2) PR : Mu s t be taken concurrently with BOT 612 Extended field trip to s ome a rea of the New World Tropics to examine major t y pe s of v eget a tion and g a in familiarity with field technique s ; re s e a rch problem development. Lab BOT 621. PLANT METABOLISM LECTURE (3) PR : BOT 421, CHM 336 or Cl. A s tudy of plant metaboli s m with e mpha s i s on the biosynthetic p a thways and their r e gul a ti o n BOT 622. PLANT METABOLISM LABO RA TORY (4) PR : BOT 421, CHM 336, or Cl. An intensive exposure to t he m e thod s u s ed in experimenting with plant material. BOT 650 MARINE ALGAL ECOLOGY (3) (Als o lis ted as MSC 650, q. v. ). (Formerly BIO 650) BOT 699. THESIS: MASTER'S (credit varies) R e pe a t a bl e (S/U only.) Biology-Microbiology (MIC) UPPER LEVEL COURSES MIC 351. INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY (4) PR : BIO 201-203; one quarter of organic chemistry and a co ur se in g e netic s i s recommended. Introduction to the biolog y o f microorgani sms; structure physiology and ecology o f b ac t e r ia alga e v iruse s rickett s iae, and protozoa; bas ic lab meth o d s in mic robiology. Lec .-La b Qtr. I II, III and IV. MIC 352 GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY (2) PR : BIO 201-203, CHM 211-213 BIO 331 recommended. At l eas t o ne qu arter of, or concurrent enrollment in Organic Ch emis tr y i s s trongl y recommended An introduction to the l a b o r a t o r y pr a ctice of microbiology : preparation of culture m edia, s t a ining, pure cultur e methodology, isolation of m ic r o b es from n a ture enumerat i on technique s resistance to inf ec tiou s dis e as e MIC 401. LABO RA TORY METHODS IN DIAGNOSTIC MICROBIOLOGY (3) PR : MIC 351 or Cl. Laboratory procedures necessary to identif y p a thogenic and commonly encountered bacteria, fungi, a nd o th e r para s ite s will be individually performed Th ese procedure s will include determinations of morphology, phy s iologic a l re ac tions a nd immunologic a l re s ponses as a ppropri a t e MIC 4 02 LABO RA TORY IN EXPERIMENT AL MICROBIOLOGY (3) PR : MIC 351, CI MIC 456 concurrentl y. Course will consist o f individuall y performed exercises to teach major techniques in qu a ntit a tiv e, experiment a l microb i ology with emphasis on bio c hemical a nd phy s iological examination of bacteria and v iru s e s th e ir c hemic a l composition enzymatic, molecular and phy s ic a l propertie s. MIC 451. APPLIED BACTERIOLOGY (5) PR : MIC 351. A s tud y of the applic a tions of microbiology to indu s tr y, a griculture medicine, a nd sanitary engineering. Le c L a b MIC 453. DETERMINATIVE BACTERIOLOGY (4) PR: MIC 351 or equiv a lent ; CHM 331-336 or equivalent *Stude nts will b e r e quir e d to pa y travel ex penses for fi e ld trips Survey of bacterial cla s sification ; detailed examin a tions of bacteria important to man in agriculture, in indu s try a nd a s pathogens Lec.-Lab. Qtr. II. (Formerly MIC 553. ) MIC 456. MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY (3) PR : MIC 351 or equivalen t, CHM 331-334 or Cl. A s tudy of physiological and metabolic phenomena pertinent to the growth development, regulation, inhibition and death of microorgani s m s and to the chemical alteration s they c a talyze Laboratory emphasis will be on quantit a tive method s for the study of microbic activity. Lec Lab. (Formerly MIC 556 ) MIC 457. VIROLOGY (4) PR : MIC 351 or equivalent a nd Cl. The biology of viruse s asso c iated with plant s animal s and bacteri a will be c on sidered ; the nature of viru s e s me c hani s m s o f v ir a l pathogenesis and interaction s with ho s t cell s. Lec. -L a b (Formerly MIC 557) MIC 491. SEMINAR IN MICROBIOLOGY (1) PR : Senior or advanced junior s tanding a nd Cl. M a y be repeated. (S/U only). FOR SENIOR AND GRADUATE STUDENTS MIC 518. MEDICAL MYCOLOGY (3) PR : MIC 351 or Cl. A survey of the yeast s mold s and actinomycetes mo s t likely to be encountered by the b ac teriologists, with special emphas is on the forms pathogenic for man MIC 552. ADVANCED BACTERIOLOGY (4) PR: MIC 351. Ultrastructure, growth metaboli s m, geneti cs a nd ecology of the bacteria and related proca ryotes MIC 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY (1-4) PR : Cl. Each topic is a c ourse in directed s tudy unde r supervision of a faculty member FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY MIC 654. BACTERIAL GENETICS (3) PR: BIO 331, MIC 351, MIC 456 or Cl. A s urvey of the recombin a tional systems found among the b acteria and bacterial viruses with emphas is on the molecular mechani s ms of gene tr a nsfer, replication and expres s ion and on the significance of the s e systems for our under s tanding of c ellul a r function s. Lee. MIC655. ADVANCEDIMMUNOLOGY (5) PR : MIC 351 or equivalent, CHM 331-336 or equi va lent. Discussion of the basic immune re a ction n a ture o f a nti genicity ; basic immunological techniques a nd th e ir u s e in biologic a l re s earch and the medical sc ience s MIC 699. THESIS: MASTER'S (credit varies) Repeatable (S/U only.) Biology-Zoology (ZOO) UPPER LEVEL COURSES ZOO 311. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY (6) PR : BIO 201-203 Anatomy of s el ected v ertebrate type s emphas izing evolutionary trends. Lec .Lab. ZOO 313. INTRODUCTORY INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (5) PR : BIO 201-203 An introduction to the major invertebrate groups, with emph a sis on local forms Field work will be required. Lec. Lab. ZOO 371. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY (4) Lectures and di s cussions on the mech a ni s ms of function of the human body For non majors credit only ZOO 411. HISTOLOGY (4) PR: ZOO 311 and/or ZOO 422 Comparati v e a pproa c h to the study of tis s ue s and the rel a tion of their s tructure and function Lec.-Lab. ZOO 415. INTRODUCTION TO ENTOMOLOGY (4) PR : BIO 201-203 An introdu c tion to gen e r a l aspects of insect

PAGE 52

morphology, development a nd cl ass ification The identi fication of local form s will be e mpha s iz e d Lee-L a b Qtr. III IV. ZOO 416. VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (5) PR : BIO 201-203. Natura l his tor y, m o rphology phylogeny and taxonomy of vertebrate s. L e c. Lab. ZOO 422. DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (5) PR : BIO 401-402. Structural and functional event s involved in differentiation and morphogenesis Lec. -Lab Qtr. I III ZOO 423. ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 201-203 and CHM 333. Adv a nced presentation of mechan ism s employ e d by a nimal s to interact with their environment, and to maintain their org a nization ZOO 460. WILDLIFE AND FISH MANAGEMENT (3) PR : BIO 201-203 BIO 445. An introduction to the principles of wildlife and fis h eries m a nagem e nt. Cert a in methods and techniques utilized in the man a gements of exploited animal species will be introduced. Des igned prim a rily for students interested in the wildlife and fish management profession ZOO 461. ANIMAL SOCIAL BEHAVIOR (5) PR: Cl. An introduction to the phy s ical chemical, and empha sis on so cial behavior a nd the evolutionary behavior. Lee-Lab ZOO 462. PRIMA TE SOCIAL BEHAVIOR PR : BIO 201, 202, 203. An introdu c tion behavior and beha v ioral e c ology b as ed research. (4) to primate social on field-oriented ZOO 491. SEMINAR IN ZOOLOGY (1) PR : Upper level. May be rep e ated once (S/U only ) FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ZOO 513. PARASITOLOGY (5) PR: BIO 201-203 Fundamentals o f animal para s itology and parasitism ; the biology of s e lec t e d a nim a l pa r asites including those of major importance to man Lec -Lab Qtr. II ZOO 514. AQUA TIC ENTOMOLOGY (4) PR: ZOO 415. Taxonomy dev e lopm e nt, and ecology of aquatic ins ects With empha s i s on lo cal form s Lee-Lab Qtr II (odd numbered years) ZOO 515. LIMNOLOGY (5) PR : Cl. An introduction to th e physical chemical and biological nature of fre s h.-water environment s Lec .Lab. Qtr III. ZOO 517. ORNITHOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 445, ZOO 311, and Cl. Th e biology of birds Field trips emphasize local avifauna. Lec.-Lab. Qtr. III. ZOO 518. MAMMALOGY (5) PR : BIO 201-203 and Cl. The biology of mammals, including systematics ecology natural history, and geographical distribution. Lee-Lab. ZOO 519. ICTHYOLOGY (5) PR : ZOO 311. Systematic s of fishes, including major classification, comparat i ve anatomy embryology, and general distribution. Lee-Lab (Also offered a s MSC 519.) ZOO 520. BIOLOGY OF ECHINODERMS (5) PR: ZOO 313, BI0 402. A study of the anatomy physiology, and ecology of echinoderms. Lee-Lab Qtr I (even numbered years). ZOO 521. COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY (5) PR : BIO 401-402 The evolution of physiological mechanisms Lec.-Lab. Qtr, I. ZOO 525. BIOLOGY OF THE AMPHIBIA (5) PR: ZOO 311; BIO 445, and Cl. Major aspects of amphibian biology emphasizing fossil history, evolutionary morphology, CHEMISTRY 147 se nsory physiology, life history, and reproductive behavior. Le e -Lab. Field Trips. Qtr III (even-numbered years). ZOO 526. BIOLOGY OF THE REPTILIA (5) PR: ZOO 311, BIO 445 and Cl. Major aspects of reptilian biology emphasizing fossil history, e volutionary morphology, s ensory phy s iology, life history and reproductive behavior. Lee-Lab Field Trip. Qtr. III (odd numbered years). ZOO 545. ZOOGEOGRAPHY (3) PR : BIO 445. Zoogeographic principles and general patterns of terrestrial a nd marine distributions. ZOO 556. TERRESTRIAL ANIMAL ECOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 445. Field and laboratory investigations of.the basic principle s of ecology as applied to terrestrial animals LecLab. ZOO 557. MARINE ANIMAL ECOLOGY (5) PR : BIO 445 and ZOO 313. Investigations of energy flow, biogeochemical cycles and community structure in marine environment s Lec.-Lab. ZOO 562. MECHANISMS OF ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (5) PR : BIO 201-203 CHM 331-333, and Cl. A comparative approach to communication and orientation in animals including homing behavior and biological clocks. Lee-Lab. ZOO 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN ZOOLOGY (1-4) PR : Cl. Each topic is a program in directed study under s upervi s ion of a faculty member. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY Z00611. EXPERIMENTALEMBRYOLOGY (4) PR: BIO 401-402, ZOO 422 and Cl. Lectures, laboratories, readings and discussions relating to contemporary advances in the a rea of biochemistry of development. Experimeptal techniques will be studied. ZOO 618. ADVANCEDMAMMALOGY (4) PR: ZOO 518. Important literature and development s in mammalogy Students will undertake individual research problem s Lec -Lab ZOO 620. INVERTEBRATE REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT (5) PR : ZOO 313 and Cl. An analysis of modes of reproduction and pattern s of larval development in major invertebrate phyla. Emphasis is on classical descriptive embryology, modern mariculture techniques, and larval ecology. Lec.-Lab ZOO 621. PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY (5) PR: CI. Effect of factors on animal function at the cellular and organ system level with emphasi s on control and mechanism. Lec.-Lab. ZOO 623. PHYSIOLOGY OF MARINE ANIMALS (5) PR : BIO 401-402. A study of the physiological mechanisms of animals in the marine environment Lec.-Lab ZOO 624. COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY (5) PR : ZOO 521 or Cl. An analysis of the similarities and differences between the hormonal mechanisms of mammals, other vertebrates and invertebrates. Lec -Lab. ZOO 625. COMPARATIVE METABOLISM (3) PR : BIO 401-402, CHM 331-334, or CHM 351, or their equivalents. Some knowledge of Animal Phylogeny will be assumed. A presentation of various metabolic pathways found in invertebrate animals including specializations related to parasitism and facultative anaerobiosis. ZOO 661. ADVANCED ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (4) PR : ZOO 461 and Cl. Recent advances in comparative animal behavior (ethology). Lec -Lab. ZOO 699. THESIS: MASTER'S (credit varies) Repeatable. (S/U only.) CHEMISTRY (CHM) (See also courses in the Physical Science s ection entitled PHS 209 211, and 213 ) Chairperson : T. C Owen; Professors : T. A. Ashford, J S. Binford, R S. Braman, J. C Davis, J. E Fernandez, D F.

PAGE 53

148 CHEMISTRY Martin, P. C. Maybury, E. D. Olsen, T. C. Owen, T. W. G. Solomons, B. Stevens, R. D. Whitaker; Associate Professors: D L. Akins, F. M. Dudley, G. R. Jurch, D. J. Raber, S W. Schneller, J. A Stanko, G. R Wenzinger, J. H. Worrell; Assistant Professors: M. D. Johnston, D. 0. Lambeth, W. E. Swartz, J. 0. Tsokos, J. E. Weinzierl; Visiting Assistant Professor: W. J Nixon; Adjunct Lecturer: L. Krane; Joint Faculty: W. H. Huang, R. Mansell, L. Monley; Courtesy Faculty: R Davis, J. H. Hsu, B. Martin LOWER LEVEL COURSES CHM 101. FOUNDATIONS OF UNIVERSITY CHEMISTRY (5) A survey of modern chemistry designed particularly for those with a poor preparation in algebra and/or chemistry as a preliminary to CHM 211. Lee. Qtr. I, 'III, IV. CHM 211. GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (3) CHM 211 students are expected to have performed well in the placement exam or to have satisfactorily completed CHM 101. Fundamentals of chemistry ; mass and energy rela tionships in chemical changes, equilibrium, chemical kinetics, atomic and molecular structure, descriptive chemistry of selected elements. Lee. and discussion. Qtr. I, II, III, IV. CHM 212. GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (3) PR : CHM 211 or equivalent. Continuation of General Chemistry Lee. and discussion. Qtr. I, II, III, IV. CHM 213. GENERAL CHEMISTRY III (3) PR: CHM 212 or equivalent Continuation of General Chemistry. Lee. and discussion : Qtr. I, II, III, IV. CHM 214. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (4) PR : CHM 212 or equivalent. Fundamental techniques used in environmental chemistry, including basic manipulations and equipment. Lec.-lab. CHM 215. ACCELERATED GENERAL CHEMISTRY I* (5) This course is designed for the beginning student who has a superior background in science and mathematics. The laboratory is project oriented. Entrance is by examination only. CHM 215-216 is equivalent to CHM 211-212-213 and 217218-219. Lee-lab and discussion Qtr. I. CHM 216. ACCELERATED GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (5) PR: CHM 215. Continuation of Accelerated General Chemistry. Lee-lab and discussion. Qtr. II. CHM 217. GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LAB (1) PR: CHM 211. Laboratory portion of General Chemistry I. Introduction to laboratory techniques; study of properties of elements and compounds; synthesis and analysis of natural and commercial materials. May not be taken concurrently with CHM 211. Qtr I II III, IV CHM 218. GENERAL CHEMISTRY LAB II (1) PR : CHM 212, 217. Laboratory portion of General Chemistry II. Continuation of chemistry laboratory May not be taken concurrently with CHM 212 Qtr I II, III, IV. CHM 219. GENERAL CHEMISTRY LAB III (l) PR: CHM 213, 218. Laboratory portion of General Chemistry III. Continuation of chemistry laboratory. May not be taken concurrently with CHM 213. Qtr. I, II, III, IV CHM 271. CURRENT ISSUES IN CHEMISTRY (4) A survey of the important current issues in which chemistry affects our lives ; e.g., environment, drugs, cancer, warfare, etc No credit for chemistry majors. CHM 291. JUNIOR SEMINAR (1) PR : CHM 213 or CHM 216. Interrelations of previous courses, Placement examination for admission to CHM 211 and CHM 215 offered the first day of registration each quarter, during the summer FOCUS program, and is available during weeks of scheduled cl_asses. Students should consult registration schedules or Chemistry office for time and place the chemical literature, and examination of the nature of the industrial, government, and academic chemistry. Lecture and discussion. (S/U only ) Qtr. I, III, IV UPPER LEVEL COURSES CHM 303. ELEMENTARY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 213 or equivalent. Fundamental organic chemistry principles. One-quarter course for non-chemi s try majors only. Lec.-lab. CHM 311. INTERMEDIATE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (5) PR: CHM 213-219 or CHM 216 Fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry. Lec.-lab Qtr. II, IV. CHM 321. ELEMENT ARY ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (5) PR: CHM 213-219 or CHM 216. Fundamentals .of gravimetric, volumetric, and spectrophotometric analysis Lec -lab. Qtr. I, II, III, IV. CHM. 331-332. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (3:2) PR : CHM 213-219 or CHM 216. Fundamental principles of organic chemistry and lab. Lecture and lab may not be taken concurrently Qtr. I, II, III, IV CHM 333-334. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY U (3:2) PR: CHM 331332 or equivalent. Continuation of Chemistry and lab Lecture and lab may not be taken concurrently. Qtr II III, IV. CHM 335-336. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY III (3:2) PR: CHM 333-334 or equivalent. Continuation of Organic Chemistry and lab Lecture and lab may not be taken concurrently Qtr. I, III, IV. CHM 341. ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (3) PR : CHM 213/219 or CHM 216, CHM 321, MTH 212, PHY 205-206. Introduction to equilibrium properties of macro scopic systems. Properties of solutions CHM 342. ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY U (3) PR : CHM 341. Kinetic behavior of systems, macromolecular solutions, and colloidal dispersions, nuclear chemistry, and spectroscopy. CHM 343. ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LAB (2) PR : Co-requisite with CHM 341 and/or CHM 342. A physical chemistry laboratory with emphasis on modern techniques and instruments. Lab.-lec. CHM 351. INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY (4) PR : CHM 333. Introduction to the chemistry and intermediary metabolism of biologically important substances. Lee. Qtr. I, II, Ill, IV. CHM 354. BASIC BIOCHEMISTRY LABO RA TORY (3) PR : CHM 351. Practical work in determination and character ization of important biomolecules. Lec.-lab. CHM 371. MODERN CHEMICAL SCIENCE. (4) An introduction to some of the major problems in chemistry, its relation to other sciences, and its relevance to contem porary culture. Designed for non-science majors. No credit for Chemistry majors. Qtr. I, IV. CHM 411. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR : CHM 441 or CI. An advanced theoretical treatment of inorganic compounds. Lee. Qtr. I III. (Formerly CHM 511. ) CHM 421. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (4) PR: CHM 443 or CI. Theory and practice of instrumental methods : Clinical Chemistry applications may be elected in the laboratory Lec.-lab. Qtr. II, Ill. (Formerly CHM 521.) CHM 423. RADIOCHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 321. Theory and applications of natural and induced radioactivity. Emphasis on the production, properties, meas urement, and uses of radioactive tracers. Lee-lab. Qtr. I, II. (Formerly CHM 523.) CHM 425. FUNDAMENTALS OF CLINICAL CHEMISTRY (4) PR : CHM 321, 351. Theoretical and practical aspects of the analysis of various body fluids, with emphasis on the medical significance. Clinical chemistry majors must take CHM 426 concurrently Lee. Qtr. I, III. (Formerly CHM 525.)

PAGE 54

CHM 426. CLINICAL LABO RA TORY (2) PR : CHM 321, 351, and CI. Laboratory experience in some of the most important clinical determinations. CHM 425 must be taken concurrently Lee-lab Qtr. I, IIL (Formerly CHM 526.) CHM 441. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (4) PR : CHM 321 and MTH 304. CR: PHY 205 or 305. Thermodynamics, the states of matter, s olutions. Lee Qtr. I, II. CHM 442. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (4) PR: CHM 441. Introduction to quantum mechanics and molecular spectroscopy. Lee Qtr II, III. CHM 443. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Ill (4) PR : CHM 441. Electrochemistry, kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics, surface and nuclear chemistry. Lee Qtr. I III, IV CHM 445. METHODS OF CHEMICAL INVESTIGATION I. ANALYTICAL-PHYSICAL (4) PR: CHM 321, 335-336. CR: CHM 441. Theory and applications of instrumental methods in chemical research with emphasis on electrochemical techniques Lec.-lab Qtr. I, II CHM 446. METHODS OF CHEMICAL INVESTIGATION II. ANALYTICAL-PHYSICAL (4) PR: CHM 445. Continuation of CHM 445. Emphasis on spectroscopic techniques. Lec.-lab Qtr. II, III. CHM: 447. METHODS OF CHEMICAL INVESTIGATION Ill. CHEMICAL SYSTEMS (3) PR: CHM 446. Continuation of CHM 446 Emphasis on studies of chemical syste .ms using a variety of techniques. Lee-lab Qtr. III, IV. CHM 471. HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES IN CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 213; or senior standing, and Cl. A study in depth of the historical and philosophical aspects of outstanding chemical discoveries and theories Lee-disc Qtr. II. CHM 475. THE MICROWORLD OF MOLECULES, ATOMS AND ELECTRONS (4) The nature of the material world from the philosophic discussion of antiquity, through some speculations of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance to the quantitative thinking and measurements of modern science. No previous back ground in science or mathematics is necessary. No credit for Chemistry majors. CHM 481. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-6) PR: Cl. (S/U only.) Qtr. I-IV. CHM 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (1-6) PR : Cl. The course content will depend on the interest of faculty members and student demand CHM 485. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICE (3-8) PR : CI. Laboratory practice in clinical chemistry laboratories in the Tampa Bay area. (S/U only .) Qtr. I-IV CHM 491. CHEMISTRY SEMINAR (1) PR: Senior standing. Discussions of selected significant chemical topics of recent interest. (S/U only ) Qtr. II, III. FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS CHM 512. PRINCIPLES OF INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR : CHM 442 or CI. Chemic a l forces, reactivity, periodicity, and literature in inorganic chemistry ; basic core course Lee Qtr. I. CHM 532. INTERMEDIATE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR : CHM 335, 336 or equivalent. A study of stereochemistry, spectroscopy, theories of bonding, acid-base chemistry, and their application to the under s tanding of organic reactions. Lee. CHM 541. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS (4) PR: CHM 443 or CI. The applications of thermodynamic theory to the study of chemical sys tems with emphasis on the energetics of reactions and chemical equilibria Lee CHEMISTRY 149 CHM 542. APPLICATIONS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY PR : CHM 443. Applications of chemical theory to systems with emphasis on chemical kinetic s and molecular spectroscopy. Lee. CHM 554. TECHNIQUES IN BIOCHEMISTRY (2) PR : CHM 555 or 657. Biochemistry laboratory with emphasis on modern technique s for u se in biochemical research. Qtr. III. CHM 555. BIOCHEMISTRY CORE COURSE (4) PR: Either CHM 335-6 and CHM 341 or 441 or graduate standing. A one-quarter survey course in biochemistry for graduate students in chemi s try, biology, and other appropriate fields and for particularly well-qualified undergraduates. Lee Qtr. III. CHM 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (1-6) PR: CI. The following course s a re represent a tive of those that are taught under this title : N at ural Products, Stereochemistry, Reactive Intermediates, Photochemi s try Instrumental Elec tronics, Advanced Lab Techniques, Heterocyclic Chemistry, etc. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY CHM 611. STRUCTURAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CHM 512 or CI. Modern theories of bonding and structure of inorganic compounds, including coordination theory, stereochemistry, solution equilibria kinetics, mechanisms of reactions, and use of physical and chemical methods Lee. Qtr. II CHM 613. CHEMISTRY OF THE LESS FAMILIAR ELEMENTS (4) PR: CI. An integrated treatment of the conceptual and factual aspects of the traditionally less familiar elements, including noble-gas elements, unfamiliar non-metals, alkali and alkaline earth metals and the transition elements. Lee Qtr. III CHM 621. ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (4) PR: CI. A study of complete analytical proce ss, including sample handling, separations, the analysis step, and statistical interpretation of data Emphasis placed on s eparation s and statistics. Lee. Qtr. II CHM 623. ELECTROCHEMISTRY (4) PR: CI. Introduction to the theory of ionic s olutions and electrode processes. Theory and applications of elec trochemical measurements. Lee. Qtr. III. CHM 631. ADV AN CED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I. NATURAL PRODUCTS (4) PR : CHM 532 or Cl. A s tudy of any of s everal of the following topics : terpenes, steroids, vitamins, alkaloids, porphyrins purine and antibiotics. Qtr. III CHM 632. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II. PHYSICAL-ORGANIC (4) PR: CHM 532. A study of organic reaction mechanism s emphasizing the interpretation of experimental data Lee. Qtr. I. CHM 633. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY III. SYNTHESIS (4) PR: CHM 532. Detailed consideration of modern synthetic methods. Lee Qtr. I. CHM 634. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY IV. (4) PR : CHM 532. The empha sis will vary from year to year. CHM 641. STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS (4) PR : Cl. Application of s tatistical mechanics to thermo dynamics the relation of molecular structure to thermo dynamic properties Lee. Qtr. II. CHM 643. QUANTUM CHEMISTRY I (4) PR : Cl. Introduction to elementary quantum mechanism Atomic s tructure and spectra. Lee. Qtr. III. CHM 645. QUANTUM CHEMISTRY II (4) PR : CHM 643. PR: Cl. Introduction to elementary quantum mechanics Atomic structure and spectra. Lee Qtr. I.

PAGE 55

150 COMMUNICOLOGY CHM 647. CHEMICAL KINETICS (4) PR: Cl. Theory and methods for the s tudy of reaction rates and the elucidation of re a ction mechanisms Lee Qtr. II. CHM 654. ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY I. ENZYMES (4) PR: CHM 659 or Cl. A study of biochemical systems with emphasis on enzymes. Lee CHM 655. ADV AN CED BIOCHEMISTRY II. BIOORGANIC MECHANISMS (4) PR: CHM 659 or Cl. A study of biochemical systems with emphasis on mechanisms of biological reaction Lee. Qtr. Ill. CHM 656. ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY Ill. BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (4) PR : CHM 659 or Cl. A study of biochemical systems with emphasis on physical methods of experimentation and interpretation. Lee CHM 657. GENERAL BIOCHEMISTRY I. (4) PR: CHM 555 or Cl. First quar ter of a rigorous three-quarter general biochemistry course for chemistry and biology graduate student s wpose primary interests are in this field. Lee Qtr. I. (Formerly CHM 551.) CHM 658. GENERAL BIOCHEMISTRY II (4) PR: CHM 657. Continuation of General Biochemistry I. Lee. Qtr. II. (Formerly CHM 552.) CHM 659. GENERAL BIOCHEMISTRY III (4) PR: CHM 658. Continuation of General Biochemistry II. Lee. Qtr. Ill. (Formerly CHM 553.) CHM 661. MARINE CHEMISTRY (4) PR: OGY 521 or Cl. Chemical and physical properties of sea water, energy flow in a marine ecosy s tem, development of tlie concepts of biogeochemical cycles and master variables, thermodynamics of the carbon dioxide-seawater s ystem, other related topics. CHM 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH. (credit varies) PR: GR. Master's level. Repeat a ble. (S/U only.) CHM 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (1-6) PR: Cl. The following titles are representative of those that are taught under this title : Symmetry and Group Theory, Photochemical Kinetics, Quantum Mechanical Calculations, Advanced Chemical Thermodynamics, Reaction Mechanisms, Advanced Instrumentation, Separations and Character izations, Spectroscopy, etc. CHM 688. RECENT ADVANCES IN CHEMISTRY WITH EMPHASIS ON THEIR IMPACT ON BEGINNING COURSES (3-6) PR : Graduate Standing. A course designed to consider and study the recent developments of a given field especially those developments that have an effect on altering the basic concepts and ideas of the field and imply a change in the presentation of introductory material in the field. (S/U only.) Qtr. I-IV CHM 691. GRADUATE SEMINARS IN CHEMISTRY (2) PR : Admi s sion to graduate program. Required every quarter (when offered) for all students enrolled in chemistry graduate program. Requires participation in and contribution to a divisional seminar and attendance at the weekly departmental seminar. Must be repeated. (S/U only.) CHM 692. CHEMISTRY COLLOQUIUM (1) PR: Admission to graduate program in Chemistry. Frequent (usually weekly) small-group analysis of current develop ments. May be repeated up to a cumulative total of 10 hours. (S/U only.) CHM 694. GRADUATE INSTRUCTION METHODS (1) Special course to be used primarily for the training of graduate teaching assistants. Variable credit, repeatable. Limited to a cumulative total of 5 credits per student. (S/U only.) CHM 695. GRADUATE RESEARCH METHODS (1) Special course to be used primarily for the training of graduate re s earch assistants. Variable credit, repeatable. Limited to a cumulative total of 5 credits per student. (S/U only.) CHM 699. THESIS: MASTER'S (credit varies) Repeatable. (S/U only.) CHM 781. DIRECTED RESEARCH. (credit varies) PR: GR level. Repeatable. (S/U only.) CHM 799. DISSERTATION: DOCTORAL (credit varies) PR: Must be admitted to Doctoral Candidacy. Repeatable. (S/U only ) COMMUNICOLOGY (CLY) Speech Pathology-Audiology-Aural (Re )Habilitation Chairperson: S. W Kinde; Professors: L. H Ricker, D. C. Shepherd; Associate Professors: J. B. Crittenden, S. W. Kinde, S. I. Ritterman; Assistanf Professor: A. M Guilford ; Instruc tors : R. L. Carlson, J. E. Falany, J. P. Glover, L. R. Light; Lecturers: E. A. L. Kasan, J. W. Scheuerle; Speech and Hearing Clinician: K. 'K. Bigelow; Adjunct: S L. Ainsworth; Courtesy ProfessorF T. E. Edwards, F X. Frueh, E.T. Gray; Courtesy Associate Professor; W. W. Wittish ; Courtesy Assistant Ptofessor : G H. Horsfall. LOWER LEVEL COURSES CLY 201 SURVEY OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (3) A general survey course concerning the nature and prevention of disorders of communication UPPER LEVEL COURSES CLY301. INTRODUCTIONTOSPEECHPATHOLOGY (6) The scope of speech pathology as a profession and field of study. An introduction to speech and language disorders (articulation, stuttering, voice, aphasia, etc.) : etiologies, major treatment approaches, and research findings. CLY 302. INTRODUCTION TO AUDIOLOGY (6) The scope of audiology as a profession and field of study. An introduction to the study of hearing impairments: classi fications, etiologies, major treatment approaches, and re search findings. CLY 311. ANATOMY OF THE SPEECH AND HEARING MECHANISM (6) The neurological and anatomical basis of communication disorders. Comparisons of normal and pathological organic strutures and their functional dynamics. Separate sections concentrating on normal and abnormal aural physiology are scheduled for those students with a primary emphasis in audiology. CLY 3l2. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH PROCEDURES IN COMMUNICOLOGY (6) Perspective on research in speech pathology and audiology Introduction to multivariate design considerations as they apply to research, speech and hearing laboratory and clinical settings Analysis of basic hypothesis testing. CLY 313. APPLIED PHONOLOGY (6) An examination of phoneme systems and distinctive features of their alophonic variants with particular emphasis upon those s uperfixes and suprasegmental modifiers necessary to the understanding and recording of early developmental and deviant speech patterns CLY 482. NATURE AND NEEDS OF THE HEARING IMPAIRED (6) A study of the effects of auditory disorders upon the

PAGE 56

organization and expression of behavioral patterns as they relate to motivation, adjustment and personality. CLY 483. SELECTED TOPICS (4) PR: Cl. A reading program of topics in speech pathology and/or audiology conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated three times. CLY 498. INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY PRACTICUM (1-12) Observation and participation in speech pathology and audiology practicum in the University clinical laboratory. FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS CLY 511. SPEECH PATHOLOGY INSTRUMENTATION (6) PR: Cl. Calibration, usage and specific applications of specialized instruments available in dealing with speech and language disorders. Includes : recording, sonograph, audio feedback, video equipment, behavior measuring devices. CLY 512. AUDIOLOGY INSTRUMENT;\TION (6) PR : Cl. Calibration, usage and specific applications of specialized instruments available in dealing with the identi fication and measurement of hearing disorders, Includes: sound level recorders, audiometers, and the electrophy siological measurement devices. CLY 513. THE SCIENCE OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (6) PR: CLY 301 or 302 or Cl. The application of behavioral and learning principles to the study of the normal development of speech, language and hearing and to the management of disorders. CLY 571. EVALUATION OF ORAL COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (6) PR: Admittance to the Program or Cl. The administration, evaluation, and reporting of diagnostic tests and procedures used in the assessment of speech and language disorders. CLY 572. AUDIOLOGY: HEARING SCIENCE (6) PR: Admittance to the Program or Cl. Introduction to psychoacoustical phenomenon as it relates to the meas urement of hearing. Overview of principles and methods of identification audiometry with emphasis on neonatal, pre school, and school age populations Procedures for determin ing pure tone thresholds including the application of masking techniques. Fundamental concepts related to hearing aids and their benefits. Management of hearing impaired individuals including counseling. CLY 573. AUDIOLOGY: SPEECH AUDIOMETRY (6) PR: CLY 572 or Cl. Advanced study of psychoacoustical phenomenon as it relates to the measurement of hearing. Instruction emphasizing principles and methods of determin ing hearing acuity through the use of speech stimuli. Management of clients from pertinent case histories through post-evaluation recommendations. Thorough consideration of hearing aids with special attention on techniques of selecting and fitting aids in a clinical setting. CLY 574. METHODS FOR ORAL COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (6) PR: CLY 571 or Cl. An in-depth analysis of classic and contemporary methods employed in the management of communicatively impaired individuals. Experimental ap proaches are reviewed through current medical, psy chological, speech language and hearing journals. CLY 575. MANAGEMENT OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (4) PR : Cl. The planning of programs for individuals with speech, language, and hearing impairments. Includes administration of programs in public schools, clinics, and private practice. CLY 576. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: VOICE (4) PR : Cl. A comprehen sive study of the medical and physical aspects of voice disorders. Primary emphasis is on therapeutic management. COMMUNICOLOGY 151 CLY 577. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: ARTICULATION (4) PR: Cl. An examination of normal and deviant articulatory acquisition and behavior. Presentation of major theoretical orientations and the therapeutic principles based upon them. CLY 578. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: STUTTERING (4) PR : Cl. A comprehensive st udy of the diagno s is and modification of stuttering based on a two-factor model. Other major theories are considered and evaluated. CLY 579. TECHNIQUES OF AUDITORY TRAINING (4) PR: CI. An analysis of theories of auditory reception and amplification. A study of the methods an
PAGE 57

152 CRIMINAL JUSTICE CLY 676. HEARING DISORDERS (4) PR : CLY 674 or CI. Th e c ompilation and interpretation of hearing test data for diagno s ing hearing impairment. Investiga tion of medical and s urgical techniques for the treatment of hearing loss, coordinating information for planning the treatment and rehabilitation of the hearing impaired, including the involvement of other profe s sional s. CLY 677. HEARING CONSERVATION (4) PR : CLY 573 or CI. A comprehen s ive s tudy of all aspect s of hearing conservation, e s pecially tho s e relating to the detection and prevention of hearing los s in both children and adult populations. Special attention i s given to problems encoun tered by industry. CLY 680. RESEARCH PROCEDURES IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY (4) PR : CI. Advanced research a nd experimental de s ign techni ques employed in cli nical a nd laboratory s ettings in speech pathology and audiology. Introduction to re search technologies; review of s tyli s tic con s ideration s in re s earch writing. CLY 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH. (credit varies) PR : GR Master's level. Repeatable. (S/U only ) CLY 683. SELECTED TOPICS (4) PR : CI. A re a ding program of topic s in s peech p a thology and/or a udiology conducted under the s upervi s ion of a faculty member. May be repeated three time s CLY 684. LANGUAGE FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED (6) PR : CLY 301, 302, 482 or Cl. Techn i que s a nd material s of teaching l a nguage to childr e n with auditory disorders. Evaluation and analy s i s of contell}por a ry method s. CLY 685. COMMUNICATIVE SKILLS FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED (6) PR : CLY 30 I 302, 482. Application and evaluation of technique s for teaching s ymbolic functioning to children with hearing impairment s Con s ider a tion of developmental and remedial a s pe c ts of reading CLY 698 PRACTICUM (1-12) PR: CI. Participation in s peech pathology and audiology practicum in the University clinical laboratory and selected field settings CLY 699. THESIS: MASTER'S (credit varies) Repeatable (S/U only .) COOPERATIVE (COE) Coordinating Staff: G F Lentz, G. R. Card D A Haney, P D Jackson, J. E Lewis COE 171. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, lST TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR : 45 hour s of a c ademic credit acc e pt a nce in Cooperative Education Program (S/U only ) COE 172. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 2NDTRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 171. (S/U only.) COE 271. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 3RD TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 17.2. (S/U only ) COE 272. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 4TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 271. (S/U only ) COE 371. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 5TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR : COE 272. (S/U only ) COE 372. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 6TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 371. (S/U only ) COE 471. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 7TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 372. (S/U only ) COE 472. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 8TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR : COE 471. (S/U only.) COE 571. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, 9TH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR : COE 472. (S/U only ) COE 572. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION lOTH TRAINING PERIOD (0) PR: COE 571. (S/U only. ) CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJP) Director: M Silverman ; Professor : Hi Vetter ; Associate Professors : W. R Blount M. C Dertke J T. Reilly, M. Silverman L Territo M Vega; Assistant Professors: H. Harper I. J. Silverman ; Instructor: D Agre s ti; Interim Lecturer : S Oster; Visiting Assistant Professor : V,. McAllister LOWER LEVEL COURSES CJP 200. MAN, CRIME, AND SOCIETY (4) Designed to give the undergraduate non-major a non technical s urvey of the American criminal justice s ystem. The nature of crime law enforcement ,' the court s ystem, and correctional practices and institution s will be covered. Not for major credit. UPPER LEVEL COURSES CJP 300. SURVEY OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (5) PR : PSY 200, SOC 201, or equivalent or Cl. An introduction to the major institution s associated with criminal justice, their structure, personnel objectives resources, and operation. Course content also include s developing an understanding of criminal law terminology and procedure. This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the activities, language, concepts and career opportunities of the entire Criminal Justice Sy s tem. The course may include an exploratory project, encouraging the s tudent to use hi s or her own initiative to explore ob s erve and interview in one or more local institutions of criminal ju s tice. ( Formerly CJP 201.) CJP 301. NATURE OF CRIME (4) PR : CJP 300. This cour s e i s designed to provide a basic understanding of the c omplex factor s related to crime in America. Focus will be center e d on reviewing the basic issues, s cope and cost s stemming from criminal activitie s. CJP 302. LEGAL FOUNDATIONS OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE (4) PR : CJP 300, POL 200 or C I. Content of this course examines the effect s upon the criminal justice s y s tem of the freedoms of habeas corpus bill s of atta ind e r s a nd ex post facto Th e reupon th e c o ur s e foll o w s th e a c cu se d through the paths of crimin a l justice from a r res t to pretrial procedures, to the c ourt and ultim a t e ly through c orr e ction s CJP 315. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE OFFENDER (4) PR: Junior standing plu s CJP 301 or Cl. A four-course series focusing on tho s e individual s being proce ss ed through the criminal justice sy s tem E ac h cour s e will examine the characteristics of a s pec ial o ff e nder group its impact on the system and the syst e m' s potenti a l to change this class of offender behavior pattern s. (Ma y be taken with different s ubject matter up to 16 hours.)

PAGE 58

CJP 410. THEORY AND PRACTICE OF LAW ENFORCEMENT (4) PR: Junior standing plus CJP 302 or CI. Designed to provide an in-depth summary of current philosophies and techniques used in the field of law enforcement with special attention given to the roles of law enforcement officers Attention will be given to the new experimental programs and techniques. CJP 412. THE LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER AND THE COMMUNITY (4) PR : Junior standing plus CJP 410 or Cl. This course examines the area of human relations especially as it applies to police functions within the community. Topics of prejudice and discrimination are emphasized CJP 420. THEORY AND PRACTICE OF CORRECTIONS (4) PR: Junior standing plus CJP 301 or Cl. The scope of this course relates to the analysis of the different treatment philosophies and technique s currently in use in the field Attention will be given to experimental and demonstration programs as well as to generally accepted and established methods CJP 421. JUVENILE CORRECTIONS (5) PR : Junior standing plus CJP 420, or Cl. Provides an in-depth analysis of the different treatment philo s ophies and techni ques used in the field of juvenile corrections today Special attention is given to experimental and demonstration programs as well as to traditional and established methods Students will be required to work in a juvenile c orrection s agency and to attend field trips CJP 422. THE PROBATION AND PAROLE PROCESS (5) PR : Junior standing plus CJP 420, or CI. The concepts of probation and parole will be thoroughly explored and related to actual and potential treatment s ituations. CJP 425. INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP PROCESSES IN CORRECTIONAL TREATMENT I (3) PR : Senior standing, PSY 200, CJP 421. Designed to introduce the student to theories and method s underlying treatment modalities currently employed in corrections. CJP 426. INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP PROCESSES IN CORRECTIONAL TREATMENT II (3) PR: Senior s tanding plus CJP 425. The s tudent will be introduced to practical applications within a correctional setting involving both individual a nd group situations. CJP 480. RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (4) PR : Junior s tanding plus CJP 300, or CI. Designed to give the criminal justice major an introduction to research method ology and the evaluation of researc h This course may not be taken for credit if the student ha s already successfully completed SSI 30 l, Social Science Statistics, ECN 231, Busines s and Economic Statistics I, or MTH 345, Introductory Statistic s I. CJP 481. DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-5) PR : CI. This c ourse is designed to provide students with a research experience in which they will work closely with faculty on the development and implementation of research project s in the area of criminal justice. CJP 485. DIRECTED READINGS (1-5) PR : Cl. This co urse i s s pec ifically designed to enable advanced student s the opportunity to do in-depth independent work in the area of criminal justic e. Each student will be under the close s upervision of a faculty member of the program NOTE: CJP 481 & CJP 485. (a) Students wishing to enroll must make arrange ments with a faculty member during the quarter prior to actually taking the course, (b) a minimum of four (4) CJP courses must have been completed satisfactorily prior to enrollment, (c) first consideration will be given to (:JP majors, and (d) individual faculty members may add additional requirements at their discretion. CRIMINAL JUSTICE 153 CJP 491. SEMINAR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3) PR: Senior standing and CI. The seminar (multi-course series variable topics) will consider the various changes occurring in the fic;.Jd of criminal justice with added emphasis placed on the responsibilities of careers in the field. (May be taken with different subject matter up to 12 hours) CJP 499. INTERNSHIP FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJORS (3-12) PR: Senior standing. The internship will consist of placement with one or more of the agencies comprising the criminal justice system This course will enable the students to gain meaningful field experience related to their future careers. Each three-hour block of credit will require a minimum of ten hours of work per week within the host agency in addition to any written work or reading assignments (S/U only ) FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY CJP 601. THEORIES OF DEVIANCY (4) An introduction and comparison of major historical and contemporary theories as they relate to the explanation of criminal behavior Attention will be given to developing, on the part of the student, a frame -ofreference by which he can organize and understand the empirical factors operating in the Criminal Justice System. CJP 602. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH AND EVALUATION IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (4) An introduction to research, evaluation, statistics, data management and manage ment information procedures. Em phasis will be given to the role of each of these topics as monitors and change agents in criminal justice, particularly in police management and corrections. CJP603. LAW AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE (4) An exposition of historical and contemporary legal principles, procedures and issues as reflected in Constitutional pro visions, statutes and case law. CJP 610. COMMUNITY CORRECTIONAL ADMINISTRATION (3) This course consists of an analysis of the complex issues and controversies related to the development and management of modern community-based corrections programs May be repeated up to 9 hours CJP 611. CORRECTIONAL TREATMENT METHODS (3) Designed to acquaint the beginning graduate student with general conditions, skills and techniques required in order to provide satisfactory treatment for both adult and juvenile offenders Emphasis will be placed on familiarizing the student with those factors and conditions which facilitate treatment and the goals of treatment in a community correctional setting. In addition, several specific and widely used treatment approaches will be extensively covered and practiced during this course. May be repeated up to 9 hours CJP 612. CORRECTIONAL PLANNING (3) This course will provide the student with an in-depth examination of urban correctional planning processes Topics included will deal with the development of personnel budgets, and facility plans and their implementation May be repeated up to 9 hour s. CJP 613. SEMINAR IN COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS (3) Thi s course will provide a mechani s m by which staff and students can focus on the latest events, issues, and problems confronting community corrections programming May be repeated up to 6 hours CJP 620. POLICE ADMINISTRATION (3) This course is designed to cover the major elements of urban police administration including personnel selection and pro motion program development and management techniques. May be repeated up to 9 hours CJP 621. URBAN POLICE PROBLEMS (3) This course addresses itself to the major problems confronting urban police departments. Areas of concentration will be

PAGE 59

154 DANCE racial tensions; police corruption, politicalization, etc. May be repeated up to 9 hours. CJP 622. URBAN POLICE PLANNING (3) This course will examine contemporary law enforcement planning and will focu s on techniques and skills required to forecast future needs of police agencies in rapidly expanding metropolitan areas. May be repeated up to 9 hours. CJP 623. SEMINAR IN URBAN LAW ENFORCEMENT (3) Designed to provide an in-depth review of contemporary issues and problems as they relate to urban police administration. May be repea ted up to 9 hours. CJP 630. RESEARCH AND EVALUATION METHODS (3) A detailed coverage of statistical re sea rch and evaluation techniques utilized for research and reporting practices in Criminal Justice. Data management, field experimentation and research methodology will be included as they apply. May be repeated up to 6 hours. CJP 631. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3) Time will be spent on the design and analysis of both existing and student created systems, with emphasis on the role of syste m analysis as it applies to management information sys t e m s, computer based systems. In addition, attention will be directed to retrieval strategies, reducing work loads, simplification, formatting, form design and control, data organization costs. May be repe ate d up to 6 hours. CJP 632. RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT AND ACQUISITION (3) Required for Planning and Ev a luation tr ac t students, optional for others, this course will survey organizations which provide financial assistance to Criminal Ju s tice age ncies In all cases, an analysis of criteria, limitation s and availability will be made. Practical experience in proposal planning and sub mission will be provided. CJP 660. GRADUATE PRACTICUM IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE* (1-4) Practicum will consist of placement with a criminal justice agency s elected by the student in consultation with his committee. This placement will enable the student to gain high level field experience related to their chosen career field A minimum of 24 graduate hours in Criminal Justice must be completed prior to enrollment. (S/U only ) (Formerly CJP 681.) CJP 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH. (credit varies) PR: GR. Master's level. R_epeatable (S/U only.) CJP 690. TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3) PR : Graduate standing in the Criminal Justice Program The field of criminal justice is characterized by a wide variety of issues and controversies that are of topical concern. This seminar provides a forum for analyzing and discussing these topics as their importance and the accumulation of data warrants. Classics in the criminal justice literature may be included among .the topics for treatment in this course. CJP 691. CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP* (12) The internship will place the student in a criminal justice position commensurate with his skills so that he may be able to blend theory with experience. Placement which will be fulltime for one year, will be worked out between the agency, the student, and the student's committee. All graduate academic course work must be completed prior to enrollment. (S/U only .) CJP 693. PRO SEMINAR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (I) One hour is required for all students. This variable topic list ing is a forum primarily for the presentation and discus s ion of ethical and research ideas by faculty, guests, and students to aid students in linking theory and research, in understanding contemporary, problem oriented research, and in developing thesis subjects. Any issue of professional concern may be treated. May be repeated up to 5 hours CJP 699. THESIS: MASTER'S (credit varies) Repeatable. (S/U only.) DANCE (DAN) Cha irperson : W. G. Hug ; Professor : W a Hug; Associate Professor : C R obi nson ; Assistant Professors : R. Sias, M. Starbuck. LOWER LEVEL COURSES DAN 201. BEGINNING MODERN (3) PR: Admission by audition. Study of basic principles of modern dance techni que Practical work in beginning ex ercises and movement phrases, utilizing changing rhythms and dynamics. May be repea ted. DAN 202. BEGINNING BALLET (3) PR: Admission by audition. Ba s i c po s ition s and fundamental barre exercises. Stress on correc t alignment of the body and the application of simple s tep combinations in centre work The use of ballet vocabulary (French terms). Material is covered almost totally as practical work in class with a few outside projects. Concert and p e rformance attendance re quired. May be repeated. DAN 203. CHOREOGRAPHY I (3) Study exec ution of ba sic principles of improvising. Preparation of s tudies in theme and variations, breath phrases and me t ric phrase s. May b e repeated. UPPER LEVEL COURSES DAN 301. I NTERMEDIATE MODERN (4) PR: A d mission by audition. Continuation of DAN 201. Further e mphasis on style and phrasing Work in projecting mood a n d quality by dancing and r e h ea rsing in more advanced stude nt choreography, leading to performance. Rehearsal hour s to be arranged. May be rep eated. DAN 302. INTERMEDIATE BALLET (4) PR : Admission by audition. Continuation of DAN 202. Intensification of barre exercises for the development of s trength and form. Centre exercises to develop quickness of mind/body coordination Most of the ballet steps are introduced. Application of phra s ing and quality of movement. Adagio, pirouettes, and allegro are specifically stressed Material covered as practical work in class with concerts and performances. Rehearsal hours to be arranged May be repeated. DAN 303. CHOREOGRAPHY II (3) PR : DAN 203 or Cl. Preparation of st udies in rhythm, dynamics form and motivation culminating in a solo. May be repeated DAN 304. JAZZ DANCE (2) PR: DAN 301 or DAN 302 or Cl. A te c hnique class with an emphasis on highly stylized, percu ss ive movement on a s trong rhythmic base. Required is the performance of a s hort dance se quence encompassing these skills May be repeated DAN 305. MUSIC FOR DANCE (3) Development of practical music skills in r e lation to dance Emphasis on rhythm and the relation s hip of music forms to dance May be repeated up to 6 credit hours DAN 311. REPERTORY (I) The development ano performance of solo and/or group Practicum is. required of all students who are n ot selected for or who c hoose not to participate in the alternative one -year int e rnship. To be completed during the second year in th e program

PAGE 60

dances. Open to all University students by audition. May be repeated. DAN 312. POINTE TECHNIQUE (1) PR: DAN 302. This course introduces fundamental exercises for the development of pointe technique. Material covered as practical work in class with a few outside projects concerts; and performances. Rehearsal hours to be arranged. Must be repeated for a total of 6 hours by Ballet Majors. May be repeated. DAN 313. WORLD HISTORY OF DANCE (3) Study of the development of dance from its inception through the Middle Ages. Reading, lecture DAN 370. INTRODUCTION TO DANCE (3) For non-dance majors, a study of the art of dance. L ectu re and activities including Modern, Ballet, Jazz Ethnic and Tap. DAN 370 may be used for University Genera l Di st ribution Requirement by the non-major, and may be used to satisfy part of the 9 hour in-College Requirement for Fine Arts Majors in Art, Music and Theatre DAN 371. DATHA YOGA (2). A course to experience and practice the basic asanas (bodily postures), pranayoma (breath control), and deep relaxation of body and mind. Hatha Yoga prepares the student for dance movement. May be used for University General Distribution Requirement by the nonmajor, and may be used to satisfy part of the 9-hour in-College requirement for Fine Arts Majors in Art, Music and Theatre. DAN 401. ADVANCED MODERN (5) PR: Admission by audition. Continuation of DAN 301 on an advanced level. Work in improvisation and individual inven tion creating an awareness of many possi biliti es of movement. Intensive work on the growth of personal performance style as a means of communication Equal emphasis will be given to training the body in the development of technical excellence Dancing in student choreography leading to performance Rehearsal hours to be arranged. Must be rep eate d for a minimum of 20 hours by the Modern Major. M ay be repeated. (Formerly DAN .401 and DAN 461.) DAN 402. ADVANCED BALLET (5) PR: Admission by audition. Continuation of DAN 302. Perfecting the execution of barre work including body alignment, quality of movement, strength, form, quickness of mind and alertness. Intensification of centre work. More stress on aesthetic quality of movement and phrasing. Perfecting the execution of classical ballet technique and a continuing awareness of performing projection a nd audience communication for those with professional performing career ECONOMICS 155 in mind Complete b ackground and knowledge of the cla ssical b allet techniques required. Students expected to be proficient in pointe work. Material covered as practical work in class with a few outside projects, concerts, and performances. Rehearsal hours to b e arranged. Must be repeated for a minimum of 20 hours by the B allet Major. May be repeated. (Formerly DAN 402 and DAN 462.) DAN 403. CHOREOGRAPHY III (3) PR: DAN 303 or Cl. Work directed toward duet s and group dances The stude nts will s ubm i t choreographic ideas for instructor's approval, then proceed with rehearsals. The best dances will be performed and fully produced under super vision of stude nt choreographers. Readjng, lecture labora tory. May b e repeated. DAN 413. HISTORY OF 20TH CENTURY BALLET (3) A study of the development of 20th Century ballet in Europe and America. Emphasis on concepts, choreographers and a rti sts Reading film, lecture DAN 453. DANCE SENIOR SEMINAR (3) PR: Senior or CC. To aid major & to understand, a ppr aise and perfect their own art a nd technique through critical and aesthetic judgem e nts of their colleag ues. DAN 463. CHOREOGRAPHY IV (3) PR : DAN 403. The st udent will prepare s tudie s based on free form, minimal art, and chance methods Reading, lecture, laboratory. M ay be repeated. (Formerly DAN 503. ) DAN 464. HISTORY OF MODERN DANCE (3) Study of the development of modem dance in the 20th Ce ntury in Americ a; the different techniq ues, conce pts in c horeography a nd lea ding ar tists of our time. Re adi ng film, and lecture (Formerly D AN 513.) DAN 481. DIRECTED STUDY (1-6) PR: CC. May be repe a ted Independent studies in the various a rea s of D ance. Course of study and c redits must be assigned prior to registration. DAN 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN DANCE (1-6) PR: CI and CC. The content of the co urse will be governed by student demand and instru ctor i nter est. May be repeated for credit for different topics only DAN 485. DIRECTED READING (3) PR: CI a nd CC Re adings in a topic of s pecial interes t to the s tudent. Selection of topic and materials must be agreed upon and appropriate credit m u st be assigne d prior to registration A contract with all n ecessary signatures is required for registration. May be repe a ted for credit for different topics only DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES DMA 001. BASIC CONCEPTS OF ALGEBRA (0) A programmed learning course in Algebra from a modern point of view for the convenience of person s without adeq uate knowledge of simple algebraic manipulation s and for persons without adequate preparation for MTH 122. DMA 002. ANALYTICAL TRIGONOMETRY (0) A programmed learning course in the study of the trigonometric func tion s as functions of real numbers and their application to triangles ECONOMICS (ECN) Chairperson : T: D. Curtis; Professors: J M Blair, G. C. Brunhild, T. D. Curtis, H. S Dye; Associate Professors: R.H. Burton, J P. Cooke, J. A Dalton, E. J. Ford, W J Herman, J B Kennedy, G H Mellish, R J Murphy R. F. Shannon, E .W. Shows, G C Steinike;Assistant Professors: J A. Anderson, K. W. Davey, R L. Finley, E. A Hanni, R Jam es, F. G. Whartenby; Instructors : C. B Hawley, R L. Moss, J G Spence LOWER LEVEL COURSES ECN 100. CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC PROBLEMS (5) An introduction to economics in the co ntext of contemporary social is s u es. The proble111 of economic scarcity, the role of et hic a l values in economics economiC processes and the economic analysis of s ocial issu es. ECN 201. ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES I: MICROECONOMICS (4) The fundamental economic concept of scar city, alternative courses of action and the problem of choice. How an economy decide s what to produce, how to produce and how to reward participants in the economy Attention is focused on factors affecting consumer wants and on the behavior of price in different type s of mark ets.

PAGE 61

156 ECONOMICS ECN 202. ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES II; MACROECONOMICS (4) An introduction to the modern theory of income determination with emphasis upon the application of monetary and fiscal policy oriented toward the accomplishment of the macro economic objectives of full employment, economic growth, and balance of payments stability. ECN 231. BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC STATISTICS I (3) PR : MTH 211. College Algebra or equivalent. Description of sample data ; calculation of probabilities; frequency functions of random variables; the binomial and normal distributions; sampling theory and estimation ; test s of hypotheses ; elements of Bayesian deci s ion theory. UPPER LEVEL COURSES ECN 301. INTERMEDIATE PRICE THEORY (5) PR : ECN 201-202. Advanced analysis of supply and demand as related to competition and monopoly; application of economic theory to product pricing and resource pricing ECN 305. MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (5) PR : ECN 201, 202. Analysis of the concepts and tools of microeconomic analysis for decision-makers in business. Emphasizes demand and production analysis, decision-making within the different market s tructures of the American Economy. Stresse s applications Recommended for non majors ECN 306. QUSINESS FLUCTUATION AND ECONOMIC FORECASTING (5) PR : ECN 201, 202, ECN 331. Introduction to business cycles and forecasting busines s fluctuation s. Forecasting techniques for GNP and GNP component s developed and appraised Use and implications of macroeconomic forecasting and business. ECN 3ll. LABOR ECONOMICS (4) PR : Cl. History of the trade union movement; economic analysis of trade union philosophies and practices; examina tion of basic influences affecting labor force, real wages aqd employment; collective bargaining and labor law ECN 323. INTERMEDIATE INCOME AND MONETARY ANALYSIS (5) PR : ECN 201-202. An advanced exposition of the neo Keynesian analysis explaining the determination of income, employment, prices, and the interest rate. Emphasis is placed upon the interaction of aggregate demand, as determined by consumption, investment, money and the government budget, and aggregate supply ECN 331. BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC STATISTICS II (5) PR: MTH 211. College Algebra or equivalent and ECN 231. Theory and use of statistical inference for decision and prediction Point and interval estimation; criteria for choosing estimators and decision rules ; hypotheses tests and prob values; analysis of variance; correlation and regression. ECN 341. ECONOMICS OF TRANSPORTATION (4) Functions of transportation agencies, rate structure of transportation companies, problems of state and federal regulations and cbordination of transportation facilities. ECN 343. ECONOMICS OF PUBLIC UTILITIES (4) PR : ECN 201-202. The economic characteristics of natural monopolies and the economic problems of regulation and public ownership ECN 351. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (4) PR : ECN 201-202. The role of international trade in the U.S. economy in world trade The bases of trade and the nature of gains from it. The balance of payments Exchange rate determination and the foreign market. Equilibrating mecha nisms for restoring balance of payments stability Interna tional commercial policy ECN 371. AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY (4) The growth and evolution of American economic institutions from Colonial times to the present. ECN 373. ECONOMICS OF THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT (5) PR: Cl. Economic analysis of the phenomena of cities as well as urban social problems including poverty, discrimination, housing, transportation, pollution crime and fiscal considera tions ECN 401. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (5) PR : ECN 201-202, 301, or Cl. The development of the economic schools (Scholasticism, Mercantilism, Physiocratic, Classicism, Utopian Socialism, Anarchism, Marxism, His toricism, Marginalism, Neo-Classicism, Institutionalism, and Keynesianism) in connection with their philosophical and political convictions in relation to their times. ECN 404. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS (4) PR : MTH 212, ECN 201-202 and ECN 331 or Cl. Economic processes expressed as equations and economic systems as mathematical models Investigation of their static and dynamic properties by mathematical analysis and computer simulation. (Formerly ECN 361.) ECN 405. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (4) Analysis of the major types of economies in industrially developed countries: competitive capitalism (e.g .; West Germany), regulated capitalism (e g.; France) "command" communism (e g.; the Soviet Union) and "worker-controlled" communism (e.g.; Yugoslavia). Each is subject to economic evaluation with particular reference to their ability to meet changing consumer demands and technological innovations ECN 410. COLLECTIVE BARGAINING (5) PR : ECN 311. The administration of labor-management arguments, mediation and arbitration of industrial disputes and governmental role in collective bargaining. (Formerly ECN 313. ) ECN 4ll. LABOR RELATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY (4) PR : ECN 311. Problems resulting from legislative and judicial interpretation of the rights, duties and responsibilities of labor unions and employers; public policy in labor-management negotiations; survey .of legislation designed to protect work ers ECN 423. PUBLIC FINANCE (5) PR : ECN 301, 323. An examination of the public sector and its contribution to economic welfare Government expenditures and revenues are examined in relation to their impact on resource allocation, income distribution stabilization, and economic growth. ECN 425. MONET ARY THEORY (5) PR : ECN 301, 323. An examination of the impact of the financial sector upon real economic magnitures The course approaches its subject matter through the theory of portfolio and capital adjustments with emphasi s upon the contributions of Pigou, Fisher, Keynes, Patinkin Friedman and Tobin. ECN 431. SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTITATIVE ECONOMICS (4) PR : MTH 212, ECN 331 or Cl. Analysis of relevant problems of social policy by application of economic criteria and econometric method. Survey of contemporary research ECN 437. BUSINESS-GOVERNMENT RELATIONSHIPS (4) Analysis of the three public policy approaches; competitive, regulatory, and ownership ; evaluation of each in terms of ability to bring about economically desirable price-cost relationships, reductions in cost invention and innovation and an optimal allocation of resources. ECN 451. INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL POLICIES (4) PR: ECN 351. An advanced analysis of balance of payments equilibrating mechanisms and of international commercial policy ECN 461. THEORY OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (4) PR : ECN 323 or Cl. Problems, policies, and dynamics of economic growth in emerging nations. The benefits and relevance of the theory of economic development is examined

PAGE 62

within the context of the social and political milieu of today s underdeveloped areas ECN 471. THEORY OF ECONOMIC DYNAMICS (4) PR: ECN 323. An examination of macroeconomic processes as they occur through time. The determination and character istics of long run growth paths based upon both Keynesian and Neoclassical models are discussed and business cycles are then treated as short run deviations from these growth paths. Empirical studies, forecasting, and policy issues are also considered ECN 481. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH OR DIRECTED READINGS (1-S) PR: Cl. Individual Study Contract with Instructor and Department Chairman required The content of the course will be mutually determined by the student and Instructor. Course may be repeated up to 10 hours ECN 483. SELECTED TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (1-S) PR : Senior standing and Cl. Topics to be selected by the instructor or instructors on pertinent economic issues (Formerly ECN 489. ) FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS ECN SOI. MICROECONOMICS (3) An accelerated introduction to the price system as a mechanism for allocating scarce resources Models are developed to explain the 1workings of both product and resource markets. This course is intended for students with no previous courses in economics and no credit towards degrees will be received in the graduate programs of the College of Business ECN 502. MACROECONOMICS (3) PR: 501. An accelerated introduction to the understanding of the post-Keynesian system through the development of a theoretical supply and demand model and the application of this model to the fiscal and monetary possibilities inherent within it. This course is intended for students with no previous study in economics and no credit towards degrees will be received in the graduate programs of the College of Business ECN 503. STATISTICS FOR BUSINESS (3) PR : ECN 231 and College Algebra Statistical inference and decision theory applied to problems of business management. ECN 507. ECONOMIC EDUCATION I (3) Basic economic processes affecting price determination income distribution, national income and employment, growth, price levels and balance of payments. This course is essentially designed for inservice teaching personnel. ECN 508. ECONOMIC EDUCATION II (3) Basic economic processes affecting price determination, income distribution, national income and employment, growth, price levels, and balance of payments. This course is essentially designed for inservice teaching personnel. ECN 509. ECONOMICS EDUCATION lli (3) This course will be concerned with current economic problems Emphasis will be placed on an analysis of those topical problems which secondary social science teachers would find particularly important to include in their courses. This course is essentially designed for inservice teaching personnel. ECN 519. INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION 1STRUCTURE (4) PR : ECN 201 and 202, or equivalent. Extent level, trends and dimension s of economic concentration ; competitive conduct of large enterprises ; causal factors underlying changes in industrial structure; technology managerfai economies and diseconomies invention and innovation and mergers ECN 520. INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION II-CONDUCT AND BEHAVIOR (4) PR: ECN 301 and ECN 519 Non-price competition, predatory practices, government intervention; oligopolistic pricing ; differences from competitive pricing, standards of, conECONOMICS 157 straints upon, effects on income distribution, production and governmental policy ECN 531. ECONOMIC PROGRAMMING AND CONTROL (S) PR: MTH 213, ECN 331 or Cl. Replication of economic structures by quantitative models and policy selection by optimization procedures Preference functions and certainty equivalence. Deterministic and stochastic linear economic models. Dynamic and chance-constrained programming. Review of work of Leontief, Von Neumann, Tinbergen, Theil, Pontryagin and Harsanyi ECN 561. ECONOMETRICS (S) PR: ECN. 301, 323, 331, or Cl. Theory and use of multiple regression to explain, forecast and influence economic behavior Applications to demand, cost and production functions. Model specification. Ordinary least squares and instrumental variables methods. Analysis of errors BMD and TSP computer programs Design and conduct of individual empirical research projects. ECN 573. URBAN ECONOMICS (4) PR: ECN 201-202 or ECN 501-502. The economics of urban areas including analysis of their growth and development as well as intra-urban location patterns. Economic analysis at an advanced level of urban social problems. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY ECN 601. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (3) PR: Cl. Theoretical and empirical research. Selection of assumptions. Model construction Specification of critical hypotheses Design of experimental tests Sources of data Model evaluation and revision in light of test results. Scientific reporting. ECN 602. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (S) PR: ECN 605 and ECN 607. An intense analysis of the main currents of modern economic thought during the last one hundred years ECN 603. MANAGERIAL STATISTICS 1 (3) PR: ECN 331 or 503 or equivalent. Techniques for statistical decisions under incomplete information Prior probabilities, likelihoods and revised probabilities. Loss functions. Bayesian decision rules Sequential decision strategies. Optimal decision revision. ECN 604. APPLIED FORECASTING (3) PR: ECN 331 or 503 or equivalent. Use of time series and cross sectional data for managerial control forecasting Construction of index numbers. Extraction of time series components. Leading economic indicators, diffusion indices and intentions surveys Cyclical fluctuations and spectral analysis Input-output models, econometric studies and linear forecasts. ECN 605. MICRO-ECONOMICS (3) PR: ECN 201-202 or ECN 501-502 An intensive study of microeconomics examining the behavior of consumers, and producers Topics covered include the general concept of scarcity and conceptual models in the areas of demand, production cost, and the firm and market organization. Advanced readings in theoretical and applied microeconomics will be emphasized. ECN 607. AGGREGATE ECONOMICS (3) PR: ECN 201-202 or ECN 501-502. An analysis of the macroeconomic interrelationships determining the level of income, employment, prices and interest rates over time and the impact of government policy upol) these variables. ECN 608. APPLIED ECONOMIC ANALYSIS (3) PR: ECN 605, 607. Application of micro and macro economic analysis to problems of policy and procedure in business and government. ECN 610. MANPOWER ECONOMICS SEMINAR (S) PR : ECN 201-202, 501-502, or Cl. This course is designed to provide the student with a background in labor force statistics, labor institutions, and problems of employment and un-

PAGE 63

158 EDUCATION employment. This background then allows for further study of the causes and remedies for unemployment and under employment. ECN 611. ADV AN CED MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3) PR: ECN 201-202 or 501-502, GBA 603 or equiv a lent. Advanced study of decision-making in households firms and not-for-profit institutions Topics cover demand, production and cost, organizational goals, efficiency vs effectiveness, environmental influences on decision-making Both problems of analysis and measurement are emphasized. ECN 612. ADVANCED BUSINESS FLUCTUATION AND ECONOMIC FORECASTING (3) PR : ECN 201-202 or ECN 501-502, GBA May be waived by instructor. Applications of statistical techniques to forecasting aggregate business activity GNP and GNP components. Critical analysis of forecasting techniques and applications of forecasting methods to business decisions ECN 614. LABOR RELATIONS LAW (3) A survey of the various legal constraints applicable to the employeremployee relationship. Included are such areas as collective bargaining, civil rights, and fair labor standards. (Also offered as MAN 614 ) ECN 623. PUBLIC FINANCE I (4) PR: ECN 201-202 or 501-502 or equivalent. An examinat i on of the role of th e public sector and its contribution to economic welfare. Tax and expenditure polici e s are examined in relation to their effects on r e source a lloc a tion and income di s tribution. ECN 624. PUBLIC FINANCE II (4) PR : ECN 6 2 3 Topics in public economics including cost functions for public goods redistributive techniques, fiscal federalism, major i s sues in government expenditures, environ mental policies stabilization growth a nd debt policy. ECN 625 MONET ARY THEORY (5) PR: ECN 605, 607 A dvanced discussion of the impact of the financial sector upon r eal economic magnitudes. The course emphasizes theore tic a l and empirical contributions found in the current literature a s an e xtension of earlier work done in the field on monetary theory ECN 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH. (credit varies) PR : GR M aster' s lev el. Repe a table. (S/U only ) ECN 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (1-6) PR : Graduate standing and CC. The course content will depend on student demand and in s tructor s interest. ECN 699. THESIS: MASTER'S (credit varies) Repeatable. (S/U only.) EDUCATION Professors : E. C. Anderson, M. L. Austin, J. W Barnard, J. A Battle W F. Benjamin, W K. Bott, L E. Bowers, H F Boyd, W. W. Burley, M E. Crickenberger, C. W Engel, D G Ferguson, J.C. Follman, J. A Howell, C W. Hunnicutt R. M. Jaeger, G. 0. Johnson, H.J. Keeler, E. Kimmel, D L. Lantz D. R Lichtenberg, C. C. Manker, J. L. Mazur H. C Merriam, L. E Monley, D. D. Neville, R L. Ober, D. E. Orlosky, R. A Patouillet, D M Purdom, J. H Robinson, J Selman R L. Shannon J T Sisco, D D Sisk A.G. Smith D E Stone R A. Urbanek, A. Ward, C. Weingartner, W.W. West, R E. Wilk; Associate Professors: L. V. Anderson, B L. Beasley, W W. Beasley, J C Bondi, D E Bostow, H. G. Brady, B C Brantley, F. D. Breit, V. A Bridges, R G. Bruce, H C. Bryant, J T Bullock, C.H. Busha, D. L. Carroll, J. A Chambers, C H Collier, C. J. Craig, J Croft W P. Danenburg J C Dickinson V J. Drapela, L. D Dubois R. C Dwyer T D. Freijo F W. Freshour J K Gates, 0 G Geiger, F S Goforth L. Greabell B W Hall, H. A Hoffman, D. P. Jaeschke E. V. Johanningmeier, R E. Johnson, H G Karl, L. T. Karns, T W Keene, F. B. Keiter, G. H Kincaid, M Kleg, S E Klesius J Knego, C. D Lavely, B. Lax, J. Levy, B. Lichtenberg, R Linder, J A Long R L. Loveless, A J Lowe M Mann L. McClellan, P E McClendon W J. Musgrove P J Newcombe R E. Palmer, E E Panther. D. D Peterson H.P. Pfost, E R Phillips F. L. Prince, I. M. Sexton, S H Silverman S. P Singh C. D. Smith H. E. Steiner C. M. Story, P W Tanner T. S. Tocco, R C Toothman A. M. Troutman, A. E. Uprichard. q W Vanover, G M Weeks, H. Weinberg, V W. Whitney T C. Wilson; Assistant Professors : C L. Anderson G. Bangstad, W. T. Bridges, L. Campbell, L. P Cleary R Cline, L. J Cqtton. P. Czyzewski M. W Durso, S. P Harter, T K. Hearn, R Hill F. F Johnson, J Kase B W. Kazani s J. A. Merica, R I. Mumme, J. A. Olson, G E. Patterson R. F Pride, D J Puglisi, R A Scott, H A. Sproles, D J Stapleton, M. S Swafford, S. Thompson B. Thorstenberg. G. M. Towery, A. E Unruh, M G Villeme ; lnstructors: G R B arkholz E. C. Guetzloe, A F Kerns J Klesius, B V LeBaron, G S : Marin W. E Pearcey J. E Radloff, C. J Schwartz ; Lecturers : J Borg R E Dwyer C. A Gordon, M S. Holland J C. Moore C. J Pierce, J S Pope, L. R. Stewart, F Totten J F Young ; Counselor-Advisor: L. G Roberts; Teaching Associates: R. G Brightwell N Cooke, M P Nesman, S Pinner, P. M Robertson, B Wagner. Art Education (EDA) UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDA 308. EXPERIENTIAL BASIS IN ART EDUCATION (4) PR: Admission to College of Education. Designed to help the individual student di scover and develop meanings and values in art and education with emphasis on communicative skills, both verbal and visual. Focus will be o n the individual and potential alternatives in the te a ching of a rt. (Formerly EDA 377) EDA 310. ART TEACHING STRATEGY AND MEDIA WORKSHOP I (5) PR : Admission to College of Education and EDA 308. A combination of theory, philosophy and practice in both public and private learning centers to provide the student with a variety of teaching concept s a nd media exploration in art education and to further enable the student to understand stages of young people, three to eighteen. (Formerly EDA 379). EDA 408. SEMINAR IN ART EDUCATION ADMINISTRA 1JON (2) PR : Admission to College of Education and EDA 308. The concepts and areas of skill ess e ntial to successful practice in art education man a g e ment. To include understanding of how art programs are funded art facility planning, art curriculum development, art exhibition techniques public relations promotion and supply and e quipment requirements. EDA 410. URBAN ENVIRONMENT ARTS WORKSHOP (5) PR : Admission to College of Education and EDA 308 Identific a tion, explor a tion, and experimentation with unique urban spaces and populations a s potential new environments for teaching and learning in the arts. EDA 412. ART TEACHING STRATEGIES AND MEDIA WORKSHOP II (5) PR: Admission t o College of Education and EDA 308 Media and the learning pro c es s a s a mean s of self-expression will be explored Media e xperience in sound exploration visual explorat ion through photographic arts cinematography and video-television sy s tem s Exploration of local business and industrial technology for de v eloping experimental media forms Designing of teaching s tr a tegies for creative media experiences as well as skill s in media criticism to include

PAGE 64

application at elementary and secondary levels. (Formerly EDA 441.) EDA 450. CRAFTS WORKSHOP IN ART EDUCATION (4) PR: Admission to College of Education and EDA 308. The study of processes and media involved in the expression of individual ideas through crafts Emphasis placed on crafts in a contemporary society with skills in metals, weaving, fibers, and ceramics and their application in a public school curriculum EDA 452. ART MEDIA FOR CHILDREN (5) PR : EDE 421 or EDA 308. An in-depth study of arts and craft media for children Emphasis will be placed on innovative use of new materials (Formerly EDA 521.) EDA 455. EXPERIMENTAL FILMMAKING FOR CHILDREN (5) PR : EDA 308 or EDE 421 or EDE 435 (suggested : COM 550). A study of basic experimental film techniques and laboratory experiences with children in the public schools, community centers and non-school arts programs (Formerly EDA 531.) FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDA 660. HISTORICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATION OF ART EDUCATION (4) Pa s t and contemporary philosophies and practices in art education. EDA 661. ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF ART EDUCATION (4) Principles of admini s tration and s upervision of art programs in the school. EDA 682 . RESEARCH SEMINAR IN ART PROGRAM (4) PR : EDA 660 or Cl. Literature and research in art education Various approaches to problem solving and evaluation with emphasis on individual research. EDA 698. FIELD WORK IN ART EDUCATION (2-6) For s tudents with degrees eeking status Supervised partici pation in activities related to art education in community centers, non -s chool arts programs, planned .workshop and research Curriculum (EDC) LOWER LEVEL COURSES EDC IOI. INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING (4) PR: Fre s hman only or CI. The people with whom teachers wo rk, the type s of tasks they perform and the challenges they can anticipate. Observation of teaching at several grade levels. (S/U only ) UPPER LEVEL COURSES E DC 401. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (5) PR: EDF 305 and 307, and admission to a teacher education pr o gram Structure and purposes of curriculum organization with special emphasis on the quality of curriculum. Students enrolled in EDC 401 are required to spend six hours a week in public schools as pre-interns in addition to regular class hours. EDC 480. DIRECTED STUDY (1-4) PR: Senior standing To extend competency in teaching field Offered only as a scheduled class. EDC 481. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1-4) PR : Senior standing and con se nt of program coordinator. EDC 485. DIRECTED READINGS (1-4) M ay be repeated for a total of 4 quarter hours. EDC 498. SENIOR SEMINAR IN EDUCATION (3) PR: Senior standing. Synthesis of candidate's courses in his complete college program Required concurrently with internship EDC 499. INTERNSHIP (1-12) One full quarter of intern s hip in a public or private school. Intern takes Senior in Education concurrently In EDUCATION 159 special programs where the intern experience is distributed over two or more quarters, students will be registered for credit which accumulates to 12 quarter hours. (S/U only ) FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDC 501. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION: ELEMENTARY OR SECONDARY (5) Curriculum scope, sequence and interrelationships, with a critical evaluation of current trends. EDC 510. HEALTH PROBLEMS IN CHILDREN (4) Health problems prevalent in the culturally disadvantaged child and the teacher s role in referral or educational adaptation in classroom activities EDC 552. CREATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING FOR THE CHILD (4) Exploration of the concept of creativity, its factors, mea s urement, and application to education Opportunities are given to work with children in a laboratory setting and to prepare materials to be used with small groups of children. EDC 557. CURRICULUM PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT IN SECONDARY ENGLISH (4) PR: Certification in English or Mass Communications Examination of new curricular policies ang procedures relating to the teaching of English in the secondary s chool. EDC 559. CURRICULUM EVALUATION IN SECONDARY ENGLISH (4) PR : Certification in English or Mass Communications. Examination of new evaluation policies and procedures relating to curricula in English in the secondary school. EDC 585. EDUCATION WORKSHOP (1-5) Professional in-service workshop in various areas of educa tion May be repeated when subjects differ. Not normally used in degree programs. (S/U only.) FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDC 601. THEORETICAL ISSUES IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (4) PR: 8 quarter hours at the graduate level in the Foundations area s. Open only to degree-seeking graduate s tudents Advanced study of basic concepts and their practical application. Persistent issues and problems and development of rationale for their examination EDC 661. PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISION (5) PR: Courses in general curriculum. Instructional leadership with emphasis on organization for curriculum improvement and in-service growth for professional school personnel. EDC 671. PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION (5) Educational administration as a profession Consideration is given to organization control, and support of the educational system. EDC 673. SCHOOL LAW (4) Basic essentials of school law, a review of court decisions affecting American education, with emphasis upon the study of Florida State Statutes as they pertain to the question of Florida public schools. EDC 674. CASE STUDIES IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION (4) PR : Consent of the program and/or EDC 671. Case s tudies presented are designed to help prospective administrafors think through various administrative problems identify feasible solutions and critically examine the decisions that are made The skill of decision making is an integral focus of the course EDC 675. SCHOOL FINANCE (4) PR : Principles of Educational Administration of Cl. A study of the support of public education programs through local, state and federal sources; principles guiding the distribution of funds for equal educational opportunity ; m e thods of budget

PAGE 65

160 EDUCATION preparation and administration; and projecting future funding requirements. EDC 677. PLANNING EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES (4) PR : CI. Study of problems in the planning, construction, and utilization of educational facilities. Visitation and/or eval uation of selected school plants. EDC 678. PROBLEMS IN SUPERVISION: SECONDARY (4) PR: Consent of the program and/or EDC 661. The analysis of instructional problems in schools. Emphasis of the course is directed to supervisory tasks, case studies, and the application of problem solving techniques and strategies EDC 679. ADMINISTRATIVE ANALYSIS AND CHANGE (4) A comp-etency based course on the application of function analysis, the Critical Incident technique and the Delphi technique to the identification, assignment, and evaluation of administrative tasks within selected organizational settings EDC 680. ADMINISTRATION PRACTICUM (4-10) PR: Completion of a significant amount of the student's program. Field experiences in school syst;:ms for the purpose of identifying and analyzing educational problems. Applica tion of concepts developed in the student's program to the solution of these problems. (Formerly EDC 695. ) EDC 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH (credit varies) PR GR. Master's level. Repeatable. (S/U only.) EDC 683. SELECTED TOPICS IN EDUCATION (1-5) PR: Graduate Standing and Cl. Each topic is a course under the supervision of a faculty member. The title and content will vary according to the topic. EDC 685. SCHOOL CURRICULUM IMPROVEMENT (4) Workshop for the improvement of the curricuJun\ of an elementary or secondary school. Open only to teachers in service Complete faculty participation required. EDC 689. SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION PLANNING SECONDARY (4) Individually planned course in a secondary school subject area for in-service teachers EDC 691. INTERNSHIP (1-9) PR: CI. Open to graduate degree candidates only. Supervised teaching at the secondary or junior college level as ap propriate. (S/U only.) EDC 699. THESIS: MASTER'S (credit varies) Repeatable. (SIU only ) EDC 781. DIRECTED RESEARCH (credit varies) PR: GR. Ph.D. level. Repeatable. (S/U only.) EDC 783. SELECTED TOPICS (1-5) PR: CC. Selected topics in advanced Education. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 15 hours. EDC 791. GRADUATE SEMINAR (1-5) PR: CC. Seminar in advanced Education. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 15 hours EDC 799. DISSERTATION: DOCTORAL (credit varies) PR: Must be admitted to Doctoral Candidacy. Repeatable. (S/U only.) Elementary Education (EDE) LOWER LEVEL COURSES EDE 201. INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (4) An overview of early childhood education with emphasis on its historical development, current theories, and practices UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDE 409 through EDE 440 open only to upper-level majors in Early Childhood, Elementary, or Exceptional Child Education. EDE 409. READING FOR THE CHILD (5) PR: Admission to Colll!ge of Education and EDF 305. Readiness, word recognition (phonics, structural, and contex tural analysis) word meanings, basic study skills com prehension abilities and reading interests : in-school work required. EDE 411. LANGUAGE ARTS FOR THE CHILD (4) PR: Admission to College of Education. Speaking, writing, reading and listening experi'ences of children and ways these skills are developed for individual creative expression. EDE 413. LITERATURE FOR THE CHILD (4) PR: Admission to College of Education. History and development of children's literature Study pf bibliographic sources, criteria and techniques for selection and use. EDE 415. ARITHMETIC FOR THE CHILD (5) PR: Admission to College of Education and MTH 331, 332, 333, or equivalent. Methods of teaching elementary school mathematic s. EDE 417. SCIENCE FOR THE CHILD (5) PR: Admission to College of Education and completion of General Distribution Requirement biological or physical science in sequence. Techniques and materials for teaching science in the elementary school. EDE 419. SOCIAL STUDIES FOR THE CHILD (5) PR : Admission to College of Education and completion of General Distribution Social Science sequence. Significant concepts in the subjects concerned with human relationships. Emphasis upon teaching pupils to solve rather than be engulfed by social problems. EDE 421. ART FOR THE CHILD (4) PR: Admission to College of Education. Art and the intellectual, creative, emotional, and esthetic growth of children. EDE 423. MUSIC FOR THE CHILD: SKILLS (2) PR : Admission to College of Education. Voice production ; music reading, creative composition and some instrumental experience. School song materials used to support this work. EDE 424. MUSIC FOR THE CHILD: METHODS (3) PR: Admission to College of Education & EDE 423. Music Literature and teaching aids for children including singing, rhythmic, creative, instrumental and listening experiences and their presentation. EDE 425. HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE CHILD (4) PR: Admission to College of Education Motivating factors of play; knowledge and skill in basic rhythmic activities; games and stunts ; health instruction for the child. EDE 426. CREATIVE EXPERIENCES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (4) PR: Admission to College of Education. The development of the child's creative expression through art, music, dance, play, and drama; included are the materials content, and teaching techniques. EDE 429. PROGRAMS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (5) PR: Admission to College of Education. A study of school programs for children ages 3-8. Analysis and evaluation of these programs in the light of the (Ilost effective current classroom practices. Observation and participation included. (Formerly EDE 529 ) EDE 435. LANGUJ\GE AND LEARNING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD (4) PR: Admission to College of Education The study of the acquisition of language in young children and the development of basic communications skills in the Language Arts Curriculum, infancy through age 8 years. (Formerly EDE 531.) EDE 440. TEACHING METHODS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (4) PR: Admission to the College of Ei:lucation. Suggested co requisite: EDC 401. Process of teaching elementary school

PAGE 66

subjects. To be taken quarter prior to internship. Six hours per week as pre-intern in public schools required (S/U only) EDE 445. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF LEARNING DISABILITIES IN SCHOOL MATHEMATICS (4) PR : EDE 415 or equivalent. Presentation and analysis of teaching methods and models appropriate for use with children experiencing learning disabilitie s in mathematics; supervised conduct of a case study. (Formerly EDE 515. ) FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDE 519. SOCIAL GROWTH IN CHILDHOOD (4) PR : Admi ssio n to College of Education A s tudy of the princip a l factors which influence the social development of young children with particular emphasis upon those cultural influences which affect both child development and the educational program s for the young child EDE 527. DEVELOPMENTAL PROCESSES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD (4) PR : Admis s ion to College of Education. The normal processes of development among c hildren age s 3-8, the relation between these characteristics a nd the c urriculum : child study through observation required EDE 539. WORKSHOP IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (4) PR : Admi ss ion to College of Education. Individual problems and innovations related to method s a nd materials of instruc tion in the early childhood grade s EDE 551. TEACHING METHODS IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL-ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (4) PR : Cl. An alys i s of nature and communication needs of students in grades 5-8 with emph as i s on l a boratory method s of teaching language FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDE 603. SEMINAR IN CURRICULUM RESEARCH (1-5) PR : EDF 607. Critical evaluation of c urrent research and curriculum literature, design a nd analy sis of individual r es earch topic s leading to s atisfa ction of r e sea rch require ments. EDE 609. TRENDS IN READING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (4) PR : EDE 409 or e quiv a lent. Extensive s tudy of recent trends in m a teri a l s a pproache s, a nd procedures in teaching reading in th e ele m e nta ry sc hool. EDE 611. TRENDS IN LANGUAGE ARTS INSTRUCTION (4) PR : EDE 411 and 413. Adv a nced materials a nd processes of instruction in elementary school l a nguage arts programs. EDE 613. CREATIVE ARTS INSTRUCTION (4) Creative proces ses in the teaching of visual arts, music dance, a nd drama to elementa ry s chool pupil s. EDE 615. TRENDS IN MATHEMATICS INSTRUCTION (4) PR : EDE 415 or equivalent Philo s ophy content and process of qualitative in s truction in modern mathematics in elemen tary school programs EDE 617. TRENDS IN SCIENCE INSTRUCTION (4) PR : EDE 417 Topics in the biological a nd physical sciences appropriate for tea c hing in excellent elementary sc hool program s. Analysis of modern c urri c ulum materials used in presenting scie nce a s a process of inquiry. EDE 619. TRENDS IN SOCIAL STUDIES INSTRUCTI N (4) PR : EDE 419. Crucial co ncept s drawn from the social s ciences Analy sis of the problem s approach. Students will select an a rea of ind ependent study on a n advanced level. EDE 621. ART FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER (4) Exploration of various m ateria l s a nd techniques in rela tionship to current theori es a bout a rt a nd the intellecual, creative, emotional a nd esthetic grow th of c hildren EDUCATION 161 EDE 629. ADVANCED PROGRAMS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (4) PR : EDE 429, EDF 605 or CI. A study of innovative curriculum designs in Early Childhoud Education, with emphasis given to related research . EDE 631. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE IN THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM (4) PR : EDE 413. CI. A study of significant concepts emerging trends and classroom techniques for implementation and utilization of children's literature in all areas of the curriculum. EDE 639. HOME-SCHOOL-COMMUNITY INTERACTION IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (4) PR : EDE 429, EDF 605 or CI. An intensive s tudy of the roles of parents, teacher aides, and community agencies involved in the education of the young child. EDE 641. PROBLEMS IN SUPERVISION (4) PR : EDF 607 or equiv a lent and EDC 661. Problems in supervising for curriculum improvement within the elemen tary school. EDE 645. ADV AN CED DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF LEARNING DISABILITIES IN SCHOOL MATHEMATICS (4) PR : EDE 415 or equivalent. Study of the s ymptoms etiologies and consequences of children' s learning disabilities in mathematics; study and guided application of theoretical models used in diagno s is and tre a tment ; s upervi se d conduct of a case s tudy (Formerly EDE 515.) EDE 646. ADVANCED PRACTICUM IN DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CHILDREN'S LEARNING DISABILITIES IN MATHEMATICS (1-8) PR: EDE 645. Supervised conduct of a case s tud y with a child experiencing learning difficulties in mathematic s. Procedures used and reporting practice employed developed i n EDE 645 reviewed and extended. (Formerly EDE 516 .) EDE 651. THEORIES AND PATTERNS OF ADV AN CED LANGUAGE ARTS INSTRUCTION (4) PR : EDE 611 or equivalent. Thi s c ourse is organized to present new re s earch findings and theories r e l a ting to language patterns and contemporary program s designed for teaching the language arts EDE 652. APPLICATIONS OF THEORIES TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF LANGUAGE ARTS PROGRAMS (4) PR : EDE 611 or equivalent, EDE 651. Thi s co urse is designed to apply research findings and theorie s for developing and organizing instructional improvement of the language arts. EDE 687. SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION PLANNING: ELEMENTARY (4) Individually planned course in an e lementary school s ubject area for in-service teachers. Exceptional Child Education (EDS) UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDS 311. EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN IN THE SCHOOLS (4) PR : EDF 305 or Cl. Characteri s tic s and need s of the Culturally Disadvantaged Emotion a lly Disturbed & S ocia lly Maladjusted, Gifted, Hearing Impaired Mentally R e tarded Physically Handicapped, Speech Impaired & Visually Lim ited EDS 322. INTRODUCTION TO MENTAL RETARDATION (4) PR : EDF 305. EDS 311, or CI. Classificati o n, diagnosis characteristics, and treatment of the mentally retarded EDS 329. UNDERGRADUATE SUPERVISED PRACTICUM IN MENTAL RETARDATION (6) Supervised Practicum experiences i n the educational social a nd vocational planning of mentally r e tarded individuals.

PAGE 67

162 EDUCATION EDS 350. INTRODUCTION TO GIFTED CHILDREN (4) PR: Junior class standing. Diagnosis, characteristics, and educational provision of the gifted and talented. EDS 359. FIELD WORK WITH GIFTED CHILDREN (1-6) Organized, supervised experiences with gifted children Specific experiences may be either a combination of observation and assistance with gifted children or individualized projects. EDS 389. UNDERGRADUATE SUPERVISED PRACTICUM IN SPECIFIC LEARNING DISAIULITIES (6) PR: EDS 311, EDS 481, and Cl. Supervised praeticum experiences in classes for children with specific learning disabilities. EDS 411. EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (4) PR : EDF 305, EDS 311, and Special Educational Major. Introduction to and familiarization with formal and informal techniques used to measure and evaluate all exceptional children The interpretation of information so derived for utilization in educational programming and individualization of instruction. EDS 423. PROCEDURES AND MATERIALS FOR ELEMENT ARY AGE EDUCABLE MENTALLY RETARDED CHILDREN (4) PR: EDS 329 and Cl. Special class organization, curriculum development, procedures and materials for elementary age educable mentally retarded children. (Formerly EDS 423 I.) EDS 424. EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE TRAINABLE MENTALLY RETARDED (4) PR: EDS 322 or Cl. Special class organization curriculum adjustments, methods and techniques of teaching the trainable retarded. EDS 425. PROCEDURES AND MATERIALS FOR SECONDARY AGE EDUCABLE MENTALLY RETARDED YOUTH AND ADULTS (4) PR: EDS 329 and Cl. Special class organization, curriculum development, procedures and materials for secondary age educable mentally retarded youth and adults (Formerly EDS 423 II. ) EDS 431. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH BEHAVIOR DISORDERS (4) PR : EDF 305, EDS 311, or Cl. Survey of emotional and social disorders in children an<1 youth manifested as behavior problems in the classroom; intervention techniques; implica tions for management tech niques in educational programs. EDS 432. EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH BERA VIOR DISORDERS (S) PR : EDF 305, EDS 311, EDS 411, EDS 431. Acceptance in Program for Emotionally Disturbed, concurrent enrollment in EDS 439. Methods and techniques for teaching children and youth with behavior disorders ; individualization of instruc tion; planning and implementation of educational programs; precision teaching and behavior modification techniques as applied to the education of children and youth with behavior disorders EDS 439. UNDERGRADUATE SUPERVISED PRACTICUM IN BEHAVIOR DISORDERS (l-}0) PR : Acceptance in undergraduate program for Emotionally Disturbed. Supervised undergraduate practicum experiences with children and youth with behavior disorders. A one hour per week Seminar' is required concurrent with prl;lcticum. EDS 45 . EDUCATION PROCEDURES FOR THE GIFTED (4) PR : Junior class standing EDS 350. Curriculum adjustment, methods, and techniques appropriate for the education of gifted children Supervised experiences exploring creative techniques and the development of innovative teaching techniques wiH be provided. EDS 481. THEORIES IN SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES (4) PR : Senior standing and Cl. Characteristics, needs and abilities of children with specific learning disabilities. Em phasis is on theories, issues, trends, and philosophy of problems for such children. (Formerly EDS 581.) EDS 482. SKILLS IN DIAGNOSIS AND INSTRUCTION FOR CHILDREN WITH SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES (4) PR: EDS 481 and Cl. Instructional diagnosis and individ ualizing instruction for children with specific learning dis abilities (Formerly EDS 582. ) FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDS Sil. THE SLOW LEARNER IN THE SCHOOL (4) Characteristics, needs and educational planning for the slow learning child. Appropriate for special class teachers and regular class teachers. EDS 529. GRADUATE SUPERVISED PRACTICUM IN MENTAL RETARDATION (1-14) Supervised graduate practicum encompassing teaching and supervising experiences in public school classes for the mentally retarded. EDS 531. BEHAVIOR DISORDERS IN THE SCHOOLS (4) PR : EDF 305 or EDF 377 or PSY 200 or Cl. Survey of emotional and social disorders in children and the implications for educational programs Students may not receive credit for both EDS 531 and PSY 613. Behavioral Disorders of Children. EDS 541. THE CULTURALLY DISADVANTAGED AND THE SCHOOLS (4) Characteristics and needs of the culturally disadvantaged and their implications for educaiional programming EDS SSO. NATURE AND NEEDS OF THE GIFTED (4) Characteristics and educational needs of gifted children and youth. EDS SSI. EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE GIFTED (4) PR : EDS 550 or Cl. Curriculum adjustments, methods and techniques, classroom organization necessary for teaching the gifted EDS 559. SUPERVISED PRACTICUM FOR THE GIFrED(l-14) Planned supervised participation in activities related to specific areas of the gifted EDS 560. THE VISUALLY HANDICAPPED IN THE CLASSROOM (4) PR: EDS 311 and Cl. The visually handicapped in the classroOfll, structure hygiene and educational implications. (Formerly EDS 660.) EDS 561. EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS OF THE PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED (4) PR : EDS 311 or Cl. Introduction to the educational, psychological and social problems of the physically disabled child in the public schoQls EDS 562. TEACHING THE CEREBRAL PALSIED CHILD (4) PR : EDS 311 or Cl. Introduction to the educational, psycho aspects of cerebral l?alsy and its implications for classroom teachers. (Formerly EDS 662 ) FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDS 610. SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (4) A critical survey of the literature related to the psychological, sociological, and education problems of exceptional children EDS 611. PSYCHO-EDUCATIONAL APPRAISAL OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (4) PR: EDS 311 or EDS 610, EDS 411, EDF 607 or Cl. Educational planning for exceptional children bas ed on diagnostic information Include s both lecture and practicum experiences in evaluative and instructional techniques for exceptional children

PAGE 68

EDS 612. SUPERVISION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILD PROGRAMS (4) PR: Cl. Principles of supervision and their application to exceptional child education. EDS 613. ADMINISTRATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILD PROGRAMS (4) PR: Cl. Procedure which local, state, and national adminis trators may use to implement services for exceptional children. EDS 620. BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF MENTAL RETARDATION (4) PR: EDS 322 or Cl. The contribution of biological factors towards the causation of mental deficiency; implications for casefinding, c are, and education. EDS 621. SOCIOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL ASPECTS OF MENTAL RETARDATION (4) PR: EDS 311, Cl. Evaluation of relevant literature. EDS 6Z2. ADV AN CED EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED (4-8) PR: EDS 423, experience in teaching the retarded, identi fication of a problem prior to registration, or Cl. Specific curriculum and methodological problems in teaching the retarded EDS 623. CURRENT TRENDS AND ISSUES IN THE EDUCATION OF THE MENTALLY RETARDED (4) PR: EDS 610 and Cl. Survey of current trends and issues related to the education of the mentally retarded. EDS 631. EDUCATIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE PSYCHOPA THOLOGIES OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (4) PR: EDS 531 and Cl. In-depth survey of childhood psycho pathology covering autism, schizophrenia and psychotic behavior. Guided exploration of exemplary services treat ment and methodolol!Y EDS 632. EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN I (4) PR : EDS 531 and Cl. Personality dynamics and research findings as related to the interpretation of disturbed behaviOr ; techniques for the management of individuai, small group, and clas s room behavior EDS 633. EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN II (4) PR : EDS 531, 632, or Cl. Personality dynamics and learning theory as related to the facilitation of learning and communica tion; techniques for teaching both individuals and groups with emphasis on improved interpersonal relations, academic learning, and communication skills. EDS 639. FIELD WORK IN EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED (1-14) PR: EDS 531 (may be taken concurrently) and Cl. Supervised graduate practicum experience s with emotionally disturbed children A one hour per week Seminar is required concurrent with practicum. EDS 643. GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING OF EXCEPTiONAL CHILDREN AND THEIR PARENTS (5) PR: EDS 610 and Cl. Investigation of the guidance needs of exceptional children and par<:nts. Through child study techniques, opportunities will be provided for the develop ment of sl'ills in guiding parents of exceptional children in providirtg assistance/support in their total development and use of potential. EDS 649. FIELD WORK WITH POTENTIALLY HANDICAPPED (CULTURALLY DISADVANTAGED) (1-9) Teaching and participation in activities related to teaching disadvantaged young children (N-3). EDS 653. SEMINAR IN EDUCATION OF THE GIFTED: RECENT RESEARCH (4) A critical survey of the literature related to the psychological and educational problems of gifted children. EDUCATION 163 EDS 654. SEMINAR IN EDUCATION OF THE GIFTED: PROGRAMS (4) A Sl.\rvey of existing programs for the gifted and evaluation of relevant literature. Individual students will plan and present a model program for the gifted. EDS 680. CURRENT TRENDS AND ISSUES RELATED TO EDUCATING SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES CHILDREN (4) PR : Cl. Trends and issues related to educating children with specific learning disabilities. (Formerly EDS 681.) EDS 682. ADVANCED ASSESSMENT AND PROCEDURES FOR SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABLED YOUNGSTERS (4) PR: Cl. Concepts related to the assessment and teaching of specific learning disabled children. -EDS 700. PHILOSOPHY AND PROCESS IN THE PREPARATION OF SPECIALISTS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (4) PR: Admission in the Program for Ed.S. and Ph D. in Education. In depth exploration of the philosophy and theory in special education. A theoretical basis for the preparation of specialists in the field of exceptional child education. EDS 710. SEMINARS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (1-10) PR: Preliminary Admission to The Graduate Program and Cl. Seminar Topics will vary to include neurophysiological mechanisms, current trends, issues, and curriculum develop ment in Speciai Education May be repeated for a maximum of 10 hours EDS 712. RESEARCH STUDIES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS IN THE EDUCATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (5) PR : EDF 605, 607 or equivalentCl. This course will involve a study of current research in exceptional child education The transition from theory into practice will be made through the examination and discussion of implications to the field of special education that can be drawn from the research. EDS 714. EDUCATIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF PSYCHO SOCIAL ASPECTS OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (1-8) PR: Cl. This course will be concerned with the identification of the psycho-social needs and characteristics of exceptional children Opportunity will also be given to the analysis of the educational implications of these needs and characteristics May be repeated for a maximum of 8 hours. EDS 719. FIELDWORK WITH EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (1-8) PR : Cl. Practical field experience in curriculum development, classroom teaching, supervision and/or administrative areas in special education. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 hours. EDS 783. SELECTED TOPICS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION(l-12) PR: EDS 712 or Cl. Identification and specification of a research problem in special education Opportunity will be provided for the student to gather and process data, culminating in a written report and/or oral presentation to fellow student researchers. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours. EDS 785. SPECIALIZED STUDY IN: MENTAL RETARDATION, EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED, SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES, AND GIFTED EDUCATION (1-12) PR: Cl. Exploration and demonstration of knowledge in an area of interest to the student in special education. The specialized study may also include areas for which the student needs to demonstrate a higher level of competency May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours English Education (EDT) UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDT 431. CURRENT TEACHING OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND MEDIA (4) PR: Acceptance into College of Education. EDT 431, EDT

PAGE 69

164 EDUCATION 447, and EDC 401 are typically taken concurrently. Methods of teaching language and media Includes current findings on teaching usage, dialect, grammar, and semantics, as well as approaches to media in English. EDT 447. METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISHLITERATURE AND READING (4) PR : EDT 431, EDT 447, an d EDC 401 a re typically taken concurrently. A su rv ey of materi a l s available to adolescent readers plu s an overview of organizational strate gie s for teaching literatur e and reading FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDT 583. SELECTED TOPICS IN THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH (4) PR : Certification in English a nd /or Mass Communications an d approval of graduate adviser. Investigation of topics which a re of s pecial intere st to the st udent and are rel ated to the teaching of English in the seco nda ry sc hool. Topics will be se le cted by the st udent in accordance with his particular goals a nd will be approved by the student s graduate adviser. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDT 631. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION (4) Curricular pattern s an d instructional practic es in secon d ary English EDT 633. CURRENT TEACHING OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (4) Application of recent techniques of language s tud y to classroom teaching of English, especially in relation to current textbooks. EDT 651. NEW PERSPECTIVES ON THE TEACHING OF LITERATURE IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS (4) PR : Certification in English or Mass Communications. Survey of recent inve stigatio n into ado le scents perception of a nd responses to literature and implication s for organization and presentation of literature curr icula EDT 661. NEW PERSPECTIVES ON THE TEACHING OF MEDIA IN SECONDARY ENGLISH (4) PR : Certification in English of Mass Communications. An examination of new method s and materi a l s designed specifi cally for media based activities in the seco nd ary English classroom. Foreign Language Education (EDX) UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDX 449. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-FOREIGN LANGUAGE (4) PR : EDC 401 or conc urrent registration in EDC 401. Tec hniques and material s of in struct ion in foreign l a nguage s To be taken in the quarter prior to intern s hip. EDX 465. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-LATIN (4) PR : EDC 401 or concurrent registration in EDC 401. Tec hnique s and materi a l s of instruction in Latin. FOR QRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDX 649. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION (4) PR: Consultation with instructor, plu s foreign l a nguage fluency Curricular pattern s a nd instructional pr ac tice s in the teaching of seco ndar y foreign langu ages. Foundations (EDF) UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDF 303. INTRODUCTION TO AND EVALUATION (4) PR : Upper level stan ding. Elementary concepts basic to a general under s t and ing of mea surement and evaluation pro cedure s EDF 305. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING (4) PR : SSI 201, 203 or General P sychology; a nd admission to College of Education or CC. Application of respondent and operant learning principles to cla s sroom learning, teaching model s for different instructional goals, analysis of teacher beh av ior micro-teaching. Credit cannot be earned for both EDF 305 and EDF 377. EDF 307. SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (4) PR : Admission to College of Education. Social, economic and political context within which sc hools function and the values which provide direction for our schoo ls; the culture as a motivating influence in instruction. Should not be taken concurrently with EDF 305. EDF 309. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION (4) PR : Upper le vel standi ng. A critical anal ys i s of selecte d philo so phie s of education in term s of their beliefs about the n at ure of m an a nd society and thei r related ass umptions about the nature of reality, knowledge and value. EDF 311. COMPARATIVE EDUCATION (4) PR : Upper level standing. A comparison of contemporary educational systems of selected countries with that of the United States. EDF 313. VALUES CLARIFICATION FOR TEACHERS (4) PR: Junior standing recommended. Techniques for teachers in identifying and analyzing values a nd value orientations of individuals a nd groups of s tud e nt s in the school. EDE 377. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (4) PR: Upper Level s t and ing The application of behavioral principles to human behavior in educational institutions, home and community setting s. Credit cannot be earned for both EDF 305 a nd EDF 377. (For non-educ atio n m a jors only.) EDF 379. BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION TECHNIQUES (4) PR : EDF 305. Special technique s in beh avior modification for c hildren with learn ing difficulties. EDF 444. WOMEN AND THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS (4) PR: Junior standing recommended. Covers both the role women playe d in education in the U.S. a nd the way schools have helped to s hape the role women play in American society. Topics include development of sex-role stereotypes through classroom interaction s and curriculum materials, the s tatus of women in public a nd higher education and laws affecting it, a nd the role of the sc hool s in forming educational a nd career as piration s of girls a nd women Emphasis will be place d on ways parents and teachers may counteract the sex typing which sc hool s, as they are currently st ructured perpetu ate. (A l so offered as WSP 444.) FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDF 502. ADOLESCENCE (4) A study of the educational, intellectual, personalit y, physical, socia l a nd vocational factors in a dole sce nce EDF 575. AMERICAN DEMOCRACY AND PUBLIC EDUCATION (4) Interdependence of the public school and democracy in the United States a nd the re s ponsibility of the sc hool in fostering and st r e ngthening basic democratic principles. EDF 585. PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION AND TEACHING MACHINES (4) Principle s for programming in the seve ral academic subjects. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDF 605. FOUNDATIONS OF MEASUREMENT (4) Fundamental descriptive statis t ics, b asic measurement con cepts, role of mea surement in education, construction of teacher-made te s ts and interpretation of standardized tests EDF 607. FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (4) PR: EDF 605. Major types of educational research with e mph asis upon underst an ding the experimental method.

PAGE 70

, EDF 611. PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION I (4) Selected topics in psychology of human development and learning EDF 612. CHILD DEVELOPMENT (4) PR: EDF 611 or Cl. Educational, emotional, hereditary, intellectual, social and physical factors influen cing child growth and development. EDF 613. PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING (5) A consideration of several theories of learning and related research studies in regard to classroom application. EDF 615. BIOLOGICAL BASES FOR LEARNING AND BEHAVIOR (5) PR: One course in Educational Psychology. A study of human biological development and its influence upon learning and behavior. EDF 617. MEASUREMENT OF INDIVIDUAL INTELLIGENCE (5) PR : EDF 305 or 605 or equivalent and a course in educational measurement of statistics. Administration and interpretation of individual measures of intelligence Students may not receive credit for both EDF 617 and PSY 6l7. Individual Intelligence Testing. EDF 621. SOCIO-ECONOMIC FOUND A TIO NS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION (4) Significant socio-economic factors as they relate to major problems facing American education. EDF 623. HISTORICAL FOUND A TIO NS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION (4) Historical and comparative problems in American education which are relevant to contemporary issues EDF 625. PHILOSOPHICAL FOUND A TIO NS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION (4) Major philosophies of education which are relevant to an understanding of contemporary educational issues EDF 627. PROSEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE EDUCATION (4) Contemporary policies and practices in education in selected the world. Methodology in Comparative Educa tion Consideration will be given to needs and interests of individual students. EDF 631. THEORIES OF PERSONALITY FOR SCHOOL PERSONNEL (4) A comparative and integrated study of personality develop ment according to major psychological theories. Application of the theoretical constructs to education and guidance. EDF 635. BEHAVIOR THEORY AND CLASSROOM LEARNING (4) PR: EDF 613 or Cl. Theoretical and practical application of behavior modification. Will cover: Introduction into ex perimental methods, e.g., independent, dependent variables; and internal validity; principles of positive reinforcement; shaping and successive approximations; application of rein forcement (parameters); operant behavior under extinction; operant methods in behavior and development; readings in behavior modification-critical analysis ; field work. EDF644. WOMEN AND EDUCATION (4) Course is designed to enable public school personnel, teachers, counselors, administrators and other professionals, to identify those aspects of public education which perpetuate sex role stereotyping. Emphasis will be placed on how the law and formal and informal a ffirmative action activities can be employed to correct sexism in schools EDF 671. SELECTED TOPICS (2-4) PR: Cl. Exploration and demonstration of knowledge in an area of special interest to the student and/or in an area for which the student needs to demonstrate a higher level of competence. Defined to fit the needs of each student. EDF 675. FIELD EXPERIENCE (1-5) PR: Cl. Demonstrate skills in the practice of the student' s EDUCATION 165 specialty. Specific objectives will be defined according to the needs of the individual student. EDF 701. EDUCATION IN METROPOLITAN AREAS (4) PR: Graduate Standing; EDF 621, 623, or 625 or permission of the instructor. An examination of the school as a formal, socializ ing institution in relationship to the residential popu lations found within the metropolitan structure with specific reference to methodologies useful for educational planning. Topics will include an identification of the metropolitan concept; an analysis of metropolitan forms, functions and dynamics; a study of socio-economic structure and ethnic composition of residential populations al)d; a discussion of the school as a metropolitan institution interacting with a spectrum of socio-economic and ethnic groups. EDF 702. SCHOOL REFORM (4) PR : Graduate Standing; EDF 621, 623, or 625 or permission of the instructor. An examination of the history, background, sources, dynamics and effects of attempts at school reform. Topics will include role of indiv iduals, foundations, legisla tion, demography, politics, media, and technology as they relate to reform aims and strategies ; distinctions between short term planning for change and the preparation of long term future strategies. EDF 703. ANALYSIS OF EDUCATIONAL ISSUES (4) PR : Graduate Standing; EDF 621, 623, or 625 or permission of Instructor. An examination and analysis of selected critical issues in public schooling in terms of their axiological, historical, and socio-culturai bases. Includes such topics as: problems of curriculum reform, influence of legislation and court rulings on school teaching and administration, teachers' organizations, and problems of educational support. Emphasis will be placed on ways of conceptualizing and evaluating problems and issues EDF 704. CLASSICS IN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (4) PR : Graduate Standing ; EDF 621, 623, or 625 or Cl. An examination of the context, me.thodology, and impact of significant research studies in education Topics will include studies of the Herbartians, J. M. Rice, E. L. Thorndike, G. S. Hall, L P. Ayers, Willard Waller, the Reading Studies, the Eight Year Study, and School Surveys. Guidance (EDG) UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDG 401. INTRODUCTION TO GUIDANCE (5) PR : Upper level standing. An introduction to the role and function of guidance, school psychology, social work and other pupil personnel services from kindergarten through junior college. EDG 402. INTRODUCTION TO STUDENT PERSONNEL WORK IN HIGHER EDUCATION (5) PR: Cl. Study of student personnel services in institutions of higher education Identification of the needs of students and of the ways to respond to meet these needs. Survey of service units on a campus, in terms of structure, organization, funding, and evaluation of each unit. EDG 404. PROBLEMS IN RESIDENCE HALL MANAGEMENT (2) PR: Cl. In-depth study of problems related to residence hall living. FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDG 503. GUIDANCE IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (4) PR: CI. Application of guidance theories and skills to the work of vocational educators. The guidance role of teachers and their relationships with counselors in providing guidance services. EDG 529. COMPARATIVE GUIDANCE (4) PR : Cl. Study of guidance theories and practices in selected foreign countries as compared with the American guidance

PAGE 71

166 EDUCATION model. Evaluation of foreign guidance through critical analysi s of primary sources. For example: guidance philosophy and practice in countries of the Soviet Bloc. (Formerly EDG 629) FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EOG 601. PRINCIPLES OF GUIDANCE (5) PR: Cl. Required first course in specialization sequence for all guidance majors. Guid a nce as a profession; philosophic framework of the guidance program, its scope and place in the total educational context. EOG 603. THE INFORMATIONAL SERVICE IN GUIDANCE ( 4) PR : EDG 601. Occupational structure i n the United Sta tes; sources a nd use s of educational, occupational, social and personal information; collecting, classifying and communicat ing such information. EOG 609. THE APPRAISAL PROCEDURES IN GUIDANCE (5) PR: EDF 605 EOG 601. A study of test and non-test technique s of appraisal with emphasis on the use of standardized test data in guidance programs and the use of the individual case study approach. EOG 613. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF GUIDANCE SERVICES IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (3) PR : EDG 601. Organization of a guidance program in the elementary school, its relation to instruction and adminis tration. Guidance roles and relationship s of members of the school staff. EOG 615. ORGANIZATION AND ADMIN ISTRA TION OF GUIDANCE SERVICES IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS (3) PR: EDG 601. Organization of a guidance program and its place in the total educat\onal program ; responsibilities of various staff members and their relationships to each other. EOG 617. GROUP PROCEDURES IN GUIDANCE IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (3) PR: EDG 601 and EOG 621. Counterpart of EDG 619 for prospective secondary sc hool counselors. Use of groups in the counseling and guidance of children an d in working with parents and teachers. EOG 619. GROUP PROCEDURES IN GUIDANCE IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS (3) PR: EDG 601 and EDG 623 Group interaction and value s of group activity for guidance purposes. Methods and techniques for working with groups. EOG 621. THE COUNSELING SERVICE IN GUIDANCE IN ELEMENT ARY SCHOOLS (5) PR : EDG 601 and EDF 631. Counterpart of EOG 623 for prospective secondary school counselors. Counseling viewed as communications through media appropriate to children. EOG 623. COUNSELING THEORIES AND PRACTICES (5) PR: EDG 601 and EDF 631. Cl. Nature of the counseling process with emphasis on some theoretical approaches and practica l techniques. EOG 625 PRACTICUM IN ELEMENTARY GIDANCE COUNSELING AND CONSULTING (6) This course is the counterpart of EDG 627 for prospective secondary sc hool counselors; enrollment by permission of program chafrman only Counseling with children in groups as well a s individually; consultation s with parents, teachers, administrators, and fellow professionals regarding the children being counseled. (S/U only.) EOG 627. PRACTICUM IN SECONDARY SCHOOL GUIDANCE COUNSELING (6) Final course in guidance program; enrollment by permission of program chairman only. Supervised practice in working with individuals in counseling relation s hip (S/U only.) EOG 633. SEMINAR IN GUIDANCE (1-3) PR or CR: EDG 601, Cl. Significant issues in the field of guidance ; topics for discussion will vary according to needs and interests of students. (S/U only.) May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 hours. EOG 679. INDIVIDUAL STUDY (1-5) PR: Cl. Independent study, research and experiences relating to guidance and pupil personnel services under the supervision of a member of the Guidance Program faculty (May be repeated for maximum total of 5 hours.) (Formerly EDG 681.) Health Education (HEN) LOWER LEVEL COURSES HEN 201. CONTEMPORARY HEALTH SCIENCE (4) A comprehensive approach to health concerns and problems in contemporary society, including methods of assessing individual health needs. (S/U only.) UPPER LEVEL COURSES HEN 310. PROCESSES AND PROGRAMS IN HEALTH EDUCATION (3) PR : Admissii>n to Health Education Program, or CI. Survey of programs in Health Education in the schools and community. Processes in programs and curriculum development will also be emphasized. (S/U only.) HEN 3ll. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF THE HUMAN BODY (6) PR: Admission to Health Education Program or CI. A study of the normal structure and function of the human body. Focus is on the relationship of structure, function, and health status. (S/U only.) HEN 321. HEALTH EDUCATION ANDRELATEDHEALTH SCIENCE CONTENT: CHILDREN (4) PR: Admission to the program or CI. Programs curriculum, health services and health education related to health needs and interests of children. (S/U only.) HEN 322. SEMINAR AND HEAL TH EDUCATION AND PROGRAMS (5) PR : Admission to program Supervised field experiences in school (k-3), pre-school, and community health agencies Scheduled seminars w ill be conducted on campus and in the field (S/U only.) HEN 331. HEALTH EDUCATION AND RELATED HEAL TH SCIENCE CONTENT: PUBESCENCE (4) PR : Admission to the program or CI. Programs, curriculum, health services and health education related to health needs a nd interest of pubescence. (S/U only.) HEN 332. SEMINAR AND INTERNSHIP IN HEAL TH EDUCATION PROGRAMS-PUBESCENCE (5) PR: Admission to the program or Cl. Supervised teaching in he a lth education (middle school or junior high school). Selected field experiences in community health programs. (S/U only ) HEN 333. SOCIETY: CHILD AND PUBESCENT HEAL TH (2) PR: Admission to the program of Cl. Seminar for students, supervisors and professionals from health related discip l ines (S/U only ) HEN 411. HEALTH EDUCATION AND RELATED HEALTH. SCIENCE CONTENT: ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS (4) PR: Admission to the program or CI. A st udy of health needs, programs, services and health content areas of adolescents and young adults. (S/U onl y .) HEN 412. SEMINAR AND INTERNSHIP: HEALTH EDUCATION AND PROGRAMS-ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS (5) PR: Admission to the program or Cl. Supervised teaching in senior high schools and selected field experiences in community health programs. (S/U only.)

PAGE 72

HEN 421. HEALTH EDUCATION AND RELATED HEALTH SCIENCE CONTENT: ADULTS (4) PR: Admission to the program or Cl. A study of health needs, services and health education programs focusing on ad ults, including the aging (S/U only.) HEN 422. SEMINAR AND FIELD EXPERIENCE: ADULT HEALTH (5) PR: Admission to the program. Supervised field experiences in adult health programs in schools and the community. (S/U only ) HEN 423. SOCIETY AND HEAL TH: ADULTS (2) PR : Admi ss ion to the program ur Cl. A seminar for students, physicians, social workers, health educators from public and private agencies, nutritionists, health care personnel, etc. ; for the exchange of program information and new developments in health information and research. (S/U only.) HEN 431. CURRENT PROBLEMS IN HEALTH (4) PR : Admission to the program or Cl. An investigation of current he a lth problems, programs and research methods. (S/U only.) HEN 432. SEMINAR AND FIELD EXPERIENCE: CURRENT HEAL TH PROBLEMS (5) PR: Admission to the program. Supervised field experience in selected health programs. (S/U Humanities Education (EDY) UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDY 433. CURRENT TRENDS IN THE TEACHING OF HUMANITIES (4) Curricular patterns materials, and ins tructional practices in the teaching of humanities. (Formerly EDY 533) Junior College (EDH) FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDH 651. THE JUNIOR COLLEGE IN AMERICAN HIGHER EDUCATION (4) History of higher education philosophical and cultural bases for definition of its role, and contemporary issues, such as control, financing, and curricular patterns The place and problem s of the community junior college will be central concerns of this course. EDH 653. SEMINAR IN COLLEGE TEACHING (5) Implications of learning theory and student characteristics for teaching at the college level. Types of teaching procedures, innovation, evaluation, student freedom and responsibility for learning . Library-Audiovisual Education (EDL) FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDL 500. FOUNDATIONS OF LIBRARIANSHIP (4) Overview of and introduction to the study of library service; history ; organization; specialized literature ; outstanding lead ers; current tren4s issues, and problems Place of the library in society with its contributions to that society. (Formerly EDL 600 ) EDL 508. TELEVISION IN THE SCHOOL (4) Utilization of open and closed circuit broadcasting in the instructional process EDL 520. MEDIA AND EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES (3) Designing teaching stations and media centers for effective media utilization Practice in helping classroom teachers modify existing classrooms in the use of newer media. EDL 525. INSTRUCTIONAL GRAPHICS (4) PR: Cl. Theoretical aspects, planning and production of instructional graphic material. The theory of graphic comEDUCATION 167 munications Interpreting needs for instructional appropriate for given behavioral objectives. EDL 526. PREPARING SINGLE CONCEPT FILMS (4) PR: Cl. Techniques and procedures in the preparation of educational films Ascertaining concepts, script writing, graphics, lighting, filming, editing. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDL 600. INTRODUCTION TO LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION (4) Behavioral approach to planning, organizing, staffing and controlling libraries as organizations; identification of admin istrative principles theories, and problems of all types of libraries; critical examination of methods of administration supporting library functions programs, and services; fiscal and legal responsibilites of libraries EDL 601. SELECTION OF LIBRARY MATERIALS (4) Bibliographical sources, evaluative criteria for books and principles of book selection for libraries. EDL 602. HISTORY OF LIBRARIES (4) Development of libraries as found from the earliest records to the great libraries of modern times and the library as a social institution. EDL 603. INFORMATION SCIENCE IN LIBRARIANSHIP (4) Historical overview of the emergence of information science as a discipline The fundamental concepts of information retrieval systems and subsystems, related information technologies, and their applications to the field of librar ianship. EDL 604. CONTEMPORARY PUBLISHING AND PRINTING (4) PR: EDL 601. A survey of book publishing as it is carried on today, primarily in the United States. Emphasis on structure of the industry, economic conditions, technological develop ments, social functions of book publishing and distribution. Complementary relations between libraries and publishing. EDL 605. HISTORY OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (5) Historical bibliographical survey of imaginative and informa tional literature for children. EDL 606. BASIC INFORMATION SOURCES AND SERVICES (4) An in-depth examination of the basic sources of information in the general library; discussion of bibliographical control of all communication media, with emphasis on those tools which are of most value to general reference services; and the provision of various types of reference services. (Formerly EDL 513.) EDL 607. THE CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY (5) Effective utilization of instructional materials as they relate to specific areas of the curriculum in elementary and high school programs. EDL 608. RESEARCH METHODS IN LIBRARIANSHIP (4) Overview of present status of research in library and information science; introduction to research methods and their application to librarianship; designed to prepare students to pl. an conduct and evaluate research relating to the acquisition Classification, cataloging, retrieval, and dis semination of information Open to both majors and non majors in library-audiovisual education. EDL 609. SUPERVISED FIELD WORK (4) PR : Completion of General Program Requirements and Cl. EDL 610. BOOKS AND RELATED MATERIALS OF LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE (4) Bibliographic sources, aids and tools for the selection and utilization of Latin American books and related materials suitable for children and young people. Examination of representative materials in terms of the basic principles and criteria of selection for libraries

PAGE 73

168 EDUCATION EDL 611. ADV AN CED INFORMATION SOURCES AND SERVICES I (4) PR: EDL 606. Reference materials in the humanities, social sciences, science, and technology EDL 612. THE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF THE SCHOOL MEDIA CENTER (5) PR : General Program Requirements or Cl. Media quarters facilities and equipment. Basic principles of organization and administration of media programs in elementary and secon dary schools. EDL 613. MATERIALS l<'OR CHILDREN (4) Examination of materials for all institutions in which children are served: school media centers, public libraries, kin dergartens etc. Stress on selection aids, reviewing techni ques, utilization. (Formerly EDL 514.) EDL 614. TECHNICAL SERVICES IN LIBRARIES (4) Principles of general library practice in technical services operations. Emphasis on des c riptive cataloging and use of unabridged Dewey Decimal Classification (Formerly EDL 5'15. ) EDL 615. CLASSIFICATION AND CATALOGING OF NON BOOK MATERIALS (3) PR : EDL 614. Principles and practice in the cataloging of non book material s. EDL 616. ADV AN CED CAT (4) PR : EDL 614 or Cl. An examination of changing policies and procedures in the a dministration of acquisition s, cataloging, binding, photographic reproduction and related area Analysis of research in the field EDL 617. BOOKS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR YOUNG ADULTS (5) Young adult materials for use in secondary school libraries, young adult sections of public libraries and other institution s servi ng youth. Equal emphasis upon 1) selection principles and bibliographic sources as well as upon 2) utilization in terms of service to the young adult. (Formerly EDL 519.) EDL 618. PREPARING INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA (4) Fundamentals of preparing and using audiovi s ual as they relate to th e communication process. (Formerly EDL 523.) EDL 619. DOCUMENTS AND SERIALS (4) The nature of documents arid s erials their reference and research value; techniques of acquisition, cataloging, or ganization, conservation and reference use EDL 620. FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY (4) Traces historical development and the application of educa tional technology to school media services EDL 621. AUDIOVISUAL ADMINISTRATION (5) PR: EDL 618 and EDL 607 or Cl. Audiovisual administrative practices in school systems and junior colleges EDL 622. AUDIOVISUAL UTILIZATION (4) Examination (and utilization) of non-print media Character istics of media equipment and paradigms of use EDL 624. ADVANCED STORYTELLING (4) PR: CI or EDL 613. Building s torytelling programs fo.r school and public libraries or other educational institutions. Analysis of historical aspects, material suitable for use and audience reaction (Formerly EDL 524 .) EDL 625. READING GUIDANCE PROGRAMS IN LIBRARIES AND CLASSROOMS (4) Working with factors and forces influencing reading habits of children and youth; programs for teaching investigative and librar y skills; materials and methods for guidance of reading, listening and viewing. EDL 629. LOCAL PRODUCTION OF RADIO AND CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISION (4) Utilization and broadca s ting t ec hniques for educators. Stress will be placed on local school production, micro-teaching, and studio broadcasting EDL 630. INFORMATION SOURCES AND SERVICES IN THE HUMANITIES (4) PR : EDL 606 or Cl. Detailed i;onsideration of the biblio graphical and reference materials in the humanities with training al'l'd practice in their use for solving problems arising in the reference service. EDL 631. INFORMATION SOURCES AND SERVICES IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (4) PR : EDL 606 or Cl. Characteristics of the social science disciplines and structure, concepts, methods of investigation. Understanding of social science reference tools as means of bibliographic control and as vehicles of research. EDL 632. INFORMATION SOURCES AND SERVICES IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (4) PR : EDL 606 or Cl. Study of representative reference sources in pure and applied sciences with equal attention given to typical problems e ncountered in scientific and technological reference service EDL 640. SEMINAR IN PUBLIC LIBRARIES (3) PR : EDL 600 or CI. Identification of problems and critical examination of methods in administrative areas of technical, student, and teaching staff services, fiscal and legal responsi bilities, staff organization and supervision in public libraries. EDL 650. SEMINAR IN ACADEMIC LIBRARIES (3) PR : EDL 600 or CI. Identification of problems and critical examination .of methods in administrative areas of technical, s tudent, and .teaching staff services, fiscal and legal responsi bilities, staff organization and supervision in academic libraries EDL 660. SEMINAR IN SPECIAL LIBRARIES (3) PR: EDL 6'oo or Cl. Identification of problems and critical examination of method s i n administrative areas of technical and s pecial service clientele; fiscal and legal responsibilities, staff organization and services in special libraries. EDL 671. LIBRARY SYSTEMS PLANNING (4) Applicatio n s of data processing technology to automation of library files. Emphasi s on applications of computer hardware and software to administrative, circulation, and ordering data, catalog and index production serials records. EDL 672. SEMINAR IN LIBRARY AUTOMATION (4) Seminar in the ap plication of data processing technology to libraries, information centers, and library networks. Emphasis on operational syste ms EDL 690. TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHING IN THE SCHOOL MEDIA CENTER (4) Methods and technique s to working with students a nd teachers in th e school m e dia program. To be taken concomitantly with EDL 609 or CI. EDL 691. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-5) PR: 20 hours earned in program and consent of adviser. (Formerly EDL 681.) Measurement-Research-Evaluation (EDQ) FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDQ 701. CRITICAL ISSUES IN EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION (4) A consideration of major issues relevant to the theory and application of: measurement and evaluat io n Topics include: culture-faire testing, accountability, normative vs criterion measure s and socio-political issues EDQ 702. ADVANCED MEASUREMENTCOGNITIVE AREA (4) PR: EDF 605. Measurement, assessment theory and pro cedures appropriate to the Cognitive Domain," i.e., intellec tual abilities, aptitudes, achievements, skill s. (Formerly EDQ 601.)

PAGE 74

EDQ 703. ADV AN CED MEASUREMENT AFFECTIVE AREA (4) Measurement, assessment theory and procedures appropriate to the affective domain, i.e feelings, attitudes, interests, personal characteristics. (Formerly EDQ 603.) EDQ 705. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH I (4) Application of statistical techniques to the study of education problems: Tests of sign ificance and confidence intervals, analysis of variance (on e-wa y factorial), correlation and linear regression. (Formerly EDQ 605.) EDQ 707. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH II (4) PR: EDQ 705. Application of statistical techniques to the study of educational problems: Multiple correlation and regression, Introductory Factor Analysis and selected non parametric techniques. (Formerly EDQ 607.) EDQ 708. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH III (4) PR : EDQ 707. Application of statistical techniques to the study of educational problems: Trend analysis, analysis of variance models and expectation of mean squares; analysis of covariance; method of least squares; Bayesian statistics (introduction) (Formerly EDQ 608. ) EDQ 709. DESIGN OF EXPERIMENT-PRODUCT RESEARCH IN EDUCATION (4) PR: EDQ 708. Basic Experimental research design theory and models appropriate for education. (Formerly EDQ 609.) EDQ 711. DESIGN OF DESCRIPTIVE-PROCESS RESEARCH (4) PR: EDQ 708. Theory and procedures for conducting descriptive research in education (Formerly EDQ 611.) EDQ 713. APPLICATION OF COMPUTER LANGUAGE AND PROCEDURES IN EDUCATION (2) Development of understanding and technical skill in relation to computer and data processing approaches to solution of educational research, and administrative problems. Training in use of Fortran as a programming language. (Formerly EDQ 613.) EDQ 720. RESEARCH-BASED PLANNING EVALUATION AND DEVELOPMENT IN EDUCATION (4) Introduction to systematic planning and development pro cedures including needs assessment, proposal development, evaluation design and process engineering. Empha sis placed on analysis of evaluation models and theory (Formerly EDQ 620.) EDQ 721. A BASIS FOR PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT IN EDUCATION (4) An introduction to systems theory and techniques emphasiz ing application to selected problems and situations in education. Development of competence in applying PERT, GANTI, Mission-Function-Task, and Modeling procedures (Formerly EDQ 621.) Music Education (EDM) LOWER LEVEL COURSES EDM 215. THEORETICAL BASES OF MUSIC EDUCATION (2) The course is designed to investigate music education practices in the schools. It provides the student with experiences and information early in his academic career which will enable him to determine his commitment to profes s ional music education. UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDM 370. BAND MATERIALS PRACTICUM (1) PR: Cl. A study of band materials, in a laboratory setting, appropriate to elementary and secondary school music programs Course content will change each quarter. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit. EDUCATION 169 EDM 380. CHORAL MATERIALS PRACTICUM (1) PR : .Cl. A study of choral materials, in a laboratory setting, appropriate to elementary and secondary school music programs. Course content will change each quarter. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit. EDM 390. ORCHESTRAL MATERIALS PRACTICUM (1) PR : Cl. A study of orchestra materials, in a laboratory setting, appropriate to elementary and secondary school music programs Course content will change each quarter. May be repeated for a total of 3 hours credit. tEDM 415. MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (4) (Formerly EDM 435.) EDM 416. FOUND A TIO NS OF INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC (3) PR: Cl, Junior Standing Introduction to the foundations of instrumental music instruction in the elementary and middle school. EDM 417. CLASSROOM MUSIC IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (4) PR: Cl. Development and implementation of methods and techniques for teaching music to the student not participating in secondary school music performing groups. (Formerly EDM 437. ) EDM 418. INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS (3) PR: Cl, Junior Standing. Development and implementation of. methods and technique s for teaching secondary school instrumental music (Formerly EDM 433.) EDM 419. CHORAL METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (3) PR : Cl, Junior Standin g. Development and implementation of methods and techniqu es for teaching secondary school choral music. (Formerly EDM 439. ) FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDM 601. TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH IN MUSIC EDUCATION (4) Professional bibliography and individual research projects. EDM 603. MUSIC SUPERVISION AND ADMINISTRATION (3) The music curriculum in relat ion to the total school program; staff and budgetary needs EDM 614. VOCAL MATERIALS AND CONDUCTING (4) A study of materials appropriate for use in vocal groups. Emphasis is given to vocal materials appropriate for use in secondary schools. EDM 617. INSTRUMENTAL MATERIALS AND CONDUCTING (4) A study of material s appropriate for use in instrumental groups Emphasi s is given to instrumental materials ap propriate for use in secondary schools EDM 633. CURRENT TRENDS IN SCHOOL INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC (3) New materials, equipment, techniques of teaching and recent historical trends in instrumental music EDM 635. CURRENT TRENDS IN SCHOOL VOCAL MUSIC (3) New materials, equipment techniques of teaching and recent historical trends in vocal music. Natural Science-Mathematics Education (EDN) UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDN 425. NEW TRENDS IN TEACHING THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES (4) Physical Science Study Committee Physics Chemical Educa-t Each class meets as a performing group. Score reading, conducting, organizational procedures, historical relationship s and method s at the appropriate grade levels Teaching techniques concerning the presenta tion of elements of theory, general music and literature.

PAGE 75

170 EDUCATION tion Materi a l s Study and other new a pproache s to the teaching of the physical sciences Recommended for te a chers of Physics Chemi s try and Earth Sciences. EDN 427. NEW TRENDS IN TEACHING BIOLOGY (4) Recent developments in curriculum materials and in strategie s for teaching biological sciences grades 7-12 Recommended for pre-service teachers of secondary school biology. EDN 441. TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN MIDDLE GRADES (4) PR : 24 quarter hours of mathematics or CC Instructional procedures and materials for teaching mathematics in the middle grades. EDN 443. TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE MIDDLE GRADES (4) PR: EDN 459 or EDE 417 plus 20 hour s of Science or Cl. Techniques and materials of instruction for te a ching science in the middle grades. EDN 4Sl. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-MATHEMATICS (4) PR: EDC 401 or concurrent registration in EDC 401 and admission to teacher education program in mathematics. Techniques and materials of instruction in mathematics EON 4S2. INTERPRETING MATHEMATICAL SYMBOLISM (2) PR : EDR 407, EDN 451 or concurrent regi s tr a tion. Methods of teaching secondary students to read mathematics. EDN 4S9. TEACHING METHODS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL-SCIENCES (4) PR : Completion of 40 hours in a ppr qv ed s cience area s or CI ; completion of EDC 401 or concurrent registration in EDC 401. Techniques and materials of instruction in se c ondary schools sciences EON 460. COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN THE SCIENCE CLASSROOM (2) PR : EDR 407 EDN 459 or concurrent registration in EDN 459. Reading and communication skills important in under standing scientific literature and communicating finding s to others (Formerly EDN 559. ) FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDN SIS. THE UTILIZATION OF LABORATORY TECHNIQUES IN THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS (4) PR: 18 quarter hours of mathematics or CI. In this course student s will make an examination of a variety of sample laboratory les sons along with method s for creating and evaluating such less ons. EON S83. SELECTED TOPICS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION (1-S) May be rereated when topic s are not duplicated. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY .EDN 616. TEACHING OF PRE-SECONDARY SCHOOL MATHEMATICS I (S) PR : 18 quarter hours of mathematics or Cl. Development of strategies and materials for teaching mathematical concepts and skills appropriate to pre-secondary school years. EON 617. TEACHING OF PRE-SECONDARY SCHOOL MATHEMATICS II (S) PR: EDN 616. Continuation of EDN 616. EDN 618. TEACHING OF PRE-SECONDARY SCHOOL MATHEMATICS III (5) PR : EDN 617. Continuation of EDN 616-617. EON 621. TEACHING OF HIGH SCHOOL ALGEBRA (4) PR: B.A. in mathematics or certification in secondary mathematics. Philosophy, content, new trend s, and methods of teaching beginning, intermediate, and advanced high school algebra. EDN 622. TEACHING OF HIGH SCHOOL GEOMETRY (4) PR : B.A in mathematic s or certification in secondary mathematic s Philo s ophy, content new trends, and methods of teaching high school geometry EON 637. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY MATHEMATICS EDUCATION (4) Curricular patterns and instruction a l practices in secondary mathematics. EON 639. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY SCIENCE EDUCATION (4) PR : Bachelor s degree with major in science area ; certification in secondary science, or CI. Curricular patterns and ins truc tional practices in secondar y science EDN 641. CASE STUDIES IN SCIENCE (4) Case studies from the Natural Science with implications for science teaching. EDN 651. TEACHING SECONDARY SCHOOL BIOLOGY (4) PR: Cl. Effective use and production of instructional materials in the biological sciences Interrelation of philosophy, materials and cla s sroom practices EDN 6S3. TEACHING SECONDARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL & EARTH SCIENCES (4) PR : Cl. Effective use and production of ins tructional materials in the physical and earth sciences Interrelation of philosophy materials, and classroom practices Physical Education for Teachers (EDP) LOWER LEVE;L COURSES tEDP 2SS. FIRST AID (3) Meets the American Red Cross certification requirements in s tandard and advanced first aid. UPPER LEVEL COURSES tEDP 311. SEMINAR AND FIELD EXPERIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (S) Students conduct a physical education progr a m for primary grade students and time is s pent te a ching in. a n elementary school which provide s a vari e ty of experience s designed to lead students to an under s t a nding of children and how they learn in the elementary s chool. (S/U only ) tEDP 312. HUMAN KINETICS I (4) The development and integration of the neuromuscular and the associate sensory systems as they affect motor and perceptual-motor performance The physiology of muscular contraction, the accompanying immed i ate changes in the cardiorespiratory systems and the permanent physiological changes resulting from exercise tEDP 313. MOVEMENT EDUCATION THEORY AND APPLICATION I (3) The philosophy objectives and analytical structure of movement education are studied Application of concepts relative to the development of basie movement competence, including rhythm and dance a ctivitie s !ire emphasized tEDP 314. INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT (2) A personal evaluation of variou s factors related to the effective teaching of physical education. An individual profile that can be used for counseling purposes will be the final product of this course tEDP 321. SEMINAR AND FIELD EXPERIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (S) Elementary school physical education teaching experience s are provided for students Seminars empha s ize planning and teaching methodology. Health and recreation a s they relate to elementary school children are s tudied. tEDP 322; HUMAN KINETICS II (4) The structure and function of the nervous s kelet a l, and muscular systems of the hum a n body a s they c ontribute to t Enr o llment in these co urses require s admi ss i o n t o the Phy s ical Education Program

PAGE 76

efficient movement; deviations in either structure or function in these systems and the role of exercise in rehabilitation tEDP 323. MOVEMENT EDUCATION THEORY AND APPLICATION II (3) Different styles of teaching are introduced relative to rhythmic dance and basic movement and manipulative skills leading to sports and gymnastics activities Mechanical principles of human movement are stressed tEDP 331. SEMINAR AND INTERNSHIP IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (5) Physical education teaching experience is provided at various grade levels. Seminars are concerned with organization evaluation, and extra-class activities. Individual teaching is analyzed and programmed tEDP 332. HUMAN KINETICS III (4) The mechanical laws of physics as they relate to movement within and of the human body and the projection of objects in throwing, hitting, and kicking Efficiency of human movement through sound body mechanics tEDP 333. MOVEMENT EDUCATION THEORY AND APPLICATION III (3) The application of principles of space, time, force, and flow of human movement to the development of children through gymnastics. The bio-mechanical aspects of performance are also analyzed. Open to program majors only. tEDP36S. AQUATICS (3) Includes analyzation and methodology of teaching swimming skills, conducting class activities, and the organization and conducting of aquatic programs in the school and the community. tEDP 411. SEMINAR AND FIELD EXPERIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (5) Student teaching or field experiences and seminars relating to physical education are offered. Field experience projects may also be taken with faculty approval. tEDP 412, 422, 432. APPLIED HUMAN KINETICS (4,4,4) A three course sequence which stresses the biomechanical analysis, motoric learning, the teaching techniques of dance, and the skills and strategies common to a number of individual and team s ports. tEDP 421. SEMINAR AND INTERNSHIP IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (5) PR : Taken concurrently with EDP 431. Supervised teaching experience at either the junior or senior high school level. Emphasis is placed on individualization of instruction and continued on structuring meaningful activities in the psy chomotor, cognitive, and effective domains A humanistic proce ss is the common thread throughout. tEDP 422. APPLIED HUMAN KINETICS (4) (See EDP 412.) tEDP 431. AND INTERNSHIP IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (S) Supervised teaching experience at either the junior or senior high s chool level. Emphasis is placed on under sta nding the adolescent student and how teaching behavior influences the teaching/learning process. Innovations in physical education are explored tEDP 432. APPLIED HUMAN KINETICS (4) (See EDP 412. ) EDP 458. SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF COACHING (S) The application of principles from exercise physiology, kinesiology and psychology to competitive athletic s (For merly EDP 558. ) EDP 459. ATHLETIC TRAINING (3) PR: Cl. Principles and techniques of conditioning athletes for t Enrollment in these courses requires admission to tl1e Physical Education Program : EDUCATION 171 competition; prevention and care of injuries in physical education and athletic activities. EDP 460. HEALTH EDUCATION PROJECT (S) PR: CI. A practicum in health education through field experiences with official and voluntary health agencies. EDP 468. COACHING OF SWIMMING (3) Methods of organizing and coaching a competitive swimming team. EDP 469. COACHING OF FOOTBALL (5) Theory and practice of the fundamental techniques, organiza tional problems and strategy involved in coaching football. EDP 478. COACHING OF WRESTLING (4) Theory and pr a ctice of the fundamental techniques, organiza tional problems and s trategy involved in coaching wrestling. EDP 479. COACHING OF SOCCER (3) Theory and practice of the fundamental techniques, organiza tiona l problems and strategy involved in coaching soccer EDP 486. COMMUNITY RECREATION (4) Introduction to recreational outlets in the c ommunity and the administrative problems confronting recreational playground leaders and directors of community recreational programs. EDP 488. COACHING OF TRACK AND FIELD (4) Theory and practice of the fundamental techniques, organiza tional problems and strategy involved in coaching track. EDP 489. COACHING OF BASKETBALL (3) Theory and practice of the fundamental techniques, organiza tional problem s and strategy in coaching basketball. EDP 499. COACHING OF BASEBALL (3) Theory and practice of the fundamental techniques organiza tional problems and strategy involved in coaching baseball FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDP 600. PROFESSIONAL ASSESSMENT (4) Selected readings of current trends in physical education; discussion of philosophies of teaching; and individual ap praisal of knowledge, values, attitudes, and professional competencies. EDP 610. OF HUMAN MOVEMENT (4) Integration of basic kinesiological foundations applied to te ac hing physical education. Specific topics include: physical growth and neuro-muscular development, role of neuro muscular mechanisms in motor performance, physical prin ciples of human movement and the effects of exercise on the muscular and cardio-respiratory systems. EDP 611. SPECIALIZED STUDY IN BIO-KINETICS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT: (SUBJECT) (1-4) Will provide in-depth study in specific areas related to neurological, physiological, and mechanical principles of human movement EDP 620. SOCIO-PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT. (4) Involve s the psychological and sociological implications of movement to historical and contemporary man Emphasis on psycho-motor learning, movement behavior physical self concept, role of movement in society and values and attitudes held towar.d movement EDP 621. SPECIALIZED STUDY IN SOCIO. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT: (SUBJECT) (1) Will prov i de in-depth study in specific areas related to sociological and psychological principles of human movement. EDP 630. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (4) Application of learning theory and education innovations, study of s tructure of subject matter and styles of teaching and investig atio n of the nature of the learner as these relate to teaching physical education Fieldwork may be a requirement of thi s course

PAGE 77

172 EDUCATION EDP 631. SPECIALIZED STUDY IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION: (SUBJECT) (1-5) Will provide in depth study in specific areas related to the teaching-learning process of physical education. EDP 640-641. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE HANDICAPPED I & II (5,5) This sequential course is concerned with the motor per formance and physical fitness of neurologically handicapped individuals and the unique problems of motor skill learning found in children and youth with visual, auditory, speech or orthopedic handicaps Study includes field experiences which apply knowledge related to psycho-educational character istics; planning, conducting, and evaluating individualized programs of special physical education; and review of relevant literature. EDP 650. RESEARCH IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (4) Emphasis will be directed toward planning, conducting, and interpreting research in physical education. The function of research in improving programs as well as the technical aspects of research designs appropriate to physical education are included for study. EDP 651'. RESEARCH PROJECT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1-6) In-depth research study of selected topics concerning human movement. Topics will vary according to needs and inte.re s ts of students May be repeated for credit. Reading Education (EDR) UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDR 407. READING IN SECONDARY CONTENT AREAS (2) PR : Cl and content area PR or CR. Provides basic instruction in phonics, word recognition, readability, interest, corrective procedures, reading behavior, comprehension, etc. Offered only in conjunction with special content reading courses (Formerly EDR 507.) EDR 408. READING IN MIDDLE SCHOOLS (4) This course is for new teachers planning to or currently teaching in a middle school. Students will study reading as it relates to their particular subject matter area. (Formerly EDR 508.) EDR 409. CURRENT TRENDS IN READING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (4) Survey of secondary, college, and adult reading practices, problems, and research . Work with students at commensurate level required. (Formerly EDR 509.) EDR 430. CORRECTIVE READING FOR THE CHILD (4) PR: EDE 409 or equivalent. Procedures for meeting ir:dividual differences through classroom organization, differentiated instruction and selective use of materials (Formerly EDR 530.) FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDR 610. READING IN SECONDARY AND HIGHER EDUCATION (4) PR : CI and Level II standing; EDR 407 408, 409, and EDE 409 or equivalent training. The course is designed for graduate students and in-service ti;achers with appropriate BA degrees, who need and/or desire more knowledge beyond an introduc tory level about reading at the Secondary (7-12) and higher (Community College, University) levels. Students will study reading as it appJies to their discipline and their level. Work with students and a research paper required. Not for undergraduates nor to be used as a first course in Reading. EDR 630. CORRECTIVE READING FOR CLASSROOM TEACHERS (4) PR: EDE 409 and EDR 430 Use of diagnostic and prescriptive procedures with individual and group reading instruction. (Formerly EDR 530 ) EDR 631. DIAGNOSIS OF READING DISABILITIES (4) PR: EDE 609, EDF 605. Causes of reading disability; techniques and materials in diagnosis of reading problems, including telebinocular and audiometer screening. Diagnoses of reading disabilities are required. EDR 632. TECHNIQUES OF REMEDIAL READING (4) PR: EDE 609, EDF 605, EDR 409, and EDR 631. Materials and methods in remediation of moderate to severe reading disability cases. Supervised individual tutoring and in-depth evaluation and use of materials. EDR 633. PRACTICUM IN READING (4) PR : EDE 609, EDF 605, EDR 409, EDR 631, EDR 632 and Cl. Remediation of severe reading disability cases, tutoring of individuals and small groups, interview techniques, prepara tion of case reports. EDR 634. CURRICULUM AND SUPERVISION PROBLEMS IN READING (4) PR: EDE 609, EDF 605, EDR 409, EDR 631, and EDR 632. Planning and administering programs and preparation as consultants in reading. Intensive work on individual project required EDR 635. SURVEY OF READING RESEARCH (4) PR: EDF 605 and EDF 607, most of EDR courses and Cl. Course deals with research in reading-a review of research is conducted by student and presented in written form. EDR 709. READING AS A SYMBOLIC PROCESS (4) PR : EDR 409 or EDE 609 Advanced Graduate standing in Reading/Language Arts or Cl. Examination and understanding of the relationship of the various perceptual, learning, affective and cognitive processes to the acquisition of reading competencies EDR 733. ADVANCED CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN READING (4-8) PR : EDR 631, 632, 633, and EDF 617 or PSY 617 and Advanced Graduate standing in Reading/Language Arts. Clinical diagnosis and remediation of severe reading disability cases with emphasis on multi-disciplinary approach. Super vision of master students in the 631, 632, 633 sequence. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 hours. Social Science Education (EDW) UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDW 410. COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN THE SOCIAL STUDIES (2) PR: Cl. Communication Skills in the Social Studies. Methods of dealing with reading problems in social studies. This course and EDR 40( satisfy the state certification requirement pertaining to secondary reading (S/U only ) EDW 461. TEACHING METHODS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL -SOCIAL STUDIES (4) PR : EDC 401 -or concurrent registration in EDC 401. Techniques and materials of instruction in social studies. FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS EDW 508. TEACHING METHODS IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL-SOCIAL STUDIES (4) PR: Admission to Mi
PAGE 78

EDW 553. INSTRUCTIONAL PROBLEMS AND STRATEGIES IN SOCIAL STUDIES: ELEMENTARY, MIDDLE OR SECONDARY SCHOOL (4) PR : Admission to Middle School Program, Secondary Social Science, or CI. Investigation of probJem s confronted when leaching Social Studies in the elementary, middle or secondary sc hool. FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDW 643. CURRENT TRENDS IN SECONDARY SOCIAL STUDIES (4) PR : EDW 461 or equivalent or CI. Curricular patterns and instructional practices in secondary social studies. EDW 645. REVIEW OF RESEARCH IN SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION (4) PR : EDF 303 or EDF 605, Graduate Students in Education or CI. Investigati"on into and an evaluation of the research in" Social Science Education. EDW 655. ELEMENT ARY SOCIAL STUDIES CURRICULUM (4) PR : Admission to College of Education or CI. Evaluation of past and present curriculum in Elementary Social Studies. EDW 657. SECONDARY SOCIAL SCIENCE CURRICULUM (4) PR: Admission to College of Education or CI. Evaluation of past and present curriculum in Secondary Social Science EDW 659. SEMINAR SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION (4) PR: EDF 303 or EDF 605, or CI. To increase general technological knowledge of graduate students in Social Science Education. Speech Communication-English Education (EDT) UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDT 423. DIRECTING SPEECH ACTIVITIES IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (5) PR : 15 hours of speech communication courses or CI. Coaching and directing cocurricular activities in discussion, debate, oratory, theatre, oral interpretation, and extem poraneous speaking Planning and s upervision of tour naments, contests, and festivals. Observations required. (Formerly EDT 523. ) EDT 424. READING IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION INSTRUCTION (2) PR: EDR 407 or in conjunction with this course Strategies and materials for teaching oral and silent reading in speech and theatre classes at the secondary school level. (Formerly EDT 524.) FOR <'.ORADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDT 621. CURRENT TRENDS IN TEACHING SPEECH COMMUNICATION (5) PR-CI. Curricular patterns; preparat ion of personnel ; instruc tional materials, facilities and practices used in teaching speech communication. EDT 622. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION IN EDUCATION (5) PR-CI. studies in selected sources, critical writings, and research which have contributed to the development of speech communication as an academic discipline Vocational and Adult Education (EDV) LOWER LEVEL COURSES EDV 207. THE TEACHER IN A WORLD OF WORK (4) A study of educational efforts in preparing people for work, the relationship of a job to man s life style, and the concept of education as a lifelong process EDUCATION 173 UPPER LEVEL COURSES EDV 353. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE MANAGEMENT (5) Functions of the business office to include systems and procedures communications, records management, office employee behavior, controlling the work of the office, and principles of office organization Also includes the method ology necessary for teaching these areas in either separate courses or integrated block programs EDV 361. BUSINESS AND OFFICE MACHINES (5) PR: Basic Typewriting. Instruction and practice on selected business and office machines to acquaint students with capabilities and limitations of the machines. Instruction and reading on te a ching methodology for business and office. EDV 406. ORGANIZATION AND COORDINATION OF COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS (4) A study of the purposes and processes used to organize, plan, direct, control, and evaluate cooperative programs EDV 407. PRINCIPLES OF ADULT AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (4) An overview of current policies and principles to include their historical, sociological and philosophical bases out of which principles of adult and vocational education have been accepted and implemented (Formerly EDY 507.) EDV 410. READING SKILLS IN ADULT AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (2) PR : EDR 407, or concurrent registration in EDR 407. Students will study reading and communication skills as they relate to their particular content areas in Adult and Yocational Technical Education This course, along with EDR 407, satisfies State certification requirement pertaining to secon dary reading EDV 431. SUPERVISED FIELD EXPERIENCE: (Specialization) (1-8) PR : CI. Planned s upervised functions in the area of specialization and co-ordinated with selected schools, govern ment, office s social agencies, businesses and industries on site tEDV 443. SPECIAL TEACHING METHODS: (Specialization) (5) Methods, techniques, a nd materials for skill development. tEDV 445. METHODS OF TEACHING: (Specialization) (4) Methods, techniques and materials for instruction. This course will specialize in Diversified Cooperative Training. EDV 461. OFFICE OCCUPATIONS PROCEDURES (5) PR : EDY 361, and Senior standing. This course is designed to integrate learnings from preceding business and office education courses. Applications involve actual and simulated office situations, problems, and evaluaton. Emphasis is placed on the qualifications needed for efficient business office operations EDV 480. FACILITY DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT (4) Design and develop instructional facility floor plans consistent with modern and efficient method s of instruction as well as evaluate existing classrooms, laboratories, and shops. Selec tion and location .of equipment Review and prepare opera tional plans for the management of equipment, furniture, tools, and s upplies as they relate to effective student learning. FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS tEDV 503. CURRICULUM CONSTRUCTION: (Specialization) ( 4) Planning and organizing an instructional program for the purpose of developing an occupational competency EDV 504. PREPARATION AND DEVELOPMENT FOR TEACHING (4) The development of selected instructional materials, use of t Areas of specialization in these courses are: Adult Education, Business Education Distributive Education and Industrial Technical Educa tion

PAGE 79

174 ENGINEERING new educational media, performance evaluation instruments, and counseling techniques. EDV505. THEADULTLEARNER (4) PR: EDF 305 or equivalent. Physiological and psychological changes in individuals throughout the adult life span and the implications which these changes have in learning capabilities of adults. A review of recent research on adult learning is also ef!lphasized. tEDV 506. PROGRAM MANAGEMENT: (Specialization) (4) Organization, co-ordination, and budgeting of adult, coopera tive, and special programs EDV 508. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH (OSHA) (4) Planning and organizing safety and health course content to be included in occupational education programs in Florida. Content to be identified in and selected from Federal Registers, Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Standards. EDV 511. SCHOOL-COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (4) An approach to identifying, assessing, and analyzing individ ual, institutional, and community needs, for the purpose of cooperative program planning, community involvement and public support FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY EDV 605. ADULT BASIC EDUCATION (4) An overview of adult basic education with emphasis on current issues and problems of curriculum and instruction in program development for culturally different adults. EDV 621. INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION (4) Attention is given to individualized instruction to include the special needs student, the slow learner, and the more capable student. EDV 631. CURRENT TRENDS (4) Historical informaton issues, current trends new dimensions and problems in the area of specialization. EDV 641. STAFF DEVELOPMENT (4) Implementation of new procedures addressed to discreet developmental needs of the staff as identified by an educational agency. tEDV 651. PRACTICUM: (Specialization) (4-8) A problem-centered field study in the local community, school, government, office, social agency, business or industry. EDV 661. SUPERVISION OF LOCAL PROGRAMS: ADULT OR VOCATIONAL (4) PR: Cl. A study of the factors involved in the supervision of instruction including plans for teacher education, improve ment of instruction, coordination of activities and personnel relations EDV 671. ADMINISTRATION OF LOCAL PROGRAMS: ADULT OR VOCATIONAL (4) A study of the organization, selection of personnel, assign ment of duties and responsibilities, and establishment of policies and procedures to accomplish the objectives of the local program within the federal, state, and local require ments. EDV 687. SEMINAR (4) PR: EDF 605 & 607. Applied research techniques and investigation of important current issues of theses is the area of specialization. EDV 690. METHODS, PROCEDURES, AND PROCESSES OF VOCATIONAL EVALUATION (4) A study of the purposes, methods, processes and procedures used to plan, impl e ment and operate a vo cational evaluation program. EDV 691. METHODS, PROCEDURES, AND PROCESSES OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION COOPERATIVE SCHOOL PROGRAM COUNSELING (3) A study of the purposes, methods, processes and procedures used to plan, implement and operate a Vocational Rehabilita tion Cooperative School Counseling Program. ENGINEERING Professors : J. L. Allen, M. W. Anderson, J.C. Bowers, G. A Burdick T. M. Chen, M. R. Donaldson, L. F. Doty, P. M. Downey, R. F Filipowsky, 0. N. Garcia, S J Garrett, J E Griffith, E. W Kopp, J A. Llewellyn, L. W. Oline, D. H Rimbey, B E. Ross, L.A. Scott, N. C. Small, W A. Smith, R. J. Wimmert, G. Zobrist ; Associate Professors: G K. Bennett, J. C. Busot, H. Glass, J. 0. Gonzalez, R. E Henning, V. K. Jain, S. C. Krane, D. H. Parr, C E Payne, S. Phillips, Jr. J. L. Ratliff, D. W. Rogers, W. H. Skelton, J. F. Twigg, L. A. Weaver; Assistant Professors : H S. Bierenbaum, R. A. Crane, J. F. Devine, J. T. Franques, D. C. Naehring, H.A Nienhaus, J.E. Sergent, C. A. Smith; Lecturers: W .R. Abbey, C. F. Bean, H Fraze, A D. Kraus, R. L. Miller, N. V. Smith, Wilma Smith. Basic and Interdisciplinary Engineering Course Work (EGB) EGB 101. GRAPHIC ANALYSIS I (3) The theory and application of proje c tive systems and related topics. Basic problems in engineering drawing. Purchase of drawing instruments and other necessary drafting supplies to be discussed at first class session. Lee-Lab EGB 102. GRAPHIC ANALYSIS II (3) PR: EGB IOI. Principles of graphic and numeric analysis. Applied problems in graphic s tatistics, empirical data, projective geometry, graphic calculus, and other graphic techniques for the solution of engineering problems. EGB 103. GRAPHIC ANALYSIS III (3) PR : EGB IOI. An elective course designed for s tudents with limited background in pre-calculus mathematics neces s ary for graphical processes Emph as i s on graphical concepts of algebraic and trigonometric rel a tionships. EGB 104. GRAPHIC ANALYSIS IV Continuation of EGB 103. (3) EGB 105. ENGINEERING ORIENTATION (1) The role of engineering in society, ch a racteristic s of different fields of engineering, required preparation for engineering careers, technique s a nd approaches u s ed by engineers in their profession. (S/U only.) EGB 201. ENGINEERING PROBLEMS I (2) CR : MTH 351. Elective course for engineering majors. Applied problems paralleling mathematics sequence. EGB 204. ANALYSIS & COMPUTATION I (3) Basic computer operation and programming concepts Use of FORTRAN in solving engineering type problems. EGB 208. INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING I (3) To present an overview of Engineering, its role and its concepts. Experimental program ; see advi ser. EGB 209. INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING II (3) PR : EGB 208. Continuation of EGB 208. (Experimental program.) EGB 301. ENGINEERING PROBLEMS II CR: MTH 352. Continuation of EGB 201. EGB 302. ENGINEERING PROBLEMS Ill CR: MTH 353. Continuation of EGB 301. (2) (2) t Areas of specialization in these courses are: Adult Education, Business Education, Distributive Education, and Industrial-Technical Educa tion

PAGE 80

EGB 303. ENGINEERING PROBLEMS IV (2) CR: MTH 354. Continuation of EGB 302. EGB 304. ANALYSIS & COMPUTATION II (3) PR: EGB 204 or equivalent. Use of FORTRAN and WATFIV in solving engineering problem s. Use of computer libraries. Structure and use of SIMSCRIPT in sys tem s s imulation EGB 306. ENGINEERING STATISTICS I (3) PR: MTH 352. An introduction to the basic concepts of s t atistica l a n a l ysis. Probability, distribution functions (For merly EGS 461.) EGB 311. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS I (4) PR: PHY 305-306, MTH 353. A course sequence in linear pas s ive circuits, electronic circuits and electromechanical devices Phy s ical principle s and mod es. Transient and steady state a naly sis. Sy stem consideration. EGB 312 INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS II (4) PR: EGB 311. Continuation of EGB 311. EGB 313. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS III (4) PR: EGB 311. Continuation of EGB 311 or EGB 312. EGB 321. THERMODYNAMICS I (4) PR: PHY 303. Introduction to Thermodynamics; Thermodynamic concepts of sys tem control volume, process, cycle, property, a nd s t ate. The Zeroth Law of Thermo dynamics and temperature scales Properties of ideal and real s ub s t a nces. Concepts of Work and He at. The First Law of Thermodynamics EGB 322. THERMODYNAMICS II (3) PR: EGB 321. Continuation of EGB 321. The Second Law and its consequences. Entropy. The Carnot and heat engine cycles. Mixtures of ideal gases and psychrometry Approx imations to behavior of "real" gases. Concepts of reversibili ty, availability and efficiency Elements of Thermodynamics of comb ust i on. EGB 323. TRANSFER OPERATIONS I (3) PR: EGB 321. Extension of classical thermodynamics into the description of non-eqilibrium processes. Emphasis on the use of balance equations and dimensional analysis in the macroscopic description of momentum, energy and mass transfer processes. Introduction to heat transfer correlations and design equations EGB 32S. DYNAMICS RESPONSE OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS I (4) PR: PHY 303, 305. Linear dynamic analysis of electrical, mechanical, pneumatic, hydraulic and thermal syste!11s. Introduction to analog computers; LaPlace transformation Block diagram representation, transient and frequency re sponse. Lec.-Dem EGB 337. ENGINEERING V TION I (3) PR : EGB 204. A study in analyzing the economic limitations imposed on engineering activities using basic models which consider. the time value of money EGB 340. SOLID MECHANICS I (3) PR: MTH 351. Principles of statics, mechanical equilibrium forces moments, plane trusses Lec -problem EGB 341. SOLID MECHANICS II (3) PR: EGB 340. Dynamics of discrete particles and distributed mass bodies; spatial kinematics and kinetics. Lec -problem. EGB 342. MATERIALS ENGINEERING I (4) PR : CHM 213, EGB 340. An introduction to structure and property relationships in engineering materials, i.e., metal, ceramic and polymer systems. Environme.ntal effects on materials are also treated Lecture. EGB 343. BASIC FLUID MECHANICS (4) PR: EGB 341. Fundamental and experimental concepts in ideal and viscous fluid theory; momentum and energy consideration, introduction to hydraulics, pipe flow. Lecture ENGINEERING 175 EGB 344. DEFORMABLE BODIES (3) PR: EGB 340. Stress, strain, Hooke's Law; torsion, beam, column analysis; combined stresses; inelastic effects, limit design Lec.-problem EGB 34S. MATERIALS ENGINEERING II (4) PR: EGB 342. Continuation of EGB 342. EGB 346. COMPRESSIBLE FLOW (4) PR: EGB 343. Compressible flow and free surface flow. EGB 401. ENGINEERING ANALYSIS I (4) PR: MTH 353. Application of differential equations. EGB 40S. INTRODUCTION TO LINEAR SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGB 401. Study and application of matrix algebra, differential equations and calculus of finite differences. (Formerly EGS 541.) EGB 481. PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR I (1-S) PR: Cl. A lecture-discussion seminar on modern trends in the engineering profession. EGB 483. PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR II (1-S) PR: CI and Senior standing An examination of current engineering and related problems facing the graduating senior. (S/U only.) EGB 501, S02, 503, S04, SOS. ENGINEERING ANALYSIS II, m, IV, V, VI (3,3,3,3,3) PR : CC or MTH 401. A five course sequence. (I) Ordinary differential equations with emphasis on series solutions and numerical methods. (2) Vector analysis ; partial differential equations, boundary value problems and orthogonal func tions (3) & (4) Functions of a complex variable with applications (5) Selected Topics EGB 601. ENGINEERING ANALYSIS VII (3) PR: CC. Application of applied mathematics to the study of linearized dynamic systems and networks; state space; stability theory ; extensions to discrete and non-linear systems. EGB 610. SCIENTIST IN THE SEA I (4) PR CI and diver certification (NAVI or equiv ) Hyperbaric Operations; the basic principles, physiology and psychology involved in submarine hyperbaric operations, inside and outside habitats. Communication and life support is also treated extensively. Lec -lab (Also listed as MSC 610.) EGB 611. SCIENTIST IN THE SEA II (4) PR: CI and diver certification (NA VI or equiv) Marine Sciences; an extensive discussion of research equipment and techniques for underwater operations in the Marine Sciences presented by practicing research workers in the field. Lee. lab. (Also listed as MSC 611.) EGB 612. SCIENTIST IN THE SEA m (4) PR: CI and diver certification (NA VI or equiv) Underwater Engineering; the ocean as a constraint for structures and devices. Factors involved in the planning and design of underwater operations and experimental devices Lec. lab. (Also listed as MSC 612.) EGB 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH (credit varies) PR : GR. Master's level. Repeatable (S/U only .) EGB 694. GRADUATE INSTRUCTION METHODS (1-S) Special course to be used primarily for the training of graduate teaching assistants. Variable credit, repeatable. Limited to a cumulative total of 5 credits per student (S/U only.) EGB69S. GRADUATERESEARCHMETHODS (1-S) Special course to be used primarily for the training of graduate research assistants Variable credit repeatable. Limited to a cumulative total of 5 credits per student. (S/U only.) EGB 699. THESIS: MASTER's (credit varies) Repeatable. (S/U only.) EGB 781. DIRECTED RESEARCH (credit varies) PR: GR. Ph.D level. Repeatable (S/U only )

PAGE 81

, 176 ENGINEERING EGB 799. DISSERTATION: DOCTORAL (credit varies) PR : Must be admitted to Doctoral Candidacy Repeatable. ( S/U only.) Electrical and Electronic Systems (EGE) EGE JC)l. LABORATORY 1 (1) PR: EGB 31 I. EGE302. LABORATORY2 PR: EGB 312. EGE 303. LABORATORY 3 PR: EGE 301. EGE 310,410. NETWORK ANALYSIS AND (1) (1) DESIGN I, D (3,3) PR: EGB 3 I I A second course in linear circuit analysis and design. Transient and steady-state responses of passive R-L-C networks to various forcing functions EGE 320, 420 ELECTRONICS I, D (3,3) PR: EGB 312. A second course in the physical principles of electronic devices with emphasis on semi-conductor elec tronics. Includes the analysis and design of amplifiers and switching circuits EGE 330,430. FIELDS AND WAVES I, D (3, 3) PR : PHY 305, 306, EGB 401. A basic introduction to electromagnetic field theory, including static and dynamic . electromagnetic fields. EGE 361. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE I (2) PR : MTH 122. CR : EGE 362. Introduction to the concepts of algorithmic formulation of problems for computer solution and the general abstract operations used in these formulations. EGE 362. COMPUTER SCIENCE LABORATORY I (1) CR : EGE 361. Laboratory for implementation of algorithms in a general purpose computer language. EGE 363. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE D (2) PR : MTH 351 or equivalent and EGE 362. CR: EGE 364. Looping and 1/0 structures ; local global static and dynamic storage. Debugging aids. Data structures. Numeric and non nurneric problems EGE 364. COMPUTER SCIENCE LADORA TORY D (1) PR: EGE 362. CR : EGE 363. Continuation of EGE 362. EGE 404. LABORATORY 4 (1) PR: EGE 302; CR: EGE 420 EGE 405. LABORATORY 5 (1) PR : EGE 302 ; CR: EGE 421 EGE 406. LABORATORY 6 (1) PR : EGE 302; CR : EGE 430. EGE 407. ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS (2) PR : EGE 310. Techniques and principles of electronic measurement (Formerly EGE 548. ) EGE 408. ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS LABORATORY (1) CR ; EGE 407. (Formerly EGE 5 49. ) EGE 410. SEE EGE 310. EGE 411. LINEAR SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (3) PR : EGE 410. Provide s further study in the analysis of linear networks and systems Includes time and frequency domain points of view. LaPlace, Fourier and superposition integrals EGE 420. SEE EGE 320. EGE 421. COMMUNICATION CIRCUITS (3) PR: EGE 420. Provides further study in electronic circuits Includes oscillator, modulator and detector analysis and design. EGE 425. COMMUNICATION ENGINEERING (3) PR : EGE 421. System considerations of electronic circuits; radio propagation; antennas; transmitters and receivers EGE 426. COMMUNICATIONS LADORA TORY (1) CR : EGE 425. Experiments in amplitude modulation frequen cy modulation, pulse communications and data transmission. EGE 430. SEE EGE 330. ELE 432. DISTRIBUTED NETWORKS (3) PR : EGE 330, EGE 410. Transmi ssio n lines standing waves, impedance, waveguides EGE 435. SYSTEMS APPROACH TO BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING I (3) PR : EGE 410 or CC. Characterization of physiological systems, principles of modeling, system properties Transfer function description physiological feedback, effects of non linearities (Formerly EGS 432. ) EGE 436. SYSTEMS APPROACH TO BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING D (3) PR: EGE 435. Continuation of EGE 435. Computer studies of physiological subsystems model evaluation Biomedical measurements, automated data collection (Formerly EGS 433.) EGE 440. LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) PR : EGB 325, EGE 420. Introduction to analysis and design of linear feedback control systems. Covers block diagram flow charts, Bode Nyquist and root locus technique s EGE441. CONTROLLABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 440 EGE 444. LOGIC DESIGN (3) PR: EGB 312. Non major s may enroll with the consent of the Chairman Binary number system; truth functions; Boolean algebra; canonical forms; minimization of combinational logic circuits ; logic circuits in computers EGE 445. LOGIC LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 444. EGE 446. MICROPROCESSOR PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS (3) PR: EGE 494 or equivalent. CR : EGE 447. Functional Descriptio. Arithmetic and Logic capabilities Control and Timing Interrupts and Priority systems. Software design and documentation. Distributed function processing. EGE 447. MICROPROCESSORS LABORATORY (1) CR : EGE 446. Laboratory for Microprocessor use and evaluation. EGE 450. MICROELECTRONICS ENGINEERING (3) PR : EGE 330, 410, 420, PHY 323. Principles of micro miniaturization of electrical circuits Fabrication techniques component realization component isolation parasitics. EGE 451. MICROELECTRONICS LADORA TORY (1) CR : EGE450. EGE 4'0, 462, 464. ELECTROMECHANICS I,D,m (3,3,3) PR: EGB 313. Theory of electromechanical energy con version Characteristics and control of rotating electrical machines transformers electromagnets loudspeakers, mi crophones, transducers EGE 461, 463, 465. ELECTROMECHANICS LAB 1,2,3 (1,1,1) CR: EGE 460. 462, 464, respectively EGE 470. COMPUTER SYSTEMS (3) PR : EGB 304, MTH 353 or CC Linked course with EGE 471. Principles of computer organization, machine and assembly language programming EGE 471. COMPUTER SYSTEMS LAB (1) PR: EGB 304, MTH 353 or CC Linked course with EGE 470 Computer systems and programming laboratory EGE 472. INTRO TO SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING (3) PR : EGE 470. Introduction to systems programming design of assemblers, loaders, linking, data structures and operating systems. EGE 473. PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES (3) PR: EGE 470. An introduction to programming languages, syntax and semantics, properties of algorithmic languages binding times, arithmetic string handling data structures, list processing, translation

PAGE 82

EGE 480, 481, 482. SPECIAL ELECTRICAL TOPICS I,11,ill PR:CC (1-4 each) EGE 490. ENGINEERING ANALYSIS FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE II (3) PR: CC or MTH 401. Numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations through series and numerical methods. EGE 491. ENGINEERING ANALYSIS FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE ill (3) PR: CC or MTH 401. Vector analysis and methods of solution for boundary value problems in partial differential equations EGE 492. SWITCHING THEORY (3) PR: EGE 444 Elements of sequential machine theory including minimization methods. EGE 493. INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE STRUCTURES (3) PR: EGE 444 Introduction to set algebra, propositional logic and finite algebraic structures as they apply to computers EGE 494. COMPUTER ORGANIZATION (3) PR: EGE 444 The structural organization of digital com puters; control, data operations, I/O, memory. Functional description of their behavior. EGE 495. MINICOMPUTER LABO RA TORY (1) CR: EGE 494. Minicomputer organization and programming EGE 498. COMPUTER SCIENCE PROJECT (3) Projects intended to develop individual interests and abilities in computer science involving either computer hardware or software aspects of a well defined proposal. EGE 499. DESIGN PROJECT (3) PR: Senior standing. An individual or team project involving the design of an electrical component or system. Required of all electrical seniors. EGE 520. PULSE CIRCUIT PRINCIPLES (3) PR: EGE 411, 421. An introduction to the analysis and design of pulse and timing circuits with applications. EGE 530. UHF PRINCIPLES (3) PR: EGE 411, 421, 430 A study of tubes, devices and circuits peculiar to systems which operate at ultra high and super high frequencies EGE 531. UHF LABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 530. EGE 540. NONLINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGE 440. Principles of state-variables phase-plane and describing functions. EGE541. CONTROLLABORATORY (1) CR: EGE 540. EGE 542. SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS (3) PR: EGE 444. The design of switching circuits with inputs that are functions of time is carried from a word description through a minimum state realization using flip-flops logic gates and delay elements. EGE 544. DIGIT AL COMPUTERS (3) PR: EGE 444. Digital arithmetic; computer subsystems, arithmetic units ; control units ; memory units; general purpose computers. EGE 545. DIGITAL LABORATORY (1) CR : EGE 544. EGE 546. DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING TECHNIQUES (3) PR : EGE 411 or CC. Techniques of real time statistical analysis of signals signal conditioning and enhancement. Design of digital networks. (Formerly EGB 523.) EGE 547. DISCRETE STRUCTURES FOR DIGIT AL SYSTEMS (3) PR : EGE 444 Set algebra, basic algebraic structures in computers. Boolean algebra propositional logic, and graphs. Applications to computers. EGE 560. POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (3) PR: CC. Analysis techniques for AC power systems. ENGINEERING 177 EGE 562. COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF POWER SYSTEMS (3) PR: CC Review of Fortran programming, matrix algebra, network formulation, short circuit studies, simulation of algebraic equations, load flow studies, numerical solution of differential equations, transient stability studies. Strong emphasis on techniques adaptable to digital computer studies programs will be written and run on the IBM 360/65. EGE 570. TOPICS IN COMPUTERS AND PROGRAMMING (4) PR : CC Machine organization, assembly and machine language, data structures, systems programming, operating systems. EGE 573. IMAGE PROCESSING BY COMPUTERS (3) PR: EGE 411 or CC. Two dimensional convolution and system functions. Fourier transform in two dimensions of two dimensional signals, sampling theorems, band-limited signals. Image processing by computers Applications of image processing (Formerly EGS 525.) EGE 580, 581, 582. SPECIAL ELECTRICAL TOPICS, I, II, m (1-3 each) PR: CC EGE 585. ENGINEERING SEMINAR PR: CC. EGE 599. RESEARCH OR DESIGN PR: CC (S/U only ) (1) (1-9) EGE 610,611. ADVANCED CIRCUIT THEORY I, II (3,3) PR: CC. Network fundamentals; network characterization; frequency analysis ; superposition integrals ; signal-flow tech niques; stability problems ; real-and-imaginary relations EGE 612. NONLINEAR CIRCUITS (3) PR: CC Analytical and topological approaches to nonlinear circuits; nonlinear resonance; relaxation oscillations. EGE 614, 615, 616. NETWORK SYNTHESIS, I, II, ill (3,3,3) PR: CC Network functions; physical realizability; two terminal network synthesis methods; frequency trans formation; potential analogy; approximation problems ; insertion-loss and transfer function synthesis EGE 620. INFORMATION THEORY (3) PR : CC. Concept s of information information channels, channel capacity, information sources and Shannon's fun damental theorem EGE 622. NOISE THEORY (3) PR: CC Electrical noise and signals through linear filters and electronic systems EGE 623. CODING THEORY I (3) PR: CC Error-correcting codes, algebraic block codes, linear codes and feedback shift registers. BCH codes and decoding methods. EGE 624. CODING THEORY II (3) PR : EGE 623. Convolutional codes ; threshold decoding and sequential decoding. Burst error codes Arithmetic codes EGE 626, 627, 628. THEORY OF COMMUNICATION I, II, ill (3,3,3) PR : CC Physical basis and statistical representation of electrical noise ; filtering, modulation and de-modulation of signals corrupted by noise; correlation techniques and linear prediction; statistical estimation of signal parameter; optimum filters and receivers; ambiguity function s and inverse probabil ity Quantitative measure of information sources, noise channels and channel capacity; an introduction to error correcting codes. EGE 630, 631, 632. ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND WAVES I, II, ill (3,3,3) PR : CC. Electromagnetic theory from the engineering point of view propagation and reflection of waves guided waves resonant cavities, antennas and radiation

PAGE 83

178 ENGINEERING EGE 635. MICRO WA VE GENERATION AND AMPLIFICATION (3) PR: CC. A study of eletromagnetic wave generation and amplifa;ation Magnetrons, klystrons, solid-state microwave oscillators and related devices EGE 636. ELECTRICAL LABORATORY (1) CR : EGE 635. EGE637. MICROWAVECOMPONENTS (3) PR: CC A study of directional couplers, junctions, cavities and other passive microwave components including micro wave integrated circuits EGE 638. MICROWAVE NETWORKS (3) PR : CC. Scattering and transfer representations of n-ports Odd and even mode theory. Wave filters EGE 639, ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF TIUN FILMS (3) PR: EGE 430 and EGE 450 or equivalent or CC. Electrical Properties of thin films as derived from Boltzmann's transport equation The growth of thin films. The fabrication of electrical circuits with thin films. Lecture supplemented by laboratory experiments and demonstrations. EGE 640. DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGE 440 or CC Sample-data and digital control processes EGE 641. RANDOM PROCESSES IN CONTROL SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGE 440 or CC. Analysis and design of control systems subject to random inputs and disturbances EGE 642. MODERN CONTROL THEORY (3) PR: EGE 440, 540, 640, 641 or CC A study of modern control techniques including optimum and adaptive control. EGE 643. OPTIMUM FILTERING AND IDENTIFICATION (3) PR : CC or EGE 640. Estimation theory and development of the Kalman-Wiener filters for continuous and discrete-time systems. System identification through deterministic and stochastic approaches. Application to control and communica tion systems. EGE644. AUTOMATA THEORYI (3) PR: EGE 547. Review of mathematical foundations, decom position and interconnection of digital machines, meas urement and control of finite-state sequential circuits machine identification, regular expressions and finite-state machines EGE 645. AUTOMATA THEORY Il (3) PR: EGE 644. Vector spaces over finite fields, linear sequential circuits, pseudo-random sequences, Turing ma chines, recursive function computability EGE 646. AUTOMATA THEORY ill (3) PR: EGE 645. Artificial languages, phase structure grammars, operations on languages decision problems, discrete value random processes, Markov processes, probabilistic sequential machines non-deterministic sequential machines. EGE 647. SIMULATION TECHNIQUES FOR ELECTRICALS (3) PR: CC Theory of simulation of systems characterized by lumped and distributed parameters EGE 648. ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS (2) PR: CC Advanced techniques and principles of electronic measurement. EGE649. MEASUREMENTSLABORATORY CR : EGE 648. EGE 650, 651, 652. SOLID STATE (1) ELECTRONICS I, n, m (3,3,3) PR: CC Theory of operation and application of circuits and device s. EGE 653, 654. PRINCIPLES OF SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE MODELING I, II (3,3) PR: EGE 411, 430. A course sequence which emphasizes systematic methods for obtaining models which relate device physics to terminal behavior and which provide appropriate compromises between accuracy and simplicity EGE 655. COMPY'fER DESIGN LANGUAGES (3) PR: CC or EGE 544. Simulation languages for digital computer systems ; APL, CDL and others Simulation of elements, operations, sequences and of a complete digital computer. EGE 656. DIGIT AL ARITHMETIC METHODS (3) PR: CC or EGE 544. Study of the number systems and the algorithms used for digital arithmetic computation with emphasis in their implementation, speed and reliability considerations EGE 657. COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE (3) PR: CC or EGE 655 or EGE 656. The macro-structure of computers is considered in this course ranging from the orthodox von Neumann designs to multiprocessors stack processors, pipe-line systems and associative computers EGE 658. PATTERN RECOGNITION THEORY (3) PR: CC. Theory of pattern recognition Parametric and non parametric methods, training theorems, unsupervised learn ing. Biomedical and other engineering applications. (Formerly EGB 631.) EGE 659. COMPUTER APPROACHES TO PATTERN RECOGNITION (3) PR : EGE 658. Computer implementation of pattern recog nition problems Feature reduction methods, CLAFIC and SELFIC techniques Sequential methods (Formerly EGB 632.) EGE 660, 661, 662. ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS I, n, m (3,3,3) PR: CC. Steady-state and transient analysis of interconnected power systems; power circuit protection ; transient character istic of apparatus EGE 663. LIGHTNING AND SURGE PROTECTION (3) PR : CC. Methods of protection against overvoltages due to lightning. Ground wire shielding, systems and tower ground ing, lightning arresters Dynamic overvoltages switching phenomena and system recovery voltages. EGE 664. PROTECTIVE RELAYING OF POWER SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGE 560, EGE 660 or CC Fundamentals of instrumenta tion. Design and operation of protective schemes for equipment in generation, transmission, and distribution circuits. Analysis of abnormal system conditions requiring relay operation EGE 670. PULSE COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM (3) PR: CC Sampling theory, pulse waveform generation and modulation. PAM, PWM, PPM, related multiplex systems telemetry applications. EGE 671. DATA TRANSMISSION (3) PR: EGE 670. Quantization theory binary coding systems, ideal binary transmission, on-off keying, FSK, PSK PCM applications. EGE 672. DATA TRANSMISSION II (3) PR: EGE 671. M-ary systems MASK, MFSK MPSK, orthogonal systems, multilevel and multistate coding, simplex codes, orthogonal and biorthogonal codes, polysignal systems, synchronization methods EGE675. DATASTRUCTURES (3) PR : CC Representation of information and information structures in a computer system, linear linked lists, multi linked lists, algorithms for list manipulation, stacks deques and queues trees and binary trees, tree traversing algorithms EGE 676. OPERA TING SYSTEMS (3) PR : CC Operating systems functions and design resource management, protection systems, process communication and deadlocks EGE 677. PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES AND TRANSLATION (3) PR : CC Grammars and languages, symbols, strings, syntax,

PAGE 84

parsing, the design of a compiler, storage organization and symbol tables, translator writing systems. EGE 678. CASE STUDIES IN INDUSTRIAL COMPUTER SYSTEMS (3) PR: CC. A case study approach to the definition and implementation of industrial computer systems. The role of automation within the industrial concern. Design of systems in inventory, production control, and related areas. Directing the computer function and systems development. (Formerly EGS 628.) EGE 679. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS BY COMPUTERS (3) PR: CC. Introduction to time series analysis by computers Discrete Fourier methods applied to time series sample spectrum, cross spectrum , smoothing of spectral estimators, distribution properties. Application to physical, biological and environmental problems (Formerly EGS 635 ) EGE 680. SPECIAL ELECTRICAL PROBLEMS (1) PR: CC. EGE 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH (credit varies) PR: GR. Master's level. Repeatable (S/U only.) EGE 682. SELECTED ELECTRICAL TOPICS (1) PR: CC. (Formerly EGE 681.) EGE694. GRADUATEINSTRUCTIONMETHODS (1-5) Special course to be used primarily for the training of graduate teaching assistants. Variable credit repeatable Limited to a cumulative total of 5 credits per student. (S/U only ) EGE 695. GRADUATE RESEARCH METHODS (lS) Special course to be used primarily for the training of graduate research assistants. Variable credit, repeatable. Limited to a cumulative total of 5 credits per student. (S/U only.) EGE 698. ADVANCED ENGINEERING SEMINAR (1-3) PR: CC. EGE 699. THESIS: MASTER'S (credit varies) Repeatable. (S/U only.) EGE 781. DIRECTED RESEARCH (credit varies) PR: GR. Ph.D. level. Repeatable (S/U only.) EGE 799. DISSERTATION: DOCTORAL (credit varies) PR: Must be admitted to Doctoral Candidacy Repeatable. (S/U only.) Energy Conversion and Mechanical Design (EGR) EGR 311. THERMODYNAMICS m (3) PR: EGB 322. The study of energy conversion processes and cycles as modified for optimization of capacity and efficiency. Applications include pumps, compressors, turbines, internal combustion engines, power and refrigeration cycles EGR 315. HEAT TRANSFER I (4) PR : EGB 322. The basic laws of conduction, convection and radiation; analysis of the effect on heat transfer of thermal conductivity, emissivity, fluid transport properties and Reynold's number. Lec.-lab. EGR 326. DYNAMICS OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS (3) PR: PHY 301, MTH 352. Plane and angular motion; velocity and acceleration curves, velocities and accelerations in mechanisms, static and dynamic force analysis. Rolling and sliding contact pairs, cams, gear tooth action. Lec .lab EGR 348. PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS I (3) PR: EGB 311. Basic Electrical Measurements, Oscilloscopes, Recorders, Temperature Measurement Displacement Meas urement, Pressure Measurement, Flow Measurement. Lee. lab. EGR 350. ENERGY CONVERSION LADORA TORY I (3) CR: EGB 322. Introduction to engineering laboratory meas urement with emphasis on the use of the library and the writing of technical reports. Experiments in the measurement of temperature, pressure, fluid flow, psychrometric properties ENGINEERING 179 of air, concentration, viscosity Determination of mass-energy balances of simple systems Preparation of formal engineering reports covering laboratory work EGR 411. THERMODYNAMICS IV (3) PR : EGR 311 or CI. Introducion to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics ; Maxwell relations, properties of real substances and solutions, description of multicomponent systems in equilibrium Qtr. III, IV. EGR 413. FLUID MACHINERY I (4) PR : EGB 343 Performance characteristics of pumps and fans; energy conversion in fluid machines ; design of piping and duct systems; proper selection of pumps and fans for given fluid systems; analysis of system efficiency parameters ; correlation of design predictions with ex,perimental data EGR 416. ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT COOLING (3) PR: EGB 312 or CI. Fundamentals of conduction, convection and radiation. Analysis of extended surfaces Printed circuit board thermal analysis Semiconductor performance and derating as a function of environmental control. Free and forced convection as applied to electrical and electronic components Thermo electric cooling and performance of cold plate heat exchangers. Microelectronics applications EGR 4i7 AND COMBUSTION (3) PR: EGB 322 or Cl. A study of chemical reactions as sources of energy Emphasis on the combustion characteristics of gaseous, solid and liquid fuels and equipment needed to safely and economically control combustion processes Lec.-lab EGR419. POWER PLANT ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3) CR: EGR 311. EGR 315. Parameters affecting utility power production ; daily load curves ; estimation of future loads; economics of power generation ; system efficiency as affected by the thermodynamic cycle, multiunit scheduling, and load variation; heat transfer regions in the steam generator; water treatment methods EGR 421. INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR ENGINEERING I (3) Neutron density and thermalization parameters; criticality calculations; transient flux parameters; reactor operation; control instrumentation EGR 424. REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING (3) CR: EGR 311, EGR 315. Application of thermodynamics, heat transfer and fluid flow to the design of systems for controlling our environment; heating and cooling load calculations; psychrometrics of air conditioning processes EGR 428. MACHINE ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3) PR: EGB 344. Stress analysis stress strain relations, deflection analysis, shock and impact, selection of materials strength of materials Principles of design Lec.-lab. EGR 429. MECHANICAL DESIGN I (3) PR: EGR 326. EGR 428 Application of the principles of engineering mechanics, materials and manufacturing to the analysis and \iesign of mechanical elements. Lec -lab. EGR 441. ANALOG AND DIGIT AL SIMULATION I (3) PR : EGB 325 EGR 348, or Cl. The use of analog and digital computers as tools for the solution of engineering problems by means of simulation. Lec.-lab. EGR 445. DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS D (3) PR: EGB 325 Analysis of response of dynamic systems with emphasis on the inter-disciplinary nature of such response. A continuation of Dynamic Response I, EGB 325 EGR 450. ENERGY CONVERSION LADORA TORY II (2) PR: EGR 350 Continuation of EGR 350 with emphasis on material and energy balances of mechanical and chemical systems and processes. Lec.-lab. EGR 451. ENERGY CONVERSION LABORATORY m (2) PR : EGR 450 or Cl. Continuation of EGR 450. Emphasis on

PAGE 85

180 ENGINEERING experiments involving momentum of Non-Newtonian fluids, heat conduction, and mass diffusion. EGR 453. MECHANICAL CONTROL (3) PR : EGB 311, 325. Analysis of devices for measurement and control. Transmitters, error detectors, controllers and final control elements. Block diagram representation EGR 454. CONTROLS LABORATORY (1) PR: EGB 325. CR: EGR 453. Familiarization with and performance testing of automatic control systems. EGR 455. PROCESS CONTROL SYSTEMS I (3) PR: EGR 453 or Cl. Analysis and design of process control systems Consideration of typical control sensors and controllers as well as advanced process control techniques such as feedforward and ratio control. (Formerly EGR 553.) EGR 471. SEPARATION PROCESSES I (3) PR: MTH 303, CR : EGB 32l : Introduction to the use of mass and energy balances and to chemical engineering thermodynamics through the description and analysis of separation processes (e.g., crystallization, distillation, os mosis, etc ) Qtr. I_. II. EGR 472. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA (4) PR: EGR 311, or EGB 343, or EGR 473. A comparative study of transport phenomena with emphasis in the macroscopic applications of the balance and flux equations of momentum energy and mass. EGR 473. MASS TRANSFER (3) PR : EGR 472. Study of molecular and turbulent diffusion in fluids, diffusion in solids, mass transfer coefficients and interphase mass transfer. Qtr. II, III. EGR 474. SEPARATION PROCESSESS II (3) PR: EGR 471 or Cl. Emphasis on selection and design of separation processes. Familiarization with graphical techni ques, group methods and other computational approaches used in design. Use of empirical correlations for size of equipment, efficiency of the process and quality of the separation. Qtr III, IV. EGR 475. INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY (3) PR: CHM 332, EGR 474. A critical study of selected chemical process industries in order to give the student a better understanding of the direct application of basic chemical process principles. EGR 476. REACTING SYSTEMS I (3) PR: EGR 411. Design and control of homogeneous chemical reactors, effect of mixing, temperature and flow character istics. Laboratory (3 contact hours) The student in this laboratory will be responsible for the safe and efficient manufacture of a "chemical" on pilot plant equipment. Lee. lab. EGR 478. DESIGN AND CASE PROBLEMS (3) PR: EGR 474. This part of the course exposes the chemical engineering student to the design of a chemical plant or a major part of a process. The annual A.l.Ch. E student contest design problems and typical design problems supplied by local industries will be used CASE PROBLEMS : This part of the course stresses engineering "art." The word "case" con notates a specific engineering problem situation actually experienced by someone in the past or present The student must generate his own individual approach to problem solving, benefitting from those of others in the class. (Formerly EGR 577.) EGR 481. SPECIAL TOPICS ENERGY CONVERSION I PR: CC. EGR 482. SPECIAL TOPICS ENERGY CONVERSION II PR : CC. (1-4) (1-4) EGR 501. INDUSTRIAL AIR POLLUTION CONTROL (4) PR: EGB 321, A basic course in the elements of l arge source air pollution and contro l as presented from the engineering viewpoint Major units to be studied : Sources, Atmospheric Meteorology, Diffu s ion, Local Influences Control Measures, Emergencies, Protection Lec .lab. EGR 511. INDUSTRIAL CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS (4) PR: Cl. Classical thermodynamics applied to complex power cycles and reacting s ystems of industrial importance Review of Maxwell relations, equations of state of real substances, and Gibbs Free Energy and Equilibria EGR 513. FLUID MACHINERY II (3) PR: EGR 413. Performance characteristics of compressors and exhausters, vacuum pumps and gas turbines; internal energy exchange and fluid flow paths; piping and ducting considerations; economic selection of proper equipment to match fluid and power system requirements ; evaluation of off design conditions. EGR 522. ACOUSTICS AND NOISE CONTROL (3) PR : CC Fundamentals of sound propagation; sound power and intensity; psychoacoustics, industrial noise sources, methods of noise attenuation; community noise ordinances; instrumentation for noise measurement. Lec .-lab EGR 523. MECHANICAL UTILITIES SYSTEMS (3) PR: EGR 413. Analysis and design of a building's mechanical sy&tems for fire and lightning protection, air conditioning, water supply waste and storm drains. EGR 526. ANALYSIS METHODS FOR MECHANICAL DESIGN (3) PR : EGR 428. Treatment of stress, strain ani:I strength aspects of Machine Design. Application of failure theories, residual stresses and energy principles to machine elements EGR 527. ADVANCED DYNAMICS OF MACHINERY (3) PR : EGR 326. A continuation of undergraduate course and devoted to a more detailed study of velocities, accelerations and forces in machine parts having reciprocating rotating and combined motion. A complete force ana l ysi s will be made of an internal combustion engine EGR 528. MECHANICAL DESIGN II (3) PR: EGR 429 A continuation of EGR 429. Lec -lab EGR 529. PROJECT DESIGN (3) PR: EGR 429. Correlation of previously acquired mechanical design experience,s with a creative design project. Lec.-lab. EGR 533. MECHANICAL VIBRATION AND BALANCING (3) PR: EGB 341, 401. Transient and steady state vibration analysis of mechanical systems with lumped parameters Dynamic balancing, vibration isolation and simulation of systems EGR 535. LUBRICATION I (3) PR: EGB 343, 401. The theoretical. basis of lubrication and hydrodynamic bearing theory. The study of lubrication requirements of different types of machines. EGR 551. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (4) PR : PHY 305, CHM 213. Instrumental Analysis This course will deal with the engineering bases of a variety of sophisticated instrumental techniques for chemical analysis Emphasis will be placed on the physical basis of the instrument and its design rather than on the interpretation of the analysis Systems to be examined will include light and r.f. spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and methods which depend on various transport properties EGR 554. HYDRAULIC CONTROL (3) PR: EGR 453 or Cl. Hydraulic control system components and their effects on closed loop system performance. Lec.-lab. EGR 560. POWER UTILIZATION SYSTEMS (3) PR : EGB 311. Standard electrical voltages. NEMA standards, motor parameters, motor control control system elements, interlocks, conductors, raceways, Electrical Code Protective devices.

PAGE 86

EGR 581. SPECIAL TOPICS ENERGY CONVERSION Ill PR: CC. EGR 582. SPECIAL TOPICS ENERGY CONVERSION IV PR : CC (1-4) (1-4) EGR 611. THERMODYNAMICS OF FLUID FLOW (3) PR : CC Interrelation s hip of the equation s of fluid motion and of thermodynami cs for ideal g as e s; s ub s onic and s uper sonic gas flow s, flow s with fri c tion and with he a t tran s fer; supers onic nozzle design ; p a r a meters of fluid thru s t. EGR 612. ADVANCED THERMODYNAMICS (4) PR: CC. Advanced treatm ent of the gener a l equations of thermodyn a mic s, principal equations of chemical rea c tion ; the chemical potential and equilibrium ; a naly s i s of met as table s tates Irreversibility and s teady flow EGR 613. PROCESS HEAT TRANSFER I (3) PR : EGR 315 Review of conduction and convection heat tran s fer counterflow 1-2 p a r a llel-counterflow, flow arrange ments for increased heat r ecovery, calculations for process condition s conden s ation a nd ev a por a tion. EGR 614. PROCESS HEAT TRANSFER II (3) PR : EGR 315 EGR 613 Extended surface, longitudinal and radial fin s, cros s flow finned pa ss ages, longitudinal high fin exchanger s, radial flow fin exchanger s, transver s e high fin exchanger s a nd compact h e at e x changers EGR 615. HEAT TRANSFER II (3) PR : EGR 315. EGB 40 I. Stead y ahd un s teady heat tran s fer by c onduction; one, two a nd three dimen s ional s ystems, numer ical gr a phical and a n a log method s, finite difference methods and periodic conduction he a t flow (Forme rly EGR 515.) EGR 616. HEAT TRANSFER Ill (3) PR : EGR 315 and EGB 401 or CC R a di a tive heat tran s fer Radiation from bl ack a nd "grey" bodies. Pure radiative heat tran s fer and in the pre s ence of other mode s of energy transfer. (Formerly EGR 615.) EGR 617. ENERGY TRANSFORMATION AND STORAGE (3) PR : CC. Analysis of direct energy conversion system s; photo electric cells, thermocouples, fuel c ells, thermionic converters magnetohydrodyn amic device s, s olar energy cell s, rectifier s inverter s, energy s torage device s. EGR 620. PROCESS DESIGN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION I (4) PR : EGR 478 or Cl. Equipment and Proces s De s ign with emphasi s on di s charge control and en v ironmental protection Economic, and ecological con s traints on optimum de s ign. EGR 622. ACOUSTICS AND NOISE CONTROL II (3) PR : EGR 522 Continuation of EGR 522 acoustics and Noise Control I. EGR 623. NOISE CONTROL DESIGN (1-3) PR : EGR 522, EGR 622 Practical solutions to real noise problem s occurring in local industrie s ; students will be required to analyze a problem design a "solution, and prepare and present a report to plant engineering per s onnel giving their analy s is and recommendations; variable credit depending on complexity of problem EGR 624. AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS (3) PR : EGR 413, EGR 424. Anal ys i s and de s ign of air conditioning system s; criteria for selection of central systems unit air conditioner s or self-contained units ; performance characteri s tics of s ingle zone s ystem s, with and without reheat, multi-zone s ystems double duct and variable volume systems EGR 625. AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS DESIGN (3) PR : EGR 424 EGR 624 or Cl. Design of a n air c onditioning s ystem from the concept s tage to final plans and specifica tions, stressing the practical a pplication of basic theory and knowledge of type s of s ystem s available ENGINEERING 181 EGR 629. ADVANCED MECHANICAL DESIGN (3) PR : CC. A technical application cour s e involving the problem of developing machines to perform specified function s The machine to be designed will be designated by the instructor. The analysis will include evaluating all part s for s tress vibration, wear and proper consideration of manufacturing proces s e s involved Lec.-Lab. EGR 630. APPLIED ENGINEERING ASPECTS OF FATIGUE (3) PR : EGR 526 Evaluation of s trength of machine members under fatigue loading s. Stres s concentrations, residual s tress effects, surface coatings environmental effects Statistical treatment in fatigue analysis. EGR 622. VIBRATION ANALYSIS (3) PR : EGR 533 Application of generalized coordinates. LaGrange's equation, matrix iteration and other specialized methods to discrete multima s s systems EGR 635 LUBRICATION II (3) PR : EGR 535 A continuation of EGR 535 with empha s i s on hydrodynamic squeeze film theory and gas lubricated bear ings EGR 640 DIGITAL TECHNIQUES IN ENERGY TRANSFER SYSTEMS (3) PR : EGR 441 or Cl. Application of both general purpose and specialized programs to the solution of problems iit the design of control systems, kinem a tic mechanisms and energy tran s fer sy s tems Some languages and programs to be used are FORTRAN the Continuous Sy s tem Modeling Program and the Mechanism De s ign Program EGR 641. ANALOG AND DIGITAL SIMULATION II (3) PR : EGR 441 or Cl. Introduction to mathematical modeling technique s applied to Me c hanical and Chemical Engineering s ystem s. The use of analog a nd digital computer s in the s olution of these models. Lec.-lab EGR 642. DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS AND MODEL THEORY I (3) PR : CC. Theory of dimensional analy s is, s imilitude, and design of models EGR 648. DIRECT DIGITAL CONTROL (3) PR : EGR 455 or Cl. Application of digital computer s to c ontrol of engineering proces s e s Includes s tudy of digital filtering Z-tran sforms supervisory control. AID and D/A conversion. EGR 651. PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS II (3) PR : EGR 348 441, 450 or CI. The techniques and theory for measuring temperature pres s ure, displacement speed ac celeration, force, power, and psychrometric propertie s with particular attention to dynamic measurement. Lec.-lab EGR 656. NUMERICAL MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL (3) PR: CC. Incremental and absolute control s ystem s. Number systems used in numerical control. Digital to analog and analog to digital conversion Application s. EGR 657. FLUID AMPLIFIERS AND CIRCUITS (3) PR : CC. Analysi s and design of fluid devices for use as amplifiers, logic devices and memory elements in instrumenta tion and control systems EGR 659. ADVANCED MECHANICAL CONTROL (3) PR : EGR 445 or Cl. Applications of state space technique s to analysis and design of energy transfer control systems. Includes study of optimal control and adaptive control. EGR 672. ADVANCED TRANSPORT PHENOMENA (4) PR : EGR 472 or Cl. Tran s port processe s (mass, momentum and energy) are the underlying phenomena in energy conversion system s This course expands and unifie s the fundamental concept s introduced in undergraduate fluid s and heat and ma s s tran s fer courses EGR 676. REACTING SYSTEMS II (4) PR : EGR 476 or Cl. Dynamics of heterogenous reaction

PAGE 87

182 ENGINEERING Eco nom i c fact or s in the design of chemical reactor s. Simulation of c omple x reacting systems. EGR 678 DESIGN AND CASE STUDIES (4) PR: EGR 478. Plant and P rocess D esign with emphasis on computer aided de s ign EGR 680. SPECIAL PROBLEMS I (1-4) PR: CC. (Formerly EGR 681.) EGR 681. DIRECTED RESEARCH (credit varies) PR : GR Master's level. Repe atab le. (S/U only ) EGR 682. SPECIAL PROBLEMS II (1-4) PR:CC. EGR 694. GRAD UATE INSTRUCTION METHODS (1-5) Special course to be used primarily for the training of graduate tea c hing assistan t s Variable credi t r e p ea t a ble Limited to a cumulative total of 5 credits p er stude nt. (S/U only .) EGR 695: GRADUATE RESEARCH METHODS (1-5) Sp ecial co urse to be used primarily for the training of graduate re sea rch ass i sta n ts. Varia ble cre dit, r epe a table Liiited to a cu mul a \ive t o tal of 5 credit s per student. ( S/ U only.) EGR 698. ADVANCED SEMINAR (1-3) PR : CC. E GR 699. THESIS: MASTER'S (credit varies) Repe a t able (S/U only ) EGR 781. DIRE CTE D R ESEA RCH (credit varies) PR: GR Ph.D. level. Repeatable. (S/U only.) EG R 799. DISSERTATION: DOCTORAL ( credit varies) PR: Mus t be a dmitted to Doctoral Candidacy Repeatable ( S/U only.) Industrial Systems (EGS) EGS 402. INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES (4) PR: EGB 337. Int rodu ct ion to b asic indu s trial processe s e mphasizing inter d e p endency and similarities among in du stries. Students research specifi c industries and visit local industrial pla nts. Lec .lab. EGS 403. PRODUCTION DESIGN I (3) PR : EG S 402, EGB 306. Methods study, p redetermi ned time syste m s, wage admi nist ration, work meas u re ment techniques incl ud ing stop-watch tim e st udy, work sa mpling, sta ndard data and production studies. Lec.-lab. EGS 404. PRODUCTION DESIGN II (3) PR; EG S 403. Continuation o f EGS 403. Lec.-lab. EGS 405. PRODUCTION C ONTROL SYSTEMS I (3) PR : EGS 411, 441, 462. Prin ciples an d technique s of industrial planning and co ntrol sys tem s d esig n C os t a n alysis, fore casti n g a nd controlli n g produ ctio n activ it ies. EGS 406. PRODUCTION CONTROL SYSTEMS II (3) PR: EGS 405, 442. Advanced topics in industrial pla nning a nd co nt ro l s y s tem s design i ncluding the use of CPM PERT and LOB EGS 407. ENGINEERING V ALUATION II (3) PR : E GB 337 or equ i valent. Analysis of ec on o mic limitation s o n e ngineering projects. Income tax considerations, re placeme nt mode l s MAPI and o b solesce n ce. EG S 409. PLANT FACILITIES DESIGN I (3) PR: EGS 404, 407. De sig n a n d mod ific a tion of plant facilities, i ncluding design of a complete manufacturing operation. Problems in plant locati on layout m a teri al handling a nd e q uip m ent s electi on. EGS 410. PLANT FACILITIES DESIGN II (3) PR: EGS 409, 4 2 2, 442. Advanced te c hnique s for evaluation of altern ative plans for pla nt a rrange ment including equipment location and material h a ndling syste m s (Formerly EGS 609.) EGS 411. NETWORK MODELS (3) PR: E GB 304. A study of the d esig n and a naly sis of network models as applied to th e so lution of process related situations. EGS 420. COMPARATIVE COMPUTER LANGUAGES I (1) PR : EGB 204, 304. Comparison ofhi gher level languages from v iewpo i nt of structure, logic, data processing, speed a nd ease of us ag e for a pplications to system problems. Included are FORTRAN, WATFIV SIMSCRIPT, GPSS, PL-I and ALGOL. EGS 421. COMPARATIVE COMPUTER LANGUAGES II (2) PR: EGS 420. Use of the higher level languages analyzed in EGS 420 for s pecific applications to s ystem design from the viewpoint of language comparisons and preferred choices. Additional comparisons are made with several procedure oriented languages EGS 422. COMPUTER SIMULATION I (3) PR : EGB 304. Use of computers in physical and industrial sys tem s. Simulation language s and their application s. (For merly EGS 521.) EGS 423. COMPUTER SYSTEMS I (3) PR : EGB 304, MTH 352 or equivalent. Algorithms and c omputing. Computer organization and operating systems Dat a management procedures. Structure and application of programming language. EGS 424. COMPUTER SYSTEMS II (3) PR : EGS 423. Study of computer hardware usage Peripheral subsystems. Transfer of information and control within a complete operating system. Executive systems and control monitors. EGS 425. COMPUTER SYSTEMS III (3) PR : EGS 424. A continuation of EGS 424 stressing detailed a pplications of ma c hine and assembly language to computer operating systems. EGS 427. FORTRAN APPLICATIONS I (3) PR: EGB 304, MTH 352. Solution of engineering problems using digital computers. Numerical methods using FORTRAN . EGS 429. COMPUTER PROJECTS (3) PR : EGS 407, 421, 422, 424. Special projects involving the use and oper a tion of digital computers. EGS 431. HYBRID COMPUTERS (3) PR: EGB 304, EGS 425. The use of hybrid computers for the solution of problems in systems analysis. Lec.-Iab. EGS 441. OPERA TIO NS RESEARCH I (3) PR: EGB 405. An introduction to the basic operation s research techniques-linear programming, dynamic programming, sim ula tion and queueing. EGS 442. OPERATIONS RESEARCH II (3) PR: EGS 441, 462. Continuation of EGS 441. EGS 452. NUMERICAL METHODS (3) PR: EGB 405. Continuation of material in EGB 405. (Formerly EGS 542.) EGS 462. ENGINEERING ST A TISTICS II (3) PR: EGB 306. Estimating and testing procedures, regre ss ion and correlation analysis EGS 463. DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS I (3) PR: EGB 306. Development of the basic experimental designs Randomized block, latin squares and factorial design s. (Formerly EGS 561.) EGS 465. STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL (3) PR: EGB 306. Application of statistical tecniques to the control of indu s trial processe s Control chart s and acceptance pro ce dures Sequential s ampling For undergraduates EGS 472. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3) PR: EGB 304, EGS 405, 442. The definition and analysis of systems. The s olution of industrial systems problems using dynamic programming simulation, queueing, linear and non line a r programming.

PAGE 88

EGS 503. HUMAN FACTORS (3) PR: CC Problems in the design analysis and evaluation of man-machine systems from the viewpoint of physical, mental and psychological characteristics and limitations encountered EGS 505. INVENTORY CONTROL (3) PR: EGS 406 or equivalent. Properties of inventory systems and the fundamentals of deterministic and probabilistic inventory models EGS 507. ENGINEERING VALUATIONS STUDIES (3) PR: CC. The analysis of economic considerations affecting engineering decision making. Not open to students who have had EGS 407. EGS 509. TECHNOLOGICAL FORECASTING (3) PR : Senior or graduate status. Open to non-majors. Recent developments in forecasting technical progres s; morphological analysis, heuristic forecasts, intuitive methods, empirical and phenomenological model s. Technology assessment. EGS 510. COMPUTER OPERATION (4) PR Graduate engineering or science status. EGB 204 or equivalent, and CC. A comprehensive study of computer operating systems for ma ture students who have limited prior computer experience Course covers material necessary to prepare the s tudent for entry into the EGS 620, 621, 622 se quence EGS 522. COMPUTER SIMULATION II (3) PR : EGS 422. Continuation of m a terial in EGS 422. EGS 533. FORTRAN APPLICATIONS II (3) PR : EGS 427 or equivalent. Advanced numerical methods using FORTRAN, applied to higher level problems in the individual student' s field of engineering, mathematics or applied science. EGS 540. OPERATIONS RESEARCH (3) PR : CC. Linear programming game theoretic models, economic optimization. Not open to students who have had EGS 422. EGS 550. HAZARD CONTROL ENGINEERING (3) PR : Senior or graduate status. Open to non-majors Nature of industrial accidents Practices, standards, OSHA and other governmental requirements for reducing accident frequency and severity in the industrial environment. Design measures for the prevention of health impairment due to non-accidental causes. EGS 560. INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS (3) PR : CC Industrial applications of probability, testing of hypotheses regression techniques and analysis of variance. Not open to students who have had EGS 462. EGS 562. DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS II (3) PR : EGS 463. Continuation of material in EGS 463. EGS 563. ENGINEERING STATISTICS III (3) PR : EGS 462 or equivalent. Application of non-parametric statistics, sequential analysis, orthogonal polynomials and other optimization techniques to industrial problems EGS 565. STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL (3) PR: EGB 306 or equivalent. Application of statistical techniques to the control of industrial processes. Control charts and acceptance procedures. Sequential sampling. EGS 566. RELIABILITY ENGINEERING (3) PR : EGS 462 or equivalent Fundamental concepts of reliability control. Estimation of reliability of systems and components. Measures of availability, maintainability and reliability. EGS 580, 581, 582. SPECIAL INDUSTRIAL PROJECTS I, II, Ill (1-3 each) PR: CC EGS 603. MAN/MACHINE SYSTEMS (3) PR : EGS 503. Principles of work measurement, process analysis, value analysis, a nd human factors and their application to industrial situations. ENGINEERING 183 EGS 605. PRODUCTION CONTROL SYSTEM S Ill (3) PR: EGS 406 or equivalent. Forecasting procedures, develop ment of production plans, scheduling techniques and inven tory models. Application of EDP to production control systems. EGS 607. ADV AN CED ENGINEERING VALUATION (3) 1 PR: EGS 407 or equivalent. Statistical mo de ls for analyzing engineering alternatives from a n economic view point. The use of advanced engineering economy concepts in solving industrial problems. EGS 620. COMPUTER THEORY I (3) PR : CC. Advanced concepts in computer organization. Combinational logic, data representation and transfer, control functions, storage and accessing. Input/output facilities. Modular programming concepts EGS 621. COMPUTER THEORY II (3) PR: EGS 620. Advanced concepts in programming languages. The interrelation between machine, assembly and procedure oriented languages. Introduction to the design of monitors assemblers, compilers EGS 622. COMPUTER THEORY Ill (3) PR: EGS 621. Continuation and extension of EGS 621 emphasizing detailed design principles used in the construc tion of monitors, assemblers and compilers. EGS 641. LINEAR PROGRAMMING (3) PR : EGS 442 or equivalent The simplex m ethod degeneracy duality theory; applications of linear programming to in dustrial problems. EGS 642. NONLINEAR AND DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING (3) PR: EGS 641. Optimiza..ion procedures using nonlinear and dynamic programming. Analysis of multi-stage systems. EGS 644. QUEUEING THEORY (3) PR : EGS 442, 462 Peterministic and probabilistic queueing models. Poisson queues and special non-Poi ss on queues with exponential and non-exponential services. Single and multiple channel queues EGS 646. MULTIV ARIABLE OPTIMIZATION (3) PR : EGS 562, 563. Optimum se eking methods; search methods, response surfaces, ridge analysis and st ochastic approximations. EGS 647, 648. STOCHASTIC PROCESSES I, II (3,3) PR: EGS 562. Theory and application of stochastic processes as models for empirical phenomena, with emphasis on the following processes : Poisson, stationary, normal, counting, renewal, Markov, birth and death. Spectral representations, time series, smoothing and filtering EGS 650. EVALUATION OF SYSTEM PERFORMANCE I (3) PR: EGB 401, EGS 441, 462, or CC. Applications of probability and random proces ses to the design and evaluation of physical systems from the viewpoint of satisfying prescribed specifications System variabilities include random process inputs and system parameters treated as random variables. Problems EG8 ti51. EVALUATION OF SYSTEM PERFORMANCE II (3) PR: EGS 650. Continuation of EGS 650 with special emphasis upon writing the computer softwa re required to implement the evaluation algorithms. Advanced problems EGS 661, 662. THEORY OF INDUSTRIAL STAT